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Sample records for allstars star lick

  1. After-School All-Stars: Providing Structured Health and Physical Activity Programs in Urban Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Walter R.

    2009-01-01

    Physical education time has been reduced or even eliminated in middle and high schools in favor of more time for standardized test preparation, especially in urban schools and inner cities. One way to replace the time lost is by providing it after school as part of a comprehensive program. After-School All-Stars (ASAS) is such a program, networked…

  2. Sodium laser guide star results at the Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.; Erbert, G.; Kuklo, T.

    1995-10-01

    Results of return signal level and guide star spot size for a sodium laser guide star recently installed at the Lick Observatory are presented. Operational characteristics of frequency stability, amplitude stability, and pointing accuracy are discussed.

  3. Measurements of the Lick Observatory Sodium Laser Guide Star

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D. T., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The Lick Observatory guide star laser has provided a beacon sufficient to close the adaptive optics loop and produce corrected images during runs in 1996 and 1997. This report summarizes measurements of the wavefront quality of the outgoing beam, photoreturn signal from the sodium beacon, and radiance distribution of the guide star on the sky, and follows with an analysis of the impact of the laser on adaptive optics system performance.

  4. Planets around Giant Stars: Results from the Lick Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirrenbach, Andreas; Reffert, Sabine; Trifonov, Trifon; Bergmann, Christoph; Schwab, Christian

    2015-12-01

    We present results from a radial-velocity survey of 373 giant stars at Lick Observatory, which started in 1999. We have detected planets around 15 of these stars; an additional 20 stars host planet candidates. Companions with up to 25 Jupiter masses are rather commonly found around stars with about 2 Solar masses. The frequency of detected planetary companions appears to increase with metallicity. No planets or planet candidates are found around stars with more than 2.7 Solar masses, although our sample contains 113 such stars. We conclude that the occurrence rate of giant planets as a function of Stellar mass peaks around 2 Solar masses. This has important consequences for our understanding of giant planet formation.The stars 91 Aqr and tau Gem have companions with orbits that are among those with the lowest eccentricities of all known exoplanets, perhaps due to tidal circularization during the RGB phase. If confirmed, this would be the first evidence of planetary orbits modified through stellar evolution.We have discovered several multiple systems in our sample. An extensive dynamical analysis of the eta Cet system indicates that it contains two massive planets in a 2:1 orbital resonance. The star nu Oph is orbited by two brown dwarf companions in a 6:1 resonance. It is likely that they arrived in this resonance through migration in a circumstellar disk, arguing strongly that objects with more than 20 Jupiter masses can be formed in disks around Herbig Ae stars.

  5. Adaptive optics and laser guide stars at Lick observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J.M.

    1994-11-15

    For the past several years LLNL has been developing adaptive optics systems for correction of both atmospheric turbulence effects and thermal distortions in optics for high-power lasers. Our early work focused on adaptive optics for beam control in laser isotope separation and ground-based free electron lasers. We are currently developing innovative adaptive optics and laser systems for sodium laser guide star applications at the University of California`s Lick and Keck Observeratories. This talk will describe our adaptive optics technology and some of its applications in high-resolution imaging and beam control.

  6. Performance of laser guide star adaptive optics at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; An, J.; Avicola, K.

    1995-07-19

    A sodium-layer laser guide star adaptive optics system has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for use on the 3-meter Shane telescope at Lick Observatory. The system is based on a 127-actuator continuous-surface deformable mirror, a Hartmann wavefront sensor equipped with a fast-framing low-noise CCD camera, and a pulsed solid-state-pumped dye laser tuned to the atomic sodium resonance line at 589 nm. The adaptive optics system has been tested on the Shane telescope using natural reference stars yielding up to a factor of 12 increase in image peak intensity and a factor of 6.5 reduction in image full width at half maximum (FWHM). The results are consistent with theoretical expectations. The laser guide star system has been installed and operated on the Shane telescope yielding a beam with 22 W average power at 589 nm. Based on experimental data, this laser should generate an 8th magnitude guide star at this site, and the integrated laser guide star adaptive optics system should produce images with Strehl ratios of 0.4 at 2.2 {mu}m in median seeing and 0.7 at 2.2 {mu}m in good seeing.

  7. Lick Spectral Indices for Super-Metal-rich Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzoni, A.; Chavez, M.; Malagnini, M. L.; Morossi, C.

    2001-11-01

    We present Lick spectral indices for a complete sample of 139 candidate super-metal-rich stars of different luminosity classes (MK type from I to V). For 91 of these stars we were able to identify, in an accompanying paper, the fundamental atmosphere parameters. This confirms that at least 2/3 of the sample consists of stars with [Fe/H] in excess of +0.1 dex. Optical indices for both observations and fiducial synthetic spectra have been calibrated to the Lick system according to Worthey et al. and include the Fe I indices of Fe5015, Fe5270, and Fe5335 and the Mg I and MgH indices of Mg2 and Mg b at 5180 Å. The internal accuracy of the observations is found to be σ(Fe5015)=+/-0.32 Å, σ(Fe5270)=+/-0.19 Å, σ(Fe5335)=+/-0.22 Å, σ(Mg2)=+/-0.004 mag, and σ(Mg b)=+/-0.19 Å. This is about a factor of 2 better than the corresponding theoretical indices from the synthetic spectra, the latter being a consequence of the intrinsic limitations in the input physics, as discussed by Chavez et al. By comparing models and observations, we find no evidence for nonstandard Mg versus Fe relative abundance, so [Mg/Fe]=0, on the average, for our sample. Both the Worthey et al. and Buzzoni et al. fitting functions are found to suitably match the data and can therefore confidently be extended for population synthesis application also to supersolar metallicity regimes. A somewhat different behavior of the two fitting sets appears, however, beyond the temperature constraints of our stellar sample. Its impact on the theoretical output is discussed, as far as the integrated Mg2 index is derived from synthesis models of stellar aggregates. A two-index plot, such as Mg2 versus Fe5270, is found to provide a simple and powerful tool for probing distinctive properties of single stars and stellar aggregates as a whole. The major advantage, over a classical CM diagram, is that it is both reddening free and distance independent. Based on observations collected at the Instituto Nacional de

  8. Documentation for the machine-readable version of the Lick Jupiter-Voyager Reference Star Catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A machine-readable version is described of the Lick Jupiter-Voyager Reference Star Catalogue (Klemola, Morabito Taraji 1978) prepared for purposes of determining up-to-date, reasonably accurate, equatorial coordinates for reference stars in a band of sky against which cameras of the Voyager spacecraft were aligned for observations of Jovian satellites during the flyby.

  9. Laser Guide Star Based Astrophysics at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C; Gavel, D.; Friedman, H.; Olivier, S.; Macintosh, B.; Brase, J.; Avicola, K.; Gibbard, S.; An, J.

    2000-03-10

    The resolution of ground-based telescopes is typically limited to {approx}1 second of arc because of the blurring effects of atmospheric turbulence. Adaptive optics (AO) technology senses and corrects for the optical distortions due to turbulence hundreds of times per second using high-speed sensors, computers, deformable mirror, and laser technology. The goal of this project is to make AO systems widely useful astronomical tools providing resolutions up to an order of magnitude better than current, ground-based telescopes. Astronomers at the University of California Lick Observatory at Mt. Hamilton now routinely use the LLNL developed AO system for high resolution imaging of astrophysical objects. We report here on the instrument development progress and on the science observations made with this system during this 3-year ERI project.

  10. Improved performance of the laser guide star adaptive optics system at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    An, J R; Avicola, K; Bauman, B J; Brase, J M; Campbell, E W; Carrano, C; Cooke, J B; Freeze, G J; Friedman, H W; Max, C E; Gates, E L; Gavel, D T; Kanz, V K; Kuklo, T C; Macintosh, B A; Newman, M J; Olivier, S S; Pierce, E L; Waltjen, K E; Watson, A

    1999-07-20

    Results of experiments with the laser guide star adaptive optics system on the 3-meter Shane telescope at Lick Observatory have demonstrated a factor of 4 performance improvement over previous results. Stellar images recorded at a wavelength of 2 {micro}m were corrected to over 40% of the theoretical diffraction-limited peak intensity. For the previous two years, this sodium-layer laser guide star system has corrected stellar images at this wavelength to {approx}10% of the theoretical peak intensity limit. After a campaign to improve the beam quality of the laser system, and to improve calibration accuracy and stability of the adaptive optics system using new techniques for phase retrieval and phase-shifting diffraction interferometry, the system performance has been substantially increased. The next step will be to use the Lick system for astronomical science observations, and to demonstrate this level of performance with the new system being installed on the 10-meter Keck II telescope.

  11. Initial results from the Lick Observatory Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; An, J.; Avicola, K.

    1995-11-08

    A prototype adaptive optics system has been installed and tested on the 3 m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory. The adaptive optics system performance, using bright natural guide stars, is consistent with expectations based on theory. A sodium-layer laser guide star system has also been installed and tested on the Shane telescope. Operating at 15 W, the laser system produces a 9th magnitude guide star with seeing-limited size at 589 nm. Using the laser guide star, the adaptive optics system has reduced the wavefront phase variance on scales above 50 cm by a factor of 4. These results represent the first continuous wavefront phase correction using a sodium-layer laser guide star. Assuming tip-tilt is removed using a natural guide star, the measured control loop performance should produce images with a Strehl ratio of 0.4 at 2.2 {mu}m in 1 arc second seeing. Additional calibration procedures must be implemented in order to achieve these results with the prototype Lick adaptive optics system.

  12. NASA ALLSTAR Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Cesar; Ebadian, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    We finished the material development of Level 1, Level 2 and most of Level 3. We created three new galleries, one of streaming videos enabling the user to select his/her appropriate speed of Internet connectivity for better performance. The second gallery on NASA's X-series aircraft and the third is on F-series aircraft, We also completed the placement and activation of all thirteen kiosks. We added one more kiosk over the number suggested in the proposal at Baker Aviation High School - a Dade County Public School for special aviation programs. We felt that the goals of this school matched ALLSTAR's goals and that the placement of the kiosk would better help the local students become interested in the Aviation and Aeronautics field. We continue to work on the development of our "Teacher Resource Guide to ALLSTAR material" in which we tied our material into the national and Florida State standards. We finished the Florida Sunshine State standards, getting positive feedback from local and other educators who use the material on a regular basis. We had another successful workshop on October 29th, 1997. We introduced the ALLSTAR website and kiosk to about twenty science and history teachers from Dade County Public Schools (DCPS). Most teachers were from middle schools, although we had some from elementary schools also. We provided several demonstrations of the ALLSTAR material to local schools in the Dade County Public Schools (DCPS) system. We used the ALLSTAR material with FIU's summer immersion program for FLAME students. This program includes a high number of minority students interested in science and engineering. We also presented the material at National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and National Congress on Aviation and Space Education (NCASE) conferences and will be presenting the material at the Southeast Florida Aviation Consortium (SEFAC). We provided two on-site workshops in the NSTA conference with total attended of about 70 teachers. The BBS was

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Lick Saturn-Voyager Reference Star Catalogue (Klemola+, 1979)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemola, A. R.; Taraji, H.; Ocampo, A.

    1995-05-01

    The Lick Saturn-Voyager Reference Star Catalogue was prepared for purposes of determining up-to-date, reasonably accurate, equatorial coordinates for reference stars in a band of sky against which cameras of the Voyager spacecraft were aligned for observations in the region of Saturn during the flyby. The requirements were a surface density of about three reference stars per observation frame of 24 sq.arcmin of the cameras - somewhat greater that the SAO (Smithsonian Astrophsyical Observatory Staff 1966) and the AGK3 (Dieckvoss et al. 1975) densities - and a positional accuracy +/- 0.5". Visual magnitudes were also required. The completed catalog contains 4551 stars in the right ascension range 12h 40min to 14h 12min, declination zones +02deg. to -09deg. Mean errors of the positions, as derived from least squares solutions against the Perth 70 Catalogue (Hoeg and von der Heide 1976), are about 0.25"; however, individual residuals for some bright and excessively faint stars are as high as 0.5" to 1.0". The accidental error of one measurement, as deduced from a tabular histogram given in the original catalog publication (referenced below), is about 0.09". Apparent photographic and visual magnitudes were derived from iris photometer measurements, visual magnitude being approximated from a derived color-index relation using UBV stars selected from the USNO photoelectric catalog (Blanco et al. 1968) and extended with Perth 70 stars. The resulting magnitudes appear to have mean errors of at least 0.2mag - 0.3mag for the brighter stars (visual magnitude < 10mag) and uncertainties can be as much as 0.5mag for the fainter stars. The magnitudes are considered to be only approximate, especially on the faint end, because of a lack of photoelectric standards there. For additional information concerning the observations and reductions, the original publication (available from A. R. Klemola) should be consulted. (1 data file).

  14. Lick slit spectra of thirty-eight objective prism quasar candidates and low metallicity halo stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David; Fan, Xiao-Ming; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Cohen, Ross D.

    1993-01-01

    Lick Observatory slit spectra of 38 objects which were claimed to have pronounced UV excess and emission lines are presented. Eleven QSOs, four galaxies at z of about 0.1, 22 stars, and one unidentified object with a low S/N spectrum were found. Of 11 objects which Zhan and Chen (1987, 1989) suggested were QSO with z(prism) not greater than 2.8; eight are QSOs. Six of the QSOs show absorption systems, including Q0000+027A with a relatively strong associated C IV absorption system, and Q0008+008 with a damped Ly-alpha system with an H I column density of 10 exp 21/sq cm. The equivalent widths of the Ca II K line, the G band, and the Balmer lines in 10 stars with the best spectra are measured, and metallicities are derived. Seven of them are in the range -2.5 to -1.7, while the others are less metal-poor.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Lick Jupiter-Voyager Reference Star Catalogue (Klemola+ 1978)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemola, A. R.; Morabito, L.

    1996-04-01

    The catalog was prepared for purposes of determining up-to-date, reasonably accurate equatorial coordinates for reference stars in a band of sky against which cameras of the Voyager spacecraft were aligned for observations of Jovian satellites during the Jupiter flyby. The catalog contains accurate equatorial coordinates for equinox 1950.0, epoch 1978.27, photographic and visual magnitudes, AGK3 identifications and proper motions for 4983 stars. All of the reference stars are in the range 6h00m to 8h04m in right ascension (1950), declination zones +16 to +23 degrees, and 8h31m to 8h57m, zones +08 to +14 degrees. Mean errors of the positions are about 0.4 second of arc. Introduction The Lick Jupiter-Voyager Reference Star Catalogue. Klemola et al. (1978) was prepared for purposes of determining up-to-date, reasonably accurate, equatorial coordinates for reference stars in a band of sky against which cameras of the Voyager spacecraft were aligned for observations of Jovian satellites during the Jupiter flyby. The requirements were a surface density of three to four reference stars per observation frame of 24 sq. arcmin. of the cameras - somewhat greater than that provided by the AGK3 catalog (Dieckvoss et al. 1975) - and a positional accuracy approximately 0.5. Visual magnitudes were also required. The completed catalog contains 4983 stars in the right ascension ranges 6h00m to 8h04m, declination zones +16 deg. to +23 deg., and 8h31m to 8h57m, declination zones +08 deg. to +14 deg.. Mean errors of the positions, as derived from least squares solutions against the AGK3 reference stars, are about 0.4"; however, individual residuals are fairly numerous in the range 0.6" to 0.8" with some in the range 1.0" to 1.3" The accidental error of one measurement, as deduced from a tabular histogram given in the original catalog publication (referenced below), is about 0.11". Apparent photographic and visual magnitudes were derived from iris photometer measurements, m(v). being

  16. The FEROS-Lick/SDSS observational data base of spectral indices of FGK stars for stellar population studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchini, M.; Morossi, C.; Marcantonio, P. Di; Malagnini, M. L.; Chavez, M.

    2014-07-01

    We present FEROS-Lick/SDSS, an empirical data base of Lick/SDSS spectral indices of FGK stars to be used in population synthesis projects for discriminating different stellar populations within the integrated light of galaxies and globular clusters. From about 2500 FEROS stellar spectra obtained from the European Southern Observatory Science Archive Facility, we computed line-strength indices for 1085 non-supergiant stars with atmospheric parameter estimates from the AMBRE project. Two samples of 312 dwarfs and of 83 subgiants with solar chemical composition and no significant α-element abundance enhancement are used to compare their observational indices with the predictions of the Lick/SDSS library of synthetic indices. In general, the synthetic library reproduces very well the behaviour of observational indices as a function of temperature, but in the case of low-temperature (Teff ≲ 5000 K) dwarfs; low-temperature subgiants are not numerous enough to derive any conclusion. Several possible causes of the disagreement are discussed and promising theoretical improvements are presented.

  17. First significant image improvement from a sodium-layer laser guide star adaptive optics system at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; Max, C.E.; Friedman, H.W.; An, J.; Avicola, K.; Beeman, B.V.; Bissinger, H.D.; Brase, J.M.; Erbert, G.V.; Gavel, D.T.; Kanz, K.; Macintosh, B.; Neeb, K.P.; Waltjen, K.E.

    1997-07-14

    Atmospheric turbulence severely limits the resolution of ground-based telescopes. Adaptive optics can correct for the aberrations caused by the atmosphere, but requires a bright wavefront reference source in close angular proximity to the object being imaged. Since natural reference stars of the necessary brightness are relatively rare, methods of generating artificial reference beacons have been under active investigation for more than a decade. In this paper, we report the first significant image improvement achieved using a sodium-layer laser guide star as a wavefront reference for a high- order adaptive optics system. An artificial beacon was created by resonant scattering from atomic sodium in the mesosphere, at an altitude of 95 km. Using this laser guide star, an adaptive optics system on the 3 m Shane Telescope at Lick Observatory produced a factor of 2.4 increase in peak intensity and a factor of 2 decrease in full width at half maximum of a stellar image, compared with image motion compensation alone. The Strehl ratio when using the laser guide star as the reference was 65% of that obtained with a natural guide star, and the image full widths at half maximum were identical, 0.3 arc sec, using either the laser or the natural guide star. This sodium-layer laser guide star technique holds great promise for the world`s largest telescopes. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Lick indices for FGK stars (Franchini+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchini, M.; Morossi, C.; Marcantonio, P. D.; Malagnini, M. L.; Chavez, M.

    2015-02-01

    The stars observed by FEROS and studied by the AMBRE project (Worley et al., 2012A&A...542A..48W) constitute an ideal working data set for our purposes since they include a large number of non-supergiant FGK stars with individual estimates of Teff, log g, [M/H], and α-to-iron ratio ([alpha/Fe]). We searched the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Science Archive Facility and retrieved, through the FEROS/HARPS pipeline processed data Query Form, all the public available spectra of FGK stars with AMBRE atmospheric parameter values in the following ranges: 38003.5, and global metallicity [M/H]>-3.0. A list of 1085 stars, corresponding to 2511 available spectra, was obtained. Since AMBRE provides individual estimates of stellar parameters derived from each spectrum, we computed for 202 stars with more than one observed spectrum average atmospheric parameter values. In any case, the dispersion of values for the same object resulted to be less than the external errors associated with AMBRE results. (1 data file).

  19. Documentation for the machine-readable version of the lick Saturn-Voyager Reference Star Catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The machine-readable version of the catalog is described. The catalog was prepared in order to determine accurate equatorial coordinates for reference stars in a band of sky against which cameras of the Voyager spacecraft were aligned for observations in the region of Saturn during the flyby. Tape contents and characteristics are described and a sample listing presented.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Lick indices for 51 stars (Sansom+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansom, A. E.; de Castro Milone, A.; Vazdekis, A.; Sanchez-Blazquez, P.

    2014-09-01

    A method that is widely used to analyse stellar populations in galaxies is to apply the theoretically derived responses of stellar spectra and line indices to element abundance variations, which are hereafter referred to as response functions. These are applied in a differential way, to base models, in order to generate spectra or indices with different abundance patterns. In this paper, sets of such response functions for three different stellar evolutionary stages are tested with new empirical [Mg/Fe] abundance data for the medium-resolution Isaac Newton Telescope library of empirical spectra (MILES). Recent theoretical models and observations are used to investigate the effects of [Fe/H], [Mg/H] and overall [Z/H] on spectra, via ratios of spectra for similar stars. The global effects of changes in abundance patterns are investigated empirically through direct comparisons of similar stars from MILES, highlighting the impact of abundance effects in the blue part of the spectrum, particularly for lower temperature stars. It is found that the relative behaviour of iron-sensitive line indices are generally well predicted by response functions, whereas Balmer line indices are not. Other indices tend to show large scatter about the predicted mean relations. Implications for element abundance and age studies in stellar populations are discussed and ways forward are suggested to improve the match with the behaviour of spectra and line-strength indices observed in real stars. (1 data file).

  1. Lick sodium laser guide star: performance during the 1998 LGS observing campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B; Friedman, H; Gavel, D T

    1999-07-19

    The performance of a sodium laser guide star adaptive optics system depends crucially on the characteristics of the laser guide star in the sodium layer. System performance is quite sensitive to sodium layer spot radiance, that is, return per unit sterradian on the sky, hence we have been working to improve projected beam quality via improvements to the laser and changes to the launched beam format. The laser amplifier was reconfigured to a ''bounce-beam'' geometry, which considerably improves wavefront quality and allows a larger round instead of square launch beam aperture. The smaller beacon makes it easier to block the unwanted Rayleigh light and improves the accuracy of Hartmann sensor wavefront measurements in the A0 system. We present measurements of the beam quality and of the resulting sodium beacon and compare to similar measurements from last year.

  2. THE LICK-CARNEGIE SURVEY: A NEW TWO-PLANET SYSTEM AROUND THE STAR HD 207832

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighipour, Nader; Butler, R. Paul; Rivera, Eugenio J.; Vogt, Steven S.

    2012-09-01

    Keck/HIRES precision radial velocities of HD 207832 indicate the presence of two Jovian-type planetary companions in Keplerian orbits around this G star. The planets have minimum masses of Msin i = 0.56 M{sub Jup} and 0.73 M{sub Jup}, with orbital periods of {approx}162 and {approx}1156 days, and eccentricities of 0.13 and 0.27, respectively. Stroemgren b and y photometry reveals a clear stellar rotation signature of the host star with a period of 17.8 days, well separated from the period of the radial velocity variations, reinforcing their Keplerian origin. The values of the semimajor axes of the planets suggest that these objects have migrated from the region of giant planet formation to closer orbits. In order to examine the possibility of the existence of additional (small) planets in the system, we studied the orbital stability of hypothetical terrestrial-sized objects in the region between the two planets and interior to the orbit of the inner body. Results indicated that stable orbits exist only in a small region interior to planet b. However, the current observational data offer no evidence for the existence of additional objects in this system.

  3. Old stellar populations. 5: Absorption feature indices for the complete LICK/IDS sample of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worthey, Guy; Faber, S. M.; Gonzalez, J. Jesus; Burstein, D.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-one optical absorption features, 11 of which have been previously defined, are automatically measured in a sample of 460 stars. Following Gorgas et al., the indices are summarized in fitting functions that give index strengths as functions of stellar temperature, gravity, and (Fe/H). This project was carried out with the purpose of predicting index strengths in the integrated light of stellar populations of different ages and metallicities, but the data should be valuable for stellar studies in the Galaxy as well. Several of the new indices appear to be promising indicators of metallicity for old stellar populations. A complete list of index data and atmospheric parameters is available in computer-readable form.

  4. All-STAR Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Polis, Jared [D-CO-2

    2013-06-04

    07/08/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. All-STAR Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Polis, Jared [D-CO-2

    2011-04-13

    05/20/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. All-STAR Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Durbin, Richard [D-IL

    2013-05-23

    05/23/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (text of measure as introduced: CR S3859-3863) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. All-STAR Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Durbin, Richard [D-IL

    2011-04-13

    04/13/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (text of measure as introduced: CR S2450-2453) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. NASA Allstar Project Aeronautics Learning Laboratory for Science,Technology, and Research (Allstar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Cesar; Ebadian M. A.

    1998-01-01

    We finished the material development of Level 1, Level 2 and most of Level 3. We created three new galleries, one of streaming videos enabling the user to select his/her appropriate speed of Internet connectivity for better performance. The second gallery on NASA's X-series aircraft and the third is on F-series aircraft. We also completed the placement and activation of all thirteen kiosks. We added one more kiosk over the number suggested in the proposal at Baker Aviation High School - a Dade County Public School for special aviation programs. We felt that the goals of this school matched ALLSTAR's goals and that the placement of the kiosk would better help the local students become interested in the Aviation and Aeronautics field. We continue to work on the development of our "Teacher Resource Guide to ALLSTAR material" in which we tied our material into the national and Florida State standards. We finished the Florida Sunshine State standards, getting positive feedback from local and other educators who use the material on a regular basis. We had another successful workshop on October 29', 1997. We introduced the ALLSTAR website and kiosk to about twenty science and history teachers from Dade County Public Schools (DCPS). Most teachers were from middle schools, although we had some from elementary schools also. We provided several demonstrations of the ALLSTAR material to local schools in the Dade County Public Schools (DCPS) system. We used the ALLSTAR material with FIU's summer immersion program for FLAME students. This program includes a high number of minority students interested in science and engineering. We also presented the material at National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and National Congress on Aviation and Space Education (NCASE) conferences and will be presenting the material at the Southeast Florida Aviation Consortium (SEFAC). We provided two on-site workshops in the NSTA conference with total attended of about 70 teachers. The BBS was

  9. Lick Jupiter-Voyager reference star catalogue (Klemola, Morabito, and Taraji 1978): Documentation for the machine-readable version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Wayne H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The machine-readable version of the catalog, as it is currently being distributed from the Astronomical Data Center, is described. The catalog contains accurate equatorial coordinates for 4983 stars in a band of sky against which cameras of the Voyager spacecraft were pointed for observations in the region of Jupiter during the flyby. All of the reference stars are in the range 6 hr 00 min to 8 hr 04 min in right ascension (1950), declination zones +16 to +23 degrees, and 8 hr to 31 min to 8 hr 57 min, zones +08 to +14 degrees. Mean errors of the positions are about 0.4 sec.

  10. Lick Saturn-Voyager reference star catalogue (Klemola, Taraji, and Ocampo 1979): Documentation for the machine-readable version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Wayne H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The machine readable version of the catalog, as it is currently being distributed from the Astronomical Data Center, is described. The catalog contains accurate equatorial coordinates for 4551 stars in a band of sky against which cameras of the Voyager spacecraft were pointed for observations in the region of Saturn during the flyby. All of the reference stars are in the range 12(exp h) 40(exp m) to 14(exp h) 12(exp m) in right ascension (1950) and +02 to -09 degs in declination. Mean errors of the positions are about 0.25 sec.

  11. The Lick-Carnegie Exoplanet Survey: HD 32963—A New Jupiter Analog Orbiting a Sun-like Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, Dominick; Meschiari, Stefano; Laughlin, Gregory; Vogt, Steven S.; Butler, R. Paul; Burt, Jennifer; Wang, Songhu; Holden, Brad; Hanson, Russell; Arriagada, Pamela; Keiser, Sandy; Teske, Johanna; Diaz, Matias

    2016-02-01

    We present a set of 109 new, high-precision Keck/HIRES radial velocity (RV) observations for the solar-type star HD 32963. Our data set reveals a candidate planetary signal with a period of 6.49 ± 0.07 years and a corresponding minimum mass of 0.7 ± 0.03 Jupiter masses. Given Jupiter's crucial role in shaping the evolution of the early Solar System, we emphasize the importance of long-term RV surveys. Finally, using our complete set of Keck radial velocities and correcting for the relative detectability of synthetic planetary candidates orbiting each of the 1122 stars in our sample, we estimate the frequency of Jupiter analogs across our survey at approximately 3%.

  12. Aeronautics Learning Laboratory for Science, Technology, and Research (ALLSTAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Cesar; Ebadian, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    We finished the material development of Level 1, Level 2 and most of Level 3. We created three new galleries, one of streaming videos enabling the user to select his/her appropriate speed of Internet connectivity for better performance. The second gallery on NASA's X-series aircraft and the third is on F-series aircraft. We also completed the placement and activation of all thirteen kiosks. We added one more kiosk over the number suggested in the proposal at Baker Aviation High School - a Dade County Public School for special aviation programs. We felt that the goals of this school matched ALLSTAR's goals and that the placement of the kiosk would better help the local students become interested in the Aviation and Aeronautics field. We continue to work on the development of our "Teacher Resource Guide to ALLSTAR material" in which we tied our material into the national and Florida State standards. We finished the Florida Sunshine State standards, getting positive feedback from local and other educators who use the material on a regular basis. We had another successful workshop on October 29 th, 1997. We introduced the ALLSTAR website and kiosk to about twenty science and history teachers from Dade County Public Schools (DCPS). Most teachers were from middle schools, although we had some from elementary schools also. We provided several demonstrations of the ALLSTAR material to local schools in the Dade County Public Schools (DCPS) system. We used the ALLSTAR material with FIU's summer immersion program for FLAME students. This program includes a high number of minority students interested in science and engineering. We also presented the material at National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and National Congress on Aviation and Space Education (NCASE) conferences and will be presenting the material at the Southeast Florida Aviation Consortium (SEFAC). We provided two on-site workshops in the NSTA conference with total attended of about 70 teachers. The BBS was

  13. ALLStars: Overcoming Multi-Survey Selection Bias using Crowd-Sourced Active Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, D. L.; Richards, J. W.; Brink, H.; Miller, A. A.; Bloom, J. S.; Butler, N. R.; James, J. B.; Long, J. P.

