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Sample records for alpha particle energy

  1. Measurement of alpha particle energy using windowless electret ion chambers.

    PubMed

    Dua, S K; Kotrappa, P; Srivastava, R; Ebadian, M A; Stieff, L R

    2002-10-01

    Electret ion chambers are inexpensive, lightweight, robust, commercially available, passive, charge-integrating devices for accurate measurement of different ionizing radiations. In an earlier work a chamber of dimensions larger than the range of alpha particles having aluminized Mylar windows of different thickness was used for measurement of alpha radiation. Correlation between electret mid-point voltage, alpha particle energy, and response was developed and it was shown that this chamber could be used for estimating the effective energy of an unknown alpha source. In the present study, the electret ion chamber is used in the windowless mode so that the alpha particles dissipate their entire energy inside the volume, and the alpha particle energy is determined from the first principles. This requires that alpha disintegration rate be accurately known or measured by an alternate method. The measured energies were within 1 to 4% of the true values for different sources (230Th, 237Np, 239Pu, 241Am, and 224Cm). This method finds application in quantitative determination of alpha energy absorbed in thin membrane and, hence, the absorbed dose. PMID:12240732

  2. Alpha particle nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) for device applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jun, Insoo; Xapsos, Michael A.; Messenger, Scott R.; Burke, Edward A.; Walters, Robert J.; Summers, Geoff; Jordan, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    A method developed for the proton NIEL calculation previously is extended to incident alpha particles in this study: ZBL screened potential for Coulomb interactions and MCNPX 'thin target approximation' for nuclear interactions.

  3. Utility of extracting {alpha}-particle energy by waves

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J.; Herrmann, M.C.

    1994-05-01

    The utility of extracting {alpha}-particle power, and then diverting this power to fast fuel ions, is investigated. As power is diverted to fast ions and then to ions, a number of effects come into play, as the relative amounts of pressure taken up by electrons, fuel ions, and fast {alpha}-particles shift. In addition, if the {alpha}-particle power is diverted to fast fuel ions, there is an enhanced fusion reactivity because of the nonthermal component of the ion distribution. Some useful expressions for describing these effects are derived, and it is shown that fusion reactors with power density about twice what otherwise might be obtained can be contemplated, so long as a substantial amount of the {alpha}-particle power can be diverted. Interestingly, in this mode of operation, once the electron heat is sufficiently confined, further improvement in confinement is actually not desirable. A similar improvement in fusion power density can be obtained for advanced fuel mixtures such as D-He{sup 3}, where the power of both the energetic {alpha}-particles and the energetic protons might be diverted advantageously.

  4. Alpha-particle diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will focus on the state of development of diagnostics which are expected to provide the information needed for {alpha}- physics studies in the future. Conventional measurement of detailed temporal and spatial profiles of background plasma properties in DT will be essential for such aspects as determining heating effectiveness, shaping of the plasma profiles and effects of MHD, but will not be addressed here. This paper will address (1) the measurement of the neutron source, and hence {alpha}-particle birth profile, (2) measurement of the escaping {alpha}-particles and (3) measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles over their full energy range. There will also be a brief discussion of (4) the concerns about instabilities being generated by {alpha}-particles and the methods necessary for measuring these effects. 51 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Summary of Alpha Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1998-08-19

    This paper summarizes the talks on alpha particle transport which were presented at the 5th International Atomic Energy Agency's Technical Committee Meeting on "Alpha Particles in Fusion Research" held at the Joint European Torus, England in September 1997.

  6. Measurements of alpha particle energy using nuclear tracks in solids methodology.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, G; Amero, C; Gammage, R B

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for the measurement of alpha particle energy using polycarbonate materials as nuclear track detectors (NTDs). This method is based on the interaction of the radiation with the solid-state materials, using the relationship between the energy deposited in the material by the ionising particle and the track developed after an established chemical process. The determination of the geometrical parameters of the formed track, such as major axis, minor axis and overall track length, permit determination of the energy of the alpha particle. The track analysis is performed automatically using a digital image system, and the data are processed in a PC with commercial software. In this experiment 148Gd, 238U, 230Th, 239Pu and 244Cm alpha particle emitters were used. The values for alpha particle energy resolution, the linear response to energy, the confidence in the results and the automatisation of the procedure make this method a promising analysis system. PMID:12382812

  7. Alpha Particle Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Ray, K.

    2009-05-13

    The study of burning plasmas is the next frontier in fusion energy research, and will be a major objective of the U.S. fusion program through U.S. collaboration with our international partners on the ITER Project. For DT magnetic fusion to be useful for energy production, it is essential that the energetic alpha particles produced by the fusion reactions be confined long enough to deposit a significant fraction of their initial ~3.5 MeV energy in the plasma before they are lost. Development of diagnostics to study the behavior of energetic confined alpha particles is a very important if not essential part of burning plasma research. Despite the clear need for these measurements, development of diagnostics to study confined the fast confined alphas to date has proven extremely difficult, and the available techniques remain for the most part unproven and with significant uncertainties. Research under this grant had the goal of developing diagnostics of fast confined alphas, primarily based on measurements of the neutron and ion tails resulting from alpha particle knock-on collisions with the plasma deuterium and tritium fuel ions. One of the strengths of this approach is the ability to measure the alphas in the hot plasma core where the interesting ignition physics will occur.

  8. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  9. Influence of source composition and particle energy on the determination of gross alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Timón, A Fernández; Vargas, M Jurado; Sánchez, A B Ruano; Pérez, J de la Torre; Sánchez, A Martín

    2013-12-01

    The influence of different source compositions and α-particle energies on the detection efficiency of a gas-flow proportional counter was examined using experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Efficiency variation with alpha-particle energy was very marked, being less significant with the substrate composition. These results show that the determination of gross alpha activity in an unknown sample must be carried out very carefully in order to give a correct estimation of its activity. PMID:24184741

  10. Solar flare alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Interplanetary disturbances frequently change the instantaneous values of the low energy solar flare alpha-to-proton flux ratios. The fluxes of alpha particles were integrated over the duration of seven large solar events occurring between May 28, 1967, and November 6, 1969, in order to investigate the total alpha particles fluxes observed at 1 AU resulting from the flares. The spectra of the event integrated alphas are always softer than the spectra of the event integrated protons. As a consequence, the event-integrated alpha-to-proton ratios decrease slightly with increasing energy per nucleon. The He-4/H-1 ratios averaged over the seven events are found to vary as 0.026 (E/nucl) sup -0.2 in the range 1 to 10 MeV/nucleon. The value of the ratio at 1 MeV/nucleon is less than the helium-to-hydrogen abundance determined from spectroscopic studies of prominences and the chromosphere, and is less than the average solar wind helium-to-hydrogen abundance.

  11. Energy and frequency dependence of the alpha particle redistribution produced by internal kink modes

    SciTech Connect

    Farengo, R.; Ferrari, H. E.; Garcia-Martinez, P. L.; Firpo, M.-C.; Ettoumi, W.; Lifschitz, A. F.

    2014-08-15

    The redistribution of alpha particles due to internal kink modes is studied. The exact particle trajectories in the total fields, equilibrium plus perturbation, are calculated. The equilibrium has circular cross section and the plasma parameters are similar to those expected in ITER. The alpha particles are initially distributed according to a slowing down distribution function and have energies between 18 keV and 3.5 MeV. The (1, 1), (2, 2), and (2, 1) modes are included and the effect of changing their amplitude and frequency is studied. When only the (1, 1) mode is included, the spreading of high energy (E≳1 MeV) alpha particles increases slowly with the energy and mode frequency. At lower energies, the redistribution is more sensitive to the mode frequency and particle energy. When a (2, 1) mode is added, the spreading increases significantly and particles can reach the edge of the plasma. Trapped particles are the most affected and the redistribution parameter can have maxima above 1 MeV, depending on the mode frequency. These results can have important implications for ash removal.

  12. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  13. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  14. RADON AND PROGENY ALPHA-PARTICLE ENERGY ANALYSIS USING NUCLEAR TRACK METHODOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa Garcia, Guillermo; Golzarri y Moreno, Dr. Jose Ignacio; Bogard, James S

    2008-01-01

    A preliminary procedure for alpha energy analysis of radon and progeny using Nuclear Track Methodology (NTM) is described in this paper. The method is based on the relationship between alpha-particle energies deposited in polycarbonate material (CR-39) and the track size developed after a well-established chemical etching process. Track geometry, defined by parameters such as major or minor diameters, track area and overall track length, is shown to correlate with alpha-particle energy over the range 6.00 MeV (218Po) to 7.69 MeV (214Po). Track features are measured and the data analyzed automatically using a digital imaging system and commercial PC software. Examination of particle track diameters in CR-39 exposed to environmental radon reveals a multi-modal distribution. Locations of the maxima in this distribution are highly correlated with alpha particle energies of radon daughters, and the distributions are sufficiently resolved to identify the radioisotopes. This method can be useful for estimating the radiation dose from indoor exposure to radon and its progeny.

  15. Low-energy electron spectrum of a copper target bombarded by {alpha}-particles of {sup 238}Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Kupryashkin, V. T. Sidorenko, L. P.; Feoktistov, A. I.; Rovenskykh, E. P.

    2011-04-15

    The ({alpha}e) time coincidence method is applied to study the low-energy electron spectrum of a copper target bombarded by {alpha}-particles of {sup 238}Pu. Ionization of atoms bombarded by charged particles is considered as the shaking of electrons into the continuous spectrum due to a sudden perturbation by a flying particle. A comparison of experimental and calculated distributions showed good agreement, which confirms the accuracy of the ionization description as a result of the shaking effect.

  16. Integrodifferential equation approach. I. Triton and. alpha. -particle binding energies

    SciTech Connect

    Oehm, W.; Sofianos, S.A.; Fiedeldey, H. Physics Department, University of South Africa, Pretoria ); Fabre de la Ripelle, M. Physics Department, University of South Africa, Pretoria )

    1990-12-01

    A single integrodifferential equation in two variables, valid for {ital A} nucleons interacting by pure Wigner forces, which has previously only been solved in the extreme and uncoupled adiabatic approximations, is now solved exactly for three- and four-nucleon systems. The results are in good agreement with the values obtained for the binding energies by means of an empirical interpolation formula. This validates all our previous conclusions, in particular that the omission of higher (than two) order correlations in our four-body equation only produces a rather small underbinding. The integrodifferential equation approach is here also extended to spin-dependent forces of the Malfliet-Tjon type, resulting in two coupled integrodifferential equations in two variables. The exact solution and the interpolated adiabatic approximation are again in good agreement. The inclusion of the hypercentral part of the two-body interaction in the definition of the Faddeev-type components again leads to substantial improvement for fully local potentials, acting in all partial waves.

  17. Alpha particle density and energy distributions in tandem mirrors using Monte-Carlo techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    We have simulated the alpha thermalization process using a Monte-Carlo technique, in which the alpha guiding center is followed between simulated collisions and Spitzer's collision model is used for the alpha-plasma interaction. Monte-Carlo techniques are used to determine the alpha radial birth position, the alpha particle position at a collision, and the angle scatter and dispersion at a collision. The plasma is modeled as a hot reacting core, surrounded by a cold halo plasma (T approx.50 eV). Alpha orbits that intersect the halo lose 90% of their energy to the halo electrons because of the halo drag, which is ten times greater than the drag in the core. The uneven drag across the alpha orbit also produces an outward, radial, guiding center drift. This drag drift is dependent on the plasma density and temperature radial profiles. We have modeled these profiles and have specifically studied a single-scale-length model, in which the density scale length (r/sub pD/) equals the temperature scale length (r/sub pT/), and a two-scale-length model, in which r/sub pD//r/sub pT/ = 1.1.

  18. Acceleration of low-energy protons and alpha particles at interplanetary shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1983-01-01

    The low-energy protons and alpha particles in the energy range 30 keV/charge to 150 keV/charge associated with three different interplanetary shock waves in the immediate preshock and postshock region are studied using data obtained by the ISEE 3. The spatial distributions in the preshock and postshock medium are presented, and the dependence of the phase space density at different energies on the distance from the shock and on the form of the distribution function of both species immediately at the shock is examined. It is found that in the preshock region the particles are flowing in the solar wind frame of reference away from the shock and in the postshock medium the distribution is more or less isotropic in this frame of reference. The distribution function in the postshock region can be represented by a power law in energy which has the same spectral exponent for both protons and alpha particles. It is concluded that the first-order Fermi acceleration process can consistently explain the data, although the spectra of diffuse bow shock associated particles are different from the spectra of the interplanetary shock-associated particles in the immediate vicinity of the shock. In addition, the mean free path of the low energy ions in the preshock medium is found to be considerably smaller than the mean free path determined by the turbulence of the background interplanetary medium.

  19. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Energy distribution of ternary {alpha} particles in spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Mutterer, M.; Kalben, J. von; Kopatch, Yu. N.; Yamaledtinov, S. R.; Lyapin, V. G.; Sillanpaeae, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Khlebnikov, S. V.; Tyurin, G. P.

    2008-12-15

    The energy distribution of the ternary {alpha} particles in spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf was measured. For the first time an energy threshold as low as 1 MeV was reached. The experiment used an array of unshielded silicon detectors measuring energy and time-of-flight (TOF) of ternary particles in coincidence with fission fragments. The TOF resolution of the system was sufficient for clear separation of {sup 6}He and tritons from {sup 4}He. The statistics were adequate to extract the {sup 6}He/{sup 4}He yield ratio. For both {sup 4}He and {sup 6}He, an excess in the yield (as compared to a Gaussian shape) was observed at energies below 9 MeV. The measured ternary {alpha} spectrum was corrected for the distortion induced by the detection geometry covering equatorial particle emission only. The emission angle was found to affect mainly the width of the energy distribution by up to 1 MeV.

  1. An Experiment to Measure Range, Range Straggling, Stopping Power, and Energy Straggling of Alpha Particles in Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouseph, P. J.; Mostovych, Andrew

    1978-01-01

    Experiments to measure range, range straggling, stopping power, and energy straggling of alpha particles are discussed in this article. Commercially available equipment with simple modifications is used for these measurements. (Author/GA)

  2. Final state interaction effects at higher energies in the photodisintegration of the {alpha}-particle

    SciTech Connect

    Fiedeldey, H.; Sofianos, S.A.; Ellerkmann, G. |

    1995-05-10

    Final State Interaction (FSI) effects are included in the photodisintegration of the {alpha}-particle by means of effective nucleon-trinucleon interactions constructed by inversion of the phase-shifts at energies 50--200 MeV. We show that the use of the Born approximation is justified and that the photonuclear cross sections are sensitive to the details of the bound state wave functions of the {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  3. PIXE-induced XRF by high energy protons and alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglioni, M.; Manfredi, G.; Milazzo, M.; Silari, M.

    1993-04-01

    In the past three years a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study has been conducted on the production of intense sources of monochromatic X-rays in the range 1-75 keV by bombardment of pure element targets with protons and alpha particles of tens of MeV energy. The present paper describes a dual-chamber irradiation system which has been designed and built for PIXE-induced XRF. Preliminary experimental results of analyses obtained with 20 MeV protons and a Zn primary target are shown.

  4. Range, energy loss, energy straggling and damage production for [alpha]-particles in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzke, Hj.

    Energy loss and energy straggling of α-particles in UO 2 were measured for α-energies up to 8.78 MeV. α-sources of Pu-239 and a `multi-energy source' emitting α-particles of five different energies obtained by recoil implantation from a Th-228 source were coated with UO 2 layers of 17 different thicknesses. Confirmation of these results was obtained from Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, RBS/channeling experiments with UO 2 single crystals preimplanted with He-ions. The measured energy loss values were used to deduce the range-energy relation. The results are in good agreement with calculations using the code TRIM 96. The energy straggling results are discussed in the frame of Bohr's theory. Finally, defects and damage produced by α-particles and He-ions in UO 2 are briefly treated.

  5. Measurement of ion cascade energies through resolution degradation of alpha particle microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Horansky, Robert D.; Stiehl, Gregory M.; Beall, James A.; Irwin, Kent D.; Ullom, Joel N.; Plionis, Alexander A.; Rabin, Michael W.

    2010-02-15

    Atomic cascades caused by ions impinging on bulk materials have remained of interest to the scientific community since their discovery by Goldstein in 1902. While considerable effort has been spent describing and, more recently, simulating these cascades, tools that can study individual events are lacking and several aspects of cascade behavior remain poorly known. These aspects include the material energies that determine cascade magnitude and the variation between cascades produced by monoenergetic ions. We have recently developed an alpha particle detector with a thermodynamic resolution near 100 eV full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) and an achieved resolution of 1.06 keV FWHM for 5.3 MeV particles. The detector relies on the absorption of particles by a bulk material and a thermal change in a superconducting thermometer. The achieved resolution of this detector provides the highest resolving power of any energy dispersive technique and a factor of 8 improvement over semiconductor detectors. The exquisite resolution can be directly applied to improved measurements of fundamental nuclear decays and nuclear forensics. In addition, we propose that the discrepancy between the thermodynamic and achieved resolution is due to fluctuations in lattice damage caused by ion-induced cascades in the absorber. Hence, this new detector is capable of measuring the kinetic energy converted to lattice damage in individual atomic cascades. This capability allows new measurements of cascade dynamics; for example, we find that the ubiquitous modeling program, SRIM, significantly underestimates the lattice damage caused in bulk tin by 5.3 MeV alpha particles.

  6. Behavior of low-energy protons and alpha particles during a disturbed time period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Fan, C. Y.; Hovestadt, D.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents observations of 130- to 1200-keV protons and 40- to 420-keV/nucleon alpha particles made on the earth-orbiting spacecraft Imp 8 and Imp 7 during an active solar period in September 1974, concentrating, in particular, on an energetic storm particle (ESP) event observed in association with an interplanetary shock wave on September 21. It is found that the observed variations in the proton-to-alpha particle ratios and spectral indices can be explained either by 'pileup' or by acceleration models of ESP events. Several instances of local acceleration of particles in the near-earth environment are also discussed.

  7. Alpha particle confinement in tandem mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Devoto, R.S.; Ohnishi, M.; Kerns, J.; Woo, J.T.

    1980-10-10

    Mechanisms leading to loss of alpha particles from non-axisymmetric tandem mirrors are considered. Stochastic diffusion due to bounce-drift resonances, which can cause rapid radial losses of high-energy alpha particles, can be suppressed by imposing a 20% rise in axisymmetric fields before the quadrupole transition sections. Alpha particles should then be well-confined until thermal energies when they enter the resonant plateau require. A fast code for computation of drift behavior in reactors is described. Sample calculations are presented for resonant particles in a proposed coil set for the Tandem Mirror Next Step.

  8. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E. Jr.; Dawson, J.M.

    1983-11-23

    This invention relates generally to high energy confined plasmas and more particularly is directed to measuring the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a confined energetic plasma.

  9. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Wolf, Michael A.; McAtee, James L.; Unruh, Wesley P.; Cucchiara, Alfred L.; Huchton, Roger L.

    1993-01-01

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  10. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Wolf, M.A.; McAtee, J.L.; Unruh, W.P.; Cucchiara, A.L.; Huchton, R.L.

    1993-02-02

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  11. Development of the MICROMEGAS detector for measuring the energy spectrum of alpha particles by using a 241Am source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Yoon; Ham, Cheolmin; Shin, Jae Won; Park, Tae-Sun; Hong, Seung-Woo; Andriamonje, Samuel; Kadi, Yacine; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    We have developed MICROMEGAS (MICRO MEsh GASeous) detectors for detecting a particles emitted from an 241Am standard source. The voltage applied to the ionization region of the detector is optimized for stable operation at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The energy of a particles from the 241Am source can be varied by changing the flight path of the a particle from the 241Am source. The channel numbers of the experimentally-measured pulse peak positions for different energies of the a particles are associated with the energies deposited by the alpha particles in the ionization region of the detector as calculated by using GEANT4 simulations; thus, the energy calibration of the MICROMEGAS detector for a particles is done. For the energy calibration, the thickness of the ionization region is adjusted so that a particles may completely stop in the ionization region and their kinetic energies are fully deposited in the region. The efficiency of our MICROMEGAS detector for a particles under the present conditions is found to be ~97.3%.

  12. Lower hybrid instability driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Vishwesh; Tripathi, V. K.

    2013-02-15

    A kinetic formalism of lower hybrid wave instability, driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread, is developed. The instability arises through cyclotron resonance interaction with high cyclotron harmonics of {alpha}-particles. The {alpha}-particles produced in D-T fusion reactions have huge Larmor radii ({approx}10 cm) as compared to the wavelength of the lower hybrid wave, whereas their speed is an order of magnitude smaller than the speed of light in vacuum. As a result, large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid waves, suitable for current drive in tokamak, are driven unstable via coupling to high cyclotron harmonics. The growth rate decreases with increase in pitch angle spread of the beam. At typical electron density of {approx}10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, magnetic field {approx}4 Tesla and {alpha}-particle concentration {approx}0.1%, the large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid wave grows on the time scale of 20 ion cyclotron periods. The growth rate decreases with plasma density.

  13. CHARGE-EXCHANGE LIMITS ON LOW-ENERGY {alpha}-PARTICLE FLUXES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, H. S.; Fletcher, L.; MacKinnon, A. L.; Woods, T. N.

    2012-06-20

    This paper reports on a search for flare emission via charge-exchange radiation in the wings of the Ly{alpha} line of He II at 304 A, as originally suggested for hydrogen by Orrall and Zirker. Via this mechanism a primary {alpha} particle that penetrates into the neutral chromosphere can pick up an atomic electron and emit in the He II bound-bound spectrum before it stops. The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory gives us our first chance to search for this effect systematically. The Orrall-Zirker mechanism has great importance for flare physics because of the essential roles that particle acceleration plays; this mechanism is one of the few proposed that would allow remote sensing of primary accelerated particles below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}. We study 10 events in total, including the {gamma}-ray events SOL2010-06-12 (M2.0) and SOL2011-02-24 (M3.5) (the latter a limb flare), seven X-class flares, and one prominent M-class event that produced solar energetic particles. The absence of charge-exchange line wings may point to a need for more complete theoretical work. Some of the events do have broadband signatures, which could correspond to continua from other origins, but these do not have the spectral signatures expected from the Orrall-Zirker mechanism.

  14. The energy spectra of protons and alpha particles above 300 keV/nucleon during quiet times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Vollmer, O.; Fan, C. Y.

    1975-01-01

    An unusual spectral feature and anomalously large abundance of helium between 0.6 and about 2 MeV/nucleon observed during the most quiet time periods in 1974 indicate the presence of low energy helium of an unknown origin. During these same quiet periods protons below 1.5 MeV and alphas below 0.6 MeV/nucleon have a power law energy spectrum with an index of -1.8 and the proton to alpha ratio is about 30. From these results and the measured anisotropy of these particles we conclude that the sun emits less than about 1 MeV particles continuously even during its most inactive periods.

  15. Typical uncertainties in alpha-particle spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommé, S.

    2015-06-01

    Alpha-particle spectrometry is routinely performed with the aim of measuring absolute activities, activity ratios between different alpha-emitting nuclides or decay data such as branching factors, alpha emission probabilities and relative half-lives. It is most commonly performed with ion-implanted silicon detectors. Strong features of the technique are the low background levels that can be achieved due to low sensitivity to other types of radiation, the intrinsic efficiency close to 1 which reduces the efficiency calculations to a geometrical problem and the uniqueness of the energy spectra for each α-decaying nuclide. The main challenge is the limitation to the attainable energy resolution, even with thin and homogenous sources, which causes alpha energy peaks to be partially unresolved due to their width and low-energy tailing. The spectral deconvolution often requires fitting of analytical functions to each peak in the alpha spectrum. True coincidence effects between alpha particles and subsequently emitted conversion electrons cause distortions of the alpha spectra which lead to significant changes in the apparent peak area ratios. Optimum energy resolution can only be achieved on very thin sources, which puts constraints on the source preparation techniques. Radiochemical separations may be needed to extract the alpha emitters from voluminous matrices and efficiency tracing is performed by adding in another isotope by known amounts. Typical uncertainty components are discussed by means of some hypothetical examples.

  16. Alpha particle confinement in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Mynick, H.E.

    1988-11-01

    An assessment of diffusive tokamak transport mechanisms of concern for alpha particles indicates that the ''stochastic regime'' is the only one which appears to pose a real danger for adequate alpha confinement. This fact, in conjunction with the threshold character of that mechanism, allows one to decide whether an alpha born at a given location will be lost or confined, according to a very simple criterion. Implementing this criterion numerically results in a new code for the assessment of alpha confinement, which is orders of magnitude faster than earlier codes used for this purpose. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Alpha-particle spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1972-01-01

    Mapping the radon emanation of the moon was studied to find potential areas of high activity by detection of radon isotopes and their daughter products. It was felt that based on observation of regions overflown by Apollo spacecraft and within the field of view of the alpha-particle spectrometer, a radon map could be constructed, identifying and locating lunar areas of outgassing. The basic theory of radon migration from natural concentrations of uranium and thorium is discussed in terms of radon decay and the production of alpha particles. The preliminary analysis of the results indicates no significant alpha emission.

  18. Alpha particles in effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Caniu, C.

    2014-11-11

    Using an effective field theory for alpha (α) particles at non-relativistic energies, we calculate the strong scattering amplitude modified by Coulomb corrections for a system of two αs. For the strong interaction, we consider a momentum-dependent interaction which, in contrast to an energy dependent interaction alone [1], could be more useful in extending the theory to systems with more than two α particles. We will present preliminary results of our EFT calculations for systems with two alpha particles.

  19. Particle Leaking, Cross-Section Ratio 10B(n,{alpha})/238U(n,fission), and Excitation Function of the Reaction 10B(n,{alpha})7Li at MeV Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Giorginis, Georgios; Khryachkov, Vitali

    2005-05-24

    The 10B(n,{alpha})7Li reaction was studied in the energy range between 1.5 MeV and 5.6 MeV at the 7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator of IRMM by using a gridded ionisation chamber, signal digitisation, and an intrinsic 238U neutron monitor. The aim was to obtain accurate data for the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the improvement of standard cross sections for light elements. The effect of particle leaking was discovered and its implications investigated. The determination of the cross section {sigma}({alpha}0+{alpha}1) strongly benefits from it but measurements of angular distributions, individual cross sections {sigma}({alpha}0) and {sigma}({alpha}1), and the branching ratio {alpha}0/{alpha}1 are negatively affected. The correct number of reaction events was obtained by identification of unknown particle signatures in the energy spectra as 10B(n,{alpha})7Li events in the form of quasi 7Li+{alpha} particles created by particle leaking. The cross-section ratio 10B(n,{alpha})7Li/238U(n,fission) was measured and the excitation function of 10B(n,{alpha})7Li determined by simultaneously detecting the charged particles from the boron disintegration in the forward hemisphere and the 238U fission fragments in the backward hemisphere. The IRMM cross sections are compared to experimental data of other groups and to predictions of the ENDF/B-VI.8, JENDL-3.3, and JEF-2.2 evaluations.

  20. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, Larry R.; Post, Jr., Douglass E.; Dawson, John M.

    1986-01-01

    Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

  1. Analytic expressions for {alpha} particle preformation in heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H. F.; Wang, Y. J.; Dong, J. M.; Royer, G.

    2009-11-15

    Experimental {alpha} decay energies and half-lives are investigated systematically to extract {alpha} particle preformation in heavy nuclei. Formulas for the preformation factors are proposed that can be used to guide microscopic studies on preformation factors and perform accurate calculations of the {alpha} decay half-lives. There is little evidence for the existence of an island of long stability of superheavy nuclei.

  2. Alpha particle destabilization of the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-10-01

    The high frequency, low mode number toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) are shown to be driven unstable by the circulating and/or trapped {alpha}-particles through the wave-particle resonances. Satisfying the resonance condition requires that the {alpha}-particle birth speed v{sub {alpha}} {ge} v{sub A}/2{vert bar}m-nq{vert bar}, where v{sub A} is the Alfven speed, m is the poloidal model number, and n is the toroidal mode number. To destabilize the TAE modes, the inverse Landau damping associated with the {alpha}-particle pressure gradient free energy must overcome the velocity space Landau damping due to both the {alpha}-particles and the core electrons and ions. The growth rate was studied analytically with a perturbative formula derived from the quadratic dispersion relation, and numerically with the aid of the NOVA-K code. Stability criteria in terms of the {alpha}-particle beta {beta}{sub {alpha}}, {alpha}-particle pressure gradient parameter ({omega}{sub {asterisk}}/{omega}{sub A}) ({omega}{sub {asterisk}} is the {alpha}-particle diamagnetic drift frequency), and (v{sub {alpha}}/v{sub A}) parameters will be presented for TFTR, CIT, and ITER tokamaks. The volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold for TAE instability also depends sensitively on the core electron and ion temperature. Typically the volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold is in the order of 10{sup {minus}4}. Typical growth rates of the n=1 TAE mode can be in the order of 10{sup {minus}2}{omega}{sub A}, where {omega}{sub A}=v{sub A}/qR. Other types of global Alfven waves are stable in D-T tokamaks due to toroidal coupling effects.

  3. Determination of primary energy in nucleus-nucleus collisions and the high P(sub)T tail of alpha-particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freier, P. S.; Atwater, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    A determination of primary energy is required in order to study the energy dependence of meson multiplicity in A-A collisions in cosmic rays. Various procedures which estimate the energy of a primary nucleus from its interaction were investigated. An average of two methods were used, one using the pions and wounded protons and the other using spectator protons and alpha particles. The high P sub T tail observed for Z = 2 fragments requires a modification of the latter method.

  4. ''Magic'' Energies for Detecting Light Elements with Resonant Alpha Particle Backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wetteland, C.J.; Maggiore, C.J.; Tesmer, J.R.; He, X-M.; Lee, D-H.

    1998-11-04

    Resonant backscattering is widely used to improve the detection limit of the light elements such as B, C, N and O. One disadvantage, however, is that several incident energies are normally needed if the sample contains a number of the light elements. There are ''magic'' energies at which several light elements can be detected simultaneously with suitable sensitivities. When these energies are used along with the elastic recoil detection of hydrogen, multiple elements can be detected without changing the beam energy, and the analysis time is greatly reduced. These reactions along with examples will be discussed.

  5. [alpha]-particle transport-driven current in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A. ); Sipilae, S.K. )

    1995-03-01

    It is shown that the radial transport of fusion-born energetic [alpha] particles, induced by electrostatic waves traveling in one poloidal direction, is directly connected to a net momentum of [alpha] particles in the toroidal direction in tokamaks. Because the momentum change is almost independent of toroidal velocity, the energy required for the momentum generation remains small on an [alpha]-particle population sustained by an isotropic time-independent source. By numerical toroidal Monte Carlo calculations it is shown that the current carried by [alpha] particles in the presence of intense well penetrated waves can reach several mega-amperes in reactor-sized tokamaks. The current obtained can greatly exceed the neoclassical bootstrap current of the [alpha] particles.

  6. Prospects for alpha particle studies on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.

    1987-05-01

    TFTR is expected to produce approximately 5 MW of alpha heating during the D/T Q approx. = 1 phase of operation in 1990. At that point the collective confinement properties and the heating effects of alpha particles become accessible for study for the first time. This paper outlines the potential performance of TFTR with respect to alpha particle production, the diagnostics which will be available for alpha particle measurements, and the physics issues which can be studied both before and during D/T operation.

  7. Additional {alpha}-particle optical potential tests below the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.

    2010-03-15

    New results of ({alpha},{gamma}) and ({alpha},n) reaction cross section measurements close to the reaction thresholds support the setting up of recent parameters of the {alpha}-particle optical model potential (OMP) below the Coulomb barrier. Particular features of the {alpha}-particle optical potential at energies below the Coulomb barrier explain the failure of using the OMP parameters obtained by analysis of only {alpha}-particle elastic scattering at higher energies.

  8. The mutagenicity of. cap alpha. particles from plutonium-238

    SciTech Connect

    Thacker, J.; Stretch, A.; Goodhead, D.T.

    1982-11-01

    Cell killing and the frequency of mutation to thioguanine resistance (HGPRT enzyme deficiency) were measured after irradiation of cultured hamster cells with 250-kV X rays and with /sup 238/Pu ..cap alpha.. particles. The frequency of mutants induced by these ..cap alpha.. particles, for a given level of cell killing, was approximately twice that induced by X rays. This agrees with expectations from our previously published data on mutation induction by radiations of high linear energy transfer, but disagrees with another recently published report of the relative mutagenicity of /sup 238/Pu ..cap alpha.. particles. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed.

  9. Variation in RBE for Survival of V79-4 Cells as a Function of Alpha-Particle (Helium Ion) Energy.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Bliss L; Stevens, David L; Goodhead, Dudley T; Hill, Mark A

    2015-07-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) α particles are important with respect to the carcinogenic risk associated with human exposure to ionizing radiation, most notably to radon and its progeny. Additionally, the potential use of alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in radiotherapy is increasingly being explored. Within the body the emitted alpha particles slow down, traversing a number of cells with a range of energies and therefore with varying efficiencies at inducing biological response. The LET of the particle typically rises from between ~70-90 keV μm(-1) at the start of the track (depending on initial energy) to a peak of ~237 keV μm(-1) towards the end of the track, before falling again at the very end of its range. To investigate the variation in biological response with incident energy, a plutonium-238 alpha-particle irradiator was calibrated to enable studies with incident energies ranging from 4.0 MeV down to 1.1 MeV. The variation in clonogenic survival of V79-4 cells was determined as a function of incident energy, along with the relative variation in the initial yields of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) measured using the FAR assay. The clonogenic survival data also extends previously published data obtained at the Medical Research Council (MRC), Harwell using the same cells irradiated with helium ions, with energies ranging from 34.9 MeV to 5.85 MeV. These studies were performed in conjunction with cell morphology measurements on live cells enabling the determination of absorbed dose and calculation of the average LET in the cell. The results show an increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for cell inactivation with decreasing helium ion energy (increasing LET), reaching a maximum for incident energies of ~3.2 MeV and corresponding average LET of 131 keV μm(-1), above which the RBE is observed to fall at lower energies (higher LETs). The effectiveness of single alpha-particle traversals (relevant to low-dose exposure) at inducing cell inactivation was observed to increase with decreasing energy to a peak of ~68% survival probability for incident energies of ~1.8 MeV (average LET of 190 keV μm(-1)) producing ~0.39 lethal lesions per track. However, the efficiency of a single traversal will also vary significantly with cell morphology and angle of incidence, as well as cell type. PMID:26121227

  10. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle emitting radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Pozzi, O R

    2004-12-01

    An important consideration in the development of effective strategies for radioimmunotherapy is the nature of the radiation emitted by the radionuclide. Radionuclides decaying by the emission of alpha-particles offer the possibility of matching the cell specific reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with radiation with a range of only a few cell diameters. Furthermore, alpha-particles have important biological advantages compared with external beam radiation and beta-particles including a higher biological effectiveness, which is nearly independent of oxygen concentration, dose rate and cell cycle position. In this review, the clinical settings most likely to benefit from alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy will be discussed. The current status of preclinical and clinical research with antibodies labeled with 3 promising alpha-particle emitting radionuclides - (213)Bi, (225)Ac, and (211)At - also will be summarized. PMID:15640792

  11. A High-Throughput Screen for Alpha Particle Radiation Protectants

    PubMed Central

    Seideman, Jonathan H.; Shum, David; Djaballah, Hakim

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Alpha-particle-emitting elements are of increasing importance as environmental and occupational carcinogens, toxic components of radiation dispersal devices and accidents, and potent therapeutics in oncology. Alpha particle radiation differs from radiations of lower linear energy transfer in that it predominantly damages DNA via direct action. Because of this, radical scavengers effective for other radiations have had only limited effect in mitigating alpha particle toxicity. We describe here a simple assay and a pilot screen of 3,119 compounds in a high-throughput screen (HTS), using the alpha-particle-emitting isotope, 225Ac, for the discovery of compounds that might protect mammalian cells from alpha particles through novel mechanisms. The assay, which monitored the viability of a myeloid leukemic cell line upon alpha particle exposure, was robust and reproducible, yielding a Z' factor of 0.66 and a signal-to-noise ratio of nearly 10 to 1. Surprisingly, 1 compound emerged from this screen, epoxy-4,5-?-dihydroxysantonin (EDHS), that showed considerable protective activity. While the value of EDHS remains to be determined, its discovery is a proof of concept and validation of the utility of this HTS methodology. Further application of the described assay could yield compounds useful in minimizing the toxicity and carcinogenesis associated with alpha particle exposure. PMID:20658946

  12. Analysis of radiation risk from alpha particle component of solar particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Golightly, M. J.; Weyland, M.

    1994-01-01

    The solar particle events (SPE) will contain a primary alpha particle component, representing a possible increase in the potential risk to astronauts during an SPE over the often studied proton component. We discuss the physical interactions of alpha particles important in describing the transport of these particles through spacecraft and body shielding. Models of light ion reactions are presented and their effects on energy and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra in shielding discussed. We present predictions of particle spectra, dose, and dose equivalent in organs of interest for SPE spectra typical of those occurring in recent solar cycles. The large events of solar cycle 19 are found to have substantial increase in biological risk from alpha particles, including a large increase in secondary neutron production from alpha particle breakup.

  13. Analysis of radiation risk from alpha particle component of soalr particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Golightly, M. J.; Weyland, M.

    1994-01-01

    The Solar Particle Events (SPE) will contain a primary alpha particle component, representing a possible increase in the potential risk to astronauts during an SPE over the often studied proton component. We discuss the physical interactions of alpha particles important in describing the transport of these particles through spacecraft and body shielding. Models of light ion reactions are presented and their effects on energy and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra in shielding are discussed. We present predictions of particle spectra, dose, and dose equivalent in organs of interest for SPE spectra typical of those occurring in recent solar cycles. The large events of solar cycle 19 are found to have substantial increase in biological risk from alpha particles, including a large increase in secondary neutron production from alpha particle breakup.

  14. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of 241Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  15. Alpha particle backscattering measurements used for chemical analysis of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J. H.

    1967-01-01

    Alpha particle backscattering performs a chemical analysis of surfaces. The apparatus uses a curium source and a semiconductor detector to determine the energy spectrum of the particles. This in turn determines the chemical composition of the surface after calibration to known samples.

  16. A Novel Experiment to Investigate the Attenuation of Alpha Particles in Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, D. G. H.

    2008-01-01

    A simple student experiment investigating dependence on air pressure of the attenuation of alpha particles in air is described. An equation giving the pressure needed to absorb all alpha particles of a given energy is derived from the Bethe-Bloch formula. Results are presented for the attenuation of alpha particles from americium 241 and radium

  17. A Novel Experiment to Investigate the Attenuation of Alpha Particles in Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, D. G. H.

    2008-01-01

    A simple student experiment investigating dependence on air pressure of the attenuation of alpha particles in air is described. An equation giving the pressure needed to absorb all alpha particles of a given energy is derived from the Bethe-Bloch formula. Results are presented for the attenuation of alpha particles from americium 241 and radium…

  18. Alpha-particle sensitive test SRAMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Blaes, B. R.

    1990-01-01

    A bench-level test is being developed to evaluate memory-cell upsets in a test SRAM designed with a cell offset voltage. This offset voltage controls the critical charge needed to upset the cell. The effect is demonstrated using a specially designed 2-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM and a Po-208 5.1-MeV 0.61-LET alpha-particle source. This test SRAM has been made sensitive to alpha particles through the use of a cell offset voltage, and this has allowed a bench-level characterization in a laboratory setting. The experimental data are linked to a alpha-particle interaction physics and to SPICE circuit simulations through the alpha-particle collection depth. The collection depth is determined by two methods and found to be about 7 micron. In addition, alpha particles that struck outside the bloated drain were able to flip the SRAM cells. This lateral charge collection was observed to be more than 6 micron.

  19. Actinium-225 in targeted alpha-particle therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2011-10-01

    Alpha particle-emitting isotopes are being investigated in radioimmunotherapeutic applications because of their unparalleled cytotoxicity when targeted to cancer and their relative lack of toxicity towards untargeted normal tissue. Actinium- 225 has been developed into potent targeting drug constructs and is in clinical use against acute myelogenous leukemia. The key properties of the alpha particles generated by 225Ac are the following: i) limited range in tissue of a few cell diameters; ii) high linear energy transfer leading to dense radiation damage along each alpha track; iii) a 10 day halflife; and iv) four net alpha particles emitted per decay. Targeting 225Ac-drug constructs have potential in the treatment of cancer. PMID:22202153

  20. Alternating current long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; McAtee, J.L.

    1993-02-16

    An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, which is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

  1. Alternating current long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM); McAtee, James L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01

    An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, whcih is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

  2. The status of alpha-particle diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.; Johnson, D.W.

    1992-08-01

    There is a flurry of activity to complete alpha-particle diagnostics so that they can undergo some experimental testing in DT plasmas on JET or TFTR prior to implementation on ITER. Successful measurements of escaping charged fusion products have been made in DD plasmas, and the {alpha}-particle source can be well characterized by neutron profile measurement. These methods can be extrapolated to DT plasmas. Measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles requires a new technique. Collective Thomson scattering, methods involving charge-exchange interactions and nuclear reactions with impurities will be discussed. Some assessment is given of the capabilities of these techniques, bearing in mind the potential for their use in the physics phase of the ITER program.

  3. The status of alpha-particle diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.; Johnson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    There is a flurry of activity to complete alpha-particle diagnostics so that they can undergo some experimental testing in DT plasmas on JET or TFTR prior to implementation on ITER. Successful measurements of escaping charged fusion products have been made in DD plasmas, and the {alpha}-particle source can be well characterized by neutron profile measurement. These methods can be extrapolated to DT plasmas. Measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles requires a new technique. Collective Thomson scattering, methods involving charge-exchange interactions and nuclear reactions with impurities will be discussed. Some assessment is given of the capabilities of these techniques, bearing in mind the potential for their use in the physics phase of the ITER program.

  4. Lunar surface outgassing and alpha particle measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, S. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Moore, K. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Belian, Richard D.; Binder, Alan B.

    2002-01-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) searched for lunar surface gas release events and mapped their distribution by detecting alpha particle?; produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life), solid polonium-2 18 (6.0 MeV, 3 minute half-life), and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but held up in production by the 21 year half-life of lead-210). These three nuclides are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238.

  5. Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauser, C. F.; Farengo, R.

    2015-12-01

    Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes in a magnetized plasma is studied. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations are employed to show that this process can be very important in the pedestal-edge-SOL regions. This is the first study that presents clear evidence of the importance of atomic processes on the diffusion of alpha particles. A simple 1D model that includes inelastic collisions with plasma species, "cold" neutrals, and partially ionized species was employed. The code, which follows the exact particle orbits and includes the effect of inelastic collisions via a Monte Carlo type random process, runs on a graphic processor unit (GPU). The analytical and numerical results show excellent agreement when a uniform background (plasma and cold species) is assumed. The simulations also show that the gradients in the density of the plasma and cold species, which are large and opposite in the edge region, produce an inward flux of alpha particles. Calculations of the alpha particles flux reaching the walls or divertor plates should include these processes.

  6. Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes

    SciTech Connect

    Clauser, C. F. Farengo, R.

    2015-12-15

    Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes in a magnetized plasma is studied. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations are employed to show that this process can be very important in the pedestal-edge-SOL regions. This is the first study that presents clear evidence of the importance of atomic processes on the diffusion of alpha particles. A simple 1D model that includes inelastic collisions with plasma species, “cold” neutrals, and partially ionized species was employed. The code, which follows the exact particle orbits and includes the effect of inelastic collisions via a Monte Carlo type random process, runs on a graphic processor unit (GPU). The analytical and numerical results show excellent agreement when a uniform background (plasma and cold species) is assumed. The simulations also show that the gradients in the density of the plasma and cold species, which are large and opposite in the edge region, produce an inward flux of alpha particles. Calculations of the alpha particles flux reaching the walls or divertor plates should include these processes.

  7. {alpha}-particle production in {sup 6}He+{sup 120}Sn collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, P. N. de; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Pires, K. C. C.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Mendes, D. R. Jr.; Barioni, A.; Morcelle, V.; Morais, M. C.; Moro, A. M.; Arazi, A.

    2010-09-15

    The collision {sup 6}He+{sup 120}Sn has been investigated at four energies near the Coulomb barrier. A large yield of {alpha} particles has been detected, with energies around the energy of the scattered {sup 6}He beam. The energy and angular distributions of the {alpha} particles have been analyzed and compared with breakup and neutron transfer calculations.

  8. Scaling of cross sections for K-electron capture by high-energy protons and alpha-particles from the multielectron atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1976-01-01

    Electron capture by protons from H, He, and the K-shell of Ar, and alpha particles from He are considered. It is shown that when a certain function of the experimental cross sections is plotted versus the inverse of the collision energy, at high energies the function falls on a straight line. At lower energies the function concaves up or down, depending on the charge of the projectile, the effective charge and the ionization potential of the electron that is being captured. The plot can be used to predict cross sections where experimental data are not available, and as a guide in future experiments. High energy scaling formulas for K-electron capture by low-charge projectiles are given.

  9. Scaling of cross sections for K-electron capture by high-energy protons and alpha-particles from the multielectron atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1979-01-01

    Electron capture by protons from H, He, and the K shell of Ar, and electron capture by alpha particles from He are considered. Using the experimental data, a function of the capture cross section is formed. It is shown that when this function is plotted versus the inverse of the collision energies, at high energies a straight line is obtained. At lower energies the line is concave up or down, depending on the charge of the projectile and/or the effective charge and the ionization potential of the electron that is being captured. The plot can be used to predict cross sections where experimental data are not available, and as a guide in future experiments. High-energy scaling formulas for K-electron capture by low-charge projectiles are given.

  10. Performance comparison of scintillators for alpha particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Yuki; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Izaki, Kenji; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Toui, Kohei; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio

    2014-11-01

    Scintillation detectors for alpha particles are often used in nuclear fuel facilities. Alpha particle detectors have also become important in the research field of radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters. ZnS(Ag) is the most often used scintillator for alpha particle detectors because its light output is high. However, the energy resolution of ZnS(Ag)-based scintillation detectors is poor because they are not transparent. A new ceramic sample, namely the cerium doped Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator, has been tested as alpha particle detector and its performances have been compared to that one of three different scintillating materials: ZnS(Ag), GAGG and a standard plastic scintillator. The different scintillating materials have been coupled to two different photodetectors, namely a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a Silicon Photo-multiplier (Si-PM): the performances of each detection system have been compared. Promising results as far as the energy resolution performances (10% with PMT and 14% with Si-PM) have been obtained in the case of GPS and GAGG samples. Considering the quantum efficiencies of the photodetectors under test and their relation to the emission wavelength of the different scintillators, the best results were achieved coupling the GPS with the PMT and the GAGG with the Si-PM

  11. Targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G; Rosenblat, Todd L

    2014-01-01

    Because alpha-particles have a shorter range and a higher linear energy transfer (LET) compared with beta-particles, targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy offers the potential for more efficient tumor cell killing while sparing surrounding normal cells. To date, clinical studies of alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have focused on the myeloid cell surface antigen CD33 as a target using the humanized monoclonal antibody lintuzumab. An initial phase I study demonstrated the safety, feasibility, and antileukemic effects of bismuth-213 ((213)Bi)-labeled lintuzumab. In a subsequent study, (213)Bi-lintuzumab produced remissions in some patients with AML after partial cytoreduction with cytarabine, suggesting the utility of targeted alpha-particle therapy for small-volume disease. The widespread use of (213)Bi, however, is limited by its short half-life. Therefore, a second-generation construct containing actinium-225 ((225)Ac), a radiometal that generates four alpha-particle emissions, was developed. A phase I trial demonstrated that (225)Ac-lintuzumab is safe at doses of 3 μCi/kg or less and has antileukemic activity across all dose levels studied. Fractionated-dose (225)Ac-lintuzumab in combination with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) is now under investigation for the management of older patients with untreated AML in a multicenter trial. Preclinical studies using (213)Bi- and astatine-211 ((211)At)-labeled anti-CD45 antibodies have shown that alpha-particle immunotherapy may be useful as part conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation. The use of novel pretargeting strategies may further improve target-to-normal organ dose ratios. PMID:24857092

  12. The effect of alpha particles on bacteriophage T4Br+.

    PubMed

    Leont'eva, G A; Akoev, I G; Grigor'ev, A E

    1983-01-01

    It is generally accepted that heavy charged particles play an important part in generating the secondary flux of nuclear particles formed by the interaction of space hadrons with nuclei. It is assumed that these particles are responsible for the high biological efficiency of space hadrons in causing cellular damage by their strong interactions. To examine this assumption we investigated the effects of 5.3 MeV alpha particles on bacteriophage T4. This energy provides a LET value of 88.6 KeV/micrometer lying in the range of the highest biological efficiency. PMID:11542756

  13. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  14. High speed imaging system in continuum and H-alpha at the Hida observatory for the study of high energy particles in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimoto, K.; Kawate, T.; Yoshikazu, N.; Ishii, T.; Nagata, S.; Asai, A.; Masuda, S.; Kusano, K.; Yamamoto, T. T.; Minoshima, T.; Yokoyama, T.; Watanabe, K.

    2011-12-01

    Non-thermal particles are the fundamental ingredient of solar flares that carry the bulk energy released from the coronal magnetic fields and cause subsequent heating of the solar atmosphere to produce the radiation of wide range of electro-magnetic waves. The observations of hard X-ray and radio emissions suggest a rapid change of population of high energy particles with a time scale of sub-second. Flare kernels observed in visible lights, ex., H-alpha and continuum, show drastic evolutions in space and time during the rising phase of solar flares, and thought to be representing the locations of the precipitation of high energy particles into the chromosphere. Therefore the observations of flare kernels with high spatial and temporal resolutions provide valuable diagnosis of the distribution of high energy particles together with the information of connectivity of coronal magnetic fields. We developed a new high speed imaging system on a 25cm diameter telescope of the Solar Magnetic Activity Research Telescope (SMART) at the Hida observatory of Kyoto University. Images in H-alpha (width~3A) and continuum (6547A, width~10A) are recorded simultaneously with two CCD cameras with a spatial sampling of 0.2 arcsec/pix, field coverage of 344 arcsec x 258 arcsec, and a frame rate of 30fr/sec. Observation is conducted continuously by focusing a targeted active region every day, while only data sets that capture flare events are permanently stored for further analysis. The spatial and temporal evolutions of flare kernels thus obtained are combined with photospheric vector magnetic field taken by the SMART, SOT/Hinode and HMI/SDO, radio data by NoRH, hard X-ray image by RHESSI, and X-ray / UV images by SXT/Hinode and AIA/SDO to identify the instantaneous locations of high energy particles injection in the corona. In this paper we will present an overview of the observing system and its initial results. This work was carried out by the joint research program of the Solar-Terrestorial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University.

  15. Alpha-particle Gas Pressure Gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Bell, L. D.; Hecht, M. H.

    1995-01-01

    Described are preliminary results obtained on a novel gas pressure gauge that operates between 0.1 and 1000 mb. This gauge uses a 1- micron Ci alpha particle source to ionize the gas in a small chamber with an electric field imposed between anode and cathode electrodes that drives positive ions to the cathode where they are collected electronically. This gauge could make Martian pressure measurements.

  16. Alpha particle heating at comet-solar wind interaction regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1995-01-01

    The satellite observations at comet Halley have shown strong heating of solar wind alpha particles over an extended region dominated by high-intensity, low-frequency turbulence. These waves are excited by the water group pickup ions and can energize the solar wind plasma by different heating processes. The alpha particle heating by the Landau damping of kinetic Alfven waves and the transit time damping of low-frequency hydromagnetic waves in this region of high plasma beta are studied in this paper. The Alfven wave heating was shown to be the dominant mechanism for the observed proton heating, but it is found to be insufficient to account for the observed alpha particle heating. The transit time damping due to the interaction of the ions with the electric fields associated with the magnetic field compressions of magnetohydrodynamic waves is found to heat the alpha particles preferentially over the protons. Comparison of the calculated heating times for the transit time damping with the observations from comet Halley shows good agreement. These processes contribute to the thermalization of the solar wind by the conversion of its directed energy into the thermal energy in the transition region at comet-solar wind interaction.

  17. Alpha particle losses from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J.; Batha, S.

    1996-01-01

    Because alpha particle losses can have a significant influence on tokamak reactor viability, the loss of deuterium-tritium alpha particles from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been measured under a wide range of conditions. In TFTR, first orbit loss and stochastic toroidal field ripple diffusion are always present. Other losses can arise due to magnetohydrodynamic instabilities or due to waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. No alpha particle losses have yet been seen due to collective instabilities driven by alphas. Ion Bernstein waves can drive large losses of fast ions from TFTR, and details of those losses support one element of the alpha energy channeling scenario.

  18. Self-consistent study of the alpha particle driven TAE mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; White, R.B.

    1994-04-01

    The interaction of high energy particles with an Alfven eigenmode is investigated self-consistently by using a realistic kinetic dispersion relation. All important poloidal mode numbers and their radial mode profiles as calculated with the NOVA-K code are included. A Hamiltonian guiding center code is used to simulate the alpha particle motion. The numerical simulations include particle orbit width, nonlinear particle dynamics and the effects of the modes on the particles. Modification of the particle distribution leading to mode saturation is observed. Particle loss is limited to devices in which the alpha particle gyro radius is a significant fraction of the minor radius.

  19. Anomalous loss of DT alpha particles in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, H.W.

    1997-09-01

    An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR`s DT phase. Energy distributions of escaping alphas have been determined by measuring the range of {alpha}-particles implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Results at 1.0 MA of plasma current are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss. Results at 1.8 MA, however, show a significant anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas (in addition to the expected first orbit loss), which is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas, but does resemble the anomalous delayed loss seen in DD plasmas. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations. An experiment designed to study the effect of plasma major radius shifts on {alpha}-particle loss has led to a better understanding of {alpha}-particle dynamics in tokamaks. Intuitively, one might suppose that confined marginally passing {alpha}-particles forced to move toward higher magnetic field during an inward major radius shift (i.e., compression) would mirror and become trapped particles, leading to increased alpha loss. Such an effect was looked for during the shift experiment, however, no significant changes in alpha loss to the 90{degree} lost alpha scintillator detector were observed during the shifts. It is calculated that the energy gained by an {alpha}-particle during the inward shift is sufficient to explain this result. However, an unexpected loss of partially thermalized {alpha}-particles near the passing/trapped boundary was observed to occur between inward and outward shifts at an intermediate value of plasma current (1.4 MA). This anomalous loss feature is not yet understood.

  20. Realizing the potential of the Actinium-225 radionuclide generator in targeted alpha-particle therapy applications

    PubMed Central

    Miederer, Matthias; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha particle-emitting isotopes have been proposed as novel cytotoxic agents for augmenting targeted therapy. Properties of alpha particle radiation such as their limited range in tissue of a few cell diameters and their high linear energy transfer leading to dense radiation damage along each alpha track are promising in the treatment of cancer, especially when single cells or clusters of tumor cells are targeted. Actinium-225 (225Ac) is an alpha particle-emitting radionuclide that generates 4 net alpha particle isotopes in a short decay chain to stable 209Bi, and as such can be described as an alpha particle nanogenerator. This article reviews the literature pertaining to the research, development, and utilization of targeted 225Ac to potently and specifically affect cancer. PMID:18514364

  1. Realizing the potential of the Actinium-225 radionuclide generator in targeted alpha particle therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Miederer, Matthias; Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2008-09-01

    Alpha particle-emitting isotopes have been proposed as novel cytotoxic agents for augmenting targeted therapy. Properties of alpha particle radiation such as their limited range in tissue of a few cell diameters and their high linear energy transfer leading to dense radiation damage along each alpha track are promising in the treatment of cancer, especially when single cells or clusters of tumor cells are targeted. Actinium-225 (225 Ac) is an alpha particle-emitting radionuclide that generates 4 net alpha particle isotopes in a short decay chain to stable 209 Bi, and as such can be described as an alpha particle nanogenerator. This article reviews the literature pertaining to the research, development, and utilization of targeted 225 Ac to potently and specifically affect cancer. PMID:18514364

  2. Simulation of Alpha Particles in Rotating Plasma Interacting with a Stationary Ripple

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-01-11

    Superthermal ExB rotation can provide magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and enhanced confinement to axisymmetric mirrors. However, the rotation speed has been limited by phenomena at end electrodes. A new prediction is that rotation might instead be produced using a magnetic ripple and alpha particle kinetic energy, in an extension of the alpha channeling concept. The interaction of alpha particles with the ripple results in visually interesting and practically useful orbits.

  3. Turbulent transport of alpha particles in reactor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2006-11-15

    A systematic study of the behavior of energetic ions in reactor plasmas is presented. Using self-consistent gyrokinetic simulations, in concert with an analytic asymptotic theory, it is found that alpha particles can interact significantly with core ion-temperature-gradient turbulence. Specifically, the per-particle flux of energetic alphas is comparable to the per-particle flux of thermal species (deuterium or helium ash). This finding opposes the conventional wisdom that energetic ions, because of their large gyroradii, do not interact with the turbulence. For the parameters studied, a turbulent modification of the alpha-particle density profile appears to be stronger than turbulent modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile. Crude estimates indicate that the alpha density modification, which is directly proportional to the core turbulence intensity, could be in the range of 15% at midradius in a reactor. The corresponding modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile is predicted to be smaller (in the 1% range)

  4. Alpha particle loss in the TFTR DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    Alpha particle loss was measured during the TFTR DT experiments using a scintillator detector located at the vessel bottom in the ion grad-B drift direction. The DT alpha particle loss to this detector was consistent with the calculated first-orbit loss over the whole range of plasma current I=0.6-2.7 MA. In particular, the alpha particle loss rate per DT neutron did not increase significantly with fusion power up to 10.7 MW, indicating the absence of any new ``collective`` alpha particle loss processes in these experiments.

