Science.gov

Sample records for alpha tau k5

  1. The Atmospheric Dynamics of Alpha Tau (K5 III) -- Clues to Understanding the Magnetic Dynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter Kenneth G.

    2008-01-01

    Using HST/GHRS, HST/STIS and FUSE archival data for (alpha) Tau and the CHIANTI spectroscopic code, we have derived line shifts, volumetric emission measures, and plasma density estimates, and calculated filling factors for a number of UV lines forming between 10,000 K and 300,000 K in the outer atmosphere of this red giant star. The data suggest the presence of low-temperature extended regions and high-temperature compact regions, associated with magnetically open and closed structures in the stellar atmosphere, respectively. The signatures of UV lines from Alpha Tau can be consistently understood via a model of upward-traveling Alfven waves in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. These wakes cause non-thermal broadening in UV lines due to unresolved wave motions and downward plasma motions in compact magnetic loops heated by resonant .4lf\\en wave heating. We discuss implications of this interpretation for understanding the nature of magnetic dynamos operating in late-type giants.

  2. The Atmospheric Dynamics of alpha Tau (K5 III) - Clues to Understanding the Magnetic Dynamo in Late-Type Giant Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Airapetian, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Using HST/GHRS, HST/STIS and FUSE archival data for alpha Tau and the CHIANTI spectroscopic code, we have derived line shifts, volumetric emission measures, and plasma density estimates, and calculated filling factors for a number of UV lines forming between 10,000 K and 300,000 K in the outer atmosphere of this red giant star. The data suggest the presence of low-temperature extended regions and high-temperature compact regions, associated with magnetically open and closed structures in the stellar atmosphere, respectively. The signatures of UV lines from alpha Tau can be consistently understood via a model of upward-traveling Alfven waves in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. These waves cause non-thermal broadening in UV lines due to unresolved wave motions and downward plasma motions in compact magnetic loops heated by resonant Alfven wave heating.

  3. The Atmospheric Dynamics of Alpha Tau (K5 III) - Clues to Understanding the Magnetic Dynamo in Late-Type Giant Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Airapetian, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Using HST/GHRS, HST/STIS and FUSE archival data for a Tau and the CHIANTI spectroscopic code, we have derived line shifts, volumetric emission measures, and plasma density estimates, and calculated filling factors for a number of UV lines forming between 10,000 K and 300,000 K in the outer atmosphere of this red giant star. The data suggest the presence of low-temperature extended regions and high-temperature compact regions, associated with magnetically open and closed structures in the stellar atmosphere, respectively. The signatures of UV lines from a Tau can be consistently understood via a model of upward-traveling Alfv6n waves in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. These waves cause nonthermal broadening in UV lines due to unresolved wave motions and downward plasma motions in compact magnetic loops heated by resonant Alfven wave heating.

  4. Far-Infrared and Millimeter Continuum Studies of K-Giants: Alpha Boo and Alpha Tau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Carbon, Duane F.; Welch, William J.; Lim, Tanya; Forster, James R.; Goorvitch, David; Thigpen, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have imaged two normal, non-coronal, infrared-bright K-giants, alpha Boo and alpha Tau, in the 1.4-millimeter and 2.8-millimeter continuum using BIMA. These stars have been used as important absolute calibrators for several infrared satellites. Our goals are: (1) to probe the structure of their upper photospheres; (2) to establish whether these stars radiate as simple photospheres or possess long-wavelength chromospheres; and (3) to make a connection between millimeter-wave and far-infrared absolute flux calibrations. To accomplish these goals we also present ISO Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) measurements of both these K-giants. The far-infrared and millimeter continuum radiation is produced in the vicinity of the temperature minimum in a Boo and a Tau, offering a direct test of the model photospheres and chromospheres for these two cool giants. We find that current photospheric models predict fluxes in reasonable agreement with those observed for those wavelengths which sample the upper photosphere, namely less than or equal to 170 micrometers in alpha Tau and less than or equal to 125 micrometers in alpha Boo. It is possible that alpha Tau is still radiative as far as 0.9 - 1.4 millimeters. We detect chromospheric radiation from both stars by 2.8 millimeters (by 1.4 millimeters in alpha Boo), and are able to establish useful bounds on the location of the temperature minimum. An attempt to interpret the chromospheric fluxes using the two-component "bifurcation model" proposed by Wiedemann et al. (1994) appears to lead to a significant contradiction.

  5. Short-Term Chromospheric Variability in alpha Tauri (K5 III): Results from IUE Time Series Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Deeney, Bryan D.; Brown, Alexander; Stencel, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    We evaluate time series observations of chromospheric lines (Mg II, Mg I, and C II) for the K giant alpha Tau obtained using the IUE LWP camera at high dispersion. These observations cover a time span of about 2 weeks in 1994 February-March and were designed to resolve variations occurring within hours, days, and weeks. We consider the observational results in relation to theoretical acoustic heating models, motivated by the fact that alpha Tau may exhibit a basal (i.e., minimum) level of chromospheric activity. The data reveal flux variations between the extremes of 8% in Mg II h+k and 15% in each emission component. These variations occur on timescales as short as 8 hr but not on timescales longer than approx.3 days. For the h and k components, flux variations occurring on a timescale as short as 1.5 hr are also found. These changes are often not correlated (and are sometimes even anticorrelated), leading to remarkable differences in the h/k ratios. We argue that these results are consistent with the presence of strong acoustic shocks, which can lead to variable Mg II line emission when only a small number of strong shocks are propagating through the atmosphere. We deduce the electron density in the C II lambda 2325 line formation region to be log(base e) of N. approx. equals 9.0, in agreement with previous studies. Our data provide evidence that the Mg II basal flux limit for K giants might be a factor of 4 higher than suggested by Rutten et al.

  6. On the Behavior of the Effective QCD Coupling {alpha}{sub {tau}}(s)at Low Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2002-12-11

    The hadronic decays of the {tau} lepton can be used to determine the effective charge {alpha}{tau}(m{sub {tau}{prime}}{sup 2}) for a hypothetical {tau}-lepton with mass in the range 0 < m{sub {tau}{prime}} < m{sub {tau}}. This definition provides a fundamental definition of the QCD coupling at low mass scales. We study the behavior of {alpha}{sub {tau}} at low mass scales directly from first principles and without any renormalization-scheme dependence by looking at the experimental data from the OPAL Collaboration. The results are consistent with the freezing of the physical coupling at mass scales s = m{sub {tau}{prime}}{sup 2} of order 1 GeV{sup 2} with a magnitude {alpha}{sub {tau}} {approx} 0.9 {+-} 0.1.

  7. MicroRNA-138 promotes tau phosphorylation by targeting retinoic acid receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiong; Tan, Lu; Lu, Yanjun; Peng, Jing; Zhu, Yaowu; Zhang, Yadong; Sun, Ziyong

    2015-03-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative dementia characterized by Aβ deposition and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) composed of hyperphosphorylated tau. Emerging evidence shows that microRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to the pathogenesis of AD. Herein, we investigated the role of miR-138, a brain enriched miRNA, which is increased in AD patients. We found that miR-138 is increased in AD models, including N2a/APP and HEK293/tau cell lines. Overexpression of miR-138 activates glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), and increases tau phosphorylation in HEK293/tau cells. Furthermore, we confirm that retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) is a direct target of miR-138, and supplement of RARA substantially suppresses GSK-3β activity, and reduces tau phosphorylation induced by miR-138. In conclusion, our data suggest that miR-138 promotes tau phosphorylation by targeting the RARA/GSK-3β pathway. PMID:25680531

  8. Soluble amyloid precursor protein alpha inhibits tau phosphorylation through modulation of GSK3β signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Deng, Juan; Habib, Ahsan; Obregon, Demian F; Barger, Steven W; Giunta, Brian; Wang, Yan-Jiang; Hou, Huayan; Sawmiller, Darrell; Tan, Jun

    2015-11-01

    We recently found that sAPPα decreases amyloid-beta generation by directly associating with β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP)-converting enzyme 1 (BACE1), thereby modulating APP processing. Because inhibition of BACE1 decreases glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β)-mediated Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like tau phosphorylation in AD patient-derived neurons, we determined whether sAPPα also reduces GSK3β-mediated tau phosphorylation. We initially found increased levels of inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK3β (Ser9) in primary neurons from sAPPα over-expressing mice. Further, recombinant human sAPPα evoked the same phenomenon in SH-SY5Y cells. Further, in SH-SY5Y cells over-expressing BACE1, and HeLa cells over-expressing human tau, sAPPα reduced GSK3β activity and tau phosphorylation. Importantly, the reductions in GSK3β activity and tau phosphorylation elicited by sAPPα were prevented by BACE1 but not γ-secretase inhibition. In accord, AD mice over-expressing human sAPPα had less GSK3β activity and tau phosphorylation compared with controls. These results implicate a direct relationship between APP β-processing and GSK3β-mediated tau phosphorylation and further define the central role of sAPPα in APP autoregulation and AD pathogenesis. PMID:26342176

  9. Alpha 1-Antichymotrypsin, an Inflammatory Protein Overexpressed in the Brains of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease, Induces Tau Hyperphosphorylation through c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Activation.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Ethika; Fiorelli, Tina; Norden, Michelle; Padmanabhan, Jaya

    2013-01-01

    The association of inflammatory proteins with neuritic plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients has led to the hypothesis that inflammation plays a pivotal role in the development of pathology in AD. Earlier studies have shown that alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) enhances amyloid beta fibrillization and accelerated plaque formation in APP transgenic mice. Later studies from our laboratory have shown that purified ACT induces tau hyperphosphorylation and degeneration in neurons. In order to understand the mechanisms by which inflammatory proteins enhance tau hyperphosphorylation, we injected interleukin-1 β (IL-1 β ) intracerebroventricularly into mice expressing human ACT, human tau, or both transgenes. It was found that the hyperphosphorylation of tau in ACT and ACT/htau mice after IL-1 β injection correlated with increased phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). We verified the involvement of JNK in ACT-induced tau phosphorylation by utilizing JNK inhibitors in cultured primary neurons treated with ACT, and we found that the inhibitor showed complete prevention of ACT-induced tau phosphorylation. These results indicate that JNK is one of the major kinases involved in the ACT-mediated tau hyperphosphorylation and suggest that inhibitors of this kinase may protect against inflammation-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and neurodegeneration associated with AD. PMID:24175110

  10. Persistent Sub-Yearly Chromospheric Variations in Lower Main-Sequence Stars: Tau Booe and alpha Com

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maulik, Davesh; Donahue, Robert A.; Baliunas, Sallie L.

    1997-01-01

    The recent discoveries of extrasolar planetary systems around lower main-sequence stars such as tau Booe (HD 120136) has prompted further investigation into their stellar activity. A cursory analysis of tau Booe for cyclic chromospheric activity, based on its 30-yr record of Ca 2 H and K fluxes obtained as part of the HK Project from Mount Wilson Observatory, finds an intermediate, sub-yearly period (approximately 117 d) in chromospheric activity in addition to, and separate from, both its rotation (3.3 d) and long-term variability. As a persistent subyearly period in surface magnetic activity is unprecedented, we investigate this apparent anomaly further by examining chromospheric activity levels of other stars with similar mass, searching for variability in chromospheric activity with periods of less than one year, but longer than measured or predicted rotation. An examination of the time series of 40 mid-to-late F dwarfs yielded one other star for further analysis: alpha Com (HD 114378, P approximately 132 d). The variations for these two stars were checked for persistence and coherence. Based on these determinations, we eliminate the possibilities of rotation, long-term activity cycle, and the evolution of active regions as the cause of this variation in both stars. In particular, for tau Booe we infer that the phenomenon may be chromospheric in origin; however, beyond this, it is difficult to identify anything further regarding the cause of the activity variations, or even whether the observed modulation in the two stars have the same origin.

  11. HST/COS SPECTRA OF DF Tau AND V4046 Sgr: FIRST DETECTION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN ABSORPTION AGAINST THE Ly{alpha} EMISSION LINE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Hao; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; France, Kevin E-mail: jlinsky@jilau1.colorado.edu

    2011-03-20

    We report the first detection of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) absorption in the Ly{alpha} emission line profiles of two classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs), DF Tau and V4046 Sgr, observed by the Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. This absorption is the energy source for many of the Lyman-band H{sub 2} fluorescent lines commonly seen in the far-ultraviolet spectra of CTTSs. We find that the absorbed energy in the H{sub 2} pumping transitions from a portion of the Ly{alpha} line significantly differ from the amount of energy in the resulting fluorescent emission. By assuming additional absorption in the H I Ly{alpha} profile along our light of sight, we can correct the H{sub 2} absorption/emission ratios so that they are close to unity. The required H I absorption for DF Tau is at a velocity close to the radial velocity of the star, consistent with H I absorption in the edge-on disk and interstellar medium. For V4046 Sgr, a nearly face-on system, the required absorption is between +100 km s{sup -1} and +290 km s{sup -1}, most likely resulting from H I gas in the accretion columns falling onto the star.

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid β1-42, Tau, and Alpha-Synuclein Predict the Heterogeneous Progression of Cognitive Dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ju-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease with heterogeneous pathological and clinical features. Cognitive dysfunction, a frequent non-motor complication, is a risk factor for poor prognosis and shows inter-individual variation in its progression. Of the clinical studies performed to identify biomarkers of PD progression, the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) study is the largest study that enrolled drug-naïve and very early stage PD patients. The baseline characteristics of the PPMI cohort were recently published. The diagnostic utility of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, including alpha-synuclein (α-syn), total tau, phosphorylated tau at Thr181, and amyloid β1-42, was not satisfactory. However, the baseline data on CSF biomarkers in the PPMI study suggested that the measurement of the CSF biomarkers enables the prediction of future cognitive decline in PD patients, which was consistent with previous studies. To prove the hypothesis that the interaction between Alzheimer’s pathology and α-syn pathology is important to the progression of cognitive dysfunction in PD, longitudinal observational studies must be followed. In this review, the neuropathological nature of heterogeneous cognitive decline in PD is briefly discussed, followed by a summarized interpretation of baseline CSF biomarkers derived from the data in the PPMI study. The combination of clinical, biochemical, genetic and imaging biomarkers of PD constitutes a feasible strategy to predict the heterogeneous progression of PD. PMID:27240810

  13. Photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of AA Tau, DN Tau, UX Tau A, T Tau, RY Tau, Lk Ca 4, and Lk Ca 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrba, F. J.; Chugainov, P. F.; Weaver, W. B.; Stauffer, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    We report the results of a UBVRI photometric monitoring campaign for three classical T Tauri stars (AA Tau, DN Tau, and UX Tau A) and two weak emission line T Tauri stars (Lk Ca 4 and Lk Ca 7). Observations were obtained at three sites during a core observing period spanning UT 1985 October 14 through UT 1985 December 25, with additional observations continuing until UT 1986 April 6. Concurrent spectrophotometric observations were obtained for all main program stars except Lk Ca 7 and additionally for T Tau, RW Aur, and RY Tau. Periodic photometric variability, assumed to be the stars' rotation periods, were found for AA Tau, DN Tau, Lk Ca 4, and Lk Ca 7, respectively, as 8.2, 6.3, 3.4, and 5.7 days. Several U-filter flares were observed for Lk Ca 4 and Lk Ca 7, which are strongly concentrated toward phases of minimum light. Correlations are found between H-alpha line strengths and V magnitudes for AA Tau and RY Tau. An analysis of absolute color variations of classical T Tauri stars confirms that hot spots are the predominant cause of these stars' variability. Our overall results are consistent with earlier findings that long-lived cool spots are responsible for most of the variability found for weak-emission T Tauri stars, while temporal hot spots are primarily responsible for the observed variability found in classical T Tauri stars.

  14. Reproductive and developmental toxicity studies on catena-(S)-[mu-[N alpha-(3-aminopropionyl) histidinato(2-)-N1,N2,O:N tau]-zinc].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, K; Nishi, N; Hiramatsu, Y; Shimizu, M; Ohta, T; Kato, M

    1991-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of Z-103 (catena-(S)-[mu-[N alpha-(3-aminopropionyl) histidinato (2-)-N1,N2,O:N tau]-zinc], CAS 107667-60-7) on the reproductive performance of male and female rats, the general toxicity of dams, and the development, physical growth and reproductive performance of the next generation, Z-103 was administered to rats prior to, and in the early stages of pregnancy, during the period of fetal organogenesis, and during the perinatal and lactation periods, and to rabbits during the period of fetal organogenesis at the appropriate doses for each study. At the administration of Z-103 prior to and in the early stages of pregnancy in rats, no dose-related abnormalities were observed in the reproductive performance of either sex. Furthermore, there were no death or evidence of teratogenicity or repressive effect on growth in fetuses. Administration of Z-103 during the period of fetal organogenesis in rats affected the growth of embryos and fetuses at 1200 mg/kg. At 600 mg/kg or less, however, there were no death, teratogenicity or repressive effect on growth in fetuses, and furthermore, no dose-related abnormalities were observed in growth, physical development, behavior and reproductive performance in offspring. Administration of Z-103 during the period of fetal organogenesis in rabbits caused a decrease in the number of live fetuses at 300 mg/kg suggesting that 300 mg/kg of Z-103 may have a lethal effect on fetuses. There were, however, neither teratogenicity nor any repressive effect on the growth of fetuses.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1799381

  15. Balmer decrements of T Tau stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katysheva, N. A.

    1981-04-01

    The relative intensities of Balmer lines calculated on the basis of Sobolev's probability method (1947) and the observed decrements of T Tau stars in the catalog of Cohen and Kuhi (1979) are compared with spectral classes between K5 and M5. For the group of stars, G5-K5, studied by Grinin (1980), emission was found to be predominantly of an envelope type, with less of a part played by chromospheric radiation. In K5-M5 stars, however, the envelope makes a smaller contribution to the total radiation, and most of the emission arises in the dense gas at the surface of the star. A comparison of the Balmer decrements of T Tau stars of different spectral classes and flare stars shows that in a transition to stars of lower luminosity, the role of chromospheric radiation increases.

  16. AMP-activated protein kinase modulates tau phosphorylation and tau pathology in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Domise, Manon; Didier, Sébastien; Marinangeli, Claudia; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Buée, Luc; Viollet, Benoit; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe; Vingtdeux, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are the pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases commonly known as tauopathies. NFTs result from the intracellular aggregation of abnormally and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Tau functions, which include the regulation of microtubules dynamics, are dependent on its phosphorylation status. As a consequence, any changes in tau phosphorylation can have major impacts on synaptic plasticity and memory. Recently, it has been demonstrated that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was deregulated in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients where it co-localized with phosphorylated tau in pre-tangle and tangle-bearing neurons. Besides, it was found that AMPK was a tau kinase in vitro. Here, we find that endogenous AMPK activation in mouse primary neurons induced an increase of tau phosphorylation at multiple sites, whereas AMPK inhibition led to a rapid decrease of tau phosphorylation. We further show that AMPK mice deficient for one of the catalytic alpha subunits displayed reduced endogenous tau phosphorylation. Finally, we found that AMPK deficiency reduced tau pathology in the PS19 mouse model of tauopathy. These results show that AMPK regulates tau phosphorylation in mouse primary neurons as well as in vivo, and thus suggest that AMPK could be a key player in the development of AD pathology. PMID:27230293

  17. AMP-activated protein kinase modulates tau phosphorylation and tau pathology in vivo.

    PubMed

    Domise, Manon; Didier, Sébastien; Marinangeli, Claudia; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Buée, Luc; Viollet, Benoit; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe; Vingtdeux, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are the pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases commonly known as tauopathies. NFTs result from the intracellular aggregation of abnormally and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Tau functions, which include the regulation of microtubules dynamics, are dependent on its phosphorylation status. As a consequence, any changes in tau phosphorylation can have major impacts on synaptic plasticity and memory. Recently, it has been demonstrated that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was deregulated in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients where it co-localized with phosphorylated tau in pre-tangle and tangle-bearing neurons. Besides, it was found that AMPK was a tau kinase in vitro. Here, we find that endogenous AMPK activation in mouse primary neurons induced an increase of tau phosphorylation at multiple sites, whereas AMPK inhibition led to a rapid decrease of tau phosphorylation. We further show that AMPK mice deficient for one of the catalytic alpha subunits displayed reduced endogenous tau phosphorylation. Finally, we found that AMPK deficiency reduced tau pathology in the PS19 mouse model of tauopathy. These results show that AMPK regulates tau phosphorylation in mouse primary neurons as well as in vivo, and thus suggest that AMPK could be a key player in the development of AD pathology. PMID:27230293

  18. Comparing Fit and Reliability Estimates of a Psychological Instrument Using Second-Order CFA, Bifactor, and Essentially Tau-Equivalent (Coefficient Alpha) Models via AMOS 22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Ryan A.; Yang, Yanyun; Beitra, Danette; McCaffrey, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of composite reliability within a hierarchical modeling framework has recently become of particular interest given the growing recognition that the underlying assumptions of coefficient alpha are often untenable. Unfortunately, coefficient alpha remains the prominent estimate of reliability when estimating total scores from a scale with…

  19. Tau protein binds to pericentromeric DNA: a putative role for nuclear tau in nucleolar organization.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Marcela K; Shestakova, Elena; Mansuroglu, Zeyni; Maccioni, Ricardo B; Bonnefoy, Eliette

    2006-05-15

    The microtubule-associated tau protein participates in the organization and integrity of the neuronal cytoskeleton. A nuclear form of tau has been described in neuronal and non-neuronal cells, which displays a nucleolar localization during interphase but is associated with nucleolar-organizing regions in mitotic cells. In the present study, based on immunofluorescence, immuno-FISH and confocal microscopy, we show that nuclear tau is mainly present at the internal periphery of nucleoli, partially colocalizing with the nucleolar protein nucleolin and human AT-rich alpha-satellite DNA sequences organized as constitutive heterochromatin. By using gel retardation, we demonstrate that tau not only colocalizes with, but also specifically binds to, AT-rich satellite DNA sequences apparently through the recognition of AT-rich DNA stretches. Here we propose a functional role for nuclear tau in relation to the nucleolar organization and/or heterochromatinization of a portion of RNA genes. Since nuclear tau has also been found in neurons from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), aberrant nuclear tau could affect the nucleolar organization during the course of AD. We discuss nucleolar tau associated with AT-rich alpha-satellite DNA sequences as a potential molecular link between trisomy 21 and AD. PMID:16638814

  20. What Renders TAU Toxic

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Jürgen; Xia, Di; Leinenga, Gerhard; Chew, Yee Lian; Nicholas, Hannah R.

    2013-01-01

    TAU is a microtubule-associated protein that under pathological conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) forms insoluble, filamentous aggregates. When 20 years after TAU’s discovery the first TAU transgenic mouse models were established, one declared goal that was achieved was the modeling of authentic TAU aggregate formation in the form of neurofibrillary tangles. However, as we review here, it has become increasingly clear that TAU causes damage much before these filamentous aggregates develop. In fact, because TAU is a scaffolding protein, increased levels and an altered subcellular localization (due to an increased insolubility and impaired clearance) result in the interaction of TAU with cellular proteins with which it would otherwise either not interact or do so to a lesser degree, thereby impairing their physiological functions. We specifically discuss the non-axonal localization of TAU, the role phosphorylation has in TAU toxicity and how TAU impairs mitochondrial functions. A major emphasis is on what we have learned from the four available TAU knock-out models in mice, and the knock-out of the TAU/MAP2 homolog PTL-1 in worms. It has been proposed that in human pathological conditions such as AD, a rare toxic TAU species exists which needs to be specifically removed to abrogate TAU’s toxicity and restore neuronal functions. However, what is toxic in one context may not be in another, and simply reducing, but not fully abolishing TAU levels may be sufficient to abrogate TAU toxicity. PMID:23772223

  1. Pathways of tau fibrillization.

    PubMed

    Kuret, Jeff; Chirita, Carmen N; Congdon, Erin E; Kannanayakal, Theresa; Li, Guibin; Necula, Mihaela; Yin, Haishan; Zhong, Qi

    2005-01-01

    New methods for analyzing tau fibrillization have yielded insights into the biochemical transitions involved in the process. Here we review the parallels between the sequential progression of tau fibrillization observed macroscopically in Alzheimer's disease (AD) lesions and the pathway of tau aggregation observed in vitro with purified tau preparations. In addition, pharmacological agents for further dissection of fibrillization mechanism and lesion formation are discussed. PMID:15615636

  2. Voyager observations of Zeta Tau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carone, T. E.; Polidan, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    Two Voyager observations of Zeta Tau, a well-known Be/shell star of spectral type B1 IVe and vsin(i) = 220 km/s, separated by 503 days are presented and discussed. The observations show that in the spectral region shortward of Lyman-alpha, the 950-1150 A flux increased by about 40 percent, while in the region longward of 1300 A the flux increased by about 30 percent. Changes in features at 975 A and at 1020 A also appear. The observed change in the continuum flux is probably associated with a change in the effective temperature of the underlying B star, though change in the ubiquitous Fe II lines cannot be ruled out as the cause. The line variations are consistent with IUE spectra of Zeta Tau taken during the same time period.

  3. Unraveling duality violations in hadronic tau decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cata, Oscar; Cata, Oscar; Golterman, Maarten; Peris, Santiago

    2008-03-03

    There are some indications from recent determinations of the strong coupling constant alpha_s and the gluon condensate that the Operator Product Expansion may not be accurate enough to describe non-perturbative effects in hadronic tau decays. This breakdown of the Operator Product Expansion is usually referred to as being due to"Duality Violations." With the help of a physically motivated model, we investigate these duality violations. Based on this model, we argue how they may introduce a non-negligible systematic error in the current analysis, which employs finite-energy sum rules with pinched weights. In particular, this systematic effect might affect the precision determination of alpha_s from tau decays. With a view to a possible future application to real data, we present an alternative method for determining the OPE coefficients that might help estimating, and possibly even reducing, this systematic error.

  4. Gene expression profiling of breast cancer patients treated with docetaxel, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide within the GEPARTRIO trial: HER-2, but not topoisomerase II alpha and microtubule-associated protein tau, is highly predictive of tumor response.

    PubMed

    Rody, A; Karn, T; Gätje, R; Ahr, A; Solbach, C; Kourtis, K; Munnes, M; Loibl, S; Kissler, S; Ruckhäberle, E; Holtrich, U; von Minckwitz, G; Kaufmann, M

    2007-02-01

    Gene expression analysis in breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy is an interesting tool for identification of gene signatures and new markers to predict tumor response. However, the detection of predictive markers strongly depends on the drugs used in the specific therapeutic setting. There is growing evidence that topoisomerase II-alpha (TOPO IIalpha) is a marker for anthracycline-, and microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) for taxane sensitivity. HER-2 has been described as a marker of both anthracycline and taxane sensitivity. We performed gene expression profiling of 50 patients within the GEPARTRIO study, an anthracycline and taxane neoadjuvant chemotherapy trial. Here we investigate the predictive value of TOPO IIalpha, MAPT and HER-2 mRNA expression for pathological complete response (pCR) in this setting. Interestingly, HER-2 gene expression was strongly predictive of pCR (P=0.017) as well as overall response (P=0.037) and clinical complete response (cCR, P=0.050). In contrast, for both TOPO IIalpha and MAPT no correlation with pCR was observed in our sample group. PMID:17010609

  5. Heterotypic seeding of Tau fibrillization by pre-aggregated Abeta provides potent seeds for prion-like seeding and propagation of Tau-pathology in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Bruno; Stancu, Ilie-Cosmin; Buist, Arjan; Bird, Matthew; Wang, Peng; Vanoosthuyse, Alexandre; Van Kolen, Kristof; Verheyen, An; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; Octave, Jean-Noël; Baatsen, Peter; Moechars, Diederik; Dewachter, Ilse

    2016-04-01

    Genetic, clinical, histopathological and biomarker data strongly support Beta-amyloid (Aβ) induced spreading of Tau-pathology beyond entorhinal cortex (EC), as a crucial process in conversion from preclinical cognitively normal to Alzheimer's Disease (AD), while the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In vivo preclinical models have reproducibly recapitulated Aβ-induced Tau-pathology. Tau pathology was thereby also induced by aggregated Aβ, in functionally connected brain areas, reminiscent of a prion-like seeding process. In this work we demonstrate, that pre-aggregated Aβ can directly induce Tau fibrillization by cross-seeding, in a cell-free assay, comparable to that demonstrated before for alpha-synuclein and Tau. We furthermore demonstrate, in a well-characterized cellular Tau-aggregation assay that Aβ-seeds cross-seeded Tau-pathology and strongly catalyzed pre-existing Tau-aggregation, reminiscent of the pathogenetic process in AD. Finally, we demonstrate that heterotypic seeded Tau by pre-aggregated Aβ provides efficient seeds for induction and propagation of Tau-pathology in vivo. Prion-like, heterotypic seeding of Tau fibrillization by Aβ, providing potent seeds for propagating Tau pathology in vivo, as demonstrated here, provides a compelling molecular mechanism for Aβ-induced propagation of Tau-pathology, beyond regions with pre-existing Tau-pathology (entorhinal cortex/locus coeruleus). Cross-seeding along functional connections could thereby resolve the initial spatial dissociation between amyloid- and Tau-pathology, and preferential propagation of Tau-pathology in regions with pre-existing 'silent' Tau-pathology, by conversion of a 'silent' Tau pathology to a 'spreading' Tau-pathology, observed in AD. PMID:26739002

  6. Untangling tau imaging.

    PubMed

    Villemagne, Victor L; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Rowe, Christopher C

    2016-01-01

    In vivo imaging of tau deposits is providing a better understanding of the temporal and spatial tau deposition in the brain, allowing a more comprehensive insight into the causes, diagnoses, and potentially treatment of tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal syndrome, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and some variants of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. The assessment of tau deposition in the brain over time will allow a deeper understanding of the relationship between tau and other variables such as cognition, genotype, and neurodegeneration, as well as assessing the role tau plays in ageing. Preliminary human studies suggest that tau imaging could also be used as a diagnostic, prognostic, and theranostic biomarker, as well as a surrogate marker for target engagement, patient recruitment, and efficacy monitoring for disease-specific therapeutic trials. PMID:27489878

  7. Tau polarisation at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemany, Ricard

    1999-04-01

    The measurements of the tau polarisation at LEP I are reviewed. Special emphasis is given to the new preliminary results presented at this conference. The ALEPH collaboration has studied the polarisation as a function of the polar angle using a new method based on the tau direction reconstruction and fully exploiting the angular correlations. A second traditional approach, based on the single tau decays has been also developed. The DELPHI collaboration has also studied the full data sample using an individual tau decay method and an inclusive hadronic selection. The results from the four experiments are presented with discussion of the compatibility among the methods and experiments.

  8. Study on the metabolic fate of catena-(S)-[mu-N alpha-(3-aminopropionyl)histidinato(2-)-N1,N2,O:N tau]-zinc]. 3rd communication: transfer into fetus and milk in rats.

    PubMed

    Toyama, S; Furuta, S; Miwa, M; Suzuki, M; Sano, H; Matsuda, K

    1991-09-01

    Studies on the transfer into the fetus and the milk were performed after administration of 14C-Z-103 and 65Zn-Z-103 (catena-(S)-[mu-[N alpha-(3-aminopropionyl)histidinato(2-)-N1,N2,O:N tau]- zinc], CAS 107667-60-7) to rats. After oral administration of 14C-Z-103 to pregnant rats, the transfer of radioactivity to the fetus was studied by means of whole body autoradiography (ARG) and measurement of radioactivity in the fetus. The concentration of radioactivity in the fetus was approximately the same as those in the blood and the placenta of the maternal animal. The transfer of radioactivity into the milk was demonstrated after administration of 14C-Z-103 to lactating rats. Radioactivity in the fetus and milk are considered to be due to metabolites of L-carnosine of Z-103, such as amino acid or protein. The distribution of radioactivity in the fetus was also observed after administration of 65Zn-Z-103 to pregnant rats. However, after administration of non-radioactive Z-103 to pregnant rats, the zinc level in the fetus was found to be almost the same level as that in the fetus of the untreated rats. The transfer of radioactivity to the milk was studied after administration of 65Zn-Z-103 to the lactating rats, and it was seen that the concentration of radioactive zinc in the milk was much lower than the endogenous level of zinc in the milk at any of the time points investigated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1796929

  9. Measurement of the tau lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1982-10-01

    If the tau lepton couples to the charged weak current with universal strength, its lifetime can be expressed in terms of the muon's lifetime, the ratio of the masses of the muon and the tau, and the tau's branching ratio into e anti nu/sub e/ nu/sub tau/ as tau/sub tau/ = tau/sub ..mu../ (m/sub ..mu..//m/sub tau/)/sup 5/ B(tau ..-->.. e anti nu/sub e/nu/sub tau/) = 2.8 +- 0.2 x 10/sup -13/ s. This paper describes the measurement of the tau lifetime made by the Mark II collaboration, using a new high precision drift chamber in contunction with the Mark II detector at PEP. The results of other tau lifetime measurements are summarized.

  10. CHIP and Hsp70 regulate tau ubiquitination, degradation and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Petrucelli, Leonard; Dickson, Dennis; Kehoe, Kathryn; Taylor, Julie; Snyder, Heather; Grover, Andrew; De Lucia, Michael; McGowan, Eileen; Lewis, Jada; Prihar, Guy; Kim, Jungsu; Dillmann, Wolfgang H; Browne, Susan E; Hall, Alexis; Voellmy, Richard; Tsuboi, Yoshio; Dawson, Ted M; Wolozin, Benjamin; Hardy, John; Hutton, Mike

    2004-04-01

    Molecular chaperones, ubiquitin ligases and proteasome impairment have been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, which are characterized by accumulation of abnormal protein aggregates (e.g. tau and alpha-synuclein respectively). Here we report that CHIP, an ubiquitin ligase that interacts directly with Hsp70/90, induces ubiquitination of the microtubule associated protein, tau. CHIP also increases tau aggregation. Consistent with this observation, diverse of tau lesions in human postmortem tissue were found to be immunopositive for CHIP. Conversely, induction of Hsp70 through treatment with either geldanamycin or heat shock factor 1 leads to a decrease in tau steady-state levels and a selective reduction in detergent insoluble tau. Furthermore, 30-month-old mice overexpressing inducible Hsp70 show a significant reduction in tau levels. Together these data demonstrate that the Hsp70/CHIP chaperone system plays an important role in the regulation of tau turnover and the selective elimination of abnormal tau species. Hsp70/CHIP may therefore play an important role in the pathogenesis of tauopathies and also represents a potential therapeutic target. PMID:14962978

  11. Pfaffian and Determinantal Tau Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Leur, Johan W.; Orlov, Alexander Yu.

    2015-11-01

    Adler, Shiota and van Moerbeke observed that a tau function of the Pfaff lattice is a square root of a tau function of the Toda lattice hierarchy of Ueno and Takasaki. In this paper, we give a representation theoretical explanation for this phenomenon. We consider 2-BKP and two-component 2-KP tau functions. We shall show that a square of a BKP tau function is equal to a certain two-component KP tau function and a square of a 2-BKP tau function is equal to a certain two-component 2-KP tau function.

  12. Measurements of the tau Mass and Mass Difference of the tau^+ and tau^- at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-30

    The authors present the result of a precision measurement of the mass of the {tau} lepton, M{sub {tau}}, based on 423 fb{sup -1} of data recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. Using a pseudomass endpoint method, they determine the mass to be 1776.68 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.41(syst) MeV. They also measure the mass difference between the {tau}{sup +} and {tau}{sup -}, and obtain (M{sub {tau}{sup +}} - M{sub {tau}{sup -}})/M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} = (-3.4 {+-} 1.3(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, where M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} is the average value of M{sub {tau}{sup +}} and M{sub {tau}{sup -}}.

  13. Neuropathology of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration–Tau (FTLD-Tau)

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Dennis W.; Kouri, Naomi; Murray, Melissa E.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    A clinically and pathologically heterogeneous type of frontotemporal lobar degeneration has abnormal tau pathology in neurons and glia (FTLD-tau). Familial FTLD-tau is usually due to mutations in the tau gene (MAPT). Even FTLD-tau determined by MAPT mutations ha s clinical and pathologic heterogeneity. Tauopathies are subclassified according to the predominant species of tau that accumulates, with respect to alternative splicing of MAPT, with tau proteins containing 3 (3R) or 4 repeats (4R) of ~ 32 amino acids in the microtubule binding domain. In Pick's disease (PiD), 3R tau predominates, whereas 4R tau is characteristic of corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Depending upon the specific mutation in MAPT, familial FTLD-tau can have 3R, 4R or a combination of 3R and 4R tau. PiD is the least common FTLD-tau characterized by neuronal Pick bodies in a stereotypic neuroanatomical distribution. PSP and CBD are more common than PiD and have extensive clinical and pathologic overlap, with no distinctive clinical syndrome or biomarker that permits their differentiation. Diagnosis rests upon postmortem examination of the brain and demonstration of globose tangles, oligodendroglial coiled bodies and tufted astrocytes in PSP or threads, pretangles and astrocytic plaques in CBD. The anatomical distribution of tau pathology determines the clinical presentation of PSP and CBD, as well as PiD. The basis for this selective cortical vulnerability in FTLD-tau is unknown. PMID:21720721

  14. Tau physics results from SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Daoudi, M.; SLD Collaboration

    1996-08-10

    Results on {tau} physics at SLD are presented. They are based on 4,316 {tau}-pair events selected from a 150 k Z{sup 0} data sample collected at the SLC. These results include measurements of the {tau} lifetime ({tau}{sub r} = 288.1 {+-} 6.1 {+-} 3.3 fs), the {tau} Michel parameters ({rho} = 0.71 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04, {zeta} = 1.03 {+-} 0.36 {+-} 0.05, and {zeta}{delta} = 0.84 {+-} 0.27 {+-} 0.05), and the {tau} neutrino helicity (h{sub {nu}} = {minus}0.81 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.03).

  15. Amyloid and tau cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Because of the emerging intersections of HIV infection and Alzheimer's disease, we examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers related of amyloid and tau metabolism in HIV-infected patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study we measured soluble amyloid precursor proteins alpha and beta (sAPPα and sAPPβ), amyloid beta fragment 1-42 (Aβ1-42), and total and hyperphosphorylated tau (t-tau and p-tau) in CSF of 86 HIV-infected (HIV+) subjects, including 21 with AIDS dementia complex (ADC), 25 with central nervous system (CNS) opportunistic infections and 40 without neurological symptoms and signs. We also measured these CSF biomarkers in 64 uninfected (HIV-) subjects, including 21 with Alzheimer's disease, and both younger and older controls without neurological disease. Results CSF sAPPα and sAPPβ concentrations were highly correlated and reduced in patients with ADC and opportunistic infections compared to the other groups. The opportunistic infection group but not the ADC patients had lower CSF Aβ1-42 in comparison to the other HIV+ subjects. CSF t-tau levels were high in some ADC patients, but did not differ significantly from the HIV+ neuroasymptomatic group, while CSF p-tau was not increased in any of the HIV+ groups. Together, CSF amyloid and tau markers segregated the ADC patients from both HIV+ and HIV- neuroasymptomatics and from Alzheimer's disease patients, but not from those with opportunistic infections. Conclusions Parallel reductions of CSF sAPPα and sAPPβ in ADC and CNS opportunistic infections suggest an effect of CNS immune activation or inflammation on neuronal amyloid synthesis or processing. Elevation of CSF t-tau in some ADC and CNS infection patients without concomitant increase in p-tau indicates neural injury without preferential accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau as found in Alzheimer's disease. These biomarker changes define pathogenetic pathways to brain injury in ADC that differ from those of Alzheimer's disease

  16. Juneau Indian Studies Elementary Curriculum Guide. Grades K-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadiente, Ronalda

    Designed to provide instruction in Tlingit culture as an integral part of the K-5 social studies curriculum, this guide presents teachers with extensive lesson plans and numerous resource materials. The units of study focus on the culture and environment of southeast Alaska and emphasize experiential learning activities. Each grade…

  17. Math and Economics: Implementing Authentic Instruction in Grades K-5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Althauser, Krista; Harter, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to outline a partnership program that involved a local elementary school district, an institution of higher education, the local business community, and a state economic education advocacy group to integrate economics into math in grades K-5. The "Economics: Math in Real Life" program was provided in…

  18. The Common Core: Insights into the K-5 Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Maureen; Overturf, Brenda J.

    2012-01-01

    The role of the Common Core English Language Arts Standards in grades K-5 literacy instruction is the focus of the article. The authors begin by raising four questions: (1) What is the essential philosophy of the Common Core State Standards?; (2) What do educators need to know to use the College and Career Readiness Standards and Common Core State…

  19. Tau physics with polarized beams

    SciTech Connect

    Daoudi, M.

    1995-11-01

    We present the first results on tau physics using polarized beams. These include measurements of the {tau} Michel parameters {xi} and {xi}{delta} and the {tau} neutrino helicity h{sub {nu}}. The measurements were performed using the SLD detector at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC).

  20. Review of tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, D.P.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of the {tau} decay modes are reviewed and compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. While the agreement is generally good, the status of the 1-prong puzzle'' remains controversial and a discrepancy between the measured leptonic branching fractions and the {tau} lifetime persists. Prospects for precision measurements at a Tau-Charm Factory are also reviewed. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Measurements of the decays tau/sup -/. -->. rho/sup -/. nu. /sub tau/, tau/sup -/. -->. pi. /sup -/. nu. /sub tau/ and tau/sup -/. -->. K*-(892). nu. /sub tau/ using the MARK II detector at SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfan, J.

    1981-04-01

    Measurements of the branching fractions for the Cabibbo favored decays tau/sup -/ ..-->.. rho/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/..nu../sub tau/ and the Cabibbo suppressed decay mode tau/sup -/ ..-->.. K*/sup -/ (892)..nu../sub tau/ are presented. The energy dependence of the tau/sup +/tau/sup -/ production cross section is obtained for the decays tau/sup -/ ..-->.. rho/sup -/..nu../sub tau/ and these spectra agree well with the classification of the tau/sup -/ as a spin-1/2 point particle. Fits to the production cross section yield a measurement of M/sub tau/ = (1787 +- 10) MeV/c/sup 2/ for the tau mass. Ninety-five percent confidence upper limits for the forbidden decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. K*/sup -/(1430)..nu../sub tau/ and the tau neutrino mass are presented.

  2. Potential synergy between tau aggregation inhibitors and tau chaperone modulators

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Tau is a soluble, microtubule-associated protein known to aberrantly form amyloid-positive aggregates. This pathology is characteristic for more than 15 neuropathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer’s disease. Finding therapeutics to reverse or remove this non-native tau state is of great interest; however, at this time only one drug is entering phase III clinical trials for treating tauopathies. Generally, tau manipulation by therapeutics can either directly or indirectly alter tau aggregation and stability. Drugs that bind and change the conformation of tau itself are largely classified as aggregation inhibitors, while drugs that alter the activity of a tau-effector protein fall into several categories, such as kinase inhibitors, microtubule stabilizers, or chaperone modulators. Chaperone inhibitors that have proven effective in tau models include heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, heat shock protein 70 inhibitors and activators, as well as inducers of heat shock proteins. While many of these compounds can alter tau levels and/or aggregation states, it is possible that combining these approaches may produce the most optimal outcome. However, because many of these compounds have multiple off-target effects or poor blood–brain barrier permeability, the development of this synergistic therapeutic strategy presents significant challenges. This review will summarize many of the drugs that have been identified to alter tau biology, with special focus on therapeutics that prevent tau aggregation and regulate chaperone-mediated clearance of tau. PMID:24041111

  3. TAU2012 Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pich, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    The main highlights discussed at TAU2012 are briefly summarized. Besides the standard topics on lepton physics covered also at previous conferences (universality, QCD tests, Vus determination from τ decay, g - 2, ν oscillations, lepton-flavour violation), the τ lepton is playing now a very important role in searches for new physics phenomena.

  4. Neuronal activity enhances tau propagation and tau pathology in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jessica W; Hussaini, S Abid; Bastille, Isle M; Rodriguez, Gustavo A; Mrejeru, Ana; Rilett, Kelly; Sanders, David W; Cook, Casey; Fu, Hongjun; Boonen, Rick A C M; Herman, Mathieu; Nahmani, Eden; Emrani, Sheina; Figueroa, Y Helen; Diamond, Marc I; Clelland, Catherine L; Wray, Selina; Duff, Karen E

    2016-08-01

    Tau protein can transfer between neurons transneuronally and trans-synaptically, which is thought to explain the progressive spread of tauopathy observed in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Here we show that physiological tau released from donor cells can transfer to recipient cells via the medium, suggesting that at least one mechanism by which tau can transfer is via the extracellular space. Neuronal activity has been shown to regulate tau secretion, but its effect on tau pathology is unknown. Using optogenetic and chemogenetic approaches, we found that increased neuronal activity stimulates the release of tau in vitro and enhances tau pathology in vivo. These data have implications for disease pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies. PMID:27322420

  5. Analysis of E. coli K5 capsular polysaccharide heparosan

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Mellisa; Wang, Zhenyu; Laremore, Tatiana N.; Zhang, Fuming; Zhong, Weihong; Pu, Dennis; Zagorevski, Dmitri V.; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Heparosan is the key precursor for the preparation of bioengineered heparin, a potential replacement for porcine intestinal heparin, an important anticoagulant drug. The molecular weight (MW) distribution of heparosan produced by the fermentation of E. coli K5 was investigated. Large-slab isocratic and mini-slab gradient polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) were used to analyze the MW and polydispersity of heparosan. A preparative method that allowed fractionation by continuous-elution PAGE was used to obtain heparosan MW standards. The MWs of the heparosan standards were determined by electrospray ionization Fourier-transform mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-MS). A ladder of the standards was then used to determine the MW properties of polydisperse heparosan samples. Unbleached and bleached heparosan produced by fermentation of E. coli K5 had similar number-averaged MWs (MN), weight-averaged MWs (MW), and MW ranges of 3,000 to 150,000 Da. PMID:20407891

  6. Tau Biology and Tau-Directed Therapies for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bakota, Lidia; Brandt, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterised by a progressive loss of cognitive functions. Histopathologically, AD is defined by the presence of extracellular amyloid plaques containing Aβ and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. According to the now well-accepted amyloid cascade hypothesis is the Aβ pathology the primary driving force of AD pathogenesis, which then induces changes in tau protein leading to a neurodegenerative cascade during the progression of disease. Since many earlier drug trials aiming at preventing Aβ pathology failed to demonstrate efficacy, tau and microtubules have come into focus as prominent downstream targets. The article aims to develop the current concept of the involvement of tau in the neurodegenerative triad of synaptic loss, cell death and dendritic simplification. The function of tau as a microtubule-associated protein and versatile interaction partner will then be introduced and the rationale and progress of current tau-directed therapy will be discussed in the biological context. PMID:26729186

  7. YES 2K5: Young Engineers and Scientists Mentorship Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, D. C.; Asbell, H. E.

    2005-12-01

    The Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) Program is a community partnership between Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA). YES has been highly successful during the past 13 years, and YES 2K5 continued this trend. It provides talented high school juniors and seniors a bridge between classroom instruction and real-world, research experiences in physical sciences (including space science and astronomy) and engineering. YES 2K5 consists of two parts: 1) an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students experience the research environment first-hand; develop skills and acquire tools for solving scientific problems, attend mini-courses and seminars on electronics, computers and the Internet, careers, science ethics, and other topics; and select individual research projects to be completed during the academic year; and 2) a collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of their mentors during the academic year and earn honors credit. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, acknowledging their accomplishments and spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. YES 2K5 developed a website for the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) from the perspective of a high school student. Over the past 13 years, all YES graduates have entered college, several have worked for SwRI, and three scientific publications have resulted. Student evaluations indicate the effectiveness of YES on their academic preparation and choice of college majors. We acknowledge funding from the NASA MMS Mission, the NASA E/PO program, and local charitable foundations.

  8. Gamma (K5 Based) Compressor Blade Material Design - Alpha Extrusion on a Small Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Young-Won

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the 2003 study is to develop a mechanically processed, high temperature TiAl alloy for use in the Turbine Based Combined Cycle compressor. An aging study with 3 temperatures and 4 time periods at each temperature will be conducted to determine the optimum aging condition. High-magnification microscopic analyses shall be employed to define the size distribution of carbide as a function of aging temperature/time. The contractor shall define optimum materials' conditions by conducting tensile and creep testing for two over-aging conditions for both alloys and fatigue testing for one over-aging condition for each alloy.

  9. Decays of the heavy lepton, tau (1785)

    SciTech Connect

    Blocker, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    The structure of the weak hadronic current coupled to the tau is investigated via some of the hadronic decays of the tau. The vector current coupling is determined by measuring the tau ..-->.. rho ..nu../sub tau/ branching ratio. The axial-vector coupling is determined by measuring the tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/ branching ratio. The Cabibbo structure of the hadronic current is established by observing the decay tau ..-->.. K*(890)..nu../sub tau/ and measuring its branching ratio. The branching ratios for the decays tau ..-->.. e anti ..nu../sub e/..nu../sub tau/ and tau ..-->.. ..mu.. anti ..nu../sub ..mu../..nu../sub tau/ are measured as a normalization for the hadronic decays and as a check on the validity of the measurements. The leptonic branching ratios agree well with previous experiments. From a kinematic fit to the pion energy spectrum in the decay tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/, an upper limit (95% confidence level) of 245 MeV is placed on the tau neutrino mass. From a simultaneous fit of the center of mass energy dependence of the tau production cross section and the pion energy spectrum in the decay tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/, the tau mass is determined to be 1.787 +- .010 GeV/c. All properties of the tau measured here are consistent with it being a sequential lepton coupled to the ordinary weak hadronic current.

  10. Tau imaging in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Dani, M; Brooks, D J; Edison, P

    2016-06-01

    Aggregated tau protein is a major neuropathological substrate central to the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. In AD, it has been shown that the density of hyperphosphorylated tau tangles correlates closely with neuronal dysfunction and cell death, unlike β-amyloid. Until now, diagnostic and pathologic information about tau deposition has only been available from invasive techniques such as brain biopsy or autopsy. The recent development of selective in-vivo tau PET imaging ligands including [(18)F]THK523, [(18)F]THK5117, [(18)F]THK5105 and [(18)F]THK5351, [(18)F]AV1451(T807) and [(11)C]PBB3 has provided information about the role of tau in the early phases of neurodegenerative diseases, and provided support for diagnosis, prognosis, and imaging biomarkers to track disease progression. Moreover, the spatial and longitudinal relationship of tau distribution compared with β - amyloid and other pathologies in these diseases can be mapped. In this review, we discuss the role of aggregated tau in tauopathies, the challenges posed in developing selective tau ligands as biomarkers, the state of development in tau tracers, and the new clinical information that has been uncovered, as well as the opportunities for improving diagnosis and designing clinical trials in the future. PMID:26572762

  11. Tau physics at future facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1994-12-01

    This paper dicusses and projects the tau research which may be carried out at CESR, at BEPC, at the SLC, in the next few years at LEP I, at the asymmetric B-factories under construction in Japan and the United States and, if built, a tau-charm factory. As the size of tau data sets increases, there is an increasing need to reduce the effects of systematic errors on the precision and search range of experiments. In most areas of tau physics there is a large amount of progress to be made, but in a few areas it will be difficult to substantially improve the precision of present measurements.

  12. Effects of tau domain-specific antibodies and intravenous immunoglobulin on tau aggregation and aggregate degradation.

    PubMed

    Esteves-Villanueva, Jose O; Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Loeffler, David A; Martić, Sanela

    2015-01-20

    Tau pathology, including neurofibrillary tangles, develops in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aggregation and hyperphosphorylation of tau are potential therapeutic targets for AD. Administration of anti-tau antibodies reduces tau pathology in transgenic "tauopathy" mice; however, the optimal tau epitopes and conformations to target are unclear. Also unknown is whether intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products, currently being evaluated in AD trials, exert effects on pathological tau. This study examined the effects of anti-tau antibodies targeting different tau epitopes and the IVIG Gammagard on tau aggregation and preformed tau aggregates. Tau aggregation was assessed by transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy, and the binding affinity of the anti-tau antibodies for tau was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Antibodies used were anti-tau 1-150 ("D-8"), anti-tau 259-266 ("Paired-262"), anti-tau 341-360 ("A-10"), and anti-tau 404-441 ("Tau-46"), which bind to tau's N-terminus, microtubule binding domain (MBD) repeat sequences R1 and R4, and the C-terminus, respectively. The antibodies Paired-262 and A-10, but not D-8 and Tau-46, reduced tau fibrillization and degraded preformed tau aggregates, whereas the IVIG reduced tau aggregation but did not alter preformed aggregates. The binding affinities of the antibodies for the epitope for which they were specific did not appear to be related to their effects on tau aggregation. These results confirm that antibody binding to tau's MBD repeat sequences may inhibit tau aggregation and indicate that such antibodies may also degrade preformed tau aggregates. In the presence of anti-tau antibodies, the resulting tau morphologies were antigen-dependent. The results also suggested the possibility of different pathways regulating antibody-mediated inhibition of tau aggregation and antibody-mediated degradation of preformed tau aggregates. PMID:25545358

  13. UX Tau A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is an artist's rendition of the one-million-year-old star system called UX Tau A, located approximately 450 light-years away. Observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope showed a gap in the dusty planet-forming disk swirling around the system's central sun-like star.

    Spitzer saw a gap in UX Tau A's disk that extends from 0.2 to 56 astronomical units (an astronomical unit is the distance between the sun and Earth). The gap extends from the equivalent of Mercury to Pluto in our solar system, and is sandwiched between thick inner and outer disks on either side. Astronomers suspect that the gap was carved out by one or more forming planets.

    Such dusty disks are where planets are thought to be born. Dust grains clump together like snowballs to form larger rocks, and then the bigger rocks collide to form the cores of planets. When rocks revolve around their central star, they act like cosmic vacuum cleaners, picking up all the gas and dust in their path and creating gaps.

    Although gaps have been detected in disks swirling around young stars before, UX Tau A is special because the gap is sandwiched between two thick disks of dust. An inner thick dusty disk hugs the central star, then, moving outward, there is a gap, followed by another thick doughnut-shaped disk. Other systems with gaps contain very little to no dust near the central star. In other words, those gaps are more like big holes in the centers of disks.

    Some scientists suspect that these holes could have been carved out by a process called photoevaporation. Photoevaporation occurs when radiation from the central star heats up the gas and dust around it to the point where it evaporates away. The fact that there is thick disk swirling extremely close to UX Tau A's central star rules out the photoevaporation scenario. If photoevaporation from the star played a role, then large amounts of dust would not be floating so close to the star.

  14. Results of tests of weathered K5NA closeout material in the MSFC Hot Gas Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. G.

    1982-01-01

    The application of K5NA over hypolon was investigated. The effects of using K5NA over painted cork surfaces, the effects of weathering on the unpainted K5NA surfaces are determined, and the use of water versus solvent for tooling K5NA in place were compared. It is concluded that: (1) K5NA can be applied to hypalon surfaces; (2) K5NA can be left unpainted; and (3) K5NA can be tested with water or solvent.

  15. Interactions between Tau and α-synuclein augment neurotoxicity in a Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Bidisha; Jackson, George R.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and pathological studies have suggested considerable overlap between tauopathies and synucleinopathies. Several genome-wide association studies have identified alpha-Synuclein (SNCA) and Tau (MAPT) polymorphisms as common risk factors for sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the mechanisms by which subtle variations in the expression of wild-type SNCA and MAPT influence risk for PD and the underlying cellular events that effect neurotoxicity remain unclear. To examine causes of neurotoxicity associated with the α-Syn/Tau interaction, we used the fruit fly as a model. We utilized misexpression paradigms in three different tissues to probe the α-Syn/Tau interaction: the retina, dopaminergic neurons and the larval neuromuscular junction. Misexpression of Tau and α-Syn enhanced a rough eye phenotype and loss of dopaminergic neurons in fly tauopathy and synucleinopathy models, respectively. Our findings suggest that interactions between α-Syn and Tau at the cellular level cause disruption of cytoskeletal organization, axonal transport defects and aberrant synaptic organization that contribute to neuronal dysfunction and death associated with sporadic PD. α-Syn did not alter levels of Tau phosphorylated at the AT8 epitope. However, α-Syn and Tau colocalized in ubiquitin-positive aggregates in eye imaginal discs. The presence of Tau also led to an increase in urea soluble α-Syn. Our findings have important implications in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying α-Syn/Tau-mediated synaptic dysfunction, which likely arise in the early asymptomatic phase of sporadic PD. PMID:24430504

  16. Using Human iPSC-Derived Neurons to Model TAU Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Verheyen, An; Diels, Annick; Dijkmans, Joyce; Oyelami, Tutu; Meneghello, Giulia; Mertens, Liesbeth; Versweyveld, Sofie; Borgers, Marianne; Buist, Arjan; Peeters, Pieter; Cik, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia are amongst the most common forms of dementia characterized by the formation and deposition of abnormal TAU in the brain. In order to develop a translational human TAU aggregation model suitable for screening, we transduced TAU harboring the pro-aggregating P301L mutation into control hiPSC-derived neural progenitor cells followed by differentiation into cortical neurons. TAU aggregation and phosphorylation was quantified using AlphaLISA technology. Although no spontaneous aggregation was observed upon expressing TAU-P301L in neurons, seeding with preformed aggregates consisting of the TAU-microtubule binding repeat domain triggered robust TAU aggregation and hyperphosphorylation already after 2 weeks, without affecting general cell health. To validate our model, activity of two autophagy inducers was tested. Both rapamycin and trehalose significantly reduced TAU aggregation levels suggesting that iPSC-derived neurons allow for the generation of a biologically relevant human Tauopathy model, highly suitable to screen for compounds that modulate TAU aggregation. PMID:26720731

  17. Tau decays: A theoretical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1992-11-01

    Theoretical predictions for various tau decay rates are reviewed. Effects of electroweak radiative corrections are described. Implications for precision tests of the standard model and ``new physics`` searches are discussed. A perspective on the tau decay puzzle and 1-prong problem is given.

  18. Tau decays: A theoretical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1992-11-01

    Theoretical predictions for various tau decay rates are reviewed. Effects of electroweak radiative corrections are described. Implications for precision tests of the standard model and new physics'' searches are discussed. A perspective on the tau decay puzzle and 1-prong problem is given.

  19. Tau identification at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Stephen; /Chicago U., EFI

    2005-07-01

    Methods for reconstructing and identifying the hadronic decays of tau leptons with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in Run II are described. Precision electroweak measurements of W and Z gauge boson cross sections are presented as well as results of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model with hadronically decaying tau leptons in the final state.

  20. Survivability of Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5 Under Simulated Martian Surface Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David J.; Schuerger, Andrew C.; Davidson, Mark M.; Pacala, Stephen W.; Bakermans, Corien; Onstott, Tullis

    2008-01-01

    Spacecraft launched to Mars can retain viable terrestrial microorganisms on board that may survive the interplanetary transit. Such biota might compromise the search for life beyond Earth if capable of propagating on Mars. The current study explored the survivability of Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5, a psychrotolerant microorganism obtained from a Siberian permafrost cryopeg, under simulated martian surface conditions of high ultraviolet irradiation, high desiccation, low temperature, and low atmospheric pressure. First, a desiccation experiment compared the survival of P. cryohalolentis cells embedded, or not embedded, within a medium/salt matrix (MSM) maintained at 25 degrees C for 24 hr within a laminar flow hood. Results indicate that the presence of the MSM enhanced survival of the bacterial cells by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. Second, tests were conducted in a Mars Simulation Chamber to determine the UV tolerance of the microorganism. No viable vegetative cells of P. cryohalolentis were detected after 8 hr of exposure to Mars-normal conditions of 4.55 W/m(2) UVC irradiation (200-280 nm), -12.5 degrees C, 7.1 mbar, and a Mars gas mix composed of CO2 (95.3%), N2 (2.7%), Ar (1.6%), O2 (0.2%), and H(2)O (0.03%). Third, an experiment was conducted within the Mars chamber in which total atmospheric opacities were simulated at tau = 0.1 (dust-free CO2 atmosphere at 7.1 mbar), 0.5 (normal clear sky with 0.4 = dust opacity and 0.1 = CO2-only opacity), and 3.5 (global dust storm) to determine the survivability of P. cryohalolentis to partially shielded UVC radiation. The survivability of the bacterium increased with the level of UVC attenuation, though population levels still declined several orders of magnitude compared to UVC-absent controls over an 8 hr exposure period.

  1. The Tau-Charm Factory and tau physics

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1989-04-01

    An international group of physicists is developing the concept and design of a Tau-Charm Factory: a two-ring, electron-positron, circular collider with 1.5 /< =/ /radical/s /< =/ 4.2 GeV and a design luminosity of 10/sup 33/ cm/sup /minus/2/ s/sup /minus/1/. This paper presents the concept of the facility and outlines the tau lepton physics which can be done. A companion talk by R. Schindler discusses the D/sup 0/, D/sup /+-//, and D/sub s/ physics at a Tau-Charm Factory. 25 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Tau exon 10 alternative splicing and tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2008-01-01

    Abnormalities of microtubule-associated protein tau play a central role in neurofibrillary degeneration in several neurodegenerative disorders that collectively called tauopathies. Six isoforms of tau are expressed in adult human brain, which result from alternative splicing of pre-mRNA generated from a single tau gene. Alternative splicing of tau exon 10 results in tau isoforms containing either three or four microtubule-binding repeats (3R-tau and 4R-tau, respectively). Approximately equal levels of 3R-tau and 4R-tau are expressed in normal adult human brain, but the 3R-tau/4R-tau ratio is altered in the brains in several tauopathies. Discovery of silence mutations and intronic mutations of tau gene in some individuals with frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), which only disrupt tau exon 10 splicing but do not alter tau's primary sequence, demonstrates that dysregulation of tau exon 10 alternative splicing and consequently of 3R-tau/4R-tau balance is sufficient to cause neurodegeneration and dementia. Here, we review the gene structure, transcripts and protein isoforms of tau, followed by the regulation of exon 10 splicing that determines the expression of 3R-tau or 4R-tau. Finally, dysregulation of exon 10 splicing of tau in several tauopathies is discussed. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which tau exon 10 splicing is regulated and how it is disrupted in tauopathies will provide new insight into the mechanisms of these tauopathies and help identify new therapeutic targets to treat these disorders. PMID:18616804

  3. a Measurement of Tau Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Arthur Michael

    At ALEPH, polarized tau pairs are produced in e^+e^- annihilations at the Z peak. The polarization depends on the tau production angle and is measured by spin analyzing tau decays in the modes tauto{rm e}nu |nu, tautomunu |nu, tautopinu, tautorhonu and tauto{rm a}_1nu . This leads to a measurement of the Z couplings to taus and electrons, {cal A} _tau and {cal A }_{rm e}, where {cal A}_{l} = 2g_sp {V}{l}g_sp{A}{l }/(g_sp{V}{l}^2 + g_sp{A}{l}^2). The values obtained using the 1992 data are { cal A}_tau = 0.129 +/- 0.016 +/- 0.010 and {cal A} _{rm e} = 0.136 +/- 0.022 +/- 0.007, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. Assuming electron-tau universality leads to {cal A}_{ rm e-tau} = 0.131 +/- 0.013 +/- 0.006. This result has been combined with the published ALEPH result for the 1990 and 1991 data for a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle sin ^2 theta_sp{W}{ rm eff} = 0.2334 +/- 0.0014.

  4. Mutated tau, amyloid and neuroinflammation in Alzheimer disease-A brief review.

    PubMed

    Hung, A S M; Liang, Y; Chow, Tony C H; Tang, H C; Wu, Sharon L Y; Wai, M S M; Yew, D T

    2016-05-01

    This review discussed the importance of mutated tau, amyloid and neuroinflammatory factors and microglia in Alzheimer disease. In particular tau, CD4 and TNF alpha were included in the review and the colocalizations of these factors were highlighted. It is important to realize the Alzheimer disease may result from the interactions of these factors. Some of these factors may coexist at the same region and at the same time e.g. mutated tau and amyloid in plaques. A summary scheme of etiology leading to the disease was included. PMID:26851150

  5. Aluminum interaction with human brain tau protein phosphorylation by various kinases

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sebae, A.H.; Zeid, M.M.A.; Saleh, M.A. . Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology Lab.); Abdel-Ghany, M.E.; Shalloway, D. ); Blancato, J. . Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab.)

