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Sample records for alpha-helical protein backbones

  1. A Novel Method for Sampling Alpha-Helical Protein Backbones

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fain, Boris; Levitt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    We present a novel technique of sampling the configurations of helical proteins. Assuming knowledge of native secondary structure, we employ assembly rules gathered from a database of existing structures to enumerate the geometrically possible 3-D arrangements of the constituent helices. We produce a library of possible folds for 25 helical protein cores. In each case the method finds significant numbers of conformations close to the native structure. In addition we assign coordinates to all atoms for 4 of the 25 proteins. In the context of database driven exhaustive enumeration our method performs extremely well, yielding significant percentages of structures (0.02%--82%) within 6A of the native structure. The method's speed and efficiency make it a valuable contribution towards the goal of predicting protein structure.

  2. Dynamic charge interactions create surprising rigidity in the ER/K [alpha]-helical protein motif

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Spink, Benjamin J.; Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Doniach, Sebastian; Spudich, James A.

    2009-06-30

    Protein {alpha}-helices are ubiquitous secondary structural elements, seldom considered to be stable without tertiary contacts. However, amino acid sequences in proteins that are based on alternating repeats of four glutamic acid (E) residues and four positively charged residues, a combination of arginine (R) and lysine (K), have been shown to form stable {alpha}-helices in a few proteins, in the absence of tertiary interactions. Here, we find that this ER/K motif is more prevalent than previously reported, being represented in proteins of diverse function from archaea to humans. By using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we characterize a dynamic pattern of side-chain interactions that extends along the backbone of ER/K {alpha}-helices. A simplified model predicts that side-chain interactions alone contribute substantial bending rigidity (0.5 pN/nm) to ER/K {alpha}-helices. Results of small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and single-molecule optical-trap analyses are consistent with the high bending rigidity predicted by our model. Thus, the ER/K {alpha}-helix is an isolated secondary structural element that can efficiently span long distances in proteins, making it a promising tool in designing synthetic proteins. We propose that the significant rigidity of the ER/K {alpha}-helix can help regulate protein function, as a force transducer between protein subdomains.

  3. Alpha-helical stabilization by side chain shielding of backbone hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    García, Angel E; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y

    2002-03-01

    We study atomic models of the thermodynamics of the structural transition of peptides that form alpha-helices. The effect of sequence variation on alpha-helix formation for alanine-rich peptides, Ac-Ala21-methyl amide (A21) and Ac-A5 (AAARA)3A-methyl amide (Fs peptide), is investigated by atomic simulation studies of the thermodynamics of the helix-coil transition in explicit water. The simulations show that the guanidinium group in the Arg side chains in the Fs peptide interacts with the carbonyl group four amino acids upstream in the chain and desolvates backbone hydrogen bonds. This desolvation can be directly correlated with a higher probability of hydrogen bond formation. We find that Fs has higher helical content than A21 at all temperatures. A small modification in the amber force field reproduces the experimental helical content and helix-coil transition temperatures for the Fs peptide. PMID:11867710

  4. Alternative function for the mitochondrial SAM complex in biogenesis of alpha-helical TOM proteins.

    PubMed

    Stojanovski, Diana; Guiard, Bernard; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2007-12-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains two preprotein translocases: the general translocase of outer membrane (TOM) and the beta-barrel-specific sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). TOM functions as the central entry gate for nuclear-encoded proteins. The channel-forming Tom40 is a beta-barrel protein, whereas all Tom receptors and small Tom proteins are membrane anchored by a transmembrane alpha-helical segment in their N- or C-terminal portion. Synthesis of Tom precursors takes place in the cytosol, and their import occurs via preexisting TOM complexes. The precursor of Tom40 is then transferred to SAM for membrane insertion and assembly. Unexpectedly, we find that the biogenesis of alpha-helical Tom proteins with a membrane anchor in the C-terminal portion is SAM dependent. Each SAM protein is necessary for efficient membrane integration of the receptor Tom22, whereas assembly of the small Tom proteins depends on Sam37. Thus, the substrate specificity of SAM is not restricted to beta-barrel proteins but also includes the majority of alpha-helical Tom proteins. PMID:18039934

  5. A consensus procedure for predicting the location of alpha-helical transmembrane segments in proteins.

    PubMed

    Parodi, L A; Granatir, C A; Maggiora, G M

    1994-09-01

    To aid in the development of three-dimensional models of membrane-bound proteins, a consensus procedure for predicting alpha-helical transmembrane segments from amino acid sequence is presented. The algorithm combines the results of six individual prediction methods and some basic properties of membrane-spanning helices to obtain a final consensus prediction. Comparison with experiment and several other recently developed methods shows that the consensus procedure performs quite well in comparison to other recent methods. A FORTRAN program has been developed which takes an input file containing an amino acid sequence in one-letter code and outputs a list of the alpha-helical transmembrane segments predicted by the consensus algorithm. PMID:7828069

  6. Fast and forceful refolding of stretched alpha-helical solenoid proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minkyu; Abdi, Khadar; Lee, Gwangrog; Rabbi, Mahir; Lee, Whasil; Yang, Ming; Schofield, Christopher J; Bennett, Vann; Marszalek, Piotr E

    2010-06-16

    Anfinsen's thermodynamic hypothesis implies that proteins can encode for stretching through reversible loss of structure. However, large in vitro extensions of proteins that occur through a progressive unfolding of their domains typically dissipate a significant amount of energy, and therefore are not thermodynamically reversible. Some coiled-coil proteins have been found to stretch nearly reversibly, although their extension is typically limited to 2.5 times their folded length. Here, we report investigations on the mechanical properties of individual molecules of ankyrin-R, beta-catenin, and clathrin, which are representative examples of over 800 predicted human proteins composed of tightly packed alpha-helical repeats (termed ANK, ARM, or HEAT repeats, respectively) that form spiral-shaped protein domains. Using atomic force spectroscopy, we find that these polypeptides possess unprecedented stretch ratios on the order of 10-15, exceeding that of other proteins studied so far, and their extension and relaxation occurs with minimal energy dissipation. Their sequence-encoded elasticity is governed by stepwise unfolding of small repeats, which upon relaxation of the stretching force rapidly and forcefully refold, minimizing the hysteresis between the stretching and relaxing parts of the cycle. Thus, we identify a new class of proteins that behave as highly reversible nanosprings that have the potential to function as mechanosensors in cells and as building blocks in springy nanostructures. Our physical view of the protein component of cells as being comprised of predominantly inextensible structural elements under tension may need revision to incorporate springs. PMID:20550922

  7. Alpha-helical protein networks are self-protective and flaw-tolerant.

    PubMed

    Ackbarow, Theodor; Sen, Dipanjan; Thaulow, Christian; Buehler, Markus J

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-helix based protein networks as they appear in intermediate filaments in the cell's cytoskeleton and the nuclear membrane robustly withstand large deformation of up to several hundred percent strain, despite the presence of structural imperfections or flaws. This performance is not achieved by most synthetic materials, which typically fail at much smaller deformation and show a great sensitivity to the existence of structural flaws. Here we report a series of molecular dynamics simulations with a simple coarse-grained multi-scale model of alpha-helical protein domains, explaining the structural and mechanistic basis for this observed behavior. We find that the characteristic properties of alpha-helix based protein networks are due to the particular nanomechanical properties of their protein constituents, enabling the formation of large dissipative yield regions around structural flaws, effectively protecting the protein network against catastrophic failure. We show that the key for these self protecting properties is a geometric transformation of the crack shape that significantly reduces the stress concentration at corners. Specifically, our analysis demonstrates that the failure strain of alpha-helix based protein networks is insensitive to the presence of structural flaws in the protein network, only marginally affecting their overall strength. Our findings may help to explain the ability of cells to undergo large deformation without catastrophic failure while providing significant mechanical resistance. PMID:19547709

  8. Alpha-Helical Protein Networks Are Self-Protective and Flaw-Tolerant

    PubMed Central

    Ackbarow, Theodor; Sen, Dipanjan; Thaulow, Christian; Buehler, Markus J.

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-helix based protein networks as they appear in intermediate filaments in the cell’s cytoskeleton and the nuclear membrane robustly withstand large deformation of up to several hundred percent strain, despite the presence of structural imperfections or flaws. This performance is not achieved by most synthetic materials, which typically fail at much smaller deformation and show a great sensitivity to the existence of structural flaws. Here we report a series of molecular dynamics simulations with a simple coarse-grained multi-scale model of alpha-helical protein domains, explaining the structural and mechanistic basis for this observed behavior. We find that the characteristic properties of alpha-helix based protein networks are due to the particular nanomechanical properties of their protein constituents, enabling the formation of large dissipative yield regions around structural flaws, effectively protecting the protein network against catastrophic failure. We show that the key for these self protecting properties is a geometric transformation of the crack shape that significantly reduces the stress concentration at corners. Specifically, our analysis demonstrates that the failure strain of alpha-helix based protein networks is insensitive to the presence of structural flaws in the protein network, only marginally affecting their overall strength. Our findings may help to explain the ability of cells to undergo large deformation without catastrophic failure while providing significant mechanical resistance. PMID:19547709

  9. An amphipathic alpha-helical peptide from apolipoprotein A1 stabilizes protein polymer vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pastuszka, Martha K; Wang, Xiangdong; Lock, Lye Lin; Janib, Siti Mohd; Cui, Honggang; DeLeve, Laurie D; MacKay, J Andrew

    2014-10-10

    L4F, an alpha helical peptide inspired by the lipid-binding domain of the ApoA1 protein, has potential applications in the reduction of inflammation involved with cardiovascular disease as well as an antioxidant effect that inhibits liver fibrosis. In addition to its biological activity, amphipathic peptides such as L4F are likely candidates to direct the molecular assembly of peptide nanostructures. Here we describe the stabilization of the amphipathic L4F peptide through fusion to a high molecular weight protein polymer. Comprised of multiple pentameric repeats, elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) are biodegradable protein polymers inspired from the human gene for tropoelastin. Dynamic light scattering confirmed that the fusion peptide forms nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic radius of approximately 50nm, which is unexpectedly above that observed for the free ELP (~5.1nm). To further investigate their morphology, conventional and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy were used to reveal that they are unilamellar vesicles. On average, these vesicles are 49nm in radius with lamellae 8nm in thickness. To evaluate their therapeutic potential, the L4F nanoparticles were incubated with hepatic stellate cells. Stellate cell activation leads to hepatic fibrosis; furthermore, their activation is suppressed by anti-oxidant activity of ApoA1 mimetic peptides. Consistent with this observation, L4F nanoparticles were found to suppress hepatic stellate cell activation in vitro. To evaluate the in vivo potential for these nanostructures, their plasma pharmacokinetics were evaluated in rats. Despite the assembly of nanostructures, both free L4F and L4F nanoparticles exhibited similar half-lives of approximately 1h in plasma. This is the first study reporting the stabilization of peptide-based vesicles using ApoA1 mimetic peptides fused to a protein polymer; furthermore, this platform for peptide-vesicle assembly may have utility in the design of biodegradable nanostructures

  10. Structural Origins of Nitroxide Side Chain Dynamics on Membrane Protein [alpha]-Helical Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kroncke, Brett M.; Horanyi, Peter S.; Columbus, Linda

    2010-12-07

    Understanding the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins in their native, hydrophobic environment is important to understanding how these proteins function. EPR spectroscopy in combination with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) can measure dynamics and structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid environment; however, until now the dynamics measured have been qualitative due to limited knowledge of the nitroxide spin label's intramolecular motion in the hydrophobic environment. Although several studies have elucidated the structural origins of EPR line shapes of water-soluble proteins, EPR spectra of nitroxide spin-labeled proteins in detergents or lipids have characteristic differences from their water-soluble counterparts, suggesting significant differences in the underlying molecular motion of the spin label between the two environments. To elucidate these differences, membrane-exposed {alpha}-helical sites of the leucine transporter, LeuT, from Aquifex aeolicus, were investigated using X-ray crystallography, mutational analysis, nitroxide side chain derivatives, and spectral simulations in order to obtain a motional model of the nitroxide. For each crystal structure, the nitroxide ring of a disulfide-linked spin label side chain (R1) is resolved and makes contacts with hydrophobic residues on the protein surface. The spin label at site I204 on LeuT makes a nontraditional hydrogen bond with the ortho-hydrogen on its nearest neighbor F208, whereas the spin label at site F177 makes multiple van der Waals contacts with a hydrophobic pocket formed with an adjacent helix. These results coupled with the spectral effect of mutating the i {+-} 3, 4 residues suggest that the spin label has a greater affinity for its local protein environment in the low dielectric than on a water-soluble protein surface. The simulations of the EPR spectra presented here suggest the spin label oscillates about the terminal bond nearest the ring while maintaining weak contact

  11. Estimation of the number of alpha-helical and beta-strand segments in proteins using circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Sreerama, N.; Venyaminov, S. Y.; Woody, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    A simple approach to estimate the number of alpha-helical and beta-strand segments from protein circular dichroism spectra is described. The alpha-helix and beta-sheet conformations in globular protein structures, assigned by DSSP and STRIDE algorithms, were divided into regular and distorted fractions by considering a certain number of terminal residues in a given alpha-helix or beta-strand segment to be distorted. The resulting secondary structure fractions for 29 reference proteins were used in the analyses of circular dichroism spectra by the SELCON method. From the performance indices of the analyses, we determined that, on an average, four residues per alpha-helix and two residues per beta-strand may be considered distorted in proteins. The number of alpha-helical and beta-strand segments and their average length in a given protein were estimated from the fraction of distorted alpha-helix and beta-strand conformations determined from the analysis of circular dichroism spectra. The statistical test for the reference protein set shows the high reliability of such a classification of protein secondary structure. The method was used to analyze the circular dichroism spectra of four additional proteins and the predicted structural characteristics agree with the crystal structure data. PMID:10048330

  12. High-resolution spot-scan electron microscopy of microcrystals of an alpha-helical coiled-coil protein.

    PubMed

    Bullough, P A; Tulloch, P A

    1990-09-01

    We describe the electron microscopy of a crystalline assembly of an alpha-helical coiled-coil protein extracted from the ootheca of the praying mantis. Electron diffraction patterns of unstained crystals show crystal lattice sampling of the coiled-coil molecular transform to a resolution beyond 1.5 A. Using a "spot-scan" method of electron imaging, micrographs of unstained crystals have been obtained that visibly diffract laser light from crystal spacings as small as 4.3 A. A projection map was calculated to 4 A using electron diffraction amplitudes and phases from computer-processed images. The projection map clearly shows modulations in density arising from the 5.1 A alpha-helical repeat, the first time this type of modulation has been revealed by electron microscopy. The crystals have p2 plane group symmetry with a = 92.4 A, b = 150.7 A, y = 92.4 degrees. Examination of tilted specimens shows that c is approximately 18 A, indicating that the unit cell is only one molecule thick. A preliminary interpretation shows tightly packed molecules some 400 A long lying with their long axes in the plane of the projection. The molecules have a coiled-coil configuration for most of their length. The possible modes of packing of the molecules in three dimensions are discussed. PMID:2398496

  13. Two modular forms of the mitochondrial sorting and assembly machinery are involved in biogenesis of alpha-helical outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Nicolas; Stroud, David A; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Guiard, Bernard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Becker, Thomas

    2010-02-26

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains two translocase machineries for precursor proteins--the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM complex). The TOM complex functions as the main mitochondrial entry gate for nuclear-encoded proteins, whereas the SAM complex was identified according to its function in the biogenesis of beta-barrel proteins of the outer membrane. The SAM complex is required for the assembly of precursors of the TOM complex, including not only the beta-barrel protein Tom40 but also a subset of alpha-helical subunits. While the interaction of beta-barrel proteins with the SAM complex has been studied in detail, little is known about the interaction between the SAM complex and alpha-helical precursor proteins. We report that the SAM is not static but that the SAM core complex can associate with different partner proteins to form two large SAM complexes with different functions in the biogenesis of alpha-helical Tom proteins. We found that a subcomplex of TOM, Tom5-Tom40, associates with the SAM core complex to form a new large SAM complex. This SAM-Tom5/Tom40 complex binds the alpha-helical precursor of Tom6 after the precursor has been inserted into the outer membrane in an Mim1 (mitochondrial import protein 1)-dependent manner. The second large SAM complex, SAM-Mdm10 (mitochondrial distribution and morphology protein), binds the alpha-helical precursor of Tom22 and promotes its membrane integration. We suggest that the modular composition of the SAM complex provides a flexible platform to integrate the sorting pathways of different precursor proteins and to promote their assembly into oligomeric complexes. PMID:20026336

  14. [Comparison of dynamic properties of various globular proteins and polyglutamic acid in alpha-helical and coil states. Rayleigh scattering of Mossbauer radiation data].

    PubMed

    Krupianskiĭ, Iu F; Kurinov, I V; Kuznetsov, S A; Eshchenko, G V; Gol'danskiĭ, V I

    1997-01-01

    Classical model system: Poly-L-glutamic acid (Poly-Glu) was investigated in a disordered coil state (at pH-7.0) and in helix state (at pH 2.0) by Rayleigh scattering of Moessbauer radiation technique. Consider that the coil state of poly-Glu models unfolded (random coil) state and alpha-helix state models the fluctuating secondary structure (during consequent folding of protein) comparative analysis of dynamical properties of poly-Glu in different states with dynamical properties of different proteins in native state (alpha-helical myoglobin and HSA, partially beta-sheet lysozyme) and in intermediate (molten globule) state (alpha-lactalbumin) was performed. This comparison bring some surprising results: native alpha-helical proteins behave itself close to random coil, native partially beta-sheet protein behaves close to fluctuating secondary structure (alpha-helix) and the dynamic behaviour of molten globule state (partially beta-sheet alpha-lactalbumin) is not different from those behaviour of lysozyme and much more rigid than native alpha-helical proteins. As a result one cannot exclude the possibility that folding process and dynamical properties at different steps of the folding are very different for alpha-helical and beta-sheet proteins. PMID:9181800

  15. The alpha-helical domain of liver fatty acid binding protein is responsible for the diffusion-mediated transfer of fatty acids to phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Córsico, Betina; Liou, Heng Ling; Storch, Judith

    2004-03-30

    Intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP) and liver FABP (LFABP), homologous proteins expressed at high levels in intestinal absorptive cells, employ markedly different mechanisms for the transfer of fatty acids (FAs) to acceptor membranes. Transfer from IFABP occurs during protein-membrane collisional interactions, while for LFABP, transfer occurs by diffusion through the aqueous phase. Earlier, we had shown that the helical domain of IFABP is critical in determining its collisional FA transfer mechanism. In the study presented here, we have engineered a pair of chimeric proteins, one with the "body" (ligand binding domain) of IFABP and the alpha-helical region of LFABP (alphaLbetaIFABP) and the other with the ligand binding pocket of LFABP and the helical domain of IFABP (alphaIbetaLFABP). The objective of this work was to determine whether the change in the alpha-helical domain of each FABP would alter the rate and mechanism of transfer of FA from the chimeric proteins in comparison with those of the wild-type proteins. The fatty acid transfer properties of the FABP chimeras were examined using a fluorescence resonance transfer assay. The results showed a significant modification of the absolute rate of FA transfer from the chimeric proteins compared to that of the wild type, indicating that the slower rate of FA transfer observed for wild-type LFABP relative to that of wild-type IFABP is, in part, determined by the helical domain of the proteins. In addition to these quantitative changes, it was of great interest to observe that the apparent mechanism of FA transfer also changed when the alpha-helical domain was exchanged, with transfer from alphaLbetaIFABP occurring by aqueous diffusion and transfer from alphaIbetaLFABP occurring via protein-membrane collisional interactions. These results demonstrate that the alpha-helical region of LFABP is responsible for its diffusional mechanism of fatty acid transfer to membranes. PMID:15035630

  16. Conversion of alpha-helices into beta-sheets features in the formation of the scrapie prion proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Pan, K M; Baldwin, M; Nguyen, J; Gasset, M; Serban, A; Groth, D; Mehlhorn, I; Huang, Z; Fletterick, R J; Cohen, F E

    1993-01-01

    Prions are composed largely, if not entirely, of prion protein (PrPSc in the case of scrapie). Although the formation of PrPSc from the cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a post-translational process, no candidate chemical modification was identified, suggesting that a conformational change features in PrPSc synthesis. To assess this possibility, we purified both PrPC and PrPSc by using nondenaturing procedures and determined the secondary structure of each. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy demonstrated that PrPC has a high alpha-helix content (42%) and no beta-sheet (3%), findings that were confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. In contrast, the beta-sheet content of PrPSc was 43% and the alpha-helix 30% as measured by FTIR. As determined in earlier studies, N-terminally truncated PrPSc derived by limited proteolysis, designated PrP 27-30, has an even higher beta-sheet content (54%) and a lower alpha-helix content (21%). Neither PrPC nor PrPSc formed aggregates detectable by electron microscopy, while PrP 27-30 polymerized into rod-shaped amyloids. While the foregoing findings argue that the conversion of alpha-helices into beta-sheets underlies the formation of PrPSc, we cannot eliminate the possibility that an undetected chemical modification of a small fraction of PrPSc initiates this process. Since PrPSc seems to be the only component of the "infectious" prion particle, it is likely that this conformational transition is a fundamental event in the propagation of prions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:7902575

  17. Rational design of alpha-helical tandem repeat proteins with closed architectures

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Lindsey; Hallinan, Jazmine; Bolduc, Jill; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Baker, David; Stoddard, Barry L.; Bradley, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Tandem repeat proteins, which are formed by repetition of modular units of protein sequence and structure, play important biological roles as macromolecular binding and scaffolding domains, enzymes, and building blocks for the assembly of fibrous materials1,2. The modular nature of repeat proteins enables the rapid construction and diversification of extended binding surfaces by duplication and recombination of simple building blocks3,4. The overall architecture of tandem repeat protein structures – which is dictated by the internal geometry and local packing of the repeat building blocks – is highly diverse, ranging from extended, super-helical folds that bind peptide, DNA, and RNA partners5–9, to closed and compact conformations with internal cavities suitable for small molecule binding and catalysis10. Here we report the development and validation of computational methods for de novo design of tandem repeat protein architectures driven purely by geometric criteria defining the inter-repeat geometry, without reference to the sequences and structures of existing repeat protein families. We have applied these methods to design a series of closed alpha-solenoid11 repeat structures (alpha-toroids) in which the inter-repeat packing geometry is constrained so as to juxtapose the N- and C-termini; several of these designed structures have been validated by X-ray crystallography. Unlike previous approaches to tandem repeat protein engineering12–20, our design procedure does not rely on template sequence or structural information taken from natural repeat proteins and hence can produce structures unlike those seen in nature. As an example, we have successfully designed and validated closed alpha-solenoid repeats with a left-handed helical architecture that – to our knowledge – is not yet present in the protein structure database21. PMID:26675735

  18. Characterizing alpha helical properties of Ebola viral proteins as potential targets for inhibition of alpha-helix mediated protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Rao, Basuthkar J; Asgeirsson, Bjarni; Dandekar, Abhaya

    2014-01-01

    Ebola, considered till recently as a rare and endemic disease, has dramatically transformed into a potentially global humanitarian crisis. The genome of Ebola, a member of the Filoviridae family, encodes seven proteins. Based on the recently implemented software (PAGAL) for analyzing the hydrophobicity and amphipathicity properties of alpha helices (AH) in proteins, we characterize the helices in the Ebola proteome. We demonstrate that AHs with characteristically unique features are involved in critical interactions with the host proteins. For example, the Ebola virus membrane fusion subunit, GP2, from the envelope glycoprotein ectodomain has an AH with a large hydrophobic moment. The neutralizing antibody (KZ52) derived from a human survivor of the 1995 Kikwit outbreak recognizes a protein epitope on this AH, emphasizing the critical nature of this secondary structure in the virulence of the Ebola virus. Our method ensures a comprehensive list of such `hotspots'. These helices probably are or can be the target of molecules designed to inhibit AH mediated protein-protein interactions. Further, by comparing the AHs in proteins of the related Marburg viruses, we are able to elicit subtle changes in the proteins that might render them ineffective to previously successful drugs. Such differences are difficult to identify by a simple sequence or structural alignment. Thus, analyzing AHs in the small Ebola proteome can aid rational design aimed at countering the `largest Ebola epidemic, affecting multiple countries in West Africa' ( http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/outbreaks/2014-west-africa/index.html). PMID:25717367

  19. Phase space trajectories and Lyapunov exponents in the dynamics of an alpha-helical protein lattice with intra- and inter-spine interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Angelin Jeba, K.; Latha, M. M.; Jain, Sudhir R.

    2015-11-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of intra- and inter-spine interaction models of alpha-helical proteins is investigated by proposing a Hamiltonian using the first quantized operators. Hamilton's equations of motion are derived, and the dynamics is studied by constructing the trajectories and phase space plots in both cases. The phase space plots display a chaotic behaviour in the dynamics, which opens questions about the relationship between the chaos and exciton-exciton and exciton-phonon interactions. This is verified by plotting the Lyapunov characteristic exponent curves.

  20. Protein destabilization by electrostatic repulsions in the two-stranded alpha-helical coiled-coil/leucine zipper.

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, W. D.; Kay, C. M.; Hodges, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    The destabilizing effect of electrostatic repulsions on protein stability has been studied by using synthetic two-stranded alpha-helical coiled-coils as a model system. The native coiled-coil consists of two identical 35-residue polypeptide chains with a heptad repeat QgVaGbAcLdQeKf and a Cys residue at position 2 to allow formation of an interchain disulfide bridge. This peptide, designed to contain no intrahelical or interhelical electrostatic interactions, forms a stable coiled-coil structure at 20 degrees C in benign medium (50 mM KCl, 25 mM PO4, pH 7) with a [urea]1/2 value of 6.1 M. Four mutant coiled-coils were designed to contain one or two Glu substitutions for Gln per polypeptide chain. The resulting coiled-coils contained potential i to i' + 5 Glu-Glu interchain repulsions (denoted as peptide E2(15,20)), i to i' + 2 Glu-Glu interchain repulsions (denoted E2(20,22)), or no interchain ionic interactions (denoted E2(13,22) and E1(20)). The stabilities of the coiled-coils were determined by measuring the ellipticities at 222 nm as a function of urea or guanidine hydrochloride concentration at 20 degrees C in the presence and absence of an interchain disulfide bridge. At pH 7, in the presence of urea, the stabilities of E2(13,22) and E2(20,22) were identical suggesting that the potential i to i' + 2 interchain Glu-Glu repulsion in the E2(20,22) coiled-coil does not occur. In contrast, the mutant E2(15,20) is substantially less stable than E2(13,22) or E2(15,20) by 0.9 kcal/mol due to the presence of two i to i' + 5 interchain Glu-Glu repulsions, which destabilize the coiled-coil by 0.45 kcal/mol each. At pH 3 the coiled-coils were found to increase in stability as the number of Glu substitutions were increased. This, combined with reversed-phase HPLC results at pH 7 and pH 2, supports the conclusion that the protonated Glu side chains present at low pH are significantly more hydrophobic than Gln side chains which are in turn more hydrophobic than the ionized

  1. Protein-protein docking with backbone flexibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chu; Bradley, Philip; Baker, David

    2007-10-19

    Computational protein-protein docking methods currently can create models with atomic accuracy for protein complexes provided that the conformational changes upon association are restricted to the side chains. However, it remains very challenging to account for backbone conformational changes during docking, and most current methods inherently keep monomer backbones rigid for algorithmic simplicity and computational efficiency. Here we present a reformulation of the Rosetta docking method that incorporates explicit backbone flexibility in protein-protein docking. The new method is based on a "fold-tree" representation of the molecular system, which seamlessly integrates internal torsional degrees of freedom and rigid-body degrees of freedom. Problems with internal flexible regions ranging from one or more loops or hinge regions to all of one or both partners can be readily treated using appropriately constructed fold trees. The explicit treatment of backbone flexibility improves both sampling in the vicinity of the native docked conformation and the energetic discrimination between near-native and incorrect models. PMID:17825317

  2. Soliton excitations and interactions for the three-coupled fourth-order nonlinear Schrödinger equations in the alpha helical proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Rong; Tian, Bo; Wang, Yu-Feng; Zhen, Hui-Ling

    2015-06-01

    Three-coupled fourth-order nonlinear Schrödinger equations describe the dynamics of alpha helical proteins with the interspine coupling at the higher order. Through symbolic computation and binary Bell-polynomial approach, bilinear forms and N-soliton solutions for such equations are constructed. Key point lies in the introduction of auxiliary functions in the Bell-polynomial expression. Asymptotic analysis is applied to investigate the elastic interaction between the two solitons: two solitons keep their original amplitudes, energies and velocities invariant after the interaction except for the phase shifts. Soliton amplitudes are related to the energy distributed in the solitons of the three spines. Overtaking interaction, head-on interaction and bound-state solitons of two solitons are given. Bound states of three bright solitons arise when all of them propagate in parallel. Elastic interaction between the bound-state solitons and one bright soliton is shown. Increase of the lattice parameter can lead to the increase of the soliton velocity, that is, the interaction period becomes shorter. The solitons propagating along the neighbouring spines are found to interact elastically. Those solitons, exhibited in this paper, might be viewed as a possible carrier of bio-energy transport in the protein molecules.

  3. A Conserved alpha-helical motif mediates the binding of diverse nuclear proteins to the SRC1 interaction domain of CBP.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Sachiko; Harries, Janet C; Viskaduraki, Maria; Troke, Philip J F; Kindle, Karin B; Ryan, Colm; Heery, David M

    2004-04-01

    CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 contain modular domains that mediate protein-protein interactions with a wide variety of nuclear factors. A C-terminal domain of CBP (referred to as the SID) is responsible for interaction with the alpha-helical AD1 domain of p160 coactivators such as the steroid receptor coactivator (SRC1), and also other transcriptional regulators such as E1A, Ets-2, IRF3, and p53. Here we show that the pointed (PNT) domain of Ets-2 mediates its interaction with the CBP SID, and describe the effects of mutations in the SID on binding of Ets-2, E1A, and SRC1. In vitro binding studies indicate that SRC1, Ets-2 and E1A display mutually exclusive binding to the CBP SID. Consistent with this, we observed negative cross-talk between ERalpha/SRC1, Ets-2, and E1A proteins in reporter assays in transiently transfected cells. Transcriptional inhibition of Ets-2 or GAL4-AD1 activity by E1A was rescued by co-transfection with a CBP expression plasmid, consistent with the hypothesis that the observed inhibition was due to competition for CBP in vivo. Sequence comparisons revealed that SID-binding proteins contain a leucine-rich motif similar to the alpha-helix Aalpha1 of the SRC1 AD1 domain. Deletion mutants of E1A and Ets-2 lacking the conserved motif were unable to bind the CBP SID. Moreover, a peptide corresponding to this sequence competed the binding of full-length SRC1, Ets-2, and E1A proteins to the CBP SID. Thus, a leucine-rich amphipathic alpha-helix mediates mutually exclusive interactions of functionally diverse nuclear proteins with CBP. PMID:14722092

  4. Assembly defects of desmin disease mutants carrying deletions in the alpha-helical rod domain are rescued by wild type protein.

    PubMed

    Bär, Harald; Mücke, Norbert; Katus, Hugo A; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald

    2007-04-01

    Most mutations of desmin that cause severe autosomal dominant forms of myofibrillar myopathy are point mutations and locate in the central alpha-helical coiled-coil rod domain. Recently, two in-frame deletions of one and three amino acids, respectively, in the alpha-helix have been described and discussed to drastically interfere with the architecture of the desmin dimer and possibly also the formation of tetramers and higher order complexes [Kaminska, A., Strelkov, S.V., Goudeau, B., Olive, M., Dagvadorj, A., Fidzianska, A., Simon-Casteras, M., Shatunov, A., Dalakas, M.C., Ferrer, I., Kwiecinski, H., Vicart, P., Goldfarb, L.G., 2004. Small deletions disturb desmin architecture leading to breakdown of muscle cells and development of skeletal or cardioskeletal myopathy. Hum. Genet. 114, 306-313.]. Therefore, it was proposed that they may poison intermediate filament (IF) assembly. We have now recombinantly synthesized both mutant proteins and subjected them to comprehensive in vitro assembly experiments. While exhibiting assembly defects when analyzed on their own, both one-to-one mixtures of the respective mutant protein with wild type desmin facilitated proper filament formation. Transient transfection studies complemented this fundamental finding by demonstrating that wild type desmin is also rescuing these assembly defects in vivo. In summary, our findings strongly question the previous hypothesis that it is assembly incompetence due to molecular rearrangements caused by the mutations, which triggers the development of disease. As an alternative, we propose that these mutations cause subtle age-dependent structural alterations of desmin IFs that eventually lead to disease. PMID:17188893

  5. Conformation Dependence of Backbone Geometry in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Berkholz, Donald S.; Shapovalov, Maxim V.; Dunbrack, Roland L.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Summary Protein structure determination and predictive modeling have long been guided by the paradigm that the peptide backbone has a single, context-independent ideal geometry. Both quantum-mechanics calculations and empirical analyses have shown this is an incorrect simplification in that backbone covalent geometry actually varies systematically as a function of the Φ and Ψ backbone dihedral angles. Here, we use a nonredundant set of ultrahigh-resolution protein structures to define these conformation-dependent variations. The trends have a rational, structural basis that can be explained by avoidance of atomic clashes or optimization of favorable electrostatic interactions. To facilitate adoption of this new paradigm, we have created a conformation-dependent library of covalent bond lengths and bond angles and shown that it has improved accuracy over existing methods without any additional variables to optimize. Protein structures derived both from crystallographic refinement and predictive modeling both stand to benefit from incorporation of the new paradigm. PMID:19836332

  6. The effect of charge reversal mutations in the alpha-helical region of liver fatty acid binding protein on the binding of fatty-acyl CoAs, lysophospholipids and bile acids.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Robert M; Davies, Joanna K; Wilton, David C

    2002-10-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) is unique among the various types of FABPs in that it can bind a variety of ligands in addition to fatty acids. LFABP is able to bind long chain fatty acids with a 2:1 stoichiometry and the crystal structure has identified two fatty acid binding sites in the binding cavity. The presumed primary site (site 1) involves the fatty acid binding with the carboxylate group buried in the cavity whereas the fatty acid at site 2 has the carboxylate group solvent-exposed within the ligand portal region and in the vicinity of alpha-helix II. The alpha-helical region contains three cationic residues, K20, K31, K33 and modelling studies suggest that K31 on alpha-helix II could make an electrostatic contribution to anionic ligands binding to site 2. The preparation of three charge reversal mutants of LFABP, K20E, K31E and K33E has allowed an investigation of the role of site 2 in ligand binding, particularly those ligands with a bulky anionic head group. The binding of oleoyl CoA, lysophosphatidic acid, lysophosphatidylcholine, lithocholic acid and taurolithocholate 3-sulphate to LFABP has been studied using the alpha-helical mutants. The results support the concept that such ligands bind at site 2 of LFABP where solvent exposure allows the accommodation of their bulky anionic group. PMID:12479568

  7. Backbone Dynamics Of Intracellular Lipid Binding Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-González, Luis H.

    2005-04-01

    The family of intracellular lipid binding proteins (iLBPs) comprises a group of homologous 14-15 kDa proteins that specifically bind and facilitate the transport of fatty acids, bile acids, retinoids or eicosanoids. Members of this family include several types of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs), ileal lipid binding protein, cellular retinoic acid binding proteins and cellular retinoid binding proteins. As a contribution to understanding the structure-function relationship in this protein family, the solution structure and backbone dynamics of human epidermal-type FABP (E-FABP) determined by NMR spectroscopy are reported. Moreover, hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments indicated a direct correlation between the stability of the hydrogen-bonding network in the β-sheet structure and the conformational exchange in the millisecond-to-microsecond time range. The features of E-FABP backbone dynamics discussed in the present study are compared with those obtained for other phylogenetically related proteins. A strong interdependence with the overall protein stability and possibly also with the ligand-binding affinity for members of the lipid-binding protein family is shown.

  8. Bilinear forms and soliton solutions for a fourth-order variable-coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger equation in an inhomogeneous Heisenberg ferromagnetic spin chain or an alpha helical protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin-Wei; Gao, Yi-Tian; Wang, Qi-Min; Su, Chuan-Qi; Feng, Yu-Jie; Yu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a fourth-order variable-coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger equation is studied, which might describe a one-dimensional continuum anisotropic Heisenberg ferromagnetic spin chain with the octuple-dipole interaction or an alpha helical protein with higher-order excitations and interactions under continuum approximation. With the aid of auxiliary function, we derive the bilinear forms and corresponding constraints on the variable coefficients. Via the symbolic computation, we obtain the Lax pair, infinitely many conservation laws, one-, two- and three-soliton solutions. We discuss the influence of the variable coefficients on the solitons. With different choices of the variable coefficients, we obtain the parabolic, cubic, and periodic solitons, respectively. We analyse the head-on and overtaking interactions between/among the two and three solitons. Interactions between a bound state and a single soliton are displayed with different choices of variable coefficients. We also derive the quasi-periodic formulae for the three cases of the bound states.

  9. TMAO influence on the backbone of proteins: an oligoglycine model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Char Y.; Lynch, Gillian C.; Kokubo, Hironori; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2009-01-01

    The study of organic osmolytes has been pivotal in demonstrating the role of solvent effects on the protein backbone in the folding process. Whereas a thermodynamic description of the interactions between the protein backbone and osmolyte has been well defined, the structural analysis of the effect of osmolyte on the protein backbone has been incomplete. Therefore, we have carried out simulations of a peptide backbone model, glycine15 in protecting osmolyte TMAO solution in order to determine the effect of the solution structure on the conformation of the peptide backbone. We demonstrate that the models chosen show that the ensemble of backbone structures shifts towards a more collapsed state in TMAO solution as compared to pure water solution. The collapse is consistent with preferential exclusion of the osmolyte caused by unfavorable interactions between osmolyte and peptide backbone. The exclusion is due to strong triplet correlations of osmolyte, water, and peptide backbone. This provides a clear mechanism demonstrating that even a modest concentration of TMAO forces the protein backbone to adopt a more collapsed structure in the absence of sidechain effects. PMID:19790265

  10. The integrity of the alpha-helical domain of intestinal fatty acid binding protein is essential for the collision-mediated transfer of fatty acids to phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Franchini, G R; Storch, J; Corsico, B

    2008-04-01

    Intestinal FABP (IFABP) and liver FABP (LFABP), homologous proteins expressed at high levels in intestinal absorptive cells, employ markedly different mechanisms of fatty acid transfer to acceptor model membranes. Transfer from IFABP occurs during protein-membrane collisional interactions, while for LFABP transfer occurs by diffusion through the aqueous phase. In addition, transfer from IFABP is markedly faster than from LFABP. The overall goal of this study was to further explore the structural differences between IFABP and LFABP which underlie their large functional differences in ligand transport. In particular, we addressed the role of the alphaI-helix domain in the unique transport properties of intestinal FABP. A chimeric protein was engineered with the 'body' (ligand binding domain) of IFABP and the alphaI-helix of LFABP (alpha(I)LbetaIFABP), and the fatty acid transfer properties of the chimeric FABP were examined using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. The results showed a significant decrease in the absolute rate of FA transfer from alpha(I)LbetaIFABP compared to IFABP. The results indicate that the alphaI-helix is crucial for IFABP collisional FA transfer, and further indicate the participation of the alphaII-helix in the formation of a protein-membrane "collisional complex". Photo-crosslinking experiments with a photoactivable reagent demonstrated the direct interaction of IFABP with membranes and further support the importance of the alphaI helix of IFABP in its physical interaction with membranes. PMID:18284926

  11. Amphipathic alpha-helices and putative cholesterol binding domains of the influenza virus matrix M1 protein are crucial for virion structure organisation.

    PubMed

    Tsfasman, Tatyana; Kost, Vladimir; Markushin, Stanislav; Lotte, Vera; Koptiaeva, Irina; Bogacheva, Elena; Baratova, Ludmila; Radyukhin, Victor

    2015-12-01

    The influenza virus matrix M1 protein is an amphitropic membrane-associated protein, forming the matrix layer immediately beneath the virus raft membrane, thereby ensuring the proper structure of the influenza virion. The objective of this study was to elucidate M1 fine structural characteristics, which determine amphitropic properties and raft membrane activities of the protein, via 3D in silico modelling with subsequent mutational analysis. Computer simulations suggest the amphipathic nature of the M1 α-helices and the existence of putative cholesterol binding (CRAC) motifs on six amphipathic α-helices. Our finding explains for the first time many features of this protein, particularly the amphitropic properties and raft/cholesterol binding potential. To verify these results, we generated mutants of the A/WSN/33 strain via reverse genetics. The M1 mutations included F32Y in the CRAC of α-helix 2, W45Y and W45F in the CRAC of α-helix 3, Y100S in the CRAC of α-helix 6, M128A and M128S in the CRAC of α-helix 8 and a double L103I/L130I mutation in both a putative cholesterol consensus motif and the nuclear localisation signal. All mutations resulted in viruses with unusual filamentous morphology. Previous experimental data regarding the morphology of M1-gene mutant influenza viruses can now be explained in structural terms and are consistent with the pivotal role of the CRAC-domains and amphipathic α-helices in M1-lipid interactions. PMID:26211889

  12. A sampling approach for protein backbone fragment conformations.

    PubMed

    Yu, J Y; Zhang, W

    2013-01-01

    In protein structure prediction, backbone fragment bias information can narrow down the conformational space of the whole polypeptide chain significantly. Unlike existing methods that use fragments as building blocks, the paper presents a probabilistic sampling approach for protein backbone torsion angles by modelling angular correlation of (phi, psi) with a directional statistics distribution. Given a protein sequence and secondary structure information, this method samples backbone fragments conformations by using a backtrack sampling algorithm for the hidden Markov model with multiple inputs and a single output. The proposed approach is applied to a fragment library, and some well-known structural motifs are sampled very well on the optimal path. Computational results show that the method can help to obtain native-like backbone fragments conformations. PMID:23777175

  13. Amphipathic Alpha-Helical Peptide Compositions as Antiviral Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, Jeffrey (Inventor); Cho, Nam-Joon (Inventor); Frank, Curtis W. (Inventor); Cheong, Kwang Ho (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The invention features methods and compositions that exploit the ability of amphipathic alpha-helical (AH) peptides to cause disruption of lipid-containing vesicles, such as enveloped viruses, in a size-dependent manner.

  14. Local backbone structure prediction of proteins.

    PubMed

    de Brevern, Alexandre G; Benros, Cristina; Gautier, Romain; Valadié, Héléne; Hazout, Serge; Etchebest, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the PDB structures has led us to define a new set of small 3D structural prototypes called Protein Blocks (PBs). This structural alphabet includes 16 PBs, each one is defined by the (phi, psi) dihedral angles of 5 consecutive residues. The amino acid distributions observed in sequence windows encompassing these PBs are used to predict by a Bayesian approach the local 3D structure of proteins from the sole knowledge of their sequences. LocPred is a software which allows the users to submit a protein sequence and performs a prediction in terms of PBs. The prediction results are given both textually and graphically. PMID:15724288

  15. Increasing protein production by directed vector backbone evolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant protein production in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms was a key enabling technology for the rapid development of industrial and molecular biotechnology. However, despite all progress the improvement of protein production is an ongoing challenge and of high importance for cost-effective enzyme production. With the epMEGAWHOP mutagenesis protocol for vector backbone optimization we report a novel directed evolution based approach to increase protein production levels by randomly introducing mutations in the vector backbone. In the current study we validate the epMEGAWHOP mutagenesis protocol for three different expression systems. The latter demonstrated the general applicability of the epMEGAWHOP method. Cellulase and lipase production was doubled in one round of directed evolution by random mutagenesis of pET28a(+) and pET22b(+) vector backbones. Protease production using the vector pHY300PLK was increased ~4-times with an average of ~1.25 mutations per kb vector backbone. The epMEGAWHOP does not require any rational understanding of the expression machinery and can generally be applied to enzymes, expression vectors and related hosts. epMEGAWHOP is therefore from our point of view a robust, rapid and straight forward alternative for increasing protein production in general and for biotechnological applications. PMID:23890095

  16. Backbone 1H, 15N, and 13C resonance assignments and secondary structure of a novel protein OGL-20P(T)-358 from hyperthermophile Thermococcus thioreducens sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Randall; Hughes, Ronny; Curto, Ernest; Ng, Joseph; Twigg, Pamela

    2007-12-31

    OGL-20P(T)-358 is a novel 66 amino acid residue protein from the hyperthermophile Thermococcus thioreducens sp. nov., strain OGL-20PT, which was collected from the wall of the hydrothermal black smoker in the Rainbow Vent along the mid-Atlantic ridge. This protein, which has no detectable sequence homology with proteins or domains of known function, has a calculated pI of 4.76 and a molecular mass of 8.2 kDa. We report here the backbone 1H, 15N, and 13C resonance assignments of OGL-20PT-358. Assignments are 97.5% (316/324) complete. Chemical shift index was used to determine the secondary structure of the protein, which appears to consist of primarily alpha-helical regions. This work is the foundation for future studies to determine the three-dimensional solution structure of the protein. PMID:18182861

  17. Consequences of non-uniformity in the stoichiometry of component fractions within one and two loops models of alpha-helical peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atoms in biomolecular structures like alpha helices contain an array of distances and angles which include abundant multiple patterns of redundancies. Thus all peptides backbones contain the three atom sequence N-C*C, whereas the repeating set of a four atom sequences (N-C*C-N, C*-C-N-C*, and C-N-C...

  18. Infrared and vibrational CD spectra of partially solvated alpha-helices: DFT-based simulations with explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Turner, David R; Kubelka, Jan

    2007-02-22

    Theoretical simulations are used to investigate the effects of aqueous solvent on the vibrational spectra of model alpha-helices, which are only partly exposed to solvent to mimic alpha-helices in proteins. Infrared absorption (IR) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) amide I' spectra for 15-amide alanine alpha-helices are simulated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations combined with the property transfer method. The solvent is modeled by explicit water molecules hydrogen bonded to the solvated amide groups. Simulated spectra for two partially solvated model alpha-helices, one corresponding to a more exposed and the other to a more buried structure, are compared to the fully solvated and unsolvated (gas phase) simulations. The dependence of the amide I spectra on the orientation of the partially solvated helix with respect to the solvent and effects of solvation on the amide I' of 13C isotopically substituted alpha-helices are also investigated. The partial exposure to solvent causes significant broadening of the amide I' bands due to differences in the vibrational frequencies of the explicitly solvated and unsolvated amide groups. The different degree of partial solvation is reflected primarily in the frequency shifts of the unsolvated (buried) amide group vibrations. Depending on which side of the alpha-helix is exposed to solvent, the simulated IR band-shapes exhibit significant changes, from broad and relatively featureless to distinctly split into two maxima. The simulated amide I' VCD band-shapes for the partially solvated alpha-helices parallel the broadening of the IR and exhibit more sign variation, but generally preserve the sign pattern characteristic of the alpha-helical structures and are much less dependent on the alpha-helix orientation with respect to the solvent. The simulated amide I' IR spectra for the model peptides with explicitly hydrogen-bonded water are consistent with the experimental data for small alpha-helical proteins

  19. Protein-Backbone Thermodynamics across the Membrane Interface.

    PubMed

    Bereau, Tristan; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-07-01

    The thermodynamics of insertion of a protein in a membrane depends on the fine interplay between backbone and side-chain contributions interacting with the lipid environment. Using computer simulations, we probe how different descriptions of the backbone glycyl unit affect the thermodynamics of insertion of individual residues, dipeptides, and entire transmembrane helices. Due to the lack of reference data, we first introduce an efficient methodology to estimate atomistic potential of mean force (PMF) curves from a series of representative and uncorrelated coarse-grained (CG) snapshots. We find strong discrepancies between two CG models, Martini and PLUM, against reference atomistic PMFs and experiments. Atomistic simulations suggest a weak free energy of insertion between water and a POPC membrane for the glycyl unit, in overall agreement with experimental results despite severe assumptions in our calculations. We show that refining the backbone contribution in PLUM significantly improves the PMF of insertion of the WALP16 transmembrane peptide. An improper balance between the glycyl backbone and the attached side chain will lead to energetic artifacts, rationalizing Martini's overstabilization of WALP's adsorbed interfacial state. It illustrates difficulties associated with free-energy-based parametrizations of single-residue models, as the relevant free energy of partitioning used for force-field parametrization does not arise from the entire residue but rather the solvent-accessible chemical groups. PMID:27138459

  20. Determination of backbone nitrogen-nitrogen J correlations in proteins.

    PubMed

    Theis, K; Dingley, A J; Hoffmann, A; Omichinski, J G; Grzesiek, S

    1997-12-01

    Recently, a quantitative J correlation technique has been presented which makes use of homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn cross-polarization (TOCSY) to measure (3)J(C)'(C)' in proteins isotopically enriched with (13)C [Grzesiek, S. and Bax, A. (1997) J. Biomol. NMR, 9, 207-211]. Since homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn is twice as fast as conventional COSY transfer, this method is much less sensitive to transverse relaxation, which is the principal limiting factor in achieving long-range J-coupling correlations in macromolecules. Here we describe a similar experiment which is used to measure(3) J(NN) coupling constants between sequential amide(15) N nuclei in the backbone of ubiquitin. As expected from the low magnetic moment of (15)N, the (3)J(NN) coupling constants are exceedingly small, with values between 0.14 and 0.36 Hz for residues in β-conformations and values below 0.15 Hz for residues in α-conformations. In contrast to what is expected from a Karplus-type dependence on the backbone angle ψ, large differences in the values of(3) J(NN) are observed for a number of residues with very similar backbone ψ angles. A quantitative description of statistical and systematic errors, in particular of relaxation effects during the TOCSY transfer, shows that these differences are highly significant. PMID:20859784

  1. Examining the Conservation of Kinks in Alpha Helices

    PubMed Central

    Wilman, Henry R.; Kelm, Sebastian; Shi, Jiye; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2016-01-01

    Kinks are a structural feature of alpha-helices and many are known to have functional roles. Kinks have previously tended to be defined in a binary fashion. In this paper we have deliberately moved towards defining them on a continuum, which given the unimodal distribution of kink angles is a better description. From this perspective, we examine the conservation of kinks in proteins. We find that kink angles are not generally a conserved property of homologs, pointing either to their not being functionally critical or to their function being related to conformational flexibility. In the latter case, the different structures of homologs are providing snapshots of different conformations. Sequence identity between homologous helices is informative in terms of kink conservation, but almost equally so is the sequence identity of residues in spatial proximity to the kink. In the specific case of proline, which is known to be prevalent in kinked helices, loss of a proline from a kinked helix often also results in the loss of a kink or reduction in its kink angle. We carried out a study of the seven transmembrane helices in the GPCR family and found that changes in kinks could be related both to subfamilies of GPCRs and also, in a particular subfamily, to the binding of agonists or antagonists. These results suggest conformational change upon receptor activation within the GPCR family. We also found correlation between kink angles in different helices, and the possibility of concerted motion could be investigated further by applying our method to molecular dynamics simulations. These observations reinforce the belief that helix kinks are key, functional, flexible points in structures. PMID:27314675

  2. Improved prediction for N-termini of alpha-helices using empirical information.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Claire L; Boardman, Paul E; Doig, Andrew J; Hubbard, Simon J

    2004-11-01

    The prediction of the secondary structure of proteins from their amino acid sequences remains a key component of many approaches to the protein folding problem. The most abundant form of regular secondary structure in proteins is the alpha-helix, in which specific residue preferences exist at the N-terminal locations. Propensities derived from these observed amino acid frequencies in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) database correlate well with experimental free energies measured for residues at different N-terminal positions in alanine-based peptides. We report a novel method to exploit this data to improve protein secondary structure prediction through identification of the correct N-terminal sequences in alpha-helices, based on existing popular methods for secondary structure prediction. With this algorithm, the number of correctly predicted alpha-helix start positions was improved from 30% to 38%, while the overall prediction accuracy (Q3) remained the same, using cross-validated testing. Although the algorithm was developed and tested on multiple sequence alignment-based secondary structure predictions, it was also able to improve the predictions of start locations by methods that use single sequences to make their predictions. Furthermore, the residue frequencies at N-terminal positions of the improved predictions better reflect those seen at the N-terminal positions of alpha-helices in proteins. This has implications for areas such as comparative modeling, where a more accurate prediction of the N-terminal regions of alpha-helices should benefit attempts to model adjacent loop regions. The algorithm is available as a Web tool, located at http://rocky.bms.umist.ac.uk/elephant. PMID:15340919

  3. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  4. AKAP350C targets to mitochondria via a novel amphipathic alpha helical domain

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Twila A; Goldenring, James R; Kolobova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria regulate metabolism and homeostasis within cells. Mitochondria are also very dynamic organelles, constantly undergoing fission and fusion. The importance of maintaining proper mitochondrial dynamics is evident in the various diseases associated with defects in these processes. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a key regulator of mitochondrial dynamics. PKA is spatially regulated by A-Kinase Anchoring Proteins (AKAPs). We completed cloning of a novel AKAP350 isoform, AKAP350C. Immunostaining for endogenous AKAP350C showed localization to mitochondria. The carboxyl-terminal 54-amino acid sequence unique to AKAP350C contains a novel amphipathic alpha helical mitochondrial-targeting domain. AKAP350C co-localizes with Mff (mitochondrial fission protein) and mitofusins 1 and 2 (mitochondrial fusion proteins), and likely regulates mitochondrial dynamics by scaffolding PKA and mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins. PMID:25610720

  5. Alpha-turn mimetics: short peptide alpha-helices composed of cyclic metallopentapeptide modules.

    PubMed

    Kelso, Michael J; Beyer, Renée L; Hoang, Huy N; Lakdawala, Ami S; Snyder, James P; Oliver, Warren V; Robertson, Tom A; Appleton, Trevor G; Fairlie, David P

    2004-04-21

    Alpha-Helices are key structural components of proteins and important recognition motifs in biology. Short peptides (protein environments. New techniques for stabilizing short peptide helices could be valuable for studying protein folding, modeling proteins, creating artificial proteins, and may aid the design of inhibitors or mimics of protein function. This study reports the facile incorporation of 3- and 4-alpha turns in 10-15 residue peptides through formation in situ of multiple cyclic metallopeptide modules [Pd(en)(H*XXXH*)](2+). The nonhelical peptides Ac-H*ELTH*H*VTDH*-NH(2) (1), Ac-H*ELTH*AVTDYH*ELTH*-NH(2) (2), and Ac-H*AAAH*HELTH*H*VTDH*-NH(2) (3) (H is histidine-methylated at imidazole-N3) react in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) or water with 2, 2, and 3 molar equivalents, respectively, of [Pd(en)(NO(3))(2)] to form exclusively [Pd(2)(en)(2)(Ac-H*ELTH*H*VTDH*-NH(2))](4+) (4), [Pd(2)(en)(2)(Ac-H*ELTH*AVTDYH*ELTH*-NH(2))](4+) (5), and [Pd(3)(en)(3)(Ac-H*AAAH*HELTH*H*VTDH*-NH(2))](6+) (6), characterized by mass spectrometry, 1D and 2D (1)H- and 1D (15)N-NMR spectroscopy. Despite the presence of multiple histidines and other possible metal-binding residues in these peptides, 2D (1)H NMR spectra reveal that Pd(en)(2+) is remarkably specific in coordinating to imidazole-N1 of only (i, i + 4) pairs of histidines (i.e., only those separated by three amino acids), resulting in 4-6 made up of cyclic metallopentapeptide modules ([Pd(en)(H*XXXH*)](2+))(n), n = 2, 2, 3, respectively, each cycle being a 22-membered ring. We have previously shown that a single metallopentapeptide can nucleate alpha-helicity (Kelso et al., Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2003, 42, 421-424.). We now demonstrate its use as an alpha-turn-mimicking module for the facile conversion of unstructured short peptides into helices of macrocycles and provide 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data, structure

  6. Trimethylamine Ν-oxide Influence on the Backbone of Proteins: An Oligoglycine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Char Y.; Lynch, Gillian C.; Kokubo, Hironori; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2010-02-15

    The study of organic osmolytes has been pivotal in demonstrating the role of solvent effects on the protein backbone in the folding process. Although a thermodynamic description of the interactions between the protein backbone and osmolyte has been well defined, the structural analysis of the effect of osmolyte on the protein backbone has been incomplete. Therefore, we have performed simulations of a peptide backbone model, glycine₁₅, in protecting osmolyte trimethylamine Ν-oxide (TMAO) solution, in order to determine the effect of the solution structure on the conformation of the peptide backbone. We show that the models chosen show that the ensemble of backbone structures shifts toward a more collapsed state in TMAO solution as compared with pure water solution. The collapse is consistent with preferential exclusion of the osmolyte caused by unfavorable interactions between osmolyte and peptide backbone. The exclusion is caused by strong triplet correlations of osmolyte, water, and peptide backbone. This provides a clear mechanism showing that even a modest concentration of TMAO forces the protein backbone to adopt a more collapsed structure in the absence of side chain effects.

  7. Computation-Guided Backbone Grafting of a Discontinuous Motif onto a Protein Scaffold

    SciTech Connect

    Azoitei, Mihai L.; Correia, Bruno E.; Ban, Yih-En Andrew; Carrico, Chris; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Chen, Lei; Schroeter, Alexandria; Huang, Po-Ssu; McLellan, Jason S.; Kwong, Peter D.; Baker, David; Strong, Roland K.; Schief, William R.

    2012-02-07

    The manipulation of protein backbone structure to control interaction and function is a challenge for protein engineering. We integrated computational design with experimental selection for grafting the backbone and side chains of a two-segment HIV gp120 epitope, targeted by the cross-neutralizing antibody b12, onto an unrelated scaffold protein. The final scaffolds bound b12 with high specificity and with affinity similar to that of gp120, and crystallographic analysis of a scaffold bound to b12 revealed high structural mimicry of the gp120-b12 complex structure. The method can be generalized to design other functional proteins through backbone grafting.

  8. Backbone additivity in the transfer model of protein solvation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Char Y; Kokubo, Hironori; Lynch, Gillian C; Bolen, D Wayne; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2010-01-01

    The transfer model implying additivity of the peptide backbone free energy of transfer is computationally tested. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine the extent of change in transfer free energy (ΔGtr) with increase in chain length of oligoglycine with capped end groups. Solvation free energies of oligoglycine models of varying lengths in pure water and in the osmolyte solutions, 2M urea and 2M trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), were calculated from simulations of all atom models, and ΔGtr values for peptide backbone transfer from water to the osmolyte solutions were determined. The results show that the transfer free energies change linearly with increasing chain length, demonstrating the principle of additivity, and provide values in reasonable agreement with experiment. The peptide backbone transfer free energy contributions arise from van der Waals interactions in the case of transfer to urea, but from electrostatics on transfer to TMAO solution. The simulations used here allow for the calculation of the solvation and transfer free energy of longer oligoglycine models to be evaluated than is currently possible through experiment. The peptide backbone unit computed transfer free energy of −54 cal/mol/M compares quite favorably with −43 cal/mol/M determined experimentally. PMID:20306490

  9. Backbone Additivity in the Transfer Model of Protein Solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Char Y.; Kokubo, Hironori; Lynch, Gillian C.; Bolen, D Wayne; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2010-05-01

    The transfer model implying additivity of the peptide backbone free energy of transfer is computationally tested. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine the extent of change in transfer free energy (ΔGtr) with increase in chain length of oligoglycine with capped end groups. Solvation free energies of oligoglycine models of varying lengths in pure water and in the osmolyte solutions, 2M urea and 2M trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), were calculated from simulations of all atom models, and ΔGtr values for peptide backbone transfer from water to the osmolyte solutions were determined. The results show that the transfer free energies change linearly with increasing chain length, demonstrating the principle of additivity, and provide values in reasonable agreement with experiment. The peptide backbone transfer free energy contributions arise from van der Waals interactions in the case of transfer to urea, but from electrostatics on transfer to TMAO solution. The simulations used here allow for the calculation of the solvation and transfer free energy of longer oligoglycine models to be evaluated than is currently possible through experiment. The peptide backbone unit computed transfer free energy of –54 cal/mol/Mcompares quite favorably with –43 cal/mol/M determined experimentally.

  10. Modeling (15)N NMR chemical shift changes in protein backbone with pressure.

    PubMed

    La Penna, Giovanni; Mori, Yoshiharu; Kitahara, Ryo; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yuko

    2016-08-28

    Nitrogen chemical shift is a useful parameter for determining the backbone three-dimensional structure of proteins. Empirical models for fast calculation of N chemical shift are improving their reliability, but there are subtle effects that cannot be easily interpreted. Among these, the effects of slight changes in hydrogen bonds, both intramolecular and with water molecules in the solvent, are particularly difficult to predict. On the other hand, these hydrogen bonds are sensitive to changes in protein environment. In this work, the change of N chemical shift with pressure for backbone segments in the protein ubiquitin is correlated with the change in the population of hydrogen bonds involving the backbone amide group. The different extent of interaction of protein backbone with the water molecules in the solvent is put in evidence. PMID:27586953

  11. Reconstruction of protein backbones from the BriX collection of canonical protein fragments.

    PubMed

    Baeten, Lies; Reumers, Joke; Tur, Vicente; Stricher, François; Lenaerts, Tom; Serrano, Luis; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost

    2008-05-01

    As modeling of changes in backbone conformation still lacks a computationally efficient solution, we developed a discretisation of the conformational states accessible to the protein backbone similar to the successful rotamer approach in side chains. The BriX fragment database, consisting of fragments from 4 to 14 residues long, was realized through identification of recurrent backbone fragments from a non-redundant set of high-resolution protein structures. BriX contains an alphabet of more than 1,000 frequently observed conformations per peptide length for 6 different variation levels. Analysis of the performance of BriX revealed an average structural coverage of protein structures of more than 99% within a root mean square distance (RMSD) of 1 Angstrom. Globally, we are able to reconstruct protein structures with an average accuracy of 0.48 Angstrom RMSD. As expected, regular structures are well covered, but, interestingly, many loop regions that appear irregular at first glance are also found to form a recurrent structural motif, albeit with lower frequency of occurrence than regular secondary structures. Larger loop regions could be completely reconstructed from smaller recurrent elements, between 4 and 8 residues long. Finally, we observed that a significant amount of short sequences tend to display strong structural ambiguity between alpha helix and extended conformations. When the sequence length increases, this so-called sequence plasticity is no longer observed, illustrating the context dependency of polypeptide structures. PMID:18483555

  12. Changing the topology of protein backbone: the effect of backbone cyclization on the structure and dynamics of a SH3 domain

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Frank H.; Varadan, Ranjani; Tayakuniyil, Praveen P.; Grossman, Jennifer H.; Camarero, Julio A.; Fushman, David

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the effects of the backbone cyclization on the structure and dynamics of a protein is essential for using protein topology engineering to alter protein stability and function. Here we have determined, for the first time, the structure and dynamics of the linear and various circular constructs of the N-SH3 domain from protein c-Crk. These constructs differ in the length and amino acid composition of the cyclization region. The backbone cyclization was carried out using intein-mediated intramolecular chemical ligation between the juxtaposed N- and the C-termini. The structure and backbone dynamics studies were performed using solution NMR. Our data suggest that the backbone cyclization has little effect on the overall three-dimensional structure of the SH3 domain: besides the termini, only minor structural changes were found in the proximity of the cyclization region. In contrast to the structure, backbone dynamics are significantly affected by the cyclization. On the subnanosecond time scale, the backbone of all circular constructs on average appears more rigid than that of the linear SH3 domain; this effect is observed over the entire backbone and is not limited to the cyclization site. The backbone mobility of the circular constructs becomes less restricted with increasing length of the circularization loop. In addition, significant conformational exchange motions (on the sub-millisecond time scale) were found in the N-Src loop and in the adjacent β-strands in all circular constructs studied in this work. These effects of backbone cyclization on protein dynamics have potential implications for the stability of the protein fold and for ligand binding. PMID:25905098

  13. Characterization of Cxorf5 (71-7A), a novel human cDNA mapping to Xp22 and encoding a protein containing coiled-coil alpha-helical domains.

    PubMed

    de Conciliis, L; Marchitiello, A; Wapenaar, M C; Borsani, G; Giglio, S; Mariani, M; Consalez, G G; Zuffardi, O; Franco, B; Ballabio, A; Banfi, S

    1998-07-15

    The human X chromosome is known to contain several disease genes yet to be cloned. In the course of a project aimed at the construction of a transcription map of the Xp22 region, we fully characterized a novel cDNA, Cxorf5 (HGMW-approved symbol, alias 71-7A), previously mapped to this region but for which no sequence information was available. We isolated and sequenced the full-length transcript, which encodes a predicted protein of unknown function containing a large number of coiled-coild domains, typically presented in a variety of different molecules, from fibrous proteins to transcription factors. We showed that the Cxorf5 cDNA is ubiquitously expressed, undergoes alternative splicing, and escapes X inactivation. Furthermore, we precisely mapped two additional Cxorf5-related loci on the Y chromosome and on chromosome 5. By virtue of its mapping assignment to the Xp22 region, Cxorf5 represents a candidate gene for at least four human diseases, namely spondyloepiphiseal dysplasia late, oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1, craniofrontonasal syndrome, and a nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness. PMID:9722947

  14. Using Excel To Study The Relation Between Protein Dihedral Angle Omega And Backbone Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shew, Christopher; Evans, Samari; Tao, Xiuping

    How to involve the uninitiated undergraduate students in computational biophysics research? We made use of Microsoft Excel to carry out calculations of bond lengths, bond angles and dihedral angles of proteins. Specifically, we studied protein backbone dihedral angle omega by examining how its distribution varies with the length of the backbone length. It turns out Excel is a respectable tool for this task. An ordinary current-day desktop or laptop can handle the calculations for midsized proteins in just seconds. Care has to be taken to enter the formulas for the spreadsheet column after column to minimize the computing load. Supported in part by NSF Grant #1238795.

  15. Nano-Scale Alignment of Proteins on a Flexible DNA Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Nojima, Tatsuya; Konno, Hiroki; Kodera, Noriyuki; Seio, Kohji; Taguchi, Hideki; Yoshida, Masasuke

    2012-01-01

    Nano-scale alignment of several proteins with freedom of motion is equivalent to an enormous increase in effective local concentration of proteins and will enable otherwise impossible weak and/or cooperative associations between them or with their ligands. For this purpose, a DNA backbone made of six oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) chains is designed in which five double-stranded segments are connected by four single-stranded flexible linkers. A desired protein with an introduced cysteine is connected covalently to the 5′-end of azido-ODN by catalyst-free click chemistry. Then, six protein-ODN conjugates are assembled with their complementary nucleotide sequences into a single multi-protein-DNA complex, and six proteins are aligned along the DNA backbone. Flexible alignment of proteins is directly observed by high-speed AFM imaging, and association of proteins with weak interaction is demonstrated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer between aligned proteins. PMID:23300700

  16. Transformation of a fragment of beta-structural bacteriophage T4 adhesin to stable alpha-helical trimer.

    PubMed

    Miroshnikov, K A; Sernova, N V; Shneider, M M; Mesyanzhinov, V V

    2000-12-01

    Gene product 12 of bacteriophage T4, adhesin, serves to adhere the virus to host cells. Adhesin is a fibrous homotrimer, and a novel tertiary structure element, a beta-helix, is supposed to be a major structural feature of this protein. We have constructed two truncated gp12 mutants, 12N1 and 12N2, containing 221 and 135 N-terminal residues, respectively. When expressed in E. coli cells, these gp12 fragments formed labile beta-structural trimers. Another hybrid protein, 12FN, containing 179 N-terminal amino acid residues of gp12 fused to the C-terminal domain (31 amino acids) of T4 fibritin, was shown to have a trimeric proteolytically resistant alpha-helical structure. This structure is probably similar to that of fibritin, which has a triple alpha-helical coiled-coil structure. Hence, we have demonstrated the possibility of global transformation of fibrous protein structure using fusion with a C-terminal domain that initiates trimerization. PMID:11173503

  17. Automated Real-Space Refinement of Protein Structures Using a Realistic Backbone Move Set

    PubMed Central

    Haddadian, Esmael J.; Gong, Haipeng; Jha, Abhishek K.; Yang, Xiaojing; DeBartolo, Joe; Hinshaw, James R.; Rice, Phoebe A.; Sosnick, Tobin R.; Freed, Karl F.