  5. Alpha-Particle Gas-Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. C.; Bell, L. D.; Hecht, M. H.

    1996-01-01

    An approximate model was developed to establish design curves for the saturation region and a more complete model developed to characterize the current-voltage curves for an alpha-particle pressure sensor. A simple two-parameter current-voltage expression was developed to describe the dependence of the ion current on pressure. The parameters are the saturation-current pressure coefficient and mu/D, the ion mobility/diffusion coefficient. The sensor is useful in the pressure range between 0.1 and 1000 mb using a 1 - mu Ci(241) Am source. Experimental results, taken between 1 and up to 200 mb, show the sensor operates with an anode voltage of 5 V and a sensitivity of 20 fA/mb in nitrogen.

  6. Complex-Energy Shell-Model Description of Alpha Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Id Betan, R.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2011-01-01

    In his pioneering work of alpha decay, Gamow assumed that the alpha particle formed inside the nucleus tunnels through the barrier of the alpha-daughter potential. The corresponding metastable state can be viewed as a complex-energy solution of the time-independent Schroedinger equation with the outgoing boundary condition. The formation of the alpha cluster, missing in the original Gamow formulation, can be described within the R-matrix theory in terms of the formation amplitude. In this work, the alpha decay process is described by computing the formation amplitude and barrier penetrability in a large complex-energy configuration space spanned by the complex-energy eigenstates of the finite Woods-Saxon (WS) potential. The proper normalization of the decay channel is essential as it strongly modifies the alpha-decay spectroscopic factor. The test calculations are carried out for the ^{212}Po alpha decay.

  7. Anomalous Loss of DT Alpha Particles in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Hans W.

    1997-06-01

    Princeton's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is the first experimental fusion device to routinely use tritium to study the deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion reaction,allowing the first systematic study of DT alpha particles in tokamak plasmas. A crucial aspect of alpha-particle physics is the fraction of alphas that escape from the plasma, particularly since these energetic particles can do severe damage to the first wall of a reactor. An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR's DT phase. Energy distributions of escaping alphas have been determined by measuring the range of alpha-particles implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Results at 1.0 MA of plasma current are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss. Results at 1.8 MA, however, show a significant anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas (in addition to the expected first orbit loss), which is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas, but does resemble the anomalous "delayed" loss seen in DD plasmas. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations. An experiment designed to study the effect of plasma major radius shifts on alpha-particle loss has led to a better understanding of alpha-particle dynamics in tokamaks. Intuitively, one might suppose that confined marginally passing alpha-particles forced to move toward higher magnetic field during an inward major radius shift (i.e. compression) would mirror and become trapped particles, leading to increased alpha loss. Such an effect was looked for during the shift experiment, however, no significant changes in alpha loss to the 90 degree lost alpha scintillator detector were observed during the shifts. It is calculated that the energy gained by an alpha-particle during the inward shift is sufficient to explain this result. However, an unexpected loss of partially thermalized alpha-particles near the passing/trapped boundary was observed to occur between inward and outward shifts at an intermediate value of plasma current (1.4 MA). This anomalous loss feature is not yet understood.

  8. Use of /sup 3/He/sup + +/ ICRF minority heating to simulate alpha particle heating

    DOEpatents

    Post, D.E. Jr.; Hwang, D.Q.; Hovey, J.

    1983-11-16

    It is an object of the present invention to provide a better understanding of alpha particle behavior in a magnetically confined, energetic plasma. Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved means and method for studying and measuring the energy distribution of heated alpha particles in a confined plasma. Yet another object of the present invention is to permit detailed analysis of energetic alpha particle behavior in a magnetically confined plasma for use in near term fusion reactor experiments. A still further object of the present invention is to simulate energetic alpha particle behavior in a deuterium-tritium plasma confined in a fusion reactor without producing the neutron activation associated with the thus produced alpha particles.

  9. Energetic alpha particle deposition in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Smitherman, D.P.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of energetic alpha particle deposition in a dense, magnetized deuterium-tritium (DT) thermonuclear fuel has been studied numerically for the case of coulomb interactions in cylindrical geometry. This was done by following the particle trajectories initiated at various radii and in different directions through the plasma and its imposed field until they had either left the plasma or deposited all their energy. The resulting complex particle trajectories in the static magnetized fuel make a detailed treatment of the problem computationally intensive. Therefore, we have attempted to use detailed modeling to produce a data base for a neural nets algorithm for incorporation in an ignition critical profile code. While the accuracy of the neutral net in reproducing the detailed calculational results is not high, it is approximately 6000 times faster. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  10. PC-based analysis of alpha-particle spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Terry C.

    1990-12-01

    Recently developed personal-computer (PC) software performs analysis of alpha-particle spectra. The spectra are collected using a commercially available multichannel analyzer board in the PC, interfaced with up to eight alpha-particle detectors. The PC is an IBM PC-AT computer with a 20 Mbyte Bernoulli-Box removable cartridge disk, a math coprocessor and a printer. Once saved on disk, the spectra are analyzed using the software described here. The PC analysis software performs automatic peak-area determination with operator override. Sample analysis can use measured detector efficiencies or chemical yields obtained from a radionuclide spike or both. Background contribution corrections for all peaks are included. Upper limit values are calculated for nuclides specified by the operator and not found in the sample. Nuclide identification uses a master table of up to 64 nuclides with up to 8 alpha lines for each nuclide. Any one of 32 available subtables can be selected for use in an analysis. Analysis time is short and is limited by interaction with the operator, not by calculation time. Both detailed and summary versions of final results are printed for ease of data reporting. Utilities included with the software provide nuclide table editing, subset table editing, energy calibration, efficiency calibration and background analysis with background correction file update.

  11. Observation of sawtooth redistribution of nonthermal, confined alpha particles in TFTR D-T discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B.; Budny, R.; Chang, Z.; Fonck, R.; Wising, F.; Odblom, A.

    1996-05-01

    Radial profiles of the density of confined alpha particles with energies in the 0.15-0.6 MeV range are spectroscopically observed before and after a sawtooth crash in a TFTR D-T plasma. A large drop in the core alpha density is seen indicating expulsion of alphas from the core to the plasma periphery. The measured changes in the alpha density profiles are consistent with predictions based on the Kolesnichenko sawtooth model, indicating that it may be used to reliably predict the effect of sawteeth on fusion-produced alphas.

  12. Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1992-07-01

    The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

  13. Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1992-07-01

    The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much_gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

  14. Transport theory for energetic alpha particles in finite aspect ratio tokamaks with broken symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaing, K. C.; Schlutt, M.; Lai, A. L.

    2016-02-01

    Transport theory for the energetic alpha particles in finite aspect ratio tokamaks with broken symmetry is developed for the case where the slowing down collision operator dominates. The transport fluxes in the 1 /ν and superbanana plateau regimes are derived. Here, ν is the typical collision frequency. They can be used in modeling the energy loss of the alpha particles in thermonuclear fusion reactors. Numerical realizations of the superbanana orbits of alpha particles in tokamaks with broken symmetry are also presented. The existence of the superbananas corroborates the predictions of the theories presented here and elsewhere.

  15. Measurement of alpha particles on PLT

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.J.; Strachan, J.D.

    1984-12-01

    The radial emission profile of the d(/sup 3/He,p)..cap alpha.. fusion reaction was measured on PLT by pitch angle resolution of the escaping 3.7-MeV alphas. The d-/sup 3/He reactions were produced by /sup 3/He minority ICRF and the emission was strongly peaked at the ICRF resonance layer.

  16. Measurements of geomagnetically trapped alpha particles, 1968-1970. I - Quiet time distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Verzariu, P.

    1973-01-01

    Results of observations of geomagnetically trapped alpha particles over the energy range from 1.18 to 8 MeV performed with the aid of the Injun 5 polar-orbiting satellite during the period from September 1968 to May 1970. Following a presentation of a time history covering this entire period, a detailed analysis is made of the magnetically quiet period from Feb. 11 to 28, 1970. During this period the alpha particle fluxes and the intensity ratio of alpha particles to protons attained their lowest values in approximately 20 months; the alpha particle intensity versus L profile was most similar to the proton profile at the same energy per nucleon interval; the intensity ratio was nearly constant as a function of L in the same energy per nucleon representation, but rose sharply with L when computed in the same total energy interval; the variation of alpha particle intensity with B suggested a steep angular distribution at small equatorial pitch angles, while the intensity ratio showed little dependence on B; and the alpha particle spectral parameter showed a markedly different dependence on L from the equivalent one for protons.

  17. Design of an alpha-particle counting system at a defined solid angle at Turkish atomic energy authority-Sarayköy nuclear research and training center (TAEK-SANAEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seferinoğlu, Meryem; Yeltepe, Emin

    2015-12-01

    The design details of an alpha-particle counting set-up at a defined solid angle (ACS-DSA) constructed in Radionuclide Metrology Department at TAEK-SANAEM for use in the primary standardization of radioactive solutions and determination of nuclear decay data of alpha-particle emitters is presented. The counting system is designed such that the solid angle is very well-defined and directly traceable to the national standards. The design involves mechanical construction of different parts like the source chamber, various coaxial flanges, and circular diaphragms in front of the passivated implanted planar silicon (PIPS®) detector, distance tubes, a digital caliper and a sliding piston to allow for different measurement configurations. All geometric configurations are easily changeable and characterisable with high accuracy which facilitates the solid angle calculation. A mixed alpha source was counted to check performance of assembled ACS-DSA system and good energy resolution and low peak tailing in the alpha energy spectrum was observed for small diaphragm apertures and far source-to-detector geometries.

  18. {alpha}-particle optical potentials for nuclear astrophysics (NA) and nuclear technology (NT)

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, V.; Avrigeanu, M.

    2012-11-20

    The high precision of recent measurements for low-energy {alpha}-particle elastic-scattering as well as induced-reaction data makes possible the understanding of actual limits and possible improvement of the global optical model potentials parameters. Involvement of recent optical potentials for reliable description of both the elastic scattering and emission of {alpha}-particles, of equal interest for nuclear astrophysics (NA) and nuclear technology (NT) for fusion devices, is discussed in the present work.

  19. Scintillation of thin tetraphenyl butadiene films under alpha particle excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, Tina; Boulay, Mark; Kuźniak, Marcin

    2011-04-01

    The alpha induced scintillation of the wavelength shifter 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene (TPB) was studied to improve the understanding of possible surface alpha backgrounds in the DEAP dark matter search experiment. We found that vacuum deposited thin TPB films emit 882±210 photons per MeV under alpha particle excitation. The scintillation pulse shape consists of a double exponential decay with lifetimes of 11±5 and 275±10 ns.

  20. Depth Measurements Using Alpha Particles and Upsettable SRAMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Reier, M.; Soli, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    A custom designed SRAM was used to measure the thickness of integrated circuit over layers and the epi-layer thickness using alpha particles and a test SRAM. The over layer consists of oxide, nitride, metal, and junction regions.

  1. Alpha-particle effects on ballooning flute modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Andrushchenko, Z.N.; Bijko, A.Y.; Cheremnykh, O.K. )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper a more accurate dispersion equation for ideal ballooning flute modes in a plasma with alpha particles is obtained. It is shown that circulating and trapped alpha particles generate the eigenbranches of the mode oscillations with frequencies {omega} {approx lt} {omega}{sub *i}, where {omega}{sub *i}, is the ion drift frequency. The relevant growth rates and frequencies are found. It is ascertained that in the frequency range {omega}{sub *i} {lt} {omega} {lt} {bar {omega}{sub Db}}, where {bar {omega}{sub Db}} is the magnetic drift frequency average over a bounce period, trapped alpha particles may generate forced oscillations that influence the ideal ballooning flute mode stability boundary. It is shown that the stability may be improved for certain plasma parameters and trapped alpha-particle pressures.

  2. Full orbit calculation for lost alpha particle measurement on ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Funaki, D.; Isobe, M.; Nishiura, M.; Sato, Y.; Okamoto, A.; Kobuchi, T.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.

    2008-10-15

    An orbit following calculation code with full gyromotion under the ITER magnetic field configuration has been developed to investigate escaping alpha particle orbits in ITER and to determine the geometrical arrangement for alpha particle detection. The code contained the full geometrical information of the first wall panels. It was carefully investigated whether an alpha particle escaping from the plasma through the last closed flux surface does not touch or intersect the first wall boundary before reaching the detection point. Candidates of blanket module modification have been studied to achieve effective measurement geometry for escaping alpha particle detection. The calculations showed that direct orbit loss and banana diffusion can be detected with a probe head recessed from the first wall surface.

  3. The simulation of the response of superheated emulsion to alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Susnata; Das, Mala

    2016-04-01

    The response of superheated emulsion of liquid perfluorobutane (C4F10; b.p.: ‑1.7o C) to alpha particle has been studied by performing the simulation using GEANT3.21 toolkit. The simulations have been performed to generate two different experimental situations. In one case, the alpha contamination is present only in polymer and in another case, the alpha contamination is present both in polymer and active liquid. The value of the nucleation parameter, k, for bubble nucleation induced by alpha particle in superheated emulsion detector is determined by comparing the simulated normalized count rates with the available experimental results. The results show that the nucleation parameter for alpha particle in C4F10 liquid is about 0.19. The energy and position of alpha particle are not able to change the response of the alpha particle in C4F10 liquid. The recoiling nuclei associated with the alpha decay chain are responsible for making the detector sensitive at lower threshold temperatures.

  4. Shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.; Santoro, R. T.; Barish, J.; Claiborne, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    The available information on the shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles is summarized. The emphasis is placed on shielding against Van Allen belt protons and against solar-flare protons and alpha particles, but information on shielding against galactic cosmic rays is also presented. The approximation methods for use by nonexperts in the space shielding field are those that are standard in the space shielding literature.

  5. Modification of alpha-particle emission spectrum in beam-injected deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, H.; Nakao, Y.

    2009-04-15

    The alpha ({alpha})-particle and neutron emission spectra in a deuterium-tritium plasma accompanied with neutral-beam-injection (NBI) heating are evaluated in a consistent way by solving the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equations for deuteron, triton, and {alpha}-particle simultaneously. It is shown that owing to the existence of non-Maxwellian tail component in fuel-ion distribution function due to NBI and/or nuclear elastic scattering, the generation rate of the energetic ({>=}4 MeV) {alpha}-particle increases significantly. When 20 MW intense deuterium beam with 1 MeV beam-injection energy is injected into an 800 m{sup 3} plasma (T{sub e}=10 keV, n{sub e}=6.2x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}), the enhancement of the fraction of the power carried by {alpha}-particles with energy above 4 (3.9) MeV to total {alpha}-particle power is almost twice (1.5 times) as much from the value for Gaussian distribution. A verification scenario for the modification of the emission spectrum by using the gamma ({gamma})-ray-generating {sup 9}Be({alpha},n{gamma}){sup 12}C reaction is also presented.

  6. Downstream energetic proton and alpha particles during quasi-parallel interplanetary shock events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, L. C.; Mason, G. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper considers the energetic particle populations in the downstream region of three quasi-parallel interplanetary shock events, which was explored using the ISEE 3 Ultra Low Energy Charge Analyzer sensor, which unambiguously identifies protons and alpha particles using the electrostatic deflection versus residual energy technique. The downstream particles were found to exhibit anisotropies due largely to convection in the solar wind. The spectral indices of the proton and the alpha-particle distribution functions were found to be remarkably constant during the downstream period, being generally insensitive to changes in particle flux levels, magnetic field direction, and solar wind densities. In two of the three events, the proton and the alpha spectra were the same throughout the entire downstream period, supporting the prediction of diffusive shock acceleration theory.

  7. A history of nuclear transmutations by natural alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Matteo

    2005-11-01

    A systematic account of the use of alpha particles up to the 1930s for promoting the disintegration of atoms is here provided. As will be shown, a number of different radium family alpha sources were used in the experiments that led to the discoveries of the proton (Rutherford E 1919 Phil. Mag. 37 581-7) and neutron (Chadwick J 1932 Nature 129 312). The reasons leading to the employment of a particular alpha particle source, as well as the relationship between these sources and the available methods of recording, will be closely addressed.

  8. Alpha particle condensation in {sup 12}C and nuclear rainbow scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2008-05-12

    It is shown that the large radius of the Hoyle state of {sup 12}C with a dilute density distribution in an {alpha} particle condensate can be clearly seen in the shift of the rainbow angle (therefore the Airy minimum) to a larger angle in {alpha}+{sup 12}C rainbow scattering at the high energy region and prerainbow oscillations in {sup 3}He+{sup 12}C scattering at the lower energy region.

  9. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  10. Alpha-particle emission probabilities of ²³⁶U obtained by alpha spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marouli, M; Pommé, S; Jobbágy, V; Van Ammel, R; Paepen, J; Stroh, H; Benedik, L

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry was performed with an ion-implanted silicon detector in vacuum on a homogeneously electrodeposited (236)U source. The source was measured at different solid angles subtended by the detector, varying between 0.8% and 2.4% of 4π sr, to assess the influence of coincidental detection of alpha-particles and conversion electrons on the measured alpha-particle emission probabilities. Additional measurements were performed using a bending magnet to eliminate conversion electrons, the results of which coincide with normal measurements extrapolated to an infinitely small solid angle. The measured alpha emission probabilities for the three main peaks - 74.20 (5)%, 25.68 (5)% and 0.123 (5)%, respectively - are consistent with literature data, but their precision has been improved by at least one order of magnitude in this work. PMID:24309010

  11. Use of .sup.3 He.sup.30 + ICRF minority heating to simulate alpha particle heating

    DOEpatents

    Post, Jr., Douglass E.; Hwang, David Q.; Hovey, Jane

    1986-04-22

    Neutron activation due to high levels of neutron production in a first heated deuterium-tritium plasma is substantially reduced by using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating of energetic .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions in a second deuterium-.sup.3 He.sup.++ plasma which exhibit an energy distribution and density similar to that of alpha particles in fusion reactor experiments to simulate fusion alpha particle heating in the first plasma. The majority of the fast .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions and their slowing down spectrum can be studied using either a modulated hydrogen beam source for producing excited states of He.sup.+ in combination with spectrometers or double charge exchange with a high energy neutral lithium beam and charged particle detectors at the plasma edge. The maintenance problems thus associated with neutron activation are substantially reduced permitting energetic alpha particle behavior to be studied in near term large fusion experiments.

  12. High resolution alpha particle detectors based on 4H-SiC epitaxial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zat'ko, B.; Dubecký, F.; Šagátová, A.; Sedlačová, K.; Ryć, L.

    2015-04-01

    We fabricated and characterized 4H-SiC Schottky diodes as a spectrometric detector of alpha particles. A thin blocking contact of Ni/Au (15 nm) was used to minimize the influence on alpha particles energy. Current-voltage characteristics of the detector were measured and a low current density below 0.3 nAcm-2 was observed at room temperature. 239Pu241Am244Cm was used as a source of alpha particles within the energy range between 5.1 MeV and 5.8 MeV for detector testing. The charge collection efficiency close to 100 % at reverse bias exceeding 50 V was determined. The best spectrometric performance shows a pulse height spectrum at a reverse bias of 200 V giving an energy resolution of 0.25 % in the full width and half maximum for 5.486 MeV of 241Am.

  13. Breakup of {sup 12}C resonances into three alpha particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsebom, O. S.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Hyldegaard, S.; Riisager, K.; Alcorta, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Cubero, M.; Dominguez-Reyes, R.; Madurga, M.; Perea, A.; Tengblad, O.; Diget, C. A.; Fulton, B. R.; Fraile, L. M.; Jonson, B.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G.; Munoz Martin, A.

    2010-06-15

    The reaction {sup 3}He+{sup 11}B->d+{sup 12}C* has been used to populate resonances in {sup 12}C up to an excitation energy of 15 MeV. The subsequent breakup to three alpha particles has been measured in complete kinematics. Dalitz plots are used to visualize and analyze the data. The Dalitz plot intensity distribution exhibits zero points characteristic of the total spin and parity of the 3alpha system allowing us to determine the spin and parity of a state in {sup 12}C at 13.35 MeV whose quantum numbers were hitherto not well established. The Dalitz plot intensity distributions of the 2{sup -} state at 11.83 MeV and the 1{sup +} state at 12.71 MeV are compared with the predictions of a recent three-body calculation as well as with simpler models. All are able to reproduce the gross structures seen in the Dalitz plot, but none give an accurate description of the detailed profile of the distributions.

  14. Investigation of the effective atomic numbers of dosimetric materials for electrons, protons and alpha particles using a direct method in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kurudirek, Murat; Aksakal, Oğuz; Akkuş, Tuba

    2015-11-01

    A direct method has been used for the first time, to compute effective atomic numbers (Z eff) of water, air, human tissues, and some organic and inorganic compounds, for total electron proton and alpha particle interaction in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV. The obtained values for Z eff were then compared to those obtained using an interpolation procedure. In general, good agreement has been observed for electrons, and the difference (%) in Z eff between the results of the direct and the interpolation method was found to be <10 % for all materials, in the energy range from 10 keV to 1 MeV. More specifically, results of the two methods were found to agree well (Dif. <10 %) for air, calcium fluoride, kapton polyimide film, paraffin wax and plastic scintillator in the entire energy region with respect to the total electron interaction. On the other hand, values for Z eff calculated using both methods for protons and alpha particles generally agree with each other in the high-energy region above 10 MeV. PMID:26082026

  15. Calculations of alpha particle loss for reversed magnetic shear in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; White, R.B.; Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; McCune, D.C.

    1997-03-01

    Hamiltonian coordinate, guiding center code calculations of the toroidal field ripple loss of alpha particles from a reversed shear plasma predict both total alpha losses and ripple diffusion losses to be greater than those from a comparable non-reversed magnetic shear plasma in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. High central q is found to increase alpha ripple losses as well as first orbit losses of alphas in the reversed shear simulations. A simple ripple loss model, benchmarked against the guiding center code, is found to work satisfactorily in transport analysis modelling of reversed and monotonic shear scenarios. Alpha ripple transport on TFTR affects ions within r/a=0.5, not at the plasma edge. The entire plasma is above threshold for stochastic ripple loss of alpha particles at birth energy in the reversed shear case simulated, so that all trapped 3.5 MeV alphas are lost stochastically or through prompt losses. The 40% alpha particle loss predictions for TFTR suggest that reduction of toroidal field ripple will be a critical issue in the design of a reversed shear fusion reactor.

  16. Alpha particle evaporation as a probe for dynamical deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-09-01

    Evaporation of alpha particles in heavy ion reactions followed by fusion has proved to be a powerful probe for the properties of emitting nuclei. Detailed experimental data and different model calculations allow us to probe whether the foundation of the statistical model holds for the compound nucleus populated in these reactions. It has been observed that in the case of composite nuclei at moderate energies and angular momenta, evaporation spectra are well explained in terms of the standard statistical model CASCADE code employing optical model transmission coefficients in the description of particle evaporation. However, it has been observed that experimental particle spectra from heavy ion induced fusion reactions are no longer consistent with the predictions of such models. It has been predicted by some authors that in these systems the emission barriers are lower than those expected from optical model transmission coefficients calculated for the respective inverse absorption channels. Some authors claim that these spectra may be well explained in terms of the statistical model incorporating only spin dependent level density and without lowering the emission barriers. The field is not yet free from the controversies. Furthermore, the assumption of the very short formation time in statistical model analysis is one extreme of the general evolution process which in fact is a continuous relaxation process, leading to the composite system from the entrance channel to the equilibrated configuration. Recent dynamical description of heavy ion collisions do not support this assumption in many cases. In symmetric entrance channels and for collisions where centre of mass energy is well above the Coulomb barrier, formation time can be even larger than decay time of the resulting composite system. In such cases realistic approach will be to couple the dynamical evolution of the intrinsic excitation of the composite system to a time dependent statistical model calculation. The above question has been addressed in the light of the alpha particle spectra taken in coincidence with the evaporation residues for the asymmetric 28Si +51V and the symmetric 28Si +27 Al systems. The experimental data have been interpreted in the framework of dynamical trajectory model calculations.

  17. Selective flow path alpha particle detector and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring alpha contamination are provided in which ions generated in the air surrounding the item, by the passage of alpha particles, are moved to a distant detector location. The parts of the item from which ions are withdrawn can be controlled by restricting the air flow over different portions of the apparatus. In this way, detection of internal and external surfaces separately, for instance, can be provided. The apparatus and method are particularly suited for use in undertaking alpha contamination measurements during the commissioning operations.

  18. Advantages of using gyrotron scattering for alpha particle diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Woskoboinikow, P.P.; Cohn, D.R.; Machuzak, J.S.; Myer, R.C.; Rhee, R.Y.

    1987-07-01

    Millimeter-wave gyrotron collective Thomson scattering can be an effective diagnostic technique for the study of alpha particle behavior in ignited plasmas. The measurement of alpha particle density, velocity distribution, and alpha particle induced plasma instabilities can be accomplished with both spatial and temporal resolution. Advantages include long pulse operation which can make possible very high signal to noise ratios and use of millimeter waves which maximizes the Doppler shifted scattered signal in WHz/sup -1/ and makes possible scattering angles up to 180/sup 0/. Extraordinary mode scattering at approximately 60 and 200 GHz would be used in TFTR and CIT respectively, and 140 GHz ordinary mode scattering in JET. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Quantum dot solar cell tolerance to alpha-particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cress, Cory D.; Hubbard, Seth M.; Landi, Brian J.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Wilt, David M.

    2007-10-29

    The effects of alpha-particle irradiation on an InAs quantum dot (QD) array and GaAs-based InAs QD solar cells were investigated. Using photoluminescence (PL) mapping, the PL intensity at 872 and 1120 nm, corresponding to bulk GaAs and InAs QD emissions, respectively, were measured for a five-layer InAs QD array which had a spatially varying total alpha-particle dose. The spectral response and normalized current-voltage parameters of the solar cells, measured as a function of alpha-particle fluence, were used to investigate the change in device performance between GaAs solar cells with and without InAs QDs.

  20. Fire Hose Instability Driven by Alpha Particle Temperature Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, L.; Hellinger, P.; Schwartz, S. J.; Landi, S.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate properties of a solar wind-like plasma, including a secondary alpha particle population exhibiting a parallel temperature anisotropy with respect to the background magnetic field, using linear and quasi-linear predictions and by means of one-dimensional hybrid simulations. We show that anisotropic alpha particles can drive a parallel fire hose instability analogous to that generated by protons, but that, remarkably, can also be triggered when the parallel plasma beta of alpha particles is below unity. The wave activity generated by the alpha anisotropy affects the evolution of the more abundant protons, leading to their anisotropic heating. When both ion species have sufficient parallel anisotropies, both of them can drive the instability, and we observe the generation of two distinct peaks in the spectra of the fluctuations, with longer wavelengths associated to alphas and shorter ones to protons. If a non-zero relative drift is present, the unstable modes propagate preferentially in the direction of the drift associated with the unstable species. The generated waves scatter particles and reduce their temperature anisotropy to a marginally stable state, and, moreover, they significantly reduce the relative drift between the two ion populations. The coexistence of modes excited by both species leads to saturation of the plasma in distinct regions of the beta/anisotropy parameter space for protons and alpha particles, in good agreement with in situ solar wind observations. Our results confirm that fire hose instabilities are likely at work in the solar wind and limit the anisotropy of different ion species in the plasma.

  1. Effects of alpha-particles on survival and chromosomal aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Gialanella, G.; Pugliese, M.; Nappo, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the radiation responses of a human mammary epithelial cell line, H184B5 F5-1 M/10. This cell line was derived from primary mammary cells after treatment with chemicals and heavy ions. The F5-1 M/10 cells are immortal, density-inhibited in growth, and non-tumorigenic in athymic nude mice and represent an in vitro model of the human epithelium for radiation studies. Because epithelial cells are the target of alpha-particles emitted from radon daughters, we concentrated our studies on the efficiency of alpha-particles. Confluent cultures of M/10 cells were exposed to accelerated alpha-particles [beam energy incident at the cell monolayer = 3.85 MeV, incident linear energy transfer (LET) in cell = 109 keV/microns] and, for comparison, to 80 kVp x-rays. The following endpoints were studied: (1) survival, (2) chromosome aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis, and (3) chromosome alterations at later passages following irradiation. The survival curve was exponential for alpha-particles (D0 = 0.73 +/- 0.04 Gy), while a shoulder was observed for x-rays (alpha/beta = 2.9 Gy; D0 = 2.5 Gy, extrapolation number 1.6). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-LET alpha-particles for human epithelial cell killing was 3.3 at 37% survival. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromosome aberrations were linear for alpha-particles and linearquadratic for x-rays. The RBE for the induction of chromosome aberrations varied with the type of aberration scored and was high (about 5) for chromosome breaks and low (about 2) for chromosome exchanges.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  2. TCAD simulation for alpha-particle spectroscopy using SIC Schottky diode.

    PubMed

    Das, Achintya; Duttagupta, Siddhartha P

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing requirement of alpha spectroscopy in the fields context of environmental radioactive contamination, nuclear waste management, site decommissioning and decontamination. Although silicon-based alpha-particle detection technology is mature, high leakage current, low displacement threshold and radiation hardness limits the operation of the detector in harsh environments. Silicon carbide (SiC) is considered to be excellent material for radiation detection application due to its high band gap, high displacement threshold and high thermal conductivity. In this report, an alpha-particle-induced electron-hole pair generation model for a reverse-biased n-type SiC Schottky diode has been proposed and verified using technology computer aided design (TCAD) simulations. First, the forward-biased I-V characteristics were studied to determine the diode ideality factor and compared with published experimental data. The ideality factor was found to be in the range of 1.4-1.7 for a corresponding temperature range of 300-500 K. Next, the energy-dependent, alpha-particle-induced EHP generation model parameters were optimised using transport of ions in matter (TRIM) simulation. Finally, the transient pulses generated due to alpha-particle bombardment were analysed for (1) different diode temperatures (300-500 K), (2) different incident alpha-particle energies (1-5 MeV), (3) different reverse bias voltages of the 4H-SiC-based Schottky diode (-50 to -250 V) and (4) different angles of incidence of the alpha particle (0°-70°).The above model can be extended to other (wide band-gap semiconductor) device technologies useful for radiation-sensing application. PMID:25634901

  3. Alpha Decay in the Complex-Energy Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Betan, R. Id

    2012-01-01

    Background: Alpha emission from a nucleus is a fundamental decay process in which the alpha particle formed inside the nucleus tunnels out through the potential barrier. Purpose: We describe alpha decay of 212Po and 104Te by means of the configuration interaction approach. Method: To compute the preformation factor and penetrability, we use the complex-energy shell model with a separable T = 1 interaction. The single-particle space is expanded in a Woods-Saxon basis that consists of bound and unbound resonant states. Special attention is paid to the treatment of the norm kernel appearing in the definition of the formation amplitude that guarantees the normalization of the channel function. Results: Without explicitly considering the alpha-cluster component in the wave function of the parent nucleus, we reproduce the experimental alpha-decay width of 212Po and predict an upper limit of T1/2 = 5.5 10 7 sec for the half-life of 104Te. Conclusions: The complex-energy shell model in a large valence configuration space is capable of providing a microscopic description of the alpha decay of heavy nuclei having two valence protons and two valence neutrons outside the doubly magic core. The inclusion of proton-neutron interaction between the valence nucleons is likely to shorten the predicted half-live of 104Te.

  4. TF ripple loss of alpha particles in TFTR DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.

    1995-08-01

    Quantitative evaluation of TF ripple loss of DT alpha particles is a central issue for reactor design because of potentially severe first wall heat load problems. DT experiments on TFTR allow experimental measurements to be compared to modeling of the underlying alpha physics, with code validation an important goal. Modeling of TF ripple loss of alphas in TFTR now includes neoclassical calculations of alpha losses arising from first orbit loss, stochastic ripple diffusion, ripple trapping and collisional effects. Recent Hamiltonian coordinate guiding center code (ORBIT) simulations for TFTR have shown that collisions enhance the stochastic TF ripple losses at TFTR. A faster way to simulate experiment has been developed and is discussed here which uses a simple stochastic domain model for TF ripple loss within the TRANSP analysis code.

  5. MHD-Induced Alpha Particle Loss in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Taylor, G.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.; von Goeler, S.

    1999-03-01

    MHD-induced increases in alpha particle loss to the wall were observed for both coherent modes and transient reconnection events using an array of scintillator detectors near the wall of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The magnitude of the coherent MHD-induced alpha loss as seen by these detectors was normally comparable to the MHD-quiescent first-orbit or toroidal-field ripple loss, but the magnitude of the alpha loss during reconnection events was up to 1000 times higher than this for a short time. Modeling suggest that the coherent MHD loss mechanism will be even less significant for future reactor-scale deuterium-tritium tokamaks due to the smaller ratio of the alpha gyroradius to minor radius.

  6. Alpha particle emission in the interaction of 12C with 59Co and 93Nb at incident energies of 300 and 400 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadioli, E.; Cavinato, M.; Fabrici, E.; Gadioli Erba, E.; Birattari, C.; Mica, I.; Solia, S.; Steyn, G. F.; Förtsch, S. V.; Lawrie, J. J.; Nortier, F. M.; Stevens, T. G.; Connell, S. H.; Sellschop, J. P. F.; Cowley, A. A.

    1999-08-01

    The results of measured inclusive double differential cross section of α particles emitted in the interaction of 12C ions with 59Co and 93Nb at incident energies of 300 and 400 MeV are presented. The analysis of these data allows us to isolate the contributions of the different reaction mechanisms, thereby confirming previous conclusions of a comprehensive analysis of a large number of excitation function, forward recoil ranges and angular distributions of residues produced in the interaction of 12C with a target nucleus in the same mass range. In particular, the probabilities associated with α-particle reemission following incomplete fussion processes have been reaffirmed. Several refinements to the theoretical model proposed in earlier studies of the interaction of 12C with nuclei are presented.

  7. Making A D-Latch Sensitive To Alpha Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Blaes, Brent R.; Nixon, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    Standard complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) D-latch integrated circuit modified to increase susceptibility to single-event upsets (SEU's) (changes in logic state) caused by impacts of energetic alpha particles. Suitable for use in relatively inexpensive bench-scale SEU tests of itself and of related integrated circuits like static random-access memories.

  8. Fusion alpha-particle diagnostics for DT experiments on the joint European torus

    SciTech Connect

    Kiptily, V. G.; Beaumont, P.; Syme, D. B.; Cecil, F. E.; Riva, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Craciunescu, T.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Curuia, M.; Soare, S.; Darrow, D.; Fernandes, A. M.; Pereira, R. C.; Sousa, J.; Gorini,; Nocente, M.; and others

    2014-08-21

    JET equipped with ITER-like wall (a beryllium wall and a tungsten divertor) can provide auxiliary heating with power up to 35MW, producing a significant population of α-particles in DT operation. The direct measurements of alphas are very difficult and α-particle studies require a significant development of dedicated diagnostics. JET now has an excellent set of confined and lost fast particle diagnostics for measuring the α-particle source and its evolution in space and time, α-particle energy distribution, and α-particle losses. This paper describes how the above mentioned JET diagnostic systems could be used for α-particle measurements, and what options exist for keeping the essential α-particle diagnostics functioning well in the presence of intense DT neutron flux. Also, α-particle diagnostics for ITER are discussed.

  9. Michrochannel plate for position sensitive alpha particle detection

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Hurley and James Tinsley

    2007-08-31

    This paper will describe the use of a microchannel plate (MCP) as the associated particle detector on a sealed tube neutron generator. The generator produces neutrons and associated alpha particles for use as a probe to locate and identify hidden explosives in associated particle imaging (API). The MCP measures the position in two dimensions and precise timing of the incident alpha particle, information which is then used to calculate the emission time and direction of the corresponding neutron. The MCP replaces the position-sensitive photomultipler tube (PSPMT) which, until recently, had been the only detector available for measuring position and timing for alpha particles in neutron generator applications. Where the PSPMT uses charge division for generating position information, a process that requires a first order correction to each pulse, the MCP uses delay-line timing, which requires no correction. The result is a device with an order of magnitude improvement in both position resolution and timing compared to the PSPMT. Hardware and software development and the measurements made to characterize the MCP for API applications are described.

  10. Biological Effect of Lead-212 Localized in the Nucleus of Mammalian Cells: Role of Recoil Energy in the Radiotoxicity of Internal Alpha-Particle Emitters1

    PubMed Central

    Azure, Michael T.; Archer, Ronald D.; Sastry, Kandula S. R.; Rao, Dandamudi V.; Howell, Roger W.

    2012-01-01

    The radiochemical dipyrrolidinedithiocarbamato-212Pb(II) [212Pb(PDC)2] is synthesized and its effects on colony formation in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells are investigated. The cellular uptake, biological retention, subcellular distribution and cytotoxicity of the radiocompound are determined. The 212Pb is taken up quickly by the cells, reaching saturation levels in 1.25 h. When the cells are washed, the intracellular activity is retained with a biological half-life of 11.6 h. Gamma-ray spectroscopy indicates that the 212Pb daughters (212Bi, 212Po and 208Tl) are in secular equilibrium within the cell. About 72% of the cellular activity localizes in the cell nucleus, of which 35% is bound specifically to nuclear DNA. The mean cellular uptake required to achieve 37% survival is 0.35 mBq of 212Pb per cell, which delivers a dose of 1.0 Gy to the cell nucleus when the recoil energy of 212Bi and 212Po decays is ignored and 1.7 Gy when recoil is included. The corresponding RBE values compared to acute external 137Cs γ rays at 37% survival are 4.0 and 2.3, respectively. The chemical Pb(PDC)2 is not chemotoxic at the concentrations used in this study. Because the β-particle emitter 212Pb decays to the α-particle-emitting daughters 212Bi and 212Po, these studies provide information on the biological effects of α-particle decays that occur in the cell nucleus. Our earlier studies with cells of the same cell line using 210Po (emits 5.3 MeV α particle) localized predominantly in the cytoplasm resulted in an RBE of 6. These earlier results for 210Po, along with the present results for 212Pb, suggest that the recoil energy associated with the 212Bi and 212Po daughter nuclei plays little or no role in imparting biological damage to critical targets in the cell nucleus. PMID:7938477

  11. Evidence for alpha-particle chain configurations in {sup 24}Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Wuosmaa, A.H.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.; Ferre, M.; Gehring, J.; Glagola, P.G.; Happ, Th.; Henderson, D.J.; Wilt, P.; Bearden, I.G.

    1992-09-01

    Many theoretical models have been employed to described the structure of the nucleus {sup 24}Mg. Among these are the Cranked Shell model (CSM), the Cranked Cluster Model (CCM), and calculations have also been performed using the Hartree-Fock formalism. One very striking prediction of these calculations is that in this nucleus there exist very unusual configurations, with structures reminiscent of linear chains of alpha particles. In the CSM, for instance, such a configuration is identified with a pronounced minimum in the potential energy energy at very large prolate deformation. In the CCM, several very different alpha-particle duster configurations are identified, many having rather large deformations. These cluster configurations can be associated with the different potential-energy minima obtained in the CSM results. In the case of the CCM, a 6{alpha} chain-like configuration is predicted to occur at excitation energies between 40 and 50 MeV, with predicted rotational spacing given by {Dirac_h}{sup 2}/2I=22 keV. At this excitation energy, such a chain configuration would lie well above the threshold for the decay of {sup 24}Mg into 6 alpha particles, and its identification poses a difficult experimental challenge. This report discusses this challenge.

  12. Evidence for alpha-particle chain configurations in sup 24 Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Wuosmaa, A.H.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.; Ferre, M.; Gehring, J.; Glagola, P.G.; Happ, Th.; Henderson, D.J.; Wilt, P. ); Bearden, I.G. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    Many theoretical models have been employed to described the structure of the nucleus {sup 24}Mg. Among these are the Cranked Shell model (CSM), the Cranked Cluster Model (CCM), and calculations have also been performed using the Hartree-Fock formalism. One very striking prediction of these calculations is that in this nucleus there exist very unusual configurations, with structures reminiscent of linear chains of alpha particles. In the CSM, for instance, such a configuration is identified with a pronounced minimum in the potential energy energy at very large prolate deformation. In the CCM, several very different alpha-particle duster configurations are identified, many having rather large deformations. These cluster configurations can be associated with the different potential-energy minima obtained in the CSM results. In the case of the CCM, a 6{alpha} chain-like configuration is predicted to occur at excitation energies between 40 and 50 MeV, with predicted rotational spacing given by {Dirac h}{sup 2}/2I=22 keV. At this excitation energy, such a chain configuration would lie well above the threshold for the decay of {sup 24}Mg into 6 alpha particles, and its identification poses a difficult experimental challenge. This report discusses this challenge.

  13. Ultra-high resolution alpha particle spectroscopy using cryogenic microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horansky, R. D.; Ullom, J. N.; Beall, J. B.; Doriese, W. B.; Duncan, W. D.; Ferreira, L.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Reintsema, C. D.; Vale, L.; Rabin, M. W.; Hoover, A. S.; Lamont, S. P.; Rudy, C. R.

    2007-03-01

    We have built a novel alpha particle detector using a transition edge sensor (TES) thermometer attached to a bulk superconducting absorber and have measured < 2.5 keV resolution at 5.3 MeV . We have used the microcalorimeter to measure a mixture of Pu isotopes and are able to individually resolve peaks corresponding to ^239Pu and ^240Pu which are separated by 12.9 keV. The ^240Pu/^239Pu activity ratio is a key parameter for determining whether a plutonium sample is weapons or reactor grade. Conventional silicon based detectors achieve resolutions no better than 10 keV, severely limiting current actinide assays. In addition, the microcalorimeter alpha detector has shown significantly better resolution for gamma rays. The origin of the resolution difference for gamma and alpha interactions may be due to lattice damage and is currently under study.

  14. Quality factors for alpha particles emitted in tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borak, Thomas B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    A concept of a mean or dose averaged quality factor was defined in ICRP Publication 26 using relationships for quality factor as a function of LET. The concept of radiation weighting factors, wR, was introduced in ICRP Publication 60 in 1990. These are meant to be generalized factors that modify absorbed dose to reflect the risk of stochastic effects as a function of the quality of the radiation incident on the body or emitted by radioactivity within the body. The values of wr are equal to 20 for all alpha particles externally or internally emitted. This note compares the dose averaged quality factor for alpha particles originating in tissue using the old and revised recommendations for quality factor as a function of LET. The dose averaged quality factor never exceeds 20 using the old recommendations and is never less than 20 with the revised recommendations.

  15. A new alpha particle diagnostic using knock-on ion tails

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.K.; Parks, P.B.; McChesney, J.M.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1994-06-01

    We propose a new method of measuring the fast confined ct-particle distribution in a reacting plasma. The presence of ct-particles in a D-T plasma will create a high energy tail on the deuterium and tritium ion energy distributions. A 3.5 MeV alpha can transfer 3.4 MeV to a tritium ion in a single elastic scattering interaction. Calculations of the size of these knock-on tails in tokamaks such as TFTR, JET, and ITER show that it may be possible to measure these tails and provide information on the fast confined alphas. The knock-on tail ions will produce D-T neutrons with energies up to 20.7 MeV, so that D-T neutron spectroscopy can be used to monitor the alpha population. Neutron spectroscopy looks especially attractive for ITER. A collimated array of threshold neutron activation detectors could be used to deduce the confined alpha density profile. Tests of this diagnostic can also be done on TFTR and JET. Existing high energy neutral particle analyzers may allow observation of the ion tails directly via passive and/or active charge exchange.

  16. Enhanced retention of the alpha-particle-emitting daughters of Actinium-225 by liposome carriers.

    PubMed

    Sofou, Stavroula; Kappel, Barry J; Jaggi, Jaspreet S; McDevitt, Michael R; Scheinberg, David A; Sgouros, George

    2007-01-01

    Targeted alpha-particle emitters hold great promise as therapeutics for micrometastatic disease. Because of their high energy deposition and short range, tumor targeted alpha-particles can result in high cancer-cell killing with minimal normal-tissue irradiation. Actinium-225 is a potential generator for alpha-particle therapy: it decays with a 10-day half-life and generates three alpha-particle-emitting daughters. Retention of (225)Ac daughters at the target increases efficacy; escape and distribution throughout the body increases toxicity. During circulation, molecular carriers conjugated to (225)Ac cannot retain any of the daughters. We previously proposed liposomal encapsulation of (225)Ac to retain the daughters, whose retention was shown to be liposome-size dependent. However, daughter retention was lower than expected: 22% of theoretical maximum decreasing to 14%, partially due to the binding of (225)Ac to the phospholipid membrane. In this study, Multivesicular liposomes (MUVELs) composed of different phospholipids were developed to increase daughter retention. MUVELs are large liposomes with entrapped smaller lipid-vesicles containing (225)Ac. PEGylated MUVELs stably retained over time 98% of encapsulated (225)Ac. Retention of (213)Bi, the last daughter, was 31% of the theoretical maximum retention of (213)Bi for the liposome sizes studied. MUVELs were conjugated to an anti-HER2/neu antibody (immunolabeled MUVELs) and were evaluated in vitro with SKOV3-NMP2 ovarian cancer cells, exhibiting significant cellular internalization (83%). This work demonstrates that immunolabeled MUVELs might be able to deliver higher fractions of generated alpha-particles per targeted (225)Ac compared to the relative fractions of alpha-particles delivered by (225)Ac-labeled molecular carriers. PMID:17935286

  17. Alpha particle transport in the presence of toroidal driftwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Huang, B.; Cheng, C. Z.

    2013-10-01

    Transport of fusion born α particles is investigated in the presence of poloidally mode coupled ballooning type driftwaves. The onset of orbit stochasticity is understood as an overlapping of electric islands produced by the driftwaves, whose overlapping threshold is lower for the thermal particles than for the α particles (high energy particles). For the trapped particles, transport is determined by the particles' sensitive response to the fluctuation at the banana tip where the parallel velocity decreases drastically. Time dependent turbulent signals (finite ω* effects) give rise to the shift of the resonant radial locations, which again is larger for the thermal particles than the high energy particles. The transport process is influenced by the microscopic structure of the islands, which deviates from the Gaussian process. This work is supported by National Science Council of Taiwan, NSC 100-2112-M-006-021-MY3 and NCKU Top University Project.

  18. Distributions of Alpha Particles Escaping to the Wall because of Sawtooth Oscillations in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnichenko, Ya.I.; Lutsenko, V.V.; White, R.B.; Yakovenko, Yu.V., Zweben, S.J.

    1998-11-01

    It has been observed experimentally in deuterium-tritium shots of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) that crashes of sawtooth oscillations may result in very inhomogeneous flux of alpha particles to the wall. Namely, measurements with four detectors installed at the wall at 20°, 45°, 60°, and 90° below the midplane of the torus have shown that the alpha flux to the wall is strongly peaked at the 20° and 90° detectors and on the noise level at the 45° detector. To explain this phenomenon, both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation have been carried out. It is concluded that the "crash-induced prompt loss," i.e., the orbital loss of marginally trapped particles arising because of the crash-induced orbit transformation of circulating particles, is responsible for the flux to the 90° and 60° detectors, whereas the crash-induced stochastic diffusion of moderately trapped particles explains the large signal at the 20° detector. The calculated poloidal distributions of the integral alpha flux are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. In addition to the integral flux, the flux of particles with given energy was calculated. The energy spectrum of the escaping particles has also been calculated, which can be used for diagnostics of the crash type.

  19. Characteristics of sunward flowing proton and alpha particle fluxes of moderate intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, F. E.; Stone, E. C.

    1978-01-01

    The diffusive streaming of low-energy protons has been found to be predominately toward the sun during periods between prompt solar particle events. This occurs for essentially all solar wind velocities and proton intensities. The average radial component of this anisotropy (14%) and its dependence on the solar wind velocity agree with values found by a steady-state propagation model. The average radial component (16%) of the diffusive flow of low-energy alpha particles is similar to that observed for protons, suggesting a common origin. The sunward diffusion of alpha particles and protons indicates that these slightly enhanced fluxes contain a positive radial gradient. The direction of the diffusive anisotropy is a function of the magnetic field direction.

  20. Preliminary experiments: High-energy alpha PIXE in archaeometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Thomas; Chêne, G.; Mathis, F.; Marchal, A.; Philippe, M.; Garnir, H.-P.; Strivay, D.

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes the work realized at the "Centre Européen d'Archéométrie" to highlight the utility of high-energy alpha PIXE in the particular field of archaeometry and to introduce the developments done and to be done to complete the knowledge of high-energy alpha PIXE. It starts with the comparison of the yield and the noise background between several alpha particle beams and the comparison between alpha particle and proton beams on different thick and thin references. After, this paper depicts the developments done at the "Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Atomique et Spectroscopie" to perform such high-energy experiments, first on standards and later on cultural heritage objects. Moreover, it introduces the problematics of such beams for the quantification in PIXE by the intermediary of the knowledge of the ionization and X-ray production cross-sections and also the developments done to answer to this serious lack in the databases.

  1. An alpha particle instrument with alpha, proton, and X-ray modes for planetary chemical analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Economou, T. E.; Turkevich, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    The interaction of alpha particles with matter is employed in a compact instrument that could provide rather complete in-situ chemical analyses of surfaces and thin atmospheres of extraterrestrial bodies. The instrument is a miniaturized and improved version of the Surveyor lunar instrument. The backscattering of alpha particles and (alpha, p) reactions provide analytical data on the light elements (carbon-iron). An X-ray mode that detects the photons produced by the alpha sources provides sensitivity and resolution for the chemical elements heavier than about silicon. The X-rays are detected by semiconductor detectors having a resolution between 150 and 250 eV at 5.9 keV. Such an instrument can identify and determine with good accuracy 99 percent of the atoms (except hydrogen) in rocks. For many trace elements, the detecting sensitivity is a few ppm. Auxiliary sources could be used to enhance the sensitivities for elements of special interest. The instrument could probably withstand the acceleration involved in semi-hard landings.

  2. High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry of ²³⁸U.

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; García-Toraño, E; Marouli, M; Crespo, M T; Jobbágy, V; Van Ammel, R; Paepen, J; Stroh, H

    2014-05-01

    The alpha-particle emission probabilities associated with the three main alpha transitions of (238)U were measured by high-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry. Highly enriched (238)U material was used and its isotopic composition characterised by mass spectrometry. Source production through electrodeposition was optimised to reconcile conflicting demands for good spectral resolution and statistical precision. Measurements were performed at IRMM and CIEMAT for 1-2 years in three different set-ups. A new magnet system was put into use to largely eliminate true coincidence effects with low-energy conversion electrons. Finally the accuracy and precision of the relative emission probabilities for the three transitions - 77.01 (10)%, 22.92 (10)% and 0.068 (10)%, respectively - have been improved significantly. PMID:24355304

  3. Further measurement of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N

    SciTech Connect

    France III, R. H.; Wilds, E. L.; McDonald, J. E.; Gai, M.

    2007-06-15

    We measured the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission spectrum of {sup 16}N with a sensitivity for {beta}-decay branching ratios of the order of 10{sup -10}. The {sup 16}N nuclei were produced using the d({sup 15}N,{sup 16}N)p reaction with 70 MeV {sup 15}N beams and a deuterium gas target 7.5 cm long at a pressure of 1250 torr. The {sup 16}N nuclei were collected (over 10 s) using a thin aluminum foil with an areal density of 180 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} tilted at 7 deg. with respect to the beam. The activity was transferred to the counting area by means of a stepping motor in less than 3 s with the counting carried out over 8 s. The {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particles were measured using a time-of-flight method to achieve a sufficiently low background. Standard calibration sources ({sup 148}Gd, {sup 241}Am, {sup 208,209}Po, and {sup 227}Ac) as well as {alpha} particles and {sup 7}Li from the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction were used for an accurate energy calibration. The energy resolution of the catcher foil (180-220 keV) was calculated and the time-of-flight resolution (3-10 nsec) was measured using the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission from {sup 8}Li that was produced using the d({sup 7}Li,{sup 8}Li)p reaction with the same setup. The line shape was corrected to account for the variation in the energy and time resolution and a high statistics spectrum of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N is reported. However, our data (as well as earlier Mainz data and unpublished Seattle data) do not agree with an earlier measurement of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N taken at TRIUMF after averaging over the energy resolution of our collection system. This disagreement, among other issues, prohibits accurate inclusion of the f-wave component in the R-matrix analysis.

  4. Superconducting calorimetric alpha particle sensors for nuclear nonproliferation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Horansky, Robert D.; Ullom, Joel N.; Beall, James A.; Hilton, Gene C.; Irwin, Kent D.; Dry, Donald E.; Hastings, Elizabeth P.; Lamont, Stephen P.; Rudy, Clifford R.; Rabin, Michael W.

    2008-09-22

    Identification of trace nuclear materials is usually accomplished by alpha spectrometry. Current detectors cannot distinguish critical elements and isotopes. We have developed a detector called a microcalorimeter, which achieves a resolution of 1.06 keV for 5.3 MeV alphas, the highest resolving power of any energy dispersive measurement. With this exquisite resolution, we can unambiguously identify the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratio in Pu, a critical measurement for ascertaining the intended use of nuclear material. Furthermore, we have made a direct measurement of the {sup 209}Po ground state decay.

  5. Alpha-particle Measurements Needed for Burning Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth M. Young

    2001-09-26

    The next major step in magnetic fusion studies will be the construction of a burning plasma (BP) experiment where the goals will be to achieve and understand the plasma behavior with the internal heating provided by fusion-generated alpha particles. Two devices with these physics goals have been proposed: the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE). Extensive conceptual design work for the instrumentation to try to meet the physics demands has been done for these devices, especially ITER. This article provides a new look at the measurements specifically important for understanding the physics aspects of the alpha particles taking into account two significant events. The first is the completion of physics experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with deuterium-tritium fueling with the first chances to study alpha physics and the second is the realization that relatively compact plasmas, making use of advanced tokamak plasma concepts, are the most probable route to burning plasmas and ultimately a fusion reactor.

  6. Interaction of alpha particle beams with metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Sorescu, M.; Barb, D.

    1998-09-18

    Samples of Fe{sub 40}Ni{sub 38}Mo{sub 4}B{sub 18}, Fe{sub 78}B{sub 13}Si{sub 9} and Fe{sub 66}Co{sub 18}B{sub 15}Si{sub 1} metallic glasses, selected with respect to the different values of their magnetostriction constants, were irradiated with alpha particle beams (W = 2.8 MeV) using radiation doses of 10{sup 16} and 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. The fundamental effects underlying the interaction of alpha particle beams with amorphous magnets were studied by transmission and conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS), hysteresis loops and a.c. susceptibility measurements, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The evolution of phases and microstructure during the radiation-induced amorphous-to-crystalline transformation was found to depend on the particle flux and sample composition. Differences between bulk and surface behaviors of the magnetic texture and constituent phases were evidenced. Radiation-driven changes in the saturation magnetic moment, coercive field, real and imaginary components of the a.c. response were observed for all samples studied and found to depend on the radiation dose employed. The surface morphology of the radiation-induced crystalline precipitates was shown to vary as a function of composition, such that both spherical and dendritical modes of growth were observed. By stimulating unconventional pathways for the crystallization process, the interaction of alpha particle beams with glassy ferromagnets offers unique opportunities to understand the fundamentals of nucleation and growth in these systems.

  7. Beams of protons and alpha particles greater than approximately 30 keV/charge from the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1981-01-01

    Two beamlike particle events (30 keV/charge to 160 keV/charge) upstream of the earth's bow shock have been investigated with the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland ultralow energy and charge analyzer on ISEE 1. These beams consist of protons as well as of alpha particles, and the spectra are generally steep and are decreasing with increasing energy. During one event the spectra of both protons and alpha particles have a maximum at approximately 65 keV/charge. During these events, the interplanetary magnetic field through the satellite position was almost tangent to the bow shock, and application of the theory of acceleration predicts acceleration of a solar wind particle up to 60 keV/nucleon in a single reflection. The observation of reflected protons as well as alpha particles has implications for the physical reflection process usually not discussed in acceleration theories.

  8. Cryogenic microcalorimeter system for ultra-high resolution alpha-particle spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, Michael W; Hoover, Andrew S; Bacrania, Mnesh K; Croce, Mark P; Hoteling, N J; Lamont, S P; Plionis, A A; Dry, D E; Ullom, J N; Bennett, D A; Horansky, R; Kotsubo, V; Cantor, R

    2009-01-01

    Microcalorimeters have been shown to yield unsurpassed energy resolution for alpha spectrometry, up to 1.06 keV FWHM at 5.3 MeV. These detectors use a superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) to measure the temperature change in an absorber from energy deposited by an interacting alpha particle. Our system has four independent detectors mounted inside a liquid nitrogen/liquid helium cryostat. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) cools the detector stage to its operating temperature of 80 mK. Temperature regulation with {approx}15 uK peak-to-peak variation is achieved by PID control of the ADR. The detectors are voltage-biased, and the current signal is amplified by a commercial SQUID readout system and digitized for further analysis, This paper will discuss design and operation of our microcalorimeter alpha spectrometer, and will show recent results.

  9. Geometrical parameters of tracks registered by collimated alpha particles on CR-39 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshirao, Pranav M.; Shin, Jae Won; Kim, Do Yoon; Hong, Seung-Woo; Kolekar, Rajesh V.; Manchanda, Vijay Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The latent tracks formed on CR-39 solid state track detector on exposure of alpha radiations emanating from a collimated 241Am source were developed by a chemical etching method. Alpha track images were captured by an optical microscope and were processed by using Image Pro-Plus (6.0) software. GEANT4 simulations were carried out to obtain the angular and energy distribution profiles of the alpha particles. Apart from fluence, geometric parameters like aspect ratio (the ratio of the major to minor axis) and the depth profiles of etched tracks were measured experimentally and correlated with simulated angular and energy profile of incident radiations. Reasonable agreement was observed in the fluence and depth profile information obtained from experiments and simulations.