    2012-09-01

    Developing a multi-survey time-series classifier presents several challenges. One problem is overcoming the sample selection bias which arises when the instruments or observing cadences differ between the training and testing datasets. In this case, the probabilistic distributions characterizing the sources in the training survey dataset differ from the source distributions in the other survey, resulting in poor results when a classifier is naively applied. To resolve this, we have developed the ALLStars active learning framework which allows us to bootstrap a classifier onto a new survey using a small set of optimally chosen sources which are then presented to users for manual classification. Several iterations of this crowd-sourcing process results in a significantly improved classifier. Using this procedure, we have built a variable star light-curve classifier using OGLE, Hipparcos, and ASAS survey data.

  14. Performance of adaptive optics at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; An, J.; Avicola, K.

    1994-03-01

    A prototype adaptive optics system has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for use at Lick Observatory. This system is based on an ITEX 69-actuator continuous-surface deformable mirror, a Kodak fast-framing intensified CCD camera, and a Mercury VME board containing four Intel i860 processors. The system has been tested using natural reference stars on the 40-inch Nickel telescope at Lick Observatory yielding up to a factor of 10 increase in image peak intensity and a factor of 6 reduction in image full width at half maximum (FWHM). These results are consistent with theoretical expectations. In order to improve performance, the intensified CCD camera will be replaced by a high-quantum-efficiency low-noise fast CCD camera built for LLNL by Adaptive Optics Associates using a chip developed by Lincoln Laboratory, and the 69-actuator deformable mirror will be replaced by a 127-actuator deformable mirror developed at LLNL. With these upgrades, the system should perform well in median seeing conditions on the 120-inch Shane telescope for observing wavelengths longer than {approximately}1 {mu}m and using natural reference stars brighter than m{sub R} {approximately} 10 or using the laser currently being developed at LLNL for use at Lick Observatory to generate a sodium-layer reference star.

  15. Progress with the lick adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D T; Olivier, S S; Bauman, B; Max, C E; Macintosh, B

    2000-03-01

    Progress and results of observations with the Lick Observatory Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System are presented. This system is optimized for diffraction-limited imaging in the near infrared, 1-2 micron wavelength bands. We describe our development efforts in a number of component areas including, a redesign of the optical bench layout, the commissioning of a new infrared science camera, and improvements to the software and user interface. There is also an ongoing effort to characterize the system performance with both natural and laser guide stars and to fold this data into a refined system model. Such a model can be used to help plan future observations, for example, predicting the point-spread function as a function of seeing and guide star magnitude.

  16. Campus Technology Innovators Awards 2011: Technology All-Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Meg; Raths, David

    2011-01-01

    Out of a total of 393 entries for the 2011 Campus Technology Innovators award, 10 winners rose to the top in six categories: (1) Leadership, Governance, and Policy; (2) Teaching and Learning; (3) Student Systems and Services; (4) Administrative Systems; (5) IT Infrastructure and Systems; and (6) Education Futurists. These innovative IT leaders…

  17. THE LICK-CARNEGIE EXOPLANET SURVEY: A SATURN-MASS PLANET IN THE HABITABLE ZONE OF THE NEARBY M4V STAR HIP 57050

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighipour, Nader; Vogt, Steven S.; Rivera, Eugenio J.; Laughlin, Greg; Meschiari, Stefano; Henry, Gregory W.

    2010-05-20

    Precision radial velocities (RV) from Keck/HIRES reveal a Saturn-mass planet orbiting the nearby M4V star HIP 57050. The planet has a minimum mass of Msin i {approx} 0.3 M{sub J}, an orbital period of 41.4 days, and an orbital eccentricity of 0.31. V-band photometry reveals a clear stellar rotation signature of the host star with a period of 98 days, well separated from the period of the RV variations and reinforcing a Keplerian origin for the observed velocity variations. The orbital period of this planet corresponds to an orbit in the habitable zone of HIP 57050, with an expected planetary temperature of {approx}230 K. The star has a metallicity of [Fe/H] = 0.32 {+-} 0.06 dex, of order twice solar and among the highest metallicity stars in the immediate solar neighborhood. This newly discovered planet provides further support that the well-known planet-metallicity correlation for F, G, and K stars also extends down into the M-dwarf regime. The a priori geometric probability for transits of this planet is only about 1%. However, the expected eclipse depth is {approx}7%, considerably larger than that yet observed for any transiting planet. Though long on the odds, such a transit is worth pursuing as it would allow for high quality studies of the atmosphere via transmission spectroscopy with Hubble Space Telescope. At the expected planetary effective temperature, the atmosphere may contain water clouds.

  18. THE LICK-CARNEGIE EXOPLANET SURVEY: A 3.1 M{sub +} PLANET IN THE HABITABLE ZONE OF THE NEARBY M3V STAR GLIESE 581

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Steven S.; Rivera, E. J.; Haghighipour, N.; Henry, Gregory W.; Williamson, Michael H.

    2010-11-01

    We present 11 years of HIRES precision radial velocities (RVs) of the nearby M3V star Gliese 581, combining our data set of 122 precision RVs with an existing published 4.3-year set of 119 HARPS precision RVs. The velocity set now indicates six companions in Keplerian motion around this star. Differential photometry indicates a likely stellar rotation period of {approx}94 days and reveals no significant periodic variability at any of the Keplerian periods, supporting planetary orbital motion as the cause of all the RV variations. The combined data set strongly confirms the 5.37-day, 12.9-day, 3.15-day, and 67-day planets previously announced by Bonfils et al., Udry et al., and Mayor et al.. The observations also indicate a fifth planet in the system, GJ 581f, a minimum-mass 7.0 M{sub +} planet orbiting in a 0.758 AU orbit of period 433 days, and a sixth planet, GJ 581g, a minimum-mass 3.1 M{sub +} planet orbiting at 0.146 AU with a period of 36.6 days. The estimated equilibrium temperature of GJ 581g is 228 K, placing it squarely in the middle of the habitable zone of the star and offering a very compelling case for a potentially habitable planet around a very nearby star. That a system harboring a potentially habitable planet has been found this nearby, and this soon in the relatively early history of precision RV surveys, indicates that {eta}{sub +}, the fraction of stars with potentially habitable planets, is likely to be substantial. This detection, coupled with statistics of the incompleteness of present-day precision RV surveys for volume-limited samples of stars in the immediate solar neighborhood, suggests that {eta}{sub +} could well be on the order of a few tens of percent. If the local stellar neighborhood is a representative sample of the galaxy as a whole, our Milky Way could be teeming with potentially habitable planets.

  19. Recent Science and Engineering Results with the Laser Guidestar Adaptive Optics System at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D T; Gates, E; Max, C; Olivier, S; Bauman, B; Pennington, D; Macintosh, B; Patience, J; Brown, C; Danforth, P; Hurd, R; Severson, S; Lloyd, J

    2002-10-17

    The Lick Observatory laser guide star adaptive optics system has undergone continual improvement and testing as it is being integrated as a facility science instrument on the Shane 3 meter telescope. Both Natural Guide Star (NGS) and Laser Guide Star (LGS) modes are now used in science observing programs. We report on system performance results as derived from data taken on both science and engineering nights and also describe the newly developed on-line techniques for seeing and system performance characterization. We also describe the future enhancements to the Lick system that will enable additional science goals such as long-exposure spectroscopy.

  20. Graduate Astronomy Education in the Early Days of Lick Observatory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterbrock, Donald E.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses Lick Observatory's (University of California) early graduate students and graduate program in astronomy. The history of the Lick Observatory and famous astronomy professors and astronomers associated with the Lick Observatory are also discussed. (DS)

  1. THE LICK/SDSS LIBRARY. I. SYNTHETIC INDEX DEFINITION AND CALIBRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Franchini, M.; Morossi, C.; Di Marcantonio, P.; Malagnini, M. L.; Chavez, M. E-mail: morossi@oats.inaf.i E-mail: malagnini@oats.inaf.i

    2010-08-10

    A new synthetic library of spectral feature indices, Lick/Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), for stellar population studies is presented. Lick/SDSS is computed from synthetic spectra with resolving power R = 1800 to fully exploit the content of the spectroscopic SDSS-DR7 stellar database. The Lick/SDSS system is based on the Lick/IDS one complemented with a UV index in the wavelength region of Ca II H and K lines. The system is well suited to study {alpha}-element abundances in F, G, and K stars. The reliability of synthetic indices in reproducing the behaviors of observational ones with effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity, and {alpha}-element abundances is tested by using empirical stellar libraries (ELODIE, INDO-U.S., and MILES) and the SDSS-DR7 spectroscopic database. The importance of using the same temperature scale in comparing theoretical and observational indices is discussed. The full consistency between Lick/SDSS and observational indices derived from the above mentioned stellar libraries is assessed. The comparison with indices computed from SDSS-DR7 spectra evidences good consistency for 'dwarf' stars and significant disagreement for 'giant' stars due to systematic overestimation of the stellar T {sub eff} by the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline.

  2. The automated planet finder at Lick Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovan, Matt V.; Lanclos, Kyle; Holden, Bradford P.; Kibrick, Robert I.; Allen, S. L.; Deich, William T. S.; Rivera, Eugenio; Burt, Jennifer; Fulton, Benjamin; Butler, Paul; Vogt, Steven S.

    2014-07-01

    By July 2014, the Automated Planet Finder (APF) at Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton will have completed its first year of operation. This facility combines a modern 2.4m computer-controlled telescope with a flexible development environment that enables efficient use of the Levy Spectrometer for high cadence observations. The Levy provides both sub-meter per second radial velocity precision and high efficiency, with a peak total system throughput of 24%. The modern telescope combined with efficient spectrometer routinely yields over 100 observations of 40 stars in a single night, each of which has velocity errors of 0.7 to 1.4 meters per second, all with typical seeing of < 1 arc second full-width-half-maximum (FWHM). The whole observing process is automated using a common application programming interface (API) for inter-process communication which allows scripting to be done in a variety of languages (Python, Tcl, bash, csh, etc.) The flexibility and ease-of-use of the common API allowed the science teams to be directly involved in the automation of the observing process, ensuring that the facility met their requirements. Since November 2013, the APF has been routinely conducting autonomous observations without human intervention.

  3. Social Licking in Pregnant Dairy Heifers

    PubMed Central

    Tresoldi, Grazyne; Weary, Daniel M.; Pinheiro Machado Filho, Luiz Carlos; von Keyserlingk, Marina A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Social licking is often associated with good animal welfare, but little is known about this behavior in cattle. Licking behavior was compared in heifers housed indoors versus on pasture. Licking frequency was four-fold higher when heifers were indoors. However, when considering all social interactions recorded (licking and aggressions) licking events represented about 10% of all interactions regardless of housing. This behavior happened more frequently between heifers that were observed more repeatedly in close vicinity of each other. Provision of smaller indoor floor spaces likely brought animals into closer proximity thus facilitating social interactions. Abstract Housing affects social behaviors, such as competition, but little work has addressed affiliative behaviors. This study compared social licking (SL) in pregnant heifers housed indoors (in a free-stall barn) versus outdoors (on pasture), and relationships with competition, feeding and physical proximity to others. Six heifer groups were observed during two six-hour-periods in both treatments. The total number of social events (SL and agonistic interactions) was four times higher when heifers were housed indoors compared to pasture (546 ± 43 vs. 128 ± 7 events/group; P < 0.05). SL as a ratio of the total number of social events was similar in the two treatments (12% vs. 8% of interactions, free-stall and pasture, respectively; P > 0.05). Housing did not affect how the SL bout was initiated and terminated, the duration, the body part licked and behavior preceding licking (P > 0.05). Animals in close proximity showed higher rates of SL (P < 0.0001) but not agonistic interactions (P > 0.05). A previous agonistic event did not predict occurrence or the role of heifers in the following licking event. The higher stocking density indoors likely resulted in increased social interactions. PMID:26610578

  4. Lick Observatory Optical SETI: targeted search and new directions.

    PubMed

    Stone, R P S; Wright, S A; Drake, F; Muñoz, M; Treffers, R; Werthimer, D

    2005-10-01

    Lick Observatory's Optical SETI (search for extraterrestrial intelligence) program has been in regular operation for 4.5 years. We have observed 4,605 stars of spectral types F-M within 200 light-years of Earth. Occasionally, we have appended objects of special interest, such as stars with known planetary systems. We have observed 14 candidate signals ("triple coincidences"), all but one of which are explained by transient local difficulties. Additional observations of the remaining candidate have failed to confirm arriving pulse events. We now plan to proceed in a more economical manner by operating in an unattended drift scan mode. Between operational and equipment modifications, efficiency will more than double. PMID:16225433

  5. Making star teams out of star players.

    PubMed

    Mankins, Michael; Bird, Alan; Root, James

    2013-01-01

    Top talent is an invaluable asset: In highly specialized or creative work, for instance, "A" players are likely to be six times as productive as "B" players. So when your company has a crucial strategic project, why not multiply all that firepower and have a team of your best performers tackle it? Yet many companies hesitate to do this, believing that all-star teams don't work: Big egos will get in the way. The stars won't be able to work with one another. They'll drive the team Leader crazy. Mankins, Bird, and Root of Bain & Company believe it's time to set aside that thinking. They have seen all-star teams do extraordinary work. But there is a right way and a wrong way to organize them. Before you can even begin to assemble such a team, you need to have the right talent management practices, so you hire and develop the best people and know what they're capable of. You have to give the team appropriate incentives and leaders and support staffers who are stars in their own right. And projects that are ill-defined or small scale are not for all-star teams. Use them only for critical missions, and make sure their objectives are clear. Even with the right setup, things can still go wrong. The wise executive will take steps to manage egos, prune non-team-players, and prevent average coworkers from feeling completely undervalued. She will also invest a lot of time in choosing the right team Leader and will ask members for lots of feedback to monitor how that leader is doing. PMID:23390743

  6. Licking Microstructure Reveals Rapid Attenuation of Neophobia

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Kevin J.; Rubin, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    Many animals hesitate when initially consuming a novel food and increase their consumption of that food between the first and second sessions of access—a process termed attenuation of neophobia (AN). AN has received attention as a model of learning and memory; it has been suggested that plasticity resulting from an association of the novel tastant with “safe outcome” results in a change in the neural response to the tastant during the second session, such that consumption increases. Most studies have reported that AN emerges only an hour or more after the end of the first exposure to the tastant, consistent with what is known of learning-related plasticity. But these studies have typically measured consumption, rather than real-time behavior, and thus the possibility exists that a more rapidly developing AN remains to be discovered. Here, we tested this possibility, examining both consumption and individual lick times in a novel variant of a brief-access task (BAT). When quantified in terms of consumption, data from the BAT accorded well with the results of a classic one-bottle task—both revealed neophobia/AN specific to higher concentrations (for instance, 28mM) of saccharin. An analysis of licking microstructure, however, additionally revealed a real-time correlate of neophobia—an explicit tendency, similarly specific for 28-mM saccharin, to cut short the initial bout of licks in a single trial (compared with water). This relative hesitancy (i.e., the shortness of the first lick bout to 28-mM saccharin compared with water) that constitutes neophobia not only disappeared between sessions but also gradually declined in magnitude across session 1. These data demonstrate that the BAT accurately measures AN, and that aspects of AN—and the processes underlying familiarization—begin within minutes of the very first taste. PMID:24363269

  7. Patterns of mineral lick visitation by spider monkeys and howler monkeys in Amazonia: are licks perceived as risky areas?

    PubMed

    Link, Andres; Galvis, Nelson; Fleming, Erin; Di Fiore, Anthony

    2011-04-01

    Mineral licks--also known as "salados," "saladeros," or "collpas"--are specific sites in tropical and temperate ecosystems where a large diversity of mammals and birds come regularly to feed on soil. Although the reasons for vertebrate geophagy are not completely understood, animals are argued to obtain a variety of nutritional and health benefits from the ingestion of soil at mineral licks. We studied the temporal patterns of mineral lick use by white-bellied spider monkey (Ateles belzebuth) and red howler monkey (Alouatta seniculus) in a lowland rain forest in Amazonian Ecuador. Using camera and video traps at four different mineral licks, combined with behavioral follows of one group of spider monkeys, we documented rates of mineral lick visitation by both primate species and the relative frequency and intensity of mineral lick use by spider monkeys. On the basis of 1,612 days and 888 nights of mineral lick monitoring, we found that A. belzebuth and A. seniculus both visit mineral licks frequently throughout the year (on average ∼14% of days for both species), and mineral lick visitation was influenced by short-term environmental conditions (e.g. sunny and dry weather). For spider monkeys, the area surrounding the lick was also the most frequently and most intensively used region within the group's home range. The fact that spider monkeys spent long periods at the lick area before coming to the ground to obtain soil, and the fact that both species visited the lick preferentially during dry sunny conditions (when predator detectability is presumed to be relatively high) and visited simultaneously more often than expected by chance, together suggest that licks are indeed perceived as risky areas by these primates. We suggest that howler and spider monkeys employ behavioral strategies aimed at minimizing the probability of predation while visiting the forest floor at risky mineral lick sites. PMID:21328597

  8. Conceptual design for a user-friendly adaptive optics system at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Bissinger, H.D.; Olivier, S.; Max, C.

    1996-03-08

    In this paper, we present a conceptual design for a general-purpose adaptive optics system, usable with all Cassegrain facility instruments on the 3 meter Shane telescope at the University of California`s Lick Observatory located on Mt. Hamilton near San Jose, California. The overall design goal for this system is to take the sodium-layer laser guide star adaptive optics technology out of the demonstration stage and to build a user-friendly astronomical tool. The emphasis will be on ease of calibration, improved stability and operational simplicity in order to allow the system to be run routinely by observatory staff. A prototype adaptive optics system and a 20 watt sodium-layer laser guide star system have already been built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for use at Lick Observatory. The design presented in this paper is for a next- generation adaptive optics system that extends the capabilities of the prototype system into the visible with more degrees of freedom. When coupled with a laser guide star system that is upgraded to a power matching the new adaptive optics system, the combined system will produce diffraction-limited images for near-IR cameras. Atmospheric correction at wavelengths of 0.6-1 mm will significantly increase the throughput of the most heavily used facility instrument at Lick, the Kast Spectrograph, and will allow it to operate with smaller slit widths and deeper limiting magnitudes. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  9. A. A. Michelson's Jovian Galilean-Satellite Interferometer at Lick Observatory in 1891

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, D. E.

    2004-12-01

    Albert A. Michelson, America's first Nobel laureate in physics, measured the angular diameter of the red supergiant star Betelgeuse in 1920 with Francis G. Pease, using the 100-inch Mount Wilson reflector as the basis of his stellar interferometer. But he had first published the concept in 1890 and tested it on celestial objects with a telescope at Lick Observatory in 1891. He used its 12-inch refractor to measure the angular diameters of the four Galilean satellites of Jupiter, assisted at the telescope by W. W. Campbell, then a young astronomer who had just joined the Lick staff. Edward S. Holden, the Lick director, had invited Michelson to come to Mount Hamilton and use its telescopes as a guest observer. Michelson had first tried and proved his method on artificial circular disks in his laboratory at Clark University, Worcester, Mass., using a 2-inch "glass." Then in 1889 and 1890 he hoped to test it at Harvard College Observatory, but apparently the telescope or the atmospheric conditions did not work out. At Lick he did achieve success, and his measured angular diameters were nearer to the true values we know from close-up space measurements of today than those of any of the top visual observers of the time. Correspondence in the Lick Archives shows that Michelson intended to come back there to use its big 36-inch refractor to improve the measurements, but he never did so. Selections from Michelson's published papers and photographs of him, the telescope, and the instrument will be posted.

  10. The Lick-Gaertner automatic measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasilevskis, S.; Popov, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    The Lick-Gaertner automatic equipment has been designed mainly for the measurement of stellar proper motions with reference to galaxies, and consists of two main components: the survey machine and the automatic measuring engine. The survey machine is used for initial inspection and selection of objects for subsequent measurement. Two plates, up to 17 x 17 inches each, are surveyed simultaneously by means of projection on a screen. The approximate positions of objects selected are measured by two optical screws: helical lines cut through an aluminum coating on glass cylinders. These approximate coordinates to a precision of the order of 0.03mm are transmitted to a card punch by encoders connected with the cylinders.

  11. Update on Optical Design of Adaptive Optics System at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B J; Gavel, D T; Waltjen, K E; Freeze, G J; Hurd, R L; Gates, E I; Max, C E; Olivier, S S; Pennington, D M

    2001-07-31

    In 1999, we presented our plan to upgrade the adaptive optics (AO) system on the Lick Observatory Shane telescope (3m) from a prototype instrument pressed into field service to a facility instrument. This paper updates the progress of that plan and details several important improvements in the alignment and calibration of the AO bench. The paper also includes a discussion of the problems seen in the original design of the tip/tilt (t/t) sensor used in laser guide star mode, and how these problems were corrected with excellent results.

  12. Schedule-induced licking during multiple schedules1

    PubMed Central

    Jacquet, Yasuko Filby

    1972-01-01

    Schedule-induced polydipsia was studied in rats bar pressing under two-component multiple schedules of food reinforcement. The first component of the multiple schedule was a variable-interval 1-min schedule throughout the experiment. The schedule comprising the second component was varied over blocks of sessions in terms of rate and magnitude of reinforcement, and was either variable-interval 3-min (one pellet), variable-interval 3-min (three pellets), variable-interval 1-min (one pellet), or extinction. Water intake per session varied with the rate of reinforcement in the schedule comprising the second component and was highest when the schedule was variable-interval 1-min. Both bar-pressing behavior and licking behavior showed behavioral interactions between the two components of the multiple schedules. With magnitude of reinforcement held constant, a matching relationship was observed between lick rate and reinforcement rate; the relative frequency of licks in the constant component matched the relative frequency of reinforcement in that component. Bar pressing, however, showed only a moderate degree of relativity matching. During the schedule-induced licking, a burst of licking followed each delivery of a pellet (post-prandial drinking). The duration of these bursts of licking was observed to be a function of the inter-reinforcement interval. PMID:16811598

  13. Proposed Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics Experiment at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B J; Gavel, D T; Flath, L M; Hurd, R L; Max, C E; Olivier, S S

    2001-08-15

    While the theory behind design of multiconjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems is growing, there is still a paucity of experience building and testing such instruments. We propose using the Lick adaptive optics (AO) system as a basis for demonstrating the feasibility/workability of MCAO systems, testing underlying assumptions, and experimenting with different approaches to solving MCAO system issues.

  14. An analysis of licking microstructure in three strains of mice

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, A.W.; Sherwood, A.; Smith, D.R.; Wosiski-Kuhn, M.; Gallagher, M.; Holland, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    Mouse models of feeding provide a useful tool for elucidating the molecular pathways of energy regulation. The majority of studies in mice have been limited to intake analyses conducted over extended periods of time, which fail to distinguish between a variety of factors that influence nutrient intake. Using licking microstructure analyses we examined both the size and number of licking bursts for water, polycose, sucrose and lecithin in three strains of mice (C57BL/6J, 129Sv/ImJ and C57129F1 hybrids), using pause criteria (250–500, >500 and >1000 ms) that have previously been described in the rat. Burst size and number varied both as a function of tastant concentration and mouse strain; however, these differences were most evident with the >1000 ms pause criterion. Consistent with previous reports, during water consumption C57 mice showed longer mean interlick intervals, a larger number of bursts but reduced burst size relative to the two other strains. F1 mice showed larger burst sizes for polycose, while C57 mice displayed a greater number of bursts for both polycose and sucrose. Both 129 and F1 mice were insensitive to sucrose concentration, whereas C57 mice showed attenuated lecithin intake influenced by a reduction in the size of bursts for this tastant. These results suggest that these strains of mice display differences in the pattern of licking that are most evident with the use of larger pause criteria. These differences in licking behavior might reflect influences of genetic background on pre- and post-ingestive factors controlling intake, the reinforcing properties of each tastant, or native differences in licking style. PMID:20006663

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Lick NPM2 Catalog Preliminary Version (Hanson+ 2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, R. B.; Klemola, A. R.; Jones, B. F.; Monet, D. G.

    2002-09-01

    The NPM2 Catalog is the second part of the Lick Northern Proper Motion (NPM) program to measure absolute proper motions, on an inertial system defined by some 50,000 faint galaxies, for nearly 400,000 stars over a blue apparent magnitude range from 8 to 18. There are 1246 6x6degree fields in the NPM survey (to declination -23°). The NPM2 Catalog covers the 28% of the northern sky lying near the plane of the the Milky Way and contains some 230,000 stars in the 347 NPM fields remaining after the 1993 NPM1 Catalog (149,000 stars in 899 fields away from the Milky Way). Each NPM field was photographed with the 51 cm Carnegie Double Astrograph at two epochs between 1947 and 1988. The mean first and second epochs are 1950 and 1977; the average epoch difference is 27 years. The first-epoch plates were taken in the blue only; both blue and yellow plates were taken at the second epoch. For NPM2, the plates were scanned by the Precision Measuring Machine (PMM) at the US Naval Observatory, Flagstaff. From the PMM scans, some 120,000 faint (B>14) stars were chosen anonymously for the NPM astrometric reductions and for statistical studies of stellar motions. In addition, the NPM2 catalog contains some 80,000 bright (B<14) positional reference stars, mostly from the Tycho-2 Catalogue, and some 35,000 stars chosen for astronomical interest from Klemola's "Lick Input Catalog of Special Stars" (ICSS). Details of the NPM2 star selection, data reductions, and catalog compilation will be presented in a paper being prepared for the Astronomical Journal. The present version (September 2002) of the NPM2 Catalog contains 196,639 stars from 295 of the 347 NPM2 fields (85%). The remaining 52 fields, in the Summer Milky Way from -02 to -23°, are now being processed, and will be added to the catalog in 2003. Together with the NPM1 Catalog (J2000 version at http://www.ucolick.org/~npm/NPM1/) the NPM2 Catalog completes the Lick Northern Proper Motion program after more than a half-century of

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The LickX Spectra library (Worthey+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthey, G.; Bianca Danilet, A.; Faber, S. M.

    2013-11-01

    Table2 lists spectral index measurements from the stellar spectral library that forms the basis of the Lick index system. Each star was cross-correlated with a template spectrum to improve the wavelength scale, removing most of the wavelength jitter from the original library, and some mistakes in names of objects were corrected. This collection of FITS files is a reworked version of the stellar spectral library that forms the basis of the Lick index system. Each star was cross-correlated with a template spectrum to improve the wavelength scale, removing most of the wavelength jitter from the original library, and some mistakes in names of objects were corrected. New FITS header Keywords give updated wavelength scale: WCRVAL is the wavelength of the first pixel in angstroms WCDELT is the dispersion in angstroms per pixel Occasionally wavelength limit information is include with keywords WLIMIT1 the wavelength in angstroms of the first reliable blue-end pixel WLIMIT2 the wavelength in angstroms of the first reliable red-end pixel Note that the old, unimproved wavelength scale is still present, using the standard keywords CRVAL and CDELT, and users are cautioned that those keywords are included only for historical reference and should not be used as the wavelength scale for scientific applications. The binary data parts of the files are 2048 pixels x 1 pixel in size. The file names are in time order and are of the form sdrXXNNMM, where XX = the number of the observing run NN = the "tape number" MM = the "scan number" Some observing runs have no data and are missing. The tape and scan numbers refer to the original PDP-11 data storage system and are no longer relevant except that the final series of integers remains in time-sequence order when alphabetized. There are 1043 FITS files, each containing one spectrum. (3 data files).

  17. Acral lick dermatitis in a jackal (Canis aureus).

    PubMed

    Yeruham, I; Nyska, A

    1998-06-01

    Acral lick dermatitis was diagnosed in a 6-mo-old female jackal (Canis aureus) that was born and housed in a zoological garden in Hafez-Haim, Israel. Other dermatologic diseases were ruled out. Although the lesions were presumed to be psychogenic in origin, they resolved with topical therapy using an ointment containing benzocaine, neomycin sulfate, and hydrocortisone acetate. No recurrence has been observed. PMID:9732044

  18. HOMESTEAD, LAKE FORK, AND LICK CREEK ROADLESS AREAS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, James G.; Conyac, Martin D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey concluded that the Homestead, Lake Fork and Lick Creek Roadless Area, Oregon offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the bedrock. Probable mineral-resource potential is assigned to the west and north parts of the Lake Fork Roadless Area, where gold resources may occur in glacial deposits and alluvium transported into this area from sources outside the roadless area to the west.

  19. Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelato, Hugo Vicente

    1999-01-01

    We will begin our study with a more or less superficial inspection of the "forest" of stars that we see in the skies. The first thing we notice is that, as sources of light, they are much weaker than the Sun. Second, their apparent colors vary; from a bluish-white in most of them to a reddish-yellow, which is rarer. There is also a third aspect, though it is not very obvious to the naked eye: most of the stars group themselves in small families of two, three or more members. A good example is the Alpha Centauri, the closest star to us, which, in fact, is a triple system of stars. Another is the group of 7 stars that make up the Pleiades, which will be discussed later on. In fact, almost half of the stars are double systems with only two members, called binary stars. Most of these double stars, though together, are separated by several astronomical units (one astronomical unit, AU, is the distance from Earth to the sun: see Chapter 1), and revolve around each other over periods of several years. And yet the revolutions of some binary stars, separated by much smaller distances, occur in only a few hours! These stars are so close to each other that they can share enveloping material. Often this exchange occurs in a somewhat violent manner. Local explosions may occur, expelling matter away from the system. In other binary systems, where one of the components is a very compact, dense star, companion material flows more calmly, making up a light disk around the compact star.

