Science.gov

Sample records for allstars star lick

  1. After-School All-Stars: Providing Structured Health and Physical Activity Programs in Urban Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Walter R.

    2009-01-01

    Physical education time has been reduced or even eliminated in middle and high schools in favor of more time for standardized test preparation, especially in urban schools and inner cities. One way to replace the time lost is by providing it after school as part of a comprehensive program. After-School All-Stars (ASAS) is such a program, networked…

  2. Measurements of the Lick Observatory Sodium Laser Guide Star

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D. T., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The Lick Observatory guide star laser has provided a beacon sufficient to close the adaptive optics loop and produce corrected images during runs in 1996 and 1997. This report summarizes measurements of the wavefront quality of the outgoing beam, photoreturn signal from the sodium beacon, and radiance distribution of the guide star on the sky, and follows with an analysis of the impact of the laser on adaptive optics system performance.

  3. Planets around Giant Stars: Results from the Lick Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirrenbach, Andreas; Reffert, Sabine; Trifonov, Trifon; Bergmann, Christoph; Schwab, Christian

    2015-12-01

    We present results from a radial-velocity survey of 373 giant stars at Lick Observatory, which started in 1999. We have detected planets around 15 of these stars; an additional 20 stars host planet candidates. Companions with up to 25 Jupiter masses are rather commonly found around stars with about 2 Solar masses. The frequency of detected planetary companions appears to increase with metallicity. No planets or planet candidates are found around stars with more than 2.7 Solar masses, although our sample contains 113 such stars. We conclude that the occurrence rate of giant planets as a function of Stellar mass peaks around 2 Solar masses. This has important consequences for our understanding of giant planet formation.The stars 91 Aqr and tau Gem have companions with orbits that are among those with the lowest eccentricities of all known exoplanets, perhaps due to tidal circularization during the RGB phase. If confirmed, this would be the first evidence of planetary orbits modified through stellar evolution.We have discovered several multiple systems in our sample. An extensive dynamical analysis of the eta Cet system indicates that it contains two massive planets in a 2:1 orbital resonance. The star nu Oph is orbited by two brown dwarf companions in a 6:1 resonance. It is likely that they arrived in this resonance through migration in a circumstellar disk, arguing strongly that objects with more than 20 Jupiter masses can be formed in disks around Herbig Ae stars.

  4. Performance of laser guide star adaptive optics at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; An, J.; Avicola, K.

    1995-07-19

    A sodium-layer laser guide star adaptive optics system has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for use on the 3-meter Shane telescope at Lick Observatory. The system is based on a 127-actuator continuous-surface deformable mirror, a Hartmann wavefront sensor equipped with a fast-framing low-noise CCD camera, and a pulsed solid-state-pumped dye laser tuned to the atomic sodium resonance line at 589 nm. The adaptive optics system has been tested on the Shane telescope using natural reference stars yielding up to a factor of 12 increase in image peak intensity and a factor of 6.5 reduction in image full width at half maximum (FWHM). The results are consistent with theoretical expectations. The laser guide star system has been installed and operated on the Shane telescope yielding a beam with 22 W average power at 589 nm. Based on experimental data, this laser should generate an 8th magnitude guide star at this site, and the integrated laser guide star adaptive optics system should produce images with Strehl ratios of 0.4 at 2.2 {mu}m in median seeing and 0.7 at 2.2 {mu}m in good seeing.

  5. Taylor's Multiple Talent Teaching Approach: All-Star Instruction in Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warkentin, Irwin E.; Millar, Garnet W.

    1985-01-01

    The article describes the application of C. Taylor's multiple talent teaching approach in an Alberta sixth-grade class. The model is described graphically in the form of a star with the center being academic learning and the five points noting the aspects of communicating, decision making, forecasting, creating, and planning. (DB)

  6. NASA ALLSTAR Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Cesar; Ebadian, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    We finished the material development of Level 1, Level 2 and most of Level 3. We created three new galleries, one of streaming videos enabling the user to select his/her appropriate speed of Internet connectivity for better performance. The second gallery on NASA's X-series aircraft and the third is on F-series aircraft, We also completed the placement and activation of all thirteen kiosks. We added one more kiosk over the number suggested in the proposal at Baker Aviation High School - a Dade County Public School for special aviation programs. We felt that the goals of this school matched ALLSTAR's goals and that the placement of the kiosk would better help the local students become interested in the Aviation and Aeronautics field. We continue to work on the development of our "Teacher Resource Guide to ALLSTAR material" in which we tied our material into the national and Florida State standards. We finished the Florida Sunshine State standards, getting positive feedback from local and other educators who use the material on a regular basis. We had another successful workshop on October 29th, 1997. We introduced the ALLSTAR website and kiosk to about twenty science and history teachers from Dade County Public Schools (DCPS). Most teachers were from middle schools, although we had some from elementary schools also. We provided several demonstrations of the ALLSTAR material to local schools in the Dade County Public Schools (DCPS) system. We used the ALLSTAR material with FIU's summer immersion program for FLAME students. This program includes a high number of minority students interested in science and engineering. We also presented the material at National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and National Congress on Aviation and Space Education (NCASE) conferences and will be presenting the material at the Southeast Florida Aviation Consortium (SEFAC). We provided two on-site workshops in the NSTA conference with total attended of about 70 teachers. The BBS was converted to an on-line discussion forum with a unique section on Blacks in Aviation, Prime Technologies coordinated with NASA LaRC and the Teacher Resource Centers (TRCS) for scale-up of ALLSTAR and performed live demonstrations of the software in schools and at conventions.

  7. The FEROS--Lick/SDSS observational database of spectral indices of FGK stars for stellar population studies

    E-print Network

    Franchini, M; Di Marcantonio, P; Malagnini, M L; Chavez, M

    2014-01-01

    We present FEROS--Lick/SDSS, an empirical database of Lick/SDSS spectral indices of FGK stars to be used in population synthesis projects for discriminating different stellar populations within the integrated light of galaxies and globular clusters. From about 2500 FEROS stellar spectra obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility we computed line--strength indices for 1085 non--supergiant stars with atmospheric parameter estimates from the AMBRE project. Two samples of 312 {\\it dwarfs} and of 83 {\\it subgiants} with solar chemical composition and no significant $\\alpha$--element abundance enhancement are used to compare their observational indices with the predictions of the Lick/SDSS library of synthetic indices. In general, the synthetic library reproduces very well the behaviour of observational indices as a function of temperature, but in the case of low temperature ($T_{\\rm eff}$ $\\lesssim $5000\\,K) dwarfs; low temperature subgiants are not numerous enough to derive any conclusion. Several possible ca...

  8. Lick slit spectra of thirty-eight objective prism quasar candidates and low metallicity halo stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David; Fan, Xiao-Ming; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Cohen, Ross D.

    1993-01-01

    Lick Observatory slit spectra of 38 objects which were claimed to have pronounced UV excess and emission lines are presented. Eleven QSOs, four galaxies at z of about 0.1, 22 stars, and one unidentified object with a low S/N spectrum were found. Of 11 objects which Zhan and Chen (1987, 1989) suggested were QSO with z(prism) not greater than 2.8; eight are QSOs. Six of the QSOs show absorption systems, including Q0000+027A with a relatively strong associated C IV absorption system, and Q0008+008 with a damped Ly-alpha system with an H I column density of 10 exp 21/sq cm. The equivalent widths of the Ca II K line, the G band, and the Balmer lines in 10 stars with the best spectra are measured, and metallicities are derived. Seven of them are in the range -2.5 to -1.7, while the others are less metal-poor.

  9. The FEROS-Lick/SDSS observational data base of spectral indices of FGK stars for stellar population studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchini, M.; Morossi, C.; Marcantonio, P. Di; Malagnini, M. L.; Chavez, M.

    2014-07-01

    We present FEROS-Lick/SDSS, an empirical data base of Lick/SDSS spectral indices of FGK stars to be used in population synthesis projects for discriminating different stellar populations within the integrated light of galaxies and globular clusters. From about 2500 FEROS stellar spectra obtained from the European Southern Observatory Science Archive Facility, we computed line-strength indices for 1085 non-supergiant stars with atmospheric parameter estimates from the AMBRE project. Two samples of 312 dwarfs and of 83 subgiants with solar chemical composition and no significant ?-element abundance enhancement are used to compare their observational indices with the predictions of the Lick/SDSS library of synthetic indices. In general, the synthetic library reproduces very well the behaviour of observational indices as a function of temperature, but in the case of low-temperature (Teff ? 5000 K) dwarfs; low-temperature subgiants are not numerous enough to derive any conclusion. Several possible causes of the disagreement are discussed and promising theoretical improvements are presented.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Lick indices for FGK stars (Franchini+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchini, M.; Morossi, C.; Marcantonio, P. D.; Malagnini, M. L.; Chavez, M.

    2015-02-01

    The stars observed by FEROS and studied by the AMBRE project (Worley et al., 2012A&A...542A..48W) constitute an ideal working data set for our purposes since they include a large number of non-supergiant FGK stars with individual estimates of Teff, log g, [M/H], and ?-to-iron ratio ([alpha/Fe]). We searched the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Science Archive Facility and retrieved, through the FEROS/HARPS pipeline processed data Query Form, all the public available spectra of FGK stars with AMBRE atmospheric parameter values in the following ranges: 38003.5, and global metallicity [M/H]>-3.0. A list of 1085 stars, corresponding to 2511 available spectra, was obtained. Since AMBRE provides individual estimates of stellar parameters derived from each spectrum, we computed for 202 stars with more than one observed spectrum average atmospheric parameter values. In any case, the dispersion of values for the same object resulted to be less than the external errors associated with AMBRE results. (1 data file).

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Lick indices for 51 stars (Sansom+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansom A.E., de Castro Milone A., Vazdekis A., Sanchez-Blazquez P.

    2014-09-01

    A method that is widely used to analyse stellar populations in galaxies is to apply the theoretically derived responses of stellar spectra and line indices to element abundance variations, which are hereafter referred to as response functions. These are applied in a differential way, to base models, in order to generate spectra or indices with different abundance patterns. In this paper, sets of such response functions for three different stellar evolutionary stages are tested with new empirical [Mg/Fe] abundance data for the medium-resolution Isaac Newton Telescope library of empirical spectra (MILES). Recent theoretical models and observations are used to investigate the effects of [Fe/H], [Mg/H] and overall [Z/H] on spectra, via ratios of spectra for similar stars. The global effects of changes in abundance patterns are investigated empirically through direct comparisons of similar stars from MILES, highlighting the impact of abundance effects in the blue part of the spectrum, particularly for lower temperature stars. It is found that the relative behaviour of iron-sensitive line indices are generally well predicted by response functions, whereas Balmer line indices are not. Other indices tend to show large scatter about the predicted mean relations. Implications for element abundance and age studies in stellar populations are discussed and ways forward are suggested to improve the match with the behaviour of spectra and line-strength indices observed in real stars. (1 data file).

  12. The LickX spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthey, G.; Danilet, A. B.; Faber, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Collections of stellar spectra, often called stellar libraries, are useful in a variety of applications in the field of stellar populations. Aims: This is an attempt to improve the much-used Lick library of stellar spectra by removing jitter from the wavelength scale via cross-correlation, and calling the result the LickX library. Methods: Each spectrum was cross-correlated with a template spectrum and a new wavelength solution sought. Low-order polynomials were fit to adjust the old scale to a new fit. Indices were measured, new standard star averages found, and adjusted averages derived for the program stars. Results: The greatest gains in accuracy are expected for the fainter stars and stars of extreme surface temperatures; the bright K giant standard stars in LickX have the same uncertainties as Lick. The spectra and a table of index measurements in which repeated measurements are averaged are made available electronically. Individual stellar spectra, in FITS files, and the ascii catalog of absorption feature index strengths are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/561/A36

  13. Lick sodium laser guide star: performance during the 1998 LGS observing campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B; Friedman, H; Gavel, D T

    1999-07-19

    The performance of a sodium laser guide star adaptive optics system depends crucially on the characteristics of the laser guide star in the sodium layer. System performance is quite sensitive to sodium layer spot radiance, that is, return per unit sterradian on the sky, hence we have been working to improve projected beam quality via improvements to the laser and changes to the launched beam format. The laser amplifier was reconfigured to a ''bounce-beam'' geometry, which considerably improves wavefront quality and allows a larger round instead of square launch beam aperture. The smaller beacon makes it easier to block the unwanted Rayleigh light and improves the accuracy of Hartmann sensor wavefront measurements in the A0 system. We present measurements of the beam quality and of the resulting sodium beacon and compare to similar measurements from last year.

  14. THE LICK-CARNEGIE SURVEY: A NEW TWO-PLANET SYSTEM AROUND THE STAR HD 207832

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighipour, Nader; Butler, R. Paul; Rivera, Eugenio J.; Vogt, Steven S.

    2012-09-01

    Keck/HIRES precision radial velocities of HD 207832 indicate the presence of two Jovian-type planetary companions in Keplerian orbits around this G star. The planets have minimum masses of Msin i = 0.56 M{sub Jup} and 0.73 M{sub Jup}, with orbital periods of {approx}162 and {approx}1156 days, and eccentricities of 0.13 and 0.27, respectively. Stroemgren b and y photometry reveals a clear stellar rotation signature of the host star with a period of 17.8 days, well separated from the period of the radial velocity variations, reinforcing their Keplerian origin. The values of the semimajor axes of the planets suggest that these objects have migrated from the region of giant planet formation to closer orbits. In order to examine the possibility of the existence of additional (small) planets in the system, we studied the orbital stability of hypothetical terrestrial-sized objects in the region between the two planets and interior to the orbit of the inner body. Results indicated that stable orbits exist only in a small region interior to planet b. However, the current observational data offer no evidence for the existence of additional objects in this system.

  15. NASA Allstar Project Aeronautics Learning Laboratory for Science,Technology, and Research (Allstar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Cesar; Ebadian M. A.

    1998-01-01

    We finished the material development of Level 1, Level 2 and most of Level 3. We created three new galleries, one of streaming videos enabling the user to select his/her appropriate speed of Internet connectivity for better performance. The second gallery on NASA's X-series aircraft and the third is on F-series aircraft. We also completed the placement and activation of all thirteen kiosks. We added one more kiosk over the number suggested in the proposal at Baker Aviation High School - a Dade County Public School for special aviation programs. We felt that the goals of this school matched ALLSTAR's goals and that the placement of the kiosk would better help the local students become interested in the Aviation and Aeronautics field. We continue to work on the development of our "Teacher Resource Guide to ALLSTAR material" in which we tied our material into the national and Florida State standards. We finished the Florida Sunshine State standards, getting positive feedback from local and other educators who use the material on a regular basis. We had another successful workshop on October 29', 1997. We introduced the ALLSTAR website and kiosk to about twenty science and history teachers from Dade County Public Schools (DCPS). Most teachers were from middle schools, although we had some from elementary schools also. We provided several demonstrations of the ALLSTAR material to local schools in the Dade County Public Schools (DCPS) system. We used the ALLSTAR material with FIU's summer immersion program for FLAME students. This program includes a high number of minority students interested in science and engineering. We also presented the material at National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and National Congress on Aviation and Space Education (NCASE) conferences and will be presenting the material at the Southeast Florida Aviation Consortium (SEFAC). We provided two on-site workshops in the NSTA conference with total attended of about 70 teachers. The BBS was converted to an on-line discussion forum with a unique section on Blacks in Aviation. Prime Technologies coordinated with NASA LARC and the Teacher Resource Centers (TRCs) for scale-up of ALLSTAR and performed live demonstrations of the software in schools and at conventions.

  16. THE LICK/SDSS LIBRARY. II. [Ca/Fe] AND [Mg/Fe] IN F, G, AND K STARS FROM SDSS-DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Franchini, M.; Morossi, C.; Di Marcantonio, P.; Malagnini, M. L.; Chavez, M. E-mail: morossi@oats.inaf.it E-mail: malagnini@oats.inaf.it

    2011-04-01

    We analyzed the spectra of 17,600 F, G, and K stars extracted from the seventh Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release (SDSS-DR7) database in order to derive ([{alpha}/Fe]), [Ca/Fe], and [Mg/Fe] ratios. Particular attention has been devoted to estimating homogeneous and self-consistent atmospheric parameter values, T{sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H], by comparing synthetic and observational Lick/SDSS indices. We present results for the sub-sample of more than 4000 spectra whose overall quality allowed us to derive fairly accurate stellar atmospheric parameter values and, therefore, reliable abundance ratios. A Monte Carlo approach was adopted to evaluate both the errors in the observational Lick/SDSS indices and in the derived parameter estimates. The analysis of the trends of [Ca/Fe] and [Mg/Fe] versus [Fe/H] pointed out that (1) the [Ca/Fe] and [Mg/Fe] ratios increase with decreasing [Fe/H] with different slopes reaching maximum average levels of +0.25 and +0.40 dex at [Fe/H] {approx_equal} -1.75, respectively; (2) our sample contains, at a given [Fe/H], stars characterized by significantly different amounts of {alpha}-enhancement, thus belonging to different Galactic populations; and (3) the analyzed sample shows a predominance of thick disk stars for [Fe/H] > - 0.5 and the presence of stars belonging to the 'high-{alpha}' halo population for -2.0 < [Fe/H] <-0.5.

  17. The Lick-Carnegie Exoplanet Survey: HD32963 -- A New Jupiter Analog Orbiting a Sun-like Star

    E-print Network

    Rowan, Dominick; Laughlin, Gregory; Vogt, Steven S; Butler, R Paul; Burt, Jennifer; Wang, Songhu; Holden, Brad; Hanson, Russell; Arriagada, Pamela; Keiser, Sandy; Teske, Johanna; Diaz, Matias

    2015-01-01

    We present a set of 109 new, high-precision Keck/HIRES radial velocity (RV) observations for the solar-type star HD 32963. Our dataset reveals a candidate planetary signal with a period of 6.49 $\\pm$ 0.07 years and a corresponding minimum mass of 0.7 $\\pm$ 0.03 Jupiter masses. Given Jupiter's crucial role in shaping the evolution of the early Solar System, we emphasize the importance of long-term radial velocity surveys. Finally, using our complete set of Keck radial velocities and correcting for the relative detectability of synthetic planetary candidates orbiting each of the 1,122 stars in our sample, we estimate the frequency of Jupiter analogs across our survey at approximately 3%.

  18. Aeronautics Learning Laboratory for Science, Technology, and Research (ALLSTAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Cesar; Ebadian, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    We finished the material development of Level 1, Level 2 and most of Level 3. We created three new galleries, one of streaming videos enabling the user to select his/her appropriate speed of Internet connectivity for better performance. The second gallery on NASA's X-series aircraft and the third is on F-series aircraft. We also completed the placement and activation of all thirteen kiosks. We added one more kiosk over the number suggested in the proposal at Baker Aviation High School - a Dade County Public School for special aviation programs. We felt that the goals of this school matched ALLSTAR's goals and that the placement of the kiosk would better help the local students become interested in the Aviation and Aeronautics field. We continue to work on the development of our "Teacher Resource Guide to ALLSTAR material" in which we tied our material into the national and Florida State standards. We finished the Florida Sunshine State standards, getting positive feedback from local and other educators who use the material on a regular basis. We had another successful workshop on October 29 th, 1997. We introduced the ALLSTAR website and kiosk to about twenty science and history teachers from Dade County Public Schools (DCPS). Most teachers were from middle schools, although we had some from elementary schools also. We provided several demonstrations of the ALLSTAR material to local schools in the Dade County Public Schools (DCPS) system. We used the ALLSTAR material with FIU's summer immersion program for FLAME students. This program includes a high number of minority students interested in science and engineering. We also presented the material at National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and National Congress on Aviation and Space Education (NCASE) conferences and will be presenting the material at the Southeast Florida Aviation Consortium (SEFAC). We provided two on-site workshops in the NSTA conference with total attended of about 70 teachers. The BBS was converted to an on-line discussion forum with a unique section on Blacks in Aviation, Prime Technologies coordinated with NASA LaRC and the Teacher Resource Centers (TRCs) for scale-up of ALLSTAR and performed live demonstrations of the software in schools and at conventions.

  19. The Twenty-five Year Lick Planet Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Debra A.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Spronck, Julien F. P.

    2014-01-01

    The Lick Planet Search program began in 1987 when the first spectrum of ? Ceti was taken with an iodine cell and the Hamilton Spectrograph. Upgrades to the instrument improved the Doppler precision from about 10 m s-1 in 1992 to about 3 m s-1 in 1995. The project detected dozens of exoplanets with orbital periods ranging from a few days to several years. The Lick survey identified the first planet in an eccentric orbit (70 Virginis) and the first multi-planet system around a normal main sequence star (Upsilon Andromedae). These discoveries advanced our understanding of planet formation and orbital migration. Data from this project helped to quantify a correlation between host star metallicity and the occurrence rate of gas giant planets. The program also served as a test bed for innovation with testing of a tip-tilt system at the Coudé focus and fiber scrambler designs to stabilize illumination of the spectrometer optics. The Lick Planet Search with the Hamilton Spectrograph effectively ended when a heater malfunction compromised the integrity of the iodine cell. Here, we present more than 14,000 velocities for 386 stars that were surveyed between 1987 and 2011. Based on observations obtained at the Lick Observatory, which is operated by the University of California.

  20. SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY WESTERN CANADIAN ALL-STAR

    E-print Network

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    (s): Date of Birth: (Day): (Month): (Year): Permanent Address: Street City Prov Postal Code Phone(s): Relationship: Address: Phone#: ( ) -_ Street City Prov Postal Code Family Doctor's Name: Phone#: ( ) -_ Please. Yes No 21. Yes No 22. Yes No 23. Yes No Have you ever lost consciousness with exercise? Have you ever

  1. THE LICK-CARNEGIE EXOPLANET SURVEY: A SATURN-MASS PLANET IN THE HABITABLE ZONE OF THE NEARBY M4V STAR HIP 57050

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighipour, Nader; Vogt, Steven S.; Rivera, Eugenio J.; Laughlin, Greg; Meschiari, Stefano; Henry, Gregory W.

    2010-05-20

    Precision radial velocities (RV) from Keck/HIRES reveal a Saturn-mass planet orbiting the nearby M4V star HIP 57050. The planet has a minimum mass of Msin i {approx} 0.3 M{sub J}, an orbital period of 41.4 days, and an orbital eccentricity of 0.31. V-band photometry reveals a clear stellar rotation signature of the host star with a period of 98 days, well separated from the period of the RV variations and reinforcing a Keplerian origin for the observed velocity variations. The orbital period of this planet corresponds to an orbit in the habitable zone of HIP 57050, with an expected planetary temperature of {approx}230 K. The star has a metallicity of [Fe/H] = 0.32 {+-} 0.06 dex, of order twice solar and among the highest metallicity stars in the immediate solar neighborhood. This newly discovered planet provides further support that the well-known planet-metallicity correlation for F, G, and K stars also extends down into the M-dwarf regime. The a priori geometric probability for transits of this planet is only about 1%. However, the expected eclipse depth is {approx}7%, considerably larger than that yet observed for any transiting planet. Though long on the odds, such a transit is worth pursuing as it would allow for high quality studies of the atmosphere via transmission spectroscopy with Hubble Space Telescope. At the expected planetary effective temperature, the atmosphere may contain water clouds.

  2. THE LICK-CARNEGIE EXOPLANET SURVEY: A 3.1 M{sub +} PLANET IN THE HABITABLE ZONE OF THE NEARBY M3V STAR GLIESE 581

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Steven S.; Rivera, E. J.; Haghighipour, N.; Henry, Gregory W.; Williamson, Michael H.

    2010-11-01

    We present 11 years of HIRES precision radial velocities (RVs) of the nearby M3V star Gliese 581, combining our data set of 122 precision RVs with an existing published 4.3-year set of 119 HARPS precision RVs. The velocity set now indicates six companions in Keplerian motion around this star. Differential photometry indicates a likely stellar rotation period of {approx}94 days and reveals no significant periodic variability at any of the Keplerian periods, supporting planetary orbital motion as the cause of all the RV variations. The combined data set strongly confirms the 5.37-day, 12.9-day, 3.15-day, and 67-day planets previously announced by Bonfils et al., Udry et al., and Mayor et al.. The observations also indicate a fifth planet in the system, GJ 581f, a minimum-mass 7.0 M{sub +} planet orbiting in a 0.758 AU orbit of period 433 days, and a sixth planet, GJ 581g, a minimum-mass 3.1 M{sub +} planet orbiting at 0.146 AU with a period of 36.6 days. The estimated equilibrium temperature of GJ 581g is 228 K, placing it squarely in the middle of the habitable zone of the star and offering a very compelling case for a potentially habitable planet around a very nearby star. That a system harboring a potentially habitable planet has been found this nearby, and this soon in the relatively early history of precision RV surveys, indicates that {eta}{sub +}, the fraction of stars with potentially habitable planets, is likely to be substantial. This detection, coupled with statistics of the incompleteness of present-day precision RV surveys for volume-limited samples of stars in the immediate solar neighborhood, suggests that {eta}{sub +} could well be on the order of a few tens of percent. If the local stellar neighborhood is a representative sample of the galaxy as a whole, our Milky Way could be teeming with potentially habitable planets.

  3. Social Licking in Pregnant Dairy Heifers

    PubMed Central

    Tresoldi, Grazyne; Weary, Daniel M.; Pinheiro Machado Filho, Luiz Carlos; von Keyserlingk, Marina A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Social licking is often associated with good animal welfare, but little is known about this behavior in cattle. Licking behavior was compared in heifers housed indoors versus on pasture. Licking frequency was four-fold higher when heifers were indoors. However, when considering all social interactions recorded (licking and aggressions) licking events represented about 10% of all interactions regardless of housing. This behavior happened more frequently between heifers that were observed more repeatedly in close vicinity of each other. Provision of smaller indoor floor spaces likely brought animals into closer proximity thus facilitating social interactions. Abstract Housing affects social behaviors, such as competition, but little work has addressed affiliative behaviors. This study compared social licking (SL) in pregnant heifers housed indoors (in a free-stall barn) versus outdoors (on pasture), and relationships with competition, feeding and physical proximity to others. Six heifer groups were observed during two six-hour-periods in both treatments. The total number of social events (SL and agonistic interactions) was four times higher when heifers were housed indoors compared to pasture (546 ± 43 vs. 128 ± 7 events/group; P < 0.05). SL as a ratio of the total number of social events was similar in the two treatments (12% vs. 8% of interactions, free-stall and pasture, respectively; P > 0.05). Housing did not affect how the SL bout was initiated and terminated, the duration, the body part licked and behavior preceding licking (P > 0.05). Animals in close proximity showed higher rates of SL (P < 0.0001) but not agonistic interactions (P > 0.05). A previous agonistic event did not predict occurrence or the role of heifers in the following licking event. The higher stocking density indoors likely resulted in increased social interactions. PMID:26610578

  4. THE LICK/SDSS LIBRARY. I. SYNTHETIC INDEX DEFINITION AND CALIBRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Franchini, M.; Morossi, C.; Di Marcantonio, P.; Malagnini, M. L.; Chavez, M. E-mail: morossi@oats.inaf.i E-mail: malagnini@oats.inaf.i

    2010-08-10

    A new synthetic library of spectral feature indices, Lick/Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), for stellar population studies is presented. Lick/SDSS is computed from synthetic spectra with resolving power R = 1800 to fully exploit the content of the spectroscopic SDSS-DR7 stellar database. The Lick/SDSS system is based on the Lick/IDS one complemented with a UV index in the wavelength region of Ca II H and K lines. The system is well suited to study {alpha}-element abundances in F, G, and K stars. The reliability of synthetic indices in reproducing the behaviors of observational ones with effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity, and {alpha}-element abundances is tested by using empirical stellar libraries (ELODIE, INDO-U.S., and MILES) and the SDSS-DR7 spectroscopic database. The importance of using the same temperature scale in comparing theoretical and observational indices is discussed. The full consistency between Lick/SDSS and observational indices derived from the above mentioned stellar libraries is assessed. The comparison with indices computed from SDSS-DR7 spectra evidences good consistency for 'dwarf' stars and significant disagreement for 'giant' stars due to systematic overestimation of the stellar T {sub eff} by the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline.

  5. Lick Observatory Optical SETI: targeted search and new directions.

    PubMed

    Stone, R P S; Wright, S A; Drake, F; Muñoz, M; Treffers, R; Werthimer, D

    2005-10-01

    Lick Observatory's Optical SETI (search for extraterrestrial intelligence) program has been in regular operation for 4.5 years. We have observed 4,605 stars of spectral types F-M within 200 light-years of Earth. Occasionally, we have appended objects of special interest, such as stars with known planetary systems. We have observed 14 candidate signals ("triple coincidences"), all but one of which are explained by transient local difficulties. Additional observations of the remaining candidate have failed to confirm arriving pulse events. We now plan to proceed in a more economical manner by operating in an unattended drift scan mode. Between operational and equipment modifications, efficiency will more than double. PMID:16225433

  6. Social Licking in Pregnant Dairy Heifers.

    PubMed

    Tresoldi, Grazyne; Weary, Daniel M; Pinheiro Machado Filho, Luiz Carlos; von Keyserlingk, Marina A G

    2015-01-01

    Housing affects social behaviors, such as competition, but little work has addressed affiliative behaviors. This study compared social licking (SL) in pregnant heifers housed indoors (in a free-stall barn) versus outdoors (on pasture), and relationships with competition, feeding and physical proximity to others. Six heifer groups were observed during two six-hour-periods in both treatments. The total number of social events (SL and agonistic interactions) was four times higher when heifers were housed indoors compared to pasture (546 ± 43 vs. 128 ± 7 events/group; P < 0.05). SL as a ratio of the total number of social events was similar in the two treatments (12% vs . 8% of interactions, free-stall and pasture, respectively; P > 0.05). Housing did not affect how the SL bout was initiated and terminated, the duration, the body part licked and behavior preceding licking ( P > 0.05). Animals in close proximity showed higher rates of SL ( P < 0.0001) but not agonistic interactions ( P > 0.05). A previous agonistic event did not predict occurrence or the role of heifers in the following licking event. The higher stocking density indoors likely resulted in increased social interactions. PMID:26610578

  7. A. A. Michelson's Jovian Galilean-Satellite Interferometer at Lick Observatory in 1891

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, D. E.

    2004-12-01

    Albert A. Michelson, America's first Nobel laureate in physics, measured the angular diameter of the red supergiant star Betelgeuse in 1920 with Francis G. Pease, using the 100-inch Mount Wilson reflector as the basis of his stellar interferometer. But he had first published the concept in 1890 and tested it on celestial objects with a telescope at Lick Observatory in 1891. He used its 12-inch refractor to measure the angular diameters of the four Galilean satellites of Jupiter, assisted at the telescope by W. W. Campbell, then a young astronomer who had just joined the Lick staff. Edward S. Holden, the Lick director, had invited Michelson to come to Mount Hamilton and use its telescopes as a guest observer. Michelson had first tried and proved his method on artificial circular disks in his laboratory at Clark University, Worcester, Mass., using a 2-inch "glass." Then in 1889 and 1890 he hoped to test it at Harvard College Observatory, but apparently the telescope or the atmospheric conditions did not work out. At Lick he did achieve success, and his measured angular diameters were nearer to the true values we know from close-up space measurements of today than those of any of the top visual observers of the time. Correspondence in the Lick Archives shows that Michelson intended to come back there to use its big 36-inch refractor to improve the measurements, but he never did so. Selections from Michelson's published papers and photographs of him, the telescope, and the instrument will be posted.

  8. Making star teams out of star players.

    PubMed

    Mankins, Michael; Bird, Alan; Root, James

    2013-01-01

    Top talent is an invaluable asset: In highly specialized or creative work, for instance, "A" players are likely to be six times as productive as "B" players. So when your company has a crucial strategic project, why not multiply all that firepower and have a team of your best performers tackle it? Yet many companies hesitate to do this, believing that all-star teams don't work: Big egos will get in the way. The stars won't be able to work with one another. They'll drive the team Leader crazy. Mankins, Bird, and Root of Bain & Company believe it's time to set aside that thinking. They have seen all-star teams do extraordinary work. But there is a right way and a wrong way to organize them. Before you can even begin to assemble such a team, you need to have the right talent management practices, so you hire and develop the best people and know what they're capable of. You have to give the team appropriate incentives and leaders and support staffers who are stars in their own right. And projects that are ill-defined or small scale are not for all-star teams. Use them only for critical missions, and make sure their objectives are clear. Even with the right setup, things can still go wrong. The wise executive will take steps to manage egos, prune non-team-players, and prevent average coworkers from feeling completely undervalued. She will also invest a lot of time in choosing the right team Leader and will ask members for lots of feedback to monitor how that leader is doing. PMID:23390743

  9. Virtual healthcare--linking firms to form all-star teams.

    PubMed

    Pallarito, K

    1996-03-18

    A new, cyber-sounding word is creeping into the healthcare lexicon. The term "virtual" is being used to describe integration initiatives that don't require a merger of assets. A main attraction of virtual integration is that a healthcare delivery system can be created without investing huge amounts of capital to acquire the pieces. PMID:10156703

  10. 77 FR 55796 - Sand Lick Fork Watershed Restoration Project; Daniel Boone National Forest, KY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... Forest Service Sand Lick Fork Watershed Restoration Project; Daniel Boone National Forest, KY AGENCY... Sand Lick Fork Watershed Restoration Project involves activities to improve water quality and reduce... watersheds to ensure water quality supports designated beneficial uses. Residential and community...

  11. Limited Dual Path Execution Gary Tyson Kelsey Lick Matthew Farrens

    E-print Network

    Tyson, Gary

    Limited Dual Path Execution Gary Tyson Kelsey Lick Matthew Farrens Electrical Engineering presents a hybrid branch predictor scheme that uses a limited form of dual path execution along with dynamic branch prediction to improve execution times. The ability to execute down both paths

  12. APF - The Lick Observatory Automated Planet Finder

    E-print Network

    Vogt, Steven S; Kibrick, Robert; Butler, R Paul; Alcott, Barry; Allen, Steve; Arriagada, Pamela; Bolte, Mike; Burt, Jennifer; Cabak, Jerry; Chloros, Kostas; Cowley, David; Deich, William; Dupraw, Brian; Earthman, Wayne; Epps, Harland; Faber, Sandra; Fischer, Debra; Gates, Elinor; Hilyard, David; Holden, Brad; Johnston, Ken; Keiser, Sandy; Kanto, Dick; Katsuki, Myra; Laiterman, Lee; Lanclos, Kyle; Laughlin, Greg; Lewis, Jeff; Lockwood, Chris; Lynam, Paul; Marcy, Geoffrey; McLean, Maureen; Miller, Joe; Misch, Tony; Peck, Michael; Pfister, Terry; Phillips, Andrew; Rivera, Eugenio; Sandford, Dale; Saylor, Mike; Stover, Richard; Thompson, Matthew; Walp, Bernie; Ward, James; Wareham, John; Wei, Mingzhi; Wright, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The Automated Planet Finder (APF) is a facility purpose-built for the discovery and characterization of extrasolar planets through high-cadence Doppler velocimetry of the reflex barycentric accelerations of their host stars. Located atop Mt. Hamilton, the APF facility consists of a 2.4-m telescope and its Levy spectrometer, an optical echelle spectrometer optimized for precision Doppler velocimetry. APF features a fixed format spectral range from 374 nm - 970 nm, and delivers a "Throughput" (resolution * slit width product) of 114,000 arc-seconds, with spectral resolutions up to 150,000. Overall system efficiency (fraction of photons incident on the primary mirror that are detected by the science CCD) on blaze at 560 nm in planet-hunting mode is 15%. First-light tests on the RV standard stars HD 185144 and HD 9407 demonstrate sub-meter per second precision (RMS per observation) held over a 3-month period. This paper reviews the basic features of the telescope, dome, and spectrometer, and gives a brief summary...

  13. HOMESTEAD, LAKE FORK, AND LICK CREEK ROADLESS AREAS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, James G.; Conyac, Martin D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey concluded that the Homestead, Lake Fork and Lick Creek Roadless Area, Oregon offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the bedrock. Probable mineral-resource potential is assigned to the west and north parts of the Lake Fork Roadless Area, where gold resources may occur in glacial deposits and alluvium transported into this area from sources outside the roadless area to the west.

  14. Speed and accuracy of taste identification and palatability: impact of learning, reward expectancy, and consummatory licking.

    PubMed

    Perez, Isaac O; Villavicencio, Miguel; Simon, Sidney A; Gutierrez, Ranier

    2013-08-01

    Despite decades of study, it remains a matter of controversy as to whether in rats taste identification is a rapid process that occurs in about 250-600 ms (one to three licks) or a slow process that evolves over seconds. To address this issue, we trained rats to perform a taste-cued two-response discrimination task (2-RDT). It was found that, after learning, regardless of intensity, the delivery of 10 ?l of a tastant (e.g., NaCl or monopotassium glutamate, MPG) was sufficient to identify its taste with maximal accuracy within 400 ms. However, despite overtraining, rats rarely stopped licking in one lick. Thus, a one-drop lick reaction task was developed in which subjects had to rapidly stop licking after release of a stop signal (tastants including water) to obtain rewards. The faster they stopped licking, the greater the reward. Rats did not stop licking after receiving either hedonically positive or negative stop signals, and thus failed to maximize rewards even when reinforced with even larger rewards. In fact, the higher the sucrose concentration given as a stop signal, the greater the number of consummatory licks elicited. However, with a stop signal of 2 mM quinine HCl, they stopped licking in ~370 ms, a time faster than that for sucrose or water, thus showing that in this rapid period, quinine HCl evoked an unpalatable response. Indeed, only when rats licked an empty sipper tube would they usually elicit a single lick to obtain a reward (operant licking). In summary, these data indicate that within 400 ms, taste identification and palatability, must either occur simultaneously or with marked overlap. PMID:23678029

  15. Lick Observatory charge-coupled-device data acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, L. B.; Stover, R. J.; Osborne, J.; Miller, J. S.; Vogt, S. S.

    1987-01-01

    The Lick Observatory CCD data acquisition system is described, with some observational results to illustrate the system capability. The electronics for the CCD are subdivided into those attached to the dewar, a 'smart' controller near the dewar, and a computer connected by serial link to the smart controller. Software for the controller is in assembler code, while the software for data acquisition and on-line analysis is written in C and uses the UNIX operating system. The computers and controllers are programmed to recognize and operate several different types of CCD. Three separate instruments that use the CCDs are described briefly, together with examples of the data they produce.

  16. Operant licking for intragastric sugar infusions: Differential reinforcing actions of glucose, sucrose and fructose in mice.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Ackroff, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Intragastric (IG) flavor conditioning studies in rodents indicate that isocaloric sugar infusions differ in their reinforcing actions, with glucose and sucrose more potent than fructose. Here we determined if the sugars also differ in their ability to maintain operant self-administration by licking an empty spout for IG infusions. Food-restricted C57BL/6J mice were trained 1h/day to lick a food-baited spout, which triggered IG infusions of 16% sucrose. In testing, the mice licked an empty spout, which triggered IG infusions of different sugars. Mice shifted from sucrose to 16% glucose increased dry licking, whereas mice shifted to 16% fructose rapidly reduced licking to low levels. Other mice shifted from sucrose to IG water reduced licking more slowly but reached the same low levels. Thus IG fructose, like water, is not reinforcing to hungry mice. The more rapid decline in licking induced by fructose may be due to the sugar's satiating effects. Further tests revealed that the Glucose mice increased their dry licking when shifted from 16% to 8% glucose, and reduced their dry licking when shifted to 32% glucose. This may reflect caloric regulation and/or differences in satiation. The Glucose mice did not maintain caloric intake when tested with different sugars. They self-infused less sugar when shifted from 16% glucose to 16% sucrose, and even more so when shifted to 16% fructose. Reduced sucrose self-administration may occur because the fructose component of the disaccharide reduces its reinforcing potency. FVB mice also reduced operant licking when tested with 16% fructose, yet learned to prefer a flavor paired with IG fructose. These data indicate that sugars differ substantially in their ability to support IG self-administration and flavor preference learning. The same post-oral reinforcement process appears to mediate operant licking and flavor learning, although flavor learning provides a more sensitive measure of sugar reinforcement. PMID:26485294

  17. Characteristics of natural salt licks located in the Colombian Amazon foothills.

    PubMed

    Molina, Eduardo; León, Tomás Enrique; Armenteras, Dolors

    2014-02-01

    Salt licks are key places for the ecological dynamics of wildlife communities around the world and are locations where animals develop geophagical behaviours. Geophagy is a method for animals to supplement their diets or facilitate their digestive processes and is related to the health of individuals and populations. This study characterises a series of salt licks located in the Colombian Amazon foothills and describes their structural, mineralogical and physicochemical properties, as well as the fauna that visit these locations. The results are analysed in reference to the geological characteristics of the study area and in relation to the role of the salt lick in the nutritional ecology of the Amazonian fauna. Located in the study area are two types of salt licks that are significantly different in composition. These salt licks are located in an area where young geological materials have been exposed. The characteristics of the salt licks supports the hypothesis that they are used to solve nutritional problems that result from herbivorous diets. The clear importance of salt licks in the ecology of several Amazonian animal species emphasises the need to prioritise conservation areas by maximising the complementarities of salt lick sites. PMID:23595632

  18. Dose-and Rate-Dependent Effects of Cocaine on Striatal Firing Related to Licking

    E-print Network

    West, Mark O.

    Dose- and Rate-Dependent Effects of Cocaine on Striatal Firing Related to Licking Chengke Tang,1 To examine the role of striatal mechanisms in cocaine-induced stereotyped licking, we investigated the acute effects of cocaine on striatal neurons in awake, freely moving rats before and after cocaine

  19. OF THE ONE HUNDRED ARBORETUM ALL-STARS, THIS LIST INCLUDES THOSE WITH THE LOWEST WATER NEEDS Acacia boormanii

    E-print Network

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    WITH THE LOWEST WATER NEEDS Acacia boormanii Snowy River wattle Acca sellowiana (Feijoa sellowiana) pineapple and sweet; large green berries have a pineapple-like flavor; can be used as hedging or as a screen; attracts

  20. Inefficient licking during forced spout alternation in rats: violation of the law of effect?

    PubMed

    Mamedov, Z; Hernandez-Mesa, N; Bures, J

    1987-01-01

    The efficiency of the neural control of licking was assessed in rats (n = 6) allowed 30-min daily access to water in a box equipped with two retractable drinking spouts. After completion of a photoelectrically monitored lick, the contacted spout was withdrawn by an electromechanical device which simultaneously made the other spout available at an adjacent wall opening. Although economy of behavior required the animals to lick at each spout only once, computer monitored licking showed that the rats emitted 2.9 +/- 0.2 and 2.5 +/- 0.1 licks per spout presentation (LPSP) on the first and fifth days of training, respectively. The transition time between spouts and the interlick interval were not significantly changed. Separation of the spouts by a vertical partition extending 24 mm into the box prolonged the transition time and increased LPSP to 3.9 and 3.3 on Days 1 and 4 of training, respectively. These values were not changed when the length of the partition was increased to 40 mm. The failure of rats to maximize reward by emitting single licks probably reflects limited control of the generator of licking and/or the tendency to avoid its frequent switching on and off. PMID:3575448

  1. Analysis of on-sky sodium profile data from Lick Observatory.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sandrine J; Gavel, Donald; Kibrick, Robert

    2010-01-20

    The next generation of adaptive optics will depend on laser guide stars to increase sky coverage. However, there are a few limitations. The thickness of the sodium layer in the mesosphere at 90 km causes spot elongation, which is more severe for large telescopes. Moreover, the outer-edge subaperture of such large telescopes will resolve variations of sodium atom density seen over the thick layer. We quantify these density fluctuations using real data taken at Lick Observatory. We used the 1 m Nickel telescope to image the return flux due to laser-induced fluorescence from a dye laser launched from the nearby 3 m Shane telescope. This view was from the side allowing the resolution of the sodium return as a function of height. We used drift scanning of the 1 m telescope to provide resolution in time. We show qualitative images of the sodium distribution for different nights and quantitatively study the temporal power spectra of those fluctuations. We conclude that the sodium profiles have an average full width half-maximum of 10 km. However, the extent beyond the nominal 10 km thickness is important for accurate wavefront sensing. The variations in the height of the sodium layer occur on short enough time scales that AO systems for 30 m class telescopes will likely need focus updates on time scales shorter than 100 ms. PMID:20090803

  2. SNAPSHOT METALLICITY ESTIMATE OF RESOLVED STELLAR SYSTEMS THROUGH LICK Fe5270 DIAGNOSTIC

    SciTech Connect

    Buzzoni, A.; Bertone, E.; Chavez, M.

    2009-10-01

    We outline a new method to derive a 'snapshot' metallicity estimate of stellar systems (providing one resolves at least the brightest part of the color-magnitude diagram) on the basis of low-resolution (i.e., 6-8 A FWHM) spectroscopy of a small stellar sample. Our method relies on the Fe5270 Lick index measurements and takes advantage of the special behavior of this spectral feature that reaches its maximum strength among the ubiquitous component of K-type giants. This makes the Fe5270{sub max} estimate a robust and model-independent tracer of cluster [Fe/H], being particularly insensitive to the age of the stellar population. A comparison of the Fe5270{sub max} distribution derived from globular and open clusters, as well as from the field giant population in the Galaxy disk, confirms a tight correlation of the index maximum versus cluster [Fe/H] over the entire metallicity range for a stellar population with [Fe/H] approx>-2.0. Relying on a theoretical calibration of the feature, we trust to infer effectively cluster metallicity within a typical uncertainty of 0.1-0.2 dex, depending on red giant branch (RGB) luminosity sampling of the observations. A handful of stars (5-10 objects) is required for the method to be applied, with low-metallicity stellar populations more easily managed, being Fe5270{sub max} located within the few brightest RGB stars of the system. In any case, we show that even the observation of a coarse stellar set would allow us to place a confident lower limit on cluster metallicity.

  3. Head Rubbing and Licking Reinforce Social Bonds in a Group of Captive African Lions, Panthera leo

    PubMed Central

    Matoba, Tomoyuki; Kutsukake, Nobuyuki; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Many social animals have a species-specific repertoire of affiliative behaviours that characterise individualised relationships within a group. To date, however, quantitative studies on intragroup affiliative behaviours in social carnivores have been limited. Here, we investigated the social functions of the two most commonly observed affiliative behaviours in captive African lions (Panthera leo): head rubbing and licking. We conducted behavioural observations on a captive group of lions composed of 7 males and 14 females, and tested hypotheses regarding three social functions: tension reduction, social bonding, and social status expression. Disproportionately frequent male–male and female-to-male head rubbing was observed, while more than 95% of all licking interactions occurred in female–female dyads. In accordance with the social bond hypothesis, and in disagreement with the social status expression hypothesis, both head rubbing and licking interactions were reciprocal. After controlling for spatial association, the dyadic frequency of head rubbing was negatively correlated with age difference while licking was positively correlated with relatedness. Group reunion after daily separation did not affect the frequencies of the affiliative behaviours, which was in disagreement with the predictions from the tension reduction hypothesis. These results support the social bond hypothesis for the functions of head rubbing and licking. Different patterns of affiliative behaviour between the sexes may reflect differences in the relationship quality in each sex or the differential predisposition to licking due to its original function in offspring care. PMID:24023806

  4. Taste Coding in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract of the Awake, Freely Licking Rat

    PubMed Central

    Roussin, Andre T.; D’Agostino, Alexandra E.; Fooden, Andrew M.; Victor, Jonathan D.; Di Lorenzo, Patricia M.

    2012-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that the brain processes sensory stimuli differently according to whether they are passively or actively acquired, and these differences can be seen early in the sensory pathway. In the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), the first relay in the central gustatory neuraxis, a rich variety of sensory inputs generated by active licking converge. Here we show that taste responses in the NTS reflect these interactions. Experiments consisted of recordings of taste-related activity in the NTS of awake rats as they freely licked exemplars of the five basic taste qualities (sweet, sour, salty, bitter, umami). Nearly all taste-responsive cells were broadly tuned across taste qualities. A subset responded to taste with long latencies (>1.0 s), suggesting the activation of extra-oral chemoreceptors. Analyses of the temporal characteristics of taste responses showed that spike timing conveyed significantly more information than spike count alone in almost half of NTS cells, as in anesthetized rats, but with less information per cell. In addition to taste-responsive cells, the NTS contains cells that synchronize with licks. Since the lick pattern per se can convey information, these cells may collaborate with taste-responsive cells to identify taste quality. Other cells become silent during licking. These latter “anti-lick” cells show a surge in firing rate predicting the beginning and signaling the end of a lick bout. Collectively, the data reveal a complex array of cell types in the NTS, only a portion of which include taste-responsive cells, which work together to acquire sensory information. PMID:22855799

  5. Constraints on Type IIn supernova progenitor outbursts from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilinski, Christopher; Smith, Nathan; Li, Weidong; Williams, G. Grant; Zheng, WeiKang; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2015-06-01

    We searched through roughly 12 years of archival survey data acquired by the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) as part of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search in order to detect or place limits on possible progenitor outbursts of Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn). The KAIT data base contains multiple pre-SN images for five SNe IIn (plus one ambiguous case of an SN IIn/imposter) within 50 Mpc. No progenitor outbursts are found using the false discovery rate statistical method in any of our targets. Instead, we derive limiting magnitudes (LMs) at the locations of the SNe. These LMs (typically reaching mR ? 19.5 mag) are compared to outbursts of SN 2009ip and ? Car, plus additional simulated outbursts. We find that the data for SN 1999el and SN 2003dv are of sufficient quality to rule out events ˜40 d before the main peak caused by initially faint SNe from blue supergiant precursor stars, as in the cases of SN 2009ip and SN 2010mc. These SNe IIn may thus have arisen from red supergiant progenitors, or they may have had a more rapid onset of circumstellar matter interaction. We also estimate the probability of detecting at least one outburst in our data set to be ?60% for each type of the example outbursts, so the lack of any detections suggests that such outbursts are either typically less luminous (intrinsically or owing to dust) than ˜-13 mag, or not very common among SNe IIn within a few years prior to explosion.

  6. Development of a flood-warning system and flood-inundation mapping in Licking County, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostheimer, Chad J.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for selected reaches of South Fork Licking River, Raccoon Creek, North Fork Licking River, and the Licking River in Licking County, Ohio, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Ohio Department of Transportation; U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration; Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District; U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service; and the City of Newark and Village of Granville, Ohio. The inundation maps depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to water levels (stages) at the following USGS streamgages: South Fork Licking River at Heath, Ohio (03145173); Raccoon Creek below Wilson Street at Newark, Ohio (03145534); North Fork Licking River at East Main Street at Newark, Ohio (03146402); and Licking River near Newark, Ohio (03146500). The maps were provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into a Web-based flood-warning system that can be used in conjunction with NWS flood-forecast data to show areas of predicted flood inundation associated with forecasted flood-peak stages. As part of the flood-warning streamflow network, the USGS re-installed one streamgage on North Fork Licking River, and added three new streamgages, one each on North Fork Licking River, South Fork Licking River, and Raccoon Creek. Additionally, the USGS upgraded a lake-level gage on Buckeye Lake. Data from the streamgages and lake-level gage can be used by emergency-management personnel, in conjunction with the flood-inundation maps, to help determine a course of action when flooding is imminent. Flood profiles for selected reaches were prepared by calibrating steady-state step-backwater models to selected, established streamgage rating curves. The step-backwater models then were used to determine water-surface-elevation profiles for up to 10 flood stages at a streamgage with corresponding streamflows ranging from approximately the 50 to 0.2-percent chance annual-exceedance probabilities for each of the 4 streamgages that correspond to the flood-inundation maps. The computed flood profiles were used in combination with digital elevation data to delineate flood-inundation areas. Maps of Licking County showing flood-inundation areas overlain on digital orthophotographs are presented for the selected floods. The USGS also developed an unsteady-flow model for a reach of South Fork Licking River for use by the NWS to enhance their ability to provide advanced flood warning in the region north of Buckeye Lake, Ohio. The unsteady-flow model was calibrated based on data from four flooding events that occurred from June 2008 to December 2011. Model calibration was approximate due to the fact that there were unmeasured inflows to the river that were not able to be considered during the calibration. Information on unmeasured inflow derived from NWS hydrologic models and additional flood-event data could enable the NWS to further refine the unsteady-flow model.

  7. Dilute bird nectars: viscosity constrains food intake by licking in a sunbird.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Angela; Leseigneur, Carolina D C; Verburgt, Luke; Nicolson, Susan W

    2010-10-01

    Floral nectars of bird-pollinated plants are relatively dilute. One hypothesis proposed to explain this concerns the difficulty for birds of drinking nectar of high viscosity. We examined the effects of viscosity, separately from those of sugar concentration, on feeding by captive whitebellied sunbirds (Cinnyris talatala). Viscosities of artificial nectar (sucrose solutions ranging in concentration from 0.25 to 1.5 mol/l) were altered with Tylose, an inert polysaccharide. Food consumption was measured over 3 h, and lick frequency and duration were recorded using photodetection devices on feeding apertures too small for the bill but large enough for the extended tongue. Volumetric intake rates (ml/s) were inversely proportional to nectar viscosity, and were similar over the range of sucrose concentrations when viscosity was held constant. Sucrose intake rates (mg/s) remained the same on pure sucrose solutions, but they decreased with increasing viscosity at a constant sucrose concentration. Lick frequencies and tongue loads were reduced at high viscosities, and lick duration increased, which confirms that sunbirds take longer to ingest viscous solutions. Licking behavior was remarkably similar in birds feeding on different sucrose concentrations if viscosity was held constant. Nectar ingestion rate is determined by viscosity; however, total food intake is mainly modulated by sugar concentration. Similar effects of food viscosity have been observed in insects that suck nectar. PMID:20686174

  8. Diversity,distribution, and abundance of ground dwelling spiders at Lick Creek Park, College Station, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Henderson, Takesha Yvonne

    2009-06-02

    Lick Creek Park is a 515 acre nature park that was acquired in 1987 by the City of College Station, Texas. The site has a variety of indigenous plant and animal species and is an important natural resource for citizens of the region. There is a...

  9. Paleontologic investigations at Big Bone Lick State Park, Kentucky: A preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, C.B.; Tanner, L.G.; Whitmore, F.C., Jr.; Ray, L.L.; Crawford, E.C.

    1963-01-01

    The Big Bone Lick area in Kentucky, the first widely known collecting locality for vertebrate fossils in North America, is being investigated for further faunal and geologic evidence. Mammal bones, ranging in age from Wisconsin (Tazewell?) to Recent, were recovered in 1962 from four different faunal zones in two terrace fills.

