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Sample records for alpha-amidating monooxygenase mrna

  1. Localization of the gene encoding peptidylglycine [alpha]-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) to human chromosome 5q14-5q21

    SciTech Connect

    Ouafik, L.H.; Giraud, P.; Oliver, C. ); Mattei, M.G. ); Eipper, B.A.; Mains, R.E. )

    1993-11-01

    Peptidylglycine [alpha]-amidating monooxygenase (PAM; EC 1.14.17.3) is a multifunctional protein containing two enzymes that act sequentially to catalyze the [alpha]-amidation of neuroendocrine peptides. Southern blot analysis of human placental DNA demonstrated that PAM is encoded by a single gene. The chromosomal localization of the PAM gene was established using in situ hybridization. A 2.2-kb human PAM cDNA hybridized to human metaphase chromosomes revealed a significant clustering of silver grains over chromosome 5 bands q14-q21. The gene encoding another enzyme important in the post-translational processing of neuroendocrine precursors, prohormone convertase 1 (PC1), is localized in the same region (5q15-q21). 14 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Structural biology of heme monooxygenases

    SciTech Connect

    Poulos, Thomas L. . E-mail: poulos@uci.edu

    2005-12-09

    Over the past few years the number of crystal structures available for heme monooxygenases has substantially increased. Those most closely related to one another are cytochrome P450, nitric oxide synthase, and heme oxygenase. The present mini-review provides a summary of some recently published work on how crystallography and solution studies have provided new insights on function and especially the oxygen activation process. It now appears that in all three monooxygenases highly ordered solvent in the active site serves as direct proton donors to the iron-linked dioxygen; a requirement for splitting the O-O bond. This is in sharp contrast to the related peroxidase family of enzymes where strategically positioned amino acid side chains serve the function of shuttling protons. The P450cam-oxy-complex as well as various mutants in a complex with either oxygen or carbon monoxide have enabled a fairly detailed picture to be developed on the role of specific amino acids and conformational changes in both electron transfer and oxygen activation.

  3. Squalene monooxygenase - a target for hypercholesterolemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Belter, Agnieszka; Skupinska, Miroslawa; Giel-Pietraszuk, Malgorzata; Grabarkiewicz, Tomasz; Rychlewski, Leszek; Barciszewski, Jan

    2011-12-01

    Squalene monooxygenase catalyzes the epoxidation of C-C double bond of squalene to yield 2,3-oxidosqualene, the key step of sterol biosynthesis pathways in eukaryotes. Sterols are essential compounds of these organisms and squalene epoxidation is an important regulatory point in their synthesis. Squalene monooxygenase downregulation in vertebrates and fungi decreases synthesis of cholesterol and ergosterol, respectively, which makes squalene monooxygenase a potent and attractive target of hypercholesterolemia and antifungal therapies. Currently some fungal squalene monooxygenase inhibitors (terbinafine, naftifine, butenafine) are in clinical use, whereas mammalian enzymes' inhibitors are still under investigation. Research on new squalene monooxygenase inhibitors is important due to the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia and the lack of both sufficient and safe remedies. In this paper we (i) review data on activity and the structure of squalene monooxygenase, (ii) present its inhibitors, (iii) compare current strategies of lowering cholesterol level in blood with some of the most promising strategies, (iv) underline advantages of squalene monooxygenase as a target for hypercholesterolemia therapy, and (v) discuss safety concerns about hypercholesterolemia therapy based on inhibition of cellular cholesterol biosynthesis and potential usage of squalene monooxygenase inhibitors in clinical practice. After many years of use of statins there is some clinical evidence for their adverse effects and only partial effectiveness. Currently they are drugs of choice but are used with many restrictions, especially in case of children, elderly patients and women of childbearing potential. Certainly, for the next few years, statins will continue to be a suitable tool for cost-effective cardiovascular prevention; however research on new hypolipidemic drugs is highly desirable. We suggest that squalene monooxygenase inhibitors could become the hypocholesterolemic agents of the

  4. Cellulose degradation by polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Beeson, William T; Vu, Van V; Span, Elise A; Phillips, Christopher M; Marletta, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs), also known as lytic PMOs (LPMOs), enhance the depolymerization of recalcitrant polysaccharides by hydrolytic enzymes and are found in the majority of cellulolytic fungi and actinomycete bacteria. For more than a decade, PMOs were incorrectly annotated as family 61 glycoside hydrolases (GH61s) or family 33 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM33s). PMOs have an unusual surface-exposed active site with a tightly bound Cu(II) ion that catalyzes the regioselective hydroxylation of crystalline cellulose, leading to glycosidic bond cleavage. The genomes of some cellulolytic fungi contain more than 20 genes encoding cellulose-active PMOs, suggesting a diversity of biological activities. PMOs show great promise in reducing the cost of conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars; however, many questions remain about their reaction mechanism and biological function. This review addresses, in depth, the structural and mechanistic aspects of oxidative depolymerization of cellulose by PMOs and considers their biological function and phylogenetic diversity. PMID:25784051

  5. An improved choline monooxygenase assay

    SciTech Connect

    Lafontaine, P.J.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Glycine betaine accumulates in leaves of plants from several angiosperm families in response to drought or salinization. Its synthesis, from the oxidation of choline, is mediated by a two step pathway. In spinach the first enzyme of this pathway is a ferredoxin-dependent choline monooxygenase (CMO). In order to purify this enzyme a sensitive and reliable assay is necessary. Two types of modifications were explored to improve the existing assay. (1) Ferredoxin reduction - one way of providing reduced Fd to CMO is by the addition of isolated spinach thylakoids in the assay mixture. In order to optimize the reduction of Fd two different systems were compared: (a) where only PS is active, by adding DCMU to inhibit electron transport from PS II and DAD as electron donor for PS I; (b) where both PS II and PS I are active. (2) Betaine aldehyde estimation - to simplify this, it is possible to couple the CMO reaction with betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) from E. coli. BADH converts betaine aldehyde to betaine as it is formed in the assay, eliminating the need for a chemical oxidation step.

  6. Comparison of Bacillus monooxygenase genes for unique fatty acid production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reviews Bacillus genes encoding monooxygenase enzymes producing unique fatty acid metabolites. Specifically, it examines standard monooxygenase electron transfer schemes and related domain structures of these fused domain enzymes on route to understanding the observed oxygenase activiti...

  7. Starch-degrading polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Vu, Van V; Marletta, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Polysaccharide degradation by hydrolytic enzymes glycoside hydrolases (GHs) is well known. More recently, polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs, also known as lytic PMOs or LPMOs) were found to oxidatively degrade various polysaccharides via a copper-dependent hydroxylation. PMOs were previously thought to be either GHs or carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), and have been re-classified in carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZY) database as auxiliary activity (AA) families. These enzymes include cellulose-active fungal PMOs (AA9, formerly GH61), chitin- and cellulose-active bacterial PMOs (AA10, formerly CBM33), and chitin-active fungal PMOs (AA11). These PMOs significantly boost the activity of GHs under industrially relevant conditions, and thus have great potential in the biomass-based biofuel industry. PMOs that act on starch are the latest PMOs discovered (AA13), which has expanded our perspectives in PMOs studies and starch degradation. Starch-active PMOs have many common structural features and biochemical properties of the PMO superfamily, yet differ from other PMO families in several important aspects. These differences likely correlate, at least in part, to the differences in primary and higher order structures of starch and cellulose, and chitin. In this review we will discuss the discovery, structural features, biochemical and biophysical properties, and possible biological functions of starch-active PMOs, as well as their potential application in the biofuel, food, and other starch-based industries. Important questions regarding various aspects of starch-active PMOs and possible economical driving force for their future studies will also be highlighted. PMID:27170366

  8. The Origin and Evolution of Baeyer—Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs): An Ancestral Family of Flavin Monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Mascotti, Maria Laura; Lapadula, Walter Jesús; Juri Ayub, Maximiliano

    2015-01-01

    The Baeyer—Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs) are enzymes belonging to the “Class B” of flavin monooxygenases and are capable of performing exquisite selective oxidations. These enzymes have been studied from a biotechnological perspective, but their physiological substrates and functional roles are widely unknown. Here, we investigated the origin, taxonomic distribution and evolutionary history of the BVMO genes. By using in silico approaches, 98 BVMO encoding genes were detected in the three domains of life: Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. We found evidence for the presence of these genes in Metazoa (Hydra vulgaris, Oikopleura dioica and Adineta vaga) and Haptophyta (Emiliania huxleyi) for the first time. Furthermore, a search for other “Class B” monooxygenases (flavoprotein monooxygenases –FMOs – and N-hydroxylating monooxygenases – NMOs) was conducted. These sequences were also found in the three domains of life. Phylogenetic analyses of all “Class B” monooxygenases revealed that NMOs and BVMOs are monophyletic, whereas FMOs form a paraphyletic group. Based on these results, we propose that BVMO genes were already present in the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) and their current taxonomic distribution is the result of differential duplication and loss of paralogous genes. PMID:26161776

  9. Tolerance to Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity in the Mouse Model of Autoprotection is Associated with Induction of Flavin-containing Monooxygenase-3 (FMO3) in Hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acetaminophen (APAP) pretreatment with a low hepatotoxic dose in mice results in resistance to a second, higher dose of APAP (APAP autoprotection). Recent microarray work by our group showed a drastic induction of liver flavin containing monooxygenase-3 (Fmo3) mRNA expression in...

  10. Microbial Flavoprotein Monooxygenases as Mimics of Mammalian Flavin-Containing Monooxygenases for the Enantioselective Preparation of Drug Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Gul, Turan; Krzek, Marzena; Permentier, Hjalmar P; Fraaije, Marco W; Bischoff, Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases, which are difficult to obtain and study, play a major role in detoxifying various xenobiotics. To provide alternative biocatalytic tools to generate flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMO)-derived drug metabolites, a collection of microbial flavoprotein monooxygenases, sequence-related to human FMOs, was tested for their ability to oxidize a set of xenobiotic compounds. For all tested xenobiotics [nicotine, lidocaine, 3-(methylthio)aniline, albendazole, and fenbendazole], one or more monooxygenases were identified capable of converting the target compound. Chiral liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry analyses of the conversions of 3-(methylthio)aniline, albendazole, and fenbendazole revealed that the respective sulfoxides are formed in good to excellent enantiomeric excess (e.e.) by several of the tested monooxygenases. Intriguingly, depending on the chosen microbial monooxygenase, either the (R)- or (S)-sulfoxide was formed. For example, when using a monooxygenase from Rhodococcus jostii the (S)-sulfoxide of albendazole (ricobendazole) was obtained with a 95% e.e. whereas a fungal monooxygenase yielded the respective (R)-sulfoxide in 57% e.e. For nicotine and lidocaine, monooxygenases could be identified that convert the amines into their respective N-oxides. This study shows that recombinantly expressed microbial monooxygenases represent a valuable toolbox of mammalian FMO mimics that can be exploited for the production of FMO-associated xenobiotic metabolites. PMID:26984198

  11. [Advances in biomolecular machine: methane monooxygenases].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jixue; Wang, Shizhen; Fang, Baishan

    2015-07-01

    Methane monooxygenases (MMO), regarded as "an amazing biomolecular machine", catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol under aerobic conditions. MMO catalyze the oxidation of methane elaborately, which is a novel way to catalyze methane to methanol. Furthermore, MMO can inspire the biomolecular machine design. In this review, we introduced MMO including structure, gene and catalytic mechanism. The history and the taxonomy of MMO were also introduced. PMID:26647577

  12. Toluene Monooxygenase-Catalyzed Epoxidation of Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Kevin; Fox, Brian G.; Steffan, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Several toluene monooxygenase-producing organisms were tested for their ability to oxidize linear alkenes and chloroalkenes three to eight carbons long. Each of the wild-type organisms degraded all of the alkenes that were tested. Epoxides were produced during the oxidation of butene, butadiene, and pentene but not hexene or octadiene. A strain of Escherichia coli expressing the cloned toluene-4-monooxygenase (T4MO) of Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 was able to oxidize butene, butadiene, pentene, and hexene but not octadiene, producing epoxides from all of the substrates that were oxidized. A T4MO-deficient variant of P. mendocina KR1 oxidized alkenes that were five to eight carbons long, but no epoxides were detected, suggesting the presence of multiple alkene-degrading enzymes in this organism. The alkene oxidation rates varied widely (ranging from 0.01 to 0.33 μmol of substrate/min/mg of cell protein) and were specific for each organism-substrate pair. The enantiomeric purity of the epoxide products also varied widely, ranging from 54 to >90% of a single epoxide enantiomer. In the absence of more preferred substrates, such as toluene or alkenes, the epoxides underwent further toluene monooxygenase-catalyzed transformations, forming products that were not identified. PMID:10788354

  13. Monooxygenase activity of type 3 copper proteins.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shinobu; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2007-07-01

    The molecular mechanism of the monooxygenase (phenolase) activity of type 3 copper proteins has been examined in detail both in the model systems and in the enzymatic systems. The reaction of a side-on peroxo dicopper(II) model compound ( A) and neutral phenols proceeds via a proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) mechanism to generate phenoxyl radical species, which collapse each other to give the corresponding C-C coupling dimer products. In this reaction, a bis(mu-oxo)dicopper(III) complex ( B) generated by O-O bond homolysis of A is suggested to be a real active species. On the other hand, the reaction of lithium phenolates (deprotonated form of phenols) with the same side-on peroxo dicopper(II) complex proceeds via an electrophilic aromatic substitution mechanism to give the oxygenated products (catechols). The mechanistic difference between these two systems has been discussed on the basis of the Marcus theory of electron transfer and Hammett analysis. Mechanistic details of the monooxygenase activity of tyrosinase have also been examined using a simplified enzymatic reaction system to demonstrate that the enzymatic reaction mechanism is virtually the same as that of the model reaction, that is, an electrophilic aromatic substitution mechanism. In addition, the monooxygenase activity of the oxygen carrier protein hemocyanin has been explored for the first time by employing urea as an additive in the reaction system. In this case as well, the ortho-hydroxylation of phenols to catechols has been demonstrated to involve the same ionic mechanism. PMID:17461541

  14. Structural basis of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Marta; Levy, Colin; Heyes, Derren J; Lafite, Pierre; Outeiro, Tiago F; Giorgini, Flaviano; Leys, David; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2013-04-18

    Inhibition of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), an enzyme in the eukaryotic tryptophan catabolic pathway (that is, kynurenine pathway), leads to amelioration of Huntington's-disease-relevant phenotypes in yeast, fruitfly and mouse models, as well as in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. KMO is a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent monooxygenase and is located in the outer mitochondrial membrane where it converts l-kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine. Perturbations in the levels of kynurenine pathway metabolites have been linked to the pathogenesis of a spectrum of brain disorders, as well as cancer and several peripheral inflammatory conditions. Despite the importance of KMO as a target for neurodegenerative disease, the molecular basis of KMO inhibition by available lead compounds has remained unknown. Here we report the first crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae KMO, in the free form and in complex with the tight-binding inhibitor UPF 648. UPF 648 binds close to the FAD cofactor and perturbs the local active-site structure, preventing productive binding of the substrate l-kynurenine. Functional assays and targeted mutagenesis reveal that the active-site architecture and UPF 648 binding are essentially identical in human KMO, validating the yeast KMO-UPF 648 structure as a template for structure-based drug design. This will inform the search for new KMO inhibitors that are able to cross the blood-brain barrier in targeted therapies against neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. PMID:23575632

  15. Electron transfer control in soluble methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weixue; Iacob, Roxana E; Luoh, Rebecca P; Engen, John R; Lippard, Stephen J

    2014-07-01

    The hydroxylation or epoxidation of hydrocarbons by bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases (BMMs) requires the interplay of three or four protein components. How component protein interactions control catalysis, however, is not well understood. In particular, the binding sites of the reductase components on the surface of their cognate hydroxylases and the role(s) that the regulatory proteins play during intermolecular electron transfer leading to the hydroxylase reduction have been enigmatic. Here we determine the reductase binding site on the hydroxylase of a BMM enzyme, soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). We present evidence that the ferredoxin domain of the reductase binds to the canyon region of the hydroxylase, previously determined to be the regulatory protein binding site as well. The latter thus inhibits reductase binding to the hydroxylase and, consequently, intermolecular electron transfer from the reductase to the hydroxylase diiron active site. The binding competition between the regulatory protein and the reductase may serve as a control mechanism for regulating electron transfer, and other BMM enzymes are likely to adopt the same mechanism. PMID:24937475

  16. Substrate radical intermediates in soluble methane monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Aimin; Jin Yi; Zhang Jingyan; Brazeau, Brian J.; Lipscomb, John D. . E-mail: lipsc001@umn.edu

    2005-12-09

    EPR spin-trapping experiments were carried out using the three-component soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO). Spin-traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), {alpha}-4-pyridyl-1-oxide N-tert-butylnitrone (POBN), and nitrosobenzene (NOB) were used to investigate the possible formation of substrate radical intermediates during catalysis. In contrast to a previous report, the NADH-coupled oxidations of various substrates did not produce any trapped radical species when DMPO or POBN was present. However, radicals were detected by these traps when only the MMO reductase component and NADH were present. DMPO and POBN were found to be weak inhibitors of the MMO reaction. In contrast, NOB is a strong inhibitor for the MMO-catalyzed nitrobenzene oxidation reaction. When NOB was used as a spin-trap in the complete MMO system with or without substrate, EPR signals from an NOB radical were detected. We propose that a molecule of NOB acts simultaneously as a substrate and a spin-trap for MMO, yielding the long-lived radical and supporting a stepwise mechanism for MMO.

  17. Substrate Trafficking And Dioxygen Activation in Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, L.J.; Lippard, S.J.

    2009-06-03

    Non-heme carboxylate-bridged diiron centers in the hydroxylase components of the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases process four substrates during catalysis: electrons, protons, dioxygen, and hydrocarbons. Understanding how protein-protein interactions mediate the transport of these substrates to the diiron center to achieve the selective oxidation of the hydrocarbon is a significant challenge. In this Account, we summarize our current knowledge of these processes with a focus on the methane monooxygenase system. We also describe recent results for the toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase and phenol hydroxylase systems from Pseudomonas sporium OX1. The observation in these latter systems of a diiron(III) oxygenated intermediate having different Moessbauer parameters from analogous species in other carboxylate-bridged diiron proteins is discussed. The results indicate that the ability of the protein framework to tune the reactivity of the diiron center at structurally similar active sites is substantially more complex than previously recognized.

  18. Hydroxylation of methane through component interactions in soluble methane monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jae

    2016-04-01

    Methane hydroxylation through methane monooxygenases (MMOs) is a key aspect due to their control of the carbon cycle in the ecology system and recent applications of methane gas in the field of bioenergy and bioremediation. Methanotropic bacteria perform a specific microbial conversion from methane, one of the most stable carbon compounds, to methanol through elaborate mechanisms. MMOs express particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in most strains and soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) under copper-limited conditions. The mechanisms of MMO have been widely studied from sMMO belonging to the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) superfamily. This enzyme has diiron active sites where different types of hydrocarbons are oxidized through orchestrated hydroxylase, regulatory and reductase components for precise control of hydrocarbons, oxygen, protons, and electrons. Recent advances in biophysical studies, including structural and enzymatic achievements for sMMO, have explained component interactions, substrate pathways, and intermediates of sMMO. In this account, oxidation of methane in sMMO is discussed with recent progress that is critical for understanding the microbial applications of C-H activation in one-carbon substrates. PMID:27033202

  19. Regulation of cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the compound 1,4-bis(2-(3,4-dichloropyridyloxy)) benzene (TCPOBOP) has been identified as a highly potent phenobabital-like agonist in mice. This finding has led to the suggestion that a receptor-mediated process may govern the induction of cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases by phenobarbital and phenobarbital-like agonists. This dissertation examines: (1) the effects of structural alterations of the TCPOBOP molecule on enzyme induction activity, (2) the induction response to phenobarbital and TCPOBOP among inbred mouse strains, (3) the spectrum of monooxygenase activities induced by phenobarbital and TCPOBOP compared to 3-methylcholanthrene, isosafrole and pregnenolone 16..cap alpha..-carbonitrile (PCN) and (4) the binding of (/sup 3/H) TCPOBOP in hepatic cytosol. Changes in the structure of the pyridyloxy or benzene rings markedly affect enzyme induction activity and provide additional indirect evidence for a receptor-mediated response. An evaluation of monooxygenase induction by TCPOBOP for 27 inbred mouse strains and by phenobarbital for 15 inbred mouse strains failed to identify a strain which was completely nonresponsive to these compounds, although several strains exhibited decreased responsiveness for select monooxygenase reactions. TCPOBOP, PCN and phenobarbital were all found to significantly increase the rate of hydroxylation of testosterone at the 2..cap alpha..-, 6..beta..- and 15..beta..- positions but only TCPOBOP and phenobarbital dramatically increased the rate of pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylation. The results demonstrates that TCPOBOP most closely resembles phenobarbital in its mode of monooxygenase induction in mice. Sucrose density gradient analysis of (/sup 3/H) TCPOBOP-hepatic cytosol incubations failed to identify specific, saturable binding of (/sup 3/H) TCPOBOP to cytosolic marcomolecular elements.

  20. Copper-dependent reciprocal transcriptional regulation of methane monooxygenase genes in Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporium.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, A K; Gerdes, K; Murrell, J C

    1997-07-01

    The methanotrophic bacteria Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b convert methane to methanol using the enzyme, methane monooxygenase (MMO). These bacteria are able to express two distinct MMOs: a cytoplasmic or soluble form (sMMO) and a membrane-bound or particulate form (pMMO). Differential expression of sMMO and pMMO is regulated by the amount of copper ions available to the cells; sMMO is expressed at low copper-biomass ratios, whereas pMMO is expressed at high copper-biomass ratios. In both methanotrophs, transcription of the sMMO gene cluster is negatively regulated by copper ions. Data suggest that transcription of the M. trichosporium OB3b sMMO gene cluster is directed from a sigma54-like and a sigma70-like promoter. The pMMO (pmo) genes of M. capsulatus (Bath) are transcribed into a polycistronic mRNA of 3.3 kb. The synthesis of this mRNA was activated by copper ions. Activation of pmo transcription by copper ions was concomitant with repression of sMMO gene transcription in both methanotrophs. This suggests that a common regulatory pathway may be involved in the transcriptional switch between sMMO and pMMO gene expression. PMID:9282751

  1. Isolation of the monooxygenase complex from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus - clues to understanding acaricide resistance.

    PubMed

    Graham, Kirsty M; Sparagano, Olivier A E; Finn, Robert D

    2016-06-01

    The monooxygenase complex is composed of three key proteins, a cytochrome P450 (CYP), the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CPR) and cytochrome b5 and plays a key role in the metabolism and detoxification of xenobiotic substances, including pesticides. In addition, overexpression of these components has been linked to pesticide resistance in several important vectors of disease. Despite this, the monooxygenase complex has not been isolated from the Southern cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, a major disease vector in livestock. Using bioinformatics 115 transcriptomic sequences were analyzed to identify putative pesticide metabolizing CYPs. RACE-PCR was used to amplify the full length sequence of one CYP; CYP3006G8 which displays a high degree of homology to members of the CYP6 and 9 subfamilies, known to metabolize pyrethroids. mRNA expression levels of CYP3006G8 were investigated in 11 strains of R. microplus with differing resistance profiles by qPCR, the results of which indicated a correlation with pyrethroid metabolic resistance. In addition to this gene, the sequences for CPR and cytochrome b5 were also identified and subsequently isolated from R. microplus using PCR. CYP3006G8 is only the third CYP gene isolated from R. microplus and the first to putatively metabolize pesticides. The initial results of expression analysis suggest that CYP3006G8 metabolizes pyrethroids but further biochemical characterization is required to confirm this. Differences in the kinetic parameters of human and mosquito CPR in terms of NADPH binding have been demonstrated and could potentially be used to design species specific pesticides. Similar differences in the tick CPR would confirm that this is a characteristic of heamatophagous arthropods. PMID:26850353

  2. Identification of a flavin-containing S-oxygenating monooxygenase involved in alliin biosynthesis in garlic.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Naoko; Onuma, Misato; Mizuno, Shinya; Sugino, Yuka; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Imai, Shinsuke; Tsuneyoshi, Tadamitsu; Sumi, Shin-ichiro; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-09-01

    S-Alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides are cysteine-derived secondary metabolites highly accumulated in the genus Allium. Despite pharmaceutical importance, the enzymes that contribute to the biosynthesis of S-alk-(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides in Allium plants remain largely unknown. Here, we report the identification of a flavin-containing monooxygenase, AsFMO1, in garlic (Allium sativum), which is responsible for the S-oxygenation reaction in the biosynthesis of S-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide (alliin). Recombinant AsFMO1 protein catalyzed the stereoselective S-oxygenation of S-allyl-l-cysteine to nearly exclusively yield (RC SS )-S-allylcysteine sulfoxide, which has identical stereochemistry to the major natural form of alliin in garlic. The S-oxygenation reaction catalyzed by AsFMO1 was dependent on the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), consistent with other known flavin-containing monooxygenases. AsFMO1 preferred S-allyl-l-cysteine to γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine as the S-oxygenation substrate, suggesting that in garlic, the S-oxygenation of alliin biosynthetic intermediates primarily occurs after deglutamylation. The transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins indicated that AsFMO1 is localized in the cytosol. AsFMO1 mRNA was accumulated in storage leaves of pre-emergent nearly sprouting bulbs, and in various tissues of sprouted bulbs with green foliage leaves. Taken together, our results suggest that AsFMO1 functions as an S-allyl-l-cysteine S-oxygenase, and contributes to the production of alliin both through the conversion of stored γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine to alliin in storage leaves during sprouting and through the de novo biosynthesis of alliin in green foliage leaves. PMID:26345717

  3. Novel cyclohexane monooxygenase from Acidovorax sp. CHX100.

    PubMed

    Salamanca, Diego; Karande, Rohan; Schmid, Andreas; Dobslaw, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Acidovorax sp. CHX100 has a remarkable ability for growth on short cycloalkanes (C5-C8) as a sole source of carbon and energy under aerobic conditions via an uncharacterized mechanism. Transposon mutagenesis of Acidovorax sp. CHX100 revealed a novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP450chx) which catalyzed the transformation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanol. Primer walking methods categorized CYP450chx as cytochrome P450 class I taking into account its operon structure: monooxygenase, FAD oxidoreductase, and ferredoxin. CYP450chx was successfully cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli JM109. The activity of CYP450chx was demonstrated by means of the indole co-oxidation. Biotransformation capability of CYP450chx was confirmed through the catalysis of cycloalkanes (C5-C8) to their respective cyclic alcohols. PMID:25935342

  4. Methane monooxygenase: functionalizing methane at iron and copper.

    PubMed

    Sazinsky, Matthew H; Lippard, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) catalyze the conversion of methane to methanol as the first committed step in the assimilation of this hydrocarbon into biomass and energy by methanotrophs, thus playing a significant role in the biogeochemistry of this potent greenhouse gas. Two distinct enzymes, a copper-dependent membrane protein, particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO), and an iron-dependent cytosolic protein, soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO), carry out this transformation using large protein scaffolds that help to facilitate the timely transport of hydrocarbon, O₂, proton, and electron substrates to buried dimetallic active sites. For both enzymes, reaction of the reduced metal centers with O₂leads to intermediates that activate the relatively inert C-H bonds of hydrocarbons to yield oxidized products. Among synthetic and biological catalysts, MMOs are unique because they are the only ones known to hydroxylate methane at ambient temperatures. As a need for new industrial catalysts and green chemical transformations increases, understanding how the different MMO metal centers efficiently accomplish this challenging chemistry has become the focus of intense study. This chapter examines current understanding of the sMMO and pMMO protein structures, their methods for substrate channeling, and mechanisms for the dimetallic activation of O₂and C-H bonds. PMID:25707469

  5. Monophenol monooxygenase and lincomysin biosynthesis in Streptomyces lincolnensis.

    PubMed

    Michalik, J; Emilianowicz-Czerska, W; Switalski, L; Raczyńska-Bojanowska, K

    1975-11-01

    Monophenol monooxygenase (monophenol, dihydroxyphenylalanine:oxygen oxidoreductase EC 1.14.18.1) was studied in melanin-positive and melanin-negative mutants of Streptomyces lincolnensis NCIB 9413, varying in the lincomycin synthesizing ability. The activities of laccase and tyrosine phenol lyase (EC 4.1.99.2) are absent in this organism. The monophenol monooxygenase catalyzes hydroxylation of monophenols (K(m) and V(max) for l-tyrosine, 2 x 10(-4) M and 8.0 nmol of O(2)/min per ml, respectively) at a slower rate than it dehydrogenates diphenols to o-quinones (K(m) and V(max) for l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, 7 x 10(-5) M and 51.7 nmol of O(2)/min per ml, respectively. It is inhibited by KCN, beta-mercaptoethanol, ethylenediaminetetraacetate, dipyridyl, thiourea, p-aminobenzoic acids and by some tryptophan metabolites. Changes in the activity of monophenol monooxygenase caused by mutation or by inhibitors are reflected in the synthesis of the antibiotic. Its participation in the biogenesis of the propylhygric moiety of lincomycin is discussed. PMID:813570

  6. mRNA imprinting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Following its synthesis in the nucleus, mRNA undergoes various stages that are critical for the proper synthesis, localization and possibly functionality of its encoded protein. Recently, we have shown that two RNA polymerase II (Pol II) subunits, Rpb4p and Rpb7p, associate with the nascent transcript co-transcriptionally. This “mRNA imprinting” lasts throughout the mRNA lifetime and is required for proper regulation of all major stages that the mRNA undergoes. Other possible cases of co-transcriptional imprinting are discussed. Since mRNAs can be transported from the synthesizing cell to other cells, we propose that mRNA imprinting can also affect the phenotype of the recipient cells. This can be viewed as “mRNA-based epigenetics.” PMID:21686103

  7. Active site models for the Cu(A) site of peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase and dopamine β-monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Kunishita, Atsushi; Ertem, Mehmed Z; Okubo, Yuri; Tano, Tetsuro; Sugimoto, Hideki; Ohkubo, Kei; Fujieda, Nobutaka; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Cramer, Christopher J; Itoh, Shinobu

    2012-09-01

    A mononuclear copper(II) superoxo species has been invoked as the key reactive intermediate in aliphatic substrate hydroxylation by copper monooxygenases such as peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), and tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM). We have recently developed a mononuclear copper(II) end-on superoxo complex using a N-[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]-1,5-diazacyclooctane tridentate ligand, the structure of which is similar to the four-coordinate distorted tetrahedral geometry of the copper-dioxygen adduct found in the oxy-form of PHM (Prigge, S. T.; Eipper, B. A.; Mains, R. E.; Amzel, L. M. Science2004, 304, 864-867). In this study, structures and physicochemical properties as well as reactivity of the copper(I) and copper(II) complexes supported by a series of tridentate ligands having the same N-[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]-1,5-diazacyclooctane framework have been examined in detail to shed light on the chemistry dictated in the active sites of mononuclear copper monooxygenases. The ligand exhibits unique feature to stabilize the copper(I) complexes in a T-shape geometry and the copper(II) complexes in a distorted tetrahedral geometry. Low temperature oxygenation of the copper(I) complexes generated the mononuclear copper(II) end-on superoxo complexes, the structure and spin state of which have been further characterized by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Detailed kinetic analysis on the O(2)-adduct formation reaction gave the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters providing mechanistic insights into the association and dissociation processes of O(2) to the copper complexes. The copper(II) end-on superoxo complex thus generated gradually decomposed to induce aliphatic ligand hydroxylation. Kinetic and DFT studies on the decomposition reaction have suggested that C-H bond abstraction occurs unimolecularly from the superoxo complex with subsequent rebound of the copper hydroperoxo species to generate the oxygenated

  8. Regulation of betaine synthesis by precursor supply and choline monooxygenase expression in Amaranthus tricolor.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Nazmul H; Hamada, Akira; Yamada, Nana; Rai, Vandna; Hibino, Takashi; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2007-01-01

    In plants, betaine is synthesized upon abiotic stress via choline oxidation, in which choline monooxygenase (CMO) is a key enzyme. Although it had been thought that betaine synthesis is well regulated to protect abiotic stress, it is shown here that an exogenous supply of precursors such as choline, serine, and glycine in the betaine-accumulating plant Amaranthus tricolor further enhances the accumulation of betaine under salt stress, but not under normal conditions. Addition of isonicotinic acid hydrazide, an inhibitor of glycine decarboxylase, inhibited the salinity-induced accumulation of betaine. Salt-induced accumulation of A. tricolor CMO (AmCMO) and betaine was much slower in roots than in leaves, and a transient accumulation of proline was observed in the roots. Antisense expression of AmCMO mRNA suppressed the salt-induced accumulation of AmCMO and betaine, but increased the level of choline approximately 2- 3-fold. This indicates that betaine synthesis is highly regulated by AmCMO expression. The genomic DNA, including the upstream region (1.6 kbp), of AmCMO was isolated. Deletion analysis of the AmCMO promoter region revealed that the 410 bp fragment upstream of the translation start codon contains the sequence responsive to salt stress. These data reveal that the promoter sequence of CMO, in addition to precursor supply, is important for the accumulation of betaine in the betaine-accumulating plant A. tricolor. PMID:18182425

  9. Pharmacological kynurenine 3-monooxygenase enzyme inhibition significantly reduces neuropathic pain in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Rojewska, Ewelina; Piotrowska, Anna; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the involvement of the kynurenine pathway in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases, but the role of this system in neuropathic pain requires further extensive research. Therefore, the aim of our study was to examine the role of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (Kmo), an enzyme that is important in this pathway, in a rat model of neuropathy after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve. For the first time, we demonstrated that the injury-induced increase in the Kmo mRNA levels in the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was reduced by chronic administration of the microglial inhibitor minocycline and that this effect paralleled a decrease in the intensity of neuropathy. Further, minocycline administration alleviated the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced upregulation of Kmo mRNA expression in microglial cell cultures. Moreover, we demonstrated that not only indirect inhibition of Kmo using minocycline but also direct inhibition using Kmo inhibitors (Ro61-6048 and JM6) decreased neuropathic pain intensity on the third and the seventh days after CCI. Chronic Ro61-6048 administration diminished the protein levels of IBA-1, IL-6, IL-1beta and NOS2 in the spinal cord and/or the DRG. Both Kmo inhibitors potentiated the analgesic properties of morphine. In summary, our data suggest that in neuropathic pain model, inhibiting Kmo function significantly reduces pain symptoms and enhances the effectiveness of morphine. The results of our studies show that the kynurenine pathway is an important mediator of neuropathic pain pathology and indicate that Kmo represents a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of neuropathy. PMID:26524415

  10. The molecular basis of polysaccharide cleavage by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Frandsen, Kristian E H; Simmons, Thomas J; Dupree, Paul; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Hemsworth, Glyn R; Ciano, Luisa; Johnston, Esther M; Tovborg, Morten; Johansen, Katja S; von Freiesleben, Pernille; Marmuse, Laurence; Fort, Sébastien; Cottaz, Sylvain; Driguez, Hugues; Henrissat, Bernard; Lenfant, Nicolas; Tuna, Floriana; Baldansuren, Amgalanbaatar; Davies, Gideon J; Lo Leggio, Leila; Walton, Paul H

    2016-04-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-containing enzymes that oxidatively break down recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose and chitin. Since their discovery, LPMOs have become integral factors in the industrial utilization of biomass, especially in the sustainable generation of cellulosic bioethanol. We report here a structural determination of an LPMO-oligosaccharide complex, yielding detailed insights into the mechanism of action of these enzymes. Using a combination of structure and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we reveal the means by which LPMOs interact with saccharide substrates. We further uncover electronic and structural features of the enzyme active site, showing how LPMOs orchestrate the reaction of oxygen with polysaccharide chains. PMID:26928935

  11. Mechanistic Studies on the Hydroxylation of Methane by Methane Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Baik, Mu-Hyun; Newcomb, Martin; Friesner, Richard A.; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2003-05-17

    Methanotrophs are bacteria that live on methane as their only source of carbon.1 The first step in their utilization of this simplest of all hydrocarbons is its selective conversion to methanol. Subsequent biochemical pathways transform methanol to formaldehyde, which in turn is processed into biomass. Further oxidation of formaldehyde to carbon dioxide provides energy that is stored for later use as NADH.2 The conversion of methane to methanol is catalyzed at the active site of a metalloenzyme known as methane monooxygenase, or MMO.3-9

  12. On the catalytic mechanisms of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Walton, Paul H; Davies, Gideon J

    2016-04-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are recently discovered copper-containing oxygenases. LPMOs oxidise recalcitrant polysaccharides such as chitin and cellulose, thereby making these substrates more tractable to canonical chitinase or cellulase action. As such, LPMOs are attracting much attention not only for their capacity to greatly increase the efficiency of production of cellulosic-based biofuels, but also for the new questions they pose about the mechanisms of biological oxidation of recalcitrant substrates. This review draws together the current thinking on the catalytic mechanisms of LPMOs and other copper catalysed oxygenations and provides a blueprint for further investigation into the mechanisms of action of these intriguing enzymes. PMID:27094791

  13. The framework of polysaccharide monooxygenase structure and chemistry.

    PubMed

    Span, Elise A; Marletta, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Polysaccharide monooxygenases, or PMOs (also known as lytic PMOs or LPMOs), are a group of enzymes discovered in recent years to catalyze the oxidative degradation of carbohydrate polymers. The PMO catalytic domain has a β-sandwich fold that bears a strong resemblance to both immunoglobulin (Ig) and fibronectin type III (FnIII) domains. PMOs are secreted by fungi and bacteria, and there is recent evidence for their roles in pathogenesis, in addition to biomass processing. This review addresses the biological origins and functions of emerging PMO families, as well as describes the aspects of PMO structure that support the chemistry of copper-catalyzed, oxidative polysaccharide degradation. PMID:26615470

  14. Bacterial expression of human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: solubility, activity, purification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K; Mole, D J; Binnie, M; Homer, N Z M; Zheng, X; Yard, B A; Iredale, J P; Auer, M; Webster, S P

    2014-03-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme central to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. KMO has been implicated as a therapeutic target in several disease states, including Huntington's disease. Recombinant human KMO protein production is challenging due to the presence of transmembrane domains, which localise KMO to the outer mitochondrial membrane and render KMO insoluble in many in vitro expression systems. Efficient bacterial expression of human KMO would accelerate drug development of KMO inhibitors but until now this has not been achieved. Here we report the first successful bacterial (Escherichia coli) expression of active FLAG™-tagged human KMO enzyme expressed in the soluble fraction and progress towards its purification. PMID:24316190

  15. The metal centres of particulate methane mono-oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2008-12-01

    pMMO (particulate methane mono-oxygenase) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that catalyses the oxidation of methane to methanol. The pMMO metal active site has not been identified, precluding detailed investigation of the reaction mechanism. Models for the metal centres proposed by various research groups have evolved as crystallographic and spectroscopic data have become available. The present review traces the evolution of these active-site models before and after the 2005 Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) pMMO crystal structure determination. PMID:19021511

  16. Role of flavin-containing monooxygenase in drug development.

    PubMed

    Cashman, John R

    2008-12-01

    This review summarizes some recent observations and information related to the role of the flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) in preclinical drug development. Flavin-containing monooxygenase is a complimentary enzyme system to the cytochrome P450 (CYP) family of enzymes and oxygenates several soft, highly polarizable nucleophilic heteroatom-containing chemicals and drugs. The products of FMO-mediated metabolism are generally benign and highly polar, readily excreted materials. There may be some advantages in designing drugs that are metabolized in part by FMO and not exclusively by CYP. In this review, I describe the practical aspects for the participation of FMO in drug and chemical metabolism including: i) the study of FMO using in vitro preparations; ii) some observations about metabolism of drugs and chemicals by FMO in vivo; and iii) the consequences of studying FMO-related metabolism in various small animal models. Some of the preclinical research and development areas related to FMO are not fully mature areas and there are certain gaps in our knowledge. However, I include discussion of these areas to stimulate further work and invite further discussion. PMID:19040327

  17. The methane monooxygenase intrinsic activity of kinds of methanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingxin; Xin, Jiaying; Chen, Linlin; Xia, Chungu

    2009-06-01

    Methanotrophs have promising applications in the epoxidation of some alkenes and some chlorinated hydrocarbons and in the production of a biopolymer, poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate; PHB). In contrast with methane monooxygenase (MMO) activity and ability of PHB synthesis of four kinds of methanotrophic bacteria Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, M. trichosporium IMV3011, Methylococcus capsulatus HD6T, Methylomonas sp. GYJ3, and the mixture of the four kinds of strains, M. trichosporium OB3b is the highest of the four in the activity of propene epoxidation (10.72 nmol/min mg dry weight of cell [dwc]), the activity of naphthalene oxidation (22.7 mmol/mg dwc), and ability in synthesis of PHB(11% PHB content in per gram dry weight of cell in 84 h). It could be feasible to improve the MMO activity by mixing four kinds of methanotrophs. The MMO activity dramatically decreased when the cellular PHB accumulated in the second stage. The reason for this may be the dilution of the MMO system in the cells with increasing PHB contents. It has been found that the PHB contents at the level of 1-5% are beneficial to the cells for maintenance of MMO epoxidation activity when enough PHB have been accumulated. Moreover, it was also found that high particulate methane monooxygenase activity may contribute to the synthesis of PHB in the cell, which could be used to improve the yield of PHB in methanotrophs. PMID:19052919

  18. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Dependent Induction of Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase mRNAs in Mouse LiverS

    PubMed Central

    Celius, Trine; Roblin, Steven; Harper, Patricia A.; Matthews, Jason; Boutros, Paul C.; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Okey, Allan B.

