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Sample records for alpha-particle inelastic scattering

  1. Alpha particle collective Thomson scattering in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Machuzak, J.S.; Woskov, P.P.; Rhee, D.Y.; Gilmore, J.; Bretz, N.L.; Park, H.K.; Aamodt, R.E.; Cheung, P.Y.; Russell, D.A.; Bindslev, H.

    1993-11-01

    A collective Thomson scattering diagnostic is being implemented on TFTR to measure alpha particle, energetic and thermal ion densities and velocity distributions. A 60 GHz, 0.1-1 kW gyrotron will be used as the transmitter source, and the scattering geometry will be perpendicular to the magnetic field in the extraordinary mode polarization. An enhanced scattered signal is anticipated from fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range with this scattering geometry. Millimeter wave collective Thomson scattering diagnostics have the advantage of larger scattering angles to decrease the amount of stray light, and long, high power, modulated pulses to obtain improved signal to noise through synchronous detection techniques.

  2. 8Be Direct Transfer in α+12C Inelastic Scattering and Signatures of the Alpha Particle Condensation in the NEAR-3α Threshold States of 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, T. L.; Demyanova, A. S.; Ogloblin, A. A.; Goncharov, S. A.

    The coupled reaction channels model calculations of the direct 8Be transfer in the α+12C elastic and inelastic (to the 7.65 MeV 02^ + and the 9.65 MeV 31^ - states) scattering have been performed. It is shown that the cluster configuration with zero relative angular momentum dominates in 02^ + state being 4.4 times larger than that in the ground state. In the 31^ - state, a dominance of the p-orbital motion is found. The condensed properties are confirmed in the Hoyle state. The 3α exotic, but hardly a condensed structure of the 31^ - state is found.

  3. Inclusive inelastic scattering of heavy ions and nuclear correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Khandelwal, Govind S.

    1990-01-01

    Calculations of inclusive inelastic scattering distributions for heavy ion collisions are considered within the high energy optical model. Using ground state sum rules, the inclusive projectile and complete projectile-target inelastic angular distributions are treated in both independent particle and correlated nuclear models. Comparisons between the models introduced are made for alpha particles colliding with He-4, C-12, and O-16 targets and protons colliding with O-16. Results indicate that correlations contribute significantly, at small momentum transfers, to the inelastic sum. Correlation effects are hidden, however, when total scattering distributions are considered because of the dominance of elastic scattering at small momentum transfers.

  4. Inelastic Scattering Form Factors

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-01-01

    ATHENA-IV computes form factors for inelastic scattering calculations, using single-particle wave functions that are eigenstates of motion in either a Woods-Saxon potential well or a harmonic oscillator well. Two-body forces of Gauss, Coulomb, Yukawa, and a sum of cut-off Yukawa radial dependences are available.

  5. Scattering of 42 MeV alpha particles from copper-65

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, W. M.; Seth, K. K.

    1973-01-01

    Beams of 42-MeV alpha particles were elastically and inelastically scattered from Cu-65 in an attempt to excite states which may be described in terms of an excited core model. Angular distributions were measured for 17 excited states. Seven of the excited states had angular distributions similar to a core quadrupole excitation and eight of the excited states had angular distributions similar to a core octupole excitation. The excited state at 2.858 MeV had an angular distribution which suggests that it may have results from the particle coupling to a two-phonon core state. An extended particle-core coupling calculation was performed and the predicted energy levels and reduced transition probabilities compared to the experimental data. The low lying levels are described quite well and the wavefunctions of these states explain the large spectroscopic factors measured in stripping reactions. For Cu-65 the coupling of the particle to the core is no larger weak as in the simpler model, and configuration mixing results.

  6. Bose-Einstein condensation of {alpha} particles and Airy structure in nuclear rainbow scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2004-10-01

    It is shown that the dilute density distribution of {alpha} particles in nuclei can be observed in the Airy structure in nuclear rainbow scattering. We have analyzed {alpha}+{sup 12}C rainbow scattering to the 0{sub 2}{sup +} (7.65 MeV) state of {sup 12}C in a coupled-channel method with the precise wave functions for {sup 12}C. It is found that the enhanced Airy oscillations in the experimental angular distributions for the 0{sub 2}{sup +} state is caused by the dilute density distribution of this state in agreement for the idea of Bose-Einstein condensation of the three alpha particles.

  7. Role of channel coupling and deuteron-exchange mechanisms in anomalous alpha-particle scattering on {sup 6}Li

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuta, S. B.; Artemov, S.V.; Burtebaev, N.; Kerimkulov, Zh.; Novatsky, B. G.; Stepanov, D.N.; Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2009-12-15

    A unified description of existing experimental data on alpha-particle scattering by {sup 6}Li over the broad energy range from 18 to 166 MeV was obtained with allowance for channel-coupling effects and mechanisms involving the exchange of a deuteron cluster. Angular distributions were analyzed on the basis of the optical model and the coupled reaction channels method. It was shown that the inclusion of channel coupling and the contributions from one- and two-step exchangemechanismsmakes it possible to describe special features of the behavior of differential cross sections for both elastic and inelastic scattering in a full energy range. Optimum values found for the parameters of optical potentials agree with the parameters of the global potential proposed previously for nuclei in the mass region A > 12.

  8. Alpha particle condensation in {sup 12}C and nuclear rainbow scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2008-05-12

    It is shown that the large radius of the Hoyle state of {sup 12}C with a dilute density distribution in an {alpha} particle condensate can be clearly seen in the shift of the rainbow angle (therefore the Airy minimum) to a larger angle in {alpha}+{sup 12}C rainbow scattering at the high energy region and prerainbow oscillations in {sup 3}He+{sup 12}C scattering at the lower energy region.

  9. Channel coupling and exchange of an alpha-particle cluster in deuteron scattering on {sup 6}Li nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuta, S. B.; Burtebaev, N.; Artemov, S. V.; Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2012-07-15

    Existing experimental data on elastic and inelastic deuteron scattering on {sup 6}Li nuclei in the energy range from 8 to 50 MeV were analyzed within the approach of coupled reaction channels. The coupling of elastic scattering and inelastic scattering accompanied by the transition to the 3{sup +} state at E{sub x} 2.186 MeV and the mechanism involving the exchange of an alpha-particle cluster were taken into account in respective calculations. The phenomenological potentials obtained from the present analysis describe well experimental angular distributions at all energies and in full angular ranges. The depths of the real and imaginary parts of the potentials in question depend smoothly on energy at fixed values of the remaining parameters. The energy dependence of relevant volume integrals agrees well with similar data for the p + {sup 6}Li, {alpha} + {sup 6}Li, and {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C systems and with the predictions of a microscopic theory.

  10. Alpha Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Term that is sometimes used to describe a helium nucleus, a positively charged particle that consists of two protons and two neutrons, bound together. Alpha particles, which were discovered by Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) in 1898, are emitted by atomic nuclei that are undergoing alpha radioactivity. During this process, an unstable heavy nucleus spontaneously emits an alpha particle and transmut...

  11. Optical Model Potential Parameters for p, d, {sup 3}He and Alpha-Particle Scattering on Lithium Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Burtebayev, N.; Nassurlla, Marzhan; Nassurlla, Maulen; Kerimkulov, Zh. K.; Sakuta, S. B.

    2008-11-11

    Analysis of the p, d, {sup 3}He and {alpha}-particles elastic scattering on the {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li nuclei has been done in the framework of the optical model at the beam energies up to 72 MeV. It was shown that the account of the cluster exchange mechanism together with the potential scattering allow reproducing the experimental cross-sections in the whole angular range.

  12. Deep and shallow inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Heather

    2015-05-15

    In this session we focused on the higher energy deep and shallow inelastic particle interactions, DIS and SIS. DIS interactions occur when the energy of the incident particle beam is so large that the beam is able to penetrate the nucleons inside of the target nuclei. These interactions occur at the smallest level possible, that of the quark-gluon, or parton, level. SIS interactions occur in an intermediate energy range, just below the energy required for DIS interactions. The DIS cross section formula contains structure functions that describe our understanding of the underlying parton structure of nature. The full description of DIS interactions requires three structure functions: two may be measured in charged lepton or neutrino scattering, but one can only be extracted from neutrino DIS data. There are reasons to expect that the impact of nuclear effects could be different for neutrinos engaging in the DIS interaction, vs those felt by leptons. In fact, fits by the nCTEQ collaboration have found that the neutrino-Fe structure functions appear to differ from those extracted from lepton scattering data [1]. To better understand the global picture of DIS and SIS, we chose a three-pronged attack that examined recent experimental results, data fits, and latest theory predictions. Experimental results from neutrino and lepton scattering, as well as collider experiments, were presented.

  13. Multiple Scattering Theory for Inelastic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, V. M.; Shabelski, Yu. M.

    The review is devoted to the description of inelastic interactions of composite systems in the framework of the multiple scattering approach. Quasielastic scattering and multiple hadron production processes are considered for hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies. We show that important information on inelastic processes follows on very general grounds from the classification of various intermediate states in the elastic amplitude, as similarly AGK cutting rules arise for reggeon diagrams. Attention is mainly given to the appropriate technique, which is illustrated with several examples of increasing complexity. The general formalism for the inelastic screening corrections is presented and its particular applications to various reactions. The review does not aim at the systematic study of numerous versions of the multiple scattering calculus confronting each other and to the extensive experimental data. Instead, we concentrate on a few simple examples to make clear the underlying physics and to work out the needed machinery employed in practical calculations.

  14. Inelastic Neutron Scattering from Glass Formers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchenau, U.

    Neutron spectra below and above the glass transition temperature show a pronounced difference between strong and fragile glass formers in Angell's fragility scheme. The strong anharmonic increase of the inelastic scattering with increasing temperature in fragile substances is absent in the strongest glass former SiO2. That difference is reflected in the temperature dependence of Brillouin sound velocities above the glass transition. Coherent inelastic neutron scattering data indicate a mixture of sound waves and local modes at the low frequency boson peak. A relation between the fragility and the temperature dependence of the transverse hypersound velocity at the glass temperature is derived.

  15. Nuclear sizes of /sup 40,42,44,48/Ca from elastic scattering of 104 MeV alpha particles. I. Experimental results and optical potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Gils, H.J.; Friedman, E.; Rebel, H.; Buschmann, J.; Zagromski, S.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Neumann, B.; Pesl, R.; Bechtold, G.

    1980-04-01

    Differential cross sections for elastic scattering of 104 MeV ..cap alpha.. particles from /sup 40,42,44,48/Ca have been measured with high angular accuracy over a wide angular range. Optical model analysis based on a Fourier-Bessel description of the real potential reveals isotopic differences which, in particular for /sup 48/Ca, indicate a small neutron skin.

  16. Neutron inelastic scattering by amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Thaper, C.L.; Sinha, S.K.; Dasannacharya, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments on normal, N-deuterated glycine, normal and N-deuterated alanine, L-valine, L-tyrosine and, L-phenylalanine at 100 K, are reported. Coupling of the external modes to different hydrogens is discussed.

  17. Parity violation in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Souder, P.

    1994-04-01

    AA beam of polarized electrons at CEBAF with an energy of 8 GeV or more will be useful for performing precision measurements of parity violation in deep inelastic scattering. Possible applications include precision tests of the Standard Model, model-independent measurements of parton distribution functions, and studies of quark correlations.

  18. Deep Inelastic Scattering at the Amplitude Level

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2005-08-04

    The deep inelastic lepton scattering and deeply virtual Compton scattering cross sections can be interpreted in terms of the fundamental wavefunctions defined by the light-front Fock expansion, thus allowing tests of QCD at the amplitude level. The AdS/CFT correspondence between gauge theory and string theory provides remarkable new insights into QCD, including a model for hadronic wavefunctions which display conformal scaling at short distances and color confinement at large distances.

  19. Deep inelastic scattering near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Gehring, J.; Back, B.; Chan, K.

    1995-08-01

    Deep inelastic scattering was recently observed in heavy ion reactions at incident energies near and below the Coulomb barrier. Traditional models of this process are based on frictional forces and are designed to predict the features of deep inelastic processes at energies above the barrier. They cannot be applied at energies below the barrier where the nuclear overlap is small and friction is negligible. The presence of deep inelastic scattering at these energies requires a different explanation. The first observation of deep inelastic scattering near the barrier was in the systems {sup 124,112}Sn + {sup 58,64}Ni by Wolfs et al. We previously extended these measurements to the system {sup 136}Xe + {sup 64}Ni and currently measured the system {sup 124}Xe + {sup 58}Ni. We obtained better statistics, better mass and energy resolution, and more complete angular coverage in the Xe + Ni measurements. The cross sections and angular distributions are similar in all of the Sn + Ni and Xe + Ni systems. The data are currently being analyzed and compared with new theoretical calculations. They will be part of the thesis of J. Gehring.

  20. Sivers effect in semiinclusive deeply inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.C.; Efremov, A. V.; Goeke, K.; Menzel, S.; Metz, A.; Schweitzer, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Sivers function is extracted from HERMES data on single spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering. Our analysis use a simple Gaussian model for the distribution of transverse parton momenta, together with the flavor dependence given by the leading 1/N{sub c} approximation and a neglect of the Sivers antiquark distribution. We find that within the errors of the data these approximations are sufficient.

  1. Deep Inelastic Scattering and Related Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostini, G.; Nigro, A.

    1997-03-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Organization * Foreword * Welcome Address * PLENARY SESSION: "From Paris to Rome" * Deep Inelastic Physics with H1 * Recent Results from ZEUS * Overview of the Status of Polarised Structure Functions * Quarks and Gluons at Hadron Colliders * Deep Inelastic Scattering - Theory and Phenomenology * WORKING GROUP 1: Structure Functions * Inclusive Jet Cross Section Measurement at CDF * Measurement of Direct Photons by the DØ Experiment * MRS Parton Distributions * Global QCD Analysis, the Gluon Distribution, and High Et Inclusive Jet Data * F2 Measurement and QCD Analysis on 94 H1 Data * The ZEUS 1994 F2 Measurement * Measurement of the Total γ*p Cross Section at very Low x and Q2 at HERA * New Results on F2 Structure Functions * Proton Structure Function and Gluon Distribution Functions from Fermilab Experiment E665 * The Transition from the Photoproduction to the DIS Region * The BFKL Pomeron: Can It Be Detected? * BFKL/CCFM Phenomenology * Physics and Mathematics of Dynamical Partons * k⊥-Factorization and Perturbative Invariants at Small x * Double Scaling Violations * On the Asymptotic Behaviour of F2(x, Q2) * Double Logarithmic Scaling of F2 * Differential Charged Current Cross-Sections at HERA * Neutral Current ep Deep Inelastic Scattering at High Q2 and Limits on New Physics * Charm Production in Charged-Current DIS and Extraction of the Strange Sea Density * Extraction of the Gluon Density * On Problems in Extracting the Gluon Density from the Nucleon Structure Function Measurements * Inclusive Measurement of the Strong Coupling at HERA * A Measurement of R = σL/σT in Deep Inelastic Neutrino-Nucleon Scattering at the Tevatron * A Measurement of R = σL/σT in Deep Inelastic μ - p and μ - d Scattering * A Determination of the Longitudinal Proton Structure Function FL(x, Q2) at Low x at HERA * Prospects for Measuring R = σL/σT at HERA in 1966 Low-Energy Running * A Leading Order, in ln(1/x) as well as

  2. On rainbow scattering in inelastic molecular collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Lowell D.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this letter is to call attention to a growing misinterpretation in the literature on rainbow scattering in inelastic molecular collisions. The importance of rainbow structures in the angular distributions of elastic scattering cross sections is well established. However, use of approximate cross section formulas has led to an incorrect classification of the types of rainbows which are possible. Actually, however, it is possible to identify two classes of rainbows. If the relevant distributions and classifications are clearly stated, there should be little chance of confusion,

  3. Inelastic electron scattering from a moving nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, S.E.; Griffioen, K.

    1994-04-01

    The authors propose to measure inelastically scattered electrons in coincidence with spectator protons emitted backwards relative to the virtual photon direction in the reaction d(e, e{prime}p{sub s})X. In a simple spectator model, the backward proton has equal and opposite momentum to the neutron before it is struck, allowing the authors to study the dependence on kinematics and off-shell behaviour of the electron-nucleon inelastic cross section. If the photon couples to a quark in a 6-quark bag, a different dependence of the cross section on the kinematic variables (x, Q{sup 2}, and p{sub s}) can be observed. This proposed experiment requires large acceptance and beam energies above 6 GeV. It is ideally suited for the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS).

  4. A New Polyethylene Scattering Law Determined Using Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lavelle, Christopher M; Liu, C; Stone, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    Monte Carlo neutron transport codes such as MCNP rely on accurate data for nuclear physics cross-sections to produce accurate results. At low energy, this takes the form of scattering laws based on the dynamic structure factor, S (Q, E). High density polyethylene (HDPE) is frequently employed as a neutron moderator at both high and low temperatures, however the only cross-sections available are for T =300 K, and the evaluation has not been updated in quite some time. In this paper we describe inelastic neutron scattering measurements on HDPE at 5 and 300 K which are used to improve the scattering law for HDPE. We describe the experimental methods, review some of the past HDPE scattering laws, and compare computations using these models to the measured S (Q, E). The total cross-section is compared to available data, and the treatment of the carbon secondary scatterer as a free gas is assessed. We also discuss the use of the measurement itself as a scattering law via the 1 phonon approximation. We show that a scattering law computed using a more detailed model for the Generalized Density of States (GDOS) compares more favorably to this experiment, suggesting that inelastic neutron scattering can play an important role in both the development and validation of new scattering laws for Monte Carlo work.

  5. ITER Plasma at Ion Cyclotron Frequency Domain: The Fusion Alpha Particles Diagnostics Based on the Stimulated Raman Scattering of Fast Magnetosonic Wave off High Harmonic Ion Bernstein Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-10-01

    A novel method for alpha particle diagnostics is proposed. The theory of stimulated Raman scattering, SRS, of the fast wave and ion Bernstein mode, IBM, turbulence in multi-ion species plasmas, (Stefan University Press, La Jolla, CA, 2008). is utilized for the diagnostics of fast ions, (4)He (+2), in ITER plasmas. Nonlinear Landau damping of the IBM on fast ions near the plasma edge leads to the space-time changes in the turbulence level, (inverse alpha particle channeling). The space-time monitoring of the IBM turbulence via the SRS techniques may prove efficient for the real time study of the fast ion velocity distribution function, spatial distribution, and transport. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., La Jolla, CA 92037.

  6. Inelastic magnetic X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzman, P. M.; Tzoar, N.

    1985-04-01

    The theory of magnetic X-ray scattering is used to discuss the possibilities for employing inelastic scattering to probe the magnetic properties of condensed matter systems. In particular, it is shown how the interference between the nonmagnetic (Compton) and magnetic scattering arising from the use of circularly polarized X-rays is absolutely essential in such experiments. The very beautiful preliminary experiments by Sakai and Ono (1976) on Fe which use circularly polarized Moessbauer gamma-rays will be discussed. They already show the sensitivity of the technique to the 'magnetic form factor'. In addition, the physics of a unique quarter wave plate employed in obtaining circularly polarized X-rays is considered, and the implications of this advance for doing such experiments on existing synchrotron X-ray sources are discussed.

  7. Inclusive Inelastic Electron Scattering from Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Fomin, Nadia

    2007-10-26

    Inclusive electron scattering from nuclei at large x and Q{sup 2} is the result of a reaction mechanism that includes both quasi-elastic scattering from nucleons and deep inelastic scattering from the quark consitituents of the nucleons. Data in this regime can be used to study a wide variety of topics, including the extraction of nuclear momentum distributions, the infiuence of final state interactions and the approach to y-scaling, the strength of nucleon-nucleon correlations, and the approach to x-scaling, to name a few. Selected results from the recent experiment E02-019 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will be shown and their relevance discussed.

  8. Inelastic Scattering Of Electrons By Protons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cone, A. A.; Chen, K. W.; Dunning, J. R. Jr.; Hartwig, G.; Ramsey, N. F.; Walker, J. K.; Wilson, R.

    1966-12-01

    The inelastic scattering of electrons by protons has been measured at incident electron energies up to 5 BeV/c and momentum transfers q{sup 2}=4(BeV/c){sup 2}. Excitation of known nucleon resonances at M=1238, 1512, 1688 and possibly 1920 MeV have been observed. The calculations for the resonance at M=1238 MeV have been compared with calculations by Adler based on the dispersion theory of Chew, Goldberger, Low and Nambu. The agreement is good. Qualitative models are discussed for the other resonances.

  9. Inelastic scattering of atoms in a double well

    SciTech Connect

    Annibale, E. S.; Fialko, O.; Ziegler, K.

    2011-04-15

    We study a mixture of two light spin-1/2 fermionic atoms and two heavy atoms in a double-well potential. Inelastic scattering processes between both atomic species excite the heavy atoms and renormalize the tunneling rate and the interaction of the light atoms (polaron effect). The effective interaction of the light atoms changes its sign and becomes attractive for strong inelastic scattering. This is accompanied by a crossing of the energy levels from singly occupied sites at weak inelastic scattering to a doubly occupied and an empty site for stronger inelastic scattering. We are able to identify the polaron effect and the level crossing in the quantum dynamics.

  10. GiBUU and shallow inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lalakulich, O.; Mosel, U.

    2015-05-15

    In this talk we shortly describe the physics contents of the GiBUU transport code, used to describe lepton scattering off nuclei. Particular attention will be given to validation of the GiBUU in pion-, electron- and photon-induced reactions, which serve as a benchmark for neutrino-induced ones. We mainly concentrate on those properties of benchmark reactions, which are relevant to the region of Shallow Inelastic Scattering (SIS). Our results in this region are presented for integrated and differential cross sections. Comparison with recent MINOS inclusive data, as well as predictions for the differential cross sections measurable in Minerνa and NoνA experiments are made.

  11. Intrinsic radial sensitivity of nucleon inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J. J.

    1988-02-01

    A linear expansion analysis of the folding model transition amplitude is used to study the intrinsic sensitivity of the inelastic scattering of intermediate energy nucleons to the radial form of the neutron transition density, given known proton transition densities from electron scattering. Realistic density-dependent effective interactions are used to construct pseudodata. These pseudodata are then reanalyzed and the error matrix is used to calculate an error band for the radial transition density. This approach reveals the sensitivity of the extracted transition density to absorption, medium modifications of the interaction, and the extent and quality of the data in a manner that is largely free of the residual inaccuracies in reaction theory that complicate the analysis of real data. We find that the intrinsic radial sensitivity of nucleon inelastic scattering is best for projectile energies between 200 and 500 MeV, but is adequate to resolve the radial dependence of neutron transition densities even in the interior of heavy nuclei throughout the energy regime 100-800 MeV. We have also compared our method with scale-factor analyses which assume proportionality between neutron and proton densities. For states whose transition densities are similar in the surface, we find scaling to be accurate at the 20% level. However, for light nuclei substantial deviations beyond the first peak of the differential cross section reveal sensitivity to shape differences. This sensitivity is reduced for heavy nuclei. The model dependence of radial densities is also studied. A high-q constraint is used to analyze the contribution of incompleteness error to the deduced error bands and to reduce the model dependence.

  12. Nuclear sizes of /sup 40,42,44,48/Ca from elastic scattering of 104 MeV alpha particles. II. Nuclear density distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Gils, H.J.; Friedman, E.; Majka, Z.; Rebel, H.

    1980-04-01

    The elastic scattering of 104 MeV ..cap alpha.. particles from /sup 40,42,44,48/Ca has been analyzed by a single-folding model with a density-dependent effective interaction. Nuclear density distributions have been extracted using various descriptions including Fourier-Bessel series which distinctly reduces the model dependence of the results and enables realistic estimates of errors. Differences of the density shapes of the Ca isotopes are well determined showing evidence for a neutron skin in /sup 48/Ca. The resulting root mean square radii are compared to the results obtained from other methods. The sensitivity and limitations of various methods are discussed.

  13. Field-theoretical description of deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, B.; Robaschik, D.; Wieczorek, E.

    1980-01-01

    The most important theoretical notions concerning deep inelastic scattering are reviewed. Topics discussed are the model-independent approach, which is based on the general principles of quantum field theory, the application of quantum chromodynamics to deep inelastic scattering, approaches based on the quark--parton model, the light cone algebra, and conformal invariance, and also investigations in the framework of perturbation theory.

  14. High energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.; Moncton, D.E.; Fujii

    1984-01-01

    A brief review is presented of various aspects of high energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering based on synchrotron sources. We show what kinematical advantages are provided by the photon probe and propose mirror and monochromator designs to achieve an optically efficient beam line for inelastic x-ray scattering.

  15. Medical applications of neutron inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, Joseph J.; Banuk-Waitekus, Anathea; Valtuena, Silvia; Sheahan, Charles A.

    1999-10-01

    A sealed, D-T, pulsed neutron generator is used for the in vivo measurement of body carbon and oxygen by neutron inelastic scattering. The generator is operated at 10 KHz, at a neutron output of about 2 X 107 n/s/4(pi) . Gamma ray spectra are collected with two B4Ge3O12 crystal detectors. The measurements are used to measure fat and lean content and distribution in the body, with minimal radiation exposure (0.08 mSv). When combined with other measurements (such as total body potassium), this whole body scanning device provides us with the `quality of lean mass', a measurable outcome of treatments designed to improve nutritional status and function. The method is used in studies of human nutrition and for assessing the efficacy of new anti-obesity and anti-cachexia pharmaceuticals.

  16. Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of Mn

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Y.; Sarachik, M.P.; Friedman, J.R.; Robinson, R.A.; Kelley, T.M.; Nakotte, H.; Christianson, A.C.; Trouw, F.; Aubin, S.M.J.; Hendrickson, D.N.

    1998-11-09

    The authors report zero-field inelastic neutron scattering experiments on a 14-gram deuterated sample of Mn{sub 12}-Acetate consisting of a large number of identical spin-10 magnetic clusters. Their resolution enables them to see a series of peaks corresponding to transitions between the anisotropy levels within the spin-10 manifold. A fit to the spin Hamiltonian H = {minus}DS{sub z}{sup 2} + {mu}{sub B}B{center_dot}g{center_dot}S-BS{sub z}{sup 4} + C(S{sub +}{sup 4} + S{sub {minus}}{sup 4}) yields an anisotropy constant D = (0.54 {+-} 0.02) K and a fourth-order diagonal anisotropy coefficient B = (1.2 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup {minus}3}K. Unlike EPR measurements, their experiments do not require a magnetic field and yield parameters that do not require knowledge of the g-value.

  17. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  18. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  19. Inelastic neutron scattering in valence fluctuation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jon M Lawrence

    2011-02-15

    The valence fluctuation compounds are rare earth intermetallics where hybridization of the nearly-localized 4f electrons with the conduction electrons leads to incorporation of the 4f's into the itinerant states. This hybridization slows down the conduction electrons and hence gives them a heavy effective mass, justifying application of the term 'heavy Fermion' (HF) to these materials. During the project period, we grew large single crystals of several such compounds and measured their properties using both standard thermodynamic probes and state-of-the-art inelastic neutron scattering. We obtained three main results. For the intermediate valence compounds CePd{sub 3} and YbAl{sub 3}, we showed that the scattering of neutrons by the fluctuations of the 4f magnetic moment does not have the momentum dependence expected for the itinerant heavy mass state; rather, the scattering is more typical of a localized spin fluctuation. We believe that incoherent scattering localizes the excitation. For the heavy Fermion compound Ce(Ni{sub 0.935}Pd{sub 0.065}){sub 2}Ge{sub 2}, which sits at a T = 0 critical point for transformation into an antiferromagnetic (AF) phase, we showed that the scattering from the AF fluctuations does not exhibit any of the divergences that are expected at a phase transition. We speculate that alloy disorder profoundly suppresses the growth of the fluctuating AF regions, leading to short range clusters rather than regions of infinite size. Finally, we explored the applicability of key concepts used to describe the behavior of rare earth heavy Fermions to uranium based HF compounds where the 5f electrons are itinerant as opposed to localized. We found that scaling laws relating the spin fluctuation energy measured in neutron scattering to the low temperature specific heat and susceptibility are valid for the uranium compounds, once corrections are made for AF fluctuations; however, the degeneracy of the high temperature moment is smaller than expected

  20. Pion inelastic scattering from sup 20 Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Burlein, M. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-12-01

    Angular distributions for {sup 20}Ne({pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}{prime}) were measured on the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer (EPICS) at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). Data were taken with both {pi}{sup {plus}} and {pi}{sup {minus}} over an angular range of 12{degree} to 90{degree} for T{sub {pi}}=180 MeV and with {pi}{sup +} from 15{degree} to 90{degree} for T{sub {pi}}=120 MeV. The data were analyzed using both the distorted-wave impulse approximation (DWIA) and the coupled-channels impulse approximation (CCIA) with collective transition densities. In addition, microscopic transition densities were used in the DWIA analysis for states in the lowest rotational bands. The transitions to the 6.73-MeV 0{sup +} and several 1{sup {minus}} states, including the states at 5.79 MeV and 8.71 MeV, were studied using several models for the transition density. Strong evidence for the importance of two-step routes in pion inelastic scattering was seen in several angular distributions, including the 5.79-MeV 1{sup {minus}}, the first three 4{sup +} states, and the 8.78-MeV 6{sup +}. 100 refs., 81 figs., 33 tabs.

  1. Hard diffraction and deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    Since the advent of hard-collision physics, the study of diffractive processes - shadow physics - has been less prominent than before. However, there is now a renewed interest in the subject, especially in that aspect which synthesizes the short-distance, hard-collision phenomena with the classical physics of large rapidity-gaps. This is especially stimulated by the recent data on deep-inelastic scattering from HERA, as well as the theoretical work which relates to it. The word diffraction is sometimes used by high-energy physicists in a loose way. The author defines this term to mean: A diffractive process occurs if and only if there is a large rapidity gap in the produced-particle phase space which is not exponentially suppressed. Here a rapidity gap means essentially no hadrons produced into the rapidity gap (which operates in the {open_quotes}lego{close_quotes} phase-space of pseudo-rapidity and azimuthal angle). And non-exponential suppression implies that the cross-section for creating a gap with width {Delta}{eta} does not have a power-law decrease with increasing subenergy s=e{sup {Delta}{eta}}, but behaves at most like some power of pseudorapidity {Delta}{eta}{approx}log(s). The term hard diffraction shall simply refer to those diffractive process which have jets in the final-state phase-space.

  2. Alpha-particle diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will focus on the state of development of diagnostics which are expected to provide the information needed for {alpha}- physics studies in the future. Conventional measurement of detailed temporal and spatial profiles of background plasma properties in DT will be essential for such aspects as determining heating effectiveness, shaping of the plasma profiles and effects of MHD, but will not be addressed here. This paper will address (1) the measurement of the neutron source, and hence {alpha}-particle birth profile, (2) measurement of the escaping {alpha}-particles and (3) measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles over their full energy range. There will also be a brief discussion of (4) the concerns about instabilities being generated by {alpha}-particles and the methods necessary for measuring these effects. 51 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Deep inelastic lepton scattering from nucleons and nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.

    1986-02-01

    A pedagogical review is presented of results obtained from inclusive deep inelastic scattering of leptons from nucleons and nuclei, with particular emphasis on open questions to be explored in future experiments.

  4. Elastic and inelastic scattering of He atoms from Bi(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamtögl, A.; Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, M.; Balak, N.; Ernst, W. E.; Rieder, K. H.

    2010-08-01

    Elastic and inelastic scattering of helium atoms has been used to study the Bi(111) surface. Sharp diffraction peaks are found with results in excellent agreement with previous structure determinations of the Bi(111) surface. The rather large first order peaks with respect to the zero order peak indicate a stronger surface corrugation than observed in helium scattering from other metallic surfaces. Time-of-flight spectra of scattered He atoms clearly reveal two inelastic scattering maxima, which allow a first report on phonon creation and annihilation events on the Bi(111) surface. An estimate of the group velocity shows that the phonon creation peak is likely to correspond to a Rayleigh mode.

  5. Azimuthal decorrelation of forward jets in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sabio Vera, Agustin; Schwennsen, Florian

    2008-01-01

    We study the azimuthal angle decorrelation of forward jets in deep inelastic scattering. We make predictions for this observable at HERA describing the high energy limit of the relevant scattering amplitudes with quasi-multi-Regge kinematics together with a collinearly-improved evolution kernel for multiparton emissions.

  6. Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes

    SciTech Connect

    Clauser, C. F. Farengo, R.

    2015-12-15

    Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes in a magnetized plasma is studied. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations are employed to show that this process can be very important in the pedestal-edge-SOL regions. This is the first study that presents clear evidence of the importance of atomic processes on the diffusion of alpha particles. A simple 1D model that includes inelastic collisions with plasma species, “cold” neutrals, and partially ionized species was employed. The code, which follows the exact particle orbits and includes the effect of inelastic collisions via a Monte Carlo type random process, runs on a graphic processor unit (GPU). The analytical and numerical results show excellent agreement when a uniform background (plasma and cold species) is assumed. The simulations also show that the gradients in the density of the plasma and cold species, which are large and opposite in the edge region, produce an inward flux of alpha particles. Calculations of the alpha particles flux reaching the walls or divertor plates should include these processes.

  7. Refinement of the Compton-Rayleigh scatter ratio method for use on the Mars Science Laboratory alpha particle X-ray spectrometer: II - Extraction of invisible element content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrett, Glynis M.; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; King, Penelope L.; Nield, Emily; O'Meara, Joanne M.; Pradler, Irina

    2016-02-01

    The intensity ratio C/R between Compton and Rayleigh scatter peaks of the exciting Pu L X-rays in the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) is strongly affected by the presence of very light elements such as oxygen which cannot be detected directly by the APXS. C/R values are determined along with element concentrations by fitting APXS spectra of geochemical reference materials (GRMs) with the GUAPX code. A quantity K is defined as the ratio between the C/R value determined by Monte Carlo simulation based on the measured element concentrations and the fitted C/R value from the spectrum. To ensure optimally accurate K values, the choice of appropriate GRMs is explored in detail, with attention paid to Rb and Sr, whose characteristic Kα X-ray peaks overlap the Pu Lα scatter peaks. The resulting relationship between the ratio K and the overall oxygen fraction is linear. This provides a calibration from which the concentration of additional light invisible constituents (ALICs) such as water may be estimated in unknown rock and conglomerate samples. Several GRMs are used as 'unknowns' in order to evaluate the accuracy of ALIC concentrations derived in this manner.

  8. Halo-independent methods for inelastic dark matter scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bozorgnia, Nassim; Schwetz, Thomas; Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Zupan, Jure E-mail: juan.a.herrero@uv.es E-mail: jure.zupan@cern.ch

    2013-07-01

    We present halo-independent methods to analyze the results of dark matter direct detection experiments assuming inelastic scattering. We focus on the annual modulation signal reported by DAMA/LIBRA and present three different halo-independent tests. First, we compare it to the upper limit on the unmodulated rate from XENON100 using (a) the trivial requirement that the amplitude of the annual modulation has to be smaller than the bound on the unmodulated rate, and (b) a bound on the annual modulation amplitude based on an expansion in the Earth's velocity. The third test uses the special predictions of the signal shape for inelastic scattering and allows for an internal consistency check of the data without referring to any astrophysics. We conclude that a strong conflict between DAMA/LIBRA and XENON100 in the framework of spin-independent inelastic scattering can be established independently of the local properties of the dark matter halo.

  9. Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Sokolov, D A; Huxley, A D; Kamenev, K V

    2011-07-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements typically require two orders of magnitude longer data collection times and larger sample sizes than neutron diffraction studies. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on pressurised samples are particularly challenging since standard high-pressure apparatus restricts sample volume, attenuates the incident and scattered beams, and contributes background scattering. Here, we present the design of a large volume two-layered piston-cylinder pressure cell with optimised transmission for inelastic neutron scattering experiments. The design and the materials selected for the construction of the cell enable its safe use to a pressure of 1.8 GPa with a sample volume in excess of 400 mm(3). The design of the piston seal eliminates the need for a sample container, thus providing a larger sample volume and reduced absorption. The integrated electrical plug with a manganin pressure gauge offers an accurate measurement of pressure over the whole range of operational temperatures. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by an inelastic neutron scattering study of UGe(2). PMID:21806195

  10. Inelastic x-ray scattering from phonons under multibeam conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosak, Alexey; Krisch, Michael

    2007-03-01

    We report on an experimental observation of a previously neglected multibeam contribution to the inelastic x-ray scattering cross section. Its manifestation is a substantial modification of the apparent phonon selection rules when two (or more) reciprocal lattice points are simultaneously intercepted by the Ewald sphere. The observed multibeam contributions can be treated semi-quantitatively in the frame of Renninger’s “simplest approach.” A few corollaries, relevant for experimental work on inelastic scattering from phonons, are presented.

  11. Model for alpha particle induced nuclear reactions: /sup 93/Nb(. cap alpha. ,x. cap alpha. ypzn) from 40--140 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Gadioli, E.; Gadioli-Erba, E.; Hogan, J.J.; Jacak, B.V.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive model is introduced for alpha particle induced nuclear reactions. Five different mechanisms are examined and discussed. These include inelastic scattering of the incident alpha particle, nucleon pickup, binary fragmentation, dissolution of the alpha in the nuclear field, and preequilibrium processes initiated by alpha-nucleon collisions. A series of experiments was performed to measure the excitation functions of many nuclides produced from the irradiation of /sup 93/Nb by 40--140 MeV alpha particles. Together with alpha particle and proton spectra measured by other authors, these data form the basis of a test of the model introduced. A detailed analysis of the comparison between the calculated and experimental results, with particular emphasis on the interpretation of breakup processes, leads to the conclusion that breakup to four nucleons is preferred to the more commonly assumed binary fragmentation in that a much broader range of experimental data may be reproduced.

  12. Evidence for alpha-particle chain configurations in sup 24 Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Wuosmaa, A.H.; Betts, R.R.; Back, B.B.; Freer, M.; Glagola, B.G.; Happ, T.; Henderson, D.J.; Wilt, P. ); Bearden, I.G. )

    1992-03-02

    We have observed a strong peak in the excitation function for the inelastic scattering reaction {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{sup 12}C(0{sub 2}{sup +})){sup 12}C(0{sub 2}{sup +}) at an energy of {ital E}{sub c.m.}=32.5 MeV. A recoil coincidence arrangement between two double-sided silicon strip detectors was used to detect the {alpha} particles from the decaying {sup 12}C nuclei, and the reconstructed reaction kinematics were used to calculate the two-body scattering {ital Q} value. This excitation-function structure may be interpreted as arising from very highly deformed {alpha}-particle chain configurations in the nucleus {sup 24}Mg.

  13. Summary of Alpha Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1998-08-19

    This paper summarizes the talks on alpha particle transport which were presented at the 5th International Atomic Energy Agency's Technical Committee Meeting on "Alpha Particles in Fusion Research" held at the Joint European Torus, England in September 1997.

  14. Deep-inelastic muon scattering from nuclei with hadron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.; Jackson, H.; Kaufman, S.

    1995-08-01

    Deep-inelastic lepton scattering from nuclei provides a direct look at the quark structure of nuclear matter. These reactions revealed the first convincing evidence that the structure of nucleons is modified in the nuclear medium and had profound implications on the understanding of nuclear dynamics. FNAL experiment E665, using the 490-GeV muon beams at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, provides new information on the nuclear effects on nucleon properties by studying deep-inelastic muon scattering with coincident hadron detection. The high beam energy makes the experiment particularly suited to the study of the region of x < 0.1 (where x is the fraction of the momentum of the nucleon carried by the struck quark in the infinite momentum frame), and total center-of-mass hadronic energy > 25 GeV, where hard QCD processes are expected to become evident and there are little data from other deep-inelastic measurements.

  15. Alpha Particle Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Ray, K.

    2009-05-13

    The study of burning plasmas is the next frontier in fusion energy research, and will be a major objective of the U.S. fusion program through U.S. collaboration with our international partners on the ITER Project. For DT magnetic fusion to be useful for energy production, it is essential that the energetic alpha particles produced by the fusion reactions be confined long enough to deposit a significant fraction of their initial ~3.5 MeV energy in the plasma before they are lost. Development of diagnostics to study the behavior of energetic confined alpha particles is a very important if not essential part of burning plasma research. Despite the clear need for these measurements, development of diagnostics to study confined the fast confined alphas to date has proven extremely difficult, and the available techniques remain for the most part unproven and with significant uncertainties. Research under this grant had the goal of developing diagnostics of fast confined alphas, primarily based on measurements of the neutron and ion tails resulting from alpha particle knock-on collisions with the plasma deuterium and tritium fuel ions. One of the strengths of this approach is the ability to measure the alphas in the hot plasma core where the interesting ignition physics will occur.

  16. Benchmarking the inelastic neutron scattering soil carbon method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The herein described inelastic neutron scattering (INS) method of measuring soil carbon was based on a new procedure for extracting the net carbon signal (NCS) from the measured gamma spectra and determination of the average carbon weight percent (AvgCw%) in the upper soil layer (~8 cm). The NCS ext...

  17. In-situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is based on the emission of 4.43 MeV gamma rays from carbon nuclei excited by fast neutrons. This in-situ method has excellent potential for easily measuring soil carbon since it does not require soil core sampling and processing ...

  18. Energy dependence of pion inelastic scattering from sup 208 Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Oakley, D.S. Lewis and Clark College, Portland, Oregon ); Peterson, R.J. ); Seestrom, S.J.; Morris, C.L.; Plum, M.A. ); Zumbro, J.D. ); Williams, A.L.; Bryan, M.A.; McDonald, J.W.; Moore, C.F. )

    1991-11-01

    Differential cross sections were measured for pion elastic and inelastic scattering from {sup 208}Pb at {ital T}{sub {pi}}=120 and 250 MeV. Energy-dependent neutron- and proton-transition matrix elements for a range of excited states were extracted and tested for consistency, using several structure models.