  10. Measurements of DT alpha particle loss near the outer midplane of TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.; Redi, M.H.; Schivell, J.; White, R.B.

    1995-07-01

    Measurements of DT alpha particle loss to the outer midplane region of TFTR have been made using a radially movable scintillator detector. The conclusion from this data is that mechanisms determining the DT alpha loss to the outer midplane are not substantially different from those for DD fusion products. Some of these results are compared with a simplified theoretical model for TF ripple-induced alpha loss, which is expected to be the dominant classical alpha loss mechanism near the outer midplane. An example of plasma-driven MHD-induced alpha particle loss is shown, but no signs of any ``collective`` alpha instability-induced alpha loss have yet been observed.

  11. Alpha particles induce pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX in primary human lymphocytes mediated through ATM.

    PubMed

    Horn, Simon; Brady, Darren; Prise, Kevin

    2015-10-01

    The use of high linear energy transfer radiations in the form of carbon ions in heavy ion beam lines or alpha particles in new radionuclide treatments has increased substantially over the past decade and will continue to do so due to the favourable dose distributions they can offer versus conventional therapies. Previously it has been shown that exposure to heavy ions induces pan-nuclear phosphorylation of several DNA repair proteins such as H2AX and ATM in vitro. Here we describe similar effects of alpha particles on ex vivo irradiated primary human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Following alpha particle irradiation pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX and ATM, but not DNA-PK and 53BP1, was observed throughout the nucleus. Inhibition of ATM, but not DNA-PK, resulted in the loss of pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX in alpha particle irradiated lymphocytes. Pan-nuclear gamma-H2AX signal was rapidly lost over 24h at a much greater rate than foci loss. Surprisingly, pan-nuclear gamma-H2AX intensity was not dependent on the number of alpha particle induced double strand breaks, rather the number of alpha particles which had traversed the cell nucleus. This distinct fluence dependent damage signature of particle radiation is important in both the fields of radioprotection and clinical oncology in determining radionuclide biological dosimetry and may be indicative of patient response to new radionuclide cancer therapies. PMID:26116906

  12. Thick Source Alpha Particle Spectroscopy: Possibilities And Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, C. T.; Zacharias, N.; Hein, A.

    The new technique for the calculation of U and Th concentration which is based on the alpha particle spectrum taken from a thick sample by using a silicon detector is briefly described. Within the present study two major advantages of the technique will also be presented: the potentiality for detecting and providing an estimation of disequilibrium in the U and Th series -when present- for especially young sediments, and the potential use of the technique as a new method for isotopic dating of speleothems and other materials. Also the validity of the basic equation and the accuracy of this technique is tested.

  13. Registration of alpha particles in Makrofol-E nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammah, Y. S.; Abdalla, Ayman M.; Ashraf, O.; Ashry, A. H.

    2016-06-01

    Fast detection of alpha particles in the range from 1 to 5 MeV in Makrofol-E polycarbonate nuclear track detectors (PCTDs) using a new chemical etchant was investigated. 252Cf and 241Am-thin open sources were used for irradiating Makrofol-E detectors with fission fragments and alpha particles in air at normal pressure and temperature (NPT). A chain of experimental work has been carried out using new etchants to register alpha particle in short time in Makrofol-E polycarbonate detectors. The etching efficiency were exhibited a clear dependence on the amount of methanol in the etching solution and etching time. The optimized chemical condition obtained at this stage of development for 200 μm Makrofol-E detectors are (8 ml of 10 N NaOH + 2 ml CH3OH) etching solutions at 60 °C for 3 h. In this study; it is possible to observe energy detection windows for Makrofol-E detectors according to applied etching duration. Makrofol-E introduced the characteristic Bragg peak, which indicates the advantages of this detector as alpha spectrometer. Consequently, the suggested new etchant can be developed for heavy ions detection and monitoring radon levels and its daughters.

  14. Scattering of 42-MeV alpha particles from Cu-65

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, W. M.; Seth, K. K.

    1972-01-01

    The extended particle-core coupling model was used to predict the properties of low-lying levels of Cu-65. A 42-MeV alpha particle cyclotron beam was used for the experiment. The experiment included magnetic analysis of the incident beam and particle detection by lithium-drifted silicon semiconductors. Angular distributions were measured for 10 to 50 degrees in the center of mass system. Data was reduced by fitting the peaks with a skewed Gaussian function using a least squares computer program with a linear background search. The energy calibration of each system was done by pulsar, and the excitation energies are accurate to + or - 25 keV. The simple weak coupling model cannot account for the experimentally observed quantities of the low-lying levels of Cu-65. The extended particle-core calculation showed that the coupling is not weak and that considerable configuration mixing of the low-lying states results.

  15. Alpha particle cluster states in fp-shell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, A.C.

    1987-08-01

    Alpha particle cluster structure is known experimentally to persist throughout the mass range 16less than or equal toAless than or equal to20, and has been very successfully described in this region in terms of the Buck-Dover-Vary local potential cluster model. It is argued that an analogous cluster structure should be present in nuclei at the beginning of the fp shell, and the available experimental data are examined to determine likely alpha particle cluster state candidates in the mass range 40less than or equal toAless than or equal to44. Calculations of the cluster state spectra and mean square cluster-core separation distances (which may be readily used to evaluate E2 electromagnetic transition rates) for /sup 40/Ca, /sup 42/Ca, /sup 42/Sc, /sup 43/Sc, /sup 43/Ti, and /sup 44/Ti using the above-mentioned model are presented, and compared with experimental measurements where possible. The agreement between theory and experiment is generally good (although inferior to that obtained in the sd shell), and points to the desirability of an extension and improvement of the measurements of the properties of the excited states in these nuclei.

  16. Detection of alpha particles using DNA/Al Schottky junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber E-mail: vengadeshp@um.edu.my; Periasamy, Vengadesh E-mail: vengadeshp@um.edu.my; Amin, Yusoff Mohd

    2015-09-21

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA can be utilized in an organic-metallic rectifying structure to detect radiation, especially alpha particles. This has become much more important in recent years due to crucial environmental detection needs in both peace and war. In this work, we fabricated an aluminum (Al)/DNA/Al structure and generated current–voltage characteristics upon exposure to alpha radiation. Two models were utilized to investigate these current profiles; the standard conventional thermionic emission model and Cheung and Cheung's method. Using these models, the barrier height, Richardson constant, ideality factor and series resistance of the metal-DNA-metal structure were analyzed in real time. The barrier height, Φ value calculated using the conventional method for non-radiated structure was 0.7149 eV, increasing to 0.7367 eV after 4 min of radiation. Barrier height values were observed to increase after 20, 30 and 40 min of radiation, except for 6, 8, and 10 min, which registered a decrease of about 0.67 eV. This was in comparison using Cheung and Cheung's method, which registered 0.6983 eV and 0.7528 eV for the non-radiated and 2 min of radiation, respectively. The barrier height values, meanwhile, were observed to decrease after 4 (0.61 eV) to 40 min (0.6945 eV). The study shows that conventional thermionic emission model could be practically utilized for estimating the diode parameters including the effect of series resistance. These changes in the electronic properties of the Al/DNA/Al junctions could therefore be utilized in the manufacture of sensitive alpha particle sensors.

  17. Detection of alpha particles using DNA/Al Schottky junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Amin, Yusoff Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA can be utilized in an organic-metallic rectifying structure to detect radiation, especially alpha particles. This has become much more important in recent years due to crucial environmental detection needs in both peace and war. In this work, we fabricated an aluminum (Al)/DNA/Al structure and generated current-voltage characteristics upon exposure to alpha radiation. Two models were utilized to investigate these current profiles; the standard conventional thermionic emission model and Cheung and Cheung's method. Using these models, the barrier height, Richardson constant, ideality factor and series resistance of the metal-DNA-metal structure were analyzed in real time. The barrier height, Φ value calculated using the conventional method for non-radiated structure was 0.7149 eV, increasing to 0.7367 eV after 4 min of radiation. Barrier height values were observed to increase after 20, 30 and 40 min of radiation, except for 6, 8, and 10 min, which registered a decrease of about 0.67 eV. This was in comparison using Cheung and Cheung's method, which registered 0.6983 eV and 0.7528 eV for the non-radiated and 2 min of radiation, respectively. The barrier height values, meanwhile, were observed to decrease after 4 (0.61 eV) to 40 min (0.6945 eV). The study shows that conventional thermionic emission model could be practically utilized for estimating the diode parameters including the effect of series resistance. These changes in the electronic properties of the Al/DNA/Al junctions could therefore be utilized in the manufacture of sensitive alpha particle sensors.

  18. Systematics of pre- and near-scission {alpha}-particle multiplicities in heavy-ion-induced fusion-fission reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Y. K.; Biswas, D. C.; Choudhury, R. K.; Saxena, A.; Nayak, B. K.; John, Bency; Ramachandran, K.; Thomas, R. G.; Danu, L. S.; Joshi, B. N.; Mahata, K.; Pandit, S. K.; Chatterjee, A.

    2011-09-15

    The {alpha}-particle energy spectra have been measured in coincidence with fission fragments over a wide range of relative angles with respect to fragment emission direction in the {sup 11}B (62 MeV) + {sup 232}Th reaction. The {alpha}-particle multiplicity spectra have been fitted with moving source model to extract the precision ({alpha}{sub pre}) and near-scission ({alpha}{sub nse}) components. The present results, along with available data from the literature over a wide range of Z{sup 2}/A and the excitation energy of a compound system, have been analyzed to develop certain global features of the pre- and near-scission emission characteristics. It is seen that {alpha}{sub pre} values when normalized to E{sub CN}{sup 2.3} (E{sub CN} is the compound nucleus excitation energy) show a systematic linearly increasing trend with the {alpha}-particle emission Q value (Q{sub {alpha}}). The fraction of near-scission multiplicity is observed to be nearly the same at around 10% of the total precision multiplicity for all the systems.

  19. Preliminary results from the lunar prospector alpha particle spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, S. L.

    2001-01-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) builds on Apollo heritage and maps the distribution of outgassing sites on the Moon. The APS searches for lunar surface gas release events and maps their distribution by detecting alpha particles produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life) and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but remains on the surface with a 21 year half-life as lead-210), which are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238. Radon is in such small quantities that it is not released directly from the lunar interior, rather it is entrained in a stream of gases and serves as a tracer for such gases. Once released, the radon spreads out by 'bouncing' across the surface on ballistic trajectories in a random-walk process. The 3.8 day half-life of radon-222 allows the gas to spread out by several 100 km before it decays and allows the APS to detect gas release events up to a few days after they occur. The long residence time (10s of years) of the lead-210 precursor to the polonium-210 allows the mapping of gas vents which have been active over the last approximately 50 years. Because radon and polonium are daughter products of the decay of uranium, the background level of alpha particle activity is a function of the lunar crustal uranium distribution. Using radioactive radon and polonium as tracers, the Apollo 15 and 16 Command Module orbital alpha particle experiments obtained evidence for the release of gases at several sites beneath the orbit tracks, especially over the Aristarchus Plateau and Mare Fecunditatis [1]. Aristarchus crater had previously been identified by ground-based observers as the site of transient optical events [2]. The Apollo 17 surface mass spectrometer showed that argon-40 is released from the lunar interior every few months, apparently in concert with some of the shallow moonquakes that are believed to be of tectonic origin [3]. The latter tectonic events could be associated with very young scarps identified in the lunar highlands [4] and are believed to indicate continued global contraction. Such quakes could open fissures leading to the release of gases that are trapped below the surface. The detection of radon-222 outgassing events at the margins of Fecunditatis basin was surprising because the observed surface distribution of uranium and thorium do not extend sufficiently eastward to cover Fecunditatis. If the Apollo detections prove sound, then those alpha particle emissions indicate substantial subsurface concentrations of uranium-238 within Fecunditatis. A primary goal of the APS was to map gas-release events, thus allowing both an appraisal of the current level of tectonic activity on the Moon and providing a probe of subsurface uranium concentrations.

  20. Effect of Alpha-Particle Irradiation on Brain Glycogen in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, L. S.; Klatzo, Igor; Miquel, Jaime; Tobias, Cornelius; Haymaker, Webb

    1962-01-01

    The studies of Klatzo, Miquel, Tobias and Haymaker (1961) have shown that one of the earliest and most sensitive indications of the effects of alpha-particle irradiation on rat bran is the appearance of glycogen granules mainly in the neuroglia of the exposed area of the brain. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) positive, alpha-amylase soluble granules were demonstrated within 12 hr after irradiation, preceding by approximately 36 hr the first microscopically detectable vascular permeability disturbances, as shown by the fluorescein labeled serum protein technique. These studies suggested that the injurious effects of alpha-particle energy were on cellular elements primarily, according to the physical properties and distribution of the radiation in the tissue, and that the vascular permeability disturbances played a secondary role in pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to correlate the histochemical observations on glycogen with a quantitative assessment of the glycogen in the irradiated brain tissue. It is felt that such a study may contribute to the understanding of radiation injury at the molecular level. A practical aspect of this problem is that the information on biological radiation effects due to accelerated particles from the cyclotron source, is employed in this study, is applicable to radiation from cosmic particles both in free space and entrapped in the Van Allen belts.

  1. INSTABILITIES DRIVEN BY THE DRIFT AND TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY OF ALPHA PARTICLES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Verscharen, Daniel; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. E-mail: s.bourouaine@unh.edu

    2013-08-20

    We investigate the conditions under which parallel-propagating Alfven/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) waves and fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) waves are driven unstable by the differential flow and temperature anisotropy of alpha particles in the solar wind. We focus on the limit in which w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} {approx}> 0.25v{sub A}, where w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} is the parallel alpha-particle thermal speed and v{sub A} is the Alfven speed. We derive analytic expressions for the instability thresholds of these waves, which show, e.g., how the minimum unstable alpha-particle beam speed depends upon w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}}/v{sub A}, the degree of alpha-particle temperature anisotropy, and the alpha-to-proton temperature ratio. We validate our analytical results using numerical solutions to the full hot-plasma dispersion relation. Consistent with previous work, we find that temperature anisotropy allows A/IC waves and FM/W waves to become unstable at significantly lower values of the alpha-particle beam speed U{sub {alpha}} than in the isotropic-temperature case. Likewise, differential flow lowers the minimum temperature anisotropy needed to excite A/IC or FM/W waves relative to the case in which U{sub {alpha}} = 0. We discuss the relevance of our results to alpha particles in the solar wind near 1 AU.

  2. Radioluminescence of solid neodymium-doped laser materials excited by {alpha}-particles and fission fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Seregina, E A; Seregin, A A

    2013-02-28

    The characteristics of radioluminescence of Nd{sup 3+} : Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} crystals and laser glasses under excitation by plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) {alpha}-particles, as well as by {alpha}-particles and spontaneous fission fragments of californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf), are studied. The radioluminescence branching ratios {beta}{sub ij} for the transition from the {sup 2}F2{sub 5/2} level to the {sup 2S+1}L{sub J} levels in Nd{sup 3+} : Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} crystals are measured. Radioluminescence from the {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} level to low-lying levels is observed. The {beta}{sub ij} ratios for transitions from the high-lying {sup 2}F2{sub 5/2}, {sup 4}D{sub 3/2}, and {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} levels are theoretically calculated. The lifetimes of metastable levels of Nd{sup 3+} excited by {sup 252}Cf fission fragments are measured. The efficiency of the conversion of energy of {alpha}-particles and fission fragments to the energy of optical radiation of Nd{sup 3+} : Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} crystals and laser glasses is determined. (active media)

  3. Alpha Particle Scintillation Analysis in High Pressure Argon Using Photomultiplier Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Daniel

    2007-10-01

    We may very likely discover dark matter by studying what it is not rather than what it is. By better understanding how ordinary matter interacts with other ordinary matter, dark matter interactions should stand out. That's why physicists such as my mentor, Dr. James White, are studying the affects of scintillation events due to ionizing high pressure noble gasses with gamma rays, alpha particles, neutrons, and electrons. My project has been using photomultiplier tubes and a high pressure pure argon gas chamber to study scintillation events. We have focused mainly on alpha particles (as well as gamma rays from decaying Cobalt-57 and neutrons from a 4-MeV proton accelerator). The resulting shape of the events, the ratios of secondary to primary scintillation, and the ratios of triplet state to singlet state decay energies helps catalog ordinary matter interactions.

  4. Evidence for alpha-particle chain configurations in sup 24 Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Wuosmaa, A.H.; Betts, R.R.; Back, B.B.; Freer, M.; Glagola, B.G.; Happ, T.; Henderson, D.J.; Wilt, P. ); Bearden, I.G. )

    1992-03-02

    We have observed a strong peak in the excitation function for the inelastic scattering reaction {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{sup 12}C(0{sub 2}{sup +})){sup 12}C(0{sub 2}{sup +}) at an energy of {ital E}{sub c.m.}=32.5 MeV. A recoil coincidence arrangement between two double-sided silicon strip detectors was used to detect the {alpha} particles from the decaying {sup 12}C nuclei, and the reconstructed reaction kinematics were used to calculate the two-body scattering {ital Q} value. This excitation-function structure may be interpreted as arising from very highly deformed {alpha}-particle chain configurations in the nucleus {sup 24}Mg.

  5. Skeletal dosimetry models for alpha-particles for use in molecular radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watchman, Christopher J.

    Molecular radiotherapy is a cancer treatment methodology whereby a radionuclide is combined with a biologically active molecule to preferentially target cancer cells. Alpha-particle emitting radionuclides show significant potential for use in molecular radiotherapy due to the short range of the alpha-particles in tissue and their high rates of energy deposition. Current radiation dosimetry models used to assess alpha emitter dose in the skeleton were developed originally for occupational applications. In medical dosimetry, individual variability in uptake, translocation and other biological factors can result in poor correlation of clinical outcome with marrow dose estimates determined using existing skeletal models. Methods presented in this work were developed in response to the need for dosimetry models which account for these biological and patient-specific factors. Dosimetry models are presented for trabecular bone alpha particle dosimetry as well as a model for cortical bone dosimetry. These radiation transport models are the 3D chord-based infinite spongiosa transport model (3D-CBIST) and the chord-based infinite cortical transport model (CBICT), respectively. Absorbed fraction data for several skeletal tissues for several subjects are presented. Each modeling strategy accounts for biological parameters, such as bone marrow cellularity, not previously incorporated into alpha-particle skeletal dosimetry models used in radiation protection. Using these data a study investigating the variability in alpha-particle absorbed fractions in the human skeleton is also presented. Data is also offered relating skeletal tissue masses in individual bone sites for a range of ages. These data are necessary for dose calculations and have previously only been available as whole body tissue masses. A revised 3D-CBIST model is also presented which allows for changes in endosteum thickness to account for revised target cell location of tissues involved in the radiological induction of bone cancer. In addition, new data are presented on the location of bone-marrow stem cells within the marrow cavities of trabecular bone of the pelvis. All results presented in this work may be applied to occupational exposures, but their greatest utility lies in dose assessments for alpha-emitters in molecular radiotherapy.

  6. Mutagenic effects of a single and an exact number of alpha particles in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hei, T. K.; Wu, L. J.; Liu, S. X.; Vannais, D.; Waldren, C. A.; Randers-Pehrson, G.

    1997-01-01

    One of the main uncertainties in risk estimation for environmental radon exposure using lung cancer data from underground miners is the extrapolation from high- to low-dose exposure where multiple traversal is extremely rare. The biological effects of a single alpha particle are currently unknown. Using the recently available microbeam source at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility at Columbia University, we examined the frequencies and molecular spectrum of S1- mutants induced in human-hamster hybrid (A(L)) cells by either a single or an exact number of alpha particles. Exponentially growing cells were stained briefly with a nontoxic concentration of Hoechst dye for image analysis, and the location of individual cells was computer-monitored. The nucleus of each cell was irradiated with either 1,2,4, or 8 alpha particles at a linear energy transfer of 90 keV/microm consistent with the energy spectrum of domestic radon exposure. Although single-particle traversal was only slightly cytotoxic to A(L) cells (survival fraction approximately 0.82), it was highly mutagenic, and the induced mutant fraction averaged 110 mutants per 10(5) survivors. In addition, both toxicity and mutant induction were dose-dependent. Multiplex PCR analysis of mutant DNA showed that the proportion of mutants with multilocus deletions increased with the number of particle traversals. These data provide direct evidence that a single a particle traversing a nucleus will have a high probability of resulting in a mutation and highlight the need for radiation protection at low doses.

  7. A self-consistent theory of collective alpha particle losses induced by Alfvenic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Diamond, P.H.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of kinetic Alfven waves, resonantly excited by energetic ions/alpha particles, is investigated. It is shown that {alpha}-particles govern both linear instability and nonlinear saturation dynamics, while the background MHD turbulence results only in a nonlinear real frequency shift. The most efficient saturation mechanism is found to be self-induced profile modification. Expressions for the fluctuation amplitudes and the {alpha}-particle radial flux are self-consistently derived. The work represents the first self-consistent, turbulent treatment of collective {alpha}-particle losses by Alfvenic fluctuations.

  8. Characteristics of the spectra of protons and alpha particles in recurrent events at 1 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    A study of 31 individual recurrent events from three long-lived corotating particle streams is presented. The spectra of protons and alpha particles during these streams are fit well by an exponential in particle rigidity. Although the spectra show considerable temporal variation, the proton and alpha particle spectra are correlated so that the e-folding rigidities Po(alpha) and Po(p) of the two spectra are in the ratio Po(alpha)/Po(p) = 1.5 plus or minus 0.1. The consistency of this ratio may be a characteristic of the interplanetary acceleration process.

  9. Energetic/alpha particle effects on MHD modes and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Budny, R.; Chen, L.

    1995-01-01

    A nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (NOVA-K) has been employed to study TAE stability in TFRR D-T and DIII-D experiments and to achieve understanding of TAE instability drive and damping mechanism. Reasonably good agreement between theory and experiment has been obtained. In these experiments the dominant damping mechanism is due to both the thermal ion Landau damping and/or the beam ion Landau damping. Based on ITER EDA parameters, the TAE modes are expected to be unstable in normal ITER operations. Energetic particle transport has been studied using a test particle code (ORBIT). Energetic particle loss scales linearly with the TAE mode amplitude and can be large for TFRR and DIII-D for {delta}B{sub r}/B > 10{sup {minus}4} due to large banana orbit. From quasi-linear (ORBIT) and nonlinear kinetic-MHD (MH3D-K) simulations the saturation of TAE modes is due to nonlinear wave particle trapping and energetic particle profile modification in both radial and energy space. Finally, a convective bucket transport mechanism by MHD waves with time-dependent frequency is presented. Based on the energy-selective characteristics of the bucket transport mechanism, undesirable particles such as helium ash can be removed from the plasma core efficiently.

  10. K-shell X-ray production cross sections of Ni induced by protons, alpha-particles, and He+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertol, A. P. L.; Hinrichs, R.; Vasconcellos, M. A. Z.

    2015-11-01

    The proton, alpha-particle, and He+ induced X-ray emissions of Ni were measured on mono-elemental thin films in order to obtain the K-shell X-ray production cross section in the energy range of 0.7-2.0 MeV for protons, 4.0-6.5 MeV for alpha-particles, and 3.0-4.0 MeV for He+. The proton-induced X-ray production cross section for Ni agreed well with the theoretical values, endorsing the quality of the measurements. The X-ray production cross section induced with alpha-particles is in good agreement with ECPSSR theory in the complete range of energies, while for He+ that quantity is systematically below. Kβ/Kα ratios were evaluated and compared with experimental and theoretical values.

  11. Observation of the production of 8Li fragments in alpha-particle interaction with photoemulsion nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinina, V. V.; Egorenkova, N. P.; Pozharova, E. A.; Smirnitsky, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    About 37 × 103 events of alpha-particle interaction with photoemulsion nuclei were scanned. Among them, 339 events involving the production of a 8Li fragment and the decay 8Li →8 Be → 2α were found. Over the region extending up to 60 MeV, the energy spectrum of 8Li is consistent with the mechanism of fragment evaporation from an excited nucleus. At 8Li energies in excess of 70 MeV, the existence of a 8Li fragment in target nuclei before their interaction with a projectile is possibly observed with a probability of about 10-5.

  12. THE ROLE OF ALPHA PARTICLES IN THE EVOLUTION OF THE SOLAR-WIND TURBULENCE TOWARD SHORT SPATIAL SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Perrone, D.; Valentini, F.; Veltri, P.

    2011-11-01

    We present a numerical study of the kinetic dynamics of protons and alpha particles during the evolution of the solar-wind turbulent cascade, in which the energy injected in large-scale slab-type Alfvenic fluctuations is transferred toward short spatial scale lengths, across the proton skin depth. We make use of a hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell code that integrates numerically the Vlasov equation for both the ion species, while the electrons are considered as a fluid. The system evolution is investigated in terms of different values of the electron to proton and alpha particle to proton temperature ratios. The numerical results show that the previously studied kinetic dynamics of protons is not strongly affected by the presence of alpha particles, at least when they are present in low concentration. Our simulations not only provide a physical explanation for the generation of beams of accelerated particles along the direction of the ambient magnetic field for both protons and alpha particles, but also show that this mechanism is more efficient for protons than for alpha particles, in agreement with recent solar-wind data analyses.

  13. Alpha-Particle/Proton Differential Flow in the Solar Wind: Implications for Plasma Heating, Azimuthal Flow, and the Parker Spiral Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verscharen, D.; Bourouaine, S.; Chandran, B. D. G.

    2014-12-01

    Protons and alpha particles in the fast solar wind are only weakly collisional and exhibit a number of non-equilibrium features, including temperature anisotropies and relative drifts along the direction of the background magnetic field. Two mechanisms have been proposed for limiting differential flow between alpha particles and protons: plasma instabilities and the rotational force. Both mechanisms decelerate the alpha particles - for example, the Alfvén/ion-cyclotron and fast-magnetosonic/whistler instabilities limit the drift velocity to a value comparable to the Alfvén speed, which decreases with increasing heliocentric distance r. However, while plasma instabilities transform bulk-flow kinetic energy into heat and plasma waves, the rotational force does not. We present an analytic expression for the rate Qflow at which energy is released when alpha particles are decelerated by instabilities. We find that Qflow becomes zero at a critical radius r=rcrit, where rcrit is between 1.5 AU and 2 AU in the fast solar wind in the ecliptic plane, and rcrit increases with increasing heliographic latitude. We show that instabilities control the deceleration of alpha particles at ralpha particles at r>rcrit. We compare the value of Qflow at ralpha particles deduced from in-situ measurements of fast-wind streams from the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft. We find that Qflow exceeds the empirical heating rate for alpha particles at r<1 AU. We conclude that the continuous energy input from alpha-particle deceleration at ralpha-particle drift for the azimuthal flow velocities of the ions and for the Parker spiral magnetic field.

  14. Experimental detection of alpha-particles from the radioactive decay of natural bismuth.

    PubMed

    de Marcillac, Pierre; Coron, Noël; Dambier, Gérard; Leblanc, Jacques; Moalic, Jean-Pierre

    2003-04-24

    The only naturally occurring isotope of bismuth, 209Bi, is commonly regarded as the heaviest stable isotope. But like most other heavy nuclei abundant in nature and characterized by an exceptionally long lifetime, it is metastable with respect to alpha-decay. However, the decay usually evades observation because the nuclear structure of 209Bi gives rise to an extremely low decay probability and, moreover, generates low-energy alpha-particles difficult to detect. Indeed, dedicated experiments attempting to record the alpha-decay of 209Bi in nuclear emulsions failed. However, scintillating bolometers operated at temperatures below 100 mK offer improved detection efficiency and sensitivity, whereas a broad palette of targets could be available. Here we report the successful use of this method for the unambiguous detection of 209Bi alpha-decay in bismuth germanate detectors cooled to 20 mK. We measure an energy release of 3,137 +/- 1 (statistical) +/- 2 (systematic) keV and a half-life of (1.9 +/- 0.2) x 10(19) yr, which are in agreement with expected values. PMID:12712201

  15. Search for {alpha}-states in {sup 13}C via elastic resonant scattering of {alpha} particles on {sup 9}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, I.; Campajola, L.; Rosato, E.; Spadaccini, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2013-07-18

    We will discuss new experimental data concerning the elastic resonant scattering of {alpha}-particles on {sup 9}Be nuclei at bombarding energies from 3.5 MeV up to 9.9 MeV. Several excitation functions have been obtained at different polar angles, mainly in the backward hemisphere in the centre of mass frame. Excitation functions show various anomalies that can be linked to the presence of various excited states in the {sup 13}C compound nucleus. In the literature, some of these states have been proposed to belong to rotational bands built on deformed a-cluster excited state. Unfortunately, up to date the spin-parity assignment of many of these states is doubtful. The set of excitation functions we obtained from the present experiment can contribute to improve spectroscopy of highling excited states of {sup 13}C.

  16. Proton and alpha particle precipitation onto the upper atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenberg Wieser, G.; Ashfaque, M.; Nilsson, H.; Futaana, Y.; Barabash, S.; Diéval, C.; Fedorov, A.; Zhang, T. L.

    2015-08-01

    We study the precipitation of protons and alpha-particles onto the upper atmosphere of Venus, using particle data recorded by the Venus Express spacecraft inside the induced magnetosphere. Our investigations are limited to the dayside close to the terminator. We observe on average a net downward flux of protons, which originate partly from the planetary atmosphere and partly from the solar wind. We present median energy spectra of the precipitating protons divided into two energy ranges, 10-100 eV and 100 eV-30 keV. The total dayside precipitation of solar wind protons is estimated to be 3×1022 s-1, assuming only protons with energies above 500 eV will reach the exobase. Downgoing protons are frequently observed but only in 3% of the available data records we see He2+. These observations are made close to the induced magnetosphere boundary and we argue that at lower altitude the countrates for alpha-particles fall below detection limits. We estimate the precipitation of He2+ onto the dayside exobase to be 1×1021 s-1, which is not enough enough to replace the helium escaping from the planet.

  17. Alpha-particle-driven instability of alfven waves in a tandem mirror. Final summary report, 21 February-20 May 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.K.

    1985-08-20

    Alpha particles born at D-T fusion are mirror confined in the tandem mirror due to their relatively high energy. Therefore, they have a loss-cone type distribution in the velocity space. This anisotropy is susceptible to microinstability. The objective of this work is to study the possible instability that can be driven by the alpha loss-cone. The low frequency (at the order of the ion cyclotron frequency) wave spectrum is studied to seek the waves that can be destabilized by the alphas. The radial mode structure is found for the growth rate calculation. The alpha particle distribution with a loss-cone is obtained from a Legendre function expansion and a diffusion front method. The growth rate of the instability is formulated from linear stability theory and computed numerically. A marginal stability boundary in the ion density and temperature parameters is calculated.

  18. Monte-Carlo dosimetry on a realistic cell monolayer geometry exposed to alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberet, Ph; Vianna, F.; Karamitros, M.; Brun, T.; Gordillo, N.; Moretto, Ph; Incerti, S.; Seznec, H.

    2012-04-01

    The energy and specific energy absorbed in the main cell compartments (nucleus and cytoplasm) in typical radiobiology experiments are usually estimated by calculations as they are not accessible for a direct measurement. In most of the work, the cell geometry is modelled using the combination of simple mathematical volumes. We propose a method based on high resolution confocal imaging and ion beam analysis (IBA) in order to import realistic cell nuclei geometries in Monte-Carlo simulations and thus take into account the variety of different geometries encountered in a typical cell population. Seventy-six cell nuclei have been imaged using confocal microscopy and their chemical composition has been measured using IBA. A cellular phantom was created from these data using the ImageJ image analysis software and imported in the Geant4 Monte-Carlo simulation toolkit. Total energy and specific energy distributions in the 76 cell nuclei have been calculated for two types of irradiation protocols: a 3 MeV alpha particle microbeam used for targeted irradiation and a 239Pu alpha source used for large angle random irradiation. Qualitative images of the energy deposited along the particle tracks have been produced and show good agreement with images of DNA double strand break signalling proteins obtained experimentally. The methodology presented in this paper provides microdosimetric quantities calculated from realistic cellular volumes. It is based on open-source oriented software that is publicly available.

  19. Monte-Carlo dosimetry on a realistic cell monolayer geometry exposed to alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Barberet, Ph; Vianna, F; Karamitros, M; Brun, T; Gordillo, N; Moretto, Ph; Incerti, S; Seznec, H

    2012-04-21

    The energy and specific energy absorbed in the main cell compartments (nucleus and cytoplasm) in typical radiobiology experiments are usually estimated by calculations as they are not accessible for a direct measurement. In most of the work, the cell geometry is modelled using the combination of simple mathematical volumes. We propose a method based on high resolution confocal imaging and ion beam analysis (IBA) in order to import realistic cell nuclei geometries in Monte-Carlo simulations and thus take into account the variety of different geometries encountered in a typical cell population. Seventy-six cell nuclei have been imaged using confocal microscopy and their chemical composition has been measured using IBA. A cellular phantom was created from these data using the ImageJ image analysis software and imported in the Geant4 Monte-Carlo simulation toolkit. Total energy and specific energy distributions in the 76 cell nuclei have been calculated for two types of irradiation protocols: a 3 MeV alpha particle microbeam used for targeted irradiation and a ²³⁹Pu alpha source used for large angle random irradiation. Qualitative images of the energy deposited along the particle tracks have been produced and show good agreement with images of DNA double strand break signalling proteins obtained experimentally. The methodology presented in this paper provides microdosimetric quantities calculated from realistic cellular volumes. It is based on open-source oriented software that is publicly available. PMID:22456322

  20. HIGH ENERGY PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Courant, E.D.; Livingston, M.S.; Snyder, H.S.

    1959-04-14

    An improved apparatus is presented for focusing charged particles in an accelerator. In essence, the invention includes means for establishing a magnetic field in discrete sectors along the path of moving charged particles, the magnetic field varying in each sector in accordance with the relation. B = B/ sub 0/ STAln (r-r/sub 0/)/r/sub 0/!, where B/sub 0/ is the value of the magnetic field at the equilibrium orbit of radius r/sub 0/ of the path of the particles, B equals the magnetic field at the radius r of the chamber and n equals the magnetic field gradient index, the polarity of n being abruptly reversed a plurality of times as the particles travel along their arcuate path. With this arrangement, the particles are alternately converged towards the axis of their equillbrium orbit and diverged therefrom in successive sectors with a resultant focusing effect.

  1. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of {alpha}-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanne, A.; Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S.; Szucs, Z.

    2005-05-24

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to E{alpha}=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi({alpha},2n)211At, 209Bi({alpha},3n)210At, 209Bi({alpha},x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  2. Enhanced homologous recombination is induced by alpha-particle radiation in somatic cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Po; Liu, Ping; Wu, Yuejin

    Almost 9 percent of cosmic rays which strike the earth's atmosphere are alpha particles. As one of the ionizing radiations (IR), its biological effects have been widely studied. However, the plant genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation was not largely known. In this research, the Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic for GUS recombination substrate was used to evaluate the genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation (3.3MeV). The pronounced effects of systemic exposure to alpha-particle radiation on the somatic homologous recombination frequency (HRF) were found at different doses. The 10Gy dose of radiation induced the maximal HRF which was 1.9-fold higher than the control. The local radiation of alpha-particle (10Gy) on root also resulted in a 2.5-fold increase of somatic HRF in non-radiated aerial plant, indicating that the signal(s) of genomic instability was transferred to non-radiated parts and initiated their genomic instability. Concurrent treatment of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana with alpha-particle and DMSO(ROS scavenger) both in systemic and local radiation signifi- cantly suppressed the somatic HR, indicating that the free radicals produced by alpha-particle radiation took part in the production of signal of genomic instability rather than the signal transfer. Key words: alpha-particle radiation, somatic homologous recombination, genomic instability

  3. Thermal and suprathermal protons and alpha particles in the earth's plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipavich, F. M.; Scholer, M.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed proton energy spectra in the quasi-stable distant plasma sheet over the energy range from approximately 13 keV to approximately 130 keV are presented. These spectra are compared with spectra of simultaneously measured alpha particles in the energy range from approximately 30 keV/Q to approximately 130 keV/Q. The proton spectra are then extended into the higher energy range up to approximately 1 MeV, thereby supplementing the study of Sarris et al. (1981). The temporal behavior of the spectra in the higher energy range is discussed. It is found that below about 16 keV the proton spectra can be represented by a Maxwellian distribution; above this level, a suprathermal tail is found that cannot be represented by a single power law.

  4. A method to reproduce alpha-particle spectra measured with semiconductor detectors.

    PubMed

    Timón, A Fernández; Vargas, M Jurado; Sánchez, A Martín

    2010-01-01

    A method is proposed to reproduce alpha-particle spectra measured with silicon detectors, combining analytical and computer simulation techniques. The procedure includes the use of the Monte Carlo method to simulate the tracks of alpha-particles within the source and in the detector entrance window. The alpha-particle spectrum is finally obtained by the convolution of this simulated distribution and the theoretical distributions representing the contributions of the alpha-particle spectrometer to the spectrum. Experimental spectra from (233)U and (241)Am sources were compared with the predictions given by the proposed procedure, showing good agreement. The proposed method can be an important aid for the analysis and deconvolution of complex alpha-particle spectra. PMID:19900817

  5. Distributions of alpha particles escaping to the wall during sawtooth oscillations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnichenko, Ya. I.; Lutsenko, V. V.; White, R. B.; Yakovenko, Yu. V.; Zweben, S. J.

    1999-04-01

    It has been observed experimentally in deuterium-tritium shots of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [D. J. Grove and D. M. Meade, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1167 (1985)] that crashes of sawtooth oscillations may result in very inhomogeneous flux of alpha particles to the wall. To explain this phenomenon, both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation have been carried out. It is concluded that the "crash-induced prompt loss," i.e., the orbital loss of marginally trapped particles arising because of the crash-induced orbit transformation of circulating particles, is responsible for the flux near the bottom of the vessel, whereas the crash-induced stochastic diffusion of moderately trapped particles explains the large signal near the equatorial plane of the torus. The calculated poloidal distributions of the integral alpha flux are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. The energy spectrum of the escaping particles has also been calculated, which can be used for diagnostics of the crash type.

  6. Alpha particles induce apoptosis through the sphingomyelin pathway.

    PubMed

    Seideman, Jonathan H; Stancevic, Branka; Rotolo, Jimmy A; McDevitt, Michael R; Howell, Roger W; Kolesnick, Richard N; Scheinberg, David A

    2011-10-01

    The sphingomyelin pathway involves the enzymatic cleavage of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, a second messenger that serves as a key mediator in the rapid apoptotic response to various cell stressors. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) γ radiation can initiate this pathway, independent of DNA damage, via the cell membrane. Whether short-ranged, high-LET α particles, which are of interest as potent environmental carcinogens, radiotherapies and potential components of dirty bombs, can act through this mechanism to signal apoptosis is unknown. Here we show that irradiation of Jurkat cells with α particles emitted by the ²²⁵Ac-DOTA-anti-CD3 IgG antibody construct results in dose-dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis was significantly reduced by pretreating cells with cholesterol-depleting nystatin, a reagent known to inhibit ceramide signaling by interfering with membrane raft coalescence and ceramide-rich platform generation. The effects of nystatin on α-particle-induced apoptosis were related to disruption of the ceramide pathway and not to microdosimetry alterations, because similar results were obtained after external irradiation of the cells with a broad beam of collimated α particles using a planar ²⁴¹Am source. External irradiation allowed for more precise control of the dosimetry and geometry of the irradiation, independent of antibody binding or cell internalization kinetics. Mechanistically consistent with these findings, Jurkat cells rapidly increased membrane concentrations of ceramide after external irradiation with an average of five α-particle traversals per cell. These data indicate that α particles can activate the sphingomyelin pathway to induce apoptosis. PMID:21631289

  7. Evidence for strong refraction of {sup 3}He in an {alpha}-particle condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2007-04-15

    We have analyzed {sup 3}He scattering from {sup 12}C at 34.7 and 72 MeV in a coupled channel method with a double folding potential derived from the precise wave functions for the ground 0{sup +} state and 0{sub 2}{sup +} (7.65 MeV) Hoyle state, which has been suggested to be an {alpha} particle condensate. It is found that strong refraction of {sup 3}He in the Hoyle state can be clearly seen in the experimental angular distribution at a low incident energy region as an Airy minimum of the prerainbow oscillations.

  8. Alpha particle detection with GaN Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, A. Y.; Smirnov, N. B.; Govorkov, A. V.; Markov, A. V.; Kozhukhova, E. A.; Gazizov, I. M.; Kolin, N. G.; Merkurisov, D. I.; Boiko, V. M.; Korulin, A. V.; Zalyetin, V. M.; Pearton, S. J.; Lee, I.-H.; Dabiran, A. M.; Chow, P. P.

    2009-11-15

    Ni/GaN Schottky diode radiation detectors were fabricated on 3-mum-thick unintentionally doped n-GaN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and on 12-mum-thick undoped n-GaN layers prepared by epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELOG). The reverse current of all detector structures was <10{sup -9} A for bias voltages necessary for detector operation, with the level of background donor doping of <10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}. With this doping level the space charge region of the Schottky diode could be extended to the entire thickness of the films. The charge collection efficiency of the detectors was close to 100% for MOCVD and ELOG detectors for alpha-particles with range comparable to the thickness of the layer. Electrical properties and deep trap spectra were also studied. The collection efficiency decreased when the concentra-tion of deep electron traps, particularly E{sub c}-0.6 eV traps, increased in MBE grown films.

  9. Fission time scale from prescission neutron, proton, and {alpha} particle multiplicities in {sup 28}Si+{sup 175}Lu

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, K.; Chatterjee, A.; Navin, A.; Mahata, K.; Shrivastava, A.; Tripathi, V.; Kailas, S.; Saxena, A.; Thomas, R.G.; Kumar, Suresh; Sahu, P.K.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R.G.

    2006-06-15

    Prescission neutron, proton, and {alpha}-particle multiplicities for the reaction {sup 28}Si+{sup 175}Lu at 159 MeV were measured simultaneously. The multiplicity data were analyzed using deformation dependent particle transmission coefficients, binding energies, and level densities to extract fission time scales and the mean deformation of the saddle-to-scission emitter. The neutron and charged particle data could be explained consistently, a better fit being obtained by considering the emission of neutrons to be favored toward larger deformation as compared to charged particles. The total fission time scale is deduced as 36-41x10{sup -21}s.

  10. Observation of KNO scaling in the neutral energy spectra from. cap alpha cap alpha. and pp collisions at ISR energies

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Neutral transverse energy spectra in pp and ..cap alpha cap alpha.. interactions are analyzed in terms of the Wounded Nucleon Model. Analysis of the ..cap alpha cap alpha.. spectrum by application of a multiple nucleon-nucleon collision mechanism is conveniently performed when a Gamma Distribution is used to represent the pp spectral shape. The Wounded Nucleon Model provides a reasonable description of the ..cap alpha cap alpha.. spectrum for the first 3 orders of magnitude, but completely fails to account for the slope of the high energy tail of the distribution. However, the pp and ..cap alpha cap alpha.. spectra can both be fit to the same Gamma Distribution when scaled by their respective mean values and thus exhibit KNO scaling. 28 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Results of the Alpha-Particle-X-Ray Spectrometer on Board of the Mars Exploration Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, R.; Zipfel, J.; Brueckner, J.; Dreibus, G.; Lugmair, G.; Rieder, R.; Waenke, H.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity landed at Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum. The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is part of the instrument suite on both rovers. It is equipped with six 244Cm sources which provide x-ray excitation with alpha-particles (PIXE) and x-ray radiation (XRF). This combination allows x-ray spectroscopy of elements from Na to Br in the energy range of 0.9 to 16 keV. X-ray detectors with a high energy resolution of 160 eV at Fe K allow us to separate even closely spaced energy peaks, such as Na, Mg, Al and Si. The APXS is attached to the rover s arm and provides in-situ measurements of the chemical composition of soils, surfaces of rocks and outcrops and their abraded surfaces. This abstract gives an overview of APXS results obtained during the first year of operation on both landing sites.

  12. Angular distribution of {alpha} particles from oriented {sup 253,254}Es and {sup 255}Fm nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Severijns, N.; Golovko, V.V.; Kraev, I.S.; Phalet, T.; Belyaev, A.A.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Noga, V.I.; Erzinkyan, A.L.; Parfenova, V.P.; Eversheim, P.-D.; Herzog, P.; Tramm, C.; Filimonov, V.T.; Toporov, Yu.G.; Zotov, E.; Gurevich, G.M.; Rusakov, A.V.; Vyachin, V.N.; Zakoucky, D.

    2005-04-01

    The anisotropy in the angular distribution of {alpha} particles from oriented {sup 253,254}Es and {sup 255}Fm nuclei, which are among the strongest deformed {alpha} emitters, was measured. Large {alpha} anisotropies have been observed for all three nuclei. The results are compared with calculations based on {alpha}-particle tunneling through a deformed Coulomb barrier.

  13. Properties of alpha-particle solutions to the many-nucleon problem

    SciTech Connect

    Gnilozub, I. A. Kurgalin, S. D. Tchuvil'sky, Yu. M.

    2006-06-15

    A class of A-nucleon (for even N = Z) Hamiltonians is found such that they admit, among others, solutions that can be exactly related to solutions to the problem of A/4 alpha particles in the sense that the respective eigenvalues of the two problems coincide and that the A-nucleon solutions can be constructed from the alpha-particle solutions within a procedure that follows from the resonating-group model. It is shown that an effective nuclear Hamiltonian close to a realistic one possesses these properties, the alpha-particle states in nuclei having basic properties of an alpha condensate and, frequently, a normal nuclear density. The statistics of alpha particles (and other composite bosons) proves to be different from Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics and from parastatistics.

  14. Coaxial charged particle energy analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael A. (Inventor); Bryson, III, Charles E. (Inventor); Wu, Warren (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A non-dispersive electrostatic energy analyzer for electrons and other charged particles having a generally coaxial structure of a sequentially arranged sections of an electrostatic lens to focus the beam through an iris and preferably including an ellipsoidally shaped input grid for collimating a wide acceptance beam from a charged-particle source, an electrostatic high-pass filter including a planar exit grid, and an electrostatic low-pass filter. The low-pass filter is configured to reflect low-energy particles back towards a charged particle detector located within the low-pass filter. Each section comprises multiple tubular or conical electrodes arranged about the central axis. The voltages on the lens are scanned to place a selected energy band of the accepted beam at a selected energy at the iris. Voltages on the high-pass and low-pass filters remain substantially fixed during the scan.

  15. Alpha-particle effects on high-n instabilities in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rewoldt, G.

    1988-06-01

    Hot ..cap alpha..-particles and thermalized helium ash particles in tokamaks can have significant effects on high toroidal mode number instabilities such as the trapped-electron drift mode and the kinetically calculated magnetohydrodynamic ballooning mode. In particular, the effects can be stabilizing, destabilizing, or negligible, depending on the parameters involved. In high-temperature tokamaks capable of producing significant numbers of hot ..cap alpha..-particles, the predominant interaction of the mode with the ..cap alpha..-particles is through resonances of various sorts. In turn, the modes can cause significant anomalous transport of the ..cap alpha..-particles and the helium ash. Here, results of comprehensive linear eigenfrequency-eigenfunction calculations are presented for relevant realistic cases to show these effects. 24 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. A study of the effects of MeV alpha particles in PE and PVDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evelyn, A. L.; Ila, D.; Zimmerman, R. L.; Bhat, K.; Poker, D. B.; Hensley, D. K.

    1997-02-01

    We have mapped and studied the effects of MeV alpha-particle bombardment in polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC) and polyethylene (PE). We used 3.5 and 5.0 MeV alpha-particle incident beams and stacked polymer films to separate the contributing effects of the electronic (ɛe) and nuclear (ɛn) stopping powers. The electrical conductance and change in the chemical structures were measured by direct resistivity measurement, Raman microprobe, RBS and FTIR. The results indicate significant differences in the (ɛe) and (ɛn) effects at higher alpha-particle bombardment fluences.

  17. On the approximations of the distribution function of fusion alpha particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bilato, R. Brambilla, M.; Poli, E.

    2014-10-15

    The solution of the drift-kinetic equation for fusion-born alpha particles is derived in the limit of dominant parallel streaming, and it is related to the usual slowing-down distribution function. The typical approximations of the fast tail of fusion-born alpha particles are briefly compared and discussed. In particular, approximating the distribution function of fast-alpha particles with an “equivalent” Maxwellian is inaccurate to describe absorption of radio-frequency waves in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies.

  18. WIND measurements of proton and alpha particle flow and number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, J. T.; Lazarus, A. J.; Ogilvie, J. T.; Lepping, R.; Byrnes, J.; Chornay, D.; Keller, J.; Torbert, R. B.; Bodet, D.; Needell, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    We propose to review measurements of the solar wind proton and alpha particle flow velocities and densities made since launch with the WIND SWE instrument. The SWE Faraday cup ion sensors are designed to be able to determine accurately flow vector directions, and thus can be used to detect proton-alpha particle differential flow. Instances of differential flow, and the solar wind features with which they are associated will be discussed. Additionally, the variability of the percentage of alpha particles as a fraction of the total solar wind ion density will be presented.

  19. Alpha particles in field-aligned beams upstream of the bow shock - Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, D.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that field-aligned ion beams (FABs) formed by direct reflection could contain alpha particles is studied using self-consistent hybrid simulations of an oblique collisionless, supercritical shock. It is found that alpha particles can backstream from a shock in which the angle between the shock normal and the upstream magnetic field is 45 degrees. The deficit of alpha particles in the FABs, expressed as a relative density ratio to H(+) normalized to the solar wind He(2+) to H(+) density ratio, varies between about 0.1 and less than 0.01 and depends on the upstream H(+) and He(2+) temperatures.

  20. Method for characterizing the upset response of CMOS circuits using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor); Blaes, Brent R. (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. A technique utilizing test structures to quickly and inexpensively characterize the SEU sensitivity of standard cell latches intended for use in a space environment. This bench-level approach utilizes alpha particles to induce upsets in a low LET sensitive 4-k bit test SRAM. This SRAM consists of cells that employ an offset voltage to adjust their upset sensitivity and an enlarged sensitive drain junction to enhance the cell's upset rate.

  1. MIRD Pamphlet No. 22 (Unabridged): Radiobiology and Dosimetry of alpha-Particle Emitters for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sgouros, George; Roeske, John C.; McDevitt, Michael S.; Palm, Stig; Allen, Barry J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Brill, Bertrand A.; Song, Hong; Howell, R. W.; Akabani, Gamal

    2010-02-28

    The potential of alpha-particle emitters to treat cancer has been recognized since the early 1900s. Advances in the targeted delivery of radionuclides, in radionuclide conjugation chemistry, and in the increased availability of alpha-emitters appropriate for clinical use have recently led to patient trials of alpha-particle-emitter labeled radiopharmaceuticals. Although alpha-emitters have been studied for many decades, their current use in humans for targeted therapy is an important milestone. The objective of this work is to review those aspects of the field that are pertinent to targeted alpha-particle-emitter therapy and to provide guidance and recommendations for human alpha-particle-emitter dosimetry.

  2. A continuous sampler with background suppression for monitoring alpha-emitting aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    McFarland, A R; Rodgers, J C; Ortiz, C A; Moore, M E

    1992-05-01

    A continuous air monitor has been developed that includes provisions for improving the detection of alpha-emitting aerosol particles in the presence of radon/thoron progeny that are unattached to ambient aerosol particles. Wind tunnel tests show that 80% of 10-microns aerodynamic equivalent diameter particles penetrate the flow system from the ambient air to the collection filter when the flow rate is 57 L min-1 (2 cfm) and the wind speed is 1 m s-1. Uniformity of aerosol collection on the filter, as characterized by the coefficient of variation of the areal density deposits, is less than 15% for 10-microns aerodynamic-equivalent-diameter aerosol particles. Tests with unattached radon daughters in a flow-through chamber showed that approximately 99% of the 218Po was removed by an inlet screen that is designed to collect radon daughters that are in the size range of molecular clusters. The inlet screen offers the opportunity to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of energy spectra in the regions of interest (subranges of the energy spectrum) of transuranic elements and thereby enhance the performance of background compensation algorithms. PMID:1559808

  3. Alpha particle driven current and torque in ITER baseline scenarios with 3D perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snicker, A.; Asunta, O.; Ylitie, H.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Schneider, M.; Pinches, S. D.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper three-dimensional (3D) kinetic Monte Carlo orbit-following simulations are carried out with the ASCOT code to estimate the alpha particle driven current and torque profiles in ITER baseline scenarios. Several different 3D magnetic field configurations, including TF ripple, ferritic inserts, test blanket modules and edge localized mode coil perturbations, are used in these simulations. The alpha particle current is found to be less than one percent for all configurations and scenarios. In axisymmetric magnetic field configurations, the collisional and j × B torque components cancel each other, whilst in non-axisymmetric cases, the total torque is nonzero. The total alpha driven torque is found to oppose that generated by the neutral beam injection particles and to be an order of magnitude smaller. Consequently, alpha particles will not significantly contribute to the plasma current nor act as a source of plasma rotation in the ITER baseline scenarios considered.

  4. LIMITS ON ALPHA PARTICLE TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY AND DIFFERENTIAL FLOW FROM KINETIC INSTABILITIES: SOLAR WIND OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bourouaine, Sofiane; Verscharen, Daniel; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Maruca, Bennett A.; Kasper, Justin C.

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that the observed temperature anisotropies of protons and alpha particles in the solar wind are constrained by theoretical thresholds for pressure and anisotropy driven instabilities such as the Alfvén/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) and fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) instabilities. In this Letter, we use a long period of in situ measurements provided by the Wind spacecraft's Faraday cups to investigate the combined constraint on the alpha proton differential flow velocity and the alpha particle temperature anisotropy due to A/IC and FM/W instabilities. We show that the majority of the data are constrained to lie within the region of parameter space in which A/IC and FM/W waves are either stable or have extremely low growth rates. In the minority of observed cases in which the growth rate of the A/IC (FM/W) instability is comparatively large, we find relatively higher values of T {sub α}/T {sub p} (T {sub ∥α}/T {sub ∥p}) when the alpha proton differential flow velocity is small, where T {sub α} and T {sub p} (T {sub ∥α} and T {sub ∥p}) are the perpendicular (parallel) temperatures of alpha particles and protons. We conjecture that this observed feature might arise from preferential alpha particle heating which can drive the alpha particles beyond the instability thresholds.

  5. Alpha particles in solar cosmic rays over the last 80,000 years.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Present-day (1967 to 1969) fluxes of alpha particles from solar cosmic rays, determined from satellite measurements, were used to calculate the production rates of cobalt-57, cobalt-58, and nickel-59 in lunar surface samples. Comparisons with the activities of nickel-59 (half-life, 80,000 years) measured in lunar samples indicate that the long-term and present-day fluxes of solar alpha particles are comparable within a factor of approximately 4.

  6. An alpha particle diagnostic based on measurements of lower hybrid wave fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.L.

    1989-07-01

    It is shown that the one-dimensional alpha particle velocity distribution function can be determined from the fluctuation- dissipation theorem based on measurements of lower hybrid wave fluctuations in an equilibrium plasma. This method uses collective Thomson scattering data with large signal-to-noise ratio, but it is applicable only when the alpha particles have an isotropic velocity distribution. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Traversal of cells by radiation and absorbed fraction estimates for electrons and alpha particles

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K.F.; Ryman, J.C.; Taner, A.C.; Kerr, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    Consideration of the pathlength which radiation traverses in a cell is central to algorithms for estimating energy deposition on a cellular level. Distinct pathlength distributions occur for radionuclides: (1) uniformly distributed in space about the cell (referred to as -randomness); (2) uniformly distributed on the surface of the cell (S-randomness); and (3) uniformly distributed within the cell volume (I-randomness). For a spherical cell of diameter d, the mean pathlengths are 2/3d, 1/2d, and 3/4d, respectively, for these distributions. Algorithms for simulating the path of radiation through a cell are presented and the absorbed fraction in the cell and its nucleus are tabulated for low energy electrons and alpha particles emitted on the surface of spherical cells. The algorithms and absorbed fraction data should be of interest to those concerned with the dosimetry of radionuclide-labeled monoclonal antibodies. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Electron correlations in single-electron capture from helium by fast protons and {alpha} particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mancev, Ivan; Milojevic, Nenad

    2010-02-15

    Single-electron capture from heliumlike atomic systems by bare projectiles is investigated by means of the four-body boundary-corrected first Born approximation (CB1-4B). The effect of the dynamic electron correlation is explicitly taken into account through the complete perturbation potential. The quantum-mechanical post and prior transition amplitudes for single charge exchange encompassing symmetric and/or asymmetric collisions are derived in terms of two-dimensional real integrals in the case of the prior form and five-dimensional quadratures for the post form. An illustrative computation is performed for single-electron capture from helium by protons and {alpha} particles at intermediate and high impact energies. The role of dynamic correlations is examined as a function of increased projectile energy. The validity and utility of the proposed CB1-4B method is critically assessed in comparison with the existing experimental data for total cross sections, and excellent agreement is obtained.