    1993-01-01

    Phosphorylation is an indispensable process for energy and signal transduction in biological systems. AlCl[sub 3] at 10 nM to 10 uM range activated in-vitro [[gamma]-[sup 32]P] ATP phosphorylation of the brain (tau) [Tau] protein in both normal human or E. coli expressed [Tau] forms; in the presence of the kinases P34, PKP, and PKC to a maximum at 1 mM level. AlCl[sub 3] at 100 uM to 500 uM range induced non-enzymatic phosphorylation of [Tau] with [gamma]-ATP, [gamma]-GTP, and [alpha]-GTP, and [alpha]-GTP. AlCl[sub 3] activated histone phosphorylation by P34 in a similar pattern. The hyperphosphorylation of [Tau] with [gamma]-ATP, [gamma]-GTP, and [alpha]-GTP. AlCl[sub 3] activated histone phosphorylation by P34 in a similar pattern. The hyperphosphorylation of [Tau] by Al[sup 3+] was accompanied by molecular shift and mobility retardation in SDS-PAGE. This may demonstrate the mechanism of the longterm neurological effect of Al[sup 3+] in human brain leading to the formation of the neurofibrillary tangles related to Alzeheimer's disease.

  6. Hadronic Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, I.M.; /Victoria U.

    2007-10-25

    Precision measurements of the exclusive branching fraction {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} h{sup -}h{sup -}h{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}, where the h represent either a pion or a kaon, from the BABAR Experiment are presented. The branching fraction for {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} is the first resonant plus non-resonant measurement of this mode and the branching fraction {tau}{sup -} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is also a first measurement. In addition we present the new measurement of the branching fraction of {tau}{sup -} {yields} {phi}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}.

  7. Increased suppression of oncolytic adenovirus carrying mutant k5 on colorectal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Junkai; Xiao Tian; Gu Jinfa; Wei Na; He Lingfeng; Ding Miao; Liu Xinyuan

    2008-09-19

    Angiogenesis plays a key role in the development of a wide variety of malignant tumors. The approach of targeting antiangiogenesis has become an important field of cancer gene therapy. In this study, the antiangiogenesis protein K5 (the kringle 5 of human plasminogen) has been mutated by changing leucine71 to arginine to form mK5. Then the ZD55-mK5, which is an oncolytic adenovirus expressing mK5, was constructed. It showed stronger inhibition on proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cell. Moreover, in tube formation and embryonic chorioallantoic membrane assay, ZD55-mK5 exhibited more effective antiangiogenesis than ZD55-K5. In addition, ZD55-mK5 generated obvious suppression on the growth of colorectal tumor xenografts and prolonged the life span of nude mice. These results indicate that ZD55-mK5 is a potent agent for inhibiting the tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth.

  8. Closing the tau loop: the missing tau mutation.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Allan; Lonergan, Roisin; Olszewska, Diana A; O'Dowd, Sean; Cummins, Gemma; Magennis, Brian; Fallon, Emer M; Pender, Niall; Huey, Edward D; Cosentino, Stephanie; O'Rourke, Killian; Kelly, Brendan D; O'Connell, Martin; Delon, Isabelle; Farrell, Michael; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Rowland, Lewis P; Fahn, Stanley; Craig, Peter; Hutton, Michael; Lynch, Tim

    2015-10-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration comprises a group of disorders characterized by behavioural, executive, language impairment and sometimes features of parkinsonism and motor neuron disease. In 1994 we described an Irish-American family with frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 associated with extensive tau pathology. We named this disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophy complex. We subsequently identified mutations in the MAPT gene. Eleven MAPT gene splice site stem loop mutations were identified over time except for 5' splice site of exon 10. We recently identified another Irish family with autosomal dominant early amnesia and behavioural change or parkinsonism associated with the 'missing' +15 mutation at the intronic boundary of exon 10. We performed a clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging study on the proband and four siblings, including two affected siblings. We sequenced MAPT and performed segregation analysis. We looked for a biological effect of the tau variant by performing real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of RNA extracted from human embryonic kidney cells transfected with exon trapping constructs. We found a c.915+15A>C exon 10/intron 10 stem loop mutation in all affected subjects but not in the unaffected. The c.915+15A>C variant caused a shift in tau splicing pattern to a predominantly exon 10+ pattern presumably resulting in predominant 4 repeat tau and little 3 repeat tau. This strongly suggests that the c.915+15A>C variant is a mutation and that it causes frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 in this pedigree by shifting tau transcription and translation to +4 repeat tau. Tau (MAPT) screening should be considered in families where amnesia or atypical parkinsonism coexists with behavioural disturbance early in the disease process. We describe the final missing stem loop tau mutation predicted 15 years ago. Mutations have now been identified at all predicted sites within the 'stem' when the stem

  9. Identification of disulfide cross-linked tau dimer responsible for tau propagation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohee; Lim, Sungsu; Haque, Md. Mamunul; Ryoo, Nayeon; Hong, Hyun Seok; Rhim, Hyewhon; Lee, Dong-Eun; Chang, Young-Tae; Lee, Jun-Seok; Cheong, Eunji; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that tau aggregates are not only neurotoxic, but also propagate in neurons acting as a seed for native tau aggregation. Prion-like tau transmission is now considered as an important pathogenic mechanism driving the progression of tau pathology in the brain. However, prion-like tau species have not been clearly characterized. To identify infectious tau conformers, here we prepared diverse tau aggregates and evaluated the effect on inducing intracellular tau-aggregation. Among tested, tau dimer containing P301L-mutation is identified as the most infectious form to induce tau pathology. Biochemical analysis reveals that P301L-tau dimer is covalently cross-linked with a disulfide bond. The relatively small and covalently cross-linked tau dimer induced tau pathology efficiently in primary neurons and also in tau-transgenic mice. So far, the importance of tau disulfide cross-linking has been overlooked in the study of tau pathology. Here our results suggested that tau disulfide cross-linking might play critical role in tau propagation by producing structurally stable and small tau conformers. PMID:26470054

  10. Identification of disulfide cross-linked tau dimer responsible for tau propagation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dohee; Lim, Sungsu; Haque, Md Mamunul; Ryoo, Nayeon; Hong, Hyun Seok; Rhim, Hyewhon; Lee, Dong-Eun; Chang, Young-Tae; Lee, Jun-Seok; Cheong, Eunji; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that tau aggregates are not only neurotoxic, but also propagate in neurons acting as a seed for native tau aggregation. Prion-like tau transmission is now considered as an important pathogenic mechanism driving the progression of tau pathology in the brain. However, prion-like tau species have not been clearly characterized. To identify infectious tau conformers, here we prepared diverse tau aggregates and evaluated the effect on inducing intracellular tau-aggregation. Among tested, tau dimer containing P301L-mutation is identified as the most infectious form to induce tau pathology. Biochemical analysis reveals that P301L-tau dimer is covalently cross-linked with a disulfide bond. The relatively small and covalently cross-linked tau dimer induced tau pathology efficiently in primary neurons and also in tau-transgenic mice. So far, the importance of tau disulfide cross-linking has been overlooked in the study of tau pathology. Here our results suggested that tau disulfide cross-linking might play critical role in tau propagation by producing structurally stable and small tau conformers. PMID:26470054

  11. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-5 - Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. 1.401(k)-5 Section 1.401(k)-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.401(k)-5 Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events....

  12. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-5 - Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. 1.401(k)-5 Section 1.401(k)-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.401(k)-5 Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events....

  13. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-5 - Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. 1.401(k)-5 Section 1.401(k)-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.401(k)-5 Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events....

  14. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-5 - Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. 1.401(k)-5 Section 1.401(k)-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.401(k)-5 Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events....

  15. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-5 - Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. 1.401(k)-5 Section 1.401(k)-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE.... § 1.401(k)-5 Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events....

  16. Accelerated Human Mutant Tau Aggregation by Knocking Out Murine Tau in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kunie; Leroy, Karelle; Héraud, Céline; Yilmaz, Zehra; Authelet, Michèle; Suain, Valèrie; De Decker, Robert; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Many models of human tauopathies have been generated in mice by expression of a human mutant tau with maintained expression of mouse endogenous tau. Because murine tau might interfere with the toxic effects of human mutant tau, we generated a model in which a pathogenic human tau protein is expressed in the absence of wild-type tau protein, with the aim of facilitating the study of the pathogenic role of the mutant tau and to reproduce more faithfully a human tauopathy. The Tg30 line is a tau transgenic mouse model overexpressing human 1N4R double-mutant tau (P301S and G272V) that develops Alzheimer's disease-like neurofibrillary tangles in an age-dependent manner. By crossing Tg30 mice with mice invalidated for their endogenous tau gene, we obtained Tg30xtau−/− mice that express only exogenous human double-mutant 1N4R tau. Although Tg30xtau−/− mice express less tau protein compared with Tg30, they exhibit signs of decreased survival, increased proportion of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in the brain and in the spinal cord, increased number of Gallyas-positive neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus, increased number of inclusions in the spinal cord, and a more severe motor phenotype. Deletion of murine tau accelerated tau aggregation during aging of this mutant tau transgenic model, suggesting that murine tau could interfere with the development of tau pathology in transgenic models of human tauopathies. PMID:21281813

  17. Glial Tau Pathology in Tauopathies: Functional Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Kahlson, Martha A.; Colodner, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies are a class of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the presence of hyperphosphorylated and aggregated tau pathology in neuronal and glial cells. Though the ratio of neuronal and glial tau aggregates varies across diseases, glial tau aggregates can populate the same degenerating brain regions as neuronal tau aggregates. While much is known about the deleterious consequences of tau pathology in neurons, the relative contribution of glial tau pathology to these diseases is less clear. Recent studies using a number of model systems implicate glial tau pathology in contributing to tauopathy pathogenesis. This review aims to highlight the functional consequences of tau overexpression in glial cells and explore the potential contribution of glial tau pathology in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative tauopathies. PMID:26884683

  18. Insulin dysfunction and Tau pathology

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Noura B.; Gratuze, Maud; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Bretteville, Alexis; Planel, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include senile plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides (a cleavage product of the Amyloid Precursor Protein, or APP) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein assembled in paired helical filaments (PHF). NFT pathology is important since it correlates with the degree of cognitive impairment in AD. Only a small proportion of AD is due to genetic variants, whereas the large majority of cases (~99%) is late onset and sporadic in origin. The cause of sporadic AD is likely to be multifactorial, with external factors interacting with biological or genetic susceptibilities to accelerate the manifestation of the disease. Insulin dysfunction, manifested by diabetes mellitus (DM) might be such factor, as there is extensive data from epidemiological studies suggesting that DM is associated with an increased relative risk for AD. Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are known to affect multiple cognitive functions in patients. In this context, understanding the effects of diabetes on Tau pathogenesis is important since Tau pathology show a strong relationship to dementia in AD, and to memory loss in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. Here, we reviewed preclinical studies that link insulin dysfunction to Tau protein pathogenesis, one of the major pathological hallmarks of AD. We found more than 30 studies reporting Tau phosphorylation in a mouse or rat model of insulin dysfunction. We also payed attention to potential sources of artifacts, such as hypothermia and anesthesia, that were demonstrated to results in Tau hyperphosphorylation and could major confounding experimental factors. We found that very few studies reported the temperature of the animals, and only a handful did not use anesthesia. Overall, most published studies showed that insulin dysfunction can promote Tau hyperphosphorylation and pathology, both directly and indirectly, through hypothermia. PMID:24574966

  19. The non-anticoagulant heparin-like K5 polysaccharide derivative K5-N,OSepi attenuates myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Collino, Massimo; Pini, Alessandro; Mastroianni, Rosanna; Benetti, Elisa; Lanzi, Cecilia; Bani, Daniele; Chini, Jacopo; Manoni, Marco; Fantozzi, Roberto; Masini, Emanuela

    2012-01-01

    Heparin and low molecular weight heparins have been demonstrated to reduce myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, although their use is hampered by the risk of haemorrhagic and thrombotic complications. Chemical and enzymatic modifications of K5 polysaccharide have shown the possibility of producing heparin-like compounds with low anticoagulant activity and strong anti-inflammatory effects. Using a rat model of regional myocardial I/R, we investigated the effects of an epimerized N-,O-sulphated K5 polysaccharide derivative, K5-N,OSepi, on infarct size and histological signs of myocardial injury caused by 30 min. ligature of the left anterior descending coronary artery followed by 1 or 24 h reperfusion. K5-N,OSepi (0.1–1 mg/kg given i.v. 15 min. before reperfusion) significantly reduced the extent of myocardial damage in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we investigated the potential mechanism(s) of the cardioprotective effect(s) afforded by K5-N,OSepi. In left ventricular samples, I/R induced mast cell degranulation and a robust increase in lipid peroxidation, free radical-induced DNA damage and calcium overload. Markers of neutrophil infiltration and activation were also induced by I/R in rat hearts, specifically myeloperoxidase activity, intercellular-adhesion-molecule-1 expression, prostaglandin-E2 and tumour-necrosis-factor-α production. The robust increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory markers was blunted by K5-N,OSepi, in a dose-dependent manner, with maximum at 1 mg/kg. Furthermore, K5-N,OSepi administration attenuated the increase in caspase 3 activity, Bid and Bax activation and ameliorated the decrease in expression of Bcl-2 within the ischaemic myocardium. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the cardioprotective effect of the non-anticoagulant K5 derivative K5-N,OSepi is secondary to a combination of anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:22248092

  20. Reconstruction and selection of Z{yields}{tau}{tau}{yields}{mu}+{tau}-jet+{nu}'s decays at the CMS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lusito, Letizia

    2010-12-22

    At the LHC, tau leptons are expected in final states of many important physics processes including Supersymmetry and the production of Higgs boson(s) and other exotic particles. An efficient and accurate {tau} reconstruction and identification are therefore an important part of the CMS physics programme. Z{sup 0}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} decays are often considered the ''standard candle'' of tau reconstruction as they validate tau lepton identification and provide a test bench for Higgs searches (for which they constitute the main irreducible background). We describe techniques for selecting and reconstructing the Z{sup 0}{yields}{tau}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}}{yields}{mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub {mu}}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}({bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}})+{tau}-jet{sup {-+}}{nu}{sub {tau}}({bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) events that were developed for the measurement of the Z production cross-section by the CMS experiment using 200 pb{sup -1} of the LHC collision data at the center-of-mass energy {radical}(s) 10 TeV. We validate these techniques using simulated events and present a data-driven method for estimating background contributions to this measurement.

  1. From tangles to tau protein.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, K; Novak, M

    2006-01-01

    Alois Alzheimer couldn't have chosen a name more appropriate than neurofibrillary tangles when one hundred years ago (Alzheimer, 1906) he presented this histopathological hallmark of the progressive dementing disorder, which got named after him as Alzheimer disease. Both, the structure and as well as the molecular composition of neurofibrillary tangles have baffled neuroscientists for many years. It was not till 1963 when with the help of the electron microscope the tangles were found to be made up of paired helical filaments (PHF). It took another 23 years before microtubule associated protein tau was immunohistochemically identified as the part of neurofibrillary tangles (Grundke-lqbal, 1986 a). The same year it was shown that tau protein in Alzheimer disease brain was abnormally hyperphosphorylated (Grundke-Iqbal, 1986 b). In 1988 Michal Novak, Cesar Milstein and Claude Wischik produced monoclonal antibody that was able to recognize then unknown protein in PHF. The antibody (MN423) allowed its isolation and let to full molecular characterization as protein tau. These studies provided molecular proof that tau protein was the major and an integral component of the PHF (Wischik et al, 1988 a, b, Goedert et al, 1988, Novak et al, 1989, 1991). Over the years the significance of tau pathology for the neurodegenerative diseases was discussed and often questioned. However, detailed studies of the maturation and distribution of NFTs, showing correlation with degree of cognitive decline and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease (Braak and Braak, 1991), together with discovery of tau gene mutations causing fronto-temporal dementia in many families (Hutton et al, 1998) promoted tau as the major pathogenic force in neurodegenerative cascade. Further studies focused on tau dysfunctions revealed truncation and phosphorylation as two major posttranslational modifications responsible for toxic gain of function as an underlying cause of tauopathies including Alzheimer

  2. Tau decays into K* mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Mankel, R.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kapitza, H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Eckstein, P.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Waldi, R.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Eckmann, R.; Kuipers, H.; Mai, O.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Frankl, C.; Reßing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Schechelnitsky, S.; Danilov, M.; Doutskoy, A.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Korolko, I.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Lubimov, V.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1995-06-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the storage ring DORIS II we have measured τ decays into three charged mesons containing K * mesons. Exploiting the good particle identification capabilities of the detector we have determined the following branching ratios:Brleft( {tau ^ - to overline {K^{*0} } π ^ - v_tau } right) = left( {0.25 ± 0.10 ± 0.05} right)% , B r (τ-→ K *0 K - v τ)= (0.20±0.05±0.04)%, and B r (τ-→ K *- X 0 v τ) =(1.15±0.15-0.18 +0.13)%.

  3. The. tau. -lepton and its associated neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A. )

    1990-10-10

    This paper discusses the {tau}-lepton and the prospects for future improvements. It is shown how a better understanding of the {tau} properties could be used for testing fundamental aspects of the electroweak and strong interactions.

  4. Tau Splicing and the Intricacies of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Andreadis, Athena

    2011-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule associated protein that fulfills several functions critical for neuronal formation and health. Tau discharges its functions by producing multiple isoforms via regulated alternative splicing. These isoforms modulate tau function in normal brain by altering the domains of the protein, thereby influencing its localization, conformation and post-translational modifications and hence its availability and affinity for microtubules and other ligands. Disturbances in tau expression result in disruption of the neuronal cytoskeleton and formation of tau structures (neurofibrillary tangles) found in brains of dementia sufferers. More specifically, aberrations in tau splicing regulation directly cause several neurodegenerative diseases which lead to dementia. In this review, I present our cumulative knowledge of tau splicing regulation in connection with neurodegeneration and also briefly go over the still-extensive list of questions that are connected to tau (dys)function. PMID:21604267

  5. Interaction of tau with the RNA-Binding Protein TIA1 Regulates tau Pathophysiology and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Vanderweyde, Tara; Apicco, Daniel J; Youmans-Kidder, Katherine; Ash, Peter E A; Cook, Casey; Lummertz da Rocha, Edroaldo; Jansen-West, Karen; Frame, Alissa A; Citro, Allison; Leszyk, John D; Ivanov, Pavel; Abisambra, Jose F; Steffen, Martin; Li, Hu; Petrucelli, Leonard; Wolozin, Benjamin

    2016-05-17

    Dendritic mislocalization of microtubule associated protein tau is a hallmark of tauopathies, but the role of dendritic tau is unknown. We now report that tau interacts with the RNA-binding protein (RBP) TIA1 in brain tissue, and we present the brain-protein interactome network for TIA1. Analysis of the TIA1 interactome in brain tissue from wild-type (WT) and tau knockout mice demonstrates that tau is required for normal interactions of TIA1 with proteins linked to RNA metabolism, including ribosomal proteins and RBPs. Expression studies show that tau regulates the distribution of TIA1, and tau accelerates stress granule (SG) formation. Conversely, TIA1 knockdown or knockout inhibits tau misfolding and associated toxicity in cultured hippocampal neurons, while overexpressing TIA1 induces tau misfolding and stimulates neurodegeneration. Pharmacological interventions that prevent SG formation also inhibit tau pathophysiology. These studies suggest that the pathophysiology of tauopathy requires an intimate interaction with RNA-binding proteins. PMID:27160897

  6. Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Carsten; /SLAC

    2009-01-22

    Recent results of tau lepton decay studies based on luminosities between 350 fb{sup -1} and 469 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. The analyses reported here are Charged Current Lepton Universality and measurements of |V{sub us}| using {tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}}, and K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, as well as searches for Second Class Currents in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, studies of Lepton Flavor Violations, and a tau mass measurement and CPT-Test. If not explicitly mentioned, charge conjugate decay modes are also implied. decays, as well as searches for Second Class Currents in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, studies of Lepton Flavor Violations, and a tau mass measurement and CPT-Test. If not explicitly mentioned, charge conjugate decay modes are also implied.

  7. Tau Trigger at the ATLAS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Benslama, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Belanger-Champange, C.; Brenner, R.; Bosman, M.; Casado, P.; Osuna, C.; Perez, E.; Vorwerk, V.; Czyczula, Z.; Dam, M.; Xella, S.; Demers, S.; Farrington, S.; Igonkina, O.; Kanaya, N.; Tsuno, S.; Ptacek, E.; Reinsch, A.; Strom, David M.; Torrence, E.; /Oregon U. /Sydney U. /Lancaster U. /Birmingham U.

    2011-11-09

    Many theoretical models, like the Standard Model or SUSY at large tan({beta}), predict Higgs bosons or new particles which decay more abundantly to final states including tau leptons than to other leptons. At the energy scale of the LHC, the identification of tau leptons, in particular in the hadronic decay mode, will be a challenging task due to an overwhelming QCD background which gives rise to jets of particles that can be hard to distinguish from hadronic tau decays. Equipped with excellent tracking and calorimetry, the ATLAS experiment has developed tau identification tools capable of working at the trigger level. This contribution presents tau trigger algorithms which exploit the main features of hadronic tau decays and describes the current tau trigger commissioning activities. Many of the SM processes being investigated at ATLAS, as well as numerous BSM searches, contain tau leptons in their final states. Being able to trigger effectively on the tau leptons in these events will contribute to the success of the ATLAS experiment. The tau trigger algorithms and monitoring infrastructure are ready for the first data, and are being tested with the data collected with cosmic muons. The development of efficiency measurements methods using QCD and Z {yields} {tau}{tau} events is well advanced.

  8. A Tau-Charm Factory at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, K.K.

    1994-04-01

    It is proposed that a Tau Charm Factory represents a natural extension of CEBAF into higher energy domains. The exciting nature of the physics of charm quarks and tau leptons is briefly reviewed and it is suggested that the concept of a linac-ring collider as a Tau Charm Factory at CEBAF should be seriously studied.

  9. Prospect for measuring the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Askew, Andrew; Jaiswal, Prerit; Okui, Takemichi; Prosper, Harrison B.; Sato, Nobuo

    2015-04-01

    The search for a new source of CP violation is one of the most important endeavors in particle physics. A particularly interesting way to perform this search is to probe the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling, as the phase is currently completely unconstrained by all existing data. Recently, a novel variable $\\Theta$ was proposed for measuring the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling through the $\\tau^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0 \

  10. Tau identification at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Galea, Cristina; /Radboud U. Nijmegen

    2006-12-01

    We describe methods to identify {tau} leptons produced in high energy p{bar p} collisions ({radical}s = 1.96 GeV) at the Tevatron, using the D0 detector. Different procedures used for discrimination against background particles misidentified as taus are also discussed. Finally, we present some physics results obtained by applying these methods to illustrate their performance.

  11. Evidence for B+ --> tau+ nu_tau Decays using Hadronic B Tags

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-11

    We present a search for the decay B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} using 467.8 x 10{sup 6} B{anti B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. We select a sample of events with on completely reconstructed B{sup -} in an hadronic decay mode (B{sup -} --> D{sup (*)0}X{sup -} and B{sup -} --> J/{psi} X{sup -}). We examine the rest of the event to search for a B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay. We identify the {tau}{sup +} lepton in the following modes: {tau}{sup +} --> e{sup +} {nu}{sub e}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} --> {mu}{sup +} {nu}{sub {mu}}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} --> {pi}{sup +}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup +} --> {rho}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}. We find an excess of events with respect to expected background, which excludes the null signal hypothesis at the level of 3.3 {sigma} and can be converted to a branching fraction central value of B(B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}})= (1.80{sup + 0.57}{sub - 0.54}(stat.) {+-} 0.26 (syst.)) x 10{sup -4}.

  12. Measurement of the {tau} lifetime at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C.J.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N.J.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bienz, T.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D`Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Daoudi, M.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell`Orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P.Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Etzion, E.; Falciai, D.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D.J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H.J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; Kim, Y.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.; Liu, M.X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Reidy, J.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; (The SLD Collabor...

    1995-11-01

    A measurement of the lifetime of the {tau} lepton has been made using a sample of 1671 {ital Z}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} decays collected by the SLD detector at the SLC. The measurement benefits from the small and stable collision region at the SLC and the precision pixel vertex detector of the SLD. Three analysis techniques have been used: decay length, impact parameter, and impact parameter difference methods. The combined result is {tau}{sub {tau}}=297{plus_minus}9 (stat){plus_minus}5(syst) fs.

  13. New results on the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1987-11-01

    This is a review of new results on the tau lepton. The results include precise measurements of the lifetime, measurements of the decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/2..pi../sup 0/nu/sub tau/ with much improved precision, and limits on decay modes containing eta mesons, including the second-class-current decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/eta nu/sub tau/. The implications of these new results on the discrepancy in the one-charged-particle decay modes are discussed. 52 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Teachers' Use of and Attitudes toward Informational Text in K-5 Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ness, Molly

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this research were (a) to understand the frequency with which K-5 teachers use informational text in their routine classroom instruction, (b) to understand the percentage of informational text in classroom libraries, and (c) to explore teachers' attitudes about informational text. Survey data of 318 participants indicated that K-5

  15. Characterization of a Unique Undergraduate Multidisciplinary STEM K-5 Teacher Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The K-5 school years are crucial, setting the framework for all subjects as well as critical thinking skills. The single most important component in a classroom is the teacher. However, in a formative timeframe for elementary-school aged children, the number of K-5 teachers that are educated with a Science, Technology, Engineering or Math…

  16. A Simple Model to Study Tau Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Houck, Alexander L.; Hernández, Félix; Ávila, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Tau proteins play a role in the stabilization of microtubules, but in pathological conditions, tauopathies, tau is modified by phosphorylation and can aggregate into aberrant aggregates. These aggregates could be toxic to cells, and different cell models have been used to test for compounds that might prevent these tau modifications. Here, we have used a cell model involving the overexpression of human tau in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing tau in a stable manner, we have been able to replicate the phosphorylation of intracellular tau. This intracellular tau increases its own level of phosphorylation and aggregates, likely due to the regulatory effect of some growth factors on specific tau kinases such as GSK3. In these conditions, a change in secreted tau was observed. Reversal of phosphorylation and aggregation of tau was found by the use of lithium, a GSK3 inhibitor. Thus, we propose this as a simple cell model to study tau pathology in nonneuronal cells due to their viability and ease to work with. PMID:26949341

  17. Extracellular Monomeric Tau Protein Is Sufficient to Initiate the Spread of Tau Protein Pathology*

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Claire H.; Kumar, Satish; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Tunnacliffe, Alan; St. George-Hyslop, Peter; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Kaminski, Clemens F.; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the formation and propagation of aggregates of the Alzheimer disease-associated Tau protein in vivo is vital for the development of therapeutics for this devastating disorder. Using our recently developed live-cell aggregation sensor in neuron-like cells, we demonstrate that different variants of exogenous monomeric Tau, namely full-length Tau (hTau40) and the Tau-derived construct K18 comprising the repeat domain, initially accumulate in endosomal compartments, where they form fibrillar seeds that subsequently induce the aggregation of endogenous Tau. Using superresolution imaging, we confirm that fibrils consisting of endogenous and exogenous Tau are released from cells and demonstrate their potential to spread Tau pathology. Our data indicate a greater pathological risk and potential toxicity than hitherto suspected for extracellular soluble Tau. PMID:24235150

  18. Rescue from tau-induced neuronal dysfunction produces insoluble tau oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Catherine M.; Quraishe, Shmma; Hands, Sarah; Sealey, Megan; Mahajan, Sumeet; Allan, Douglas W.; Mudher, Amritpal

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of highly phosphorylated tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies. Nevertheless, animal models demonstrate that tau-mediated dysfunction/toxicity may not require large tau aggregates but instead may be caused by soluble hyper-phosphorylated tau or by small tau oligomers. Challenging this widely held view, we use multiple techniques to show that insoluble tau oligomers form in conditions where tau-mediated dysfunction is rescued in vivo. This shows that tau oligomers are not necessarily always toxic. Furthermore, their formation correlates with increased tau levels, caused intriguingly, by either pharmacological or genetic inhibition of tau kinase glycogen-synthase-kinase-3beta (GSK-3β). Moreover, contrary to common belief, these tau oligomers were neither highly phosphorylated, and nor did they contain beta-pleated sheet structure. This may explain their lack of toxicity. Our study makes the novel observation that tau also forms non-toxic insoluble oligomers in vivo in addition to toxic oligomers, which have been reported by others. Whether these are inert or actively protective remains to be established. Nevertheless, this has wide implications for emerging therapeutic strategies such as those that target dissolution of tau oligomers as they may be ineffective or even counterproductive unless they act on the relevant toxic oligomeric tau species. PMID:26608845

  19. Genome-wide analysis of H4K5 acetylation associated with fear memory in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Histone acetylation has been implicated in learning and memory in the brain, however, its function at the level of the genome and at individual genetic loci remains poorly investigated. This study examines a key acetylation mark, histone H4 lysine 5 acetylation (H4K5ac), genome-wide and its role in activity-dependent gene transcription in the adult mouse hippocampus following contextual fear conditioning. Results Using ChIP-Seq, we identified 23,235 genes in which H4K5ac correlates with absolute gene expression in the hippocampus. However, in the absence of transcription factor binding sites 150 bp upstream of the transcription start site, genes were associated with higher H4K5ac and expression levels. We further establish H4K5ac as a ubiquitous modification across the genome. Approximately one-third of all genes have above average H4K5ac, of which ~15% are specific to memory formation and ~65% are co-acetylated for H4K12. Although H4K5ac is prevalent across the genome, enrichment of H4K5ac at specific regions in the promoter and coding region are associated with different levels of gene expression. Additionally, unbiased peak calling for genes differentially acetylated for H4K5ac identified 114 unique genes specific to fear memory, over half of which have not previously been associated with memory processes. Conclusions Our data provide novel insights into potential mechanisms of gene priming and bookmarking by histone acetylation following hippocampal memory activation. Specifically, we propose that hyperacetylation of H4K5 may prime genes for rapid expression following activity. More broadly, this study strengthens the importance of histone posttranslational modifications for the differential regulation of transcriptional programs in cognitive processes. PMID:23927422

  20. Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$

    SciTech Connect

    Bethke, Siegfried; Hoang, Andre H.; Kluth, Stefan; Schieck, Jochen; Stewart, Iain W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Bethke, S.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; /MIT, LNS

    2011-10-01

    These are the proceedings of the Workshop on Precision Measurements of {alpha}{sub s} held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) in the {ovr MS} scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, {tau}-decays, electro-weak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  1. Reduced CSF p-Tau181 to Tau ratio is a biomarker for FTLD-TDP

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Kelly; Grossman, Murray; Glass, Jonathan; Lah, James J.; Hales, Chadwick; Shelnutt, Matthew; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Trojanowski, John Q.; Levey, Allan I.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To validate the ability of candidate CSF biomarkers to distinguish between the 2 main forms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), FTLD with TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) inclusions (FTLD-TDP) and FTLD with Tau inclusions (FTLD-Tau). Methods: Antemortem CSF samples were collected from 30 patients with FTLD in a single-center validation cohort, and CSF levels of 5 putative FTLD-TDP biomarkers as well as levels of total Tau (t-Tau) and Tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (p-Tau181) were measured using independent assays. Biomarkers most associated with FTLD-TDP were then tested in a separate 2-center validation cohort composed of subjects with FTLD-TDP, FTLD-Tau, Alzheimer disease (AD), and cognitively normal subjects. The sensitivity and specificity of FTLD-TDP biomarkers were determined. Results: In the first validation cohort, FTLD-TDP cases had decreased levels of p-Tau181 and interleukin-23, and increased Fas. Reduced ratio of p-Tau181 to t-Tau (p/t-Tau) was the strongest predictor of FTLD-TDP pathology. Analysis in the second validation cohort showed CSF p/t-Tau ratio <0.37 to distinguish FTLD-TDP from FTLD-Tau, AD, and healthy seniors with 82% sensitivity and 82% specificity. Conclusion: A reduced CSF p/t-Tau ratio represents a reproducible, validated biomarker for FTLD-TDP with performance approaching well-established CSF AD biomarkers. Introducing this biomarker into research and the clinical arena can significantly increase the power of clinical trials targeting abnormal accumulations of TDP-43 or Tau, and select the appropriate patients for target-specific therapies. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that the CSF p/t-Tau ratio distinguishes FTLD-TDP from FTLD-Tau. PMID:24174584

  2. Tau oligomers as potential targets for early diagnosis of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Sahara, Naruhiko; Ren, Yan; Ward, Sarah; Binder, Lester I; Suhara, Tetsuya; Higuchi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of tau mutations in frontotemporal dementia has been a key event in neurodegenerative disease research. The rTg4510 mouse line expressing human tau with P301L FTDP-17-tau mutation has been established to understand the role of tau in neurodegeneration. Our histological analyses with tau antibodies and fluorescent tau ligands on rTg4510 mice revealed that tau oligomer formation was distinct from tangle formation. While in vivo imaging of mature tangles is now available, imaging biomarkers for tau oligomers would be useful for clarifying their roles in neurotoxicity and for diagnosing early-stage tau pathology. PMID:24595194

  3. Differential induction and spread of tau pathology in young PS19 tau transgenic mice following intracerebral injections of pathological tau from Alzheimer's disease or corticobasal degeneration brains.

    PubMed

    Boluda, Susana; Iba, Michiyo; Zhang, Bin; Raible, Kevin M; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2015-02-01

    Filamentous tau pathologies are hallmark lesions of several neurodegenerative tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD) which show cell type-specific and topographically distinct tau inclusions. Growing evidence supports templated transmission of tauopathies through functionally interconnected neuroanatomical pathways suggesting that different self-propagating strains of pathological tau could account for the diverse manifestations of neurodegenerative tauopathies. Here, we describe the rapid and distinct cell type-specific spread of pathological tau following intracerebral injections of CBD or AD brain extracts enriched in pathological tau (designated CBD-Tau and AD-Tau, respectively) in young human mutant P301S tau transgenic (Tg) mice (line PS19) ~6-9 months before they show onset of mutant tau transgene-induced tau pathology. At 1 month post-injection of CBD-Tau, tau inclusions developed predominantly in oligodendrocytes of the fimbria and white matter near the injection sites with infrequent intraneuronal tau aggregates. In contrast, injections of AD-Tau in young PS19 mice induced tau pathology predominantly in neuronal perikarya with little or no oligodendrocyte involvement 1 month post-injection. With longer post-injection survival intervals of up to 6 months, CBD-Tau- and AD-Tau-induced tau pathology spread to different brain regions distant from the injection sites while maintaining the cell type-specific pattern noted above. Finally, CA3 neuron loss was detected 3 months post-injection of AD-Tau but not CBD-Tau. Thus, AD-Tau and CBD-Tau represent specific pathological tau strains that spread differentially and may underlie distinct clinical and pathological features of these two tauopathies. Hence, these strains could become targets to develop disease-modifying therapies for CBD and AD. PMID:25534024

  4. Increased 4R-Tau Induces Pathological Changes in a Human-Tau Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Kathleen M; DeVos, Sarah L; Miller, Rebecca L; Chun, Seung J; Norrbom, Michaela; Wozniak, David F; Dawson, Hana N; Bennett, C Frank; Rigo, Frank; Miller, Timothy M

    2016-06-01

    Pathological evidence for selective four-repeat (4R) tau deposition in certain dementias and exon 10-positioned MAPT mutations together suggest a 4R-specific role in causing disease. However, direct assessments of 4R toxicity have not yet been accomplished in vivo. Increasing 4R-tau expression without change to total tau in human tau-expressing mice induced more severe seizures and nesting behavior abnormality, increased tau phosphorylation, and produced a shift toward oligomeric tau. Exon 10 skipping could also be accomplished in vivo, providing support for a 4R-tau targeted approach to target 4R-tau toxicity and, in cases of primary MAPT mutation, eliminate the disease-causing mutation. PMID:27210553

  5. Inhibition of tau aggregation by a rosamine derivative that blocks tau intermolecular disulfide cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Mamunul; Kim, Dohee; Yu, Young Hyun; Lim, Sungsu; Kim, Dong Jin; Chang, Young-Tae; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2014-09-01

    Abnormal tau aggregates are presumed to be neurotoxic and are an important therapeutic target for multiple neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Growing evidence has shown that tau intermolecular disulfide cross-linking is critical in generating tau oligomers that serve as a building block for higher-order aggregates. Here we report that a small molecule inhibitor prevents tau aggregation by blocking the generation of disulfide cross-linked tau oligomers. Among the compounds tested, a rosamine derivative bearing mild thiol reactivity selectively labeled tau and effectively inhibited oligomerization and fibrillization processes in vitro. Our data suggest that controlling tau oxidation status could be a new therapeutic strategy for prevention of abnormal tau aggregation. PMID:24919397

  6. Tau physics 1994: A theoretical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    In this paper I describe some recent advances in tau physics and discuss their implications from a theoretical perspective. The examples I have chosen include e-{mu}-{tau} universality, QCD studies, anomalous electroweak dipole moments, and forbidden decays. That list is by no means exhaustive. It should, however, demonstrate the breath of tau physics, describe some interesting new results, and point out the potential for future advances.

  7. Evidence for a tau-neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, M.A.; Mendel, R.R.

    1988-03-01

    In a recent experiment, the measured lifetime of the tau lepton indicates that the e - ..mu.. universality may not hold in the case of the third-generation leptons. It is shown here that the universality of weak interactions can be restored if the tau-neutrino has a non-zero mass. This results is m/sub v/tau/sub / = (160 +- 70) MeV.

  8. Distinct Therapeutic Mechanisms of Tau Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Kristen E.; Mirbaha, Hilda; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M.; Diamond, Marc I.

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of Tau amyloids, and include Alzheimer disease and certain frontotemporal dementias. Trans-neuronal propagation of amyloid mediated by extracellular Tau may underlie disease progression. Consistent with this, active and passive vaccination studies in mouse models reduce pathology, although by unknown mechanisms. We previously reported that intracerebroventricular administration of three anti-Tau monoclonal antibodies (HJ8.5, HJ9.3, and HJ9.4) reduces pathology in a model overexpressing full-length mutant (P301S) human Tau. We now study effects of these three antibodies and a negative control antibody (HJ3.4) on Tau aggregate uptake into BV2 microglial-like cells and primary neurons. Antibody-independent Tau uptake into BV2 cells was blocked by heparin, consistent with a previously described role for heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Two therapeutic antibodies (HJ8.5 and HJ9.4) promoted uptake of full-length Tau fibrils into microglia via Fc receptors. Surprisingly, HJ9.3 promoted uptake of fibrils composed of the Tau repeat domain or Alzheimer disease-derived Tau aggregates, but failed to influence full-length recombinant Tau fibrils. Size fractionation of aggregates showed that antibodies preferentially promote uptake of larger oligomers (n ≥∼20-mer) versus smaller oligomers (n ∼10-mer) or monomer. No antibody inhibited uptake of full-length recombinant fibrils into primary neurons, but HJ9.3 blocked neuronal uptake of Tau repeat domain fibrils and Alzheimer disease-derived Tau. Antibodies thus have multiple potential mechanisms, including clearance via microglia and blockade of neuronal uptake. However these effects are epitope- and aggregate size-dependent. Establishing specific mechanisms of antibody activity in vitro may help in design and optimization of agents that are more effective in vivo. PMID:26126828

  9. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  10. Tau Flavour Violation at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Carquin, E.

    2009-04-17

    We study the relevance of neutrino oscillation data for sparticle decays that violate the {tau} lepton number at the LHC, in the context of the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM) and in SU(5) extensions of the theory. We study the conditions required for {chi}{sub 2}{yields}{chi}+{tau}{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {+-}} decays to yield observable tau flavour violation, for cosmologically interesting values of the neutralino relic density. We present detailed studies of the relevant supersymmetric parameter space and pay particular emphasis to signals from tau hadronisation, that are analysed using PYTHIA event simulation.

  11. Formation and propagation of tau oligomeric seeds.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Julia E; Kayed, Rakez

    2013-01-01

    Tau misfolding and aggregation leads to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), which have long been considered one of the main pathological hallmarks for numerous neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies, including Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and Parkinson's Disease (PD). However, recent studies completed both in vitro and in vivo suggest that intermediate forms of tau, known as tau oligomers, between the monomeric form and NFTs are the true toxic species in disease and the best targets for anti-tau therapies. However, the exact mechanism by which the spread of pathology occurs is unknown. Evidence suggests that tau oligomers may act as templates for the misfolding of native tau, thereby seeding the spread of the toxic forms of the protein. Recently, researchers have reported the ability of tau oligomers to enter and exit cells, propagating from disease-affected regions to unaffected areas. While the mechanism by which the spreading of misfolded tau occurs has yet to be elucidated, there are a few different models which have been proposed, including cell membrane stress and pore-formation, endocytosis and exocytosis, and non-traditional secretion of protein not enclosed by a membrane. Coming to an understanding of how toxic tau species seed and spread through the brain will be crucial to finding effective treatments for neurodegenerative tauopathies. PMID:23882255

  12. Reactive microglia drive tau pathology and contribute to the spreading of pathological tau in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Maphis, Nicole; Xu, Guixiang; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N.; Jiang, Shanya; Cardona, Astrid; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Lamb, Bruce T.

    2015-01-01

    Pathological aggregation of tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and related tauopathies. We have previously shown that the deficiency of the microglial fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) led to the acceleration of tau pathology and memory impairment in an hTau mouse model of tauopathy. Here, we show that microglia drive tau pathology in a cell-autonomous manner. First, tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation occur as early as 2 months of age in hTauCx3cr1−/− mice. Second, CD45+ microglial activation correlates with the spatial memory deficit and spread of tau pathology in the anatomically connected regions of the hippocampus. Third, adoptive transfer of purified microglia derived from hTauCx3cr1−/− mice induces tau hyperphosphorylation within the brains of non-transgenic recipient mice. Finally, inclusion of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (Kineret®) in the adoptive transfer inoculum significantly reduces microglia-induced tau pathology. Together, our results suggest that reactive microglia are sufficient to drive tau pathology and correlate with the spread of pathological tau in the brain. PMID:25833819

  13. Detecting tau in serum of transgenic animal models after tau immunotherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    d'Abramo, Cristina; Acker, Christopher M; Schachter, Joel B; Terracina, Giuseppe; Wang, Xiaohai; Forest, Stefanie K; Davies, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In the attempt to elucidate if the "peripheral sink hypothesis" could be a potential mechanism of action for tau removal in passive immunotherapy experiments, we have examined tau levels in serum of chronically injected JNPL3 and Tg4510 transgenic animals. Measurement of tau in serum of mice treated with tau antibodies is challenging because of the antibody interference in sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. To address this issue, we have developed a heat-treatment protocol at acidic pH to remove interfering molecules from serum, with excellent recovery of tau. The present data show that pan-tau and conformational antibodies do increase tau in mouse sera. However, these concentrations in serum do not consistently correlate with reductions of tau pathology in brain, suggesting that large elevations of tau species measured in serum are not predictive of efficacy. Here, we describe a reliable method to detect tau in serum of transgenic animals that have undergone tau immunotherapy. Levels of tau in human serum are less than the sensitivity of current assays, although artifactual signals are common. The method may be useful in similarly treated humans, a situation in which false positive signals are likely. PMID:26508157

  14. Prognostic and Functional Significance of MAP4K5 in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Oliver H.; Azizian, Nancy; Guo, Ming; Capello, Michela; Deng, Defeng; Zang, Fenglin; Fry, Jason; Katz, Matthew H.; Fleming, Jason B.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Wolff, Robert A.; Hanash, Samir; Wang, Huamin; Maitra, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Objectives MAP4K5 plays an important role in regulating a range of cellular responses and is involved in Wnt signaling in hematopoietic cells. However, its functions in human malignancies have not been studied. The major objectives of this study are to examine the expression, functions and clinical significance of MAP4K5 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Materials and Methods The expression levels of MAP4K5, E-cadherin, vimentin, and carboxylesterase 2 (CES2) were examined by immunohistochemistry in 105 PDAC and matched non-neoplastic pancreas samples from our institution. The RNA sequencing data of 112 PDAC patients were downloaded from the TCGA data portal. Immunoblotting and RNA sequencing analysis were used to examine the expression of MAP4K5 and E-cadherin in pancreatic cancer cell lines. The effect of knockdown MAP4K5 using siRNA on the expression of CDH1 and vimentin were examined by Real-time RT-PCR in Panc-1 and AsPC-1 cells. Statistical analyses were performed using IBM SPSS Statistics. Results MAP4K5 protein is expressed at high levels specifically in the pancreatic ductal cells of 100% non-neoplastic pancreas samples, but is decreased or lost in 77.1% (81/105) of PDAC samples. MAP4K5-low correlated with the loss of E-cadherin (P = 0.001) and reduced CES2 expression (P = 0.002) in our patient populations. The expression levels of MAP4K5 mRNA directly correlated with the expression levels of CDH1 mRNA (R = 0.2490, P = 0.008) in the second cohort of 112 PDAC patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) RNA-seq dataset. Similar correlations between the expression of MAP4K5 and E-cadherin were observed both at protein and mRNA levels in multiple pancreatic cancer cell lines. Knockdown MAP4K5 led to decreased CDH1 mRNA expression in Panc-1 and AsPC-1 cells. MAP4K5-low correlated significantly with reduced overall survival and was an independent prognosticator in patients with stage II PDAC. Conclusions MAP4K5 expression is decreased or lost in

  15. Selected Topics in Tau Physics from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Paramesvaran, S.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London

    2012-04-06

    Selected results from {tau} analyses performed using the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. A precise measurement of the {tau} mass and the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} mass difference is undertaken using the hadronic decay mode {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub {tau}}. In addition an investigation into the strange decay modes {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is also presented, including a fit to the {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} invariant mass spectrum. Precise values for M(K*(892)) and {Lambda}(K*(892)) are obtained.

  16. The Search for B+ to Tau+ Nu(Tau) at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, L.A.; /SLAC

    2007-01-08

    We present a search for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} using 288 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. A sample of events with one reconstructed semileptonic B decay (B{sup -} {yields} D{sup o}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}X) is selected, and in the recoil a search for B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} signal is performed. The {tau} is identified in the following channels: {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {nu}{sub {mu}}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}. We measure a branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = 0.88{sub -0.67}{sup +0.68}(stat.) {+-} 0.11(syst.) x 10{sup -4} and extract an upper limit on the branching fraction, at the 90% confidence level, of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 1.8 x 10{sup -4}. We calculate the product of the B meson decay constant and |V{sub ub}| to be f{sub B} {center_dot} |V{sub ub}| = (7.0{sub -3.6}{sup +2.3}(stat.){sub -0.5}{sup +0.4}(syst.)) x 10{sup -4} GeV.

  17. Measurement of the Semileptonic Decays B->D tau nu and B->D* tau nu

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, : B.

    2009-02-23

    The authors present measurements of the semileptonic decays B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0} {tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup 0} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +} {tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, which are sensitive to non-Standard Model amplitudes in certain scenarios. The data sample consists of 232 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. They select events with a D or D* meson and a light lepton ({ell} = e or {mu}) recoiling against a fully reconstructed B meson. They perform a fit to the joint distribution of lepton momentum and missing mass squared to distinguish signal B {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} ({tau}{sup -} {yields} {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}{nu}{sub {tau}}) events from the backgrounds, predominantly B {yields} D{sup (*)} {ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}. They measure the branching-fraction ratios R(D) {triple_bond} {Beta}(B {yields} D{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}(B {yields} D{ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) and R(D*) {triple_bond} {Beta}(B {yields} D*{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}(B {yields} D* {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) and, from a combined fit to B{sup -} and {bar B}{sup 0} channels, obtain the results R(D) = (41.6 {+-} 11.7 {+-} 5.2)% and R(D*) = (29.7 {+-} 5.6 {+-} 1.8)%, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic. Normalizing to measured B{sup -} {yields} D{sup (*)0} {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} branching fractions, they obtain {Beta}(B {yields} D{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) = (0.86 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.06)% and {Beta}(B {yields} D*{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) = (1.62 {+-} 0.31 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.05)%, where the additional third uncertainty is from the normalization mode. They also present, for the first time, distributions of

  18. Prospect for measuring the CP phase in the $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling at the LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Askew, Andrew; Jaiswal, Prerit; Okui, Takemichi; Prosper, Harrison B.; Sato, Nobuo

    2015-04-01

    The search for a new source of CP violation is one of the most important endeavors in particle physics. A particularly interesting way to perform this search is to probe the CP phase in themore » $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling, as the phase is currently completely unconstrained by all existing data. Recently, a novel variable $$\\Theta$$ was proposed for measuring the CP phase in the $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling through the $$\\tau^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0 \

  19. Exclusive branching-fraction measurements of semileptonic tau decays into three charged hadrons, into phipi(-)nu tau, and into phi K(-)nu tau.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2008-01-11

    Using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 342 fb(-1) collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II electron-positron storage ring operating at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, we measure B(tau(-)--> pi(-)pi(-)pi+nu(tau)(ex.K(S0))=(8.83+/-0.01+/-0.13)%, B(tau(-) -->K(-)pi(-)pi+nu tau(ex.K(S0))=(0.273+/-0.002+/-0.009)%, B(tau(-) -->K(-)pi(-)K+nu tau)=(0.1346+/-0.0010+/-0.0036)%, and B(tau(-) -->K(-)K(-)K+nu tau)=(1.58+/-0.13+/-0.12)x10;{-5}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. These include significant improvements over previous measurements and a first measurement of B(tau(-) -->K(-)K(-)K+nu tau) in which no resonance structure is assumed. We also report a first measurement of B(tau(-) -->var phi(-)nu tau)=(3.42+/-0.55+/-0.25)x10(-5), a new measurement of B(tau(-) -->var phi K(-)nu tau)=(3.39+/-0.20+/-0.28)x10(-5) and a first upper limit on B(tau(-) -->K(-)K(-)K+nu tau(ex.var phi)). PMID:18232752

  20. Intrinsic Tau Acetylation Is Coupled to Auto-Proteolytic Tau Fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Todd J.; Constance, Brian H.; Hwang, Andrew W.; James, Michael; Yuan, Chao-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Tau proteins are abnormally aggregated in a range of neurodegenerative tauopathies including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recently, tau has emerged as an extensively post-translationally modified protein, among which lysine acetylation is critical for normal tau function and its pathological aggregation. Here, we demonstrate that tau isoforms have different propensities to undergo lysine acetylation, with auto-acetylation occurring more prominently within the lysine-rich microtubule-binding repeats. Unexpectedly, we identified a unique intrinsic property of tau in which auto-acetylation induces proteolytic tau cleavage, thereby generating distinct N- and C-terminal tau fragments. Supporting a catalytic reaction-based mechanism, mapping and mutagenesis studies showed that tau cysteines, which are required for acetyl group transfer, are also essential for auto-proteolytic tau processing. Further mass spectrometry analysis identified the C-terminal 2nd and 4th microtubule binding repeats as potential sites of auto-cleavage. The identification of acetylation-mediated auto-proteolysis provides a new biochemical mechanism for tau self-regulation and warrants further investigation into whether auto-catalytic functions of tau are implicated in AD and other tauopathies. PMID:27383765

  1. Physics with tau leptons at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, C.P.; /Oxford U.

    2007-04-01

    The {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions produced by the Tevatron result in many processes with tau leptons in the final state. The CDF Collaboration has studied these final states in Z and t{bar t} production, and has used tau leptons to search for evidence of Higgs, sparticle, and Z{prime} production.

  2. New Features about Tau Function and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Miguel; Hernández, Félix; Avila, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Tau is a brain microtubule-associated protein that directly binds to a microtubule and dynamically regulates its structure and function. Under pathological conditions, tau self-assembles into filamentous structures that end up forming neurofibrillary tangles. Prominent tau neurofibrillary pathology is a common feature in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, collectively referred to as tauopathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Beyond its classical role as a microtubule-associated protein, recent advances in our understanding of tau cellular functions have revealed novel insights into their important role during pathogenesis and provided potential novel therapeutic targets. Regulation of tau behavior and function under physiological and pathological conditions is mainly achieved through post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, glycosylation, acetylation, and truncation, among others, indicating the complexity and variability of factors influencing regulation of tau toxicity, all of which have significant implications for the development of novel therapeutic approaches in various neurodegenerative disorders. A more comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating tau function and dysfunction will provide us with a better outline of tau cellular networking and, hopefully, offer new clues for designing more efficient approaches to tackle tauopathies in the near future. PMID:27104579

  3. CHIP-ping away at tau.

    PubMed

    Goryunov, Dmitry; Liem, Ronald K H

    2007-03-01

    Protein accumulation is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), a hyperphosphorylated form of the protein tau (p-tau) forms intracellular inclusions known as neurofibrillary tangles. Deposits of p-tau have also been found in the brains of patients with Down's syndrome, supranuclear palsy, and prion disease. Mutations in tau have been causally associated with at least one inherited neurologic disorder, frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), implying that tau abnormalities by themselves can be a primary cause of degenerative diseases of the CNS. Removal of these p-tau species may occur by both chaperone-mediated refolding and degradation. In this issue of the JCI, Dickey and colleagues show that a cochaperone protein, carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP), in a complex with Hsp90 plays an important role in the removal of p-tau (see the related article beginning on page 648). Pharmacologic manipulation of Hsp90 may be used to alleviate p-tau accumulation in disease. PMID:17332887

  4. Measurement of tau lepton branching fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, N.A.

    1993-09-30

    We present {tau}{sup {minus}} lepton branching fraction measurements based on data from the TPC/Two-Gamma detector at PEP. Using a sample of{tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} events, we examine the resonance structure of the K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} system and obtain the first measurements of branching fractions for {tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sub 1}{sup {minus}}(1270) and {tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sub 1}{sup {minus}}(1400). We also describe a complete set of branching fraction measurements in which all the decays of the {tau}{sup {minus}} lepton are separated into classes defined by the identities of the charged particles and an estimate of the number of neutrals. This is the first such global measurement with decay classes defined by the four possible charged particle species, e, {mu}, {pi}, and K.

  5. New Features about Tau Function and Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Medina, Miguel; Hernández, Félix; Avila, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Tau is a brain microtubule-associated protein that directly binds to a microtubule and dynamically regulates its structure and function. Under pathological conditions, tau self-assembles into filamentous structures that end up forming neurofibrillary tangles. Prominent tau neurofibrillary pathology is a common feature in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, collectively referred to as tauopathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer's disease (AD). Beyond its classical role as a microtubule-associated protein, recent advances in our understanding of tau cellular functions have revealed novel insights into their important role during pathogenesis and provided potential novel therapeutic targets. Regulation of tau behavior and function under physiological and pathological conditions is mainly achieved through post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, glycosylation, acetylation, and truncation, among others, indicating the complexity and variability of factors influencing regulation of tau toxicity, all of which have significant implications for the development of novel therapeutic approaches in various neurodegenerative disorders. A more comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating tau function and dysfunction will provide us with a better outline of tau cellular networking and, hopefully, offer new clues for designing more efficient approaches to tackle tauopathies in the near future. PMID:27104579

  6. Large tau and tau neutrino electric dipole moments in models with vectorlike multiplets

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Tarek; Nath, Pran

    2010-02-01

    It is shown that the electric dipole moment of the {tau} lepton several orders of magnitude larger than predicted by the standard model can be generated from mixings in models with vectorlike mutiplets. The electric dipole moment (EDM) of the {tau} lepton arises from loops involving the exchange of the W, the charginos, the neutralinos, the sleptons, the mirror leptons, and the mirror sleptons. The EDM of the Dirac {tau} neutrino is also computed from loops involving the exchange of the W, the charginos, the mirror leptons, and the mirror sleptons. A numerical analysis is presented, and it is shown that the EDMs of the {tau} lepton and the {tau} neutrino which lie just a couple of orders of magnitude below the sensitivity of the current experiment can be achieved. Thus the predictions of the model are testable in an improved experiment on the EDM of the {tau} and the {tau} neutrino.

  7. Tau pathology-mediated presynaptic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Moreno, H; Morfini, G; Buitrago, L; Ujlaki, G; Choi, S; Yu, E; Moreira, J E; Avila, J; Brady, S T; Pant, H; Sugimori, M; Llinás, R R

    2016-06-14

    Brain tauopathies are characterized by abnormal processing of tau protein. While somatodendritic tau mislocalization has attracted considerable attention in tauopathies, the role of tau pathology in axonal transport, connectivity and related dysfunctions remains obscure. We have previously shown using the squid giant synapse that presynaptic microinjection of recombinant human tau protein (htau42) results in failure of synaptic transmission. Here, we evaluated molecular mechanisms mediating this effect. Thus, the initial event, observed after htau42 presynaptic injection, was an increase in transmitter release. This event was mediated by calcium release from intracellular stores and was followed by a reduction in evoked transmitter release. The effect of htau42 on synaptic transmission was recapitulated by a peptide comprising the phosphatase-activating domain of tau, suggesting activation of phosphotransferases. Accordingly, findings indicated that htau42-mediated toxicity involves the activities of both GSK3 and Cdk5 kinases. PMID:27012611

  8. Tau monoclonal antibody generation based on humanized yeast models: impact on Tau oligomerization and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rosseels, Joëlle; Van den Brande, Jeff; Violet, Marie; Jacobs, Dirk; Grognet, Pierre; Lopez, Juan; Huvent, Isabelle; Caldara, Marina; Swinnen, Erwin; Papegaey, Anthony; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Buée-Scherrer, Valerie; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Lippens, Guy; Colin, Morvane; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Winderickx, Joris

    2015-02-13

    A link between Tau phosphorylation and aggregation has been shown in different models for Alzheimer disease, including yeast. We used human Tau purified from yeast models to generate new monoclonal antibodies, of which three were further characterized. The first antibody, ADx201, binds the Tau proline-rich region independently of the phosphorylation status, whereas the second, ADx215, detects an epitope formed by the Tau N terminus when Tau is not phosphorylated at Tyr(18). For the third antibody, ADx210, the binding site could not be determined because its epitope is probably conformational. All three antibodies stained tangle-like structures in different brain sections of THY-Tau22 transgenic mice and Alzheimer patients, and ADx201 and ADx210 also detected neuritic plaques in the cortex of the patient brains. In hippocampal homogenates from THY-Tau22 mice and cortex homogenates obtained from Alzheimer patients, ADx215 consistently stained specific low order Tau oligomers in diseased brain, which in size correspond to Tau dimers. ADx201 and ADx210 additionally reacted to higher order Tau oligomers and presumed prefibrillar structures in the patient samples. Our data further suggest that formation of the low order Tau oligomers marks an early disease stage that is initiated by Tau phosphorylation at N-terminal sites. Formation of higher order oligomers appears to require additional phosphorylation in the C terminus of Tau. When used to assess Tau levels in human cerebrospinal fluid, the antibodies permitted us to discriminate patients with Alzheimer disease or other dementia like vascular dementia, indicative that these antibodies hold promising diagnostic potential. PMID:25540200

  9. Reduced number of axonal mitochondria and tau hypophosphorylation in mouse P301L tau knockin neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Pooler, Amy M.; Lau, Dawn H.W.; Mórotz, Gábor M.; De Vos, Kurt J.; Gilley, Jonathan; Coleman, Michael P.; Hanger, Diane P.

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the frontotemporal dementia-related tau mutation, P301L, at physiological levels in adult mouse brain (KI-P301L mice) results in overt hypophosphorylation of tau and age-dependent alterations in axonal mitochondrial transport in peripheral nerves. To determine the effects of P301L tau expression in the central nervous system, we examined the kinetics of mitochondrial axonal transport and tau phosphorylation in primary cortical neurons from P301L knock-in (KI-P301L) mice. We observed a significant 50% reduction in the number of mitochondria in the axons of cortical neurons cultured from KI-P301L mice compared to wild-type neurons. Expression of murine P301L tau did not change the speed, direction of travel or likelihood of movement of mitochondria. Notably, the angle that defines the orientation of the mitochondria in the axon, and the volume of individual moving mitochondria, were significantly increased in neurons expressing P301L tau. We found that murine tau phosphorylation in KI-P301L mouse neurons was diminished and the ability of P301L tau to bind to microtubules was also reduced compared to tau in wild-type neurons. The P301L mutation did not influence the ability of murine tau to associate with membranes in cortical neurons or in adult mouse brain. We conclude that P301L tau is associated with mitochondrial changes and causes an early reduction in murine tau phosphorylation in neurons coupled with impaired microtubule binding of tau. These results support the association of mutant tau with detrimental effects on mitochondria and will be of significance for the pathogenesis of tauopathies. PMID:26459111

  10. Mutant Tau knock-in mice display frontotemporal dementia relevant behaviour and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Koss, David J; Robinson, Lianne; Drever, Benjamin D; Plucińska, Kaja; Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Veselcic, Peter; Riedel, Gernot; Platt, Bettina

    2016-07-01

    Models of Tau pathology related to frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are essential to determine underlying neurodegenerative pathologies and resulting tauopathy relevant behavioural changes. However, existing models are often limited in their translational value due to Tau overexpression, and the frequent occurrence of motor deficits which prevent comprehensive behavioural assessments. In order to address these limitations, a forebrain-specific (CaMKIIα promoter), human mutated Tau (hTauP301L+R406W) knock-in mouse was generated out of the previously characterised PLB1Triple mouse, and named PLB2Tau. After confirmation of an additional hTau species (~60kDa) in forebrain samples, we identified age-dependent progressive Tau phosphorylation which coincided with the emergence of FTD relevant behavioural traits. In line with the non-cognitive symptomatology of FTD, PLB2Tau mice demonstrated early emerging (~6months) phenotypes of heightened anxiety in the elevated plus maze, depressive/apathetic behaviour in a sucrose preference test and generally reduced exploratory activity in the absence of motor impairments. Investigations of cognitive performance indicated prominent dysfunctions in semantic memory, as assessed by social transmission of food preference, and in behavioural flexibility during spatial reversal learning in a home cage corner-learning task. Spatial learning was only mildly affected and task-specific, with impairments at 12months of age in the corner learning but not in the water maze task. Electroencephalographic (EEG) investigations indicated a vigilance-stage specific loss of alpha power during wakefulness at both parietal and prefrontal recording sites, and site-specific EEG changes during non-rapid eye movement sleep (prefrontal) and rapid eye movement sleep (parietal). Further investigation of hippocampal electrophysiology conducted in slice preparations indicated a modest reduction in efficacy of synaptic transmission in the absence of altered synaptic

  11. Characteristics of Tau and Its Ligands in PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Ryuichi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Furumoto, Shozo; Tago, Tetsuro; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Arai, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka

    2016-01-01

    Tau deposition is one of the neuropathological hallmarks in Alzheimer’s disease as well as in other neurodegenerative disorders called tauopathies. Recent efforts to develop selective tau radiopharmaceuticals have allowed the visualization of tau deposits in vivo. In vivo tau imaging allows the assessment of the regional distribution of tau deposits in a single human subject over time for determining the pathophysiology of tau accumulation in aging and neurodegenerative conditions as well as for application in drug discovery of anti-dementia drugs as surrogate markers. However, tau deposits show complicated characteristics because of different isoform composition, histopathology, and ultrastructure in various neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, since tau radiopharmaceuticals possess different chemotype classes, they may show different binding characteristics with heterogeneous tau deposits. In this review, we describe the characteristics of tau deposits and their ligands that have β-sheet binding properties, and the status of tau imaging in clinical studies. PMID:26751494

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli Strain Nissle 1917 (Serovar O6:K5:H1).

    PubMed

    Cress, Brady F; Linhardt, Robert J; Koffas, Mattheos A G

    2013-01-01

    We announce the availability of the 5.023-Mbp high-quality draft assembly of the Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (serovar O6:K5:H1) genome. Short genomic segments from this important probiotic strain have been available in public databases, but the full genome sequence has remained inaccessible. Thus, high-coverage, whole genome sequencing of E. coli Nissle 1917 is presented herein. Reannotation and metabolic reconstruction will enable comparative genomics analysis and model-guided predictions of genetic manipulations leading to increased production of the K5 capsular polysaccharide known as N-acetyl heparosan, a precursor to the anticoagulant pharmaceutical heparin. PMID:23516190

  13. K8(K5F)U6Si8O40: An Intergrowth Uranyl Silicate.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Gregory; Tran, T Thao; Halasyamani, P Shiv; Zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2016-04-01

    Single crystals of K8(K5F)U6Si8O40 were grown from a mixed alkali halide flux. K8(K5F)U6Si8O40 is the first intergrowth uranyl silicate, being composed of alternating slabs related to two previously reported uranyl silicates: Cs2USiO6 and [Na9F2][(UO2)(UO2)2(Si2O7)2]. It exhibits intense luminescence, which is influenced by the [(UO2)2O] dimers present in the structure. PMID:26974872

  14. Hadronic decays of the tau lepton : {tau}- {yields} ({pi}{pi}{pi})- {nu}{tau} within Resonance Chiral Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Pich, A.; Portoles, J.