  20. The 40-Foot Solar Eclipse Camera of the Lick Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John; Orchiston, W.

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of the Lick Observatory's direct solar eclipse photography program was to secure high-resolution images of coronal detail that was visible only during the brief moments of a total eclipse of the Sun. Obtaining a wide range of plate scales of the eclipsed Sun became a vital necessity in accomplishing this objective. Cameras and telescopes with unique pedigrees_some of which were originally intended for other astronomical and non-astronomical duties_were put to the test. The Lick Observatory sent seventeen eclipse expeditions worldwide beginning January 1889 and ending in 1932. Direct coronal photography was a significant part of the program and continued to the end of the expedition series. These expeditions occurred at a time when little was known about coronal content, motion within the corona or the forces that shaped the corona. Early successful attempts by E.E. Barnard, S.W. Burnham and J.M. Schaeberle to obtain coronal photographs with increasing image size and resolution set the stage for Schaeberle. He designed what would become the hallmark of the Observatory's expeditions, a camera of 5-inches aperture with a 40-foot focal length. It was this instrument which set the new standard for high-resolution eclipse imaging. By the end of the expeditions, new generation cameras originally intended for Vulcan searches and Einstein theory of relativity verification imaging replaced the 40-foot camera for coronal photography. This paper will present the cameras, their operators, views of the instruments at the various eclipse sites, a sample of the images produced and a summary of the Lick Observatory's most significant contributions to coronal science.

  1. Twenty Years of Precise Radial Velocities at Keck and Lick Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. T.

    2015-10-01

    The precise radial velocity survey at Keck Observatory began over 20 years ago. Its survey of thousands of stars now has the time baseline to be sensitive to planets with decade-long orbits, including Jupiter analogs. I present several newly-finished orbital solutions for long-period giant planets. Although hot Jupiters are generally ``lonely'' (i.e. they are not part of multiplanet systems), those that are not appear to often have giant companions at 5 AU or beyond. I present two of the highest period-ratios among planets in a two-planet system, and some of the longest orbital periods ever measured for exoplanets. In many cases, combining Keck radial velocities from those from other long-term surveys at Lick Observatory, McDonald Observatory, HARPS, and, of course, OHP spectrographs, produces superior orbital fits, constraining both period and eccentricity better than could be possible with any single set alone. Stellar magnetic activity cycles can masquerade as long-period planets. In most cases this effect is very small, but a loud minority of stars, including, apparently, HD 154345, show very strong RV-activity correlations.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The twenty-five year Lick planet search (Fischer+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, D. A.; Marcy, G. W.; Spronck, J. F. P.

    2014-01-01

    The Hamilton Spectrograph is a high-resolution optical echelle spectrometer that is located at the Coude focus of the 3m Shane telescope with a second light feed from the Coude Auxiliary Telescope (CAT), which is a siderostat-fed 0.6m telescope. The CAT enables use of the spectrometer when other instruments are being used on the 3m telescope. The free spectral range can include 3400-9000Å in a single observation. The instrument resolution varies from 50000-115000 depending primarily on the choice of decker (the width of the entrance slit). One of the most impactful changes to the Lick Planet Search project involved a series of upgrades of CCD detectors. The pixel size and charge transfer characteristics of the detector affect the spectral resolution and contribute to the spectral line spread function (SLSF; Spronck et al. 2013PASP..125..511S) so that CCD replacements can introduce velocity offsets that required zero-point corrections based on "standard" stars in the program (stars with low rms velocities). See section 3 for detailed explanations. (2 data files).

  3. Operant licking for intragastric sugar infusions: Differential reinforcing actions of glucose, sucrose and fructose in mice.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Ackroff, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Intragastric (IG) flavor conditioning studies in rodents indicate that isocaloric sugar infusions differ in their reinforcing actions, with glucose and sucrose more potent than fructose. Here we determined if the sugars also differ in their ability to maintain operant self-administration by licking an empty spout for IG infusions. Food-restricted C57BL/6J mice were trained 1 h/day to lick a food-baited spout, which triggered IG infusions of 16% sucrose. In testing, the mice licked an empty spout, which triggered IG infusions of different sugars. Mice shifted from sucrose to 16% glucose increased dry licking, whereas mice shifted to 16% fructose rapidly reduced licking to low levels. Other mice shifted from sucrose to IG water reduced licking more slowly but reached the same low levels. Thus IG fructose, like water, is not reinforcing to hungry mice. The more rapid decline in licking induced by fructose may be due to the sugar's satiating effects. Further tests revealed that the Glucose mice increased their dry licking when shifted from 16% to 8% glucose, and reduced their dry licking when shifted to 32% glucose. This may reflect caloric regulation and/or differences in satiation. The Glucose mice did not maintain caloric intake when tested with different sugars. They self-infused less sugar when shifted from 16% glucose to 16% sucrose, and even more so when shifted to 16% fructose. Reduced sucrose self-administration may occur because the fructose component of the disaccharide reduces its reinforcing potency. FVB mice also reduced operant licking when tested with 16% fructose, yet learned to prefer a flavor paired with IG fructose. These data indicate that sugars differ substantially in their ability to support IG self-administration and flavor preference learning. The same post-oral reinforcement process appears to mediate operant licking and flavor learning, although flavor learning provides a more sensitive measure of sugar reinforcement. PMID:26485294

  4. Parsing the hedonic and motivational influences of nociceptin on feeding using licking microstructure analysis in mice.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Ian A; Maidment, Nigel T; Murphy, Niall P

    2016-09-01

    Opioid peptides are implicated in processes related to reward and aversion; however, how specific opioid peptides are involved remains unclear. We investigated the role of nociceptin (NOC) in voluntary licking for palatable and aversive tastants by studying the effect of intracerebroventricularly administered NOC on licking microstructure in wild-type and NOC receptor knockout (NOP KO) mice. Compared with the wild-type mice, NOP KO mice emitted fewer bouts of licking when training to lick for a 20% sucrose solution. Correspondingly, intracerebroventricular administration of NOC increased the number of licking bouts for sucrose and sucralose in wild-type, but not in NOP KO mice. The ability of NOC to initiate new bouts of licking for sweet solutions suggests that NOC may drive motivational aspects of feeding behavior. Conversely, adulterating a sucrose solution with the aversive tastant quinine reduced licking bout lengths in wild-type and NOP KOs, suggesting that NOC signaling is not involved in driving voluntary consumption of semiaversive tastants. Interestingly, when consuming sucrose following 20 h of food deprivation, NOP KO mice emitted longer bouts of licking than wild types, suggesting that under hungry conditions, NOC may also contribute toward hedonic aspects of feeding. Together, these results suggest differential roles for NOC in the motivational and hedonic aspects of feeding. PMID:27100061

  5. Characteristics of natural salt licks located in the Colombian Amazon foothills.

    PubMed

    Molina, Eduardo; León, Tomás Enrique; Armenteras, Dolors

    2014-02-01

    Salt licks are key places for the ecological dynamics of wildlife communities around the world and are locations where animals develop geophagical behaviours. Geophagy is a method for animals to supplement their diets or facilitate their digestive processes and is related to the health of individuals and populations. This study characterises a series of salt licks located in the Colombian Amazon foothills and describes their structural, mineralogical and physicochemical properties, as well as the fauna that visit these locations. The results are analysed in reference to the geological characteristics of the study area and in relation to the role of the salt lick in the nutritional ecology of the Amazonian fauna. Located in the study area are two types of salt licks that are significantly different in composition. These salt licks are located in an area where young geological materials have been exposed. The characteristics of the salt licks supports the hypothesis that they are used to solve nutritional problems that result from herbivorous diets. The clear importance of salt licks in the ecology of several Amazonian animal species emphasises the need to prioritise conservation areas by maximising the complementarities of salt lick sites. PMID:23595632

  6. 75 FR 9530 - FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, French Lick, Indiana, and Irvington, Kentucky.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... 261A. See 73 FR 50296, published August 26, 2008. Although Station WFLQ(FM) argued that it should not... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, French Lick, Indiana, and Irvington, Kentucky. AGENCY... accommodate this new allotment, the staff modifies the license of Station WFLQ(FM), French Lick, Indiana,...

  7. A water lick conflict paradigm using drug experienced rats.

    PubMed

    Petersen, E N; Lassen, J B

    1981-01-01

    A modified water-lick conflict paradigm is described, using trained rats for up to 35 weekly test sessions under 48 h of water deprivation. The rats rapidly became maximally suppressed by the punishment. This suppression was attenuated by the anxiolytics lorazepam, diazepam, phenobarbital, and meprobamate. The potentially anxiolytic drug CL 218872 and the anticonvulsant drug valproate sodium were also active. The antiserotonin drugs methysergide, cyproheptadine, cinanserin and parachlorophenylalanine were all inactive, as were several several other distinct classes of psychotropic drugs including propranolol, clonidine, THIP, theophylline, chlorpromazine, paroxetine and ethanol. The paradigm proved reliable, reproducible and useful for large scale investigations. Furthermore, it may provide means for detailed neuropharmacological and anatomical studies. PMID:6119729

  8. Nutrition or Detoxification: Why Bats Visit Mineral Licks of the Amazonian Rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Christian C.; Capps, Krista A.; Dechmann, Dina K. N.; Michener, Robert H.; Kunz, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    Many animals in the tropics of Africa, Asia and South America regularly visit so-called salt or mineral licks to consume clay or drink clay-saturated water. Whether this behavior is used to supplement diets with locally limited nutrients or to buffer the effects of toxic secondary plant compounds remains unclear. In the Amazonian rainforest, pregnant and lactating bats are frequently observed and captured at mineral licks. We measured the nitrogen isotope ratio in wing tissue of omnivorous short-tailed fruit bats, Carollia perspicillata, and in an obligate fruit-eating bat, Artibeus obscurus, captured at mineral licks and at control sites in the rainforest. Carollia perspicillata with a plant-dominated diet were more often captured at mineral licks than individuals with an insect-dominated diet, although insects were more mineral depleted than fruits. In contrast, nitrogen isotope ratios of A. obscurus did not differ between individuals captured at mineral lick versus control sites. We conclude that pregnant and lactating fruit-eating bats do not visit mineral licks principally for minerals, but instead to buffer the effects of secondary plant compounds that they ingest in large quantities during periods of high energy demand. These findings have potential implications for the role of mineral licks for mammals in general, including humans. PMID:18431492

  9. Conditioned lick behavior and evoked responses using whisker twitches in head restrained rats.

    PubMed

    Topchiy, Irina A; Wood, Rachael M; Peterson, Breeanne; Navas, Jinna A; Rojas, Manuel J; Rector, David M

    2009-01-30

    To examine whisker barrel evoked response potentials in chronically implanted rats during behavioral learning with very fast response times, rats must be calm while immobilized with their head restrained. We quantified their behaviors during training with an ethogram and measured each individual animals' progress over the training period. Once calm under restraint, rats were conditioned to differentiate between a reward and control whisker twitch, then provide a lick response when presented with the correct stimulus, rewarded by a drop of water. Rats produced the correct licking response (after reward whisker twitch), and learned not to lick after a control whisker was twitched. By implementing a high-density 64-channel electrocorticogram (ECoG) electrode array, we mapped the barrel field of the somatosensory cortex with high spatial and temporal resolution during conditioned lick behaviors. In agreement with previous reports, we observe a larger evoked response after training, probably related to mechanisms of cortical plasticity. PMID:18718491

  10. Influence of AVOTAN (avoparcin) containing salt licks on the daily weight gain of bulls.

    PubMed

    Flachowsky, G; Richter, G; Hickisch, F

    1991-01-01

    3 group feeding experiments were carried out with the glycopeptide antibiotic avoparcin. Avoparcin was added to salt licks (2.5 g per kg lick stone) and offered to 30 (experiment I), 80 (experiment II), or 20 (experiment III) growing cattle ad libitum over 210, 122, or 281 days. Control animals consumed unsupplemented lick stones. The avoparcin intake amounted to 60 (experiment I), 145 (experiment II), and 100 mg (experiment III) per cattle per day. The daily weight gain increased from 750 to 808 (experiment I), 553 to 649 (experiment II), and from 812 to 822 g per animal per day (experiment III) when avoparcin was added. Avoparcin is a safe feed additive and should be supplemented to various lick stones to improve ruminant performances under tropical rangeland conditions. 15 to 30 mg avoparcin per kg dry matter intake are recommended. PMID:1812838

  11. Photometric light curves for ten rapidly rotating stars in Alpha Persei, the Pleiades, and the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.; Schild, Rudolph E.; Stauffer, John R.; Jones, Burton F.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results from a photometric monitoring program of ten rapidly rotating stars observed during 1991 using the FLWO 48-in. telescope. Brightness variations for an additional six cluster stars observed with the Lick 40-in. telescope are also given. The periods and light curves for seven Alpha Persei members, two Pleiades members, and one naked T Tauri field star are reported.

  12. EPS Prize Lecture. Licking and liking: the assessment of hedonic responses in rodents.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Dominic M

    2012-01-01

    Affective processes are a key determinant of behaviour: At its simplest, liked stimuli are approached while disliked stimuli are avoided. Although assessing hedonic responses in nonverbal animals can be difficult, one relatively tractable approach relies on detailed analyses of rodents' consummatory behaviour. Rodents typically produce rhythmic sets of licks that can be grouped into clusters on the basis of the intervals between licks. The mean number of licks in a cluster (cluster size) is directly related to the concentration of palatable and unpalatable solutions. These relationships suggest that lick cluster size might be a useful index of an animal's hedonic reaction to the solution being consumed. I begin by reviewing studies of conditioned flavour preference and aversion that support the idea that lick cluster size can provide useful information about rats' hedonic reactions. I then describe how this methodology has been used to address previously intractable issues in the investigation of contrast effects as well as revealing an analogue of effort justification effects that, in humans, are commonly explained in terms of cognitive dissonance reduction. Finally, I consider how lick analysis might provide information about hedonic responses in animal models of human psychiatric disorders. In all these cases, how an animal did something was particularly informative about why it was doing it. PMID:22404646

  13. IV nicotine self-administration in rats using the consummatory operant licking response.

    PubMed

    Levin, Edward D; Hampton, Dawn; Rose, Jed E

    2010-12-01

    Nicotine self-administered by tobacco smoking or chewing is very addictive in humans. Rat models have been developed in which nicotine is self-administered IV by the rats pressing a lever. However the reinforcing value of nicotine is much less in these models than the addictiveness of human tobacco use would indicate. The IV nicotine self-administration operant lever press model does not fully capture important aspects of tobacco use in humans. Conditioned oral consumption actions of smoking or chewing tobacco may play important roles in tobacco addiction. Neural circuitry underlying essential food consummatory responses may facilitate consummatory aspects of tobacco intake. To capture this motor consummatory aspect of tobacco addiction in the rat model of nicotine self-administration, we have developed a method of using a licking response instead of a lever press to self-administer IV nicotine. Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to lick one of two waterspouts for IV nicotine (0.03mg/kg/infusion). With the licking response rats self-administered stable nicotine levels throughout 24 sessions (45min each) of testing. The number of total licks/session significantly increased in a linear fashion over that period. The number of licks/infusion was substantial, rising steadily with training to an average of over 100 licks/infusion. Including the consummatory motor act with nicotine self-administration could help better model the compulsive aspects of tobacco addiction in humans. PMID:20804779

  14. Head Rubbing and Licking Reinforce Social Bonds in a Group of Captive African Lions, Panthera leo

    PubMed Central

    Matoba, Tomoyuki; Kutsukake, Nobuyuki; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Many social animals have a species-specific repertoire of affiliative behaviours that characterise individualised relationships within a group. To date, however, quantitative studies on intragroup affiliative behaviours in social carnivores have been limited. Here, we investigated the social functions of the two most commonly observed affiliative behaviours in captive African lions (Panthera leo): head rubbing and licking. We conducted behavioural observations on a captive group of lions composed of 7 males and 14 females, and tested hypotheses regarding three social functions: tension reduction, social bonding, and social status expression. Disproportionately frequent male–male and female-to-male head rubbing was observed, while more than 95% of all licking interactions occurred in female–female dyads. In accordance with the social bond hypothesis, and in disagreement with the social status expression hypothesis, both head rubbing and licking interactions were reciprocal. After controlling for spatial association, the dyadic frequency of head rubbing was negatively correlated with age difference while licking was positively correlated with relatedness. Group reunion after daily separation did not affect the frequencies of the affiliative behaviours, which was in disagreement with the predictions from the tension reduction hypothesis. These results support the social bond hypothesis for the functions of head rubbing and licking. Different patterns of affiliative behaviour between the sexes may reflect differences in the relationship quality in each sex or the differential predisposition to licking due to its original function in offspring care. PMID:24023806

  15. Constraints on Type IIn supernova progenitor outbursts from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilinski, Christopher; Smith, Nathan; Li, Weidong; Williams, G. Grant; Zheng, WeiKang; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2015-06-01

    We searched through roughly 12 years of archival survey data acquired by the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) as part of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search in order to detect or place limits on possible progenitor outbursts of Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn). The KAIT data base contains multiple pre-SN images for five SNe IIn (plus one ambiguous case of an SN IIn/imposter) within 50 Mpc. No progenitor outbursts are found using the false discovery rate statistical method in any of our targets. Instead, we derive limiting magnitudes (LMs) at the locations of the SNe. These LMs (typically reaching mR ≈ 19.5 mag) are compared to outbursts of SN 2009ip and η Car, plus additional simulated outbursts. We find that the data for SN 1999el and SN 2003dv are of sufficient quality to rule out events ˜40 d before the main peak caused by initially faint SNe from blue supergiant precursor stars, as in the cases of SN 2009ip and SN 2010mc. These SNe IIn may thus have arisen from red supergiant progenitors, or they may have had a more rapid onset of circumstellar matter interaction. We also estimate the probability of detecting at least one outburst in our data set to be ≳60% for each type of the example outbursts, so the lack of any detections suggests that such outbursts are either typically less luminous (intrinsically or owing to dust) than ˜-13 mag, or not very common among SNe IIn within a few years prior to explosion.

  16. Keepers of the double stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2013-03-01

    Astronomers have long tracked double stars in efforts to find those that are gravitationally-bound binaries and then to determine their orbits. Early catalogues by the Herschels, Struves, and others began with their own discoveries. In 1906 court reporter and amateur astronomer Sherburne Wesley Burnham published a massive double star catalogue containing data from many observers on more than 13,000 systems. Lick Observatory astronomer Robert Grant Aitken produced a much larger catalogue in 1932 and coordinated with Robert Innes of Johannesburg, who catalogued the southern systems. Aitken maintained and expanded Burnham's records of observations on handwritten file cards, and eventually turned them over to the Lick Observatory, where astrometrist Hamilton Jeffers further expanded the collection and put all the observations on punched cards. With the aid of Frances M. "Rete" Greeby he made two catalogues: an Index Catalogue with basic data about each star, and a complete catalogue of observations, with one observation per punched card. He enlisted Willem van den Bos of Johannesburg to add southern stars, and together they published the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0. As Jeffers approached retirement he became greatly concerned about the disposition of the catalogues. He wanted to be replaced by another "double star man," but Lick Director Albert E. Whitford had the new 120-inch reflector, the world's second largest telescope, and he wanted to pursue modern astrophysics instead. Jeffers was vociferously opposed to turning over the card files to another institution, and especially against their coming under the control of Kaj Strand of the United States Naval Observatory. In the end the USNO got the files and has maintained the records ever since, first under Charles Worley, and, since 1997, under Brian Mason. Now called the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS), it is completely online and currently contains more than 1,200,000 measures of more than 125

  17. Localization of the central rhythm generator involved in spontaneous consummatory licking in rats: functional ablation and electrical brain stimulation studies.

    PubMed Central

    Brozek, G; Zhuravin, I A; Megirian, D; Bures, J

    1996-01-01

    Localization of the central rhythm generator (CRG) of spontaneous consummatory licking was studied in freely moving rats by microinjection of tetrodotoxin (TTX) into the pontine reticular formation. Maximum suppression of spontaneous water consumption was elicited by TTX (1 ng) blockade of the oral part of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRG), whereas TTX injections into more caudal or rostral locations caused significantly weaker disruption of drinking. To verify the assumption that TTX blocked the proper CRG of licking rather than some relay in its output, spontaneously drinking thirsty rats were intracranially stimulated via electrodes chronically implanted into the oral part of the NRG. Lick-synchronized stimulation (a 100-ms train of 0.1-ms-wide rectangular pulses at 100 Hz and 25-150 microA) applied during continuous licking (after eight regular consecutive licks) caused a phase shift of licks emitted after stimulus delivery. The results suggest that the stimulation has reset the CRG of licking without changing its frequency. The reset-inducing threshold current was lowest during the tongue retraction and highest during the tongue protrusion period of the lick cycle. It is concluded that the CRG of licking is located in the oral part of NRG. PMID:8622936

  18. A USB 2.0 computer interface for the UCO/Lick CCD cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Mingzhi; Stover, Richard J.

    2004-09-01

    The new UCO/Lick Observatory CCD camera uses a 200 MHz fiber optic cable to transmit image data and an RS232 serial line for low speed bidirectional command and control. Increasingly RS232 is a legacy interface supported on fewer computers. The fiber optic cable requires either a custom interface board that is plugged into the mainboard of the image acquisition computer to accept the fiber directly or an interface converter that translates the fiber data onto a widely used standard interface. We present here a simple USB 2.0 interface for the UCO/Lick camera. A single USB cable connects to the image acquisition computer and the camera's RS232 serial and fiber optic cables plug into the USB interface. Since most computers now support USB 2.0 the Lick interface makes it possible to use the camera on essentially any modern computer that has the supporting software. No hardware modifications or additions to the computer are needed. The necessary device driver software has been written for the Linux operating system which is now widely used at Lick Observatory. The complete data acquisition software for the Lick CCD camera is running on a variety of PC style computers as well as an HP laptop.

  19. Development of a flood-warning system and flood-inundation mapping in Licking County, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostheimer, Chad J.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for selected reaches of South Fork Licking River, Raccoon Creek, North Fork Licking River, and the Licking River in Licking County, Ohio, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Ohio Department of Transportation; U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration; Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District; U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service; and the City of Newark and Village of Granville, Ohio. The inundation maps depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to water levels (stages) at the following USGS streamgages: South Fork Licking River at Heath, Ohio (03145173); Raccoon Creek below Wilson Street at Newark, Ohio (03145534); North Fork Licking River at East Main Street at Newark, Ohio (03146402); and Licking River near Newark, Ohio (03146500). The maps were provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into a Web-based flood-warning system that can be used in conjunction with NWS flood-forecast data to show areas of predicted flood inundation associated with forecasted flood-peak stages. As part of the flood-warning streamflow network, the USGS re-installed one streamgage on North Fork Licking River, and added three new streamgages, one each on North Fork Licking River, South Fork Licking River, and Raccoon Creek. Additionally, the USGS upgraded a lake-level gage on Buckeye Lake. Data from the streamgages and lake-level gage can be used by emergency-management personnel, in conjunction with the flood-inundation maps, to help determine a course of action when flooding is imminent. Flood profiles for selected reaches were prepared by calibrating steady-state step-backwater models to selected, established streamgage rating curves. The step-backwater models then were used to determine water-surface-elevation profiles for up to 10 flood stages at a streamgage with corresponding streamflows ranging from approximately

  20. The medial prefrontal cortex is crucial for the maintenance of persistent licking and the expression of incentive contrast

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Marc A.; Amarante, Linda M.; Liu, Benjamine; Weikum, Damian; Laubach, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We examined the role of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in reward processing and the control of consummatory behavior. Rats were trained in an operant licking procedure in which they received alternating access to solutions with relatively high and low levels of sucrose (20 and 4%, w/v). Each level of sucrose was available for fixed intervals of 30 s over 30 min test sessions. Over several days of training, rats came to lick persistently when the high level of sucrose was available and suppressed licking when the low level of sucrose was available. Pharmacological inactivations of the mPFC, specifically the rostral part of the prelimbic area, greatly reduced intake of the higher value fluid and only slightly increased intake of the lower value fluid. In addition, the inactivations altered within-session patterns and microstructural measures of licking. Rats licked equally for the high and low levels of sucrose at the beginning of the test sessions and “relearned” to reduce intake of the low value fluid over the test sessions. Durations of licking bouts (clusters of licks with inter-lick intervals <0.5 s) were reduced for the high value fluid and there were many more brief licking bouts (<1 s) when the low value fluid was available. These effects were verified using an alternative approach (optogenetic silencing using archaerhodopsin) and were distinct from inactivation of the ventral striatum, which simply increased overall intake. Our findings suggest that the mPFC is crucial for the maintenance of persistent licking and the expression of learned feeding strategies. PMID:25870544

  1. Paleontologic investigations at Big Bone Lick State Park, Kentucky: A preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, C.B.; Tanner, L.G.; Whitmore, F.C., Jr.; Ray, L.L.; Crawford, E.C.

    1963-01-01

    The Big Bone Lick area in Kentucky, the first widely known collecting locality for vertebrate fossils in North America, is being investigated for further faunal and geologic evidence. Mammal bones, ranging in age from Wisconsin (Tazewell?) to Recent, were recovered in 1962 from four different faunal zones in two terrace fills.

  2. The Eclipse Expeditions of the Lick Observatory and the Beginnings of Astrophysics in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malville, J. McKim; Pearson, John

    2012-09-01

    During the years 1898 to 1932, Lick Observatory organized a remarkable series of 17 solar eclipse expeditions, all the more remarkable because Lick astronomers evidenced no enduring interest in solar physics. The science of these expeditions involved three issues of major significance during the development of astrophysics during the first three decades of the twentieth century: (1) testing of General Relativity; (2) non-LTE in extended atmospheres and gaseous nebulae; (3) role of magnetic fields in the sun. The expeditions made major contributions to the first two topics. Even though W.W. Campbell, the director of Lick, had extensive contact with George Ellery Hale, who had measured the magnetic fields of sunspots at Mt. Wilson, Lick astronomers missed the clues concerning the importance of magnetic fields in the corona. Campbell's measurement of the deflection of starlight at the eclipse of 1922 was his major achievement of the many eclipse expeditions. He had approached that test of General Relativity with considerable distrust of Einstein's theory and considered Eddington's 1919 results to be suspect. It is to Campbell's great credit that the results published jointly with Trumpler confirmed the predictions of Einstein with higher precision than Eddington had achieved. Donald Menzel joined the staff of Lick Observatory in 1926 as their first astrophysicist. Osterbrock describes him as a ``stranger in a strange land.'' He was given the analysis of the eclipse flash spectra. This work, published in 1931, represents the beginning of the astrophysical study of chromospheres and laid the foundation for the quantitative analysis of extended atmospheres and gaseous nebula.

  3. Licking for taste solutions by potassium-deprived rats: Specificity and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Guenthner, C.J.; McCaughey, S.A.; Tordoff, M.G.; Baird, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    There has been little work on the specificity and mechanisms underlying the appetite of potassium (K+) deprived rats, and there are conflicting results. To investigate the contribution of oral factors to changes in intake induced by K+ deficiency, we conducted two experiments using 20-s “brief access” tests. In Experiment 1, K+-deprived rats licked less for water than did replete rats. After adjusting for this difference, K+-deprived rats exhibited increased licking for 100 mM CaCl2, 100 mM MgCl2, and 100 mM FeCl2 compared with K+-replete rats. In Experiment 2, which used larger rats, the K+-deprived and replete groups licked equally for water, 500 mM Na·Gluconate, 350 mM KCl, 500 mM KHCO3, and 1 mM quinine·HCl, but the K+-deprived rats licked more for 500 mM KCl, 500 mM CsCl, and 500 mM NaCl than did the replete rats. Licking was unaffected by addition to NaCl of 200 μM amiloride, an epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) blocker, or 100 μM ruthenium red, a vanilloid receptor 1 (VR-1) antagonist, or by addition to KCl of 50 μM 4-aminopyridine, a K+ channel blocker. These findings suggest that K+-deprivation produces a non-specific appetite that is guided by oral factors. We found no evidence that this response was mediated by ENaC, VR-1, or K+ channels in taste receptor cells. PMID:18255104

  4. ShaneAO: an enhanced adaptive optics and IR imaging system for the Lick Observatory 3-meter telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupke, Renate; Gavel, Donald; Roskosi, Constance; Cabak, Gerald; Cowley, David; Dillon, Daren; Gates, Elinor L.; McGurk, Rosalie; Norton, Andrew; Peck, Michael; Ratliff, Christopher; Reinig, Marco

    2012-07-01

    The Lick Observatory 3-meter telescope has a history of serving as a testbed for innovative adaptive optics techniques. In 1996, it became one of the first astronomical observatories to employ laser guide star (LGS) adaptive optics as a facility instrument available to the astronomy community. Work on a second-generation LGS adaptive optics system, ShaneAO, is well underway, with plans to deploy on telescope in 2013. In this paper we discuss key design features and implementation plans for the ShaneAO adaptive optics system. Once again, the Shane 3-m will host a number of new techniques and technologies vital to the development of future adaptive optics systems on larger telescopes. Included is a woofer-tweeter based wavefront correction system incorporating a voice-coil actuated, low spatial and temporal bandwidth, high stroke deformable mirror in conjunction with a high order, high bandwidth MEMs deformable mirror. The existing dye laser, in operation since 1996, will be replaced with a fiber laser recently developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. The system will also incorporate a high-sensitivity, high bandwidth wavefront sensor camera. Enhanced IR performance will be achieved by replacing the existing PICNIC infrared array with an Hawaii 2RG. The updated ShaneAO system will provide opportunities to test predictive control algorithms for adaptive optics. Capabilities for astronomical spectroscopy, polarimetry, and visible-light adaptive optical astronomy will be supported.