  9. [Temperature effect correction for Chang'E-3 alpha particle X-ray spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Ye; Wang, Huan-Yu; Peng, Wen-Xi; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Liang, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Jin-Zhou; Yang, Jia-Wei; Fan, Rui-Rui; Liu, Ya-Qing; Dong, Yi-Fan; Wu, Feng; Zhao, Xiao-Yun

    2012-07-01

    Alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) is one of the payloads of Chang'E-3 lunar rover of China's Lunar Exploration Project. The present paper introduces briefly the components of APXS, how it works and its working environment on the lunar surface. The environmental temperature effect has been studied with simulations and experiments, and the results show that the temperature of the APXS sensor will be varying during the measuring on the lunar surface. And another experiment reveals that the energy resolution becomes worse if the sensor's temperature is varying. In this paper, a correction method based on Pearson's chi-squared test is presented. The method can improve the energy resolution when the sensor's temperature is varying. We have tested the method with the spectra acquired by APXS in the temperature varying period of Temperature Cycling Test, and the results show that the method is efficient and reliable. PMID:23016364

  10. Study of L-subshell ionization cross sections of Ho, Er, and Tm by {alpha} particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dhehadeh, B.A.; Hallak, A.W.; Garwan, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    The L-subshell ionization cross sections induced by 1 to 6 MeV {alpha} particles were measured for three elements of the rare earth group: holmium, erbium, and thulium. Simultaneous PIXE and RBS measurements were utilized. The measured cross sections were compared with the theoretical calculations of the ECPSSR theory. The comparison shows good agreement at high bombardment energies especially for L{sub 2} subshell. When the effect of intra-shell transitions (IS) induced by the Coulomb field of the projectile was included in the ECPSSR formalism, the systematic discrepancies between the theoretical and the experimental values at low energies were reduced. The L{sub 2} and L{sub 3} subshells discrepancies have been resolved only after the united atom effect (UA) has been incorporated into the theory. However; as the discrepancies of the L{sub 1} subshell remain to be addressed only possible reasons are discussed.

  11. Schottky barrier detectors on 4H-SiC n-type epitaxial layer for alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, S. K.; Krishna, R. M.; Zavalla, K. J.; Mandal, K. C.

    2013-02-01

    Schottky barrier detectors have been fabricated on 50 μm n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layers grown on 360 μm SiC substrates by depositing ∼10 nm nickel contact. Current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements were carried out to investigate the Schottky barrier properties. The detectors were evaluated for alpha particle detection using a 241Am alpha source. An energy resolution of ∼2.7% was obtained with a reverse bias of 100 V for 5.48 MeV alpha particles. The measured charge collection efficiency (CCE) was seen to vary as a function of bias voltage following a minority carrier diffusion model. Using this model, a diffusion length of∼3.5 μm for holes was numerically calculated from the CCE vs. bias voltage plot. Rise-time measurements of digitally recorded charge pulses for the 5.48 MeV alpha particles showed a presence of two sets of events having different rise-times at a higher bias of 200 V. A biparametric correlation scheme was successfully implemented for the first time to visualize the correlated pulse-height distribution of the events with different rise-times. Using the rise-time measurements and the biparametric plots, the observed variation of energy resolution with applied bias was explained.

  12. Computation of Cosmic Ray Ionization and Dose at Mars: a Comparison of HZETRN and Planetocosmics for Proton and Alpha Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gronoff, Guillaume; Norman, Ryan B.; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to evaluate the cosmic ray environment at Mars is of interest for future manned exploration. To support exploration, tools must be developed to accurately access the radiation environment in both free space and on planetary surfaces. The primary tool NASA uses to quantify radiation exposure behind shielding materials is the space radiation transport code, HZETRN. In order to build confidence in HZETRN, code benchmarking against Monte Carlo radiation transport codes is often used. This work compares the dose calculations at Mars by HZETRN and the Geant4 application Planetocosmics. The dose at ground and the energy deposited in the atmosphere by galactic cosmic ray protons and alpha particles has been calculated for the Curiosity landing conditions. In addition, this work has considered Solar Energetic Particle events, allowing for the comparison of varying input radiation environments. The results for protons and alpha particles show very good agreement between HZETRN and Planetocosmics.

  13. Bose-Einstein condensation of {alpha} particles and Airy structure in nuclear rainbow scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2004-10-01

    It is shown that the dilute density distribution of {alpha} particles in nuclei can be observed in the Airy structure in nuclear rainbow scattering. We have analyzed {alpha}+{sup 12}C rainbow scattering to the 0{sub 2}{sup +} (7.65 MeV) state of {sup 12}C in a coupled-channel method with the precise wave functions for {sup 12}C. It is found that the enhanced Airy oscillations in the experimental angular distributions for the 0{sub 2}{sup +} state is caused by the dilute density distribution of this state in agreement for the idea of Bose-Einstein condensation of the three alpha particles.

  14. Determination of the radial gradient in the region 0.81-1.0 AU using both high- and low-energy /more than 10-GeV and more than 52-MeV/ detectors for the 1-AU monitor. [solar quiet measurements of alpha particles and protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, W. R.; Bukata, R. P.; Rao, U. R.

    1974-01-01

    A determination of the radial gradient for alpha particles (31-46 MeV/nuc) and protons with energies above 7.5 MeV and 44-77 MeV in the region 1.0-0.81 AU is presented for the solar-quiet year 1966. The determinations are based on data from the Pioneer 6 space probe. Two different detectors are used: the Deep River neutron monitor and measurements of low energy protons made on the IMP-C satellite. The average energy response of the Deep River monitor is 16 GeV, whereas the IMP-C data is for protons with energies above 50 MeV. The resulting radial gradient is found to be nearly zero for the alpha particles and slightly negative for the protons. The same qualitative results were found using the IMP-C data and the Deep River neutron monitor to measure the temporal variation in the cosmic ray intensity. The present analysis indicates that detectors over a wide range of energies are suitable for measuring the radial gradient, providing sufficient statistical precision is obtained to evaluate short-term modulation and the azimuthal separation of the detectors is not great.

  15. Scattering of 42 MeV alpha particles from copper-65

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, W. M.; Seth, K. K.

    1973-01-01

    Beams of 42-MeV alpha particles were elastically and inelastically scattered from Cu-65 in an attempt to excite states which may be described in terms of an excited core model. Angular distributions were measured for 17 excited states. Seven of the excited states had angular distributions similar to a core quadrupole excitation and eight of the excited states had angular distributions similar to a core octupole excitation. The excited state at 2.858 MeV had an angular distribution which suggests that it may have results from the particle coupling to a two-phonon core state. An extended particle-core coupling calculation was performed and the predicted energy levels and reduced transition probabilities compared to the experimental data. The low lying levels are described quite well and the wavefunctions of these states explain the large spectroscopic factors measured in stripping reactions. For Cu-65 the coupling of the particle to the core is no larger weak as in the simpler model, and configuration mixing results.

  16. Reexamination of the {alpha}-{alpha}''fishbone'' potential

    SciTech Connect

    Day, J. P.; McEwen, J. E.; Elhanafy, M.; Smith, E.; Woodhouse, R.; Papp, Z.

    2011-09-15

    The fishbone potential of composite particles simulates the Pauli effect by nonlocal terms. We determine the {alpha}-{alpha} fishbone potential by simultaneously fitting to two-{alpha} resonance energies, experimental phase shifts, and three-{alpha} binding energies. We found that, essentially, a simple Gaussian can provide a good description of two-{alpha} and three-{alpha} experimental data without invoking three-body potentials.

  17. The optical, wettability and hardness properties of polyethylene improved by alpha particle irradiations.

    PubMed

    Zaki, M F

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the optical, chemical and morphological changes of alpha irradiated low-density polyethylene (LDPE) were investigated using UV/Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). In addition to, the wettability and Vicker's Micro-Hardness have been studied using the contact angle measurements and Vicker's Micro-Hardness tester. The polymer samples are irradiated with different times of alpha particles. UV/Vis spectra show that the absorbance increases with increase in the irradiation time and the absorption edge shifts toward the higher wavelength. This indicates to a decrease in the optical band gap energy and an increase in number of carbon clusters. FTIR analysis reveals that the formation of CH groups and O-H has been observed and also indicated the presence of unsaturations due to vinyl end groups in the irradiated samples. Noticeable decreases in the contact angle of irradiated samples were observed. This decrease reflects the increase in the wettability and consequently the surface free energy. This behavior is due to the formation of oxidized layer on the irradiated surface polymer. Induced increasing in the Vicker's hardness in the irradiated polymers was observed, that can be attributed to crosslinking effects in the chain of the polymers. PMID:26184467

  18. Optical Model Potential Parameters for p, d, {sup 3}He and Alpha-Particle Scattering on Lithium Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Burtebayev, N.; Nassurlla, Marzhan; Nassurlla, Maulen; Kerimkulov, Zh. K.; Sakuta, S. B.

    2008-11-11

    Analysis of the p, d, {sup 3}He and {alpha}-particles elastic scattering on the {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li nuclei has been done in the framework of the optical model at the beam energies up to 72 MeV. It was shown that the account of the cluster exchange mechanism together with the potential scattering allow reproducing the experimental cross-sections in the whole angular range.

  19. Intense alpha-particle emitting crystallites in uranium mill wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.; Stieff, L.R.; Germani, M.S.; Tanner, A.B.; Evans, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear emulsion microscopy has demonstrated the presence of small, intense ??-particle emitting crystallites in laboratory-produced tailings derived from the sulfuric acid milling of uranium ores. The ??-particle activity is associated with the isotope pair 210Pb 210Po, and the host mineral appears to be PbSO4 occurring as inclusions in gypsum laths. These particles represent potential inhalation hazards at uranium mill tailings disposal areas. ?? 1994.

  20. Solar flare protons and alpha particles during the last three solar cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, J. N.; Mcguire, R. E.; Reedy, R. C.; Lal, D.; Jha, R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents solar-flare-associated proton and alpha-particle fluxes determined for major events from October 1972 through March 1987 (the period that represents the last part of solar cycle 20 and the whole of solar cycle 21), using data obtained by detectors on board the IMP-7 and IMP-8 satellites, along with earlier obtained data for cycle 20. It was found that the average omnidirectional flux of protons with kinetic energy above 10 MeV for cycle 21 (64/sq cm per sec) is lower than the corresponding number for cycle 20 (92/sq cm per sec) and for the cycle 19 (378/sq cm per sec). No definitive correlation was found to exist between cycle-averaged solar flare proton fluxes and peak sunspot numbers.

  1. Studies of Light and Charge Produced by Alpha-Particles in High-Pressure Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey; Ramsey, Brian

    1999-01-01

    The results of measurements of scintillation light induced by alpha-particles in high-pressure Xe are presented. The ratio of N(sub ex)/N(sub i) and the intensity and time characteristics of the luminescence signal have been measured for different densities up to 0.74 g/cc. The role and mechanisms of the electron-ion recombination in high-pressure gas have been investigated. The existence of clusters and self-trapped excitons above 0.6 g/cc has been observed and discussed. This work is a part of a development program of high-pressure Xe detectors for low-energy gamma rays.

  2. An alpha particle measurement system using an energetic neutral helium beam in ITER (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, M.; Tanaka, N.; Terai, K.; Kaneko, O.; Kisaki, M.; Kobuchi, T.; Tsumori, K.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S.; Shinto, K.; Wada, M.

    2012-02-15

    An energetic helium neutral beam is involved in the beam neutralization measurement system of alpha particles confined in a DT fusion plasma. A full size strong-focusing He{sup +} ion source (2 A, the beam radius of 11.3 mm, the beam energy less than 20 keV). Present strong-focusing He{sup +} ion source shows an emittance diagram separated for each beamlet of multiple apertures without phase space mixing, despite the space charge of a beamlet is asymmetric and the beam flow is non-laminar. The emittance of beamlets in the peripheral region was larger than that of center. The heat load to the plasma electrode was studied to estimate the duty factor for the ITER application.

  3. Production of an Associated Particle Neutron Generator with ZnO:Ga Alpha-Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Koltick, David; Kane, S Z.; Mihalczo, John T; McConchie, Seth M; Mace, E. K.; Lvovsky, M.

    2008-01-01

    An associated particle neutron generator (APNG) capable of 109 neutrons per second has been operated with an alpha particle detector made of a ZnO:Ga phosphor with decay time of approximately 1 ns. Fast 14.1 MeV neutrons and 3.5 MeV alpha particles are produced through deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion reactions and travel in opposite directions to conserve momentum. The neutron generator provides high rate capability, excellent subnanosecond time resolution (< 0.7 ns), and a large solid angle with acceptance of 8%. The alpha detector was found to have a detection efficiency of 88% using a Burle 8850 bialkali photocathode. The DT beam spot diameter was measured down to 2.1 mm with the possibility of achieving 1 mm if desired. An opaque aperture was placed on the alpha detector and the neutron beam was obstructed using various amounts of lead shielding in an effort to study the generator s imaging contrast capability for neutron radiography. The alpha detector can be pixilated using a multianode photomultiplier tube to deliver imaging capability and to enhance the signal to noise ratio. Due to its ability to suppress background, the developed APNG is to be used to search cargo containers for illicit special nuclear materials, using as a trigger prompt fission gamma rays in coincidence with an alpha particle within a 10 ns gate.

  4. Simple experimental method for alpha particle range determination in lead iodide films.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Yuri; Bennett, Paul R; Cirignano, Leonard J; Klugerman, Mikhail; Shah, Kanai S

    2007-05-01

    An experimental method for determining the range of alpha particles in films based on I-V(s) analysis has been suggested. The range of 5.5 MeV alpha particles in PbI(2) films determined by this technique is 30+/-5 microm, and this value is in agreement with the value calculated by SRIM (the stopping and range of ions in matter), r=24 microm in PbI(2). More than 100 I-V(s) of PbI(2) films with different thicknesses and quality have been analyzed, and the influence of alpha particle radiation on PbI(2) I-V(s) curves has been studied. Developed analytical methods (dependence of current density on electric field and conception of surface defects) were used, and the method limitations are discussed. It was shown that I-V(s) demonstrate the tendency to obey Ohm's law under alpha radiation. On the other hand, dark conductivity of the lead iodide films shows a typical impure character that can lead to an overestimation of the alpha particles' range in PbI(2) films. After films were exposed to alpha radiation, the dark resistivity and I-V shape of some films improved. Also, a weak decrease of the charge carrier concentration, due to a decrease of the "surface defect" concentration ("surface refining"), was registered after successive measurements of I-V(s). PMID:17552841

  5. Simple experimental method for alpha particle range determination in lead iodide films

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, Yuri; Bennett, Paul R.; Cirignano, Leonard J.; Klugerman, Mikhail; Shah, Kanai S.

    2007-05-15

    An experimental method for determining the range of alpha particles in films based on I-V{sub s} analysis has been suggested. The range of 5.5 MeV alpha particles in PbI{sub 2} films determined by this technique is 30{+-}5 {mu}m, and this value is in agreement with the value calculated by SRIM (the stopping and range of ions in matter), r=24 {mu}m in PbI{sub 2}. More than 100 I-V{sub s} of PbI{sub 2} films with different thicknesses and quality have been analyzed, and the influence of alpha particle radiation on PbI{sub 2} I-V{sub s} curves has been studied. Developed analytical methods (dependence of current density on electric field and conception of surface defects) were used, and the method limitations are discussed. It was shown that I-V{sub s} demonstrate the tendency to obey Ohm's law under alpha radiation. On the other hand, dark conductivity of the lead iodide films shows a typical impure character that can lead to an overestimation of the alpha particles' range in PbI{sub 2} films. After films were exposed to alpha radiation, the dark resistivity and I-V shape of some films improved. Also, a weak decrease of the charge carrier concentration, due to a decrease of the ''surface defect'' concentration (''surface refining''), was registered after successive measurements of I-V{sub s}.

  6. The track interaction model for alpha particle induced thermoluminescence supralinearity: dependence of the supralinearity on the vector properties of the alpha particle radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Y. S.; Rosenkrantz, M.; Mahajna, S.; Yossian, D.

    1996-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) - fluence response characteristics for peaks 5, 7, 8 and 9 in LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100; Harshaw/Bicron) were measured for 5 MeV alpha particles, in both `non-parallel' and `near-parallel' geometries,and for 1 MeV alpha particles in `near-parallel' geometry. The onset of supralinearity in the non-parallel configuration is always at a significantly lower fluence (by approximately a factor of five) than in the nearly parallel configuration. This dependence of the onset of supralinearity on the vector properties of the alpha particle radiation field is interpreted as `proof positive' of the dominant importance of track interaction effects in the linear/supralinear behaviour of the glow peaks of TLD-100. A mathematical expression for the linear/supralinear behaviour for heavy charged particles in near-parallel geometry has been developed and fitted to the TL - fluence response curves. The model incorporates both possibilities of electron and hole diffusion in the glow curve heating stage as well as the contribution to the supralinearity of all the participating nearest-neighbour track interactions. The model is capable of yielding excellent fits to the experimental data; the inclusion of hole diffusion and retrapping is preferred to predict the very abrupt transition from linear to supralinear behaviour for the high-temperature peaks.

  7. Study of the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jianbing Zhang, Xianmei Yu, Limin Zhao, Xiang

    2014-02-12

    Part of the energy of the Lower Hybrid (LH) waves may be absorbed by the α particles via the so-called perpendicular landau damping mechanism, which depends on various parameters of fusion reactors and the LH waves. In this article, we calculate the absorption coefficient γ{sub α} of LH waves due to α particles. Results show that, the γ{sub α} increases with the parallel refraction index n{sub ∥} while deceases with increasing the frequency of LH waves ω{sub LH} over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption, and there is a peak value of γ{sub α} when n{sub e}≈8×10{sup 19}m{sup −3} for ITER-like scenario. The thermal corrections to the cold plasma dispersion relation will change the damping rate to a certain extent under some specific conditions. We have also evaluated the fraction of LH power absorbed by the alpha particles, η ≈ 0.47% and 4.1% for an LH frequency of 5 GHz and 3.7 GHz respectively for ITER-like scenario. This work gives the effective reference for the choice of parameters of future fusion reactors.

  8. Evaluation of ZnO(Ga)Coatings as Alpha Particle Transducers Within a Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J. T.; Neal, J. S.; Cooper, J. C.; Koltick, D. S.

    2002-05-02

    We report investigations and preliminary results from efforts to develop a recoil alpha particle detector for use in a portable neutron generator. The associated particle sealed tube neutron generator (APSTNG) will be used as an interrogation source for the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS). With the emission of 14.1 MeV neutrons produced by the D-T reaction, associated 3.5 MeV alpha particles are emitted. These neutrons and alphas may then be correlated in time and direction, thus effectively ''tagging'' the neutrons of interest for subsequent use as an active nuclear materials interrogation source. The alpha particle detector uses a ZnO(Ga) scintillator coating applied to a fiber optic face plate. Gallium-doped zinc oxide is a fast (1.5 ns decay time), inorganic scintillator with a high melting point (1975C) and an absolute light yield of 1.5% of NaI(Tl). The scintillator is coated with a thin layer of nickel in order to screen out light produced in the tube and scattered deuterons and tritons. This coating also serves to prevent the buildup of charge on the detector surface. Results to date indicate promise as an effective alpha particle detector for the APSTNG for future use in the NMIS.

  9. Effects of q(r) on the Alpha Particle Ripple Loss in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Darrow; M. Diesso; R.V. Budny; S. Batha; S.J. Zweben; et al.

    1997-09-01

    An experiment was done with TFTR DT plasmas to determine the effect of the q(r) profile on the alpha particle ripple loss to the outer midplane. The alpha particle loss measurements were made using a radially movable scintillator detector 20 degrees below the outer midplane. The experimental results were compared with TF ripple loss calculations done using a Monte Carlo guiding center orbit following code, ORBIT. Although some of the experimental results are consistent with the ORBIT code modeling, the variation of the alpha loss with the q(r) profiles is not well explained by this code. Quantitative interpretation of these measurements requires a careful analysis of the limiter shadowing effect, which strongly determines the diffusion of alphas into the detector aperture.

  10. Measurements of thoron progeny concentration using apotential alpha-energy monitor in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Yamasaki, T.; Iida, T.

    1995-06-01

    It is reported that thoron concentration in Japanese dwellings may be higher than in other dwellings. Therefore, in order to assess the risk for indoor thoron progeny, the portable potential alpha-energy monitor has been developed. The monitor detects alpha-particles from the {sup 212}Po collected on the filter using a piece of cellulose nitrate film. The detection efficiency of the alpha-particles has been estimated by Monte Carlo calculation. From the results of measurements, the mean indoor thoron progeny concentration in the dwellings was 1.5 Bq m{sup -3} (EC{sub Tn}), and ranged from 0.04 to 8.2 Bq m{sup -3}. The effects of three typical interior walls (soil-based plaster, concrete, and modern materials) on the thoron progeny supply were considered. The mean annual effective dose equivalent was 0.45 mSv. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Alpha particle heating in hot diamagnetic cavities. [in solar wind near earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvez, Miguel; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Gary, S. Peter; Thomsen, Michelle F.; Winske, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Observational data from ISEE 1 are analyzed and a one-dimensional electromagnetic hybrid computer simulation is conducted for the heating of solar wind alpha particles in hot diamagnetic cavities (HDCs). In the simulation, which envisions alpha heating by ion-ion instabilities, low beam densities excite the proton/proton right-hand resonant instability that then pitch-angle scatters the beam without significantly heating the alphas. At greater beam densities, the proton/proton nonresonant instability undergoes saturation through a trapping of all three ion components. These results support the Thomsen et al. (1988) hypothesis that the nonresonant instability is the primary source of ion heating in hot diamagnetic cavities.

  12. Alpha particle simulation of space radiation damage effects in semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Colerico, C.W.; Serreze, H.B.; Messenger, S.R.; Burke, E.A.; Xapsos, M.A.

    1995-12-01

    The authors describe a method that uses an {sup 241}Am alpha particle source to simulate effects of space radiation damage to semiconductor devices. By applying a unique combination of analytic and numerical techniques to data obtained from alpha irradiation experiments, device response to protons and other radiation types can be predicted. The techniques enable the interpretation of the alpha data by deriving the damage-depth profiles for both ionizing and nonionizing damage in InP devices. The results agree well when compared to the results from proton and electron irradiation of the same type of devices.

  13. Alfvenic behavior of alpha particle driven ion cyclotron emission in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Cauffman, S.; Majeski, R.; McClements, K.G.

    1995-07-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) has been observed during D-T discharges in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), using rf probes located near the top and bottom of the vacuum vessel. Harmonics of the alpha cyclotron frequency ({Omega}{sub {alpha}}) evaluated at the outer midplane plasma edge are observed at the onset of the beam injection phase of TFTR supershots, and persist for approximately 100-250 ms. These results are in contrast with observations of ICE in JET, in which harmonics of {Omega}{sub {alpha}} evolve with the alpha population in the plasma edge. Such differences are believed to be due to the fact that newly-born fusion alpha particles are super-Alfvenic near the edge of JET plasmas, while they are sub-Alfvenic near the edge of TFTR supershot plasmas. In TFTR discharges with edge densities such that newly-born alpha particles are super-Alfvenic, alpha cyclotron harmonics are observed to persist. These results are in qualitative agreement with numerical calculations of growth rates due to the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability.

  14. Rigidity-independent coronal propagation and escape of solar protons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perron, C.; Domingo, V.; Reinhard, R.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1978-01-01

    In a study of rigidity-independent coronal propagation processes, data on the azimuthal variation of the solar proton/alpha-particle ratio were obtained. Sources for the data included a statistical analysis of events observed by Heos-2, a comparative study of events recorded by both Heos-2 and Pioneer-10 and -11, and a multiday survey of individual events observed by Heos-2 and Pioneer-10. The statistical investigation of Heos-2 events reveals an increase of the lower value of the proton/alpha-particle ratio away from the well-connected region. The data from one or two spacecraft connected at different heliolongitudes indicates no azimuthal dependence of the proton/alpha-particle ratio. All the data appear to suggest rigidity-independent propagation or escape processes.

  15. A study of the effects of MeV alpha particles in PE and PVDC

    SciTech Connect

    Evelyn, A.L.; Ila, D.; Zimmerman, R.L.; Bhat, K.; Poker, D.B.; Hensley, D.K.

    1997-02-01

    We have mapped and studied the effects of MeV alpha-particle bombardment in polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC) and polyethylene (PE). We used 3.5 and 5.0 MeV alpha-particle incident beams and stacked polymer films to separate the contributing effects of the electronic ({var_epsilon}{sub e}) and nuclear ({var_epsilon}{sub n}) stopping powers. The electrical conductance and change in the chemical structures were measured by direct resistivity measurement, Raman microprobe, RBS and FTIR. The results indicate significant differences in the ({var_epsilon}{sub e}) and ({var_epsilon}{sub n}) effects at higher alpha-particle bombardment fluences. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Charged-particle mutagenesis 2. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 sq micrometer and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(exp -3) sq micrometer respectively. The maximum values were obtained by Fe-56 with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(exp -5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  17. Deceleration of Alpha Particles in the Solar Wind by Instabilities and the Rotational Force: Implications for Heating, Azimuthal Flow, and the Parker Spiral Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verscharen, Daniel; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Hollweg, Joseph V.

    2015-06-01

    Protons and alpha particles in the fast solar wind are only weakly collisional and exhibit a number of non-equilibrium features, including relative drifts between particle species. Two non-collisional mechanisms have been proposed for limiting differential flow between alpha particles and protons: plasma instabilities and the rotational force. Both mechanisms decelerate the alpha particles. In this paper, we derive an analytic expression for the rate {Q}{flow} at which energy is released by alpha-particle deceleration, accounting for azimuthal flow and conservation of total momentum. We show that instabilities control the deceleration of alpha particles at r\\lt {r}{crit}, and the rotational force controls the deceleration of alpha particles at r\\gt {r}{crit}, where {r}{crit}≃ 2.5 {AU} in the fast solar wind in the ecliptic plane. We find that {Q}{flow} is positive at r\\lt {r}{crit} and {Q}{flow}=0 at r≥slant {r}{crit}, consistent with the previous finding that the rotational force does not lead to a release of energy. We compare the value of {Q}{flow} at r\\lt {r}{crit} with empirical heating rates for protons and alpha particles, denoted {Q}p and {Q}α , deduced from in situ measurements of fast-wind streams from the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft. We find that {Q}{flow} exceeds {Q}α at r\\lt 1 {AU}, and that {Q}{flow}/{Q}p decreases with increasing distance from the Sun from a value of about one at r = 0.29-0.42 AU to about 1/4 at 1 AU. We conclude that the continuous energy input from alpha-particle deceleration at r\\lt {r}{crit} makes an important contribution to the heating of the fast solar wind. We also discuss the implications of the alpha-particle drift for the azimuthal flow velocities of the ions and for the Parker spiral magnetic field.

  18. Plasma heating from alpha particle micro-instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.; Sutton, W.R.; Choi, C.K.

    1981-01-01

    Potential use of thermonuclear (i.e., fusion product) driven kinetic instabilities to heat the background plasma has long been recognized. Considerable research on velocity space micro-instabilities exists. Most work to date has focused upon the basic physics criteria for and characteristics of particular micro-instabilities. Kinetic instabilities resulting in spatial transport of fusion products have also received some attention, but the effects on reactor concepts and performance remain uncertain. We have developed an engineering model which scopes the effect of a velocity space relaxation of fast alphas on a quasi-linear time scale. This model includes the additional heating to background plasma ions under the assumptions of: ion damping of the plasma wave; heating to background plasma results predominantly from fusion products; and periodic hiccups of the instability.

  19. A potential deduced from low energy {sup 16}O({alpha},{alpha}) elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, F.; Reidemeister, G.; Kondo, Y.

    1995-06-01

    The properties of the {alpha}+{sup 16}O interaction in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier are investigated by constructing (real, energy-independent) potentials which reproduce---when resonant nonpotential contributions are added to the potential background---all available {sup 16}O({alpha},{alpha}) elastic scattering angular distributions and excitation functions between 3.5 and 9 MeV incident energies. These low energy potentials, which are constructed for angular momenta ranging from 0 to 5, are in line with the global potential extracted from the analysis of the higher energy data (20{le}{ital E}{sub {alpha}}{le}150 MeV), but a slight angular momentum dependence, and an increase of the barrier height of about 1 MeV, are found necessary to reproduce the low energy data; this effect is qualitatively similar to that predicted by calculations taking into account antisymmetrization or dispersion relation effects. These potentials reproduce the properties of the first three members of the {sup 20}Ne {ital K}{sup {pi}}=0{sub 4}{sup +} ``higher nodal`` rotational band, which dominate the scattering in the investigated energy range, and of the {ital J}{sup {pi}}=5{sup {minus}} member of the {ital K}{sup {pi}}=0{sup {minus}} ``inversion doublet`` band. By taking into account the energy dependence of the interaction at lower energy, these potentials also give a nice account of the properties of the {ital J}{sup {pi}}=1{sup {minus}} and 3{sup {minus}} members of the same band, and are found to be compatible with the properties of the first three members of the {sup 20}Ne ground state band.

  20. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 micrometer2 and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(-3) micrometer2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(-5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  1. H{alpha} measurements and neutral particle transport in Heliotron J

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, S.; Yabutani, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Higashizono, Y.; Nagasaki, K.; Mizuuchi, T.; Okada, H.; Sano, F.; Cappa, A.; Kondo, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Suzuki, Y.

    2006-10-15

    A multichannel system of the H{alpha}-line emission detector is developed in order to investigate the neutral particle transport in the Heliotron J plasma. The application of a multianode photomultiplier tube to the filter measurement system enables us to observe the H{alpha} emission profile with 32 chords. The absolute calibration with a standard lamp is performed and the cross-talk between each of the adjoining channels is evaluated to be less than 6%, while the photomultiplier tube has a typical cross-talk of 3% in nominal value. The temporal and spatial profiles of the H{alpha} emission are measured in detail in the plasma breakdown by electron cyclotron heating (ECH). The H{alpha} emission profile in the ECH plasma is calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation using a three-dimensional mesh model. The fueling rates of the wall recycling and the gas puffing are estimated by means of the simulation and the measurement.

  2. Fossil alpha-particle recoil tracks: a new method of age determination.

    PubMed

    Huang, W H; Walker, R M

    1967-03-01

    The discovery of a new type of fossil nuclear track in mica is reported. This track is produced by the recoil nucleus accompanying the alpha-particle decay of uranium and thorium impurities. The tracks are very short and can be seen with phase contrast microscopy. Measurement of fossil alpha-recoil track densities, coupled with determinations of the thorium and uranium contents, provides a new dating technique analogous to the previously discovered "fission-track method." The primary advantage of the alpha-recoil method is a several-thousand-fold increase in sensitivity over the fission-track technique. The alpha-recoil method should also prove useful in studying the problem of extinct isotopes in meteorites. PMID:17812006

  3. Simulations of alpha particle ripple loss from the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Budny, R.V.; McCune, D.C.; Miller, C.O.; White, R.B.

    1996-05-01

    Calculations of collisional stochastic ripple loss of alpha particles from the new 20 toroidal field (TF) coil International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) predict small alpha ripple losses, less than 0.4%, close to the loss calculated for the full current operation of the earlier 24 TF coil design. An analytic fit is obtained to the ITER ripple data field demonstrating the nonlinear height dependence of the ripple minimum for D shaped ripple contours. In contrast to alpha loss simulations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), a simple Goldston, White, Boozer stochastic loss criterion ripple loss model is found to require an increased renormalization of the stochastic threshold {delta}{sub s}/{delta}{sub GWB} {ge} 1. Effects of collisions, sawtooth broadening and reversal of the grad B drift direction are included in the particle following simulations.

  4. Cancer incidence and lifespan vs. alpha-particle dose in beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, C.W.; Lloyd, R.D.; Taylor, G.N.; Wrenn, M.E.

    1987-05-01

    Young adult beagles were injected with graded activities of /sup 239/Pu, /sup 241/Am, /sup 228/Th, /sup 228/Ra or /sup 226/Ra and observed throughout their lifespans. The vast majority of the dose was from alpha particles. The lifetime incidence of bone sarcoma increased with average skeletal dose, more or less linearly up to high incidence for /sup 239/Pu, /sup 241/Am, /sup 228/Th and /sup 226/Ra, but sigmoid fashion for /sup 228/Ra. Based on average skeletal dose, the toxicity of the emitters relative to /sup 226/Ra = 1.0 was /sup 239/Pu = 16.6 +/- 4.5, /sup 241/Am = 5.4 +/- 1.6, /sup 228/Th = 8.5 +/- 2.3 and /sup 228/Ra = 2.0 +/- 0.5. At the lowest doses, the average lifespans were 97% +/- 3% of that in the controls. If beneficial effects occurred, they may have been overwhelmed by the destructiveness of the densely ionizing alpha particles. A cell nucleus 5 micron in diameter receives a mean dose of about 1 Gy (100 rad) when traversed by a single alpha particle. We found no evidence that alpha-particle doses suppressed cancer or lengthened lifespan in beagles.

  5. Nucleon-Alpha Particle Disequilibrium and Short-Lived r-Process Radioactivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, B. S.; Clayton, D. D.; Chellapilla, S.; The, L.-S.

    2002-01-01

    r-Process yields can be extremely sensitive to expansion parameters when a persistent disequilibrium between free nucleons and alpha particles is present. This may provide a natural scenario for understanding the variation of heavy and light r-process isotopes in different r-process events. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. AlfvWaves, Alpha Particles, and Pickup Ions in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. E.; Neugebauer, M.; Smith, E. J.

    1996-01-01

    The alpha particles at high latitudes are traveling significantly faster than the effective wave speed, unlike the in-ecliptic situation and the discrepancy between effective wave speed and the Alfvspeed calculated with all known corrections is also larger than in the ecliptic.

  7. Nucleon-Alpha Particle Disequilibrium and Short-Lived r-Process Radioactivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, B. S.; Clayton, D. D.; Chellapilla, S.; The, L.-S.

    2002-03-01

    r-Process yields can be extremely sensitive to expansion parameters when a persistent disequilibrium between free nucleons and alpha particles is present. This may provide a natural scenario for understanding the variation of heavy and light r-process isotopes in different r-process events.

  8. Effect of non-adiabaticity of alpha particles in the axisymmetric cusp TMR

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.A.; Barr, W.L.

    1981-07-20

    One of the end plug configurations we have investigated for use in a tandem mirror reactor is the axisymmetric cusp. We show that because of non-adiabaticity, the containment of 3.5 MeV alpha particles in this configuration is insufficient for the attainment of acceptable plasma performance.

  9. A Strange Box and a Stubborn Brit: Rutherford's Experiments with Alpha Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digilov, M.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses 5 innovative experiments conducted by Rutherford in early 1900s utilizing the 30 milligrams of radium salt he personally carried from Europe to Canada in 1903. Traces his work with alpha particles from his original results which determined their nature, charge, and mass, to his technique of backscattering which helped to advance

  10. A Strange Box and a Stubborn Brit: Rutherford's Experiments with Alpha Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digilov, M.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses 5 innovative experiments conducted by Rutherford in early 1900s utilizing the 30 milligrams of radium salt he personally carried from Europe to Canada in 1903. Traces his work with alpha particles from his original results which determined their nature, charge, and mass, to his technique of backscattering which helped to advance…

  11. Can Bose condensation of alpha particles be observed in heavy ion collisions?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    Using a fully self-consistent quantum statistical model, we demonstrate the possibility of Bose condensation of alpha particles with a concomitant phase transition in heavy ion collisions. Suggestions for the experimental observation of the signature of the onset of this phenomenon are made.

  12. Production of actinium-225 for alpha particle mediated radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Boll, Rose A; Malkemus, Dairin; Mirzadeh, Saed

    2005-05-01

    The initial clinical trials for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia have demonstrated the effectiveness of the alpha emitter (213)Bi in killing cancer cells. Bismuth-213 is obtained from a radionuclide generator system from decay of 10-days (225)Ac parent. Recent pre-clinical studies have also shown the potential application of both (213)Bi, and the (225)Ac parent radionuclide in a variety of cancer systems and targeted radiotherapy. This paper describes our five years of experience in production of (225)Ac in partial support of the on-going clinical trials. A four-step chemical process, consisting of both anion and cation exchange chromatography, is utilized for routine separation of carrier-free (225)Ac from a mixture of (228)Th, (229)Th and (232)Th. The separation of Ra and Ac from Th is achieved using the marcoporous anion exchange resin MP1 in 8M HNO(3) media. Two sequential MP1/NO(3) columns provide a separation factor of approximately 10(6) for Ra and Ac from Th. The separation of Ac from Ra is accomplished on a low cross-linking cation exchange resin AG50-X4 using 1.2M HNO(3) as eluant. Two sequential AG50/NO(3) columns provide a separation factor of approximately 10(2) for Ac from Ra. A 60-day processing schedule has been adopted in order to reduce the processing cost and to provide the highest levels of (225)Ac possible. Over an 8-week campaign, a total of approximately 100 mCi of (225)Ac (approximately 80% of the theoretical yield) is shipped in 5-6 batches, with the first batch typically consisting of approximately 50 mCi. After the initial separation and purification of Ac, the Ra pool is re-processed on a bi-weekly schedule or as needed to provide smaller batches of (225)Ac. The averaged radioisotopic purity of the (225)Ac was 99.6 +/- 0.7% with a (225)Ra content of < or =0.6%, and an average (229)Th content of (4(-4)(+5)) x 10(-5)%. PMID:15763472

  13. The alpha channeling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  14. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status.

    PubMed

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena; Lindegren, Sture; Jensen, Holger; Bäck, Tom; Swanpalmer, John; Elmroth, Kecke

    2014-07-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to (211)At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1Gy (211)At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative effectiveness of alpha particles. PMID:24769180

  15. Lung cancer risk from exposure to alpha particles and inhalation of other pollutants in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of these experiments is to establish a quantitative correlation between early DNA damage and cancer incidence in a way that would be helpful for assessing the carcinogenic risk of radon alone or in combination with specific indoor pollutants. Rat tracheal epithelium has been exposed in vivo to {sup 210}Po alpha particles in the presence and absence of NO{sub 2} or cigarette smoke. The major accomplishments so far are: the design and implementation of a tracheal implant to simulate radon alpha particle exposure, the measurement of DNA breaks in a small 7.0 mm segment of the trachea exposed to external x-irradiation, the measurement of the rate of repair of the x-ray induced tracheal DNA strand breaks, the measurement of DNA strand breaks following inhalation of cigarette smoke or NO{sub 2}, the measurement of tracheal DNA stand breaks following exposure to high doses {sup 210}Po alpha particle radiation, the assessment of the amount of mucous in the goblet cells and in the underlying mucous glands. So far we have been unable to detect DNA strand breaks in the tracheal epithelium as a result of exposure to NO{sub 2} cigarette smoke or {sup 210}Po alpha particles. We have developed a simple artificial' trachea consisting of rat tracheal epithelial cells growing on a basement membrane coated millipore filter. Experiments are proposed to utilize these artificial tracheas to eliminate the potential interference of increased mucous secretion and/or inflammation that can significantly affect the radiation dose from the alpha particles. 61 refs., 17 figs.

  16. Azimuthal 2{alpha} correlations and projectile-residue distributions selected by neutron and charged-particle multiplicity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kunde, G.J.; Gaff, S.; Gelbke, C.K.; Glasmacher, T.; Huang, M.J.; Lemmon, R.; Lynch, W.G.; Manduci, L.; Martin, L.; Popescu, R.; Tsang, M.B.; Dempsey, J.; Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G.; Agnihotri, D.K.; Djerroud, B.; Schroeder, W.U.; Skulski, W.; Toke, J.; Wyrozebski, K.; Ruess, D.

    1997-03-01

    The resolution of reaction filters for intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions based upon charged-particle and neutron multiplicity measurements with 4{pi} coverage is compared for {sup 112}Sn+{sup 112}Sn and {sup 124}Sn+{sup 124}Sn collisions at E/A=40 MeV. The quality of event characterization is inferred from the azimuthal correlations of {alpha} particles emitted at intermediate rapidity and from the {ital Z} distributions of projectilelike fragments emitted at forward angles. For central and midimpact parameter collisions, the associated charged-particle multiplicity appears to provide better impact-parameter selection than the associated neutron multiplicity. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Analysis of {sup 90}Sr and alpha-particle emitters on air filters and swipe samples using a liquid scintillation counter with alpha/beta discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, E.L.; Cox, J.M.; Workman, W.J.

    1998-12-31

    The capabilities of a Quantulus{trademark} model 1220 Liquid Scintillation Counter (LSC) for rapidly analyzing alpha-particle emitters and {sup 90}Sr on air filters and swipe samples have been studied. Counting conditions were established and the instrument was calibrated using quench standards of {sup 90}Sr/Y and {sup 241}Am prepared on membrane filters. A LOTUS{trademark} template was developed to analyze the spectra. The data were used to develop a method for estimating the optimum pulse-shape analysis parameter based on linear fits to the quench parameter. Linear fits were also used to estimate window settings for {sup 90}Sr and {sup 90}Y, the Sr/Y ratio and the counting efficiencies. The linear fits have been incorporated into the template so that they are all done automatically when the quench parameter is entered. Analysis of the spectra from a sample can be done in a matter of minutes. Sample preparation simply involves transferring the filter to a scintillation vial and adding cocktail. Since the counting efficiencies of the LSC are high, counting times of an hour or less can be employed. The study showed that the method produces results that are sufficiently reliable for air filters and swipe samples. This methodology was used to analyze swipe samples from CANDU{reg_sign} nuclear stations. The results revealed complex beta-particle spectra with a number of components present. However, {sup 90}Y could be estimated from the high-energy component, which was less abundant than the low and intermediate energy components. The swipe samples contained much less alpha- than beta-particle activity.

  18. Energetic protons, alpha particles, and electrons in magnetic flux transfer events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1982-01-01

    Energetic proton, alpha particle, and electron data are presented for two magnetopause crossings, which show magnetic field signatures characteristic of flux transfer events (FTEs). Energetic proton and alpha particles are observed streaming along the magnetic field within the magnetosheath in all events showing magnetic signatures characteristic of the FTEs. Flux ratios as high as about 180 parallel and antiparallel to the magnetic field are observed, which means that ions of about 30 keV per charge are at times streaming almost scatter-free from the magnetopause into the magnetosheath. Energetic ion bursts with signatures equal to those observed in FTEs are reduced by more than an order of magnitude as compared to the trapped particle flux.

  19. Confined alpha particle diagnostic system using an energetic He{sup 0} beam for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, M.; Shinto, K.; Isobe, M.; Nishiura, M.; Kaneko, O.; Wada, M.; Walker, C. I.; Kitajima, S.; Okamoto, A.; Sugawara, H.; Takeuchi, S.; Tanaka, N.; Aoyama, H.; Kisaki, M.

    2006-10-15

    The beam neutralization system for measurement of the spatial and velocity distributions of alpha particles of ITER plasmas was studied. As forward angle detection against the beam injection direction is required for effective neutralization, arrangement of the measurement system using possible ports in ITER configuration is proposed. The count rate of neutralized alpha particles produced by the double charge exchange interaction with energetic He{sup 0} beam particles injected is estimated. The ratios of signal to neutron-induced noise are evaluated. When a He{sup 0} beam produced by autodetachment from a 1-1.5 MeV He{sup -} beam of 10 mA is injected, the signal to noise ratio becomes greater than 1 at {rho}<0.4, even without beam modulation. Usage of a lock-in technique at the frequency of radio-frequency quadrapole accelerator will make measurement at the outer region possible.

  20. Map model for nonlinear alpha particle interaction with toroidal Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Ye, H.

    1992-09-01

    A map model has been developed for studying the nonlinear interaction of alpha particles with the toroidal Alfven eigenmodes. The map is constructed by assuming a linear interaction during a single poloidal transit, which allows the study of the nonlinear interaction over many transits. By using this map, analytic expressions are obtained for the particle nonlinear bounce frequency, and the wave amplitude threshold for the onset of particle orbit stochasticity. The map model can also facilitate self-consistent simulations which incorporate the time variation of the waves.

  1. Studies of SSNTDs made from LR-115 in view of their applicability in radiobiological experiments with alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörschel, B.; Hermsdorf, D.; Pieck, S.; Starke, S.; Thiele, H.; Weickert, F.

    2003-06-01

    Radiobiological studies on cell monolayers irradiated by charged particles need to determine the number and position of particle traversals. Solid state nuclear track detectors used as basic substrate for the cell layers are in principle suitable for this purpose. The detector foils must be as thin as possible but still guaranteeing mechanical stability. Two types of LR-115, red coloured and colourless, were tested in the present work. The studies aimed at optimisation of the etching conditions and determination of the registration efficiency for alpha particles in a wide range of energies and angles of incidence. Specific requirements have to be fulfilled for application of the detector foils under the environmental conditions of radiobiological experiments. Most important are biocompatibility between detector and cells and registration properties insensible against special treatments, as UV sterilisation and cell plating prior to irradiation as well as cell incubation after the irradiation. The experimental studies performed with alpha particles showed that environmental conditions of radiobiological experiments do not change the registration properties of LR-115 detectors significantly.

  2. Fire hose instability driven by alpha particles in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, Lorenzo; Hellinger, Petr; Schwartz, Steven J.; Landi, Simone

    2015-04-01

    We discuss the dynamics of fire hose parallel instability driven by anisotropic alpha particles in a plasma with typical solar wind composition (nα = 5%ne). We show, for the first time, the liner and nonlinear dynamics of the instability by means of hybrid numeric simulations, highlighting its dependence on the main plasma parameters, including the relative drift between the alphas and the main proton population. Our results confirm that the parallel fire hose instability can be efficiently excited by anisotropic distribution of the less abundant alpha particles, even when the rest of the plasma (electrons and protons) is Maxwellian. Moreover, our finding suggest that the dynamics driven by the alphas can also influence the properties of the protons. In particular the instability is found to significantly affect the evolution of the alpha-proton drift, constraining its final intensity to values smaller than the local Alfvén speed, as observed in the solar wind far from the Sun. When simulations with both species initially anisotropic are performed, we find a coexistence of the fire hose wave activity excited by both ions, leading to final stable configurations which reflect the marginal stability state of each species. As a consequence, when observed in the commonly used (β||,T⊥/T||) plane, alpha particles and protons are seen to saturate in different regions of the parameter space. This property is in very good agreement with recent solar wind in situ observations and strongly suggests that those instabilities play a role in regulating the anisotropy solar wind ions.

  3. Electronic Properties of DNA-Based Schottky Barrier Diodes in Response to Alpha Particles

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ta’ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Amin, Yusoff Mohd

    2015-01-01

    Detection of nuclear radiation such as alpha particles has become an important field of research in recent history due to nuclear threats and accidents. In this context; deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) acting as an organic semiconducting material could be utilized in a metal/semiconductor Schottky junction for detecting alpha particles. In this work we demonstrate for the first time the effect of alpha irradiation on an Al/DNA/p-Si/Al Schottky diode by investigating its current-voltage characteristics. The diodes were exposed for different periods (0–20 min) of irradiation. Various diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height, series resistance, Richardson constant and saturation current were then determined using conventional, Cheung and Cheung’s and Norde methods. Generally, ideality factor or n values were observed to be greater than unity, which indicates the influence of some other current transport mechanism besides thermionic processes. Results indicated ideality factor variation between 9.97 and 9.57 for irradiation times between the ranges 0 to 20 min. Increase in the series resistance with increase in irradiation time was also observed when calculated using conventional and Cheung and Cheung’s methods. These responses demonstrate that changes in the electrical characteristics of the metal-semiconductor-metal diode could be further utilized as sensing elements to detect alpha particles. PMID:26007733

  4. Alpha-particle emissivity screening of materials used for semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael; Rodbell, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    Single-Event Upsets (SEU's) in semiconductor memory and logic devices continue to be a reliability issue in modern CMOS devices. SEU's result from deposited charge in the Si devices caused by the passage of ionizing radiation. With technology scaling, the device area decreases, but the critical charge required to flip bits decreases as well. The interplay between both determines how the SEU rate scales with shrinking device geometries and dimensions. In order to minimize the alpha-particle component of SEU, the radiation in the device environment has to be at the Ultra-Low Alpha (ULA) activity levels, e.g. less than 2 α/khr-cm2. Most detectors have background levels that are significantly larger than that level which makes making these measurements difficult and time consuming. A new class of alpha particle detector, utilizing pulse shape discrimination, is now available which allows one to make measurements quickly with ultra-low detector background. This talk will discuss what is involved in making alpha particle measurements of materials in the ULA activity levels, in terms of calibration, radon adsorption mitigation, the time required for obtaining reasonable statistics and comparisons to other detectors.

  5. Lost alpha-particle diagnostics from a D-T plasma by using nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, Mamiko; Wada, Motoi; Isobe, Mitsutaka

    2014-08-21

    Among various methods proposed for alpha-particles loss measurement, we studied on those by measuring gamma rays of three cases, from (1) nuclear reactions induced by alpha particles, (2) those from short-life-time activities and (3) those from long-life-time activities induced by alpha particles. The time evolution of local alpha flux may possibly be measured by using the {sup 9}Be (a, n) {sup 12}C reaction (1). Using the same system, but with a target set up close to the first wall, activation measurement on site right after turning-off the discharge is possible (2). Nuclear reaction, {sup 25}Mg (a, p) {sup 28}Al, that produce radioisotopes of short lifetime of 2.2 minutes in one of the best candidates. As to the activation to a long lifetime (3), it is predicted that the gamma ray yield from {sup 19}F (a, n) {sup 22}Na reaction is enough for the measurement at the reactor site.

  6. Alpha particle induced gamma yields in uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Stephen; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Miller, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine has a relatively large (α,n) production cross-section in the MeV range, the energy range of interest for special nuclear materials. In the uranium fuel cycle enriched UF6 in particular is a reasonably prolific source of (α,n) neutrons because along with 235U, 234U becomes enriched and it has a relatively short half-life. This enables the mass content of storage cylinders containing UF6 to be verified by neutron counting methods. In association with such measurements high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (HRGS) measurements using a high-purity Ge detector are often undertaken to determine the 235U enrichment based off the intensity of the direct 186 keV line. The specific (α,n) neutron production, neutrons per second per gram of U, is sensitive to the relative isotopic composition, particularly the 234U concentration, and the traditional gross neutron counting approach is needed to quantitatively interpret the data. In addition to F(α,n) neutrons, α-induced reaction γ-rays are generated, notably at 110, 197, 582, 891, 1236 and 1275 keV. If one could observe 19F(α,xγ) gamma-lines in the HRGS spectra the thought was that perhaps the α-activity could be estimated directly, and in turn the 234U abundance obtained. For example, by utilizing the ratio of the detected 197-186 keV full energy peaks. However, until now there has been no readily available estimate of the expected strength of the reaction gamma-rays nor any serious consideration as to whether they might be diagnostic or not. In this work we compute the thick target yields of the chief reaction gamma-rays in UF6 using published thin target data. Comparisons are made to the neutron production rates to obtain γ/n estimates, and also to the 235U decay line at 186 keV which we take as a fiducial line. It is shown that the reaction gamma-rays are produced but are far too weak for practical safeguards purposes. Now that the underlying numerical data is readily available however, it can be used to support neutron and gamma production calculations in other fluorine compounds, for example impure plutonium reference materials where fluorine may be present only at the parts per million by weight level yet still present a serious nuisance addition to the neutron production rate.

  7. Antisense oligonucleotide targeting TNF-alpha can suppress Co-Cr-Mo particle-induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lei; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Yi-An; Wang, Chunming; Diao, Huajia; Zhang, Chenyu; Zhao, Jianning; Zhang, Junfeng

    2008-08-01

    The most common cause of implant failure in joint replacement is aseptic loosening due to particle-induced osteolysis. TNF-alpha has been shown to be one of the key factors in the process of osteoclastogenesis. Anti-TNF agents are useful in the treatment of joint inflammation related to osteolysis. This study investigated the effect of a single subcutaneous dose of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) on particle-induced osteolysis. We utilized the murine calvaria osteolysis model in C57BL/J6 mice. Bone resorption was measured by the toluidine blue staining. Osteoclasts were detected by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining assay and were quantified by a TRAP quantification kit. Results show that bone resorption is 0.347 +/- 0.09 mm(2) in mice with particle implantation, and decreased to 0.123 +/- 0.05 mm(2) and 0.052 +/- 0.02 mm(2) after ASO treatment with low and high doses, respectively. The number of osteoclasts in animal calvaria treated with ASO is reduced compared with that of untreated animals, and the quantification results indicate that about 90% of osteoclastogenesis is suppressed by the ASO. In addition, the osteoclastogenesis can be reestablished by the addition of TNF-alpha. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the antisense oligonucleotide targeting to TNF-alpha can suppress osteolysis induced by metal particles in a murine calvaria model. This new finding may be of value in the search for novel therapeutic methods for implant loosening. PMID:18327794

  8. The calibration of photographic and spectroscopic films: The response of 2aO film to small dosages of alpha particles from 3/10th's rad to 8 rads at energy levels 153 MeV, 79 MeV and 47 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, E. C., Jr.; Peters, Kevin; Stober, AL

    1984-01-01

    The 2aO film, pre-exposed to a series of neutral density filters which on development under standard conditions will produce the standard H-D curve for that film, were then exposed to Alpha paricles with a dose range of 3/10ths rads to 8 rads while varying the energy of the particles using 153 MeV, 70 MeV, and 47 MeV, respectively. An analysis of the film shows that the 3/10th rad dose produces the lowest optical density changes at 70 MeV and 47 MeV. While the optical density readings for the darker patterns seem to oscillate and decrease when exposed to radiation dosages of 3/10th rads to 8 rads.

  9. Calculation of effective atomic number and electron density of essential biomolecules for electron, proton, alpha particle and multi-energetic photon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Onaran, Tayfur

    2015-07-01

    Effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and electron densities (Ne) of some essential biomolecules have been calculated for total electron interaction, total proton interaction and total alpha particle interaction using an interpolation method in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV. Also, the spectrum weighted Zeff for multi-energetic photons has been calculated using Auto-Zeff program. Biomolecules consist of fatty acids, amino acids, carbohydrates and basic nucleotides of DNA and RNA. Variations of Zeff and Ne with kinetic energy of ionizing charged particles and effective photon energies of heterogeneous sources have been studied for the given materials. Significant variations in Zeff and Ne have been observed through the entire energy region for electron, proton and alpha particle interactions. Non-uniform variation has been observed for protons and alpha particles in low and intermediate energy regions, respectively. The maximum values of Zeff have found to be in higher energies for total electron interaction whereas maximum values have found to be in relatively low energies for total proton and total alpha particle interactions. When it comes to the multi-energetic photon sources, it has to be noted that the highest Zeff values were found at low energy region where photoelectric absorption is the pre-dominant interaction process. The lowest values of Zeff have been shown in biomolecules such as stearic acid, leucine, mannitol and thymine, which have highest H content in their groups. Variation in Ne seems to be more or less the same with the variation in Zeff for the given materials as expected.

  10. Metamaterial particles for electromagnetic energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramahi, Omar M.; Almoneef, Thamer S.; AlShareef, Mohammed; Boybay, Muhammed S.

    2012-10-01

    Metamaterials are typically made of an ensemble of electrically small resonators such as metallic loops. The fact that such particles resonate individually to generate a bulk material behavior having enhanced constitutive parameters is essentially indicative of these particles' ability to collect energy. We show that such particles act as energy collectors when a resistive load is inserted within the particle's gap. A proof of concept is provided using a 5.8 GHz field and a split-ring resonator (SRR) as the electromagnetic energy collecting cell. Numerical simulation for a 9 × 9 SRR array shows the effectiveness of an SRR array as an energy collector plate.

  11. Alpha channeling in a rotating plasma.

    PubMed

    Fetterman, Abraham J; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2008-11-14

    The wave-particle alpha-channeling effect is generalized to include rotating plasma. Specifically, radio frequency waves can resonate with alpha particles in a mirror machine with ExB rotation to diffuse the alpha particles along constrained paths in phase space. Of major interest is that the alpha-particle energy, in addition to amplifying the rf waves, can directly enhance the rotation energy which in turn provides additional plasma confinement in centrifugal fusion reactors. An ancillary benefit is the rapid removal of alpha particles, which increases the fusion reactivity. PMID:19113347

  12. The WASTED Resolutions: exploration of the spatial and energy limits of the Webcam Alpha Spectrometer TEchnology Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryman, Joseph; Pallone, Arthur

    2012-02-01

    Scientists and engineers build simple, low-cost, webcam-based instruments for use in many disciplines. Analysis of the optical signal received through the three broadband color filters -- red, green and blue -- form the basis of many of those instruments. The CMOS sensors in webcam pixels also produce signals in response to ionizing radiations -- such as alpha particles from a radioactive source. Simple alpha radiography has been demonstrated with an alpha source and a webcam modified to expose the sensors. The performance of the Webcam Alpha Spectrometer TEchnology Demonstrator (WASTED) built from such a modified webcam and a commercially available alpha source mounted to an optics rail is analyzed in terms of the energy upper-half-width-half-maximum and of the spatial modulation transfer function.

  13. Measurement of potential alpha energy exposure and potential alpha energy concentration and estimating radiation dose of radon in Sari city in the north region of Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Seyed Ali; Nikpour, Behzad

    2014-12-01

    In dwellings in Sari city in the northern region of Iran, the potential alpha energy exposure (PAEE) and potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) have been measured and the radiation dose due to radon and its progenies has been estimated. In this study, the dosemeters DOSEman and SARAD GmbH (Germany), which are sensitive to alpha particles, were used. The population of the city of Sari is 495,369 people and the density of population is 116.5 people per km(2). A percentage of the total household population of Sari in areas of geographically different samples was selected. The PAEE, PAEC and radon concentration in four different seasons in a year in homes for sampling were measured. The mean PAEE due to indoor radon in homes of four cities in Sari city was estimated to be 28.23 Bq m(-3) and the mean PAEC was estimated to be 27.11 Bq m(-3). Also the mean indoor radon level was found to be 29.95 Bq m(-3). The annual dose equivalent is ∼0.0151 μSv y(-1). Measurement results show that the average PAEE, PAEC and radon concentration are higher in winter than in other seasons. This difference could be due to stillness and lack of air movement indoors in winter. PMID:24292487

  14. Survival and yields of chromosome aberrations in hamster and human lung cells irradiated by alpha particles

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.A.; Cohn, P.; Min, T.