    2011-01-01

    Crystals of many important biological macromolecules diffract to limited resolution, rendering accurate model building and refinement difficult and time-consuming. We present a torsional optimization protocol that is applicable to many such situations and combines Protein Data Bank-based torsional optimization with real-space refinement against the electron density derived from crystallography or cryo-electron microscopy. Our method converts moderate- to low-resolution structures at initial (e.g., backbone trace only) or late stages of refinement to structures with increased numbers of hydrogen bonds, improved crystallographic R-factors, and superior backbone geometry. This automated method is applicable to DNA-binding and membrane proteins of any size and will aid studies of structural biology by improving model quality and saving considerable effort. The method can be extended to improve NMR and other structures. Our backbone score and its sequence profile provide an additional standard tool for evaluating structural quality. PMID:21843481

  18. Backbone Solution Structures of Proteins Using Residual Dipolar Couplings: Application to a Novel Structural Genomics Target

    PubMed Central

    Valafar, H.; Mayer, K. L.; Bougault, C. M.; LeBlond, P. D.; Jenney, F. E.; Brereton, P. S.; Adams, M.W.W.; Prestegard, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Structural genomics (or proteomics) activities are critically dependent on the availability of high-throughput structure determination methodology. Development of such methodology has been a particular challenge for NMR based structure determination because of the demands for isotopic labeling of proteins and the requirements for very long data acquisition times. We present here a methodology that gains efficiency from a focus on determination of backbone structures of proteins as opposed to full structures with all side chains in place. This focus is appropriate given the presumption that many protein structures in the future will be built using computational methods that start from representative fold family structures and replace as many as 70% of the side chains in the course of structure determination. The methodology we present is based primarily on residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), readily accessible NMR observables that constrain the orientation of backbone fragments irrespective of separation in space. A new software tool is described for the assembly of backbone fragments under RDC constraints and an application to a structural genomics target is presented. The target is an 8.7 kDa protein from Pyrococcus furiosus, PF1061, that was previously not well annotated, and had a nearest structurally characterized neighbor with only 33% sequence identity. The structure produced shows structural similarity to this sequence homologue, but also shows similarity to other proteins that suggests a functional role in sulfur transfer. Given the backbone structure and a possible functional link this should be an ideal target for development of modeling methods. PMID:15704012

  19. Folding a protein by discretizing its backbone torsional dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ariel

    1999-05-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a coarse codification of local conformational constraints associated with each folding motif of a peptide chain in order to obtain a rough solution to the protein folding problem. This is accomplished by implementing a discretized version of the soft-mode dynamics on a personal computer (PC). Our algorithm mimics a parallel process as it evaluates concurrent folding possibilities by pattern recognition. It may be implemented in a PC as a sequence of perturbation-translation-renormalization (p-t-r) cycles performed on a matrix of local topological constraints (LTM). This requires suitable representational tools and a periodic quenching of the dynamics required for renormalization. We introduce a description of the peptide chain based on a local discrete variable the values of which label the basins of attraction of the Ramachandran map for each residue. Thus, the local variable indicates the basin in which the torsional coordinates of each residue lie at a given time. In addition, a coding of local topological constraints associated with each secondary and tertiary structural motif is introduced. Our treatment enables us to adopt a computation time step of 81 ps, a value far larger than hydrodynamic drag time scales. Folding pathways are resolved as transitions between patterns of locally encoded structural signals that change within the 10 μs-100 ms time scale range. These coarse folding pathways are generated by the periodic search for structural patterns in the time-evolving LTM. Each pattern is recorded as a contact matrix, an operation subject to a renormalization feedback loop. The validity of our approach is tested vis-a-vis experimentally-probed folding pathways eventually generating tertiary interactions in proteins which recover their active structure under in vitro renaturation conditions. As an illustration, we focus on determining significant folding intermediates and late kinetic bottlenecks that occur within the

  20. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins. PMID:25296323

  1. On the relationship between NMR-derived amide order parameters and protein backbone entropy changes

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Kim A.; O’Brien, Evan; Kasinath, Vignesh; Wand, A. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to analyze the relationship between NMR-derived squared generalized order parameters of amide NH groups and backbone entropy. Amide order parameters (O2NH) are largely determined by the secondary structure and average values appear unrelated to the overall flexibility of the protein. However, analysis of the more flexible subset (O2NH < 0.8) shows that these report both on the local flexibility of the protein and on a different component of the conformational entropy than that reported by the side chain methyl axis order parameters, O2axis. A calibration curve for backbone entropy vs. O2NH is developed which accounts for both correlations between amide group motions of different residues, and correlations between backbone and side chain motions. This calibration curve can be used with experimental values of O2NH changes obtained by NMR relaxation measurements to extract backbone entropy changes, e.g. upon ligand binding. In conjunction with our previous calibration for side chain entropy derived from measured O2axis values this provides a prescription for determination of the total protein conformational entropy changes from NMR relaxation measurements. PMID:25739366

  2. A structural role for arginine in proteins: multiple hydrogen bonds to backbone carbonyl oxygens.

    PubMed

    Borders, C L; Broadwater, J A; Bekeny, P A; Salmon, J E; Lee, A S; Eldridge, A M; Pett, V B

    1994-04-01

    We propose that arginine side chains often play a previously unappreciated general structural role in the maintenance of tertiary structure in proteins, wherein the positively charged guanidinium group forms multiple hydrogen bonds to backbone carbonyl oxygens. Using as a criterion for a "structural" arginine one that forms 4 or more hydrogen bonds to 3 or more backbone carbonyl oxygens, we have used molecular graphics to locate arginines of interest in 4 proteins: Arg 180 in Thermus thermophilus manganese superoxide dismutase, Arg 254 in human carbonic anhydrase II, Arg 31 in Streptomyces rubiginosus xylose isomerase, and Arg 313 in Rhodospirillum rubrum ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Arg 180 helps to mold the active site channel of superoxide dismutase, whereas in each of the other enzymes the structural arginine is buried in the "mantle" (i.e., inside, but near the surface) of the protein interior well removed from the active site, where it makes 5 hydrogen bonds to 4 backbone carbonyl oxygens. Using a more relaxed criterion of 3 or more hydrogen bonds to 2 or more backbone carbonyl oxygens, arginines that play a potentially important structural role were found in yeast enolase, Bacillus stearothermophilus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, bacteriophage T4 and human lysozymes, Enteromorpha prolifera plastocyanin, HIV-1 protease, Trypanosoma brucei brucei and yeast triosephosphate isomerases, and Escherichia coli trp aporepressor (but not trp repressor or the trp repressor/operator complex).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8003972

  3. On the satisfaction of backbone-carbonyl lone pairs of electrons in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Gail J; Woolfson, Derek N

    2016-04-01

    Protein structures are stabilized by a variety of noncovalent interactions (NCIs), including the hydrophobic effect, hydrogen bonds, electrostatic forces and van der Waals' interactions. Our knowledge of the contributions of NCIs, and the interplay between them remains incomplete. This has implications for computational modeling of NCIs, and our ability to understand and predict protein structure, stability, and function. One consideration is the satisfaction of the full potential for NCIs made by backbone atoms. Most commonly, backbone-carbonyl oxygen atoms located within α-helices and β-sheets are depicted as making a single hydrogen bond. However, there are two lone pairs of electrons to be satisfied for each of these atoms. To explore this, we used operational geometric definitions to generate an inventory of NCIs for backbone-carbonyl oxygen atoms from a set of high-resolution protein structures and associated molecular-dynamics simulations in water. We included more-recently appreciated, but weaker NCIs in our analysis, such as n→π* interactions, Cα-H bonds and methyl-H bonds. The data demonstrate balanced, dynamic systems for all proteins, with most backbone-carbonyl oxygen atoms being satisfied by two NCIs most of the time. Combinations of NCIs made may correlate with secondary structure type, though in subtly different ways from traditional models of α- and β-structure. In addition, we find examples of under- and over-satisfied carbonyl-oxygen atoms, and we identify both sequence-dependent and sequence-independent secondary-structural motifs in which these reside. Our analysis provides a more-detailed understanding of these contributors to protein structure and stability, which will be of use in protein modeling, engineering and design. PMID:26833776

  4. Backrub-like backbone simulation recapitulates natural protein conformational variability and improves mutant side-chain prediction

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Colin A.; Kortemme, Tanja

    2008-01-01

    Summary Incorporation of effective backbone sampling into protein simulation and design is an important step in increasing the accuracy of computational protein modeling. Recent analysis of high-resolution crystal structures has suggested a new model, termed backrub, to describe localized, hinge-like alternative backbone and side chain conformations observed in the crystal lattice. The model involves internal backbone rotations about axes between Cα atoms. Based on this observation, we have implemented a backrub-inspired sampling method in the Rosetta structure prediction and design program. We evaluate this model of backbone flexibility using three different tests. First, we show that Rosetta backrub simulations recapitulate the correlation between backbone and side-chain conformations in the high-resolution crystal structures upon which the model was based. As a second test of backrub sampling, we show that backbone flexibility improves the accuracy of predicting point-mutant side chain conformations over fixed backbone rotameric sampling alone. Finally, we show that backrub sampling of triosephosphate isomerase loop 6 can capture the ms/µs oscillation between the open and closed states observed in solution. Our results suggest that backrub sampling captures a sizable fraction of localized conformational changes that occur in natural proteins. Application of this simple model of backbone motions may significantly improve both protein design and atomistic simulations of localized protein flexibility. PMID:18547585

  5. Membrane Curvature Sensing by Amphipathic Helices Is Modulated by the Surrounding Protein Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Doucet, Christine M.; Esmery, Nina; de Saint-Jean, Maud; Antonny, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Membrane curvature is involved in numerous biological pathways like vesicle trafficking, endocytosis or nuclear pore complex assembly. In addition to its topological role, membrane curvature is sensed by specific proteins, enabling the coordination of biological processes in space and time. Amongst membrane curvature sensors are the ALPS (Amphipathic Lipid Packing Sensors). ALPS motifs are short peptides with peculiar amphipathic properties. They are found in proteins targeted to distinct curved membranes, mostly in the early secretory pathway. For instance, the ALPS motif of the golgin GMAP210 binds trafficking vesicles, while the ALPS motif of Nup133 targets nuclear pores. It is not clear if, besides curvature sensitivity, ALPS motifs also provide target specificity, or if other domains in the surrounding protein backbone are involved. To elucidate this aspect, we studied the subcellular localization of ALPS motifs outside their natural protein context. The ALPS motifs of GMAP210 or Nup133 were grafted on artificial fluorescent probes. Importantly, ALPS motifs are held in different positions and these contrasting architectures were mimicked by the fluorescent probes. The resulting chimeras recapitulated the original proteins localization, indicating that ALPS motifs are sufficient to specifically localize proteins. Modulating the electrostatic or hydrophobic content of Nup133 ALPS motif modified its avidity for cellular membranes but did not change its organelle targeting properties. In contrast, the structure of the backbone surrounding the helix strongly influenced targeting. In particular, introducing an artificial coiled-coil between ALPS and the fluorescent protein increased membrane curvature sensitivity. This coiled-coil domain also provided membrane curvature sensitivity to the amphipathic helix of Sar1. The degree of curvature sensitivity within the coiled-coil context remains correlated to the natural curvature sensitivity of the helices. This suggests

  6. The magnitude of the backbone conformational entropy change in protein folding.

    PubMed

    D'Aquino, J A; Gómez, J; Hilser, V J; Lee, K H; Amzel, L M; Freire, E

    1996-06-01

    The magnitude of the conformational entropy change experienced by the peptide backbone upon protein folding was investigated experimentally and by computational analysis. Experimentally, two different pairs of mutants of a 33 amino acid peptide corresponding to the leucine zipper region of GCN4 were used for high-sensitivity microcalorimetric analysis. Each pair of mutants differed only by having alanine or glycine at a specific solvent-exposed position under conditions in which the differences in stability could be attributed to differences in the conformational entropy of the unfolded state. The mutants studied were characterized by different stabilities but had identical heat capacity changes of unfolding (delta Cp), identical solvent-related entropies of unfolding (delta Ssolv), and identical enthalpies of unfolding (delta H) at equivalent temperatures. Accordingly, the differences in stability between the different mutants could be attributed to differences in conformational entropy. The computational studies were aimed at generating the energy profile of backbone conformations as a function of the main chain dihedral angles phi and phi. The energy profiles permit a direct calculation of the probability distribution of different conformers and therefore of the conformational entropy of the backbone. The experimental results presented in this paper indicate that the presence of the methyl group in alanine reduces the conformational entropy of the peptide backbone by 2.46 +/- 0.2 cal/K. mol with respect to that of glycine, consistent with a 3.4-fold reduction in the number of allowed conformations in the alanine-containing peptides. Similar results were obtained from the energy profiles. The computational analysis also indicates that the addition of further carbon atoms to the side chain had only a small effect as long as the side chains were unbranched at position beta. A further reduction with respect to Ala of only 0.61 and 0.81 cal/K. mol in the backbone

  7. Monitoring Backbone Hydrogen-Bond Formation in β-Barrel Membrane Protein Folding.

    PubMed

    Raschle, Thomas; Rios Flores, Perla; Opitz, Christian; Müller, Daniel J; Hiller, Sebastian

    2016-05-10

    β-barrel membrane proteins are key components of the outer membrane of bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts. Their three-dimensional structure is defined by a network of backbone hydrogen bonds between adjacent β-strands. Here, we employ hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange in combination with NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to monitor backbone hydrogen bond formation during folding of the outer membrane protein X (OmpX) from E. coli in detergent micelles. Residue-specific kinetics of interstrand hydrogen-bond formation were found to be uniform in the entire β-barrel and synchronized to formation of the tertiary structure. OmpX folding thus propagates via a long-lived conformational ensemble state in which all backbone amide protons exchange with the solvent and engage in hydrogen bonds only transiently. Stable formation of the entire OmpX hydrogen bond network occurs downhill of the rate-limiting transition state and thus appears cooperative on the overall folding time scale. PMID:27062600

  8. Predicting Disease-Related Proteins Based on Clique Backbone in Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; Zhao, Xudong; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Network biology integrates different kinds of data, including physical or functional networks and disease gene sets, to interpret human disease. A clique (maximal complete subgraph) in a protein-protein interaction network is a topological module and possesses inherently biological significance. A disease-related clique possibly associates with complex diseases. Fully identifying disease components in a clique is conductive to uncovering disease mechanisms. This paper proposes an approach of predicting disease proteins based on cliques in a protein-protein interaction network. To tolerate false positive and negative interactions in protein networks, extending cliques and scoring predicted disease proteins with gene ontology terms are introduced to the clique-based method. Precisions of predicted disease proteins are verified by disease phenotypes and steadily keep to more than 95%. The predicted disease proteins associated with cliques can partly complement mapping between genotype and phenotype, and provide clues for understanding the pathogenesis of serious diseases. PMID:25013377

  9. NMR Backbone Assignment of Large Proteins by Using (13) Cα -Only Triple-Resonance Experiments.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingtao; Chen, Jiajing; Mi, Juan; Zhang, Jiahai; Ruan, Ke; Wu, Jihui

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to interrogate protein structure and dynamics residue by residue. However, the prerequisite chemical-shift assignment remains a bottleneck for large proteins due to the fast relaxation and the frequency degeneracy of the (13) Cα nuclei. Herein, we present a covariance NMR strategy to assign the backbone chemical shifts by using only HN(CO)CA and HNCA spectra that has a high sensitivity even for large proteins. By using the peak linear correlation coefficient (LCC), which is a sensitive probe even for tiny chemical-shift displacements, we correctly identify the fidelity of approximately 92 % cross-peaks in the covariance spectrum, which is thus a significant improvement on the approach developed by Snyder and Brüschweiler (66 %) and the use of spectral derivatives (50 %). Thus, we calculate the 4D covariance spectrum from HN(CO)CA and HNCA experiments, in which cross-peaks with LCCs above a universal threshold are considered as true correlations. This 4D covariance spectrum enables the sequential assignment of a 42 kDa maltose binding protein (MBP), in which about 95 % residues are successfully assigned with a high accuracy of 98 %. Our LCC approach, therefore, paves the way for a residue-by-residue study of the backbone structure and dynamics of large proteins. PMID:27276173

  10. NMR Structure Determination for Larger Proteins Using Backbone-Only Data

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Srivatsan; Lange, Oliver F.; Rossi, Paolo; Tyka, Michael; Wang, Xu; Aramini, James; Liu, Gaohua; Ramelot, Theresa; Eletsky, Alexander; Szyperski, Thomas; Kennedy, Michael; Prestegard, James; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2010-01-01

    Conventional protein structure determination from nuclear magnetic resonance data relies heavily on side-chain proton-proton distances. The necessary side-chain resonance assignment, however, is labor intensive and prone to error. Here we show that structures can be accurately determined without NMR information on the sidechains for proteins up to 25 kDa by incorporating backbone chemical shifts, residual dipolar couplings, and amide proton distances into the Rosetta protein structure modelling methodology. These data, which are too sparse for conventional methods, serve only to guide conformational search towards the lowest energy conformations in the folding landscape; the details of the computed models are determined by the physical chemistry implicit in the Rosetta all atom energy function. The new method is not hindered by the deuteration required to suppress nuclear relaxation processes for proteins greater than 15 kDa, and should enable routine NMR structure determination for larger proteins. PMID:20133520

  11. Robust Chemical Synthesis of Membrane Proteins through a General Method of Removable Backbone Modification.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji-Shen; He, Yao; Zuo, Chao; Cai, Xiao-Ying; Tang, Shan; Wang, Zhipeng A; Zhang, Long-Hua; Tian, Chang-Lin; Liu, Lei

    2016-03-16

    Chemical protein synthesis can provide access to proteins with post-translational modifications or site-specific labelings. Although this technology is finding increasing applications in the studies of water-soluble globular proteins, chemical synthesis of membrane proteins remains elusive. In this report, a general and robust removable backbone modification (RBM) method is developed for the chemical synthesis of membrane proteins. This method uses an activated O-to-N acyl transfer auxiliary to install in the Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis process a RBM group with switchable reactivity toward trifluoroacetic acid. The method can be applied to versatile membrane proteins because the RBM group can be placed at any primary amino acid. With RBM, the membrane proteins and their segments behave almost as if they were water-soluble peptides and can be easily handled in the process of ligation, purification, and mass characterizations. After the full-length protein is assembled, the RBM group can be readily removed by trifluoroacetic acid. The efficiency and usefulness of the new method has been demonstrated by the successful synthesis of a two-transmembrane-domain protein (HCV p7 ion channel) with site-specific isotopic labeling and a four-transmembrane-domain protein (multidrug resistance transporter EmrE). This method enables practical synthesis of small- to medium-sized membrane proteins or membrane protein domains for biochemical and biophysical studies. PMID:26943264

  12. Direct Observation of the Intrinsic Backbone Torsional Mobility of Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neha; Narang, Dominic; Bhasne, Karishma; Dalal, Vijit; Arya, Shruti; Bhattacharya, Mily; Mukhopadhyay, Samrat

    2016-08-23

    The fundamental backbone dynamics of unfolded proteins arising due to intrinsic ϕ-ψ dihedral angle fluctuations dictate the course of protein folding, binding, assembly, and function. These internal fluctuations are also critical for protein misfolding associated with a range of human diseases. However, direct observation and unambiguous assignment of this inherent dynamics in chemically denatured proteins is extremely challenging due to various experimental limitations. To directly map the backbone torsional mobility in the ϕ-ψ dihedral angle space, we used a model intrinsically disordered protein, namely, α-synuclein, that adopts an expanded state under native conditions. We took advantage of nonoccurrence of tryptophan in α-synuclein and created a number of single-tryptophan variants encompassing the entire polypeptide chain. We then utilized highly sensitive picosecond time-resolved fluorescence depolarization measurements that allowed us to discern the site-specific torsional relaxation at a low protein concentration under physiological conditions. For all the locations, the depolarization kinetics exhibited two well-separated rotational-correlation-time components. The shorter, subnanosecond component arises due to the local mobility of the indole side chain, whereas the longer rotational-correlation-time component (1.37 ± 0.15 ns), independent of global tumbling, represents a characteristic timescale for short-range conformational exchange in the ϕ-ψ dihedral space. This correlation time represents an intrinsic timescale for torsional relaxation and is independent of position, which is expected for an extended polypeptide chain having little or no propensity to form persistent structures. We were also able to capture this intrinsic timescale at the N-terminal unstructured domain of the prion protein. Our estimated timescale of the segmental mobility is similar to that of unfolded proteins studied by nuclear magnetic resonance in conjunction with

  13. Structure and Assembly of Group B Streptococcus Pilus 2b Backbone Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cozzi, Roberta; Malito, Enrico; Lazzarin, Maddalena; Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Castagnetti, Andrea; Bottomley, Matthew J.; Margarit, Immaculada; Maione, Domenico; Rinaudo, C. Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of invasive disease in infants. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS uses a sortase C-catalyzed transpeptidation mechanism to generate cell surface pili from backbone and ancillary pilin precursor substrates. The three pilus types identified in GBS contain structural subunits that are highly immunogenic and are promising candidates for the development of a broadly-protective vaccine. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the backbone protein of pilus 2b (BP-2b) at 1.06Å resolution. The structure reveals a classical IgG-like fold typical of the pilin subunits of other Gram-positive bacteria. The crystallized portion of the protein (residues 185-468) encompasses domains D2 and D3 that together confer high stability to the protein due to the presence of an internal isopeptide bond within each domain. The D2+D3 region, lacking the N-terminal D1 domain, was as potent as the entire protein in conferring protection against GBS challenge in a well-established mouse model. By site-directed mutagenesis and complementation studies in GBS knock-out strains we identified the residues and motives essential for assembly of the BP-2b monomers into high-molecular weight complexes, thus providing new insights into pilus 2b polymerization. PMID:25942637

  14. Conformation-dependent backbone geometry restraints set a new standard for protein crystallographic refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Tronrud, Dale E.; Adams, Paul D.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2014-06-17

    Ideal values of bond angles and lengths used as external restraints are crucial for the successful refinement of protein crystal structures at all but the highest of resolutions. The restraints in common usage today have been designed based on the assumption that each type of bond or angle has a single ideal value independent of context. However, recent work has shown that the ideal values are, in fact, sensitive to local conformation, and as a first step toward using such information to build more accurate models, ultra-high resolution protein crystal structures have been used to derive a conformation-dependent library (CDL) of restraints for the protein backbone (Berkholz et al. 2009. Structure. 17, 1316). Here, we report the introduction of this CDL into the Phenix package and the results of test refinements of thousands of structures across a wide range of resolutions. These tests show that use of the conformation dependent library yields models that have substantially better agreement with ideal main-chain bond angles and lengths and, on average, a slightly enhanced fit to the X-ray data. No disadvantages of using the backbone CDL are apparent. In Phenix usage of the CDL can be selected by simply specifying the cdl=True option. This successful implementation paves the way for further aspects of the context-dependence of ideal geometry to be characterized and applied to improve experimental and predictive modelling accuracy.

  15. Conformation-dependent backbone geometry restraints set a new standard for protein crystallographic refinement

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Tronrud, Dale E.; Adams, Paul D.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2014-06-17

    Ideal values of bond angles and lengths used as external restraints are crucial for the successful refinement of protein crystal structures at all but the highest of resolutions. The restraints in common usage today have been designed based on the assumption that each type of bond or angle has a single ideal value independent of context. However, recent work has shown that the ideal values are, in fact, sensitive to local conformation, and as a first step toward using such information to build more accurate models, ultra-high resolution protein crystal structures have been used to derive a conformation-dependent library (CDL)more » of restraints for the protein backbone (Berkholz et al. 2009. Structure. 17, 1316). Here, we report the introduction of this CDL into the Phenix package and the results of test refinements of thousands of structures across a wide range of resolutions. These tests show that use of the conformation dependent library yields models that have substantially better agreement with ideal main-chain bond angles and lengths and, on average, a slightly enhanced fit to the X-ray data. No disadvantages of using the backbone CDL are apparent. In Phenix usage of the CDL can be selected by simply specifying the cdl=True option. This successful implementation paves the way for further aspects of the context-dependence of ideal geometry to be characterized and applied to improve experimental and predictive modelling accuracy.« less

  16. The effect of chirality and steric hindrance on intrinsic backbone conformational propensities: tools for protein design.

    PubMed

    Childers, Matthew Carter; Towse, Clare-Louise; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-07-01

    The conformational propensities of amino acids are an amalgamation of sequence effects, environmental effects and underlying intrinsic behavior. Many have attempted to investigate neighboring residue effects to aid in our understanding of protein folding and improve structure prediction efforts, especially with respect to difficult to characterize states, such as disordered or unfolded states. Host-guest peptide series are a useful tool in examining the propensities of the amino acids free from the surrounding protein structure. Here, we compare the distributions of the backbone dihedral angles (φ/ψ) of the 20 proteogenic amino acids in two different sequence contexts using the AAXAA and GGXGG host-guest pentapeptide series. We further examine their intrinsic behaviors across three environmental contexts: water at 298 K, water at 498 K, and 8 M urea at 298 K. The GGXGG systems provide the intrinsic amino acid propensities devoid of any conformational context. The alanine residues in the AAXAA series enforce backbone chirality, thereby providing a model of the intrinsic behavior of amino acids in a protein chain. Our results show modest differences in φ/ψ distributions due to the steric constraints of the Ala side chains, the magnitudes of which are dependent on the denaturing conditions. One of the strongest factors modulating φ/ψ distributions was the protonation of titratable side chains, and the largest differences observed were in the amino acid propensities for the rarely sampled αL region. PMID:27284086

  17. Conformation-dependent backbone geometry restraints set a new standard for protein crystallographic refinement

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Tronrud, Dale E.; Adams, Paul D.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Ideal values of bond angles and lengths used as external restraints are crucial for the successful refinement of protein crystal structures at all but the highest of resolutions. The restraints in common usage today have been designed based on the assumption that each type of bond or angle has a single ideal value independent of context. However, recent work has shown that the ideal values are, in fact, sensitive to local conformation, and as a first step toward using such information to build more accurate models, ultra-high resolution protein crystal structures have been used to derive a conformation-dependent library (CDL) of restraints for the protein backbone (Berkholz et al. 2009. Structure. 17, 1316). Here, we report the introduction of this CDL into the Phenix package and the results of test refinements of thousands of structures across a wide range of resolutions. These tests show that use of the conformation dependent library yields models that have substantially better agreement with ideal main-chain bond angles and lengths and, on average, a slightly enhanced fit to the X-ray data. No disadvantages of using the backbone CDL are apparent. In Phenix usage of the CDL can be selected by simply specifying the cdl=True option. This successful implementation paves the way for further aspects of the context-dependence of ideal geometry to be characterized and applied to improve experimental and predictive modelling accuracy. PMID:24890778

  18. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Protein Backbone Transitions in Aqueous Solution: combined QM and MM Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jun; Abramavicius, Darius; Bulheller, Benjamin M.; Hirst, Jonathan D.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2010-01-01

    A generalized approach combining Quantum Mechanics (QM) and Molecular Mechanics (MM) calculations is developed to simulate the n → π* and π → π* backbone transitions of proteins in aqueous solution. These transitions, which occur in the ultraviolet (UV) at 180–220 nm, provide a sensitive probe for secondary structures. The excitation Hamiltonian is constructed using high level electronic structure calculations of N-methylacetamide (NMA). Its electrostatic fluctuations are modeled using a new algorithm, EHEF, which combines a molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory obtained with a molecular mechanics forcefield, and electronic structures of sampled MD snapshots calculated by QM. The lineshapes and excitation split-tings induced by the electrostatic environment in the experimental UV linear absorption (LA) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra of several proteins in aqueous solution are reproduced by our calculations. The distinct CD features of α-helix and β-sheet protein structures are observed in the simulations and can be assigned to different backbone geometries. The fine structure of the UV spectra is accurately characterized and enables us to identify signatures of secondary structures. PMID:20503991

  19. Statistical mechanics of protein allostery: Roles of backbone and side-chain structural fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kazuhito; Sasai, Masaki

    2011-03-01

    A statistical mechanical model of allosteric transition of proteins is developed by extending the structure-based model of protein folding to cases that a protein has two different native conformations. Partition function is calculated exactly within the model and free-energy surfaces associated with allostery are derived. In this paper, the model of allosteric transition proposed in a previous paper [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A 134, 7775 (2010)] is reformulated to describe both fluctuation in side-chain configurations and that in backbone structures in a balanced way. The model is applied to example proteins, Ras, calmodulin, and CheY: Ras undergoes the allosteric transition between guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-bound and guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-bound forms, and the model results show that the GDP-bound form is stabilized enough to prevent unnecessary signal transmission, but the conformation in the GTP-bound state bears large fluctuation in side-chain configurations, which may help to bind multiple target proteins for multiple pathways of signaling. The calculated results of calmodulin show the scenario of sequential ordering in Ca2 + binding and the associated allosteric conformational change, which are realized though the sequential appearing of pre-existing structural fluctuations, i.e., fluctuations to show structures suitable to bind Ca2 + before its binding. Here, the pre-existing fluctuations to accept the second and third Ca2 + ions are dominated by the side-chain fluctuation. In CheY, the calculated side-chain fluctuation of Tyr106 is coordinated with the backbone structural change in the β4-α4 loop, which explains the pre-existing Y-T coupling process in this protein. Ability of the model to explain allosteric transitions of example proteins supports the view that the large entropic effects lower the free-energy barrier of allosteric transition.

  20. Correlation between protein secondary structure, backbone bond angles, and side-chain orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Martin; Niemi, Antti J.

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the fine structure of the sp3 hybridized covalent bond geometry that governs the tetrahedral architecture around the central Cα carbon of a protein backbone, and for this we develop new visualization techniques to analyze high-resolution x-ray structures in the Protein Data Bank. We observe that there is a correlation between the deformations of the ideal tetrahedral symmetry and the local secondary structure of the protein. We propose a universal coarse-grained energy function to describe the ensuing side-chain geometry in terms of the Cβ carbon orientations. The energy function can model the side-chain geometry with a subatomic precision. As an example we construct the Cα-Cβ structure of HP35 chicken villin headpiece. We obtain a configuration that deviates less than 0.4 Å in root-mean-square distance from the experimental x-ray structure.

  1. Assignment of protein backbone resonances using connectivity, torsion angles and 13Calpha chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Morris, Laura C; Valafar, Homayoun; Prestegard, James H

    2004-05-01

    A program is presented which will return the most probable sequence location for a short connected set of residues in a protein given just (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts (delta((13)C(alpha))) and data restricting the phi and psi backbone angles. Data taken from both the BioMagResBank and the Protein Data Bank were used to create a probability density function (PDF) using a multivariate normal distribution in delta((13)C(alpha)), phi, and psi space for each amino acid residue. Extracting and combining probabilities for particular amino acid residues in a short proposed sequence yields a score indicative of the correctness of the proposed assignment. The program is illustrated using several proteins for which structure and (13)C(alpha) chemical shift data are available. PMID:15017135

  2. Strength of integration of transmembrane alpha-helical peptides in lipid bilayers as determined by atomic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ganchev, Dragomir N; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Snel, Margot M E; Killian, J Antoinette; de Kruijff, Ben

    2004-11-30

    In this study we address the stability of integration of proteins in membranes. Using dynamic atomic force spectroscopy, we measured the strength of incorporation of peptides in lipid bilayers. The peptides model the transmembrane parts of alpha-helical proteins and were studied in both ordered peptide-rich and unordered peptide-poor bilayers. Using gold-coated AFM tips and thiolated peptides, we were able to observe force events which are related to the removal of single peptide molecules out of the bilayer. The data demonstrate that the peptides are very stably integrated into the bilayer and that single barriers within the investigated region of loading rates resist their removal. The distance between the ground state and the barrier for peptide removal was found to be 0.75 +/- 0.15 nm in different systems. This distance falls within the thickness of the interfacial layer of the bilayer. We conclude that the bilayer interface region plays an important role in stably anchoring transmembrane proteins into membranes. PMID:15554706

  3. Identification of amino acids within the second alpha helical domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpu that are critical for preventing CD4 cell surface expression.

    PubMed

    Hill, M Sarah; Ruiz, Autumn; Schmitt, Kimberly; Stephens, Edward B

    2010-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) encodes for a Vpu protein, which interacts with CD4 resulting in its degradation. In this study, we examined the role of the 10 amino acids within the predicted second alpha-helical domain of the subtype B Vpu cytoplasmic tail in CD4 down-modulation using a VpuEGFP reporter system. Our findings indicate that the invariant leucine at position 63 and, to a lesser extent, the valine at position 68 were required for CD4 down-modulation. Mutation of analogous L63 in Vpu proteins subtypes A2, B(YU-2), C, D, and H also abolished CD4 down-modulation from the cell surface. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that L63A and V68A mutants were capable of binding CD4 and still retained the ability to interact with h-beta-TrCP1. Taken together, these results indicate that amino acid substitutions in the second alpha-helical domain that retain the predicted structure and binding to h-beta-TrCP1 can influence Vpu-mediated CD4 degradation. PMID:19944437

  4. Slow dynamics of a protein backbone in molecular dynamics simulation revealed by time-structure based independent component analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Naritomi, Yusuke; Fuchigami, Sotaro

    2013-12-07

    We recently proposed the method of time-structure based independent component analysis (tICA) to examine the slow dynamics involved in conformational fluctuations of a protein as estimated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation [Y. Naritomi and S. Fuchigami, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 065101 (2011)]. Our previous study focused on domain motions of the protein and examined its dynamics by using rigid-body domain analysis and tICA. However, the protein changes its conformation not only through domain motions but also by various types of motions involving its backbone and side chains. Some of these motions might occur on a slow time scale: we hypothesize that if so, we could effectively detect and characterize them using tICA. In the present study, we investigated slow dynamics of the protein backbone using MD simulation and tICA. The selected target protein was lysine-, arginine-, ornithine-binding protein (LAO), which comprises two domains and undergoes large domain motions. MD simulation of LAO in explicit water was performed for 1 μs, and the obtained trajectory of C{sub α} atoms in the backbone was analyzed by tICA. This analysis successfully provided us with slow modes for LAO that represented either domain motions or local movements of the backbone. Further analysis elucidated the atomic details of the suggested local motions and confirmed that these motions truly occurred on the expected slow time scale.

  5. Slow dynamics of a protein backbone in molecular dynamics simulation revealed by time-structure based independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naritomi, Yusuke; Fuchigami, Sotaro

    2013-12-01

    We recently proposed the method of time-structure based independent component analysis (tICA) to examine the slow dynamics involved in conformational fluctuations of a protein as estimated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation [Y. Naritomi and S. Fuchigami, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 065101 (2011)]. Our previous study focused on domain motions of the protein and examined its dynamics by using rigid-body domain analysis and tICA. However, the protein changes its conformation not only through domain motions but also by various types of motions involving its backbone and side chains. Some of these motions might occur on a slow time scale: we hypothesize that if so, we could effectively detect and characterize them using tICA. In the present study, we investigated slow dynamics of the protein backbone using MD simulation and tICA. The selected target protein was lysine-, arginine-, ornithine-binding protein (LAO), which comprises two domains and undergoes large domain motions. MD simulation of LAO in explicit water was performed for 1 μs, and the obtained trajectory of Cα atoms in the backbone was analyzed by tICA. This analysis successfully provided us with slow modes for LAO that represented either domain motions or local movements of the backbone. Further analysis elucidated the atomic details of the suggested local motions and confirmed that these motions truly occurred on the expected slow time scale.

  6. Effect of chain length on the formation and stability of synthetic alpha-helical coiled coils.

    PubMed

    Su, J Y; Hodges, R S; Kay, C M

    1994-12-27

    A series of polypeptides containing 9, 12, 16, 19, 23, 26, 30, 33, and 35 amino acid residues was designed to investigate the effects of peptide chain length on the formation and stability of two-stranded alpha-helical dimers or coiled coils. These peptides were synthesized by the solid-phase method, purified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), and characterized by RP-HPLC, amino acid composition analysis, and mass spectrometry. The amphipathic alpha-helical peptides were designed to dimerize by interchain hydrophobic interactions at positions a and d and interchain salt bridges between lysine and glutamic acid residues at positions e and g of the repeating heptad sequence of Glu-Ile-Glu-Ala-Leu-Lys-Ala (g-a-b-c-d-e-f). The ability of these peptides to form alpha-helical structures in the presence and absence of a helix-inducing reagent (trifluoroethanol) was monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The helicity of the peptides increased with increasing chain length in a cooperative manner. A minimum of three heptads corresponding to six helical turns was required for a peptide to adopt the two-stranded alpha-helical coiled coil conformation in aqueous medium. The increased stability of the peptides as a result of an increase in hydrophobic interactions (chain length) was demonstrated by the shift in the transitions of the guanidine hydrochloride (Gdn.HCl) denaturation and thermal unfolding profiles. The concentrations of denaturant (Gdn.HCl) required to achieve 50% denaturation are 3.2, 4.9, 6.9, and 7.5 M for peptides 23r, 26r, 30r, and 33r, respectively, in aqueous medium. However, the effect of a chain length increase on coiled-coil stability was not additive. The melting temperature, Tm, at which 50% of the helicity is lost, increased by 34 degrees C in changing the peptide chain length from 23 to 26; however, that shift was only 14 degrees C when the chain length was increased from 30 to 33 residues. These results are

  7. Water proton spin saturation affects measured protein backbone 15 N spin relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Tjandra, Nico

    2011-12-01

    Protein backbone 15N NMR spin relaxation rates are useful in characterizing the protein dynamics and structures. To observe the protein nuclear-spin resonances a pulse sequence has to include a water suppression scheme. There are two commonly employed methods, saturating or dephasing the water spins with pulse field gradients and keeping them unperturbed with flip-back pulses. Here different water suppression methods were incorporated into pulse sequences to measure 15N longitudinal T1 and transversal rotating-frame T1ρ spin relaxation. Unexpectedly the 15N T1 relaxation time constants varied significantly with the choice of water suppression method. For a 25-kDa Escherichiacoli. glutamine binding protein (GlnBP) the T1 values acquired with the pulse sequence containing a water dephasing gradient are on average 20% longer than the ones obtained using a pulse sequence containing the water flip-back pulse. In contrast the two T1ρ data sets are correlated without an apparent offset. The average T1 difference was reduced to 12% when the experimental recycle delay was doubled, while the average T1 values from the flip-back measurements were nearly unchanged. Analysis of spectral signal to noise ratios ( s/ n) showed the apparent slower 15N relaxation obtained with the water dephasing experiment originated from the differences in 1H N recovery for each relaxation time point. This in turn offset signal reduction from 15N relaxation decay. The artifact becomes noticeable when the measured 15N relaxation time constant is comparable to recycle delay, e.g., the 15N T1 of medium to large proteins. The 15N relaxation rates measured with either water suppression schemes yield reasonable fits to the structure. However, data from the saturated scheme results in significantly lower Model-Free order parameters (< S2> = 0.81) than the non-saturated ones (< S2> = 0.88), indicating such order parameters may be previously underestimated.

  8. Solution structure and backbone dynamics of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV) nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Y.; Kaluarachchi, K.; Giedroc, D. P.

    1998-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid proteins (NCPs) are CCHC-type zinc finger proteins that mediate virion RNA binding activities associated with retrovirus assembly and genomic RNA encapsidation. Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV), a type D retrovirus, encodes a 96-amino acid nucleocapsid protein, which contains two Cys-X2-Cys-X4-His-X4-Cys (CCHC) zinc fingers connected by an unusually long 15-amino acid linker. Homonuclear, two-dimensional sensitivity-enhanced 15N-1H, three-dimensional 15N-1H, and triple resonance NMR spectroscopy have been used to determine the solution structure and residue-specific backbone dynamics of the structured core domain of MPMV NCP containing residues 21-80. Structure calculations and spectral density mapping of N-H bond vector mobility reveal that MPMV NCP 21-80 is best described as two independently folded, rotationally uncorrelated globular domains connected by a seven-residue flexible linker consisting of residues 42-48. The N-terminal CCHC zinc finger domain (residues 24-37) appears to adopt a fold like that described previously for HIV-1 NCP; however, residues within this domain and the immediately adjacent linker region (residues 38-41) are characterized by extensive conformational averaging on the micros-ms time scale at 25 degrees C. In contrast to other NCPs, residues 49-77, which includes the C-terminal CCHC zinc-finger (residues 53-66), comprise a well-folded globular domain with the Val49-Pro-Gly-Leu52 sequence and C-terminal tail residues 67-77 characterized by amide proton exchange properties and 15N R1, R2, and (1H-15N) NOE values indistinguishable to residues in the core C-terminal finger. Twelve refined structural models of MPMV NCP residues 49-80 (pairwise backbone RMSD of 0.77 A) reveal that the side chains of the conserved Pro50 and Trp62 are in van der Waals contact with one another. Residues 70-73 in the C-terminal tail adopt a reverse turn-like structure. Ile77 is involved in extensive van der Waals contact with the core

  9. Evolutionary bidirectional expansion for the tracing of alpha helices in cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mirabela; Wriggers, Willy

    2012-02-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) enables the imaging of macromolecular complexes in near-native environments at resolutions that often permit the visualization of secondary structure elements. For example, alpha helices frequently show consistent patterns in volumetric maps, exhibiting rod-like structures of high density. Here, we introduce VolTrac (Volume Tracer) - a novel technique for the annotation of alpha-helical density in cryo-EM data sets. VolTrac combines a genetic algorithm and a bidirectional expansion with a tabu search strategy to trace helical regions. Our method takes advantage of the stochastic search by using a genetic algorithm to identify optimal placements for a short cylindrical template, avoiding exploration of already characterized tabu regions. These placements are then utilized as starting positions for the adaptive bidirectional expansion that characterizes the curvature and length of the helical region. The method reliably predicted helices with seven or more residues in experimental and simulated maps at intermediate (4-10Å) resolution. The observed success rates, ranging from 70.6% to 100%, depended on the map resolution and validation parameters. For successful predictions, the helical axes were located within 2Å from known helical axes of atomic structures. PMID:22155667

  10. A Multi-Objective Approach for Protein Structure Prediction Based on an Energy Model and Backbone Angle Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Tsay, Jyh-Jong; Su, Shih-Chieh; Yu, Chin-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) is concerned with the prediction of protein tertiary structure from primary structure and is a challenging calculation problem. After decades of research effort, numerous solutions have been proposed for optimisation methods based on energy models. However, further investigation and improvement is still needed to increase the accuracy and similarity of structures. This study presents a novel backbone angle preference factor, which is one of the factors inducing protein folding. The proposed multiobjective optimisation approach simultaneously considers energy models and backbone angle preferences to solve the ab initio PSP. To prove the effectiveness of the multiobjective optimisation approach based on the energy models and backbone angle preferences, 75 amino acid sequences with lengths ranging from 22 to 88 amino acids were selected from the CB513 data set to be the benchmarks. The data sets were highly dissimilar, therefore indicating that they are meaningful. The experimental results showed that the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of the multiobjective optimization approach based on energy model and backbone angle preferences was superior to those of typical energy models, indicating that the proposed approach can facilitate the ab initio PSP. PMID:26151847

  11. A new default restraint library for the protein backbone in Phenix: a conformation-dependent geometry goes mainstream

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Tronrud, Dale E.; Adams, Paul D.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Chemical restraints are a fundamental part of crystallographic protein structure refinement. In response to mounting evidence that conventional restraints have shortcomings, it has previously been documented that using backbone restraints that depend on the protein backbone conformation helps to address these shortcomings and improves the performance of refinements [Moriarty et al. (2014 ▸), FEBS J. 281, 4061–4071]. It is important that these improvements be made available to all in the protein crystallography community. Toward this end, a change in the default geometry library used by Phenix is described here. Tests are presented showing that this change will not generate increased numbers of outliers during validation, or deposition in the Protein Data Bank, during the transition period in which some validation tools still use the conventional restraint libraries. PMID:26894545

  12. Unconventional N-H…N Hydrogen Bonds Involving Proline Backbone Nitrogen in Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Deepak, R N V Krishna; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2016-05-10

    Contrary to DNA double-helical structures, hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) involving nitrogen as the acceptor are not common in protein structures. We systematically searched N-H…N H-bonds in two different sets of protein structures. Data set I consists of neutron diffraction and ultrahigh-resolution x-ray structures (0.9 Å resolution or better) and the hydrogen atom positions in these structures were determined experimentally. Data set II contains structures determined using x-ray diffraction (resolution ≤ 1.8 Å) and the positions of hydrogen atoms were generated using a computational method. We identified 114 and 14,347 potential N-H…N H-bonds from these two data sets, respectively, and 56-66% of these were of the Ni+1-Hi+1…Ni type, with Ni being the proline backbone nitrogen. To further understand the nature of such unusual contacts, we performed quantum chemical calculations on the model compound N-acetyl-L-proline-N-methylamide (Ace-Pro-NMe) with coordinates taken from the experimentally determined structures. A potential energy profile generated by varying the ψ dihedral angle in Ace-Pro-NMe indicates that the conformation with the N-H…N H-bond is the most stable. An analysis of H-bond-forming proline residues reveals that more than 30% of the proline carbonyl groups are also involved in n → π(∗) interactions with the carbonyl carbon of the preceding residue. Natural bond orbital analyses demonstrate that the strength of N-H…N H-bonds is less than half of that observed for a conventional H-bond. This study clearly establishes the H-bonding capability of proline nitrogen and its prevalence in protein structures. We found many proteins with multiple instances of H-bond-forming prolines. With more than 15% of all proline residues participating in N-H…N H-bonds, we suggest a new, to our knowledge, structural role for proline in providing stability to loops and capping regions of secondary structures in proteins. PMID:27166805

  13. Protein inhibitors of serine proteinases: role of backbone structure and dynamics in controlling the hydrolysis constant.

    PubMed

    Song, Jikui; Markley, John L

    2003-05-13

    Standard mechanism protein inhibitors of serine proteinases bind as substrates and are cleaved by cognate proteinases at their reactive sites. The hydrolysis constant for this cleavage reaction at the P(1)-P(1)' peptide bond (K(hyd)) is determined by the relative concentrations at equilibrium of the "intact" (uncleaved, I) and "modified" (reactive site cleaved, I*) forms of the inhibitor. The pH dependence of K(hyd) can be explained in terms of a pH-independent term, K(hyd) degrees, plus the proton dissociation constants of the newly formed amino and carboxylate groups at the cleavage site. Two protein inhibitors that differ from one another by a single residue substitution have been found to have K(hyd) degrees values that differ by a factor of 5 [Ardelt, W., and Laskowski, M., Jr. (1991) J. Mol. Biol. 220, 1041-1052]: turkey ovomucoid third domain (OMTKY3) has K(hyd) degrees = 1.0, and Indian peafowl ovomucoid third domain (OMIPF3), which differs from OMTKY3 by the substitution P(2)'-Tyr(20)His, has K(hyd) degrees = 5.15. What mechanism is responsible for this small difference? Is it structural (enthalpic) or dynamic (entropic)? Does the mutation affect the free energy of the I state, the I* state, or both? We have addressed these questions through NMR investigations of the I and I forms of OMTKY3 and OMIPF3. Information about structure was derived from measurements of NMR chemical shift changes and trans-hydrogen-bond J-couplings; information about dynamics was obtained through measurements of (15)N relaxation rates and (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear NOEs with model-free analysis of the results. Although the I forms of each variant are more dynamic than the corresponding I forms, the study revealed no appreciable difference in the backbone dynamics of either intact inhibitor (OMIPF3 vs OMTKY3) or modified inhibitor (OMIPF3* vs OMTKY3*). Instead, changes in chemical shifts and trans-hydrogen-bond J-couplings suggested that the K(hyd) degrees difference arises from

  14. Comparison of Backbone Modification in Protein β-Sheets by α→γ Residue Replacement and α-Residue Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Lengyel, George A.; Reinert, Zachary E.; Griffith, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    The mimicry of protein tertiary structure by oligomers with unnatural backbones is a significant contemporary research challenge. Among common elements of secondary structure found in natural proteins, sheets have proven the most difficult to address. Here, we report the systematic comparison of different strategies for peptide backbone modification in β-sheets with the goal of identifying the best method for replacing a multi-stranded sheet in a protein tertiary fold. The most effective sheet modifications examined lead to native-like tertiary folding behavior with thermodynamic fold stability comparable to the prototype protein on which the modified backbones are based. PMID:24909436

  15. Reduced dimensionality (4,3)D-hnCOCANH experiment: an efficient backbone assignment tool for NMR studies of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-09-01

    Sequence specific resonance assignment of proteins forms the basis for variety of structural and functional proteomics studies by NMR. In this context, an efficient standalone method for rapid assignment of backbone ((1)H, (15)N, (13)C(α) and (13)C') resonances of proteins has been presented here. Compared to currently available strategies used for the purpose, the method employs only a single reduced dimensionality experiment--(4,3)D-hnCOCANH and exploits the linear combinations of backbone ((13)C(α) and (13)C') chemical shifts to achieve a dispersion relatively better compared to those of individual chemical shifts (see the text). The resulted increased dispersion of peaks--which is different in sum (CA + CO) and difference (CA - CO) frequency regions--greatly facilitates the analysis of the spectrum by resolving the problems (associated with routine assignment strategies) arising because of degenerate amide (15)N and backbone (13)C chemical shifts. Further, the spectrum provides direct distinction between intra- and inter-residue correlations because of their opposite peak signs. The other beneficial feature of the spectrum is that it provides: (a) multiple unidirectional sequential (i→i + 1) (15)N and (13)C correlations and (b) facile identification of certain specific triplet sequences which serve as check points for mapping the stretches of sequentially connected HSQC cross peaks on to the primary sequence for assigning the resonances sequence specifically. On top of all this, the F₂-F₃ planes of the spectrum corresponding to sum (CA + CO) and difference (CA - CO) chemical shifts enable rapid and unambiguous identification of sequential HSQC peaks through matching their coordinates in these two planes (see the text). Overall, the experiment presented here will serve as an important backbone assignment tool for variety of structural and functional proteomics and drug discovery research programs by NMR involving well behaved small folded proteins (MW

  16. Improving prediction of secondary structure, local backbone angles, and solvent accessible surface area of proteins by iterative deep learning

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Rhys; Paliwal, Kuldip; Lyons, James; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Sharma, Alok; Wang, Jihua; Sattar, Abdul; Yang, Yuedong; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2015-01-01

    Direct prediction of protein structure from sequence is a challenging problem. An effective approach is to break it up into independent sub-problems. These sub-problems such as prediction of protein secondary structure can then be solved independently. In a previous study, we found that an iterative use of predicted secondary structure and backbone torsion angles can further improve secondary structure and torsion angle prediction. In this study, we expand the iterative features to include solvent accessible surface area and backbone angles and dihedrals based on Cα atoms. By using a deep learning neural network in three iterations, we achieved 82% accuracy for secondary structure prediction, 0.76 for the correlation coefficient between predicted and actual solvent accessible surface area, 19° and 30° for mean absolute errors of backbone φ and ψ angles, respectively, and 8° and 32° for mean absolute errors of Cα-based θ and τ angles, respectively, for an independent test dataset of 1199 proteins. The accuracy of the method is slightly lower for 72 CASP 11 targets but much higher than those of model structures from current state-of-the-art techniques. This suggests the potentially beneficial use of these predicted properties for model assessment and ranking. PMID:26098304

  17. Disruption of prion rods generates 10-nm spherical particles having high alpha-helical content and lacking scrapie infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Riesner, D; Kellings, K; Post, K; Wille, H; Serban, H; Groth, D; Baldwin, M A; Prusiner, S B

    1996-01-01

    An abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrP) designated PrPSc is the major, or possibly the only, component of infectious prions. Structural studies of PrPSc have been impeded by its lack of solubility under conditions in which infectivity is retained. Among the many detergents examined, only treatment with the ionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or Sarkosyl followed by sonication dispersed prion rods which are composed of PrP 27-30, an N-terminally truncated form of PrPSc. After ultracentrifugation at 100,000 x g for 1 h, approximately 30% of the PrP 27-30 and scrapie infectivity were found in the supernatant, which was fractionated by sedimentation through 5 to 20% sucrose gradients. Near the top of the gradient, spherical particles with an observed sedimentation coefficient of approximately 6S, approximately 10 mm in diameter and composed of four to six PrP 27-30 molecules, were found. The spheres could be digested with proteinase K and exhibited little, if any, scrapie infectivity. When the prion rods were disrupted in SDS and the entire sample was fractionated by sucrose gradient centrifugation, a lipid-rich fraction at the meniscus composed of fragments of rods and heterogeneous particles containing high levels of prion infectivity was found. Fractions adjacent to the meniscus also contained spherical particles. Circular dichroism of the spheres revealed 60% alpha-helical content; addition of 25% acetonitrile induced aggregates high in beta sheet but remaining devoid of infectivity. Although the highly purified spherical oligomers of PrP 27-30 lack infectivity, they may provide an excellent substrate for determining conditions of renaturation under which prion particles regain infectivity. PMID:8627692

  18. Alpha-helical hydrophobic polypeptides form proton-selective channels in lipid bilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, A. E.; Deamer, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    Proton translocation is important in membrane-mediated processes such as ATP-dependent proton pumps, ATP synthesis, bacteriorhodopsin, and cytochrome oxidase function. The fundamental mechanism, however, is poorly understood. To test the theoretical possibility that bundles of hydrophobic alpha-helices could provide a low energy pathway for ion translocation through the lipid bilayer, polyamino acids were incorporated into extruded liposomes and planar lipid membranes, and proton translocation was measured. Liposomes with incorporated long-chain poly-L-alanine or poly-L-leucine were found to have proton permeability coefficients 5 to 7 times greater than control liposomes, whereas short-chain polyamino acids had relatively little effect. Potassium permeability was not increased markedly by any of the polyamino acids tested. Analytical thin layer chromatography measurements of lipid content and a fluorescamine assay for amino acids showed that there were approximately 135 polyleucine or 65 polyalanine molecules associated with each liposome. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that a major fraction of the long-chain hydrophobic peptides existed in an alpha-helical conformation. Single-channel recording in both 0.1 N HCl and 0.1 M KCl was also used to determine whether proton-conducting channels formed in planar lipid membranes (phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylethanolamine, 1:1). Poly-L-leucine and poly-L-alanine in HCl caused a 10- to 30-fold increase in frequency of conductive events compared to that seen in KCl or by the other polyamino acids in either solution. This finding correlates well with the liposome observations in which these two polyamino acids caused the largest increase in membrane proton permeability but had little effect on potassium permeability. Poly-L-leucine was considerably more conductive than poly-L-alanine due primarily to larger event amplitudes and, to a lesser extent, a higher event frequency. Poly-L-leucine caused two

  19. Molecular organization in striated domains induced by transmembrane alpha-helical peptides in dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayers.

    PubMed

    Sparr, Emma; Ganchev, Dragomir N; Snel, Margot M E; Ridder, Anja N J A; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M J; Chupin, Vladimir; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Killian, J Antoinette; de Kruijff, Ben

    2005-01-11

    Transmembrane (TM) alpha-helical peptides with neutral flanking residues such as tryptophan form highly ordered striated domains when incorporated in gel-state 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayers and inspected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) (1). In this study, we analyze the molecular organization of these striated domains using AFM, photo-cross-linking, fluorescence spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and X-ray diffraction techniques on different functionalized TM peptides. The results demonstrate that the striated domains consist of linear arrays of single TM peptides with a dominantly antiparallel organization in which the peptides interact with each other and with lipids. The peptide arrays are regularly spaced by +/-8.5 nm and are separated by somewhat perturbed gel-state lipids with hexagonally organized acyl chains, which have lost their tilt. This system provides an example of how domains of peptides and lipids can be formed in membranes as a result of a combination of specific peptide-peptide and peptide-lipid interactions. PMID:15628840

  20. ff14SB: Improving the Accuracy of Protein Side Chain and Backbone Parameters from ff99SB.

    PubMed

    Maier, James A; Martinez, Carmenza; Kasavajhala, Koushik; Wickstrom, Lauren; Hauser, Kevin E; Simmerling, Carlos

    2015-08-11

    Molecular mechanics is powerful for its speed in atomistic simulations, but an accurate force field is required. The Amber ff99SB force field improved protein secondary structure balance and dynamics from earlier force fields like ff99, but weaknesses in side chain rotamer and backbone secondary structure preferences have been identified. Here, we performed a complete refit of all amino acid side chain dihedral parameters, which had been carried over from ff94. The training set of conformations included multidimensional dihedral scans designed to improve transferability of the parameters. Improvement in all amino acids was obtained as compared to ff99SB. Parameters were also generated for alternate protonation states of ionizable side chains. Average errors in relative energies of pairs of conformations were under 1.0 kcal/mol as compared to QM, reduced 35% from ff99SB. We also took the opportunity to make empirical adjustments to the protein backbone dihedral parameters as compared to ff99SB. Multiple small adjustments of φ and ψ parameters were tested against NMR scalar coupling data and secondary structure content for short peptides. The best results were obtained from a physically motivated adjustment to the φ rotational profile that compensates for lack of ff99SB QM training data in the β-ppII transition region. Together, these backbone and side chain modifications (hereafter called ff14SB) not only better reproduced their benchmarks, but also improved secondary structure content in small peptides and reproduction of NMR χ1 scalar coupling measurements for proteins in solution. We also discuss the Amber ff12SB parameter set, a preliminary version of ff14SB that includes most of its improvements. PMID:26574453

  1. Vanishing amplitude of backbone dynamics causes a true protein dynamical transition: 2H NMR studies on perdeuterated C-phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Kämpf, Kerstin; Kremmling, Beke; Vogel, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using a combination of H2 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, we study internal rotational dynamics of the perdeuterated protein C-phycocyanin (CPC) in dry and hydrated states over broad temperature and dynamic ranges with high angular resolution. Separating H2 NMR signals from methyl deuterons, we show that basically all backbone deuterons exhibit highly restricted motion occurring on time scales faster than microseconds. The amplitude of this motion increases when a hydration shell exists, while it decreases upon cooling and vanishes near 175 K. We conclude that the vanishing of the highly restricted motion marks a dynamical transition, which is independent of the time window and of a fundamental importance. This conclusion is supported by results from experimental and computational studies of the proteins myoglobin and elastin. In particular, we argue based on findings in molecular dynamics simulations that the behavior of the highly restricted motion of proteins at the dynamical transition resembles that of a characteristic secondary relaxation of liquids at the glass transition, namely the nearly constant loss. Furthermore, H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated CPC reveal that, in addition to highly restricted motion, small fractions of backbone segments exhibit weakly restricted dynamics when temperature and hydration are sufficiently high. PMID:24730877

  2. DNA Backbone BI/BII Distribution and Dynamics in E2 Protein-Bound Environment Determined by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Robertson, James C; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2015-11-01

    BI and BII conformational substates in the DNA backbone typify canonical B-form DNA. The BI and BII substates are important for structural variation of DNA and have been implicated in protein-nucleic acid recognition mechanisms. Recent refinements have been made to nucleic acid force fields employed in molecular dynamics simulations that demonstrate a better ability to model the BI and BII states, leading to overall improved modeling of DNA structure and dynamics. These force field improvements have yet to be significantly demonstrated in the context of a protein-DNA system extended to long time scales. Our plan was to run molecular dynamics simulations of a well-studied protein-DNA system (E2-DNA) into the microsecond time scale and determine the ability of the force field to populate BII states in the DNA backbone consistent with dinucleotide steps crystallized in the BII conformation. The results showed that the dinucleotide steps in the E2-DNA complex with the highest BII populations from simulation trajectories corresponded to the dinucleotide steps crystallized in the BII state and that decoy BI and BII states converge to the same results within approximately one microsecond. PMID:26482568

  3. Vanishing amplitude of backbone dynamics causes a true protein dynamical transition: H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated C-phycocyanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kämpf, Kerstin; Kremmling, Beke; Vogel, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using a combination of H2 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, we study internal rotational dynamics of the perdeuterated protein C-phycocyanin (CPC) in dry and hydrated states over broad temperature and dynamic ranges with high angular resolution. Separating H2 NMR signals from methyl deuterons, we show that basically all backbone deuterons exhibit highly restricted motion occurring on time scales faster than microseconds. The amplitude of this motion increases when a hydration shell exists, while it decreases upon cooling and vanishes near 175 K. We conclude that the vanishing of the highly restricted motion marks a dynamical transition, which is independent of the time window and of a fundamental importance. This conclusion is supported by results from experimental and computational studies of the proteins myoglobin and elastin. In particular, we argue based on findings in molecular dynamics simulations that the behavior of the highly restricted motion of proteins at the dynamical transition resembles that of a characteristic secondary relaxation of liquids at the glass transition, namely the nearly constant loss. Furthermore, H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated CPC reveal that, in addition to highly restricted motion, small fractions of backbone segments exhibit weakly restricted dynamics when temperature and hydration are sufficiently high.

  4. Assembly and Structure of alpha-helical Peptide Films on Hydrophobic Fluorocarbon Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weidner, T.; Samual, N; McCrea, K; Gamble, L; Ward, R; Castner, D

    2010-01-01

    The structure, orientation, and formation of amphiphilic {alpha}-helix model peptide films on fluorocarbon surfaces has been monitored with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The {alpha}-helix peptide is a 14-mer of hydrophilic lysine and hydrophobic leucine residues with a hydrophobic periodicity of 3.5. This periodicity yields a rigid amphiphilic peptide with leucine and lysine side chains located on opposite sides. XPS composition analysis confirms the formation of a peptide film that covers about 75% of the surface. NEXAFS data are consistent with chemically intact adsorption of the peptides. A weak linear dichroism of the amide {pi}* is likely due to the broad distribution of amide bond orientations inherent to the {alpha}-helical secondary structure. SFG spectra exhibit strong peaks near 2865 and 2935 cm{sup -1} related to aligned leucine side chains interacting with the hydrophobic surface. Water modes near 3200 and 3400 cm{sup -1} indicate ordering of water molecules in the adsorbed-peptide fluorocarbon surface interfacial region. Amide I peaks observed near 1655 cm{sup -1} confirm that the secondary structure is preserved in the adsorbed peptide. A kinetic study of the film formation process using XPS and SFG showed rapid adsorption of the peptides followed by a longer assembly process. Peptide SFG spectra taken at the air-buffer interface showed features related to well-ordered peptide films. Moving samples through the buffer surface led to the transfer of ordered peptide films onto the substrates.

  5. The backbone structure of the thermophilic Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis ribose binding protein is essentially identical to its mesophilic E. coli homolog

    PubMed Central

    Cuneo, Matthew J; Tian, Yaji; Allert, Malin; Hellinga, Homme W

    2008-01-01

    Background Comparison of experimentally determined mesophilic and thermophilic homologous protein structures is an important tool for understanding the mechanisms that contribute to thermal stability. Of particular interest are pairs of homologous structures that are structurally very similar, but differ significantly in thermal stability. Results We report the X-ray crystal structure of a Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis ribose binding protein (tteRBP) determined to 1.9 Å resolution. We find that tteRBP is significantly more stable (appTm value ~102°C) than the mesophilic Escherichia coli ribose binding protein (ecRBP) (appTm value ~56°C). The tteRBP has essentially the identical backbone conformation (0.41 Å RMSD of 235/271 Cα positions and 0.65 Å RMSD of 270/271 Cα positions) as ecRBP. Classification of the amino acid substitutions as a function of structure therefore allows the identification of amino acids which potentially contribute to the observed thermal stability of tteRBP in the absence of large structural heterogeneities. Conclusion The near identity of backbone structures of this pair of proteins entails that the significant differences in their thermal stabilities are encoded exclusively by the identity of the amino acid side-chains. Furthermore, the degree of sequence divergence is strongly correlated with structure; with a high degree of conservation in the core progressing to increased diversity in the boundary and surface regions. Different factors that may possibly contribute to thermal stability appear to be differentially encoded in each of these regions of the protein. The tteRBP/ecRBP pair therefore offers an opportunity to dissect contributions to thermal stability by side-chains alone in the absence of large structural differences. PMID:18373848

  6. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Longhua; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of {sup 15}N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S{sup 2}) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S{sup 2}) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S{sup 2} values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S{sup 2} parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S{sup 2} calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S{sup 2}) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models.

  7. The backbone structure of the thermophilic Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis ribose binding protein is essentially identical to its mesophilic E. coli homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Tian, Yaji; Allert, Malin; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2008-10-27

    We report the X-ray crystal structure of a Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis ribose binding protein (tteRBP) determined to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. We find that tteRBP is significantly more stable ({sup app}T{sub m} value {approx} 102 C) than the mesophilic Escherichia coli ribose binding protein (ecRBP) ({sup app}T{sub m} value {approx} 56 C). The tteRBP has essentially the identical backbone conformation (0.41 {angstrom} RMSD of 235/271 C{sub {alpha}} positions and 0.65 {angstrom} RMSD of 270/271 C{sub {alpha}} positions) as ecRBP. Classification of the amino acid substitutions as a function of structure therefore allows the identification of amino acids which potentially contribute to the observed thermal stability of tteRBP in the absence of large structural heterogeneities.

  8. A HAUSDORFF-BASED NOE ASSIGNMENT ALGORITHM USING PROTEIN BACKBONE DETERMINED FROM RESIDUAL DIPOLAR COUPLINGS AND ROTAMER PATTERNS

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jianyang (Michael); Tripathy, Chittaranjan; Zhou, Pei; Donald, Bruce R.

    2008-01-01

    High-throughput structure determination based on solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays an important role in structural genomics. One of the main bottlenecks in NMR structure determination is the interpretation of NMR data to obtain a sufficient number of accurate distance restraints by assigning nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) spectral peaks to pairs of protons. The difficulty in automated NOE assignment mainly lies in the ambiguities arising both from the resonance degeneracy of chemical shifts and from the uncertainty due to experimental errors in NOE peak positions. In this paper we present a novel NOE assignment algorithm, called HAusdorff-based NOE Assignment (HANA), that starts with a high-resolution protein backbone computed using only two residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) per residue37, 39, employs a Hausdorff-based pattern matching technique to deduce similarity between experimental and back-computed NOE spectra for each rotamer from a statistically diverse library, and drives the selection of optimal position-specific rotamers for filtering ambiguous NOE assignments. Our algorithm runs in time O(tn3 +tn log t), where t is the maximum number of rotamers per residue and n is the size of the protein. Application of our algorithm on biological NMR data for three proteins, namely, human ubiquitin, the zinc finger domain of the human DNA Y-polymerase Eta (pol η) and the human Set2-Rpb1 interacting domain (hSRI) demonstrates that our algorithm overcomes spectral noise to achieve more than 90% assignment accuracy. Additionally, the final structures calculated using our automated NOE assignments have backbone RMSD < 1.7 Å and all-heavy-atom RMSD < 2.5 Å from reference structures that were determined either by X-ray crystallography or traditional NMR approaches. These results show that our NOE assignment algorithm can be successfully applied to protein NMR spectra to obtain high-quality structures. PMID:19122773

  9. Insight into a molecular interaction force supporting peptide backbones and its implication to protein loops and folding

    PubMed Central

    Du, Qi-Shi; Chen, Dong; Xie, Neng-Zhong; Huang, Ri-Bo; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Although not being classified as the most fundamental protein structural elements like α-helices and β-strands, the loop segment may play considerable roles for protein stability, flexibility, and dynamic activity. Meanwhile, the protein loop is also quite elusive; i.e. its interactions with the other parts of protein as well as its own shape-maintaining forces have still remained as a puzzle or at least not quite clear yet. Here, we report a molecular force, the so-called polar hydrogen–π interaction (Hp–π), which may play an important role in supporting the backbones of protein loops. By conducting the potential energy surface scanning calculations on the quasi π-plane of peptide bond unit, we have observed the following intriguing phenomena: (1) when the polar hydrogen atom of a peptide unit is perpendicularly pointing to the π-plane of other peptide bond units, a remarkable Hp–π interaction occurs; (2) the interaction is distance and orientation dependent, acting in a broad space, and belonging to the ‘point-to-plane’ one. The molecular force reported here may provide useful interaction concepts and insights into better understanding the loop’s unique stability and flexibility feature, as well as the driving force of the protein global folding. PMID:25375237

  10. Insight into a molecular interaction force supporting peptide backbones and its implication to protein loops and folding.

    PubMed

    Du, Qi-Shi; Chen, Dong; Xie, Neng-Zhong; Huang, Ri-Bo; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2015-09-01

    Although not being classified as the most fundamental protein structural elements like α-helices and β-strands, the loop segment may play considerable roles for protein stability, flexibility, and dynamic activity. Meanwhile, the protein loop is also quite elusive; i.e. its interactions with the other parts of protein as well as its own shape-maintaining forces have still remained as a puzzle or at least not quite clear yet. Here, we report a molecular force, the so-called polar hydrogen-π interaction (Hp-π), which may play an important role in supporting the backbones of protein loops. By conducting the potential energy surface scanning calculations on the quasi π-plane of peptide bond unit, we have observed the following intriguing phenomena: (1) when the polar hydrogen atom of a peptide unit is perpendicularly pointing to the π-plane of other peptide bond units, a remarkable Hp-π interaction occurs; (2) the interaction is distance and orientation dependent, acting in a broad space, and belonging to the 'point-to-plane' one. The molecular force reported here may provide useful interaction concepts and insights into better understanding the loop's unique stability and flexibility feature, as well as the driving force of the protein global folding. PMID:25375237

  11. Toward quantification of protein backbone–backbone hydrogen bonding energies: An energetic analysis of an amide-to-ester mutation in an α-helix within a protein

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jianmin; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2008-01-01

    Amide-to-ester backbone mutagenesis enables a specific backbone–backbone hydrogen bond (H-bond) in a protein to be eliminated in order to quantify its energetic contribution to protein folding. To extract a H-bonding free energy from an amide-to-ester perturbation free energy (ΔG folding,wt − ΔG folding,mut), it is necessary to correct for the putative introduction of a lone pair–lone pair electrostatic repulsion, as well as for the transfer free energy differences that may arise between the all amide sequence and the predominantly amide sequence harboring an ester bond. Mutation of the 9–10 amide bond within the V9F variant of the predominantly helical villin headpiece subdomain (HP35) to an ester or an E-olefin backbone bond results in a less stable but defined wild-type fold, an attribute required for this study. Comparing the folding free energies of the ester and E-olefin mutants, with correction for the desolvation free energy differences (ester and E-olefin) and the loss of an n-to-π* interaction (E-olefin), yields an experimentally based estimate of +0.4 kcal/mol for the O–O repulsion energy in an α-helical context, analogous to our previous experimentally based estimate of the O–O repulsion free energy in the context of a β-sheet. The small O–O repulsion energy indicates that amide-to-ester perturbation free energies can largely be attributed to the deletion of the backbone H-bonds after correction for desolvation differences. Quantitative evaluation of H-bonding in an α-helix should now be possible, an important step toward deciphering the balance of forces that enable spontaneous protein folding. PMID:18434500

  12. A Network Flow Approach to Predict Protein Targets and Flavonoid Backbones to Treat Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Poloni, Joice de Faria; Saraiva Macedo Timmers, Luis Fernando; Bonatto, Diego; Condessa Pitrez, Paulo Márcio; Tetelbom Stein, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Background. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in lower respiratory tract in infants and young children. Attempts to develop effective vaccines or pharmacological treatments to inhibit RSV infection without undesired effects on human health have been unsuccessful. However, RSV infection has been reported to be affected by flavonoids. The mechanisms underlying viral inhibition induced by these compounds are largely unknown, making the development of new drugs difficult. Methods. To understand the mechanisms induced by flavonoids to inhibit RSV infection, a systems pharmacology-based study was performed using microarray data from primary culture of human bronchial cells infected by RSV, together with compound-proteomic interaction data available for Homo sapiens. Results. After an initial evaluation of 26 flavonoids, 5 compounds (resveratrol, quercetin, myricetin, apigenin, and tricetin) were identified through topological analysis of a major chemical-protein (CP) and protein-protein interacting (PPI) network. In a nonclustered form, these flavonoids regulate directly the activity of two protein bottlenecks involved in inflammation and apoptosis. Conclusions. Our findings may potentially help uncovering mechanisms of action of early RSV infection and provide chemical backbones and their protein targets in the difficult quest to develop new effective drugs. PMID:25879022

  13. Isolation of the protein backbone of an arabinogalactan-protein from the styles of Nicotiana alata and characterization of a corresponding cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Du, H; Simpson, R J; Moritz, R L; Clarke, A E; Bacic, A

    1994-01-01

    Arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) from the styles of Nicotiana alata were isolated by ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. After deglycosylation by anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, the protein backbones were fractionated by reversed-phase HPLC. One of the protein backbones, containing mainly hydroxyproline, alanine, and serine residues (53% of total residues), was digested with proteases, and the peptides were isolated and sequenced. This sequence information allowed the cloning of a 712-bp cDNA, AGPNa1. AGPNa1 encodes a 132-amino acid protein with three domains: an N-terminal secretion signal sequence, which is cleaved from the mature protein; a central sequence, which contains most of the hydroxyproline/proline residues; and a C-terminal hydrophobic region. AGPNa1 is expressed in many tissues of N. alata and related species. The arrangement of domains and amino acid composition of the AGP encoded by AGPNa1 are similar to that of an AGP from pear cell suspension culture filtrate, although the only sequence identity is at the N termini of the mature proteins. PMID:7827496

  14. Bayesian probabilistic approach for predicting backbone structures in terms of protein blocks.

    PubMed

    de Brevern, A G; Etchebest, C; Hazout, S

    2000-11-15

    By using an unsupervised cluster analyzer, we have identified a local structural alphabet composed of 16 folding patterns of five consecutive C(alpha) ("protein blocks"). The dependence that exists between successive blocks is explicitly taken into account. A Bayesian approach based on the relation protein block-amino acid propensity is used for prediction and leads to a success rate close to 35%. Sharing sequence windows associated with certain blocks into "sequence families" improves the prediction accuracy by 6%. This prediction accuracy exceeds 75% when keeping the first four predicted protein blocks at each site of the protein. In addition, two different strategies are proposed: the first one defines the number of protein blocks in each site needed for respecting a user-fixed prediction accuracy, and alternatively, the second one defines the different protein sites to be predicted with a user-fixed number of blocks and a chosen accuracy. This last strategy applied to the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme (alpha/beta protein) shows that 91% of the sites may be predicted with a prediction accuracy larger than 77% considering only three blocks per site. The prediction strategies proposed improve our knowledge about sequence-structure dependence and should be very useful in ab initio protein modelling. PMID:11025540

  15. Structural and functional analysis of the NF-kappa B p65 C terminus. An acidic and modular transactivation domain with the potential to adopt an alpha-helical conformation.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, M L; dos Santos Silva, M A; Altmann, H; Czisch, M; Holak, T A; Baeuerle, P A

    1994-10-14

    The p65 subunit of the NF-kappa B transcription factor contains in its C-terminal 120 amino acids at least two transcription activation domains. One domain (TA1) is contained within only the 30 C-terminal amino acids. Structural studies employing CD and NMR spectroscopy revealed that the TA1 domain is unstructured. NMR analysis of a protein corresponding to the C-terminal 123 amino acids also showed a random coil conformation. However, a portion of TA1 was found to adopt an alpha-helical conformation in the presence of hydrophobic solvents. Transcriptional analysis of point mutants revealed the functional importance of two evolutionary conserved sequence repeats, which are located in the conditionally alpha-helical region of TA1. These repeats acted synergistically in transcription activation. The inhibitory effect of some mutants indicated secondary structure constraints on TA1 in intact cells. Inverting the sequence of two acidic activation domains significantly reduced their transactivating potential, suggesting that amino acid composition is not solely essential for activity; a defined primary structure is necessary as well. Acidic sequence motifs related in primary structure and squelching activity to those of TA1 are present in the activation domains of VP16, c-Rel, and several other transcription factors. We propose a model suggesting that primarily unstructured acidic activation domains can adopt a secondary structure upon contacting their target molecules by an "induced fit" mechanism. PMID:7929265

  16. Genetically encoded multispectral labeling of proteins with polyfluorophores on a DNA backbone.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay; Wang, Shenliang; Kool, Eric T

    2013-04-24

    Genetically encoded methods for protein conjugation are of high importance as biological tools. Here we describe the development of a new class of dyes for genetically encoded tagging that add new capabilities for protein reporting and detection via HaloTag methodology. Oligodeoxyfluorosides (ODFs) are short DNA-like oligomers in which the natural nucleic acid bases are replaced by interacting fluorescent chromophores, yielding a broad range of emission colors using a single excitation wavelength. We describe the development of an alkyl halide dehalogenase-compatible chloroalkane linker phosphoramidite derivative that enables the rapid automated synthesis of many possible dyes for protein conjugation. Experiments to test the enzymatic self-conjugation of nine different DNA-like dyes to proteins with HaloTag domains in vitro were performed, and the data confirmed the rapid and efficient covalent labeling of the proteins. Notably, a number of the ODF dyes were found to increase in brightness or change color upon protein conjugation. Tests in mammalian cellular settings revealed that the dyes are functional in multiple cellular contexts, both on the cell surface and within the cytoplasm, allowing protein localization to be imaged in live cells by epifluorescence and laser confocal microscopy. PMID:23590213

  17. The three-dimensional structural surface of two beta-sheet scorpion toxins mimics that of an alpha-helical dihydropyridine receptor segment.