    2016-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) are important in detoxication but generally are considered not to be inducible by xenobiotics. Our recent microarray studies revealed induction of FMO2 and FMO3 mRNAs by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in liver of mice with wild-type aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) but not in Ahr-null mice. The aim of the present study was to delineate mechanisms of FMO regulation. In adult male mice, basal FMO3 mRNA is low but was induced 6-fold at 4 h and 6000-fold at 24 h. The ED50 was approximately 1 μg/kg for FMO2 and FMO3, similar to that for the classic AHR-regulated gene, Cyp1a1. In adult female mice basal FMO3 mRNA is high and was not induced at 4 h but was elevated 8-fold at 24 h. FMO5 mRNA was significantly down-regulated by TCDD in both male and female adult mice. Juvenile mice show no sex difference in response to TCDD; FMO3 was induced 4 to 6-fold by TCDD in both sexes. Chromatin immuno-precipitation demonstrated recruitment of AHR and aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator proteins to Fmo3 regulatory regions, suggesting that induction by TCDD is a primary AHR-mediated event. Although FMO2 and FMO3 mRNAs were highly induced by TCDD in adult males, overall FMO catalytic activity increased only modestly. In contrast to the striking up-regulation of FMO2 and FMO3 in mouse liver, TCDD has little effect on FMO mRNA in rat liver. However, FMO2 and FMO3 mRNAs were highly induced in transgenic mice that express wild-type rat AHR, indicating that lack of induction in rat is not due to an incompetent AHR in this species. PMID:18765683

  19. Analysis of the gene cluster encoding toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoni, G.; Martino, M.; Galli, E.; Barbieri, P.

    1998-10-01

    The toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase cloned from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 displays a very broad range of substrates and a very peculiar regioselectivity, because it is able to hydroxylate more than one position on the aromatic ring of several hydrocarbons and phenols. The nucleotide sequence of the gene cluster coding for this enzymatic system has been determined. The sequence analysis revealed the presence of six open reading frames (ORFs) homologous to other genes clustered in operons coding for multicomponent monooxygenases found in benzene- and toluene-degradative pathways cloned from Pseudomonas strains. Significant similarities were also found with multicomponent monooxygenase systems for phenol, methane, alkene, and dimethyl sulfide cloned from different bacterial strains. The knockout of each ORF and complementation with the wild-type allele indicated that all six ORFs are essential for the full activity of the toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase in Escherichia coli. This analysis also shows that despite its activity on both hydrocarbons and phenols, toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase belongs to a toluene multicomponent monooxygenase subfamily rather than to the monooxygenases active on phenols.

  20. Characterization of the peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) from the venom ducts of neogastropods, Conus bullatus and Conus geographus

    PubMed Central

    Ul-Hasan, Sabah; Burgess, Daniel M.; Gajewiak, Joanna; Li, Qing; Hu, Hao; Yandell, Mark; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K.

    2014-01-01

    Cone snails, genus Conus, are predatory marine snails that use venom to capture their prey. This venom contains a diverse array of peptide toxins, known as conotoxins, which undergo a diverse set of posttranslational modifications. Amidating enzymes modify peptides and proteins containing a C-terminal glycine residue, resulting in loss of the glycine residue and amidation of the preceding residue. A significant fraction of peptides present in the venom of cone snails contain C-terminal amidated residues, which are important for optimizing biological activity. This study describes the characterization of the amidating enzyme, peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), present in the venom duct of cone snails, Conus bullatus and Conus geographus. PAM is known to carry out two functions, peptidyl α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) and peptidylamido-glycolate lyase (PAL). In some animals, such as Drosophila melanogaster, these two functions are present in separate polypeptides, working as individual enzymes. In other animals, such as mammals and in Aplysia californica, PAM activity resides in a single, bifunctional polypeptide. Using specific oligonucleotide primers and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction we have identified and cloned from the venom duct cDNA library, a cDNA with 49% homology to PAM from A. californica. We have determined that both the PHM and PAL activities are encoded in one mRNA polynucleotide in both C. bullatus and C. geographus. We have directly demonstrated enzymatic activity catalyzing the conversion of dansyl-YVG-COOH to dansyl-YV-NH2 in cloned cDNA expressed in Drosophila S2 cells. PMID:23994590

  1. Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase activity in human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, G.D.; Schuresko, D.D.

    1981-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase (AHM), an enzyme of key importance in metabolism of xenobiotic chemicals such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA), is present in human lymphocytes. Studies investing the relation of activity of AHM in human lymphocytes to parameters such as disease state, PNA exposure, in vitro mitogen stimulation, etc. have been summarized in this report. Some studies have demonstrated increased AHM activity in lymphocytes from cigarette smokers (compared to nonsmokers), and in lung cancer patients when compared to appropriate control groups. These observations are confused by extreme variability in human lymphocyte AHM activities, such variability arising from factors such as genetic variation in AHM activity, variation in in vitro culture conditions which affect AHM activity, and the problematical relationship of common AHM assays to actual PNA metabolism taking place in lymphocytes. If some of the foregoing problems can be adequately addressed, lymphocyte AHM activity could hold the promise of being a useful biomarker system for human PNA exposure.

  2. Determinants of regioselective hydroxylation in the fungal polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Vu, Van V; Beeson, William T; Phillips, Christopher M; Cate, Jamie H D; Marletta, Michael A

    2014-01-15

    The ubiquitous fungal polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs) (also known as GH61 proteins, LPMOs, and AA9 proteins) are structurally related but have significant variation in sequence. A heterologous expression method in Neurospora crassa was developed as a step toward connecting regioselectivity of the chemistry to PMO phylogeny. Activity assays, as well as sequence and phylogenetic analyses, showed that the majority of fungal PMOs fall into three major groups with distinctive active site surface features. PMO1s and PMO2s hydroxylate glycosidic positions C1 and C4, respectively. PMO3s hydroxylate both C1 and C4. A subgroup of PMO3s (PMO3*) hydroxylate C1. Mutagenesis studies showed that an extra subdomain of about 12 amino acids contribute to C4 oxidation in the PMO3 family. PMID:24350607

  3. Quantum Chemical Studies of Methane Monooxygenase: Comparison with P450

    SciTech Connect

    Guallar, Victor; Gherman, Benjamin F.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Friesner, Richard A.

    2002-04-01

    The catalytic pathways of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and cytochrome P450CAM, iron-containing enzymes, are described and compared. Recent extensive density functional ab initio electronic structure calculations have revealed many similarities in a number of the key catalytic steps, as well as some important differences. A particularly interesting and significant contrast is the role played by the protein in each system. For sMMO, the protein stabilizes various species in the catalytic cycle through a series of carboxylate shifts. This process is adequately described by a relatively compact model of the active site (similar to100 atoms), providing a reasonable description of the energetics of hydrogen atom abstraction. For P450CAM, in contrast, the inclusion of the full protein is necessary for an accurate description of the hydrogen atom abstraction.

  4. [Association of kynurenine-3-monooxygenase gene with schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Golimbet, V E; Lezheiko, T V; Alfimova, M V; Abramova, L I; Kondrat'ev, N V

    2014-06-01

    Neurotoxic products produced during tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway could be involved in schizophrenia pathogenesis. It has been shown that kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) is indirectly involved in these products' formation. KMO polymorphic loci rs2275163 (C/T) and rs1053230 (A/G) were examined in 187 schizophrenia patients and 229 healthy subjects. A genetic combination of allele T and genotype GG was observed more often in a patient group compared with healthy controls (p = 0.003, OR 2.0 (95% CI 1.2-2.9). In the latter group, this combination was associated with schizophrenia endophenotype (p = 0.04), which manifested in a higher expression of schizotypal personality traits assessed using the MMPI test. PMID:25715464

  5. Kynurenine-3-monooxygenase: a review of structure, mechanism, and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jason R; Jamie, Joanne F; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2016-02-01

    Kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme of the kynurenine (Kyn) pathway (KP), which is the major catabolic route of tryptophan. Kyn represents a branch point of the KP, being converted into the neurotoxin 3-hydroxykynurenine via KMO, neuroprotectant kynurenic acid, and anthranilic acid. As a result of this branch point, KMO is an attractive drug target for several neurodegenerative and/or neuroinflammatory diseases, especially Huntington's (HD), Alzheimer's (AD), and Parkinson's (PD) diseases. Although a neurological target, administration of KMO inhibitors in the periphery has demonstrated promising pharmacological results. In light of a recent crystal structure release and reports of preclinical candidates, here we provide a concise yet comprehensive update on the current state of research into the enzymology of KMO and related drug discovery efforts, highlighting areas where further work is required. PMID:26589832

  6. Acinetobacter cyclohexanone monooxygenase: gene cloning and sequence determination.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y C; Peoples, O P; Walsh, C T

    1988-01-01

    The gene coding for cyclohexanone monooxygenase from Acinetobacter sp. strain NCIB 9871 was isolated by immunological screening methods. We located and determined the nucleotide sequence of the gene. The structural gene is 1,626 nucleotides long and codes for a polypeptide of 542 amino acids; 389 nucleotides 5' and 108 nucleotides 3' of the coding region are also reported. The complete amino acid sequence of the enzyme was derived by translation of the nucleotide sequence. From a comparison of the amino acid sequence with consensus sequences of nucleotide-binding folds, we identified a potential flavin-binding site at the NH2 terminus of the enzyme (residues 6 to 18) and a potential nicotinamide-binding site extending from residue 176 to residue 208 of the protein. An overproduction system for the gene to facilitate genetic manipulations was also constructed by using the tac promoter vector pKK223-3 in Escherichia coli. Images PMID:3338974

  7. Evolving P450pyr Monooxygenase for Regio- and Stereoselective Hydroxylations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Li, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    P450pyr monooxygenase from Sphingomonas sp. HXN-200 catalysed the regio- and stereoselective hydroxylation at a non-activated carbon atom, a useful but challenging reaction in classic chemistry, with unique substrate specificity for a number of alicyclic compounds. New P450pyr mutants were developed by directed evolution with improved catalytic performance, thus significantly extending the application of the P450pyr monooxygenase family in biohydroxylation to prepare useful and valuable chiral alcohols. Directed evolution of P450pyr created new enzymes with improved S-enantioselectivity or R-enantioselectivity for the hydroxylation of N-benzyl pyrrolidine, enhanced regioselectivity for the hydroxylation of N-benzyl pyrrolidinone, and increased enantioselectivity for the hydroxylation of N-benzyl piperidinone, respectively. Directed evolution of P450pyr generated also mutants with fully altered regioselectivity (from terminal to subterminal) and newly created excellent S-enantioselectivity for the biohydroxylation of n-octane and propylbenzene, respectively, providing new opportunities for the regio- and enantioselective alkane functionalization. New P450pyr mutants were engineered as the first catalyst for highly selective terminal hydroxylation of n-butanol to 1,4-butanediol. Several novel, accurate, sensitive, simple, and HTS assays based on colorimetric or MS detection for measuring the enantio- and/or regioselectivity of hydroxylation were developed and proven to be practical in directed evolution. The P450pyr X-ray structure was obtained and used to guide the evolution. In silico modelling and substrate docking provided some insight into the influence of several important amino acid mutations of the engineered P450pyr mutants on the altered or enhanced regio- and enantioselectivity as well as new substrate acceptance. The obtained information and knowledge is useful for further engineering of P450pyr for other hydroxylations and oxidations. PMID:26507217

  8. Monooxygenase Substrates Mimic Flavin to Catalyze Cofactorless Oxygenations.

    PubMed

    Machovina, Melodie M; Usselman, Robert J; DuBois, Jennifer L

    2016-08-19

    Members of the antibiotic biosynthesis monooxygenase family catalyze O2-dependent oxidations and oxygenations in the absence of any metallo- or organic cofactor. How these enzymes surmount the kinetic barrier to reactions between singlet substrates and triplet O2 is unclear, but the reactions have been proposed to occur via a flavin-like mechanism, where the substrate acts in lieu of a flavin cofactor. To test this model, we monitored the uncatalyzed and enzymatic reactions of dithranol, a substrate for the nogalamycin monooxygenase (NMO) from Streptomyces nogalater As with flavin, dithranol oxidation was faster at a higher pH, although the reaction did not appear to be base-catalyzed. Rather, conserved asparagines contributed to suppression of the substrate pKa The same residues were critical for enzymatic catalysis that, consistent with the flavoenzyme model, occurred via an O2-dependent slow step. Evidence for a superoxide/substrate radical pair intermediate came from detection of enzyme-bound superoxide during turnover. Small molecule and enzymatic superoxide traps suppressed formation of the oxygenation product under uncatalyzed conditions, whereas only the small molecule trap had an effect in the presence of NMO. This suggested that NMO both accelerated the formation and directed the recombination of a superoxide/dithranyl radical pair. These catalytic strategies are in some ways flavin-like and stand in contrast to the mechanisms of urate oxidase and (1H)-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, both cofactor-independent enzymes that surmount the barriers to direct substrate/O2 reactivity via markedly different means. PMID:27307041

  9. Effects of bromocriptine on hepatic cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase system.

    PubMed

    Moochhala, S M; Lee, E J; Hu, G T; Koh, O S; Becket, G

    1989-02-01

    We have evaluated the in vitro effects of bromocriptine (Br), on the hepatic cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase system of rats pretreated with saline phenobarbitone (PB) and beta-naphthoflavone (BNF). Br inhibited ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (EROD) activity in liver microsomes of rats pretreated with saline and PB but not in BNF pretreated animals. Maximum inhibition of EROD activity by Br in the microsomes of saline and PB pretreated rats were 50%-60% of the control. In contrast, a dual effect was observed on aminopyrine N-demethylase activity (APD) by Br in microsomes of saline, PB and BNF pretreated rats. At a low concentration (25 microM), Br inhibited the activity of APD to a similar extent in all pretreatment groups; however, with higher concentrations of Br (50 microM to 300 microM), enhancement of APD activity was observed. Br (300 microM) increased the APD activity to 2-3 times the control level in microsomes of rats pretreated with saline, PB or BNF. Spectral studies revealed a Type II binding of Br to cytochrome P-450 from microsomes of saline and PB pretreated rats. A reverse type I binding was observed for BNF induced microsomes. In addition, Br also enhanced NADPH cytochrome c (P-450) reductase activity to a similar extent in all pretreatment groups. These results suggest that the inhibition of EROD activity may be due to direct binding by Br to certain isozymes of cytochrome P-450 and that the enhancing effect of Br on APD activity may be in part due to the activation of the NADPH cytochrome c reductase component of the cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase system. PMID:2499727

  10. Trichloroethylene oxidation by purified toluene 2-monooxygenase: products, kinetics, and turnover-dependent inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, L M; Wackett, L P

    1997-01-01

    Trichloroethylene is oxidized by several types of nonspecific bacterial oxygenases. Toluene 2-monooxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia G4 is implicated in trichloroethylene oxidation and is uniquely suggested to be resistant to turnover-dependent inactivation in vivo. In this work, the oxidation of trichloroethylene was studied with purified toluene 2-monooxygenase. All three purified toluene 2-monooxygenase protein components and NADH were required to reconstitute full trichloroethylene oxidation activity in vitro. The apparent Km and Vmax were 12 microM and 37 nmol per min per mg of hydroxylase component, respectively. Ten percent of the full activity was obtained when the small-molecular-weight enzyme component was omitted. The stable oxidation products, accounting for 84% of the trichloroethylene oxidized, were carbon monoxide, formic acid, glyoxylic acid, and covalently modified oxygenase proteins that constituted 12% of the reacted [14C]trichloroethylene. The stable oxidation products may all derive from the unstable intermediate trichloroethylene epoxide that was trapped by reaction with 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine. Chloral hydrate and dichloroacetic acid were not detected. This finding differs from that with soluble methane monooxygenase and cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase, which produce chloral hydrate. Trichloroethylene-dependent inactivation of toluene 2-monooxygenase activity was observed. All of the protein components were covalently modified during the oxidation of trichloroethylene. The addition of cysteine to reaction mixtures partially protected the enzyme system against inactivation, most notably protecting the NADH-oxidoreductase component. This suggested the participation of diffusible intermediates in the inactivation of the oxidoreductase. PMID:8981984

  11. Coupling Oxygen Consumption with Hydrocarbon Oxidation in Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weixue; Liang, Alexandria D; Lippard, Stephen J

    2015-09-15

    A fundamental goal in catalysis is the coupling of multiple reactions to yield a desired product. Enzymes have evolved elegant approaches to address this grand challenge. A salient example is the biological conversion of methane to methanol catalyzed by soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO), a member of the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) superfamily. sMMO is a dynamic protein complex of three components: a hydroxylase, a reductase, and a regulatory protein. The active site, a carboxylate-rich non-heme diiron center, is buried inside the 251 kDa hydroxylase component. The enzyme processes four substrates: O2, protons, electrons, and methane. To couple O2 activation to methane oxidation, timely control of substrate access to the active site is critical. Recent studies of sMMO, as well as its homologues in the BMM superfamily, have begun to unravel the mechanism. The emerging and unifying picture reveals that each substrate gains access to the active site along a specific pathway through the hydroxylase. Electrons and protons are delivered via a three-amino-acid pore located adjacent to the diiron center; O2 migrates via a series of hydrophobic cavities; and hydrocarbon substrates reach the active site through a channel or linked set of cavities. The gating of these pathways mediates entry of each substrate to the diiron active site in a timed sequence and is coordinated by dynamic interactions with the other component proteins. The result is coupling of dioxygen consumption with hydrocarbon oxidation, avoiding unproductive oxidation of the reductant rather than the desired hydrocarbon. To initiate catalysis, the reductase delivers two electrons to the diiron(III) center by binding over the pore of the hydroxylase. The regulatory component then displaces the reductase, docking onto the same surface of the hydroxylase. Formation of the hydroxylase-regulatory component complex (i) induces conformational changes of pore residues that may bring protons to the

  12. Inhibition of ammonia monooxygenase in Nitrosomonas europaea by carbon disulfide.

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, M R; Kim, C Y; Arp, D J

    1990-01-01

    Carbon disulfide has long been recognized as a potent inhibitor of nitrification, and it is the likely active component in several nitrification inhibitors suitable for field use. The effects of this compound on Nitrosomonas europaea have been investigated, and the site of action has been determined. Low concentrations of CS2 (less than 400 microM) produced a time-dependent inhibition of ammonia-dependent O2 uptake but did not inhibit hydrazine-oxidizing activity. CS2 also produced distinct changes in difference spectra of whole cells. These results suggest that ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) is the site of action of CS2. Unlike the case for thiourea and acetylene, saturating concentrations of CS2 did not fully inhibit AMO, and the inhibition resulted in a low but significant rate of ammonia-dependent O2 uptake. The effects of CS2 were not competitive with respect to ammonia concentration, and the inhibition by CS2 did not require the turnover of AMO to take effect. The ability of CS2-treated cells to incorporate [14C]acetylene into the 28-kilodalton polypeptide of AMO was used to demonstrate that the effects of CS2 are compatible with a mode of action which involves a reduction of the rate of turnover of AMO without effects on the catalytic mechanism. It is proposed that CS2 may act on AMO by reversibly reacting with a suitable nucleophilic amino acid in close proximity to the active site copper. Images PMID:2118501

  13. Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase: An Influential Mediator of Neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Jennifer M.; O’Connor, Jason C.

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence demonstrates that kynurenine metabolism may play an important pathogenic role in the development of multiple neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. The kynurenine pathway consists of two functionally distinct branches that generate both neuroactive and oxidatively reactive metabolites. In the brain, the rate-limiting enzyme for one of these branches, kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), is predominantly expressed in microglia and has emerged as a pivotal point of metabolic regulation. KMO substrate and expression levels are upregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and altered by functional genetic mutations. Increased KMO metabolism results in the formation of metabolites that activate glutamate receptors and elevate oxidative stress, while recent evidence has revealed neurodevelopmental consequences of reduced KMO activity. Together, the evidence suggests that KMO is positioned at a critical metabolic junction to influence the development or trajectory of a myriad of neurological diseases. Understanding the mechanism(s) by which alterations in KMO activity are able to impair neuronal function, and viability will enhance our knowledge of related disease pathology and provide insight into novel therapeutic opportunities. This review will discuss the influence of KMO on brain kynurenine metabolism and the current understanding of molecular mechanisms by which altered KMO activity may contribute to neurodevelopment, neurodegenerative, and neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:26347662

  14. Structural basis for pregnenolone biosynthesis by the mitochondrial monooxygenase system

    SciTech Connect

    Strushkevich, Natallia; MacKenzie, Farrell; Cherkesova, Tatyana; Grabovec, Irina; Usanov, Sergey; Park, Hee-Won

    2011-09-06

    In humans, the precursor to all steroid hormones, pregnenolone, is synthesized from cholesterol by an enzyme complex comprising adrenodoxin reductase (AdR), adrenodoxin (Adx), and a cytochrome P450 (P450scc or CYP11A1). This complex not only plays a key role in steroidogenesis, but also has long been a model to study electron transfer, multistep catalysis, and C-C bond cleavage performed by monooxygenases. Detailed mechanistic understanding of these processes has been hindered by a lack of structural information. Here we present the crystal structure of the complex of human Adx and CYP11A1 - the first of a complex between a eukaryotic CYP and its redox partner. The structures with substrate and a series of reaction intermediates allow us to define the mechanism underlying sequential hydroxylations of the cholesterol and suggest the mechanism of C-C bond cleavage. In the complex the [2Fe-2S] cluster of Adx is positioned 17.4 {angstrom} away from the heme iron of CYP11A1. This structure suggests that after an initial protein-protein association driven by electrostatic forces, the complex adopts an optimized geometry between the redox centers. Conservation of the interaction interface suggests that this mechanism is common for all mitochondrial P450s.

  15. Diversity and evolution of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in Oomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Sello, Mopeli Marshal; Jafta, Norventia; Nelson, David R; Chen, Wanping; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Parvez, Mohammad; Kgosiemang, Ipeleng Kopano Rosinah; Monyaki, Richie; Raselemane, Seiso Caiphus; Qhanya, Lehlohonolo Benedict; Mthakathi, Ntsane Trevor; Sitheni Mashele, Samson; Syed, Khajamohiddin

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are heme-thiolate proteins whose role as drug targets against pathogens, as well as in valuable chemical production and bioremediation, has been explored. In this study we performed comprehensive comparative analysis of P450s in 13 newly explored oomycete pathogens. Three hundred and fifty-six P450s were found in oomycetes. These P450s were grouped into 15 P450 families and 84 P450 subfamilies. Among these, nine P450 families and 31 P450 subfamilies were newly found in oomycetes. Research revealed that oomycetes belonging to different orders contain distinct P450 families and subfamilies in their genomes. Evolutionary analysis and sequence homology data revealed P450 family blooms in oomycetes. Tandem arrangement of a large number of P450s belonging to the same family indicated that P450 family blooming is possibly due to its members’ duplications. A unique combination of amino acid patterns was observed at EXXR and CXG motifs for the P450 families CYP5014, CYP5015 and CYP5017. A novel P450 fusion protein (CYP5619 family) with an N-terminal P450 domain fused to a heme peroxidase/dioxygenase domain was discovered in Saprolegnia declina. Oomycete P450 patterns suggested host influence in shaping their P450 content. This manuscript serves as reference for future P450 annotations in newly explored oomycetes. PMID:26129850

  16. Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase: An Influential Mediator of Neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Jennifer M; O'Connor, Jason C

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence demonstrates that kynurenine metabolism may play an important pathogenic role in the development of multiple neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. The kynurenine pathway consists of two functionally distinct branches that generate both neuroactive and oxidatively reactive metabolites. In the brain, the rate-limiting enzyme for one of these branches, kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), is predominantly expressed in microglia and has emerged as a pivotal point of metabolic regulation. KMO substrate and expression levels are upregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and altered by functional genetic mutations. Increased KMO metabolism results in the formation of metabolites that activate glutamate receptors and elevate oxidative stress, while recent evidence has revealed neurodevelopmental consequences of reduced KMO activity. Together, the evidence suggests that KMO is positioned at a critical metabolic junction to influence the development or trajectory of a myriad of neurological diseases. Understanding the mechanism(s) by which alterations in KMO activity are able to impair neuronal function, and viability will enhance our knowledge of related disease pathology and provide insight into novel therapeutic opportunities. This review will discuss the influence of KMO on brain kynurenine metabolism and the current understanding of molecular mechanisms by which altered KMO activity may contribute to neurodevelopment, neurodegenerative, and neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:26347662

  17. Effects of Zinc on Particulate Methane Monooxygenase Activity and Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Sirajuddin, Sarah; Barupala, Dulmini; Helling, Stefan; Marcus, Katrin; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is a membrane-bound metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. Zinc is a known inhibitor of pMMO, but the details of zinc binding and the mechanism of inhibition are not understood. Metal binding and activity assays on membrane-bound pMMO from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) reveal that zinc inhibits pMMO at two sites that are distinct from the copper active site. The 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure of Methylocystis species strain Rockwell pMMO reveals two previously undetected bound lipids, and metal soaking experiments identify likely locations for the two zinc inhibition sites. The first is the crystallographic zinc site in the pmoC subunit, and zinc binding here leads to the ordering of 10 previously unobserved residues. A second zinc site is present on the cytoplasmic side of the pmoC subunit. Parallels between these results and zinc inhibition studies of several respiratory complexes suggest that zinc might inhibit proton transfer in pMMO. PMID:24942740

  18. Architecture and active site of particulate methane monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Culpepper, Megen A.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria, organisms that live on methane gas as their sole carbon source. Understanding pMMO function has important implications for bioremediation applications and for the development of new, environmentally friendly catalysts for the direct conversion of methane to methanol. Crystal structures of pMMOs from three different methanotrophs reveal a trimeric architecture, consisting of three copies each of the pmoB, pmoA, and pmoC subunits. There are three distinct metal centers in each protomer of the trimer, mononuclear and dinuclear copper sites in the periplasmic regions of pmoB and a mononuclear site within the membrane that can be occupied by copper or zinc. Various models for the pMMO active site have been proposed within these structural constraints, including dicopper, tricopper, and diiron centers. Biochemical and spectroscopic data on pMMO and recombinant soluble fragments, denoted spmoB proteins, indicate that the active site involves copper and is located at the site of the dicopper center in the pmoB subunit. Initial spectroscopic evidence for O2 binding at this site has been obtained. Despite these findings, questions remain about the active site identity and nuclearity and will be the focus of future studies. PMID:22725967

  19. Effects of zinc on particulate methane monooxygenase activity and structure.

    PubMed

    Sirajuddin, Sarah; Barupala, Dulmini; Helling, Stefan; Marcus, Katrin; Stemmler, Timothy L; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2014-08-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is a membrane-bound metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. Zinc is a known inhibitor of pMMO, but the details of zinc binding and the mechanism of inhibition are not understood. Metal binding and activity assays on membrane-bound pMMO from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) reveal that zinc inhibits pMMO at two sites that are distinct from the copper active site. The 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure of Methylocystis species strain Rockwell pMMO reveals two previously undetected bound lipids, and metal soaking experiments identify likely locations for the two zinc inhibition sites. The first is the crystallographic zinc site in the pmoC subunit, and zinc binding here leads to the ordering of 10 previously unobserved residues. A second zinc site is present on the cytoplasmic side of the pmoC subunit. Parallels between these results and zinc inhibition studies of several respiratory complexes suggest that zinc might inhibit proton transfer in pMMO. PMID:24942740

  20. Mechanism of Action of a Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Eswaramoorthy,S.; Bonanno, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    Elimination of nonnutritional and insoluble compounds is a critical task for any living organism. Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) attach an oxygen atom to the insoluble nucleophilic compounds to increase solubility and thereby increase excretion. Here we analyze the functional mechanism of FMO from Schizosaccharomyces pombe using the crystal structures of the wild type and protein-cofactor and protein-substrate complexes. The structure of the wild-type FMO revealed that the prosthetic group FAD is an integral part of the protein. FMO needs NADPH as a cofactor in addition to the prosthetic group for its catalytic activity. Structures of the protein-cofactor and protein-substrate complexes provide insights into mechanism of action. We propose that FMOs exist in the cell as a complex with a reduced form of the prosthetic group and NADPH cofactor, readying them to act on substrates. The 4{alpha}-hydroperoxyflavin form of the prosthetic group represents a transient intermediate of the monooxygenation process. The oxygenated and reduced forms of the prosthetic group help stabilize interactions with cofactor and substrate alternately to permit continuous enzyme turnover.

  1. Assay, Purification, and Partial Characterization of Choline Monooxygenase from Spinach.

    PubMed Central

    Burnet, M.; Lafontaine, P. J.; Hanson, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    The osmoprotectant glycine betaine is synthesized via the path-way choline -> betaine aldehyde -> glycine betaine. In spinach (Spinacia oleracea), the first step is catalyzed by choline monooxygenase (CMO), and the second is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase. Because betaine aldehyde is unstable and not easily detected, we developed a coupled radiometric assay for CMO. [14C]Choline is used as substrate; NAD+ and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase prepared from Escherichia coli are added to oxidize [14C]betaine aldehyde to [14C]glycine betaine, which is isolated by ion exchange. The assay was used in the purification of CMO from leaves of salinized spinach. The 10-step procedure included polyethylene glycol precipitation, polyethyleneimine precipitation, hydrophobic interaction, anion exchange on choline-Sepharose, dimethyldiethanolamine-Sepharose, and Mono Q, hydroxyapatite, gel filtration, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Following gel filtration, overall purification was about 600-fold and recovery of activity was 0.5%. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 45 kD. Taken with the value of 98 kD estimated for native CMO (R. Brouquisse, P. Weigel, D. Rhodes, C.F. Yocum, A.D. Hanson [1989] Plant Physiol 90: 322-329), this indicates that CMO is a homodimer. CMO preparations were red-brown, showed absorption maxima at 329 and 459 nm, and lost color upon dithionite addition, suggesting that CMO is an iron-sulfur protein. PMID:12228495

  2. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase inhibition in blood ameliorates neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zwilling, Daniel; Huang, Shao-Yi; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V.; Notarangelo, Francesca M.; Guidetti, Paolo; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Lee, Jason; Truong, Jennifer; Andrews-Zwilling, Yaisa; Hsieh, Eric W.; Louie, Jamie Y.; Wu, Tiffany; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Patrick, Christina; Adame, Anthony; Giorgini, Flaviano; Moussaoui, Saliha; Laue, Grit; Rassoulpour, Arash; Flik, Gunnar; Huang, Yadong; Muchowski, Joseph M.; Masliah, Eliezer; Schwarcz, Robert; Muchowski, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Metabolites in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation are thought to play an important role in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease. Metabolites that cause glutamate receptor-mediated excitotoxicity and free radical formation are elevated in the blood and vulnerable brain regions in these diseases, while levels of the neuroprotective metabolite kynurenic acid are often decreased. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of JM6, a novel small-molecule pro-drug inhibitor of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO). JM6 raises kynurenic acid and reduces extracellular glutamate in the brain after chronic oral administration by inhibiting KMO in blood. In a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, JM6 prevented spatial memory deficits, anxiety-related behavior, and synaptic loss. JM6 also extended life span, prevented synaptic loss, and decreased microglial activation in a mouse model of Huntington’s disease. These findings support a critical link between blood cells and neurodegeneration that is mediated by KMO and the kynurenine pathway. PMID:21640374

  3. Activation of enzymatic chitin degradation by a lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Hamre, Anne Grethe; Eide, Kristine B; Wold, Hanne H; Sørlie, Morten

    2015-04-30

    For decades, the enzymatic conversion of recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose and chitin was thought to solely rely on the synergistic action of hydrolytic enzymes, but recent work has shown that lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are important contributors to this process. Here, we have examined the initial rate enhancement an LPMO (CBP21) has on the hydrolytic enzymes (ChiA, ChiB, and ChiC) of the chitinolytic machinery of Serratia marcescens through determinations of apparent k(cat) (k(cat)(app)) values on a β-chitin substrate. k(cat)(app) values were determined to be 1.7±0.1 s(-1) and 1.7±0.1 s(-1) for the exo-active ChiA and ChiB, respectively and 1.2±0.1 s(-1) for the endo-active ChiC. The addition of CBP21 boosted the k(cat)(app) values of ChiA and ChiB giving values of 11.1±1.5 s(-1) and 13.9±1.4 s(-1), while there was no effect on ChiC (0.9±0.1 s(-1)). PMID:25812992

  4. Isoform distinct time-, dose-, and castration-dependent alterations in flavin-containing monooxygenase expression in mouse liver after 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Novick, Rachel M.; Vezina, Chad M.; Elfarra, Adnan A.

    2010-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) expression in male mouse liver is altered after 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure or castration. Because TCDD is slowly eliminated from the body, we examined hepatic Fmo mRNA alterations for up to 32 days following 10 or 64 µg/kg TCDD exposure by oral gavage in male C57BL/6J mice. Fmo2 mRNA was significantly induced at 1, 4, and 8 days whereas Fmo3 mRNA was also induced at 32 days relative to controls. Fmo3 mRNA levels exhibited a dose-dependent increase at 4, 8, and 32 days after exposure; Fmo1, Fmo4, and Fmo5 mRNA did not exhibit clear trends. Because castration alone also increased Fmo2, Fmo3, and Fmo4 mRNA we examined the combined effects of castration and TCDD treatment on FMO expression. A greater than additive effect was observed with Fmo2 and Fmo3 mRNA expression. Fmo2 mRNA exhibited a 3–5 fold increase after castration or 10 µg/kg TCDD exposure by oral gavage, whereas an approximately 20-fold increase was observed between the sham-castrated control and castrated TCDD-treated mice. Similarly, treatment with 10 µg/kg TCDD alone increased Fmo3 mRNA 130- and 180-fold in the sham-castrated and castrated mice compared to their controls respectively, whereas, Fmo3 mRNA increased approximately 1900-fold between the sham control and castrated TCDD-treated mice. An increase in hepatic Fmo3 protein in TCDD treated mice was observed by immunoblotting and assaying methionine S-oxidase activity. Collectively, these results provide evidence for isoform distinct time-, dose-, and castration-dependent effects of TCDD on FMO expression and suggest cross-talk between TCDD and testosterone signal transduction pathways. PMID:20036217

  5. Tolerance to Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity in the Mouse Model of Autoprotection Is Associated with Induction of Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase-3 (FMO3) in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rudraiah, Swetha; Rohrer, Philip R.; Gurevich, Igor; Goedken, Michael J.; Rasmussen, Theodore; Hines, Ronald N.; Manautou, José E.

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) pretreatment with a hepatotoxic dose (400 mg/kg) in mice results in resistance to a second, higher dose (600 mg/kg) of APAP (APAP autoprotection). Recent microarray work by our group showed a drastic induction of liver flavin containing monooxygenase-3 (Fmo3) mRNA expression in our mouse model of APAP autoprotection. The role of liver Fmo3, which detoxifies xenobiotics, in APAP autoprotection is unknown. The purpose of this study was to characterize the gene regulation and protein expression of liver Fmo3 during APAP hepatotoxicity. The functional consequences of Fmo3 induction were also investigated. Plasma and livers were collected from male C57BL/6J mice over a period of 72 h following a single dose of APAP (400 mg/kg) to measure Fmo3 mRNA and protein expression. Although Fmo3 mRNA levels increased significantly following APAP treatment, protein expression changed marginally. In contrast, both Fmo3 mRNA and protein expression were significantly higher in APAP autoprotected livers. Unlike male C57BL/6J mice, female mice have ∼80-times higher constitutive Fmo3 mRNA levels and are highly resistant to APAP hepatotoxicity. Coadministration of APAP with the FMO inhibitor methimazole rendered female mice susceptible to APAP hepatotoxicity, with no changes in susceptibility detected in male mice. Furthermore, a human hepatocyte cell line (HC-04) clone over-expressing human FMO3 showed enhanced resistance to APAP cytotoxicity. Taken together, these findings establish for the first time induction of Fmo3 protein expression and function by xenobiotic treatment. Our results also indicate that Fmo3 expression and function plays a role in protecting the liver from APAP-induced toxicity. Although the mechanism(s) of this protection remains to be elucidated, this work describes a novel protective function for this enzyme. PMID:24973094

  6. THE BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF FERRET CAROTENE-9', 10'-MONOOXYGENASE CATALYZING CLEAVAGE OF CAROTENOIDS IN VITRO AND IN VIVO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that beta -carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase (CMO1) catalyzes the cleavage of beta -carotene at the central carbon 15, 15’-double bond, but cleaves lycopene with much lower activity. However, expressing the mouse carotene-9’,10’-monooxygenase (CMO2) in beta-carotene/lycopene...