    1996-02-01

    The effects of {alpha}-particle irradiation on hamster and human lung cells have been studied. In both cases two end points were taken, cell death and the induction of chromosome aberrations. The hamster cells were common stock V79 cells; the human ones were freshly derived from fetal material. For both types of cells, the survival curves could be described by straight lines in the conventional exponential plot, with values of D{sub 0} of 0.78 and 0.37 Gy for the hamster and human cells, respectively. The rate of induction of chromosome aberrations could also be described by straight lines with slopes of 0.30 and 0.62 aberration per cell per gray. Thus, for this second end point also, it appears that human cells are twice as sensitive to the effects of {alpha}-particle irradiation as hamster cells. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Status of the JET Faraday cup lost alpha particle diagnostic KA-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, F. E.; Kiptily, V.; Darrow, D. S.; Murari, A.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2012-09-01

    We review the operational status and present a few recent results from the JET lost alpha particle diagnostic KA2. We summarize the results of our study of the correlation between KA2 signals and JET magnetic fields and the correlation between KA2 signals and the scintillator-based lost alpha probe KA3. In addition we quantify the relative insensitivity of the diagnostic to intense neutron and gamma ray background radiation fields and our observations of the electro-mechanical noise in the diagnostics signals. We present recent observations carried out during the 2011 JET campaign following the installation of the beryllium ITER-like wall. These observations include lost energetic deuterons during both ion-cyclotron and neutral beam heated plasmas; in particular we have measured relatively intense fluxes of energetic particles during sawtooth plasmas.

  16. Candidate Reactions for Mercury Detection Induced by Neutron and Alpha Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, James J.; Wittman, Richard S.; Schenter, Robert E.; Cooper, John A.

    2007-03-21

    This paper summarizes modeling of mercury to activated states with alpha particles, neutrons, or deuterons, and the spectral emission from the activated products. Activation can occur with a source such as 242Cf , 241Am-Be, a neutron generator, or a particle accelerator, and the activation products measured if sufficient signal is provided. Identification and measurement of mercury by prompt gamma emission, generated by bombardment with neutrons is reported. Activation product reactions of (α, xn) (d, xn) (n,γ) and (n,p) are screened as candidate reactions. Initial calculations indicate the potential use of either alpha, or 14 MeV neutron activation to assess part per billion concentrations of mercury in the gaseous phase. Ultimately, data from sample analysis of ambient conditions flue gas will be used to assess mercury detection sensitivity and specificity under typical operating conditions.

  17. Alpha Channeling in Rotating Plasma with Stationary Waves

    SciTech Connect

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    An extension of the alpha channeling effect to supersonically rotating mirrors shows that the rotation itself can be driven using alpha particle energy. Alpha channeling uses radiofrequency waves to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. We show that stationary magnetic fields with high nθ can be used for this purpose, and simulations show that a large fraction of the alpha energy can be converted to rotation energy.

  18. Fusion alpha-particle losses in a high-beta rippled tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Bunno, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Shinohara, K.; Matsunaga, G.; Tani, K.

    2013-08-15

    In tokamak plasmas, the confinement of energetic ions depends on the magnetic field structure. If the plasma pressure is finite, the equilibrium current (i.e., the Pfirsch-Schlüter current and diamagnetic current) flows in the plasma to maintain the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium. These plasma currents generate poloidal and toroidal magnetic field and alter the field structure. Moreover, if we consider the non-axisymmetry of magnetic field structures such as toroidal field (TF) ripples, the non-axisymmetric component of the equilibrium current can alter TF ripples themselves. When the plasma beta becomes high, the changes in the field structure due to the equilibrium current might affect the confinement of energetic ions significantly. We intend to clarify how these currents alter the field structure and affect the confinement of alpha particles in high-beta plasma. The MHD equilibrium is calculated using VMEC and the orbits of fusion alpha particles are followed by using the fully three-dimensional magnetic field orbit-following Monte Carlo code. In relatively low-beta plasma (e.g., the volume-averaged beta value <β>≤2%), the changes in the magnetic field component due to the plasma current negligibly affect the confinement of alpha particles except for the Shafranov shift effect. However, for <β>≥3%, the diamagnetic effect reduces the magnetic field strength and significantly increases alpha-particle losses. In these high-beta cases, the non-axisymmetric field component generated by the equilibrium current also increases these losses, but not as effectively as compared to the diamagnetic effect.

  19. Nanodosimetry and nanodosimetric-based models of radiation action for radon alpha particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zaider, M.

    1992-01-01

    We report on a theory for describing the biological effects of ionizing radiation in particular radon [alpha] particles. Behind this approach is the recognition that biological effects such as chromosome aberrations, cellular transformation, cellular inactivation, etc, are the result of a hierarchic sequence of radiation effects. We indicate how to treat each of the individual processes in this sequence, and also how to relate one effect to the hierarchically superior one.

  20. Bismuth-212-labeled anti-Tac monoclonal antibody: alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides as modalities for radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, R.W.; Atcher, R.W.; Gansow, O.A.; Friedman, A.M.; Hines, J.J.; Waldmann, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Anti-Tac, a monoclonal antibody directed to the human interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor, has been successfully conjugated to the alpha-particle-emitting radionuclide bismuth-212 by use of a bifunctional ligand, the isobutylcarboxycarbonic anhydride of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. The physical properties of 212Bi are appropriate for radioimmunotherapy in that it has a short half-life, deposits its high energy over a short distance, and can be obtained in large quantities from a radium generator. Antibody specific activities of 1-40 microCi/microgram (1 Ci = 37 GBq) were achieved. Specificity of the 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac was demonstrated for the IL-2 receptor-positive adult T-cell leukemia line HUT-102B2 by protein synthesis inhibition and clonogenic assays. Activity levels of 0.5 microCi or the equivalent of 12 rad/ml of alpha radiation targeted by anti-Tac eliminated greater than 98% the proliferative capabilities of HUT-102B2 cells with more modest effects on IL-2 receptor-negative cell lines. Specific cytotoxicity was blocked by excess unlabeled anti-Tac but not by human IgG. In addition, an irrelevant control monoclonal antibody of the same isotype labeled with 212Bi was unable to target alpha radiation to cell lines. Therefore, 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac is a potentially effective and specific immunocytotoxic reagent for the elimination of IL-2 receptor-positive cells. These experiments thus provide the scientific basis for use of alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in immunotherapy.

  1. Critical temperature for {alpha}-particle condensation within a momentum-projected mean-field approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sogo, T.; Roepke, G.; Lazauskas, R.

    2009-05-15

    {alpha}-particle (quartet) condensation in homogeneous spin-isospin symmetric nuclear matter is investigated. The usual Thouless criterion for the critical temperature is extended to the quartet case. The in-medium four-body problem is strongly simplified by the use of a momentum-projected mean-field ansatz for the quartet. The self-consistent single-particle wave functions are shown and discussed for various values of the density at the critical temperature. Excellent agreement of the critical temperature with a numerical solution of the Faddeev-Yakubovsky equation is obtained.

  2. Subunit exchange of lens alpha-crystallin: a fluorescence energy transfer study with the fluorescent labeled alphaA-crystallin mutant W9F as a probe.

    PubMed

    Sun, T X; Akhtar, N J; Liang, J J

    1998-07-01

    A Trp-free alphaA-crystallin mutant (W9F) was prepared by site-directed mutation. This mutant appears to be identical to the wild-type in terms of conformation (secondary and tertiary structures). W9F was labeled with a sulfhydryl-specific fluorescent probe, 2-(4'-maleimidylanilino) naphthalene-6-sulfonate (MIANS), and used in a subunit exchange between alphaA- and alphaA-crystallins as well as between alphaA- and alphaB-crystallins, studied by measurement of fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Energy transfer was observed between Trp (donor, with emission maximum at 336 nm) of wild-type alphaA- or alphaB-crystallin and MIANS (acceptor, with absorption maximum at 313 nm) of labeled W9F when subunit exchange occurred. Time-dependent decrease of Trp and increase of MIANS fluorescence were recorded. The exchange was faster at 37 degrees C than at 25 degrees C. The energy transfer efficiency was greater between homogeneous subunits (alphaA-alphaA) than between heterogeneous subunits (alphaA-alphaB). A previous exchange study with isoelectric focusing indicated a complete but slow exchange between alphaA and alphaB subunits. The present study showed that the exchange was a fast process, and the different energy transfer efficiencies between alphaA-alphaA and alphaA-alphaB indicated that alphaA- and alphaB-crystallins were not necessarily structurally equivalent. PMID:9688580

  3. Electrostatic ion-acoustic-like instabilities in the solar wind with a backstreaming alpha particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gomberoff, L.; Gomberoff, K.; Deutsch, A.

    2010-06-15

    Nonlinear electrostatic instabilities have been shown to occur frequently and under very different conditions in plasma with two ion beams such as the fast solar wind. These instabilities can be triggered when the phase velocity of electrostatic ion-acoustic waves propagating forward and backward relative to the interplanetary magnetic field overlaps due to the presence of a finite amplitude of circularly polarized wave. The instabilities can be triggered by waves supported by the same ion component, or by waves supported by different ion components. By assuming a beam of alpha particles moving backward relative to the external magnetic field, as observed in some events in the fast solar wind, it is shown that a very small negative drift velocity of the alpha particle beam relative to the core plasma--a few percent of the local Alfven velocity--can trigger a very rich variety of nonlinear electrostatic acousticlike instabilities. Their growth rates can be rather large and they persist for larger negative alpha particles drift velocities and temperatures.

  4. Novel Equipment for In Situ Alpha Spectrometry with Good Energy Resolution.

    PubMed

    Pöllänen, Roy; Turunen, Jani; Karhunen, Tero; Peräjärvi, Kari; Siiskonen, Teemu; Wirta, Markus; Turunen, Asko

    2015-12-01

    An approach for in situ alpha spectrometry that allows one to measure the spectra with good energy resolution at ambient air pressure has been developed recently. Here, novel equipment is introduced for in situ measurements. Neither vacuum pumps nor radiochemical sample processing are necessary. Flat and smooth surfaces are ideal sources provided that the radionuclide contamination represents a thin layer on the surface. Other sources, such as air filters or evaporation residues, are also possible. Alpha particle collimation is used to obtain good energy resolution, but the equipment can also be used without collimation. An estimation of the detection efficiency with and without collimation is given using an extended area source containing 241Am. PMID:26509627

  5. Use of 4.7 MeV alpha particles in elemental analysis and fusion reactor materials studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, B.; Dima, S.; Florescu, V.; Ivanov, E. A.; Ploştinaru, D.; Sârbu, C.

    1986-07-01

    The possibilities for using 4.7 MeV alpha particles produced at the U-120 CIP Cyclotron for charged particle induced X- and gamma-ray emission applications (PIXE and PIGE, respectively) and for fast neutron radiation damage simulation are presented. The combined analysis using PIGE and PIXE methods either separately or simultaneously is an excellent means of determining the relative abundances of lighter elements with gamma-ray spectra and of heavier elements ( Z ⩾ 16) with X-ray spectra. Some aspects of surface deformation effects by neutrons were simulated by means of medium-energy helium ions. An investigation of three types of commercial stainless steel (Romanian W 4016, Soviet 12KH18N10T and Japanese W 4541) was started using 3.0 [1], 4.7 and 6.8 MeV helium ions. The main post-irradiation effects observed are discussed.

  6. Response of Ni/4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes to alpha-particle irradiation at different fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotoso, E.; Meyer, W. E.; Auret, F. D.; Diale, M.; Ngoepe, P. N. M.

    2016-01-01

    Irradiation experiments have been carried out on 1.9×1016 cm-3 nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC at room temperature using 5.4 MeV alpha-particle irradiation over a fluence ranges from 2.6×1010 to 9.2×1011 cm-2. Current-voltage (I-V), capacitance-voltage (C-V) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements have been carried out to study the change in characteristics of the devices and free carrier removal rate due to alpha-particle irradiation, respectively. As radiation fluence increases, the ideality factors increased from 1.20 to 1.85 but the Schottky barrier height (SBHI-V) decreased from 1.47 to 1.34 eV. Free carrier concentration, Nd decreased with increasing fluence from 1.7×1016 to 1.1×1016 cm-2 at approximately 0.70 μm depth. The reduction in Nd shows that defects were induced during the irradiation and have effect on compensating the free carrier. The free carrier removal rate was estimated to be 6480±70 cm-1. Alpha-particle irradiation introduced two electron traps (E0.39 and E0.62), with activation energies of 0.39±0.03 eV and 0.62±0.08 eV, respectively. The E0.39 as attribute related to silicon or carbon vacancy, while the E0.62 has the attribute of Z1/Z2.

  7. Radioimmunotherapy of breast cancer metastases with alpha-particle emitter 225Ac: comparing efficacy with 213Bi and 90Y.

    PubMed

    Song, Hong; Hobbs, Robert F; Vajravelu, Ravy; Huso, David L; Esaias, Caroline; Apostolidis, Christos; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sgouros, George

    2009-12-01

    alpha-Particles are suitable to treat cancer micrometastases because of their short range and very high linear energy transfer. alpha-Particle emitter (213)Bi-based radioimmunotherapy has shown efficacy in a variety of metastatic animal cancer models, such as breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. Its clinical implementation, however, is challenging due to the limited supply of (225)Ac, high technical requirement to prepare radioimmunoconjugate with very short half-life (T(1/2) = 45.6 min) on site, and prohibitive cost. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of the alpha-particle emitter (225)Ac, parent of (213)Bi, in a mouse model of breast cancer metastases. A single administration of (225)Ac (400 nCi)-labeled anti-rat HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody (7.16.4) completely eradicated breast cancer lung micrometastases in approximately 67% of HER-2/neu transgenic mice and led to long-term survival of these mice for up to 1 year. Treatment with (225)Ac-7.16.4 is significantly more effective than (213)Bi-7.16.4 (120 microCi; median survival, 61 days; P = 0.001) and (90)Y-7.16.4 (120 microCi; median survival, 50 days; P < 0.001) as well as untreated control (median survival, 41 days; P < 0.0001). Dosimetric analysis showed that (225)Ac-treated metastases received a total dose of 9.6 Gy, significantly higher than 2.0 Gy from (213)Bi and 2.4 Gy from (90)Y. Biodistribution studies revealed that (225)Ac daughters, (221)Fr and (213)Bi, accumulated in kidneys and probably contributed to the long-term renal toxicity observed in surviving mice. These data suggest (225)Ac-labeled anti-HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody could significantly prolong survival in HER-2/neu-positive metastatic breast cancer patients. PMID:19920193

  8. Evidence of DNA double strand breaks formation in Escherichia coli bacteria exposed to alpha particles of different LET assessed by the SOS response.

    PubMed

    Serment-Guerrero, Jorge; Breña-Valle, Matilde; Aguilar-Moreno, Magdalena; Balcázar, Miguel

    2012-12-01

    Ionizing radiation produces a plethora of lesion upon DNA which sometimes is generated among a relatively small region due to clustered energy deposition events, the so called locally multiply damaged sites that could change to DSB. Such clustered damages are more likely to occur in high LET radiation exposures. The effect of alpha particles of different LET was evaluated on the bacterium Escherichia coli either by survival properties or the SOS response activity. Alpha radiation and LET distribution was controlled by means of Nuclear Track Detectors. The results suggest that alpha particles produce two types of lesion: lethal lesions and SOS inducing-mutagenic, a proportion that varies depending on the LET values. The SOS response as a sensitive parameter to assess RBE is mentioned. PMID:22705051

  9. Balmer alpha emission and hydrogen atom energy in ion-source discharges

    SciTech Connect

    McNeill, D.H.; Kim, J.

    1981-07-01

    The structure of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line emission profiles from three types of neutral beam injector ion source plasmas (filling pressure approx. 10 mTorr, electron density approx. 1 to 2 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/, electron temperature approx. 2 to 4 eV) is studied with the aid of a simple model for the neutral particle balance and H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission. A large fraction of the H/sub ..cap alpha../ is produced by dissociative excitation of H/sub 2/ and dissociative recombination of H/sub 2//sup +/, while the remainder is produced by excitation of H atoms, most of which have energies that are close to the characteristic H/sub 2/ dissociation energies. The H/sub ..cap alpha../ linewidth is thus insensitive to the discharge operating conditions and equals approx. 0.27 A when only slow (approx. 0.3 eV) dissociatively excited atoms are present or approx. 0.35 A when fast (> 1 eV) atoms, apparently also produced in dissociation reactions, are present as well.

  10. An analysis of 25Al energy levels observed in the 28Si(p,alpha)25Al reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pittman, S. T.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Kozub, R. L.; Smith, Michael Scott

    2009-01-01

    The level structure of {sup 25}Al has been studied at the ORNL Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) by measuring the angular and energy distributions of alpha particles from the {sup 28}Si(p,{alpha}){sup 25}Al reaction. Proton beams ({approx}10 nA) at laboratory energies of 40- and 42-MeV were generated by the 25 MV tandem accelerator and bombarded a natural silicon target (50 {micro}g/cm{sup 2}). Alpha particles were detected and identified in the Silicon Detector Array (SIDAR) in the 'telescope' configuration [1]. Eighteen levels have been observed and spins for several have been constrained through a distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) analysis of the angular distributions.

  11. Very High Efficiency, Miniaturized, Long-Lived Alpha Particle Power Source Using Diamond Devices for Extreme Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolawa, Elizabeth A. (Inventor); Patel, Jagdishbhai U. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A power source that converts a-particle energy into electricity by coulomb collision in doped diamond films is described. Alpha particle decay from curium-244 creates electron-hole pairs by free- ing electrons and holes inside the crystal lattice in N- and P-doped diamond films. Ohmic contacts provide electrical connection to an electronic device. Due to the built-in electric field at the rectifying junction across the hT- and P-doped diamond films, the free electrons are constrained to traveling in generally one direction. This one direction then supplies electrons in a manner similar to that of a battery. The radioactive curium layer may be disposed on diamond films for even distribution of a-particle radiation. The resulting power source may be mounted on a diamond substrate that serves to insulate structures below the diamond substrate from a-particle emission. Additional insulation or isolation may be provided in order to prevent damage from a-particle collision. N-doped silicon may be used instead of N-doped diamond.

  12. Interaction of alpha particle beams with Fe-based and FeNi-based glassy ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sorescu, M.; Barb, D.

    1996-12-31

    Samples of Fe{sub 78}B{sub 13}Si{sub 9} and Fe{sub 40}Ni{sub 38}Mo{sub 4}B{sub 18} metallic glasses were irradiated with alpha particle beams (W = 2.8 MeV) using radiation doses of 10{sup 16} and 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}2}. Irradiation-induced effects on the magnetic texture and phase composition of alloy samples were studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Related morphological changes and resultant crystalline precipitates were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The evolution of phases and microstructure during the radiation-induced amorphous-to-crystalline transformation was found to depend on the particle flux and sample composition. The lowest radiation dose employed was found to be more effective in inducing amorphous-to-crystalline transformations in both ferromagnetic alloys studied. In addition, the FeNi-based amorphous system investigated was found to be more stale than the Fe-based metallic glass, exposed to the same particle-beam irradiation conditions. By stimulating unconventional pathways for the crystallization process, the interaction of alpha particle beams with glassy ferromagnets offers unique opportunities to understand the fundamentals of nucleation and growth in amorphous magnets.

  13. Identification of gene-based responses in human blood cells exposed to alpha particle radiation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The threat of a terrorist-precipitated nuclear event places humans at danger for radiological exposures. Isotopes which emit alpha (α)-particle radiation pose the highest risk. Currently, gene expression signatures are being developed for radiation biodosimetry and triage with respect to ionizing photon radiation. This study was designed to determine if similar gene expression profiles are obtained after exposures involving α-particles. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to identify sensitive and robust gene-based biomarkers of α-particle radiation exposure. Cells were isolated from healthy individuals and were irradiated at doses ranging from 0-1.5 Gy. Microarray technology was employed to identify transcripts that were differentially expressed relative to unirradiated cells 24 hours post-exposure. Statistical analysis identified modulated genes at each of the individual doses. Results Twenty-nine genes were common to all doses with expression levels ranging from 2-10 fold relative to control treatment group. This subset of genes was further assessed in independent complete white blood cell (WBC) populations exposed to either α-particles or X-rays using quantitative real-time PCR. This 29 gene panel was responsive in the α-particle exposed WBCs and was shown to exhibit differential fold-changes compared to X-irradiated cells, though no α-particle specific transcripts were identified. Conclusion Current gene panels for photon radiation may also be applicable for use in α-particle radiation biodosimetry. PMID:25017500

  14. Gamma-H2AX foci in cells exposed to a mixed beam of X-rays and alpha particles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the cellular effects of exposure to mixed beams of high and low linear energy transfer radiation. So far, the effects of combined exposures have mainly been assessed with clonogenic survival or cytogenetic methods, and the results are contradictory. The gamma-H2AX assay has up to now not been applied in this context, and it is a promising tool for investigating the early cellular response to mixed beam irradiation. Purpose To determine the dose response and repair kinetics of gamma-H2AX ionizing radiation-induced foci in VH10 human fibroblasts exposed to mixed beams of 241Am alpha particles and X-rays. Results VH10 human fibroblasts were irradiated with each radiation type individually or both in combination at 37°C. Foci were scored for repair kinetics 0.5, 1, 3 and 24 h after irradiation (one dose per irradiation type), and for dose response at the 1 h time point. The dose response effect of mixed beam was additive, and the relative biological effectiveness for alpha particles (as compared to X-rays) was of 0.76 ± 0.52 for the total number of foci, and 2.54 ± 1.11 for large foci. The repair kinetics for total number of foci in cells exposed to mixed beam irradiation was intermediate to that of cells exposed to alpha particles and X-rays. However, for mixed beam-irradiated cells the frequency and area of large foci were initially lower than predicted and increased during the first 3 hours of repair (while the predicted number and area did not). Conclusions The repair kinetics of large foci after mixed beam exposure was significantly different from predicted based on the effect of the single dose components. The formation of large foci was delayed and they did not reach their maximum area until 1 h after irradiation. We hypothesize that the presence of low X-ray-induced damage engages the DNA repair machinery leading to a delayed DNA damage response to the more complex DNA damage induced by alpha particles. PMID:23121736

  15. Induction of a bystander mutagenic effect of alpha particles in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, H.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Waldren, C. A.; Vannais, D.; Hall, E. J.; Hei, T. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of X-rays was made by Rontgen more than a hundred years ago, it has always been accepted that the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation such as mutation and carcinogenesis are attributable mainly to direct damage to DNA. Although evidence based on microdosimetric estimation in support of a bystander effect appears to be consistent, direct proof of such extranuclear/extracellular effects are limited. Using a precision charged particle microbeam, we show here that irradiation of 20% of randomly selected A(L) cells with 20 alpha particles each results in a mutant fraction that is 3-fold higher than expected, assuming no bystander modulation effect. Furthermore, analysis by multiplex PCR shows that the types of mutants induced are significantly different from those of spontaneous origin. Pretreatment of cells with the radical scavenger DMSO had no effect on the mutagenic incidence. In contrast, cells pretreated with a 40 microM dose of lindane, which inhibits cell-cell communication, significantly decreased the mutant yield. The doses of DMSO and lindane used in these experiments are nontoxic and nonmutagenic. We further examined the mutagenic yield when 5-10% of randomly selected cells were irradiated with 20 alpha particles each. Results showed, likewise, a higher mutant yield than expected assuming no bystander effects. Our studies provide clear evidence that irradiated cells can induce a bystander mutagenic response in neighboring cells not directly traversed by alpha particles and that cell-cell communication process play a critical role in mediating the bystander phenomenon.

  16. A new mechanism for DNA alterations induced by alpha particles such as those emitted by radon and radon progeny.

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, B E; Goodwin, E H

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which alpha (alpha) particles like those emitted from inhaled radon and radon progeny cause their carcinogenic effects in the lung remains unclear. Although direct nuclear traversals by alpha-particles may be involved in mediating these outcomes, increasing evidence indicates that a particles can cause alterations in DNA in the absence of direct hits to cell nuclei. Using the occurrence of excessive sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) as an index of DNA damage in human lung fibroblasts, we investigated the hypothesis that alpha-particles may induce DNA damage through the generation of extracellular factors. We have found that a relatively low dose of alpha-particles can result in the generation of extracellular factors, which, upon transfer to unexposed normal human cells, can cause excessive SCE to an extent equivalent to that observed when the cells are directly irradiated with the same irradiation dose. A short-lived, SCE-inducing factor(s) is generated in alpha-irradiated culture medium containing serum in the absence of cells. A more persistent SCE-inducing factor(s), which can survive freeze-thaw and is heat labile is produced by fibroblasts after exposure to the alpha-particles. These results indicate that the initiating target for alpha-particle-induced genetic changes can be larger than a cell's nucleus or even a whole cell. How transmissible factors like those observed here in vitro may extend to the in vivo condition in the context of a-particle-induced carcinogenesis in the respiratory tract remains to be determined. PMID:9400706

  17. Analysis of {sup 25}Al energy levels observed in the {sup 28}Si(p,{alpha}){sup 25}Al reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pittman, S. T.; Bardayan, D. W.; Smith, M. S.; Blackmon, J. C.; Kozub, R. L.

    2009-09-15

    The level structure of {sup 25}Al has been studied at the ORNL Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility by measuring the angular and energy distributions of {alpha} particles from the {sup 28}Si(p,{alpha}){sup 25}Al reaction. Proton beams ({approx}10 nA) at laboratory energies of 40 and 42 MeV were generated by the 25 MV tandem accelerator and bombarded a natural silicon target (50 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}). Seventeen levels were observed and spins for several were constrained through a distorted-wave Born approximation analysis of the angular distributions.

  18. Orbit-averaged drift kinetic equation for the study of alpha-particle transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, G.T.; Miley, G.H. . Fusion Studies Lab.); Burrell, K.H. )

    1990-11-01

    Neoclassical transport of minority suprathermal alpha particles is investigated. This paper departs from previous investigations in that (a) the banana-width ordering parameter {rho}{sub {theta}}/L is not formally restricted to be a small parameter and (b) a linearized collision operator that retains the effects of pitch-angle scattering, electron and ion drag, and speed diffusion is used. A step model approximation for the large-aspect-ratio, circular-cross-section tokamak magnetic field is adopted to simplify the orbit-averaging procedure. Assuming that the suprathermal alphas are in the banana regime, an asymptotic expansion in {tau}{sub B}/{tau}{sub S} {much lt} l is carried out.

  19. Computation of cosmic ray ionization and dose at Mars. I: A comparison of HZETRN and Planetocosmics for proton and alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronoff, Guillaume; Norman, Ryan B.; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to evaluate the cosmic ray environment at Mars is of interest for future manned exploration. To support exploration, tools must be developed to accurately access the radiation environment in both free space and on planetary surfaces. The primary tool NASA uses to quantify radiation exposure behind shielding materials is the space radiation transport code, HZETRN. In order to build confidence in HZETRN, code benchmarking against Monte Carlo radiation transport codes is often used. This work compares the dose calculations at Mars by HZETRN and the Geant4 application Planetocosmics. The dose at ground and the energy deposited in the atmosphere by galactic cosmic ray protons and alpha particles has been calculated for the Curiosity landing conditions. In addition, this work has considered Solar Energetic Particle events, allowing for the comparison of varying input radiation environments. The results for protons and alpha particles show very good agreement between HZETRN and Planetocosmics.

  20. MASS SEPARATION OF HIGH ENERGY PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, L.

    1962-09-25

    An apparatus and method are described for separating charged, high energy particles of equal momentum forming a beam where the particles differ slightly in masses. Magnetic lenses are utilized to focus the beam and maintain that condition while electrostatic fields located between magnetic lenses are utilized to cause transverse separation of the particles into two beams separated by a sufficient amount to permit an aperture to block one beam. (AEC)

  1. Detectors for alpha particles and X-rays operating in ambient air in pulse counting mode or/and with gas amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpak, G.; Benaben, P.; Breuil, P.; Peskov, V.

    2008-02-01

    Ionization chambers working in ambient air in current detection mode are attractive due to their simplicity and low cost and are widely used in several applications such as smoke detection, dosimetry, therapeutic beam monitoring and so on. The aim of this work was to investigate if gaseous detectors can operate in ambient air in pulse counting mode as well as with gas amplification which potentially offers the highest possible sensitivity in applications like alpha particle detection or high energy X-ray photon or electron detection. To investigate the feasibility of this method two types of open- end gaseous detectors were build and successfully tested. The first one was a single wire or multiwire cylindrical geometry detector operating in pulse mode at a gas gain of one (pulse ionization chamber). This detector was readout by a custom made wide -band charge sensitive amplifier able to deal with slow induced signals generated by slow motion of negative and positive ions. The multiwire detector was able to detect alpha particles with an efficiency close to 22%. The second type of an alpha detector was an innovative GEM-like detector with resistive electrodes operating in air in avalanche mode at high gas gains (up to 104). This detector can also operate in a cascaded mode or being combined with other detectors, for example with MICROMEGAS. This detector was readout by a conventional charge -sensitive amplifier and was able to detect alpha particles with 100% efficiency. This detector could also detect X-ray photons or fast electrons. A detailed comparison between these two detectors is given as well as a comparison with commercially available alpha detectors. The main advantages of gaseous detectors operating in air in a pulse detection mode are their simplicity, low cost and high sensitivity. One of the possible applications of these new detectors is alpha particle background monitors which, due to their low cost can find wide application not only in houses, but in public areas: airports, railway station and so on.

  2. An alpha-particle irradiator for radiobiological research and its implementation for bystander effect studies.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Giuseppe; Antonelli, Francesca; Belli, Mauro; Campa, Alessandro; Simone, Giustina; Sorrentino, Eugenio; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella

    2009-11-01

    An experimental system based on an improved version of an existing alpha-particle irradiator has been developed for radiobiological studies, in particular those investigating bystander effects. It consists of a 20-mm-diameter stainless steel chamber that can be equipped alternatively with 244Cm or 241Am sources of different activities. Mylar-based petri dishes 56 mm in diameter were specially designed to house adaptors for permeable membrane inserts that reproduce the geometry of commercial cell culture insert companion plates. Characterization of the radiation field at the cell level was performed by experimental measurements and calculations. The average incident LET was about 122 keV/microm for 244Cm and about 125 keV/microm for 241Am. Dose rates at the chosen source-sample distance were 2.8 and 88.6 mGy/min, respectively. These low dose rates are suitable for our planned experiments on low-dose effects. For both sources, the uniformity of the alpha-particle dose was better than +/-7%, and the photon dose calculated at the cell entrance was negligible compared to the alpha-particle dose. The irradiator is small enough to be inserted into a cell incubator for irradiation under physiological conditions or into a refrigerator to prevent metabolic processes during irradiation. Benchmark experiments using the 241Am source to examine DNA double-strand breaks in directly hit and bystander primary human fibroblasts have shown that the irradiator can be used successfully for bystander effect studies. PMID:19883232

  3. Differential Velocity between Solar Wind Protons and Alpha Particles in Pressure Balance Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Yohei; Suess, Steven T.; Steinberg, John T.; Sakurai, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common high-plasma beta feature in high-latitude, high-speed solar wind. They have been proposed as remnants of coronal plumes. If true, they should reflect the observation that plumes are rooted in unipolar magnetic flux concentrations in the photosphere and are heated as oppositely directed flux is advected into and reconnects with the flux concentration. A minimum variance analysis (MVA) of magnetic discontinuities in PBSs showed there is a larger proportion of tangential discontinuities than in the surrounding high-speed wind, supporting the hypothesis that plasmoids or extended current sheets are formed during reconnection at the base of plumes. To further evaluate the character of magnetic field discontinuities in PBSs, differential streaming between alpha particles and protons is analyzed here for the same sample of PBSs used in the MVA. Alpha particles in high-speed wind generally have a higher radial flow speed than protons. However, if the magnetic field is folded back on itself, as in a large-amplitude Alfven wave, alpha particles will locally have a radial flow speed less than protons. This characteristic is used here to distinguish between folded back magnetic fields (which would contain rotational discontinuities) and tangential discontinuities using Ulysses high-latitude, high-speed solar wind data. The analysis indicates that almost all reversals in the radial magnetic field in PBSs are folded back field lines. This is found to also be true outside PBSs, supporting existing results for typical high-speed, high-latitude wind. There remains a small number of cases that appear not to be folds in the magnetic field and which may be flux tubes with both ends rooted in the Sun. The distinct difference in MVA results inside and outside PBSs remains unexplained.

  4. Differential Velocity Between Solar Wind Protons and Alpha Particles in Pressure Balance Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Y.; Suess, S. T.; Steinberg, J. T.; Sakurai, T.

    2003-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common high plasma beta feature in high latitude, high speed solar wind. They have been proposed as remnants of coronal plumes. If true, they should reflect the observation that plumes are rooted in unipolar magnetic flux concentrations in the photosphere and are heated as oppositely directed flux is advected into and reconnects with the flux concentration. A minimum variance analysis (MVA) of magnetic discontinuities in PBSs showed there is a larger proportion of tangential discontinuities than in the surrounding high speed wind, supporting the hypothesis that plasmoids or extended current sheets are formed during reconnection at the base of plumes. To further evaluate the character of magnetic field discontinuities in PBSs, differential streaming between alpha particles and protons is analyzed here for the same sample of PBSs used in the MVA. Alpha particles in high speed wind generally have a higher radial flow speed than protons. However, if the magnetic field is folded back on itself, as in a large amplitude Alfven wave, alpha particles will locally have a radial flow speed less than protons. This characteristic is used here to distinguish between folded back magnetic fields (which would contain rotational discontinuities) and tangential discontinuities using Ulysses high latitude, high speed solar wind data. The analysis indicates that almost all reversals in the radial magnetic field in PBSs are folded back field lines. This is found to also be true outside PBSs, supporting existing results for typical high speed, high latitude wind. There remains a small number of cases that appear not to be folds in the magnetic field and which may be flux tubes with both ends rooted in the Sun. The distinct difference in MVA results inside and outside PBSs remains unexplained.

  5. Secondary ion mass spectrometry combined with alpha track detection for isotope abundance ratio analysis of individual uranium-bearing particles.

    PubMed

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki

    2014-03-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used in combination with alpha track detection for the efficient analysis of uranium-bearing particles with higher (235)U abundances in environmental samples. A polycarbonate film containing particles was prepared and placed in contact with a CR-39 plastic detector. After exposure for 28 days, the detector was etched in a NaOH solution and each uranium-bearing particle was identified through observation of the alpha tracks recorded in the detector. A portion of the film containing each uranium-bearing particle was cut out and put onto a glassy carbon planchet. The films on the planchet were decomposed through plasma ashing for subsequent uranium abundance ratio analysis with SIMS. The alpha track-SIMS analysis of 10 uranium-bearing particles in a sample taken from a nuclear facility enabled n((235)U)/n((238)U) abundance ratios in the range 0.0072-0.25 to be detected, which were significantly higher than those obtained by SIMS without alpha track detection. The duration of the whole analytical process for analysis of 10 particles was about 32 days. The detection efficiency was calculated to be 27.1±6.5%, based on the analysis of the particles in uranium reference materials. The detection limits, defined as the diameter of the particle which produces alpha tracks more than one for a 28-days exposure, were estimated to be 0.8, 0.9, 1.1, 2.1 and 3.0 μm for the particles having the same uranium abundance ratios with NBL CRM U850, U500, U350, U050 and U010 reference materials, respectively. The use of alpha track detection for subsequent SIMS analysis is an inexpensive and an efficient way to measure uranium-bearing particles with higher (235)U abundances. PMID:24468381

  6. The instrumental blank of the Mars Science Laboratory alpha particle X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. L.

    2012-10-01

    The alpha particle X-ray spectrometers on the Mars exploration rovers Spirit and Opportunity accomplished extensive elemental analysis of the Martian surface through a combination of XRF and PIXE. An advanced APXS is now part of the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover. APXS spectra contain contributions which enhance elemental peak areas but which do not arise from these elements within the sample under study, thereby introducing error into derived concentrations. A detailed examination of these effects in the MSL APXS enables us to test two schemes for making the necessary corrections.

  7. Chemistry of rocks and soils in Gusev Crater from the alpha particle x-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gellert, R; Rieder, R; Anderson, R C; Brückner, J; Clark, B C; Dreibus, G; Economou, T; Klingelhöfer, G; Lugmair, G W; Ming, D W; Squyres, S W; D'Uston, C; Wänke, H; Yen, A; Zipfel, J

    2004-08-01

    The alpha particle x-ray spectrometer on the Spirit rover determined major and minor elements of soils and rocks in Gusev crater in order to unravel the crustal evolution of planet Mars. The composition of soils is similar to those at previous landing sites, as a result of global mixing and distribution by dust storms. Rocks (fresh surfaces exposed by the rock abrasion tool) resemble volcanic rocks of primitive basaltic composition with low intrinsic potassium contents. High abundance of bromine (up to 170 parts per million) in rocks may indicate the alteration of surfaces formed during a past period of aqueous activity in Gusev crater. PMID:15297665

  8. Matrix Characterization of Plutonium Residues by Alpha-Particle Self-Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T.H.; Foster, L.A.; Staples, P.

    1998-07-26

    Legacy plutonium residues often have inadequate item descriptions. Nondestructive characterization can help segregate these items for reprocessing or provide information needed for disposal or storage. Alpha particle-induced gamma-ray spectra contain a wealth of information that can be used for matrix characterization. We demonstrate how this information can be used for item identification. Gamma-ray spectra were recorded at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility from a variety of legacy, plutonium-processing residues and product materials. The comparison and analysis of these spectra are presented.

  9. Elastic scattering of alpha particles and the phase of the nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, V.; Yin, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Glauber theory can describe elastic scattering of alpha particles by He-4, He-3, H-2, and H-1 at 7 GeV/c if the phase of the nucleon-nucleon elastic-scattering amplitude varies with momentum transfer. The phase variation leads to diffraction patterns differing markedly from those typical of constant-phase calculations and greatly affects the magnitudes of the intensities. These changes are mainly due to changes in the interference between amplitudes for different orders of multiple scattering and to a decrease in their moduli.

  10. Chemistry of Rocks and Soils in Gusev Crater from the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellert, R.; Rieder, R.; Anderson, R. C.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B. C.; Dreibus, G.; Economou, T.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lugmair, G. W.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    The alpha particle x-ray spectrometer on the Spirit rover determined major and minor elements of soils and rocks in Gusev crater in order to unravel the crustal evolution of planet Mars. The composition of soils is similar to those at previous landing sites, as a result of global mixing and distribution by dust storms. Rocks (fresh surfaces exposed by the rock abrasion tool) resemble volcanic rocks of primitive basaltic composition with low intrinsic potassium contents. High abundance of bromine (up to 170 parts per million) in rocks may indicate the alteration of surfaces formed during a past period of aqueous activity in Gusev crater.

  11. Development of a He{sup 0} Source for Confined Alpha Particle Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, N.; Kisaki, M.; Iwazaki, K.; Kikuchi, M.; Okamoto, A.; Kobuchi, T.; Shinto, K.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kaneko, O.; Wada, M.

    2008-03-12

    A probing He{sup 0} beam for confined alpha particle measurement using a double charge exchange process is now under development. A proof of principle experiment for ground-state He{sup 0} beam production will be performed on a test stand. Several methods are developed to measure the metastable fraction of a He{sup 0} beam. A full-size strong-focusing He{sup +} source has been constructed and sufficient beam current was achieved with a beam size tolerable to be used on ITER.

  12. Generation of volatile organic compounds by alpha particle degradation of WIPP plastic and rubber material

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.T.; Molecke, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    The generation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hydrogen, and carbon oxides due to alpha particle irradiation of polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, and neoprene, is being investigated. A wide diversity of VOCs was found including alkenes, alkanes, alcohols, ketones, benzene derivatives, and nitro compounds. Their yields however, were quite low. The relative amounts of these compounds depended on the material, atmosphere present, and the absorbed dose. This investigation will help evaluate the effect of ionizing radiation on the long-term performance assessment and regulatory compliance issues related to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).

  13. Chemistry of rocks and soils at Meridiani Planum from the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Rieder, R; Gellert, R; Anderson, R C; Brückner, J; Clark, B C; Dreibus, G; Economou, T; Klingelhöfer, G; Lugmair, G W; Ming, D W; Squyres, S W; d'Uston, C; Wänke, H; Yen, A; Zipfel, J

    2004-12-01

    The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer on the Opportunity rover determined major and minor elements of soils and rocks in Meridiani Planum. Chemical compositions differentiate between basaltic rocks, evaporite-rich rocks, basaltic soils, and hematite-rich soils. Although soils are compositionally similar to those at previous landing sites, differences in iron and some minor element concentrations signify the addition of local components. Rocky outcrops are rich in sulfur and variably enriched in bromine relative to chlorine. The interaction with water in the past is indicated by the chemical features in rocks and soils at this site. PMID:15576611

  14. Alpha particles are extremely damaging to developing hemopoiesis compared to gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tie-Nan Jiang ); Lord, B.I.; Hendry, J.H. )

    1994-03-01

    Estimates of risk of stochastic effects from contamination with [alpha]-particle-emitting radionuclides are based on equivalent doses which take into account the RBE of the high-LET radiation. It is assumed that the RBEs for deterministic effects are considerably less than those for stochastic effects. However, the offspring of mice injected with 30 Bq g[sup [minus]1] [sup 239]Pu at 13 days gestation develop a persistent deficit in hemopoietic stem cells which is primarily the result of damage to their regulatory microenvironment. Their spatial distribution in the marrow is also perturbed, and recent observations on those mice suggested a considerably higher factor than 20. To define a more realistic RBE for hemopoiesis, the effects of external [gamma] irradiation during the fetal development period have been compared directly with those of [sup 239]Pu incorporated via placental transfer on the development of hemopoietic tissue. Pregnant mice were irradiated with [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays (a) continuously from day 13 of gestation to birth at 0.15 or 0.6 Gy/day; (b) six repeated acute doses (0.6 Gy/min) at 0.1 or 0.3 Gy from day 13 of gestation; (c) one acute dose of 0.6 or 1.8 Gy on day 15 of gestation. The spatial distribution of hemopoietic stem cells in 8-week-old offspring was then determined and compared to that resulting from [alpha]-particle irradiation. In each case, the higher dose was required to match the results for [alpha] particles, suggesting an RBE for developing hemopoiesis of 250-360 compared to a continuous [gamma]-ray dose and a rather lower value of 130-180 compared to a single acute dose of [gamma] rays. This contrasts greatly to values for direct irradiation of the stem cells but argues that the effective RBE, measured for long-term effects in vivo, is the more realistic. It is concluded that an all-embracing factor can be grossly misleading and can greatly underestimate the risks of exposure to [alpha] particles. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Mapping alpha-Particle X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (Map-X)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Sarrazin, P.; Bristow, T.

    2014-01-01

    Many planetary surface processes (like physical and chemical weathering, water activity, diagenesis, low-temperature or impact metamorphism, and biogenic activity) leave traces of their actions as features in the size range 10s to 100s of micron. The Mapping alpha-particle X-ray Spectrometer ("Map-X") is intended to provide chemical imaging at 2 orders of magnitude higher spatial resolution than previously flown instruments, yielding elemental chemistry at or below the scale length where many relict physical, chemical, and biological features can be imaged and interpreted in ancient rocks.

  16. EXTRACTOR FOR HIGH ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Lambertson, G.R.

    1964-04-01

    A particle-extracting apparatus for use with a beam of high-energy charged particles such as travel in an evacuated chamber along a circular equilibrium axis is described. A magnetized target is impacted relatively against the beam whereby the beam particles are deflected from the beam by the magnetic induction in the target. To this end the target may be moved into the beam or the beam may coast into the target and achieve high angular particle deflection and slow extraction. A deflecting septum magnet may additionally be used for deflection at even sharper angles. (AEC)

  17. Correlation between {alpha}-Decay Energies of Superheavy Nuclei Involving the Effects of Symmetry Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Jianmin; Zuo Wei; Scheid, Werner

    2011-07-01

    A formula for the relationship between the {alpha}-decay energies (Q values) of superheavy nuclei (SHN) is presented, which is composed of the effects of Coulomb energy and symmetry energy. It can be employed not only to validate the experimental observations and measurements to a large extent, but also to predict the Q values of heaviest SHN with a high accuracy generally which will be very useful for future experiments. Furthermore, the shell closures in superheavy region and the effect of the symmetry energy on the stability of SHN against {alpha} decay are discussed with the help of this formula.

  18. Dissipative particle dynamics with energy conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonet Avalos, J.; Mackie, A. D.

    1997-10-01

    The stochastic differential equations for a model of dissipative particle dynamics with both total energy and total momentum conservation in the particle-particle interactions are presented. The corresponding Fokker-Planck equation for the evolution of the probability distribution for the system is deduced together with the corresponding fluctuation-dissipation theorems ensuring that the ab initio chosen equilibrium probability distribution for the relevant variables is a stationary solution. When energy conservation is included, the system can sustain temperature gradients and heat flow can be modeled.

  19. Alfven waves, alpha particles, and pickup ions in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. E.; Neugebauer, M.; Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    Past studies of the properties of Alfven waves in the solar wind have indicated that (1) the amplitude of the velocity fluctuations is almost always smaller than expected on the basis of the amplitude of the field fluctuations, even when the anisotropy of the plasma is taken into account, and (2) the alpha particles do not participate in the wave motions because they 'surf' on the waves carried by the proton fluid. Ulysses data are used to demonstrate that (1) the discrepancy between the velocity and field fluctuations is greater at high heliographic latitudes than in the ecliptic plane, and (2) the alphas do participate in the waves, being either in phase or out of phase with the proton motions depending on whether the differential flow speed between the alphas and protons is greater than or less than the 'observed' wave speed, B(sub o)(delta v squared / delta B squared)exp 1/2, as determined from the ratio of the amplitudes of the velocity and magnetic fluctuations. It is proposed that the modification of Alfven wave propagation speed is due to pressure anisotropies resulting from asymmetric distributions of interstellar pickup ions. If the proposed explanation is correct, it indicates that scattering of pickup ions onto a (bi)spherical shell may not be as complete as generally supposed.

  20. A study of the scintillation light induced in liquid xenon by electrons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena; Mukherjee, Reshmi; Suzuki, Masayo

    1990-01-01

    The time dependence and the intensity of the primary scintillation light in liquid Xe excited by Am-241 alpha particles and Bi-207 internal-conversion electrons were measured at different electric-field strengths. High-purity liquid Xe was used to fill a parallel-plate ionization chamber equipped with a CaF2 window coupled to a UV-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The effect of the specific ionization density on the scintillation light and the time correlation between the light signal and the charge signal is reported. It is demonstrated that the fast scintillation signal produced in liquid Xe by an ionizing particle provides an ideal trigger in a detector aiming at a complete three-dimensional event reconstruction with an excellent background rejection capability.

  1. The fine structure constant alpha: relevant for a model of a self-propelling photon and for particle masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greulich, Karl O.

    2015-09-01

    A model for a self propelling (i.e. massless) photon1 is based on oscillations of a pair of charges amounting to elementary charge divided by SQRT alpha, where alpha is the fine structure (Sommerfeld) constant. When one assumes a similar model for particles that do have rest mas (i.e. which are non- self propelling), alpha plays also a role in the rest masses of elementary particles. Indeed all fundamental elementary particle masses can be described by the alpha / beta rule2 --> m(particle) = alpha-n * betam* 27.2 eV /c2 where beta is the proton to electron mass ratio 183612 and n= 0….14, m= -1,0 or Thus, photons and particle masses are intimately related to the fine structure constant. If the latter would not have been strictly constant throughout all times, this would have had consequences for the nature of light and for all masses including those of elementary particles.

  2. Utilization of wavelength-shifting fibers coupled to ZnS(Ag) and plastic scintillator for simultaneous detection of alpha/beta particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifergan, Y.; Dadon, S.; Israelashvili, I.; Osovizky, A.; Gonen, E.; Yehuda-Zada, Y.; Smadja, D.; Knafo, Y.; Ginzburg, D.; Kadmon, Y.; Cohen, Y.; Mazor, T.

    2015-06-01

    Low level radioactive surface contamination measurements require lightweight, large area and high efficiency detector. In most existing scintillation detectors there is a tradeoff between effective area and scintillation light collection. By using wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers the scintillation light may be collected efficiently also in a large area detector. In this study, WLS fibers were coupled to a beta sensitive plastic scintillator layer and to a alpha sensitive silver-activated zinc sulfide ZnS(Ag) layer for detecting both alpha and beta particles. The WLS fibers collect the scintillation light from the whole detector and transfer it to a single PMT. This first prototype unique configuration enables monitoring radioactive contaminated surfaces by both sides of the detector and provides high gamma rejection. In this paper, the detector structure, as well as the detector's measured linear response, will be described. The measured detection efficiency of 238Pu alpha particles (5.5 MeV) is ~63%. The measured detection efficiency for beta particles is ~89% for 90Sr-90Y (average energy of 195.8 keV, 934.8 keV), ~50% for 36Cl (average energy of 251.3 keV), and 35% for 137Cs (average energy of 156.8 keV).

  3. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A.; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles (4He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei—nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons—is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the ‘adiabatic projection method’ to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of quarks and gluons.

  4. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of quarks and gluons. PMID:26632590

  5. Partition of thorium between organs of monkeys injected with thorotrast: implications for alpha-particle dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Y; Humphreys, J A; Wesch, H; Priest, N D

    1998-09-01

    Risk estimates for alpha-particle-induced malignancies have been based mainly on studies of Thorotrast patients, but certain aspects of its deposition in the body have been at issue: the partition between the liver, spleen and red bone marrow, and the deposition at lower concentrations in other organs, such as muscle and fat, which may contribute to the risk. To supplement the existing data for humans, thorium concentrations were measured in the organs of two female monkeys 3-4 years after injection with Thorotrast. Relative deposits (liver:spleen:red bone marrow) were 54:6:41 and 75:4:21, in better agreement with the most recent observations in Thorotrast patients than with previous reports. Whereas the human testis had ranked among intermediate-level organs such as the adrenal glands and pancreas, the ovary of the monkey was among the organs with the lowest concentrations. The data suggest that risk factors for induction of malignancies by alpha-particle irradiation should be re-examined. PMID:9728666

  6. Observation of lunar radon emanation with the Apollo 15 alpha particle spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1972-01-01

    The alpha particle spectrometer, a component of the orbital Sim Bay group of 'geochemistry' experiments on Apollo 15, was designed to detect alpha particles emitted during the decay of isotopes of radon gas and her daughter products. The purpose was to measure the gross activity of radon on the lunar surface and to find possible regions of increased local activity. Results are presented from a partial analysis of Apollo 15 data. For the moon as a whole, Rn220 was not observed and the upper limit on its decay rate above the lunar surface is 0.00038 disintegrations/sq cm-sec. Rn222 was marginally observed. Possible variations of radon activity on the lunar surface are being investigated. Po210 (a daughter product of Rn222) has been detected in a broad region from west of Mare Crisium to the Van de Graaff-Orlov region. The observed count rate is (4.6 plus or minus 1.4) x 0.001 disintegrations/sq cm-sec. The observed level of Po210 activity is in excess of the amount that would be in equilibrium with Rn222 by about an order of magnitude. This implies that larger levels of radon emanation have occurred on the moon within a time scale of 10 to 100 years.

  7. An improved electrostatic integrating radon monitor with the CR-39 as alpha-particle detector.

    PubMed

    Fan, D; Zhuo, W; Chen, B; Zhao, C; Yi, Y; Zhang, Y

    2015-11-01

    In this study, based on the electrostatic integrating radon monitor (EIRM) developed by Iida et al., a new type of EIRM with the allyl glycol carbonate (CR-39) as alpha-particle detector was developed for outdoor radon measurements. Besides using the CR-39 to replace the cellulose nitrate film as alpha-particle detector, the electrode and the setting place of the CR-39 were also optimally designed based on the simulation results of the electric field and the detection efficiency. The calibration factor of the new EIRM was estimated to be 0.136±0.002 tracks cm(-2) (Bq m(-3) h)(-1), with the lower detection limit of 0.6 Bq m(-3) for a 2-month exposure. Furthermore, both the battery and the dry agent were also replaced to protect the environment. The results of intercomparison and field experiments showed that the performances of the new EIRM were much better than the original one. It suggests that the new type of ERIM is more suitable for large-scale and long-term outdoor radon surveys. PMID:25920784

  8. Detailed 8-transistor SRAM cell analysis for improved alpha particle radiation hardening in nanometer technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bota, Sebastià A.; Torrens, Gabriel; Verd, Jaume; Segura, Jaume

    2015-09-01

    Eight-transistor (8T) cells were introduced to improve variability tolerance, cell stability and low-voltage operation in high-speed SRAM caches by decoupling the read and write design requirements. Altogether, 8T-SRAM can be designed without significant area penalty over 6T-SRAM. Ionizing radiation effects are nowadays a major concern for reliability and dependability of emerging electronic SRAM devices, even for sea-level applications. In this paper we demonstrate from experimental results that the 8T-SRAM also exhibits an enhanced overall intrinsic tolerance to alpha particle radiation even though its critical charge values are smaller than conventional 6T cells. We have experimentally found that the soft error rate measured in accelerated experiments with alpha particles in SRAM devices implemented in a 65 nm CMOS is 56% better for 8T cells with respect to standard 6T-cells. Even more, we show that this value can be increased up to a 200% through transistor sizing optimization.

  9. Selective Alpha-Particle Mediated Depletion of Tumor Vasculature with Vascular Normalization

    PubMed Central

    Seshan, Surya V.; Kappel, Barry J.; Chattopadhyay, Debjit; May, Chad; McDevitt, Michael R.; Nolan, Daniel; Mittal, Vivek; Benezra, Robert; Scheinberg, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Abnormal regulation of angiogenesis in tumors results in the formation of vessels that are necessary for tumor growth, but compromised in structure and function. Abnormal tumor vasculature impairs oxygen and drug delivery and results in radiotherapy and chemotherapy resistance, respectively. Alpha particles are extraordinarily potent, short-ranged radiations with geometry uniquely suitable for selectively killing neovasculature. Methodology and Principal Findings Actinium-225 (225Ac)-E4G10, an alpha-emitting antibody construct reactive with the unengaged form of vascular endothelial cadherin, is capable of potent, selective killing of tumor neovascular endothelium and late endothelial progenitors in bone-marrow and blood. No specific normal-tissue uptake of E4G10 was seen by imaging or post-mortem biodistribution studies in mice. In a mouse-model of prostatic carcinoma, 225Ac-E4G10 treatment resulted in inhibition of tumor growth, lower serum prostate specific antigen level and markedly prolonged survival, which was further enhanced by subsequent administration of paclitaxel. Immunohistochemistry revealed lower vessel density and enhanced tumor cell apoptosis in 225Ac-E4G10 treated tumors. Additionally, the residual tumor vasculature appeared normalized as evident by enhanced pericyte coverage following 225Ac-E4G10 therapy. However, no toxicity was observed in vascularized normal organs following 225Ac-E4G10 therapy. Conclusions The data suggest that alpha-particle immunotherapy to neovasculature, alone or in combination with sequential chemotherapy, is an effective approach to cancer therapy. PMID:17342201

  10. TEST PROCEDURE FOR GROSS ALPHA PARTICLE ACTIVITY IN DRINKING WATER: INTERLABORATORY COLLABORATIVE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gross alpha activity values were calculated with four different alpha emitting radionuclide standard counting efficiencies to see which standard was best for gross alpha activity determinations. Thorium-230, a pure alpha emitter, appeared to be the best standard for gross alpha c...

  11. Alpha voltaic batteries and methods thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffaelle, Ryne P. (Inventor); Jenkins, Phillip (Inventor); Wilt, David (Inventor); Scheiman, David (Inventor); Chubb, Donald (Inventor); Castro, Stephanie (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An alpha voltaic battery includes at least one layer of a semiconductor material comprising at least one p/n junction, at least one absorption and conversion layer on the at least one layer of semiconductor layer, and at least one alpha particle emitter. The absorption and conversion layer prevents at least a portion of alpha particles from the alpha particle emitter from damaging the p/n junction in the layer of semiconductor material. The absorption and conversion layer also converts at least a portion of energy from the alpha particles into electron-hole pairs for collection by the one p/n junction in the layer of semiconductor material.

  12. Self-consistent calculations of alpha-decay energies

    SciTech Connect

    Tolokonnikov, S. V.; Lutostansky, Yu. S.; Saperstein, E. E.

    2013-06-15

    On the basis of the self-consistent theory of finite Fermi systems, the energies of alphadecay chains were calculated for several new superheavy nuclei discovered recently in experiments of the Dubna-Livermore Collaboration headed by Yu.Ts. Oganessian. The approach in question is implemented on the basis of the generalized method of the density functional proposed by Fayans and his coauthors. The version used here relies on the functional DF3-a proposed recently for describing a wide array of nuclear data, including data on superheavy nuclei. A detailed comparison of the results obtained on this basis with the predictions of different approaches, including the self-consistent Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method, the micro-macro method in the version developed by Sobiczewski and his coauthors, and the phenomenological method of Liran and his coauthors, is performed. The resulting alpha-decay energies are used to calculate respective lifetimes with the aid of the phenomenological Parkhomenko-Sobiczewski formula.