    PubMed Central

    Green, Daniel; Pace, Suzi; Curtis, Suzanne M; Sakowska, Magdalena; Lamb, Graham D; Dulhunty, Angela F; Casarotto, Marco G

    2003-01-01

    An alpha-helical II-III loop segment of the dihydropyridine receptor activates the ryanodine receptor calcium-release channel. We describe a novel manipulation in which this agonist's activity is increased by modifying its surface structure to resemble that of a toxin molecule. In a unique system, native beta-sheet scorpion toxins have been reported to activate skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor calcium channels with high affinity by binding to the same site as the lower-affinity alpha-helical dihydropyridine receptor segment. We increased the alignment of basic residues in the alpha-helical peptide to mimic the spatial orientation of active residues in the scorpion toxin, with a consequent 2-20-fold increase in the activity of the alpha-helical peptide. We hypothesized that, like the native peptide, the modified peptide and the scorpion toxin may bind to a common site. This was supported by (i) similar changes in ryanodine receptor channel gating induced by the native or modified alpha-helical peptide and the beta-sheet toxin, a 10-100-fold reduction in channel closed time, with a < or = 2-fold increase in open dwell time and (ii) a failure of the toxin to further activate channels activated by the peptides. These results suggest that diverse structural scaffolds can present similar conformational surface properties to target common receptor sites. PMID:12429019

  18. Prediction of Mutational Tolerance in HIV-1 Protease and Reverse Transcriptase Using Flexible Backbone Protein Design

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Rocco; Ó Conchúir, Shane; Kortemme, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Predicting which mutations proteins tolerate while maintaining their structure and function has important applications for modeling fundamental properties of proteins and their evolution; it also drives progress in protein design. Here we develop a computational model to predict the tolerated sequence space of HIV-1 protease reachable by single mutations. We assess the model by comparison to the observed variability in more than 50,000 HIV-1 protease sequences, one of the most comprehensive datasets on tolerated sequence space. We then extend the model to a second protein, reverse transcriptase. The model integrates multiple structural and functional constraints acting on a protein and uses ensembles of protein conformations. We find the model correctly captures a considerable fraction of protease and reverse-transcriptase mutational tolerance and shows comparable accuracy using either experimentally determined or computationally generated structural ensembles. Predictions of tolerated sequence space afforded by the model provide insights into stability-function tradeoffs in the emergence of resistance mutations and into strengths and limitations of the computational model. PMID:22927804

  19. High Accuracy of Karplus Equations for Relating Three-Bond J Couplings to Protein Backbone Torsion Angles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Lee, Jung Ho; Grishaev, Alexander; Ying, Jinfa; Bax, Ad

    2015-01-01

    3JC′C′ and 3JHNHα couplings are related to the intervening backbone torsion angle ϕ by standard Karplus equations. Although these couplings are known to be affected by parameters other than ϕ, including H-bonding, valence angles and residue type, experimental results and quantum calculations indicate that the impact of these latter parameters is typically very small. The solution NMR structure of protein GB3, newly refined by using extensive sets of residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), yields 50–60% better Karplus equation agreement between ϕ angles and experimental 3JC′C′ and 3JHNHα values than does the high resolution X-ray structure. In intrinsically disordered proteins, 3JC′C′ and 3JHNHα couplings can be measured at even higher accuracy, and the impact of factors other than the intervening torsion angle on 3J will be smaller than in folded proteins, making these couplings exceptionally valuable reporters on the ensemble of ϕ angles sampled by each residue. PMID:25511552

  20. Independent Metrics for Protein Backbone and Side-Chain Flexibility: Time Scales and Effects of Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julian E; Waldner, Birgit J; Huber, Roland G; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R

    2015-03-10

    Conformational dynamics are central for understanding biomolecular structure and function, since biological macromolecules are inherently flexible at room temperature and in solution. Computational methods are nowadays capable of providing valuable information on the conformational ensembles of biomolecules. However, analysis tools and intuitive metrics that capture dynamic information from in silico generated structural ensembles are limited. In standard work-flows, flexibility in a conformational ensemble is represented through residue-wise root-mean-square fluctuations or B-factors following a global alignment. Consequently, these approaches relying on global alignments discard valuable information on local dynamics. Results inherently depend on global flexibility, residue size, and connectivity. In this study we present a novel approach for capturing positional fluctuations based on multiple local alignments instead of one single global alignment. The method captures local dynamics within a structural ensemble independent of residue type by splitting individual local and global degrees of freedom of protein backbone and side-chains. Dependence on residue type and size in the side-chains is removed via normalization with the B-factors of the isolated residue. As a test case, we demonstrate its application to a molecular dynamics simulation of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) on the millisecond time scale. This allows for illustrating different time scales of backbone and side-chain flexibility. Additionally, we demonstrate the effects of ligand binding on side-chain flexibility of three serine proteases. We expect our new methodology for quantifying local flexibility to be helpful in unraveling local changes in biomolecular dynamics. PMID:26579739

  1. HMM-based prediction for protein structural motifs' two local properties: solvent accessibility and backbone torsion angles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianyong; Xiang, Leijun; Hong, Jiang; Zhang, Weidong

    2013-02-01

    Protein structure prediction is often assisted by predicting one-dimensional structural properties including relative solvent accessibility (RSA) surface and backbone torsion angles (BTA) of residues, and these two properties are continuously varying variables because proteins can move freely in a three-dimensional space. Instead of subdividing them into a few arbitrarily defined states that many popular approaches used, this paper proposes an integrated system for realvalue prediction of protein structural motifs' two local properties, based on the modified Hidden Markov Model that we previously presented. The model was used to capture the relevance of RSA and the dependency of BTA between adjacent residues along the local protein chain in motifs with definite probabilities. These two properties were predicted according to their own probability distribution. The method was applied to a protein fragment library. For nine different classes of motifs, real values of RSA were predicted with mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.122-0.175 and Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC) of 0.623-0.714 between predicted and actual RSA. Meanwhile, real values of BTA were obtained with MAE of 8.5⁰-29.4⁰ for Φ angles, 11.2⁰-38.5⁰ for ψ angles and PCC of 0.601-0.716 for Φ, 0.597-0.713 for ψ. The results were compared with well-known Real-SPINE Server, and indicate the proposed method may at least serve as the foundation to obtain better local properties from structural motifs for protein structure prediction. PMID:22894152

  2. (4,2)D Projection--reconstruction experiments for protein backbone assignment: application to human carbonic anhydrase II and calbindin D(28K).

    PubMed

    Venters, Ronald A; Coggins, Brian E; Kojetin, Doug; Cavanagh, John; Zhou, Pei

    2005-06-22

    Projection-reconstruction NMR experiments have been shown to significantly reduce the acquisition time required to obtain protein backbone assignment data. To date, this concept has only been applied to smaller (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins. Here, we show that projection-reconstruction NMR techniques can be extended to larger protonated and perdeuterated proteins. We present a suite of (4,2)D triple-resonance experiments for protein backbone assignment and a Hybrid Backprojection/Lower-Value algorithm for reconstructing data with relatively weak signal-to-noise ratios. In addition, we propose a sampling theorem and discuss its implication on the choice of projection angles. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach using the 29 kDa protein, human carbonic anhydrase II and the 30 kDa protein, calbindin D(28K). PMID:15954785

  3. Assessing protein conformational sampling methods based on bivariate lag-distributions of backbone angles

    PubMed Central

    Maadooliat, Mehdi; Huang, Jianhua Z.

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in the past decades, protein structure prediction remains one of the major unsolved problems in computational biology. Angular-sampling-based methods have been extensively studied recently due to their ability to capture the continuous conformational space of protein structures. The literature has focused on using a variety of parametric models of the sequential dependencies between angle pairs along the protein chains. In this article, we present a thorough review of angular-sampling-based methods by assessing three main questions: What is the best distribution type to model the protein angles? What is a reasonable number of components in a mixture model that should be considered to accurately parameterize the joint distribution of the angles? and What is the order of the local sequence–structure dependency that should be considered by a prediction method? We assess the model fits for different methods using bivariate lag-distributions of the dihedral/planar angles. Moreover, the main information across the lags can be extracted using a technique called Lag singular value decomposition (LagSVD), which considers the joint distribution of the dihedral/planar angles over different lags using a nonparametric approach and monitors the behavior of the lag-distribution of the angles using singular value decomposition. As a result, we developed graphical tools and numerical measurements to compare and evaluate the performance of different model fits. Furthermore, we developed a web-tool (http://www.stat.tamu.edu/∼madoliat/LagSVD) that can be used to produce informative animations. PMID:22926831

  4. Synthesis and in vitro antioxidant functions of protein hydrolysate from backbones of Rastrelliger kanagurta by proteolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Sheik Abdulazeez; Sundaram, Balasubramanian; Ramamoorthy, Baranitharan; Ponnusamy, Ponmurugan

    2014-01-01

    Every year, a huge quantity of fishery wastes and by-products are generated by fish processing industries. These wastes are either underutilized to produce low market value products or dumped leading to environmental issues. Complete utilization of fishery wastes for recovering value added products would be beneficial to the society and individual. The fish protein hydrolysates and derived peptides of fishery resources are widely used as nutritional supplements, functional ingredients, and flavor enhancers in food, beverage and pharmaceutical industries. Antioxidants from fishery resources have attracted the attention of researchers as they are cheaper in cost, easy to derive, and do not have side effects. Thus the present investigation was designed to produce protein hydrolysate by pepsin and papain digestion from the backbones of Rastrelliger kanagurta (Indian mackerel) and evaluate its antioxidant properties through various in vitro assays. The results reveal that both hydrolysates are potent antioxidants, capable of scavenging 46% and 36% of DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl) and 58.5% and 37.54% of superoxide radicals respectively. The hydrolysates exhibit significant (p < 0.05) reducing power and lipid peroxidation inhibition. Among the two hydrolysates produced, pepsin derived fraction is superior than papain derived fraction in terms of yield, DH (Degree of hydrolysis), and antioxidant activity. PMID:24596496

  5. Synthesis and in vitro antioxidant functions of protein hydrolysate from backbones of Rastrelliger kanagurta by proteolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sheriff, Sheik Abdulazeez; Sundaram, Balasubramanian; Ramamoorthy, Baranitharan; Ponnusamy, Ponmurugan

    2013-01-01

    Every year, a huge quantity of fishery wastes and by-products are generated by fish processing industries. These wastes are either underutilized to produce low market value products or dumped leading to environmental issues. Complete utilization of fishery wastes for recovering value added products would be beneficial to the society and individual. The fish protein hydrolysates and derived peptides of fishery resources are widely used as nutritional supplements, functional ingredients, and flavor enhancers in food, beverage and pharmaceutical industries. Antioxidants from fishery resources have attracted the attention of researchers as they are cheaper in cost, easy to derive, and do not have side effects. Thus the present investigation was designed to produce protein hydrolysate by pepsin and papain digestion from the backbones of Rastrelliger kanagurta (Indian mackerel) and evaluate its antioxidant properties through various in vitro assays. The results reveal that both hydrolysates are potent antioxidants, capable of scavenging 46% and 36% of DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl) and 58.5% and 37.54% of superoxide radicals respectively. The hydrolysates exhibit significant (p < 0.05) reducing power and lipid peroxidation inhibition. Among the two hydrolysates produced, pepsin derived fraction is superior than papain derived fraction in terms of yield, DH (Degree of hydrolysis), and antioxidant activity. PMID:24596496

  6. The effects of regularly spaced glutamine substitutions on alpha-helical peptide structures: A DFT/ONIOM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Dipankar; Dannenberg, J. J.

    2011-08-01

    The side-chains of the residues of glutamine (Q) and asparagine (N) contain amide groups. These can H-bond to each other in patterns similar to those of the backbone amides in α-helices. We show that mutating multiple Q's for alanines (A's) in a polyalanine helix stabilizes the helical structure, while similar mutations with multiple N's do not. We suggest that modification of peptides by incorporating Q's in such positions can make more robust helices that can be used to test the effects of secondary structures in biochemical experiments linked to proteins with variable structures such as tau and α-synuclein.

  7. Role of enzyme-peptide substrate backbone hydrogen bonding in determining protein kinase substrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Thomas, N E; Bramson, H N; Miller, W T; Kaiser, E T

    1987-07-14

    As part of a search for peptides that have specificity for selected protein kinases, the possibility that adenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate dependent protein kinase (A-kinase) recognizes the hydrogen-bonding potential of its peptide substrates was investigated. A-Kinase catalyzes the phosphorylation of five N alpha-methylated and four depsipeptide derivatives of Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ser-Leu-Gly (peptide 1) at rates that differ by at least 7 orders of magnitude. These peptide 1 analogues each lack the ability to donate a hydrogen bond at selected positions in the peptide chain. If a particular amide hydrogen of a peptide amide is involved in hydrogen bonding, which is important for enzyme recognition, the prediction is that peptides which contain an ester or a N-methylated bond at that position in peptide 1 will be comparatively poor substrates. In contrast, if a depsipeptide has a reactivity comparable to that of peptide 1 but the analogous N-methylated peptide has a poor reactivity with A-kinase, the result might indicate that the N-methyl group causes unfavorable steric effects. The depsipeptide that lacks a Leu6 amide proton is a good substrate for A-kinase, but the corresponding N-methylated peptide is phosphorylated far less efficiently. This result and others presented in this paper suggest that although enzyme-substrate hydrogen bonding may play some role in A-kinase catalysis of phosphoryl group transfer, other explanations are necessary to account for the relative reactivities of N alpha-methylated and depsi-containing peptide 1 analogues.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3663600

  8. NMR characterization of structure, backbone dynamics, and glutathione binding of the human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF).

    PubMed

    Mühlhahn, P; Bernhagen, J; Czisch, M; Georgescu, J; Renner, C; Ross, A; Bucala, R; Holak, T A

    1996-10-01

    Human macrophage migration inhibitory factor is a 114 amino acid protein that belongs to the family of immunologic cytokines. Assignments of 1H, 15N, and 13C resonances have enabled the determination of the secondary structure of the protein, which consists of two alpha-helices (residues 18-31 and 89-72) and a central four-stranded beta-sheet. In the beta-sheet, two parallel beta-sheets are connected in an antiparallel sense. From the total of three cysteines present in the primary structure of MIF, none was found to form disulfide bridges. 1H-15N heteronuclear T1, T2, and steady-state NOE measurements indicate that the backbone of MIF exists in a rigid structure of limited conformational flexibility (on the nanosecond to picosecond time scale). Several residues located in the loop regions and at the N termini of two helices exhibit internal motions on the 1-3 ns time scale. The capacity to bind glutathione was investigated by titration of a uniform 15N-labeled sample and led us to conclude that MIF has, at best, very low affinity for glutathione. PMID:8897610

  9. NMR characterization of structure, backbone dynamics, and glutathione binding of the human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF).

    PubMed Central

    Mühlhahn, P.; Bernhagen, J.; Czisch, M.; Georgescu, J.; Renner, C.; Ross, A.; Bucala, R.; Holak, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    Human macrophage migration inhibitory factor is a 114 amino acid protein that belongs to the family of immunologic cytokines. Assignments of 1H, 15N, and 13C resonances have enabled the determination of the secondary structure of the protein, which consists of two alpha-helices (residues 18-31 and 89-72) and a central four-stranded beta-sheet. In the beta-sheet, two parallel beta-sheets are connected in an antiparallel sense. From the total of three cysteines present in the primary structure of MIF, none was found to form disulfide bridges. 1H-15N heteronuclear T1, T2, and steady-state NOE measurements indicate that the backbone of MIF exists in a rigid structure of limited conformational flexibility (on the nanosecond to picosecond time scale). Several residues located in the loop regions and at the N termini of two helices exhibit internal motions on the 1-3 ns time scale. The capacity to bind glutathione was investigated by titration of a uniform 15N-labeled sample and led us to conclude that MIF has, at best, very low affinity for glutathione. PMID:8897610

  10. The creation of the artificial RING finger from the cross-brace zinc finger by {alpha}-helical region substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide; Togiya, Kayo

    2010-04-16

    The creation of the artificial RING finger as ubiquitin-ligating enzyme (E3) has been demonstrated. In this study, by the {alpha}-helical region substitution between the EL5 RING finger and the Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) PHD finger, the artificial E3 (WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger) was newly created. The experiments of the chemical modification of residues Cys and the circular dichroism spectra revealed that the WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger binds two zinc atoms and adopts the zinc-dependent ordered-structure. In the substrate-independent ubiquitination assay, the WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger functions as E3 and was poly- or mono-ubiquitinated. The present strategy is very simple and convenient, and consequently it might be widely applicable to the creation of various artificial E3 RING fingers with the specific ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2)-binding capability.

  11. Enhancement of alpha -helicity in the HIV-1 inhibitory peptide DP178 leads to an increased affinity for human monoclonal antibody 2F5 but does not elicit neutralizing responses in vitro. Implications for vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Joseph G; Hurni, William M; Bogusky, Michael J; Garsky, Victor M; Liang, Xiaoping; Citron, Michael P; Danzeisen, Renee C; Miller, Michael D; Shiver, John W; Keller, Paul M

    2002-11-29

    The synthetic peptide DP178, derived from the carboxyl-terminal heptad repeat region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 GP41 protein is a potent inhibitor of viral-mediated fusion and contains the sequence ELDKWA, which constitutes the recognition epitope for the broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody 2F5. Efforts at eliciting a 2F5-like immune response by immunization with peptides or fusion proteins containing this sequence have not met with success, possibly because of incorrect structural presentation of the epitope. Although the structure of the carboxyl-terminal heptad repeat on the virion is not known, several recent reports have suggested a propensity for alpha-helical conformation. We have examined DP178 in the context of a model for optimized alpha-helices and show that the native sequence conforms poorly to the model. Solution conformation of DP178 was studied by circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy and found to be predominantly random, consistent with previous reports. NMR mapping was used to show that the low percentage of alpha-helix present was localized to residues Glu(662) through Asn(671), a region encompassing the 2F5 epitope. Using NH(2)-terminal extensions derived from either GP41 or the yeast GCN4 leucine zipper dimerization domain, we designed peptide analogs in which the average helicity is significantly increased compared with DP178 and show that these peptides exhibit both a modest increase in affinity for 2F5 using a novel competitive solution-based binding assay and an increased ability to inhibit viral entry in a single-cycle infectivity model. Selected peptides were conjugated to carrier protein and used for guinea pig immunizations. High peptide-specific titers were achieved using these immunogens, but the resulting sera were incapable of viral neutralization. We discuss these findings in terms of structural and immunological considerations as to the utility of a 2F5-like response. PMID:12237296

  12. Amplitudes of protein backbone dynamics and correlated motions in a small alpha/beta protein: correspondence of dipolar coupling and heteronuclear relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Clore, G Marius; Schwieters, Charles D

    2004-08-24

    Backbone residual dipolar coupling (N-H, Calpha-Halpha, N-C', and Calpha-C') data collected in five different media on the B3 IgG binding domain of streptococcal protein G (GB3) have been analyzed by simultaneous refinement of the coordinates and optimization of the magnitudes and orientations of the alignment tensors using single and multiple structure representations. We show, using appropriate error analysis, that agreement between observed and calculated dipolar couplings at the level of experimental uncertainty is obtained with a two-structure (N(e) = 2) ensemble representation which represents the simplest equilibrium description of anisotropic motions. The data permit one to determine the magnitude of the anisotropic motions along the four different backbone bond vectors in terms of order parameters. The order parameters, , for the N-H bond vectors are in qualitative agreement with the generalized order parameters, S(2)NH(relaxation), derived from (15)N relaxation measurements, with a correlation coefficient of 0.84. S(2)NH(relaxation) can be regarded as the product of an anisotropic order parameter, corresponding to derived from the residual dipolar couplings, and an axially symmetric order parameter, S(2)NH(axial), corresponding to bond librations which are expected to be essentially uniform along the polypeptide chain. The current data indicate that the average value of S(2)NH(axial) is approximately 0.9. The close correspondence of and S(2)NH(relaxation) indicates that any large-scale displacements from the mean coordinate positions on time scales longer than the rotational correlation time are rare and hence do not perturb the observed dipolar couplings. Analysis of a set of 100 N(e) = 2 ensembles reveals the presence of some long-range correlated motions of N-H and Calpha-Halpha vectors involving residues far apart in the sequence but close together in space. In addition, direct evidence is

  13. Drug screening strategy for human membrane proteins: from NMR protein backbone structure to in silica- and NMR-screened hits.

    PubMed

    Lindert, Steffen; Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Chiu, Ellis J C; Pierce, Levi C; McCammon, J Andrew; Choe, Senyon

    2014-03-21

    About 8000 genes encode membrane proteins in the human genome. The information about their druggability will be very useful to facilitate drug discovery and development. The main problem, however, consists of limited structural and functional information about these proteins because they are difficult to produce biochemically and to study. In this paper we describe the strategy that combines Cell-free protein expression, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular DYnamics simulation (CNDY) techniques. Results of a pilot CNDY experiment provide us with a guiding light towards expedited identification of the hit compounds against a new uncharacterized membrane protein as a potentially druggable target. These hits can then be further characterized and optimized to develop the initial lead compound quicker. We illustrate such "omics" approach for drug discovery with the CNDY strategy applied to two example proteins: hypoxia-induced genes HIGD1A and HIGD1B. PMID:24525125

  14. Graft copolymer composed of cationic backbone and bottle brush-like side chains as a physically adsorbed coating for protein separation by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Xiang, Lina; Zeng, Rongju; Cao, Fuhu; Zhu, Xiaoxi; Wang, Yanmei

    2011-12-01

    To stabilize electroosmotic flow (EOF) and suppress protein adsorption onto the silica capillary inner wall, a cationic hydroxyethylcellulose-graft-poly (poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (cat-HEC-g-PPEGMA) graft copolymer composed of cationic backbone and bottle brush-like side chains was synthesized for the first time and used as a novel physically adsorbed coating for protein separation by capillary electrophoresis. Reversed (anodal) and very stable EOF was obtained in cat-HEC-g-PPEGMA-coated capillary at pH 2.2-7.8. The effects of degree of cationization, PEGMA grafting ratio, PEGMA molecular mass, and buffer pH on the separation of basic proteins were investigated. A systematic comparative study of protein separation in bare and HEC-coated capillaries and in cat-HEC-g-PPEGMA-coated capillary was also performed. The basic proteins can be well separated in cat-HEC-g-PPEGMA-coated capillary over the pH range of 2.8-6.8 with good repeatability and high separation efficiency, because the coating combines good protein-resistant property of bottle brush-like PPEGMA side chains with excellent coating ability of cat-HEC backbone. Besides its success in separation of basic proteins, the cat-HEC-g-PPEGMA coating was also superior in the fast separation of other protein samples, such as protein mixture, egg white, and saliva, which indicates that it is a promising coating for further proteomics analysis. PMID:22038787

  15. A maximum entropy approach to the study of residue-specific backbone angle distributions in α-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein

    PubMed Central

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B; Maltsev, Alexander S; Ying, Jinfa; Shen, Yang; Hummer, Gerhard; Bax, Ad

    2014-01-01

    α-Synuclein is an intrinsically disordered protein of 140 residues that switches to an α-helical conformation upon binding phospholipid membranes. We characterize its residue-specific backbone structure in free solution with a novel maximum entropy procedure that integrates an extensive set of NMR data. These data include intraresidue and sequential HN–Hα and HN–HN NOEs, values for 3JHNHα, 1JHαCα, 2JCαN, and 1JCαN, as well as chemical shifts of 15N, 13Cα, and 13C′ nuclei, which are sensitive to backbone torsion angles. Distributions of these torsion angles were identified that yield best agreement to the experimental data, while using an entropy term to minimize the deviation from statistical distributions seen in a large protein coil library. Results indicate that although at the individual residue level considerable deviations from the coil library distribution are seen, on average the fitted distributions agree fairly well with this library, yielding a moderate population (20–30%) of the PPII region and a somewhat higher population of the potentially aggregation-prone β region (20–40%) than seen in the database. A generally lower population of the αR region (10–20%) is found. Analysis of 1H–1H NOE data required consideration of the considerable backbone diffusion anisotropy of a disordered protein. PMID:24976112

  16. Improving the prediction accuracy of residue solvent accessibility and real-value backbone torsion angles of proteins by guided-learning through a two-layer neural network

    PubMed Central

    Faraggi, Eshel; Xue, Bin; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2008-01-01

    This paper attempts to increase the prediction accuracy of residue solvent accessibility and real-value backbone torsion angles of proteins through improved learning. Most methods developed for improving the backpropagation algorithm of artificial neural networks are limited to small neural networks. Here, we introduce a guided-learning method suitable for networks of any size. The method employs a part of the weights for guiding and the other part for training and optimization. We demonstrate this technique by predicting residue solvent accessibility and real-value backbone torsion angles of proteins. In this application, the guiding factor is designed to satisfy the intuitive condition that for most residues, the contribution of a residue to the structural properties of another residue is smaller for greater separation in the protein-sequence distance between the two residues. We show that the guided-learning method makes a 2-4% reduction in ten-fold cross-validated mean absolute errors (MAE) for predicting residue solvent accessibility and backbone torsion angles, regardless of the size of database, the number of hidden layers and the size of input windows. This together with introduction of two-layer neural network with a bipolar activation function leads to a new method that has a MAE of 0.11 for residue solvent accessibility, 36° for ψ, and 22° for ϕ. The method is available as a Real-SPINE 3.0 server in http://sparks.informatics.iupui.edu. PMID:18704931

  17. Distortions in protein helices.

    PubMed

    Geetha, V

    1996-08-01

    alpha-helices are the most common secondary structures in observed proteins. However, they are not always found in ideal helical conformation and they often exhibit structural distortions. Quantification of these irregularities become essential in understanding the packing of helices and therefore, their role in the functional characteristics of the protein. The backbone torsions phi, psi are of limited utility in this endeavor, because distorted helices often maintain the backbone geometry. The local compensatory effects are responsible for the preservation of the entire hydrogen bond network of the helical stretch. Earlier descriptions of helical linearity and curvature rest mostly on approximation, thus motivating the search for a better method for understanding and quantifying helical irregularities. We developed a method which involves the rotation and superposition of identical repeating units of the protein by the quaternion method. The set of parameters derived from the rotation-superposition algorithm helps in identifying the bends and kinks which are not necessarily induced by unusual amino acids like proline. The quantification of irregularities of observed helices might lead to a better understanding of their packing interactions. PMID:8842770

  18. Charged single alpha-helices in proteomes revealed by a consensus prediction approach.

    PubMed

    Gáspári, Zoltán; Süveges, Dániel; Perczel, András; Nyitray, László; Tóth, Gábor

    2012-04-01

    Charged single α-helices (CSAHs) constitute a recently recognized protein structural motif. Its presence and role is characterized in only a few proteins. To explore its general features, a comprehensive study is necessary. We have set up a consensus prediction method available as a web service (at http://csahserver.chem.elte.hu) and downloadable scripts capable of predicting CSAHs from protein sequences. Using our method, we have performed a comprehensive search on the UniProt database. We found that the motif is very rare but seems abundant in proteins involved in symbiosis and RNA binding/processing. Although there are related proteins with CSAH segments, the motif shows no deep conservation in protein families. We conclude that CSAH-containing proteins, although rare, are involved in many key biological processes. Their conservation pattern and prevalence in symbiosis-associated proteins suggest that they might be subjects of relatively rapid molecular evolution and thus can contribute to the emergence of novel functions. PMID:22310480

  19. Strategies to control the binding mode of de novo designed protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Der, Bryan S.; Kuhlman, Brian

    2013-01-01

    There has been significant recent progress in the computational design of protein interactions including the creation of novel heterodimers, homodimers, nanohedra, fibril caps and a protein crystal. Essential to these successes has been the use of innovative strategies for finding binding modes that are achievable, i.e. identifying binding partners and docked conformations that can be successfully stabilized via sequence optimization and backbone refinement. In many cases this has involved the use of structural motifs commonly found at naturally occurring interfaces including alpha helices inserted into hydrophobic grooves, beta-strand pairing, metal binding, established helix packing motifs, and the use of symmetry to form cooperative interactions. Future challenges include the creation of hydrogen bond networks and antibody-like interactions based on the redesign of protein surface loops. PMID:23731800

  20. Detergent-like activity and alpha-helical structure of warnericin RK, an anti-Legionella peptide.

    PubMed

    Verdon, Julien; Falge, Mirjam; Maier, Elke; Bruhn, Heike; Steinert, Michael; Faber, Cornelius; Benz, Roland; Héchard, Yann

    2009-10-01

    Warnericin RK is the first antimicrobial peptide known to be active against Legionella pneumophila, a pathogen bacterium that is responsible for severe pneumonia. Strikingly, this peptide displays a very narrow range of antimicrobial activity, almost limited to the Legionella genus, and a hemolytic activity. A similar activity has been described for delta-lysin, a well-known hemolytic peptide of Staphylococci that has not been described as antimicrobial. In this study we aimed to understand the mode of action of warnericin RK and to explain its particular target specificity. We found that warnericin RK permeabilizes artificial membranes in a voltage-independent manner. Osmotic protection experiments on erythrocytes showed that warnericin RK does not form well-defined pores, suggesting a detergent-like mode of action, as previously described for delta-lysin at high concentrations. Warnericin RK also permeabilized Legionella cells, and these cells displayed a high sensitivity to detergents. Depending on the detergent used, Legionella was from 10- to 1000-fold more sensitive than the other bacteria tested. Finally, the structure of warnericin RK was investigated by means of circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy. The peptide adopted an amphiphilic alpha-helical structure, consistent with the proposed mode of action. We conclude that the specificity of warnericin RK toward Legionella results from both the detergent-like mode of action of the peptide and the high sensitivity of these bacteria to detergents. PMID:19804724

  1. Effects of Synthetic Amphiphilic alpha-Helical Peptides on the Electrochemical and Structural Properties of Supported Hybrid Bilayers on Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Smith,M.; Tong, J.; Genzer, J.; Fischer, D.; Kilpatrick, P.

    2006-01-01

    Amphiphilic {alpha}-helices were formed from designed synthetic peptides comprising alanine, phenylalanine, and lysine residues. The insertion of the -helical peptides into hybrid bilayers assembled on gold was studied by a variety of methods to assess the resulting structural characteristics, such as electrical resistance and molecular orientation. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of dodecanethiol (DDT); octadecanethiol (ODT); and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphothioethanol (DPPTE) were formed on gold substrates with and without incorporated peptide. Supported hybrid bilayers and multilayers of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) were formed on SAMs by the 'paint-freeze' method of bilayer formation. Modeling of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data using equivalent electrochemical circuits revealed that the addition of peptide decreased dramatically the resistive element of the bilayer films while maintaining the value of the capacitive element, indicating successful incorporation of peptide into a well-formed bilayer. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy data provided evidence that the molecules in the SAMs and hybrid multilayers were ordered even in the presence of peptide. The peptide insertion into the SAM was confirmed by observing the {pi}* resonance peak correlating with phenylalanine and a peak in the nitrogen K-edge regime attributable to the peptide bond.

  2. A new approach to measuring protein backbone protection with high spatial resolution using H/D exchange and electron capture dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Abzalimov, Rinat R.; Bobst, Cedric E.; Kaltashov, Igor A.

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate spatial resolution remains one of the most serious limitations of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS), especially when applied to larger proteins (over 30 kDa). Supplementing proteolytic fragmentation of the protein in solution with ion dissociation in the gas phase has been used successfully by several groups to obtain near-residue level resolution. However, the restrictions imposed by the LC/MS/MS mode of operation on the data acquisition time frame makes it difficult in many cases to obtain signal-to-noise ratio adequate for reliable assignment of the backbone amide protection levels at individual residues. This restriction is lifted in the present work by eliminating the LC separation step from the workflow and taking advantage of the high resolving power and dynamic range of a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT ICR MS). A residue-level resolution is demonstrated for a peptic fragment of a 37 kDa recombinant protein (N-lobe of human serum transferrin) using electron-capture dissociation as an ion fragmentation tool. The absence of hydrogen scrambling in the gas phase prior to ion dissociation is verified using redundant HDX MS data generated by FT ICR MS. The backbone protection pattern generated by direct HDX MS/MS is in excellent agreement with the known crystal structure of the protein, but also provides information on conformational dynamics, which is not available from the static X-ray structure. PMID:23978257

  3. Backbone conformational flexibility of the lipid modified membrane anchor of the human N-Ras protein investigated by solid-state NMR and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Alexander; Reuther, Guido; Roark, Matthew B; Tan, Kui-Thong; Waldmann, Herbert; Feller, Scott E; Huster, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    The lipid modified human N-Ras protein, implicated in human cancer development, is of particular interest due to its membrane anchor that determines the activity and subcellular location of the protein. Previous solid-state NMR investigations indicated that this membrane anchor is highly dynamic, which may be indicative of backbone conformational flexibility. This article aims to address if a dynamic exchange between three structural models exist that had been determined previously. We applied a combination of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods and replica exchange molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a Ras peptide that represents the terminal seven amino acids of the human N-Ras protein. Analysis of correlations between the conformations of individual amino acids revealed that Cys 181 and Met 182 undergo collective conformational exchange. Two major structures constituting about 60% of all conformations could be identified. The two conformations found in the simulation are in rapid exchange, which gives rise to low backbone order parameters and nuclear spin relaxation as measured by experimental NMR methods. These parameters were also determined from two 300 ns conventional MD simulations, providing very good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:19819220

  4. The three-dimensional structure of the seed storage protein phaseolin at 3 A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, M C; Suzuki, E; Varghese, J N; Davis, P C; Van Donkelaar, A; Tulloch, P A; Colman, P M

    1990-01-01

    The polypeptides of the trimeric seed storage protein phaseolin comprise two structurally similar units each made up of a beta-barrel and an alpha-helical domain. The beta-barrel has the 'jelly-roll' folding topology of the viral coat proteins and the alpha-helical domain shows structural similarity to the helix-turn-helix motif found in certain DNA-binding proteins. PMID:2295315

  5. TAT Modification of Alpha-Helical Anticancer Peptides to Improve Specificity and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xueyu; Yan, Qiuyan; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Wenren; Huang, Yibing; Chen, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    HPRP-A1 is an amphipathic α-helical anticancer peptide (ACP) derived from the N-terminus of ribosomal protein L1 (RpL1) of Helicobacter pylori. In our previously study, HPRP-A1 has been reported that induced HeLa cell apoptosis in a caspase-dependent approach and involved both by the death receptor ‘extrinsic’ pathway and the mitochondria ‘intrinsic’ pathway. Here we report the construction of a new hybrid peptide, HPRP-A1-TAT, comprising the cell-permeating peptide TAT linked to the C-terminus of HPRP-A1. This peptide exhibits higher anticancer activity against HeLa cells with lower toxicity against human RBC than HPRP-A1. Two FITC-labeled peptides, FITC-HPRP-A1 and FITC-HPRP-A1-TAT, were used to investigate and compare the cellular uptake mechanism using fluorescence spectra and flow cytometry. Compared with HPRP-A1, HPRP-A1-TAT quickly crossed cell, entered the cytoplasm via endocytosis, and disrupted the cell membrane integrity. HPRP-A1-TAT exhibited stronger anticancer activity than HPRP-A1 at the same concentration by increasing early apoptosis of HeLa cells and inducing caspase activity. Notably, after 24 h, the cellular concentration of HPRP-A1-TAT was higher than that of HPRP-A1. This result suggests that TAT protects HPRP-A1 against degradation, likely due to its high number of positively charged amino acids or the further release of peptides into cancer cells from endocytotic vesicles. We believe that this TAT modification approach may provide an effective new strategy for improving the therapeutic index and anticancer activity of ACPs for clinical use. PMID:26405806

  6. Reduced dimensionality tailored HN(C)N experiments for facile backbone resonance assignment of proteins through unambiguous identification of sequential HSQC peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-12-01

    Two novel reduced dimensionality (RD) tailored HN(C)N [S.C. Panchal, N.S. Bhavesh, R.V. Hosur, Improved 3D triple resonance experiments, HNN and HN(C)N, for HN and 15N sequential correlations in (13C, 15N) labeled proteins: application to unfolded proteins, J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] experiments are proposed to facilitate the backbone resonance assignment of proteins both in terms of its accuracy and speed. These experiments - referred here as (4,3)D-hNCOcaNH and (4,3)D-hNcoCANH - exploit the linear combination of backbone 15N and 13C‧/13Cα chemical shifts simultaneously to achieve higher peak dispersion and randomness along their respective F1 dimensions. Simply, this has been achieved by modulating the backbone 15N(i) chemical shifts with that of 13C‧ (i - 1)/13Cα (i - 1) spins following the established reduced dimensionality NMR approach [T. Szyperski, D.C. Yeh, D.K. Sukumaran, H.N. Moseley, G.T. Montelione, Reduced-dimensionality NMR spectroscopy for high-throughput protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 8009-8014]. Though the modification is simple it has resulted an ingenious improvement of HN(C)N both in terms of peak dispersion and easiness of establishing the sequential connectivities. The increased dispersion along F1 dimension solves two purposes here: (i) resolves the ambiguities arising because of degenerate 15N chemical shifts and (ii) reduces the signal overlap in F2(15N)-F3(1H) planes (an important requisite in HN(C)N based assignment protocol for facile and unambiguous identification of sequentially connected HSQC peaks). The performance of both these experiments and the assignment protocol has been demonstrated using bovine apo Calbindin-d9k (75 aa) and urea denatured UNC60B (a 152 amino acid ADF/cofilin family protein of Caenorhabditis elegans), as representatives of folded and unfolded protein systems, respectively.

  7. Reduced dimensionality tailored HN(C)N experiments for facile backbone resonance assignment of proteins through unambiguous identification of sequential HSQC peaks.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-12-01

    Two novel reduced dimensionality (RD) tailored HN(C)N [S.C. Panchal, N.S. Bhavesh, R.V. Hosur, Improved 3D triple resonance experiments, HNN and HN(C)N, for HN and 15N sequential correlations in (13C, 15N) labeled proteins: application to unfolded proteins, J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] experiments are proposed to facilitate the backbone resonance assignment of proteins both in terms of its accuracy and speed. These experiments - referred here as (4,3)D-hNCOcaNH and (4,3)D-hNcoCANH - exploit the linear combination of backbone (15)N and (13)C'/(13)C(α) chemical shifts simultaneously to achieve higher peak dispersion and randomness along their respective F1 dimensions. Simply, this has been achieved by modulating the backbone (15)N(i) chemical shifts with that of (13)C' (i-1)/(13)C(α) (i-1) spins following the established reduced dimensionality NMR approach [T. Szyperski, D.C. Yeh, D.K. Sukumaran, H.N. Moseley, G.T. Montelione, Reduced-dimensionality NMR spectroscopy for high-throughput protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 8009-8014]. Though the modification is simple it has resulted an ingenious improvement of HN(C)N both in terms of peak dispersion and easiness of establishing the sequential connectivities. The increased dispersion along F1 dimension solves two purposes here: (i) resolves the ambiguities arising because of degenerate (15)N chemical shifts and (ii) reduces the signal overlap in F2((15)N)-F3((1)H) planes (an important requisite in HN(C)N based assignment protocol for facile and unambiguous identification of sequentially connected HSQC peaks). The performance of both these experiments and the assignment protocol has been demonstrated using bovine apo Calbindin-d9k (75 aa) and urea denatured UNC60B (a 152 amino acid ADF/cofilin family protein of Caenorhabditis elegans), as representatives of folded and unfolded protein systems, respectively. PMID:24161682

  8. Proton-detected MAS NMR experiments based on dipolar transfers for backbone assignment of highly deuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR was applied to a highly deuterated insoluble, non-crystalline biological assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type iii secretion system (T3SS) needle. Spectra of very high resolution and sensitivity were obtained at a low protonation level of 10-20% at exchangeable amide positions. We developed efficient experimental protocols for resonance assignment tailored for this system and the employed experimental conditions. Using exclusively dipolar-based interspin magnetization transfers, we recorded two sets of 3D spectra allowing for an almost complete backbone resonance assignment of the needle subunit PrgI. The additional information provided by the well-resolved proton dimension revealed the presence of two sets of resonances in the N-terminal helix of PrgI, while in previous studies employing 13C detection only a single set of resonances was observed.

  9. Backbone and Ile-δ1, Leu, Val Methyl 1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shift assignments for human interferon-stimulated gene 15 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Cuifeng; Aramini, James M.; Ma, LiChung; Cort, John R.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Krug, R. M.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2011-10-01

    Human interferon-stimulated gene 15 protein (ISG15), also called ubiquitin cross-reactive protein (UCRP), is the first identified ubiquitin-like protein containing two ubiquitin-like domains fused in tandem. The active form of ISG15 is conjugated to target proteins via the C-terminal glycine residue through an isopeptide bond in a manner similar to ubiquitin. The biological role of ISG15 is strongly associated with the modulation of cell immune function, and there is mounting evidence suggesting that many viral pathogens evade the host innate immune response by interfering with ISG15 conjugation to both host and viral proteins in a variety of ways. Here we report nearly complete backbone 1HN, 15N, 13CO, and 13Ca, as well as side chain 13Cb, methyl (Ile-d1, Leu, Val), amide (Asn, Gln), and indole NH (Trp) NMR resonance assignments for the 157-residue human ISG15 protein. These resonance assignments provide the basis for future structural and functional solution NMR studies of the biologically important human ISG15 protein.

  10. Insight into the factors influencing the backbone dynamics of three homologous proteins, dendrotoxins I and K, and BPTI: FTIR and time-resolved fluorescence investigations.

    PubMed

    Hollecker, Michelle; Vincent, Michel; Gallay, Jacques; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Goormaghtigh, Erik

    2002-12-24

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, combined with hydrogen/deuterium exchange technique and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, has been used to investigate the changes in structure and dynamics that underlie the thermodynamic stability differences observed for three closely homologous proteins: dendrotoxins I and K, and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). The experiments were performed on proteins under their native state and a modified form, obtained by selective reduction of a disulfide bond at the surface of the molecule, increasing slightly the backbone flexibility without changing the average structure. The data confirmed the high local as well as global rigidity of BPTI. In protein K, the exchange process was slow during the first 2 h of exchange, presumably reflecting a compact three-dimensional conformation, and then increased rapidly, the internal amide protons of the beta-strands exchanging 10-fold faster than in BPTI or protein I. The most probable destabilizing element was identified as Pro32, in the core of the beta-sheet. Protein I was found to present a 10% more expanded volume than protein K or BPTI, and there is a possible correlation between the resulting increased flexibility of the molecule and the lower thermodynamic stability observed for this protein. Interestingly, the interior amide protons of the beta-sheet structure were found to be as protected against exchange in protein I as in BPTI, suggesting that, although globally more flexible than that of Toxin K or BPTI, the structure of Toxin I could be locally quite rigid. The structural factors suspected to be responsible for the differences in internal flexibility of the two toxins could play a significant role in determining their functional properties. PMID:12484765

  11. RrgB321, a Fusion Protein of the Three Variants of the Pneumococcal Pilus Backbone RrgB, Is Protective In Vivo and Elicits Opsonic Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Harfouche, Carole; Filippini, Sara; Gianfaldoni, Claudia; Ruggiero, Paolo; Moschioni, Monica; Maccari, Silvia; Pancotto, Laura; Arcidiacono, Letizia; Galletti, Bruno; Censini, Stefano; Mori, Elena; Giuliani, Marzia; Facciotti, Claudia; Cartocci, Elena; Savino, Silvana; Doro, Francesco; Pallaoro, Michele; Nocadello, Salvatore; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Haston, Mitch; Goldblatt, David; Barocchi, Michèle A.; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae pilus 1 is present in 30 to 50% of invasive disease-causing strains and is composed of three subunits: the adhesin RrgA, the major backbone subunit RrgB, and the minor ancillary protein RrgC. RrgB exists in three distinct genetic variants and, when used to immunize mice, induces an immune response specific for each variant. To generate an antigen able to protect against the infection caused by all pilus-positive S. pneumoniae strains, we engineered a fusion protein containing the three RrgB variants (RrgB321). RrgB321 elicited antibodies against proteins from organisms in the three clades and protected mice against challenge with piliated pneumococcal strains. RrgB321 antisera mediated complement-dependent opsonophagocytosis of piliated strains at levels comparable to those achieved with the PCV7 glycoconjugate vaccine. These results suggest that a vaccine composed of RrgB321 has the potential to cover 30% or more of all pneumococcal strains and support the inclusion of this fusion protein in a multicomponent vaccine against S. pneumoniae. PMID:22083702

  12. Structural insights into the evolution of a sexy protein: novel topology and restricted backbone flexibility in a hypervariable pheromone from the red-legged salamander, Plethodon shermani.

    PubMed

    Wilburn, Damien B; Bowen, Kathleen E; Doty, Kari A; Arumugam, Sengodagounder; Lane, Andrew N; Feldhoff, Pamela W; Feldhoff, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    In response to pervasive sexual selection, protein sex pheromones often display rapid mutation and accelerated evolution of corresponding gene sequences. For proteins, the general dogma is that structure is maintained even as sequence or function may rapidly change. This phenomenon is well exemplified by the three-finger protein (TFP) superfamily: a diverse class of vertebrate proteins co-opted for many biological functions - such as components of snake venoms, regulators of the complement system, and coordinators of amphibian limb regeneration. All of the >200 structurally characterized TFPs adopt the namesake "three-finger" topology. In male red-legged salamanders, the TFP pheromone Plethodontid Modulating Factor (PMF) is a hypervariable protein such that, through extensive gene duplication and pervasive sexual selection, individual male salamanders express more than 30 unique isoforms. However, it remained unclear how this accelerated evolution affected the protein structure of PMF. Using LC/MS-MS and multidimensional NMR, we report the 3D structure of the most abundant PMF isoform, PMF-G. The high resolution structural ensemble revealed a highly modified TFP structure, including a unique disulfide bonding pattern and loss of secondary structure, that define a novel protein topology with greater backbone flexibility in the third peptide finger. Sequence comparison, models of molecular evolution, and homology modeling together support that this flexible third finger is the most rapidly evolving segment of PMF. Combined with PMF sequence hypervariability, this structural flexibility may enhance the plasticity of PMF as a chemical signal by permitting potentially thousands of structural conformers. We propose that the flexible third finger plays a critical role in PMF:receptor interactions. As female receptors co-evolve, this flexibility may allow PMF to still bind its receptor(s) without the immediate need for complementary mutations. Consequently, this unique

  13. "Pinning strategy": a novel approach for predicting the backbone structure in terms of protein blocks from sequence.

    PubMed

    De Brevern, A G; Etchebest, C; Benros, C; Hazout, S

    2007-01-01

    The description of protein 3D structures can be performed through a library of 3D fragments, named a structural alphabet. Our structural alphabet is composed of 16 small protein fragments of 5 C alpha in length, called protein blocks (PBs). It allows an efficient approximation of the 3D protein structures and a correct prediction of the local structure. The 72 most frequent series of 5 consecutive PBs, called structural words (SWs)are able to cover more than 90% of the 3D structures. PBs are highly conditioned by the presence of a limited number of transitions between them. In this study, we propose a new method called "pinning strategy" that used this specific feature to predict long protein fragments. Its goal is to define highly probable successions of PBs. It starts from the most probable SW and is then extended with overlapping SWs. Starting from an initial prediction rate of 34.4%, the use of the SWs instead of the PBs allows a gain of 4.5%. The pinning strategy simply applied to the SWs increases the prediction accuracy to 39.9%. In a second step, the sequence-structure relationship is optimized, the prediction accuracy reaches 43.6%. PMID:17426380

  14. Context and Force Field Dependence of the Loss of Protein Backbone Entropy upon Folding Using Realistic Denatured and Native State Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Baxa, Michael C.; Haddadian, Esmael J.; Jha, Abhishek K.; Freed, Karl F.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2012-01-01

    The loss of conformational entropy is the largest unfavorable quantity affecting a protein’s stability. We calculate the reduction in the number of backbone conformations upon folding using the distribution of backbone dihedral angles (φ,ψ) obtained from an experimentally validated denatured state model, along with all-atom simulations for both the denatured and native states. The average loss of entropy per residue is TΔSBBU-N = 0.7, 0.9, or 1.1 kcal·mol−1 at T = 298 K, depending on the force field used, with a 0.6 kcal·mol−1 dispersion across the sequence. The average equates to a decrease of a factor of 3–7 in the number of conformations available per residue (f = ΩDenatured/ΩNative) or to a total of ftot=3n–7n for an n residue protein. Our value is smaller than most previous estimates where f = 7–20, i.e., our computed TΔSBBU-N is smaller by 10–100 kcal mol−1 for n=100. The differences emerge from our use of realistic native and denatured state ensembles as well as from the inclusion of accurate local sequence preferences, neighbor effects, and correlated motions (vibrations), in contrast to some previous studies that invoke gross assumptions about the entropy in either or both states. We find that the loss of entropy primarily depends on the local environment and less on properties of the native state, with the exception of α-helical residues in some force fields. PMID:22928488

  15. Backbone Relaxation Coupled to the Ionization of Internal Groups in Proteins: A Self-Guided Langevin Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Damjanović, Ana; Wu, Xiongwu; García-Moreno E., Bertrand; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2008-01-01

    Pathways of structural relaxation triggered by ionization of internal groups in staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) were studied through multiple self-guided Langevin dynamics (SGLD) simulations. Circular dichroism, steady-state Trp fluorescence, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown previously that variants of SNase with internal Glu, Asp, and Lys at positions 66 or 92, and Arg at position 66, exhibit local reorganization or global unfolding when the internal ionizable group is charged. Except for Arg-66, these internal ionizable groups have unusual pKa values and are neutral at physiological pH. The structural trends observed in the simulations are in general agreement with experimental observations. The I92D variant, which unfolds globally upon ionization of Asp-92, in simulations often exhibits extensive hydration of the protein core, and sometimes also significant perturbations of the β-barrel. In the crystal structure of the V66R variant, the β1 strand from the β-barrel is domain-swapped; in the simulations, the β1 strand is sometimes partially released. The V66K variant, which in solutions shows reorganization of six residues at the C-terminus of helix α1 and perturbations in the β-barrel structure, exhibits fraying of three residues of helix α1 in one simulation, and perturbations and partial unfolding of three β-strands in a few other simulations. In sharp contrast, very small structural changes were observed in simulations of the wild-type protein. The simulations indicate that charging of internal groups frequently triggers penetration of water into the protein interior. The pKa values of Asp-92 and Arg-66 calculated with continuum methods on SGLD-relaxed structures reached the normal values in most simulations. Detailed analysis of accuracy and performance of SGLD demonstrates that SGLD outperforms LD in sampling of alternative protein conformations without loss of the accuracy and level of detail characteristic of regular LD. PMID

  16. Grid-based backbone correction to the ff12SB protein force field for implicit-solvent simulations.

    PubMed

    Perez, Alberto; MacCallum, Justin L; Brini, Emiliano; Simmerling, Carlos; Dill, Ken A

    2015-10-13

    Force fields, such as Amber's ff12SB, can be fairly accurate models of the physical forces in proteins and other biomolecules. When coupled with accurate solvation models, force fields are able to bring insight into the conformational preferences, transitions, pathways, and free energies for these biomolecules. When computational speed/cost matters, implicit solvent is often used but at the cost of accuracy. We present an empirical grid-like correction term, in the spirit of cMAPs, to the combination of the ff12SB protein force field and the GBneck2 implicit-solvent model. Ff12SB-cMAP is parametrized on experimental helicity data. We provide validation on a set of peptides and proteins. Ff12SB-cMAP successfully improves the secondary structure biases observed in ff12SB + Gbneck2. Ff12SB-cMAP can be downloaded ( https://github.com/laufercenter/Amap.git ) and used within the Amber package. It can improve the agreement of force fields + implicit solvent with experiments. PMID:26574266

  17. Restraints on backbone conformations in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins from quantitative amide 15N–15N and carbonyl 13C–13C dipolar recoupling data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Qiang, Wei; Bermejo, Guillermo A.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Recent structural studies of uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled proteins by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) rely principally on two sources of structural restraints: (i) restraints on backbone conformation from isotropic 15N and 13C chemical shifts, based on empirical correlations between chemical shifts and backbone torsion angles; (ii) restraints on inter-residue proximities from qualitative measurements of internuclear dipole–dipole couplings, detected as the presence or absence of inter-residue crosspeaks in multidimensional spectra. We show that site-specific dipole–dipole couplings among 15N-labeled backbone amide sites and among 13C-labeled backbone carbonyl sites can be measured quantitatively in uniformly-labeled proteins, using dipolar recoupling techniques that we call 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE (BAckbone REcoupling), and that the resulting data represent a new source of restraints on backbone conformation. 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE data can be incorporated into structural modeling calculations as potential energy surfaces, which are derived from comparisons between experimental 15N and 13C signal decay curves, extracted from crosspeak intensities in series of two-dimensional spectra, with numerical simulations of the 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE measurements. We demonstrate this approach through experiments on microcrystalline, uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled protein GB1. Results for GB1 show that 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE restraints are complementary to restraints from chemical shifts and inter-residue crosspeaks, improving both the precision and the accuracy of calculated structures. PMID:22449573

  18. Ner protein of phage Mu: Assignments using {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strzelecka, T.; Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    The Ner protein is a small (74-amino acid) DNA-binding protein that regulates a switch between the lysogenic and lytic stages of phage Mu. It inhibits expression of the C repressor gene and down-regulates its own expression. Two-dimensional NMR experiments on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled protein provided most of the backbone and some of the sidechain proton assignments. The secondary structure determination using two-dimensional NOESY experiments showed that Ner consists of five {alpha}-helices. However, because most of the sidechain protons could not be assigned, the full structure was not determined. Using uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled Ner and a set of three-dimensional experiments, we were able to assign all of the backbone and 98% of the sidechain protons. In particular, the CBCANH and CBCA(CO)NH experiments were used to sequentially assign the C{alpha} and C{beta} resonances; the HCCH-CTOCSY and HCCH-COSY were used to assign sidechain carbon and proton resonances.

  19. Strike a Balance: Optimization of Backbone Torsion Parameters of AMBER Polarizable Force Field for Simulations of Proteins and Peptides

    PubMed Central

    WANG, ZHI-XIANG; ZHANG, WEI; WU, CHUN; LEI, HONGXING; CIEPLAK, PIOTR; DUAN, YONG

    2014-01-01

    Based on the AMBER polarizable model (ff02), we have reoptimized the parameters related to the main-chain (Φ, Ψ) torsion angles by fitting to the Boltzmann-weighted average quantum mechanical (QM) energies of the important regions (i.e., β, PII, αR, and αL regions). Following the naming convention of the AMBER force field series, this release will be called ff02pol.rl The force field has been assessed both by energetic comparison against the QM data and by the replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of short alanine peptides in water. For Ace-Ala-Nme, the simulated populations in the β, PII and αR regions were approximately 30, 43, and 26%, respectively. For Ace-(Ala)7-Nme, the populations in these three regions were approximately 24, 49, and 26%. Both were in qualitative agreement with the NMR and CD experimental conclusions. In comparison with the previous force field, ff02pol.rl demonstrated good balance among these three important regions. The optimized torsion parameters, together with those in ff02, allow us to carry out simulations on proteins and peptides with the consideration of polarization. PMID:16526038

  20. On the source of entropic elastomeric force in polypeptides and proteins: Backbone configurational vs. side-chain solvational entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Chihao; Jaggard, J.; Harris, R.D.; Urry, D.W. )

    1989-01-01

    At physiological temperature in water, the relaxed state of the protein, elastin, and model elastomeric sequential polypeptides derived from this biological elastomer is the result of an inverse temperature transition. At lower temperatures, say at 20{degree}C, the hydrophobic side chains of the elastomers are hydrated with a low-entropy net of water. Following Flory and colleagues, thermoelasticity studies suggests that these polypeptide elastomers are dominantly entropic elastomers above the temperature of the inverse temperature transition. A central question becomes the source of the entropic elastomeric force. On stretching, hydrophobic side chains become exposed to water, resulting in an exothermic reaction of hydrophobic hydration. The issue addressed by the present report is whether this decrease in solvent entropy on stretching might make a major contribution to the entropic elastomeric restoring force. It has previously been argued that the free energy of solvation can be made very small by a 30% ethylene glycol (EG):70% water solvent mixture. This is demonstrated here using the repeating pentapeptide sequence of elastin (Val{sup 1}-Pro{sup 2}-Gly{sup 3} -Val{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}){sub n} or poly(VPGVG) and its {gamma}-irradiation cross-linked elastomeric matrix. Differential scanning calorimetry of the inverse temperature transition of poly(VPGVG) shows the endothermic heat of the transition to become very small in EG/H{sub 2}O when compared with H{sub 2}O alone, which also indicates a very small entropy change for the transition on exposure of the hydrophobic side chains to the EG/H{sub 2}O solvent mixture. A similar result is found for the crosslinked elastomeric matrix. Significantly, however, in spite of the lower heats for hydrophobic solvation, the elastic modulus and the entropic elastomeric forces generated are greater in EG/H{sub 2}O.

  1. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of the LAM-RRM1 N-terminal module of La protein from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Chasapis, Christos T; Argyriou, Aikaterini I; Apostolidi, Maria; Konstantinidou, Parthena; Bentrop, Detlef; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2015-10-01

    The N-terminal half of La protein consists of two concatenated motifs: La motif (LAM) and the N-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM1) both of which are responsible for poly(U) RNA binding. Here, we present the backbone and side-chain assignments of the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonances of the 191-residue LAM-RRM1 region of the La protein from the lower eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum and its secondary structure prediction. PMID:25687647

  2. The Na+-phosphate cotransport system (NaPi-II) with a cleaved protein backbone: implications on function and membrane insertion

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Beate; Wagner, Carsten A; Huelseweh, Birgit; Busch, Andreas E; Werner, Andreas

    1998-01-01

    Renal handling of inorganic phosphate (Pi) involves a Na+-Pi cotransport system which is well conserved between vertebrates. The members of this protein family, denoted NaPi-II, share a topology with, it is thought, eight transmembrane domains. The transporter is proposed to be proteolytically cleaved within a large hydrophilic loop in vivo. The consequences of an interrupted backbone were tested by constructing cDNA clones encoding different N- (1-3 and 1-5) and C-terminal (4-8 and 6-8) complementary fragments of NaPi-II from winter flounder. When the cognate fragments were used in combination (1-3 plus 4-8; 1-5 plus 6-8) they comprised the full complement of the putative transporter domains. None of the four individual fragments or the 1-5 plus 6-8 combination when expressed in Xenopus oocytes increased Pi flux. Coexpression of fragments 1-3 plus 4-8 stimulated transport activity identical to that for expressed wild-type NaPi-II with regard to pH dependency and Km for Na+ and Pi binding; however, the maximal transport rate (vmax) was lower. Immunohistochemistry on cryosections confined the functionally active 1-3 plus 4-8 combination to the oocyte membrane. This was not the case for the 1-5 plus 6-8 combination or any of the individual fragments, all of which failed to induce fluorescence. A second immunohistochemical approach using intact oocytes allowed determination of the extracellular regions of the protein. Epitopes within the loop between transmembrane domains 3 and 4 enhanced fluorescence. Neither N- nor C-terminal tags induced fluorescence. PMID:9508800

  3. The role of the central L- or D-Pro residue on structure and mode of action of a cell-selective alpha-helical IsCT-derived antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shin Saeng; Kim, Yangmee; Park, Yoonkyung; Kim, Jae Il; Park, Il-Seon; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Shin, Song Yub

    2005-09-01

    IsCT-P (ILKKIWKPIKKLF-NH2) is a novel alpha-helical antimicrobial peptide with bacterial cell selectivity designed from a scorpion-derived peptide IsCT. To investigate the role of L- or D-Pro kink on the structure and the mode of action of a short alpha-helical antimicrobial peptide with bacterial cell selectivity, we synthesized IsCT-p, in which D-Pro is substituted for L-Pro8 of IsCT-P. CD spectra revealed that IsCT-P adopted a typical alpha-helical structure in various membrane-mimicking conditions, whereas IsCT-p showed a random structure. This result indicated that D-Pro in the central position of a short alpha-helical peptide provides more remarkable structural flexibility than L-Pro. Despite its higher antibacterial activity, IsCT-p was much less effective at inducing dye leakage in the negatively charged liposome mimicking bacterial membrane and induced no or little membrane potential depolarization of Staphylococcus aureus. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that IsCT-p penetrated the bacterial cell membrane and accumulated in the cytoplasm, whereas IsCT-P remained outside or on the cell membrane. These results suggested that the major target of IsCT-P and IsCT-p is the bacterial membranes and intracellular components, respectively. Collectively, our results demonstrated that the central D-Pro kink in alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides plays an important role in penetrating bacterial membrane as well as bacterial cell selectivity. PMID:16040002

  4. The unfolded state of the C-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9 contains both native and non-native structure.

    PubMed

    Shan, Bing; Eliezer, David; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2009-06-01

    Interest in the structural and dynamic properties of unfolded proteins has increased in recent years owing to continued interest in protein folding and misfolding. Knowledge of the unfolded state under native conditions is particularly important for obtaining a complete picture of the protein folding process. The C-terminal domain of protein L9 is a globular alpha, beta protein with an unusual mixed parallel and antiparallel beta-strand structure. The folding kinetics and equilibrium unfolding of CTL9 strongly depend on pH, and follow a simple two state model. Both the native and the unfolded state can be significantly populated at pH 3.8 in the absence of denaturant, allowing the native state and the unfolded state to be characterized under identical conditions. Backbone (15)N, (13)C, (1)H and side-chain (13)C(beta), (1)H(beta) chemical shifts, amide proton NOEs, and (15)N R(2) relaxation rates were obtained for the two conformational states at pH 3.8. All the data indicate that the pH 3.8 native state is well folded and is similar to the native state at neutral pH. There is significant residual structure in the pH 3.8 unfolded state. The regions corresponding to the two native state alpha-helices show strong preference to populate helical phi and psi angles. The segment that connects alpha-helix 2 and beta-strand 2 has a significant tendency to form non-native alpha-helical structure. Comparison with the pH 2.0 unfolded state and the urea unfolded state indicates that the tendency to adopt both native and non-native helical structure is stronger at pH 3.8, demonstrating that the unfolded state of CTL9 under native-like conditions is more structured. The implications for the folding of CTL9 are discussed. PMID:19301913

  5. X-ray diffraction analysis of scrapie prion: intermediate and folded structures in a peptide containing two putative alpha-helices.

    PubMed

    Inouye, H; Kirschner, D A

    1997-05-01

    Small proteinaceous infectious particles called prions cause certain neurodegenerative diseases in human and animals. Limited proteolysis of infectious scrapie prions PrP(Sc) yields an N-truncated polypeptide termed PrP 27-30, which encompasses residues 90 to 231 of PrP(Sc) and which assembles into 100 to 200 A wide amyloid rods. It has been hypothesized that the infectious prion is converted from its non-infectious cellular form (PrP(C)) by means of an alpha-helical to beta-sheet conformational change. Secondary structure analysis, computer modeling, and structural biophysics methods support this hypothesis. Residues 90 to 145 of PrP, which contain two putative alpha-helical domains H1 and H2, may be of particular relevance to the disease pathogenesis, as C-terminal truncation at residue 145 was found in a patient with an inherited prion disease. Moreover, our recent X-ray diffraction analysis suggests that the peptide consisting of these residues (designated SHa 90-145) closely models the amyloidogenic beta-sheet core of PrP. In the current study, we have analyzed in detail the X-ray diffraction patterns of SHa 90-145. Two samples were examined: one that was dehydrated under ambient conditions whilst in an external magnetic field (to induce fibril orientation), and another that was sealed after partial drying. The dried, magnetically oriented sample showed a cross-beta diffraction pattern in which the fiber axis (rotation axis) was parallel to the H-bonding direction of the beta-sheets. The major wide-angle peaks indicate the presence of approximately 40 A wide beta-crystallites, which constitute the protofilament. Each crystallite is composed of several orthogonal unit cells, normal to the fiber (a-axis) direction, having lattice constants a = 9.69 A, b = 6.54 A, and c = 18.06 A. Electron density maps were calculated by iterative Fourier synthesis using beta-silk as an initial phase model. The distribution of density indicated that there were two types of beta

  6. Database algorithm for generating protein backbone and side-chain co-ordinates from a C alpha trace application to model building and detection of co-ordinate errors.

    PubMed

    Holm, L; Sander, C

    1991-03-01

    The problem of constructing all-atom model co-ordinates of a protein from an outline of the polypeptide chain is encountered in protein structure determination by crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, in model building by homology and in protein design. Here, we present an automatic procedure for generating full protein co-ordinates (backbone and, optionally, side-chains) given the C alpha trace and amino acid sequence. To construct backbones, a protein structure database is first scanned for fragments that locally fit the chain trace according to distance criteria. A best path algorithm then sifts through these segments and selects an optimal path with minimal mismatch at fragment joints. In blind tests, using fully known protein structures, backbones (C alpha, C, N, O) can be reconstructed with a reliability of 0.4 to 0.6 A root-mean-square position deviation and not more than 0 to 5% peptide flips. This accuracy is sufficient to identify possible errors in protein co-ordinate sets. To construct full co-ordinates, side-chains are added from a library of frequently occurring rotamers using a simple and fast Monte Carlo procedure with simulated annealing. In tests on X-ray structures determined at better than 2.5 A resolution, the positions of side-chain atoms in the protein core (less than 20% relative accessibility) have an accuracy of 1.6 A (r.m.s. deviation) and 70% of chi 1 angles are within 30 degrees of the X-ray structure. The computer program MaxSprout is available on request. PMID:2002501

  7. Sonication Induced Intermediate in Prion Protein Conversion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In vivo conversion of prion protein (PrPC) to its abnormal pathogenic isoform (PrPSc) is associated with conformational transition of alpha-helices and unstructured regions to beta-sheets. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) is thought to mimics this conversion in vitro. PMCA involves son...

  8. Reduced dimensionality (3,2)D NMR experiments and their automated analysis: implications to high-throughput structural studies on proteins.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jithender G; Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2015-02-01

    Protein NMR spectroscopy has expanded dramatically over the last decade into a powerful tool for the study of their structure, dynamics, and interactions. The primary requirement for all such investigations is sequence-specific resonance assignment. The demand now is to obtain this information as rapidly as possible and in all types of protein systems, stable/unstable, soluble/insoluble, small/big, structured/unstructured, and so on. In this context, we introduce here two reduced dimensionality experiments – (3,2)D-hNCOcanH and (3,2)D-hNcoCAnH – which enhance the previously described 2D NMR-based assignment methods quite significantly. Both the experiments can be recorded in just about 2-3 h each and hence would be of immense value for high-throughput structural proteomics and drug discovery research. The applicability of the method has been demonstrated using alpha-helical bovine apo calbindin-D9k P43M mutant (75 aa) protein. Automated assignment of this data using AUTOBA has been presented, which enhances the utility of these experiments. The backbone resonance assignments so derived are utilized to estimate secondary structures and the backbone fold using Web-based algorithms. Taken together, we believe that the method and the protocol proposed here can be used for routine high-throughput structural studies of proteins. PMID:25178811

  9. Molecular dynamics studies of protein folding and aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feng

    that globular proteins under a denaturing environment partially unfold and aggregate by forming stabilizing hydrogen bonds between the backbones of the partial folded substructures. Proteins or peptides rich in alpha-helices also aggregate into beta-rich amyloid fibrils. Upon aggregation, the protein or peptide undergoes a conformational transition from alpha-helices to beta-sheets. The transition of alpha-helix to beta-hairpin (two-stranded beta-sheet) is studied in an all-heavy-atom discrete molecular dynamics model of a polyalanine chain. An entropical driving scenario for the alpha-helix to beta-hairpin transition is discovered.