  19. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering from molecules and atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, U.; Deslattes, R.D.; Miyano, K.E.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy is one of the most powerful methods for the understanding of the electronic structure of matter. We report here on fluorescence experiments in the 2 to 6 keV photon energy range using tunable synchrotron radiation and the resulting experimental programs on resonant inelastic scattering in atoms and on polarization measurements in resonant molecular excitations.

  20. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Studies of Electronic Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Kenji; Tohyama, Takami; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro

    2013-02-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) has developed into one of the most powerful momentum-resolved spectroscopies. Especially in the last decade, it has achieved significant progress utilizing brilliant x-rays from third-generation synchrotron radiation facilities. Simultaneously, theoretical efforts have been made to predict or interpret the experimental spectra. One of the scientific fields studied intensively by IXS is strongly correlated electron systems, where the interplay of charge, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom determines their physical properties. IXS can provide a new insight into the electron dynamics of the systems through the observation of charge, spin, and orbital excitations. Focusing on the momentum-resolved electronic excitations in strongly correlated electron systems, we review IXS studies and the present capabilities of IXS for the study of the dynamics of materials. With nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NIXS), one can directly obtain dynamical charge correlation and we discuss its complementary aspects with inelastic neutron scattering. NIXS also has a unique capability of measuring higher multipole transitions, which are usually forbidden in conventional optical absorption. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) is now established as a valuable tool for measuring charge, spin, and orbital excitations in a momentum-resolved manner. We describe RIXS works on cuprates in detail and show what kind of electronic excitations have been observed. We also discuss RIXS studies on other transition-metal compounds. Finally, we conclude with an outlook on IXS using next-generation x-ray sources.

  1. Inelastic electron scattering on C{sub 60} clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yabana, K.; Bertsch, G.F.

    1993-12-31

    We calculate the electronic excitation of C{sub 60} by inelastic electron scattering or electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The scattering process is treated in the distorted-wave Born approximation, and the electronic excitations are calculated in a spherical basis model. We find that low energy electrons excite some non-photoactive modes, in agreement with experiment. Spin triplet modes are poorly excited, even at the lowest electron energies.

  2. CHEMICAL APPLICATIONS OF INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    HAYASHI,H.; UDAGAWA,Y.; GILLET,J.M.; CALIEBE,W.A.; KAO,C.C.

    2001-08-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS), complementary to other more established inelastic scattering probes, such as light scattering, electron scattering, and neutron scattering, is becoming an important experimental technique in the study of elementary excitations in condensed matters. Over the past decade, IXS with total energy resolution of few meV has been achieved, and is being used routinely in the study of phonon dispersions in solids and liquids as well as dynamics in disordered and biological systems. In the study of electronic excitations, IXS with total energy resolution on the order of 100 meV to 1 eV is gaining wider applications also. For example, IXS has been used to study collective excitations of valence electrons, single electron excitations of valence electrons, as well as core electron excitations. In comparison with the alternative scattering techniques mentioned above, IXS has several advantages. First, IXS probes the full momentum transfer range of the dielectric response of the sample, whereas light scattering is limited to very small momentum transfers, and electron scattering suffers the effects of multiple scattering at large momentum transfers. Second, since IXS measures the bulk properties of the sample it is not surface sensitive, therefore it does not require special preparation of the sample. The greater flexibility in sample conditions and environments makes IXS an ideal probe in the study of liquids and samples under extreme temperature, pressure, and magnetic field. Third, the tunability of synchrotron radiation sources enables IXS to exploit element specificity and resonant enhancement of scattering cross sections. Fourth, IXS is unique in the study of dynamics of liquids and amorphous solids because it can probe the particular region of energy-momentum transfer phase space, which is inaccessible to inelastic neutron scattering. On the other hand, the main disadvantages of IXS are the small cross sections and the strong absorption of

  3. Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Paul

    2011-07-15

    Recent inclusive charged and neutral current scattering data from HERA are presented. Emphasis is placed on the resulting constraints on the proton parton densities and on the influence of low x proton structure on diffraction.

  4. The status of alpha-particle diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.; Johnson, D.W.

    1992-08-01

    There is a flurry of activity to complete alpha-particle diagnostics so that they can undergo some experimental testing in DT plasmas on JET or TFTR prior to implementation on ITER. Successful measurements of escaping charged fusion products have been made in DD plasmas, and the {alpha}-particle source can be well characterized by neutron profile measurement. These methods can be extrapolated to DT plasmas. Measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles requires a new technique. Collective Thomson scattering, methods involving charge-exchange interactions and nuclear reactions with impurities will be discussed. Some assessment is given of the capabilities of these techniques, bearing in mind the potential for their use in the physics phase of the ITER program.

  5. The status of alpha-particle diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.; Johnson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    There is a flurry of activity to complete alpha-particle diagnostics so that they can undergo some experimental testing in DT plasmas on JET or TFTR prior to implementation on ITER. Successful measurements of escaping charged fusion products have been made in DD plasmas, and the {alpha}-particle source can be well characterized by neutron profile measurement. These methods can be extrapolated to DT plasmas. Measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles requires a new technique. Collective Thomson scattering, methods involving charge-exchange interactions and nuclear reactions with impurities will be discussed. Some assessment is given of the capabilities of these techniques, bearing in mind the potential for their use in the physics phase of the ITER program.

  6. [Inelastic electron scattering from surfaces]. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This program uses ab-initio and multiple scattering to study surface dynamical processes; high-resolution electron-energy loss spectroscopy is used in particular. Off-specular excitation cross sections are much larger if electron energies are in the LEED range (50--300 eV). The analyses have been extended to surfaces of ordered alloys. Phonon eigenvectors and eigenfrequencies were used as inputs to electron-energy-loss multiple scattering cross section calculations. Work on low-energy electron and positron holography is mentioned.

  7. DEEPLY INELASTIC SCATTERING OFF NUCLEI AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    VENUGOPALAN, R.

    2001-09-14

    In this talk, we discussed the physics case for an eA collider. We emphasized the novel physics that might be studied at small x. The interesting physics at intermediate x's has been discussed elsewhere [3]. Plans for an electron-ion collider include, as a major part of the program, the possibility of doing polarized electron-polarized proton/light ion scattering. A discussion of the combined case for high energy electron nucleus and polarized electron-polarized proton scattering will be published separately [66].

  8. Inelastic light scattering from a Mott insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Oosten, D. van; Dickerscheid, D.B.M.; Farid, B.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Straten, P. van der

    2005-02-01

    We propose to use Bragg spectroscopy to measure the excitation spectrum of the Mott-insulator state of an atomic Bose gas in an optical lattice. We calculate the structure factor of the Mott insulator taking into account both the self-energy corrections of the atoms and the corresponding dressing of the atom-photon interaction. We determine the scattering rate of photons in the stimulated Raman transition and show that by measuring this scattering rate in an experiment, in particular, the excitation gap of the Mott insulator can be determined.

  9. Inelastic scattering at the B K edge of hexagonal BN

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, J.J.; Callcott, T.A.; Zhou, L.

    1997-04-01

    Many recent soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) studies have shown that inelastic scattering processes make important contributions to the observed spectra for excitation near the x-ray threshold. These effects are all attributed to a process, usually called an electronic Raman scattering (ERS) process, in which energy is lost to an electronic excitation. The theory has been described using second order perturbation theory by Tulkki and Aberg. In different materials, the detailed nature of the electronic excitation producing the energy loss may be very different. In crystalline Si, diamond and graphite, changes in spectral shape and dispersion of spectral features with variation of the excitation energy are observed, which are attributed to k conservation between the photoelectron generated in the excitation process and the valence hole remaining after the coupled emission process. Hence the process is strongly localized in k-space. In haxagonal boron nitride, which has a lattice and band structure very similar to graphite, inelastic scattering produces very different effects on the observed spectra. Here, the inelastic losses are coupled to a strong resonant elastic scattering process, in which the intermediate state is a localized core exciton and the final state is a localized valence exciton, so that the electronic excitation is strongly localized in real rather than reciprocal space.

  10. The interpretation of polycrystalline coherent inelastic neutron scattering from aluminium

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Daniel L.; Ross, D. Keith; Gale, Julian D.; Taylor, Jon W.

    2013-01-01

    A new approach to the interpretation and analysis of coherent inelastic neutron scattering from polycrystals (poly-CINS) is presented. This article describes a simulation of the one-phonon coherent inelastic scattering from a lattice model of an arbitrary crystal system. The one-phonon component is characterized by sharp features, determined, for example, by boundaries of the (Q, ω) regions where one-phonon scattering is allowed. These features may be identified with the same features apparent in the measured total coherent inelastic cross section, the other components of which (multiphonon or multiple scattering) show no sharp features. The parameters of the model can then be relaxed to improve the fit between model and experiment. This method is of particular interest where no single crystals are available. To test the approach, the poly-CINS has been measured for polycrystalline aluminium using the MARI spectrometer (ISIS), because both lattice dynamical models and measured dispersion curves are available for this material. The models used include a simple Lennard-Jones model fitted to the elastic constants of this material plus a number of embedded atom method force fields. The agreement obtained suggests that the method demonstrated should be effective in developing models for other materials where single-crystal dispersion curves are not available. PMID:24282332

  11. Modern Techniques for Inelastic Thermal Neutron Scattering Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawari, A. I.

    2014-04-01

    A predictive approach based on ab initio quantum mechanics and/or classical molecular dynamics simulations has been formulated to calculate the scattering law, S(κ⇀,ω), and the thermal neutron scattering cross sections of materials. In principle, these atomistic methods make it possible to generate the inelastic thermal neutron scattering cross sections of any material and to accurately reflect the physical conditions of the medium (i.e, temperature, pressure, etc.). In addition, the generated cross sections are free from assumptions such as the incoherent approximation of scattering theory and, in the case of solids, crystalline perfection. As a result, new and improved thermal neutron scattering data libraries have been generated for a variety of materials. Among these are materials used for reactor moderators and reflectors such as reactor-grade graphite and beryllium (including the coherent inelastic scattering component), silicon carbide, cold neutron media such as solid methane, and neutron beam filters such as sapphire and bismuth. Consequently, it is anticipated that the above approach will play a major role in providing the nuclear science and engineering community with its needs of thermal neutron scattering data especially when considering new materials where experimental information may be scarce or nonexistent.

  12. Deep inelastic scattering at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Gehring, J.; Rehm, K.E.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1993-10-01

    A large yield for a process that appears to have many of the features of deep inelastic scattering has been observed at energies, near the Coulomb barrier in the systems {sup 112,124}Sn + {sup 58}Ni by Wolfs et al. In order to better understand the mechanisms by which energy dissipation takes place close to the barrier, we have extended the measurements of Wolfs to the system {sup 136}Xe + {sup 64}Ni. The use of inverse kinematics in the present measurements resulted in better mass and energy resolution due to reduced target effects and in more complete angular coverage. We have obtained angular distributions, mass distributions, and total cross sections for deep inelastic scattering at two energies near the barrier. The results on the closed neutron shell nucleus {sup 136}Xe complement those from the closed proton shell Sn nuclei.

  13. Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitweg, J.; Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Pellegrino, A.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Abbiendi, G.; Anselmo, F.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; De Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Amelung, C.; Bornheim, A.; Brock, I.; Coböken, K.; Crittenden, J.; Deffner, R.; Hartmann, H.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Paul, E.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Wieber, H.; Bailey, D. S.; Barret, O.; Brook, N. H.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; McFall, J. D.; Piccioni, D.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Jeoung, H. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Ma, K. J.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Liu, W.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Sampson, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Klimek, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowalski, T.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Kotański, A.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Bienlein, J. K.; Burgard, C.; Dannheim, D.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Graciani, R.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hasell, D.; Hebbel, K.; Johnson, K. F.; Kasemann, M.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Lindemann, L.; Löhr, B.; Martínez, M.; Milite, M.; Monteiro, T.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Pelucchi, F.; Petrucci, M. C.; Rohde, M.; Saull, P. R. B.; Savin, A. A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Sievers, M.; Stonjek, S.; Tassi, E.; Wolf, G.; Wollmer, U.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Coldewey, C.; Lopez-Duran Viani, A.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Straub, P. B.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P.; Maccarrone, G.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Wölfle, S.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Lee, S. W.; Macdonald, N.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Sinclair, L. E.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Waugh, R.; Bohnet, I.; Gendner, N.; Holm, U.; Meyer-Larsen, A.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Garfagnini, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Kçira, D.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Poelz, G.; Zetsche, F.; Goncalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Mallik, U.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, S. B.; Park, S. K.; Lim, H.; Park, I. H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; García, G.; Glasman, C.; Gonzalez, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Barbi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Ochs, A.; Padhi, S.; Riveline, M.; Stairs, D. G.; Wing, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korotkova, N. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lukina, O. Y.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Botje, M.; Brümmer, N.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Schagen, S.; van Sighem, A.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Vossebeld, J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Große-Knetter, J.; Matsushita, T.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dosselli, U.; Dusini, S.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Adamczyk, L.; Iannotti, L.; Oh, B. Y.; Okrasiński, J. R.; Toothacker, W. S.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Shah, T. P.; Epperson, D.; Heusch, C.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Wichmann, R.; Williams, D. C.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Polenz, S.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Simmons, D.; Butterworth, J. M.; Catterall, C. D.; Hayes, M. E.; Heaphy, E. A.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlak, R.; Smalska, B.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Z˙arnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Gadaj, T.; Deppe, O.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Badgett, W. F.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Foudas, C.; Mattingly, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wildschek, T.; Wodarczyk, M.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C.; Cole, J. E.; Frisken, W. R.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Khakzad, M.; Menary, S.

    2000-05-01

    The distribution of the azimuthal angle for the charged hadrons has been studied in the hadronic centre-of-mass system for neutral current deep inelastic positron-proton scattering with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Measurements of the dependence of the moments of this distribution on the transverse momenta of the charged hadrons are presented. Asymmetries that can be unambiguously attributed to perturbative QCD processes have been observed for the first time.

  14. Hadron mass corrections in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    A. Accardi, T. Hobbs, W. Melnitchouk

    2009-11-01

    We derive mass corrections for semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of leptons from nucleons using a collinear factorization framework which incorporates the initial state mass of the target nucleon and the final state mass of the produced hadron $h$. The hadron mass correction is made by introducing a generalized, finite-$Q^2$ scaling variable $\\zeta_h$ for the hadron fragmentation function, which approaches the usual energy fraction $z_h = E_h/\

  15. Collective microdynamics of liquid lithium: An inelastic neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskiĭ, N. M.; Novikov, A. G.; Savostin, V. V.

    2010-05-01

    A portion of the dispersion curve for collective modes in liquid lithium has been constructed from experimental data on inelastic scattering of slow neutrons obtained on the DIN-2PI neutron spectrometer (IBR-2 reactor, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia). Measurements have been performed at a temperature of 500 K ( T m (Li) = 453.7 K). The coherent scattering component has been separated from the experimental spectra and analyzed. Information on the characteristics of collective excitations in liquid lithium has been derived.

  16. Coherent inelastic Mössbauer scattering of synchrotron radiation (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakov, V. A.

    2002-03-01

    Recent success of coherent elastic [Nuclear Resonant Scattering of Synchrotron Radiation, Part A edited by E. Gerdau and H. de Woard (Baltzer Science, 2000), Hyperfine Interact. 123/124, Chap. 4] and incoherent inelastic (Hyperfine Interact. 123/124, Chap. 5) Mössbauer scattering of synchrotron radiation (SR) in investigations of very delicate properties of the condensed matter also makes it urgent to perform experiments on coherent inelastic Mössbauer scattering (CIMS) of synchrotron radiation (the common meaning of the term CIMS is coherent inelastic Mössbauer scattering accompanied by creation or annihilation of phonons in the crystal lattice, i.e., by very low energy losses of SR quanta). However up to now there were no publications on experimental observation of CIMS so there is a need in theoretical investigations to reveal the most favorable conditions for CIMS observation. The theory of CIMS is presented below and applied to specific processes of CIMS such as forward scattering, scattering at grazing incidence angles, and scattering via a cascade of Mössbauer transitions. It is shown that the phase matching (between the incident and scattered beam) is very important for the angular and frequency distribution in CIMS and processes where phase matching can be reached, which the best candidates for CIMS experimental investigations. The performed analysis shows that because of the phase matching demands the forward CIMS is suppressed significantly in comparison with the coherent elastic Mössbauer scattering [V. A. Belyakov, JETP Lett. 67, 8 (1998)] and more favorable for observation is CIMS at a nonzero scattering angle. Some examples of CIMS specific geometries are discussed. In particular, it is shown that for the grazing CIMS at isotope interface (a plane interface between regions with different abundance of the Mössbauer isotope) there is enhancement of CIMS at the critical angle of total reflection and suppression of CIMS at angles below the critical

  17. Inelastic x-ray scattering at modest energy resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, K. D.; Tischler, J. Z.; Larson, B. C.

    1997-07-01

    We report results from the development of an inelastic scattering spectrometer designed to take advantage of high energy synchrotron radiation available at CHESS. The device allows a large increase of the effective scattering volume in the sample by permitting measurements to be made in an energy range up to 25 KeV. The highest useable energy appears limited by the efficiency of the analyzers under consideration. At 20 KeV a novel 4-bounce, sagittal focusing monochromator passes 10e11 photons/second with Darwin width limited energy resolution. In the scattering plane, the monochromator images the electron beam producing a small scattering source for the analyzing optics. Analyzer systems under study include a cooled mosaic crystal in para-focusing geometry, and an adjustable spherically bent silicon crystal respectively for parallel and point-by-point collection of the energy loss spectrum. This paper discusses the optical configurations presents results from our early measurements and suggests directions for improvements.

  18. Inelastic pion scattering by /sup 13/C at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Angular distributions for inelastically scattered pions were obtained for several states in /sup 13/C at an incident energy of 65 MeV. The data include results from both ..pi../sup +/ and ..pi../sup -/ measurements. In addition, ..pi../sup -/ measurements were made at T/sub ..pi../ = 50 MeV at one angle to give a two point fixed-q excitation function. The data are compared to theory and the data of others. As might be expected, medium corrections are shown to be considerably more important at low energies than at resonance. This is true for inelastic transitions of multipolarity 0,2 and 3. Parameters derived from an analysis of elastic pion scattering and SCX data also provide an adequate description of the inelastic transitions. The charge asymmetry in the cross sections for the 9/2/sup +/ state that was seen at resonance persists at these energies. This result is consistent with an impulse approximation treatment of the spin-flip amplitude. This is true even though the incoming energy of the pions is far below the range where the validity of an impulse treatment is expected. 65 refs., 45 figs.

  19. In situ measurement of inelastic light scattering in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuanmin

    Variation in the shape of solar absorption (Fraunhofer) lines are used to study the inelastic scattering in natural waters. In addition, oxygen absorption lines near 689nm are used to study the solar stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The prototype Oceanic Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (OFLD) has been further developed and improved by using a well protected fiber optic - wire conductor cable and underwater electronic housing. A Monte-Carlo code and a simple code have been modified to simulate the Raman scattering, DOM fluorescence and chlorophyll fluorescence. A series of in situ measurements have been conducted in clear ocean waters in the Florida Straits, in the turbid waters of Florida Bay, and in the vicinity of a coral reef in the Dry Tortugas. By comparing the reduced data with the model simulation results, the Raman scattering coefficient, b r with an excitation wavelength at 488nm, has been verified to be 2.6 × 10-4m-1 (Marshall and Smith, 1990), as opposed to 14.4 × 10- 4m-1 (Slusher and Derr, 1975). The wavelength dependence of b r cannot be accurately determined from the data set as the reported values (λ m-4 to λ m- 5) have an insignificant effect in the natural underwater light field. Generally, in clear water, the percentage of inelastic scattered light in the total light field at /lambda < 510nm is negligible for the whole water column, and this percentage increases with depth at /lambda > 510nm. At low concentrations (a y(/lambda = 380nm) less than 0.1m-1), DOM fluorescence plays a small role in the inelastic light field. However, chlorophyll fluorescence is much stronger than Raman scattering at 685nm. In shallow waters where a sea bottom affects the ambient light field, inelastic light is negligible for the whole visible band. Since Raman scattering is now well characterized, the new OFLD can be used to measure the solar stimulated in situ fluorescence. As a result, the fluorescence signals of various bottom surfaces, from coral to

  20. Inelastic neutron scattering studies of novel quantum magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Kemp W.

    Inelastic neutron scattering was used to study the magnetic excitation spectrum of three quantum magnets: (i) the double perovskite Ba2FeReO 6; (ii) the two-dimensional square lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet Sr2CuO2Cl2; and (iii) the quasi-two-dimensional frustrated two-leg ladder BiCu2PO6. We have conducted inelastic neutron scattering measurements on powder samples of the double perovskite compound Ba2FeReO6. The measurements revealed two well defined dispersing spin wave modes. No excitation gap was observable and the spectrum can be explained with a local moment model incorporating the interactions of Fe spins with spin-orbital locked degrees of freedom on the Re site. The results reveal that both significant electronic correlations and spin-orbit coupling on the Re site play a significant role in the spin dynamics of Ba2FeReO6. High resolution neutron scattering measurements of magnetic excitations in the parent cuprate Sr2CuO2Cl2 reveal a significant dispersion and momentum dependent damping of the zone boundary magnons. We directly compare our measurements with previous resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements and find a ~25 meV discrepancy between the two techniques for the measured zone boundary energy at (1/2, 0). The deviations are greatest precisely in the region of phase space where the magnon damping is strongest. This comparison shows that the inelastic x-ray spectrum must contain significant contributions from higher energy excitations not previously considered. Our measurements demonstrate that the high energy continuum of magnetic fluctuations is a ubiquitous feature of the magnetic spectrum among insulating monolayer cuprates, and that these excitations couple to both inelastic neutron and light scattering. A comprehensive series of inelastic neutron scattering measurements was used to investigate spin excitations in the frustrated two-leg ladder compound BiCu2PO6. The measurements revealed six branches of steeply dispersing triplon

  1. Probabilistic description of particle transport. III. Inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Goulet, T.; Keszei, E.; Jay-Gerin, J. Departement de Medecine Nucleaire et de Radiobiologie, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, PQ )

    1990-06-01

    We extend our probabilistic model of quasielastic particle transport to include possible inelastic scatterings of the particles in the bulk of the studied media. We show that this extended model can be used to describe different types of experiments involving electrons that go through or are reflected by a plane-parallel layer deposited on a substrate. In particular, we reanalyze the experimental results of low-energy ({approx lt}10 eV) electron transmission through solid xenon and solid molecular nitrogen. This analysis shows that the extended model is consistent with the quasielastic one, but is more powerful since we can now determine both the elastic and inelastic electron mean free paths. The analysis allows one to study the threshold creation of excitons that can be observed at about 8.5 and 9.5 eV in solid xenon, and around 7.5 eV in solid molecular nitrogen.

  2. Elastic and Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons using a CLYC array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Tristan; Doucet, E.; Chowdhury, P.; Lister, C. J.; Wilson, G. L.; Devlin, M.; Mosby, S.

    2015-10-01

    CLYC scintillators, which have dual neutron and gamma response, have recently ushered in the possibility of fast neutron spectroscopy without time-of-flight (TOF). A 16-element array of 1'' x 1'' 6Li-depleted CLYC crystals, where pulse-shape-discrimination is achieved via digital pulse processing, has been commissioned at UMass Lowell. In an experiment at LANSCE, high energy neutrons were used to bombard 56Fe and 238U targets, in order to measure elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections as a function of energy and angle with the array. The array is placed very close to the targets for enhanced geometrical solid angles for scattered neutrons compared to standard neutron-TOF measurements. A pulse-height spectrum of scattered neutrons in the detectors is compared to the energy of the incident neutrons, which is measured via the TOF of the pulsed neutrons from the source to the detectors. Recoil corrections are necessary to combine the energy spectra from all the detectors to obtain angle-integrated elastic and inelastic cross-sections. The detection techniques, analysis procedures and results will be presented. Supported by NNSA-SSAA program through DOE Grant DE-NA00013008.

  3. Studies of toxic aerosols via elastic and inelastic light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Foss, W.; Li, W.; Allen, T.M.; Blair, D.S.; Davis, E.J. )

    1993-02-01

    Evaporation rates and chemical characteristics of potentially toxic aerosols have been determined by elastic and inelastic light-scattering measurements. The aerosol systems examined were a commercial catalyst consisting of a mixture of stannous octanoate (SNO) and 2-ethylhexanoic acid (EHA) and droplets emitted from open tanks of chromic acid solutions used for anodizing aluminum. The heavy metals contained in these aerosols represent a danger to the workplace if such materials are inhaled. Nanogram amounts of the solutions were studied by suspending single microdroplets in electrodynamic balances in a flow of air to measure evaporation rates and to obtain Raman spectra. Elastic scattering data include phase functions and morphological resonance spectra from which droplet sizes are determined. The inelastic light-scattering data or Raman spectra provide molecular vibrational bond information. It was found that EHA spectra agree with bulk data in the literature, and that SNO Raman spectra, which are not available in the literature, are consistent with infrared spectra for bulk SNO. At room temperature the vapor pressure of SNO is on the order of 0.01 Pa while that of EHA is on the order of 0.1 Pa. Raman data for the residue of evaporated chromic acid solutions show the presence of chromium oxides (Cr[sup 6+] compounds), surfactants, and bound (nonvolatile) water. 31 refs., 14 figs.

  4. Semi-inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering at Small-x

    SciTech Connect

    Marquet, C.; Xiao, B.-W.; Yuan, Feng

    2009-05-29

    We study the semi-inclusive hadron production in deep inelastic scattering at small-x.A transverse momentum dependent factorization is found consistent with the resultscalculated in the color-dipole framework in the appropriate kinematic region. The transverse momentum dependent quark distribution can be studied in this processas a probe for the small-x saturation physics. Especially, the ratio of the quark distributions as functions of transverse momentum at different x demonstrates strong dependence on the saturation scale. The Q2 dependence of the same ratio is also studied by applying the Collins-Soper-Sterman resummation method.

  5. Lattice dynamics in copper indium diselenide by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derollez, P.; Fouret, R.; Laamyem, A.; Hennion, B.; Gonzalez, J.

    1999-05-01

    The phonon dispersion curves along the [100] and [001] directions of CuInSe2 have been measured by inelastic neutron scattering. The neutron measurements reveal the uncertainty of optical measurements because of the large absorption of this material. The lattice dynamics is analysed with a rigid ion model: Born-von Karman short range interactions associated with long range electrostatic forces. The calculated dispersion curves are in good agreement with the experiment. The atomic displacements associated with each vibrational mode are used to discuss the optical phonons. The obtained results provide a strong experimental basis from which we can validate the ab initio methods.

  6. Transition probability functions for applications of inelastic electron scattering.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Stefan; Schattschneider, Peter

    2012-09-01

    In this work, the transition matrix elements for inelastic electron scattering are investigated which are the central quantity for interpreting experiments. The angular part is given by spherical harmonics. For the weighted radial wave function overlap, analytic expressions are derived in the Slater-type and the hydrogen-like orbital models. These expressions are shown to be composed of a finite sum of polynomials and elementary trigonometric functions. Hence, they are easy to use, require little computation time, and are significantly more accurate than commonly used approximations. PMID:22560709

  7. NLO QCD corrections to graviton induced deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirling, W. J.; Vryonidou, E.

    2011-06-01

    We consider Next-to-Leading-Order QCD corrections to ADD graviton exchange relevant for Deep Inelastic Scattering experiments. We calculate the relevant NLO structure functions by calculating the virtual and real corrections for a set of graviton interaction diagrams, demonstrating the expected cancellation of the UV and IR divergences. We compare the NLO and LO results at the centre-of-mass energy relevant to HERA experiments as well as for the proposed higher energy lepton-proton collider, LHeC, which has a higher fundamental scale reach.

  8. Rotationally inelastic gas--surface scattering: HCl from Au(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Lykke, K.R.; Kay, B.D. )

    1990-02-15

    A quantum-resolved molecular beam--surface scattering study of HCl scattered from Au(111) is described. The HCl is detected in a quantum-resolved manner via (2+1) resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). Greater than 85% of the incident HCl molecules are in a single-quantum state ({ital v}=0, {ital J}=0) with a narrow velocity distribution ({Delta}{upsilon}/{upsilon}{lt}0.10). The scattered HCl is strongly peaked about the specular angle, and both its final velocity and rotational distributions are indicative of direct inelastic scattering. The scattered rotational distributions exhibit features characteristic of rotational rainbows and have a mean rotational energy that displays a bilinear dependence upon the incident normal kinetic energy and surface temperature. The final velocity distributions are largely insensitive to the rotational level and indicate that the energy loss to phonons is small ({lt}20%). Analysis of the scattered data indicates an orientation-averaged attractive well depth of {similar to}5 kcal/mol for the HCl--Au(111) interaction.

  9. Inelastic x-ray scattering from shocked liquid deuterium.

    PubMed

    Regan, S P; Falk, K; Gregori, G; Radha, P B; Hu, S X; Boehly, T R; Crowley, B J B; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Gericke, D O; Döppner, T; Meyerhofer, D D; Murphy, C D; Sangster, T C; Vorberger, J

    2012-12-28

    The Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions created in liquid deuterium by a laser-ablation-driven shock wave were probed with noncollective, spectrally resolved, inelastic x-ray Thomson scattering employing Cl Ly(α) line emission at 2.96 keV. These first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of the microscopic properties of shocked deuterium show an inferred spatially averaged electron temperature of 8±5  eV, an electron density of 2.2(±0.5)×10(23)  cm(-3), and an ionization of 0.8 (-0.25, +0.15). Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using equation-of-state models suited for the extreme parameters occurring in inertial confinement fusion research and planetary interiors are consistent with the experimental results. PMID:23368573

  10. Inelastic X-ray Scattering from Shocked Liquid Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, S. P.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Boehly, T. R.; Crowley, B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O.; Gericke, D. O.; Doeppner, T.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Murphy, C. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Vorberger, J.

    2012-12-28

    The Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions created in liquid deuterium by a laser-ablation—driven shock wave were probed with noncollective, spectrally resolved, inelastic x-ray Thomson scattering employing Cl Lyα line emission at 2.96 keV. Thus, these first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of the microscopic properties of shocked deuterium show an inferred spatially averaged electron temperature of 8±5 eV, an electron density of 2.2(±0.5)×1023 cm-3, and an ionization of 0.8 (-0.25, +0.15). Our two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using equation-of-state models suited for the extreme parameters occurring in inertial confinement fusion research and planetary interiors are consistent with the experimental results.

  11. Inelastic X-ray Scattering from Shocked Liquid Deuterium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Regan, S. P.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Boehly, T. R.; Crowley, B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O.; Gericke, D. O.; et al

    2012-12-28

    The Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions created in liquid deuterium by a laser-ablation—driven shock wave were probed with noncollective, spectrally resolved, inelastic x-ray Thomson scattering employing Cl Lyα line emission at 2.96 keV. Thus, these first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of the microscopic properties of shocked deuterium show an inferred spatially averaged electron temperature of 8±5 eV, an electron density of 2.2(±0.5)×1023 cm-3, and an ionization of 0.8 (-0.25, +0.15). Our two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using equation-of-state models suited for the extreme parameters occurring in inertial confinement fusion research and planetary interiors are consistent with the experimental results.

  12. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Wolf, Michael A.; McAtee, James L.; Unruh, Wesley P.; Cucchiara, Alfred L.; Huchton, Roger L.

    1993-01-01

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  13. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Wolf, M.A.; McAtee, J.L.; Unruh, W.P.; Cucchiara, A.L.; Huchton, R.L.

    1993-02-02

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  14. Inelastic Proton Scattering on 21Na in Inverse Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Roby

    2009-10-01

    R.A.E. Austin, R. Kanungo, S. Reeve, Saint Mary's University; D.G. Jenkins, C.Aa.Diget, A. Robinson, A.G. Tuff, O. Roberts, University of York, UK; P.J. Woods, T. Davinson, G. J. Lotay, University of Edinburgh; C.-Y. Wu, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; H. Al Falou, G.C. Ball, M. Djongolov, A. Garnsworthy, G. Hackman, J.N. Orce, C.J. Pearson, S. Triambak, S.J. Williams, TRIUMF; C. Andreiou, D.S. Cross, N. Galinski, R. Kshetri, Simon Fraser University; C. Sumithrarachchi, M.A. Schumaker, University of Guelph; M.P. Jones, S.V. Rigby, University of Liverpool; D. Cline, A. Hayes, University of Rochester; T.E. Drake, University of Toronto; We describe an experiment and associated technique [1] to measure resonances of interest in astrophysical reactions. At the TRIUMF ISAC-II radioactive beam accelerator facility in Canada, particles inelastically scattered in inverse kinematics are detected with Bambino, a δE-E silicon telescope spanning 15-40 degrees in the lab. We use the TIGRESS to detect gamma rays in coincidence with the charged particles to cleanly select inelastic scattering events. We measured resonances above the alpha threshold in ^22Mg of relevance to the rate of break-out from the hot-CNO cycle via the reaction ^ 18Ne(α,p)^21Na. [1] PJ Woods et al. Rex-ISOLDE proposal 424 Cern (2003).

  15. Inelastic proton scattering of Sn isotopes studied with GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The chain of semi-magic Sn nuclei, with many stable isotopes, has been a fertile ground for experimental and theoretical studies. Encompassing a major neutron shell from N = 50 to 82, the properties and structure of these nuclei provided important data for the development of the pairing-plus-quadrupole model. Recent experimental information on B(E2) for 106,108,110,112Sn came as a surprise as it indicated a larger collectivity than the predicted parabolic trend of quadrupole collectivity. These data, instead, show an unexpectedly flat trend even as the number of valence particles is reduced from 12 to 6. To fully understand how collectivity is evolving in these isotopes, 108,110,112Sn have been studied using thick-target, inelastic proton scattering with GRETINA tagging inelastic scattering events by detecting gamma-rays from the prompt decay of states excited in the reaction. We will present the trend of 2 + excitation cross-sections, the deduced quadrupole deformation parameters, and observations of other low-lying collective states. Comparison of these (p,p') quadrupole deformation parameters with B(E2) data will provide new insights into the relative importance of proton and neutron contributions to collectivity in these nuclei. GRETINA was funded by the US DOE - Office of Science. Operation of the array at NSCL is supported by NSF under Cooperative Agreement PHY-1102511(NSCL) and DOE under grant DE-AC02-05CH11231(LBNL).

  16. Dynamic color screening in diffractive deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingelman, Gunnar; Pasechnik, Roman; Werder, Dominik

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel Monte Carlo implementation of dynamic color screening via multiple exchanges of semisoft gluons as a basic QCD mechanism to understand diffractive electron-proton scattering at the HERA collider. Based on the kinematics of individual events in the standard QCD description of deep inelastic scattering at the parton level, which at low x is dominantly gluon initiated, the probability is evaluated for additional exchanges of softer gluons resulting in an overall color singlet exchange leading to a forward proton and a rapidity gap as the characteristic observables for diffractive scattering. The probability depends on the impact parameter of the soft exchanges and varies with the transverse size of the hard scattering subsystem and is therefore influenced by different QCD effects. We account for matrix elements and parton shower evolution either via conventional DGLAP log Q2 evolution with collinear factorization or CCFM small x evolution with k⊥ factorization and discuss the sensitivity to the gluon density distribution in the proton and the importance of large log x contributions. The overall result is, with only two model parameters which have theoretically motivated values, a satisfactory description of the observed diffractive cross section at HERA obtained in a wide kinematical range.

  17. Inelastic x-ray scattering at modest energy resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, K.D.; Larson, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    We report results from the development of an inelastic scattering spectrometer designed to take advantage of high energy synchrotron radiation available at CHESS. The device allows a large increase of the effective scattering volume in the sample by permitting measurements to be made in an energy range up to 25 KeV. The highest useable energy appears limited by the efficiency of the analyzers under consideration. At 20 KeV a novel 4-bounce, sagittal focusing monochromator passes 10e11 photons/second with Darwin width limited energy resolution. In the scattering plane, the monochromator images the electron beam producing a small scattering source for the analyzing optics. Analyzer systems under study include a cooled mosaic crystal in para-focusing geometry, and an adjustable spherically bent silicon crystal respectively for parallel and point-by-point collection of the energy loss spectrum. This paper discusses the optical configurations presents results from our early measurements and suggests directions for improvements. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Bessel-Weighted Asymmetries in Semi Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    D. Boer, L. Gamberg, B.U. Musch, A. Prokudin

    2011-10-01

    The concept of weighted asymmetries is revisited for semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. We consider the cross section in Fourier space, conjugate to the outgoing hadron's transverse momentum, where convolutions of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions and fragmentation functions become simple products. Individual asymmetric terms in the cross section can be projected out by means of a generalized set of weights involving Bessel functions. Advantages of employing these Bessel weights are that they suppress (divergent) contributions from high transverse momentum and that soft factors cancel in (Bessel-) weighted asymmetries. Also, the resulting compact expressions immediately connect to previous work on evolution equations for transverse momentum dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions and to quantities accessible in lattice QCD. Bessel weighted asymmetries are thus model independent observables that augment the description and our understanding of correlations of spin and momentum in nucleon structure.

  19. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Studies of Zeolite Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, G. Neville; Kargl, Florian; Ward, David; Holliman, Peter; Meneau, Florian

    2009-01-29

    In situ inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) experiments have been used to probe heterogeneity and deformability in zeolte Y as this thermally collapses to a high density amorphous (HDA) aluminosilicate phase. The Landau-Placzek ratio R{sub LP} falls slowly as amorphisation advances, increasing in the later stages of collapse clearly showing how homogeneity improves non-linearly--behaviour linked closely with the decline in molar volume V{sub Molar}. The Brillouin frequency {omega}{sub Q} also decreases with amorphisation in a similar fashion, signifying a non-uniform decrease in the speed of sound v{sub l}. All of these changes with zeolite amorphisation infer formation of an intermediate low density amorphous (LDA) phase. This low entropy or 'perfect glass' has mechanical properties which are closer to the zeolite rather to the HDA glass--notably a very small value of Poisson's Ratio signifying unusually low resistance to deformation.

  20. INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING AT ULTRAHIGH PRESSURES.

    SciTech Connect

    MAO, H.K.; HEMLEY, J.; KAO, C.C.

    2000-08-28

    Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) provides high-pressure research with an arsenal of analytical capabilities for key measurements that were previously unattainable, and high pressure research provides IXS with numerous applications where the technique has unique advantages over other methods. High-pressure investigations can now be conducted using non-resonant IXS, resonant IXS, nuclear resonant IXS, and x-ray emission spectroscopy with energy resolutions of 100 meV to 1 eV for electronic transitions and 1 to 10 meV for phonon studies. By pressure-tuning materials over a wide range, we are able to investigate fundamental physics of electron gases, strongly correlated electron systems, high-energy electronic excitations, and phonons in energy and momentum space. The results will have a profound influence on materials applications as well as providing basic information for understanding the deep interior of the Earth and other planets.

  1. Alpha-particle spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1972-01-01

    Mapping the radon emanation of the moon was studied to find potential areas of high activity by detection of radon isotopes and their daughter products. It was felt that based on observation of regions overflown by Apollo spacecraft and within the field of view of the alpha-particle spectrometer, a radon map could be constructed, identifying and locating lunar areas of outgassing. The basic theory of radon migration from natural concentrations of uranium and thorium is discussed in terms of radon decay and the production of alpha particles. The preliminary analysis of the results indicates no significant alpha emission.

  2. Alpha particles in effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Caniu, C.

    2014-11-11

    Using an effective field theory for alpha (α) particles at non-relativistic energies, we calculate the strong scattering amplitude modified by Coulomb corrections for a system of two αs. For the strong interaction, we consider a momentum-dependent interaction which, in contrast to an energy dependent interaction alone [1], could be more useful in extending the theory to systems with more than two α particles. We will present preliminary results of our EFT calculations for systems with two alpha particles.

  3. Molecular-dynamics study of ionic motions and neutron inelastic scattering in α-AgI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarotti, Guido L.; Jacucci, G.; Rahman, A.

    1986-11-01

    Contrary to the current interpretation of inelastic-neutron-scattering data on α-AgI, molecular-dynamics calculations show that inelastic neutron scattering is dominated by coherent scattering from Ag+ ions. The calculations agree with the available data. Ag+ ions diffuse by jumps between tetrahedral sites, the consequences being in complete accord with the Chudley-Elliot model only if the full geometrical complexity of these sites is included. Phonon modes due to I- motions are predicted for certain wave vectors.

  4. Compact turnkey focussing neutron guide system for inelastic scattering investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, G.; Georgii, R.; Dunsiger, S. R.; Tsurkan, V.; Loidl, A.; Adams, T.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the performance of a compact neutron guide module which boosts the intensity in inelastic neutron scattering experiments by approximately a factor of 40. The module consists of two housings containing truly curved elliptic focussing guide elements, positioned before and after the sample. The advantage of the module lies in the ease with which it may be reproducibly mounted on a spectrometer within a few hours, on the same timescale as conventional sample environments. It is particularly well suited for samples with a volume of a few mm3, thus enabling the investigation of materials which to date would have been considered prohibitively small or samples exposed to extreme environments, where there are space constraints. We benchmark the excellent performance of the module by measurements of the structural and magnetic excitations in single crystals of model systems. In particular, we report the phonon dispersion in the simple element lead. We also determine the magnon dispersion in the spinel ZnCr2Se4 (V = 12.5 mm3), where strong magnetic diffuse scattering at low temperatures evolves into distinct helical order.

  5. Compact turnkey focussing neutron guide system for inelastic scattering investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Brandl, G.; Georgii, R.; Dunsiger, S. R.; Tsurkan, V.; Loidl, A.; Adams, T.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.