  7. Transcriptional Regulation of the Grape Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase Gene CYP736B Expression in Response to Xylella fastidiosa Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are a group of versatile redox proteins that mediate the biosynthesis of lignins, terpenes, alkaloids, and a variety of other secondary compounds which act as plant defense agents. To determine if cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in defense response to...

  8. Selective Usage of Transcription Initiation and Polyadenylation Sites in Grape Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase Gene CYP736B Expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are versatile redox proteins that mediate biosynthesis of lignins, terpenes, alkaloids, and a variety of other secondary compounds as plant defense agents against a range of pathogens and insects. To determine if cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in the...

  9. Terpene hydroxylation with microbial cytochrome P450 monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Janocha, Simon; Schmitz, Daniela; Bernhardt, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoids comprise a highly diverse group of natural products. In addition to their basic carbon skeleton, they differ from one another in their functional groups. Functional groups attached to the carbon skeleton are the basis of the terpenoids' diverse properties. Further modifications of terpene olefins include the introduction of acyl-, aryl-, or sugar moieties and usually start with oxidations catalyzed by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s, CYPs). P450s are ubiquitously distributed throughout nature, involved in essential biological pathways such as terpenoid biosynthesis as well as the tailoring of terpenoids and other natural products. Their ability to introduce oxygen into nonactivated C-H bonds is unique and makes P450s very attractive for applications in biotechnology. Especially in the field of terpene oxidation, biotransformation methods emerge as an attractive alternative to classical chemical synthesis. For this reason, microbial P450s depict a highly interesting target for protein engineering approaches in order to increase selectivity and activity, respectively. Microbial P450s have been described to convert industrial and pharmaceutically interesting terpenoids such as ionones, limone, valencene, resin acids, and triterpenes (including steroids) as well as vitamin D3. Highly selective and active mutants have been evolved by applying classical site-directed mutagenesis as well as directed evolution of proteins. As P450s usually depend on electron transfer proteins, mutagenesis has also been applied to improve the interactions between P450s and their respective redox partners. This chapter provides an overview of terpenoid hydroxylation reactions catalyzed by bacterial P450s and highlights the achievements made by protein engineering to establish productive hydroxylation processes. PMID:25682070

  10. Membrane-associated methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, J A; DiSpirito, A A

    1996-01-01

    An active preparation of the membrane-associated methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath was isolated by ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography using dodecyl beta-D-maltoside as the detergent. The active preparation consisted of three major polypeptides with molecular masses of 47,000, 27,000, and 25,000 Da. Two of the three polypeptides (those with molecular masses of 47,000 and 27,000 Da) were identified as the polypeptides induced when cells expressing the soluble MMO are switched to culture medium in which the pMMO is expressed. The 27,000-Da polypeptide was identified as the acetylene-binding protein. The active enzyme complex contained 2.5 iron atoms and 14.5 copper atoms per 99,000 Da. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of the enzyme showed evidence for a type 2 copper center (g perpendicular = 2.057, g parallel = 2.24, and magnitude of A parallel = 172 G), a weak high-spin iron signal (g = 6.0), and a broad low-field (g = 12.5) signal. Treatment of the pMMO with nitric oxide produced the ferrous-nitric oxide derivative observed in the membrane fraction of cells expressing the pMMO. When duroquinol was used as a reductant, the specific activity of the purified enzyme was 11.1 nmol of propylene oxidized.min-1.mg of protein-1, which accounted for approximately 30% of the cell-free propylene oxidation activity. The activity was stimulated by ferric and cupric metal ions in addition to the cytochrome b-specific inhibitors myxothiazol and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide. PMID:8576034

  11. Membrane-associated methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Zahn, J A; DiSpirito, A A

    1996-02-01

    An active preparation of the membrane-associated methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath was isolated by ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography using dodecyl beta-D-maltoside as the detergent. The active preparation consisted of three major polypeptides with molecular masses of 47,000, 27,000, and 25,000 Da. Two of the three polypeptides (those with molecular masses of 47,000 and 27,000 Da) were identified as the polypeptides induced when cells expressing the soluble MMO are switched to culture medium in which the pMMO is expressed. The 27,000-Da polypeptide was identified as the acetylene-binding protein. The active enzyme complex contained 2.5 iron atoms and 14.5 copper atoms per 99,000 Da. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of the enzyme showed evidence for a type 2 copper center (g perpendicular = 2.057, g parallel = 2.24, and magnitude of A parallel = 172 G), a weak high-spin iron signal (g = 6.0), and a broad low-field (g = 12.5) signal. Treatment of the pMMO with nitric oxide produced the ferrous-nitric oxide derivative observed in the membrane fraction of cells expressing the pMMO. When duroquinol was used as a reductant, the specific activity of the purified enzyme was 11.1 nmol of propylene oxidized.min-1.mg of protein-1, which accounted for approximately 30% of the cell-free propylene oxidation activity. The activity was stimulated by ferric and cupric metal ions in addition to the cytochrome b-specific inhibitors myxothiazol and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide. PMID:8576034

  12. A family of starch-active polysaccharide monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Van V.; Beeson, William T.; Span, Elise A.; Farquhar, Erik R.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The recently discovered fungal and bacterial polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs) are capable of oxidatively cleaving chitin, cellulose, and hemicelluloses that contain β(1→4) linkages between glucose or substituted glucose units. They are also known collectively as lytic PMOs, or LPMOs, and individually as AA9 (formerly GH61), AA10 (formerly CBM33), and AA11 enzymes. PMOs share several conserved features, including a monocopper center coordinated by a bidentate N-terminal histidine residue and another histidine ligand. A bioinformatic analysis using these conserved features suggested several potential new PMO families in the fungus Neurospora crassa that are likely to be active on novel substrates. Herein, we report on NCU08746 that contains a C-terminal starch-binding domain and an N-terminal domain of previously unknown function. Biochemical studies showed that NCU08746 requires copper, oxygen, and a source of electrons to oxidize the C1 position of glycosidic bonds in starch substrates, but not in cellulose or chitin. Starch contains α(1→4) and α(1→6) linkages and exhibits higher order structures compared with chitin and cellulose. Cellobiose dehydrogenase, the biological redox partner of cellulose-active PMOs, can serve as the electron donor for NCU08746. NCU08746 contains one copper atom per protein molecule, which is likely coordinated by two histidine ligands as shown by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and sequence analysis. Results indicate that NCU08746 and homologs are starch-active PMOs, supporting the existence of a PMO superfamily with a much broader range of substrates. Starch-active PMOs provide an expanded perspective on studies of starch metabolism and may have potential in the food and starch-based biofuel industries. PMID:25201969

  13. A family of starch-active polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Vu, Van V; Beeson, William T; Span, Elise A; Farquhar, Erik R; Marletta, Michael A

    2014-09-23

    The recently discovered fungal and bacterial polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs) are capable of oxidatively cleaving chitin, cellulose, and hemicelluloses that contain β(1→4) linkages between glucose or substituted glucose units. They are also known collectively as lytic PMOs, or LPMOs, and individually as AA9 (formerly GH61), AA10 (formerly CBM33), and AA11 enzymes. PMOs share several conserved features, including a monocopper center coordinated by a bidentate N-terminal histidine residue and another histidine ligand. A bioinformatic analysis using these conserved features suggested several potential new PMO families in the fungus Neurospora crassa that are likely to be active on novel substrates. Herein, we report on NCU08746 that contains a C-terminal starch-binding domain and an N-terminal domain of previously unknown function. Biochemical studies showed that NCU08746 requires copper, oxygen, and a source of electrons to oxidize the C1 position of glycosidic bonds in starch substrates, but not in cellulose or chitin. Starch contains α(1→4) and α(1→6) linkages and exhibits higher order structures compared with chitin and cellulose. Cellobiose dehydrogenase, the biological redox partner of cellulose-active PMOs, can serve as the electron donor for NCU08746. NCU08746 contains one copper atom per protein molecule, which is likely coordinated by two histidine ligands as shown by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and sequence analysis. Results indicate that NCU08746 and homologs are starch-active PMOs, supporting the existence of a PMO superfamily with a much broader range of substrates. Starch-active PMOs provide an expanded perspective on studies of starch metabolism and may have potential in the food and starch-based biofuel industries. PMID:25201969

  14. Discovery and industrial applications of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Katja S

    2016-02-01

    The recent discovery of copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (LPMOs) has opened up a vast area of research covering several fields of application. The biotech company Novozymes A/S holds patents on the use of these enzymes for the conversion of steam-pre-treated plant residues such as straw to free sugars. These patents predate the correct classification of LPMOs and the striking synergistic effect of fungal LPMOs when combined with canonical cellulases was discovered when fractions of fungal secretomes were evaluated in industrially relevant enzyme performance assays. Today, LPMOs are a central component in the Cellic CTec enzyme products which are used in several large-scale plants for the industrial production of lignocellulosic ethanol. LPMOs are characterized by an N-terminal histidine residue which, together with an internal histidine and a tyrosine residue, co-ordinates a single copper atom in a so-called histidine brace. The mechanism by which oxygen binds to the reduced copper atom has been reported and the general mechanism of copper-oxygen-mediated activation of carbon is being investigated in the light of these discoveries. LPMOs are widespread in both the fungal and the bacterial kingdoms, although the range of action of these enzymes remains to be elucidated. However, based on the high abundance of LPMOs expressed by microbes involved in the decomposition of organic matter, the importance of LPMOs in the natural carbon-cycle is predicted to be significant. In addition, it has been suggested that LPMOs play a role in the pathology of infectious diseases such as cholera and to thus be relevant in the field of medicine. PMID:26862199

  15. A study of the hepatic microsomal monooxygenase of sea birds and its relationship to organochlorine pollutants.

    PubMed

    Knight, G C; Walker, C H

    1982-01-01

    1. The levels of hepatic microsomal monooxygenase in sea birds were determined using organochlorine substrates. Levels of cytochrome P450 and organochlorine residues were also measured. 2. The razorbill (Alca torda) and puffin (Fratercula arctica) showed highly variable activities which were resolved into multiple peaks on frequency diagrams. 3. The most active individuals amongst razorbills were early season females with large ovaries. 4. The properties of monooxygenase from individuals of low and high activity were compared. 5. The results are discussed in relation to PCB pollution. PMID:6128175

  16. Toluene 2-Monooxygenase-Dependent Growth of Burkholderia cepacia G4/PR1 on Diethyl Ether

    PubMed Central

    Hur, H.; Newman, L. M.; Wackett, L. P.; Sadowsky, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Aerobic bacterial growth on aromatic hydrocarbons typically requires oxygenase enzymes, which are known to fortuitously oxidize nongrowth substrates. In this study, we found that oxidation of diethyl ether by toluene 2-monooxygenase supported more rapid growth of Burkholderia cepacia G4/PR1 than did the aromatic substrates n-propylbenzene and o-xylene. The wild-type Burkholderia cepacia G4 failed to grow on diethyl ether. Purified toluene 2-monooxygenase protein components oxidized diethyl ether stoichiometrically to ethanol and acetaldehyde. Butyl methyl ether, diethyl sulfide, and 2-chloroethyl ethyl ether were oxidized by B. cepacia G4/PR1. PMID:16535583

  17. mRNA transcript therapy.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Drew

    2015-02-01

    mRNA is the central molecule of all forms of life. It is generally accepted that current life on Earth descended from an RNA world. mRNA, after its first therapeutic description in 1992, has recently come into increased focus as a method to deliver genetic information. The recent solution to the two main difficulties in using mRNA as a therapeutic, immune stimulation and potency, has provided the basis for a wide range of applications. While mRNA-based cancer immunotherapies have been in clinical trials for a few years, novel approaches; including, in vivo delivery of mRNA to replace or supplement proteins, mRNA-based generation of pluripotent stem cells, or genome engineering using mRNA-encoded meganucleases are beginning to be realized. This review presents the current state of mRNA drug technologies and potential applications, as well as discussing the challenges and prospects in mRNA development and drug discovery. PMID:25359562

  18. Intermediate P* from Soluble Methane Monooxygenase Contains a Diferrous Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Rahul; Meier, Katlyn K.; Münck, Eckard; Lipscomb, John D.

    2013-01-01

    During a single turnover of the hydroxylase component (MMOH) of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, several discrete intermediates are formed. The diiron cluster of MMOH is first reduced to the FeIIFeII state (Hred). O2 binds rapidly at a site away from the cluster to form the FeIIFeII intermediate O, which converts to an FeIIIFeIII-peroxo intermediate P and finally to the FeIVFeIV intermediate Q. Q binds and reacts with methane to yield methanol and water. The rate constants for these steps are increased by a regulatory protein, MMOB. Previously reported transient kinetic studies have suggested that an intermediate P* forms between O and P in which the g = 16 EPR signal characteristic of the reduced diiron cluster of Hred and O is lost. This was interpreted as signaling oxidation of the cluster, but low accumulation of P* prevented further characterization. In this study, three methods to directly detect and trap P* are applied together to allow its spectroscopic and kinetic characterization. First, the MMOB mutant His33Ala is used to specifically slow the decay of P* without affecting its formation rate, leading to its nearly quantitative accumulation. Second, spectra-kinetic data collection is used to provide a sensitive measure of the formation and decay rate constants of intermediates as well as their optical spectra. Finally, the substrate furan is included to react with Q and quench its strong chromophore. The optical spectrum of P* closely mimics those of Hred and O, but it is distinctly different from that of P. The reaction cycle rate constants allowed prediction of the times for maximal accumulation of the intermediates. Mössbauer spectra of rapid freeze quench samples at these times show that the intermediates are formed at almost exactly the predicted levels. The Mössbauer spectra show that the diiron cluster of P*, quite unexpectedly, is in the FeIIFeII state. Thus, the loss of the g = 16 EPR results from a change of

  19. Flavoprotein monooxygenases for oxidative biocatalysis: recombinant expression in microbial hosts and applications

    PubMed Central

    Ceccoli, Romina D.; Bianchi, Dario A.; Rial, Daniela V.

    2014-01-01

    External flavoprotein monooxygenases comprise a group of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases that catalyze the insertion of one atom of molecular oxygen into an organic substrate and the second atom is reduced to water. These enzymes are involved in a great number of metabolic pathways both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Flavoprotein monooxygenases have attracted the attention of researchers for several decades and the advent of recombinant DNA technology caused a great progress in the field. These enzymes are subjected to detailed biochemical and structural characterization and some of them are also regarded as appealing oxidative biocatalysts for the production of fine chemicals and valuable intermediates toward active pharmaceutical ingredients due to their high chemo-, stereo-, and regioselectivity. Here, we review the most representative reactions catalyzed both in vivo and in vitro by prototype flavoprotein monooxygenases, highlighting the strategies employed to produce them recombinantly, to enhance the yield of soluble proteins, and to improve cofactor regeneration in order to obtain versatile biocatalysts. Although we describe the most outstanding features of flavoprotein monooxygenases, we mainly focus on enzymes that were cloned, expressed and used for biocatalysis during the last years. PMID:24567729

  20. Cloning, expression and characterization of a eukaryotic cycloalkanone monooxygenase from Cylindrocarpon radicicola ATCC 11011.

    PubMed

    Leipold, Friedemann; Wardenga, Rainer; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we have cloned and characterized a cycloalkanone monooxygenase (CAMO) from the ascomycete Cylindrocarpon radicicola ATCC 11011 (identical to Cylindrocarpon destructans DSM 837). The primary structure of this Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BMVO) revealed 531 residues with around 45% sequence identity to known cyclohexanone monooxygenases. The enzyme was functionally overexpressed in Escherichia coli and investigated with respect to substrate spectrum and kinetic parameters. Substrate specificity studies revealed that a large variety of cycloaliphatic and bicycloaliphatic ketones are converted by this CAMO. A high catalytic efficiency against cyclobutanone was observed and seems to be a particular property of this BVMO. The thus produced butyrolactone derivatives are valuable building blocks for the synthesis of a variety of natural products and bioactive compounds. Furthermore, the enzyme revealed activity against open-chain ketones such as cyclobutyl, cyclopentyl and cyclohexyl methyl ketone which have not been reported to be accepted by typical cyclohexanone monooxygenases. These results suggest that the BVMO from C. radicicola indeed might be rather unique and since no BVMOs originating from eukaryotic organisms have been produced recombinantly so far, this study provides the first example for such an enzyme. PMID:22075635

  1. Expression of Individual Copies of Methylococcus capsulatus Bath Particulate Methane Monooxygenase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Stolyar, Sergei; Franke, Marion; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2001-01-01

    The expression of the two gene clusters encoding the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in Methylococcus capsulatus Bath was assessed by analysis of transcripts and by use of chromosomal gene fusions. The results suggest that the two clusters are functionally redundant but that relative expression alters depending on the copper levels available for growth. PMID:11160118

  2. Some properties of a soluble methane mono-oxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus strain Bath.

    PubMed Central

    Colby, J; Dalton, H

    1976-01-01

    Soluble extracts of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), obtained by centrifugation of crude extracts at 160000g for 1h, catalyse the NAD(P)H- and O2-dependent disappearance of bromomethane, and also the formation of methanol from methane. Soluble methane mono-oxygenase is not inhibited by chelating agents or by most electron-transport inhibitors, and is a multicomponent enzyme. PMID:962879

  3. Expression of individual copies of Methylococcus capsulatus bath particulate methane monooxygenase genes.

    PubMed

    Stolyar, S; Franke, M; Lidstrom, M E

    2001-03-01

    The expression of the two gene clusters encoding the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in Methylococcus capsulatus Bath was assessed by analysis of transcripts and by use of chromosomal gene fusions. The results suggest that the two clusters are functionally redundant but that relative expression alters depending on the copper levels available for growth. PMID:11160118

  4. Biocatalytic conversion of ethylene to ethylene oxide using an engineered toluene monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, DA; Bertolani, SJ; Siegel, JB

    2015-01-01

    Mutants of toluene o-xylene monooxygenase are demonstrated to oxidize ethylene to ethylene oxide in vivo at yields of >99%. The best mutant increases ethylene oxidation activity by >5500-fold relative to the native enzyme. This is the first report of a recombinant enzyme capable of carrying out this industrially significant chemical conversion.

  5. A fluorescence polarization binding assay to identify inhibitors of flavin-dependent monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jun; Kizjakina, Karina; Robinson, Reeder; Tolani, Karishma; Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-06-01

    N-Hydroxylating monooxygenases (NMOs) are essential for pathogenesis in fungi and bacteria. NMOs catalyze the hydroxylation of sine and ornithine in the biosynthesis of hydroxamate-containing siderophores. Inhibition of kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO), which catalyzes the conversion of kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine, alleviates neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases and brain infections caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. These enzymes are examples of flavin-dependent monooxygenases, which are validated drug targets. Here, we describe the development and optimization of a fluorescence polarization assay to identify potential inhibitors of flavin-dependent monooxygenases. Fluorescently labeled ADP molecules were synthesized and tested. An ADP-TAMRA chromophore bound to KMO with a K(d) value of 0.60 ± 0.05 μM and to the NMOs from Aspergillus fumigatus and Mycobacterium smegmatis with K(d) values of 2.1 ± 0.2 and 4.0 ± 0.2 μM, respectively. The assay was tested in competitive binding experiments with substrates and products of KMO and an NMO. Furthermore, we show that this assay can be used to identify inhibitors of NMOs. A Z' factor of 0.77 was calculated, and we show that the assay exhibits good tolerance to temperature, incubation time, and dimethyl sulfoxide concentration. PMID:22410281

  6. Identification of a microsomal retinoic acid synthase as a microsomal cytochrome P-450-linked monooxygenase system.

    PubMed

    Tomita, S; Tsujita, M; Matsuo, Y; Yubisui, T; Ichikawa, Y

    1993-12-01

    1. To characterize an enzyme which metabolizes retinal in liver microsomes, several properties of the enzymatic reaction from retinal to retinoic acid were investigated using rabbit liver microsomes. 2. The maximum pH of the reaction in the liver microsomes was 7.6. 3. The Km and Vmax values for all-trans, 9-cis and 13-cis-retinals were determined. 4. The reaction proceeded in the presence of NADPH and molecular oxygen. 5. The incorporation of one atom of molecular oxygen into retinal was confirmed by using oxygen-18, showing that the reaction comprised monooxygenation, not dehydrogenation. 6. The monooxygenase activity was inhibited by carbon monoxide, phenylisocyanide and anti-NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase IgG, but not by anti-cytochrome b5 IgG. 7. The enzymatic activity inhibited by carbon monoxide was photoreversibly restored by light of a wavelength of around 450 nm. 8. The retinal-induced spectra of liver microsomes with three isomeric retinals were type I spectra. 9. The microsomal monooxygenase activity induced by phenobarbital or ethanol were more effective than that by 3-methylcholanthrene, clotrimazole or beta-naphthoflavone. 10. These results showed that the monooxygenase reaction from retinal to retinoic acid in liver microsomes is catalyzed by a cytochrome P-450-linked monooxygenase system. PMID:8138015

  7. Identification of Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in Diaphornia citri, an economically important psyllid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty P450’s in the CYP monooxygenases were identified in the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The psyllid is responsible for the transmission of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the causative agent of huanglongbing ( HLB), also known as citrus greening dise...

  8. Flavin-containing monooxygenase-3: induction by 3-methylcholanthrene and complex regulation by xenobiotic chemicals in hepatoma cells and mouse liver1

    PubMed Central

    Celius, Trine; Pansoy, Andrea; Matthews, Jason; Okey, Allan B.; Henderson, Marilyn C.; Krueger, Sharon K.; Williams, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases often are thought not to be inducible but we recently demonstrated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-dependent induction of FMO mRNAs in mouse liver by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (Celius et al., Drug Metab Dispos 36:2499, 2008). We now evaluated FMO induction by other AHR ligands and xenobiotic chemicals in vivo and in mouse Hepa1c1c7 hepatoma cells (Hepa-1). In mouse liver, 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC) induced FMO3 mRNA 8-fold. In Hepa-1 cells, 3MC and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) induced FMO3 mRNA >30-fold. Induction by 3MC and BaP was AHR-dependent but, surprisingly, the potent AHR agonist, TCDD, did not induce FMO3 mRNA in Hepa-1 cells nor did chromatin immunoprecipitation assays detect recruitment of AHR or ARNT to Fmo3 regulatory elements after exposure to 3MC in liver or in Hepa-1 cells. However, in Hepa-1, 3MC and BaP (but not TCDD) caused recruitment of p53 protein to a p53 response element in the 5'-flanking region of the Fmo3 gene. We tested the possibility that FMO3 induction in Hepa-1 cells might be mediated by Nrf2/antioxidant response pathways but agents known to activate Nrf2 or to induce oxidative stress did not affect FMO3 mRNA levels. The protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide (which causes “superinduction” of CYP1A1 mRNA in TCDD-treated cells) by itself caused dramatic upregulation (>300-fold) of FMO3 mRNA in Hepa-1 suggesting that cycloheximide prevents synthesis of a labile protein that suppresses FMO3 expression. Although FMO3 mRNA is highly induced by 3MC or TCDD in mouse liver and in Hepa-1 cells, FMO protein levels and FMO catalytic function showed only modest elevation. PMID:20570689

  9. Flavin-containing monooxygenase-3: Induction by 3-methylcholanthrene and complex regulation by xenobiotic chemicals in hepatoma cells and mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Celius, Trine; Pansoy, Andrea; Matthews, Jason; Okey, Allan B.; Henderson, Marilyn C.; Krueger, Sharon K.; Williams, David E.

    2010-08-15

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases often are thought not to be inducible but we recently demonstrated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-dependent induction of FMO mRNAs in mouse liver by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (Celius et al., Drug Metab Dispos 36:2499, 2008). We now evaluated FMO induction by other AHR ligands and xenobiotic chemicals in vivo and in mouse Hepa1c1c7 hepatoma cells (Hepa-1). In mouse liver, 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC) induced FMO3 mRNA 8-fold. In Hepa-1 cells, 3MC and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) induced FMO3 mRNA > 30-fold. Induction by 3MC and BaP was AHR dependent but, surprisingly, the potent AHR agonist, TCDD, did not induce FMO3 mRNA in Hepa-1 cells nor did chromatin immunoprecipitation assays detect recruitment of AHR or ARNT to Fmo3 regulatory elements after exposure to 3MC in liver or in Hepa-1 cells. However, in Hepa-1, 3MC and BaP (but not TCDD) caused recruitment of p53 protein to a p53 response element in the 5'-flanking region of the Fmo3 gene. We tested the possibility that FMO3 induction in Hepa-1 cells might be mediated by Nrf2/anti-oxidant response pathways, but agents known to activate Nrf2 or to induce oxidative stress did not affect FMO3 mRNA levels. The protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide (which causes 'superinduction' of CYP1A1 mRNA in TCDD-treated cells), by itself caused dramatic upregulation (> 300-fold) of FMO3 mRNA in Hepa-1 suggesting that cycloheximide prevents synthesis of a labile protein that suppresses FMO3 expression. Although FMO3 mRNA is highly induced by 3MC or TCDD in mouse liver and in Hepa-1 cells, FMO protein levels and FMO catalytic function showed only modest elevation.

  10. Cloning and characterization of the genes encoding nitrilotriacetate monooxygenase of Chelatobacter heintzii ATCC 29600.

    PubMed Central

    Knobel, H R; Egli, T; van der Meer, J R

    1996-01-01

    A 6.2-kb DNA fragment containing the genes for the nitrilotriacetate (NTA) monooxygenase of Chelatobacter heintzii ATCC 29600 was cloned and characterized by DNA sequencing and expression studies. The nucleotide sequence contained three major open reading frames (ORFs). Two of the ORFs, which were oriented divergently with an intergenic region of 307 bp, could be assigned to the NTA monooxygenase components A and B. The predicted N-terminal amino acid sequences of these ORFs were identical with those determined for the purified components. We therefore named these genes ntaA (for component A of NTA monooxygenase) and ntaB (for component B). The ntaA and ntaB genes could be expressed in Escherichia coli DH5alpha, and the gene products were visualized after Western blotting (immunoblotting) and incubation with polyclonal antibodies against component A or B. By mixing overproduced NtaB from E. coli and purified component A from C. heintzii ATCC 29600, reconstitution of a functional NTA monooxygenase complex was possible. The deduced gene product of ntaA showed only significant homology to SoxA (involved in dibenzothiophene degradation) and to SnaA (involved in pristamycin synthesis); that of ntaB shared weak homologies in one domain with other NADH:flavine mononucleotide oxidoreductases. These homologies provide no conclusive answer as to the possible evolutionary origin of the NTA monooxygenase. The deduced gene product of the third ORF (ORF1) had homology in the N-terminal region with the GntR class of bacterial regulator proteins and therefore may encode a regulator protein, possibly involved in regulation of ntaA and ntaB expression. PMID:8892809

  11. A New Biocatalyst for Production of Optically Pure Aryl Epoxides by Styrene Monooxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens ST

    PubMed Central

    Di Gennaro, Patrizia; Colmegna, Andrea; Galli, Enrica; Sello, Guido; Pelizzoni, Francesca; Bestetti, Giuseppina

    1999-01-01

    We developed a biocatalyst by cloning the styrene monooxygenase genes (styA and styB) from Pseudomonas fluorescens ST responsible for the oxidation of styrene to its corresponding epoxide. Recombinant Escherichia coli was able to oxidize different aryl vinyl and aryl ethenyl compounds to their corresponding optically pure epoxides. The results of bioconversions indicate the broad substrate preference of styrene monooxygenase and its potential for the production of several fine chemicals. PMID:10347083

  12. Nucleotide sequence analysis of genes encoding a toluene/benzene-2-monooxygenase from pseudomonas sp. strain JS150

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.R.; Olsen, R.H.

    1995-09-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain JS150 metabolizes benzene and alkyl- and chloro-substituted benzenes by using dioxygenase-initiated pathways coupled with multiple downstream metabolic pathways to accommodate catechol metabolism. By cloning genes encoding benzene-degradative enzymes, strain JS150 was also found to carry genes for a toluene/benzene-2-monooxygenase. The gene cluster encoding a 2-monooxygenase and its cognate regulator was cloned from a plasmid carried by strain JS150. Oxygen ({sup 18}O{sub 2}) incorporation experiments using Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains carrying the cloned genes confirmed toluene hydroxylation was catalyzed through an authentic monooxygenase reaction to yield ortho-cresol. Encoding the toluene-2-monooxygenase and regulatory gene product was localized in two regions of the cloned fragment. The nucleotide sequence of the toluene/benzene-2-monooxygenase locus was determined, revealing six open reading frames that were then designated tbmA, tbmB, tbmC, tbmD, tbmE, and tbmF. The deduced amino acid sequences for these genes showed the presence of motifs similar to well-conserved functional domains of multicomponent oxygenases. This analysis allowed the tentative identification of two terminal oxygenase subunits (TbmB and TbmD) and an electron transport protein (TbmF) for the monooxygenase enzyme. All the tbm polypeptides shared significant homology with protein components from other bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases. Overall, the tbm gene products shared greater similarity with polypeptides from the phenol hydroxylases of Pseudomo-KR1 and Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) picketti PKO1. The relationship found between the phenol hydroxlases and a toluene-2-monooxygenase, characterized in this study for the first time at the nucleotide sequence level, suggested DNA probes used for surveys of environmental populations should be carefully selected to reflect DNA sequences corresponding to the metabolic pathway of interest. 58 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Effects of salinity acclimation on the pesticide-metabolizing enzyme flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Lavado, Ramon; Aparicio-Fabre, Rosaura; Schlenk, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Thioether-containing pesticides are more toxic in certain anadromous and catadromous fish species that have undergone acclimation to hypersaline environments. Enhanced toxicity has been shown to be mediated through the bioactivation of these xenobiotics by one or more flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs), which are induced by hyperosmotic conditions. To better understand the number of FMO genes that may be regulated by hyperosmotic conditions, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were maintained and acclimated to freshwater (<0.5 g/L salinity) and to 18 g/L salinity. The expression of 3 different FMO transcripts (A, B and C) and associated enzymatic activities methyl p-tolyl sulfoxidation (MTSO) and benzydamine N-oxigenation (BZNO) were measured in four tissues. In freshwater-acclimated organisms FMO catalytic activities were as follows: liver>kidney>gills=olfactory tissues; in hypersaline-acclimated animals activities were higher in liver>gills>olfactory tissues>kidney. Acclimation to 18 g/L caused a significant induction in the stereoselective formation of R-MTSO in gill. In olfactory tissues, stereoselective (100%) formation of S-MTSO was observed and was unaltered by acclimation to hypersaline water. When specific transcripts were evaluated, salinity-acclimation increased FMO A in liver (up to 2-fold) and kidney (up to 3-fold) but not in olfactory tissues and gills. FMO B mRNA was significantly down-regulated in all tissues, and FMO C was unchanged by hypersaline acclimation. FMO B and C failed to correlate with any FMO catalytic activity, but FMO A mRNA expression linearly correlated to both FMO catalytic activities (MTSO and BZNO) in liver (r2=0.92 and r2=0.88) and kidney microsomes (r2=0.93 and r2=90). FMO A only correlated with MTSO activity in gills (r2=0.93). These results indicate unique tissue specific expression of FMO genes in salmonids and are consistent with salinity-mediated enhancement of thioether-containing pesticide bioactivation by FMO which

  14. Diversity of soluble methane monooxygenase-containing methanotrophs isolated from polluted environments.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Ian R; Miguez, Carlos B; Rogge, Gerlinde; Bourque, Denis; Wendlandt, Karin D; Groleau, Denis; Murrell, J Colin

    2006-02-01

    Methanotrophs were enriched and isolated from polluted environments in Canada and Germany. Enrichments in low copper media were designed to specifically encourage growth of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) containing organisms. The 10 isolates were characterized physiologically and genetically with one type I and nine type II methanotrophs being identified. Three key genes: 16S rRNA; pmoA and mmoX, encoding for the particulate and soluble methane monooxygenases respectively, were cloned from the isolates and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequences identified strains, which were closely related to Methylococcus capsulatus, Methylocystis sp., Methylosinus sporium and Methylosinus trichosporium. Diversity of sMMO-containing methanotrophs detected in this and previous studies was rather narrow, both genetically and physiologically, suggesting possible constraints on genetic diversity of sMMO due to essential conservation of enzyme function. PMID:16448499

  15. Induction of cytochrome P450 1A1 and monooxygenase activity in Tilapia by sediment extract

    SciTech Connect

    Ueng, Y.F.; Ueng, T.H.; Liu, T.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450)-dependent monooxygenases of fishes are inducible by a variety of environmental pollutants including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Induction of fish monoxygenases may serve as a biological monitor for PAH- and PCB-types of environmental chemicals. Many studies have demonstrated environmental induction of fish monooxygenases using various experimental approaches. However, relatively few studies have been conducted using fish treated with contaminated river sediment extracts. Damsui River is the largest river in the north of Taiwan. The lower section of the river in the Taipei Metropolitan area is heavily polluted by industrial and municipal wastes. Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) is one of the few species of fish that occur in the polluted river. Previous field studies showed that the levels of P450 1A1, benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activities in tilapia collected at Fu-Ho Bridge, a polluted section of Damsui River, were higher than respective levels in fish collected from an unpolluted section. These results suggested that tilapia caught at the polluted site were exposed to substances similar in action to PAHs and PCBs, because these chemical pollutants are potent inducers of P450 1A1. PAHs and PCBs are persistent compounds that can accumulate in sediment. Tilapia are occasionally associated with the bottom and could ingest chemically contaminated sediment. In the present study, we determined the induction properties of monooxygenases using tilapia treated with extract of sediment collected from a polluted section of Damsui River. The present study demonstrates that Damsui River sediment extract has the ability to induce hepatic P450 1A1 and dependent monooxygenase activities in tilapia. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Factors limiting aliphatic chlorocarbon degradation by Nitrosomonas europaea: Cometabolic inactivation of ammonia monooxygenase and substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Rasche, M.E.; Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J. )

    1991-10-01

    The soil nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea is capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) and other halogenated hydrocarbons. TCE cometabolism by N. europaea resulted in an irreversible loss of TCE biodegradative capacity, ammonia-oxidizing activity, and ammonia-dependent O{sub 2} uptake by the cells. Inactivation was not observed in the presence of allylthiourea, a specific inhibitor of enzyme ammonia monooxygenase, or under anaerobic conditions, indicating that the TCE-mediated inactivation required ammonia monooxygenase activity. When N. europaea cells were incubated with ({sup 14}C)TCE under conditions which allowed turnover of ammonia monooxygenase, a number of cellular proteins were covalently labeled with {sup 14}C. Treatment of cells with allylthiourea or acetylene prior to incubation with ({sup 14}C)TCE prevented incorporation of {sup 14}C into proteins. The ammonia-oxidizing activity of cells inactivated in the presence of TCE could be recovered through a process requiring de novo protein synthesis. In addition to TCE, a series of chlorinated methanes, ethanes, and other ethylenes were screened as substrates for ammonia monooxygenase and for their ability to inactivate the ammonia-oxidizing system of N. europaea. The chlorocarbons would be divided into three classes depending on their biodegradability and inactivating potential: (1) compounds which were not biodegradable by N. europaea and which had no toxic effect on the cells (2) compounds which were cooxidized by N. europaea and had little or no toxic effect on the cells; and (3) compounds which were cooxidized and produced a turnover-dependent inactivation of ammonia oxidation by N. europaea.

  17. Enhancing Indigo Production by Over-Expression of the Styrene Monooxygenase in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Yin, Sheng; Chen, Min; Sun, Baoguo; Hao, Shuai; Wang, Chengtao

    2016-08-01

    As an important traditional blue dye, indigo has been used in food and textile industry for centuries, which can be produced via the styrene oxygenation pathway in Pseudomonas putida. Hence, the styrene monooxygenase gene styAB and oxide isomerase gene styC are over-expressed in P. putida to investigate their roles in indigo biosynthesis. RT-qPCR analysis indicated that transcriptions of styA and styB were increased by 2500- and 750-folds in the styAB over-expressed strain B4-01, compared with the wild-type strain B4, consequently significantly enhancing the indole monooxygenase activity. Transcription of styC was also increased by 100-folds in the styC over-expressed strain B4-02. Besides, styAB over-expression slightly up-regulated the transcription of styC in B4-01, while styC over-expression hardly exerted an effect on the transcriptional levels of styA and styB and indole monooxygenase activity in B4-02. Furthermore, shaking flask experiments showed that indigo production in B4-01 reached 52.13 mg L(-1) after 24 h, which was sevenfold higher than that in B4. But no obvious increase in indigo yield was observed in B4-02. Over-expression of styAB significantly enhanced the indigo production, revealing that the monooxygenase STYAB rather than oxide isomerase STYC probably acted as the key rate-limiting enzyme in the indigo biosynthesis pathway in P. putida. This work provided a new strategy for enhancing indigo production in Pseudomonas. PMID:27154464

  18. Catalytic residues and a predicted structure of tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Watschinger, Katrin; Fuchs, Julian E.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Keller, Markus A.; Golderer, Georg; Hermetter, Albin; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele; Hulo, Nicolas; Werner, Ernst R.