  10. Journal of Mammalogy, 93(4):10991109, 2012 Keystone resource (Ficus) chemistry explains lick visitation by

    E-print Network

    Harms, Kyle E.

    provide substances that render dietary toxins less harmful. We assessed the former by examining bats' diets in conjunction with lick chemistry in the Peruvian Amazon. We found that most bats that visit supplement their fruit diets with insects, potential sources of sodium. Complementary results among diets

  11. The Eclipse Expeditions of the Lick Observatory and the Beginnings of Astrophysics in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malville, J. McKim; Pearson, John

    2012-09-01

    During the years 1898 to 1932, Lick Observatory organized a remarkable series of 17 solar eclipse expeditions, all the more remarkable because Lick astronomers evidenced no enduring interest in solar physics. The science of these expeditions involved three issues of major significance during the development of astrophysics during the first three decades of the twentieth century: (1) testing of General Relativity; (2) non-LTE in extended atmospheres and gaseous nebulae; (3) role of magnetic fields in the sun. The expeditions made major contributions to the first two topics. Even though W.W. Campbell, the director of Lick, had extensive contact with George Ellery Hale, who had measured the magnetic fields of sunspots at Mt. Wilson, Lick astronomers missed the clues concerning the importance of magnetic fields in the corona. Campbell's measurement of the deflection of starlight at the eclipse of 1922 was his major achievement of the many eclipse expeditions. He had approached that test of General Relativity with considerable distrust of Einstein's theory and considered Eddington's 1919 results to be suspect. It is to Campbell's great credit that the results published jointly with Trumpler confirmed the predictions of Einstein with higher precision than Eddington had achieved. Donald Menzel joined the staff of Lick Observatory in 1926 as their first astrophysicist. Osterbrock describes him as a ``stranger in a strange land.'' He was given the analysis of the eclipse flash spectra. This work, published in 1931, represents the beginning of the astrophysical study of chromospheres and laid the foundation for the quantitative analysis of extended atmospheres and gaseous nebula.

  12. NLTE and LTE Lick indices for red giants from [M/H] 0.0 to -6.0 at SDSS and IDS spectral resolution

    E-print Network

    Short, C Ian; Layden, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of the complete system of 22 Lick indices on overall metallicity scaled from solar abundances, [M/H], from the solar value, 0.0, down to the extremely-metal-poor (XMP) value of -6.0, for late-type giant stars (MK luminosity class III, log(g)=2.0) of MK spectral class late-K to late-F (3750 Teff < 6500 K) of the type that are detected as "fossils" of early galaxy formation in the Galactic halo and in extra-galactic structures. Our investigation is based on synthetic index values, I, derived from atmospheric models and synthetic spectra computed with PHOENIX in LTE and Non-LTE (NLTE), where the synthetic spectra have been convolved to the spectral resolution, R, of both IDS and SDSS (and LAMOST) spectroscopy. We identify nine indices, that we designate "Lick-XMP", that remain both detectable and significantly [M/H]-dependent down to [M/H] values of at least ~-5.0, and down to [M/H] ~ -6.0 in five cases, while also remaining well-behaved . For these nine, we study the depend...

  13. THE LICK-CARNEGIE SURVEY: FOUR NEW EXOPLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Meschiari, Stefano; Laughlin, Gregory; Vogt, Steven S.; Rivera, Eugenio J.; Haghighipour, Nader; Jalowiczor, Peter

    2011-02-01

    We present new precise HIRES radial velocity (RV) data sets of five nearby stars obtained at Keck Observatory. HD 31253, HD 218566, HD 177830, HD 99492, and HD 74156 are host stars of spectral classes F through K and show RV variations consistent with new or additional planetary companions in Keplerian motion. The orbital parameters of the candidate planets in the five planetary systems span minimum masses of M sin i = 27.43 M{sub +} to 8.28 M{sub J}, periods of 17.05-4696.95 days and eccentricities ranging from circular to extremely eccentric (e {approx} 0.63). The fifth star, HD 74156, was known to have both a 52 day and a 2500 day planet, and was claimed to also harbor a third planet at 336 days, in apparent support of the 'Packed Planetary System' hypothesis. Our greatly expanded data set for HD 74156 provides strong confirmation of both the 52 day and 2500 day planets, but strongly contradicts the existence of a 336 day planet, and offers no significant evidence for any other planets in the system.

  14. Nearby supernova rates from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search - I. The methods and data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leaman, Jesse; Li, Weidong; Chornock, Ryan; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2011-04-01

    This is the first paper of a series in which we present new measurements of the observed rates of supernovae (SNe) in the local Universe, determined from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search. We have obtained 2.3 million observations of 14 882 sample galaxies over an interval of 11 years (1998 March to 2008 December). We considered 1036 SNe detected in our sample and used an optimal subsample of 726 SNe (274 Type Ia SNe, 116 Type Ibc SNe and Type II 324 SNe) to determine our SN rates. This is the largest and most homogeneous set of nearby SNe ever assembled for this purpose, and ours is the first local SN rate analysis based on CCD imaging and modern image-subtraction techniques. In this paper, we lay the foundation of the study. We derive the recipe for the control-time calculation for SNe with a known luminosity function and provide details on the construction of the galaxy and SN samples used in the calculations. Compared with a complete volume-limited galaxy sample, our sample has a deficit of low-luminosity galaxies but still provides enough statistics for a reliable rate calculation. There is a strong Malmquist bias, so the average size (luminosity or mass) of the galaxies increases monotonically with distance, and this trend is used to showcase a correlation between SN rates and galaxy sizes. Very few core-collapse SNe are found in early-type galaxies, providing strong constraints on the amount of recent star formation within these galaxies. The small average observation interval (˜9 d) of our survey ensures that our control-time calculations can tolerate a reasonable amount of uncertainty in the luminosity functions of SNe. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to determine the limiting magnitude of each image and the SN detection efficiency as a function of galaxy Hubble type. The limiting magnitude and the detection efficiency, together with the luminosity function derived from a complete sample of very nearby SNe in Paper II, will be used to calculate the control time and the SN rates in Paper III.

  15. Photometric light curves for ten rapidly rotating stars in Alpha Persei, the Pleiades, and the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.; Schild, Rudolph E.; Stauffer, John R.; Jones, Burton F.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results from a photometric monitoring program of ten rapidly rotating stars observed during 1991 using the FLWO 48-in. telescope. Brightness variations for an additional six cluster stars observed with the Lick 40-in. telescope are also given. The periods and light curves for seven Alpha Persei members, two Pleiades members, and one naked T Tauri field star are reported.

  16. The effect of self-licking behavior on pharmacokinetics of eprinomectin and clinical efficacy against Psoroptes cuniculi in topically administered rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wen, Huiqiang; Pan, Baoliang; Wang, Fangfei; Yang, Zhenzhong; Wang, Zhujun; Liu, Shuai; Wang, Ming

    2010-02-01

    Ear mange mite Psoroptes cuniculi, one of the predominant parasites in rabbits, can cause considerable weight loss, low favorable fee conversion rates, and meningitis. The present experiment was to investigate the difference of plasma disposition and the variation of clinical efficacy under the effect of animal self-licking behavior in topically administered rabbits. Ten rabbits for pharmacokinetic study in two groups (the self-licking and the nonlicking)were topically administered with 1 mg kg(-1) of eprinomectin. In the self-licking group, rabbits were allowed to self-lick freely, while, to prevent self-licking, each animal in the non-licking group was fitted with a pet collar. Compared to the non-licking group, self-licking behavior contributed to an extremely significant shorter half-life of absorption (14.85+/-2.79 h in licking group vs.29.44+/-7.81 h in non-licking group, p<0.01) and an extremely significant higher C(max) value for eprinomectin (21.95+/-5.36 h in licking group vs. 6.98+/-0.72 ng ml(-1) in non-licking group, p<0.01) in plasma disposition. An extremely significantly shorter mean residence time (50.72+/-3.45 h) in self-licking group was also determined compared with the value obtained in non-licking group (106.66+/-7.39 h; p<0.01). Clinical efficacy study of eprinomectin was examined in rabbits naturally infested with P. cuniculi which were randomly allocated in three groups: the self-licking, the non-licking, and control groups. All rabbits in the self-licking and the non-licking groups were treated with topical eprinomectin at a single dose of 2 mg kg(-1) (day 0). Topical eprinomection led to a complete parasitological recovery in both treated groups on day 14 and remained free of live mites and clinical lesions from day 21 to the end of the study period (day 35). PMID:20069313

  17. Ground-based detectability of terrestrial and Jovian extrasolar planets: observations of CM Draconis at Lick Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, L. R.; Dunham, E. T.; Deeg, H. J.; Blue, J. E.; Jenkins, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    The detection of terrestrial-sized extrasolar planets from the ground has been thought to be virtually impossible due to atmospheric scintillation limits. However, we show that this is not the case especially selected (but nevertheless main sequence) stars, namely small eclipsing binaries. For the smallest of these systems, CM Draconis, several months to a few years of photometric observations with 1-m-class telescopes will be sufficient to detect the transits of any short-period planets of sizes > or = 1.5 Earth radii (RE), using cross-correlation analysis with moderately good photometry. Somewhat larger telescopes will be needed to extend this detectability to terrestrial planets in larger eclipsing binary systems. (We arbitrarily define "terrestrial planets" herein as those whose disc areas are closer to that of Earth's than Neptune's i.e., less than about 2.78 RE.) As a "spin-off" of such observations, we will also be able to detect the presence of Jovian-mass planets without transits using the timing of the eclipse minima. Eclipse minima will drift in time as the binary system is offset by a sufficiently massive planet (i.e., one Jupiter mass) about the binary/giant-planet barycenter, causing a periodic variation in the light travel time to the observer. We present here an outline of present observations taking place at the University of California Lick Observatory using the Crossley 0.9-m telescope in collaboration with other observatories (in South Korea, Crete, France, Canary Islands, and New York) to detect or constrain the existence of terrestrial planets around main sequence eclipsing binary star systems, starting with CM Draconis. We demonstrate the applicability of photometric data to the general detection of gas giant planets via eclipse minima timings in many other small-mass eclipsing binary systems as well.

  18. Keepers of the double stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2013-03-01

    Astronomers have long tracked double stars in efforts to find those that are gravitationally-bound binaries and then to determine their orbits. Early catalogues by the Herschels, Struves, and others began with their own discoveries. In 1906 court reporter and amateur astronomer Sherburne Wesley Burnham published a massive double star catalogue containing data from many observers on more than 13,000 systems. Lick Observatory astronomer Robert Grant Aitken produced a much larger catalogue in 1932 and coordinated with Robert Innes of Johannesburg, who catalogued the southern systems. Aitken maintained and expanded Burnham's records of observations on handwritten file cards, and eventually turned them over to the Lick Observatory, where astrometrist Hamilton Jeffers further expanded the collection and put all the observations on punched cards. With the aid of Frances M. "Rete" Greeby he made two catalogues: an Index Catalogue with basic data about each star, and a complete catalogue of observations, with one observation per punched card. He enlisted Willem van den Bos of Johannesburg to add southern stars, and together they published the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0. As Jeffers approached retirement he became greatly concerned about the disposition of the catalogues. He wanted to be replaced by another "double star man," but Lick Director Albert E. Whitford had the new 120-inch reflector, the world's second largest telescope, and he wanted to pursue modern astrophysics instead. Jeffers was vociferously opposed to turning over the card files to another institution, and especially against their coming under the control of Kaj Strand of the United States Naval Observatory. In the end the USNO got the files and has maintained the records ever since, first under Charles Worley, and, since 1997, under Brian Mason. Now called the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS), it is completely online and currently contains more than 1,200,000 measures of more than 125,000 star systems.

  19. Mineral licks: motivational factors for visitation and accompanying disease risk at communal use sites of elk and deer.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Michael J; Phillips, Gregory E; Fischer, Justin W; Burke, Patrick W; Seward, Nathan W; Stahl, Randal S; Nichols, Tracy A; Wunder, Bruce A; VerCauteren, Kurt C

    2014-12-01

    Free-ranging cervids acquire most of their essential minerals through forage consumption, though occasionally seek other sources to account for seasonal mineral deficiencies. Mineral sources occur as natural geological deposits (i.e., licks) or as anthropogenic mineral supplements. In both scenarios, these sources commonly serve as focal sites for visitation. We monitored 11 licks in Rocky Mountain National Park, north-central Colorado, using trail cameras to quantify daily visitation indices (DVI) and soil consumption indices (SCI) for Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) during summer 2006 and documented elk, mule deer, and moose (Alces alces) visiting licks. Additionally, soil samples were collected, and mineral concentrations were compared to discern levels that explain rates of visitation. Relationships between response variables; DVI and SCI, and explanatory variables; elevation class, moisture class, period of study, and concentrations of minerals were examined. We found that DVI and SCI were greatest at two wet, low-elevation licks exhibiting relatively high concentrations of manganese and sodium. Because cervids are known to seek Na from soils, we suggest our observed association of Mn with DVI and SCI was a likely consequence of deer and elk seeking supplemental dietary Na. Additionally, highly utilized licks such as these provide an area of concentrated cervid occupation and interaction, thus increasing risk for environmental transmission of infectious pathogens such as chronic wasting disease, which has been shown to be shed in the saliva, urine, and feces of infected cervids. PMID:24711146

  20. MULTIPLICITY AMONG WIDELY SEPARATED BROWN DWARF COMPANIONS TO NEARBY STARS: GLIESE 337CD

    E-print Network

    Burgasser, Adam J.

    MULTIPLICITY AMONG WIDELY SEPARATED BROWN DWARF COMPANIONS TO NEARBY STARS: GLIESE 337CD Adam J March 13 ABSTRACT We present Lick Natural Guide Star Adaptive Optics observations of the L8 brown dwarf and metallicity. From a compilation of all known widely separated (k100 AU) stellar­ brown dwarf multiple systems

  1. Geochemical study of acid mine drainage of the Big Lick Tunnel area, Williamstown, PA

    SciTech Connect

    Tollin, S. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1993-03-01

    Acid mine drainage in the anthracite region of Pennsylvania continues to be a significant environmental problem. This study examines the acid mine outflow from the Big Lick Tunnel, north of Williamstown, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. The tunnel drains abandoned mines on the north side of the Big Lick Mountain. Mining ceased in the area circa 1940, and the tunnel has been in operation since that time. The water, soil and stream bed sediment geochemistry has been studied to determine their changes in chemistry over distance. The pH, TDS and metal concentrations were the primary focus. Metal concentrations were determined using an ICP unit. Data indicates the pH of the outflow to range between 6.7 and 7.3 Fe and Mn concentrations are as high as 9.7 ppb. Extensive metal precipitation ( yellow boy'') occurs within the tunnel and for several hundred meters from the mouth of the tunnel. The combination of near neutral pH and high metal concentration suggest that the drainage is in contact with highly alkaline materials prior to discharge from the tunnel. The geology of the area does not suggest bedrock as the possible source of alkaline material. One hypothesis is that the acidic water is reacting with the concrete tunnel and being neutralized. Data also suggests that the Fe precipitates much quicker than the Mn, resulting in a zonation between Fe-rich and Mn-rich sediments along the length of the drainage.

  2. Gender, culture, and astrophysical fieldwork: Elizabeth Campbell and the Lick Observatory-Crocker eclipse expeditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, A. S.-K.

    The article is organized as follows. It begins with an overview of women in nineteenth-century American science. It then describes the culture of mountaintop observatories and life on Mount Hamilton. Elizabeth Campbell's unique role in the Crocker-Lick expeditions drew upon her equally unique role in the observatory, and also on the meaning given to women's work in general on the mountain. The bulk of the article focuses on the Campbells and their expeditions to India in 1898, Spain in 1905, and the South Pacific in 1908. The third section compares the Lick Observatory expeditions to those conducted by David Todd of Amherst College. Todd's wife, Mabel Loomis Todd, went into the field several times with her husband, but her place in the field was radically different from Elizabeth Campbell's, a difference that can be ascribed to a combination of local culture and personality. Finally, it compares American expeditions to British expeditions of the period, to see what the absence of British women on expeditions can tell us about the way national scientific styles and cultures affected gender roles in science.

  3. The lick-index calibration of the Gemini multi-object spectrographs

    SciTech Connect

    Puzia, Thomas H.; Miller, Bryan W.; Trancho, Gelys; Basarab, Brett; Mirocha, Jordan T.; Butler, Karen E-mail: bmiller@gemini.edu

    2013-06-01

    We present the calibration of the spectroscopic Lick/IDS standard line-index system for measurements obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrographs known as GMOS-North and GMOS-South. We provide linear correction functions for each of the 25 standard Lick line indices for the B600 grism and two instrumental setups, one with 0.''5 slit width and 1 × 1 CCD pixel binning (corresponding to ?2.5 Å spectral resolution) and the other with 0.''75 slit width and 2 × 2 binning (?4 Å). We find small and well-defined correction terms for the set of Balmer indices H?, H? {sub A}, and H? {sub A} along with the metallicity sensitive indices Fe5015, Fe5270, Fe5335, Fe5406, Mg{sub 2}, and Mgb that are widely used for stellar population diagnostics of distant stellar systems. We find other indices that sample molecular absorption bands, such as TiO{sub 1} and TiO{sub 2}, with very wide wavelength coverage or indices that sample very weak molecular and atomic absorption features, such as Mg{sub 1}, as well as indices with particularly narrow passband definitions, such as Fe4384, Ca4455, Fe4531, Ca4227, and Fe5782, which are less robustly calibrated. These indices should be used with caution.

  4. -ENHANCED INTEGRATED LICK/IDS SPECTRAL INDICES AND MILKY WAY AND M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AND EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    E-print Network

    Lee, Hyun-chul

    -ENHANCED INTEGRATED LICK/IDS SPECTRAL INDICES AND MILKY WAY AND M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AND EARLY fraction Z) and compare to Milky Way globular clusters that have independently estimated mean [Fe/H] and [/Fe]. Comparison of our models with observations of Milky Way and M31 globular clusters in index

  5. Lick-index entanglement and biased diagnostic of stellar populations in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzoni, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    The inherent statistical and operational properties of the Lick-index spectrophotometric system are investigated to facilitate a more appropriate use for astrophysical studies. Non-Gaussian effects in the index standardization procedure suggest that a minimum S/N ratio has to be met by spectral data, such as S/N ? 5 px-1 for a spectral resolution R ˜ 2000. In addition, index (re-)definition in terms of narrow-band colour should be preferred over the classical pseudo-equivalent width scheme. The overlapping wavelength range among different indices is also an issue, as it may lead the later ones to correlate beyond any strictly physical relationship. The nested configuration of the Fe5335 and Fe5270 indices, and the so-called Mg complex (including Mg1, Mg2 and Mgb), is analysed, in this context, by assessing the implied bias when joining entangled features into global diagnostic meta-indices, like the perused [MgFe] metallicity tracer. The perturbing effect of [O III]5007 and [N I]5199 forbidden gas emission on Fe5015 and Mgb absorption features is considered, and an updated correction scheme is proposed when using [O III]5007 as a proxy to appraise H? residual emission. When applied to the present-day elliptical galaxy population, the revised H? scale leads, on average, to 20-30 per cent younger age estimates. Finally, the misleading role of the christening element in Lick-based chemical analyses is illustrated for the striking case of Fe4531. In fact, while iron is nominally the main contributor to the observed feature in high-resolution spectra, we have shown that the maximum responsiveness of the Fe4531 index is actually to titanium abundance.

  6. The Michigan Binary Star Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Rudi P.

    2007-07-01

    At the end of the nineteenth century, William J. Hussey and Robert G. Aitken, both at Lick Observatory, began a systematic search for unrecorded binary stars with the aid of the 12" and 36" refracting telescopes at Lick Observatory. Aitken's work (and book on binary stars) are well known, Hussey's contributions less so. In 1905 Hussey, a Michigan engineering graduate, returned to direct the Ann Arbor astronomy program, and immediately he began to design new instrumentation for the study of binary stars and to train potential observers. For a time, he spent six months a year at the La Plata Observatory, where he discovered a number of new pairs and decided upon a major southern hemisphere campaign. He spent a decade obtaining the lenses for a large refractor, through the vicissitudes of war and depression. Finally, he obtained a site in South Africa, a 26" refractor, and a small corps of observers, but he died in London en route to fulfill his dream. His right hand man, Richard Rossiter, established the observatory and spent the next thirty years discovering and measuring binary stars: his personal total is a record for the field. This talk is an account of the methods, results, and utility of the extraordinary binary star factory in the veldt.

  7. Hamilton Jeffers and the Double Star Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Astronomers have long tracked double stars in efforts to find those that are gravitationally-bound binaries and then to determine their orbits. Court reporter and amateur astronomer Shelburne Wesley Burnham (1838-1921) published a massive double star catalogue containing more than 13,000 systems in 1906. The next keeper of the double stars was Lick Observatory astronomer Robert Grant Aitken (1864-1951), who produced a much larger catalogue in 1932. Aitken maintained and expanded Burnham’s records of observations on handwritten file cards, eventually turning them over to Lick Observatory astrometrist Hamilton Moore Jeffers (1893-1976). Jeffers further expanded the collection and put all the observations on punched cards. With the aid of Frances M. "Rete" Greeby (1921-2002), he made two catalogues: an Index Catalogue with basic data about each star, and a complete catalogue of observations, with one observation per punched card. He enlisted Willem van den Bos of Johannesburg to add southern stars, and they published the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0. As Jeffers approached retirement he became greatly concerned about the disposition of the catalogues. He wanted to be replaced by another "double star man," but Lick Director Albert E. Whitford (1905-2002) had the new 120-inch reflector, the world’s second largest telescope, and he wanted to pursue modern astrophysics instead. Jeffers was vociferously opposed to turning over the card files to another institution, and especially against their coming under the control of Kaj Strand of the U.S. Naval Observatory. In the end the USNO got the files and has maintained the records ever since, first under Charles Worley (1935-1997), and, since 1997, under Brian Mason. Now called the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS), it is completely online and currently contains more than 1,000,000 measures of more than 100,000 pairs.

  8. NLTE and LTE Lick Indices for Red Giants from [Fe/H] 0.0 to -6.0 at SDSS and IDS Spectral Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, C. Ian; Young, Mitchell E.; Layden, Nicholas

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the dependence of the complete system of 22 Lick indices on overall metallicity scaled from solar abundances, [{{M}}/{{H}}], from the solar value, 0.0, down to the extremely metal-poor (XMP) value of -6.0, for late-type giant stars (MK luminosity class III, {log}g=2.0) of MK spectral class late-K to late-F (3750\\lt {T}{eff}\\lt 6500 K) of the type that are detected as “fossils” of early galaxy formation in the Galactic halo and in extra-galactic structures. Our investigation is based on synthetic index values, I, derived from atmospheric models and synthetic spectra computed with PHOENIX in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) and Non-LTE (NLTE), where the synthetic spectra have been convolved to the spectral resolution, R, of both IDS and SDSS (and LAMOST) spectroscopy. We identify nine indices, that we designate “Lick-XMP,” that remain both detectable and significantly [{{M}}/{{H}}]-dependent down to [{{M}}/{{H}}] values of at least ˜ -5.0, and down to [{{M}}/{{H}}] ˜ -6.0 in five cases, while also remaining well-behaved (single-valued as a function of [{{M}}/{{H}}] and positive in linear units). For these nine indices, we study the dependence of I on NLTE effects, and on spectral resolution. For our LTE I values for spectra of SDSS resolution, we present the fitted polynomial coefficients, {C}{{n}}, from multi-variate linear regression for I with terms up to third order in the independent variable pairs ({T}{eff}, [{{M}}/{{H}}] ) and (V-K, [{{M}}/{{H}}]), and compare them to the fitted {C}{{n}} values of Worthey et al. at IDS spectral resolution. For this fitted I data-set we present tables of LTE partial derivatives, \\frac{\\partial I}{\\partial {T}{eff}}{| }[{{M}/{{H}}]}, \\frac{\\displaystyle \\partial I}{\\partial [{{M}}/{{H}}]}{| }{T{eff}}, \\frac{\\displaystyle \\partial I}{\\partial (V-K)}{| }[{{M}/{{H}}]}, and \\frac{\\partial I}{\\partial [{{M}}/{{H}}]}{| }(V-K), that can be used to infer the relation between a given difference, {{? }}I, and a difference {{? }}{T}{eff} or {{? }}(V-K), or a difference {{? }}[{{M}}/{{H}}], while the other parameters are held fixed. For Fe-dominated Lick indices, the effect of NLTE is to generally weaken the value of I at any given {T}{eff} and [{{M}}/{{H}}] values. As an example of the impact on stellar parameter estimation, for late-type giants of inferred {T}{eff}? 4200 K, an Fe-dominated I value computed in LTE that is too strong might be compensated for by inferring a {T}{eff} value that is too large.

  9. Odor-Taste Convergence in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract of the Awake Freely Licking Rat

    PubMed Central

    Escanilla, Olga D.; Victor, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Flavor is produced by the integration of taste, olfaction, texture, and temperature, currently thought to occur in the cortex. However, previous work has shown that brainstem taste-related nuclei also respond to multisensory inputs. Here, we test the hypothesis that taste and olfaction interact in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS; the first neural relay in the central gustatory pathway) in awake, freely licking rats. Electrophysiological recordings of taste and taste + odor responses were conducted in an experimental chamber following surgical electrode implantation and recovery. Tastants (0.1 m NaCl, 0.1 m sucrose, 0.01 m citric acid, and 0.0001 m quinine) were delivered for five consecutive licks interspersed with five licks of artificial saliva rinse delivered on a VR5 schedule. Odorants were n-amyl acetate (banana), acetic acid (vinegar), octanoic acid (rancid), and phenylethyl alcohol (floral). For each cell, metric space analyses were used to quantify the information conveyed by spike count, by the rate envelope, and by individual spike timing. Results revealed diverse effects of odorants on taste-response magnitude and latency across cells. Importantly, NTS cells were more competent at discriminating taste + odor stimuli versus tastants presented alone for all taste qualities using both rate and temporal coding. The strong interaction of odorants and tastants at the NTS underscores its role as the initial node in the neural circuit that controls food identification and ingestion. PMID:25904782

  10. Odor-taste convergence in the nucleus of the solitary tract of the awake freely licking rat.

    PubMed

    Escanilla, Olga D; Victor, Jonathan D; Di Lorenzo, Patricia M

    2015-04-22

    Flavor is produced by the integration of taste, olfaction, texture, and temperature, currently thought to occur in the cortex. However, previous work has shown that brainstem taste-related nuclei also respond to multisensory inputs. Here, we test the hypothesis that taste and olfaction interact in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS; the first neural relay in the central gustatory pathway) in awake, freely licking rats. Electrophysiological recordings of taste and taste + odor responses were conducted in an experimental chamber following surgical electrode implantation and recovery. Tastants (0.1 m NaCl, 0.1 m sucrose, 0.01 m citric acid, and 0.0001 m quinine) were delivered for five consecutive licks interspersed with five licks of artificial saliva rinse delivered on a VR5 schedule. Odorants were n-amyl acetate (banana), acetic acid (vinegar), octanoic acid (rancid), and phenylethyl alcohol (floral). For each cell, metric space analyses were used to quantify the information conveyed by spike count, by the rate envelope, and by individual spike timing. Results revealed diverse effects of odorants on taste-response magnitude and latency across cells. Importantly, NTS cells were more competent at discriminating taste + odor stimuli versus tastants presented alone for all taste qualities using both rate and temporal coding. The strong interaction of odorants and tastants at the NTS underscores its role as the initial node in the neural circuit that controls food identification and ingestion. PMID:25904782

  11. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine does not alter consummatory concentration-dependent licking of prototypical taste stimuli by rats.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Clare M; Spector, Alan C

    2011-07-01

    Serotonin and the 5HT(1A) receptor are expressed in a subset of taste receptor cells, and the 5HT(3) receptor is expressed on afferent fibers innervating taste buds. Exogenous administration of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, paroxetine, has been shown to increase taste sensitivity to stimuli described by humans as sweet and bitter. Serotonergic agonists also decrease food and fluid intake, and it is possible that modulations of serotonin may alter taste-based hedonic responsiveness; alternatively, or in combination, serotonin may interact with physiological state to impact ingestive behavior. In this study, the unconditioned licking of prototypical taste stimuli by rats in brief-access taste tests was assessed following paroxetine administration (0.3-10 mg/kg intraperitoneal). We also measured sucrose licking by rats in different deprivation states after paroxetine (5 mg/kg). In neither experiment did we find any evidence of an effect of paroxetine on licking relative to water to any of the taste stimuli in the brief-access test at doses that decreased food intake. However, in some conditions, paroxetine decreased trials initiated to tastants. Therefore, a systemic increase in serotonin via paroxetine administration can decrease appetitive behavior in brief-access tests but is insufficient to alter taste-guided consummatory behavior. PMID:21422376

  12. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for Little and Big Lick creeks, Blackford and Delaware counties, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, James G.; Crawford, Charles G.; Wilber, William G.

    1980-01-01

    A digital computer model was used to predict alternatives for future waste loadings on Little Lick and Big Lick Creeks, Blackford and Delaware Counties, IN, that would be compatible with Indiana stream water-quality standards defined for two critical hydrologic conditions, summer and winter low flows. The model parameters included atmospheric reaeration, carbonaceous and nitrogenous biochemical-oxygen demand, and benthic-oxygen demand. The model was calibrated with data collected during three water-quality surveys at low flow. During these surveys, in-stream dissolved-oxygen concentrations averaged less than 3 mg/L, well below the State minimum requirement of 5.0 mg/L. The model indicated that these low concentrations were caused by high waste loadings, lack of dilution, low reaeration, and benthic-oxygen demand. The summer waste-assimilation study assumed that future reductions in discharge loadings would decrease carbonaceous and benthic decay and increase nitrogenous decay. This study indicated that projected effluent waste loads that would provide acceptable in-stream dissolved-oxygen concentrations are highly dependent on rates of nitrification. Ammonia toxicity became the limiting water-quality criterion at low nitrification rates. The winter waste-assimilation study indicated that projected dissolved-oxygen concentrations in Little Lick and Big Lick Creeks did not fall below the State standard. Owing to a lack of dilution, however, ammonia-nitrogen concentrations would violate in-stream toxicity standards in both Little Lick and Big Lick Creeks. (USGS)

  13. Quaternary chronostratigraphy and stable isotope paleoecology of Big Bone Lick, Kentucky, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankersley, Kenneth Barnett; Murari, Madhav Krishna; Crowley, Brooke E.; Owen, Lewis A.; Storrs, Glenn W.; Mortensen, Litsa

    2015-05-01

    Big Bone Lick (BBL) in northern Kentucky, USA has been a critical geologic site in the historical development of North American Quaternary vertebrate paleontology since the 1700s. Sedimentology, geoarcheology, paleontology, accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence dating, and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses were undertaken to develop a chronostratigraphy and history of erosion and deposition for the site to provide a foundation for understanding taphonomy, and species extinction and adaptation to periods of climatic and environmental change. Three geomorphic surfaces are recognized at BBL representing significant periods of floodplain aggradation since the last glacial maximum (26.5-19 ka) dating to the Oldest Dryas (Tazewell, 25-19 ka), the Older Dryas (Cary, 14-12 ka), and late Holocene (5 ka to the present). Unconformities suggest significant periods of degradation during the transitions from cold and dry to warm and moist climates from the Oldest Dryas (Tazewell) to Bølling Oscillation, from the Older Dryas (Cary) to the Allerød, and from the Younger Dryas (Valders) to the Holocene Climatic Optimum. Increased anthropogenic activities since ~ 5 ka may have increased soil upland erosion and floodplain aggradation. Stable isotopes demonstrate that the landscape has been dominated by C3 vegetation since the last glacial maximum.

  14. The Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2011: Reverberation Mapping of Markarian 50

    E-print Network

    Barth, A J; Thorman, S J; Bennert, V N; Sand, D J; Li, W; Canalizo, G; Filippenko, A V; Gates, E L; Greene, J E; Malkan, M A; Stern, D; Treu, T; Woo, J -H; Assef, R J; Bae, H -J; Brewer, B J; Buehler, T; Cenko, S B; Clubb, K I; Cooper, M C; Diamond-Stanic, A M; Hiner, K D; Hoenig, S F; Joner, M D; Kandrashoff, M T; Laney, C D; Lazarova, M S; Nierenberg, A M; Park, D; Silverman, J M; Son, D; Sonnenfeld, A; Tollerud, E J; Walsh, J L; Walters, R; da Silva, R L; Fumagalli, M; Gregg, M D; Harris, C E; Hsiao, E Y; Lee, J; Lopez, L; Rex, J; Suzuki, N; Trump, J R; Tytler, D; Worseck, G; Yesuf, H M

    2011-01-01

    The Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2011 observing campaign was carried out over the course of 11 weeks in Spring 2011. Here we present the first results from this program, a measurement of the broad-line reverberation lag in the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 50. Combining our data with supplemental observations obtained prior to the start of the main observing campaign, our dataset covers a total duration of 4.5 months. During this time, Mrk 50 was highly variable, exhibiting a maximum variability amplitude of a factor of 4 in the U-band continuum and a factor of 2 in the H-beta line. Using standard cross-correlation techniques, we find that H-beta and H-gamma lag the V-band continuum by tau_cen = 10.64(-0.93,+0.82) and 8.43(-1.28,+1.30) days, respectively, while the lag of He II 4686 is unresolved. The H-beta line exhibits a symmetric velocity-resolved reverberation signature with shorter lags in the high-velocity wings than in the line core, consistent with an origin in a broad-line region dominated by orbital motion r...

  15. The lick AGN monitoring project 2011: Fe II reverberation from the outer broad-line region

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Aaron J.; Cooper, Michael C.; Pancoast, Anna; Treu, Tommaso; Bennert, Vardha N.; Brewer, Brendon J.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Sand, David J.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto J.; Woo, Jong-Hak; Bae, Hyun-Jin; Buehler, Tabitha; and others

    2013-06-01

    The prominent broad Fe II emission blends in the spectra of active galactic nuclei have been shown to vary in response to continuum variations, but past attempts to measure the reverberation lag time of the optical Fe II lines have met with only limited success. Here we report the detection of Fe II reverberation in two Seyfert 1 galaxies, NGC 4593 and Mrk 1511, based on data from a program carried out at Lick Observatory in Spring 2011. Light curves for emission lines including H? and Fe II were measured by applying a fitting routine to decompose the spectra into several continuum and emission-line components, and we use cross-correlation techniques to determine the reverberation lags of the emission lines relative to V-band light curves. In both cases, the measured lag (?{sub cen}) of Fe II is longer than that of H?, although the inferred lags are somewhat sensitive to the choice of Fe II template used in the fit. For spectral decompositions done using the Fe II template of Véron-Cetty et al., we find ?{sub cen}(Fe II)/?{sub cen}(H?) = 1.9 ± 0.6 in NGC 4593 and 1.5 ± 0.3 in Mrk 1511. The detection of highly correlated variations between Fe II and continuum emission demonstrates that the Fe II emission in these galaxies originates in photoionized gas, located predominantly in the outer portion of the broad-line region.

  16. The Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2011: Spectroscopic Campaign and Emission-Line Light Curves

    E-print Network

    Barth, A J; Canalizo, G; Filippenko, A V; Gates, E L; Greene, J E; Li, W; Malkan, M A; Pancoast, A; Sand, D J; Stern, D; Treu, T; Woo, J -H; Assef, R J; Bae, H -J; Brewer, B J; Cenko, S B; Clubb, K I; Cooper, M C; Diamond-Stanic, A M; Hiner, K D; Hoenig, S F; Hsiao, E; Kandrashoff, M T; Lazarova, M S; Nierenberg, A M; Rex, J; Silverman, J M; Tollerud, E J; Walsh, J L

    2015-01-01

    In the Spring of 2011 we carried out a 2.5 month reverberation mapping campaign using the 3 m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory, monitoring 15 low-redshift Seyfert 1 galaxies. This paper describes the observations, reductions and measurements, and data products from the spectroscopic campaign. The reduced spectra were fitted with a multicomponent model in order to isolate the contributions of various continuum and emission-line components. We present light curves of broad emission lines and the AGN continuum, and measurements of the broad H-beta line widths in mean and root-mean square (rms) spectra. For the most highly variable AGNs we also measured broad H-beta line widths and velocity centroids from the nightly spectra. In four AGNs exhibiting the highest variability amplitudes, we detect anticorrelations between broad H-beta width and luminosity, demonstrating that the broad-line region "breathes" on short timescales of days to weeks in response to continuum variations. We also find that broad H-beta ve...

  17. Stability Analysis of the Planetary System Orbiting Upsilon Andromedae. 2; Simulations Using New Lick Observatory Fits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Rivera, Eugenio J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present results of long-term numerical orbital integrations designed to test the stability of the three-planet system orbiting upsilon Andromedae and short-term integrations to test whether mutual perturbations among the planets can be used to determine planetary masses. Our initial conditions are based on recent fits to the radial velocity data obtained by the planet search group at Lick Observatory. The new fits result in significantly more stable systems than did the initially announced planetary parameters. Our integrations using the 2000 February parameters show that if the system is nearly planar, then it is stable for at least 100 Myr for m(sub f) = 1/sin i less than or = 4. In some stable systems, the eccentricity of the inner planet experiences large oscillations. The relative periastra of the outer two planets' orbits librate about 0 deg. in most of the stable systems; if future observations imply that the periastron longitudes of these planets are very closely aligned at the present epoch, dynamical simulations may provide precise estimates for the masses and orbital inclinations of these two planets.

  18. Laser guide star measurements at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.; Avicola, K.; Bissinger, H.; Brase, J.; Duff, J.; Gavel, D.; Horton, J.; Max, C.; Olivier, S.; Rapp, D.; Salmon, T.; Smauley, D.; Waltjen, K.

    1993-02-01

    Recent studies from the Laser Guide Star Project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are presented. Photometry of the return signal has shown that the photon return is approximately 10 photons/cm{sup 2}ms at the pupil of the receiving telescope in agreement with a detailed model of the sodium interaction. Wavefronts of the laser guide star have also been measured with a Shack-Hartmann technique and power spectra have been shown to agree with those of nearby natural stars. Plans for closed loop demonstrations using the laser guide star at LLNL and nearby Lick Observatory are discussed.

  19. Searching for Planets Around other Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In this colloquim presentation, Professor of Astronomy, Geoffrey Marcy discusses the discovery of planets orbiting other stars. Using the Doppler shift caused by stellar wobble that is caused by nearby planetary mass, astronomers have been able to infer the existence of Jupiter-sized planets around other stars. Using a special spectrometer at Lick Observatory, the wobble of several stars have been traced over the years required to generate an accurate pattern required to infer the stellar wobble. Professor Marcy, discusses the findings of planets around 47 Ursae Majoris, 16 Cygni B, 51 Pegasus, and 56 Rho 1 Cne. In the case of 56 Rho 1 Cne the planet appears to be close to the star, within 1.5 astronomical units. The observations from the smaller Lick Observatory will be augmented by new observations from the larger telescope at the Kek observatory. This move will allow observations of smaller planets, as opposed to the massive planets thus far discovered. The astronomers also hope to observe smaller stars with the Kek data. Future spaceborne observations will allow the discovery of even smaller planets. A spaceborne interferometer is in the planning stages, and an even larger observatory, called the Terrestrial Planet Finder, is hoped for. Professor Marcy shows artists' renderings of two of the planets thus far discovered. He also briefly discusses planetary formation and shows slides of both observations from the Orion Nebula and models of stellar system formation.

  20. Measurement of the reaeration coefficients of the North Fork Licking River at Utica, Ohio by radioactive tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hren, Janet

    1983-01-01

    Reaeration coefficients of the North Fork Licking River at Utica, Ohio were measured by the radioactive-tracer method. The tests were conducted on a 2.1-mile reach on September 23 and October 7, 1981, during low-flow conditions. Krypton-85 gas and tritium were the radioopactive tracers, which were used in conjunction with rhodamine-WT dye. The reaertion coefficients determined on September 23 were 3.09 days-1 (subreach 1-2) and 3.32 days-1 (subreach 2-3). On October 7, the values were 2.04 days -1 and 2.23 days-1 respectively.

  1. Image improvement from a sodium-layer laser guide star adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C. E., LLNL

    1997-06-01

    A sodium-layer laser guide star beacon with high-order adaptive optics at Lick Observatory produced a factor of 2.4 intensity increase and a factor of 2 decrease in full width at half maximum for an astronomical point source, compared with image motion compensation alone. Image full widths at half maximum were identical for laser and natural guide stars (0.3 arc seconds). The Strehl ratio with the laser guide star was 65% of that with a natural guide star. This technique should allow ground-based telescopes to attain the diffraction limit, by correcting for atmospheric distortions.

  2. Ground-Water Data and Flow Directions in the Vicinity of Swamp Road, Licking County, Ohio, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dumouchelle, Denise H.

    2007-01-01

    The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is proposing to build a dry dam on the South Fork Licking River to mitigate flood impacts. Concerns have been raised regarding the effects of impounded floodwaters on ground-water conditions in the Swamp Road neighborhood. To obtain a better understanding of existing ground-water conditions, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the NRCS, installed three monitoring wells and collected ground-water-quality samples on two occasions from these and four residential wells. In addition, transducers were placed in these seven wells to obtain hourly water-level measurements from August, 2006 to early March, 2007. Intermittent water levels also were measured in another seven residential wells in the area. Water-quality samples were collected in September 2006 and January 2007. Samples were analyzed for nutrients, inorganic elements, and fecal-indicator bacteria. In general, the ground-water quality was very hard with large iron concentrations of 1,700 ?g/L and above. Although the aquifer underlying the Swamp Road area is confined, the continuous water-level records indicate a rapid response to precipitation. Comparison of the well hydrographs with the stage hydrograph for the nearby South Fork Licking River indicates a hydraulic connection between the river and the aquifer. In the vicinity of Swamp Road, the ground-water-flow direction was southeast during the duration of the study. The ground-water-level elevations were above the planned maximum elevation for water impounded by the dam, thus the impounded floodwater should have minimal impact on ground-water conditions along Swamp Road.

  3. T1R2 and T1R3 subunits are individually unnecessary for normal affective licking responses to Polycose: implications for saccharide taste receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Treesukosol, Yada; Blonde, Ginger D; Spector, Alan C

    2009-04-01

    The T1R2 and T1R3 proteins are expressed in taste receptor cells and form a heterodimer binding with compounds described as sweet by humans. We examined whether Polycose taste might be mediated through this heterodimer by testing T1R2 knockout (KO) and T1R3 KO mice and their wild-type (WT) littermate controls in a series of brief-access taste tests (25-min sessions with 5-s trials). Sucrose, Na-saccharin, and Polycose were each tested for three consecutive sessions with order of presentation varied among subgroups in a Latin-Square manner. Both KO groups displayed blunted licking responses and initiated significantly fewer trials of sucrose and Na-saccharin across a range of concentrations. KO mice tested after Polycose exposure demonstrated some degree of concentration-dependent licking of sucrose, likely attributable to learning related to prior postingestive experience. These results are consistent with prior findings in the literature, implicating the T1R2+3 heterodimer as the principal taste receptor for sweet-tasting ligands, and also provide support for the potential of postingestive experience to influence responding in the KO mice. In contrast, T1R2 KO and T1R3 KO mice displayed concentration-dependent licking responses to Polycose that tracked those of their WT controls and in some cases licked midrange concentrations more; the number of Polycose trials initiated overall did not differ between KO and WT mice. Thus, the T1R2 and T1R3 proteins are individually unnecessary for normal concentration-dependent licking of Polycose to be expressed in a brief-access test. Whether at least one of these T1R protein subunits is necessary for normal Polycose responsiveness remains untested. Alternatively, there may be a novel taste receptor(s) that mediates polysaccharide taste. PMID:19158407

  4. BINARIES AMONG DEBRIS DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, David R.; Zuckerman, B.

    2012-02-01

    We have gathered a sample of 112 main-sequence stars with known debris disks. We collected published information and performed adaptive optics observations at Lick Observatory to determine if these debris disks are associated with binary or multiple stars. We discovered a previously unknown M-star companion to HD 1051 at a projected separation of 628 AU. We found that 25% {+-} 4% of our debris disk systems are binary or triple star systems, substantially less than the expected {approx}50%. The period distribution for these suggests a relative lack of systems with 1-100 AU separations. Only a few systems have blackbody disk radii comparable to the binary/triple separation. Together, these two characteristics suggest that binaries with intermediate separations of 1-100 AU readily clear out their disks. We find that the fractional disk luminosity, as a proxy for disk mass, is generally lower for multiple systems than for single stars at any given age. Hence, for a binary to possess a disk (or form planets) it must either be a very widely separated binary with disk particles orbiting a single star or it must be a small separation binary with a circumbinary disk.

  5. The remote-controlled spectrograph, area scanner, and spectropolarimeter for the Lick 3-m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. S.; Robinson, L. B.; Schmidt, G. D.

    1980-10-01

    A Cassegrain spectrograph used in conjunction with an image-tube, image-dissector scanner (ITS) is discussed with reference to its design features and operation. The spectrograph has a remote control feature, and its parameters, such as slit width, decker position, filter selection, focus, and grating selection, can be easily changed by computer command or a hard-wired control box. The discussion also includes the area scanner modification which allows raster scanning and limited picture taking. Finally, the design of a two-channel polarization analyzer is presented which allows simultaneous sky and sky-plus-star observations and faint-object polarimetry.

  6. Chromospheric CaII Emission in Nearby F, G, K, and M stars

    E-print Network

    Jason T. Wright; Geoffrey W. Marcy; R. Paul Butler; Steve S. Vogt

    2004-02-24

    We present chromospheric CaII activity measurements, rotation periods and ages for ~1200 F-, G-, K-, and M- type main-sequence stars from ~18,000 archival spectra taken at Keck and Lick Observatories as a part of the California and Carnegie Planet Search Project. We have calibrated our chromospheric S values against the Mount Wilson chromospheric activity data. From these measurements we have calculated median activity levels and derived R'HK, stellar ages, and rotation periods for 1228 stars, ~1000 of which have no previously published S values. We also present precise time series of activity measurements for these stars.

  7. Chromospheric CaII Emission in Nearby F, G, K, and M stars

    E-print Network

    Wright, J T; Butler, R P; Vogt, S S; Wright, Jason T.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Vogt, Steve S.

    2004-01-01

    We present chromospheric CaII activity measurements, rotation periods and ages for ~1200 F-, G-, K-, and M- type main-sequence stars from ~18,000 archival spectra taken at Keck and Lick Observatories as a part of the California and Carnegie Planet Search Project. We have calibrated our chromospheric S values against the Mount Wilson chromospheric activity data. From these measurements we have calculated median activity levels and derived R'HK, stellar ages, and rotation periods for 1228 stars, ~1000 of which have no previously published S values. We also present precise time series of activity measurements for these stars.

  8. Pairs and Groups of Genetically Related Long-Period Comets and Probable Identity of the Mysterious Lick Object of 1921

    E-print Network

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    We present the history of investigation of the dynamical properties of pairs and groups of genetically related long-period comets (other than the Kreutz sungrazing system). Members of a comet pair or group move in nearly identical orbits and their origin as fragments of a common parent comet is unquestionable. The only variable is the time of perihelion passage, which differs from member to member considerably due primarily to an orbital-momentum increment acquired during breakup. Meter-per-second separation velocities account for gaps of years or tens of years, thanks to the orbital periods of many millennia. The physical properties of individual members may not at all be alike, as illustrated by the trio of C/1988 A1, C/1996 Q1, and C/2015 F3. We exploit orbital similarity to examine whether the celebrated and as yet unidentified object, discovered from the Lick Observatory near the Sun at sunset on 1921 August 7, happened to be a member of such a pair and to track down the long-period comet to which it cou...

  9. RESULTS OF THE LICK OBSERVATORY SUPERNOVA SEARCH FOLLOW-UP PHOTOMETRY PROGRAM: BVRI LIGHT CURVES OF 165 TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Li Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Anderson, Carmen; Foster, Griffin; Griffith, Christopher V.; Joubert, Niels; Leja, Joel; Macomber, Brent; Pritchard, Tyler; Thrasher, Patrick; Winslow, Dustin; Gates, Elinor L.; Grigsby, Bryant J.; Lowe, Thomas B.

    2010-10-15

    We present BVRI light curves of 165 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search follow-up photometry program from 1998 through 2008. Our light curves are typically well sampled (cadence of 3-4 days) with an average of 21 photometry epochs. We describe our monitoring campaign and the photometry reduction pipeline that we have developed. Comparing our data set to that of Hicken et al., with which we have 69 overlapping supernovae (SNe), we find that as an ensemble the photometry is consistent, with only small overall systematic differences, although individual SNe may differ by as much as 0.1 mag, and occasionally even more. Such disagreement in specific cases can have significant implications for combining future large data sets. We present an analysis of our light curves which includes template fits of light-curve shape parameters useful for calibrating SNe Ia as distance indicators. Assuming the B - V color of SNe Ia at 35 days past maximum light can be presented as the convolution of an intrinsic Gaussian component and a decaying exponential attributed to host-galaxy reddening, we derive an intrinsic scatter of {sigma} = 0.076 {+-} 0.019 mag, consistent with the Lira-Phillips law. This is the first of two papers, the second of which will present a cosmological analysis of the data presented herein.

  10. Sodium Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics Imaging Polarimetry of Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, M D; Graham, J R; Lloyd, J P; Kalas, P; Gates, E L; Gavel, D T; Pennington, D M; Max, C E

    2004-01-08

    The future of high-resolution ground-based optical and infrared astronomy requires the successful implementation of laser guide star adaptive optics systems. We present the first science results from the Lick Observatory sodium beacon laser guide star system. By coupling this system to a near-infrared (J;H;Ks bands) dual-channel imaging polarimeter, we achieve very high sensitivity to light scattered in the circumstellar enviroment of Herbig Ae/Be stars on scales of 100-300 AU. Observations of LkH{alpha} 198 reveal a highly polarized, biconical nebula 10 arcseconds in diameter (6000 AU) . We also observe a polarized jet-like feature associated with the deeply embedded source LkH{alpha} 198-IR. The star LkH{alpha} 233 presents a narrow, unpolarized dark lane dividing its characteristic butterfly-shaped polarized reflection nebulosity. This linear structure is oriented perpendicular to an optical jet and bipolar cavity and is consistent with the presence of an optically thick circumstellar disk blocking our direct view of the star. These data suggest that the evolutionary picture developed for the lower-mass T Tauri stars is also relevant to the Herbig Ae/Be stars and demonstrate the ability of laser guide star adaptive optics systems to obtain scientific results competitive with natural guide star adaptive optics or space-based telescopes.

  11. Performance of MEMS-based visible-light adaptive optics at Lick Observatory: closed- and open-loop control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzinski, Katie; Johnson, Luke C.; Gavel, Donald T.; Grigsby, Bryant; Dillon, Daren; Reinig, Marc; Macintosh, Bruce A.

    2010-07-01

    At the University of California's Lick Observatory, we have implemented an on-sky testbed for next-generation adaptive optics (AO) technologies. The Visible-Light Laser Guidestar Experiments instrument (ViLLaGEs) includes visible-light AO, a micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) deformable mirror, and open-loop control of said MEMS on the 1-meter Nickel telescope at Mt. Hamilton. (Open-loop in this sense refers to the MEMS being separated optically from the wavefront sensing path; the MEMS is still included in the control loop.) Future upgrades include predictive control with wind estimation and pyramid wavefront sensing. Our unique optical layout allows the wavefronts along the open- and closed-loop paths to be measured simultaneously, facilitating comparison between the two control methods. In this paper we evaluate the performance of ViLLaGEs in openand closed-loop control, finding that both control methods give equivalent Strehl ratios of up to ~ 7% in I-band and similar rejection of temporal power. Therefore, we find that open-loop control of MEMS on-sky is as effective as closed-loop control. Furthermore, after operating the system for three years, we find MEMS technology to function well in the observatory environment. We construct an error budget for the system, accounting for 130 nm of wavefront error out of 190 nm error in the science-camera PSFs. We find that the dominant known term is internal static error, and that the known contributions to the error budget from open-loop control (MEMS model, position repeatability, hysteresis, and WFS linearity) are negligible.

  12. Precise radial velocities of giant stars VIII. Testing for the presence of planets with CRIRES Infrared Radial Velocities

    E-print Network

    Trifonov, Trifon; Zechmeister, Mathias; Reiners, Ansgar; Quirrenbach, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We have been monitoring 373 very bright (V nonradial stellar pulsations or rotating stellar features, such as spots, could effectively mimic a planetary signal in the radial velocity data. Our goal is to compare optical and infrared radial velocities for those stars with periodic radial velocity patterns and to test for consistency of their fitted radial velocity semiamplitudes. Thereby, we distinguish processes intrinsic to the star from orbiting companions as reason for the radial velocity periodicity observed in the optical. Stellar spectra with high spectral resolution have been taken in the H-band with the CRIRES near-infrared spectrograph at ESO's VLT for 20 stars of our Lick survey. Radial velo...

  13. Xenon in Mercury-Manganese Stars

    E-print Network

    M. M. Dworetsky; J. L. Persaud; K. Patel

    2008-01-16

    Previous studies of elemental abundances in Mercury-Manganese (HgMn) stars have occasionally reported the presence of lines of the ionized rare noble gas Xe II, especially in a few of the hottest stars with Teff ~ 13000--15000 K. A new study of this element has been undertaken using observations from Lick Observatory's Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph. In this work, the spectrum synthesis program UCLSYN has been used to undertake abundance analysis assuming LTE. We find that in the Smith & Dworetsky sample of HgMn stars, Xe is vastly over-abundant in 21 of 22 HgMn stars studied, by factors of 3.1--4.8 dex. There does not appear to be a significant correlation of Xe abundance with Teff. A comparison sample of normal late B stars shows no sign of Xe II lines that could be detected, consistent with the expected weakness of lines at normal abundance. The main reason for the previous lack of widespread detection in HgMn stars is probably due to the strongest lines being at longer wavelengths than the photographic blue. The lines used in this work were 4603.03A, 4844.33A and 5292.22A.

  14. Old, Rich, and Eccentric: Two Jovian Planets Orbiting Evolved Metal-Rich Stars

    E-print Network

    Peek, Kathryn M G; Fischer, Debra A; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Henry, Gregory W; Howard, Andrew W; Wright, Jason T; Lowe, Thomas B; Reffert, Sabine; Schwab, Christian; Williams, Peter K G; Isaacson, Howard; Giguere, Matthew J

    2009-01-01

    We present Doppler radial velocity measurements of two stars observed as part of the Lick Subgiants Planet Search and the Keck N2K survey. Variations in the radial velocities of both stars reveal the presence of Jupiter-mass exoplanets in highly eccentric orbits. HD 16175 is a G0 subgiant from the Lick Subgiants Planet Search, orbited by a planet having a minimum mass of 4.4 M_Jup, in an eccentric (e = 0.59), 2.71-yr orbit. HD 96167 is a G5 subgiant from the N2K ("Next 2000") program at Keck Observatory, orbited by a planet having a minimum mass of 0.68 M_Jup, in an eccentric (e = 0.71), 1.366-yr orbit. Both stars are relatively massive (M_star = 1.3 M_sun) and are very metal rich ([Fe/H] > +0.3). We describe our methods for measuring the stars' radial velocity variations and photometric stability.

  15. Desing of a Laser Guide Star System for the Keck II Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.W.; Erbert, G.V.; Kuklo, T.; Thompson, G.R.; Wong, N.J.; Gavel, D.T.; Salmon, J.T.; Feldman, M.

    1997-09-11

    A laser guide star system similar to that deployed at the Lick Observatory has been designed for the Keck II 10 m telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The subaperature size on the primary is comparable to that at Lick, and at the same observational wavelength centered about the K band, so that the average power requirements of the laser system are also comparable, at about 20 W. One major difference is that the seeing at Mauna Kea is about a factor of two better than at Lick so that the spot diameter requirements are smaller and this can give rise to reduced back scatter resulting from saturation effects in the sodium layer. To reduce the peak flux in the sodium layer and obtain a smaller spot diameter, the output beam diameter has been increased along with the repetition rate of the laser. As with the Lick laser system, a dye laser is pumped by a series of frequency doubled YAG lasers which are remotely located and coupled to the dye laser on the telescope by optical fibers. The laser system has a full set of beam control optics as well as launch telescope and safety systems. A computer system couples the laser system to the User Interface and Supervisory Control system of the main telescope. The laser system is due to be shipped to Keck during the fall of 1997 where it will be integrated with the telescope at Mauna Kea. The Adaptive Optics and Optics Bench systems will be integrated first and be ready for integration with the laser in the summer of 1998. 1 ref., 8 figs.