    2006-01-12

    {tau} decays into hadrons foresee the study of the hadronization of vector and axial-vector QCD currents, yielding relevant information on the dynamics of the resonances entering into the processes. We analyse {tau} {yields} {pi}{pi}{pi}{nu}{tau} decays within the framework of the Resonance Chiral Theory, comparing this theoretical scheme with the experimental data, namely ALEPH spectral function and branching ratio. Hence we get values for the mass and on-shell width of the a 1 (1260) resonance, and provide the structure functions that have been measured by OPAL and CLEO-II.

  15. Early maturation and distinct tau pathology in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from patients with MAPT mutations.

    PubMed

    Iovino, Mariangela; Agathou, Sylvia; González-Rueda, Ana; Del Castillo Velasco-Herrera, Martin; Borroni, Barbara; Alberici, Antonella; Lynch, Timothy; O'Dowd, Sean; Geti, Imbisaat; Gaffney, Daniel; Vallier, Ludovic; Paulsen, Ole; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur Thóra; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2015-11-01

    Tauopathies, such as Alzheimer's disease, some cases of frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, are characterized by aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein tau, which are linked to neuronal death and disease development and can be caused by mutations in the MAPT gene. Six tau isoforms are present in the adult human brain and they differ by the presence of 3(3R) or 4(4R) C-terminal repeats. Only the shortest 3R isoform is present in foetal brain. MAPT mutations found in human disease affect tau binding to microtubules or the 3R:4R isoform ratio by altering exon 10 splicing. We have differentiated neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from fibroblasts of controls and patients with N279K and P301L MAPT mutations. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons recapitulate developmental tau expression, showing the adult brain tau isoforms after several months in culture. Both N279K and P301L neurons exhibit earlier electrophysiological maturation and altered mitochondrial transport compared to controls. Specifically, the N279K neurons show abnormally premature developmental 4R tau expression, including changes in the 3R:4R isoform ratio and AT100-hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates, while P301L neurons are characterized by contorted processes with varicosity-like structures, some containing both alpha-synuclein and 4R tau. The previously unreported faster maturation of MAPT mutant human neurons, the developmental expression of 4R tau and the morphological alterations may contribute to disease development. PMID:26220942

  16. Early maturation and distinct tau pathology in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from patients with MAPT mutations

    PubMed Central

    Iovino, Mariangela; Agathou, Sylvia; González-Rueda, Ana; Del Castillo Velasco-Herrera, Martin; Borroni, Barbara; Alberici, Antonella; Lynch, Timothy; O’Dowd, Sean; Geti, Imbisaat; Gaffney, Daniel; Vallier, Ludovic; Paulsen, Ole; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur Thóra

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies, such as Alzheimer’s disease, some cases of frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, are characterized by aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein tau, which are linked to neuronal death and disease development and can be caused by mutations in the MAPT gene. Six tau isoforms are present in the adult human brain and they differ by the presence of 3(3R) or 4(4R) C-terminal repeats. Only the shortest 3R isoform is present in foetal brain. MAPT mutations found in human disease affect tau binding to microtubules or the 3R:4R isoform ratio by altering exon 10 splicing. We have differentiated neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from fibroblasts of controls and patients with N279K and P301L MAPT mutations. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons recapitulate developmental tau expression, showing the adult brain tau isoforms after several months in culture. Both N279K and P301L neurons exhibit earlier electrophysiological maturation and altered mitochondrial transport compared to controls. Specifically, the N279K neurons show abnormally premature developmental 4R tau expression, including changes in the 3R:4R isoform ratio and AT100-hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates, while P301L neurons are characterized by contorted processes with varicosity-like structures, some containing both alpha-synuclein and 4R tau. The previously unreported faster maturation of MAPT mutant human neurons, the developmental expression of 4R tau and the morphological alterations may contribute to disease development. PMID:26220942

  17. Phosphorylated tau and the neurodegenerative foldopathies.

    PubMed

    Kosik, Kenneth S; Shimura, Hideki

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have implicated phosphorylated tau in the Alzheimer disease process. However, the cellular fate of phosphorylated tau has only recently been described. Recent work has shown that tau phosphorylation at substrate sites for the kinases Cdk5 and GSK3-beta can trigger the binding of tau to the chaperones Hsc70 and Hsp27. The binding of phosphorylated tau to Hsc70 implied that the complex may be a substrate for the E3 ligase CHIP and this possibility was experimentally verified. The presence of this system in cells suggests that phosphorylated tau may hold toxic dangers for cell viability, and the response of the cell is to harness a variety of protective mechanisms. These include binding to chaperones, which may prevent more toxic conformations of the protein, ubiquitination which will direct the protein to the proteasome, segregation of tau aggregates from the cellular machinery, and recruitment of Hsp27 which will confer anti-apoptotic properties to the cell. PMID:15615647

  18. Language Assessment Scales, LAS I, for Grades K-5, English/Spanish. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Avila, Edward A.; Duncan, Sharon E.

    Language Assessment Scales, LAS I, are designed for children in grades K-5. LAS I accommodates ethnic and linguistic differences and provides direct language activities taken from the popular culture of both English- and Spanish-speaking peoples. LAS I consists of two independent tests, one in English and the other in Spanish, presented largely on…

  19. Stress Education Curriculum: Grades K-5, Elementary School Level. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Jennie C.

    Stress is an inevitable part of living, but too much stress can have damaging consequences. Ways in which children can respond positively to stress are covered in this curriculum guide. It was developed to help teachers teach students, grades K-5, ways to cope with stress. Its curriculum objectives include helping students understand stress and…

  20. Science IDEAS: A Research-Based K-5 Interdisciplinary Instructional Model Linking Science and Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romance, Nancy R.; Vitale, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Science IDEAS is an evidence-based model that reflects interdisciplinary research findings that support the integration of literacy (e.g., reading comprehension) within science instruction in grades K-5. Presented is a framework for planning integrated science and literacy instruction in which six elements (hands-on investigations, reading,…

  1. Mobile Devices and the Teacher Perceived Barriers Impacting Effective Integration in the K-5 Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Tina S.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, phenomenological study explored the teacher perceived barriers of using mobile devices in the K-5 classroom. Research confirms teachers face various types of variables and become reluctant to use technology within their curriculum driven lessons. This study sought to understand what teachers perceive as barriers, and how the…

  2. K-5 Student Experiences in a Dance Residency: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Alison E.; McShane-Hellenbrand, Karen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the collaborating authors, a researcher and dance artist, confront assumptions surrounding dance's experiential nature and assessment in schools. Presenting findings from a qualitative case study assessment of a three-week, whole-school dance artist-in-residence at a diverse and inclusive metropolitan K-5 school, the authors focus…

  3. Perceptions of Stress among Native American and Hispanic K-5 Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotz-Drlik, Jane Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Within the context of a nationwide shortage of teachers of color, stable enrollment of Native American students, and increasing enrollments of Hispanic students, the purpose of this study was to examine self-reported stress among Native American, Hispanic, and Caucasian K-5 teachers. This was a mixed-methods study, with both quantitative and…

  4. Students' Stories of Their Best and Poorest K-5 Teachers: A Mixed Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slate, John R.; Capraro, Mary Margaret; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a multi-stage mixed analysis was used to examine stories from 72 undergraduate teacher education students regarding their best and poorest K-5 teachers, alongside responses to Likert-format survey items. Participants expressed strong agreement with items derived from the literature concerning characteristics of effective teachers…

  5. Democratic Bodies: Exemplary Practice and Democratic Education in a K-5 Dance Residency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Alison E.

    2014-01-01

    This research highlights a K-5 dance artist-in-residence as a form of democratic and exemplary dance education that ignited collaboration, promoted equity, fostered student autonomy, and demonstrated rigor in school curriculum. Through examining observation, interview, and performance-based data and calling upon critical, democratic education…

  6. Social Studies: Standards, End of Grade Cluster Benchmarks, Performance Indicators. Grades K-5. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware State Dept. of Public Instruction, Dover.

    This Delaware state content standards booklet for teaching grades K-5 social studies in Delaware public schools begins with a one page chart outlining information for the disciplines of civics, economics, geography, and U.S. history. The booklet addresses standards for civics, lists end of cluster expectations for the end of grade three and the…

  7. Native American (K-5) and Math (9 - 12 ) Astronomy Lessons Plans.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canterna, Ronald W.; Singer, E.; Hoffman, J.

    2007-12-01

    As part of the education component of the Wyoming RET program astronomy lesson plans were developed for elementary and senior HS students. E. Singer developed a thematic unit for grades K-5 based on Native American astronomy. J Hoffman developed lesson plans for high school (9-12) math classes based on astronomy topics. Both plans will be present.

  8. Tensor mesons produced in tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Castro, G.; Munoz, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    Light tensor mesons (T=a{sub 2}, f{sub 2} and K{sub 2}*) can be produced in decays of {tau} leptons. In this paper we compute the branching ratios of {tau}{yields}T{pi}{nu} decays by assuming the dominance of intermediate virtual states to model the form factors involved in the relevant hadronic matrix elements. The exclusive f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup -} decay mode turns out to have the largest branching ratio, of O(10{sup -4}). Our results indicate that the contribution of tensor meson intermediate states to the three-pseudoscalar channels of {tau} decays are rather small.

  9. Precision measurements of tau lepton decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, Ian M.

    Using data collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II electron-positron storage ring operating at a centre-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, the branching fractions B (tau-- → pi--pi --pi+nutau) = (8.83 +/- 0.01 +/- 0.13)%, B (tau-- → K--pi --pi+nutau) = (0.273 +/- 0.002 +/- 0.009)%, B (tau-- → K--pi --K+nutau) = (0.1346 +/- 0.0010 +/- 0.0036)%, and B (tau-- → K-- K--K +nutau) = (1.58 +/- 0.13 +/- 0.12) x 10--5 are measured where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The invariant mass distribution for the tau -- → pi--pi--pi +nutau, tau-- → K--pi--pi+nu tau, tau-- → K --pi--K+nu tau and tau-- → K --K--K +nutau decays are unfolded to correct for detector effects. A measurement of B (tau-- → φpi--nu tau) = (3.42 +/- 0.55 +/- 0.25) x 10--5 , a measurement of B (tau-- → φK --nutau) = (3.39 +/- 0.20 +/- 0.28) x 10--5 and an upper limit on B (tau-- → K-- K--K +nutau [ex.φ]) ≤ 2.5 x 10--6 90%CL are determined from a binned maximum likelihood fit of the tau-- → K-- pi--K+nu tau and tau-- → K --K--K +nutau K+K -- invariant mass distributions. The branching ratio Bt-→K -nt Bt-→p -nt is measured to be (6.531 +/- 0.056 +/- 0.093) x 10 --2 from which |Vus| is determined to be 0.2255 +/- 0.0023. The branching ratio Bt-→m -ntn¯ mB t-→e-nt n¯e = (9.796 +/- 0.016 +/- 0.035) x 10--1 is measured enabling a precision test of the Standard Model assumption of charged current lepton universality, gmge = 1.0036 +/- 0.0020. The branching ratios Bt-→K -nt Bt-→e- ntn¯ e = (3.882 +/- 0.032 +/- 0.056) x 10--2 , and Bt-→p -nt Bt-→e- ntn¯ e = (5.945 +/- 0.014 +/- 0.061) x 10--1 are measured which provide additional tests of charged current lepton universality, gtgm p = 0.9856 +/- 0.0057 and gtgm K = 0.9827 +/- 0.0086 which can be combined to give gtgm p/K = 0.9850 +/- 0.0054. Any deviation of these measurements from the expected Standard Model values would be an indication of new physics.

  10. FTDP-17 tau mutations decrease the susceptibility of tau to calpain I digestion.

    PubMed

    Yen, S; Easson, C; Nacharaju, P; Hutton, M; Yen, S H

    1999-11-12

    Frontal temporal dementia and Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) is caused by splice site and missense mutations in the tau gene, and characterized by the accumulation of filamentous tau in cerebral neurons and glia. The missense mutations reduce the ability of tau to promote microtubule assembly and increase the ability of tau to form filaments. In this report we demonstrate that mutants V337M and R406W are less susceptible than mutant P301L or corresponding wild type tau to degradation by calpain I. The differences were at least in part due to changes in accessibility of a cleavage site located about 100 amino acids off the carboxy-terminus. The results suggest that the pathogenesis of some forms of FTDP-17 may involve tau accumulation due to decreased proteolytic degradation. PMID:10561502

  11. Measurement of the Tau Lepton Lifetime at Opal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janissen, Anna Cornelia

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes a new measurement of the tau (tau) lepton lifetime using two statistically independent techniques each associated with one of the two principle decay topologies of the tau to one and three charged particles, respectively. The measurement was performed with data collected in 1990 and 1991 at the OPAL detector at the LEP e^+e ^- colliding beam accelerator at CERN. The LEP collider operates at a significantly higher energy than previous e^+e^- colliders. This presents a new experimental opportunity to investigate the physics associated with the tau<=pton in general and the tau lifetime in particular. The tau lepton is one of three similar electron -like particles: e, mu, and tau. These leptons exhibit a hierarchy of masses with: m_{e} < m_ {mu} < m_{tau}. While the electron is stable, the mu and the tau are unstable and decay via the weak interaction charged current. It is a fundamental feature of the standard model of fundamental particles and their interactions that this weak charged current has exactly the same strength for each of the three leptons; a phenomenon called lepton universality. The tau lifetime, tau_tau, can be related to the mu lifetime, tau_ mu, and the average leptonic branching ratio, BR(tau to lnu| nu), by:tau_ tau = tau_mu {G_mu G_{e}over G_tau G_ l} ({m_muover m_tau})^5 {rm BR}(tautolnu|nu)R where R is a calculable factor to account for phase space and radiative corrections, and G _l is the Fermi effective coupling strength of the weak charged current to the lepton l. Lepton universality implies that G _mu = G_{e} = G_tau. The experimentally measured tau lifetime, together with the measurements of the other quantities in the above relation, can be interpreted as a direct test of lepton universality. The tau lifetime measured with each of the two independent techniques is: eqalign{tau_1 &rm= 296.4+/-7.1(stat.)+/- 3.8(sys.) fscr tau_3 &rm= 286.3+/-7.4(stat.)+/-5.2(sys.) fs.}The systematic uncertainties for each of the

  12. Search for second-class currents in tau;{-} --> omegapi;{-}nu_{tau}.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; da Costa, J Firmino; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Sevilla, M Franco; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-07-24

    We report an analysis of tau;{-} decaying into omegapi;{-}nu_{tau} with omega --> pi;{+}pi;{-}pi;{0} using a data sample containing nearly 320 x 10;{6}tau pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-Factory. We find no evidence for second-class currents, and we set an upper limit of 0.69% at 90% confidence level for the fraction of second-class currents in this decay mode. PMID:19659341

  13. Progranulin reduction is associated with increased tau phosphorylation in P301L tau transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Masato; Arai, Tetsuaki; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami; Kondo, Hiromi; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Nishihara, Masugi; Hasegawa, Masato; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2015-02-01

    Granulin (GRN) mutations have been identified in familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration patients with ubiquitin pathology. GRN transcript haploinsufficiency is proposed as a disease mechanism that leads to the loss of functional progranulin (PGRN) protein. Thus, these mutations are strongly involved in frontotemporal lobar degeneration pathogenesis. Moreover, recent findings indicate that GRN mutations are associated with other neurodegenerative disorders with tau pathology, including Alzheimer disease and corticobasal degeneration. To investigate the potential influence of a decline in PGRN protein on tau accumulation, P301L tau transgenic mice were interbred with GRN-deficient mice, producing P301L tau transgenic mice harboring the GRN hemizygote. Brains were collected from 13- and 19-month-old mice, and sequential extraction of proteins, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemical analyses were performed. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that tau phosphorylation was accelerated in the Tris-saline soluble fraction of 13-month-old and in the sarkosyl-insoluble fraction of 19-month-old P301L tau/GRN hemizygotes compared with those in fractions from P301L tau transgenic mice. Activity of cyclin-dependent kinases was also upregulated in the brains of P301L tau/GRN hemizygote mice. Although the mechanisms involved in these findings remain unknown, our data suggest that a reduction in PGRN protein might contribute to phosphorylation and intraneuronal accumulation of tau. PMID:25575133

  14. Missense tau mutations identified in FTDP-17 have a small effect on tau-microtubule interactions.

    PubMed

    DeTure, M; Ko, L W; Yen, S; Nacharaju, P; Easson, C; Lewis, J; van Slegtenhorst, M; Hutton, M; Yen, S H

    2000-01-17

    Frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) is a group of related disorders frequently characterized by the formation of tau inclusions in neurons and glial cells. To determine whether the formation of tau inclusions in FTDP-17 results from an alteration in the ability of mutant tau to maintain the microtubule (MT) system, we compared wild type four-repeat tau with three FTDP-17 mutants (P301L, V337M and R406W) for their ability to bind MT, promote MT assembly and bundling. According to in vitro binding and assembly assays, P301L is the only mutant that demonstrates a small, yet significant reduction, in its affinity for MT while both P301L and R406W have a small reduction in their ability to promote tubulin assembly. Based on studies of neuroblastoma and CHO cells transfected with GFP-tagged tau DNA constructs, both mutant and wild type tau transfectants were indistinguishable in the distribution pattern of tau in terms of co-localization with MT and generation of MT bundles. These results suggest that missense mutation of tau gene do not have an immediate impact on the integrity of MT system, and that exposure of affected neurons to additional insults or factors (e.g., aging) may be needed to initiate the formation of tau inclusions in FTDP-17. PMID:10627302

  15. Orbital motions and light curves of young binaries XZ Tau and VY Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodin, A. V.; Emelyanov, N. V.; Zharova, A. V.; Lamzin, S. A.; Malogolovets, E. V.; Roe, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The results of our speckle interferometric observations of young binaries VY Tau and XZ Tau are presented. For the first time, we found a relative displacement of VY Tau components as well as a preliminary orbit for XZ Tau. It appeared that the orbit is appreciably non-circular and is inclined by i ≲ 47◦ from the plane of the sky. It means that the rotation axis of XZ Tau A and the axis of its jet are significantly non-perpendicular to the orbital plane. We found that the average brightness of XZ Tau had been increasing from the beginning of the last century up to the mid-thirties and then it decreased by Δ B > 2 mag. The maximal brightness has been reached significantly later on the time of periastron passage. The total brightness of XZ Tau's components varied in a non-regular way from 1970 to 1985 when eruptions of hot gas from XZ Tau A presumably had occurred. In the early nineties the variations became regular following which a chaotic variability had renewed. We also report that a flare activity of VY Tau has resumed after 40 yr pause, parameters of the previous and new flares are similar, and the flares are related with the A component.

  16. Searches for Lepton Flavor Violation in the Decays tau+- ---> e+- gamma and tau+- ---> mu+- gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /more authors..

    2010-06-11

    Searches for lepton-flavor-violating decays of a {tau} lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a photon have been performed with the entire dataset of (963 {+-} 7) x 10{sup 6} {tau} decays collected by the BABAR detector near the {Upsilon}(4S), {Upsilon}(3S) and {Upsilon}(2S) resonances. The searches yield no evidence of signals and they set upper limits on the branching fractions of {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 3.3 x 10{sup -8} and {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 4.4 x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  17. A Search for the Rare Decay B0 to tau+tau- atBaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, AUTHOR = Roethel, W. /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /INFN, Perugia /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2005-11-09

    We present the results of a search for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} in a data sample of (232 {+-} 3) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays using the BABAR detector. Certain extensions of the Standard Model predict measurable levels of this otherwise rare decay. We reconstruct fully one neutral B meson and seek evidence for the signal decay in the rest of the event. We find no evidence for signal events and obtain {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) < 3.2 x 10{sup -3} at the 90% confidence level.

  18. Search for the rare decay B0-->tau+tau- at BABAR.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Martinez-Vidal, F; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, Ian J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissiere, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganit, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H; Schott, G

    2006-06-23

    We present the results of a search for the decay B0-->tau+tau- in a data sample of (232+/-3)x10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays using the BABAR detector. Certain extensions of the standard model predict measurable levels of this otherwise rare decay. We reconstruct fully one neutral B meson and seek evidence for the signal decay in the rest of the event. We find no evidence for signal events and obtain Beta(B0->tau+tau-)<4.1x10(-3) at the 90% confidence level. PMID:16907230

  19. Park2-null/tau transgenic mice reveal a functional relationship between parkin and tau.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Rosa; Navarro, Paloma; Gallego, Eva; Avila, Jesus; de Yebenes, Justo G; Sanchez, Marina P

    2008-03-01

    Mutations, haplotypes, and polymorphisms of tau and Park-2 genes constitute risk factors for developing tauopathies. In order to analyze the possible relationship between parkin and tau we generated a double-mutant mouse deficient for Park-2 expression and overexpressing a mutant tau protein (hTauVLW). Mice develop normally, although the median survival rate is considerably reduced with respect to wild type (45%). Aggregates of phosphorylated tau in neurons and reactive gliosis are quite abundant in cortex and hippocampus of these mice. Moreover, while in young transgenic mice the hTauVLW immunostained transgene product is observed in both cell bodies and dendrites, the hTauVLW mutant protein is only detected in the neuronal cell bodies when Park-2 gene is additionally deleted. Moreover, DNA fragmentation was detected by the TUNEL method, and cerebral atrophy is also present in these regions. The levels of phosphorylated tau and Hsp70 are increased in the double-mutant mice, while CHIP expression in hippocampus is lower when the Park-2 gene is deleted. Thus, the combination of Park-2 gene deletion with hTauVLW transgene overexpression in mice produces serious neuropathological effects, which reflect the existence of some relationship between both proteins. PMID:18376058

  20. Tau longitudinal polarization in B{yields}D{tau}{nu} and its role in the search for the charged Higgs boson

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Minoru; Watanabe, Ryoutaro

    2010-08-01

    We study the longitudinal polarization of the tau lepton in B{yields}D{tau}{nu} decay. After discussing possible sensitivities of {tau} decay modes to the {tau} polarization, we examine the effect of charged Higgs boson on the {tau} polarization in B{yields}D{tau}{nu}. We find a relation between the decay rate and the {tau} polarization, and clarify the role of the {tau} polarization measurement in the search for the charged Higgs boson.

  1. Deletion of endogenous Tau proteins is not detrimental in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Burnouf, Sylvie; Grönke, Sebastian; Augustin, Hrvoje; Dols, Jacqueline; Gorsky, Marianna Karina; Werner, Jennifer; Kerr, Fiona; Alic, Nazif; Martinez, Pedro; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Human Tau (hTau) is a highly soluble and natively unfolded protein that binds to microtubules within neurons. Its dysfunction and aggregation into insoluble paired helical filaments is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), constituting, together with accumulated β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, a hallmark of the disease. Deciphering both the loss-of-function and toxic gain-of-function of hTau proteins is crucial to further understand the mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration in AD. As the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster expresses Tau proteins (dTau) that are homologous to hTau, we aimed to better comprehend dTau functions by generating a specific tau knock-out (KO) fly line using homologous recombination. We observed that the specific removal of endogenous dTau proteins did not lead to overt, macroscopic phenotypes in flies. Indeed, survival, climbing ability and neuronal function were unchanged in tau KO flies. In addition, we did not find any overt positive or negative effect of dTau removal on human Aβ-induced toxicity. Altogether, our results indicate that the absence of dTau proteins has no major functional impact on flies, and suggests that our tau KO strain is a relevant model to further investigate the role of dTau proteins in vivo, thereby giving additional insights into hTau functions. PMID:26976084

  2. Deletion of endogenous Tau proteins is not detrimental in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Burnouf, Sylvie; Grönke, Sebastian; Augustin, Hrvoje; Dols, Jacqueline; Gorsky, Marianna Karina; Werner, Jennifer; Kerr, Fiona; Alic, Nazif; Martinez, Pedro; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Human Tau (hTau) is a highly soluble and natively unfolded protein that binds to microtubules within neurons. Its dysfunction and aggregation into insoluble paired helical filaments is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), constituting, together with accumulated β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, a hallmark of the disease. Deciphering both the loss-of-function and toxic gain-of-function of hTau proteins is crucial to further understand the mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration in AD. As the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster expresses Tau proteins (dTau) that are homologous to hTau, we aimed to better comprehend dTau functions by generating a specific tau knock-out (KO) fly line using homologous recombination. We observed that the specific removal of endogenous dTau proteins did not lead to overt, macroscopic phenotypes in flies. Indeed, survival, climbing ability and neuronal function were unchanged in tau KO flies. In addition, we did not find any overt positive or negative effect of dTau removal on human Aβ-induced toxicity. Altogether, our results indicate that the absence of dTau proteins has no major functional impact on flies, and suggests that our tau KO strain is a relevant model to further investigate the role of dTau proteins in vivo, thereby giving additional insights into hTau functions. PMID:26976084

  3. The winds from HL Tau

    PubMed Central

    Klaassen, P. D.; Mottram, J. C.; Maud, L. T.; Juhasz, A.

    2016-01-01

    Outflowing motions, whether a wind launched from the disc, a jet launched from the protostar, or the entrained molecular outflow, appear to be a ubiquitous feature of star formation. These outwards motions have a number of root causes, and how they manifest is intricately linked to their environment as well as the process of star formation itself. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Science Verification data of HL Tau, we investigate the high-velocity molecular gas being removed from the system as a result of the star formation process. We aim to place these motions in context with the optically detected jet, and the disc. With these high-resolution (∼1 arcsec) ALMA observations of CO (J=1−0), we quantify the outwards motions of the molecular gas. We find evidence for a bipolar outwards flow, with an opening angle, as measured in the redshifted lobe, starting off at 90°, and narrowing to 60° further from the disc, likely because of magnetic collimation. Its outwards velocity, corrected for inclination angle is of the order of 2.4 km s−1. PMID:27559304

  4. The winds from HL Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaassen, P. D.; Mottram, J. C.; Maud, L. T.; Juhasz, A.

    2016-07-01

    Outflowing motions, whether a wind launched from the disc, a jet launched from the protostar, or the entrained molecular outflow, appear to be a ubiquitous feature of star formation. These outwards motions have a number of root causes, and how they manifest is intricately linked to their environment as well as the process of star formation itself. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Science Verification data of HL Tau, we investigate the high-velocity molecular gas being removed from the system as a result of the star formation process. We aim to place these motions in context with the optically detected jet, and the disc. With these high-resolution (˜1 arcsec) ALMA observations of CO (J=1-0), we quantify the outwards motions of the molecular gas. We find evidence for a bipolar outwards flow, with an opening angle, as measured in the redshifted lobe, starting off at 90°, and narrowing to 60° further from the disc, likely because of magnetic collimation. Its outwards velocity, corrected for inclination angle is of the order of 2.4 km s-1.

  5. The winds from HL Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaassen, P. D.; Mottram, J. C.; Maud, L. T.; Juhasz, A.

    2016-04-01

    Outflowing motions, whether a wind launched from the disk, a jet launched from the protostar, or the entrained molecular outflow, appear to be an ubiquitous feature of star formation. These outwards motions have a number of root causes, and how they manifest is intricately linked to their environment as well as the process of star formation itself. Using the ALMA Science Verification data of HL Tau, we investigate the high velocity molecular gas being removed from the system as a result of the star formation process. We aim to place these motions in context with the optically detected jet, and the disk. With these high resolution (˜1″) ALMA observations of CO (J=1-0), we quantify the outwards motions of the molecular gas. We find evidence for a bipolar outwards flow, with an opening angle, as measured in the red-shifted lobe, starting off at 90°, and narrowing to 60° further from the disk, likely because of magnetic collimation. Its outwards velocity, corrected for inclination angle is of order 2.4 km s-1.

  6. Escherichia coli K5 capsule expression enhances colonization of the large intestine in the gnotobiotic rat.

    PubMed Central

    Hérias, M V; Midtvedt, T; Hanson, L A; Wold, A E

    1997-01-01

    The role of capsule expression in the capacity of Escherichia coli to colonize in the large intestinal environment was studied in a gnotobiotic rat model. The rats were given perorally a mixture of two mutant strains differing in K5 expression. After 2 weeks, the rats were sacrificed, and subsequently intestinal contents, intestinal mucosae, and mesenteric lymph nodes were homogenized and bacterial numbers were quantified. Two E. coli mutant pairs were used, the first pair (972-998) lacking the O-specific side chain and the second pair (973-997) carrying the O75 lipopolysaccharide. The K5+ mutants established themselves at a higher level than the K5- mutants (10(9) versus 10(6) CFU/g [P < 0.001] for the first pair and 10(9) versus 10(8) CFU/g [P < 0.01] for the second pair, respectively). The results were confirmed by serology showing a K5+ phenotype for practically all isolates. The bacterial population associated with the mucosa was similar to that in the luminal contents with respect to the proportions of the respective mutants, and translocation occurred in numbers proportional to the intestinal population densities of the respective mutants. All mutants were able to express type 1 as well as P fimbriae. After colonization, the expression of P fimbriae remained high whereas only a minority of the isolates expressed type 1 fimbriae. The results suggest that capsule expression and P fimbriae enhance intestinal colonization by E. coli and that these virulence factors, by increasing bacterial densities in the intestine, secondarily increase translocation. PMID:9009309

  7. Common Core Literacy Lesson Plans: Ready-to-Use Resources, K-5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    Schools nationwide are transitioning to the Common Core--our advice to you: Don't go it alone! Our new book, "Common Core Literacy Lesson Plans: Ready-to-Use Resources, K-5," shows you that teaching the Common Core State Standards in the elementary grades doesn't have to be intimidating! This easy-to-use guide provides model lesson plans for…

  8. The decay. tau. sup minus r arrow K sup minus K sup +. pi. sup minus. nu. sub. tau. and the. nu. sub. tau. mass

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Cadenas, J.J. ); Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C.; Pich, A. Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Valencia, Burjasot )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper, we present a model based on the effective chiral Lagrangian to describe the decay {tau}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{ital K}{sup {minus}}{ital K}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{nu}{sub {tau}}. Using our model we study the possible limits on the {nu}{sub {tau}} mass that can be achieved by a high-statistics, high-precision experiment taking data close to the {tau}-pair production threshold.

  9. The future of tau physics and tau-charm detector and factory design

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1991-02-01

    Future research on the tau lepton requires large statistics, thorough investigation of systematic errors, and direct experimental knowledge of backgrounds. Only a tau-charm factory with a specially designed detector can provide all the experimental conditions to meet these requirements. This paper is a summary of three lectures delivered at the 1991 Lake Louise Winter Institute.

  10. Protoplanetary disk formation and evolution models: DM Tau and GM Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, R.; Guillot, T.

    2002-09-01

    We study the formation and evolution of protoplanetary disks using an axisymmetric turbulent disk model. We compare model results with observational parameters derived for the DM Tau and GM Aur systems. These are relatively old T Tauri stars with large and massive protoplanetary disks. Early disk formation is studied in the standard scenario of slowly rotating isothermal collapsing spheres and is strongly dependent on the initial angular momentum and the collapse accretion rate. The viscous evolution of the disk is integrated in time using the classical Alpha prescription of turbulence. We follow the temporal evolution of the disks until their characteristics fit the observed characteristics of DM Tau and GM Aur. We therefore obtain the set of model parameters that are able to explain the present state of these disks. We also study the disk evolution under the Beta parameterization of turbulence, recently proposed for sheared flows on protoplanetary disks. Both parameterizations allow explaining the present state of both DM Tau and GM Aur. We infer a value of Alpha between 5x10-3 to 0.02 for DM Tau and one order of magnitude smaller for GM Aur. Values of the Beta parameter are in accordance with theoretical predictions of Beta around 2x10-5 but with a larger dispersion on other model parameters, which make us favor the Alpha parameterization of turbulence. Implications for planetary system development in these systems are presented. In particular, GM Aur is a massive and slowly evolving disk where conditions are very favorable for planetesimal growth. The large value of present disk mass and the relatively small observed accretion rate of this system may also be indicative of the presence of an inner gas giant planet. Acknowledgements: This work has been supported by Programme Nationale de Planetologie. R. Hueso acknowledges a post-doctoral fellowship from Gobierno Vasco.

  11. Study of the Tau- to Pi- Pi+ Pi- Pi0 Nu/Tau And Tau- to Pi- Pi- Pi+ Eta Nu/Tau Decays Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sobie, Randall; /Victoria U.

    2007-11-14

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays have been studied with the BABAR detector. Preliminary branching fractions on the two modes are presented. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} mode is found to have a large contribution from the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is studied using the {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mode and the {tau}{sup -} f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is seen to be the primary source of these decays. A 90% confidence level upper limit is placed on the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}(958){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay which proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of perfect isospin symmetry.

  12. Curcumin improves tau-induced neuronal dysfunction of nematodes.

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, Tomohiro; Xie, Ce; Yoshimura, Satomi; Shinzaki, Yuki; Yoshina, Sawako; Kage-Nakadai, Eriko; Mitani, Shohei; Ihara, Yasuo

    2016-03-01

    Tau is a key protein in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases, which are categorized as tauopathies. Because the extent of tau pathologies is closely linked to that of neuronal loss and the clinical symptoms in Alzheimer's disease, anti-tau therapeutics, if any, could be beneficial to a broad spectrum of tauopathies. To learn more about tauopathy, we developed a novel transgenic nematode (Caenorhabditis elegans) model that expresses either wild-type or R406W tau in all the neurons. The wild-type tau-expressing worms exhibited uncoordinated movement (Unc) and neuritic abnormalities. Tau accumulated in abnormal neurites that lost microtubules. Similar abnormalities were found in the worms that expressed low levels of R406W-tau but were not in those expressing comparative levels of wild-type tau. Biochemical studies revealed that tau is aberrantly phosphorylated but forms no detergent-insoluble aggregates. Drug screening performed in these worms identified curcumin, a major phytochemical compound in turmeric, as a compound that reduces not only Unc but also the neuritic abnormalities in both wild-type and R406W tau-expressing worms. Our observations suggest that microtubule stabilization mediates the antitoxicity effect of curcumin. Curcumin is also effective in the worms expressing tau fragment, although it does not prevent the formation of tau-fragment dimers. These data indicate that curcumin improves the tau-induced neuronal dysfunction that is independent of insoluble aggregates of tau. PMID:26923403

  13. Simulated Cytoskeletal Collapse via Tau Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sendek, Austin; Fuller, Henry R.; Hayre, N. Robert; Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Cox, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    We present a coarse-grained two dimensional mechanical model for the microtubule-tau bundles in neuronal axons in which we remove taus, as can happen in various neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimers disease, tauopathies, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Our simplified model includes (i) taus modeled as entropic springs between microtubules, (ii) removal of taus from the bundles due to phosphorylation, and (iii) a possible depletion force between microtubules due to these dissociated phosphorylated taus. We equilibrate upon tau removal using steepest descent relaxation. In the absence of the depletion force, the transverse rigidity to radial compression of the bundles falls to zero at about 60% tau occupancy, in agreement with standard percolation theory results. However, with the attractive depletion force, spring removal leads to a first order collapse of the bundles over a wide range of tau occupancies for physiologically realizable conditions. While our simplest calculations assume a constant concentration of microtubule intercalants to mediate the depletion force, including a dependence that is linear in the detached taus yields the same collapse. Applying percolation theory to removal of taus at microtubule tips, which are likely to be the protective sites against dynamic instability, we argue that the microtubule instability can only obtain at low tau occupancy, from 0.06–0.30 depending upon the tau coordination at the microtubule tips. Hence, the collapse we discover is likely to be more robust over a wide range of tau occupancies than the dynamic instability. We suggest in vitro tests of our predicted collapse. PMID:25162587

  14. Alpha Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Term that is sometimes used to describe a helium nucleus, a positively charged particle that consists of two protons and two neutrons, bound together. Alpha particles, which were discovered by Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) in 1898, are emitted by atomic nuclei that are undergoing alpha radioactivity. During this process, an unstable heavy nucleus spontaneously emits an alpha particle and transmut...

  15. Inhibition of Both Hsp70 Activity and Tau Aggregation in Vitro Best Predicts Tau Lowering Activity of Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Martin, Mackenzie D; Baker, Jeremy D; Suntharalingam, Amirthaa; Nordhues, Bryce A; Shelton, Lindsey B; Zheng, Dali; Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Haystead, Timothy A J; Gestwicki, Jason E; Dickey, Chad A

    2016-07-15

    Three scaffolds with inhibitory activity against the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family of chaperones have been found to enhance the degradation of the microtubule associated protein tau in cells, neurons, and brain tissue. This is important because tau accumulation is linked to neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Here, we expanded upon this study to investigate the anti-tau efficacy of additional scaffolds with Hsp70 inhibitory activity. Five of the nine scaffolds tested lowered tau levels, with the rhodacyanine and phenothiazine scaffolds exhibiting the highest potency as previously described. Because phenothiazines also inhibit tau aggregation in vitro, we suspected that this activity might be a more accurate predictor of tau lowering. Interestingly, the rhodacyanines did inhibit in vitro tau aggregation to a similar degree as phenothiazines, correlating well with tau-lowering efficacy in cells and ex vivo slices. Moreover, other Hsp70 inhibitor scaffolds with weaker tau-lowering activity in cells inhibited tau aggregation in vitro, albeit at lower potencies. When we tested six well-characterized tau aggregation inhibitors, we determined that this mechanism of action was not a better predictor of tau-lowering than Hsp70 inhibition. Instead, we found that compounds possessing both activities were the most effective at promoting tau clearance. Moreover, cytotoxicity and PAINS activity are critical factors that can lead to false-positive lead identification. Strategies designed around these principles will likely yield more efficacious tau-lowering compounds. PMID:27177119

  16. Tau neutrino component to tritium beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snyderman, N.J.

    1995-06-01

    A framework is given for explaining anomalous results of neutrino mass experiments that measure the high energy electron spectrum of tritium {beta} decay. The experimental results have been fit to a negative neutrino mass square. We show that there is a consistent phenomenological interpretation due to a positive mass tau neutrino component of the {beta} decay spectrum, with strong near threshold final state interactions with the He nucleus. If this enhancement is due to new interactions between low energy tau neutrinos and nuclei, then the tritium 0 decay experiments could be used as detectors for cosmic background tau neutrinos. The model predicts a distinctive spectrum shape that is consistent with a recent high statistics LLNL experiment. A fit to the experiment gives a tau neutrino mass of 23 eV. Tau neutrinos of this mass would dominate the mass of the universe. Requirements for a theoretical model are given, as well as models that realize different aspects of these requirements. While qualitatively successful, the theoretical models have such severe quantitative difficulties that the accuracy of the molecular physics of the T-{sup 3}He ion, assumed in the analysis of the experimental data, is called into question.

  17. Targeted deletion of Atg5 reveals differential roles of autophagy in keratin K5-expressing epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Sukseree, Supawadee; Rossiter, Heidemarie; Mildner, Michael; Pammer, Johannes; Buchberger, Maria; Gruber, Florian; Watanapokasin, Ramida; Tschachler, Erwin; Eckhart, Leopold

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated mice lacking Atg5 and autophagy in keratin K5-positive epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suppression of autophagy in thymic epithelium was not associated with signs of autoimmunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy was required for normal terminal differentiation of preputial gland cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy-deficient cells of the preputial glands degraded nuclear DNA prematurely. -- Abstract: Autophagy contributes to the homeostasis of many tissues, yet its role in epithelia is incompletely understood. A recent report proposed that Atg5-dependent autophagy in thymic epithelial cells is essential for their function in the negative selection of self-reactive T-cells and, thus, for the suppression of tissue inflammation. Here we crossed mice carrying floxed alleles of the Atg5 gene with mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of the keratin K5 promoter to suppress autophagy in all K5-positive epithelia. The efficiency of autophagy abrogation was confirmed by immunoanalyses of LC3, which was converted to the autophagy-associated LC3-II form in normal but not Atg5-deficient cells, and of p62, which accumulated in Atg5-deficient cells. Mice carrying the epithelium-specific deletion of Atg5 showed normal weight gain, absence of tissue inflammation, and a normal morphology of the thymic epithelium. By contrast, autophagy-deficient epithelial cells of the preputial gland showed aberrant eosinophilic staining in histology and premature degradation of nuclear DNA during terminal differentiation. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that autophagy is dispensable for the suppression of autoimmunity by thymic epithelial cells but essential for normal differentiation of the preputial gland in mice.

  18. Study of the tau- ---> pi- pi- pi+ pi0 pi0 nu/tau and tau- --> 3h- 2h+ nu/tau Decays Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sobie, R.; /Victoria U.

    2005-06-21

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -} 2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decays have been studied using the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. Preliminary branching fractions are given for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and to the sub-channels {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}(782){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}. A preliminary upper limit is given on the branching fraction for the {phi}(1020){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} mode. In addition a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -}2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay (h = {pi}, K) is presented.

  19. PICALM modulates autophagy activity and tau accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Kevin; Fleming, Angeleen; Imarisio, Sara; Lopez Ramirez, Ana; Mercer, Jacob L.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Maria; Bento, Carla F.; Puri, Claudia; Zavodszky, Eszter; Siddiqi, Farah; Lavau, Catherine P.; Betton, Maureen; O’Kane, Cahir J.; Wechsler, Daniel S.; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several loci associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), including proteins involved in endocytic trafficking such as PICALM/CALM (phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein). It is unclear how these loci may contribute to AD pathology. Here we show that CALM modulates autophagy and alters clearance of tau, a protein which is a known autophagy substrate and which is causatively linked to AD, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, altered CALM expression exacerbates tau-mediated toxicity in zebrafish transgenic models. CALM influences autophagy by regulating the endocytosis of SNAREs, such as VAMP2, VAMP3 and VAMP8, which have diverse effects on different stages of the autophagy pathway, from autophagosome formation to autophagosome degradation. This study suggests that the AD genetic risk factor CALM modulates autophagy, and this may affect disease in a number of ways including modulation of tau turnover. PMID:25241929

  20. Pathological tau disrupts ongoing network activity.

    PubMed

    Menkes-Caspi, Noa; Yamin, Hagar G; Kellner, Vered; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Cohen, Dana; Stern, Edward A

    2015-03-01

    Pathological tau leads to dementia and neurodegeneration in tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. It has been shown to disrupt cellular and synaptic functions, yet its effects on the function of the intact neocortical network remain unknown. Using in vivo intracellular and extracellular recordings, we measured ongoing activity of neocortical pyramidal cells during various arousal states in the rTg4510 mouse model of tauopathy, prior to significant cell death, when only a fraction of the neurons show pathological tau. In transgenic mice, membrane potential oscillations are slower during slow-wave sleep and under anesthesia. Intracellular recordings revealed that these changes are due to longer Down states and state transitions of membrane potentials. Firing rates of transgenic neurons are reduced, and firing patterns within Up states are altered, with longer latencies and inter-spike intervals. By changing the activity patterns of a subpopulation of affected neurons, pathological tau reduces the activity of the neocortical network. PMID:25704951

  1. The Tau Lepton and the Search for New Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin L.

    1998-11-18

    This Fifth International WEIN Symposium is devoted to physics beyond the standard model. This talk is about tau lepton physics, but I begin with the question: do we know how to find new physics in the world of elementary particles? This question is interwoven with the various tau physics topics. These topics are: searching for unexpected tau decay modes; searching for additional tau decay mechanisms; radiative tau decays; tau decay modes of the W, B, and D; decay of the Z{sup 0} to tau pairs; searching for CP violation in tau decay; the tau neutrino, dreams and odd ideas in tau physics; and tau research facilities in the next decades.

  2. Microtubule-associated protein tau in bovine retinal photoreceptor rod outer segments: comparison with brain tau.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Akio; Nishizawa, Yuji; Matsuura, Isao; Hayashi, Fumio; Usukura, Jiro; Bondarenko, Vladimir A

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have suggested a possible involvement of abnormal tau in some retinal degenerative diseases. The common view in these studies is that these retinal diseases share the mechanism of tau-mediated degenerative diseases in brain and that information about these brain diseases may be directly applied to explain these retinal diseases. Here we collectively examine this view by revealing three basic characteristics of tau in the rod outer segment (ROS) of bovine retinal photoreceptors, i.e., its isoforms, its phosphorylation mode and its interaction with microtubules, and by comparing them with those of brain tau. We find that ROS contains at least four isoforms: three are identical to those in brain and one is unique in ROS. All ROS isoforms, like brain isoforms, are modified with multiple phosphate molecules; however, ROS isoforms show their own specific phosphorylation pattern, and these phosphorylation patterns appear not to be identical to those of brain tau. Interestingly, some ROS isoforms, under the normal conditions, are phosphorylated at the sites identical to those in Alzheimer's patient isoforms. Surprisingly, a large portion of ROS isoforms tightly associates with a membranous component(s) other than microtubules, and this association is independent of their phosphorylation states. These observations strongly suggest that tau plays various roles in ROS and that some of these functions may not be comparable to those of brain tau. We believe that knowledge about tau in the entire retinal network and/or its individual cells are also essential for elucidation of tau-mediated retinal diseases, if any. PMID:23712071

  3. Probing keratinocyte and differentiation specificity of the human K5 promoter in vitro and in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, C; Fuchs, E

    1993-01-01

    Keratins K5 and K14 form the extensive intermediate filament network of mitotically active basal cells in all stratified epithelia. We have explored the regulatory mechanisms governing cell-type-specific and differentiation stage-specific expression of the human K5 gene in transiently transfected keratinocytes in vitro and in transgenic mice in vivo. Six thousand base pairs of 5' upstream K5 sequence directed proper basal cell-specific expression in all stratified epithelia. Surprisingly, as few as 90 bp of the K5 promoter still directed expression to stratified epithelia, with expression predominantly in epidermis, hair follicles, and tongue. Despite keratinocyte-preferred expression, the truncated K5 promoter displayed departures from basal to suprabasal expression in epidermis and from outer root sheath to inner root sheath expression in the follicle, with some regional variations in expression as well. To begin to elucidate the molecular controls underlying the keratinocyte specificity of the truncated promoter, we examined protein-DNA interactions within this region. A number of keratinocyte nuclear proteins bind to a K5 gene segment extending from -90 to +32 bp and are functionally involved in transcriptional regulation in vitro. Interestingly, several of these factors are common to both the K5 and K14 promoters, although they appear to be distinct from those previously implicated in keratinocyte specificity. Mutagenesis studies indicate that factors binding in the vicinity of the TATA box and transcription initiation are responsible for the cell type specificity of the truncated K5 promoter. Images PMID:7684490

  4. Can we see tau-Flavour Violation at the LHC?

    SciTech Connect

    Carquin, E.; Gomez, M. E.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.

    2010-02-10

    We study the conditions required for chi{sub 2}->chi+tau{sup +}-mu{sup +}- decays to yield observable tau flavour violation at the LHC, for cosmologically interesting values of the neutralino relic density.

  5. Tau physics at p[bar p] colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Konigsberg, J. . High Energy Physics Lab.)

    1993-01-01

    Tau detection techniques in hadron colliders are discussed together with the measurements and searches performed so far. We also underline the importance tau physics has in present and future collider experiments.

  6. Tau physics at p{bar p} colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Konigsberg, J.

    1993-01-01

    Tau detection techniques in hadron colliders are discussed together with the measurements and searches performed so far. We also underline the importance tau physics has in present and future collider experiments.

  7. Tau phosphorylation at Alzheimer's disease-related Ser356 contributes to tau stabilization when PAR-1/MARK activity is elevated.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kanae; Oka, Mikiko; Ohtake, Yosuke; Hayashishita, Motoki; Shimizu, Sawako; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi; Iijima, Koichi M

    2016-09-16

    Abnormal phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau is observed in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD-related phosphorylation of two tau residues, Ser262 and Ser356, by PAR-1/MARK stabilizes tau in the initial phase of mismetabolism, leading to subsequent phosphorylation events, accumulation, and toxicity. However, the relative contribution of phosphorylation at each of these sites to tau stabilization has not yet been elucidated. In a Drosophila model of human tau toxicity, we found that tau was phosphorylated at Ser262, but not at Ser356, and that blocking Ser262 phosphorylation decreased total tau levels. By contrast, when PAR-1 was co-overexpressed with tau, tau was hyperphosphorylated at both Ser262 and Ser356. Under these conditions, the protein levels of tau were significantly elevated, and prevention of tau phosphorylation at both residues was necessary to completely suppress this elevation. These results suggest that tau phosphorylation at Ser262 plays the predominant role in tau stabilization when PAR-1/MARK activity is normal, whereas Ser356 phosphorylation begins to contribute to this process when PAR-1/MARK activity is abnormally elevated, as in diseased brains. PMID:27520376

  8. Multiple-neutral-meson decays of the /tau/ lepton and electromagnetic calorimeter requirements at Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1989-08-01

    This is a study of the physics sensitivity to the multiple-neutral-meson decays of the /tau/ lepton at the Tau-Charm Factory. The sensitivity is compared for a moderate and an ultimate electromagnetic calorimeter. With the high luminosity of the Tau- Charm Factory, a very large sample of the decays /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus//2/pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau// and /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus//3/pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau// can be collected with both detectors. However, with the ultimate detector, 2/pi//sup 0/ and 3/pi//sup 0/ can be unambiguously reconstructed with very little background. For the suppressed decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus///eta//pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau//, only the ultimate detector has the sensitivity. The ultimate detector is also sensitive to the more suppressed decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ K/sup /minus///eta//nu//sub /tau// and the moderate detector may have the sensitivity if the hadronic background is not significantly larger than that predicted by Lund. In the case of the highly suppressed second-class-current decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus///eta//nu//sub /tau//, only the ultimate detector has sensitivity. The sensitivity can be greatly enhanced with a small-angle photon veto. 16 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Search for Second-Class Currents in tau- -> omega.pi-.nu_tau

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2009-04-22

    We report an analysis of {tau}{sup -} decaying into {omega}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} with {omega} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} using a data sample containing nearly 320 million {tau} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-Factory. We find no evidence for second-class currents and we set an upper limit of 0.69% at 90% confidence level for the fraction of second-class currents in this decay mode.

  10. Elimination of spurious eigenvalues in the Chebyshev tau spectral method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, G. B.; Murray, B. T.; Boisvert, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    A very simple modification is presented for the Chebyshev tau method which can eliminate spurious eigenvalues, proceeding from a consideration of the vorticity-streamfunction reformulation of the Chebyshev tau method and the Chebyshev-Galerkin method, which have no spurious modes. Consideration of a model problem indicates that these two approaches are equivalent, and that they reduce to the present modification of the tau method. This modified tau method also eliminates spurious eigenvalues from the Orr-Sommerfeld equation.

  11. Microglial tau undergoes phosphorylation-independent modification after ischemia.

    PubMed

    Uchihara, Toshiki; Nakamura, Ayako; Arai, Tetsuaki; Ikeda, Kenji; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki

    2004-01-15

    Tau2 is a phosphorylation-independent antibody that immunolabels neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) of Alzheimer type and microglia around ischemic foci on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections. We found that copresence of polyethyleneglycol-p-isooctylphenyl ether (Triton X-100; TX) with tau2 abolished its immunoreactivity (IR) in these microglia but not its IR on NFTs. Tau2-immunoreactive bands, exclusively retrieved in Tris-soluble fraction of brain homogenates from ischemic foci, normal human and bovine brains, were of similar electrophoretic mobility, indicating that tau2 IR in these microglia is unrelated to hyperphosphorylation of tau. These tau2-immunoreactive bands except those from bovine brain were abolished in the copresence of TX. This was not due to washing out of tau, because similar immunoreactive bands were detectable with another antitau antibody even under a higher concentration of TX and because washing after TX exposure restored similar tau2 IR both on immunohistochemistry and immunoblot. These findings are explained if tau, modified after ischemia, undergoes a reversible conformational change on TX exposure. Because conformation at Ser101 of bovine tau is crucial for its affinity to tau2, this Ser-like conformation mimicked by its human counterpart Pro may represent pathological modification of tau shared by microglia around ischemic foci and NFTs. Relative resistance of tau2 epitope in NFTs to TX exposure suggests that tau woven into NFTs confers additional stability to this pathological modification on tau2 epitope. Susceptibility of tau2 epitope to TX, seen in these microglia, is shared with glial cytoplasmic inclusions and will show its conformational state to be different from that in NFTs. PMID:14730711

  12. W{right arrow} {tau} {nu} at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Serban Protopopescu

    1998-12-01

    We present results from the CDF and D0 detectors on the production of W-bosons decaying to {tau}{nu}{sub {tau}} at the FNAL Tevatron from data taken between 1992 and 1996. From CDF comes the first observation of W charge asymmetry in W {yields} {tau}{nu} final states, and from D0 a new measurement of g{sup W}{sub {tau}}/g{sup W}{sub e} , 1.003 {+-} 0.032.

  13. Recent Results From BaBar in Tau Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lewczuk, Mateusz; /Victoria U.

    2009-06-25

    The BaBar collaboration has accumulated over 400 million {tau}-pairs which can be used to study charged leptonic and hadronic weak currents to unprecedented precision. This note presents results on lepton universality, measurements of |V{sub us}|, and searches for {tau} decays which violate lepton flavour conservation, or {tau} decays that proceed through a suppressed second class current.

  14. Antisense Reduction of Tau in Adult Mice Protects against Seizures

    PubMed Central

    DeVos, Sarah L.; Goncharoff, Dustin K.; Chen, Guo; Kebodeaux, Carey S.; Yamada, Kaoru; Stewart, Floy R.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Maloney, Susan E.; Wozniak, David F.; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C. Frank; Cirrito, John R.; Holtzman, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Tau, a microtubule-associated protein, is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) in regard to both neurofibrillary tangle formation and neuronal network hyperexcitability. The genetic ablation of tau substantially reduces hyperexcitability in AD mouse lines, induced seizure models, and genetic in vivo models of epilepsy. These data demonstrate that tau is an important regulator of network excitability. However, developmental compensation in the genetic tau knock-out line may account for the protective effect against seizures. To test the efficacy of a tau reducing therapy for disorders with a detrimental hyperexcitability profile in adult animals, we identified antisense oligonucleotides that selectively decrease endogenous tau expression throughout the entire mouse CNS—brain and spinal cord tissue, interstitial fluid, and CSF—while having no effect on baseline motor or cognitive behavior. In two chemically induced seizure models, mice with reduced tau protein had less severe seizures than control mice. Total tau protein levels and seizure severity were highly correlated, such that those mice with the most severe seizures also had the highest levels of tau. Our results demonstrate that endogenous tau is integral for regulating neuronal hyperexcitability in adult animals and suggest that an antisense oligonucleotide reduction of tau could benefit those with epilepsy and perhaps other disorders associated with tau-mediated neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:23904623

  15. Regulation of alternative splicing of tau exon 10.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei; Liu, Fei

    2014-04-01

    The neuronal microtubule-associated protein tau is abnormally hyperphosphorylated and aggregated into neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative disorders. The adult human brain expresses six isoforms of tau generated by alternative splicing of exons 2, 3, and 10 of its pre-mRNA. Exon 10 encodes the second microtubule-binding repeat of tau. Its alternative splicing produces tau isoforms with either three or four microtubule-binding repeats, termed 3R-tau and 4Rtau. In the normal adult human brain, the level of 3R-tau is approximately equal to that of 4R-tau. Several silent and intronic mutations of the tau gene associated with FTDP-17T (frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 and specifically characterized by tau pathology) only disrupt exon 10 splicing, but do not influence the primary sequence of the tau protein. Thus, abnormal exon 10 splicing is sufficient to cause neurodegeneration and dementia. Here, we review the regulation of tau exon 10 splicing by cis-elements and trans-factors and summarize all the mutations associated with FTDP-17T and related tauopathies. The findings suggest that correction of exon 10 splicing may be a potential target for tau exon 10 splicing-related tauopathies. PMID:24627328

  16. Observation of B{sup +{yields}}D*{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}and evidence for B{sup +{yields}}D{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, A.; Rozanska, M.; Kapusta, P.; Matyja, A.; Ostrowicz, W.; Stypula, J.; Adachi, I.; Higuchi, T.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Nozaki, T.; Sakai, Y.; Schuemann, J.; Trabelsi, K.; Uehara, S.; Uno, S.; Aihara, H.

    2010-10-01

    We present measurements of B{sup +{yields}}D*{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}and B{sup +{yields}}D{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}decays in a data sample of 657x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We find 446{sub -56}{sup +58} B{sup +{yields}}D*{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}events with a significance of 8.1 standard deviations, and 146{sub -41}{sup +42} B{sup +{yields}}D{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}events with a significance of 3.5 standard deviations. The latter signal provides the first evidence for this decay mode. The measured branching fractions are B(B{sup +{yields}}D*{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}})=(2.12{sub -0.27}{sup +0.28}(stat){+-}0.29(syst))% and B(B{sup +{yields}}D{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}})=(0.77{+-}0.22(stat){+-}0.12(syst))%.

  17. Estimation of Tau and Phosphorylated Tau181 in Serum of Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Shashank; Kumar, Rahul; Rai, Nitish; Kumar, Vijay; Singh, Kusum; Upadhyay, Ashish Datt; Tripathi, Manjari; Dwivedi, Sadanand; Dey, Aparajit B.; Dey, Sharmistha

    2016-01-01

    The elevated level of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Tau and phosphorylated Tau181 (p-Tau181) proteins are well established hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Elevated level of p-Tau181 can differentiate AD from other neurodegenerative disease. However, the expression level of these proteins in serum of AD patient is not well set up. This study sought to evaluate the level of Tau and p-Tau181 in serum of AD, and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients for an alternative approach to establish protein-based markers by convenient way. Blood samples were collected from 39 AD patients, 37 MCI patients and 37 elderly individuals as controls. The levels of Tau and p-Tau181 in the serum of the different groups were measured by label free real time Surface Plasmon Resonance technology by using specific antibodies, and were further confirmed by the conventional western blot method. An appropriate statistical analysis, including Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC), was performed. The concentrations of serum Tau and p-Tau181 were significantly higher (p<0.00001) in AD (Tau; 47.49±9.00ng/μL, p-Tau181; 0.161±0.04 ng/μL) compared to MCI (Tau; 39.26±7.78 ng/μL, p-Tau181; 0.135±0.02 ng/μL) and were further higher compared to elderly controls (Tau; 34.92±6.58 ng/μL, p-Tau181; 0.122±0.01 ng/ μL). A significant (p<0.0001) downhill correlation was found between Tau as well as p-Tau181 levels with HMSE and MoCA score. This study for the first time reports the concentration of Tau and p-Tau181 in serum of AD and MCI patients. The cutoff values of Tau and p-Tau181 of AD and MCI patients with sensitivity and specificity reveal that serum level of these proteins can be used as a predictive marker for AD and MCI. PMID:27459603

  18. Optical variability in the unusual K5 V infrared-excess star HD 98800

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Gregory W.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1994-01-01

    The dusty infrared-excess star HD 98800 (K5 V) was observed for several weeks in the spring of 1993 by the Vanderbilt/Tennessee State 0.4 m automatic photoelectric telescope. It was found to be a variable star with an amplitude of 0.07 mag in V and a period of 14.7 days. We show, by comparison with other chromospherically active variable stars and constant stars with good observational histories, that the Rossby number for HD 98800, determined to be 0.30, places it well within the regime of stars whose convective envelopes and rotation rates combine to drive a magnetic dynamo strong enough to generate photometrically observable starspots. The light curve suggests at least two large spots at somewhat different longitudes on HD 98800, one of which could be as large as 16 deg in radius.

  19. Final report. SIM comparison in mass standards SIM.M.M-K5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, L. O.; Peña, L. M.; Luján, L.; Díaz, J. C.; Centeno, L. M.; Loayza, V.; Cacais, F.; Ramos, O.; Rodriguez, S.; Garcia, Fr; Garcia, Fe; Leyton, F.; Santo, C.; Caceres, J.; Kornblit, F.; Leiblich, J.; Jacques, C.

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a SIM comparison in masss carried out between 7 NMIs. Five mass standards with nominal values 2 kg, 200 g, 50 g, 1 g and 200 mg have been circulated by the NMIs. The results reported by the participants are consistent with each other and with the key comparison reference valu of the comparison CCM.M-K5 to which the present comparison has been linked. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  20. Riluzole rescues glutamate alterations, cognitive deficits, and tau pathology associated with P301L tau expression.

    PubMed

    Hunsberger, Holly C; Weitzner, Daniel S; Rudy, Carolyn C; Hickman, James E; Libell, Eric M; Speer, Rebecca R; Gerhardt, Greg A; Reed, Miranda N

    2015-10-01

    Hyperexcitability of the hippocampus is a commonly observed phenomenon in the years preceding a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our previous work suggests a dysregulation in glutamate neurotransmission may mediate this hyperexcitability, and glutamate dysregulation correlates with cognitive deficits in the rTg(TauP301L)4510 mouse model of AD. To determine whether improving glutamate regulation would attenuate cognitive deficits and AD-related pathology, TauP301L mice were treated with riluzole (~ 12.5 mg/kg/day p.o.), an FDA-approved drug for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis that lowers extracellular glutamate levels. Riluzole-treated TauP301L mice exhibited improved performance in the water radial arm maze and the Morris water maze, associated with a decrease in glutamate release and an increase in glutamate uptake in the dentate gyrus, cornu ammonis 3 (CA3), and cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) regions of the hippocampus. Riluzole also attenuated the TauP301L-mediated increase in hippocampal vesicular glutamate transporter 1, which packages glutamate into vesicles and influences glutamate release; and the TauP301L-mediated decrease in hippocampal glutamate transporter 1, the major transporter responsible for removing glutamate from the extracellular space. The TauP301L-mediated reduction in PSD-95 expression, a marker of excitatory synapses in the hippocampus, was also rescued by riluzole. Riluzole treatment reduced total levels of tau, as well as the pathological phosphorylation and conformational changes in tau associated with the P301L mutation. These findings open new opportunities for the development of clinically applicable therapeutic approaches to regulate glutamate in vulnerable circuits for those at risk for the development of AD. PMID:26146790

  1. Search for a low-mass higgs boson in Upsilon(3S)-->gammaA(0), A(0)-->tau(+)tau(-) at BABAR.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; da Costa, J Firmino; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Sevilla, M Franco; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-10-30

    We search for a light Higgs boson A0 in the radiative decay Upsilon(3S)-->gammaA(0), A(0)-->tau+tau-, tau+-->e+nu(e)nu(tau), or tau+-->mu+nu(mu)nu(tau). The data sample contains 122x10(6) Upsilon(3S) events recorded with the BABAR detector. We find no evidence for a narrow structure in the studied tau+tau- invariant mass region of 4.03tau+tau-)<10.10 GeV/c2. We exclude at the 90% confidence level (C.L.) a low-mass Higgs boson decaying to tau+tau- with a product branching fraction B(Upsilon(3S)-->gammaA(0))xB(A(0)-->tau+tau-)>(1.5-16)x10(-5) across the m(tau+tau-) range. We also set a 90% C.L. upper limit on the tau+tau- decay of the eta(b) at B(eta(b)-->tau+tau-)<8%. PMID:19905799

  2. Trans-cellular propagation of Tau aggregation by fibrillar species.

    PubMed

    Kfoury, Najla; Holmes, Brandon B; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M; Diamond, Marc I

    2012-06-01

    Aggregation of the microtubule associated protein Tau is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia. In Alzheimer disease, Tau pathology spreads progressively throughout the brain, possibly along existing neural networks. However, it is still unclear how the propagation of Tau misfolding occurs. Intriguingly, in animal models, vaccine-based therapies have reduced Tau and synuclein pathology by uncertain mechanisms, given that these proteins are intracellular. We have previously speculated that trans-cellular propagation of misfolding could be mediated by a process similar to prion pathogenesis, in which fibrillar Tau aggregates spread pathology from cell to cell. However, there has been little evidence to demonstrate true trans-cellular propagation of Tau misfolding, in which Tau aggregates from one cell directly contact Tau protein in the recipient cell to trigger further aggregation. Here we have observed that intracellular Tau fibrils are directly released into the medium and then taken up by co-cultured cells. Internalized Tau aggregates induce fibrillization of intracellular Tau in these naive recipient cells via direct protein-protein contact that we demonstrate using FRET. Tau aggregation can be amplified across several generations of cells. An anti-Tau monoclonal antibody blocks Tau aggregate propagation by trapping fibrils in the extracellular space and preventing their uptake. Thus, propagation of Tau protein misfolding among cells can be mediated by release and subsequent uptake of fibrils that directly contact native protein in recipient cells. These results support the model of aggregate propagation by templated conformational change and suggest a mechanism for vaccine-based therapies in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22461630

  3. Resolved multifrequency radio observations of GG Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Sean M.; Birnstiel, T.; Rosenfeld, K. A.; Wilner, D. J.; Chandler, Claire J.; Pérez, L. M.; Isella, Andrea; Ricci, L.; Carpenter, J. M.; Calvet, N.; Corder, S. A.; Deller, A. T.; Dullemond, C. P.; Greaves, J. S.; Harris, R. J.; Henning, Th.; Linz, H.; Kwon, W.; Lazio, J.; Mundy, L. G.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We present subarcsecond resolution observations of continuum emission associated with the GG Tau quadruple star system at wavelengths of 1.3, 2.8, 7.3, and 50 mm. These data confirm that the GG Tau A binary is encircled by a circumbinary ring at a radius of 235 AU with a FWHM width of ∼60 AU. We find no clear evidence for a radial gradient in the spectral shape of the ring, suggesting that the particle size distribution is spatially homogeneous on angular scales ≳0.''1. A central point source, likely associated with the primary component (GG Tau Aa), exhibits a composite spectrum from dust and free-free emission. Faint emission at 7.3 mm is observed toward the low-mass star GG Tau Ba, although its origin remains uncertain. Using these measurements of the resolved, multifrequency emission structure of the GG Tau A system, models of the far-infrared to radio spectrum are developed to place constraints on the grain size distribution and dust mass in the circumbinary ring. The non-negligible curvature present in the ring spectrum implies a maximum particle size of 1-10 mm, although we are unable to place strong constraints on the distribution shape. The corresponding dust mass is 30-300 M {sub ⊕}, at a temperature of 20-30 K. We discuss how this significant concentration of relatively large particles in a narrow ring at a large radius might be produced in a local region of higher gas pressures (i.e., a particle 'trap') located near the inner edge of the circumbinary disk.