    2012-01-01

    Alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase (EC 1.14.16.5) forms a third, distinct, class among tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent enzymes in addition to aromatic amino acid hydroxylases and nitric oxide synthases. Its protein sequence contains the fatty acid hydroxylase motif, a signature indicative of a di-iron centre, which contains eight conserved histidine residues. Membrane enzymes containing this motif, including alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase, are especially labile and so far have not been purified to homogeneity in active form. To obtain a first insight into structure–function relationships of this enzyme, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of 26 selected amino acid residues and expressed wild-type and mutant proteins containing a C-terminal Myc tag together with fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase in Chinese-hamster ovary cells. Among all of the acidic residues within the eight-histidine motif, only mutation of Glu137 to alanine led to an 18-fold increase in the Michaelis–Menten constant for tetrahydrobiopterin, suggesting a role in tetrahydrobiopterin interaction. A ninth additional histidine residue essential for activity was also identified. Nine membrane domains were predicted by four programs: ESKW, TMHMM, MEMSAT and Phobius. Prediction of a part of the structure using the Rosetta membrane ab initio method led to a plausible suggestion for a structure of the catalytic site of alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase. PMID:22220568

  19. Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases: structure/function, genetic polymorphisms and role in drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Sharon K.; Williams, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) oxygenates drugs and xenobiotics containing a “soft-nucleophile”, usually nitrogen or sulfur. FMO, like cytochrome P450 (CYP), is a monooxygenase, utilizing the reducing equivalents of NADPH to reduce 1 atom of molecular oxygen to water, while the other atom is used to oxidize the substrate. FMO and CYP also exhibit similar tissue and cellular location, molecular weight, substrate specificity, and exist as multiple enzymes under developmental control. The human FMO functional gene family is much smaller (5 families each with a single member) than CYP. FMO does not require a reductase to transfer electrons from NADPH and the catalytic cycle of the 2 monooxygenases is strikingly different. Another distinction is the lack of induction of FMOs by xenobiotics. In general, CYP is the major contributor to oxidative xenobiotic metabolism. However, FMO activity may be of significance in a number of cases and should not be overlooked. FMO and CYP have overlapping substrate specificities, but often yield distinct metabolites with potentially significant toxicological/pharmacological consequences. The physiological function(s) of FMO are poorly understood. Three of the 5 expressed human FMO genes, FMO1, FMO2 and FMO3, exhibit genetic polymorphisms. The most studied of these is FMO3 (adult human liver) in which mutant alleles contribute to the disease known as trimethylaminuria. The consequences of these FMO genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism and human health are areas of research requiring further exploration. PMID:15922018

  20. Kinetic evidence for an anion binding pocket in the active site of nitronate monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Francis, Kevin; Gadda, Giovanni

    2009-10-01

    A series of monovalent, inorganic anions and aliphatic aldehydes were tested as inhibitors for Hansenula mrakii and Neurospora crassa nitronate monooxygenase, formerly known as 2-nitropropane dioxygenase, to investigate the structural features that contribute to the binding of the anionic nitronate substrates to the enzymes. A linear correlation between the volumes of the inorganic anions and their effectiveness as competitive inhibitors of the enzymes was observed in a plot of pK(is)versus the ionic volume of the anion with slopes of 0.041+/-0.001 mM/A(3) and 0.027+/-0.001 mM/A(3) for the H. mrakii and N. crassa enzymes, respectively. Aliphatic aldehydes were weak competitive inhibitors of the enzymes, with inhibition constants that are independent of their alkyl chain lengths. The reductive half reactions of H. mrakii nitronate monooxygenase with primary nitronates containing two to four carbon atoms all showed apparent K(d) values of approximately 5 mM. These results are consistent with the presence of an anion binding pocket in the active site of nitronate monooxygenase that interacts with the nitro group of the substrate, and suggest a minimal contribution of the hydrocarbon chain of the nitronates to the binding of the ligands to the enzyme. PMID:19683782

  1. Two distinct monooxygenases for alkane oxidation in Nocardioides sp. strain CF8.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, N; Yeager, C M; Arp, D J

    2001-11-01

    Alkane monooxygenases in Nocardioides sp. strain CF8 were examined at the physiological and genetic levels. Strain CF8 can utilize alkanes ranging in chain length from C(2) to C(16). Butane degradation by butane-grown cells was strongly inhibited by allylthiourea, a copper-selective chelator, while hexane-, octane-, and decane-grown cells showed detectable butane degradation activity in the presence of allylthiourea. Growth on butane and hexane was strongly inhibited by 1-hexyne, while 1-hexyne did not affect growth on octane or decane. A specific 30-kDa acetylene-binding polypeptide was observed for butane-, hexane-, octane-, and decane-grown cells but was absent from cells grown with octane or decane in the presence of 1-hexyne. These results suggest the presence of two monooxygenases in strain CF8. Degenerate primers designed for PCR amplification of genes related to the binuclear-iron-containing alkane hydroxylase from Pseudomonas oleovorans were used to clone a related gene from strain CF8. Reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blot analysis showed that this gene encoding a binuclear-iron-containing alkane hydroxylase was expressed in cells grown on alkanes above C(6). These results indicate the presence of two distinct monooxygenases for alkane oxidation in Nocardioides sp. strain CF8. PMID:11679317

  2. Crystallization and initial crystallographic characterization of the Corynebacterium glutamicum nitrilotriacetate monooxygenase component A

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Sujin; Lee, Sujin; Kang, Beom Sik; Lee, Heung-Soo; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Kim, Myung Hee

    2006-11-01

    The Corynebacterium glutamicum NTA monooxygenase component A protein, which plays the central role in NTA biodegradation, was crystallized. The initial X-ray crystallographic characterization is reported. Safety and environmental concerns have recently dictated the proper disposal of nitrilotriacetate (NTA). Biodegradation of NTA is initiated by NTA monooxygenase, which is composed of two proteins: component A and component B. The NTA monooxygenase component A protein from Corynebacterium glutamicum was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 2.5 Å on a synchrotron beamline. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 111.04, b = 98.51, c = 171.61 Å, β = 101.94°. The asymmetric unit consists of four molecules, corresponding to a packing density of 2.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. The structure was solved by molecular replacement. Structure refinement is in progress.

  3. Catalytic residues and a predicted structure of tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Watschinger, Katrin; Fuchs, Julian E; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Keller, Markus A; Golderer, Georg; Hermetter, Albin; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele; Hulo, Nicolas; Werner, Ernst R

    2012-04-01

    Alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase (EC 1.14.16.5) forms a third, distinct, class among tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent enzymes in addition to aromatic amino acid hydroxylases and nitric oxide synthases. Its protein sequence contains the fatty acid hydroxylase motif, a signature indicative of a di-iron centre, which contains eight conserved histidine residues. Membrane enzymes containing this motif, including alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase, are especially labile and so far have not been purified to homogeneity in active form. To obtain a first insight into structure-function relationships of this enzyme, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of 26 selected amino acid residues and expressed wild-type and mutant proteins containing a C-terminal Myc tag together with fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase in Chinese-hamster ovary cells. Among all of the acidic residues within the eight-histidine motif, only mutation of Glu137 to alanine led to an 18-fold increase in the Michaelis-Menten constant for tetrahydrobiopterin, suggesting a role in tetrahydrobiopterin interaction. A ninth additional histidine residue essential for activity was also identified. Nine membrane domains were predicted by four programs: ESKW, TMHMM, MEMSAT and Phobius. Prediction of a part of the structure using the Rosetta membrane ab initio method led to a plausible suggestion for a structure of the catalytic site of alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase. PMID:22220568

  4. Glucosinolate Biosynthesis (Further Characterization of the Aldoxime-Forming Microsomal Monooxygenases in Oilseed Rape Leaves).

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, R. N.; Hick, A. J.; Dawson, G. W.; Wallsgrove, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    The initial steps in glucosinolate biosynthesis are thought to proceed from amino acids, via N-hydroxy amino acids, to aldoximes. We showed previously that microsomes from green leaves of oilseed rape (Brassica napus cv Bienvenu) contain two distinct monooxygenases that catalyze the conversion of homophenylalanine and dihomomethionine to their respective aldoximes. Further characterization of these enzymes has now demonstrated that the latter enzyme catalyzes the NADPH-dependent oxidative decarboxylation of two higher homologs of methionine, in addition to dihomomethionine. No activity was found for either enzyme with L-methionine, DL-homomethionine, L-phenylalanine, L-tyrosine, or L-tryptophan. Both of these rape monooxygenase activities are dependent on O2, not requiring any other O2 species or radical. The presence of an unoxidized sulfur atom and its relative position in the side chain of the aliphatic substrates are important for binding to the active site of the methionine-homolog enzyme. Neither enzyme has any characteristics of a cytochrome P450-type enzyme, and antiserum raised against cytochrome P450 reductase did not significantly inhibit monooxygenase activity. PMID:12228596

  5. Crystal structure of a phenol-coupling P450 monooxygenase involved in teicoplanin biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhi; Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa G.; Schuler, Mary A.; Nair, Satish K.

    2012-02-08

    The lipoglycopeptide antibiotic teicoplanin has proven efficacy against gram-positive pathogens. Teicoplanin is distinguished from the vancomycin-type glycopeptide antibiotics, by the presence of an additional cross-link between the aromatic amino acids 1 and 3 that is catalyzed by the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase Orf6* (CYP165D3). As a goal towards understanding the mechanism of this phenol-coupling reaction, we have characterized recombinant Orf6* and determined its crystal structure to 2.2-{angstrom} resolution. Although the structure of Orf6* reveals the core fold common to other P450 monooxygenases, there are subtle differences in the disposition of secondary structure elements near the active site cavity necessary to accommodate its complex heptapeptide substrate. Specifically, the orientation of the F and G helices in Orf6* results in a more closed active site than found in the vancomycin oxidative enzymes OxyB and OxyC. In addition, Met226 in the I helix replaces the more typical Gly/Ala residue that is positioned above the heme porphyrin ring, where it forms a hydrogen bond with a heme iron-bound water molecule. Sequence comparisons with other phenol-coupling P450 monooxygenases suggest that Met226 plays a role in determining the substrate regiospecificity of Orf6*. These features provide further insights into the mechanism of the cross-linking mechanisms that occur during glycopeptide antibiotics biosynthesis.

  6. Inducible Monooxygenase Activities and 3-Methylcholanthrene-Initiated Tumorigenesis in Mouse Recombinant Inbred Sublines

    PubMed Central

    Atlas, Steven A.; Taylor, Benjamin A.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Nebert, Daniel W.

    1976-01-01

    The induction of a certain group of hepatic monooxygenase activities by polycyclic aromatic compounds is regulated by the same locus or gene cluster controlling the formation of cytochrome P1–450 (P–448) in mice. Certain inbred strains of mice are "responsive" (Ahb) to such induction, whereas others are "nonresponsive" (Ahd). A pair of closely related sublines that differ with respect to the Ah locus (for aromatic hydrocarbon responsiveness) were used to identify or confirm the pleiotropic effects of this gene. The lines were derived by sibling-mating without selection from (C57L/J x AKR/J)F 2 mice; the two sublines were separated at the F12 generation. Ten microsomal monooxygenase activities and one cytosol enzyme activity known to be associated with the Ah locus were similarly associated with cytochrome P1–450 formation in these recombinant inbred sublines as well. Nine additional hepatic monooxygenase activities studied were found not to be associated with the Ah locus; certain of these activities were increased slightly, following treatment of nonresponsive as well as responsive mice with polycyclic aromatic compounds. The Ahb-containing subline was highly susceptible to 3-methylcholanthrene-induced subcutaneous sarcomas, whereas the Ah-d-containing subline was relatively resistant. These results emphasize the potential importance of this particular enzyme for the study of coordinated regulation in mammals. PMID:955403

  7. A Flexible Glutamine Regulates the Catalytic Activity of Toluene o-Xylene Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) is a bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase capable of oxidizing aromatic substrates. The carboxylate-rich diiron active site is located in the hydroxylase component of ToMO (ToMOH), buried 12 Å from the surface of the protein. A small, hydrophilic pore is the shortest pathway between the diiron active site and the protein exterior. In this study of ToMOH from Pseudomonas sp. OX1, the functions of two residues lining this pore, N202 and Q228, were investigated using site-directed mutagenesis. Steady-state characterization of WT and the three mutant enzymes demonstrates that residues N202 and Q228 are critical for turnover. Kinetic isotope effects and pH profiles reveal that these residues govern the kinetics of water egress and prevent quenching of activated oxygen intermediates formed at the diiron active site. We propose that this activity arises from movement of these residues, opening and closing the pore during catalysis, as seen in previous X-ray crystallographic studies. In addition, N202 and Q228 are important for the interactions of the reductase and regulatory components to ToMOH, suggesting that they bind competitively to the hydroxylase. The role of the pore in the hydroxylase components of other bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases within the superfamily is discussed in light of these conclusions. PMID:24873259

  8. The oxygenating constituent of 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from the CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida: the first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Isupov, Michail N.; Schröder, Ewald; Gibson, Robert P.; Beecher, Jean; Donadio, Giuliana; Saneei, Vahid; Dcunha, Stephlina A.; McGhie, Emma J.; Sayer, Christopher; Davenport, Colin F.; Lau, Peter C.; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Kadow, Maria; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Bourenkov, Gleb; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-10-31

    The first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase reveals a different ring orientation of its FMN cofactor compared with other related bacterial luciferase-family enzymes. The three-dimensional structures of the native enzyme and the FMN complex of the overexpressed form of the oxygenating component of the type II Baeyer–Villiger 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase have been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of this dimeric FMN-dependent enzyme, which is encoded on the large CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida, has been solved by a combination of multiple anomalous dispersion from a bromine crystal soak and molecular replacement using a bacterial luciferase model. The orientation of the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in the active site of this TIM-barrel fold enzyme differs significantly from that previously observed in enzymes of the bacterial luciferase-like superfamily. The Ala77 residue is in a cis conformation and forms a β-bulge at the C-terminus of β-strand 3, which is a feature observed in many proteins of this superfamily.

  9. mRNA stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J

    1995-01-01

    This review concerns how cytoplasmic mRNA half-lives are regulated and how mRNA decay rates influence gene expression. mRNA stability influences gene expression in virtually all organisms, from bacteria to mammals, and the abundance of a particular mRNA can fluctuate manyfold following a change in the mRNA half-life, without any change in transcription. The processes that regulate mRNA half-lives can, in turn, affect how cells grow, differentiate, and respond to their environment. Three major questions are addressed. Which sequences in mRNAs determine their half-lives? Which enzymes degrade mRNAs? Which (trans-acting) factors regulate mRNA stability, and how do they function? The following specific topics are discussed: techniques for measuring eukaryotic mRNA stability and for calculating decay constants, mRNA decay pathways, mRNases, proteins that bind to sequences shared among many mRNAs [like poly(A)- and AU-rich-binding proteins] and proteins that bind to specific mRNAs (like the c-myc coding-region determinant-binding protein), how environmental factors like hormones and growth factors affect mRNA stability, and how translation and mRNA stability are linked. Some perspectives and predictions for future research directions are summarized at the end. PMID:7565413

  10. The oxygenating constituent of 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from the CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida: the first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Isupov, Michail N.; Schröder, Ewald; Gibson, Robert P.; Beecher, Jean; Donadio, Giuliana; Saneei, Vahid; Dcunha, Stephlina A.; McGhie, Emma J.; Sayer, Christopher; Davenport, Colin F.; Lau, Peter C.; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Kadow, Maria; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Bourenkov, Gleb; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional structures of the native enzyme and the FMN complex of the overexpressed form of the oxygenating component of the type II Baeyer–Villiger 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase have been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of this dimeric FMN-dependent enzyme, which is encoded on the large CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida, has been solved by a combination of multiple anomalous dispersion from a bromine crystal soak and molecular replacement using a bacterial luciferase model. The orientation of the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in the active site of this TIM-barrel fold enzyme differs significantly from that previously observed in enzymes of the bacterial luciferase-like superfamily. The Ala77 residue is in a cis conformation and forms a β-bulge at the C-terminus of β-strand 3, which is a feature observed in many proteins of this superfamily. PMID:26527149

  11. CYP63A2, a catalytically versatile fungal P450 monooxygenase capable of oxidizing higher-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols, and alkanes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are known to oxidize hydrocarbons albeit with limited substrate specificity across classes of these compounds. Here we report a P450 monooxygenase (CYP63A2) from the model ligninolytic white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium that was fo...

  12. Structural and Catalytic Characterization of a Fungal Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, Felix Martin; Tolmie, Carmien; Smit, Martha Sophia; Opperman, Diederik Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are biocatalysts that convert ketones to esters. Due to their high regio-, stereo- and enantioselectivity and ability to catalyse these reactions under mild conditions, they have gained interest as alternatives to chemical Baeyer-Villiger catalysts. Despite their widespread occurrence within the fungal kingdom, most of the currently characterized BVMOs are from bacterial origin. Here we report the catalytic and structural characterization of BVMOAFL838 from Aspergillus flavus. BVMOAFL838 converts linear and aryl ketones with high regioselectivity. Steady-state kinetics revealed BVMOAFL838 to show significant substrate inhibition with phenylacetone, which was more pronounced at low pH, enzyme and buffer concentrations. Para substitutions on the phenyl group significantly improved substrate affinity and increased turnover frequencies. Steady-state kinetics revealed BVMOAFL838 to preferentially oxidize aliphatic ketones and aryl ketones when the phenyl group are separated by at least two carbons from the carbonyl group. The X-ray crystal structure, the first of a fungal BVMO, was determined at 1.9 Å and revealed the typical overall fold seen in type I bacterial BVMOs. The active site Arg and Asp are conserved, with the Arg found in the "in" position. Similar to phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO), a two residue insert relative to cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) forms a bulge within the active site. Approximately half of the "variable" loop is folded into a short α-helix and covers part of the active site entry channel in the non-NADPH bound structure. This study adds to the current efforts to rationalize the substrate scope of BVMOs through comparative catalytic and structural investigation of different BVMOs. PMID:27472055

  13. Structural and Catalytic Characterization of a Fungal Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Ferroni, Felix Martin; Tolmie, Carmien; Smit, Martha Sophia; Opperman, Diederik Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are biocatalysts that convert ketones to esters. Due to their high regio-, stereo- and enantioselectivity and ability to catalyse these reactions under mild conditions, they have gained interest as alternatives to chemical Baeyer-Villiger catalysts. Despite their widespread occurrence within the fungal kingdom, most of the currently characterized BVMOs are from bacterial origin. Here we report the catalytic and structural characterization of BVMOAFL838 from Aspergillus flavus. BVMOAFL838 converts linear and aryl ketones with high regioselectivity. Steady-state kinetics revealed BVMOAFL838 to show significant substrate inhibition with phenylacetone, which was more pronounced at low pH, enzyme and buffer concentrations. Para substitutions on the phenyl group significantly improved substrate affinity and increased turnover frequencies. Steady-state kinetics revealed BVMOAFL838 to preferentially oxidize aliphatic ketones and aryl ketones when the phenyl group are separated by at least two carbons from the carbonyl group. The X-ray crystal structure, the first of a fungal BVMO, was determined at 1.9 Å and revealed the typical overall fold seen in type I bacterial BVMOs. The active site Arg and Asp are conserved, with the Arg found in the “in” position. Similar to phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO), a two residue insert relative to cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) forms a bulge within the active site. Approximately half of the “variable” loop is folded into a short α-helix and covers part of the active site entry channel in the non-NADPH bound structure. This study adds to the current efforts to rationalize the substrate scope of BVMOs through comparative catalytic and structural investigation of different BVMOs. PMID:27472055

  14. A stopped-flow kinetic study of soluble methane mono-oxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed Central

    Green, J; Dalton, H

    1989-01-01

    1. The roles of the three protein components of soluble methane mono-oxygenase were investigated by the use of rapid-reaction techniques. The transfer of electrons through the enzyme complex from NADH to methane/O2 was also investigated. 2. Electron transfer from protein C, the reductase component, to protein A, the hydroxylase component, was demonstrated. Protein C was shown to undergo a three-electron--one-electron catalytic cycle. The interaction of protein C with NADH was investigated. Reduction of protein C was shown to be rapid, and a charge-transfer interaction between reduced FAD and NAD+ was observed; this intermediate was also found in static titration experiments. Thus the binding of NADH, the reduction of protein C and the intramolecular transfer of electrons through protein C were shown to be much more rapid than the turnover rate of methane mono-oxygenase. 3. The rate of transfer of electrons from protein C to protein A was shown to be lower than the reduction of protein C but higher than the turnover rate of methane mono-oxygenase. Association of the proteins was not rate-limiting. The amount of protein A present in the system had a small effect on the rate of reduction of protein C, indicating some co-operativity between the two proteins. 4. Protein B was shown to prevent electron transfer between protein C and protein A in the absence of methane. On addition of saturating concentrations of methane electron transfer was restored. With saturating concentrations of methane and O2 the observed rate constant for the conversion of methane into methanol was 0.26 s-1 at 18 degrees C. 5. By the use of [2H4]methane it was demonstrated that C-H-bond breakage is likely to be the rate-limiting step in the conversion of methane into methanol. PMID:2497729

  15. Oxidative cleavage of cellulose by fungal copper-dependent polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Beeson, William T; Phillips, Christopher M; Cate, Jamie H D; Marletta, Michael A

    2012-01-18

    Fungal-derived, copper-dependent polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs), formerly known as GH61 proteins, have recently been shown to catalyze the O(2)-dependent oxidative cleavage of recalcitrant polysaccharides. Different PMOs isolated from Neurospora crassa were found to generate oxidized cellodextrins modified at the reducing or nonreducing ends upon incubation with cellulose and cellobiose dehydrogenase. Here we show that the nonreducing end product formed by an N. crassa PMO is a 4-ketoaldose. Together with isotope labeling experiments, further support is provided for a mechanism involving oxygen insertion and subsequent elimination to break glycosidic bonds in crystalline cellulose. PMID:22188218

  16. Overexpression and purification of the particulate methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Chan, Sunney I; Nguyen, H-Hoa T; Chen, Kelvin H-C; Yu, Steve S-F

    2011-01-01

    The particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is a multi-copper enzyme that mediates the facile conversion of methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. As a membrane-bound multi-subunit metalloprotein, the highly active protein has been difficult to isolate and purify to homogeneity for biochemical and biophysical studies. In this chapter, we describe a method to overexpress pMMO with good specific activity in high yields in the intracytoplasmic membranes of the host organism, together with two protocols to isolate and purify the enzyme from pMMO-enriched membranes without loss of the copper cofactors and enzymatic activity. PMID:21419922

  17. Metal reconstitution of particulate methane monooxygenase and heterologous expression of the pmoB subunit.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen M; Balasubramanian, Ramakrishnan; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2011-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is a multisubunit metalloenzyme complex used by methanotrophic bacteria to oxidize methane in the first step of carbon assimilation and energy production. In this chapter, we detail methods to prepare metal free (apo) membrane-bound pMMO and to reconstitute apo pMMO with metal ions. We also describe protocols to clone, express, and refold metal-loaded soluble domain constructs of the pmoB subunit. These approaches were used to address fundamental questions concerning the metal content and location of the pMMO active site. PMID:21419923

  18. Structure and boosting activity of a starch-degrading lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lo Leggio, Leila; Simmons, Thomas J; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Frandsen, Kristian E H; Hemsworth, Glyn R; Stringer, Mary A; von Freiesleben, Pernille; Tovborg, Morten; Johansen, Katja S; De Maria, Leonardo; Harris, Paul V; Soong, Chee-Leong; Dupree, Paul; Tryfona, Theodora; Lenfant, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2015-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are recently discovered enzymes that oxidatively deconstruct polysaccharides. LPMOs are fundamental in the effective utilization of these substrates by bacteria and fungi; moreover, the enzymes have significant industrial importance. We report here the activity, spectroscopy and three-dimensional structure of a starch-active LPMO, a representative of the new CAZy AA13 family. We demonstrate that these enzymes generate aldonic acid-terminated malto-oligosaccharides from retrograded starch and boost significantly the conversion of this recalcitrant substrate to maltose by β-amylase. The detailed structure of the enzyme's active site yields insights into the mechanism of action of this important class of enzymes. PMID:25608804

  19. Degradation of trichloroethene by a linear-plasmid-encoded alkene monooxygenase in Rhodococcus corallinus (Nocardia corallina) B-276.

    PubMed

    Saeki, H; Akira, M; Furuhashi, K; Averhoff, B; Gottschalk, G

    1999-07-01

    Rhodococcus corallinus (formerly Nocardia corallina) B-276, isolated with propene as sole carbon and energy source, is able to oxidize trichloroethene (TCE). Glucose- or propene-grown R. corallinus B-276 cells exhibited no difference in TCE degradation efficiency. TCE degradation was found to be growth-phase-dependent and maximum rates were monitored with stationary-phase cells. K(m) and Vmax values for TCE degradation of R. corallinus B-276 grown in nutrient broth medium in the presence of glucose were 187 microM and 2.4 nmol min-1 (mg protein)-1, respectively. Escherichia coli recombinants harbouring and expressing the alkene monooxygenase genes of R. corallinus B-276 exhibited the ability to degrade TCE. This result provides clear evidence that the alkene monooxygenase of R. corallinus B-276 catalyses TCE oxidation. R. corallinus B-276 was shown to contain four linear plasmids, pNC10 (70 kb), pNC20 (85 kb), pNC30 (185 kb) and pNC40 (235 kb). The observation that pNC30-deficient strains had lost the ability to grow on propene suggested that the genes of the propene degradation pathway are encoded by the linear plasmid pNC30. Southern blot analysis with cloned alkene monooxygenase genes from R. corallinus B-276 revealed a positive hybridization signal with the linear plasmid pNC30. This result clearly shows that the alkene monooxygenase is encoded by the linear plasmid pNC30. Eleven short-chain-alkene-oxidizing strains were screened for the presence of linear plasmids. Among these, four propene-oxidizing Rhodococcus strains and one ethene-oxidizing Mycobacterium strain were found to contain linear megaplasmids. Southern blot analysis with the alkene monooxygenase revealed positive signals with linear plasmids of two propene-oxidizing Rhodococcus ruber strains. These results indicate that homologous alkene monooxygenases are encoded by linear plasmids in R. ruber strains. PMID:10439411

  20. Biodegradation of tetrahydrofuran and 1,4-dioxane by soluble diiron monooxygenase in Pseudonocardia sp. strain ENV478.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hisako; McClay, Kevin; Steffan, Robert J; Zylstra, Gerben J

    2012-01-01

    1,4-Dioxane is an important groundwater contaminant. Pseudonocardia sp. strain ENV478 degrades 1,4-dioxane via cometabolism after the growth on tetrahydrofuran (THF) and other carbon sources. Here, we have identified a THF monooxygenase (thm) in ENV478. The thm genes are transcribed constitutively and are induced to higher levels by THF. Decreased translation of the thmB gene encoding one of the monooxygenase subunits by antisense RNA resulted in the loss of its ability to degrade THF and 1,4-dioxane. This is the first study to link thm genes to THF degradation, as well as the cometabolic oxidation of 1,4-dioxane. PMID:23147387

  1. P450monooxygenases (P450ome) of the model white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Khajamohiddin; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2012-01-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium, the model white rot fungus, has been the focus of research for the past about four decades for understanding the mechanisms and processes of biodegradation of the natural aromatic polymer lignin and a broad range of environmental toxic chemicals. The ability to degrade this vast array of xenobiotic compounds was originally attributed to its lignin-degrading enzyme system (LDS), mainly the extracellular peroxidases. However, subsequent physiological, biochemical, and/or genetic studies by us and others identified the involvement of a peroxidase-independent oxidoreductase system, the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system. The whole genome sequence revealed an extraordinarily large P450 contingent (P450ome) with an estimated 149 P450s in this organism. This review focuses on the current status of understanding on the P450 monooxygenase system of P. chrysosporium in terms of pre-genomic and post-genomic identification, structural and evolutionary analysis, transcriptional regulation, redox partners, and functional characterization for its biodegradative potential. Future research on this catalytically diverse oxidoreductase enzyme system and its major role as a newly emerged player in xenobiotic metabolism/degradation is discussed. PMID:22624627

  2. Contribution to catalysis of ornithine binding residues in ornithine N5-monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Reeder; Qureshi, Insaf A; Klancher, Catherine A; Rodriguez, Pedro J; Tanner, John J; Sobrado, Pablo

    2015-11-01

    The SidA ornithine N5-monooxygenase from Aspergillus fumigatus is a flavin monooxygenase that catalyzes the NADPH-dependent hydroxylation of ornithine. Herein we report a mutagenesis study targeting four residues that contact ornithine in crystal structures of SidA: Lys107, Asn293, Asn323, and Ser469. Mutation of Lys107 to Ala abolishes activity as measured in steady-state oxygen consumption and ornithine hydroxylation assays, indicating that the ionic interaction of Lys107 with the carboxylate of ornithine is essential for catalysis. Mutation of Asn293, Asn323, or Ser469 individually to Ala results in >14-fold increases in Km values for ornithine. Asn323 to Ala also increases the rate constant for flavin reduction by NADPH by 18-fold. Asn323 is unique among the four ornithine binding residues in that it also interacts with NADPH by forming a hydrogen bond with the nicotinamide ribose. The crystal structure of N323A complexed with NADP(+) and ornithine shows that the nicontinamide riboside group of NADP is disordered. This result suggests that the increase in flavin reduction rate results from an increase in conformational space available to the enzyme-bound NADP(H). Asn323 thus facilitates ornithine binding at the expense of hindering flavin reduction, which demonstrates the delicate balance that exists within protein-ligand interaction networks in enzyme active sites. PMID:26375201

  3. Electron-transfer reactions and functionalization of cytochrome P450cam monooxygenase system in reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Hirofumi; Michizoe, Junji; Maruyama, Tatsuo; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2004-06-22

    Enzyme-based electron-transfer reactions involved in the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system were investigated in nanostructural reverse micelles. A bacterial flavoprotein, putidaredoxin reductase (PdR), was activated and shown to be capable of catalyzing the electron transport from NADH to electron-carrier proteins such as cytochrome b5 (tCyt-b5) and putidaredoxin (Pdx) in reverse micelles. Ferric tCyt-b5 in reverse micelles was effectively converted to its ferrous form by the exogenous addition of separately prepared reverse micellar solution harboring PdR and NADH. The fact that direct interactions of macromolecular proteins should be possible in the reverse micellar system encouraged us to functionalize a multicomponent monooxygenase system composed of the bacterial cytochrome P450cam (P450cam), putidaredoxin (Pdx), and PdR in reverse micelles. The successful camphor hydroxylation reaction catalyzed by P450cam was significantly dependent on the coexistence of Pdx, PdR, and NADH but not H2O2, suggesting that the oxygen-transfer reactions proceeded via a "monooxygenation" mechanism. This is the first report of a multicomponent cytochrome P450 system exhibiting enzymatic activity in organic media. PMID:15986701

  4. Component Interactions and Electron Transfer in Toluene/o-Xylene Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The multicomponent protein toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) activates molecular oxygen to oxidize aromatic hydrocarbons. Prior to dioxygen activation, two electrons are injected into each of two diiron(III) units of the hydroxylase, a process that involves three redox active proteins: the ToMO hydroxylase (ToMOH), Rieske protein (ToMOC), and an NADH oxidoreductase (ToMOF). In addition to these three proteins, a small regulatory protein is essential for catalysis (ToMOD). Through steady state and pre-steady state kinetics studies, we show that ToMOD attenuates electron transfer from ToMOC to ToMOH in a concentration-dependent manner. At substoichiometric concentrations, ToMOD increases the rate of turnover, which we interpret to be a consequence of opening a pathway for oxygen transport to the catalytic diiron center in ToMOH. Excess ToMOD inhibits steady state catalysis in a manner that depends on ToMOC concentration. Through rapid kinetic assays, we demonstrate that ToMOD attenuates formation of the ToMOC–ToMOH complex. These data, coupled with protein docking studies, support a competitive model in which ToMOD and ToMOC compete for the same binding site on the hydroxylase. These results are discussed in the context of other studies of additional proteins in the superfamily of bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases. PMID:25402597

  5. The reduced flavin-dependent monooxygenase SfnG converts dimethylsulfone to methanesulfinate.

    PubMed

    Wicht, Denyce K

    2016-08-15

    The biochemical pathway through which sulfur may be assimilated from dimethylsulfide (DMS) is proposed to proceed via oxidation of DMS to dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and subsequent conversion of DMSO to dimethylsulfone (DMSO2). Analogous chemical oxidation processes involving biogenic DMS in the atmosphere result in the deposition of DMSO2 into the terrestrial environment. Elucidating the enzymatic pathways that involve DMSO2 contribute to our understanding of the global sulfur cycle. Dimethylsulfone monooxygenase SfnG and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) reductase MsuE from the genome of the aerobic soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 were produced in Escherichia coli, purified, and biochemically characterized. The enzyme MsuE functions as a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent FMN reductase with apparent steady state kinetic parameters of Km = 69 μM and kcat/Km = 9 min(-1) μM (-1) using NADH as the variable substrate, and Km = 8 μM and kcat/Km = 105 min(-1) μM (-1) using FMN as the variable substrate. The enzyme SfnG functions as a flavoprotein monooxygenase and converts DMSO2 to methanesulfinate in the presence of FMN, NADH, and MsuE, as evidenced by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The results suggest that methanesulfinate is a biochemical intermediate in sulfur assimilation. PMID:27392454

  6. Steady-state kinetic analysis of soluble methane mono-oxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed Central

    Green, J; Dalton, H

    1986-01-01

    A steady-state kinetic analysis of purified soluble methane mono-oxygenase of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) was performed. The enzyme was found to follow a concerted-substitution mechanism. Methane binds to the enzyme followed by NADH, which reacts to yield reduced enzyme and NAD+. The reduced enzyme-methane complex binds O2 to give a second ternary complex, which breaks down to release water and methanol. In this way the enzyme can control the supply of electrons to the active site to coincide with the arrival of methane. Product-inhibition studies (with propylene as substrate) supported the reaction mechanism proposed. Ki values for NAD+ and propylene oxide are reported. The Km for NADH varied from 25 microM to 300 microM, depending on the nature of the hydrocarbon substrate, and thus supports the proposed reaction sequence. With methane as substrate the Km values for methane, NADH and O2 were shown to be 3 microM, 55.8 microM and 16.8 microM respectively. With propylene as substrate the Km values for propylene, NADH and O2 were 0.94 microM, 25.2 microM and 12.7-15.9 microM respectively. Methane mono-oxygenase was shown to be well adapted to the oxidation of methane compared with other straight-chain alkanes. PMID:3098230

  7. NMR structure of the flavin domain from soluble methane monooxygenase reductase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Chatwood, Lisa L; Müller, Jens; Gross, John D; Wagner, Gerhard; Lippard, Stephen J

    2004-09-28

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) catalyzes the hydroxylation of methane by dioxygen to methanol, the first step in carbon assimilation by methanotrophs. This multicomponent system transfers electrons from NADH through a reductase component to the non-heme diiron center in the hydroxylase where O(2) is activated. The reductase component comprises three distinct domains, a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin domain along with FAD- and NADH-binding domains. We report the solution structure of the reduced 27.6 kDa FAD- and NADH-binding domains (MMOR-FAD) of the reductase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). The FAD-binding domain consists of a six-stranded antiparallel beta-barrel and one alpha-helix, with the first 10 N-terminal residues unstructured. In the interface between the two domains, the FAD cofactor is tightly bound in an unprecedented extended conformation. The NADH-binding domain consists of a five-stranded parallel beta-sheet with four alpha-helices packing closely around this sheet. MMOR-FAD is structurally homologous to other FAD-containing oxidoreductases, and we expect similar structures for the FAD/NADH-binding domains of reductases that occur in other multicomponent monooxygenases. PMID:15379538

  8. Characterization and structural analysis of an active particulate methane monooxygenase trimer from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Kitmitto, Ashraf; Myronova, Natalia; Basu, Piku; Dalton, Howard

    2005-08-23

    The oxidation of methane to methanol in methanotrophs is catalyzed by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO). Two distinct forms of this enzyme exist, a soluble cytoplasmic MMO (sMMO) and a membrane-bound particulate form (pMMO). We describe here the biochemical characterization of a stable and active purified pMMO hydroxylase (pMMO-H) and report a three-dimensional (3D) structure, determined by electron microscopy and single-particle analysis at 23 A resolution. Both biochemical and structural data indicate that pMMO hydroxylase is trimeric, with each monomer unit comprised of three polypeptides of 47, 26, and 23 kDa. Comparison of the recent crystal structure [Lieberman, R. L., and Rosenzweig, A. C. (2005) Nature 434, 177] of an uncharacterized pMMO-H complex with the three-dimensional (3D) structure determined here yielded a good match between the principal features and the organization of the enzyme monomers into trimers. The data presented here advance our current understanding of particulate methane monooxygenase function by the characterization of an active form of the enzyme and the corresponding 3D structure. PMID:16101279

  9. Increased monooxygenase activity associated with resistance to permethrin in Pediculus humanus capitis (Anoplura: Pediculidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    González Audino, P; Barrios, S; Vassena, C; Mougabure Cueto, G; Zerba, E; Picollo, M I

    2005-05-01

    We studied the profile of permethrin resistance in populations of head lice infesting children 6-12 yr old in schools and their homes in and around Buenos Aires, Argentina. Five permethrin-resistant populations with different levels of resistance were collected: Hogar Loyola (HL), Republica de Turquia (RT), Hogar Mitre (HM), Guardia de Honor (GH), and Ricardo Guiraldes (RG). One susceptible population, Bandera Argentina (BA), also was collected. Their level of resistance was evaluated, and results showed resistance ratios of 13 for HL, 16 for RT, 22 for HM, 61 for GH, and 69 for RG. To elucidate the possible involvement of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system in conferring permethrin resistance, ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase (ECOD) activity was measured in abdomens of individual third instars and adults by using a fluorometric assay. The ECOD activity was lower in the susceptible BA population (4.7 ng per louse) than in the resistant ones (13.7 ng per louse for RG, 12.3 ng per louse for GH, 8.6 ng per louse for RT, and 8.2 ng per louse for HL). ECOD activity was significantly correlated with the level of resistance in the field populations (r = 0.97, P = 0.0009), suggesting a role for cytochrome monooxygenase P450 system in permethrin resistance by head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer. PMID:15962785

  10. Investigation of the enzymology and pharmacology of novel substrates and inhibitors of dopamine beta-monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S.F.

    1987-01-01

    Dopamine beta-monooxygenase (DBM) was shown to catalyze the selenoxidation of 2-(phenylseleno)ethylamines, selenium-containing analogues of dopamine, by the normal monooxygenase pathway. The compounds 2-(phenylseleno)-ethylamine (PAESe), 2-(4'-hydroxyphenylseleno)ethylamine (pOH PAESe), and 1-(phenylseleno)-2-propylamine (Me PAESe) were synthesized and fully characterized as DBM substrates. Two other classes of compounds were investigated as potential alternate substrates for DBM. The possibility of stereoselective sulfonylation of 2-(phenylsulfenyl)- ethylamine (PAESO) was considered. A unique class of compounds, 2-(phenylthio)ethanols were designed and synthesized as DBM substrates but were found to be a novel class of potent competitive inhibitors of DBM with respect to tyramine. Preliminary experiments were also performed in an effort to demonstrate that the potent antihypertensive and indirect-acting sympathomimetic activity of 2-(phenylthio)ethylamine (PAES) was a result of DBM-oxygenation of this compound in vivo. The specific reserpine-sensitive uptake of (/sup 3/H)-norepinephrine into rat brain synaptosomes was demonstrated as was the synaptosomal conversion of (/sup 3/H)-dopamine to (/sup 3/H)-norepinephrine.