  16. The Lick-Carnegie exoplanet survey: Gliese 687 b—A Neptune-mass planet orbiting a nearby red dwarf

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, Jennifer; Vogt, Steven S.; Hanson, Russell; Rivera, Eugenio J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Meschiari, Stefano; Henry, Gregory W.

    2014-07-10

    Precision radial velocities from the Automated Planet Finder (APF) and Keck/HIRES reveal an Msin (i) = 18 ± 2 M{sub ?} planet orbiting the nearby M3V star GJ 687. This planet has an orbital period P = 38.14 days and a low orbital eccentricity. Our Strömgren b and y photometry of the host star suggests a stellar rotation signature with a period of P = 60 days. The star is somewhat chromospherically active, with a spot filling factor estimated to be several percent. The rotationally induced 60 day signal, however, is well separated from the period of the radial velocity variations, instilling confidence in the interpretation of a Keplerian origin for the observed velocity variations. Although GJ 687 b produces relatively little specific interest in connection with its individual properties, a compelling case can be argued that it is worthy of remark as an eminently typical, yet at a distance of 4.52 pc, a very nearby representative of the galactic planetary census. The detection of GJ 687 b indicates that the APF telescope is well suited to the discovery of low-mass planets orbiting low-mass stars in the as yet relatively un-surveyed region of the sky near the north celestial pole.

  17. Pasteurella multocida non-native joint infection after a dog lick: A case report describing a complicated two-stage revision and a comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Philip W, Lam; Page, Andrea V

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are commonly caused by pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci; however, other microbial etiologies and specific risk factors are increasingly recognized. Pasteurella multocida is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that is part of the normal oral flora in many animals, and is particularly common in dogs and cats. PJIs caused by P multocida have been reported only rarely in the literature and typically occur in the context of an animal bite or scratch. The present article describes a P multocida joint infection that occurred after a dog lick and complicated a two-stage revision arthroplasty. A comprehensive review of the literature regarding P multocida PJIs follows. PMID:26361490

  18. Variations in Maternal Behavior in C57BL/6J Mice: Behavioral Comparisons between Adult Offspring of High and Low Pup-Licking Mothers.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Cort A; Vadlamudi, Sivaramprasad; Boccia, Maria L; Moy, Sheryl S

    2011-01-01

    The amount of maternal licking received by newborn rats affects their adult stress reactivity and maternal behavior. Mouse studies in which litters were cross-fostered between strains that exhibit high vs. low amounts of maternal behavior also suggest that rearing conditions affect adult outcomes. The current study is the first to compare within a single mouse strain (C57BL/6J) behavioral responses between adult animals reared by mothers that exhibited frequencies of pup-licking (PL) at the high end and the low end of the normal distribution within the strain. Maternal behaviors were coded during 10-s intervals every 3?min during five 1-h periods (two light, three dark cycle) on postpartum days 2, 4, 6, and 8 in 36 unrelated C57BL/6J mothers. The distribution of mean frequencies/h for PL, still crouched nursing, hovering over pups, self-grooming, and no contact with pups were determined. Offspring (6-12?weeks of age) from the eight mothers who exhibited the highest mean frequencies of PL and the seven mothers who exhibited the lowest PL frequencies underwent the following tests over three consecutive weeks: (1) elevated plus-maze (EPM) and 1-h open field on three successive days, (2) 3-h open field with an acute stressor (IP saline injection) at the 1-h time point, and (3) acoustic startle and prepulse inhibition. Females reared by low PL mothers exhibited significantly more time in the closed arms of the EPM, less locomotion, center time, and rearing during the first test in the open field, greater reactivity to an acute stressor, and reduced prepulse inhibition, an index of sensorimotor gating. Male offspring from low PL dams had reduced reactivity to an acute stressor, but no other altered performance in the behavioral tests. PL frequencies of C57BL/6J mothers appear to selectively alter behavior outcomes, primarily in female offspring. PMID:21808624

  19. PRECISE DOPPLER MONITORING OF BARNARD'S STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jieun; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard; McCarthy, Chris; Fischer, Debra A.; Johnson, John A.; Wright, Jason T.

    2013-02-20

    We present 248 precise Doppler measurements of Barnard's Star (Gl 699), the second nearest star system to Earth, obtained from Lick and Keck Observatories during the 25 years between 1987 and 2012. The early precision was 20 m s{sup -1} but was 2 m s{sup -1} during the last 8 years, constituting the most extensive and sensitive search for Doppler signatures of planets around this stellar neighbor. We carefully analyze the 136 Keck radial velocities spanning 8 years by first applying a periodogram analysis to search for nearly circular orbits. We find no significant periodic Doppler signals with amplitudes above {approx}2 m s{sup -1}, setting firm upper limits on the minimum mass (Msin i) of any planets with orbital periods from 0.1 to 1000 days. Using a Monte Carlo analysis for circular orbits, we determine that planetary companions to Barnard's Star with masses above 2 M {sub Circled-Plus} and periods below 10 days would have been detected. Planets with periods up to 2 years and masses above 10 M {sub Circled-Plus} (0.03 M {sub Jup}) are also ruled out. A similar analysis allowing for eccentric orbits yields comparable mass limits. The habitable zone of Barnard's Star appears to be devoid of roughly Earth-mass planets or larger, save for face-on orbits. Previous claims of planets around the star by van de Kamp are strongly refuted. The radial velocity of Barnard's Star increases with time at 4.515 {+-} 0.002 m s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, consistent with the predicted geometrical effect, secular acceleration, that exchanges transverse for radial components of velocity.

  20. Van Gogh's Starry Nights, Lincoln's Moon, Shakespeare's Stars, and More: Tales of Astronomy in Art, History, and Literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Donald W.

    2009-01-01

    How do astronomical methods make it possible to calculate dates and times for Vincent van Gogh's night-sky paintings? Why is there a blood-red sky in Edvard Munch's The Scream? How can the 18.6-year cycle of the lunar nodes and the Moon's declination on the night of August 29-30, 1857, explain a long-standing mystery about Abraham Lincoln's honesty in the murder case known as the almanac trial? Why is a bright star described in Act 1, Scene 1, of Hamlet? There is a long tradition of astronomical methods employed to analyze works of art, to understand historical events, and to elucidate passages in literature. Both Edmond Halley and George Biddell Airy calculated lunar phases and tide tables in attempts to determine the landing beach where Julius Caesar invaded Britain in 55 B.C. Henry Norris Russell computed configurations of Jupiter and Saturn to determine a date for a 14th-century celestial event mentioned in Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde. In this tradition, our Texas State group has published a series of articles in Sky & Telescope over the last two decades, applying astronomy to art, history, and literature. Don Osterbrock worked with us 3 years ago when my students and I calculated dates for moonrise photographs taken by Ansel Adams in Yosemite National Park. The peaks of the Sierra Nevada crest in Yosemite are more than 125 miles from Lick Observatory, but the mountains can become visible from Lick on clear winter days and were photographed from there on early infrared-sensitive plates during the 1920s and 1930s. As we tested our topographic software by identifying the peaks that appear in the Lick plates, it was a pleasure to come to know Don, a former director of Lick Observatory and the person in whose honor this talk is dedicated.

  1. Precise radial velocities of giant stars. VIII. Testing for the presence of planets with CRIRES infrared radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, Trifon; Reffert, Sabine; Zechmeister, Mathias; Reiners, Ansgar; Quirrenbach, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Context. We have been monitoring 373 very bright (V ? 6 mag) G and K giants with high precision optical Doppler spectroscopy for more than a decade at Lick Observatory. Our goal was to discover planetary companions around those stars and to better understand planet formation and evolution around intermediate-mass stars. However, in principle, long-term, g-mode nonradial stellar pulsations or rotating stellar features, such as spots, could effectively mimic a planetary signal in the radial velocity data. Aims: Our goal is to compare optical and infrared radial velocities for those stars with periodic radial velocity patterns and to test for consistency of their fitted radial velocity semiamplitudes. Thereby, we distinguish processes intrinsic to the star from orbiting companions as reason for the radial velocity periodicity observed in the optical. Methods: Stellar spectra with high spectral resolution have been taken in the H-band with the CRIRES near-infrared spectrograph at ESO's VLT for 20 stars of our Lick survey. Radial velocities are derived using many deep and stable telluric CO2 lines for precise wavelength calibration. Results: We find that the optical and near-infrared radial velocities of the giant stars in our sample are consistent. We present detailed results for eight stars in our sample previously reported to have planets or brown dwarf companions. All eight stars passed the infrared test. Conclusions: We conclude that the planet hypothesis provides the best explanation for the periodic radial velocity patterns observed for these giant stars. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under program IDs 088.D-0132, 089.D-0186, 090.D-0155 and 091.D-0365.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. The Evolving Mixture of Barium Isotopes in Milky Way Halo Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Zareen; Kirby, E. N.; Guhathakurta, P.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals in stars form through one of two types of neutron capture processes: the rapid r-process or slower s-process. The fraction of odd and even barium isotopes in stars can indicate which process predominantly contributed to a star’s heavy metals, since odd barium isotopes predominantly form through the r-process and even barium isotopes through the s-process. The “stellar model” predicts that older stars contain comparable amounts of odd and even barium isotopes, while the “classical model” states that they almost exclusively contain odd isotopes. This study investigated these competing models by analyzing high-resolution spectra of twelve Milky Way stars. These spectra were analyzed for the first time in this study. To quantify r- and s-process enrichment, we measured the odd barium isotope fraction in the stars by fitting models to the stars’ spectra. Generating models involved measuring the stars’ Doppler shift, resolution, and barium abundance. To reduce error margins we optimized resolution and barium abundance measurements by enhancing existing techniques through several rounds of revisions. Our results support the stellar model of heavy metal enrichment, and our proposed optimizations will enable future researchers to obtain a deeper understanding of chemical enrichment in the Universe. This research was supported by the Science Internship Program at the University of California Santa Cruz, Lick Observatory, and the National Science Foundation.

  3. The StarScan Plate Measuring Machine: Overview and Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, N.; Winter, L.; Holdenried, E. R.; de Cuyper, J.-P.; Rafferty, T. J.; Wycoff, G. L.

    2008-05-01

    The StarScan machine at the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) completed measuring photographic astrograph plates to allow determination of proper motions for the USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC) program. All applicable 1940 AGK2 plates, about 2200 Hamburg Zone Astrograph plates, 900 Black Birch (USNO Twin Astrograph) plates, and 300 Lick Astrograph plates have been measured. StarScan comprises a CCD camera, a telecentric lens, an air-bearing granite table, stepper motor screws, and Heidenhain scales to operate in a step-stare mode. The repeatability of StarScan measures is about 0.2 ?m. The CCD mapping as well as the global table coordinate system has been calibrated using a special dot calibration plate and the overall accuracy of StarScan y data is derived to be 0.5 ?m. Application to real photographic plate data shows that position information of at least 0.65 ?m accuracy can be extracted from coarse-grain 103a-type emulsion astrometric plates. Transformations between "direct" and "reverse" measures of fine-grain emulsion plate measures are obtained on the 0.3 ?m level per well-exposed stellar image and coordinate, a level that is at the limit of the StarScan machine.

  4. Strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, Charles; Farhi, Edward; Olinto, Angela

    1986-01-01

    Strange matter, a form of quark matter that is postulated to be absolute stable, may be the true ground stage of the hadrons. If this hypothesis is correct, neutron stars may convert to 'strange stars'. The mass-radius relation for strange stars is very different from that of neutron stars; there is no minimum mass, and for mass of 1 solar mass or less, mass is proportional to the cube of the radius. For masses between 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses, the radii of strange stars are about 10 km, as for neutron stars. Strange stars may have an exposed quark surface, which is capable of radiating at rates greatly exceeding the Eddington limit, but has a low emissivity for X-ray photons. The stars may have a thin crust with the same composition as the preneutron drip outer layer of a conventional neutron star crust. Strange stars cool efficiently via neutrino emission.

  5. THE LICK-CARNEGIE EXOPLANET SURVEY: A URANUS-MASS FOURTH PLANET FOR GJ 876 IN AN EXTRASOLAR LAPLACE CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Eugenio J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Vogt, Steven S.; Meschiari, Stefano; Haghighipour, Nader

    2010-08-10

    Continued radial velocity (RV) monitoring of the nearby M4V red dwarf star GJ 876 with Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph has revealed the presence of a Uranus-mass fourth planetary companion in the system. The new planet has a mean period of P{sub e} = 126.6 days (over the 12.6-year baseline of the RV observations), and a minimum mass of m{sub e} sin i{sub e} = 12.9 {+-} 1.7 M {sub +}. The detection of the new planet has been enabled by significant improvements to our RV data set for GJ 876. The data have been augmented by 36 new high-precision measurements taken over the past five years. In addition, the precision of all of the Doppler measurements have been significantly improved by the incorporation of a high signal-to-noise template spectrum for GJ 876 into the analysis pipeline. Implementation of the new template spectrum improves the internal rms errors for the velocity measurements taken during 1998-2005 from 4.1 m s{sup -1} to 2.5 m s{sup -1}. Self-consistent, N-body fits to the RV data set show that the four-planet system has an invariable plane with an inclination relative to the plane of the sky of i = 59.{sup 0}5. The fit is not significantly improved by the introduction of a mutual inclination between the planets 'b' and 'c', but the new data do confirm a non-zero eccentricity, e{sub d} = 0.207 {+-} 0.055 for the innermost planet, 'd'. In our best-fit coplanar model, the mass of the new component is m{sub e} = 14.6 {+-} 1.7 M {sub +}. Our best-fitting model places the new planet in a three-body resonance with the previously known giant planets (which have mean periods of P{sub c} = 30.4 and P{sub b} = 61.1 days). The critical argument, {psi}{sub Laplace} = {lambda} {sub c} - 3{lambda} {sub b} + 2{lambda} {sub e}, for the Laplace resonance librates with an amplitude of {Delta}{psi}{sub Laplace} = 40{sup 0} {+-} 13{sup 0} about {psi}{sub Laplace} = 0{sup 0}. Numerical integration indicates that the four-planet system is stable for at least a billion years (at least for the coplanar cases). This resonant configuration of three giant planets orbiting an M dwarf primary differs from the well-known Laplace configuration of the three inner Galilean satellites of Jupiter, which are executing very small librations about {psi}{sub Laplace} = 180{sup 0} and which never experience triple conjunctions. The GJ 876 system, by contrast, comes close to a triple conjunction between the outer three planets once per every orbit of the outer planet, 'e'.

  6. Stars and Star Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  7. Spectrophotometry of 237 Stars in 7 Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, Lori; Burstein, David

    1997-08-01

    Spectrophotometry is presented for 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M39. The observations were taken by Lee McDonald and David Burstein using the Wampler single-channel scanner on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. Sixteen bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwidths 32Angstroms, 48 Angstroms or 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes-Latham system to mutual accuracy of 0.016 mag per passband. The accuracy of the spectrophotometry is assessed in three ways on a star-by-star basis. First, comparisons are made with previously published spectrophotometry for 19 stars observed in common. Second, (B-V) colors and uvby colors are compared for 236 stars and 221 stars, respectively. Finally, comparsions are made for 200 main sequence stars to the spectral synthesis models of Kurucz, fixing log g = 4.0 and [Fe/H] = 0.0, and only varying effective temperature. The accuracy of tests using uvby colors and the Kurucz models are shown to track each other closely, yielding an accuracy estimate (1 sigma ) of 0.01 mag for the 13 colors formed from bandpasses longward of the Balmer jump, and 0.02 mag for the 3 colors formed from the three bandpasses below the Balmer jump. In contrast, larger scatter is found relative to the previously published spectrophotometry of Bohm-Vitense & Johnson (16 stars in common) and Gunn & Stryker (3 stars). We also show that the scatter in the fits of the spectrophotometric colors and the uvby filter colors is a reasonable way to identify the observations of which specific stars are accurate to 1 sigma , 2 sigma , .... As such, the residuals from both the filter color fits and the Kurucz model fits are tabulated for each star where it was possible to make a comparison, so users of these data can choose stars according to the accuracy of the data that is appropriate to their needs. The very good agreement between the models and these data verifies the accuracy of these data, and also verifies the usefulness of the Kurucz models to define spectrophotometry for stars in this temperature range (>5000 K). These data define accurate spectrophotometry of bright, open cluster stars that can be used as a secondary flux calibration for CCD-based spectrophotometric surveys.

  8. Analysis of transcriptional levels of the oxytocin receptor in different areas of the central nervous system and behaviors in high and low licking rats.

    PubMed

    Ruthschilling, Carina Anicet; Albiero, Gabriela; Lazzari, Virgínia Meneghini; Becker, Roberta Oriques; de Moura, Ana Carolina; Lucion, Aldo Bolten; Almeida, Silvana; Veiga, Ana Beatriz Gorini da; Giovenardi, Márcia

    2012-03-01

    The natural variation in maternal care is an interesting model to analyze the physiological mechanisms that lead to differences in the mother-infant interaction. Several studies have shown differences in the expression of brain receptors such as the dopamine, estrogen and oxytocin receptors in areas classically involved in the onset and/or maintenance of maternal behavior: the medial preoptic area, the nucleus accumbens, the amygdala, the lateral septum, and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. The present study examined the responses of HL and LL rats in several behavioral tests and analyzes the transcription of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) in the olfactory bulb (OB), the prefrontal cortex (FPC), the hippocampus (HP) and the striatum (ST) in different patterns of licking behavior. Our results showed that, in the second week postpartum, HL and LL mothers did not show behavioral differences in the elevated plus maze (EPM), the forced swimming test (FST) or the open field test. In the maternal aggressive behavior test, HL females showed a higher frequency of biting compared to LL females, but no significant differences in other aggressive behaviors were detected. LL mothers had higher levels of transcriptional OXTR in the OB and in the HP when compared to HL mothers. No differences in other areas were detected when compared LL and HL. These findings suggest that variations in maternal behavior may be associated with biting behavior of mothers and that OXTR participates in modulation of maternal behavior in rats, while other emotional behaviors are less related to such behavior. PMID:22178314

  9. Pulsating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.

    2015-03-01

    This book surveys our understanding of stars which change in brightness because they pulsate. Pulsating variable stars are keys to distance scales inside and beyond the Milky Way galaxy. They test our understanding not only of stellar pulsation theory but also of stellar structure and evolution theory. Moreover, pulsating stars are important probes of the formation and evolution of our own and neighboring galaxies. Our understanding of pulsating stars has greatly increased in recent years as large-scale surveys of pulsating stars in the Milky Way and other Local Group galaxies have provided a wealth of new observations and as space-based instruments have studied particular pulsating stars in unprecedented detail.

  10. A survey of the central-star characteristics of mostly faint planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, L. H.; Keyes, C. D.

    1985-12-01

    From a survey of 70 planetary nebulae whose spectra have been studied with the image-tube scanner (ITS) at the Shane 3-m telescope of Lick Observatory, the authors assess the characteristics of the central stars. About two dozen appear to have central stars with continuous spectra; a slightly large number is classified as weak-emission-line objects with N III, C III, and C IV lines; seven are of the Wolf-Rayet type. Most of the observed objects lie in the direction of the galactic bulge; the others were scattered in galactic longitude to the anticenter. There appears to be no evidence for a systematic concentration of the types with respect to galactic longitude.

  11. Super-solar metallicity in G0-G3 main sequence stars with V$<$15

    E-print Network

    López-Valdivia, R; Chávez, M; Tapia-Schiavon, C; Hernández-Águila, J B; Valdés, J R; Chavushyan, V

    2014-01-01

    The basic stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity and global metallicity) were simultaneously determined for a sample of 233 stars, limited in magnitude ($VG3 and luminosity class V (main sequence). The analysis was based on spectroscopic observations collected at the Observatorio Astrof\\'isico Guillermo Haro and using a set of Lick-like indices defined in the spectral range of 3800-4800 \\AA. An extensive set of indices computed in a grid of theoretical spectra was used as a comparison tool in order to determine the photospheric parameters. The method was validated by matching the results from spectra of the asteroids Vesta and Ceres with the Sun parameters. The main results were: i) the photospheric parameters were determined for the first time for 213 objects in our sample; ii) a sample of 20 new super metal-rich stars candidates was found.

  12. Supersolar metallicity in G0-G3 main-sequence stars with V < 15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Valdivia, R.; Bertone, E.; Chávez, M.; Tapia-Schiavon, C.; Hernández-Águila, J. B.; Valdés, J. R.; Chavushyan, V.

    2014-11-01

    The basic stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity and global metallicity) were determined simultaneously for a sample of 233 stars, limited in magnitude (V < 15), with spectral types between G0 and G3 and luminosity class V (main sequence). The analysis was based on spectroscopic observations collected at the Observatorio Astrofísico Guillermo Haro and using a set of Lick-like indices defined in the spectral range 3800-4800 Å. An extensive set of indices computed in a grid of theoretical spectra was used as a comparison tool in order to determine the photospheric parameters. The method was validated by matching the results from spectra of the asteroids Vesta and Ceres with the Sun parameters. The main results were as follows: (i) the photospheric parameters were determined for the first time for 213 objects in our sample and (ii) a sample of 20 new super-metal-rich star candidates was found.

  13. Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  14. Photometric Observations of 6000 Stars in the Cygnus Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W.; Caldwell, D.; Koch, D.; Jenkins, J.; Ninkov, Z.

    1999-01-01

    A small photometer to detect transits by extrasolar planets has been assembled and is being tested at Lick Observatory on Mt. Hamilton, California. The Vulcan photometer is constructed from a 30 cm focal length, F/2.5 AeroEktar reconnaissance lens and Photometrics PXL16800 CCD camera. A spectral filter is used to confine the pass band from 480 to 763 mn. It simultaneously monitors 6000 stars brighter than 12th magnitude within a single star field in the galactic plane. When the data are folded and phased to discover low amplitude transits, the relative precision of one-hour samples is about 1 part per thousand (10 x l0(exp -3)) for many of the brighter stars. This precision is sufficient to find jovian-size planets orbiting solar-like stars, which have signal amplitudes from 5 to 30 x l0(exp -3) depending on the inflation of the planet and the size of the star. Based on the frequency of giant inner-planets discovered by Doppler-velocity method, one or two planets should be detectable in a rich star field. The goal of the observations is to obtain the sizes of giant extrasolar planets in short-period orbits and to combine these with masses determined from Doppler velocity measurements to determine the densities of these planets. A further goal is to compare the measured planetary diameters with those predicted from theoretical models. From August 10 through September 30 of 1998, a forty nine square degree field in the Cygnus constellation centered at RA and DEC of 19 hr 47 min, +36 deg 55 min was observed. Useful data were obtained on twenty-nine nights. Nearly fifty stars showed some evidence of transits with periods between 0.3 and 8 days. Most had amplitudes too large to be associated with planetary transits. However, several stars showed low amplitude transits. The data for several transits of each of these two stars have been folded and been folded into 30 minute periods. Only Cygl433 shows any evidence of a flattened bottom that is expected when a small object transits a much larger primary. However when high-resolution spectra were obtained for both stars, the stars were found to be double-lined binaries so similar in size as to have indistinguishable transit depths. The low amplitude of the transits is explained if the stellar orbital planes are tipped approximately 5 degrees from the line of sight causing both binaries to show grazing transits. The two absorption lines, due to the H(sub beta) feature in each star, are apparent and indicate the presence of a binary system with similar components.

  15. Finding Habitable Planets Around the Nearest Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, R.

    The discovery of the first 700 extrasolar planets have had a profound impact on science and society. The 2000 Decadal Survey of Astronomy & Astrophysics cites the discovery of extrasolar planets as the most important advance of the previous decade. The 2010 Decadal Survey cites extrasolar planets as one of the three pillars of modern astrophysics, and explicitly states that the discovery of potentially habitable planets around nearby stars is the highest priority for the next decade. Most of the planets that have been discovered orbiting nearby stars are massive gas giants found with Doppler velocity systems that have achieved 3 to 10 m/s. This first generation of exoplanets had amplitudes of 50 m/s or more, and could be detected with sparse sampling. Terrestrial mass and super-earth planets in habitable 1 AU orbits around G dwarfs have Doppler amplitudes of less than 0.5 m/s, and are currently undetectable. Due to their lower mass and brightness, the habitable liquid water zone around M dwarfs is at 0.1 to 0.2 AU, with corresponding Doppler velocity amplitudes of 2 to 5 m/s. These planets are typically in multiple planet systems in which several planets have similar amplitudes, leading to complex Doppler velocity signals. These planets can be detected with high cadence observations that achieve state-of-the-art precision of 1 m/s. While M dwarfs constitute 70% of the nearest stars, they are significantly fainter than nearby G & K dwarfs, and require large telescopes to reach 1 m/s precision. We have built the first American Doppler velocity system that produces 1 m/s precision. The Planet Finding Spectrometer (PFS) on Magellan has been custom built for precision velocity measurements. Compared to HIRES on Keck, PFS is mechanically and thermally stabilized, has triple the throughput, operates at higher resolution, and had 50% greater sampling. PFS on Magellan is slightly faster than HIRES on Keck in spite of the difference in aperture, 6.5-m vs 10-m. We are currently receiving ~50 nights per year on Magellan/PFS to target the nearest M dwarfs with high cadence observations. Over the next 3 years we will survey the nearest 200 M dwarfs with sufficient precision and cadence to detect terrestrial mass and super- earth planets in the habitable zone of these stars. After just two high cadence observing runs we already have candidates. Over the past quarter century our planet surveys, initially at Lick and later at Keck and the AAT, have had a broad societal and scientific impact, including the discovery of half of the known planets orbiting nearby stars. Our work has been credited with providing the motivation for the new disciplines of astrobiology and extrasolar planet studies. All the Iodine precision velocity systems in the world are based on our original system on the Lick 3-m (Butler et al. 1996). For us the PFS/Magellan system is the culmination of 25 years of work, leading to the detection of potentially habitable planets.

  16. 14 CFR 91.145 - Management of aircraft operations in the vicinity of aerial demonstrations and major sporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Demonstration Team (Blue Angels); (2) United States Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron (Thunderbirds); (3) United...Annual Tournament of Roses Football Game; (6) World Cup Soccer; (7) Major League Baseball All-Star Game; (8)...

  17. 14 CFR 91.145 - Management of aircraft operations in the vicinity of aerial demonstrations and major sporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Demonstration Team (Blue Angels); (2) United States Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron (Thunderbirds); (3) United...Annual Tournament of Roses Football Game; (6) World Cup Soccer; (7) Major League Baseball All-Star Game; (8)...

  18. 14 CFR 91.145 - Management of aircraft operations in the vicinity of aerial demonstrations and major sporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Demonstration Team (Blue Angels); (2) United States Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron (Thunderbirds); (3) United...Annual Tournament of Roses Football Game; (6) World Cup Soccer; (7) Major League Baseball All-Star Game; (8)...

  19. 14 CFR 91.145 - Management of aircraft operations in the vicinity of aerial demonstrations and major sporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Demonstration Team (Blue Angels); (2) United States Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron (Thunderbirds); (3) United...Annual Tournament of Roses Football Game; (6) World Cup Soccer; (7) Major League Baseball All-Star Game; (8)...

  20. 14 CFR 91.145 - Management of aircraft operations in the vicinity of aerial demonstrations and major sporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Demonstration Team (Blue Angels); (2) United States Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron (Thunderbirds); (3) United...Annual Tournament of Roses Football Game; (6) World Cup Soccer; (7) Major League Baseball All-Star Game; (8)...

  1. [Moderate revisionposted 4/21/15 (replaces 10/18/13 edition)] Operating Policy and Procedure

    E-print Network

    Rock, Chris

    officer (VPAF/CFO). POLICY/PROCEDURE 1. General Policy With the exception of free expression activities.02 (4) Texas high school all-star football games; (5) High school playoff games; and (6) Intramural

  2. The effect of footwear and surface conditions on spinal contour and flexibility with constrained standing 

    E-print Network

    Stephenson, Donya Ann

    1995-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to determine the effects on the spinal column, flexibility and the level of discomfort people experience as a result of standing using Converse[] All-Star athletic shoes on six different industrial floor surfaces and four...

  3. Energy Star 

    E-print Network

    Reihl, K.; Tullos, A.

    2012-01-01

    Conference, Galveston, TX, October 9-11, 2012 Next Step: Energy Star Label ? Application Process ? Use of portfolio manager (EPA?s energy tracking tool) ? Utility Bills, Normalize climate conditions ? Professional Engineer performance verification... ? Use portfolio manager tool to achieve minimum rating of 69 ? EAc1.0 ? Optimize Energy Performance ? Use portfolio manager tool to achieve points, as listed below: Energy Star Rating LEED Points Energy Star Rating LEED Points 71 1 81 10 73 2...

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason B.D., Wycoff G.L., Hartkopf W.I., Douglass G.G., Worley C.E.

    2015-11-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2009-10-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2013-11-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2010-11-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2012-11-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2014-11-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2011-11-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  11. Studies of bipolar nebulae. VII - The exciting star of OH 0739-14 /equals OH 231.8 plus 4.2/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M.

    1981-01-01

    A spectral classification for the exciting star of the bipolar reflection nebula OH 0739-14, which has also been observed to be an OH/H2O maser source, is obtained from the spectrum of the nebulosity in the range 6000-9000 A. Spectrophotometry of the visible nebula was obtained with the Cassegrain image-tube scanner on the Lick Observatory 3-m telescope at a resolution of approximately 7 A. The red spectrum is found to be distinguished by TiO absorption at the bandheads at 8206, 8303, 8432, 8442 and 8452 A and VO in the 7400 and 7900 A regions. On the basis of the depths of these bandheads and the K I 7699 A and Ca II infrared triplet, OH 0739-14 is determined to be of spectral type M9 III. The underlying star thus represents the coolest known star to occur in a bipolar system.

  12. The Stellar Populations of Nuclei, Globular Clusters, and Stars in dE Galaxies in Virgo and Fornax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield Miller, Bryan; Hyazinth Puzia, Thomas; Hilker, Michael; Sanchez-Janssen, Ruben; Kissler-Patig, Markus

    2015-08-01

    We present ages and metallicities for globular clusters, nuclei, and underlying stars in nucleated dwarf elliptical galaxies (dE,N) in the Virgo and Fornax Cluster based on Lick/IDS index measurements and SSP models. Gemini/GMOS spectroscopy shows that the globular clusters are mostly old and metal-poor, very similar to the globular clusters in the Milky Way halo. The nuclei and underlying stars tend to be more metal-rich than the globular clusters and have a wide range of ages. The [?/Fe] ratios for both the globular clusters and nuclei range between 0.0 and 0.3. Formation scenarios for globular clusters and nuclei will be discussed.

  13. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars. PMID:17836594

  14. Structure and Evolution of Nearby Stars with Planets II. Physical Properties of ~1000 Cool Stars from the SPOCS Catalog

    E-print Network

    Genya Takeda; Eric B. Ford; Alison Sills; Frederic A. Rasio; Debra A. Fischer; Jeff A. Valenti

    2006-11-09

    We derive detailed theoretical models for 1074 nearby stars from the SPOCS (Spectroscopic Properties of Cool Stars) Catalog. The California and Carnegie Planet Search has obtained high-quality echelle spectra of over 1000 nearby stars taken with the Hamilton spectrograph at Lick Observatory, the HIRES spectrograph at Keck, and UCLES at the Anglo Australian Observatory. A uniform analysis of the high-resolution spectra has yielded precise stellar parameters, enabling systematic error analyses and accurate theoretical stellar modeling. We have created a large database of theoretical stellar evolution tracks using the Yale Stellar Evolution Code (YREC) to match the observed parameters of the SPOCS stars. Our very dense grids of evolutionary tracks eliminate the need for interpolation between stellar evolutionary tracks and allow precise determinations of physical stellar parameters (mass, age, radius, size and mass of the convective zone, etc.). Combining our stellar models with the observed stellar atmospheric parameters and uncertainties, we compute the likelihood for each set of stellar model parameters separated by uniform time steps along the stellar evolutionary tracks. The computed likelihoods are used for a Bayesian analysis to derive posterior probability distribution functions for the physical stellar parameters of interest. We provide a catalog of physical parameters for 1074 stars that are based on a uniform set of high quality spectral observations, a uniform spectral reduction procedure, and a uniform set of stellar evolutionary models. We explore this catalog for various possible correlations between stellar and planetary properties, which may help constrain the formation and dynamical histories of other planetary systems.

  15. RW Tauri as a weak W Serpentis star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavec, M. J.; Dobias, J. J.

    1983-09-01

    Observations of the short-period eclipsing binary RW Tau made with the LWR and SWP cameras of the IUE satellite and with the ITS scanner at the 3-m Shane telescope of the Lick Observatory in August and October, 1982, are reported and analyzed. At total eclipse, weak excess continuous radiation in the LWR range and emission lines at Si IV (1), C IV (1), Al III (1), Fe III (34), and Mg II (1) in the SWP range were detected. These findings are similar to those for W Ser-type binaries such as U Cep. The parameters of the system are estimated using a bilinearly interpolated atmospheric model of the type developed by Kurucz (1979): primary-star T(eff) = 11,750 K, log g = 4.2, cool-component spectral type = K0 III, E(B-V) color excess = 0.14 mag, system distance = 270 pc. The implications of these findings for proposed models of the W Ser binaries are discussed, and the observation of a possible distant optical companion star 45 arcsec from RW Tau is reported.

  16. THE FREQUENCY OF HOT JUPITERS ORBITING NEARBY SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J. T.; Marcy, G. W.; Howard, A. W.; Johnson, John Asher; Morton, T. D.; Fischer, D. A.

    2012-07-10

    We determine the fraction of F, G, and K dwarfs in the solar neighborhood hosting hot Jupiters as measured by the California Planet Survey from the Lick and Keck planet searches. We find the rate to be 1.2% {+-} 0.38%, which is consistent with the rate reported by Mayor et al. from the HARPS and CORALIE radial velocity (RV) surveys. These numbers are more than double the rate reported by Howard et al. for Kepler stars and the rate of Gould et al. from the OGLE-III transit search; however, due to small number statistics these differences are of only marginal statistical significance. We explore some of the difficulties in estimating this rate from the existing RV data sets and comparing RV rates to rates from other techniques.

  17. 4 star 3 star 2 star 1 star unclassified CityU 15 10 35 48 7 0

    E-print Network

    Cheung, Yiu-ming

    1 4 star 3 star 2 star 1 star unclassified CityU 15 10 35 48 7 0 HKBU 15 3 35 49 11 2 LU clinical dentistry #12;2 4 star 3 star 2 star 1 star unclassified Panel Cost Centre Institution Number sciences #12;3 4 star 3 star 2 star 1 star unclassified Panel Cost Centre Institution Numb

  18. Extensive Lesions in the Gustatory Cortex in the Rat Do Not Disrupt the Retention of a Presurgically Conditioned Taste Aversion and Do Not Impair Unconditioned Concentration-Dependent Licking of Sucrose and Quinine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although damage to gustatory cortex (GC) in the rat has been reported to severely impair, if not eliminate, retention of a presurgically conditioned taste aversion (CTA), it has equivocal effects on taste preference as measured by intake tests. Because intake tests can be influenced by nongustatory (e.g., postingestive) factors, we employed the brief-access taste test to assess the effects of ibotenic acid–induced lesions targeting the GC on unconditioned licking to a sucrose and then a quinine concentration series in a specialized lickometer. As a functional lesion assessment, a presurgical CTA to 0.1M NaCl was established in thirsty rats by following 15-min intake with intraperitoneal administration of either LiCl (or NaCl for control) on 2 occasions. Both conditioned sham-operated (SHAM) rats and rats with histologically confirmed extensive damage to the GC (GCX) avoided a NaCl concentration series relative to unconditioned controls in a postsurgical brief-access CTA test, with no difference between the surgical groups in their responses to NaCl or similar concentrations of KCl. GCX rats also did not differ from SHAM rats in the EC50 of concentration–response functions for sucrose or quinine. Clearly, the critical cortical area required for the retention of a presurgical CTA falls outside of the extensive area of damage, which was well centered within the conventionally defined gustatory zone of the insular cortex. The absence of an effect on unconditioned responsiveness to sucrose and quinine suggests that the damaged region is also unnecessary for the normal expression of affective licking responses to tastants. PMID:24226296

  19. STARS no star on Kauai

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.

    1993-04-01

    The island of Kuai, home to the Pacific Missile Range Facility, is preparing for the first of a series of Star Wars rocket launches expected to begin early this year. The Strategic Defense Initiative plans 40 launches of the Stategic Target System (STARS) over a 10-year period. The focus of the tests appears to be weapons and sensors designed to combat multiple-warhead ICBMs, which will be banned under the START II Treaty that was signed in January. The focus of this article is to express the dubious value of testing the STARS at a time when their application will not be an anticipated problem.

  20. Chameleon stars

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Folomeev, Vladimir; Singleton, Douglas

    2011-10-15

    We consider a gravitating spherically symmetric configuration consisting of a scalar field nonminimally coupled to ordinary matter in the form of a perfect fluid. For this system we find static, regular, asymptotically flat solutions for both relativistic and nonrelativistic cases. It is shown that the presence of the nonminimal interaction leads to substantial changes both in the radial matter distribution of the star and in the star's total mass. A simple stability test indicates that, for the choice of parameters used in the paper, the solutions are unstable.

  1. Chameleon stars

    E-print Network

    V. Dzhunushaliev; V. Folomeev; D. Singleton

    2011-08-22

    We consider a gravitating spherically symmetric configuration consisting of a scalar field non-minimally coupled to ordinary matter in the form of a perfect fluid. For this system we find static, regular, asymptotically flat solutions for both relativistic and non-relativistic cases. It is shown that the presence of the non-minimal interaction leads to substantial changes both in the radial matter distribution of the star and in the star's total mass. A simple stability test indicates that, for the choice of parameters used in the paper, the solutions are unstable.

  2. Precise Radial Velocities of Giant Stars VII. Occurrence Rate of Giant Extrasolar Planets as a Function of Mass and Metallicity

    E-print Network

    Reffert, Sabine; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Trifonov, Trifon; Künstler, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    (abridged) We have obtained precise radial velocities for a sample of 373 G and K type giants at Lick Observatory regularly over more than 12 years. Planets have been identified around 15 giant stars; an additional 20 giant stars host planet candidates. We investigate the occurrence rate of substellar companions around giant stars as a function of stellar mass and metallicity. We probe the stellar mass range from about 1 to beyond 3 M_Sun, which is not being explored by main-sequence samples. We fit the giant planet occurrence rate as a function of stellar mass and metallicity with a Gaussian and an exponential distribution, respectively. We find strong evidence for a planet-metallicity correlation among the secure planet hosts of our giant star sample, in agreement with the one for main-sequence stars. However, the planet-metallicity correlation is absent for our sample of planet candidates, raising the suspicion that a good fraction of them might indeed not be planets. Consistent with the results obtained b...

  3. Brittle Star

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A tiny brittle star (the central disc is smaller than a dime) clings to the branches of a soft coral in a sample bucket brought into the shipboard laboratory from a submersible dive. This creature makes its home on the deep, dark ocean floor. ...

  4. STAR Highlights

    E-print Network

    Hiroshi Masui; for the STAR Collaboration

    2011-06-29

    We report selected results from STAR collaboration at RHIC, focusing on jet-hadron and jet-like correlations, quarkonium suppression and collectivity, di-electron spectrum in both p+p and Au+Au, and higher moments of net-protons as well as azimuthal anisotropy from RHIC Beam Energy Scan program.

  5. Star Power

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-11-18

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  6. Star Power

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  7. Variable Stars Pulsating Stars: periodic

    E-print Network

    Basu, Shantanu

    's Laws (Kepler's 3rd Law ) imply . 14 2 3 2 G P GMR P = Note: free-fall time and pulsation time to novae in binary systems. Type II: End stage of massive star life. A rebound occurs after the collapse

  8. Converting neutron stars into strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    If strange matter is formed in the interior of a neutron star, it will convert the entire neutron star into a strange star. The proposed mechanisms are reviewed for strange matter seeding and the possible strange matter contamination of neutron star progenitors. The conversion process that follows seeding and the recent calculations of the conversion timescale are discussed.

  9. Modeling Mid-Ultraviolet Spectra. I. Temperatures of Metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ruth C.; Dorman, Ben; Rood, Robert T.

    2001-09-01

    Determining the properties of remote globular clusters and elliptical galaxies using evolutionary population synthesis requires a library of reliable model stellar fluxes. Empirical libraries are limited to spectra of stars in the solar neighborhood, with nearly solar abundances and abundance ratios. We report here a first step toward providing a flux library that includes nonsolar abundances, based on calculations from first principles that are calibrated empirically. Because the mid-ultraviolet spectrum of an old stellar system is dominated by the contribution from its main-sequence turnoff stars, we have started by modeling these. We have calculated mid-ultraviolet spectra for the Sun and nine nearby, near-main-sequence stars spanning metallicities from less than 1/100 solar to greater than solar, encompassing a range of light-element-abundance enhancements. We first determined temperatures of eight of the stars by analyzing optical echelle spectra together with the mid-ultraviolet. Both could be matched at the same time only when models with no convective overshoot were adopted and only when an approximate chromosphere was incorporated near the surface of relatively metal-rich models. Extensive modifications to mid-UV line parameters were also required, notably the manual assignment of approximate identifications for mid-UV lines missing from laboratory line lists. Without recourse to additional missing opacity, these measures suffice to reproduce in detail almost the entire mid-UV spectrum of solar-temperature stars up to 1/10 solar metallicity and the region from 2900 to 3100 Å throughout the entire metallicity range. Ramifications for abundance determinations in individual metal-poor stars and for age-metallicity determinations of old stellar systems are briefly discussed, with emphasis on the predictive power of the calculations. Based on observations obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope of the Space Telescope Science Institute, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Based on observations obtained with the Shane Telescope at Mt. Hamilton, UCO-Lick Observatory.

  10. Planck stars

    E-print Network

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    A star that collapses gravitationally can reach a further stage of its life, where quantum-gravitational pressure counteracts weight. The duration of this stage is very short in the star proper time, yielding a bounce, but extremely long seen from the outside, because of the huge gravitational time dilation. Since the onset of quantum-gravitational effects is governed by energy density --not by size-- the star can be much larger than planckian in this phase. The object emerging at the end of the Hawking evaporation of a black hole can can then be larger than planckian by a factor $(m/m_{\\scriptscriptstyle P})^n$, where $m$ is the mass fallen into the hole, $m_{\\scriptscriptstyle P}$ is the Planck mass, and $n$ is positive. The existence of these objects alleviates the black-hole information paradox. More interestingly, these objects could have astrophysical and cosmological interest: they produce a detectable signal, of quantum gravitational origin, around the $10^{-14} cm$ wavelength.

  11. Planck stars

    E-print Network

    Carlo Rovelli; Francesca Vidotto

    2014-02-08

    A star that collapses gravitationally can reach a further stage of its life, where quantum-gravitational pressure counteracts weight. The duration of this stage is very short in the star proper time, yielding a bounce, but extremely long seen from the outside, because of the huge gravitational time dilation. Since the onset of quantum-gravitational effects is governed by energy density ---not by size--- the star can be much larger than planckian in this phase. The object emerging at the end of the Hawking evaporation of a black hole can then be larger than planckian by a factor $(m/m_{\\scriptscriptstyle P})^n$, where $m$ is the mass fallen into the hole, $m_{\\scriptscriptstyle P}$ is the Planck mass, and $n$ is positive. We consider arguments for $n=1/3$ and for $n=1$. There is no causality violation or faster-than-light propagation. The existence of these objects alleviates the black-hole information paradox. More interestingly, these objects could have astrophysical and cosmological interest: they produce a detectable signal, of quantum gravitational origin, around the $10^{-14} cm$ wavelength.

  12. When Stars Collide

    E-print Network

    E. Glebbeek; O. R. Pols

    2007-10-09

    When two stars collide and merge they form a new star that can stand out against the background population in a starcluster as a blue straggler. In so called collision runaways many stars can merge and may form a very massive star that eventually forms an intermediate mass blackhole. We have performed detailed evolution calculations of merger remnants from collisions between main sequence stars, both for lower mass stars and higher mass stars. These stars can be significantly brighter than ordinary stars of the same mass due to their increased helium abundance. Simplified treatments ignoring this effect give incorrect predictions for the collision product lifetime and evolution in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram.

  13. Triggered Star Formation by Massive Stars

    E-print Network

    Hsu-Tai Lee; W. P. Chen

    2009-02-03

    We present our diagnosis of the role that massive stars play in the formation of low- and intermediate-mass stars in OB associations (the Lambda Ori region, Ori OB1, and Lac OB1 associations). We find that the classical T Tauri stars and Herbig Ae/Be stars tend to line up between luminous O stars and bright-rimmed or comet-shaped clouds; the closer to a cloud the progressively younger they are. Our positional and chronological study lends support to the validity of the radiation-driven implosion mechanism, where the Lyman continuum photons from a luminous O star create expanding ionization fronts to evaporate and compress nearby clouds into bright-rimmed or comet-shaped clouds. Implosive pressure then causes dense clumps to collapse, prompting the formation of low-mass stars on the cloud surface (i.e., the bright rim) and intermediate-mass stars somewhat deeper in the cloud. These stars are a signpost of current star formation; no young stars are seen leading the ionization fronts further into the cloud. Young stars in bright-rimmed or comet-shaped clouds are likely to have been formed by triggering, which would result in an age spread of several megayears between the member stars or star groups formed in the sequence.

  14. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars. PMID:17749544

  15. Carlsberg Meridian Catalogue, La Palma. Number 9. Observations of positions of stars and planets, May 1984 to March 1995 including extinction and meteorological data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This catalogue (CMC9) contains 141593 positions and magnitudes of 138603 stars north of declination -40°, 117559 proper motions, and 19585 positions and magnitudes of 97 Solar System objects obtained with the Carlsberg Automatic Meridian Circle on La Palma during the period May 1984 to March 1995. CMC9 includes CMC1 to CMC8; i.e. it comprises all the observations made since the instrument began operation on La Palma. The positions of the stars are for the epoch of observation and the equinox J2000.0, and are referred to the new International Celestial Reference Frame. The original version of the catalogue with positions referred to a smoothed version of the FK5 is also given. The limiting magnitude is V = 15.4. The catalogue mainly comprises observations and proper motions for the following programmes: 36000 International Reference Stars, 30000 faint reference stars in a global net, 18000 reference stars in the fields of radio sources, 17000 stars in the Lick Northern Proper Motion catalogue, 5000 reference stars for calibration of Schmidt plates, 2600 stars in the Gliese catalogue of nearby stars, 5000 stars in nearby OB associations, 10500 F-type stars within 100 pc, 9000 G-type d&g, K-type g stars within 300 pc, 2200 unbiased sample of K/M-type d stars, 2200 reference stars near Veron-Cetty galaxies, 1050 variable stars (12 - 14 mag) in GCVS, 800 stars (11 - 14 mag) with pm > 0?-3/yr ion NLTT, and several smaller programmes mainly aimed at galactic kinematics. Positions and magnitudes of 8 novae and 7 supernovae which occurred in the years 1991 to 1995 are included. The catalogue also contains observations of the following Solar System objects: Callisto, Ganymede, Rhea, Titan, Iapetus, Hyperion, Uranus, Oberon, Neptune, Pluto and 87 minor planets. The mean error of a catalogue position in the zenith is 0?-09 in right ascension and declination in CMC4-5-6, improving to 0?-06 in CMC7-9. The accuracy in magnitude is 0.05 mag throughout. The mean error of the proper motions, derived by combining the position in this catalogue with those at earlier epochs, is typically in the range 0?-003 to 0?-004 per year. Cross-references are given to DM, AGK, SAO, HD and the double star catalogues ADS and WDS. The catalogue also contains 12216 mean annual observed positions of the FK5 stars used to transfer the instrumental system to the FK5 frame. A compilation of all the meteorological data collected in the years 1984 - 1995 is appended.

  16. Carlsberg Meridian Catalogues, La Palma. Numbers 1 - 11, 1999. Observations of positions of stars and planets, May 1984 to May 1998 including extinction and meteorological data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This composite catalogue contains 180812 positions and magnitudes of 176591 stars north of declination -40°, 155005 proper motions, and 25848 positions and magnitudes of 184 Solar System objects obtained with the Carlsberg Automatic Meridian Circle on La Palma during the period May 1984 to May 1998. It includes CMC1 - 11; i.e. it comprises all the observations made with the moving-slit micrometer since the instrument began operation on La Palma. The positions of the stars are for the epoch of observation and the equinox J2000.0, and are referred to the new International Celestial Reference Frame. The limiting magnitude is V = 15.4. The catalogue mainly comprises observations and proper motions for the following programmes: 36000 International Reference Stars, 30000 faint reference stars in a global net, 18000 reference stars in the fields of radio sources, 17000 stars in the Lick Northern Proper Motion catalogue, 5000 reference stars for calibration of Schmidt plates, 2600 stars in the Gliese catalogue of nearby stars, 5000 stars in nearby OB associations, 10500 F-type stars within 100 pc, 9000 G-type d&g, K-type g stars within 300 pc, 2200 unbiased sample of K/M-typed stars, 19400 reference stars near Veron-Cetty galaxies, 4700 variable stars (12 - 14 mag) in GCVS, 12400 stars (11 - 14 mag) with pm > 0?-18/yr in NLTT, and several smaller programmes mainly aimed at galactic kinematics. Positions and magnitudes of 12 novae and 8 supernovae which occurred in the years 1991 to 1998 are included. The catalogue also contains observations of the following Solar System objects: Callisto, Ganymede, Rhea, Titan, Iapetus, Hyperion, Uranus, Oberon, Neptune, Pluto and 173 minor planets and comet P/Wild 2. The mean error of a catalogue position in the zenith is 0-09 in right ascension and declination in CMC1 - 6, improving to 0-06 in CMC7 - 11. The accuracy in magnitude is 0.05 mag in CMC1 - 10, improving to 0.03 mag in CMC11. The mean error of the proper motions, derived by combining the position in this catalogue with those at earlier epochs, is typically in the range 0??003 to 0??004 per year. Cross-references are given to DM, AGK, SAO, HD and the Washington Double Star catalogues. The catalogue also contains 12216 mean annual observed positions of the FK5 stars used to transfer the instrumental system to the FK5 frame in the years 1984 - 1995. A compilation of all the meteorological data collected in the years 1984 - 1998, including the atmospheric extinction, is appended.

  17. Toward Understanding the B[e] Phenomenon. II. New Galactic FS CMa Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Manset, N.; Kusakin, A. V.; Chentsov, E. L.; Klochkova, V. G.; Zharikov, S. V.; Gray, R. O.; Grankin, K. N.; Gandet, T. L.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Rudy, R. J.; Lynch, D. K.; Venturini, C. C.; Mazuk, S.; Puetter, R. C.; Perry, R. B.; Levato, H.; Grosso, M.; Bernabei, S.; Polcaro, V. F.; Viotti, R. F.; Norci, L.; Kuratov, K. S.

    2007-12-01

    FS CMa stars form a group of objects with the B[e] phenomenon that were previously known as unclassified B[e] stars or B[e] stars with warm dust (B[e]WD) until recently. They exhibit strong emission-line spectra and strong IR excesses, most likely due to recently formed circumstellar dust. These properties have been suggested to be due to ongoing or recent rapid mass exchange in binary systems with hot primaries and various types of secondaries. The first paper of this series reported an analysis of the available information about previously known Galactic objects with the B[e] phenomenon, the initial selection of the FS CMa group objects, and a qualitative explanation of their properties. This paper reports the results of our new search for more FS CMa objects in the IRAS Point Source Catalog. We present new photometric criteria for identifying FS CMa stars as well as the first results of our observations of nine new FS CMa group members. With this addition, the FS CMa group has now 40 members, becoming the largest among the dust-forming hot star groups. We also present nine objects with no evidence for the B[e] phenomenon, but with newly discovered spectral line emission and/or strong IR excesses. Partially based on data obtained at the 6 m BTA Telescope of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, 3 m Shane Telescope of the Lick Observatory, 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith and 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescopes of the McDonald Observatory, 2.1 m telescope of the San Pedro Martir Observatory, 1.5 m telescope of the Loiano Observatory, and 0.8 m telescope of the Dark Sky Observatory.

  18. On stars and Steiner stars Adrian Dumitrescu

    E-print Network

    Dumitrescu, Adrian

    On stars and Steiner stars Adrian Dumitrescu Csaba D. T´oth Guangwu Xu§ March 9, 2009 Abstract A Steiner star for a set P of n points in Rd connects an arbitrary point in Rd to all points of P, while a star connects one of the points in P to the remaining n - 1 points of P. All connections are realized

  19. O stars and Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Underhill, Anne B.; Jordan, Stuart (editor); Thomas, Richard (editor)

    1988-01-01

    Basic information is given about O and Wolf-Rayet stars indicating how these stars are defined and what their chief observable properties are. Part 2 of the volume discussed four related themes pertaining to the hottest and most luminous stars. Presented are: an observational overview of the spectroscopic classification and extrinsic properties of O and Wolf-Rayet stars; the intrinsic parameters of luminosity, effective temperature, mass, and composition of the stars, and a discussion of their viability; stellar wind properties; and the related issues concerning the efforts of stellar radiation and wind on the immediate interstellar environment are presented.

  20. Activity of young stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamzin, S.

    2008-12-01

    The possibility to clarify the nature of activity of different types of young stars by means of ob- servations from orbital observatory WSO-UV is considered. These types include Herbig Ae/Be stars, T Tauri stars, brown dwarfs and FUORs. The problem of interstellar extinction law toward star formation regions is also discussed.

  1. Star Clusters Sterrenstelsels & Kosmos

    E-print Network

    Weijgaert, Rien van de

    Star Clusters Sterrenstelsels & Kosmos deel 2 1 #12;Types of star clusters 2 #12;Open or Galactic Clusters · "Open" or Galactic clusters are low mass, relatively small (~10 pc diameter) clusters of stars in the Galactic disk containing stars · The Pleiades cluster is a good example of an open cluster

  2. Egyptian "Star Clocks"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Sarah

    Diagonal, transit, and Ramesside star clocks are tables of astronomical information occasionally found in ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyri. The tables represent the motions of selected stars (decans and hour stars) throughout the Egyptian civil year. Analysis of star clocks leads to greater understanding of ancient Egyptian constellations, ritual astronomical activities, observational practices, and pharaonic chronology.

  3. Lifestyles of the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cocoa Beach, FL. John F. Kennedy Space Center.

    Some general information on stars is provided in this National Aeronautics and Space Administration pamphlet. Topic areas briefly discussed are: (1) the birth of a star; (2) main sequence stars; (3) red giants; (4) white dwarfs; (5) neutron stars; (6) supernovae; (7) pulsars; and (8) black holes. (JN)

  4. Extragalactic Star Clusters: the Resolved Star Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellerin, Anne; Meyer, M. J.; Jason, H.; Calzetti, D.