    2015-12-21

    We demonstrate the performance of a compact neutron guide module which boosts the intensity in inelastic neutron scattering experiments by approximately a factor of 40. The module consists of two housings containing truly curved elliptic focussing guide elements, positioned before and after the sample. The advantage of the module lies in the ease with which it may be reproducibly mounted on a spectrometer within a few hours, on the same timescale as conventional sample environments. It is particularly well suited for samples with a volume of a few mm{sup 3}, thus enabling the investigation of materials which to date would have been considered prohibitively small or samples exposed to extreme environments, where there are space constraints. We benchmark the excellent performance of the module by measurements of the structural and magnetic excitations in single crystals of model systems. In particular, we report the phonon dispersion in the simple element lead. We also determine the magnon dispersion in the spinel ZnCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} (V = 12.5 mm{sup 3}), where strong magnetic diffuse scattering at low temperatures evolves into distinct helical order.

  6. Self Organizing Maps for use in Deep Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askanazi, Evan

    2015-04-01

    Self Organizing Maps are a type of artificial neural network that has been proven to be particularly useful in solving complex problems in neural biology, engineering, robotics and physics. We are attempting to use the Self Organizing Map to solve problems and probe phenomenological patterns in subatomic physics, specifically in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS). In DIS there is a cross section in electron hadron scattering that is dependent on the momentum fraction x of the partons in the hadron and the momentum transfer of the virtual photon exchanged. There is a soft cross part of this cross section that currently can only be found through experimentation; this soft part is comprised of Structure Functions which in turn are comprised of the Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs). We aim to use the Self Organizing Process, or SOP, to take theoretical models of these PDFs and fit it to the previous, known data. The SOP will also be used to probe the behavior of the PDFs in particular at large x values, in order to observe how they congregate. The ability of the SOPto take multidimensional data and convert it into two dimensional output is anticipated to be particularly useful in achieving this aim.

  7. Elastic and inelastic scattering of neutrons from 56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Anthony Paul; McEllistrem, M. T.; Liu, S. H.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Peters, E. E.; Yates, S. W.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Harrison, T. D.; Rice, B. G.; Thompson, B. K.; Hicks, S. F.; Howard, T. J.; Jackson, D. T.; Lenzen, P. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Pecha, R. L.

    2015-10-01

    The differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattered neutrons from 56Fe have been measured at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory (www.pa.uky.edu/accelerator) for incident neutron energies between 2.0 and 8.0 MeV and for the angular range 30° to 150°. Time-of-flight techniques and pulse-shape discrimination were employed for enhancing the neutron energy spectra and for reducing background. An overview of the experimental procedures and data analysis for the conversion of neutron yields to differential cross sections will be presented. These include the determination of the energy-dependent detection efficiencies, the normalization of the measured differential cross sections, and the attenuation and multiple scattering corrections. Our results will also be compared to evaluated cross section databases and reaction model calculations using the TALYS code. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Universities Program: NU-12-KY-UK-0201-05, and the Donald A. Cowan Physics Institute at the University of Dallas.

  8. Advanced Elastic/Inelastic Nuclear Data Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, Frank; Chowdhury, Partha; Greife, Uwe; Fisher Hicks, Sally; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Rahn Vanhoy, Jeffrey; Hill, Tony; Kawano, Toshihiko; Slaughter, David

    2015-06-08

    The optical model is used to analyze the elastic and inelastic scattering of nucleons, deuterons, hellions, tritons, and alpha particles by the nuclei. Since this paper covers primarily neutron-nucleus scattering, the focus will be limited to only that interaction. For the sake of this model, the nucleus is described as a blob of nuclear matter with properties based upon its number of nucleons. This infers that a single potential can describe the interaction of particles with different energies with different nuclei.

  9. Inelastic-impurity-scattering-induced spin texture and topological transitions in surface electron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransson, J.

    2015-09-01

    Inelastic scattering off magnetic impurities in a spin-chiral two-dimensional electron gas, e.g., the Rashba system, is shown to generate topological changes in the spin texture of the electron waves emanating from the scattering center. While elastic scattering gives rise to a purely in-plane spin texture for an in-plane magnetic scattering potential, out-of-plane components emerge upon activation of inelastic scattering processes. This property leads to a possibility to make controlled transitions between trivial and nontrivial topologies of the spin texture.

  10. D* production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitweg, J.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Yoshida, R.; Zhang, H.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Anselmo, F.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Romeo, G. Cara; Castellini, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; de Pasquale, S.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Garcia, Y. Zamora; Zichichi, A.; Amelung, C.; Bornheim, A.; Brock, I.; Coböken, K.; Crittenden, J.; Deffner, R.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Grothe, M.; Hartmann, H.; Heinloth, K.; Heinz, L.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Katz, U. F.; Paul, E.; Pfeiffer, M.; Rembser, Ch.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Bailey, D. S.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cottingham, W. N.; Foster, B.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Hayes, M. E.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Piccioni, D.; Roff, D. G.; Tapper, R. J.; Arneodo, M.; Ayad, R.; Capua, M.; Garfagnini, A.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Jing, Z.; Liu, W.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sampson, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Jakubowski, Z.; Przybycień, M. B.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zajac, J.; Duliński, Z.; Kotański, A.; Abbiendi, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J. K.; Cases, G.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Fricke, U.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Glasman, C.; Göttlicher, P.; Große-Knetter, J.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Johnson, K. F.; Kasemann, M.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Lindemann, L.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Mańczak, O.; Milewski, J.; Monteiro, T.; Ng, J. S. T.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Park, I. H.; Pellegrino, A.; Pelucchi, F.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Ryan, J. J.; Savin, A. A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Surrow, B.; Tassi, E.; Voß, T.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Wollmer, U.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zeuner, W.; Burow, B. D.; Grabosch, H. J.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P.; Maccarrone, G.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Markun, P.; Trefzger, T.; Wölfle, S.; Bromley, J. T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Saxon, D. H.; Sinclair, L. E.; Strickland, E.; Utley, M. L.; Waugh, R.; Wilson, A. S.; Bohnet, I.; Gendner, N.; Holm, U.; Meyer-Larsen, A.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Gladilin, L. K.; Horstmann, D.; Kçira, D.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Butterworth, I.; Cole, J. E.; Harris, V. L.; Howell, G.; Hung, B. H. Y.; Lamberti, L.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Pavel, N.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Sideris, D.; Whitfield, A. F.; Mallik, U.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Fleck, J. I.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Nakao, M.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; An, S. H.; Lee, S. B.; Nam, S. W.; Park, H. S.; Park, S. K.; Barreiro, F.; Fernández, J. P.; García, G.; Graciani, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; Martínez, M.; del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; Terrón, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Lim, J. N.; Murray, W. N.; Ochs, A.; Riveline, M.; Stairs, D. G.; St-Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Tsurugai, T.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Khein, L. A.; Korotkova, N. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shumilin, A. V.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Botje, M.; Brümmer, N.; Chlebana, F.; Engelen, J.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; van Sighem, A.; Tiecke, H.; Verkerke, W.; Vossebeld, J.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Nylander, P.; Romanowski, T. A.; Blaikley, H. E.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Edmonds, J. K.; Harnew, N.; Lancaster, M.; McFall, J. D.; Nath, C.; Noyes, V. A.; Quadt, A.; Ruske, O.; Tickner, J. R.; Uijterwaal, H.; Walczak, R.; Waters, D. S.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; dal Corso, F.; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Bulmahn, J.; Feild, R. G.; Oh, B. Y.; Okrasiński, J. R.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Raso, M.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Shah, T. P.; Barberis, E.; Dubbs, T.; Heusch, C.; van Hook, M.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D. C.; Schwarzer, O.; Walenta, A. H.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Doeker, T.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Nagano, K.; Suzuki, I.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Matsushita, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Petrucci, M. C.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Brkic, M.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Polenz, S.; Sampson, C. R.; Simmons, D.; Teuscher, R. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Catterall, C. D.; Jones, T. W.; Kaziewicz, P. B.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Shulman, J.; Sutton, M. R.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlak, R.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Adamus, M.; Coldewey, C.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Revel, D.; Badgett, W. F.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Dasu, S.; Foudas, C.; Loveless, R. J.; Mattingly, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wodarczyk, M.; Bhadra, S.; Frisken, W. R.; Khakzad, M.; Schmidke, W. B.

    1997-02-01

    This paper presents measurements of D*+/- production in deep inelastic scattering from collisions between 27.5 GeV positrons and 820 GeV protons. The data have been taken with the ZEUS detector at HERA. The decay channel D*+ -> (D0 -> K- π+) π+ (+c.c.) has been used in the study. The e+p cross section for inclusive D*+/- production with 5 < Q2 < 100 GeV2 and y < 0.7 is 5.3 +/- 1.0 +/- 0.8 nb in the kinematic region 1.3 < pT(D*+/-) < 9.0 GeV and η(D*+/-) < 1.5. Differential cross sections as functions of pT(D*+/-), η(D*+/-), W and Q2 are compared with next-to-leading order QCD calculations based on the photon-gluon fusion production mechanism. After an extrapolation of the cross section to the full kinematic region in pT(D*+/-) and η(D*+/-), the charm contribution Fcc2 (x, Q2) to the proton structure function is determined for Bjorken x between 2.10-4 and 5.10-3.

  11. Multiplicity moments in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZEUS Collaboration; Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Pellegrino, A.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; De Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Brock, I.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Kind, O.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Wieber, H.; Bailey, D. S.; Brook, N. H.; Cole, J. E.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Robins, S.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Wing, M.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Jeoung, H. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Ma, K. J.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Helbich, M.; Liu, W.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Sampson, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Klimek, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowal, M.; Kowalski, T.; Mindur, B.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Kotański, A.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Chiochia, V.; Crittenden, J.; Dannheim, D.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Geiser, A.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Graciani, R.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hebbel, K.; Hillert, S.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labes, H.; Löhr, B.; Mankel, R.; Martens, J.; Martínez, M.; Milite, M.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Petrucci, M. C.; Polini, A.; Savin, A. A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Stonjek, S.; Wolf, G.; Wollmer, U.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, R.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Coldewey, C.; Lopez-Duran Viani, A.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Coppola, N.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Wölfle, S.; Bell, M.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Glasman, C.; Lee, S. W.; Lupi, A.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Bodmann, B.; Gendner, N.; Holm, U.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Yildirim, A.; Ziegler, A.; Carli, T.; Garfagnini, A.; Gialas, I.; Lohrmann, E.; Foudas, C.; Gonçalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Metlica, F.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, S. B.; Park, S. K.; Lim, H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; García, G.; González, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Vázquez, M.; Barbi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Padhi, S.; Stairs, D. G.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Bashkirov, V.; Danilov, P.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korotkova, N. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Y.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Botje, M.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Schagen, S.; van Sighem, A.; Tassi, E.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Vossebeld, J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Brümmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Ferrando, J.; Große-Knetter, J.; Matsushita, T.; Rigby, M.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Parenti, A.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Adamczyk, L.; Iannotti, L.; Oh, B. Y.; Saull, P. R. B.; Toothacker, W. S.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Epperson, D.; Heusch, C.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D. C.; Park, I. H.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Kohno, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Matsuzawa, K.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Bailey, D. C.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Mirea, A.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Butterworth, J. M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hayes, M. E.; Heaphy, E. A.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Plucinski, P.; Smalska, B.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, J.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Z˙arnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Sztuk, J.; Deppe, O.; Eisenberg, Y.; Gladilin, L. K.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Breitweg, J.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Kçira, D.; Lammers, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Smith, W. H.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Straub, P. B.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Frisken, W. R.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Khakzad, M.; Menary, S.

    2001-06-01

    Multiplicity moments of charged particles in deep inelastic e+p scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 38.4 pb-1. The moments for Q2>1000 GeV2 were studied in the current region of the Breit frame. The evolution of the moments was investigated as a function of restricted regions in polar angle and, for the first time, both in the transverse momentum and in absolute momentum of final-state particles. Analytic perturbative QCD predictions in conjunction with the hypothesis of Local Parton-Hadron Duality (LPHD) reproduce the trends of the moments in polar-angle regions, although some discrepancies are observed. For the moments restricted either in transverse or absolute momentum, the analytic results combined with the LPHD hypothesis show considerable deviations from the measurements. The study indicates a large influence of the hadronisation stage on the multiplicity distributions in the restricted phase-space regions studied here, which is inconsistent with the expectations of the LPHD hypothesis.

  12. Phonon dynamics and inelastic neutron scattering of sodium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Gupta, M. K.; Mittal, R.; Zbiri, M.; Rols, S.; Schober, H.; Chaplot, S. L.

    2014-05-01

    Sodium niobate (NaNbO3) exhibits an extremely complex sequence of structural phase transitions in the perovskite family and therefore provides an excellent model system for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions. We report temperature dependence of inelastic neutron scattering measurements of phonon densities of states in sodium niobate. The measurements are carried out in various crystallographic phases of this material at various temperatures from 300 to 1048 K. The phonon spectra exhibit peaks centered on 19, 37, 51, 70, and 105 meV. Interestingly, the peak near 70 meV shifts significantly towards lower energy with increasing temperature, while the other peaks do not exhibit any appreciable shift. The phonon spectra at 783 K show prominent change and become more diffusive as compared to those at 303 K. In order to better analyze these features, we have performed first-principles lattice dynamics calculations based on the density functional theory. The computed phonon density of states is found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. Based on our calculation we are able to assign the characteristic Raman modes in the antiferroelectric phase, which are due to the folding of the T (ω = 95 cm-1) and Δ (ω = 129 cm-1) points of the cubic Brillouin zone, to the A1g symmetry.

  13. Inelastic neutron scattering from tetramethylammonium cations occluded within zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, T.O.; Curtiss, L.A.; Iton, L.E.; Kleb, R.; Newsam, J.M.; Beyerlein, R.A.; Vaughan, D.E.W.

    1987-06-24

    The use of organic bases, for example, tetraalklylammonium hydroxides, and other organic reagents has greatly enhanced the scope of gel/solution synthesis routes to crystalline microporous materials such as zeolites. The role of these organic components, however, continues to be the topic of considerable debate. The organic components first modify the gel structural chemistry. The presence of tetramethylammonium (TMA) hydroxide, for example, promotes the formation of double four-ring units in silicate solutions. Occlusion of organic gel components in zeolite crystal structures, however, leads also to the concept of a templating effect in which the organic component provides a basis around which the developing zeolite cages form. The mechanism of this templating process remains somewhat ill defined and must, at least, be of variable specificity. The authors describe here the use of inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to measure TMA template torsional vibrations, vibrations that provide to be sensitive to the strength of the interaction between the template cation and the enclosing zeolite cage.

  14. Hadron attenuation in deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Falter, T.; Cassing, W.; Gallmeister, K.; Mosel, U.

    2004-11-01

    We present a detailed theoretical investigation of hadron attenuation in deep inelastic scattering off complex nuclei in the kinematic regime of the HERMES experiment. The analysis is carried out in the framework of a probabilistic coupled-channel transport model based on the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation, which allows for a treatment of the final-state interactions beyond simple absorption mechanisms. Furthermore, our event-by-event simulations account for the kinematic cuts of the experiments as well as the geometrical acceptance of the detectors. We calculate the multiplicity ratios of charged hadrons for various nuclear targets relative to deuterium as a function of the photon energy {nu}, the hadron energy fraction z{sub h}=E{sub h}/{nu}, and the transverse momentum p{sub T}. We also confront our model results on double-hadron attenuation with recent experimental data. Separately, we compare the attenuation of identified hadrons ({pi}{sup {+-}}, {pi}{sup 0}, K{sup {+-}}, p, and p) on {sup 20}Ne and {sup 84}Kr targets with the data from the HERMES Collaboration and make predictions for a {sup 131}Xe target. At the end we turn towards hadron attenuation on {sup 63}Cu nuclei at EMC energies. Our studies demonstrate that (pre-)hadronic final-state interactions play a dominant role in the kinematic regime of the HERMES experiment while our present approach overestimates the attenuation at EMC energies.

  15. Sivers Effect in Semi-Inclusive Deeply Inelastic Scattering and DRELL-YAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, J. C.; Efremov, A. V.; Goeke, K.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Menzel, S.; Meredith, B.; Metz, A.; Schweitzer, P.

    The Sivers function is extracted from HERMES data on single spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering. The result is used for making predictions for the Sivers effect in the Drell-Yan process.

  16. On the role of inelastic scattering in phase-plate transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hettler, Simon; Wagner, Jochen; Dries, Manuel; Oster, Marco; Wacker, Christian; Schröder, Rasmus R; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2015-08-01

    The phase contrast of Au nanoparticles on amorphous-carbon films with different thicknesses is analyzed using an electrostatic Zach phase plate in a Zeiss 912 Ω transmission electron microscope with in-column energy filter. Specifically, unfiltered and plasmon-filtered phase-plate transmission electron microscopy (PP TEM) images are compared to gain insight in the role of coherence after inelastic scattering processes. A considerable phase-contrast contribution resulting from a combined elastic-inelastic scattering process is found in plasmon-filtered PP TEM images. The contrast reduction compared to unfiltered images mainly originates from zero-order beam broadening caused by the inelastic scattering process. The effect of the sequence of the elastic and inelastic scattering processes is studied by varying the position of the nanoparticles, which can be either located on top or at the bottom of the amorphous-carbon film with respect to the incident electron beam direction. PMID:25879156

  17. QCD analysis of neutrino charged current structure function F2 in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aleem, F.; Saleem, M.

    1985-01-01

    An analytic expression for the neutrino charged current structure function F sub 2 (x, Q sup 2) in deep inelastic scattering, consistent with quantum chromodynamics, is proposed. The calculated results are in good agreement with experiment.

  18. Focusing polycapillary to reduce parasitic scattering for inelastic x-ray measurements at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, P. Xiao, Y. M.; Rod, E.; Bai, L. G.; Shen, G. Y.; Sinogeikin, S.; Gao, N.; Ding, Y.; Mao, H.-K.

    2015-07-15

    The double-differential scattering cross-section for the inelastic scattering of x-ray photons from electrons is typically orders of magnitude smaller than that of elastic scattering. With samples 10-100 μm size in a diamond anvil cell at high pressure, the inelastic x-ray scattering signals from samples are obscured by scattering from the cell gasket and diamonds. One major experimental challenge is to measure a clean inelastic signal from the sample in a diamond anvil cell. Among the many strategies for doing this, we have used a focusing polycapillary as a post-sample optic, which allows essentially only scattered photons within its input field of view to be refocused and transmitted to the backscattering energy analyzer of the spectrometer. We describe the modified inelastic x-ray spectrometer and its alignment. With a focused incident beam which matches the sample size and the field of view of polycapillary, at relatively large scattering angles, the polycapillary effectively reduces parasitic scattering from the diamond anvil cell gasket and diamonds. Raw data collected from the helium exciton measured by x-ray inelastic scattering at high pressure using the polycapillary method are compared with those using conventional post-sample slit collimation.

  19. Study of rlastic and inelastic {sup 11}B +α scattering and search for cluster states of enlarged radius in {sup 11}B

    SciTech Connect

    Danilov, A. N. Demyanova, A. S.; Dmitriev, S. V.; Ogloblin, A. A.; Belyaeva, T. L.; Goncharov, S. A.; Gurov, Yu. B.; Maslov, V. A.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Trzaska, W.; Khlebnikov, S. V.; Heikkinen, P.; Julin, R.; Tyurin, G. P.; Burtebaev, N.; Zholdybayev, T.

    2015-09-15

    The differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic {sup 11}B + α scattering were measured at the alpha-particle energy of 65 MeV, the inelastic-scattering processes leading to the excitation of known states of {sup 11}B up to excitation energies of about 14 MeV. Data on elastic scattering were analyzed together with those that were published earlier for lower energies. The cross sections for inelastic scattering were analyzed on the basis of the distorted-wave method. A modified diffractionmodel was used to determine the root-mean-square radii of excited states. The radii of states whose excitation energies were below about 7MeV were found to agree with radius of the ground state to within 0.1 to 0.15 fm. This result complieswith the traditional idea that the low-lying states of {sup 11}B have a shell structure. The possibility that these states belong to the predicted rotational bands, which, if any, are truncated to three states, cannot be ruled out either. The majority of the observed highly excited states are distributed among four rotational bands. The moments of inertia of these bands are close; for the band based on the 3/2{sup −} state at E* = 8.56 MeV, they are even higher than those of the Hoyle state in the {sup 12}C nucleus. The measured radii of states associated with these bands of {sup 11}B are larger than the ground-state radius by 0.7 to 1.0 fm and are also close to the radius of the Hoyle state. The results of the present study agree with the existing predictions that the cluster structure of the {sup 11}B nucleus is diverse at high excitation energies. The hypothesis that the {sup 11}B nucleus features a “giant” state of size commensurate with those in heavy nuclei was not confirmed.

  20. The gamma rays associated with the inelastic scattering of 14 MeV neutrons in large samples of iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shalabi, B.; Cox, A. J.

    1983-02-01

    Iron is likely to be a common construction material in the first generation of fusion reactors and a knowledge of the effect of multiple scattering processes in large samples of this material is important for reactor design. In the present work, the angular distributions of gamma rays produced after the inelastic scattering of 14 MeV neutrons in increasing thicknesses of iron samples have been measured. The measurements were performed using an associated particle time of flight system to gate the gamma-ray signals and reduce the background to an acceptable level. The 14 MeV neutrons were produced by the T(d, n) 4He reaction with the deuterons being accelerated in a 150 KV SAMES type J accelerator at Aston and in the 3 MeV dynamitron at the Joint Radiation Centre, Birmingham. The incident neutron flux was monitored by counting the alpha particles associated with the neutrons passing through the sample. The gamma rays were detected by a NaI(Tl) scintillator mounted on a 56 AVP photo-multiplier tube. The samples of iron varied in thickness from 2 to 10.5 cm. In each case, the differential cross sections for gamma ray production at angles varying between 20° and 90° to the incident neutron beam were measured. The results were fitted to an even order Legendre polynomial. The increase in effective cross section σ due to multiple scattering effects as the sample thickness increased was found to obey the law σ = σ0 exp αx in the region considered for each sample where x is the sample thickness in mean free paths and α has an average value of 0.17 ± 1 (mean free paths) -1. The results have been analysed on a semi-empirical model based on the assumption of continuous slowing down.

  1. Inelastic scattering of electron and light ion beams in organic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Vera, Pablo de; Abril, Isabel; Garcia-Molina, Rafael

    2011-05-01

    We have calculated the inelastic mean free path, stopping power, and energy-loss straggling of swift electron, proton, and {alpha}-particle beams in a broad incident energy range in four organic polymers: poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), Kapton, polyacetylene (PA), and poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP). These calculations have been done through a suitable description of their optical properties and its extension into the whole momentum and energy transfer excitation spectrum. For electrons, we take into account the exchange effect between the projectile and the target electrons, while the charge-state fractions have been considered for ions. Our results are compared with other models and with the available experimental data. An excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained in the case of proton and {alpha}-particle beams in Kapton and a reasonably good agreement has been achieved for electron beams in PMMA, Kapton, and PA. We have parameterized by means of simple analytical expressions our results for electron beams interacting with these four polymers, which can be easily implemented in Monte Carlo calculations.

  2. Dynamical transition of myoglobin revealed by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doster, Wolfgang; Cusack, Stephen; Petry, Winfried

    1989-02-01

    Structural fluctuations in proteins on the picosecond timescale have been studied in considerable detail by theoretical methods such as molecular dynamics simulation1,2, but there exist very few experimental data with which to test the conclusions. We have used the technique of inelastic neutron scattering to investigate atomic motion in hydrated myoglobin over the temperature range 4 350 K and on the molecular dynamics timescale 0.1 100 ps. At temperatures below 180 K myglobin behaves as a harmonic solid, with essentially only vibrational motion. Above 180 K there is a striking dynamic transition arising from the excitation of non-vibrational motion, which we interpret as corresponding to tor-sional jumps between states of different energy, with a mean energy asymmetry of KJ mol -1. This extra mobility is reflected in a strong temperature dependence of the mean-square atomic displacements, a phenomenon previously observed specifically for the heme iron by Mossbauer spectroscopy3 5, but on a much slower timescale (10-7 s). It also correlates with a glass-like transition in the hydration shell of myoglobin6 and with the temperature-dependence of ligand-binding rates at the heme iron, as monitored by flash photolysis7. In contrast, the crystal structure of myoglobin determined down to 80 K shows no significant structural transition8 10. The dynamical behaviour we find for myoglobin (and other globular proteins) suggests a coupling of fast local motions to slower collective motions, which is a characteristic feature of other dense glass-forming systems.

  3. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Inelastic scattering of electrons by metastable hydrogen atoms in a laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buica, Gabriela

    2015-09-01

    The inelastic scattering of fast electrons by metastable hydrogen atoms in the presence of a linearly polarized laser field is theoretically studied in the domain of field intensities below 1010 W/cm2. The interaction of the hydrogen atom with the laser field is described by first-order time-dependent perturbation theory, while the projectile electrons interacting with the laser field are described by the Gordon-Volkov wave functions. An analytic expression is obtained for the differential scattering cross section in the first-order Born approximation for laser-assisted inelastic e--H (2 s ) scattering for the 2 s →n l excitation. Detailed analytical and numerical results are presented for inelastic scattering accompanied by one-photon absorption, and the angular dependence and resonance structure of the differential cross sections are discussed for the 2 s →4 l excitation of metastable hydrogen.

  5. Low-lying 1- and 2+ states in 124Sn via inelastic scattering of 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegri, L.; Bracco, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.

    2016-05-01

    The γ decay of low-lying 1-and 2+ states up to the neutron separation energy in 124Sn populate by the inelastic scattering of 17O was measured. The Angular distributions were measured both for the γ rays and the scattered 17O ions. The results are presented.

  6. Born Hartree Bethe approximation in the theory of inelastic electron molecule scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretinin, I. Yu; Krisilov, A. V.; Zon, B. A.

    2008-11-01

    We propose a new approximation in the theory of inelastic electron atom and electron molecule scattering. Taking into account the completeness property of atomic and molecular wavefunctions, considered in the Hartree approximation, and using Bethe's parametrization for electronic excitations during inelastic collisions via the mean excitation energy, we show that the calculation of the inelastic total integral cross-sections (TICS), in the framework of the first Born approximation, involves only the ground-state wavefunction. The final analytical formula obtained for the TICS, i.e. for the sum of elastic and inelastic ones, contains no adjusting parameters. Calculated TICS for electron scattering by light atoms and molecules (He, Ne, and H2) are in good agreement within the experimental data; results show asymptotic coincidence for heavier ones (Ar, Kr, Xe and N2).

  7. Vibrational density of states of thin films measured by inelastic scattering of synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhlsberger, R.; Sturhahn, W.; Toellner, T. S.; Quast, K. W.; Alp, E. E.; Bernhard, A.; Metge, J.; Rüffer, R.; Burkel, E.

    1999-03-01

    Vibrational spectra of thin films were measured by inelastic nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation in grazing incidence geometry. A strong enhancement of the inelastic signal was obtained by designing the layer system as X-ray waveguide and coupling the incident beam into a guided mode. This effect opens the possibility to study vibrational excitations in thin films that were so far impossible to obtain due to flux limitations.

  8. Reviews Book: Marie Curie and Her Daughters Resource: Cumulus Equipment: Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Equipment: 3D Magnetic Tube Equipment: National Grid Transmission Model Book: Einstein's Physics Equipment: Barton's Pendulums Equipment: Weather Station Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Marie Curie and Her Daughters An insightful study of a resilient and ingenious family and their achievements Cumulus Simple to install and operate and with obvious teaching applications, this weather station 'donationware' is as easy to recommend as it is to use Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Good design and construction make for good results National Grid Transmission Model Despite its expense, this resource offers excellent value Einstein's Physics A vivid, accurate, compelling and rigorous treatment, but requiring an investment of time and thought WORTH A LOOK 3D Magnetic Tube Magnetic fields in three dimensions at a low cost Barton's Pendulums A neat, well-made and handy variant, but not a replacement for the more traditional version Weather Station Though not as robust or substantial as hoped for, this can be put to good use with the right software WEB WATCH An online experiment and worksheet are useful for teaching motor efficiency, a glance at CERN, and NASA's interesting information on the alpha-magnetic spectrometer and climate change

  9. Inelastic scattering in planetary atmospheres. I - The Ring effect, without aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattawar, G. W.; Young, A. T.; Humphreys, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    The contribution of inelastic molecular scattering (Rayleigh-Brillouin and rotational Raman scattering) to the filling-in of Fraunhofer lines in the light of the blue sky is studied. Aerosol fluorescence is shown to be negligible, and aerosol scattering is ignored. The angular and polarization dependences of the filling-in detail for single scattering are discussed. An approximate treatment of multiple scattering, using a backward Monte Carlo technique, makes it possible to investigate the effects of the ground albedo. As the molecular scatterings alone produce more line-filling than is observed, it seems likely that aerosols dilute the effect by contributing unaltered sunlight to the observed spectra.

  10. Inelastically scattering particles and wealth distribution in an open economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanina, František

    2004-04-01

    Using the analogy with inelastic granular gases we introduce a model for wealth exchange in society. The dynamics is governed by a kinetic equation, which allows for self-similar solutions. The scaling function has a power-law tail, the exponent being given by a transcendental equation. In the limit of continuous trading, a closed form of the wealth distribution is calculated analytically.

  11. Miscibility gap and phonon thermodynamics of Fe-Au alloys studied by inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Muñoz, Jorge A.; Fultz, Brent

    2015-07-23

    Recent measurements of the phonon spectra of several Au-rich alloys of face-centered-cubic Fe-Au using inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering are summarized. The Wills-Harrison model, accounting for charge transfer upon alloying, is used to explain the observed negative excess vibrational entropy of mixing, which increases the miscibility gap temperature in the system by an estimated maximum of 550 K and we adjudicate to a charge transfer from the Fe to the Au atoms that results in an increase in the electron density in the free-electron-like states and in stronger sd-hybridization. When Au is the solvent, this softens the Fe–Fe bonds but stiffens the Au–Au and Au–Fe bonds which results in a net stiffening relative to the elemental components.

  12. A maximally informative version of inelastic scattering of electromagnetic waves by Langmuir waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, V. I.

    2015-09-01

    The concept of informativeness of nonlinear plasma physics scenarios is explained. Natural ideas of developing highly informative models of plasma kinetics are spelled out. A maximally informative version of inelastic scattering of electromagnetic waves by Langmuir waves in a weakly turbulent inhomogeneous plasma is developed with consideration of possible changes in wave polarization. In addition, a new formula for wave drift in spatial positions and wave vectors is derived. New scenarios of the respective wave drift and inelastic scattering are compared with the previous visions. The results indicate the need for further revision of the traditional understanding of nonlinear plasma phenomena.

  13. High energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering at the SRI-CAT

    SciTech Connect

    Macrander, A.T.

    1996-08-01

    This report is a combination of vugraphs and two papers. The vugraphs give information on the beamline at the APS for IXS and the science addressable by IXS. They also cover the 10 milli-eV resolution spectrometer and the 200 milli-eV resolution spectrometer. The first paper covers the performance of the focusing Ge(444) backscattering analyzers for the inelastic x-ray scattering. The second paper discusses inelastic x-ray scattering from TiC and Ti single crystals.

  14. Enhanced Thermoelectric Power in Graphene: Violation of the Mott Relation by Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahari, Fereshte; Xie, Hong-Yi; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Foster, Matthew S.; Kim, Philip

    2016-04-01

    We report the enhancement of the thermoelectric power (TEP) in graphene with extremely low disorder. At high temperature we observe that the TEP is substantially larger than the prediction of the Mott relation, approaching to the hydrodynamic limit due to strong inelastic scattering among the charge carriers. However, closer to room temperature the inelastic carrier-optical-phonon scattering becomes more significant and limits the TEP below the hydrodynamic prediction. We support our observation by employing a Boltzmann theory incorporating disorder, electron interactions, and optical phonons.

  15. Variability of the downwelling diffuse attenuation coefficient with consideration of inelastic scattering.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaobing; Dickey, Tommy; Chang, Grace

    2002-10-20

    In situ time-series measurements of spectral diffuse downwelling irradiance from the Bermuda Testbed Mooring are presented. Averaged diffuse attenuation coefficients of downwelling irradiance, Kd,and their elastic and inelastic components are investigated at seven wavelengths. At shorter wavelengths (<510 nm), Kd is weakly dependent on the solar zenith angle owing to the prevailing scattering effect and therefore can be considered a quasi-inherent optical property. At longer wavelengths (>510 nm), Kd shows a strong dependence on the solar zenith angle. As depth increases, inelastic scattering plays a greater role for the underwater light field at red wavelengths. PMID:12396201

  16. Elastic and inelastic scattering of /sup 16/O by /sup 26/Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Rotberg, V.H.; Mittig, W.

    1980-10-01

    Angular distributions and excitation functions for the elastic and inelastic (2/sup +/,1.81 MeV) scattering of /sup 16/O ions by /sup 26/Mg have been measured in the energy range from 22 up to 50 MeV. The data were analyzed in the coupled channel scheme with different potentials. The inelastic scattering data are found to be important to distinguish between optical model parameter sets. The deformation parameter delta/sub n/=..beta../sub n/R is extracted and found to be potential dependent. It is compared to the Coulomb deformation delta/sub C/.

  17. Enhanced Thermoelectric Power in Graphene: Violation of the Mott Relation by Inelastic Scattering.

    PubMed

    Ghahari, Fereshte; Xie, Hong-Yi; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Foster, Matthew S; Kim, Philip

    2016-04-01

    We report the enhancement of the thermoelectric power (TEP) in graphene with extremely low disorder. At high temperature we observe that the TEP is substantially larger than the prediction of the Mott relation, approaching to the hydrodynamic limit due to strong inelastic scattering among the charge carriers. However, closer to room temperature the inelastic carrier-optical-phonon scattering becomes more significant and limits the TEP below the hydrodynamic prediction. We support our observation by employing a Boltzmann theory incorporating disorder, electron interactions, and optical phonons. PMID:27081996

  18. Observation of events with an energetic forward neutron in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Okrasinski, J. R.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Zhang, H.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Amelung, C.; Bornheim, A.; Crittenden, J.; Deffner, R.; Doeker, T.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Grothe, M.; Hartmann, H.; Heinloth, K.; Heinz, L.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Katz, U. F.; Mengel, S.; Paul, E.; Pfeiffer, M.; Rembser, Ch.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Cottingham, W. N.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Hayes, M. E.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Piccioni, D.; Roff, D. G.; Tapper, R. J.; Yoshida, R.; Arneodo, M.; Ayad, R.; Capua, M.; Garfagnini, A.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Jing, Z.; Liu, W.; Parsons, J. A.; Titz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Jakubowski, Z.; Przybycień, M. B.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zajaç, J.; Duliński, Z.; Kotański, A.; Abbiendi, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J. K.; Cases, G.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Flasiński, M.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Glasman, C.; Göttlicher, P.; Große-Knetter, J.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Heßling, H.; Iga, Y.; Johnson, K. F.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Lüke, D.; Mainusch, J.; Mańczak, O.; Milewski, J.; Monteiro, T.; Ng, J. S. T.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Poitrzkowski, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Schneekloth, U.; Schulz, W.; Selonke, F.; Surrow, B.; Voß, T.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Wollmer, U.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Grabosch, H. J.; Kharchilava, A.; Mari, S. M.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Wulff, N.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P.; Maccarrone, G.; De Pasquale, S.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Trefzger, T.; Wölfle, S.; Bromley, J. T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Saxon, D. H.; Sinclair, L. E.; Utley, M. L.; Wilson, A. S.; Dannemann, A.; Holm, U.; Horstmann, D.; Sinkus, R.; Wick, K.; Burow, B. D.; Hagge, L.; Lohrmann, E.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Brümmer, N.; Butterworth, I.; Harris, V. L.; Howell, G.; Hung, B. H. Y.; Lamberti, L.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Pavel, N.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Sideris, D.; Whitfield, A. F.; Mallik, U.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; An, S. H.; Cho, G. H.; Ko, B. J.; Lee, S. B.; Nam, S. W.; Park, H. S.; Park, S. K.; Kartik, S.; Kim, H.-J.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W.; Nadendla, V. K.; Barreiro, F.; Fernandez, J. P.; Graciani, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; Martinez, M.; del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; Terron, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Lim, J. N.; Matthews, C. G.; Patel, P. M.; Riveline, M.; Stairs, D. G.; St-Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Zacek, G.; Tsurugai, T.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Kobrin, V. D.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Savin, A. A.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotov, N. P.; Botje, M.; Chlebana, F.; Engelen, J.; de Kamps, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; van Sighem, A.; Tiecke, H.; Verkerke, W.; Vossebeld, J.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; van Woudenberg, R.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Li, C.; Ling, T. Y.; Nylander, P.; Park, I. H.; Romanowski, T. A.; Bailey, D. S.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Harnew, N.; Lancaster, M.; Lindemann, L.; McFall, J. D.; Nath, C.; Noyes, V. A.; Quadt, A.; Tickner, J. R.; Uijterwaal, H.; Walczak, R.; Waters, D. S.; Wilson, F. F.; Yip, T.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; De Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Zuin, F.; Bulmahn, J.; Feild, R. G.; Oh, B. Y.; Whitmore, J. J.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Tassi, E.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Shah, T. P.; Barberis, E.; Dubbs, T.; Heusch, C.; Van Hook, M.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D. C.; Biltzinger, J.; Seifert, R. J.; Schwarzer, O.; Walenta, A. H.; Zech, G.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Levy, A.; Fleck, J. I.; Inuzuka, M.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Mine, S.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Umemori, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Matsushita, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Benard, F.; Brkic, M.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Polenz, S.; Sampson, C. R.; Simmons, D.; Teuscher, R. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Catterall, C. D.; Jones, T. W.; Kaziewicz, P. B.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Shulman, J.; Sutton, M. R.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Bogusz, W.; Ciborowski, J.; Gajewski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Krzyżanowski, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Coldewey, C.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Revel, D.; Zer-Zion, D.; Badgett, W. F.; Breitweg, J.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Dasu, S.; Foudas, C.; Loveless, R. J.; Mattingly, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Silverstein, S.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wodarczyk, M.; Bhadra, S.; Cardy, M. L.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Frisken, W. R.; Furutani, K. M.; Khakzad, M.; Murray, W. N.; Schmidke, W. B.; ZEUS Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    In deep inelastic neutral current scattering of positrons and protons at the center of mass energy of 300 GeV, we observe, with the ZEUS detector, events with a high energy neutron produced at very small scattering angles with respect to the proton direction. The events constitute a fixed fraction of the deep inelastic, neutral current event sample independent of Bjorken x and Q2 in the range 3 · 10 -4 < xBJ < 6 · 10 -3 and 10 < Q2 < 100 GeV 2.

  19. A maximally informative version of inelastic scattering of electromagnetic waves by Langmuir waves

    SciTech Connect

    Erofeev, V. I.

    2015-09-15

    The concept of informativeness of nonlinear plasma physics scenarios is explained. Natural ideas of developing highly informative models of plasma kinetics are spelled out. A maximally informative version of inelastic scattering of electromagnetic waves by Langmuir waves in a weakly turbulent inhomogeneous plasma is developed with consideration of possible changes in wave polarization. In addition, a new formula for wave drift in spatial positions and wave vectors is derived. New scenarios of the respective wave drift and inelastic scattering are compared with the previous visions. The results indicate the need for further revision of the traditional understanding of nonlinear plasma phenomena.

  20. Conversion method of powder inelastic scattering data for one-dimensional systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tomiyasu, Dr. Keisuke; Fujita, Prof. Masaki; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Bewley, Robert I.; Bull, Dr. Martyn J.; Bennington, Dr. Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Extracting dispersive magnetic excitations from inelastic neutron scattering data usually requires large single crystals. We present a simple yet powerful method for extracting such information from polycrystalline or powder data for one-dimensional systems. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this data treatment by extracting dispersion curves from powder inelastic neutron scattering data on the one-dimensional spin-half systems: CuGeO3 and Rb2Cu2Mo3O12. For many such materials it is not possible to grow sufficiently large crystals and this method offers a quick and efficient way to study their magnetic excitations.

  1. State-to-state inelastic and reactive molecular beam scattering from surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lykke, K.R. ); Kay, B.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) laser spectroscopic and molecular beam-surface scattering techniques are coupled to study inelastic and reactive gas-surface scattering with state-to-state specificity. Rotational, vibrational, translational and angular distributions have been measured for the inelastic scattering of HCI and N {sub 2} from Au(111). In both cases the scattering is direct-inelastic in nature and exhibits interesting dynamical features such as rotational rainbow scattering. In an effort to elucidate the dynamics of chemical reactions occurring on surfaces we have extended our quantum-resolved scattering studies to include the reactive scattering of a beam of gas phase H-atoms from a chlorinated metal surface M-CI. The nascent rotational and vibrational distributions of the HCI product are determined using REMPI. The thermochemistry for this reaction on Au indicates that the product formation proceeding through chemisorbed H-atoms is slightly endothermic while direct reaction of a has phase H-atom with M-CI is highly exothermic (ca. 50 kcal/mole). Details of the experimental techniques, results and implications regarding the scattering dynamics are discussed. 55 ref., 8 fig.

  2. NEANSC international evaluation cooperation SG10 activities on inelastic scattering cross sections for weakly absorbing fission-product nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Chiba, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Tsuneo; Nakajima, Yutaka; Zukeran, Atsushi; Gruppelaar, H.; Hogenbirk, A.; Salvatores, M.; Dietze, K.

    1994-12-31

    An evaluation method of inelastic scattering cross sections of FP nuclides is investigated. The origins of the discrepancy found in the calculated and measured sample reactivity worths are also discussed emphasizing the effect of ambiguity in inelastic scattering cross sections and neutron spectra.

  3. Inelastic neutron scattering and raman light scattering from hydrogen-filled clathrates hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulivi, L.; Celli, M.; Giannasi, A.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.; Zoppi, M.