  10. Motif-directed flexible backbone design of functional interactions

    PubMed Central

    Havranek, James J; Baker, David

    2009-01-01

    Computational protein design relies on a number of approximations to efficiently search the huge sequence space available to proteins. The fixed backbone and rotamer approximations in particular are important for formulating protein design as a discrete combinatorial optimization problem. However, the resulting coarse-grained sampling of possible side-chain terminal positions is problematic for the design of protein function, which depends on precise positioning of side-chain atoms. Although backbone flexibility can greatly increase the conformation freedom of side-chain functional groups, it is not obvious which backbone movements will generate the critical constellation of atoms responsible for protein function. Here, we report an automated method for identifying protein backbone movements that can give rise to any specified set of desired side-chain atomic placements and interactions, using protein–DNA interfaces as a model system. We use a library of previously observed protein–DNA interactions (motifs) and a rotamer-based description of side-chain conformation freedom to identify placements for the protein backbone that can give rise to a favorable side-chain interaction with DNA. We describe a tree-search algorithm for identifying those combinations of interactions from the library that can be realized with minimal perturbation of the protein backbone. We compare the efficiency of this method with the alternative approach of building and screening alternate backbone conformations. PMID:19472357

  11. Chicken NK-lysin is an alpha-helical cationic peptide that exerts its antibacterial activity through damage of bacterial cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Ok; Jang, Hyun-Jun; Han, Jae Yong; Womack, James E

    2014-04-01

    The antimicrobial peptides (AMP) are important elements of the first line of defense against pathogens in animals, and an important constituent of innate immunity. Antimicrobial peptides act on a broad spectrum of microbial organisms. NK-Lysin is a cationic antibacterial peptide that was originally isolated from porcine intestinal tissue based on its antibacterial activity. We synthesized peptides corresponding to each helical region of chicken NK-lysin and analyzed their secondary structures in addition to their antimicrobial activity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of the synthetic chicken NK-lysin (cNK-78) and 4 small peptides in negatively charged liposomes demonstrated transition in the conformation of α-helical peptides relative to the charged environment. Chicken NK-lysin inhibits the growth of a representative gram-negative bacterium, Escherichia coli. The antimicrobial activity of 2 peptides designated H23 and H34 was similar to that of mature NK-lysin, cNK-78. Microscopic analyses revealed the death of bacterium with disrupted membranes after peptide treatment, suggesting that chicken NK-lysin, an alpha-helical cationic peptide, exerts its antimicrobial activity by damaging the bacterial cell membrane. PMID:24706963

  12. The structure of aquaporin-1 at 4.5-A resolution reveals short alpha-helices in the center of the monomer.

    PubMed

    Mitsuoka, K; Murata, K; Walz, T; Hirai, T; Agre, P; Heymann, J B; Engel, A; Fujiyoshi, Y

    1999-12-01

    Aquaporin-1 is a water channel found in mammalian red blood cells that is responsible for high water permeability of its membrane. Our electron crystallographic analysis of the three-dimensional structure of aquaporin-1 at 4.5-A resolution confirms the previous finding that each subunit consists of a right-handed bundle of six highly tilted transmembrane helices that surround a central X-shaped structure. In our new potential map, the rod-like densities for the transmembrane helices show helically arranged protrusions, indicating the positions of side chains. Thus, in addition to the six transmembrane helices, observation of helically arranged side-chain densities allowed the identification of two short alpha-helices representing the two branches of the central X-shaped structure that extend to the extracellular and cytoplasmic membrane surfaces. The other two branches are believed to be loops connecting the short alpha-helix to a neighboring transmembrane helix. A pore found close to the center of the aquaporin-1 monomer is suggested to be the course of water flow with implications for the water selectivity. PMID:10600556

  13. Optimization of amino acid type-specific 13C and 15N labeling for the backbone assignment of membrane proteins by solution- and solid-state NMR with the UPLABEL algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hefke, Frederik; Bagaria, Anurag; Reckel, Sina; Ullrich, Sandra Johanna; Dötsch, Volker; Glaubitz, Clemens; Güntert, Peter

    2011-02-01

    We present a computational method for finding optimal labeling patterns for the backbone assignment of membrane proteins and other large proteins that cannot be assigned by conventional strategies. Following the approach of Kainosho and Tsuji (Biochemistry 21:6273-6279 (1982)), types of amino acids are labeled with (13)C or/and (15)N such that cross peaks between (13)CO(i - 1) and (15)NH(i) result only for pairs of sequentially adjacent amino acids of which the first is labeled with (13)C and the second with (15)N. In this way, unambiguous sequence-specific assignments can be obtained for unique pairs of amino acids that occur exactly once in the sequence of the protein. To be practical, it is crucial to limit the number of differently labeled protein samples that have to be prepared while obtaining an optimal extent of labeled unique amino acid pairs. Our computer algorithm UPLABEL for optimal unique pair labeling, implemented in the program CYANA and in a standalone program, and also available through a web portal, uses combinatorial optimization to find for a given amino acid sequence labeling patterns that maximize the number of unique pair assignments with a minimal number of differently labeled protein samples. Various auxiliary conditions, including labeled amino acid availability and price, previously known partial assignments, and sequence regions of particular interest can be taken into account when determining optimal amino acid type-specific labeling patterns. The method is illustrated for the assignment of the human G-protein coupled receptor bradykinin B2 (B(2)R) and applied as a starting point for the backbone assignment of the membrane protein proteorhodopsin. PMID:21170670

  14. Possible role of the Nt-4/1 protein in macromolecular transport in vascular tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Arabidopsis thaliana 4/1 (At-4/1) protein has a highly alpha-helical structure with potential to interact both with itself and other protein ligands, including the movement proteins of some plant viruses; the Nicotiana tabacum ortholog (Nt-4/1) has similar structure. Here we describe localizatio...

  15. Slow alpha helix formation during folding of a membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Riley, M L; Wallace, B A; Flitsch, S L; Booth, P J

    1997-01-01

    Very little is known about the folding of proteins within biological membranes. A "two-stage" model has been proposed on thermodynamic grounds for the folding of alpha helical, integral membrane proteins, the first stage of which involves formation of transmembrane alpha helices that are proposed to behave as autonomous folding domains. Here, we investigate alpha helix formation in bacteriorhodopsin and present a time-resolved circular dichroism study of the slow in vitro folding of this protein. We show that, although some of the protein's alpha helices form early, a significant part of the protein's secondary structure appears to form late in the folding process. Over 30 amino acids, equivalent to at least one of bacteriorhodopsin's seven transmembrane segments, slowly fold from disordered structures to alpha helices with an apparent rate constant of about 0.012 s-1 at pH 6 or 0.0077 s-1 at pH 8. This is a rate-limiting step in protein folding, which is dependent on the pH and the composition of the lipid bilayer. PMID:8993333

  16. Parameterization of backbone flexibility in a coarse-grained force field for proteins (COFFDROP) derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations of all possible two-residue peptides

    PubMed Central

    Frembgen-Kesner, Tamara; Andrews, Casey T.; Li, Shuxiang; Ngo, Nguyet Anh; Shubert, Scott A.; Jain, Aakash; Olayiwola, Oluwatoni; Weishaar, Mitch R.; Elcock, Adrian H.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported the parameterization of a set of coarse-grained (CG) nonbonded potential functions, derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acid pairs, and designed for use in (implicit-solvent) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins; this force field was named COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representations Of Proteins). Here, we describe the extension of COFFDROP to include bonded backbone terms derived from fitting to results of explicit-solvent MD simulations of all possible two-residue peptides containing the 20 standard amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms. The iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method was used to optimize new CG potential functions for backbone-related terms by attempting to reproduce angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions generated by the MD simulations. In a simple test of the transferability of the extended force field, the angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions obtained from BD simulations of 56 three-residue peptides were compared to results from corresponding explicit-solvent MD simulations. In a more challenging test of the COFFDROP force field, it was used to simulate eight intrinsically disordered proteins and was shown to quite accurately reproduce the experimental hydrodynamic radii (Rhydro), provided that the favorable nonbonded interactions of the force field were uniformly scaled downwards in magnitude. Overall, the results indicate that the COFFDROP force field is likely to find use in modeling the conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins and multi-domain proteins connected by flexible linkers. PMID:26574429

  17. Accurate measurement of methyl 13C chemical shifts by solid-state NMR for the determination of protein side chain conformation: the influenza a M2 transmembrane peptide as an example.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mei; Mishanina, Tatiana V; Cady, Sarah D

    2009-06-10

    The use of side chain methyl (13)C chemical shifts for the determination of the rotameric conformation of Val and Leu residues in proteins by solid-state NMR spectroscopy is described. Examination of the solution NMR stereospecifically assigned methyl groups shows significant correlation between the difference in the two methyl carbons' chemical shifts and the side chain conformation. It is found that alpha-helical and beta-sheet backbones cause different side chain methyl chemical shift trends. In alpha-helical Leu's, a relatively large absolute methyl (13)C shift difference of 2.89 ppm is found for the most populated mt rotamer (chi(1) = -60 degrees, chi(2) = 180 degrees), while a much smaller value of 0.73 ppm is found for the next populated tp rotamer (chi(1) = 180 degrees, chi(2) = 60 degrees). For alpha-helical Val residues, the dominant t rotamer (chi(1) = 180 degrees) has more downfield Cgamma2 chemical shifts than Cgamma1 by 1.71 ppm, while the next populated m rotamer (chi(1) = -60 degrees) shows the opposite trend of more downfield Cgamma1 chemical shift by 1.23 ppm. These significantly different methyl (13)C chemical shifts exist despite the likelihood of partial rotameric averaging at ambient temperature. We show that these conformation-dependent methyl (13)C chemical shifts can be utilized for side chain structure determination once the methyl (13)C resonances are accurately measured by double-quantum (DQ) filtered 2D correlation experiments, most notably the dipolar DQ to single-quantum (SQ) correlation technique. The advantage of the DQ-SQ correlation experiment over simple 2D SQ-SQ correlation experiments is demonstrated on the transmembrane peptide of the influenza A M2 proton channel. The methyl chemical shifts led to predictions of the side chain rotameric states for several Val and Leu residues in this tetrameric helical bundle. The predicted Val rotamers were further verified by dipolar correlation experiments that directly measure the chi(1

  18. Design of HIV-1 protease inhibitors with pyrrolidinones and oxazolidinones as novel P1'-ligands to enhance backbone-binding interactions with protease: synthesis, biological evaluation, and protein-ligand X-ray studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Leshchenko-Yashchuk, Sofiya; Anderson, David D.; Baldridge, Abigail; Noetzel, Marcus; Miller, Heather B.; Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Koh, Yasuhiro; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2009-09-02

    Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors are described. In an effort to enhance interactions with protease backbone atoms, we have incorporated stereochemically defined methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and methyl oxazolidinone as the P1{prime}-ligands. These ligands are designed to interact with Gly-27{prime} carbonyl and Arg-8 side chain in the S1{prime}-subsite of the HIV protease. We have investigated the potential of these ligands in combination with our previously developed bis-tetrahydrofuran (bis-THF) and cyclopentanyltetrahydrofuran (Cp-THF) as the P2-ligands. Inhibitor 19b with a (R)-aminomethyl-2-pyrrolidinone and a Cp-THF was shown to be the most potent compound. This inhibitor maintained near full potency against multi-PI-resistant clinical HIV-1 variants. A high resolution protein-ligand X-ray crystal structure of 19b-bound HIV-1 protease revealed that the P1{prime}-pyrrolidinone heterocycle and the P2-Cp-ligand are involved in several critical interactions with the backbone atoms in the S1{prime} and S2 subsites of HIV-1 protease.

  19. HRTEM in protein crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyson, P. W.; Spargo, A. E. C.; Tulloch, P. A.; Johnson, A. W. S.

    Electron microscopy/diffraction (ED/D) using spot-scan and low-dose imaging has been successfully applied to investigate microcrystals of an alpha-helical coiled-coil protein extracted from ootheca of the praying mantis. Fourier transforms of the images show resolution out to 4 A and can be used to phase the corresponding ED data which shows reflections out to 2 A.

  20. Simulation of Ames Backbone Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahnasser, Hamid

    1998-01-01

    The networking demands of Ames Research Center are dramatically increasing. More and more workstations are requested to run video and audio applications on the network. These applications require a much greater bandwidth than data applications. The existing ARCLAN 2000 network bandwidth is insufficient, due to the use of FDDI as its backbone, for accommodating video applications. Operating at a maximum of 100 Mbps, FDDI can handle only a few workstations running multimedia applications. The ideal solution is to replace the current ARCLAN 2000 FDDI backbone with an ATM backbone. ATM has the capability to handle the increasing traffic loads on the ARCLAN 2000 that results from these new applications. As it can be seen from Figure 1, ARCLAN 2000 have a total of 32 routers (5 being core routers) each connected to the FDDI backbone via a 100 Mbps link. This network serves 34 different locations by using 34 hubs that are connected to secondary routers. End users are connected to the secondary routers with 10 Mbps links.

  1. Evaluation of Newcastle disease virus chimeras expressing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of velogenic strains in the context of a mesogenic recombinant virus backbone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major factor in the pathogenicity of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is the amino acid sequence of the fusion protein cleavage site, but the role of other viral genes that contribute to virulence and different clinical forms of the disease remain undefined. To assess the role of other NDV genes in ...

  2. Adding Diverse Noncanonical Backbones to Rosetta: Enabling Peptidomimetic Design

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Timothy W.; Butterfoss, Glenn L.; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Lyskov, Sergey; Bullock, Brooke N.; Watkins, Andrew; Labonte, Jason W.; Pacella, Michael; Kilambi, Krishna Praneeth; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Kuhlman, Brian; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Bradley, Philip; Kirshenbaum, Kent; Arora, Paramjit S.; Das, Rhiju; Bonneau, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Peptidomimetics are classes of molecules that mimic structural and functional attributes of polypeptides. Peptidomimetic oligomers can frequently be synthesized using efficient solid phase synthesis procedures similar to peptide synthesis. Conformationally ordered peptidomimetic oligomers are finding broad applications for molecular recognition and for inhibiting protein-protein interactions. One critical limitation is the limited set of design tools for identifying oligomer sequences that can adopt desired conformations. Here, we present expansions to the ROSETTA platform that enable structure prediction and design of five non-peptidic oligomer scaffolds (noncanonical backbones), oligooxopiperazines, oligo-peptoids, -peptides, hydrogen bond surrogate helices and oligosaccharides. This work is complementary to prior additions to model noncanonical protein side chains in ROSETTA. The main purpose of our manuscript is to give a detailed description to current and future developers of how each of these noncanonical backbones was implemented. Furthermore, we provide a general outline for implementation of new backbone types not discussed here. To illustrate the utility of this approach, we describe the first tests of the ROSETTA molecular mechanics energy function in the context of oligooxopiperazines, using quantum mechanical calculations as comparison points, scanning through backbone and side chain torsion angles for a model peptidomimetic. Finally, as an example of a novel design application, we describe the automated design of an oligooxopiperazine that inhibits the p53-MDM2 protein-protein interaction. For the general biological and bioengineering community, several noncanonical backbones have been incorporated into web applications that allow users to freely and rapidly test the presented protocols (http://rosie.rosettacommons.org). This work helps address the peptidomimetic community's need for an automated and expandable modeling tool for noncanonical

  3. ANSS Backbone Station Quality Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeds, A.; McNamara, D.; Benz, H.; Gee, L.

    2006-12-01

    In this study we assess the ambient noise levels of the broadband seismic stations within the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) backbone network. The backbone consists of stations operated by the USGS as well as several regional network stations operated by universities. We also assess the improved detection capability of the network due to the installation of 13 additional backbone stations and the upgrade of 26 existing stations funded by the Earthscope initiative. This assessment makes use of probability density functions (PDF) of power spectral densities (PSD) (after McNamara and Buland, 2004) computed by a continuous noise monitoring system developed by the USGS- ANSS and the Incorporated Research Institutions in Seismology (IRIS) Data Management Center (DMC). We compute the median and mode of the PDF distribution and rank the stations relative to the Peterson Low noise model (LNM) (Peterson, 1993) for 11 different period bands. The power of the method lies in the fact that there is no need to screen the data for system transients, earthquakes or general data artifacts since they map into a background probability level. Previous studies have shown that most regional stations, instrumented with short period or extended short period instruments, have a higher noise level in all period bands while stations in the US network have lower noise levels at short periods (0.0625-8.0 seconds), high frequencies (8.0- 0.125Hz). The overall network is evaluated with respect to accomplishing the design goals set for the USArray/ANSS backbone project which were intended to increase broadband performance for the national monitoring network.

  4. 1H, 13C, 15N backbone and side chain NMR resonance assignments for the N-terminal RNA recognition motif of the HvGR-RBP1 protein involved in the regulation of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) senescence

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Katelyn E.; Tripet, Brian P.; Parrott, David; Fischer, Andreas M.; Copié, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Leaf senescence is an important process in the developmental life of all plant species. Senescence efficiency influences important agricultural traits such as grain protein content and plant growth, which are often limited by nitrogen use. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating this highly orchestrated process. To enhance our understanding of leaf senescence and its regulation, we have undertaken the structural and functional characterization of previously unknown proteins that are involved in the control of senescence in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Previous microarray analysis highlighted several barley genes whose transcripts are differentially expressed during senescence, including a specific gene which is greater than 40 fold up-regulated in the flag leaves of early- as compared to late-senescing near-isogenic barley lines at 14 and 21 days past flowering (anthesis). From inspection of its amino acid sequence, this gene is predicted to encode a glycine-rich RNA-binding protein herein referred to as HvGR-RBP1. HvGR-RBP1 has been expressed as a recombinant protein in E. coli, and preliminary NMR data analysis has revealed that its glycine-rich C-terminal region [residues: 93–162] is structurally disordered whereas its N-terminal region [residues: 1–92] forms a well-folded domain. Herein, we report the complete 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments of backbone and sidechain atoms, and the secondary structural topology of the N-terminal RNA Recognition Motif (RRM) domain of HvGR-RBP1, as a first step to unraveling its structural and functional role in the regulation of barley leaf senescence. PMID:23417794

  5. Backbone upgrades and DEC equipment replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancamp, Warren

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Science Internet (NSI) dual protocol backbone is outlined. It includes DECnet link upgrades to match TCP/IP link performance. It also includes the integration of backbone resources and central management. The phase 1 transition process is outlined.

  6. Physics-based potentials for the coupling between backbone- and side-chain-local conformational states in the united residue (UNRES) force field for protein simulations

    PubMed Central

    Sieradzan, Adam K.; Krupa, Paweł; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam; Czaplewski, Cezary

    2015-01-01

    The UNited RESidue (UNRES) model of polypeptide chains is a coarse-grained model in which each amino-acid residue is reduced to two interaction sites, namely a united peptide group (p) located halfway between the two neighboring α-carbon atoms (Cαs), which serve only as geometrical points, and a united side chain (SC) attached to the respective Cα. Owing to this simplification, millisecond Molecular Dynamics simulations of large systems can be performed. While UNRES predicts overall folds well, it reproduces the details of local chain conformation with lower accuracy. Recently, we implemented new knowledge-based torsional potentials (Krupa et. al. J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2013, 9, 4620–4632) that depend on the virtual-bond dihedral angles involving side chains: Cα ⋯ Cα ⋯ Cα ⋯ SC (τ(1)), SC ⋯ Cα ⋯ Cα ⋯ Cα (τ(2)), and SC ⋯ Cα ⋯ Cα ⋯ SC (τ(3)) in the UNRES force field. These potentials resulted in significant improvement of the simulated structures, especially in the loop regions. In this work, we introduce the physics-based counterparts of these potentials, which we derived from the all-atom energy surfaces of terminally-blocked amino-acid residues by Boltzmann integration over the angles λ(1) and λ(2) for rotation about the Cα ⋯ Cα virtual-bond angles and over the side-chain angles χ. The energy surfaces were, in turn, calculated by using the semiempirical AM1 method of molecular quantum mechanics. Entropy contribution was evaluated with use of the harmonic approximation from Hessian matrices. One-dimensional Fourier series in the respective virtual-bond-dihedral angles were fitted to the calculated potentials, and these expressions have been implemented in the UNRES force field. Basic calibration of the UNRES force field with the new potentials was carried out with eight training proteins, by selecting the optimal weight of the new energy terms and reducing the weight of the regular torsional terms. The force field was

  7. TRAJELIX: a computational tool for the geometric characterization of protein helices during molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Mezei, Mihaly; Filizola, Marta

    2006-02-01

    We have developed a computer program with the necessary mathematical formalism for the geometric characterization of distorted conformations of alpha-helices proteins, such as those that can potentially be sampled during typical molecular dynamics simulations. This formalism has been incorporated into TRAJELIX, a new module within the SIMULAID framework (http://inka.mssm.edu/~mezei/simulaid/) that is capable of monitoring distortions of alpha-helices in terms of their displacement, global and local tilting, rotation around their axes, compression/extension, winding/unwinding, and bending. Accurate evaluation of these global and local structural properties of the helix can help study possible intramolecular and intermolecular changes in the helix packing of alpha-helical membrane proteins, as shown here in an application to the interacting helical domains of rhodopsin dimers. Quantification of the dynamic structural behavior of alpha-helical membrane proteins is critical for our understanding of signal transduction, and may enable structure-based design of more specific and efficient drugs. PMID:16783601

  8. Self assembling proteins

    DOEpatents

    Yeates, Todd O.; Padilla, Jennifer; Colovos, Chris

    2004-06-29

    Novel fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into regular structures, as well as nucleic acids encoding the same, are provided. The subject fusion proteins comprise at least two oligomerization domains rigidly linked together, e.g. through an alpha helical linking group. Also provided are regular structures comprising a plurality of self-assembled fusion proteins of the subject invention, and methods for producing the same. The subject fusion proteins find use in the preparation of a variety of nanostructures, where such structures include: cages, shells, double-layer rings, two-dimensional layers, three-dimensional crystals, filaments, and tubes.

  9. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements.

    PubMed

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanosecond-to-millisecond (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear ((13)C, (15)N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radiofrequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins have been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely, (1) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) and (2) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e., proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable and that the CCR rate constant depends on ns-ms motions; it can thus provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin diffusion attenuates this CCR due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and this article reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation. PMID:27500976

  10. Protein Normal Modes: Calculations of Amide Band Positions and Infrared Intensities for Helical Polypeptides and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisdorf, William Charles, Jr.

    To understand protein function requires input from a wide variety of techniques. The ability of diffraction and magnetic resonance studies to provide structural models with high atomic resolution are particularly crucial. Increasingly, information on protein dynamics is also sought. Vibrational spectroscopy can contribute information on the conformations of peptides and proteins, but the complexity of proteins makes interpretation of their spectra difficult. For this reason, computational models of protein vibrational modes are expected to play a major role in aiding our comprehension of protein dynamics. A set of FORTRAN programs referred to as 'POLYPEP' has been designed for computing the frequencies (eigenvalues) and normal modes (eigenvectors) of polypeptides of any structure. Model structures can be generated by specifying the backbone dihedral angles and using standard peptide group geometry. Alternatively one can use cartesian coordinates from experimental structures as input. The side chains are modeled as point masses, except for cysteine residues which may participate in disulfide linkages. Hydrogen bonding interactions between backbone groups are also included. The force fields adopted have been developed and refined to accurately reproduce the vibrational modes of alpha-helical and beta -sheet conformations of poly-L-alanine. Preliminary attempts have also been made for modifying selected force constants according to variations in hydrogen bond strength. Dipole derivatives for the peptide group are taken from an ab initio study of hydrogen-bonded N-methylacetamide. Those values, in combination with the calculated eigenvectors and frequencies, allow determination of infrared intensities for selected spectral regions, and the use of transition dipole coupling theory to obtain better frequencies. The present work involves application of this model to studies of model helical polypeptides and proteins. For the model structures (alpha-helix, 3 _{10}-helix

  11. Periodicity, planarity, and pixel (3P): a program using the intrinsic residual dipolar coupling periodicity-to-peptide plane correlation and phi/psi angles to derive protein backbone structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinbu; Walsh, Joseph D; Kuszewski, John; Wang, Yun-Xing

    2007-11-01

    We present a detailed description of a theory and a program called 3P. "3P" stands for periodicity, planarity, and pixel. The 3P program is based on the intrinsic periodic correlations between residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) and in-plane internuclear vectors, and between RDCs and the orientation of peptide planes relative to an alignment tensor. The program extracts accurate rhombic, axial components of the alignment tensor without explicit coordinates, and discrete peptide plane orientations, which are utilized in combination with readily available phi/psi angles to determine the three-dimensional backbone structures of proteins. The 3P program uses one alignment tensor. We demonstrate the utility and robustness of the program, using both experimental and synthetic data sets, which were added with different levels of noise or were incomplete. The program is interfaced to Xplor-NIH via a "3P" module and is available to the public. The limitations and differences between our program and existing methods are also discussed. PMID:17892961

  12. The backbone of a city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scellato, S.; Cardillo, A.; Latora, V.; Porta, S.

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies have revealed the importance of centrality measures to analyze various spatial factors affecting human life in cities. Here we show how it is possible to extract the backbone of a city by deriving spanning trees based on edge betweenness and edge information. By using as sample cases the cities of Bologna and San Francisco, we show how the obtained trees are radically different from those based on edge lengths, and allow an extended comprehension of the “skeleton” of most important routes that so much affects pedestrian/vehicular flows, retail commerce vitality, land-use separation, urban crime and collective dynamical behaviours.

  13. Effects of phosphorylation on the intrinsic propensity of backbone conformations of serine/threonine.

    PubMed

    He, Erbin; Yan, Guanghui; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Li, Wenfei

    2016-03-01

    Each amino acid has its intrinsic propensity for certain local backbone conformations, which can be further modulated by the physicochemical environment and post-translational modifications. In this work, we study the effects of phosphorylation on the intrinsic propensity for different local backbone conformations of serine/threonine by molecular dynamics simulations. We showed that phosphorylation has very different effects on the intrinsic propensity for certain local backbone conformations for the serine and threonine. The phosphorylation of serine increases the propensity of forming polyproline II, whereas that of threonine has the opposite effect. Detailed analysis showed that such different responses to phosphorylation mainly arise from their different perturbations to the backbone hydration and the geometrical constraints by forming side-chain-backbone hydrogen bonds due to phosphorylation. Such an effect of phosphorylation on backbone conformations can be crucial for understanding the molecular mechanism of phosphorylation-regulated protein structures/dynamics and functions. PMID:26759163

  14. TMRPres2D: high quality visual representation of transmembrane protein models.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, Ioannis C; Liakopoulos, Theodore D; Bagos, Pantelis G; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2004-11-22

    The 'TransMembrane protein Re-Presentation in 2-Dimensions' (TMRPres2D) tool, automates the creation of uniform, two-dimensional, high analysis graphical images/models of alpha-helical or beta-barrel transmembrane proteins. Protein sequence data and structural information may be acquired from public protein knowledge bases, emanate from prediction algorithms, or even be defined by the user. Several important biological and physical sequence attributes can be embedded in the graphical representation. PMID:15201184

  15. The "universal polymer backbone" concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollino, Joel Matthew

    This thesis begins with a brief analysis of the synthetic methodologies utilized in polymer science. A conclusion is drawn inferring that upper limits in molecular design are inevitable, arising as a direct consequence of the predominance of covalent strategies in the field. To address these concerns, the 'universal polymer backbone' (UPB) concept has been hypothesized. A UPB has been defined as any copolymer, side-chain functionalized with multiple recognition elements that are individually capable of forming strong, directional, and reversible non-covalent bonds. Non-covalent functionalization of these scaffolds can lead to the formation of a multitude of new polymer structures, each stemming from a single parent or 'universal polymer backbone'. To prepare such a UPB, isomerically pure exo-norbornene esters containing either a PdII SCS pincer complex or a diaminopyridine residue were synthesized, polymerized, and copolymerized via ROMP. All polymerizations were living under mild reaction conditions. Kinetic studies showed that the kp values are highly dependent upon the isomeric purity but completely independent of the terminal recognition units. Non-covalent functionalization of these copolymers was accomplished via (1) directed self-assembly, (2) multi-step self-assembly , and (3) one-step orthogonal self-assembly. This system shows complete specificity of each recognition motif for its complementary unit with no observable changes in the association constant upon functionalization. To explore potential applications of this UPB concept, random terpolymers possessing high concentrations of pendant alkyl chains and small amounts of recognition units were synthesized. Non-covalent crosslinking using a directed functionalization strategy resulted in dramatic increases in solution viscosities for metal crosslinked polymers with only minor changes in viscosity for hydrogen bonding motifs. The crosslinked materials were further functionalized via self-assembly by

  16. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  17. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  18. Free backbone carbonyls mediate rhodopsin activation.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Naoki; Pope, Andreyah; Sanchez-Reyes, Omar B; Eilers, Markus; Opefi, Chikwado A; Ziliox, Martine; Reeves, Philip J; Smith, Steven O

    2016-08-01

    Conserved prolines in the transmembrane helices of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are often considered to function as hinges that divide the helix into two segments capable of independent motion. Depending on their potential to hydrogen-bond, the free C=O groups associated with these prolines can facilitate conformational flexibility, conformational switching or stabilization of the receptor structure. To address the role of conserved prolines in family A GPCRs through solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we focus on bovine rhodopsin, a GPCR in the visual receptor subfamily. The free backbone C=O groups on helices H5 and H7 stabilize the inactive rhodopsin structure through hydrogen-bonds to residues on adjacent helices. In response to light-induced isomerization of the retinal chromophore, hydrogen-bonding interactions involving these C=O groups are released, thus facilitating repacking of H5 and H7 onto the transmembrane core of the receptor. These results provide insights into the multiple structural and functional roles of prolines in membrane proteins. PMID:27376589

  19. Truncation mutagenesis of the non-alpha-helical carboxyterminal tail domain of vimentin reveals contributions to cellular localization but not to filament assembly.

    PubMed

    Rogers, K R; Eckelt, A; Nimmrich, V; Janssen, K P; Schliwa, M; Herrmann, H; Franke, W W

    1995-02-01

    We have investigated the effect of stepwise truncating the carboxyterminal domain ("tail") of the intermediate filament (IF) protein vimentin of the clawed toad, Xenopus laevis, on filament assembly in vitro and, using cell transfection, in vivo and also on the cellular topology of the structures formed. All truncations examined, except the minimal one missing the last 11 amino acids which made the protein more sensitive to changes of ionic strength, did not significantly alter IF assembly in vitro, as judged by electron microscopy, viscometry and determination of viscoelastic properties with a laser-operated torsion pendulum. Stable transfections of vimentin-free mammalian cells with cDNAs encoding these mutations resulted at 28 degrees C, i.e. the permissive temperature for assembly of Xenopus vimentin, in the formation of extended IF bundle arrays. At 37 degrees C, however, the mutants lacking more than the last 35 amino acids could leave the cytoplasm and accumulated in the nucleus, indicating a certain topogenic element is located in the tail and directs cytoplasmic restriction in the wild-type protein although this does not form IFs under these conditions. Transfer to the nucleus is, however, abolished if the IF-consensus motif at the end of the rod domain is removed, suggesting that this part of the molecule also contributes to nuclear location. Similar results were obtained with human vimentin: While the rod entered the nucleus, headless vimentin, unable to form IFs, remained restricted to the cytoplasm owing to its tail domain. In contrast, tailless human vimentin and tailless mouse desmin, which are fully assembly-competent in vitro, both formed extensive IF arrays in the cytoplasm but did not accumulate in the nucleus. We conclude that in class III IF proteins stepwise deletions in the tail, while not considerably altering IF assembly in vitro, can change the topogenesis of IF proteins and structures in the living cell. PMID:7774600

  20. Solution structure of a chemosensory protein from the moth Mamestra brassicae.

    PubMed Central

    Mosbah, Amor; Campanacci, Valérie; Lartigue, Audrey; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian; Darbon, Hervé

    2003-01-01

    Chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are believed to be involved in chemical communication and perception. A number of such proteins, of molecular mass approximately 13 kDa, have been isolated from different sensory organs of a wide range of insect species. Several CSPs have been identified in the antennae and proboscis of the moth Mamestra brassicae. CSPMbraA6, a 112-amino-acid antennal protein, has been expressed in a soluble form in large quantities in the Escherichi coli periplasm. NMR structure determination of CSPMbraA6 has been performed with 1H- and 15N-labelled samples. The calculated structures present an average root mean square deviation about the mean structure of 0.63 A for backbone atoms and 1.27 A for all non-hydrogen atoms except the 12 N-terminal residues. The protein is well folded from residue 12 to residue 110, and consists of a non-bundle alpha-helical structure with six helices connected by alpha alpha loops. It has a globular shape, with overall dimensions of 32 A x 28 A x 24 A. A channel is visible in the hydrophobic core, with dimensions of 3 A x 9 A x 21 A. In some of the 20 solution structures calculated, this channel is closed either by Trp-94 at one end or by Tyr-26 at the other end; in some other solutions, this channel is closed at both ends. Binding experiments with 12-bromododecanol indicate that the CSPMbraA6 structure is modified upon ligand binding. PMID:12217077

  1. Membrane Protein Crystallisation: Current Trends and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Parker, Joanne L; Newstead, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Alpha helical membrane proteins are the targets for many pharmaceutical drugs and play important roles in physiology and disease processes. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in determining their atomic structure using X-ray crystallography. However, a major bottleneck still remains; the identification of conditions that give crystals that are suitable for structure determination. Over the past 10 years we have been analysing the crystallisation conditions reported for alpha helical membrane proteins with the aim to facilitate a rational approach to the design and implementation of successful crystallisation screens. The result has been the development of MemGold, MemGold2 and the additive screen MemAdvantage. The associated analysis, summarised and updated in this chapter, has revealed a number of surprisingly successfully strategies for crystallisation and detergent selection. PMID:27553235

  2. An alpha-helical extension of the ELMO1 pleckstrin homology domain mediates direct interaction to DOCK180 and is critical in Rac signaling.

    PubMed

    Komander, David; Patel, Manishha; Laurin, Mélanie; Fradet, Nadine; Pelletier, Ariane; Barford, David; Côté, Jean-François

    2008-11-01

    The mammalian DOCK180 protein belongs to an evolutionarily conserved protein family, which together with ELMO proteins, is essential for activation of Rac GTPase-dependent biological processes. Here, we have analyzed the DOCK180-ELMO1 interaction, and map direct interaction interfaces to the N-terminal 200 amino acids of DOCK180, and to the C-terminal 200 amino acids of ELMO1, comprising the ELMO1 PH domain. Structural and biochemical analysis of this PH domain reveals that it is incapable of phospholipid binding, but instead structurally resembles FERM domains. Moreover, the structure revealed an N-terminal amphiphatic alpha-helix, and point mutants of invariant hydrophobic residues in this helix disrupt ELMO1-DOCK180 complex formation. A secondary interaction between ELMO1 and DOCK180 is conferred by the DOCK180 SH3 domain and proline-rich motifs at the ELMO1 C-terminus. Mutation of both DOCK180-interaction sites on ELMO1 is required to disrupt the DOCK180-ELMO1 complex. Significantly, although this does not affect DOCK180 GEF activity toward Rac in vivo, Rac signaling is impaired, implying additional roles for ELMO in mediating intracellular Rac signaling. PMID:18768751

  3. Protein similarity from knot theory: geometric convolution and line weavings.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Michael A

    2005-01-01

    Shape similarity is one of the most elusive and intriguing questions of nature and mathematics. Proteins provide a rich domain in which to test theories of shape similarity. Proteins can match at different scales and in different arrangements. Sometimes the detection of common local structure is sufficient to infer global alignment of two proteins; at other times it provides false information. Proteins with very low sequence identity may share large substructures, or perhaps just a central core. There are even examples of proteins with nearly identical primary sequences in which alpha-helices have become beta-sheets. Shape similarity can be formulated (i) in terms of global metrics, such as RMSD or Hausdorff distance, (ii) in terms of subgraph isomorphisms, such as the detection of shared substructures with similar relative locations, or (iii) purely topologically, in terms of structure preserving transformations. Existing protein structure detection programs are built on the first two types of similarity. The third forms the foundations of knot theory. The thesis of this paper is this: Protein similarity detection leads naturally to algorithms operating at the metric, relational, and isotopic scales. The paper introduces a definition of similarity based on atomic motions that preserve local backbone topology without incurring significant distance errors. Such motions are motivated by the physical requirements for rearranging subsequences of a protein. Similarity detection then seeks rigid body motions able to overlay pairs of substructures, each related by a substructure-preserving motion, without necessarily requiring global structure preservation. This definition is general enough to span a wide range of questions: One can ask for full rearrangement of one protein into another while preserving global topology, as in drug design; or one can ask for rearrangements of sets of smaller substructures, preserving local but not global topology, as in protein evolution

  4. External Tank - The Structure Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welzyn, Kenneth; Pilet, Jeffrey C.; Diecidue-Conners, Dawn; Worden, Michelle; Guillot, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The External Tank forms the structural backbone of the Space Shuttle in the launch configuration. Because the tank flies to orbital velocity with the Space Shuttle Orbiter, minimization of weight is mandatory, to maximize payload performance. Choice of lightweight materials both for structure and thermal conditioning was necessary. The tank is large, and unique manufacturing facilities, tooling, handling, and transportation operations were required. Weld processes and tooling evolved with the design as it matured through several block changes, to reduce weight. Non Destructive Evaluation methods were used to assure integrity of welds and thermal protection system materials. The aluminum-lithium alloy was used near the end of the program and weld processes and weld repair techniques had to be refined. Development and implementation of friction stir welding was a substantial technology development incorporated during the Program. Automated thermal protection system application processes were developed for the majority of the tank surface. Material obsolescence was an issue throughout the 40 year program. The final configuration and tank weight enabled international space station assembly in a high inclination orbit allowing international cooperation with the Russian Federal Space Agency. Numerous process controls were implemented to assure product quality, and innovative proof testing was accomplished prior to delivery. Process controls were implemented to assure cleanliness in the production environment, to control contaminants, and to preclude corrosion. Each tank was accepted via rigorous inspections, including non-destructive evaluation techniques, proof testing, and all systems testing. In the post STS-107 era, the project focused on ascent debris risk reduction. This was accomplished via stringent process controls, post flight assessment using substantially improved imagery, and selective redesigns. These efforts were supported with a number of test programs to

  5. NET amyloidogenic backbone in human activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Pulze, L; Bassani, B; Gini, E; D'Antona, P; Grimaldi, A; Luini, A; Marino, F; Noonan, D M; Tettamanti, G; Valvassori, R; de Eguileor, M

    2016-03-01

    Activated human neutrophils produce a fibrillar DNA network [neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs)] for entrapping and killing bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. Our results suggest that the neutrophil extracellular traps show a resistant amyloidogenic backbone utilized for addressing reputed proteins and DNA against the non-self. The formation of amyloid fibrils in neutrophils is regulated by the imbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cytoplasm. The intensity and source of the ROS signal is determinant for promoting stress-associated responses such as amyloidogenesis and closely related events: autophagy, exosome release, activation of the adrenocorticotrophin hormone/α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (ACTH/α-MSH) loop and synthesis of specific cytokines. These interconnected responses in human activated neutrophils, that have been evaluated from a morphofunctional and quantitative viewpoint, represent primitive, but potent, innate defence mechanisms. In invertebrates, circulating phagocytic immune cells, when activated, show responses similar to those described previously for activated human neutrophils. Invertebrate cells within endoplasmic reticulum cisternae produce a fibrillar material which is then assembled into an amyloidogenic scaffold utilized to convey melanin close to the invader. These findings, in consideration to the critical role played by NET in the development of several pathologies, could explain the structural resistance of these scaffolds and could provide the basis for developing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in immunomediated diseases in which the innate branch of the immune system has a pivotal role. PMID:26462606

  6. µ-Calpain Conversion of Antiapoptotic Bfl-1 (BCL2A1) into a Prodeath Factor Reveals Two Distinct alpha-Helices Inducing Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jugé, Romain; Debaud, Anne-Laure; Giménez, Diana; Gillet, Germain; Bonnefoy-Bérard, Nathalie; Salgado, Jesús; Salles, Gilles; Aouacheria, Abdel; Kucharczak, Jérôme

    2012-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic Bfl-1 and pro-apoptotic Bax, two members of the Bcl-2 family sharing a similar structural fold, are classically viewed as antagonist regulators of apoptosis. However, both proteins were reported to be death inducers following cleavage by the cysteine protease µ-calpain. Here we demonstrate that calpain-mediated cleavage of full-length Bfl-1 induces the release of C-terminal membrane active α-helices that are responsible for its conversion into a pro-apoptotic factor. A careful comparison of the different membrane-active regions present in the Bfl-1 truncated fragments with homologous domains of Bax show that helix α5, but not α6, of Bfl-1 induces cell death and cytochrome c release from purified mitochondria through a Bax/Bak-dependent mechanism. In contrast, both helices α5 and α6 of Bax permeabilize mitochondria regardless of the presence of Bax or Bak. Moreover, we provide evidence that the α9 helix of Bfl-1 promotes cytochrome c release and apoptosis through a unique membrane-destabilizing action whereas Bax-α9 does not display such activities. Hence, despite a common 3D-structure, C-terminal toxic domains present on Bfl-1 and Bax function in a dissimilar manner to permeabilize mitochondria and induce apoptosis. These findings provide insights for designing therapeutic approaches that could exploit the cleavage of endogenous Bcl-2 family proteins or the use of Bfl-1/Bax-derived peptides to promote tumor cell clearance. PMID:22745672

  7. Design of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with Amino-bis-tetrahydrofuran Derivatives as P2-Ligands to Enhance Backbone-Binding Interactions. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Protein-Ligand X-ray Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Osswald, Heather L.; Sheri, Venkat Reddy; Kassekert, Luke A.; Chen, Shujing; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Hayashi, Hironori; Aoki, Manabu; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2015-10-30

    Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of very potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors are described. In an effort to improve backbone ligand–binding site interactions, we have incorporated basic-amines at the C4 position of the bis-tetrahydrofuran (bis-THF) ring. We speculated that these substituents would make hydrogen bonding interactions in the flap region of HIV-1 protease. Synthesis of these inhibitors was performed diastereoselectively. A number of inhibitors displayed very potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Inhibitors 25f, 25i, and 25j were evaluated against a number of highly-PI-resistant HIV-1 strains, and they exhibited improved antiviral activity over darunavir. Two high resolution X-ray structures of 25f- and 25g-bound HIV-1 protease revealed unique hydrogen bonding interactions with the backbone carbonyl group of Gly48 as well as with the backbone NH of Gly48 in the flap region of the enzyme active site. These ligand–binding site interactions are possibly responsible for their potent activity.

  8. Matt: local flexibility aids protein multiple structure alignment.

    PubMed

    Menke, Matthew; Berger, Bonnie; Cowen, Lenore

    2008-01-01

    Even when there is agreement on what measure a protein multiple structure alignment should be optimizing, finding the optimal alignment is computationally prohibitive. One approach used by many previous methods is aligned fragment pair chaining, where short structural fragments from all the proteins are aligned against each other optimally, and the final alignment chains these together in geometrically consistent ways. Ye and Godzik have recently suggested that adding geometric flexibility may help better model protein structures in a variety of contexts. We introduce the program Matt (Multiple Alignment with Translations and Twists), an aligned fragment pair chaining algorithm that, in intermediate steps, allows local flexibility between fragments: small translations and rotations are temporarily allowed to bring sets of aligned fragments closer, even if they are physically impossible under rigid body transformations. After a dynamic programming assembly guided by these "bent" alignments, geometric consistency is restored in the final step before the alignment is output. Matt is tested against other recent multiple protein structure alignment programs on the popular Homstrad and SABmark benchmark datasets. Matt's global performance is competitive with the other programs on Homstrad, but outperforms the other programs on SABmark, a benchmark of multiple structure alignments of proteins with more distant homology. On both datasets, Matt demonstrates an ability to better align the ends of alpha-helices and beta-strands, an important characteristic of any structure alignment program intended to help construct a structural template library for threading approaches to the inverse protein-folding problem. The related question of whether Matt alignments can be used to distinguish distantly homologous structure pairs from pairs of proteins that are not homologous is also considered. For this purpose, a p-value score based on the length of the common core and average root

  9. Solution Structure and Backbone Dynamics of Streptopain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Chieh; Houng, Hsiang-Chee; Chen, Chun-Liang; Wang, Pei-Ju; Kuo, Chih-Feng; Lin, Yee-Shin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lin, Ming T.; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Huang, Wenya; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SPE B) is a cysteine protease expressed by Streptococcus pyogenes. The D9N, G163S, G163S/A172S, and G239D mutant proteins were expressed to study the effect of the allelic variants on their protease activity. In contrast to other mutants, the G239D mutant was ∼12-fold less active. The Gly-239 residue is located within the C-terminal S230-G239 region, which cannot be observed in the x-ray structure. The three-dimensional structure and backbone dynamics of the 28-kDa mature SPE B (mSPE B) were determined. Unlike the x-ray structure of the 40-kDa zymogen SPE B (proSPE B), we observed the interactions between the C-terminal loop and the active site residues in mSPE B. The structural differences between mSPE B and proSPE B were the conformation of the C-terminal loop and the orientation of the catalytic His-195 residue, suggesting that activation and inactivation of SPE B is involved in the His-195 side-chain rotation. Dynamics analysis of mSPE B and the mSPE B/inhibitor complexes showed that the catalytic and C-terminal loops were the most flexible regions with low order parameter values of 0.5 to 0.8 and exhibited the motion on the ps/ns timescale. These findings suggest that the flexible C-terminal loop of SPE B may play an important role in controlling the substrate binding, resulting in its broad substrate specificity. PMID:19237546

  10. Statistical Analysis of RNA Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Hershkovitz, Eli; Sapiro, Guillermo; Tannenbaum, Allen; Williams, Loren Dean

    2009-01-01

    Local conformation is an important determinant of RNA catalysis and binding. The analysis of RNA conformation is particularly difficult due to the large number of degrees of freedom (torsion angles) per residue. Proteins, by comparison, have many fewer degrees of freedom per residue. In this work, we use and extend classical tools from statistics and signal processing to search for clusters in RNA conformational space. Results are reported both for scalar analysis, where each torsion angle is separately studied, and for vectorial analysis, where several angles are simultaneously clustered. Adapting techniques from vector quantization and clustering to the RNA structure, we find torsion angle clusters and RNA conformational motifs. We validate the technique using well-known conformational motifs, showing that the simultaneous study of the total torsion angle space leads to results consistent with known motifs reported in the literature and also to the finding of new ones. PMID:17048391

  11. AbDesign: an algorithm for combinatorial backbone design guided by natural conformations and sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lapidoth, Gideon D.; Baran, Dror; Pszolla, Gabriele M.; Norn, Christoffer; Alon, Assaf; Tyka, Michael D.; Fleishman, Sarel J.

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of protein function has made substantial progress, generating new enzymes, binders, inhibitors, and nanomaterials not previously seen in nature. However, the ability to design new protein backbones for function – essential to exert control over all polypeptide degrees of freedom – remains a critical challenge. Most previous attempts to design new backbones computed the mainchain from scratch. Here, instead, we describe a combinatorial backbone and sequence optimization algorithm called AbDesign, which leverages the large number of sequences and experimentally determined molecular structures of antibodies to construct new antibody models, dock them against target surfaces and optimize their sequence and backbone conformation for high stability and binding affinity. We used the algorithm to produce antibody designs that target the same molecular surfaces as nine natural, high-affinity antibodies; in six the backbone conformation at the core of the antibody binding surface is similar to the natural antibody targets, and in several cases sequence and sidechain conformations recapitulate those seen in the natural antibodies. In the case of an anti-lysozyme antibody, designed antibody CDRs at the periphery of the interface, such as L1 and H2, show a greater backbone conformation diversity than the CDRs at the core of the interface, and increase the binding surface area compared to the natural antibody, which could enhance affinity and specificity. PMID:25670500

  12. The cold denatured state of the C-terminal domain of protein L9 is compact and contains both native and non-native structure.

    PubMed

    Shan, Bing; McClendon, Sebastian; Rospigliosi, Carla; Eliezer, David; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2010-04-01

    Cold denaturation is a general property of globular proteins, and the process provides insight into the origins of the cooperativity of protein folding and the nature of partially folded states. Unfortunately, studies of protein cold denaturation have been hindered by the fact that the cold denatured state is normally difficult to access experimentally. Special conditions such as addition of high concentrations of denaturant, encapsulation into reverse micelles, the formation of emulsified solutions, high pressure, or extremes of pH have been applied, but these can perturb the unfolded state of proteins. The cold denatured state of the C-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9 can be populated under native-like conditions by taking advantage of a destabilizing point mutation which leads to cold denaturation at temperatures above 0 degrees C. This state is in slow exchange with the native state on the NMR time scale. Virtually complete backbone (15)N, (13)C, and (1)H as well as side-chain (13)C(beta) and (1)H(beta) chemical shift assignments were obtained for the cold denatured state at pH 5.7, 12 degrees C. Chemical shift analysis, backbone N-H residual dipolar couplings, amide proton NOEs, and R(2) relaxation rates all indicate that the cold denatured state of CTL9 (the C-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9) not only contains significant native-like secondary structure but also non-native structure. The regions corresponding to the two native alpha-helices show a strong tendency to populate helical Phi and Psi angles. The segment which connects alpha-helix 2 and beta-strand 2 (residues 107-124) in the native state exhibits a significant preference to form non-native helical structure in the cold denatured state. The structure observed in the cold denatured state of the I98A mutant is similar to that observed in the pH 3.8 unfolded state of wild type CTL9 at 25 degrees C, suggesting that it is a robust feature of the denatured state ensemble of this

  13. WDM backbone network with guaranteed performance planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Peng; Sheng, Wang; Zhong, Xusi; Li, Lemin

    2005-11-01

    Wavelength-Division multiplexing (WDM), which allows a single fibre to carry multiple signals simultaneously, has been widely used to increase link capacity and is a promising technology in backbone transport network. But designing such WDM backbone network is hard for two reasons, one is the uncertainty of future traffic demand, the other is difficulty of planning of the backup resource for failure conditions. As a result, enormous amount of link capacity for the network has to be provided for the network. Recently, a new approach called Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme (VLBS) has been proposed to design the WDM backbone network. The network planned by Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme is insensitive to the traffic and continues to guarantee performance under a user defined number of link or node failures. In this paper, the Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme (VLBS) for backbone network planning has been studied and a new Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme has been proposed. Compared with the early work, the new Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme is much more general and can be used for the computation of the link capacity of both homogeneous and heterogeneous networks. The abbreviation for the general Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme is GVLBS. After a brief description of the VLBS, we will give the detail derivation of the GVLBS. The central concept of the derivation of GVLBS is transforming the heterogeneous network into a homogeneous network, and taking advantage of VLBS to get GVLBS. Such transformation process is described and the derivation and analysis of GVLBS for link capacity under normal and failure conditions is also given. The numerical results show that GVLBS can compute the minimum link capacity required for the heterogeneous backbone network under different conditions (normal or failure).

  14. Interplay among side chain sequence, backbone composition, and residue rigidification in polypeptide folding and assembly

    PubMed Central

    Horne, W. Seth; Price, Joshua L.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2008-01-01

    The extent to which polypeptide conformation depends on side-chain composition and sequence has been widely studied, but less is known about the importance of maintaining an α-amino acid backbone. Here, we examine a series of peptides with backbones that feature different repeating patterns of α- and β-amino acid residues but an invariant side-chain sequence. In the pure α-backbone, this sequence corresponds to the previously studied peptide GCN4-pLI, which forms a very stable four-helix bundle quaternary structure. Physical characterization in solution and crystallographic structure determination show that a variety of α/β-peptide backbones can adopt sequence-encoded quaternary structures similar to that of the α prototype. There is a loss in helix bundle stability upon β-residue incorporation; however, stability of the quaternary structure is not a simple function of β-residue content. We find that cyclically constrained β-amino acid residues can stabilize the folds of α/β-peptide GCN4-pLI analogues and restore quaternary structure formation to backbones that are predominantly unfolded in the absence of cyclic residues. Our results show a surprising degree of plasticity in terms of the backbone compositions that can manifest the structural information encoded in a sequence of amino acid side chains. These findings offer a framework for the design of nonnatural oligomers that mimic the structural and functional properties of proteins. PMID:18587049

  15. ANSS Backbone Station Installation and Site Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meremonte, M.; Leeds, A.; Overturf, D.; McMillian, J.; Allen, J.; McNamara, D.

    2004-12-01

    During 2004 several new broadband seismic stations have been deployed as a part of the USGS's Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) backbone and regional networks. New stations include: ERPA, MNTX, OGLA, AMTX, NATX, KCCO, BMO, MARC, TZTN, LAO, DGMT, REDW, KSU1, MOOW, TPAW, LOHW, RAMW. Permanent station locations were chosen to minimize the local noise conditions by recording continuous data and using a quantitative analysis of the statistical distribution of noise power estimates. For each one-hour segment of continuous data, a power spectral density (PSD) is estimated and smoothed in full octave averages at 1/8 octave intervals. Powers for each 1/8 period interval were then accumulated in one dB power bins. A statistical analysis of power bins yields probability density functions (PDFs) as a function of noise power for each of the octave bands at each station and component. Examination of earthquake signal, artifacts related to station operation and episodic cultural noise in the PDFs allow us to estimate both the overall station quality and the level of earth noise at each potential backbone site. The main function of a seismic network, such as the ANSS, is to provide high quality data for earthquake monitoring, source studies, and Earth structure research. The utility of seismic data is greatly increased when noise levels are reduced. A good quantification and understanding of seismic noise is a first step at reducing noise levels in seismic data and improving overall data quality from the ANSS backbone network.

  16. Structures of segments of [alpha]-synuclein fused to maltose-binding protein suggest intermediate states during amyloid formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Minglei; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberg, David

    2011-08-29

    Aggregates of the protein {alpha}-synuclein are the main component of Lewy bodies, the hallmark of Parkinson's disease. {alpha}-Synuclein aggregates are also found in many human neurodegenerative diseases known as synucleinopathies. In vivo, {alpha}-synuclein associates with membranes and adopts {alpha}-helical conformations. The details of how {alpha}-synuclein converts from the functional native state to amyloid aggregates remain unknown. In this study, we use maltose-binding protein (MBP) as a carrier to crystallize segments of {alpha}-synuclein. From crystal structures of fusions between MBP and four segments of {alpha}-synuclein, we have been able to trace a virtual model of the first 72 residues of {alpha}-synuclein. Instead of a mostly {alpha}-helical conformation observed in the lipid environment, our crystal structures show {alpha}-helices only at residues 1-13 and 20-34. The remaining segments are extended loops or coils. All of the predicted fiber-forming segments based on the 3D profile method are in extended conformations. We further show that the MBP fusion proteins with fiber-forming segments from {alpha}-synuclein can also form fiber-like nano-crystals or amyloid-like fibrils. Our structures suggest intermediate states during amyloid formation of {alpha}-synuclein.

  17. Phylogeny of the plant 4/1 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Sergey Y.; Solovyev, Andrey G.; Troitsky, Alexey V.

    2015-01-01

    The Nt-4/1 protein of unknown function has been shown to be alpha-helical and predominantly expressed in conductive tissues of tobacco plants. So far, obvious Nt-4/1 orthologs were found only in flowering plants. We report the analysis of 4/1 genes and the encoded proteins of lower land plants (Morozov et al., 2015) [1]. In this data article, we present two phylogenetic trees of angiosperm 4/1 proteins together with orthologs from liverworts, lycophytes, ferns and gymnosperms. PMID:26759821

  18. Phylogeny of the plant 4/1 proteins.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Sergey Y; Solovyev, Andrey G; Troitsky, Alexey V

    2016-03-01

    The Nt-4/1 protein of unknown function has been shown to be alpha-helical and predominantly expressed in conductive tissues of tobacco plants. So far, obvious Nt-4/1 orthologs were found only in flowering plants. We report the analysis of 4/1 genes and the encoded proteins of lower land plants (Morozov et al., 2015) [1]. In this data article, we present two phylogenetic trees of angiosperm 4/1 proteins together with orthologs from liverworts, lycophytes, ferns and gymnosperms. PMID:26759821

  19. Electron transfer in proteins.

    PubMed

    Gray, H B; Winkler, J R

    1996-01-01

    Electron-transfer (ET) reactions are key steps in a diverse array of biological transformations ranging from photosynthesis to aerobic respiration. A powerful theoretical formalism has been developed that describes ET rates in terms of two parameters: the nuclear reorganization energy (lambda) and the electronic-coupling strength (HAB). Studies of ET reactions in ruthenium-modified proteins have probed lambda and HAB in several metalloproteins (cytochrome c, myoglobin, azurin). This work has shown that protein reorganization energies are sensitive to the medium surrounding the redox sites and that an aqueous environment, in particular, leads to large reorganization energies. Analyses of electronic-coupling strengths suggest that the efficiency of long-range ET depends on the protein secondary structure: beta sheets appear to mediate coupling more efficiently than alpha-helical structures, and hydrogen bonds play a critical role in both. PMID:8811189

  20. Characterizing Aciniform Silk Repetitive Domain Backbone Dynamics and Hydrodynamic Modularity.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marie-Laurence; Xu, Lingling; Sarker, Muzaddid; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K

    2016-01-01

    Spider aciniform (wrapping) silk is a remarkable fibrillar biomaterial with outstanding mechanical properties. It is a modular protein consisting, in Argiope trifasciata, of a core repetitive domain of 200 amino acid units (W units). In solution, the W units comprise a globular folded core, with five α-helices, and disordered tails that are linked to form a ~63-residue intrinsically disordered linker in concatemers. Herein, we present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based (15)N spin relaxation analysis, allowing characterization of backbone dynamics as a function of residue on the ps-ns timescale in the context of the single W unit (W₁) and the two unit concatemer (W₂). Unambiguous mapping of backbone dynamics throughout W₂ was made possible by segmental NMR active isotope-enrichment through split intein-mediated trans-splicing. Spectral density mapping for W₁ and W₂ reveals a striking disparity in dynamics between the folded core and the disordered linker and tail regions. These data are also consistent with rotational diffusion behaviour where each globular domain tumbles almost independently of its neighbour. At a localized level, helix 5 exhibits elevated high frequency dynamics relative to the proximal helix 4, supporting a model of fibrillogenesis where this helix unfolds as part of the transition to a mixed α-helix/β-sheet fibre. PMID:27517921

  1. Characterizing Aciniform Silk Repetitive Domain Backbone Dynamics and Hydrodynamic Modularity

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Marie-Laurence; Xu, Lingling; Sarker, Muzaddid; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K.

    2016-01-01

    Spider aciniform (wrapping) silk is a remarkable fibrillar biomaterial with outstanding mechanical properties. It is a modular protein consisting, in Argiope trifasciata, of a core repetitive domain of 200 amino acid units (W units). In solution, the W units comprise a globular folded core, with five α-helices, and disordered tails that are linked to form a ~63-residue intrinsically disordered linker in concatemers. Herein, we present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based 15N spin relaxation analysis, allowing characterization of backbone dynamics as a function of residue on the ps–ns timescale in the context of the single W unit (W1) and the two unit concatemer (W2). Unambiguous mapping of backbone dynamics throughout W2 was made possible by segmental NMR active isotope-enrichment through split intein-mediated trans-splicing. Spectral density mapping for W1 and W2 reveals a striking disparity in dynamics between the folded core and the disordered linker and tail regions. These data are also consistent with rotational diffusion behaviour where each globular domain tumbles almost independently of its neighbour. At a localized level, helix 5 exhibits elevated high frequency dynamics relative to the proximal helix 4, supporting a model of fibrillogenesis where this helix unfolds as part of the transition to a mixed α-helix/β-sheet fibre. PMID:27517921

  2. Secondary-structure characterization by far-UV CD of highly purified uncoupling protein 1 expressed in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Douette, Pierre; Navet, Rachel; Bouillenne, Fabrice; Brans, Alain; Sluse-Goffart, Claudine; Matagne, André; Sluse, Francis E

    2004-01-01

    The rat UCP1 (uncoupling protein 1) is a mitochondrial inner-membrane carrier involved in energy dissipation and heat production. We expressed UCP1 carrying a His6 epitope at its C-terminus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria. The recombinant-tagged UCP1 was purified by immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography to homogeneity (>95%). This made it suitable for subsequent biophysical characterization. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments showed that n-dodecyl-beta-D-maltoside-solubilized UCP1-His6 retained its PN (purine nucleotide)-binding capacity. The far-UV CD spectrum of the functional protein clearly indicated the predominance of alpha-helices in the UCP1 secondary structure. The UCP1 secondary structure exhibited an alpha-helical degree of approx. 68%, which is at least 25% higher than the previously reported estimations based on computational predictions. Moreover, the helical content remained unchanged in free and PN-loaded UCP1. A homology model of the first repeat of UCP1, built on the basis of X-ray-solved close parent, the ADP/ATP carrier, strengthened the CD experimental results. Our experimental and computational results indicate that (i) alpha-helices are the major component of UCP1 secondary structure; (ii) PN-binding mechanism does not involve significant secondary-structure rearrangement; and (iii) UCP1 shares similar secondary-structure characteristics with the ADP/ATP carrier, at least for the first repeat. PMID:14766012

  3. Base-pairing potential identified by in vitro selection predicts the kinked RNA backbone observed in the crystal structure of the alfalfa mosaic virus RNA-coat protein complex.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Michael; Scott, Felicia; Guogas, Laura M; Gehrke, Lee

    2006-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the 3' terminus of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA in complex with an amino-terminal coat protein peptide revealed an unusual RNA fold with inter-AUGC basepairing stabilized by key arginine residues (Guogas, et al., 2004). To probe viral RNA interactions with the full-length coat protein, we have used in vitro genetic selection to characterize potential folding patterns among RNAs isolated from a complex randomized pool. Nitrocellulose filter retention, electrophoretic mobility bandshift analysis, and hydroxyl radical footprinting techniques were used to define binding affinities and to localize the potential RNA-protein interaction sites. Minimized binding sites were identified that included both the randomized domain and a portion of the constant regions of the selected RNAs. The selected RNAs, identified by their ability to bind full-length coat protein, have the potential to form the same unusual inter-AUGC Watson-Crick base pairs observed in the crystal structure, although the primary sequences diverge from the wild-type RNA. A constant feature of both the wild-type RNA and the selected RNAs is a G ribonucleotide in the third position of an AUGC-like repeat. Competitive binding assays showed that substituting adenosine for the constant guanosine in either the wild-type or selected RNAs impaired coat protein binding. These data suggest that the interactions observed in the RNA-peptide structure are likely recapitulated when the full-length protein binds. Further, the results underscore the power of in vitro genetic selection for probing RNA-protein structure and function. PMID:16312015

  4. Secondary Structure Switch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2006-01-01

    Neurogenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease involve a transformation between two peptide and protein structures of alpha-helices and beta-sheets, where the peptide backbone can also participate in metal ion binding in addition to histidine residues. However, the complete absence of change in conformation of Coiled…

  5. Functional and Genomic Analyses of Alpha-Solenoid Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, David; Palidwor, Gareth A.; Shcherbinin, Sergey; Szengel, Angelika; Schaefer, Martin H.; Perez-Iratxeta, Carol; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-solenoids are flexible protein structural domains formed by ensembles of alpha-helical repeats (Armadillo and HEAT repeats among others). While homology can be used to detect many of these repeats, some alpha-solenoids have very little sequence homology to proteins of known structure and we expect that many remain undetected. We previously developed a method for detection of alpha-helical repeats based on a neural network trained on a dataset of protein structures. Here we improved the detection algorithm and updated the training dataset using recently solved structures of alpha-solenoids. Unexpectedly, we identified occurrences of alpha-solenoids in solved protein structures that escaped attention, for example within the core of the catalytic subunit of PI3KC. Our results expand the current set of known alpha-solenoids. Application of our tool to the protein universe allowed us to detect their significant enrichment in proteins interacting with many proteins, confirming that alpha-solenoids are generally involved in protein-protein interactions. We then studied the taxonomic distribution of alpha-solenoids to discuss an evolutionary scenario for the emergence of this type of domain, speculating that alpha-solenoids have emerged in multiple taxa in independent events by convergent evolution. We observe a higher rate of alpha-solenoids in eukaryotic genomes and in some prokaryotic families, such as Cyanobacteria and Planctomycetes, which could be associated to increased cellular complexity. The method is available at http://cbdm.mdc-berlin.de/~ard2/. PMID:24278209

  6. Backbone Assignment of the MALT1 Paracaspase by Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Nowakowski, Michal; Baraznenok, Vera; Stenberg, Gun; Lindberg, Jimmy; Mayzel, Maxim; Orekhov, Vladislav; Agback, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is a unique paracaspase protein whose protease activity mediates oncogenic NF-κB signalling in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCLs). ABC-DLBCLs are aggressive lymphomas with high resistance to current chemotherapies. Low survival rate among patients emphasizes the urgent need for alternative treatment options. The characterization of the MALT1 will be an essential tool for developing new target-directed drugs against MALT1 dependent disorders. As the first step in the atomic-level NMR studies of the system, here we report, the 15N/13C/1H backbone assignment of the apo form of the MALT1 paracaspase region together with the third immunoglobulin-like (Ig3) domain, 44 kDa, by high resolution NMR. In addition, the non-uniform sampling (NUS) based targeted acquisition procedure is evaluated as a mean of decreasing acquisition and analysis time for larger proteins. PMID:26788853

  7. Backbone dependency further improves side chain prediction efficiency in the Energy-based Conformer Library (bEBL).

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sabareesh; Senes, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    Side chain optimization is an integral component of many protein modeling applications. In these applications, the conformational freedom of the side chains is often explored using libraries of discrete, frequently occurring conformations. Because side chain optimization can pose a computationally intensive combinatorial problem, the nature of these conformer libraries is important for ensuring efficiency and accuracy in side chain prediction. We have previously developed an innovative method to create a conformer library with enhanced performance. The Energy-based Library (EBL) was obtained by analyzing the energetic interactions between conformers and a large number of natural protein environments from crystal structures. This process guided the selection of conformers with the highest propensity to fit into spaces that should accommodate a side chain. Because the method requires a large crystallographic data-set, the EBL was created in a backbone-independent fashion. However, it is well established that side chain conformation is strongly dependent on the local backbone geometry, and that backbone-dependent libraries are more efficient in side chain optimization. Here we present the backbone-dependent EBL (bEBL), whose conformers are independently sorted for each populated region of Ramachandran space. The resulting library closely mirrors the local backbone-dependent distribution of side chain conformation. Compared to the EBL, we demonstrate that the bEBL uses fewer conformers to produce similar side chain prediction outcomes, thus further improving performance with respect to the already efficient backbone-independent version of the library. PMID:25212195

  8. Global Transcriptional Regulation of Backbone Genes in Broad-Host-Range Plasmid RA3 from the IncU Group Involves Segregation Protein KorB (ParB Family).

    PubMed

    Kulinska, Anna; Godziszewska, Jolanta; Wojciechowska, Anna; Ludwiczak, Marta; Jagura-Burdzy, Grazyna

    2016-04-01

    The KorB protein of the broad-host-range conjugative plasmid RA3 from the IncU group belongs to the ParB family of plasmid and chromosomal segregation proteins. As a partitioning DNA-binding factor, KorB specifically recognizes a 16-bp palindrome which is an essential motif in the centromere-like sequence parSRA3, forms a segrosome, and together with its partner IncC (ParA family) participates in active DNA segregation ensuring stable plasmid maintenance. Here we show that by binding to this palindromic sequence, KorB also acts as a repressor for the adjacent mobC promoter driving expression of the mobC-nicoperon, which is involved in DNA processing during conjugation. Three other promoters, one buried in the conjugative transfer module and two divergent promoters located at the border between the replication and stability regions, are regulated by KorB binding to additional KorB operators (OBs). KorB acts as a repressor at a distance, binding to OBs separated from their cognate promoters by between 46 and 1,317 nucleotides. This repressor activity is facilitated by KorB spreading along DNA, since a polymerization-deficient KorB variant with its dimerization and DNA-binding abilities intact is inactive in transcriptional repression. KorB may act as a global regulator of RA3 plasmid functions in Escherichia coli, since its overexpression in transnegatively interferes with mini-RA3 replication and stable maintenance of RA3. PMID:26850301

  9. Protein secondary structural types are differentially coded on messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Thanaraj, T. A.; Argos, P.

    1996-01-01

    Tricodon regions on messenger RNAs corresponding to a set of proteins from Escherichia coli were scrutinized for their translation speed. The fractional frequency values of the individual codons as they occur in mRNAs of highly expressed genes from Escherichia coli were taken as an indicative measure of the translation speed. The tricodons were classified by the sum of the frequency values of the constituent codons. Examination of the conformation of the encoded amino acid residues in the corresponding protein tertiary structures revealed a correlation between codon usage in mRNA and topological features of the encoded proteins. Alpha helices on proteins tend to be preferentially coded by translationally fast mRNA regions while the slow segments often code for beta strands and coil regions. Fast regions correspondingly avoid coding for beta strands and coil regions while the slow regions similarly move away from encoding alpha helices. Structural and mechanistic aspects of the ribosome peptide channel support the relevance of sequence fragment translation and subsequent conformation. A discussion is presented relating the observation to the reported kinetic data on the formation and stabilization of protein secondary structural types during protein folding. The observed absence of such strong positive selection for codons in non-highly expressed genes is compatible with existing theories that mutation pressure may well dominate codon selection in non-highly expressed genes. PMID:8897597

  10. Solvation thermodynamics of amino acid side chains on a short peptide backbone

    SciTech Connect

    Hajari, Timir; Vegt, Nico F. A. van der

    2015-04-14

    The hydration process of side chain analogue molecules differs from that of the actual amino acid side chains in peptides and proteins owing to the effects of the peptide backbone on the aqueous solvent environment. A recent molecular simulation study has provided evidence that all nonpolar side chains, attached to a short peptide backbone, are considerably less hydrophobic than the free side chain analogue molecules. In contrast to this, the hydrophilicity of the polar side chains is hardly affected by the backbone. To analyze the origin of these observations, we here present a molecular simulation study on temperature dependent solvation free energies of nonpolar and polar side chains attached to a short peptide backbone. The estimated solvation entropies and enthalpies of the various amino acid side chains are compared with existing side chain analogue data. The solvation entropies and enthalpies of the polar side chains are negative, but in absolute magnitude smaller compared with the corresponding analogue data. The observed differences are large; however, owing to a nearly perfect enthalpy-entropy compensation, the solvation free energies of polar side chains remain largely unaffected by the peptide backbone. We find that a similar compensation does not apply to the nonpolar side chains; while the backbone greatly reduces the unfavorable solvation entropies, the solvation enthalpies are either more favorable or only marginally affected. This results in a very small unfavorable free energy cost, or even free energy gain, of solvating the nonpolar side chains in strong contrast to solvation of small hydrophobic or nonpolar molecules in bulk water. The solvation free energies of nonpolar side chains have been furthermore decomposed into a repulsive cavity formation contribution and an attractive dispersion free energy contribution. We find that cavity formation next to the peptide backbone is entropically favored over formation of similar sized nonpolar side

  11. Histidine-Directed Arylation/Alkenylation of Backbone N-H Bonds Mediated by Copper(II).

    PubMed

    Ohata, Jun; Minus, Matthew B; Abernathy, Morgan E; Ball, Zachary T

    2016-06-22

    Chemical modification of proteins and peptides represents a challenge of reaction design as well as an important biological tool. In contrast to side-chain modification, synthetic methods to alter backbone structure are extremely limited. In this communication, copper-mediated backbone N-alkenylation or N-arylation of peptides and proteins by direct modification of natural sequences is described. Histidine residues direct oxidative coupling of boronic acids at the backbone NH of a neighboring amino acid. The mild reaction conditions in common physiological buffers, at ambient temperature, are compatible with proteins and biological systems. This simple reaction demonstrates the potential for directed reactions in complex systems to allow modification of N-H bonds that directly affect polypeptide structure, stability, and function. PMID:27249339

  12. Extracting the Information Backbone in Online System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers have been mainly dedicated to improving the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity) of the algorithms while they have overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such “less can be more” feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improving both of their effectiveness and efficiency. PMID:23690946

  13. Toward future IP optical backbone networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urushidani, Shigeo

    2005-11-01

    The rapid and aggressive penetration of broadband access services such as fiber to the home (FTTH) has been accelerating the increase in IP traffic volume and new networking technologies are required in order to accommodate future traffic in a cost-effective manner. This paper overviews the advanced IP optical network architecture and technologies for very-large-scale IP backbone networks. These technologies are the key to accommodate the huge volumes of IP traffic expected and control network resources in an effective and dynamic manner. We describe advanced IP optical networking technologies which accommodate multiple service networks using multi-instance technologies, and enable multi-layer traffic engineering using virtual network topology technologies. The migration scenario is described from the existing networks to GMPLS networks; reference is made to the advanced Path Computation Element (PCE) which enables multi-layer traffic engineering and MPLS/GMPLS migration. New network concepts such as Layer 1 Virtual Private Network (L1VPN) and GMPLS interoperability issues, which are being discussed in IETF, are also described.