    2006-12-01

    The physical processes leading to the dissolution of star clusters is a topic barely studied and still not understood. We started a pilot project to develop a new approach to directly detect and study the properties of stellar clusters while they are being destroyed. Our technique currently under development makes use of the exceptional spatial resolution and sensitivity of the ACS camera onboard HST to resolve individual stars in nearby galaxies. PSF stellar photometry and color-magnitude diagrams allows us to separate the most massive stars (more likely to be in clusters) from the star field background. While applying the method to the normal spiral galaxy NGC1313, we found that the method of studying star clusters through resolved stars in nearby galaxies is even more powerful than we first expected. The stellar maps obtained for NGC1313 show that a large fraction of early B-type stars contained in the galaxy are already part of the star field background rather that being in star clusters. Such stars live for 5 to 25 Myr. Since most stars form in clusters, the presence of such massive stars in the field means that they must have left their birthplace very rapidly. It also means that the processes involved in the dissolution of the clusters are extremely efficient. The only plausible explanation for so many young stars to be in the field background is the infant mortality of star clusters. We will present the latest results on the two galaxies NGC 1313 and IC 2475 and discuss the potential of the new approach for studying extragalactic stellar clusters.

  5. The Automated Planet Finder's detection of a 6-planet system orbiting the bright, nearby star HD219134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, Jennifer; Laughlin, Greg; Meschiari, Stefano; Vogt, Steve; Butler, R. Paul

    2015-12-01

    The Automated Planet Finder (APF) is the newest facility at Lick Observatory, comprised of a 2.4m telescope coupled with the high-resolution Levy echelle spectrograph. Purpose built for exoplanet detection and characterization, 80% of the telescope's observing time is dedicated to these science goals. The APF has demonstrated 1 m/s radial velocity precision on bright, RV standard stars and performs with the same speed-on-sky as Keck/HIRES when observing M-dwarfs.The APF has contributed to the detection of four planetary systems in its first two years of scientific operations. Our most recent detection is that of a 6-planet system around the bright (V=5.5), nearby (d=6.5pc), K3V star HD219134. The planets in this system have masses ranging from 3.5 to108 MEarth, with orbital periods from 3 to 2247 days. An independent detection of the inner 4 planets in this system by the HARPS-N team has shown that the 3d planet transits the star, making this system ideal for follow-up observations.I will discuss the APF's detections to date, highlighting HD219134, as well as the overall performance results of the telescope and our future observing strategy.

  6. IntrAst2 (Petrovay) Variable stars VARIABLE STARS

    E-print Network

    Petrovay, Kristóf

    IntrAst2 (Petrovay) Variable stars VARIABLE STARS Definitions: (a) Stars displaying brightness variations (in the optical domain) All stars are variables (a matter of sensitivity only). (b) Stars) A variable star is what is listed in GCVS or VSX GCVS: General Catalogue of Variable Stars; http

  7. Neutron Stars and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, Varun

    2012-05-01

    My thesis centers around the study of neutron stars, especially those in massive binary systems. To this end, it has two distinct components: the observational study of neutron stars in massive binaries with a goal of measuring neutron star masses and participation in NuSTAR, the first imaging hard X-ray mission, one that is extremely well suited to the study of massive binaries and compact objects in our Galaxy. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing high energy X-ray telescope to orbit. NuSTAR has an order-of-magnitude better angular resolution and has two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than any currently orbiting hard X-ray telescope. I worked to develop, calibrate, and test CdZnTe detectors for NuSTAR. I describe the CdZnTe detectors in comprehensive detail here - from readout procedures to data analysis. Detailed calibration of detectors is necessary for analyzing astrophysical source data obtained by the NuSTAR. I discuss the design and implementation of an automated setup for calibrating flight detectors, followed by calibration procedures and results. Neutron stars are an excellent probe of fundamental physics. The maximum mass of a neutron star can put stringent constraints on the equation of state of matter at extreme pressures and densities. From an astrophysical perspective, there are several open questions in our understanding of neutron stars. What are the birth masses of neutron stars? How do they change in binary evolution? Are there multiple mechanisms for the formation of neutron stars? Measuring masses of neutron stars helps answer these questions. Neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries have masses close to their birth mass, providing an opportunity to disentangle the role of "nature" and "nurture" in the observed mass distributions. In 2006, masses had been measured for only six such objects, but this small sample showed the greatest diversity in masses among all classes of neutron star binaries. Intrigued by this diversity - which points to diverse birth masses - we undertook a systematic survey to measure the masses of neutron stars in nine high-mass X-ray binaries. In this thesis, I present results from this ongoing project. While neutron stars formed the primary focus of my work, I also explored other topics in compact objects. Appendix A describes the discovery and complete characterization of a 1RXS J173006.4+033813, a polar cataclysmic variable. Appendix B describes the discovery of a diamond planet orbiting a millisecond pulsar, and our search for its optical counterpart.

  8. A Comprehensive Examination of Several Symbiotic Stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Charles Dayton

    Contemporaneous observations of five northern symbiotic stars with the IUE satellite and Lick ITS throughout the spectral range 1200 - 8000 A. are analyzed. The objects studied are AG Pegasi, AG Draconis, YY Herculis, V443 Herculis, and RW Hydrae. Late component spectral types, emitting region electron temperatures and densities, hot component Zanstra temperatures, and stellar parameters are determined. All of the objects studied appear to be binaries. Photoionization is, in all cases except possibly AG Dra, the energy input mechanism. Our object, YY Her, appears to be embedded in a disk-like structure of accreting material. Electron densities in the emitting region characterized by the ultraviolet intercombination lines of N III}, O IV}, and O III} are in the range 1 x 10('9) to 5 x 10('10). These values are considerably higher than those seen in planetary nebulae and gaseous H II regions and are a factor of 100 or so higher than crude estimates made from optical region features. The mean electron temperatures characteristic of the {O III} and N V emitting zones range between 9000 K. and 20,000 K. The hot components of all the objects are well below the main sequence, indeed, and He II Zanstra temperatures of all the hot components are on the order of 100,000 K. With the possible exception of AG Dra, the hot component ultraviolet spectrum is probably not produced by nuclear burning of a thin hydrogen shell of material accreted onto a white dwarf as suggested by Paczynski and Rudak (1980). The supercritical wind accretion disk model of Bath (1977) may operate, especially in YY Her, but the accreting component must be a subdwarf in AG Peg, the system for which we have performed the most detailed analysis. Furthermore, accretion fueled by mass transfer via Roche lobe overflow does not appear to be currently occurring in AG Peg and, possibly, AG Dra. No information is available for RW Hya. At least one system, AG Peg, appears to be an evolved object in or near the second stage of mass transfer, however, the AG Peg slow nova outburst may not have been the result of a planetary nebula-like shell ejection episode. We quite often see bound-free and free-free emission from the nebular regions in these systems. Variations of this emission seem to account for most of the observed optical region brightness fluctuations. This emission contributes strongly in the satellite ultraviolet so that the hot component may not always be seen directly. Therefore, simple model atmosphere continuum-fitting procedures should be regarded with extreme caution.

  9. The Millennium Star Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnott, R. W.

    1997-08-01

    Derived from Hipparcos and Tycho observations, the Millennium Star Atlas is a set of 1548 charts covering the entire sky to about magnitude 11. It stands apart from all previous printed atlases in completeness to magnitude 10 and in uniformity around the sky. The generous chart scale has made possible a number of innovations never before seen in a star atlas: arrows on high-proper-motion stars, double-star ticks conveying separation and position angle for a specific modern epoch, distance labels for nearby stars, and variable stars coded by amplitude, period, and type. Among the nonstellar objects plotted, more than 8000 galaxies are shown with aspect ratio and orientation.

  10. The Pistol Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najarro, F.; Figer, D. F.

    1998-06-01

    Results of an spectroscopic investigation of the Pistol star are presented. The near-infrared spectra and photometry data are fit with stellar wind models to find that the star is extraordinarily luminous, L = 106.7±0.5 L?, making it one of the most luminous stars known. Coupled with the relatively cool temperature, Teff = 10^{4.17_{ - 0.06}^{ + 0.19} } K, the star is clearly in violation of the Humphreys-Davidson limit. The derived line of sight velocity of the star assures its membership in the Quintuplet cluster. This, along with the inferred extinction, places the star at the Galactic Center.

  11. Articulation: Arizona Guidebook Can Lick Transfer "Sting."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Robert E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the Arizona "Course Equivalency Guide," a combined listing of courses at Arizona community colleges and universities, which enables students to evaluate whether and in what way each course is accepted for transfer at the universities.

  12. Quark core stars, quark stars and strange stars

    SciTech Connect

    Grassi, F.

    1988-01-01

    A recent one flavor quark matter equation of state is generalized to several flavors. It is shown that quarks undergo a first order phase transition. In addition, this equation of state depends on just one parameter in the two flavor case, two parameters in the three flavor case, and these parameters are constrained by phenomenology. This equation of state is then applied to the hadron-quark transition in neutron stars and the determination of quark star stability, the investigation of strange matter stability and possible strange star existence. 43 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Rising Stars "Welcome to MIT! The Rising Stars Work-

    E-print Network

    Gabrieli, John

    EECS Rising Stars 2013 #12;"Welcome to MIT! The Rising Stars Work- shop has again brought together EECS RISING STARS From the 2013 Rising Stars Workshop Chairs Welcome to the 2013 Rising Stars in EECS universities or research positions in industry labs. The Rising Stars workshop is open to outstanding female Ph

  14. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  15. Star Formation Ralf Klessen

    E-print Network

    Klessen,Ralf

    bangl) Stars form in galaxies and protogalaxies star formation at high redshift (Hubble Ultra-Deep Field, from HST Web site) #12;Antennae galaxy NGC4038/39 distance: 19.2Mpc vis. Magn: 11.2 optical: white

  16. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  17. Astrophysics: Stars fight back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.

    2014-12-01

    Galaxies contain fewer stars than predicted. The discovery of a massive galactic outflow of molecular gas in a compact galaxy, which forms stars 100 times faster than the Milky Way, may help to explain why. See Letter p.68

  18. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Olinto, A.V.; Haensel, P.; Frieman, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  19. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  20. Chromospheres of Coronal Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.

    1996-01-01

    We summarize the main results obtained from the analysis of ultraviolet emission line profiles of coronal late-type stars observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The excellent GHRS spectra provide new information on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena in the chromospheres and transition regions of these stars. One exciting new result is the discovery of broad components in the transition region lines of active stars that we believe provide evidence for microflare heating in these stars.

  1. America's Star Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  2. Star formation Simon Goodwin

    E-print Network

    Crowther, Paul

    Star formation Simon Goodwin Dept Physics & Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield, S3 7RH, UK. s.goodwin@sheffield.ac.uk 1 Abstract Stars are one of the most important consituents of the Universe, and understanding their formation is crucial to many areas of astrophysics. Stars form from dense

  3. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies

    E-print Network

    Bradley C. Whitmore

    2006-12-22

    Large numbers of young stars are formed in merging galaxies, such as the Antennae galaxies. Most of these stars are formed in compact star clusters (i.e., super star clusters), which have been the focus of a large number of studies. However, an increasing number of projects are beginning to focus on the individual stars as well. In this contribution, we examine a few results relevant to the triggering of star and star cluster formation; ask what fraction of stars form in the field rather than in clusters; and begin to explore the demographics of both the massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae.

  4. Spectroscopic study of extended star clusters in dwarf galaxy NGC 6822

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Narae; Kim, Sang Chul; Park, Hong Soo; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lim, Sungsoon; Hodge, Paul W.; Weisz, Daniel; Miller, Bryan

    2014-03-01

    We present a spectroscopic study of the four extended star clusters (ESCs) in NGC 6822 based on the data obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Gemini-South 8.1 m telescope. The radial velocities derived from the spectra range from –61.2 ± 20.4 km s{sup –1} (for C1) to –115.34 ± 57.9 km s{sup –1} (for C4) and, unlike the intermediate-age carbon stars, they do not display any sign of systematic rotation around NGC 6822. The ages and metallicities derived using the Lick indices show that the ESCs are old (?8 Gyr) and metal poor ([Fe/H] ? –1.5). NGC 6822 is found to have both metal poor ([Fe/H] ?–2.0) and metal rich ([Fe/H] ?–0.9) star clusters within 15' (2 kpc) from the center, whereas only metal poor clusters are observed in the outer halo with r ? 20'(2.6 kpc). The kinematics, old ages, and low metallicities of ESCs suggest that ESCs may have accreted into the halo of NGC 6822. Based on the velocity distribution of ESCs, we have determined the total mass and the mass-to-light ratio of NGC 6822: M{sub N6822}=7.5{sub ?0.1}{sup +4.5}×10{sup 9} M{sub ?} and (M/L){sub N6822}=75{sub ?1}{sup +45}(M/L){sub ?}. It shows that NGC 6822 is one of the most dark matter dominated dwarf galaxies in the Local Group.

  5. First magnetic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanyuk, Iosif I.; Kudryavtsev, Dimitry O.

    2009-04-01

    This contribution dedicated to the analysis of the magnetism of chemically peculiar (CP) stars of the upper Main Sequence. We use our own measurements and published data to compile a catalog of magnetic CP stars containing a total of 326 objects with confidently detected magnetic fields and 29 stars which are very likely to possess magnetic field. Our analysis shows that the number of magnetic CP stars decreases with increasing field strength in accordance with exponential law, hotter and faster rotating stars have stronger fields. Intensity of depressions in the continua correlates with the magnetic field strength.

  6. Strange Quark Star Crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Andrew W.

    2007-02-27

    If strange quark matter is absolutely stable, some neutron stars may be strange quark stars. Strange quark stars are usually assumed to have a simple liquid surface. We show that if the surface tension of droplets of quark matter in the vacuum is sufficiently small, droplets of quark matter on the surface of a strange quark star may form a solid crust on top of the strange quark star. This solid crust can significantly modify the predictions for the photon emission for the surface in an observable way.

  7. Dynamical Analysis of the 6:1 Resonance of the Brown Dwarfs Orbiting the K Giant Star ? Ophiuchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Man Hoi; Trifonov, Trifon; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Reffert, Sabine

    2015-05-01

    The K giant star ? Oph has two brown dwarf companions (with minimum masses of about 22 and 25 times the mass of Jupiter), whose orbital periods are about 530 and 3200 days and close to 6:1 in ratio. We present a dynamical analysis of this system, using 150 precise radial velocities obtained at the Lick Observatory in combination with data already available in the literature. We investigate a large set of orbital fits by applying systematic ?2 grid-search techniques coupled with self-consistent dynamical fitting. We find that the brown dwarfs are indeed locked in an aligned 6:1 resonant configuration, with all six mean-motion resonance angles librating around 0°, but the inclination of the orbits is poorly constrained. As with resonant planet pairs, the brown dwarfs in this system were most likely captured into resonance through disk-induced convergent migration. Thus the ? Oph system shows that brown dwarfs can form like planets in disks around stars.This work is supported in part by Hong Kong RGC grant HKU 7024/13P.

  8. Rotating Skyrmion Stars

    E-print Network

    Rachid OUYED

    2001-11-17

    In a previous paper, using an equation of state of dense matter representing a fluid of Skyrmions we constructed the corresponding non-rotating compact-star models in hydrostatic equilibrium; these are mostly fluid stars (the Skyrmion fluid) thus naming them {\\it Skyrmion Stars}. Here we generalize our previous calculations by constructing equilibrium sequences of rotating Skyrmion stars in general relativity using the computer code {\\it RNS} developed by Stergioulas. We calculated their masses and radii to be 0.4 \\le M/M_{\\odot} \\le 3.45, and 13.0 {\\rm km}\\le R\\le 23.0 {\\rm km}, respectively (R being the circumferential radius of the star). The period of the maximally rotating Skyrmion stars is calculated to be 0.8 {\\rm ms}\\le P \\le 2.0 {\\rm ms}. We find that a gap (the height between the star surface and the inner stable circular orbit) starts to appear for M\\sim 2.0M_{\\odot}. Specifically, the Skyrmion star mass range with an existing gap is calculated to be 1.8 Skyrmion star candidate in the 4U 1636-53 system. We discuss the difficulties encountered by our model in the 4U 0614+09 case with the highest known Quasi-Periodic Oscillation frequency of 1329 Hz. A comparative study of Skyrmion stars and models of neutron stars based on recent/modern equations of state is also presented.

  9. A Star's Close Encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version

    The potential planet-forming disk (or 'protoplanetary disk') of a sun-like star is being violently ripped away by the powerful winds of a nearby hot O-type star in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. At up to 100 times the mass of sun-like stars, O stars are the most massive and energetic stars in the universe.

    The O star can be seen to the right of the image, as the large orange spot with the white center. To the left, the comet-like structure is actually a neighboring solar system that is being destroyed by the O star's powerful winds and intense ultraviolet light.

    In a process called 'photoevaporation,' immense output from the O star heats up the nearby protoplanetary disk so much that gas and dust boil off, and the disk can no longer hold together. Photon (or light) blasts from the O star then strip the potential planet-forming disk off its neighbor star by blowing away evaporated material. This effect is illustrated in the smaller system's comet-like structure.

    The system is located about 2,450 light-years away in the star-forming cloud IC 1396. The image was taken with Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer instrument at 24 microns. The picture is a pseudo-color stretch representing intensity. Yellow and white represent hot areas, whereas purple and blue represent relatively cooler, fainter regions.

  10. Ponderable soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The theory of Lee and Pang (1987), who obtained solutions for soliton stars composed of zero-temperature fermions and bosons, is applied here to quark soliton stars. Model soliton stars based on a simple physical model of the proton are computed, and the properties of the solitons are discussed, including the important problem of the existence of a limiting mass and thus the possible formation of black holes of primordial origin. It is shown that there is a definite mass limit for ponderable soliton stars, so that during cooling a soliton star might reach a stage beyond which no equilibrium configuration exists and the soliton star probably will collapse to become a black hole. The radiation of ponderable soliton stars may alter the short-wavelength character of the cosmic background radiation, and may be observed as highly redshifted objects at z of about 100,000.

  11. White dwarfs - fossil stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaler, S.D.; Winget, D.E.

    1987-08-01

    The structure and properties of white dwarfs are analyzed. The physical structure of white dwarf interiors is balanced by a quantum-mechanical effect known as electron degeneracy pressure. Besides preventing gravitational collapse, the degenerate electrons also control the thermal structure of the stars. The transport of energy in the interior and near the surface of the stars is discussed. The surface composition of the white dwarfs is examined. It is observed that the surface of the stars contains only one element; 80 percent of the stars contain only H and the remaining stars contain He. It is determined that the intense gravity of the stars leads to a layering arrangement of material within the star. The origin and evolution of white dwarfs, in particular their crystal stage, are described.

  12. Are neutron stars Q-stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, Safi; Lynn, Bryan W.; Selipsky, Stephen B.

    1990-02-01

    We show that certain classical solutions of hadronic effective field theories can model neutron stars. Within the uncertainties of what is known from laboratory measurements of nuclear physics, these solutions, called Q-stars, may have masses much larger (>> 3 M solar) or may be able to rotate faster (Prot < 0.5 ms) than previously believed possible. Stable chunks of nuclear density baryonic matter varying in size from 10-12 cm to several kilometers may also exist. Cygnus X-1, LMC X-3, and the SN1987A remnant are candidates for Q-stars.

  13. A four-planet system orbiting the K0V star HD 141399

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Steven S.; Rivera, Eugenio J.; Kibrick, Robert; Burt, Jennifer; Hanson, Russell; Laughlin, Gregory; Meschiari, Stefano; Henry, Gregory W.

    2014-06-01

    We present precision radial velocity (RV) data sets from Keck-HIRES and from Lick Observatory's new Automated Planet Finder Telescope and Levy Spectrometer on Mt. Hamilton that reveal a multiple-planet system orbiting the nearby, slightly evolved, K-type star HD 141399. Our 91 observations over 10.5 yr suggest the presence of four planets with orbital periods of 94.35, 202.08, 1070.35, and 3717.35 days and minimum masses of 0.46, 1.36, 1.22, and 0.69 M{sub J} , respectively. The orbital eccentricities of the three inner planets are small, and the phase curves are well sampled. The inner two planets lie just outside the 2:1 resonance, suggesting that the system may have experienced dissipative evolution during the protoplanetary disk phase. The fourth companion is a Jupiter-like planet with a Jupiter-like orbital period. Its orbital eccentricity is consistent with zero, but more data will be required for an accurate eccentricity determination.

  14. Massive Compact Stars as Quark Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Hilário; Barbosa Duarte, Sérgio; de Oliveira, José Carlos T.

    2011-03-01

    High-mass compact stars have been reported recently in the literature, providing strong constraints on the properties of the ultra dense matter beyond the saturation nuclear density. In view of these results, the calculations of quark star or hybrid star equilibrium structure must be compatible with the provided observational data. But since the equations of state used in describing quark matter are in general too soft in comparison with the equation of states used to describe the hadronic or nuclear matter, the calculated quark star models presented in the literature are in general not suitable to explain the stability of highly-compact massive objects. In this work, we present the calculations of a spherically symmetric quark star structure by using an equation of state that takes into account the superconducting color-flavor locked phase of the strange quark matter. In addition, some fundamental aspects of QCD (asymptotic freedom and confinement) are considered by means of a phenomenological description of the deconfined quark phase, the density-dependent quark mass model. The quark matter behavior introduced by this model stiffens the corresponding equation of state. We thus investigate the influence of this model on the mass-radius diagram of quark stars. We obtain massive quark stars due to the stiffness of the equation of state, when a reasonable parameterization of the color superconducting gap is used. Models of quark stars enveloped by a nucleonic crust composed of a nuclear lattice embedded in an electron gas, with nuclei close to neutron drip line, are also discussed.

  15. Miras among C stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battinelli, P.; Demers, S.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Carbon stars are among the brightest intermediate-age stars. They are seen in nearly all galaxies of the Local Group. In the Milky Way they are members of the thin disk but over a hundred have been identified in the Galactic halo. Since the halo consists essentially of an old stellar population, these carbon stars warrant special attention. We believe that such stars are trespassers and belong to streams left over by disrupted dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Aims: By performing photometric monitoring we intend to identify Miras among the halo carbon stars. Methods: We obtained, over several semesters, K and J images centered on the carbon stars in order to determine their variation and periodicity. Results: We establish the variability for a number of stars and identify the Miras among them. We collect data from the literature on the Miras among various carbon star populations and show that the fraction of Miras among carbon stars is fairly constant. We demonstrate that such fractions for the halo and Sagittarius are biased because of the way targets are selected. We finally investigate the near-infrared color distribution of Miras and carbon stars. Based on observations made with the REM Telescope, INAF Chile.The observed K and J magnitudes are available only at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/568/A100

  16. Metal-Poor Stars

    E-print Network

    Anna Frebel

    2008-02-13

    The abundance patterns of metal-poor stars provide us a wealth of chemical information about various stages of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. In particular, these stars allow us to study the formation and evolution of the elements and the involved nucleosynthesis processes. This knowledge is invaluable for our understanding of the cosmic chemical evolution and the onset of star- and galaxy formation. Metal-poor stars are the local equivalent of the high-redshift Universe, and offer crucial observational constraints on the nature of the first stars. This review presents the history of the first discoveries of metal-poor stars that laid the foundation to this field. Observed abundance trends at the lowest metallicities are described, as well as particular classes of metal-poor stars such as r-process and C-rich stars. Scenarios on the origins of the abundances of metal-poor stars and the application of large samples of metal-poor stars to cosmological questions are discussed.

  17. Search for associations containing young stars (SACY). VI. Is multiplicity universal? Stellar multiplicity in the range 3-1000 au from adaptive-optics observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, P.; Huélamo, N.; Bouy, H.; Bayo, A.; Melo, C. H. F.; Torres, C. A. O.; Sterzik, M. F.; Quast, G. R.; Chauvin, G.; Barrado, D.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Young loose nearby associations are unique samples of close (<150 pc), young (?5-100 Myr) pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars. A significant number of members of these associations have been identified in the SACY (search for associations containing young stars) collaboration. We can use the proximity and youth of these members to investigate key ingredients in star formation processes, such as multiplicity. Aims: With the final goal of better understanding multiplicity properties at different evolutionary stages of PMS stars, we present the statistics of identified multiple systems from 113 confirmed SACY members. We derive multiplicity frequencies, mass-ratio, and physical separation distributions in a consistent parameter space, and compare our results to other PMS populations and the field. Methods: We have obtained adaptive-optics assisted near-infrared observations with the Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System and Near-Infrared Imager and Spectrograph (NACO), ESO/VLT, and the Infrared Camera for Adaptive optics at Lick observatory (IRCAL), Lick Observatory, for at least one epoch of all 113 SACY members. We have identified multiple systems using co-moving proper-motion analysis for targets with multi-epoch data, and using contamination estimates in terms of mass-ratio and physical separation for targets with single-epoch data. We have explored ranges in projected separation and mass-ratio of a [3-1000 au], and q [0.1-1], respectively. Results: We have identified 31 multiple systems (28 binaries and 3 triples). We derive a multiplicity frequency (MF) of MF3-1000 au=28.4+4.7_{-3.9}% and a triple frequency (TF) of TF3-1000 au =2.8 +2.5-0.8% in the separation range of 3-1000 au. We do not find any evidence for an increase in the MF with primary mass. The estimated mass-ratio of our statistical sample (with power-law index ? = -0.04 ± 0.14) is consistent with a flat distribution (? = 0). Conclusions: Analysis from previous work using tight binaries indicated that the underlying multiple system distribution of the SACY dataset and the young star-forming region Taurus are statistically similar, supporting the idea that these two populations formed in a similar way. In this work, we show further similarities (but also hints of discrepancies) between the two populations: flat mass-ratio distributions and statistically similar MF and TF values. We also compared the SACY sample to the field (in the separation range of 19-100 au), finding that the two distributions are indistinguishable, suggesting a similar formation mechanism. Based on observations obtained using the instruments NACO at the VLT (077.C-0483, 081.C-0825, 088.C-0506, 089.C-0207) and the adaptive optics facilities at the Lick Observatory (UCO 3 m).Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgTable B.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A88

  18. The First Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Naoki

    2010-10-01

    The standard cosmological model predicts that the first cosmological objects are formed when the age of the universe is a few hundred million years. Recent theoretical studies and numerical simulations consistently suggest that the first objects are very massive primordial stars. We introduce the key physics and explain why the first stars are thought to be massive, rather than to be low-mass stars. The state-of-the-art simulations include all the relevant atomic and molecular physics to follow the thermal evolution of a prestellar gas cloud to very high ``stellar'' densities. Evolutionary calculations of the primordial stars suggest the formation of massive blackholes in the early universe. Finally, we show the results from high-resolution simulations of star formation in a low-metallicity gas. Vigorous fragmentation is triggered in a star-forming gas cloud at a metallicity of as low as Z = 10-5Zsolar.

  19. Massive stars in galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between the morphologic type of a galaxy and the evolution of its massive stars is explored, reviewing observational results for nearby galaxies. The data are presented in diagrams, and it is found that the massive-star populations of most Sc spiral galaxies and irregular galaxies are similar, while those of Sb spirals such as M 31 and M 81 may be affected by morphology (via differences in the initial mass function or star-formation rate). Consideration is also given to the stability-related upper luminosity limit in the H-R diagram of hypergiant stars (attributed to radiation pressure in hot stars and turbulence in cool stars) and the goals of future observation campaigns. 88 references.

  20. Cooling of dense stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuruta, S.

    1972-01-01

    Cooling rates were calculated for neutron stars of about one solar mass and 10 km radius, with magnetic fields from zero to about 10 to the 14th power gauss, for extreme cases of maximum and zero superfluidity. The results show that most pulsars are so cold that thermal ionization of surface atoms would be negligible. Nucleon superfluidity and crystallization of heavy nuclei were treated quantitatively, and more realistic hadron star models were chosen. Cooling rates were calculated for a stable hyperon star near the maximum mass limit, a medium weight neutron star, and a light neutron star with neutron-rich heavy nuclei near the minimum mass limit. Results show that cooling rates are a sensitive function of density. The Crab and Vela pulsars are considered, as well as cooling of a massive white dwarf star.

  1. Strange nonchaotic stars

    E-print Network

    John F. Lindner; Vivek Kohar; Behnam Kia; Michael Hippke; John G. Learned; William L. Ditto

    2015-02-04

    The unprecedented light curves of the Kepler space telescope document how the brightness of some stars pulsates at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear dynamical system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies generically exhibits a strange but nonchaotic attractor. For Kepler's "golden" stars, we present evidence of the first observation of strange nonchaotic dynamics in nature outside the laboratory. This discovery could aid the classification and detailed modeling of variable stars.

  2. Introduction to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.

    2015-02-24

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts can set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.

  3. CSTAR star catalogue development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhde-Lacovara, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Continuous Stellar Tracking Attitude Reference (CSTAR) system is an in-house project for the Space Station to provide high accuracy, drift free attitude and angular rate information for the GN&C system. Constraints exist on the star catalogue incorporated in the system. These constraints include the following: mass memory allocated for catalogue storage, star tracker imaging sensitivity, the minimum resolvable separation angle between stars, the width of the field of view of the star tracker, and the desired number of stars to be tracked in a field of view. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) catalogue is the basis reference for this study. As it stands, the SAO does not meet the requirements of any of the above constraints. Star selection algorithms have been devised for catalogue optimization. Star distribution statistics have been obtained to aid in the development of these rules. VAX based software has been developed to implement the star selection algorithms. The software is modular and provides a design tool to tailor the catalogue to available star tracker technology. The SAO catalogue has been optimized for the requirements of the present CSTAR system.

  4. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  5. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one`s understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying {delta} Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for {delta} Scuti stars, using FG Vir, {delta} Scuti, and CD-24{degree} 7599 as examples.

  6. Strange Nonchaotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, John F.; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Ditto, William L.

    2015-08-01

    Exploiting the unprecedented capabilities of the planet-hunting Kepler space telescope, which stared at 150 000 stars for four years, we discuss recent evidence that certain stars dim and brighten in complex patterns with fractal features. Such stars pulsate at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the famous golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies is generically attracted toward a “strange” behavior that is geometrically fractal without displaying the “butterfly effect” of chaos. Strange nonchaotic attractors have been observed in laboratory experiments and have been hypothesized to describe the electrochemical activity of the brain, but a bluish white star 16 000 light years from Earth in the constellation Lyra may manifest, in the scale-free distribution of its minor frequency components, the first strange nonchaotic attractor observed in the wild. The recognition of stellar strange nonchaotic dynamics may improve the classification of these stars and refine the physical modeling of their interiors. We also discuss nonlinear analysis of other RR Lyrae stars in Kepler field of view and discuss some toy models for modeling these stars.References: 1) Hippke, Michael, et al. "Pulsation period variations in the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878." The Astrophysical Journal 798.1 (2015): 42.2) Lindner, John F., et al. "Strange nonchaotic stars." Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 054101 (2015)

  7. Star-ND (Multi-Dimensional Star-Identification) 

    E-print Network

    Spratling, Benjamin

    2012-07-16

    In order to perform star-identification with lower processing requirements, multi-dimensional techniques are implemented in this research as a database search as well as to create star pattern parameters. New star pattern parameters are presented...

  8. Combinations of 148 navigation stars and the star tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R.

    1980-01-01

    The angular separation of all star combinations for 148 nav star on the onboard software for space transportation system-3 flight and following missions is presented as well as the separation of each pair that satisfies the viewing constraints of using both star trackers simultaneously. Tables show (1) shuttle star catalog 1980 star position in M 1950 coordinates; (2) two star combination of 148 nav stars; and (3) summary of two star-combinations of the star tracker 5 deg filter. These 148 stars present 10,875 combinations. For the star tracker filters of plus or minus 5 deg, there are 875 combinations. Formalhaut (nav star 26) has the best number of combinations, which is 33.

  9. Horizontal Branch stars as AmFm/HgMn stars

    E-print Network

    G. Michaud; J. Richer

    2008-02-12

    Recent observations and models for horizontal branch stars are briefly described and compared to models for AmFm stars. The limitations of those models are emphasized by a comparison to observations and models for HgMn stars.

  10. A*STAR(SERC) A*STAR SERC

    E-print Network

    Yao, Shao Q

    A*STAR(SERC) A*STAR SERC H&LSERCBMRC MedTech · 3D · IT · · · · R&D · · · (CIMIT · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · EPGC · · iPSP · · · · · · · · NDT · · · · · A*STAR · A*STARA*CAR GET-Up GET-UpA*STARSERC SMEs GET-UpA*STARSPRING EDBMOEIE 1. (T-Up) A*STARRSE A*STAR 2. (OTR) 3. (TA) A*STAR 4. A*STAR

  11. The Pistol Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald F.; Najarro, Francisco; Morris, Mark; McLean, Ian S.; Geballe, Thomas R.; Ghez, Andrea M.; Langer, Norbert

    1998-10-01

    We present new near-infrared data and analysis, which indicate that the Pistol Star is one of the most luminous stars known, adding another test point for massive star formation and stellar evolution theories. We estimate an extinction of AK = 3.2 +/- 0.5 using the near-infrared colors of the star and of surrounding stars in the young Quintuplet cluster. Using our wind/atmosphere code, we find two families of models that fit the spectral energy distribution and detailed line profiles. The lower luminosity models give L = 106.6+/-0.2 L? and Teff = 104.15+/-0.01 K, while the higher luminosity models give L = 107.2+/-0.2 L? and Teff = 104.33+/-0.01 K; the error in luminosity assumes an uncertainty of +/-0.5 in AK, while the error in Teff is constrained by detailed line modeling. The models also reveal a helium enriched surface. As previously existing stellar evolution models do not extend to such high luminosities, we employ new evolutionary tracks for very massive stars to determine the initial mass and age of the Pistol Star, and estimate Minitial = 200-250 M? and an age of 1.7-2.1 Myr. The inferred luminosity and temperature place the star in a sparsely populated zone in the H-R diagram where luminous blue variables (LBVs) are often found. This is consistent with our evolutionary models, which predict that the star is in an unstable evolutionary stage. We interpret the star and its surrounding nebula as an LBV that has recently ejected large amounts of material. Our K-band speckle-imaging data reveal the star to be single down to a projected separation of 110 AU.

  12. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Norman, Colin E-mail: norman@stsci.edu

    2009-07-20

    A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multiphase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and SK law residuals. The model is extended to include a multiphase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.

  13. Stars and Flowers, Flowers and Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minti, Hari

    2012-12-01

    The author, a graduated from the Bucharest University (1964), actually living and working in Israel, concerns his book to variable stars and flowers, two domains of his interest. The analogies includes double stars, eclipsing double stars, eclipses, Big Bang. The book contains 34 chapters, each of which concerns various relations between astronomy and other sciences and pseudosciences such as Psychology, Religion, Geology, Computers and Astrology (to which the author is not an adherent). A special part of the book is dedicated to archeoastronomy and ethnoastronomy, as well as to history of astronomy. Between the main points of interest of these parts: ancient sanctuaries in Sarmizegetusa (Dacia), Stone Henge(UK) and other. The last chapter of the book is dedicated to flowers. The book is richly illustrated. It is designed for a wide circle of readers.

  14. Finding Mars-Sized Planets in Inner Orbits of Other Stars by Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W.; Cullers, K.; Dunham, E.; Koch, D.; Mena-Werth, J.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    High precision photometry from a spaceborne telescope has the potential of discovering sub-earth sized inner planets. Model calculations by Wetherill indicate that Mars-sized planets can be expected to form throughout the range of orbits from that of Mercury to Mars. While a transit of an Earth-sized planet causes a 0.084% decrease in brightness from a solar-like star, a transit of a planet as small as Mars causes a flux decrease of only 0.023%. Stellar variability will be the limiting factor for transit measurements. Recent analysis of solar variability from the SOLSTICE experiment shows that much of the variability is in the UV at <400 nm. Combining this result with the total flux variability measured by the ACRIM-1 photometer implies that the Sun has relative amplitude variations of about 0.0007% in the 17-69 pHz bandpass and is presumably typical for solar-like stars. Tests were conducted at Lick Observatory to determine the photometric precision of CCD detectors in the 17-69 pHz bandpass. With frame-by-frame corrections of the image centroids it was found that a precision of 0.001% could be readily achieved, corresponding to a signal to noise ratio of 1.4, provided the telescope aperture was sufficient to keep the statistical noise below 0.0006%. With 24 transits a planet as small as Mars should be reliably detectable. If Wetherill's models are correct in postulating that Mars-like planets are present in Mercury-like orbits, then a six year search should be able to find them.

  15. Hyperons in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1986-04-01

    Generalized beta equilibrium involving nucleons, hyperons, and isobars is examined for neutron star matter. The hyperons produce a considerable softening of the equation of state. It is shown that the observed masses of neutron stars can be used to settle a recent controversy concerning the nuclear compressibility. Compressibilities less than 200 MeV are incompatible with observed masses. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Observing Double Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, Russell M.; Fulton, B. J.; Bianco, Federica B.; Martinez, John; Baxter, John; Brewer, Mark; Carro, Joseph; Collins, Sarah; Estrada, Chris; Johnson, Jolyon; Salam, Akash; Wallen, Vera; Warren, Naomi; Smith, Thomas C.; Armstrong, James D.; McGaughey, Steve; Pye, John; Mohanan, Kakkala; Church, Rebecca

    2012-05-01

    Double stars have been systematically observed since William Herschel initiated his program in 1779. In 1803 he reported that, to his surprise, many of the systems he had been observing for a quarter century were gravitationally bound binary stars. In 1830 the first binary orbital solution was obtained, leading eventually to the determination of stellar masses. Double star observations have been a prolific field, with observations and discoveries - often made by students and amateurs - routinely published in a number of specialized journals such as the Journal of Double Star Observations. All published double star observations from Herschel's to the present have been incorporated in the Washington Double Star Catalog. In addition to reviewing the history of visual double stars, we discuss four observational technologies and illustrate these with our own observational results from both California and Hawaii on telescopes ranging from small SCTs to the 2-meter Faulkes Telescope North on Haleakala. Two of these technologies are visual observations aimed primarily at published "hands-on" student science education, and CCD observations of both bright and very faint doubles. The other two are recent technologies that have launched a double star renaissance. These are lucky imaging and speckle interferometry, both of which can use electron-multiplying CCD cameras to allow short (30 ms or less) exposures that are read out at high speed with very low noise. Analysis of thousands of high speed exposures allows normal seeing limitations to be overcome so very close doubles can be accurately measured.

  17. Science through ARts (STAR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densmore, Marycay; Kolecki, Joseph C.; Miller, Allan; Petersen, Ruth; Terrell, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Science Through ARts (STAR) is a free, international, cross-curricular program thematically aligned with "The Vision for Space Exploration," a framework of goals and objectives published by NASA in February 2004. Through the STAR program, students in grades 5 through 12 are encouraged to apply their knowledge in creative ways as they approach a…

  18. The Ages of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, David R.

    2010-09-01

    The age of an individual star cannot be measured, only estimated through mostly model-dependent or empirical methods, and no single method works well for a broad range of stellar types or for a full range in age. This review presents a summary of the available techniques for age-dating stars and ensembles of stars, their realms of applicability, and their strengths and weaknesses. My emphasis is on low-mass stars because they are present from all epochs of star formation in the Galaxy and because they present both special opportunities and problems. The ages of open clusters are important for understanding the limitations of stellar models and for calibrating empirical age indicators. For individual stars, a hierarchy of quality for the available age-dating methods is described. Although our present ability to determine the ages of even the nearest stars is mediocre, the next few years hold great promise as asteroseismology probes beyond stellar surfaces and starts to provide precise interior properties of stars and as models continue to improve when stressed by better observations.

  19. The Birth of Massive Stars and Star Clusters

    E-print Network

    Jonathan C. Tan

    2005-04-11

    In the present-day universe, it appears that most, and perhaps all, massive stars are born in star clusters. It also appears that all star clusters contain stars drawn from an approximately universal initial mass function, so that almost all rich young star clusters contain massive stars. In this review I discuss the physical processes associated with both massive star formation and with star cluster formation. First I summarize the observed properties of star-forming gas clumps, then address the following questions. How do these clumps emerge from giant molecular clouds? In these clustered environments, how do individual stars form and gain mass? Can a forming star cluster be treated as an equilibrium system or is this process too rapid for equilibrium to be established? How does feedback affect the formation process?

  20. Electrically charged compact stars

    E-print Network

    Subharthi Ray; Manuel Malheiro; Jose' P. S. Lemos; Vilson T. Zanchin

    2006-04-17

    We review here the classical argument used to justify the electrical neutrality of stars and show that if the pressure and density of the matter and gravitational field inside the star are large, then a charge and a strong electric field can be present. For a neutron star with high pressure (~ 10^{33} to 10^{35} dynes /cm^2) and strong gravitational field (~ 10^{14} cm/s^2), these conditions are satisfied. The hydrostatic equation which arises from general relativity, is modified considerably to meet the requirements of the inclusion of the charge. In order to see any appreciable effect on the phenomenology of the neutron stars, the charge and the electrical fields have to be huge (~ 10^{21} Volts/cm). These stars are not however stable from the viewpoint that each charged particle is unbound to the uncharged particles, and thus the system collapses one step further to a charged black hole

  1. On stars and Steiner stars Adrian Dumitrescu # Csaba D. Toth +

    E-print Network

    Dumitrescu, Adrian

    On stars and Steiner stars Adrian Dumitrescu # Csaba D. Tâ??oth + February 26, 2008 Abstract For a set of n points in the plane, a star connects one of the points (the center) to the other n - 1 points by straight line edges, while a Steiner star connects an arbitrary point in the plane to all n input points

  2. On stars and Steiner stars. II Adrian Dumitrescu

    E-print Network

    Dumitrescu, Adrian

    On stars and Steiner stars. II Adrian Dumitrescu Csaba D. T´oth Guangwu Xu June 26, 2008 Abstract A Steiner star for a set P of n points in Rd connects an arbitrary center point to all points of P, while a star connects a point p P to the remaining n-1 points of P. All connections are realized by straight

  3. Pseudosynchronization of Heartbeat Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Mara; Thompson, Susan E.; Hambleton, Kelly; Fuller, Jim; Shporer, Avi; Isaacson, Howard T.; Howard, Andrew; Kurtz, Donald

    2016-01-01

    A type of eccentric binary star that undergoes extreme dynamic tidal forces, known as Heartbeat stars, were discovered by the Kepler Mission. As the two stars pass through periastron, the tidal distortion causes unique brightness variations. Short period, eccentric binary stars, like these, are theorized to pseudosynchronize, or reach a rotational frequency that matches the weighted average orbital angular velocity of the system. This pseudosynchronous rate, as predicted by Hut (1981), depends on the binary's orbital period and eccentricity. We tested whether sixteen heartbeat stars have pseudosynchronized. We measure the rotation rate from obvious spot signatures in the light curve. We measure the eccentricity by fitting the light curve using PHOEBE and are actively carrying out a radial velocity monitoring program with Keck/HIRES in order to improve these orbital parameters. Our initial results show that while most heartbeat stars appear to have pseudosynchronized we find stars with rotation frequencies both longer and shorter than this rate. We thank the SETI Institute REU program, the NSF, and the Kepler Guest Observer Program for making this work possible.

  4. Measuring stars with Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thévenin, F.

    2013-12-01

    Beyond the extraordinary three dimensional map that Gaia will create for a billion of stars, it will reveal the origin and history of the Milky Way as the major goal. This does not weakness the fantastic impact of Gaia on the stellar physic. It will put constraints on the modeling of stars to an extreme that consequently new input physics will be mandatory to understand a Gaia HR diagram. Stars are formed in populations and evolve as collection of objects revealing important clues on how they formed, what kind of mass function is active during the star formation, how frequent is the star formation, all of this is imprinted in the intrinsic properties of stars that large surveys combined together like Gaia, Kepler, PLATO will revealed. The characterization of stars hosting planets is also a goal of such combination of large surveys and in particular of the measure of distances in the Galaxy. The launch of Gaia is for November of 2013 and the output catalogue is expected for 2020. Then will start the beginning of a new Astrophysics touching so many topics that a new age of astrophysics is then foreseen.

  5. Mariner 9 star photography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    Mariner 9 achieved successful photography of the stars, the purpose of the experiment being to measure camera parameters associated with point source photometry, and to examine the feasibility of using stars as invariant calibration sources and a reference for optical navigation. The Mariner 9 camera-B photography demonstrated photometric response consistency over a limited sample of data to better than 15%. Camera performance verified the ability to model vidicon response characteristics as well as demonstrated an imaging capability sufficient to permit the use of stars for photometric calibration.

  6. Strange nonchaotic stars.

    PubMed

    Lindner, John F; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G; Ditto, William L

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented light curves of the Kepler space telescope document how the brightness of some stars pulsates at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear dynamical system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies generically exhibits a strange but nonchaotic attractor. For Kepler's "golden" stars, we present evidence of the first observation of strange nonchaotic dynamics in nature outside the laboratory. This discovery could aid the classification and detailed modeling of variable stars. PMID:25699444

  7. Mass loss of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution we review the properties of the winds of massive stars. We focus on OB stars, red supergiants, Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) and Wolf-Rayet stars. For each type of star, we summarize the main wind properties and we give a brief description of the physical mechanism(s) responsible for mass loss.

  8. Hypernuclear Physics for Neutron Stars

    E-print Network

    Jurgen Schaffner-Bielich

    2008-01-24

    The role of hypernuclear physics for the physics of neutron stars is delineated. Hypernuclear potentials in dense matter control the hyperon composition of dense neutron star matter. The three-body interactions of nucleons and hyperons determine the stiffness of the neutron star equation of state and thereby the maximum neutron star mass. Two-body hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon interactions give rise to hyperon pairing which exponentially suppresses cooling of neutron stars via the direct hyperon URCA processes. Non-mesonic weak reactions with hyperons in dense neutron star matter govern the gravitational wave emissions due to the r-mode instability of rotating neutron stars.

  9. Sleeping under the stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirkel, Jack

    Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson went on a camping trip. As they lay down for the night, Holmes said, “Watson, look up at the sky and tell me what you see.”Watson:“! see millions and millions of stars.”

  10. Guide star probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soneira, R. M.; Bahcall, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    Probabilities are calculated for acquiring suitable guide stars (GS) with the fine guidance system (FGS) of the space telescope. A number of the considerations and techniques described are also relevant for other space astronomy missions. The constraints of the FGS are reviewed. The available data on bright star densities are summarized and a previous error in the literature is corrected. Separate analytic and Monte Carlo calculations of the probabilities are described. A simulation of space telescope pointing is carried out using the Weistrop north galactic pole catalog of bright stars. Sufficient information is presented so that the probabilities of acquisition can be estimated as a function of position in the sky. The probability of acquiring suitable guide stars is greatly increased if the FGS can allow an appreciable difference between the (bright) primary GS limiting magnitude and the (fainter) secondary GS limiting magnitude.

  11. Conformally symmetric relativistic star

    E-print Network

    Rahaman, Farook; Sardar, Iftikar Hossain; Chakraborty, Koushik

    2015-01-01

    We investigate whether compact stars having Tolman-like interior geometry admit conformal symmetry. Taking anisotropic pressure along the two principal directions within the compact object, we obtain physically relevant quantities such as transverse and radial pressure, density and redshift function. We study the equation of state for the matter distribution inside the star. From the relation between pressure and density function of the constituent matter, we explore the nature and properties of the interior matter. The red shift function, compactness parameter are found to be physically reasonable. The matter inside the star satisfies the null, weak and strong energy conditions. Finally, we compare the masses and radii predicted from the model with corresponding values in some observed stars.

  12. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  13. Conformally symmetric relativistic star

    E-print Network

    Farook Rahaman; Sunil D. Maharaj; Iftikar Hossain Sardar; Koushik Chakraborty

    2015-08-03

    We investigate whether compact stars having Tolman-like interior geometry admit conformal symmetry. Taking anisotropic pressure along the two principal directions within the compact object, we obtain physically relevant quantities such as transverse and radial pressure, density and redshift function. We study the equation of state for the matter distribution inside the star. From the relation between pressure and density function of the constituent matter, we explore the nature and properties of the interior matter. The red shift function, compactness parameter are found to be physically reasonable. The matter inside the star satisfies the null, weak and strong energy conditions. Finally, we compare the masses and radii predicted from the model with corresponding values in some observed stars.

  14. Worlds around other stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The possible, though tentative, detection of planetary companions to other stars which may be capable of supporting life as we know it through the use of a new generation of detectors and telescopes, combined with some innovative detection techniques, is discussed. The current view of the origin of the solar system, based on the nebular hypothesis, is discussed as it pertains to the formation of how and where planets form and, hence, how and where to search for them. Both direct methods of search for other planetary systems, which involve detecting reflected light or infrared radiation form the planets themselves, and indirect methods, which involve the scrutinization of a star for signs that it is responding to the gravitational tug of an orbiting planet, are discussed at length. In particular, various methods for detecting minute velocity perturbations of stars are discussed. It is noted that the study of brown dwarfs may also provide clues on the formation of stars and planets.

  15. Notes on Star Formation

    E-print Network

    Krumholz, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the field of star formation at a level suitable for graduate students or advanced undergraduates in astronomy or physics. The structure of the book is as follows. The first two chapters begin with a discussion of observational techniques, and the basic phenomenology they reveal. The goal is to familiarize students with the basic techniques that will be used throughout, and to provide a common vocabulary for the rest of the book. The next five chapters provide a similar review of the basic physical processes that are important for star formation. Again, the goal is to provide a basis for what follows. The remaining chapters discuss star formation over a variety of scales, starting with the galactic scale and working down to the scales of individual stars and their disks. The book concludes with a brief discussion of the clearing of disks and the transition to planet formation. The book includes five problem sets, complete with solutions.

  16. Cosmions and stars

    SciTech Connect

    Salati, P.

    1987-12-01

    Hypothetical particles such as the heavy neutrino, the photino, or the sneutrino/emdash/generically called cosmions/emdash/may solve the so called missing mass problem. If they exist, the cosmions may close the Universe. In addition to their gravitational effect on cosmological scales, the cosmions may also be captured by stars and concentrate in their cores. Since cosmions are able to transport heat outside stellar cores much more efficiently than photons, they may seriously affect the thermodynamics of the inner layer of stars. We have done an exact calculation of the accretion rate of cosmions by main sequence stars and we have studied the suppression of their central convection. We concluded that central convection inside stars between 0.3 Msub solar and 1 Msub solar is broken in the presence of cosmions. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Discovery of variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurochkin, N. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Instrumented methods of discovering variable stars are reviewed, specifically the blink comparator, color contrast method, positive-negative method, and television method. Among the empirical methods discussed, the Van Gent method is the most important.

  18. Cosmology with hypervelocity stars

    SciTech Connect

    Loeb, Abraham

    2011-04-01

    In the standard cosmological model, the merger remnant of the Milky Way and Andromeda (Milkomeda) will be the only galaxy remaining within our event horizon once the Universe has aged by another factor of ten, ? 10{sup 11} years after the Big Bang. After that time, the only extragalactic sources of light in the observable cosmic volume will be hypervelocity stars being ejected continuously from Milkomeda. Spectroscopic detection of the velocity-distance relation or the evolution in the Doppler shifts of these stars will allow a precise measurement of the vacuum mass density as well as the local matter distribution. Already in the near future, the next generation of large telescopes will allow photometric detection of individual stars out to the edge of the Local Group, and may target the ? 10{sup 5±1} hypervelocity stars that originated in it as cosmological tracers.

  19. The Pistol Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, D. F.; Morris, M.; McLean, I. S.; Ghez, A. M.; Najarro, F.; Geballe, T. R.; Serabyn, E.; Rich, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    We present near-infrared spectra, photometry (JHK(') nbL), and Keck K-band speckle images of the ``Pistol Star.'' We also present HST/NICMOS Paschen-alpha images and near-infrared spectra of the surrounding HII region (G0.15-0.05), the ``Pistol.'' The stellar spectra cover the J, H, and K bands at low resolution, and between 1.80 to 1.96 \\micron, 2.10 to 2.26 \\micron, and 4.02 to 4.08 \\micron\\ at moderate resolution. The spectra of the Pistol cover the K-band at low resolution and 1.80 to 1.96 \\micron\\ at moderate resolution. The stellar data are fit with wind/atmosphere models to find that the star is extraordinarily luminous, having L = 10(6.7({+0.5}_{-0.5})) L_sun, making it one of the most luminous stars known; the range in luminosity is primarily due to uncertainties in extinction and intrinsic spectral energy distribution of the star. Coupled with the relatively cool temperature, T_eff = 10(4.17({+0.19}_{-0.06})) K, the star is clearly in violation of the Humphreys-Davidson limit. The line of sight velocity of the star is confirmed to be ~ 130 kms(-1) , assuring membership in the Quintuplet cluster. This, along with the inferred extinction, places the star at the Galactic Center. The spectra of the Pistol confirm that the ionized gas has smoothly varying velocity gradients superposed on a bulk velocity of 130 kms(-1) . Radio and near-infrared hydrogen-to-helium line ratios suggest that the Pistol may have extrasolar helium abundance and that it must be excited, in part, by a star which is hotter than the Pistol Star. The morphology of the gas, the velocities in the gas, and the location of the star in the HR diagram suggest that the gas in G0.15-0.05 is matter which was ejected from the star.

  20. Cold Hybrid Star Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Moshfegh, H. R.; Darehmoradi, M.; Mojarrad, M. Ghazanfari

    2011-10-28

    Properties of neutron stars with quark core are investigated. The equation of state of hadronic matter is calculated using Myers and Swiatecki two nucleon interaction within Thomas-Fermi semiclassical approximation (TF). For quark matter we employ The MIT bag model with constant and density dependent bag parameter. With use of the obtained equation of states we have calculated mass-radius relation of such hybrid stars.

  1. Chaotic Star Birth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Poster VersionClick on the image for IRAS 4B Inset

    Located 1,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Perseus, a reflection nebula called NGC 1333 epitomizes the beautiful chaos of a dense group of stars being born. Most of the visible light from the young stars in this region is obscured by the dense, dusty cloud in which they formed. With NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, scientists can detect the infrared light from these objects. This allows a look through the dust to gain a more detailed understanding of how stars like our sun begin their lives.

    The young stars in NGC 1333 do not form a single cluster, but are split between two sub-groups. One group is to the north near the nebula shown as red in the image. The other group is south, where the features shown in yellow and green abound in the densest part of the natal gas cloud. With the sharp infrared eyes of Spitzer, scientists can detect and characterize the warm and dusty disks of material that surround forming stars. By looking for differences in the disk properties between the two subgroups, they hope to find hints of the star and planet formation history of this region.

    The knotty yellow-green features located in the lower portion of the image are glowing shock fronts where jets of material, spewed from extremely young embryonic stars, are plowing into the cold, dense gas nearby. The sheer number of separate jets that appear in this region is unprecedented. This leads scientists to believe that by stirring up the cold gas, the jets may contribute to the eventual dispersal of the gas cloud, preventing more stars from forming in NGC 1333.

    In contrast, the upper portion of the image is dominated by the infrared light from warm dust, shown as red.

  2. Bubbly Little Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this processed Spitzer Space Telescope image, baby star HH 46/47 can be seen blowing two massive 'bubbles.' The star is 1,140 light-years away from Earth.