  11. Inactivation of peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase by cinnamic acid analogs.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Neil R; Lowe, Edward W; Battistini, Matthew R; Leahy, James W; Merkler, David J

    2016-08-01

    Peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) is a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the final reaction in the maturation of α-amidated peptide hormones. Peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) is the PAM domain responsible for the copper-, ascorbate- and O2-dependent hydroxylation of a glycine-extended peptide. Peptidylamidoglycolate lyase is the PAM domain responsible for the Zn(II)-dependent dealkylation of the α-hydroxyglycine-containing precursor to the final α-amidated peptide. We report herein that cinnamic acid and cinnamic acid analogs are inhibitors or inactivators of PHM. The inactivation chemistry exhibited by the cinnamates exhibits all the attributes of a suicide-substrate. However, we find no evidence for the formation of an irreversible linkage between cinnamate and PHM in the inactivated enzyme. Our data support the reversible formation of a Michael adduct between an active site nucleophile and cinnamate that leads to inactive enzyme. Our data are of significance given that cinnamates are found in foods, perfumes, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. PMID:26024288

  12. Control of substrate access to the active site in methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jae; McCormick, Michael S; Lippard, Stephen J; Cho, Uhn-Soo

    2013-02-21

    Methanotrophs consume methane as their major carbon source and have an essential role in the global carbon cycle by limiting escape of this greenhouse gas to the atmosphere. These bacteria oxidize methane to methanol by soluble and particulate methane monooxygenases (MMOs). Soluble MMO contains three protein components, a 251-kilodalton hydroxylase (MMOH), a 38.6-kilodalton reductase (MMOR), and a 15.9-kilodalton regulatory protein (MMOB), required to couple electron consumption with substrate hydroxylation at the catalytic diiron centre of MMOH. Until now, the role of MMOB has remained ambiguous owing to a lack of atomic-level information about the MMOH-MMOB (hereafter termed H-B) complex. Here we remedy this deficiency by providing a crystal structure of H-B, which reveals the manner by which MMOB controls the conformation of residues in MMOH crucial for substrate access to the active site. MMOB docks at the α(2)β(2) interface of α(2)β(2)γ(2) MMOH, and triggers simultaneous conformational changes in the α-subunit that modulate oxygen and methane access as well as proton delivery to the diiron centre. Without such careful control by MMOB of these substrate routes to the diiron active site, the enzyme operates as an NADH oxidase rather than a monooxygenase. Biological catalysis involving small substrates is often accomplished in nature by large proteins and protein complexes. The structure presented in this work provides an elegant example of this principle. PMID:23395959

  13. Effects of nutrition and alcohol on the microsomal monooxygenase system (MMS) of rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Ronis, M.; Huang, J.; Ingelman-Sundberg, M.; Badger, T.M. Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Center, Little Rock )

    1991-03-15

    Ethanol is a known inducer of the hepatic cytochrome P450 dependent microsomal monooxygenase system (MMS). As a consequence, ethanol intake affects the clearance and metabolism of many drugs and other xenobiotics including acetaminophen, enflurane, carbon tetrachloride and ethanol itself. The major ethanol inducible cytochrome P450 isozyme in the rat liver, CYP 2E1, has been well characterized. Much less is known concerning extrahepatic effects of ethanol on the monooxygenase system. In the current study, the effects of diet and alcohol were examined on MMS activities and cytochrome P450 expression in the kidneys of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Three diets containing no ethanol and two diets containing ethanol at 35% of total calories were studied. Renal MMS activities were measured using enzyme specific substrates and isozyme apoprotein levels were determined by Western blot analysis using antibodies directed against rat hepatic cytochrome P450s CYP 2E1, CYP 2A1 and CYP 3A2. Several diet and alcohol induced effects were observed, including a 5-fold diet-independent ethanol induction of CYP 2E1 cross reactive protein. No diet or ethanol effects were observed in levels of CYP 2A1 or CYP 3A2 cross reactive proteins.

  14. Structural and biochemical characterization of EDTA monooxygenase and its physical interaction with a partner flavin reductase.

    PubMed

    Jun, Se-Young; Lewis, Kevin M; Youn, Buhyun; Xun, Luying; Kang, ChulHee

    2016-06-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) is currently the most abundant organic pollutant due to its recalcitrance and extensive use. Only a few bacteria can degrade it, using EDTA monooxygenase (EmoA) to initiate the degradation. EmoA is an FMNH2 -dependent monooxygenase that requires an NADH:FMN oxidoreductase (EmoB) to provide FMNH2 as a cosubstrate. Although EmoA has been identified from Chelativorans (ex. Mesorhizobium) sp. BNC1, its catalytic mechanism is unknown. Crystal structures of EmoA revealed a domain-like insertion into a TIM-barrel, which might serve as a flexible lid for the active site. Docking of MgEDTA(2-) into EmoA identified an intricate hydrogen bond network connected to Tyr(71) , which should potentially lower its pKa. Tyr(71) , along with nearby Glu(70) and a peroxy flavin, facilitates a keto-enol transition of the leaving acetyl group of EDTA. Further, for the first time, the physical interaction between EmoA and EmoB was observed by ITC, molecular docking and enzyme kinetic assay, which enhanced both EmoA and EmoB activities probably through coupled channelling of FMNH2 . PMID:26928990

  15. Process development for oxidations of hydrophobic compounds applying cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in-vitro.

    PubMed

    Brummund, Jan; Müller, Monika; Schmitges, Thomas; Kaluzna, Iwona; Mink, Daniel; Hilterhaus, Lutz; Liese, Andreas

    2016-09-10

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are a unique family of enzymes that are able to catalyze regio- and stereospecific oxidations for a broad substrate range. However, due to limited enzyme activities and stabilities, hydrophobicity of substrates, as well as the necessity of a continuous electron and oxygen supply the implementation of P450s for industrial processes remains challenging. Aim of this study was to point out key aspects for the development of an efficient synthesis concept for cytochrome P450 catalyzed oxidations. In order to regenerate the natural cofactor NADPH, a glucose dehydrogenase was applied. The low water soluble terpene α-ionone was used as substrate for the model reaction system. The studies reveal that an addition of surfactants in combination with low volumetric amounts of co-solvent can significantly increase substrate availability and reaction rates. Furthermore, these additives facilitated a reliable sampling procedure during the process. Another key factor for the process design was the oxygen supply. Based on various investigations, a bubble-aerated stirred tank reactor in batch mode represents a promising reactor concept for P450 oxidations. Main restriction of the investigated reaction system was the low process stability of the P450 monooxygenase, characterized by maximum total turnover numbers of ∼4100molα-ionone/molP450. PMID:27396939

  16. Whole genome co-expression analysis of soybean cytochrome P450 genes identifies nodulation-specific P450 monooxygenases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) catalyze oxidation of various substrates using oxygen and NAD(P)H. Plant P450s are involved in the biosynthesis of primary and secondary metabolites performing diverse biological functions. The recent availability of soybean genome sequence allows us to ident...

  17. Using tyrosinase as a monophenol monooxygenase: A combined strategy for effective inhibition of melanin formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Baek, Kiheon; Lee, Ju-Eun; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2016-04-01

    Tyrosinase is a binuclear copper-containing metalloprotein that leads the fast and regio-selective o-hydroxylation of monophenols to o-diphenols. However, the subsequent second oxidation to produce o-quinones, i.e., melanin precursors, from the o-diphenols has restricted its use to the production of functional o-diphenol derivatives. Herein, we present a combined strategy for the effective inhibition of melanin formation in tyrosinase reaction, which allows the use of tyrosinase as a monophenol monooxygenase. The o-diphenolic products were protected from being oxidized in the tyrosinase reaction by borate ions and L-ascorbic acid (LAA). Borate-o-diphenol complexes were favorable formed at high pH and consequentially protected the o-diphenolic products from the catecholase activity of tyrosinase. LAA not only directly reduced the byproduct, o-quinones, into o-diphenols but also assisted the completion of the tyrosinase reaction cycle by removing a hydroxyl group attached to the copper metal cluster at the active site of the met-form tyrosinase. The regio-selective o-hydroxylation of 7,4'-dihydroxyisoflavone (daidzein) to produce 7,3',4'-trihydroxyisoflavone (3'-ODI) was successfully carried out by whole E. coli cell biotransformation with heterologously expressed tyrosinase from Bacillus megaterium. The yield of this o-hydroxylation of 5 mM daidzein in one-pot 400 mL reaction was ca. 100% in 90 min and the productivity was 16.3 mg 3'-ODI · L(-1)  ·  h(-1)  ·  DCW mg(-1) , which is considerably higher than that of other monooxygenases. The method effectively abolished melanin synthesis, so that the o-diphenolic product remained stable without enzyme inactivation. Other monophenolic phytochemicals such as resveratrol and genistein could be subjected to the same strategy. After 1 h, 1 mM of genistein and resveratrol were both converted to orobol and piceatannol, respectively, with ca. 95% conversion yield. These results support the strong

  18. Biomaterials for mRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K. G.; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R.; Zetter, Bruce R.; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  19. Biomaterials for mRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K G; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R; Zetter, Bruce R; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-12-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  20. Hepatic microsomal monooxygenase activity in black-crowned night herons (BCNHS) from the Chesapeake basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melancon, M.J.; Rattner, B.A.; Rice, C.P.; Hines, R.K.; Eisemann, J.

    1992-01-01

    In a continuation of our studies on the use of hepatic cytochromes P450 as a biomarker for contaminant exposure, BCNH eggs were collected from Baltimore Harbor (BH) (n = 20), Washington National Zoo (WNZ) (n = 13) and Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR) (reference location) (n = 20). Eggs were artificially incubated and sacrificed at pipping. Livers were snap frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored at -80?C until assay. Hepatic microsomes were prepared by differential centrifugation of homogenates and assayed for protein, benzyloxy-resorufin-O-dealkylase, (BROD) ethoxyresorufinO-dealkylase (EROD) and pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (PROD). Monooxygenase assays were run in triplicate using a computer-coupled fluorometric microwell plate scanner. Values for EROD and BROD, but not PROD, from BH and WNZ were significantly greater (approximately double) than those from CNWR. Organochlorine pesticide residues were much higher in carcasses from BH and WNZ as compared to CNWR. Carcasses are presently being analyzed for PCB congeners.

  1. Rv1894c Is a Novel Hypoxia-Induced Nitronate Monooxygenase Required for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Lee G.; Karakousis, Petros C.

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is difficult to cure, requiring a minimum of 6 months of treatment with multiple antibiotics. Small numbers of organisms are able to tolerate the antibiotics and persist in the lungs of infected humans, but they still require some metabolic activity to survive. We studied the role of the hypoxia-induced Rv1894c gene in Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence in guinea pigs, which develop hypoxic, necrotic granulomas histologically resembling those in humans and found this gene to be necessary for full bacillary growth and survival. We characterized the function of the encoded enzyme as a nitronate monooxygenase, which is needed to prevent the buildup of toxic products during hypoxic metabolism and is negatively regulated by the transcriptional repressor KstR. Future studies will focus on developing small-molecule inhibitors that target Rv1894c and its homologs, with the goal of killing persistent bacteria, thereby shortening the time needed to treat tuberculosis. PMID:23408846

  2. Nitronate monooxygenase, a model for anionic flavin semiquinone intermediates in oxidative catalysis.

    PubMed

    Gadda, Giovanni; Francis, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Nitronate monooxygenase (NMO), formerly referred to as 2-nitropropane dioxygenase, is an FMN-dependent enzyme that uses molecular oxygen to oxidize (anionic) alkyl nitronates and, in the case of the enzyme from Neurospora crassa, (neutral) nitroalkanes to the corresponding carbonyl compounds and nitrite. Over the past 5 years, a resurgence of interest on the enzymology of NMO has driven several studies aimed at the elucidation of the mechanistic and structural properties of the enzyme. This review article summarizes the knowledge gained from these studies on NMO, which has been emerging as a model system for the investigation of anionic flavosemiquinone intermediates in the oxidative catalysis of organic molecules, and for the effect that branching of reaction intermediates has on both the kinetic parameters and isotope effects associated with enzymatic reactions. A comparison of the catalytic mechanism of NMO with other flavin-dependent enzymes that oxidize nitroalkane and nitronates is also presented. PMID:19577534

  3. Structure and boosting activity of a starch-degrading lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Lo Leggio, Leila; Simmons, Thomas J.; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N.; Frandsen, Kristian E. H.; Hemsworth, Glyn R.; Stringer, Mary A.; von Freiesleben, Pernille; Tovborg, Morten; Johansen, Katja S.; De Maria, Leonardo; Harris, Paul V.; Soong, Chee-Leong; Dupree, Paul; Tryfona, Theodora; Lenfant, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Davies, Gideon J.; Walton, Paul H.

    2015-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are recently discovered enzymes that oxidatively deconstruct polysaccharides. LPMOs are fundamental in the effective utilization of these substrates by bacteria and fungi; moreover, the enzymes have significant industrial importance. We report here the activity, spectroscopy and three-dimensional structure of a starch-active LPMO, a representative of the new CAZy AA13 family. We demonstrate that these enzymes generate aldonic acid-terminated malto-oligosaccharides from retrograded starch and boost significantly the conversion of this recalcitrant substrate to maltose by β-amylase. The detailed structure of the enzyme’s active site yields insights into the mechanism of action of this important class of enzymes. PMID:25608804

  4. Searching for monooxygenases and hydrolases in bacteria from an extreme environment.

    PubMed

    da Cruz, Georgiana F; Angolini, Célio F F; de Oliveira, Luciana G; Lopes, Patrícia F; de Vasconcellos, Suzan P; Crespim, Elaine; de Oliveira, Valéria M; dos Santos Neto, Eugênio V; Marsaioli, Anita J

    2010-06-01

    Microbial oxidation potentials of extremophiles recovered from Pampo Sul oil field, Campos Basin, Brazil, in pure culture or in consortia, were investigated using high-throughput screening (HTS) and multibioreactions. Camphor (1), cis-jasmone (2), 2-methyl-cyclohexanone (3), 1,2-epoxyoctane (4), phenylethyl acetate (5), phenylethyl propionate (6), and phenylethyl octanoate (7) were used to perform multibioreaction assays. Eighty-two bacterial isolates were recovered from oil and formation water samples and those presenting outstanding activities in HTS assays were identified by sequencing their 16S rRNA genes. These results revealed that most microorganisms belonged to the genus Bacillus and presented alcohol dehydrogenase, monooxygenase, epoxide hydrolase, esterase, and lipase activities. PMID:20204614

  5. Structural basis for substrate targeting and catalysis by fungal polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Beeson, William T; Phillips, Christopher M; Marletta, Michael A; Cate, Jamie H D

    2012-06-01

    The use of cellulases remains a major cost in the production of renewable fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Fungi secrete copper-dependent polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs) that oxidatively cleave crystalline cellulose and improve the effectiveness of cellulases. However, the means by which PMOs recognize and cleave their substrates in the plant cell wall remain unclear. Here, we present structures of Neurospora crassa PMO-2 and PMO-3 at 1.10 and 1.37 Å resolution, respectively. In the structures, dioxygen species are found in the active sites, consistent with the proposed cleavage mechanism. Structural and sequence comparisons between PMOs also reveal that the enzyme substrate-binding surfaces contain highly varied aromatic amino acid and glycosylation positions. The structures reported here provide evidence for a wide range of PMO substrate recognition patterns in the plant cell wall, including binding modes that traverse multiple glucan chains. PMID:22578542

  6. Expression and characterization of a lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiyan; Zhao, Yong; Cao, Hailong; Mou, Guangqing; Yin, Heng

    2015-08-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are recently discovered oxidative enzymes that are capable of oxidative cleavage of recalcitrant polysaccharides such as chitin or cellulose. Despite the importance of LPMOs in biomass conversion and the large number of lpmo genes in microorganisms, only a few LPMOs have been well studied, and further characterization of these proteins is thus of interest. In this study, a chitin-active AA10 family LPMO from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki, BtLPMO10A, is described. This enzyme generates even-numbered oxidized oligosaccharides as the dominated products from crystalline chitin, however, interestingly, when colloidal chitin is used as the substrate, a ladder of oxidized oligosaccharides is observed. These results provide new insights into the action mode of LPMOs that may be affected by the substrates. PMID:25936286

  7. Discovery and characterization of a new family of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Hemsworth, Glyn R; Henrissat, Bernard; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2014-02-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a recently discovered class of enzymes capable of oxidizing recalcitrant polysaccharides. They are attracting considerable attention owing to their potential use in biomass conversion, notably in the production of biofuels. Previous studies have identified two discrete sequence-based families of these enzymes termed AA9 (formerly GH61) and AA10 (formerly CBM33). Here, we report the discovery of a third family of LPMOs. Using a chitin-degrading exemplar from Aspergillus oryzae, we show that the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme shares some features of the previous two classes of LPMOs, including a copper active center featuring the 'histidine brace' active site, but is distinct in terms of its active site details and its EPR spectroscopy. The newly characterized AA11 family expands the LPMO clan, potentially broadening both the range of potential substrates and the types of reactive copper-oxygen species formed at the active site of LPMOs. PMID:24362702

  8. Direct electrochemistry of the hydroxylase of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Kazlauskaite, J; Hill, H A; Wilkins, P C; Dalton, H

    1996-10-15

    The redox properties of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) have been thoroughly investigated. Previous studies used redox indicator titrations and spectroscopic methods for the determination of the concentrations of reduced species. Herein we report, for the first time, direct electrochemistry (i.e. without the use of mediators) of the diiron centers of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus (Bath) at a modified gold electrode giving rise to two waves at 4(+/- 10) mV and -386(+/- 14) mV versus saturated calomel electrode (SCE). In addition, the effects of proteins B and B' on the redox reactions were determined. The redox potentials of the complex with protein B are -25(+/- 14) mV and -433(+/- 8) mV versus SCE whereas protein B' had no effect though it did alter the effect of protein B on the redox potentials. PMID:8917455

  9. Fourier transform infrared characterization of the azido complex of methane monooxygenase hydroxylase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Lu, Shen; Sazinsky, Matthew H; Whittaker, James W; Lippard, Stephen J; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre

    2005-03-30

    The azido complex formed in oxidized methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) was investigated with resonance Raman and FTIR techniques. These experiments show the presence of a nuas(NNN) at approximately 2077 cm-1 which splits to two components at 2059 and 2073 cm-1 with 15N14N2. The vibrational data are assigned to an azido complex bound terminally to one iron(III) at the diiron center. When the azido complex is illuminated at 15 K, a new nuas(NNN) is observed at 2136 cm-1 which is assigned to a photodissociated HN3 within the substrate pocket. We propose a model where an aqua ligand engages a hydrogen bond interaction with the 1N atom of the azido group and acts as at a proton donor during the photolysis process. PMID:15783178

  10. Crystal Structure of Dicamba Monooxygenase: A Rieske Nonheme Oxygenase that Catalyzes Oxidative Demethylation

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, Razvan; Jiang, Wen Zhi; Weeks, Donald P.; Wilson, Mark A.

    2009-08-28

    Dicamba (3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid) is a widely used herbicide that is efficiently degraded by soil microbes. These microbes use a novel Rieske nonheme oxygenase, dicamba monooxygenase (DMO), to catalyze the oxidative demethylation of dicamba to 3,6-dichlorosalicylic acid (DCSA) and formaldehyde. We have determined the crystal structures of DMO in the free state, bound to its substrate dicamba, and bound to the product DCSA at 2.10-1.75 {angstrom} resolution. The structures show that the DMO active site uses a combination of extensive hydrogen bonding and steric interactions to correctly orient chlorinated, ortho-substituted benzoic-acid-like substrates for catalysis. Unlike other Rieske aromatic oxygenases, DMO oxygenates the exocyclic methyl group, rather than the aromatic ring, of its substrate. This first crystal structure of a Rieske demethylase shows that the Rieske oxygenase structural scaffold can be co-opted to perform varied types of reactions on xenobiotic substrates.

  11. Recent insights into copper-containing lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Hemsworth, Glyn R; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2013-10-01

    Recently the role of oxidative enzymes in the degradation of polysaccharides by saprophytic bacteria and fungi was uncovered, challenging the classical model of polysaccharide degradation of being solely via a hydrolytic pathway. 3D structural analyses of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases of both bacterial AA10 (formerly CBM33) and fungal AA9 (formerly GH61) enzymes revealed structures with β-sandwich folds containing an active site with a metal coordinated by an N-terminal histidine. Following some initial confusion about the identity of the metal ion it has now been shown that these enzymes are copper-dependent oxygenases. Here we assess recent developments in the academic literature, focussing on the structures of the copper active sites. We provide critical comparisons with known small-molecules studies of copper-oxygen complexes and with copper methane monoxygenase, another of nature's powerful copper oxygenases. PMID:23769965

  12. Cell Non-Autonomous Activation of Flavin-containing Monooxygenase Promotes Longevity and Healthspan

    PubMed Central

    Leiser, Scott F.; Fletcher, Marissa; Leonard, Alison; Primitivo, Melissa; Rintala, Nicholas; Ramos, Fresnida J.; Miller, Dana L.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) increases lifespan and healthspan in nematodes through an unknown mechanism. We report that neuronal stabilization of HIF-1 mediates these effects in C. elegans through a cell non-autonomous signal to the intestine resulting in activation of the xenobiotic detoxification enzyme flavin-containing monooxygenase-2 (FMO-2). This pro-longevity signal requires the serotonin biosynthetic enzyme TPH-1 in neurons and the serotonin receptor SER-7 in the intestine. Intestinal FMO-2 is also activated by dietary restriction (DR) and necessary for DR-mediated lifespan extension, suggesting that this enzyme represents a point of convergence for two distinct longevity pathways. FMOs are conserved in eukaryotes and induced by multiple lifespan-extending interventions in mice, suggesting that these enzymes may play a critical role in promoting health and longevity across phyla. PMID:26586189

  13. Single-domain flavoenzymes trigger lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases for oxidative degradation of cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Garajova, Sona; Mathieu, Yann; Beccia, Maria Rosa; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Biaso, Frédéric; Fanuel, Mathieu; Ropartz, David; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Record, Eric; Rogniaux, Hélène; Henrissat, Bernard; Berrin, Jean-Guy

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic conversion of plant biomass has been recently revolutionized by the discovery of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) that carry out oxidative cleavage of polysaccharides. These very powerful enzymes are abundant in fungal saprotrophs. LPMOs require activation by electrons that can be provided by cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs), but as some fungi lack CDH-encoding genes, other recycling enzymes must exist. We investigated the ability of AA3_2 flavoenzymes secreted under lignocellulolytic conditions to trigger oxidative cellulose degradation by AA9 LPMOs. Among the flavoenzymes tested, we show that glucose dehydrogenase and aryl-alcohol quinone oxidoreductases are catalytically efficient electron donors for LPMOs. These single-domain flavoenzymes display redox potentials compatible with electron transfer between partners. Our findings extend the array of enzymes which regulate the oxidative degradation of cellulose by lignocellulolytic fungi. PMID:27312718

  14. Fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases bind starch and β-cyclodextrin similarly to amylolytic hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Nekiunaite, Laura; Isaksen, Trine; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2016-08-01

    Starch-binding modules of family 20 (CBM20) are present in 60% of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) catalyzing the oxidative breakdown of starch, which highlights functional importance in LPMO activity. The substrate-binding properties of starch-active LMPOs, however, are currently unexplored. Affinities and binding-thermodynamics of two recombinant fungal LPMOs toward starch and β-cyclodextrin were shown to be similar to fungal CBM20s. Amplex Red assays showed ascorbate and Cu-dependent activity, which was inhibited in the presence of β-cylodextrin and amylose. Phylogenetically, the clustering of CBM20s from starch-targeting LPMOs and hydrolases was in accord with taxonomy and did not correlate to appended catalytic activity. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the CBM20-binding scaffold is retained in the evolution of hydrolytic and oxidative starch-degrading activities. PMID:27397613

  15. Single-domain flavoenzymes trigger lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases for oxidative degradation of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Garajova, Sona; Mathieu, Yann; Beccia, Maria Rosa; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Biaso, Frédéric; Fanuel, Mathieu; Ropartz, David; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Record, Eric; Rogniaux, Hélène; Henrissat, Bernard; Berrin, Jean-Guy

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic conversion of plant biomass has been recently revolutionized by the discovery of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) that carry out oxidative cleavage of polysaccharides. These very powerful enzymes are abundant in fungal saprotrophs. LPMOs require activation by electrons that can be provided by cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs), but as some fungi lack CDH-encoding genes, other recycling enzymes must exist. We investigated the ability of AA3_2 flavoenzymes secreted under lignocellulolytic conditions to trigger oxidative cellulose degradation by AA9 LPMOs. Among the flavoenzymes tested, we show that glucose dehydrogenase and aryl-alcohol quinone oxidoreductases are catalytically efficient electron donors for LPMOs. These single-domain flavoenzymes display redox potentials compatible with electron transfer between partners. Our findings extend the array of enzymes which regulate the oxidative degradation of cellulose by lignocellulolytic fungi. PMID:27312718

  16. Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 as a potential player in diabetes-associated atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ji; Ling, Alisha V; Manthena, Praveen V; Gearing, Mary E; Graham, Mark J; Crooke, Rosanne M; Croce, Kevin J; Esquejo, Ryan M; Clish, Clary B; Vicent, David; Biddinger, Sudha B

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-documented association between insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease, the key targets of insulin relevant to the development of cardiovascular disease are not known. Here, using non-biased profiling methods, we identify the enzyme flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) to be a target of insulin. FMO3 produces trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which has recently been suggested to promote atherosclerosis in mice and humans. We show that FMO3 is suppressed by insulin in vitro, increased in obese/insulin resistant male mice and increased in obese/insulin-resistant humans. Knockdown of FMO3 in insulin-resistant mice suppresses FoxO1, a central node for metabolic control, and entirely prevents the development of hyperglycaemia, hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. Taken together, these data indicate that FMO3 is required for FoxO1 expression and the development of metabolic dysfunction. PMID:25849138

  17. Structure, dynamics, and function of the monooxygenase P450 BM-3: insights from computer simulations studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roccatano, Danilo

    2015-07-01

    The monooxygenase P450 BM-3 is a NADPH-dependent fatty acid hydroxylase enzyme isolated from soil bacterium Bacillus megaterium. As a pivotal member of cytochrome P450 superfamily, it has been intensely studied for the comprehension of structure-dynamics-function relationships in this class of enzymes. In addition, due to its peculiar properties, it is also a promising enzyme for biochemical and biomedical applications. However, despite the efforts, the full understanding of the enzyme structure and dynamics is not yet achieved. Computational studies, particularly molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, have importantly contributed to this endeavor by providing new insights at an atomic level regarding the correlations between structure, dynamics, and function of the protein. This topical review summarizes computational studies based on MD simulations of the cytochrome P450 BM-3 and gives an outlook on future directions.

  18. Crystal Structure of Albaflavenone Monooxygenase Containing a Moonlighting Terpene Synthase Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Bin; Lei, Li; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.; Lin, Xin; Cane, David E.; Kelly, Steven L.; Yuan, Hang; Lamb, David C.; Waterman, Michael R.

    2010-01-08

    Albaflavenone synthase (CYP170A1) is a monooxygenase catalyzing the final two steps in the biosynthesis of this antibiotic in the soil bacterium, Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). Interestingly, CYP170A1 shows no stereo selection forming equal amounts of two albaflavenol epimers, each of which is oxidized in turn to albaflavenone. To explore the structural basis of the reaction mechanism, we have studied the crystal structures of both ligand-free CYP170A1 (2.6 {angstrom}) and complex of endogenous substrate (epi-isozizaene) with CYP170A1 (3.3 {angstrom}). The structure of the complex suggests that the proximal epi-isozizaene molecules may bind to the heme iron in two orientations. In addition, much to our surprise, we have found that albaflavenone synthase also has a second, completely distinct catalytic activity corresponding to the synthesis of farnesene isomers from farnesyl diphosphate. Within the cytochrome P450 {alpha}-helical domain both the primary sequence and x-ray structure indicate the presence of a novel terpene synthase active site that is moonlighting on the P450 structure. This includes signature sequences for divalent cation binding and an {alpha}-helical barrel. This barrel is unusual because it consists of only four helices rather than six found in all other terpene synthases. Mutagenesis establishes that this barrel is essential for the terpene synthase activity of CYP170A1 but not for the monooxygenase activity. This is the first bifunctional P450 discovered to have another active site moonlighting on it and the first time a terpene synthase active site is found moonlighting on another protein.

  19. Eukaryotic formylglycine-generating enzyme catalyses a monooxygenase type of reaction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jianhe; Alam, Sarfaraz; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; Mariappan, Malaiyalam; Rudolph, Markus Georg; May, Caroline; Dierks, Thomas; von Figura, Kurt; Schmidt, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    C α-formylglycine (FGly) is the catalytic residue of sulfatases in eukaryotes. It is generated by a unique post-translational modification catalysed by the FGly-generating enzyme (FGE) in the endoplasmic reticulum. FGE oxidizes a cysteine residue within the conserved CxPxR sequence motif of nascent sulfatase polypeptides to FGly. Here we show that this oxidation is strictly dependent on molecular oxygen (O2) and consumes 1 mol O2 per mol FGly formed. For maximal activity FGE requires an O2 concentration of 9% (105 μM). Sustained FGE activity further requires the presence of a thiol-based reductant such as DTT. FGly is also formed in the absence of DTT, but its formation ceases rapidly. Thus inactivated FGE accumulates in which the cysteine pair Cys336/Cys341 in the catalytic site is oxidized to form disulfide bridges between either Cys336 and Cys341 or Cys341 and the CxPxR cysteine of the sulfatase. These results strongly suggest that the Cys336/Cys341 pair is directly involved in the O2 -dependent conversion of the CxPxR cysteine to FGly. The available data characterize eukaryotic FGE as a monooxygenase, in which Cys336/Cys341 disulfide bridge formation donates the electrons required to reduce one oxygen atom of O2 to water while the other oxygen atom oxidizes the CxPxR cysteine to FGly. Regeneration of a reduced Cys336/Cys341 pair is accomplished in vivo by a yet unknown reductant of the endoplasmic reticulum or in vitro by DTT. Remarkably, this monooxygenase reaction utilizes O2 without involvement of any activating cofactor. PMID:26077311

  20. The biochemical mechanism of auxin biosynthesis by an arabidopsis YUCCA flavin-containing monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xinhua; Mashiguchi, Kiyoshi; Chen, Qingguo; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Kamiya, Yuji; Ojha, Sunil; DuBois, Jennifer; Ballou, David; Zhao, Yunde

    2013-01-18

    Auxin regulates every aspect of plant growth and development. Previous genetic studies demonstrated that YUCCA (YUC) flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) catalyze a rate-limiting step in auxin biosynthesis and that YUCs are essential for many developmental processes. We proposed that YUCs convert indole-3-pyruvate (IPA) to indole-3-acetate (IAA). However, the exact biochemical mechanism of YUCs has remained elusive. Here we present the biochemical characterization of recombinant Arabidopsis YUC6. Expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli, YUC6 contains FAD as a cofactor, which has peaks at 448 nm and 376 nm in the UV-visible spectrum. We show that YUC6 uses NADPH and oxygen to convert IPA to IAA. The first step of the YUC6-catalyzed reaction is the reduction of the FAD cofactor to FADH(-) by NADPH. Subsequently, FADH(-) reacts with oxygen to form a flavin-C4a-(hydro)peroxy intermediate, which we show has a maximum absorbance at 381 nm in its UV-visible spectrum. The final chemical step is the reaction of the C4a-intermediate with IPA to produce IAA. Although the sequences of the YUC enzymes are related to those of the mammalian FMOs, which oxygenate nucleophilic substrates, YUC6 oxygenates an electrophilic substrate (IPA). Nevertheless, both classes of enzymes form quasi-stable C4a-(hydro)peroxyl FAD intermediates. The YUC6 intermediate has a half-life of ∼20 s whereas that of some FMOs is >30 min. This work reveals the catalytic mechanism of the first known plant flavin monooxygenase and provides a foundation for further investigating how YUC activities are regulated in plants. PMID:23188833

  1. Form Follows Function: Structural and Catalytic Variation in the Class A Flavoprotein Monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Crozier-Reabe, Karen; Moran, Graham R.

    2012-01-01

    Flavoprotein monooxygenases (FPMOs) exhibit an array of mechanistic solutions to a common chemical objective; the monooxygenation of a target substrate. Each FPMO efficiently couples reduction of a flavin cofactor by NAD(P)H to oxygenation of the target substrate via a (hydro)peroxyflavin intermediate. This purpose of this review is to describe in detail the Class A flavoprotein hydroxylases (FPMO) in the context of the other FPMO classes (B–F). Both one and two component FPMOs are found in nature. Two-component enzymes require, in addition to the monooxygenase, the involvement of a reductase that first catalyzes the reduction of the flavin by NAD(P)H. The Class A and B FPMOs are single-component and manage to orchestrate the same net reaction within a single peptide. The Class A enzymes have, by some considerable margin, the most complete research record. These enzymes use choreographed movements of the flavin ring that facilitate access of the organic substrates to the active site, provide a means for interaction of NADPH with the flavin, offer a mechanism to sequester the dioxygen reduction chemistry from solvent and a means to release the product. The majority of the discrete catalytic events of the catalytic cycle can be observed directly in exquisite detail using spectrophotometric kinetic methods and many of the key mechanistic conclusions are further supported by structural data. This review attempts to compile each of the key observations made for both paradigm and newly discovered examples of Class A FPMOs into a complete catalytic description of one enzymatic turnover. PMID:23443084

  2. Influence of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) gene polymorphism on cognitive function in schizophrenia✰,✰✰

    PubMed Central

    Wonodi, Ikwunga; McMahon, Robert P.; Krishna, Nithin; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Liu, Judy; Glassman, Matthew; Hong, L. Elliot; Gold, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive deficits compromise quality of life and productivity for individuals with schizophrenia and have no effective treatments. Preclinical data point to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism as a potential target for pro-cognitive drug development. We have previously demonstrated association of a kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) gene variant with reduced KMO gene expression in postmortem schizophrenia cortex, and neurocognitive endophenotypic deficits in a clinical sample. KMO encodes kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), the rate-limiting microglial enzyme of cortical kynurenine metabolism. Aberration of the KMO gene might be the proximal cause of impaired cortical kynurenine metabolism observed in schizophrenia. However, the relationship between KMO variation and cognitive function in schizophrenia is unknown. This study examined the effects of the KMO rs2275163C>T C (risk) allele on cognitive function in schizophrenia. Methods We examined the association of KMO polymorphisms with general neuropsychological performance and P50 gating in a sample of 150 schizophrenia and 95 healthy controls. Results Consistent with our original report, the KMO rs2275163C>T C (risk) allele was associated with deficits in general neuropsychological performance, and this effect was more marked in schizophrenia compared with controls. Additionally, the C (Arg452) allele of the missense rs1053230C>T variant (KMO Arg452Cys) showed a trend effect on cognitive function. Neither variant affected P50 gating. Conclusions These data suggest that KMO variation influences a range of cognitive domains known to predict functional outcome. Extensive molecular characterization of this gene would elucidate its role in cognitive function with implications for vertical integration with basic discovery. PMID:25464917

  3. Structure and Ligand Binding Properties of the Epoxidase Component of Styrene Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ukaegbu, Uchechi E.; Kantz, Auric; Beaton, Michelle; Gassner, George T.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-07-23

    Styrene monooxygenase (SMO) is a two-component flavoprotein monooxygenase that transforms styrene to styrene oxide in the first step of the styrene catabolic and detoxification pathway of Pseudomonas putida S12. The crystal structure of the N-terminally histidine-tagged epoxidase component of this system, NSMOA, determined to 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, indicates the enzyme exists as a homodimer in which each monomer forms two distinct domains. The overall architecture is most similar to that of p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH), although there are some significant differences in secondary structure. Structural comparisons suggest that a large cavity open to the surface forms the FAD binding site. At the base of this pocket is another cavity that likely represents the styrene binding site. Flavin binding and redox equilibria are tightly coupled such that reduced FAD binds apo NSMOA {approx}8000 times more tightly than the oxidized coenzyme. Equilibrium fluorescence and isothermal titration calorimetry data using benzene as a substrate analogue indicate that the oxidized flavin and substrate analogue binding equilibria of NSMOA are linked such that the binding affinity of each is increased by 60-fold when the enzyme is saturated with the other. A much weaker {approx}2-fold positive cooperative interaction is observed for the linked binding equilibria of benzene and reduced FAD. The low affinity of the substrate analogue for the reduced FAD complex of NSMOA is consistent with a preferred reaction order in which flavin reduction and reaction with oxygen precede the binding of styrene, identifying the apoenzyme structure as the key catalytic resting state of NSMOA poised to bind reduced FAD and initiate the oxygen reaction.