  14. Extracting the information backbone in online system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers have been mainly dedicated to improving the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity) of the algorithms while they have overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such "less can be more" feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improving both of their effectiveness and efficiency. PMID:23690946

  15. A New Secondary Structure Assignment Algorithm Using Cα Backbone Fragments.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Guishen; Liu, An; Xu, Shutan; Wang, Lincong; Zou, Shuxue

    2016-01-01

    The assignment of secondary structure elements in proteins is a key step in the analysis of their structures and functions. We have developed an algorithm, SACF (secondary structure assignment based on Cα fragments), for secondary structure element (SSE) assignment based on the alignment of Cα backbone fragments with central poses derived by clustering known SSE fragments. The assignment algorithm consists of three steps: First, the outlier fragments on known SSEs are detected. Next, the remaining fragments are clustered to obtain the central fragments for each cluster. Finally, the central fragments are used as a template to make assignments. Following a large-scale comparison of 11 secondary structure assignment methods, SACF, KAKSI and PROSS are found to have similar agreement with DSSP, while PCASSO agrees with DSSP best. SACF and PCASSO show preference to reducing residues in N and C cap regions, whereas KAKSI, P-SEA and SEGNO tend to add residues to the terminals when DSSP assignment is taken as standard. Moreover, our algorithm is able to assign subtle helices (310-helix, π-helix and left-handed helix) and make uniform assignments, as well as to detect rare SSEs in β-sheets or long helices as outlier fragments from other programs. The structural uniformity should be useful for protein structure classification and prediction, while outlier fragments underlie the structure-function relationship. PMID:26978354

  16. Bond distances in polypeptide backbones depend on the local conformation.

    PubMed

    Improta, Roberto; Vitagliano, Luigi; Esposito, Luciana

    2015-06-01

    By combining quantum-mechanical analysis of small model peptides and statistical surveys of high-resolution protein structures, a systematic conformational dependence of bond lengths in polypeptide backbones has been unveiled which involves both the peptide bond (C-O and C-N) and those bonds centred on the C(α) atom. All of these bond lengths indeed display a systematic variability in the ψ angle according to both calculations and surveys of protein structures. The overall agreement between the computed and the statistical data suggests that these trends are essentially driven by local effects. The dependence of C(α) distances on ψ is governed by interactions between the σ system of the C(α) moiety and the C-O π system of the peptide bond. Maximum and minimum values for each bond distance are found for conformations with the specific bond perpendicular and parallel to the adjacent CONH peptide plane, respectively. On the other hand, the variability of the C-O and C-N distances is related to the strength of the interactions between the lone pair of the N atom and the C-O π* system, which is modulated by the ψ angle. The C-O and C-N distances are related but their trends are not strictly connected to peptide-bond planarity, although a correlation amongst all of these parameters is expected on the basis of the classical resonance model. PMID:26057667

  17. A New Secondary Structure Assignment Algorithm Using Cα Backbone Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Guishen; Liu, An; Xu, Shutan; Wang, Lincong; Zou, Shuxue

    2016-01-01

    The assignment of secondary structure elements in proteins is a key step in the analysis of their structures and functions. We have developed an algorithm, SACF (secondary structure assignment based on Cα fragments), for secondary structure element (SSE) assignment based on the alignment of Cα backbone fragments with central poses derived by clustering known SSE fragments. The assignment algorithm consists of three steps: First, the outlier fragments on known SSEs are detected. Next, the remaining fragments are clustered to obtain the central fragments for each cluster. Finally, the central fragments are used as a template to make assignments. Following a large-scale comparison of 11 secondary structure assignment methods, SACF, KAKSI and PROSS are found to have similar agreement with DSSP, while PCASSO agrees with DSSP best. SACF and PCASSO show preference to reducing residues in N and C cap regions, whereas KAKSI, P-SEA and SEGNO tend to add residues to the terminals when DSSP assignment is taken as standard. Moreover, our algorithm is able to assign subtle helices (310-helix, π-helix and left-handed helix) and make uniform assignments, as well as to detect rare SSEs in β-sheets or long helices as outlier fragments from other programs. The structural uniformity should be useful for protein structure classification and prediction, while outlier fragments underlie the structure–function relationship. PMID:26978354

  18. How does a simplified-sequence protein fold?

    PubMed

    Guarnera, Enrico; Pellarin, Riccardo; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2009-09-16

    To investigate a putatively primordial protein we have simplified the sequence of a 56-residue alpha/beta fold (the immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G) by replacing it with polyalanine, polythreonine, and diglycine segments at regions of the sequence that in the folded structure are alpha-helical, beta-strand, and turns, respectively. Remarkably, multiple folding and unfolding events are observed in a 15-micros molecular dynamics simulation at 330 K. The most stable state (populated at approximately 20%) of the simplified-sequence variant of protein G has the same alpha/beta topology as the wild-type but shows the characteristics of a molten globule, i.e., loose contacts among side chains and lack of a specific hydrophobic core. The unfolded state is heterogeneous and includes a variety of alpha/beta topologies but also fully alpha-helical and fully beta-sheet structures. Transitions within the denatured state are very fast, and the molten-globule state is reached in <1 micros by a framework mechanism of folding with multiple pathways. The native structure of the wild-type is more rigid than the molten-globule conformation of the simplified-sequence variant. The difference in structural stability and the very fast folding of the simplified protein suggest that evolution has enriched the primordial alphabet of amino acids mainly to optimize protein function by stabilization of a unique structure with specific tertiary interactions. PMID:19751679

  19. Theoretical model of prion propagation: a misfolded protein induces misfolding.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Boniecki, Michal; Kolinski, Andrzej; Piela, Lucjan

    2005-05-31

    There is a hypothesis that dangerous diseases such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, Alzheimer's, fatal familial insomnia, and several others are induced by propagation of wrong or misfolded conformations of some vital proteins. If for some reason the misfolded conformations were acquired by many such protein molecules it might lead to a "conformational" disease of the organism. Here, a theoretical model of the molecular mechanism of such a conformational disease is proposed, in which a metastable (or misfolded) form of a protein induces a similar misfolding of another protein molecule (conformational autocatalysis). First, a number of amino acid sequences composed of 32 aa have been designed that fold rapidly into a well defined native-like alpha-helical conformation. From a large number of such sequences a subset of 14 had a specific feature of their energy landscape, a well defined local energy minimum (higher than the global minimum for the alpha-helical fold) corresponding to beta-type structure. Only one of these 14 sequences exhibited a strong autocatalytic tendency to form a beta-sheet dimer capable of further propagation of protofibril-like structure. Simulations were done by using a reduced, although of high resolution, protein model and the replica exchange Monte Carlo sampling procedure. PMID:15911770

  20. Crystal Structure of Menin Reveals Binding Site for Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Murai, Marcelo J.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Reddy, Gireesh; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2014-10-02

    Menin is a tumor suppressor protein that is encoded by the MEN1 (multiple endocrine neoplasia 1) gene and controls cell growth in endocrine tissues. Importantly, menin also serves as a critical oncogenic cofactor of MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) fusion proteins in acute leukemias. Direct association of menin with MLL fusion proteins is required for MLL fusion protein-mediated leukemogenesis in vivo, and this interaction has been validated as a new potential therapeutic target for development of novel anti-leukemia agents. Here, we report the first crystal structure of menin homolog from Nematostella vectensis. Due to a very high sequence similarity, the Nematostella menin is a close homolog of human menin, and these two proteins likely have very similar structures. Menin is predominantly an {alpha}-helical protein with the protein core comprising three tetratricopeptide motifs that are flanked by two {alpha}-helical bundles and covered by a {beta}-sheet motif. A very interesting feature of menin structure is the presence of a large central cavity that is highly conserved between Nematostella and human menin. By employing site-directed mutagenesis, we have demonstrated that this cavity constitutes the binding site for MLL. Our data provide a structural basis for understanding the role of menin as a tumor suppressor protein and as an oncogenic co-factor of MLL fusion proteins. It also provides essential structural information for development of inhibitors targeting the menin-MLL interaction as a novel therapeutic strategy in MLL-related leukemias.

  1. Backbone and side chain NMR assignments for the ribosome assembly factor Nop6 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Jan Philip; Lioutikov, Anatoli; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Wöhnert, Jens

    2014-10-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nop6 protein is involved in the maturation of the small ribosomal subunit. It contains a central RNA binding domain and a predicted C-terminal coiled-coil domain. Here we report the almost complete (>90%) (1)H,(13)C,(15)N backbone and side chain NMR assignment of a 15 kDa Nop6 construct comprising the RNA binding and coiled-coil domains. PMID:23921755

  2. Radiation safety system (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication and installation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, J.E.; Sturrock, J.C.; Gallegos, F.R.

    1998-12-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) Backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system insuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS Backbones control the safety fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low energy beam transport. The Backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the Backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two Linac Backbone segments and experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3,500 feet from beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The Backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely.

  3. Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication, and installation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, J. E.; Sturrock, J. C.; Gallegos, F. R.

    1998-12-10

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system ensuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS backbones control the safety-fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low-energy beam transport. The backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two linac backbone segments and the experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3500 feet from the beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely.

  4. Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication, and installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmarth, J. E.; Sturrock, J. C.; Gallegos, F. R.

    1998-12-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system ensuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS backbones control the safety-fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low-energy beam transport. The backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two linac backbone segments and the experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3500 feet from the beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely.

  5. Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication, and installation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, J.E.; Sturrock, J.C.; Gallegos, F.R.

    1998-12-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system ensuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS backbones control the safety-fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low-energy beam transport. The backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two linac backbone segments and the experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3500 feet from the beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Molecular Chemical Structure of Barley Proteins Revealed by Ultra-Spatially Resolved Synchrotron Light Sourced FTIR Microspectroscopy: Comparison of Barley Varieties

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    Barley protein structure affects the barley quality, fermentation, and degradation behavior in both humans and animals among other factors such as protein matrix. Publications show various biological differences among barley varieties such as Valier and Harrington, which have significantly different degradation behaviors. The objectives of this study were to reveal the molecular structure of barley protein, comparing various varieties (Dolly, Valier, Harrington, LP955, AC Metcalfe, and Sisler), and quantify protein structure profiles using Gaussian and Lorentzian methods of multi-component peak modeling by using the ultra-spatially resolved synchrotron light sourced Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (SFTIRM). The items of the protein molecular structure revealed included protein structure {alpha}-helices, {beta}-sheets, and others such as {beta}-turns and random coils. The experiment was performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL, US Department of Energy, NY). The results showed that with the SFTIRM, the molecular structure of barley protein could be revealed. Barley protein structures exhibited significant differences among the varieties in terms of proportion and ratio of model-fitted {alpha}-helices, {beta}-sheets, and others. By using multi-component peaks modeling at protein amide I region of 1710-1576 cm{sup -1}, the results show that barley protein consisted of approximately 18-34% of {alpha}-helices, 14-25% of {beta}-sheets, and 44-69% others. AC Metcalfe, Sisler, and LP955 consisted of higher (P < 0.05) proportions of {alpha}-helices (30-34%) than Dolly and Valier ({alpha}-helices 18-23%). Harrington was in between which was 25%. For protein {beta}-sheets, AC Metcalfe, and LP955 consisted of higher proportions (22-25%) than Dolly and Valier (13-17%). Different barley varieties contained different {alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheet ratios, ranging from 1.4 to 2.0, although the difference were

  7. Solution structure of Syrian hamster prion protein rPrP(90-231).

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Farr-Jones, S; Ulyanov, N B; Llinas, M; Marqusee, S; Groth, D; Cohen, F E; Prusiner, S B; James, T L

    1999-04-27

    NMR has been used to refine the structure of Syrian hamster (SHa) prion protein rPrP(90-231), which is commensurate with the infectious protease-resistant core of the scrapie prion protein PrPSc. The structure of rPrP(90-231), refolded to resemble the normal cellular isoform PrPC spectroscopically and immunologically, has been studied using multidimensional NMR; initial results were published [James et al. (1997) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 94, 10086-10091]. We now report refinement with better definition revealing important structural and dynamic features which can be related to biological observations pertinent to prion diseases. Structure refinement was based on 2778 unambiguously assigned nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) connectivities, 297 ambiguous NOE restraints, and 63 scalar coupling constants (3JHNHa). The structure is represented by an ensemble of 25 best-scoring structures from 100 structures calculated using ARIA/X-PLOR and further refined with restrained molecular dynamics using the AMBER 4.1 force field with an explicit shell of water molecules. The rPrP(90-231) structure features a core domain (residues 125-228), with a backbone atomic root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of 0.67 A, consisting of three alpha-helices (residues 144-154, 172-193, and 200-227) and two short antiparallel beta-strands (residues 129-131 and 161-163). The N-terminus (residues 90-119) is largely unstructured despite some sparse and weak medium-range NOEs implying the existence of bends or turns. The transition region between the core domain and flexible N-terminus, i.e., residues 113-128, consists of hydrophobic residues or glycines and does not adopt any regular secondary structure in aqueous solution. There are about 30 medium- and long-range NOEs within this hydrophobic cluster, so it clearly manifests structure. Multiple discrete conformations are evident, implying the possible existence of one or more metastable states, which may feature in conversion of PrPC to PrPSc. To

  8. Constructing optimal backbone segments for joining fixed DNA base pairs.

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, J; Jernigan, R L; Sarai, A

    1996-01-01

    A method is presented to link a sequence of space-fixed base pairs by the sugar-phosphate segments of single nucleotides and to evaluate the effects in the backbone caused by this positioning of the bases. The entire computational unit comprises several nucleotides that are energy-minimized, subject to constraints imposed by the sugar-phosphate backbone segments being anchored to space-fixed base pairs. The minimization schemes are based on two stages, a conjugate gradient method followed by a Newton-Raphson algorithm. Because our purpose is to examine the response, or relaxation, of an artificially stressed backbone, it is essential to be able to obtain, as closely as possible, a lowest minimum energy conformation of the backbone segment in conformational space. For this purpose, an algorithm is developed that leads to the generation of an assembly of many local energy minima. From these sets of local minima, one conformation corresponding to the one with the lowest minimum is then selected and designated to represent the backbone segment at its minimum. The effective electrostatic potential of mean force is expressed in terms of adjustable parameters that incorporate solvent screening action in the Coulombic interactions between charged backbone atoms; these parameters are adjusted to obtain the best fit of the nearest-neighbor phosphorous atoms in an x-ray structure. PMID:8874023

  9. Large-scale measurement and modeling of backbone Internet traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roughan, Matthew; Gottlieb, Joel

    2002-07-01

    There is a brewing controversy in the traffic modeling community concerning how to model backbone traffic. The fundamental work on self-similarity in data traffic appears to be contradicted by recent findings that suggest that backbone traffic is smooth. The traffic analysis work to date has focused on high-quality but limited-scope packet trace measurements; this limits its applicability to high-speed backbone traffic. This paper uses more than one year's worth of SNMP traffic data covering an entire Tier 1 ISP backbone to address the question of how backbone network traffic should be modeled. Although the limitations of SNMP measurements do not permit us to comment on the fine timescale behavior of the traffic, careful analysis of the data suggests that irrespective of the variation at fine timescales, we can construct a simple traffic model that captures key features of the observed traffic. Furthermore, the model's parameters are measurable using existing network infrastructure, making this model practical in a present-day operational network. In addition to its practicality, the model verifies basic statistical multiplexing results, and thus sheds deep insight into how smooth backbone traffic really is.

  10. Development of a Backbone Cyclic Peptide Library as Potential Antiparasitic Therapeutics Using Microwave Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Qvit, Nir; Kornfeld, Opher S

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are intimately involved in almost all biological processes and are linked to many human diseases. Therefore, there is a major effort to target PPIs in basic research and in the pharmaceutical industry. Protein-protein interfaces are usually large, flat, and often lack pockets, complicating the discovery of small molecules that target such sites. Alternative targeting approaches using antibodies have limitations due to poor oral bioavailability, low cell-permeability, and production inefficiency. Using peptides to target PPI interfaces has several advantages. Peptides have higher conformational flexibility, increased selectivity, and are generally inexpensive. However, peptides have their own limitations including poor stability and inefficiency crossing cell membranes. To overcome such limitations, peptide cyclization can be performed. Cyclization has been demonstrated to improve peptide selectivity, metabolic stability, and bioavailability. However, predicting the bioactive conformation of a cyclic peptide is not trivial. To overcome this challenge, one attractive approach it to screen a focused library to screen in which all backbone cyclic peptides have the same primary sequence, but differ in parameters that influence their conformation, such as ring size and position. We describe a detailed protocol for synthesizing a library of backbone cyclic peptides targeting specific parasite PPIs. Using a rational design approach, we developed peptides derived from the scaffold protein Leishmania receptor for activated C-kinase (LACK). We hypothesized that sequences in LACK that are conserved in parasites, but not in the mammalian host homolog, may represent interaction sites for proteins that are critical for the parasites' viability. The cyclic peptides were synthesized using microwave irradiation to reduce reaction times and increase efficiency. Developing a library of backbone cyclic peptides with different ring sizes facilitates a

  11. Backbone and sidechain 1H, 15N and 13C assignments of the KSR1 CA1 domain

    PubMed Central

    Koveal, Dorothy; Pinheiro, Anderson S.; Peti, Wolfgang; Page, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The backbone and side chain resonance assignments of the murine KSR1 CA1 domain have been determined based on triple-resonance experiments using uniformly [13C, 15N]-labeled protein. This assignment is the first step towards the determination of the three-dimensional structure of the unique KSR1 CA1 domain. PMID:20737253

  12. Virus-specific interaction between the human cytomegalovirus major capsid protein and the C terminus of the assembly protein precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Beaudet-Miller, M; Zhang, R; Durkin, J; Gibson, W; Kwong, A D; Hong, Z

    1996-01-01

    We previously identified a minimal 12-amino-acid domain in the C terminus of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) scaffolding protein which is required for interaction with the HSV-1 major capsid protein. An alpha-helical structure which maximizes the hydropathicity of the minimal domain is required for the interaction. To address whether cytomegalovirus (CMV) utilizes the same strategy for capsid assembly, several glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins to the C terminus of the CMV assembly protein precursor were produced and purified from bacterial cells. The study showed that the glutathione S-transferase fusion containing 16 amino acids near the C-terminal end was sufficient to interact with the major capsid protein. Interestingly, no cross-interaction between HSV-1 and CMV could be detected. Mutation analysis revealed that a three-amino-acid region at the N-terminal side of the central Phe residue of the CMV interaction domain played a role in determining the viral specificity of the interaction. When this region was converted so as to correspond to that of HSV-1, the CMV assembly protein domain lost its ability to interact with the CMV major capsid protein but gained full interaction with the HSV-1 major capsid protein. To address whether the minimal interaction domain of the CMV assembly protein forms an alpha-helical structure similar to that in HSV-1, peptide competition experiments were carried out. The results showed that a cyclic peptide derived from the interaction domain with a constrained (alpha-helical structure competed for interaction with the major capsid protein much more efficiently than the unconstrained linear peptide. In contrast, a cyclic peptide containing an Ala substitution for the critical Phe residue did not compete for the interaction at all. The results of this study suggest that (i) CMV may have developed a strategy similar to that of HSV-1 for capsid assembly; (ii) the minimal interaction motif in the CMV assembly protein

  13. Toxoplasma gondii: Biochemical and biophysical characterization of recombinant soluble dense granule proteins GRA2 and GRA6

    SciTech Connect

    Bittame, Amina; Effantin, Grégory; Pètre, Graciane; Ruffiot, Pauline; Travier, Laetitia; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Gagnon, Jean; Mercier, Corinne

    2015-03-27

    The most prominent structural feature of the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) in which the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii proliferates is a membranous nanotubular network (MNN), which interconnects the parasites and the PV membrane. The MNN function remains unclear. The GRA2 and GRA6 proteins secreted from the parasite dense granules into the PV have been implicated in the MNN biogenesis. Amphipathic alpha-helices (AAHs) predicted in GRA2 and an alpha-helical hydrophobic domain predicted in GRA6 have been proposed to be responsible for their membrane association, thereby potentially molding the MMN in its structure. Here we report an analysis of the recombinant proteins (expressed in detergent-free conditions) by circular dichroism, which showed that full length GRA2 displays an alpha-helical secondary structure while recombinant GRA6 and GRA2 truncated of its AAHs are mainly random coiled. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy showed that recombinant GRA6 and truncated GRA2 constitute a homogenous population of small particles (6–8 nm in diameter) while recombinant GRA2 corresponds to 2 populations of particles (∼8–15 nm and up to 40 nm in diameter, respectively). The unusual properties of GRA2 due to its AAHs are discussed. - Highlights: • Toxoplasma gondii: soluble GRA2 forms 2 populations of particles. • T. gondii: the dense granule protein GRA2 folds intrinsically as an alpha-helix. • T. gondii: monomeric soluble GRA6 forms particles of 6–8 nm in diameter. • T. gondii: monomeric soluble GRA6 is random coiled. • Unusual biophysical properties of the dense granule protein GRA2 from T. gondii.

  14. Interaction of a nonspecific wheat lipid transfer protein with phospholipid monolayers imaged by fluorescence microscopy and studied by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Subirade, M; Salesse, C; Marion, D; Pézolet, M

    1995-01-01

    The interaction of a nonspecific wheat lipid transfer protein (LTP) with phospholipids has been studied using the monolayer technique as a simplified model of biological membranes. The molecular organization of the LTP-phospholipid monolayer has been determined by using polarized attenuated total internal reflectance infrared spectroscopy, and detailed information on the microstructure of the mixed films has been investigated by using epifluorescence microscopy. The results show that the incorporation of wheat LTP within the lipid monolayers is surface-pressure dependent. When LTP is injected into the subphase under a dipalmytoylphosphatidylglycerol monolayer at low surface pressure (< 20 mN/m), insertion of the protein within the lipid monolayer leads to an expansion of dipalmytoylphosphatidylglycerol surface area. This incorporation leads to a decrease in the conformational order of the lipid acyl chains and results in an increase in the size of the solid lipid domains, suggesting that LTP penetrates both expanded and solid domains. By contrast, when the protein is injected under the lipid at high surface pressure (> or = 20 mN/m) the presence of LTP leads neither to an increase of molecular area nor to a change of the lipid order, even though some protein molecules are bound to the surface of the monolayer, which leads to an increase of the exposure of the lipid ester groups to the aqueous environment. On the other hand, the conformation of LTP, as well as the orientation of alpha-helices, is surface-pressure dependent. At low surface pressure, the alpha-helices inserted into the monolayers are rather parallel to the monolayer plane. In contrast, at high surface pressure, the alpha-helices bound to the surface of the monolayers are neither parallel nor perpendicular to the interface but in an oblique orientation. Images FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 9 PMID:8519997

  15. Peptide Amphiphile Nanofibers with Conjugated Polydiacetylene Backbones in Their Core

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Lorraine; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2008-01-01

    The coupling of electronic and biological functionality through self-assembly is an interesting target in supramolecular chemistry. We report here on a set of diacetylene-derivatized peptide amphiphiles (PAs) that react to form conjugated polydiacetylene backbones following self-assembly into cylindrical nanofibers. The polymerization reaction yields highly conjugated backbones when the peptidic segment of the PAs has a linear, as opposed to a branched, architecture. Given the topotactic nature of the polymerization, these results suggest that a high degree of internal order exists in the supramolecular nanofibers formed by the linear PA. On the basis of microscopy, the formation of a polydiacetylene backbone to covalently connect the β-sheets that help form the fibers does not disrupt the fiber shape. Interestingly, we observe the appearance of a polydiacetylene (PDA) circular dichroism band at 547 nm in linear PA nanofibers suggesting the conjugated backbone in the core of the nanostructures is twisted. We believe this CD signal is due to chiral induction by the β-sheets, which are normally twisted in helical fashion. Heating and cooling shows simultaneous changes in β-sheet and conjugated backbone structure, indicating they are both correlated. At the same time, poor polymerization in nanofibers formed by branched PAs indicates that less internal order exists in these nanostructures and, as expected, then a circular dichroism signal is not observed for the conjugated backbone. The general variety of materials investigated here has the obvious potential to couple electronic properties and in vitro bioactivity. Furthermore, the polymerization of monomers in peptide amphiphile assemblies by a rigid conjugated backbone also leads to mechanical robustness and insolubility, two properties that may be important for the patterning of these materials at the cellular scale. PMID:18314978

  16. Chemical Synthesis of Hydrocarbon-Stapled Peptides for Protein Interaction Research and Therapeutic Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Gregory H.; Crannell, W. Christian; Walensky, Loren D.

    2016-01-01

    The peptide alpha-helix represents one of Nature’s most featured protein shapes and is employed in a diversity of protein architectures, spanning the very cytoskeletal infrastructure of the cell to the most intimate contact points between crucial signaling proteins. By installing an all-hydrocarbon crosslink into native sequences, we recapitulate the shape and biological activity of natural peptide alpha-helices, yielding a chemical toolbox to both interrogate the protein interactome and modulate interaction networks for potential therapeutic benefit. Here, we describe our latest approach to synthesizing Stabilized Alpha-Helices (SAH) corresponding to key protein interaction domains. We emphasize a stepwise approach to the production of crosslinking non-natural amino acids, their incorporation into peptide templates, and the application of ruthenium-catalyzed ring closing metathesis to generate hydrocarbon-stapled peptides. Through facile derivatization and functionalization steps, SAHs can be tailored for a broad range of applications in biochemical, structural, proteomic, cellular and in vivo studies. PMID:23801563

  17. Enhanced Inter-helical Residue Contact Prediction in Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Y.; Floudas, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, based on a recent work by McAllister and Floudas who developed a mathematical optimization model to predict the contacts in transmembrane alpha-helical proteins from a limited protein data set [1], we have enhanced this method by 1) building a more comprehensive data set for transmembrane alpha-helical proteins and this enhanced data set is then used to construct the probability sets, MIN-1N and MIN-2N, for residue contact prediction, 2) enhancing the mathematical model via modifications of several important physical constraints and 3) applying a new blind contact prediction scheme on different protein sets proposed from analyzing the contact prediction on 65 proteins from Fuchs et al. [2]. The blind contact prediction scheme has been tested on two different membrane protein sets. Firstly it is applied to five carefully selected proteins from the training set. The contact prediction of these five proteins uses probability sets built by excluding the target protein from the training set, and an average accuracy of 56% was obtained. Secondly, it is applied to six independent membrane proteins with complicated topologies, and the prediction accuracies are 73% for 2ZY9A, 21% for 3KCUA, 46% for 2W1PA, 64% for 3CN5A, 77% for 3IXZA and 83% for 3K3FA. The average prediction accuracy for the six proteins is 60.7%. The proposed approach is also compared with a support vector machine method (TMhit [3]) and it is shown that it exhibits better prediction accuracy. PMID:21892227

  18. Bacterial binding protein-dependent permeases: characterization of distinctive signatures for functionally related integral cytoplasmic membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Saurin, W; Köster, W; Dassa, E

    1994-06-01

    Bacterial binding protein-dependent transport systems belong to the superfamily of ABC transporters, which is widely distributed among living organisms. Their hydrophobic membrane proteins are the least characterized components. The primary structures of 61 integral membrane proteins from 35 uptake systems were compared in order to characterize a short conserved hydrophilic segment, with a consensus EAA---G---------I-LP, located approximately 100 residues from the C-terminus. Secondary structure predictions indicated that this conserved region might be formed by two amphipathic alpha-helices connected by a loop containing the invariant G residue. We classified the conserved motifs and found that membrane proteins from systems transporting structurally related substrates specifically display a greater number of identical residues in the conserved region. We determined a consensus for each class of membrane protein and showed that these can be considered as signatures. PMID:7934906

  19. Backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments of apolipophorin III from Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Crowhurst, Karin A; Horn, James V C; Weers, Paul M M

    2016-04-01

    Apolipophorin III, a 163 residue monomeric protein from the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella (abbreviated as apoLp-IIIGM), has roles in upregulating expression of antimicrobial proteins as well as binding and deforming bacterial membranes. Due to its similarity to vertebrate apolipoproteins there is interest in performing atomic resolution analysis of apoLp-IIIGM as part of an effort to better understand its mechanism of action in innate immunity. In the first step towards structural characterization of apoLp-IIIGM, 99 % of backbone and 88 % of side chain (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts were assigned. TALOS+ analysis of the backbone resonances has predicted that the protein is composed of five long helices, which is consistent with the reported structures of apolipophorins from other insect species. The next stage in the characterization of apoLp-III from G. mellonella will be to utilize these resonance assignments in solving the solution structure of this protein. PMID:26493308

  20. Crystal Structure of the β2Adrenergic Receptor-Gs protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; DeVree, Brian T.; Zou, Yaozhong; Kruse, Andrew C.; Chung, Ka Young; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Chae, Pil Seok; Pardon, Els; Calinski, Diane; Mathiesen, Jesper M.; Shah, Syed T. A.; Lyons, Joseph A.; Caffrey, Martin; Gellman, Samuel H.; Steyaert, Jan; Skiniotis, Georgios; Weis, William I.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters as well as the senses of sight, olfaction and taste. The paradigm of GPCR signaling is the activation of a heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein) by an agonist-occupied receptor. The β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) activation of Gs, the stimulatory G protein for adenylyl cyclase, has long been a model system for GPCR signaling. Here we present the crystal structure of the active state ternary complex composed of agonist-occupied monomeric β2AR and nucleotide-free Gs heterotrimer. The principal interactions between the β2AR and Gs involve the amino and carboxyl terminal α-helices of Gs, with conformational changes propagating to the nucleotide-binding pocket. The largest conformational changes in the β2AR include a 14 Å outward movement at the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 6 (TM6) and an alpha helical extension of the cytoplasmic end of TM5. The most surprising observation is a major displacement of the alpha helical domain of Gαs relative to the ras-like GTPase domain. This crystal structure represents the first high-resolution view of transmembrane signaling by a GPCR. PMID:21772288

  1. Triazole linkages and backbone branches in nucleic acids for biological and extra-biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, Eduardo

    The recently increasing evidence of nucleic acids' alternative roles in biology and potential as useful nanomaterials and therapeutic agents has enabled the development of useful probes, elaborate nanostructures and therapeutic effectors based on nucleic acids. The study of alternative nucleic acid structure and function, particularly RNA, hinges on the ability to introduce site-specific modifications that either provide clues to the nucleic acid structure function relationship or alter the nucleic acid's function. Although the available chemistries allow for the conjugation of useful labels and molecules, their limitations lie in their tedious conjugation conditions or the lability of the installed probes. The development and optimization of click chemistry with RNA now provides the access to a robust and orthogonal conjugation methodology while providing stable conjugates. Our ability to introduce click reactive groups enzymatically, rather than only in the solid-phase, allows for the modification of larger, more cell relevant RNAs. Additionally, ligation of modified RNAs with larger RNA constructs through click chemistry represents an improvement over traditional ligation techniques. We determined that the triazole linkage generated through click chemistry is compatible in diverse nucleic acid based biological systems. Click chemistry has also been developed for extra-biological applications, particularly with DNA. We have expanded its use to generate useful polymer-DNA conjugates which can form controllable soft nanoparticles which take advantage of DNA's properties, i.e. DNA hybridization and computing. Additionally, we have generated protein-DNA conjugates and assembled protein-polymer hybrids mediated by DNA hybridization. The use of click chemistry in these reactions allows for the facile synthesis of these unnatural conjugates. We have also developed backbone branched DNA through click chemistry and showed that these branched DNAs are useful in generating

  2. Crystallization of a trimeric human T cell leukemia virus type 1 gp21 ectodomain fragment as a chimera with maltose-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Center, R. J.; Kobe, B.; Wilson, K. A.; Teh, T.; Howlett, G. J.; Kemp, B. E.; Poumbourios, P.

    1998-01-01

    We present a novel protein crystallization strategy, applied to the crystallization of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) transmembrane protein gp21 lacking the fusion peptide and the transmembrane domain, as a chimera with the Escherichia coli maltose binding protein (MBP). Crystals could not be obtained with a MBP/gp21 fusion protein in which fusion partners were separated by a flexible linker, but were obtained after connecting the MBP C-terminal alpha-helix to the predicted N-terminal alpha-helical sequence of gp21 via three alanine residues. The gp21 sequences conferred a trimeric structure to the soluble fusion proteins as assessed by sedimentation equilibrium and X-ray diffraction, consistent with the trimeric structures of other retroviral transmembrane proteins. The envelope protein precursor, gp62, is likewise trimeric when expressed in mammalian cells. Our results suggest that MBP may have a general application for the crystallization of proteins containing N-terminal alpha-helical sequences. PMID:9684894

  3. Macromolecular crowding increases structural content of folded proteins.

    PubMed

    Perham, Michael; Stagg, Loren; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2007-10-30

    Here we show that increased amount of secondary structure is acquired in the folded states of two structurally-different proteins (alpha-helical VlsE and alpha/beta flavodoxin) in the presence of macromolecular crowding agents. The structural content of flavodoxin and VlsE is enhanced by 33% and 70%, respectively, in 400 mg/ml Ficoll 70 (pH 7, 20 degrees C) and correlates with higher protein-thermal stability. In the same Ficoll range, there are only small effects on the unfolded-state structures of the proteins. This is the first in vitro assessment of crowding effects on the native-state structures at physiological conditions. Our findings imply that for proteins with low intrinsic stability, the functional structures in vivo may differ from those observed in dilute buffers. PMID:17919600

  4. The Graphical Representation of the Digital Astronaut Physiology Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briers, Demarcus

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes my internship project with the NASA Digital Astronaut Project to analyze the Digital Astronaut (DA) physiology backbone model. The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) applies integrated physiology models to support space biomedical operations, and to assist NASA researchers in closing knowledge gaps related to human physiologic responses to space flight. The DA physiology backbone is a set of integrated physiological equations and functions that model the interacting systems of the human body. The current release of the model is HumMod (Human Model) version 1.5 and was developed over forty years at the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC). The physiology equations and functions are scripted in an XML schema specifically designed for physiology modeling by Dr. Thomas G. Coleman at UMMC. Currently it is difficult to examine the physiology backbone without being knowledgeable of the XML schema. While investigating and documenting the tags and algorithms used in the XML schema, I proposed a standard methodology for a graphical representation. This standard methodology may be used to transcribe graphical representations from the DA physiology backbone. In turn, the graphical representations can allow examination of the physiological functions and equations without the need to be familiar with the computer programming languages or markup languages used by DA modeling software.

  5. Determination of backbone chain direction of PDA using FFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Sadaharu; Okamoto, Kentaro; Takenaga, Mitsuru

    2010-01-01

    The effect of backbone chains on friction force was investigated on both Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of 10,12-heptacosadiynoic acid and the (0 1 0) surfaces of single crystals of 2,4-hexadiene-1,6-diol using friction force microscopy (FFM). It was observed that friction force decreased when the scanning direction was parallel to the [0 0 1] direction in both samples. Moreover, friction force decreased when the scanning direction was parallel to the crystallographic [1 0 2], [1 0 1], [1 0 0] and [1 0 1¯] directions in only the single crystals. For the LB films, the [0 0 1] direction corresponds to the backbone chain direction of 10,12-heptacosadiynoic acid. For the single crystals, both the [0 0 1] and [1 0 1] directions correspond to the backbone chain direction, and the [1 0 2], [1 0 0] and [1 0 1¯] directions correspond to the low-index crystallographic direction. In both the LB films and single crystals, the friction force was minimized when the directions of scanning and the backbone chain were parallel.

  6. Impact of template backbone heterogeneity on RNA polymerase II transcription

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Lu; Chong, Jenny; Huang, Xuhui; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the sugar component (ribose or deoxyribose) and the nature of the phosphodiester linkage (3′-5′ or 2′-5′ orientation) have been a challenge for genetic information transfer from the very beginning of evolution. RNA polymerase II (pol II) governs the transcription of DNA into precursor mRNA in all eukaryotic cells. How pol II recognizes DNA template backbone (phosphodiester linkage and sugar) and whether it tolerates the backbone heterogeneity remain elusive. Such knowledge is not only important for elucidating the chemical basis of transcriptional fidelity but also provides new insights into molecular evolution. In this study, we systematically and quantitatively investigated pol II transcriptional behaviors through different template backbone variants. We revealed that pol II can well tolerate and bypass sugar heterogeneity sites at the template but stalls at phosphodiester linkage heterogeneity sites. The distinct impacts of these two backbone components on pol II transcription reveal the molecular basis of template recognition during pol II transcription and provide the evolutionary insight from the RNA world to the contemporary ‘imperfect’ DNA world. In addition, our results also reveal the transcriptional consequences from ribose-containing genomic DNA. PMID:25662224

  7. Cooperative UAV-Based Communications Backbone for Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R S

    2001-10-07

    The objective of this project is to investigate the use of unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) as mobile, adaptive communications backbones for ground-based sensor networks. In this type of network, the UAVs provide communication connectivity to sensors that cannot communicate with each other because of terrain, distance, or other geographical constraints. In these situations, UAVs provide a vertical communication path for the sensors, thereby mitigating geographic obstacles often imposed on networks. With the proper use of UAVs, connectivity to a widely disbursed sensor network in rugged terrain is readily achieved. Our investigation has focused on networks where multiple cooperating UAVs are used to form a network backbone. The advantage of using multiple UAVs to form the network backbone is parallelization of sensor connectivity. Many widely spaced or isolated sensors can be connected to the network at once using this approach. In these networks, the UAVs logically partition the sensor network into sub-networks (subnets), with one UAV assigned per subnet. Partitioning the network into subnets allows the UAVs to service sensors in parallel thereby decreasing the sensor-to-network connectivity. A UAV services sensors in its subnet by flying a route (path) through the subnet, uplinking data collected by the sensors, and forwarding the data to a ground station. An additional advantage of using multiple UAVs in the network is that they provide redundancy in the communications backbone, so that the failure of a single UAV does not necessarily imply the loss of the network.

  8. Structure of the nucleocapsid protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Doan, Danny N P; Dokland, Terje

    2003-11-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an enveloped RNA virus of the Arteriviridae family, genomically related to the coronaviruses. PRRSV is the causative agent of both severe and persistent respiratory disease and reproductive failure in pigs worldwide. The PRRSV virion contains a core made of the 123 amino acid nucleocapsid (N) protein, a product of the ORF7 gene. We have determined the crystal structure of the capsid-forming domain of N. The structure was solved to 2.6 A resolution by SAD methods using the anomalous signal from sulfur. The N protein exists in the crystal as a tight dimer forming a four-stranded beta sheet floor superposed by two long alpha helices and flanked by two N- and two C-terminal alpha helices. The structure of N represents a new class of viral capsid-forming domains, distinctly different from those of other known enveloped viruses, but reminiscent of the coat protein of bacteriophage MS2. PMID:14604534

  9. Backbone and side-chain (1)H, (15)N, (13)C assignment and secondary structure of BPSL1445 from Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Quilici, Giacomo; Berardi, Andrea; Gaudesi, Davide; Gourlay, Louise J; Bolognesi, Martino; Musco, Giovanna

    2015-10-01

    BPSL1445 is a lipoprotein produced by the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei), the etiological agent of melioidosis. Immunodetection assays against sera patients using protein microarray suggest BPSL1445 involvement in melioidosis. Herein we report backbone, side chain NMR assignment and secondary structure for the recombinant protein. PMID:25893672

  10. Comparative analysis of nanomechanics of protein filaments under lateral loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solar, Max; Buehler, Markus J.

    2012-02-01

    Using a combination of explicit solvent atomistic simulation and continuum theory, here we study the lateral deformation mechanics of three distinct protein structures: an amyloid fibril, a beta helix, and an alpha helix. We find that the two β-sheet rich structures - amyloid fibril and beta helix, with persistence lengths on the order of μm - are well described by continuum mechanical theory, but differ in the degree to which shear deformation affects the overall bending behavior. The alpha helical protein structure, however, with a persistence length on the order of one nanometer, does not conform to the continuum theory and its deformation is dominated by entropic elasticity due to significant fluctuations. This study provides fundamental insight into the nanomechanics of widely found protein motifs and insight into molecular-scale deformation mechanisms, as well as quantitative estimates of Young's modulus and shear modulus in agreement with experimental results.

  11. Structural evolution of the 4/1 genes and proteins in non-vascular and lower vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Sergey Y; Milyutina, Irina A; Bobrova, Vera K; Ryazantsev, Dmitry Y; Erokhina, Tatiana N; Zavriev, Sergey K; Agranovsky, Alexey A; Solovyev, Andrey G; Troitsky, Alexey V

    2015-12-01

    The 4/1 protein of unknown function is encoded by a single-copy gene in most higher plants. The 4/1 protein of Nicotiana tabacum (Nt-4/1 protein) has been shown to be alpha-helical and predominantly expressed in conductive tissues. Here, we report the analysis of 4/1 genes and the encoded proteins of lower land plants. Sequences of a number of 4/1 genes from liverworts, lycophytes, ferns and gymnosperms were determined and analyzed together with sequences available in databases. Most of the vascular plants were found to encode Magnoliophyta-like 4/1 proteins exhibiting previously described gene structure and protein properties. Identification of the 4/1-like proteins in hornworts, liverworts and charophyte algae (sister lineage to all land plants) but not in mosses suggests that 4/1 proteins are likely important for plant development but not required for a primary metabolic function of plant cell. PMID:26542289

  12. Backbone Model of an Aquareovirus Virion by Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lingpeng; Zhu, Jiang; Hui, Wong Hoi; Zhang, Xiaokang; Honig, Barry; Fang, Qin; Zhou, Z. Hong

    2010-01-01

    Grass carp reovirus (GCRV) is a member of the aquareovirus genus in the Reoviridae family and has a capsid with two shells—a transcription-competent core surrounded by a coat. We report a near-atomic-resolution reconstruction of the GCRV virion by cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction. A backbone model of the GCRV virion, including seven conformers of the five capsid proteins making up the 1500 molecules in both the core and the coat, was derived using cryo-electron microscopy density-map-constrained homology modeling and refinement. Our structure clearly showed that the amino-terminal segment of core protein VP3B forms an ~120-Å-long α-helix-rich extension bridging across the icosahedral 2-fold-symmetry-related molecular interface. The presence of this unique structure across this interface and the lack of an external cementing molecule at this location in GCRV suggest a stabilizing role of this extended amino-terminal density. Moreover, part of this amino-terminal extension becomes invisible in the reconstruction of transcription-competent core particles, suggesting its involvement in endogenous viral RNA transcription. Our structure of the VP1 turret represents its open state, and comparison with its related structures at the closed state suggests hinge-like domain movements associated with the mRNA-capping machinery. Overall, this first backbone model of an aquareovirus virion provides a wealth of structural information for understanding the structural basis of GCRV assembly and transcription. PMID:20036256

  13. Conformational detection of prion protein with biarsenical labeling and FlAsH fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Bradley M.; Nisbet, Rebecca M.; Han, Sen; Cappai, Roberto; Hatters, Danny M.; Hill, Andrew F.

    2009-03-13

    Prion diseases are associated with the misfolding of the host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) into a disease associated form (PrP{sup Sc}). Recombinant PrP can be refolded into either an {alpha}-helical rich conformation ({alpha}-PrP) resembling PrP{sup C} or a {beta}-sheet rich, protease resistant form similar to PrP{sup Sc}. Here, we generated tetracysteine tagged recombinant PrP, folded this into {alpha}- or {beta}-PrP and determined the levels of FlAsH fluorescence. Insertion of the tetracysteine tag at three different sites within the 91-111 epitope readily distinguished {beta}-PrP from {alpha}-PrP upon FlAsH labeling. Labelling of tetracysteine tagged PrP in the {alpha}-helical form showed minimal fluorescence, whereas labeling of tagged PrP in the {beta}-sheet form showed high fluorescence indicating that this region is exposed upon conversion. This highlights a region of PrP that can be implicated in the development of diagnostics and is a novel, protease free mechanism for distinguishing PrP{sup Sc} from PrP{sup C}. This technique may also be applied to any protein that undergoes conformational change and/or misfolding such as those involved in other neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases.

  14. Evolutionary Strategies for Protein Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy Gopal, Srinivasa; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    The free energy approach for predicting the protein tertiary structure describes the native state of a protein as the global minimum of an appropriate free-energy forcefield. The low-energy region of the free-energy landscape of a protein is extremely rugged. Efficient optimization methods must therefore speed up the search for the global optimum by avoiding high energy transition states, adapt large scale moves or accept unphysical intermediates. Here we investigate an evolutionary strategies(ES) for optimizing a protein conformation in our all-atom free-energy force field([1],[2]). A set of random conformations is evolved using an ES to get a diverse population containing low energy structure. The ES is shown to balance energy improvement and yet maintain diversity in structures. The ES is implemented as a master-client model for distributed computing. Starting from random structures and by using this optimization technique, we were able to fold a 20 amino-acid helical protein and 16 amino-acid beta hairpin[3]. We compare ES to basin hopping method. [1]T. Herges and W. Wenzel,Biophys.J. 87,3100(2004) [2] A. Verma and W. Wenzel Stabilization and folding of beta-sheet and alpha-helical proteins in an all-atom free energy model(submitted)(2005) [3] S. M. Gopal and W. Wenzel Evolutionary Strategies for Protein Folding (in preparation)

  15. Atomic resolution structure of cucurmosin, a novel type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from the sarcocarp of Cucurbita moschata

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Xiaomin; Meehan, Edward J.; Xie, Jieming; Huang, Mingdong; Chen, Minghuang; Chen, Liqing

    2008-10-27

    A novel type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) designated cucurmosin was isolated from the sarcocarp of Cucurbita moschata (pumpkin). Besides rRNA N-glycosidase activity, cucurmosin exhibits strong cytotoxicities to three cancer cell lines of both human and murine origins, but low toxicity to normal cells. Plant genomic DNA extracted from the tender leaves was amplified by PCR between primers based on the N-terminal sequence and X-ray sequence of the C-terminal. The complete mature protein sequence was obtained from N-terminal protein sequencing and partial DNA sequencing, confirmed by high resolution crystal structure analysis. The crystal structure of cucurmosin has been determined at 1.04 {angstrom}, a resolution that has never been achieved before for any RIP. The structure contains two domains: a large N-terminal domain composed of seven {alpha}-helices and eight {beta}-strands, and a smaller C-terminal domain consisting of three {alpha}-helices and two {beta}-strands. The high resolution structure established a glycosylation pattern of GlcNAc{sub 2}Man3Xyl. Asn225 was identified as a glycosylation site. Residues Tyr70, Tyr109, Glu158 and Arg161 define the active site of cucurmosin as an RNA N-glycosidase. The structural basis of cytotoxicity difference between cucurmosin and trichosanthin is discussed.

  16. Stoichiometry of lipid interactions with transmembrane proteins--Deduced from the 3D structures.

    PubMed

    Páli, Tibor; Bashtovyy, Denys; Marsh, Derek

    2006-05-01

    The stoichiometry of the first shell of lipids interacting with a transmembrane protein is defined operationally by the population of spin-labeled lipid chains whose motion is restricted directly by the protein. Interaction stoichiometries have been determined experimentally for a wide range of alpha-helical integral membrane proteins by using spin-label ESR spectroscopy. Here, we determine the spatially defined number of first-shell lipids at the hydrophobic perimeter of integral membrane proteins whose 3D structure has been determined by X-ray crystallography and lipid-protein interactions characterized by spin-labeling. Molecular modeling is used to build a single shell of lipids surrounding transmembrane structures derived from the PDB. Constrained energy optimization of the protein-lipid assemblies is performed by molecular mechanics. For relatively small proteins (up to 7-12 transmembrane helices), the geometrical first shell corresponds to that defined experimentally by perturbation of the lipid-chain dynamics. For larger, multi-subunit alpha-helical proteins, the lipids perturbed directly by the protein may either exceed or be less in number than those that can be accommodated at the intramembranous perimeter. In these latter cases, the motionally restricted spin-labeled lipids can be augmented by intercalation, or can correspond to a specific subpopulation at the protein interface, respectively. For monomeric beta-barrel proteins, the geometrical lipid stoichiometry corresponds to that determined from lipid mobility for a 22-stranded barrel, but fewer lipids are motionally restricted than can be accommodated around an eight-stranded barrel. Deviations from the geometrical first shell, in the beta-barrel case, are for the smaller protein with a highly curved barrel. PMID:16641489

  17. On the role of thermal backbone fluctuations in myoglobin ligand gate dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Niemi, Antti J.; Peng, Xubiao

    2013-05-01

    We construct an energy function that describes the crystallographic structure of sperm whale myoglobin backbone. As a model in our construction, we use the Protein Data Bank entry 1ABS that has been measured at liquid helium temperature. Consequently, the thermal B-factor fluctuations are very small, which is an advantage in our construction. The energy function that we utilize resembles that of the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Likewise, ours supports topological solitons as local minimum energy configurations. We describe the 1ABS backbone in terms of topological solitons with a precision that deviates from 1ABS by an average root-mean-square distance, which is less than the experimentally observed Debye-Waller B-factor fluctuation distance. We then subject the topological multi-soliton solution to extensive numerical heating and cooling experiments, over a very wide range of temperatures. We concentrate in particular to temperatures above 300 K and below the Θ-point unfolding temperature, which is around 348 K. We confirm that the behavior of the topological multi-soliton is fully consistent with Anfinsen's thermodynamic principle, up to very high temperatures. We observe that the structure responds to an increase of temperature consistently in a very similar manner. This enables us to characterize the onset of thermally induced conformational changes in terms of three distinct backbone ligand gates. One of the gates is made of the helix F and the helix E. The two other gates are chosen similarly, when open they provide a direct access route for a ligand to reach the heme. We find that out of the three gates we investigate, the one which is formed by helices B and G is the most sensitive to thermally induced conformational changes. Our approach provides a novel perspective to the important problem of ligand entry and exit.

  18. Exposing Hidden Alternative Backbone Conformations in X-ray Crystallography Using qFit

    PubMed Central

    Keedy, Daniel A.; Fraser, James S.; van den Bedem, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Proteins must move between different conformations of their native ensemble to perform their functions. Crystal structures obtained from high-resolution X-ray diffraction data reflect this heterogeneity as a spatial and temporal conformational average. Although movement between natively populated alternative conformations can be critical for characterizing molecular mechanisms, it is challenging to identify these conformations within electron density maps. Alternative side chain conformations are generally well separated into distinct rotameric conformations, but alternative backbone conformations can overlap at several atomic positions. Our model building program qFit uses mixed integer quadratic programming (MIQP) to evaluate an extremely large number of combinations of sidechain conformers and backbone fragments to locally explain the electron density. Here, we describe two major modeling enhancements to qFit: peptide flips and alternative glycine conformations. We find that peptide flips fall into four stereotypical clusters and are enriched in glycine residues at the n+1 position. The potential for insights uncovered by new peptide flips and glycine conformations is exemplified by HIV protease, where different inhibitors are associated with peptide flips in the “flap” regions adjacent to the inhibitor binding site. Our results paint a picture of peptide flips as conformational switches, often enabled by glycine flexibility, that result in dramatic local rearrangements. Our results furthermore demonstrate the power of large-scale computational analysis to provide new insights into conformational heterogeneity. Overall, improved modeling of backbone heterogeneity with high-resolution X-ray data will connect dynamics to the structure-function relationship and help drive new design strategies for inhibitors of biomedically important systems. PMID:26506617

  19. Exposing hidden alternative backbone conformations in X-ray crystallography using qFit

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Keedy, Daniel A.; Fraser, James S.; van den Bedem, Henry; Shehu, Amarda

    2015-10-27

    Proteins must move between different conformations of their native ensemble to perform their functions. Crystal structures obtained from high-resolution X-ray diffraction data reflect this heterogeneity as a spatial and temporal conformational average. Although movement between natively populated alternative conformations can be critical for characterizing molecular mechanisms, it is challenging to identify these conformations within electron density maps. Alternative side chain conformations are generally well separated into distinct rotameric conformations, but alternative backbone conformations can overlap at several atomic positions. Our model building program qFit uses mixed integer quadratic programming (MIQP) to evaluate an extremely large number of combinations of sidechainmore » conformers and backbone fragments to locally explain the electron density. Here, we describe two major modeling enhancements to qFit: peptide flips and alternative glycine conformations. We find that peptide flips fall into four stereotypical clusters and are enriched in glycine residues at the n+1 position. The potential for insights uncovered by new peptide flips and glycine conformations is exemplified by HIV protease, where different inhibitors are associated with peptide flips in the “flap” regions adjacent to the inhibitor binding site. Our results paint a picture of peptide flips as conformational switches, often enabled by glycine flexibility, that result in dramatic local rearrangements. Our results furthermore demonstrate the power of large-scale computational analysis to provide new insights into conformational heterogeneity. Furthermore, improved modeling of backbone heterogeneity with high-resolution X-ray data will connect dynamics to the structure-function relationship and help drive new design strategies for inhibitors of biomedically important systems.« less

  20. Exposing hidden alternative backbone conformations in X-ray crystallography using qFit

    SciTech Connect

    Keedy, Daniel A.; Fraser, James S.; van den Bedem, Henry; Shehu, Amarda

    2015-10-27

    Proteins must move between different conformations of their native ensemble to perform their functions. Crystal structures obtained from high-resolution X-ray diffraction data reflect this heterogeneity as a spatial and temporal conformational average. Although movement between natively populated alternative conformations can be critical for characterizing molecular mechanisms, it is challenging to identify these conformations within electron density maps. Alternative side chain conformations are generally well separated into distinct rotameric conformations, but alternative backbone conformations can overlap at several atomic positions. Our model building program qFit uses mixed integer quadratic programming (MIQP) to evaluate an extremely large number of combinations of sidechain conformers and backbone fragments to locally explain the electron density. Here, we describe two major modeling enhancements to qFit: peptide flips and alternative glycine conformations. We find that peptide flips fall into four stereotypical clusters and are enriched in glycine residues at the n+1 position. The potential for insights uncovered by new peptide flips and glycine conformations is exemplified by HIV protease, where different inhibitors are associated with peptide flips in the “flap” regions adjacent to the inhibitor binding site. Our results paint a picture of peptide flips as conformational switches, often enabled by glycine flexibility, that result in dramatic local rearrangements. Our results furthermore demonstrate the power of large-scale computational analysis to provide new insights into conformational heterogeneity. Furthermore, improved modeling of backbone heterogeneity with high-resolution X-ray data will connect dynamics to the structure-function relationship and help drive new design strategies for inhibitors of biomedically important systems.

  1. Light-activated DNA binding in a designed allosteric protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, Devin; Moffat, Keith; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2008-09-03

    An understanding of how allostery, the conformational coupling of distant functional sites, arises in highly evolvable systems is of considerable interest in areas ranging from cell biology to protein design and signaling networks. We reasoned that the rigidity and defined geometry of an {alpha}-helical domain linker would make it effective as a conduit for allosteric signals. To test this idea, we rationally designed 12 fusions between the naturally photoactive LOV2 domain from Avena sativa phototropin 1 and the Escherichia coli trp repressor. When illuminated, one of the fusions selectively binds operator DNA and protects it from nuclease digestion. The ready success of our rational design strategy suggests that the helical 'allosteric lever arm' is a general scheme for coupling the function of two proteins.

  2. Supramolecular Organization of the Repetitive Backbone Unit of the Streptococcus pneumoniae Pilus

    PubMed Central

    Spraggon, Glen; Koesema, Eric; Scarselli, Maria; Malito, Enrico; Biagini, Massimiliano; Norais, Nathalie; Emolo, Carla; Barocchi, Michèle Anne; Giusti, Fabiola; Hilleringmann, Markus; Rappuoli, Rino; Lesley, Scott; Covacci, Antonello; Masignani, Vega; Ferlenghi, Ilaria

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, like many other Gram-positive bacteria, assembles long filamentous pili on their surface through which they adhere to host cells. Pneumococcal pili are formed by a backbone, consisting of the repetition of the major component RrgB, and two accessory proteins (RrgA and RrgC). Here we reconstruct by transmission electron microscopy and single particle image reconstruction method the three dimensional arrangement of two neighbouring RrgB molecules, which represent the minimal repetitive structural domain of the native pilus. The crystal structure of the D2-D4 domains of RrgB was solved at 1.6 Å resolution. Rigid-body fitting of the X-ray coordinates into the electron density map enabled us to define the arrangement of the backbone subunits into the S. pneumoniae native pilus. The quantitative fitting provide evidence that the pneumococcal pilus consists uniquely of RrgB monomers assembled in a head-to-tail organization. The presence of short intra-subunit linker regions connecting neighbouring domains provides the molecular basis for the intrinsic pilus flexibility. PMID:20559564

  3. RNA-Redesign: a web server for fixed-backbone 3D design of RNA.

    PubMed

    Yesselman, Joseph D; Das, Rhiju

    2015-07-01

    RNA is rising in importance as a design medium for interrogating fundamental biology and for developing therapeutic and bioengineering applications. While there are several online servers for design of RNA secondary structure, there are no tools available for the rational design of 3D RNA structure. Here we present RNA-Redesign (http://rnaredesign.stanford.edu), an online 3D design tool for RNA. This resource utilizes fixed-backbone design to optimize the sequence identity and nucleobase conformations of an RNA to match a desired backbone, analogous to fundamental tools that underlie rational protein engineering. The resulting sequences suggest thermostabilizing mutations that can be experimentally verified. Further, sequence preferences that differ between natural and computationally designed sequences can suggest whether natural sequences possess functional constraints besides folding stability, such as cofactor binding or conformational switching. Finally, for biochemical studies, the designed sequences can suggest experimental tests of 3D models, including concomitant mutation of base triples. In addition to the designs generated, detailed graphical analysis is presented through an integrated and user-friendly environment. PMID:25964298

  4. RNA-Redesign: a web server for fixed-backbone 3D design of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Yesselman, Joseph D.; Das, Rhiju

    2015-01-01

    RNA is rising in importance as a design medium for interrogating fundamental biology and for developing therapeutic and bioengineering applications. While there are several online servers for design of RNA secondary structure, there are no tools available for the rational design of 3D RNA structure. Here we present RNA-Redesign (http://rnaredesign.stanford.edu), an online 3D design tool for RNA. This resource utilizes fixed-backbone design to optimize the sequence identity and nucleobase conformations of an RNA to match a desired backbone, analogous to fundamental tools that underlie rational protein engineering. The resulting sequences suggest thermostabilizing mutations that can be experimentally verified. Further, sequence preferences that differ between natural and computationally designed sequences can suggest whether natural sequences possess functional constraints besides folding stability, such as cofactor binding or conformational switching. Finally, for biochemical studies, the designed sequences can suggest experimental tests of 3D models, including concomitant mutation of base triples. In addition to the designs generated, detailed graphical analysis is presented through an integrated and user-friendly environment. PMID:25964298

  5. GADIS: Algorithm for designing sequences to achieve target secondary structure profiles of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Tyler S; Crabtree, Michael D; Shammas, Sarah L; Posey, Ammon E; Clarke, Jane; Pappu, Rohit V

    2016-09-01

    Many intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) participate in coupled folding and binding reactions and form alpha helical structures in their bound complexes. Alanine, glycine, or proline scanning mutagenesis approaches are often used to dissect the contributions of intrinsic helicities to coupled folding and binding. These experiments can yield confounding results because the mutagenesis strategy changes the amino acid compositions of IDPs. Therefore, an important next step in mutagenesis-based approaches to mechanistic studies of coupled folding and binding is the design of sequences that satisfy three major constraints. These are (i) achieving a target intrinsic alpha helicity profile; (ii) fixing the positions of residues corresponding to the binding interface; and (iii) maintaining the native amino acid composition. Here, we report the development of a G: enetic A: lgorithm for D: esign of I: ntrinsic secondary S: tructure (GADIS) for designing sequences that satisfy the specified constraints. We describe the algorithm and present results to demonstrate the applicability of GADIS by designing sequence variants of the intrinsically disordered PUMA system that undergoes coupled folding and binding to Mcl-1. Our sequence designs span a range of intrinsic helicity profiles. The predicted variations in sequence-encoded mean helicities are tested against experimental measurements. PMID:27503953

  6. Design of a minimal protein oligomerization domain by a structural approach.

    PubMed Central

    Burkhard, P.; Meier, M.; Lustig, A.

    2000-01-01

    Because of the simplicity and regularity of the alpha-helical coiled coil relative to other structural motifs, it can be conveniently used to clarify the molecular interactions responsible for protein folding and stability. Here we describe the de novo design and characterization of a two heptad-repeat peptide stabilized by a complex network of inter- and intrahelical salt bridges. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation show that this peptide is highly alpha-helical and 100% dimeric tinder physiological buffer conditions. Interestingly, the peptide was shown to switch its oligomerization state from a dimer to a trimer upon increasing ionic strength. The correctness of the rational design principles used here is supported by details of the atomic structure of the peptide deduced from X-ray crystallography. The structure of the peptide shows that it is not a molten globule but assumes a unique, native-like conformation. This de novo peptide thus represents an attractive model system for the design of a molecular recognition system. PMID:11206050

  7. Design of a minimal protein oligomerization domain by a structural approach.

    PubMed

    Burkhard, P; Meier, M; Lustig, A

    2000-12-01

    Because of the simplicity and regularity of the alpha-helical coiled coil relative to other structural motifs, it can be conveniently used to clarify the molecular interactions responsible for protein folding and stability. Here we describe the de novo design and characterization of a two heptad-repeat peptide stabilized by a complex network of inter- and intrahelical salt bridges. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation show that this peptide is highly alpha-helical and 100% dimeric tinder physiological buffer conditions. Interestingly, the peptide was shown to switch its oligomerization state from a dimer to a trimer upon increasing ionic strength. The correctness of the rational design principles used here is supported by details of the atomic structure of the peptide deduced from X-ray crystallography. The structure of the peptide shows that it is not a molten globule but assumes a unique, native-like conformation. This de novo peptide thus represents an attractive model system for the design of a molecular recognition system. PMID:11206050

  8. Backbone Structure of Transmembrane Domain IX of the Na+/Proline Transporter PutP of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hilger, Daniel; Polyhach, Yevhen; Jung, Heinrich; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The backbone structure is determined by site-directed spin labeling, double electron electron resonance measurements of distances, and modeling in terms of a helix-loop-helix construct for a transmembrane domain that is supposed to line the translocation pathway in the 54.3 kDa Na+/proline symporter PutP of Escherichia coli. The conformational distribution of the spin labels is accounted for by a rotamer library. An ensemble of backbone models with a root mean-square deviation of less than 2 Å is obtained. These models exhibit a pronounced kink near residue T341, which is involved in substrate binding. The kink may be associated with a hinge that allows the protein to open and close an inwardly oriented cavity. PMID:19134477

  9. Robust identification of backbone curves using control-based continuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renson, L.; Gonzalez-Buelga, A.; Barton, D. A. W.; Neild, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Control-based continuation is a recently developed approach for testing nonlinear dynamic systems in a controlled manner and exploring their dynamic features as system parameters are varied. In this paper, control-based continuation is adapted to follow the locus where system response and excitation are in quadrature, extracting the backbone curve of the underlying conservative system. The method is applied to a single-degree-of-freedom oscillator under base excitation, and the results are compared with the standard resonant-decay method.

  10. Scientific Laser Market Still The Backbone Of The Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomkins, Jon

    1988-06-01

    Good morning. I would like to thank Gary Forrest and Laser Focus for giving me the opportunity to participate in this seminar. After listening to Moe Levitt's overview of the industry outlook for 1988, it is a pleasure for me to represent one of the 'hot' sectors in the market - the old research market. My mission today is to provide a perspective of this market to you as one of the healthier parts of the industry, as one of the backbones of our industry.

  11. Isolation and characterization of haemoporin, an abundant haemolymph protein from Aplysia californica.

    PubMed Central

    Jaenicke, Elmar; Walsh, Patrick J; Decker, Heinz

    2003-01-01

    In the present study, we show the isolation and characterization of the protein haemoporin, which constitutes the second most abundant protein fraction in the haemolymph of the marine gastropod Aplysia californica. Although Aplysia is commonly used to investigate the molecular basis of learning, not much is known about the proteins in its haemolymph, which is in contact with the neurons owing to the open circulatory system of molluscs. In the native state, haemoporin is a macromolecular complex forming a cylinder with a central solvent-filled pore. The native complex most probably is a homopentamer made up from 70 kDa subunits with a molecular mass of 360 kDa and a sedimentation coefficient of 11.7 S. Prediction of the secondary structure by CD spectroscopy revealed that haemoporin contains 36% alpha-helices and 19% beta-strands. An absorption band in the 300-400 nm region indicates that haemoporin probably contains a bound substance. Haemoporin also contains a below average amount of tryptophan as evident from absorption and fluorescence spectra. The specific absorption coefficient at 280 nm (a (280 nm, 1 mg/ml)) varies between 0.42 and 0.59 l x g(-1) x cm(-1) depending on the method. The function of the protein is not yet known, but there are structural parallels between haemoporin and a pore protein reported previously in the haemolymph of another marine gastropod Megathura crenulata. The alanine-rich N-terminal sequence (AAVPEAAAEATAEAAPVSEF) is unique among protein sequences and indicates an alpha-helical structure. Whereas one side of the helix is hydrophobic and faces the interior of the protein, the other side contains a glutamic cluster, which may form the channel of the pore in the quaternary structure. Thus both proteins might belong to a new class of haemolymph proteins present in the haemolymph of marine gastropods. PMID:12889987

  12. A phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia: an RNA-seq approach

    PubMed Central

    González, Vanessa L.; Andrade, Sónia C. S.; Bieler, Rüdiger; Collins, Timothy M.; Dunn, Casey W.; Mikkelsen, Paula M.; Taylor, John D.; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Bivalves are an ancient and ubiquitous group of aquatic invertebrates with an estimated 10 000–20 000 living species. They are economically significant as a human food source, and ecologically important given their biomass and effects on communities. Their phylogenetic relationships have been studied for decades, and their unparalleled fossil record extends from the Cambrian to the Recent. Nevertheless, a robustly supported phylogeny of the deepest nodes, needed to fully exploit the bivalves as a model for testing macroevolutionary theories, is lacking. Here, we present the first phylogenomic approach for this important group of molluscs, including novel transcriptomic data for 31 bivalves obtained through an RNA-seq approach, and analyse these data with published genomes and transcriptomes of other bivalves plus outgroups. Our results provide a well-resolved, robust phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia with all major lineages delineated, addressing long-standing questions about the monophyly of Protobranchia and Heterodonta, and resolving the position of particular groups such as Palaeoheterodonta, Archiheterodonta and Anomalodesmata. This now fully resolved backbone demonstrates that genomic approaches using hundreds of genes are feasible for resolving phylogenetic questions in bivalves and other animals. PMID:25589608

  13. Long-term forecasting of internet backbone traffic.

    PubMed

    Papagiannaki, Konstantina; Taft, Nina; Zhang, Zhi-Li; Diot, Christophe

    2005-09-01

    We introduce a methodology to predict when and where link additions/upgrades have to take place in an Internet protocol (IP) backbone network. Using simple network management protocol (SNMP) statistics, collected continuously since 1999, we compute aggregate demand between any two adjacent points of presence (PoPs) and look at its evolution at time scales larger than 1 h. We show that IP backbone traffic exhibits visible long term trends, strong periodicities, and variability at multiple time scales. Our methodology relies on the wavelet multiresolution analysis (MRA) and linear time series models. Using wavelet MRA, we smooth the collected measurements until we identify the overall long-term trend. The fluctuations around the obtained trend are further analyzed at multiple time scales. We show that the largest amount of variability in the original signal is due to its fluctuations at the 12-h time scale. We model inter-PoP aggregate demand as a multiple linear regression model, consisting of the two identified components. We show that this model accounts for 98% of the total energy in the original signal, while explaining 90% of its variance. Weekly approximations of those components can be accurately modeled with low-order autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models. We show that forecasting the long term trend and the fluctuations of the traffic at the 12-h time scale yields accurate estimates for at least 6 months in the future. PMID:16252820

  14. A phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia: an RNA-seq approach.

    PubMed

    González, Vanessa L; Andrade, Sónia C S; Bieler, Rüdiger; Collins, Timothy M; Dunn, Casey W; Mikkelsen, Paula M; Taylor, John D; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2015-02-22

    Bivalves are an ancient and ubiquitous group of aquatic invertebrates with an estimated 10 000-20 000 living species. They are economically significant as a human food source, and ecologically important given their biomass and effects on communities. Their phylogenetic relationships have been studied for decades, and their unparalleled fossil record extends from the Cambrian to the Recent. Nevertheless, a robustly supported phylogeny of the deepest nodes, needed to fully exploit the bivalves as a model for testing macroevolutionary theories, is lacking. Here, we present the first phylogenomic approach for this important group of molluscs, including novel transcriptomic data for 31 bivalves obtained through an RNA-seq approach, and analyse these data with published genomes and transcriptomes of other bivalves plus outgroups. Our results provide a well-resolved, robust phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia with all major lineages delineated, addressing long-standing questions about the monophyly of Protobranchia and Heterodonta, and resolving the position of particular groups such as Palaeoheterodonta, Archiheterodonta and Anomalodesmata. This now fully resolved backbone demonstrates that genomic approaches using hundreds of genes are feasible for resolving phylogenetic questions in bivalves and other animals. PMID:25589608

  15. Sequential backbone resonance assignments of the E. coli dihydrofolate reductase Gly67Val mutant: folate complex.

    PubMed

    Puthenpurackal Narayanan, Sunilkumar; Maeno, Akihiro; Wada, Yuji; Tate, Shin-Ichi; Akasaka, Kazuyuki

    2016-04-01

    Occasionally, a mutation in an exposed loop region causes a significant change in protein function and/or stability. A single mutation Gly67Val of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) in the exposed CD loop is such an example. We have carried out the chemical shift assignments for H(N), N(H), C(α) and C(β) atoms of the Gly67Val mutant of E. coli DHFR complexed with folate at pH 7.0, 35 °C, and then evaluated the H(N), N(H), C(α) and C(β) chemical shift changes caused by the mutation. The result indicates that, while the overall secondary structure remains the same, the single mutation Gly67Val causes site-specific conformational changes of the polypeptide backbone restricted around the adenosine-binding subdomain (residues 38-88) and not in the distant catalytic domain. PMID:26482924

  16. Side chain and backbone contributions of Phe508 to CFTR folding

    SciTech Connect

    Thibodeau, Patrick H.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Machius, Mischa; Thomas, Philip J.

    2010-12-07

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an integral membrane protein, cause cystic fibrosis (CF). The most common CF-causing mutant, deletion of Phe508, fails to properly fold. To elucidate the role Phe508 plays in the folding of CFTR, missense mutations at this position were generated. Only one missense mutation had a pronounced effect on the stability and folding of the isolated domain in vitro. In contrast, many substitutions, including those of charged and bulky residues, disrupted folding of full-length CFTR in cells. Structures of two mutant nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) reveal only local alterations of the surface near position 508. These results suggest that the peptide backbone plays a role in the proper folding of the domain, whereas the side chain plays a role in defining a surface of NBD1 that potentially interacts with other domains during the maturation of intact CFTR.

  17. Phosphorylation of serine residues affects the conformation of the calmodulin binding domain of human protein 4.1.

    PubMed

    Vetter, S W; Leclerc, E

    2001-08-01

    We have previously characterized the calcium-dependent calmodulin (CaM)-binding domain (Ser76-Ser92) of the 135-kDa human protein 4.1 isoform using fluorescence spectroscopy and chemically synthesized nonphosphorylated or serine phosphorylated peptides [Leclerc, E. & Vetter, S. (1998) Eur. J. Biochem. 258, 567-671]. Here we demonstrate that phosphorylation of two serine residues within the 17-residue peptide alters their ability to adopt alpha helical conformation in a position-dependent manner. The helical content of the peptides was determined by CD-spectroscopy and found to increase from 36 to 45% for the Ser80 phosphorylated peptide and reduce to 28% for the Ser84 phosphorylated peptide; the di-phosphorylated peptide showed 32% helical content. Based on secondary structure prediction methods we propose that initial helix formation involves the central residues Leu82-Phe86. The ability of the peptides to adopt alpha helical conformations did not correlate with the observed binding affinities to CaM. We suggest that the reduced CaM-binding affinities observed for the phosphorylated peptides are more likely to be the result of unfavorable sterical and electrostatic interactions introduced into the CaM peptide-binding interface by the phosphate groups, rather than being due to the effect of phosphorylation on the secondary structure of the peptides. PMID:11488924

  18. Structure of the hypothetical Mycoplasma protein, MPN555, suggestsa chaperone function

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula; Aono, Shelly; Chen, Shengfeng; Yokota,Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2005-06-15

    The crystal structure of the hypothetical protein MPN555from Mycoplasma pneumoniae (gi pbar 1673958) has been determined to a resolution of 2.8 Angstrom using anomalous diffraction data at the Sepeak wavelength. Structure determination revealed a mostly alpha-helical protein with a three-lobed shape. The three lobes or fingers delineate a central binding groove and additional grooves between lobes 1 and 3, and between lobes 2 and 3. For one of the molecules in the asymmetric unit,the central binding pocket was filled with a peptide from the uncleaved N-terminal affinity tag. The MPN555 structure has structural homology to two bacterial chaperone proteins, SurA and trigger factor from Escherichia coli. The structural data and the homology to other chaperone for MPN555.