    2008-07-01

    Several samples of ternary tetrahydrofuran-H2O-H2 and binary H2O-H2 clathrate hydrates have been analysed by high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering and Raman light scattering. The neutron spectrum presents several intense bands due to H2 molecule excitations and in particular to rotational transitions, centre-of-mass translational transitions of either para-or ortho-H2, and to combinations of these. The H2 molecule behaves in the clathrate cage as an almost free rotor, and performs a translational motion (rattling), that is a paradigmatic example of the motion of a quantum particle in a non-harmonic three-dimensional potential well. Both the H2 rotational transition and the fundamental of the rattling transition split into triplets. Raman spectra show a similar splitting of the S0(0) rotational transition, due to a significant anisotropy of the potential with respect to the orientation of the molecule in the cage. The comparison of our experimental values for the transition frequencies to a recent quantum mechanical calculation is discussed.

  4. {alpha}-particle optical potentials for nuclear astrophysics (NA) and nuclear technology (NT)

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, V.; Avrigeanu, M.

    2012-11-20

    The high precision of recent measurements for low-energy {alpha}-particle elastic-scattering as well as induced-reaction data makes possible the understanding of actual limits and possible improvement of the global optical model potentials parameters. Involvement of recent optical potentials for reliable description of both the elastic scattering and emission of {alpha}-particles, of equal interest for nuclear astrophysics (NA) and nuclear technology (NT) for fusion devices, is discussed in the present work.

  5. 26Al+p elastic and inelastic scattering reactions and galactic abundances of 26Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittman, S. T.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K. A.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Matei, C.; Matos, M.; Moazen, B. H.; Nesaraja, C. D.; O'Malley, P. D.; Pain, S. D.; Parker, P. D.; Peters, W. A.; Shriner, J. F., Jr.; Smith, M. S.

    2012-06-01

    Galactic 26Al is the first radioactive nucleus to be positively identified by γ-ray astronomy with detection of the 1.809 MeV γ ray associated with its decay. This nucleus is destroyed in astrophysical environments in the 26Al(p,γ)27Si and inelastic 26Al+p scattering reactions where properties of 27Si levels determine reaction rates. To investigate these properties, elastic and inelastic 26Al+p scattering reactions were measured between Ec.m. = 0.5-1.5 MeV at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A candidate for a new resonance in the 26Al(p,γ)27Si reaction was identified. Upper limits were also set on the strengths of postulated resonances and on the cross section of the inelastic reaction, but there is little effect on current reaction rate calculations.

  6. Shadowing in deep inelastic muon scattering from nuclear targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, M.; Arvidson, A.; Aubert, J. J.; Badelek, B.; Beaufays, J.; Bee, C. P.; Benchouk, C.; Berghoff, G.; Bird, I.; Blum, D.; Böhm, E.; De Bouard, X.; Brasse, F. W.; Braun, H.; Broll, C.; Brown, S.; Brück, H.; Brüll, A.; Calen, H.; Chima, J. S.; Ciborowski, J.; Clifft, R.; Coignet, G.; Combley, F.; Coughlan, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dahlgren, S.; Dengler, F.; Derado, I.; Dreyer, T.; Drees, J.; Drobnitzki, M.; Düren, M.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, A.; Edwards, M.; Ernst, T.; Eszes, G.; Favier, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, J.; Ftacnik, J.; Gabathuler, E.; Gajewski, J.; Gamet, R.; Geddes, N.; Grafström, P.; Gustafsson, L.; Haas, J.; Hagberg, E.; Hasert, F. J.; Hayman, P.; Heusse, P.; Jaffré, M.; Jacholkowska, A.; Janata, F.; Jancso, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kabuss, E. M.; Kaiser, R.; Kellner, G.; Krüger, A.; Krüger, J.; Kullander, S.; Landgraf, U.; Lanske, D.; Loken, J.; Long, K.; Maire, M.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Maselli, S.; Mohr, W.; Montanet, F.; Montgomery, H. E.; Nagy, E.; Nassalski, J.; Norton, P. R.; Oakham, F. G.; Osborne, A. M.; Pascaud, C.; Pawlik, B.; Payre, P.; Peroni, C.; Peschel, H.; Pessard, H.; Pettingale, J.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pietrzyk, U.; Pönsgen, B.; Pötsch, M.; Renton, P.; Ribarics, P.; Rith, K.; Rondio, E.; Sandacz, A.; Scheer, M.; Schlagböhmer, A.; Schiemann, H.; Schmitz, N.; Schneegans, M.; Scholz, M.; Schröder, T.; Schultze, K.; Seidel, A.; Sloan, T.; Stier, H. E.; Studt, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Thénard, J. M.; Thompson, J. C.; De La Torre, A.; Toth, J.; Urban, L.; Urban, L.; Wallucks, W.; Whalley, M.; Wheeler, S.; Williams, W. S. C.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Windmolders, R.; Wolf, G.; Ziemons, K.; European Muon Collaboration

    1988-09-01

    Results are presented on the ratio of the inelastic muon-nucleus cross section per nucleon for carbon and calcium relative to that for deuterium. The measurements were made in the kinematic range of low x (0.003-0.1) and low Q2 (0.3-3.2 GeV 2) at an incident muon energy of 280 GeV. The calcium to deuterium ratio shows a significant x dependence which is interpreted as a shadowing effect. No strong Q2 dependence is observed. This suggests that the effect is due at least partially to parton interactions within the nucleus.

  7. Mechanism of elastic and inelastic proton scattering on a {sup 15}C nucleus in diffraction theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraeva, E. T.; Zhusupov, M. A.; Imambekov, O.

    2012-11-15

    The amplitudes for elastic and inelastic proton scattering on the neutron-rich nucleus {sup 15}C (to its J{sup {pi}} = 5/2{sup +} level in the latter case) in inverse kinematics were calculated within Glauber diffraction theory. First- and second-order terms were taken into account in the multiple-scattering operator. The {sup 15}C wave function in the multiparticle shell model was used. This made it possible to calculate not only respective differential cross sections but also the contribution of proton scattering on nucleons occurring in different shells. The differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering were calculated at the energies of 0.2, 0.6, and 1 GeV per nucleon.

  8. Magnetic relaxation studies on a single-molecule magnet by time-resolved inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, O.; Carver, G.; Dobe, C.; Biner, D.; Sieber, A.; Güdel, H. U.; Mutka, H.; Ollivier, J.; Chakov, N. E.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved inelastic neutron scattering measurements on an array of single-crystals of the single-molecule magnet Mn12ac are presented. The data facilitate a spectroscopic investigation of the slow relaxation of the magnetization in this compound in the time domain.

  9. Application of Geant4 simulation for analysis of soil carbon inelastic neutron scattering measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) was applied to determine soil carbon content. Due to non-uniform soil carbon depth distribution, the correlation between INS signals with some soil carbon content parameter is not obvious; however, a proportionality between INS signals and average carbon weight per...

  10. Longitudinal Polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar Hyperons in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Sapozhnikov, M. G.

    2007-06-13

    The longitudinal polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar hyperons produced in deep-inelastic scattering of 160 GeV/c polarized positive muons is studied in the COMPASS (CERN NA58) experiment. Preliminary results on the longitudinal polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar from data collected during the 2003 run are presented.

  11. Monte-Carlo simulation of soil carbon measurements by inelastic neutron scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring soil carbon is critical for assessing the potential impact of different land management practices on carbon sequestration. The inelastic neutron scattering (INS) of fast neutrons (with energy around 14 MeV) on carbon-12 nuclei produces gamma rays with energy of 4.43 MeV; this gamma flux ca...

  12. Hot background” of the mobile inelastic neutron scattering system for soil carbon analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The problem of gamma spectrum peaks identification arises when conducting soil carbon (and other elements) analysis using the mobile inelastic neutron scattering (MINS) system. Some gamma spectrum peaks could be associated with radioisotopes appearing due to neutron activation of both the MINS syste...

  13. 4 f excitations in Ce Kondo lattices studied by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorese, A.; Dellea, G.; Fanciulli, M.; Seiro, S.; Geibel, C.; Krellner, C.; Makarova, I. P.; Braicovich, L.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Brookes, N. B.; Kummer, K.

    2016-04-01

    The potential of resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering to measure 4 f crystal electric-field excitation spectra in Ce Kondo lattices has been examined. Spectra have been obtained for several Ce systems and show a well-defined structure determined by crystal-field, spin-orbit, and charge-transfer excitations only. The spectral shapes of the excitation spectra can be well understood in the framework of atomic multiplet calculations. For CeCu2Si2 we found notable disagreement between the inelastic x-ray-scattering spectra and theoretical calculations when using the crystal-field scheme proposed from inelastic neutron scattering. Modified sets of crystal-field parameters yield better agreement. Our results also show that, with the very recent improvements of soft x-ray spectrometers in resolution to below 30 meV at the Ce M4 ,5 edges, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering could be an ideal tool to determine the crystal-field scheme in Ce Kondo lattices and other rare-earth compounds.

  14. Gate-opening effect in ZIF-8: the first experimental proof using inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Casco, M E; Cheng, Y Q; Daemen, L L; Fairen-Jimenez, D; Ramos-Fernández, E V; Ramirez-Cuesta, A J; Silvestre-Albero, J

    2016-03-01

    The gate-opening phenomenon in ZIFs is of paramount importance to understand their behavior in industrial molecular separations. Here we show for the first time using in situ inelastic neutron scattering (INS) the swinging of the -CH3 groups and the imidazolate linkers in the prototypical ZIF-8 and ZIF-8@AC hybrid materials upon exposure to mild N2 pressure. PMID:26845644

  15. Reply to comment by Thomas on ''On rainbow scattering in inelastic molecular collisions''

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.M.; Lee, K.T.

    1981-02-15

    The comments of Thomas/sup 1/ on the location of rainbows in inelastic molecular scattering of Ref. 2 are discussed and evaluated. It is contended that more insight into the nature of reainbows in rotatinally inelstic collisions is obtained by using the arguments in ref. 2. (AIP)

  16. Resonances in rotationally inelastic scattering of OH(X2Π) with helium and neon.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, Koos B; Ma, Qianli; Alexander, Millard H; Dagdigian, Paul J; Tanis, Dick; Groenenboom, Gerrit C; van der Avoird, Ad; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T

    2012-04-14

    We present detailed calculations on resonances in rotationally and spin-orbit inelastic scattering of OH (X(2)Π, j = 3/2, F(1), f) radicals with He and Ne atoms. We calculate new ab initio potential energy surfaces for OH-He, and the cross sections derived from these surfaces compare well with the recent crossed beam scattering experiment of Kirste et al. [Phys. Rev. A 82, 042717 (2010)]. We identify both shape and Feshbach resonances in the integral and differential state-to-state scattering cross sections, and we discuss the prospects for experimentally observing scattering resonances using Stark decelerated beams of OH radicals. PMID:22502519

  17. Resource Letter on Stimulated Inelastic X-ray Scattering at an XFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Bruce D.; /SLAC

    2010-09-02

    At sufficient X-ray intensity, stimulated effects in inelastic scattering will become important. These coherent, non-linear optical phenomena may be used to impulsively produce a high degree of collective excitation in, for example, correlated electron materials, suitable for performing ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy. This Resource Letter collects information on fundamental aspects of stimulated X-ray scattering and evaluates the prospect for successful experiments at a present or future X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facility.

  18. Inelastic and reactive scattering of hyperthermal atomic oxygen from amorphous carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K.; Nelson, Christine M.; Brinza, David E.; Liang, Ranty H.

    1991-01-01

    The reaction of hyperthermal oxygen atoms with an amorphous carbon-13 surface was studied using a modified universal crossed molecular beams apparatus. Time-of-flight distributions of inelastically scattered O-atoms and reactively scattered CO-13 and CO2-13 were measured with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. Two inelastic scattering channels were observed, corresponding to a direct inelastic process in which the scattered O-atoms retain 20 to 30 percent of their initial kinetic energy and to a trapping desorption process whereby O-atoms emerge from the surface at thermal velocities. Reactive scattering data imply the formation of two kinds of CO products, slow products whose translational energies are determined by the surface temperature and hyperthermal (Approx. 3 eV) products with translational energies comprising roughly 30 percent of the total available energy (E sub avl), where E sub avl is the sum of the collision energy and the reaction exothermicity. Angular data show that the hyperthermal CO is scattered preferentially in the specular direction. CO2 product was also observed, but at much lower intensities than CO and with only thermal velocities.

  19. Prospects for alpha particle studies on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.

    1987-05-01

    TFTR is expected to produce approximately 5 MW of alpha heating during the D/T Q approx. = 1 phase of operation in 1990. At that point the collective confinement properties and the heating effects of alpha particles become accessible for study for the first time. This paper outlines the potential performance of TFTR with respect to alpha particle production, the diagnostics which will be available for alpha particle measurements, and the physics issues which can be studied both before and during D/T operation.

  20. Alpha particle confinement in tandem mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Devoto, R.S.; Ohnishi, M.; Kerns, J.; Woo, J.T.

    1980-10-10

    Mechanisms leading to loss of alpha particles from non-axisymmetric tandem mirrors are considered. Stochastic diffusion due to bounce-drift resonances, which can cause rapid radial losses of high-energy alpha particles, can be suppressed by imposing a 20% rise in axisymmetric fields before the quadrupole transition sections. Alpha particles should then be well-confined until thermal energies when they enter the resonant plateau require. A fast code for computation of drift behavior in reactors is described. Sample calculations are presented for resonant particles in a proposed coil set for the Tandem Mirror Next Step.

  1. Jet production and fragmentation properties in deep inelastic muon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, M.; Arvidson, A.; Aubert, J. J.; Badelek, B.; Beaufays, J.; Bee, C. P.; Benchouk, C.; Berghoff, G.; Bird, I.; Blum, D.; Böhm, E.; de Bouard, X.; Brasse, F. W.; Braun, H.; Broll, C.; Brown, S.; Brück, H.; Calen, H.; Chima, J. S.; Ciborowski, J.; Clifft, R.; Coignet, G.; Combley, F.; Conrad, J.; Coughlan, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dahlgren, S.; Dengler, F.; Derado, I.; Dreyer, T.; Drees, J.; Drobnitzki, M.; Düren, M.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, A.; Edwards, M.; Ernst, T.; Eszes, G.; Favier, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Flauger, W.; Foster, J.; Ftàčnik, J.; Gabathuler, E.; Gajewski, J.; Gamet, R.; Gayler, J.; Geddes, N.; Grafström, P.; Grard, F.; Haas, J.; Hagberg, E.; Hasert, F. J.; Hayman, P.; Heusse, P.; Jaffre, M.; Jacholkowska, A.; Janata, F.; Jancso, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kabuss, E. M.; Kellner, G.; Korbel, V.; Krüger, A.; Krüger, J.; Kullander, S.; Landgraf, U.; Lanske, D.; Loken, J.; Long, K.; Maire, M.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Maselli, S.; Mohr, W.; Montanet, F.; Montgomery, H. E.; Nagy, E.; Nassalski, J.; Norton, P. R.; Oakham, F. G.; Osborne, A. M.; Pascaud, C.; Pawlik, B.; Payre, P.; Peroni, C.; Peschel, H.; Pessard, H.; Pettingale, J.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pietrzyk, U.; Pönsgen, B.; Pötsch, M.; Renton, P.; Ribarics, P.; Rith, K.; Rondio, E.; Sandacz, A.; Scheer, M.; Schlabböhmer, A.; Schiemann, H.; Schmitz, N.; Schneegans, M.; Scholz, M.; Schröder, T.; Schultze, K.; Sloan, T.; Stier, H. E.; Studt, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Thénard, J. M.; Thompson, J. C.; de La Torre, A.; Toth, J.; Urban, L.; Urban, L.; Wallucks, W.; Whalley, M.; Wheeler, S.; Williams, W. S. C.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Windmolders, R.; Wolf, G.; Ziemons, K.

    1987-12-01

    Results are presented from a study of deep inelastic 280 GeV muon-nucleon interactions on the transverse momenta and jet properties of the final state hadrons. The results are analysed in a way which attempts to separate the contributions of hard and soft QCD effects from those that arise from the fragmentation process. The fragmentation models with which the data are compared are the Lund string model, the independent jet model, the QCD parton shower model including soft gluon interference effects, and the firestring model. The discrimination between these models is discussed. Various methods of analysis of the data in terms of hard QCD processes are presented. From a study of the properties of the jet profiles a value of α s , to leading order, is determined using the Lund string model, namely α s =0.29±0.01 (stat.) ±0.02 (syst.), for Q 2˜20 GeV2.

  2. Dynamical regimes on the Cl + H2 collisions: Inelastic rainbow scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Sánchez, L.; Aldegunde, J.; Jambrina, P. G.; Aoiz, F. J.

    2011-08-01

    While Cl + H2 reactive collisions have been a subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies, inelastic collisions leading to rotational energy transfer and/or vibrational excitation have been largely ignored. In this work, extensive quantum mechanical calculations covering the 0.5-1.5 eV total energy range and various initial rovibrational states have been carried out and used to perform a joint study of inelastic and reactive Cl + H2 collisions. Quasiclassical trajectories calculations complement the quantum mechanical results. The analysis of the inelastic transition probabilities has revealed the existence of two distinct dynamical regimes that correlate with low and high impact parameters, b, and are neatly separated by glory scattering. It has been found that while high-b collisions are mainly responsible for |Δj| = 2 transitions which dominate the inelastic scattering, they are very inefficient in promoting higher |Δj| transitions. The effectiveness of this type of collision also drops with rotational excitation of H2. In contrast, reactive scattering, that competes with |Δ j| > 2 inelastic transitions, is exclusively caused by low-b collisions, and it is greatly favored when the reactants get rotationally excited. Previous studies focusing on the reactivity of the Cl + H2 system established that the van der Waals well located in the entrance channel play a key role in determining the mechanism of the collisions. Our results prove this to be also a case for inelastic processes, where the origin of the double dynamical regime can be traced back to the influence exerted by this well that shapes the topology of the entrance channel of the Cl-H2 system.

  3. Precise QCD Predictions for the Production of Dijet Final States in Deep Inelastic Scattering.

    PubMed

    Currie, James; Gehrmann, Thomas; Niehues, Jan

    2016-07-22

    The production of two-jet final states in deep inelastic scattering is an important QCD precision observable. We compute it for the first time to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in perturbative QCD. Our calculation is fully differential in the lepton and jet variables and allows one to impose cuts on the jets in both the laboratory and the Breit frame. We observe that the NNLO corrections are moderate in size, except at kinematical edges, and that their inclusion leads to a substantial reduction of the scale variation uncertainty on the predictions. Our results will enable the inclusion of deep inelastic dijet data in precision phenomenology studies. PMID:27494466

  4. Precise QCD Predictions for the Production of Dijet Final States in Deep Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, James; Gehrmann, Thomas; Niehues, Jan

    2016-07-01

    The production of two-jet final states in deep inelastic scattering is an important QCD precision observable. We compute it for the first time to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in perturbative QCD. Our calculation is fully differential in the lepton and jet variables and allows one to impose cuts on the jets in both the laboratory and the Breit frame. We observe that the NNLO corrections are moderate in size, except at kinematical edges, and that their inclusion leads to a substantial reduction of the scale variation uncertainty on the predictions. Our results will enable the inclusion of deep inelastic dijet data in precision phenomenology studies.

  5. Calculation of inelastic electron-nucleus scattering form factors of 29Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, A. D.; Al-Dahan, N.; Sharrad, F. I.; Hossain, I.

    2014-08-01

    Inelastic electron scattering form factors for 29Si nucleus with total angular momentum and positive parity (Jπ) and excited energy (3/2+, 1.273 MeV; 5/2+, 2.028 MeV; 3/2+, 2.425 MeV and 7/2+, 4.079 MeV) have been calculated using higher energy configurations outside the sd-shell. The calculations of inelastic form factors up to the first- and second-order with and without core-polarization (CP) effects were compared with the available experimental data. The calculations of inelastic electron scattering form factors up to the first-order with CP effects are in agreement with the experimental data, excepted for states 3/2+(1.273 MeV) and 5/2+(2.028 MeV) and without this effect are failed for all states. Furthermore, the calculations of inelastic electron scattering form factors up to the second-order with CP effects are in agreement with the experimental data for 3/2+(1.273 MeV) and 5/2+(2.028 MeV).

  6. Inelastic scattering in atom-diatomic molecule collisions. I - Rotational transitions in the sudden approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The impact parameter method and the sudden approximation are applied to determine the total probability of inelastic rotational transitions arising from a collision of an atom and a homonuclear diatomic molecule at large impact parameters. An analytical approximation to this probability is found for conditions where the electron exchange or overlap forces dominate the scattering. An approximate upper bound to the range of impact parameters for which rotational scattering can be important is determined. In addition, an estimate of the total inelastic cross section is found at conditions for which a statistical model describes the scattering well. The results of this analysis are applied to Ar-O2 collisions and may be readily applied to other combinations of atoms and molecules.

  7. Resonant inelastic contact scattering of X-ray photons on atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopersky, A. N.; Nadolinsky, A. M.; Yavna, V. A.

    2006-10-01

    The existence of an extended resonance structure outside the X-ray emission regions is theoretically predicted in the total double differential cross section for the scattering of linearly polarized photons on free atoms (ions). This structure is almost entirely determined by inelastic photon scattering of the contact type. The amplitude of the inelastic contact scattering probability is described using an analytical expression for a non-relativistic transition operator, which was previously obtained by the author outside the dipole and momentum approximations. The resonant inelastic contact scattering of X-ray photons on a neon atom and neonlike ions of argon, titanium, and iron has been studied. Calculations were performed in a nonrelativistic approximation for the wave functions of the scattering states, with allowance for many-body effects of the radial relaxation of one-electron orbitals in the Hartree-Fock field of a deep 1 s vacancy and (for neon atom) the double excitation/ionization of the ground atomic state.

  8. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E. Jr.; Dawson, J.M.

    1983-11-23

    This invention relates generally to high energy confined plasmas and more particularly is directed to measuring the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a confined energetic plasma.

  9. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle emitting radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Pozzi, O R

    2004-12-01

    An important consideration in the development of effective strategies for radioimmunotherapy is the nature of the radiation emitted by the radionuclide. Radionuclides decaying by the emission of alpha-particles offer the possibility of matching the cell specific reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with radiation with a range of only a few cell diameters. Furthermore, alpha-particles have important biological advantages compared with external beam radiation and beta-particles including a higher biological effectiveness, which is nearly independent of oxygen concentration, dose rate and cell cycle position. In this review, the clinical settings most likely to benefit from alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy will be discussed. The current status of preclinical and clinical research with antibodies labeled with 3 promising alpha-particle emitting radionuclides - (213)Bi, (225)Ac, and (211)At - also will be summarized. PMID:15640792

  10. Study of Low Energy Electron Inelastic Scattering Mechanisms Using Spin Sensitive Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hongbing

    1995-01-01

    Spin sensitive electron spectroscopies were used to study low energy electron inelastic scattering from metal surfaces and thin films. In these experiments, a beam of spin polarized electrons from a GaAs source is directed on the sample surface, and the spin polarization and intensity are measured as a function of energy loss and scattering angle by a Mott electron polarimeter coupled with a concentric hemispherical energy analyzer. Systematic studies of the angular dependence of inelastically scattered electrons were conducted on a Cu(100) surface, and Mo/Cu(100), non-magnetized Fe/Cu(100), and Co/Cu(100) films. The polarization and intensity of scattered electrons were measured as function of energy loss and scattering angle. Further studies were also conducted on Ag(100) surface and amorphous Cu/Ag(100) films. From the experimental results, the angular distributions of dipole and impact scattered electrons can be determined individually and both are found to peak in the specular scattering direction. Preliminary studies were conducted on magnetized Co/Cu(100) films. The spin dependent scattering intensity asymmetry was measured, with a clearly observable peak at energy loss of ~1 eV, which coincides with the band splitting. The polarizations of secondary electrons produced by an unpolarized primary beam were also measured. The polarizations can be related to the band polarization of magnetized cobalt films.

  11. Inelastic scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yelon, W.B.; Schupp, G.

    1990-10-01

    We give a progress report for the work which has been carried out in the last three years with DOE support. A facility for high-intensity Moessbauer scattering is now fully operational at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) as well as facility at Purdue, using special isotopes produced at MURR. High precision, fundamental Moessbauer effect studies have been carried out using scattering to filter the unwanted radiation. These have led to a new Fourier transform method for describing Moessbauer effect (ME) lineshape and a direct method of fitting ME data to the convolution integral. These methods allow complete correction for source resonance self absorption (SRSA) and the accurate representation of interference effects that add an asymmetric component to the ME lines. We have begun applying these techniques to attenuated ME sources whose central peak has been attenuated by stationary resonant absorbers, to more precisely determine interference parameters and line-shape behavior in the resonance asymptotic region. This analysis is important to both the fundamental ME studies and to scattering studies for which a deconvolution is essential for extracting the correct recoilless fractions and interference parameters. A number of scattering studies have been successfully carried out including a study of the thermal diffuse scattering in Si, which led to an analysis of the resolution function for gamma-ray scattering. Also studied was the anharmonic motion in Na and the satellite reflection Debye-Waller factor in TaS{sub 2}, which indicate phason rather than phonon behavior. We have begun quasielastic diffusion studies in viscous liquids and current results are summarized. These advances, coupled to our improvements in MIcrofoil Conversion Electron spectroscopy lay the foundation for the proposed research outlined in this request for a three-year renewal of DOE support.

  12. Elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons in gases and solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Three apparatuses were designed and built: The first, which is now operative, was designed to study the details of positron thermalization in solids and the subsequent emission of the low energy positrons from moderating foils; The second apparatus now under test is a positron bottle similar in design to an electron trap. It was built to store positrons at a fixed energy and to look at the number of stored positrons (storage time) as a function of a scattering gas in the vacuum chamber. The third apparatus is a crossed beam apparatus where positron-, alkali scattering will be studied. Much of the apparatus is now under test with electrons.

  13. Measurement of high energy resolution inelastic proton scattering at and close to zero degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamii, A.; Fujita, Y.; Matsubara, H.; Adachi, T.; Carter, J.; Dozono, M.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Itahashi, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Ninomiya, S.; Perez-Cerdan, A. B.; Popescu, L.; Rubio, B.; Saito, T.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Sasamoto, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Smit, F. D.; Tameshige, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Zenhiro, J.

    2009-07-01

    Measurements of inelastic proton scattering with high energy resolution at forward scattering angles including 0∘ are described. High-resolution halo-free beams were accelerated by the cyclotron complex at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics. Instrumental background events were minimized using the high-quality beam. The remaining instrumental background events were eliminated by applying a background subtraction method. As a result, clean spectra were obtained even for a heavy target nucleus such as Pb208. A high energy resolution of 20 keV (FWHM) and a scattering angle resolution of ±0.6∘ were achieved at an incident proton energy of 295 MeV.

  14. A 2 m inelastic x-ray scattering spectrometer at CMC-XOR, Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J. P.; Coburn, D. S.; Kim, Y. J.; Gog, T.; Casa, D. M.; Kodituwakku, C. N.; Sinn, H.; X-Ray Science Division; BNL; Univ. of Toronto

    2007-07-01

    The design and commissioning of an inelastic X-ray scattering instrument at CMC-XOR at the Advanced Photon Source is reported. The instrument features a 2 m vertical-scattering arm with a novel counterweight design to reduce the twisting moment as the arm is moved in the scattering plane. A Ge(733) spherical analyzer was fabricated and an overall resolution of 118 meV (FWHM) was obtained with a Si(444) monochromator and a Si(111) pre-monochromator. Early results from a representative cuprate, La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, are reported.

  15. Toroidal silicon polarization analyzer for resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuan; Casa, Diego; Kim, Jungho; Gog, Thomas; Li, Chengyang; Burns, Clement

    2016-08-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is a powerful probe for studying electronic excitations in materials. Standard high energy RIXS measurements do not measure the polarization of the scattered x-rays, which is unfortunate since it carries information about the nature and symmetry of the excitations involved in the scattering process. Here we report the fabrication of thin Si-based polarization analyzers with a double-concave toroidal surface, useful for L-edge RIXS studies in heavier atoms such as the 5-d transition metals. PMID:27587100

  16. Inelastic scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yelon, W.B.; Schupp, G.

    1993-02-01

    The QUEGS facility at MURR has produced a number of new results and demonstrated the range of potential applications of high resolution, high intensity Moessbauer scattering. This work has been carried out by both MU and Purdue researchers and includes published results on Na, W, pentadecane, polydimethylsiloxane and other systems, manuscripts submitted on alkali halides (Phys. Rev. B) and accurate Moessbauer lineshape measurements (Phys. Rev. C), and manuscripts in preparation on glycerol, NiAl and Moessbauer spectra obtained by modulating a scattering crystal. Recently, new collaborations have been initiated which will substantially enhance our efforts. These are with W. Steiner (Vienna), G. Coddens (Saclay), and R. D. Taylor (Los Alamos). Steiner is experienced with Fe-57 Moessbauer scattering, while Coddens specializes in quasielastic neutron scattering; both of these areas naturally complement our work. R. D. Taylor has pioneered Moessbauer spectroscopy from the time of its discovery and has already made important contributions to our study of lattice dynamics and superconductivity for lead alloyed with small quantities of tin. At the same time, a significant instrument upgrade is underway, funded in part by the DOE-URIP program.

  17. CT14QED parton distribution functions from isolated photon production in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Carl; Pumplin, Jon; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C.-P.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the implementation of quantum electrodynamic (QED) evolution at leading order (LO) along with quantum chromodynamic (QCD) evolution at next-to-leading order (NLO) in the CTEQ-TEA global analysis package. The inelastic contribution to the photon parton distribution function (PDF) is described by a two-parameter ansatz, coming from radiation off the valence quarks, and based on the CT14 NLO PDFs. Setting the two parameters to be equal allows us to completely specify the inelastic photon PDF in terms of the inelastic momentum fraction carried by the photon, p0γ, at the initial scale Q0=1.295 GeV . We obtain constraints on the photon PDF by comparing with ZEUS data [S. Chekanov et al. (ZEUS Collaboration), Phys. Lett. B 687, 16 (2010)] on the production of isolated photons in deep inelastic scattering, e p →e γ +X . For this comparison we present a new perturbative calculation of the process that consistently combines the photon-initiated contribution with the quark-initiated contribution. Comparison with the data allows us to put a constraint at the 90% confidence level of p0γ≲0.14 % for the inelastic photon PDF at the initial scale of Q0=1.295 GeV in the one-parameter radiative ansatz. The resulting inelastic CT14QED PDFs will be made available to the public. In addition, we also provide CT14QEDinc PDFs, in which the inclusive photon PDF at the scale Q0 is defined by the sum of the inelastic photon PDF and the elastic photon distribution obtained from the equivalent photon approximation.

  18. Phase interference and sub-femtosecond time dynamics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wray, L. Andrew; Huang, Shih-Wen; Xia, Yuqi; Hasan, M. Zahid; Mathy, Charles; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Hussain, Zahid; Chuang, Yi-De

    2014-03-01

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) is a powerful technique for observing the energy states of many-body quantum materials. The core hole resonance states that make RIXS possible are strongly correlated, and undergo complex time evolution that shapes scattering spectra. However, current inelastic scattering measurements cannot be converted to a time resolved picture, because techniques that determine relative phase information from elastic scattering have not been adapted to the greater complexity of inelastic spectra. We will show that inelastic scattering phases can be identified from quantum interference in sharply resolved (dE < 35meV) M-edge RIXS spectra of Mott insulators (e.g. SrCuO2 and NiO), and provide new information for identifying excitation symmetries and many-body time dynamics.

  19. State-to-state inelastic scattering of Stark-decelerated OH radicals with Ar atoms.

    PubMed

    Scharfenberg, Ludwig; Kłos, Jacek; Dagdigian, Paul J; Alexander, Millard H; Meijer, Gerard; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T

    2010-09-28

    The Stark deceleration method exploits the concepts of charged particle accelerator physics to produce molecular beams with a tunable velocity. These tamed molecular beams offer interesting perspectives for precise crossed beam scattering studies as a function of the collision energy. The method has advanced sufficiently to compete with state-of-the-art beam methods that are used for scattering studies throughout. This is demonstrated here for the scattering of OH radicals (X(2)Pi(3/2), J = 3/2, f) with Ar atoms, a benchmark system for the scattering of open-shell molecules with atoms. Parity-resolved integral state-to-state inelastic scattering cross sections are measured at collision energies between 80 and 800 cm(-1). The threshold behavior and collision energy dependence of 13 inelastic scattering channels is accurately determined. Excellent agreement is obtained with the cross sections predicted by close-coupling scattering calculations based on the most accurate ab initio OH + Ar potential energy surfaces to date. PMID:20657906

  20. Rotationally Inelastic Scattering of Quantum-State-Selected ND3 with Ar.

    PubMed

    Tkáč, Ondřej; Saha, Ashim K; Loreau, Jérôme; Parker, David H; van der Avoird, Ad; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2015-06-11

    Rotationally inelastic scattering of ND3 with Ar is studied at mean collision energies of 410 and 310 cm(–1). In the experimental component of the study, ND3 molecules are prepared by supersonic expansion and subsequent hexapole state selection in the ground electronic and vibrational levels and in the jk(±) = 1(1) rotational level. A beam of state-selected ND3 molecules is crossed with a beam of Ar, and scattered ND3 molecules are detected in single final j′k′(±) quantum states using resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. State-to-state differential cross sections for rotational-level changing collisions are obtained by velocity map imaging. The experimental measurements are compared with close-coupling quantum-mechanical scattering calculations performed using an ab initio potential energy surface. The computed DCSs agree well with the experimental measurements, confirming the high quality of the potential energy surface. The angular distributions are dominated by forward scattering for all measured final rotational and vibrational inversion symmetry states. This outcome is in contrast to our recent results for inelastic scattering of ND3 with He, where we observed significant amount of sideways and backward scattering for some final rotational levels of ND3. The differences between He and Ar collision partners are explained by differences in the potential energy surfaces that govern the scattering dynamics. PMID:25532415

  1. An alpha particle diagnostic based on measurements of lower hybrid wave fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.L.

    1989-07-01

    It is shown that the one-dimensional alpha particle velocity distribution function can be determined from the fluctuation- dissipation theorem based on measurements of lower hybrid wave fluctuations in an equilibrium plasma. This method uses collective Thomson scattering data with large signal-to-noise ratio, but it is applicable only when the alpha particles have an isotropic velocity distribution. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Two Photon Exchange in Quasi-elastic and Deep-inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Averett, Todd D.; Katich, Joseph; Zhao Bo

    2011-10-24

    In this paper, I present an overview and preliminary results from three experiments at Jefferson Lab that were recently completed using a {sup 3}He gas target with polarization oriented normal to the scattering plane of unpolarized incident electrons. A target single spin asymmetry was formed by periodically flipping the direction of the target spin. In the reaction {up_arrow}{sup 3}He(e,e'), the Born contribution is expected to be zero, giving direct sensitivity to two photon exchange. This asymmetry was measured in the quasi-elastic and deep-inelastic regimes with 0.1 < Q{sup 2} < 1.0 GeV{sup 2}. The asymmetry is predicted to decrease by two-orders of magnitude for deep-inelastic versus quasi-elastic scattering. Preliminary results from these experiments will be presented.

  3. Perturbative QCD effects observed in 490 GeV deep-inelastic muon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.R.; Aied, S.; Anthony, P.L.; Baker, M.D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A.A.; Braun, H.M.; Busza, W.; Conrad, J.M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S.K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H.J.; Geesaman, D.F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M.C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V.W.; Jackson, H.E.; Jaffe, D.E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D.M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R.D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H.G.E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J.J.; Lubatti, H.J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D.G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H.E.; Morfin, J.G.; Nickerson, R.B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F.M.; Ramberg, E.J.; Roeser, A.; Ryan, J.J.; Salgado, C.W.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schueler, K.P.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G.A.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P.H.; Stier, H.E.; Stopa, P.; Swanso

    1993-12-01

    Results on forward charged hadrons in 490 GeV deep-inelastic muon scattering are presented. The transverse momenta, azimuthal asymmetry, and energy flow of events with four or more forward charged hadrons are studied. The range of the invariant hadronic mass squared 300[lt][ital W][sup 2][lt]900 GeV[sup 2]/[ital c][sup 4] extends higher than previous deep-inelastic muon scattering experiments. Data are compared to the predictions of the Lund Monte Carlo model with perturbative QCD simulated by matrix elements, parton showers, and color dipole radiation. All of the QCD-based models are consistent with the data while a model without QCD processes is not. Correlations with the multiplicity-independent event variable [Pi][congruent][summation][vert bar][ital p][sub [ital T

  4. Self-dynamics of hydrogen gas as probed by means of inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarini, Eleonora; Orecchini, Andrea; Formisano, Ferdinando; Demmel, Franz; Petrillo, Caterina; Sacchetti, Francesco; Bafile, Ubaldo; Barocchi, Fabrizio

    2005-12-01

    The neutron double-differential cross-section of molecular hydrogen at low density has been measured at two rather low scattering angles and different final neutron energies by means of three-axis spectrometry. This first inelastic scattering determination of the single-particle roto-translational dynamics of room temperature H2 allows for a detailed test of the theoretical modelling of the spectral line-shapes of such a fundamental molecule, performed by referring both to a careful quantum-mechanical treatment and to a simpler semi-classical approximation. A comprehensive report on the neutron measurements and data analysis is presented, along with an overview of the theories used for comparison with the experimental results. An encouraging picture of the present capabilities in the calculation of the true dynamic response of hydrogen gas to slow and thermal neutrons is obtained, opening new perspectives for accurate data calibration in inelastic neutron spectroscopy, with special relevance for small-angle experiments.

  5. D^* production in deep-inelastic scattering at low Q^2

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Andreas W.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    Inclusive production of D* mesons in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA is studied in the range 5 < Q{sup 2} < 100 GeV{sup 2} of the photon virtuality and 0.02 < y < 0.70 of the inelasticity of the scattering process. The visible range for the D* meson is p{sub T} (D*) > 1.25 GeV and |{eta}(D*)| < 1.8. The data were taken with the H1 detector in the years 2004 to 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 347 pb{sup -1}. Single and double differential cross sections are measured. The results are compared to QCD predictions.

  6. Highly efficient beamline and spectrometer for inelastic soft X-ray scattering at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Lai, C H; Fung, H S; Wu, W B; Huang, H Y; Fu, H W; Lin, S W; Huang, S W; Chiu, C C; Wang, D J; Huang, L J; Tseng, T C; Chung, S C; Chen, C T; Huang, D J

    2014-03-01

    The design, construction and commissioning of a beamline and spectrometer for inelastic soft X-ray scattering at high resolution in a highly efficient system are presented. Based on the energy-compensation principle of grating dispersion, the design of the monochromator-spectrometer system greatly enhances the efficiency of measurement of inelastic soft X-rays scattering. Comprising two bendable gratings, the set-up effectively diminishes the defocus and coma aberrations. At commissioning, this system showed results of spin-flip, d-d and charge-transfer excitations of NiO. These results are consistent with published results but exhibit improved spectral resolution and increased efficiency of measurement. The best energy resolution of the set-up in terms of full width at half-maximum is 108 meV at an incident photon energy tuned about the Ni L3-edge. PMID:24562553

  7. Inelastic scattering of 72,74Ni off a proton target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, M. L.; Doornenbal, P.; Obertelli, A.; Pietralla, N.; Werner, V.; Authelet, G.; Baba, H.; Calvet, D.; Château, F.; Corsi, A.; Delbart, A.; Gheller, J.-M.; Gillibert, A.; Isobe, T.; Lapoux, V.; Louchart, C.; Matsushita, M.; Momiyama, S.; Motobayashi, T.; Niikura, M.; Otsu, H.; Péron, C.; Peyaud, A.; Pollacco, E. C.; Roussé, J.-Y.; Sakurai, H.; Santamaria, C.; Sasano, M.; Shiga, Y.; Takeuchi, S.; Taniuchi, R.; Uesaka, T.; Wang, H.; Yoneda, K.; Browne, F.; Chung, L. X.; Dombradi, Zs; Franchoo, S.; Giacoppo, F.; Gottardo, A.; Hadynska-Klek, K.; Korkulu, Z.; Koyama, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lee, J.; Lettmann, M.; Lozeva, R.; Matsui, K.; Miyazaki, T.; Nishimura, S.; Olivier, L.; Ota, S.; Patel, Z.; Sahin, E.; Shand, C. M.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stefan, I.; Steppenbeck, D.; Sumikama, T.; Suzuki, D.; Vajta, Zs; Wu, J.; Xu, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Inelastic scattering of 72,74Ni off a proton target was performed at RIBF, RIKEN, Japan. The isotopes were produced by the fission of 238U on a thick Beryllium target and were then selected and identified on an event-by-event basis using the BigRIPS separator. Selected isotopes were focused onto the liquid hydrogen target of the MINOS device and gamma rays from the reactions were measured with the DALI2 array. The energy of the ions in the middle of the target was 213 MeV/u. Outgoing particles were identified using the ZeroDegree spectrometer. Here, we report on the current status of the data analysis and preliminary results for the proton inelastic scattering cross sections for both isotopes.

  8. Producing a compound Nucleus via Inelastic Scattering: The 90Zr(alpha,alpha')90Zr* Case

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Dietrich, F S

    2008-05-23

    In a Surrogate reaction a compound nucleus is produced via a direct reaction (pickup, stripping, or inelastic scattering). For a proper application of the Surrogate approach it is necessary to predict the resulting angular momentum and parity distribution in the compound nucleus. A model for determining these distributions is developed for the case of inelastic alpha scattering off a spherical nucleus. The focus is on obtaining a first, simple description of the direct-reaction process that produces the compound nucleus and on providing the basis for a more complete treatment of the problem. The approximations employed in the present description are discussed and the extensions required for a more rigorous treatment of the problem are outlined. To illustrate the formalism, an application to {sup 90}Zr({alpha},{alpha}{prime}){sup 90}Zr* is presented.