  4. Methane monooxygenase gene expression mediated by methanobactin in the presence of mineral copper sources

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Charles W.; Fowle, David A.; Kulczycki, Ezra; Roberts, Jennifer A.; Graham, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Methane is a major greenhouse gas linked to global warming; however, patterns of in situ methane oxidation by methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs), nature's main biological mechanism for methane suppression, are often inconsistent with laboratory predictions. For example, one would expect a strong relationship between methanotroph ecology and Cu level because methanotrophs require Cu to sustain particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO), the most efficient enzyme for methane oxidation. However, no correlation has been observed in nature, which is surprising because methane monooxygenase (MMO) gene expression has been unequivocally linked to Cu availability. Here we provide a fundamental explanation for this lack of correlation. We propose that MMO expression in nature is largely controlled by solid-phase Cu geochemistry and the relative ability of Cu acquisition systems in methanotrophs, such as methanobactins (mb), to obtain Cu from mineral sources. To test this hypothesis, RT-PCR expression assays were developed for Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b (which produces mb) to quantify pMMO, soluble MMO (the alternate MMO expressed when Cu is “unavailable”), and 16S-rRNA gene expression under progressively more stringent Cu supply conditions. When Cu was provided as CuCl2, pMMO transcript levels increased significantly consistent with laboratory work. However, when Cu was provided as Cu-doped iron oxide, pMMO transcript levels increased only when mb was also present. Finally, when Cu was provided as Cu-doped borosilicate glass, pMMO transcription patterns varied depending on the ambient mb:Cu supply ratio. Cu geochemistry clearly influences MMO expression in terrestrial systems, and, as such, local Cu mineralogy might provide an explanation for methane oxidation patterns in the natural environment. PMID:17615240

  5. Transformation yields of chlorinated ethenes by a methanotrophic mixed culture expressing particulate methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J E; McCarty, P L

    1997-01-01

    Transformation yields for the aerobic cometabolic degradation of five chlorinated ethenes were determined by using a methanotrophic mixed culture expressing particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Transformation yields (expressed as moles of chlorinated ethene degraded per mole of methane consumed) were 0.57, 0.25, 0.058, 0.0019, and 0.00022 for trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (t-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (c-DCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and 1,1-dichloroethylene (1,1-DCE), respectively. Degradation of t-DCE and VC was observed only in the presence of formate or methane, sources of reducing energy necessary for cometabolism. The t-DCE and VC transformation yields represented 35 and 15%, respectively, of the theoretical maximum yields, based on reducing-energy availability from methane dissimilation to carbon dioxide, exclusive of all other processes that require reducing energy. The yields for t-DCE and VC were 20 times greater than the yields reported by others for cells expressing soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO). Transformation yields for c-DCE, TCE, and 1,1-DCE were similar to or less than those for cultures expressing sMMO. Although methanotrophic biotreatment systems have typically been designed to incorporate cultures expressing sMMO, these results suggest that pMMO expression may be highly advantageous for degradation of t-DCE or VC. It may also be much easier to maintain pMMO expression in treatment systems, because pMMO is expressed by all methanotrophs whereas sMMO is expressed only by type II methanotrophs under copper-limited conditions. PMID:9023946

  6. Soluble expression and purification of the oxidoreductase component of toluene 4-monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Lucas J; Elsen, Nathaniel L; Pierce, Brad S; Fox, Brian G

    2008-01-01

    Toluene 4-monooxygenase (T4MO) is a member of the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases, an enzyme family that utilizes a soluble diiron hydroxylase to oxidize a variety of hydrocarbons as the initial step in their metabolism. The hydroxylases obtain reducing equivalents from NAD(P)H via an electron transfer chain that is initiated by an oxidoreductase containing an N-terminal ferredoxin domain and C-terminal flavin- and NAD-binding domains. T4moF, the NADH oxidoreductase of T4MO, was expressed as a soluble protein in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) from the pUC-derived expression vector pRS205. This vector contains a lac promoter instead of a T7 promoter. A three step purification from the soluble cell lysate yielded approximately 1 mg of T4moF per gram of wet cell paste with greater than 90% purity. The purified protein contained 1 mol of FAD and 2 mol of Fe per mol of T4moF; quantitative EPR spectroscopy showed approximately 1 mol of the S=1/2 signal from the reduced [2Fe-2S] cluster per mol of T4moF. Steady state kinetic analysis of p-cresol formation activity treating T4moF as the variable substrate while all other proteins and substrates were held constant gave apparent K(M-) and apparent k(cat)-values of 0.15 microM and 3.0 s(-1), respectively. This expression system and purification allows for the recovery of the soluble oxidoreductase in yields that facilitate further biochemical and structural characterizations. PMID:17964805

  7. Insights into the different dioxygen activation pathways of methane and toluene monooxygenase hydroxylases.

    PubMed

    Bochevarov, Arteum D; Li, Jianing; Song, Woon Ju; Friesner, Richard A; Lippard, Stephen J

    2011-05-18

    The methane and toluene monooxygenase hydroxylases (MMOH and TMOH, respectively) have almost identical active sites, yet the physical and chemical properties of their oxygenated intermediates, designated P*, H(peroxo), Q, and Q* in MMOH and ToMOH(peroxo) in a subclass of TMOH, ToMOH, are substantially different. We review and compare the structural differences in the vicinity of the active sites of these enzymes and discuss which changes could give rise to the different behavior of H(peroxo) and Q. In particular, analysis of multiple crystal structures reveals that T213 in MMOH and the analogous T201 in TMOH, located in the immediate vicinity of the active site, have different rotatory configurations. We study the rotational energy profiles of these threonine residues with the use of molecular mechanics (MM) and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) computational methods and put forward a hypothesis according to which T213 and T201 play an important role in the formation of different types of peroxodiiron(III) species in MMOH and ToMOH. The hypothesis is indirectly supported by the QM/MM calculations of the peroxodiiron(III) models of ToMOH and the theoretically computed Mössbauer spectra. It also helps explain the formation of two distinct peroxodiiron(III) species in the T201S mutant of ToMOH. Additionally, a role for the ToMOD regulatory protein, which is essential for intermediate formation and protein functioning in the ToMO system, is advanced. We find that the low quadrupole splitting parameter in the Mössbauer spectrum observed for a ToMOH(peroxo) intermediate can be explained by protonation of the peroxo moiety, possibly stabilized by the T201 residue. Finally, similarities between the oxygen activation mechanisms of the monooxygenases and cytochrome P450 are discussed. PMID:21517016

  8. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases as a detoxification mechanism in insects: new insights from the arctiids (lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Sehlmeyer, Sven; Wang, Linzhu; Langel, Dorothee; Heckel, David G; Mohagheghi, Hoda; Petschenka, Georg; Ober, Dietrich

    2010-01-01

    Insects experience a wide array of chemical pressures from plant allelochemicals and pesticides and have developed several effective counterstrategies to cope with such toxins. Among these, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are crucial in plant-insect interactions. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs) seem not to play a central role in xenobiotic detoxification in insects, in contrast to mammals. However, the previously identified senecionine N-oxygenase of the arctiid moth Tyria jacobaeae (Lepidoptera) indicates that FMOs have been recruited during the adaptation of this insect to plants that accumulate toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Identification of related FMO-like sequences of various arctiids and other Lepidoptera and their combination with expressed sequence tag (EST) data and sequences emerging from the Bombyx mori genome project show that FMOs in Lepidoptera form a gene family with three members (FMO1 to FMO3). Phylogenetic analyses suggest that FMO3 is only distantly related to lepidopteran FMO1 and FMO2 that originated from a more recent gene duplication event. Within the FMO1 gene cluster, an additional gene duplication early in the arctiid lineage provided the basis for the evolution of the highly specific biochemical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations of these butterflies to pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-producing plants. The genes encoding pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-N-oxygenizing enzymes (PNOs) are transcribed in the fat body and the head of the larvae. An N-terminal signal peptide mediates the transport of the soluble proteins into the hemolymph where PNOs efficiently convert pro-toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids into their non-toxic N-oxide derivatives. Heterologous expression of a PNO of the generalist arctiid Grammia geneura produced an N-oxygenizing enzyme that shows noticeably expanded substrate specificity compared with the related enzyme of the specialist Tyria jacobaeae. The data about the evolution of FMOs within lepidopteran insects and the

  9. The Contribution of Non-catalytic Carbohydrate Binding Modules to the Activity of Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases*

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, Lucy I.; Labourel, Aurore; Walton, Paul H.; Davies, Gideon J.; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a sustainable industrial substrate. Copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) contribute to the degradation of lignocellulose and increase the efficiency of biofuel production. LPMOs can contain non-catalytic carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), but their role in the activity of these enzymes is poorly understood. Here we explored the importance of CBMs in LPMO function. The family 2a CBMs of two monooxygenases, CfLPMO10 and TbLPMO10 from Cellulomonas fimi and Thermobispora bispora, respectively, were deleted and/or replaced with CBMs from other proteins. The data showed that the CBMs could potentiate and, surprisingly, inhibit LPMO activity, and that these effects were both enzyme-specific and substrate-specific. Removing the natural CBM or introducing CtCBM3a, from the Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome scaffoldin CipA, almost abolished the catalytic activity of the LPMOs against the cellulosic substrates. The deleterious effect of CBM removal likely reflects the importance of prolonged presentation of the enzyme on the surface of the substrate for efficient catalytic activity, as only LPMOs appended to CBMs bound tightly to cellulose. The negative impact of CtCBM3a is in sharp contrast with the capacity of this binding module to potentiate the activity of a range of glycoside hydrolases including cellulases. The deletion of the endogenous CBM from CfLPMO10 or the introduction of a family 10 CBM from Cellvibrio japonicus LPMO10B into TbLPMO10 influenced the quantity of non-oxidized products generated, demonstrating that CBMs can modulate the mode of action of LPMOs. This study demonstrates that engineered LPMO-CBM hybrids can display enhanced industrially relevant oxygenations. PMID:26801613

  10. Identification of a Novel Self-Sufficient Styrene Monooxygenase from Rhodococcus opacus 1CP▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tischler, Dirk; Eulberg, Dirk; Lakner, Silvia; Kaschabek, Stefan R.; van Berkel, Willem J. H.; Schlömann, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Sequence analysis of a 9-kb genomic fragment of the actinobacterium Rhodococcus opacus 1CP led to identification of an open reading frame encoding a novel fusion protein, StyA2B, with a putative function in styrene metabolism via styrene oxide and phenylacetic acid. Gene cluster analysis indicated that the highly related fusion proteins of Nocardia farcinica IFM10152 and Arthrobacter aurescens TC1 are involved in a similar physiological process. Whereas 413 amino acids of the N terminus of StyA2B are highly similar to those of the oxygenases of two-component styrene monooxygenases (SMOs) from pseudomonads, the residual 160 amino acids of the C terminus show significant homology to the flavin reductases of these systems. Cloning and functional expression of His10-StyA2B revealed for the first time that the fusion protein does in fact catalyze two separate reactions. Strictly NADH-dependent reduction of flavins and highly enantioselective oxygenation of styrene to (S)-styrene oxide were shown. Inhibition studies and photometric analysis of recombinant StyA2B indicated the absence of tightly bound heme and flavin cofactors in this self-sufficient monooxygenase. StyA2B oxygenates a spectrum of aromatic compounds similar to those of two-component SMOs. However, the specific activities of the flavin-reducing and styrene-oxidizing functions of StyA2B are one to two orders of magnitude lower than those of StyA/StyB from Pseudomonas sp. strain VLB120. PMID:19482928

  11. The Toluene o-Xylene Monooxygenase Enzymatic Activity for the Biosynthesis of Aromatic Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Pizzo, Elio; Notomista, Eugenio; Pezzella, Alessandro; Di Cristo, Carlo; De Lise, Federica; Di Donato, Alberto; Izzo, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Monocyclic phenols and catechols are important antioxidant compounds for the food and pharmaceutic industries; their production through biotransformation of low-added value starting compounds is of major biotechnological interest. The toluene o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) from Pseudomonas sp. OX1 is a bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) that is able to hydroxylate a wide array of aromatic compounds and has already proven to be a versatile biochemical tool to produce mono- and dihydroxylated derivatives of aromatic compounds. The molecular determinants of its regioselectivity and substrate specificity have been thoroughly investigated, and a computational strategy has been developed which allows designing mutants able to hydroxylate non-natural substrates of this enzyme to obtain high-added value compounds of commercial interest. In this work, we have investigated the use of recombinant ToMO, expressed in cells of Escherichia coli strain JM109, for the biotransformation of non-natural substrates of this enzyme such as 2-phenoxyethanol, phthalan and 2-indanol to produce six hydroxylated derivatives. The hydroxylated products obtained were identified, isolated and their antioxidant potential was assessed both in vitro, using the DPPH assay, and on the rat cardiomyoblast cell line H9c2. Incubation of H9c2 cells with the hydroxylated compounds obtained from ToMO-catalyzed biotransformation induced a differential protective effect towards a mild oxidative stress induced by the presence of sodium arsenite. The results obtained confirm once again the versatility of the ToMO system for oxyfunctionalization reactions of biotechnological importance. Moreover, the hydroxylated derivatives obtained possess an interesting antioxidant potential that encourages the use of the enzyme for further functionalization reactions and their possible use as scaffolds to design novel bioactive molecules. PMID:25915063

  12. Listeria monocytogenes has a functional chitinolytic system and an active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Paspaliari, Dafni K; Loose, Jennifer S M; Larsen, Marianne H; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav

    2015-03-01

    Chitinases and chitin-active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are most commonly associated with chitin metabolism, but are also reported as virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. Listeria monocytogenes, a well-known virulent bacterium, possesses two chitinases (ChiA and ChiB) and a multi-modular lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LmLPMO10). These enzymes have been related to virulence and their role in chitin metabolism is poorly understood. It is thus of interest to functionally characterize the individual enzymes in order to shed light on their roles in vivo. Our results demonstrate that L. monocytogenes has a fully functional chitinolytic system. Both chitinases show substrate degradation rates similar to those of the nonprocessive endo-chitinase SmChiC from Serratia marcescens. Compared to the S. marcescens LPMO chitin-binding protein CBP21, LmLPMO10 shows a similar rate but different product profiles depending on the substrate. In LPMO-chitinase synergy experiments, CBP21 is able to boost the activity of both ChiA and ChiB more than LmLPMO10. Product analysis of the synergy assays revealed that the chitinases were unable to efficiently hydrolyse the LPMO products (chitooligosaccharide aldonic acids) with a degree of polymerization below four (ChiA and SmChiC) or three (ChiB). Gene transcription and protein expression analysis showed that LmLPMO10 is neither highly transcribed, nor abundantly secreted during the growth of L. monocytogenes in a chitin-containing medium. The chitinases on the other hand are both abundantly secreted in the presence of chitin. Although LmLPMO10 is shown to promote chitin degradation in tandem with the chitinases in vitro, the secretome and transcription data question whether this is the primary role of LmLPMO10 in vivo. PMID:25565565

  13. Monooxygenase, peroxidase and peroxygenase properties and reaction mechanisms of cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hrycay, Eugene G; Bandiera, Stelvio M

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the monooxygenase, peroxidase and peroxygenase properties and reaction mechanisms of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in bacterial, archaeal and mammalian systems. CYP enzymes catalyze monooxygenation reactions by inserting one oxygen atom from O2 into an enormous number and variety of substrates. The catalytic versatility of CYP stems from its ability to functionalize unactivated carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds of substrates through monooxygenation. The oxidative prowess of CYP in catalyzing monooxygenation reactions is attributed primarily to a porphyrin π radical ferryl intermediate known as Compound I (CpdI) (Por•+FeIV=O), or its ferryl radical resonance form (FeIV-O•). CYP-mediated hydroxylations occur via a consensus H atom abstraction/oxygen rebound mechanism involving an initial abstraction by CpdI of a H atom from the substrate, generating a highly-reactive protonated Compound II (CpdII) intermediate (FeIV-OH) and a carbon-centered alkyl radical that rebounds onto the ferryl hydroxyl moiety to yield the hydroxylated substrate. CYP enzymes utilize hydroperoxides, peracids, perborate, percarbonate, periodate, chlorite, iodosobenzene and N-oxides as surrogate oxygen atom donors to oxygenate substrates via the shunt pathway in the absence of NAD(P)H/O2 and reduction-oxidation (redox) auxiliary proteins. It has been difficult to isolate the historically elusive CpdI intermediate in the native NAD(P)H/O2-supported monooxygenase pathway and to determine its precise electronic structure and kinetic and physicochemical properties because of its high reactivity, unstable nature (t½~2 ms) and short life cycle, prompting suggestions for participation in monooxygenation reactions of alternative CYP iron-oxygen intermediates such as the ferric-peroxo anion species (FeIII-OO-), ferric-hydroperoxo species (FeIII-OOH) and FeIII-(H2O2) complex. PMID:26002730

  14. Escherichia coli Overexpressing a Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase from Acinetobacter radioresistens Becomes Resistant to Imipenem

    PubMed Central

    Minerdi, Daniela; Zgrablic, Ivan; Castrignanò, Silvia; Catucci, Gianluca; Medana, Claudio; Terlizzi, Maria Elena; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global issue currently resulting in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people a year worldwide. Data present in the literature illustrate the emergence of many bacterial species that display resistance to known antibiotics; Acinetobacter spp. are a good example of this. We report here that Acinetobacter radioresistens has a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (Ar-BVMO) with 100% amino acid sequence identity to the ethionamide monooxygenase of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. Both enzymes are only distantly phylogenetically related to other canonical bacterial BVMO proteins. Ar-BVMO not only is capable of oxidizing two anticancer drugs metabolized by human FMO3, danusertib and tozasertib, but also can oxidize other synthetic drugs, such as imipenem. The latter is a member of the carbapenems, a clinically important antibiotic family used in the treatment of MDR bacterial infections. Susceptibility tests performed by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method demonstrate that imipenem-sensitive Escherichia coli BL21 cells overexpressing Ar-BVMO become resistant to this antibiotic. An agar disk diffusion assay proved that when imipenem reacts with Ar-BVMO, it loses its antibiotic property. Moreover, an NADPH consumption assay with the purified Ar-BVMO demonstrates that this antibiotic is indeed a substrate, and its product is identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to be a Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation product of the carbonyl moiety of the β-lactam ring. This is the first report of an antibiotic-inactivating BVMO enzyme that, while mediating its usual BV oxidation, also operates by an unprecedented mechanism of carbapenem resistance. PMID:26459905

  15. Cytoplasmic mRNA turnover and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Borbolis, Fivos; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover that determines the lifetime of cytoplasmic mRNAs is a means to control gene expression under both normal and stress conditions, whereas its impact on ageing and age-related disorders has just become evident. Gene expression control is achieved at the level of the mRNA clearance as well as mRNA stability and accessibility to other molecules. All these processes are regulated by cis-acting motifs and trans-acting factors that determine the rates of translation and degradation of transcripts. Specific messenger RNA granules that harbor the mRNA decay machinery or various factors, involved in translational repression and transient storage of mRNAs, are also part of the mRNA fate regulation. Their assembly and function can be modulated to promote stress resistance to adverse conditions and over time affect the ageing process and the lifespan of the organism. Here, we provide insights into the complex relationships of ageing modulators and mRNA turnover mechanisms. PMID:26432921

  16. Enzymatic formation of apo-carotenoids from the xanthophyll carotenoids lutein, zeaxanthin and b-cryptoxanthin by ferret carotene-9, 10-monooxygenase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xanthophyll carotenoids, such as lutein, zeaxanthin and b-cryptoxanthin, may provide potential health benefits against chronic and degenerative diseases. Investigating pathways of xanthophyll metabolism are important to understanding their biological functions. Carotene-15,150-monooxygenase (CMO1) h...

  17. Sequencing and characterization of mixed function monooxygenase genes CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 of Mink (Mustela vison) to facilitate study of dioxin-like compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaowei; Moore, Jeremy N.; Newsted, John L.; Hecker, Markus Zwiernik, Matthew J.; Jones, Paul D.; Bursian, Steven J.

    2009-02-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to understand aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated toxicity in mink, cDNAs encoding for CYP1A1 and the CYP1A2 mixed function monooxygenases were cloned and characterized. In addition, the effects of selected dibenzofurans on the expression of these genes and the presence of their respective proteins (P4501A) were investigated, and then correlated with the catalytic activities of these proteins as measured by ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) and methoxyresorufin O-deethylase (MROD) activities. The predicted protein sequences for CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 comprise 517 and 512 amino acid residues, respectively. The phylogenetic analysis of the mink CYP1As with protein sequences of other mammals revealed high sequence homology with sea otter, seals and the dog, with amino acid identities ranging from 89 to 95% for CYP1A1 and 81 to 93% for CYP1A2. Since exposure to both 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF) and 2,3,4,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF) resulted in dose-dependent increases of CYP1A1 mRNA, CYP1A2 mRNA and CYP1A protein levels an underlying AhR-mediated mechanism is suggested. The up-regulation of CYP1A mRNA in liver was more consistent to the sum adipose TEQ concentration than to the liver TEQ concentration in minks treated with TCDF or PeCDF. The result suggested that the hepatic-sequestered fraction of PeCDF was biologically inactive to the induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2.

  18. Five monomeric hemocyanin subunits from Portunus trituberculatus: purification, spectroscopic characterization, and quantitative evaluation of phenol monooxygenase activity.

    PubMed

    Fujieda, Nobutaka; Yakiyama, Aki; Itoh, Shinobu

    2010-11-01

    Five kinds of monomeric subunits of arthropod hemocyanin have been isolated from swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus hemolymph. The copper centers holding a peroxo species, [(μ-η2:η2-peroxo)dicopper(II)], of these subunits exhibited almost the same UV-vis and visible region CD spectroscopic properties, indicating that they have a similar copper coordination geometry and an electronic structure. Under anaerobic conditions, the oxy-forms of the monomeric subunits were stable in 0.5 M borate buffer (pH 9.0) and reacted with 4-methylphenol (p-cresol) to show the phenolases (cresolase/phenol monooxygenase) activity in the presence of urea. To compare the phenolase (monooxygenase) reactivity, the reactivity of the isolated subunits has been examined quantitatively by using a simplified catalytic system, where the initial product catechol is trapped with borate anion of the buffer solution to prevent following catecholase reaction (Yamazaki and Itoh, 2003). The far-UV region CD spectra were measured in order to clarify the relationship between the content of the secondary structure and the phenolase reactivity. Even though the monomeric subunits exhibit a weak catalytic phenol monooxygenase activity, addition of urea (3 M) significantly enhances their catalytic activity. The differences of the phenolase activity among the monomeric subunits has been discussed on the basis of the spectroscopic analysis and reactivity studies in order to shed light on the enzymatic function of the arthropod hemocyanin in vivo. PMID:20727990

  19. Widespread distribution of soluble di-iron monooxygenase (SDIMO) genes in Arctic groundwater impacted by 1,4-dioxane.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengyan; Mathieu, Jacques; Yang, Yu; Fiorenza, Stephanie; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2013-09-01

    Soluble di-iron monooxygenases (SDIMOs), especially group-5 SDIMOs (i.e., tetrahydrofuran and propane monooxygenases), are of significant interest due to their potential role in the initiation of 1,4-dioxane (dioxane) degradation. Functional gene array (i.e., GeoChip) analysis of Arctic groundwater exposed to dioxane since 1980s revealed that various dioxane-degrading SDIMO genes were widespread, and PCR-DGGE analysis showed that group-5 SDIMOs were present in every tested sample, including background groundwater with no known dioxane exposure history. A group-5 thmA-like gene was enriched (2.4-fold over background, p < 0.05) in source-zone samples with higher dioxane concentrations, suggesting selective pressure by dioxane. Microcosm assays with (14)C-labeled dioxane showed that the highest mineralization capacity (6.4 ± 0.1% (14)CO2 recovery during 15 days, representing over 60% of the amount degraded) corresponded to the source area, which was presumably more acclimated and contained a higher abundance of SDIMO genes. Dioxane mineralization ceased after 7 days and was resumed by adding acetate (0.24 mM) as an auxiliary substrate to replenish NADH, a key coenzyme for the functioning of monoxygenases. Acetylene inactivation tests further corroborated the vital role of monooxygenases in dioxane degradation. This is the first report of the prevalence of oxygenase genes that are likely involved in dioxane degradation and suggests their usefulness as biomarkers of dioxane natural attenuation. PMID:23909410

  20. Molecular Determinants of the Regioselectivity of Toluene/o-Xylene Monooxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. Strain OX1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Notomista, Eugenio; Cafaro, Valeria; Bozza, Giuseppe; Di Donato, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases (BMMs) are a heterogeneous family of di-iron monooxygenases which share the very interesting ability to hydroxylate aliphatic and/or aromatic hydrocarbons. Each BMM possesses defined substrate specificity and regioselectivity which match the metabolic requirements of the strain from which it has been isolated. Pseudomonas sp. strain OX1, a strain able to metabolize o-, m-, and p-cresols, produces the BMM toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO), which converts toluene to a mixture of o-, m-, and p-cresol isomers. In order to investigate the molecular determinants of ToMO regioselectivity, we prepared and characterized 15 single-mutant and 3 double-mutant forms of the ToMO active site pocket. Using the Monte Carlo approach, we prepared models of ToMO-substrate and ToMO-reaction intermediate complexes which allowed us to provide a molecular explanation for the regioselectivities of wild-type and mutant ToMO enzymes. Furthermore, using binding energy values calculated by energy analyses of the complexes and a simple mathematical model of the hydroxylation reaction, we were able to predict quantitatively the regioselectivities of the majority of the variant proteins with good accuracy. The results show not only that the fine-tuning of ToMO regioselectivity can be achieved through a careful alteration of the shape of the active site but also that the effects of the mutations on regioselectivity can be quantitatively predicted a priori. PMID:19074607

  1. Molecular determinants of the regioselectivity of toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain OX1.

    PubMed

    Notomista, Eugenio; Cafaro, Valeria; Bozza, Giuseppe; Di Donato, Alberto

    2009-02-01

    Bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases (BMMs) are a heterogeneous family of di-iron monooxygenases which share the very interesting ability to hydroxylate aliphatic and/or aromatic hydrocarbons. Each BMM possesses defined substrate specificity and regioselectivity which match the metabolic requirements of the strain from which it has been isolated. Pseudomonas sp. strain OX1, a strain able to metabolize o-, m-, and p-cresols, produces the BMM toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO), which converts toluene to a mixture of o-, m-, and p-cresol isomers. In order to investigate the molecular determinants of ToMO regioselectivity, we prepared and characterized 15 single-mutant and 3 double-mutant forms of the ToMO active site pocket. Using the Monte Carlo approach, we prepared models of ToMO-substrate and ToMO-reaction intermediate complexes which allowed us to provide a molecular explanation for the regioselectivities of wild-type and mutant ToMO enzymes. Furthermore, using binding energy values calculated by energy analyses of the complexes and a simple mathematical model of the hydroxylation reaction, we were able to predict quantitatively the regioselectivities of the majority of the variant proteins with good accuracy. The results show not only that the fine-tuning of ToMO regioselectivity can be achieved through a careful alteration of the shape of the active site but also that the effects of the mutations on regioselectivity can be quantitatively predicted a priori. PMID:19074607

  2. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization. PMID:25620012

  3. Isolation of mRNA from specific tissues of Drosophila by mRNA tagging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Edenberg, Howard J; Davis, Ronald L

    2005-01-01

    To study the function of specific cells or tissues using genomic tools like microarray analyses, it is highly desirable to obtain mRNA from a homogeneous source. However, this is particularly challenging for small organisms, like Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. We have optimized and applied a new technique, mRNA tagging, to isolate mRNA from specific tissues of D.melanogaster. A FLAG-tagged poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) is expressed in a specific tissue and mRNA from that tissue is thus tagged by the recombinant PABP and separated from mRNA in other tissues by co-immunoprecipitation with a FLAG-tag specific antibody. The fractionated mRNA is then amplified and used as probe in microarray experiments. As a test system, we employed the procedures to identify genes expressed in Drosophila photoreceptor cells. We found that most known photoreceptor cell-specific mRNAs were identified by mRNA tagging. Furthermore, at least 11 novel genes have been identified as enriched in photoreceptor cells. mRNA tagging is a powerful general method for profiling gene expression in specific tissues and for identifying tissue-specific genes. PMID:16204451

  4. A flavin-dependent monooxygenase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis involved in cholesterol catabolism.

    PubMed

    Dresen, Carola; Lin, Leo Y-C; D'Angelo, Igor; Tocheva, Elitza I; Strynadka, Natalie; Eltis, Lindsay D

    2010-07-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 have similar cholesterol catabolic pathways. This pathway contributes to the pathogenicity of Mtb. The hsaAB cholesterol catabolic genes have been predicted to encode the oxygenase and reductase, respectively, of a flavin-dependent mono-oxygenase that hydroxylates 3-hydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9,17-dione (3-HSA) to a catechol. An hsaA deletion mutant of RHA1 did not grow on cholesterol but transformed the latter to 3-HSA and related metabolites in which each of the two keto groups was reduced: 3,9-dihydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-17-one (3,9-DHSA) and 3,17-dihydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9-one (3,17-DHSA). Purified 3-hydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9,17-dione 4-hydroxylase (HsaAB) from Mtb had higher specificity for 3-HSA than for 3,17-DHSA (apparent k(cat)/K(m) = 1000 +/- 100 M(-1) s(-1) versus 700 +/- 100 M(-1) s(-1)). However, 3,9-DHSA was a poorer substrate than 3-hydroxybiphenyl (apparent k(cat)/K(m) = 80 +/- 40 M(-1) s(-1)). In the presence of 3-HSA the K(m)(app) for O(2) was 100 +/- 10 microM. The crystal structure of HsaA to 2.5-A resolution revealed that the enzyme has the same fold, flavin-binding site, and catalytic residues as p-hydroxyphenyl acetate hydroxylase. However, HsaA has a much larger phenol-binding site, consistent with the enzyme's substrate specificity. In addition, a second crystal form of HsaA revealed that a C-terminal flap (Val(367)-Val(394)) could adopt two conformations differing by a rigid body rotation of 25 degrees around Arg(366). This rotation appears to gate the likely flavin entrance to the active site. In docking studies with 3-HSA and flavin, the closed conformation provided a rationale for the enzyme's substrate specificity. Overall, the structural and functional data establish the physiological role of HsaAB and provide a basis to further investigate an important class of monooxygenases as well as the bacterial

  5. A Flavin-dependent Monooxygenase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Involved in Cholesterol Catabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Dresen, Carola; Lin, Leo Y.-C.; D'Angelo, Igor; Tocheva, Elitza I.; Strynadka, Natalie; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 have similar cholesterol catabolic pathways. This pathway contributes to the pathogenicity of Mtb. The hsaAB cholesterol catabolic genes have been predicted to encode the oxygenase and reductase, respectively, of a flavin-dependent mono-oxygenase that hydroxylates 3-hydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9,17-dione (3-HSA) to a catechol. An hsaA deletion mutant of RHA1 did not grow on cholesterol but transformed the latter to 3-HSA and related metabolites in which each of the two keto groups was reduced: 3,9-dihydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-17-one (3,9-DHSA) and 3,17-dihydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9-one (3,17-DHSA). Purified 3-hydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9,17-dione 4-hydroxylase (HsaAB) from Mtb had higher specificity for 3-HSA than for 3,17-DHSA (apparent kcat/Km = 1000 ± 100 m−1 s−1 versus 700 ± 100 m−1 s−1). However, 3,9-DHSA was a poorer substrate than 3-hydroxybiphenyl (apparent kcat/Km = 80 ± 40 m−1 s−1). In the presence of 3-HSA the Kmapp for O2 was 100 ± 10 μm. The crystal structure of HsaA to 2.5-Å resolution revealed that the enzyme has the same fold, flavin-binding site, and catalytic residues as p-hydroxyphenyl acetate hydroxylase. However, HsaA has a much larger phenol-binding site, consistent with the enzyme's substrate specificity. In addition, a second crystal form of HsaA revealed that a C-terminal flap (Val367–Val394) could adopt two conformations differing by a rigid body rotation of 25° around Arg366. This rotation appears to gate the likely flavin entrance to the active site. In docking studies with 3-HSA and flavin, the closed conformation provided a rationale for the enzyme's substrate specificity. Overall, the structural and functional data establish the physiological role of HsaAB and provide a basis to further investigate an important class of monooxygenases as well as the bacterial catabolism of steroids. PMID

  6. Sensitivity of mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Poker, Gilad; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    Using the dynamic mean-field approximation of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we investigate the effect of small changes in the initiation, elongation, and termination rates along the mRNA strand on the steady-state protein translation rate. We show that the sensitivity of mRNA translation is equal to the sensitivity of the maximal eigenvalue of a symmetric, nonnegative, tridiagonal, and irreducible matrix. This leads to new analytical results as well as efficient numerical schemes that are applicable for large-scale models. Our results show that in the usual endogenous case, when initiation is more rate-limiting than elongation, the sensitivity of the translation rate to small mutations rapidly increases towards the 5′ end of the ORF. When the initiation rate is high, as may be the case for highly expressed and/or heterologous optimized genes, the maximal sensitivity is with respect to the elongation rates at the middle of the mRNA strand. We also show that the maximal possible effect of a small increase/decrease in any of the rates along the mRNA is an increase/decrease of the same magnitude in the translation rate. These results are in agreement with previous molecular evolutionary and synthetic biology experimental studies. PMID:26238363

  7. Involvement of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in the response of mosquito larvae to dietary plant xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    David, J P; Boyer, S; Mesneau, A; Ball, A; Ranson, H; Dauphin-Villemant, C

    2006-05-01

    The response of mosquito larvae to plant toxins found in their breeding sites was investigated by using Aedes aegypti larvae and toxic arborescent leaf litter as experimental models. The relation between larval tolerance to toxic leaf litter and cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) was examined at the toxicological, biochemical and molecular levels. Larvae pre-exposed to toxic leaf litter show a higher tolerance to those xenobiotics together with a strong increase in P450 activity levels. This enzymatic response is both time- and dose-dependent. The use of degenerate primers from various P450 genes (CYPs) allowed us to isolate 16 new CYP genes belonging to CYP4, CYP6 and CYP9 families. Expression studies revealed a 2.3-fold over-expression of 1 CYP gene (CYP6AL1) after larval pre-exposure to toxic leaf litter, this gene being expressed at a high level in late larval and pupal stages and in fat bodies and midgut. The CYP6AL1 protein has a high level of identity with other insect's CYPs involved in xenobiotic detoxification. The role of CYP genes in tolerance to natural xenobiotics and the importance of such adaptive responses in the capacity of mosquitoes to colonize new habitats and to develop insecticide resistance mechanisms are discussed. PMID:16651188

  8. C. elegans flavin-containing monooxygenase-4 is essential for osmoregulation in hypotonic stress.

    PubMed

    Hirani, Nisha; Westenberg, Marcel; Seed, Paul T; Petalcorin, Mark I R; Dolphin, Colin T

    2016-01-01

    Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have revealed osmoregulatory systems engaged when worms experience hypertonic conditions, but less is known about measures employed when faced with hypotonic stress. Inactivation of fmo-4, which encodes flavin-containing monooxygenase-4, results in dramatic hypoosmotic hypersensitivity; worms are unable to prevent overwhelming water influx and swell rapidly, finally rupturing due to high internal hydrostatic pressure. fmo-4 is expressed prominently in hypodermis, duct and pore cells but is excluded from the excretory cell. Thus, FMO-4 plays a crucial osmoregulatory role by promoting clearance of excess water that enters during hypotonicity, perhaps by synthesizing an osmolyte that acts to establish an osmotic gradient from excretory cell to duct and pore cells. C. elegans FMO-4 contains a C-terminal extension conserved in all nematode FMO-4s. The coincidently numbered human FMO4 also contains an extended C-terminus with features similar to those of FMO-4. Although these shared sequence characteristics suggest potential orthology, human FMO4 was unable to rescue the fmo-4 osmoregulatory defect. Intriguingly, however, mammalian FMO4 is expressed predominantly in the kidney - an appropriate site if it too is, or once was, involved in osmoregulation. PMID:27010030

  9. Kynurenine-3-monooxygenase inhibition prevents multiple organ failure in rodent models of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mole, Damian J; Webster, Scott P; Uings, Iain; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Binnie, Margaret; Wilson, Kris; Hutchinson, Jonathan P; Mirguet, Olivier; Walker, Ann; Beaufils, Benjamin; Ancellin, Nicolas; Trottet, Lionel; Bénéton, Véronique; Mowat, Christopher G; Wilkinson, Martin; Rowland, Paul; Haslam, Carl; McBride, Andrew; Homer, Natalie Z M; Baily, James E; Sharp, Matthew G F; Garden, O James; Hughes, Jeremy; Howie, Sarah E M; Holmes, Duncan S; Liddle, John; Iredale, John P

    2016-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and devastating inflammatory condition of the pancreas that is considered to be a paradigm of sterile inflammation leading to systemic multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and death. Acute mortality from AP-MODS exceeds 20% (ref. 3), and the lifespans of those who survive the initial episode are typically shorter than those of the general population. There are no specific therapies available to protect individuals from AP-MODS. Here we show that kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO), a key enzyme of tryptophan metabolism, is central to the pathogenesis of AP-MODS. We created a mouse strain that is deficient for Kmo (encoding KMO) and that has a robust biochemical phenotype that protects against extrapancreatic tissue injury to the lung, kidney and liver in experimental AP-MODS. A medicinal chemistry strategy based on modifications of the kynurenine substrate led to the discovery of the oxazolidinone GSK180 as a potent and specific inhibitor of KMO. The binding mode of the inhibitor in the active site was confirmed by X-ray co-crystallography at 3.2 Å resolution. Treatment with GSK180 resulted in rapid changes in the levels of kynurenine pathway metabolites in vivo, and it afforded therapeutic protection against MODS in a rat model of AP. Our findings establish KMO inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of AP-MODS, and they open up a new area for drug discovery in critical illness. PMID:26752518

  10. Yeast flavin-containing monooxygenase is induced by the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jung-Keun; Robertus, Jon D.

    2000-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase from yeast (yFMO) carries out the O2- and NADPH-dependent oxidation of biological thiols, including oxidizing glutathione to glutathione disulfide. FMO provides a large fraction of the oxidizing necessary for proper folding of disulfide bond-containing proteins; deletion of the enzyme reduces proper folding of endogenous carboxypeptidase Y by about 40%. The enzyme is not essential to cell viability because other enzymes can generate a significant fraction of the oxidizing equivalents required by the cell. However, yFMO is vital to the yeast response to reductive stress. FMO1 deletion mutants grow poorly under reductive stress, and carboxypeptidase Y activity is less than 10% of that in a stressed wild type. The FMO1 gene appears to be under control of an unfolded protein response element and is inducible by factors, such as reductive stress, that elicit the unfolded protein response. Reductive stress can increase yFMO activity at least 6-fold. This increased activity allows the cell to process endogenous disulfide bond-containing proteins and also to allow correct folding of disulfide-bonded proteins expressed from multicopy plasmids. The unfolded protein response is mediated by the Hac1p transcription factor that mediates virtually all of the induction of yFMO triggered by exogenous reducing agents. PMID:10618381

  11. Molecular and dietary regulation of beta,beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 (BCMO1).

    PubMed

    Lietz, Georg; Lange, Jennifer; Rimbach, Gerald

    2010-10-01

    beta,beta-Carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase-1 (BCMO1) is a key enzyme in vitamin A metabolism in mammals. Various dietary components such as non-pro-vitamin A carotenoids, fat, and polyphenols have been shown to influence the intestinal absorption and conversion of pro-vitamin A carotenoids. Furthermore, vitamin A deficiency has been shown to induce BCMO1 expression, whereas supplementation with vitamin A or its active metabolites, all-trans and 9-cis retinoic acid, dose-dependently reverse these effects. A diet-responsive regulatory network involving the intestine specific homeodomain transcription factor ISX has been shown to regulate the intestinal vitamin A uptake and production via a negative feedback control. Furthermore, non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human BCMO1 gene have been discovered causing observably reduced BCMO1 activity. Detailed knowledge about BCMO1 regulation as well as genetic variations causing variable cleavage activities may provide a background, on which individual and/or population based dietary recommendations for beta-carotene and vitamin A intake could be established. PMID:20599666

  12. A C4-oxidizing Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase Cleaving Both Cellulose and Cello-oligosaccharides*

    PubMed Central

    Isaksen, Trine; Westereng, Bjørge; Aachmann, Finn L.; Agger, Jane W.; Kracher, Daniel; Kittl, Roman; Ludwig, Roland; Haltrich, Dietmar; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.; Horn, Svein J.