  19. The evolutionarily conserved Krueppel-associated box domain defines a subfamily of eukaryotic multifingered proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bellefroid, E.J.; Poncelet, D.A.; Lecocq, P.J.; Revelant, O.; Martial, J.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The authors have previously shown that the human genome includes hundreds of genes coding for putative factors related to the Krueppel zinc-finger protein, which regulates Drosophila segmentation. They report herein that about one-third of these genes code for proteins that share a very conserved region of about 75 amino acids in their N-terminal nonfinger portion. Homologous regions are found in a number of previously described finger proteins, including mouse Zfp-1 and Xenopus Xfin. They named this region the Krueppel-associated box (KRAB). This domain has the potential to form two amphipathic {alpha}-helices. Southern blot analysis of zoo blots suggests that the Krueppel-associated box is highly conserved during evolution. Northern blot analysis shows that these genes are expressed in most adult tissues and are down-regulated during in vitro terminal differentiation of human myeloid cells.

  20. A FUSCA gene of Arabidopsis encodes a novel protein essential for plant development.

    PubMed Central

    Castle, L A; Meinke, D W

    1994-01-01

    Arabidopsis fusca mutants display striking purple coloration due to anthocyanin accumulation in their cotyledons. We describe six recessive fusca mutants isolated from Agrobacterium-transformed Arabidopsis families. These mutants first become defective during embryogenesis and exhibit limited seedling development. Double mutant constructs revealed that developmental defects were not simply a consequence of anthocyanin accumulation. fusca seedlings showed altered responses to several environmental and endogenous factors. Allelism tests established that three fusca loci are represented by mutants previously described as defective in light-regulated responses. To study the molecular basis of the fusca phenotype, we cloned the FUS6 gene. FUS6 encodes a novel protein that is hydrophilic, alpha-helical, and contains potential protein kinase C phosphorylation sites. The FUSCA proteins appear to act in a network of signal transduction pathways critical for plant development. PMID:8130643

  1. Backbone dynamics of barstar: a (15)N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Majumdar, A; Udgaonkar, J B

    2000-12-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly (15)N-labeled barstar have been studied at 32 degrees C, pH 6.7, by using (15)N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopy. (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R(1)), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R(2)), and steady-state heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N NOEs have been determined for 69 of the 86 (excluding two prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide (15)N at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla. The primary relaxation data have been analyzed by using the model-free formalism of molecular dynamics, using both isotropic and axially symmetric diffusion of the molecule, to determine the overall rotational correlation time (tau(m)), the generalized order parameter (S(2)), the effective correlation time for internal motions (tau(e)), and NH exchange broadening contributions (R(ex)) for each residue. As per the axially symmetric diffusion, the ratio of diffusion rates about the unique and perpendicular axes (D( parallel)/D( perpendicular)) is 0.82 +/- 0.03. The two results have only marginal differences. The relaxation data have also been used to map reduced spectral densities for the NH vectors of these residues at three frequencies: 0, omega(H), and omega(N), where omega(H),(N) are proton and nitrogen Larmor frequencies. The value of tau(m) obtained from model-free analysis of the relaxation data is 5.2 ns. The reduced spectral density analysis, however, yields a value of 5.7 ns. The tau(m) determined here is different from that calculated previously from time-resolved fluorescence data (4.1 ns). The order parameter ranges from 0.68 to 0.98, with an average value of 0.85 +/- 0.02. A comparison of the order parameters with the X-ray B-factors for the backbone nitrogens of wild-type barstar does not show any considerable correlation. Model-free analysis of the relaxation data for seven residues required the inclusion of an exchange broadening term, the magnitude of which ranges from 2

  2. Solution conformation of a peptide fragment representing a proposed RNA-binding site of a viral coat protein studied by two-dimensional NMR

    SciTech Connect

    van der Graaf, M.; van Mierlo, C.P.M.; Hemminga, M.A. )

    1991-06-11

    The first 25 amino acids of the coat protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus are essential for binding the encapsidated RNA. Although an {alpha}-helical conformation has been predicted for this highly positively charged N-terminal region. No experimental evidence for this conformation has been presented so far. In this study, two-dimensional proton NMR experiments were performed on a chemically synthesized pentacosapeptide containing the first 25 amino acids of this coat protein. All resonances could be assigned by a combined use of two-dimensional correlated spectroscopy and nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy carried out at four different temperatures. Various NMR parameters indicate the presence of a conformational ensemble consisting of helical structures rapidly converting into more extended states. Differences in chemical shifts and nuclear Overhauser effects indicate that lowering the temperature induces a shift of the dynamic equilibrium toward more helical structures. At 10{degrees}C, a perceptible fraction of the conformational ensemble consists of structures with an {alpha}-helical conformation between residues 9 and 17, likely starting with a turnlike structure around Thr9 and Arg10. Both the conformation and the position of this helical region agree well with the secondary structure predictions mentioned above.

  3. Carbon backbone topology of the metabolome of a cell.

    PubMed

    Bingol, Kerem; Zhang, Fengli; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2012-05-30

    The complex metabolic makeup of a biological system, such as a cell, is a key determinant of its biological state providing unique insights into its function. Here we characterize the metabolome of a cell by a novel homonuclear (13)C 2D NMR approach applied to a nonfractionated uniformly (13)C-enriched lysate of E. coli cells and determine de novo their carbon backbone topologies that constitute the "topolome". A protocol was developed, which first identifies traces in a constant-time (13)C-(13)C TOCSY NMR spectrum that are unique for individual mixture components and then assembles for each trace the corresponding carbon-bond topology network by consensus clustering. This led to the determination of 112 topologies of unique metabolites from a single sample. The topolome is dominated by carbon topologies of carbohydrates (34.8%) and amino acids (45.5%) that can constitute building blocks of more complex structures. PMID:22540339

  4. A Native to Amyloidogenic Transition Regulated by a Backbone Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Eakin,C.; Berman, A.; Miranker, A.

    2006-01-01

    Many polypeptides can self-associate into linear, aggregated assemblies termed amyloid fibers. High-resolution structural insights into the mechanism of fibrillogenesis are elusive owing to the transient and mixed oligomeric nature of assembly intermediates. Here, we report the conformational changes that initiate fiber formation by beta-2-microglobulin (beta2m) in dialysis-related amyloidosis. Access of beta2m to amyloidogenic conformations is catalyzed by selective binding of divalent cations. The chemical basis of this process was determined to be backbone isomerization of a conserved proline. On the basis of this finding, we designed a beta2m variant that closely adopts this intermediate state. The variant has kinetic, thermodynamic and catalytic properties consistent with its being a fibrillogenic intermediate of wild-type beta2m. Furthermore, it is stable and folded, enabling us to unambiguously determine the initiating conformational changes for amyloid assembly at atomic resolution.

  5. Efficient synthesis of longer Aβ peptides via removable backbone modification.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Chao; Tang, Shan; Si, Yan-Yan; Wang, Zhipeng A; Tian, Chang-Lin; Zheng, Ji-Shen

    2016-06-14

    Longer amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides (43 to 49 amino acids) play essential roles in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The difficulty in the preparation of longer Aβ peptides is still an obstacle to elucidate their roles in AD. Herein we report a robust and efficient strategy for the chemical synthesis of longer Aβ peptides (Aβ48 and Aβ49). A key feature of this method is the installation of removable Arg4-tagged backbone modification groups into the hydrophobic region of Aβ. This modification can improve the handling properties of the purification, ligation and mass characterization of longer Aβ peptides. The practicability of the new method has been demonstrated by the successful synthesis of Aβ48 and Aβ49 peptides. PMID:27188564

  6. Transforming plastic surfaces with electrophilic backbones from hydrophobic to hydrophilic.

    PubMed

    Kim, Samuel; Bowen, Raffick A R; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-28

    We demonstrate a simple nonaqueous reaction scheme for transforming the surface of plastics from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. The chemical modification is achieved by base-catalyzed trans-esterification with polyols. It is permanent, does not release contaminants, and causes no optical or mechanical distortion of the plastic. We present contact angle measurements to show successful modification of several types of plastics including poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and polycarbonate (PC). Its applicability to blood analysis is explored using chemically modified PET blood collection tubes and found to be quite satisfactory. We expect this approach will reduce the cost of manufacturing plastic devices with optimized wettability and can be generalized to other types of plastic materials having an electrophilic linkage as its backbone. PMID:25565370

  7. The backbone of the post-synaptic density originated in a unicellular ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Comparative genomics of the early diverging metazoan lineages and of their unicellular sister-groups opens new window to reconstructing the genetic changes which preceded or accompanied the evolution of multicellular body plans. A recent analysis found that the genome of the nerve-less sponges encodes the homologues of most vertebrate post-synaptic proteins. In vertebrate excitatory synapses, these proteins assemble to form the post-synaptic density, a complex molecular platform linking membrane receptors, components of their signalling pathways, and the cytoskeleton. Newly available genomes from Monosiga brevicollis (a member of Choanoflagellata, the closest unicellular relatives of animals) and Trichoplax adhaerens (a member of Placozoa: besides sponges, the only nerve-less metazoans) offer an opportunity to refine our understanding of post-synaptic protein evolution. Results Searches for orthologous proteins and reconstruction of gene gains/losses based on the taxon phylogeny indicate that post-synaptic proteins originated in two main steps. The backbone scaffold proteins (Shank, Homer, DLG) and some of their partners were acquired in a unicellular ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoans. A substantial additional set appeared in an exclusive ancestor of the Metazoa. The placozoan genome contains most post-synaptic genes but lacks some of them. Notably, the master-scaffold protein Shank might have been lost secondarily in the placozoan lineage. Conclusions The time of origination of most post-synaptic proteins was not concomitant with the acquisition of synapses or neural-like cells. The backbone of the scaffold emerged in a unicellular context and was probably not involved in cell-cell communication. Based on the reconstructed protein composition and potential interactions, its ancestral function could have been to link calcium signalling and cytoskeleton regulation. The complex later became integrated into the evolving synapse through the

  8. Crystal structure of cce_0566 from Cyanothece 51142, a protein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF269 family

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko G. W.; Robinson H.

    2012-02-01

    The crystal structure for cce{_}0566 (171 aa, 19.4 kDa), a DUF269 annotated protein from the diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, was determined to 1.60 {angstrom} resolution. Cce{_}0566 is a homodimer with each molecule composed of eight {alpha}-helices folded on one side of a three strand anti-parallel {beta}-sheet. Hydrophobic interactions between the side chains of largely conserved residues on the surface of each {beta}-sheet hold the dimer together. The fold observed for cce{_}0566 may be unique to proteins in the DUF269 family, hence, the protein may also have a function unique to nitrogen fixation. A solvent accessible cleft containing conserved charged residues near the dimer interface could represent the active site or ligand-binding surface for the protein's biological function.

  9. Thin Films Formed from Conjugated Polymers with Ionic, Water-Soluble Backbones.

    PubMed

    Voortman, Thomas P; Chiechi, Ryan C

    2015-12-30

    This paper compares the morphologies of films of conjugated polymers in which the backbone (main chain) and pendant groups are varied between ionic/hydrophilic and aliphatic/hydrophobic. We observe that conjugated polymers in which the pendant groups and backbone are matched, either ionic-ionic or hydrophobic-hydrophobic, form smooth, structured, homogeneous films from water (ionic) or tetrahydrofuran (hydrophobic). Mismatched conjugated polymers, by contrast, form inhomogeneous films with rough topologies. The polymers with ionic backbone chains are conjugated polyions (conjugated polymers with closed-shell charges in the backbone), which are semiconducting materials with tunable bad-gaps, not unlike uncharged conjugated polymers. PMID:25723354

  10. Novel Variants of AbaR Resistance Islands with a Common Backbone in Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates of European Clone II

    PubMed Central

    Povilonis, Justas; Sužiedėlienė, Edita

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the genetic organization of three novel genomic antibiotic resistance islands (AbaRs) in Acinetobacter baumannii isolates belonging to group of European clone II (EC II) comM integrated sequences of 18-, 21-, and 23-kb resistance islands were determined. These resistance islands carry the backbone of AbaR-type transposon structures, which are composed of the transposition module coding for potential transposition proteins and other genes coding for the intact universal stress protein (uspA), sulfate permease (sul), and proteins of unknown function. The antibiotic resistance genes strA, strB, tetB, and tetR and insertion sequence CR2 element were found to be inserted into the AbaR transposons. GenBank homology searches indicated that they are closely related to the AbaR sequences found integrated in comM in strains of EC II (A. baumannii strains 1656-2 and TCDC-AB0715) and AbaR4 integrated in another location of A. baumannii AB0057 (EC I). All of the AbaRs showed structural similarity to the previously described AbaR4 island and share a 12,008-bp backbone. AbaRs contain Tn1213, Tn2006, and the multiple fragments which could be derived from transposons Tn3, Tn10, Tn21, Tn1000, Tn5393, and Tn6020, the insertion sequences IS26, ISAba1, ISAba14, and ISCR2, and the class 1 integron. Moreover, chromosomal DNA was inserted into distinct regions of the AbaR backbone. Sequence analysis suggested that the AbaR-type transposons have evolved through insertions, deletions, and homologous recombination. AbaR islands, sharing the core structure similar to AbaR4, appeared to be distributed in isolates of EC I and EC II via integration into distinct genomic sites, i.e., pho and comM, respectively. PMID:22290980

  11. Exocyclic groups in the minor groove influence the backbone conformation of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wellenzohn, Bernd; Flader, Wolfgang; Winger, Rudolf H.; Hallbrucker, Andreas; Mayer, Erwin; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2001-01-01

    Exocyclic groups in the minor groove of DNA modulate the affinity and positioning of nucleic acids to the histone protein. The addition of exocyclic groups decreases the formation of this protein–DNA complex, while their removal increases nucleosome formation. On the other hand, recent theoretical results show a strong correlation between the BI/BII phosphate backbone conformation and the hydration of the grooves of the DNA. We performed a simulation of the d(CGCGAATTCGCG)2 Drew Dickerson dodecamer and one simulation of the d(CGCIAATTCGCG)2 dodecamer in order to investigate the influence of the exocyclic amino group of guanine. The removal of the amino group introduces a higher intrinsic flexibility to DNA supporting the suggestions that make the enhanced flexibility responsible for the enlarged histone complexation affinity. This effect is attributed to changes in the destacking interactions of both strands of the DNA. The differences in the hydration of the minor groove could be the explanation of this flexibility. The changed hydration of the minor groove also leads to a different BI/BII substate pattern. Due to the fact that the histone preferentially builds contacts with the backbone of the DNA, we propose an influence of these BI/BII changes on the nucleosome formation process. Thus, we provide an additional explanation for the enhanced affinity to the histone due to removal of exocyclic groups. In terms of BI/BII we are also able to explain how minor groove binding ligands could affect the nucleosome assembly without disrupting the structure of DNA. PMID:11812834

  12. An avian live attenuated master backbone for potential use in epidemic and pandemic influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Danielle; Hossain, Md Jaber; Song, Haichen; Araya, Yonas; Solórzano, Alicia; Perez, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    The unprecedented emergence in Asia of multiple avian influenza virus (AIV) subtypes with a broad host range poses a major challenge in the design of vaccination strategies that are both effective and available in a timely manner. The present study focused on the protective effects of a genetically modified AIV as a source for the preparation of vaccines for epidemic and pandemic influenza. It has previously been demonstrated that a live attenuated AIV based on the internal backbone of influenza A/Guinea fowl/Hong Kong/WF10/99 (H9N2), called WF10att, is effective at protecting poultry species against low- and high-pathogenicity influenza strains. More importantly, this live attenuated virus provided effective protection when administered in ovo. In order to characterize the WF10att backbone further for use in epidemic and pandemic influenza vaccines, this study evaluated its protective effects in mice. Intranasal inoculation of modified attenuated viruses in mice provided adequate protective immunity against homologous lethal challenges with both the wild-type influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) and A/Vietnam/1203/04 (H5N1) viruses. Adequate heterotypic immunity was also observed in mice vaccinated with modified attenuated viruses carrying H7N2 surface proteins. The results presented in this report suggest that the internal genes of a genetically modified AIV confer similar protection in a mouse model and thus could be used as a master donor strain for the generation of live attenuated vaccines for epidemic and pandemic influenza. PMID:18931063

  13. Backbone NMR reveals allosteric signal transduction networks in the β1-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Shin; Deupi, Xavier; Opitz, Christian; Heydenreich, Franziska M; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Brueckner, Florian; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Veprintsev, Dmitry B; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2016-02-11

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are physiologically important transmembrane signalling proteins that trigger intracellular responses upon binding of extracellular ligands. Despite recent breakthroughs in GPCR crystallography, the details of ligand-induced signal transduction are not well understood owing to missing dynamical information. In principle, such information can be provided by NMR, but so far only limited data of functional relevance on few side-chain sites of eukaryotic GPCRs have been obtained. Here we show that receptor motions can be followed at virtually any backbone site in a thermostabilized mutant of the turkey β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR). Labelling with [(15)N]valine in a eukaryotic expression system provides over twenty resolved resonances that report on structure and dynamics in six ligand complexes and the apo form. The response to the various ligands is heterogeneous in the vicinity of the binding pocket, but gets transformed into a homogeneous readout at the intracellular side of helix 5 (TM5), which correlates linearly with ligand efficacy for the G protein pathway. The effect of several pertinent, thermostabilizing point mutations was assessed by reverting them to the native sequence. Whereas the response to ligands remains largely unchanged, binding of the G protein mimetic nanobody NB80 and G protein activation are only observed when two conserved tyrosines (Y227 and Y343) are restored. Binding of NB80 leads to very strong spectral changes throughout the receptor, including the extracellular ligand entrance pocket. This indicates that even the fully thermostabilized receptor undergoes activating motions in TM5, but that the fully active state is only reached in presence of Y227 and Y343 by stabilization with a G protein-like partner. The combined analysis of chemical shift changes from the point mutations and ligand responses identifies crucial connections in the allosteric activation pathway, and presents a general experimental

  14. Surface recognition elements of membrane protein oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M

    2008-02-15

    Although certain membrane proteins are functional as monomeric polypeptides, others must assemble into oligomers to carry out their biological roles. High-resolution membrane protein structures provide a valuable resource for examining the sequence features that facilitate-or preclude-assembly of membrane protein monomers into multimeric structures. Here we have utilized a data set of 28 high-resolution alpha-helical membrane protein structures comprising 32 nonredundant polypeptides to address this issue. The lipid-exposed surfaces of membrane proteins that have reached their fully assembled and functional biological units have been compared with those of the individual subunits that build quaternary structures. Though the overall amino acid composition of each set of surfaces is similar, a key distinction-the distribution of small-xxx-small motifs-delineates subunits from membrane proteins that have reached a functioning oligomeric state. Quaternary structure formation may therefore be dictated by small-xxx-small motifs that are not satisfied by intrachain contacts. PMID:17729275

  15. A New DNA Binding Protein Highly Conserved in Diverse Crenarchaeal Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, E.T.; Eilers, B.J.; Reiter, D.; Ortmann, A.C.; Young, M.J.; Lawrence, C.M.; /Montana State U. /Tubingen U.

    2007-07-09

    Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) infects Sulfolobus species found in the hot springs of Yellowstone National Park. Its 37 open reading frames (ORFs) generally lack sequence similarity to other genes. One exception, however, is ORF B116. While its function is unknown, orthologs are found in three additional crenarchaeal viral families. Due to the central importance of this protein family to crenarchaeal viruses, we have undertaken structural and biochemical studies of B116. The structure reveals a previously unobserved fold consisting of a five-stranded beta-sheet flanked on one side by three alpha helices. Two subunits come together to form a homodimer with a 10-stranded mixed beta-sheet, where the topology of the central strands resembles an unclosed beta-barrel. Highly conserved loops rise above the surface of the saddle-shaped protein and suggest an interaction with the major groove of DNA. The predicted B116-DNA interaction is confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays.

  16. Physico-chemical characterization of human von Ebner gland protein expressed in Escherichia coli: implications for its physiological role.

    PubMed

    Creuzenet, C; Mangroo, D

    1998-11-01

    The human von Ebner gland protein (VEG) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The sequence and mass of the recombinant protein were confirmed, and far and near UV circular dichroic analyses showed that the protein was properly folded. The secondary structure of recombinant VEG consisted of 75% beta-sheets and 12% alpha-helices, and it was found to be stable under acidic conditions, in the presence of alcohol, and at high temperatures. The denaturation temperature was 79 degreesC at pH 3.5, with a denaturation enthalpy (DeltaHd) of 160,600 J/mol. Fluorescence analysis and measurement of the denaturation temperature by circular dichroism did not detect any interaction between VEG and extremely bitter (denatonium benzoate, caffein) or sweet (aspartame) compounds. These results suggest that VEG may not function as a shuttle for transfer of sapid molecules to taste receptors. PMID:9790888

  17. Pendant Dynamics of Ethylene-Oxide Containing Polymers with Diverse Backbones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Joshua; Wang, Jing-Han Helen; Chen, Quan; Runt, James; Colby, Ralph

    In the last twenty years, a wide variety of ion conducting polymers have used ether oxygens to facilitate ion conduction, and it is therefore important to understand the dynamics of ether oxygens (EOs) when attached to different polymer backbones. Four different EO-containing polymer architectures are studied by dielectric spectroscopy to understand the backbone effect on the EO dipoles. Polysiloxanes, polyphosphazenes, polymethylmethacrylates, and a polyester ether are compared, with different EO pendant lengths for the siloxane and methylmethacrylate backbones. The flexible polysiloxanes and polyphosphazene backbones impart superior segmental mobility with a glass transition temperature 15 K lower than that of the organic backbone polymers. Short EO pendants are found to impart a lower static dielectric constant at comparable EO content as compared to longer EO pendants of either inorganic or organic backbones. The long-pendant polymethylmethacrylate polymers show two relaxations corresponding to fast EOs near the pendant tail end and slow EOs close to the slower backbone, whereas the long-pendant polysiloxane shows a single relaxation due to the siloxane backbone relaxing faster than the EO pendant. Supported by the NSF Division of Materials Research Polymers Program through Grants DMR-1404586 (RHC) and DMR-1505953 (JR).

  18. Live-attenuated influenza A virus vaccines using a B virus backbone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The currently FDA-licensed live attenuated influenza virus vaccine contains a trivalent mixture of types A (H1N1 and H3N2) and B vaccine viruses. The two A virus vaccines have the backbone of a cold-adapted influenza A virus and the B virus vaccine has the six backbone segments derived from a cold-...

  19. Quantitative Analysis of PMLA Nanoconjugate Components after Backbone Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hui; Patil, Rameshwar; Portilla-Arias, Jose; Black, Keith L.; Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Holler, Eggehard

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional polymer nanoconjugates containing multiple components show great promise in cancer therapy, but in most cases complete analysis of each component is difficult. Polymalic acid (PMLA) based nanoconjugates have demonstrated successful brain and breast cancer treatment. They consist of multiple components including targeting antibodies, Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (AONs), and endosome escape moieties. The component analysis of PMLA nanoconjugates is extremely difficult using conventional spectrometry and HPLC method. Taking advantage of the nature of polyester of PMLA, which can be cleaved by ammonium hydroxide, we describe a method to analyze the content of antibody and AON within nanoconjugates simultaneously using SEC-HPLC by selectively cleaving the PMLA backbone. The selected cleavage conditions only degrade PMLA without affecting the integrity and biological activity of the antibody. Although the amount of antibody could also be determined using the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) method, our selective cleavage method gives more reliable results and is more powerful. Our approach provides a new direction for the component analysis of polymer nanoconjugates and nanoparticles. PMID:25894227

  20. Backbones of evolutionary history test biodiversity theory for microbes

    PubMed Central

    O’Dwyer, James P.; Kembel, Steven W.; Sharpton, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that determine biological diversity is a central question in ecology. In microbial ecology, phylogenetic diversity is an increasingly common and relevant means of quantifying community diversity, particularly given the challenges in defining unambiguous species units from environmental sequence data. We explore patterns of phylogenetic diversity across multiple bacterial communities drawn from different habitats and compare these data to evolutionary trees generated using theoretical models of biodiversity. We have two central findings. First, although on finer scales the empirical trees are highly idiosyncratic, on coarse scales the backbone of these trees is simple and robust, consistent across habitats, and displays bursts of diversification dotted throughout. Second, we find that these data demonstrate a clear departure from the predictions of standard neutral theories of biodiversity and that an alternative family of generalized models provides a qualitatively better description. Together, these results lay the groundwork for a theoretical framework to connect ecological mechanisms to observed phylogenetic patterns in microbial communities. PMID:26106159

  1. Thermogelling Biodegradable Polymers with Hydrophilic Backbones: PEG-g-PLGA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Byeongmoon; Kibbey, Merinda R.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Won, You-Yeong; Gutowska, Anna

    2000-10-31

    The aqueous solutions of poly(ethylene glycol)grafted with poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) flow freely at room temperature but form gels at higher temperature. The existence of micelles in water at low polymer concentration was confirmed by Cro-transmission electron microscopy and dye solubilization studies. The micellar diameter and critical micelle concentration are about 9 nm and 0.47 wt.% respectively. The critical gel concentration, above which a gel phase appears was 16 wt.% and sol-to-gel transition temperature was slightly affected by the concentration in the range of 16 {approx} 25 wt.%. At sol-to-gel transition, viscosity increased abruptly and C-NMR showed molecular motion of hydrophilic poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) side-chains increased. The hydrogel of PEG-g-PLGA with hydrophilic backbones was transparent during degradation and remained a gel for one week, suggesting a promising material for short-term drug delivery.

  2. Solid state radiation chemistry of the DNA backbone

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard, W.A.

    1989-09-01

    The long term goal of this program is to determine the fundamental rules needed to predict the type and yield of damage produced in DNA due to direct effects of ionizing radiation. The focus is on damage to the sugar-phosphate backbone, damage that would lead to strand breaks. Model systems have been chosen that permit various aspects of this problem to be investigated. The emphasis will be on single crystals of monosaccharides, nucleosides, and nucleotides but will also include some powder work on polynucleotides. In these model systems, free radical products and reactions are observed by electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) techniques. The information thus gained is used in constructing rules that predict what primary free radicals are formed in single crystals of model compounds and the reactions stemming from the primary radicals. The formulation of a set of rules that work in model systems will represent a major advance toward formulating a set of rules that predict the direct damage in DNA itself. In a broader context this program is part of the effort to understand and predict the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation received at low dose rates over long periods of time. Assessment of low dose effects requires a basic understanding of the action of radiation at the molecular level. By contributing to that basic understanding, this program will help solve the problems of risk assessment under low dose conditions. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Backbone of complex networks of corporations: the flow of control.

    PubMed

    Glattfelder, J B; Battiston, S

    2009-09-01

    We present a methodology to extract the backbone of complex networks based on the weight and direction of links, as well as on nontopological properties of nodes. We show how the methodology can be applied in general to networks in which mass or energy is flowing along the links. In particular, the procedure enables us to address important questions in economics, namely, how control and wealth are structured and concentrated across national markets. We report on the first cross-country investigation of ownership networks, focusing on the stock markets of 48 countries around the world. On the one hand, our analysis confirms results expected on the basis of the literature on corporate control, namely, that in Anglo-Saxon countries control tends to be dispersed among numerous shareholders. On the other hand, it also reveals that in the same countries, control is found to be highly concentrated at the global level, namely, lying in the hands of very few important shareholders. Interestingly, the exact opposite is observed for European countries. These results have previously not been reported as they are not observable without the kind of network analysis developed here. PMID:19905177

  4. Backbone of complex networks of corporations: The flow of control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glattfelder, J. B.; Battiston, S.

    2009-09-01

    We present a methodology to extract the backbone of complex networks based on the weight and direction of links, as well as on nontopological properties of nodes. We show how the methodology can be applied in general to networks in which mass or energy is flowing along the links. In particular, the procedure enables us to address important questions in economics, namely, how control and wealth are structured and concentrated across national markets. We report on the first cross-country investigation of ownership networks, focusing on the stock markets of 48 countries around the world. On the one hand, our analysis confirms results expected on the basis of the literature on corporate control, namely, that in Anglo-Saxon countries control tends to be dispersed among numerous shareholders. On the other hand, it also reveals that in the same countries, control is found to be highly concentrated at the global level, namely, lying in the hands of very few important shareholders. Interestingly, the exact opposite is observed for European countries. These results have previously not been reported as they are not observable without the kind of network analysis developed here.

  5. Mapping of the RNA recognition site of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S7.

    PubMed Central

    Robert, F; Gagnon, M; Sans, D; Michnick, S; Brakier-Gingras, L

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial ribosomal protein S7 initiates the folding of the 3' major domain of 16S ribosomal RNA by binding to its lower half. The X-ray structure of protein S7 from thermophilic bacteria was recently solved and found to be a modular structure, consisting of an alpha-helical domain with a beta-ribbon extension. To gain further insights into its interaction with rRNA, we cloned the S7 gene from Escherichia coli K12 into a pET expression vector and introduced 4 deletions and 12 amino acid substitutions in the protein sequence. The binding of each mutant to the lower half of the 3' major domain of 16S rRNA was assessed by filtration on nitrocellulose membranes. Deletion of the N-terminal 17 residues or deletion of the B hairpins (residues 72-89) severely decreased S7 affinity for the rRNA. Truncation of the C-terminal portion (residues 138-178), which includes part of the terminal alpha-helix, significantly affected S7 binding, whereas a shorter truncation (residues 148-178) only marginally influenced its binding. Severe effects were also observed with several strategic point mutations located throughout the protein, including Q8A and F17G in the N-terminal region, and K35Q, G54S, K113Q, and M115G in loops connecting the alpha-helices. Our results are consistent with the occurrence of several sites of contact between S7 and the 16S rRNA, in line with its role in the folding of the 3' major domain. PMID:11105763

  6. The solution structure of the outer membrane lipoprotein OmlA from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri reveals a protein fold implicated in protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Vanini, Marina Marques Teixeira; Spisni, Alberto; Sforça, Maurício Luis; Pertinhez, Thelma Aguiar; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2008-06-01

    The outer membrane lipoprotein A (OmlA) belongs to a family of bacterial small lipoproteins widely distributed across the beta and gamma proteobacteria. Although the role of numerous bacterial lipoproteins is known, the biological function of OmlA remains elusive. We found that in the citrus canker pathogen, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (X. citri), OmlA is coregulated with the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) and their expression is enhanced when X. citri is grown on citrus leaves, suggesting that these proteins are involved in plant-pathogen interaction. To gain insights into the function of OmlA, its conformational and dynamic features were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. The protein has highly flexible N- and C- termini and a structurally well defined core composed of three beta-strands and two small alpha-helices, which pack against each other forming a two-layer alpha/beta scaffold. This protein fold resembles the domains of the beta-lactamase inhibitory protein BLIP, involved in protein-protein binding. In conclusion, the structure of OmlA does suggest that this protein may be implicated in protein-protein interactions required during X. citri infection. PMID:18186471

  7. The 2 A resolution structure of the sulfate-binding protein involved in active transport in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Pflugrath, J W; Quiocho, F A

    1988-03-01

    The crystal structure of the liganded form of the sulfate-binding protein, an initial receptor for active transport of sulfate in Salmonella typhimurium, has been solved and refined at 2.0 A resolution (1 A = 0.1 nm). The final model, which consists of 2422 non-hydrogen atoms, one sulfate substrate and 143 water molecules, yields a crystallographic R-factor of 14.0% for 16,959 reflections between 8 and 2 A. The structure deviates from ideal bond lengths and angle distances by 0.015 A and 0.037 A, respectively. The protein is ellipsoid with overall dimensions of 35 A x 35 A x 65 A and consists of two similar globular domains. The two domains are linked by three distinct peptide segments, which though widely separated in the amino acid sequence, are in close proximity in the tertiary structure. As these connecting segments are located near the periphery of the molecule, they further serve as the base or a "boundary" of the deep cleft formed between the two domains. Despite the unusual interdomain connectivity, both domains have similar supersecondary structure consisting of a central five-stranded beta-pleated sheet sandwiched by alpha-helices on either side. The arrangement of the two domains gives rise to the ellipsoidal shape and to the cleft between the two domains wherein the sulfate substrate is found and completely engulfed. A discovery of considerable importance is that the sulfate substrate is tightly held in place primarily by seven hydrogen bonds, five of which are donated by main-chain peptide NH groups, another by a serine hydroxyl and the last by the indole NH moiety of a tryptophan side-chain; there are no positively charged residues, nor cations, nor water molecules within van der Waals' distance to the sulfate dianion. All the main-chain peptide units associated with the sulfate are in turn linked (via the peptide CO group) to arrays of hydrogen bonds. Three of these arrays are composed of alternating peptide units and hydrogen bonds within the

  8. Synonymous codon bias and functional constraint on GC3-related DNA backbone dynamics in the prokaryotic nucleoid

    PubMed Central

    Babbitt, Gregory A.; Alawad, Mohammed A.; Schulze, Katharina V.; Hudson, André O.

    2014-01-01

    While mRNA stability has been demonstrated to control rates of translation, generating both global and local synonymous codon biases in many unicellular organisms, this explanation cannot adequately explain why codon bias strongly tracks neighboring intergene GC content; suggesting that structural dynamics of DNA might also influence codon choice. Because minor groove width is highly governed by 3-base periodicity in GC, the existence of triplet-based codons might imply a functional role for the optimization of local DNA molecular dynamics via GC content at synonymous sites (≈GC3). We confirm a strong association between GC3-related intrinsic DNA flexibility and codon bias across 24 different prokaryotic multiple whole-genome alignments. We develop a novel test of natural selection targeting synonymous sites and demonstrate that GC3-related DNA backbone dynamics have been subject to moderate selective pressure, perhaps contributing to our observation that many genes possess extreme DNA backbone dynamics for their given protein space. This dual function of codons may impose universal functional constraints affecting the evolution of synonymous and non-synonymous sites. We propose that synonymous sites may have evolved as an ‘accessory’ during an early expansion of a primordial genetic code, allowing for multiplexed protein coding and structural dynamic information within the same molecular context. PMID:25200075

  9. Backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of the A147T polymorph of mouse TSPO in complex with a high-affinity radioligand.

    PubMed

    Jaremko, Mariusz; Jaremko, Łukasz; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The integral polytopic membrane protein TSPO is the target for numerous endogenous and synthetic ligands. However, the affinity of many ligands is influenced by a common polymorphism in TSPO, in which an alanine at position 147 is replaced by threonine, thereby complicating the use of several radioligands for clinical diagnosis. In contrast, the best-characterized TSPO ligand (R)-PK11195 binds with similar affinity to both variants of mitochondrial TSPO (wild-type and A147T variant). Here we report the (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of the A147T polymorph of TSPO from Mus Musculus in complex with (R)-PK11195 in DPC detergent micelles. More than 90 % of all resonances were sequence-specifically assigned, demonstrating the ability to obtain high-quality spectral data for both the backbone and the side-chains of medically relevant integral membrane proteins. PMID:26364056

  10. Resistance issues with new nucleoside/nucleotide backbone options.

    PubMed

    Wainberg, Mark A; Turner, Dan

    2004-09-01

    The nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs/NtRTIs) remain an enduring feature of combination therapy. As NRTI/NtRTI options continue to expand, questions arise about how best to combine these agents to create effective dual NRTI/NtRTI backbones in antiretroviral regimens while avoiding treatment-emergent drug resistance. Clinicians must consider how NRTIs/NtRTIs such as tenofovir DF (TDF), abacavir (ABC), and emtricitabine (FTC), as well as new once-daily and coformulated NRTIs/NtRTIs, interact with older agents when combined in novel regimens and how sequencing the new NRTIs can preserve future treatment options. Resistance data from clinical trials have revealed important information on the patterns, prevalence, and effects of resistance seen among patients experiencing virologic failure. In recent years, the prevalence of some mutations such as M184V and Q151M has remained relatively constant, while the L74V mutation, the 69 insertions, and thymidine analogue mutations have decreased in prevalence. Other mutations such as K65R and Y115F, while still relatively uncommon, are increasing in prevalence. This increase may be due to the use of new treatment combinations that select for these mutations at a higher rate. Clinical trials suggest that new regimens containing TDF or ABC select for K65R and that this mutation is observed more frequently with TDF; in contrast, L74V is observed more frequently in ABC-containing regimens but is not commonly selected by TDF-containing regimens. Several lines of evidence are converging to suggest that the presence of zidovudine may decrease the risk of L74V and K65R in ABC- or TDF-containing regimens. This review summarizes the clinical implications of resistance profiles associated with new NRTI/NtRTI regimens in current use and in advanced clinical studies. PMID:15319668

  11. Conformation-specific spectroscopy of capped glutamine-containing peptides: role of a single glutamine residue on peptide backbone preferences.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Patrick S; Dean, Jacob C; McBurney, Carl; Kang, Hyuk; Gellman, Samuel H; Zwier, Timothy S

    2016-04-20

    The conformational preferences of a series of short, aromatic-capped, glutamine-containing peptides have been studied under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase. This work seeks a bottom-up understanding of the role played by glutamine residues in directing peptide structures that lead to neurodegenerative diseases. Resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopy is used to record single-conformation infrared spectra in the NH stretch, amide I and amide II regions. Comparison of the experimental spectra with the predictions of calculations carried out at the DFT M05-2X/6-31+G(d) level of theory lead to firm assignments for the H-bonding architectures of a total of eight conformers of four molecules, including three in Z-Gln-OH, one in Z-Gln-NHMe, three in Ac-Gln-NHBn, and one in Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn. The Gln side chain engages actively in forming H-bonds with nearest-neighbor amide groups, forming C8 H-bonds to the C-terminal side, C9 H-bonds to the N-terminal side, and an amide-stacked geometry, all with an extended (C5) peptide backbone about the Gln residue. The Gln side chain also stabilizes an inverse γ-turn in the peptide backbone by forming a pair of H-bonds that bridge the γ-turn and stabilize it. Finally, the entire conformer population of Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn is funneled into a single structure that incorporates the peptide backbone in a type I β-turn, stabilized by the Gln side chain forming a C7 H-bond to the central amide group in the β-turn not otherwise involved in a hydrogen bond. This β-turn backbone structure is nearly identical to that observed in a series of X-(AQ)-Y β-turns in the protein data bank, demonstrating that the gas-phase structure is robust to perturbations imposed by the crystalline protein environment. PMID:27054830

  12. Conserved Determinants for Membrane Association of Nonstructural Protein 5A from Hepatitis C Virus and Related Viruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Brass, Volker; Pal, Zsuzsanna; Sapay, Nicolas; Deléage, Gilbert; Blum, Hubert E.; Penin, François; Moradpour, Darius

    2007-01-01

    Nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) is a membrane-associated essential component of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication complex. An N-terminal amphipathic alpha helix mediates in-plane membrane association of HCV NS5A and at the same time is likely involved in specific protein-protein interactions required for the assembly of a functional replication complex. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants for membrane association of NS5A from the related GB viruses and pestiviruses. Although primary amino acid sequences differed considerably, putative membrane anchor domains with amphipathic features were predicted in the N-terminal domains of NS5A proteins from these viruses. Confocal laser scanning microscopy, as well as membrane flotation analyses, demonstrated that NS5As from GB virus B (GBV-B), GBV-C, and bovine viral diarrhea virus, the prototype pestivirus, display membrane association characteristics very similar to those of HCV NS5A. The N-terminal 27 to 33 amino acid residues of these NS5A proteins were sufficient for membrane association. Circular dichroism analyses confirmed the capacity of these segments to fold into alpha helices upon association with lipid-like molecules. Despite structural conservation, only very limited exchanges with sequences from related viruses were tolerated in the context of functional HCV RNA replication, suggesting virus-specific interactions of these segments. In conclusion, membrane association of NS5A by an N-terminal amphipathic alpha helix is a feature shared by HCV and related members of the family Flaviviridae. This observation points to conserved roles of the N-terminal amphipathic alpha helices of NS5A in replication complex formation. PMID:17192310

  13. Crystal structure of delta9 stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase from castor seed and its relationship to other di-iron proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Y; Huang, W; Schneider, G; Shanklin, J

    1996-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of recombinant homodimeric delta9 stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase, the archetype of the soluble plant fatty acid desaturases that convert saturated to unsaturated fatty acids, has been determined by protein crystallographic methods to a resolution of 2.4 angstroms. The structure was solved by a combination of single isomorphous replacement, anomalous contribution from the iron atoms to the native diffraction data and 6-fold non-crystallographic symmetry averaging. The 363 amino acid monomer consists of a single domain of 11 alpha-helices. Nine of these form an antiparallel helix bundle. The enzyme subunit contains a di-iron centre, with ligands from four of the alpha-helices in the helix bundle. The iron ions are bound in a highly symmetric environment, with one of the irons forming interactions with the side chains of E196 and H232 and the second iron with the side chains of E105 and H146. Two additional glutamic acid side chains, from E143 and E229, are within coordination distance to both iron ions. A water molecule is found within the second coordination sphere from the iron atoms. The lack of electron density corresponding to a mu-oxo bridge, and the long (4.2 angstroms) distance between the iron ions suggests that this probably represents the diferrous form of the enzyme. A deep channel which probably binds the fatty acid extends from the surface into the interior of the enzyme. Modelling of the substrate, stearic acid, into this channel places the delta9 carbon atom in the vicinity of one of the iron ions. Images PMID:8861937

  14. MCBT: Multi-Hop Cluster Based Stable Backbone Trees for Data Collection and Dissemination in WSNs.

    PubMed

    Shin, Inyoung; Kim, Moonseong; Mutka, Matt W; Choo, Hyunseung; Lee, Tae-Jin

    2009-01-01

    We propose a stable backbone tree construction algorithm using multi-hop clusters for wireless sensor networks (WSNs). The hierarchical cluster structure has advantages in data fusion and aggregation. Energy consumption can be decreased by managing nodes with cluster heads. Backbone nodes, which are responsible for performing and managing multi-hop communication, can reduce the communication overhead such as control traffic and minimize the number of active nodes. Previous backbone construction algorithms, such as Hierarchical Cluster-based Data Dissemination (HCDD) and Multicluster, Mobile, Multimedia radio network (MMM), consume energy quickly. They are designed without regard to appropriate factors such as residual energy and degree (the number of connections or edges to other nodes) of a node for WSNs. Thus, the network is quickly disconnected or has to reconstruct a backbone. We propose a distributed algorithm to create a stable backbone by selecting the nodes with higher energy or degree as the cluster heads. This increases the overall network lifetime. Moreover, the proposed method balances energy consumption by distributing the traffic load among nodes around the cluster head. In the simulation, the proposed scheme outperforms previous clustering schemes in terms of the average and the standard deviation of residual energy or degree of backbone nodes, the average residual energy of backbone nodes after disseminating the sensed data, and the network lifetime. PMID:22454570

  15. α-Helical to β-Helical Conformation Change in the C-Terminal of the Mammalian Prion Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jesse; Whitford, Paul; Hayre, Natha; Cox, Daniel; Onuchic, José.

    2011-03-01

    We employ all-atom structure-based models with mixed basis contact maps to explore whether there are any significant geometric or energetic constraints limiting conjectured conformational transitions between the alpha-helical (α H) and the left handed beta helical (LHBH) conformations for the C-terminal (residues 166-226) of the mammalian prion protein. The LHBH structure has been proposed to describe infectious oligomers and one class of in vitro grown fibrils, as well as possibly self- templating the conversion of normal cellular prion protein to the infectious form. Our results confirm that the kinetics of the conformation change are not strongely limited by large scale geometry modification and there exists an overall preference for the LHBH conformation.

  16. Two-dimensional sup 1 H NMR studies on HPr protein from Staphylococcus aureus: Complete sequential assignments and secondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbitzer, H.R.; Neidig, K.P. ); Hengstenberg, W. )

    1991-11-19

    Complete sequence-specific assignments of the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of HPr protein from Staphylococcus aureus were obtained by two-dimensional NMR methods. Important secondary structure elements that can be derived from the observed nuclear Overhauser effects are a large antiparallel {beta}-pleated sheet consisting of four strands, A, B, C, D, a segment S{sub AB} consisting of an extended region around the active-center histidine (His-15) and an {alpha}-helix, a half-turn between strands B and C, a segment S{sub CD} which shows no typical secondary structure, and the {alpha}-helical, C-terminal segment S{sub term}. These general structural features are similar to those found earlier in HPr proteins from different microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Streptococcus faecalis.

  17. Interaction of two intrinsically disordered plant stress proteins (COR15A and COR15B) with lipid membranes in the dry state.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, Anja; Hundertmark, Michaela; Popova, Antoaneta V; Seckler, Robert; Hincha, Dirk K

    2010-09-01

    COR15A and COR15B form a tandem repeat of highly homologous genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Both genes are highly cold induced and the encoded proteins belong to the Pfam LEA_4 group (group 3) of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. Both proteins were predicted to be intrinsically disordered in solution. Only COR15A has previously been characterized and it was shown to be localized in the soluble stroma fraction of chloroplasts. Ectopic expression of COR15A in Arabidopsis resulted in increased freezing tolerance of both chloroplasts after freezing and thawing of intact leaves and of isolated protoplasts frozen and thawed in vitro. In the present study we have generated recombinant mature COR15A and COR15B for a comparative study of their structure and possible function as membrane protectants. CD spectroscopy showed that both proteins are predominantly unstructured in solution and mainly alpha-helical after drying. Both proteins showed similar effects on the thermotropic phase behavior of dry liposomes. A decrease in the gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition temperature depended on both the unsaturation of the fatty acyl chains and lipid headgroup structure. FTIR spectroscopy indicated no strong interactions between the proteins and the lipid phosphate and carbonyl groups, but significant interactions with the galactose headgroup of the chloroplast lipid monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. These findings were rationalized by modeling the secondary structure of COR15A and COR15B. Helical wheel projection indicated the presence of amphipathic alpha-helices in both proteins. The helices lacked a clear separation of positive and negative charges on the hydrophilic face, but contained several hydroxylated amino acids. PMID:20510170

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance secondary shifts of a light-harvesting 2 complex reveal local backbone perturbations induced by its higher-order interactions.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Anjali; Wawrzyniak, Piotr K; van Gammeren, Adriaan J; Buda, Francesco; Ganapathy, Swapna; de Groot, Huub J M

    2010-01-26

    Protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) secondary chemical shifts are widely used to predict the secondary structure, and in solid-state NMR, they are often the only unambiguous structural parameters available. However, the employed prediction methods are empirical in nature, relying on the assumption that secondary shifts are only affected by shielding effects of neighboring atoms. We analyzed the secondary shifts of a photosynthetic membrane protein with a high density of chromophores and very tight packing, the light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complex of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. A relation was found between secondary shift anomalies and protein-protein or pigment-protein tertiary and quaternary contacts. For several residues, including the bacteriochlorophyll-coordinating histidines (alphaH31 and betaH30) and the phenylalanine alphaF41 that has strongly twisted C(b)-C(a)-C and C(a)-C-N conformations in the LH2 crystal structure, the perturbing effects on the backbone chemical shifts were tested by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We propose that higher-order interactions in the tightly packed complex can induce localized perturbations of the backbone conformation and electronic structure, related to functional pigment-protein or protein-protein interactions. PMID:19954238

  19. Comparative Analysis of SWIRM Domain-Containing Proteins in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Yang, Songguang; Yuan, Lianyu; Cui, Yuhai; Wu, Keqiang

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin-remodeling complexes affect gene expression by using the energy of ATP hydrolysis to locally disrupt or alter the association of histones with DNA. SWIRM (Swi3p, Rsc8p, and Moira) domain is an alpha-helical domain of about 85 residues in chromosomal proteins. SWIRM domain-containing proteins make up large multisubunit complexes by interacting with other chromatin modification factors and may have an important function in plants. However, little is known about SWIRM domain-containing proteins in plants. In this study, 67 SWIRM domain-containing proteins from 6 plant species were identified and analyzed. Plant SWIRM domain proteins can be divided into three distinct types: Swi-type, LSD1-type, and Ada2-type. Generally, the SWIRM domain forms a helix-turn-helix motif commonly found in DNA-binding proteins. The genes encoding SWIRM domain proteins in Oryza sativa are widely expressed, especially in pistils. In addition, OsCHB701 and OsHDMA701 were downregulated by cold stress, whereas OsHDMA701 and OsHDMA702 were significantly induced by heat stress. These observations indicate that SWIRM domain proteins may play an essential role in plant development and plant responses to environmental stress. PMID:22924025

  20. A large iris-like expansion of a mechanosensitive channel protein induced by membrane tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betanzos, Monica; Chiang, Chien-Sung; Guy, H. Robert; Sukharev, Sergei

    2002-01-01

    MscL, a bacterial mechanosensitive channel of large conductance, is the first structurally characterized mechanosensor protein. Molecular models of its gating mechanisms are tested here. Disulfide crosslinking shows that M1 transmembrane alpha-helices in MscL of resting Escherichia coli are arranged similarly to those in the crystal structure of MscL from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. An expanded conformation was trapped in osmotically shocked cells by the specific bridging between Cys 20 and Cys 36 of adjacent M1 helices. These bridges stabilized the open channel. Disulfide bonds engineered between the M1 and M2 helices of adjacent subunits (Cys 32-Cys 81) do not prevent channel gating. These findings support gating models in which interactions between M1 and M2 of adjacent subunits remain unaltered while their tilts simultaneously increase. The MscL barrel, therefore, undergoes a large concerted iris-like expansion and flattening when perturbed by membrane tension.

  1. Domain architecture and oligomerization properties of the paramyxovirus PIV 5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Ping; Leser, George P.; Demeler, Borries; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2008-09-01

    The mechanism by which the paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein couples receptor binding to activation of virus entry remains to be fully understood, but the HN stalk is thought to play an important role in the process. We have characterized ectodomain constructs of the parainfluenza virus 5 HN to understand better the underlying architecture and oligomerization properties that may influence HN functions. The PIV 5 neuraminidase (NA) domain is monomeric whereas the ectodomain forms a well-defined tetramer. The HN stalk also forms tetramers and higher order oligomers with high {alpha}-helical content. Together, the data indicate that the globular NA domains form weak intersubunit interactions at the end of the HN stalk tetramer, while stabilizing the stalk and overall oligomeric state of the ectodomain. Electron microscopy of the HN ectodomain reveals flexible arrangements of the NA and stalk domains, which may be important for understanding how these two HN domains impact virus entry.

  2. The alpha/beta fold family of proteins database and the cholinesterase gene server ESTHER.

    PubMed Central

    Cousin, X; Hotelier, T; Giles, K; Lievin, P; Toutant, J P; Chatonnet, A

    1997-01-01

    ESTHER (for esterases, alpha/betahydrolase enzyme and relatives) is a database of sequences phylogenetically related to cholinesterases. These sequences define a homogeneous group of enzymes (carboxylesterases, lipases and hormone-sensitive lipases) sharing a similar structure of a central beta-sheet surrounded by alpha-helices. Among these proteins a wide range of functions can be found (hydrolases, adhesion molecules, hormone precursors). The purpose of ESTHER is to help comparison of structures and functions of members of the family. Since the last release, new features have been added to the server. A BLAST comparison tool allows sequence homology searches within the database sequences. New sections are available: kinetics and inhibitors of cholinesterases, fasciculin-acetylcholinesterase interaction and a gene structure review. The mutation analysis compilation has been improved with three-dimensional images. A mailing list has been created. PMID:9016525

  3. Uganda's National Transmission Backbone Infrastructure Project: Technical Challenges and the Way Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulega, T.; Kyeyune, A.; Onek, P.; Sseguya, R.; Mbabazi, D.; Katwiremu, E.

    2011-10-01

    Several publications have identified technical challenges facing Uganda's National Transmission Backbone Infrastructure project. This research addresses the technical limitations of the National Transmission Backbone Infrastructure project, evaluates the goals of the project, and compares the results against the technical capability of the backbone. The findings of the study indicate a bandwidth deficit, which will be addressed by using dense wave division multiplexing repeaters, leasing bandwidth from private companies. Microwave links for redundancy, a Network Operation Center for operation and maintenance, and deployment of wireless interoperability for microwave access as a last-mile solution are also suggested.

  4. Aggregation tendencies in the p53 family are modulated by backbone hydrogen bonds

    PubMed Central

    Cino, Elio A.; Soares, Iaci N.; Pedrote, Murilo M.; de Oliveira, Guilherme A. P.; Silva, Jerson L.

    2016-01-01

    The p53 family of proteins is comprised of p53, p63 and p73. Because the p53 DNA binding domain (DBD) is naturally unstable and possesses an amyloidogenic sequence, it is prone to form amyloid fibrils, causing loss of functions. To develop p53 therapies, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of p53 instability and aggregation. Light scattering, thioflavin T (ThT) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) assays showed that p53 DBD aggregates faster and to a greater extent than p63 and p73 DBDs, and was more susceptible to denaturation. The aggregation tendencies of p53, p63, and p73 DBDs were strongly correlated with their thermal stabilities. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations indicated specific regions of structural heterogeneity unique to p53, which may be promoted by elevated incidence of exposed backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs). The results indicate regions of structural vulnerability in the p53 DBD, suggesting new targetable sites for modulating p53 stability and aggregation, a potential approach to cancer therapy. PMID:27600721

  5. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; LeHoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through 15N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6. PMID:27340016

  6. Aggregation tendencies in the p53 family are modulated by backbone hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Cino, Elio A; Soares, Iaci N; Pedrote, Murilo M; de Oliveira, Guilherme A P; Silva, Jerson L

    2016-01-01

    The p53 family of proteins is comprised of p53, p63 and p73. Because the p53 DNA binding domain (DBD) is naturally unstable and possesses an amyloidogenic sequence, it is prone to form amyloid fibrils, causing loss of functions. To develop p53 therapies, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of p53 instability and aggregation. Light scattering, thioflavin T (ThT) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) assays showed that p53 DBD aggregates faster and to a greater extent than p63 and p73 DBDs, and was more susceptible to denaturation. The aggregation tendencies of p53, p63, and p73 DBDs were strongly correlated with their thermal stabilities. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations indicated specific regions of structural heterogeneity unique to p53, which may be promoted by elevated incidence of exposed backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs). The results indicate regions of structural vulnerability in the p53 DBD, suggesting new targetable sites for modulating p53 stability and aggregation, a potential approach to cancer therapy. PMID:27600721

  7. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism.

    PubMed

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; LeHoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through (15)N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6. PMID:27340016

  8. Chemorheology of phenylboronate-salicylhydroxamate crosslinked hydrogel networks with a sulfonated polymer backbone

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Meredith C.; Mahalingam, Alamelu; Hanson, Melissa C.; Kiser, Patrick F.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogel networks crosslinked with polymer-bound phenylboronic acid (PBA) and salicylhydroxamic acid (SHA) demonstrate pH-reversible gel behavior due to the pH-dependent equilibrium of the crosslinking moieties that form the gel network. Furthermore, the pH at which gels behave dynamically can be controlled by use of a polyelectrolyte backbone. Here we report on the frequency-dependent chemorheological characterization of PBA-SHA crosslinked hydrogel networks with a sulfonated polymer backbone. Our results suggest that the anionic nature of the polymers allows reversible crosslinking at neutral pH that an otherwise neutral-backboned PBA-SHA crosslinked network cannot, and that these charge-induced dynamics can be effectively screened by ions in solution. Moreover, moduli-frequency data can effectively be reduced into a single master curve with a neutral-backboned PBA-SHA gel data set as the reference condition. PMID:23132956

  9. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for investigation of backbone dynamics of oxidized and reduced cytochrome P450cam.

    PubMed

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Molnar, Kathleen S; Coales, Stephen J; OuYang, Bo; Simorellis, Alana K; Pochapsky, Thomas C

    2008-02-01

    Backbone dynamics of the camphor monoxygenase cytochrome P450(cam) (CYP101) as a function of oxidation/ligation state of the heme iron were investigated via hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/D exchange) as monitored by mass spectrometry. Main chain amide NH hydrogens can exchange readily with solvent and the rate of this exchange depends upon, among other things, dynamic fluctuations in local structural elements. A fluxional region of the polypeptide will exchange more quickly with solvent than one that is more constrained. In most regions of the enzyme, exchange rates were similar between oxidized high-spin camphor-bound and reduced camphor- and CO-bound CYP101 (CYP-S and CYP-S-CO, respectively). However, in regions of the protein that have previously been implicated in substrate access by structural and molecular dynamics investigations, the reduced enzyme shows significantly slower exchange rates than the oxidized CYP-S. This observation corresponds to increased flexibility of the oxidized enzyme relative to the reduced form. Structural features previously found to be perturbed in CYP-S-CO upon binding of the biologically relevant effector and reductant putidaredoxin (Pdx) as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance are also more protected from exchange in the reduced state. To our knowledge, this study represents the first experimental investigation of backbone dynamics within the P450 family using this methodology. PMID:18023482

  10. Inhibitory effects of nontoxic protein volvatoxin A1 on pore-forming cardiotoxic protein volvatoxin A2 by interaction with amphipathic alpha-helix.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Tzu; Lin, Su-Chang; Hsu, Chyong-Ing; Liaw, Yen-Chywan; Lin, Jung-Yaw

    2006-07-01

    Volvatoxin A2, a pore-forming cardiotoxic protein, was isolated from the edible mushroom Volvariella volvacea. Previous studies have demonstrated that volvatoxin A consists of volvatoxin A2 and volvatoxin A1, and the hemolytic activity of volvatoxin A2 is completely abolished by volvatoxin A1 at a volvatoxin A2/volvatoxin A1 molar ratio of 2. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which volvatoxin A1 inhibits the cytotoxicity of volvatoxin A2. Volvatoxin A1 by itself was found to be nontoxic, and furthermore, it inhibited the hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of volvatoxin A2 at molar ratios of 2 or lower. Interestingly, volvatoxin A1 contains 393 amino acid residues that closely resemble a tandem repeat of volvatoxin A2. Volvatoxin A1 contains two pairs of amphipathic alpha-helices but it lacks a heparin-binding site. This suggests that volvatoxin A1 may interact with volvatoxin A2 but not with the cell membrane. By using confocal microscopy, it was demonstrated that volvatoxin A1 could not bind to the cell membrane; however, volvatoxin A1 could inhibit binding of volvatoxin A2 to the cell membrane at a molar ratio of 2. Via peptide competition assay and in conjunction with pull-down and co-pull-down experiments, we demonstrated that volvatoxin A1 and volvatoxin A2 may form a complex. Our results suggest that this occurs via the interaction of one molecule of volvatoxin A1, which contains two amphipathic alpha-helices, with two molecules of volvatoxin A2, each of which contains one amphipathic alpha-helix. Taken together, the results of this study reveal a novel mechanism by which volvatoxin A1 regulates the cytotoxicity of volvatoxin A2 via direct interaction, and potentially provide an exciting new strategy for chemotherapy. PMID:16792702

  11. Base sequence dependence and backbone-induced effects on charge transport through DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe, Yong; Lee, Sun; Hedin, Eric

    2009-03-01

    We investigate quantum mechanical electron transmission along the long axis of the DNA molecule using a tight-binding model. Specifically, we use two different DNA models to study the charge transfer efficiency of synthetic ds-DNA. First, the generic form of a simple one-conduction channel model, called the fishbone model, is used. The sugar-phosphate backbone and the coupling amplitude between each site of the base and the backbone are incorporated into an energy-dependent on-site potential in the main DNA site. Here, individual sites represent a base-pair formed by either AT (TA) or GC (CG) pairs coupled via hydrogen bonds. Second, we employ a two-dimensional three-chain model where the backbone on-site energy, the coupling amplitude between the bases and the backbone, and a possible hopping of charge carriers between the successive backbone sites are used as key parameters. The overall transmission and the current-voltage characteristics are calculated to determine the influence of mismatch (impurity) effects in the DNA sequence. Finally, we discuss the transmission gap as a function of coupling between the bases and between the bases and the backbone. *One of the authors (E.R.H) is partially supported by a grant from the Center for Energy Research, Education, and Service (CERES) at Ball State University.

  12. Uranyl mediated photofootprinting reveals strong E. coli RNA polymerase--DNA backbone contacts in the +10 region of the DeoP1 promoter open complex.

    PubMed Central

    Jeppesen, C; Nielsen, P E

    1989-01-01

    Employing a newly developed uranyl photofootprinting technique (Nielsen et al. (1988) FEBS Lett. 235, 122), we have analyzed the structure of the E. coli RNA polymerase deoP1 promoter open complex. The results show strong polymerase DNA backbone contacts in the -40, -10, and most notably in the +10 region. These results suggest that unwinding of the -12 to +3 region of the promoter in the open complex is mediated through polymerase DNA backbone contacts on both sides of this region. The pattern of bases that are hyperreactive towards KMnO4 or uranyl within the -12 to +3 region furthermore argues against a model in which this region is simply unwound and/or single stranded. The results indicate specific protein contacts and/or a fixed DNA conformation within the -12 to +3 region. Images PMID:2503811

  13. Sequence-specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of the plakin repeat domain of human envoplakin.

    PubMed

    Jeeves, Mark; Fogl, Claudia; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Chidgey, Martyn; Overduin, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The plakin repeat domain is a distinctive hallmark of the plakin superfamily of proteins, which are found within all epithelial tissues. Plakin repeat domains mediate the interactions of these proteins with the cell cytoskeleton and are critical for the maintenance of tissue integrity. Despite their biological importance, no solution state resonance assignments are available for any homologue. Here we report the essentially complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone chemical shift assignments of the singular 22 kDa plakin repeat domain of human envoplakin, providing the means to investigate its interactions with ligands including intermediate filaments. PMID:26590577

  14. Structure of a C-terminal fragment of its Vps53 subunit suggests similarity of Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex to a family of tethering complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Vasan, Neil; Hutagalung, Alex; Novick, Peter; Reinisch, Karin M.

    2010-08-13

    The Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex is a membrane-tethering complex that functions in traffic from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network. Here we present the structure of a C-terminal fragment of the Vps53 subunit, important for binding endosome-derived vesicles, at a resolution of 2.9 {angstrom}. We show that the C terminus consists of two {alpha}-helical bundles arranged in tandem, and we identify a highly conserved surface patch, which may play a role in vesicle recognition. Mutations of the surface result in defects in membrane traffic. The fold of the Vps53 C terminus is strongly reminiscent of proteins that belong to three other tethering complexes - Dsl1, conserved oligomeric Golgi, and the exocyst - thought to share a common evolutionary origin. Thus, the structure of the Vps53 C terminus suggests that GARP belongs to this family of complexes.

  15. The highly abundant protein Ag-lbp55 from Ascaridia galli represents a novel type of lipid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Jordanova, Rositsa; Radoslavov, Georgi; Fischer, Peter; Torda, Andrew; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Boteva, Raina; Walter, Rolf D; Bankov, Ilia; Liebau, Eva

    2005-12-16

    Lipid-binding proteins exhibit important functions in lipid transport, cellular signaling, gene transcription, and cytoprotection. Their functional analogues in nematodes are nematode polyprotein allergens/antigens and fatty acid and retinoid-binding proteins. This work describes a novel 55-kDa protein, Ag-lbp55, purified from the parasitic nematode Ascaridia galli. By direct N-terminal sequencing, a partial amino acid sequence was obtained that allowed the design of oligonucleotide primers to obtain the full-length cDNA sequence. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of an N-terminal signal peptide of 25 amino acid residues and a FAR domain at the C terminus. Data base searches showed almost no significant homologies to other described proteins. The secondary structure of Ag-lbp55 was predominantly alpha-helical (65%) as shown by CD spectroscopy. It was found to bind with high affinity fatty acids (caprylic, oleic, and palmitic acid) and their fluorescent analogue dansylaminoundecanic acid. Immunolocalization showed that Ag-lbp55 is a highly abundant protein, mainly distributed in the inner hypodermis and extracellularly in the pseudocoelomatic fluid. A similar staining pattern was observed in other pathogenic nematodes, indicating the existence of similar proteins in these species. PMID:16210327

  16. The structure and dynamics in solution of Cu(I) pseudoazurin from Paracoccus pantotrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, G. S.; Leung, Y. C.; Ferguson, S. J.; Radford, S. E.; Redfield, C.