    The infant star can be seen as a white spot toward the center of the Spitzer image. The two bubbles are shown as hollow elliptical shells of bluish-green material extending from the star. Wisps of green in the image reveal warm molecular hydrogen gas, while the bluish tints are formed by starlight scattered by surrounding dust.

    These bubbles formed when powerful jets of gas, traveling at 200 to 300 kilometers per second, or about 120 to 190 miles per second, smashed into the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that surrounds HH 46/47. The red specks at the end of each bubble show the presence of hot sulfur and iron gas where the star's narrow jets are currently crashing head-on into the cosmic cloud's gas and dust material.

    Whenever astronomers observe a star, or snap a stellar portrait, through the lens of any telescope, they know that what they are seeing is slightly blurred. To clear up the blurring in Spitzer images, astronomers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed an image processing technique for Spitzer called Hi-Res deconvolution.

    This process reduces blurring and makes the image sharper and cleaner, enabling astronomers to see the emissions around forming stars in greater detail. When scientists applied this image processing technique to the Spitzer image of HH 46/47, they were able to see winds from the star and jets of gas that are carving the celestial bubbles.

    This infrared image is a three-color composite, with data at 3.6 microns represented in blue, 4.5 and 5.8 microns shown in green, and 24 microns represented as red.

  3. Holographic neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; Papadodimas, Kyriakos; Verlinde, Erik

    2010-10-01

    We construct in the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence degenerate composite operators in the conformal field theory that are holographically dual to degenerate stars in anti de Sitter space. We calculate the effect of the gravitational back-reaction using the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations, and determine the ”Chandrasekhar limit” beyond which the star undergoes gravitational collapse towards a black hole.

  4. Holographic Neutron Stars

    E-print Network

    Jan de Boer; Kyriakos Papadodimas; Erik Verlinde

    2009-07-23

    We construct in the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence degenerate composite operators in the conformal field theory that are holographically dual to degenerate stars in anti de Sitter space. We calculate the effect of the gravitational back-reaction using the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations, and determine the "Chandrasekhar limit" beyond which the star undergoes gravitational collapse towards a black hole.

  5. Matter accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the fundamental neutron star parameters, such as the mass and the magnetic field strength, were experimentally determined in accreting neutron star systems. Some of the relevant data and the models used to derive useful information from them, are reviewed concentrating mainly on X-ray pulsars. The latest advances in our understanding of the radiation mechanisms and the transfer in the strongly magnetized polar cap regions are discussed.

  6. Alkaline broadening in Stars

    E-print Network

    A. De Kertanguy

    2015-01-14

    Giving new insight for line broadening theory for atoms with more structure than hydrogen in most stars. Using symbolic software to build precise wave functions corrected for ds;dp quantum defects. The profiles obtained with that approach, have peculiar trends, narrower than hydrogen, all quantum defects used are taken from atomic database topbase. Illustration of stronger effects of ions and electrons on the alkaline profiles, than neutral-neutral collision mechanism. Keywords : Stars: fundamental parameters - Atomic processes - Line: profiles.

  7. The Dependence of Signal-To-Noise Ratio (S/N) Between Star Brightness and Background on the Filter Used in Images Taken by the Vulcan Photometric Planet Search Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mena-Werth, Jose

    1998-01-01

    The Vulcan Photometric Planet Search is the ground-based counterpart of Kepler Mission Proposal. The Kepler Proposal calls for the launch of telescope to look intently at a small patch of sky for four year. The mission is designed to look for extra-solar planets that transit sun-like stars. The Kepler Mission should be able to detect Earth-size planets. This goal requires an instrument and software capable of detecting photometric changes of several parts per hundred thousand in the flux of a star. The goal also requires the continuous monitoring of about a hundred thousand stars. The Kepler Mission is a NASA Discovery Class proposal similar in cost to the Lunar Prospector. The Vulcan Search is also a NASA project but based at Lick Observatory. A small wide-field telescope monitors various star fields successively during the year. Dozens of images, each containing tens of thousands of stars, are taken any night that weather permits. The images are then monitored for photometric changes of the order of one part in a thousand. These changes would reveal the transit of an inner-orbit Jupiter-size planet similar to those discovered recently in spectroscopic searches. In order to achieve a one part in one thousand photometric precision even the choice of a filter used in taking an exposure can be critical. The ultimate purpose of an filter is to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of one's observation. Ideally, filters reduce the sky glow cause by street lights and, thereby, make the star images more distinct. The higher the S/N, the higher is the chance to observe a transit signal that indicates the presence of a new planet. It is, therefore, important to select the filter that maximizes the S/N.

  8. STAR facility tritium accountancy

    SciTech Connect

    Pawelko, R. J.; Sharpe, J. P.; Denny, B. J.

    2008-07-15

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has been established to provide a laboratory infrastructure for the fusion community to study tritium science associated with the development of safe fusion energy and other technologies. STAR is a radiological facility with an administrative total tritium inventory limit of 1.5 g (14,429 Ci) [1]. Research studies with moderate tritium quantities and various radionuclides are performed in STAR. Successful operation of the STAR facility requires the ability to receive, inventory, store, dispense tritium to experiments, and to dispose of tritiated waste while accurately monitoring the tritium inventory in the facility. This paper describes tritium accountancy in the STAR facility. A primary accountancy instrument is the tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS): a system designed to receive, assay, store, and dispense tritium to experiments. Presented are the methods used to calibrate and operate the SAS. Accountancy processes utilizing the Tritium Cleanup System (TCS), and the Stack Tritium Monitoring System (STMS) are also discussed. Also presented are the equations used to quantify the amount of tritium being received into the facility, transferred to experiments, and removed from the facility. Finally, the STAR tritium accountability database is discussed. (authors)

  9. Star cluster disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieles, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Star clusters are often used as tracers of major star-formation events in external galaxies as they can be studied out to much greater distances than individual stars. It is vital to understand their evolution if they are used to derive, for example, the star-formation history of their host galaxy. More specifically, we want to know how cluster lifetimes depend on their environment and on structural properties such as mass and radius. This review presents a theoretical overview of the early evolution of star clusters and the consequent long-term survival chances. It is suggested that clusters forming with initial densities of ?104 M? pc-3 survive the gas expulsion, or ‘infant mortality,’ phase. At ~10Myr, they are bound and have densities of ~103±1 M? pc-3. After this time, they are stable against expansion through stellar evolution, encounters with giant molecular clouds and will most likely survive for another Hubble time if they are located in a moderate tidal field. Clusters with lower initial densities (?100 M? pc-3) will disperse into the field within a few 10s of Myrs. Some discussion is given on how extragalactic star cluster populations, and especially their age distributions, can be used to gain insight into disruption.

  10. Seeing Stars in Serpens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Infant stars are glowing gloriously in this infrared image of the Serpens star-forming region, captured by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The reddish-pink dots are baby stars deeply embedded in the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that collapsed to create it. A dusty disk of cosmic debris, or 'protoplanetary disk,' that may eventually form planets, surrounds the infant stars.

    Wisps of green throughout the image indicate the presence of carbon rich molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. On Earth, these molecules can be found on charred barbecue grills and in automobile exhaust. Blue specks sprinkled throughout the image are background stars in our Milky Way galaxy.

    The Serpens star-forming region is located approximately 848 light-years away in the Serpens constellation.

    The image is a three-channel, false-color composite, where emission at 4.5 microns is blue, emission at 8.0 microns is green, and 24 micron emission is red.

  11. Dark Stars: A Review

    E-print Network

    Katherine Freese; Tanja Rindler-Daller; Douglas Spolyar; Monica Valluri

    2015-01-10

    Dark Stars (DS) are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of ordinary atomic material but powered by the heat from Dark Matter (DM) annihilation (rather than by fusion). Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for DM, can be their own antimatter and can accumulate inside the star, with their annihilation products thermalizing with and heating the DS. The resulting DSs are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium. The first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. Though DM constituted only $10^6 M_\\odot$), very bright ($>10^9 L_\\odot$), and potentially detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Once the DM runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus DSs can provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses DSs existing today but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  12. Appendix 14-C Revised July 2010

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    of the athletics director. Institutional Basketball Camp or Clinic (13.12.1.1.4) An institution's basketball camp.12.1.7) An institution's basketball sports camp or clinic must include an educational session presented in all-star camp held from June 30 to July 2, 2000, the women's basketball coaching staff restricted

  13. Playing to Win: Raising Children in a Competitive Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levey, Hilary Leigh

    2009-01-01

    Many parents work more hours outside of the home and their lives are crowded with more obligations than ever before; many children spend their evenings and weekends trying out for all-star teams, travelling to regional and national tournaments, and eating dinner in the car while being shuttled between activities. What explains the increase in…

  14. What Research Tells the Coach About Football.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paige, Roderick R.

    This booklet is designed to make available research findings about football with interpretations for practical application. Chapter 1, "Physical Characteristics of Football Athletes," includes a table comparing the height and weight of National Football League players and All-Star players. Somatotyping and body composition are discussed. In…

  15. 14 CFR 91.145 - Management of aircraft operations in the vicinity of aerial demonstrations and major sporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Knights); (4) Summer/Winter Olympic Games; (5) Annual Tournament of Roses Football Game; (6) World Cup Soccer; (7) Major League Baseball All-Star Game; (8) World Series; (9) Kodak Albuquerque International... mixed high and low performance aircraft. (10) Impact on non-participating aircraft. (11)...

  16. Football Field Turf This project is established to replace the grass in Brooks Stadium with artificial turf. This will

    E-print Network

    Hutchens, John

    Football Field Turf This project is established to replace the grass in Brooks Stadium such as student gatherings, concerts, regional all-star football games, etc. The field is shared by two varsity sports, football and women's lacrosse. This project will provide an additional practice space for both

  17. Resident and Commuter Camps Ages 9-17 years old (entering 12th grade)

    E-print Network

    -out: 1:30 - 4:30 p.m. (Thursday) depending on final All-star game Camp fees: Resident Camp $675-Ice Sessions t Individual skating video analysis t Separate goalie program t 1 hour of scrimmage daily on your receipt and sent to you at time of payment. Medical Policy Each participant should have his or her

  18. Brave New World: A Good News Scenario for Educational Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenaghan, D.

    A good news scenario about the future of education in the United States includes many things that are already being done and other things that can be dreamed of. One example is the "Awesome All-Stars Academy," a dream of a group of dedicated politicians, administrators, teachers, parents, community members, and students who took seriously their…

  19. Collapsing Enormous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    One of the big puzzles in astrophysics is how supermassive black holes (SMBHs) managed to grow to the large sizes weve observed in the very early universe. In a recent study, a team of researchers examines the possibility that they were formed by the direct collapse of supermassive stars.Formation MysterySMBHs billions of times as massive as the Sun have been observed at a time when the universe was less than a billion years old. But thats not enough time for a stellar-mass black hole to grow to SMBH-size by accreting material so another theory is needed to explain the presence of these monsters so early in the universes history. A new study, led by Tatsuya Matsumoto (Kyoto University, Japan), poses the following question: what if supermassive stars in the early universe collapsed directly into black holes?Previous studies of star formation in the early universe have suggested that, in the hot environment of these primordial times, stars might have been able to build up mass much faster than they can today. This could result in early supermassive stars roughly 100,000 times more massive than the Sun. But if these early stars end their lives by collapsing to become massive black holes in the same way that we believe massive stars can collapse to form stellar-mass black holes today this should result in enormously violent explosions. Matusmoto and collaborators set out to model this process, to determine what we would expect to see when it happens!Energetic BurstsThe authors modeled the supermassive stars prior to collapse and then calculated whether a jet, created as the black hole grows at the center of the collapsing star, would be able to punch out of the stellar envelope. They demonstrated that the process would work much like the widely-accepted collapsar model of massive-star death, in which a jet successfully punches out of a collapsing star, violently releasing energy in the form of a long gamma-ray burst (GRB).Because the length of a long GRB is thought to be proportional to the free-fall timescale of the collapsing star, the collapse of these supermassive stars would create much longer GRBs than are typical of massive stars today. Instead of the typical long-GRB length of ~30 seconds, these ultra-long GRBs would be 104106 seconds.Interestingly, we have already detected a small number of ultralong GRBs; they make up the tail end of the long GRB duration distribution. Could these detections be signals of collapsing supermassive stars in the early universe? According to the authors estimates, we could optimistically expect to detect roughly one of these events per year so its entirely possible!CitationTatsuya Matsumoto et al 2015 ApJ 810 64. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/810/1/64

  20. Collapsing Enormous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    One of the big puzzles in astrophysics is how supermassive black holes (SMBHs) managed to grow to the large sizes weve observed in the very early universe. In a recent study, a team of researchers examines the possibility that they were formed by the direct collapse of supermassive stars.Formation MysterySMBHs billions of times as massive as the Sun have been observed at a time when the universe was less than a billion years old. But thats not enough time for a stellar-mass black hole to grow to SMBH-size by accreting material so another theory is needed to explain the presence of these monsters so early in the universes history. A new study, led by Tatsuya Matsumoto (Kyoto University, Japan), poses the following question: what if supermassive stars in the early universe collapsed directly into black holes?Previous studies of star formation in the early universe have suggested that, in the hot environment of these primordial times, stars might have been able to build up mass much faster than they can today. This could result in early supermassive stars roughly 100,000 times more massive than the Sun. But if these early stars end their lives by collapsing to become massive black holes in the same way that we believe massive stars can collapse to form stellar-mass black holes today this should result in enormously violent explosions. Matusmoto and collaborators set out to model this process, to determine what we would expect to see when it happens!Energetic BurstsThe authors modeled the supermassive stars prior to collapse and then calculated whether a jet, created as the black hole grows at the center of the collapsing star, would be able to punch out of the stellar envelope. They demonstrated that the process would work much like the widely-accepted collapsar model of massive-star death, in which a jet successfully punches out of a collapsing star, violently releasing energy in the form of a long gamma-ray burst (GRB).Because the length of a long GRB is thought to be proportional to the free-fall timescale of the collapsing star, the collapse of these supermassive stars would create much longer GRBs than are typical of massive stars today. Instead of the typical long-GRB length of ~30 seconds, these ultra-long GRBs would be 104106 seconds.Interestingly, we have already detected a small number of ultralong GRBs; they make up the tail end of the long GRB duration distribution. Could these detections be signals of collapsing supermassive stars in the early universe? According to the authors estimates, we could optimistically expect to detect roughly one of these events per year so its entirely possible!CitationTatsuya Matsumoto et al 2015 ApJ 810 64. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/810/1/64

  1. Spectra of hot stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. John

    2015-08-01

    Non-LTE modeling is essential for interpreting the spectra of O stars and their decendents, and much progress has been made. The major uncertainty associated with analyzing photospheric spectra of O stars arises from issues related to microturbulence and macroturbulence. Many supergiants, for example, have microturbulent velocities that approach the sound speed, while macroturbulent velocities are often several times the sound speed. The cause of this turbulence is unknown, but may be related to pulsation, an underlying convection zone associated with the Fe opacity bump, or feedback from the stellar wind. Determining accurate abundances in O stars is hampered by the lack of lines belonging to low-z elements. Many species only have a few observable lines, and some of these are subject to complex non-LTE effects. A characteristic of massive stars is the existence of a stellar wind which is driven by radiation pressure. Radiation driving is inherently unstable, and this leads to winds with an inhomogeneous structure. Major issues that are still unresolved include: How are winds driven through the sonic point? What is the nature of the inhomogeneities, and how do the properties of these inhomogeneities change with density and velocity? How important is spatial porosity, and porosity in velocity space? What is the structure of the shocks, and in what stars do the shocks fail to cool? With Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars the major uncertainty arises because the classic spectroscopic radius (i.e., the location where ? = 2/3) often refers to a location in the wind — not necessarily the stellar radius associated with stellar evolution models. Derived radii are typically several times those predicted by stellar evolution calculations, although for strong-lined W-R stars it is possible to construct models that are consistent with evolution calculations. The driving of the winds in these stars is strongly coupled to the closeness of the stars to the Eddington limit and to their inhomogeneities, and the latter have not been derived from first principles. Theoretically, it is possible that the radii of the stars are inflated due to the Fe opacity bump.

  2. Captured older stars as the reason for apparently prolonged star formation in young star clusters

    E-print Network

    Jan Pflamm-Altenburg; Pavel Kroupa

    2006-11-28

    The existence of older stars within a young star cluster can be interpreted to imply that star formation occurs on time scales longer than a free-fall time of a pre-cluster cloud core. Here the idea is explored that these older stars are not related to the star formation process forming the young star cluster but rather that the orbits of older field stars are focused by the collapsing pre-cluster cloud core. Two effects appear: The focussing of stellar orbits leads to an enhancement of the density of field stars in the vicinity of the centre of the young star cluster. And due to the time-dependent potential of the forming cluster some of these stars can get bound gravitationally to the cluster. These stars exhibit similar kinematical properties as the newly formed stars and can not be distinguished from them on the basis of radial-velocity or proper-motion surveys. Such contaminations may lead to a wrong apparent star-formation history of a young cluster. In the case of the ONC the theoretical number of gravitationally bound older low-mass field stars agrees with the number of observed older low-mass stars.

  3. Models of symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedjung, Michael

    1993-01-01

    One of the most important features of symbiotic stars is the coexistence of a cool spectral component that is apparently very similar to the spectrum of a cool giant, with at least one hot continuum, and emission lines from very different stages of ionization. The cool component dominates the infrared spectrum of S-type symbiotics; it tends to be veiled in this wavelength range by what appears to be excess emission in D-type symbiotics, this excess usually being attributed to circumstellar dust. The hot continuum (or continua) dominates the ultraviolet. X-rays have sometimes also been observed. Another important feature of symbiotic stars that needs to be explained is the variability. Different forms occur, some variability being periodic. This type of variability can, in a few cases, strongly suggest the presence of eclipses of a binary system. One of the most characteristic forms of variability is that characterizing the active phases. This basic form of variation is traditionally associated in the optical with the veiling of the cool spectrum and the disappearance of high-ionization emission lines, the latter progressively appearing (in classical cases, reappearing) later. Such spectral changes recall those of novae, but spectroscopic signatures of the high-ejection velocities observed for novae are not usually detected in symbiotic stars. However, the light curves of the 'symbiotic nova' subclass recall those of novae. We may also mention in this connection that radio observations (or, in a few cases, optical observations) of nebulae indicate ejection from symbiotic stars, with deviations from spherical symmetry. We shall give a historical overview of the proposed models for symbiotic stars and make a critical analysis in the light of the observations of symbiotic stars. We describe the empirical approach to models and use the observational data to diagnose the physical conditions in the symbiotics stars. Finally, we compare the results of this empirical approach with existing models and discuss unresolved problems requiring new observational and theoretical work.

  4. Life Cycle of Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this stunning picture of the giant galactic nebula NGC 3603, the crisp resolution of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captures various stages of the life cycle of stars in one single view. To the upper left of center is the evolved blue supergiant called Sher 25. The star has a unique circumstellar ring of glowing gas that is a galactic twin to the famous ring around the supernova 1987A. The grayish-bluish color of the ring and the bipolar outflows (blobs to the upper right and lower left of the star) indicates the presence of processed (chemically enriched) material. Near the center of the view is a so-called starburst cluster dominated by young, hot Wolf-Rayet stars and early O-type stars. A torrent of ionizing radiation and fast stellar winds from these massive stars has blown a large cavity around the cluster. The most spectacular evidence for the interaction of ionizing radiation with cold molecular-hydrogen cloud material are the giant gaseous pillars to the right of the cluster. These pillars are sculptured by the same physical processes as the famous pillars Hubble photographed in the M16 Eagle Nebula. Dark clouds at the upper right are so-called Bok globules, which are probably in an earlier stage of star formation. To the lower left of the cluster are two compact, tadpole-shaped emission nebulae. Similar structures were found by Hubble in Orion, and have been interpreted as gas and dust evaporation from possibly protoplanetary disks (proplyds). This true-color picture was taken on March 5, 1999 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2.

  5. Sounds of a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    Acoustic Oscillations in Solar-Twin "Alpha Cen A" Observed from La Silla by Swiss Team Summary Sound waves running through a star can help astronomers reveal its inner properties. This particular branch of modern astrophysics is known as "asteroseismology" . In the case of our Sun, the brightest star in the sky, such waves have been observed since some time, and have greatly improved our knowledge about what is going on inside. However, because they are much fainter, it has turned out to be very difficult to detect similar waves in other stars. Nevertheless, tiny oscillations in a solar-twin star have now been unambiguously detected by Swiss astronomers François Bouchy and Fabien Carrier from the Geneva Observatory, using the CORALIE spectrometer on the Swiss 1.2-m Leonard Euler telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. This telescope is mostly used for discovering exoplanets (see ESO PR 07/01 ). The star Alpha Centauri A is the nearest star visible to the naked eye, at a distance of a little more than 4 light-years. The new measurements show that it pulsates with a 7-minute cycle, very similar to what is observed in the Sun . Asteroseismology for Sun-like stars is likely to become an important probe of stellar theory in the near future. The state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph , to be mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla, will be able to search for oscillations in stars that are 100 times fainter than those for which such demanding observations are possible with CORALIE. PR Photo 23a/01 : Oscillations in a solar-like star (schematic picture). PR Photo 23b/01 : Acoustic spectrum of Alpha Centauri A , as observed with CORALIE. Asteroseismology: listening to the stars ESO PR Photo 23a/01 ESO PR Photo 23a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 357 x 400 pix - 96k] [Normal - JPEG: 713 x 800 pix - 256k] [HiRes - JPEG: 2673 x 3000 pix - 2.1Mb Caption : PR Photo 23a/01 is a graphical representation of resonating acoustic waves in the interior of a solar-like star. Red and blue colours show element displacements in opposite directions. Geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth, and thus learn about the inner structure of our planet. The same technique works for stars. The Sun, our nearest star and a typical middle-age member of its class, has been investigated in this way since the 1960's. With "solar seismology" , astronomers have been able to learn much about the inner parts of the star, and not only the outer layers normally visible to the telescopes. In the Sun, heat is bubbling up from the central regions where enormous amount of energy is created by nuclear reactions . In the so-called convective zone , the gas is virtually boiling, and hot gas-bubbles are rising with a speed that is close to that of sound. Much like you can hear when water starts to boil, the turbulent convection in the Sun creates noise . These sound waves then propagate through the solar interior and are reflected on the surface, making it oscillate. This "ringing" is well observed in the Sun, where the amplitude and frequency of the oscillations provide astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the solar interior. From the Sun to the stars There is every reason to believe that our Sun is a quite normal star of its type. Other stars that are similar to the Sun are therefore likely to pulsate in much the same way as the Sun. The search for such oscillations in other solar-like stars has, however, been a long and difficult one. The problem is simply that the pulsations are tiny, so very great precision is needed in the measurements. However, the last few years have seen considerable progress in asteroseismology, and François Bouchy and Fabien Carrier from the Geneva Observatory have now been able to detect unambiguous acoustic oscillations in the Solar-twin star, Alpha Centauri A. The bright and nearby star Alpha Centauri Alpha Centauri (Alpha Cen) [1] is the brightest star in the constellation Centaurus in the southern hemisphere. It is actually

  6. Pulsating Star Mystery Solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-11-01

    By discovering the first double star where a pulsating Cepheid variable and another star pass in front of one another, an international team of astronomers has solved a decades-old mystery. The rare alignment of the orbits of the two stars in the double star system has allowed a measurement of the Cepheid mass with unprecedented accuracy. Up to now astronomers had two incompatible theoretical predictions of Cepheid masses. The new result shows that the prediction from stellar pulsation theory is spot on, while the prediction from stellar evolution theory is at odds with the new observations. The new results, from a team led by Grzegorz Pietrzy?ski (Universidad de Concepción, Chile, Obserwatorium Astronomiczne Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Poland), appear in the 25 November 2010 edition of the journal Nature. Grzegorz Pietrzy?ski introduces this remarkable result: "By using the HARPS instrument on the 3.6-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, along with other telescopes, we have measured the mass of a Cepheid with an accuracy far greater than any earlier estimates. This new result allows us to immediately see which of the two competing theories predicting the masses of Cepheids is correct." Classical Cepheid Variables, usually called just Cepheids, are unstable stars that are larger and much brighter than the Sun [1]. They expand and contract in a regular way, taking anything from a few days to months to complete the cycle. The time taken to brighten and grow fainter again is longer for stars that are more luminous and shorter for the dimmer ones. This remarkably precise relationship makes the study of Cepheids one of the most effective ways to measure the distances to nearby galaxies and from there to map out the scale of the whole Universe [2]. Unfortunately, despite their importance, Cepheids are not fully understood. Predictions of their masses derived from the theory of pulsating stars are 20-30% less than predictions from the theory of the evolution of stars. This embarrassing discrepancy has been known since the 1960s. To resolve this mystery, astronomers needed to find a double star containing a Cepheid where the orbit happened to be seen edge-on from Earth. In these cases, known as eclipsing binaries, the brightness of the two stars dims as one component passes in front of the other, and again when it passes behind the other star. In such pairs astronomers can determine the masses of the stars to high accuracy [3]. Unfortunately neither Cepheids nor eclipsing binaries are common, so the chance of finding such an unusual pair seemed very low. None are known in the Milky Way. Wolfgang Gieren, another member of the team, takes up the story: "Very recently we actually found the double star system we had hoped for among the stars of the Large Magellanic Cloud. It contains a Cepheid variable star pulsating every 3.8 days. The other star is slightly bigger and cooler, and the two stars orbit each other in 310 days. The true binary nature of the object was immediately confirmed when we observed it with the HARPS spectrograph on La Silla." The observers carefully measured the brightness variations of this rare object, known as OGLE-LMC-CEP0227 [4], as the two stars orbited and passed in front of one another. They also used HARPS and other spectrographs to measure the motions of the stars towards and away from the Earth - both the orbital motion of both stars and the in-and-out motion of the surface of the Cepheid as it swelled and contracted. This very complete and detailed data allowed the observers to determine the orbital motion, sizes and masses of the two stars with very high accuracy - far surpassing what had been done before for a Cepheid. The mass of the Cepheid is now known to about 1% and agrees exactly with predictions from the theory of stellar pulsation. However, the larger mass predicted by stellar evolution theory was shown to be significantly in error. The much-improved mass estimate is only one outcome of this work, and the team hopes to find other examples of these

  7. How star clusters could survive low star formation efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellhauer, Michael; Kroupa, Pavel

    2004-12-01

    After the stars of a new, embedded star cluster have formed they blow the remaining gas out of the cluster. Especially winds of high mass stars and definitely the on-set of the first super novae can remove the residual gas from a cluster. This leads to a very violent mass-loss and leaves the cluster out of virial equilibrium. Standard models predict that the star formation efficiency (SFE) has to be about 33 per cent for sudden (within one crossing-time of the cluster) gas expulsion to retain some of the stars in a bound cluster. If the efficiency is lower the stars of the cluster disperse completely. Recent observations reveal that in strong star bursts star clusters do not form in isolation but in complexes containing dozens and up to several hundred star clusters (super-clusters). By carrying out numerical experiments we demonstrate that in these environments (i.e. the deeper potential of the star cluster complex and the merging process of the star clusters within these super-clusters) the SFEs could be as low as 20 per cent, leaving a gravitationally bound stellar population. We demonstrate that the merging of the first clusters happens faster than the dissolution time therefore enabling more stars to stay bound within the merger object. Such an object resembles the outer Milky Way globular clusters and the faint fuzzy star clusters recently discovered in NGC 1023.

  8. How star clusters could survive low star formation efficiencies

    E-print Network

    M. Fellhauer; P. Kroupa

    2004-11-29

    After the stars of a new, embedded star cluster have formed they blow the remaining gas out of the cluster. Especially winds of high mass stars and definitely the on-set of the first super novae can remove the residual gas from a cluster. This leads to a very violent mass-loss and leaves the cluster out of virial equilibrium. Standard models predict that the star formation efficiency (SFE) has to be about 33 per cent for sudden (within one crossing-time of the cluster) gas expulsion to retain some of the stars in a bound cluster. If the efficiency is lower the stars of the cluster disperse completely. Recent observations reveal that in strong star bursts star clusters do not form in isolation but in complexes containing dozens and up to several hundred star clusters (super-clusters). By carrying out numerical experiments we demonstrate that in these environments (i.e. the deeper potential of the star cluster complex and the merging process of the star clusters within these super-clusters) the SFEs could be as low as 20 per cent, leaving a gravitationally bound stellar population. We demonstrate that the merging of the first clusters happens faster than the dissolution time therefore enabling more stars to stay bound within the merger object. Such an object resembles the outer Milky Way globular clusters and the faint fuzzy star clusters recently discovered in NGC 1023.

  9. Apollo Project- star projector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The specially designed star projector used in the Projection Planetarium. From A.W. Vogeley, 'Piloted Space-Flight Simulation at Langley Research Center,' Paper presented at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 1966 Winter Meeting, New York, NY, November 27 - December 1, 1966. 'Another approach to the scene-generation problem is the point-light-source projection technique. This technique has been used in the Langley Projection Planetarium,... to study Apollo launch-abort problems. This method was very effective in providing the required horizon-to-horizon view of Florida as seen from about 100,000 feet.' 'This projector operates on a concept developed by Spitz. It consists of a point-light source reflecting off a centrally located highly reflective sphere which directs the light outward through the many holes representing the stars. The size of the holes is varied to vary star magnitude. The star images are brought into focus on the inside of the planetarium by lenses glued to the surface of the projector and the diameter of the projection sphere govern the focal length required for these lenses. Although this type of projector does not have the precision required for the study of navigation problems it is very adequate for pilot control problems such as rendezvous where the star field is primarily used as an attitude reference.'

  10. Star Caught Smoking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-08-01

    VLTI Snapshots Dusty Puff Around Variable Star Using ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer, astronomers from France and Brazil have detected a huge cloud of dust around a star. This observation is further evidence for the theory that such stellar puffs are the cause of the repeated extreme dimming of the star. ESO PR Photo 34a/07 ESO PR Photo 34a/07 Dust Cloud in a R CrB Star (Artist's Impression) R Coronae Borealis stars are supergiants exhibiting erratic variability. Named after the first star that showed such behaviour [1], they are more than 50 times larger than our Sun. R Coronae Borealis stars can see their apparent brightness unpredictably decline to a thousandth of their nominal value within a few weeks, with the return to normal light levels being much slower. It has been accepted for decades that such fading could be due to obscuration of the stellar surface by newly formed dusty clouds. This 'Dust Puff Theory' suggests that mass is lost from the R Coronae Borealis (or R CrB for short) star and then moves away until the temperature is low enough for carbon dust to form. If the newly formed dust cloud is located along our line-of-sight, it eclipses the star. As the dust is blown away by the star's strong light, the 'curtain' vanishes and the star reappears. RY Sagittarii is the brightest member in the southern hemisphere of this family of weird stars. Located about 6,000 light-years away towards the constellation of Sagittarius (The Archer), its peculiar nature was discovered in 1895 by famous Dutch astronomer Jacobus Cornelius Kapteyn. In 2004, near-infrared adaptive optics observations made with NACO on ESO's Very Large Telescope allowed astronomers Patrick de Laverny and Djamel Mékarnia to clearly detect the presence of clouds around RY Sagittarii. This was the first direct confirmation of the standard scenario explaining the light variations of R CrB stars by the presence of heterogeneities in their envelope surrounding the star. ESO PR Photo 32e/07 ESO PR Photo 34b/07 Clouds around RY Sagittarii (NACO/VLT) However, the precise place where such dust clouds would form was still unclear. The brightest cloud detected was several hundred stellar radii from the centre, but it had certainly formed much closer. But how much closer? To probe the vicinity of the star, the astronomers then turned to ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer. Combining two different pairs of the 8.2-m Unit Telescopes and using the mid-infrared MIDI instrument that allows detecting cold structures, the astronomers explored the inner 110 astronomical units [2] around the star. Given the remoteness of RY Sagittarii, this corresponds to looking at details on a one-euro coin that is about 75 km away! The astronomers found that a huge envelope, about 120 times as big as RY Sagittarii itself, surrounds the supergiant star. But more importantly, the astronomers also found evidence for a dusty cloud lying only about 30 astronomical units away from the star, or 100 times the radius of the star. "This is the closest dusty cloud ever detected around a R CrB-type variable since our first direct detection in 2004," says Patrick de Laverny, leader of the team. "However, it is still detected too far away from the star to distinguish between the different scenarios proposed within the Dust Puff Theory for the possible locations in which the dusty clouds form." If the cloud moves at the speed of 300 km/s, as one can conservatively assume, it was probably ejected more than 6 months before its discovery from deeper inside the envelope. The astronomers are now planning to monitor RY Sagittarii more carefully to shed more light on the evolution of the dusty clouds surrounding it. "Two hundred years after the discovery of the variable nature of R CrB, many aspects of the R CrB phenomenon remain mysterious," concludes de Laverny.

  11. Holographic Magnetic Star

    E-print Network

    Piyabut Burikham; Tossaporn Chullaphan

    2012-05-16

    A warm fermionic AdS star under a homogeneous magnetic field is explored. We obtain the relativistic Landau levels by using Dirac equation and use the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff (TOV) equation to study the physical profiles of the star. Bulk properties such as sound speed, adiabatic index, and entropy density within the star are calculated analytically and numerically. Bulk temperature increases the mass limit of the AdS star but external magnetic field has the opposite effect. The results are partially interpreted in terms of the pre-thermalization process of the gauge matter at the AdS boundary after the mass injection. The entropy density is found to demonstrate similar temperature dependence as the magnetic black brane in the AdS in certain limits regardless of the different nature of the bulk and Hawking temperatures. Total entropy of the AdS star is also found to be an increasing function of the bulk temperature and a decreasing function of the magnetic field, similar behaviour to the mass limit. Since both total entropy and mass limit are global quantities, they could provide some hints to the value of entropy and energy of the dual gauge matter before and during the thermalization.

  12. Origin of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, K.

    1999-12-01

    The origin of the concept of neutron stars can be traced to two brief, incredibly insightful publications. Work on the earlier paper by Lev Landau (Phys. Z. Sowjetunion, 1, 285, 1932) actually predated the discovery of neutrons. Nonetheless, Landau arrived at the notion of a collapsed star with the density of a nucleus (really a "nucleus star") and demonstrated (at about the same time as, and independent of, Chandrasekhar) that there is an upper mass limit for dense stellar objects of about 1.5 solar masses. Perhaps even more remarkable is the abstract of a talk presented at the December 1933 meeting of the American Physical Society published by Walter Baade and Fritz Zwicky in 1934 (Phys. Rev. 45, 138). It followed the discovery of the neutron by just over a year. Their report, which was about the same length as the present abstract: (1) invented the concept and word supernova; (2) suggested that cosmic rays are produced by supernovae; and (3) in the authors own words, proposed "with all reserve ... the view that supernovae represent the transitions from ordinary stars to neutron stars (italics), which in their final stages consist of extremely closely packed neutrons." The abstract by Baade and Zwicky probably contains the highest density of new, important (and correct) ideas in high energy astrophysics ever published in a single paper. In this talk, we will discuss some of the facts and myths surrounding these two publications.

  13. Fingerprinting Nearby Star Suspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Todd J.; Bean, Jacob; Golimowski, Dave; Jao, Wei-Chun; Subasavage, John; Walkowicz, Lucianne

    2002-02-01

    To identify and characterize the Sun's neighbors, we propose to obtain red spectra (5300-9900+ Å) for suspected nearby red, brown, and white dwarfs. These spectra play an important role in a new parallax effort initiated as part of a small telescope consortium operating at CTIO. This new effort, CTIOPI2, will be an expansion of the highly successful CTIOPI effort - an NOAO Surveys Program in which we are measuring parallaxes for more than 200 southern nearby stars. Both are carried out under the RECONS (Research Consortium on Nearby Stars) effort based at Georgia State U., Johns Hopkins U., and U. Virginia. During RECONS' two previous CTIO spectroscopic observing runs, we had two partly cloudy nights in Feb 1998, and three rainy nights in Jul 2001. Nonetheless, from the earlier run's meager data we have identified six new stars within 25 pc, two of which lie within 10 pc. High quality spectra for these new nearby stars are being provided to the fundamental database of the NASA/NSF NStars Project. This proposal is similar to our previous proposal, 2001A-0270, although we now include three new samples of stars that are being examined for CTIOPI2 targets. These samples are being used for both PhD (Jao, Subasavage) and undergraduate senior (Bean, Walkowicz) theses.

  14. Dark Stars: A Review

    E-print Network

    Freese, Katherine; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Dark Stars (DS) are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of ordinary atomic material but powered by the heat from Dark Matter (DM) annihilation (rather than by fusion). Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for DM, can be their own antimatter and can accumulate inside the star, with their annihilation products thermalizing with and heating the DS. The resulting DSs are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium. The first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. Though DM constituted only $10^6 M_\\odot$), very bright ($>10^9 L_\\odot$), and potentially detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Once the DM runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus DSs can provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The curre...

  15. I-Love relation for incompressible stars and realistic stars

    E-print Network

    T. K. Chan; Atma P. O. Chan; P. T. Leung

    2014-11-26

    In spite of the diversity in the equations of state of nuclear matter, the recently discovered I-Love-Q relations [Yagi and Yunes, Science {\\bf 341}, 365 (2013)], which relate the moment of inertia, tidal Love number (deformability) and the spin-induced quadrupole moment of compact stars, hold for various kinds of realistic neutron stars and quark stars. While the physical origin of such universality is still a current issue, the observation that the I-Love-Q relations of incompressible stars can well approximate those of realistic compact stars hints at a new direction to approach the problem. In this paper, by establishing recursive post-Minkowskian expansion for the moment of inertia and the tidal deformability of incompressible stars, we analytically derive the I-Love relation for incompressible stars and show that the so obtained formula can be used to accurately predict the behavior of realistic compact stars from the Newtonian limit to the maximum mass limit.

  16. General Relativity&Compact Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2005-08-16

    Compact stars--broadly grouped as neutron stars and white dwarfs--are the ashes of luminous stars. One or the other is the fate that awaits the cores of most stars after a lifetime of tens to thousands of millions of years. Whichever of these objects is formed at the end of the life of a particular luminous star, the compact object will live in many respects unchanged from the state in which it was formed. Neutron stars themselves can take several forms--hyperon, hybrid, or strange quark star. Likewise white dwarfs take different forms though only in the dominant nuclear species. A black hole is probably the fate of the most massive stars, an inaccessible region of spacetime into which the entire star, ashes and all, falls at the end of the luminous phase. Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars known. Like all stars, neutron stars rotate--some as many as a few hundred times a second. A star rotating at such a rate will experience an enormous centrifugal force that must be balanced by gravity or else it will be ripped apart. The balance of the two forces informs us of the lower limit on the stellar density. Neutron stars are 10{sup 14} times denser than Earth. Some neutron stars are in binary orbit with a companion. Application of orbital mechanics allows an assessment of masses in some cases. The mass of a neutron star is typically 1.5 solar masses. They can therefore infer their radii: about ten kilometers. Into such a small object, the entire mass of our sun and more, is compressed.

  17. Cool Stars in Hot Places

    E-print Network

    S. T. Megeath; E. Gaidos; J. J. Hester; F. C. Adams; J. Bally; J. -E. Lee; S. Wolk

    2007-04-08

    During the last three decades, evidence has mounted that star and planet formation is not an isolated process, but is influenced by current and previous generations of stars. Although cool stars form in a range of environments, from isolated globules to rich embedded clusters, the influences of other stars on cool star and planet formation may be most significant in embedded clusters, where hundreds to thousands of cool stars form in close proximity to OB stars. At the cool stars 14 meeting, a splinter session was convened to discuss the role of environment in the formation of cool stars and planetary systems; with an emphasis on the ``hot'' environment found in rich clusters. We review here the basic results, ideas and questions presented at the session. We have organized this contribution into five basic questions: what is the typical environment of cool star formation, what role do hot star play in cool star formation, what role does environment play in planet formation, what is the role of hot star winds and supernovae, and what was the formation environment of the Sun? The intention is to review progress made in addressing each question, and to underscore areas of agreement and contention.

  18. On the efficiency of field star capture by star clusters

    E-print Network

    Steffen Mieske; Holger Baumgardt

    2007-09-10

    An exciting recent finding regarding scaling relations among globular clusters is the so-called 'blue tilt': clusters of the blue sub-population follow a trend of redder colour with increasing luminosity. In this paper we evaluate to which extent field star capture over a Hubble time may explain the 'blue tilt'. We perform collisional N-body simulations to quantify the amount of field star capture occuring over a Hubble time to star clusters with 10^3 to 10^6 stars. In the simulations we follow the orbits of field stars passing through a star cluster and calculate the energy change that the field stars experience due to gravitational interaction with cluster stars during one passage through the cluster. The capture condition is that their total energy after the passage is smaller than the gravitational potential at the cluster's tidal radius. By folding this with the fly-by rates of field stars with an assumed space density as in the solar neighbourhood and a range of velocity dispersions, we derive estimates on the mass fraction of captured field stars as a function of environment. We find that integrated over a Hubble time, the ratio between captured field stars and total number of clusters stars is very low (star velocity dispersion sigma=15 km/s. This holds for star clusters in the mass range of both open clusters and globular clusters. We furthermore show that tidal friction has a negligible effect on the energy distribution of field stars after interaction with the cluster. We conclude that field star capture is not a probable mechanism for creating the colour-magnitude trend of metal-poor globular clusters.

  19. Exploring Game Performance in the National Basketball Association Using Player Tracking Data

    PubMed Central

    Calleja-González, Julio; Jiménez Sáiz, Sergio; Schelling i del Alcázar, Xavi; Balciunas, Mindaugas

    2015-01-01

    Recent player tracking technology provides new information about basketball game performance. The aim of this study was to (i) compare the game performances of all-star and non all-star basketball players from the National Basketball Association (NBA), and (ii) describe the different basketball game performance profiles based on the different game roles. Archival data were obtained from all 2013-2014 regular season games (n = 1230). The variables analyzed included the points per game, minutes played and the game actions recorded by the player tracking system. To accomplish the first aim, the performance per minute of play was analyzed using a descriptive discriminant analysis to identify which variables best predict the all-star and non all-star playing categories. The all-star players showed slower velocities in defense and performed better in elbow touches, defensive rebounds, close touches, close points and pull-up points, possibly due to optimized attention processes that are key for perceiving the required appropriate environmental information. The second aim was addressed using a k-means cluster analysis, with the aim of creating maximal different performance profile groupings. Afterwards, a descriptive discriminant analysis identified which variables best predict the different playing clusters. The results identified different playing profile of performers, particularly related to the game roles of scoring, passing, defensive and all-round game behavior. Coaching staffs may apply this information to different players, while accounting for individual differences and functional variability, to optimize practice planning and, consequently, the game performances of individuals and teams. PMID:26171606

  20. Exploring Game Performance in the National Basketball Association Using Player Tracking Data.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Jaime; McGarry, Tim; Calleja-González, Julio; Jiménez Sáiz, Sergio; Schelling I Del Alcázar, Xavi; Balciunas, Mindaugas

    2015-01-01

    Recent player tracking technology provides new information about basketball game performance. The aim of this study was to (i) compare the game performances of all-star and non all-star basketball players from the National Basketball Association (NBA), and (ii) describe the different basketball game performance profiles based on the different game roles. Archival data were obtained from all 2013-2014 regular season games (n = 1230). The variables analyzed included the points per game, minutes played and the game actions recorded by the player tracking system. To accomplish the first aim, the performance per minute of play was analyzed using a descriptive discriminant analysis to identify which variables best predict the all-star and non all-star playing categories. The all-star players showed slower velocities in defense and performed better in elbow touches, defensive rebounds, close touches, close points and pull-up points, possibly due to optimized attention processes that are key for perceiving the required appropriate environmental information. The second aim was addressed using a k-means cluster analysis, with the aim of creating maximal different performance profile groupings. Afterwards, a descriptive discriminant analysis identified which variables best predict the different playing clusters. The results identified different playing profile of performers, particularly related to the game roles of scoring, passing, defensive and all-round game behavior. Coaching staffs may apply this information to different players, while accounting for individual differences and functional variability, to optimize practice planning and, consequently, the game performances of individuals and teams. PMID:26171606

  1. Mesopotamian Star Lists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Wayne

    Sumerian and Akkadian names of stars and constellations occur in cuneiform texts for over 2,000 years, from the third millennium BC down to the death of cuneiform in the early first millennium AD, but no fully comprehensive list was ever compiled in antiquity. Lists of stars and constellations are available in both the lexical tradition and astronomical-astrological tradition of the cuneiform scribes. The longest list in the former is that in the series Urra = hubullu, in the latter, those in Mul-Apin.

  2. A Real Shooting Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of A Real Shooting Star

    This artist's animation illustrates a star flying through our galaxy at supersonic speeds, leaving a 13-light-year-long trail of glowing material in its wake. The star, named Mira (pronounced my-rah) after the latin word for 'wonderful,' sheds material that will be recycled into new stars, planets and possibly even life. NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer discovered the long trail of material behind Mira during its survey of the entire sky in ultraviolet light.

    The animation begins by showing a close-up of Mira -- a red-giant star near the end of its life. Red giants are red in color and extremely bloated; for example, if a red giant were to replace our sun, it would engulf everything out to the orbit of Mars. They constantly blow off gas and dust in the form of stellar winds, supplying the galaxy with molecules, such as oxygen and carbon, that will make their way into new solar systems. Our sun will mature into a red giant in about 5 billion years.

    As the animation pulls out, we can see the enormous trail of material deposited behind Mira as it hurls along between the stars. Like a boat traveling through water, a bow shock, or build up of gas, forms ahead of the star in the direction of its motion. Gas in the bow shock is heated and then mixes with the cool hydrogen gas in the wind that is blowing off Mira. This heated hydrogen gas then flows around behind the star, forming a turbulent wake.

    Why does the trailing hydrogen gas glow in ultraviolet light? When it is heated, it transitions into a higher-energy state, which then loses energy by emitting ultraviolet light - a process known as fluorescence.

    Finally, the artist's rendering gives way to the actual ultraviolet image taken by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer

    Mira is located 350 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cetus, otherwise known as the whale. Coincidentally, Mira and its 'whale of a tail' can be found in the tail of the whale constellation.

  3. The DQ Herculis stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We review the properties of the DQ Herculis stars: cataclysmic variables containing an accreting, magnetic, rapidly rotating white dwarf. These stars are characterized by strong X-ray emission, high-excitation spectra, and very stable optical and X-ray pulsations in their light curves. There is considerable resemblance to their more famous cousins, the AM Herculis stars, but the latter class is additionally characterized by spin-orbit synchronism and the presence of strong circular polarization. We list eighteen stars passing muster as certain or very likely DQ Her stars. The rotational periods range from 33 s to 2.0 hr. Additional periods can result when the rotating searchlight illuminates other structures in the binary. A single hypothesis explains most of the observed properties: magnetically channeled accretion within a truncated disk. Some accretion flow still seems to proceed directly to the magnetosphere, however. The white dwarfs' magnetic moments are in the range 10(sup 32) - 10(sup 34) G cc, slightly weaker than in AM Her stars but with some probable overlap. The more important reason why DQ Hers have broken synchronism is probably their greater accretion rate and orbital separation. The observed L(sub x)/L(sub V) values are surprisingly low for a radially accreting white dwarf, suggesting that most of the accretion energy is not radiated in a strong shock above the magnetic pole. The fluxes can be more satisfactorily explained if most of the radial infall energy manages to bypass the shock and deposit itse lf directly in the white dwarf photosphere, where it should emerge as extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. This also provides an adequate source of ionizing photons to power the high-excitation optical and UV emission lines. This is probably the DQ Her analog to the famous 'soft X-ray excess' in AM Her stars. However, unlike the AM Her case, this radiation has not been directly observed, so the analogy must not (yet) be embraced too firmly. There is some conventional wisdom today which segregates the short-period from the long-period DQ Her stars. But the observational grounds for this distinction are slim, except in one respect: X-ray emission from short-period systems appears to be weaker and softer. This must be due to the shallower depth of the potential well, and/or the greater difficulty the fast rotators have in enforcing radial accretion flow.

  4. Synthetic guide star generation

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Page, Ralph H.; Ebbers, Christopher A.; Beach, Raymond J.

    2004-03-09

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  5. Synthetic guide star generation

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA) [Castro Valley, CA; Page, Ralph H. (Castro Valley, CA) [Castro Valley, CA; Ebbers, Christopher A. (Livermore, CA) [Livermore, CA; Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA) [Livermore, CA

    2008-06-10

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  6. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of triggered star formation in a cosmological context.

  7. A Star on Earth

    ScienceCinema

    Prager, Stewart; Zwicker, Andrew; Hammet, Greg; Tresemer, Kelsey; Diallo, Ahmed

    2014-06-06

    At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: create a star on Earth. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized gases in which, under the right conditions, nuclear fusion will occur. Fusion is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. Not just limited to theoretical work, the NSTX is enabling cutting-edge research to develop fusion as a future energy source.

  8. A Star on Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, Stewart; Zwicker, Andrew; Hammet, Greg; Tresemer, Kelsey; Diallo, Ahmed

    2014-03-05

    At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: create a star on Earth. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized gases in which, under the right conditions, nuclear fusion will occur. Fusion is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. Not just limited to theoretical work, the NSTX is enabling cutting-edge research to develop fusion as a future energy source.

  9. Neutrinos from neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    A calculation of the flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos from galactic neutron stars is presented. The calculation is used to determine the number of point sources detectable at the sensitivity threshold of a proposed deep underwater muon and neutrino detector array. The detector array would have a point source detection threshold of about 100 eV/sq cm-sec. Analysis of neutrino luminosities and the number of detectable sources suggests that the deep underwater detector may make a few discoveries. In particular, a suspected neutron star in the Cyg X-3 source seems a promising target for the deep underwater array.

  10. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  11. The Austin Energy Star Program 

    E-print Network

    Seiter, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    The Austin Energy Star Program is an Austin-specific energy rating system implemented in July, 1985. Since the first builders joined the program, Energy Star has gone through significant improvements vithout changing the fundamental marketing theme...

  12. The Death of a Star

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, Kip S.

    1971-01-01

    Theories associated with the gravitational collapse of a star into black holes" are described. Suggests that the collapse and compression might go through the stages from white dwarf star to neutron core to black hole." (TS)

  13. Extended relativistic hyperon star model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, I.; Keska, M.; Manka, R.

    2003-09-01

    In this paper an equation of state of neutron star matter, which includes strange baryons in the framework of Zimanyi and Moszkowski model has been obtained. We focus on the effects of the isospin dependence of the equation of state and construct the hyperon star model for the fitted parameters. Numerous neutron star models show that the appearance of hyperons is connected with the increasing density in neutron star interiors. Analysis carried out in this paper shows that the inclusion of ? meson and additional nonlinear meson interaction terms affects the density dependence of the symmetry energy and the chemical composition of a neutron star. Since the effective baryon masses contribute to baryon chemical potentials, they also alter the chemical composition of the star. The obtained model of the star not only excludes large population of hyperons but also does not significantly reduce the lepton content in the star interior.

  14. Photographic photometry of variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kholopov, P. N.

    1973-01-01

    Photographic methods of determining stellar magnitude and measuring brightness of variable stars on negatives include the photoelectric method and the contascope. Calibration curves are usually plotted by the UBV method. Magnitudes of comparison stars can be determined from photographs.

  15. Spectroscopic Study of Extended Star Clusters in Dwarf Galaxy NGC 6822

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Narae; Park, Hong Soo; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lim, Sungsoon; Hodge, Paul W.; Kim, Sang Chul; Miller, Bryan; Weisz, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    We present a spectroscopic study of the four extended star clusters (ESCs) in NGC 6822 based on the data obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Gemini-South 8.1 m telescope. The radial velocities derived from the spectra range from -61.2 ± 20.4 km s-1 (for C1) to -115.34 ± 57.9 km s-1 (for C4) and, unlike the intermediate-age carbon stars, they do not display any sign of systematic rotation around NGC 6822. The ages and metallicities derived using the Lick indices show that the ESCs are old (>=8 Gyr) and metal poor ([Fe/H] <~ -1.5). NGC 6822 is found to have both metal poor ([Fe/H] ?-2.0) and metal rich ([Fe/H] ?-0.9) star clusters within 15' (2 kpc) from the center, whereas only metal poor clusters are observed in the outer halo with r >= 20'(2.6 kpc). The kinematics, old ages, and low metallicities of ESCs suggest that ESCs may have accreted into the halo of NGC 6822. Based on the velocity distribution of ESCs, we have determined the total mass and the mass-to-light ratio of NGC 6822: M_{N6822} = 7.5^{+4.5}_{-0.1} \\times 10^{9}\\ M_{\\odot } and (M/L)_{N6822} = 75^{+45}_{-1} (M/L)_{\\odot }. It shows that NGC 6822 is one of the most dark matter dominated dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  16. A Vanishing Star Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    VLT Observations of an Unusual Stellar System Reinhold Häfner of the Munich University Observatory (Germany) is a happy astronomer. In 1988, when he was working at a telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory, he came across a strange star that suddenly vanished off the computer screen. He had to wait for more than a decade to get the full explanation of this unusual event. On June 10-11, 1999, he observed the same star with the first VLT 8.2-m Unit Telescope (ANTU) and the FORS1 astronomical instrument at Paranal [1]. With the vast power of this new research facility, he was now able to determine the physical properties of a very strange stellar system in which two planet-size stars orbit each other. One is an exceedingly hot white dwarf star , weighing half as much as the Sun, but only twice as big as the Earth. The other is a much cooler and less massive red dwarf star , one-and-a-half times the size of planet Jupiter. Once every three hours, the hot star disappears behind the other, as seen from the Earth. For a few minutes, the brightness of the system drops by a factor of more than 250 and it "vanishes" from view in telescopes smaller than the VLT. A variable star named NN Serpentis ESO PR Photo 30a/99 ESO PR Photo 30a/99 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 468 pix - 152k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 936 pix - 576k] [High-Res - JPEG: 2304 x 2695 pix - 4.4M] Caption to ESO PR Photo 30a/99 : The sky field around the 17-mag variable stellar system NN Serpentis , as seen in a 5 sec exposure through a V(isual) filter with VLT ANTU and FORS1. It was obtained just before the observation of an eclipse of this unsual object and served to centre the telescope on the corresponding sky position. The field shown here measures 4.5 x 4.5 armin 2 (1365 x 1365 pix 2 ; 0.20 arcsec/pix). The field is somewhat larger than that shown in Photo 30b/99 and has the same orientation to allow comparison: North is about 20° anticlockwise from the top and East is 90° clockwise from that direction. The unsual star in question is designated NN Serpentis , or just NN Ser . As the name indicates, it is located in the constellation of Serpens (The Serpent), about 12° north of the celestial equator. A double letter, here "NN", is used to denote variable stars [2]. It is a rather faint object of magnitude 17, about 25,000 times fainter than what can be perceived with the unaided eye. The distance is about 600 light-years (180 pc). In July 1988, Reinhold Häfner performed observations of NN Ser (at that time still known by its earlier name PG 1550+131 ) with the Danish 1.54-m telescope at La Silla. He was surprised, but also very pleased to discover that it underwent a very deep eclipse every 187 minutes. Within less than 2 minutes, the brightness dropped by a factor of more than 100 (5 magnitudes). During the next 9 minutes, the star completely disappeared from view - it was too faint to be observed with this telescope. It then again reappeared and the entire event was over after just 11 minutes. Why eclipses are so important for stellar studies An eclipse occurs when one of the stars in a binary stellar system moves in front of the other, as seen by the observer. The effect is similar to what happens during a solar eclipse when the Moon moves in front of the Sun. In both cases, the eclipse may be partial or total , depending on whether or not the eclipsed star (or the Sun) is completely hidden from view. The occurence of eclipses in stellar systems, as seen from the Earth, depends on the spatial orientation of the orbital plane and the sizes of the two stars. Two eclipses take place during one orbital revolution, but they may not both be observable. The physical properties of the two stars in a binary system (e.g., the sizes of the stars, the size and shape of the orbit, the distribution of the light on the surfaces of the stars, their temperatures etc.) can be determined from the measured "light-curve" of the system (a plot of brightness vrs. time). The stars are always too close to each other to be seen as anything but a point of lig

  17. Effective temperatures of CP stars

    E-print Network

    N. A. Sokolov

    1998-05-12

    A new method of T_eff determination for CP stars is proposed. The method is based on the fact that the slope of the energy distribution in the Balmer continuum near the Balmer jump is identical for "normal" main sequence stars and for CP stars with the same T_eff. It is shown that the T_eff of CP stars derived by this method are in good agreement with those derived by other methods.