  5. An Infrared Method for Discovering AGN: Lick Spectroscopy of New Seyfert I’s in the Kepler Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsan, Tran; Edelson, Rick; Smith, Krista Lynne; Malkan, Matthew Arnold

    2016-06-01

    Spectra of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) candidates in the Kepler fields were observed at Lick Observatory. We used the Shane 3.0-meter telescope with the Kast double spectrograph, covering from 0.35-0.8 μm. Using IRAF, we extracted 1D spectra from the original 2D long-slit images of the candidates. Our main goals are to determine the redshift of the candidates and identify any new AGN. The wavelength and flux calibration are fairly accurate, and most spectra have a good signal-to-noise ratio. Twenty- seven nights of data (consisting of 106 candidates) have been analyzed. For 89% of them, we have determined the redshifts to a precision of δz = 0.0005 in most cases. The rest give inconclusive results. 19 of the candidates turn out to be galactic stars. The most commonly identified emission lines are Hα+[NII], the [OIII] doublet, and Hβ. 44 of the candidates show a Broad Line Region, meaning that their wide permitted lines classify them as either Seyfert I’s or quasars. 6 of these have redshifts above 0.5, indicating that they are highly luminous quasars. One candidate appears to be a bl-lac object. We are now analyzing the Kepler light curves of these Seyfert galaxies.

  6. APF—The Lick Observatory Automated Planet Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Steven S.; Radovan, Matthew; Kibrick, Robert; Butler, R. Paul; Alcott, Barry; Allen, Steve; Arriagada, Pamela; Bolte, Mike; Burt, Jennifer; Cabak, Jerry; Chloros, Kostas; Cowley, David; Deich, William; Dupraw, Brian; Earthman, Wayne; Epps, Harland; Faber, Sandra; Fischer, Debra; Gates, Elinor; Hilyard, David; Holden, Brad; Johnston, Ken; Keiser, Sandy; Kanto, Dick; Katsuki, Myra; Laiterman, Lee; Lanclos, Kyle; Laughlin, Greg; Lewis, Jeff; Lockwood, Chris; Lynam, Paul; Marcy, Geoffrey; McLean, Maureen; Miller, Joe; Misch, Tony; Peck, Michael; Pfister, Terry; Phillips, Andrew; Rivera, Eugenio; Sandford, Dale; Saylor, Mike; Stover, Richard; Thompson, Matthew; Walp, Bernie; Ward, James; Wareham, John; Wei, Mingzhi; Wright, Chris

    2014-04-01

    The Automated Planet Finder (APF) is a facility purpose-built for the discovery and characterization of extrasolar planets through high-cadence Doppler velocimetry of the reflex barycentric accelerations of their host stars. Located atop Mount Hamilton, the APF facility consists of a 2.4 m telescope and its Levy spectrometer, an optical echelle spectrometer optimized for precision Doppler velocimetry. APF features a fixed-format spectral range from 374-970 nm, and delivers a "throughput" (resolution × slit width product) of 114,000'', with spectral resolutions up to 150,000. Overall system efficiency (fraction of photons incident on the primary mirror that are detected by the science CCD) on blaze at 560 nm in planet-hunting mode is 15%. First-light tests on the radial-velocity (RV) standard stars HD 185144 and HD 9407 demonstrate sub-meter-per-second precision (rms per observation) held over a 3 month period. This paper reviews the basic features of the telescope, dome, and spectrometer, and gives a brief summary of first-light performance.

  7. The Michigan Binary Star Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Rudi P.

    2007-07-01

    At the end of the nineteenth century, William J. Hussey and Robert G. Aitken, both at Lick Observatory, began a systematic search for unrecorded binary stars with the aid of the 12" and 36" refracting telescopes at Lick Observatory. Aitken's work (and book on binary stars) are well known, Hussey's contributions less so. In 1905 Hussey, a Michigan engineering graduate, returned to direct the Ann Arbor astronomy program, and immediately he began to design new instrumentation for the study of binary stars and to train potential observers. For a time, he spent six months a year at the La Plata Observatory, where he discovered a number of new pairs and decided upon a major southern hemisphere campaign. He spent a decade obtaining the lenses for a large refractor, through the vicissitudes of war and depression. Finally, he obtained a site in South Africa, a 26" refractor, and a small corps of observers, but he died in London en route to fulfill his dream. His right hand man, Richard Rossiter, established the observatory and spent the next thirty years discovering and measuring binary stars: his personal total is a record for the field. This talk is an account of the methods, results, and utility of the extraordinary binary star factory in the veldt.

  8. Ground-based detectability of terrestrial and Jovian extrasolar planets: observations of CM Draconis at Lick Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, L. R.; Dunham, E. T.; Deeg, H. J.; Blue, J. E.; Jenkins, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    The detection of terrestrial-sized extrasolar planets from the ground has been thought to be virtually impossible due to atmospheric scintillation limits. However, we show that this is not the case especially selected (but nevertheless main sequence) stars, namely small eclipsing binaries. For the smallest of these systems, CM Draconis, several months to a few years of photometric observations with 1-m-class telescopes will be sufficient to detect the transits of any short-period planets of sizes > or = 1.5 Earth radii (RE), using cross-correlation analysis with moderately good photometry. Somewhat larger telescopes will be needed to extend this detectability to terrestrial planets in larger eclipsing binary systems. (We arbitrarily define "terrestrial planets" herein as those whose disc areas are closer to that of Earth's than Neptune's i.e., less than about 2.78 RE.) As a "spin-off" of such observations, we will also be able to detect the presence of Jovian-mass planets without transits using the timing of the eclipse minima. Eclipse minima will drift in time as the binary system is offset by a sufficiently massive planet (i.e., one Jupiter mass) about the binary/giant-planet barycenter, causing a periodic variation in the light travel time to the observer. We present here an outline of present observations taking place at the University of California Lick Observatory using the Crossley 0.9-m telescope in collaboration with other observatories (in South Korea, Crete, France, Canary Islands, and New York) to detect or constrain the existence of terrestrial planets around main sequence eclipsing binary star systems, starting with CM Draconis. We demonstrate the applicability of photometric data to the general detection of gas giant planets via eclipse minima timings in many other small-mass eclipsing binary systems as well.

  9. Division G Commission 42: Close Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Mercedes T.; Pribulla, Theodor; Ribas, Ignasi; Bradstreet, David H.; Dreschsel, Horst; Maceroni, Carla; Mikolajewska, Joanna; Munari, Ulisse; Prsa, Andrej; Scharfe, Colin; Southworth, John; Trimble, Virginia

    2016-04-01

    Commission 42 began life as Photometric Double Stars in 1948 at the 7th General Assembly in Zurich, under the presidency of Zdenek Kopal. As early as 1961, then General Secretary Lukas Plaut recommended a merger between C42 and C26, Double Stars, one of the original 32 commissions going back to 1919-22 (first president Aitken, assistant director at Lick). C42 became Close Binary Stars in 1970, at the 14th GA in Brighton (the first one I attended). Table 1 shows the presidents of C42, and vice presidents, from when the office started, through the history of the Commission.

  10. Be Stars in the Open Cluster NGC 6830

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Po-Chieh; Lin, Chien-Cheng; Lin, Hsing-Wen; Lee, Chien-De; Konidaris, Nick; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Ip, Wing-Huen; Chen, Wen-Ping; Chen, Hui-Chen; Malkan, Matthew A.; Chang, Chan-Kao; Laher, Russ; Huang, Li-Ching; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Edelson, Rick; Ritter, Andreas; Quimby, Robert; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Ofek, Eran. O.; Surace, Jason; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of two new Be stars, and re-identify one known Be star in the open cluster NGC 6830. Eleven Hα emitters were discovered using the Hα imaging photometry of the Palomar Transient Factory Survey. Stellar membership of the candidates was verified with photometric and kinematic information using 2MASS data and proper motions. The spectroscopic confirmation was carried out by using the Shane 3 m telescope at the Lick observatory. Based on their spectral types, three Hα emitters were confirmed as Be stars with Hα equivalent widths greater than ‑10 Å. Two objects were also observed by the new spectrograph spectral energy distribution-machine (SED-machine) on the Palomar 60-inch Telescope. The SED-machine results show strong Hα emission lines, which are consistent with the results of the Lick observations. The high efficiency of the SED-machine can provide rapid observations for Be stars in a comprehensive survey in the future.

  11. Hamilton Jeffers and the Double Star Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Astronomers have long tracked double stars in efforts to find those that are gravitationally-bound binaries and then to determine their orbits. Court reporter and amateur astronomer Shelburne Wesley Burnham (1838-1921) published a massive double star catalogue containing more than 13,000 systems in 1906. The next keeper of the double stars was Lick Observatory astronomer Robert Grant Aitken (1864-1951), who produced a much larger catalogue in 1932. Aitken maintained and expanded Burnham’s records of observations on handwritten file cards, eventually turning them over to Lick Observatory astrometrist Hamilton Moore Jeffers (1893-1976). Jeffers further expanded the collection and put all the observations on punched cards. With the aid of Frances M. "Rete" Greeby (1921-2002), he made two catalogues: an Index Catalogue with basic data about each star, and a complete catalogue of observations, with one observation per punched card. He enlisted Willem van den Bos of Johannesburg to add southern stars, and they published the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0. As Jeffers approached retirement he became greatly concerned about the disposition of the catalogues. He wanted to be replaced by another "double star man," but Lick Director Albert E. Whitford (1905-2002) had the new 120-inch reflector, the world’s second largest telescope, and he wanted to pursue modern astrophysics instead. Jeffers was vociferously opposed to turning over the card files to another institution, and especially against their coming under the control of Kaj Strand of the U.S. Naval Observatory. In the end the USNO got the files and has maintained the records ever since, first under Charles Worley (1935-1997), and, since 1997, under Brian Mason. Now called the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS), it is completely online and currently contains more than 1,000,000 measures of more than 100,000 pairs.

  12. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for Little Lick and Big Lick Creeks, Blackford and Delaware counties, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, James G.; Crawford, Charles G.; Wilber, William G.

    1980-01-01

    A digital computer model was used to predict alternatives for future waste loadings on Little Lick and Big Lick Creeks, Blackford and Delaware Counties, IN, that would be compatible with Indiana stream water-quality standards defined for two critical hydrologic conditions, summer and winter low flows. The model parameters included atmospheric reaeration, carbonaceous and nitrogenous biochemical-oxygen demand, and benthic-oxygen demand. The model was calibrated with data collected during three water-quality surveys at low flow. During these surveys, in-stream dissolved-oxygen concentrations averaged less than 3 mg/L, well below the State minimum requirement of 5.0 mg/L. The model indicated that these low concentrations were caused by high waste loadings, lack of dilution, low reaeration, and benthic-oxygen demand. The summer waste-assimilation study assumed that future reductions in discharge loadings would decrease carbonaceous and benthic decay and increase nitrogenous decay. This study indicated that projected effluent waste loads that would provide acceptable in-stream dissolved-oxygen concentrations are highly dependent on rates of nitrification. Ammonia toxicity became the limiting water-quality criterion at low nitrification rates. The winter waste-assimilation study indicated that projected dissolved-oxygen concentrations in Little Lick and Big Lick Creeks did not fall below the State standard. Owing to a lack of dilution, however, ammonia-nitrogen concentrations would violate in-stream toxicity standards in both Little Lick and Big Lick Creeks.

  13. Synthesis of Lick Spectral Indices With Overshooting and No-Overshooting Model Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulati, R. K.; Chavez, M.

    1999-01-01

    Lick indices have been widely used for interpretation of stellar content in the Local Group of galaxies. The behavior of the empirical spectral indices with basic atmospheric parameters, which is used as an input for modeling stellar populations, hampers the study of stellar populations in elliptical galaxies due to its limitation parameter space. We have been investigating the potential of theoretical spectral indices based on atmospheric models in order to complement with the empirical indices. In our earlier works we have (Gulati et al., 1993, ApJ, 413, 166; Chavez, et al., 1996, ApJ 471, 726) looked into two generation of the Kurucz's model atmospheres for consistency with empirical indices. New generation of Kurucz's models, which take into account the convection with mixing length theory with and without approximate overshooting, and model colors based on the latter criterion seem to reproduce more observations. In this paper we investigate the role of convection on the Lick indices and present preliminary results.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Lick indices of EDCSN galaxies (Sanchez-Blazquez+, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Blazquez, P.; Jablonka, P.; Noll, S.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moustakas, J.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Halliday, C.; Aragon-Salamanca, A.; Saglia, R. P.; Desai, V.; de, G. Lucia; Clowe, D. I.; Pello, R.; Rudnick, G.; Simard, L.; White, S. D. M.; Zaritsky, D.

    2009-05-01

    We present a table with the 11 Lick/IDS spectroscopic indices and the velocity dispersions for a sample of galaxies in the RED-sequence of 24 clusters extracted from EDisCS. The table include only galaxies with no-or-weak (EW[OII]3727<7{AA}) emission lines, with a minimum signal-to-noise per Angstroem of 10 and with velocity dispersions larger than 100km/s. (1 data file).

  15. Greater Superficial Petrosal Nerve Transection in Rats does not Change Unconditioned Licking Responses to Putatively Sweet Taste Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Enshe; Blonde, Ginger; Garcea, Mircea

    2008-01-01

    The greater superficial petrosal nerve (GSP), innervating taste buds in the palate, is known to be exceptionally responsive to sucrose, especially compared with the responsiveness of the chorda tympani nerve (CT). However, whereas transection of the CT (CTX) alone has little or no effect on unconditioned licking responses to many “sweet” stimuli, the impact of GSP transection (GSPX) alone is equivocal. To further examine the role of the GSP on licking responses to putatively sweet-tasting substances, brief-access taste tests were conducted in nondeprived rats before and after sham surgery (SHAM) or CTX or GSPX. A range of concentrations of sucrose, L-alanine, glycine, and L-serine, with and without 1.0 mM inosine monophosphate (IMP) added, were used. All groups showed significant concentration-dependent increases in licking to all stimuli presurgically and postsurgically. CTX decreased licking responses relative to SHAM rats in the first sucrose test. There was also a group × concentration interaction for L-alanine, but post hoc tests did not reveal its basis. Other than this, there were no significant differences among the surgical groups. Interestingly, rats with GSPX tended to initiate fewer trials than SHAM rats. Overall, after GSPX, the remaining gustatory nerves are apparently sufficient to maintain concentration-dependent licking responses to all stimuli tested here. The disparity between our results and others in the literature where GSPX reduced licking responses to sucrose is possibly related to differences in surgical technique or test trial duration. PMID:18635557

  16. Laser guide star measurements at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.; Avicola, K.; Bissinger, H.; Brase, J.; Duff, J.; Gavel, D.; Horton, J.; Max, C.; Olivier, S.; Rapp, D.; Salmon, T.; Smauley, D.; Waltjen, K.

    1993-02-01

    Recent studies from the Laser Guide Star Project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are presented. Photometry of the return signal has shown that the photon return is approximately 10 photons/cm{sup 2}ms at the pupil of the receiving telescope in agreement with a detailed model of the sodium interaction. Wavefronts of the laser guide star have also been measured with a Shack-Hartmann technique and power spectra have been shown to agree with those of nearby natural stars. Plans for closed loop demonstrations using the laser guide star at LLNL and nearby Lick Observatory are discussed.

  17. Blue stragglers in star clusters and the conventional SSP models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Licai; Kroupa, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    The presence of blue straggler stars (BSs) as secure members of star clusters poses a major challenge to the conventional picture of simple stellar population (SSP) models. The models are based on the stellar evolution theory of single stars, while the major formation mechanisms of BSs are all correlated with stellar interactions. Based on a sufficient working sample including 100 Galactic open clusters, one Galactic globular cluster, and seven Magellanic Cloud star clusters, we discuss the modifications of the properties of broad-band colors and Lick indices of the standard SSP models due to BS populations.

  18. Identifying Young, Nearby Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Rich; Song, Inseok; Zuckerman, Ben; Bessell, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Young stars have certain characteristics, e.g., high atmospheric abundance of lithium and chromospheric activity, fast rotation, distinctive space motion and strong X-ray flux compared to that of older main sequence stars. We have selected a list of candidate young (<100Myr) and nearby (<60pc) stars based on their space motion and/or strong X-ray flux. To determine space motion of a star, one needs to know its coordinates (RA, DEC), proper motion, distance, and radial velocity. The Hipparcos and Tycho catalogues provide all this information except radial velocities. We anticipate eventually searching approx. 1000 nearby stars for signs of extreme youth. Future studies of the young stars so identified will help clarify the formation of planetary systems for times between 10 and 100 million years. Certainly, the final output of this study will be a very useful resource, especially for adaptive optics and space based searches for Jupiter-mass planets and dusty proto-planetary disks. We have begun spectroscopic observations in January, 2001 with the 2.3 m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) in New South Wales, Australia. These spectra will be used to determine radial velocities and other youth indicators such as Li 6708A absorption strength and Hydrogen Balmer line intensity. Additional observations of southern hemisphere stars from SSO are scheduled in April and northern hemisphere observations will take place in May and July at the Lick Observatory of the University of California. AT SSO, to date, we have observed about 100 stars with a high resolution spectrometer (echelle) and about 50 stars with a medium spectral resolution spectrometer (the "DBS"). About 20% of these stars turn out to be young stars. Among these, two especially noteworthy stars appear to be the closest T-Tauri stars ever identified. Interestingly, these stars share the same space motions as that of a very famous star with a dusty circumstellar disk--beta Pictoris. This new finding better

  19. Mineral licks: motivational factors for visitation and accompanying disease risk at communal use sites of elk and deer.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Michael J; Phillips, Gregory E; Fischer, Justin W; Burke, Patrick W; Seward, Nathan W; Stahl, Randal S; Nichols, Tracy A; Wunder, Bruce A; VerCauteren, Kurt C

    2014-12-01

    Free-ranging cervids acquire most of their essential minerals through forage consumption, though occasionally seek other sources to account for seasonal mineral deficiencies. Mineral sources occur as natural geological deposits (i.e., licks) or as anthropogenic mineral supplements. In both scenarios, these sources commonly serve as focal sites for visitation. We monitored 11 licks in Rocky Mountain National Park, north-central Colorado, using trail cameras to quantify daily visitation indices (DVI) and soil consumption indices (SCI) for Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) during summer 2006 and documented elk, mule deer, and moose (Alces alces) visiting licks. Additionally, soil samples were collected, and mineral concentrations were compared to discern levels that explain rates of visitation. Relationships between response variables; DVI and SCI, and explanatory variables; elevation class, moisture class, period of study, and concentrations of minerals were examined. We found that DVI and SCI were greatest at two wet, low-elevation licks exhibiting relatively high concentrations of manganese and sodium. Because cervids are known to seek Na from soils, we suggest our observed association of Mn with DVI and SCI was a likely consequence of deer and elk seeking supplemental dietary Na. Additionally, highly utilized licks such as these provide an area of concentrated cervid occupation and interaction, thus increasing risk for environmental transmission of infectious pathogens such as chronic wasting disease, which has been shown to be shed in the saliva, urine, and feces of infected cervids. PMID:24711146

  20. Lick of death: Capnocytophaga canimorsus is an important cause of sepsis in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James P; Kafetz, Kalman; Fink, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old Caucasian woman was treated for Capnocytophaga canimorsus septicaemia. The source of bacteraemia was very likely to be her household pet, an Italian greyhound. The patient presented with a presumed complex partial seizure but deteriorated rapidly with sepsis and multiorgan dysfunction. Neither scratch nor bite was established, although close petting including licks was reported. Blood cultures grew Gram-negative rods, identified by molecular techniques as C. canimorsus-a bacterium frequently isolated in the oral cavities of dogs and cats. A full recovery was made following 2 weeks of intensive care support and broad-spectrum antibiotics. No underlying immune dysfunction was found. PMID:27364692

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Lick AGN monitoring 2011: light curves (Barth+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, A. J.; Bennert, V. N.; Canalizo, G.; Filippenko, A. V.; Gates, E. L.; Greene, J. E.; Li, W.; Malkan, M. A.; Pancoast, A.; Sand, D. J.; Stern, D.; Treu, T.; Woo, J.-H.; Assef, R. J.; Bae, H.-J.; Brewer, B. J.; Cenko, S. B.; Clubb, K. I.; Cooper, M. C.; Diamond-Stanic, A. M.; Hiner, K. D.; Honig, S. F.; Hsiao, E.; Kandrashoff, M. T.; Lazarova, M. S.; Nierenberg, A. M.; Rex, J.; Silverman, J. M.; Tollerud, E. J.; Walsh, J. L.

    2015-05-01

    This project was allocated 69 nights at the Lick 3m Shane telescope, distributed between 2011 March 27 and June 13. Observations were conducted using the Kast double spectrograph (3440-5515Å on the blue side and 5410-8200Å on the red side). In order to extend our light curves for two AGNs, we also requested additional observations from other observers using the Kast spectrograph: Mrk 50 from 2011 January through March, and Zw 229-015 in June and July. For Zw 229-015, three additional observations were taken 20-23 days after the end of our main campaign. See section 3. (2 data files).

  2. Design of a fieldable laser system for a sodium guide star

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.; Erbert, G.; Kuklo, T.; Salmon, T.; Smauley, D.; Thompson, G.; Wong, Nan

    1994-03-17

    The design and background data for a sodium layer laser guide star system to be installed on the 3 meter telescope at Lick Observatory is presented. A 30 W dye laser at 589 nm and 10 kHz will be mounted on the telescope and will be pumped by fiber coupled frequency doubled YAG laser located in a separate room.

  3. Searching for Planets Around other Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In this colloquim presentation, Professor of Astronomy, Geoffrey Marcy discusses the discovery of planets orbiting other stars. Using the Doppler shift caused by stellar wobble that is caused by nearby planetary mass, astronomers have been able to infer the existence of Jupiter-sized planets around other stars. Using a special spectrometer at Lick Observatory, the wobble of several stars have been traced over the years required to generate an accurate pattern required to infer the stellar wobble. Professor Marcy, discusses the findings of planets around 47 Ursae Majoris, 16 Cygni B, 51 Pegasus, and 56 Rho 1 Cne. In the case of 56 Rho 1 Cne the planet appears to be close to the star, within 1.5 astronomical units. The observations from the smaller Lick Observatory will be augmented by new observations from the larger telescope at the Kek observatory. This move will allow observations of smaller planets, as opposed to the massive planets thus far discovered. The astronomers also hope to observe smaller stars with the Kek data. Future spaceborne observations will allow the discovery of even smaller planets. A spaceborne interferometer is in the planning stages, and an even larger observatory, called the Terrestrial Planet Finder, is hoped for. Professor Marcy shows artists' renderings of two of the planets thus far discovered. He also briefly discusses planetary formation and shows slides of both observations from the Orion Nebula and models of stellar system formation.

  4. Geochemical study of acid mine drainage of the Big Lick Tunnel area, Williamstown, PA

    SciTech Connect

    Tollin, S. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1993-03-01

    Acid mine drainage in the anthracite region of Pennsylvania continues to be a significant environmental problem. This study examines the acid mine outflow from the Big Lick Tunnel, north of Williamstown, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. The tunnel drains abandoned mines on the north side of the Big Lick Mountain. Mining ceased in the area circa 1940, and the tunnel has been in operation since that time. The water, soil and stream bed sediment geochemistry has been studied to determine their changes in chemistry over distance. The pH, TDS and metal concentrations were the primary focus. Metal concentrations were determined using an ICP unit. Data indicates the pH of the outflow to range between 6.7 and 7.3 Fe and Mn concentrations are as high as 9.7 ppb. Extensive metal precipitation ( yellow boy'') occurs within the tunnel and for several hundred meters from the mouth of the tunnel. The combination of near neutral pH and high metal concentration suggest that the drainage is in contact with highly alkaline materials prior to discharge from the tunnel. The geology of the area does not suggest bedrock as the possible source of alkaline material. One hypothesis is that the acidic water is reacting with the concrete tunnel and being neutralized. Data also suggests that the Fe precipitates much quicker than the Mn, resulting in a zonation between Fe-rich and Mn-rich sediments along the length of the drainage.

  5. The lick-index calibration of the Gemini multi-object spectrographs

    SciTech Connect

    Puzia, Thomas H.; Miller, Bryan W.; Trancho, Gelys; Basarab, Brett; Mirocha, Jordan T.; Butler, Karen E-mail: bmiller@gemini.edu

    2013-06-01

    We present the calibration of the spectroscopic Lick/IDS standard line-index system for measurements obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrographs known as GMOS-North and GMOS-South. We provide linear correction functions for each of the 25 standard Lick line indices for the B600 grism and two instrumental setups, one with 0.''5 slit width and 1 × 1 CCD pixel binning (corresponding to ∼2.5 Å spectral resolution) and the other with 0.''75 slit width and 2 × 2 binning (∼4 Å). We find small and well-defined correction terms for the set of Balmer indices Hβ, Hγ {sub A}, and Hδ {sub A} along with the metallicity sensitive indices Fe5015, Fe5270, Fe5335, Fe5406, Mg{sub 2}, and Mgb that are widely used for stellar population diagnostics of distant stellar systems. We find other indices that sample molecular absorption bands, such as TiO{sub 1} and TiO{sub 2}, with very wide wavelength coverage or indices that sample very weak molecular and atomic absorption features, such as Mg{sub 1}, as well as indices with particularly narrow passband definitions, such as Fe4384, Ca4455, Fe4531, Ca4227, and Fe5782, which are less robustly calibrated. These indices should be used with caution.

  6. FIRST, a fibered aperture masking instrument: Results of the Lick observing campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordwell, Baylee; Duchene, Gaspard; Huby, Elsa; Goebel, Sean; Marchis, Franck; Perrin, Guy; Lacour, Sylvestre; Kotani, Takayuki; Gates, Elinor L.; Choquet, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    FIRST is a prototype instrument aimed at achieving high dynamic range and angular resolution in ground-based images at visible wavelengths near the diffraction limit. FIRST utilizes an aperture masking-like technique that makes use of single-mode fibers and pupil remapping to maximize the area of the telescope mirror in use. While located at Lick observatory in 2011 and 2012, FIRST observed 25 binary systems with the Shane 3m telescope, with separations ranging from 20 to 200 mas, comparable to the 50 mas diffraction limit for our central wavelength. Huby et al. (2013) has reported results for the Capella system that established the utility of FIRST for characterizing stellar binaries using the directly measured spectral flux ratio. Using an improved data analysis pipeline, we obtained closure phase measurements for a majority of the targets observed at Lick, and derived angular separations and spectral flux ratios. From the spectral flux ratios we obtained spectra for the companions over at least 600-850 nm with R~300. Finally, by obtaining results for many binary systems we have better constrained the current performance of FIRST, which has an exciting future ahead at its current location behind SCExAO at the Subaru 8.2 m telescope, where it will eventually become available for general use by the astronomical community.

  7. Arsenic in groundwater of Licking County, Ohio, 2012—Occurrence and relation to hydrogeology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic concentrations were measured in samples from 168 domestic wells in Licking County, Ohio, to document arsenic concentrations in a wide variety of wells and to identify hydrogeologic factors associated with arsenic concentrations in groundwater. Elevated concentrations of arsenic (greater than 10.0 micrograms per liter [µg/L]) were detected in 12 percent of the wells (about 1 in 8). The maximum arsenic concentration of about 44 µg/L was detected in two wells in the same township.A subset of 102 wells was also sampled for iron, sulfate, manganese, and nitrate, which were used to estimate redox conditions of the groundwater. Elevated arsenic concentrations were detected only in strongly reducing groundwater. Almost 20 percent of the samples with iron concentrations high enough to produce iron staining (greater than 300 µg/L) also had elevated concentrations of arsenic.In groundwater, arsenic primarily occurs as two inorganic species—arsenite and arsenate. Arsenic speciation was determined for a subset of nine samples, and arsenite was the predominant species. Of the two species, arsenite is more difficult to remove from water, and is generally considered to be more toxic to humans.Aquifer and well-construction characteristics were compiled from 99 well logs. Elevated concentrations of arsenic (and iron) were detected in glacial and bedrock aquifers but were more prevalent in glacial aquifers. The reason may be that the glacial deposits typically contain more organic carbon than the Paleozoic bedrock. Organic carbon plays a role in the redox reactions that cause arsenic (and iron) to be released from the aquifer matrix. Arsenic concentrations were not significantly different for different types of bedrock (sandstone, shale, sandstone/shale, or other). However, arsenic concentrations in bedrock wells were correlated with two well-construction characteristics; higher arsenic concentrations in bedrock wells were associated with (1) shorter open intervals and

  8. A resolution recognizing Major League Baseball as an important part of the cultural history of American society, celebrating the 2012 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, and honoring Kansas City, Missouri, as the host city of the 83rd All-Star Game.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Blunt, Roy [R-MO

    2012-06-26

    06/26/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S4642-4644; text as passed Senate: CR S4643; text of measure as introduced: CR S4640) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. The new Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (1994).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, C. E.; Douglass, G. G.

    Following the 1984 version of the Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, the authors began planning a successor to be issued approximately ten years later. The 1984 catalog was intended primarily to provide an updated and corrected version of the Lick Index Catalogue, and was produced in the same format, though with considerably augmented notes and a bibliography. This report details both the changes in format and in content, as well as some of the problems of melding other data sources into this catalog.