  9. Deep Inelastic Scattering from the AdS/CFT correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taliotis, Anastasios

    2009-11-01

    We calculate [J.L. Albacete, Y.V. Kovchegov, and A. Taliotis, JHEP07, 074 (2008), 0806.1484] the cross section of an ultra relativistic nucleus scattering on a qq OverBar pair at large coupling in N=4 SUSY gauge theory. We study the problem in the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence [J.M. Maldacena, Adv. Theor. Math. Phys. 2 (1998) 231-252]. The nucleus is modeled as a gravitational shockwave in an AdS5 background moving along the light cone. The dipole (qq OverBar) is represented by a Wilson loop moving in the opposite direction. Due to the correspondence, calculating the scattering amplitude of the Wilson loop with the nucleus, reduces to calculating the extreme value of the Nambu-Goto action for an open string. Its two end points are attached to the qq OverBar respectively and it hangs in an AdS5 shockwave spacetime. Six solutions are found two of which are physically meaningful. Both solutions predict that the saturation scale Q at high enough energies becomes energy independent; in particular it behaves as Q∝A1 where A is the atomic number. One solution predicts pomeron intercept α=2 and agrees with [R.C. Brower, J. Polchinski, M.J. Strassler, and C.-I. Tan, JHEP12 (2007) 005, [hep-th/0603115

  10. Anomalous vibrational modes in acetanilide as studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthes, Mariette; Eckert, Juegen; Johnson, Susanna W.; Moret, Jacques; Swanson, Basil I.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    1992-10-01

    A study of the anomalous modes in acetanilide and five deuterated derivatives by incoherent inelastic neutron scattering is reported. These data show that the dynamics of the amide and methyl groups influence each other. In addition, the anomalous temperature behaviour of the NH out-of-plane bending mode is confirmed. These observations suggest that the self-trapping mechanism in ACN may be more complex than hitherto assumed.

  11. Test of factorization in diffractive deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Polifka, Richard

    2015-04-10

    The QCD factorization theorem in diffraction is tested by comparing diffractive jet production data to QCD predictions based on fits to inclusive diffractive cross section data. H1 measured dijet production with a leading proton detected in the Very Forward Proton Spectrometer (VFPS), both in deep-inelastic scattering and in photoproduction. The DIS measurements are complemented by measurements of dijet production with an associated rapidity gap and in a data sample selected with a leading proton in the Forward Proton Spectrometer (FPS)

  12. Shadowing in the muon-xenon inelastic scattering cross section at 490 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Carroll, T. J.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, G.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G. E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salgado, C.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H.-J.; Venkataramania, H.; Vidal, M.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, Richard; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.; Fermilab E665 Collaboration

    1992-08-01

    Inelastic scattering of 490 GeV μ + from deuterium and xenon nuclei has been studied for xBj> s.001. The ratio of the xenon/deuterium cross section per nucleon is observed to vary with xBj, with a depletion in the kinematic range 0.001 < xBj < 0.025 which exhibits no significant Q2 dependence. An electromagnetic calorimeter was used to verify the radiative corrections.

  13. Measurements of transverse momentum in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    K.A. Griffioen

    2012-12-01

    With mounting experimental evidence that only a small fraction of the proton's spin comes from the spins of its quarks and gluons, the quest for orbital angular momentum has begun. The parton distributions relevant to this depend on transverse quark momenta. Recent CLAS semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering measurements probe these new transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions using longitudinally polarized beams and targets and detecting {pi}{sup +},{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup 0} in the final state.

  14. Toward a QCD analysis of jet rates in deep-inelastic Muon-Proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-08-01

    Measurements of multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic Muon-Proton scattering at Fermilab-E665 are presented. Jet rates defined by the JADE clustering algorithm are compared to perturbative Quantum chromodynamics (PQCD) and different Monte Carlo model predictions. The applicability of the jet-parton duality hypothesis is studied. We obtain hadronic jet rates which are approximately a factor of two higher than PQCD predictions at the parton level. Possible causes for this discrepancy are discussed.

  15. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W. )

    1992-02-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, [ital y][sub [ital cut

  16. Differences between the deformed-potential and folding-model descriptions of inelastic nuclear scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hnizdo, V. )

    1994-08-01

    The differences between the deformed-potential and folding-model descriptions of inelastic nuclear scattering, attention to which has been called recently by Beene, Horen, and Satchler [Phys. Rev. C 48, 3128 (1993)], were pointed out already some time ago by contrasting the rules of equal deformation lengths and equal normalized multipole moments for the optical potential and the underlying nucleon distribution of the excited nucleus.

  17. Analysis of inelastic neutron scattering spectra from a time-of-flight spectrometer with filter detector

    SciTech Connect

    Vorderwisch, P.; Mezei, F.; Eckert, J.; Goldstone, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering spectra obtained from time-of-flight spectrometers with filter detector suffer in energy resolution from a long time-of-flight tail in the filter response function. A mathematical method is described which removes this tail in measured spectra. The energy resolution can thereby be adapted for each part of the spectrum. Applications of the method to data taken at the LANSCE pulsed spallation source are presented.

  18. Structure and dynamics of cadmium telluride studied by x-ray and inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Niedziela, Jennifer L; Stone, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    We present a combined study of density functional theory, x-ray diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering examining the temperature dependent structure and lattice dynamics of commercially available cadmium telluride. A subtle change in the structure is evinced near 80~K, which manifests also in the measured phonon density of states. There is no change to the long-range ordered structure. The implications of the change in relation to structural defects are discussed.

  19. Structure and dynamics of cadmium telluride studied by x-ray and inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Niedziela, J. L.; Stone, M. B.

    2014-09-08

    We present a combined study of density functional theory, x-ray diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering examining the temperature dependent structure and lattice dynamics of commercially available cadmium telluride. A subtle change in the structure is evinced near 80 K, which manifests also in the measured phonon density of states. There is no change to the long-range ordered structure. The implications of the change in relation to structural defects are discussed.

  20. "Hot background" of the mobile inelastic neutron scattering system for soil carbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Kavetskiy, Aleksandr; Yakubova, Galina; Prior, Stephen A; Torbert, H Allen

    2016-01-01

    The problem of gamma spectrum peak identification arises when conducting soil carbon analysis using the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system. Some spectral peaks could be associated with radioisotopes appearing due to neutron activation of both the measurement system and soil samples. The investigation of "hot background" gamma spectra from the construction materials, whole measurement system, and soil samples over time showed that activation of (28)Al isotope can contribute noticeable additions to the soil neutron stimulated gamma spectra. PMID:26595773

  1. Inelastic He-atom scattering from the MgO(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jinhe; Jung, David R.; Frankl, Daniel R.

    1990-11-01

    Dispersion curves of Rayleigh phonons on an in situ cleaved, room-temperature surface of MgO(001) are determined by time-of-flight measurements of inelastically scattered He atoms. Along both the Γ¯ X¯ and Γ¯ M¯ directions, the measured phonon frequencies agree fairly well with a shell-model calculation for an unrelaxed MgO(001) surface.

  2. Inelastic neutron scattering investigation of crystal-field splittings in UBr 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murasik, A.; Furrer, A.

    1980-10-01

    An inelastic neutron scattering technique was used to measure the crystal-field splittings in UBr 3 at various temperatures and momentum transfers. In the interpretation of the observed energy spectra it turns out that the Russell-Saunders coupling scheme is a reasonable approximation. The crystal-field level scheme could be unambiguously assigned. The detailed nature of the crystal-field transition from the ground state to the first-excited state is not yet fully understood.

  3. Differential Cross Sections for Neutron Elastic and Inelastic Scattering on 23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhoy, J. R.; Hicks, S. F.; Chakraborty, A.; Champine, B. R.; Combs, B.; Crider, B. P.; Kersting, L. J.; Kumar, A.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P. J.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Sidwell, L.; Sigillito, A.; Watts, D. W.; Yates, S. W.

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of neutron elastic and inelastic scattering from 23Na have been performed for sixteen incident neutron energies above 1.5 MeV with the 7-MV University of Kentucky Accelerator using the 3H(p,n) reaction as the neutron source. These measurements were complemented by γ-ray excitation functions using the (n,n'γ) reaction. The time-of-flight technique is employed for background reduction in both neutron and γ- ray measurements and for determining the energy of the scattered neutrons. Cross section determinations support fuel cycle and structural materials research and development. Previous reaction model evaluations [1] relied primarily on total cross sections and four (n,n0) and (n,n1) angular distributions in the En = 5 to 9 MeV range. The inclusion of more inelastic channels at lower neutron energies provides additional information on direct couplings between elastic and inelastic scattering as a function of angular momentum transfer. Reaction model calculations examining direct collective and statistical properties were performed.

  4. High-contrast sub-millivolt inelastic X-ray scattering for nano- and mesoscale science

    PubMed Central

    Shvyd’ko, Yuri; Stoupin, Stanislav; Shu, Deming; Collins, Stephen P.; Mundboth, Kiran; Sutter, John; Tolkiehn, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Photon and neutron inelastic scattering spectrometers are microscopes for imaging condensed matter dynamics on very small length and time scales. Inelastic X-ray scattering permitted the first quantitative studies of picosecond nanoscale dynamics in disordered systems almost 20 years ago. However, the nature of the liquid-glass transition still remains one of the great unsolved problems in condensed matter physics. It calls for studies at hitherto inaccessible time and length scales, and therefore for substantial improvements in the spectral and momentum resolution of the inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometers along with a major enhancement in spectral contrast. Here we report a conceptually new spectrometer featuring a spectral resolution function with steep, almost Gaussian tails, sub-meV (≃620 μeV) bandwidth and improved momentum resolution. The spectrometer opens up uncharted space on the dynamics landscape. New results are presented on the dynamics of liquid glycerol, in the regime that has become accessible with the novel spectrometer. PMID:24953338

  5. Alpha-particle losses in compact torsatron reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, S.L.; Lyon, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    Loss of alpha particles in compact torsatron reactors is studied. For 6, 9, and 12 field period reactors, the direct loss is a relatively weak function of radius and energy and varies from approx. =33% for M = 6 to approx. =18% for M = 12. Loss of alpha particles through scattering into the loss region is calculated using the Fokker-Plank equation for fast ions and found to contribute an additional alpha-particle energy loss of approx. =15%. The consequences of these relatively large losses for torsatron reactor design are discussed. The relationship between the direct particle losses and the magnetic field structure is also studied. Orbit losses from a variety of stellarator configurations are calculated and a figure-of-merit that characterizes the orbit confinement of a magnetic configuration is deduced from these calculations. This figure-of-merit is used to show how the direct losses might be reduced at low aspect-ratio. Effects of finite beta on the direct particle losses are also addressed, and are shown to significantly increase the direct losses in some configurations. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Inelastic scattering in the trajectory approximation and its improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himes, D.; Celli, V.

    We analyze several versions of the trajectory approximation for He scattering from non-corrugated surfaces. We find that under typical conditions used in the study of simple metal surfaces all the formulations we consider lead to similar results. However, the exponentiated DWBA and various eikonal approximations correctly predict a shift of the average energy transfer with surface temperature, while the simple specular TA does not. We obtain a modified Brako-Newns formula for the energy and momentum distribution in the classical limit. We report calculations carried out for Pt(111) and Cu(111) under conditions of experimental interest and we discuss the importance of multiphonon processes and the contribution of various surface correlation functions.

  7. Inelastic cross sections for positron scattering from atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.; Hofmann, A.; Raith, W.; Sperber, W.; Jacobsen, F.; Lynn, K.G.

    1994-12-31

    Positronium formation (Ps) cross sections for positrons impinging on atomic hydrogen were measured in the impact energy range from 13eV to 255eV at the High Intensity Positron (HIP) beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Ps-formation cross section was found to rise rapidly from the threshold at 6.8eV to a maximum value of (2.98 {plus_minus} 0.18) {times} 10{sup {minus}16} cm{sup 2} for {approx} 15eV positrons. By 75eV it drops below the detection limit of 0.17 {times} 10{sup {minus}16} cm{sup 2} which is the present level of statistical uncertainty. The experiment was modified to enable the measurement of doubly differential scattering cross sections.

  8. Alpha-particle sensitive test SRAMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Blaes, B. R.

    1990-01-01

    A bench-level test is being developed to evaluate memory-cell upsets in a test SRAM designed with a cell offset voltage. This offset voltage controls the critical charge needed to upset the cell. The effect is demonstrated using a specially designed 2-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM and a Po-208 5.1-MeV 0.61-LET alpha-particle source. This test SRAM has been made sensitive to alpha particles through the use of a cell offset voltage, and this has allowed a bench-level characterization in a laboratory setting. The experimental data are linked to a alpha-particle interaction physics and to SPICE circuit simulations through the alpha-particle collection depth. The collection depth is determined by two methods and found to be about 7 micron. In addition, alpha particles that struck outside the bloated drain were able to flip the SRAM cells. This lateral charge collection was observed to be more than 6 micron.

  9. Inelastic microwave photon scattering off a quantum impurity in a Josephson-junction array.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Moshe; Devoret, Michel H; Houzet, Manuel; Glazman, Leonid I

    2013-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations in an anharmonic superconducting circuit enable frequency conversion of individual incoming photons. This effect, linear in the photon beam intensity, leads to ramifications for the standard input-output circuit theory. We consider an extreme case of anharmonicity in which photons scatter off a small set of weak links within a Josephson junction array. We show that this quantum impurity displays Kondo physics and evaluate the elastic and inelastic photon scattering cross sections. These cross sections reveal many-body properties of the Kondo problem that are hard to access in its traditional fermionic version. PMID:23383827

  10. Elastic and inelastic scattering of 15N ions by 9Be at 84 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudchik, A. T.; Chercas, K. A.; Kemper, K. W.; Rusek, K.; Rudchik, A. A.; Herashchenko, O. V.; Koshchy, E. I.; Pirnak, Val. M.; Piasecki, E.; Trzcińska, A.; Sakuta, S. B.; Siudak, R.; Strojek, I.; Stolarz, A.; Ilyin, A. P.; Ponkratenko, O. A.; Stepanenko, Yu. M.; Shyrma, Yu. O.; Szczurek, A.; Uleshchenko, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Angular distributions of the 9Be + 15N elastic and inelastic scattering were measured at Elab(15N) = 84 MeV (Ec.m. = 31.5 MeV) for the 0-6.76 MeV states of 9Be and 0-6.32 MeV states of 15N. The data were analyzed within the optical model and coupled-reaction-channels method. The elastic and inelastic scattering, spin reorientations of 9Be in ground and excited states and 15N in excited states as well as the most important one- and two-step transfer reactions were included in the channels-coupling scheme. The parameters of the 9Be + 15N optical potential of Woods-Saxon form as well as deformation parameters of these nuclei were deduced. The analysis showed that the 9Be + 15N pure potential elastic scattering dominates at the forward angles whereas the ground state spin reorientation of 9Be gives a major contribution to the elastic scattering cross sections at the large angles. Contributions from particle transfers are found to be negligible for the present scattering system.

  11. Study of the soft dipole modes in 140Ce via inelastic scattering of 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzysiek, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Fornal, B.; Grȩbosz, J.; Mazurek, K.; Mȩczyński, W.; Ziȩbliński, M.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Bracco, A.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Nicolini, R.; Pellegri, L.; Riboldi, S.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; De Angelis, G.; Napoli, D. R.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.; Gottardo, A.; Lenzi, S.; Lunardi, S.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Recchia, F.; Ur, C.; Gadea, A.; Huyuk, T.; Barrientos, D.; Birkenbach, B.; Geibel, K.; Hess, H.; Reiter, P.; Steinbach, T.; Wiens, A.; Bürger, A.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Siem, S.

    2014-05-01

    The main aim of this study was a deeper understanding of the nuclear structure properties of the soft dipole modes in 140Ce, excited via inelastic scattering of weakly bound 17O projectiles. An important aim was to investigate the ‘splitting’ of the PDR into two parts: a low-energy isoscalar component dominated by neutron-skin oscillations and a higher-energy component lying on the tail of the giant dipole resonance of a rather isovector character. This was already observed for this nucleus, investigated in (α, α‧) and (γ, γ‧) experiments. The experiment was performed at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy. Inelastic scattering of 17O ion beam at 20 MeV A-1 was used to excite the resonance modes in the 140Ce target. Gamma-rays were registered by five triple clusters of AGATA-Demonstrator and nine large volume scintillators (LaBr3). The scattered 17O ions were identified by two ΔE - E Si telescopes of the TRACE array mounted inside the scattering chamber. The telescopes consisted of two segmented Si-pad detectors, each of 60 pixels. Very preliminary data have shown a strong domination of the E1 transitions in the ‘pygmy’ region with a character more similar to the one obtained in alpha scattering experiment.

  12. [Inelastic electron scattering from surfaces]. [Annual] progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This program is aimed at the quantitative study of surface dynamical processes (vibrational, magnetic excitations) in crystalline slabs, ultrathin-layered materials, and chemisorbed systems on substrates, and of the geometric structure connected to these dynamical excitations. High-resolution electron-energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful probe. Off-specular excitation cross sections are much larger if electron energies are in the LEED range (50-300 eV). The analyses has been used to study surfaces of ordered alloys (NiAl). Ab-initio surface lattice dynamical results were combined with phonon-loss cross sections to achieve a more accurate microscopic description. First-principles phonon eigenvectors and eigenfrequencies were used as inputs to electron-energy-loss multiple scattering cross-section calculations. The combined microscopic approach was used to analyze EELS data of Cu(0001) and Ag(001) at two points. Positron diffraction is discussed as a structural and imaging tool. The relation between geometric structure of a film and its local magnetic properties will be studied in the future, along with other things.

  13. Alternating current long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; McAtee, J.L.

    1993-02-16

    An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, which is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

  14. Alternating current long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; McAtee, James L.

    1993-01-01

    An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, whcih is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

  15. Neutron Elastic and Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections on ^NatFe and ^23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersting, Luke; Lueck, Collin J.; Hicks, S. F.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2010-10-01

    Neutron elastic and inelastic scattering angular distributions from ^NatFe and ^23Na at incident neutron energies of 3.57 and 3.81 MeV have been measured at the University of Kentucky 7 MV Van de Graaff laboratory using neutron time-of-flight techniques. The neutron beam was produced using the ^3H(p,n)He^3reaction. The scattered neutrons were detected at angles between 20 and 150 in 10 intervals with a hexafluorbenzene detector located approximately 3 m from the scattering samples. Neutron scattering differential cross sections were deduced. These cross sections and their uncertainties are important for understanding neutron-induced reactions in fission reactors and are important for fission reactor criticality calculations.

  16. Development of a graphite polarization analyzer for resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Xuan; Burns, Clement; Li Chengyang; Casa, Diego; Upton, Mary; Gog, Thomas; Kim, Jungho

    2011-11-15

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) is a powerful technique for studying electronic excitations in correlated electron systems. Current RIXS spectrometers measure the changes in energy and momentum of the photons scattered by the sample. A powerful extension of the RIXS technique is the measurement of the polarization state of the scattered photons which contains information about the symmetry of the excitations. This long-desired addition has been elusive because of significant technical challenges. This paper reports the development of a new diffraction-based polarization analyzer which discriminates between linear polarization components of the scattered photons. The double concave surface of the polarization analyzer was designed as a good compromise between energy resolution and throughput. Such a device was fabricated using highly oriented pyrolytic graphite for measurements at the Cu K-edge incident energy. Preliminary measurements on a CuGeO{sub 3} sample are presented.

  17. Inelastic electron tunneling spectrum from surface magnon and magnetic impurity scatterings in magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H. X.; Qin, Q. H.; Ma, Q. L.; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2010-01-01

    Analytic expressions for contributions to the inelastic electron tunneling spectrum (IETS) from surface magnon scattering and magnetic impurity scattering are obtained. It is shown that surface magnon scattering alone does not lead to peaks in the IETS. The peaks at small bias often observed in the IETS of magnetic junctions are due to magnetic impurity scattering, in agreement with the traditional model for zero bias anomaly. These impurity resonance peaks can sometimes split due to the impurities' magnetic coupling to the electrodes. Measurements of AlO and MgO barrier junctions yield excellent agreement to the theory. The experiment further shows that the magnetic impurities in MgO barriers are strongly coupled to the electrodes but those in AlO barriers are not magnetically coupled to the electrodes.

  18. Pygmy dipole resonance in 124Sn populated by inelastic scattering of 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegri, L.; Bracco, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Leoni, S.; Camera, F.; Lanza, E. G.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Avigo, R.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Ceruti, S.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Nicolini, R.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; Bazzacco, D.; Bednarczyk, P.; Bellato, M.; Birkenbach, B.; Bortolato, D.; Cederwall, B.; Charles, L.; Ciemala, M.; De Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Hess, H.; Isocrate, R.; Jolie, J.; Judson, D.; Jungclaus, A.; Karkour, N.; Krzysiek, M.; Litvinova, E.; Lunardi, S.; Mazurek, K.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Menegazzo, R.; Molini, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Salsac, M. D.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Simpson, J.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stezowski, O.; Theisen, Ch.; Ur, C.; Valiente Dobon, J. J.; Zieblinski, M.

    2014-11-01

    The γ decay from the high-lying states of 124Sn was measured using the inelastic scattering of 17O at 340 MeV. The emitted γ rays were detected with high resolution with the AGATA demonstrator array and the scattered ions were detected in two segmented ΔE- E silicon telescopes. The angular distribution was measured both for the γ rays and the scattered 17O ions. An accumulation of E1 strength below the particle threshold was found and compared with previous data obtained with (γ ,γ‧) and (α ,α‧ γ) reactions. The present results of elastic scattering, and excitation of E2 and E1 states were analysed using the DWBA approach. From this comprehensive description the isoscalar component of the 1- excited states was extracted. The obtained values are based on the comparison of the data with DWBA calculations including a form factor deduced using a microscopic transition density.

  19. Lunar surface outgassing and alpha particle measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, S. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Moore, K. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Belian, Richard D.; Binder, Alan B.

    2002-01-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) searched for lunar surface gas release events and mapped their distribution by detecting alpha particle?; produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life), solid polonium-2 18 (6.0 MeV, 3 minute half-life), and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but held up in production by the 21 year half-life of lead-210). These three nuclides are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238.

  20. Recent Advances in Development and Applications of the Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory for Inelastic Scattering.

    PubMed

    Babikov, Dmitri; Semenov, Alexander

    2016-01-28

    A mixed quantum/classical approach to inelastic scattering (MQCT) is developed in which the relative motion of two collision partners is treated classically, and the rotational and vibrational motion of each molecule is treated quantum mechanically. The cases of molecule + atom and molecule + molecule are considered including diatomics, symmetric-top rotors, and asymmetric-top rotor molecules. Phase information is taken into consideration, permitting calculations of elastic and inelastic, total and differential cross sections for excitation and quenching. The method is numerically efficient and intrinsically parallel. The scaling law of MQCT is favorable, which enables calculations at high collision energies and for complicated molecules. Benchmark studies are carried out for several quite different molecular systems (N2 + Na, H2 + He, CO + He, CH3 + He, H2O + He, HCOOCH3 + He, and H2 + N2) in a broad range of collision energies, which demonstrates that MQCT is a viable approach to inelastic scattering. At higher collision energies it can confidently replace the computationally expensive full-quantum calculations. At low collision energies and for low-mass systems results of MQCT are less accurate but are still reasonable. A proposal is made for blending MQCT calculations at higher energies with full-quantum calculations at low energies. PMID:26618533

  1. Photon correlations generated by inelastic scattering in a one-dimensional waveguide coupled to three-level systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yao-Lung L.; Baranger, Harold U.

    2016-04-01

    We study photon correlations generated by scattering from three-level systems (3LS) in one dimension. The two systems studied are a 3LS in a semi-infinite waveguide (3LS plus a mirror) and two 3LS in an infinite waveguide (double 3LS). Our two-photon scattering approach naturally connects photon correlation effects with inelastically scattered photons; it corresponds to input-output theory in the weak-probe limit. At the resonance where electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) occurs, we find that no photons are scattered inelastically and hence there are no induced correlations. Slightly away from EIT, the total inelastically scattered flux is large, being substantially enhanced due to the additional interference paths. This enhancement carries over to the two-photon correlation function, which exhibits non-classical behavior such as strong bunching with a very long time-scale. The long time scale originates from the slow-light effect associated with EIT.

  2. Reprint of : Photon correlations generated by inelastic scattering in a one-dimensional waveguide coupled to three-level systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yao-Lung L.; Baranger, Harold U.

    2016-08-01

    We study photon correlations generated by scattering from three-level systems (3LS) in one dimension. The two systems studied are a 3LS in a semi-infinite waveguide (3LS plus a mirror) and two 3LS in an infinite waveguide (double 3LS). Our two-photon scattering approach naturally connects photon correlation effects with inelastically scattered photons; it corresponds to input-output theory in the weak-probe limit. At the resonance where electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) occurs, we find that no photons are scattered inelastically and hence there are no induced correlations. Slightly away from EIT, the total inelastically scattered flux is large, being substantially enhanced due to the additional interference paths. This enhancement carries over to the two-photon correlation function, which exhibits non-classical behavior such as strong bunching with a very long time-scale. The long time scale originates from the slow-light effect associated with EIT.

  3. Spin relaxation of conduction electrons by inelastic scattering with neutral donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Lan; Dery, Hanan; Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2015-03-01

    At low temperatures in n-doped semiconductors, a significant fraction of shallow donor sites are occupied by electrons, neutralizing the impurity core charge in equilibrium. Inelastic scattering by externally-injected conduction electrons accelerated by electric fields can excite transitions within the manifold of these localized states. Promotion into highly spin-mixed excited states results in spin relaxation that couples strongly to the conduction electrons by exchange interaction. Through experiments with silicon spin transport devices and complementary theory, we reveal the consequences of this previously unknown depolarization mechanism both below and above the impact ionization threshold and into the ``deep inelastic'' regime. This work is supported by NSF under Contracts ECCS-1231570 and ECCS-1231855, by DTRA under Contract HDTRA1-13-1-0013, and by ONR under Contract N000141410317.

  4. Measurement of parity-violating asymmetry in electron-deuteron inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.; Ahmed, Z.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Bellini, V.; Beminiwattha, R.; Benesch, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Dalton, M. M.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deconinck, W.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; Fassi, L. El; Erler, J.; Flay, D.; Franklin, G. B.; Friend, M.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Giusa, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Golge, S.; Grimm, K.; Hafidi, K.; Hansen, J.-O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmes, R.; Holmstrom, T.; Holt, R. J.; Huang, J.; Hyde, C. E.; Jen, C. M.; Jones, D.; Kang, Hoyoung; King, P. M.; Kowalski, S.; Kumar, K. S.; Lee, J. H.; LeRose, J. J.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; McNulty, D.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Meddi, F.; Meekins, D. G.; Mercado, L.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Mihovilovic, M.; Muangma, N.; Mesick, K. E.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Nuruzzaman, none; Oh, Y.; Parno, D.; Paschke, K. D.; Phillips, S. K.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Quinn, B.; Rakhman, A.; Reimer, P. E.; Rider, K.; Riordan, S.; Roche, J.; Rubin, J.; Russo, G.; Saenboonruang, K.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Shahinyan, A.; Silwal, R.; Sirca, S.; Souder, P. A.; Suleiman, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Sutera, C. M.; Tobias, W. A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Waidyawansa, B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ye, L.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.

    2015-04-01

    The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally-polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were published earlier, but are presented here in more detail.

  5. Measurement of parity-violating asymmetry in electron-deuteron inelastic scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.; Ahmed, Z.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Bellini, V.; Beminiwattha, R.; et al

    2015-04-01

    The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally-polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were publishedmore » earlier, but are presented here in more detail.« less

  6. Measurement of parity-violating asymmetry in electron-deuteron inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.; Ahmed, Z.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Bellini, V.; Beminiwattha, R.; Benesch, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Dalton, M. M.; de Jager, C. W.; de Leo, R.; Deconinck, W.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; Fassi, L. El; Erler, J.; Flay, D.; Franklin, G. B.; Friend, M.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Giusa, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Golge, S.; Grimm, K.; Hafidi, K.; Hansen, J.-O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmes, R.; Holmstrom, T.; Holt, R. J.; Huang, J.; Hyde, C. E.; Jen, C. M.; Jones, D.; Kang, Hoyoung; King, P. M.; Kowalski, S.; Kumar, K. S.; Lee, J. H.; Lerose, J. J.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; McNulty, D.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Meddi, F.; Meekins, D. G.; Mercado, L.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Mihovilovic, M.; Muangma, N.; Mesick, K. E.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Nuruzzaman, Oh, Y.; Parno, D.; Paschke, K. D.; Phillips, S. K.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Quinn, B.; Rakhman, A.; Reimer, P. E.; Rider, K.; Riordan, S.; Roche, J.; Rubin, J.; Russo, G.; Saenboonruang, K.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Shahinyan, A.; Silwal, R.; Širca, S.; Souder, P. A.; Suleiman, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Sutera, C. M.; Tobias, W. A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Waidyawansa, B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ye, L.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.; Pvdis Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep-inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were published earlier, but are presented here in more detail.

  7. High resolution measurement of neutron inelastic scattering cross-sections for 23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouki, C.; Archier, P.; Borcea, C.; De Saint Jean, C.; Drohé, J. C.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Nankov, N.; Negret, A.; Noguère, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Stanoiu, M.

    2012-04-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross-section of 23Na has been measured in response to the relevant request of the OECD-NEA High Priority Request List, which requires a target uncertainty of 4% in the energy range up to 1.35 MeV for the development of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The measurement was performed at the GELINA facility with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS), featuring eight high purity germanium detectors. The setup is installed at a 200 m flight path from the neutron source and provides high resolution measurements using the (n,n'γ)-technique. The sample was an 80 mm diameter metallic sodium disk prepared at IRMM. Transitions up to the seventh excited state were observed and the differential gamma cross-sections at 110° and 150° were measured, showing mostly isotropic gamma emission. From these the gamma production, level and inelastic cross-sections were determined for neutron energies up to 3838.9 keV. The results agree well with the existing data and the evaluated nuclear data libraries in the low energies, and provide new experimental points in the little studied region above 2 MeV. Following a detailed review of the methodology used for the gamma efficiency calibrations and flux normalization of GAINS data, an estimated total uncertainty of 2.2% was achieved for the inelastic cross-section integrals over the energy ranges 0.498-1.35 MeV and 1.35-2.23 MeV, meeting the required targets.

  8. Alpha particle spectrometry using superconducting microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horansky, Robert; Ullom, Joel; Beall, James; Hilton, Gene; Stiehl, Gregory; Irwin, Kent; Plionis, Alexander; Lamont, Stephen; Rudy, Clifford; Rabin, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Alpha spectrometry is the preferred technique for analyzing trace samples of radioactive material because the alpha particle flux can be significantly higher than the gamma-ray flux from nuclear materials of interest. Traditionally, alpha spectrometry is performed with Si detectors whose resolution is at best 8 keV FWHM. Here, we describe the design and operation of a microcalorimeter alpha detector with an energy resolution of 1.06 keV FWHM at 5 MeV. We demonstrate the ability of the microcalorimeter to clearly resolve the alpha particles from Pu-239 and Pu-240, whose ratio differentiates reactor-grade Pu from weapons-grade. We also show the first direct observation of the decay of Po-209 to the ground state of Pb-205 which has traditionally been obscured by a much stronger alpha line 2 keV away. Finally, the 1.06 keV resolution observed for alpha particles is far worse than the 0.12 keV resolution predicted from thermal fluctuations and measurement of gamma-rays. The cause of the resolution degradation may be ion damage in the tin. Hence, alpha particle microcalorimeters may provide a novel tool for studying ion damage and lattice displacement energies in bulk materials.

  9. Direct inelastic scattering of oriented NO from Ag(111) and Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenner, Manfred G.; Kuipers, Edgar W.; Kleyn, Aart W.; Stolte, Steven

    1991-04-01

    A pulsed supersonic and cold oriented beam of NO molecules is incident upon the (111) face of clean Ag and Pt single crystal surfaces. The steric effect in the scattered density distributions is determined by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. It is found that the steric effect in the peak in the distribution of direct inelastically scattered molecules depends linearly on the reflection angle. In all circumstances O-end collisions lead to scattering angles more inclined towards the surface than N-end collisions. For the Pt(111) surface a much stronger steric effect is measured than for the Ag(111) surface. The steric effect seems to scale with the incident normal velocity. These strong steric effects can be explained by the larger trapping probability for the N-end orientation and a leverage effect due to the high trapping probability.

  10. Pygmy dipole resonance in 140Ce via inelastic scattering of 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzysiek, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Bracco, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Lanza, E. G.; Litvinova, E.; Paar, N.; Avigo, R.; Bazzacco, D.; Benzoni, G.; Birkenbach, B.; Blasi, N.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Ciemała, M.; de Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Giaz, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Hess, H.; Isocarte, R.; Jungclaus, A.; Leoni, S.; Ljungvall, J.; Lunardi, S.; Mazurek, K.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Milion, B.; Morales, A. I.; Napoli, D. R.; Nicolini, R.; Pellegri, L.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Rosso, D.; Salsac, M. D.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Söderström, P.-A.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Wieland, O.; Ziebliński, M.

    2016-04-01

    The γ decay from the high-lying states of 140Ce excited via inelastic scattering of 17O at a bombarding energy of 340 MeV was measured using the high-resolution AGATA-demonstrator array in coincidence with scattered ions detected in two segmented Δ E -E silicon detectors. Angular distributions of scattered ions and emitted γ rays were measured, as well as their differential cross sections. The excitation of 1- states below the neutron separation energy is similar to the one obtained in reactions with the α isoscalar probe. The comparison between the experimental differential cross sections and the corresponding predictions using the distorted-wave Born approximation allowed us to extract the isoscalar component of identified 1- pygmy states. For this analysis the form factor obtained by folding microscopically calculated transition densities and optical potentials was used.

  11. Calibration and absolute normalization procedure of a new Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Palomino, L. A.; Blostein, J. J.; Dawidowski, J.

    2011-08-01

    We describe the calibration process of a new Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) spectrometer, recently implemented at the Bariloche Electron LINAC (Argentina), consisting in the determination of the incident neutron spectrum, dead-time and electronic delay of the data acquisition line, and detector bank efficiency. For this purpose, samples of lead, polyethylene and graphite of different sizes were employed. Their measured spectra were corrected by multiple scattering, attenuation and detector efficiency effects, by means of an ad hoc Monte Carlo code. We show that the corrected spectra are correctly scaled with respect to the scattering power of the tested materials within a 2% of experimental error, thus allowing us to define an experimental constant that links the arbitrary experimental scale (number of recorded counts per monitor counts) with the involved cross-sections. The present work also serves to analyze the existence of possible sources of systematic errors.

  12. Monte Carlo Calculation of Thermal Neutron Inelastic Scattering Cross Section Uncertainties by Sampling Perturbed Phonon Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jesse Curtis

    Nuclear data libraries provide fundamental reaction information required by nuclear system simulation codes. The inclusion of data covariances in these libraries allows the user to assess uncertainties in system response parameters as a function of uncertainties in the nuclear data. Formats and procedures are currently established for representing covariances for various types of reaction data in ENDF libraries. This covariance data is typically generated utilizing experimental measurements and empirical models, consistent with the method of parent data production. However, ENDF File 7 thermal neutron scattering library data is, by convention, produced theoretically through fundamental scattering physics model calculations. Currently, there is no published covariance data for ENDF File 7 thermal libraries. Furthermore, no accepted methodology exists for quantifying or representing uncertainty information associated with this thermal library data. The quality of thermal neutron inelastic scattering cross section data can be of high importance in reactor analysis and criticality safety applications. These cross sections depend on the material's structure and dynamics. The double-differential scattering law, S(alpha, beta), tabulated in ENDF File 7 libraries contains this information. For crystalline solids, S(alpha, beta) is primarily a function of the material's phonon density of states (DOS). Published ENDF File 7 libraries are commonly produced by calculation and processing codes, such as the LEAPR module of NJOY, which utilize the phonon DOS as the fundamental input for inelastic scattering calculations to directly output an S(alpha, beta) matrix. To determine covariances for the S(alpha, beta) data generated by this process, information about uncertainties in the DOS is required. The phonon DOS may be viewed as a probability density function of atomic vibrational energy states that exist in a material. Probable variation in the shape of this spectrum may be

  13. Neutron Inelastic Scattering Mechanism and Measurement of Neutron Asymmetry Using Time of Flight Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Azzawe, A. J. M.

    2007-02-01

    Inelastic scattering is an essential reaction for other nuclear reactions to detect the optical model and compound nucleus formation within the range of (0.4- 5.0) MeV neutron incident energy by using time of flight technique. The time of flight system (TOFS) installed on the horizontal channel reactor RRA has been used to measure the asymmetry of scattered fast neutrons, when data acquisition and system control were recorded event by event by HP — computer via CAMAC system. Eight NE 213 neutron counters were used in order to detect neutron inelastic scattering in the forward direction (4 neutron counters at 0° angle) and in the backward direction (4 neutron counters at 180° angle) to measure the asymmetry of fast neutron. Each neutron counter was 50cm in length and 8cm in diameter, viewed by two (58 — DVP) photomultiplier tubes. The contribution of direct interaction to the compound nucleus formation was deduced from the asymmetry in the neutron detection at the same direction of these eight neutron counters. A time resolution of 8.2 ns between the eight neutron counters and one of the two Ge(Li) detectors has been obtained.

  14. Probing Scattering Resonances in (Ultra)Cold Inelastic NO-He Collisions.

    PubMed

    Onvlee, Jolijn; Avoird, Ad van der; Groenenboom, Gerrit; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T

    2016-07-14

    We theoretically study inelastic collisions between NO radicals and He atoms at low collision energies, focusing on the occurrence of scattering resonances. We specifically investigate de-excitation of rotationally excited NO radicals (X (2)Π1/2, v = 0, j = 3/2, f) at collision energies ranging from 10(-3) to 20 cm(-1) and compute integral and differential cross sections using quantum mechanical close-coupling calculations. Although unconventional, we show that the measurement of rotational de-excitation cross sections brings several advantages to experiments that aim to study rotational energy transfer at temperatures approaching zero kelvin. We analyze the nature and partial wave composition of the quasi-bound states associated with each individual resonance and compute the scattering wave functions. The differential cross sections contain the partial wave fingerprints of the scattering process and are found to change drastically as the collision energy is varied over the resonances. The prospects for measuring these differential cross sections in inelastic de-excitation collisions at low energies are discussed. PMID:26760050

  15. Final-state interactions in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off the Deuteron

    SciTech Connect

    Wim Cosyn, Misak Sargsian

    2011-07-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off the Deuteron with production of a slow nucleon in recoil kinematics is studied in the virtual nucleon approximation, in which the final state interaction (FSI) is calculated within general eikonal approximation. The cross section is derived in a factorized approach, with a factor describing the virtual photon interaction with the off-shell nucleon and a distorted spectral function accounting for the final-state interactions. One of the main goals of the study is to understand how much the general features of the diffractive high energy soft rescattering accounts for the observed features of FSI in deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Comparison with the Jefferson Lab data shows good agreement in the covered range of kinematics. Most importantly, our calculation correctly reproduces the rise of the FSI in the forward direction of the slow nucleon production angle. By fitting our calculation to the data we extracted the W and Q{sup 2} dependences of the total cross section and slope factor of the interaction of DIS products, X, off the spectator nucleon. This analysis shows the XN scattering cross section rising with W and decreasing with an increase of Q{sup 2}. Finally, our analysis points at a largely suppressed off-shell part of the rescattering amplitude.

  16. Cross sections for inelastic scattering of electrons by atoms: selected topics related to electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Inokuti, M.; Manson, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    We begin with a resume of the Bethe theory, which provides a general framework for discussing the inelastic scattering of fast electrons and leads to powerful criteria for judging the reliability of cross-section data. The central notion of the theory is the generalized oscillator strength as a function of both the energy transfer and the momentum transfer, and is the only non-trivial factor in the inelastic-scattering cross section. Although the Bethe theory was initially conceived for free atoms, its basic ideas apply to solids, with suitable generalizations; in this respect, the notion of the dielectric response function is the most fundamental. Topics selected for discussion include the generalized oscillator strengths for the K-shell and L-shell ionization for all atoms with Z less than or equal to 30, evaluated by use of the Hartree-Slater potential. As a function of the energy transfer, the generalized oscillator strength most often shows a non-monotonic structure near the K-shell and L-shell thresholds, which has been interpreted as manifestations of electron-wave propagation through atomic fields. For molecules and solids, there are additional structures due to the scattering of ejected electrons by the fields of other atoms.

  17. The SEXTANTS beamline at SOLEIL: a new facility for elastic, inelastic and coherent scattering of soft X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchi, M.; Jaouen, N.; Popescu, H.; Gaudemer, R.; Tonnerre, J. M.; Chiuzbaian, S. G.; Hague, C. F.; Delmotte, A.; Dubuisson, J. M.; Cauchon, G.; Lagarde, B.; Polack, F.

    2013-03-01

    SEXTANTS is a new SOLEIL beamline dedicated to soft X-ray scattering techniques. The beamline, covering the 50-1700 eV energy range, features two Apple-II undulators for polarization control and a fixed-deviation monochromator. Two branch-lines host three end-stations for elastic, inelastic and coherent scattering experiments.