  18. Star clusters as diaries of galaxies

    E-print Network

    Th. Maschberger; P. Kroupa

    2007-06-11

    Most if not all stars form in star clusters. Thus the distribution of star clusters preserves the information on the star formation history of a galaxy. Massive clusters form only during episodes of high star formation activity whereas periods of low star formation activity cannot produce them. We present here the method of Maschberger & Kroupa (2007) to derive the star formation history of a galaxy from its star-cluster content.

  19. Spectral Modeling Hot Star Winds

    E-print Network

    Cohen, David

    Spectral Modeling of X-Rays from Hot Star Winds Emma Wollman Advisor: David Cohen #12;Hot Stars ·· Short-livedShort-lived (~ 1-10 million yrs)(~ 1-10 million yrs) #12;Stellar Winds · Net momentum · More luminosity !"stronger wind · Mass-loss rate determines the fate of the star #12;X-ray Production

  20. The evolution of massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The hypotheses underlying theoretical studies of the evolution of massive model stars with and without mass loss are summarized. The evolutionary tracks followed by the models across theoretical Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagrams are compared with the observed distribution of B stars in an HR diagram. The pulsational properties of models of massive star are also described.

  1. High-gravity central stars

    E-print Network

    Thomas Rauch

    2006-07-11

    NLTE spectral analyses of high-gravity central stars by means of state-of-the-art model atmosphere techniques provide information about the precursor AGB stars. The hydrogen-deficient post-AGB stars allow investigations on the intershell matter which is apparently exhibited at the stellar surface. We summarize recent results from imaging, spectroscopy, and spectropolarimetry.

  2. X Rays from Old Neutron Stars Heated by Axion Stars

    E-print Network

    Aiichi Iwazaki

    1999-06-14

    We show that axionic boson stars collide with isolated old neutron stars with strong magnetic field ($>10^8$ Gauss) and causes the neutron stars to radiate X ray by heating them. Surface temperatures of such neutron stars becomes$10^5 K \\sim 10^6 K$. We suggest that these are possible candidates for X ray sources observed in ROSAT Survey. We discuss a possible way of identifying such neutron stars. We also point out that the collision generates a burst of monochromatic radiations with frequency given by axion mass.

  3. Chemical Compositions of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckrone, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In 1835, in a famously inaccurate forecast, the French philosopher Auguste Comte wrote of stars that, `We understand the possibility of determining their shapes, their distances, their sizes and their movements; whereas we would never know how to study by any means their chemical composition…'. At the close of the 20th century the accurate measurement of the abundances of the chemical elements in...

  4. NuStar

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    NuStar ; CASRN 85509 - 19 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  5. Anisotropic Quintessence stars

    E-print Network

    Mehedi Kalam; Farook Rahaman; Sajahan Molla; Sk. Monowar Hossein

    2013-10-23

    We propose a relativistic model for quintessence stars with the combination of an anisotropic pressure corresponding to normal matter and a quintessence dark energy having a characteristic parameter {\\omega}q such that -1 <{\\omega}q < - 1/3. We discuss various physical features of the model and show that the model satisfies all the regularity conditions and can provide stable equilibrium configurations.

  6. Anisotropic Quintessence stars

    E-print Network

    Kalam, Mehedi; Molla, Sajahan; Hossein, Sk Monowar

    2013-01-01

    We propose a relativistic model for quintessence stars with the combination of an anisotropic pressure corresponding to normal matter and a quintessence dark energy having a characteristic parameter {\\omega}q such that -1 <{\\omega}q < - 1/3. We discuss various physical features of the model and show that the model satisfies all the regularity conditions and can provide stable equilibrium configurations.

  7. Focus on the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geary, Pat; And Others

    This document consists of a series of astronomy activities for intermediate grade students. It contains three major teaching sections. Teacher Section I deals with stars, constellations, and galaxies and presents a series of demonstrations, discussion topics, readings, and hands-on-activities. Teachers Section II is concerned with a planetarium…

  8. First Star I See.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caffrey, Jaye Andras

    This children's novel tells the story of a young girl with attention deficit disorder (ADD) without hyperactivity and her younger brother who has ADD with hyperactivity. Trying to win a school writing contest on the topic of space and stars helps bright, imaginative Paige Bradley realize that fixing her "focusing knob" will compensate for her ADD.…

  9. The Astounding Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Angela; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Studying about stellar constellations provides children with an opportunity to learn about ancient myths and mathematics at the same time. An interdisciplinary teaching unit combines information about myths associated with the zodiac signs and instructions for plotting the coordinates of stars. (PP)

  10. Housing Star Schools Reforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tushnet, Naida C.

    The Star Schools Program has funded projects to explore innovative educational applications of technology in distance education. Funded projects have applied a variety of technologies, including videodisks, compressed data transmission, fiber optic technology, and computer networks. Program evaluation is a mandated aspect of the program. This…

  11. Molecules between the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a listing of molecules discovered to date in the vast interstellar clouds of dust and gas. Emphasizes the recent discoveries of organic molecules. Discusses molecular spectral lines, MASERs (microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation), molecular clouds, and star birth. (TW)

  12. Pygmy stars: first pair.

    PubMed

    Zwicky, F

    1966-07-01

    The binary LP 101-15/16 having the proper motion of 1.62 seconds of arc per year has been studied with the prime-focus spectrograph of the 200-inch (508 cm) telescope. Indications are that LP 101-15/16 is the first pair of pygmy stars ever discovered. One of its components, LP 101-16, is probably a blue pygmy star which is at least four magnitudes fainter than the ordinary white dwarfs. Also, two of the Balmer lines in absorption appear to be displaced toward the red by amounts which indicate the existence of an Einstein gravitational red shift corresponding to about 1000 km sec-1. On the other hand LP 101-15 is red and shows an entirely new type of spectrum, which suggests that it may be a first representative of a type of red pygmy star which is 2.5 magnitudes fainter than the M-type dwarf stars of the main sequence. PMID:17730606

  13. Quarkonium at STAR

    SciTech Connect

    LeCompte, T. J.

    1998-11-11

    The STAR detector is capable of reconstruction the J/{psi} meson in its dielectron decay channel, along with continuum dielectrons from heavy quark decay. The limitation is not instrumental--the ability of the STAR detector to identify electrons--rather, the primary limitation is yield. We expect to reconstruct of order 10,000 events per year in the bin of highest centrality, with perhaps ten times that many integrated over all bins of centrality. This is enough for a rather detailed study of J/{psi} production. The yields for {psi}{prime} and the high p{sub T} {chi} mesons which are in a low enough background region of phase space to permit reconstruction are too small for precision measurements. The only parent of the J/{psi} with a large enough yield for clear observation is the b quark. Even limited to just the J/{psi}, there is a rich physics program available to STAR: the yield provides information on the gluon flux as well as color screening, especially when compared to the open charm and b {r_arrow} J/{psi}X yields. The p{sub T} distribution measures energy loss in a nuclear medium, either by comparison with pp data or across different bins in centrality. The STAR quarkonium program should provide several unique windows into the physics of heavy ion collisions at RHIC.

  14. Insight into star death

    SciTech Connect

    Talcott, R.

    1988-02-01

    Nineteen neutrinos, formed in the center of a supernova, became a theorist's dream. They came straight from the heart of supernova 1987A and landed in two big underground tanks of water. Suddenly a new chapter in observational astronomy opened as these two neutrino telescopes gave astronomers their first look ever into the core of a supernova explosion. But the theorists' dream almost turned into a nightmare. Observations of the presupernova star showed conclusively that the star was a blue supergiant, but theorists have long believed only red supergiant stars could explode as supernovae. Do astronomers understand supernovae better now than when supernova 1987A exploded in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) one year ago Yes. The observations of neutrinos spectacularly confirmed a vital aspect of supernova theory. But the observed differences between 1987A and other supernovae have illuminated and advanced our perception of how supernovae form. By working together, observers and theorists are continuing to hone their ideas about how massive stars die and how the subsequent supernovae behave.

  15. Deepsea Brittle Star

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Collected from more than 1000 feet below the surface of the Gulf of Mexico, this fragile brittle star clings to a soft coral.  These deep-sea coral ecosystems ar biodiversity hot-spots in the deep ocean, but they are also vulnerable to climate change issues such as increased temperature and ocean ac...

  16. Stabilizing Star Wars

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, A.M.; Barkenbus, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    An orderly replacement of offensive with defensive nuclear weapons is part of the defense-protected build-down (DPB) strategy described by Weinberg and Barkenbus. Differing from the administration's Star Wars approach by relying on interceptor missiles rather than costly and unproven lasers and particle beams, the plan also calls for a simultaneous freeze on offensive weapons. (DCK)

  17. Fluctuation studies in STAR

    E-print Network

    Supriya Das

    2006-12-08

    Study of event by event fluctuations of thermodynamic quantities offer us more insight about the hot and dense matter created in the relativistic heavy ion collisions. In this review the recent results on these studies carried out by the STAR collaboration are presented.

  18. Dilepton Measurements at STAR

    E-print Network

    F. Geurts

    2013-05-23

    In the study of hot and dense nuclear matter, created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, dilepton measurements play an essential role. Leptons, when compared to hadrons, have only little interaction with the strongly interacting system. Thus, dileptons provide ideal penetrating probes that allow the study of such a system throughout its space-time evolution. In the low mass range ($M_{ll}3.0$ GeV/$c^2$), dilepton measurements are expected to see contributions from primordial processes involving heavy quarks, and Drell-Yan production. With the introduction of the Time-of-Flight detector, the STAR detector has been able to perform large acceptance, high purity electron identification. In this contribution, we will present STAR's recent dielectron measurements in the low and intermediate mass range for RHIC beam energies ranging between 19.6 and 200 GeV. Compared to electrons, muon measurements have the advantage of reduced bremsstrahlung radiation in the surrounding detector materials. With the upcoming detector upgrades, specifically the muon detector (MTD), STAR will be able to include such measurements in its (di-)lepton studies. We will discuss the future dilepton program at STAR and the physics cases for these upgrades.

  19. Reaching for the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper-Davis, Sharon

    1999-01-01

    Describes "Reaching for the Stars," a program which develops teaming and mentoring skills in senior physics students. Phase 1 requires student pairs to design a rocket; Phase 2 pairs seniors with gifted second graders who build the rocket from written instructions; and in Phase 3, pairs of seniors create a children's storybook explaining one of…

  20. Physics of the Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haig, G. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Describes how astrophysics can be a do-it-yourself project within a school boy's budget and background, by giving detailed instruction on equipment construction. In addition, this article describes many experiments to undertake, with the equipment, such as determining color temperature, star spectra, chemical composition and others. (BR)

  1. StarLogo TNG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopfer, Eric; Scheintaub, Hal; Huang, Wendy; Wendel, Daniel

    Computational approaches to science are radically altering the nature of scientific investigatiogn. Yet these computer programs and simulations are sparsely used in science education, and when they are used, they are typically “canned” simulations which are black boxes to students. StarLogo The Next Generation (TNG) was developed to make programming of simulations more accessible for students and teachers. StarLogo TNG builds on the StarLogo tradition of agent-based modeling for students and teachers, with the added features of a graphical programming environment and a three-dimensional (3D) world. The graphical programming environment reduces the learning curve of programming, especially syntax. The 3D graphics make for a more immersive and engaging experience for students, including making it easy to design and program their own video games. Another change to StarLogo TNG is a fundamental restructuring of the virtual machine to make it more transparent. As a result of these changes, classroom use of TNG is expanding to new areas. This chapter is concluded with a description of field tests conducted in middle and high school science classes.

  2. Reaching for the Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Dorothy Givens

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Mae Jemison is the world's first woman astronaut of color who continues to reach for the stars. Jemison was recently successful in leading a team that has secured a $500,000 federal grant to make interstellar space travel a reality. The Dorothy Jemison Foundation for Excellence (named after Jemison's mother) was selected in June by the Defense…

  3. Neutron Star Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruderman, Malvin

    1998-01-01

    Various phenomena involving neutron stars are addressed. Electron-positron production in the near magnetosphere of gamma-ray pulsars is discussed along with magnetic field evolution in spun-up and spinning-down pulsars. Glitches and gamma-ray central engines are also discussed.

  4. Magnetic Dynamos and Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleton, P P

    2007-02-15

    Djehuty is a code that has been developed over the last five years by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), from earlier code designed for programmatic efforts. Operating in a massively parallel environment, Djehuty is able to model entire stars in 3D. The object of this proposal was to continue the effort to introduce magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) into Djehuty, and investigate new classes of inherently 3D problems involving the structure, evolution and interaction of stars and planets. However, towards the end of the second year we discovered an unexpected physical process of great importance in the evolution of stars. Consequently for the third year we changed direction and concentrated on this process rather than on magnetic fields. Our new process was discovered while testing the code on red-giant stars, at the 'helium flash'. We found that a thin layer was regularly formed which contained a molecular-weight inversion, and which led therefore to Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This in turn led to some deeper-than-expected mixing, which has the property that (a) much {sup 3}He is consumed, and (b) some {sup 13}C is produced. These two properties are closely in accord with what has been observed over the last thirty years in red giants, whereas what was observed was largely in contradiction to what earlier theoretical models predicted. Thus our new 3D models with Djehuty explain a previously-unexplained problem of some thirty years standing.

  5. Hadrons in compact stars

    E-print Network

    Debades Bandyopadhyay

    2005-12-28

    We discuss $\\beta$-equilibrated and charge neutral matter involving hyperons and $\\bar K$ condensates within relativistic models. It is observed that populations of baryons are strongly affected by the presence of antikaon condensates. Also, the equation of state including $\\bar K$ condensates becomes softer resulting in a smaller maximum mass neutron star.

  6. Written in the Stars

    E-print Network

    Seager, Sara

    I first really saw the stars when I was 10 years old and on my first camping trip, in Ontario. I remember awakening late one night, stepping outside the tent, and looking up. I was completely stunned by what I saw. ...

  7. Multipath star switch controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, T. O.

    1980-01-01

    Device concept permits parallel computers to scan several commonnetwork-connected data stations at maximum rate. Sequencers leap-frog to bypass ports already being serviced by another computer. Two-path system for 16-port star switch controller is cost effective if added bandwidth or increased reliability is desired. Triple-path system would be cost effective for 32-port controller.

  8. Education Secondary the stars ...

    E-print Network

    Little, Tony

    knowledge and developed experience of these processes to maximise the quality of education experienced of Stirling is rated number one in Scotland for Education by a number of University Guides and for the qualityBA(Hons) Education Secondary Reach for the stars ... #12;Why study Secondary Education

  9. Halo Star Lithium Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Narayanan, Vijay K.

    1999-12-10

    The depletion of lithium during the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence phases of stellar evolution plays a crucial role in the comparison of the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis with the abundances observed in halo stars. Previous work has indicated a wide range of possible depletion factors, ranging from minimal in standard (nonrotating) stellar models to as much as an order of magnitude in models that include rotational mixing. Recent progress in the study of the angular momentum evolution of low-mass stars permits the construction of theoretical models capable of reproducing the angular momentum evolution of low-mass open cluster stars. The distribution of initial angular momenta can be inferred from stellar rotation data in young open clusters. In this paper we report on the application of these models to the study of lithium depletion in main-sequence halo stars. A range of initial angular momenta produces a range of lithium depletion factors on the main sequence. Using the distribution of initial conditions inferred from young open clusters leads to a well-defined halo lithium plateau with modest scatter and a small population of outliers. The mass-dependent angular momentum loss law inferred from open cluster studies produces a nearly flat plateau, unlike previous models that exhibited a downward curvature for hotter temperatures in the 7Li-Teff plane. The overall depletion factor for the plateau stars is sensitive primarily to the solar initial angular momentum used in the calibration for the mixing diffusion coefficients. Uncertainties remain in the treatment of the internal angular momentum transport in the models, and the potential impact of these uncertainties on our results is discussed. The 6Li/7Li depletion ratio is also examined. We find that the dispersion in the plateau and the 6Li/7Li depletion ratio scale with the absolute 7Li depletion in the plateau, and we use observational data to set bounds on the 7Li depletion in main-sequence halo stars. A maximum of 0.4 dex depletion is set by the observed dispersion and 6Li/7Li depletion ratio, and a minimum of 0.2 dex depletion is required by both the presence of highly overdepleted halo stars and consistency with the solar and open cluster 7Li data. The cosmological implications of these bounds on the primordial abundance of 7Li are discussed. (c) (c) 1999. The American Astronomical Society.

  10. Star Cluster Formation and Star Formation: The Role of Environment and Star Formation Efficiencies

    E-print Network

    Uta Fritze

    2008-01-15

    Analyzing global starburst properties in various kinds of starburst and post-starburst galaxies and relating them to the properties of the star cluster populations they form, I explore the conditions for the formation of massive, compact, long-lived star clusters. The aim is to find out whether the relative amount of star formation that goes into star cluster formation as opposed to field star formation, and into the formation of massive long-lived clusters in particular, is universal or scales with star formation rate, burst strength, star formation efficiency, galaxy or gas mass, and whether or not there are special conditions or some threshold for the formation of star clusters that merit to be called globular clusters a few gigayears later.

  11. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.

    2014-10-01

    White dwarfs are the evolutionary endpoint for nearly 95% of all stars born in our Galaxy, the final stages of evolution of all low- and intermediate mass stars, i.e., main sequence stars with masses below (8.5± 1.5) M_{odot}, depending on metallicity of the progenitor, mass loss and core overshoot. Massive white dwarfs are intrinsically rare objects, tand produce a gap in the determination of the initial vs. final mass relation at the high mass end (e.g. Weidemann 2000 A&A, 363, 647; Kalirai et al. 2008, ApJ, 676, 594; Williams, Bolte & Koester 2009, ApJ, 693, 355). Main sequences stars with higher masses will explode as SNII (Smartt S. 2009 ARA&A, 47, 63), but the limit does depend on the metallicity of the progenitor. Massive white dwarfs are probably SNIa progenitors through accretion or merger. They are rare, being the final product of massive stars (less common) and have smaller radius (less luminous). Kepler et al. 2007 (MNRAS, 375, 1315), Kleinman et al. 2013 (ApJS, 204, 5) estimate only 1-2% white dwarfs have masses above 1 M_{odot}. The final stages of evolution after helium burning are a race between core growth and loss of the H-rich envelope in a stellar wind. When the burning shell is exposed, the star rapidly cools and burning ceases, leaving a white dwarf. As they cool down, the magnetic field freezes in, ranging from a few kilogauss to a gigagauss. Peculiar type Ia SN 2006gz, SN 2007if, SN 2009dc, SN 2003fg suggest progenitors in the range 2.4-2.8 M_{odot}, and Das U. & Mukhopadhyay B. (2012, Phys. Rev. D, 86, 042001) estimate that the Chandrasekhar limit increases to 2.3-2.6 M_{odot} for extremely high magnetic field stars, but differential rotation induced by accretion could also increase it, according to Hachisu I. et al. 2012 (ApJ, 744, 69). García-Berro et al. 2012, ApJ, 749, 25, for example, proposes double degenerate mergers are the progenitors of high-field magnetic white dwarfs. We propose magnetic fields enhance the line broadening in WDs, causing an overestimated surface gravity, and ultimately determine if these magnetic fields are likely developed through the star's own surface convection zone, or inherited from massive Ap/Bp progenitors. We discovered around 20 000 spectroscopic white dwarfs with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), with a corresponding increase in relatively rare varieties of white dwarfs, including the massive ones (Kleinman et al. 2013, ApJS, 204, 5, Kepler et al. 2013, MNRAS, 439, 2934). The mass distributions of the hydrogen-rich (DA) measured from fitting the spectra with model atmospheres calculated using unidimensinal mixing lenght-theory (MLT) shows the average mass (as measured by the surface gravity) increases apparently below 13 000K for DAs (e.g. Bergeron et al. 1991, ApJ, 367, 253; Tremblay et al. 2011, ApJ, 730, 128; Kleinman et al. 2013). Only with the tridimensional (3D) convection calculations of Tremblay et al. 2011 (A&A, 531, L19) and 2013 (A&A, 552, 13; A&A, 557, 7; arXiv 1309.0886) the problem has finally been solved, but the effects of magnetic fields are not included yet in the mass determinations. Pulsating white dwarf stars are used to measure their interior and envelope properties through seismology, and together with the luminosity function of white dwarf stars in clusters and around the Sun are valuable tools for the study of high density physics, and the history of stellar formation.

  12. Variable stars in young open star cluster NGC 7380

    E-print Network

    Lata, Sneh; Panwar, Neelam; Chen, W P; Samal, M R; Pandey, J C

    2015-01-01

    We present time series photometry of 57 variable stars in the cluster region NGC 7380. The association of these variable stars to the cluster NGC 7380 has been established on the basis of two colour diagrams and colour-magnitude diagrams. Seventeen stars are found to be main-sequence variables, which are mainly B type stars and are classified as slowly pulsating B stars, $\\beta$ Cep or $\\delta$ Scuti stars. Some of them may belong to new class variables as discussed by Mowlavi et al. (2013) and Lata et al. (2014). Present sample also contains 14 pre-main-sequence stars, whose ages and masses are found to be mostly $\\lesssim$ 5 Myr and range 0.60 $\\lesssim M/M_{\\odot} \\lesssim$ 2.30 and hence should be T-Tauri stars. About half of the weak line T-Tauri stars are found to be fast rotators with a period of $\\lesssim$ 2 days as compared to the classical T-Tauri stars. Some of the variables belong to the field star population.

  13. Weighing the Smallest Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    VLT Finds Young, Very Low Mass Objects Are Twice As Heavy As Predicted Summary Thanks to the powerful new high-contrast camera installed at the Very Large Telescope, photos have been obtained of a low-mass companion very close to a star. This has allowed astronomers to measure directly the mass of a young, very low mass object for the first time. The object, more than 100 times fainter than its host star, is still 93 times as massive as Jupiter. And it appears to be almost twice as heavy as theory predicts it to be. This discovery therefore suggests that, due to errors in the models, astronomers may have overestimated the number of young "brown dwarfs" and "free floating" extrasolar planets. PR Photo 03/05: Near-infrared image of AB Doradus A and its companion (NACO SDI/VLT) A winning combination A star can be characterised by many parameters. But one is of uttermost importance: its mass. It is the mass of a star that will decide its fate. It is thus no surprise that astronomers are keen to obtain a precise measure of this parameter. This is however not an easy task, especially for the least massive ones, those at the border between stars and brown dwarf objects. Brown dwarfs, or "failed stars", are objects which are up to 75 times more massive than Jupiter, too small for major nuclear fusion processes to have ignited in its interior. To determine the mass of a star, astronomers generally look at the motion of stars in a binary system. And then apply the same method that allows determining the mass of the Earth, knowing the distance of the Moon and the time it takes for its satellite to complete one full orbit (the so-called "Kepler's Third Law"). In the same way, they have also measured the mass of the Sun by knowing the Earth-Sun distance and the time - one year - it takes our planet to make a tour around the Sun. The problem with low-mass objects is that they are very faint and will often be hidden in the glare of the brighter star they orbit, also when viewed in large telescopes. Astronomers have however found ways to overcome this difficulty. For this, they rely on a combination of a well-considered observational strategy with state-of-the-art instruments. High contrast camera First, astronomers searching for very low mass objects look at young nearby stars because low-mass companion objects will be brightest while they are young, before they contract and cool off. In this particular case, an international team of astronomers [1] led by Laird Close (Steward Observatory, University of Arizona), studied the star AB Doradus A (AB Dor A). This star is located about 48 light-years away and is "only" 50 million years old. Because the position in the sky of AB Dor A "wobbles", due to the gravitational pull of a star-like object, it was believed since the early 1990s that AB Dor A must have a low-mass companion. To photograph this companion and obtain a comprehensive set of data about it, Close and his colleagues used a novel instrument on the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope. This new high-contrast adaptive optics camera, the NACO Simultaneous Differential Imager, or NACO SDI [2], was specifically developed by Laird Close and Rainer Lenzen (Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany) for hunting extrasolar planets. The SDI camera enhances the ability of the VLT and its adaptive optics system to detect faint companions that would normally be lost in the glare of the primary star. A world premiere ESO PR Photo 03/05 ESO PR Photo 03/05 Infrared image of AB Doradus A and its companion [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 406 pix - 99k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 812 pix - 235k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 03/05 is an enhanced, false-colour near-infrared image of AB Dor A and C. The faint companion "AB Dor C" - seen as the pink dot at 8 o'clock - is 120 times fainter than its primary star. The tiny separation between A and C, only 0.156 arcsec, is smaller than a one Euro coin seen at 20 km distance. Nevertheless, the new NACO SDI camera was able to

  14. Neutron stars and quark stars: Two coexisting families of compact stars?

    E-print Network

    J. Schaffner-Bielich

    2006-12-29

    The mass-radius relation of compact stars is discussed with relation to the presence of quark matter in the core. The existence of a new family of compact stars with quark matter besides white dwarfs and ordinary neutron stars is outlined.

  15. Swift, UVOT and Hot Stars

    E-print Network

    Siegel, Michael H; Hagen, Lea M Z; Hoversten, Erik A

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of our ongoing investigation into the properties of hot stars and young stellar populations using the Swift/UVOT telescope. We present UVOT photometry of open and globular clusters and show that UVOT is capable of characterizing a variety of rare hot stars, including Post-Asymptotic Giant Branch and Extreme Horizontal Branch Stars. We also present very early reults of our survey of stellar populations in the Small Magellanic Cloud. We find that the SMC has experienced recent bouts of star formation but constraining the exact star formation history will depend on finding an effective model of the reddening within the SMC.

  16. Theoretical Modelling of Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najarro, F.; Hillier, D. J.; Figer, D. F.; Geballe, T. R.

    1999-06-01

    Recent progress towards model atmospheres for hot stars is discussed. A new generation of NLTE wind blanketed models, together with high S/N spectra of the hot star population in the central parsec, which are currently being obtained, will allow metal abundance determinations (Fe, Si, Mg, Na, etc). Metallicity studies of hot stars in the IR will provide major constraints not only on the theory of evolution of massive stars but also on our efforts to solve the puzzle of the central parsecs of the Galaxy. Preliminary results suggest that the metallicity of the Pistol Star is 3 times solar, thus indicating strong chemical enrichment of the gas in the Galactic Center.

  17. A*STAR SCHOLARSHIPS FOR PHD STUDIES A*STAR GRADUATE

    E-print Network

    Wallace, Mark

    A*STAR SCHOLARSHIPS FOR PHD STUDIES A*STAR GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP NATIONAL SCIENCE SCHOLARSHIP (PHD*STAR Scholarships, visit www.a-star.edu.sg Printed in September 2012 Apply for an A*STAR Scholarship at www.a-star.edu.sg National Science Scholarship (PhD) A*STAR Graduate Scholarship SCIENCE. SEETHINGS DIFFERENTLY I USE SALTTO

  18. Disk Dispersal Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David

    2004-01-01

    We first review the evidence pertaining to the lifetimes of planet-forming disks of gas and dust around young stars and discuss possible disk dispersal mechanisms: 1) viscous accretion of material onto the central source, 2) close stellar encounters, 3) stellar winds, and 4) photoevaporation caused by the heating of the disk surface by ultraviolet radiation. Photoevaporation is likely the most important dispersal mechanism for the outer regions of disks, and this talk focuses on the evaporation caused by the presence of a nearby, luminous star rather than the central star itself. We also focus on disks around low-mass stars like the Sun rather than high-mass stars, which we have treated previously. Stars often form in clusters and the ultraviolet flux from the most luminous star in the cluster can have a dramatic effect on the disk orbiting a nearby low-mass star. We apply our theoretical models to the evaporating protoplanetary disks (or "proplyds") in the Trapezium cluster in Orion, to the formation of gas giant planets like Jupiter around Sun-like stars in the Galaxy, and to the formation of Kuiper belts around low mass stars. We find a possible explanation for the differences between Neptune and Jupiter, and make a prediction concerning recent searches for giant planets in large clusters. We discuss recent models of the infrared spectra from gaseous disks around young stars.

  19. Magnetic braking in convective stars

    E-print Network

    Hussain, G A J

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic braking causes the spin-down of single stars as they evolve on the main sequence. Models of magnetic braking can also explain the evolution of close binary systems, including cataclysmic variables. The well-known period gap in the orbital period distribution of cataclysmic variable systems indicates that magnetic braking must be significantly disrupted in secondaries that are fully convective. However, activity studies show that fully convective stars are some of the most active stars observed in young open clusters. There is therefore conflicting evidence about what happens to magnetic activity in fully convective stars. Results from spectro-polarimetric studies of cool stars have found that the field morphologies and field strengths are dependent on spectral type and rotation rate. While rapidly rotating stars with radiative cores show strong, complex magnetic fields, they have relatively weak dipole components. Fully convective stars that are rapidly rotating also possess strong magnetic fields, b...

  20. The Nurture of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vine, S. G.; Bonnell, I. A.; Bate, M. R.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the physical processes which lead to the formation of massive stars. Using a numerical simulation of the formation of a stellar cluster from the fragmentation of a turbulent molecular cloud we evaluate the relative contributions of isolated fragmentation and competitive accretion. We find little correlation between initial clump mass and final star mass. The gas which eventually contributes to the mass of a massive star is initially widespread throughout the molecular cloud. There is a clear relation between the number of stars in a cluster and the mass of the massive star within it. High-mass stars gain mass as they gain companions, exposing a direct relation between massive stars and the cluster formation process.

  1. Massive stars: Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa María

    2007-07-01

    Starbursts are the preferred place where massive stars form; the main source of thermal and mechanical heating in the interstellar medium, and the factory where the heavy elements form. Thus, starbursts play an important role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. Starbursts are bright at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, and after the pioneering IUE program, high spatial and spectral resolution UV observations of local starburst galaxies, mainly taken with HST and FUSE, have made relevant contributions to the following issues: a) The determination of the initial mass function (IMF) in violent star forming systems in low and high metallicity environments, and in dense (e.g. in stellar clusters) and diffuse environments: A Salpeter IMF with high-mass stars constrains well the UV properties. b) Stellar clusters are an important mode of star formation in starbursts. c) The role of starbursts in AGN: Nuclear starbursts can dominate the UV light in Seyfert 2 galaxies, having bolometric luminosities similar to the estimated bolometric luminosities of the obscured AGN. d) The interaction between massive stars and the interstellar medium: Outflows in cold, warm and coronal phases leave their imprints on the UV interstellar lines. Outflows of a few hundred km s%u22121 are ubiquitous phenomena in starbursts. Despite the very significant progress obtained over the past two decades of UV observations of starbursts, there are important problems that still need to be solved. High-spatial resolution UV observations of nearby starbursts are crucial to further progress in understanding the violent star formation processes in galaxies, the interaction between the stellar clusters and the interstellar medium, and the variation of the IMF. High-spatial resolution spectra are also needed to isolate the light from the center to the disk in UV luminous galaxies found by GALEX. Thus, a new UV mission furnished with an intermediate spectral resolution spectrograph with high spatial resolution and high UV sensitivity is required to further progress in the study of starburst galaxies and their impact on the evolution of galaxies.

  2. Dead Star Rumbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Composite of Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A This Spitzer Space Telescope composite shows the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (white ball) and surrounding clouds of dust (gray, orange and blue). It consists of two processed images taken one year apart. Dust features that have not changed over time appear gray, while those that have changed are colored blue or orange. Blue represents an earlier time and orange, a later time.

    These observations illustrate that a blast of light from Cassiopeia A is waltzing outward through the dusty skies. This dance, called an 'infrared echo,' began when the remnant erupted about 50 years ago.

    Cassiopeia A is the remnant of a once massive star that died in a violent supernova explosion 325 years ago. It consists of a dead star, called a neutron star, and a surrounding shell of material that was blasted off as the star died. This remnant is located 10,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Cassiopeia.

    An infrared echo is created when a star explodes or erupts, flashing light into surrounding clumps of dust. As the light zips through the dust clumps, it heats them up, causing them to glow successively in infrared, like a chain of Christmas bulbs lighting up one by one. The result is an optical illusion, in which the dust appears to be flying outward at the speed of light. This apparent motion can be seen here by the shift in colored dust clumps.

    Echoes are distinct from supernova shockwaves, which are made up material that is swept up and hurled outward by exploding stars.

    This infrared echo is the largest ever seen, stretching more than 50 light-years away from Cassiopeia A. If viewed from Earth, the entire movie frame would take up the same amount of space as two full moons.

    Hints of an older infrared echo from Cassiopeia A's supernova explosion hundreds of years ago can also be seen.

    The earlier Spitzer image was taken on November 30, 2003, and the later, on December 2, 2004.

  3. Complexes of stars and complexes of star clusters

    E-print Network

    Yuri N. Efremov

    2010-11-20

    Most star complexes are in fact complexes of stars, clusters and gas clouds; term "star complexes" was introduced as general one disregarding the preferential content of a complex. Generally the high rate of star formation in a complex is accompanied by the high number of bound clusters, including massive ones, what was explained by the high gas pressure in such regions. However, there are also complexes, where clusters seems to be more numerous in relation to stars than in a common complex. The high rate of clusters - but not isolated stars - formation seems to be typical for many isolated bursts of star formation, but deficit of stars might be still explained by the observational selection. The latter cannot, however, explain the complexes or the dwarf galaxies, where the high formation rate of only stars is observed. The possibility of the very fast dissolution of parental clusters just in such regions should itself be explained. Some difference in the physical conditions (turbulence parameters ?) within the initial gas supercloud might be a reason for the high or low stars/clusters number ratio in a complex.

  4. STAR Integrated Tracker

    E-print Network

    A. Rose

    2003-07-16

    We present the design and performance analysis of a new integrated track reconstruction code developed for the STAR experiment at RHIC. The code is meant to replace multiple previous tracking codes written in FORTRAN many years ago, and to readily enable the integration of new and varied detector components. The new tracker is written from the ground up in C++ using a strong object-oriented model. Key features include an abstract geometry model for representation of detector components, a flexible track representation model, a built-in KALMAN filter for track parameter determination, and a powerful object factory model for fast handling of numerous small objects, such as hits and tracks. The new tracker will be deployed and used for analysis of data aquired during the RHIC year 3 run of the STAR experiment.

  5. O-star kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Karimova, D.K.; Pavlovskaya, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    Proper motions determined by the authors are utilized to study the kinematics of 79 O-type stars at distance r< or =2.5 kpc. The sample is divided into two groups, having space-velocity dispersions tau/sub I/roughly-equal10 km/sec, sigma/sub II/roughly-equal35 km/sec. Solutions for the velocity-field parameters for group I yield a galactic angular rotation speed ..omega../sub 0/ = 24.9 km sec/sup -1/ kpc/sup -1/ at the sun (for R/sub 0/ = 10.0 kpc) and an Oort constant A = 12.2 km sec/sup -1/ kpc/sup -1/. Most of the O stars exhibit a small z-velocity directed away from the galactic plane. The velocity-ellipsoid parameters and box-orbit elements are calculated.

  6. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Peering deep inside a cluster of several hundred thousand stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered the oldest burned-out stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, giving astronomers a fresh reading on the age of the universe.

    Located in the globular cluster M4, these small, burned-out stars -- called white dwarfs -- are about 12 to 13 billion years old. By adding the one billion years it took the cluster to form after the Big Bang, astronomers found that the age of the white dwarfs agrees with previous estimates that the universe is 13 to 14 billion years old.

    The images, including some taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, are available online at

    http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/10/ or

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc .

    The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    In the top panel, a ground-based observatory snapped a panoramic view of the entire cluster, which contains several hundred thousand stars within a volume of 10 to 30 light-years across. The Kitt Peak National Observatory's .9-meter telescope took this picture in March 1995. The box at left indicates the region observed by the Hubble telescope.

    The Hubble telescope studied a small region of the cluster. A section of that region is seen in the picture at bottom left. A sampling of an even smaller region is shown at bottom right. This region is only about one light-year across. In this smaller region, Hubble pinpointed a number of faint white dwarfs. The blue circles indicate the dwarfs. It took nearly eight days of exposure time over a 67-day period to find these extremely faint stars.

    Globular clusters are among the oldest clusters of stars in the universe. The faintest and coolest white dwarfs within globular clusters can yield a globular cluster's age. Earlier Hubble observations showed that the first stars formed less than 1 billion years after the universe's birth in the big bang. So, finding the oldest stars puts astronomers within arm's reach of the universe's age.

    Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 made the observations from January through April 2001. These optical observations were combined to create the above images. Spectral data were also taken. M4 is 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Scorpius.

    The full press release on the latest findings is online at

    http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/10/pr.html .

    The Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between the European Space Agency and NASA. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA.

  7. Hyperons and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidaña, Isaac

    2015-02-01

    In this lecture I will briefly review some of the effects of hyperons on the properties of neutron and proto-neutron stars. In particular, I will revise the problem of the strong softening of the EoS, and the consequent reduction of the maximum mass, induced by the presence of hyperons, a puzzle which has become more intringuing and difficult to solve due the recent measurements of the unusually high masses of the millisecond pulsars PSR J1903+0327 (1.667±0.021M?), PSR J1614-2230 (1.97±0.04M?), and PSR J0348+0432 (2.01±0.04M?). Finally, I will also examine the role of hyperons on the cooling properties of newly born neutron stars and on the so-called r-mode instability.

  8. From stars to planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzano, Jean-Christophe; Deleuil, Magali; De Laverny, Patrick; Blanco, Alejandra Recio; Bouchy, François; Gandolfi, Davide; Loeillet, Benoît

    2009-02-01

    A large program of multi-fibre (FLAMES) spectroscopic observations of the stellar population in two CoRoT/Exoplanet field with the GIRAFFE/VLT, took place in spring 2008. It aims at characterizing the brightest dwarf population and providing the ground for statistical analysis of the planetary population found by CoRoT. To perform such an ambitious analysis, we use an automated software based on the MATISSE algorithm, originally designed for the GAIA/RVS spectral analysis. This software derives the atmospheric stellar parameters: effective temperature, surface gravity and the overall metallicity. Further improvements are foreseen in order to measure also individual abundances. By comparing the main physical and chemical properties of the host stars to those of the stellar population they belong to, this will bring new insights into the formation and evolution of exoplanetary systems and the star-planet connection.

  9. Detector limitations, STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D. G.

    1998-07-13

    Every detector has limitations in terms of solid angle, particular technologies chosen, cracks due to mechanical structure, etc. If all of the presently planned parts of STAR [Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC] were in place, these factors would not seriously limit our ability to exploit the spin physics possible in RHIC. What is of greater concern at the moment is the construction schedule for components such as the Electromagnetic Calorimeters, and the limited funding for various levels of triggers.

  10. Chameleon dark matter stars

    E-print Network

    Vladimir Folomeev; Ascar Aringazin; Vladimir Dzhunushaliev

    2013-09-07

    We consider static, spherically symmetric equilibrium configurations consisting of fermionic dark matter nonminimally coupled to dark energy in the form of a quintessence scalar field. With the scalar field coupling function, the form of which is taken to meet cosmological observations, we estimate the effect of such a nonminimal coupling on the properties of dark matter compact configurations. We show that the masses and sizes of the resulting chameleon dark matter stars are smaller than those of systems with no field present.

  11. Asymmetric dark matter stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouvaris, Chris; Nielsen, Niklas Grønlund

    2015-09-01

    We study the possibility of asymmetric dark matter with self-interactions forming compact stable objects. We solve the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation and find the mass-radius relation of such "dark stars," their density profile and their Chandrasekhar mass limit. We consider fermionic asymmetric dark matter with Yukawa-type self-interactions appropriate for solving the well-known problems of the collisionless dark matter paradigm. We find that in several cases the relativistic effects are significant.

  12. Asymmetric Dark Matter Stars

    E-print Network

    Kouvaris, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We study the possibility of asymmetric dark matter with self-interactions forming compact stable objects. We solve the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation and find the mass-radius relation of such "dark stars", their density profile and their Chandrasekhar mass limit. We consider fermionic asymmetric dark matter with Yukawa-type self-interactions appropriate for solving the well known problems of the collisionless dark matter paradigm. We find that in several cases the relativistic effects are significant.

  13. Stars of WIMPs

    E-print Network

    F. Pisano; J. L. Tomazelli

    1995-09-11

    A class of boson-fermion stars, whose spin-0 and spin-1/2 constituents interact through a U(1) current-current term in the Lagrangian density, is analysed. It is shown that it describes the low-energy behavior of a system of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) from the leptonic sector of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. In this case the effective coupling constant $\\lambda$ is related to the Fermi constant $G_F$.

  14. Chameleon dark matter stars

    E-print Network

    Folomeev, Vladimir; Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    We consider static, spherically symmetric equilibrium configurations consisting of interacting dark matter/dark energy and embedded in an external, homogeneous chameleon scalar field. With the coupling function, form of which is taken to meet cosmological observations, we estimate the effect of such a nonminimal coupling on the properties of dark matter compact configurations. We show that the masses and sizes of the resulting chameleon dark matter stars are smaller than those of systems with no field present.

  15. Studying Kepler Superflare Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, U.; Wichmann, R.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Czesla, S.

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 300 ``superflare stars'' (SFS) of approximately solar spectral type have been found in the data observed by the Kepler satellite tep{2013ApJS..209....5S}. These SFS show white-light flares with estimated energies between 10^{34} and 10^{36} erg in the Kepler band, making them at least two orders of magnitude more energetic than the largest flares observed on the Sun. We study a sample of SFS using optical high-resolution spectroscopy, an in-depth light curve analysis and XMM-Newton X-ray observations. We find no spectroscopic ``peculiarities'' in these stars, most of our sample stars appear as singles in our spectra. Most, but not all, show significant chromospheric emission. We find decay times of more than one hour for the majority of detected flare events. This duration massively exceeds the lifetime of solar white-light flares which are visible only up to a few minutes. We detect X-ray emission for all SFS in our XMM-Newton sample, corresponding to luminosities between several 10^{29} erg/s and a few 10^{30} erg/s in soft X-rays, i.e. considerably more luminous than the Sun. However, our 15 - 20 ksec exposures cover no significant X-ray flare.

  16. Heavy Metal Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    La Silla Telescope Detects Lots of Lead in Three Distant Binaries Summary Very high abundances of the heavy element Lead have been discovered in three distant stars in the Milky Way Galaxy . This finding strongly supports the long-held view that roughly half of the stable elements heavier than Iron are produced in common stars during a phase towards the end of their life when they burn their Helium - the other half results from supernova explosions. All the Lead contained in each of the three stars weighs about as much as our Moon. The observations show that these "Lead stars" - all members of binary stellar systems - have been more enriched with Lead than with any other chemical element heavier than Iron. This new result is in excellent agreement with predictions by current stellar models about the build-up of heavy elements in stellar interiors. The new observations are reported by a team of Belgian and French astronomers [1] who used the Coude Echelle Spectrometer on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at the La Silla Observatory (Chile). PR Photo 26a/01 : A photo of HD 196944 , one of the "Lead stars". PR Photo 26b/01 : A CES spectrum of HD 196944 . The build-up of heavy elements Astronomers and physicists denote the build-up of heavier elements from lighter ones as " nucleosynthesis ". Only the very lightest elements (Hydrogen, Helium and Lithium [2]) were created at the time of the Big Bang and therefore present in the early universe. All the other heavier elements we now see around us were produced at a later time by nucleosynthesis inside stars. In those "element factories", nuclei of the lighter elements are smashed together whereby they become the nuclei of heavier ones - this process is known as nuclear fusion . In our Sun and similar stars, Hydrogen is being fused into Helium. At some stage, Helium is fused into Carbon, then Oxygen, etc. The fusion process requires positively charged nuclei to move very close to each other before they can unite. But with increasing atomic mass and hence, increasing positive charge of the nuclei, the electric repulsion between the nuclei becomes stronger and stronger. In fact, the fusion process only works up to a certain mass limit, corresponding to the element Iron [2]. All elements that are heavier than Iron cannot be produced via this path. But then, how were those heavy elements we now find on the Earth produced in the first place? From where comes the Zirconium in artificial diamonds, the Barium that colours fireworks, the Tungsten in the filaments in electric bulbs? Which process made the Lead in your car battery? Beyond iron The production of elements heavier than Iron takes place by adding neutrons to the atomic nuclei . These neutral particles do not feel any electrical repulsion from the charged nuclei. They can therefore easily approach them and thereby create heavier nuclei. This is indeed the way the heaviest chemical elements are built up. There are actually two different stellar environments where this process of "neutron capture" can happen. One place where this process occurs is inside very massive stars when they explode as supernovae . In such a dramatic event, the build-up proceeds very rapidly, via the so-called "r-process" ( "r" for rapid ). The AGB stars But not all heavy elements are created in such an explosive way. A second possibility follows a more "peaceful" road. It takes place in rather normal stars, when they burn their Helium towards the end of their lives. In the so-called "s-process" ( "s" for slow ), heavier elements are then produced by a rather gentle addition of neutral neutrons to atomic nuclei. In fact, roughly half of all the elements heavier than Iron are believed to be synthesized by this process during the late evolutionary phases of stars. This process takes place during a specific stage of stellar evolution, known as the "AGB" phase [3]. It occurs just before an old star expels its gaseous envelope into the surrounding interstellar s

  17. Compactness of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Chia; Piekarewicz, J.

    2015-10-01

    Recent progress in the determination of both masses and radii of neutron stars is starting to place stringent constraints on the dense matter equation of state. In particular, new theoretical developments together with improved statistical tools seem to favor stellar radii that are significantly smaller than those predicted by models using purely nucleonic equations of state. Given that the underlying equation of state must also account for the observation of 2 M? neutron stars, theoretical approaches to the study of the dense matter equation of state are facing serious challenges. In response to this challenge, we compute the underlying equation of state associated with an assumed mass-radius template similar to the "common radius" assumption used in recent studies. Once such a mass-radius template is adopted, the equation of state follows directly from the implementation of Lindblom's algorithm; assumptions on the nature or composition of the dense stellar core are not required. By analyzing mass-radius profiles with a maximum mass consistent with observation and common radii in the 8-11 km range, a lower limit on the stellar radius of a 1.4 M? neutron star of RNS?10.7 km is required to prevent the equation of state from violating causality.

  18. Compactness of Neutron Stars.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Chia; Piekarewicz, J

    2015-10-16

    Recent progress in the determination of both masses and radii of neutron stars is starting to place stringent constraints on the dense matter equation of state. In particular, new theoretical developments together with improved statistical tools seem to favor stellar radii that are significantly smaller than those predicted by models using purely nucleonic equations of state. Given that the underlying equation of state must also account for the observation of 2M_{?} neutron stars, theoretical approaches to the study of the dense matter equation of state are facing serious challenges. In response to this challenge, we compute the underlying equation of state associated with an assumed mass-radius template similar to the "common radius" assumption used in recent studies. Once such a mass-radius template is adopted, the equation of state follows directly from the implementation of Lindblom's algorithm; assumptions on the nature or composition of the dense stellar core are not required. By analyzing mass-radius profiles with a maximum mass consistent with observation and common radii in the 8-11 km range, a lower limit on the stellar radius of a 1.4M_{?} neutron star of R_{NS}?10.7??km is required to prevent the equation of state from violating causality. PMID:26550859

  19. Asteroseismology of Pulsating Stars

    E-print Network

    Joshi, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    The success of helioseismology is due to its capability of measuring p-mode oscillations in the Sun. This allows us to extract informations on the internal structure and rotation of the Sun from the surface to the core. Similarly, asteroseismology is the study of the internal structure of the stars as derived from stellar oscillations. In this review we highlight the progress in the observational asteroseismology, including some basic theoretical aspects. In particular, we discuss our contributions to asteroseismology through the study of chemically peculiar stars under the "Nainital-Cape Survey" project being conducted at ARIES, Nainital since 1999. This survey aims to detect new rapidly-pulsating Ap (roAp) stars in the northern hemisphere. We also discuss the contribution of ARIES towards the asteroseismic study of the compact pulsating variables. We comment on the future prospects of our project in the light of the new optical 3.6-m telescope to be install at Devasthal (ARIES). Finally, we present a prelim...

  20. Magnetic fields in star formation: from galaxies to stars

    E-print Network

    Price, Daniel J; Dobbs, Clare L

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic fields are important at every scale in the star formation process: from the dynamics of the ISM in galaxies, to the collapse of turbulent molecular clouds to form stars and in the fragmentation of individual star forming cores. The recent development of a robust algorithm for MHD in the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method has enabled us to perform simulations of star formation including magnetic fields at each of these scales. This paper focusses on three questions in particular: What is the effect of magnetic fields on fragmentation in star forming cores? How do magnetic fields affect the collapse of turbulent molecular clouds to form stars? and: What effect do magnetic fields have on the dynamics of the interstellar medium?

  1. Magnetic fields in star formation: from galaxies to stars

    E-print Network

    Daniel J. Price; Matthew R. Bate; Clare L. Dobbs

    2008-04-29

    Magnetic fields are important at every scale in the star formation process: from the dynamics of the ISM in galaxies, to the collapse of turbulent molecular clouds to form stars and in the fragmentation of individual star forming cores. The recent development of a robust algorithm for MHD in the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method has enabled us to perform simulations of star formation including magnetic fields at each of these scales. This paper focusses on three questions in particular: What is the effect of magnetic fields on fragmentation in star forming cores? How do magnetic fields affect the collapse of turbulent molecular clouds to form stars? and: What effect do magnetic fields have on the dynamics of the interstellar medium?

  2. Photoevaporating Disks Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David

    2004-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from the central star or from a nearby massive star heats the surfaces of protoplanetary disks and causes the outer, less gravitationally bound part of the disks, to photoevaporate into interstellar space. Photoevaporation is likely the most important dispersal mechanism for the outer regions of disks. We focus in this talk on disks around low-mass stars like the Sun rather than high-mass stars, which we have treated previously. Stars often form in clusters and the ultraviolet flux from the most luminous star in the cluster can have a dramatic effect on the disk orbiting a nearby low-mass star. We apply our theoretical models to the evaporating protoplanetary disks (or "proplyds") in the Trapezium cluster in Orion, to the formation of gas giant planets like Jupiter around Sun-like stars in the Galaxy, and to the formation of Kuiper belts around low mass stars. We discuss recent models of the effects of the radiation from the central low mass star including both the predicted infrared spectra from the heated disks as well as preliminary results on the photoevaporation rates.

  3. A 235 Star Sample Sodium, Magnesium, and Aluminum Abundance Study in the Globular Clusters M3 (NGC 5272) and M13 (NGC 6205)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Kraft, Robert P.; Pilachowski, Catherine A.; Sneden, Christopher; Ivans, Inese I.; Benman, Gabriel

    2005-12-01

    We have derived sodium, magnesium, and aluminum abundances for more than 100 red giant branch (RGB) stars in each of the Galactic globular clusters M3 and M13 (235 total stars), using moderate resolution (R~10,000) spectra obtained with the 3.5 m WIYN telescope and Hydra multifiber spectrograph. Temperatures for the cluster samples are based on calibrations of photometric indices, in particular V-K. Gravities, microturbulent velocities, and the overall M3 and M13 metallicities ([Fe/H]~-1.50) are based on the results of previous work by the Lick-Texas group. Na and Mg abundances have been determined from observed versus synthetic spectrum matches of the Na I ??5682, 5688 lines and the Mg I ?5711 line. Al abundances have been determined from equivalent-width measurements of the Al I (??6696, 6698) doublet. The resulting M3 and M13 analyses are compared with the more detailed high-resolution analyses of smaller samples of RGB stars. We conclude that on average, M13 tends to have higher abundances of Na, Mg, and Al than M3 by roughly 0.10-0.20 dex, a likely by-product of additional proton-capture synthesis. Compared to halo field stars of comparable [Fe/H] metallicity, M3 and M13 giants tend to have a greater abundance of Na for a given Mg. Unlike M3, the most luminous M13 giants (M0v<-1.70) show a strong inclination toward having [Na/Fe] values enhanced above the cluster median. In the last 0.70 mag interval before M13's RGB tip, there is a large number of low-O, high-Na, and high-Al stars. This is not seen in M3. Compared with halo field giants, the anomalous abundances of O, Na, Mg, and Al seen in both M3 and M13 stars appear to have a ``primordial'' (``pollution''?) origin. However, a ``second stage'' of proton-capture synthesis within the M13 giants themselves seems required to distinguish their pattern of O, Na, Mg, and Al abundances from those of the brightest giants of M3.

  4. Nuclear Star Clusters and Bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, David R.; Debattista, Victor P.

    Nuclear star clusters are among the densest stellar systems known and are common in both early- and late-type galaxies. They exhibit scaling relations with their host galaxy which may be related to those of supermassive black holes (SMBHs). These may therefore help us to unravel the complex physical processes occurring at the centers of galaxies. The properties of nuclear stellar systems suggest that their formation requires both dissipational and dissipationless processes. They have stellar populations of different ages, from stars as old as their host galaxy to young stars formed in the last 100 Myr. Therefore star formation must be happening either directly in the nuclear star cluster or in its vicinity. The secular processes that fuel the formation of pseudobulges very likely also contribute to nuclear star cluster growth.

  5. The Physics of Neutron Stars

    E-print Network

    J. M. Lattimer; M. Prakash

    2004-05-13

    Neutron stars are some of the densest manifestations of massive objects in the universe. They are ideal astrophysical laboratories for testing theories of dense matter physics and provide connections among nuclear physics, particle physics and astrophysics. Neutron stars may exhibit conditions and phenomena not observed elsewhere, such as hyperon-dominated matter, deconfined quark matter, superfluidity and superconductivity with critical temperatures near ${10^{10}}$ kelvin, opaqueness to neutrinos, and magnetic fields in excess of $10^{13}$ Gauss. Here, we describe the formation, structure, internal composition and evolution of neutron stars. Observations that include studies of binary pulsars, thermal emission from isolated neutron stars, glitches from pulsars and quasi-periodic oscillations from accreting neutron stars provide information about neutron star masses, radii, temperatures, ages and internal compositions.