  4. EFFECT OF DUST ON Ly{alpha} PHOTON TRANSFER IN AN OPTICALLY THICK HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yang; Shu Chiwang; Roy, Ishani; Fang Lizhi

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the effects of dust on Ly{alpha} photons emergent from an optically thick medium by solving the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer of resonant photons. To solve the differential equations numerically, we use the weighted essentially non-oscillatory method. Although the effects of dust on radiative transfer are well known, the resonant scattering of Ly{alpha} photons makes the problem non-trivial. For instance, if the medium has an optical depth of dust absorption and scattering of {tau}{sub a} >> 1, {tau} >> 1, and {tau} >> {tau}{sub a}, the effective absorption optical depth in a random walk scenario would be equal to {radical}({tau}{sub a}({tau}{sub a}+{tau})). We show, however, that for a resonant scattering at frequency {nu}{sub 0}, the effective absorption optical depth would be even larger than {tau}({nu}{sub 0}). If the cross section of dust scattering and absorption is frequency-independent, the double-peaked structure of the frequency profile given by the resonant scattering is basically dust-independent. That is, dust causes neither narrowing nor widening of the width of the double-peaked profile. One more result is that the timescales of the Ly{alpha} photon transfer in an optically thick halo are also basically independent of the dust scattering, even when the scattering is anisotropic. This is because those timescales are mainly determined by the transfer in the frequency space, while dust scattering, either isotropic or anisotropic, does not affect the behavior of the transfer in the frequency space when the cross section of scattering is wavelength-independent. This result does not support the speculation that dust will lead to the smoothing of the brightness distribution of a Ly{alpha} photon source with an optically thick halo.

  5. Curcumin Suppresses Soluble Tau Dimers and Corrects Molecular Chaperone, Synaptic, and Behavioral Deficits in Aged Human Tau Transgenic Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiu-Lan; Zuo, Xiaohong; Yang, Fusheng; Ubeda, Oliver J.; Gant, Dana J.; Alaverdyan, Mher; Teng, Edmond; Hu, Shuxin; Chen, Ping-Ping; Maiti, Panchanan; Teter, Bruce; Cole, Greg M.; Frautschy, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying Tau-related synaptic and cognitive deficits and the interrelationships between Tau species, their clearance pathways, and synaptic impairments remain poorly understood. To gain insight into these mechanisms, we examined these interrelationships in aged non-mutant genomic human Tau mice, with established Tau pathology and neuron loss. We also examined how these interrelationships changed with an intervention by feeding mice either a control diet or one containing the brain permeable beta-amyloid and Tau aggregate binding molecule curcumin. Transgene-dependent elevations in soluble and insoluble phospho-Tau monomer and soluble Tau dimers accompanied deficits in behavior, hippocampal excitatory synaptic markers, and molecular chaperones (heat shock proteins (HSPs)) involved in Tau degradation and microtubule stability. In human Tau mice but not control mice, HSP70, HSP70/HSP72, and HSP90 were reduced in membrane-enriched fractions but not in cytosolic fractions. The synaptic proteins PSD95 and NR2B were reduced in dendritic fields and redistributed into perikarya, corresponding to changes observed by immunoblot. Curcumin selectively suppressed levels of soluble Tau dimers, but not of insoluble and monomeric phospho-Tau, while correcting behavioral, synaptic, and HSP deficits. Treatment increased PSD95 co-immunoprecipitating with NR2B and, independent of transgene, increased HSPs implicated in Tau clearance. It elevated HSP90 and HSC70 without increasing HSP mRNAs; that is, without induction of the heat shock response. Instead curcumin differentially impacted HSP90 client kinases, reducing Fyn without reducing Akt. In summary, curcumin reduced soluble Tau and elevated HSPs involved in Tau clearance, showing that even after tangles have formed, Tau-dependent behavioral and synaptic deficits can be corrected. PMID:23264626

  6. Phosphorylation of tau by glycogen synthase kinase 3beta affects the ability of tau to promote microtubule self-assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Utton, M A; Vandecandelaere, A; Wagner, U; Reynolds, C H; Gibb, G M; Miller, C C; Bayley, P M; Anderton, B H

    1997-01-01

    To study the effects of phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) on the ability of the microtubule-associated protein tau to promote microtubule self-assembly, tau isoform 1 (foetal tau) and three mutant forms of this tau isoform were investigated. The three mutant forms of tau had the following serine residues, known to be phosphorylated by GSK-3, replaced with alanine residues so as to preclude their phosphorylation: (1) Ser-199 and Ser-202 (Ser-199/202-->Ala), (2) Ser-235 (Ser-235-->Ala) and (3) Ser-396 and Ser-404 (Ser-396/404-->Ala). Wild-type tau and the mutant forms of tau were phosphorylated with GSK-3beta, and their ability to promote microtubule self-assembly was compared with the corresponding non-phosphorylated tau species. In the non-phosphorylated form, wild-type tau and all of the mutants affected the mean microtubule length and number concentrations of assembled microtubules in a manner consistant with enhanced microtubule nucleation. Phosphorylation of these tau species with GSK-3beta consistently reduced the ability of a given tau species to promote microtubule self-assembly, although the affinity of the tau for the microtubules was not greatly affected by phosphorylation since the tau species remained largely associated with the microtubules. This suggests that the regulation of microtubule assembly can be controlled by phosphorylation of tau at sites accessible to GSK-3beta by a mechanism that does not necessarily involve the dissociation of tau from the microtubules. PMID:9169608

  7. Evidence for two distinct binding sites for tau on microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Makrides, Victoria; Massie, Michelle R.; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Lew, John

    2004-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau regulates diverse and essential microtubule functions, from the nucleation and promotion of microtubule polymerization to the regulation of microtubule polarity and dynamics, as well as the spacing and bundling of axonal microtubules. Thermodynamic studies show that tau interacts with microtubules in the low- to mid-nanomolar range, implying moderate binding affinity. At the same time, it is well established that microtubule-bound tau does not undergo exchange with the bulk medium readily, suggesting that the tau-microtubule interaction is essentially irreversible. Given this dilemma, we investigated the mechanism of interaction between tau and microtubules in kinetic detail. Stopped-flow kinetic analysis reveals moderate binding affinity between tau and preassembled microtubules and rapid dissociation/association kinetics. In contrast, when microtubules are generated by copolymerization of tubulin and tau, a distinct population of microtubule-bound tau is observed, the binding of which seems irreversible. We propose that reversible binding occurs between tau and the surface of preassembled microtubules, whereas irreversible binding results when tau is coassembled with tubulin into a tau-microtubule copolymer. Because the latter is expected to be physiologically relevant, its characterization is of central importance. PMID:15096589

  8. The Disk around the Brown Dwarf KPNO Tau 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda; Duchêne, Gaspard; Di Francesco, James; Scholz, Aleks; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2014-07-01

    We present submillimeter observations of the young brown dwarfs KPNO Tau 1, KPNO Tau 3, and KPNO Tau 6 at 450 μm and 850 μm taken with the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. KPNO Tau 3 and KPNO Tau 6 have been previously identified as Class II objects hosting accretion disks, whereas KPNO Tau 1 has been identified as a Class III object and shows no evidence of circumsubstellar material. Our 3σ detection of cold dust around KPNO Tau 3 implies a total disk mass of (4.0 ± 1.1) × 10-4 M ⊙ (assuming a gas to dust ratio of 100:1). We place tight constraints on any disks around KPNO Tau 1 or KPNO Tau 6 of <2.1 × 10-4 M ⊙ and <2.7 × 10-4 M ⊙, respectively. Modeling the spectral energy distribution of KPNO Tau 3 and its disk suggests the disk properties (geometry, dust mass, and grain size distribution) are consistent with observations of other brown dwarf disks and low-mass T-Tauri stars. In particular, the disk-to-host mass ratio for KPNO Tau 3 is congruent with the scenario that at least some brown dwarfs form via the same mechanism as low-mass stars.

  9. The disk around the brown dwarf KPNO Tau 3

    SciTech Connect

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda; Di Francesco, James; Duchêne, Gaspard; Scholz, Aleks; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2014-07-10

    We present submillimeter observations of the young brown dwarfs KPNO Tau 1, KPNO Tau 3, and KPNO Tau 6 at 450 μm and 850 μm taken with the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. KPNO Tau 3 and KPNO Tau 6 have been previously identified as Class II objects hosting accretion disks, whereas KPNO Tau 1 has been identified as a Class III object and shows no evidence of circumsubstellar material. Our 3σ detection of cold dust around KPNO Tau 3 implies a total disk mass of (4.0 ± 1.1) × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉} (assuming a gas to dust ratio of 100:1). We place tight constraints on any disks around KPNO Tau 1 or KPNO Tau 6 of <2.1 × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉} and <2.7 × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉}, respectively. Modeling the spectral energy distribution of KPNO Tau 3 and its disk suggests the disk properties (geometry, dust mass, and grain size distribution) are consistent with observations of other brown dwarf disks and low-mass T-Tauri stars. In particular, the disk-to-host mass ratio for KPNO Tau 3 is congruent with the scenario that at least some brown dwarfs form via the same mechanism as low-mass stars.

  10. Dimer model for Tau proteins bound in microtubule bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Natalie; Kluber, Alexander; Hayre, N. Robert; Singh, Rajiv; Cox, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    The microtubule associated protein tau is important in nucleating and maintaining microtubule spacing and structure in neuronal axons. Modification of tau is implicated as a later stage process in Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about the structure of tau in microtubule bundles. We present preliminary work on a proposed model for tau dimers in microtubule bundles (dimers are the minimal units since there is one microtubule binding domain per tau). First, a model of tau monomer was created and its characteristics explored using implicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation. Multiple simulations yield a partially collapsed form with separate positively/negatively charged clumps, but which are a factor of two smaller than required by observed microtubule spacing. We argue that this will elongate in dimer form to lower electrostatic energy at a cost of entropic ``spring'' energy. We will present preliminary results on steered molecular dynamics runs on tau dimers to estimate the actual force constant. Supported by US NSF Grant DMR 1207624.

  11. APP metabolism regulates tau proteostasis in human cerebral cortex neurons.

    PubMed

    Moore, Steven; Evans, Lewis D B; Andersson, Therese; Portelius, Erik; Smith, James; Dias, Tatyana B; Saurat, Nathalie; McGlade, Amelia; Kirwan, Peter; Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik; Livesey, Frederick J

    2015-05-01

    Accumulation of Aβ peptide fragments of the APP protein and neurofibrillary tangles of the microtubule-associated protein tau are the cellular hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate the relationship between APP metabolism and tau protein levels and phosphorylation, we studied human-stem-cell-derived forebrain neurons with genetic forms of AD, all of which increase the release of pathogenic Aβ peptides. We identified marked increases in intracellular tau in genetic forms of AD that either mutated APP or increased its dosage, suggesting that APP metabolism is coupled to changes in tau proteostasis. Manipulating APP metabolism by β-secretase and γ-secretase inhibition, as well as γ-secretase modulation, results in specific increases and decreases in tau protein levels. These data demonstrate that APP metabolism regulates tau proteostasis and suggest that the relationship between APP processing and tau is not mediated solely through extracellular Aβ signaling to neurons. PMID:25921538

  12. PE859, a Novel Tau Aggregation Inhibitor, Reduces Aggregated Tau and Prevents Onset and Progression of Neural Dysfunction In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Michiaki; Hijikuro, Ichiro; Fujita, Yuki; Wu, Xiaofeng; Nakayama, Shinichi; Sakata, Yoko; Noguchi, Yuji; Ogo, Makoto; Akasofu, Shigeru; Ito, Yoshimasa; Soeda, Yoshiyuki; Tsuchiya, Nobuhiko; Tanaka, Naoki; Takahashi, Takashi; Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2015-01-01

    In tauopathies, a neural microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) is abnormally aggregated and forms neurofibrillary tangle. Therefore, inhibition of the tau aggregation is one of the key approaches for the treatment of these diseases. Here, we have identified a novel tau aggregation inhibitor, PE859. An oral administration of PE859 resulted in the significant reduction of sarkosyl-insoluble aggregated tau along with the prevention of onset and progression of the motor dysfunction in JNPL3 P301L-mutated human tau transgenic mice. These results suggest that PE859 is useful for the treatment of tauopathies. PMID:25659102

  13. Tau Monoclonal Antibody Generation Based on Humanized Yeast Models

    PubMed Central

    Rosseels, Joëlle; Van den Brande, Jeff; Violet, Marie; Jacobs, Dirk; Grognet, Pierre; Lopez, Juan; Huvent, Isabelle; Caldara, Marina; Swinnen, Erwin; Papegaey, Anthony; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Buée-Scherrer, Valerie; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Lippens, Guy; Colin, Morvane; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Winderickx, Joris

    2015-01-01

    A link between Tau phosphorylation and aggregation has been shown in different models for Alzheimer disease, including yeast. We used human Tau purified from yeast models to generate new monoclonal antibodies, of which three were further characterized. The first antibody, ADx201, binds the Tau proline-rich region independently of the phosphorylation status, whereas the second, ADx215, detects an epitope formed by the Tau N terminus when Tau is not phosphorylated at Tyr18. For the third antibody, ADx210, the binding site could not be determined because its epitope is probably conformational. All three antibodies stained tangle-like structures in different brain sections of THY-Tau22 transgenic mice and Alzheimer patients, and ADx201 and ADx210 also detected neuritic plaques in the cortex of the patient brains. In hippocampal homogenates from THY-Tau22 mice and cortex homogenates obtained from Alzheimer patients, ADx215 consistently stained specific low order Tau oligomers in diseased brain, which in size correspond to Tau dimers. ADx201 and ADx210 additionally reacted to higher order Tau oligomers and presumed prefibrillar structures in the patient samples. Our data further suggest that formation of the low order Tau oligomers marks an early disease stage that is initiated by Tau phosphorylation at N-terminal sites. Formation of higher order oligomers appears to require additional phosphorylation in the C terminus of Tau. When used to assess Tau levels in human cerebrospinal fluid, the antibodies permitted us to discriminate patients with Alzheimer disease or other dementia like vascular dementia, indicative that these antibodies hold promising diagnostic potential. PMID:25540200

  14. Alpha Thalassemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... an apparently normal individual has a child with hemoglobin H disease or alpha thalassemia minor. It can ... gene on one chromosome 25% 25% 25% 25% hemoglobin H disease there is a 25% chance with ...

  15. Scaling and organization of electroencephalographic background activity and alpha rhythm in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Lin, D C; Sharif, A; Kwan, H C

    2006-11-01

    The coexistence of the broad-band fluctuation and alpha rhythm of the brain dynamics is studied based on the zero-crossing property of the local electroencephalographic (EEG) recording in eyes closed and eyes open. A two-component zero-crossing scenario, consisting of a broad-band fractal and narrow-band rhythm components, is assumed. Scaling is found in the power law distribution p(tau) approximately tau(-nu) of the crossing time interval tau of the broad-band fluctuation. In alpha dominant brain state, the alpha rhythm interval L also exhibits scaling in the form of power law distribution: p(L) approximately L(phi). Our main result is the relationship nu + phi approximately 3 that characterizes the organization of these two prominent features of the brain dynamics. The possible role of self-organized criticality of punctuated equilibrium in this organization is discussed. PMID:16897091

  16. Can numerical modeling help understand the fate of tau protein in the axon terminal?

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, I A; Kuznetsov, A V

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we used mathematical modeling to investigate the fate of tau protein in the axon terminal. We developed a comprehensive model of tau transport that accounts for transport of cytosolic tau by diffusion, diffusion transport of microtubule (MT)-bound tau along the MT lattice, active motor-driven transport of MT-bound tau via slow axonal transport mechanism, and degradation of tau in the axon due to tau's finite half-life. We investigated the effect of different assumptions concerning the fate of tau in the terminal on steady-state transport of tau in the axon. In particular, we studied two possible scenarios: (i) tau is destroyed in the terminal and (ii) there is no tau destruction in the terminal, and to avoid tau accumulation we postulated zero flux of tau at the terminal. We found that the tau concentration and percentage of MT-bound tau are not very sensitive to the assumption concerning the fate of tau in the terminal, but the tau's flux and average velocity of tau transport are very sensitive to this assumption. This suggests that measuring the velocity of tau transport and comparing it with the results of mathematical modeling for different assumptions concerning tau's fate in the terminal can provide information concerning what happens to tau in the terminal. PMID:25563412

  17. Calorie restriction does not restore brain mitochondrial function in P301L tau mice, but it does decrease mitochondrial F0F1-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Delic, Vedad; Brownlow, Milene; Joly-Amado, Aurelie; Zivkovic, Sandra; Noble, Kenyaria; Phan, Tam-Anh; Ta, Yen; Zhang, Yumeng; Bell, Stephen D; Kurien, Crupa; Reynes, Christian; Morgan, Dave; Bradshaw, Patrick C

    2015-07-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) has been shown to increase lifespan and delay aging phenotypes in many diverse eukaryotic species. In mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), CR has been shown to decrease amyloid-beta and hyperphosphorylated tau levels and preserve cognitive function. Overexpression of human mutant tau protein has been shown to induce deficits in mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I activity. Therefore, experiments were performed to determine the effects of 4-month CR on brain mitochondrial function in Tg4510 mice, which express human P301L tau. Expression of mutant tau led to decreased ADP-stimulated respiratory rates, but not uncoupler-stimulated respiratory rates. The membrane potential was also slightly higher in mitochondria from the P301L tau mice. As shown previously, tau expression decreased mitochondrial complex I activity. The decreased complex I activity, decreased ADP-stimulated respiratory rate, and increased mitochondrial membrane potential occurring in mitochondria from Tg4510 mice were not restored by CR. However, the CR diet did result in a genotype independent decrease in mitochondrial F0F1-ATPase activity. This decrease in F0F1-ATPase activity was not due to lowered levels of the alpha or beta subunits of F0F1-ATPase. The possible mechanisms through which CR reduces the F0F1-ATPase activity in brain mitochondria are discussed. PMID:26048366

  18. Expression, purification and crystallization of a human tau-tubulin kinase 2 that phosphorylates tau protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kitano-Takahashi, Michiko; Morita, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Shin; Tomizawa, Kayoko; Kato, Ryohei; Tanio, Michikazu; Shirota, Yoshiko; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Sugio, Shigetoshi; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2007-07-01

    The kinase domain (residues 1–331) of human tau-tubulin kinase 2 was expressed in insect cells, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Tau-tubulin kinase 2 (TTBK2) is a Ser/Thr kinase that putatively phosphorylates residues Ser208 and Ser210 (numbered according to a 441-residue human tau isoform) in tau protein. Functional analyses revealed that a recombinant kinase domain (residues 1–331) of human TTBK2 expressed in insect cells with a baculovirus overexpression system retains kinase activity for tau protein. The kinase domain of TTBK2 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.6, b = 113.7, c = 117.3 Å, α = β = γ = 90.0°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at BL24XU of SPring-8.

  19. The Copernicus ultraviolet spectral atlas Tau Scorpii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, J. B., Jr.; Upson, W. L., II

    1977-01-01

    An ultraviolet spectral atlas was presented for the B0 V star, Tau Scorpii. It was scanned from 949 to 1560 A by the Princeton spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. From 949 to 1420 A the observations have a nominal resolution of 0.05 A. At the longer wavelengths, the resolution was 0.1 A. The atlas was presented in both tables and graphs.

  20. TAU as Tao. [interstellar spacecraft performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyman, P. T.; Reid, M. S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility of building and launching a truly deep-space spacecraft mission that will penetrate near interstellar space to a depth of one thousand astronomical units (TAU) within a flight time of 50 years. Particular attention is given to the mission profile and to its communications system, power system, and propulsion system. Results of experimental studies indicate that, with advanced technology, reasonable trip times can be achieved and adequate science information can be brought to earth.

  1. Hyperphosphorylation results in tau dysfunction in DNA folding and protection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; He, Hai-Jin; Zhou, Jun; Miao, Jun-Ye; Lu, Jing; He, Ying-Ge; Pan, Rong; Wei, Yan; Liu, Ying; He, Rong-Qiao

    2013-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylation of tau occurs in preclinical and clinical stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and hyperphosphorylated tau is the main constituent of the paired helical filaments in the brains of mild cognitive impairment and AD patients. While most of the work described so far focused on the relationship between hyperphosphorylation of tau and microtubule disassembly as well as axonal transport impairments, both phenomena ultimately leading to cell death, little work has been done to study the correlation between tau hyperphosphorylation and DNA damage. As we showed in this study, tau hyperphosphorylation and DNA damage co-occurred under formaldehyde treatment in N2a cells, indicating that phosphorylated tau (p-Tau) induced by formaldehyde may be involved in DNA impairment. After phosphorylation, the effect of tau in preventing DNA from thermal denaturation was diminished, its ability to accelerate DNA renaturation was lost, and its function in protecting DNA from reactive oxygen species (ROS) attack was impaired. Thus, p-Tau is not only associated with the disassembly of the microtubule system, but also plays a crucial role in DNA impairment. Hyperphosphorylation-mediated dysfunction of tau protein in prevention of DNA structure from damage under the attack of ROS may provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying tauopathies. PMID:24064506

  2. Robust Coefficients Alpha and Omega and Confidence Intervals with Outlying Observations and Missing Data: Methods and Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Yuan, Ke-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Cronbach's coefficient alpha is a widely used reliability measure in social, behavioral, and education sciences. It is reported in nearly every study that involves measuring a construct through multiple items. With non-tau-equivalent items, McDonald's omega has been used as a popular alternative to alpha in the literature. Traditional estimation…

  3. The tau lepton in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Nienart, L.

    1988-01-01

    This dissertation presents the results of an investigation into trying to see how the mass of the tau lepton can arise from general Relativistic considerations. The formalism was applied earlier to electrons and predicted both the electron's mass and the muon's mass. The tau leptons mass will be found by considering the contribution of a non-zero magnetic moment to the quaternion fields and the spin affine connection fields in a Riemannian space. The exact mass operator is constructed from these fields, and is then approximated in 3 different ways in order to permit calculation. The expectation value of these approximations to the mass operator is then found, using the relativistic Coulomb wavefunctions. The choice of Coulomb states is due to the consideration that the pairs that comprise the vacuum in this field theory couple to the magnetic moment of the core electron in a manner resembling that of the electrons in the Hydrogen atom. As the coupling the author is considering in his model is that of magnetic dipole by design, an argument is presented in which the Coulombic coupling strength parameters of the Coulomb states are scaled in order to provide a suitable description of the magnetic states which the author is actually interested in. The resulting values for the mass of the tau lepton are then within half an order of magnitude of the experimental values.

  4. Expression of the Escherichia coli K5 capsular antigen: immunoelectron microscopic and biochemical studies with recombinant E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kröncke, K D; Boulnois, G; Roberts, I; Bitter-Suermann, D; Golecki, J R; Jann, B; Jann, K

    1990-01-01

    The capsular K5 polysaccharide, a representative of group II capsular antigens of Escherichia coli, has been cloned previously, and three gene regions responsible for polymerization and surface expression have been defined (I. S. Roberts, R. Mountford, R. Hodge, K. B. Jann, and G. J. Boulnois, J. Bacteriol. 170:1305-1310, 1988). In this report, we describe the immunoelectron microscopic analysis of recombinant bacteria expressing the K5 antigen and of mutants defective in either region 1 or region 3 gene functions, as well as the biochemical analysis of the K5 capsular polysaccharide. Whereas the K5 clone expressed the K5 polysaccharide as a well-developed capsule in about 25% of its population, no capsule was observed in whole mount preparations and ultrathin sections of the expression mutants. Immunogold labeling of sections from the region 3 mutant revealed the capsular K5 polysaccharide in the cytoplasm. With the region 1 mutant, the capsular polysaccharide appeared associated with the cell membrane, and, unlike the region 3 mutant polysaccharide, the capsular polysaccharide could be detected in the periplasm after plasmolysis of the bacteria. Polysaccharides were isolated from the homogenized mutants with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. The polysaccharide from the region 1 mutant had the same size as that isolated from the capsule of the original K5 clone, and both polysaccharides were substituted with phosphatidic acid. The polysaccharide from the region 3 mutant was smaller and was not substituted with phosphatidic acid. These results prompt us to postulate that gene region 3 products are involved in the translocation of the capsular polysaccharide across the cytoplasmic membrane and that region 1 directs the transport of the lipid-substituted capsular polysaccharide through the periplasm and across the outer membrane. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 6 PMID:2404935

  5. Polymeric alkylpyridinium salts permit intracellular delivery of human Tau in rat hippocampal neurons: requirement of Tau phosphorylation for functional deficits.

    PubMed

    Koss, Dave J; Robinson, Lianne; Mietelska-Porowska, Anna; Gasiorowska, Anna; Sepčić, Kristina; Turk, Tom; Jaspars, Marcel; Niewiadomska, Grazyna; Scott, Roderick H; Platt, Bettina; Riedel, Gernot

    2015-12-01

    Patients suffering from tauopathies including frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) present with intra-neuronal aggregation of microtubule-associated protein Tau. During the disease process, Tau undergoes excessive phosphorylation, dissociates from microtubules and aggregates into insoluble neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), accumulating in the soma. While many aspects of the disease pathology have been replicated in transgenic mouse models, a region-specific non-transgenic expression model is missing. Complementing existing models, we here report a novel region-specific approach to modelling Tau pathology. Local co-administration of the pore-former polymeric 1,3-alkylpyridinium salts (Poly-APS) extracted from marine sponges, and synthetic full-length 4R recombinant human Tau (hTau) was performed in vitro and in vivo. At low doses, Poly-APS was non-toxic and cultured cells exposed to Poly-APS (0.5 µg/ml) and hTau (1 µg/ml; ~22 µM) had normal input resistance, resting-state membrane potentials and Ca(2+) transients induced either by glutamate or KCl, as did cells exposed to a low concentration of the phosphatase inhibitor Okadaic acid (OA; 1 nM, 24 h). Combined hTau loading and phosphatase inhibition resulted in a collapse of the membrane potential, suppressed excitation and diminished glutamate and KCl-stimulated Ca(2+) transients. Stereotaxic infusions of Poly-APS (0.005 µg/ml) and hTau (1 µg/ml) bilaterally into the dorsal hippocampus at multiple sites resulted in hTau loading of neurons in rats. A separate cohort received an additional 7-day minipump infusion of OA (1.2 nM) intrahippocampally. When tested 2 weeks after surgery, rats treated with Poly-APS+hTau+OA presented with subtle learning deficits, but were also impaired in cognitive flexibility and recall. Hippocampal plasticity recorded from slices ex vivo was diminished in Poly-APS+hTau+OA subjects, but not in other treatment groups. Histological sections confirmed the intracellular

  6. Observation of CO2 in Comet C/2012 K5 LINEAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Adam; Kelley, Michael; DiSanti, Michael; Chanover, Nancy

    2012-12-01

    The study of cometary composition is important to understanding the formation and evolution of our solar system. Comets have undergone very little thermal evolution in their lifetimes, which results in their near pristine composition. The nucleus of a comet is very rarely detected directly. Instead, we observe the coma that surrounds the nucleus. Physical and chemical processes in the coma affect its composition, and therefore coma composition is not a direct representation of nuclear composition. An important trend is the observed variation of coma composition with heliocentric distance, most likely influenced by the volatility of the main surface ices, H2O, CO2, and CO. Infrared studies of these molecules are complicated by telluric features, so often daughter molecules of these species such as OH are observed instead. A potentially effective tracer for these primary ices is atomic oxygen in the coma. However, the relationship between these ices and atomic oxygen is only understood at a qualitative level. We propose to use Spitzer observations in IRAC's 4.5 micron band pass to observe the CO2 v3 band at 4.26 microns in comet C/2012 K5 LINEAR. These observations will be coordinated with observations of atomic oxygen obtained at Apache Point Observatory and observations of H2O at Keck. These near simultaneous observations of H2O, CO2, and atomic oxygen in a cometary coma will increase our understanding of the link between these primary ices and atomic oxygen. With a complete understanding of the relationship between atomic oxygen and the primary ices on the nucleus, observations of atomic oxygen can serve as a powerful proxy for the production of these primary volatiles and aid our understanding of the variation in coma composition as a function of heliocentric distance, and therefore the composition of the nucleus and how our solar system was formed.

  7. Survivability of Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5 Under Simulated Martian Surface Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David J.; Schuerger, Andrew C.; Davidson, Mark M.; Pacala, Stephen W.; Bakermans, Corien; Onstott, Tullis C.

    2009-03-01

    Spacecraft launched to Mars can retain viable terrestrial microorganisms on board that may survive the interplanetary transit. Such biota might compromise the search for life beyond Earth if capable of propagating on Mars. The current study explored the survivability of Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5, a psychrotolerant microorganism obtained from a Siberian permafrost cryopeg, under simulated martian surface conditions of high ultraviolet irradiation, high desiccation, low temperature, and low atmospheric pressure. First, a desiccation experiment compared the survival of P. cryohalolentis cells embedded, or not embedded, within a medium/salt matrix (MSM) maintained at 25°C for 24 h within a laminar flow hood. Results indicate that the presence of the MSM enhanced survival of the bacterial cells by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. Second, tests were conducted in a Mars Simulation Chamber to determine the UV tolerance of the microorganism. No viable vegetative cells of P. cryohalolentis were detected after 8 h of exposure to Mars-normal conditions of 4.55 W/m2 UVC irradiation (200-280 nm), -12.5°C, 7.1 mbar, and a Mars gas mix composed of CO2 (95.3%), N2 (2.7%), Ar (1.6%), O2 (0.2%), and H2O (0.03%). Third, an experiment was conducted within the Mars chamber in which total atmospheric opacities were simulated at τ = 0.1 (dust-free CO2 atmosphere at 7.1 mbar), 0.5 (normal clear sky with 0.4 = dust opacity and 0.1 = CO2-only opacity), and 3.5 (global dust storm) to determine the survivability of P. cryohalolentis to partially shielded UVC radiation. The survivability of the bacterium increased with the level of UVC attenuation, though population levels still declined several orders of magnitude compared to UVC-absent controls over an 8 h exposure period.

  8. Search for tau- ---> 4pi- 3pi+ (pi0) nu/tau Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Antonian, R.; Kass, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Hast, C.; /SLAC

    2005-06-21

    A search for the decay of the {tau} lepton to seven charged pions and at most one {pi}{sup 0} was performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The analysis uses data recorded on and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance between 1999 and 2003, a total of 124.3 fb{sup -1}. They observe 7 events with an expected background of 11.9 {+-} 2.2 events and calculate a preliminary upper limit of BR({tau}{sup -} {yields} 4{pi}{sup -} 3{pi}{sup +}({pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}}) < 2.7 x 10{sup -7} at 90% CL. This is a significant improvement over the previous limit established by the CLEO Collaboration.

  9. The CDF-II tau physics program triggers, tau ID and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    C. Pagliarone et al.

    2003-11-03

    The study of processes containing {tau} leptons in the final state will play an important role at Tevatron Run II. Such final states will be relevant both for electroweak studies and measurements as well as in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. The present paper discusses the physics opportunities and challenges related to the implementation of new set of triggers able to select events containing tau candidates in the final state. They illustrate, in particular, the physics capabilities for a variety of new physics scenarios such as supersymmetry (SUSY), SUSY with Rp-parity violation, with Bilinear parity violation or models with the violation of lepton flavor. Finally, they present the first Run II results obtained using some of the described tau triggers.

  10. Tau protein is essential for stress-induced brain pathology.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Sofia; Vaz-Silva, João; Pinto, Vitor; Dalla, Christina; Kokras, Nikolaos; Bedenk, Benedikt; Mack, Natalie; Czisch, Michael; Almeida, Osborne F X; Sousa, Nuno; Sotiropoulos, Ioannis

    2016-06-28

    Exposure to chronic stress is frequently accompanied by cognitive and affective disorders in association with neurostructural adaptations. Chronic stress was previously shown to trigger Alzheimer's-like neuropathology, which is characterized by Tau hyperphosphorylation and missorting into dendritic spines followed by memory deficits. Here, we demonstrate that stress-driven hippocampal deficits in wild-type mice are accompanied by synaptic missorting of Tau and enhanced Fyn/GluN2B-driven synaptic signaling. In contrast, mice lacking Tau [Tau knockout (Tau-KO) mice] do not exhibit stress-induced pathological behaviors and atrophy of hippocampal dendrites or deficits of hippocampal connectivity. These findings implicate Tau as an essential mediator of the adverse effects of stress on brain structure and function. PMID:27274066

  11. PET Imaging of Tau Deposition in the Aging Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Schöll, Michael; Lockhart, Samuel N; Schonhaut, Daniel R; O'Neil, James P; Janabi, Mustafa; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Baker, Suzanne L; Vogel, Jacob W; Faria, Jamie; Schwimmer, Henry D; Rabinovici, Gil D; Jagust, William J

    2016-03-01

    Tau pathology is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) but also occurs in normal cognitive aging. Using the tau PET agent (18)F-AV-1451, we examined retention patterns in cognitively normal older people in relation to young controls and AD patients. Age and β-amyloid (measured using PiB PET) were differentially associated with tau tracer retention in healthy aging. Older age was related to increased tracer retention in regions of the medial temporal lobe, which predicted worse episodic memory performance. PET detection of tau in other isocortical regions required the presence of cortical β-amyloid and was associated with decline in global cognition. Furthermore, patterns of tracer retention corresponded well with Braak staging of neurofibrillary tau pathology. The present study defined patterns of tau tracer retention in normal aging in relation to age, cognition, and β-amyloid deposition. PMID:26938442

  12. Wess-Zumino current and the structure of the decay tau- -->K- pi- K+ nu tau.

    PubMed

    Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Stroynowski, R; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Dambasuren, E; Dorjkhaidav, O; Haynes, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Muramatsu, H; Nandakumar, R; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, Kevin; Mahmood, A H; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Bornheim, A; Lipeles, E; Pappas, S P; Shapiro, A; Weinstein, A J; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Boisvert, V; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Magerkurth, A; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Patterson, J R; Pedlar, T K; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shepherd, M R; Sun, W M; Thayer, J G; Urner, D; Wilksen, T; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Potlia, V; Stoeck, H; Yelton, J; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Kubota, Y; Li, S Z; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Stepaniak, C J; Urheim, J; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Zweber, P; Arms, K; Eckhart, E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Severini, H; Skubic, P; Asner, D M; Dytman, S A; Mehrabyan, S; Mueller, J A; Nam, S; Savinov, V; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Adams, G S; Chasse, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Park, C S; Park, W; Thayer, J B; Thorndike, E H

    2004-06-11

    We present the first study of the vector (Wess-Zumino) current in tau(-)-->K-pi-K+nu(tau) decay using data collected with the CLEO III detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. We determine the quantitative contributions to the decay width from the vector and axial vector currents. Within the framework of a model by Kühn and Mirkes, we identify the quantitative contributions to the total decay rate from the intermediate states omegapi, rho(')pi, and K*K. PMID:15245150

  13. Resonance Effective Theory Approach to {tau} {yields} 3{pi}{nu}{tau} Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Pich, A.; Portoles, J.

    2004-12-02

    The decays {tau} {yields} 3{pi}{nu}{tau} are analyzed in the framework of the resonance effective theory of QCD, We derive the effective chiral Lagrangian relevant for the evaluation of the hadronic axial-vector current, taking into account the constraints imposed by QCD on the high energy asymptotic behaviour. Then we fit the unknown parameters to the spectral function and branching ratio measured by ALEPH, showing that the theory is in good agreement with experimental data. A detailed description of the work sketched here can be found.

  14. Waring's problem with the Ramanujan \\tau-function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaev, M. Z.; Garcia, V. C.; Konyagin, S. V.

    2008-02-01

    We prove that for every integer N the Diophantine equation \\sum_{i=1}^{74000}\\tau(n_i)=N, where \\tau(n) is the Ramanujan \\tau-function, has a solution in positive integers n_1, n_2,\\dots, n_{74000} satisfying the condition \\max_{1\\le i\\le 74000}n_i\\,{\\ll}\\vert N\\vert^{2/11}+1. We also consider similar questions in residue fields modulo a large prime p.

  15. Temperature and toxic Tau in Alzheimer's disease: new insights

    PubMed Central

    Carrettiero, Daniel Carneiro; Santiago, Fernando Enrique; Motzko-Soares, Anna Carolina Parracho; Almeida, Maria Camila

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common dementia in the elderly, is characterized by cognitive impairment and severe autonomic symptoms such as disturbance in core body temperature (Tc), which may be predictors or early events in AD onset. Inclusions of phosphorylated Tau (p-Tau) are a hallmark of AD and other neurodegenerative disorders called “Tauopathies.” Animal and human studies show that anesthesia augments p-Tau levels through reduction of Tc, with implications for AD. Additionally, hypothermia impairs memory and cognitive function. The molecular networks related to Tc that are associated with AD remain poorly characterized. Under physiological conditions, Tau binds microtubules, promoting their assembly and stability. The dynamically regulated Tau-microtubule interaction plays an important role in structural remodeling of the cytoskeleton, having important functions in neuronal plasticity and memory in the hippocampus. Hypothermia-induced increases in p-Tau levels are significant, with an 80% increase for each degree Celsius below normothermic conditions. Although the effects of temperature on Tau phosphorylation are evident, its effects on p-Tau degradation remain poorly understoodWe review information concerning the mechanisms of Tau regulation of neuron plasticity via its effects on microtubule dynamics, with focus on pathways regulating the abundance of phosphorylated Tau species.  We highlight the effects of temperature on molecular mechanisms influencing the development of Tau-related diseases. Specifically, we argue that cold might preferentially affects central nervous system structures that are highly reliant upon plasticity, such as the hippocampus, and that the effect of cold on Tau phosphorylation may constitute a pathology-initiating trigger leading to neurodegeneration. PMID:27227069

  16. Tau: The Center of a Signaling Nexus in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahzad S.; Bloom, George S.

    2016-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein whose misfolding, hyper-phosphorylation, loss of normal function and toxic gain of function are linked to several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review discusses the role of tau in amyloid-β (Aβ) induced toxicity in AD. The consequences of tau dysfunction, starting from the axon and concluding at somadendritic compartments, will be highlighted. PMID:26903798

  17. MSUT2 is a determinant of susceptibility to tau neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Chris R; Greenup, Lynne; Leverenz, James B; Kraemer, Brian C

    2011-05-15

    Lesions containing abnormal aggregated tau protein are one of the diagnostic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathy disorders. How aggregated tau leads to dementia remains enigmatic, although neuronal dysfunction and loss clearly contribute. We previously identified sut-2 as a gene required for tau neurotoxicity in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans model of tauopathy. Here, we further explore the role of sut-2 and show that overexpression of SUT-2 protein enhances tau-induced neuronal dysfunction, neurotoxicity and accumulation of insoluble tau. We also explore the relationship between sut-2 and its human homolog, mammalian SUT-2 (MSUT2) and find both proteins to be predominantly nuclear and localized to SC35-positive nuclear speckles. Using a cell culture model for the accumulation of pathological tau, we find that high tau levels lead to increased expression of MSUT2 protein. We analyzed MSUT2 protein in age-matched post-mortem brain samples from AD patients and observe a marked decrease in overall MSUT2 levels in the temporal lobe of AD patients. Analysis of post-mortem tissue from AD cases shows a clear reduction in neuronal MSUT2 levels in brain regions affected by tau pathology, but little change in regions lacking tau pathology. RNAi knockdown of MSUT2 in cultured human cells overexpressing tau causes a marked decrease in tau aggregation. Both cell culture and post-mortem tissue studies suggest that MSUT2 levels may influence neuronal vulnerability to tau toxicity and aggregation. Thus, neuroprotective strategies targeting MSUT2 may be of therapeutic interest for tauopathy disorders. PMID:21355046

  18. MSUT2 is a determinant of susceptibility to tau neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Chris R.; Greenup, Lynne; Leverenz, James B.; Kraemer, Brian C.

    2011-01-01

    Lesions containing abnormal aggregated tau protein are one of the diagnostic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathy disorders. How aggregated tau leads to dementia remains enigmatic, although neuronal dysfunction and loss clearly contribute. We previously identified sut-2 as a gene required for tau neurotoxicity in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans model of tauopathy. Here, we further explore the role of sut-2 and show that overexpression of SUT-2 protein enhances tau-induced neuronal dysfunction, neurotoxicity and accumulation of insoluble tau. We also explore the relationship between sut-2 and its human homolog, mammalian SUT-2 (MSUT2) and find both proteins to be predominantly nuclear and localized to SC35-positive nuclear speckles. Using a cell culture model for the accumulation of pathological tau, we find that high tau levels lead to increased expression of MSUT2 protein. We analyzed MSUT2 protein in age-matched post-mortem brain samples from AD patients and observe a marked decrease in overall MSUT2 levels in the temporal lobe of AD patients. Analysis of post-mortem tissue from AD cases shows a clear reduction in neuronal MSUT2 levels in brain regions affected by tau pathology, but little change in regions lacking tau pathology. RNAi knockdown of MSUT2 in cultured human cells overexpressing tau causes a marked decrease in tau aggregation. Both cell culture and post-mortem tissue studies suggest that MSUT2 levels may influence neuronal vulnerability to tau toxicity and aggregation. Thus, neuroprotective strategies targeting MSUT2 may be of therapeutic interest for tauopathy disorders. PMID:21355046

  19. Updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-23

    We present an updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD. 4316 {tau}-pair events, selected from a 150k Z{sup 0} data sample, are analyzed using three techniques: decay length, impact parameter, and impact parameter difference methods. The measurement benefits from the small and stable interaction region at the SLC and the precision CCD pixel vertex detector of the SLD. The combined result is: {tau}{sub {tau}} = 288.1 {+-} 6.1(stat) {+-} 3.3(syst) fs.

  20. Cellular factors modulating the mechanism of tau protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Sarah N; Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Baker, Jeremy; Martinez-Licha, Carlos R; Darling, April; Dickey, Chad A

    2015-05-01

    Pathological accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein tau, in the form of neurofibrillary tangles, is a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, the most prevalent neurodegenerative condition worldwide. In addition to Alzheimer's disease, a number of neurodegenerative diseases, called tauopathies, are characterized by the accumulation of aggregated tau in a variety of brain regions. While tau normally plays an important role in stabilizing the microtubule network of the cytoskeleton, its dissociation from microtubules and eventual aggregation into pathological deposits is an area of intense focus for therapeutic development. Here we discuss the known cellular factors that affect tau aggregation, from post-translational modifications to molecular chaperones. PMID:25666877

  1. Tau Mislocation in Glucocorticoid-Triggered Hippocampal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Sara; Silva, Joana; Mota, Cristina; Vaz-Silva, João; Veloso, Ana; Pinto, Vítor; Sousa, Nuno; Cerqueira, João; Sotiropoulos, Ioannis

    2016-09-01

    The exposure to high glucocorticoids (GC) triggers neuronal atrophy and cognitive deficits, but the exact cellular mechanisms underlying the GC-associated dendritic remodeling and spine loss are still poorly understood. Previous studies have implicated sustained GC elevations in neurodegenerative mechanisms through GC-evoked hyperphosphorylation of the cytoskeletal protein Tau while Tau mislocation has recently been proposed as relevant in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. In light of the dual cytoplasmic and synaptic role of Tau, this study monitored the impact of prolonged GC treatment on Tau intracellular localization and its phosphorylation status in different cellular compartments. We demonstrate, both by biochemical and ultrastructural analysis, that GC administration led to cytosolic and dendritic Tau accumulation in rat hippocampus, and triggered Tau hyperphosphorylation in epitopes related to its malfunction (Ser396/404) and cytoskeletal pathology (e.g., Thr231 and Ser262). In addition, we show, for the first time, that chronic GC administration also increased Tau levels in synaptic compartment; however, at the synapse, there was an increase in phosphorylation of Ser396/404, but a decrease of Thr231. These GC-triggered Tau changes were paralleled by reduced levels of synaptic scaffolding proteins such as PSD-95 and Shank proteins as well as reduced dendritic branching and spine loss. These in vivo findings add to our limited knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of GC-evoked synaptic atrophy and neuronal disconnection implicating Tau missorting in mechanism(s) of synaptic damage, beyond AD pathology. PMID:26328538

  2. NMR Meets Tau: Insights into Its Function and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Lippens, Guy; Landrieu, Isabelle; Smet, Caroline; Huvent, Isabelle; Gandhi, Neha S.; Gigant, Benoît; Despres, Clément; Qi, Haoling; Lopez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focus on what we have learned from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies on the neuronal microtubule-associated protein Tau. We consider both the mechanistic details of Tau: the tubulin relationship and its aggregation process. Phosphorylation of Tau is intimately linked to both aspects. NMR spectroscopy has depicted accurate phosphorylation patterns by different kinases, and its non-destructive character has allowed functional assays with the same samples. Finally, we will discuss other post-translational modifications of Tau and its interaction with other cellular factors in relationship to its (dys)function. PMID:27338491

  3. Tau physiology and pathomechanisms in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Bodea, Liviu-Gabriel; Eckert, Anne; Ittner, Lars Matthias; Piguet, Olivier; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) has been associated with toxic intracellular aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau (FTLD-tau). Moreover, genetic studies identified mutations in the MAPT gene encoding tau in familial cases of the disease. In this review, we cover a range of aspects of tau function, both in the healthy and diseased brain, discussing several in vitro and in vivo models. Tau structure and function in the healthy brain is presented, accentuating its distinct compartmentalization in neurons and its role in microtubule stabilization and axonal transport. Furthermore, tau-driven pathology is discussed, introducing current concepts and the underlying experimental evidence. Different aspects of pathological tau phosphorylation, the protein's genomic and domain organization as well as its spreading in disease, together with MAPT-associated mutations and their respective models are presented. Dysfunction related to other post-transcriptional modifications and their effect on normal neuronal functions such as cell cycle, epigenetics and synapse dynamics are also discussed, providing a mechanistic explanation for the observations made in FTLD-tau cases, with the possibility for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we cover aspects of tau function, both in the healthy and diseased brain, referring to different in vitro and in vivo models. In healthy neurons, tau is compartmentalized, with higher concentrations found in the distal part of the axon. Cargo molecules are sensitive to this gradient. A disturbed tau distribution, as found in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-tau), has severe consequences for cellular physiology: tau accumulates in the neuronal soma and dendrites, leading among others to microtubule depolymerization and impaired axonal transport. Tau forms insoluble aggregates that sequester additional molecules stalling cellular physiology. Neuronal communication is gradually lost as toxic tau accumulates in dendritic spines

  4. Cellular factors modulating the mechanism of tau protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Sarah N.; Sabbagh, Jonathan J.; Baker, Jeremy; Martinez-Licha, Carlos R.; Darling, April

    2015-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein tau, in the form of neurofibrillary tangles, is a major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, the most prevalent neurodegenerative condition worldwide. In addition to Alzheimer’s disease, a number of neurodegenerative diseases, called tauopathies, are characterized by the accumulation of aggregated tau in a variety of brain regions. While tau normally plays an important role in stabilizing the microtubule network of the cytoskeleton, its dissociation from microtubules and eventual aggregation into pathological deposits is an area of intense focus for therapeutic development. Here we discuss the known cellular factors that affect tau aggregation, from post-translational modifications to molecular chaperones. PMID:25666877

  5. Connecting the Dots Between Tau Dysfunction and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Bess; Götz, Jürgen; Feany, Mel B.

    2014-01-01

    Tauopathies are devastating and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative diseases, which are histopathologically defined by insoluble filamentous deposits of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein within neurons and glia. Identifying the causes of abnormal tau phosphorylation and subsequent aggregation has been the focus of much research, and is currently a major target for the development of therapeutic interventions for tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease. Recently much has been learned about the sequence of events that lead from tau dysfunction to neuronal death. This review focuses on the cascade of events that are catalyzed by pathological tau, and highlights current and potential therapeutic strategies to target this pathway. PMID:25172552

  6. Nuclear Tau and Its Potential Role in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bukar Maina, Mahmoud; Al-Hilaly, Youssra K; Serpell, Louise C

    2016-01-01

    Tau protein, found in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells, forms aggregates in neurons that constitutes one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). For nearly four decades, research efforts have focused more on tau's role in physiology and pathology in the context of the microtubules, even though, for over three decades, tau has been localised in the nucleus and the nucleolus. Its nuclear and nucleolar localisation had stimulated many questions regarding its role in these compartments. Data from cell culture, mouse brain, and the human brain suggests that nuclear tau could be essential for genome defense against cellular distress. However, its nature of translocation to the nucleus, its nuclear conformation and interaction with the DNA and other nuclear proteins highly suggest it could play multiple roles in the nucleus. To find efficient tau-based therapies, there is a need to understand more about the functional relevance of the varied cellular distribution of tau, identify whether specific tau transcripts or isoforms could predict tau's localisation and function and how they are altered in diseases like AD. Here, we explore the cellular distribution of tau, its nuclear localisation and function and its possible involvement in neurodegeneration. PMID:26751496

  7. NMR Meets Tau: Insights into Its Function and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Lippens, Guy; Landrieu, Isabelle; Smet, Caroline; Huvent, Isabelle; Gandhi, Neha S; Gigant, Benoît; Despres, Clément; Qi, Haoling; Lopez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focus on what we have learned from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies on the neuronal microtubule-associated protein Tau. We consider both the mechanistic details of Tau: the tubulin relationship and its aggregation process. Phosphorylation of Tau is intimately linked to both aspects. NMR spectroscopy has depicted accurate phosphorylation patterns by different kinases, and its non-destructive character has allowed functional assays with the same samples. Finally, we will discuss other post-translational modifications of Tau and its interaction with other cellular factors in relationship to its (dys)function. PMID:27338491

  8. Final report on the key comparison CCPR-K5: Spectral diffuse reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadal, Maria; Eckerle, Kenneth L.; Early, Edward A.; Ohno, Yoshi

    2013-01-01

    The CCPR K5 key comparison on spectral diffuse reflectance was carried out in the framework of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement, by 13 national metrology institutes (MMIs) as participants. The participants were CSIR-NML (South Africa), HUT (Finland), IFA-CSIC (Spain), KRISS (Republic of Korea), MSL (New Zealand), NIM (China), NIST (United States of America), NMIJ (Japan), NPL (United Kingdom), NRC (Canada), OMH (Hungary), PTB (Germany) and VNIIOFI (Russia Federation). NIST (USA) piloted the comparison. The aim of this comparison was to check the agreement of measurement of the spectral diffuse reflectance among participants, using the measurement geometry of d/0 or 0/d in the wavelength range of 360 nm to 820 nm at 20 nm increment. The comparison was a star type comparison with the samples provided by the pilot laboratory and with the measurement sequence: Pilot-Participant-Pilot. Spectralon and matte white ceramic tiles were used as the transfer standards. Each participant received three of each type of sample and at least one sample of each type was measured three times on three separate days, and the other two samples were measured once. The report presents the description of the measurement facilities, procedures and uncertainties of all the participants as well as the results of the comparison. Measurement results from the participants and their associated uncertainties were analyzed in accordance with the Guidelines for CCPR Key Comparison Report Preparation, using weighted mean with cut-off. For the calculation of the Key Comparison Reference Value (KCRV), as agreed by the participants, the data of both samples were used for the 460 nm to 820 nm region and only the data of the Spectralon samples were used in the spectral region of 360 nm to 440 nm. The unilateral degrees of equivalence (DoE) calculated for each participant are mostly consistent within the uncertainty (k = 2) of the DoE. This international comparison of spectral diffuse reflectance

  9. Proceedings, High-Precision $\\alpha_s$ Measurements from LHC to FCC-ee

    SciTech Connect

    d'Enterria, David; Skands, Peter Z.

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a writeup of all contributions to the workshop on "High precision measurements of $\\alpha_s$: From LHC to FCC-ee" held at CERN, Oct. 12--13, 2015. The workshop explored in depth the latest developments on the determination of the QCD coupling $\\alpha_s$ from 15 methods where high precision measurements are (or will be) available. Those include low-energy observables: (i) lattice QCD, (ii) pion decay factor, (iii) quarkonia and (iv) $\\tau$ decays, (v) soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, as well as high-energy observables: (vi) global fits of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, (viii) jets in $e^\\pm$p DIS and $\\gamma$-p photoproduction, (ix) photon structure function in $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$, (x) event shapes and (xi) jet cross sections in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (xii) W boson and (xiii) Z boson decays, and (xiv) jets and (xv) top-quark cross sections in proton-(anti)proton collisions. The current status of the theoretical and experimental uncertainties associated to each extraction method, the improvements expected from LHC data in the coming years, and future perspectives achievable in $e^+e^-$ collisions at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-ee) with $\\cal{O}$(1--100 ab$^{-1}$) integrated luminosities yielding 10$^{12}$ Z bosons and jets, and 10$^{8}$ W bosons and $\\tau$ leptons, are thoroughly reviewed. The current uncertainty of the (preliminary) 2015 strong coupling world-average value, $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ = 0.1177 $\\pm$ 0.0013, is about 1\\%. Some participants believed this may be reduced by a factor of three in the near future by including novel high-precision observables, although this opinion was not universally shared. At the FCC-ee facility, a factor of ten reduction in the $\\alpha_s$ uncertainty should be possible, mostly thanks to the huge Z and W data samples available.

  10. Stabilization of Microtubule-Unbound Tau via Tau Phosphorylation at Ser262/356 by Par-1/MARK Contributes to Augmentation of AD-Related Phosphorylation and Aβ42-Induced Tau Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kanae; Maruko-Otake, Akiko; Ohtake, Yosuke; Hayashishita, Motoki; Sekiya, Michiko; Iijima, Koichi M.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of the microtubule-interacting protein tau is associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). β-amyloid (Aβ) lies upstream of abnormal tau behavior, including detachment from microtubules, phosphorylation at several disease-specific sites, and self-aggregation into toxic tau species in AD brains. To prevent the cascade of events leading to neurodegeneration in AD, it is essential to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the initial events of tau mismetabolism. Currently, however, these mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, using transgenic Drosophila co-expressing human tau and Aβ, we found that tau phosphorylation at AD-related Ser262/356 stabilized microtubule-unbound tau in the early phase of tau mismetabolism, leading to neurodegeneration. Aβ increased the level of tau detached from microtubules, independent of the phosphorylation status at GSK3-targeted SP/TP sites. Such mislocalized tau proteins, especially the less phosphorylated species, were stabilized by phosphorylation at Ser262/356 via PAR-1/MARK. Levels of Ser262 phosphorylation were increased by Aβ42, and blocking this stabilization of tau suppressed Aβ42-mediated augmentation of tau toxicity and an increase in the levels of tau phosphorylation at the SP/TP site Thr231, suggesting that this process may be involved in AD pathogenesis. In contrast to PAR-1/MARK, blocking tau phosphorylation at SP/TP sites by knockdown of Sgg/GSK3 did not reduce tau levels, suppress tau mislocalization to the cytosol, or diminish Aβ-mediated augmentation of tau toxicity. These results suggest that stabilization of microtubule-unbound tau by phosphorylation at Ser262/356 via the PAR-1/MARK may act in the initial steps of tau mismetabolism in AD pathogenesis, and that such tau species may represent a potential therapeutic target for AD. PMID:27023670

  11. Mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous, gene-edited Tau differs from that of over-expressed human wild-type and P301L mutant Tau

    PubMed Central

    Di Xia; Gutmann, Julia M.; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and a subset of frontotemporal dementia termed FTLD-Tau are characterized by a massive, yet incompletely characterized and understood redistribution of Tau. To establish a framework for understanding this pathology, we used the genome-editing tool TALEN and generated Tau-mEOS2 knock-in mice to determine the mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous Tau in hippocampal cultures. We analysed Tau in axons, dendrites and spines at three stages of maturation using live-cell imaging, photo-conversion and FRAP assays. Tau-mEOS2 cultures were compared with those over-expressing EGFP-tagged forms of human wild-type (hWT-Tau) and P301L mutant Tau (hP301L-Tau), modelling Tau accumulation in AD and FTLD-Tau, respectively. In developing neurons, Tau-mEOS2 followed a proximo-distal gradient in axons and a subcellular distribution similar to that of endogenous Tau in neurons obtained from wild-type mice, which were abolished, when either hWT-Tau or hP301L-Tau was over-expressed. For the three conditions, FRAP analysis revealed a similar mobility in dendrites compared with axons; however, Tau-mEOS2 was less mobile than hWT-Tau and hP301L-Tau and the mobile fraction was smaller, possibly reflecting less efficient microtubule binding of Tau when over-expressed. Together, our study presents Tau-mEOS2 mice as a novel tool for the study of Tau in a physiological and a pathological context. PMID:27378256

  12. Mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous, gene-edited Tau differs from that of over-expressed human wild-type and P301L mutant Tau.

    PubMed

    Di Xia; Gutmann, Julia M; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a subset of frontotemporal dementia termed FTLD-Tau are characterized by a massive, yet incompletely characterized and understood redistribution of Tau. To establish a framework for understanding this pathology, we used the genome-editing tool TALEN and generated Tau-mEOS2 knock-in mice to determine the mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous Tau in hippocampal cultures. We analysed Tau in axons, dendrites and spines at three stages of maturation using live-cell imaging, photo-conversion and FRAP assays. Tau-mEOS2 cultures were compared with those over-expressing EGFP-tagged forms of human wild-type (hWT-Tau) and P301L mutant Tau (hP301L-Tau), modelling Tau accumulation in AD and FTLD-Tau, respectively. In developing neurons, Tau-mEOS2 followed a proximo-distal gradient in axons and a subcellular distribution similar to that of endogenous Tau in neurons obtained from wild-type mice, which were abolished, when either hWT-Tau or hP301L-Tau was over-expressed. For the three conditions, FRAP analysis revealed a similar mobility in dendrites compared with axons; however, Tau-mEOS2 was less mobile than hWT-Tau and hP301L-Tau and the mobile fraction was smaller, possibly reflecting less efficient microtubule binding of Tau when over-expressed. Together, our study presents Tau-mEOS2 mice as a novel tool for the study of Tau in a physiological and a pathological context. PMID:27378256

  13. 18F-AV-1451 tau PET imaging correlates strongly with tau neuropathology in MAPT mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Puschmann, Andreas; Schöll, Michael; Ohlsson, Tomas; van Swieten, John; Honer, Michael; Englund, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Tau positron emission tomography ligands provide the novel possibility to image tau pathology in vivo. However, little is known about how in vivo brain uptake of tau positron emission tomography ligands relates to tau aggregates observed post-mortem. We performed tau positron emission tomography imaging with 18F-AV-1451 in three patients harbouring a p.R406W mutation in the MAPT gene, encoding tau. This mutation results in 3- and 4-repeat tau aggregates similar to those in Alzheimer’s disease, and many of the mutation carriers initially suffer from memory impairment and temporal lobe atrophy. Two patients with short disease duration and isolated memory impairment exhibited 18F-AV-1451 uptake mainly in the hippocampus and adjacent temporal lobe regions, correlating with glucose hypometabolism in corresponding regions. One patient died after 26 years of disease duration with dementia and behavioural deficits. Pre-mortem, there was 18F-AV-1451 uptake in the temporal and frontal lobes, as well as in the basal ganglia, which strongly correlated with the regional extent and amount of tau pathology in post-mortem brain sections. Amyloid-β (18F-flutemetamol) positron emission tomography scans were negative in all cases, as were stainings of brain sections for amyloid. This provides strong evidence that 18F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography can be used to accurately quantify in vivo the regional distribution of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. PMID:27357347

  14. Searches for Lepton flavor violation in the decays tau{+/-}-->e{+/-}gamma and tau{+/-}-->mu{+/-}gamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Lindsay, C D; Locke, C B; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2010-01-15

    Searches for lepton-flavor-violating decays of a tau lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a photon have been performed with the entire data set of (963+/-7)x10{6} tau decays collected by the BABAR detector near the Upsilon(4S), Upsilon(3S) and Upsilon(2S) resonances. The searches yield no evidence of signals and we set upper limits on the branching fractions of B(tau{+/-}-->e{+/-}gamma)<3.3x10{-8} and B(tau{+/-}-->mu{+/-}gamma)<4.4x10{-8} at 90% confidence level. PMID:20366586

  15. 18F-AV-1451 tau PET imaging correlates strongly with tau neuropathology in MAPT mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ruben; Puschmann, Andreas; Schöll, Michael; Ohlsson, Tomas; van Swieten, John; Honer, Michael; Englund, Elisabet; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-09-01

    Tau positron emission tomography ligands provide the novel possibility to image tau pathology in vivo However, little is known about how in vivo brain uptake of tau positron emission tomography ligands relates to tau aggregates observed post-mortem. We performed tau positron emission tomography imaging with (18)F-AV-1451 in three patients harbouring a p.R406W mutation in the MAPT gene, encoding tau. This mutation results in 3- and 4-repeat tau aggregates similar to those in Alzheimer's disease, and many of the mutation carriers initially suffer from memory impairment and temporal lobe atrophy. Two patients with short disease duration and isolated memory impairment exhibited (18)F-AV-1451 uptake mainly in the hippocampus and adjacent temporal lobe regions, correlating with glucose hypometabolism in corresponding regions. One patient died after 26 years of disease duration with dementia and behavioural deficits. Pre-mortem, there was (18)F-AV-1451 uptake in the temporal and frontal lobes, as well as in the basal ganglia, which strongly correlated with the regional extent and amount of tau pathology in post-mortem brain sections. Amyloid-β ((18)F-flutemetamol) positron emission tomography scans were negative in all cases, as were stainings of brain sections for amyloid. This provides strong evidence that (18)F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography can be used to accurately quantify in vivo the regional distribution of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. PMID:27357347

  16. Truncation of tau at E391 Promotes Early Pathological Changes in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Pamela J.; Kraemer, Brian C.; Robinson, Linda; Leverenz, James B.; Raskind, Murray; Schellenberg, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of tau at glutamic acid 391 (E391) is linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). This C-terminal truncated tau species exists in neurofibrillary tangles and abnormal neurites in the brains of AD patients and may potentiate tau polymerization. We generated a mouse model that expresses human tau truncated at E391 to begin to elucidate the role of this C-terminal truncated tau species in the development of tau pathology. Our results show that truncated but otherwise wild type human tau is sufficient to drive pre-tangle pathological changes in tau, including accumulation of insoluble tau, somatodendritic redistribution, formation of pathological conformations, and dual phosphorylation of tau at sites associated with AD pathology. In addition, these mice exhibit atypical neuritic tau immunoreactivity, including abnormal neuritic processes and dystrophic neurites. These results suggest that changes in tau proteolysis can initiate tauopathy. PMID:22002427

  17. Constraining new interactions with leptonic {tau} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A.; Silva, J.P.

    1995-10-01

    The recent measurements of the Michel parameters in {tau} decays enable, for the first time, a thorough analysis of the leptonic sector. In general, in models beyond the standard model, these parameters will be altered through changes in the {ital W} and {ital Z} couplings, and/or through interactions mediated by new gauge bosons. We perform a complete, model-independent analysis of the constraints imposed by the present data on such boson-mediated interactions, and point out the existence of useful relations among the couplings.

  18. Sequestration of tau by granulovacuolar degeneration in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bondareff, W.; Wischik, C. M.; Novak, M.; Roth, M.