  18. Energy calibration of a high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Verbeni, Roberto; D'Astuto, Matteo; Krisch, Michael; Lorenzen, Maren; Mermet, Alain; Monaco, Giulio; Requardt, Herwig; Sette, Francesco

    2008-08-01

    The energy scale of a triple-axis x-ray spectrometer with meV energy resolution based on perfect silicon crystal optics is calibrated, utilizing the most recent determination of the silicon lattice parameter and its thermal expansion coefficient and recording the dispersion of longitudinal acoustic and optical phonons in a diamond single crystal and the molecular vibration mode in liquid nitrogen. Comparison of the x-ray results with previous inelastic neutron and Raman scattering results as well as with ab initio phonon dispersion calculations yields an overall agreement better than 2%. PMID:19044359

  19. Energy calibration of a high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeni, Roberto; D'Astuto, Matteo; Krisch, Michael; Lorenzen, Maren; Mermet, Alain; Monaco, Giulio; Requardt, Herwig; Sette, Francesco

    2008-08-15

    The energy scale of a triple-axis x-ray spectrometer with meV energy resolution based on perfect silicon crystal optics is calibrated, utilizing the most recent determination of the silicon lattice parameter and its thermal expansion coefficient and recording the dispersion of longitudinal acoustic and optical phonons in a diamond single crystal and the molecular vibration mode in liquid nitrogen. Comparison of the x-ray results with previous inelastic neutron and Raman scattering results as well as with ab initio phonon dispersion calculations yields an overall agreement better than 2%.

  20. Hadron transverse momentum distributions in muon deep inelastic scattering at 160 GeV/ c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexakhin, V. Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Heß, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Morreale, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.-F.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V.; Rondio, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmitt, L.; Schmïden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.

    2013-08-01

    Multiplicities of charged hadrons produced in deep inelastic muon scattering off a 6LiD target have been measured as a function of the DIS variables x Bj , Q 2, W 2 and the final state hadron variables p T and z. The distributions are fitted with a single exponential function at low values of to determine the dependence of on x Bj , Q 2, W 2 and z. The z-dependence of is shown to be a potential tool to extract the average intrinsic transverse momentum squared of partons, , as a function of x Bj and Q 2 in a leading order QCD parton model.

  1. Study of Σ(1385) and Ξ(1321) hyperon and antihyperon production in deep inelastic muon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexakhin, V. Y.; Alexandrov, Y.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Y.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Heß, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, C.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanshin, Y.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Y. A.; Kisselev, Y.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Y. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Morreale, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V.; Rondio, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmitt, L.; Schmïden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Y.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.

    2013-10-01

    Large samples of Λ, Σ(1385) and Ξ(1321) hyperons produced in the deep-inelastic muon scattering off a 6LiD target were collected with the COMPASS experimental setup at CERN. The relative yields of Σ(1385)+, Σ(1385)-, , , Ξ(1321)-, and hyperons decaying into were measured. The ratios of heavy-hyperon to Λ and heavy-antihyperon to were found to be in the range 3.8 % to 5.6 % with a relative uncertainty of about 10 %. They were used to tune the parameters relevant for strange particle production of the LEPTO Monte Carlo generator.

  2. Study of 180 Mev Proton Inelastic Scattering from SILICON-28 and SILICON-30.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Quan

    This thesis reports the measurement of cross section and analyzing power angular distribution of elastic and inelastic scattering of 180 MeV proton for ^ {28}Si and ^{30} Si. Measurements were carried out using the proton beam available at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. The scattered protons were detected using the QDDM magnetic spectrometer. The DWIA framework, in which most inelastic proton scattering observables are analyzed, has three ingredients, (1) NN-effective interaction, (2) transition density, and (3) distorted waves. The procedure used here to obtain effective NN-interaction empirically is that first suggested by J. J. Kelly. It models effective NN-interaction guided by the nuclear matter theory(G-matrix) and employs the local density approximation(LDA). By using the transitions, for which transition densities are known, it fits the inelastic observable to determine the parameters used to model the momentum transfer(q) and density(k_{F }) dependence of the effective interaction (here reference to as empirical interaction). The distorted waves are calculated in a self-consistent manner from the model empirical interaction. The salient results are: (1) It is observed that, although the data base was increased by combining the ^{16}O observable with those of ^{28}Si, it still was not large enough to determine all the parameters without ambiguity in terms of which the effective NN-interaction was modeled. (2) The model prediction of cross section and analyzing power in terms of DWIA, using both the Paris -g and empirical interaction, with the observed are compared. It is clear that the results and the technique used to obtain effective NN-interaction shows that there is substantial potential to gain both qualitative and quantitative insight into how the interaction between two nucleons is modified within the nuclear medium. In particular, at low-q effective interaction is reduced and at high-q repulsion is enhanced compared to free interaction

  3. The application of inelastic neutron scattering to investigate the interaction of methyl propanoate with silica.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Andrew R; Geller, Hannah; Silverwood, Ian P; Cooper, Richard I; Watkin, David J; Parker, Stewart F; Winfield, John M; Lennon, David

    2016-06-29

    A modern industrial route for the manufacture of methyl methacrylate involves the reaction of methyl propanoate and formaldehyde over a silica-supported Cs catalyst. Although the process has been successfully commercialised, little is known about the surface interactions responsible for the forward chemistry. This work concentrates upon the interaction of methyl propanoate over a representative silica. A combination of infrared spectroscopy, inelastic neutron scattering, DFT calculations, X-ray diffraction and temperature-programmed desorption is used to deduce how the ester interacts with the silica surface. PMID:27182815

  4. First measurements of jet production rates in deep-inelastic lepton-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.R.; Aied, S.; Anthony, P.L.; Baker, M.D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A.A.; Braun, H.M.; Busza, W.; Conrad, J.M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S.K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H.J.; Geesaman, D.F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M.C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V.W.; Jackson, H.E.; Jaffe, D.E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D.M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R.D.; Kobrak, H.G.E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J.J.; Lubatti, H.J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Michael, D.G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H.E.; Morfin, J.G.; Nickerson, R.B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F.M.; Ramberg, E.J.; Roeser, A.; Ryan, J.; Salgado, C.W.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, N.; Schueler, K.P.; Seyerlein, H.J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G.A.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P.H.; Stier, H.E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R.A.; Talaga, R.; T

    1992-08-17

    The first measurements of forward multijet rates in deep-inelastic lepton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490-GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. The jets were defined using the GADE algorithm. The measured rates are presented as a function of the jet resolution parameter {ital y}{sub cut}, and as a function of the virtual-photon--proton center-of-momentum energy {ital W}, in the range 13{le}{ital W}{le}33 GeV. Comparisons are made to the predictions of the Lund Monte Carlo programs and good agreement is obtained when QCD corrections are included in the model.

  5. First measurements of jet production rates in deep-inelastic lepton-proton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kobrak, H. G.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J.; Salgado, C. W.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H.-J.; Venkataramania, H.; Vidal, M.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, Richard; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1992-08-01

    The first measurements of forward multijet rates in deep-inelastic lepton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490-GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. The jets were defined using the gade algorithm. The measured rates are presented as a function of the jet resolution parameter ycut, and as a function of the virtual-photon-proton center-of-momentum energy W, in the range 13<=W<=33 GeV. Comparisons are made to the predictions of the Lund Monte Carlo programs and good agreement is obtained when QCD corrections are included in the model.

  6. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the limit of subfemtosecond natural lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, T.; Journel, L.; Marin, T.; Guillemin, R.; Carniato, S.; Simon, M.; Zitnik, M.; Kavcic, M.; Bucar, K.; Mihelic, A.; Hoszowska, J.; Cao, W.

    2011-04-14

    We present measurements of the resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra of the CH{sub 3}I molecule in the hard-x-ray region near the iodine L{sub 2} and L{sub 3} absorption edges. We show that dispersive RIXS spectral features that were recognized as a fingerprint of dissociative molecular states can be interpreted in terms of ultrashort natural lifetime of {approx}200 attoseconds in the case of the iodine L-shell core-hole. Our results demonstrate the capacity of the RIXS technique to reveal subtle dynamical effects in molecules with sensitivity to nuclear rearrangement on a subfemtosecond time scale.

  7. Momentum-resolved resonant and nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Gog, T.; Seidler, G. T.; Casa, D. M.; Upton, M. H.; Kim, J.; Shvydko, Y.; Stoupin, S.; Nagle, K. P.; Balasubramanian, M.; Gordon, R. A.; Fister, T. T.; Heald, S. M.; Toellner, T.; Hill, J. P.; Coburn, D. S.; Kim, Y. J.; Said, A. H.; Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.; Yavas, H.; Burns, C. A.; Sinn, H.

    2009-11-01

    The study of electronic excitations by inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) has a rich history. Very early IXS work, for example, provided seminal demonstrations of the validity of relativistic kinematics and the quantum hypothesis and of Fermi-Dirac statistics. While there have been many important results in the interim, it has been the development of the third generation light sources together with continuing innovations in the manufacture and implementation of dispersive X-ray optics that has led to the rapid growth of IXS studies of electronic excitations.

  8. Phonon dispersion in uranium measured using inelastic x-ray scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, M. E.; Lander, G. H.; Sinn, H.; Alatas, A.; Hults, W. L.; McQueeney, R. J.; Smith, J. L.; Wilt, J.; XFD

    2003-02-01

    Phonon-dispersion curves were obtained from inelastic x-ray scattering measurements on high-purity uranium single crystals at room temperature. Modes displacing atoms along [00{zeta}] and propagating in all three high-symmetry directions were measured. Whereas the acoustic modes agree with the neutron measurements, the longitudinal-optic branch is about 10% higher in energy, but consistent with higher cutoff energies observed in phonon density-of-states measurements on polycrystals. The application of this x-ray technique, which requires only very small samples, opens possibilities in actinide science.

  9. Novel rhenium gasket design for nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, Elizabeth A.; Giefers, Hubertus; Nicol, Malcolm F.

    2008-02-15

    For the first time, a highly absorbing element, rhenium, has been proven to be a strong, reliable, and safe gasket material for achieving high pressure in nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) experiments. Rhenium foil was cut into rectangular slices and in order to reduce absorption, the elevated imprint due to preindenting of the gasket is removed using electrical discharge machining. By utilizing this novel gasket design, transmission losses were mitigated while performing NRIXS experiments conducted on the {sup 119}Sn and {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer isotopes.

  10. Jet production in deep-inelastic muon scattering at 490 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Melanson, H.L.

    1993-06-01

    Measurements of jet rates in deep-inelastic muon scattering are presented. The JADE algorithm is used to define jets in the kinematic region 9 < W < 33 GeV. Data taken on a proton target are analyzed within the QCD framework, with the goal of extracting [alpha][sub s]. Results on the Q[sup 2] dependence of the average transverse momentum of jets are used to demonstrate the running of the strong coupling constant [alpha][sub s]. In addition, first measurements of the production of jets from heavy nuclei in the region x[sub B[sub j

  11. Measurement of diffractive production of D*+/-(2010) mesons in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZEUS Collaboration; Chekanov, S.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; de Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Crittenden, J.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Kind, O.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Renner, R.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Bailey, D. S.; Brook, N. H.; Cole, J. E.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Robins, S.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Wing, M.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Helbich, M.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowal, M.; Kowalski, T.; Mindur, B.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Kotański, A.; Slomiński, W.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Chiochia, V.; Dannheim, D.; Derrick, M.; Drews, G.; Fourletova, J.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Geiser, A.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Gutsche, O.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hillert, S.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labes, H.; Lelas, D.; Löhr, B.; Mankel, R.; Martínez, M.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Pellmann, I.-A.; Petrucci, M. C.; Polini, A.; Raval, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Surrow, B.; Wessoleck, H.; Wichmann, R.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Lopez-Duran Viani, A.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Genta, C.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Coppola, N.; Raach, H.; Bell, M.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Glasman, C.; Hanlon, S.; Lee, S. W.; Lupi, A.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Gialas, I.; Bodmann, B.; Carli, T.; Holm, U.; Klimek, K.; Krumnack, N.; Lohrmann, E.; Milite, M.; Salehi, H.; Stonjek, S.; Wick, K.; Ziegler, A.; Ziegler, Ar.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Foudas, C.; Gonçalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Metlica, F.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Lim, H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; González, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Vázquez, M.; Barbi, M.; Bertolin, A.; Corriveau, F.; Ochs, A.; Padhi, S.; Stairs, D. G.; St-Laurent, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Bashkirov, V.; Danilov, P.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Maddox, E.; Pellegrino, A.; Schagen, S.; Tassi, E.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Brümmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Ferrando, J.; Grzelak, G.; Matsushita, T.; Rigby, M.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Parenti, A.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Heaphy, E. A.; Oh, B. Y.; Saull, P. R. B.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Heusch, C.; Park, I. H.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Kohno, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Matsuzawa, K.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Mirea, A.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Butterworth, J. M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; Lightwood, M. S.; Loizides, J. H.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Smalska, B.; Sztuk, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, A.; Ukleja, J.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Eisenberg, Y.; Gladilin, L. K.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Kçira, D.; Lammers, S.; Li, L.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Straub, P. B.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Fourletov, S.; Menary, S.; Soares, M.; Standage, J.

    2002-10-01

    Diffractive production of D*+/-(2010) mesons in deep inelastic scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 44.3pb-1. Diffractive charm production is identified by the presence of a large rapidity gap in the final state of events in which a D*+/-(2010) meson is reconstructed in the decay channel D*+-->(D0-->K- π+)π+s (/+ charge conjugate). Differential cross sections when compared with theoretical predictions indicate the importance of gluons in such diffractive interactions.

  12. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies of the organic semiconductor copper phthalocyanine

    SciTech Connect

    Kodituwakku, C. N.; Burns, C. A.; Said, A. H.; Sinn, H.; Wang, X.; Gog, T.; Casa, D. M.; Tuel, M.; Western Michigan Univ.; DESY, Hasylab

    2008-01-01

    We report resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements on polycrystalline and single crystal samples of the organic semiconductor {beta}-copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) as well as time dependent density functional theory calculations of the electronic properties of the CuPc molecule. Resonant and nonresonant excitations were measured along the three crystal axes with 120 meV resolution. We observe molecular excitations as well as charge-transfer excitons along certain crystal directions and compare our data with the calculations. Our results demonstrate that RIXS is a powerful tool for studying excitons and other electronic excitations in organic semiconductors.

  13. Inelastic X-ray scattering experiments on B[subscript 4]C under high static pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ravhi S.; Dandekar, Dattatraya; Leithe-Jasper, Andres; Tanaka, Takaho; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul; Nicol, Malcolm F.; Cornelius, Andrew L.

    2010-05-04

    Boron K-edge inelastic X-ray scattering experiments were performed on clean B{sub 4}C and shock impact recovered boron carbide up to 30 GPa and at ambient temperature to understand the pressure induced bonding changes. The spectral features corresponding to the boron site in the interlinking chain remained unchanged up to 30 GPa. The results of our experiments indicate that pressure induces less distortion to the boron sites and the local amorphization observed in the previous reports are due to the rearrangement of carbon atoms under extreme conditions without affecting the boron environment.

  14. A pressure cell for nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies of gas phases

    SciTech Connect

    Minzer, M.; Bradley, J. A.; Musgrave, R.; Seidler, G. T.; Skilton, A.

    2008-08-15

    We report the design and performance of a gas-phase sample cell for measurements of momentum transfer (q) dependent nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS). NRIXS measurements from He gas at 2 MPa (20 bars) readily demonstrate dipole-allowed and dipole-forbidden final states for two-electron excitations. Direct comparison of gas-phase NRIXS measurements with the corresponding nonresonant electron energy loss spectroscopy results (EELS) will be a valuable method for characterizing systematic errors in either technique for studies that require absolute normalization of the double differential cross section.

  15. Collins effect in semiinclusive deeply inelastic scattering and in electron-positron-annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, A.V.; Goeke, K.; Schweitzer, P.

    2006-05-01

    The Collins fragmentation function is extracted from HERMES data on azimuthal single spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering, and BELLE data on azimuthal asymmetries in e{sup +}e{sup -}-annihilations. A Gaussian model is assumed for the distribution of transverse parton momenta and predictions are used from the chiral quark-soliton model for the transversity distribution function. We find that the HERMES and BELLE data yield a consistent picture of the Collins fragmentation function which is compatible with COMPASS data and the information previously obtained from an analysis of DELPHI data. Estimates for future experiments are made.

  16. Measurement of hadron azimuthal distributions in deep inelastic muon proton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, M.; Arvidson, A.; Aubert, J. J.; Badelek, B.; Beaufays, J.; Bee, C. P.; Benchouk, C.; Berghoff, G.; Bird, I.; Blum, D.; Böhm, E.; de Bouard, X.; Brasse, F. W.; Braun, H.; Broll, C.; Brown, S.; Brück, H.; Calen, H.; Chima, J. S.; Ciborowski, J.; Clifft, R.; Coignet, G.; Combley, F.; Conrad, J.; Coughlan, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dahlgren, S.; Dengler, F.; Derado, I.; Dreyer, T.; Drees, J.; Düren, M.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, A.; Edwards, M.; Ernst, T.; Eszes, G.; Favier, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Flauger, W.; Foster, J.; Gabathuler, E.; Gajewski, J.; Gamet, R.; Gayler, J.; Geddes, N.; Grafström, P.; Grard, F.; Haas, J.; Hagberg, E.; Hasert, F. J.; Hayman, P.; Heusse, P.; Jaffre, M.; Jacholkowska, A.; Janata, F.; Jancso, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kabuss, E. M.; Kellner, G.; Korbel, V.; Krüger, J.; Kullander, S.; Landgraf, U.; Lanske, D.; Loken, J.; Long, K.; Maire, M.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Maselli, S.; Mohr, W.; Montanet, F.; Montgomery, H. E.; Nagy, E.; Nassalski, J.; Norton, P. R.; Oakham, F. G.; Osborne, A. M.; Pascaud, C.; Pavel, N.; Pawlik, B.; Payre, P.; Peroni, C.; Peschel, H.; Pessard, H.; Pettingale, J.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pönsgen, B.; Pötsch, M.; Renton, P.; Ribarics, P.; Rith, K.; Rondio, E.; Scheer, M.; Sandacz, A.; Schlagböhmer, A.; Schiemann, H.; Schmitz, N.; Schneegans, M.; Scholz, M.; Schröder, T.; Schultze, K.; Sloan, T.; Stier, H. E.; Studt, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Thénard, J. M.; Thompson, J. C.; de La Torre, A.; Toth, J.; Urban, L.; Wallucks, W.; Whalley, M.; Wheeler, S.; Williams, W. S. C.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Windmolders, R.; Wolf, G.

    1987-09-01

    A study of the distribution of the azimuthal angle ϕ of charged hadrons in deep inelastic μ- p scattering is presented. The dependence of the moments of this distribution on the Feynman x variable and the momentum transverse to the virtual photon indicates that non-zero moments arise mainly from the effects of the intrinsic K T of the struck quark with < K {/T 2}>>≳(0.44 GeV)2, and to a lesser extent from QCD processes. No significant variation with Q 2 or W 2 is observed.

  17. Application of Geant4 simulation for analysis of soil carbon inelastic neutron scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Yakubova, Galina; Kavetskiy, Aleksandr; Prior, Stephen A; Torbert, H Allen

    2016-07-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) was applied to determine soil carbon content. Due to non-uniform soil carbon depth distribution, the correlation between INS signals with some soil carbon content parameter is not obvious; however, a proportionality between INS signals and average carbon weight percent in ~10cm layer for any carbon depth profile is demonstrated using Monte-Carlo simulation (Geant4). Comparison of INS and dry combustion measurements confirms this conclusion. Thus, INS measurements give the value of this soil carbon parameter. PMID:27124122

  18. High-frequency collective excitations in molten and glassy Te studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Martin, M. D.; Jimenez-Ruiz, M.; Bermejo, F. J.

    2006-03-01

    The spectra of collective excitations of liquid and glassy tellurium have been studied by means of inelastic neutron scattering. Here we report on the dynamics of liquid Te as measured at two different temperatures, just above melting (T{sub m}=723 K) and at {approx}1000 K as well as the glass that is studied at room temperature. Estimates for the velocity of propagating excitations for both temperatures have been obtained from the experimental data, and a contrasting behavior is found with respect to anomalies shown by the adiabatic sound velocity measured by ultrasound methods. The origin of such differences is finally discussed.

  19. Spherical momentum distribution of the protons in hexagonal ice from modeling of inelastic neutron scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flammini, D.; Pietropaolo, A.; Senesi, R.; Andreani, C.; McBride, F.; Hodgson, A.; Adams, M. A.; Lin, L.; Car, R.

    2012-01-01

    The spherical momentum distribution of the protons in ice is extracted from a high resolution deep inelastic neutron scattering experiment. Following a recent path integral Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study, data were successfully interpreted in terms of an anisotropic Gaussian model, with a statistical accuracy comparable to that of the model independent scheme used previously, but providing more detailed information on the three dimensional potential energy surface experienced by the proton. A recently proposed theoretical concept is also employed to directly calculate the mean force from the experimental neutron Compton profile, and to evaluate the accuracy required to unambiguously resolve and extract the effective proton potential from the experimental data.

  20. Density of phonon states in solid parahydrogen from inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colognesi, D.; Celli, M.; Zoppi, M.

    2004-03-01

    We have measured the inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of solid parahydrogen (at low pressure and T=13.3 K) using the thermal original spectrometer with cylindrical analyzers spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron source (UK). From the experimental spectrum we have obtained the parahydrogen density of phonon states which has been compared with the estimates available in the literature. The present determination improves substantially the previous experimental scenario from the point of view of both statistics and accuracy. The comparison with the most recent estimate obtained from a quantum mechanical simulation of the molecular dynamics calls for an improvement of the computational methods.

  1. Investigation of the domain wall dynamic by the inelastic light scattering method (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreines, N. M.

    1991-04-01

    Light scattering by a moving domain wall (DW) has been investigated by means of Brillouin-Mandel'stam spectroscopy for the first time.1,2 The proportional to the DW velocity frequency shift due to Doppler effect has been observed in the light scattering spectra in the weak ferromagnets. The DW velocity (till 13 km/s) and the intensity of the scattered light as a function of pulsed magnetic field are determined from the spectra at different temperatures. As the DW velocity approaches that of sound (transversal or longitudinal) the scattered light intensity increases dramatically due to phonons emitted by the DW (Cherenkov radiation). Regions of the nonstationary DW motion are observed wherein scattering spectra have complicated character. The inelastic light scattering directly by the excited sound soliton (or phonons) has been observed. The space and time spreading of this soliton was investigated.3 The mean free path l of the acoustic phonons was determined. For YFeO3 at T=2 K l≂300 μm for transversal sound with ν≂12 GHz. The temperature dependence of the DW mobility was studied.

  2. Energy and Mass Dependences of the Parameters of the Semimicroscopic Folding Model for Alpha Particles at Low and Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kuterbekov, K.A.; Zholdybayev, T.K.; Kukhtina, I.N.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.E.

    2005-06-01

    The energy and mass dependences of the parameters of the semimicroscopic alpha-particle potential are investigated for the first time in the region of low and intermediate energies. Within the semimicroscopic folding model, both elastic and inelastic differential and total cross sections for reactions on various nuclei are well described by using global parameters obtained in this study.

  3. Inelastic Scattering in STEM for Studying Structural and Electronic Properties of Chalcogenide-Based Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawan, Aloysius Andhika

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) relies upon elastic and inelastic scattering signals to perform imaging and analysis of materials. TEM images typically contain contributions from both types of scattering. The ability to separate the contributions from elastic and inelastic processes individually through energy filter or electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) allows unique analysis that is otherwise unachievable. Two prominent types of inelastic scattering probed by EELS, namely plasmon and core-loss excitations, are useful for elucidating structural and electronic properties of chalcogenide-based semiconductor nanocrystals. The elastic scattering, however, is still a critical part of the analysis and used in conjunction with the separated inelastic scattering signals. The capability of TEM operated in scanning mode (STEM) to perform localized atomic length scale analysis also permits the understanding of the nanocrystals unattainable by other techniques. Despite the pivotal role of inelastic scatterings, their contributions for STEM imaging, particularly high-angle annular dark field STEM (HAADF-STEM), are not completely understood. This is not surprising since it is currently impossible to experimentally separate the inelastic signals contributing to HAADF-STEM images although images obtained under bright-field TEM mode can be analyzed separately from their scattering contributions using energy-filtering devices. In order to circumvent such problem, analysis based on simulation was done. The existing TEM image simulation algorithm called Multislice method, however, only accounts for elastic scattering. The existing Multislice algorithm was modified to incorporate (bulk or volume) plasmon inelastic scattering. The results were verified based on data from convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and HAADF-STEM imaging as well as comparison to experimental data. Dopant atoms are crucial factors which control

  4. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, Larry R.; Post Jr., Douglass E.; Dawson, John M.

    1986-06-03

    Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

  5. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, Larry R.; Post, Jr., Douglass E.; Dawson, John M.

    1986-01-01

    Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

  6. Nuclear inelastic scattering of heme proteins: from iron ligand vibrations to low energy protein modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeser, Beate; Janoschka, Adam; Wolny, Juliusz A.; Filipov, Igor; Chumakov, Aleksandr I.; Walker, F. Ann; Schünemann, Volker

    2012-03-01

    The binding of the signal molecule nitric oxide (NO) to the NO transporter protein Nitrophorin 2 (NP2) from the bloodsucking insect Rhodnius prolixus has been characterized by Mössbauer spectroscopy as well as nuclear forward scattering (NFS) and nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS). A striking feature of the vibrational spectrum obtained from NP2-NO is a vibration at 594 cm - 1. This mode is assigned to a Fe-NO stretching mode via simulation of the NIS data by density functional theory (DFT) coupled with molecular mechanics (MM) methods. At frequencies below 100 cm - 1 collective motions like heme doming occur which could explain spectroscopic features observed by NIS at these low energies.

  7. Level Lifetimes in 132,134Xe from Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, E. E.; Chakraborty, A.; Crider, B. P.; Kumar, A.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Ashley, S. F.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Yates, S. W.

    2013-10-01

    The stable isotopes of xenon span a region which exhibits an evolution from spherical to gamma-soft behavior; thus the structure of these nuclei may provide insight into the nature of this transition. Highly enriched (>99.9%) 132Xe and 134Xe gases were converted to solid 132XeF2 and 134XeF2, which were used as scattering samples for inelastic neutron scattering measurements at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory. Lifetimes of levels up to 3.5 MeV in excitation energy in 132Xe and 134Xe were determined using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. New transitions and levels have been observed and reduced transition probabilities have also been determined. This new information will be examined in an effort to elucidate the structure of these two transitional nuclei. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation under grant no. PHY-0956310.

  8. Resonances in rotationally inelastic scattering of NH3 and ND3 with H2.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qianli; van der Avoird, Ad; Loreau, Jérôme; Alexander, Millard H; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T; Dagdigian, Paul J

    2015-07-28

    We present theoretical studies on the scattering resonances in rotationally inelastic collisions of NH3 and ND3 molecules with H2 molecules. We use the quantum close-coupling method to compute state-to-state integral and differential cross sections for the NH3/ND3-H2 system for collision energies between 5 and 70 cm(-1), using a previously reported potential energy surface [Maret et al., Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 399, 425 (2009)]. We identify the resonances as shape or Feshbach resonances. To analyze these, we use an adiabatic bender model, as well as examination at the scattering wave functions and lifetimes. The strength and width of the resonance peaks suggest that they could be observed in a crossed molecular beam experiment involving a Stark-decelerated NH3 beam. PMID:26233134

  9. Integrated cross sections for excitation of nuclear isomers by inelastic photon scattering at giant resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáfár, József; Lakosi, László

    2014-02-01

    In the view of the evidences arising from our experimental and theoretical studies, the long-standing picture of a two-humped excitation function for photoexcitation of isomers cannot be confirmed. Whereas the first maximum (at the photoneutron threshold) of the cross section of nuclear photon scattering can be attributed to inelastic (compound) scattering, the second large peak at about giant dipole resonance is mostly due to the elastic (direct) process. A second large peak or increase reported to appear in isomer production has been shown to be practically vanishing. On realizing such a situation, calculated estimates have been given for saturated integral cross section values for isomer activation, based on photoabsorption cross sections taken from the usual Lorentzian parametrization up to the photoneutron threshold. Results compare reasonably well to available experimental data acquired by gamma-ray spectrometry in a large set of stable nuclides having long-lived isomeric states.

  10. Study of inelastic contribution in the 7Be + p scattering experiment at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Amadio, G.; Yamaguchi, H.; He, J. J.; Saito, A.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Fujikawa, H.; Kubono, S.; Khiem, L. H.; Kwon, Y. K.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Togano, Y.; Niikura, M.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, S.

    2006-07-12

    The 7Be(p,{gamma})8B reaction is undoubtfully important to the understanding of the solar model. As a step in the direction of improving the accuracy of the S17 astrophysical factor, a study of the 7Be + p scattering was performed with the thick target method at the CRIB facility. In addition to its astrophysical significance, this reaction is also useful to clarify the nuclear structure of 8B. A primary beam of 7Li and a hydrogen gas target were used to produce a 7Be secondary beam at 7.69 MeV/u. This was the first time in which {gamma}-rays were measured in coincidence with protons, and we have successfully measured the inelastic contribution to the scattering cross section.

  11. Collective nature of spin excitations in superconducting cuprates probed by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Minola, M; Dellea, G; Gretarsson, H; Peng, Y Y; Lu, Y; Porras, J; Loew, T; Yakhou, F; Brookes, N B; Huang, Y B; Pelliciari, J; Schmitt, T; Ghiringhelli, G; Keimer, B; Braicovich, L; Le Tacon, M

    2015-05-29

    We used resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) with and without analysis of the scattered photon polarization, to study dispersive spin excitations in the high temperature superconductor YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{6+x} over a wide range of doping levels (0.1≤x≤1). The excitation profiles were carefully monitored as the incident photon energy was detuned from the resonant condition, and the spin excitation energy was found to be independent of detuning for all x. These findings demonstrate that the largest fraction of the spin-flip RIXS profiles in doped cuprates arises from magnetic collective modes, rather than from incoherent particle-hole excitations as recently suggested theoretically [Benjamin et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 247002 (2014)]. Implications for the theoretical description of the electron system in the cuprates are discussed. PMID:26066453

  12. Lattice dynamics in spin-crossover nanoparticles through nuclear inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Félix, Gautier; Mikolasek, Mirko; Peng, Haonan; Nicolazzi, William; Molnár, Gábor; Chumakov, Aleksandr I.; Salmon, Lionel; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2015-01-01

    We used nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) to investigate the lattice dynamics in [Fe(pyrazine)(Ni(CN)4)] spin crossover nanoparticles. The vibrational density of states of iron was extracted from the NIS data, which allowed to determine characteristic thermodynamical and lattice dynamical parameters as well as their spin-state dependence. The optical part of the NIS spectra compares well with the Raman scattering data reflecting the expansion/contraction of the coordination octahedron during the spin transition. From the acoustic part, we extracted the sound velocity in the low-spin (vLS=2073 ±31 m s-1) and high-spin (vHS=1942 ±23 m s-1) states of the particles. The spin-state dependence of this parameter is of primary interest to rationalize the spin-transition behavior in solids as well as its dynamics and finite size effects.

  13. Band Structure of Helimagnons in MnSi Resolved by Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugler, M.; Brandl, G.; Waizner, J.; Janoschek, M.; Georgii, R.; Bauer, A.; Seemann, K.; Rosch, A.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.; Garst, M.

    2015-08-01

    A magnetic helix realizes a one-dimensional magnetic crystal with a period given by the pitch length λh . Its spin-wave excitations—the helimagnons—experience Bragg scattering off this periodicity, leading to gaps in the spectrum that inhibit their propagation along the pitch direction. Using high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering, the resulting band structure of helimagnons was resolved by preparing a single crystal of MnSi in a single magnetic-helix domain. At least five helimagnon bands could be identified that cover the crossover from flat bands at low energies with helimagnons basically localized along the pitch direction to dispersing bands at higher energies. In the low-energy limit, we find the helimagnon spectrum to be determined by a universal, parameter-free theory. Taking into account corrections to this low-energy theory, quantitative agreement is obtained in the entire energy range studied with the help of a single fitting parameter.

  14. Single-spin asymmetries in inclusive deep inelastic scattering and multiparton correlations in the nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, A.; Pitonyak, D.; Schäfer, A.; Schlegel, M.; Vogelsang, W.; Zhou, J.

    2012-11-01

    Transverse single-spin asymmetries in inclusive deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering can be generated through multiphoton exchange between the leptonic and the hadronic part of the process. Here we consider the two-photon exchange and mainly focus on the transverse target spin asymmetry. In particular, we investigate the case where two photons couple to different quarks. Such a contribution involves a quark-photon-quark correlator in the nucleon, which has a (model-dependent) relation to the Efremov-Teryaev-Qiu-Sterman quark-gluon-quark correlator TF. Using different parametrizations for TF we compute the transverse target spin asymmetries for both a proton and a neutron target and compare the results to recent experimental data. In addition, potential implications for our general understanding of single-spin asymmetries in hard scattering processes are discussed.

  15. Inelastic x-ray scattering studies on dynamic structure factor of polymeric liquid Se under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, Masanori; Kajihara, Yukio; Kimura, Koji; Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Ohara, Koji; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Daisuke

    2015-08-17

    Inelastic X-ray scattering measurements at 25 MPa using synchrotron radiation were carried out for semiconducting liquid Se at high temperatures up to 1673 K. The excitation energy of the acoustic mode disperses approximately 10-50 % faster than the ultrasonic sound velocity in the observed temperature range while the ultrasonic sound rapidly slows down with increasing temperature. We carried out X-ray scattering measurements and found that the average coordination number at 1673 K is 1.3, indicating that the high temperature liquid consists of short chain molecules. These results suggest that weakening of the interatomic interaction is correlated with breaking of polymeric chain molecules.

  16. Deep inelastic scattering near the endpoint in soft-collinear effective theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chay, Junegone; Kim, Chul

    2007-01-01

    We apply the soft-collinear effective theory to deep inelastic scattering near the endpoint region. The forward scattering amplitude and the structure functions are shown to factorize as a convolution of the Wilson coefficients, the jet functions, and the parton distribution functions. The behavior of the parton distribution functions near the endpoint region is considered. It turns out that it evolves with the Altarelli-Parisi kernel even in the endpoint region, and the parton distribution function can be factorized further into a collinear part and the soft Wilson line. The factorized form for the structure functions is obtained by the two-step matching, and the radiative corrections or the evolution for each factorized part can be computed in perturbation theory. We present the radiative corrections of each factorized part to leading order in {alpha}{sub s}, including the zero-bin subtraction for the collinear part.

  17. AdS Black Disk Model for Small-x Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cornalba, Lorenzo; Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, Joao

    2010-08-13

    Using the approximate conformal invariance of QCD at high energies we consider a simple anti-de Sitter black disk model to describe saturation in deep inelastic scattering. Deep inside saturation the structure functions have the same power law scaling, F{sub T}{approx}F{sub L}{approx}x{sup -{omega}}, where {omega} is related to the expansion rate of the black disk with energy. Furthermore, the ratio F{sub L}/F{sub T} is given by the universal value (1+{omega}/3+{omega}), independently of the target. For {gamma}*-{gamma}* scattering at high energies we obtain explicit expressions and ratios for the total cross sections of transverse and longitudinal photons in terms of the single parameter {omega}.

  18. High resolution alpha particle spectrometry through collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seunghoon; Kwak, Sung-Woo; Kang, Han-Byeol

    2015-06-01

    Alpha particle spectrometry with collimation is a useful method for identifying nuclear materials among various nuclides. A mesh type collimator reduces the low energy tail and broadened energy distribution by cutting off particles with a low incidence angle. The relation between the resolution and the counting efficiency can be investigated by changing a ratio of the mesh hole diameter and the collimator thickness. Through collimation, a target particle can be distinguished by a PIPS® detector under a mixture of various nuclides.

  19. Inelastic X-ray scattering from 6H-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Macrander, A.T.; Blasdell, B.; Montano, P.A. |; Kao, C.C.

    1995-07-01

    The authors have studied electronic excitations in 6H-SiC using inelastic x-ray scattering. Inelastic scattering spectra were measured at momentum transfers ranging from 0.47 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1} to 2.00 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1} along the c-axis in the hexagonal lattice, i.e. , along [00{center_dot}1], and from 0.67 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1} to 2.00 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1} along the a-axis, i.e., alone, [10{center_dot}0]. Comparison of the two sets of data reveals an orientation dependence of the spectra, except for a characteristic peak at 22--23 eV that occurs for both directions at low Q. This peak has also been observed in electron energy loss spectroscopy studies and is identified as a bulk plasmon. The orientation dependence of the other spectral features is indicative of band structure effects. These data were obtained using a Ge(444) analyzer in a near backscattering geometry.

  20. γ production and neutron inelastic scattering cross sections for 76Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouki, C.; Domula, A. R.; Drohé, J. C.; Koning, A. J.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Zuber, K.

    2013-11-01

    The 2040.7-keV γ ray from the 69th excited state of 76Ge was investigated in the interest of Ge-based double-β-decay experiments like the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment. The predicted transition could interfere with valid 0νββ events at 2039.0 keV, creating false signals in large-volume 76Ge enriched detectors. The measurement was performed with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) at the Geel Electron Linear Accelerator (GELINA) white neutron source, using the (n,n'γ) technique and focusing on the strongest γ rays originating from the level. Upper limits obtained for the production cross section of the 2040.7-keV γ ray showed no possible influence on GERDA data. Additional analysis of the data yielded high-resolution cross sections for the low-lying states of 76Ge and related γ rays, improving the accuracy and extending existing data for five transitions and five levels. The inelastic scattering cross section for 76Ge was determined for incident neutron energies up to 2.23 MeV, significantly increasing the energy range for which experimental data are available. Comparisons with model calculations using the talys code are presented indicating that accounting for the recently established asymmetric rotor structure should lead to an improved description of the data.

  1. Perturbative QCD effects observed in 490 GeV deep-inelastic muon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salgado, C. W.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H.-J.; Venkataramania, H.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, Richard; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1993-12-01

    Results on forward charged hadrons in 490 GeV deep-inelastic muon scattering are presented. The transverse momenta, azimuthal asymmetry, and energy flow of events with four or more forward charged hadrons are studied. The range of the invariant hadronic mass squared 300inelastic muon scattering experiments. Data are compared to the predictions of the Lund Monte Carlo model with perturbative QCD simulated by matrix elements, parton showers, and color dipole radiation. All of the QCD-based models are consistent with the data while a model without QCD processes is not. Correlations with the multiplicity-independent event variable Π~=J||pT|| are studied. The relationship between the azimuthal asymmetry and transverse momentum of forward hadrons is also presented. The data are most consistent with intrinsic parton transverse momentum squared k2T of 0.25 GeV2/c2.

  2. General-mass treatment for deep inelastic scattering at NNLO in CTEQ PDF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzi, Marco; Lai, Hung-Liang; Nadolsky, Pavel M.; Yuan, C.-P.

    2011-10-01

    We present an NNLO realization of the general mass scheme S-ACOT-χ for the treatment of heavy-flavour production in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering. Practical implementation of the NNLO calculation is illustrated on the example of semi-inclusive structure functions F2c(x,Q) and FLc(x,Q). In a modern global QCD analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs), several factors are comparable in magnitude to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) radiative contributions in the QCD coupling strength αs. Among these factors, dependence of QCD cross sections on masses of heavy quarks, mc and mb, can be significant. Global fits are sensitive to two types of mass effects, kinematical suppression of production of c and b quarks near respective mass thresholds in deep inelastic scattering (DIS), and large radiative contributions to collinear production of c c or bb pairs at large collider energy. It is therefore natural to evaluate all fitted cross sections in a ``general-mass'' (GM) factorization scheme, which assumes that the number of (nearly) massless quark flavors varies with energy, and at the same time includes dependence on heavy-quark masses in relevant kinematical regions. The S-ACOT-χ scheme that we present, is motivated by the QCD factorization theorem for DIS with massive quarks and we show it is valid to all orders of αs.

  3. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  4. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials' functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future. PMID:26821751

  5. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future. PMID:26821751

  6. Crystal Dynamics of (delta) fcc Pu-Ga by High Resolution Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J; Krisch, M; Farber, D; Occelli, F; Xu, R; Chiang, T C; Clatterbuck, D; Schwartz, A J; Wall, M; Boro, C

    2004-09-28

    We have used a microbeam on large grain sample concept to carry out an inelastic x-ray scattering experiment to map the full phonon dispersion curves of an fcc {delta}-phase Pu-Ga alloy. This approach obviates experimental difficulties with conventional inelastic neutron scattering due to the high absorption cross section of the common {sup 239}Pu isotope and the non-availability of large (mm size) single crystal materials for Pu and its alloys. A classical Born von-Karman force constant model was used to model the experimental results, and no less than 4th nearest neighbor interactions had to be included to account for the observation. Several unusual features including, a large elastic anisotropy, a small shear elastic modulus, (C{sub 11}-C{sub 12})/2, a Kohn-like anomaly in the T{sub 1}[011] branch, and a pronounced softening of the T[111] branch towards the L point in the Brillouin are found. These features can be related to the phase transitions of plutonium and to strong coupling between the crystal structure and the 5f valence instabilities. Our results represent the first full phonon dispersions ever obtained for any Pu-bearing material, thus ending a 40-year quest for this fundamental data. The phonon data also provide a critical test for theoretical treatments of highly correlated 5f electron systems as exemplified by recent dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) calculations for {delta}-plutonium.