  10. IV Nicotine Self-Administration in Rats Using a Consummatory Operant Licking Response: Sensitivity to Serotonergic, Glutaminergic and Histaminergic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Vanessa; Rose, Jed E.; Levin, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is characterized by repeated self-administration of nicotine by placing the cigarette in the mouth. The repeated hand-to-mouth self-administration is essentially a consummatory act. We recently developed a paradigm in which rats lick one of two spouts to trigger intravenous (IV) delivery of nicotine, which combines a consummatory act with rapid delivery of nicotine to model the act of tobacco smoking. We have found that rats will lick hundreds of times per nicotine infusion. In the current study, using the operant licking nicotine self-administration model with young adult Sprague-Dawley rats (0.03 mg/kg/infusion of nicotine), we tested the effect of antagonists of H1 histamine receptors pyrilamine, serotonin (5HT) type 2 receptors ketanserin and lorcaserin and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors with D-cycloserine in dose ranges that we have found in previous studies to significantly reduce IV nicotine self-administration with the operant lever press operand. The H1 antagonist pyrilamine significantly reduced operant licking for nicotine self-administration. Pyrilamine caused significant reductions in the operant licking paradigm at lower doses (10 and 20 mg/kg) than those we previously observed to affect responding in the operant lever press paradigm. In contrast, the 5HT2A and C antagonist ketanserin did not show an effect of reducing nicotine self-administration in the same dose range we had found in a previous study to significantly reduce operant lever press nicotine self-administration. The 5HT2C agonist lorcaserin significantly decreased nicotine self-administration in the licking paradigm at the same dose threshold as with lever press responding. The NMDA glutamate partial agonist D-cycloserine did not produce any change in nicotine self-administration with the licking operand, in contrast to its effect on the classic lever-pressing task. The rat model incorporating consummatory aspects of tobacco addiction can provide distinct

  11. IV nicotine self-administration in rats using a consummatory operant licking response: sensitivity to serotonergic, glutaminergic and histaminergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Vanessa; Rose, Jed E; Levin, Edward D

    2014-10-01

    Tobacco smoking is characterized by repeated self-administration of nicotine by placing the cigarette in the mouth. The repeated hand-to-mouth self-administration is essentially a consummatory act. We recently developed a paradigm in which rats lick one of two spouts to trigger intravenous (IV) delivery of nicotine, which combines a consummatory act with rapid delivery of nicotine to model the act of tobacco smoking. We have found that rats will lick hundreds of times per nicotine infusion. In the current study, using the operant licking nicotine self-administration model with young adult Sprague-Dawley rats (0.03mg/kg/infusion of nicotine), we tested the effect of antagonists of H1 histamine receptors pyrilamine, serotonin (5HT) type 2 receptors ketanserin and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors with d-cycloserine as well as an agonist of 5HT2c receptors lorcaserin, in dose ranges that we have found in previous studies to significantly reduce IV nicotine self-administration with the operant lever press operand. The H1 antagonist pyrilamine significantly reduced operant licking for nicotine self-administration. Pyrilamine caused significant reductions in the operant licking paradigm at lower doses (10 and 20mg/kg) than those we previously observed to affect responding in the operant lever press paradigm. In contrast, the 5HT2A and C antagonist ketanserin did not show an effect of reducing nicotine self-administration in the same dose range we had found in a previous study to significantly reduce operant lever press nicotine self-administration. The 5HT2C agonist lorcaserin significantly decreased nicotine self-administration in the licking paradigm at the same dose threshold as with lever press responding. The NMDA glutamate partial agonist d-cycloserine did not produce any change in nicotine self-administration with the licking operand, in contrast to its effect on the classic lever-pressing task. The rat model incorporating consummatory aspects of

  12. Geophagy in animals and geology of kudurs (mineral licks): a review of Russian publications.

    PubMed

    Panichev, A M; Golokhvast, K S; Gulkov, A N; Chekryzhov, I Yu

    2013-02-01

    This paper reviews from the geological and biological perspectives the achievements of Russian researchers in the field of geophagy, which have not been published in English. It is focused on publications in Russian language about (1) animal behavior related to geophagy, (2) mineral and chemical composition as well as geological characteristics and biological effects of the earths, eaten by animals in various locations in Russia and neighboring countries. The authors argue that the Russian term "solonetz" (salt lick) is too limiting, as animals consume not just salt but many other minerals too. The more general term "kudur" is used for places where animals eat earths. The geological nature and biological properties of kudurites (the common name given to biologically active mineral-crystal substances consumed by animals) and gastroliths (stones consumed by birds and reptiles) are addressed. On the basis of the reviewed data, the authors propose their own views regarding the causes of geophagy. PMID:22699430

  13. ShaneAO: wide science spectrum adaptive optics system for the Lick Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavel, Donald; Kupke, Renate; Dillon, Daren; Norton, Andrew; Ratliff, Chris; Cabak, Jerry; Phillips, Andrew; Rockosi, Connie; McGurk, Rosalie; Srinath, Srikar; Peck, Michael; Deich, William; Lanclos, Kyle; Gates, John; Saylor, Michael; Ward, Jim; Pfister, Terry

    2014-07-01

    A new high-order adaptive optics system is now being commissioned at the Lick Observatory Shane 3-meter telescope in California. This system uses a high return efficiency sodium beacon and a combination of low and high-order deformable mirrors to achieve diffraction-limited imaging over a wide spectrum of infrared science wavelengths covering 0.8 to 2.2 microns. We present the design performance goals and the first on-sky test results. We discuss several innovations that make this system a pathfinder for next generation AO systems. These include a unique woofer-tweeter control that provides full dynamic range correction from tip/tilt to 16 cycles, variable pupil sampling wavefront sensor, new enhanced silver coatings developed at UC Observatories that improve science and LGS throughput, and tight mechanical rigidity that enables a multi-hour diffraction-limited exposure in LGS mode for faint object spectroscopy science.

  14. Lick-index entanglement and biased diagnostic of stellar populations in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzoni, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    The inherent statistical and operational properties of the Lick-index spectrophotometric system are investigated to facilitate a more appropriate use for astrophysical studies. Non-Gaussian effects in the index standardization procedure suggest that a minimum S/N ratio has to be met by spectral data, such as S/N ≳ 5 px-1 for a spectral resolution R ˜ 2000. In addition, index (re-)definition in terms of narrow-band colour should be preferred over the classical pseudo-equivalent width scheme. The overlapping wavelength range among different indices is also an issue, as it may lead the later ones to correlate beyond any strictly physical relationship. The nested configuration of the Fe5335 and Fe5270 indices, and the so-called Mg complex (including Mg1, Mg2 and Mgb), is analysed, in this context, by assessing the implied bias when joining entangled features into global diagnostic meta-indices, like the perused [MgFe] metallicity tracer. The perturbing effect of [O III]5007 and [N I]5199 forbidden gas emission on Fe5015 and Mgb absorption features is considered, and an updated correction scheme is proposed when using [O III]5007 as a proxy to appraise Hβ residual emission. When applied to the present-day elliptical galaxy population, the revised Hβ scale leads, on average, to 20-30 per cent younger age estimates. Finally, the misleading role of the christening element in Lick-based chemical analyses is illustrated for the striking case of Fe4531. In fact, while iron is nominally the main contributor to the observed feature in high-resolution spectra, we have shown that the maximum responsiveness of the Fe4531 index is actually to titanium abundance.

  15. Robert G. Aitken and His ADS: Double Star Oberver, Cataloguer, Statistician, and Observatory Director

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, D. E.

    2000-05-01

    Robert G. Aitken was a dynamical astronomer of the old school, a long-time visual double star observer. He was born in 1864 in Jackson, California, a small town in the Gold Country midway between Yosemite and Sacramento. His education at Williams College under Truman Safford; his early teaching career at Livermore College and the University of the Pacific; his simultaneous graduate reading course in mathematics; and his becoming a professional astronomer under the tutelage of Edward S. Holden and Edward E. Barnard at Lick Observatory will be described. Aitken made a systematic survey of the entire sky north of -30 degrees for double stars, joined by William J. Hussey for a time. It produced important new information on binary and multiple stars and their orbits. His book The Binary Stars and his New General Catalogue of Double Stars (ADS) were his monuments. Aitken was associate director of Lick Observatory from 1923 until 1930, while W. W. Campbell was simultaneously director and president of the University of California. Then Aitken was director himself from 1930 until he retired in 1935 and moved to Berkeley, where he continued writing until his death in 1951. Aitken was editor of the PASP for 51 years. He hoped that Gerard P. Kuiper would succeed him as the double star observer at Lick Observatory, but that was not to be. Aitken at various times held every office in the ASP, and was vice president, then president, of the AAS.

  16. BINARIES AMONG DEBRIS DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, David R.; Zuckerman, B.

    2012-02-01

    We have gathered a sample of 112 main-sequence stars with known debris disks. We collected published information and performed adaptive optics observations at Lick Observatory to determine if these debris disks are associated with binary or multiple stars. We discovered a previously unknown M-star companion to HD 1051 at a projected separation of 628 AU. We found that 25% {+-} 4% of our debris disk systems are binary or triple star systems, substantially less than the expected {approx}50%. The period distribution for these suggests a relative lack of systems with 1-100 AU separations. Only a few systems have blackbody disk radii comparable to the binary/triple separation. Together, these two characteristics suggest that binaries with intermediate separations of 1-100 AU readily clear out their disks. We find that the fractional disk luminosity, as a proxy for disk mass, is generally lower for multiple systems than for single stars at any given age. Hence, for a binary to possess a disk (or form planets) it must either be a very widely separated binary with disk particles orbiting a single star or it must be a small separation binary with a circumbinary disk.

  17. Image improvement from a sodium-layer laser guide star adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C. E., LLNL

    1997-06-01

    A sodium-layer laser guide star beacon with high-order adaptive optics at Lick Observatory produced a factor of 2.4 intensity increase and a factor of 2 decrease in full width at half maximum for an astronomical point source, compared with image motion compensation alone. Image full widths at half maximum were identical for laser and natural guide stars (0.3 arc seconds). The Strehl ratio with the laser guide star was 65% of that with a natural guide star. This technique should allow ground-based telescopes to attain the diffraction limit, by correcting for atmospheric distortions.

  18. NLTE and LTE Lick Indices for Red Giants from [Fe/H] 0.0 to -6.0 at SDSS and IDS Spectral Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, C. Ian; Young, Mitchell E.; Layden, Nicholas

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the dependence of the complete system of 22 Lick indices on overall metallicity scaled from solar abundances, [{{M}}/{{H}}], from the solar value, 0.0, down to the extremely metal-poor (XMP) value of -6.0, for late-type giant stars (MK luminosity class III, {log}g=2.0) of MK spectral class late-K to late-F (3750\\lt {T}{eff}\\lt 6500 K) of the type that are detected as “fossils” of early galaxy formation in the Galactic halo and in extra-galactic structures. Our investigation is based on synthetic index values, I, derived from atmospheric models and synthetic spectra computed with PHOENIX in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) and Non-LTE (NLTE), where the synthetic spectra have been convolved to the spectral resolution, R, of both IDS and SDSS (and LAMOST) spectroscopy. We identify nine indices, that we designate “Lick-XMP,” that remain both detectable and significantly [{{M}}/{{H}}]-dependent down to [{{M}}/{{H}}] values of at least ˜ -5.0, and down to [{{M}}/{{H}}] ˜ -6.0 in five cases, while also remaining well-behaved (single-valued as a function of [{{M}}/{{H}}] and positive in linear units). For these nine indices, we study the dependence of I on NLTE effects, and on spectral resolution. For our LTE I values for spectra of SDSS resolution, we present the fitted polynomial coefficients, {C}{{n}}, from multi-variate linear regression for I with terms up to third order in the independent variable pairs ({T}{eff}, [{{M}}/{{H}}] ) and (V-K, [{{M}}/{{H}}]), and compare them to the fitted {C}{{n}} values of Worthey et al. at IDS spectral resolution. For this fitted I data-set we present tables of LTE partial derivatives, \\frac{\\partial I}{\\partial {T}{eff}}{| }[{{M}/{{H}}]}, \\frac{\\displaystyle \\partial I}{\\partial [{{M}}/{{H}}]}{| }{T{eff}}, \\frac{\\displaystyle \\partial I}{\\partial (V-K)}{| }[{{M}/{{H}}]}, and \\frac{\\partial I}{\\partial [{{M}}/{{H}}]}{| }(V-K), that can be used to infer the relation between a given

  19. Stars and star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, D. Ia.

    Topics examined include close binary systems, supernovae and their remnants, variable stars, young star groups (e.g., clusters and associations), spherical star clusters, and planetary nebulae. Also considered are the interstellar medium and star formation, systems of galaxies, and current problems in cosmology.

  20. Odor-Taste Convergence in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract of the Awake Freely Licking Rat

    PubMed Central

    Escanilla, Olga D.; Victor, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Flavor is produced by the integration of taste, olfaction, texture, and temperature, currently thought to occur in the cortex. However, previous work has shown that brainstem taste-related nuclei also respond to multisensory inputs. Here, we test the hypothesis that taste and olfaction interact in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS; the first neural relay in the central gustatory pathway) in awake, freely licking rats. Electrophysiological recordings of taste and taste + odor responses were conducted in an experimental chamber following surgical electrode implantation and recovery. Tastants (0.1 m NaCl, 0.1 m sucrose, 0.01 m citric acid, and 0.0001 m quinine) were delivered for five consecutive licks interspersed with five licks of artificial saliva rinse delivered on a VR5 schedule. Odorants were n-amyl acetate (banana), acetic acid (vinegar), octanoic acid (rancid), and phenylethyl alcohol (floral). For each cell, metric space analyses were used to quantify the information conveyed by spike count, by the rate envelope, and by individual spike timing. Results revealed diverse effects of odorants on taste-response magnitude and latency across cells. Importantly, NTS cells were more competent at discriminating taste + odor stimuli versus tastants presented alone for all taste qualities using both rate and temporal coding. The strong interaction of odorants and tastants at the NTS underscores its role as the initial node in the neural circuit that controls food identification and ingestion. PMID:25904782

  1. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT: ALTERNATE ROUTES TO A BROAD-LINE REGION RADIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Hood, Carol E.; Barth, Aaron J.; Bentz, Misty C.; Walsh, Jonelle L.; Bennert, Vardha N.; Treu, Tommaso; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gates, Elinor; Malkan, Matthew A.; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2010-11-01

    It is now possible to estimate black hole (BH) masses across cosmic time, using broad emission lines in active galaxies. This technique informs our views of how galaxies and their central BHs coevolve. Unfortunately, there are many outstanding uncertainties associated with these 'virial' mass estimates. One of these comes from using the accretion luminosity to infer a size for the broad-line region (BLR). Incorporating the new sample of low-luminosity active galaxies from our recent monitoring campaign at Lick Observatory, we recalibrate the radius-luminosity relation with tracers of the accretion luminosity other than the optical continuum. We find that the radius of the BLR scales as the square root of the X-ray and H{beta} luminosities, in agreement with recent optical studies. On the other hand, the scaling appears to be marginally steeper with narrow-line luminosities. This is consistent with a previously observed decrease in the ratio of narrow-line to X-ray luminosity with increasing total luminosity. The radius of the BLR correlates most tightly with H{beta} luminosity, while the X-ray and narrow-line relations both have comparable scatter of a factor of 2. These correlations provide useful alternative virial BH masses in objects with no detectable optical/UV continuum emission, such as high-redshift galaxies with broad emission lines, radio-loud objects, or local active galaxies with galaxy-dominated continua.

  2. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT: PHOTOMETRIC LIGHT CURVES AND OPTICAL VARIABILITY CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Jonelle L.; Bentz, Misty C.; Barth, Aaron J.; Minezaki, Takeo; Sakata, Yu; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Baliber, Nairn; Bennert, Vardha Nicola; Street, Rachel A.; Treu, Tommaso; Li Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Stern, Daniel; Brown, Timothy M.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2009-11-01

    The Lick AGN Monitoring Project targeted 13 nearby Seyfert 1 galaxies with the intent of measuring the masses of their central black holes using reverberation mapping. The sample includes 12 galaxies selected to have black holes with masses roughly in the range 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M {sub sun}, as well as the well-studied active galactic nucleus (AGN) NGC 5548. In conjunction with a spectroscopic monitoring campaign, we obtained broadband B and V images on most nights from 2008 February through 2008 May. The imaging observations were carried out by four telescopes: the 0.76 m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope, the 2 m Multicolor Active Galactic Nuclei Monitoring telescope, the Palomar 60 inch (1.5 m) telescope, and the 0.80 m Tenagra II telescope. Having well-sampled light curves over the course of a few months is useful for obtaining the broad-line reverberation lag and black hole mass, and also allows us to examine the characteristics of the continuum variability. In this paper, we discuss the observational methods and the photometric measurements, and present the AGN continuum light curves. We measure various variability characteristics of each of the light curves. We do not detect any evidence for a time lag between the B- and V-band variations, and we do not find significant color variations for the AGNs in our sample.

  3. Quaternary chronostratigraphy and stable isotope paleoecology of Big Bone Lick, Kentucky, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankersley, Kenneth Barnett; Murari, Madhav Krishna; Crowley, Brooke E.; Owen, Lewis A.; Storrs, Glenn W.; Mortensen, Litsa

    2015-05-01

    Big Bone Lick (BBL) in northern Kentucky, USA has been a critical geologic site in the historical development of North American Quaternary vertebrate paleontology since the 1700s. Sedimentology, geoarcheology, paleontology, accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence dating, and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses were undertaken to develop a chronostratigraphy and history of erosion and deposition for the site to provide a foundation for understanding taphonomy, and species extinction and adaptation to periods of climatic and environmental change. Three geomorphic surfaces are recognized at BBL representing significant periods of floodplain aggradation since the last glacial maximum (26.5-19 ka) dating to the Oldest Dryas (Tazewell, 25-19 ka), the Older Dryas (Cary, 14-12 ka), and late Holocene (5 ka to the present). Unconformities suggest significant periods of degradation during the transitions from cold and dry to warm and moist climates from the Oldest Dryas (Tazewell) to Bølling Oscillation, from the Older Dryas (Cary) to the Allerød, and from the Younger Dryas (Valders) to the Holocene Climatic Optimum. Increased anthropogenic activities since ~ 5 ka may have increased soil upland erosion and floodplain aggradation. Stable isotopes demonstrate that the landscape has been dominated by C3 vegetation since the last glacial maximum.

  4. The lick AGN monitoring project 2011: Fe II reverberation from the outer broad-line region

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Aaron J.; Cooper, Michael C.; Pancoast, Anna; Treu, Tommaso; Bennert, Vardha N.; Brewer, Brendon J.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Sand, David J.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto J.; Woo, Jong-Hak; Bae, Hyun-Jin; Buehler, Tabitha; and others

    2013-06-01

    The prominent broad Fe II emission blends in the spectra of active galactic nuclei have been shown to vary in response to continuum variations, but past attempts to measure the reverberation lag time of the optical Fe II lines have met with only limited success. Here we report the detection of Fe II reverberation in two Seyfert 1 galaxies, NGC 4593 and Mrk 1511, based on data from a program carried out at Lick Observatory in Spring 2011. Light curves for emission lines including Hβ and Fe II were measured by applying a fitting routine to decompose the spectra into several continuum and emission-line components, and we use cross-correlation techniques to determine the reverberation lags of the emission lines relative to V-band light curves. In both cases, the measured lag (τ{sub cen}) of Fe II is longer than that of Hβ, although the inferred lags are somewhat sensitive to the choice of Fe II template used in the fit. For spectral decompositions done using the Fe II template of Véron-Cetty et al., we find τ{sub cen}(Fe II)/τ{sub cen}(Hβ) = 1.9 ± 0.6 in NGC 4593 and 1.5 ± 0.3 in Mrk 1511. The detection of highly correlated variations between Fe II and continuum emission demonstrates that the Fe II emission in these galaxies originates in photoionized gas, located predominantly in the outer portion of the broad-line region.

  5. Sodium Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics Imaging Polarimetry of Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, M D; Graham, J R; Lloyd, J P; Kalas, P; Gates, E L; Gavel, D T; Pennington, D M; Max, C E

    2004-01-08

    The future of high-resolution ground-based optical and infrared astronomy requires the successful implementation of laser guide star adaptive optics systems. We present the first science results from the Lick Observatory sodium beacon laser guide star system. By coupling this system to a near-infrared (J;H;Ks bands) dual-channel imaging polarimeter, we achieve very high sensitivity to light scattered in the circumstellar enviroment of Herbig Ae/Be stars on scales of 100-300 AU. Observations of LkH{alpha} 198 reveal a highly polarized, biconical nebula 10 arcseconds in diameter (6000 AU) . We also observe a polarized jet-like feature associated with the deeply embedded source LkH{alpha} 198-IR. The star LkH{alpha} 233 presents a narrow, unpolarized dark lane dividing its characteristic butterfly-shaped polarized reflection nebulosity. This linear structure is oriented perpendicular to an optical jet and bipolar cavity and is consistent with the presence of an optically thick circumstellar disk blocking our direct view of the star. These data suggest that the evolutionary picture developed for the lower-mass T Tauri stars is also relevant to the Herbig Ae/Be stars and demonstrate the ability of laser guide star adaptive optics systems to obtain scientific results competitive with natural guide star adaptive optics or space-based telescopes.

  6. Spectroscopic Observations of Nearby Low Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vican, Laura; Zuckerman, B. M.; Rodriguez, D.

    2014-01-01

    Young low-mass stars are known to be bright in X-ray and UV due to a high level of magnetic activity. By cross-correlating the GALEX Catalog with the WISE and 2MASS Point Source Catalogs, we have identified more than 2,000 stars whose UV excesses suggest ages in the 10-100 Myr range. We used the Shane 3-m telescope at Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton, California to observe some of these 2,000 stars spectroscopically. We measured the equivalent width of lithium at 6708 A absorption and H-alpha emission lines. Out of a total of 122 stars observed with the Kast grating spectrometer, we find that roughly 10% have strong lithium absorption features. The high percentage of stars with lithium present is further evidence of the importance of UV emission as a youth indicator for low-mass stars. In addition, we used high-resolution spectra obtained with the Hamilton echelle spectrograph to determine radial velocities for several UV-bright stars. These radial velocities will be useful for the calculation of Galactic UVW space velocities for determination of possible moving group membership. This work is supported by NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program award NNX12AH37G to RIT and UCLA and Chilean FONDECYT grant 3130520 to Universidad de Chile. This submission presents work for the GALNYSS project and should be linked to abstracts submitted by David Rodriguez, Laura Vican, and Joel Kastner.

  7. The Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2011: Spectroscopic Campaign and Emission-line Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Aaron J.; Bennert, Vardha N.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E..; Li, Weidong; Malkan, Matthew A.; Pancoast, Anna; Sand, David J.; Stern, Daniel; Cenko, S. Bradley

    2016-01-01

    In the Spring of 2011 we carried out a 2.5 month reverberation mapping campaign using the 3 m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory, monitoring 15 low-redshift Seyfert 1 galaxies. This paper describes the observations, reductions and measurements, and data products from the spectroscopic campaign. The reduced spectra were fitted with a multicomponent model in order to isolate the contributions of various continuum and emission-line components. We present light curves of broad emission lines and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) continuum, and measurements of the broad Hß line widths in mean and rms spectra. For the most highly variable AGNs we also measured broad H beta line widths and velocity centroids from the nightly spectra. In four AGNs exhibiting the highest variability amplitudes, we detect anticorrelations between broad H beta width and luminosity, demonstrating that the broad-line region "breathes" on short timescales of days to weeks in response to continuum variations. We also find that broad H beta velocity centroids can undergo substantial changes in response to continuum variations; in NGC 4593, the broad H beta velocity shifted by approximately 250 km s(exp -1) over a 1 month period. This reverberation-induced velocity shift effect is likely to contribute a significant source of confusion noise to binary black hole searches that use multi-epoch quasar spectroscopy to detect binary orbital motion. We also present results from simulations that examine biases that can occur in measurement of broad-line widths from rms spectra due to the contributions of continuum variations and photon-counting noise.

  8. The Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2011: Spectroscopic Campaign and Emission-line Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Aaron J.; Bennert, Vardha N.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Li, Weidong; Malkan, Matthew A.; Pancoast, Anna; Sand, David J.; Stern, Daniel; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak; Assef, Roberto J.; Bae, Hyun-Jin; Brewer, Brendon J.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Cooper, Michael C.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Hiner, Kyle D.; Hönig, Sebastian F.; Hsiao, Eric; Kandrashoff, Michael T.; Lazarova, Mariana S.; Nierenberg, A. M.; Rex, Jacob; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Tollerud, Erik J.; Walsh, Jonelle L.

    2015-04-01

    In the Spring of 2011 we carried out a 2.5 month reverberation mapping campaign using the 3 m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory, monitoring 15 low-redshift Seyfert 1 galaxies. This paper describes the observations, reductions and measurements, and data products from the spectroscopic campaign. The reduced spectra were fitted with a multicomponent model in order to isolate the contributions of various continuum and emission-line components. We present light curves of broad emission lines and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) continuum, and measurements of the broad Hβ line widths in mean and rms spectra. For the most highly variable AGNs we also measured broad Hβ line widths and velocity centroids from the nightly spectra. In four AGNs exhibiting the highest variability amplitudes, we detect anticorrelations between broad Hβ width and luminosity, demonstrating that the broad-line region “breathes” on short timescales of days to weeks in response to continuum variations. We also find that broad Hβ velocity centroids can undergo substantial changes in response to continuum variations; in NGC 4593, the broad Hβ velocity shifted by ˜250 km s-1 over a 1 month period. This reverberation-induced velocity shift effect is likely to contribute a significant source of confusion noise to binary black hole searches that use multi-epoch quasar spectroscopy to detect binary orbital motion. We also present results from simulations that examine biases that can occur in measurement of broad-line widths from rms spectra due to the contributions of continuum variations and photon-counting noise.

  9. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT 2011: REVERBERATION MAPPING OF MARKARIAN 50

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Aaron J.; Thorman, Shawn J.; Pancoast, Anna; Bennert, Vardha N.; Sand, David J.; Treu, Tommaso; Brewer, Brendon J.; Li, Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto J.; Woo, Jong-Hak; Bae, Hyun-Jin; Buehler, Tabitha; and others

    2011-12-10

    The Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2011 observing campaign was carried out over the course of 11 weeks in spring 2011. Here we present the first results from this program, a measurement of the broad-line reverberation lag in the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 50. Combining our data with supplemental observations obtained prior to the start of the main observing campaign, our data set covers a total duration of 4.5 months. During this time, Mrk 50 was highly variable, exhibiting a maximum variability amplitude of a factor of {approx}4 in the U-band continuum and a factor of {approx}2 in the H{beta} line. Using standard cross-correlation techniques, we find that H{beta} and H{gamma} lag the V-band continuum by {tau}{sub cen} = 10.64{sup +0.82}{sub -0.93} and 8.43{sup +1.30}{sub -1.28} days, respectively, while the lag of He II {lambda}4686 is unresolved. The H{beta} line exhibits a symmetric velocity-resolved reverberation signature with shorter lags in the high-velocity wings than in the line core, consistent with an origin in a broad-line region (BLR) dominated by orbital motion rather than infall or outflow. Assuming a virial normalization factor of f = 5.25, the virial estimate of the black hole mass is (3.2 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }. These observations demonstrate that Mrk 50 is among the most promising nearby active galaxies for detailed investigations of BLR structure and dynamics.

  10. Reconstructing Star Formation Histories of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritze-v. Alvensleben, U.; Lilly, T.

    2007-12-01

    We present a methodological study to find out how far back and to what precision star formation histories of galaxies can be reconstructed from CMDs, from integrated spectra and Lick indices, and from integrated multi-band photometry. Our evolutionary synthesis models GALEV allow to describe the evolution of galaxies in terms of all three approaches and we have assumed typical observational uncertainties for each of them and then investigated to what extent and accuracy different star formation histories can be discriminated. For a field in the LMC bar region with both a deep CMD from HST observations and a trailing slit spectrum across exactly the same field of view we could test our modelling results against real data.

  11. Measurement of the reaeration coefficients of the North Fork Licking River at Utica, Ohio by radioactive tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hren, Janet

    1983-01-01

    Reaeration coefficients of the North Fork Licking River at Utica, Ohio were measured by the radioactive-tracer method. The tests were conducted on a 2.1-mile reach on September 23 and October 7, 1981, during low-flow conditions. Krypton-85 gas and tritium were the radioopactive tracers, which were used in conjunction with rhodamine-WT dye. The reaertion coefficients determined on September 23 were 3.09 days-1 (subreach 1-2) and 3.32 days-1 (subreach 2-3). On October 7, the values were 2.04 days -1 and 2.23 days-1 respectively.

  12. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT: REVERBERATION MAPPING OF OPTICAL HYDROGEN AND HELIUM RECOMBINATION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Misty C.; Walsh, Jonelle L.; Barth, Aaron J.; Thornton, Carol E.; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Sakata, Yu; Minezaki, Takeo; Woo, Jong-Hak; Malkan, Matthew A.; Wang, Xiaofeng; Steele, Thea N.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Serduke, Frank J. D.; Li, Weidong; Lee, Nicholas; Treu, Tommaso; Street, Rachel A.; Hidas, Marton G.; Hiner, Kyle D.; Greene, Jenny E.