  13. Influence of plasma parameters on the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhang, X. Yu, L.; Zhao, X.

    2014-12-15

    In tokamaks, fusion generated α particles may absorb lower hybrid (LH) wave energy, thus reducing the LH current drive efficiency. The absorption coefficient γ{sub α} of LH waves due to α particles changing with some typical parameters is calculated in this paper. Results show that γ{sub α} increases with the parallel refraction index n{sub ‖}, while decreases with the frequency of LH waves ω over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption. The absorption coefficient γ{sub α} increases with n{sub e} when n{sub e} ≤ 8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, while decreases with n{sub e} when n{sub e} becomes larger, and there is a peak value of γ{sub α} when n{sub e} ≈ 8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −1} for the ITER-like scenario. The influence of spectral broadening in parametric decay instabilities on the absorption coefficient is evaluated. The value of γ{sub α} with n{sub ‖} being 2.5 is almost two times larger than that with n{sub ‖} being 2.0 and is even lager in the case of 2.9, which will obviously increase the absorption of the LH power by alpha particles.

  14. Varying ghost dark energy and particle creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshudyan, M.

    2016-02-01

    One of the models of dark energy is the ghost dark energy, which has a geometrical origin. Recently, a certain type of phenomenological modification of ghost dark energy has been suggested which motivated us for this work. The goal of this paper is twofold. First, we would like to study the cosmological scenario involving interacting varying ghost dark energy. A cosmographic analysis of a non-interacting model is also performed. Then, we study the particle creation following the straight analogy between quantization in Minkowski background and canonical quantization of a scalar field in curved dynamical backgrounds. Particular attention will be paid to massless-particle production from a radiation-dominated universe (according to our toy model) which evolves to our large-scale universe. Constraints on the parameters of the models obtained during the cosmographic analysis did allow to demonstrate the possibility of a massless-particle creation in a radiation-dominated universe.

  15. Design of a neutron-TPC prototype and its performance evaluation based on an alpha-particle test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Meng; Li, Yu-Lan; Niu, Li-Bo; Li, Jin; Deng, Zhi; He, Li; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Cheng, Xiao-Lei; Fu, Jian-Qiang; Li, Yuan-Jing

    2015-08-01

    A neutron-TPC (nTPC) is being developed for use as a fast neutron spectrometer in the fields of nuclear physics, nuclear reactor operation monitoring, and thermo-nuclear fusion plasma diagnostics. An nTPC prototype based on a GEM-TPC (Time Projection Chamber with Gas Electron Multiplier amplification) has been assembled and tested using argon-hydrocarbon mixture as the working gas. By measuring the energy deposition of the recoil proton in the sensitive volume and the angle of the proton track, the incident neutron energy can be deduced. A Monte Carlo simulation was carried out to analyze the parameters affecting the energy resolution of the nTPC, and gave an optimized resolution under ideal conditions. An alpha particle experiment was performed to verify its feasibility, and to characterize its performance, including energy resolution and spatial resolution. Based on the experimental measurement and analysis, the energy resolution (FWHM) of the nTPC prototype is predicted to be better than 3.2% for 5 MeV incident neutrons, meeting the performance requirement (FWHM<5%) for the nTPC prototype.

  16. Bench-level characterization of a CMOS standard-cell D-latch using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaes, B. R.; Soli, G. A.; Buehler, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is described for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. Measurements were made on a 1.6-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM irradiated with an Am-241 alpha-particle source. A collection depth of 6.09 micron was determined using these results and TRIM computer code. Using this collection depth and SPICE derived critical charge results on the latch design, an LET threshold of 34 MeV sq cm/mg was predicted. Heavy ion tests were then performed on the latch and an LET threshold of 41 MeV sq cm/mg was determined.

  17. Bench-level characterization of a CMOS standard-cell D-latch using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Blaes, B.R.; Soli, G.A.; Buehler, M.G. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper describes a methodology for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. Measurements were made on a 1.6-{mu}m n-well CMOS 4k-bit test SRAM irradiated with an Am-241 alpha-particle source. A collection depth of 6.09 {mu}m was determined using these results and TRIM computer code. Using this collection depth and SPICE derived critical charge results on the latch design, an LET threshold of 34 Mev cm{sup 2}/mg was predicted. Heavy ion tests were then performed on the latch and an LET threshold of 41 MeV cm{sup 2}/mg was determined.

  18. Energy-range relation and mean energy variation in therapeutic particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, Johanna; Brahme, Anders

    2008-01-15

    Analytical expressions for the mean energy and range of therapeutic light ion beams and low- and high-energy electrons have been derived, based on the energy dependence of their respective stopping powers. The new mean energy and range relations are power-law expressions relevant for light ion radiation therapy, and are based on measured practical ranges or known tabulated stopping powers and ranges for the relevant incident particle energies. A practical extrapolated range, R{sub p}, for light ions was defined, similar to that of electrons, which is very closely related to the extrapolated range of the primary ions. A universal energy-range relation for light ions and electrons that is valid for all material mixtures and compounds has been developed. The new relation can be expressed in terms of the range for protons and alpha particles, and is found to agree closely with experimental data in low atomic number media and when the difference in the mean ionization energy is low. The variation of the mean energy with depth and the new energy-range relation are useful for accurate stopping power and mass scattering power calculations, as well as for general particle transport and dosimetry applications.

  19. Transcriptional and secretomic profiling of epidermal cells exposed to alpha particle radiation.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Greene, Hillary Boulay; Wilkins, Ruth C

    2012-01-01

    Alpha (α)-particle emitters are probable isotopes to be used in a terrorist attack. The development of biological assessment tools to identify those who have handled these difficult to detect materials would be an asset to our current forensic capacity. In this study, for the purposes of biomarker discovery, human keratinocytes were exposed to α-particle and X-radiation (0.98 Gy/h at 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 Gy) and assessed for differential gene and protein expression using microarray and Bio-Plex technology, respectively. Secretomic analysis of supernatants showed expression of two pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-13 and PDGF-bb) to be exclusively affected in α-particle exposed cells. The highest dose of α-particle radiation modulated a total of 67 transcripts (fold change>|1.5|, (False discovery rate) FDR<0.05) in exposed cells. Several genes which responded with high expression levels (>2 fold) included KIF20A, NEFM, C7orf10, HIST1H2BD, BMP6, and HIST1H2AC. Among the high expressing genes, five (CCNB2, BUB1, NEK2, CDC20, AURKA) were also differentially expressed at the medium (1.0 Gy) dose however, these genes were unmodulated following exposure to X-irradiation. Networks of these genes clustered around tumor protein-53 and transforming growth factor-beta signaling. This study has identified some potential gene /protein responses and networks that may be validated further to confirm their specificity and potential to be signature biomarkers of α-particle exposure. PMID:23002402

  20. High energy particles and quanta in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, F. B. (Editor); Fichtel, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    The various subdisciplines of high-energy astrophysics are surveyed in a series of articles which attempt to give an overall view of the subject as a whole by emphasizing the basic physics common to all fields in which high-energy particles and quanta play a role. Successive chapters cover cosmic ray experimental observations, the abundances of nuclei in the cosmic radiation, cosmic electrons, solar modulation, solar particles (observation, relationship to the sun acceleration, interplanetary medium), radio astronomy, galactic X-ray sources, the cosmic X-ray background, and gamma ray astronomy. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  1. Detection of alpha radiation in a beta radiation field

    DOEpatents

    Mohagheghi, Amir H.; Reese, Robert P.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting alpha particles in the presence of high activities of beta particles utilizing an alpha spectrometer. The apparatus of the present invention utilizes a magnetic field applied around the sample in an alpha spectrometer to deflect the beta particles from the sample prior to reaching the detector, thus permitting detection of low concentrations of alpha particles. In the method of the invention, the strength of magnetic field required to adequately deflect the beta particles and permit alpha particle detection is given by an algorithm that controls the field strength as a function of sample beta energy and the distance of the sample to the detector.

  2. Effect of crystal thickness and geometry on the alpha-particle resolution of CsI (Tl)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinez, P.; Senftle, F.E.

    1960-01-01

    The resolution of CsI(Tl) for Po210 alpha particles has been measured as a function of crystal thickness. The best resolution of a 12;-in. diam cylindrical crystal was obtained for a thickness of 0.38 mm, and the effect of thickness on the resolution is discussed. Based on the proposed model, a conical crystal was designed, which yielded a line width of 1.8% for Po 210 alpha particles with a selected photomultiplier tube. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  3. Gas production due to alpha particle degradation of polyethylene and polyvinylchloride

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.T.; Hoh, J.; Emery, J.; Okajima, S.; Krause, T.

    1998-07-01

    Alpha particle degradation experiments were performed on polyethylene (PE) and polyvinylchloride (PVC) plastic samples typical of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) transuranic (TRU) waste. This was done to evaluate the effects of sealing TRU waste during shipment. Experiments were conducted at three temperatures using low dose rates. Predominant products from both plastics were hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and various organic species, with the addition of hydrochloric acid from PVC. In all experiments, the total pressure decreased. Irradiation at 30 and 60 C and at various dose rates caused small changes for both plastics, but at 100 C coupled thermal-radiolytic effects included discoloration of the material as well as large differences in the gas phase composition.

  4. An alpha particle experiment for chemical analysis of the Martian surface and atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Economou, T. E.; Turkevich, A. L.; Patterson, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    An alpha particle experiment similar to the one performed successfully on the Surveyor lunar missions is described. It is designed to provide a chemical analysis of the Martian surface and atmosphere. Analyses of rocks of known and unknown compositions have been made under simulated Martian conditions. The accuracies attained are generally comparable to those of the Surveyor lunar analyses. Improvements have been achieved in determining carbon and oxygen, so that a few per cent of water or carbonates in rocks can be detected. Some aspects of the integration of such an experiment with the spacecraft, a possible mission profile, and some other problems associated with a soft-landing mission to Mars are discussed. The importance of such a chemical analysis experiment in answering current questions about the nature and history of Martian surface material and its suitability for life processes is presented.

  5. Characterization of coal and charcoal by alpha-particle and gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco Lourtau, A. M.; Rubio Montero, M. P.; Jurado Vargas, M.

    2015-11-01

    Although coal and charcoal have similar physical and chemical characteristics, there are several crystallographic procedures used to distinguish and characterize them. But if the matrix is crushed, there is no standard procedure to distinguish coal from charcoal. In this work, a procedure to characterize coal and charcoal samples based on the radioactive content is proposed. The first assay is by gamma-ray spectrometry, which allows a part of the radioactive content to be determined rapidly and non-destructively. Then, alpha-particle spectrometry is applied to assay the content of those radionuclides which are difficult to determine precisely by gamma-ray spectrometry. This second technique requires prior chemical purification of the carbon sample in order to separate the corresponding radionuclides of interest.

  6. Collisional stochastic ripple diffusion of alpha particles and beam ions on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; White, R.B.; Budny, R.V.; Janos, A.C.; Owens, D.K.; Schivell, J.F.; Scott, S.D.; Zweben, S.J.

    1995-07-01

    Predictions for ripple loss of fast ions from TFTR are investigated with a guiding center code including both collisional and ripple effects. A synergistic enhancement of fast ion diffusion is found for toroidal field ripple with collisions. The total loss is calculated to be roughly twice the sum of ripple and collisional losses calculated separately. Discrepancies between measurements and calculations of plasma beta at low current and large major radius are resolved when both effects are included for neutral beam ions. A 20--30% reduction in alpha particle heating is predicted for q{sub a} = 6--14, R = 2.6 m DT plasmas on TFTR due to first orbit and collisional stochastic ripple diffusion.

  7. [Near infrared distance sensing method for Chang'e-3 alpha particle X-ray spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao-Hua; Wu, Ming-Ye; Wang, Huan-Yu; Peng, Wen-Xi; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Wang, Jin-Zhou; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Yang, Jia-Wei; Fan, Rui-Rui; Gao, Min; Liu, Ya-Qing; Zhang, Fei; Dong, Yi-Fan; Guo, Dong-Ya

    2013-05-01

    Alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) is one of the payloads of Chang'E-3 lunar rover, the scientific objective of which is in-situ observation and off-line analysis of lunar regolith and rock. Distance measurement is one of the important functions for APXS to perform effective detection on the moon. The present paper will first give a brief introduction to APXS, and then analyze the specific requirements and constraints to realize distance measurement, at last present a new near infrared distance sensing algorithm by using the inflection point of response curve. The theoretical analysis and the experiment results verify the feasibility of this algorithm. Although the theoretical analysis shows that this method is not sensitive to the operating temperature and reflectance of the lunar surface, the solar infrared radiant intensity may make photosensor saturation. The solutions are reducing the gain of device and avoiding direct exposure to sun light. PMID:23905352

  8. Evaluation of uncertainty components associated with alpha-particle spectrometric measurements of uranium isotopes in water.

    PubMed

    Seferinoğlu, Meryem; Dirican, Abdullah; Esra Erden, Pınar; Erçin, Demet

    2014-12-01

    Qualifications of uncertainties associated with the measurement of specific activity concentration of uranium radioisotope ((238)U) in water samples by alpha-particle spectrometry are presented. Possible sources of uncertainty are identified and quantified in the activity concentration measurements of (238)U isotope; the major source being the statistical counting uncertainty as expected. The combined relative standard uncertainty [Formula: see text] of the measurement was calculated as 1.4Bq kg(-1) (7.9%) for the investigated NPL sample. The accuracy and precision of recommended procedure were checked analysing six spiked water samples supplied from IAEA-proficiency test exercises. The results were evaluated in terms of relative bias, z-score, u-score, trueness and precision. These results show that the activity values and their uncertainties are in good agreement with recommended values. PMID:25306402

  9. Mitigation of radiation nephropathy after internal {alpha}-particle irradiation of kidneys

    SciTech Connect

    Jaggi, Jaspreet Singh; Seshan, Surya V.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Sgouros, George; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Scheinberg, David A. . E-mail: d-scheinberg@ski.mskcc.org

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Internal irradiation of kidneys as a consequence of radioimmunotherapy, radiation accidents, or nuclear terrorism can result in radiation nephropathy. We attempted to modify pharmacologically, the functional and morphologic changes in mouse kidneys after injection with the actinium ({sup 225}Ac) nanogenerator, an in vivo generator of {alpha}- and {beta}-particle emitting elements. Methods and Materials: The animals were injected with 0.35 {mu}Ci of the {sup 225}Ac nanogenerator, which delivers a dose of 27.6 Gy to the kidneys. Then, they were randomized to receive captopril (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor), L-158,809 (angiotensin II receptor-1 blocker), spironolactone (aldosterone receptor antagonist), or a placebo. Results: Forty weeks after the {sup 225}Ac injection, the placebo-control mice showed a significant increase in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (87.6 {+-} 6.9 mg/dL), dilated Bowman spaces, and tubulolysis with basement membrane thickening. Captopril treatment accentuated the functional (BUN 119.0 {+-} 4.0 mg/dL; p <0.01 vs. placebo controls) and histopathologic damage. In contrast, L-158,809 offered moderate protection (BUN 66.6 {+-} 3.9 mg/dL; p = 0.02 vs. placebo controls). Spironolactone treatment, however, significantly prevented the development of histopathologic and functional changes (BUN 31.2 {+-} 2.5 mg/dL; p <0.001 vs. placebo controls). Conclusions: Low-dose spironolactone and, to a lesser extent, angiotensin receptor-1 blockade can offer renal protection in a mouse model of internal {alpha}-particle irradiation.

  10. Renal tubulointerstitial changes after internal irradiation with alpha-particle-emitting actinium daughters.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, Jaspreet Singh; Seshan, Surya V; McDevitt, Michael R; LaPerle, Krista; Sgouros, George; Scheinberg, David A

    2005-09-01

    The effect of external gamma irradiation on the kidneys is well described. However, the mechanisms of radiation nephropathy as a consequence of targeted radionuclide therapies are poorly understood. The functional and morphologic changes were studied chronologically (from 10 to 40 wk) in mouse kidneys after injection with an actinium-225 (225Ac) nanogenerator, a molecular-sized, antibody-targeted, in vivo generator of alpha-particle-emitting elements. Renal irradiation from free, radioactive daughters of 225Ac led to time-dependent reduction in renal function manifesting as increase in blood urea nitrogen. The histopathologic changes corresponded with the decline in renal function. Glomerular, tubular, and endothelial cell nuclear pleomorphism and focal tubular cell injury, lysis, and karyorrhexis were observed as early as 10 wk. Progressive thinning of the cortex as a result of widespread tubulolysis, collapsed tubules, glomerular crowding, decrease in glomerular cellularity, interstitial inflammation, and an elevated juxtaglomerular cell count were noted at 20 to 30 wk after treatment. By 35 to 40 wk, regeneration of simplified tubules with tubular atrophy and loss with focal, mild interstitial fibrosis had occurred. A lower juxtaglomerular cell count with focal cytoplasmic vacuolization, suggesting increased degranulation, was also observed in this period. A focal increase in tubular and interstitial cell TGF-beta1 expression starting at 20 wk, peaking at 25 wk, and later declining in intensity with mild increase in the extracellular matrix deposition was noticed. These findings suggest that internally delivered alpha-particle irradiation-induced loss of tubular epithelial cells triggers a chain of adaptive changes that result in progressive renal parenchymal damage accompanied by a loss of renal function. These findings are dissimilar to those seen after gamma or beta irradiation of kidneys. PMID:15987754

  11. High energy neutrinos from big bang particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinsky, V. S.

    1993-04-01

    The production of high energy neutrinos by big bang particles is reviewed. The big bang particles are divided into two categories: dark matter particles (DMP), i.e. those with the critical mass density (?X = ?c) at present, and the exotic relics whose mass density can be smaller than the critical one. For the case of DMP the neutralino and the gravitino are considered. High energy neutrinos can be produced due to the capture of the neutralinos in the earth and the sun, with the subsequent annihilation of these particles there. If R-parity is weakly violated, the neutralino decay can be a source of high energy neutrinos. The gravitino as DMP is unobservable directly, unless R-parity is violated and the gravitino decays. For thermal exotic relics a very general conclusion is reached: the detectable neutrino flux can be produced only by long-lived particles with ?X > to, where to is the age of the Universe (the exceptional case is the decay only to the neutrinos). Very large neutrino fluxes can be produced by superheavy (up to ~ 1018 GeV) metastable relics in the particular cosmological scenario where the violent entropy production occurs.

  12. High-energy particles. [in Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schardt, A. W.; Goertz, C. K.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the magnetosphere of Jupiter is in many respects quite different from that of the earth. The energy required to drive the Jovian magnetosphere is apparently extracted from Jupiter's rotational energy rather than from the solar wind. Jupiter is a strong source of energetic charged particles which can be detected as far away as the orbit of Mercury. The structure and dynamics of the energetic particle distribution in the inner magnetosphere is discussed, taking into account observations, transport and losses in the inner magnetosphere, satellite interactions, and electron synchrotron radiation. The subsolar hemisphere is considered, giving attention to particle fluxes in the subsolar magnetosphere, conditions in the middle magnetosphere, and the characteristics of the outer magnetosphere. A description of the predawn magnetosphere is also provided.

  13. Studies of High Energy Particle Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Nitz, David F; Fick, Brian E

    2014-07-30

    This report covers the progress of the Michigan Technological University particle astrophysics group during the period April 15th, 2011 through April 30th, 2014. The principal investigator is Professor David Nitz. Professor Brian Fick is the Co-PI. The focus of the group is the study of the highest energy cosmic rays using the Pierre Auger Observatory. The major goals of the Pierre Auger Observatory are to discover and understand the source or sources of cosmic rays with energies exceeding 10**19 eV, to identify the particle type(s), and to investigate the interactions of those cosmic particles both in space and in the Earth's atmosphere. The Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina was completed in June 2008 with 1660 surface detector stations and 24 fluorescence telescopes arranged in 4 stations. It has a collecting area of 3,000 square km, yielding an aperture of 7,000 km**2 sr.

  14. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  15. Formation of the isomeric pair {sup 194}Ir{sup m,g} in interactions of {alpha} particles with {sup 192}Os

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, M. S.; Qaim, S. M.; Sudar, S.

    2011-08-15

    Cross sections were measured by the activation technique for the nuclear processes {sup 192}Os({alpha},d+pn+np){sup 194}Ir{sup m,g} up to {alpha}-particle energies of 39 MeV. From the measured data the isomeric cross-section ratio was deduced as a function of projectile energy. The present experimental data as well as those for the {sup 194}Pt(n,p){sup 194}Ir{sup m,g} reaction, given in the literature, were compared with the results of nuclear model calculations using the code talys, which combines the statistical, precompound, and direct interactions. In general, the experimental data were reproduced well by the model calculations, which were done using relatively low values of {eta} (i.e., {Theta}{sub eff}/{Theta}{sub rigid}). The results provide more evidence for the mass dependence of {eta}. The level density parameter for {sup 194}Ir was determined unambiguously.

  16. Polarization bremsstrahlung in {alpha} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Zon, B. A. Kretinin, I. Yu.

    2007-08-15

    A mechanism of formation of electromagnetic radiation that accompanies {alpha} decay and is associated with the emission of photons by electrons of atomic shells due to the scattering of {alpha} particles by these atoms (polarization bremsstrahlung) is proposed. It is shown that, when the photon energy is no higher than the energy of K electrons of an atom, polarization bremsstrahlung makes a significant contribution to the bremsstrahlung in {alpha} decay.

  17. Initial observations of low energy charged particles near the earth's bow shock on ISEE-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Fan, C. Y.; Fisk, L. A.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Ogallagher, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    Initial measurements from the ULECA sensor of the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland experiment on ISEE 1 are reported. ULECA is an electrostatic deflection - total energy sensor consisting of a collimator, a deflection analyzer, and an array of solid-state detectors. The position of a given detector, which determines the energy per charge of an incident particle, together with the measured energy, determines the particle's charge state. It is found that a rich variety of phenomena are operative in the transthermal energy regime (about 10 keV/Q to 100 keV/Q) covered by ULECA. Specifically, observations are presented of locally accelerated protons, alpha particles, and heavier ions in the magnetosheath and upstream of earth's bow shock. Preliminary analysis indicates that the behavior of these locally accelerated particles is most similar at the same energy per charge.

  18. Measurements of nuclear {gamma}-ray line emission in interactions of protons and {alpha} particles with N, O, Ne, and Si

    SciTech Connect

    Benhabiles-Mezhoud, H.; Kiener, J.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Tatischeff, V.; Deloncle, I.; Coc, A.; Duprat, J.; Hamadache, C.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Dalouzy, J.-C.; Grancey, F. de; Oliveira, F. de; Dayras, F.; Sereville, N. de; Pellegriti, M.-G.; Lamia, L.; Ouichaoui, S.

    2011-02-15

    {gamma}-ray production cross sections have been measured in proton irradiations of N, Ne, and Si and {alpha}-particle irradiations of N and Ne. In the same experiment we extracted also line shapes for strong {gamma}-ray lines of {sup 16}O produced in proton and {alpha}-particle irradiations of O. For the measurements gas targets were used for N, O, and Ne and a thick foil for Si. All targets were of natural isotopic composition. Beams in the energy range up to 26 MeV for protons and 39 MeV for {alpha} particles were delivered by the Institut de Physique Nucleaire-Orsay tandem accelerator. The {gamma} rays were detected with four high-purity Ge detectors in the angular range 30 deg. to 135 deg. We extracted 36 cross-section excitation functions for proton reactions and 14 for {alpha}-particle reactions. For the majority of the excitation functions no other data exist to our knowledge. Where comparison with existing data was possible, usually a very good agreement was found. It is shown that these data are very interesting for constraining nuclear reaction models. In particular, the agreement of cross section calculations in the nuclear reaction code talys with the measured data could be improved by adjusting the coupling schemes of collective levels in the target nuclei {sup 14}N, {sup 20,22}Ne, and {sup 28}Si. The importance of these results for the modeling of nuclear {gamma}-ray line emission in astrophysical sites is discussed.

  19. Electrical characterization of deep levels created by bombarding nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC with alpha-particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotoso, Ezekiel; Meyer, Walter E.; Auret, F. Danie; Paradzah, Alexander T.; Legodi, Matshisa J.

    2016-03-01

    Deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and Laplace-DLTS were used to investigate the effect of alpha-particle irradiation on the electrical properties of nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC. The samples were bombarded with alpha-particles at room temperature (300 K) using an americium-241 (241Am) radionuclide source. DLTS revealed the presence of four deep levels in the as-grown samples, E0.09, E0.11, E0.16 and E0.65. After irradiation with a fluence of 4.1 × 1010 alpha-particles-cm-2, DLTS measurements indicated the presence of two new deep levels, E0.39 and E0.62 with energy levels, EC - 0.39 eV and EC - 0.62 eV, with an apparent capture cross sections of 2 × 10-16 and 2 × 10-14 cm2, respectively. Furthermore, irradiation with fluence of 8.9 × 1010 alpha-particles-cm-2 resulted in the disappearance of shallow defects due to a lowering of the Fermi level. These defects re-appeared after annealing at 300 °C for 20 min. Defects, E0.39 and E0.42 with close emission rates were attributed to silicon or carbon vacancy and could only be separated by using high resolution Laplace-DLTS. The DLTS peaks at EC - (0.55-0.70) eV (known as Z1/Z2) were attributed to an isolated carbon vacancy (VC).

  20. Structure study of [sup 42]Ca by [alpha]+[sup 38]Ar cluster model: Coexistence of alpha-particle clustering and shell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuda, T. ); Ohkubo, S. )

    1995-02-01

    The structure of [sup 42]Ca is investigated by the [alpha]+[sup 38]Ar orthogonality condition model. The energy spectra, [alpha]-spectroscopic factors, [ital E]2 transitions, and charge form factors are analyzed. On the whole, the calculated properties are in very good agreement with the experimental data. The levels are classified into the cluster and shell-model states through the analysis of the wave functions. It is emphasized that the coexistence and interplay of cluster and shell-model states are essential to understand the properties of [sup 42]Ca.

  1. Acoustic detection of high energy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, S.D.

    1981-01-01

    The acoustic signals generated by charged particles traversing a medium offer a new technique for particle detection. Rapid thermal expansion of the medium produces an impulsive signal with a shape similar to one cycle of a sine wave. In the case of charged particles, the energy deposition results from thermalization of the particles ionization energy loss in the medium. A thermodynamic model which derives an acoustic potential for the signal produced by a given energy deposition is presented. The relationship between the acoustic potential and the signal period and amplitute is illustrated. Three non-thermal mechanisms (1) microbubble production; (2) molecular dissociation and (3) electrostriction are discussed. The acoustic potential and pulse shapes for these mechanisms are also shown. The results of two experiments are presented. In the first, acoustic signals generated by absorption of pulsed laser beams in water are observed to be similar to the signals generated by charged particle beams. Evidence of a non-thermal acoustic mechanism, possibly microbubbles or molecular dissociation, was found in this experiment. The second experiment used the BNL proton beam to check a previously observed discrepancy with the thermodynamic theory. The earlier experiment reported that the amplitude of the acoustic signals generated by particle beams traversing water vanished at 6/sup 0/C rather than at 4/sup 0/C where the thermal expansion of water is zero. The new experiment attributes this feature to the superposition of the thermal signal and a non-thermal pulse, due to electrostriction of the water. Calculations are presented which indicate that the source of this electrostriction is the electric field of the large number of charges freed by the ionization of the water molecules.

  2. New calorimetric all-particle energy spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    Both the maximum size N sub m and the sea level muon size N sub mu have been used separately to find the all-particle energy spectrum in the air shower domain. However the conversion required, whether from N sub m to E or from N sub mu to E, has customarily been carried out by means of calculations based on an assumed cascase model. It is shown here that by combining present data on N sub m and N sub mu spectra with data on: (1); the energy spectrum of air shower muons and (2) the average width of the electron profile, one can obtain empirical values of the N sub m to E and N sub mu to E conversion factors, and an empirical calorimetric all-particle spectrum, in the energy range 2 x 10 to the 6th power E 2 x 10 to the 9th power GeV.

  3. Negative energy particle as an expanding wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culetu, Hristu

    2015-03-01

    The properties of a dynamic wormhole are investigated. Using a particular equation of state for the fluid on the wormhole throat, we reached an equation of motion for the throat (a hyperbola) that leads to a negative surface energy density σ. The throat expands with the same acceleration 2π|σ| as the Ipser-Sikivie domain wall. We found the Lagrangian leading to the above equation of motion of the throat. The associated Hamiltonian corresponds to a relativistic free particle of a time-dependent negative energy -ℏc/R, where R is the throat radius, similar in form with the Casimir energy inside an expanding spherical box.

  4. Low-energy cross sections in the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuma, M.

    2008-09-15

    The low-energy {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction is analyzed with the potential model. The potentials are chosen from the deep potential describing the {alpha}-particle nuclear rainbow phenomena at high energies. Below E{sub c.m.}=1 MeV, the cross section is found to be dominated by the E2 transition to the ground state of {sup 16}O. No enhancement of the E1 component at low energies is predicted. The extrapolated astrophysical S-factors at E{sub c.m.}=0.3 MeV are S{sub E2}=150 keV b and S{sub E1}=3 keV b.

  5. Cosmic absorption of ultra high energy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, R.; Vereshchagin, G. V.; Xue, S.-S.

    2016-02-01

    This paper summarizes the limits on propagation of ultra high energy particles in the Universe, set up by their interactions with cosmic background of photons and neutrinos. By taking into account cosmic evolution of these backgrounds and considering appropriate interactions we derive the mean free path for ultra high energy photons, protons and neutrinos. For photons the relevant processes are the Breit-Wheeler process as well as the double pair production process. For protons the relevant reactions are the photopion production and the Bethe-Heitler process. We discuss the interplay between the energy loss length and mean free path for the Bethe-Heitler process. Neutrino opacity is determined by its scattering off the cosmic background neutrino. We compute for the first time the high energy neutrino horizon as a function of its energy.

  6. Low doses of alpha particles do not induce sister chromatid exchanges in bystander Chinese hamster cells defective in homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasawa, H; Wilson, P F; Chen, D J; Thompson, L H; Bedford, J S; Little, J B

    2007-10-26

    We reported previously that the homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line irs3 (deficient in the Rad51 paralog Rad51C) showed only a 50% spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as compared to parental wild-type V79 cells. Furthermore, when irradiated with very low doses of alpha particles, SCEs were not induced in irs3 cells, as compared to a prominent bystander effect observed in V79 cells (Nagasawa et al., Radiat. Res. 164, 141-147, 2005). In the present study, we examined additional Chinese hamster cell lines deficient in the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C, Rad51D, Xrcc2, and Xrcc3 as well as another essential HRR protein, Brca2. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in non-irradiated wild-type cell lines CHO, AA8 and V79 were 0.33 SCE/chromosome, whereas two Rad51C-deficient cell lines showed only 0.16 SCE/chromosome. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in cell lines defective in Rad51D, Xrcc2, Xrcc3, and Brca2 ranged from 0.23-0.33 SCE/chromosome, 0-30% lower than wild-type cells. SCEs were induced significantly 20-50% above spontaneous levels in wild-type cells exposed to a mean dose of 1.3 mGy of alpha particles (<1% of nuclei traversed by an alpha particle). However, induction of SCEs above spontaneous levels was minimal or absent after {alpha}-particle irradiation in all of the HRR-deficient cell lines. These data suggest that Brca2 and the Rad51 paralogs contribute to DNA damage repair processes induced in bystander cells (presumably oxidative damage repair in S-phase cells) following irradiation with very low doses of alpha particles.

  7. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Alpha-Particle Emitters In Vivo at Low Doses

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Roger W.; Azure, Michael T.; Narra, Venkat R.; Rao, Dandamudi V.

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of radionuclides that emit α particles, as well as their associated health hazards, have attracted considerable attention. The 224Ra daughters 212Pb and 212Bi, by virtue of their radiation properties which involve emission of α and β particles in their decay to stable 208Pb, have been proposed as candidates for radioimmunotherapy. Using mouse testes as the experimental model and testicular spermhead survival as the biological end point, the present work examines the radiotoxicity of 212Pb and its daughters. When 212Pb, in equilibrium with its daughters 212Bi, 212Po and 208Tl, was administered directly into the testis, the dose required to achieve 37% survival (D37) was 0.143 ± 0.014 Gy and the corresponding RBE of the mixed radiation field was 4.7 when compared to the D37 for acute external 120 kVp X rays. This datum, in conjunction with our earlier results for 210Po, was used to obtain an RBE–LET relationship for α particles emitted by tissue-incorporated radionuclides: RBEα = 4.8 − 6.1 × 10−2 LET + 1.0 × 10−3 LET2. Similarly, the dependence of RBE on α-particle energy Eα was given by RBEα=22Eα−0.73. These relationships, based on in vivo experimental data, may be valuable in predicting biological effects of α-particle emitters. PMID:8146279

  8. Review of lattice results concerning low-energy particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, S.; Aoki, Y.; Bernard, C.; Blum, T.; Colangelo, G.; Della Morte, M.; Dürr, S.; El-Khadra, A. X.; Fukaya, H.; Horsley, R.; Jüttner, A.; Kaneko, T.; Laiho, J.; Lellouch, L.; Leutwyler, H.; Lubicz, V.; Lunghi, E.; Necco, S.; Onogi, T.; Pena, C.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Sharpe, S. R.; Simula, S.; Sommer, R.; Van de Water, R. S.; Vladikas, A.; Wenger, U.; Wittig, H.

    2014-09-01

    We review lattice results related to pion, kaon, D- and B-meson physics with the aim of making them easily accessible to the particle physics community. More specifically, we report on the determination of the light-quark masses, the form factor f+(0), arising in semileptonic K -> pi transition at zero momentum transfer, as well as the decay constant ratio fK/fpi of decay constants and its consequences for the CKM matrix elements Vus and Vud. Furthermore, we describe the results obtained on the lattice for some of the low-energy constants of SU(2)LxSU(2)R and SU(3)LxSU(3)R Chiral Perturbation Theory and review the determination of the BK parameter of neutral kaon mixing. The inclusion of heavy-quark quantities significantly expands the FLAG scope with respect to the previous review. Therefore, for this review, we focus on D- and B-meson decay constants, form factors, and mixing parameters, since these are most relevant for the determination of CKM matrix elements and the global CKM unitarity-triangle fit. In addition we review the status of lattice determinations of the strong coupling constant alpha_s.

  9. Alpha spectrometric characterization of process-related particle size distributions from active particle sampling at the Los Alamos National Laboratory uranium foundry

    SciTech Connect

    Plionis, Alexander A; Peterson, Dominic S; Tandon, Lav; Lamont, Stephen P

    2009-01-01

    Uranium particles within the respirable size range pose a significant hazard to the health and safety of workers. Significant differences in the deposition and incorporation patterns of aerosols within the respirable range can be identified and integrated into sophisticated health physics models. Data characterizing the uranium particle size distribution resulting from specific foundry-related processes are needed. Using personal air sampling cascade impactors, particles collected from several foundry processes were sorted by activity median aerodynamic diameter onto various Marple substrates. After an initial gravimetric assessment of each impactor stage, the substrates were analyzed by alpha spectrometry to determine the uranium content of each stage. Alpha spectrometry provides rapid nondestructive isotopic data that can distinguish process uranium from natural sources and the degree of uranium contribution to the total accumulated particle load. In addition, the particle size bins utilized by the impactors provide adequate resolution to determine if a process particle size distribution is: lognormal, bimodal, or trimodal. Data on process uranium particle size values and distributions facilitate the development of more sophisticated and accurate models for internal dosimetry, resulting in an improved understanding of foundry worker health and safety.

  10. Alpha spectrometric characterization of process-related particle size distributions from active particle sampling at the Los Alamos National Laboratory uranium foundry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plionis, A. A.; Peterson, D. S.; Tandon, L.; LaMont, S. P.

    2010-03-01

    Uranium particles within the respirable size range pose a significant hazard to the health and safety of workers. Significant differences in the deposition and incorporation patterns of aerosols within the respirable range can be identified and integrated into sophisticated health physics models. Data characterizing the uranium particle size distribution resulting from specific foundry-related processes are needed. Using personal air sampling cascade impactors, particles collected from several foundry processes were sorted by activity median aerodynamic diameter onto various Marple substrates. After an initial gravimetric assessment of each impactor stage, the substrates were analyzed by alpha spectrometry to determine the uranium content of each stage. Alpha spectrometry provides rapid non-distructive isotopic data that can distinguish process uranium from natural sources and the degree of uranium contribution to the total accumulated particle load. In addition, the particle size bins utilized by the impactors provide adequate resolution to determine if a process particle size distribution is: lognormal, bimodal, or trimodal. Data on process uranium particle size values and distributions facilitate the development of more sophisticated and accurate models for internal dosimetry, resulting in an improved understanding of foundry worker health and safety.

  11. Radioactive Positron Emitter Production by Energetic Alpha Particles in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, B.; Share, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of the 0.511 MeV positron-annihilation line from solar flares are used to explore the flare process in general and ion acceleration in particular. In flares, positrons are produced primarily by the decay of radioactive positron-emitting isotopes resulting from nuclear interactions of flare-accelerated ions with ambient solar material. Kozlovsky et al. provided ion-energy-dependent production cross sections for 67 positron emitters evaluated from their threshold energies (some <1 MeV nucleon-1) to a GeV nucleon-1, incorporating them into a computer code for calculating positron-emitter production. Adequate cross-section measurements were available for proton reactions, but not for α-particle reactions where only crude estimates were possible. Here we re-evaluate the α-particle cross sections using new measurements and nuclear reaction codes. In typical large gamma-ray line flares, proton reactions dominate positron production, but α-particle reactions will dominate for steeper accelerated-ion spectra because of their relatively low threshold energies. With the accelerated-3He reactions added previously, the code is now reliable for calculating positron production from any distribution of accelerated-ion energies, not just those of typical flares. We have made the code available in the online version of the Journal. We investigate which reactions, projectiles, and ion energies contribute to positron production. We calculate ratios of the annihilation-line fluence to fluences of other gamma-ray lines. Such ratios can be used in interpreting flare data and in determining which nuclear radiation is most sensitive for revealing acceleration of low-energy ions at the Sun.

  12. RADIOACTIVE POSITRON EMITTER PRODUCTION BY ENERGETIC ALPHA PARTICLES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, B.; Share, G. H. E-mail: benz@wise.tau.ac.il

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the 0.511 MeV positron-annihilation line from solar flares are used to explore the flare process in general and ion acceleration in particular. In flares, positrons are produced primarily by the decay of radioactive positron-emitting isotopes resulting from nuclear interactions of flare-accelerated ions with ambient solar material. Kozlovsky et al. provided ion-energy-dependent production cross sections for 67 positron emitters evaluated from their threshold energies (some <1 MeV nucleon{sup –1}) to a GeV nucleon{sup –1}, incorporating them into a computer code for calculating positron-emitter production. Adequate cross-section measurements were available for proton reactions, but not for α-particle reactions where only crude estimates were possible. Here we re-evaluate the α-particle cross sections using new measurements and nuclear reaction codes. In typical large gamma-ray line flares, proton reactions dominate positron production, but α-particle reactions will dominate for steeper accelerated-ion spectra because of their relatively low threshold energies. With the accelerated-{sup 3}He reactions added previously, the code is now reliable for calculating positron production from any distribution of accelerated-ion energies, not just those of typical flares. We have made the code available in the online version of the Journal. We investigate which reactions, projectiles, and ion energies contribute to positron production. We calculate ratios of the annihilation-line fluence to fluences of other gamma-ray lines. Such ratios can be used in interpreting flare data and in determining which nuclear radiation is most sensitive for revealing acceleration of low-energy ions at the Sun.

  13. Scenarios for the nonlinear evolution of alpha particle induced Alfven wave instability

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Ye, Huanchun.

    1992-03-01

    Various nonlinear scenarios are given for the evolution of energetic particles that are slowing down in a background plasma and simultaneously causing instability of the background plasma waves. If the background damping is sufficiently weak, a steady-state wave is established as described by Berk and Breizman. For larger background damping rate pulsations develop. Saturation occurs when the wave amplitude rises to where the wave trapping frequency equals the growth rate. The wave then damps due to the small background dissipation present and a relatively long quiet interval exists between bursts while the free energy of the distribution is refilled by classical transport. In this scenario the anomalous energy loss of energetic particles due to diffusion is small compared to the classical collisional energy exchange with the background plasma. However, if at the trapping frequency, the wave amplitude is large enough to cause orbit stochasticity, a phase space explosion'' occurs where the wave amplitudes rise to higher levels which leads to rapid loss of energetic particles.

  14. Scenarios for the nonlinear evolution of alpha particle induced Alfven wave instability

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Ye, Huanchun

    1992-03-01

    Various nonlinear scenarios are given for the evolution of energetic particles that are slowing down in a background plasma and simultaneously causing instability of the background plasma waves. If the background damping is sufficiently weak, a steady-state wave is established as described by Berk and Breizman. For larger background damping rate pulsations develop. Saturation occurs when the wave amplitude rises to where the wave trapping frequency equals the growth rate. The wave then damps due to the small background dissipation present and a relatively long quiet interval exists between bursts while the free energy of the distribution is refilled by classical transport. In this scenario the anomalous energy loss of energetic particles due to diffusion is small compared to the classical collisional energy exchange with the background plasma. However, if at the trapping frequency, the wave amplitude is large enough to cause orbit stochasticity, a phase space ``explosion`` occurs where the wave amplitudes rise to higher levels which leads to rapid loss of energetic particles.

  15. Operant responding following exposure to HZE particles and its relationship to particle energy and LET

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On exploratory class missions astronauts will be exposed to range of heavy particles which differ in terms of particle energy and particle linear energy transfer. The present experiments were designed to evaluate how these physical characteristics of different particles affect cognitive performance...

  16. Interaction of the human cytomegalovirus particle with the host cell induces hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Steven; Nicholl, Mary Jane; Sutherland, Jane S.; Preston, Chris M.

    2011-05-25

    The cellular protein hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1{alpha}) was induced after infection of human fibroblasts with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). HCMV irradiated with ultraviolet light (uv-HCMV) also elicited the effect, demonstrating that the response was provoked by interaction of the infecting virion with the cell and that viral gene expression was not required. Although induction of HIF-1{alpha} was initiated by an early event, accumulation of the protein was not detected until 9 hours post infection, with levels increasing thereafter. Infection with uv-HCMV resulted in increased abundance of HIF-1{alpha}-specific RNA, indicating stimulation of transcription. In addition, greater phosphorylation of the protein kinase Akt was observed, and the activity of this enzyme was required for induction of HIF-1{alpha} to occur. HIF-1{alpha} controls the expression of many cellular gene products; therefore the findings reveal new ways in which interaction of the HCMV particle with the host cell may cause significant alterations to cellular physiology.

  17. High energy proton and alpha radiation effects on GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna, S.M.; Liu, H.C.; Wilson, P.H.; Li, L.; Buchanan, M.

    1996-12-01

    Gallium arsenide quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) are ideally suited for infrared imagery due to their detection capability over a wide infrared wavelength region and the feasibility of fabrication of monolithic two-dimensional arrays of such detectors. This paper reports on the effects of high energy proton and alpha particle radiations on the performance of these devices. The particle energies ranged from 0.8 MeV to 10.0 MeV and the fluences used in this work ranged from 10{sup 11} to 10{sup 16}cm{sup {minus}2}. The dark current and spectral response of these radiated devices were measured at different fluence levels. Using the spectral response as a measure of device performance, it is concluded that the device performance decreases with fluence and the degradation due to alpha particles is greater than for protons of the same energy. Further, the damage to device performance decreases with the increase in the energy of both types of these radiations. From prior work, it was expected that these devices would be sensitive to permanent radiation damage. The extent of damage, however, could not be pre-judged due to the device complexity. These are the first reported measurements of radiation hardness of QWIPs.

  18. Stopping of 0.3 1.2 MeV/u protons and alpha particles in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdesselam, M.; Ouichaoui, S.; Azzouz, M.; Chami, A. C.; Siad, M.

    2008-09-01

    The stopping cross sections ε(E) of silicon for protons and alpha particles have been measured over the velocity range 0.3-1.2 MeV/u from a Si//SiO2//Si (SIMOX) target using the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) with special emphasis put on experimental aspects. A detection geometry coupling simultaneously two solid-state Si detectors placed at 165° and 150° relative to each side of the incident beam direction was used to measure the energies of the scattered ions and determine their energy losses within the stopping medium. In this way, the basic energy parameter, Ex, at the Si/SiO2 interface for a given incident energy E0 is the same for ions backscattered in the two directions off both the Si and O target elements, and systematic uncertainties in the ε(E) data mainly originating from the target thickness are significantly minimized. A powerful computer code has been elaborated for extracting the relevant ε(E) experimental data and the associated overall uncertainty that amounts to less than 3%. The measured ε(E) data sets were found to be in fair agreement with Paul's compilation and with values calculated by the SRIM 06 computer code. In the case of 4He+ ions, experimental data for the γ effective charge parameter have been deduced by scaling the measured stopping cross sections to those of protons crossing the same target with the same velocity, and compared to the predictions of the SRIM 06 computer code. It is found that the γ-parameter values generated by the latter code slightly deviate from experiment over the velocity region around the stopping cross section maximum where strong charge exchanges usually occur.

  19. {alpha}-decay energy formula for superheavy nuclei based on the liquid-drop model

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Tiekuang; Ren Zhongzhou

    2010-09-15

    A formula of {alpha}-decay energy for superheavy nuclei based on the method of macroscopic model plus shell corrections is proposed. The macroscopic part of this formula is derived from the Bethe-Weizsaecker binding energy formula, and the shell corrections at N=152 and N=162 are expressed by the Mexican hat wavelet functions. The parameters of this formula are obtained through fitting to 170 {alpha}-decay energies for nuclei ranging from Z=90 to Z=118 with N{>=}140. Numerical results show that 170 existing {alpha}-decay energies can be reproduced very well; the average and standard deviations between theoretical results and experimental data are 0.177 and 0.226 MeV, respectively. The {alpha}-decay energies of newly synthesized nuclei {sup 293,294}117 and their {alpha}-decay products are also reproduced very well. In addition, the {alpha}-decay energies for nuclei with Z=110-120 are predicted and compared with the results calculated by the macroscopic-microscopic model. Great differences are found for nuclei with Z{>=}116 and N{>=}176 due to the shell effects near the hypothetical doubly magic nucleus {sup 298}114{sub 184} in the macroscopic-microscopic model. Therefore, by comparing experimental {alpha}-decay energies measured in the future with the ones predicted by these two methods, one can obtain useful information about the next proton and neutron magic numbers.

  20. Prompt detection of alpha particles from 210Po: another clue to the origin of rock varnish?

    PubMed

    Hodge, Vernon F; Farmer, Dennis E; Diaz, Tammy; Orndorff, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    Alpha particles have been measured coming from the surfaces of rocks covered with dark red-brown rock varnish, as well as rocks that appear to have little, if any, varnish. A pronounced peak at 5.3 MeV indicates the presence of 210Po, a short-lived natural-radioactive element. Surface activities for 33 samples range from 0.008 Bq/cm2 to 0.065 Bq/cm2. It is estimated that this nuclide is concentrated 10(11) times in these paper-thin coatings above its concentration in ground-level air. Gamma rays from the decay of 137Cs, a product of testing nuclear weapons some 50 years ago, were also detected. Analysis of samples of varnish stripped from the rock revealed traces of 239,240Pu and 238Pu. The presence of all of these isotopes strongly supports the theory that varnish films derive their building blocks from the atmosphere and, with time, all rocks in arid environments will become coated. PMID:15511566

  1. The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS): Results from Gusev Crater and Calibration Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellert, R.; Rieder, R.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B.; Dreibus, G.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lugmair, G.; Ming, D.; Waenke, H.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.; Squyres, S.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical composition of rocks and soils on Mars analyzed during the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit Mission was determined by X-ray analyses with the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). Details of the data analysis method and the instrument calibration are presented. Measurements performed on Mars to address geometry effects and background contributions are shown. Cross calibration measurements among several instrument sensors and sources are discussed. An unintentional swap of the two flight instruments is evaluated. New concentration data acquired during the first 470 sols of rover Spirit in Gusev Crater are presented. There are two geological regions, the Gusev plains and the Columbia Hills. The plains contain soils that are very similar to previous landing sites on Mars. A meteoritic component in the soil is identified. Rocks in the plains revealed thin weathering rinds. The underlying abraded rock was classified as primitive basalt. One of these rocks contained significant Br that is probably associated with vein-filling material of different composition. One of the trenches showed large subsurface enrichments of Mg, S, and Br. Disturbed soils and rocks in the Columbia Hills revealed different elemental compositions. These rocks are significantly weathered and enriched in mobile elements, such as P, S, Cl, or Br. Even abraded rock surfaces have high Br concentrations. Thus, in contrast to the rocks and soils in the Gusev Plains, the Columbia Hills material shows more significant evidence of ancient aqueous alteration.

  2. Thorium and actinium polyphosphonate compounds as bone-seeking alpha particle-emitting agents.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Gjermund; Bruland, Oyvind S; Larsen, Roy H

    2004-01-01

    The present study explores the use of alpha-particle-emitting, bone-seeking agents as candidates for targeted radiotherapy. Actinium and thorium 1,4,7,10 tetraazacyclododecane N,N',N'',N''' 1,4,7,10-tetra(methylene) phosphonic acid (DOTMP) and thorium-diethylene triamine N,N',N'' penta(methylene) phosphonic acid (DTMP) were prepared and their biodistribution evaluated in conventional Balb/C mice at four hours after injection. All three bone-seeking agents showed a high uptake in bone and a low uptake in soft tissues. Among the soft tissue organs, only kidney had a relatively high uptake. The femur/kidney ratios for 227Th-DTMP, 228-Ac-DOTMP and 227Th-DOTMP were 14.2, 7.6 and 6.0, respectively. A higher liver uptake of 228Ac-DOTMP was seen than for 227Th-DTMP and 227Th-DOTMP. This suggests that some demetallation of the 228Ac-DOTMP complex had occurred. The results indicate that 225Ac-DOTMP, 227Th-DOTMP and 227Th-DTMP have promising properties as potential therapeutic bone-seeking agents. PMID:15015582

  3. Alpha-particle capture reactions in inverse kinematics relevant to p-process nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujić, P.; Lagoyannis, A.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Harissopulos, S.; Demetriou, P.; Perrot, L.; Stodel, Ch.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Kamalou, O.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Spyrou, A.; Amthor, M. A.; Grevy, S.; Caceres, L.; Koivisto, H.; Laitinen, M.; Uusitalo, J.; Julin, R.

    2011-10-01

    The first feasibility study of an α-particle capture reaction in inverse kinematics at energies relevant to the p process was performed at the Wien Filter of the LISE spectrometer at GANIL. Hereby, the 4He(78Kr,γ)82Sr reaction was investigated using as target an 4He-implanted thin Al foil. The analysis of the data has shown that the determination of (α,γ) reaction cross sections at rather low energies around 2 MeV/u in inverse kinematics is indeed feasible regarding the high rejection rate of the primary beam, which in the present work was better than a factor of 109. However, the expected position of the recoils of interest was completely masked by particles of currently unknown origin that could hardly be attributed to scattering of the primary beam. The most probable explanation for the origin of these "pollutants" could be microscopic dust particles of 10 μm diameter and less, that are extremely difficult to avoid in standard experimental conditions. Hence, the use of a gas-jet target instead of a solid one is compulsory.

  4. Alpha-induced reaction studies using low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hu, J.; Kubono, S.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.

    2012-11-12

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Studies on proton and alpha resonance scatterings, ({alpha}, p) reactions, and other types of measurements ({beta}-decay lifetimes etc.) have been performed using RI beams at CRIB, motivated by interests on astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among the studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Li+{alpha}/{sup 7}Be+{alpha} resonant scatterings are presented.

  5. Nanocrystalline particle coatings on alpha-alumina powders by a carbonate precipitation and thermal-assisted combustion route.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Woo; Jung, Young Mi

    2007-11-01

    We have suggested ultrafine particle coating processes for preparing nanocrystalline particle coated alpha-alumina powders by a carbonate precipitation and thermal-assisted combustion route, which is environmentally friendly. The nanometric ammonium aluminum carbonate hydroxide (AACH) as a precursor for coating of alumina was produced from precipitation reaction of ammonium aluminum sulfate and ammonium hydrogen carbonate. The synthetic crystalline size and morphology were greatly dependent on pH and temperature. By adding ammonium aluminum sulfate solution dispersed the alpha-alumina core particle in the ammonium hydrogen carbonate aqueous solution, nanometric AACH with a size of 5 nm was tightly bonded and uniformly coated on the core powder due to formation of surface complexes by the adsorption of carbonates, hydroxyl and ammonia groups on the surface of aluminum oxide. The synthetic precursor rapidly converted to amorphous- and y-alumina phase without significant change in the morphological features through decomposition of surface complexes and thermal-assisted phase transformation. As a result, the nanocrystalline polymorphic particle coated alpha-alumina core powders with highly uniform distribution were prepared from the route of carbonate precipitation and thermal-assisted combustion. PMID:18047085

  6. Effects of corotating interaction regions on Ulysses high energy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Droege, W.; Kunow, H.; Heber, B.; Mueller-Mellin, R.; Sierks, H.; Wibberenz, G.; Raviart, A.; Ducros, R.; Ferrando, P.; Rastoin, C.; Paizis, C.; Gosling, J. T.

    1996-07-20

    We investigate the intensity variation of low energy ({approx}6-23 MeV/N) heliospheric ions and of galactic protons (250-2200 MeV) observed by the Kiel Electron Telescope onboard the Ulysses spacecraft associated with Corotating Interaction Regions (CIR) from mid-1992 to end of June 1995. This period covers Ulysses' transit to high southern latitudes, the south polar pass, return to the solar equator and ascent to the north pole up to 70 deg. We find that the flux of high energy protons exhibits a periodicity of about 26 days with a relative intensity variation of 10%. At latitudes below {approx}50 deg. the recurrent variations of galactic protons are in coincidence with the passage of CIRs and enhancements of low energies protons and alpha particles which are accelerated at the shocks of the CIRs. The modulation of galactic protons is observed up to high southern latitudes, where the signatures of a CIR are no longer visible in plasma or magnetic field data. The periodicity does not depend on latitude and its phase apparently remains constant during Ulysses' pass over the south pole as well as through the solar equator.

  7. Effects of corotating interaction regions on Ulysses high energy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Droege, W.; Kunow, H.; Heber, B.; Mueller-Mellin, R.; Sierks, H.; Wibberenz, G.; Raviart, A.; Ducros, R.; Ferrando, P.; Rastoin, C.; Gosling, J.T.

    1996-07-01

    We investigate the intensity variation of low energy ({approximately}6{endash}23MeV/N) heliospheric ions and of galactic protons (250{endash}2200 MeV) observed by the Kiel Electron Telescope onboard the Ulysses spacecraft associated with Corotating Interaction Regions (CIR) from mid-1992 to end of June 1995. This period covers Ulysses{close_quote} transit to high southern latitudes, the south polar pass, return to the solar equator and ascent to the north pole up to 70{degree}. We find that the flux of high energy protons exhibits a periodicity of about 26 days with a relative intensity variation of 10{percent}. At latitudes below {approximately}50{degree} the recurrent variations of galactic protons are in coincidence with the passage of CIRs and enhancements of low energies protons and alpha particles which are accelerated at the shocks of the CIRs. The modulation of galactic protons is observed up to high southern latitudes, where the signatures of a CIR are no longer visible in plasma or magnetic field data. The periodicity does not depend on latitude and its phase apparently remains constant during Ulysses{close_quote} pass over the south pole as well as through the solar equator. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Summary of the IEA Workshop on Alpha Physics and Tritium Issues in Large Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Stratton, B.; Zweben, S.J.; Pitcher, C.S.

    1993-11-01

    A brief summary is presented of the talks given during this meeting, which was held at PPPL and sponsored by the IEA (International Energy Agency) as part of the Large Tokamak collaboration. These talks are summarized into four sessions: tritium issues in large tokamaks, alpha particle simulation experiments, alpha particle theory, and alpha particle diagnostics.

  9. Calculating alpha Eigenvalues in a Continuous-Energy Infinite Medium with Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Betzler, Benjamin R.; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Brown, Forrest B.; Martin, William R.

    2012-09-04

    The {alpha} eigenvalue has implications for time-dependent problems where the system is sub- or supercritical. We present methods and results from calculating the {alpha}-eigenvalue spectrum for a continuous-energy infinite medium with a simplified Monte Carlo transport code. We formulate the {alpha}-eigenvalue problem, detail the Monte Carlo code physics, and provide verification and results. We have a method for calculating the {alpha}-eigenvalue spectrum in a continuous-energy infinite-medium. The continuous-time Markov process described by the transition rate matrix provides a way of obtaining the {alpha}-eigenvalue spectrum and kinetic modes. These are useful for the approximation of the time dependence of the system.

  10. Characterization of an Associated Particle Neutron Generator with ZnO:Ga Alpha-Detector and Active Focusing

    SciTech Connect

    McConchie, Seth M; Mihalczo, John T

    2008-01-01

    A deuterium-tritium (DT) associated particle neutron generator (APNG) with active focusing has been operated using an alpha particle detector made of a ZnO:Ga phosphor with decay time of approximately 1 ns. The APNG is capable of producing 109 neutrons per second. The DT beam spot diameter was adjusted and measured from 7 mm to 2.1 mm with the possibility of achieving 1 mm subject to the removal of a safety interlock protecting the APNG tritiated target. In addition, the alpha detector was found to have a detection efficiency of 88% and sub-nanosecond time resolution (<0.7 ns) using a Burle 8850 bialkali photocathode. Lastly, the neutron beam was obstructed using various amounts of lead shielding to study the generator's imaging contrast capability for neutron radiography. The APNG provides high-rate capability and a large solid angle with acceptance of 8%.

  11. Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James R.; Reich, Morris; Ludewig, Hans; Todosow, Michael

    1999-02-09

    A particle accelerator (12) generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target (14) is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target (14) produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer (44) and a neutron filter (42) are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired.