  6. Spectropolarimetry of hot, luminous stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina E.

    1994-01-01

    I review polarimetric observations of presumably single, hot luminous stars. The stellar types discussed are OB stars. B(e) supergiants, Luminous Blue Variables (LBV), Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars, and type II supernovae (SN). It is shown that variable, intrinsic polarization is a common phenomenon in that part of the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram which these stars occupy. However, much observational work remains to be done before we can answer the most basic, statistical questions about the polarimetric properties of different groups of hot, luminous stars. Insight into the diagnostic power of polarization observations has been gained, but cannot be exploited without detailed models. Thus, while polarimetric observations do tell us that the mass-loss processes of all types of massive stars are time-dependent and anisotropic, the significance that this might have for the accuracy of their stellar parameters and evolutionary paths remains elusive.

  7. Nuclear Star Clusters and Bulges

    E-print Network

    Cole, David R

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear star clusters are among the densest stellar systems known and are common in both early- and late-type galaxies. They exhibit scaling relations with their host galaxy which may be related to those of supermassive black holes. These may therefore help us to unravel the complex physical processes occurring at the centres of galaxies. The properties of nuclear stellar systems suggest that their formation requires both dissipational and dissipationless processes. They have stellar populations of different ages, from stars as old as their host galaxy to young stars formed in the last 100 Myr. Therefore star formation must be happening either directly in the nuclear star cluster or in its vicinity. The secular processes that fuel the formation of pseudobulges very likely also contributes to nuclear star cluster growth.

  8. Chinese Constellations and Star Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    Star observations can be traced back to as early as the twenty-third century BC in ancient China. By the fifth century BC, the Chinese had named the 28 asterisms that formed the basic reference points for the Chinese equatorial coordinate system. By the first century BC, the Chinese had developed a unique system of constellations that reflected Chinese cosmological ideas with the central theme of the correlation between Heaven and Man. Star charts have been discovered on tomb ceilings dating back to Han times. But most of them are illustrative in their presentation of stars. The Dunhuang star maps from the ninth century, the star maps in the Xin yixiang fa yao of the eleventh century, and the Suzhou Astronomical Planisphere of the thirteenth century are examples of precise star maps from ancient China.

  9. An Introduction to the Sun and Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Simon F.; Jones, Mark H.

    2004-02-01

    Introduction; 1. Seeing the Sun; 2. The working Sun; 3. Measuring stars; 4. Comparing stars; 5. The formation of stars; 6. The main sequence life of stars; 7. The life of stars beyond the main sequence; 8. The death of stars; 9. The remnants of stars; Conclusion; Answers and comments; Appendix 1. Useful quantities and units; Appendix 2. Stellar nomenclature; Appendix 3. The 100 closest stars to the Sun; Appendix 4. The 100 brightest stars visible from Earth; Appendix 5. The chemical elements and their abundances; Glossary; Acknowledgements; Index.

  10. New Abundansec From Very Old Stars

    E-print Network

    Hansen, T; Christlieb, N; Yong, D; Beers, T C; Andersen, J

    2015-01-01

    Metal-poor stars hold the fossil record of the Galactic chemical evolution and nucleosynthesis processes that took place at the earliest times in the history of our Galaxy. From detailed abundance studies of low mass, extremely metal-poor stars ([Fe/H] capture. The sample includes some of the most metal-poor stars ([Fe/H] capture elements, and also a number of stars enhanced in carbon. The so called CEMP (carbon enhanced metal-poor) stars, these stars make up ~20% of the stars with [Fe/H] < -3, and 80% of the stars with [Fe/H] < -4.5. The progenitors of CEMP stars is still ...

  11. The Birth of Stars and Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John; Reipurth, Bo

    2006-08-01

    Part I. Stars and Clusters: 1. Our Cosmic Backyard; 2. Looking up at the night sky; 3. The dark clouds of the Milky Way; 4. Infant stars; 5. Companions in birth: binary stars; 6. Outflows from young stars; 7. Towards adulthood; 8. The social life of stars: stellar groups; 9. Chaos in the nest: The brief lives of massive stars. Part II. Planetary Systems: 10. Solar systems in the making; 11. Messengers from the past; 12. Hazards to planet formation; 13. Planets around other stars; Part III. The Cosmic Context: 14. Cosmic cycles; 15. Star formation in galaxies; 16. The first stars and galaxies; 17. Astrobiology, origins, and SETI.

  12. The Orion nebula star cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Photography through filters which suppress nebular light reveal a clustering of faint red stars centered on the Trapezium, this evidences a distinct cluster within the larger OB1 association. Stars within about 20 ft of trapezium comprise the Orion Nebula star cluster are considered. Topics discussed re: (1) extinction by dust grains; (2) photometric peculiarities; (3) spectroscopic peculiarities; (4) young variables; (5) the distribution and motion of gas within the cluster.

  13. Mass Determinations of Star Clusters

    E-print Network

    Georges Meylan

    2001-07-03

    Mass determinations are difficult to obtain and still frequently characterised by deceptively large uncertainties. We review below the various mass estimators used for star clusters of all ages and luminosities. We highlight a few recent results related to (i) very massive old star clusters, (ii) the differences and similarities between star clusters and cores of dwarf elliptical galaxies, and (iii) the possible strong biases on mass determination induced by tidal effects.

  14. Massive star clusters in galaxies.

    PubMed

    Harris, William E

    2010-02-28

    The ensemble of all star clusters in a galaxy constitutes its star cluster system. In this review, the focus of the discussion is on the ability of star clusters, particularly the systems of old massive globular clusters (GCs), to mark the early evolutionary history of galaxies. I review current themes and key findings in GC research, and highlight some of the outstanding questions that are emerging from recent work. PMID:20083511

  15. Remote OB stars in Puppis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetson, P. B.; Fitzgerald, M. P.

    1985-06-01

    Spectroscopic observations are presented for 54 remote OB stars in Puppis, for which UBV photometry has been published by Reed and FitzGerald (1983). The combination of MK spectral classification and the photometric data suggests that the overwhelming majority of these stars lie at a common distance of about 6 kpc from the sun, and may form a physical association. This result prevents using these stars to achieve the original goal of mapping the rotation curve of the outer Galactic disk.

  16. New Stars on the Block

    E-print Network

    Ray Jayawardhana

    2000-05-10

    Groups of young stars located in the solar neighborhood have recently received a lot of attention. These stars, which are $\\lesssim$ 10 million years old, can provide insights into the birth of stars and planetary systems. For example, the TW Hydrae Association is just at the age when planets are believed to form, while MBM12 represents an earlier stage. In this Perspective, I briefly discuss recent research in this field.

  17. Space Science in Action: Stars [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This videotape recording shows students the many ways scientists look at the stars and how they can use what they see to answer questions such as What are stars made of?, How far away are they?, and How old are the stars? Students learn about the life span of stars and the various stages they pass through from protostar to main sequence star to…

  18. Formation of the First Star Clusters

    E-print Network

    Klessen,Ralf

    Formation of the First Star Clusters Ralf Klessen Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg-Hsu Wang ... many collaborators abroad! #12;First star formation agenda #12;Star cluster formation First of molecular clouds Star cluster formation First star formation Magnetic fields in the primordial universe

  19. Radial solitary waves in periodic variable stars

    E-print Network

    Fedor V. Prigara

    2006-09-15

    It is shown that the oscillations of brightness in classical Cepheids and other 'pulsating' variable stars are caused rather by the passing of radial solitary waves through the photosphere of a star, than by pulsations of a star. Radial solitary waves also determine the oscillations of brightness in some other types of periodic variable stars ordinary not considered as pulsating stars.

  20. Quark Stars: Features and Findings

    E-print Network

    Prashanth Jaikumar

    2007-01-25

    Under extreme conditions of temperature and/or density, quarks and gluons are expected to undergo a deconfinement phase transition. While this is an ephemeral phenomenon at the ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collider (BNL-RHIC), quark matter may exist naturally in the dense interior of neutron stars. Herein, we present an appraisal of the possible phase structure of dense quark matter inside neutron stars, and the likelihood of its existence given the current status of neutron star observations. We conclude that quark matter inside neutron stars cannot be dismissed as a possibility, although recent observational evidence rules out most soft equations of state.

  1. Thermal instability in DAV stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrador, J.; Falcon, N.

    2008-01-01

    The short period of the fluctuations of stars DAV, in the order of the hun dreds of seconds; the modes of luminosity oscillation's to constant radio, and the non existence of fusion processes in such stars invite elaboration of models in the formalism of Mixing Length Theory of Convection(MLT). In the present work a mechanism of luminosity variation in DAV stars based on thermodynamic processes of non balance with homogenous convection. The results of the model allow satisfactorily reproducing the light curves of DAV classic stars: G29- 38, GD 358, HL Tau- 76 and WD1647+1591.

  2. Binary Star Software for Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, C. H. S.

    1998-12-01

    Educational software for Macintosh computers to aid in teaching binary star concepts is now available free from my web site http://www.uark.edu/misc/clacy/BinaryStars/. Four programs are available to teach binary star concepts such as orbital period, orbital phase, eclipsing binary star, dates of minima, semi-major axis, eccentricity, longitude of periastron, orbital inclination, Kepler;s laws, and observing seasons. These programs may be used in a teaching laboratory setting, or for personal use. Both student manuals and instructor manuals are provided.

  3. Surface abundances of ON stars

    E-print Network

    Martins, F; Palacios, A; Howarth, I; Georgy, C; Walborn, N R; Bouret, J -C; Barba, R

    2015-01-01

    Massive stars burn hydrogen through the CNO cycle during most of their evolution. When mixing is efficient, or when mass transfer in binary systems happens, chemically processed material is observed at the surface of O and B stars. ON stars show stronger lines of nitrogen than morphologically normal counterparts. Whether this corresponds to the presence of material processed through the CNO cycle or not is not known. Our goal is to answer this question. We perform a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of ON stars with atmosphere models. We determine the fundamental parameters as well as the He, C, N, and O surface abundances. We also measure the projected rotational velocities. We compare the properties of the ON stars to those of normal O stars. We show that ON stars are usually helium-rich. Their CNO surface abundances are fully consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis. ON stars are more chemically evolved and rotate - on average - faster than normal O stars. Evolutionary models including rotation cann...

  4. Apple Valley Double Star Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The High Desert Astronomical Society hosts an annual double star workshop, where participants measure the position angles and separations of double stars. Following the New Generation Science Standards (NGSS), adopted by the California State Board of Education, participants are assigned to teams where they learn the process of telescope set-up and operation, the gathering of data, and the reduction of the data. Team results are compared to the latest epoch listed in the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) and papers are written for publication in the Journal of Double Star Observations (JDSO). Each team presents a PowerPoint presentation to their peers about actual hands-on astronomical research.

  5. QPO Constraints on Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. Coleman

    2005-01-01

    The kilohertz frequencies of QPOs from accreting neutron star systems imply that they are generated in regions of strong gravity, close to the star. This suggests that observations of the QPOs can be used to constrain the properties of neutron stars themselves, and in particular to inform us about the properties of cold matter beyond nuclear densities. Here we discuss some relatively model-insensitive constraints that emerge from the kilohertz QPOs, as well as recent developments that may hint at phenomena related to unstable circular orbits outside neutron stars.

  6. Polyelectrolyte stars in planar confinement

    E-print Network

    Martin Konieczny; Christos N. Likos

    2006-04-18

    We employ monomer-resolved Molecular Dynamics simulations and theoretical considerations to analyze the conformations of multiarm polyelectrolyte stars close to planar, uncharged walls. We identify three mechanisms that contribute to the emergence of a repulsive star-wall force, namely: the confinement of the counterions that are trapped in the star interior, the increase in electrostatic energy due to confinement as well as a novel mechanism arising from the compression of the stiff polyelectrolyte rods approaching the wall. The latter is not present in the case of interaction between two polyelectrolyte stars and is a direct consequence of the impenetrable character of the planar wall.

  7. Stars with Extended Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.

    2002-12-01

    This Workshop consisted of a full-day meeting of the Working Group "Sterren met Uitgebreide Atmosferen" (SUA, Working Group Stars with Extended Atmospheres), a discussion group founded in 1979 by Kees de Jager, Karel van der Hucht and Pik Sin The. This loose association of astronomers and astronomy students working in the Dutch-speaking part of the Low Countries (The Netherlands and Flanders) organised at regular intervals one-day meetings at the Universities of Utrecht, Leiden, Amsterdam and Brussels. These meetings consisted of the presentation of scientific results by junior as well as senior members of the group, and by discussions between the participants. As such, the SUA meetings became a forum for the exchange of ideas, and for asking questions and advice in an informal atmosphere. Kees de Jager has been chairman of the WG SUA from the beginning in 1979 till today, as the leading source of inspiration. At the occasion of Prof. Kees de Jager's 80th birthday, we decided to collect the presented talks in written form as a Festschrift in honour of this well-respected and much beloved scientist, teacher and friend. The first three papers deal with the personality of Kees de Jager, more specifically with his role as a supervisor and mentor of young researchers and as a catalyst in the research work of his colleagues. And also about his remarkable role in the establishment of astronomy education and research at the University of Brussels. The next presentation is a very detailed review of solar research, a field in which Cees was prominently active for many years. Then follow several papers dealing with stars about which Kees is a true expert: massive stars and extended atmospheres.

  8. H-cluster stars

    E-print Network

    X. Y. Lai; C. Y. Gao; R. X. Xu

    2013-03-20

    The study of dense matter at ultra-high density has a very long history, which is meaningful for us to understand not only cosmic events in extreme circumstances but also fundamental laws of physics. It is well known that the state of cold matter at supra-nuclear density depends on the non-perturbative nature of quantum chromo-dynamics (QCD) and is essential for modeling pulsars. A so-called H-cluster matter is proposed in this paper as the nature of dense matter in reality. In compact stars at only a few nuclear densities but low temperature, quarks could be interacting strongly with each other there. That might render quarks grouped in clusters, although the hypothetical quark-clusters in cold dense matter has not been confirmed due to the lack of both theoretical and experimental evidence. Motivated by recent lattice QCD simulations of the H-dibaryons (with structure uuddss), we are therefore considering here a possible kind of quark-clusters, H-clusters, that could emerge inside compact stars during their initial cooling, as the dominant components inside (the degree of freedom could then be H-clusters there).Taking into account the in-medium stiffening effect, we find that at baryon densities of compact stars $H$-cluster matter could be more stable than nuclear matter. We also find that for the H-cluster matter with lattice structure, the equation of state could be so stiff that it would seem to be "superluminal" in most dense region. However, the real sound speed for H-cluster matter is in fact hard to calculate, so at this stage we do not put constraints on our model from the usual requirment of causality.

  9. Rotation of Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissin, Yevgeni; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    The internal rotation of post-main sequence stars is investigated, in response to the convective pumping of angular momentum toward the stellar core, combined with a tight magnetic coupling between core and envelope. The spin evolution is calculated using model stars of initial mass 1, 1.5, and 5 {M}? , taking into account mass loss on the giant branches. We also include the deposition of orbital angular momentum from a sub-stellar companion, as influenced by tidal drag along with the excitation of orbital eccentricity by a fluctuating gravitational quadrupole moment. A range of angular velocity profiles {{? }}(r) is considered in the envelope, extending from solid rotation to constant specific angular momentum. We focus on the backreaction of the Coriolis force, and the threshold for dynamo action in the inner envelope. Quantitative agreement with measurements of core rotation in subgiants and post-He core flash stars by Kepler is obtained with a two-layer angular velocity profile: uniform specific angular momentum where the Coriolis parameter {Co}\\equiv {{? }}{? }{con}? 1 (here {? }{con} is the convective time), and {{? }}(r)\\propto {r}-1 where {Co}? 1. The inner profile is interpreted in terms of a balance between the Coriolis force and angular pressure gradients driven by radially extended convective plumes. Inward angular momentum pumping reduces the surface rotation of subgiants, and the need for a rejuvenated magnetic wind torque. The co-evolution of internal magnetic fields and rotation is considered in Kissin & Thompson, along with the breaking of the rotational coupling between core and envelope due to heavy mass loss.

  10. Supermassive monopole stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, J. N.; Fuller, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, the evolution of a superheavy monopole-dominated universe is reexamined; in particular, the evolution of rotation-stabilized monopole-burning 'stars', balancing effects of radiation and annihilation are examined. In contrast to earlier results, it is found that this can lead to complete burning of all poles present in such an object within finite time. If monopoles can be brought within acceptable limits by dynamical processes, an inflationary epoch of the early universe need not be associated with grand unification.

  11. The guide star catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasker, Barry M.; Jenkner, Helmut; Russell, Jane L.

    1987-01-01

    Part 1 of the catalog presents an astronomical overview of the Guide Star Catalog, together with its history, the properties of its current implementation, and the prospects for enhancement. Part 2 presents the algorithms used in photometric and astrometric calibration of the catalog, as well as the analyses of the related errors. Part 3 presents the current structure and content, as well as future enhancements in this area. An overview of the forthcoming publications is given, both with regard to scientific papers and electronic media.

  12. Dust from AGB stars

    E-print Network

    Anja C. Andersen

    2007-02-22

    Dust is formed in the expanding atmosphere during late stages of stellar evolution. Dust influences the dynamics and thermodynamics of the stellar atmosphere by its opacity. The dust opacity depends both on the optical properties of the grain material as well as on the amount of dust present. A rich source of information on some mineral phases of dust in AGB stars comes from the study of presolar grains from meteorites. This paper presents a short overview of presolar grains studies and describes how the optical properties of dust grains are obtained in the laboratory.

  13. Dielectron Measurements in STAR

    E-print Network

    F. Geurts; for the STAR Collaboration

    2012-08-16

    Ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions provide a unique environment to study the properties of strongly interacting matter. Dileptons, which are not affected by the strong interactions, are an ideal penetrating probe. We present the dielectron results for p+p and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}}}$ =200 GeV, as measured by the STAR experiment. We discuss the prospects of dilepton measurements with the near-future detector upgrades, and the recent lower beam energy Au+Au measurements.

  14. Upsilon measurement in STAR

    E-print Network

    Mauro R. Cosentino

    2007-06-06

    We present preliminary results of Upsilon production in p+p collisions at sqrt(s)=200 GeV at central rapidity. This measurement was performed at the STAR experiment through the Upsilon->e^+e^- decay channel. In this manuscript we describe the experimental details, from the development of a specially designed trigger setup to the analysis methods used to discriminate electrons from hadrons. The production cross-section obtained B*{(dsigma/dy)|(y=0)}=91(28)(22) pb is compatible with our expectations based on pQCD calculations.

  15. On Magnetized Neutron Stars

    E-print Network

    Luiz L. Lopes; Debora P. Menezes

    2015-08-05

    In this work we review the formalism normally used in the literature about the effects of density-dependent magnetic fields on the properties of neutron and quark stars, expose some ambiguities that arise and propose a way to solve the related problem. Our approach explores more deeply the concept of pressure, yielding the so called chaotic magnetic field formalism for the stress tensor. We also use a different way of introducing a variable magnetic field, which depends on the energy density rather than on the baryonic density, which allows us to build a parameter free model.

  16. The emergence of "super-canonical" stars in R136-type star-burst clusters

    E-print Network

    Crowther, Paul

    The emergence of "super-canonical" stars in R136-type star-burst clusters Sambaran Banerjee stars in the local universe" (JD2) #12;Super-cluster R136: a magnificent gallery of massive stars cluster in the LMC. Image credit: ESO #12;Observation of "super-canonical" stars in R136Very massive stars

  17. Hubble Sees a Neutron Star Alone in Space Nearest Known Neutron Star

    E-print Network

    Barnes, Joshua Edward

    Hubble Sees a Neutron Star Alone in Space Nearest Known Neutron Star #12;Birth of a Neutron Star & neutrinos. The birth temperature of a neutron star is ~5×1011 K, but neutrino emission cools it to `only' 106 to 107 K. #12;Sizes of Neutron Stars Google Maps: Oahu #12;Sizes of Neutron Stars Artist

  18. The first stars: a classification of CEMP-no stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, André; Meynet, Georges

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We propose and apply a new classification for the CEMP-no stars, which are carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars with no overabundance of s-elements and with [Fe/H] generally ?-2.5. Methods: This classification is based on the changes in abundances for the elements and isotopes involved in the CNO, Ne-Na, and Mg-Al nuclear cycles. These abundances change very much owing to successive back and forth mixing motions between the He- and H-burning regions in massive stars (the "source stars" responsible for the chemical enrichment of the CEMP-no stars). Results: The wide variety of the ratios [C/Fe], 12C/13C, [N/Fe], [O/Fe], [Na/Fe], [Mg/Fe], [Al/Fe], [Sr/Fe], and [Ba/Fe], which are the main characteristics making the CEMP-no and low-s stars so peculiar, is described well in terms of the proposed nucleosynthetic classification. We note that the [(C+N+O)/Fe] ratios significantly increase for lower values of [Fe/H]. Conclusions: The classification of CEMP-no stars and the behavior of [(C+N+O)/Fe] support the presence, in the first stellar generations of the Galaxy, of fast-rotating massive stars experiencing strong mixing and mass loss (spinstars). This result has an impact on the early chemical and spectral evolution of the Galaxy.

  19. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION SURROUNDING WOLF-RAYET STAR HD 211853

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei; Qin Shengli

    2012-05-20

    The environment surrounding Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star HD 211853 is studied in molecular, infrared, as well as radio, and H I emission. The molecular ring consists of well-separated cores, which have a volume density of 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3} and kinematic temperature {approx}20 K. Most of the cores are under gravitational collapse due to external pressure from the surrounding ionized gas. From the spectral energy distribution modeling toward the young stellar objects, the sequential star formation is revealed on a large scale in space spreading from the W-R star to the molecular ring. A small-scale sequential star formation is revealed toward core 'A', which harbors a very young star cluster. Triggered star formations are thus suggested. The presence of the photodissociation region, the fragmentation of the molecular ring, the collapse of the cores, and the large-scale sequential star formation indicate that the 'collect and collapse' process functions in this region. The star-forming activities in core 'A' seem to be affected by the 'radiation-driven implosion' process.

  20. Star-forming galaxy models: Blending star formation into TREESPH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Hernquist, Lars

    1994-01-01

    We have incorporated star-formation algorithms into a hybrid N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (TREESPH) in order to describe the star forming properties of disk galaxies over timescales of a few billion years. The models employ a Schmidt law of index n approximately 1.5 to calculate star-formation rates, and explicitly include the energy and metallicity feedback into the Interstellar Medium (ISM). Modeling the newly formed stellar population is achieved through the use of hybrid SPH/young star particles which gradually convert from gaseous to collisionless particles, avoiding the computational difficulties involved in creating new particles. The models are shown to reproduce well the star-forming properties of disk galaxies, such as the morphology, rate of star formation, and evolution of the global star-formation rate and disk gas content. As an example of the technique, we model an encounter between a disk galaxy and a small companion which gives rise to a ring galaxy reminiscent of the Cartwheel (AM 0035-35). The primary galaxy in this encounter experiences two phases of star forming activity: an initial period during the expansion of the ring, and a delayed phase as shocked material in the ring falls back into the central regions.

  1. Stars For Citizens With Urban Star Parks and Lighting Specialists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, Valentin

    2015-08-01

    General contextOne hundred years ago, almost nobody imagine a life without stars every night even in the urban areas. Now, to see a starry sky is a special event for urban citizens.It is possible to see the stars even inside cities? Yes, but for that we need star parks and lighting specialists as partners.Educational aspectThe citizens must be able to identify the planets, constellations and other celestial objects in their urban residence. This is part of a basic education. The number of the people living in the urban area who never see the main constellations or important stars increase every year. We must do something for our urban community.What is an urban star park?An urban public park where we can see the main constellations can be considered an urban star park. There can be organized a lot of activities as practical lessons of astronomy, star parties, etc.Classification of the urban star parksA proposal for classification of the urban star parks taking in consideration the quality of the sky and the number of the city inhabitants:Two categories:- city star parks for cities with < 100.000 inhabitants- metropolis star parks for cities with > 100.000 inhabitantsFive levels of quality:- 1* level = can see stars of at least 1 magnitude with the naked eyes- 2* level = at least 2 mag- 3* level = at least 3 mag- 4* level= at least 4 mag- 5* level = at least 5 magThe urban star urban park structure and lighting systemA possible structure of a urban star park and sky-friend lighting including non-electric illumination are descripted.The International Commission on IlluminationA description of this structure which has as members national commissions from all over the world.Dark-sky activists - lighting specialistsNational Commissions on Illumination organize courses of lighting specialist. Dark-sky activists can become lighting specialists. The author shows his experience in this aspect as a recent lighting specialist and his cooperation with the Romanian National Commission on Illumination working for a law of illumination in Romania and to implement the sky protection elements into the lighting specialist accreditation.

  2. Al-Sufi's Investigation of Stars, Star Clusters and Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, Ihsan; Stephenson, F. R.; Orchiston, W.

    2011-01-01

    The distinguished Arabic astronomer, Al-Sufi (AD 903-986) is justly famous for his Book of the Fixed Stars, an outstanding Medieval treatise on astronomy that was assembled in 964. Developed from Ptolemy's Algamest, but based upon al-Sufi's own stellar observations, the Book of the Fixed Stars has been copied down through the ages, and currently 35 copies are known to exist in various archival repositories around the world. Among other things, this major work contains 55 astronomical tables, plus star charts for 48 constellations. For the first time a long-overdue English translation of this important early work is in active preparation. In this paper we provide biographical material about Al-Sufi and the contents of his Book of the Fixed Stars, before examining his novel stellar magnitude system, and his listing of star clusters and nebulae (including the first-ever mention of the Great Nebula in Andromeda).

  3. Wolf-Rayet stars from Very Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Norhasliza

    2015-01-01

    Many studies focused on very massive stars (VMS) within the framework of Pop. III stars, because this is where they were thought to be abundant. In this work, we focus on the evolution of VMS in the local universe following the discovery of VMS in the R136 cluster in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We computed grids of VMS evolutionary tracks in the range 120-500 M ? with solar, LMC and Small Magellanic Cloud metallicities. All models end their lives as Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars of the WC (or WO) type. We discuss the evolution and fate of VMS around solar metallicity with particular focus on the WR phase. For example, we show that a distinctive feature that may be used to disentangle Wolf-Rayet stars originating from VMS from those originating from lower initial masses is the enhanced abundances of Ne and Mg at the surface of WC stars.

  4. Clues about the first stars from CEMP-no stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choplin, A.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.

    2015-12-01

    The material used to form the CEMP-no stars presents signatures of material processed by the CNO cycle and by He-burning from a previous stellar generation called the source stars. In order to reproduce the relative abundance ratios like for instance C/N or ^{12}C/^{13}C, some mixing between the two burning regions must have occured in the source stars and only the outer layers of the stars, with modest amount coming from the CO core, must have been expelled either through stellar winds or at the time of the (faint) supernova event. With new models at low metallicity including rotational mixing, we shall discuss how the variety of abundances observed for CEMP-no stars can be reproduced.

  5. Massive Star Formation in the Galactic Center

    E-print Network

    D. F. Figer

    2008-03-12

    The Galactic center is a hotbed of star formation activity, containing the most massive star formation site and three of the most massive young star clusters in the Galaxy. Given such a rich environment, it contains more stars with initial masses above 100 \\Msun than anywhere else in the Galaxy. This review concerns the young stellar population in the Galactic center, as it relates to massive star formation in the region. The sample includes stars in the three massive stellar clusters, the population of younger stars in the present sites of star formation, the stars surrounding the central black hole, and the bulk of the stars in the field population. The fossil record in the Galactic center suggests that the recently formed massive stars there are present-day examples of similar populations that must have been formed through star formation episodes stretching back to the time period when the Galaxy was forming.

  6. Star Products for Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    E-print Network

    P. Henselder

    2007-05-24

    The star product formalism has proved to be an alternative formulation for nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. We want introduce here a covariant star product in order to extend the star product formalism to relativistic quantum mechanics in the proper time formulation.

  7. THE CHANDRA VARIABLE GUIDE STAR CATALOG

    E-print Network

    Nichols, Joy S.

    Variable stars have been identified among the optical-wavelength light curves of guide stars used for pointing control of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We present a catalog of these variable stars along with their light ...

  8. Stars and Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neta, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    'Estrelas e Planetas' (Stars and Planets) project was developed during the academic year 2009/2010 and was tested on three 3rd grade classes of one school in Quarteira, Portugal. The aim was to encourage the learning of science and the natural and physical phenomena through the construction and manipulation of materials that promote these themes - in this case astronomy. Throughout the project the students built a small book containing three themes of astronomy: differences between stars and planets, the solar system and the phases of the Moon. To each topic was devoted two sessions of about an hour each: the first to teach the theoretical aspects of the theme and the second session to assembly two pages of the book. All materials used (for theoretical sessions and for the construction of the book) and videos of the finished book are available for free use in www.miguelneta.pt/estrelaseplanetas. So far there is only a Portuguese version but soon will be published in English as well. This project won the Excellency Prize 2011 of Casa das Ciências, a portuguese site for teachers supported by the Calouste Gulbenkian Fundation (www.casadasciencias.org).

  9. Really Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    Spectacular VLT Photos Unveil Mysterious Nebulae Summary Quite a few of the most beautiful objects in the Universe are still shrouded in mystery. Even though most of the nebulae of gas and dust in our vicinity are now rather well understood, there are some which continue to puzzle astronomers. This is the case of a small number of unusual nebulae that appear to be the subject of strong heating - in astronomical terminology, they present an amazingly "high degree of excitation". This is because they contain significant amounts of ions, i.e., atoms that have lost one or more of their electrons. Depending on the atoms involved and the number of electrons lost, this process bears witness to the strength of the radiation or to the impact of energetic particles. But what are the sources of that excitation? Could it be energetic stars or perhaps some kind of exotic objects inside these nebulae? How do these peculiar objects fit into the current picture of universal evolution? New observations of a number of such unusual nebulae have recently been obtained with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). In a dedicated search for the origin of their individual characteristics, a team of astronomers - mostly from the Institute of Astrophysics & Geophysics in Liège (Belgium) [1] - have secured the first detailed, highly revealing images of four highly ionized nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds, two small satellite galaxies of our home galaxy, the Milky Way, only a few hundred thousand light-years away. In three nebulae, they succeeded in identifying the sources of energetic radiation and to eludicate their exceptional properties: some of the hottest, most massive stars ever seen, some of which are double. With masses of more than 20 times that of the Sun and surface temperatures above 90 000 degrees, these stars are truly extreme. PR Photo 09a/03: Nebula around the hot star AB7 in the SMC. PR Photo 09b/03: Nebula near the hot Wolf-Rayet star BAT99-2 in the LMC. PR Photo 09c/03: Nebula near the hot binary star BAT99-49 in the LMC. PR Photo 09d/03: The N44C Nebula in the LMC. Four unique images of highly excited nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds ESO PR Photo 09a/03 ESO PR Photo 09a/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 472 pix - 74k [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 943 pix - 720k] [Full-Res - JPEG: 1200 x 1414 pix - 1.2M] ESO PR Photo 09b/03 ESO PR Photo 09b/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 466 pix - 70k [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 931 pix - 928k] [Full-Res - JPEG: 1200 x 1397 pix - 1.8M] ESO PR Photo 09c/03 ESO PR Photo 09c/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 469 pix - 74k [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 937 pix - 1.1M] [Full-Res - JPEG: 1200 x 1405 pix - 2.2M] ESO PR Photo 09d/03 ESO PR Photo 09d/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 473 pix - 28k [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 945 pix - 368k] [Full-Res - JPEG: 1200 x 1418 pix - 600k] Captions: PR Photo 09a/03 is a reproduction of a "near-true" three-colour composite image of the highly excited nebula around the hot double star AB7 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), obtained in January 2002 with the FORS1 multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m VLT MELIPAL telescope at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). It is based on three exposures through narrow-band optical (interference) filters that isolate the light from specific atoms and ions. In this rendering, the blue colour represents the light from singly ionized Helium (He II; wavelength 468.6 nm; exposure time 30 min), green corresponds to doubly ionized oxygen ([O III]; 495.7 + 500.7 nm; 5 min) and red to hydrogen atoms (H; H-alpha line at 656.2 nm; 5 min). Of these three ions, He II is the tracer of high excitation, i.e. the bluest areas of the nebula are the hottest. The sky field measures 400 x 400 arcsec2; the original pixel size on the 2k x 2k CCD is 0.23 arcsec. North is up and east to the left. Before combination, the CCD frames were flat-fielded and cleaned of cosmic-rays. Moreover, the stars in the blue (He II) image were removed in order to provide a clearer view of the surrounding nebular emission. The reproduced brightness is proportional to the squar

  10. The Stars of Heaven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickover, Clifford A.

    2004-05-01

    Do a little armchair space travel, rub elbows with alien life forms, and stretch your mind to the furthest corners of our uncharted universe. With this astonishing guidebook, you don't have to be an astronomer to explore the mysteries of stars and their profound meaning for human existence. Clifford A. Pickover tackles a range of topics from stellar evolution to the fundamental reasons why the universe permits life to flourish. He alternates sections that explain the mysteries of the cosmos with sections that dramatize mind-expanding concepts through a fictional dialog between futuristic humans and their alien peers (who embark on a journey beyond the reader's wildest imagination). This highly accessible and entertaining approach turns an intimidating subject into a scientific game open to all dreamers. Told in Pickover's inimitable blend of fascinating state-of-the-art science and whimsical science fiction, and packed with numerous diagrams and illustrations, The Stars of Heaven unfolds a world of paradox and mystery, one that will intrigue anyone who has ever pondered the night sky with wonder.

  11. Multistate boson stars

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, A.; Barranco, J.; Alic, D.; Palenzuela, C.

    2010-02-15

    Motivated by the increasing interest in models which consider scalar fields as viable dark matter candidates, we have constructed a generalization of relativistic boson stars (BS) composed of two coexisting states of the scalar field, the ground state and the first excited state. We have studied the dynamical evolution of these multistate boson stars (MSBS) under radial perturbations, using numerical techniques. We show that stable MSBS can be constructed, when the number of particles in the first excited state, N{sup (2)}, is smaller than the number of particles in the ground state, N{sup (1)}. On the other hand, when N{sup (2)}>N{sup (1)}, the configurations are initially unstable. However, they evolve and settle down into stable configurations. In the stabilization process, the initially ground state is excited and ends in a first excited state, whereas the initially first excited state ends in a ground state. During this process, both states emit scalar field radiation, decreasing their number of particles. This behavior shows that even though BS in the first excited state are intrinsically unstable under finite perturbations, the configuration resulting from the combination of this state with the ground state produces stable objects. Finally we show in a qualitative way, that stable MSBS could be realistic models of dark matter galactic halos, as they produce rotation curves that are flatter at large radii than the rotation curves produced by BS with only one state.

  12. A Star on the Run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    Usually stars that are born together tend to move together but sometimes stars can go rogue and run away from their original birthplace. A pair of astronomers have now discovered the first runaway red supergiant (RSG) ever identified in another galaxy. With a radial velocity discrepancy of 300 km/s, its also the fastest runaway massive star known. Discrepant Speeds: When massive stars form in giant molecular clouds, they create what are known as OB associations: groups of hot, massive, short-lived stars that have similar velocities because theyre moving through space together. But sometimes stars that appear to be part of an OB association dont have the same velocity as the rest of the group. These stars are called runaways.What causes an OB star to run away is still debated, but we know that a fairly significant fraction of OB stars are runaways. In spite of this, surprisingly few runaways have been found that are evolved massive stars i.e., the post-main-sequence state of OB stars. This is presumably because these evolved stars have had more time to move away from their birthplace, and its more difficult to identify a runaway without the context of its original group. An Evolved Runaway: Difference between observed velocity and expected velocity, plotted as a function of expected velocity. The black points are foreground stars. The red points are expected RSGs, clustered around a velocity difference of zero. The green pentagon is the runaway RSG J004330.06+405258.4. [Evans Massey 2015]Despite this challenge, a recent survey of RSGs in the galaxy M31 has led to the detection of a massive star on the run! Kate Evans (Lowell Observatory and California Institute of Technology) and Philip Massey (Lowell Observatory and Northern Arizona University) discovered that RSG J004330.06+405258.4 is moving through the Andromeda Galaxy with a radial velocity thats off by about 300 km/s from the radial velocity expected for its location.Evans and Massey discovered this rogue star via a photometric survey of RSGs in M31, followed up by spectroscopy with the Multiple Mirror Telescope. They determined that the star is also separated from other massive stars in the disk of the galaxy by about 4.6 kpc which is roughly the distance it would be expected to travel, given its discrepant motion, in an assumed age of about 10 Myr.The authors suggest that this star may be a high-mass analog of hypervelocity stars stars within the Milky Way that are moving fast enough to escape the galaxy. The authors demonstrate that the total discrepant speed of RSG J004330.06+405258.4 is probably comparable to the escape velocity of M31s disk.But whether or not this star is moving fast enough to escape turns out to be moot: it will only live another million years, which means it wont have enough time to leave the galaxy before ending its life in a spectacular supernova. Citation: Kate Anne Evans and Philip Massey 2015 AJ 150 149. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/5/149

  13. A Star on the Run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Usually stars that are born together tend to move together but sometimes stars can go rogue and run away from their original birthplace. A pair of astronomers have now discovered the first runaway red supergiant (RSG) ever identified in another galaxy. With a radial velocity discrepancy of 300 km/s, its also the fastest runaway massive star known.Discrepant SpeedsWhen massive stars form in giant molecular clouds, they create what are known as OB associations: groups of hot, massive, short-lived stars that have similar velocities because theyre moving through space together. But sometimes stars that appear to be part of an OB association dont have the same velocity as the rest of the group. These stars are called runaways.What causes an OB star to run away is still debated, but we know that a fairly significant fraction of OB stars are runaways. In spite of this, surprisingly few runaways have been found that are evolved massive stars i.e., the post-main-sequence state of OB stars. This is presumably because these evolved stars have had more time to move away from their birthplace, and its more difficult to identify a runaway without the context of its original group.An Evolved RunawayDifference between observed velocity and expected velocity, plotted as a function of expected velocity. The black points are foreground stars. The red points are expected RSGs, clustered around a velocity difference of zero. The green pentagon is the runaway RSG J004330.06+405258.4. [Evans Massey 2015]Despite this challenge, a recent survey of RSGs in the galaxy M31 has led to the detection of a massive star on the run! Kate Evans (Lowell Observatory and California Institute of Technology) and Philip Massey (Lowell Observatory and Northern Arizona University) discovered that RSG J004330.06+405258.4 is moving through the Andromeda Galaxy with a radial velocity thats off by about 300 km/s from the radial velocity expected for its location.Evans and Massey discovered this rogue star via a photometric survey of RSGs in M31, followed up by spectroscopy with the Multiple Mirror Telescope. They determined that the star is also separated from other massive stars in the disk of the galaxy by about 4.6 kpc which is roughly the distance it would be expected to travel, given its discrepant motion, in an assumed age of about 10 Myr.The authors suggest that this star may be a high-mass analog of hypervelocity stars stars within the Milky Way that are moving fast enough to escape the galaxy. The authors demonstrate that the total discrepant speed of RSG J004330.06+405258.4 is probably comparable to the escape velocity of M31s disk.But whether or not this star is moving fast enough to escape turns out to be moot: it will only live another million years, which means it wont have enough time to leave the galaxy before ending its life in a spectacular supernova.CitationKate Anne Evans and Philip Massey 2015 AJ 150 149. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/5/149

  14. Thermal Evolution of Strange Stars

    E-print Network

    Zhou Xia; Wang Lingzhi; Zhou Aizhi

    2007-09-03

    We investigated the thermal evolution of rotating strange stars with the deconfinement heating due to magnetic braking. We consider the stars consisting of either normal quark matter or color-flavor-locked phase. Combining deconfinement heating with magnetic field decay, we find that the thermal evolution curves are identical to pulsar data.

  15. Dust near luminous ultraviolet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes research activities related to the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) sky survey. About 745 luminous stars were examined for the presence of interstellar dust heated by a nearby star. The 'cirrus' discovered by IRAS is thermal radiation from interstellar dust at moderate and high galactic latitudes. The IRAS locates the dust which must (at some level) scatter ultraviolet starlight, although it was expected that thermal emission would be found around virtually every star, most stars shown no detectable emission. And the emission found is not uniform. It is not that the star is embedded in 'an interstellar medium', but rather what is found are discrete clouds that are heated by starlight. An exception is the dearth of clouds near the very hottest stars, implying that the very hottest stars play an active role with respect to destroying or substantially modifying the dust clouds over time. The other possibility is simply that the hottest stars are located in regions lacking in dust, which is counter-intuitive. A bibliography of related journal articles is attached.

  16. STARS: A Year in Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System[TM] (STARS) is a program of AASHE, the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. AASHE is a member-driven organization with a mission to empower higher education to lead the sustainability transformation. STARS was developed by AASHE with input and insight from…

  17. Mathematics Teaching with the Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Sueanne E.; Bol, Linda; Berube, Clair

    2010-01-01

    The mathematics instructional approaches of effective elementary teachers in urban high- poverty schools were investigated. Approximately 99 urban elementary teachers were administered the Star Teacher Selection Interview; a total of 31 were identified as star teachers. These teachers were then administered the Instructional Practices…

  18. Stars get dizzy after lunch

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Michael; Penev, Kaloyan

    2014-06-01

    Exoplanet searches have discovered a large number of {sup h}ot Jupiters{sup —}high-mass planets orbiting very close to their parent stars in nearly circular orbits. A number of these planets are sufficiently massive and close-in to be significantly affected by tidal dissipation in the parent star, to a degree parameterized by the tidal quality factor Q {sub *}. This process speeds up their star's rotation rate while reducing the planet's semimajor axis. In this paper, we investigate the tidal destruction of hot Jupiters. Because the orbital angular momenta of these planets are a significant fraction of their star's rotational angular momenta, they spin up their stars significantly while spiraling to their deaths. Using the Monte Carlo simulation, we predict that for Q {sub *} = 10{sup 6}, 3.9 × 10{sup –6} of stars with the Kepler Target Catalog's mass distribution should have a rotation period shorter than 1/3 day (8 hr) due to accreting a planet. Exoplanet surveys such as SuperWASP, HATnet, HATsouth, and KELT have already produced light curves of millions of stars. These two facts suggest that it may be possible to search for tidally destroyed planets by looking for stars with extremely short rotational periods, then looking for remnant planet cores around those candidates, anomalies in the metal distribution, or other signatures of the recent accretion of the planet.

  19. Physics of Neutron Star Crusts

    E-print Network

    N. Chamel; P. Haensel

    2008-12-20

    The physics of neutron star crusts is vast, involving many different research fields, from nuclear and condensed matter physics to general relativity. This review summarizes the progress, which has been achieved over the last few years, in modeling neutron star crusts, both at the microscopic and macroscopic levels. The confrontation of these theoretical models with observations is also briefly discussed.

  20. WhiteStar user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Ezell, T.F.

    1990-08-01

    The WhiteStar project provides design engineers with needed part design data. WhiteStar encourages the use of preferred parts by providing a user-convenient parts database. This report shows selections the user makes in order to obtain information on a particular part. 15 figs.

  1. Star formation in the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan

    2009-03-15

    We develop a simple semianalytic model of the star formation rate as a function of time. We estimate the star formation rate for a wide range of values of the cosmological constant, spatial curvature, and primordial density contrast. Our model can predict such parameters in the multiverse, if the underlying theory landscape and the cosmological measure are known.

  2. Effective Dynamics for Boson Stars

    E-print Network

    Juerg Froehlich; B. Lars G. Jonsson; Enno Lenzmann

    2006-05-17

    We study solutions close to solitary waves of the pseudo-relativistic Hartree equation describing boson stars under the influence of an external gravitational field. In particular, we analyze the long-time effective dynamics of such solutions. In essence, we establish a (long-time) stability result for solutions describing boson stars that move under the influence of an external gravitational field.

  3. Physics of primordial star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Naoki

    2012-09-01

    The study of primordial star formation has a history of nearly sixty years. It is generally thought that primordial stars are one of the key elements in a broad range of topics in astronomy and cosmology, from Galactic chemical evolution to the formation of super-massive blackholes. We review recent progress in the theory of primordial star formation. The standard theory of cosmic structure formation posits that the present-day rich structure of the Universe developed through gravitational amplification of tiny matter density fluctuations left over from the Big Bang. It has become possible to study primordial star formation rigorously within the framework of the standard cosmological model. We first lay out the key physical processes in a primordial gas. Then, we introduce recent developments in computer simulations. Finally, we discuss prospects for future observations of the first generation of stars.

  4. Magnetic Field Generation in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, Lilia; Melatos, Andrew; Zrake, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    Enormous progress has been made on observing stellar magnetism in stars from the main sequence (particularly thanks to the MiMeS, MAGORI and BOB surveys) through to compact objects. Recent data have thrown into sharper relief the vexed question of the origin of stellar magnetic fields, which remains one of the main unanswered questions in astrophysics. In this chapter we review recent work in this area of research. In particular, we look at the fossil field hypothesis which links magnetism in compact stars to magnetism in main sequence and pre-main sequence stars and we consider why its feasibility has now been questioned particularly in the context of highly magnetic white dwarfs. We also review the fossil versus dynamo debate in the context of neutron stars and the roles played by key physical processes such as buoyancy, helicity, and superfluid turbulence, in the generation and stability of neutron star fields.

  5. Grand unification of neutron stars

    PubMed Central

    Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2010-01-01

    The last decade has shown us that the observational properties of neutron stars are remarkably diverse. From magnetars to rotating radio transients, from radio pulsars to isolated neutron stars, from central compact objects to millisecond pulsars, observational manifestations of neutron stars are surprisingly varied, with most properties totally unpredicted. The challenge is to establish an overarching physical theory of neutron stars and their birth properties that can explain this great diversity. Here I survey the disparate neutron stars classes, describe their properties, and highlight results made possible by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, in celebration of its 10th anniversary. Finally, I describe the current status of efforts at physical “grand unification” of this wealth of observational phenomena, and comment on possibilities for Chandra’s next decade in this field. PMID:20404205

  6. Improved autonomous star identification algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Li-Yan; Xu, Lu-Ping; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Jing-Rong

    2015-06-01

    The log-polar transform (LPT) is introduced into the star identification because of its rotation invariance. An improved autonomous star identification algorithm is proposed in this paper to avoid the circular shift of the feature vector and to reduce the time consumed in the star identification algorithm using LPT. In the proposed algorithm, the star pattern of the same navigation star remains unchanged when the stellar image is rotated, which makes it able to reduce the star identification time. The logarithmic values of the plane distances between the navigation and its neighbor stars are adopted to structure the feature vector of the navigation star, which enhances the robustness of star identification. In addition, some efforts are made to make it able to find the identification result with fewer comparisons, instead of searching the whole feature database. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively accelerate the star identification. Moreover, the recognition rate and robustness by the proposed algorithm are better than those by the LPT algorithm and the modified grid algorithm. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61172138 and 61401340), the Open Research Fund of the Academy of Satellite Application, China (Grant No. 2014_CXJJ-DH_12), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. JB141303 and 201413B), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2013JQ8040), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20130203120004), and the Xi’an Science and Technology Plan, China (Grant. No CXY1350(4)).

  7. Clues About the First Stars from CEMP-no Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, Georges; Maeder, André; Choplin, Arthur; Hirschi, Raphael; Ekström, Sylvia; Chiappini, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    The material used to form the CEMP-no stars presents signatures of material processed by the CNO cycle and by He-burning from a previous stellar generation called the source stars. In order to reproduce the absolute amounts of CNO elements observed at the surface of CEMP-no stars ([X/H] values), as well as the relative abundance ratios, for instance C/N, O/N or 12C/13C, some mixing between the two burning regions must have occured in the source stars and only the outer layers of the source stars, with modest amount coming from the CO core, must have been expelled either through stellar winds or at the time of the (faint) supernova event. With new models at low metallicity including rotational mixing, we shall discuss how the variety of abundances observed at the surface of CEMP-no stars can be reproduced. Some new results about the s-process nucleosynthesis by massive metal-poor rotating stars will also be presented.

  8. Double Neutron Star Systems and Natal Neutron Star Kicks

    E-print Network

    Chris Fryer; Vassiliki Kalogera

    1997-06-03

    We study the four double neutron star systems found in the Galactic disk in terms of the orbital characteristics of their immediate progenitors and the natal kicks imparted to neutron stars. Analysis of the effect of the second supernova explosion on the orbital dynamics, combined with recent results from simulations of rapid accretion onto neutron stars lead us to conclude that the observed systems could not have been formed had the explosion been symmetric. Their formation becomes possible if kicks are imparted to the radio-pulsar companions at birth. We identify the constraints imposed on the immediate progenitors of the observed double neutron stars and calculate the ranges within which their binary characteristics (orbital separations and masses of the exploding stars) are restricted. We also study the dependence of these limits on the magnitude of the kick velocity and the time elapsed since the second explosion. For each of the double neutron stars, we derive a minimum kick magnitude required for their formation, and for the two systems in close orbits we find it to exceed 200km/s. Lower limits are also set to the center-of-mass velocities of double neutron stars, and we find them to be consistent with the current proper motion observations.

  9. Neutron stars, strange stars, and the nuclear equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F.; Glendenning, N.K.

    1992-11-02

    This article consists of three parts. In part one we review the present status of dense nuclear matter calculations, and introduce a representative collection of realistic nuclear equations of state which are derived for different assumptions about the physical behavior of dense matter (baryon population, pion condensation,.possible transition of baryon matter to quark matter). In part two we review recently performed non-rotating and rotating compact star calculations performed for these equations of state. The minimum stable rotational periods of compact stars, whose knowledge is of decisive importance for the interpretation of rapidly rotating pulsars, axe determined. For this purpose two different limits on stable rotation are studied: rotation at the general relativistic Kepler period (below which mass shedding at the star`s equator sets in), and, secondly, rotation at the gravitational radiation-reaction instability (at which emission of gravitational waves set in which slows the star down). Part three of this article deals with the properties of hypothetical strange stars. Specifically we investigate the amount of nuclear solid crust that can be carried by a rotating strange star, and answer the question whether such objects can give rise to the observed phenomena of pulsar glitches, which is at the present time the only astrophysical test of the strange-quark-matter hypothesis.

  10. The first stars: a classification of CEMP-no stars

    E-print Network

    Maeder, Andre

    2015-01-01

    We propose and apply a new classification for the CEMP-no stars, which are "carbon-enhanced metal-poor" stars with no overabundance of s-elements and with [Fe/H] generally inferior or equal to -2.5. This classification is based on the changes in abundances for the elements and isotopes involved in the CNO, Ne-Na, and Mg-Al nuclear cycles. These abundances change very much owing to successive back and forth mixing motions between the He- and H-burning regions in massive stars (the "source stars" responsible for the chemical enrichment of the CEMP-no stars). The wide variety of the ratios [C/Fe], 12C/13C, [N/Fe], [O/Fe], [Na/Fe], [Mg/Fe], [Al/Fe], [Sr/Fe], and [Ba/Fe], which are the main characteristics making the CEMP-no and low s stars so peculiar, is described well in terms of the proposed nucleosynthetic classification. We note that the [(C+N+O)/Fe] ratios significantly increase for lower values of [Fe/H]. The classification of CEMP-no stars and the behavior of [(C+N+O)/Fe] support the presence, in the firs...

  11. Surface abundances of ON stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Palacios, A.; Howarth, I.; Georgy, C.; Walborn, N. R.; Bouret, J.-C.; Barbá, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Massive stars burn hydrogen through the CNO cycle during most of their evolution. When mixing is efficient or when mass transfer in binary systems occurs, chemically processed material is observed at the surface of O and B stars. Aims: ON stars show stronger lines of nitrogen than morphologically normal counterparts. Whether this corresponds to the presence of material processed through the CNO cycle is not known. Our goal is to answer this question. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of ON stars with atmosphere models. We determined the fundamental parameters as well as the He, C, N, and O surface abundances. We also measured the projected rotational velocities. We compared the properties of the ON stars to those of normal O stars. Results: We show that ON stars are usually rich in helium. Their CNO surface abundances are fully consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis. ON stars are more chemically evolved and rotate - on average - faster than normal O stars. Evolutionary models including rotation cannot account for the extreme enrichment observed among ON main sequence stars. Some ON stars are members of binary systems, but others are single stars as indicated by stable radial velocities. Mass transfer is therefore not a simple explanation for the observed chemical properties. Conclusions: We conclude that ON stars show extreme chemical enrichment at their surface, consistent with nucleosynthesis through the CNO cycle. Its origin is not clear at present. Based on observations obtained 1) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope; 2) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii; 3) at the ESO/La Silla Observatory under programs 081.D-2008, 083.D-0589, 086.D-0997; 4) the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias; 5) the Mercator Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma by the Flemish Community at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe reduced spectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/578/A109

  12. GENERAL: Double Degenerate Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xin-Lian; Bai, Hua; Zhao, Lei

    2008-07-01

    Regardless of the formation mechanism, an exotic object, the double degenerate star (DDS), is introduced and investigated, which is composed of baryonic matter and some unknown fermion dark matter. Different from the simple white dwarfs (WDs), there is additional gravitational force provided by the unknown fermion component inside DDSs, which may strongly affect the structure and the stability of such kind of objects. Many possible and strange observational phenomena connecting with them are concisely discussed. Similar to the normal WD, this object can also experience thermonuclear explosion as type Ia supernova explosion when DDS's mass exceeds the maximum mass that can be supported by electron degeneracy pressure. However, since the total mass of baryonic matter can be much lower than that of WD at Chandrasekhar mass limit, the peak luminosity should be much dimmer than what we expect before, which may throw a slight shadow on the standard candle of SN Ia in the research of cosmology.

  13. Double Degenerate Stars

    E-print Network

    Xin-Lian, Luo; Lei, Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Regardless of the formation mechanism, an exotic object, Double Degenerate Star (DDS), is introduced and investigated, which is composed of baryonic matter and some unknown fermion dark matter. Different from the simple White Dwarfs (WDs), there are additional gravitational force provided by the unknown fermion component inside DDSs, which may strongly affect the structure and the stability of such kind of objects. Many possible and strange observational phenomena connecting with them are concisely discussed. Similar to the normal WD, this object can also experience thermonuclear explosion as type Ia supernova explosion when DDS's mass exceeds the maximum mass that can be supported by electron degeneracy pressure. However, since the total mass of baryonic matter can be much lower than that of WD at Chandrasekhar mass limit, the peak luminosity should be much dimmer than what we expect before, which may throw a slight shadow on the standard candle of SNIa in the research of cosmology.

  14. StarCam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley

    1999-01-01

    This project can be defined by it's three phases. The goals of Phase A of this contract are to (1) Determine the required dynamic range of the combined sky and stellar image and to (2) Specify camera and optics. That was accomplished and reported in the Phase A report attached. The goals of Phase B of this contract are to 1) Produce and demonstrate algorithms for starfield background removal, 2) Produce and demonstrate star tracking and centroiding algorithms, 3) Prepare and demonstrate pointing and auto- focus algorithms, and 4) Consult with those who develop flight software on above algorithms. We are pleased to report that the above has been accomplished and delivered to NASA via our contracting contact for this project, Cheryl Alexander and are attached here. We are proud to present this final report with the expectations that all should work as planned and under budget as well: two cameras for the expected price of one.

  15. Host's stars and habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, F.; Charbonnel, C.; Amard, L.

    2015-12-01

    With about 2000 exoplanets discovered within a large range of different configurations of distance from the star, size, mass, and atmospheric conditions, the concept of habitability cannot rely only on the stellar effective temperature anymore. In addition to the natural evolution of habitability with the intrinsic stellar parameters, tidal, magnetic, and atmospheric interactions are believed to have strong impact on the relative position of the planets inside the so-called habitable zone. Moreover, the notion of habitability itself strongly depends on the definition we give to the term ``habitable''. The aim of this talk is to provide a global and up-to-date overview of the work done during the last few years about the description and the modelling of the habitability, and to present the physical processes currently includes in this description.