    2010-06-20

    We have recently completed a 64-night spectroscopic monitoring campaign at the Lick Observatory 3 m Shane telescope with the aim of measuring the masses of the black holes in 12 nearby (z < 0.05) Seyfert 1 galaxies with expected masses in the range {approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and also the well-studied nearby active galactic nucleus (AGN) NGC 5548. Nine of the objects in the sample (including NGC 5548) showed optical variability of sufficient strength during the monitoring campaign to allow for a time lag to be measured between the continuum fluctuations and the response to these fluctuations in the broad H{beta} emission, which we have previously reported. We present here the light curves for the H{alpha}, H{gamma}, He II {lambda}4686, and He I {lambda}5876 emission lines and the time lags for the emission-line responses relative to changes in the continuum flux. Combining each emission-line time lag with the measured width of the line in the variable part of the spectrum, we determine a virial mass of the central supermassive black hole from several independent emission lines. We find that the masses are generally consistent within the uncertainties. The time-lag response as a function of velocity across the Balmer line profiles is examined for six of the AGNs. We find similar responses across all three Balmer lines for Arp 151, which shows a strongly asymmetric profile, and for SBS 1116+583A and NGC 6814, which show a symmetric response about zero velocity. For the other three AGNs, the data quality is somewhat lower and the velocity-resolved time-lag response is less clear. Finally, we compare several trends seen in the data set against the predictions from photoionization calculations as presented by Korista and Goad. We confirm several of their predictions, including an increase in responsivity and a decrease in the mean time lag as the excitation and ionization level for the species increases. Specifically, we find the time lags of the optical

  13. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT: RECALIBRATING SINGLE-EPOCH VIRIAL BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATES

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Daeseong; Woo, Jong-Hak; Treu, Tommaso; Bennert, Vardha N.; Barth, Aaron J.; Walsh, Jonelle; Bentz, Misty C.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gates, Elinor; Greene, Jenny E.; Malkan, Matthew A.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the calibration and uncertainties of black hole (BH) mass estimates based on the single-epoch (SE) method, using homogeneous and high-quality multi-epoch spectra obtained by the Lick Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) Monitoring Project for nine local Seyfert 1 galaxies with BH masses <10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }. By decomposing the spectra into their AGNs and stellar components, we study the variability of the SE H{beta} line width (full width at half-maximum intensity, FWHM{sub H{beta}} or dispersion, {sigma}{sub H{beta}}) and of the AGN continuum luminosity at 5100 A (L{sub 5100}). From the distribution of the 'virial products' ({proportional_to} FWHM{sub H{beta}}{sup 2} L{sup 0.5}{sub 5100} or {sigma}{sub H{beta}}{sup 2} L{sup 0.5}{sub 5100}) measured from SE spectra, we estimate the uncertainty due to the combined variability as {approx}0.05 dex (12%). This is subdominant with respect to the total uncertainty in SE mass estimates, which is dominated by uncertainties in the size-luminosity relation and virial coefficient, and is estimated to be {approx}0.46 dex (factor of {approx}3). By comparing the H{beta} line profile of the SE, mean, and root-mean-square (rms) spectra, we find that the H{beta} line is broader in the mean (and SE) spectra than in the rms spectra by {approx}0.1 dex (25%) for our sample with FWHM{sub H{beta}} <3000 km s{sup -1}. This result is at variance with larger mass BHs where the difference is typically found to be much less than 0.1 dex. To correct for this systematic difference of the H{beta} line profile, we introduce a line-width dependent virial factor, resulting in a recalibration of SE BH mass estimators for low-mass AGNs.

  14. A NEW CEMP-s RR LYRAE STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Kinman, T. D.; Beers, Timothy C.; Aoki, Wako; Brown, Warren R.

    2012-08-10

    We show that SDSS J170733.93+585059.7 (hereafter SDSS J1707+58), previously identified by Aoki and collaborators as a carbon-enhanced metal-poor star (with s-process-element enhancements, CEMP-s), on the assumption that it is a main-sequence turnoff star, is the RR Lyrae star VIII-14 identified by the Lick Astrograph Survey. Revised abundances for SDSS J1707+58 are [Fe/H] = -2.92, [C/Fe] = +2.79, and [Ba/Fe] = +2.83. It is thus one of the most metal-poor RR Lyrae stars known, and has more extreme [C/Fe] and [Ba/Fe] than the only other RR Lyrae star known to have a CEMP-s spectrum (TY Gru). Both stars are Oosterhoff II stars with prograde kinematics, in contrast to stars with [C/Fe] < + 0.7, such as KP Cyg and UY CrB, which are disk stars. Twelve other RR Lyrae stars with [C/Fe] {>=}+0.7 are presented as CEMP candidates for further study.

  15. Star Light, Star Bright.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iadevaia, David G.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a technique for obtaining a rough measure of the brightness among different stars. Materials needed include a standard 35-mm camera, a plastic ruler, and a photo enlarger. Although a telescope can be used, it is not essential. (JN)

  16. Ground-Water Data and Flow Directions in the Vicinity of Swamp Road, Licking County, Ohio, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dumouchelle, Denise H.

    2007-01-01

    The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is proposing to build a dry dam on the South Fork Licking River to mitigate flood impacts. Concerns have been raised regarding the effects of impounded floodwaters on ground-water conditions in the Swamp Road neighborhood. To obtain a better understanding of existing ground-water conditions, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the NRCS, installed three monitoring wells and collected ground-water-quality samples on two occasions from these and four residential wells. In addition, transducers were placed in these seven wells to obtain hourly water-level measurements from August, 2006 to early March, 2007. Intermittent water levels also were measured in another seven residential wells in the area. Water-quality samples were collected in September 2006 and January 2007. Samples were analyzed for nutrients, inorganic elements, and fecal-indicator bacteria. In general, the ground-water quality was very hard with large iron concentrations of 1,700 ?g/L and above. Although the aquifer underlying the Swamp Road area is confined, the continuous water-level records indicate a rapid response to precipitation. Comparison of the well hydrographs with the stage hydrograph for the nearby South Fork Licking River indicates a hydraulic connection between the river and the aquifer. In the vicinity of Swamp Road, the ground-water-flow direction was southeast during the duration of the study. The ground-water-level elevations were above the planned maximum elevation for water impounded by the dam, thus the impounded floodwater should have minimal impact on ground-water conditions along Swamp Road.

  17. Pairs and Groups of Genetically Related Long-period Comets and Proposed Identity of the Mysterious Lick Object of 1921

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek; Kracht, Rainer

    2016-05-01

    We present the history of investigation of the dynamical properties of pairs and groups of genetically related long-period comets (other than the Kreutz sungrazing system). Members of a comet pair or group move in nearly identical orbits, and their origin as fragments of a common parent comet is unquestionable. The only variable is the time of perihelion passage, which differs considerably from member to member owing primarily to an orbital-momentum increment acquired during breakup. Meter-per-second separation velocities account for gaps of years or tens of years, thanks to the orbital periods of many millennia. The physical properties of individual members may not at all be alike, as illustrated by the trio of C/1988 A1, C/1996 Q1, and C/2015 F3. We exploit orbital similarity to examine whether the enigmatic and as-yet-unidentified object discovered from the Lick Observatory near the Sun at sunset on 1921 August 7 happened to be a member of such a pair and to track down the long-period comet to which it might be genetically related. Our search shows that the Lick object, which could not be a Kreutz sungrazer, was likely a companion to comet C/1847 C1 (Hind), whose perihelion distance was ˜9 R ⊙ and true orbital period was approximately 8300 yr. The gap of 74.4 yr between their perihelion times is consistent with a separation velocity of ˜1 m s‑1 which sets the fragments apart following the parent's breakup in a general proximity of perihelion during the previous return to the Sun in the seventh millennium BCE.

  18. Pairs and Groups of Genetically Related Long-period Comets and Proposed Identity of the Mysterious Lick Object of 1921

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek; Kracht, Rainer

    2016-05-01

    We present the history of investigation of the dynamical properties of pairs and groups of genetically related long-period comets (other than the Kreutz sungrazing system). Members of a comet pair or group move in nearly identical orbits, and their origin as fragments of a common parent comet is unquestionable. The only variable is the time of perihelion passage, which differs considerably from member to member owing primarily to an orbital-momentum increment acquired during breakup. Meter-per-second separation velocities account for gaps of years or tens of years, thanks to the orbital periods of many millennia. The physical properties of individual members may not at all be alike, as illustrated by the trio of C/1988 A1, C/1996 Q1, and C/2015 F3. We exploit orbital similarity to examine whether the enigmatic and as-yet-unidentified object discovered from the Lick Observatory near the Sun at sunset on 1921 August 7 happened to be a member of such a pair and to track down the long-period comet to which it might be genetically related. Our search shows that the Lick object, which could not be a Kreutz sungrazer, was likely a companion to comet C/1847 C1 (Hind), whose perihelion distance was ∼9 R ⊙ and true orbital period was approximately 8300 yr. The gap of 74.4 yr between their perihelion times is consistent with a separation velocity of ∼1 m s‑1 which sets the fragments apart following the parent's breakup in a general proximity of perihelion during the previous return to the Sun in the seventh millennium BCE.

  19. T1R2 and T1R3 subunits are individually unnecessary for normal affective licking responses to Polycose: implications for saccharide taste receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Treesukosol, Yada; Blonde, Ginger D; Spector, Alan C

    2009-04-01

    The T1R2 and T1R3 proteins are expressed in taste receptor cells and form a heterodimer binding with compounds described as sweet by humans. We examined whether Polycose taste might be mediated through this heterodimer by testing T1R2 knockout (KO) and T1R3 KO mice and their wild-type (WT) littermate controls in a series of brief-access taste tests (25-min sessions with 5-s trials). Sucrose, Na-saccharin, and Polycose were each tested for three consecutive sessions with order of presentation varied among subgroups in a Latin-Square manner. Both KO groups displayed blunted licking responses and initiated significantly fewer trials of sucrose and Na-saccharin across a range of concentrations. KO mice tested after Polycose exposure demonstrated some degree of concentration-dependent licking of sucrose, likely attributable to learning related to prior postingestive experience. These results are consistent with prior findings in the literature, implicating the T1R2+3 heterodimer as the principal taste receptor for sweet-tasting ligands, and also provide support for the potential of postingestive experience to influence responding in the KO mice. In contrast, T1R2 KO and T1R3 KO mice displayed concentration-dependent licking responses to Polycose that tracked those of their WT controls and in some cases licked midrange concentrations more; the number of Polycose trials initiated overall did not differ between KO and WT mice. Thus, the T1R2 and T1R3 proteins are individually unnecessary for normal concentration-dependent licking of Polycose to be expressed in a brief-access test. Whether at least one of these T1R protein subunits is necessary for normal Polycose responsiveness remains untested. Alternatively, there may be a novel taste receptor(s) that mediates polysaccharide taste. PMID:19158407

  20. Magnetic cycles of Sun-like stars with different levels of coronal and chromospheric activity — comparison with the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimanovskaya, Elena; Bruevich, Vasiliy; Bruevich, Elena

    2016-09-01

    The atmospheric activity of the Sun and Sun-like stars is analyzed involving observations from the HK-project at the Mount Wilson Observatory, the California and Carnegie Planet Search Program at the Keck and Lick Observatories and the Magellan Planet Search Program at the Las Campanas Observatory. We show that for stars of F, G and K spectral classes, the cyclic activity, similar to the 11-yr solar cycle, is different: it becomes more prominent in K-stars. Comparative study of Sun-like stars with different levels of chromospheric and coronal activity confirms that the Sun belongs to stars with a low level of chromospheric activity and stands apart among these stars by its minimum level of coronal radiation and minimum level of variations in photospheric flux.

  1. Strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, Charles; Farhi, Edward; Olinto, Angela

    1986-01-01

    Strange matter, a form of quark matter that is postulated to be absolute stable, may be the true ground stage of the hadrons. If this hypothesis is correct, neutron stars may convert to 'strange stars'. The mass-radius relation for strange stars is very different from that of neutron stars; there is no minimum mass, and for mass of 1 solar mass or less, mass is proportional to the cube of the radius. For masses between 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses, the radii of strange stars are about 10 km, as for neutron stars. Strange stars may have an exposed quark surface, which is capable of radiating at rates greatly exceeding the Eddington limit, but has a low emissivity for X-ray photons. The stars may have a thin crust with the same composition as the preneutron drip outer layer of a conventional neutron star crust. Strange stars cool efficiently via neutrino emission.

  2. Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, G.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A Be star (pronounced `bee-ee' star) is a non-supergiant B-type star whose spectrum displays or has displayed one or more Balmer lines in emission and Be is the notation for the spectral classification of such a star (see also CLASSIFICATION OF STELLAR SPECTRA). `Classical' Be stars are believed to have acquired the circumstellar (CS) material that produces the Balmer emission through ejection of...

  3. Stars and Star Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  4. Image improvement from a sodium-layer laser guide star adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Olivier, S.S.; Friedman, H.W.

    1997-09-12

    A sodium-layer laser guide star beacon with high-order adaptive optics at Lick Observatory (Mount Hamilton, California) produced a factor of 2.4 intensity increase and a factor of 2 decrease in full width at half maximum for an astronomical point source, compared with image motion compensation alone. The image full widths at half maximum were identical for laser and natural guide stars (0.3 arc second). The Strehl ratio with the laser guide star was 65 percent of that with a natural guide star. This technique should allow ground-based telescopes to attain the diffraction limit, by correcting for atmospheric distortions. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. PRECISE DOPPLER MONITORING OF BARNARD'S STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jieun; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard; McCarthy, Chris; Fischer, Debra A.; Johnson, John A.; Wright, Jason T.

    2013-02-20

    We present 248 precise Doppler measurements of Barnard's Star (Gl 699), the second nearest star system to Earth, obtained from Lick and Keck Observatories during the 25 years between 1987 and 2012. The early precision was 20 m s{sup -1} but was 2 m s{sup -1} during the last 8 years, constituting the most extensive and sensitive search for Doppler signatures of planets around this stellar neighbor. We carefully analyze the 136 Keck radial velocities spanning 8 years by first applying a periodogram analysis to search for nearly circular orbits. We find no significant periodic Doppler signals with amplitudes above {approx}2 m s{sup -1}, setting firm upper limits on the minimum mass (Msin i) of any planets with orbital periods from 0.1 to 1000 days. Using a Monte Carlo analysis for circular orbits, we determine that planetary companions to Barnard's Star with masses above 2 M {sub Circled-Plus} and periods below 10 days would have been detected. Planets with periods up to 2 years and masses above 10 M {sub Circled-Plus} (0.03 M {sub Jup}) are also ruled out. A similar analysis allowing for eccentric orbits yields comparable mass limits. The habitable zone of Barnard's Star appears to be devoid of roughly Earth-mass planets or larger, save for face-on orbits. Previous claims of planets around the star by van de Kamp are strongly refuted. The radial velocity of Barnard's Star increases with time at 4.515 {+-} 0.002 m s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, consistent with the predicted geometrical effect, secular acceleration, that exchanges transverse for radial components of velocity.

  6. Pulsating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.

    2015-03-01

    This book surveys our understanding of stars which change in brightness because they pulsate. Pulsating variable stars are keys to distance scales inside and beyond the Milky Way galaxy. They test our understanding not only of stellar pulsation theory but also of stellar structure and evolution theory. Moreover, pulsating stars are important probes of the formation and evolution of our own and neighboring galaxies. Our understanding of pulsating stars has greatly increased in recent years as large-scale surveys of pulsating stars in the Milky Way and other Local Group galaxies have provided a wealth of new observations and as space-based instruments have studied particular pulsating stars in unprecedented detail.

  7. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  8. Desing of a Laser Guide Star System for the Keck II Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.W.; Erbert, G.V.; Kuklo, T.; Thompson, G.R.; Wong, N.J.; Gavel, D.T.; Salmon, J.T.; Feldman, M.

    1997-09-11

    A laser guide star system similar to that deployed at the Lick Observatory has been designed for the Keck II 10 m telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The subaperature size on the primary is comparable to that at Lick, and at the same observational wavelength centered about the K band, so that the average power requirements of the laser system are also comparable, at about 20 W. One major difference is that the seeing at Mauna Kea is about a factor of two better than at Lick so that the spot diameter requirements are smaller and this can give rise to reduced back scatter resulting from saturation effects in the sodium layer. To reduce the peak flux in the sodium layer and obtain a smaller spot diameter, the output beam diameter has been increased along with the repetition rate of the laser. As with the Lick laser system, a dye laser is pumped by a series of frequency doubled YAG lasers which are remotely located and coupled to the dye laser on the telescope by optical fibers. The laser system has a full set of beam control optics as well as launch telescope and safety systems. A computer system couples the laser system to the User Interface and Supervisory Control system of the main telescope. The laser system is due to be shipped to Keck during the fall of 1997 where it will be integrated with the telescope at Mauna Kea. The Adaptive Optics and Optics Bench systems will be integrated first and be ready for integration with the laser in the summer of 1998. 1 ref., 8 figs.

  9. Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  10. STAR System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doverspike, James E.

    The STAR System is a developmental guidance approach to be used with elementary school children in the 5th or 6th grades. Two basic purposes underlie STAR: to increase learning potential and to enhance personal growth and development. STAR refers to 4 basic skills: sensory, thinking, adapting, and revising. Major components of the 4 skills are:…

  11. CH Stars and Barium Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, H.; Sion, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The classical barium (or `Ba II') stars are RED GIANT STARS whose spectra show strong absorption lines of barium, strontium and certain other heavy elements, as well as strong features due to carbon molecules. Together with the related class of CH stars, the Ba II stars were crucial in establishing the existence of neutron-capture reactions in stellar interiors that are responsible for the synt...

  12. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT 2011: DYNAMICAL MODELING OF THE BROAD-LINE REGION IN Mrk 50

    SciTech Connect

    Pancoast, Anna; Brewer, Brendon J.; Treu, Tommaso; Bennert, Vardha N.; Sand, David J.; Barth, Aaron J.; Cooper, Michael C.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto J.; Woo, Jong-Hak; Bae, Hyun-Jin; Buehler, Tabitha; and others

    2012-07-20

    We present dynamical modeling of the broad-line region (BLR) in the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 50 using reverberation mapping data taken as part of the Lick AGN Monitoring Project (LAMP) 2011. We model the reverberation mapping data directly, constraining the geometry and kinematics of the BLR, as well as deriving a black hole mass estimate that does not depend on a normalizing factor or virial coefficient. We find that the geometry of the BLR in Mrk 50 is a nearly face-on thick disk, with a mean radius of 9.6{sup +1.2}{sub -0.9} light days, a width of the BLR of 6.9{sup +1.2}{sub -1.1} light days, and a disk opening angle of 25 {+-} 10 deg above the plane. We also constrain the inclination angle to be 9{sup +7}{sub -5} deg, close to face-on. Finally, the black hole mass of Mrk 50 is inferred to be log{sub 10}(M{sub BH}/M{sub Sun }) = 7.57{sup +0.44}{sub -0.27}. By comparison to the virial black hole mass estimate from traditional reverberation mapping analysis, we find the normalizing constant (virial coefficient) to be log{sub 10} f = 0.78{sup +0.44}{sub -0.27}, consistent with the commonly adopted mean value of 0.74 based on aligning the M{sub BH}-{sigma}* relation for active galactic nuclei and quiescent galaxies. While our dynamical model includes the possibility of a net inflow or outflow in the BLR, we cannot distinguish between these two scenarios.

  13. Precise radial velocities of giant stars. VIII. Testing for the presence of planets with CRIRES infrared radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, Trifon; Reffert, Sabine; Zechmeister, Mathias; Reiners, Ansgar; Quirrenbach, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Context. We have been monitoring 373 very bright (V ≤ 6 mag) G and K giants with high precision optical Doppler spectroscopy for more than a decade at Lick Observatory. Our goal was to discover planetary companions around those stars and to better understand planet formation and evolution around intermediate-mass stars. However, in principle, long-term, g-mode nonradial stellar pulsations or rotating stellar features, such as spots, could effectively mimic a planetary signal in the radial velocity data. Aims: Our goal is to compare optical and infrared radial velocities for those stars with periodic radial velocity patterns and to test for consistency of their fitted radial velocity semiamplitudes. Thereby, we distinguish processes intrinsic to the star from orbiting companions as reason for the radial velocity periodicity observed in the optical. Methods: Stellar spectra with high spectral resolution have been taken in the H-band with the CRIRES near-infrared spectrograph at ESO's VLT for 20 stars of our Lick survey. Radial velocities are derived using many deep and stable telluric CO2 lines for precise wavelength calibration. Results: We find that the optical and near-infrared radial velocities of the giant stars in our sample are consistent. We present detailed results for eight stars in our sample previously reported to have planets or brown dwarf companions. All eight stars passed the infrared test. Conclusions: We conclude that the planet hypothesis provides the best explanation for the periodic radial velocity patterns observed for these giant stars. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under program IDs 088.D-0132, 089.D-0186, 090.D-0155 and 091.D-0365.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Super-metal-rich stars (Buzzoni+, 2001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzoni, A.; Chavez, M.; Malagnini, M. L.; Morossi, C.

    2002-01-01

    We present Lick spectral indices for a complete sample of 139 candidate super-metal-rich stars of different luminosity classes (MK type from I to V). For 91 of these stars we were able to identify, in an accompanying paper, the fundamental atmosphere parameters. This confirms that at least 2/3 of the sample consists of stars with [Fe/H] in excess of +0.1 dex. Optical indices for both observations and fiducial synthetic spectra have been calibrated to the Lick system according to Worthey et al. (1994, Cat. ) and include the FeI indices of Fe5015, Fe5270, and Fe5335 and the MgI and MgH indices of Mg2 and Mgb at 5180Å. The internal accuracy of the observations is found to be σ(Fe5015)=10.32Å, σ(Fe5270)=10.19Å, σ(Fe5335)=10.22Å, σ(Mg2)=10.004mag, and σ(Mgb)=10.19Å. This is about a factor of 2 better than the corresponding theoretical indices from the synthetic spectra, the latter being a consequence of the intrinsic limitations in the input physics, as discussed by Chavez et al. (1997, Cat. ). (1 data file).

  15. The StarScan Plate Measuring Machine: Overview and Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, N.; Winter, L.; Holdenried, E. R.; De Cuyper, J.-P.; Rafferty, T. J.; Wycoff, G. L.

    2008-06-01

    The StarScan machine at the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) completed measuring photographic astrograph plates to allow determination of proper motions for the USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC) program. All applicable 1940 AGK2 plates, about 2200 Hamburg Zone Astrograph plates, 900 Black Birch (USNO Twin Astrograph) plates, and 300 Lick Astrograph plates have been measured. StarScan comprises a CCD camera, a telecentric lens, an air-bearing granite table, stepper motor screws, and Heidenhain scales to operate in a step-stare mode. The repeatability of StarScan measures is about 0.2 μm. The CCD mapping as well as the global table coordinate system has been calibrated using a special dot calibration plate and the overall accuracy of StarScan x, y data is derived to be 0.5 μm. Application to real photographic plate data shows that position information of at least 0.65 μm accuracy can be extracted from coarse-grain 103a-type emulsion astrometric plates. Transformations between "direct" and "reverse" measures of fine-grain emulsion plate measures are obtained on the 0.3 μm level per well-exposed stellar image and coordinate, a level that is at the limit of the StarScan machine.

  16. Studies of Extreme Carbon Stars. 2; Periods From Optical Spectral Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Hitchon, Keith; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Rocket and satellite IR sky surveys have revealed vast populations of extreme AGB stars with substantial circumstellar dust shells. It is normally assumed that these shells permit essentially no light to escape. However, using the Lick 3 meter reflector we have been able to secure and analyze a large number of spectra of a well-defined sample of these extreme evolved stars. From this archive we have determined that these objects are all long period Mira variables and have estimated their periods, correlated these with IR photometric variations, and deduced distances to the stars. The data reveal a population of disk carbon-giants, typically of 1-2 yr periods, mostly within 2 kpc of the sun. We have also been able to quantify the thickness of their dust shells.

  17. Spectrophotometry of 237 Stars in 7 Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, Lori; Burstein, David

    1997-08-01

    Spectrophotometry is presented for 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M39. The observations were taken by Lee McDonald and David Burstein using the Wampler single-channel scanner on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. Sixteen bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwidths 32Angstroms, 48 Angstroms or 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes-Latham system to mutual accuracy of 0.016 mag per passband. The accuracy of the spectrophotometry is assessed in three ways on a star-by-star basis. First, comparisons are made with previously published spectrophotometry for 19 stars observed in common. Second, (B-V) colors and uvby colors are compared for 236 stars and 221 stars, respectively. Finally, comparsions are made for 200 main sequence stars to the spectral synthesis models of Kurucz, fixing log g = 4.0 and [Fe/H] = 0.0, and only varying effective temperature. The accuracy of tests using uvby colors and the Kurucz models are shown to track each other closely, yielding an accuracy estimate (1 sigma ) of 0.01 mag for the 13 colors formed from bandpasses longward of the Balmer jump, and 0.02 mag for the 3 colors formed from the three bandpasses below the Balmer jump. In contrast, larger scatter is found relative to the previously published spectrophotometry of Bohm-Vitense & Johnson (16 stars in common) and Gunn & Stryker (3 stars). We also show that the scatter in the fits of the spectrophotometric colors and the uvby filter colors is a reasonable way to identify the observations of which specific stars are accurate to 1 sigma , 2 sigma , .... As such, the residuals from both the filter color fits and the Kurucz model fits are tabulated for each star where it was possible to make a comparison, so users of these data can choose stars according to the accuracy of the data

  18. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT: THE M {sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} RELATION FOR REVERBERATION-MAPPED ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Jong-Hak; Treu, Tommaso; Bennert, Vardha N.; Barth, Aaron J.; Walsh, Jonelle L.; Bentz, Misty C.; Wright, Shelley A.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong; Martini, Paul; Canalizo, Gabriela; Gates, Elinor; Greene, Jenny; Malkan, Matthew A.; Stern, Daniel; Minezaki, Takeo

    2010-06-10

    To investigate the black hole mass versus stellar velocity dispersion (M {sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *}) relation of active galaxies, we measured the velocity dispersions of a sample of local Seyfert 1 galaxies, for which we have recently determined black hole masses using reverberation mapping. For most objects, stellar velocity dispersions were measured from high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra centered on the Ca II triplet region ({approx}8500 A), obtained at the Keck, Palomar, and Lick Observatories. For two objects, in which the Ca II triplet region was contaminated by nuclear emission, the measurement was based on high-quality H-band spectra obtained with the OH-Suppressing Infrared Imaging Spectrograph at the Keck-II telescope. Combining our new measurements with data from the literature, we assemble a sample of 24 active galaxies with stellar velocity dispersions and reverberation-based black hole mass measurements in the range of black hole mass 10{sup 6} < M {sub BH}/M {sub sun} < 10{sup 9}. We use this sample to obtain reverberation-mapping constraints on the slope and intrinsic scatter of the M {sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation of active galaxies. Assuming a constant virial coefficient f for the reverberation-mapping black hole masses, we find a slope {beta} = 3.55 {+-} 0.60 and the intrinsic scatter {sigma}{sub int} = 0.43 {+-} 0.08 dex in the relation log(M {sub BH}/M {sub sun}) = {alpha} + {beta} log({sigma}{sub *}/200 km s{sup -1}), which are consistent with those found for quiescent galaxies. We derive an updated value of the virial coefficient f by finding the value which places the reverberation masses in best agreement with the M {sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation of quiescent galaxies; using the quiescent M {sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation determined by Gueltekin et al., we find log f = 0.72{sup +0.09} {sub -0.10} with an intrinsic scatter of 0.44 {+-} 0.07 dex. No strong correlations between f and parameters connected to the physics of accretion

  19. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT: BROAD-LINE REGION RADII AND BLACK HOLE MASSES FROM REVERBERATION MAPPING OF Hbeta

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Misty C.; Walsh, Jonelle L.; Barth, Aaron J.; Baliber, Nairn; Bennert, Vardha Nicola; Greene, Jenny E.; Hidas, Marton G.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Hiner, Kyle D.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Lee, Nicholas; Li, Weidong; Serduke, Frank J. D.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Steele, Thea N.; Gates, Elinor L.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Minezaki, Takeo; Sakata, Yu

    2009-11-01

    We have recently completed a 64-night spectroscopic monitoring campaign at the Lick Observatory 3-m Shane telescope with the aim of measuring the masses of the black holes in 12 nearby (z < 0.05) Seyfert 1 galaxies with expected masses in the range approx10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M {sub sun} and also the well-studied nearby active galactic nucleus (AGN) NGC 5548. Nine of the objects in the sample (including NGC 5548) showed optical variability of sufficient strength during the monitoring campaign to allow for a time lag to be measured between the continuum fluctuations and the response to these fluctuations in the broad Hbeta emission. We present here the light curves for all the objects in this sample and the subsequent Hbeta time lags for the nine objects where these measurements were possible. The Hbeta lag time is directly related to the size of the broad-line region (BLR) in AGNs, and by combining the Hbeta lag time with the measured width of the Hbeta emission line in the variable part of the spectrum, we determine the virial mass of the central supermassive black hole in these nine AGNs. The absolute calibration of the black hole masses is based on the normalization derived by Onken et al., which brings the masses determined by reverberation mapping into agreement with the local M {sub BH}-sigma{sub *}relationship for quiescent galaxies. We also examine the time lag response as a function of velocity across the Hbeta line profile for six of the AGNs. The analysis of four leads to rather ambiguous results with relatively flat time lags as a function of velocity. However, SBS 1116+583A exhibits a symmetric time lag response around the line center reminiscent of simple models for circularly orbiting BLR clouds, and Arp 151 shows an asymmetric profile that is most easily explained by a simple gravitational infall model. Further investigation will be necessary to fully understand the constraints placed on the physical models of the BLR by the velocity-resolved response

  20. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars. PMID:17836594

  1. Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings. PMID:27299693

  2. Planetary Systems Around Spectroscopic Binary Stars: The Very Dusty, Old, Sun-like BD+20 307

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerman, Ben M.; Fekel, F. C.; Williamson, M. H.; Henry, G. W.; Muno, M. P.; Melis, C.; Marois, C.