    2000-01-01

    The solution structure and backbone dynamics of Cu(I) pseudoazurin, a 123 amino acid electron transfer protein from Paracoccus pantotrophus, have been determined using NMR methods. The structure was calculated to high precision, with a backbone RMS deviation for secondary structure elements of 0.35+/-0.06 A, using 1,498 distance and 55 torsion angle constraints. The protein has a double-wound Greek-key fold with two alpha-helices toward its C-terminus, similar to that of its oxidized counterpart determined by X-ray crystallography. Comparison of the Cu(I) solution structure with the X-ray structure of the Cu(II) protein shows only small differences in the positions of some of the secondary structure elements. Order parameters S2, measured for amide nitrogens, indicate that the backbone of the protein is rigid on the picosecond to nanosecond timescale. PMID:10850794

  17. Design and Synthesis of Peptide YY Analogues with C-terminal Backbone Amide-to-Ester Modifications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) is a gut hormone that activates the G protein-coupled neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors, and because of its appetite reducing actions, it is evaluated as an antiobesity drug candidate. The C-terminal tail of PYY is crucial for activation of the NPY receptors. Here, we describe the design and preparation of a series of PYY(3–36) depsipeptide analogues, in which backbone amide-to-ester modifications were systematically introduced in the C-terminal. Functional NPY receptor assays and circular dichroism revealed that the ψ(CONH) bonds at positions 30–31 and 33–34 are particularly important for receptor interaction and that the latter is implicated in Y2 receptor selectivity. PMID:24900634

  18. Backbone and stereospecific (13)C methyl Ile (δ1), Leu and Val side-chain chemical shift assignments of Crc.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakhi; Sahu, Bhubanananda; Ray, Malay K; Deshmukh, Mandar V

    2015-04-01

    Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) allows bacteria to selectively assimilate a preferred compound among a mixture of several potential carbon sources, thus boosting growth and economizing the cost of adaptability to variable nutrients in the environment. The RNA-binding catabolite repression control (Crc) protein acts as a global post-transcriptional regulator of CCR in Pseudomonas species. Crc triggers repression by inhibiting the expression of genes involved in transport and catabolism of non-preferred substrates, thus indirectly favoring assimilation of preferred one. We report here a nearly complete backbone and stereospecific (13)C methyl side-chain chemical shift assignments of Ile (δ1), Leu and Val of Crc (~ 31 kDa) from Pseudomonas syringae Lz4W. PMID:24496608

  19. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone assignment of the EC-1 domain of human E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Prasasty, Vivitri D; Krause, Mary E; Tambunan, Usman S F; Anbanandam, Asokan; Laurence, Jennifer S; Siahaan, Teruna J

    2015-04-01

    The Extracellular 1 (EC1) domain of E-cadherin has been shown to be important for cadherin-cadherin homophilic interactions. Cadherins are responsible for calcium-mediated cell-cell adhesion located at the adherens junction of the biological barriers (i.e., intestinal mucosa and the blood-brain barrier (BBB)). Cadherin peptides can modulate cadherin interactions to improve drug delivery through the BBB. However, the mechanism of modulating the E-cadherin interactions by cadherin peptides has not been fully elucidated. To provide a basis for subsequent examination of the structure and peptide-binding properties of the EC1 domain of human E-cadherin using solution NMR spectroscopy, the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone resonance of the uniformly labeled-EC1 were assigned and the secondary structure was determined based on the chemical shift values. These resonance assignments are essential for assessing protein-ligand interactions and are reported here. PMID:24510398

  20. Characterization of protein hydration by solution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wand, Joshua

    A comprehensive understanding of the interactions between protein molecules and hydration water remains elusive. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been proposed as a means to characterize these interactions but is plagued with artifacts when employed in bulk aqueous solution. Encapsulation of proteins in reverse micelles prepared in short chain alkane solvents can overcome these technical limitations. Application of this approach has revealed that the interaction of water with the surface of protein molecules is quite heterogeneous with some regions of the protein having long-lived interactions while other regions show relatively transient hydration. Results from several proteins will be presented including ubiquitin, staphylococcal nuclease, interleukin 1beta, hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and T4 lysozyme. Ubiquitin and interleukin 1beta are signaling proteins and interact with other proteins through formation of dry protein-protein interfaces. Interestingly, the protein surfaces of the free proteins show relatively slowed (restricted) motion at the surface, which is indicative of low residual entropy. Other regions of the protein surface have relatively high mobility water. These results are consistent with the idea that proteins have evolved to maximize the hydrophobic effect in optimization of binding with protein partners. As predicted by simulation and theory, we find that hydration of internal hydrophobic cavities of interleukin 1beta and T4 lysozyme is highly disfavored. In contrast, the hydrophilic polar cavity of HEWL is occupied by water. Initial structural correlations suggest that hydration of alpha helical structure is characterized by relatively mobile water while those of beta strands and loops are more ordered and slowed. These and other results from this set of proteins reveals that the dynamical and structural character of hydration of proteins is heterogeneous and complex. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  1. Conformational Transitions in the Membrane Scaffold Protein of Phospholipid Bilayer Nanodiscs*

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Christopher R.; Hebling, Christine M.; Rand, Kasper D.; Stafford, Darrel W.; Jorgenson, James W.; Engen, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs are model membrane systems that provide an environment where membrane proteins are highly stable and monodisperse without the use of detergents or liposomes. Nanodiscs consist of a discoidal phospholipid bilayer encircled by two copies of an amphipathic alpha helical membrane scaffold protein, which is modeled from apolipoprotein A-1. Hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry was used to probe the structure and dynamics of the scaffold protein in the presence and absence of lipid. On nanodisc self-assembly, the entire scaffold protein gained significant protection from exchange, consistent with a large, protein-wide, structural rearrangement. This protection was short-lived and the scaffold protein was highly deuterated within 2 h. Several regions of the scaffold protein, in both the lipid-free and lipid-associated states, displayed EX1 unfolding kinetics. The rapid deuteration of the scaffold protein and the presence of correlated unfolding events both indicate that nanodiscs are dynamic rather than rigid bodies in solution. This work provides a catalog of the expected scaffold protein peptic peptides in a nanodisc-hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry experiment and their deuterium uptake signatures, data that can be used as a benchmark to verify correct assembly and nanodisc structure. Such reference data will be useful control data for all hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry experiments involving nanodiscs in which transmembrane or lipid-associated proteins are the primary molecule(s) of interest. PMID:21715319

  2. Fluorescently labeled pulmonary surfactant protein C in spread phospholipid monolayers.

    PubMed Central

    Nag, K; Perez-Gil, J; Cruz, A; Keough, K M

    1996-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, a lipid-protein complex, secreted into the fluid lining of lungs prevents alveolar collapse at low lung volumes. Pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C), an acylated, hydrophobic, alpha-helical peptide, enhances the surface activity of pulmonary surfactant lipids. Fluorescein-labeled SP-C (F-SP-C) (3, 6, 12 wt%) in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and DPPC:dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) [DPPC:DPPG 7:3 mol/mol] in spread monolayers was studied by epifluorescence microscopy. Mass spectometry of F-SP-C indicated that the protein is partially deacylated and labeled with 1 mol fluorescein/1 mol protein. The protein partitioned into the fluid, or liquid expanded, phase. Increasing amounts of F-SP-C in DPPC or DPPC:DPPG monolayers decreased the size and total amounts of the condensed phase at all surface pressures. Calcium (1.6 mM) increased the amount of the condensed phase in monolayers of DPPC:DPPG but not of DPPC alone, and such monolayers were also perturbed by F-SP-C. The study indicates that SP-C perturbs the packing of neutral and anionic phospholipid monolayers even when the latter systems are condensed by calcium, indicating that interactions between SP-C and the lipids are predominantly hydrophobic in nature. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 7 PMID:8804608

  3. Catalytic mechanism of RNA backbone cleavage by ribonuclease H from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Edina; Nowotny, Marcin; Yang, Wei; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-06-15

    We use quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations to study the cleavage of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) backbone catalyzed by ribonuclease H. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family of enzymes that use two-metal catalysis to process nucleic acids. By combining Hamiltonian replica exchange with a finite-temperature string method, we calculate the free energy surface underlying the RNA-cleavage reaction and characterize its mechanism. We find that the reaction proceeds in two steps. In a first step, catalyzed primarily by magnesium ion A and its ligands, a water molecule attacks the scissile phosphate. Consistent with thiol-substitution experiments, a water proton is transferred to the downstream phosphate group. The transient phosphorane formed as a result of this nucleophilic attack decays by breaking the bond between the phosphate and the ribose oxygen. In the resulting intermediate, the dissociated but unprotonated leaving group forms an alkoxide coordinated to magnesium ion B. In a second step, the reaction is completed by protonation of the leaving group, with a neutral Asp132 as a likely proton donor. The overall reaction barrier of ∼15 kcal mol(-1), encountered in the first step, together with the cost of protonating Asp132, is consistent with the slow measured rate of ∼1-100/min. The two-step mechanism is also consistent with the bell-shaped pH dependence of the reaction rate. The nonmonotonic relative motion of the magnesium ions along the reaction pathway agrees with X-ray crystal structures. Proton-transfer reactions and changes in the metal ion coordination emerge as central factors in the RNA-cleavage reaction. PMID:21539371

  4. Catalytic Mechanism of RNA Backbone Cleavage by Ribonuclease H from QM/MM Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Rosta, Edina; Nowotny, Marcin; Yang, Wei; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    We use quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to study the cleavage of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) backbone catalyzed by ribonuclease H. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family of enzymes that use two-metal catalysis to process nucleic acids. By combining Hamiltonian replica exchange with a finite-temperature string method, we calculate the free energy surface underlying the RNA cleavage reaction and characterize its mechanism. We find that the reaction proceeds in two steps. In a first step, catalyzed primarily by magnesium ion A and its ligands, a water molecule attacks the scissile phosphate. Consistent with thiol-substitution experiments, a water proton is transferred to the downstream phosphate group. The transient phosphorane formed as a result of this nucleophilic attack decays by breaking the bond between the phosphate and the ribose oxygen. In the resulting intermediate, the dissociated but unprotonated leaving group forms an alkoxide coordinated to magnesium ion B. In a second step, the reaction is completed by protonation of the leaving group, with a neutral Asp132 as a likely proton donor. The overall reaction barrier of ~15 kcal mol−1, encountered in the first step, together with the cost of protonating Asp132, is consistent with the slow measured rate of ~1–100/min. The two-step mechanism is also consistent with the bell-shaped pH dependence of the reaction rate. The non-monotonic relative motion of the magnesium ions along the reaction pathway agrees with X-ray crystal structures. Proton transfer reactions and changes in the metal ion coordination emerge as central factors in the RNA cleavage reaction. PMID:21539371

  5. Backbone structures in human milk oligosaccharides: trans-glycosylation by metagenomic β-N-acetylhexosaminidases.

    PubMed

    Nyffenegger, Christian; Nordvang, Rune Thorbjørn; Zeuner, Birgitte; Łężyk, Mateusz; Difilippo, Elisabetta; Logtenberg, Madelon J; Schols, Henk A; Meyer, Anne S; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the discovery and characterization of two novel β-N-acetylhexosaminidases HEX1 and HEX2, capable of catalyzing the synthesis of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) backbone structures with fair yields using chitin oligomers as β-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) donor. The enzyme-encoding genes were identified by functional screening of a soil-derived metagenomic library. The β-N-acetylhexosaminidases were expressed in Escherichia coli with an N-terminal His6-tag and were purified by nickel affinity chromatography. The sequence similarities of the enzymes with their respective closest homologues are 59 % for HEX1 and 51 % for HEX2 on the protein level. Both β-N-acetylhexosaminidases are classified into glycosyl hydrolase family 20 (GH 20) are able to hydrolyze para-nitrophenyl-β-N-acetylglucosamine (pNP-GlcNAc) as well as para-nitrophenyl-β-N-acetylgalactosamine (pNP-GalNAc) and exhibit pH optima of 8 and 6 for HEX1 and HEX2, respectively. The enzymes are able to hydrolyze N-acetylchitooligosaccharides with a degree of polymerization of two, three, and four. The major findings were, that HEX1 and HEX2 catalyze trans-glycosylation reactions with lactose as acceptor, giving rise to the human milk oligosaccharide precursor lacto-N-triose II (LNT2) with yields of 2 and 8 % based on the donor substrate. In total, trans-glycosylation reactions were tested with the disaccharide acceptors β-lactose, sucrose, and maltose, as well as with the monosaccharides galactose and glucose resulting in the successful attachment of GlcNAc to the acceptor in all cases. PMID:25843303

  6. Solution structure and backbone dynamics of streptopain: insight into diverse substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Chieh; Houng, Hsiang-Chee; Chen, Chun-Liang; Wang, Pei-Ju; Kuo, Chih-Feng; Lin, Yee-Shin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lin, Ming T; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Huang, Wenya; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2009-04-17

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SPE B) is a cysteine protease expressed by Streptococcus pyogenes. The D9N, G163S, G163S/A172S, and G239D mutant proteins were expressed to study the effect of the allelic variants on their protease activity. In contrast to other mutants, the G239D mutant was approximately 12-fold less active. The Gly-239 residue is located within the C-terminal S230-G239 region, which cannot be observed in the x-ray structure. The three-dimensional structure and backbone dynamics of the 28-kDa mature SPE B (mSPE B) were determined. Unlike the x-ray structure of the 40-kDa zymogen SPE B (proSPE B), we observed the interactions between the C-terminal loop and the active site residues in mSPE B. The structural differences between mSPE B and proSPE B were the conformation of the C-terminal loop and the orientation of the catalytic His-195 residue, suggesting that activation and inactivation of SPE B is involved in the His-195 side-chain rotation. Dynamics analysis of mSPE B and the mSPE B/inhibitor complexes showed that the catalytic and C-terminal loops were the most flexible regions with low order parameter values of 0.5 to 0.8 and exhibited the motion on the ps/ns timescale. These findings suggest that the flexible C-terminal loop of SPE B may play an important role in controlling the substrate binding, resulting in its broad substrate specificity. PMID:19237546

  7. Baculovirus expression and biochemical characterization of the human microsomal triglyceride transfer protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, P J; Decout, A; Amey, J; Mann, C J; Read, J; Rosseneu, M; Scott, J; Shoulders, C C

    1999-01-01

    The microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) complexed to protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) is obligatory for the assembly of chylomicrons and very-low-density lipoproteins. The determination of the atomic structure of the MTP-PDI heterodimer has important implications for the treatment of those forms of hyperlipidaemia associated with the overproduction of very-low-density lipoproteins, which predispose to premature coronary heart disease. To perform structural studies of the human MTP-PDI complex it was necessary to produce milligram quantities of pure protein. We chose the baculovirus expression system for this purpose. Insects cells were co-infected with recombinant viruses encoding FLAG-tagged MTP and His-tagged PDI; the resulting heterodimer was purified by affinity chromatography. From 5 litres of insect cells, 4-6 mg of more than 95% pure recombinant protein was obtained. CD and attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy indicate that the purified protein has around 34% alpha-helical and 33% beta-structure content. The recombinant protein had a comparable triglyceride transfer activity to that of bovine MTP-PDI. The production of polyclonal antibodies raised against the MTP and PDI subunits of the purified protein is described. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of expressing two proteins at high levels in insect cells and describes a transferable methodology for the purification of the resulting protein complex. PMID:10036224

  8. The BAR domain proteins: molding membranes in fission, fusion, and phagy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Gang; Vajjhala, Parimala; Lee, Janet S; Winsor, Barbara; Munn, Alan L

    2006-03-01

    The Bin1/amphiphysin/Rvs167 (BAR) domain proteins are a ubiquitous protein family. Genes encoding members of this family have not yet been found in the genomes of prokaryotes, but within eukaryotes, BAR domain proteins are found universally from unicellular eukaryotes such as yeast through to plants, insects, and vertebrates. BAR domain proteins share an N-terminal BAR domain with a high propensity to adopt alpha-helical structure and engage in coiled-coil interactions with other proteins. BAR domain proteins are implicated in processes as fundamental and diverse as fission of synaptic vesicles, cell polarity, endocytosis, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, transcriptional repression, cell-cell fusion, signal transduction, apoptosis, secretory vesicle fusion, excitation-contraction coupling, learning and memory, tissue differentiation, ion flux across membranes, and tumor suppression. What has been lacking is a molecular understanding of the role of the BAR domain protein in each process. The three-dimensional structure of the BAR domain has now been determined and valuable insight has been gained in understanding the interactions of BAR domains with membranes. The cellular roles of BAR domain proteins, characterized over the past decade in cells as distinct as yeasts, neurons, and myocytes, can now be understood in terms of a fundamental molecular function of all BAR domain proteins: to sense membrane curvature, to bind GTPases, and to mold a diversity of cellular membranes. PMID:16524918

  9. Mnn10 Maintains Pathogenicity in Candida albicans by Extending α-1,6-Mannose Backbone to Evade Host Dectin-1 Mediated Antifungal Immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi Qun; Zou, Zui; Shen, Hui; Shen, Shuai Shuai; Miao, Qi; Huang, Xin; Liu, Wei; Li, Li Ping; Chen, Si Min; Yan, Lan; Zhang, Jun Dong; Zhao, Jing Jun; Xu, Guo Tong; An, Mao Mao; Jiang, Yuan Ying

    2016-05-01

    The cell wall is a dynamic structure that is important for the pathogenicity of Candida albicans. Mannan, which is located in the outermost layer of the cell wall, has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of C. albicans, however, the molecular mechanism by which this occurs remains unclear. Here we identified a novel α-1,6-mannosyltransferase encoded by MNN10 in C. albicans. We found that Mnn10 is required for cell wall α-1,6-mannose backbone biosynthesis and polysaccharides organization. Deletion of MNN10 resulted in significant attenuation of the pathogenesis of C. albicans in a murine systemic candidiasis model. Inhibition of α-1,6-mannose backbone extension did not, however, impact the invasive ability of C. albicans in vitro. Notably, mnn10 mutant restored the invasive capacity in athymic nude mice, which further supports the notion of an enhanced host antifungal defense related to this backbone change. Mnn10 mutant induced enhanced Th1 and Th17 cell mediated antifungal immunity, and resulted in enhanced recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes for pathogen clearance in vivo. We also demonstrated that MNN10 could unmask the surface β-(1,3)-glucan, a crucial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) of C. albicans recognized by host Dectin-1. Our results demonstrate that mnn10 mutant could stimulate an enhanced Dectin-1 dependent immune response of macrophages in vitro, including the activation of nuclear factor-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, and secretion of specific cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-12p40. In summary, our study indicated that α-1,6-mannose backbone is critical for the pathogenesis of C. albicans via shielding β-glucan from recognition by host Dectin-1 mediated immune recognition. Moreover, our work suggests that inhibition of α-1,6-mannose extension by Mnn10 may represent a novel modality to reduce the pathogenicity of C. albicans. PMID:27144456

  10. Mnn10 Maintains Pathogenicity in Candida albicans by Extending α-1,6-Mannose Backbone to Evade Host Dectin-1 Mediated Antifungal Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi Qun; Zou, Zui; Shen, Hui; Shen, Shuai Shuai; Miao, Qi; Huang, Xin; Liu, Wei; Li, Li Ping; Chen, Si Min; Yan, Lan; Zhang, Jun Dong; Zhao, Jing Jun; Xu, Guo Tong; An, Mao Mao; Jiang, Yuan Ying

    2016-01-01

    The cell wall is a dynamic structure that is important for the pathogenicity of Candida albicans. Mannan, which is located in the outermost layer of the cell wall, has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of C. albicans, however, the molecular mechanism by which this occurs remains unclear. Here we identified a novel α-1,6-mannosyltransferase encoded by MNN10 in C. albicans. We found that Mnn10 is required for cell wall α-1,6-mannose backbone biosynthesis and polysaccharides organization. Deletion of MNN10 resulted in significant attenuation of the pathogenesis of C. albicans in a murine systemic candidiasis model. Inhibition of α-1,6-mannose backbone extension did not, however, impact the invasive ability of C. albicans in vitro. Notably, mnn10 mutant restored the invasive capacity in athymic nude mice, which further supports the notion of an enhanced host antifungal defense related to this backbone change. Mnn10 mutant induced enhanced Th1 and Th17 cell mediated antifungal immunity, and resulted in enhanced recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes for pathogen clearance in vivo. We also demonstrated that MNN10 could unmask the surface β-(1,3)-glucan, a crucial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) of C. albicans recognized by host Dectin-1. Our results demonstrate that mnn10 mutant could stimulate an enhanced Dectin-1 dependent immune response of macrophages in vitro, including the activation of nuclear factor-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, and secretion of specific cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-12p40. In summary, our study indicated that α-1,6-mannose backbone is critical for the pathogenesis of C. albicans via shielding β-glucan from recognition by host Dectin-1 mediated immune recognition. Moreover, our work suggests that inhibition of α-1,6-mannose extension by Mnn10 may represent a novel modality to reduce the pathogenicity of C. albicans. PMID:27144456

  11. Diffraction in resonant electron scattering from helical macromolecules: Effects of the DNA backbone

    SciTech Connect

    Caron, Laurent; Sanche, Leon

    2005-09-15

    We recently developed a theoretical framework to treat low-energy electron scattering from helical macromolecules. In this article, we use this framework to extend our previous model of simple base-pair scatterers, organized into the DNA structure, to include the backbone. The internal diffraction pattern due to base pairs is still present, but addition of the backbone screens the base pairs by a factor of 2. More interestingly, the effect of constructive interference on the phosphate groups within the backbone itself is seen to be strong at lower energies. We perform a calculation for electrons incident perpendicular and parallel to the axis of a fragment and find comparable electron patterns on the phosphate groups at the surface of films consisting of vertically or horizontally arranged segments relative to the substrate.

  12. Protein secondary structure prediction using logic-based machine learning.

    PubMed

    Muggleton, S; King, R D; Sternberg, M J

    1992-10-01

    Many attempts have been made to solve the problem of predicting protein secondary structure from the primary sequence but the best performance results are still disappointing. In this paper, the use of a machine learning algorithm which allows relational descriptions is shown to lead to improved performance. The Inductive Logic Programming computer program, Golem, was applied to learning secondary structure prediction rules for alpha/alpha domain type proteins. The input to the program consisted of 12 non-homologous proteins (1612 residues) of known structure, together with a background knowledge describing the chemical and physical properties of the residues. Golem learned a small set of rules that predict which residues are part of the alpha-helices--based on their positional relationships and chemical and physical properties. The rules were tested on four independent non-homologous proteins (416 residues) giving an accuracy of 81% (+/- 2%). This is an improvement, on identical data, over the previously reported result of 73% by King and Sternberg (1990, J. Mol. Biol., 216, 441-457) using the machine learning program PROMIS, and of 72% using the standard Garnier-Osguthorpe-Robson method. The best previously reported result in the literature for the alpha/alpha domain type is 76%, achieved using a neural net approach. Machine learning also has the advantage over neural network and statistical methods in producing more understandable results. PMID:1480619

  13. Convenient and Scalable Synthesis of Fmoc-Protected Peptide Nucleic Acid Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Feagin, Trevor A.; Shah, Nirmal I.; Heemstra, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    The peptide nucleic acid backbone Fmoc-AEG-OBn has been synthesized via a scalable and cost-effective route. Ethylenediamine is mono-Boc protected, then alkylated with benzyl bromoacetate. The Boc group is removed and replaced with an Fmoc group. The synthesis was performed starting with 50 g of Boc anhydride to give 31 g of product in 32% overall yield. The Fmoc-protected PNA backbone is a key intermediate in the synthesis of nucleobase-modified PNA monomers. Thus, improved access to this molecule is anticipated to facilitate future investigations into the chemical properties and applications of nucleobase-modified PNA. PMID:22848796

  14. Convenient and scalable synthesis of fmoc-protected Peptide nucleic Acid backbone.

    PubMed

    Feagin, Trevor A; Shah, Nirmal I; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2012-01-01

    The peptide nucleic acid backbone Fmoc-AEG-OBn has been synthesized via a scalable and cost-effective route. Ethylenediamine is mono-Boc protected, then alkylated with benzyl bromoacetate. The Boc group is removed and replaced with an Fmoc group. The synthesis was performed starting with 50 g of Boc anhydride to give 31 g of product in 32% overall yield. The Fmoc-protected PNA backbone is a key intermediate in the synthesis of nucleobase-modified PNA monomers. Thus, improved access to this molecule is anticipated to facilitate future investigations into the chemical properties and applications of nucleobase-modified PNA. PMID:22848796

  15. Polyboramines for Hydrogen Release: Polymers Containing Lewis Pairs in their Backbone.

    PubMed

    Ledoux, Audrey; Larini, Paolo; Boisson, Christophe; Monteil, Vincent; Raynaud, Jean; Lacôte, Emmanuel

    2015-12-21

    The one-step polycondensation of diamines and diboranes triggered by the in situ deprotonation of the diammonium salts and concomitant reduction of bisboronic acids leads to the assembly of polymer chains through multiple Lewis pairing in their backbone. These new polyboramines are dihydrogen reservoirs that can be used for the hydrogenation of imines and carbonyl compounds. They also display a unique dihydrogen thermal release profile that is a direct consequence of the insertion of the amine-borane linkages in the polymeric backbone. PMID:26563914

  16. Electric field induced localization phenomena in a ladder network with superlattice configuration: Effect of backbone environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Paramita; Maiti, Santanu K.; Karmakar, S. N.

    2014-09-01

    Electric field induced localization properties of a tight-binding ladder network in presence of backbone sites are investigated. Based on Green's function formalism we numerically calculate two-terminal transport together with density of states for different arrangements of atomic sites in the ladder and its backbone. Our results lead to a possibility of getting multiple mobility edges which essentially plays a switching action between a completely opaque to fully or partly conducting region upon the variation of system Fermi energy, and thus, support in fabricating mesoscopic or DNA-based switching devices.

  17. Design of HIV Protease Inhibitors Targeting Protein Backbone: An Effective Strategy for Combating Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Chapsal, Bruno D.; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2008-06-03

    The discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs) and their utilization in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have been a major turning point in the management of HIV/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, despite the successes in disease management and the decrease of HIV/AIDS-related mortality, several drawbacks continue to hamper first-generation protease inhibitor therapies. The rapid emergence of drug resistance has become the most urgent concern because it renders current treatments ineffective and therefore compels the scientific community to continue efforts in the design of inhibitors that can efficiently combat drug resistance.

  18. Crystal structure of an endotoxin-neutralizing protein from the horseshoe crab, Limulus anti-LPS factor, at 1.5 A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Hoess, A; Watson, S; Siber, G R; Liddington, R

    1993-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or endotoxin, is the major mediator of septic shock, a serious complication of Gram-negative bacterial infections in humans. Molecules that bind LPS and neutralize its biological effects or enhance its clearance could have important clinical applications. Limulus anti-LPS factor (LALF) binds LPS tightly, and, in animal models, reduces mortality when administered before or after LPS challenge or bacterial infection. Here we present the high resolution structure of a recombinant LALF. It has a single domain consisting of three alpha-helices packed against a four-stranded beta-sheet. The wedge-shaped molecule has a striking charge distribution and amphipathicity that suggest how it can insert into membranes. The binding site for LPS probably involves an extended amphipathic loop, and we propose that two mammalian LPS-binding proteins will have a similar loop. The amphipathic loop structure may be used in the design of molecules with therapeutic properties against septic shock. Images PMID:8253062

  19. Lasso peptide, a highly stable structure and designable multifunctional backbone.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ning; Pan, Yongxu; Cheng, Zhen; Liu, Hongguang

    2016-06-01

    Lasso peptide belongs to a new class of natural product with highly compact and stable structure. It has varieties of biological activities, among which the most important one is its antibacterial efficacy. Novel lasso peptides have been constantly discovered and analyzed by advanced techniques, and the biosynthesis or even chemical synthesis of lasso peptide has been studied after learning its constituent amino acids and maturation process. Structural identification of lasso peptide provides information for elucidating the mechanisms of its antibacterial activity and basis for further modifications. Ring of lasso peptide is the key to both its highly compact and stable structure and its intrinsic antibacterial property. The loop has been considered as suitable modification region of lasso peptide, such as V11-S18 of MccJ25 being modifiable without disrupting the lasso structure in biosynthesis. The tail is the immunity protein that can export lasso peptide out of its produced strain and serve as a self-protection mechanism at the same time. Most of currently known lasso peptides are non-pathogenic, which implies that the modified lasso peptides are promising candidates for medical applications. Arginine, glycine, and aspartic acid as a ligands of cancer-specific receptor have been grafted to the loop of lasso peptide without losing its bioactivity, and many other targets are expected to be used for lasso peptide modification. Multi-molecular modification and large-scale production need to be studied and solved in future for designing and using multifunctional lasso peptide based on its extraordinary stable structure. PMID:27074719

  20. Prion protein (PrP) synthetic peptides induce cellular PrP to acquire properties of the scrapie isoform.

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, K; Peretz, D; Pan, K M; Blochberger, T C; Wille, H; Gabizon, R; Griffith, O H; Cohen, F E; Baldwin, M A; Prusiner, S B

    1995-01-01

    Conversion of the cellular isoform of prion protein (PrPC) into the scrapie isoform (PrPSc) involves an increase in the beta-sheet content, diminished solubility, and resistance to proteolytic digestion. Transgenetic studies argue that PrPC and PrPSc form a complex during PrPSc formation; thus, synthetic PrP peptides, which mimic the conformational pluralism of PrP, were mixed with PrPC to determine whether its properties were altered. Peptides encompassing two alpha-helical domains of PrP when mixed with PrPC produced a complex that displayed many properties of PrPSc. The PrPC-peptide complex formed fibrous aggregates and up to 65% of complexed PrPC sedimented at 100,000 x g for 1 h, whereas PrPC alone did not. These complexes were resistant to proteolytic digestion and displayed a high beta-sheet content. Unexpectedly, the peptide in a beta-sheet conformation did not form the complex, whereas the random coil did. Addition of 2% Sarkosyl disrupted the complex and rendered PrPC sensitive to protease digestion. While the pathogenic A117V mutation increased the efficacy of complex formation, anti-PrP monoclonal antibody prevented interaction between PrPC and peptides. Our findings in concert with transgenetic investigations argue that PrPC interacts with PrPSc through a domain that contains the first two putative alpha-helices. Whether PrPC-peptide complexes possess prion infectivity as determined by bioassays remains to be established. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7479957

  1. Prion proteins leading to neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    La Mendola, D; Mendola, D L; Pietropaolo, A; Pappalardo, G; Zannoni, C; Rizzarelli, E

    2008-12-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders related to the conformational alteration of the prion protein (PrP C) into a pathogenic and protease-resistant isoform PrP(Sc). PrP(C) is a cell surface glycoprotein expressed mainly in the central nervous system and despite numerous efforts to elucidate its physiological role, the exact biological function remains unknown. Many lines of evidences indicate that prion is a copper binding protein and thus involved in the copper metabolism. Prion protein is not expressed only in mammals but also in other species such as birds, reptiles and fishes. However, it is noteworthy to point out that prion diseases are only observed in mammals while they seem to be spared to other species. The chicken prion protein (chPrP C) shares about 30% of identity in its primary sequence with mammal PrP C. Both types of proteins have an N-terminal domain endowed with tandem amino acid repeats (PHNPGY in the avian protein, PHGGGWQ in mammals), followed by a highly conserved hydrophobic core. Furthermore, NMR studies have highlighted a similar globular domain containing three alpha-helices, one short 3(10)-helix and a short antiparallel beta-sheet. Despite this structural similarity, it should be noted that the normal isoform of mammalian PrP C is totally degraded by proteinase K, while avian PrP C is not, thereby producing N-terminal domain peptide fragments stable to further proteolysis. Notably, the hexarepeat domain is considered essential for protein endocytosis, and it is supposed to be the analogous copper-binding octarepeat region of mammalian prion proteins. The number of copper binding sites, the affinity and the coordination environment of metal ions are still matter of discussion for both mammal and avian proteins. In this review, we summarize the similarities and the differences between mammalian and avian prion proteins, as revealed by studies carried out on the entire protein and related peptide fragments, using a range of

  2. Manipulating and Visualizing Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Horst D.

    2003-12-05

    ProteinShop Gives Researchers a Hands-On Tool for Manipulating, Visualizing Protein Structures. The Human Genome Project and other biological research efforts are creating an avalanche of new data about the chemical makeup and genetic codes of living organisms. But in order to make sense of this raw data, researchers need software tools which let them explore and model data in a more intuitive fashion. With this in mind, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Davis, have developed ProteinShop, a visualization and modeling program which allows researchers to manipulate protein structures with pinpoint control, guided in large part by their own biological and experimental instincts. Biologists have spent the last half century trying to unravel the ''protein folding problem,'' which refers to the way chains of amino acids physically fold themselves into three-dimensional proteins. This final shape, which resembles a crumpled ribbon or piece of origami, is what determines how the protein functions and translates genetic information. Understanding and modeling this geometrically complex formation is no easy matter. ProteinShop takes a given sequence of amino acids and uses visualization guides to help generate predictions about the secondary structures, identifying alpha helices and flat beta strands, and the coil regions that bind them. Once secondary structures are in place, researchers can twist and turn these pre-configurations until they come up with a number of possible tertiary structure conformations. In turn, these are fed into a computationally intensive optimization procedure that tries to find the final, three-dimensional protein structure. Most importantly, ProteinShop allows users to add human knowledge and intuition to the protein structure prediction process, thus bypassing bad configurations that would otherwise be fruitless for optimization. This saves compute cycles and accelerates the entire process, so

  3. Definition of an electrostatic relay switch critical for the cAMP-dependent activation of protein kinase A as revealed by the D170A mutant of RIalpha.

    PubMed

    Abu-Abed, Mona; Das, Rahul; Wang, Lijun; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2007-10-01

    The Regulatory (R) subunit of Protein Kinase A (PKA) inhibits its kinase activity by shielding the Catalytic (C) subunit from physiological substrates. This inhibition is reversed in response to extra-cellular signals that increase cAMP levels in the cytoplasm. Upon cAMP binding to R, C is allosterically released from R, activating a spectrum of downstream signaling cascades. Crystallographic data indicated that a series of distinct conformational changes within CBD-A must occur to relay the cAMP signal from the cAMP binding site to the R:C interaction interface. One critical cAMP relay site within the CBD-A of R has been identified as Asp170 because the D170A mutation selectively reduces the negative cooperativity between the cAMP- and C-recognition sites (i.e. the KD for the R:C complex in the presence of cAMP is reduced by more than 12-fold), without significantly compromising the high affinity of R for both binding partners. Here, utilizing an integrated set of comparative NMR analyses we have elucidated how this critical electrostatic switch is able to control the interaction network which transmits the cAMP signal within CBD-A. The D170A-induced variations in backbone chemical shifts as well as in hydrogen-deuterium and hydrogen-hydrogen exchange profiles show that Asp170 not only plays a pivotal role in controlling the local conformation of the phosphate binding cassette (PBC), where cAMP docks, but also significantly affects the long-range cAMP-dependent interaction network that extends from the PBC to the three major sites of C-recognition. We also found that the D170A mutation promotes partial unfolding, thus assisting the uncoupling of the alpha- and beta-subdomains of CBD-A as required for the major alpha-helical conformational re-arrangement necessary for C-binding. Overall, the emerging map of allosteric networks features Asp170 as an essential component of an electrostatic switch mechanism that stabilizes the conformation of the PBC region for

  4. The 1.7 Å resolution structure of At2g44920, a pentapeptide-repeat protein in the thylakoid lumen of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Shuisong; McGookey, Michael E.; Tinch, Stuart L.; Jones, Alisha N.; Jayaraman, Seetharaman; Tong, Liang; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2012-01-09

    At2g44920 belongs to a diverse family (Pfam PF00805) of pentapeptide-repeat proteins (PRPs) that are present in all known organisms except yeast. PRPs contain at least eight tandem-repeating sequences of five amino acids with an approximate consensus sequence (STAV)(D/N)(L/F)(S/T/R)(X). Recent crystal structures show that PRPs adopt a highly regular four-sided right-handed {beta}-helical structure consisting mainly of type II and type IV {beta}-turns, sometimes referred to as a repeated five-residue (or Rfr) fold. Among sequenced genomes, PRP genes are most abundant in cyanobacteria, leading to speculation that PRPs play an important role in the unique lifestyle of photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Despite the recent structural characterization of several cyanobacterial PRPs, most of their functions remain unknown. Plants, whose chloroplasts are of cyanobacterial origin, have only four PRP genes in their genomes. At2g44920 is one of three PRPs located in the thylakoid lumen. Here, the crystal structure of a double methionine mutant of residues 81-224 of At2g44920, the naturally processed fragment of one of its full-length isoforms, is reported at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of At2g44920 consists of the characteristic Rfr fold with five uninterrupted coils made up of 25 pentapeptide repeats and {alpha}-helical elements capping both termini. A disulfide bridge links the two {alpha}-helices with a conserved loop between the helical elements at its C-terminus. This structure represents the first structure of a PRP protein whose subcellular location has been experimentally confirmed to be the thylakoid lumen in a plant species.

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of backbone/amide-modified analogs of leualacin.

    PubMed

    Hu, M K; Yang, F C; Chou, C C; Yen, M H

    1999-02-22

    Leualacin (1), a cyclic depsi-pentapeptide, and its backbone/amide-modified analogs 2-4 were synthesized. Amide analogue 3 exhibited stronger vasodilatory effects. It also strongly inhibited collagen- and arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregations with IC50s of 0.6 microM and 2.0 microM, respectively. PMID:10098664

  6. Animals without Backbones: The Invertebrate Story. Grade Level 5-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerome, Brian; Fuqua, Paul

    This guide, when used in tandem with the videotape "Animals Without Backbones," helps students learn about invertebrates. These materials promote hands-on discovery and learning. The guide is composed of six curriculum-based teaching units: (1) "Getting Started"; (2) "Porifera"; (3) "Cnidarians"; (4) "Worms"; (5) "Mollusks"; (6) "Arthropods"; and…

  7. Graduate Education in Kinesiology: Are We Part of "America's Backbone for Competitiveness and Innovation"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePauw, Karen P.

    2008-01-01

    Graduate education in the United States has been identified as being the backbone of American competitiveness and innovation in a recent report by the Council of Graduate Schools. The report provides a framework for examining the role of graduate education in partnership with business and government to advance an action agenda for achieving…

  8. DNA mimicry by proteins.

    PubMed

    Dryden, D T F; Tock, M R

    2006-04-01

    It has been discovered recently, via structural and biophysical analyses, that proteins can mimic DNA structures in order to inhibit proteins that would normally bind to DNA. Mimicry of the phosphate backbone of DNA, the hydrogen-bonding properties of the nucleotide bases and the bending and twisting of the DNA double helix are all present in the mimics discovered to date. These mimics target a range of proteins and enzymes such as DNA restriction enzymes, DNA repair enzymes, DNA gyrase and nucleosomal and nucleoid-associated proteins. The unusual properties of these protein DNA mimics may provide a foundation for the design of targeted inhibitors of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:16545103

  9. Folding dynamics of a family of beta-sheet proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2008-03-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) consist of ten anti-parallel beta strands and two small alpha helices. The beta strands are arranged into two nearly orthogonal five-strand beta sheets that surround the interior cavity, which binds unsaturated long-chain fatty acids. In the brain isoform (BFABP), these are very important for the development of the central nervous system and neuron differentiation. Furthermore, BFABP is implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases including cancer and neuronal degenerative disorders. In this work, site-directed spin labeling combined with EPR techniques have been used to study the folding mechanism of BFABP. In the first series of studies, we labeled the two Cys residues at position 5 and 80 in the wild type protein with an EPR spin marker; in addition, two singly labeled mutants at positions 5 and 80 in the C80A and C5A mutants, respectively, were also produced and used as controls. The changes in the distances between the two residues were examined by a pulsed EPR method, DEER (Double Electron Electron Resonance), as a function of guanidinium hydrochloride concentration. The results were compared with those from CW EPR, circular dichroism and fluorescence measurements, which provide the information regarding sidechain mobility, secondary structure and tertiary structure, respectively. The results will be discussed in the context of the folding mechanism of the family of fatty acid binding proteins.

  10. Structure and function of a mitochondrial late embryogenesis abundant protein are revealed by desiccation.

    PubMed

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Jaquinod, Michel; Mangavel, Cécile; Passirani, Catherine; Saulnier, Patrick; Manon, Stephen; Teyssier, Emeline; Payet, Nicole; Avelange-Macherel, Marie-Hélène; Macherel, David

    2007-05-01

    Few organisms are able to withstand desiccation stress; however, desiccation tolerance is widespread among plant seeds. Survival without water relies on an array of mechanisms, including the accumulation of stress proteins such as the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. These hydrophilic proteins are prominent in plant seeds but also found in desiccation-tolerant organisms. In spite of many theories and observations, LEA protein function remains unclear. Here, we show that LEAM, a mitochondrial LEA protein expressed in seeds, is a natively unfolded protein, which reversibly folds into alpha-helices upon desiccation. Structural modeling revealed an analogy with class A amphipathic helices of apolipoproteins that coat low-density lipoprotein particles in mammals. LEAM appears spontaneously modified by deamidation and oxidation of several residues that contribute to its structural features. LEAM interacts with membranes in the dry state and protects liposomes subjected to drying. The overall results provide strong evidence that LEAM protects the inner mitochondrial membrane during desiccation. According to sequence analyses of several homologous proteins from various desiccation-tolerant organisms, a similar protection mechanism likely acts with other types of cellular membranes. PMID:17526751

  11. Amyloid formation and inhibition of an all-beta protein: A study on fungal polygalacturonase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinisaz, Maryam; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Larijani, Bagher; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh

    2014-02-01

    Theoretically, all proteins can adopt the nanofibrillar structures known as amyloid, which contain cross-beta structures. The all-beta folded proteins are particularly interesting in this regard, since they appear to be naturally more predisposed toward this structural arrangement. In this study, methanol has been used to drive the beta-helix protein polygalacturonase (PG), toward amyloid fibril formation. Congo red absorbance, thioflavin T fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and transmission electron microscopy have been used to characterize this process. Similar to other all-beta proteins, PG shows a non-cooperative fibrillation mechanism, but the structural changes that are monitored by CD indicate a different pattern. Furthermore, several compounds containing aromatic components were tested as potential inhibitors of amyloid formation. Another protein predominantly composed of alpha-helices (human serum albumin) was also targeted by these ligands, in order to get an insight into their potential anti-aggregation property toward structurally different proteins. Among tested compounds, silibinin and chlorpropamide were able to considerably affect both proteins fibrillation process.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Analysis of Lysozyme Protein in Ethanol-Water Mixed Solvent Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochije, Henry Ikechukwu

    Effect of protein-solvent interaction on the protein structure is widely studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Despite such extensive studies molecular level understanding of proteins and some simple solvents is still not fully understood. This work focuses on detailed molecular dynamics simulations to study of solvent effect on lysozyme protein, using water, alcohol and different concentrations of water-alcohol mixtures as solvents. The lysozyme protein structure in water, alcohol and alcohol-water mixture (0-12% alcohol) was studied using GROMACS molecular dynamics simulation code. Compared to water environment, the lysozome structure showed remarkable changes in solvents with increasing alcohol concentration. In particular, significant changes were observed in the protein secondary structure involving alpha helices. The influence of alcohol on the lysozyme protein was investigated by studying thermodynamic and structural properties. With increasing ethanol concentration we observed a systematic increase in total energy, enthalpy, root mean square deviation (RMSD), and radius of gyration. a polynomial interpolation approach. Using the resulting polynomial equation, we could determine above quantities for any intermediate alcohol percentage. In order to validate this approach, we selected an intermediate ethanol percentage and carried out full MD simulation. The results from MD simulation were in reasonably good agreement with that obtained using polynomial approach. Hence, the polynomial approach based method proposed here eliminates the need for computationally intensive full MD analysis for the concentrations within the range (0-12%) studied in this work.

  13. Same fold with different mobility: backbone dynamics of small protease inhibitors from the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Szenthe, Borbála; Gáspári, Zoltán; Nagy, Attila; Perczel, András; Gráf, László

    2004-03-30

    SGCI (Schistocerca gregaria chymotrypsin inhibitor) and SGTI (Sch. gregaria trypsin inhibitor) are small, 35-residue serine protease inhibitors with intriguing taxon specificity: SGTI is specific for arthropod proteases while SGCI is an excellent inhibitor on both mammalian and arthropodal enzymes. Here we report the cloning, expression, and (15)N backbone dynamics investigations of these peptides. Successful expression could be achieved by a "dimeric" construct similar to the natural precursor of the inhibitors. An engineered methionine residue between the two modules served as a unique cyanogen bromide cleavage site to cleave the precursor and physically separate SGCI and SGTI. The overall correlation time of the precursor (5.29 ns) as well as the resulted SGCI (3.14 ns) and SGTI (2.96 ns) are as expected for proteins of this size. General order parameters (S(2)) for the inhibitors are lower than those characteristic of well-folded proteins. Values in the binding loop region are even lower. Interestingly, the distribution of residues for which a chemical exchange (R(ex)) term should be considered is strikingly different in SGCI and SGTI. Together with H-D exchange studies, this indicates that the internal dynamics of the two closely related molecules differ. We suggest that the dynamic properties of these inhibitors is one of the factors that determine their specificity. PMID:15035609

  14. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  15. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  16. Isolation, characterization, and bioinformatic analysis of calmodulin-binding protein cmbB reveals a novel tandem IP22 repeat common to many Dictyostelium and Mimivirus proteins.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Suhre, Karsten; Myre, Michael A; Chatterjee-Chakraborty, Munmun; Chavez, Sara E

    2006-08-01

    A novel calmodulin-binding protein cmbB from Dictyostelium discoideum is encoded in a single gene. Northern analysis reveals two cmbB transcripts first detectable at 4 h during multicellular development. Western blotting detects an approximately 46.6 kDa protein. Sequence analysis and calmodulin-agarose binding studies identified a "classic" calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding domain (179IPKSLRSLFLGKGYNQPLEF198) but structural analyses suggest binding may not involve classic alpha-helical calmodulin-binding. The cmbB protein is comprised of tandem repeats of a newly identified IP22 motif ([I,L]Pxxhxxhxhxxxhxxxhxxxx; where h = any hydrophobic amino acid) that is highly conserved and a more precise representation of the FNIP repeat. At least eight Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus proteins and over 100 Dictyostelium proteins contain tandem arrays of the IP22 motif and its variants. cmbB also shares structural homology to YopM, from the plague bacterium Yersenia pestis. PMID:16777069

  17. Did homeodomain proteins duplicate before the origin of angiosperms, fungi, and metazoa?

    PubMed Central

    Bharathan, Geeta; Janssen, Bart-Jan; Kellogg, Elizabeth A.; Sinha, Neelima

    1997-01-01

    Homeodomain proteins are transcription factors that play a critical role in early development in eukaryotes. These proteins previously have been classified into numerous subgroups whose phylogenetic relationships are unclear. Our phylogenetic analysis of representative eukaryotic sequences suggests that there are two major groups of homeodomain proteins, each containing sequences from angiosperms, metazoa, and fungi. This result, based on parsimony and neighbor-joining analyses of primary amino acid sequences, was supported by two additional features of the proteins. The two protein groups are distinguished by an insertion/deletion in the homeodomain, between helices I and II. In addition, an amphipathic alpha-helical secondary structure in the region N terminal of the homeodomain is shared by angiosperm and metazoan sequences in one group. These results support the hypothesis that there was at least one duplication of homeobox genes before the origin of angiosperms, fungi, and metazoa. This duplication, in turn, suggests that these proteins had diverse functions early in the evolution of eukaryotes. The shared secondary structure in angiosperm and metazoan sequences points to an ancient conserved functional domain. PMID:9391098

  18. Did homeodomain proteins duplicate before the origin of angiosperms, fungi, and metazoa?

    PubMed

    Bharathan, G; Janssen, B J; Kellogg, E A; Sinha, N

    1997-12-01

    Homeodomain proteins are transcription factors that play a critical role in early development in eukaryotes. These proteins previously have been classified into numerous subgroups whose phylogenetic relationships are unclear. Our phylogenetic analysis of representative eukaryotic sequences suggests that there are two major groups of homeodomain proteins, each containing sequences from angiosperms, metazoa, and fungi. This result, based on parsimony and neighbor-joining analyses of primary amino acid sequences, was supported by two additional features of the proteins. The two protein groups are distinguished by an insertion/deletion in the homeodomain, between helices I and II. In addition, an amphipathic alpha-helical secondary structure in the region N terminal of the homeodomain is shared by angiosperm and metazoan sequences in one group. These results support the hypothesis that there was at least one duplication of homeobox genes before the origin of angiosperms, fungi, and metazoa. This duplication, in turn, suggests that these proteins had diverse functions early in the evolution of eukaryotes. The shared secondary structure in angiosperm and metazoan sequences points to an ancient conserved functional domain. PMID:9391098

  19. Revealing the global map of protein folding space by large-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinner, Claude; Lutz, Benjamin; Verma, Abhinav; Schug, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The full characterization of protein folding is a remarkable long-standing challenge both for experiment and simulation. Working towards a complete understanding of this process, one needs to cover the full diversity of existing folds and identify the general principles driving the process. Here, we want to understand and quantify the diversity in folding routes for a large and representative set of protein topologies covering the full range from all alpha helical topologies towards beta barrels guided by the key question: Does the majority of the observed routes contribute to the folding process or only a particular route? We identified a set of two-state folders among non-homologous proteins with a sequence length of 40-120 residues. For each of these proteins, we ran native-structure based simulations both with homogeneous and heterogeneous contact potentials. For each protein, we simulated dozens of folding transitions in continuous uninterrupted simulations and constructed a large database of kinetic parameters. We investigate folding routes by tracking the formation of tertiary structure interfaces and discuss whether a single specific route exists for a topology or if all routes are equiprobable. These results permit us to characterize the complete folding space for small proteins in terms of folding barrier ΔG‡, number of routes, and the route specificity RT.

  20. Structure-function studies of the magnetite-biomineralizing magnetosome-associated protein MamC.

    PubMed

    Nudelman, Hila; Valverde-Tercedor, Carmen; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Perez Gonzalez, Teresa; Widdrat, Marc; Grimberg, Noam; Levi, Hilla; Nelkenbaum, Or; Davidov, Geula; Faivre, Damien; Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Zarivach, Raz

    2016-06-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are Gram-negative bacteria that navigate along geomagnetic fields using the magnetosome, an organelle that consists of a membrane-enveloped magnetic nanoparticle. Magnetite formation and its properties are controlled by a specific set of proteins. MamC is a small magnetosome-membrane protein that is known to be active in iron biomineralization but its mechanism has yet to be clarified. Here, we studied the relationship between the MamC magnetite-interaction loop (MIL) structure and its magnetite interaction using an inert biomineralization protein-MamC chimera. Our determined structure shows an alpha-helical fold for MamC-MIL with highly charged surfaces. Additionally, the MamC-MIL induces the formation of larger magnetite crystals compared to protein-free and inert biomineralization protein control experiments. We suggest that the connection between the MamC-MIL structure and the protein's charged surfaces is crucial for magnetite binding and thus for the size control of the magnetite nanoparticles. PMID:26970040

  1. Structure, Function, Self-Assembly and Origin of Simple Membrane Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins perform such essential cellular functions as transport of ions, nutrients and waste products across cell walls, transduction of environmental signals, regulation of cell fusion, recognition of other cells, energy capture and its conversion into high-energy compounds. In fact, 30-40% of genes in modem organisms codes for membrane proteins. Although contemporary membrane proteins or their functional assemblies can be quite complex, their transmembrane fragments are usually remarkably simple. The most common structural motif for these fragments is a bundle of alpha-helices, but occasionally it could be a beta-barrel. In a series of molecular dynamics computer simulations we investigated self-organizing properties of simple membrane proteins based on these structural motifs. Specifically, we studied folding and insertion into membranes of short, nonpolar or amphiphatic peptides. We also investigated glycophorin A, a peptide that forms sequence-specific dimers, and a transmembrane aggregate of four identical alpha-helices that forms an efficient and selective voltage-gated proton channel was investigated. Many peptides are attracted to water-membrane interfaces. Once at the interface, nonpolar peptides spontaneously fold to a-helices. Whenever the sequence permits, peptides that contain both polar and nonpolar amino also adopt helical structures, in which polar and nonpolar amino acid side chains are immersed in water and membrane, respectively. Specific identity of side chains is less important. Helical peptides at the interface could insert into the membrane and adopt a transmembrane conformation. However, insertion of a single helix is unfavorable because polar groups in the peptide become completely dehydrated upon insertion. The unfavorable free energy of insertion can be regained by spontaneous association of peptides in the membrane. The first step in this process is the formation of dimers, although the most common are aggregates of 4

  2. Knot theory in understanding proteins.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rama; Bhushan, Shantha

    2012-12-01

    This paper aims to enthuse mathematicians, especially topologists, knot theorists and geometers to examine problems in the study of proteins. We have highlighted those advances and breakthroughs in knot theory that directly and indirectly help in understanding proteins. We have discussed the phenomena of knotting of protein backbone. This paper also provides a few open questions for knot theorists, the answers to which will help in further understanding of proteins. PMID:22105789

  3. Impact of HIV-1 Backbone on Neutralization Sensitivity: Neutralization Profiles of Heterologous Envelope Glycoproteins Expressed in Native Subtype C and CRF01_AE Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Sanders-Buell, Eric; Wesberry, Maggie; Towle, Teresa; Pillis, Devin M.; Molnar, Sebastian; McLinden, Robert; Edmonds, Tara; Hirsch, Ivan; O’Connell, Robert; McCutchan, Francine E.; Montefiori, David C.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C.; Kim, Jerome H.; Polonis, Victoria R.; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2013-01-01

    Standardized assays to assess vaccine and antiviral drug efficacy are critical for the development of protective HIV-1 vaccines and drugs. These immune assays will be advanced by the development of standardized viral stocks, such as HIV-1 infectious molecular clones (IMC), that i) express a reporter gene, ii) are representative of globally diverse subtypes and iii) are engineered to easily exchange envelope (env) genes for expression of sequences of interest. Thus far, a subtype B IMC backbone expressing Renilla luciferase (LucR), and into which the ectodomain of heterologous env coding sequences can be expressed has been successfully developed but as execution of HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials shifts increasingly to non-subtype B epidemics (Southern African and Southeast Asia), non-subtype B HIV-1 reagents are needed to support vaccine development. Here we describe two IMCs derived from subtypes C and CRF01_AE HIV-1 primary isolates expressing LucR (IMC.LucR) that were engineered to express heterologous gp160 Envs. 18 constructs expressing various subtypes C and CRF01_AE Envs, mostly acute, in subtype-matched and –unmatched HIV backbones were tested for functionality and neutralization sensitivity. Our results suggest a possible effect of non-env HIV-1 genes on the interaction of Env and neutralizing antibodies and highlight the need to generate a library of IMCs representative of the HIV-1 subtype spectrum to be used as standardized neutralization assay reagents for assessing HIV-1 vaccine efficacy. PMID:24312165

  4. Self-assembly of diphenylalanine backbone homologues and their combination with functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinesh, Bhimareddy; Squillaci, Marco A.; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Samorì, Paolo; Bianco, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    The integration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into organized nanostructures is of great interest for applications in materials science and biomedicine. In this work we studied the self-assembly of β and γ homologues of diphenylalanine peptides under different solvent and pH conditions. We aimed to investigate the role of peptide backbone in tuning the formation of different types of nanostructures alone or in combination with carbon nanotubes. In spite of having the same side chain, β and γ peptides formed distinctively different nanofibers, a clear indication of the role played by the backbone homologation on the self-assembly. The variation of the pH allowed to transform the nanofibers into spherical structures. Moreover, the co-assembly of β and γ peptides with carbon nanotubes covalently functionalized with the same peptide generated unique dendritic assemblies. This comparative study on self-assembly using diphenylalanine backbone homologues and of the co-assembly with CNT covalent conjugates is the first example exploring the capacity of β and γ peptides to adopt precise nanostructures, particularly in combination with carbon nanotubes. The dendritic organization obtained by mixing carbon nanotubes and peptides might find interesting applications in tissue engineering and neuronal interfacing.The integration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into organized nanostructures is of great interest for applications in materials science and biomedicine. In this work we studied the self-assembly of β and γ homologues of diphenylalanine peptides under different solvent and pH conditions. We aimed to investigate the role of peptide backbone in tuning the formation of different types of nanostructures alone or in combination with carbon nanotubes. In spite of having the same side chain, β and γ peptides formed distinctively different nanofibers, a clear indication of the role played by the backbone homologation on the self-assembly. The variation of the pH allowed to

  5. Solution NMR analysis of the interaction between the actinoporin sticholysin I and DHPC micelles--correlation with backbone dynamics.

    PubMed

    López-Castilla, Aracelys; Pazos, Fabiola; Schreier, Shirley; Pires, José Ricardo

    2014-06-01

    Sticholysin I (StI), an actinoporin expressed as a water-soluble protein by the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, binds to natural and model membranes, forming oligomeric pores. It is proposed that the first event of a multistep pore formation mechanism consists of the monomeric protein attachment to the lipid bilayer. To date there is no high-resolution structure of the actinoporin pore or other membrane-bound form available. Here we evaluated StI:micelle complexes of variable lipid composition to look for a suitable model for NMR studies. Micelles of pure or mixed lysophospholipids and of dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) were examined. The StI:DHPC micelle was found to be the best system, yielding a stable sample and good quality spectra. A comprehensive chemical shift perturbation analysis was performed to map the StI membrane recognition site in the presence of DHPC micelles. The region mapped (residues F(51), R(52), S(53) in loop 3; F(107), D(108), Y(109), W(111), Y(112), W(115) in loop 7; Q(129), Y(132), D(134), M(135), Y(136), Y(137), G(138) in helix-α2) is in agreement with previously reported data, but additional residues were found to interact, especially residues V(81), A(82), T(83), G(84) in loop 5, and A(85), A(87) in strand-β5. Backbone dynamics measurements of StI free in solution and bound to micelles highlighted the relevance of protein flexibility for membrane binding and suggested that a conformer selection process may take place during protein-membrane interaction. We conclude that the StI:DHPC micelles system is a suitable model for further characterization of an actinoporin membrane-bound form by solution NMR. PMID:24218049

  6. Monitoring prion protein stability by NMR.

    PubMed

    Julien, Olivier; Graether, Steffen P; Sykes, Brian D

    2009-01-01

    Prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), are a group of fatal neurological diseases that affect both humans and animals. At the end of the 20th century, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), better known as mad cow disease, was shown to be transmissible to humans. This resulted in considerable concern for public health and a number of questions for scientists. The first question answered was the possible source of the disease, which appears to be the prion protein (PrP). There are two major forms of this protein: the native, noninfectious form (PrP(C)), and the misfolded infectious form (PrP(Sc)). PrP(C) is mainly alpha-helical in structure, whereas PrP(Sc) aggregates into an assembly of beta-sheets, forming amyloid fibrils. Since the first solution structure of the noninfectious form of the mouse prion protein, about 30 structures of the globular portion of PrP(C) have been characterized from different organisms. However, only a few minor differences are observed when comparing one PrP(C) structure to another. The key to understanding prion formation may then be not in the structure of PrP(C), but in the mechanism underlying PrP(C) unfolding and then conversion into a misfolded fibril state. To identify the possible region(s) of PrP(C) responsible for initiating the conversion into the amyloid fibril formation, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was applied to characterize the stability and structure of PrP(C) and intermediate states during the conversion from PrP(C) to PrP(Sc). Subsequently urea was used to induce unfolding, and data analysis revealed region-specific structural stabilities that may bring insights into the mechanisms underlying conversion of protein into an infectious prion. PMID:19697241

  7. The structure of the C-terminal domain of the pro-apoptotic protein Bak and its interaction with model membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Senac, María del Mar; Corbalán-García, Senena; Gómez-Fernández, Juan C

    2002-01-01

    Bak is a pro-apoptotic protein widely distributed in different cell types that is associated with the mitochondrial outer membrane, apparently through a C-terminal hydrophobic domain. We used infrared spectroscopy to study the secondary structure of a synthetic peptide ((+)(3)HN-(188)ILNVLVVLGVVLLGQFVVRRFFKS(211)-COO(-)) with the same sequence as the C-terminal domain of Bak. The spectrum of this peptide in D(2)O buffer shows an amide I' band with a maximum at 1636 cm(-1), which clearly indicates the predominance of an extended beta-structure in aqueous solvent. However, the peptide incorporated in multilamellar dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes shows a different amide I' band spectrum, with a maximum at 1658 cm(-1), indicating a predominantly alpha-helical structure induced by its interaction with the membrane. It was observed that through differential scanning calorimetry the transition of the phospholipid model membrane was broadened in the presence of the peptide. Fluorescence polarization of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) in fluid DMPC vesicles showed that increasing concentrations of the peptide produced increased polarization values, which is compatible with the peptide being inserted into the membrane. High concentrations of the peptide considerably broaden the phase transition of DMPC multilamellar vesicles, and DPH polarization increased, especially at temperatures above the T(c) transition temperature of the pure phospholipid. The addition of peptide destabilized unilamellar vesicles and released encapsulated carboxyfluorescein. These results indicate that this domain is able to insert itself into membranes, where it adopts an alpha-helical structure and considerably perturbs the physical properties of the membrane. PMID:11751312

  8. New nucleoside/nucleotide backbone options: a review of recent studies.

    PubMed

    Ruane, Peter J; DeJesus, Edwin

    2004-09-01

    The nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI/NtRTI) class continues to serve as an important component of the standard of care for HIV infection. Combinations of dual NRTIs/NtRTIs with protease inhibitors (PIs) or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) remain the most commonly used regimens in clinical practice. In recent years, clinical outcomes data on previously novel NRTI/NtRTI backbone combinations have provided clinicians with new options to address potency, tolerability, and convenience of antiretroviral therapy. However, the tolerability, drug-drug interactions, and resistance profiles of specific regimens using new NRTI/NtRTI combinations must be weighed against the needs and preferences of individual patients. This review summarizes recent efficacy and safety data on emerging NRTI/NtRTI combination backbones, including tenofovir DF (TDF) with lamivudine (3TC), abacavir with 3TC, didanosine (ddI) with 3TC, ddI with emtricitabine (FTC), and TDF with FTC. PMID:15319666

  9. Modifications to the Peptidoglycan Backbone Help Bacteria To Establish Infection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Kimberly M.; Weiser, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens that colonize mucosal surfaces have acquired resistance to antimicrobials that are abundant at these sites. One of the main antimicrobials present on mucosal surfaces is lysozyme, a muramidase that hydrolyzes the peptidoglycan backbone of bacteria. Cleavage of the peptidoglycan backbone leads to bacterial cell death and lysis, which releases bacterial fragments, including peptidoglycan, at the site of infection. Peptidoglycan fragments can be recognized by host receptors and initiate an immune response that will aid in clearing infection. Many mucosal pathogens modify the peptidoglycan residues surrounding the cleavage site for lysozyme to avoid peptidoglycan degradation and the release of these proinflammatory fragments. This review will focus specifically on peptidoglycan modifications, their role in lysozyme resistance, and downstream effects on the host immune response to infection. PMID:21041496

  10. Smart-Grid Backbone Network Real-Time Delay Reduction via Integer Programming.

    PubMed

    Pagadrai, Sasikanth; Yilmaz, Muhittin; Valluri, Pratyush

    2016-08-01

    This research investigates an optimal delay-based virtual topology design using integer linear programming (ILP), which is applied to the current backbone networks such as smart-grid real-time communication systems. A network traffic matrix is applied and the corresponding virtual topology problem is solved using the ILP formulations that include a network delay-dependent objective function and lightpath routing, wavelength assignment, wavelength continuity, flow routing, and traffic loss constraints. The proposed optimization approach provides an efficient deterministic integration of intelligent sensing and decision making, and network learning features for superior smart grid operations by adaptively responding the time-varying network traffic data as well as operational constraints to maintain optimal virtual topologies. A representative optical backbone network has been utilized to demonstrate the proposed optimization framework whose simulation results indicate that superior smart-grid network performance can be achieved using commercial networks and integer programming. PMID:25935050

  11. Structure and dynamics of Escherichia coli chemosensory receptors. Engineered sulfhydryl studies.

    PubMed Central

    Careaga, C L; Falke, J J

    1992-01-01

    Cysteine residues introduced by site-directed mutagenesis have been used to probe the conformation and dynamics of two receptors in the E. coli chemotaxis pathway. (a) Thermal motions of the polypeptide backbone were investigated in the periplasmic D-galactose and D-glucose receptor, a globular protein of known structure. Disulfide bond formation between pairs of engineered sulfhydryls were used to trap collisions during the relative motions of surface alpha-helices I and X. Motions with amplitudes ranging from 4.5 to 15.2 A were detected on timescales ranging from 10(-4) to 10(-1) s, respectively. These results suggest that thermal backbone motions may have larger amplitudes than previously thought. (b) Conformational features of the transmembrane aspartate transducer have been investigated. Engineered sulfhydryls were used to ascertain the location and orientations of two putative transmembrane alpha-helices in the primary structure, to investigate the packing of these helices, to determine the oligomer and surface structures, and to detect thermal and ligand-induced dynamics of the polypeptide backbone. A model for the folded conformation of the transducer oligomer is reviewed. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:1318100

  12. Cysteine-Rich Atrial Secretory Protein from the Snail Achatina achatina: Purification and Structural Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Shabelnikov, Sergey; Kiselev, Artem

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive studies of cardiac bioactive peptides and their functions in molluscs, soluble proteins expressed in the heart and secreted into the circulation have not yet been reported. In this study, we describe an 18.1-kDa, cysteine-rich atrial secretory protein (CRASP) isolated from the terrestrial snail Achatina achatina that has no detectable sequence similarity to any known protein or nucleotide sequence. CRASP is an acidic, 158-residue, N-glycosylated protein composed of eight alpha-helical segments stabilized with five disulphide bonds. A combination of fold recognition algorithms and ab initio folding predicted that CRASP adopts an all-alpha, right-handed superhelical fold. CRASP is most strongly expressed in the atrium in secretory atrial granular cells, and substantial amounts of CRASP are released from the heart upon nerve stimulation. CRASP is detected in the haemolymph of intact animals at nanomolar concentrations. CRASP is the first secretory protein expressed in molluscan atrium to be reported. We propose that CRASP is an example of a taxonomically restricted gene that might be responsible for adaptations specific for terrestrial pulmonates. PMID:26444993

  13. Evolutionary Implications and Physicochemical Analyses of Selected Proteins of Type III Polyketide Synthase Family

    PubMed Central

    Mallika, V.; Sivakumar, K.C.; Soniya, E.V.

    2011-01-01

    Type III polyketide synthases have a substantial role in the biosynthesis of various polyketides in plants and microorganisms. Comparative proteomic analysis of type III polyketide synthases showed evolutionarily and structurally related positions in a compilation of amino acid sequences from different families. Bacterial and fungal type III polyketide synthase proteins showed <50% similarity but in higher plants, it exhibited >80% among chalcone synthases and >70% in the case of non-chalcone synthases. In a consensus phylogenetic tree based on 1000 replicates; bacterial, fungal and plant proteins were clustered in separate groups. Proteins from bryophytes and pteridophytes grouped immediately near to the fungal cluster, demonstrated how evolutionary lineage has occurred among type III polyketide synthase proteins. Upon physicochemical analysis, it was observed that the proteins localized in the cytoplasm and were hydrophobic in nature. Molecular structural analysis revealed comparatively stable structure comprising of alpha helices and random coils as major structural components. It was found that there was a decline in the structural stability with active site mutation as prophesied by the in silico mutation studies. PMID:21697991

  14. Function and structure of lipid storage droplet protein 1 studied in lipoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Arrese, Estela L; Rivera, Laticia; Hamada, Masakazu; Mirza, Saima; Hartson, Steve D; Weintraub, Susan; Soulages, Jose L

    2008-05-01

    Triglycerides (TG) stored in lipid droplets (LDs) are the main energy reserve in all animals. The mechanism by which animals mobilize TG is complex and not fully understood. Several proteins surrounding the LDs have been implicated in TG homeostasis such as mammalian perilipin A and insect lipid storage proteins (Lsd). Most of the knowledge on LD-associated proteins comes from studies using cells or LDs leaving biochemical properties of these proteins uncharacterized. Here we describe the purification of recombinant Lsd1 and its reconstitution with lipids to form lipoprotein complexes suitable for functional and structural studies. Lsd1 in the lipid bound state is a predominately alpha-helical protein. Using lipoprotein complexes containing triolein it is shown that PKA mediated phosphorylation of Lsd1 promoted a 1.7-fold activation of the main fat body lipase demonstrating the direct link between Lsd1 phosphorylation and activation of lipolysis. Serine 20 was identified as the Lsd1-phosphorylation site triggering this effect. PMID:18342616

  15. Tritium containing polymers having a polymer backbone substantially void of tritium

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, G.A.; Nelson, D.A.; Molton, P.M.

    1992-03-31

    A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matrix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium. 2 figs.

  16. Tritium containing polymers having a polymer backbone substantially void of tritium

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, George A.; Nelson, David A.; Molton, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matrix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium.

  17. Efficient backbone cyclization of linear peptides by a recombinant asparaginyl endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Harris, Karen S; Durek, Thomas; Kaas, Quentin; Poth, Aaron G; Gilding, Edward K; Conlan, Brendon F; Saska, Ivana; Daly, Norelle L; van der Weerden, Nicole L; Craik, David J; Anderson, Marilyn A

    2015-01-01

    Cyclotides are diverse plant backbone cyclized peptides that have attracted interest as pharmaceutical scaffolds, but fundamentals of their biosynthetic origin remain elusive. Backbone cyclization is a key enzyme-mediated step of cyclotide biosynthesis and confers a measure of stability on the resultant cyclotide. Furthermore, cyclization would be desirable for engineered peptides. Here we report the identification of four asparaginyl endopeptidases (AEPs), proteases implicated in cyclization, from the cyclotide-producing plant Oldenlandia affinis. We recombinantly express OaAEP1b and find it functions preferably as a cyclase by coupling C-terminal cleavage of propeptide substrates with backbone cyclization. Interestingly, OaAEP1b cannot cleave at the N-terminal site of O. affinis cyclotide precursors, implicating additional proteases in cyclotide biosynthesis. Finally, we demonstrate the broad utility of this enzyme by cyclization of peptides unrelated to cyclotides. We propose that recombinant OaAEP1b is a powerful tool for use in peptide engineering applications where increased stability of peptide products is desired. PMID:26680698

  18. East vergent structure of Backbone Range: Insights from A-Lan-Yi area and sandbox modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. A.; Lu, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Southern Taiwan, including Pingtung peninsula and Taitung, is the incipient oblique collision zone of Eurasian plate and Philippine Sea plate. The Luzon volcanic arc converged toward Taiwan Island and formed Hengchun Ridge south offshore Taiwan. Thus, Taiwan mountain belt developed from north to south as the Backbone Range, so that we can infer the incipient feature structure from the topography and outcrop study of southern Taiwan. Our field survey of this study concentrated at the southeast coastline of Taiwan, also known as A-Lan-Yi Trail. According to previous study, the deformational structures such as faults and folds are consistent with regional kinematic processes, and the preserved transpression structure is the most important evidence of incipient collision. In this study, we use the sedimentary sequences of study area to trace the regional tectonics from north to south. Discovered structures in this area show the similar kinematic history as the eastern flank of Backbone Range, so that we suggest they are at the same series of a tectonic event. To complete the regional structure mapping in this accessible area, besides the field geological data, we also applied the LiDAR-derived DTM which is a 3D visualization technology to improve our topography information. In addition, we use the sandbox modeling to demonstrate the development of structures in the eastern flank of Backbone Range. After combining the results of field observation and regional structure mapping, this study provides a strong evidence of backthrusting and backfolding deformation during the incipient oblique collision stage.

  19. Evolution of functional nucleic acids in the presence of nonheritable backbone heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Trevino, Simon G.; Zhang, Na; Elenko, Mark P.; Lupták, Andrej; Szostak, Jack W.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence support the hypothesis that the early evolution of life was dominated by RNA, which can both transfer information from generation to generation through replication directed by base-pairing, and carry out biochemical activities by folding into functional structures. To understand how life emerged from prebiotic chemistry we must therefore explain the steps that led to the emergence of the RNA world, and in particular, the synthesis of RNA. The generation of pools of highly pure ribonucleotides on the early Earth seems unlikely, but the presence of alternative nucleotides would support the assembly of nucleic acid polymers containing nonheritable backbone heterogeneity. We suggest that homogeneous monomers might not have been necessary if populations of heterogeneous nucleic acid molecules could evolve reproducible function. For such evolution to be possible, function would have to be maintained despite the repeated scrambling of backbone chemistry from generation to generation. We have tested this possibility in a simplified model system, by using a T7 RNA polymerase variant capable of transcribing nucleic acids that contain an approximately 1∶1 mixture of deoxy- and ribonucleotides. We readily isolated nucleotide-binding aptamers by utilizing an in vitro selection process that shuffles the order of deoxy- and ribonucleotides in each round. We describe two such RNA/DNA mosaic nucleic acid aptamers that specifically bind ATP and GTP, respectively. We conclude that nonheritable variations in nucleic acid backbone structure may not have posed an insurmountable barrier to the emergence of functionality in early nucleic acids. PMID:21825162

  20. Self-assembly of diphenylalanine backbone homologues and their combination with functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Bhimareddy; Squillaci, Marco A; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Samorì, Paolo; Bianco, Alberto

    2015-10-14

    The integration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into organized nanostructures is of great interest for applications in materials science and biomedicine. In this work we studied the self-assembly of β and γ homologues of diphenylalanine peptides under different solvent and pH conditions. We aimed to investigate the role of peptide backbone in tuning the formation of different types of nanostructures alone or in combination with carbon nanotubes. In spite of having the same side chain, β and γ peptides formed distinctively different nanofibers, a clear indication of the role played by the backbone homologation on the self-assembly. The variation of the pH allowed to transform the nanofibers into spherical structures. Moreover, the co-assembly of β and γ peptides with carbon nanotubes covalently functionalized with the same peptide generated unique dendritic assemblies. This comparative study on self-assembly using diphenylalanine backbone homologues and of the co-assembly with CNT covalent conjugates is the first example exploring the capacity of β and γ peptides to adopt precise nanostructures, particularly in combination with carbon nanotubes. The dendritic organization obtained by mixing carbon nanotubes and peptides might find interesting applications in tissue engineering and neuronal interfacing. PMID:26359907

  1. Efficient backbone cyclization of linear peptides by a recombinant asparaginyl endopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Karen S.; Durek, Thomas; Kaas, Quentin; Poth, Aaron G.; Gilding, Edward K.; Conlan, Brendon F.; Saska, Ivana; Daly, Norelle L.; van der Weerden, Nicole L.; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclotides are diverse plant backbone cyclized peptides that have attracted interest as pharmaceutical scaffolds, but fundamentals of their biosynthetic origin remain elusive. Backbone cyclization is a key enzyme-mediated step of cyclotide biosynthesis and confers a measure of stability on the resultant cyclotide. Furthermore, cyclization would be desirable for engineered peptides. Here we report the identification of four asparaginyl endopeptidases (AEPs), proteases implicated in cyclization, from the cyclotide-producing plant Oldenlandia affinis. We recombinantly express OaAEP1b and find it functions preferably as a cyclase by coupling C-terminal cleavage of propeptide substrates with backbone cyclization. Interestingly, OaAEP1b cannot cleave at the N-terminal site of O. affinis cyclotide precursors, implicating additional proteases in cyclotide biosynthesis. Finally, we demonstrate the broad utility of this enzyme by cyclization of peptides unrelated to cyclotides. We propose that recombinant OaAEP1b is a powerful tool for use in peptide engineering applications where increased stability of peptide products is desired. PMID:26680698

  2. Probing the Backbone Function of Tumor Targeting Peptides by an Amide-to-Triazole Substitution Strategy.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Ibai E; Vomstein, Sandra; Fischer, Christiane A; Mascarin, Alba; Mindt, Thomas L

    2015-09-24

    Novel backbone-modified radiolabeled analogs based on the tumor targeting peptide bombesin were synthesized and fully evaluated in vitro and in vivo. We have recently introduced the use of 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles as metabolically stable trans-amide bond surrogates in radiolabeled peptides in order to improve their tumor targeting. As an extension of our approach, we now report several backbone-modified analogs of the studied bombesin peptide bearing multiple triazole substitutions. We investigated the effect of the modifications on several biological parameters including the internalization of the radiopeptidomimetics into tumor cells, their affinity toward the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPr), metabolic stability in blood plasma, and biodistribution in mice bearing GRPr-expressing xenografts. The backbone-modified radiotracers exhibited a significantly increased resistance to proteolytic degradation. In addition, some of the radiopeptidomimetics retained a nanomolar affinity toward GRPr, resulting in an up to 2-fold increased tumor uptake in vivo in comparison to a (all amide bond) reference compound. PMID:26309061

  3. Sulfation and cation effects on the conformational properties of the glycan backbone of chondroitin sulfate disaccharides.

    PubMed

    Faller, Christina E; Guvench, Olgun

    2015-05-21

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is one of several glycosaminoglycans that are major components of proteoglycans. A linear polymer consisting of repeats of the disaccharide -4GlcAβ1-3GalNAcβ1-, CS undergoes differential sulfation resulting in five unique sulfation patterns. Because of the dimer repeat, the CS glycosidic "backbone" has two distinct sets of conformational degrees of freedom defined by pairs of dihedral angles: (ϕ1, ψ1) about the β1-3 glycosidic linkage and (ϕ2, ψ2) about the β1-4 glycosidic linkage. Differential sulfation and the possibility of cation binding, combined with the conformational flexibility and biological diversity of CS, complicate experimental efforts to understand CS three-dimensional structures at atomic resolution. Therefore, all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations with Adaptive Biasing Force sampling of the CS backbone were applied to obtain high-resolution, high-precision free energies of CS disaccharides as a function of all possible backbone geometries. All 10 disaccharides (β1-3 vs β1-4 linkage × five different sulfation patterns) were studied; additionally, ion effects were investigated by considering each disaccharide in the presence of either neutralizing sodium or calcium cations. GlcAβ1-3GalNAc disaccharides have a single, broad, thermodynamically important free-energy minimum, whereas GalNAcβ1-4GlcA disaccharides have two such minima. Calcium cations but not sodium cations bind to the disaccharides, and binding is primarily to the GlcA -COO(-) moiety as opposed to sulfate groups. This binding alters the glycan backbone thermodynamics in instances where a calcium cation bound to -COO(-) can act to bridge and stabilize an interaction with an adjacent sulfate group, whereas, in the absence of this cation, the proximity of a sulfate group to -COO(-) results in two like charges being both desolvated and placed adjacent to each other and is found to be destabilizing. In addition to providing information

  4. Pressure dependence of backbone chemical shifts in the model peptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2.

    PubMed

    Erlach, Markus Beck; Koehler, Joerg; Crusca, Edson; Kremer, Werner; Munte, Claudia E; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-06-01

    For a better understanding of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detected pressure responses of folded as well as unstructured proteins the availability of data from well-defined model systems are indispensable. In this work we report the pressure dependence of chemical shifts of the backbone atoms (1)H(α), (13)C(α) and (13)C' in the protected tetrapeptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2 (Xxx one of the 20 canonical amino acids). Contrary to expectation the chemical shifts of these nuclei have a nonlinear dependence on pressure in the range from 0.1 to 200 MPa. The polynomial pressure coefficients B 1 and B 2 are dependent on the type of amino acid studied. The coefficients of a given nucleus show significant linear correlations suggesting that the NMR observable pressure effects in the different amino acids have at least partly the same physical cause. In line with this observation the magnitude of the second order coefficients of nuclei being direct neighbors in the chemical structure are also weakly correlated. PMID:27335085

  5. 1H, 13C and 15N Backbone Assignment of the EC-1 Domain of Human E-Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Prasasty, Vivitri D.; Krause, Mary E.; Tambunan, Usman S. F.; Anbanandam, Asokan; Laurence, Jennifer S.; Siahaan, Teruna J.