  7. Fast Imaging with Inelastically Scattered Electrons by Off-Axis Chromatic Confocal Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Changlin; Zhu, Ye; Lazar, Sorin; Etheridge, Joanne

    2014-04-01

    We introduce off-axis chromatic scanning confocal electron microscopy, a technique for fast mapping of inelastically scattered electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope without a spectrometer. The off-axis confocal mode enables the inelastically scattered electrons to be chromatically dispersed both parallel and perpendicular to the optic axis. This enables electrons with different energy losses to be separated and detected in the image plane, enabling efficient energy filtering in a confocal mode with an integrating detector. We describe the experimental configuration and demonstrate the method with nanoscale core-loss chemical mapping of silver (M4,5) in an aluminium-silver alloy and atomic scale imaging of the low intensity core-loss La (M4,5@840 eV) signal in LaB6. Scan rates up to 2 orders of magnitude faster than conventional methods were used, enabling a corresponding reduction in radiation dose and increase in the field of view. If coupled with the enhanced depth and lateral resolution of the incoherent confocal configuration, this offers an approach for nanoscale three-dimensional chemical mapping.

  8. Multiferroic phase of doped delafossite CuFeO2 identified using inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Haraldsen, Jason T; Ye, Feng; Fishman, Randy Scott; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A; Yamaguchi, Y.; Kimura, K.; Kimura, T.

    2010-01-01

    Multiferroic materials allow the electric polarization to be controlled by switching the direction of magnetic ordering and consequently offer prospects for many new technological applications [1 4]. Because multiferroic behavior has been found in materials that exhibit complex (non-collinear and incommensurate) magnetic order, it is essential to know the spin arrangement of the ground states in these materials [4 9]. In many cases, elastic neutron scattering measurements alone are not sufficient to distinguish among several potential complex magnetic states. We report inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements that provide a distinct dynamical fingerprint for the multiferroic ground state of 3.5% Ga-doped CuFeO2. The complex ground state is stabilized by the displacement of the oxygen atoms [10], which are also responsible for the multiferroic coupling predicted by Arima [8]. By comparing the observed and calculated spectrum of spin excitations, we conclude that the magnetic ground state is a distorted screwtype spin configuration. The exchange interactions that stabilize this structure are consistent with those obtained from inelastic measurements [11, 12] on undoped CuFeO2.

  9. Res-Parity: Parity Violation in Inelastic scattering at Low Q2

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Paul; Bosted, Peter; Arrington, John; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Zheng, Xiaochao

    2006-05-16

    Parity violating electron scattering has become a well established tool which has been used, for example, to probe the Standard Model and the strange-quark contribution to the nucleon. While much of this work has focused on elastic scattering, the RES-Parity experiment, which has been proposed to take place at Jefferson Laboratory, would focus on inelastic scattering in the low-Q2, low-W domain. RES-Parity would search for evidence of quark-hadron duality and resonance structure with parity violation in the resonance region. In terms of parity violation, this region is essentially unexplored, but the interpretation of other high-precision electron scattering experiments will rely on a reasonable understanding of scattering at lower energy and low-W through the effects of radiative corrections. RES-Parity would also study nuclear effects with the weak current. Because of the intrinsic broad band energy spectrum of neutrino beams, neutrino experiments are necessarily dependent on an untested, implicit assumption that these effects are identical to electromagnetic nuclear effects. RES-Parity is a relatively straight forward experiment. With a large expected asymmetry (~ 0.5 × 10-4) these studies may be completed with in a relatively brief period.

  10. Expression of a momentum-transfer scattering at an inelastic collision on electron transport in a collisional plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makabe, Toshiaki

    2015-09-01

    An expression for the inelastic momentum-transfer scattering on the collision integral of the Boltzmann equation is derived in order to reflect the effect of the inelastic collision of an electron with a molecule on the electron kinetics in gases and collisional plasmas. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to formulate the effect of the momentum-transfer scattering of an inelastic collision. The present procedure is a traditional one in which the Boltzmann equation of electrons is expanded by the Spherical-harmonics in velocity space. It is shown that the effect of the inelastic momentum-transfer on the electron transport is expressed only when we consider the first anisotropic part of the velocity distribution in the expanded Boltzmann equation. In addition, case studies are performed by considering the dependence of the scattering angle and the magnitude distribution. The influence of the inelastic momentum-transfer scattering on the electron transport should be further investigated, particularly in the case of a Ramsauer gas having the relation Qvib (v) >Qm (v) in the vicinity of the Ramsauer-minimum in SiH4, CH4, and CF4 etc.

  11. Understanding inelastically scattered neutrons from water on a time-of-flight small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Changwoo; Heller, William T.; Stanley, Christopher; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Doucet, Mathieu; Smith, Gregory S.

    2014-02-01

    It is generally assumed by most of the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) user community that a neutron's energy is unchanged during SANS measurements. Here, the scattering from water, specifically light water, was measured on the EQ-SANS instrument, a time-of-flight (TOF) SANS instrument located at the Spallation Neutron Source of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A significant inelastic process was observed in the TOF spectra of neutrons scattered from water. Analysis of the TOF spectra from the sample showed that the scattered neutrons have energies consistent with room-temperature thermal energies (~20 meV) regardless of the incident neutron's energy. With the aid of Monte Carlo particle transport simulations, we conclude that the thermalization process within the sample results in faster neutrons that arrive at the detector earlier than expected based on the incident neutron energies. This thermalization process impacts the measured SANS intensities in a manner that will ultimately be sample- and temperature-dependent, necessitating careful processing of the raw data into the SANS cross-section.

  12. First Search for the EMC Effect and Nuclear Shadowing in Neutrino Nucleus Deep Inelastic Scattering at MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Mousseau, Joel A.

    2015-01-01

    Decades of research in electron-nucleus deep inelastic scattering (DIS) have provided a clear picture of nuclear physics at high momentum transfer. While these effects have been clearly demonstrated by experiment, the theoretical explanation of their origin in some kinematic regions has been lacking. Particularly, the effects in the intermediate regions of Bjorken-x, anti-shadowing and the EMC effect have no universally accepted quantum mechanical explanation. In addition, these effects have not been measured systematically with neutrino-nucleus deep inelastic scattering, due to experiments lacking multiple heavy targets.

  13. Elastic and inelastic scattering of polarized [sup 6]Li by [sup 26]Mg at 60 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.P.; Clarke, N.M. School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B152TT ); Pearce, K.I.; Pinder, C.N. ); Blyth, C.O.; Choi, H.D.; Dee, P.R.; Roman, S.; Tungate, G. ); Davis, N.J. )

    1994-08-01

    Angular distributions of differential cross section and vector analyzing power have been measured for the elastic and inelastic scattering of polarized [sup 6]Li by [sup 26]Mg at 60 MeV bombarding energy. The data have been compared with the results of coupled-channels calculations using phenomenological potentials and coupling strengths derived from inelastic scattering cross-section data and [ital B]([ital E]2) values. The data are reproduced by calculations including couplings between the ground and excited states of the projectile.

  14. A practical alpha particle irradiator for studying internal alpha particle exposure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Man; Lee, Ui-Seob; Kim, Eun-Hee

    2016-09-01

    An alpha particle irradiator has been built in the Radiation Bioengineering Laboratory at Seoul National University (SNU) to investigate the cellular responses to alpha emissions from radon and the progeny. This irradiator is designed to have the energy of alpha particles entering target cells similar to that of alpha emissions from the radon progeny Po-218 and Po-214 residing in the human respiratory tract. For the SNU alpha particle irradiator, an irradiation system is equipped with cell dishes of 4µm thick Mylar bottom and a special setup of cells on slide for gamma-H2AX assay. Dose calibration for the alpha particle irradiator was performed by dual approaches, detection and computer simulation, in consideration of the source-to-target distance (STD) and the size of a cell dish. The uniformity of dose among cells in a dish is achieved by keeping the STD and the size of cell dish in certain ranges. The performance of the SNU alpha particle irradiator has been proven to be reliable through the gamma-H2AX assay with the human lung epithelial cells irradiated. PMID:27475622

  15. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  16. Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections for fission reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, S. F.; Combs, B.; Downes, L.; Girgis, J.; Kersting, L. J.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P. J.; Schniederjan, J.; Sidwell, L.; Sigillito, A. J.; Chakraborty, A.; Crider, B. P.; Kumar, A.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estevz, F. M.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Watts, D.; Yates, S. W.

    2013-04-19

    Nuclear data important for the design and development of the next generation of light-water reactors and future fast reactors include neutron elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections on important structural materials, such as Fe, and on coolant materials, such as Na. These reaction probabilities are needed since neutron reactions impact fuel performance during irradiations and the overall efficiency of reactors. While neutron scattering cross sections from these materials are available for certain incident neutron energies, the fast neutron region, particularly above 2 MeV, has large gaps for which no measurements exist, or the existing uncertainties are large. Measurements have been made at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory to measure neutron scattering cross sections on both Fe and Na in the region where these gaps occur and to reduce the uncertainties on scattering from the ground state and first excited state of these nuclei. Results from measurements on Fe at incident neutron energies between 2 and 4 MeV will be presented and comparisons will be made to model calculations available from data evaluators.

  17. Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections for fission reactor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. F.; Chakraborty, A.; Combs, B.; Crider, B. P.; Downes, L.; Girgis, J.; Kersting, L. J.; Kumar, A.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P. J.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estevz, F. M.; Schniederjan, J.; Sidwell, L.; Sigillito, A. J.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Watts, D.; Yates, S. W.

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear data important for the design and development of the next generation of light-water reactors and future fast reactors include neutron elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections on important structural materials, such as Fe, and on coolant materials, such as Na. These reaction probabilities are needed since neutron reactions impact fuel performance during irradiations and the overall efficiency of reactors. While neutron scattering cross sections from these materials are available for certain incident neutron energies, the fast neutron region, particularly above 2 MeV, has large gaps for which no measurements exist, or the existing uncertainties are large. Measurements have been made at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory to measure neutron scattering cross sections on both Fe and Na in the region where these gaps occur and to reduce the uncertainties on scattering from the ground state and first excited state of these nuclei. Results from measurements on Fe at incident neutron energies between 2 and 4 MeV will be presented and comparisons will be made to model calculations available from data evaluators.

  18. Rotationally inelastic scattering of methyl radicals with Ar and N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Tkáč, Ondřej; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Ma, Qianli; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Stei, Martin

    2015-01-07

    The rotationally inelastic scattering of methyl radical with Ar and N{sub 2} is examined at collision energies of 330 ± 25 cm{sup −1} and 425 ± 50 cm{sup −1}, respectively. Differential cross sections (DCSs) were measured for different final n′ rotational levels (up to n′ = 5) of the methyl radicals, averaged over k′ sub-levels, using a crossed molecular beam machine with velocity map imaging. For Ar as a collision partner, we present a newly constructed ab initio potential energy surface and quantum mechanical scattering calculations of state-resolved DCSs. These computed DCSs agree well with the measurements. The DCSs for both Ar and N{sub 2} collision partners are strongly forward peaked for all spectroscopic lines measured. For scattering angles below 60°, the theoretical CD{sub 3}–Ar DCSs show diffraction oscillations that become less pronounced as n′ increases, but these oscillations are not resolved experimentally. Comparisons are drawn with our recently reported DCSs for scattering of methyl radicals with He atoms.

  19. Inelastic scattering measurements of low energy x-ray photons by organics, soil, water, wood, and metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paki Amouzou, P.; Gertsenshteyn, M.; Jannson, T.; Shnitser, P.; Savant, G.

    2006-08-01

    The angular distribution of the inelastic scattering of photons at low energies (<=80 KeV) has been measured in organic material, soil, rocks, wood, steel sheet, and water. The measurements have been performed under air inside an X-ray shield cabinet using X-rays tube as a photon source and a thermoelectrically cooled CdTe detector. Measurements have been taken for both single and combined materials. The contributions of inelastic scattering of photons for the lower Z material in a given configuration have been extracted. The measured signal is primarily Compton scattering. The measured inelastic scattering contributions were compared with the calculated inelastic scattering cross sections according to the Klein-Nishina theory, updated to include a practical energy distribution of an X-ray tube beam. Relatively good agreement was found for all targets under investigation. The slight discrepancy is attributed to photoelectric effect and sample configuration. Present results may act as a guide for optimization of X-ray imaging sensors and in particular of those based on lobster eye X-ray optics suitable for cargo inspection, improvised explosives detection, non-destructive evaluation, and medical imaging.

  20. Are quantum spin Hall edge modes more resilient to disorder, sample geometry and inelastic scattering than quantum Hall edge modes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Arjun; Benjamin, Colin

    2016-04-01

    On the surface of 2D topological insulators, 1D quantum spin Hall (QSH) edge modes occur with Dirac-like dispersion. Unlike quantum Hall (QH) edge modes, which occur at high magnetic fields in 2D electron gases, the occurrence of QSH edge modes is due to spin-orbit scattering in the bulk of the material. These QSH edge modes are spin-dependent, and chiral-opposite spins move in opposing directions. Electronic spin has a larger decoherence and relaxation time than charge. In view of this, it is expected that QSH edge modes will be more robust to disorder and inelastic scattering than QH edge modes, which are charge-dependent and spin-unpolarized. However, we notice no such advantage accrues in QSH edge modes when subjected to the same degree of contact disorder and/or inelastic scattering in similar setups as QH edge modes. In fact we observe that QSH edge modes are more susceptible to inelastic scattering and contact disorder than QH edge modes. Furthermore, while a single disordered contact has no effect on QH edge modes, it leads to a finite charge Hall current in the case of QSH edge modes, and thus a vanishing of the pure QSH effect. For more than a single disordered contact while QH states continue to remain immune to disorder, QSH edge modes become more susceptible—the Hall resistance for the QSH effect changes sign with increasing disorder. In the case of many disordered contacts with inelastic scattering included, while quantization of Hall edge modes holds, for QSH edge modes a finite charge Hall current still flows. For QSH edge modes in the inelastic scattering regime we distinguish between two cases: with spin-flip and without spin-flip scattering. Finally, while asymmetry in sample geometry can have a deleterious effect in the QSH case, it has no impact in the QH case.

  1. Field and temperature dependence of electromagnon scattering in TbMnO3 studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbein, S.; Steffens, P.; Finger, T.; Komarek, A. C.; Sidis, Y.; Link, P.; Braden, M.

    2015-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering techniques have been used to study the field-induced multiferroic transition and the temperature dependence of magnetic excitations in TbMnO3. The significant changes in the spin-wave spectra across the field-induced transition perfectly agree with a rotation of the cycloidal spiral plane and with efficient pinning in the commensurate high-field phase. Further analysis of the Q dependence allows the identification of an electromagnon in the multiferroic high-field phase whose energy and polarization precisely matches previous infrared data. This and the zero-field temperature dependence of a zone-center magnon, which exactly agrees with that of an optically detected excitation, document that the inverse Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction induces an electromagnon hybrid excitation in TbMnO3.

  2. Comparison of inelastic and quasielastic scattering effects on nonlinear electron transport in quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Danhong; Gumbs, Godfrey

    2010-05-01

    When impurity and phonon scattering coexist, the Boltzmann equation has been solved accurately for nonlinear electron transport in a quantum wire. Based on the calculated nonequilibrium distribution of electrons in momentum space, the scattering effects on both the nondifferential (for a fixed dc field) and differential (for a fixed temperature) mobilities of electrons as functions of temperature and dc field have been demonstrated. The nondifferential mobility of electrons is switched from a linearly increasing function of temperature to a paraboliclike temperature dependence as the quantum wire is tuned from an impurity-dominated system to a phonon-dominated one, as described by Fang et al. [Phys. Rev. B 78, 205403 (2008)]. In addition, a maximum has been obtained in the dc field dependence of the differential mobility of electrons. The low-field differential mobility is dominated by the impurity scattering, whereas the high-field differential mobility is limited by the phonon scattering as described by Hauser et al. [Semicond. Sci. Technol. 9, 951 (1994)]. Once a quantum wire is dominated by quasielastic scattering, the peak of the momentum-space distribution function becomes sharpened and both tails of the equilibrium electron distribution centered at the Fermi edges are raised by the dc field after a redistribution of the electrons is fulfilled in a symmetric way in the low-field regime. If a quantum wire is dominated by inelastic scattering, on the other hand, the peak of the momentum-space distribution function is unchanged while both shoulders centered at the Fermi edges shift leftward correspondingly with increasing dc field through an asymmetric redistribution of the electrons even in low-field regime as described by Wirner et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 2609 (1993)].

  3. The simultaneous measurement of energy and linear polarization of the scattered radiation in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Braicovich, L. Minola, M.; Dellea, G.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Le Tacon, M.; Moretti Sala, M.; Morawe, C.; Peffen, J.-Ch.; Yakhou, F.; Brookes, N. B.; Supruangnet, R.

    2014-11-15

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) in the soft x-ray range is an element-specific energy-loss spectroscopy used to probe the electronic and magnetic excitations in strongly correlated solids. In the recent years, RIXS has been progressing very quickly in terms of energy resolution and understanding of the experimental results, but the interpretation of spectra could further improve, sometimes decisively, from a full knowledge of the polarization of incident and scattered photons. Here we present the first implementation, in a high resolution soft-RIXS spectrometer used to analyze the scattered radiation, of a device allowing the measurement of the degree of linear polarization. The system, based on a graded W/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror installed in proximity of the CCD detector, has been installed on the AXES spectrometer at the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); it has been fully characterized and it has been used for a demonstration experiment at the Cu L{sub 3} edge on a high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprate. The loss in efficiency suffered by the spectrometer equipped with this test facility was a factor 17.5. We propose also a more advanced version, suitable for a routine use on the next generation of RIXS spectrometers and with an overall efficiency up to 10%.

  4. The simultaneous measurement of energy and linear polarization of the scattered radiation in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Braicovich, L; Minola, M; Dellea, G; Le Tacon, M; Moretti Sala, M; Morawe, C; Peffen, J-Ch; Supruangnet, R; Yakhou, F; Ghiringhelli, G; Brookes, N B

    2014-11-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) in the soft x-ray range is an element-specific energy-loss spectroscopy used to probe the electronic and magnetic excitations in strongly correlated solids. In the recent years, RIXS has been progressing very quickly in terms of energy resolution and understanding of the experimental results, but the interpretation of spectra could further improve, sometimes decisively, from a full knowledge of the polarization of incident and scattered photons. Here we present the first implementation, in a high resolution soft-RIXS spectrometer used to analyze the scattered radiation, of a device allowing the measurement of the degree of linear polarization. The system, based on a graded W/B4C multilayer mirror installed in proximity of the CCD detector, has been installed on the AXES spectrometer at the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); it has been fully characterized and it has been used for a demonstration experiment at the Cu L3 edge on a high-Tc superconducting cuprate. The loss in efficiency suffered by the spectrometer equipped with this test facility was a factor 17.5. We propose also a more advanced version, suitable for a routine use on the next generation of RIXS spectrometers and with an overall efficiency up to 10%. PMID:25430146

  5. Observation of Localized Vibrational Modes of Graphene Nanodomes by Inelastic Atom Scattering.

    PubMed

    Maccariello, D; Al Taleb, A; Calleja, F; Vázquez de Parga, A L; Perna, P; Camarero, J; Gnecco, E; Farías, D; Miranda, R

    2016-01-13

    Inelastic helium atom scattering (HAS) is suitable to determine low-energy (few meV) vibrations spatially localized on structures in the nanometer range. This is illustrated for the nanodomes that appear often on graphene (Gr) epitaxially grown on single crystal metal surfaces. The nature of the inelastic losses observed in Gr/Ru(0001) and Gr/Cu/Ru(0001) has been clarified by intercalation of Cu below the Gr monolayer, which decouples the Gr layer from the Ru substrate and changes substantially the out-of-plane, flexural phonon dispersion of epitaxial Gr, while maintaining the nanodomes and their localized vibrations. He diffraction proves that the Cu-intercalated Gr layer is well ordered structurally, while scanning tunneling microscopy reveals the persistence of the (slightly modified) periodic array of Gr nanodomes. A simple model explains the order of magnitude of the energy losses associated with the Gr nanodomes and their size dependence. The dispersionless, low-energy phonon branches may radically alter the transport of heat in intercalated Gr. PMID:26630565

  6. Polarized Electron - Polarized Deuteron Deep-Inelastic Scattering in Electron-Ion Collider with Tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsian, Misak; Cosyn, Wim; Weiss, Christian

    2015-10-01

    For the past several years there have been an intensive research and development for the possible electron-ion collider that will be able to probe deep inelastic processes at unprecedentedly high energies in eA channel. One of the important advantages of the collider kinematics in DIS processes is the possibility for an unambiguous separation of hadrons emerging from DIS and hadrons fragmenting from the target nucleus. This creates a unique possibility for tagging the interacting nucleon with the recoil slow fragments in the DIS process. The situation is most clean for the deuteron target in which case the recoil particle is a nucleon. In addition, the possibility of having polarized deuteron beams will create unprecedented opportunities in probing polarization degrees of freedom for parton distributions in the interacting bound nucleon. In this work we develop a theoretical framework for the polarized electron-polarized deuteron deep inelastic scattering in which the recoil nucleon is detected in the target fragmentation region. Two main contributions for which theoretical models are developed are the plane-wave impulse approximation, in which no reinteractions are taking place between the final state products of DIS and the recoil nucleon.

  7. Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of Ce3Sn and Ce3In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. H.; Lawrence, J. M.; Christianson, A. D.; Goremychkin, E. A.; Bauer, E. D.; de Souza, N. R.; Kolesnikov, A. I.

    2009-03-01

    In Ce3Sn and Ce3In, the linear coefficients of specific heat γ are 260 mJ/mol Ce-K^2 and 700 mJ/mol Ce-K^2, respectively. The Wilson ratio is 7.0 for Ce3Sn and 11.5 for Ce3In. Such large values suggest the presence of ferromagnetic correlations in the ground state. Hence, this system is a potential candidate for studying the magnetic instability at a quantum critical point (QCP). As an initial measurement, we have measured the magnetic inelastic neutron scattering line shape of polycrystalline samples to determine the crystal field (CF) excitations. The low temperature spectrum of both Ce3Sn and Ce3In consist of a quasi- elastic line and two obvious inelastic lines resulting from the two excited crystal field doublets of Ce^3+ in the tetragonal symmetry. The quasi-elastic linewidth,which is related to the Kondo scale, is 3.2meV for Ce3Sn and 1.5meV for Ce3In, consistent with the linear coefficients of specific heat. For Ce3Sn the two CF excitations are at 20meV and 35meV while for Ce3In, the splitting is much larger giving the two excitations at 15meV and 47meV.

  8. Track nanodosimetry of an alpha particle.

    PubMed

    De Nardo, L; Colautti, P; Baek, W Y; Grosswendt, B; Alkaa, A; Ségur, P; Tornielli, G

    2002-01-01

    Experimental measurements and calculations are described of ionisation distributions in propane wall-less gas cavities of about 20 nm simulated size, performed at different distances from a 244Cm alpha particle track. Ionisation events are detected one by one by collecting electrons from the sensitive volume and by separating them with a drift column. Experimental results and Monte Carlo calculations indicate that, in the delta ray cloud, conditional probability curves, average cluster size and the ratio of second moment above first moment of the cluster distribution are invariant with track distance. PMID:12194323

  9. Low-lying Structure of 132Xe from Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, E. E.; Chakraborty, A.; Crider, B. P.; Kumar, A.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Ashley, S. F.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Yates, S. W.

    2011-10-01

    The stable isotopes of xenon span a region which exhibits the transition from spherical vibrators to gamma-soft nuclei and could thus provide some insight into this lesser understood shape transition. Many measurements to examine the nuclear structure of the xenon isotopes are constrained, however, as xenon is a gas under ambient conditions. Recently, highly enriched samples of 132Xe and 134Xe were converted to solid XeF2 and were studied at the University of Kentucky 7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator facility using inelastic neutron scattering with gamma-ray detection. Lifetimes for some of the low-lying levels were determined via the Doppler-shift attenuation method and reduced transition probabilities were determined. First results of the experiments on 132Xe will be presented. This material is based on work supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation under grant no. PHY-0956310.

  10. Low-lying Structure of ^134Xe from Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, E. E.; Crider, B. P.; Ashley, S. F.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Yates, S. W.

    2010-11-01

    Unlike the transition from spherical vibrators to axially symmetric rotors, little is known about the transition from spherical vibrators to gamma-soft nuclei. The stable isotopes of xenon span a region which exhibits this lesser understood shape transition. While ^136Xe shows evidence of being a spherical vibrator, the lighter xenon nuclei demonstrate gamma-soft behavior. Measurements to determine the nuclear structure of the xenon isotopes are difficult, however, since they are gases under ambient conditions, and solid targets are much more amenable to typical methods. Recently, highly enriched (>99.9%) samples of ^132Xe and ^134Xe were converted to solid XeF2. These isotopes were studied at the University of Kentucky 7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator facility using the inelastic neutron scattering reaction with gamma-ray detection. Both excitation function and angular distribution data were obtained for the low-lying levels. First results of the experiments on ^134Xe will be presented.

  11. Measurement of azimuthal hadron asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off unpolarised nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M. G.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joerg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kral, Z.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Orlov, I.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesek, M.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V.; Rondio, E.; Rychter, A.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szableski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.

    2014-09-01

    Spin-averaged asymmetries in the azimuthal distributions of positive and negative hadrons produced in deep inelastic scattering were measured using the CERN SPS longitudinally polarised muon beam at 160 GeV/c and a 6LiD target. The amplitudes of the three azimuthal modulations cos⁡ϕh, cos⁡2ϕh and sin⁡ϕh were obtained binning the data separately in each of the relevant kinematic variables x, z or pTh and binning in a three-dimensional grid of these three variables. The amplitudes of the cos⁡ϕh and cos⁡2ϕh modulations show strong kinematic dependencies both for positive and negative hadrons.

  12. Cold-collision-shift cancellation and inelastic scattering in a Yb optical lattice clock

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, A. D.; Lemke, N. D.; Sherman, J. A.; Oates, C. W.; Quemener, G.; Stecher, J. von; Rey, A. M.

    2011-11-15

    Recently, p-wave cold collisions were shown to dominate the density-dependent shift of the clock transition frequency in a {sup 171}Yb optical lattice clock. Here we demonstrate that by operating such a system at the proper excitation fraction, the cold-collision shift is canceled below the 5x10{sup -18} fractional frequency level. We report inelastic two-body loss rates for {sup 3} P{sub 0} -{sup 3} P{sub 0} and {sup 1} S{sub 0} -{sup 3} P{sub 0} scattering. We also measure interaction shifts in an unpolarized atomic sample. Collision measurements for this spin-1/2 {sup 171}Yb system are relevant for high-performance optical clocks as well as strongly interacting systems for quantum information and quantum simulation applications.

  13. Antimony vibrations in skutterudites probed by 121Sb nuclear inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wille, H. -C.; Hermann, R. P.; Sergueev, I.; Leupold, O.; van der Linden, P.; Sales, Brian C; Grandjean, F.; Long, G. J.; Ruffer, R.; Shvyd'ko, Yu. V.

    2007-01-01

    The antimony specific lattice dynamic properties in the unfilled and filled EuFe4Sb12 skutterudites have been determined by nuclear inelastic scattering at the 121Sb nuclear resonance energy of 37.1298(2) keV with a 4.5 meV high-resolution backscattering sapphire monochromator. The Sb partial vibrational density of states, DOS, shows a maximum centered at 17 and 16 meV in CoSb3 and EuFe4Sb12, respectively. The difference in the Sb DOS of CoSb3 and EuFe4Sb12 reveals that upon filling a transfer of 10% of the vibrational states towards lower energy occurs. Further, a likely indication of the coupling between the guest and the host lattice in rattler systems is observed, a coupling that is required to reduce the lattice thermal conductivity.

  14. A Viscoelastic Analysis of Inelastic X-ray Scattering Spectra from He/Ne Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    M Izzo; F Bencivenga; A Gessini; A Cunsolo; C Masciovecchio

    2011-12-31

    A generalization of the viscoelastic model to binary systems has been applied to analyze inelastic X-ray scattering spectra from a He{sub 0.8}Ne{sub 0.2} mixture. Experiments have been carried out at temperature T = 82 K and number density n = 18.5 nm{sup -3}. In order to test the reliability of such a generalization, we measured a few representative spectra. The model exhaustively describes the experimental data and provides a determination of the spectral densities of the separate mixture components as well as those of both density and concentration fluctuations. These results can be considered as a first test for further developments.

  15. General Helicity Formalism for Polarized Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmino, M; Boglione, M; D’Alesio, U; Melis, S; Murgia, F; Nocera, E R; Prokudin, A

    2011-06-01

    We study polarized Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) processes, within the QCD parton model and a factorization scheme, taking into account all transverse motions, of partons inside the initial proton and of hadrons inside the fragmenting partons. We use the helicity formalism. The elementary interactions are computed at LO with non collinear exact kinematics, which introduces phases in the expressions of their helicity amplitudes. Several Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) distribution and fragmentation functions appear and contribute to the cross sections and to spin asymmetries. Our results agree with those obtained with different formalisms, showing the consistency of our approach. The full expression for single and double spin asymmetries is derived. Simplified, explicit analytical expressions, convenient for phenomenological studies, are obtained assuming a factorized Gaussian dependence on intrinsic momenta for the TMDs.

  16. Quasi elastic and inelastic neutron scattering study of vitamin C aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliardo, F.; Branca, C.; Magazù, S.; Migliardo, P.; Coppolino, S.; Villari, A.; Micali, N.

    2002-02-01

    In this paper, new results obtained by quasi elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments performed on vitamin C ( L-ascorbic acid)/H 2O mixtures are reported. The data analysis of the QENS measurements, by a separation of the diffusive dynamics of hydrated L-ascorbic acid from that of water, furnishes quantitative evidences of a random jump diffusion motion of vitamin C and shows that the water dynamics is strongly affected by the presence of L-ascorbic acid. Concerning the INS experiment, we are able, through the behaviour of neutron spectra across the glass transition temperature ( T g≈233 K for the vitamin C/water system), to collocate the investigated system in the Angell “strong-fragile” scheme.

  17. Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering Study of the Electronic Structure of Cu2O

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.P.; Kim, Y.-J.; Yamaguchi, H.; Gog, T.; Casa, D.

    2010-05-15

    A resonant inelastic x-ray scattering study of the electronic structure of the semiconductor cuprous oxide, Cu{sub 2}O, is reported. When the incident x-ray energy is tuned to the CuK-absorption edge, large enhancements of the spectral features corresponding to the electronic transitions between the valence band and the conduction band are observed. A feature at 6.5 eV can be well described by an interband transition from occupied states of mostly Cu3d character to unoccupied states with mixed 3d, 4s, and O2p character. In addition, an insulating band gap is observed, and the momentum dependence of the lower bound is measured along the {Gamma}-R direction. This is found to be in good agreement with the valence-band dispersion measured with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  18. Neutron Inelastic Scattering Measurements for Na, Ge, Zr, Mo and U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacquias, A.; Dessagne, Ph.; Kerveno, M.; Rudolf, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Drohé, J. C.; Rouki, C.; Nankov, N.; Nyman, M.; Borcea, C.; Negret, A.; Archier, P.; De Saint Jean, C.; Noguère, G.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Koning, A.; Domula, A.; Zuber, K.; Leal, L. C.

    2014-05-01

    Studies for advanced reactor systems such as sodium-cooled fast reactors designed for recycling of high level waste, accelerator driven systems for transmutation, and systems envisioning the use of the Th/U fuel cycle impose tight requirements on nuclear data for accurate predictions of their operation and safety characteristics. Among the identified needs established by sensitivity studies, neutron inelastic scattering on the main structural materials and actinides and some (n,xn) cross sections for actinides feature prominently. Prompt-gamma spectroscopy and time-of-flight techniques were used to measure (n,xnγ) cross-sections of interest. Experiments were performed at the GELINA neutron time-of-flight facility of IRMM. Results for 235U and 23Na are briefly recalled; pertaining theoretical discussions are mentioned to explain observations concerning 238U. The status of studies on 76Ge, Zr and Mo is also reported.

  19. Nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at high pressure and low temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Wenli; Zhao, Jiyong; Lin, Jung-Fu; Jia, Quanjie; Hu, Michael Y.; Jin, Changqing; Ferry, Richard; Yang, Wenge; Struzhkin, Viktor; Alp, E. Ercan

    2015-01-01

    A new synchrotron radiation experimental capability of coupling nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering with the cryogenically cooled high-pressure diamond anvil cell technique is presented. The new technique permits measurements of phonon density of states at low temperature and high pressure simultaneously, and can be applied to studies of phonon contribution to pressure- and temperature-induced magnetic, superconducting and metal–insulator transitions in resonant isotope-bearing materials. In this report, a pnictide sample, EuFe2As2, is used as an example to demonstrate this new capability at beamline 3-ID of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. A detailed description of the technical development is given. The Fe-specific phonon density of states and magnetism from the Fe sublattice in Eu57Fe2As2 at high pressure and low temperature were derived by using this new capability. PMID:25931094

  20. Longitudinal polarization of hyperon and antihyperon in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Shanshan; Chen Ye; Liang Zuotang; Xu Qinghua

    2009-05-01

    We make a detailed study of the longitudinal polarization of hyperons and antihyperons in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering. We present the numerical results for spin transfer in quark fragmentation processes, and analyze the possible origins for a difference between the polarization for hyperon and that for the corresponding antihyperon. We present the results obtained in the case that there is no asymmetry between sea and antisea distribution in the nucleon as well as those obtained when such an asymmetry is taken into account. We compare the results with the available data such as those from COMPASS and make predictions for future experiments including those at even higher energies such as at eRHIC.

  1. Sivers asymmetries for inclusive pion and kaon production in deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, John; Hwang, Dae Sung; Kotzinian, Aram

    2009-10-01

    We calculate the Sivers distribution functions induced by the final-state interaction due to one-gluon exchange in diquark models of a nucleon structure, treating the cases of scalar and axial-vector diquarks with both dipole and Gaussian form factors. We use these distribution functions to calculate the Sivers single-spin asymmetries for inclusive pion and kaon production in deep-inelastic scattering. We compare our calculations with the results of HERMES and COMPASS, finding good agreement for {pi}{sup +} production at HERMES, and qualitative agreement for {pi}{sup 0} and K{sup +} production. Our predictions for pion and kaon production at COMPASS could be probed with increased statistics. The successful comparison of our calculations with the HERMES data constitutes prima facie evidence that the quarks in the nucleon have some orbital angular momentum in the infinite-momentum frame.

  2. Experimental and Computational Studies on Collective Hydrogen Dynamics in Ammonia Borane: Incoherent Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kathmann, Shawn M.; Parvanov, Vencislav M.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Stowe, Ashley C.; Daemen, Luke L.; Hartl, Monika A.; Linehan, John C.; Hess, Nancy J.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas

    2009-02-26

    Incoherent inelastic neutron scattering can be used as a sensitive probe of the vibrational dynamics in chemical hydrogen storage materials. Thermal neutron energy loss measurements at 10K are presented and compared to the vibrational power spectrum calculated using ab initio molecular dynamics of pure and deuterated ammonia borane (NH3BH3, NH3BD3, and ND3BH3). A harmonic vibrational analysis on NH3BH3 clusters was also explored to check for consistency with experiment and the power spectrum. The measured neutron spectra and computed ab initio power spectrum compare extremely well (50 to 500 cm-1) and some assignment of modes to simple motion is possible, however, it is found that the lowest modes (below 250 cm-1) are dominated by collective motion. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  3. Measurement of inclusive jet cross-sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adloff, C.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bähr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J. C.; Böhme, J.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bröker, H.-B.; Brown, D. P.; Brückner, W.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Clarke, D.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J. G.; Coppens, Y. R.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J. D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y. H.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formánek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Grab, C.; Grabski, V.; Grässler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Haynes, W. J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hladký, J.; Höting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; İşsever, Ç.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D. P.; Jones, M. A. S.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, C.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Krüger, K.; Kuhr, T.; Kurča, T.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leißner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Lüders, S.; Lüke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Mangano, S.; Maraček, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.-O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Nellen, G.; Newman, P. R.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Phillips, J. P.; Pitzl, D.; Pöschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rädel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Schätzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlák, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Swart, M.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J. E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Uraev, A.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vest, A.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Wobisch, M.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wünsch, E.; Wyatt, A. C.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; zur Nedden, M.; H1 Collaboration

    2002-08-01

    A measurement of inclusive jet cross-sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA is presented based on data with an integrated luminosity of 21.1 pb -1. The measurement is performed for photon virtualities Q2 between 5 and 100 GeV 2, differentially in Q2, in the jet transverse energy ET, in ET2/ Q2 and in the pseudorapidity ηlab. With the renormalization scale μR= ET, perturbative QCD calculations in next-to-leading order (NLO) give a good description of the data in most of the phase space. Significant discrepancies are observed only for jets in the proton beam direction with ET below 20 GeV and Q2 below 20 GeV 2. This corresponds to the region in which NLO corrections are largest and further improvement of the calculations is thus of particular interest.

  4. Parity violating asymmetry with nuclear medium effects in deep inelastic e → scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, H.; Sajjad Athar, M.; Singh, S. K.; Ruiz Simo, I.

    2015-08-01

    Recently parity violating asymmetry (APV) in the Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) of polarized electrons (e →) from deuterons has been measured at JLab and there exist future plans to measure this asymmetry from nuclear targets. In view of this we study nuclear medium effects in APV in the DIS of e → from some nuclear targets like 12C, 56Fe and 208Pb. The effects of Fermi motion, binding energy and nucleon correlations are taken into account through the nucleon spectral function calculated in a local density approximation for nuclei. The pion and rho cloud contributions have also been taken into account. This model has been earlier used to study nuclear medium effects in the electromagnetic and weak interaction induced processes. The results are presented and discussed in view of the future JLab experiments.

  5. A-dependence of deep-inelastic electron scattering from nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, R.G.; Bodek, A.; Bosted, P.E.; Chang, C.C.; Giokaris, N.; Gomez, J.; Katramatou, A.T.; Lombard, R.M.; Mecking, B.A.; Petratos, G.G.

    1984-04-01

    The deep inelastic electron scattering cross sections per nucleon sigma/sub A/ for d, He, Be, C, Al, Ca, Fe, Ag, and Au were measured in the kinematic range 0.09 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.9 and 2 less than or equal to Q/sup 2/ less than or equal to 15 (GEV/c)/sup 2/ using electrons with energies ranging from 8 to 24.5 GeV. The ratio sigma/sub A//sigma/sub d/ is consistent with unity in the range 0.1 < x < 0.3. For 0.3 < x < 0.8, the ratio decreases logarithmically with atomic weight A, or linearly with average nuclear density. No Q/sup 2/ dependence in the ratio was observed over the kinematic range of the data. 12 references.

  6. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.

    1992-10-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muonproton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, y[sub cut], in energies up to W=33 GeV. Good agreement is found in comparisons with predictions of the QCD-inspired Lund Monte Carlo models. Non-perturbative QCD production mechanisms, inside the Lund Model, can not reproduce the results for energies greater than W [approx equal] 20 GeV. Sensitivities of the jet rate measurements to the low x (x [approx equal] 0.02) gluon content of the nucleon and the evolution of [alpha][sub s], are studied.

  7. Jet production in deep-inelastic muon scattering at 490 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Melanson, H.L.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-06-01

    Measurements of jet rates in deep-inelastic muon scattering are presented. The JADE algorithm is used to define jets in the kinematic region 9 < W < 33 GeV. Data taken on a proton target are analyzed within the QCD framework, with the goal of extracting {alpha}{sub s}. Results on the Q{sup 2} dependence of the average transverse momentum of jets are used to demonstrate the running of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}. In addition, first measurements of the production of jets from heavy nuclei in the region x{sub B{sub j}} > 0.001 are discussed. Initial results indicate a suppression in the rate of two forward jets in carbon, calcium and lead as compared to deuterium. All results presented are preliminary.

  8. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muonproton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, y{sub cut}, in energies up to W=33 GeV. Good agreement is found in comparisons with predictions of the QCD-inspired Lund Monte Carlo models. Non-perturbative QCD production mechanisms, inside the Lund Model, can not reproduce the results for energies greater than W {approx_equal} 20 GeV. Sensitivities of the jet rate measurements to the low x (x {approx_equal} 0.02) gluon content of the nucleon and the evolution of {alpha}{sub s}, are studied.