  16. Nonassociative Weyl star products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriyanov, V. G.; Vassilevich, D. V.

    2015-09-01

    Deformation quantization is a formal deformation of the algebra of smooth functions on some manifold. In the classical setting, the Poisson bracket serves as an initial conditions, while the associativity allows to proceed to higher orders. Some applications to string theory require deformation in the direction of a quasi-Poisson bracket (that does not satisfy the Jacobi identity). This initial condition is incompatible with associativity, it is quite unclear which restrictions can be imposed on the deformation. We show that for any quasi-Poisson bracket the deformation quantization exists and is essentially unique if one requires (weak) hermiticity and the Weyl condition. We also propose an iterative procedure that allows one to compute the star product up to any desired order.

  17. Improving night sky star image processing algorithm for star sensors.

    PubMed

    Arbabmir, Mohammad Vali; Mohammadi, Seyyed Mohammad; Salahshour, Sadegh; Somayehee, Farshad

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the night sky star image processing algorithm, consisting of image preprocessing, star pattern recognition, and centroiding steps, is improved. It is shown that the proposed noise reduction approach can preserve more necessary information than other frequently used approaches. It is also shown that the proposed thresholding method unlike commonly used techniques can properly perform image binarization, especially in images with uneven illumination. Moreover, the higher performance rate and lower average centroiding estimation error of near 0.045 for 400 simulated images compared to other algorithms show the high capability of the proposed night sky star image processing algorithm. PMID:24695142

  18. Stars Just Got Bigger - A 300 Solar Mass Star Uncovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    Using a combination of instruments on ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers have discovered the most massive stars to date, one weighing at birth more than 300 times the mass of the Sun, or twice as much as the currently accepted limit of 150 solar masses. The existence of these monsters - millions of times more luminous than the Sun, losing weight through very powerful winds - may provide an answer to the question "how massive can stars be?" A team of astronomers led by Paul Crowther, Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Sheffield, has used ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), as well as archival data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, to study two young clusters of stars, NGC 3603 and RMC 136a in detail. NGC 3603 is a cosmic factory where stars form frantically from the nebula's extended clouds of gas and dust, located 22 000 light-years away from the Sun (eso1005). RMC 136a (more often known as R136) is another cluster of young, massive and hot stars, which is located inside the Tarantula Nebula, in one of our neighbouring galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud, 165 000 light-years away (eso0613). The team found several stars with surface temperatures over 40 000 degrees, more than seven times hotter than our Sun, and a few tens of times larger and several million times brighter. Comparisons with models imply that several of these stars were born with masses in excess of 150 solar masses. The star R136a1, found in the R136 cluster, is the most massive star ever found, with a current mass of about 265 solar masses and with a birthweight of as much as 320 times that of the Sun. In NGC 3603, the astronomers could also directly measure the masses of two stars that belong to a double star system [1], as a validation of the models used. The stars A1, B and C in this cluster have estimated masses at birth above or close to 150 solar masses. Very massive stars produce very powerful outflows. "Unlike humans, these stars are born heavy and lose weight as they age," says Paul Crowther. "Being a little over a million years old, the most extreme star R136a1 is already 'middle-aged' and has undergone an intense weight loss programme, shedding a fifth of its initial mass over that time, or more than fifty solar masses." If R136a1 replaced the Sun in our Solar System, it would outshine the Sun by as much as the Sun currently outshines the full Moon. "Its high mass would reduce the length of the Earth's year to three weeks, and it would bathe the Earth in incredibly intense ultraviolet radiation, rendering life on our planet impossible," says Raphael Hirschi from Keele University, who belongs to the team. These super heavyweight stars are extremely rare, forming solely within the densest star clusters. Distinguishing the individual stars - which has now been achieved for the first time - requires the exquisite resolving power of the VLT's infrared instruments [2]. The team also estimated the maximum possible mass for the stars within these clusters and the relative number of the most massive ones. "The smallest stars are limited to more than about eighty times more than Jupiter, below which they are 'failed stars' or brown dwarfs," says team member Olivier Schnurr from the Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam. "Our new finding supports the previous view that there is also an upper limit to how big stars can get, although it raises the limit by a factor of two, to about 300 solar masses." Within R136, only four stars weighed more than 150 solar masses at birth, yet they account for nearly half of the wind and radiation power of the entire cluster, comprising approximately 100 000 stars in total. R136a1 alone energises its surroundings by more than a factor of fifty compared to the Orion Nebula cluster, the closest region of massive star formation to Earth. Understanding how high mass stars form is puzzling enough, due to their very short lives and powerful winds, so that the identification of such extreme cases as R136a1 raises the challenge to theorists still fu

  19. Energetic outflows from young stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lada, C.J.

    1982-07-01

    In our galaxy, stars are born in clouds of gas, bodies so cold they do not emit any radiation at the visible wavelengths. Moreover, the clouds are permeated by cosmic dust, so that the visible radiation emitted by new stars is absorbed. Radiation at the wavelengths of infrared waves and the shortest radio waves penetrate these clouds. With the development of new telescopes and equipment for the detection of radiation at those wavelengths, astronomers are now able to explore the dark clouds where stars are born. A prime probe of the conditions within star-forming clouds has turned out to be the molecule carbon monoxide (CO). In interstellar molecular clouds, CO molecules emit radiation at a wavelength of 2.6 mm. The study of such radiation has recently revealed a new and intriguing phenomena closely associated with the birth and early evolution of stars. When certain stars are in the earliest stages of their life, they appear to be associated with violent outflows of mass. In a number of instances, molecular gas is found to be flowing outward from around newly formed stars in two supersonic streams 180/sup 0/ apart. The origin and nature of these energetic outflows is a mystery. (SC)

  20. Sea Star Succumbing to Sea Star Wasting Disease

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Unlike their smiling cartoon brethren on television, since 2013, real-life sea stars have been suffering from a wasting disease epidemic in which they lose limbs and literally disintegrate in a matter of days. ...

  1. Oscillations on the star Procyon

    E-print Network

    Francois Bouchy; Andre Maeder; Michel Mayor; Denis Megevand; Francesco Pepe; Danuta Sosnowska

    2005-10-11

    Stars are sphere of hot gas whose interiors transmit acoustic waves very efficiently. Geologists learn about the interior structure of Earth by monitoring how seismic waves propagate through it and, in a similar way, the interior of a star can be probed using the periodic motions on the surface that arise from such waves. Matthews et al. claim that the star Procyon does not have acoustic surface oscillations of the strength predicted. However, we show here, using ground-based spectroscopy, that Procyon is oscillating, albeit with an amplitude that is only slightly greater than the noise level observed by Matthews et al. using spaced-based photometry.

  2. The Sun: Our Nearest Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have in our celestial backyard, a prime example of a variable star. The Sun, long thought to be "perfect" and unvarying, began to reveal its cycles in the early 1600s as Galileo Galilei and Christoph Scheiner used a telescope to study sunspots. For the past four hundred years, scientists have accumulated data, showing a magnetic cycle that repeats, on average, every eleven (or twenty-two) years. In addition, modern satellites have shown that the energy output at radio and x-ray wavelengths also varies with this cycle. This talk will showcase the Sun as a star and discuss how solar studies may be used to understand other stars.

  3. Boson star and dark matter

    E-print Network

    R. Sharma; S. Karmakar; S. Mukherjee

    2008-12-18

    Bound states of complex scalar fields (boson stars) have long been proposed as possible candidates for the dark matter in the universe. Considerable work has already been done to study various aspects of boson stars. In the present work, assuming a particular anisotropic matter distribution, we solve the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations with a cosmological constant to obtain bosonic configurations by treating the problem geometrically. The results are then applied to problems covering a wide range of masses and radii of the boson stars and the relevant self interaction parameters are calculated. We compare our results with earlier treatments to show the applicability of the geometrical approach.

  4. Star polymers in correlated disorder

    E-print Network

    V. Blavats'ka; C. von Ferber; Yu. Holovatch

    2007-11-23

    We analyze the impact of a porous medium (structural disorder) on the scaling of the partition function of a star polymer immersed in a good solvent. We show that corresponding scaling exponents change if the disorder is long-range-correlated and calculate the exponents in the new universality class. A notable finding is that star and chain polymers react in qualitatively different manner on the presence of disorder: the corresponding scaling exponents increase for chains and decrease for stars. We discuss the physical consequences of this difference.

  5. Doppler Imaging of Ap Stars

    E-print Network

    R. Kuschnig

    1998-05-06

    Doppler imaging, a technique which inverts spectral line profile variations of an Ap star into a two-dimensional abundance maps, provides new observational constraints on diffusion mechanism in the presence of a global magnetic field. A programme is presented here with the aim to obtain abundance distributions of at least five elements on each star, in order to study how different diffusion processes act under influence of a stellar magnetic field. The importance of this multi-element approach is demonstrated, by presenting the abundance maps of helium, magnesium, silicon, chromium and iron for the magnetic B9pSi star CU Virginis.

  6. Unraveling Disks in AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykou, F.; Hron, J.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Tuthill, P. G.; Norris, B. R. M.; Kluska, J.; Paladini, C.; Lagadec, E.; Wittkowski, M.; Ramstedt, S.; Maercker, M.

    2015-12-01

    It is commonly accepted that asymmetries found in the post-AGB stars and planetary nebulae should originate as early as during the AGB phase. We present results from our high-angular resolution observing programs, with an aperture masking technique on the VLT, of a sample of evolved stars that were known to present asymmetries at larger spatial scales (e.g. jets, torii and/or bipolar nebulae). Disk-like structures have been found in the vicinity of at least two of these stars.

  7. Variable stars in Stellar Systems

    E-print Network

    Giuseppe Bono; Silvia Petroni; Marcella Marconi

    2002-12-07

    We discuss in detail the pulsation properties of variable stars in globular clusters (GCs) and in Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies. Data available in the literature strongly support the evidence that we still lack a complete census of variable stars in these stellar systems. This selection bias is even more severe for small-amplitude variables such as Oscillating Blue Stragglers (OBSs) and new exotic groups of variable stars located in crowded cluster regions. The same outcome applies to large-amplitude, long-period variables as well as to RR Lyrae and Anomalous Cepheids in dwarf galaxies.

  8. "Catch a Star !"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    ESO and EAAE Launch Web-based Educational Programme for Europe's Schools Catch a star!... and discover all its secrets! This is the full title of an innovative educational project, launched today by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). It welcomes all students in Europe's schools to an exciting web-based programme with a competition. It takes place within the context of the EC-sponsored European Week of Science and Technology (EWST) - 2002 . This unique project revolves around a web-based competition and is centred on astronomy. It is specifically conceived to stimulate the interest of young people in various aspects of this well-known field of science, but will also be of interest to the broad public. What is "Catch a Star!" about? [Go to Catch a Star Website] The programme features useful components from the world of research, but it is specifically tailored to (high-)school students. Younger participants are also welcome. Groups of up to four persons (e.g., three students and one teacher) have to select an astronomical object - a bright star, a distant galaxy, a beautiful comet, a planet or a moon in the solar system, or some other celestial body. Like detectives, they must then endeavour to find as much information as possible about "their" object. This information may be about the position and visibility in the sky, the physical and chemical characteristics, particular historical aspects, related mythology and sky lore, etc. They can use any source available, the web, books, newspaper and magazine articles, CDs etc. for this work. The group members must prepare a (short) summarising report about this investigation and "their" object, with their own ideas and conclusions, and send it to ESO (email address: eduinfo@eso.org). A jury, consisting of specialists from ESO and the EAAE, will carefully evaluate these reports. All projects that are found to fulfill the stipulated requirements, including a reasonable degree of scientific correctness, are entered as "registered projects" and will receive a lottery number. The first 1000 participants from the corresponding groups will also get a "Catch a star" T-Shirt by mail. All accepted entries will be listed at the corresponding website and all accepted reports will be displayed soon after the expiry of the deadline for submission on November 1st, 2002 . Winners to be Announced on November 8, 2002 On November 8th, 2002, at the end of the European Week of Science and Technology, the winners will be found by drawing numbers in a lottery. This event will take place at the ESO Headquarters in Garching (Germany) and will be webcast. The First Prize is a free trip for the members of the group to the ESO Paranal Observatory in Chile , the site of the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) . The Paranal trip will be realised in any case, but because of age restrictions, it can only be offered to a group in which all participants are 15 years of age or older at the time of the drawing. Younger participants may win an interesting trip within Europe. There will also be other prizes, to be announced later. Starting now The programme starts now and is open for groups of up to three students and one teacher, who must all belong to a school in Europe on November 1, 2002 . This means that only students who did not yet terminate their school studies on this date can participate. No student may participate in more than one group. The programme is administered by the ESO Educational Office , in close collaboration with members of the EAAE, mostly physics teachers. Details about how to register and how to prepare the report about "your" object are available on the web at: http://www.eso.org/public/outreach/eduoff/cas/ About the ESO Educational Office The ESO Educational Office was established in July 2001. It is part of the EPR Department at ESO Headquarters in Garching near Munich. The aim is to provide support of astronomy and astrophysics education, especially at the high-schoo

  9. Lick Run: Green Infrastructure in Cincinnati and Beyond

    EPA Science Inventory

    By capturing and redistributing rain water or runoff in plant-soil systems such as green roofs, rain gardens or swales, green infrastructure restores natural hydrologic cycles and reduces runoff from overburdened gray infrastructure. Targeted ecosystem restoration, contaminant fi...

  10. A Simple 2-Transistor Touch or Lick Detector Circuit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slotnick, Burton

    2009-01-01

    Contact or touch detectors in which a subject acts as a switch between two metal surfaces have proven more popular and arguably more useful for recording responses than capacitance switches, photocell detectors, and force detectors. Components for touch detectors circuits are inexpensive and, except for some special purpose designs, can be easily…

  11. The Lick Observatory charge-coupled device /CCD/ and controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of a flexible microprocessor-based controller for charge-coupled device two-dimensional detectors. It is noted that the controller can operate under manual control or as a slave to a remote computer linked by coaxial cable. The system is discussed, together with data taken at the telescope and in the laboratory. The flexibility of the controller derives from its modular form and from the use of a programmable 8-bit microprocessor to control and sequence the electronic logic. The electronic circuits for such functions as signal processing, clock sequencing, voltage level adjustment, and temperature control are on small individual plug-in cards, making future improvements and changes simple. The software of the microprocessor is stored in erasable, programmable, read-only memory. Among the limitations of the controller is a scan speed of roughly 35 microsec per pixel.

  12. Magnetic stars from a FEROS cool Ap star survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkin, V. G.; Kurtz, D. W.; Nitschelm, C.

    2012-03-01

    New magnetic Ap stars with split Zeeman components are presented. These stars were discovered from observations with the Fibre-fed Extended Range Optical Spectrograph (FEROS) spectrograph at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) 2.2-m telescope. 15 new magnetic stars are analysed here. Several stars with very strong magnetic fields were found, including HD 70702 with a 15-kG magnetic field strength, and HD 168767 with a 16.5-kG magnetic field strength measured using split Zeeman components of spectral lines and by comparison with synthetic calculations. The physical parameters of the stars were estimated from photometric and spectroscopic data. Together with previously published results for stars with strong magnetic fields, the relationship between magnetic field strength and rotation period is discussed. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, as part of programmes 078.D-0080(A), 080.D- 0191(A), 081.D-2002(A), 082.D-0061(A), 083.D-0034(A) and 084.D-0067(A).

  13. Neutron stars, strange stars, and the nuclear equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F.; Glendenning, N.K.

    1992-11-02

    This article consists of three parts. In part one we review the present status of dense nuclear matter calculations, and introduce a representative collection of realistic nuclear equations of state which are derived for different assumptions about the physical behavior of dense matter (baryon population, pion condensation,.possible transition of baryon matter to quark matter). In part two we review recently performed non-rotating and rotating compact star calculations performed for these equations of state. The minimum stable rotational periods of compact stars, whose knowledge is of decisive importance for the interpretation of rapidly rotating pulsars, axe determined. For this purpose two different limits on stable rotation are studied: rotation at the general relativistic Kepler period (below which mass shedding at the star's equator sets in), and, secondly, rotation at the gravitational radiation-reaction instability (at which emission of gravitational waves set in which slows the star down). Part three of this article deals with the properties of hypothetical strange stars. Specifically we investigate the amount of nuclear solid crust that can be carried by a rotating strange star, and answer the question whether such objects can give rise to the observed phenomena of pulsar glitches, which is at the present time the only astrophysical test of the strange-quark-matter hypothesis.

  14. Violent star and star cluster formation in nearby and distant galaxies

    E-print Network

    Uta Fritze - v. Alvensleben

    2005-09-14

    I present recent observations and analyses of star cluster formation in a wide variety of environments -- from young star clusters and super star clusters in normal actively star-forming spirals and irregulars to starbursting dwarfs and spiral-spiral mergers. Star cluster formation in interacting galaxies can be restricted to central starburst region, extend over the entire body of the merger, or even all along extended tidal structures. I address methods and results for the determination of star cluster ages, metallicities, masses, and sizes and discuss the nature, possible lifetimes and future signatures of these star cluster populations, as well as the relative importance of field star formation vs. star cluster formation.

  15. The Stars behind the Curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    ESO is releasing a magnificent VLT image of the giant stellar nursery surrounding NGC 3603, in which stars are continuously being born. Embedded in this scenic nebula is one of the most luminous and most compact clusters of young, massive stars in our Milky Way, which therefore serves as an excellent "local" analogue of very active star-forming regions in other galaxies. The cluster also hosts the most massive star to be "weighed" so far. NGC 3603 is a starburst region: a cosmic factory where stars form frantically from the nebula's extended clouds of gas and dust. Located 22 000 light-years away from the Sun, it is the closest region of this kind known in our galaxy, providing astronomers with a local test bed for studying intense star formation processes, very common in other galaxies, but hard to observe in detail because of their great distance from us. The nebula owes its shape to the intense light and winds coming from the young, massive stars which lift the curtains of gas and clouds revealing a multitude of glowing suns. The central cluster of stars inside NGC 3603 harbours thousands of stars of all sorts (eso9946): the majority have masses similar to or less than that of our Sun, but most spectacular are several of the very massive stars that are close to the end of their lives. Several blue supergiant stars crowd into a volume of less than a cubic light-year, along with three so-called Wolf-Rayet stars - extremely bright and massive stars that are ejecting vast amounts of material before finishing off in glorious explosions known as supernovae. Using another recent set of observations performed with the SINFONI instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have confirmed that one of these stars is about 120 times more massive than our Sun, standing out as the most massive star known so far in the Milky Way [1]. The clouds of NGC 3603 provide us with a family picture of stars in different stages of their life, with gaseous structures that are still growing into stars, newborn stars, adult stars and stars nearing the end of their life. All these stars have roughly the same age, a million years, a blink of an eye compared to our five billion year-old Sun and Solar System. The fact that some of the stars have just started their lives while others are already dying is due to their extraordinary range of masses: high-mass stars, being very bright and hot, burn through their existence much faster than their less massive, fainter and cooler counterparts. The newly released image, obtained with the FORS instrument attached to the VLT at Cerro Paranal, Chile, portrays a wide field around the stellar cluster and reveals the rich texture of the surrounding clouds of gas and dust. Notes [1] The star, NGC 3603-A1, is an eclipsing system of two stars orbiting around each other in 3.77 days. The most massive star has an estimated mass of 116 solar masses, while its companion has a mass of 89 solar masses. More information ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world's most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory and VISTA, the largest survey telescope. ESO is the European partner of a revolutionary astronomical telescope ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. ESO is currently planning a 42-metre European Extremely Large op

  16. A Heavy Flavor Tracker for STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Chen, Y.; Kleinfelder, S.; Koohi, A.; Li, S.; Huang, H.; Tai, A.; Kushpil, V.; Sumbera, M.; Colledani, C.; Dulinski, W.; Himmi,A.; Hu, C.; Shabetai, A.; Szelezniak, M.; Valin, I.; Winter, M.; Miller,M.; Surrow, B.; Van Nieuwenhuizen G.; Bieser, F.; Gareus, R.; Greiner,L.; Lesser, F.; Matis, H.S.; Oldenburg, M.; Ritter, H.G.; Pierpoint, L.; Retiere, F.; Rose, A.; Schweda, K.; Sichtermann, E.; Thomas, J.H.; Wieman, H.; Yamamoto, E.; Kotov, I.

    2005-03-14

    We propose to construct a Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) for theSTAR experiment at RHIC. The HFT will bring new physics capabilities toSTAR and it will significantly enhance the physics capabilities of theSTAR detector at central rapidities. The HFT will ensure that STAR willbe able to take heavy flavor data at all luminosities attainablethroughout the proposed RHIC II era.

  17. Scale Height Evolution of Star Clusters

    E-print Network

    Froebrich, Dirk

    Scale Height Evolution of Star Clusters Dirk Froebrich Anne Buckner, et al. #12;Layout of the talk in clusters. Lada & Lada (2003) #12;Whybother? Most (~2/3) stars are formed in clusters. Megeath et al. (2008) #12;Whybother? i.e. star clusters are the building blocks of galaxies #12;Whybother? (most) star

  18. Recovery From Giant Eruptions in Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashi, A.; Davidson, K.; Humphreys, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    We perform radiation hydrodynamic simulations to study how very massive stars recover from giant eruptions. The post eruption star experience strong mass loss due to strong winds, driven by radial pulsations in the star*s interior, that operate by the ?-mechanism. The mass loss history obtained in our simulations resembles ? Car*s history.

  19. Homogeneous Star Products Louis Boutet de Monvel

    E-print Network

    Boutet de Monvel, Louis

    Homogeneous Star Products Louis Boutet de Monvel Abstract: We give short proofs of results concerning homogeneous star products, of which S. Gutt's star product on the dual of a Lie algebra is a particular case. Keywords: Star-products, linear Poisson brackets. MSC2000: 19L47, 32A25, 58J20, 58J40

  20. THE STAR OF PROJECT A GROUP 18

    E-print Network

    Aslaksen, Helmer

    THE STAR OF BETHLEHEM PROJECT A ­ GROUP 18 NAJIEB ZAIN KEITH NG YANG SHUYI 1 #12;Contents 1. Introduction 2. What is the Star of Bethlehem? 3. Astronomical Events (7 B.C. ­ 1 B.C.) 4. Story of the `Star of Bethlehem' 5. Scientific Outlook on the `Star of Bethlehem' 6. Conclusion 2 #12;Introduction From

  1. WIMP Annihilation and Cooling of Neutron Stars

    E-print Network

    Chris Kouvaris

    2007-08-17

    We study the effect of WIMP annihilation on the temperature of a neutron star. We shall argue that the released energy due to WIMP annihilation inside the neutron stars, might affect the temperature of stars older than 10 million years, flattening out the temperature at $\\sim 10^4$ K for a typical neutron star.

  2. Pioneers of Astrobiology Written in the Stars

    E-print Network

    Seager, Sara

    Pioneers of Astrobiology Written in the Stars Sara Seager Awakening Ifirst really saw the stars, stepping outside the tent, and looking up. I was completely stunned by what I saw. Stars--millions of them guide star was set. I rushed home to tell my father, who immediately harshly lectured that in his view

  3. A Heavy Flavor Tracker for STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Chen, Y.; Kleinfelder, S.; Koohi, A.; Li, S.; Huang, H.; Tai, A.; Kushpil, V.; Sumbera, M.; Colledani, C.; Dulinski, W.; Himmi,A.; Hu, C.; Shabetai, A.; Szelezniak, M.; Valin, I.; Winter, M.; Surrow,B.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Bieser, F.; Gareus, R.; Greiner, L.; Lesser,F.; Matis, H.S.; Oldenburg, M.; Ritter, H.G.; Pierpoint, L.; Retiere, F.; Rose, A.; Schweda, K.; Sichtermann, E.; Thomas, J.H.; Wieman, H.; Yamamoto, E.; Kotov, I.

    2005-03-14

    We propose to construct a Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) for the STAR experiment at RHIC. The HFT will bring new physics capabilities to STAR and it will significantly enhance the physics capabilities of the STAR detector at central rapidities. The HFT will ensure that STAR will be able to take heavy flavor data at all luminosities attainable throughout the proposed RHIC II era.

  4. The Neutron Star Zoo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2014-01-01

    Neutron stars are a very diverse population, both in their observational and their physical properties. They prefer to radiate most of their energy at X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. But whether their emission is powered by rotation, accretion, heat, magnetic fields or nuclear reactions, they are all different species of the same animal whose magnetic field evolution and interior composition remain a mystery. This article will broadly review the properties of inhabitants of the neutron star zoo, with emphasis on their high-energy emission. XXX Neutron stars are found in a wide variety of sources, displaying an amazing array of behavior. They can be isolated or in binary systems, accreting, heating, cooling, spinning down, spinning up, pulsing, flaring and bursting. The one property that seems to determine their behavior most strongly is their magnetic field strength, structure and evolution. The hot polar caps, bursts and flares of magnetars are likely due to the rapid decay and twisting of their superstrong magnetic fields, whose very existence requires some kind of early dynamo activity. The intermediate-strength magnetic fields of RPPs determines their spin-down behavior and radiation properties. However, the overlap of the magnetar and RPP populations is not understood at present. Why don't high-field RPPs burst or flare? Why don't lower-field magnetars sometimes behave more like RPPs? INS may be old magnetars whose high fields have decayed, but they do not account for the existence of younger RPPs with magnetar-strength fields. Not only the strength of the magnetic field but also its configuration may be important in making a NS a magnetar or a RPP. Magnetic field decay is a critical link between other NS populations as well. "Decay" of the magnetic field is necessary for normal RPPs to evolve into MSPs through accretion and spin up in LMXBs. Some kind of accretion-driven field reduction is the most likely mechanism, but it is controversial since it is not clear how effective it is or on what timescale a buried field might re-emerge. One piece of evidence in favor of accretion-driven field reduction is the fact that NSs in LMXBs, which are older systems (> 108 yr), have mostly low fields and NSs in HMXBs, which are younger systems (107 - 108 yr), have higher fields. This may be an indication that accretion-driven field reduction or decay has not had enough time to operate in HMXBs but has in LMXBs. However, there does not seem to be any evidence of decaying fields in either the LMXB or HMXB populations; e.g. smaller magnetic fields in older systems. On the other hand, CCOs are very young so if they acquired their low fields through mass fallback accretion, the field submergence would have had to operate on much faster timescales than it apparently does in LMXBs. But as we continue to find new species in the NS zoo, one of these may someday be the "Rosetta Stone" that will give us the clues for solving these puzzles.

  5. THE ROLE OF HELIUM STARS IN THE FORMATION OF DOUBLE NEUTRON STARS N. Ivanova,1

    E-print Network

    Rasio, Frederic A.

    THE ROLE OF HELIUM STARS IN THE FORMATION OF DOUBLE NEUTRON STARS N. Ivanova,1 K. Belczynski,1,2 V:5 6 M with a 1.4 M neutron star companion to investigate the formation of double neutron star systems phase) leads to the formation of extremely short-period double neutron star systems (with Pd0:1 days

  6. Stellar Evolution: from star birth to star death and back again

    E-print Network

    Cohen, David

    Stellar Evolution: from star birth to star death and back again Prof. David Cohen Dept. of Physics of this young, massive star ­ its stellar wind This numerical simulation shows the density of material in the magnetized stellar wind of theta-1 Ori C. #12;The belt stars of Orion ­ young hot stars, producing energy

  7. Bondi-Hoyle Accretion in Dense Star Clusters: Implications for Stars, Disks, and Planets

    E-print Network

    Throop, Henry

    Bondi-Hoyle Accretion in Dense Star Clusters: Implications for Stars, Disks, and Planets Draft the Bondi-Hoyle accretion of gas from a GMC onto young star- disk systems in a cluster. This post stars and removed from the cluster, or when low-mass stars are ejected from the cluster. We perform N

  8. Extreme Stars: At the Edge of Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaler, James B.

    Unique in its approach, Extreme stars describes the lives of stars from a new perspective by examining their amazing features. The result is a refreshing, up-to-date, and engaging overview of stellar evolution, suitable for everyone interested in viewing or studying the stars. Ten chapters, generously illustrated throughout, explain the nature of the brightest, the largest, the hottest, and the youngest, among other kinds of stars, ending with a selection of the strangest stars the Universe has to offer. Extreme stars shows how stars develop and die and how each extreme turns into another under the inexorable twin forces of time and gravity.

  9. Neutron Stars : A Comparative Study

    E-print Network

    Mehedi Kalam; Sk. Monowar Hossein; Sajahan Molla

    2015-10-23

    The inner structure of neutron star is considered from theoretical point of view and is compared with the observed data. We have proposed a form of an equation of state relating pressure with matter density which indicates the stiff equation of state of neutron stars. From our study we have calculated mass(M), compactness(u) and surface red-shift(Zs ) for the neutron stars namely PSR J1614-2230, PSR J1903+327, Cen X-3, SMC X-1, Vela X-1, Her X-1 and compared with the recent observational data. We have also indicated the possible radii of the different stars which needs further study. Finally we have examined the stability for such type of theoretical structure.

  10. Neutron Stars : A Comparative Study

    E-print Network

    Kalam, Mehedi; Molla, Sajahan

    2015-01-01

    The inner structure of neutron star is considered from theoretical point of view and is compared with the observed data. We have proposed a form of an equation of state relating pressure with matter density which indicates the stiff equation of state of neutron stars. From our study we have calculated mass(M), compactness(u) and surface red-shift(Zs ) for the neutron stars namely PSR J1614-2230, PSR J1903+327, Cen X-3, SMC X-1, Vela X-1, Her X-1 and compared with the recent observational data. We have also indicated the possible radii of the different stars which needs further study. Finally we have examined the stability for such type of theoretical structure.

  11. Simulation of STAR TPC performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qun; Sakrejda, Iwona; Panitkin, S.

    1998-10-01

    The main purpose of studying the relativistic heavy ion collisions is to understand the physics of nuclear matter under extreme condition and possible formation of the new form of matter: Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). STAR is one of the detectors at the up-coming RHIC collider at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this talk, we will review the performance of the STAR TPC in terms of the momentum resolutions (for charged pions, kaons, and protons), tracking efficiencies, and two-track resolution. These studies were performed with the standard STAR software chain which includes GEANT,fast TPC (response) simulation and STAR track reconstruction code. RQMD(v2.4) event generator was used to provide input for the simulations.

  12. Abundance Analysis of Barium Stars

    E-print Network

    G. Q. Liu; Y. C. Liang; L. Deng

    2008-11-13

    We obtain the chemical abundances of six barium stars and two CH subgiant stars based on the high signal-to-noise ratio and high resolution Echelle spectra. The neutron capture process elements Y, Zr, Ba, La, Eu show obvious overabundance relative to the Sun, for example, their [Ba/Fe] values are from 0.45 to 1.27. Other elements, including Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, show comparable abundances to the Solar ones, and their [Fe/H] cover a range from $-$0.40 to 0.21, which means they belong to Galactic disk. The predicts of the theoretical model of wind accretion for binary systems can explain the observed abundance patterns of the neutron capture process elements in these stars, which means that their overabundant heavy-elements could be caused by accreting the ejecta of AGB stars, the progenitors of the present white dwarf companions in the binary systems.

  13. Quantum Collapse in Quark Stars?

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Martinez, A.; Perez Rojas, H.; Mosquera Cuesta, H. J.

    2006-06-19

    Quark matter is expected to exist in the interior of compact stellar objects as neutron stars or even the more exotic strange stars. Bare strange quark stars and (normal) strange quark-matter stars, those possessing a baryon (electron-supported) crust, are hypothesized as good candidates to explain the properties of a set of peculiar stellar sources. In this presentation, we modify the MIT Bag Model by including the electromagnetic interaction. We also show that this version of the MIT model implies the anisotropy of the Bag pressure due to the presence of the magnetic field. The equations of state of degenerate quarks gases are studied in the presence of ultra strong magnetic fields. The behavior of a system made-up of quarks having (or not) anomalous magnetic moment is reviewed. A structural instability is found, which is related to the anisotropic nature of the pressures in this highly magnetized matter.

  14. Nonradial oscillations of quark stars

    E-print Network

    Hajime Sotani; Tomohiro Harada

    2003-07-09

    Recently, it has been reported that a candidate for a quark star may have been observed. In this article, we pay attention to quark stars with radiation radii in the reported range. We calculate nonradial oscillations of $f$-, $w$- and $w_{\\rm II}$-modes. Then, we find that the dependence of the $f$-mode quasi-normal frequency on the bag constant and stellar radiation radius is very strong and different from that of the lowest $w_{\\rm II}$-mode quasi-normal frequency. Furthermore we deduce a new empirical formula between the $f$-mode frequency of gravitational waves and the parameter of the equation of state for quark stars. The observation of gravitational waves both of the $f$-mode and of the lowest $w_{\\rm II}$-mode would provide a powerful probe for the equation of state of quark matter and the properties of quark stars.

  15. Faint star counts with HST

    E-print Network

    Flynn, C; Bahcall, J N; Flynn, Chris; Gould, Andrew; Bahcall, John

    1998-01-01

    We describe a program of star counts in the range 19 1.0) stars at these magnitudes are primarily disk and spheroid M dwarfs. The stars are found both on dedicated images as part of the parallel program and by using appropriate archive data. We measure the faint end of the luminosity functions of the disk and spheroid (i.e. stellar halo). We measure the low mass end of the mass function and show that M dwarfs do not dominate the total disk or spheroid mass. We place strong I-band constraints on the amount of halo dark matter in the form of low mass stars (such as M dwarfs or cool white dwarfs). The disk and spheroid contribute only a minor amount of optical depth toward the Magellanic clouds.

  16. Bag model and quark star

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hua; Luo Xinlian; Zong Hongshi

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, incorporating the property of the vacuum negative pressure, namely, the bag constant, we present a new model of the equation of state (EOS) of quark matter at finite chemical potential and zero temperature. By comparing our EOS with Fraga et al.'s EOS and SQM1 model, one finds that our EOS is softer than Fraga et al.'s EOS and SQM1 model. The reason for this difference is analyzed. With these results we investigate the structure of a quark star. A comparison between our model of the quark star and other models is made. The obtained mass of the quark star is 1.3{approx}1.66M{sub {center_dot}}and the radius is 9.5{approx}14 Km. One can see that our star's compactness is smaller than that of the other two models.

  17. Children's Literature on Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struck, James

    Children's literature is simple discussion of complicated issues. Neutron stars are discussed in several children's books. Using libraries in Chicago, I will review children's books on neutron stars and compare the literature to literature from scientific discussions of neutron stars on sites like the Chandra site, Hubble Space Telescope site and NASA site. The result will be a discussion of problems and issues involved in discussion of neutron stars. Do children's books leave material out? Do children's books discuss recent observations? Do children's books discuss anything discredited or wrong? How many children's books are in resources like World Cat, the Library of Congress catalog, and the Chicago Public Library catalog? Could children's books be useful to present some of your findings or observations or projects? Children's books are useful for both children and scientist as they present simplified discussion of topics, although sometimes issues are simplified too much.

  18. Cool Stars and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidotto, A. A.; Jardine, M.; Cameron, A. C.; Morin, J.; Villadsen, J.; Saar, S. H.; Alvarado, J.; Cohen, Ofer; Holzwarth, V.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Reville, V.

    2015-01-01

    Stellar flares, winds and coronal mass ejections form the ``space weather''. They are signatures of the magnetic activity of cool stars and, since activity varies with age, mass and rotation, the space weather that extra-solar planets experience can be very different from the one encountered by the solar system planets. How do stellar activity and magnetism influence the space weather of exoplanets orbiting main-sequence stars? How do the environments surrounding exoplanets differ from those around the planets in our own solar system? How can the detailed knowledge acquired by the solar system community be applied in exoplanetary systems? How does space weather affect habitability? These were questions that were addressed in the splinter session ``Cool stars and Space Weather'', that took place on 9 Jun 2014, during the Cool Stars 18 meeting. In this paper, we present a summary of the contributions made to this session.

  19. Sleuthing the Isolated Compact Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. J.

    2004-08-01

    In the early 1990's, isolated thermally-emitting neutron stars accreting from the interstellar medium were predicted to show up in their thousands in the ROSAT soft X-ray all-sky survey. The glut of sources would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the equation of state of ultra-dense matter. Only seven objects have been firmly identified to date. The reasons for this discrepency are discussed and recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations of these objects are described. Spectra of the brightest of the isolated neutron star candidates, RX J1856.5-3754, continue to present interpretational difficulties for current neutron star model atmospheres and alternative models are briefly discussed. RX J1856.5-3754 remains a valid quark star candidate.

  20. Star patterns on lake ice.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Victor C; Wettlaufer, J S

    2007-06-01

    Star patterns, reminiscent of a wide range of diffusively controlled growth forms from snowflakes to Saffman-Taylor fingers, are ubiquitous features of ice-covered lakes. Despite the commonality and beauty of these "lake stars," the underlying physical processes that produce them have not been explained in a coherent theoretical framework. Here we describe a simple mathematical model that captures the principal features of lake-star formation; radial fingers of (relatively warm) water-rich regions grow from a central source and evolve through a competition between thermal and porous media flow effects in a saturated snow layer covering the lake. The number of star arms emerges from a stability analysis of this competition and the qualitative features of this meter-scale natural phenomenon are captured in laboratory experiments. PMID:17677323

  1. Neutron Stars—Thermal Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potekhin, Alexander Y.; De Luca, Andrea; Pons, José A.

    2015-10-01

    Confronting theoretical models with observations of thermal radiation emitted by neutron stars is one of the most important ways to understand the properties of both, superdense matter in the interiors of the neutron stars and dense magnetized plasmas in their outer layers. Here we review the theory of thermal emission from the surface layers of strongly magnetized neutron stars, and the main properties of the observational data. In particular, we focus on the nearby sources for which a clear thermal component has been detected, without being contaminated by other emission processes (magnetosphere, accretion, nebulae). We also discuss the applications of the modern theoretical models of the formation of spectra of strongly magnetized neutron stars to the observed thermally emitting objects.

  2. Torsional oscillations of strange stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannarelli, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    Strange stars are one of the hypothetical compact stellar objects that can be formed after a supernova explosion. The existence of these objects relies on the absolute stability of strange collapsed quark matter with respect to standard nuclear matter. We discuss simple models of strange stars with a bare quark matter surface, thus standard nuclear matter is completely absent. In these models an electric dipole layer a few hundreds Fermi thick should exist close to the star surface. Studying the torsional oscillations of the electrically charged layer we estimate the emitted power, finding that it is of the order of 1045 erg/s, meaning that these objects would be among the brightest compact sources in the heavens. The associated relaxation times are very uncertain, with values ranging between microseconds and minutes, depending on the crust thickness. Although part of the radiated power should be absorbed by the electrosphere surrounding the strange star, a sizable fraction of photons should escape and be detectable.

  3. Hybrid Stars and Coronal Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Dupree, Andrea K.

    2004-01-01

    This program addresses the evolution of stellar coronas by comparing a solar-like corona in the supergiant Dra (G2 Ib-IIa) to the corona in the allegedly more evolved state of a hybrid star, TrA (K2 11-111). Because the hybrid star has a massive wind, it appears likely that the corona will be cooler and less dense as the magnetic loop structures are no longer closed. By analogy with solar coronal holes, when the topology of the magnetic field is configured with open magnetic structures, both the coronal temperature and density are lower than in atmospheres dominated by closed loops. The hybrid stars assume a pivotal role in the definition of coronal evolution, atmospheric heating processes and mechanisms to drive winds of cool stars.

  4. The stars of low luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luyten, Willem J.

    A summary is presented of a search for stars of low luminosity, defined as objects of a luminosity smaller than one thousandth of that of the sun, bolometrically. It is shown that the most efficient way of finding such stars is through proper motion surveys which have resulted in the publication of catalogues containing data for some 4,000 such objects. The possibility is suggested that blue or white degenerates of much lower luminosity than the typical objects now known may exist.

  5. Magnesium Isotopes in Halo Stars

    E-print Network

    Jorge Melendez; Judith G. Cohen

    2007-08-29

    We have determined Mg isotope ratios in halo field dwarfs and giants in the globular cluster M71 based on high S/N high spectral resolution (R = 10$^5$) Keck HIRES spectra. Unlike previous claims of an important contribution from intermediate-mass AGB stars to the Galactic halo, we find that our $^{26}$Mg/$^{24}$Mg ratios can be explained by massive stars.

  6. How Far Are the Stars?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Edward; Bell, Randy L.

    2005-01-01

    On any night, the stars seen in the sky can be as close to Earth as a few light-years or as distant as a few thousand light-years. Distances this large are hard to comprehend. The stars are so far away that the fastest spacecraft would take tens of thousands of years to reach even the nearest one. Yet, astronomers have been able to accurately…

  7. The STAR Dilepton Physics Program

    E-print Network

    Frank Geurts

    2012-10-19

    Dileptons provide ideal penetrating probes of the evolution of strongly-interacting matter. With the Time-of-Flight upgrade, STAR is in a unique position to provide large-acceptance dielectron measurements. We discuss preliminary dielectron results for Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}}$=19.6 - 200 GeV, and compare to recent model calculations. With upcoming detector upgrades STAR will further improve its dielectron measurements as well as include dimuon measurements.

  8. Metastability of hadronic compact stars

    SciTech Connect

    Bombaci, Ignazio; Panda, Prafulla K.; Providencia, Constanca; Vidana, Isaac

    2008-04-15

    Pure hadronic compact stars, above a threshold value of their gravitational mass (central pressure), are metastable to the conversion to quark stars (hybrid or strange stars). In this paper, we present a systematic study of the metastability of pure hadronic compact stars using different relativistic models for the equation of state. In particular, we compare results for the quark-meson coupling model with those for the Glendenning-Moszkowski parametrization of the nonlinear Walecka model. For the quark-meson coupling model, we find large values (M{sub cr}=1.6-1.9M{sub {center_dot}}) for the critical mass of the hadronic star sequence and we find that the formation of a quark star is only possible with a soft quark matter equation of state. For the Glendenning-Moszkowski parametrization of the nonlinear Walecka model, we explore the effect of different hyperon couplings on the critical mass and on the stellar conversion energy. We find that increasing the value of the hyperon coupling constants shifts the bulk transition point for quark deconfinement to higher densities, increases the stellar metastability threshold mass and the value of the critical mass, and thus makes the formation of quark stars less likely. For the largest values of the hyperon couplings we find a critical mass which may be as high as 1.9-2.1M{sub {center_dot}}. These stellar configurations, which contain a large central hyperon fraction (f{sub Y,cr}{approx}30%), would be able to describe highly massive compact stars, such as the one associated with the millisecond pulsar PSR B1516+02B with a mass M=1.94{sub -0.19}{sup +0.17}M{sub {center_dot}}.

  9. STAR Vertex Detector Upgrade Development

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, Leo C.; Matis, Howard S.; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Vu,Chinh Q.; Wieman, Howard; Szelezniak, Michal; Sun, Xiangming

    2008-01-28

    We report on the development and prototyping efforts undertaken with the goal of producing a micro-vertex detector for the STAR experiment at the RHIC accelerator at BNL. We present the basic detector requirements and show a sensor development path, conceptual mechanical design candidates and readout architecture. Prototyping and beam test results with current generation MimoSTAR-2 sensors and a readout system featuring FPGA based on-the-fly hit finding and data sparsification are also presented.

  10. Watching the Birth of Super Star Clusters

    E-print Network

    Jean L. Turner; Sara C. Beck

    2003-11-07

    Subarcsecond infrared and radio observations yield important information about the formation of super star clusters from their surrounding gas. We discuss the general properties of ionized and molecular gas near young, forming SSCs, as illustrated by the prototypical young forming super star cluster nebula in the dwarf galaxy, NGC 5253. This super star cluster appears to have a gravitationally bound nebula. The lack of molecular gas suggests a very high star formation efficiency, consistent with the formation of a large, bound star cluster.

  11. The Quarkyonic Star

    E-print Network

    Kenji Fukushima; Toru Kojo

    2015-11-10

    We discuss theoretical scenarios on crossover between nuclear matter (NM) and quark matter (QM). We classify various possibilities into three major scenarios according to the onset of diquark degrees of freedom that characterizes color-superconducting (CSC) states. In the conventional scenario NM occurs at the liquid-gas (or liquid-vacuum at zero temperature) phase transition and QM occurs next, after which CSC eventually appears. With the effect of strong correlation, the BEC-BCS scenario implies that CSC occurs next to NM and QM comes last in the BCS regime. We adopt the quarkyonic scenario in which NM, QM, and CSC are theoretically indistinguishable and thus these names refer to not distinct states but relevant descriptions of the same physical system. Based on this idea we propose a natural scheme to interpolate NM near normal nuclear density and CSC with vector coupling at high baryon density. We finally discuss the mass-radius relation of the neutron star and constraints on parameters in the proposed scheme.

  12. Star Wars software debate

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.

    1986-02-01

    David L. Parnas, Landsdowne Professor of Computer Science at the University of Victoria resigned from the SDI Organization's Panel on Computing in Support of Battle Management on June 28, 1985. Parnas, with 20 years of research on software engineering plus 8 years of work on military aircraft real-time software, says the software portion of SDI cannot be built error-free and he doesn't expect the next 20 years of research to change that fact. Since Parnas resigned, there have been several public debates on Star Wars software questions. In November 1985 the SDIO panel from which Parnas resigned released a draft of its report, reflecting its effort to critics of the project. While one might think that errors could be entirely eliminated with enough care and checking, most software professionals believe there will always be some residue of errors in a system of this size and complexity. The general line of the critics' argument is that the larger the amount of software in a single, unified system, the higher the percentage of errors it will contain. Proponents counter that the one very large system can be divided into a number of smaller, relatively independent pieces, thus reducing the proportionate number of errors in each separate piece. This approach is in turn countered by those who point to the intricate relations between these pieces, which themselves contribute to error.

  13. Space Shuttle Star Tracker Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    The space shuttle fleet of avionics was originally designed in the 1970's. Many of the subsystems have been upgraded and replaced, however some original hardware continues to fly. Not only fly, but has proven to be the best design available to perform its designated task. The shuttle star tracker system is currently flying as a mixture of old and new designs, each with a unique purpose to fill for the mission. Orbiter missions have tackled many varied missions in space over the years. As the orbiters began flying to the International Space Station (ISS), new challenges were discovered and overcome as new trusses and modules were added. For the star tracker subsystem, the growing ISS posed an unusual problem, bright light. With two star trackers on board, the 1970's vintage image dissector tube (IDT) star trackers track the ISS, while the new solid state design is used for dim star tracking. This presentation focuses on the challenges and solutions used to ensure star trackers can complete the shuttle missions successfully. Topics include KSC team and industry partner methods used to correct pressurized case failures and track system performance.

  14. First stars and reionization: Spinstars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappini, C.

    2013-06-01

    Soon after the Big Bang, the appearance of the first stellar generations (hereafter, first stars) drastically changed the course of the history of the Universe by enriching the primordial gas with elements heavier than helium (referred to as metals) through both stellar winds and supernova explosions. High-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the formation of the first stars suggest these objects to have formed in dark matter mini-halos, and to have played a key role in the formation of the first galaxies. Today these stars are (most likely) long dead, and even though next generation facilities will push the observational frontier to extremely high redshifts, with the aim of discovering the first galaxies, the first stars will still lie beyond reach. Thus, the only way to constrain our theoretical understanding of the formation of the first stars is to search for their imprints left in the oldest, still surviving, stars in our own backyard: the Milky Way and its satellites. Which imprints are we looking for, and where can we find them? We address these questions in the present review.

  15. FAINT UBVRI STANDARD STAR FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Clem, James L.; Landolt, Arlo U. E-mail: landolt@phys.lsu.edu

    2013-10-01

    High-quality CCD-based UBVRI photometry is presented for ?45, 000 stars distributed among 60 different fields centered on the celestial equator and at ? ? –50°. This photometry has been calibrated to the standard Johnson UBV and Kron-Cousins RI systems via observations of the UBVRI standard stars presented in the works of Landolt. The majority of the stars in our photometric catalog fall in the magnitude range 12 ?< V ?< 22 and in the color range –0.3 ?< (B – V) ?< 1.8. Each star averages 67 measures in each UBVRI filter from data taken on 250 different photometric nights over a period of ?6.5 yr from two different telescopes. Our final photometric database effectively extends the UBVRI standard star network defined by Landolt to much fainter magnitudes and increases the number density of stars within pre-existing standard fields. Hence, these new, fainter standards serve as suitable calibrators for investigators who employ either small or large-aperture telescopes for their observational projects.

  16. Kepler rapidly rotating giant stars

    E-print Network

    Costa, A D; Bravo, J P; Paz-Chinchón, F; Chagas, M L das; Leão, I C; de Oliveira, G Pereira; da Silva, R Rodrigues; Roque, S; de Oliveira, L L A; da Silva, D Freire; De Medeiros, J R

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of sub-stellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present letter we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points for remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the Sun rotation. These giants are combined with 6 other recently listed in the literature for mid-IR diagnostic based on WISE information, from which a trend for an infrared excess is revealed for at least a half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.

  17. Variability of halo carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battinelli, P.; Demers, S.

    2012-08-01

    Context. Carbon stars are among the brightest intermediate-age stars. Over one hundred have been identified in the Galactic halo. Since the halo consists essentially in an old stellar population, we believe that these C stars are trespassers and belong to streams left over by disrupted dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Aims: By performing photometric monitoring we intend to detect long-period variables among halo carbon stars. We should be in position to identify Mira, semi-regular, and irregular variables and determine their period and age group. Methods: We obtained, over several semesters, K, J, and I images centered on the C stars in order to determine their variation and periodicity. Results: We establish the period of 14 program stars and discover 13 Miras among them. Most of them belong to the 1-3 Gyr age group. Conclusions: The period distribution of the halo Miras closely matches that of the Miras of Fornax. The lack of old Miras suggests that the majority of the halo Miras likely do not originate from the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy, which is believed to be older than 5 Gyr. Based on observations made with the REM Telescope, INAF Chile.

  18. Enigma of Runaway Stars Solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-01-01

    Supernova Propels Companion Star through Interstellar Space The following success story is a classical illustration of scientific progress through concerted interplay of observation and theory. It concerns a 35-year old mystery which has now been solved by means of exciting observations of a strange double star. An added touch is the successive involvement of astronomers connected to the European Southern Observatory. For many years, astronomers have been puzzled by the fact that, among the thousands of very young, hot and heavy stars which have been observed in the Milky Way, there are some that move with exceptionally high velocities. In some cases, motions well above 100 km/sec, or ten times more than normal for such stars, have been measured. How is this possible? Which mechanism is responsible for the large amounts of energy needed to move such heavy bodies at such high speeds? Could it be that these stars are accelerated during the powerful explosion of a companion star as a supernova? Such a scenario was proposed in 1961 by Adriaan Blaauw [1], but until now, observational proof has been lacking. Now, however, strong supporting evidence for this mechanism has become available from observations obtained at the ESO La Silla observatory. The mysterious runaway stars OB-runaway stars [2] are heavy stars that travel through interstellar space with an anomalously high velocity. They have been known for several decades, but it has always been a problem to explain their high velocities. Although most OB-runaway stars are located at distances of several thousands of lightyears, their high velocity results in a measurable change in position on sky photos taken several years apart. The velocity component in the direction of the Earth can be measured very accurately from a spectrogram. From a combination of such observations, it is possible to measure the space velocity of OB-runaways. Bow shocks reveal runaway stars It has also been found that some OB-runaways display bow shocks of compressed matter, which look very much like the bow wave around a boat crossing the ocean. They are of the same physical nature as a bow shock created by a jet-fighter in the air. The explanation is similar: when an OB-runaway star plows through the interstellar medium (a very thin mixture of gas and dust particles) with supersonic velocity [3], interstellar matter is swept up in a bow shock. Stars of low velocity do not create bow shocks. Thus, the detection of a bow shock around a particular OB star indicates that it must have a supersonic velocity, thereby securely identifying it as a runaway star, even if its velocity has not been measured directly. Runaway stars come from stellar groups When a star's direction of motion in space is known, it is possible to reconstruct its previous path and, even more interestingly, to find the place where the star originally came from. It turns out that the paths of many OB-runaways can be traced back to socalled OB-associations , that is groups of 10 to 100 OB-type stars which are located in the spiral arms of our galaxy. About fifty OB-associations are known in the Milky Way. In fact, the majority of all known OB stars are members of an OB-association. Therefore, it is not very surprising that OB-runaway stars should also originate from OB-associations. This is also how they got their name: at some moment, they apparently left the association in which they were formed. The ejection mechanism But why were the OB-runaway stars kicked out of the OB-association and how did they achieve such high speeds? One possibility is that some OB stars in an OB-association are ejected due to strong gravitational effects at the time of close encounters between the members of the group. Complicated computer simulations show that this is in principle possible. Nevertheless, since many years, most astronomers think that a more likely scenario is that of violent supernova explosions, first proposed in 1961 by Adriaan Blaauw. Stellar evolution theory predicts that all OB stars will end their life in a supernova explosion. The he

  19. Catalog of Galactic Beta Cephei Stars

    E-print Network

    Anamarija Stankov; Gerald Handler

    2005-06-21

    We present an extensive and up-to-date catalog of Galactic Beta Cephei stars. This catalog is intended to give a comprehensive overview of observational characteristics of all known Beta Cephei stars. 93 stars could be confirmed to be Beta Cephei stars. For some stars we re-analyzed published data or conducted our own analyses. 61 stars were rejected from the final Beta Cephei list, and 77 stars are suspected to be Beta Cephei stars. A list of critically selected pulsation frequencies for confirmed Beta Cephei stars is also presented. We analyze the Beta Cephei stars as a group, such as the distributions of their spectral types, projected rotational velocities, radial velocities, pulsation periods, and Galactic coordinates. We confirm that the majority of these stars are multiperiodic pulsators. We show that, besides two exceptions, the Beta Cephei stars with high pulsation amplitudes are slow rotators. We construct a theoretical HR diagram that suggests that almost all 93 Beta Cephei stars are MS objects. We discuss the observational boundaries of Beta Cephei pulsation and their physical parameters. We corroborate that the excited pulsation modes are near to the radial fundamental mode in frequency and we show that the mass distribution of the stars peaks at 12 solar masses. We point out that the theoretical instability strip of the Beta Cephei stars is filled neither at the cool nor at the hot end and attempt to explain this observation.

  20. Galactic Star Cluster mass evolution. High performance star by star simulations. Observations vs. modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berczik, Peter; Just, Andreas; Ernst, Andreas; Spurzem, Rainer

    2015-08-01

    We carry out the large set of Galactic Star Cluster simulations (from 1e2 up to 5e5 Msol initial masses) using our high performance parallel direct N-body code phi-GRAPE+GPU with the maximum possible numerical resolution (one particle one star) on the largest astrophysical GPU clusters (in Germany and China). Our main goal was to investigate the cluster initial volume "filling" factor to the process of the cluster mass loss as well us the cluster whole lifetime. We also investigate the evolution of the present day Cluster Mass Function in solar cylinder depending on the initial parameters of the star formation, Initial Cluster Mass Function and the star clusters masses and initial "filling" factors.