    2014-01-01

    The EC1 domain of E-cadherin has been shown to be important for cadherin-cadherin homophilic interactions. Cadherins are responsible for calcium-mediated cell-cell adhesion located at the adherens junction of the biological barriers (i.e., intestinal mucosa and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Cadherin peptides can modulate cadherin interactions to improve drug delivery through the blood-brain barriers (BBB). However, the mechanism of modulating the E-cadherin interactions by cadherin peptides has not been fully elucidated. To provide a basis for subsequent examination of the structure and peptide-binding properties of the EC1 domain of human E-cadherin using solution NMR spectroscopy, the 1H, 13C and 15N backbone resonance of the uniformly labeled-EC1 were assigned and the secondary structure was determined based on the chemical shift values. These resonance assignments are essential for assessing protein-ligand interactions and are reported here. PMID:24510398

  6. Inorganic backbone ionomers: Design and dielectric response of single-ion conducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Joshua

    Ion-conducting polymers were studied primarily through the use of dielectric spectroscopy. The conclusions drawn from ion conduction models of the dielectric data are corroborated by additional independent experiments, including x-ray scattering, calorimetry, prism coupling, and DFT calculations. The broad concern of this dissertation is to understand and clarify a path forward in ion conducting polymer research. This is achieved by considering low-Tg ionomers and the advantages imparted by siloxane and phosphazene backbones. The most successful dielectric spectroscopy model for the materials studied is the electrode polarization model (EP), whereas other models, such as the Dyre random barrier model, fail to describe the experimental results. Seven nonionic ether oxygen (EO) containing polymers were studied in order to observe the effect that backbone chemistry has on dipole motion. Conventional carboncarbon backbone EO-containing polymers show no distinct advantage over similar EO-pendant polysiloxane or polyphosphazene systems. The mobility and effective backbone Tg imparted by the inorganic backbones are comparable. A short EO pendant results in a lower static dielectric constant due to restricted motion of dipoles close to the chain. The flexibility and chemical versatility of inorganic backbone polymers motivates further study of two ionomer systems. A polypohosphazene iodide conducting system was characterized by dielectric spectroscopy and x-ray scattering. Two end "tail" functionalization of the ammonium ion were used, a tail with two EOs and an alkyl tail of six carbons. This functional group plays an important role in ion dynamics and can wrap around the ion and self-solvate when EOs are present. The iodide-ammonium ionomers are observed to have unusually large high-frequency dielectric constants due to atomic polarization of ions. The strength of the atomic polarization scales with ion content. The aggregation state of ions is able to be determined from

  7. Direct effects of ionizing radiation on integral membrane proteins. Noncovalent energy transfer requires specific interpeptide interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jhun, E.; Jhun, B.H.; Jones, L.R.; Jung, C.Y. )

    1991-05-25

    The 12 transmembrane alpha helices (TMHs) of human erythrocyte glucose transporter were individually cut by pepsin digestion as membrane-bound 2.5-3.5-kDa peptide fragments. Radiation-induced chemical degradation of these fragments showed an average target size of 34 kDa. This is 10-12 x larger than the average size of an individual TMH, demonstrating that a significant energy transfer occurs among these TMHs in the absence of covalent linkage. Heating this TMH preparation at 100{degree}C for 15 min reduced the target size to 5 kDa or less, suggesting that the noncovalent energy transfer requires specific helix-helix interactions. Purified phospholamban, a small (6-kDa) integral membrane protein containing a single TMH, formed a pentameric assembly in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The chemical degradation target size of this phospholamban pentamer was 5-6 kDa, illustrating that not all integral membrane protein assemblies permit intersubunit energy transfer. These findings together with other published observations suggest strongly that significant noncovalent energy transfer can occur within the tertiary and quaternary structure of membrane proteins and that as yet undefined proper molecular interactions are required for such covalent energy transfer. Our results with pepsin-digested glucose transporter also illustrate the importance of the interhelical interaction as a predominating force in maintaining the tertiary structure of a transmembrane protein.

  8. Structure of a designed protein cage that self-assembles into a highly porous cube

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lai, Yen-Ting; Reading, Eamonn; Hura, Greg L.; Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Laganowsky, Arthur; Asturias, Francisco J.; Tainer, John A.; Robinson, Carol V.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-11-10

    Natural proteins can be versatile building blocks for multimeric, self-assembling structures. Yet, creating protein-based assemblies with specific geometries and chemical properties remains challenging. Highly porous materials represent particularly interesting targets for designed assembly. Here we utilize a strategy of fusing two natural protein oligomers using a continuous alpha-helical linker to design a novel protein that self assembles into a 750 kDa, 225 Å diameter, cube-shaped cage with large openings into a 130 Å diameter inner cavity. A crystal structure of the cage showed atomic level agreement with the designed model, while electron microscopy, native mass spectrometry, and small angle x-raymore » scattering revealed alternate assembly forms in solution. These studies show that accurate design of large porous assemblies with specific shapes is feasible, while further specificity improvements will likely require limiting flexibility to select against alternative forms. Finally, these results provide a foundation for the design of advanced materials with applications in bionanotechnology, nanomedicine and material sciences.« less

  9. Exon organization of the human FKBP-12 gene: Correlation with structural and functional protein domains

    SciTech Connect

    DiLella, A.G.; Craig, R.J. )

    1991-09-03

    FKBP-12, the major T-cell binding protein for the immunosuppressive agents FK506 and rapamycin, catalyzes the interconversion of the cis and trans rotamers of the peptidyl-prolyl amide bond of peptide and protein substrates. The function of rotamase activity in cells and the role of FKBP-12 in immunoregulation is uncertain. In this paper the authors report the cloning and characterization of the human chromosomal FKBP-12 gene and four processed FKBP-12 pseudogenes. The FKBP-12 gene is 24 kilobases in length and contains five exons. The protein-coding region of the gene is divided into four exon modules that correlate with the structural and functional domains of the protein. The novel structure of FKBP-12 resulting form the topology of the antiparallel {beta}-sheet is the topological crossing of two loops that are encoded by separate exons. Separate exons also encode the antiparallel {beta}-sheet and {alpha}-helical region that define the drug-binding pocket and enzyme activity site of FKBP-12. The exon organization of the FKBP-12 gene structure will enable inactivation of this gene by homologous recombination in cells to provide a model to study the role of FKBP-12 in immunoregulation and normal cellular processes.

  10. Structure of a designed protein cage that self-assembles into a highly porous cube

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Yen-Ting; Reading, Eamonn; Hura, Greg L.; Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Laganowsky, Arthur; Asturias, Francisco J.; Tainer, John A.; Robinson, Carol V.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-11-10

    Natural proteins can be versatile building blocks for multimeric, self-assembling structures. Yet, creating protein-based assemblies with specific geometries and chemical properties remains challenging. Highly porous materials represent particularly interesting targets for designed assembly. Here we utilize a strategy of fusing two natural protein oligomers using a continuous alpha-helical linker to design a novel protein that self assembles into a 750 kDa, 225 Å diameter, cube-shaped cage with large openings into a 130 Å diameter inner cavity. A crystal structure of the cage showed atomic level agreement with the designed model, while electron microscopy, native mass spectrometry, and small angle x-ray scattering revealed alternate assembly forms in solution. These studies show that accurate design of large porous assemblies with specific shapes is feasible, while further specificity improvements will likely require limiting flexibility to select against alternative forms. Finally, these results provide a foundation for the design of advanced materials with applications in bionanotechnology, nanomedicine and material sciences.

  11. Molecular dynamics analysis of conformational change of paramyxovirus F protein during the initial steps of membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Garcia, Fernando; Mendieta-Moreno, Jesus Ignacio; Mendieta, Jesus

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Initial conformational change of paramyxovirus F protein is caused only by mechanical forces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HRA region undergoes a structural change from a beta + alpha conformation to an extended coil and then to an all-alpha conformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HRS domains of F protein form three single {alpha}-helices prior to generation of the coiled coil. -- Abstract: The fusion of paramyxovirus to the cell membrane is mediated by fusion protein (F protein) present in the virus envelope, which undergoes a dramatic conformational change during the process. Unlike hemagglutinin in orthomyxovirus, this change is not mediated by an alteration of environmental pH, and its cause remains unknown. Steered molecular dynamics analysis leads us to suggest that the conformational modification is mediated only by stretching mechanical forces once the transmembrane fusion peptide of the protein is anchored to the cell membrane. Such elongating forces will generate major secondary structure rearrangement in the heptad repeat A region of the F protein; from {beta}-sheet conformation to an elongated coil and then spontaneously to an {alpha}-helix. In addition, it is proposed that the heptad repeat A region adopts a final three-helix coiled coil and that this structure appears after the formation of individual helices in each monomer.

  12. Interaction of recombinant analogs of spider silk proteins 1F9 and 2E12 with phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Antonenko, Yuri N; Perevoshchikova, Irina V; Davydova, Lyubov I; Agapov, Igor A; Bogush, Vladimir G

    2010-06-01

    Recombinant analogs of spider dragline silk proteins 1F9 and 2E12 are characterized by numerous repeats consisting of hydrophobic poly-Ala blocks and Gly-rich sequences with a substantial number of positively charged amino acid residues which suggest a pronounced ability to interact with negatively charged phospholipid membranes. Actually both proteins displayed substantial binding affinity towards lipid vesicles formed of acidic lipids as measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) using rhodamine-labeled conjugates of the proteins. Both proteins did not induce liposome leakage, fusion or breakdown, but were able to bring about liposome aggregation. 1F9 was more active in the induction of liposome aggregation compared to 2E12. Interestingly, 2E12 markedly decreased the rate of calcium-induced liposome fusion. Circular dichroism data showed that binding of the proteins to negatively charged phosphatidylserine liposomes provoked transition from the left-handed helix of polyproline II (PPII) type to beta-structures and alpha-helices. The data suggested predominantly surface location of membrane bound proteins without significant perturbation of their hydrophobic core. PMID:20214876

  13. Automated design of the surface positions of protein helices.

    PubMed Central

    Dahiyat, B. I.; Gordon, D. B.; Mayo, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    Using a protein design algorithm that quantitatively considers side-chain interactions, the design of surface residues of alpha helices was examined. Three scoring functions were tested: a hydrogen-bond potential, a hydrogen-bond potential in conjunction with a penalty for uncompensated burial of polar hydrogens, and a hydrogen-bond potential in combination with helix propensity. The solvent exposed residues of a homodimeric coiled coil based on GCN4-p1 were designed by using the Dead-End Elimination Theorem to find the optimal amino acid sequence for each scoring function. The corresponding peptides were synthesized and characterized by circular dichroism spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. The designed peptides were dimeric and nearly 100% helical at 1 degree C, with melting temperatures from 69-72 degrees C, over 12 degrees C higher than GCN4-p1, whereas a random hydrophilic sequence at the surface positions produced a peptide that melted at 15 degrees C. Analysis of the designed sequences suggests that helix propensity is the key factor in sequence design for surface helical positions. PMID:9194194

  14. Effect of Liquid-Crystalline Epoxy Backbone Structure on Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy-Alumina Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giang, Thanhkieu; Kim, Jinhwan

    2016-06-01

    In a series of papers published recently, we clearly demonstrated that the most important factor governing the thermal conductivity of epoxy-Al2O3 composites is the backbone structure of the epoxy. In this study, three more epoxies based on diglycidyl ester-terminated liquid-crystalline epoxy (LCE) have been synthesized to draw conclusions regarding the effect of the epoxy backbone structure on the thermal conductivity of epoxy-alumina composites. The synthesized structures were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and optical microscopy were also employed to examine the thermal and optical properties of the synthesized LCEs and the cured composites. All three LCE resins exhibited typical liquid-crystalline behaviors: clear solid crystalline state below the melting temperature (T m), sharp crystalline melting at T m, and transition to nematic phase above T m with consequent isotropic phase above the isotropic temperature (T i). The LCE resins displayed distinct nematic liquid-crystalline phase over a wide temperature range and retained liquid-crystalline phase after curing, with high thermal conductivity of the resulting composite. The thermal conductivity values ranged from 3.09 W/m-K to 3.89 W/m-K for LCE-Al2O3 composites with 50 vol.% filler loading. The steric effect played a governing role in the difference. The neat epoxy resin thermal conductivity was obtained as 0.35 W/m-K to 0.49 W/m-K based on analysis using the Agari-Uno model. The results clearly support the objective of this study in that the thermal conductivity of the LCE-containing networks strongly depended on the epoxy backbone structure and the degree of ordering in the cured network.

  15. RNA backbone: consensus all-angle conformers and modular string nomenclature (an RNA Ontology Consortium contribution).

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jane S; Schneider, Bohdan; Murray, Laura W; Kapral, Gary J; Immormino, Robert M; Headd, Jeffrey J; Richardson, David C; Ham, Daniela; Hershkovits, Eli; Williams, Loren Dean; Keating, Kevin S; Pyle, Anna Marie; Micallef, David; Westbrook, John; Berman, Helen M

    2008-03-01

    A consensus classification and nomenclature are defined for RNA backbone structure using all of the backbone torsion angles. By a consensus of several independent analysis methods, 46 discrete conformers are identified as suitably clustered in a quality-filtered, multidimensional dihedral angle distribution. Most of these conformers represent identifiable features or roles within RNA structures. The conformers are given two-character names that reflect the seven-angle delta epsilon zeta alpha beta gamma delta combinations empirically found favorable for the sugar-to-sugar "suite" unit within which the angle correlations are strongest (e.g., 1a for A-form, 5z for the start of S-motifs). Since the half-nucleotides are specified by a number for delta epsilon zeta and a lowercase letter for alpha beta gamma delta, this modular system can also be parsed to describe traditional nucleotide units (e.g., a1) or the dinucleotides (e.g., a1a1) that are especially useful at the level of crystallographic map fitting. This nomenclature can also be written as a string with two-character suite names between the uppercase letters of the base sequence (N1aG1gN1aR1aA1cN1a for a GNRA tetraloop), facilitating bioinformatic comparisons. Cluster means, standard deviations, coordinates, and examples are made available, as well as the Suitename software that assigns suite conformer names and conformer match quality (suiteness) from atomic coordinates. The RNA Ontology Consortium will combine this new backbone system with others that define base pairs, base-stacking, and hydrogen-bond relationships to provide a full description of RNA structural motifs. PMID:18192612

  16. Toward Atomistic Resolution Structure of Phosphatidylcholine Headgroup and Glycerol Backbone at Different Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Botan, Alexandru; Favela-Rosales, Fernando; Fuchs, Patrick F J; Javanainen, Matti; Kanduč, Matej; Kulig, Waldemar; Lamberg, Antti; Loison, Claire; Lyubartsev, Alexander; Miettinen, Markus S; Monticelli, Luca; Määttä, Jukka; Ollila, O H Samuli; Retegan, Marius; Róg, Tomasz; Santuz, Hubert; Tynkkynen, Joona

    2015-12-10

    Phospholipids are essential building blocks of biological membranes. Despite a vast amount of very accurate experimental data, the atomistic resolution structures sampled by the glycerol backbone and choline headgroup in phoshatidylcholine bilayers are not known. Atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations have the potential to resolve the structures, and to give an arrestingly intuitive interpretation of the experimental data, but only if the simulations reproduce the data within experimental accuracy. In the present work, we simulated phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid bilayers with 13 different atomistic models, and compared simulations with NMR experiments in terms of the highly structurally sensitive C-H bond vector order parameters. Focusing on the glycerol backbone and choline headgroups, we showed that the order parameter comparison can be used to judge the atomistic resolution structural accuracy of the models. Accurate models, in turn, allow molecular dynamics simulations to be used as an interpretation tool that translates these NMR data into a dynamic three-dimensional representation of biomolecules in biologically relevant conditions. In addition to lipid bilayers in fully hydrated conditions, we reviewed previous experimental data for dehydrated bilayers and cholesterol-containing bilayers, and interpreted them with simulations. Although none of the existing models reached experimental accuracy, by critically comparing them we were able to distill relevant chemical information: (1) increase of choline order parameters indicates the P-N vector tilting more parallel to the membrane, and (2) cholesterol induces only minor changes to the PC (glycerol backbone) structure. This work has been done as a fully open collaboration, using nmrlipids.blogspot.fi as a communication platform; all the scientific contributions were made publicly on this blog. During the open research process, the repository holding our simulation trajectories and files ( https

  17. Toward Atomistic Resolution Structure of Phosphatidylcholine Headgroup and Glycerol Backbone at Different Ambient Conditions†

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids are essential building blocks of biological membranes. Despite a vast amount of very accurate experimental data, the atomistic resolution structures sampled by the glycerol backbone and choline headgroup in phoshatidylcholine bilayers are not known. Atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations have the potential to resolve the structures, and to give an arrestingly intuitive interpretation of the experimental data, but only if the simulations reproduce the data within experimental accuracy. In the present work, we simulated phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid bilayers with 13 different atomistic models, and compared simulations with NMR experiments in terms of the highly structurally sensitive C–H bond vector order parameters. Focusing on the glycerol backbone and choline headgroups, we showed that the order parameter comparison can be used to judge the atomistic resolution structural accuracy of the models. Accurate models, in turn, allow molecular dynamics simulations to be used as an interpretation tool that translates these NMR data into a dynamic three-dimensional representation of biomolecules in biologically relevant conditions. In addition to lipid bilayers in fully hydrated conditions, we reviewed previous experimental data for dehydrated bilayers and cholesterol-containing bilayers, and interpreted them with simulations. Although none of the existing models reached experimental accuracy, by critically comparing them we were able to distill relevant chemical information: (1) increase of choline order parameters indicates the P–N vector tilting more parallel to the membrane, and (2) cholesterol induces only minor changes to the PC (glycerol backbone) structure. This work has been done as a fully open collaboration, using nmrlipids.blogspot.fi as a communication platform; all the scientific contributions were made publicly on this blog. During the open research process, the repository holding our simulation trajectories and files (https

  18. Identification of outer membrane proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Song, Houhui; Sandie, Reatha; Wang, Ying; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Niederweis, Michael

    2008-11-01

    The cell wall of mycobacteria includes an unusual outer membrane of extremely low permeability. While Escherichia coli uses more than 60 proteins to functionalize its outer membrane, only two mycobacterial outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are known. The porin MspA of Mycobacterium smegmatis provided the proof of principle that integral mycobacterial OMPs share the beta-barrel structure, the absence of hydrophobic alpha-helices and the presence of a signal peptide with OMPs of gram-negative bacteria. These properties were exploited in a multi-step bioinformatic approach to predict OMPs of M. tuberculosis. A secondary structure analysis was performed for 587 proteins of M. tuberculosis predicted to be exported. Scores were calculated for the beta-strand content and the amphiphilicity of the beta-strands. Reference OMPs of gram-negative bacteria defined threshold values for these parameters that were met by 144 proteins of unknown function of M. tuberculosis. Two of them were verified as OMPs by a novel two-step experimental approach. Rv1698 and Rv1973 were detected only in the total membrane fraction of M. bovis BCG in Western blot experiments, while proteinase K digestion of whole cells showed the surface accessibility of these proteins. These findings established that Rv1698 and Rv1973 are indeed localized in the outer membrane and tripled the number of known OMPs of M. tuberculosis. Significantly, these results provide evidence for the usefulness of the bioinformatic approach to predict mycobacterial OMPs and indicate that M. tuberculosis likely has many OMPs with beta-barrel structure. Our findings pave the way to identify the set of proteins which functionalize the outer membrane of M. tuberculosis. PMID:18439872

  19. Coiled-coil protein composition of 22 proteomes – differences and common themes in subcellular infrastructure and traffic control

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Annkatrin; Schraegle, Shannon J; Stahlberg, Eric A; Meier, Iris

    2005-01-01

    Background Long alpha-helical coiled-coil proteins are involved in diverse organizational and regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. They provide cables and networks in the cyto- and nucleoskeleton, molecular scaffolds that organize membrane systems and tissues, motors, levers, rotating arms, and possibly springs. Mutations in long coiled-coil proteins have been implemented in a growing number of human diseases. Using the coiled-coil prediction program MultiCoil, we have previously identified all long coiled-coil proteins from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and have established a searchable Arabidopsis coiled-coil protein database. Results Here, we have identified all proteins with long coiled-coil domains from 21 additional fully sequenced genomes. Because regions predicted to form coiled-coils interfere with sequence homology determination, we have developed a sequence comparison and clustering strategy based on masking predicted coiled-coil domains. Comparing and grouping all long coiled-coil proteins from 22 genomes, the kingdom-specificity of coiled-coil protein families was determined. At the same time, a number of proteins with unknown function could be grouped with already characterized proteins from other organisms. Conclusion MultiCoil predicts proteins with extended coiled-coil domains (more than 250 amino acids) to be largely absent from bacterial genomes, but present in archaea and eukaryotes. The structural maintenance of chromosomes proteins and their relatives are the only long coiled-coil protein family clearly conserved throughout all kingdoms, indicating their ancient nature. Motor proteins, membrane tethering and vesicle transport proteins are the dominant eukaryote-specific long coiled-coil proteins, suggesting that coiled-coil proteins have gained functions in the increasingly complex processes of subcellular infrastructure maintenance and trafficking control of the eukaryotic cell. PMID:16288662

  20. Sulfation and Cation Effects on the Conformational Properties of the Glycan Backbone of Chondroitin Sulfate Disaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Faller, Christina E.; Guvench, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is one of several glycosaminoglycans that are major components of proteoglycans. A linear polymer consisting of repeats of the disaccharide -4GlcAβ1-3GalNAcβ1-, CS undergoes differential sulfation resulting in five unique sulfation patterns. Because of the dimer repeat, the CS glycosidic “backbone” has two distinct sets of conformational degrees of freedom defined by pairs of dihedral angles: (ϕ1, ψ1) about the β1-3 glycosidic linkage and (ϕ2, ψ2) about the β1-4 glycosidic linkage. Differential sulfation and the possibility of cation binding, combined with the conformational flexibility and biological diversity of CS, complicate experimental efforts to understand CS three-dimensional structures at atomic resolution. Therefore, all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations with Adaptive Biasing Force sampling of the CS backbone were applied to obtain high resolution, high precision free energies of CS disaccharides as a function of all possible backbone geometries. All ten disaccharides (β1-3 vs. β1-4 linkage x five different sulfation patterns) were studied; additionally, ion effects were investigated by considering each disaccharide in the presence of either neutralizing sodium or calcium cations. GlcAβ1-3GalNAc disaccharides have a single, broad, thermodynamically important free-energy minimum whereas GalNAcβ1-4GlcA disaccharides have two such minima. Calcium cations but not sodium cations bind to the disaccharides, and binding is primarily to the GlcA –COO− moiety as opposed to sulfate groups. This binding alters the glycan backbone thermodynamics in instances where a calcium cation bound to –COO− can act to bridge and stabilize an interaction with an adjacent sulfate group, whereas, in the absence of this cation, the proximity of a sulfate group to –COO− results in two like charges being both desolvated and placed adjacent to each other and is found to be destabilizing. In addition to providing

  1. Integrating the university medical center. Phase one: providing an information backbone.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, S. J.; Reber, E.; Offeman, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    UCLA School of Medicine represents a diverse computing community where the creation of each individual network has been driven by applications, price/performance and functionality. Indeed, the ability to connect to other computers has had no bearing on selection. Yet, there exists a need to seamlessly connect the individual networks to other minicomputers, mainframes and remote computers. We have created a school wide backbone network that will enable an individual from a single workstation to access a wide variety of services residing on any number of machines. PMID:1807658

  2. First water-soluble backbone Ru-Ru-Ni heterometallic organometallic polymer.

    PubMed

    Scalambra, Franco; Serrano-Ruiz, Manuel; Romerosa, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    The water-soluble backbone heterometallic polymer {[(PTA)2 CpRu-μ-CN-RuCp(PTA)2 -μ-NiCl3 ]}n (2) is synthesized using a reproducible and robust method and fully characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction. The Ru-Ru-Ni polymer is found to be stable in the solid state and soluble in water. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and light scattering studies show that the polymer is stable in water for several days in air. PMID:25739739

  3. Colloidal quantum dot lasers built on a passive two-dimensional photonic crystal backbone.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hojun; Min, Kyungtaek; Lee, Myungjae; Kang, Minsu; Park, Yeonsang; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Roh, Young-Geun; Woo Hwang, Sung; Jeon, Heonsu

    2016-03-17

    We report the room-temperature lasing action from two-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) structures composed of a passive Si3N4 backbone with an over-coat of CdSe/CdS/ZnS colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) for optical gain. When optically excited, devices lased in dual PC band-edge modes, with the modal dominance governed by the thickness of the CQD over-layer. The demonstrated laser platform should have an impact on future photonic integrated circuits as the on-chip coupling between active and passive components is readily achievable. PMID:26935411

  4. The Arabidopsis genome encodes structurally and functionally diverse HMGB-type proteins.

    PubMed

    Grasser, Marion; Lentz, Anne; Lichota, Jacek; Merkle, Thomas; Grasser, Klaus D

    2006-05-01

    The high mobility group (HMG) proteins of the HMGB family are chromatin-associated proteins that act as architectural factors in nucleoprotein structures, which regulate DNA-dependent processes including transcription and recombination. In addition to the previously identified HMGB1-HMGB6 proteins, the Arabidopsis genome encodes at least two other candidate family members (encoded by the loci At2g34450 and At5g23405) having the typical overall structure of a central domain displaying sequence similarity to HMG-box DNA binding domains, which is flanked by basic N-terminal and acidic C-terminal regions. Subcellular localisation experiments demonstrate that the At2g34450 protein is a nuclear protein, whereas the At5g23405 protein is found mainly in the cytoplasm. In line with this finding, At5g23405 displays specific interaction with the nuclear export receptor AtXPO1a. According to CD measurements, the HMG-box domains of both proteins have an alpha-helical structure. The HMG-box domain of At2g34450 interacts with linear DNA and binds structure-specifically to DNA minicircles, whereas the HMG-box domain of At5g23405 does not interact with DNA at all. In ligation experiments with short DNA fragments, the At2g34450 HMG-box domain can facilitate the formation of linear oligomers, but it does not promote the formation of DNA minicircles. Therefore, the At2g34450 protein shares several features with HMGB proteins, whereas the At5g23405 protein has different characteristics. Despite the presence of a region with similarity to the nucleosome-binding domain typical of HMGN proteins, At2g34450 does not bind nucleosome particles. In summary, our data demonstrate (i) that plant HMGB-type proteins are functionally variable and (ii) that it is difficult to predict HMG-box function solely based on sequence similarity. PMID:16563436

  5. Structure of the protein core of the glypican Dally-like and localization of a region important for hedgehog signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min-Sung; Saunders, Adam M.; Hamaoka, Brent Y.; Beachy, Philip A.; Leahy, Daniel J.

    2011-09-20

    Glypicans are heparan sulfate proteoglycans that modulate the signaling of multiple growth factors active during animal development, and loss of glypican function is associated with widespread developmental abnormalities. Glypicans consist of a conserved, approximately 45-kDa N-terminal protein core region followed by a stalk region that is tethered to the cell membrane by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor. The stalk regions are predicted to be random coil but contain a variable number of attachment sites for heparan sulfate chains. Both the N-terminal protein core and the heparan sulfate attachments are important for glypican function. We report here the 2.4-{angstrom} crystal structure of the N-terminal protein core region of the Drosophila glypican Dally-like (Dlp). This structure reveals an elongated, {alpha}-helical fold for glypican core regions that does not appear homologous to any known structure. The Dlp core protein is required for normal responsiveness to Hedgehog (Hh) signals, and we identify a localized region on the Dlp surface important for mediating its function in Hh signaling. Purified Dlp protein core does not, however, interact appreciably with either Hh or an Hh:Ihog complex.

  6. Physicochemical properties and amino acid composition of highly purified preparation of distinctive estrogen-binding protein from rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Shchelkunova, T.A.; Smirnov, A.N.; Rozen, V.B.

    1986-12-10

    The structure and properties of a distinctive estrogen-binding protein (DEBP) from the livers of male rats, purified with the aid of an affinity sorbent, was investigated. A high degree of purification of the DEBP obtained (> 99%), associated with the pronounced microheterogeneity, was found. Apparently, this microheterogeneity is the result of partial proteolysis of the protein from the N-end during isolation. Purified DEBP molecules have the following parameters: molecular weight 31,000 (according to the data of electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel in the presence of SDS), sedimentation coefficient 3.765, Stokes' radius 25.6 A, frictional ratio 1.11. Absorption maximum of the protein in the ultraviolet region 276 nm; extinction coefficient 26; content of ..cap alpha..-helical segments 25-30%. The equilibrium constant of the association with estradiol is 5 x 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/. Estriol (> 100%) and, to a lesser degree, estrone and testosterone (approx. 10%) compete for the protein-binding sites on (/sup 3/H) estradiol, whereas androsterone has practically no competitive effect. A study of the amino acid composition of the DEBP showed that the protein contains a large number of residues with hydrophobic side groups (34.4%), it has more acidic than basic amino acids, and possesses a low content of cysteine, threonine, and histidine.

  7. Characterisation of three alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides from the venom of Scorpio maurus palmatus.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Patrick L; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed A; Strong, Peter N; Tawfik, Mohamed M; Miller, Keith

    2016-07-01

    Scorpion venoms provide a rich source of anti-microbial peptides. Here we characterise three from the venom of Scorpion maurus palmatus. Smp13 is biologically inactive, despite sharing homology with other antimicrobial peptides, probably because it lacks a typically charged structure. Both Smp-24 and Smp-43 have broad spectrum antimicrobial activity, disrupting bacterial membranes. In addition, there is evidence that Smp24 may inhibit DNA synthesis in Bacillus subtilis. Smp24 haemolysed red blood cells but in contrast, Smp43 was non-haemolytic. The introduction of a flexible Gly-Val-Gly hinge into the middle of Smp24 did not alter the haemolytic activity of Smp24 (as might have been predicted from earlier studies with Pandinin2 (Pin2), although C-terminal truncation of Smp-24 reduced its haemolytic activity, in agreement with earlier Pin 2 studies. Smp24 and its derivatives, as well as Smp-43, were all cytotoxic (ATP release assay) toward mammalian HepG2 liver cells. Our results highlight the beneficial effect of helical-hinge-helical conformation on promoting prokaryotic selectivity of long chain scorpion AMPs, as well as the importance of examining a wide range of mammalian cell types in cytotoxicity testing. PMID:27019370

  8. Single amino acid mutation in alpha-helical peptide affect second harmonic generation hyperpolarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jing; Wang, Jin-Yun; Zhang, Min-Yi; Chai, Guo-Liang; Lin, Chen-Sheng; Cheng, Wen-Dan

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effect of side chain on the first-order hyperpolarizability in α-helical polyalanine peptide with the 10th alanine mutation (Acetyl(ala)9X(ala)7NH2). Structures of various substituted peptides are optimized by ONIOM (DFT: AM1) scheme, and then linear and nonlinear optical properties are calculated by SOS//CIS/6-31G∗ method. The polarizability and first-order hyperpolarizability increase obviously only when 'X' represents phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan. We also discuss the origin of nonlinear optical response and determine what caused the increase of first-order hyperpolarizability. Our results strongly suggest that side chains containing benzene, phenol and indole have important contributions to first-order hyperpolarizability.

  9. Recent developments in the electronic spectroscopy of amides and alpha-helical polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Woody, Robert W; Koslowski, Axel

    2002-12-10

    Recent experimental and theoretical advances in understanding the electronic excited states of simple amides are reviewed. Polarized reflection spectroscopy of single crystals of N-acetylglycine shows that the direction of the first pipi* (NV(1)) transition dipole moment of a secondary amide differs by approximately 15 degrees from that of a primary amide. Ab initio calculations on simple amides support this conclusion. Ab initio studies of di- and tri-amides demonstrate that several inter-amide charge-transfer (CT) transitions occur in the 150-175-nm region, between the NV(1) and NV(2) transitions. When the correct dipole transition moment direction for peptides is used in calculations of the circular dichroism of the alpha-helix, the results are much improved over those from earlier calculations that used the direction for primary amides. Studies that consider the mixing of the NV(1) transition with CT transitions are reviewed. These indicate that such mixing is likely to have a significant effect on the absorption and CD spectra of the alpha-helix and other types of peptide conformation. Nevertheless, the independent systems model gives a reasonable first approximation to the absorption and CD spectra of the alpha-helix. PMID:12488025

  10. The conserved KNOX domain mediates specificity of tobacco KNOTTED1-type homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, T; Nishimura, A; Tamaoki, M; Kuba, M; Tanaka, H; Iwahori, S; Matsuoka, M

    1999-01-01

    Overproduction of the tobacco KNOTTED1-type homeodomain proteins NTH1, NTH15, and NTH23 in transgenic tobacco plants causes mild, severe, and no morphological alterations, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of the homeodomains and adjacent ELK domains are highly conserved, and the N-terminal KNOX domains also are moderately conserved. To investigate the contributions of both the conserved and divergent regions to the severity of morphological alterations, we generated chimeric proteins by exchanging different regions of NTH1, NTH15, and NTH23. The severity of the abnormal phenotype was dependent upon the synergistic action of both the N terminus, containing the KNOX domain, and the C terminus, containing the ELK homeodomain. Detailed analysis focusing on the C terminus revealed that the C-terminal half of the ELK domain is more effective in inducing the abnormal phenotypes than are the homeodomains. For the N terminus, severe morphological alterations were induced by exchanging a part of the KNOX domain of NTH1 with the corresponding region of NTH15. This limited region in the KNOX domain of all homeodomain proteins includes a predicted alpha-helical region, but only that in NTH15 is predicted to form a typical amphipathic structure. We discuss the possibility, based on these results, that the secondary structure of the KNOX domain is important for the induction of abnormal morphology in transgenic tobacco plants. PMID:10449577

  11. A small molecule directly inhibits the p53 transactivation domain from binding to replication protein A

    PubMed Central

    Glanzer, Jason G.; Carnes, Katie A.; Soto, Patricia; Liu, Shengqin; Parkhurst, Lawrence J.; Oakley, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), essential for DNA replication, repair and DNA damage signalling, possesses six ssDNA-binding domains (DBDs), including DBD-F on the N-terminus of the largest subunit, RPA70. This domain functions as a binding site for p53 and other DNA damage and repair proteins that contain amphipathic alpha helical domains. Here, we demonstrate direct binding of both ssDNA and the transactivation domain 2 of p53 (p53TAD2) to DBD-F, as well as DBD-F-directed dsDNA strand separation by RPA, all of which are inhibited by fumaropimaric acid (FPA). FPA binds directly to RPA, resulting in a conformational shift as determined through quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence in full length RPA. Structural analogues of FPA provide insight on chemical properties that are required for inhibition. Finally, we confirm the inability of RPA possessing R41E and R43E mutations to bind to p53, destabilize dsDNA and quench tryptophan fluorescence by FPA, suggesting that protein binding, DNA modulation and inhibitor binding all occur within the same site on DBD-F. The disruption of p53–RPA interactions by FPA may disturb the regulatory functions of p53 and RPA, thereby inhibiting cellular pathways that control the cell cycle and maintain the integrity of the human genome. PMID:23267009

  12. UPF201 Archaeal Specific Family Members Reveal Structural Similarity to RNA-Binding Proteins but Low Likelyhood for RNA-Binding Function

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.; Burley, S; Swaminathan, S

    2008-01-01

    We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54) to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40%) and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and five {alpha}-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  13. UPF201 Archaeal Specific Family Members Reveals Structural Similarity to RNA-Binding Proteins but Low Likelihood for RNA-Binding Function

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.N.; Swaminathan, S.; Burley, S. K.

    2008-12-11

    We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54) to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40%) and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and five {alpha}-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  14. Backbone and side chain NMR assignments of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ZapA allow identification of residues that mediate the interaction of ZapA with FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Maria Luiza C; Sforça, Mauricio Luis; Chin, Yanni K-Y; Mobli, Mehdi; Handler, Aaron; Gorbatyuk, Vitaliy Y; Robson, Scott A; King, Glenn F; Gueiros-Filho, Frederico J; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial division begins with the formation of a contractile protein ring at midcell, which constricts the bacterial envelope to generate two daughter cells. The central component of the division ring is FtsZ, a tubulin-like protein capable of self-assembling into filaments which further associate into a higher order structure known as the Z ring. Proteins that bind to FtsZ play a crucial role in the formation and regulation of the Z ring. One such protein is ZapA, a widely conserved 21 kDa homodimeric protein that associates with FtsZ filaments and promotes their bundling. Although ZapA was discovered more than a decade ago, the structural details of its interaction with FtsZ remain unknown. In this work, backbone and side chain NMR assignments for the Geobacillus stearothermophilus ZapA homodimer are described. We titrated FtsZ into (15)N(2)H-ZapA and mapped ZapA residues whose resonances are perturbed upon FtsZ binding. This information provides a structural understanding of the interaction between FtsZ and ZapA. PMID:25967379

  15. First-principles study of the effect of functional groups on polyaniline backbone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. P.; Jiang, J. K.; Liang, Q. H.; Yang, N.; Ye, H. Y.; Cai, M.; Shen, L.; Yang, D. G.; Ren, T. L.

    2015-11-01

    We present a first-principles density functional theory study focused on how the chemical and electronic properties of polyaniline are adjusted by introducing suitable substituents on a polymer backbone. Analyses of the obtained energy barriers, reaction energies and minimum energy paths indicate that the chemical reactivity of the polyaniline derivatives is significantly enhanced by protonic acid doping of the substituted materials. Further study of the density of states at the Fermi level, band gap, HOMO and LUMO shows that both the unprotonated and protonated states of these polyanilines are altered to different degrees depending on the functional group. We also note that changes in both the chemical and electronic properties are very sensitive to the polarity and size of the functional group. It is worth noting that these changes do not substantially alter the inherent chemical and electronic properties of polyaniline. Our results demonstrate that introducing different functional groups on a polymer backbone is an effective approach to obtain tailored conductive polymers with desirable properties while retaining their intrinsic properties, such as conductivity.

  16. Di-Isocyanate Crosslinked Aerogels with 1, 6-Bis (Trimethoxysilyl) Hexane Incorporated in Silica Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vivod, Stephanie L.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Nguyen, Baochau N.; Quade, Derek; Randall, Jason; Perry, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Silica aerogels are desirable materials for many applications that take advantage of their light weight and low thermal conductivity. Addition of a conformal polymer coating which bonds with the amine decorated surface of the silica network improves the strength of the aerogels by as much as 200 times. Even with vast improvement in strength they still tend to undergo brittle failure due to the rigid silica backbone. We hope to increase the flexibility and elastic recovery of the silica based aerogel by altering the silica back-bone by incorporation of more flexible hexane links. To this end, we investigated the use of 1,6-bis(trimethoxysilyl)hexane (BTMSH), a polysilsesquioxane precursor3, as an additional co-reactant to prepare silica gels which were subsequently cross-linked with di-isocyanate. Previously, this approach of adding flexibility by BTMSH incorporation was demonstrated with styrene cross-linked aerogels. In our study, we varied silane concentration, mol % of silicon from BTMSH and di-isocyanate concentration by weight percent to attempt to optimize both the flexibility and the strength of the aerogels.

  17. A backbone amide protecting group for overcoming difficult sequences and suppressing aspartimide formation.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, Abu-Baker M; Papageorgiou, George; Raz, Richard; Quibell, Martin; Burlina, Fabienne; Offer, John

    2016-05-01

    A backbone amide bond protecting group, 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-5-nitrobenzyl (Hmnb), improved the synthesis of aggregation and aspartimide-prone peptides. Introduction of Hmnb is automated and carried out during peptide assembly by addition of 4-methoxy-5-nitrosalicylaldehyde to the peptidyl-resin and on-resin reduction to the secondary amine. Acylation of the hindered secondary amine is aided by the formation of an internal nitrophenol ester that undergoes a favourable O,N intramolecular acyl transfer. This activated ester participates in the coupling and generally gives complete reaction with standard coupling conditions. Hmnb is easily available in a single preparative step from commercially available material. Different methods for removing the amide protecting group were explored. The protecting group is labile to acidolysis, following reduction of the nitro group to the aniline. The two main uses of backbone protection of preventing aspartimide formation and of overcoming difficult sequences are demonstrated, first with the synthesis of a challenging aspartimide-prone test sequence and then with the classic difficult sequence ACP (65-74) and a 23-mer homopolymer of polyalanine. PMID:27086749

  18. The structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the lipopolysaccharide of Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-79104.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Li, Jianjun; Sadovskaya, Irina; Jabbouri, Said; Helander, Ilkka M

    2004-06-22

    The structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the lipopolysaccharide from Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-79104 was analyzed using chemical degradations, NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. The LPS contains two major structural variants, differing in the presence or absence of an octasaccharide fragment. The largest structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the LPS, that could be deduced from experimental results, consists of 20 monosaccharides arranged in a nonrepetitive sequence: [carbohydrate structure: see text] where R is H or 4-O-Me-alpha-L-Fuc-(1-2)-4-O-Me-beta-Hep-(1-3)-alpha-GlcNAc-(1-2)-beta-Man-(1-3)-beta-ManNAc-(1-4)-alpha-Gal-(1-4)-beta-Hep-(1-3)-beta-GalNAc-(1- where Hep is a residue of D-glycero-D-galacto-heptose; all monosaccharides have the D-configuration except for 4-O-Me-L-Fuc and L-Ara4N. This structure is architecturally similar to the oligosaccharide system reported previously in P. frisingensis VTT E-82164 LPS, but differs from the latter in composition and also in the size of the outer region. PMID:15183738

  19. First-principles study of the effect of functional groups on polyaniline backbone

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X. P.; Jiang, J. K.; Liang, Q. H.; Yang, N.; Ye, H. Y.; Cai, M.; Shen, L.; Yang, D. G.; Ren, T. L.

    2015-01-01

    We present a first-principles density functional theory study focused on how the chemical and electronic properties of polyaniline are adjusted by introducing suitable substituents on a polymer backbone. Analyses of the obtained energy barriers, reaction energies and minimum energy paths indicate that the chemical reactivity of the polyaniline derivatives is significantly enhanced by protonic acid doping of the substituted materials. Further study of the density of states at the Fermi level, band gap, HOMO and LUMO shows that both the unprotonated and protonated states of these polyanilines are altered to different degrees depending on the functional group. We also note that changes in both the chemical and electronic properties are very sensitive to the polarity and size of the functional group. It is worth noting that these changes do not substantially alter the inherent chemical and electronic properties of polyaniline. Our results demonstrate that introducing different functional groups on a polymer backbone is an effective approach to obtain tailored conductive polymers with desirable properties while retaining their intrinsic properties, such as conductivity. PMID:26584671

  20. Low Molecular Weight Oligomers with Aromatic Backbone as Efficient Nonviral Gene Vectors.

    PubMed

    Luan, Chao-Ran; Liu, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Ji; Yu, Qing-Ying; Huang, Zheng; Wang, Bing; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2016-05-01

    A series of oligomers were synthesized via ring-opening polymerization. Although the molecular weights of these oligomers are only ∼2.5 kDa, they could efficiently bind and condense DNA into nanoparticles. These oligomers gave comparable transfection efficiency (TE) to PEI 25 kDa, while their TE could even increase with the presence of serum, and up to 65 times higher TE than PEI was obtained. The excellent serum tolerance was also confirmed by TEM, flow cytometry, and BSA adsorption assay. Moreover, structure-activity relationship studies revealed some interesting factors. First, oligomers containing aromatic rings in the backbone showed better DNA binding ability. These materials could bring more DNA cargo into the cells, leading to much better TE. Second, the isomerism of the disubstituted phenyl group on the oligomer backbone has large effect on the transfection. The ortho-disubstituted ones gave at least 1 order of magnitude higher TE than meta- or para-disubstituted oligomers. Gel electrophoresis involving DNase and heparin indicated that the difficulty to release DNA might contribute to the lower TE of the latter. Such clues may help us to design novel nonviral gene vectors with high efficiency and biocompatibility. PMID:27077449

  1. Phosphorothioate backbone modifications of nucleotide-based drugs are potent platelet activators.

    PubMed

    Flierl, Ulrike; Nero, Tracy L; Lim, Bock; Arthur, Jane F; Yao, Yu; Jung, Stephanie M; Gitz, Eelo; Pollitt, Alice Y; Zaldivia, Maria T K; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Schäfer, Andreas; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Andrews, Robert K; Parker, Michael W; Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Peter, Karlheinz

    2015-02-01

    Nucleotide-based drug candidates such as antisense oligonucleotides, aptamers, immunoreceptor-activating nucleotides, or (anti)microRNAs hold great therapeutic promise for many human diseases. Phosphorothioate (PS) backbone modification of nucleotide-based drugs is common practice to protect these promising drug candidates from rapid degradation by plasma and intracellular nucleases. Effects of the changes in physicochemical properties associated with PS modification on platelets have not been elucidated so far. Here we report the unexpected binding of PS-modified oligonucleotides to platelets eliciting strong platelet activation, signaling, reactive oxygen species generation, adhesion, spreading, aggregation, and thrombus formation in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, the platelet-specific receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI) mediates these platelet-activating effects. Notably, platelets from GPVI function-deficient patients do not exhibit binding of PS-modified oligonucleotides, and platelet activation is fully abolished. Our data demonstrate a novel, unexpected, PS backbone-dependent, platelet-activating effect of nucleotide-based drug candidates mediated by GPVI. This unforeseen effect should be considered in the ongoing development programs for the broad range of upcoming and promising DNA/RNA therapeutics. PMID:25646267

  2. An optimized microRNA backbone for effective single-copy RNAi.

    PubMed

    Fellmann, Christof; Hoffmann, Thomas; Sridhar, Vaishali; Hopfgartner, Barbara; Muhar, Matthias; Roth, Mareike; Lai, Dan Yu; Barbosa, Inês A M; Kwon, Jung Shick; Guan, Yuanzhe; Sinha, Nishi; Zuber, Johannes

    2013-12-26

    Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) technology enables stable and regulated gene repression. For establishing experimentally versatile RNAi tools and minimizing toxicities, synthetic shRNAs can be embedded into endogenous microRNA contexts. However, due to our incomplete understanding of microRNA biogenesis, such "shRNAmirs" often fail to trigger potent knockdown, especially when expressed from a single genomic copy. Following recent advances in design of synthetic shRNAmir stems, here we take a systematic approach to optimize the experimental miR-30 backbone. Among several favorable features, we identify a conserved element 3' of the basal stem as critically required for optimal shRNAmir processing and implement it in an optimized backbone termed "miR-E", which strongly increases mature shRNA levels and knockdown efficacy. Existing miR-30 reagents can be easily converted to miR-E, and its combination with up-to-date design rules establishes a validated and accessible platform for generating effective single-copy shRNA libraries that will facilitate the functional annotation of the genome. PMID:24332856

  3. Colloidal quantum dot lasers built on a passive two-dimensional photonic crystal backbone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hojun; Min, Kyungtaek; Lee, Myungjae; Kang, Minsu; Park, Yeonsang; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Roh, Young-Geun; Woo Hwang, Sung; Jeon, Heonsu

    2016-03-01

    We report the room-temperature lasing action from two-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) structures composed of a passive Si3N4 backbone with an over-coat of CdSe/CdS/ZnS colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) for optical gain. When optically excited, devices lased in dual PC band-edge modes, with the modal dominance governed by the thickness of the CQD over-layer. The demonstrated laser platform should have an impact on future photonic integrated circuits as the on-chip coupling between active and passive components is readily achievable.We report the room-temperature lasing action from two-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) structures composed of a passive Si3N4 backbone with an over-coat of CdSe/CdS/ZnS colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) for optical gain. When optically excited, devices lased in dual PC band-edge modes, with the modal dominance governed by the thickness of the CQD over-layer. The demonstrated laser platform should have an impact on future photonic integrated circuits as the on-chip coupling between active and passive components is readily achievable. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08544f

  4. First-principles study of the effect of functional groups on polyaniline backbone.

    PubMed

    Chen, X P; Jiang, J K; Liang, Q H; Yang, N; Ye, H Y; Cai, M; Shen, L; Yang, D G; Ren, T L

    2015-01-01

    We present a first-principles density functional theory study focused on how the chemical and electronic properties of polyaniline are adjusted by introducing suitable substituents on a polymer backbone. Analyses of the obtained energy barriers, reaction energies and minimum energy paths indicate that the chemical reactivity of the polyaniline derivatives is significantly enhanced by protonic acid doping of the substituted materials. Further study of the density of states at the Fermi level, band gap, HOMO and LUMO shows that both the unprotonated and protonated states of these polyanilines are altered to different degrees depending on the functional group. We also note that changes in both the chemical and electronic properties are very sensitive to the polarity and size of the functional group. It is worth noting that these changes do not substantially alter the inherent chemical and electronic properties of polyaniline. Our results demonstrate that introducing different functional groups on a polymer backbone is an effective approach to obtain tailored conductive polymers with desirable properties while retaining their intrinsic properties, such as conductivity. PMID:26584671

  5. The Nanomechanical Properties of Lactococcus lactis Pili Are Conditioned by the Polymerized Backbone Pilin

    PubMed Central

    Castelain, Mickaël; Duviau, Marie-Pierre; Canette, Alexis; Schmitz, Philippe; Loubière, Pascal; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Piard, Jean-Christophe; Mercier-Bonin, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Pili produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis are putative linear structures consisting of repetitive subunits of the major pilin PilB that forms the backbone, pilin PilA situated at the distal end of the pilus, and an anchoring pilin PilC that tethers the pilus to the peptidoglycan. We determined the nanomechanical properties of pili using optical-tweezers force spectroscopy. Single pili were exposed to optical forces that yielded force-versus-extension spectra fitted using the Worm-Like Chain model. Native pili subjected to a force of 0–200 pN exhibit an inextensible, but highly flexible ultrastructure, reflected by their short persistence length. We tested a panel of derived strains to understand the functional role of the different pilins. First, we found that both the major pilin PilB and sortase C organize the backbone into a full-length organelle and dictate the nanomechanical properties of the pili. Second, we found that both PilA tip pilin and PilC anchoring pilin were not essential for the nanomechanical properties of pili. However, PilC maintains the pilus on the bacterial surface and may play a crucial role in the adhesion- and biofilm-forming properties of L. lactis. PMID:27010408

  6. Characterization of a new antifungal lipid transfer protein from wheat.

    PubMed

    Kirubakaran, S Isaac; Begum, S Mubarak; Ulaganathan, K; Sakthivel, N

    2008-10-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are members of the family of pathogenesis-related proteins (PR-14) that are believed to be involved in plant defense responses. In this study, a novel gene Ltp 3F1 encoding an antifungal protein from wheat (Sumai 3) was subcloned, overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL-21 (DE3) and enriched using ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by gel permeation chromatography. Molecular phylogeny analyses of wheat Ltp 3F1 gene showed a strong identity to other plant LTPs. Predicted three-dimensional structural model showed the presence of 6 alpha-helices and 9 loop turns. The active site catalytic residues Gly30, Pro50, Ala52 and Cys55 may be suggested for catalyzing the reaction involved in lipid binding. SDS-PAGE analysis confirmed the production of recombinant fusion protein. The LTP fusion protein exhibited a broad-spectrum antifungal activity against Alternaria sp., Rhizoctonia solani, Curvularia lunata, Bipolaris oryzae, Cylindrocladium scoparium, Botrytis cinerea and Sarocladium oryzae. Gene cassette with cyanamide hydratase (cah) marker and Ltp 3F1 gene was constructed for genetic transformation in tobacco. Efficient regeneration was achieved in selective media amended with cyanamide. Transgenic plants with normal phenotype were obtained. Results of PCR and Southern, Northern and Western hybridization analyses confirmed the integration and expression of genes in transgenic plants. Experiments with detached leaves from transgenic tobacco expressing Ltp 3F1 gene showed fungal resistance. Due to the innate potential of broad-spectrum antifungal activity, wheat Ltp 3F1 gene can be used to enhance resistance against fungi in crop plants. PMID:18595724

  7. Juvenile hormone diol kinase, a calcium-binding protein with kinase activity, from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Zhang, Qi-Rui; Xu, Wei-Hua; Schooley, David A

    2005-11-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) diol kinase (JHDK) is an important enzyme involved in the JH degradation pathway. Bombyx mori (Bommo)-JHDK cDNA (637bp) contains an open reading frame encoding a 183-amino acid protein, which reveals a high degree of identity to the two previously reported JHDKs. JHDK is similar to GTP-binding proteins with three conserved sequence elements involved in purine nucleotide binding, contains eight alpha-helices and three EF-hand motifs, and resembles the three-dimensional model of 2SCP and some other calcium-binding proteins. The Bommo-JHDK gene has only a single copy in the silkworm haploid genome, contains only one exon, and its 5'-upstream sequence does not have a JH response element. Although Bommo-JHDK is highly expressed in the gut of the silkworm, its mRNA expression remains at a constant level during larval development suggesting this enzyme is constitutive and not regulated by JH, at least at the transcriptional level. Recombinant Bommo-JHDK catalyzed the conversion of 10S-JH diol into JH diol phosphate, confirming its enzymatic function. Recombinant enzyme formed a dimer and had biochemical characteristics similar to other JHDKs. Bommo-JHDK, a calcium-binding protein with kinase activity, provides unique insights on how JH levels are regulated in the silkworm. PMID:16203205

  8. Phosphorylation of CREB at Ser-133 induces complex formation with CREB-binding protein via a direct mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, D; Ferreri, K; Nakajima, T; LaMorte, V J; Evans, R; Koerber, S C; Hoeger, C; Montminy, M R

    1996-01-01

    We have characterized a phosphoserine binding domain in the coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP) which interacts with the protein kinase A-phosphorylated, and hence activated, form of the cyclic AMP-responsive factor CREB. The CREB binding domain, referred to as KIX, is alpha helical and binds to an unstructured kinase-inducible domain in CREB following phosphorylation of CREB at Ser-133. Phospho-Ser-133 forms direct contacts with residues in KIX, and these contacts are further stabilized by hydrophobic residues in the kinase-inducible domain which flank phospho-Ser-133. Like the src homology 2 (SH2) domains which bind phosphotyrosine-containing peptides, phosphoserine 133 appears to coordinate with a single arginine residue (Arg-600) in KIX which is conserved in the CBP-related protein P300. Since mutagenesis of Arg-600 to Gln severely reduces CREB-CBP complex formation, our results demonstrate that, as in the case of tyrosine kinase pathways, signal transduction through serine/threonine kinase pathways may also require protein interaction motifs which are capable of recognizing phosphorylated amino acids. PMID:8552098

  9. Localization of the equine IgG-binding domain in the fibrinogen-binding protein (FgBP) of Streptococcus equi subsp. equi.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Mary; Lewis, Melanie J; Byrne, Caroline; O'Hare, David; Woof, Jenny M; Owen, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Fibrinogen-binding protein (FgBP, also termed SeM) is a cell-wall-associated anti-phagocytic M-like protein of the equine pathogen Streptococcus equi subsp. equi, and binds fibrinogen (Fg) and IgG. FgBP binds Fg avidly through residues located at the extreme N terminus of the molecule, whereas the IgG-binding site is more centrally located between the A and B repeats. FgBP binds equine IgG4 and IgG7 subclasses through interaction with the CH2-CH3 interdomain region of IgG-Fc, and possesses overlapping Fc-binding sites with protein A and protein G. In this study, FgBP truncates containing defined internal deletions were used to identify a stretch of 14 aa (residues 335-348) critical for IgG binding. Protein chimeras consisting of the non-IgG-binding alpha-helical coiled-coil M5 protein fused to FgBP sequences were used to identify a minimal equine IgG-binding domain consisting of residues 329-360. Competition ELISA tests suggested that IgG does not compromise Fg binding and vice versa. PMID:19423628

  10. Evaluation of the non-toxic mutant of the diphtheria toxin K51E/E148K as carrier protein for meningococcal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Pecetta, S; Vijayakrishnan, B; Romano, M R; Proietti, D; Surdo, P Lo; Balocchi, C; Mori, E; Davis, B G; Berti, F

    2016-03-01

    Diphtheria toxin mutant CRM197 is a common carrier protein for glycoconjugate vaccines, which has been proven an effective protein vector for, among others, meningococcal carbohydrates. The wide-range use of this protein in massive vaccine production requires constant increase of production yields and adaptability to an ever-growing market. Here we compare CRM197 with the alternative diphtheria non-toxic variant DT-K51E/E148K, an inactive mutant that can be produced in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. Biophysical characterization of DT-K51E/E148K suggested high similarity with CRM197, with main differences in their alpha-helical content, and a suitable purity for conjugation and vaccine preparation. Meningococcal serogroup A (MenA) glycoconjugates were synthesized using CRM197 and DT-K51E/E148K as carrier proteins, obtaining the same conjugation yields and comparable biophysical profiles. Mice were then immunized with these CRM197 and DT-K51E/E148K conjugates, and essentially identical immunogenic and protective effects were observed. Overall, our data indicate that DT-K51E/E148K is a readily produced protein that now allows the added flexibility of E. coli production in vaccine development and that can be effectively used as protein carrier for a meningococcal conjugate vaccine. PMID:26845738

  11. Coherent topological phenomena in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Bohr, H; Brunak, S; Bohr, J

    1997-01-01

    A theory is presented for coherent topological phenomena in protein dynamics with implications for protein folding and stability. We discuss the relationship to the writhing number used in knot diagrams of DNA. The winding state defines a long-range order along the backbone of a protein with long-range excitations, 'wring' modes, that play an important role in protein denaturation and stability. Energy can be pumped into these excitations, either thermally or by an external force. PMID:9218961

  12. HIV-1 Phenotypic Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Drug Resistance Test Interpretation Is Not Dependent on the Subtype of the Virus Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Bronze, Michelle; Steegen, Kim; Wallis, Carole L.; De Wolf, Hans; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A.; Van Houtte, Margriet; Stevens, Wendy S.; de Wit, Tobias Rinke; Stuyver, Lieven J.

    2012-01-01

    To date, the majority of HIV-1 phenotypic resistance testing has been performed with subtype B virus backbones (e.g. HXB2). However, the relevance of using this backbone to determine resistance in non-subtype B HIV-1 viruses still needs to be assessed. From 114 HIV-1 subtype C clinical samples (36 ARV-naïve, 78 ARV-exposed), pol amplicons were produced and analyzed for phenotypic resistance using both a subtype B- and C-backbone in which the pol fragment was deleted. Phenotypic resistance was assessed in resulting recombinant virus stocks (RVS) for a series of antiretroviral drugs (ARV's) and expressed as fold change (FC), yielding 1660 FC comparisons. These Antivirogram® derived FC values were categorized as having resistant or sensitive susceptibility based on biological cut-off values (BCOs). The concordance between resistance calls obtained for the same clinical sample but derived from two different backbones (i.e. B and C) accounted for 86.1% (1429/1660) of the FC comparisons. However, when taking the assay variability into account, 95.8% (1590/1660) of the phenotypic data could be considered as being concordant with respect to their resistance call. No difference in the capacity to detect resistance associated with M184V, K103N and V106M mutations was noted between the two backbones. The following was concluded: (i) A high level of concordance was shown between the two backbone phenotypic resistance profiles; (ii) Assay variability is largely responsible for discordant results (i.e. for FC values close to BCO); (iii) Confidence intervals should be given around the BCO's, when assessing resistance in HIV-1 subtype C; (iv) No systematic resistance under- or overcalling of subtype C amplicons in the B-backbone was observed; (v) Virus backbone subtype sequence variability outside the pol region does not contribute to phenotypic FC values. In conclusion the HXB2 virus backbone remains an acceptable vector for phenotyping HIV-1 subtype C pol amplicons. PMID

  13. Characterization of the Burkholderia mallei tonB Mutant and Its Potential as a Backbone Strain for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Tiffany M.; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Sbrana, Elena; Endsley, Janice J.; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2015-01-01

    Background In this study, a Burkholderia mallei tonB mutant (TMM001) deficient in iron acquisition was constructed, characterized, and evaluated for its protective properties in acute inhalational infection models of murine glanders and melioidosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Compared to the wild-type, TMM001 exhibits slower growth kinetics, siderophore hyper-secretion and the inability to utilize heme-containing proteins as iron sources. A series of animal challenge studies showed an inverse correlation between the percentage of survival in BALB/c mice and iron-dependent TMM001 growth. Upon evaluation of TMM001 as a potential protective strain against infection, we found 100% survival following B. mallei CSM001 challenge of mice previously receiving 1.5 x 104 CFU of TMM001. At 21 days post-immunization, TMM001-treated animals showed significantly higher levels of B. mallei-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgM when compared to PBS-treated controls. At 48 h post-challenge, PBS-treated controls exhibited higher levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and more severe pathological damage to target organs compared to animals receiving TMM001. In a cross-protection study of acute inhalational melioidosis with B. pseudomallei, TMM001-treated mice were significantly protected. While wild type was cleared in all B. mallei challenge studies, mice failed to clear TMM001. Conclusions/Significance Although further work is needed to prevent chronic infection by TMM001 while maintaining immunogenicity, our attenuated strain demonstrates great potential as a backbone strain for future vaccine development against both glanders and melioidosis. PMID:26114445

  14. The Inherent Conformational Preferences of Glutamine-Containing Peptides: the Role for Side-Chain Backbone Hydrogen Bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Patrick S.; McBurney, Carl; Gellman, Samuel H.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2015-06-01

    Glutamine is widely known to be found in critical regions of peptides which readily fold into amyloid fibrils, the structures commonly associated with Alzheimer's disease and glutamine repeat diseases such as Huntington's disease. Building on previous single-conformation data on Gln-containing peptides containing an aromatic cap on the N-terminus (Z-Gln-OH and Z-Gln-NHMe), we present here single-conformation UV and IR spectra of Ac-Gln-NHBn and Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn, with its C-terminal benzyl cap. These results point towards side-chain to backbone hydrogen bonds dominating the structures observed in the cold, isolated environment of a molecular beam. We have identified and assigned three main conformers for Ac-Gln-NHBn all involving primary side-chain to backbone interactions. Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn extends the peptide chain by one amino acid, but affords an improvement in the conformational flexibility. Despite this increase in the flexibility, only a single conformation is observed in the gas-phase: a structure which makes use of both side-chain-to-backbone and backbone-to-backbone hydrogen bonds.

  15. Incorporating backbone flexibility in MedusaDock improves ligand-binding pose prediction in the CSAR2011 docking benchmark.

    PubMed

    Ding, Feng; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2013-08-26

    Solution of the structures of ligand-receptor complexes via computational docking is an integral step in many structural modeling efforts as well as in rational drug discovery. A major challenge in ligand-receptor docking is the modeling of both receptor and ligand flexibilities in order to capture receptor conformational changes induced by ligand binding. In the molecular docking suite MedusaDock, both ligand and receptor side chain flexibilities are modeled simultaneously with sets of discrete rotamers, where the ligand rotamer library is generated "on the fly" in a stochastic manner. Here, we introduce backbone flexibility into MedusaDock by implementing ensemble docking in a sequential manner for a set of distinct receptor backbone conformations. We generate corresponding backbone ensembles to capture backbone changes upon binding to different ligands, as observed experimentally. We develop a simple clustering and ranking approach to select the top poses as blind predictions. We applied our method in the CSAR2011 benchmark exercise. In 28 out of 35 cases (80%) where the ligand-receptor complex structures were released, we were able to predict near-native poses (<2.5 Å RMSD), the highest success rate reported for CSAR2011. This result highlights the importance of modeling receptor backbone flexibility to the accurate docking of ligands to flexible targets. We expect a broad application of our fully flexible docking approach in biological studies as well as in rational drug design. PMID:23237273

  16. Oligo(p-phenylene-ethynylene)s with backbone conformation controlled by competitive intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Yan, Qifan; Zhao, Dahui

    2011-06-14

    A series of conjugated oligo(p-phenylene-ethynylene) (OPE) molecules with backbone conformations (that is, the relative orientations of the contained phenylene units) controlled by competitive intramolecular hydrogen bonds to be either co-planar or random were synthesised and studied. In these oligomers, carboxylate and amido substituents were attached to alternate phenylene units in the OPE backbone. These functional groups were able to form intramolecular hydrogen bonds between neighbouring phenylene units. Thereby, all phenylene units in the backbone were confined in a co-planar conformation. This planarised structure featured a more extended effective conjugation length than that of regular OPEs with phenylene units adopting random orientation due to a low rotational-energy barrier. However, if a tri(ethylene glycol) (Tg) side chain was appended to the amido group, it enabled another type of intramolecular hydrogen bond, formed by the Tg chain folding back and the contained ether oxygen atom competing with the ester carbonyl group as the hydrogen-bond acceptor. The outcome of this competition was proven to depend on the length of the alkylene linker joining the ether oxygen atom to the amido group. Specifically, if the Tg chain folded back to form a five-membered cyclic structure, this hydrogen-bonding motif was sufficiently robust to overrule the hydrogen bonds between adjacent phenylene units. Consequently, the oligomers assumed non-planar conformations. However, if the side chain formed a six-membered ring by hydrogen bonding with the amido NH group, such a motif was much less stable and yielded in the competition with the ester carbonyl group from the adjacent phenylene unit. Thus, the hydrogen bonds between the phenylene units remained, and the co-planar conformation was manifested. In our system, the hydrogen bonds formed by the back-folded Tg chain and amido NH group relied on a single oxygen atom as the hydrogen-bond acceptor. The additional oxygen

  17. Detecting pore-lining regions in transmembrane protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Alpha-helical transmembrane channel and transporter proteins play vital roles in a diverse range of essential biological processes and are crucial in facilitating the passage of ions and molecules across the lipid bilayer. However, the experimental difficulties associated with obtaining high quality crystals has led to their significant under-representation in structural databases. Computational methods that can identify structural features from sequence alone are therefore of high importance. Results We present a method capable of automatically identifying pore-lining regions in transmembrane proteins from sequence information alone, which can then be used to determine the pore stoichiometry. By labelling pore-lining residues in crystal structures using geometric criteria, we have trained a support vector machine classifier to predict the likelihood of a transmembrane helix being involved in pore formation. Results from testing this approach under stringent cross-validation indicate that prediction accuracy of 72% is possible, while a support vector regression model is able to predict the number of subunits participating in the pore with 62% accuracy. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first tool capable of identifying pore-lining regions in proteins and we present the results of applying it to a data set of sequences with available crystal structures. Our method provides a way to characterise pores in transmembrane proteins and may even provide a starting point for discovering novel routes of therapeutic intervention in a number of important diseases. This software is freely available as source code from: http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/downloads/memsat-svm/. PMID:22805427

  18. Structure analysis of the protein transduction domain of human Period1 and its mutant analogs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao Lin; Xie, Jun; Niu, Bo; Hu, Xiao Nian; Gao, Yang; Xiang, Qian; Zhang, Yue Hong; Guo, Yong; Zhang, Zheng Guo

    2005-04-01

    Human Period1 (hPer1) has been proved to be able to translocate into cells in a protein transduction manner. The segment of amino acids 830-845 of hPer1 is its protein transduction domain (PTD). In order to explore the membrane penetrating mechanism of hPer1-PTD and the physico-chemical properties necessary in the process, Ala scanning mutation method was used to investigate the variation in the peptide internalization. To further investigate the related physico-chemical requirements, the three dimensional structures of hPer1-PTD and its mutant analogs were simulated by Rosetta method. The electrostatic potentials and energies of these structures were calculated using the Delphi algorithm to solve Poisson-Boltzman equation. The hydrophobicity was assessed by the percentage of the nonpolar area in SAS (solvent accessible surface (SAS)). It has been proved that the Arg836 was the key residue for peptide internalization. When this Arg mutated into Ala, the peptide could not cross the membrane. The large enough area with positive charge was the decisive factor for hPer1-PTD. The alpha-helical structure seemed to play an assistant role so as to enable the positive charge connected in spatial arrangement. PMID:15781181

  19. The Plasmodium PHIST and RESA-Like Protein Families of Human and Rodent Malaria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Cristina K; Naissant, Bernina; Coppi, Alida; Bennett, Brandy L; Aime, Elena; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Janse, Chris J; Coppens, Isabelle; Sinnis, Photini; Templeton, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    The phist gene family has members identified across the Plasmodium genus, defined by the presence of a domain of roughly 150 amino acids having conserved aromatic residues and an all alpha-helical structure. The family is highly amplified in P. falciparum, with 65 predicted genes in the genome of the 3D7 isolate. In contrast, in the rodent malaria parasite P. berghei 3 genes are identified, one of which is an apparent pseudogene. Transcripts of the P. berghei phist genes are predominant in schizonts, whereas in P. falciparum transcript profiles span different asexual blood stages and gametocytes. We pursued targeted disruption of P. berghei phist genes in order to characterize a simplistic model for the expanded phist gene repertoire in P. falciparum. Unsuccessful attempts to disrupt P. berghei PBANKA_114540 suggest that this phist gene is essential, while knockout of phist PBANKA_122900 shows an apparent normal progression and non-essential function throughout the life cycle. Epitope-tagging of P. falciparum and P. berghei phist genes confirmed protein export to the erythrocyte cytoplasm and localization with a punctate pattern. Three P. berghei PEXEL/HT-positive exported proteins exhibit at least partial co-localization, in support of a common vesicular compartment in the cytoplasm of erythrocytes infected with rodent malaria parasites. PMID:27022937

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of conformation changes of HIV-1 regulatory protein on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Daohui; Li, Libo; He, Daohang; Zhou, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The fragment of viral protein R (Vpr), Vpr13-33, plays an important role in regulating nuclear importing of HIV genes through channel formation in which it adopts a leucine-zipper-like alpha-helical conformation. A recent experimental study reported that helical Vpr13-33 would transform to β-sheet or random coil structures and aggregate on the surface of graphene or graphene oxide through hydrophobic interactions. Due to experimental limitations, however, there is still a considerable lack of understanding on the adsorption dynamics at the early stage of the conformational transition at water-graphene interface and the underlying driving force at molecular level. In this study, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore the conformation transition phenomena. Vpr13-33 kept α-helical structure in solution, but changed to β-sheet structure when strongly adsorbed onto graphene. Preferential adsorption of Vpr13-33 on graphene is dominated by hydrophobic interactions. The cluster analysis identified the most significant populated conformation and the early stage of structure conversion from α-helical to β-sheet was found, but the full β-sheet propagation was not observed. Free energy landscape analysis further complemented the transformation analysis of peptide conformations. These findings are consistent with experimental results, and give a molecular level interpretation for the reduced cytotoxicity of Vpr13-33 to some extent upon graphene exposure. Meanwhile, this study provides some significant insights into the detailed mechanism of graphene-induced protein conformation transition.

  1. Structural Basis for dsRNA Recognition by NS1 Protein of Influenza A Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, A.; Wong, S; Yuan, Y

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are important human pathogens causing periodic pandemic threats. Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) protein of influenza A virus (NS1A) shields the virus against host defense. Here, we report the crystal structure of NS1A RNA-binding domain (RBD) bound to a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) at 1.7A. NS1A RBD forms a homodimer to recognize the major groove of A-form dsRNA in a length-independent mode by its conserved concave surface formed by dimeric anti-parallel alpha-helices. dsRNA is anchored by a pair of invariable arginines (Arg38) from both monomers by extensive hydrogen bonds. In accordance with the structural observation, isothermal titration calorimetry assay shows that the unique Arg38-Arg38 pair and two Arg35-Arg46 pairs are crucial for dsRNA binding, and that Ser42 and Thr49 are also important for dsRNA binding. Agrobacterium co-infiltration assay further supports that the unique Arg38 pair plays important roles in dsRNA binding in vivo.