    1991-01-01

    Antibodies directed against three regions of tau have been used in a histologic study of granulovacuolar degeneration (GVD) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Granulovascular degeneration complexes, consisting of a dense granule in a less-dense vacuole, were found in hippocampal pyramidal neurons in all patients studied. Anti-tau antibodies directed against the N-and C-termini, and the repeat region of tau, were found to immunolabel the granule of the GVD complex. Intracellular neurofibrillary tangles also were labeled by these antibodies. In particular, MAb6.423, which recognizes tau protein sequestered in paired helical filaments (PHF) in AD, but not the normal tau proteins so far described in human brain, labeled GVD granules. Contrarily, a generic tau marker (MAb7.51), which immunolabels all known isoforms of isolated and expressed tau protein, including PHF-tau, did not label the GVD granule. These findings demonstrate that the entire tau molecule is sequestered within the GVD granule, and that the tau protein found in GVD complexes is antigenically related to that found in PHFs. There is, however, a difference in the way in which the repeat region of tau is incorporated into the two structures, making the MAb7.51 epitope unavailable in the GVD complex. These findings suggest that the formation of GVD complexes in hippocampal pyramidal neurons vulnerable to neurofibrillary degeneration may represent an alternative pathway for dealing with an aberrant molecular complex, which contributes to the formation of GVD granules and neurofibrillary tangles in AD. Images Figure 1 PMID:1909492

  19. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease Information > Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Explore this section to learn more about alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including a description of the disorder ...

  20. Examining the Internal Structure of the easyCBM Reading Measures, Grades K-5. Technical Report #1302

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe a study examining the internal structures of the easyCBM reading measures, Grades K-5. Data were gathered from a convenience sample of 114 Kindergarten students, 43 first graders, 82 second graders, 100 third graders, 109 fourth graders, and 71 fifth graders attending schools in Oregon, Georgia, South…

  1. Exploring the World of Animals: Linking Fiction to Nonfiction. Literature Bridges to Science Series. Grades K-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Phyllis J.

    This teacher resource book, designed to encourage student interest and build learning across the curriculum in grades K-5, is based on the theme of animals. Resource lists and activities in the book focus on the following sections: (1) animals as pets; (2) animals on the farm; (3) animals in the woods; and (4) animals in the wild. Each section…

  2. The Relationship between Teacher Training, Intervention Strategies, and Students' Academic Achievement in the Classroom with K-5 ADHD Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    The primary intent of this study was to explore the effect between teachers' training, intervention strategies, and the academic achievement of K-5 ADHD students. The study design employed a mixed research design. The quantitative method focused on collecting data from certified regular and special-education teachers. Additionally, effects were…

  3. A Bookbag of the Bag Ladies' Best: Resources, Ideas, and Hands-On Activities for the K-5 Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Karen; Guinn, Cindy

    Encouraging interactive learning and motivating K-5 students, this book presents step-by-step directions, drawings, black line masters, and photographs for 48 thematic classroom projects that use everyday items. The first chapter discusses the history of the "bag ladies." The second chapter describes how to gather, make, and store classroom…

  4. Studies of tau- to h- h- h+ nu and tau- to K- pi0 nu Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, I.M.; /Victoria U.

    2007-10-24

    We present preliminary inclusive branching fraction measurements of {tau}{sup -} {yields} h{sup -}h{sup -}h{sup +}{nu} (h = {pi} or K) and {tau}{sup -} K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu} decay modes using a sample of {tau}-pair events collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. The branching fractions of {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}, and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}K{sup +}{nu} are measured with higher precision than previously published results and the inclusive branching fraction {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu} is measured for the first time. In addition, the first measurement of the branching fraction {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{phi}{nu} and the measurement of the branching fraction {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{phi}{nu} are determined by means of a binned maximum likelihood fit to the K{sup +}K{sup -} invariant mass distribution. These branching fractions are extracted by means of a migration matrix that accounts for the cross contamination between the {tau}{sup -} {yields} h{sup -}h{sup -}h{sup +}{nu} modes. The preliminary {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu} branching fraction and invariant mass distributions are also presented in this paper.

  5. Microtubule-associated protein tau (tau) is a major antigenic component of paired helical filaments in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kosik, K S; Joachim, C L; Selkoe, D J

    1986-01-01

    The detailed protein composition of the paired helical filaments (PHF) that accumulate in human neurons in aging and Alzheimer disease is unknown. However, the identity of certain components has been surmised by using immunocytochemical techniques. Whereas PHF share epitopes with neurofilament proteins and microtubule-associated protein (MAP) 2, we report evidence that the MAP tau (tau) appears to be their major antigenic component. Immunization of rabbits with NaDodSO4-extracted, partially purified PHF (free of normal cytoskeletal elements, including tau) consistently produces antibodies to tau but not, for example, to neurofilaments. Such PHF antibodies label all of the heterogeneous fetal and mature forms of tau from rat and human brain. Absorption of PHF antisera with heat-stable MAPs (rich in tau) results in almost complete loss of staining of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) in human brain sections. An affinity-purified antibody to tau specifically labels NFT and the neurites of senile plaques in human brain sections as well as NaDodSO4-extracted NFT. tau-Immunoreactive NFT frequently extend into the apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons, suggesting an aberrant intracellular locus for this axonal protein. tau and PHF antibodies label tau proteins identically on electrophoretic transfer blots and stain the gel-excluded protein representing NaDodSO4-insoluble PHF in homogenates of human brain. The progressive accumulation of altered tau protein in neurons in Alzheimer disease may result in instability of microtubules, consequent loss of effective transport of molecules and organelles, and, ultimately, neuronal death. Images PMID:2424016

  6. The many faces of interferon tau.

    PubMed

    Bazer, Fuller W; Ying, Wei; Wang, Xiaoqiu; Dunlap, Kathrin A; Zhou, Beiyan; Johnson, Greg A; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-03-01

    Interferon tau (IFNT) was discovered as the pregnancy recognition signal in ruminants, but is now known to have a plethora of physiological functions in the mammalian uterus. The mammalian uterus includes, from the outer surface to the lumen, the serosa, myometrium and endometrium. The endometrium consists of the luminal, superficial glandular, and glandular epithelia, each with a unique phenotype, stromal cells, vascular elements, nerves and immune cells. The uterine epithelia secrete or selectively transport molecules into the uterine lumen that are collectively known as histotroph. Histotroph is required for growth and development of the conceptus (embryo and its associated extra-embryonic membranes) and includes nutrients such as amino acids and glucose, enzymes, growth factors, cytokines, lymphokines, transport proteins for vitamins and minerals and extracellular matrix molecules. Interferon tau and progesterone stimulate transport of amino acids in histotroph, particularly arginine. Arginine stimulates the mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway to induce proliferation, migration and protein synthesis by cells of the conceptus, and arginine is the substrate for synthesis of nitric oxide and polyamines required for growth and development of the conceptus. In ruminants, IFNT also acts in concert with progesterone from the corpus luteum to increase expression of genes for transport of nutrients into the uterine lumen, as well as proteases, protease inhibitors, growth factors for hematopoiesis and angiogenesis and other molecules critical for implantation and placentation. Collectively, the pleiotropic effects of IFNT contribute to survival, growth and development of the ruminant conceptus. PMID:25557050

  7. Importance of precision measurements in the tau sector

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A.

    1996-01-01

    {tau} decays provide a powerful tool to test the structure of the weak currents and the universality of their couplings to the {ital W} boson. The constraints implied by present data and the possible improvements at the {tau}cF are analyzed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Biochemistry and Cell Biology of Tau Protein in Neurofibrillary Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    Tau represents the subunit protein of one of the major hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD), the neurofibrillary tangles, and is therefore of major interest as an indicator of disease mechanisms. Many of the unusual properties of Tau can be explained by its nature as a natively unfolded protein. Examples are the large number of structural conformations and biochemical modifications (phosphorylation, proteolysis, glycosylation, and others), the multitude of interaction partners (mainly microtubules, but also other cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, and phosphatases, motor proteins, chaperones, and membrane proteins). The pathological aggregation of Tau is counterintuitive, given its high solubility, but can be rationalized by short hydrophobic motifs forming β structures. The aggregation of Tau is toxic in cell and animal models, but can be reversed by suppressing expression or by aggregation inhibitors. This review summarizes some of the structural, biochemical, and cell biological properties of Tau and Tau fibers. Further aspects of Tau as a diagnostic marker and therapeutic target, its involvement in other Tau-based diseases, and its histopathology are covered by other chapters in this volume. PMID:22762014

  9. Identification of nuclear. tau. isoforms in human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, P.A.; Howard, T.H.; Castleberry, R.P.; Binder, L.I. )

    1990-11-01

    The {tau} proteins have been reported only in association with microtubules and with ribosomes in situ, in the normal central nervous system. In addition, {tau} has been shown to be an integral component of paired helical filaments, the principal constituent of the neurofibrillary tangles found in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease and of most aged individuals with Down syndrome (trisomy 21). The authors report here the localization of the well-characterized Tau-1 monoclonal antibody to the nucleolar organizer regions of the acrocentric chromosomes and to their interphase counterpart, the fibrillar component of the nucleolus, in human neuroblastoma cells. Similar localization to the nucleolar organizer regions was also observed in other human cell lines and in one monkey kidney cell line but was not seen in non-primate species. Immunochemically, they further demonstrated the existence of the entire {tau} molecule in the isolated nuclei of neuroblastoma cells. Nuclear {tau} proteins, like the {tau} proteins of the paired helical filaments, cannot be extracted in standard SDS-containing electrophoresis sample buffer but require pretreatment with formic acid prior to immunoblot analysis. This work indicates that {tau} may function in processes not directly associated with microtubules and that highly insoluble complexes of {tau} may also play a role in normal cellular physiology.

  10. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Induces Both Direct and Indirect Tau Hyperphosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Carl; Marcouiller, François; Bretteville, Alexis; El Khoury, Noura B.; Baillargeon, Joanie; Hébert, Sébastien S.; Planel, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is widely used as a solvent or vehicle for biological studies, and for treatment of specific disorders, including traumatic brain injury and several forms of amyloidosis. As Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brains are characterized by deposits of β-amyloid peptides, it has been suggested that DMSO could be used as a treatment for this devastating disease. AD brains are also characterized by aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau protein, but the effect of DMSO on tau phosphorylation is unknown. We thus investigated the impact of DMSO on tau phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. One hour following intraperitoneal administration of 1 or 2 ml/kg DMSO in mice, no change was observed in tau phosphorylation. However, at 4 ml/kg, tau was hyperphosphorylated at AT8 (Ser202/Thr205), PHF-1 (Ser396/Ser404) and AT180 (Thr231) epitopes. At this dose, we also noticed that the animals were hypothermic. When the mice were maintained normothermic, the effect of 4 ml/kg DMSO on tau hyperphosphorylation was prevented. On the other hand, in SH-SY5Y cells, 0.1% DMSO induced tau hyperphosphorylation at AT8 and AT180 phosphoepitopes in normothermic conditions. Globally, these findings demonstrate that DMSO can induce tau hyperphosphorylation indirectly via hypothermia in vivo, and directly in vitro. These data should caution researchers working with DMSO as it can induce artifactual results both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:22768202

  11. The tau and beyond: Future research on heavy leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.I.

    1988-01-01

    This paper outlines directions for future experimental research on the tau and tau neutrino. Present limits on the existence of heavier charged leptons are reviewed, with emphasis on the close-mass lepton pair concept. 44 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Isolation, sequence, and expression of a human keratin K5 gene: transcriptional regulation of keratins and insights into pairwise control.

    PubMed Central

    Lersch, R; Stellmach, V; Stocks, C; Giudice, G; Fuchs, E

    1989-01-01

    The mitotically active basal layers of most stratified squamous epithelia express 10 to 30% of their total protein as keratin. The two keratins specifically expressed in these cells are the type II keratin K5 (58 kilodaltons) and its corresponding partner, type I keratin K14 (50 kilodaltons), both of which are essential for the formation of 8-nm filaments. Dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying the coordinate regulation of the two keratins is an important first step in understanding epidermal differentiation and in designing promoters that will enable delivery and expression of foreign gene products in stratified squamous epithelia, e.g., skin. Previously, we reported the sequence of the gene encoding human K14 (D. Marchuk, S. McCrohon, and E. Fuchs, Cell 39:491-498, 1984; Marchuk et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:1609-1613, 1985). We have now isolated and characterized the gene encoding human K5. The sequence of the coding portion of this gene matched perfectly with that of a partial K5 cDNA sequence obtained from a cultured human epidermal library (R. Lersch and E. Fuchs, Mol. Cell. Biol. 8:486-493, 1988), and gene transfection studies indicated that the gene is functional. Nuclear runoff experiments demonstrated that the K5 and K14 genes were both transcribed at dramatically higher levels in cultured human epidermal cells than in fibroblasts, indicating that at least part of the regulation of the expression of this keratin pair is at the transcriptional level. When the K5 gene was transfected transiently into NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, foreign expression of the gene caused the appearance of endogenous mouse K14 and the subsequent formation of a keratin filament array in the cells. In this case, transcriptional changes did not appear to be involved in the regulation, suggesting that there may be multiple control mechanisms underlying the pairwise expression of keratins. Images PMID:2476664

  13. Tau co-organizes dynamic microtubule and actin networks

    PubMed Central

    Elie, Auréliane; Prezel, Elea; Guérin, Christophe; Denarier, Eric; Ramirez-Rios, Sacnicte; Serre, Laurence; Andrieux, Annie; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Blanchoin, Laurent; Arnal, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The crosstalk between microtubules and actin is essential for cellular functions. However, mechanisms underlying the microtubule-actin organization by cross-linkers remain largely unexplored. Here, we report that tau, a neuronal microtubule-associated protein, binds to microtubules and actin simultaneously, promoting in vitro co-organization and coupled growth of both networks. By developing an original assay to visualize concomitant microtubule and actin assembly, we show that tau can induce guided polymerization of actin filaments along microtubule tracks and growth of single microtubules along actin filament bundles. Importantly, tau mediates microtubule-actin co-alignment without changing polymer growth properties. Mutagenesis studies further reveal that at least two of the four tau repeated motifs, primarily identified as tubulin-binding sites, are required to connect microtubules and actin. Tau thus represents a molecular linker between microtubule and actin networks, enabling a coordination of the two cytoskeletons that might be essential in various neuronal contexts. PMID:25944224

  14. Search for the Decay B+-->K+ tau-/+ mu+/-.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-11-16

    We present a search for the lepton flavor violating decay B+-->K+ tau-/+ mu+/- using 383 x 10;{6} BB[over ] events collected by the BABAR experiment. The branching fraction for this decay can be substantially enhanced in new physics models. The kinematics of the tau from the signal B decay are inferred from the K+, mu, and other B in the event, which is fully reconstructed in one of a variety of hadronic decay modes, allowing the signal B candidate to be fully reconstructed. We observe no excess of events over the expected background and set a limit of B(B+-->K+ tau mu)<7.7 x 10(-5) at 90% confidence level, where the branching fraction is for the sum of the K+ tau- mu+ and K+ tau+mu- final states. We use this result to improve a model-independent bound on the energy scale of flavor-changing new physics. PMID:18233132

  15. What triggered the early planet formation processes in HL Tau?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plevne, O.

    2016-06-01

    T Tauri stars are in the pre-main sequence phase of stellar evolution. These stars convert their own gravitational potential energy to light, but their cores do not have enough temperature for nuclear reactions like a main sequence star. T Tauri stars are surrounded by a circumstellar disk, hot plasma and dust. Some T Tauri stars host protoplanetary objects in their circumstellar disk such as HL Tau. In this case HL Tau system is a good example for stellar evolution and planet formation. But HL Tau's protoplanetary objects were formed earlier than planet formation theories' expectations. With this purpose, this study will discuss "What triggered the early planet formation processes in HL Tau system?" with XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of HL Tau system.

  16. 14-3-3ζ Mediates Tau Aggregation in Human Neuroblastoma M17 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Paudel, Hemant K.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau is the major component of paired helical filaments (PHFs) associated with the neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Tau in the normal brain binds and stabilizes microtubules. Tau isolated from PHFs is hyperphosphorylated, which prevents it from binding to microtubules. Tau phosphorylation has been suggested to be involved in the development of NFT pathology in the AD brain. Recently, we showed that 14-3-3ζ is bound to tau in the PHFs and when incubated in vitro with 14-3-3ζ, tau formed amorphous aggregates, single-stranded straight filaments, double stranded ribbon-like filaments and PHF-like filaments that displayed close resemblance with corresponding ultrastructures of AD brain. Surprisingly however, phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated tau aggregated in a similar manner, indicating that tau phosphorylation does not affect in vitro tau aggregation (Qureshi et al (2013) Biochemistry 52, 6445–6455). In this study, we have examined the role of tau phosphorylation in tau aggregation in cellular level. We have found that in human M17 neuroblastoma cells, tau phosphorylation by GSK3β or PKA does not cause tau aggregation, but promotes 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation by destabilizing microtubules. Microtubule disrupting drugs also promoted 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation without changing tau phosphorylation in M17 cell. In vitro, when incubated with 14-3-3ζ and microtubules, nonphosphorylated tau bound to microtubules and did not aggregate. Phosphorylated tau on the other hand did not bind to microtubules and aggregated. Our data indicate that microtubule-bound tau is resistant to 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation and suggest that tau phosphorylation promotes tau aggregation in the brain by detaching tau from microtubules and thus making it accessible to 14-3-3ζ. PMID:27548710

  17. 14-3-3ζ Mediates Tau Aggregation in Human Neuroblastoma M17 Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Paudel, Hemant K

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau is the major component of paired helical filaments (PHFs) associated with the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau in the normal brain binds and stabilizes microtubules. Tau isolated from PHFs is hyperphosphorylated, which prevents it from binding to microtubules. Tau phosphorylation has been suggested to be involved in the development of NFT pathology in the AD brain. Recently, we showed that 14-3-3ζ is bound to tau in the PHFs and when incubated in vitro with 14-3-3ζ, tau formed amorphous aggregates, single-stranded straight filaments, double stranded ribbon-like filaments and PHF-like filaments that displayed close resemblance with corresponding ultrastructures of AD brain. Surprisingly however, phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated tau aggregated in a similar manner, indicating that tau phosphorylation does not affect in vitro tau aggregation (Qureshi et al (2013) Biochemistry 52, 6445-6455). In this study, we have examined the role of tau phosphorylation in tau aggregation in cellular level. We have found that in human M17 neuroblastoma cells, tau phosphorylation by GSK3β or PKA does not cause tau aggregation, but promotes 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation by destabilizing microtubules. Microtubule disrupting drugs also promoted 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation without changing tau phosphorylation in M17 cell. In vitro, when incubated with 14-3-3ζ and microtubules, nonphosphorylated tau bound to microtubules and did not aggregate. Phosphorylated tau on the other hand did not bind to microtubules and aggregated. Our data indicate that microtubule-bound tau is resistant to 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation and suggest that tau phosphorylation promotes tau aggregation in the brain by detaching tau from microtubules and thus making it accessible to 14-3-3ζ. PMID:27548710

  18. Mechanisms of tau and Aβ-induced excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pallo, Susanne P; DiMaio, John; Cook, Alexis; Nilsson, Bradley; Johnson, Gail V W

    2016-03-01

    Excitotoxicity was originally postulated to be a late stage side effect of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD)-related neurodegeneration, however more recent studies indicate that it may occur early in AD and contribute to the neurodegenerative process. Tau and amyloid beta (Aβ), the main components of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and amyloid plaques, have been implicated in cooperatively and independently facilitating excitotoxicity. Our study investigated the roles of tau and Aβ in AD-related excitotoxicity. In vivo studies showed that tau knockout (tau(-/-)) mice were significantly protected from seizures and hippocampal superoxide production induced with the glutamate analog, kainic acid (KA). We hypothesized that tau accomplished this by facilitating KA-induced Ca(2+) influx into neurons, however lentiviral tau knockdown failed to ameliorate KA-induced Ca(2+) influx into primary rat cortical neurons. We further investigated if tau cooperated with Aβ to facilitate KA-induced Ca(2+) influx. While Aβ biphasically modulated the KA-induced Cacyt(2+) responses, tau knockdown continued to have no effect. Therefore, tau facilitates KA-induced seizures and superoxide production in a manner that does not involve facilitation of Ca(2+) influx through KA receptors (KAR). On the other hand, acute pretreatment with Aβ (10 min) enhanced KA-induced Ca(2+) influx, while chronic Aβ (24 h) significantly reduced it, regardless of tau knockdown. Given previously published connections between Aβ, group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and KAR regulation, we hypothesized that Aβ modulates KAR via a G-protein coupled receptor pathway mediated by group 1 mGluRs. We found that Aβ did not activate group 1 mGluRs and inhibition of these receptors did not reverse Aβ modulation of KA-induced Ca(2+) influx. Therefore, Aβ biphasically regulates KAR via a mechanism that does not involve group 1mGluR activation. PMID:26731336

  19. Evidence for B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}with a semileptonic tagging method

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, K.; Iijima, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Inami, K.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mori, T.; Ohshima, T.; Senyo, K.; Aihara, H.; Aulchenko, V.; Bondar, A.; Eidelman, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Kuzmin, A.; Shwartz, B.; Zhilich, V.; Zyukova, O.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Mohanty, G. B.

    2010-10-01

    We present a measurement of the decay B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}using a data sample containing 657x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. A sample of B{sup +}B{sup -} pairs are tagged by reconstructing one B{sup +} meson decaying semileptonically. We detect the B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}candidate in the recoil. We obtain a signal with a significance of 3.6 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties, and measure the branching fraction to be B(B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}})=[1.54{sub -0.37}{sup +0.38}(stat){sub -0.31}{sup +0.29}(syst)]x10{sup -4}. This result confirms the evidence for B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}obtained in a previous Belle measurement that used a hadronic B tagging method.

  20. Measurement of the Semileptonic B-bar->D{sup (*)}{tau}{nu}-bar{sub {tau}} Decays at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes Pegna, David

    2010-02-10

    Semileptonic B meson decays into final states containing the tau lepton are of interesting as they provide information on the Standard Model as well as a window on new physics effects. We present results on B-bar->D{sup (*)}taunu-bar{sub tau} decays where the second B in the event is fully reconstructed.

  1. Development of a Scalable, High-Throughput-Compatible Assay to Detect Tau Aggregates Using iPSC-Derived Cortical Neurons Maintained in a Three-Dimensional Culture Format.

    PubMed

    Medda, X; Mertens, L; Versweyveld, S; Diels, A; Barnham, L; Bretteville, A; Buist, A; Verheyen, A; Royaux, I; Ebneth, A; Cabrera-Socorro, A

    2016-09-01

    Tau aggregation is the pathological hallmark that best correlates with the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), formed of hyperphosphorylated tau, leads to neuronal dysfunction and loss, and is directly associated with the cognitive decline observed in AD patients. The limited success in targeting β-amyloid pathologies has reinforced the hypothesis of blocking tau phosphorylation, aggregation, and/or spreading as alternative therapeutic entry points to treat AD. Identification of novel therapies requires disease-relevant and scalable assays capable of reproducing key features of the pathology in an in vitro setting. Here we use induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a virtually unlimited source of human cortical neurons to develop a robust and scalable tau aggregation model compatible with high-throughput screening (HTS). We downscaled cell culture conditions to 384-well plate format and used Matrigel to introduce an extra physical protection against cell detachment that reduces shearing stress and better recapitulates pathological conditions. We complemented the assay with AlphaLISA technology for the detection of tau aggregates in a high-throughput-compatible format. The assay is reproducible across users and works with different commercially available iPSC lines, representing a highly translational tool for the identification of novel treatments against tauopathies, including AD. PMID:26984927

  2. Effects of wild type tau and disease-linked tau mutations on microtubule organization and intracellular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dezhi; Feinstein, Stuart C; Valentine, Megan T

    2016-05-24

    We investigate the effects of transient expression of wild type (WT) and disease-linked mutations of tau (R406W, P301L, ΔN296) on cytoskeletal organization and cargo transport in COS-7 cells, which are natively tau-free. The introduction of tau proteins (either WT or mutant forms) leads to a dramatic restructuring of the microtubule cytoskeleton, as observed using immunofluorescence microscopy. Yet, this microtubule bundling and aggregation has a modest effect on the speed and travel distance of motor-driven cargo transport, as measured by the motions of fluorescently-labeled lysosomes. This suggests that localized transport events are insensitive to the global structure of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Importantly, we also found no evidence that the disease-linked tau mutants were particularly toxic; in fact we found that expression of mutant and WT tau had similar effects on overall microtubule structure and transport phenotypes. PMID:26674472

  3. Overexpression of Wild-Type Murine Tau Results in Progressive Tauopathy and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Stephanie J.; Crook, Richard J.P.; DeTure, Michael; Randle, Suzanne J.; Innes, Amy E.; Yu, Xin Z.; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dugger, Brittany N.; McBride, Melinda; Hutton, Mike; Dickson, Dennis W.; McGowan, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Here, we describe the generation and characterization of a novel tau transgenic mouse model (mTau) that overexpresses wild-type murine tau protein by twofold compared with endogenous levels. Transgenic tau expression was driven by a BAC transgene containing the entire wild-type mouse tau locus, including the endogenous promoter and the regulatory elements associated with the tau gene. The mTau model therefore differs from other tau models in that regulation of the genomic mouse transgene mimics that of the endogenous gene, including normal exon splicing regulation. Biochemical data from the mTau mice demonstrated that modest elevation of mouse tau leads to tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple pathologically relevant epitopes and accumulation of sarkosyl-insoluble tau. The mTau mice show a progressive increase in hyperphosphorylated tau pathology with age up to 15 to 18 months, which is accompanied by gliosis and vacuolization. In contrast, older mice show a decrease in tau pathology levels, which may represent hippocampal neuronal loss occurring in this wild-type model. Collectively, these results describe a novel model of tauopathy that develops pathological changes reminiscent of early stage Alzheimer’s disease and other related neurodegenerative diseases, achieved without overexpression of a mutant human tau transgene. This model will provide an important tool for understanding the early events leading to the development of tau pathology and a model for analysis of potential therapeutic targets for sporadic tauopathies. PMID:19717642

  4. The Dynamics and Turnover of Tau Aggregates in Cultured Cells: INSIGHTS INTO THERAPIES FOR TAUOPATHIES.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing L; Buist, Arjan; Soares, Alberto; Callaerts, Kathleen; Calafate, Sara; Stevenaert, Frederik; Daniels, Joshua P; Zoll, Bryan E; Crowe, Alex; Brunden, Kurt R; Moechars, Diederik; Lee, Virginia M Y

    2016-06-17

    Filamentous tau aggregates, the hallmark lesions of Alzheimer disease (AD), play key roles in neurodegeneration. Activation of protein degradation systems has been proposed to be a potential strategy for removing pathological tau, but it remains unclear how effectively tau aggregates can be degraded by these systems. By applying our previously established cellular model system of AD-like tau aggregate induction using preformed tau fibrils, we demonstrate that tau aggregates induced in cells with regulated expression of full-length mutant tau can be gradually cleared when soluble tau expression is suppressed. This clearance is at least partially mediated by the autophagy-lysosome pathway, although both the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosome pathway are deficient in handling large tau aggregates. Importantly, residual tau aggregates left after the clearance phase leads to a rapid reinstatement of robust tau pathology once soluble tau expression is turned on again. Moreover, we succeeded in generating monoclonal cells persistently carrying tau aggregates without obvious cytotoxicity. Live imaging of GFP-tagged tau aggregates showed that tau inclusions are dynamic structures constantly undergoing "fission" and "fusion," which facilitate stable propagation of tau pathology in dividing cells. These findings provide a greater understanding of cell-to-cell transmission of tau aggregates in dividing cells and possibly neurons. PMID:27129267

  5. Evidence for the decay tau/sup -/. -->. pi. /sup -/eta nu/sub tau/

    SciTech Connect

    Repond, J.

    1987-01-01

    The inclusive production of eta mesons in tau lepton decay has been studied using the High Resolution Spectrometer at the PEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ facility. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 300 pb/sup -1/ and the storage ring was operated at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV. The eta production appears to be only compatible with the decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/eta nu, which violates isospin and G-parity conservation. The branching ratio of 5.1 +- 1.5% explains much of the current discrepancy between the one-prong topological branching ratio and the sum of the individual one-prong modes. Various checks to test the validity of the signal are described.

  6. Hadron structure in {tau}{yields}KK{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Roig, P.; Pich, A.; Portoles, J.

    2010-02-01

    We analyze the hadronization structure of both vector and axial-vector currents leading to {tau}{yields}KK{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}decays. At leading order in the 1/N{sub C} expansion, and considering only the contribution of the lightest resonances, we work out, within the framework of the resonance chiral Lagrangian, the structure of the local vertices involved in those processes. The couplings in the resonance theory are constrained by imposing the asymptotic behavior of vector and axial-vector spectral functions ruled by QCD. In this way we predict the hadron spectra and conclude that, contrary to previous assertions, the vector contribution dominates by far over the axial-vector one in all KK{pi} charge channels.

  7. Histone deacetylase 6 inhibition improves memory and reduces total tau levels in a mouse model of tau deposition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tau pathology is associated with a number of age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Few treatments have been demonstrated to diminish the impact of tau pathology in mouse models and none are yet effective in humans. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is an enzyme that removes acetyl groups from cytoplasmic proteins, rather than nuclear histones. Its substrates include tubulin, heat shock protein 90 and cortactin. Tubastatin A is a selective inhibitor of HDAC6. Modification of tau pathology by specific inhibition of HDAC6 presents a potential therapeutic approach in tauopathy. Methods We treated rTg4510 mouse models of tau deposition and non-transgenic mice with tubastatin (25 mg/kg) or saline (0.9%) from 5 to 7 months of age. Cognitive behavior analysis, histology and biochemical analysis were applied to access the effect of tubastatin on memory, tau pathology and neurodegeneration (hippocampal volume). Results We present data showing that tubastatin restored memory function in rTg4510 mice and reversed a hyperactivity phenotype. We further found that tubastatin reduced the levels of total tau, both histologically and by western analysis. Reduction in total tau levels was positively correlated with memory improvement in these mice. However, there was no impact on phosphorylated forms of tau, either by histology or western analysis, nor was there an impact on silver positive inclusions histologically. Conclusion Potential mechanisms by which HDAC6 inhibitors might benefit the rTg4510 mouse include stabilization of microtubules secondary to increased tubulin acetylation, increased degradation of tau secondary to increased acetylation of HSP90 or both. These data support the use of HDAC6 inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents against tau pathology. PMID:24576665

  8. Filamentous nerve cell inclusions in neurodegenerative diseases: tauopathies and alpha-synucleinopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, M

    1999-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease are the most common neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by the degeneration of selected populations of nerve cells that develop filamentous inclusions before degeneration. The neuronal inclusions of Alzheimer's disease are made of the microtubule-associated protein tau, in a hyperphosphorylated state. Recent work has shown that the filamentous inclusions of Parkinson's disease are made of the protein alpha-synuclein and that rare, familial forms of Parkinson's disease are caused by missense mutations in the alpha-synuclein gene. Besides Parkinson's disease, the filamentous inclusions of two additional neurodegenerative diseases, namely dementia with Lewy bodies and multiple system atrophy, have also been found to be made of alpha-synuclein. Abundant filamentous tau inclusions are not limited to Alzheimer's disease. They are the defining neuropathological characteristic of frontotemporal dementias such as Pick's disease, and of progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration. The recent discovery of mutations in the tau gene in familial forms of frontotemporal dementia has provided a direct link between tau dysfunction and dementing disease. The new work has established that tauopathies and alpha-synucleinopathies account for most late-onset neurodegenerative diseases in man. The formation of intracellular filamentous inclusions might be the gain of toxic function that leads to the demise of affected brain cells. PMID:10434313

  9. First measurement of sigma (p anti-p ---> Z) . Br (Z ---> tau tau) at s**(1/2) = 1.96- TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Askew, A.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay /Strasbourg, IReS

    2004-12-01

    The authors present a measurement of the cross section for Z production times the branching fraction to {tau} leptons, {sigma} {center_dot} Br(Z {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}), in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the channel in which one {tau} decays into {mu}{nu}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and the other into hadrons + {nu}{sub {tau}} or e{nu}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 226 pb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The final sample contains 2008 candidate events with an estimated background of 55%. From this they obtain {sigma} {center_dot} Br(Z {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) = 237 {+-} 15(stat) {+-} 18(sys) {+-} 15(lum) pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction.

  10. CP Violation in Tau to K* Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgkinson, Mark; /Manchester U.

    2006-03-10

    A sample of {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} K*{sup {+-}} decays with K*{sup {+-}} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup {+-}} and K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, using 123.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, is used to search for a direct CP violation effect in the charged Higgs sector. No evidence of CP violation is found and the imaginary part of the charged Higgs coupling, {l_brace}Im{r_brace}({Lambda}), in the Multi-Higgs-Doublet-Model is found to be at -0.284 < {l_brace}Im{r_brace}({Lambda}) < 0.200 at 90% Confidence Level. In addition the installation of the kk2f Monte Carlo generator into the BaBar software framework is described.

  11. Highly Sulfated K5 Escherichia coli Polysaccharide Derivatives Inhibit Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infectivity in Cell Lines and Human Tracheal-Bronchial Histocultures

    PubMed Central

    Cagno, Valeria; Donalisio, Manuela; Civra, Andrea; Volante, Marco; Veccelli, Elena; Oreste, Pasqua; Rusnati, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) exploits cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) as attachment receptors. The interaction between RSV and HSPGs thus presents an attractive target for the development of novel inhibitors of RSV infection. In this study, selective chemical modification of the Escherichia coli K5 capsular polysaccharide was used to generate a collection of sulfated K5 derivatives with a backbone structure that mimics the heparin/heparan sulfate biosynthetic precursor. The screening of a series of N-sulfated (K5-NS), O-sulfated (K5-OS), and N,O-sulfated (K5-N,OS) derivatives with different degrees of sulfation revealed the highly sulfated K5 derivatives K5-N,OS(H) and K5-OS(H) to be inhibitors of RSV. Their 50% inhibitory concentrations were between 1.07 nM and 3.81 nM in two different cell lines, and no evidence of cytotoxicity was observed. Inhibition of RSV infection was maintained in binding and attachment assays but not in preattachment assays. Moreover, antiviral activity was also evident when the K5 derivatives were added postinfection, both in cell-to-cell spread and viral yield reduction assays. Finally, both K5-N,OS(H) and K5-OS(H) prevented RSV infection in human-derived tracheal/bronchial epithelial cells cultured to form a pseudostratified, highly differentiated model of the epithelial tissue of the human respiratory tract. Together, these features put K5-N,OS(H) and K5-OS(H) forward as attractive candidates for further development as RSV inhibitors. PMID:24914125

  12. Elimination of spurious eigenvalues in the Chebyshev tau spectral method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, G. B.; Murray, B. T.; Boisvert, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    Spectral methods have been used to great advantage in hydrodynamic stability calculations; the concepts are described in Orszag's seminal application of the Chebyshev tau method to the Orr-Sommerfeld equation for plane Poiseuille flow in 1971. Orszag discusses both the Chebyshev Galerkin and the Chebyshev tau methods, but presents results for the tau method, which is easier to implement than the Galerkin method. The tau method has the disadvantage that two unstable eigenvalues are produced that are artifacts of the discretization. An extremely simple modification to the Chebyshev tau method is presented which eliminates the spurious eigenvalues. First a simplified model of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation discussed by Gottlieb and Orszag was studied. Then the Chebyshev tau method is considered, which has two spurious eigenvalues, and then a modification which eliminates them is described. Finally, results for the Orr-Sommerfeld equation are considered where the modified tau method also eliminates the spurious eigenvalues. The simplicity of the modification makes it a convenient alternative to other approaches to the problem.

  13. LRRK2 Promotes Tau Accumulation, Aggregation and Release.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Patrícia Silva; Gerhardt, Ellen; Lopes da Fonseca, Tomás; Bähr, Mathias; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming; Eckermann, Katrin

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene are known as the most frequent cause of familial Parkinson's disease (PD), but are also present in sporadic cases. The G2019S-LRRK2 mutation is located in the kinase domain of the protein, and has consistently been reported to promote a gain of kinase function. Several proteins have been reported as LRRK2 substrates and/or interactors, suggesting possible pathways involved in neurodegeneration in PD. Hyperphosphorylated Tau protein accumulates in neurofibrillary tangles, a typical pathological hallmark in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia. In addition, it is also frequently found in the brains of PD patients. Although LRRK2 is a kinase, it appears that a putative interaction with Tau is phosphorylation-independent. However, the underlying mechanisms and the cellular consequences of this interaction are still unclear. In this study, we demonstrate an interaction between LRRK2 and Tau and that LRRK2 promotes the accumulation of non-monomeric and high-molecular weight (HMW) Tau species independent of its kinase activity. Interestingly, we found that LRRK2 increases Tau secretion, possibly as a consequence of an impairment of Tau proteasomal degradation. Our data highlight a mechanism through which LRRK2 regulates intracellular Tau levels, contributing to the progression of the pathology caused by the LRRK2-mediated proteasome impairment. In total, our findings suggest that the interplay between LRRK2 and proteasome activity might constitute a valid target for therapeutic intervention in PD. PMID:26014385

  14. Measurement of the tau- to eta pi-pi+pi-nu tau Branching Fraction and a Search for a Second-Class Current in the tau- to eta'(958)pi-nu tau Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2008-03-24

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay with the {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mode is studied using 384 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the BABAR detector. The branching fraction is measured to be (1.60 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -4}. It is found that {tau}{sup -} {yields} f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is the dominant decay mode with a branching fraction of (1.11 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -4}. The first error on the branching fractions is statistical and the second systematic. In addition, a 90% confidence level upper limit on the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}(958){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is measured to be 7.2 x 10{sup -6}. This last decay proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of isospin symmetry.

  15. Lepton flavor violating {tau} and B decays and heavy neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    He Xiaogang

    2004-12-01

    We study lepton flavor violating (LFV) {tau} and B decays in models with heavy neutrinos to constrain the mixing matrix parameters U{sub {tau}}{sub N}. We find that the best current constraints when the heavy neutrinos are purely left handed come from LFV radiative {tau} decay modes. To obtain competitive constraints in LFV B decay, it is necessary to probe b{yields}X{sub s}{tau}{sup {+-}}e{sup {+-}} at the 10{sup -7} level. When the heavy neutrinos have both left- and right-handed couplings, the mixing parameters can be constrained by studying LFV B decay modes and LFV {tau} decay into three charged leptons. We find that the branching ratios B({tau}{sup {+-}}{yields}l{sub 1}{sup {+-}}l{sub 2}{sup {+-}}l{sub 3}{sup {+-}}), B(B{sub s}{yields}{tau}{sup {+-}}e{sup {+-}}) and B(b{yields}X{sub s}l{sub 1}{sup {+-}}l{sub 2}{sup {+-}}) need to be probed at the 10{sup -8} level in order to constrain the mixing parameters beyond what is known from unitarity.

  16. Early Axonopathy Preceding Neurofibrillary Tangles in Mutant Tau Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Karelle; Bretteville, Alexis; Schindowski, Katharina; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Authelet, Michèle; De Decker, Robert; Yilmaz, Zehra; Buée, Luc; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases characterized by brain and spinal cord involvement often show widespread accumulations of tau aggregates. We have generated a transgenic mouse line (Tg30tau) expressing in the forebrain and the spinal cord a human tau protein bearing two pathogenic mutations (P301S and G272V). These mice developed age-dependent brain and hippocampal atrophy, central and peripheral axonopathy, progressive motor impairment with neurogenic muscle atrophy, and neurofibrillary tangles and had decreased survival. Axonal spheroids and axonal atrophy developed early before neurofibrillary tangles. Neurofibrillary inclusions developed in neurons at 3 months and were of two types, suggestive of a selective vulnerability of neurons to form different types of fibrillary aggregates. A first type of tau-positive neurofibrillary tangles, more abundant in the forebrain, were composed of ribbon-like 19-nm-wide filaments and twisted paired helical filaments. A second type of tau and neurofilament-positive neurofibrillary tangles, more abundant in the spinal cord and the brainstem, were composed of 10-nm-wide neurofilaments and straight 19-nm filaments. Unbiased stereological analysis indicated that total number of pyramidal neurons and density of neurons in the lumbar spinal cord were not reduced up to 12 months in Tg30tau mice. This Tg30tau model thus provides evidence that axonopathy precedes tangle formation and that both lesions can be dissociated from overt neuronal loss in selected brain areas but not from neuronal dysfunction. PMID:17690183

  17. Measurement of the Tau- to F1(1285) Pi- Nu/Tau Branching Fraction And a Search for Second-Class Currents in Tau to Eta-Prime(958) Pi- Nu/Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Alwyn, K.E.; /Manchester U.

    2011-12-01

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}+{pi}{sup -}{nu}{tau} decay with the {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mode is studied using 384 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the BaBar detector. The branching fraction is measured to be (1.60 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -4}. It is found that {tau}{sup -} {yields} f1(1285){pi}{sup -}{nu}{tau} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}+{pi}{sup -}{nu}{tau} is the dominant decay mode with a branching fraction of (1.11 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -4}. The first error is statistical and the second systematic. In addition, a 90% confidence level upper limit on the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}(958){pi}{sup -}{nu}{tau} decay is measured to be 7.2 x 10{sup -6}. This last decay proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of isospin symmetry.

  18. Effects of macromolecular crowding and osmolyte on human Tau fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingying; Teng, Ningning; Li, Sen

    2016-09-01

    Tau fibrillation is reported to be involved in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, in which the natural environment is very crowded in the cells. Understanding the role of crowding environments in regulating Tau fibrillation is of great importance for elucidating the etiology of these diseases. In this experiment, the effects of macromolecular crowding and osmolyte reagents in the crowding environment on Tau fibrillation were studied by thioflavin T binding, SDS-PAGE and TEM assays. Ficoll 70 and Dextran 70 of different concentrations were used as macromolecular crowding reagents inside the cells and showed a strong enhancing effect on the fibrillation of normal and hyperphosphorylated Tau. The enhancing effect of Dextran is stronger than that of Ficoll 70 at the same concentration. In addition, the cellular osmolyte sucrose was found to protect Tau against fibrillation, and inhibit the enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on Tau fibrillation. A possible model for the fibrillation process of Tau and the effect of macromolecular crowding and osmolyte on this process was proposed based on these experimental results. The information obtained from our study can enhance the understanding of how proteins aggregate and avoid aggregation in crowded physiological environments and might lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease in vivo. PMID:26683879

  19. Somatic mutations in MAP3K5 attenuate its pro-apoptotic function in melanoma through increased binding to Thioredoxin

    PubMed Central

    Prickett, Todd D.; Zerlanko, Brad; Gartner, Jared J.; Parker, Stephen C. J.; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Lin, Jimmy C.; Teer, Jamie K.; Wei, Xiaomu; Jiang, Jiji; Chen, Guo; Davies, Michael A.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Robinson, William; Robinson, Steven; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Rosenberg, Steven, A.; Margulies, Elliott H.; Samuels, Yardena

    2013-01-01

    Patients with advanced metastatic melanoma have poor prognosis and the genetics underlying its pathogenesis are poorly understood. High throughput sequencing has allowed comprehensive discovery of somatic mutations in cancer samples. Here, upon analysis of our whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing data of 29 melanoma samples we identified several genes that harbor recurrent non-synonymous mutations. These included MAP3K5, which in a prevalence screen of 288 melanomas was found to harbor a R256C substitution in 5 cases. All MAP3K5 mutated samples were wild-type for BRAF, suggesting a mutual exclusivity for these mutations. Functional analysis of the MAP3K5 R256C mutation revealed attenuation of MKK4 activation through increased binding of the inhibitory protein thioredoxin (TXN/TRX-1/Trx); resulting in increased proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of melanoma cells. This mutation represents a potential target for the design of new therapies to treat melanoma. PMID:24008424

  20. Final report of COOMET.T-K5: realizations of the ITS-90 at 1084.62 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergiyenko, R. P.; Matveyev, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    At the meeting of the Technical Committee 1.10 of COOMET in 2007 it was decided to undertake a regional comparison between the VNIIM (Russian Federation) and the NSC IM (Ukraine) for realization of the ITS-90 at the freezing point of copper in the field of non-contact thermometry. The VNIIM participated in the key comparisons CCT-K5. As a consequence, the VNIIM therefore acts as the linking institute for this comparison, registered in the KCDB as COOMET.T-K5, to disseminate metrological equivalence to the NSC IM standards (Ukraine). The protocol of the comparison covers two separate comparisons: a comparison of fixed-point cells (Stage 1), and a comparison of lamp calibrations (Stage 2) at 1084.62 °C. The results of the Stage 2 comparison are used in this report for linkage with the CCT-K5. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCT, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  1. Ubiquitination of lysine-331 by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus protein K5 targets HFE for lysosomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, David A.; Boyle, Louise H.; Boname, Jessica M.; Lehner, Paul J.; Trowsdale, John

    2010-01-01

    The nonclassical MHC class I-related (MHC-I) molecule HFE controls cellular iron homeostasis by a mechanism that has not been fully elucidated. We examined the regulation of HFE by K5, the E3 ubiquitin ligase encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV8), that is known to down-regulate classical MHC-I. K5 down-regulated HFE efficiently, using polyubiquitination of the membrane proximal lysine in the HFE cytoplasmic tail (K331), to target the molecule for degradation via ESCRT1/TSG101-dependent sorting from endosomes to multivesicular bodies (MVBs)/lysosomes. In the primary effusion lymphoma cell line BC-3, which carries latent KSHV, HFE was degraded rapidly upon virus reactivation. HFE was ubiquitinated on lysine-331 in unactivated BC-3 cells, conditions where K5 was not detectable, consistent with an endogenous E3 ubiquitin ligase controlling HFE expression. The results show regulated expression of HFE by ubiquitination, consistent with a role in cellular iron homeostasis, a molecular mechanism targeted by KSHV to achieve a positive iron balance. PMID:20805500

  2. Dynamic Competing Histone H4 K5K8 Acetylation and Butyrylation Are Hallmarks of Highly Active Gene Promoters.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Afsaneh; Zhang, Di; Huang, He; Barral, Sophie; Kwon, Oh Kwang; Qi, Shankang; Tang, Zhanyun; Buchou, Thierry; Vitte, Anne-Laure; He, Tieming; Cheng, Zhongyi; Montellier, Emilie; Gaucher, Jonathan; Curtet, Sandrine; Debernardi, Alexandra; Charbonnier, Guillaume; Puthier, Denis; Petosa, Carlo; Panne, Daniel; Rousseaux, Sophie; Roeder, Robert G; Zhao, Yingming; Khochbin, Saadi

    2016-04-21

    Recently discovered histone lysine acylation marks increase the functional diversity of nucleosomes well beyond acetylation. Here, we focus on histone butyrylation in the context of sperm cell differentiation. Specifically, we investigate the butyrylation of histone H4 lysine 5 and 8 at gene promoters where acetylation guides the binding of Brdt, a bromodomain-containing protein, thereby mediating stage-specific gene expression programs and post-meiotic chromatin reorganization. Genome-wide mapping data show that highly active Brdt-bound gene promoters systematically harbor competing histone acetylation and butyrylation marks at H4 K5 and H4 K8. Despite acting as a direct stimulator of transcription, histone butyrylation competes with acetylation, especially at H4 K5, to prevent Brdt binding. Additionally, H4 K5K8 butyrylation also marks retarded histone removal during late spermatogenesis. Hence, alternating H4 acetylation and butyrylation, while sustaining direct gene activation and dynamic bromodomain binding, could impact the final male epigenome features. PMID:27105113

  3. Dynamic Competing Histone H4 K5K8 Acetylation and Butyrylation Are Hallmarks of Highly Active Gene Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Afsaneh; Zhang, Di; Huang, He; Barral, Sophie; Kwon, Oh Kwang; Qi, Shankang; Tang, Zhanyun; Buchou, Thierry; Vitte, Anne-Laure; He, Tieming; Cheng, Zhongyi; Montellier, Emilie; Gaucher, Jonathan; Curtet, Sandrine; Debernardi, Alexandra; Charbonnier, Guillaume; Puthier, Denis; Petosa, Carlo; Panne, Daniel; Rousseaux, Sophie; Roeder, Robert G.; Zhao, Yingming; Khochbin, Saadi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Recently discovered histone lysine acylation marks increase the functional diversity of nucleosomes well beyond acetylation. Here, we focus on histone butyrylation in the context of sperm cell differentiation. Specifically, we investigate the butyrylation of histone H4 lysine 5 and 8 at gene promoters where acetylation guides the binding of Brdt, a bromodomain-containing protein, thereby mediating stage-specific gene expression programs and post-meiotic chromatin reorganization. Genome-wide mapping data show that highly active Brdt-bound gene promoters systematically harbor competing histone acetylation and butyrylation marks at H4 K5 and H4 K8. Despite acting as a direct stimulator of transcription, histone butyrylation competes with acetylation, especially at H4 K5, to prevent Brdt binding. Additionally, H4 K5K8 butyrylation also marks retarded histone removal during late spermatogenesis. Hence, alternating H4 acetylation and butyrylation, while sustaining direct gene activation and dynamic bromodomain binding, could impact the final male epigenome features. PMID:27105113

  4. Aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG): harmonized evaluation strategy.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gabor G; Ferrer, Isidro; Grinberg, Lea T; Alafuzoff, Irina; Attems, Johannes; Budka, Herbert; Cairns, Nigel J; Crary, John F; Duyckaerts, Charles; Ghetti, Bernardino; Halliday, Glenda M; Ironside, James W; Love, Seth; Mackenzie, Ian R; Munoz, David G; Murray, Melissa E; Nelson, Peter T; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Trojanowski, John Q; Ansorge, Olaf; Arzberger, Thomas; Baborie, Atik; Beach, Thomas G; Bieniek, Kevin F; Bigio, Eileen H; Bodi, Istvan; Dugger, Brittany N; Feany, Mel; Gelpi, Ellen; Gentleman, Stephen M; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Heale, Richard; Hof, Patrick R; Hofer, Monika; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Jellinger, Kurt; Jicha, Gregory A; Ince, Paul; Kofler, Julia; Kövari, Enikö; Kril, Jillian J; Mann, David M; Matej, Radoslav; McKee, Ann C; McLean, Catriona; Milenkovic, Ivan; Montine, Thomas J; Murayama, Shigeo; Lee, Edward B; Rahimi, Jasmin; Rodriguez, Roberta D; Rozemüller, Annemieke; Schneider, Julie A; Schultz, Christian; Seeley, William; Seilhean, Danielle; Smith, Colin; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Takao, Masaki; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Toledo, Jon B; Tolnay, Markus; Troncoso, Juan C; Vinters, Harry V; Weis, Serge; Wharton, Stephen B; White, Charles L; Wisniewski, Thomas; Woulfe, John M; Yamada, Masahito; Dickson, Dennis W

    2016-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in astrocytes is a frequent, but poorly characterized feature of the aging brain. Its etiology is uncertain, but its presence is sufficiently ubiquitous to merit further characterization and classification, which may stimulate clinicopathological studies and research into its pathobiology. This paper aims to harmonize evaluation and nomenclature of aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG), a term that refers to a morphological spectrum of astroglial pathology detected by tau immunohistochemistry, especially with phosphorylation-dependent and 4R isoform-specific antibodies. ARTAG occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in individuals over 60 years of age. Tau-immunoreactive astrocytes in ARTAG include thorn-shaped astrocytes at the glia limitans and in white matter, as well as solitary or clustered astrocytes with perinuclear cytoplasmic tau immunoreactivity that extends into the astroglial processes as fine fibrillar or granular immunopositivity, typically in gray matter. Various forms of ARTAG may coexist in the same brain and might reflect different pathogenic processes. Based on morphology and anatomical distribution, ARTAG can be distinguished from primary tauopathies, but may be concurrent with primary tauopathies or other disorders. We recommend four steps for evaluation of ARTAG: (1) identification of five types based on the location of either morphologies of tau astrogliopathy: subpial, subependymal, perivascular, white matter, gray matter; (2) documentation of the regional involvement: medial temporal lobe, lobar (frontal, parietal, occipital, lateral temporal), subcortical, brainstem; (3) documentation of the severity of tau astrogliopathy; and (4) description of subregional involvement. Some types of ARTAG may underlie neurological symptoms; however, the clinical significance of ARTAG is currently uncertain and awaits further studies. The goal of this proposal is to raise awareness of

  5. Short Fibrils Constitute the Major Species of Seed-Competent Tau in the Brains of Mice Transgenic for Human P301S Tau

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Samuel J.; Kerridge, Caroline; Cooper, Jane; Cavallini, Annalisa; Falcon, Benjamin; Cella, Claire V.; Landi, Alessia; Szekeres, Philip G.; Murray, Tracey K.; Ahmed, Zeshan; Goedert, Michel; Hutton, Michael; O'Neill, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The interneuronal propagation of aggregated tau is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of human tauopathies. It requires the uptake of seed-competent tau into cells, seeding of soluble tau in recipient neurons and release of seeded tau into the extracellular space to complete the cycle. At present, it is not known which tau species are seed-competent. Here, we have dissected the molecular characteristics of seed-competent tau species from the TgP301S tau mouse model using various biochemical techniques and assessed their seeding ability in cell and animal models. We found that sucrose gradient fractions from brain lysates seeded cellular tau aggregation only when large (>10 mer) aggregated, hyperphosphorylated (AT8- and AT100-positive) and nitrated tau was present. In contrast, there was no detectable seeding by fractions containing small, oligomeric (<6 mer) tau. Immunodepletion of the large aggregated AT8-positive tau strongly reduced seeding; moreover, fractions containing these species initiated the formation and spreading of filamentous tau pathology in vivo, whereas fractions containing tau monomers and small oligomeric assemblies did not. By electron microscopy, seed-competent sucrose gradient fractions contained aggregated tau species ranging from ring-like structures to small filaments. Together, these findings indicate that a range of filamentous tau aggregates are the major species that underlie the spreading of tau pathology in the P301S transgenic model. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The spread of tau pathology from neuron to neuron is postulated to account for, or at least to contribute to, the overall propagation of tau pathology during the development of human tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease. It is therefore important to characterize the native tau species responsible for this process of seeding and pathology spreading. Here, we use several biochemical techniques to dissect the molecular characteristics of native tau protein

  6. Short Fibrils Constitute the Major Species of Seed-Competent Tau in the Brains of Mice Transgenic for Human P301S Tau.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Samuel J; Kerridge, Caroline; Cooper, Jane; Cavallini, Annalisa; Falcon, Benjamin; Cella, Claire V; Landi, Alessia; Szekeres, Philip G; Murray, Tracey K; Ahmed, Zeshan; Goedert, Michel; Hutton, Michael; O'Neill, Michael J; Bose, Suchira

    2016-01-20

    The interneuronal propagation of aggregated tau is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of human tauopathies. It requires the uptake of seed-competent tau into cells, seeding of soluble tau in recipient neurons and release of seeded tau into the extracellular space to complete the cycle. At present, it is not known which tau species are seed-competent. Here, we have dissected the molecular characteristics of seed-competent tau species from the TgP301S tau mouse model using various biochemical techniques and assessed their seeding ability in cell and animal models. We found that sucrose gradient fractions from brain lysates seeded cellular tau aggregation only when large (>10 mer) aggregated, hyperphosphorylated (AT8- and AT100-positive) and nitrated tau was present. In contrast, there was no detectable seeding by fractions containing small, oligomeric (<6 mer) tau. Immunodepletion of the large aggregated AT8-positive tau strongly reduced seeding; moreover, fractions containing these species initiated the formation and spreading of filamentous tau pathology in vivo, whereas fractions containing tau monomers and small oligomeric assemblies did not. By electron microscopy, seed-competent sucrose gradient fractions contained aggregated tau species ranging from ring-like structures to small filaments. Together, these findings indicate that a range of filamentous tau aggregates are the major species that underlie the spreading of tau pathology in the P301S transgenic model. Significance statement: The spread of tau pathology from neuron to neuron is postulated to account for, or at least to contribute to, the overall propagation of tau pathology during the development of human tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease. It is therefore important to characterize the native tau species responsible for this process of seeding and pathology spreading. Here, we use several biochemical techniques to dissect the molecular characteristics of native tau protein

  7. Tau function of the CKP hierarchy and nonlinearizable virasoro symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Liang; Wu, Chao-Zhong

    2013-09-01

    We introduce a single tau function that represents the C-type Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (CKP) hierarchy in a generalized Hirota ‘bilinear’ equation. The actions on the tau function by additional symmetries for the hierarchy are also calculated, which involve strictly more than a central extension of the w^C_\\infty -algebra. As an application, for Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchies associated to affine Kac-Moody algebras of type C, we obtain a formula to compute the obstacles in linearizing their Virasoro symmetries and hence prove the Virasoro symmetries to be nonlinearizable when acting on the tau function.

  8. Disentangling perturbative and power corrections in precision tau decay analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbunov, D.S.; Pivovarov, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Hadronic tau decay precision data are analyzed with account of both perturbative and power corrections of high orders within QCD. It is found that contributions of high order power corrections are essential for extracting a numerical value for the strange quark mass from the data on Cabibbo suppressed tau decays. We show that with inclusion of new five-loop perturbative corrections in the analysis the convergence of perturbation theory remains acceptable only for few low order moments. We obtain m{sub s}(M{sub {tau}})=130{+-}27 MeV in agreement with previous estimates.

  9. Search for lepton flavor violating decays tau+/--->l+/-omega.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Ayad, R; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Biesiada, J; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2008-02-22

    A search for lepton flavor violating decays of a tau to a lighter-mass charged lepton and an omega vector meson is performed using 384.1 fb(-1) of e(+)e(-) annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center PEP-II storage ring. No signal is found, and the upper limits on the branching ratios are determined to be B(tau(+/-)-->e;{+/-}omega)<1.1 x10 (-7) and B(tau(+/-)-->micro(+/-)omega)<1.0 x 10(-7) at 90% confidence level. PMID:18352541

  10. Conformation determines the seeding potencies of native and recombinant Tau aggregates.

    PubMed

    Falcon, Benjamin; Cavallini, Annalisa; Angers, Rachel; Glover, Sarah; Murray, Tracey K; Barnham, Luanda; Jackson, Samuel; O'Neill, Michael J; Isaacs, Adrian M; Hutton, Michael L; Szekeres, Philip G; Goedert, Michel; Bose, Suchira

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular Tau inclusions are a pathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as the tauopathies. They include Alzheimer disease, tangle-only dementia, Pick disease, argyrophilic grain disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal degeneration. Tau pathology appears to spread through intercellular propagation, requiring the formation of assembled "prion-like" species. Several cell and animal models have been described that recapitulate aspects of this phenomenon. However, the molecular characteristics of seed-competent Tau remain unclear. Here, we have used a cell model to understand the relationships between Tau structure/phosphorylation and seeding by aggregated Tau species from the brains of mice transgenic for human mutant P301S Tau and full-length aggregated recombinant P301S Tau. Deletion of motifs (275)VQIINK(280) and (306)VQIVYK(311) abolished the seeding activity of recombinant full-length Tau, suggesting that its aggregation was necessary for seeding. We describe conformational differences between native and synthetic Tau aggregates that may account for the higher seeding activity of native assembled Tau. When added to aggregated Tau seeds from the brains of mice transgenic for P301S Tau, soluble recombinant Tau aggregated and acquired the molecular properties of aggregated Tau from transgenic mouse brain. We show that seeding is conferred by aggregated Tau that enters cells through macropinocytosis and seeds the assembly of endogenous Tau into filaments. PMID:25406315

  11. Loss of medial septum cholinergic neurons in THY-Tau22 mouse model: what links with tau pathology?

    PubMed

    Belarbi, K; Burnouf, S; Fernandez-Gomez, F-J; Desmercières, J; Troquier, L; Brouillette, J; Tsambou, L; Grosjean, M-E; Caillierez, R; Demeyer, D; Hamdane, M; Schindowski, K; Blum, D; Buée, L

    2011-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder histologically defined by the cerebral accumulation of amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons is another hallmark of the disease thought to contribute to the cognitive dysfunctions. To this date, the mechanisms underlying cholinergic neurons degeneration remain uncertain. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between neurofibrillary degeneration and cholinergic defects in AD using THY-Tau22 transgenic mouse model exhibiting a major hippocampal AD-like tau pathology and hyperphosphorylated tau species in the septohippocampal pathway. Here, we report that at a time THY-Tau22 mice display strong reference memory alterations, the retrograde transport of fluorogold through the septohippocampal pathway is altered. This impairment is associated with a significant reduction in the number of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-immunopositive cholinergic neurons in the medial septum. Analysis of nerve growth factor (NGF) levels supports an accumulation of the mature neurotrophin in the hippocampus of THY-Tau22 mice, consistent with a decrease of its uptake or retrograde transport by cholinergic terminals. Finally, our data strongly support that tau pathology could be instrumental in the cholinergic neuronal loss observed in AD. PMID:21605043

  12. Pattern of tau hyperphosphorylation and neurotransmitter markers in the brainstem of senescent tau filament forming transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Morcinek, Kerstin; Köhler, Christoph; Götz, Jürgen; Schröder, Hannsjörg

    2013-02-25

    The early occurrence of brainstem-related symptoms, e.g. gait and balance impairment, apathy and depression in Alzheimer's disease patients suggests brainstem involvement in the initial pathogenesis. To address the question whether tau filament forming mice expressing mutated human tau mirror histopathological changes observed in Alzheimer brainstem, the degree and distribution of neurofibrillary lesions as well as the pattern of cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons were investigated. The expression of the human tau transgene was observed in multiple brainstem nuclei, particularly in the magnocellular reticular formation, vestibular nuclei, cranial nerve motor nuclei, sensory trigeminal nerve nuclei, inferior and superior colliculi, periaqueductal and pontine gray matter, and the red nucleus. Most of the human tau-immunoreactive cell groups also showed tau hyperphosphorylation at the epitopes Thr231/Ser235 and Ser202/Thr205, while abnormal tau phosphorylation at the epitope Ser422 or silver stained structures were almost totally lacking. We found no obvious differences in distribution and density of cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons between tau-transgenic and wild type mice. Although numerous brainstem nuclei in our model expressed human tau protein, the development of neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads and ghost tangles was rare and likewise its distribution differed largely from Alzheimer's disease pattern. The number of monoaminergic neurons remained unchanged in the transgenic mice, while monoaminergic nuclei in Alzheimer brainstem showed a distinct neuronal loss. However, the distribution of pretangle-affected neurons in the tau-transgenic mice partly resembled those seen in progressive supranuclear palsy, presenting these animals as a model to examine brainstem pathogenesis of progressive supranuclear palsy. PMID:23261664

  13. The neuritic plaque facilitates pathological conversion of tau in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Braunstein, Kerstin E.; Zhang, Juhong; Lau, Ashley; Sibener, Leslie; Deeble, Christopher; Wong, Philip C.

    2016-01-01

    A central question in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is whether the neuritic plaque is necessary and sufficient for the development of tau pathology. Hyperphosphorylation of tau is found within dystrophic neurites surrounding β-amyloid deposits in AD mouse models but the pathological conversion of tau is absent. Likewise, expression of a human tau repeat domain in mice is insufficient to drive the pathological conversion of tau. Here we developed an Aβ-amyloidosis mouse model that expresses the human tau repeat domain and show that in these mice, the neuritic plaque facilitates the pathological conversion of wild-type tau. We show that this tau fragment seeds the neuritic plaque-dependent pathological conversion of wild-type tau that spreads from the cortex and hippocampus to the brain stem. These results establish that in addition to the neuritic plaque, a second determinant is required to drive the conversion of wild-type tau. PMID:27373369

  14. Study of High-multiplicity 3-prong and 5-prong Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P

    2012-06-01

    We present measurements of the branching fractions of 3-prong and 5-prong {tau} decay modes using a sample of 430 million {tau} lepton pairs, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} (3{pi}){sup -} {eta}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} (3{pi}){sup -} {yields} {omega}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} f{sub 1}(1285){nu}{sub {tau}} branching fractions are presented as well as a new limit on the branching fraction of the isospin-forbidden, second-class current {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} {eta}{prime}(958){nu}{sub {tau}} decay. We find no evidence for charged kaons in these decay modes and place the first upper limits on their branching fractions.

  15. Search for CP Violation in the Decay tau- \\to pi- K^0_S (>= 0 pi0) nu_tau

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-02-16

    We report a search for CP violation in the decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0}({>=} 0{pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}} using a dataset of 437 million {tau} lepton pairs, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 476 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. The CP-violating decay-rate asymmetry is determined to be (-0.45 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.11)%, approximately three standard deviations from the Standard Model prediction of (0.33 {+-} 0.01)%.