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable resource that significantly can substitute fossil resources for the production of fuels, chemicals, and materials. Efficient saccharification of this biomass to fermentable sugars will be a key technology in future biorefineries. Traditionally, saccharification was thought to be accomplished by mixtures of hydrolytic enzymes. However, recently it has been shown that lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) contribute to this process by catalyzing oxidative cleavage of insoluble polysaccharides utilizing a mechanism involving molecular oxygen and an electron donor. These enzymes thus represent novel tools for the saccharification of plant biomass. Most characterized LPMOs, including all reported bacterial LPMOs, form aldonic acids, i.e., products oxidized in the C1 position of the terminal sugar. Oxidation at other positions has been observed, and there has been some debate concerning the nature of this position (C4 or C6). In this study, we have characterized an LPMO from Neurospora crassa (NcLPMO9C; also known as NCU02916 and NcGH61–3). Remarkably, and in contrast to all previously characterized LPMOs, which are active only on polysaccharides, NcLPMO9C is able to cleave soluble cello-oligosaccharides as short as a tetramer, a property that allowed detailed product analysis. Using mass spectrometry and NMR, we show that the cello-oligosaccharide products released by this enzyme contain a C4 gemdiol/keto group at the nonreducing end. PMID:24324265

  13. A C4-oxidizing lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase cleaving both cellulose and cello-oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Trine; Westereng, Bjørge; Aachmann, Finn L; Agger, Jane W; Kracher, Daniel; Kittl, Roman; Ludwig, Roland; Haltrich, Dietmar; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Horn, Svein J

    2014-01-31

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable resource that significantly can substitute fossil resources for the production of fuels, chemicals, and materials. Efficient saccharification of this biomass to fermentable sugars will be a key technology in future biorefineries. Traditionally, saccharification was thought to be accomplished by mixtures of hydrolytic enzymes. However, recently it has been shown that lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) contribute to this process by catalyzing oxidative cleavage of insoluble polysaccharides utilizing a mechanism involving molecular oxygen and an electron donor. These enzymes thus represent novel tools for the saccharification of plant biomass. Most characterized LPMOs, including all reported bacterial LPMOs, form aldonic acids, i.e., products oxidized in the C1 position of the terminal sugar. Oxidation at other positions has been observed, and there has been some debate concerning the nature of this position (C4 or C6). In this study, we have characterized an LPMO from Neurospora crassa (NcLPMO9C; also known as NCU02916 and NcGH61-3). Remarkably, and in contrast to all previously characterized LPMOs, which are active only on polysaccharides, NcLPMO9C is able to cleave soluble cello-oligosaccharides as short as a tetramer, a property that allowed detailed product analysis. Using mass spectrometry and NMR, we show that the cello-oligosaccharide products released by this enzyme contain a C4 gemdiol/keto group at the nonreducing end. PMID:24324265

  14. Discovery and characterization of a new family of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Hemsworth, Glyn R.; Henrissat, Bernard; Davies, Gideon J.; Walton, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (LPMOs) are a recently discovered class of enzymes capable of oxidizing recalcitrant polysaccharides. They currently attract much attention due to their potential use in biomass conversion, notably in the production of biofuels. Past work has identified two discrete sequence-based families of these enzymes termed AA9 (formerly GH61) and AA10 (formerly CBM33). Here we report the discovery of a third family of LPMOs. Using a chitin-degrading exemplar from Aspergillus oryzae, we show that the 3-D structure of the enzyme shares some features of the previous two classes of LPMOs, including a copper active centre featuring the histidine brace active site, but is distinct in terms of its active site details and its EPR spectroscopy. The new AA11 family expands the LPMO clan with the potential to broaden both the range of potential substrates and the types of reactive copper-oxygen species formed at the active site of LPMOs. PMID:24362702

  15. Production of four Neurospora crassa lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in Pichia pastoris monitored by a fluorimetric assay

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies demonstrate that enzymes from the glycosyl hydrolase family 61 (GH61) show lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (PMO) activity. Together with cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) an enzymatic system capable of oxidative cellulose cleavage is formed, which increases the efficiency of cellulases and put PMOs at focus of biofuel research. Large amounts of purified PMOs, which are difficult to obtain from the native fungal producers, are needed to study their reaction kinetics, structure and industrial application. In addition, a fast and robust enzymatic assay is necessary to monitor enzyme production and purification. Results Four pmo genes from Neurospora crassa were expressed in P. pastoris under control of the AOX1 promoter. High yields were obtained for the glycosylated gene products PMO-01867, PMO-02916 and PMO-08760 (>300 mg L-1), whereas the yield of non-glycosylated PMO-03328 was moderate (~45 mg L-1). The production and purification of all four enzymes was specifically followed by a newly developed, fast assay based on a side reaction of PMO: the production of H2O2 in the presence of reductants. While ascorbate is a suitable reductant for homogeneous PMO preparations, fermentation samples require the specific electron donor CDH. Conclusions P. pastoris is a high performing expression host for N. crassa PMOs. The pmo genes under control of the native signal sequence are correctly processed and active. The novel CDH-based enzyme assay allows fast determination of PMO activity in fermentation samples and is robust against interfering matrix components. PMID:23102010

  16. Novel hydrocarbon monooxygenase genes in the metatranscriptome of a natural deep-sea hydrocarbon plume.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Jain, Sunit; Baker, Brett J; Taylor, Chris; Dick, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    Particulate membrane-associated hydrocarbon monooxygenases (pHMOs) are critical components of the aerobic degradation pathway for low molecular weight hydrocarbons, including the potent greenhouse gas methane. Here, we analysed pHMO gene diversity in metagenomes and metatranscriptomes of hydrocarbon-rich hydrothermal plumes in the Guaymas Basin (GB) and nearby background waters in the deep Gulf of California. Seven distinct phylogenetic groups of pHMO were present and transcriptionally active in both plume and background waters, including several that are undetectable with currently available polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. The seven groups of pHMOs included those related to a putative ethane oxidizing Methylococcaceae-like group, a group of the SAR324 Deltaproteobacteria, three deep-sea clades (Deep sea-1/symbiont-like, Deep sea-2/PS-80 and Deep sea-3/OPU3) within gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs, one clade related to Group Z and one unknown group. Differential abundance of pHMO gene transcripts in plume and background suggests niche differentiation between groups. Corresponding 16S rRNA genes reflected similar phylogenetic and transcriptomic abundance trends. The novelty of transcriptionally active pHMOs we recovered from a hydrocarbon-rich hydrothermal plume suggests there are significant gaps in our knowledge of the diversity and function of these enzymes in the environment. PMID:23826624

  17. Modulation of MICAL Monooxygenase Activity by its Calponin Homology Domain: Structural and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Alqassim, Saif S.; Urquiza, Mauricio; Borgnia, Eitan; Nagib, Marc; Amzel, L. Mario; Bianchet, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    MICALs (Molecule Interacting with CasL) are conserved multidomain enzymes essential for cytoskeletal reorganization in nerve development, endocytosis, and apoptosis. In these enzymes, a type-2 calponin homology (CH) domain always follows an N-terminal monooxygenase (MO) domain. Although the CH domain is required for MICAL-1 cellular localization and actin-associated function, its contribution to the modulation of MICAL activity towards actin remains unclear. Here, we present the structure of a fragment of MICAL-1 containing the MO and the CH domains—determined by X-ray crystallography and small angle scattering—as well as kinetics experiments designed to probe the contribution of the CH domain to the actin-modification activity. Our results suggest that the CH domain, which is loosely connected to the MO domain by a flexible linker and is far away from the catalytic site, couples F-actin to the enhancement of redox activity of MICALMO-CH by a cooperative mechanism involving a trans interaction between adjacently bound molecules. Binding cooperativity is also observed in other proteins regulating actin assembly/disassembly dynamics, such as ADF/Cofilins. PMID:26935886

  18. Crystal Structure and Characterization of Particulate Methane Monooxygenase from Methylocystis species Strain M

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen M.; Rawat, Swati; Telser, Joshua; Hoffman, Brian M.; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. Previous biochemical and structural studies of pMMO have focused on preparations from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. A pMMO from a third organism, Methylocystis species strain M, has been isolated and characterized. Both membrane-bound and solubilized Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO contain ~2 copper ions per 100 kDa protomer and exhibit copper-dependent propylene epoxidation activity. Spectroscopic data indicate that Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO contains a mixture of CuI and CuII, of which the latter exhibits two distinct type 2 CuII electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data are best fit with a mixture of Cu–O/N and Cu–Cu ligand environments with a Cu–Cu interaction at 2.52–2.64 Å. The crystal structure of Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO was determined to 2.68 Å resolution and is the best quality pMMO structure obtained to date. It provides a revised model for the pmoA and pmoC subunits and has led to an improved model of M. capsulatus (Bath) pMMO. In these new structures, the intramembrane zinc/copper binding site has a different coordination environment from that in previous models. PMID:22013879

  19. Reconstitution of {beta}-carotene hydroxylase activity of thermostable CYP175A1 monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Momoi, Kyoko; Hofmann, Ute; Schmid, Rolf D.; Urlacher, Vlada B. . E-mail: itbvkha@po.uni-stuttgart.de

    2006-01-06

    CYP175A1 is a thermostable P450 Monooxygenase from Thermus thermophilus HB27, demonstrating in vivo activity towards {beta}-carotene. Activity of CYP175A1 was reconstituted in vitro using artificial electron transport proteins. First results were obtained in the mixture with a crude Escherichia coli cell extract at 37 {sup o}C. In this system, {beta}-carotene was hydroxylated to {beta}-cryptoxanthin. The result indicated the presence of electron transport enzymes among the E. coli proteins, which are suitable for CYP175A1. However, upon in vitro reconstitution of CYP175A1 activity with purified recombinant flavodoxin and flavodoxin reductase from E. coli, only very low {beta}-cryptoxanthin production was observed. Remarkably, with another artificial electron transport system, putidaredoxin and putidaredoxin reductase from Pseudomonas putida, purified CYP175A1 enzyme hydroxylated {beta}-carotene at 3- and also 3'-positions, resulting in {beta}-cryptoxanthin and zeaxanthin. Under the optimal reaction conditions, the turnover rate of the enzyme reached 0.23 nmol {beta}-cryptoxanthin produced per nmol P450 per min.

  20. Oxidation of ultrafast radical clock substrate probes by the soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Valentine, A M; LeTadic-Biadatti, M H; Toy, P H; Newcomb, M; Lippard, S J

    1999-04-16

    Radical clock substrate probes were used to assess the viability of a discrete substrate radical species in the mechanism of hydrocarbon oxidation by the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). New substituted cyclopropane probes were used with very fast ring-opening rate constants and other desirable attributes, such as the ability to discriminate between radical and cationic intermediates. Oxidation of these substrates by a reconstituted sMMO system resulted in no rearranged products, allowing an upper limit of 150 fs to be placed on the lifetime of a putative radical species. This limit strongly suggests that there is no such substrate radical intermediate. The two enantiomers of trans-1-methyl-2-phenyl-cyclopropane were prepared, and the regioselectivity of their oxidation to the corresponding cyclopropylmethanol and cyclopropylphenol products was determined. The results are consistent with selective orientation of the two enantiomeric substrates in the hydrophobic cavity at the active site of sMMO, specific models for which were examined by molecular modeling. PMID:10196150

  1. Effects of the compounds 2-methoxynaphthoquinone, 2-propoxynaphthoquinone, and 2-isopropoxynaphthoquinone on ecdysone 20-monooxygenase activity.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Martin J; Brescia, Aaron I; Smith, Stan L; Morgan, E David

    2007-09-01

    The effects of the natural compound 2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, isolated from the leaves of Impatiens glandulifera and the synthetic compounds 2-propoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and 2-isopropoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone on ecdysone 20-monooxygenase (E-20-M) activity were examined in three insect species. Homogenates of wandering stage third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster, or abdomens from adult female Aedes aegypti, or fat body or midgut from fifth instar larvae of Manduca sexta were incubated with radiolabelled ecdysone and increasing concentrations (from 1 x 10(-8) to 1 x 10(-3) M) of the three compounds. All three compounds were found to inhibit in a dose-dependent fashion the E-20-M activity in the three insect species. The concentration of these compounds required to elicit a 50% inhibition of this steroid hydroxylase activity in the three insect species examined ranged from approximately 3 x 10(-5) to 7 x 10(-4) M. PMID:17694563

  2. Reaction Mechanism of the Bicopper Enzyme Peptidylglycine α-Hydroxylating Monooxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Enrique; Rommel, Judith B.; Kästner, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase is a noninteracting bicopper enzyme that stereospecifically hydroxylates the terminal glycine of small peptides for its later amidation. Neuroendocrine messengers, such as oxytocin, rely on the biological activity of this enzyme. Each catalytic turnover requires one oxygen molecule, two protons from the solvent, and two electrons. Despite this enzyme having been widely studied, a consensus on the reaction mechanism has not yet been found. Experiments and theoretical studies favor a pro-S abstraction of a hydrogen atom followed by the rebinding of an OH group. However, several hydrogen-abstracting species have been postulated; because two protons are consumed during the reaction, several protonation states are available. An electron transfer between the copper atoms could play a crucial role for the catalysis as well. This leads to six possible abstracting species. In this study, we compare them on equal footing. We perform quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations, considering the glycine hydrogen abstraction. Our results suggest that the most likely mechanism is a protonation of the abstracting species before the hydrogen abstraction and another protonation as well as a reduction before OH rebinding. PMID:24668808

  3. Localization of genes encoding three distinct flavin-containing monooxygenases to human chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Shephard, E.A.; Fox, M.F.; Povey, S. ); Dolphin, C.T.; Phillips, I.R.; Smith, R. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction to map the gene encoding human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) form II (N. Lomri, Q. Gu, and J. R. Cashman, 1992, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89: 1685--1689) to chromosome 1. They propose the designation FMO3 for this gene as it is the third FMO gene to be mapped. The two other human FMO genes identified to date, FMO1 and FMO2, are also located on chromosome 1 (C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. Povey, C. N. A. Palmer, D. M. Ziegler, R. Ayesh, R. L. Smith, and 1. R. Phillips, 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266: 12379--12385; C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. F. Povey, R. L. Smith, and I. R. Phillips, 1992, Biochem. J. 286: 261--267). The localization of FMO1, FMO2, and FMO3 has been refined to the long arm of chromosome 1. Analysis of human metaphase chromosomes by in situ hybridization confirmed the mapping of FMO1 and localized this gene more precisely to 1 q23-q25. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Kynurenine–3–monooxygenase inhibition prevents multiple organ failure in rodent models of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mole, Damian J; Webster, Scott P; Uings, Iain; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Binnie, Margaret; Wilson, Kris; Hutchinson, Jonathan P; Mirguet, Olivier; Walker, Ann; Beaufils, Benjamin; Ancellin, Nicolas; Trottet, Lionel; Bénéton, Véronique; Mowat, Christopher G; Wilkinson, Martin; Rowland, Paul; Haslam, Carl; McBride, Andrew; Homer, Natalie ZM; Baily, James E; Sharp, Matthew GF; Garden, O James; Hughes, Jeremy; Howie, Sarah EM; Holmes, Duncan S; Liddle, John; Iredale, John P

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and devastating inflammatory condition of the pancreas that is considered to be a paradigm of sterile inflammation leading to systemic multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and death1,2 Acute mortality from AP-MODS exceeds 20%3 and for those who survive the initial episode, their lifespan is typically shorter than the general population4. There are no specific therapies available that protect individuals against AP-MODS. Here, we show that kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO), a key enzyme of tryptophan metabolism5, is central to the pathogenesis of AP-MODS. We created a mouse strain deficient for Kmo with a robust biochemical phenotype that protected against extrapancreatic tissue injury to lung, kidney and liver in experimental AP-MODS. A medicinal chemistry strategy based on modifications of the kynurenine substrate led to the discovery of GSK180 as a potent and specific inhibitor of KMO. The binding mode of the inhibitor in the active site was confirmed by X-ray co-crystallography at 3.2 Å resolution. Treatment with GSK180 resulted in rapid changes in levels of kynurenine pathway metabolites in vivo and afforded therapeutic protection against AP-MODS in a rat model of AP. Our findings establish KMO inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of AP-MODS and open up a new area for drug discovery in critical illness. PMID:26752518

  5. Purification and properties of the NADH reductase component of alkene monooxygenase from Mycobacterium strain E3.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, F J; van Berkel, W J; Hartmans, S; de Bont, J A

    1992-01-01

    Alkene monooxygenase, a multicomponent enzyme system which catalyzes the epoxidation of short-chain alkenes, is induced in Mycobacterium strain E3 when it is grown on ethene. We purified the NADH reductase component of this enzyme system to homogeneity. Recovery of the enzyme was 19%, with a purification factor of 920-fold. The enzyme is a monomer with a molecular mass of 56 kDa as determined by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It is yellow-red with absorption maxima at 384, 410, and 460 nm. Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) was identified as a prosthetic group at a FAD-protein ratio of 1:1. Tween 80 prevented irreversible dissociation of FAD from the enzyme during chromatographic purification steps. Colorimetric analysis revealed 2 mol each of iron and acid-labile sulfide, indicating the presence of a [2Fe-2S] cluster. The presence of this cluster was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (g values at 2.011, 1.921, and 1.876). Anaerobic reduction of the reductase by NADH resulted in formation of a flavin semiquinone. Images PMID:1315734

  6. Trichloroethylene degradation using recombinant bacteria expressing the soluble methane monooxygenase from methylosinus trichosporium OB3b

    SciTech Connect

    Jahng, D.; Kim, C.; Wood, T.K.

    1995-12-01

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from M. trichosporium OB3b has the ability to degrade many halogenated aliphatic compounds that are found in contaminated soil and groundwater. For efficient trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation in a foreign host, efforts are being made to improve inconsistent and low sMMO activity of the recombinant strain constructed previously (Pseudomonas putida F1/pSMMO20). Additional smmo-containing recombinant strains have been constructed including various Pseudomonas, Agrobacterium, and Rhizobium strains. Recombinant facultative methylotrophs containing the smmo locus were also constructed through electroporation and tri-parental mating using a new plasmid pSMMO50. TCE degradation by these recombinant strains was examined. The effect of metal ions on in vitro sMMO activity was also discerned to optimize the expression medium. Among the metal ions examined, Cu(I), Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) inhibited sMMO purified from trichosporium OB3b, and the effect of the metal ions on each of the components of sMMO will also be discussed. In addition, the post-segregational killing locus (hok/sok) from E. coli plasmid R1 was inserted downstream of the smmo locus to stabilize the recombinant plasmid in these host cells, and chemostat cultures were used to optimize expression of active sMMO by varying the growth rate.

  7. Cellulose surface degradation by a lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase and its effect on cellulase hydrolytic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Eibinger, Manuel; Ganner, Thomas; Bubner, Patricia; Rošker, Stephanie; Kracher, Daniel; Haltrich, Dietmar; Ludwig, Roland; Plank, Harald; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2014-12-26

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) represents a unique principle of oxidative degradation of recalcitrant insoluble polysaccharides. Used in combination with hydrolytic enzymes, LPMO appears to constitute a significant factor of the efficiency of enzymatic biomass depolymerization. LPMO activity on different cellulose substrates has been shown from the slow release of oxidized oligosaccharides into solution, but an immediate and direct demonstration of the enzyme action on the cellulose surface is lacking. Specificity of LPMO for degrading ordered crystalline and unordered amorphous cellulose material of the substrate surface is also unknown. We show by fluorescence dye adsorption analyzed with confocal laser scanning microscopy that a LPMO (from Neurospora crassa) introduces carboxyl groups primarily in surface-exposed crystalline areas of the cellulosic substrate. Using time-resolved in situ atomic force microscopy we further demonstrate that cellulose nano-fibrils exposed on the surface are degraded into shorter and thinner insoluble fragments. Also using atomic force microscopy, we show that prior action of LPMO enables cellulases to attack otherwise highly resistant crystalline substrate areas and that it promotes an overall faster and more complete surface degradation. Overall, this study reveals key characteristics of LPMO action on the cellulose surface and suggests the effects of substrate morphology on the synergy between LPMO and hydrolytic enzymes in cellulose depolymerization. PMID:25361767

  8. Carbon Isotope Fractionations Associated with Methanotrophic Growth with the Soluble and Particulate Methane Monooxygenases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Summons, Roger E.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Growth experiments with the RuMP-type methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), have demonstrated that biomass and lipid biomarkers are significantly depleted in C-13 compared to the substrate methane and that the extent of fractionation is dependent on whether cells express the soluble (s) or particulate (p) methane monooxygenase (MMO). The presence or absence of the characteristic sMMO subunits was monitored using SDS-polyacrylamide gels. In M. capsulatus grown with no Cu supplementation, the characteristic sMMO subunits were observed in the soluble fraction throughout the entire growth period and biomass was depleted in C-13 by approximately 14,700 relative to substrate methane. In cells grown with 5uM Cu, no sMMO bands were observed and a greater fractionation of approximately 27,700 in resultant biomass was obtained. Methanol growth experiments with M. capsulatus and with a RuMP methylotroph, Methylophilus methylotrophus, in which biomass measurements yielded depletions in C-13 of 9 and 5%(sub o), respectively, suggest that oxidation of methane is the major fractionation step. Growth of M. capsulatus at a low level of oxygen, approximately 0.5%, had no significant effect on carbon isotope fractionation by either sMMO or pMMO. These observations are significant for identification of molecular biomarkers; and methanotrophic contributions to carbon isotope composition in natural environments.

  9. Sterol homeostasis requires regulated degradation of squalene monooxygenase by the ubiquitin ligase Doa10/Teb4

    PubMed Central

    Foresti, Ombretta; Ruggiano, Annamaria; Hannibal-Bach, Hans K; Ejsing, Christer S; Carvalho, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Sterol homeostasis is essential for the function of cellular membranes and requires feedback inhibition of HMGR, a rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. As HMGR acts at the beginning of the pathway, its regulation affects the synthesis of sterols and of other essential mevalonate-derived metabolites, such as ubiquinone or dolichol. Here, we describe a novel, evolutionarily conserved feedback system operating at a sterol-specific step of the mevalonate pathway. This involves the sterol-dependent degradation of squalene monooxygenase mediated by the yeast Doa10 or mammalian Teb4, a ubiquitin ligase implicated in a branch of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway. Since the other branch of ERAD is required for HMGR regulation, our results reveal a fundamental role for ERAD in sterol homeostasis, with the two branches of this pathway acting together to control sterol biosynthesis at different levels and thereby allowing independent regulation of multiple products of the mevalonate pathway. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00953.001 PMID:23898401

  10. Chopping and Changing: the Evolution of the Flavin-dependent Monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Mascotti, Maria Laura; Juri Ayub, Maximiliano; Furnham, Nicholas; Thornton, Janet M; Laskowski, Roman A

    2016-07-31

    Flavin-dependent monooxygenases play a variety of key physiological roles and are also very powerful biotechnological tools. These enzymes have been classified into eight different classes (A-H) based on their sequences and biochemical features. By combining structural and sequence analysis, and phylogenetic inference, we have explored the evolutionary history of classes A, B, E, F, and G and demonstrate that their multidomain architectures reflect their phylogenetic relationships, suggesting that the main evolutionary steps in their divergence are likely to have arisen from the recruitment of different domains. Additionally, the functional divergence within in each class appears to have been the result of other mechanisms such as a complex set of single-point mutations. Our results reinforce the idea that a main constraint on the evolution of cofactor-dependent enzymes is the functional binding of the cofactor. Additionally, a remarkable feature of this family is that the sequence of the key flavin adenine dinucleotide-binding domain is split into at least two parts in all classes studied here. We propose a complex set of evolutionary events that gave rise to the origin of the different classes within this family. PMID:27423402

  11. Immobilization of P450 monooxygenase and chloroplast for use in light-driven bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Hara, M; Iazvovskaia, S; Ohkawa, H; Asada, Y; Miyake, J

    1999-01-01

    P450 monooxygenases exhibit great potential for application to bioreactors for the decomposition of various hydrophobic chemicals including pollutant compounds. P450-containing microsomes were immobilized in spinach chloroplasts for use in light-driven bioreactors. We tested three methods (entrapment, adsorption and cross-linking) to immobilize chloroplasts and yeast microsomes containing a genetically engineered fusion enzyme between rat P450 1A1 and yeast P450 reductase. Entrapment in agarose gave the best activity for the conversion of 7-ethoxycoumarin to 7-hydroxycoumarin under illumination of 6200 lx. We then tested three light-driven bioreactors (two column-type and one batch-type reactors developed) using the immobilized gels. A two-phase column-type reactor with separately immobilized microsomes and chloroplasts showed a higher conversion rate than a reactor with co-immobilization of both components. The reactor showed a turnover rate of 6.32 mol product/mol P450/min after a 40-min run, and 2.49 after a 180-min run. These turnover rates are higher than the values reported by others using immobilized microsomal P450s. PMID:16232556

  12. Structure of T4moF, the Toluene 4-Monooxygenase Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Acheson, Justin F; Moseson, Hannah; Fox, Brian G

    2015-09-29

    The 1.6 Å crystal structure of toluene 4-monooxygenase reductase T4moF is reported. The structure includes ferredoxin, flavin, and NADH binding domains. The position of the ferredoxin domain relative to the other two domains represents a new configuration for the iron-sulfur flavoprotein family. Close contacts between the C8 methyl group of FAD and [2Fe-2S] ligand Cys36-O represent a plausible pathway for electron transfer between the redox cofactors. Energy-minimized docking of NADH and calculation of hingelike motions between domains suggest how simple coordinated shifts of residues at the C-terminus of the enzyme could expose the N5 position of FAD for productive interaction with the nicotinamide ring. The domain configuration revealed by the T4moF structure provides an excellent steric and electrostatic match to the obligate electron acceptor, Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin T4moC. Protein-protein docking and energy minimization of the T4moFC complex indicate that T4moF [2Fe-2S] ligand Cys41 and T4moC [2Fe-2S] ligand His67, along with other electrostatic interactions between the protein partners, form the functional electron transfer interface. PMID:26309236

  13. (+)-Abscisic Acid 8′-Hydroxylase Is a Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase1

    PubMed Central

    Krochko, Joan E.; Abrams, Garth D.; Loewen, Mary K.; Abrams, Suzanne R.; Cutler, Adrian J.

    1998-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) 8′-hydroxylase catalyzes the first step in the oxidative degradation of (+)-ABA. The development of a robust in vitro assay has now permitted detailed examination and characterization of this enzyme. Although several factors (buffer, cofactor, and source tissue) were critical in developing the assay, the most important of these was the identification of a tissue displaying high amounts of in vivo enzyme activity (A.J. Cutler, T.M. Squires, M.K. Loewen, J.J. Balsevich [1997] J Exp Bot 48: 1787–1795). (+)-ABA 8′-hydroxylase is an integral membrane protein that is localized to the microsomal fraction in suspension-cultured maize (Zea mays) cells. (+)-ABA metabolism requires both NADPH and molecular oxygen. NADH was not an effective cofactor, although there was substantial stimulation of activity (synergism) when it was included at rate-limiting NADPH concentrations. The metabolism of (+)-ABA was progressively inhibited at O2 concentrations less than 10% (v/v) and was very low (less than 5% of control) under N2. (+)-ABA 8′-hydroxylase activity was inhibited by tetcyclacis (50% inhibition at 10−6 m), cytochrome c (oxidized form), and CO. The CO inhibition was reversible by light from several regions of the visible spectrum, but most efficiently by blue and amber light. These data strongly support the contention that (+)-ABA 8′-hydroxylase is a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase. PMID:9808729

  14. Two Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases Catalyze Early Hydroxylation Steps in the Potato Steroid Glycoalkaloid Biosynthetic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Umemoto, Naoyuki; Nakayasu, Masaru; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Mizutani, Masaharu; Seki, Hikaru; Saito, Kazuki; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2016-08-01

    α-Solanine and α-chaconine, steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) found in potato (Solanum tuberosum), are among the best-known secondary metabolites in food crops. At low concentrations in potato tubers, SGAs are distasteful; however, at high concentrations, SGAs are harmful to humans and animals. Here, we show that POTATO GLYCOALKALOID BIOSYNTHESIS1 (PGA1) and PGA2, two genes that encode cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP72A208 and CYP72A188), are involved in the SGA biosynthetic pathway, respectively. The knockdown plants of either PGA1 or PGA2 contained very little SGA, yet vegetative growth and tuber production were not affected. Analyzing metabolites that accumulated in the plants and produced by in vitro enzyme assays revealed that PGA1 and PGA2 catalyzed the 26- and 22-hydroxylation steps, respectively, in the SGA biosynthetic pathway. The PGA-knockdown plants had two unique phenotypic characteristics: The plants were sterile and tubers of these knockdown plants did not sprout during storage. Functional analyses of PGA1 and PGA2 have provided clues for controlling both potato glycoalkaloid biosynthesis and tuber sprouting, two traits that can significantly impact potato breeding and the industry. PMID:27307258

  15. A magnetic bead-based ligand binding assay to facilitate human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kris; Mole, Damian J; Homer, Natalie Z M; Iredale, John P; Auer, Manfred; Webster, Scott P

    2015-02-01

    Human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is emerging as an important drug target enzyme in a number of inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease states. Recombinant protein production of KMO, and therefore discovery of KMO ligands, is challenging due to a large membrane targeting domain at the C-terminus of the enzyme that causes stability, solubility, and purification difficulties. The purpose of our investigation was to develop a suitable screening method for targeting human KMO and other similarly challenging drug targets. Here, we report the development of a magnetic bead-based binding assay using mass spectrometry detection for human KMO protein. The assay incorporates isolation of FLAG-tagged KMO enzyme on protein A magnetic beads. The protein-bound beads are incubated with potential binding compounds before specific cleavage of the protein-compound complexes from the beads. Mass spectrometry analysis is used to identify the compounds that demonstrate specific binding affinity for the target protein. The technique was validated using known inhibitors of KMO. This assay is a robust alternative to traditional ligand-binding assays for challenging protein targets, and it overcomes specific difficulties associated with isolating human KMO. PMID:25296660

  16. Lead discovery for human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase by high-throughput RapidFire mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Denise M; Gee, Michelle; Haslam, Carl; Leavens, Bill; Christodoulou, Erica; Hissey, Paul; Hardwicke, Philip; Argyrou, Argyrides; Webster, Scott P; Mole, Damian J; Wilson, Kris; Binnie, Margaret; Yard, Beverley A; Dean, Tony; Liddle, John; Uings, Iain; Hutchinson, Jonathan P

    2014-04-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a therapeutically important target on the eukaryotic tryptophan catabolic pathway, where it converts L-kynurenine (Kyn) to 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK). We have cloned and expressed the human form of this membrane protein as a full-length GST-fusion in a recombinant baculovirus expression system. An enriched membrane preparation was used for a directed screen of approximately 78,000 compounds using a RapidFire mass spectrometry (RF-MS) assay. The RapidFire platform provides an automated solid-phase extraction system that gives a throughput of approximately 7 s per well to the mass spectrometer, where direct measurement of both the substrate and product allowed substrate conversion to be determined. The RF-MS methodology is insensitive to assay interference, other than where compounds have the same nominal mass as Kyn or 3-HK and produce the same mass transition on fragmentation. These instances could be identified by comparison with the product-only data. The screen ran with excellent performance (average Z' value 0.8) and provided several tractable hit series for further investigation. PMID:24381207

  17. C. elegans flavin-containing monooxygenase-4 is essential for osmoregulation in hypotonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Hirani, Nisha; Westenberg, Marcel; Seed, Paul T.; Petalcorin, Mark I. R.; Dolphin, Colin T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have revealed osmoregulatory systems engaged when worms experience hypertonic conditions, but less is known about measures employed when faced with hypotonic stress. Inactivation of fmo-4, which encodes flavin-containing monooxygenase-4, results in dramatic hypoosmotic hypersensitivity; worms are unable to prevent overwhelming water influx and swell rapidly, finally rupturing due to high internal hydrostatic pressure. fmo-4 is expressed prominently in hypodermis, duct and pore cells but is excluded from the excretory cell. Thus, FMO-4 plays a crucial osmoregulatory role by promoting clearance of excess water that enters during hypotonicity, perhaps by synthesizing an osmolyte that acts to establish an osmotic gradient from excretory cell to duct and pore cells. C. elegans FMO-4 contains a C-terminal extension conserved in all nematode FMO-4s. The coincidently numbered human FMO4 also contains an extended C-terminus with features similar to those of FMO-4. Although these shared sequence characteristics suggest potential orthology, human FMO4 was unable to rescue the fmo-4 osmoregulatory defect. Intriguingly, however, mammalian FMO4 is expressed predominantly in the kidney – an appropriate site if it too is, or once was, involved in osmoregulation. PMID:27010030

  18. Electron transfer reactions in the alkene mono-oxygenase complex from Nocardia corallina B-276.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, S C; Cammack, R; Dalton, H

    1999-01-01

    Nocardia corallina B-276 possesses a multi-component enzyme, alkene mono-oxygenase (AMO), that catalyses the stereoselective epoxygenation of alkenes. The reductase component of this system has been shown by EPR and fluorescence spectroscopy to contain two prosthetic groups, an FAD centre and a [2Fe-2S] cluster. The role of these centres in the epoxygenation reaction was determined by midpoint potential measurements and electron transfer kinetics. The order of potentials of the prosthetic groups of the reductase were FAD/FAD.=-216 mV, [2Fe-2S]/[2Fe-2S].=-160 mV and FAD./FAD.=-134 mV. Combined, these data implied that the reductase component supplied the energy required for the epoxygenation reaction and allowed a prediction of the mechanism of electron transfer within the AMO complex. The FAD moiety was reduced by bound NADH in a two-electron reaction. The electrons were then transported to the [2Fe-2S] centre one at a time, which in turn reduced the di-iron centre of the epoxygenase. Reduction of the di-iron centre is required for oxygen binding and substrate oxidation. PMID:10085230

  19. Suppressed expression of choline monooxygenase in sugar beet on the accumulation of glycine betaine.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Nana; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kitou, Kunihide; Sahashi, Kosuke; Tamagake, Hideto; Tanaka, Yoshito; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-11-01

    Glycine betaine (GB) is an important osmoprotectant and synthesized by two-step oxidation of choline. Choline monooxygenase (CMO) catalyzes the first step of the pathway and is believed to be a rate limiting step for GB synthesis. Recent studies have shown the importance of choline-precursor supply for GB synthesis. In order to investigate the role of CMO for GB accumulation in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris), transgenic plants carrying the antisense BvCMO gene were developed. The antisense BvCMO plants showed the decreased activity of GB synthesis from choline compared to wild-type (WT) plants which is well related to the suppressed level of BvCMO protein. However, GB contents were similar between transgenic and WT plants with the exception of young leaves and storage roots. Transgenic plants showed enhanced susceptibility to salt stress than WT plants. These results suggest the importance of choline-precursor-supply for GB accumulation, and young leaves and storage root are sensitive sites for GB accumulation. PMID:26302482

  20. Influence of liver disease and environmental factors on hepatic monooxygenase activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brodie, M J; Boobis, A R; Bulpitt, C J; Davies, D S

    1981-01-01

    The effects of liver disease and environmental factors on hepatic microsomal cytochrome P-450 content, NADPH-cytochrome c reductase (reductase) activity and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity have been simultaneously investigated in 70 patients undergoing diagnostic liver biopsy. The activity of reductase was not significantly affected by the presence of liver disease or any of the environmental factors studied. Cytochrome P-450 content decreased with increasing severity of liver disease whereas AHH activity was only significantly reduced in biopsies showing hepatocellular destruction. None of the parameters of monooxygenase activity varied significantly with the age or sex of the patients. Alcohol excess was associated with decreased cytochrome P-450 content and AHH activity and this effect was independent of the histological status of the biopsy. Both high caffeine intake and cigarette smoking increased AHH activity in the absence of any change in cytochrome P-450 content. There was a positive correlation between the number of meat meals eaten per week and cytochrome P-450 content. Chronic treatment with enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants appeared to increase both cytochrome P-450 content and AHH activity. Despite differential effects of liver disease and environmental influences on cytochrome P-450 content and AHH activity there was a highly significant correlation between the two parameters. The results of the present study correlate well with the known effects of disease and environment on drug metabolism in vivo. PMID:7308271

  1. Monooxygenase mediating catecholestrogen formation by rat anterior pituitary is an estrogen-4-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Bui, Q D; Weisz, J

    1989-02-01

    Microsomes from rat anterior pituitaries (AP) were incubated with (3H)estradiol under conditions previously shown to support catecholestrogen (CE) formation by placental microsomes via an NADPH- or an organic hydroperoxide-dependent, peroxidatic mechanism. Under conditions optimized for monooxygenase activity (pH 8.0, 5 mM NADPH), 4-hydroxylation predominated (apparent Vmax = 65 pmol and 13 pmol/mg protein/30 min for 4- and 2-hydroxy-E2, respectively). Under conditions optimized for peroxidatic activity (pH 6.0, 50 mM cumene hydroperoxide) 2- and 4-hydroxylated-E2 were produced in similar amounts. Thus in the AP, unlike in other target tissues studied, NADPH-dependent CE synthetase is a 4-hydroxylase and significant 2-hydroxylation occurs only via the peroxidatic mechanism. We propose that 4-hydroxylated CEs, which are both potent, long acting estrogens and catechols, serve as local mediators of actions of phenolic estrogens on the AP. PMID:2536311

  2. Purification and characterization of chlorophenol 4-monooxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia AC1100.