  12. Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1999-02-09

    A particle accelerator generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer and a neutron filter are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired. 18 figs.

  13. Nanodosimetry and nanodosimetric-based models of radiation action for radon alpha particles. Progress report, July 1990--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zaider, M.

    1992-12-31

    We report on a theory for describing the biological effects of ionizing radiation in particular radon {alpha} particles. Behind this approach is the recognition that biological effects such as chromosome aberrations, cellular transformation, cellular inactivation, etc, are the result of a hierarchic sequence of radiation effects. We indicate how to treat each of the individual processes in this sequence, and also how to relate one effect to the hierarchically superior one.

  14. Dependence of alpha particle track diameter on the free volume holes size using positron annihilation lifetime technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gamal, S.; Abdalla, Ayman M.; Abdel-Hady, E. E.

    2015-09-01

    The alpha particle track diameter dependence of the free volume holes size (Vf) in DAM-ADC and CR-39 nuclear track detectors was investigated using positron annihilation lifetime technique. The effect of temperature on the alpha particle track diameter and free volume were also investigated in the T-range (RT-130 °C). The obtained results revealed that the values of ortho-positronium lifetime τ3 and Vf increases while I3 slightly increases as T increases for the two detectors. The values of τ3, Vf and I3 are higher in CR-39 than DAM-ADC. The interpretation of obtained results is based on the fact that increasing T leads to significant enhancement of thermal expansion of the polymer matrix and consequently Vf increases. The track diameter increases as T increases. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in T increases the crystal size and Vf in the polymer. A relationship between Vf and the alpha particle track diameter was obtained. Moreover results of detector irradiation, along with free volume evaluation are addressed and thoroughly discussed.

  15. Designing experimental setup and procedures for studying alpha-particle-induced adaptive response in zebrafish embryos in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, V. W. Y.; Lam, R. K. K.; Chong, E. Y. W.; Cheng, S. H.; Yu, K. N.

    2010-03-01

    The present work was devoted to designing the experimental setup and the associated procedures for alpha-particle-induced adaptive response in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Thin PADC films with a thickness of 16 μm were fabricated and employed as support substrates for holding dechorionated zebrafish embryos for alpha-particle irradiation from the bottom through the films. Embryos were collected within 15 min when the light photoperiod began, which were then incubated and dechorionated at 4 h post fertilization (hpf). They were then irradiated at 5 hpf by alpha particles using a planar 241Am source with an activity of 0.1151 μCi for 24 s (priming dose), and subsequently at 10 hpf using the same source for 240 s (challenging dose). The levels of apoptosis in irradiated zebrafish embryos at 24 hpf were quantified through staining with the vital dye acridine orange, followed by counting the stained cells under a florescent microscope. The results revealed the presence of the adaptive response in zebrafish embryos in vivo, and demonstrated the feasibility of the adopted experimental setup and procedures.

  16. Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Jason, Andrew J.; Blind, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

  17. Development of a CO2 Laser Collective Thomson Scattering Fast Ion/Alpha Particle Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Roger K.; Hutchinson, Donald P.

    2000-10-01

    A collective Thomson scattering diagnostic is being developed for the measurement of confined fast ions in hot, dense plasmas such as the ion tail in JT-60U and the alphas produced in a burning reactor or the upgraded JET device. A CO2 laser scattering system has been installed on JT-60U for this purpose. The diagnostic also has the capability of measuring the isotopic D/T density ratio of the core ions. The advances under development for this diagnostic include improvements in the high power source laser, increased bandwidth and reduced noise in the receiver, and the development of an IF electronic filter bank. Such improvements are designed to permit the temporal measurement of the fast ions and improve the accuracy in determining their velocity distribution. Modeling of the expected scattered signals produced by these improvements and the diagnostics capability to measure the velocity distribution and isotopic ratio are presented. · Managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC0500OR22725.

  18. Energy levels in {sub 98}{sup 251}Cf populated in the {alpha} decay of {sub 100}{sup 255}Fm

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chasman, R. R.; Greene, J. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Reiter, P.

    2000-12-01

    Gamma-ray spectra of a 20-h {sup 255}Fm source containing {approx}1 mCi activity were measured with a 25% Ge detector and a low-energy photon spectrometer (LEPS). Gamma lines with intensities as low as 1.0x10{sup -6}% per {sup 255}Fm {alpha} decay were observed. Gamma-gamma coincidence spectra of a {sup 255}Fm sample were measured with the GAMMASPHERE array. A comparison of the {gamma}-ray spectrum gated by the Cf K{sub {alpha}} x-ray peak with the {gamma}-singles spectrum provided spins of the excited states in {sup 251}Cf. The {gamma}-ray data, in conjunction with previously measured {sup 250}Cf(d,p) reaction data, allowed us to characterize several single-particle and vibrational states above the N=152 subshell gap.

  19. R-matrix description of particle energy spectra produced by low-energy 3H + 3H reactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brune, C. R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Bacher, A. D.; Hale, G. M.; Paris, M. W.

    2015-07-20

    An R-matrix model for three-body final states is presented and applied to a recent measurement of the neutron energy spectrum from the 3H + 3H→ 2n + α reaction. The calculation includes the n alpha and n n interactions in the final state, angular momentum conservation, antisymmetrization, and the interference between different channels. A good fit to the measured spectrum is obtained, where clear evidence for the 5He ground state is observed. The model is also used to predict the alpha-particle spectrum from 3H + 3H as well as particle spectra from 3He + 3He. The R-matrix approach presented heremore » is very general, and can be adapted to a wide variety of problems with three-body final states.« less

  20. The Apollo Alpha Spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoda, N.; Kubierschky, K.; Frank, R.; Carroll, J.

    1973-01-01

    Located in the Science Instrument Module of Apollo 15 and 16, the Alpha Particle Spectrometer was designed to detect and measure the energy of alpha particles emitted by the radon isotopes and their daughter products. The spectrometer sensor consisted of an array of totally depleted silicon surface barrier detectors. Biased amplifier and linear gate techniques were utilized to reduce resolution degradation, thereby permitting the use of a single 512 channel PHA. Sensor identification and in-flight radioactive calibration were incorporated to enhance data reduction.

  1. Improve the catalytic activity of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in decomposition of ammonium perchlorate by coating amorphous carbon on their surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yifu; Liu Xinghai; Nie Jiaorong; Yu Lei; Zhong Yalan; Huang Chi

    2011-02-15

    Sphere- and pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles have been selectively synthesized using NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O and NaOH solution to adjust the pH value of the designed synthetic system, respectively. The sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles with diameter about 25 nm on average were encapsulated into carbon shells to fabricate a novel core-shell composite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C) through the coating experiments. The catalytic performance of the products on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) was investigated by thermal gravimetric analyzer (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The thermal decomposition temperatures of AP in the presence of pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C are reduced by 72, 81 and 109 {sup o}C, respectively, which show that {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C core-shell composites have higher catalytic activity than that of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. -- Graphical abstract: The catalytic performance of pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Sphere- and pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles have been selectively synthesized using NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O and NaOH solution to adjust the pH value. {yields} A novel core-shell composite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C core-shell structured composite) has been successfully synthesized using sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles as the cores and glucose as the source of carbon. {yields} The thermal decomposition temperatures of AP in the presence of pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C are reduced by 72, 81 and 109 {sup o}C, respectively, which shows that these materials have high catalytic activity.

  2. Alpha-Particle Emitting 213Bi-Anti-EGFR Immunoconjugates Eradicate Tumor Cells Independent of Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Gaertner, Florian C.; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Essler, Markus; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia is a central problem in tumor treatment because hypoxic cells are less sensitive to chemo- and radiotherapy than normoxic cells. Radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells is due to reduced sensitivity towards low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation. High LET α-emitters are thought to eradicate tumor cells independent of cellular oxygenation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to demonstrate that cell-bound α-particle emitting 213Bi immunoconjugates kill hypoxic and normoxic CAL33 tumor cells with identical efficiency. For that purpose CAL33 cells were incubated with 213Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb or irradiated with photons with a nominal energy of 6 MeV both under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Oxygenation of cells was checked via the hypoxia-associated marker HIF-1α. Survival of cells was analysed using the clonogenic assay. Cell viability was monitored with the WST colorimetric assay. Results were evaluated statistically using a t-test and a Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM). Survival and viability of CAL33 cells decreased both after incubation with increasing 213Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb activity concentrations (9.25 kBq/ml–1.48 MBq/ml) and irradiation with increasing doses of photons (0.5–12 Gy). Following photon irradiation survival and viability of normoxic cells were significantly lower than those of hypoxic cells at all doses analysed. In contrast, cell death induced by 213Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb turned out to be independent of cellular oxygenation. These results demonstrate that α-particle emitting 213Bi-immunoconjugates eradicate hypoxic tumor cells as effective as normoxic cells. Therefore, 213Bi-radioimmunotherapy seems to be an appropriate strategy for treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:23724085

  3. Multipurpose Radiation Resistant Semiconductor Detectors for Alpha, Neutron & Low Energy Gamma Ray Measurements at High Temperatures in High-Intensity Gamma Ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, Frank H.

    2005-06-01

    Work scheduled under year two of DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER63734 is on schedule and all year-two milestones have or will be met. Results to date demonstrate that unprecedented silicon carbide (SiC) energy resolution has been obtained, and that SiC detectors may achieve energy resolution that exceeds that obtainable with the best silicon alpha spectrometers. Fast-neutron energy spectrometry measurements indicate that recoil-ion energy spectrometry should be possible with SiC detectors. Furthermore, SiC detectors have been demonstrated to perform well even after gamma-ray exposures of 1.E09 Rad. This result and the previously demonstrated capability of SiC detectors to operate in elevated-temperature environments are very promising for potential DOE EMSP applications. A new class of multipurpose, radiation-resistant semiconductor detectors that can be used in elevated-temperature and high-radiation environments is being developed under this grant. These detectors, based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor are designed to have larger active volumes than previously available SiC detectors, and are being tested for their response to alpha particles, X-rays and low energy gamma rays, and fast neutrons. Specifically, SiC radiation detectors with larger areas and 100-micrometer thick active regions have been designed and manufactured according to detector-design specifications. Detectors based on a Schottky diode design were specified in order to minimize the effects of the detector entrance window on alpha particle measurements. During manufacture of the Schottky diodes, the manufacturer also provided a set of large-volume SiC p-i-n diodes for testing Extensive alpha particle measurements have been carried out to test and quantify the response of the SiC Schottky diodes. Exposures to 148-Gd, 213-Po, 217-At, 221-Fr, 225-Ac, 237-Np, 238-Pu, 240-Pu, and 242-Pu sources were used to obtain detailed alpha response data in the alpha energy range from 3182.787 keV to 8375.9 keV. The 148-Gd, 213-Po, 217-At, and 221-Fr sources provide energy-separated, mono-energetic alpha particle peaks which can be analyzed to provide detailed information on the energy response characteristics of the detectors.

  4. Humidity influenced capacitance and resistance of an Al/DNA/Al Schottky diode irradiated by alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA based sensors, especially as humidity and alpha particle sensors have become quite popular in recent times due to flexible and highly optimizable nature of this fundamental biomaterial. Application of DNA electronics allow for more sensitive, accurate and effective sensors to be developed and fabricated. In this work, we examined the effect of different humidity conditions on the capacitive and resistive response of Aluminum (Al)/DNA/Al Schottky barrier structure when bombarded by time-dependent dosages of alpha particles. Based on current-voltage profiles, which demonstrated rectifying behaviours, Schottky diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance was calculated. Results observed generally pointed towards a decrease in the resistance value from the pristine to the radiated structures. It was also demonstrated that under the effect of humidity, the capacitance of the DNA thin film increased from 0.05894 to 92.736 nF, with rising relative humidity level. We also observed the occurrence of the hypersensitivity phenomena after alpha irradiation between 2 to 4 min by observing a drop in the series resistance, crucial in the study of DNA damage and repair mechanisms. These observations may also suggest the exciting possibility of utilizing Al/DNA/Al Schottky diodes as potentially sensitive humidity sensors. PMID:27160654

  5. Humidity influenced capacitance and resistance of an Al/DNA/Al Schottky diode irradiated by alpha particles

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ta’ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA based sensors, especially as humidity and alpha particle sensors have become quite popular in recent times due to flexible and highly optimizable nature of this fundamental biomaterial. Application of DNA electronics allow for more sensitive, accurate and effective sensors to be developed and fabricated. In this work, we examined the effect of different humidity conditions on the capacitive and resistive response of Aluminum (Al)/DNA/Al Schottky barrier structure when bombarded by time-dependent dosages of alpha particles. Based on current-voltage profiles, which demonstrated rectifying behaviours, Schottky diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance was calculated. Results observed generally pointed towards a decrease in the resistance value from the pristine to the radiated structures. It was also demonstrated that under the effect of humidity, the capacitance of the DNA thin film increased from 0.05894 to 92.736 nF, with rising relative humidity level. We also observed the occurrence of the hypersensitivity phenomena after alpha irradiation between 2 to 4 min by observing a drop in the series resistance, crucial in the study of DNA damage and repair mechanisms. These observations may also suggest the exciting possibility of utilizing Al/DNA/Al Schottky diodes as potentially sensitive humidity sensors. PMID:27160654

  6. Statins enhance peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha activity to regulate energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenxian; Wong, Chi-Wai

    2010-03-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) serves as an inducible coactivator for a number of transcription factors to control energy metabolism. Insulin signaling through Akt kinase has been demonstrated to phosphorylate PGC-1alpha at serine 571 and downregulate its activity in the liver. Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that reduce cholesterol synthesis in the liver. In this study, we found that statins reduced the active form of Akt and enhanced PGC-1alpha activity. Specifically, statins failed to activate an S571A mutant of PGC-1alpha. The activation of PGC-1alpha by statins selectively enhanced the expression of energy metabolizing enzymes and regulators including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, acyl-CoA oxidase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1A, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4. Importantly, a constitutively active form of Akt partially reduced the statin-enhanced gene expression. Our study thus provides a plausible mechanistic explanation for the hypolipidemic effect of statin through elevating the rate of beta-oxidation and mitochondrial Kreb's cycle capacity to enhance fatty acid utilization while reducing the rate of glycolysis. PMID:19915805

  7. The thermoluminescence response of doped SiO2 optical fibres subjected to alpha-particle irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Bradley, D A; Hashim, Suhairul; Wagiran, Husin

    2009-03-01

    Ion beams are used in radiotherapy to deliver a more precise dose to the target volume while minimizing dose to the surrounding healthy tissue. For optimum dose monitoring in ion-beam therapy, it is essential to be able to measure the delivered dose with a sensitivity, spatial resolution and dynamic range that is sufficient to meet the demands of the various therapy situations. Optical fibres have been demonstrated by this group to show promising thermoluminescence properties with respect to photon, electron and proton irradiation. In particular, and also given the flexibility and small size of optical fibre cores, for example 125.0+/-0.1 microm for the Al- and Ge-doped fibres used in this study, these fibres have the potential to fulfill the above requirements. This study investigates the thermoluminescence dosimetric characteristics of variously doped SiO(2) optical fibres irradiated with alpha particles from (241)Am. Following subtraction of the gamma contribution from the above source, the thermoluminescence characteristics of variously doped SiO(2) optical fibres have been compared with that of TLD-100 rods. The irradiations were performed in a bell jar. Of related potential significance is the effective atomic number, Z(eff) of the fibre, modifying measured dose from that deposited in tissues; in the present work, a scanning electron microscope and associated energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy facility have been used to provide evaluation of Z(eff). For Ge-doped fibres, the effective atomic numbers value was 11.4, the equivalent value for Al-doped fibres was 12.3. This paper further presents results on dose response and the glow curves obtained. The results obtained indicate there to be good potential for use of variously doped SiO(2) optical fibres in measuring ion-beam doses in radiotherapeutic applications. PMID:18693114

  8. Use of incomplete energy recovery for the energy compression of large energy spread charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David R.; Benson, Stephen V.

    2007-01-23

    A method of energy recovery for RF-base linear charged particle accelerators that allows energy recovery without large relative momentum spread of the particle beam involving first accelerating a waveform particle beam having a crest and a centroid with an injection energy E.sub.o with the centroid of the particle beam at a phase offset f.sub.o from the crest of the accelerating waveform to an energy E.sub.full and then recovering the beam energy centroid a phase f.sub.o+Df relative to the crest of the waveform particle beam such that (E.sub.full-E.sub.o)(1+cos(f.sub.o+Df))>dE/2 wherein dE=the full energy spread, dE/2=the full energy half spread and Df=the wave form phase distance.

  9. Energy-loss rate of a fast particle in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, Yee Sin; Zhang, C.; Kee, Chun Yun

    2011-08-01

    The energy-loss rate of a fast particle in graphene is studied. The energy-loss rate always increases with increasing incident particle energy, which is quite unusual when compared to electron gas in normal metal. Graphene exhibits a ''discriminating'' behavior where there exists a low energy cut-off below which the scattering process is strictly forbidden, leading to lossless traverse of an external particle in graphene. This low energy cutoff is of the order of nearest neighbor hopping bandwidth. Our results suggest that backscattering is also absent in the external particle scattering of graphene.

  10. Near Fermi Energy reaction dynamics and clustering in alpha-conjugate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiguang; Schmidt, Katarzyna; Kim, E.-J.; Hagel, K.; Barbui, M.; Wuenschel, S.; Natowitz, J. B.; Zheng, H.; Blando, N.; Bonasera, A.; Giuliani, G.

    2015-10-01

    Theoretical study predicted that the self-organizing of alpha cluster is favored over deuteron below a critical density with moderate temperature, where the possible Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is expected to occur. However the experimental information about the alpha states at low density is scarce. It is natural to pursue experiments with α conjugate beams and advanced detection apparatus to explore the collective dynamics of alpha clustered systems at low density. Systematical experiments were carried out with 40Ca and 28Si beams at 10, 25, 35 MeV/u incident on 28Si, 12C, 40Ca and 180Ta targets, detected with the NIMROD-ISiS 4 Pi detector array. It is found that there is a strong neck-like emission, which consists mainly of alpha-like fragments. The characteristic of the α emission source is explored by shape analysis, multi-particle correlation and quantum fluctuation approaches. How these observables reveal the possible alpha BEC in low density and possible exotic toroidal and linear chain configurations made out of alpha clusters is discussed.

  11. The atmosphere of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko diagnosed by charge-exchanged solar wind alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon Wedlund, C.; Kallio, E.; Alho, M.; Nilsson, H.; Stenberg Wieser, G.; Gunell, H.; Behar, E.; Pusa, J.; Gronoff, G.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The ESA/Rosetta mission has been orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since August 2014, measuring its dayside plasma environment. The ion spectrometer onboard Rosetta has detected two ion populations, one energetic with a solar wind origin (H+, He2+, He+), the other at lower energies with a cometary origin (water group ions such as H2O+). He+ ions arise mainly from charge-exchange between solar wind alpha particles and cometary neutrals such as H2O. Aims: The He+ and He2+ ion fluxes measured by the Rosetta Plasma Consortium Ion Composition Analyser (RPC-ICA) give insight into the composition of the dayside neutral coma, into the importance of charge-exchange processes between the solar wind and cometary neutrals, and into the way these evolve when the comet draws closer to the Sun. Methods: We combine observations by the ion spectrometer RPC-ICA onboard Rosetta with calculations from an analytical model based on a collisionless neutral Haser atmosphere and nearly undisturbed solar wind conditions. Results: Equivalent neutral outgassing rates Q can be derived using the observed RPC-ICA He+/He2+ particle flux ratios as input into the analytical model in inverse mode. A revised dependence of Q on heliocentric distance Rh in AU is found to be Rh-7.06 between 1.8 and 3.3 AU, suggesting that the activity in 2015 differed from that of the 2008 perihelion passage. Conversely, using an outgassing rate determined from optical remote sensing measurements from Earth, the forward analytical model results are in relatively good agreement with the measured RPC-ICA flux ratios. Modelled ratios in a 2D spherically-symmetric plane are also presented, showing that charge exchange is most efficient with solar wind protons. Detailed cometocentric profiles of these ratios are also presented. Conclusions: In conclusion, we show that, with the help of a simple analytical model of charge-exchange processes, a mass-capable ion spectrometer such as RPC-ICA can be used as a "remote-sensing" instrument for the neutral cometary atmosphere.

  12. Review of lattice results concerning low-energy particle physics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aoki, S.; Aoki, Y.; Bernard, C.; Blum, T.; Colangelo, G.; Della Morte, M.; Dürr, S.; El-Khadra, A. X.; Fukaya, H.; Horsley, R.; et al

    2014-09-01

    We review lattice results related to pion, kaon, D- and B-meson physics with the aim of making them easily accessible to the particle physics community. More specifically, we report on the determination of the light-quark masses, the form factor f+(0), arising in semileptonic K -> pi transition at zero momentum transfer, as well as the decay constant ratio fK/fpi of decay constants and its consequences for the CKM matrix elements Vus and Vud. Furthermore, we describe the results obtained on the lattice for some of the low-energy constants of SU(2)LxSU(2)R and SU(3)LxSU(3)R Chiral Perturbation Theory and review the determination ofmore » the BK parameter of neutral kaon mixing. The inclusion of heavy-quark quantities significantly expands the FLAG scope with respect to the previous review. Therefore, for this review, we focus on D- and B-meson decay constants, form factors, and mixing parameters, since these are most relevant for the determination of CKM matrix elements and the global CKM unitarity-triangle fit. In addition we review the status of lattice determinations of the strong coupling constant alpha_s.« less

  13. Modelling TF ripple loss of alpha particles in TFTR DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.

    1995-07-01

    Modelling of TF ripple loss of alphas in DT experiments on TFTR now includes neoclassical calculations of first orbit loss, stochastic ripple diffusion, ripple trapping and collisional effects. A rapid way to simulate experiment has been developed which uses a simple stochastic domain model for TF ripple loss within the TRANSP analysis code, with the ripple diffusion threshold evaluated by comparison with more accurate but computationally expensive Hamiltonian coordinate guiding center code simulations. Typical TF collisional ripple loss predictions are 6-10% loss of alphas for TFTR D-T experiments at I{sub p} = 1.0-2.0 MA and R = 2.52 m.

  14. Low energy particle composition. [cosmic rays produced in solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.

    1975-01-01

    A review is given of current knowledge of low-energy cosmic ray particles produced in the solar system. It is argued that the notion that the sun alone can accelerate particles in the solar system must be abandoned in light of evidence that Jupiter and earth may be sources of observed low-energy particles. Measurements of the composition and energy spectra of low-energy particles during quiet times are examined, emphasizing the abundance of protons and helium and of anomalous N, O, and Ne. The abundance of heavy particles (B, C, N, O, Ne, Ca and Fe) of unknown origin in the earth magnetosphere is examined. Reported observations of Jovian electrons are discussed and solar particle events with anomalous compositions (He-3 rich events and Fe rich events) are treated in detail. Nuclear abundances of solar particles, emphasizing their temporal and spatial variations are considered together with the nature of nuclear reaction products in solar flares.

  15. Effects of Complex Symmetry-Breakings on Alpha Particle Power Loads on First Wall Structures and Equilibrium in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, K.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Spong, Donald A; Asunta, O.; Tani, K.; Strumberger, E.; Briguglio, S.; Vlad, G.; Kramer, G.; Putvinski, S.; Hamamatsu, K.

    2011-01-01

    Within the ITPA Topical Group on Energetic Particles, we have investigated the impact that various mechanisms breaking the tokamak axisymmetry can have on the fusion alpha particle confinement in ITER as well as on the wall power loads due to these alphas. In addition to the well-known TF ripple, the 3D effect due to ferromagnetic materials (in ferritic inserts and test blanket modules) and ELM mitigation coils are included in these mechanisms. ITER scenario 4 was chosen since, due to its lower plasma current, it is more vulnerable for various off-normal features. First, the validity of using a 2D equilibrium was investigated: a 3D equilibrium was reconstructed using the VMEC code, and it was verified that no 3D equilibrium reconstruction is needed but it is sufficient to add the vacuum field perturbations onto an axisymmetric equilibrium. Then the alpha particle confinement was studied using three independent codes, ASCOT, DELTA5D and F3D OFMC, all of which assume MHD quiescent background plasma and no anomalous diffusion. All the codes gave a loss power fraction of about 0.2%. The distribution of the peak power load was found to depend on the first wall shape. We also made the first attempt to accommodate the effect of fast-ion-related MHD on the wall loads in ITER using the HMGC and ASCOT codes. The power flux to the wall was found to increase due to the redistribution of fast ions by the MHD activity. Furthermore, the effect of the ELM mitigation field on the fast-ion confinement was addressed by simulating NBI ions with the F3D OFMC code. The loss power fraction of NBI ions was found to increase from 0.3% without the ELM mitigation field to 4-5% with the ELM mitigation field.

  16. Simulation of the alpha particle heating and the helium ash source in an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like tokamak with an internal transport barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Lei Guo, Wenfeng; Xiao, Xiaotao; Dai, Zongliang; Wang, Shaojie

    2014-12-15

    A guiding center orbit following code, which incorporates a set of non-singular coordinates for orbit integration, was developed and applied to investigate the alpha particle heating in an ITER-like tokamak with an internal transport barrier. It is found that a relatively large q (safety factor) value can significantly broaden the alpha heating profile in comparison with the local heating approximation; this broadening is due to the finite orbit width effects; when the orbit width is much smaller than the scale length of the alpha particle source profile, the heating profile agrees with the source profile, otherwise, the heating profile can be significantly broadened. It is also found that the stagnation particles move to the magnetic axis during the slowing-down process, thus the effect of stagnation orbits is not beneficial to the helium ash removal. The source profile of helium ash is broadened in comparison with the alpha source profile, which is similar to the heating profile.

  17. Ionization of noble gas atoms by alpha particles and fission fragments from the decay of 252Cf1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, B. M.; Watson, R. L.; Wohrer, K.; Bandong, B. B.; Sampoll, G.; Horvat, V.

    1993-07-01

    Charge state distributions of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe ions produced in single collisions with alpha particles and fission fragments from the decay of 252Cf have been measured using time of flight spectrometry. The measurements reveal that the maximum number of electrons removed in a fission fragment collision ranges from eight in the case of Ne to 20 in the case of Xe. Recoil-ion production cross sections have been determined for the resolvable ionic charge states and compared with the predictions of a model based upon the independent electron approximation.

  18. New interpretation of alpha-particle-driven instabilities in deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor.

    PubMed

    Nazikian, R; Kramer, G J; Cheng, C Z; Gorelenkov, N N; Berk, H L; Sharapov, S E

    2003-09-19

    The original description of alpha particle driven instabilities in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor in terms of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) remained inconsistent with three fundamental characteristics of the observations: (i) the variation of the mode frequency with toroidal mode number, (ii) the chirping of the mode frequency for a given toroidal mode number, and (iii) the antiballooning density perturbation of the modes. It is now shown that these characteristics can be explained by observing that cylindrical-like modes can exist in the weak magnetic shear region of the plasma that then make a transition to TAEs as the central safety factor decreases in time. PMID:14525368

  19. 1.5D Quasilinear Model for Alpha Particle-TAE Interaction in ARIES ACT-I

    SciTech Connect

    K. Ghantous, N.N. Gorelenkov, C. Kessel, F. Poli

    2013-01-30

    We study the TAE interaction with alpha particle fusion products in ARIES ACT-I using the 1.5D quasilinear model. 1.5D uses linear analytic expressions for growth and damping rates of TAE modes evaluated using TRANSP pro les to calculates the relaxation of pressure pro les. NOVA- K simulations are conducted to validate the analytic dependancies of the rates, and to normalize their absolute value. The low dimensionality of the model permits calculating loss diagrams in large parameter spaces.

  20. Nickel-59 in Surface Layers of Lunar Basalt 74275: Implications for the Solar Alpha Particle Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnabel, C.; Xue, S.; Ma, P.; Herzog, G. F.; Fifield, K.; Cresswell, R. G.; diTada, M. L.; Hausladen, Paul; Reedy, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    By using AMS we have profiled 59 Ni/Ni ratios in lunar basalt 74275. Activities (dpm 59 Ni/[kg Fe]) range from 120 to 10 at depths (mg/cm 2) from about 30 to 650. Modeling results hint at higher solar alpha fluxes during the last about 0.5 My than during the last approximately 1 My.

  1. Constraints on Dirac-Born-Infeld type dark energy models from varying alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Garousi, Mohammad R.; Sami, M.; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2005-04-15

    We study the variation of the effective fine-structure constant alpha for Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) type dark energy models. The DBI action based on string theory naturally gives rise to a coupling between gauge fields and a scalar field responsible for accelerated expansion of the universe. This leads to the change of alpha due to a dynamical evolution of the scalar field, which can be compatible with the recently observed cosmological data around the redshift z-tilde < or approx. 3. We place constraints on several different DBI models including exponential, inverse power-law and rolling massive scalar potentials. We find that these models can satisfy the varying alpha constraint provided that mass scales of the potentials are fine-tuned. When we adopt the mass scales which are motivated by string theory, both exponential and inverse power-law potentials give unacceptably large change of alpha, thus ruled out from observations. On the other hand the rolling massive scalar potential is compatible with the observationally allowed variation of alpha. Therefore the information of varying alpha provides a powerful way to distinguish between a number of string-inspired DBI dark energy models.

  2. A Comparitive Assessement of Cytokine Expression in Human-Derived Cell Lines Exposed to Alpha Particles and X-Rays

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Wilkins, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Alpha- (α-) particle radiation exposure has been linked to the development of lung cancer and has been identified as a radiation type likely to be employed in radiological dispersal devices. Currently, there exists a knowledge gap concerning cytokine modulations associated with exposure to α-particles. Bio-plex technology was employed to investigate changes in proinflammatory cytokines in two human-derived cell lines. Cells were irradiated at a dose of 1.5 Gy to either α-particles or X-rays at equivalent dose rates. The two cell lines exhibited a unique pattern of cytokine expression and the response varied with radiation type. Of the 27 cytokines assessed, only vascular endothelin growth factor (VEGF) was observed to be modulated in both cell lines solely after α-particle exposure, and the expression of VEGF was shown to be dose responsive. These results suggest that certain proinflammatory cytokines may be involved in the biological effects related to α- particle exposure and the responses are cell type and radiation type specific. PMID:22619631

  3. Transcriptional Response of Human Cells to Microbeam Irradiation with 2.1 MeV Alpha Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, C. E.; Bogner, S.; Spitta, L.; Arenz, A.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Greif, K. D.; Giesen, U.

    Within the next decades an increasing number of human beings in space will be simultaneously exposed to different stimuli especially microgravity and radiation To assess the risks for humans during long-duration space missions the complex interplay of these parameters at the cellular level must be understood Cellular stress protection responses lead to increased transcription of several genes via modulation of transcription factors Activation of the Nuclear Factor kappa B NF- kappa B pathway as a possible anti-apoptotic route represents such an important cellular stress response A screening assay for detection of NF- kappa B-dependent gene activation using the destabilized variant of Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein d2EGFP as reporter protein had been developed It consists of Human Embryonic Kidney HEK 293 Cells stably transfected with a receptor-reporter-construct carrying d2EGFP under the control of a NF- kappa B response element Clones positive for Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha TNF- alpha inducible d2EGFP expression were selected as cellular reporters Irradiation was performed either with X-rays 150 kV 19 mA at DLR Cologne or with 2 1 MeV alpha particles LET sim 160 keV mu m at PTB Braunschweig After irradiation the following biological endpoints were determined i cell survival via the colony forming ability test ii time-dependent activation of NF- kappa B dependent d2EGFP gene expression using flow cytometry iii quantitative RT-PCR

  4. Elastic alpha scattering experiments and the alpha-nucleus optical potential at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, P.; Kiss, G.G.; Fülöp, Zs.; Galaviz, D.; Gyürky, Gy.; Somorjai, E.

    2013-11-15

    High precision angular distribution data of (α,α) elastic scattering are presented for the nuclei {sup 89}Y, {sup 92}Mo, {sup 106,110,116}Cd, {sup 112,124}Sn, and {sup 144}Sm at energies around the Coulomb barrier. Such data with small experimental uncertainties over the full angular range (20–170°) are the indispensable prerequisite for the extraction of local optical potentials and for the determination of the total reaction cross section σ{sub reac}. A systematic fitting procedure was applied to the experimental scattering data presented to obtain comprehensive local potential parameter sets that are composed of a real folding potential and an imaginary potential of Woods–Saxon surface type. The potential parameters obtained were used in turn to construct a new systematic α-nucleus potential with very few parameters. Although this new potential cannot reproduce the angular distributions with the same small deviations as the local potential, the new potential is able to predict the total reaction cross sections for all cases under study.

  5. Screening materials with the XIA UltraLo alpha particle counter at Southern Methodist University

    SciTech Connect

    Nakib, M. Z.; Cooley, J.; Kara, B.; Qiu, H.; Scorza, S.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Rielage, K.; Schnee, R. W.

    2013-08-08

    Southern Methodist University houses one of five existing commercially available UltraLo 1800 production model alpha counters made by XIA LLC. The instrument has an electron drift chamber with a 707 cm{sup 2} or 1800 cm{sup 2} counting region which is determined by selecting the inner electrode size. The SMU team operating this device is part of the SuperCDMS screening working group, and uses the alpha counter to study the background rates from the decay of radon in materials used to construct the SuperCDMS experiment. We have studied four acrylic samples obtained from the MiniCLEAN direct dark matter search with the XIA instrument demonstrating its utility in low background experiments by investigating the plate-out of {sup 210}Pb and comparing the effectiveness of cleaning procedures in removing {sup 222}Rn progenies from the samples.

  6. Screening materials with the XIA UltraLo alpha particle counter at Southern Methodist University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakib, M. Z.; Cooley, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Kara, B.; Qiu, H.; Rielage, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.

    2013-08-01

    Southern Methodist University houses one of five existing commercially available UltraLo 1800 production model alpha counters made by XIA LLC. The instrument has an electron drift chamber with a 707 cm2 or 1800 cm2 counting region which is determined by selecting the inner electrode size. The SMU team operating this device is part of the SuperCDMS screening working group, and uses the alpha counter to study the background rates from the decay of radon in materials used to construct the SuperCDMS experiment. We have studied four acrylic samples obtained from the MiniCLEAN direct dark matter search with the XIA instrument demonstrating its utility in low background experiments by investigating the plate-out of 210Pb and comparing the effectiveness of cleaning procedures in removing 222Rn progenies from the samples.

  7. Development of a strongly focusing high-intensity He{sup +} ion source for a confined alpha particle measurement at ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Kisaki, M.; Shinto, K.; Kobuchi, T.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.; Tsumori, K.; Nishiura, M.; Kaneko, O.; Matsuda, Y.; Wada, M.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Hirano, Y.

    2008-02-15

    A strongly focusing high-intensity He{sup +} ion source has been designed and constructed as a beam source for a high-energy He{sup 0} beam probe system for diagnosis of fusion produced alpha particles in the thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The He{sup +} beam was extracted from the ion source at an acceleration voltage of 18-35 kV. Temperature distributions of the beam target were observed with an IR camera. The 1/e-holding beam profile half-width was about 15 mm at optimum perveance (Perv) of 0.03 (I{sub beam}=2.4 A). A beam current about 3 A was achieved at an acceleration voltage of 26.7 kV with an arc power of 10 kW (Perv=0.023)

  8. Gene amplification and microsatellite instability induced in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells by alpha particles and heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Gene amplification and microsatellite alteration are useful markers of genomic instability in tumor and transformed cell lines. It has been suggested that genomic instability contributes to the progression of tumorigenesis by accumulating genetic changes. In this study, amplification of the carbamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbamylase, dihydro-orotase (CAD) gene in transformed and tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by either alpha particles or (56)Fe ions was assessed by measuring resistance to N-(phosphonacetyl)-l-aspartate (PALA). In addition, alterations of microsatellite loci located on chromosomes 3p and 18q were analyzed in a series of primary and secondary tumor cell lines generated in nude mice. The frequency of PALA-resistant colonies was 1-3 x 10(-3) in tumor cell lines, 5-8 x 10(-5) in transformed cells prior to inoculation into nude mice, and less than 10(-7) in control BEP2D cells. Microsatellite alterations were detected in all 11 tumor cell lines examined at the following loci: D18S34, D18S363, D18S877, D3S1038 and D3S1607. No significant difference in either PALA resistance or microsatellite instability was found in tumor cell lines that were induced by alpha particles compared to those induced by (56)Fe ions.

  9. A neutral-beam diagnostic for fast confined alpha particles in a burning plasma: Application on CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak)

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.; Stearns, J.W.; Cooper, W.S.

    1987-10-01

    Diagnostic methods for fast confined alpha particles are essential for a burning-plasma experiment. We review one- and two-electron-capture methods using energetic neutral beams, and provide quantitative estimates of signal level for a two-electron-capture method applicable to CIT. The best probe is a ground-state helium-atom beam because of its relatively good penetration into a CIT plasma and the large cross section for two-electron capture; it can be produced in useful quantities from HeH/sup +/. We calculate a signal level of the order of 10/sup 7/ counts/s for 100 mA of accelerated HeH/sup +/, which is sufficient to allow time-resolved measurements of the alpha-particle velocity distribution. Limited position information could be obtained for appropriate access port geometry. This diagnostic is feasible, and we recommend further research and development leading to implementation on CIT. 39 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Non-gyrotropic proton and alpha-particle velocity distributions in the solar wind: TAUS observations and stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astudillo, H. F.; Marsch, E.; Livi, S.; Rosenbauer, H.

    1995-01-01

    Ion velocity distribution functions have been measured with high time resolution by the TAUS plasma instrument on the PHOBOS mission to Mars in 1989. The unambiguous separation of protons and alpha-particles by TAUS enabled us to study the nonthermal features of their distributions separately and to analyze the stability of the distributions against excitation of waves in the cyclotron-frequency domain. Typical nonthermal features include temperature anisotropies, with T(sub perpendicular) larger than T(sub parallel), and ion beam populations drifting along the local magnetic field direction. Also, distinctly non-gyrotropic alpha-particle velocity distributions were sometimes found. Non-gyrotropy strongly changes the wave dispersion and gives rise to new growing modes, related to the coupling of the standard wave modes existing in gyrotropic plasma. It is found that for the measured non-gyrotropic ion distributions the right-hand polarized wave can also be excited by a temperature anistropy instead of the usual beam drift.

  11. Enhancement of particle-wave energy exchange by resonance sweeping

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.

    1995-10-01

    It is shown that as the resonance condition of the particle-wave interaction is varied adiabatically, that the particles trapped in the wave will form phase space holes or clumps that can enhance the particle-wave energy exchange. This mechanism can cause much larger saturation levels of instabilities, and even allow the free energy associated with instability, to be tapped in a system that is linearly stable due to background dissipation.

  12. Interacting boson model of clustering in nuclei: alpha-particle clustering in heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    A general interacting boson model of clustering in nuclei is presented. The model is then specialized to the case of n identical ..cap alpha..-clusters (U(6) circle cross U(4)), followed by a detailed study of the SU(3) dynamical limit. Many useful formulae are derived in this limit. The general problem of coexistence and configuration mixing is discussed, and a useful SU(3) bank mixing approximation (BMA) is presented. Formulae of the case of two mixed configurations are derived. The method of calculating the matrix elements for two-nucleon transfer reactions is demonstrated, and formulae for ..cap alpha..-decay reduced widths are given. This model is then utilized for the study of the systematic trends of the data available for actinide nuclei. Most of the results presented here are for the well-deformed even-even mass actinides with A < 242; however, some trends in going to the spherical region and to larger A are studied. Tests, based on experimental data, are presented to discriminate between different limits of this model, and between this and other models. The limit of the model presented here satisfies all of the experimental tests found, while all other competing models were found to have serious deficiencies. This phenomenological study indicates that ..cap alpha..-clustering effects are of fundamental importance for understanding the structure and dynamics of actinide nuclei. Suggestions for future research are made, some of which are based on preliminary work that has already been done.

  13. Evaluation of internal alpha-particle radiation exposure and subsequent fertility among a cohort of women formerly employed in the radium dial industry

    SciTech Connect

    Schieve, L.A.; Davis, F.; Freels, S.

    1997-02-01

    This study examined the effect of internal exposure to {alpha}-particle radiation on subsequent fertility among women employed in radium dial industry prior to 1930, when appreciable amounts of radium were often ingested through the practice of pointing the paint brush with the lips. The analysis was limited to women for whom a radium body burden measurement had been obtained and who were married prior to age 45 (n = 603). Internal radiation dose to the ovary was calculated based on initial intakes of radium-226 and radium-228, average ovarian mass, number and energy of {alpha} particles emitted, fraction of energy absorbed within the ovary, effective retention integrals and estimated photon irradiation. Time between marriage and pregnancy, number of pregnancies and number of live births served as surrogates for fertility. Radiation appeared to have no effect on fertility at estimated cumulative ovarian dose equivalents below 5 Sv; above this dose, however, statistically significant declines in both number of pregnancies and live births were observed. These trends persisted after multivariable adjustment for potential confounding variables and after exclusion of subjects contributing a potential classification or selection bias to the study. Additionally, the high-dose group experienced fewer live births than would have been expected based on population rates. There were no differences in time to first pregnancy between high- and low-dose groups. These results are consistent with earlier studies of {gamma}-ray exposures and suggest that exposure to high doses of radiation from internally deposited radium reduces fertility rather than inducing sterility. 42 refs., 5 tabs.

  14. A novel zirconium K{alpha} imager for high energy density physics research

    SciTech Connect

    Akli, K. U.; Jiang, S.; Storm, M. S.; Krygier, A.; Freeman, R. R.; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Stephens, R. B.; Pereira, N. R.; Baronova, E. O.; Theobald, W.; Ping, Y.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Key, M. H.

    2011-12-15

    We report on the development and characterization of a zirconium K{alpha} imager for high energy density physics research. The imager consists of a spherically bent quartz crystal operating at 15.7 keV photon energy. We compare the performance of the imager in terms of integrated reflectivity (R{sub int}) and temperature dependent collection efficiency ({eta}{sub Te}) to that of the widely used Cu K{alpha} imager. Our collisional-radiative simulations show that the new imager can be reliably used up to 250 eV plasma temperature. Monte Carlo simulations show that for a 25 {mu}m thick tracer layer of zirconium, the contribution to K{alpha} production from photo-pumping is only 2%. We present, for the first time, 2D spatially resolved images of zirconium plasmas generated by a high intensity short pulse laser interacting with Zr solid targets.

  15. Accounting for long alpha-particle stopping distances in (U-Th-Sm)/He geochronology: Refinement of the baseline case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketcham, Richard A.; Gautheron, Ccile; Tassan-Got, Laurent

    2011-12-01

    This contribution proposes a number of methodological refinements for accounting for ejection of energetic particles, most particularly in the case of long alpha-particle stopping distance effects in (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronometry. Recent stopping-distance estimates for minerals commonly used for thermochronometry are up to 1.5 ?m shorter than previously thought, which directly affects the magnitude of the ejection correction parameter FT. The revision in stopping distances necessitates re-fitting the empirical polynomials that have been used to calculate FT corrections for various crystal forms. Reformulation and re-parameterization of these polynomials enables them to account for present and any future change in stopping distances without needing to be recalibrated. The library of shapes described with these polynomials to accommodate habits is expanded for all crystal systems and also ellipsoids, thus covering all minerals currently used and under development for (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronometry. In addition, the inaccuracy caused by characterizing a set of alpha particles from a decay chain with a single mean stopping distance is examined, and a simple method for compensation is recommended. A new method of using FT parameters to calculate corrected ages by applying them to parents instead of daughters or age is presented, which maximizes accuracy for old specimens such as meteorites. Altogether, the refinements proposed will affect (U-Th-Sm)/He ages by 1-5%, depending on size and age. Finally, the concept of an FT-equivalent sphere is introduced as a sphere with the same effective FT value as a given mineral grain. Testing indicates that the FT-equivalent sphere is of comparable or superior accuracy to a sphere of the same surface to volume ratio for diffusion modeling. This finding greatly facilitates utilization of (U-Th-Sm)/He data from standard data tables for forward and inverse modeling.

  16. Trojan horse particle invariance studied with the {sup 6}Li(d,{alpha}){sup 4}He and {sup 7}Li(p,{alpha}){sup 4}He reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.; Cherubini, S.; La Cognata, M.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Bertulani, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Blokhintsev, L.; Burjan, V.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Mrazek, J.; Piskor, S.; Kiss, G. G.; Li, C.; Tumino, A.

    2011-04-15

    The Trojan horse nucleus invariance for the binary reaction cross section extracted from the Trojan horse reaction was tested using the quasifree {sup 3}He({sup 6}Li,{alpha}{alpha})H and {sup 3}He({sup 7}Li,{alpha}{alpha}){sup 2}H reactions. The cross sections for the {sup 6}Li(d,{alpha}){sup 4}He and {sup 7}Li(p,{alpha}){sup 4}He binary processes were extracted in the framework of the plane wave approximation. They are compared with direct behaviors as well as with cross sections extracted from previous indirect investigations of the same binary reactions using deuteron as the Trojan horse nucleus instead of {sup 3}He. The very good agreement confirms the applicability of the plane wave approximation which suggests the independence of the binary indirect cross section on the chosen Trojan horse nucleus, at least for the investigated cases.

  17. Improving Alpha Spectrometry Energy Resolution by Ion Implantation with ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, Michael P.; Liezers, Martin; Farmer, Orville T.; Miller, Brian W.; Morley, Shannon M.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    We report results of a novel technique using an Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) as a method of source preparation for alpha spectrometry. This method produced thin, contaminant free 241Am samples which yielded extraordinary energy resolution which appear to be at the lower limit of the detection technology used in this research.

  18. I. Excluded Volume Effects in Ising Cluster Distributions and Nuclear Multifragmentation II. Multiple-Chance Effects in Alpha-Particle Evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Breus, Dimitry E.

    2005-05-16

    In Part 1, geometric clusters of the Ising model are studied as possible model clusters for nuclear multifragmentation. These clusters may not be considered as non-interacting (ideal gas) due to excluded volume effect which predominantly is the artifact of the cluster's finite size. Interaction significantly complicates the use of clusters in the analysis of thermodynamic systems. Stillinger's theory is used as a basis for the analysis, which within the RFL (Reiss, Frisch, Lebowitz) fluid-of-spheres approximation produces a prediction for cluster concentrations well obeyed by geometric clusters of the Ising model. If thermodynamic condition of phase coexistence is met, these concentrations can be incorporated into a differential equation procedure of moderate complexity to elucidate the liquid-vapor phase diagram of the system with cluster interaction included. The drawback of increased complexity is outweighted by the reward of greater accuracy of the phase diagram, as it is demonstrated by the Ising model. A novel nuclear-cluster analysis procedure is developed by modifying Fisher's model to contain cluster interaction and employing the differential equation procedure to obtain thermodynamic variables. With this procedure applied to geometric clusters, the guidelines are developed to look for excluded volume effect in nuclear multifragmentation. In part 2, an explanation is offered for the recently observed oscillations in the energy spectra of {alpha}-particles emitted from hot compound nuclei. Contrary to what was previously expected, the oscillations are assumed to be caused by the multiple-chance nature of {alpha}-evaporation. In a semi-empirical fashion this assumption is successfully confirmed by a technique of two-spectra decomposition which treats experimental {alpha}-spectra has having contributions from at least two independent emitters. Building upon the success of the multiple-chance explanation of the oscillations, Moretto's single-chance evaporation theory is augmented to include multiple-chance emission and tested on experimental data to yield positive results.

  19. EDITORIAL: Focus on High Energy Particle Astronomy FOCUS ON HIGH ENERGY PARTICLE ASTRONOMY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Rene A.; Covault, Corbin E.

    2009-05-01

    Astrophysics as a sub-discipline provides both unique opportunities and unique challenges relative to other fields of physics. On the one hand, the scope of astrophysics is literally universal, and we are free to examine the most interesting and exotic phenomena to be found anywhere. On the other hand, our access to the universe is limited to only those bits of information that nature happens to provide to us here on Earth. As astrophysicists, we have no direct control over our subject of study. We cannot conduct experiments to arrange stars in galaxies to our liking. We cannot initiate supernovas at specific times and places just to test our hypotheses. What we can do is to squeeze whatever information possible out of the the tiny particles that have traveled across vast distances to act as messengers to Earth from space. Fortunately, we are getting quite good at building a picture of the universe from the available astrophysical information. Nearly a decade into the millennium, scientists have deployed an impressive collection of sensitive observatories that are especially capable of unlocking the secrets of some of the most persistent astrophysical puzzles. In particular, in the fields of high-energy astrophysics corresponding to gamma-ray, cosmic ray and neutrino detection, we are moving to a new generation of experimental techniques that are dramatically more sensitive than prior efforts. These new instruments have two key properties: (1) increased collection area, which is critical for the low fluxes corresponding to high-energy messenger particles, and (2) precision directional reconstructions which allow observers to trace back the paths of these messengers to the originating astrophysical objects. Furthermore, as observational techniques mature, results from these complementary instruments provide an increasingly comprehensive picture of some of the more elusive astrophysical subjects. Each photon, cosmic ray, and neutrino result reported represents another clue to understanding the nature of high-energy objects both within and outside our galaxy. And yet, along with new understandings, we are also faced with new puzzles. Each of the papers in this focus issue presents the field of high-energy particle astronomy from the perspective of a given instrumental approach, corresponding to the current state-of-the-art for a particular class of messenger particle in a given energy range. For gamma-ray astronomy, we have a excellent report by R Johnson and R Mukherjee on results from space-borne telescopes, first from the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and then from the recently commissioned Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The detailed paper by J Hinton describes a wealth of results from several ground-based gamma-ray telescopes using the atmospheric Cherenokov technique. Gamma-ray results and the prospects from air-shower detectors which can provide all-sky monitoring are very well described in a paper by G Sinnis. Larger plans for the future of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy are summarized in a paper by F Krennrich (in preparation). We also include two papers for 'non-photon' particle detection, a summary of the exciting new results for cosmic ray physics by P Sommers and S Westerhoff and an article by K Hoffman describing the astrophysics and capabilities of truly remarkable, large-volume neutrino detectors. For both cosmic rays and neutrinos, the fields seem to be on the threshold of doing astronomy—that is, associating specific detected particles with particular astrophysical objects. Together, the fully operational space- and ground-based gamma-ray observatories and the new large-area experiments for cosmic ray and neutrino detection represent a new era in astronomy. We can be confident that the field of high-energy particle astronomy will continue to rapidly develop as more exciting results from these instruments are reported in the future. Focus on High Energy Particle Astronomy Contents Gamma ray astronomy with atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes: the future Frank Krennrich GeV telescopes: results and prospects for Fermi R P Johnson and R Mukherjee Air shower detectors in gamma-ray astronomy G Sinnis High energy neutrino telescopes K D Hoffman Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy with Cherenkov telescopes Jim Hinton Cosmic ray astronomy P Sommers and S Westerhoff

  20. If there is dissipation the particle can gain energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egydio de Carvalho, R.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we summarize two different mechanisms to gain energy from the presence of dissipation in a time-dependent non-linear system. The particles can gain energy, in the average, from two different scenarios: i) for very week dissipation with the creation of an attractor with high velocity, and ii) in the opposite limit, for very strong dissipation, the particles can also gain energy from a boundary crisis. From the thermodynamic viewpoint both results are totally acceptable.

  1. Redefining relative biological effectiveness in the context of the EQDX formalism: implications for alpha-particle emitter therapy.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Robert F; Howell, Roger W; Song, Hong; Baechler, Sébastien; Sgouros, George

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-particle radiopharmaceutical therapy (αRPT) is currently enjoying increasing attention as a viable alternative to chemotherapy for targeting of disseminated micrometastatic disease. In theory, αRPT can be personalized through pre-therapeutic imaging and dosimetry. However, in practice, given the particularities of α-particle emissions, a dosimetric methodology that accurately predicts the thresholds for organ toxicity has not been reported. This is in part due to the fact that the biological effects caused by α-particle radiation differ markedly from the effects caused by traditional external beam (photon or electron) radiation or β-particle emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The concept of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is used to quantify the ratio of absorbed doses required to achieve a given biological response with alpha particles versus a reference radiation (typically a beta emitter or external beam radiation). However, as conventionally defined, the RBE varies as a function of absorbed dose and therefore a single RBE value is limited in its utility because it cannot be used to predict response over a wide range of absorbed doses. Therefore, efforts are underway to standardize bioeffect modeling for different fractionation schemes and dose rates for both nuclear medicine and external beam radiotherapy. Given the preponderant use of external beams of radiation compared to nuclear medicine in cancer therapy, the more clinically relevant quantity, the 2 Gy equieffective dose, EQD2(α/β), has recently been proposed by the ICRU. In concert with EQD2(α/β), we introduce a new, redefined RBE quantity, named RBE2(α/β), as the ratio of the two linear coefficients that characterize the α particle absorbed dose-response curve and the low-LET megavoltage photon 2 Gy fraction equieffective dose-response curve. The theoretical framework for the proposed new formalism is presented along with its application to experimental data obtained from irradiation of a breast cancer cell line. Radiobiological parameters are obtained using the linear quadratic model to fit cell survival data for MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells that were irradiated with either α particles or a single fraction of low-LET (137)Cs γ rays. From these, the linear coefficient for both the biologically effective dose (BED) and the EQD2(α/β) response lines were derived for fractionated irradiation. The standard RBE calculation, using the traditional single fraction reference radiation, gave RBE values that ranged from 2.4 for a surviving fraction of 0.82-6.0 for a surviving fraction of 0.02, while the dose-independent RBE2(4.6) value was 4.5 for all surviving fraction values. Furthermore, bioeffect modeling with RBE2(α/β) and EQD2(α/β) demonstrated the capacity to predict the surviving fraction of cells irradiated with acute and fractionated low-LET radiation, α particles and chronic exponentially decreasing dose rates of low-LET radiation. RBE2(α/β) is independent of absorbed dose for α-particle emitters and it provides a more logical framework for data reporting and conversion to equieffective dose than the conventional dose-dependent definition of RBE. Moreover, it provides a much needed foundation for the ongoing development of an α-particle dosimetry paradigm and will facilitate the use of tolerance dose data available from external beam radiation therapy, thereby helping to develop αRPT as a single modality as well as for combination therapies. PMID:24502376

  2. Redefining Relative Biological Effectiveness in the Context of the EQDX Formalism: Implications for Alpha-Particle Emitter Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Robert F; Howell, Roger W; Song, Hong; Baechler, Sébastien; Sgouros, George

    2013-12-30

    Alpha-particle radiopharmaceutical therapy (αRPT) is currently enjoying increasing attention as a viable alternative to chemotherapy for targeting of disseminated micrometastatic disease. In theory, αRPT can be personalized through pre-therapeutic imaging and dosimetry. However, in practice, given the particularities of α-particle emissions, a dosimetric methodology that accurately predicts the thresholds for organ toxicity has not been reported. This is in part due to the fact that the biological effects caused by α-particle radiation differ markedly from the effects caused by traditional external beam (photon or electron) radiation or β-particle emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The concept of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is used to quantify the ratio of absorbed doses required to achieve a given biological response with alpha particles versus a reference radiation (typically a beta emitter or external beam radiation). However, as conventionally defined, the RBE varies as a function of absorbed dose and therefore a single RBE value is limited in its utility because it cannot be used to predict response over a wide range of absorbed doses. Therefore, efforts are underway to standardize bioeffect modeling for different fractionation schemes and dose rates for both nuclear medicine and external beam radiotherapy. Given the preponderant use of external beams of radiation compared to nuclear medicine in cancer therapy, the more clinically relevant quantity, the 2 Gy equieffective dose, EQD2(α/β), has recently been proposed by the ICRU. In concert with EQD2(α/β), we introduce a new, redefined RBE quantity, named RBE2(α/β), as the ratio of the two linear coefficients that characterize the α particle absorbed dose-response curve and the low-LET megavoltage photon 2 Gy fraction equieffective dose-response curve. The theoretical framework for the proposed new formalism is presented along with its application to experimental data obtained from irradiation of a breast cancer cell line. Radiobiological parameters are obtained using the linear quadratic model to fit cell survival data for MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells that were irradiated with either α particles or a single fraction of low-LET (137)Cs γ rays. From these, the linear coefficient for both the biologically effective dose (BED) and the EQD2(α/β) response lines were derived for fractionated irradiation. The standard RBE calculation, using the traditional single fraction reference radiation, gave RBE values that ranged from 2.4 for a surviving fraction of 0.82-6.0 for a surviving fraction of 0.02, while the dose-independent RBE2(4.6) value was 4.5 for all surviving fraction values. Furthermore, bioeffect modeling with RBE2(α/β) and EQD2(α/β) demonstrated the capacity to predict the surviving fraction of cells irradiated with acute and fractionated low-LET radiation, α particles and chronic exponentially decreasing dose rates of low-LET radiation. RBE2(α/β) is independent of absorbed dose for α-particle emitters and it provides a more logical framework for data reporting and conversion to equieffective dose than the conventional dose-dependent definition of RBE. Moreover, it provides a much needed foundation for the ongoing development of an α-particle dosimetry paradigm and will facilitate the use of tolerance dose data available from external beam radiation therapy, thereby helping to develop αRPT as a single modality as well as for combination therapies. PMID:24377718

  3. Redefining Relative Biological Effectiveness in the Context of the EQDX Formalism: Implications for Alpha-Particle Emitter Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Robert F.; Howell, Roger W.; Song, Hong; Baechler, Sébastien; Sgouros, George

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-particle radiopharmaceutical therapy (αRPT) is currently enjoying increasing attention as a viable alternative to chemotherapy for targeting of disseminated micrometastatic disease. In theory, αRPT can be personalized through pre-therapeutic imaging and dosimetry. However, in practice, given the particularities of α-particle emissions, a dosimetric methodology that accurately predicts the thresholds for organ toxicity has not been reported. This is in part due to the fact that the biological effects caused by α-particle radiation differ markedly from the effects caused by traditional external beam (photon or electron) radiation or β-particle emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The concept of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is used to quantify the ratio of absorbed doses required to achieve a given biological response with alpha particles versus a reference radiation (typically a beta emitter or external beam radiation). However, as conventionally defined, the RBE varies as a function of absorbed dose and therefore a single RBE value is limited in its utility because it cannot be used to predict response over a wide range of absorbed doses. Therefore, efforts are underway to standardize bioeffect modeling for different fractionation schemes and dose rates for both nuclear medicine and external beam radiotherapy. Given the preponderant use of external beams of radiation compared to nuclear medicine in cancer therapy, the more clinically relevant quantity, the 2 Gy equieffective dose, EQD2(α/β), has recently been proposed by the ICRU. In concert with EQD2(α/β), we introduce a new, redefined RBE quantity, named RBE2(α/β), as the ratio of the two linear coefficients that characterize the α particle absorbed dose-response curve and the low-LET megavoltage photon 2 Gy fraction equieffective dose-response curve. The theoretical framework for the proposed new formalism is presented along with its application to experimental data obtained from irradiation of a breast cancer cell line. Radiobiological parameters are obtained using the linear quadratic model to fit cell survival data for MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells that were irradiated with either α particles or a single fraction of low-LET 137Cs γ rays. From these, the linear coefficient for both the biologically effective dose (BED) and the EQD2(α/β) response lines were derived for fractionated irradiation. The standard RBE calculation, using the traditional single fraction reference radiation, gave RBE values that ranged from 2.4 for a surviving fraction of 0.82–6.0 for a surviving fraction of 0.02, while the dose-independent RBE2(4.6) value was 4.5 for all surviving fraction values. Furthermore, bioeffect modeling with RBE2(α/β) and EQD2(α/β) demonstrated the capacity to predict the surviving fraction of cells irradiated with acute and fractionated low-LET radiation, α particles and chronic exponentially decreasing dose rates of low-LET radiation. RBE2(α/β) is independent of absorbed dose for α-particle emitters and it provides a more logical framework for data reporting and conversion to equieffective dose than the conventional dose-dependent definition of RBE. Moreover, it provides a much needed foundation for the ongoing development of an α-particle dosimetry paradigm and will facilitate the use of tolerance dose data available from external beam radiation therapy, thereby helping to develop αRPT as a single modality as well as for combination therapies. PMID:24502376

  4. Orientational energy of anisometric particles in liquid-crystalline suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burylov, S. V.; Zakhlevnykh, A. N.