  16. Porcine MAP3K5 analysis: molecular cloning, characterization, tissue expression pattern, and copy number variations associated with residual feed intake.

    PubMed

    Pu, L; Zhang, L C; Zhang, J S; Song, X; Wang, L G; Liang, J; Zhang, Y B; Liu, X; Yan, H; Zhang, T; Yue, J W; Li, N; Wu, Q Q; Wang, L X

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 5 (MAP3K5) is essential for apoptosis, proliferation, differentiation, and immune responses, and is a candidate marker for residual feed intake (RFI) in pig. We cloned the full-length cDNA sequence of porcine MAP3K5 by rapid-amplification of cDNA ends. The 5451-bp gene contains a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) (718 bp), a coding region (3738 bp), and a 3'-UTR (995 bp), and encodes a peptide of 1245 amino acids, which shares 97, 99, 97, 93, 91, and 84% sequence identity with cattle, sheep, human, mouse, chicken, and zebrafish MAP3K5, respectively. The deduced MAP3K5 protein sequence contains two conserved domains: a DUF4071 domain and a protein kinase domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that porcine MAP3K5 forms a separate branch to vicugna and camel MAP3K5. Tissue expression analysis using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that MAP3K5 was expressed in the heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, muscle, fat, pancrea, ileum, and stomach tissues. Copy number variation was detected for porcine MAP3K5 and validated by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, a significant increase in average copy number was detected in the low RFI group when compared to the high RFI group in a Duroc pig population. These results provide useful information regarding the influence of MAP3K5 on RFI in pigs. PMID:27525933

  17. Planet Formation in the GG Tau A System?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutrey, A.

    2015-12-01

    Located at 140 pc, the environment of the young hierarchical TTauri star system GG Tau A remains a unique laboratory to study tidal interactions and planet formation. We report new ALMA observations of the triple star GG Tau A performed at 0.5mm and in CO J=6-5 at resolution of 0.3 arcsecond. These new images resolve out the massive and narrow dust ring and reveal that a large amount of CO gas is streaming inside the cavity or the gravitationally unstable area. The dust and gas disk surrounding GG Tau Aa which is separated by 35 AU from the binary GG Tau Ab, would not survive without regular replenishment form these streamers.

  18. Measurement of the tau polarisation at the Z resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Mours, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fenandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Mattison, T.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Casper, D.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Haywood, S.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Lusiani, A.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miotto, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Perlas, J. A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; El Fellous, R.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Lannutti, J.; Levinthal, D.; Mermikides, M.; Sawyer, L.; Wasserbaech, S.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Belk, A. T.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Dugeay, S.; Greene, A. M.; Hassaed, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Nash, J.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Orteu, S.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Rotscheidt, H.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jaffe, D. E.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Carter, J. M.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Mir, Ll. M.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; West, L. R.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Edwards, M.; Fisher, S. M.; Jones, T. J.; Norton, P. R.; Salmon, D. P.; Thompson, J. C.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Aubert, J.-J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Roos, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Carney, R. E.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hatfield, F.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J. S.; Cowen, D. F.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Jared, R. C.; Leclaire, B. W.; Lishka, C.; Pan, Y. B.; Pater, J. R.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Sharma, V.; Shi, Z. H.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.

    1993-09-01

    Using 18.8 pb-1 of data collected in 1990 and 1991, ALEPH has measured the tau polarisation in the decay modes τ→ ev bar v, τ→μ v bar v, τ→πν, τ→ρν and τ→ a 1ν, using both the individual tau decay kinematics and the event acollinearity. The measurement of the tau polarisation as a function of the production polar angle yields the two parameters A τ and A e , where A l =2 g {/v l } g {/A l }/( g {/v l })2+( g {/A l })2] The results A τ=0.143±0.023 and A e =0.120±0.026 are consistent with the hypothesis of electron-tau universality. Assuming universality yields a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle sin2θ{/w eff}=0.2332±0.0022.

  19. Tau/Amyloid Beta 42 Peptide Test (Alzheimer Biomarkers)

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alzheimer Biomarkers Formal name: Tau Protein and Amyloid Beta ... supplemental tests to help establish a diagnosis of Alzheimer disease and to distinguish between AD and other ...

  20. Measurement of \\mathcal{B}(\\tau^{-}\\-->\\bar{K^{0}}\\pi^{-}\

    SciTech Connect

    Wren, A

    2008-08-13

    A preliminary measurement of the branching fraction {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) is made using 384.6 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data provided by the PEP-II collider, operating primarily at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV, and recorded using the BABAR detector. From this they measure: {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.840 {+-} 0.004(stat) {+-} 0.023(syst))%. This result is the most precise measurement to date and is consistent with the world average.

  1. Study of the $\\tau^- to 3h^- 2h^+ \

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /more authors..

    2005-05-04

    The branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -} 2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay (h = {pi}, K) is measured with the BABAR detector to be (8.56 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.42) x 10{sup -4}, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. The observed structure of this decay is significantly different from the phase space prediction, with the {rho} resonance playing a strong role. The decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, with the f{sub 1}(1285) meson decaying to four charged pions, is observed and the branching fraction is measured to be (3.9 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup -4}.

  2. Argonne Tau-charm factory collider design study

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.; Crosbie, E.A.; Norem, J.

    1995-12-01

    The design approach and design principles for a Tau-charm Factory at Argonne were studied. These studies led to a set of preliminary parameters and tentative component features as presented in this paper.

  3. Lepton-Flavor-Violating Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Marchiori, G.; /Paris, LPTHE

    2012-04-09

    We present the most recent searches for lepton-flavor-violating (LFV) {tau} decays in BABAR. We find no evidence of {tau} decaying to three charged leptons or to a charged lepton and a neutral meson (K{sub S}{sup 0}, {rho}, {phi}, K*{sup 0}, {bar K}*{sup 0}), and set upper limits on the corresponding branching fractions (BF) between 1.8 and 19 x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level (CL).

  4. Physiological and pathological phosphorylation of tau by Cdk5.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Taeko; Ishiguro, Koichi; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau is one of the major pathological events in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other related neurodegenerative diseases, including frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). Mutations in the tau gene MAPT are a cause of FTDP-17, and the mutated tau proteins are hyperphosphorylated in patient brains. Thus, it is important to determine the molecular mechanism of hyperphosphorylation of tau to understand the pathology of these diseases collectively called tauopathy. Tau is phosphorylated at many sites via several protein kinases, and a characteristic is phosphorylation at Ser/Thr residues in Ser/Thr-Pro sequences, which are targeted by proline-directed protein kinases such as ERK, GSK3β, and Cdk5. Among these kinases, Cdk5 is particularly interesting because it could be abnormally activated in AD. Cdk5 is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), but in contrast to the major Cdks, which promote cell cycle progression in proliferating cells, Cdk5 is activated in post-mitotic neurons via the neuron-specific activator p35. Cdk5-p35 plays a critical role in brain development and physiological synaptic activity. In contrast, in disease brains, Cdk5 is thought to be hyperactivated by p25, which is the N-terminal truncated form of p35 and is generated by cleavage with calpain. Several reports have indicated that tau is hyperphosphorylated by Cdk5-p25. However, normal and abnormal phosphorylation of tau by Cdk5 is still not completely understood. In this article, we summarize the physiological and pathological phosphorylation of tau via Cdk5. PMID:25076872

  5. Physics of a high-luminosity Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.E.

    1992-10-01

    This paper highlights the physics capabilities of a Tau-Charm Factory; i.e., high luminosity ({approximately}10{sup 33}cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}) e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider operating in the center-of-mass energy range of 3-5 GeV, with a high-precision, general-purpose detector. Recent developments in {tau} and charm physics are emphasized.

  6. Lepton Flavour Violation in Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, F.F.; /Rutherford

    2011-11-07

    Recent results from {tau} physics studies at BABAR are presented with an emphasis on Lepton Flavour Violation measurements. The results from the current generation of B-meson Factories are already beginning to constrain the parameter space of models that go beyond the Standard Model. By the end of their data-taking, the current generation of B-meson factories will have produced nearly 2 billion {tau} pair decays. The physics potential of this legacy has only just begun to be exploited.

  7. Physiological and pathological phosphorylation of tau by Cdk5

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Taeko; Ishiguro, Koichi; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau is one of the major pathological events in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other related neurodegenerative diseases, including frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). Mutations in the tau gene MAPT are a cause of FTDP-17, and the mutated tau proteins are hyperphosphorylated in patient brains. Thus, it is important to determine the molecular mechanism of hyperphosphorylation of tau to understand the pathology of these diseases collectively called tauopathy. Tau is phosphorylated at many sites via several protein kinases, and a characteristic is phosphorylation at Ser/Thr residues in Ser/Thr-Pro sequences, which are targeted by proline-directed protein kinases such as ERK, GSK3β, and Cdk5. Among these kinases, Cdk5 is particularly interesting because it could be abnormally activated in AD. Cdk5 is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), but in contrast to the major Cdks, which promote cell cycle progression in proliferating cells, Cdk5 is activated in post-mitotic neurons via the neuron-specific activator p35. Cdk5-p35 plays a critical role in brain development and physiological synaptic activity. In contrast, in disease brains, Cdk5 is thought to be hyperactivated by p25, which is the N-terminal truncated form of p35 and is generated by cleavage with calpain. Several reports have indicated that tau is hyperphosphorylated by Cdk5-p25. However, normal and abnormal phosphorylation of tau by Cdk5 is still not completely understood. In this article, we summarize the physiological and pathological phosphorylation of tau via Cdk5. PMID:25076872

  8. Acetylation mimic of lysine 280 exacerbates human Tau neurotoxicity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gorsky, Marianna Karina; Burnouf, Sylvie; Dols, Jacqueline; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction and accumulation of the microtubule-associated human Tau (hTau) protein into intraneuronal aggregates is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Reversible lysine acetylation has recently emerged as a post-translational modification that may play an important role in the modulation of hTau pathology. Acetylated hTau species have been observed within hTau aggregates in human AD brains and multi-acetylation of hTau in vitro regulates its propensity to aggregate. However, whether lysine acetylation at position 280 (K280) modulates hTau-induced toxicity in vivo is unknown. We generated new Drosophila transgenic models of hTau pathology to evaluate the contribution of K280 acetylation to hTau toxicity, by analysing the respective toxicity of pseudo-acetylated (K280Q) and pseudo-de-acetylated (K280R) mutant forms of hTau. We observed that mis-expression of pseudo-acetylated K280Q-hTau in the adult fly nervous system potently exacerbated fly locomotion defects and photoreceptor neurodegeneration. In addition, modulation of K280 influenced total hTau levels and phosphorylation without changing hTau solubility. Altogether, our results indicate that pseudo-acetylation of the single K280 residue is sufficient to exacerbate hTau neurotoxicity in vivo, suggesting that acetylated K280-hTau species contribute to the pathological events leading to neurodegeneration in AD. PMID:26940749

  9. SUMOylation at K340 inhibits tau degradation through deregulating its phosphorylation and ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong-Bin; Xia, Yi-Yuan; Shu, Xi-Ji; Liu, Zan-Chao; Feng, Ye; Liu, Xing-Hua; Yu, Guang; Yin, Gang; Xiong, Yan-Si; Zeng, Kuan; Jiang, Jun; Ye, Keqiang; Wang, Xiao-Chuan; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2014-11-18

    Intracellular accumulation of the abnormally modified tau is hallmark pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the mechanism leading to tau aggregation is not fully characterized. Here, we studied the effects of tau SUMOylation on its phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and degradation. We show that tau SUMOylation induces tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple AD-associated sites, whereas site-specific mutagenesis of tau at K340R (the SUMOylation site) or simultaneous inhibition of tau SUMOylation by ginkgolic acid abolishes the effect of small ubiquitin-like modifier protein 1 (SUMO-1). Conversely, tau hyperphosphorylation promotes its SUMOylation; the latter in turn inhibits tau degradation with reduction of solubility and ubiquitination of tau proteins. Furthermore, the enhanced SUMO-immunoreactivity, costained with the hyperphosphorylated tau, is detected in cerebral cortex of the AD brains, and β-amyloid exposure of rat primary hippocampal neurons induces a dose-dependent SUMOylation of the hyperphosphorylated tau. Our findings suggest that tau SUMOylation reciprocally stimulates its phosphorylation and inhibits the ubiquitination-mediated tau degradation, which provides a new insight into the AD-like tau accumulation. PMID:25378699

  10. Critical role of acetylation in tau-mediated neurodegeneration and cognitive deficits.

    PubMed

    Min, Sang-Won; Chen, Xu; Tracy, Tara E; Li, Yaqiao; Zhou, Yungui; Wang, Chao; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Minami, S Sakura; Defensor, Erwin; Mok, Sue Ann; Sohn, Peter Dongmin; Schilling, Birgit; Cong, Xin; Ellerby, Lisa; Gibson, Bradford W; Johnson, Jeffrey; Krogan, Nevan; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Gestwicki, Jason; Masliah, Eliezer; Verdin, Eric; Gan, Li

    2015-10-01

    Tauopathies, including frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), are neurodegenerative diseases in which tau fibrils accumulate. Recent evidence supports soluble tau species as the major toxic species. How soluble tau accumulates and causes neurodegeneration remains unclear. Here we identify tau acetylation at Lys174 (K174) as an early change in AD brains and a critical determinant in tau homeostasis and toxicity in mice. The acetyl-mimicking mutant K174Q slows tau turnover and induces cognitive deficits in vivo. Acetyltransferase p300-induced tau acetylation is inhibited by salsalate and salicylate, which enhance tau turnover and reduce tau levels. In the PS19 transgenic mouse model of FTD, administration of salsalate after disease onset inhibited p300 activity, lowered levels of total tau and tau acetylated at K174, rescued tau-induced memory deficits and prevented hippocampal atrophy. The tau-lowering and protective effects of salsalate were diminished in neurons expressing K174Q tau. Targeting tau acetylation could be a new therapeutic strategy against human tauopathies. PMID:26390242

  11. H4K5 histone acetylation of BRG1 is associated with heroin administration rather than addiction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Limin; Hong, Qingxiao; Chen, Xiaoying; Xu, Xuting; Liu, Huifen; Zhou, Wenhua; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    Diacetylmorphine hydrochloride (heroin) addiction is a chronic relapsing brain disorder that is a heavy public health burden worldwide. Brm/SWI2-related gene-1 (BRG1) is a tumor suppressor gene that can influence embryogenesis and the development of the cerebellum. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of histone H4 lysine 5 (H4K5) modifications on the BRG1 gene in brain tissue of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of heroin-addicted rats. A total of 21 male Sprague Dawley rats were raised in a standard manner and underwent heroin self-administration training. Rats were randomly divided into three equal groups: Group A, self-administered delivery of heroin; group B, yoked delivery of heroin; and group C, yoked delivery of saline. The VTA was harvested and subjected to chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis. Gene expression was evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We calculated the recovery rate, which indicated the percentage of the total input BRG1 recovered by ChIP. Our results showed that BRG1 was less associated with H4K5 histone modification in the group of rats that underwent heroin self-administration than in the other two groups (A vs. B, P=0.031; A vs. C, P=0.067). The recovery fold changes of the self-administration group and the passive-administration group were significantly different from those of the group with yoked saline (A vs. C, P=0.013; B vs. C, P=0.009; A vs. B, P=0.731). The results of the current study demonstrated that H4K5 histone acetylation of BRG1 in the VTA may be associated with heroin administration, but not addiction. PMID:27588112

  12. A measurement of the tau Michel parameters at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Quigley, J.

    1997-05-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of the tau Michel parameters. This measurement utilizes the highly polarized SLC electron beam to extract these quantities directly from the measured tau decay spectra using the 1993--95 SLD sample of 4,528 tau pair events. The results are {rho}{sup e} = 0.71 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.05, {xi}{sup e} = 1.16 {+-} 0.52 {+-} 0.06, and ({xi}{delta}){sup e} = 0.85 {+-} 0.43 {+-} 0.08 for tau decays to electrons and {rho}{sup {mu}} = 0.54 {+-} 0.28 {sup {minus}} 0.14, {eta}{sup {mu}} = {minus}0.59 {+-} 0.82 {+-} 0.45, {xi}{sup {mu}} = 0.75 {+-} 0.50 {+-} 0.14, and ({xi}{delta}){sup {mu}} = 0.82 {+-} 0.32 {+-} 0.07 for tau decays to muons. Combining all leptonic tau decays gives {rho} = 0.72 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.03, {xi} = 1.05 {+-} 0.35 {+-} 0.04, and {Xi}{delta} = 0.88 {+-} 0.27 {+-} 0.04. These results agree well with the current world average and the Standard Model.

  13. Tau triage decisions mediated by the chaperone network.

    PubMed

    Cook, Casey; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    The pathological accumulation of the microtubule-binding protein tau is linked to an increasing number of neurodegenerative conditions associated with aging, though the mechanisms by which tau accumulates in disease are unclear. In this review, we will summarize our previous research assessing the mechanism of action, as well as the therapeutic potential of Hsp90 inhibition for the treatment of tauopathies. Specifically, we describe the development of a high-throughput screening approach to identify and rank compounds, and demonstrate the selective elimination of aberrant p-tau species in the brain following treatment with an Hsp90 inhibitor. Additionally, we identify CHIP as an essential component of the Hsp90 chaperone complex that mediates tau degradation, and present evidence to suggest that CHIP functions to identify and sequester neurotoxic tau species. Finally, we discuss recent data identifying an additional mechanism by which CHIP modulates protein triage decisions involving Hsp90. Specifically, CHIP indirectly regulates Hsp90 chaperone activity by modulating steady-state levels of the Hsp90 deacetylase, HDAC6, thus influencing both the acetylation state and function of Hsp90. Thus future research directions will focus on the manipulation of this network to promote degradation of pathogenic tau species in disease. PMID:22596270

  14. The triple binary star EQ Tau with an active component

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K.; Hu, S.-M.; Qian, S.-B.; He, J.-J. E-mail: likai@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-05-01

    New photometric data of EQ Tau observed in 2010 and 2013 are presented. Light curves obtained in 2000 and 2004 by Yuan and Qian and 2001 by Yang and Liu, together with our two newly determined sets of light curves, were analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney code. The five sets of light curves exhibit very obvious variations, implying that the light curves of EQ Tau show a strong O'Connell effect. We found that EQ Tau is an A-type shallow contact binary with a contact degree of f = 11.8%; variable dark spots on the primary component of EQ Tau were also observed. Using 10 new times of minimum light, together with those collected from the literature, the orbital period change of EQ Tau was analyzed. We found that its orbital period includes a secular decrease (dP/dt = –3.63 × 10{sup –8} days yr{sup –1}) and a cyclic oscillation (A {sub 3} = 0.0058 days and P {sub 3} = 22.7 yr). The secular increase of the period can be explained by mass transfer from the more massive component to the less massive one or/and angular momentum loss due to a magnetic stellar wind. The Applegate mechanism cannot explain the cyclic orbital period change. A probable transit-like event was observed in 2010. Therefore, the cyclic orbital period change of EQ Tau may be due to the light time effect of a third body.

  15. Potent inhibition of tau fibrillization with a multivalent ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Honson, Nicolette S.; Jensen, Jordan R.; Darby, Michael V.; Kuret, Jeff

    2007-11-09

    Small-molecule inhibitors of tau fibrillization are under investigation as tools for interrogating the tau aggregation pathway and as potential therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease. Established inhibitors include thiacarbocyanine dyes, which can inhibit recombinant tau fibrillization in the presence of anionic surfactant aggregation inducers. In an effort to increase inhibitory potency, a cyclic bis-thiacarbocyanine molecule containing two thiacarbocyanine moieties was synthesized and characterized with respect to tau fibrillization inhibitory activity by electron microscopy and ligand aggregation state by absorbance spectroscopy. Results showed that the inhibitory activity of the bis-thiacarbocyanine was qualitatively similar to a monomeric cyanine dye, but was more potent with 50% inhibition achieved at {approx}80 nM concentration. At all concentrations tested in aqueous solution, the bis-thiacarbocyanine collapsed to form a closed clamshell structure. However, the presence of tau protein selectively stabilized the open conformation. These results suggest that the inhibitory activity of bis-thiacarbocyanine results from multivalency, and reveal a route to more potent tau aggregation inhibitors.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Tau-Microtubule Interaction Using FRET

    PubMed Central

    Di Maïo, Isabelle L.; Barbier, Pascale; Allegro, Diane; Brault, Cédric; Peyrot, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between the microtubule associated protein, tau and the microtubules is investigated. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay was used to determine the distance separating tau to the microtubule wall, as well as the binding parameters of the interaction. By using microtubules stabilized with Flutax-2 as donor and tau labeled with rhodamine as acceptor, a donor-to-acceptor distance of 54 ± 1 Å was found. A molecular model is proposed in which Flutax-2 is directly accessible to tau-rhodamine molecules for energy transfer. By titration, we calculated the stoichiometric dissociation constant to be equal to 1.0 ± 0.5 µM. The influence of the C-terminal tails of αβ-tubulin on the tau-microtubule interaction is presented once a procedure to form homogeneous solution of cleaved tubulin has been determined. The results indicate that the C-terminal tails of α- and β-tubulin by electrostatic effects and of recruitment seem to be involved in the binding mechanism of tau. PMID:25196605

  17. ATLAS Search for SM H{yields}{tau}{tau} in the VBF Production Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Hanninger, Guilherme Nunes

    2008-11-23

    This article discusses the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in vector boson fusion and subsequent decay into {tau} pairs with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. This analysis is based on Monte Carlo signal and background samples simulated with a detailed detector description and the entire trigger chain. Preliminary results are reported including the expected discovery potential with 30 fb{sup -1} of data as well as the 95% expected signal exclusion with 10 fb{sup -1}.

  18. Preliminary Measurement of B(tau- ---> K- pi0 nu/tau) Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Salvatore, F.; Lyon, A.J.; /Manchester U.

    2005-07-08

    A preliminary measurement of the branching fraction {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) is made using 124.4 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data provided by the PEP-II accelerator, operating primarily at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV, and recorded using the BABAR detector. They measure: {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.438 {+-} 0.004(stat) {+-} 0.022(syst))%. This result is the world's most precise measurement of this branching fraction to date and is consistent with the world average.

  19. Pseudophosphorylation of Tau at distinct epitopes or the presence of the P301L mutation targets the microtubule-associated protein Tau to dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Xia, Di; Li, Chuanzhou; Götz, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and Tau in the brain. In mature neurons, Tau is concentrated in the axon and found at lower levels in the dendrite where it is required for targeting Fyn to the spines. Here Fyn mediates Aβ toxicity, which is vastly abrogated when Tau is either deleted or a truncated form of Tau (Tau(1-255)) is co-expressed. Interestingly, MAP2, a microtubule-binding protein with mainly dendritic localization that shares Fyn-binding motifs with Tau, does not mediate Aβ's synaptic toxicity in the absence of Tau. Here we show in hippocampal neurons that endogenous Tau enters the entire spine, albeit at low levels, whereas MAP2 only enters its neck or is restricted to the dendritic shaft. Based on an extensive mutagenesis study, we also reveal that the spine localization of Tau is facilitated by deletion of the microtubule-binding repeat domain. When distinct phosphorylation sites (AT180-T231/S235, 12E8-S262/S356, PHF1-S396/S404) were pseudophosphorylated (with glutamic acid, using alanine replacements as controls), Tau targeting to spines was markedly increased, whereas the pseudophosphorylation of the late phospho-epitope S422 had no effect. In determining the role physiological Fyn has in the spine localization of Tau, we found that neither were endogenous Tau levels reduced in Fyn knockout compared with wild-type synaptosomal brain fractions nor was the spine localization of over-expressed pseudophosphorylated or P301L Tau. This demonstrates that although Fyn targeting to the spine is Tau dependent, elevated levels of phosphorylated Tau or P301L Tau can enter the spine in a Fyn-independent manner. PMID:25558816

  20. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (an-tee-TRIP-sin) deficiency, or AAT ... as it relates to lung disease. Overview Alpha-1 antitrypsin, also called AAT, is a protein made ...

  1. Betaine Alleviates Hypertriglycemia and Tau Hyperphosphorylation in db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ga-young; Won, Sae-Bom; Kim, Juhae; Jeon, Sookyoung; Han, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Betaine supplementation has been shown to alleviate altered glucose and lipid metabolism in mice fed a high-fat diet or a high-sucrose diet. We investigated the beneficial effects of betaine in diabetic db/db mice. Alleviation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress was also examined in the livers and brains of db/db mice fed a betaine-supplemented diet. Male C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice were fed with or without 1% betaine for 5 wk (referred to as the db/db-betaine group and the db/db group, respectively). Lean non-diabetic db/db+ mice were used as the control group. Betaine supplementation significantly alleviated hyperinsulinemia in db/db mice. Betaine reduced hepatic expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha, a major transcription factor involved in gluconeogenesis. Lower serum triglyceride concentrations were also observed in the db/db-betaine group compared to the db/db group. Betaine supplementation induced hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a mRNA levels, and reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. Mice fed a betaine-supplemented diet had increased total glutathione concentrations and catalase activity, and reduced lipid peroxidation levels in the liver. Furthermore, betaine also reduced ER stress in liver and brain. c-Jun N-terminal kinase activity and tau hyperphosphorylation levels were lower in db/db mice fed a betaine-supplemented diet, compared to db/db mice. Our findings suggest that betaine improves hyperlipidemia and tau hyperphosphorylation in db/db mice with insulin resistance by alleviating ER and oxidative stress. PMID:24278623

  2. Enhanced tau neutrino appearance through invisible decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliaroli, Giulia; Di Marco, Natalia; Mannarelli, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    The decay of neutrino mass eigenstates leads to a change of the conversion and survival probability of neutrino flavor eigenstates. Exploiting the recent results released by the long-baseline OPERA experiment we perform the statistical investigation of the neutrino invisible decay hypothesis in the νμ→ντ appearance channel. We find that the neutrino decay provides an enhancement of the expected tau appearance signal with respect to the standard oscillation scenario for the long-baseline OPERA experiment. The increase of the νμ→ντ conversion probability by the decay of one of the mass eigenstates is due to a reduction of the "destructive interference" among the different massive neutrino components. Despite data showing a very mild preference for invisible decays with respect to the oscillations only hypothesis, we provide an upper limit for the neutrino decay lifetime in this channel of τ3/m3≳1.3 ×10-13 s /eV at the 90% confidence level.

  3. POLARIMETRY OF DG TAU AT 350 mum

    SciTech Connect

    Krejny, M.; Matthews, T. G.; Novak, G.; Cho, J.; Li, H.; Shinnaga, H.; Vaillancourt, J. E.

    2009-11-01

    We present the first 350 mum polarization measurement for the disk of the T Tauri star (TTS) DG Tau. The data were obtained using the SHARP polarimeter at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We measured normalized Stokes parameters q= -0.0086 +- 0.0060 and u = -0.0012 +- 0.0061, which gives a 2sigma upper limit for the percent polarization of 1.7%. We obtain information about the polarization spectrum by comparing our 350 mum measurement with an 850 mum polarization detection previously published for this source. Comparing the two measurements in Stokes space (not in percent polarization) shows that the two data points are not consistent, i.e., either the degree of polarization or the angle of polarization (or both) must change significantly as one moves from 850 mum to 350 mum. This conclusion concerning the polarization spectrum disagrees with the predictions of a recent model for TTS disk polarization. We show that this discrepancy can be explained by optical depth effects. Specifically, we demonstrate that if one were to add more mass to the model disk, one would expect to obtain a model polarization spectrum in which the polarization degree falls sharply with increasing frequency, consistent with the observations at the two wavelengths. We suggest that multiwavelength polarimetry of TTS disk emission may provide a promising method for probing the opacity of TTS disks.

  4. Tau Pathology Spread in PS19 Tau Transgenic Mice Following Locus Coeruleus (LC) Injections of Synthetic Tau Fibrils is Determined by the LC’s Afferent and Efferent Connections

    PubMed Central

    Iba, Michiyo; McBride, Jennifer D.; Guo, Jing L.; Zhang, Bin; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous tau inclusions are hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative tauopathies. An increasing number of studies implicate the cell-to-cell propagation of tau pathology in the progression of tauopathies. We recently showed [25] that inoculation of preformed synthetic tau fibrils (tau PFFs) into the hippocampus of young transgenic (Tg) mice (PS19) overexpressing human P301S mutant tau induced robust tau pathology in anatomically connected brain regions including the locus coeruleus (LC). Since Braak and colleagues hypothesized that the LC is the first brain structure to develop tau lesions and since LC has widespread connections throughout the CNS, LC neurons could be the critical initiators of the stereotypical spreading of tau pathology through connectome-dependent transmission of pathological tau in AD. Here, we report that injections of tau PFFs into the LC of PS19 mice induced propagation of tau pathology to major afferents and efferents of the LC. Notably, tau pathology propagated along LC efferent projections was localized not only to axon terminals but also to neuronal perikarya, suggesting transneuronal transfer of templated tau pathology to neurons receiving LC projections. Further, brainstem neurons giving rise to major LC afferents also developed perikaryal tau pathology. Surprisingly, while tangle bearing neurons degenerated in the LC ipsilateral to the injection site starting 6 months post-injection, no neuron loss was seen in the contralateral LC wherein tangle bearing neurons gradually cleared tau pathology by 6–12 months post-injection. However, the spreading pattern of tau pathology observed in our LC-injected mice is different from that in AD brains since hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, which are affected in early stages of AD, were largely spared of tau inclusions in our model. Thus, while our study tested critical aspects of the Braak hypothesis of tau pathology spread, this novel mouse model provides unique

  5. Determination of the CP properties of the Higgs boson from data on tau-lepton-decay products in the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {sup {yields}} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}{nu}{nu}-bar

    SciTech Connect

    Likhoded, A. A.

    2008-03-15

    The process e{sup +}e{sup -} {sup {yields}} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}v{nu}-bar, which is highly sensitive to anomalous H{tau}{tau} interaction, is investigated within a model involving a new pseudoscalar Higgs boson. It is shown that the problem of separating the contributions of the scalar and pseudoscalar states of the Higgs boson can be solved via taking into account the polarizations of final-state particles. The inclusion of cascade tau-lepton decays makes it possible to determine reliably the CP state of the Higgs boson and to pinpoint the magnitude and sign of respective coupling constants.

  6. cuTauLeaping: A GPU-Powered Tau-Leaping Stochastic Simulator for Massive Parallel Analyses of Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Besozzi, Daniela; Pescini, Dario; Mauri, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    Tau-leaping is a stochastic simulation algorithm that efficiently reconstructs the temporal evolution of biological systems, modeled according to the stochastic formulation of chemical kinetics. The analysis of dynamical properties of these systems in physiological and perturbed conditions usually requires the execution of a large number of simulations, leading to high computational costs. Since each simulation can be executed independently from the others, a massive parallelization of tau-leaping can bring to relevant reductions of the overall running time. The emerging field of General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPGPU) provides power-efficient high-performance computing at a relatively low cost. In this work we introduce cuTauLeaping, a stochastic simulator of biological systems that makes use of GPGPU computing to execute multiple parallel tau-leaping simulations, by fully exploiting the Nvidia's Fermi GPU architecture. We show how a considerable computational speedup is achieved on GPU by partitioning the execution of tau-leaping into multiple separated phases, and we describe how to avoid some implementation pitfalls related to the scarcity of memory resources on the GPU streaming multiprocessors. Our results show that cuTauLeaping largely outperforms the CPU-based tau-leaping implementation when the number of parallel simulations increases, with a break-even directly depending on the size of the biological system and on the complexity of its emergent dynamics. In particular, cuTauLeaping is exploited to investigate the probability distribution of bistable states in the Schlögl model, and to carry out a bidimensional parameter sweep analysis to study the oscillatory regimes in the Ras/cAMP/PKA pathway in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24663957

  7. Tyrosine Nitration within the Proline-Rich Region of Tau in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Juan F.; Fu, Yifan; Vana, Laurel; Kanaan, Nicholas M.; Binder, Lester I.

    2011-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence suggests that nitrative injury contributes to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. Previously, we showed in vitro that within the tau protein the N-terminal tyrosine residues (Y18 and Y29) are more susceptible to nitrative modifications than other tyrosine sites (Y197 and Y394). Using site-specific antibodies to nitrated tau at Y18 and Y29, we identified tau nitrated in both glial (Y18) and neuronal (Y29) tau pathologies. In this study, we report the characterization of two novel monoclonal antibodies, Tau-nY197 and Tau-nY394, recognizing tau nitrated at Y197 and Y394, respectively. By Western blot analysis, Tau-nY197 labeled soluble tau and insoluble paired helical filament proteins (PHF-tau) nitrated at Y197 from control and AD brain samples. Tau-nY394 failed to label soluble tau isolated from control or severe AD samples, but labeled insoluble PHF-tau to a limited extent. Immunohistochemical analysis using Tau-nY197 revealed the hallmark tau pathology associated with AD; Tau-nY394 did not detect any pathological lesions characteristic of the disorder. These data suggest that a subset of the hallmark pathological inclusions of AD contain tau nitrated at Y197. However, nitration at Y197 was also identified in soluble tau from all control samples, including those at Braak stage 0, suggesting that nitration at this site in the proline-rich region of tau may have normal biological functions in the human brain. PMID:21514440

  8. Absence of a Role for Phosphorylation in the Tau Pathology of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Robert Y. K.; Harrington, Charles R.; Wischik, Claude M.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by redistribution of the tau protein pool from soluble to aggregated states. Aggregation forms proteolytically stable core polymers restricted to the repeat domain, and this binding interaction has prion-like properties. We have compared the binding properties of tau and tubulin in vitro using a system in which we can measure binding affinities for proteins alternated between solid and aqueous phases. The study reveals that a phase-shifted repeat domain fragment from the Paired Helical Filament core contains all that is required for high affinity tau-tau binding. Unlike tau-tubulin binding, tau-tau binding shows concentration-dependent enhancement in both phase directions due to an avidity effect which permits one molecule to bind to many as the concentration in the opposite phase increases. Phosphorylation of tau inhibits tau-tau binding and tau-tubulin binding to equivalent extents. Tau-tau binding is favoured over tau-tubulin binding by factors in the range 19–41-fold, irrespective of phosphorylation status. A critical requirement for tau to become aggregation-competent is prior binding to a solid-phase substrate, which induces a conformational change in the repeat domain permitting high-affinity binding to occur even if tau is phosphorylated. The endogenous species enabling this nucleation event to occur in vivo remains to be identified. The findings of the study suggest that development of disease-modifying drugs for tauopathies should not target phosphorylation, but rather should target inhibitors of tau-tau binding or inhibitors of the binding interaction with as yet unidentified endogenous polyanionic substrates required to nucleate tau assembly. PMID:27070645

  9. Alzheimer’s Disease-Like Tau Neuropathology Leads to Memory Deficits and Loss of Functional Synapses in a Novel Mutated Tau Transgenic Mouse without Any Motor Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Schindowski, Katharina; Bretteville, Alexis; Leroy, Karelle; Bégard, Séverine; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Hamdane, Malika; Buée, Luc

    2006-01-01

    Tau transgenic mice are valuable models to investigate the role of tau protein in Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies. However, motor dysfunction and dystonic posture interfering with behavioral testing are the most common undesirable effects of tau transgenic mice. Therefore, we have generated a novel mouse model (THY-Tau22) that expresses human 4-repeat tau mutated at sites G272V and P301S under a Thy1.2-promotor, displaying tau pathology in the absence of any motor dysfunction. THY-Tau22 shows hyperphosphorylation of tau on several Alzheimer’s disease-relevant tau epitopes (AT8, AT100, AT180, AT270, 12E8, tau-pSer396, and AP422), neurofibrillary tangle-like inclusions (Gallyas and MC1-positive) with rare ghost tangles and PHF-like filaments, as well as mild astrogliosis. These mice also display deficits in hippocampal synaptic transmission and impaired behavior characterized by increased anxiety, delayed learning from 3 months, and reduced spatial memory at 10 months. There are no signs of motor deficits or changes in motor activity at any age investigated. This mouse model therefore displays the main features of tau pathology and several of the pathophysiological disturbances observed during neurofibrillary degeneration. This model will serve as an experimental tool in future studies to investigate mechanisms underlying cognitive deficits during pathogenic tau aggregation. PMID:16877359

  10. Multifrequency Study of Giant Radio Pulses from the Crab Pulsar with the K5 VLBI Recording Terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Mikhail; Soglasnov, Vladimir; Kondratiev, Vladislav; Bilous, Anna; Moshkina, Olga; Oreshko, Vasily; Ilyasov, Yury; Sekido, Mamoru; Kondo, Tetsuro

    2009-12-01

    Simultaneous multifrequency observations of Crab pulsar giant pulses (GPs) were performed with the 64-m Kalyazin radio telescope at four frequency (ν = 0.6, 1.4, 2.2, and 8.3 GHz) using the K5 VLBI recording terminal. The K5 terminal provided continuous recording in 16 × 4-MHz wide frequency channels distributed over 4 frequency bands. Several thousand GPs were detected during about 6 hours of observations on two successive days in 2005 July. The radio spectra of single GPs were analyzed at separate frequencies and over the whole frequency range. These spectra manifest notable modulation over the frequency ranges, Δν, both on large (Δν/ν ≈ 0.5) and small (Δν/ν ≈ 0.01) frequency scales. A cross-correlation analysis of GPs at 2.2 GHz showed that their pulse shapes can be interpreted as being an ensemble of unresolved bursts grouped together on time scales of ≈1μs, being well-correlated over a 60-MHz band. The corresponding GP cross-correlation functions do not obey the predictions of the amplitude-modulated noise model of Rickett(1975), thus indicating that unresolved components represent a small number of elementary emitters.

  11. Monte Carlo treatment of Lyman-alpha radiation in a plane-parallel atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modali, S. B.; Brandt, J. C.; Kastner, S. O.

    1972-01-01

    A Monte Carlo technique involving Stokes vectors is used to obtain the state of polarization and intensity of solar Lyman-alpha photons as they diffuse through a plane-parallel homogeneous model of earth's hydrogen envelope. Fine structure of Lyman-alpha and Doppler redistribution of frequencies are taken into account. Comparison of the results with Heath's observed upper limit for polarization of 1.5 per cent implies an optical thickness tau greater than 7 and intensities of 8-10 kilorayleighs for a solar Lyman-alpha flux of 5.8 ergs per sq cm per sec.

  12. Measurement of the tau lepton mass by the Beijing Spectrometer (BES) Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Soderstrom, E.; BES Collaboration

    1992-11-01

    The mass of the {tau} lepton has been measured at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider using the Beijing Spectrometer. A search near threshold for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} was performed. Candidate events were identified by requiring that one {tau} decay via {tau} {yields} e{nu}{bar {nu}}, and the other via {tau} {yields} {mu}{nu}{bar {nu}}. The mass value, obtained from a fit to the energy dependence of the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} cross section, is m{sub {tau}} = 1776.9{sub -0.5}{sup +0.4} {plus_minus} 0.2 MeV.

  13. Lepton Universality, |V(Us)| and Search for Second Class Current in Tau Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Swagato; /Victoria U.

    2011-11-10

    Several hundred million {tau} decays have been studied with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Recent results on Charged Current Lepton Universality and two independent measurements of |V{sub us}| using {tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, K{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} and K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} decays, and a search for Second Class Current in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} {omega}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays are presented, where the charge conjugate decay modes are also implied.

  14. Evidence for the appearance of atmospheric tau neutrinos in super-Kamiokande.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Hayato, Y; Iida, T; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Kozuma, Y; Marti, Ll; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Ueno, K; Ueshima, K; Yamada, S; Yokozawa, T; Ishihara, C; Kaji, H; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Lee, K P; McLachlan, T; Okumura, K; Shimizu, Y; Tanimoto, N; Labarga, L; Kearns, E; Litos, M; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Goldhaber, M; Bays, K; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Regis, C; Renshaw, A; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Albert, J B; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wendell, R; Wongjirad, T M; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Nishikawa, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Ikeda, M; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Tanaka, T; Jung, C K; Lopez, G D; Taylor, I; Yanagisawa, C; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Mino, S; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Toyota, H; Kuno, Y; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Yang, B S; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Yokoyama, M; Totsuka, Y; Martens, K; Schuemann, J; Vagins, M R; Chen, S; Heng, Y; Yang, Z; Zhang, H; Kielczewska, D; Mijakowski, P; Connolly, K; Dziomba, M; Thrane, E; Wilkes, R J

    2013-05-01

    Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino data were fit with an unbinned maximum likelihood method to search for the appearance of tau leptons resulting from the interactions of oscillation-generated tau neutrinos in the detector. Relative to the expectation of unity, the tau normalization is found to be 1.42 ± 0.35(stat)(-0.12)(+0.14)(syst) excluding the no-tau-appearance hypothesis, for which the normalization would be zero, at the 3.8σ level. We estimate that 180.1 ± 44.3(stat)(-15.2)(+17.8) (syst) tau leptons were produced in the 22.5 kton fiducial volume of the detector by tau neutrinos during the 2806 day running period. In future analyses, this large sample of selected tau events will allow the study of charged current tau neutrino interaction physics with oscillation produced tau neutrinos. PMID:23683190

  15. Characterization of Early Pathological Tau Conformations and Phosphorylation in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, Nicholas M; Cox, Kristine; Alvarez, Victor E; Stein, Thor D; Poncil, Sharra; McKee, Ann C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative tauopathy that develops after repetitive head injury. Several lines of evidence in other tauopathies suggest that tau oligomer formation induces neurotoxicity and that tau oligomer-mediated neurotoxicity involves induction of axonal dysfunction through exposure of an N-terminal motif in tau, the phosphatase-activating domain (PAD). Additionally, phosphorylation at serine 422 in tau occurs early and correlates with cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). We performed immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence on fixed brain sections and biochemical analysis of fresh brain extracts to characterize the presence of PAD-exposed tau (TNT1 antibody), tau oligomers (TOC1 antibody), tau phosphorylated at S422 (pS422 antibody), and tau truncated at D421 (TauC3 antibody) in the brains of 9-11 cases with CTE and cases of nondemented aged controls and AD (Braak VI) (n = 6, each). All 3 early tau markers (ie, TNT1, TOC1, and pS422) were present in CTE and displayed extensive colocalization in perivascular tau lesions that are considered diagnostic for CTE. Notably, the TauC3 epitope, which is abundant in AD, was relatively sparse in CTE. Together, these results provide the first description of PAD exposure, TOC1 reactive oligomers, phosphorylation of S422, and TauC3 truncation in the tau pathology of CTE. PMID:26671985

  16. Alzheimer’s disease imaging with a novel Tau targeted near infrared ratiometric probe

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Yeong; Sengupta, Urmi; Shao, Pin; Guerrero-Muñoz, Marcos J; Kayed, Rakez; Bai, Mingfeng

    2013-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) have long been recognized as one of the pathological hallmarks in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recent studies, however, showed that soluble aggregated Tau species, especially hyperphosphorylated Tau oligomers, which are formed at early stage of AD prior to the formation of NFT, disrupted neural system integration. Unfortunately, little is known about Tau aggregates, and few Tau targeted imaging probe has been reported. Successful development of new imaging methods that can visualize early stages of Tau aggregation specifically will obviously be important for AD imaging, as well as understanding Tau-associated neuropathology of AD. Here, we report the first NIR ratiometric probe, CyDPA2, that targets Tau aggregates. The specificity of CyPDA2 to aggregated Tau was evaluated with in vitro hyperphosphorylated Tau proteins (pTau), as well as ex vivo Tau samples from AD human brain samples and the tauopathy transgenic mouse model, P301L. The characteristic enhancements of absorption ratio and fluorescence intensity in CyDPA2 were observed in a pTau concentration-dependent manner. In addition, fluorescence microscopy and gel staining studies demonstrated CyDPA2-labeled Tau aggregates. These data indicate that CyDPA2 is a promising imaging probe for studying Tau pathology and diagnosing AD at an early stage. PMID:23526074

  17. Critical Role of Acetylation in Tau-Mediated Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Min, Sang-Won; Chen, Xu; Tracy, Tara E; Li, Yaqiao; Zhou, Yungui; Wang, Chao; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Minami, S. Sakura; Defensor, Erwin; Mok, Sue Ann; Sohn, Peter Dongmin; Schilling, Birgit; Cong, Xin; Ellerby, Lisa; Gibson, Bradford W.; Johnson, Jeffrey; Krogan, Nevan; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Gestwicki, Jason; Masliah, Eliezer; Verdin, Eric; Gan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies, including frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD), are neurodegenerative diseases in which tau fibrils accumulate. Recent evidence supports soluble tau species as the major toxic species. How soluble tau accumulates and how it causes neurodegeneration remains unclear. Here we identified tau acetylation at K174 as an early change in AD brains and as a critical determinant in tau homeostasis and toxicity in mice. An acetyl-mimicking mutant (K174Q) slows down tau turnover and induces cognitive deficits in vivo. The acetyltransferase p300-induced tau acetylation is inhibited by a prescription drug salsalate/salicylate, which enhances tau turnover and reduces tau levels. In the PS19 transgenic mouse model of FTD, administering salsalate after disease onset inhibited p300 activity, lowered ac-K174 and total tau levels, rescued tau-induced memory deficits and prevented hippocampal atrophy. The tau-lowering and protective effects of salsalate/salicylate are diminished in neurons expressing K174Q tau. Targeting tau acetylation could be a new therapeutic strategy against human tauopathies. PMID:26390242

  18. Planet formation in multiple stellar systems: GG Tau A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Folco, E.; Dutrey, A.; Guilloteau, S.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Lacour, S.; Berger, J.-P.; Köhler, R.; Piétu, V.

    2014-12-01

    GG Tau is a hierarchical quadruple system of young, low-mass stars. Because of its well-studied bright circumbinary ring of dust and gas surrounding the main binary GG Tau A, it is a unique laboratory to study planet formation in the disturbed environment of binary/multiple stellar systems. We have started a large observing program of GG Tau A that combines several high-resolution instruments in a multi-wavelength approach. We have recently reported the detection of a new low-mass companion in GG Tau A that turns out to itself be a triple system. This discovery was possible thanks to the very high angular resolution of the near-IR instrument PIONIER on the VLT interferometer, and was confirmed with sub-aperture masking techniques on VLT/NaCo. The detected close binary GG Tau Ab (ρ = 0.032'', or about 5 AU) provides a natural explanation for two enigmas: the discrepancy between the dynamical mass and the spectral type estimates in GG Tau A, and the absence of dust thermal emission in the vicinity of the Ab component. GRAVITY will provide the adequate angular resolution to complete the astrometric characterization of the close binary in the next 10 years. With now 5 coeval low-mass stars, GG Tau is an ideal laboratory to calibrate stellar evolution tracks at young ages (few Myr). Beyond this peculiar system, GRAVITY also has a strong potential to study the impact of multiplicity on the existence of disks, and in fine on planet formation mechanisms in multiple systems.

  19. ELISA measurement of specific antibodies to phosphorylated tau in intravenous immunoglobulin products.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, David A; Klaver, Andrea C; Coffey, Mary P

    2015-10-01

    The therapeutic effects of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products were recently studied in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Pilot studies produced encouraging results but phase II and III trials gave disappointing results; a further study is in progress. IVIG products contain antibodies to tau protein, the main component of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). The tau used to detect IVIG's anti-tau antibodies in previous studies was non-phosphorylated recombinant human tau-441, but NFT-associated tau is extensively phosphorylated. The objective of this study was to determine if various IVIG products contain specific antibodies to phosphorylated tau (anti-pTau antibodies). ELISAs were used to evaluate binding of six IVIG products to a 12 amino acid peptide, tau 196-207, which was phosphorylated ("pTau peptide") or non-phosphorylated ("non-pTau peptide") at Serine-199 and Serine-202. Both amino acid residues are phosphorylated in AD NFTs. Each IVIG's "anti-pTau antibody ratio" was calculated by dividing its binding to the pTau peptide by its binding to the non-pTau peptide. Seven experiments were performed and data were pooled, with each experiment contributing one data point from each IVIG product. Mean anti-pTau antibody ratios greater than 1.0, suggesting specific antibodies to phosphorylated tau, were found for three IVIG products. Because administration of antibodies to phosphorylated tau has been found to reduce tau-associated pathology in transgenic mouse models of tauopathy, increasing the levels of anti-pTau antibodies, together with other selected antibodies such as anti-Aβ, in IVIG might increase its ability to slow AD's progression. PMID:26330100

  20. Phospholipids block nuclear factor-kappa B and tau phosphorylation and inhibit amyloid-beta secretion in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pandey, N R; Sultan, K; Twomey, E; Sparks, D L

    2009-12-29

    Inflammation and oxidative stress have been shown to play a critical role in the pathophysiology that leads to neurodegeneration. Omega-6 phospholipids, e.g. dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC), have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties and therefore experiments were undertaken to determine whether DLPC can prevent inflammatory neurodegenerative events in the model neuronal cell line, SH-SY5Y. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) and H(2)O(2) activate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in SH-SY5Y cells within 5 min and this activation is completely blocked by DLPC (12 microM). DLPC blocks IkappaBalpha phosphorylation in the SH-SY5Y cells and prevents the phosphorylation and activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB). The phospholipid inhibits induction of MAPK and NF-kappaB in similar fashion to the MEK1/2-inhibitor, U0126 (10 microM). DLPC completely abolishes TNF-alpha, H(2)O(2) and lipopolysaccaride (LPS)-induced neuronal tau phosphorylation. Cellular amyloid precursor protein levels are reduced by DLPC and LPS-induced amyloid-beta expression and secretion in SH-SY5Y cells are completely blocked by DLPC. Taken together, these data suggest that DLPC can act through MAPK to block neuronal inflammatory cascades and prevent potential pathological consequences in the neuronal metabolism of amyloid and tau proteins. PMID:19788916

  1. Observations of AA Tau requested to schedule XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-08-01

    Dr. Hans Moritz Guenther (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) has requested nightly observations of the classical T Tauri star AA Tau in order to schedule x-ray observations with XMM-Newton that have been planned for between 2013 August 15 and September 15. The purpose of the AAVSO observations is to determine whether AA Tau is at a suitable magnitude for the satellite observations. Taurus is difficult to observe during this time period but that is exactly why AAVSO assistance is needed! AA Tau is a morning object, and also, many of the professional ground-based telescopes are offline because of the US southwest monsoon season. Since it is critical to know the brightness of AA Tau, AAVSO observations will be truly essential. Nightly visual and snapshot (not more than once per night) observations beginning now and continuing through September 20 are needed. Coverage beginning ahead of the XMM window is requested because there is a one- to two-week lead time for the target to be inserted into the telescope schedule. Continuing the nightly observations a few days beyond the end of the XMM window will give better optical context for the x-ray data. AA Tau ranges between ~12.8V and ~16.1V; since December 2011 or earlier it has been at ~14.5V. The most recent observation in the AAVSO International Database shows it at 14.779V on 2013 Feb 5 (J. Roe, Bourbon, MO). Dr. Guenther writes, "AA Tau is surrounded by a thick accretion disk which is seen nearly edge-on. For decades the light curve of AA Tau showed regular eclipsing events when the accretion funnel rotated through the line of sight. However, earlier this year J. Bouvier and his group found that this behavior changed dramatically: AA Tau now seems to be deeply absorbed all the time (V band 14.5 mag). In collaboration with this group we will perform X-ray observations of AA Tau with the XMM-Newton satellite." Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plo! tter (http

  2. Multinomial tau-leaping method for stochastic kinetic simulations.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Michel F; Resat, Haluk

    2007-02-28

    We introduce the multinomial tau-leaping (MtauL) method for general reaction networks with multichannel reactant dependencies. The MtauL method is an extension of the binomial tau-leaping method where efficiency is improved in several ways. First, tau-leaping steps are determined simply and efficiently using a priori information and Poisson distribution-based estimates of expectation values for reaction numbers over a tentative tau-leaping step. Second, networks are partitioned into closed groups of reactions and corresponding reactants in which no group reactant set is found in any other group. Third, product formation is factored into upper-bound estimation of the number of times a particular reaction occurs. Together, these features allow larger time steps where the numbers of reactions occurring simultaneously in a multichannel manner are estimated accurately using a multinomial distribution. Furthermore, we develop a simple procedure that places a specific upper bound on the total reaction number to ensure non-negativity of species populations over a single multiple-reaction step. Using two disparate test case problems involving cellular processes--epidermal growth factor receptor signaling and a lactose operon model--we show that the tau-leaping based methods such as the MtauL algorithm can significantly reduce the number of simulation steps thus increasing the numerical efficiency over the exact stochastic simulation algorithm by orders of magnitude. PMID:17343434

  3. Oligomerization of the protein tau in the Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larini, Luca

    The Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the formation of protein aggregates both within and outside of the brain's cells, the neurons. Within the neurons, the aggregation of the microtubule associated protein tau leads to the destruction of the microtubules in the axon of the neuron. Tau is extremely flexible and is classified as an intrinsically disordered protein due to its low propensity to form secondary structure. Tau promotes tubulin assembly into microtubules, which are an essential component of the cytoskeleton of the axon. The microtubule binding region of tau consists of 4 pseudo-repeats that are critical for aggregation as well. In this study, we focus on the aggregation propensity of different segments of the microtubule binding region as well as post-translational modifications that can alter tau dynamics and structure. We have performed replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the ensemble of conformations of the monomer and small oligomers as well as how these structures are stabilized or destabilized by mutations and post-translational modifications.

  4. Oligomer Formation of Tau Protein Hyperphosphorylated in Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Katharina; Biernat, Jacek; Kumar, Satish; Wegmann, Susanne; Timm, Thomas; Hübschmann, Sabrina; Redecke, Lars; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Müller, Daniel J.; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation (“hyperphosphorylation”) and aggregation of Tau protein are hallmarks of Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies, but their causative connection is still a matter of debate. Tau with Alzheimer-like phosphorylation is also present in hibernating animals, mitosis, or during embryonic development, without leading to pathophysiology or neurodegeneration. Thus, the role of phosphorylation and the distinction between physiological and pathological phosphorylation needs to be further refined. So far, the systematic investigation of highly phosphorylated Tau was difficult because a reliable method of preparing reproducible quantities was not available. Here, we generated full-length Tau (2N4R) in Sf9 cells in a well defined phosphorylation state containing up to ∼20 phosphates as judged by mass spectrometry and Western blotting with phospho-specific antibodies. Despite the high concentration in living Sf9 cells (estimated ∼230 μm) and high phosphorylation, the protein was not aggregated. However, after purification, the highly phosphorylated protein readily formed oligomers, whereas fibrils were observed only rarely. Exposure of mature primary neuronal cultures to oligomeric phospho-Tau caused reduction of spine density on dendrites but did not change the overall cell viability. PMID:25339173

  5. P70 S6 kinase mediates tau phosphorylation and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jin-Jing; An, Wen-Lin; Zhou, Xin-Wen; Nishimura, Takeshi; Norberg, Jan; Benedikz, Eirikur; Götz, Jürgen; Winblad, Bengt

    2006-01-01

    Currently, we found that the 70-kDa p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) directly phosphorylates tau at S262, S214, and T212 sites in vitro. By immunoprecipitation, p-p70S6K (T421/S424) showed a close association with p-tau (S262 and S396/404). Zinc-induced p70S6K activation could only upregulate translation of total S6 and tau but not global proteins in SH-SY5Y cells. The requirement of p70S6K activation was confirmed in the SH-SY5Y cells that overexpress wild-type htau40. Level of p-p70S6K (T421/S424) was only significantly correlated with p-tau at S262, S214, and T212, but not T212/S214, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. These suggested that p70S6K might contribute to tau related pathologies in AD brains. PMID:16364302

  6. TauG-guidance of transients in expressive musical performance.

    PubMed

    Schogler, Benjaman; Pepping, Gert-Jan; Lee, David N

    2008-08-01

    The sounds in expressive musical performance, and the movements that produce them, offer insight into temporal patterns in the brain that generate expression. To gain understanding of these brain patterns, we analyzed two types of transient sounds, and the movements that produced them, during a vocal duet and a bass solo. The transient sounds studied were inter-tone f (0)(t)-glides (the continuous change in fundamental frequency, f (0)(t), when gliding from one tone to the next), and attack intensity-glides (the continuous rise in sound intensity when attacking, or initiating, a tone). The temporal patterns of the inter-tone f (0)(t)-glides and attack intensity-glides, and of the movements producing them, all conformed to the mathematical function, tau (G)(t) (called tauG), predicted by General Tau Theory, and assumed to be generated in the brain. The values of the parameters of the tau (G)(t) function were modulated by the performers when they modulated musical expression. Thus the tau (G)(t) function appears to be a fundamental of brain activity entailed in the generation of expressive temporal patterns of movement and sound. PMID:18560815

  7. Crystal structures of the glutamate receptor ion channel GluK3 and GluK5 amino terminal domains

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Janesh; Mayer, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) mediate the majority of fast excitatory synaptic neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The selective assembly of iGluRs into the AMPA, kainate and NMDA receptor subtypes is regulated by their extracellular amino terminal domains (ATD). Kainate receptors are further classified into low-affinity (GluK1-3) and high-affinity (GluK4-5) receptor families based on their affinity for the neurotoxin kainic acid. These two families share 42% sequence identity for the intact receptor but only 28% sequence identity at the level of ATD. We have determined for the first time high-resolution crystal structures for the GluK3 and GluK5 ATDs, both of which crystallize as dimers, but with a strikingly different dimer assembly at the R1 interface. By contrast, for both GluK3 and GluK5 the R2 domain dimer assembly is similar to that reported previously for other non-NMDA iGluRs. This observation is consistent with the reports that GluK4-5 cannot form functional homomeric ion channels and require obligate coassembly with GluK1-3. Our analysis also reveals that the relative orientation of domains R1 and R2 in individual non-NMDA receptor ATDs varies by up to 10°, in contrast to the 50° difference reported for the NMDA receptor GluN2B subunit. This restricted domain movement in non-NMDA receptor ATDs seems to result from both extensive intramolecular contacts between domains R1 and R2, and from their assembly as dimers which interact at both the R1 and R2 domains. Our results provide the first insights into the structure and function for GluK4-5, the least understood family of iGluRs. PMID:20951142

  8. 3D Visualization of the Temporal and Spatial Spread of Tau Pathology Reveals Extensive Sites of Tau Accumulation Associated with Neuronal Loss and Recognition Memory Deficit in Aged Tau Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hongjun; Hussaini, S. Abid; Wegmann, Susanne; Profaci, Caterina; Daniels, Jacob D.; Herman, Mathieu; Emrani, Sheina; Figueroa, Helen Y.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Davies, Peter; Duff, Karen E.

    2016-01-01

    3D volume imaging using iDISCO+ was applied to observe the spatial and temporal progression of tau pathology in deep structures of the brain of a mouse model that recapitulates the earliest stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Tau pathology was compared at four timepoints, up to 34 months as it spread through the hippocampal formation and out into the neocortex along an anatomically connected route. Tau pathology was associated with significant gliosis. No evidence for uptake and accumulation of tau by glia was observed. Neuronal cells did appear to have internalized tau, including in extrahippocampal areas as a small proportion of cells that had accumulated human tau protein did not express detectible levels of human tau mRNA. At the oldest timepoint, mature tau pathology in the entorhinal cortex (EC) was associated with significant cell loss. As in human AD, mature tau pathology in the EC and the presence of tau pathology in the neocortex correlated with cognitive impairment. 3D volume imaging is an ideal technique to easily monitor the spread of pathology over time in models of disease progression. PMID:27466814

  9. 3D Visualization of the Temporal and Spatial Spread of Tau Pathology Reveals Extensive Sites of Tau Accumulation Associated with Neuronal Loss and Recognition Memory Deficit in Aged Tau Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hongjun; Hussaini, S Abid; Wegmann, Susanne; Profaci, Caterina; Daniels, Jacob D; Herman, Mathieu; Emrani, Sheina; Figueroa, Helen Y; Hyman, Bradley T; Davies, Peter; Duff, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    3D volume imaging using iDISCO+ was applied to observe the spatial and temporal progression of tau pathology in deep structures of the brain of a mouse model that recapitulates the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau pathology was compared at four timepoints, up to 34 months as it spread through the hippocampal formation and out into the neocortex along an anatomically connected route. Tau pathology was associated with significant gliosis. No evidence for uptake and accumulation of tau by glia was observed. Neuronal cells did appear to have internalized tau, including in extrahippocampal areas as a small proportion of cells that had accumulated human tau protein did not express detectible levels of human tau mRNA. At the oldest timepoint, mature tau pathology in the entorhinal cortex (EC) was associated with significant cell loss. As in human AD, mature tau pathology in the EC and the presence of tau pathology in the neocortex correlated with cognitive impairment. 3D volume imaging is an ideal technique to easily monitor the spread of pathology over time in models of disease progression. PMID:27466814

  10. Passive immunization targeting the N-terminal projection domain of tau decreases tau pathology and improves cognition in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease and tauopathies.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chun-ling; Chen, Xia; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2015-04-01

    Intraneuronal accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain is a histopathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and a family of related neurodegenerative disorders collectively called tauopathies. At present there is no effective treatment available for these progressive neurodegenerative diseases which are clinically characterized by dementia in mid to old-age. Here we report the treatment of 14-17-months-old 3xTg-AD mice with tau antibodies 43D (tau 6-18) and 77E9 (tau 184-195) to the N-terminal projection domain of tau or mouse IgG as a control by intraperitoneal injection once a week for 4 weeks, and the effects of the passive immunization on reduction of hyperphosphorylated tau, Aβ accumulation and cognitive performance in these animals. We found that treatment with tau antibodies 43D and 77E9 reduced total tau level, decreased tau hyperphosphorylated at Ser199, Ser202/Thr205 (AT8), Thr205, Ser262/356 (12E8), and Ser396/404 (PHF-1) sites, and a trend to reduce Aβ pathology. Most importantly, targeting N-terminal tau especially by 43D (tau 6-18) improved reference memory in the Morris water maze task in 3xTg-AD mice. We did not observe any abnormality in general physical characteristics of the treated animals with either of the two antibodies during the course of this study. Taken together, our studies demonstrate for the first time (1) that passive immunization targeting normal tau can effectively clear the hyperphosphorylated protein and possibly reduce Aβ pathology from the brain and (2) that targeting N-terminal projection domain of tau containing amino acid 6-18 is especially beneficial. Thus, targeting selective epitopes of N-terminal domain of tau may present a novel effective therapeutic opportunity for Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies. PMID:25233799

  11. Monitoring of Intracellular Tau Aggregation Regulated by OGA/OGT Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sungsu; Haque, Md Mamunul; Nam, Ghilsoo; Ryoo, Nayeon; Rhim, Hyewhon; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation of tau has been considered as a key pathogenic mechanism inducing tau aggregation in multiple neurodegenerative disorders, collectively called tauopathies. Recent evidence showed that tau phosphorylation sites are protected with O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in normal brain. In pathological condition, tau is de-glycosylated and becomes a substrate for kinases. Despite the importance of O-GlcNAcylation in tau pathology, O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), and an enzyme catalyzing O-GlcNAc to tau, has not been carefully investigated in the context of tau aggregation. Here, we investigated intracellular tau aggregation regulated by BZX2, an inhibitor of OGT. Upon the inhibition of OGT, tau phosphorylation increased 2.0-fold at Ser199 and 1.5-fold at Ser396, resulting in increased tau aggregation. Moreover, the BZX2 induced tau aggregation was efficiently reduced by the treatment of Thiamet G, an inhibitor of O-GlcNAcase (OGA). Our results demonstrated the protective role of OGT in tau aggregation and also suggest the counter-regulatory mechanism of OGA and OGT in tau pathology. PMID:26343633

  12. Monitoring of Intracellular Tau Aggregation Regulated by OGA/OGT Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sungsu; Haque, Md. Mamunul; Nam, Ghilsoo; Ryoo, Nayeon; Rhim, Hyewhon; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation of tau has been considered as a key pathogenic mechanism inducing tau aggregation in multiple neurodegenerative disorders, collectively called tauopathies. Recent evidence showed that tau phosphorylation sites are protected with O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in normal brain. In pathological condition, tau is de-glycosylated and becomes a substrate for kinases. Despite the importance of O-GlcNAcylation in tau pathology, O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), and an enzyme catalyzing O-GlcNAc to tau, has not been carefully investigated in the context of tau aggregation. Here, we investigated intracellular tau aggregation regulated by BZX2, an inhibitor of OGT. Upon the inhibition of OGT, tau phosphorylation increased 2.0-fold at Ser199 and 1.5-fold at Ser396, resulting in increased tau aggregation. Moreover, the BZX2 induced tau aggregation was efficiently reduced by the treatment of Thiamet G, an inhibitor of O-GlcNAcase (OGA). Our results demonstrated the protective role of OGT in tau aggregation and also suggest the counter-regulatory mechanism of OGA and OGT in tau pathology. PMID:26343633

  13. Sustained high levels of neuroprotective, high molecular weight, phosphorylated tau in the longest-lived rodent

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Miranda E.; Garbarino, Valentina R.; Salinas, Angelica; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    Tau protein is primarily expressed in neuronal axons and modulates microtubule stability. Tau phosphorylation, aggregation and subcellular mislocalization coincide with neurodegeneration in numerous diseases, including Alzheimer's disease [AD]. During AD pathogenesis, tau misprocessing accompanies Aß accumulation; however, AD animal models, despite elevated Aß, fail to develop tauopathy. To assess whether lack of tau pathology is linked to short lifespan common to most AD models, we examined tau processing in extraordinarily long-lived, mouse-sized naked mole-rats (NMR; ~32 years), which express appreciable levels of Aß throughout life. NMRs, like other mammals, displayed highest tau phosphorylation during brain development. While tau phosphorylation decreased with aging, unexpectedly adult NMRs had higher levels than transgenic mice overexpressing mutant human tau. However, in sharp contrast with the somatodendritic accumulation of misprocessed tau in the transgenic mice, NMRs maintain axonal tau localization. Intriguingly, the adult NMR tau protein is 88kDa, much larger than 45-68kDa tau expressed in other mammals. We propose that this 88kDa tau protein may offer exceptional microtubule stability and neuroprotection against lifelong elevated Aß. PMID:25576082

  14. Search for Tau-Lepton Decays to Seven Or More Pions With BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, R.; Ter-Antonian, R.; Hast, C.; /SLAC

    2007-11-02

    We report the results of searches for several decay modes of the {tau}-lepton with {ge} 7 pions in the final state using 207 x 10{sup 6} {tau}-pairs collected with the BaBar detector. For the decays with 7 charged pions in the final state we find the following 90% CL upper limits: B({tau}{sup -} {yields} 4{pi}{sup -}3{pi}{sup +}({pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}}) < 3.0 x 10{sup -7}, B({tau}{sup -} {yields} 4{pi}{sup -}3{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 4.3 x 10{sup -7} and B({tau}{sup -} {yields}) B({tau}{sup -} {yields} 4{pi}{sup -}3{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 2.5 x 10{sup -7}. We also search for the decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3{pi}{sup -}2{pi}{sup +}2{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and report a 90% CL upper limit of < 3.4 x 10{sup -6} for its branching fraction. Finally, we search for the exclusive final state {tau}{sup -} {yields} 2{sigma}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and find a 90% CL upper limit for its branching fraction of < 5.4 x 10{sup -7}.