    2009-01-01

    Field star BD+20 307 is the dustiest known main sequence star, based on the fraction of its bolometric luminosity, 4%, emitted at infrared wavelengths (Song et al. 2005; Rhee et al. 2008). The temperature of the particles that carry this large IR luminosity is comparable to that of the Sun's zodiacal dust, and their existence is likely a consequence of a fairly recent collision of large objects such as planets or planetary embryos. BD+20 307 is now known to be a 3.4 day spectroscopic binary composed of two nearly equal solar-mass stars (Weinberger 2008; Zuckerman et al. 2008). Consideration of various age indicators implies that that star is likely to be at least one Gyr old, perhaps many Gyr old. Probably the dust around this close binary star has nothing to do with planet formation and everything to do with some major catastrophic event that recently took place near 1 AU in a mature planetary system. Destabilizing planetary orbits in an old system with a single star at its center appears to be possible, e.g., Mercury (Batygin & Laughlin 2008 and references therein). Destabilization may be easier to achieve in a close binary star system and easier yet in a triple star system. Tokovinin et al. (2006) conclude that, for a spectroscopic binary star with an orbital period of 3.4 days, the probability is 70% that a third star is present. Thus, we have searched for such a tertiary star in the BD+20 307 system using accurate radial velocities measured at Fairborn and Lick observatories and with adaptive optics imaging at Keck observatory. As of the writing of this abstract, no third star is detected. Limits on mass and semimajor axis of any tertiary star will be discussed. This research was supported by a grant from the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  3. Van Gogh's Starry Nights, Lincoln's Moon, Shakespeare's Stars, and More: Tales of Astronomy in Art, History, and Literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Donald W.

    2009-01-01

    How do astronomical methods make it possible to calculate dates and times for Vincent van Gogh's night-sky paintings? Why is there a blood-red sky in Edvard Munch's The Scream? How can the 18.6-year cycle of the lunar nodes and the Moon's declination on the night of August 29-30, 1857, explain a long-standing mystery about Abraham Lincoln's honesty in the murder case known as the almanac trial? Why is a bright star described in Act 1, Scene 1, of Hamlet? There is a long tradition of astronomical methods employed to analyze works of art, to understand historical events, and to elucidate passages in literature. Both Edmond Halley and George Biddell Airy calculated lunar phases and tide tables in attempts to determine the landing beach where Julius Caesar invaded Britain in 55 B.C. Henry Norris Russell computed configurations of Jupiter and Saturn to determine a date for a 14th-century celestial event mentioned in Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde. In this tradition, our Texas State group has published a series of articles in Sky & Telescope over the last two decades, applying astronomy to art, history, and literature. Don Osterbrock worked with us 3 years ago when my students and I calculated dates for moonrise photographs taken by Ansel Adams in Yosemite National Park. The peaks of the Sierra Nevada crest in Yosemite are more than 125 miles from Lick Observatory, but the mountains can become visible from Lick on clear winter days and were photographed from there on early infrared-sensitive plates during the 1920s and 1930s. As we tested our topographic software by identifying the peaks that appear in the Lick plates, it was a pleasure to come to know Don, a former director of Lick Observatory and the person in whose honor this talk is dedicated.

  4. The Lick-Carnegie exoplanet survey: Gliese 687 b—A Neptune-mass planet orbiting a nearby red dwarf

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, Jennifer; Vogt, Steven S.; Hanson, Russell; Rivera, Eugenio J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Meschiari, Stefano; Henry, Gregory W.

    2014-07-10

    Precision radial velocities from the Automated Planet Finder (APF) and Keck/HIRES reveal an Msin (i) = 18 ± 2 M{sub ⊕} planet orbiting the nearby M3V star GJ 687. This planet has an orbital period P = 38.14 days and a low orbital eccentricity. Our Strömgren b and y photometry of the host star suggests a stellar rotation signature with a period of P = 60 days. The star is somewhat chromospherically active, with a spot filling factor estimated to be several percent. The rotationally induced 60 day signal, however, is well separated from the period of the radial velocity variations, instilling confidence in the interpretation of a Keplerian origin for the observed velocity variations. Although GJ 687 b produces relatively little specific interest in connection with its individual properties, a compelling case can be argued that it is worthy of remark as an eminently typical, yet at a distance of 4.52 pc, a very nearby representative of the galactic planetary census. The detection of GJ 687 b indicates that the APF telescope is well suited to the discovery of low-mass planets orbiting low-mass stars in the as yet relatively un-surveyed region of the sky near the north celestial pole.

  5. Hypervelocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Warren R.

    2015-08-01

    Hypervelocity stars (HVSs) travel with such extreme velocities that dynamical ejection via gravitational interaction with a massive black hole (MBH) is their most likely origin. Observers have discovered dozens of unbound main-sequence stars since the first in 2005, and the velocities, stellar nature, spatial distribution, and overall numbers of unbound B stars in the Milky Way halo all fit an MBH origin. Theorists have proposed various mechanisms for ejecting unbound stars, and these mechanisms can be tested with larger and more complete samples. HVSs' properties are linked to the nature and environment of the Milky Way's MBH, and, with future proper motion measurements, their trajectories may provide unique probes of the dark matter halo that surrounds the Milky Way.

  6. STARS no star on Kauai

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.

    1993-04-01

    The island of Kuai, home to the Pacific Missile Range Facility, is preparing for the first of a series of Star Wars rocket launches expected to begin early this year. The Strategic Defense Initiative plans 40 launches of the Stategic Target System (STARS) over a 10-year period. The focus of the tests appears to be weapons and sensors designed to combat multiple-warhead ICBMs, which will be banned under the START II Treaty that was signed in January. The focus of this article is to express the dubious value of testing the STARS at a time when their application will not be an anticipated problem.

  7. Photometric Observations of 6000 Stars in the Cygnus Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W.; Caldwell, D.; Koch, D.; Jenkins, J.; Ninkov, Z.

    1999-01-01

    A small photometer to detect transits by extrasolar planets has been assembled and is being tested at Lick Observatory on Mt. Hamilton, California. The Vulcan photometer is constructed from a 30 cm focal length, F/2.5 AeroEktar reconnaissance lens and Photometrics PXL16800 CCD camera. A spectral filter is used to confine the pass band from 480 to 763 mn. It simultaneously monitors 6000 stars brighter than 12th magnitude within a single star field in the galactic plane. When the data are folded and phased to discover low amplitude transits, the relative precision of one-hour samples is about 1 part per thousand (10 x l0(exp -3)) for many of the brighter stars. This precision is sufficient to find jovian-size planets orbiting solar-like stars, which have signal amplitudes from 5 to 30 x l0(exp -3) depending on the inflation of the planet and the size of the star. Based on the frequency of giant inner-planets discovered by Doppler-velocity method, one or two planets should be detectable in a rich star field. The goal of the observations is to obtain the sizes of giant extrasolar planets in short-period orbits and to combine these with masses determined from Doppler velocity measurements to determine the densities of these planets. A further goal is to compare the measured planetary diameters with those predicted from theoretical models. From August 10 through September 30 of 1998, a forty nine square degree field in the Cygnus constellation centered at RA and DEC of 19 hr 47 min, +36 deg 55 min was observed. Useful data were obtained on twenty-nine nights. Nearly fifty stars showed some evidence of transits with periods between 0.3 and 8 days. Most had amplitudes too large to be associated with planetary transits. However, several stars showed low amplitude transits. The data for several transits of each of these two stars have been folded and been folded into 30 minute periods. Only Cygl433 shows any evidence of a flattened bottom that is expected when a small object

  8. Symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, M.; Michalitsianos, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    The physical characteristics of symbiotic star systems are discussed, based on a review of recent observational data. A model of a symbiotic star system is presented which illustrates how a cool red-giant star is embedded in a nebula whose atoms are ionized by the energetic radiation from its hot compact companion. UV outbursts from symbiotic systems are explained by two principal models: an accretion-disk-outburst model which describes how material expelled from the tenuous envelope of the red giant forms an inwardly-spiralling disk around the hot companion, and a thermonuclear-outburst model in which the companion is specifically a white dwarf which superheats the material expelled from the red giant to the point where thermonuclear reactions occur and radiation is emitted. It is suspected that the evolutionary course of binary systems is predetermined by the initial mass and angular momentum of the gas cloud within which binary stars are born. Since red giants and Mira variables are thought to be stars with a mass of one or two solar mass, it is believed that the original cloud from which a symbiotic system is formed can consist of no more than a few solar masses of gas.

  9. Observations of comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 impact on Jupiter from Lick Obseravtory using a high resolution speckle imaging camera

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.; Gavel, D.; Johansson, E.; Sherwood, B.; Liu, M.; Bradford, B.

    1996-03-15

    During the week of the impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 into Jupiter, we used a speckle imaging camera mounted on the Lick Observatory 3 meter Telescope to record a continuous stream of images of the planet. Because the speckle imaging technique compensates for atmospheric blurring, the resulting images were most likely the highest resolution of any taken from the ground. These images compliment the Hubble Space Telescope data by covering time periods when Hubble was not observing Jupiter. We collected full planet 1024 by 1024 pixel CCD images taken 20 per minute for 4 hours per night over 6 nights July 15 to 22. Only a portion of this raw data has been reduced to high resolution images to date.

  10. Pasteurella multocida non-native joint infection after a dog lick: A case report describing a complicated two-stage revision and a comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Philip W, Lam; Page, Andrea V

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are commonly caused by pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci; however, other microbial etiologies and specific risk factors are increasingly recognized. Pasteurella multocida is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that is part of the normal oral flora in many animals, and is particularly common in dogs and cats. PJIs caused by P multocida have been reported only rarely in the literature and typically occur in the context of an animal bite or scratch. The present article describes a P multocida joint infection that occurred after a dog lick and complicated a two-stage revision arthroplasty. A comprehensive review of the literature regarding P multocida PJIs follows. PMID:26361490

  11. Modified level II streambed-scour analysis for structure I-70-69-5185 crossing East Fork White Lick Creek in Hendricks County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, B.A.; Voelker, D.C.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Level II scour evaluations follow a process in which hydrologic, hydraulic, and sediment transport data are evaluated to calculate the depth of scour that may result when a given discharge is routed through a bridge opening. The results of the modified Level II analysis for structure 1-70-69-5185 on Interstate 70 crossing East Fork White Lick Creek in Hendricks County, Indiana, are presented. The site is near the town of Camby and is in the southeastern part of Hendricks County. Scour depths were computed with the Water Surface PROfile model, version V050196, which incorporates the scour-calculation procedures outlined in Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18. Total scour depths at the piers were approximately 12.0 feet for the modeled discharge of 5,720 cubic feet per second and approximately 13.8 feet for the modeled discharge of 7,360 cubic feet per second.

  12. An Astrometric Companion to the Nearby Metal-Poor, Low-Mass Star LHS 1589

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lépine, Sébastien; Rich, R. Michael; Shara, Michael M.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Skemer, Andrew

    2007-10-01

    We report the discovery of a companion to the high proper motion star LHS 1589, a nearby high-velocity, low-mass subdwarf. The companion (LHS 1589B) is located 0.224''+/-0.004'' to the southwest of the primary (LHS 1589A), and is 0.5 mag fainter than the primary in the Ks band. The pair was resolved with the IRCAL infrared camera at Lick Observatory, operating with the Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system. A low-resolution spectrum of the unresolved pair obtained at the MDM observatory shows the source to be consistent with a cool subdwarf of spectral subtype sdK7.5. A photometric distance estimate places the metal-poor system at a distance d=81+/-18 pc from the Sun. We also measure a radial velocity Vrad=67+/-8 km s-1, which, together with the proper motion and estimated distance, suggests that the pair is roaming the inner Galactic halo on a highly eccentric orbit. With a projected orbital separation s=18.1+/-4.8 AU, and a crude estimate of the system's total mass, we estimate the orbital period of the system to be in the range 75 yr stars. Based on observations performed with the Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system at the Lick Observatory, operated by the University of California system. Based on observations conducted at the MDM observatory, operated jointly by the University of Michigan, Dartmouth College, the Ohio State University, Columbia University, and the University of Ohio.

  13. THE MANGANESE MERCURY STAR π1 BOOTIS

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, John Wm.; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1969-01-01

    High-dispersion plates secured with the Coudé spectrograph of the Lick 120 inch telescope have been used to analyze the peculiar A star π1 Bootis. Spectral-energy distribution measurements are combined with line-intensity data for iron and manganese in two stages of ionization to obtain a fit with model atmospheres for Teff = 13,000°K and log g = 4. The influence of adopted T and g on the derived abundances is discussed. Although C, O, Mg, Si, Ti, Cr, and Fe appear to have nearly normal (i.e., solar) abundances, strontium appears to be enhanced in abundance by an order of magnitude, and scandium is about 50 times overabundant, while manganese and yttrium appear to be two orders of magnitude overabundant. If the identification of gallium is correct, this element is overabundant by a factor approaching 100,000; while if λ3983.90 is to be attributed to HgII, as Bidelman suggests, the overabundance of this element is many orders of magnitude. PMID:16578698

  14. A survey study of energy distribution in component stars of Algol-type binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobias, Jan Joseph

    A study survey of Algol-type binary systems was undertaken in order to investigate radiative flux distributions of their component stars. For hot primaries low-dispersion ultraviolet spectra, made with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUD) satellite, are combined at comparable phases with optical spectrophotometric scans, made at Lick Observatory, and then matched with a least-square method to Kurucz model atmospheres. Cooler secondaries are classified by matching their optical flux distributions, observed at totality, to standard stars. Results show that the U Sagittae system consists of a B7.5V-IV star while the secondary is matched by a G4III IV standard. The RW Tauri system consists of a B8V primary, while the secondary is matched by a KOIII standard. The UV spectrum of the primary in RY Geminorum matches that of an AOV standard. The secondary in RY GEM is KOIV. The system of RS Cephei consists of B9.7Ve and G8III-IV stars. The system of RW Persei consists of B9.6e and K2(+ or - 2)IV-III stars. The system of RX Geminorum consists of AOV or AOIII and K2(+ or - 2) stars. Finally, in Beta Lyrae the primary appears to be a B8.5-B9II-Ib object.

  15. Chameleon stars

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Folomeev, Vladimir; Singleton, Douglas

    2011-10-15

    We consider a gravitating spherically symmetric configuration consisting of a scalar field nonminimally coupled to ordinary matter in the form of a perfect fluid. For this system we find static, regular, asymptotically flat solutions for both relativistic and nonrelativistic cases. It is shown that the presence of the nonminimal interaction leads to substantial changes both in the radial matter distribution of the star and in the star's total mass. A simple stability test indicates that, for the choice of parameters used in the paper, the solutions are unstable.

  16. The friendly stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Martha Evans

    Describes prominent stars such as Vega, Arcturus, and Antares and means of identifying them, discusses the constellations in which they are located, and explains star names, stellar light, distances between stars, and types of stars.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2013-11-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2014-11-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2011-11-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2009-10-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2010-11-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2012-11-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2016-07-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2016-08-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2015-11-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  6. Barnard’s Star: Planets or Pretense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Jennifer L.; Ianna, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Barnard’s Star remains popular with planet hunters because it is not only an extremely near, high proper motion star, but also the object of early planet-detection claims. In 1963, van de Kamp explained perturbations in its proper motion by the presence of a planet. In 1969, he produced another single-planet solution and a two-planet solution to the astrometric wobbles detected. At least 19 studies have failed to confirm his results using a range of techniques, including radial velocity, direct imaging, and speckle interferometry. However, most of them lacked the sensitivity to detect the planets he described, including astrometric studies at the McCormick and Naval Observatories. However, radial-velocity monitoring of Barnard’s Star at Lick and Keck Observatories from 1987 through 2012 appears to have ruled out such planets. Based upon observations made at the Sproul Observatory between 1916 and 1962, van de Kamp claimed that Barnard’s Star had a planet with about 1.6 times the mass of Jupiter and an orbital period of 24 years. After accounting for instrumentation effects that might have been partially responsible for his initial results, he continued to assert that this red dwarf had two planets. In his 1982 analysis of ~20,000 exposures collected between 1938 and 1981, he calculated that two planets with 0.7- and 0.5-Jupiter masses in 12- and 20-year orbits, respectively, orbited the second-closest stellar system to our own. Starting in 1995, the dramatic successes of radial velocity searches for extrasolar planets drove van de Kamp’s unsubstantiated claims from popular consciousness. Although many low-mass stellar companions were discovered through astrometry, the technique has been less successful for planets: “The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia” identifies one such discovery out of the 997 planets listed on 2013 September 23. Although Barnard’s Star has lost its pretensions to hosting the first extrasolar planets known, its intrinsic

  7. Star Power

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  8. Star Power

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-11-18

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  9. Star Numbers and Constellations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    A number for which the number of digits categorizes the number is called a star number. A set of star numbers having a designated property is called a constellation. Discusses nature and cardinality of constellations made up of star square, star prime, star abundant, and star deficient numbers. Presents five related problems for exploration. (MDH)

  10. Converting neutron stars into strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    If strange matter is formed in the interior of a neutron star, it will convert the entire neutron star into a strange star. The proposed mechanisms are reviewed for strange matter seeding and the possible strange matter contamination of neutron star progenitors. The conversion process that follows seeding and the recent calculations of the conversion timescale are discussed.

  11. Christmas star.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biała, J.

    There are continuous attempts to identify the legendary Christmas Star with a real astronomical event accompanying the birth of Jesus from Nazareth. Unfortunately, the date of birth is difficult to establish on the basis of historical records with better accuracy than a few years. During that period a number of peculiar astronomical events were observed and it seem to be impossible to identify the right one unambiguously.

  12. Exceptional Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Hansen, B.; van Kerkwijk, M.; Phinney, E. S.

    2005-12-01

    As part of our Interdisciplinary Scientist effort (PI, Kulkarni) for the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) we proposed an investigation with SIM of a number of exceptional stars. With SIM we plan to observe dozens of nearby white dwarfs and search for planets surviving the evolution away from the main sequence as well as (newly formed) planets formed in the circumbinary disks of post-AGB binaries or as a result of white dwarf mergers. We propose to measure the proper motion of a sample of X-ray binaries and Be star binaries with the view of understanding the originof high latitude objects and inferring natal kicks and pre-supernova orbits. We plan to observe several compact object binaries to determine the mass of the compact star. Of particular importance is the proposed observation of SS 433 (for which we propose to use the spectrometer on SIM to measure the proper motion of the emission line clumps embedded in the relativistic jets). Separately we are investigating the issue of frame tie between SIM and the ecliptic frame (by observing binary millisecond pulsars with SIM; the position of these objects is very well determined by pulsar timing) and the degree to which highly precise visibility amplitude measurements can be inverted to infer binary parameters.

  13. Symbiotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.

    2012-06-01

    Symbiotic stars are interacting binary systems composed of a white dwarf (WD) accreting at high rate from a cool giant companion, which frequently fills its Roche lobe. The WD usually is extremely hot and luminous, and able to ionize a sizeable fraction of the cool giant wind, because it is believed the WD undergoes stable hydrogen nuclear burning on its surface of the material accreted from the companion. This leads to consider symbiotic stars as good candidates for the yet-to-be-identified progenitors of type Ia supernovae. Symbiotic stars display the simultaneous presence of many different types of variability, induced by the cool giant, the accreting WD, the circumstellar dust and ionized gas, with time scales ranging from seconds to decades. The long orbital periods (typically a couple of years) and complex outburst patterns, lasting from a few years to a century, make observations from professionals almost impossible to carry out, and open great opportunities to amateur astronomers to contribute fundamental data to science.

  14. Star ratings. Stars of wonder.

    PubMed

    Dawes, David

    2002-09-12

    Analysis of trusts that changed their star-rating over the past two years indicates that a change of chief executive was not a significant factor. The length of time in post and the experience of the chief executive were also insignificant. This has serious implications for the theory behind franchising and the evaluation of franchised trusts. Holding chief executives to account for the organisation's performance within their first 12 months is unlikely to be effective. PMID:12357738

  15. Studies of bipolar nebulae. VII - The exciting star of OH 0739-14 /equals OH 231.8 plus 4.2/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M.

    1981-01-01

    A spectral classification for the exciting star of the bipolar reflection nebula OH 0739-14, which has also been observed to be an OH/H2O maser source, is obtained from the spectrum of the nebulosity in the range 6000-9000 A. Spectrophotometry of the visible nebula was obtained with the Cassegrain image-tube scanner on the Lick Observatory 3-m telescope at a resolution of approximately 7 A. The red spectrum is found to be distinguished by TiO absorption at the bandheads at 8206, 8303, 8432, 8442 and 8452 A and VO in the 7400 and 7900 A regions. On the basis of the depths of these bandheads and the K I 7699 A and Ca II infrared triplet, OH 0739-14 is determined to be of spectral type M9 III. The underlying star thus represents the coolest known star to occur in a bipolar system.

  16. The Stellar Populations of Nuclei, Globular Clusters, and Stars in dE Galaxies in Virgo and Fornax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield Miller, Bryan; Hyazinth Puzia, Thomas; Hilker, Michael; Sanchez-Janssen, Ruben; Kissler-Patig, Markus

    2015-08-01

    We present ages and metallicities for globular clusters, nuclei, and underlying stars in nucleated dwarf elliptical galaxies (dE,N) in the Virgo and Fornax Cluster based on Lick/IDS index measurements and SSP models. Gemini/GMOS spectroscopy shows that the globular clusters are mostly old and metal-poor, very similar to the globular clusters in the Milky Way halo. The nuclei and underlying stars tend to be more metal-rich than the globular clusters and have a wide range of ages. The [α/Fe] ratios for both the globular clusters and nuclei range between 0.0 and 0.3. Formation scenarios for globular clusters and nuclei will be discussed.

  17. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars. PMID:17749544

  18. Eutactic star closest to a given star

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, A.; Torres, M.; Aragon, J. L.

    2007-05-15

    A eutactic star is a set of M vectors in R{sup n} (M>n) that are projections of M orthogonal vectors in R{sup M}. Eutactic stars have remarkable properties that have been exploited in several fields such as crystallography, graph theory, wavelets, and quantum measurement theory. In this work we show that given an arbitrary star of vectors, there exists a closest eutactic star in the Frobenius norm. An algorithm for calculating this star is presented. Additionally, the distance between both stars provides a new measure of eutacticity.

  19. Star formation - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, N. J., II

    1985-01-01

    Methods for studying star formation are reviewed. Stellar clusters and associations, as well as field stars, provide a fossil record of the star formation process. Regions of current star formation provide a series of snapshots of different epochs of star formation. A simplified picture of individual star formation as it was envisioned in the late 1970s is contrasted with the results of recent observations, in particular the outflow phenomenon.

  20. THE LICK-CARNEGIE EXOPLANET SURVEY: A URANUS-MASS FOURTH PLANET FOR GJ 876 IN AN EXTRASOLAR LAPLACE CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Eugenio J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Vogt, Steven S.; Meschiari, Stefano; Haghighipour, Nader

    2010-08-10

    Continued radial velocity (RV) monitoring of the nearby M4V red dwarf star GJ 876 with Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph has revealed the presence of a Uranus-mass fourth planetary companion in the system. The new planet has a mean period of P{sub e} = 126.6 days (over the 12.6-year baseline of the RV observations), and a minimum mass of m{sub e} sin i{sub e} = 12.9 {+-} 1.7 M {sub +}. The detection of the new planet has been enabled by significant improvements to our RV data set for GJ 876. The data have been augmented by 36 new high-precision measurements taken over the past five years. In addition, the precision of all of the Doppler measurements have been significantly improved by the incorporation of a high signal-to-noise template spectrum for GJ 876 into the analysis pipeline. Implementation of the new template spectrum improves the internal rms errors for the velocity measurements taken during 1998-2005 from 4.1 m s{sup -1} to 2.5 m s{sup -1}. Self-consistent, N-body fits to the RV data set show that the four-planet system has an invariable plane with an inclination relative to the plane of the sky of i = 59.{sup 0}5. The fit is not significantly improved by the introduction of a mutual inclination between the planets 'b' and 'c', but the new data do confirm a non-zero eccentricity, e{sub d} = 0.207 {+-} 0.055 for the innermost planet, 'd'. In our best-fit coplanar model, the mass of the new component is m{sub e} = 14.6 {+-} 1.7 M {sub +}. Our best-fitting model places the new planet in a three-body resonance with the previously known giant planets (which have mean periods of P{sub c} = 30.4 and P{sub b} = 61.1 days). The critical argument, {psi}{sub Laplace} = {lambda} {sub c} - 3{lambda} {sub b} + 2{lambda} {sub e}, for the Laplace resonance librates with an amplitude of {Delta}{psi}{sub Laplace} = 40{sup 0} {+-} 13{sup 0} about {psi}{sub Laplace} = 0{sup 0}. Numerical integration indicates that the four-planet system is stable for at least a

  1. THE FREQUENCY OF HOT JUPITERS ORBITING NEARBY SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J. T.; Marcy, G. W.; Howard, A. W.; Johnson, John Asher; Morton, T. D.; Fischer, D. A.

    2012-07-10

    We determine the fraction of F, G, and K dwarfs in the solar neighborhood hosting hot Jupiters as measured by the California Planet Survey from the Lick and Keck planet searches. We find the rate to be 1.2% {+-} 0.38%, which is consistent with the rate reported by Mayor et al. from the HARPS and CORALIE radial velocity (RV) surveys. These numbers are more than double the rate reported by Howard et al. for Kepler stars and the rate of Gould et al. from the OGLE-III transit search; however, due to small number statistics these differences are of only marginal statistical significance. We explore some of the difficulties in estimating this rate from the existing RV data sets and comparing RV rates to rates from other techniques.

  2. 14 CFR 91.145 - Management of aircraft operations in the vicinity of aerial demonstrations and major sporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Soccer; (7) Major League Baseball All-Star Game; (8) World Series; (9) Kodak Albuquerque International... mixed high and low performance aircraft. (10) Impact on non-participating aircraft. (11)...

  3. 14 CFR 91.145 - Management of aircraft operations in the vicinity of aerial demonstrations and major sporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Soccer; (7) Major League Baseball All-Star Game; (8) World Series; (9) Kodak Albuquerque International... mixed high and low performance aircraft. (10) Impact on non-participating aircraft. (11)...

  4. 14 CFR 91.145 - Management of aircraft operations in the vicinity of aerial demonstrations and major sporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Soccer; (7) Major League Baseball All-Star Game; (8) World Series; (9) Kodak Albuquerque International... mixed high and low performance aircraft. (10) Impact on non-participating aircraft. (11)...

  5. 14 CFR 91.145 - Management of aircraft operations in the vicinity of aerial demonstrations and major sporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Soccer; (7) Major League Baseball All-Star Game; (8) World Series; (9) Kodak Albuquerque International... mixed high and low performance aircraft. (10) Impact on non-participating aircraft. (11)...

  6. 14 CFR 91.145 - Management of aircraft operations in the vicinity of aerial demonstrations and major sporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Soccer; (7) Major League Baseball All-Star Game; (8) World Series; (9) Kodak Albuquerque International... mixed high and low performance aircraft. (10) Impact on non-participating aircraft. (11)...

  7. O stars and Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Underhill, Anne B.; Jordan, Stuart (Editor); Thomas, Richard (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Basic information is given about O and Wolf-Rayet stars indicating how these stars are defined and what their chief observable properties are. Part 2 of the volume discussed four related themes pertaining to the hottest and most luminous stars. Presented are: an observational overview of the spectroscopic classification and extrinsic properties of O and Wolf-Rayet stars; the intrinsic parameters of luminosity, effective temperature, mass, and composition of the stars, and a discussion of their viability; stellar wind properties; and the related issues concerning the efforts of stellar radiation and wind on the immediate interstellar environment are presented.

  8. Egyptian "Star Clocks"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Sarah

    Diagonal, transit, and Ramesside star clocks are tables of astronomical information occasionally found in ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyri. The tables represent the motions of selected stars (decans and hour stars) throughout the Egyptian civil year. Analysis of star clocks leads to greater understanding of ancient Egyptian constellations, ritual astronomical activities, observational practices, and pharaonic chronology.

  9. Lifestyles of the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cocoa Beach, FL. John F. Kennedy Space Center.

    Some general information on stars is provided in this National Aeronautics and Space Administration pamphlet. Topic areas briefly discussed are: (1) the birth of a star; (2) main sequence stars; (3) red giants; (4) white dwarfs; (5) neutron stars; (6) supernovae; (7) pulsars; and (8) black holes. (JN)

  10. Taste coding of complex naturalistic taste stimuli and traditional taste stimuli in the parabrachial pons of the awake, freely licking rat.