    PubMed Central

    Xun, L

    1996-01-01

    Burkholderia (formerly Pseudomonas) cepacia AC1100 mineralizes the herbicide 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4,5-T), and the first intermediate of 2,4,5-T degradation is 2,4,5-trichlorophenol. Chlorophenol 4-monooxygenase activity responsible for 2,4,5-trichlorophenol degradation was detected in the cell extract. The enzyme consisted of two components separated during purification, and both were purified to more than 95% homogeneity. The reconstituted enzyme catalyzed the hydroxylation of several tested chlorophenols with the coconsumption of NADH and oxygen. In addition to chlorophenols, the enzyme also hydroxylated some chloro-p-hydroquinones with the coconsumption of NADH and oxygen. Apparently, the single enzyme was responsible for converting 2,4,5-trichlorophenol to 2,5-dichloro-p-hydroquinone and then to 5-chlorohydroxyquinol (5-chloro-1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene). Component A had a molecular weight of 22,000 and contained flavin adenine dinucleotide. Component A alone catalyzed NADH-dependent cytochrome c reduction, indicating that it had reductase activity. Component B had a molecular weight of 58,000, and no catalytic activity has yet been shown by itself. PMID:8626333

  3. Functional characterization of choline monooxygenase, an enzyme for betaine synthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Hibino, Takashi; Waditee, Rungaroon; Araki, Etsuko; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Aoki, Kenji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2002-11-01

    In plants, the first step in betaine synthesis was shown to be catalyzed by a novel Rieske-type iron-sulfur enzyme, choline monooxygenase (CMO). Although CMO so far has been found only in Chenopodiaceae and Amaranthaceae, the recent genome sequence suggests the presence of a CMO-like gene in Arabidopsis, a betaine non-accumulating plant. Here, we examined the functional properties of CMO expressed in Escherichia coli, cyanobacterium, and Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that E. coli cells in which choline dehydrogenase (CDH) was replaced with spinach CMO accumulate betaine and complement the salt-sensitive phenotype of the CDH-deleted E. coli mutant. Changes of Cys-181 in spinach CMO to Ser, Thr, and Ala and His-287 to Gly, Val, and Ala abolished the accumulation of betaine. The Arabidopsis CMO-like gene was transcribed in Arabidopsis, but its protein was not detected. When the Arabidopsis CMO-like gene was expressed in E. coli, the protein was detected but was found not to promote betaine sysnthesis. Overexpression of spinach CMO in E. coli, Synechococcus sp. PCC7942, and Arabidopsis conferred resistance to abiotic stress. These facts clearly indicate that CMO, but not the CMO-like protein, could oxidize choline and that Cys-181 and His-287 are involved in the binding of Fe-S cluster and Fe, respectively. PMID:12192001

  4. Bacterial dioxygenase- and monooxygenase-catalysed sulfoxidation of benzo[b]thiophenes.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Derek R; Sharma, Narain D; McMurray, Brian; Haughey, Simon A; Allen, Christopher C R; Hamilton, John T G; McRoberts, W Colin; O'Ferrall, Rory A More; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Coulombel, Lydie A; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2012-01-28

    Asymmetric heteroatom oxidation of benzo[b]thiophenes to yield the corresponding sulfoxides was catalysed by toluene dioxygenase (TDO), naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) and styrene monooxygenase (SMO) enzymes present in P. putida mutant and E. coli recombinant whole cells. TDO-catalysed oxidation yielded the relatively unstable benzo[b]thiophene sulfoxide; its dimerization, followed by dehydrogenation, resulted in the isolation of stable tetracyclic sulfoxides as minor products with cis-dihydrodiols being the dominant metabolites. SMO mainly catalysed the formation of enantioenriched benzo[b]thiophene sulfoxide and 2-methyl benzo[b]thiophene sulfoxides which racemized at ambient temperature. The barriers to pyramidal sulfur inversion of 2- and 3-methyl benzo[b]thiophene sulfoxide metabolites, obtained using TDO and NDO as biocatalysts, were found to be ca.: 25-27 kcal mol(-1). The absolute configurations of the benzo[b]thiophene sulfoxides were determined by ECD spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and stereochemical correlation. A site-directed mutant E. coli strain containing an engineered form of NDO, was found to change the regioselectivity toward preferential oxidation of the thiophene ring rather than the benzene ring. PMID:22134441

  5. Evidence for oxygen binding at the active site of particulate methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Culpepper, Megen A; Cutsail, George E; Hoffman, Brian M; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2012-05-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that converts methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. The enzyme consists of three subunits, pmoB, pmoA, and pmoC, organized in an α(3)β(3)γ(3) trimer. Studies of intact pMMO and a recombinant soluble fragment of the pmoB subunit (denoted as spmoB) indicate that the active site is located within the soluble region of pmoB at the site of a crystallographically modeled dicopper center. In this work, we have investigated the reactivity of pMMO and spmoB with oxidants. Upon reduction and treatment of spmoB with O(2) or H(2)O(2) or pMMO with H(2)O(2), an absorbance feature at 345 nm is generated. The energy and intensity of this band are similar to those of the μ-η(2):η(2)-peroxo-Cu(II)(2) species formed in several dicopper enzymes and model compounds. The feature is not observed in inactive spmoB variants in which the dicopper center is disrupted, consistent with O(2) binding to the proposed active site. Reaction of the 345 nm species with CH(4) results in the disappearance of the spectroscopic feature, suggesting that this O(2) intermediate is mechanistically relevant. Taken together, these observations provide strong new support for the identity and location of the pMMO active site. PMID:22540911

  6. Crystal structure and characterization of particulate methane monooxygenase from Methylocystis species strain M.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen M; Rawat, Swati; Telser, Joshua; Hoffman, Brian M; Stemmler, Timothy L; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2011-11-29

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. Previous biochemical and structural studies of pMMO have focused on preparations from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. A pMMO from a third organism, Methylocystis species strain M, has been isolated and characterized. Both membrane-bound and solubilized Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO contain ~2 copper ions per 100 kDa protomer and exhibit copper-dependent propylene epoxidation activity. Spectroscopic data indicate that Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO contains a mixture of Cu(I) and Cu(II), of which the latter exhibits two distinct type 2 Cu(II) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data are best fit with a mixture of Cu-O/N and Cu-Cu ligand environments with a Cu-Cu interaction at 2.52-2.64 Å. The crystal structure of Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO was determined to 2.68 Å resolution and is the best quality pMMO structure obtained to date. It provides a revised model for the pmoA and pmoC subunits and has led to an improved model of M. capsulatus (Bath) pMMO. In these new structures, the intramembrane zinc/copper binding site has a different coordination environment from that in previous models. PMID:22013879

  7. Soluble methane monooxygenase component B gene probe for identification of methanotrophs that rapidly degrade trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Hsienchyang Tsien; Hanson, R.S. )

    1992-03-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphisms, Western blot (immunoblot) analysis, and fluorescence-labelled signature probes were used for the characterization of methanotrophic bacteria as well as for the identification of methanotrophs which contained the soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) gene and were able to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE). The gene encoding a soluble MMO component B protein from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b was cloned. It contained a 2.2-kb EcoRI fragment. With this cloned component B gene as probe, methanotroph types I, II, and X and environmental and bioreactor samples were screened for the presence of the gene encoding soluble MMO. Among twelve pure or mixed cultures, DNA fragments of seven methanotrophs hybridized with the soluble MMO B gene probe. When grown in media with limited copper, all of these bacteria degraded TCE. All of them are type II methanotrophs. The soluble MMO component B gene of the type X methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath, did not hybridize to the M. trichosporium OB3b soluble MMO component B gene probe, although M. capsulatus Baath also produces a soluble MMO.

  8. Crystal Structure and Characterization of Particulate Methane Monooxygenase from Methylocystis species Strain M

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Stephen M.; Rawat, Swati; Telser, Joshua; Hoffman, Brian M.; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2012-02-08

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. Previous biochemical and structural studies of pMMO have focused on preparations from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. A pMMO from a third organism, Methylocystis species strain M, has been isolated and characterized. Both membrane-bound and solubilized Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO contain {approx}2 copper ions per 100 kDa protomer and exhibit copper-dependent propylene epoxidation activity. Spectroscopic data indicate that Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO contains a mixture of Cu{sup I} and Cu{sup II}, of which the latter exhibits two distinct type 2 Cu{sup II} electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data are best fit with a mixture of Cu-O/N and Cu-Cu ligand environments with a Cu-Cu interaction at 2.52-2.64 {angstrom}. The crystal structure of Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO was determined to 2.68 {angstrom} resolution and is the best quality pMMO structure obtained to date. It provides a revised model for the pmoA and pmoC subunits and has led to an improved model of M. capsulatus (Bath) pMMO. In these new structures, the intramembrane zinc/copper binding site has a different coordination environment from that in previous models.

  9. Bacteriohemerythrin bolsters the activity of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelvin H-C; Wu, Hsin-Hui; Ke, Si-Fu; Rao, Ya-Ting; Tu, Chia-Ming; Chen, Yu-Ping; Kuei, Kuo-Hsuan; Chen, Ying-Siao; Wang, Vincent C-C; Kao, Wei-Chun; Chan, Sunney I

    2012-06-01

    Recently, a native bacteriohemerythrin (McHr) has been identified in Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). Both the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) and McHr are over-expressed in cells of this bacterium when this strain of methanotroph is cultured and grown under high copper to biomass conditions. It has been suggested that the role of the McHr is to provide a shuttle to transport dioxygen from the cytoplasm of the cell to the intra-cytoplasmic membranes for consumption by the pMMO. Indeed, McHr enhances the activity of the pMMO when pMMO-enriched membranes are used to assay the enzyme activity. We find that McHr can dramatically improve the activity of pMMO toward the epoxidation of propylene to propylene oxide. The maximum activity is observed at a pMMO to McHr concentration ratio of 4:1, where we have obtained specific activities of 103.7nmol propylene oxide/min/mg protein and 122.8nmol propylene oxide/min/mg protein at 45°C when the turnover is driven by NADH and duroquinol, respectively. These results are consistent with the suggestion that the bacterium requires McHr to deliver dioxygen to the pMMO in the intra-cytoplasmic membranes to accomplish efficient catalysis of methane oxidation when the enzyme is over-expressed in the cells. PMID:22484247

  10. Taxol biosynthesis: taxane 13 alpha-hydroxylase is a cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Jennewein, S; Rithner, C D; Williams, R M; Croteau, R B

    2001-11-20

    A central feature in the biosynthesis of Taxol is oxygenation at multiple positions of the taxane core structure, reactions that are considered to be mediated by cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases. A PCR-based differential display-cloning approach, using Taxus (yew) cells induced for Taxol production, yielded a family of related cytochrome P450 genes, one of which was assigned as a taxane 10 beta-hydroxylase by functional expression in yeast. The acquired clones that did not function in yeast were heterologously expressed by using the Spodoptera fugiperda-baculovirus-based system and were screened for catalytic capability by using taxa-4(20),11(12)-dien-5 alpha-ol and its acetate ester as test substrates. This approach allowed identification of one of the cytochrome P450 clones (which bore 63% deduced sequence identity to the aforementioned taxane 10 beta-hydroxylase) as a taxane 13 alpha-hydroxylase by chromatographic and spectrometric characterization of the corresponding recombinant enzyme product. The demonstration of a second relevant hydroxylase from the induced family of cytochrome P450 genes validates this strategy for elucidating the oxygenation steps of taxane diterpenoid (taxoid) metabolism. Additionally, substrate specificity studies with the available cytochrome P450 hydroxylases now indicate that there is likely more than one biosynthetic route to Taxol in yew species. PMID:11707604

  11. Interactions of a fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase with β-glucan substrates and cellobiose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Courtade, Gaston; Wimmer, Reinhard; Røhr, Åsmund K; Preims, Marita; Felice, Alfons K G; Dimarogona, Maria; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Sørlie, Morten; Sandgren, Mats; Ludwig, Roland; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Aachmann, Finn Lillelund

    2016-05-24

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-dependent enzymes that catalyze oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds using molecular oxygen and an external electron donor. We have used NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to study the interactions of a broad-specificity fungal LPMO, NcLPMO9C, with various substrates and with cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH), a known natural supplier of electrons. The NMR studies revealed interactions with cellohexaose that center around the copper site. NMR studies with xyloglucans, i.e., branched β-glucans, showed an extended binding surface compared with cellohexaose, whereas ITC experiments showed slightly higher affinity and a different thermodynamic signature of binding. The ITC data also showed that although the copper ion alone hardly contributes to affinity, substrate binding is enhanced for metal-loaded enzymes that are supplied with cyanide, a mimic of O2 (-) Studies with CDH and its isolated heme b cytochrome domain unambiguously showed that the cytochrome domain of CDH interacts with the copper site of the LPMO and that substrate binding precludes interaction with CDH. Apart from providing insights into enzyme-substrate interactions in LPMOs, the present observations shed new light on possible mechanisms for electron supply during LPMO action. PMID:27152023

  12. Cellulose Surface Degradation by a Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase and Its Effect on Cellulase Hydrolytic Efficiency*

    PubMed Central

    Eibinger, Manuel; Ganner, Thomas; Bubner, Patricia; Rošker, Stephanie; Kracher, Daniel; Haltrich, Dietmar; Ludwig, Roland; Plank, Harald; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) represents a unique principle of oxidative degradation of recalcitrant insoluble polysaccharides. Used in combination with hydrolytic enzymes, LPMO appears to constitute a significant factor of the efficiency of enzymatic biomass depolymerization. LPMO activity on different cellulose substrates has been shown from the slow release of oxidized oligosaccharides into solution, but an immediate and direct demonstration of the enzyme action on the cellulose surface is lacking. Specificity of LPMO for degrading ordered crystalline and unordered amorphous cellulose material of the substrate surface is also unknown. We show by fluorescence dye adsorption analyzed with confocal laser scanning microscopy that a LPMO (from Neurospora crassa) introduces carboxyl groups primarily in surface-exposed crystalline areas of the cellulosic substrate. Using time-resolved in situ atomic force microscopy we further demonstrate that cellulose nano-fibrils exposed on the surface are degraded into shorter and thinner insoluble fragments. Also using atomic force microscopy, we show that prior action of LPMO enables cellulases to attack otherwise highly resistant crystalline substrate areas and that it promotes an overall faster and more complete surface degradation. Overall, this study reveals key characteristics of LPMO action on the cellulose surface and suggests the effects of substrate morphology on the synergy between LPMO and hydrolytic enzymes in cellulose depolymerization. PMID:25361767

  13. Flavin containing monooxygenase 3 exerts broad effects on glucose and lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shih, Diana M; Wang, Zeneng; Lee, Richard; Meng, Yonghong; Che, Nam; Charugundla, Sarada; Qi, Hannah; Wu, Judy; Pan, Calvin; Brown, J Mark; Vallim, Thomas; Bennett, Brian J; Graham, Mark; Hazen, Stanley L; Lusis, Aldons J

    2015-01-01

    We performed silencing and overexpression studies of flavin containing monooxygenase (FMO) 3 in hyperlipidemic mouse models to examine its effects on trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) levels and atherosclerosis. Knockdown of hepatic FMO3 in LDL receptor knockout mice using an antisense oligonucleotide resulted in decreased circulating TMAO levels and atherosclerosis. Surprisingly, we also observed significant decreases in hepatic lipids and in levels of plasma lipids, ketone bodies, glucose, and insulin. FMO3 overexpression in transgenic mice, on the other hand, increased hepatic and plasma lipids. Global gene expression analyses suggested that these effects of FMO3 on lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis may be mediated through the PPARα and Kruppel-like factor 15 pathways. In vivo and in vitro results were consistent with the concept that the effects were mediated directly by FMO3 rather than trimethylamine/TMAO; in particular, overexpression of FMO3 in the human hepatoma cell line, Hep3B, resulted in significantly increased glucose secretion and lipogenesis. Our results indicate a major role for FMO3 in modulating glucose and lipid homeostasis in vivo, and they suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of FMO3 to reduce TMAO levels would be confounded by metabolic interactions. PMID:25378658

  14. Flavin containing monooxygenase 3 exerts broad effects on glucose and lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Diana M.; Wang, Zeneng; Lee, Richard; Meng, Yonghong; Che, Nam; Charugundla, Sarada; Qi, Hannah; Wu, Judy; Pan, Calvin; Brown, J. Mark; Vallim, Thomas; Bennett, Brian J.; Graham, Mark; Hazen, Stanley L.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2015-01-01

    We performed silencing and overexpression studies of flavin containing monooxygenase (FMO) 3 in hyperlipidemic mouse models to examine its effects on trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) levels and atherosclerosis. Knockdown of hepatic FMO3 in LDL receptor knockout mice using an antisense oligonucleotide resulted in decreased circulating TMAO levels and atherosclerosis. Surprisingly, we also observed significant decreases in hepatic lipids and in levels of plasma lipids, ketone bodies, glucose, and insulin. FMO3 overexpression in transgenic mice, on the other hand, increased hepatic and plasma lipids. Global gene expression analyses suggested that these effects of FMO3 on lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis may be mediated through the PPARα and Kruppel-like factor 15 pathways. In vivo and in vitro results were consistent with the concept that the effects were mediated directly by FMO3 rather than trimethylamine/TMAO; in particular, overexpression of FMO3 in the human hepatoma cell line, Hep3B, resulted in significantly increased glucose secretion and lipogenesis. Our results indicate a major role for FMO3 in modulating glucose and lipid homeostasis in vivo, and they suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of FMO3 to reduce TMAO levels would be confounded by metabolic interactions. PMID:25378658

  15. Crystallization and preliminary structural analysis of dibenzothiophene monooxygenase (DszC) from Rhodococcus erythropolis

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaolu; Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Daming; Ji, Kaihua; Ma, Ting; Shui, Wenqing; Li, Guoqiang; Li, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT) and its derivatives are typical sulfur compounds found in fossil fuels. These compounds show resistance to the hydrodesulfuriz­ation treatment that is commonly used in industry. Dibenzothiophene monooxygenase (DszC) is responsible for the oxidation of DBT, which is the first and the rate-limiting step in the DBT enzymatic desulfurization 4S pathway. In this study, the crystal structure of DszC from Rhodococcus erythropolis DS-3 is reported. The crystal of native DszC belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 96.16, b = 96.27, c = 98.56 Å, α = 81.03, β = 67.57, γ = 85.84°. To determine the phase, SAD X-ray diffraction data were collected from a SeMet-derivative DszC crystal, which also belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 95.379, b = 95.167, c = 94.891 Å, α = 87.046, β = 70.536, γ = 79.738°. Further structural analysis of DszC is in progress. PMID:23722833

  16. Acute and subacute effects of miconazole nitrate on hepatic styrene oxide hydrolase and cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase activities in male and female AKR/J mice.

    PubMed

    James, M O

    1988-08-01

    The imidazole-containing anti-fungal drug, miconazole nitrate, was shown to enhance hepatic microsomal styrene oxide hydrolase and inhibit several cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase activities in the AKR/J mouse. Miconazole was a more potent inhibitor of cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase activities in microsomes from male than female mice, and inhibitory potency also varied with substrate. When administered in vivo miconazole nitrate stimulated epoxide hydrolase activity, but had a substrate-dependent biphasic effect on cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase activities. Monooxygenase activities with benzo[a]pyrene and benzphetamine were inhibited to varying degrees in liver homogenate and hepatic microsomes from mice sacrificed 45 min after miconazole administration. After repeated administration of miconazole, liver weight, microsomal protein yield and cytochrome P-450 were increased, as were specific monooxygenase activities with ethoxycoumarin and ethoxyresorufin, but benzphetamine N-demethylase activity was decreased. These results suggested that a metabolite of miconazole was responsible for the inhibition of benzphetamine N-demethylase. It was of special interest that ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity was induced in the AKR/J mouse by miconazole, since the AKR/J mouse is not responsive to induction by aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:3394155

  17. Mechanism of Cytoplasmic mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a fundamental process in gene expression that depends upon the abundance and accessibility of the mRNA transcript as well as the activity of many protein and RNA-protein complexes. Here we focus on the intricate mechanics of mRNA translation in the cytoplasm of higher plants. This chapter includes an inventory of the plant translational apparatus and a detailed review of the translational processes of initiation, elongation, and termination. The majority of mechanistic studies of cytoplasmic translation have been carried out in yeast and mammalian systems. The factors and mechanisms of translation are for the most part conserved across eukaryotes; however, some distinctions are known to exist in plants. A comprehensive understanding of the complex translational apparatus and its regulation in plants is warranted, as the modulation of protein production is critical to development, environmental plasticity and biomass yield in diverse ecosystems and agricultural settings. PMID:26019692

  18. Dioxin-like pollutants increase hepatic flavin containing monooxygenase (FMO3) expression to promote synthesis of the pro-atherogenic nutrient biomarker trimethylamine N-oxide from dietary precursors.

    PubMed

    Petriello, Michael C; Hoffman, Jessie B; Sunkara, Manjula; Wahlang, Banrida; Perkins, Jordan T; Morris, Andrew J; Hennig, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    The etiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is impacted by multiple modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors including dietary choices, genetic predisposition, and environmental exposures. However, mechanisms linking diet, exposure to pollutants, and CVD risk are largely unclear. Recent studies identified a strong link between plasma levels of nutrient-derived Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and coronary artery disease. Dietary precursors of TMAO include carnitine and phosphatidylcholine, which are abundant in animal-derived foods. Dioxin-like pollutants can upregulate a critical enzyme responsible for TMAO formation, hepatic flavin containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3), but a link between dioxin-like PCBs, upregulation of FMO3, and increased TMAO has not been reported. Here, we show that mice exposed acutely to dioxin-like PCBs exhibit increased hepatic FMO3 mRNA, protein, as well as an increase in circulating levels of TMAO following oral administration of its metabolic precursors. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 5μmol PCB 126/kg mouse weight (1.63mg/kg). At 48h post-PCB exposure, mice were subsequently given a single gavage of phosphatidylcholine dissolved in corn oil. Exposure to 5 μmole/kg PCB 126 resulted in greater than 100-fold increase in FMO3 mRNA expression, robust induction of FMO3 protein, and a 5-fold increase in TMAO levels compared with vehicle treated mice. We made similar observations in mice exposed to PCB 77 (49.6mg/kg twice); stable isotope tracer studies revealed increased formation of plasma TMAO from an orally administered precursor trimethylamine (TMA). Taken together, these observations suggest a novel diet-toxicant interaction that results in increased production of a circulating biomarker of cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:27155921

  19. Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase S-Oxygenation of a Series of Thioureas and Thiones

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Marilyn C.; Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Krueger, Sharon K.; Stevens, J. Fred; Kedzie, Karen; Fang, Ken; Heidelbaugh, Todd; Nguyen, Phong; Chow, Ken; Garst, Michael; Gil, Daniel; Williams, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) is active towards many drugs with a heteroatom having the properties of a soft nucleophile. Thiocarbamides and thiones are S-oxygenated to the sulfenic acid which can either react with glutathione and initiate a redox-cycle or be oxygenated a second time to the unstable sulfinic acid. In this study, we utilized LC-MS/MS to demonstrate that the oxygenation by hFMO of the thioureas under test terminated at the sulfenic acid. With thiones, hFMO catalyzed the second reaction and the sulfinic acid rapidly lost sulfite to form the corresponding imidazole. Thioureas are often pulmonary toxicants in mammals and, as previously reported by our laboratory, are excellent substrates for hFMO2. This isoform is expressed at high levels in the lung of most mammals, including non-human primates. Genotyping to date indicates that individuals of African (up to 49%) or Hispanic (2–7%) ancestry have at least one allele for functional hFMO2 in lung, but not Caucasians nor Asians. In this study the major metabolite formed by hFMO2 with thioureas from Allergan, Inc. was the sulfenic acid that reacted with glutathione. The majority of thiones were poor substrates for hFMO3, the major form in adult human liver. However, hFMO1, the major isoform expressed in infant and neonatal liver and adult kidney and intestine, readily S-oxygenated thiones under test, with Kms ranging from 7–160 μM and turnover numbers of 30–40 min−1. The product formed was identified by LC-MS/MS as the imidazole. The activities of the mouse and human FMO1 and FMO3 orthologs were in good agreement with the exception of some thiones for which activity was much greater with hFMO1 than mFMO1. PMID:24727368

  20. Flavin-containing monooxygenase S-oxygenation of a series of thioureas and thiones.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Marilyn C; Siddens, Lisbeth K; Krueger, Sharon K; Stevens, J Fred; Kedzie, Karen; Fang, Wenkui K; Heidelbaugh, Todd; Nguyen, Phong; Chow, Ken; Garst, Michael; Gil, Daniel; Williams, David E

    2014-07-15

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) is active towards many drugs with a heteroatom having the properties of a soft nucleophile. Thiocarbamides and thiones are S-oxygenated to the sulfenic acid which can either react with glutathione and initiate a redox-cycle or be oxygenated a second time to the unstable sulfinic acid. In this study, we utilized LC-MS/MS to demonstrate that the oxygenation by hFMO of the thioureas under test terminated at the sulfenic acid. With thiones, hFMO catalyzed the second reaction and the sulfinic acid rapidly lost sulfite to form the corresponding imidazole. Thioureas are often pulmonary toxicants in mammals and, as previously reported by our laboratory, are excellent substrates for hFMO2. This isoform is expressed at high levels in the lung of most mammals, including non-human primates. Genotyping to date indicates that individuals of African (up to 49%) or Hispanic (2-7%) ancestry have at least one allele for functional hFMO2 in lung, but not Caucasians nor Asians. In this study the major metabolite formed by hFMO2 with thioureas from Allergan, Inc. was the sulfenic acid that reacted with glutathione. The majority of thiones were poor substrates for hFMO3, the major form in adult human liver. However, hFMO1, the major isoform expressed in infant and neonatal liver and adult kidney and intestine, readily S-oxygenated thiones under test, with Kms ranging from 7 to 160 μM and turnover numbers of 30-40 min(-1). The product formed was identified by LC-MS/MS as the imidazole. The activities of the mouse and human FMO1 and FMO3 orthologs were in good agreement with the exception of some thiones for which activity was much greater with hFMO1 than mFMO1. PMID:24727368

  1. Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) as a source of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Siddens, Lisbeth K; Krueger, Sharon K; Henderson, Marilyn C; Williams, David E

    2014-05-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) oxygenates drugs/xenobiotics containing a soft nucleophile through a C4a hydroperoxy-FAD intermediate. Human FMOs 1, 2 and 3, expressed in Sf9 insect microsomes, released 30-50% of O₂ consumed as H₂O₂ upon addition of NADPH. Addition of substrate had little effect on H₂O₂ production. Two common FMO2 (the major isoform in the lung) genetic polymorphisms, S195L and N413K, were examined for generation of H₂O₂. FMO2 S195L exhibited higher "leakage", producing much greater amounts of H₂O₂, than ancestral FMO2 (FMO2.1) or the N413K variant. S195L was distinct in that H₂O₂ generation was much higher in the absence of substrate. Addition of superoxide dismutase did not impact H₂O₂ release. Catalase did not reduce levels of H₂O₂ with either FMO2.1 or FMO3 but inhibited H₂O₂ generated by FMO2 allelic variants N413K and S195L. These data are consistent with FMO molecular models. S195L resides in the GxGxSG/A NADP(+) binding motif, in which serine is highly conserved (76/89 known FMOs). We hypothesize that FMO, especially allelic variants such as FMO2 S195L, may enhance the toxicity of xenobiotics such as thioureas/thiocarbamides both by generation of sulfenic and sulfinic acid metabolites and enhanced release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the form of H₂O₂. PMID:24561181

  2. Fungal Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases: Their Distribution, Structure, Functions, Family Expansion, and Evolutionary Origin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanping; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Jefcoate, Colin; Kim, Sun-Chang; Chen, Fusheng; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenase superfamily contributes a broad array of biological functions in living organisms. In fungi, CYPs play diverse and pivotal roles in versatile metabolism and fungal adaptation to specific ecological niches. In this report, CYPomes in the 47 genomes of fungi belong to the phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota have been studied. The comparison of fungal CYPomes suggests that generally fungi possess abundant CYPs belonging to a variety of families with the two global families CYP51 and CYP61, indicating individuation of CYPomes during the evolution of fungi. Fungal CYPs show highly conserved characteristic motifs, but very low overall sequence similarities. The characteristic motifs of fungal CYPs are distinguishable from those of CYPs in animals, plants, and especially archaea and bacteria. The four representative motifs contribute to the general function of CYPs. Fungal CYP51s and CYP61s can be used as the models for the substrate recognition sites analysis. The CYP proteins are clustered into 15 clades and the phylogenetic analyses suggest that the wide variety of fungal CYPs has mainly arisen from gene duplication. Two large duplication events might have been associated with the booming of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. In addition, horizontal gene transfer also contributes to the diversification of fungal CYPs. Finally, a possible evolutionary scenario for fungal CYPs along with fungal divergences is proposed. Our results provide the fundamental information for a better understanding of CYP distribution, structure and function, and new insights into the evolutionary events of fungal CYPs along with the evolution of fungi. PMID:24966179

  3. Flavin-containing monooxygenase S-oxygenation of a series of thioureas and thiones

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Marilyn C.; Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Krueger, Sharon K.; Stevens, J. Fred; Kedzie, Karen; Fang, Wenkui K.; Heidelbaugh, Todd; Nguyen, Phong; Chow, Ken; Garst, Michael; Gil, Daniel; Williams, David E.

    2014-07-15

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) is active towards many drugs with a heteroatom having the properties of a soft nucleophile. Thiocarbamides and thiones are S-oxygenated to the sulfenic acid which can either react with glutathione and initiate a redox-cycle or be oxygenated a second time to the unstable sulfinic acid. In this study, we utilized LC–MS/MS to demonstrate that the oxygenation by hFMO of the thioureas under test terminated at the sulfenic acid. With thiones, hFMO catalyzed the second reaction and the sulfinic acid rapidly lost sulfite to form the corresponding imidazole. Thioureas are often pulmonary toxicants in mammals and, as previously reported by our laboratory, are excellent substrates for hFMO2. This isoform is expressed at high levels in the lung of most mammals, including non-human primates. Genotyping to date indicates that individuals of African (up to 49%) or Hispanic (2–7%) ancestry have at least one allele for functional hFMO2 in lung, but not Caucasians nor Asians. In this study the major metabolite formed by hFMO2 with thioureas from Allergan, Inc. was the sulfenic acid that reacted with glutathione. The majority of thiones were poor substrates for hFMO3, the major form in adult human liver. However, hFMO1, the major isoform expressed in infant and neonatal liver and adult kidney and intestine, readily S-oxygenated thiones under test, with K{sub m}s ranging from 7 to 160 μM and turnover numbers of 30–40 min{sup −1}. The product formed was identified by LC–MS/MS as the imidazole. The activities of the mouse and human FMO1 and FMO3 orthologs were in good agreement with the exception of some thiones for which activity was much greater with hFMO1 than mFMO1.

  4. Structural and functional characterization of a conserved pair of bacterial cellulose-oxidizing lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Zarah; Mackenzie, Alasdair K; Sørlie, Morten; Røhr, Åsmund K; Helland, Ronny; Arvai, Andrew S; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Eijsink, Vincent G H

    2014-06-10

    For decades, the enzymatic conversion of cellulose was thought to rely on the synergistic action of hydrolytic enzymes, but recent work has shown that lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are important contributors to this process. We describe the structural and functional characterization of two functionally coupled cellulose-active LPMOs belonging to auxiliary activity family 10 (AA10) that commonly occur in cellulolytic bacteria. One of these LPMOs cleaves glycosidic bonds by oxidation of the C1 carbon, whereas the other can oxidize both C1 and C4. We thus demonstrate that C4 oxidation is not confined to fungal AA9-type LPMOs. X-ray crystallographic structures were obtained for the enzyme pair from Streptomyces coelicolor, solved at 1.3 Å (ScLPMO10B) and 1.5 Å (CelS2 or ScLPMO10C) resolution. Structural comparisons revealed differences in active site architecture that could relate to the ability to oxidize C4 (and that also seem to apply to AA9-type LPMOs). Despite variation in active site architecture, the two enzymes exhibited similar affinities for Cu(2+) (12-31 nM), redox potentials (242 and 251 mV), and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra, with only the latter clearly different from those of chitin-active AA10-type LPMOs. We conclude that substrate specificity depends not on copper site architecture, but rather on variation in substrate binding and orientation. During cellulose degradation, the members of this LPMO pair act in synergy, indicating different functional roles and providing a rationale for the abundance of these enzymes in biomass-degrading organisms. PMID:24912171

  5. The Nature of the Reaction Intermediates in the FAD-Dependent Epoxidation Mechanism of Styrene Monooxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Kantz, Auric; Gassner, George T.

    2010-01-01

    Styrene monooxygenase (SMO) is a two-component flavoenzyme composed of an NADH-specific flavin reductase (SMOB) and FAD-specific styrene epoxidase (NSMOA). NSMOA binds tightly to reduced FAD and catalyzes the stereospecific addition of one atom of molecular oxygen to the vinyl side chain of styrene in the enantioselective synthesis of S-styrene oxide. In this mechanism, molecular oxygen first reacts with NSMOA(FADred) to yield an FAD C(4a)- peroxide intermediate. This species is non-fluorescent and has an absorbance maximum of 382 nm. Styrene then reacts with the peroxide intermediate with a second order rate constant of 2.6 × 106 ± 0.1 × 106 M−1 s−1 to yield a fluorescent intermediate with an absorbance maximum of 368 nm. We compute an activation free energy of 8.7 kcal.mol∙−1 for the oxygenation step in good agreement with that expected for a peroxide-catalyzed epoxidation, and acid-quenched samples recovered at defined time points in the single-turnover reaction indicate that styrene oxide synthesis is coincident with the formation phase of the fluorescent intermediate. These findings support FAD C(4a)-peroxide as the oxygen atom donor and identity of the fluorescent intermediate as an FAD C(4a)-hydroxide product of the styrene epoxidation. Overall, four pH-dependent rate constants corresponding to peroxyflavin formation (pKa = 7.2), styrene epoxidation (pKa = 7.7), styrene oxide dissociation (pKa = 8.3), and hydroxyflavin dehydration (pKa 7.6) are needed to fit the single-turnover kinetics. PMID:21166448

  6. Two Novel Flavin-Containing Monooxygenases Involved in Biosynthesis of Aliphatic Glucosinolates

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wenwen; Li, Jing; Yu, Qingyue; Cang, Wei; Xu, Rui; Wang, Yang; Ji, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates, a class of secondary metabolites from cruciferous plants, are derived from amino acids and have diverse biological activities, such as in biotic defense, depending on their side chain modification. The first structural modification step in the synthesis of aliphatic (methionine-derived) glucosinolates—S-oxygenation of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates—was found to be catalyzed by five flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs), FMOGS-OX1-5. Here, we report two additional FMOGS-OX enzymes, FMOGS-OX6, and FMOGS-OX7, encoded by At1g12130 and At1g12160, respectively. The overexpression of both FMOGS-OX6 and FMOGS-OX7 decreased the ratio of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to the sum of methylthioalkyl and methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates, suggesting that the introduction of the two genes converted methylthioalkyl glucosinolates into methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates. Analysis of expression pattern revealed that the spatial expression of the two genes is quite similar and partially overlapped with the other FMOGS-OX genes, which are primarily expressed in vascular tissue. We further analyzed the responsive expression pattern of all the seven FMOGS-OX genes to exogenous treatment with abscisic acid, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and low and high temperatures. Although these genes showed same tendency toward the changing stimulus, the sensitivity of each gene was quite different. The variety in spatial expression among the FMOGS-OX genes while responding to environmental stimulus indicated a complex and finely tuned regulation of glucosinolates modifications. Identification of these two novel FMOGS-OX enzymes will enhance the understanding of glucosinolates modifications and the importance of evolution of these duplicated genes. PMID:27621741

  7. Domain engineering of the reductase component of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Blazyk, Jessica L; Lippard, Stephen J

    2004-02-13

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) is a three-component enzyme system that catalyzes the conversion of methane to methanol. A reductase (MMOR), which contains [2Fe-2S] and FAD cofactors, facilitates electron transfer from NADH to the hydroxylase diiron active sites where dioxygen activation and substrate hydroxylation take place. By separately expressing the ferredoxin (MMORFd, MMOR residues 1-98) and FAD/NADH (MMOR-FAD, MMOR residues 99-348) domains of the reductase, nearly all biochemical properties of full-length MMOR are retained, except for interdomain electron transfer rates. To investigate the extent to which rapid electron transfer between domains might be restored and further to explore the modularity of MMOR, MMOR-Fd and MMOR-FAD were connected in a non-native fashion. Four different linker sequences were employed to create MMOR reversed-domain (MMOR-RD) constructs, MMOR(99-342)-linker-MMOR(2-98), with a domain connectivity observed in other homologous oxidoreductases. The optical, redox, and electron transfer properties of the four MMOR-RD proteins were characterized and compared with those of wild-type MMOR. The linker sequence plays a key role in controlling solvent accessibility to the FAD cofactor, as evidenced by perturbed flavin optical spectra, decreased FADox/FADsq redox potentials, and increased steady-state oxidase activities in three of the constructs. Stopped-flow optical spectroscopy revealed slow interdomain electron transfer (k < 0.04 s(-1) at 4 degrees C, compared with 90 s(-1) for wild-type MMOR) for all three MMOR-RD proteins with 7-residue linkers. A long (14-residue), flexible linker afforded much faster electron transfer between the FAD and [2Fe-2S] cofactors (k = 0.9 s(-1) at 4 degrees C). PMID:14613937

  8. Component interactions in the soluble methane monooxygenase system from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Gassner, G T; Lippard, S J

    1999-09-28

    The soluble methane monooxygenase system of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) includes three protein components: a 251-kDa non-heme dinuclear iron hydroxylase (MMOH), a 39-kDa iron-sulfur- and FAD-containing reductase (MMOR), and a 16-kDa regulatory protein (MMOB). The thermodynamic stability and kinetics of formation of complexes between oxidized MMOH and MMOB or MMOR were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry and stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy at temperatures ranging from 3.3 to 45 degrees C. The results, in conjunction with data from equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation studies of MMOR and MMOB, indicate that free MMOR and MMOB exist as monomers in solution and bind MMOH with 2:1 stoichiometry. The role of component interactions in the catalytic mechanism of sMMO was investigated through simultaneous measurement of oxidase and hydroxylase activities as a function of varied protein component concentrations during steady-state turnover. The partitioning of oxidase and hydroxylase activities of sMMO is highly dependent on both the MMOR concentration and the nature of the organic substrate. In particular, NADH oxidation is significantly uncoupled from methane hydroxylation at MMOR concentrations exceeding 20% of the hydroxylase concentration but remains tightly coupled to propylene epoxidation at MMOR concentrations ranging up to the MMOH concentration. The steady-state kinetic data were fit to numerical simulations of models that include both the oxidase activities of free MMOR and of MMOH/MMOR complexes and the hydroxylase activity of MMOH/MMOB complexes. The data were well described by a model in which MMOR and MMOB bind noncompetitively at distinct interacting sites on the hydroxylase. MMOB manifests its regulatory effects by differentially accelerating intermolecular electron transfer from MMOR to MMOH containing bound substrate and product in a manner consistent with its activating and inhibitory effects on the hydroxylase. PMID:10504247

  9. Electron-transfer reactions of the reductase component of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Kopp, D A; Gassner, G T; Blazyk, J L; Lippard, S J

    2001-12-11

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) catalyzes the hydroxylation of methane by dioxygen to afford methanol and water, the first step of carbon assimilation in methanotrophic bacteria. This enzyme comprises three protein components: a hydroxylase (MMOH) that contains a dinuclear nonheme iron active site; a reductase (MMOR) that facilitates electron transfer from NADH to the diiron site of MMOH; and a coupling protein (MMOB). MMOR uses a noncovalently bound FAD cofactor and a [2Fe-2S] cluster to mediate electron transfer. The gene encoding MMOR was cloned from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and expressed in Escherichia coli in high yield. Purified recombinant MMOR was indistinguishable from the native protein in all aspects examined, including activity, mass, cofactor content, and EPR spectrum of the [2Fe-2S] cluster. Redox potentials for the FAD and [2Fe-2S] cofactors, determined by reductive titrations in the presence of indicator dyes, are FAD(ox/sq), -176 +/- 7 mV; FAD(sq/hq), -266 +/- 15 mV; and [2Fe-2S](ox/red), -209 +/- 14 mV. The midpoint potentials of MMOR are not altered by the addition of MMOH, MMOB, or both MMOH and MMOB. The reaction of MMOR with NADH was investigated by stopped-flow UV-visible spectroscopy, and the kinetic and spectral properties of intermediates are described. The effects of pH on the redox properties of MMOR are described and exploited in pH jump kinetic studies to measure the rate constant of 130 +/- 17 s(-)(1) for electron transfer between the FAD and [2Fe-2S] cofactors in two-electron-reduced MMOR. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters determined significantly extend our understanding of the sMMO system. PMID:11732913

  10. Proteomic and targeted qPCR analyses of subsurface microbial communities for presence of methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Paszczynski, Andrzej J; Paidisetti, Ravindra; Johnson, Andrew K; Crawford, Ronald L; Colwell, Frederick S; Green, Tonia; Delwiche, Mark; Lee, Hope; Newby, Deborah; Brodie, Eoin L; Conrad, Mark

    2011-11-01

    The Test Area North (TAN) site at the Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, USA, sits over a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminant plume in the Snake River Plain fractured basalt aquifer. Past observations have provided evidence that TCE at TAN is being transformed by biological natural attenuation that may be primarily due to co-metabolism in aerobic portions of the plume by methanotrophs. TCE co-metabolism by methanotrophs is the result of the broad substrate specificity of microbial methane monooxygenase which permits non-specific oxidation of TCE in addition to the primary substrate, methane. Arrays of experimental approaches have been utilized to understand the biogeochemical processes driving intrinsic TCE co-metabolism at TAN. In this study, aerobic methanotrophs were enumerated by qPCR using primers targeting conserved regions of the genes pmoA and mmoX encoding subunits of the particulate MMO (pMMO) and soluble MMO (sMMO) enzymes, respectively, as well as the gene mxa encoding the downstream enzyme methanol dehydrogenase. Identification of proteins in planktonic and biofilm samples from TAN was determined using reverse phase ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with a quadrupole-time-of-flight (QToF) mass spectrometer to separate and sequence peptides from trypsin digests of the protein extracts. Detection of MMO in unenriched water samples from TAN provides direct evidence of intrinsic methane oxidation and TCE co-metabolic potential of the indigenous microbial population. Mass spectrometry is also well suited for distinguishing which form of MMO is expressed in situ either soluble or particulate. Using this method, pMMO proteins were found to be abundant in samples collected from wells within and adjacent to the TCE plume at TAN. PMID:21360114