  15. Measurement of the branching fraction for $\\tau\\to\\eta K\

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-12

    The authors report on analyses of tau lepton decays {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, with {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, using 470 fb{sup -1} of data from the BABAR experiment at PEP-II, collected at center-of-mass energies at and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. They measure the branching fraction for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay mode, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.42 {+-} 0.11(stat) {+-} 0.07(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, and report a 95% confidence level upper limit for the second-class current process {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 9.9 x 10{sup -5}.

  16. HS3ST2 expression is critical for the abnormal phosphorylation of tau in Alzheimer's disease-related tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda-Diaz, Julia Elisa; Alavi Naini, Seyedeh Maryam; Huynh, Minh Bao; Ouidja, Mohand Ouidir; Yanicostas, Constantin; Chantepie, Sandrine; Villares, Joao; Lamari, Foudil; Jospin, Estelle; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe Guy; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Soussi-Yanicostas, Nadia; Papy-Garcia, Dulce

    2015-05-01

    Heparan sulphate (glucosamine) 3-O-sulphotransferase 2 (HS3ST2, also known as 3OST2) is an enzyme predominantly expressed in neurons wherein it generates rare 3-O-sulphated domains of unknown functions in heparan sulphates. In Alzheimer's disease, heparan sulphates accumulate at the intracellular level in disease neurons where they co-localize with the neurofibrillary pathology, while they persist at the neuronal cell membrane in normal brain. However, it is unknown whether HS3ST2 and its 3-O-sulphated heparan sulphate products are involved in the mechanisms leading to the abnormal phosphorylation of tau in Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. Here, we first measured the transcript levels of all human heparan sulphate sulphotransferases in hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease (n = 8; 76.8 ± 3.5 years old) and found increased expression of HS3ST2 (P < 0.001) compared with control brain (n = 8; 67.8 ± 2.9 years old). Then, to investigate whether the membrane-associated 3-O-sulphated heparan sulphates translocate to the intracellular level under pathological conditions, we used two cell models of tauopathy in neuro-differentiated SH-SY5Y cells: a tau mutation-dependent model in cells expressing human tau carrying the P301L mutation hTau(P301L), and a tau mutation-independent model in where tau hyperphosphorylation is induced by oxidative stress. Confocal microscopy, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and western blot analyses showed that 3-O-sulphated heparan sulphates can be internalized into cells where they interact with tau, promoting its abnormal phosphorylation, but not that of p38 or NF-κB p65. We showed, in vitro, that the 3-O-sulphated heparan sulphates bind to tau, but not to GSK3B, protein kinase A or protein phosphatase 2, inducing its abnormal phosphorylation. Finally, we demonstrated in a zebrafish model of tauopathy expressing the hTau(P301L), that inhibiting hs3st2 (also known as 3ost2) expression results in a strong inhibition of the

  17. Direct cellular delivery of human proteasomes to delay tau aggregation.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong Hoon; Na, Hee-Kyung; Choi, Won Hoon; Lee, Jung Hoon; Kim, Yun Kyung; Won, Cheolhee; Lee, Seung-Han; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kuret, Jeff; Min, Dal-Hee; Lee, Min Jae

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the primary machinery that degrades ubiquitin (Ub)-conjugated proteins, including many proteotoxic proteins implicated in neurodegeneraton. It has been suggested that the elevation of proteasomal activity is tolerable to cells and may be beneficial to prevent the accumulation of protein aggregates. Here we show that purified proteasomes can be directly transported into cells through mesoporous silica nanoparticle-mediated endocytosis. Proteasomes that are loaded onto nanoparticles through non-covalent interactions between polyhistidine tags and nickel ions fully retain their proteolytic activity. Cells treated with exogenous proteasomes are more efficient in degrading overexpressed human tau than endogenous proteasomal substrates, resulting in decreased levels of tau aggregates. Moreover, exogenous proteasome delivery significantly promotes cell survival against proteotoxic stress caused by tau and reactive oxygen species. These data demonstrate that increasing cellular proteasome activity through the direct delivery of purified proteasomes may be an effective strategy for reducing cellular levels of proteotoxic proteins. PMID:25476420

  18. Acetylated tau neuropathology in sporadic and hereditary tauopathies.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David J; Cohen, Todd J; Grossman, Murray; Arnold, Steven E; McCarty-Wood, Elisabeth; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2013-08-01

    We have recently shown acetylation of tau at lysine residue 280 (AC-K280) to be a disease-specific modification in Alzheimer disease (AD), corticobasal degeneration, and progressive supranuclear palsy, likely representing a major regulatory tau modification. Herein, we extend our observations using IHC with a polyclonal antibody specific for AC-K280. Thirty brain regions were examined in argyrophilic grain disease (AGD; n = 5), tangle-predominant senile dementia (TPSD; n = 5), Pick disease (n = 4), familial AD (FAD; n = 2; PSEN1 p.G206A and p.S170P), and frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome-17 (FTDP-17; n = 2; MAPT p.P301L and IVS10 + 16). All AGD, TPSD, FAD, and FTDP-17 cases had significant AC-K280 reactivity that was similar in severity and distribution to phosphorylated tau. AC-K280 robustly labeled grain pathological characteristics in AGD and was predominantly associated with thioflavin-S-positive neurofibrillary tangles and less reactive in neuropil threads and extracellular tangles in TPSD and FAD. Thioflavin-S-negative neuronal and glial inclusions of patients with FTDP-17 were robustly AC-K280 reactive. A low degree of AC-K280 was found in a subset of 4-repeat tau-containing lesions in Pick disease. AC-K280 is a prominent feature of both neuronal and glial tau aggregations in tauopathies of various etiologies. The close association of AC-K280 with amyloid and pre-amyloid conformations of tau suggests a potential role in tangle maturation and, thus, could serve as a useful biomarker or therapeutic target in a variety of tauopathies. PMID:23885714

  19. Bilocal expansion of the Borel amplitude and the hadronic tau decay width

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetic, Gorazd; Lee, Taekoon

    2001-07-01

    The singular part of the Borel transform of a QCD amplitude near the infrared renormalon can be expanded in terms of higher order Wilson coefficients of the operators associated with the renormalon. In this paper we observe that this expansion gives nontrivial constraints on the Borel amplitude that can be used to improve the accuracy of the ordinary perturbative expansion of the Borel amplitude. In particular, we consider the Borel transform of the Adler function and its expansion around the first infrared renormalon due to the gluon condensate. Using the next-to-leading order (NLO) Wilson coefficient of the gluon condensate operator, we obtain an exact constraint on the Borel amplitude at the first IR renormalon. We then extrapolate, using judiciously chosen conformal transformations and Pade{prime} approximants, the ordinary perturbative expansion of the Borel amplitude in such a way that this constraint is satisfied. This procedure allows us to predict the O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 4}) coefficient of the Adler function, which gives a result consistent with the estimate by Kataev and Starshenko using a completely different method. We then apply this improved Borel amplitude to the tau decay width and obtain the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub z}{sup 2})=0.1193{+-}0.0007{sub exp.}{+-}0.0010{sub EW+CKM}{+-}0.0009{sub meth.}{+-}0.0003{sub evol.}. We then compare this result with those of other resummation methods.

  20. Traceless purification and desulfurization of tau protein ligation products.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Oliver; Smet-Nocca, Caroline; Hackenberger, Christian P R

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel strategy for the traceless purification and synthetic modification of peptides and proteins obtained by native chemical ligation. The strategy involves immobilization of a photocleavable semisynthetic biotin-protein conjugate on streptavidin-coated agarose beads, which eliminates the need for tedious rebuffering steps and allows the rapid removal of excess peptides and additives. On-bead desulfurization is followed by delivery of the final tag-free protein product. The strategy is demonstrated in the isolation of a tag-free Alzheimer's disease related human tau protein from a complex EPL mixture as well as a triphosphorylated peptide derived from the C-terminus of tau. PMID:25404175

  1. Depletion of microglia and inhibition of exosome synthesis halt tau propagation.

    PubMed

    Asai, Hirohide; Ikezu, Seiko; Tsunoda, Satoshi; Medalla, Maria; Luebke, Jennifer; Haydar, Tarik; Wolozin, Benjamin; Butovsky, Oleg; Kügler, Sebastian; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2015-11-01

    Accumulation of pathological tau protein is a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Tau protein spreads from the entorhinal cortex to the hippocampal region early in the disease. Microglia, the primary phagocytes in the brain, are positively correlated with tau pathology, but their involvement in tau propagation is unknown. We developed an adeno-associated virus-based model exhibiting rapid tau propagation from the entorhinal cortex to the dentate gyrus in 4 weeks. We found that depleting microglia dramatically suppressed the propagation of tau and reduced excitability in the dentate gyrus in this mouse model. Moreover, we demonstrate that microglia spread tau via exosome secretion, and inhibiting exosome synthesis significantly reduced tau propagation in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that microglia and exosomes contribute to the progression of tauopathy and that the exosome secretion pathway may be a therapeutic target. PMID:26436904

  2. Goodman and Kruskal's TAU-B Statistics: A Fortran-77 Subroutine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Kenneth J.; Mielke, Paul W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm and associated FORTRAN-77 computer subroutine are described for computing Goodman and Kruskal's tau-b statistic along with the associated nonasymptotic probability value under the null hypothesis tau=O. (Author)

  3. Depletion of microglia and inhibition of exosome synthesis halt tau propagation

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Hirohide; Ikezu, Seiko; Tsunoda, Satoshi; Medalla, Maria; Luebke, Jennifer; Haydar, Tarik; Wolozin, Benjamin; Butovsky, Oleg; Kügler, Sebastian; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of pathological tau protein is a major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. Tau protein spreads from the entorhinal cortex to the hippocampal region early in the disease. Microglia, the primary phagocytes in the brain, are positively correlated with tau pathology, but their involvement in tau propagation is unknown. We developed an adeno-associated virus–based model exhibiting rapid tau propagation from the entorhinal cortex to the dentate gyrus in 4 weeks. We found that depleting microglia dramatically suppressed the propagation of tau and reduced excitability in the dentate gyrus in this mouse model. Moreover, we demonstrate that microglia spread tau via exosome secretion, and inhibiting exosome synthesis significantly reduced tau propagation in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that microglia and exosomes contribute to the progression of tauopathy and that the exosome secretion pathway may be a therapeutic target. PMID:26436904

  4. Studies of the Strange Hadronic Tau Decay Tau- to K0(S) Pi- Nu-Tau Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Andrew J.; /Manchester U. /SLAC

    2006-01-27

    A study of the decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} (K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) using the BABAR detector is presented. Using 124.4 fb{sup -1} of data we measure {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.830 {+-} 0.005(stat) {+-} 0.042(syst))%, which is the world's most precise measurement to date of this branching ratio, and is consistent with the current world average. This preliminary result, unlike most of the {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) measurements already published, is systematics dominated and so the biggest future improvement to this number should come from reducing the systematic uncertainties in the analysis. A study of the K{pi} mass spectrum, from which the strange (K{pi}) spectral function can be measured, reveals excess contributions above the K*(892) tail at higher K{pi} mass. While in the past this has been thought to be due to K*(892) - K*(1410) interference, we find that the K*(1410), whose branching ratio to K{pi} is approximately 7%, seems insufficient to explain the excess mass observed in the data. Instead, we perform a fit using a K*(892) - K*(1680) interference model and find better agreement. The discrepancy that remains could be due to an s-wave contribution to the interference that is not parameterized in the model used, and/or detector smearing that is not accounted for in our fit. We also attempt to find an s-wave contribution to the K{pi} mass spectrum by searching for an sp-interference effect. While we find a hint that such an effect exists, we have neither the confidence in the statistics nor systematics in the higher K{pi} mass region to announce an observation. We conclude that it would be a worthwhile study to pursue.

  5. Carboxy terminus heat shock protein 70 interacting protein reduces tau-associated degenerative changes.

    PubMed

    Saidi, Laiq-Jan; Polydoro, Manuela; Kay, Kevin R; Sanchez, Laura; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Hyman, Bradley T; Spires-Jones, Tara L

    2015-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease is the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, intracellular aggregates of hyperphosphorylated, mislocalized tau protein, which are associated with neuronal loss. Changes in tau are known to impair cellular transport (including that of mitochondria) and are associated with cell death in cell culture and mouse models of tauopathy. Thus clearing pathological forms of tau from cells is a key therapeutic strategy. One critical modulator in the degradation and clearance of misfolded proteins is the co-chaperone CHIP (Carboxy terminus Hsp70 interacting Protein), which is known to play a role in refolding and clearance of hyperphosphorylated tau. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CHIP could ameliorate pathological changes associated with tau. We find that co-expressing CHIP with full-length tau, tau truncated at D421 mimicking caspase cleavage, or the short tauRDΔK280 tau construct containing only the tau repeat domain with a tauopathy mutation, decreases tau protein levels in human H4 neuroglioma cells in a manner dependent on the Hsp70-binding TPR domain of CHIP. The observed reduction in tau levels by CHIP is associated with a decrease of tau phosphorylation and reduced levels of cleaved Caspase 3 indicating that CHIP plays an important role in preventing tau-induced pathological changes. Furthermore, tau-associated mitochondrial transport deficits are rescued by CHIP co-expression in H4 cells. Together, these data suggest that the co-chaperone CHIP can rescue the pathological effects of tau, and indicate that other diseases of protein misfolding and accumulation may also benefit from CHIP upregulation. PMID:25374103

  6. Validation of ELISA methods for quantification of total tau and phosporylated-tau181 in human cerebrospinal fluid with measurement in specimens from two Alzheimer's disease studies.

    PubMed

    Lachno, D Richard; Romeo, Martin J; Siemers, Eric R; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Coart, Els; Konrad, Robert J; Zajac, Joseph J; Talbot, Jayne A; Jensen, Hans F; Sethuraman, Gopalan; Demattos, Ronald B; May, Patrick C; Dean, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Tau measurements in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are gaining acceptance as aids to diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and differentiation from other dementias. Two ELISA assays, the INNOTEST® hTAU Ag and the INNOTEST® PHOSPHO-TAU(181P) for quantification of t-tau and p-tau181 respectively, have been validated to regulatory standards. Validation parameters were determined by repeated testing of human CSF pools. Specimens from Phase 2 studies of the γ-secretase inhibitor semagacestat and the therapeutic antibody solanezumab at baseline and following 12-14 weeks of treatment were also tested. Estimated intra-assay CV for repeated testing of 3 CSF pools were ≤11.5% and RE varied between -14.1% and +6.4%. Inter-assay CV for t-tau was <5% and RE was within ±8%. For p-tau181, inter-assay CV was <9% and RE was within ±2.5%. Total CV (intra-assay plus inter-assay) were below 10% for both analytes. Up to 20-fold dilutional linearity was demonstrated for both analytes. Stability of t-tau and p-tau181 was demonstrated in CSF during five freeze-thaw cycles at ≤-20 °C and ≤-70 °C and at 18-22 °C for up to 24 h. Neither semagacestat nor solanezumab interfered with either assay. Inter-individual t-tau and p-tau181 concentrations were highly variable but intra-individual variations were small. These assays are suitable for analysis of CSF t-tau and p-tau181 in a single laboratory supporting multi-center AD clinical trials. No effect of treatment with semagacestat or solanezumab was observed in response to three months of drug administration. PMID:21694458

  7. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A.; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles (4He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei—nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons—is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the ‘adiabatic projection method’ to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  8. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  9. Is phosphorylated tau unique to chronic traumatic encephalopathy? Phosphorylated tau in epileptic brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Puvenna, Vikram; Engeler, Madeline; Banjara, Manoj; Brennan, Chanda; Schreiber, Peter; Dadas, Aaron; Bahrami, Ashkon; Solanki, Jesal; Bandyopadhyay, Anasua; Morris, Jacqueline K; Bernick, Charles; Ghosh, Chaitali; Rapp, Edward; Bazarian, Jeffrey J; Janigro, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive traumatic brain injury (rTBI) is one of the major risk factors for the abnormal deposition of phosphorylated tau (PT) in the brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) affect the limbic system, but no comparative studies on PT distribution in TLE and CTE are available. It is also unclear whether PT pathology results from repeated head hits (rTBI). These gaps prevent a thorough understanding of the pathogenesis and clinical significance of PT, limiting our ability to develop preventative and therapeutic interventions. We quantified PT in TLE and CTE to unveil whether a history of rTBI is a prerequisite for PT accumulation in the brain. Six postmortem CTE (mean 73.3 years) and age matched control samples were compared to 19 surgically resected TLE brain specimens (4 months-58 years; mean 27.6 years). No history of TBI was present in TLE or control; all CTE patients had a history of rTBI. TLE and CTE brain displayed increased levels of PT as revealed by immunohistochemistry. No age-dependent changes were noted, as PT was present as early as 4 months after birth. In TLE and CTE, cortical neurons, perivascular regions around penetrating pial vessels and meninges were immunopositive for PT; white matter tracts also displayed robust expression of extracellular PT organized in bundles parallel to venules. Microscopically, there were extensive tau-immunoreactive neuronal, astrocytic and degenerating neurites throughout the brain. In CTE perivascular tangles were most prominent. Overall, significant differences in staining intensities were found between CTE and control (P<0.01) but not between CTE and TLE (P=0.08). pS199 tau analysis showed that CTE had the most high molecular weight tangle-associated tau, whereas epileptic brain contained low molecular weight tau. Tau deposition may not be specific to rTBI since TLE recapitulated most of the pathological features of CTE. PMID:26556772

  10. Tau pathology-dependent remodelling of cerebral arteries precedes Alzheimer's disease-related microvascular cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Merlini, Mario; Wanner, Debora; Nitsch, Roger M

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterised by pathologic cerebrovascular remodelling. Whether this occurs already before disease onset, as may be indicated by early Braak tau-related cerebral hypoperfusion and blood-brain barrier (BBB) impairment found in previous studies, remains unknown. Therefore, we systematically quantified Braak tau stage- and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA)-dependent alterations in the alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), collagen, and elastin content of leptomeningeal arterioles, small arteries, and medium-sized arteries surrounding the gyrus frontalis medialis (GFM) and hippocampus (HIPP), including the sulci, of 17 clinically and pathologically diagnosed AD subjects (Braak stage IV-VI) and 28 non-demented control subjects (Braak stage I-IV). GFM and HIPP paraffin sections were stained for general collagen and elastin with the Verhoeff-van Gieson stain; α-SMA and CAA/amyloid β (Aβ) were detected using immunohistochemistry. Significant arterial elastin degradation was observed from Braak stage III onward and correlated with Braak tau pathology (ρ = 0.909, 95 % CI 0.370 to 0.990, p < 0.05). This was accompanied by an increase in neutrophil elastase expression by α-SMA-positive cells in the vessel wall. Small and medium-sized arteries exhibited significant CAA-independent α-SMA loss starting between Braak stage I and II-III, along with accumulation of phosphorylated paired helical filament (PHF) tau in the perivascular space of intraparenchymal vessels. α-SMA remained at the decreased level throughout the later Braak stages. In contrast, arterioles exhibited significant α-SMA loss only at Braak stage V and VI/in AD subjects, which was CAA-dependent/correlated with CAA burden (ρ = -0.422, 95 % CI -0.557 to -0.265, p < 0.0001). Collagen content was only significantly changed in small arteries. Our data indicate that vessel wall remodelling of leptomeningeal arteries is an early-onset, Braak tau pathology-dependent process

  11. Learning and Memory Deficits upon TAU Accumulation in "Drosophila" Mushroom Body Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mershin, Andreas; Pavlopoulos, Elias; Fitch, Olivia; Braden, Brittany C.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.; Skoulakis, Efthimios M. C.

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in the neuronal-specific microtubule-binding protein TAU are associated with several dementias and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the effects of elevated TAU accumulation on behavioral plasticity are unknown. We report that directed expression of wild-type vertebrate and "Drosophila" TAU in adult mushroom body neurons, centers for…

  12. Parkin deletion causes cerebral and systemic amyloidosis in human mutated tau over-expressing mice.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Jose A; Gómez, Ana; Rodal, Izaskun; Perucho, Juan; Martinez, Armando; Furió, Vicente; Ampuero, Israel; Casarejos, María J; Solano, Rosa M; de Yébenes, Justo García; Mena, Maria A

    2008-10-15

    Deposition of proteins leading to amyloid takes place in some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Mutations of tau and parkin proteins produce neurofibrillary abnormalities without deposition of amyloid. Here we report that mature, parkin null, over-expressing human mutated tau (PK(-/-)/Tau(VLW)) mice have altered behaviour and dopamine neurotransmission, tau pathology in brain and amyloid deposition in brain and peripheral organs. PK(-/-)/Tau(VLW) mice have abnormal behaviour and severe drop out of dopamine neurons in the ventral midbrain, up to 70%, at 12 months and abundant phosphorylated tau positive neuritic plaques, neuro-fibrillary tangles, astrogliosis, microgliosis and plaques of murine beta-amyloid in the hippocampus. PK(-/-)/Tau(VLW) mice have organomegaly of the liver, spleen and kidneys. The electron microscopy of the liver confirmed the presence of a fibrillary protein deposits with amyloid characteristics. There is also accumulation of mouse tau in hepatocytes. These mice have lower levels of CHIP-HSP70, involved in the proteosomal degradation of tau, increased oxidative stress, measured as depletion of glutathione which, added to lack of parkin, could trigger tau accumulation and amyloidogenesis. This model is the first that demonstrates beta-amyloid deposits caused by over-expression of tau and without modification of the amyloid precursor protein, presenilins or secretases. PK(-/-)/Tau(VLW) mice provide a link between the two proteins more important for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. PMID:18640988

  13. Convergence of Presenilin- and Tau-mediated Pathways on Axonal Trafficking and Neuronal Function

    PubMed Central

    Peethumnongsin, Erica; Yang, Li; Kallhoff-Muñoz, Verena; Hu, Lingyun; Takashima, Akihiko; Pautler, Robia G.; Zheng, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a significant and growing health problem in the aging population. Although definitive mechanisms of pathogenesis remain elusive, genetic and histological clues have implicated the proteins presenilin (PS) and tau as key players in AD development. PS mutations lead to familial AD, and although tau is not mutated in AD, tau pathology is a hallmark of the disease. Axonal transport deficits are a common feature of several neurodegenerative disorders and may represent a point of intersection of PS and tau function. To investigate the contribution of wild-type, as opposed to mutant, tau to axonal transport defects in the context of presenilin loss, we used a mouse model postnatally deficient for PS (PS cDKO) and expressing wild-type human tau (WtTau). The resulting PS cDKO;WtTau mice exhibited early tau pathology and axonal transport deficits that preceded development of these phenotypes in WtTau or PS cDKO mice. These deficits were associated with reduced neurotrophin signaling, defective learning and memory and impaired synaptic plasticity. The combination of these effects accelerated neurodegeneration in PS cDKO;WtTau mice. Our results strongly support a convergent role for PS and tau in axonal transport and neuronal survival and function and implicate their misregulation as a contributor to AD pathogenesis. PMID:20926667

  14. Large Sample Confidence Limits for Goodman and Kruskal's Proportional Prediction Measure TAU-b

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Kenneth J.; Mielke, Paul W.

    1976-01-01

    A Fortran Extended program which computes Goodman and Kruskal's Tau-b, its asymmetrical counterpart, Tau-a, and three sets of confidence limits for each coefficient under full multinomial and proportional stratified sampling is presented. A correction of an error in the calculation of the large sample standard error of Tau-b is discussed.…

  15. Abnormal tau induces cognitive impairment through two different mechanisms: synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss

    PubMed Central

    Di, J.; Cohen, L. S.; Corbo, C. P.; Phillips, G. R.; El Idrissi, A.; Alonso, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    The hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau is present in several neurodegenerative diseases, although the causal relationship remains elusive. Few mouse models used to study Alzheimer-like dementia target tau phosphorylation. We created an inducible pseudophosphorylated tau (Pathological Human Tau, PH-Tau) mouse model to study the effect of conformationally modified tau in vivo. Leaky expression resulted in two levels of PH-Tau: low basal level and higher upon induction (4% and 14% of the endogenous tau, respectively). Unexpectedly, low PH-Tau resulted in significant cognitive deficits, decrease in the number of synapses (seen by EM in the CA1 region), reduction of synaptic proteins, and localization to the nucleus. Induction of PH-Tau triggered neuronal death (60% in CA3), astrocytosis, and loss of the processes in CA1. These findings suggest, that phosphorylated tau is sufficient to induce neurodegeneration and that two different mechanisms can induce cognitive impairment depending on the levels of PH-Tau expression. PMID:26888634

  16. A measurement of the ({tau}) polarization at the Z resonance with the DELPHI detector at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Wong Chan, A.

    1993-07-01

    The polarization of {tau} leptons produced in the reaction e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} near the peak of the Z{degree} resonance has been measured using a sample of 24904 {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} events, with an estimated background of 1.5%. We have selected 4562 {tau} {yields} e{nu}{bar {nu}} 2218 {tau} {yields} {pi}{nu} and 5133 {tau} {yields} {rho}{nu} candidates. The mean value obtained is P{sub {tau}} = {minus}0.176 {plus_minus} 0.029. This corresponds to a ratio of the neutral current vector to the axial-vector coupling constants of the {tau} lepton of g{sub V}{sup {tau}}/g{sub A}{sup {tau}} = 0.088 {plus_minus} 0.014. This leads to a value of the electroweak mixing angle of sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} = 0.2280 {plus_minus} 0.0036. This result is in good agreement with previous measurements of the weak mixing angle from the study of the Z{degree} lineshape and the forward-backward asymmetries in the processes Z{degree} {yields} l{sup +}l{sup {minus}} and Z{degree} {yields} q{bar q}.

  17. alpha-Hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    alpha - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( alpha - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 84 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Ass

  18. H{alpha} ABSORPTION IN TRANSITING EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, Duncan; Arras, Phil; Li Zhiyun E-mail: pla7y@virginia.edu

    2013-08-01

    Absorption of stellar H{alpha} by the upper atmosphere of the planet HD 189733b has recently been detected by Jensen et al. Motivated by this observation, we have developed a model for atomic hydrogen in the n = 2 state and compared the resulting H{alpha} line profile to the observations. The model atmosphere is in hydrostatic balance, as well as thermal and photoionization equilibrium. Collisional and radiative transitions are included in the determination of the n = 2 state level population. We find that H{alpha} absorption is dominated by an optical depth {tau} {approx} 1 shell, composed of hydrogen in the metastable 2s state that is located below the hydrogen ionization layer. The number density of the 2s state within the shell is found to vary slowly with radius, while that of the 1s state falls rapidly. Thus while the Ly{alpha} absorption, for a certain wavelength, occurs inside a relatively well defined impact parameter, the contribution to H{alpha} absorption is roughly uniform over the entire atomic hydrogen layer. The model can approximately reproduce the observed Ly{alpha} and H{alpha} integrated transit depths for HD 189733b by using an ionization rate enhanced over that expected for the star by an order of magnitude. For HD 209458b, we are unable to explain the asymmetric H{alpha} line profile observed by Jensen et al., as the model produces a symmetric line profile with transit depth comparable to that of HD 189733b. In an appendix, we study the effect of the stellar Ly{alpha} absorption on the net cooling rate.

  19. Inhibition of HDAC6 modifies tau inclusion body formation and impairs autophagic clearance.

    PubMed

    Leyk, Janina; Goldbaum, Olaf; Noack, Monika; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Proteinaceous inclusions in nerve cells and glia are a defining neuropathological hallmark in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Their occurrence may be related to malfunctions of the proteolytic degradation systems. In cultured oligodendrocytes, proteasomal inhibition leads to protein aggregate formation resembling coiled bodies, which are characteristic for PSP and CBD. Large protein aggregates are excluded from the proteasome and can only be degraded by autophagy, a lysosomal pathway. Autophagy is a highly selective process, which requires a variety of receptor proteins for ubiquitinated proteins, such as p62 and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6). HDAC6 is mainly localized in the cytoplasm, and alpha-tubulin is its major substrate. HDAC6 is considered as a sensor of proteasomal stress; it is involved in the autophagosomal pathway and can mediate the retrograde transport of ubiquitinated proteins along the microtubules. As we have shown recently, HDAC6 is present in oligodendrocytes and its inhibition leads to morphological alterations, microtubule bundling, modulation of acetylation, and phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether HDAC6 is involved in protein aggregate formation in oligodendrocytes and whether its inhibition modifies the consequences of MG-132-induced inhibition of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). The data show that HDAC6 and acetylated tau are recruited to protein aggregates after proteasomal inhibition. Pharmacological inhibition of HDAC6 by the selective inhibitor tubastatin A (TST) and its small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated downregulation alters the assembly of MG-132-induced compact protein aggregates. After TST treatment, they appear more diffusely dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. This is not a protective means but promotes the onset

  20. The Abundance of Nonphosphorylated Tau in Mouse and Human Tauopathy Brains Revealed by the Use of Phos-Tag Method.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Taeko; Hatsuta, Hiroyuki; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami; Hosokawa, Masato; Ishiguro, Koichi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Murayama, Shigeo; Hasegawa, Masato; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2016-02-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau. Previous studies have identified many disease-related phosphorylation sites on tau. However, it is not understood how tau is hyperphosphorylated and what extent these sites are phosphorylated in both diseased and normal brains. Most previous studies have used phospho-specific antibodies to analyze tau phosphorylation. These results are useful but do not provide information about nonphosphorylated tau. Here, we applied the method of Phos-tag SDS-PAGE, in which phosphorylated tau was separated from nonphosphorylated tau in vivo. Among heterogeneously phosphorylated tau species in adult mouse brains, the nonphosphorylated 0N4R isoform was detected most abundantly. In contrast, perinatal tau and tau in cold water-stressed mice were all phosphorylated with a similar extent of phosphorylation. In normal elderly human brains, nonphosphorylated 0N3R and 0N4R tau were most abundant. A slightly higher phosphorylation of tau, which may represent the early step of hyperphosphorylation, was increased in Alzheimer disease patients at Braak stage V. Tau with this phosphorylation state was pelleted by centrifugation, and sarkosyl-soluble tau in either Alzheimer disease or corticobasal degeneration brains showed phosphorylation profiles similar to tau in normal human brain, suggesting that hyperphosphorylation occurs in aggregated tau. These results indicate that tau molecules are present in multiple phosphorylation states in vivo, and nonphosphorylated forms are highly expressed among them. PMID:26687814

  1. Variances and Covariances of Kendall's Tau and Their Estimation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliff, Norman; Charlin, Ventura

    1991-01-01

    Variance formulas of H. E. Daniels and M. G. Kendall (1947) are generalized to allow for the presence of ties and variance of the sample tau correlation. Applications of these generalized formulas are discussed and illustrated using data from a 1965 study of contraceptive use in 15 developing countries. (SLD)

  2. Aggregation propensity of critical regions of the protein Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthee, Micaiah; Ahmed, Azka; Larini, Luca

    The Alzheimer's disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills, which eventually leads to the ability to not able to carry out the simplest tasks. The Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the formation of protein aggregates both within and outside of the brain's cells, the neurons. Within the neurons, the aggregation of the protein tau leads to the destruction of the microtubules in the axon of the neuron. Tau belongs to a group of proteins referred to as Microtubule-Associated Proteins. It is extremely flexible and is classified as an intrinsically unstructured protein due to its low propensity to form secondary structure. Tau promotes tubulin assembly into microtubules thereby stabilizing the cytoskeleton of the axon of the neurons. The microtubule binding region of tau consists of 4 pseudo-repeats. In this study, we will focus on the aggregation propensity of two fragments. In this study we will focus on the PHF43 fragment that contains the third pseudo-repeat and has been shown experimentally to aggregate readily. Another fragment that contains the second pseudo-repeat will be considered as well. Mutations in this region are associated with various form of dementia and for this reason we will consider the mutant P301L.

  3. Astrophysical tau neutrinos and their detection by large neutrino telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bugaev, E.V.; Montaruli, T.

    2004-06-01

    We present results of the detailed Monte Carlo calculation of the rates of double-bang events in a 1-km{sup 3} underwater neutrino telescope taking into account the effects of {tau}-neutrino propagation through the Earth. As an input, the moderately optimistic theoretical predictions for diffuse neutrino spectra of AGN jets are used.

  4. Detection of tau neutrinos by imaging air Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, D.; Bernardini, E.

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the potential to detect tau neutrinos in the energy range of 1-1000 PeV searching for very inclined showers with imaging Cherenkov telescopes. A neutrino induced tau lepton escaping from the Earth may decay and initiate an air shower which can be detected by a fluorescence or Cherenkov telescope. We present here a study of the detection potential of Earth-skimming neutrinos taking into account neutrino interactions in the Earth crust, local matter distributions at various detector sites, the development of tau-induced showers in air and the detection of Cherenkov photons with IACTs. We analyzed simulated shower images on the camera focal plane and implemented generic reconstruction chains based on Hillas parameters. We find that present IACTs can distinguish air showers induced by tau neutrinos from the background of hadronic showers in the PeV-EeV energy range. We present the neutrino trigger efficiency obtained for a few configurations being considered for the next-generation Cherenkov telescopes, i.e. the Cherenkov Telescope Array. Finally, for a few representative neutrino spectra expected from astrophysical sources, we compare the expected event rates at running IACTs to what is expected for the dedicated IceCube neutrino telescope.

  5. Secondary nucleating sequences affect kinetics and thermodynamics of tau aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Christopher L.; Huang, Michael H.; Robbennolt, Shauna A.; Voss, Kellen R.; Combs, Benjamin; Gamblin, T. Chris; Goux, Warren J.

    2011-01-01

    Tau protein was scanned for highly amyloidogenic sequences in amphiphilic motifs (X)nZ, Z(X)nZ (n≥2) or (XZ)n (n≥2), where X is a hydrophobic residue and Z is a charged or polar residue. N-acetyl peptides homologous to these sequences were used to study aggregation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed 7 peptides, in addition to well known primary nucleating sequences c275VQIINK (AcPHF6*) and Ac306VQIVYK (AcPHF6), formed fibers, tubes, ribbons or rolled sheets. Of the peptides shown by TEM to form amyloid, Ac10VME, AcPHF6*, Ac375KLTFR, and Ac393VYK were found to enhance the fraction of β-structure of AcPHF6 formed at equilibrium, and Ac375KLTFR was found to inhibit AcPHF6 and AcPHF6* aggregation kinetics in a dose-dependent manner, consistent with its participation in a hybrid steric zipper model. Single site mutants were generated which transformed predicted amyloidogenic sequences in tau into non-amyloidogenic ones. A M11K mutant had fewer filaments and showed a decrease in aggregation kinetics and an increased lag time compared to wild type tau, while a F378K mutant showed significantly more filaments. Our results infer that sequences throughout tau, in addition to PHF6 and PHF6*, can seed amyloid formation or affect aggregation kinetics or thermodynamics. PMID:22085312

  6. Lattice considerations for a tau-charm factory

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.; Crosbie, E.A.

    1995-06-01

    The magnet lattice appropriate for a tau-charm factory had been studied extensively. Here we discuss two possible simplifying features which make the design, construction, and operation of the machine simpler without sacrificing performance. These two features may be characterized and identified as (a) luminosity optimization in the ``monochromatic`` mode, and (b) chromaticity correction with sextupoles only in the arcs.

  7. Improved measurement of absolute branching fraction of D{sub s}{sup +}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}

    SciTech Connect

    Onyisi, P. U. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Galik, R. S.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.; Hunt, J. M.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Ledoux, J.; Mahlke-Krueger, H.

    2009-03-01

    We have studied the leptonic decay D{sub s}{sup +}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}, via the decay channel {tau}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, using a sample of tagged D{sub s}{sup +} decays collected near the D{sub s}*{sup {+-}}D{sub s}{sup {+-}} peak production energy in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions with the CLEO-c detector. We obtain B(D{sub s}{sup +}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(5.30{+-}0.47{+-}0.22)% and determine the decay constant f{sub D{sub s}}=(252.5{+-}11.1{+-}5.2) MeV, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic.

  8. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... measures the level of the protein AAT in blood. Alpha-1 antitrypsin phenotype testing evaluates the amount and type of AAT being produced and compares it to normal patterns. Alpha-1 antitrypsin genotype testing ( DNA testing) can ...

  9. Alpha-1 antitrypsin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003715.htm Alpha-1 antitrypsin test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is a laboratory test to measure the ...

  10. Divergent CSF tau alterations in two common tauopathies: Alzheimer’s disease and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Wagshal, Dana; Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Guss, Valerie; Hall, Tracey; Berisha, Flora; Lobach, Iryna; Karydas, Anna; Voltarelli, Lisa; Scherling, Carole; Heuer, Hilary; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Miller, Zachary; Coppola, Giovanni; Ahlijanian, Michael; Soares, Holly; Kramer, Joel H; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rosen, Howard J; Miller, Bruce L; Meredith, Jere; Boxer, Adam L

    2014-01-01

    Background Elevated CSF tau is considered a biomarker of neuronal injury in newly developed Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) criteria. However, previous studies have failed to detect alterations of tau species in other primary tauopathies. We assessed CSF tau protein abnormalities in AD, a tauopathy with prominent Aβ pathology, and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), a primary tauopathy characterized by deposition of four microtubule binding repeat (4R) tau with minimal Aβ pathology. Methods 26 normal control (NC), 37 AD, and 24 PSP patients participated in the study. AD and PSP were matched for severity using the clinical dementia rating sum of boxes (CDR-sb) scores. The INNO BIA AlzBio3 multiplex immunoassay was used to measure CSF Aβ, total tau, and ptau181. Additional, novel ELISAs targeting different N-terminal and central tau epitopes were developed to examine CSF tau components and to investigate interactions between diagnostic group, demographics, and genetic variables. Results PSP had lower CSF N-terminal and C-terminal tau concentrations than NC and AD measured with both the novel tau ELISAs and the standard AlzBio3 tau and ptau assays. AD had higher total tau and ptau levels than NC and PSP. There was a gender by diagnosis interaction in both AD and PSP for most tau species, with lower concentrations for male compared to female patients. Conclusions CSF tau fragment concentrations are different in PSP compared with AD despite the presence of severe tau pathology and neuronal injury in both disorders. CSF tau concentration likely reflects multiple factors in addition to the degree of neuronal injury. PMID:24899730

  11. Tau and muon lepton flavor violations in the littlest Higgs model with T parity

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Toru; Okada, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2011-03-01

    Lepton flavor violation in {tau} and {mu} processes is studied in the littlest Higgs model with T parity. We consider various asymmetries defined in polarized {tau} and {mu} decays. Correlations among branching ratios and asymmetries are shown in the following lepton flavor violation processes: {mu}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{gamma}, {mu}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup +}e{sup -}, {mu}{sup -}A{yields}e{sup -}A (A=Al, Ti, Au, and Pb), {tau}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{gamma}, {tau}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, {tau}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}e{sup +}e{sup -}, {tau}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}P (P={pi}{sup 0}, {eta} and {eta}{sup '}), {tau}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}V (V={rho}{sup 0}, {omega} and {phi}), {tau}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{gamma}, {tau}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup +}e{sup -}, {tau}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, {tau}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}P, {tau}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}V, {tau}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}e{sup -} and {tau}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. It is shown that large parity asymmetries and time-reversal asymmetries are allowed in {mu}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup +}e{sup -}. For {tau} lepton flavor violation processes, sizable asymmetries are possible reflecting characteristic chirality structure of lepton flavor violating interactions in this model.

  12. Orbit-averaged drift kinetic equation for the study of alpha-particle transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, G.T.; Miley, G.H. . Fusion Studies Lab.); Burrell, K.H. )

    1990-11-01

    Neoclassical transport of minority suprathermal alpha particles is investigated. This paper departs from previous investigations in that (a) the banana-width ordering parameter {rho}{sub {theta}}/L is not formally restricted to be a small parameter and (b) a linearized collision operator that retains the effects of pitch-angle scattering, electron and ion drag, and speed diffusion is used. A step model approximation for the large-aspect-ratio, circular-cross-section tokamak magnetic field is adopted to simplify the orbit-averaging procedure. Assuming that the suprathermal alphas are in the banana regime, an asymptotic expansion in {tau}{sub B}/{tau}{sub S} {much lt} l is carried out.

  13. The Alpha Centauri System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderblom, David R.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Alpha Centauri star system, which is the closest star system to the sun. Discusses the difficulties associated with measurements involving Alpha Centauri, along with some of the recent advances in stellar seismology. Raises questions about the possibilities of planets around Alpha Centauri. (TW)

  14. Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Tau Aggregation by Targeting Monomeric Tau As a Potential Therapeutic Approach for Tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Pickhardt, Marcus; Neumann, Thomas; Schwizer, Daniel; Callaway, Kari; Vendruscolo, Michele; Schenk, Dale; St. George-Hyslop, Peter; Mandelkow, Eva M.; Dobson, Christopher M.; McConlogue, Lisa; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Tóth, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    A potential strategy to alleviate the aggregation of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is to maintain the native functional state of the protein by small molecule binding. However, the targeting of the native state of IDPs by small molecules has been challenging due to their heterogeneous conformational ensembles. To tackle this challenge, we applied a high-throughput chemical microarray surface plasmon resonance imaging screen to detect the binding between small molecules and monomeric full-length Tau, a protein linked with the onset of a range of Tauopathies. The screen identified a novel set of drug-like fragment and lead-like compounds that bound to Tau. We verified that the majority of these hit compounds reduced the aggregation of different Tau constructs in vitro and in N2a cells. These results demonstrate that Tau is a viable receptor of drug-like small molecules. The drug discovery approach that we present can be applied to other IDPs linked to other misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.

  15. Identification of small molecule inhibitors of Tau aggregation by targeting monomeric Tau as a potential therapeutic approach for Tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Pickhardt, Marcus; Neumann, Thomas; Schwizer, Daniel; Callaway, Kari; Vendruscolo, Michele; Schenk, Dale; George-Hyslop, Peter; Mandelkow, Eva M.; Dobson, Christopher M.; McConlogue, Lisa; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Tóth, Gergely

    2016-01-01

    A potential strategy to alleviate the aggregation of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is to maintain the native functional state of the protein by small molecule binding. However, the targeting of the native state of IDPs by small molecules has been challenging due to their heterogeneous conformational ensembles. To tackle this challenge, we applied a high-throughput chemical microarray surface plasmon resonance imaging screen to detect the binding between small molecules and monomeric full-length Tau, a protein linked with the onset of a range of Tauopathies. The screen identified a novel set of drug-like fragment and lead-like compounds that bound to Tau. We verified that the majority of these hit compounds reduced the aggregation of different Tau constructs in vitro and in N2a cells. These results demonstrate that Tau is a viable receptor of drug-like small molecules. The drug discovery approach that we present can be applied to other IDPs linked to other misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. PMID:26510979

  16. Searches for Lepton Flavor Violation in the Decays tau{sup +}-->e{sup +}-{gamma} and {tau}{sup +}-->{mu}{sup +}-{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.

    2010-01-15

    Searches for lepton-flavor-violating decays of a {tau} lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a photon have been performed with the entire data set of (963+-7)x10{sup 6} {tau} decays collected by the BABAR detector near the {Upsilon}(4S), {Upsilon}(3S) and {Upsilon}(2S) resonances. The searches yield no evidence of signals and we set upper limits on the branching fractions of B(tau{sup +}-->e{sup +}-{gamma})<3.3x10{sup -8} and B({tau}{sup +}-->{mu}{sup +}-{gamma})<4.4x10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  17. Massive accumulation of modified tau and severe depletion of normal tau characterize the cerebral cortex and white matter of Alzheimer's disease. Demonstration using the hydrated autoclaving method.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, R. W.; Iwaki, T.; Kitamoto, T.; Sato, Y.; Tateishi, J.

    1992-01-01

    Using the hydrated autoclaving method, a new immunohistochemical procedure to enhance tau immunoreactivity in formalin-fixed brain tissue, the authors recently reported that tau protein is detected in neuronal cell bodies and proximal dendrites, gray matter neuropil, axons, and glial cells in normal human hippocampus and neocortex. In the this study, the authors performed a comparative study of the distribution of normal and modified forms of tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and control brains. In the cerebral cortex and white matter of AD brains, a massive accumulation of modified tau and/or severe depletion of normal tau were documented in all the tau compartments. In mild AD cases, gray matter neuropil, axons, and glial cells were less severely involved than neuronal perikarya. In the controls, neuronal perikarya were often involved by modified tau accumulation, but the other compartments showed normal distribution. These observations suggest that modifications of tau which lead to neurofibrillary lesions in AD may begin in neuronal perikarya and extend to the other tau compartments in advanced stages of the disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1373272

  18. Chronic Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Results in Reduced Cerebral Blood Flow, Axonal Injury, Gliosis, and Increased T-Tau and Tau Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Joseph O; Mouzon, Benoit; Algamal, Moustafa; Leary, Paige; Lynch, Cillian; Abdullah, Laila; Evans, James; Mullan, Michael; Bachmeier, Corbin; Stewart, William; Crawford, Fiona

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a risk factor for chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which is characterized by patchy deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates in neurons and astrocytes at the depths of cortical sulci. We developed an mTBI paradigm to explore effects of repetitive concussive-type injury over several months in mice with a human tau genetic background (hTau). Two injuries were induced in the hTau mice weekly over a period of 3 or 4 months and the effects were compared with those in noninjured sham animals. Behavioral and in vivo measures and detailed neuropathological assessments were conducted 6 months after the first injury. Our data confirm impairment in cerebral blood flow and white matter damage. This was accompanied by a 2-fold increase in total tau levels and mild increases in tau oligomers/conformers and pTau (Thr231) species in brain gray matter. There was no evidence of neurofibrillary/astroglial tangles, neuropil threads, or perivascular foci of tau immunoreactivity. There were neurobehavioral deficits (ie, disinhibition and impaired cognitive performance) in the mTBI animals. These data support the relevance of this new mTBI injury model for studying the consequences of chronic repetitive mTBI in humans, and the role of tau in TBI. PMID:27251042

  19. Final report on inter-RMO Key Comparison EUROMET.L-K5.2004: Calibration of a step gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Emilio; Brown, Nicholas; Lassila, Antti; Lewis, Andrew; Matus, Michael; Vailleau, Georges; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Kotte, Gerard W. J. L.; Frennberg, Mikael; McQuoid, Howard; Zelený, Vít; Ramotowski, Zbigniew; Bánréti, Edit; Duta, Alexandru; Bartolo Picotto, Gian; Doytchinov, Kostadin; Valente de Oliveira, Jose Carlos; Viliesid Alonso, Miguel; Chekirda, Konstantin

    2012-01-01

    The results of the inter-RMO key comparison EUROMET.L-K5.2004 on the calibration of a step gauge are reported. Eighteen National Metrology Institutes and one Designated Institute from four different metrological regions all over the world participated in this comparison which lasted three years, from December 2004 to December 2007. A lack of stability was observed through the shifting of some of the inserted gauges. In order to save the comparison and get valuable and useful conclusions, it was agreed to exclude four gauges from calculation and assume that only seven gauges were reasonably stable so as to get the corresponding reference values. It was also agreed to divide the participants into two groups, analyze separately their results and, taking the pilot as the linking laboratory, refer the results to common reference values. The inverse-variance weighted mean was taken as reference value. Due to the significant instability of the step it was also considered an artefact uncertainty. The reported uncertainties ranged from 0.045 µm to 1.2 µm (k = 1). The uncertainty of the artefact ranged from 0.018 µm (for the 20 mm face) to 0.176 µm (for the 400 mm face). The compatibility of all participants for measuring step gauges was demonstrated with the only exception of a participant showing very high systematic (both positive and negative) errors. Five participants communicated higher uncertainties than the corresponding approved CMCs. A set of Recommendations and Actions were agreed therefore. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCL, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  20. Tau Clearance Mechanisms and Their Possible Role in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chesser, Adrianne S.; Pritchard, Susanne M.; Johnson, Gail V. W.

    2013-01-01

    One of the defining pathological features of Alzheimer disease (AD) is the intraneuronal accumulation of tau. The tau that forms these accumulations is altered both posttranslationally and conformationally, and there is now significant evidence that soluble forms of these modified tau species are the toxic entities rather than the insoluble neurofibrillary tangles. However there is still noteworthy debate concerning which specific pathological forms of tau are the contributors to neuronal dysfunction and death in AD. Given that increases in aberrant forms of tau play a role in the neurodegeneration process in AD, there is growing interest in understanding the degradative pathways that remove tau from the cell, and the selectivity of these different pathways for various forms of tau. Indeed, one can speculate that deficits in a pathway that selectively removes certain pathological forms of tau could play a pivotal role in AD. In this review we will discuss the different proteolytic and degradative machineries that may be involved in removing tau from the cell. How deficits in these different degradative pathways may contribute to abnormal accumulation of tau in AD will also be considered. In addition, the issue of the selective targeting of specific tau species to a given degradative pathway for clearance from the cell will be addressed. PMID:24027553

  1. Kaon content of three-prong decays of the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, J.J.

    1990-12-01

    We present a series of measurements involving the production of charged kaons in three-prong hadronic decays of the {tau} lepton. The data sample was obtained with the TPC/Two-Gamma detector facility at PEP. We set a limit on the branching fraction BR({tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}K{sup 0}) < 0.26% at the 95% confidence level. The process {tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}K{sup 0} is related via SU(3) to the second-class current decay {tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}{pi}{sup {minus}}{eta}. We also present new measurements of the three-prong branching fractions BR({tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} + neutrals) = 0.70 (+0.20/{minus}0.17)% and BR({tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}K{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} + neutrals) = 0.16 (+0.10/{minus}0.07)%. 68 refs., 29 figs., 15 tabs.

  2. Altered phosphorylation of. tau. protein in heat-shocked rats and patients with Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Papasozomenos, S.C.; Yuan Su Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX )

    1991-05-15

    Six hours after heat shocking 2- to 3-month-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 42C for 15 min, the authors analyzed {tau} protein immunoreactivity in SDS extracts of cerebrums and peripheral nerves by using immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry with the anti-{tau} monoclonal antibody Tau-1, which recognizes a phosphate-dependent nonphosphorylated epitope, and with {sup 125}I-labeled protein A. In the cerebal extracts, the authors found altered phosphorylation of {tau} in heat-shocked females, characterized by a marked reduction in the amount of nonphosphorylated {tau}, a doubling of the ratio of total (phosphorylated plus nonphosphorylated) {tau} to nonphosphorylated {tau}, and the appearance of the slowest moving phosphorylated {tau} polypeptide (68 kDa). Similar, but milder, changes were observed in male rats. Quantitative immunoblot analysis of cortex and the underlying white matter with Tau-1 and {sup 125}I-labeled protein A showed that the amount of phosphorylated {tau} progressively increased in the Alzheimer disease-affected cerebral cortex, while concurrently a proportionally lesser amount of {tau} entered the white matter axons. The similar findings for the rat heat-shock model and Alzheimer disease suggest that life stressors may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Identification of Novel Tau Interactions with Endoplasmic Reticulum Proteins in Alzheimer’s Disease Brain

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Shelby; Bell, Michelle; Lyons, Danielle N.; Ingram, Alexandria; Chen, Jing; Gensel, John C.; Zhu, Haining; Nelson, Peter T.; Abisambra, Jose F.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is pathologically characterized by the formation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal tau tangles. We recently identified that tau associates with proteins known to participate in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD); consequently, ERAD becomes dysfunctional and causes neurotoxicity. We hypothesized that tau associates with other ER proteins, and that this association could also lead to cellular dysfunction in AD. Portions of human AD and non-demented age matched control brains were fractionated to obtain microsomes, from which tau was co-immunoprecipitated. Samples from both conditions containing tau and its associated proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry. In total, we identified 91 ER proteins that co-immunoprecipitated with tau; 15.4% were common between AD and control brains, and 42.9% only in the AD samples. The remainder, 41.8% of the proteins, was only seen in the control brain samples. We identified a variety of previously unreported interactions between tau and ER proteins. These proteins participate in over sixteen functional categories, the most abundant being involved in RNA translation. We then determined that association of tau with these ER proteins was different between the AD and control samples. We found that tau associated equally with the ribosomal protein L28 but more robustly with the ribosomal protein P0. These data suggest that the differential association between tau and ER proteins in disease could reveal the pathogenic processes by which tau induces cellular dysfunction. PMID:26402096

  4. Phosphorylation of tau protein over time in rats subjected to transient brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Song, Bo; Ao, Qiang; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Weiqiang; Niu, Ying; Shen, Qin; Zuo, Huancong; Zhang, Xiufang; Gong, Yandao

    2013-12-01

    Transient brain ischemia has been shown to induce hyperphosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau. To further determine the mechanisms underlying these processes, we investigated the interaction between tau, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β and protein phos-phatase 2A. The results confirmed that tau protein was dephosphorylated during brain ischemia; in addition, the activity of GSK-3β was increased and the activity of protein phosphatase 2A was decreased. After reperfusion, tau protein was hyperphosphorylated, the activity of GSK-3β was decreased and the activity of protein phosphatase 2A remained low. Importantly, the interaction of tau with GSK-3β and protein phosphatase 2A was altered during ischemia and reperfusion. Lithium chloride could affect tau phosphorylation by regulating the interaction of tau with GSK-3β and protein phosphatase 2A, and improve learning and memory ability of rats after transient brain ischemia. The present study demonstrated that it was the interaction of tau with GSK-3β and protein phosphatase 2A, rather than their individual activities, that dominates the phosphorylation of tau in transient brain ischemia. Hyperphosphorylated tau protein may play an important role in the evolution of brain injury in ischemic stroke. The neuroprotective effects of lithium chloride partly depend on the inhibition of tau phosphorylation during transient brain ischemia. PMID:25206638

  5. Appoptosin-Mediated Caspase Cleavage of Tau Contributes to Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingjun; Tseng, I-Chu; Heyser, Charles J; Rockenstein, Edward; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Zheng, Qiuyang; Huang, Timothy; Wang, Xin; Arslan, Pharhad E; Chakrabarty, Paramita; Wu, Chengbiao; Bu, Guojun; Mobley, William C; Zhang, Yun-Wu; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Masliah, Eliezer; Fraser, Paul; Xu, Huaxi

    2015-09-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a movement disorder characterized by tau neuropathology where the underlying mechanism is unknown. An SNP (rs1768208 C/T) has been identified as a strong risk factor for PSP. Here, we identified a much higher T-allele occurrence and increased levels of the pro-apoptotic protein appoptosin in PSP patients. Elevations in appoptosin correlate with activated caspase-3 and caspase-cleaved tau levels. Appoptosin overexpression increased caspase-mediated tau cleavage, tau aggregation, and synaptic dysfunction, whereas appoptosin deficiency reduced tau cleavage and aggregation. Appoptosin transduction impaired multiple motor functions and exacerbated neuropathology in tau-transgenic mice in a manner dependent on caspase-3 and tau. Increased appoptosin and caspase-3-cleaved tau were also observed in brain samples of patients with Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia with tau inclusions. Our findings reveal a novel role for appoptosin in neurological disorders with tau neuropathology, linking caspase-3-mediated tau cleavage to synaptic dysfunction and behavioral/motor defects. PMID:26335643

  6. Characterization of Prefibrillar Tau Oligomers in Vitro and in Alzheimer Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Kristina R.; Remmers, Christine; Fu, Yifan; Brooker, Sarah; Kanaan, Nicholas M.; Vana, Laurel; Ward, Sarah; Reyes, Juan F.; Philibert, Keith; Glucksman, Marc J.; Binder, Lester I.

    2011-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles, composed of insoluble aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein Tau, are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD) and other tauopathies. However, recent evidence indicates that neuronal dysfunction precedes the formation of these insoluble fibrillar deposits, suggesting that earlier prefibrillar Tau aggregates may be neurotoxic. To determine the composition of these aggregates, we have employed a photochemical cross-linking technique to examine intermolecular interactions of full-length Tau in vitro. Using this method, we demonstrate that dimerization is an early event in the Tau aggregation process and that these dimers self-associate to form larger oligomeric aggregates. Moreover, using these stabilized Tau aggregates as immunogens, we generated a monoclonal antibody that selectively recognizes Tau dimers and higher order oligomeric aggregates but shows little reactivity to Tau filaments in vitro. Immunostaining indicates that these dimers/oligomers are markedly elevated in AD, appearing in early pathological inclusions such as neuropil threads and pretangle neurons as well as colocalizing with other early markers of Tau pathogenesis. Taken as a whole, the work presented herein demonstrates the existence of alternative Tau aggregates that precede formation of fibrillar Tau pathologies and raises the possibility that these hierarchical oligomeric forms of Tau may contribute to neurodegeneration. PMID:21550980

  7. SIL1 Rescued Bip Elevation-Related Tau Hyperphosphorylation in ER Stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zan-Chao; Chu, Jiang; Lin, Li; Song, Jie; Ning, Lin-Na; Luo, Hong-Bin; Yang, Shu-Sheng; Shi, Yan; Wang, Qun; Qu, Na; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Tian, Qing

    2016-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been indicated in the early stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD), in which tau hyperphosphorylation is one major pathological alteration. The elevation of binding immunoglobulin protein (Bip), an important ER chaperon, was reported in AD brain. It is important to study the roles of ER-related chaperons in tau hyperphosphorylation. In this research, increased Bip was found in the brains of the AD model mice (Tg2576) compared to the age-matched control mice. Meanwhile, deficiency of SIL1, an important co-chaperon of Bip, was observed in brains of Tg2576 mice and in ER stress both in vivo and in vitro. Then, we transfected Bip-EGFP plasmid into HEK293 cells stably expressing the longest human tau (HEK293/tau) or N2a cells and found that increased Bip induced tau hyperphosphorylation via activating glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), an important tau kinase, and increased the association with tau and GSK-3β. When we overexpressed SIL1 in Bip-transfected HEK293/tau cells and thapsigargin-treated HEK293/tau cells, significantly reduced tau hyperphosphorylation and GSK-3β activation were observed. These results suggested the important roles of ER-related chaperons, Bip and SIL1, in AD-like tau hyperphosphorylation. PMID:25575678

  8. Toxic tau oligomer formation blocked by capping of cysteine residues with 1,2-dihydroxybenzene groups

    PubMed Central

    Soeda, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Misato; Almeida, Osborne F. X.; Sumioka, Akio; Maeda, Sumihiro; Osada, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Saito, Akiko; Miyasaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Masaaki; Koyama, Hiroko; Yoshiike, Yuji; Sugimoto, Hachiro; Ihara, Yasuo; Takashima, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles, composed of hyperphosphorylated tau fibrils, are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; the neurofibrillary tangle load correlates strongly with clinical progression of the disease. A growing body of evidence indicates that tau oligomer formation precedes the appearance of neurofibrillary tangles and contributes to neuronal loss. Here we show that tau oligomer formation can be inhibited by compounds whose chemical backbone includes 1,2-dihydroxybenzene. Specifically, we demonstrate that 1,2-dihydroxybenzene-containing compounds bind to and cap cysteine residues of tau and prevent its aggregation by hindering interactions between tau molecules. Further, we show that orally administered DL-isoproterenol, an adrenergic receptor agonist whose skeleton includes 1,2-dihydroxybenzene and which penetrates the brain, reduces the levels of detergent-insoluble tau, neuronal loss and reverses neurofibrillary tangle-associated brain dysfunction. Thus, compounds that target the cysteine residues of tau may prove useful in halting the progression of Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies. PMID:26671725

  9. Toxic tau oligomer formation blocked by capping of cysteine residues with 1,2-dihydroxybenzene groups.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Misato; Almeida, Osborne F X; Sumioka, Akio; Maeda, Sumihiro; Osada, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Saito, Akiko; Miyasaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Masaaki; Koyama, Hiroko; Yoshiike, Yuji; Sugimoto, Hachiro; Ihara, Yasuo; Takashima, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles, composed of hyperphosphorylated tau fibrils, are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; the neurofibrillary tangle load correlates strongly with clinical progression of the disease. A growing body of evidence indicates that tau oligomer formation precedes the appearance of neurofibrillary tangles and contributes to neuronal loss. Here we show that tau oligomer formation can be inhibited by compounds whose chemical backbone includes 1,2-dihydroxybenzene. Specifically, we demonstrate that 1,2-dihydroxybenzene-containing compounds bind to and cap cysteine residues of tau and prevent its aggregation by hindering interactions between tau molecules. Further, we show that orally administered DL-isoproterenol, an adrenergic receptor agonist whose skeleton includes 1,2-dihydroxybenzene and which penetrates the brain, reduces the levels of detergent-insoluble tau, neuronal loss and reverses neurofibrillary tangle-associated brain dysfunction. Thus, compounds that target the cysteine residues of tau may prove useful in halting the progression of Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies. PMID:26671725

  10. Ectosomes: a new mechanism for non-exosomal secretion of tau protein.

    PubMed

    Dujardin, Simon; Bégard, Séverine; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Lachaud, Cédrick; Delattre, Lucie; Carrier, Sébastien; Loyens, Anne; Galas, Marie-Christine; Bousset, Luc; Melki, Ronald; Aurégan, Gwennaëlle; Hantraye, Philippe; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Buée, Luc; Colin, Morvane

    2014-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that aggregates in neurodegenerative disorders known as tauopathies. Recently, studies have suggested that Tau may be secreted and play a role in neural network signalling. However, once deregulated, secreted Tau may also participate in the spreading of Tau pathology in hierarchical pathways of neurodegeneration. The mechanisms underlying neuron-to-neuron Tau transfer are still unknown; given the known role of extra-cellular vesicles in cell-to-cell communication, we wondered whether these vesicles could carry secreted Tau. We found, among vesicles, that Tau is predominately secreted in ectosomes, which are plasma membrane-originating vesicles, and when it accumulates, the exosomal pathway is activated. PMID:24971751

  11. Tau-based therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease: active and passive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Seripa, Davide; Imbimbo, Bruno P; Lozupone, Madia; Santamato, Andrea; Tortelli, Rosanna; Galizia, Ilaria; Prete, Camilla; Daniele, Antonio; Pilotto, Alberto; Greco, Antonio; Logroscino, Giancarlo

    2016-09-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of tau protein in Alzheimer's disease included microtubule-stabilizing agents, tau protein kinase inhibitors, tau aggregation inhibitors, active and passive immunotherapies and, more recently, inhibitors of tau acetylation. Animal studies have shown that both active and passive approaches can remove tau pathology and, in some cases, improve cognitive function. Two active vaccines targeting either nonphosphorylated (AAD-vac1) and phosphorylated tau (ACI-35) have entered Phase I testing. Notwithstanding, the recent discontinuation of the monoclonal antibody RG7345 for Alzheimer's disease, two other antitau antibodies, BMS-986168 and C2N-8E12, are also currently in Phase I testing for progressive supranuclear palsy. After the recent impressive results in animal studies obtained by salsalate, the dimer of salicylic acid, inhibitors of tau acetylation are being actively pursued. PMID:27485083

  12. Lepton flavor violating Higgs bosons and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Sacha; Grenier, Gerald

    2010-05-01

    We update phenomenological constraints on a two Higgs doublet model with lepton flavor nonconserving Yukawa couplings. We review that tan{beta} is ambiguous in such 'type III' models, and define it from the {tau} Yukawa coupling. The neutral scalars {phi} could be searched for at hadron colliders in {phi}{yields}{tau}{mu} and are constrained by the rare decay {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}. The Feynman diagrams for the collider process, with Higgs production via gluon fusion, are similar to the two-loop ''Barr-Zee'' diagrams, which contribute to {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}. Some ''tuning'' is required to obtain a collider cross section of order the standard model expectation for {sigma}(gg{yields}h{sub SM{yields}{tau}}{sup +{tau}-}), while agreeing with the current bound from {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}.