    PubMed

    Sammons, Joshua D; Weiss, Michael S; Victor, Jonathan D; Di Lorenzo, Patricia M

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have shown that taste-responsive cells in the brainstem taste nuclei of rodents respond to sensory qualities other than gustation. Such data suggest that cells in the classical gustatory brainstem may be better tuned to respond to stimuli that engage multiple sensory modalities than to stimuli that are purely gustatory. Here, we test this idea by recording the electrophysiological responses to complex, naturalistic stimuli in single neurons in the parabrachial pons (PbN, the second neural relay in the central gustatory pathway) in awake, freely licking rats. Following electrode implantation and recovery, we presented both prototypical and naturalistic taste stimuli and recorded the responses in the PbN. Prototypical taste stimuli (NaCl, sucrose, citric acid, and caffeine) and naturalistic stimuli (clam juice, grape juice, lemon juice, and coffee) were matched for taste quality and intensity (concentration). Umami (monosodium glutamate + inosine monophosphate) and fat (diluted heavy cream) were also tested. PbN neurons responded to naturalistic stimuli as much or more than to prototypical taste stimuli. Furthermore, they convey more information about naturalistic stimuli than about prototypical ones. Moreover, multidimensional scaling analyses showed that across unit responses to naturalistic stimuli were more widely separated than responses to prototypical taste stimuli. Interestingly, cream evoked a robust and widespread response in PbN cells. Collectively, these data suggest that natural foods are more potent stimulators of PbN cells than purely gustatory stimuli. Probing PbN cells with pure taste stimuli may underestimate the response repertoire of these cells. PMID:27121585

  11. Neutron Stars and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, Varun

    2012-05-01

    My thesis centers around the study of neutron stars, especially those in massive binary systems. To this end, it has two distinct components: the observational study of neutron stars in massive binaries with a goal of measuring neutron star masses and participation in NuSTAR, the first imaging hard X-ray mission, one that is extremely well suited to the study of massive binaries and compact objects in our Galaxy. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing high energy X-ray telescope to orbit. NuSTAR has an order-of-magnitude better angular resolution and has two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than any currently orbiting hard X-ray telescope. I worked to develop, calibrate, and test CdZnTe detectors for NuSTAR. I describe the CdZnTe detectors in comprehensive detail here - from readout procedures to data analysis. Detailed calibration of detectors is necessary for analyzing astrophysical source data obtained by the NuSTAR. I discuss the design and implementation of an automated setup for calibrating flight detectors, followed by calibration procedures and results. Neutron stars are an excellent probe of fundamental physics. The maximum mass of a neutron star can put stringent constraints on the equation of state of matter at extreme pressures and densities. From an astrophysical perspective, there are several open questions in our understanding of neutron stars. What are the birth masses of neutron stars? How do they change in binary evolution? Are there multiple mechanisms for the formation of neutron stars? Measuring masses of neutron stars helps answer these questions. Neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries have masses close to their birth mass, providing an opportunity to disentangle the role of "nature" and "nurture" in the observed mass distributions. In 2006, masses had been measured for only six such objects, but this small sample showed the greatest diversity in masses

  12. The Cambridge Double Star Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacEvoy, Bruce; Tirion, Wil

    2015-12-01

    Preface; What are double stars?; The binary orbit; Double star dynamics; Stellar mass and the binary life cycle; The double star population; Detecting double stars; Double star catalogs; Telescope optics; Preparing to observe; Helpful accessories; Viewing challenges; Next steps; Appendices: target list; Useful formulas; Double star orbits; Double star catalogs; The Greek alphabet.

  13. Modeling Mid-Ultraviolet Spectra. I. Temperatures of Metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ruth C.; Dorman, Ben; Rood, Robert T.

    2001-09-01

    Determining the properties of remote globular clusters and elliptical galaxies using evolutionary population synthesis requires a library of reliable model stellar fluxes. Empirical libraries are limited to spectra of stars in the solar neighborhood, with nearly solar abundances and abundance ratios. We report here a first step toward providing a flux library that includes nonsolar abundances, based on calculations from first principles that are calibrated empirically. Because the mid-ultraviolet spectrum of an old stellar system is dominated by the contribution from its main-sequence turnoff stars, we have started by modeling these. We have calculated mid-ultraviolet spectra for the Sun and nine nearby, near-main-sequence stars spanning metallicities from less than 1/100 solar to greater than solar, encompassing a range of light-element-abundance enhancements. We first determined temperatures of eight of the stars by analyzing optical echelle spectra together with the mid-ultraviolet. Both could be matched at the same time only when models with no convective overshoot were adopted and only when an approximate chromosphere was incorporated near the surface of relatively metal-rich models. Extensive modifications to mid-UV line parameters were also required, notably the manual assignment of approximate identifications for mid-UV lines missing from laboratory line lists. Without recourse to additional missing opacity, these measures suffice to reproduce in detail almost the entire mid-UV spectrum of solar-temperature stars up to 1/10 solar metallicity and the region from 2900 to 3100 Å throughout the entire metallicity range. Ramifications for abundance determinations in individual metal-poor stars and for age-metallicity determinations of old stellar systems are briefly discussed, with emphasis on the predictive power of the calculations. Based on observations obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope of the Space Telescope Science Institute, under contract with the

  14. Transit Search of 10,000 Stars for ExtraSolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Caldwell, D. A.; Koch, D. G.; Stout-Batalha, N. M.; Jenkins, J. M.; Showen, R. L.

    2000-12-01

    Doppler velocity searches for extrasolar planets have discovered over fifty planets orbiting solar-like stars. Combining the size determined from transit detections with the mass determined from Doppler velocity measurements yields the density of the extrasolar planet. With the orbital period and characteristics of the central star, these quantities provide a critical test of current theories of planetary structure. Observations of the planet orbiting HD209458 give an estimate of 0.3 g/cc, in agreement with theories of a planet that either formed near the central star or migrated there very shortly after formation. Several transit searches to discover extrasolar planets and determine their sizes are underway. Our Vulcan photometer at Lick Observatory has a 10-cm aperture, a 49-sq. degree FOV, and has monitored three different star fields for several weeks each for two years. Over 10,000 stars brighter than 12th magnitude have been observed with a precision adequate to detect Jovian-size planets. Hundreds of eclipsing binaries have been found. Over a dozen binaries showing transits with amplitudes as small as those expected for planetary companions demonstrate that the precision attained by the measurements is sufficient. Identification of these companions as grazing binaries or high area-ratio binaries has been accomplished. (See the meeting paper by Posson-Brown et al.) Early estimates of the frequency of planets with orbital periods less than a week ranged from 2 1 geometrical probability near 10 after including missed transits and the fraction of stars that are binaries with short periods or giants, discovery of a few planetary companions are expected. Currently we are investigating several candidates that show low amplitude transits. This project is funded by the NASA Origins and Astrobiology programs.

  15. The Pistol Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najarro, F.; Figer, D. F.

    1998-06-01

    Results of an spectroscopic investigation of the Pistol star are presented. The near-infrared spectra and photometry data are fit with stellar wind models to find that the star is extraordinarily luminous, L = 106.7±0.5 L⊙, making it one of the most luminous stars known. Coupled with the relatively cool temperature, Teff = 10^{4.17_{ - 0.06}^{ + 0.19} } K, the star is clearly in violation of the Humphreys-Davidson limit. The derived line of sight velocity of the star assures its membership in the Quintuplet cluster. This, along with the inferred extinction, places the star at the Galactic Center.

  16. The Millennium Star Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnott, R. W.

    1997-08-01

    Derived from Hipparcos and Tycho observations, the Millennium Star Atlas is a set of 1548 charts covering the entire sky to about magnitude 11. It stands apart from all previous printed atlases in completeness to magnitude 10 and in uniformity around the sky. The generous chart scale has made possible a number of innovations never before seen in a star atlas: arrows on high-proper-motion stars, double-star ticks conveying separation and position angle for a specific modern epoch, distance labels for nearby stars, and variable stars coded by amplitude, period, and type. Among the nonstellar objects plotted, more than 8000 galaxies are shown with aspect ratio and orientation.

  17. Spectroscopic study of formation, evolution and interaction of M31 and M33 with star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhou; Yang, Yanbin

    2016-02-01

    The recent studies show that the formation and evolution process of the nearby galaxies are still unclear. By using the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) 3.6m telescope, the PanDAS shows complicated substructures (dwarf satellite galaxies, halo globular clusters, extended clusters, star streams, etc.) in the halo of M31 to ~150 kpc from the center of galaxy and M31-M33 interaction has been studied. In our work, we would like to investigate formation, evolution and interaction of M31 and M33, which are the nearest two spiral galaxies in Local Group. The star cluster systems of the two galaxies are good tracers to study the dynamics of the substructures and the interaction. Since 2010, the Xinglong 2.16m, Lijiang 2.4m and MMT 6.5m telescopes have been used for our spectroscopic observations. The radial velocities and Lick absorption-line indices can thus be measured with the spectroscopy and then ages, metallicities and masses of the star clusters can be fitted with the simple stellar population models. These parameters could be used as the input physical parameters for numerical simulations of M31-M33 interaction.

  18. Carlsberg Meridian Catalogue, La Palma. Number 9. Observations of positions of stars and planets, May 1984 to March 1995 including extinction and meteorological data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This catalogue (CMC9) contains 141593 positions and magnitudes of 138603 stars north of declination -40°, 117559 proper motions, and 19585 positions and magnitudes of 97 Solar System objects obtained with the Carlsberg Automatic Meridian Circle on La Palma during the period May 1984 to March 1995. CMC9 includes CMC1 to CMC8; i.e. it comprises all the observations made since the instrument began operation on La Palma. The positions of the stars are for the epoch of observation and the equinox J2000.0, and are referred to the new International Celestial Reference Frame. The original version of the catalogue with positions referred to a smoothed version of the FK5 is also given. The limiting magnitude is V = 15.4. The catalogue mainly comprises observations and proper motions for the following programmes: 36000 International Reference Stars, 30000 faint reference stars in a global net, 18000 reference stars in the fields of radio sources, 17000 stars in the Lick Northern Proper Motion catalogue, 5000 reference stars for calibration of Schmidt plates, 2600 stars in the Gliese catalogue of nearby stars, 5000 stars in nearby OB associations, 10500 F-type stars within 100 pc, 9000 G-type d&g, K-type g stars within 300 pc, 2200 unbiased sample of K/M-type d stars, 2200 reference stars near Veron-Cetty galaxies, 1050 variable stars (12 - 14 mag) in GCVS, 800 stars (11 - 14 mag) with pm > 0″-3/yr ion NLTT, and several smaller programmes mainly aimed at galactic kinematics. Positions and magnitudes of 8 novae and 7 supernovae which occurred in the years 1991 to 1995 are included. The catalogue also contains observations of the following Solar System objects: Callisto, Ganymede, Rhea, Titan, Iapetus, Hyperion, Uranus, Oberon, Neptune, Pluto and 87 minor planets. The mean error of a catalogue position in the zenith is 0″-09 in right ascension and declination in CMC4-5-6, improving to 0″-06 in CMC7-9. The accuracy in magnitude is 0.05 mag throughout. The mean error of the

  19. Carlsberg Meridian Catalogues, La Palma. Numbers 1 - 11, 1999. Observations of positions of stars and planets, May 1984 to May 1998 including extinction and meteorological data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This composite catalogue contains 180812 positions and magnitudes of 176591 stars north of declination -40°, 155005 proper motions, and 25848 positions and magnitudes of 184 Solar System objects obtained with the Carlsberg Automatic Meridian Circle on La Palma during the period May 1984 to May 1998. It includes CMC1 - 11; i.e. it comprises all the observations made with the moving-slit micrometer since the instrument began operation on La Palma. The positions of the stars are for the epoch of observation and the equinox J2000.0, and are referred to the new International Celestial Reference Frame. The limiting magnitude is V = 15.4. The catalogue mainly comprises observations and proper motions for the following programmes: 36000 International Reference Stars, 30000 faint reference stars in a global net, 18000 reference stars in the fields of radio sources, 17000 stars in the Lick Northern Proper Motion catalogue, 5000 reference stars for calibration of Schmidt plates, 2600 stars in the Gliese catalogue of nearby stars, 5000 stars in nearby OB associations, 10500 F-type stars within 100 pc, 9000 G-type d&g, K-type g stars within 300 pc, 2200 unbiased sample of K/M-typed stars, 19400 reference stars near Veron-Cetty galaxies, 4700 variable stars (12 - 14 mag) in GCVS, 12400 stars (11 - 14 mag) with pm > 0″-18/yr in NLTT, and several smaller programmes mainly aimed at galactic kinematics. Positions and magnitudes of 12 novae and 8 supernovae which occurred in the years 1991 to 1998 are included. The catalogue also contains observations of the following Solar System objects: Callisto, Ganymede, Rhea, Titan, Iapetus, Hyperion, Uranus, Oberon, Neptune, Pluto and 173 minor planets and comet P/Wild 2. The mean error of a catalogue position in the zenith is 0-09 in right ascension and declination in CMC1 - 6, improving to 0-06 in CMC7 - 11. The accuracy in magnitude is 0.05 mag in CMC1 - 10, improving to 0.03 mag in CMC11. The mean error of the proper motions, derived by

  20. Magnetized Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebling, Steven; Anderson, Matthew; Hirschmann, Eric; Lehner, Luis; Motl, Patrick; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos; Tohline, Joel

    2008-04-01

    Magnetized neutron stars, whether considered individually or within compact binary systems, demonstrate a number of interesting dynamical effects. Using a distributed adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code, we evolve such stars and study their dynamics.

  1. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  2. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  3. QCD in Neutron Stars and Strange Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Fridolin; Negreiros, Rodrigo

    2011-05-24

    This paper provides an overview of the possible role of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) for neutron stars and strange stars. The fundamental degrees of freedom of QCD are quarks, which may exist as unconfined (color superconducting) particles in the cores of neutron stars. There is also the theoretical possibility that a significantly large number of up, down, and strange quarks may settle down in a new state of matter known as strange quark matter, which, by hypothesis, could be more stable than even the most stable atomic nucleus, {sup 56}Fe. In the latter case new classes of self-bound, color superconducting objects, ranging from strange quark nuggets to strange quark stars, should exist. The properties of such objects will be reviewed along with the possible existence of deconfined quarks in neutron stars. Implications for observational astrophysics are pointed out.

  4. Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars are a class of peculiar stars first identified in 1867 by C J E WOLF and G RAYET. Unlike the spectra of most stars, which are dominated by narrow absorption lines, the spectra of W-R stars show broad emission lines. The rich emission line spectrum makes them easy to identify, by spectroscopic observations, even at large distances....

  5. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  6. Chromospheres of Coronal Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.

    1996-01-01

    We summarize the main results obtained from the analysis of ultraviolet emission line profiles of coronal late-type stars observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The excellent GHRS spectra provide new information on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena in the chromospheres and transition regions of these stars. One exciting new result is the discovery of broad components in the transition region lines of active stars that we believe provide evidence for microflare heating in these stars.

  7. S.Res.509 — 112th Congress (2011-2012) A resolution recognizing Major League Baseball as an important part of the cultural history of American society, celebrating the 2012 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, and honoring Kansas City...

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Blunt, Roy [R-MO

    2012-06-26

    06/26/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S4642-4644; text as passed Senate: CR S4643; text of measure as introduced: CR S4640) (All Actions)

  8. America's Star Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  9. Managing the star performer.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Our culture seems to be endlessly fascinated with its stars in entertainment, athletics, politics, and business, and holds fast to the idea that extraordinary talent accounts for an individual's extraordinary performance. At first glance, managing a star performer in your medical practice may seem like it would be an easy task. However, there's much more to managing a star performer than many practice managers realize. The concern is how to keep the star performer happy and functioning at a high level without detriment to the rest of the medical practice team. This article offers tips for practice managers who manage star performers. It explores ways to keep the star performer motivated, while at the same time helping the star performer to meld into the existing medical practice team. This article suggests strategies for redefining the star performer's role, for holding the star performer accountable for his or her behavior, and for coaching the star performer. Finally, this article offers practical tips for keeping the star performer during trying times, for identifying and cultivating new star performers, and for managing medical practice prima donnas. PMID:23767124

  10. Overexpression of neuropeptide Y in the dorsomedial hypothalamus increases trial initiation but does not significantly alter concentration-dependent licking to sucrose in a brief-access taste test.

    PubMed

    Treesukosol, Yada; Bi, Sheng; Moran, Timothy H

    2013-02-17

    Evidence in the literature raises the possibility that alterations in neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) may contribute to hyperphagia leading to body weight gain. Previously, we have shown that compared to AAVGFP controls, adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated overexpression of NPY in the DMH of lean rats resulted in significantly higher body weight gain that was attributed to increased food intake, and this was further exacerbated by a high-fat diet. Here, we tested AAVNPY and AAVGFP control rats in a brief-access taste procedure (10-s trials, 30-min sessions) to an array of sucrose concentrations under ad libitum and partial food and water access conditions. The test allows for some segregation of the behavioral components by providing a measure of trial initiation (appetitive) and unconditioned licks at each concentration (consummatory). Consistent with previous findings suggesting that NPY has a primary effect on appetitive function, overexpression of DMH NPY did not significantly alter concentration-dependent licking response to sucrose but when tested in a non-restricted food and water schedule, AAVNPY rats initiated significantly more sucrose trials compared to AAVGFP controls in a brief-access taste test. PMID:23313404

  11. Strange Quark Star Crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Andrew W.

    2007-02-27

    If strange quark matter is absolutely stable, some neutron stars may be strange quark stars. Strange quark stars are usually assumed to have a simple liquid surface. We show that if the surface tension of droplets of quark matter in the vacuum is sufficiently small, droplets of quark matter on the surface of a strange quark star may form a solid crust on top of the strange quark star. This solid crust can significantly modify the predictions for the photon emission for the surface in an observable way.

  12. Toward Understanding the B[e] Phenomenon. II. New Galactic FS CMa Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Manset, N.; Kusakin, A. V.; Chentsov, E. L.; Klochkova, V. G.; Zharikov, S. V.; Gray, R. O.; Grankin, K. N.; Gandet, T. L.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Rudy, R. J.; Lynch, D. K.; Venturini, C. C.; Mazuk, S.; Puetter, R. C.; Perry, R. B.; Levato, H.; Grosso, M.; Bernabei, S.; Polcaro, V. F.; Viotti, R. F.; Norci, L.; Kuratov, K. S.

    2007-12-01

    FS CMa stars form a group of objects with the B[e] phenomenon that were previously known as unclassified B[e] stars or B[e] stars with warm dust (B[e]WD) until recently. They exhibit strong emission-line spectra and strong IR excesses, most likely due to recently formed circumstellar dust. These properties have been suggested to be due to ongoing or recent rapid mass exchange in binary systems with hot primaries and various types of secondaries. The first paper of this series reported an analysis of the available information about previously known Galactic objects with the B[e] phenomenon, the initial selection of the FS CMa group objects, and a qualitative explanation of their properties. This paper reports the results of our new search for more FS CMa objects in the IRAS Point Source Catalog. We present new photometric criteria for identifying FS CMa stars as well as the first results of our observations of nine new FS CMa group members. With this addition, the FS CMa group has now 40 members, becoming the largest among the dust-forming hot star groups. We also present nine objects with no evidence for the B[e] phenomenon, but with newly discovered spectral line emission and/or strong IR excesses. Partially based on data obtained at the 6 m BTA Telescope of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, 3 m Shane Telescope of the Lick Observatory, 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith and 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescopes of the McDonald Observatory, 2.1 m telescope of the San Pedro Martir Observatory, 1.5 m telescope of the Loiano Observatory, and 0.8 m telescope of the Dark Sky Observatory.

  13. Ponderable soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The theory of Lee and Pang (1987), who obtained solutions for soliton stars composed of zero-temperature fermions and bosons, is applied here to quark soliton stars. Model soliton stars based on a simple physical model of the proton are computed, and the properties of the solitons are discussed, including the important problem of the existence of a limiting mass and thus the possible formation of black holes of primordial origin. It is shown that there is a definite mass limit for ponderable soliton stars, so that during cooling a soliton star might reach a stage beyond which no equilibrium configuration exists and the soliton star probably will collapse to become a black hole. The radiation of ponderable soliton stars may alter the short-wavelength character of the cosmic background radiation, and may be observed as highly redshifted objects at z of about 100,000.

  14. Stars and their Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaler, James B.

    1997-03-01

    This unique and informative text describes how stars are classified according to their spectral qualities and temperature. James Kaler explains the alphabet of stellar astronomy, running from cool M stars to hot O stars, and tells the story of their evolution. Before embarking on a voyage of cosmic discovery, the author discusses the fundamental properties of stars, their atomic structure and the formation of spectra. Then, Kaler considers each star type individually and explores its spectra in detail. A review of unusual, hard-to-classify stars, and a discussion of data related to the birth, life and death of stars round out the text. This book is an important resource for all amateur astronomers and students of astronomy. Professionals will find it a refreshing read as well.

  15. Massive Compact Stars as Quark Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Hilário; Barbosa Duarte, Sérgio; de Oliveira, José Carlos T.

    2011-03-01

    High-mass compact stars have been reported recently in the literature, providing strong constraints on the properties of the ultra dense matter beyond the saturation nuclear density. In view of these results, the calculations of quark star or hybrid star equilibrium structure must be compatible with the provided observational data. But since the equations of state used in describing quark matter are in general too soft in comparison with the equation of states used to describe the hadronic or nuclear matter, the calculated quark star models presented in the literature are in general not suitable to explain the stability of highly-compact massive objects. In this work, we present the calculations of a spherically symmetric quark star structure by using an equation of state that takes into account the superconducting color-flavor locked phase of the strange quark matter. In addition, some fundamental aspects of QCD (asymptotic freedom and confinement) are considered by means of a phenomenological description of the deconfined quark phase, the density-dependent quark mass model. The quark matter behavior introduced by this model stiffens the corresponding equation of state. We thus investigate the influence of this model on the mass-radius diagram of quark stars. We obtain massive quark stars due to the stiffness of the equation of state, when a reasonable parameterization of the color superconducting gap is used. Models of quark stars enveloped by a nucleonic crust composed of a nuclear lattice embedded in an electron gas, with nuclei close to neutron drip line, are also discussed.

  16. Dark stars: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only ≲ 0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼1{{M}ȯ} as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >{{10}6}{{M}ȯ} and luminosities  >{{10}10}{{L}ȯ} , making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  17. Dark stars: a review.

    PubMed

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars. PMID:27214049

  18. Cooling of dense stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuruta, S.

    1972-01-01

    Cooling rates were calculated for neutron stars of about one solar mass and 10 km radius, with magnetic fields from zero to about 10 to the 14th power gauss, for extreme cases of maximum and zero superfluidity. The results show that most pulsars are so cold that thermal ionization of surface atoms would be negligible. Nucleon superfluidity and crystallization of heavy nuclei were treated quantitatively, and more realistic hadron star models were chosen. Cooling rates were calculated for a stable hyperon star near the maximum mass limit, a medium weight neutron star, and a light neutron star with neutron-rich heavy nuclei near the minimum mass limit. Results show that cooling rates are a sensitive function of density. The Crab and Vela pulsars are considered, as well as cooling of a massive white dwarf star.

  19. Intelligent star tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2001-11-01

    Current state-of-the-art commercial star sensors typically weigh 15 pounds, attain 5 to 10 arc-second accuracy, and use roughly 10 watts of power. Unfortunately, the current state-of-the-art commercial star sensors do not meet many of NASA's next-generation spacecraft and instrument needs. Nor do they satisfy Air Force's needs for micro/nano-satellite systems. In an effort to satisfy micro/nano satellite mission needs the Air Force Research Laboratory is developing an intelligent star Tracker, called IntelliStar, which incorporates several novel technologies including Silicon carbide optical housing, MEMs based adaptive optic technologies, smart active pixels, and algebraic coding theory. The design considerations associated with the development of the IntelliStar system are presented along with experimental results which characterize each technologies contribution to overall system performance. In addition to being light weight, the IntelliStar System offers advantages in speed, size, power consumption, and radiation tolerance.

  20. The First Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Naoki

    2010-10-01

    The standard cosmological model predicts that the first cosmological objects are formed when the age of the universe is a few hundred million years. Recent theoretical studies and numerical simulations consistently suggest that the first objects are very massive primordial stars. We introduce the key physics and explain why the first stars are thought to be massive, rather than to be low-mass stars. The state-of-the-art simulations include all the relevant atomic and molecular physics to follow the thermal evolution of a prestellar gas cloud to very high ``stellar'' densities. Evolutionary calculations of the primordial stars suggest the formation of massive blackholes in the early universe. Finally, we show the results from high-resolution simulations of star formation in a low-metallicity gas. Vigorous fragmentation is triggered in a star-forming gas cloud at a metallicity of as low as Z = 10-5Zsolar.

  1. Activity in F stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, Sidney C.; Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Simon, Theodore

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of He I 5876 A and IUE measurements of chromospheric and transition region lines in a large sample of F-type stars are presented. The data show that activity is detectable in nearly all early F-type stars and differs in several of its characteristics from that typically seen in cooler stars with slow rotation and fully developed convective zones. The onset of activity occurs near B-V = 0.28, which corresponds approximately to spectral type F0 and T(eff) = 7300 K. There is no correlation between the level of activity and the abundances of lithium and beryllium in F stars hotter than T(eff) = 6600 K. All but one of the stars in the 6600-7300 K temperature interval are active. The levels of activity in these stars are independent of Rossby number.

  2. Nagyszombat and the stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsoldos, E.

    Péter Pázmány, founder of the University of Nagyszombat, considered stars in terms inherited from medieval times. The theses, connected to the university graduation, soon left this definition, and imagined stars as made from sublunar elements. The 1753 decree of the Empress Maria Theresia ordered university professors to publish textbooks. These textbooks, together with the theses showed a definite improvement, defining stars according to contemporary knowledge.

  3. Strange Nonchaotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, John F.; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Ditto, William L.

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented light curves of the Kepler space telescope document how the brightness of some stars pulsates at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear dynamical system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies generically exhibits a strange but nonchaotic attractor. For Kepler's "golden" stars, we present evidence of the first observation of strange nonchaotic dynamics in nature outside the laboratory. This discovery could aid the classification and detailed modeling of variable stars.

  4. Introduction to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.

    2015-02-24

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts can set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.

  5. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one`s understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying {delta} Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for {delta} Scuti stars, using FG Vir, {delta} Scuti, and CD-24{degree} 7599 as examples.

  6. Strange Nonchaotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, John F.; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Ditto, William L.

    2015-08-01

    Exploiting the unprecedented capabilities of the planet-hunting Kepler space telescope, which stared at 150 000 stars for four years, we discuss recent evidence that certain stars dim and brighten in complex patterns with fractal features. Such stars pulsate at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the famous golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies is generically attracted toward a “strange” behavior that is geometrically fractal without displaying the “butterfly effect” of chaos. Strange nonchaotic attractors have been observed in laboratory experiments and have been hypothesized to describe the electrochemical activity of the brain, but a bluish white star 16 000 light years from Earth in the constellation Lyra may manifest, in the scale-free distribution of its minor frequency components, the first strange nonchaotic attractor observed in the wild. The recognition of stellar strange nonchaotic dynamics may improve the classification of these stars and refine the physical modeling of their interiors. We also discuss nonlinear analysis of other RR Lyrae stars in Kepler field of view and discuss some toy models for modeling these stars.References: 1) Hippke, Michael, et al. "Pulsation period variations in the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878." The Astrophysical Journal 798.1 (2015): 42.2) Lindner, John F., et al. "Strange nonchaotic stars." Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 054101 (2015)

  7. CSTAR star catalogue development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhde-Lacovara, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Continuous Stellar Tracking Attitude Reference (CSTAR) system is an in-house project for the Space Station to provide high accuracy, drift free attitude and angular rate information for the GN&C system. Constraints exist on the star catalogue incorporated in the system. These constraints include the following: mass memory allocated for catalogue storage, star tracker imaging sensitivity, the minimum resolvable separation angle between stars, the width of the field of view of the star tracker, and the desired number of stars to be tracked in a field of view. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) catalogue is the basis reference for this study. As it stands, the SAO does not meet the requirements of any of the above constraints. Star selection algorithms have been devised for catalogue optimization. Star distribution statistics have been obtained to aid in the development of these rules. VAX based software has been developed to implement the star selection algorithms. The software is modular and provides a design tool to tailor the catalogue to available star tracker technology. The SAO catalogue has been optimized for the requirements of the present CSTAR system.

  8. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  9. Combinations of 148 navigation stars and the star tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R.

    1980-01-01

    The angular separation of all star combinations for 148 nav star on the onboard software for space transportation system-3 flight and following missions is presented as well as the separation of each pair that satisfies the viewing constraints of using both star trackers simultaneously. Tables show (1) shuttle star catalog 1980 star position in M 1950 coordinates; (2) two star combination of 148 nav stars; and (3) summary of two star-combinations of the star tracker 5 deg filter. These 148 stars present 10,875 combinations. For the star tracker filters of plus or minus 5 deg, there are 875 combinations. Formalhaut (nav star 26) has the best number of combinations, which is 33.

  10. Extensive lesions in the gustatory cortex in the rat do not disrupt the retention of a presurgically conditioned taste aversion and do not impair unconditioned concentration-dependent licking of sucrose and quinine.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Koji; Spector, Alan C

    2014-01-01

    Although damage to gustatory cortex (GC) in the rat has been reported to severely impair, if not eliminate, retention of a presurgically conditioned taste aversion (CTA), it has equivocal effects on taste preference as measured by intake tests. Because intake tests can be influenced by nongustatory (e.g., postingestive) factors, we employed the brief-access taste test to assess the effects of ibotenic acid-induced lesions targeting the GC on unconditioned licking to a sucrose and then a quinine concentration series in a specialized lickometer. As a functional lesion assessment, a presurgical CTA to 0.1M NaCl was established in thirsty rats by following 15-min intake with intraperitoneal administration of either LiCl (or NaCl for control) on 2 occasions. Both conditioned sham-operated (SHAM) rats and rats with histologically confirmed extensive damage to the GC (GCX) avoided a NaCl concentration series relative to unconditioned controls in a postsurgical brief-access CTA test, with no difference between the surgical groups in their responses to NaCl or similar concentrations of KCl. GCX rats also did not differ from SHAM rats in the EC50 of concentration-response functions for sucrose or quinine. Clearly, the critical cortical area required for the retention of a presurgical CTA falls outside of the extensive area of damage, which was well centered within the conventionally defined gustatory zone of the insular cortex. The absence of an effect on unconditioned responsiveness to sucrose and quinine suggests that the damaged region is also unnecessary for the normal expression of affective licking responses to tastants. PMID:24226296