    2013-07-01

    We obtain a general expression for the orientational energy of an individual anisometric particle suspended in uniform nematic liquid crystals when the main axis of the particle rotates with respect to the nematic director. We show that there is a qualitative and quantitative analogy between the internal and external problems for cylindrical volumes of nematic liquid crystals, and on this basis we obtain an estimate of the orientational energy of a particle of cylindrical (rodlike, needlelike, or ellipsoidal) shape. For an ensemble of such particles we propose a modified form of their orientational energy in the nematic matrix. This orientational energy has the usual second-order term, and additional fourth-order term in the scalar product of the nematic director and the vector which characterizes an average direction of the main axes of the particles. As an example we obtain the expression for the free energy density of ferronematics, i.e., colloidal suspensions of needlelike magnetic particles in nematic liquid crystals. Unlike previous models, the free energy density includes the proposed modified form of the particle orientational energy, and also a contribution describing the surface saddle-splay deformations of the liquid crystal matrix.

  5. Energy-Efficient Rate-Based Particle Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lievano, Diana; Bhattacharya, Tathagata; McCarthy, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    The effective separation of particles is key to numerous processes and industries handling solid materials. Despite this fact, particle separations techniques remain typically quite ``low tech'' and often are energy-intensive (e.g., sieving) or environmentally unfriendly (e.g., froth floatation) or both. Rate-based separation processes, on the other hand, represent a unique approach to particle separation that has the potential to be more flexible, more efficient, and more environmentally friendly than existing ``low tech'' techniques. In the present paper, we highlight passive granular ratchets, where particles of differing properties flow through a device often called a Galton board. In this type of device, the gravity-driven flow of particles down an inclined plane causes collisions between the particles and the evenly distributed pegs along the board. Dissipative collisions between particles as well as between paticles and pegs results in a diffusion-like motion of particles perpendicular to the flow. The extent of separation (i.e., how far one type of particle is removed from another) depends on the different distances traversed by the two types of particles and, ultimately, on the collision rate and energy dissipation for particle-peg events. A simple theory, will be set. University of Pittsburgh

  6. Performance of an in-situ alpha spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Pöllänen, R

    2016-03-01

    Equipment was recently developed for detecting alpha particles from flat and smooth surfaces with good energy resolution at ambient air pressure. In this work, the detection efficiencies were determined using different extended-area sources emitting alpha and beta radiation and a mixed nuclide point source emitting alpha radiation. Beta particles are of importance because they can also be detected. Counts originating from alpha and beta particles are mainly at different energies, which make their separation possible. An efficiency of 0.14 was determined for an extended-area (>30cm(2)) homogeneous source emitting alpha radiation at the energy of 5-6MeV, whereas for the beta emitters the efficiencies were 0.07-0.19 depending on the beta-particle emission energies. The use of a collimator reduces the detection efficiencies by a factor of up to ten. PMID:26688356

  7. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  8. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  9. The Cosmic Ray All-Particle Energy Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongin

    1998-07-01

    The cosmic ray all-particle energy spectrum in the energy range from 10 GeV to ~100 TeV is presented here. Data were obtained from the Thin Ionisation Calorimeter (TIC) experiment flown on balloon for 76 hours in August 1994 over northern Canada. TIC was calibrated with a 2.3 TeV gold beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1994 and with a 800 GeV proton beam at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in 1997. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations were conducted using GEANT/FLUKA to (1) evaluate the instrument performance including energy calibration and energy resolution, (2) calculate the energy deposited by interacting particles, and (3) reconstruct the cosmic ray all-particle energy spectrum. The derived integral spectral index of the cosmic ray spectrum is γCR=1.68± 0.01 from the measured deposited energy spectrum.

  10. Solar modulation of protons and alpha particles at rigidities of 4-10 GV/c

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Golden, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The high statistics and high resolution rigidity spectra from geomagnetic cutoff to 160 GV/c were provided by a superconducting-magnet spectrometer flown on a balloon. The spectra above 8.3 GV/c fit a power law in rigidity for protons and alphas; below 8.3 GV/c, no clear evidence of solar modification is available. The analysis of data from 5.5 to 8.3 GV/c by the Gleeson-Axford model for solar modulation indicated that the modulation parameter was 0.3 + or - 0.05 Gev/nucleon; the spectra below 5.5 GV/c are being analyzed using a portion of the flight data recorded while the balloon was essentially stationary

  11. Double-electron capture in collision of fast alpha particles with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari-Adivi, Ebrahim; Ghavaminia, Hoda

    2014-11-01

    A four-body boundary-corrected first-order Jackson-Schiff approximation (JS1-4B) is developed to calculate the differential and integral cross-sections (DCSs) for double-electron exchange in collision of fast alpha ions with helium atoms in their ground states. The influence of the static electron correlations on cross-sections is taken into account through choosing the different wave functions to describe the initial and final bound states of the electrons. The quantum-mechanical post and prior transition amplitudes for double charge exchange are derived in terms of two-dimensional real integrals which can be calculated numerically. The validity and utility of the applied approach is critically assessed in comparison with the available experimental data for differential and integral cross-sections. The present calculations are also compared with the results obtained from the other theories.

  12. Outgassing from alpha particle irradiation of lithium hydride and lithium hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haertling, Carol; Usov, Igor; Wang, Yongqiang

    2011-02-01

    We have experimentally studied the effects of α-particle radiation on isotopically enriched lithium hydride ( 6LiH) and its corrosion product lithium hydroxide ( 6LiOH) to determine, in particular, the type and amount of gases evolved during irradiation. SRIM Monte Carlo simulations suggest that irradiating these materials with 2.2-MeV α-particles will ionize atoms and form hydrogen vacancies in the target material, and that these α-particles will penetrate 13.5 and 9 μm into LiH and LiOH, respectively. Using an accelerator to irradiate LiH and LiOH with 2.2-MeV α-particles released only H 2 and CO 2; no other product gases were observed. At 25 °C, doses that simulated 66.5 years of actinide exposure (with accelerated fluxes) produced 2.3 × 10 5 mol/(cm 3 J) H 2 in LiH and 2.3 × 10 6 mol/(cm 3 J) H 2 in LiOH, in the form of a ˜9-μm-thick surface layer on LiH. More H 2 evolved from LiOH than from LiH. We argue that the production of H 2 gas was the result of radiolysis, rather than radiation-induced chemical reaction.

  13. Hit rates and radiation doses to nuclei of bone lining cells from alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polig, E.; Jee, W. S.; Kruglikov, I. L.

    1992-01-01

    Factors relating the local concentration of a bone-seeking alpha-particle emitter to the mean hit rate have been determined for nuclei of bone lining cells using a Monte Carlo procedure. Cell nuclei were approximated by oblate spheroids with dimensions and location taken from a previous histomorphometric study. The Monte Carlo simulation is applicable for planar and diffuse labels at plane or cylindrical bone surfaces. Additionally, the mean nuclear dose per hit, the dose mean per hit, the mean track segment length and its second moment, the percentage of stoppers, and the frequency distribution of the dose have been determined. Some basic features of the hit statistics for bone lining cells have been outlined, and the consequences of existing standards of radiation protection with regard to the hit frequency to cell nuclei are discussed.

  14. Determination of oxygen in silicon and carbide by activation with 27.2 meV alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgolenko, A. P.; Kornienko, N. D.; Lithovchenko, P. G.

    1978-01-01

    The Si sample was polished on one side, and on the other side Ni was applied chemically and soldered with Pb to a water cooled Cu substrate. Optical quartz standard was fixed from the other side. Si carbide samples were soldered to a substrated with In. The prepared samples were irradiated in a cyclotron with a 27.2 MeV alpha particle beam. The layers were removed from the Si and Si carbide samples by grinding and the positron activity of F-18(t sub 1/2 110 min) was measured by using a gamma, gamma coincidence spectrometer with two NaI(TI) crystals. For analysis of Si carbide, the activity decay curve of the samples was recorded to find the contribution of the positron activity of Cu-65(t sub 1/2 12.9 hr) which formed from Ni impurity on irradiation.

  15. On resonant destabilization of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes by circulating and trapped energetic ions/alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Zonca, F.; Chen, L.

    1991-10-01

    Toroidal Alfven eigenmodes are shown to be resonantly destabilized by both circulating and trapped energetic ions/alpha particles. In particular, the energetic circulating ions are shown to resonate with the mode not only at the Alfven speed ({upsilon}{sub A}), but also one-third of this speed, while resonances exist between trapped energetic ions and the wave when {upsilon} = {upsilon}{sub A}/21{epsilon}{sup {1/2}} (l=integer, {epsilon}=r/R is the local inverse aspect ratio), although the instability becomes weaker for resonances other than the fundamental. The oft-quoted criterion that instability requires super-Alfvenic ion velocities is thus sufficient but not necessary. 14 refs.

  16. The problem of low energy particle measurements in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, E. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The accurate measurement of low energy (less than 100 eV) particle properties in the magnetosphere has been difficult, partly because of the low density of such particles, but more particularly because of spacecraft interference effects. Some early examples of how these phenomena have affected particle measurements on an OGO spacecraft are presented. Data obtained with the UCSD particle detectors on ATS-6 are then presented showing how some of these difficulties have been partially overcome. Future measurements of low energy particles in the magnetosphere can be improved by: (1) improving the low energy resolution of detectors; (2) building electrostatically clean spacecraft; (3) controlling spacecraft potential; and (4) using auxiliary measurements, particularly wave data.

  17. Particle energy cascade in the intergalactic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés, M.; Evoli, C.; Ferrara, A.

    2010-05-01

    We study the development of high-energy (Ein <= 1 TeV) cascades produced by a primary electron of energy Ein injected into the intergalactic medium (IGM). To this aim we have developed the new code MEDEA (Monte Carlo Energy Deposition Analysis) which includes Bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton (IC) processes, along with H/He collisional ionizations and excitations, and electron-electron collisions. The cascade energy partition into heating, excitations and ionizations depends primarily not only on the IGM ionized fraction, xe, but also on redshift, z, due to IC on cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons. While Bremsstrahlung is unimportant under most conditions, IC becomes largely dominant at energies Ein >= 1 MeV. The main effect of IC at injection energies Ein <= 100 MeV is a significant boost of the fraction of energy converted into low-energy photons (hν < 10.2 eV) which do not further interact with the IGM. For energies Ein >= 1 GeV CMB photons are preferentially upscattered within the X-ray spectrum (hν > 104 eV) and can free stream to the observer. Complete tables of the fractional energy depositions as a function of redshift, Ein and ionized fraction are given. Our results can be used in many astrophysical contexts, with an obvious application related to the study of decaying/annihilating dark matter (DM) candidates in the high-z Universe.

  18. Evaluation of Melt-Grown, ZnO Single Crystals for Use as Alpha-Particle Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, John S; Giles, N. C.; Yang, Xiaocheng; Wall, R. Andrew; Ucer, Burak; Williams, Richard T.; Wisniewski, Dariusz J; Boatner, Lynn A; Rengarajan, Varatharajan; Nause, Jeff E; Nemeth, Bell

    2008-01-01

    As part of an ongoing investigation of the scintillation properties of zinc-oxide-based scintillators, several melt-grown, ZnO single crystals have been characterized using -particle excitation, infrared reflectance, and room temperature photoluminescence. The crystals, grown by Cermet, Inc. using a pressurized melt growth process, were doped with Group 1 elements (Li), Group 2 elements (Mg), Group 3 elements (Ga, In) and Lanthanides (Gd, Er, Tm). The goals of these studies are to better understand the scintillation mechanisms associated with various members of the ZnO scintillator family and to then use this knowledge to improve the radiation detection capabilities of ZnO-based scintillators. One application for which ZnO is particularly well suited as a scintillator is as the associated particle detector in a deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron generator. Application requirements include the exclusion of organic materials, outstanding timing resolution, and high radiation resistance. ZnO(Ga) and ZnO(In) have demonstrated fast (sub-nanosecond) decay times with relatively low light yields, and ZnO(Ga) has been used in a powder form as the associated particle detector for a D-T neutron generator. Four promising candidate materials, ZnO, ZnO:Ga, ZnO:In,Li, and ZnO:Er,Li, were identified in this study. These four samples demonstrated sub-nanosecond decay times and alpha particle excited luminescence comparable to BC-400 fast plastic scintillator. The ZnO:Mg,Ga, ZnO:Gd, and ZnO:Li samples demonstrated appreciable slow (microsecond) decay components that would be incompatible with high-counting-rate applications.

  19. Alpha-channeling in mirror machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhmoginov, Andrey

    2011-10-01

    Coupling suitable electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron frequency range to plasmas can lead to particle ejection and cooling. This effect can be exploited for extracting energy from alpha particles to sustain the fusion reaction. First suggested for tokamaks and known as alpha-channeling, this technique might also improve mirror machine operation. But diffusion in mirror phase space is very different from in tokamaks; the waves are different and there are phase space loss boundaries. This talk summarizes the analytical and computational tools newly developed to study the feasibility of alpha-channeling in linear traps. We identified waves suitable for alpha-channeling in practical mirror devices by optimizing the energy extraction rate with respect to the wave parameters. With the optimal regime identified, we carried out a systematic search for modes with similar parameters in mirror plasmas. Modes suitable for alpha particle energy extraction are then identified in several device designs. Redirection of the energy extracted from alpha particles is shown to be possible in principle by either collisional relaxation of resonant minority ions, or by coupling the alpha-channeling mode to the ICRH waves in the tandem mirror device plugs. As a spinoff result, in the generalized extraction problem in a network of diffusion paths, we derived a fundamental theorem. This work was supported by DOE Contracts No. DE-FG02-06ER54851 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. Design of a compact, low energy charged particle spectrometer for stellar nucleosynthesis experiments at OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, E.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Orozco, D.; Rinderknecht, H.; Rosenberg, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-11-01

    Simulations have been used to model an ``Orange Spectrometer'' for measuring alpha and proton energy spectra in the range ~1-5 MeV for experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). An important application will be the study of stellar nucleosynthesis reactions, in particular 3He +3He --> α + p +p, which is a step in the solar proton-proton chain. Experiments to study this reaction have been undertaken at OMEGA before, but no diagnostics have been able to measure the low-energy, low-yield alpha particles generated in the reaction. Feasibility studies were performed with particle trajectory calculations utilizing magnetic field models from COMSOL, and several designs have been identified for testing and development. Ability to study the alpha particles in addition to the protons is essential for understanding the nuclear physics governing the final-state interactions between pairs of particles in the three-body final state. This work was supported in part by NLUF, DOE, and LLE.

  1. Central Exclusive Particle Production at High Energy Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, M.G.; Coughlin, T.D.; Forshaw, J.R.; /Manchester U.

    2010-06-01

    We review the subject of central exclusive particle production at high energy hadron colliders. In particular we consider reactions of the type A + B {yields} A + X + B, where X is a fully specified system of particles that is well separated in rapidity from the outgoing beam particles. We focus on the case where the colliding particles are strongly interacting and mainly they will be protons (or antiprotons) as at the ISR, Sp{bar p}S, Tevatron and LHC. The data are surveyed and placed within the context of theoretical developments.

  2. Limit on possible energy-dependent velocities for massless particles

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, T.J.; Alexandreas, D.E.; Allen, R.C.; Biller, S.; Berley, D.; Burman, R.L.; Cady, D.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Dingus, B.L.; Dion, G.M.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Goodman, J.A.; Hoffman, C.M.; Lloyd-Evans, J.; Nagle, D.E.; Potter, M.; Sandberg, V.D.; Wilkinson, C.A.; Yodh, G.B. The University of California, Irvine, California 92717 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 )

    1990-01-15

    A basic tenet of special relativity is that all massless particles travel at a constant, energy-independent velocity. Astrophysical data, including observation of the Crab pulsar at {similar to}100 MeV and the recent detection of the pulsar in Hercules X-1 at energies {ge}100 TeV, are used to place new experimental constraints on energy-dependent deviations from constant velocity for massless particles. Previous experiments reached energies {similar to}10 GeV; this analysis improves the previous constraints by 7 orders of magnitude.

  3. Activation measurement of the 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be cross section at low energy.

    PubMed

    Bemmerer, D; Confortola, F; Costantini, H; Formicola, A; Gyürky, Gy; Bonetti, R; Broggini, C; Corvisiero, P; Elekes, Z; Fülöp, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Laubenstein, M; Lemut, A; Limata, B; Lozza, V; Marta, M; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C Rossi; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P

    2006-09-22

    The nuclear physics input from the 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be cross section is a major uncertainty in the fluxes of 7Be and 8B neutrinos from the Sun predicted by solar models and in the 7Li abundance obtained in big-bang nucleosynthesis calculations. The present work reports on a new precision experiment using the activation technique at energies directly relevant to big-bang nucleosynthesis. Previously such low energies had been reached experimentally only by the prompt-gamma technique and with inferior precision. Using a windowless gas target, high beam intensity, and low background gamma-counting facilities, the 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be cross section has been determined at 127, 148, and 169 keV center-of-mass energy with a total uncertainty of 4%. The sources of systematic uncertainty are discussed in detail. The present data can be used in big-bang nucleosynthesis calculations and to constrain the extrapolation of the 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be astrophysical S factor to solar energies. PMID:17025958

  4. Double strand break rejoining after irradiation of human fibroblasts with X rays or alpha particles: PFGE studies and numerical models.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M; Prise, K M; Michael, B D

    2002-01-01

    When a charged-particle track intercepts the chromatin fibre in DNA of mammalian cells, clustered damage is induced depending on the DNA conformation, local environment and track structure. Intra-track correlated DNA damage may have a higher probability of being mis-repaired or left un-repaired. Fragment size-distributions of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) induced in primary human fibroblasts by 240 kVp X rays and 238Pu alpha particles (110 keV.micron-1) were resolved using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). By monitoring DSB rejoining kinetics and changes in the fragment size distribution with repair time, the relevance of spatial association of DSBs in determining rejoining kinetics was investigated. Rejoining kinetics appeared bi-phasic and independent of the size of the DNA fragments for both radiation qualities, with high LET radiation-induced DSBs repairing more slowly. Results suggest that local complexity of individual DSBs, rather than spatial association with other breaks is more significant in the determination of rejoining kinetics. PMID:12194265

  5. STRV RADMON: An integrated high-energy particle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin; Soli, George; Blaes, Brent; Tardio, Gemma

    1993-01-01

    The RADMON (Radiation Monitor) was developed as a compact device with a 4-kbit SRAM particle detector and two p-FET total dose monitors. Thus it can be used as a spacecraft radiation alarm and in situ total dose monitor. This paper discusses the design and calibration of the SRAM for proton, alpha, and heavy ion detection. Upset rates for the RADMON, based on a newly developed space particle flux algorithm, are shown to vary over eight orders of magnitude. On the STRV (Space Technology Research Vehicle) the RADMON's SRAM will be used to detect trapped protons, solar flares, and cosmic rays and to evaluate our ability to predict space results from ground tests.

  6. Targeting Aberrant DNA double strand break repair in triple negative breast cancer with alpha particle emitter radiolabeled anti-EGFR antibody

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hong; Hedayati, Mohammad; Hobbs, Robert F.; Shao, Chunbo; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Sgouros, George

    2013-01-01

    The higher potential efficacy of alpha-particle radiopharmaceutical therapy lies in the 3 to 8-fold greater biological effectiveness (RBE) of alpha particles relative to photon or beta-particle radiation. This greater RBE, however, also applies to normal tissue, thereby reducing the potential advantage of high RBE. Since alpha particles typically cause DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), targeting tumors that are defective in DSB repair effectively increases the RBE, yielding a secondary, RBE-based differentiation between tumor and normal tissue that is complementary to conventional, receptor-mediated tumor targeting. In some triple negative breast cancers (TNBC, ER−/PR−/HER-2−), germline mutation in BRCA-1, a key gene in homologous recombination (HR) DSB repair, predisposes patients to early onset of breast cancer. These patients have few treatment options once the cancer has metastasized. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of alpha particle emitter, 213Bi labeled anti-EGFR antibody, Cetuximab, in BRCA-1 defective TNBC. 213Bi-Cetuximab was found to be significantly more effective in the BRCA-1 mutated TNBC cell line HCC1937 than BRCA-1 competent TNBC cell MDA-MB-231. siRNA knockdown of BRCA-1 or DNA-PKcs, a key gene in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DSB repair pathway, also sensitized TNBC cells to 213Bi-Cetuximab. Furthermore, the small molecule inhibitor of DNA-PKcs, NU7441, sensitized BRCA-1 competent TNBC cells to alpha particle radiation. Immunofluorescent staining of γH2AX foci and comet assay confirmed that enhanced RBE is caused by impaired DSB repair. These data offer a novel strategy for enhancing conventional receptor-mediated targeting with an additional, potentially synergistic radiobiological targeting that could be applied to TNBC. PMID:23873849

  7. Elementary particle physics and high energy phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, A.R.; Cumalat, J.P.; de Alwis, S.P.; DeGrand, T.A.; Ford, W.T.; Mahanthappa, K.T.; Nauenberg, U.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses the following research in high energy physics: the properties of the z neutral boson with the SLD detector; the research and development program for the SDC muon detector; the fixed-target k-decay experiments; the Rocky Mountain Consortium for HEP; high energy photoproduction of states containing heavy quarks; and electron-positron physics with the CLEO II and Mark II detectors. (LSP).

  8. Model for radial dependence of frequency distributions for energy imparted in nanometer volumes from HZE particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Nikjoo, H.; Goodhead, D. T.; Decillo, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    This paper develops a deterministic model of frequency distributions for energy imparted (total energy deposition) in small volumes similar to DNA molecules from high-energy ions of interest for space radiation protection and cancer therapy. Frequency distributions for energy imparted are useful for considering radiation quality and for modeling biological damage produced by ionizing radiation. For high-energy ions, secondary electron (delta-ray) tracks originating from a primary ion track make dominant contributions to energy deposition events in small volumes. Our method uses the distribution of electrons produced about an ion's path and incorporates results from Monte Carlo simulation of electron tracks to predict frequency distributions for ions, including their dependence on radial distance. The contribution from primary ion events is treated using an impact parameter formalism of spatially restricted linear energy transfer (LET) and energy-transfer straggling. We validate our model by comparing it directly to results from Monte Carlo simulations for proton and alpha-particle tracks. We show for the first time frequency distributions of energy imparted in DNA structures by several high-energy ions such as cosmic-ray iron ions. Our comparison with results from Monte Carlo simulations at low energies indicates the accuracy of the method.

  9. Effect of energy distribution on sorption kinetics in bidispersed particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xijun; Rao, G.N.; Do, D.D. )

    1993-02-01

    In this article, the authors present a model to describe sorption kinetics of gaseous adsorbates onto bidispersed heterogeneous microporous particles. This model describes adsorption and desorption of gaseous adsorbates with allowance for the energy distribution of adsorption site for both equilibrium isotherm and diffusion of the adsorbed species. The adsorbed species of all energy levels diffuse in two directions inside the particle. One direction is the direction along the particle coordinate while the other is the direction perpendicular to the particle coordinate (that is, the direction into the grain of the solid). This model is more fundamental than models previously proposed by Do and coworkers. Effects of energy distribution on the adsorption and desorption dynamics are investigated. Extensive experimental analysis of adsorption and desorption dynamics of ethane and propane onto Ajax activated carbon are carried out to validate this theory.

  10. Calculation of the quasi-energies and resonances behavior of the hydrogen Lyman-alpha problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruyten, Wilhelmus M.

    1992-01-01

    Recently, Bakshi and Kalman presented numerical results for the quasi-energies of the n = 2 multiplet in the hydrogen Lyman-alpha transition for a plasma in which both strong static and oscillating electric fields are present. Recent work on related magnetic and optical resonance problems provides a simplified mathematical treatment, as well as greater insight into the complex resonance behavior of this interaction.

  11. LET-Dependent Bystander Effects Caused by Irradiation of Human Prostate Carcinoma Cells with X Rays or Alpha Particles

    PubMed Central

    Anzenberg, Vered; Chandiramani, Sarika; Coderre, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been demonstrated in both normal and tumor cells using a variety of different radiation qualities. Literature reports are contradictory, however, on whether there is an LET dependence of the bystander effect. This study investigated the ability of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells irradiated with either α particles or 250 kVp X rays to cause medium-mediated bystander effects in unirradiated populations of DU-145 cells or in AG01522 human fibroblasts. The end points measured in both of the bystander cell lines were micronucleus formation, γ-H2AX focus induction, and the surviving fraction. The incidence of micronuclei increased 1.5–2.0-fold in both tumor and fibroblast bystander cells after 4 h of co-culture with DU-145 tumor cells that had been directly irradiated with either α particles or X rays. Only the AG01522 fibroblasts showed bystander effects for the γ-H2AX focus (a 1.5-fold increase) and surviving fraction (a decrease to 0.8) end points when co-cultured with X-irradiated tumor cells. Alpha-particle irradiation of DU-145 tumor cells produced no decrease in the surviving fraction and no increase in γ-H2AX focus induction in co-cultured bystander cells of either cell line. These results indicate that there are LET-dependent differences in the signal released from DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells and that, for some end points, bystander AG01522 fibroblasts and bystander DU-145 prostate carcinoma cells respond differently to the same medium-mediated signal. PMID:19024654

  12. Semiconductor polycrystalline alpha detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, M.; Roth, M.; Zuck, A.; Marom, G.; Khakhan, O.; Alfassi, Z. B.

    2006-08-01

    In order to check possible novel neutron detectors based on composite semiconductor detectors containing nuclides with large cross sections for neutron, we tested their response to alpha particles. In the present paper we describe results obtained with composite samples made of hexagonal Boron Nitride particles bound with Polystyrene or Nylon-6. The samples were tested under 5.5 MeV alpha particle radiation emitted from 241Am source and 4.8MeV alpha particle of 226Ra source. Some of the responses of these composite detectors to thermal neutrons were already reported and here we shall show some newer results obtained with thermal neutrons, from a low intensity 241Am - 9Be and also from a medium intensity 252Cf source, which were thermalized using 10 cm thick paraffin. The Alpha detection experiments show that all the tested samples, regardless of the binder, show a well-defined peak around the 270 energy channel. There was very little polarization of the alpha radiation, since the amplitude of the alpha peak is reduced after ~ 2min from start of the irradiation, from 100% to 95% and it stayed stable at this level for another 10 minutes. The alpha spectrum detected from a PbI II single crystal is also shown for comparison. The neutron spectrum obtained by the composite BN samples showed an apparent peak around the 150 energy channel. The Signal to noise ratio for neutron detection from radionuclide shown here is about 2 only, whereas recent results to be published later, obtained with our composite BN detectors from a neutron beam of about 10 7 sec -1cm -2 is ~2 5. The 1.4 and 1.7 MeV alpha peaks resulting from the nuclear reaction of thermal neutrons with 10B of the boron nitride detector are not buried in the noise range. The capacitance noise requires small contact areas, therefore for large area detectors it is necessary to produce an electronic read-out device which can add up a multitude of small (less than 10sq.mm) pixilated contacts.

  13. Readout cross-talk for alpha-particle measurements in a pixelated sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norlin, B.; Reza, S.; Krapohl, D.; Fröjdh, E.; Thungström, G.

    2015-05-01

    Simulations in Medici are performed to quantify crosstalk and charge sharing in a hybrid pixelated silicon detector. Crosstalk and charge sharing degrades the spatial and spectral resolution of single photon processing X-ray imaging systems. For typical medical X-ray imaging applications, the process is dominated by charge sharing between the pixels in the sensor. For heavier particles each impact generates a large amount of charge and the simulation seems to over predict the charge collection efficiency. This indicates that some type of non modelled degradation of the charge transport efficiency exists, like the plasma effect where the plasma might shield the generated charges from the electric field and hence distorts the charge transport process. Based on the simulations it can be reasoned that saturation of the amplifiers in the Timepix system might generate crosstalk that increases the charge spread measured from ion impact on the sensor.

  14. Applications of 211At and 223Ra in Targeted Alpha-Particle Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy using agents tagged with α-emitting radionuclides is gaining traction with several clinical trials already undertaken or ongoing, and others in the advanced planning stage. The most commonly used α-emitting radionuclides are 213Bi, 211At, 223Ra and 225Ac. While each one of these has pros and cons, it can be argued that 211At probably is the most versatile based on its half life, decay scheme and chemistry. On the other hand, for targeting bone metastases, 223Ra is the ideal radionuclide because simple cationic radium can be used for this purpose. In this review, we will discuss the recent developments taken place in the application of 211At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and give an overview of the current status of 223Ra for targeted α-particle radiotherapy. PMID:22202151

  15. (Medium energy particle physics): Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1985-10-01

    Investigations currently carried out by the UCLA Particle Physics Research Group can be arranged into four programs: Pion-Nucleon Scattering; Tests of Charge Symmetry and Isospin Invariance; Light Nuclei (Strong Form Factors of /sup 3/H, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He; Detailed Balance in pd /r reversible/ /gamma//sup 3/H; Interaction Dynamics); and Search for the Rare Decay /Mu//sup +/ /yields/ e/sup +/ + /gamma/ (MEGA). The general considerations which led to the choice of physics problems investigated by our group are given in the next section. We also outline the scope of the research being done which includes over a dozen experiments. The main body of this report details the research carried out in the past year, the status of various experiments, and new projects.

  16. Track structure based modelling of chromosome aberrations after photon and alpha-particle irradiation.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Werner; Kundrát, Pavel

    2013-08-30

    A computational model of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human cells within the PARTRAC Monte Carlo simulation framework is presented. The model starts from radiation-induced DNA damage assessed by overlapping radiation track structures with multi-scale DNA and chromatin models, ranging from DNA double-helix in atomic resolution to chromatin fibre loops, heterochromatic and euchromatic regions, and chromosome territories. The repair of DNA double-strand breaks via non-homologous end-joining is followed. Initial spatial distribution and complexity, diffusive motion, enzymatic processing, synapsis and ligation of individual DNA ends from the breaks are simulated. To enable scoring of different chromosome aberration types resulting from improper joining of DNA fragments, the repair module has been complemented by tracking the chromosome origin of the ligated fragments and the positions of centromeres. The modelled motion of DNA ends has sub-diffusive characteristics and corresponds to measured chromatin mobility within time-scales of a few hours. The calculated formation of dicentrics after photon and α-particle irradiation in human fibroblasts is compared to experimental data (Cornforth et al., 2002, Radiat Res 158, 43). The predicted yields of dicentrics overestimate the measurements by factors of five for γ-rays and two for α-particle irradiation. Nevertheless, the observed relative dependence on radiation dose is correctly reproduced. Calculated yields and size distributions of other aberration types are discussed. The present work represents a first mechanistic approach to chromosome aberrations and their kinetics, combining full track structure simulations with detailed models of chromatin and accounting for the kinetics of DNA repair. PMID:23811166

  17. Factorization of Number into Prime Numbers Viewed as Decay of Particle into Elementary Particles Conserving Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugamoto, A.

    2009-02-01

    Number theory is considered, by proposing quantum mechanical models and string-like models at zero and finite temperatures, where the factorization of number into prime numbers is viewed as the decay of particle into elementary particles conserving energy. In these models, energy of a particle labeled by an integer n is assumed or derived to being proportional to ln n. The one-loop vacuum amplitudes, the free energies and the partition functions at finite temperature of the string-like models are estimated and compared with the zeta functions. The SL(2, Z) modular symmetry, being manifest in the free energies is broken down to the additive symmetry of integers, {Z}_{+}, after interactions are turned on. In the dynamical model existing behind the zeta function, prepared are the fields labeled by prime numbers. On the other hand the fields in our models are labeled, not by prime numbers but by integers. Nevertheless, we can understa nd whether a number is prime or not prime by the decay rate, namely by the corresponding particle can decay or cannot decay through interactions conserving energy. Among the models proposed, the supersymmetric string-like model has the merit of that the zero point energies are cancelled and the energy levels may be stable against radiative corrections.

  18. Giant Resonances in the Alpha-Nucleus Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karpeshin, F. F.

    2010-04-30

    Tunneling of alpha particles through the Coulomb barrier for the source {sup 135}Pr nucleus is consecutively considered. The effect of sharp peaks arising in the case of coincidence of the alpha energy with that of a quasistationary state within the barrier is elucidated. Peaks' energy depend on the alpha-nucleus potential. They can give rise to 'anomalous' properties of some neutron resonances. The peaks can also be observed in the incoming alpha-nucleus channel. The method can be applied for solution of the reverse problem of the alpha-nucleus scattering.

  19. Labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with the alpha-particle-emitting nuclide astatine-211: preservation of immunoreactivity and in vivo localizing capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Zalutsky, M R; Garg, P K; Friedman, H S; Bigner, D D

    1989-01-01

    alpha-Particles such as those emitted by 211At may be advantageous for radioimmunotherapy since they are radiation of high linear energy transfer, depositing high energy over a short distance. Here we describe a strategy for labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with 211At by means of the bifunctional reagent N-succinimidyl 3-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate. An intact antibody, 81C6, and the F(ab')2 fragment of Me1-14 (both reactive with human gliomas) were labeled with 211At in high yield and with a specific activity of up to 4 mCi/mg in a time frame compatible with the 7.2-hr half-life of 211At. Quantitative in vivo binding assays demonstrated that radioastatination was accomplished with maintenance of high specific binding and affinity. Comparison of the biodistribution of 211At-labeled Me1-14 F(ab')2 to that of a nonspecific antibody fragment labeled with 211At and 131I in athymic mice bearing D-54 MG human glioma xenografts demonstrated selective and specific targeting of 211At-labeled antibody in this human tumor model. PMID:2476813

  20. Evaluation of nuclear reaction cross section data for the production of (87)Y and (88)Y via proton, deuteron and alpha-particle induced transmutations.

    PubMed

    Zaneb, H; Hussain, M; Amjad, N; Qaim, S M

    2016-06-01

    Proton, deuteron and alpha-particle induced reactions on (87,88)Sr, (nat)Zr and (85)Rb targets were evaluated for the production of (87,88)Y. The literature data were compared with nuclear model calculations using the codes ALICE-IPPE, TALYS 1.6 and EMPIRE 3.2. The evaluated cross sections were generated; therefrom thick target yields of (87,88)Y were calculated. Analysis of radio-yttrium impurities and yield showed that the (87)Sr(p, n)(87)Y and (88)Sr(p, n)(88)Y reactions are the best routes for the production of (87)Y and (88)Y respectively. The calculated yield for the (87)Sr(p, n)(87)Y reaction is 104 MBq/μAh in the energy range of 14→2.7MeV. Similarly, the calculated yield for the (88)Sr(p, n)(88)Y reaction is 3.2 MBq/μAh in the energy range of 15→7MeV. PMID:27016709

  1. Confinement of high energy trapped particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Goldston, R.J.; White, R.B.; Boozer, A.H.

    1981-04-01

    The banana orbits of high energy trapped particles in tokamaks are found to diffuse rapidly in the radial direction if the toroidal ripple exceeds a low critical value. During this diffusion the energy, the magnetic moment, and the value of the magnetic field strength at the banana tips are conserved.

  2. Confinement of high-energy trapped particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Goldston, R.J.; White, R.B.; Boozer, A.H.

    1981-08-31

    The banana orbits of high-energy trapped particles in tokamaks are found to diffuse rapidly in the radial direction if the toroidal ripple exceeds a low critical value. During this diffusion the energy, the magnetic moment, and the value of the magnetic field strength at the banana tips are conserved.

  3. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-emitting nuclides.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, M R; Sgouros, G; Finn, R D; Humm, J L; Jurcic, J G; Larson, S M; Scheinberg, D A

    1998-09-01

    This review discusses the application of alpha particle-emitting radionuclides in targeted radioimmunotherapy. It will outline the production and chemistry of astatine-211, bismuth-212, lead-212, actinium-225, bismuth-213, fermium-255, radium-223 and terbium-149, which at present are the most promising alpha-emitting isotopes available for human clinical use. The selective cytotoxicity offered by alpha particle-emitting radioimmunoconstructs is due to the high linear energy transfer and short particle path length of these radionuclides. Based upon the pharmacokinetics of alpha particle-emitting radioimmunoconstructs, both stochastic and conventional dosimetric methodology is discussed, as is the preclinical and initial clinical use of these radionuclides conjugated to monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of human neoplasia. PMID:9724387

  4. Analyzing power and cross section distributions of the {sup 12}C(p,p{alpha}){sup 8}Be cluster knockout reaction at an incident energy of 100 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Mabiala, J.; Cowley, A. A.; Foertsch, S. V.; Buthelezi, E. Z.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Steyn, G. F.; Van Zyl, J. J.

    2009-05-15

    The (p,p{alpha}) reaction on {sup 12}C was investigated experimentally using polarized incident protons of 100 MeV. The scattered proton and {alpha} particle, from the knockout reaction, were detected in coincidence. Coincident data, which were obtained at ten quasifree angle pairs for proton angles ranging from 25 deg. to 110 deg., were analyzed in terms of the distorted-wave impulse approximation (DWIA). Calculated energy-sharing cross section and analyzing power distributions reproduce the data reasonably well, indicating that a quasifree knockout mechanism dominates the reaction. Since measurements of analyzing powers were made, spin-orbit distortions were included in the DWIA calculations. The effects of this were found to be very small near zero recoil momentum and did not destroy the validity of the factorization approximation where the two-body p-{alpha} cross section enters as a multiplicative factor in the three-body (p,p{alpha}) cross section expression. Spectroscopic factors derived from the data are consistent with theoretical predictions. Analyzing power data also follow the trend of free p-{sup 4}He scattering data, and comparisons with DWIA predictions are in reasonable agreement. Because the two-body interaction response between the projectile and the {alpha} cluster was found to resemble the scattering of protons from a free {alpha} particle to a remarkable degree, the present results would strongly imply the existence of preformed {alpha} clusters in {sup 12}C.

  5. EDITORIAL: Focus on high energy particles and atmospheric processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. Giles; Nicoll, Keri; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Yair, Yoav

    2015-10-01

    The letters published in the ‘Focus issue on high energy particles and atmospheric processes’ serve to broaden the discussion about the influence of high energy particles on the atmosphere beyond their possible effects on clouds and climate. These letters link climate and meteorological processes with atmospheric electricity, atmospheric chemistry, high energy physics and aerosol science from the smallest molecular cluster ions through to liquid droplets. Progress in such a disparate and complex topic is very likely to benefit from continued interdisciplinary interactions between traditionally distinct science areas.

  6. Particle Energy Spectrum, Revisited from a Counting Statistics Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    2012-07-28

    In nuclear science, gamma and neutron spectra are counted energy by energy, and then particle by particle. Until recently, few studies have been performed on how exactly those energy spectra are counted, or how those counts are correlated. Because of lack of investigation, cross section covariance and correlation matrices are usually estimated using perturbation method. We will discuss a statistical counting scheme that shall mimic the gamma and neutron counting process used in nuclear science. From this counting scheme, the cross section covariance and correlation can be statistically derived.

  7. Radiotoxicity of Gadolinium-148 and Radium-223 in Mouse Testes: Relative Biological Effectiveness of Alpha-Particle Emitters In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Roger W.; Goddu, S. Murty; Narra, Venkat R.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Schenter, Robert E.; Rao, Dandamudi V.

    2012-01-01

    The biological effects of radionuclides that emit α particles are of considerable interest in view of their potential for therapy and their presence in the environment. The present work is a continuation of our ongoing effort to study the radiotoxicity of α-particle emitters in vivo using the survival of murine testicular sperm heads as the biological end point. Specifically, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of very low-energy α particles (3.2 MeV) emitted by 148Gd is investigated and determined to be 7.4 ± 2.4 when compared to the effects of acute external 120 kVp X rays. This datum, in conjunction with our earlier results for 210Po and 212Pb in equilibrium with its daughters, is used to revise and extend the range of validity of our previous RBE–energy relationship for α particles emitted by tissue-incorporated radionuclides. The new empirical relationship is given by RBEα = 9.14 − 0.510 Eα, where 3 < Eα < 9 MeV. The validity of this empirical relationship is tested by determining the RBE of the prolific α-particle emitter 223Ra (in equilibrium with its daughters) experimentally in the same biological model and comparing the value obtained experimentally with the predicted value. The resulting RBE values are 5.4 ± 0.9 and 5.6, respectively. This close agreement strongly supports the adequacy of the empirical RBE-Eα relationship to predict the biological effects of α-particle emitters in Vivo. PMID:9052681

  8. Alpha-cluster description of excitation energies in 12C(12C,3 alpha)X at 2.1A GeV.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, F A; Dubey, R R

    1994-08-01

    An alpha-cluster expansion of the Glauber multiple scattering [correction of scatteirng] series is used to calculate the energy transfer spectrum to the 12C projectile in the 12C(12C,3 alpha)X reaction at 2.1A GeV. Cluster-abrasion response functions are defined in terms of alpha-cluster wave function and the collision dynamics appropriate for heavy-ion reactions. Comparisons are made to recent quasiexclusive experimental data with good agreement found. Calculations indicate that substructures in a 12C projectile are likely to be true spectators in fragmentation, however, with virtual states of excitation in the projectile ground state making a significant contribution to the fragmentation cross section. PMID:9969752

  9. First Experimental Measurement of the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N Reaction at Astrophysical Energies

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Kiss, G.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Goldberg, V.; Tribble, R.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; Sereville, N. de; Tumino, A.

    2010-11-24

    The {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N reactions are of primary importance in several as-trophysical scenarios, including nucleosynthesis inside Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and oxygen and nitrogen isotopic ratios in meteorite grains. They are also key reactions to understand exotic systems such as R-Coronae Borealis stars and novae. Thus, the measurement of their cross sections in the low energy region can be crucial to reduce the nuclear uncertainty on theoretical predictions, because the resonance parameters are poorly determined. The Trojan Horse Method, in its newly developed form particularly suited to investigate low-energy resonances, has been applied to the {sup 2}H({sup 18}O,{alpha}{sup 15}N)n and {sup 2}H({sup 17}O,{alpha}{sup 14}N)n reactions to deduce the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N cross sections at low energies. Resonances in the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N excitation functions have been studied and the resonance parameters deduced.

  10. Constant Energy of Time Involute Particles of Biharmonic Particles in Bianchi Type-I Cosmological Model Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körpinar, Talat; Turhan, Essin

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we study energy of time involute particles of biharmonic particles in Bianchi type-I (B-I) cosmological model spacetime. We give a geometrical description of energy for a Frenet vector fields of timelike biharmonic particle. Finally, using the Frenet frame of the given particle, we obtain different cases for this particles and give important characterizations about them in Bianchi type-I (B-I) cosmological model spacetime.

  11. Multipurpose Radiation Resistant Semiconductor Detectors for Alpha, Neutron & Low Energy Gamma Ray Measurements at High Temperatures in High-Intensity Gamma Ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, Frank H.

    2005-06-01

    Work scheduled under year two of DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER63734 is on schedule and all year-two milestones have or will be met. Results to date demonstrate that unprecedented silicon carbide (SiC) energy resolution has been obtained, and that SiC detectors may achieve energy resolution that exceeds that obtainable with the best silicon alpha spectrometers. Fast-neutron energy spectrometry measurements indicate that recoil-ion energy spectrometry should be possible with SiC detectors. Furthermore, SiC detectors have been demonstrated to perform well even after gamma-ray exposures of 1.E09 Rad. This result and the previously demonstrated capability of SiC detectors to operate in elevated-temperature environments are very promising for potential DOE EMSP applications. A new class of multipurpose, radiation-resistant semiconductor detectors that can be used in elevated-temperature and high-radiation environments is being developed under this grant. These detectors, based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor are designed to have larger active volumes than previously available SiC detectors, and are being tested for their response to alpha particles, X-rays and low energy gamma rays, and fast neutrons. Specifically, SiC radiation detectors with larger areas and 100-micrometer thick active regions have been designed and manufactured according to detector-design specifications. Detectors based on a Schottky diode design were specified in order to minimize the effects of the detector entrance window on alpha particle measurements. During manufacture of the Schottky diodes, the manufacturer also provided a set of large-volume SiC p-i-n diodes for testing Extensive alpha particle measurements have been carried out to test and quantify the response of the SiC Schottky diodes. Exposures to 148-Gd, 213-Po, 217-At, 221-Fr, 225-Ac, 237-Np, 238-Pu, 240-Pu, and 242-Pu sources were used to obtain detailed alpha response data in the alpha energy range from 3182.787 keV to 8375.9 keV. The 148-Gd, 213-Po, 217-At, and 221-Fr sources provide energy-separated, mono-energetic alpha particle peaks which can be analyzed to provide detailed information on the energy response characteristics of the detectors. As was reported last year, a highly linear response was obtained between observed pulse height and alpha-particle energy over the entire energy range. Detailed full width at half maximum (FWHM) measurements were made for each of five mono-energetic peaks. The FWHM values ranged from 41.5 keV for 3182.787-keV 148-Gd (1.3% energy resolution) to 55.4 keV for 8379.5-keV 213-Po (0.66% energy resolution). Although these energy resolution values are comparable to those obtainable with silicon alpha-particle spectrometers and surpass the best values reported previously for SiC detectors, other factors in addition to the inherent SiC energy resolution contribute to the observed values and were evaluated. Details of the energy deposition processes that contribute to the FWHM were modeled with calculations using the SRIM-2003.26 code developed by Ziegler and Beirsack. Electronic and statistical broadening of the FWHM were also evaluated in order to isolate the component of the FWHM that is inherent to SiC semiconductor. It was found that the SRIM calculations systematically overestimated the range straggling component of the FWHM leading to calculated values that exceeded the measured total FWHM values. It is believed that the overestimates are a result of inherent limitations of the SRIM code. The range-straggling component of the measured energy resolution results primarily from energy-loss processes in the detector entrance window, which consists of thin layers of Au, Pt, and Ti. Therefore, it was decided to perform measurements to evaluate the range straggling component directly. For this purpose, a high-resolution (15 keV FWHM) Si alpha spectrometer was obtained.

  12. Particle-number restoration within the energy density functional formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, M.; Lacroix, D.

    2009-04-15

    We give a detailed analysis of the origin of spurious divergences and finite steps that have been recently identified in particle-number-restoration calculations within the nuclear energy density functional framework. We isolate two distinct levels of spurious contributions to the energy. The first one is encoded in the definition of the basic energy density functional itself, whereas the second one relates to the canonical procedure followed to extend the use of the energy density functional to multi-reference calculations. The first level of spuriosity relates to the long-known self-interaction problem and to the newly discussed self-pairing interaction process that might appear when describing paired systems with energy functional methods using auxiliary reference states of Bogoliubov or BCS type. A minimal correction to the second level of spuriosity to the multi-reference nuclear energy density functional proposed in [D. Lacroix, T. Duguet, and M. Bender, Phys. Rev. C 79, 044318 (2009)] is shown to remove completely the anomalies encountered in particle-number-restored calculations. In particular, it restores sum rules over (positive) particle numbers that are to be fulfilled by the particle-number-restored formalism. The correction is found to be on the order of several hundreds of keVs up to about 1 MeV in realistic calculations, which is small compared to the total binding energy but often accounts for a substantial percentage of the energy gain from particle-number restoration and is on the same energy scale as the excitations one addresses with multi-reference energy density functional methods.

  13. Equivalence of particle-particle random phase approximation correlation energy and ladder-coupled-cluster doubles.

    PubMed

    Peng, Degao; Steinmann, Stephan N; van Aggelen, Helen; Yang, Weitao

    2013-09-14

    The recent proposal to determine the (exact) correlation energy based on pairing matrix fluctuations by van Aggelen et al. ["Exchange-correlation energy from pairing matrix fluctuation and the particle-particle random phase approximation," preprint arXiv:1306.4957 (2013)] revived the interest in the simplest approximation along this path: the particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA). In this paper, we present an analytical connection and numerical demonstrations of the equivalence of the correlation energy from pp-RPA and ladder-coupled-cluster doubles. These two theories reduce to identical algebraic matrix equations and correlation energy expressions. The numerical examples illustrate that the correlation energy missed by pp-RPA in comparison with coupled-cluster singles and doubles is largely canceled out when considering reaction energies. This theoretical connection will be beneficial to design density functionals with strong ties to coupled-cluster theories and to study molecular properties at the pp-RPA level relying on well established coupled cluster techniques. PMID:24050333

  14. Integro-differential equation approach. II. Triton and. alpha. -particle wave functions, graphical plots

    SciTech Connect

    Oehm, W.; Sofianos, S.A.; Fiedeldey, H. Physics Department, University of South Africa, Pretoria 0001 ); Fabre de la Ripelle, M. Physics Department, University of South Africa, Pretoria 0001 )

    1991-01-01

    Three- and four-nucleon ground-state wave functions are displayed graphically in coordinate space as well as the Faddeev amplitudes from which they are constructed. In the four-body case only two-particle correlations are taken into account in the integro-differential equation approach, which consequently allows us to make a direct comparison between the Faddeev amplitudes for three and four nucleons and to demonstrate their high degree of similarity in shape. We also investigate the effect of the inclusion of the hypercentral potential in the definition of the (modified) Faddeev amplitudes. It is shown that the Faddeev-type components calculated in the adiabatic approximation are rather similar in shape to those calculated by means of the exact solution of the system of coupled integro-differential equations in two variables. The mixed symmetry component of the Faddeev-type amplitudes show the greatest sensitivity to the number of nucleons, the inclusion of the hypercentral potential, and to the adiabatic approximation.

  15. Numerical evaluation of high energy particle effects in magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Wu, Y.

    1994-03-01

    The interaction of high energy ions with magnetohydrodynamic modes is analyzed. A numerical code is developed which evaluates the contribution of the high energy particles to mode stability using orbit averaging of motion in either analytic or numerically generated equilibria through Hamiltonian guiding center equations. A dispersion relation is then used to evaluate the effect of the particles on the linear mode. Generic behavior of the solutions of the dispersion relation is discussed and dominant contributions of different components of the particle distribution function are identified. Numerical convergence of Monte-Carlo simulations is analyzed. The resulting code ORBIT provides an accurate means of comparing experimental results with the predictions of kinetic magnetohydrodynamics. The method can be extended to include self consistent modification of the particle orbits by the mode, and hence the full nonlinear dynamics of the coupled system.

  16. Alpha-particle emission as a probe of nuclear shapes and structure effects in proton evaporation spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolis, N.G.; Sarantites, D.G.; Abenante, V.; Adler, L.A.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Majka, Z.; Semkow, T.M.; Stracener, D.W. . Dept. of Chemistry); Baktash, C.; Beene, J.R.; Garcia-Bermudez, G.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Johnson, N.R.; Lee, I.Y.; McGowan, F.K.; Riley, M.A.; Virtanen, A. ); Griffin, H.C. . Dep

    1990-01-01

    Emission barriers and subbarrier anisotropies from {alpha} decay of Sn* and Yb* compound nuclei are examined in the light of calculations incorporating deformation effects in the decay process. For the Yb* systems deformation which increases with spin is necessary to explain the data. For the Sn* systems the spectral shapes and anisotropies can be explained without deformation. For systems lighter than Sn this probe is not sensitive to the deformation. Energy spectra and angular correlations of evaporated protons from the {sup 52}Cr({sup 34}S, 2n2p){sup 82}Sr reaction were measured in coincidence with discrete transitions. Large shifts in proton spectra were observed when high spin states in different rotational bands are populated. They are interpreted as due to near-yrast stretched proton emission preferentially populating the yrast band by subbarrier protons. Simulations show that channel selected proton spectra cannot be used as probes of deformation.

  17. The flow configuration of protons and alpha particles in the Earth's subsolar magnetosheath

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    Attempts were made to experimentally determine whether the magnetosheath bulk flow has a stagnation point or a stagnation line configuration, using data from the Active Mesospheric Particle Tracer Explorer (AMPTE)/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) Spacecraft. The AMPTE/CCE spacecraft has an equatorial orbit with an apogee of 8.8 R sub 3. During compressions of the magnetosphere, it enters the subsolar magnetosheath, sometimes for several hours. This is an ideal situation to observe the flow configuration because the spacecraft is at rest, or nearly so, in the subsolar region. The CHEM instrument can detect ions from 1 to 300 keV/e in approximately the YZ GSE plane, the plane parallel to the magnetopause. Near the subsolar region, most of the bulk flow speed is in this plane. The H(+) and He(+2) is approximately 20 percent lower than that of the H(+) on average, although this may be a computational artifact. The bulk flow direction was compared to the theoretical flow direction predictions for a stagnation point and a stagnation line. It was found that 36 percent of the time intervals were consistent with the theory of a stagnation point, while 24 percent of the intervals were consistent with the theory of a stagnation line. The hourly average interplanetary magnetic field from the IMP 8 spacecraft was examined during the orbits for which it was available. For orbits with a significant number (greater than 4) of stagnation point-like intervals, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was either northward or unmeasured. In contrast, for stagnation line-like orbits the IMF was either southward or unmeasured. The flow configuration of the subsolar magnetosheath appears to be fundamentally different for different orientations of the IMF.

  18. Overview of high energy physics with polarized particles

    SciTech Connect

    Soffer, J. . Centre de Physique Theorique Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY )

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this talk is to review spin effects in various areas of particle physics at high energy and by selecting the most interesting topics, to show the relevance of dealing with polarized particles. We will see that it provides crucial tests for the Standard Model and can give us clear signatures to uncover new interactions. We will also discuss some striking experimental facts recently observed in hadronic collisions and their implications for current theoretical ideas. 43 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Using energy peaks to measure new particle masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Kim, Doojin

    2014-11-01

    We discussed in arXiv:1209.0772 that the laboratory frame distribution of the energy of a massless particle from a two-body decay at a hadron collider has a peak whose location is identical to the value of this daughter's (fixed) energy in the rest frame of the corresponding mother particle. For that result to hold we assumed that the mother is unpolarized and has a generic boost distribution in the laboratory frame. In this work we discuss how this observation can be applied for determination of masses of new particles, with out requiring a full reconstruction of their decay chains or information about the rest of the event. We focus on a two-step cascade decay of a massive particle that has one invisible particle in the final state: C → Bb → Aab, where C, B and A are new particles of which A is invisible and a, b are visible particles. Combining the measurements of the peaks of energy distributions of a and b with that of the edge in their invariant mass distribution, we demonstrate that it is in principle possible to determine separately all three masses of the new particles, in particular, without using any measurement of missing transverse momentum. Furthermore, we show how the use of the peaks in an inclusive energy distribution is generically less affected (as compared to other mass measurement strategies) by combinatorial issues. For some simplified, yet interesting, scenarios we find that these combinatorial issues are absent altogether. As an example of this general strategy, we study SUSY models where gluino decays to an invisible lightest neutralino via an on-shell bottom squark. Taking into account the dominant backgrounds, we show how the mass of the bottom squark, the gluino and (for some class of spectra) that of the neutralino can be determined using this technique.

  20. Charged-particle multiplicity at LHC energies

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    The talk presents the measurement of the pseudorapidity density and the multiplicity distribution with ALICE at the achieved LHC energies of 0.9 and 2.36 TeV.An overview about multiplicity measurements prior to LHC is given and the related theoretical concepts are briefly discussed.The analysis procedure is presented and the systematic uncertainties are detailed. The applied acceptance corrections and the treatment of diffraction are discussed.The results are compared with model predictions. The validity of KNO scaling in restricted phase space regions is revisited.