  13. Expression of A152T human tau causes age-dependent neuronal dysfunction and loss in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Sumihiro; Djukic, Biljana; Taneja, Praveen; Yu, Gui-Qiu; Lo, Iris; Davis, Allyson; Craft, Ryan; Guo, Weikun; Wang, Xin; Kim, Daniel; Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Gill, T Michael; Masliah, Eliezer; Mucke, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    A152T-variant human tau (hTau-A152T) increases risk for tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. Comparing mice with regulatable expression of hTau-A152T or wild-type hTau (hTau-WT), we find age-dependent neuronal loss, cognitive impairments, and spontaneous nonconvulsive epileptiform activity primarily in hTau-A152T mice. However, overexpression of either hTau species enhances neuronal responses to electrical stimulation of synaptic inputs and to an epileptogenic chemical. hTau-A152T mice have higher hTau protein/mRNA ratios in brain, suggesting that A152T increases production or decreases clearance of hTau protein. Despite their functional abnormalities, aging hTau-A152T mice show no evidence for accumulation of insoluble tau aggregates, suggesting that their dysfunctions are caused by soluble tau. In human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) transgenic mice, co-expression of hTau-A152T enhances risk of early death and epileptic activity, suggesting copathogenic interactions between hTau-A152T and amyloid-β peptides or other hAPP metabolites. Thus, the A152T substitution may augment risk for neurodegenerative diseases by increasing hTau protein levels, promoting network hyperexcitability, and synergizing with the adverse effects of other pathogenic factors. PMID:26931567

  14. Molecular pathways that influence human tau-induced pathology in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Brian C; Burgess, Jack K; Chen, Jin H; Thomas, James H; Schellenberg, Gerard D

    2006-05-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding tau cause frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism--chromosome 17 type (FTDP-17). In FTDP-17, Alzheimer's disease, and other tauopathies, aggregated hyper-phosphorylated tau forms the neurofibrillary tangles characteristic of these disorders. We previously reported a Caenorhabditis elegans model for tauopathies using human normal and FTDP-17 mutant tau as transgenes. Neuronal transgene expression caused insoluble phosphorylated tau accumulation, neurodegeneration and uncoordinated (Unc) movement. Here we describe a genome-wide RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) screen for genes that modify the tau-induced Unc phenotype. We tested RNAi sequences for 16,757 genes and found 75 that enhanced the transgene-induced Unc phenotype. Forty-six of these genes have sequence similarity to known human genes and fall into a number of broad classes including kinases, chaperones, proteases and phosphatases. The remaining 29 modifiers have sequence similarity only with other nematode genes. To determine if the enhancers are specific for the tau-induced Unc behavior, we exposed several non-tau Unc mutants to tau RNAi enhancer clones. Fifteen enhancers modified phenotypes in multiple Unc mutants, whereas 60 modified only the Unc phenotype in the tau transgenic lines. We also introduced the tau transgene into the background of genetic loss-of-function mutations for a subset of the enhancer genes. Tau transgenic animals homozygous for loss of these enhancer genes exhibited increased impaired motility relative to the tau transgene line alone. This work uncovers novel candidate genes that prevent tau toxicity, as well as genes previously implicated in tau-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:16600994

  15. Tau isoform regulation is region- and cell-specific in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Pamela; Korvatska, Elena; Poorkaj, Parvoneh; Evstafjeva, Zana; Robinson, Linda; Greenup, Lynne; Leverenz, James; Schellenberg, Gerard D; D'Souza, Ian

    2008-12-20

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein implicated in neurodegenerative tauopathies. Alternative splicing of the tau gene (MAPT) generates six tau isoforms, distinguishable by the exclusion or inclusion of a repeat region of exon 10, which are referred to as 3-repeat (3R) and 4-repeat (4R) tau, respectively. We developed transgenic mouse models that express the entire human MAPT gene in the presence and absence of the mouse Mapt gene and compared the expression and regulation of mouse and human tau isoforms during development and in the young adult. We found differences between mouse and human tau in the regulation of exon 10 inclusion. Despite these differences, the isoform splicing pattern seen in normal human brain is replicated in our mouse models. In addition, we found that all tau, both in the neonate and young adult, is phosphorylated. We also examined the normal anatomic distribution of mouse and human tau isoforms in mouse brain. We observed developmental and species-specific variations in the expression of 3R- and 4R-tau within the frontal cortex and hippocampus. In addition, there were differences in the cellular distribution of the isoforms. Mice transgenic for the human MAPT gene exhibited higher levels of neuronal cell body expression of tau compared to wildtype mice. This neuronal cell body expression of tau was limited to the 3R isoform, whereas expression of 4R-tau was more "synaptic like," with granular staining of neuropil rather than in neuronal cell bodies. These developmental and species-specific differences in the regulation and distribution of tau isoforms may be important to the understanding of normal and pathologic tau isoform expression. PMID:18925637

  16. Tau isoform regulation is region and cell-specific in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Pamela; Korvatska, Elena; Poorkaj, Parvoneh; Evstafjeva, Zana; Robinson, Linda; Greenup, Lynne; Leverenz, James; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; D’Souza, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein implicated in neurodegenerative tauopathies. Alternative splicing of the tau gene (MAPT) generates six tau isoforms, distinguishable by the exclusion or inclusion of a repeat region of exon 10, that are referred to as 3-repeat (3R) and 4-repeat (4R) tau, respectively. We developed transgenic mouse models that express the entire human MAPT gene in the presence and absence of the mouse Mapt gene and compared the expression and regulation of mouse and human tau isoforms during development and in the young adult. We found differences between mouse and human tau in the regulation of exon 10 inclusion. Despite these differences, the isoform splicing pattern seen in normal human brain is replicated in our mouse models. In addition, we found that all tau, both in the neonate and young adult, is phosphorylated. We also examined the normal anatomic distribution of mouse and human tau isoforms in mouse brain. We observed developmental and species-specific variations in the expression of 3R and 4R-tau within the frontal cortex and hippocampus. In addition, there were differences in the cellular distribution of the isoforms. Mice transgenic for the human MAPT gene exhibited higher levels of neuronal cell body expression of tau compared to wild-type mice. This neuronal cell body expression of tau was limited to the 3R isoform, whereas expression of 4R tau was more “synaptic like”, with granular staining of neuropil rather than in neuronal cell bodies. These developmental and species-specific differences in the regulation and distribution of tau isoforms may be important to the understanding of normal and pathologic tau isoform expression. PMID:18925637

  17. The relationship between cerebrospinal fluid markers of Alzheimer pathology and positron emission tomography tau imaging.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Brian A; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brier, Matthew; Blazey, Tyler; Su, Yi; Christensen, Jon; Aldea, Patricia; McConathy, Jonathan; Holtzman, David M; Cairns, Nigel J; Morris, John C; Fagan, Anne M; Ances, Beau M; Benzinger, Tammie L S

    2016-08-01

    The two primary molecular pathologies in Alzheimer's disease are amyloid-β plaques and tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles. Investigations into these pathologies have been restricted to cerebrospinal fluid assays, and positron emission tomography tracers that can image amyloid-β plaques. Tau tracers have recently been introduced into the field, although the utility of the tracer and its relationship to other Alzheimer biomarkers are still unknown. Here we examined tau deposition in 41 cognitively normal and 11 cognitively impaired older adults using the radioactive tau ligand (18)F-AV-1451 (previously known as T807) who also underwent a lumbar puncture to assess cerebrospinal fluid levels of total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181 (p-tau181) and amyloid-β42 Voxel-wise statistical analyses examined spatial patterns of tau deposition associated with cognitive impairment. We then related the amount of tau tracer uptake to levels of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. All analyses controlled for age and gender and, when appropriate, the time between imaging and lumbar puncture assessments. Symptomatic individuals (Clinical Dementia Rating > 0) demonstrated markedly increased levels of tau tracer uptake. This elevation was most prominent in the temporal lobe and temporoparietal junction, but extended more broadly into parietal and frontal cortices. In the entire cohort, there were significant relationships among all cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and tracer uptake, notably for tau-related cerebrospinal fluid markers. After controlling for levels of amyloid-β42, the correlations with tau uptake were r = 0.490 (P < 0.001) for t-tau and r = 0.492 (P < 0.001) for p-tau181 Within the cognitively normal cohort, levels of amyloid-β42, but not t-tau or p-tau181, were associated with elevated tracer binding that was confined primarily to the medial temporal lobe and adjacent neocortical regions. AV-1451 tau binding in the medial temporal, parietal, and frontal cortices

  18. Tau Pathology is Present In Vivo and Develops In Vitro in Sensory Neurons from Human P301S Tau Transgenic Mice: A System for Screening Drugs against Tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Mellone, Manuela; Kestoras, Dimitra; Andrews, Melissa R.; Dassie, Elisa; Crowther, R. Anthony; Stokin, Gorazd B.; Tinsley, Jon; Horne, Graeme; Goedert, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular tau aggregates are the neuropathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and cases of frontotemporal dementia, but the link between these aggregates and neurodegeneration remains unclear. Neuronal models recapitulating the main features of tau pathology are necessary to investigate the molecular mechanisms of tau malfunction, but current models show little and inconsistent spontaneous tau aggregation. We show that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in transgenic mice expressing human P301S tau (P301S-htau) develop tau pathology similar to that found in brain and spinal cord and a significant reduction in mechanosensation occurs before detectable fibrillar tau formation. DRG neuronal cultures established from adult P301S-htau mice at different ages retained the pattern of aberrant tau found in vivo. Moreover, htau became progressively hyperphosphorylated over 2 months in vitro beginning with nonsymptomatic neurons, while hyperphosphorylated P301S-htau-positive neurons from 5-month-old mice cultured for 2 months died preferentially. P301S-htau-positive neurons grew aberrant axons, including spheroids, typically found in human tauopathies. Neurons cultured at advanced stages of tau pathology showed a 60% decrease in the fraction of moving mitochondria. SEG28019, a novel O-GlcNAcase inhibitor, reduced steady-state pSer396/pSer404 phosphorylation over 7 weeks in a significant proportion of DRG neurons showing for the first time the possible beneficial effect of prolonged dosing of O-GlcNAcase inhibitor in vitro. Our system is unique in that fibrillar tau forms without external manipulation and provides an important new tool for understanding the mechanisms of tau dysfunction and for screening of compounds for treatment of tauopathies. PMID:24227726

  19. Calibration issues in delta alpha /alpha .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, Paolo; Centurión, Miriam; Levshakov, Sergei

    Laser Comb Wavelength calibration shows that the ThAr one is locally unreliable with possible deviations of up to 100 {m s}-1 within one order range, while delivering an overall 1 {m s}-1 accuracy (Wilken et al 2009). Such deviation corresponds to delta alpha /alpha ≈ 7* 10-6 for a Fe II-Mg II pair. Comparison of line shifts among the 5 Fe II lines, with almost identical sensitivity to fine structure constant changes, offers a clean way to directly test the presence of possible local wavelength calibration errors of whatever origin. We analyzed 5 absorption systems, with zabs ranging from 1.15 to 2.19 towards 3 bright QSOs. The results show that while some lines are aligned within 20 {m s}-1, others reveal large deviations reaching 200 {m s}-1 or higher and corresponding to a delta alpha /alpha > 10-5 level. The origin of these deviations is not clearly identified but could be related to the adaptation of wavelength calibration to CCD manufacturing irregularities. These results suggest that to draw conclusions from delta alpha /alpha analysis based on one or only few lines must be done with extreme care.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CaII and Hα data for dK5/dM4 stars (Houdebine, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdebine, E. R.

    2013-03-01

    We use 665 high-resolution spectra for 60 different dM4 stars and 1088 high-resolution spectra for 97 different dK5 stars from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and Observatoire de Haute Provence (OHP) data bases. We present 179 new measurements of the CaII resonance lines and 615 new measurements of the Hα line for dM4 stars. We also present 701 new measurements of the CaII resonance lines and 1088 new measurements of the Hα line for dK5 stars. We also compiled other measurements available in the literature. (6 data files).

  1. The consideration of Tau-Charm Factory construction in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhipeng, Zheng

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents a proposal to extend the present Beijing Electron Positron Collider into a Tau Charm Factory. To achieve this aim the author points out that a number of things need to come together, and to be successfully communicated to the Chinese government. Such a machine is a logical extension of the present BEPC device. The physics which can be accomplished at such a device, is important, and cannot be duplicated in planned meson factories, due to the presence of resonances and thresholds which allow minimization of systematic errors. The author stresses the need for international coorperation on this project, to have hope of it coming to fruition. The whole concept of such a Tau Charm Factory needs more support from the high energy physics community.

  2. Tau PET: the next frontier in molecular imaging of dementia.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chenjie; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2016-09-01

    We have arrived at an exciting juncture in dementia research: the second major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-tau-can now be seen for the first time in the living human brain. The major proteinopathies in AD include amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) made of hyperphosphorylated paired helical filament (PHF) tau. Since its advent more than a decade ago, amyloid PET imaging has revolutionized the field of dementia research, enabling more confident diagnosis of the likely pathology in patients with a variety of clinical dementia syndromes, paving the way for the identification of people with preclinical or prodromal AD pathology, and serving as a minimally invasive molecular readout in clinical trials of putative disease-modifying interventions. Now that we are on the brink of a second revolution in molecular imaging in dementia, it is worth considering the likely potential impact of this development on the field. PMID:27334648

  3. Characterization of novel CSF Tau and ptau biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Jere E; Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Guss, Valerie; Lanzetti, Anthony J; Berisha, Flora; Neely, Robert J; Slemmon, J Randall; Portelius, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Soares, Holly; Ahlijanian, Michael; Albright, Charles F

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) Aβ42, tau and p181tau are widely accepted biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Numerous studies show that CSF tau and p181tau levels are elevated in mild-to-moderate AD compared to age-matched controls. In addition, these increases might predict preclinical AD in cognitively normal elderly. Despite their importance as biomarkers, the molecular nature of CSF tau and ptau is not known. In the current study, reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography was used to enrich and concentrate tau prior to western-blot analysis. Multiple N-terminal and mid-domain fragments of tau were detected in pooled CSF with apparent sizes ranging from <20 kDa to ~40 kDa. The pattern of tau fragments in AD and control samples were similar. In contrast, full-length tau and C-terminal-containing fragments were not detected. To quantify levels, five tau ELISAs and three ptau ELISAs were developed to detect different overlapping regions of the protein. The discriminatory potential of each assay was determined using 20 AD and 20 age-matched control CSF samples. Of the tau ELISAs, the two assays specific for tau containing N-terminal sequences, amino acids 9-198 (numbering based on tau 441) and 9-163, exhibited the most significant differences between AD and control samples. In contrast, CSF tau was not detected with an ELISA specific for a more C-terminal region (amino acids 159-335). Significant discrimination was also observed with ptau assays measuring amino acids 159-p181 and 159-p231. Interestingly, the discriminatory potential of p181 was reduced when measured in the context of tau species containing amino acids 9-p181. Taken together, these results demonstrate that tau in CSF occurs as a series of fragments and that discrimination of AD from control is dependent on the subset of tau species measured. These assays provide novel tools to investigate CSF tau and ptau as biomarkers for other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24116116

  4. Characterization of Novel CSF Tau and ptau Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guss, Valerie; Lanzetti, Anthony J.; Berisha, Flora; Neely, Robert J.; Slemmon, J. Randall; Portelius, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Soares, Holly; Ahlijanian, Michael; Albright, Charles F.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) Aβ42, tau and p181tau are widely accepted biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Numerous studies show that CSF tau and p181tau levels are elevated in mild-to-moderate AD compared to age-matched controls. In addition, these increases might predict preclinical AD in cognitively normal elderly. Despite their importance as biomarkers, the molecular nature of CSF tau and ptau is not known. In the current study, reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography was used to enrich and concentrate tau prior to western-blot analysis. Multiple N-terminal and mid-domain fragments of tau were detected in pooled CSF with apparent sizes ranging from <20 kDa to ~40 kDa. The pattern of tau fragments in AD and control samples were similar. In contrast, full-length tau and C-terminal-containing fragments were not detected. To quantify levels, five tau ELISAs and three ptau ELISAs were developed to detect different overlapping regions of the protein. The discriminatory potential of each assay was determined using 20 AD and 20 age-matched control CSF samples. Of the tau ELISAs, the two assays specific for tau containing N-terminal sequences, amino acids 9-198 (numbering based on tau 441) and 9-163, exhibited the most significant differences between AD and control samples. In contrast, CSF tau was not detected with an ELISA specific for a more C-terminal region (amino acids 159-335). Significant discrimination was also observed with ptau assays measuring amino acids 159-p181 and 159-p231. Interestingly, the discriminatory potential of p181 was reduced when measured in the context of tau species containing amino acids 9-p181. Taken together, these results demonstrate that tau in CSF occurs as a series of fragments and that discrimination of AD from control is dependent on the subset of tau species measured. These assays provide novel tools to investigate CSF tau and ptau as biomarkers for other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24116116

  5. Antibody-Mediated Targeting of Tau In Vivo Does Not Require Effector Function and Microglial Engagement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hye; Le Pichon, Claire E; Adolfsson, Oskar; Gafner, Valérie; Pihlgren, Maria; Lin, Han; Solanoy, Hilda; Brendza, Robert; Ngu, Hai; Foreman, Oded; Chan, Ruby; Ernst, James A; DiCara, Danielle; Hotzel, Isidro; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Hansen, David V; Atwal, Jasvinder; Lu, Yanmei; Bumbaca, Daniela; Pfeifer, Andrea; Watts, Ryan J; Muhs, Andreas; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Ayalon, Gai

    2016-08-01

    The spread of tau pathology correlates with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. In vitro, tau antibodies can block cell-to-cell tau spreading. Although mechanisms of anti-tau function in vivo are unknown, effector function might promote microglia-mediated clearance. In this study, we investigated whether antibody effector function is required for targeting tau. We compared efficacy in vivo and in vitro of two versions of the same tau antibody, with and without effector function, measuring tau pathology, neuron health, and microglial function. Both antibodies reduced accumulation of tau pathology in Tau-P301L transgenic mice and protected cultured neurons against extracellular tau-induced toxicity. Only the full-effector antibody enhanced tau uptake in cultured microglia, which promoted release of proinflammatory cytokines. In neuron-microglia co-cultures, only effectorless anti-tau protected neurons, suggesting full-effector tau antibodies can induce indirect toxicity via microglia. We conclude that effector function is not required for efficacy, and effectorless tau antibodies may represent a safer approach to targeting tau. PMID:27475227

  6. The Copernicus ultraviolet spectral atlas of Tau Scorpii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, J. B., Jr.; Upson, W. L., II

    1977-01-01

    An ultraviolet spectral atlas is presented for the B0 V star, Tau Scorpii. It has been scanned from 949 to 1560 A by the Princeton spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. From 949 to 1420 A the observations have a nominal resolution of 0.05 A. At the longer wavelengths, the resolution is 0.1 A. The atlas is presented in both tables and graphs.

  7. Is tau a preload-independent measure of isovolumetric relaxation?

    PubMed

    Varma, S K; Owen, R M; Smucker, M L; Feldman, M D

    1989-12-01

    Several studies have been performed in patients with a variety of myocardial diseases that have identified a prolongation of tau. However, it is not clear whether prolongation of tau represents abnormal myocardial physiology or the effect of excessive load associated with a particular disease process. Accordingly, we evaluate the effect on tau of an isolated decrease in preload induced by inferior vena cava occlusion before the appearance of reflex changes in six patients designated as normal by catheterization criteria. A computer-based digitization routine identified cardiac contractions in all patients early after inferior vena cava occlusion where left ventricular end-diastolic pressure decreased (18.3 +/- 6.3 to 9.3 +/- 5.8, p less than 0.05) while left ventricular systolic pressure (113.3 +/- 13.8 to 111.8 +/- 14.0, p = NS) and heart rate (66.0 +/- 10.0 to 65.9 +/- 10.3, p = NS) did not change. After this alteration in preload, no change in tau from baseline, as calculated by the logarithmic (TL), derivative (TD), or method of Mirsky (T1/2), was noted: TL, 47.4 +/- 6.5 to 44.6 +/- 7.6; TD, 39.3 +/- 8.1 to 39.8 +/- 8.4; T1/2, 33.0 +/- 4.0 to 31.8 +/- 4.6; all p = NS. The baseline pressure extrapolated from isovolumetric relaxation did not change in these preload beats compared with baseline (+4.26 +/- 6.20 to -0.80 +/- 4.87, p = NS). Subsequent beats were identified where left ventricular systolic pressure showed a numeric decrease compared with baseline (113.3 +/- 13.8 to 100.8 +/- 14.3, p = NS) despite no change in heart rate (66.0 +/- 10.0 to 66.8 +/- 10.5, p = NS).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2598435

  8. Tau aggregation and its interplay with amyloid-β.

    PubMed

    Nisbet, Rebecca M; Polanco, Juan-Carlos; Ittner, Lars M; Götz, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques constitute the hallmark brain lesions of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Tangles are composed of fibrillar aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein tau, and plaques comprise fibrillar forms of a proteolytic cleavage product, amyloid-β (Aβ). Although plaques and tangles are the end-stage lesions in AD, small oligomers of Aβ and tau are now receiving increased attention as they are shown to correlate best with neurotoxicity. One key question of debate, however, is which of these pathologies appears first and hence is upstream in the pathocascade. Studies suggest that there is an intense crosstalk between the two molecules and, based on work in animal models, there is increasing evidence that Aβ, at least in part, exerts its toxicity via tau, with the Src kinase Fyn playing a crucial role in this process. In other experimental paradigms, Aβ and tau have been found to exert both separate and synergistic modes of toxicity. The challenge, however, is to integrate these different scenarios into a coherent picture. Furthermore, the ability of therapeutic interventions targeting just one of these molecules, to successfully neutralize the toxicity of the other, needs to be ascertained to improve current therapeutic strategies, such as immunotherapy, for the treatment of AD. Although this article is not intended to provide a comprehensive review of the currently pursued therapeutic strategies, we will discuss what has been achieved by immunotherapy and, in particular, how the inherent limitations of this approach can possibly be overcome by novel strategies that involve single-chain antibodies. PMID:25492702

  9. Behind the curtain of tauopathy: a show of multiple players orchestrating tau toxicity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yunpeng; Wu, Zhihao; Zhou, Bing

    2016-01-01

    tau, a microtubule-associated protein, directly binds with microtubules to dynamically regulate the organization of cellular cytoskeletons, and is especially abundant in neurons of the central nervous system. Under disease conditions such as Pick's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, frontotemporal dementia, parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 and Alzheimer's disease, tau proteins can self-assemble to paired helical filaments progressing to neurofibrillary tangles. In these diseases, collectively referred to as "tauopathies", alterations of diverse tau modifications including phosphorylation, metal ion binding, glycosylation, as well as structural changes of tau proteins have all been observed, indicating the complexity and variability of factors in the regulation of tau toxicity. Here, we review our current knowledge and hypotheses from relevant studies on tau toxicity, emphasizing the roles of phosphorylations, metal ions, folding and clearance control underlining tau etiology and their regulations. A summary of clinical efforts and associated findings of drug candidates under development is also presented. It is hoped that a more comprehensive understanding of tau regulation will provide us with a better blueprint of tau networking in neuronal cells and offer hints for the design of more efficient strategies to tackle tau-related diseases in the future. PMID:26403791

  10. NPAS4 Facilitates the Autophagic Clearance of Endogenous Tau in Rat Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenhui; Long, Yan; Lai, Yujie; Wang, Xuefeng; Chen, Guojun; Zhu, Binglin

    2016-04-01

    Tau, a microtubule-binding phosphoprotein, plays a critical role in the stabilisation of microtubules and neuronal function. However, hyperphosphorylated tau is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other tauopathies. The facilitation of tau clearance is now regarded as a valid therapeutic strategy for these neurodegenerative tauopathies. Here, we provide the first demonstration that the over-expression of neuronal PAS domain protein 4 (NPAS4)-induced autophagy and effectively facilitated the clearance of endogenous total and phosphorylated tau in rat primary cortical neurons. Moreover, the activation of autophagy by serum depletion significantly decreased endogenous total and phosphorylated tau levels. Autophagy inhibitors, such as 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ), induced tau aggregation. However, NPAS4 over-expression reversed the aggregation of tau that was induced by the inhibition of autophagy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibition by MG132, had no effect on autophagy, but did reduce tau levels, indicating that NPAS4 may also degrade tau proteins through an unknown proteasome-mediated mechanism. Furthermore, NPAS4 did not alter the activity of two major tau kinases, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5). Taken together, the results indicate that targeting NPAS4 could provide a therapeutic approach for the treatment of AD and other tauopathies. PMID:26635026

  11. γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A (GABAA) Receptor Activation Modulates Tau Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Nykänen, Niko-Petteri; Kysenius, Kai; Sakha, Prasanna; Tammela, Päivi; Huttunen, Henri J.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation and aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau are hallmarks of various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease. Molecular mechanisms that regulate Tau phosphorylation are complex and currently incompletely understood. We have developed a novel live cell reporter system based on protein-fragment complementation assay to study dynamic changes in Tau phosphorylation status. In this assay, fusion proteins of Tau and Pin1 (peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans-isomerase 1) carrying complementary fragments of a luciferase protein serve as a sensor of altered protein-protein interaction between Tau and Pin1, a critical regulator of Tau dephosphorylation at several disease-associated proline-directed phosphorylation sites. Using this system, we identified several structurally distinct GABAA receptor modulators as novel regulators of Tau phosphorylation in a chemical library screen. GABAA receptor activation promoted specific phosphorylation of Tau at the AT8 epitope (Ser-199/Ser-202/Thr-205) in cultures of mature cortical neurons. Increased Tau phosphorylation by GABAA receptor activity was associated with reduced Tau binding to protein phosphatase 2A and was dependent on Cdk5 but not GSK3β kinase activity. PMID:22235112

  12. The Co-chaperone BAG2 Sweeps PHF Insoluble Tau from the Microtubule

    PubMed Central

    Carrettiero, Daniel C.; Hernandez, Israel; Neveu, Pierre; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Kosik, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01

    Tau inclusions are a prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease. Their accumulation in neurons as ubiquitinated filaments suggests a failure in the degradation limb of the Tau pathway. The components of a Tau protein triage system consisting of CHIP/Hsp70 and other chaperones have begun to emerge. However, the site of triage and the master regulatory elements are unknown. Here we report an elegant mechanism of Tau degradation involving the co-chaperone BAG2. The BAG2/Hsp70 complex is tethered to the microtubule and this complex can capture and deliver Tau to the proteasome for ubiquitin-independent degradation. This complex preferentially degrades sarkosyl insoluble Tau and phosphorylated Tau. BAG2 levels in cells are under the physiological control of the microRNA miR-128a, which can tune PHF Tau levels in neurons. Thus we propose that ubiquitinated Tau inclusions arise due to shunting of Tau degradation toward a less efficient ubiquitin-dependent pathway. PMID:19228967

  13. Interaction of cinnamaldehyde and epicatechin with tau: implications of beneficial effects in modulating Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    George, Roshni C; Lew, John; Graves, Donald J

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal modifications in tau such as hyperphosphorylation, oxidation, and glycation interfere with its interaction with microtubules leading to its dissociation and self-aggregation into neurofibrillary tangles, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previously we reported that an aqueous extract of cinnamon has the ability to inhibit tau aggregation in vitro and can even induce dissociation of tangles isolated from AD brain. In the present study, we carried out investigations with cinnamaldehyde (CA) and epicatechin (EC), two components of active cinnamon extract. We found that CA and the oxidized form of EC (ECox) inhibited tau aggregation in vitro and the activity was due to their interaction with the two cysteine residues in tau. Mass spectrometry of a synthetic peptide, SKCGS, representing the actual tau sequence, identified the thiol as reacting with CA and ECox. Use of a cysteine double mutant of tau showed the necessity of cysteine for aggregation inhibition by CA. The interaction of CA with tau cysteines was reversible and the presence of CA did not impair the biological function of tau in tubulin assembly in vitro. Further, these compounds protected tau from oxidation caused by the reactive oxygen species, H2O2, and prevented subsequent formation of high molecular weight species that are considered to stimulate tangle formation. Finally, we observed that EC can sequester highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxidation such as acrolein. Our results suggest that small molecules that form a reversible interaction with cysteines have the potential to protect tau from abnormal modifications. PMID:23531502

  14. Tau Acts as a Mediator for Alzheimer's Disease-Related Synaptic Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Dezhi; Miller, Eric C.; Teravskis, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The two histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are amyloid plaques containing multiple forms of Aβ and neurofibrillary tangles containing phosphorylated tau proteins. As mild cognitive impairment frequently occurs long before the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, the scientific community has been increasingly interested in the roles of Aβ and tau in earlier cellular changes that lead to functional deficits. Therefore, great progress has recently been made in understanding how Aβ or tau causes synaptic dysfunction. However, the interaction between the Aβ and tau-initiated intracellular cascades that lead to synaptic dysfunction remains elusive. The cornerstone of the two decade-old hypothetical amyloid cascade model is that amyloid pathologies precede tau pathologies. Although the premise of Aβ-tau pathway remains valid, the model keeps evolving as new signaling events are discovered that lead to functional deficits and neurodegeneration. Recent progress has been made in understanding Aβ-PrPC-Fyn-mediated neurotoxicity and synaptic deficits. Although still elusive, many novel upstream and downstream signaling molecules have been found to modulate tau mislocalization and tau hyperphosphorylation. Here we will discuss the mechanistic interactions between Aβ-PrPC-mediated neurotoxicity and tau-mediated synaptic deficits in an updated amyloid cascade model with calcium and tau as the central mediators. PMID:24712999

  15. α-Synuclein Fibrils Exhibit Gain of Toxic Function, Promoting Tau Aggregation and Inhibiting Microtubule Assembly.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Takayuki; Nonaka, Takashi; Terada, Makoto; Tamaoka, Akira; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi; Hasegawa, Masato

    2016-07-15

    α-Synuclein is the major component of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites in Parkinson disease and dementia with Lewy bodies and of glial cytoplasmic inclusions in multiple system atrophy. It has been suggested that α-synuclein fibrils or intermediate protofibrils in the process of fibril formation may have a toxic effect on neuronal cells. In this study, we investigated the ability of soluble monomeric α-synuclein to promote microtubule assembly and the effects of conformational changes of α-synuclein on Tau-promoted microtubule assembly. In marked contrast to previous findings, monomeric α-synuclein had no effect on microtubule polymerization. However, both α-synuclein fibrils and protofibrils inhibited Tau-promoted microtubule assembly. The inhibitory effect of α-synuclein fibrils was greater than that of the protofibrils. Dot blot overlay assay and spin-down techniques revealed that α-synuclein fibrils bind to Tau and inhibit microtubule assembly by depleting the Tau available for microtubule polymerization. Using various deletion mutants of α-synuclein and Tau, the acidic C-terminal region of α-synuclein and the basic central region of Tau were identified as regions involved in the binding. Furthermore, introduction of α-synuclein fibrils into cultured cells overexpressing Tau protein induced Tau aggregation. These results raise the possibility that α-synuclein fibrils interact with Tau, inhibit its function to stabilize microtubules, and also promote Tau aggregation, leading to dysfunction of neuronal cells. PMID:27226637

  16. Relative abundance of tau and neurofilament epitopes in hippocampal neurofibrillary tangles.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, M. L.; Lee, V. M.; Trojanowski, J. Q.

    1990-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) derive, in part, from normal neuronal cytoskeletal proteins, ie, large portions of tau (tau) but only restricted segments of the peripheral domains of the high- and middle-molecular weight neurofilament subunits. To learn more about the events leading to the incorporation of tau and neurofilament epitopes into NFTs, the relative abundance of tau and NF determinants in these lesions was quantitatively analyzed in hippocampi from Alzheimer disease (AD) patients and age-matched controls using monoclonal antibodies specific for tau or for NF proteins. Immunostained NFTs appeared qualitatively the same in both AD and controls, ie, every epitope found in AD NFTs occurred also in the NFTs of the control patients. However, in hippocampi with only a few tangles, tau epitopes, but no NF epitopes, were detected in NFTs. In contrast, both tau and NF epitopes were present in those tangles that were found in hippocampi with abundant NFTs. Nevertheless, the number of tau-positive NFTs generally exceeded the number of NF-positive NFTs. These findings indicate that tau epitopes are more abundant than NF epitopes in NFTs and that the formation of NFTs may be linked to a derangement in the normal metabolism of tau that is more extensive than alterations in NF protein metabolism. Images Figure 1 PMID:1693468

  17. Inhibition of tau aggregation in a novel Caenorhabditis elegans model of tauopathy mitigates proteotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fatouros, Chronis; Pir, Ghulam Jeelani; Biernat, Jacek; Koushika, Sandhya Padmanabhan; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Schmidt, Enrico; Baumeister, Ralf

    2012-08-15

    Increased Tau protein amyloidogenicity has been causatively implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, collectively called tauopathies. In pathological conditions, Tau becomes hyperphosphorylated and forms intracellular aggregates. The deletion of K280, which is a mutation that commonly appears in patients with frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17, enhances Tau aggregation propensity (pro-aggregation). In contrast, introduction of the I277P and I308P mutations prevents β-sheet formation and subsequent aggregation (anti-aggregation). In this study, we created a tauopathy model by expressing pro- or anti-aggregant Tau species in the nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans. Animals expressing the highly amyloidogenic Tau species showed accelerated Tau aggregation and pathology manifested by severely impaired motility and evident neuronal dysfunction. In addition, we observed that the axonal transport of mitochondria was perturbed in these animals. Control animals expressing the anti-aggregant combination had rather mild phenotype. We subsequently tested several Tau aggregation inhibitor compounds and observed a mitigation of Tau proteotoxicity. In particular, a novel compound that crosses the blood-brain barrier of mammals proved effective in ameliorating the motility as well as delaying the accumulation of neuronal defects. Our study establishes a new C. elegans model of Tau aggregation-mediated toxicity and supports the emerging notion that inhibiting the nucleation of Tau aggregation can be neuroprotective. PMID:22611162

  18. Stages and Conformations of the Tau Repeat Domain during Aggregation and Its Effect on Neuronal Toxicity*

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satish; Tepper, Katharina; Kaniyappan, Senthilvelrajan; Biernat, Jacek; Wegmann, Susanne; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Müller, Daniel J.; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the aggregation and posttranslational modifications of Tau protein. Its “repeat domain” (TauRD) is mainly responsible for the aggregation properties, and oligomeric forms are thought to dominate the toxic effects of Tau. Here we investigated the conformational transitions of this domain during oligomerization and aggregation in different states of β-propensity and pseudo-phosphorylation, using several complementary imaging and spectroscopic methods. Although the repeat domain generally aggregates more readily than full-length Tau, its aggregation was greatly slowed down by phosphorylation or pseudo-phosphorylation at the KXGS motifs, concomitant with an extended phase of oligomerization. Analogous effects were observed with pro-aggregant variants of TauRD. Oligomers became most evident in the case of the pro-aggregant mutant TauRDΔK280, as monitored by atomic force microscopy, and the fluorescence lifetime of Alexa-labeled Tau (time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC)), consistent with its pronounced toxicity in mouse models. In cell models or primary neurons, neither oligomers nor fibrils of TauRD or TauRDΔK280 had a toxic effect, as seen by assays with lactate dehydrogenase and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, respectively. However, oligomers of pro-aggregant TauRDΔK280 specifically caused a loss of spine density in differentiated neurons, indicating a locally restricted impairment of function. PMID:24825901

  19. Two polypeptide chains in yeast transcription factor tau interact with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielsen, O.S.; Marzouki, N.; Ruet, A.; Sentenac, A.; Fromageot, P.

    1989-05-05

    Yeast transcription factor tau interacts with the A and B blocks of the intragenic promoter of tRNA genes. The structure of tau was investigated by identifying the polypeptide chains specifically complexed to the tRNA3Glu gene. Highly purified factor, obtained by an improved purification procedure, contained several polypeptide chains, four of which (Mr = 145,000, 135,000, 100,000 and 65,000) comigrated with tau-DNA complex by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Antibodies raised against the 145- and 100-kDa components altered the migration of tau-DNA complexes in band shift assays and inhibited tRNA synthesis in a reconstituted transcription system. These components are immunologically unrelated proteins. By UV cross-linking to /sup 32/P-body-labeled tDNA followed by extensive DNase treatment, two polypeptides of the same size (145 and 100 kDa) were found to be radioactively labeled. Factor tau, therefore, appears to be a multisubunit DNA-binding protein with two distinct polypeptides contributing to DNA recognition. Limited proteolysis of tau generated a protease-resistant tau B (tau B) domain that binds solely to the B block. tau B-tDNA complexes were recognized by anti-145 IgG and contained a 120-kDa polypeptide that could originate from the 145-kDa component by proteolysis. These results strongly suggest that the 145-kDa polypeptide belongs to tau B and is responsible for B block binding.

  20. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration: old knowledge and new insight into the pathogenetic mechanisms of tau mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Giacomina; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a group of heterogeneous neurodegenerative diseases which includes tauopathies. In the central nervous system (CNS) tau is the major microtubule-associated protein (MAP) of neurons, promoting assembly and stabilization of microtubules (MTs) required for morphogenesis and axonal transport. Primary tauopathies are characterized by deposition of abnormal fibrils of tau in neuronal and glial cells, leading to neuronal death, brain atrophy and eventually dementia. In genetic tauopathies mutations of tau gene impair the ability of tau to bind to MTs, alter the normal ratio among tau isoforms and favor fibril formation. Recently, additional functions have been ascribed to tau and different pathogenetic mechanisms are then emerging. In fact, a role of tau in DNA protection and genome stability has been reported and chromosome aberrations have been found associated with tau mutations. Furthermore, newly structurally and functionally characterized mutations have suggested novel pathological features, such as a tendency to form oligomeric rather than fibrillar aggregates. Tau mutations affecting axonal transport and plasma membrane interaction have also been described. In this article, we will review the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying tau mutations, focusing in particular on the less common aspects, so far poorly investigated. PMID:26528178

  1. A Novel, Ultrasensitive Assay for Tau: Potential for Assessing Traumatic Brain Injury in Tissues and Biofluids

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Binggong; Davies, Peter; Wagner, Amy K.; Robertson, Claudia S.; Wang, Kevin K.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a cause of death and disability and can lead to tauopathy-related dementia at an early age. Pathologically, TBI results in axonal injury that is coupled to tau hyperphosphorylation, leading to microtubule instability and tau-mediated neurodegeneration. This suggests that the forms of this protein might serve as neuroinjury-related biomarkers for diagnosis of injury severity and prognosis of the neurological damage prior to clinical expression. We initially determined whether we could detect tau in body fluids using a highly sensitive assay. We used a novel immunoassay, enhanced immunoassay using multi-arrayed fiberoptics (EIMAF) either alone or in combination with rolling circle amplification (a-EIMAF) for the detection of total (T) and phosphorylated (P) tau proteins from brains and biofluids (blood, CSF) of rodents following controlled cortical impact (CCI) and human patients post severe TBI (sTBI). This assay technology for tau is the most sensitive to date with a detection limit of approximately 100 ag/mL for either T-tau and P-tau. In the rodent models, T-tau and P-tau levels in brain and blood increased following CCI during the acute phase and remained high during the chronic phase (30 d). In human CSF samples, T-tau and P-tau increased during the sampling period (5–6 d). T-tau and P-tau in human serum rose during the acute phase and decreased during the chronic stage but was still detectable beyond six months post sTBI. Thus, EIMAF has the potential for assessing both the severity of the proximal injury and the prognosis using easily accessible samples. PMID:25177776

  2. Tau loss attenuates neuronal network hyperexcitability in mouse and Drosophila genetic models of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Holth, Jerrah K.; Bomben, Valerie C.; Reed, J. Graham; Inoue, Taeko; Younkin, Linda; Younkin, Steven G.; Pautler, Robia G.; Botas, Juan; Noebels, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal network hyperexcitability underlies the pathogenesis of seizures and is a component of some degenerative neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recently, the microtubule binding protein tau has been implicated in the regulation of network synchronization. Genetic removal of Mapt, the gene encoding tau, in AD models overexpressing amyloid-beta (Aβ) decreases hyperexcitability and normalizes the excitation/inhibition imbalance. Whether this effect of tau removal is specific to Aβ mouse models remains to be determined. Here we examined tau as an excitability modifier in the non-AD nervous system using genetic deletion of tau in mouse and Drosophila models of hyperexcitability. Kcna1−/− mice lack Kv1.1 delayed rectifier currents and exhibit severe spontaneous seizures, early lethality, and megencephaly. Young Kcna1−/− mice retained wild-type levels of Aβ, tau, and tau phospho-Thr231. Decreasing tau in Kcna1−/− mice reduced hyperexcitability and alleviated seizure-related comorbidities. Tau reduction decreased Kcna1−/− video-EEG recorded seizure frequency and duration as well as normalized Kcna1−/− hippocampal network hyperexcitability in vitro. Additionally, tau reduction increased Kcna1−/− survival and prevented megencephaly and hippocampal hypertrophy, as determined by MRI. Bang-sensitive Drosophila mutants display paralysis and seizures in response to mechanical stimulation, providing a complementary excitability assay for epistatic interactions. We found that tau reduction significantly decreased seizure sensitivity in two independent bang-sensitive mutant models, kcc and eas. Our results indicate that tau plays a general role in regulating intrinsic neuronal network hyperexcitability independently of Aβ overexpression and suggest that reducing tau function could be a viable target for therapeutic intervention in seizure disorders and antiepileptogenesis. PMID:23345237

  3. Tau in Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome is insoluble and abnormally phosphorylated.

    PubMed Central

    Hanger, D P; Brion, J P; Gallo, J M; Cairns, N J; Luthert, P J; Anderton, B H

    1991-01-01

    Some investigators have described the presence in Alzheimer's disease brain extracts of several abnormal forms of the microtubule-associated protein tau, based on their unusual mobility in SDS/PAGE. It has been proposed that these abnormal forms of tau may be the result of aberrant tau phosphorylation. In this study we show that tau in extracts of Alzheimer's disease brain can be separated into two fractions based upon its solubility (100,000 g x 1 h supernatant) in non-denaturing conditions (100 mM-Mes, pH 6.5, 0.5 mM-MgCl2, 1 mM-EGTA and 1 M-NaCl). The tau isoforms with decreased mobility in SDS/PAGE are predominantly in an insoluble fraction, whereas the soluble tau is indistinguishable by its mobility in SDS/PAGE from tau in soluble extracts of control brain. Insoluble tau displaying abnormal mobility on SDS/PAGE was only found in Alzheimer and adult Down's syndrome brains and was absent from the brains of age-matched controls and from foetal and infant Down's syndrome brains. There was a good correlation between the presence of insoluble tau in brain extracts and the abundance of neurofibrillary tangles and senile neuritic plaques. The monoclonal antibody Tau. 1 stained insoluble tau on Western blots only after treatment of the nitrocellulose transfers with alkaline phosphatase, implying that this insoluble tau is in a particular state of phosphorylation. We conclude that, in Alzheimer's disease, a fraction of tau has a modified phosphorylation state and a decreased solubility; these modifications may precede formation of the neurofibrillary tangles characteristic of Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome in adults. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1826835

  4. IS FS Tau B DRIVING AN ASYMMETRIC JET?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chun-Fan; Shang, Hsien; Takami, Michihiro; Yan, Chi-Hung; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Walter, Frederick M.; Hayashi, Masahiko

    2012-04-10

    FS Tau B is one of the few T Tauri stars that possess a jet and a counterjet as well as an optically visible cavity wall. We obtained images and spectra of its jet-cavity system in the near-infrared H and K bands using the Subaru/Infrared Camera and Spectrograph and detected the jet and the counterjet in the [Fe II] 1.644 {mu}m line for the first time. Within 2'' the blueshifted jet is brighter, whereas beyond {approx}5'' the redshifted counterjet dominates the [Fe II] emission. The innermost blueshifted knot is spectrally resolved to have a large line width of {approx}110 km s{sup -1}, while the innermost redshifted knot appears spectrally unresolved. The velocity ratio of the jet to the counterjet is {approx}1.34, which suggests that FS Tau B is driving an asymmetric jet, similar to those found in several T Tauri stars. Combining with optical observations in the literature, we showed that the blueshifted jet has a lower density and higher excitation than the redshifted counterjet. We suggest that the asymmetry in brightness and velocity is the manifestation of a bipolar outflow driving at different mass-loss rates, while maintaining balance of linear momentum. A full explanation of the asymmetry in the FS Tau B system awaits detail modeling and further investigation of the kinematic structure of the wind-associated cavity walls.

  5. Tau Functions and Virasoro Actions for soliton Hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terng, Chuu-Lian; Uhlenbeck, Karen

    2016-02-01

    There is a general method for constructing a soliton hierarchy from a splitting {{L_{±}}} of a loop group as positive and negative sub-groups together with a commuting linearly independent sequence in the positive Lie algebra {{L}+}. Many known soliton hierarchies can be constructed this way. The formal inverse scattering associates to each f in the negative subgroup {L_-} a solution {uf} of the hierarchy. When there is a 2 co-cycle of the Lie algebra that vanishes on both sub-algebras, Wilson constructed a tau function {τf} for each element {f in L_-}. In this paper, we give integral formulas for variations of {lnτf} and second partials of {lnτf}, discuss whether we can recover solutions {uf} from {τf}, and give a general construction of actions of the positive half of the Virasoro algebra on tau functions. We write down formulas relating tau functions and formal inverse scattering solutions and the Virasoro vector fields for the {GL(n,{C})}-hierarchy.

  6. Granulovacuolar degeneration: a neurodegenerative change that accompanies tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Granule-containing vacuoles in the cytoplasm of hippocampal neurons are a neuropathological feature of Alzheimer's disease. Granulovacuolar degeneration (GVD) is not disease-specific and can be observed in other neurodegenerative disorders and even in the brains of non-demented elderly people. However, several studies have reported much higher numbers of neurons undergoing GVD in the hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease cases. Recently, a neuropathological staging system for GVD has facilitated neuropathological assessment. Data obtained by electron microscopy and immunolabeling suggest that GVD inclusions are a special form of autophagic vacuole. GVD frequently occurs together with pathological changes of the microtubule-associated protein tau, but to date, the relationship between the two lesions remains elusive. Originally identified in hematoxylin- and silver-stained sections, immunolabeling has shown that the granules are composed of a variety of proteins, including those related to tau pathology, autophagy, diverse signal transduction pathways, cell stress and apoptosis. Several of these proteins serve as markers of GVD. Most researchers and authors have interpreted the sequestration of proteins into GVD inclusions as either a cellular defense mechanism or one that leads to the impairment of important cellular functions. This review provides a detailed overview of the various aspects of GVD and focuses on the relationship between tau pathology and GVD. PMID:27062260

  7. Toxicity of phosphine fumigation against Bactrocera tau at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liu, Tao; Li, Baishu; Zhang, Fanhua; Dong, Shujun; Wang, Yuejin

    2014-04-01

    Bactrocera tau (Walker) is one of the most harmful pests to fruits and vegetables. To counteract this pest, the development of phytosanitary treatment is required to comply with the pest regulation requirements of certain countries. This study investigated the toxicity of phosphine fumigation against B. tau under low temperature conditions. Different growth stages (eggs and instars) of B. tau were exposed to 1.07 mg/liter phosphine for 1-10 d at 5 degrees C, and compared with unfumigated flies at 5 degrees C. The results showed that tolerance to cold treatment alone or phosphine fumigation at low temperatures generally increased with the stage of insect development. However, eggs incubated for 12 h at 25 degrees C represented the most tolerant growth stage to phosphine fumigation at 5 degrees C. Furthermore, 8.56- to 2.18-d exposure periods were required to achieve 99% mortality with a range of phosphine concentrations from 0.46 to 3.81 mg/liter. C0.62 t = k expression was obtained from the LT99 values, indicating that the exposure time was more important than the phosphine concentration. PMID:24772539

  8. A clinical perspective: anti tau's treatment in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, P; Catalan, J

    2011-09-01

    Alzheimer΄s Disease (AD) physiopathology is not yet totally established. Nevertheless it is known that a metabolism dysfunction of the amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) and the abnormal tau protein phosphorylation lead to the formation of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, respectively. These events finally drive to the clinical expression of dementia. Formally approved during the past decade, treatments for AD are lacking of an updating, being essentially symptomatic. Anticholinesterase agents have failed in providing a substantial improvement in the mental health condition of AD patients. On the other hand, antiamyloid strategies, have failed in their efficacy or security on their last development phases. In this context, tau represents a potential therapeutic target, by the action of drugs that diminish its aggregation, or acting by altering its phosphorylation or filaments formation. There is also anti-tau miscellaneous strategies such as normal microtubule-stabilizing agents. Thus, it might be possible that in a near future the neurodegenerative process could be stopped. PMID:21605037

  9. Tau-targeted treatment strategies in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Götz, Jürgen; Ittner, Arne; Ittner, Lars M

    2012-03-01

    With populations ageing worldwide, the need for treating and preventing diseases associated with high age is pertinent. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is reaching epidemic proportions, yet the currently available therapies are limited to a symptomatic relief, without halting the degenerative process that characterizes the AD brain. As in AD cholinergic neurons are lost at high numbers, the initial strategies were limited to the development of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, and more recently the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine, in counteracting excitotoxicity. With the identification of the protein tau in intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and of the peptide amyloid-β (Aβ) in extracellular amyloid plaques in the AD brain, and a better understanding of their role in disease, newer strategies are emerging, which aim at either preventing their formation and deposition or at accelerating their clearance. Interestingly, what is well established to combat viral diseases in peripheral organs - vaccination - seems to work for the brain as well. Accordingly, immunization strategies targeting Aβ show efficacy in mice and to some degree also in humans. Even more surprising is the finding in mice that immunization strategies targeting tau, a protein that forms aggregates in nerve cells, ameliorates the tau-associated pathology. We are reviewing the literature and discuss what can be expected regarding the translation into clinical practice and how the findings can be extended to other neurodegenerative diseases with protein aggregation in brain. PMID:22044248

  10. Evidence of a massive planet candidate orbiting the young active K5V star BD+20 1790

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernán-Obispo, M.; Gálvez-Ortiz, M. C.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Kane, S. R.; Barnes, J. R.; de Castro, E.; Cornide, M.

    2010-03-01

    Context. BD+20 1790 is a young active, metal-rich, late-type K5Ve star. We have undertaken a study of stellar activity and kinematics for this star over the past few years. Previous results show a high level of stellar activity, with the presence of prominence-like structures, spots on the surface, and strong flare events, despite the moderate rotational velocity of the star. In addition, radial velocity variations with a semi-amplitude of up to 1 km s-1 were detected. Aims: We investigate the nature of these radial velocity variations, in order to determine whether they are due to stellar activity or the reflex motion of the star induced by a companion. Methods: We have analysed high-resolution echelle spectra by measuring stellar activity indicators and computing radial velocity (RV) and bisector velocity spans. Two-band photometry was also obtained to produce the light curve and determine the photometric period. Results: Based upon the analysis of the bisector velocity span, as well as spectroscopic indices of chromospheric indicators, Ca ii H & K, Hα, and taking the photometric analysis into account, we report that the best explanation for the RV variation is the presence of a substellar companion. The Keplerian fit of the RV data yields a solution for a close-in massive planet with an orbital period of 7.78 days. The presence of the close-in massive planet could also be an interpretation for the high level of stellar activity detected. Since the RV data are not part of a planet search programme, we can consider our results as a serendipitous evidence of a planetary companion. To date, this is the youngest main sequence star for which a planetary candidate has been reported. Based on observations collected at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto, jointly operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie Heidelberg and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC). Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo

  11. Probing light pseudoscalar, axial vector states through {eta}{sub b}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Rashed, Ahmed; Duraisamy, Murugeswaran; Datta, Alakabha

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we explore the decay {eta}{sub b}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} as a probe for a light pseudoscalar or a light axial vector state. We estimate the standard model branching ratio for this decay to be {approx}4x10{sup -9}. We show that considerably larger branching ratios, up to the present experimental limit of {approx}8%, are possible in models with a light pseudoscalar or a light axial vector state. As we do not include possible mixing effects between the light pseudoscalar and the {eta}{sub b}, our results should be reliable when the pseudoscalar mass is away from the {eta}{sub b} mass.

  12. Co-immunoprecipitation with Tau Isoform-specific Antibodies Reveals Distinct Protein Interactions and Highlights a Putative Role for 2N Tau in Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Song, Xiaomin; Nisbet, Rebecca; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Alternative splicing generates multiple isoforms of the microtubule-associated protein Tau, but little is known about their specific function. In the adult mouse brain, three Tau isoforms are expressed that contain either 0, 1, or 2 N-terminal inserts (0N, 1N, and 2N). We generated Tau isoform-specific antibodies and performed co-immunoprecipitations followed by tandem mass tag multiplexed quantitative mass spectrometry. We identified novel Tau-interacting proteins of which one-half comprised membrane-bound proteins, localized to the plasma membrane, mitochondria, and other organelles. Tau was also found to interact with proteins involved in presynaptic signal transduction. MetaCore analysis revealed one major Tau interaction cluster that contained 33 Tau pulldown proteins. To explore the pathways in which these proteins are involved, we conducted an ingenuity pathway analysis that revealed two significant overlapping pathways, "cell-to-cell signaling and interaction" and "neurological disease." The functional enrichment tool DAVID showed that in particular the 2N Tau-interacting proteins were specifically associated with neurological disease. Finally, for a subset of Tau interactions (apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), apoE, mitochondrial creatine kinase U-type, β-synuclein, synaptogyrin-3, synaptophysin, syntaxin 1B, synaptotagmin, and synapsin 1), we performed reverse co-immunoprecipitations, confirming the preferential interaction of specific isoforms. For example, apoA1 displayed a 5-fold preference for the interaction with 2N, whereas β-synuclein showed preference for 0N. Remarkably, a reverse immunoprecipitation with apoA1 detected only the 2N isoform. This highlights distinct protein interactions of the different Tau isoforms, suggesting that they execute different functions in brain tissue. PMID:26861879

  13. Co-immunoprecipitation with Tau Isoform-specific Antibodies Reveals Distinct Protein Interactions and Highlights a Putative Role for 2N Tau in Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Song, Xiaomin; Nisbet, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing generates multiple isoforms of the microtubule-associated protein Tau, but little is known about their specific function. In the adult mouse brain, three Tau isoforms are expressed that contain either 0, 1, or 2 N-terminal inserts (0N, 1N, and 2N). We generated Tau isoform-specific antibodies and performed co-immunoprecipitations followed by tandem mass tag multiplexed quantitative mass spectrometry. We identified novel Tau-interacting proteins of which one-half comprised membrane-bound proteins, localized to the plasma membrane, mitochondria, and other organelles. Tau was also found to interact with proteins involved in presynaptic signal transduction. MetaCore analysis revealed one major Tau interaction cluster that contained 33 Tau pulldown proteins. To explore the pathways in which these proteins are involved, we conducted an ingenuity pathway analysis that revealed two significant overlapping pathways, “cell-to-cell signaling and interaction” and “neurological disease.” The functional enrichment tool DAVID showed that in particular the 2N Tau-interacting proteins were specifically associated with neurological disease. Finally, for a subset of Tau interactions (apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), apoE, mitochondrial creatine kinase U-type, β-synuclein, synaptogyrin-3, synaptophysin, syntaxin 1B, synaptotagmin, and synapsin 1), we performed reverse co-immunoprecipitations, confirming the preferential interaction of specific isoforms. For example, apoA1 displayed a 5-fold preference for the interaction with 2N, whereas β-synuclein showed preference for 0N. Remarkably, a reverse immunoprecipitation with apoA1 detected only the 2N isoform. This highlights distinct protein interactions of the different Tau isoforms, suggesting that they execute different functions in brain tissue. PMID:26861879

  14. Differential interaction and aggregation of 3-repeat and 4-repeat tau isoforms with 14-3-3{zeta} protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sadik, Golam; Tanaka, Toshihisa; Kato, Kiyoko; Yanagi, Kentaro; Kudo, Takashi; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2009-05-22

    Tau isoforms, 3-repeat (3R) and 4-repeat tau (4R), are differentially involved in neuronal development and in several tauopathies. 14-3-3 protein binds to tau and 14-3-3/tau association has been found both in the development and in tauopathies. To understand the role of 14-3-3 in the differential regulation of tau isoforms, we have performed studies on the interaction and aggregation of 3R-tau and 4R-tau, either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated, with 14-3-3{zeta}. We show by surface plasmon resonance studies that the interaction between unphosphorylated 3R-tau and 14-3-3{zeta} is {approx}3-folds higher than that between unphosphorylated 4R-tau and 14-3-3{zeta}. Phosphorylation of tau by protein kinase A (PKA) increases the affinity of both 3R- and 4R-tau for 14-3-3{zeta} to a similar level. An in vitro aggregation assay employing both transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy revealed the aggregation of unphosphorylated 4R-tau to be significantly higher than that of unphosphorylated 3R-tau following the induction of 14-3-3{zeta}. The filaments formed from 3R- and 4R-tau were almost similar in morphology. In contrast, the aggregation of both 3R- and 4R-tau was reduced to a similar low level after phosphorylation with PKA. Taken together, these results suggest that 14-3-3{zeta} exhibits a similar role for tau isoforms after PKA-phosphorylation, but a differential role for unphosphorylated tau. The significant aggregation of 4R-tau by 14-3-3{zeta} suggests that 14-3-3 may act as an inducer in the generation of 4R-tau-predominant neurofibrillary tangles in tauopathies.

  15. [Alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes and alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists].

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Ikunobu; Suzuki, Fumiko; Tanaka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Hatsumi; Morishima, Shigeru

    2006-03-01

    Alpha(1)-adrenoceptors are widely distributed in the human body and play important physiologic roles. Three alpha(1)-adrenoceptor subtypes (alpha(1A), alpha(1B) and alpha(1D)) have been cloned and show different pharmacologic profiles. In addition, a putative alpha(1)-adrenoceptor (alpha(1L) subtype) has also been proposed. Recently, three drugs (tamsulosin, naftopidil, and silodosin) have been developed in Japan for the treatment of urinary obstruction in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. In this review, we describe recent alpha(1)-adrenoceptor subclassifications and the pharmacologic characteristics (subtype selectivity and clinical relevance) of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists. PMID:16518082

  16. VERY LARGE ARRAY OBSERVATIONS OF DG TAU'S RADIO JET: A HIGHLY COLLIMATED THERMAL OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, C.; Mutel, R. L.; Gayley, K. G.; Guedel, M.; Ray, T.; Skinner, S. L.; Schneider, P. C.

    2013-03-20

    The active young protostar DG Tau has an extended jet that has been well studied at radio, optical, and X-ray wavelengths. We report sensitive new Very Large Array (VLA) full-polarization observations of the core and jet between 5 GHz and 8 GHz. Our high angular resolution observation at 8 GHz clearly shows an unpolarized inner jet with a size of 42 AU (0.''35) extending along a position angle similar to the optical-X ray outer jet. Using our nearly coeval 2012 VLA observations, we find a spectral index {alpha} = +0.46 {+-} 0.05, which combined with the lack of polarization is consistent with bremsstrahlung (free-free) emission, with no evidence for a non-thermal coronal component. By identifying the end of the radio jet as the optical depth unity surface, and calculating the resulting emission measure, we find that our radio results are in agreement with previous optical line studies of electron density and consequent mass-loss rate. We also detect a weak radio knot at 5 GHz located 7'' from the base of the jet, coincident with the inner radio knot detected by Rodriguez et al. in 2009 but at lower surface brightness. We interpret this as due to expansion of post-shock ionized gas in the three years between observations.

  17. Aluminum interaction with human brain tau protein phosphorylation by various kinases

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sebae; Abou Zeid, M.M.; Saleh, M.A. . Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology Lab.); Abdel-Ghany, M.E.; Shalloway, D. . Section of Biochemistry, Mol, and Cell Biology); Blancato, J. . Environmental Monit. Systems Lab.)

    1993-01-01

    Phosphorylation is an indispensable process for energy and signal transduction in biological systems. AlCl[sub 3] at 10 nM to 10 [mu]M range activated in-vitro [[gamma][sup [minus]32]P]ATP phosphorylation of the brain ([tau]) [Gamma] protein in both normal human or E.coli expressed [Gamma] forms; in the presence of the kinases P34,PKP, and PKC. However, higher concentrations of AlCl[sub 3] inhibited the [Gamma] phosphorylation with P34, PKP, and PKC to a maximum at 1 mM level. AlCl[sub 3] at 100 [mu]M to 500 [mu]M range induced non-enzymatic phosphorylation of [Gamma] with [gamma]-ATP, [gamma]-GTP, and [alpha]-GRP. AlCl[sub 3] activated histone phosphorylation by P34 in a similar pattern. The hyperphosphorylation of [Gamma] by Al[sup 3+] was accompanied in molecular shift and mobility retardation in SDS-PAGE. This may demonstrate the mechanism of the long term neurological effect of Al[sub 3+] in human brain leading to the formation of the neutrofibrillary tangles related to Alzeheimer's disease.

  18. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K3 and K5 proteins down regulate both DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR.

    PubMed

    Lang, Sabine M; Bynoe, Meisha O F; Karki, Roshan; Tartell, Michael A; Means, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiological agent of multicentric Castleman's disease, primary effusion lymphoma and Kaposi's sarcoma. In this study, we show that like the C-type lectin DC-SIGN, the closely related DC-SIGNR can also enhance KSHV infection. Following infection, they are both targeted for down modulation and our data indicate that the KSHV MARCH-family ubiquitin ligase K5 is mediating this regulation and subsequent targeting for degradation of DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR in the context of the virus. The closely related viral K3 protein, is also able to target these lectins in exogenous expressions studies, but only weakly during viral infection. In addition to requiring a functional RING-CH domain, several protein trafficking motifs in the C-terminal region of both K3 and K5 are important in regulation of DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR. Further exploration of this modulation revealed that DC-SIGN is endocytosed from the cell surface in THP-1 monocytes, but degraded from an internal location with minimal endocytosis in HEK-293 cells. Pull-down data indicate that both K3 and K5 preferentially associate with immature forms of the lectins, mediating their ubiquitylation and degradation. Together, these data emphasize the molecular complexities of K3 and K5, while expanding the repertoire of targets of these two viral proteins. PMID:23460925

  19. Do Boys or Girls Rule? Gender Equitable Teaching Practice of K-5 Classroom Teachers at an Elementary School in the Bronx, NY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Barbara C.

    The purpose of this study is to use observations, questionnaires, and discussions with the principal investigator to encourage awareness of gender equitable teaching behaviors of K-5 classroom teachers at an elementary school in the Bronx, New York. During the observations of these teachers, there was a balance seen in the active interactions by…

  20. Expanding the Role of K-5 Science Instruction in Educational Reform: Implications of an Interdisciplinary Model for Integrating Science and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romance, Nancy R.; Vitale, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Addressed is the current practice in educational reform of reducing time for science instruction in favor of traditional reading/language arts instruction. In contrast, presented is an evidence-based rationale for increasing instructional time for K-5 science instruction as an educational reform initiative. Overviewed are consensus…