  9. Event shape analysis of deep inelastic scattering events with a large rapidity gap at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZEUS Collaboration; Breitweg, J.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Yoshida, R.; Zhang, H.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Anselmo, F.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; de Pasquale, S.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Polini, A.; Ricci, F.; Sartorelli, G.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Amelung, C.; Bornheim, A.; Brock, I.; Coböken, K.; Crittenden, J.; Deffner, R.; Eckert, M.; Grothe, M.; Hartmann, H.; Heinloth, K.; Heinz, L.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Paul, E.; Pfeiffer, M.; Rembser, Ch.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Wieber, H.; Bailey, D. S.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cottingham, W. N.; Foster, B.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Hayes, M. E.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; McFall, J. D.; Piccioni, D.; Roff, D. G.; Tapper, R. J.; Arneodo, M.; Ayad, R.; Capua, M.; Garfagnini, A.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Jing, Z.; Liu, W.; Mellado, B.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sampson, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Klimek, K.; Przybycień , M. B.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Bukowy, M.; Jeleń , K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Przybycień , M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩ Bska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zaja C, J.; Duliń Ski, Z.; Kotań Ski, A.; Abbiendi, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J. K.; Cases, G.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Fricke, U.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Glasman, C.; Göttlicher, P.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Johnson, K. F.; Kasemann, M.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Lindemann, L.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Mań Czak, O.; Milewski, J.; Monteiro, T.; Ng, J. S. T.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Park, I. H.; Pellegrino, A.; Pelucchi, F.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Ryan, J. J.; Savin, A. A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Surrow, B.; Tassi, E.; Voß, T.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Wollmer, U.; Youngman, C.; Zsolararnecki, A. F.; Zeuner, W.; Burow, B. D.; Grabosch, H. J.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P.; Maccarrone, G.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Markun, P.; Trefzger, T.; Wölfle, S.; Bromley, J. T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; MacDonald, N.; Saxon, D. H.; Sinclair, L. E.; Strickland, E.; Waugh, R.; Bohnet, I.; Gendner, N.; Holm, U.; Meyer-Larsen, A.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Gladilin, L. K.; Horstmann, D.; Kçira, D.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Butterworth, I.; Cole, J. E.; Howell, G.; Hung, B. H. Y.; Lamberti, L.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Pavel, N.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Sideris, D.; Walker, R.; Mallik, U.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Fleck, J. I.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Hong, S. J.; Lee, S. B.; Nam, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Barreiro, F.; Fernández, J. P.; García, G.; Graciani, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; Martínez, M.; del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; Terrón, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Murray, W. N.; Ochs, A.; Riveline, M.; Stairs, D. G.; St-Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Tsurugai, T.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Khein, L. A.; Korotkova, N. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Botje, M.; Brümmer, N.; Chlebana, F.; Engelen, J.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; van Sighem, A.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Verkerke, W.; Vossebeld, J.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Nylander, P.; Romanowski, T. A.; Blaikley, H. E.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Edmonds, J. K.; Große-Knetter, J.; Harnew, N.; Nath, C.; Noyes, V. A.; Quadt, A.; Ruske, O.; Tickner, J. R.; Uijterwaal, H.; Walczak, R.; Waters, D. S.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; dal Corso, F.; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Bulmahn, J.; Oh, B. Y.; Okrasiń Ski, J. R.; Toothacker, W. S.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Raso, M.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Shah, T. P.; Epperson, D.; Heusch, C.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Wichmann, R.; Williams, D. C.; Schwarzer, O.; Walenta, A. H.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Nagano, K.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Matsushita, T.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Petrucci, M. C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Polenz, S.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Simmons, D.; Teuscher, R. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Catterall, C. D.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Sutton, M. R.; Wing, M.; Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlak, R.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Adamus, M.; Coldewey, C.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Badgett, W. F.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Dasu, S.; Foudas, C.; Loveless, R. J.; Mattingly, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wodarczyk, M.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Bhadra, S.; Frisken, W. R.; Khakzad, M.; Schmidke, W. B.

    1998-03-01

    A global event shape analysis of the multihadronic final states observed in neutral current deep inelastic scattering events with a large rapidity gap with respect to the proton direction is presented. The analysis is performed in the range 5<=Q2<=185 GeV2 and 160<=W<=250 GeV, where Q2 is the virtuality of the photon and W is the virtual-photon proton centre of mass energy. Particular emphasis is placed on the dependence of the shape variables, measured in the γ*-pomeron rest frame, on the mass of the hadronic final state, MX. With increasing MX the multihadronic final state becomes more collimated and planar. The experimental results are compared with several models which attempt to describe diffractive events. The broadening effects exhibited by the data require in these models a significant gluon component of the pomeron.

  10. Refined model of the {Fe9} magnetic molecule from low-temperature inelastic neutron scattering studies

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhardt, Larry; Demmel, Franz; Luban, Marshall; Timco, Grigore A; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E

    2014-06-01

    We present a refined model of the {Fe9} tridiminished icosahedron magnetic molecule system. This molecule was originally modeled as being composed of two ({Fe3} and {Fe6}) clusters, with the Fe3+ ions within each cluster being coupled via exchange interactions, but with no coupling between the clusters. The present inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements were used to probe the low-lying energy spectrum of {Fe9}, and these results demonstrate that the previously published model of two uncoupled clusters is incomplete. To achieve agreement between the experiment and theory, we have augmented the model with relatively small exchange coupling between the clusters. A combination of Lanczos matrix diagonalization and quantum Monte Carlo simulations have been used to achieve good agreement between the experimental data and the improved model of the full {Fe9} system despite the complexity of this model (with Hilbert space dimension >107).

  11. Nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at high pressure and low temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bi, Wenli; Zhao, Jiyong; Lin, Jung -Fu; Jia, Quanjie; Hu, Michael Y.; Jin, Changqing; Ferry, Richard; Yang, Wenge; Struzhkin, Viktor; Alp, E. Ercan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new synchrotron radiation experimental capability of coupling nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering with the cryogenically cooled high-pressure diamond anvil cell technique is presented. The new technique permits measurements of phonon density of states at low temperature and high pressure simultaneously, and can be applied to studies of phonon contribution to pressure- and temperature-induced magnetic, superconducting and metal–insulator transitions in resonant isotope-bearing materials. In this report, a pnictide sample, EuFe2As2, is used as an example to demonstrate this new capability at beamline 3-ID of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. A detailed description of the technicalmore » development is given. The Fe-specific phonon density of states and magnetism from the Fe sublattice in Eu57Fe2As2 at high pressure and low temperature were derived by using this new capability.« less

  12. Phonon density of states of α - and δ -plutonium by inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manley, M. E.; Said, A. H.; Fluss, M. J.; Wall, M.; Lashley, J. C.; Alatas, A.; Moore, K. T.; Shvyd'Ko, Yu.

    2009-02-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of the phonon density of states (DOS) were performed on polycrystalline samples of pure α-Pu and δ-Pu0.98Ga0.02 at room temperature. The heat capacity of α-Pu is well reproduced by contributions calculated from the measured phonon DOS plus conventional thermal-expansion and electronic contributions, showing that α-Pu is a “well-behaved” metal in this regard. A comparison of the phonon DOS of the two phases at room temperature showed that the vibrational entropy difference between them is only a quarter of the total entropy difference expected from known thermodynamic measurements. The missing entropy is too large to be accounted for by conventional electronic entropy and evidence from the literature rules out a contribution from spin fluctuations. Possible alternative sources for the missing entropy are discussed.

  13. Performance of spherically focusing Ge(444) backscattering analyzers for inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Macrander, A.T.; Kushnir, V.I.; Blasdell, R.C. )

    1995-02-01

    A spectrometer designed for use as an undulator source and having targeted resolutions of 0.01 eV in one mode of use and 0.2 eV in another will operate at the APS. We report here on analyzers that we have constructed for use on this spectrometer for 0.2 eV resolution. We have tested them at NSLS beamline X21 using focused wiggler radiation and at the Cornell high energy synchrotron source (CHESS) using radiation from the CHESS-ANL undulator. Analyzers were constructed by gluing and pressing 90-mm-diam, (111) oriented Ge wafers into concave glass forms having a radius near 1 m. An overall inelastic scattering resolution of 0.3 eV using the (444) reflection was demonstrated at CHESS. Recent results at X21 revealed a useful diameter of 74 mm at an 87[degree] Bragg angle.

  14. Performance of spherically focusing Ge(444) backscattering analyzers for inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Macrander, A.T.; Kushnir, V.I.; Blasdell, R.C.

    1994-08-01

    A spectrometer designed to use an undulator source and having targeted resolutions of 0.01 eV in one mode of use and 0.2 eV in another will operate at the APS. We report here on analyzers that we have, constructed for use on this spectrometer for 0.2-eV resolution. We have tested them at NSLS beamline X21 using focused wiggler radiation and at CHESS using radiation from the CHESS-ANL undulator. Analyzers were constructed by gluing and pressing 90-mm-diameter, (111) oriented Ge wafers into concave glass forms having a radius near 1 m. An overall inelastic scattering resolution of 0.3 eV using the (444) reflection was demonstrated at CHESS. Recent results at X21 revealed a useful diameter of 74 mm at an 870 Bragg angle.

  15. Parity Violation in Deep Inelastic Scattering at JLab 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaochao Zheng

    2006-05-16

    The parity-violating asymmetry in e-$^2$H deep inelastic scattering (DIS) can be used to extract the weak neutral-current coupling constants $C_{2q}$. A measurement of this asymmetry at two $Q^2$ values is planned at Jefferson Lab. Results from this experiment will provide a value of $2C_{2u}-C_{2d}$ to a precision of $\\pm 0.03$, a factor of eight improvement over our current knowledge. If all hadronic effects can be understood, this results will provide information on possible extensions of the Standard Model, complementary to other experiments dedicated to new physics searches. Presented here are the physics motivation, experimental setup, potential hadronic effects and their implications, and the future of PV DIS at Jefferson Lab.

  16. Phenomenological analysis of azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, V.; Boglione, M.; Gonzalez Hernandez, J. O.; Melis, S.

    2015-04-01

    We present a phenomenological analysis of the cos ϕ and cos 2 ϕ asymmetries in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, based on the recent multidimensional data released by the COMPASS and HERMES collaborations. In the transverse-momentum-dependent framework, valid at relatively low transverse momenta, these asymmetries arise from intrinsic transverse momentum and transverse spin effects, and from their correlations. The role of the Cahn and Boer-Mulders effects in both azimuthal moments is explored up to order 1 /Q . As the kinematics of the present experiments is dominated by the low-Q2 region, higher-twist contributions turn out to be important, affecting the results of our fits.

  17. Fully microscopic description of elastic and inelastic scattering at intermediate incident energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minomo, Kosho; Kohno, Michio; Toyokawa, Masakazu; Yahiro, Masanobu; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2016-06-01

    We aim for fully microscopic understanding of many-body nuclear reactions starting from two- and three-nucleon forces based on chiral effective field theory (Ch-EFT). We first construct a g-matrix with the nuclear forces based on Ch-EFT using Brueckner-Hartree-Fock theory, in which the three-nucleon force effects are represented through the density dependence of the g-matrix. Then, the folding model and microscopic coupled-channels method with the g-matrix are applied to nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus scattering at intermediate incident energies. This new microscopic framework well describes the elastic and inelastic cross sections with no ad-hoc parameters. In addition, the three-nucleon force and coupled-channels effects on many-body nuclear reactions are clarified.

  18. Nitric oxide heme interactions in nitrophorin 7 investigated by nuclear inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, H.; Faus, I.; Rackwitz, S.; Wolny, J. A.; Walker, F. A.; Chumakov, A. I.; Ogata, H.; Knipp, M.; Schünemann, V.

    2014-04-01

    Nitrophorins (NPs) occur in the blood-sucking insect Rhodnius prolixus. These proteins use ferric heme to store nitric oxide (NO) in the salivary glands of the insects and transport it to the victim's tissues, resulting in vasodilation and reduced blood coagulation. In this work we present a nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) study in order to characterize the iron-NO interaction in the isoform nitrophorin 7 (NP7). The NIS data obtained for NP7 complexed with NO show a strong band at ˜589 cm-1 which is due to modes with significant Fe-NO stretching and bending character. Another conspicuous feature is a significant peak at ˜280 cm-1 in the region where the heme modes occur. Based on a hybrid calculation method, which uses density functional theory and molecular mechanics, the band at ˜280 cm-1 is assigned to heme modes with substantial doming character.

  19. A cryogenic high pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of quantum fluids and solids

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, Justin R; Omar Diallo, Souleymane

    2013-01-01

    We present our new development of a high pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of helium at ultra-low temperatures. The cell has a large sample volume of ~140 cm3, and a working pressure of ~70 bar, with a relatively thin wall-thickness (1.1 mm) - thanks to the high yield strength aluminum used in the design. Two variants of this cell have been developed; one with permanently joined components using electron-beam welding and explosion welding, methods that have little or no impact on the global heat treatment of the cell, and another with modular and interchangeable components, which include a capacitance pressure gauge, that can be sealed using traditional indium wire technique. The performance of the cell has been tested in recent measurements on superfluid liquid helium near the solidification line.

  20. Wide-angle mechanical velocity selection for scattered neutrons in inelastic neutron spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamontov, E.

    2014-09-01

    We have analyzed the performance of the proposed mechanical device suitable for wide-angle velocity selection of neutrons scattered at the sample position in inelastic neutron spectrometers. The proposed wide-angle velocity selector (WAVES) is essentially a collimator that rotates about the vertical axis passing through the sample position, whose blades are not radial, but instead shaped to optimize the transmission of neutrons of the targeted velocity. The rotation phase of the selector does not need to be synchronized with the incident beam pulses, as long as the incident neutrons can reach the sample position, which greatly simplifies the selector control and makes it suitable for neutron spectrometers at both pulsed and steady sources. We discuss applications of the proposed selector in various types of the inverted-geometry neutron spectrometers.

  1. Anisotropic Nuclear Inelastic Scattering of an Iron(II) Molecular Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, H.; Benda, R.; Herta, C.; Schünemann, V.; Chumakov, A. I.; Duelund, L.; Winkler, H.; Toftlund, H.; Trautwein, A. X.

    2001-02-01

    Nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) spectra were recorded for a monocrystal of the spin-crossover complex [Fe\\(tptMetame\\)] \\(ClO 4\\)2 \\(tptMetame = 1,1,1-tris\\{[N-\\(2-pyridylmethyl\\)-N-methylamino]-methyl\\}ethane\\) at T = 30 K (low-spin state) and at room temperature (high-spin state) for different crystal orientations. The high energy resolution (0.65 meV) allowed us to resolve individual molecular vibrations which were unambiguously identified by density functional calculations. From the NIS spectra for the first time the angular-resolved iron-partial density of phonon states (PDOS) was extracted. The PDOS corroborates a vibrational entropy difference as driving force of the spin transition.

  2. Inelastic neutron scatter iron concentrations of the moon from orbital gamma ray data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, P. A., Jr.; Bielefeld, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    The considered investigation is concerned with the relation between KREEP and thermal neutron flux depression. The Fe(n, n-prime gamma) concentrations of selected lunar regions were calculated by energy-band analysis of the 0.803-0.872 MeV band. The result of the investigation will be used to evaluate the reliability of the previously determined Fe(n, gamma) values. A 0.803-0.872 MeV band was isolated from the Apollo 15 and 16 orbital gamma ray spectra. Preliminary regression analysis of regional ground truth count rates and Fe concentrations showed this energy interval to be optimum for the 0.8467 MeV inelastic scatter (n, n-prime gamma)Fe peak.

  3. Quark initial state interaction in deep inelastic scattering and the Drell-Yan process

    SciTech Connect

    Linnyk, O.; Leupold, S.; Mosel, U.

    2005-02-01

    We pursue a phenomenological study of higher-twist effects in high-energy processes by taking into account the off-shellness (virtuality) of partons bound in the nucleon. The effect of parton off-shellness in deep inelastic ep{yields}eX scattering (DIS) and the Drell-Yan process (pp{yields}llX) is examined. Assuming factorization and a single-parameter Breit-Wigner form for the parton spectral function, we develop a model to calculate the corresponding off-shell cross sections. Allowing for a finite parton width {approx_equal}100 MeV, we reproduce the data of both DIS and the triple-differential Drell-Yan cross section without an additional K-factor. The results are compared to those from perturbative QCD and the intrinsic-k{sub T} approach.

  4. Single-Spin Asymmetries in Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering and Drell-Yan Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievert, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    In this brief article, we summarize our recent work1 regarding the origin of the nucleon Sivers functions within the diquark spectator model in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and the Drell-Yan process (DY). We demonstrate that the C, P, T symmetry properties of transverse spinors always couple the spin-dependent part of the numerator algebra to the imaginary part of the denominator in the cross section. This complex phase, and its sign change under time reversal, is believed to be responsible for the predicted sign change of the Sivers functions in SIDIS and DY. We study the complex phase generated in both processes by the "color-lensing" mechanism and find that, although the phases appear to be different in structure between SIDIS and DY, they do give rise to the expected sign flip relation at leading twist.

  5. A cryogenic high pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of quantum fluids and solids.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, J R; Diallo, S O

    2013-01-01

    We present our new development of a high pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of helium at ultra-low temperatures. The cell has a large sample volume of ~140 cm(3) and a working pressure of ~7 MPa, with a relatively thin wall-thickness (1.1 mm)--thanks to the high yield strength aluminum used in the design. Two variants of this cell have been developed. The first cell is permanently joined components using electron-beam welding and explosion welding, methods that have little or no impact on the global heat treatment of the cell. The second cell discussed has modular and interchangeable components, which includes a capacitance pressure gauge, that can be sealed using the traditional indium wire technique. The performance of the cells have been tested in recent measurements on superfluid liquid helium near the solidification line. PMID:23387689

  6. Exploring a direct measurement of quark energy loss using semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, C.; Brooks, W.; Hakobyan, H.; Arratia, M.

    2012-02-01

    This work consists of an evaluation of the feasibility of a direct extraction of quark energy loss from the E02-104 experiment π+ data and using semi-inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS). The method is based on a shape analysis of the pion energy spectrum, coupled with a GENIE simulation which includes an hadronic cascade model in nuclei. The pion energy spectrum from different nuclei such as C, Fe, and Pb is compared to that of deuterium in order to find a simple energy shift, which is predicted by BDMPS if the parton energy is high enough that the medium length L is smaller than a certain critical length Lc. GENIE is used to rule out hadronic interaction effects which could also explain the same behavior observed in data.

  7. Longitudinal spin transfer to the {lambda} hyperon in semiinclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Airapetian, A.; Deconinck, W.; Lorenzon, W.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Elbakian, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Marukyan, H.; Rostomyan, A.; Taroian, S.; Amarian, M.; Andrus, A.; Bailey, P.; Bouwhuis, M.; Chiang, H. C.; Linden-Levy, L. A.; Makins, N. C. R.; Rubin, J.

    2006-10-01

    The transfer of polarization from a high-energy positron to a {lambda}{sup 0} hyperon produced in semiinclusive deep-inelastic scattering has been measured. The data have been obtained by the HERMES experiment at DESY using the 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized positron beam of the HERA collider and unpolarized gas targets internal to the positron (electron) storage ring. The longitudinal spin-transfer coefficient is found to be D{sub LL{sup '}}{sup {lambda}}=0.11{+-}0.10(stat){+-}0.03(syst) at an average fractional energy carried by the {lambda}{sup 0} hyperon =0.45. The dependence of D{sub LL{sup '}}{sup {lambda}} on both the fractional energy z and the fractional longitudinal momentum x{sub F} is presented.

  8. Parity violation in deep inelastic scattering at JLab 6 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, X.; Arrington, J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Hafidi, K.; Holt, R. J.; Jackson, H. E.; Potterveld, D. H.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E.; Zeidman, B.; Physics

    2007-01-01

    The parity-violating asymmetry in e-2H deep inelastic scattering (DIS) can be used to extract the weak neutral-current coupling constants C 2q . A measurement of this asymmetry at two Q 2 values is planned at Jefferson Lab. Results from this experiment will provide a value of 2C 2u - C 2d to a precision of {+-}0.03, a factor of eight improvement over our current knowledge. If all hadronic effects can be understood, this result will provide information on possible extensions of the Standard Model, complementary to other experiments dedicated to new physics searches. Presented here are the physics motivation, experimental setup, potential hadronic effects and their implications, and the future of PV DIS at Jefferson Lab.

  9. Acoustic phonons in chrysotile asbestos probed by high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Vakhrushev, S. B.; Kumzerov, Yu. A,; Alatas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic phonons in an individual, oriented fiber of chrysotile asbestos (chemical formula Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}) were observed at room temperature in the inelastic x-ray measurement with a very high (meV) resolution. The x-ray scattering vector was aligned along [1 0 0] direction of the reciprocal lattice, nearly parallel to the long axis of the fiber. The latter coincides with [1 0 0] direction of the direct lattice and the axes of the nano-channels. The data were analyzed using a damped harmonic oscillator model. Analysis of the phonon dispersion in the first Brillouin zone yielded the longitudinal sound velocity of (9200 {+-} 600) m/s.

  10. Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of phonon dynamics in URu2Si2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gardner, D. R.; Bonnoit, C. J.; Chisnell, R.; Said, A. H.; Leu, B. M.; Williams, Travis J.; Luke, G. M.; Lee, Y. S.

    2016-02-11

    In this paper, we study high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of the acoustic phonons of URu2Si2. At all temperatures, the longitudinal acoustic phonon linewidths are anomalously broad at small wave vectors revealing a previously unknown anharmonicity. The phonon modes do not change significantly upon cooling into the hidden order phase. In addition, our data suggest that the increase in thermal conductivity in the hidden order phase cannot be driven by a change in phonon dispersions or lifetimes. Hence, the phonon contribution to the thermal conductivity is likely much less significant compared to that of the magnetic excitations in the lowmore » temperature phase.« less

  11. Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic e^± p scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 372 pb^{-1}. The measurement was performed for γ ^{*}- p centre-of-mass energies in the range 90< W < {250} {GeV} and for photon virtualities Q^2 > {25} {GeV2}. Energy flows around the jet axis are presented. The cross section is presented as a function of β and φ , where β =x/x_IP, x is the Bjorken variable and x_IP is the proton fractional longitudinal momentum loss. The angle φ is defined by the γ ^{*}-dijet plane and the γ ^{*}-e^± plane in the rest frame of the diffractive final state. The φ cross section is measured in bins of β . The results are compared to predictions from models based on different assumptions about the nature of the diffractive exchange.

  12. Anomalous vibrational modes in acetanilide: A F. D. S. incoherent inelastic neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Barthes, M.; Moret, J. ); Eckert, J.; Johnson, S.W.; Swanson, B.I.; Unkefer, C.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The origin of the anomalous infra-red and Raman modes in acetanilide (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}NHCOCH{sub 3}, or ACN), remains a subject of considerable controversy. One family of theoretical models involves Davydov-like solitons nonlinear vibrational coupling, or polaronic'' localized modes. An alternative interpretation of the extra-bands in terms of a Fermi resonance was proposed and recently the existence of slightly non-degenerate hydrogen atom configurations in the H-bond was suggested as an explanation for the anomalies. In this paper we report some new results on the anomalous vibrational modes in ACN that were obtained by inelastic incoherent neutron scattering (INS).

  13. Sivers asymmetries for inclusive pion and kaon production in deep-inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Hwang, Dae Sung; Kotzinian, Aram

    2009-10-01

    We calculate the Sivers distribution functions induced by the final-state interaction due to one-gluon exchange in diquark models of a nucleon structure, treating the cases of scalar and axial-vector diquarks with both dipole and Gaussian form factors. We use these distribution functions to calculate the Sivers single-spin asymmetries for inclusive pion and kaon production in deep-inelastic scattering. We compare our calculations with the results of HERMES and COMPASS, finding good agreement for π+ production at HERMES, and qualitative agreement for π0 and K+ production. Our predictions for pion and kaon production at COMPASS could be probed with increased statistics. The successful comparison of our calculations with the HERMES data constitutes prima facie evidence that the quarks in the nucleon have some orbital angular momentum in the infinite-momentum frame.

  14. Collective dynamics in fully hydrated phospholipid bilayers studied by inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Chen, S H; Liao, C Y; Huang, H W; Weiss, T M; Bellisent-Funel, M C; Sette, F

    2001-01-22

    The short wavelength density fluctuation of DLPC (dilaurylphosphatidylcholine) bilayers close to full hydration has been studied by the inelastic x-ray scattering technique below and above the main transition temperature. The analysis based on a generalized three effective eigenmode theory allows us to construct the dispersion relation of the high frequency sound mode for the first time. The marked softening of the excitation near k = 14 nm(-1), corresponding to the lipid chain-chain correlation peak in the structure factor, in the L(alpha) phase implies prevalent occurrences of short-wavelength in-plane motions of lipid chains that might be of importance for transportation of small molecules across membranes. PMID:11177926

  15. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mousseau, J.

    2016-04-19

    Here, the MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5–50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy.more » However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x < 0.1. This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.« less

  16. Inelastic Neutron Scattering Studies of the Dynamics of Glass-Forming Materials in Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorn, Reiner

    2015-03-01

    The study of the dynamics of glass-forming liquids in nanoscopic confinement may contribute to the understanding of the glass transition. Especially, the question of a cooperativity length scale may be addressed. In this presentation, results obtained by inelastic neutron scattering are presented. The first experiments were done to study the α relaxation of glass-forming liquids and polymers in nanoporous silica. Neutron scattering is a suitable method to study such composite materials because the scattering of the liquid component can be emphasized by proper choice of isotopes. By combining time-of-flight spectroscopy and backscattering spectroscopy it is possible to cover the large dynamical range spanned by the dynamics of glass-forming materials. The experiments demonstrated a broadening of the spectrum of relaxation times with faster as well as slower components compared to the bulk. In later experiments `soft' confinement in a microemulsion was used to reduce surface effects. In this system a definite acceleration of the dynamics was observed. In all cases the glass-specific fast vibrational dynamics (boson peak) was also studied, revealing a characteristic confinement dependence which allows conclusions on its nature. Finally, studies were carried out on polymers by neutron spin echo spectroscopy with the aim of observing the confinement effect on polymer specific dynamics (Rouse motion). These studies showed that a comparatively simple model is able to explain the deviation from bulk behavior.

  17. Inelastic neutron- and Raman-scattering studies of muscovite and vermiculite layered silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, N. ); Kamitakahara, W.A. University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland National Institute of Standards and Technology, Building 235, E-151, Gaithersburg, Maryland )

    1991-01-15

    Investigations on the lattice dynamics of muscovite and vermiculite have been carried out by inelastic neutron scattering and Raman scattering. In the neutron measurements, dispersion curves for the out-of-plane and in-plane LA and TA phonons were fully obtained for muscovite, while more limited data were obtained for Mg vermiculite. Sound velocities were estimated from the slopes of the dispersion curves. Raman-scattering experiments revealed an interlayer shearing mode in Na and Sr vermiculites in the 0-water-layer hydration state. The intercalated water molecules in Na and Sr vermiculites exhibited a broad Raman feature (OH stretching vibrations) at 3450 cm{sup {minus}1} with a full width at half maximum of {similar to}300 cm{sup {minus}1}. In addition, relatively sharp Raman peaks from the inner-layer hydroxyls in the host octahedral layers were found at {similar to}3700 cm{sup {minus}1}. These peaks were sensitive to the hydration state or charge in the intercalated layer.

  18. Diffusive and inelastic scattering in ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy and ballistic-electron-emission microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.Y.; Turner, B.R.; Schowalter, L.J.

    1993-07-01

    Ballistic-electron-emission microscopy (BEEM) of Au/Si(001) n type was done to study whether elastic scattering in the Au overlayer is dominant. It was found that there is no dependence of the BEEM current on the relative gradient of the Au surface with respect to the Si interface, and this demonstrates that significant elastic scattering must occur in the Au overlayer. Ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy (BEES) was also done, and, rather than using the conventional direct-current BEES, alternating-current (ac) BEES was done on Au/Si and also on Au/PtSi/Si(001) n type. The technique of ac BEES was found to give linear threshold for the Schottky barrier, and it also clearly showed the onset of electron-hole pair creation and other inelastic scattering events. The study of device quality PtSi in Au/PtSi/Si(001) yielded an attenuation length of 4 nm for electrons of energy 1 eV above the PtSi Fermi energy. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Minerν A Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5-50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy. However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x <0.1 . This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice et al. (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.

  20. Unpolarised TMD Distribution and Fragmentation Functions from recent HERMES and COMPASS Semi-inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering Multiplicities

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexey; Anselmino, Mauro; Boglione, Mariaelena; Melis, Stefano; Gonzalez, J. O.

    2014-10-01

    The unpolarised transverse momentum dependent distribution and fragmentation functions (TMDs) are extracted from HERMES and COMPASS experimental measurements of semi- inclusive deep inelastic scattering multiplicities for charged hadron production. A simple factorised functional form of the TMDs is adopted, with a Gaussian dependence on the intrinsic transverse momentum, which turns out to be quite adequate in shape.

  1. Nucleon-nucleon correlations and multiquark cluster effects in semi-inclusive deep inelastic lepton scattering off

    SciTech Connect

    Simula, S.

    1994-04-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic lepton scattering off nuclei is investigated assuming that virtual boson absorption occurs on a hadronic cluster which can be either a two-nucleon correlated pair or a six-quark bag. The differences in the energy distribution of nucleons produced in backward and forward directions are analyzed both at x<1 and x>1.

  2. Jet rates from deep inelastic muon scattering in the W range of 15 to 35 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.

    1991-08-01

    Production rates of forward jets in deep inelastic muon scattering are studied using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The evolution of di-jet rates with W is compared to QCD first order predictions in the W range of 15 to 25 GeV. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  3. {gamma}-ray production by proton and {alpha}-particle induced reactions on {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 24}Mg, and Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Belhout, A.; Kiener, J.; Coc, A.; Duprat, J.; Engrand, C.; Fitoussi, C.; Gounelle, M.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Sereville, N. de; Tatischeff, V.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Chabot, M.; Hammache, F.; Benhabiles-Mezhoud, H.

    2007-09-15

    {gamma}-ray production cross sections for proton and {alpha}-particle interactions with {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 24}Mg, and Fe have been measured in the energy range 5-25 MeV with proton beams and 5-40 MeV with {alpha}-particle beams. Isotopically pure foils of {sup 24}Mg and foils of natural isotopical composition of C, MgO, and Fe have been used. {gamma}-ray angular distributions were obtained with five high-purity Ge detectors with bismuth germanate Compton shields placed at angles of 45 deg. to 157.5 deg. Cross sections for more than 50 different {gamma}-ray transitions were extracted, and for many of them no data have been published before. Comparison of present data with data available in the literature shows mostly good to excellent agreement. In addition to the production cross sections, high-statistics, low-background line shapes of the 4.438 MeV {sup 12}C {gamma} ray from inelastic scattering off {sup 12}C and spallation of {sup 16}O were obtained. Comparison with nuclear reaction calculations shows that these data place interesting constraints on nuclear reaction models.

  4. Investigation of ARGON-36 and ARGON-38 Nuclei via Inelastic Electron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltz, Curt W.

    1991-02-01

    Inelastic electron scattering form factors were measured for ^{36}Ar and ^{38}Ar, using electrons with incident energies of 25, 35, 42, 55 MeV and a scattering angle of 153^circ. An additional spectrum from 47 MeV electrons was collected at 117 ^circ. Data for nuclear excitation energies from 6.5 to 15.0 MeV were acquired; elastic spectra were also recorded. Form factors of 69 (for ^ {36}Ar) and 54 (for ^{38 }Ar) inelastic transitions were obtained through normalization to the elastic form factors. The multipolarities of 34 (for ^{36}Ar) and 22 (for ^{38}Ar) transitions were determined, using a model-independent analysis of Plane-Wave equivalent form factors, and corresponding reduced transition probabilities were deduced. The reduced transition probabilities from this study were compared with those from previous experiments, and with theoretical expectations. The transitions identified as magnetic dipole (M1) in this work, for both ^{36} Ar and ^{38}Ar, were compared with recent theoretical predictions obtained from a configuration-mixed shell model calculation which incorporated the full 2s-1d shell. In ^ {36}Ar, the present experiment measured a total M1 strength which was approximately 86% of the strength predicted in the measured energy range, and the M1 strength agreed qualitatively with the calculations. For ^{38}Ar, the single strong M1 transition transition predicted by the shell model calculation was not observed, and the M1 strength was instead found to be highly fragmented, although the total observed M1 strength was reasonably consistent with the calculations.

  5. In situ determination of soil carbon pool by inelastic neutron scattering: Comparison with dry combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Mitra, S.; Chatterjee, A.; Lal, R.

    2011-01-01

    There is a well-documented need for new in situ technologies for elemental analysis of soil, particularly for carbon (C), that overcome the limitations of the currently established chemical method by dry combustion (DC). In this work, we evaluated the concordance between the new INS (inelastic neutron scattering) technology and the DC method. The comparisons were carried out in the high C content (30-40%) organic soils of Willard, Ohio (4 sites), in natural forest in Willard, Ohio (1 site), and in a watershed pasture, with an {approx} 10{sup o} slope, in Coshocton, Ohio (5 sites). In addition to these stationary measurements, the organic soil and the pasture were continuously scanned with the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system to obtain the transects mean C value. Both types of measurements, INS and DC, registered a decline in the surface density of C along transects in the watershed and in the organic soil. Similarly, both recorded a drop in C in the organic soil of about 0.16%. In the pastureland, declines in C levels of 0.08% and 0.10% were observed, respectively, by DC and INS. Combining the results from the three sites yielded a very satisfactory correlation between the INS- and DC-responses, with a regression coefficient, r{sup 2}, value of about 0.99. This suggests the possibility of establishing a universal regression line for various soil types. In addition, we demonstrated the ability of INS to measure the mean value over transect. In organic soil the mean value of an INS scan agreed, {approx} 0.5%, with the mean values of the DC analysis, whereas large discrepancy between these two was recorded in the pastureland. Overall, the various trends observed in C measurements by INS concurred with those determined by the DC method, so enhancing the confidence in the new INS technology.

  6. Structure of 8B from elastic and inelastic 7Be+p scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J. P.; Rogachev, G. V.; Johnson, E. D.; Baby, L. T.; Kemper, K. W.; Moro, A. M.; Peplowski, P.; Volya, A. S.; Wiedenhöver, I.

    2013-05-01

    Background: Detailed experimental knowledge of the level structure of light weakly bound nuclei is necessary to guide the development of new theoretical approaches that combine nuclear structure with reaction dynamics.Purpose: The resonant structure of 8B is studied in this work.Method: Excitation functions for elastic and inelastic 7Be+p scattering were measured using a 7Be rare isotope beam. Excitation energies ranging between 1.6 and 3.4 MeV were investigated. An R-matrix analysis of the excitation functions was performed.Results: New low-lying resonances at 1.9, 2.54, and 3.3 MeV in 8B are reported with spin-parity assignment 0+, 2+, and 1+, respectively. Comparison to the time-dependent continuum shell (TDCSM) model and ab initio no-core shell model/resonating-group method (NCSM/RGM) calculations is performed. This work is a more detailed analysis of the data first published as a Rapid Communication. J. P. Mitchell, G. V. Rogachev, E. D. Johnson, L. T. Baby, K. W. Kemper , [Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.82.011601 82, 011601(R) (2010)].Conclusions: Identification of the 0+, 2+, 1+ states that were predicted by some models at relatively low energy but never observed experimentally is an important step toward understanding the structure of 8B. Their identification was aided by having both elastic and inelastic scattering data. Direct comparison of the cross sections and phase shifts predicted by the TDCSM and ab initio no-core shell model coupled with the resonating group method is of particular interest and provides a good test for these theoretical approaches.

  7. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Measurements of Ionization in Warm, Dense Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Paul F.

    In this work we demonstrate spectrally resolved x-ray scattering from electron-plasma waves in shock-compressed deuterium and proton-heated matter. Because the spectral signature of inelastic x-ray scattering is strongly dependent on the free electron density of the system, it is used to infer ionization in dynamically heated samples. Using 2-6 ns, 500 J laser pulses from LLNL's Janus laser, we shocked liquid deuterium to pressures approaching 50 GPa, reaching compressions of 4 times liquid density. A second laser produced intense 2 keV x-rays. By collecting and spectrally dispersing forward scattered photons at 45°, the onset of ionization was detected at compressions of about 3 times in the form of plasmon oscillations. Backscattered x-rays bolstered this observation by measuring the free electron distribution through Compton scattering. Comparison with simulations shows very close agreement between the pressure dependence of ionization and molecular dissociation in dynamically compressed deuterium. In a second set of experiments, a 10 ps, 200 J Titan laser pulse was split into two beams. One created a stream of MeV protons to heat samples of boron and boron-nitride and the other pumped 4.5 keV K-alpha radiation in a titanium foil to probe the hot target. We observed scattered x-rays 300 ps after heating, noting a strong difference in average ionization between the two target materials at temperatures of 16 eV and very similar mass densities. Comparison with electron structure calculations suggests that this difference is due to a persistence of long-range ion structure in BN resulting in high-temperature band structure. These results underscore the importance of understanding the complex electron structure of materials even at electron-volt temperatures and gigapascal pressures. Our results provide new data to guide the theoretical modeling of warm, dense matter important to understanding giant planets and inertial fusion targets.

  8. Study of M1 and E1 excitations by high-resolution proton inelastic scattering measurement at forward angles

    SciTech Connect

    Tamii, A.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kaneda, T.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Carter, J.; Dozono, M.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Sasamoto, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von

    2007-06-13

    Experimental technique for measuring proton inelastic scattering with high-resolution at 295 MeV and at forward angles including zero degrees is described. The method is useful for extracting spin part of the M1 strength via nuclear excitation as well as E1 strength via Coulomb excitation. An excitation energy resolution of 20 keV, good scattering angle resolution, and low background condition have been achieved. The experimental technique was applied for several sd and pf shell nuclei.

  9. Measurement of proton-proton inelastic scattering cross-section at \\chem{\\sqrt {s} = 7\\,{ {TeV}}}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The TOTEM Collaboration; Antchev, G.; Aspell, P.; Atanassov, I.; Avati, V.; Baechler, J.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bossini, E.; Bozzo, M.; Brogi, P.; Brücken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F. S.; Calicchio, M.; Catanesi, M. G.; Covault, C.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Deile, M.; Doubek, M.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Fiergolski, A.; Garcia, F.; Giani, S.; Greco, V.; Grzanka, L.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Intonti, R. A.; Kašpar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrát, V.; Kurvinen, K.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leszko, T.; Lippmaa, E.; Lokajíček, M.; Lo Vetere, M.; Rodríguez, F. Lucas; Macrí, M.; Mäki, T.; Mercadante, A.; Minafra, N.; Minutoli, S.; Nemes, F.; Niewiadomski, H.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oriunno, M.; Österberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Procházka, J.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Robutti, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Saarikko, H.; Santroni, A.; Scribano, A.; Smajek, J.; Snoeys, W.; Sziklai, J.; Taylor, C.; Turini, N.; Vacek, V.; Vítek, M.; Welti, J.; Whitmore, J.; Wyszkowski, P.

    2013-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC has measured the inelastic proton-proton cross-section at \\sqrt {s}= 7\\,{ { TeV}} in a β* = 90 m run with low inelastic pile-up. The measurement was based on events with at least one charged particle in the T2 telescope acceptance of 5.3 < |η| < 6.5 in pseudorapidity. Combined with data from the T1 telescope, covering 3.1 < |η| < 4.7, the cross-section for inelastic events with at least one |η| ⩽ 6.5 final-state particle was determined to be (70.5 ± 2.9) mb. This cross-section includes all central diffractive events of which maximally 0.25 mb is estimated to escape the detection of the telescopes. Based on models for low mass diffraction, the total inelastic cross-section was deduced to be (73.7 ± 3.4) mb. An upper limit of 6.31 mb at 95% confidence level on the cross-section for events with diffractive masses below 3.4 GeV was obtained from the difference between the overall inelastic cross-section obtained by TOTEM using elastic scattering and the cross-section for inelastic events with at least one |η| ⩽ 6.5 final-state particle.

  10. Differential cross-sections for elastic and inelastic electron scattering from fundamental polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakoo, Murtadha A.

    2011-10-01

    The near-threshold scattering of electrons from polyatomic molecules of fundamental interest, e.g. water, primary alcohols and ring molecules e.g. furan, benzene are important in plasma fuel processes, plasmas used in biological processes e.g. in the treatment of skin diseases, astrophysical plasmas, etc. The determination of cross-sections for such molecules has gathered impetus because of the increasing number of applications industrial plasma and biomedical processes and the need to understand and model these complex processes. It is now possible to determine accurate differential cross-sections for electron scattering from these polyatomic molecules. We will present recent normalized, absolute low energy electron scattering differential cross-sections for near-threshold elastic and inelastic scattering from water, primary alcohols, furan and benzene using a well-tested electron spectrometer apparatus. We will also compare our results with those of other experiments and available theoretical models, which show an encouragingly overall improved picture in terms of agreement between the different research groups. Funded by the National Science Foundation Research in an Undergraduate Institution Grant #s 0653452 and 1135203. This work was done collaboratively with Drs. V. Mckoy and C. Winstead, Caltech, USA (National Science Foundation Grant # 0653396 and Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US DOE Grant) and Dr. M. C. A. Lopes, U. Fed. de Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brazil; Dr. M. H. F. Bettega, U. Fed. do Parana, Curitiba, Brazil Drs. R. F. da Costa and M. A. P. Lima, Universidade Estadual de Campinas UNICAMP and CTBE, Campinas, Brazil (CNPq, FAPESP, FAPEMG, Finep, CENAPAD-SP and CAPES grants). Funded by US-NSF Grant #s 0653452 and 1135203.

  11. Inelastic scattering of NO from Ag(111): Internal state, angle, and velocity resolved measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rettner, C.T.; Kimman, J.; Auerbach, D.J. )

    1991-01-01

    We have determined the velocity distributions of individual quantum states of NO scattering from Ag(111) at specific scattering angles {theta}{sub {ital f}} using molecular beam techniques to control the incidence energy {ital E}{sub {ital i}} and angle {theta}{sub {ital i}}. We find that the mean energies of scattered species {ital E}{sub {ital f}} depend weakly on {theta}{sub {ital f}} at low collision energies, but become increasingly independent of this parameter as {ital E}{sub {ital i}} approaches 1.0 eV. This is true for all final rotation states {ital J}. The previously reported insensitivity of the final kinetic energy to {ital J} is found to apply at all scattering angles, so that {ital E}{sub {ital f}} vs {theta}{sub {ital f}} curves for high {ital J} fall only slightly below those for low {ital J}. This system is highly translationally inelastic at high incidence energies, with up to 55% of {ital E}{sub {ital i}} being lost to phonons at {ital E}{sub {ital i}}=1.0 eV. Angular distributions are relatively insensitive to {ital J} at low {ital E}{sub {ital i}} , but for high {ital E}{sub {ital i}} the peak flux is found to shift away from the surface normal as {ital E}{sub {ital i}} increases. The effect of the surface temperature only becomes apparent at low incidence energies. A search for supernumerary rotational rainbows reveals no discernible oscillations even for the lowest surface temperatures. We believe that these supernumerary oscillations may be damped by surface corrugation'' effects for this system. Discussion focuses on the observed anticorrelation between kinetic energy transfer to phonons and to rotation, the extent to which parallel momentum is conserved in this system, and energy-angle scaling laws for energy transfer.

  12. Analytic expressions for the inelastic scattering and energy loss of electron and proton beams in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Kyriakou, I.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Abril, I.; Kostarelos, K.

    2010-09-15

    We have determined ''effective'' Bethe coefficients and the mean excitation energy of stopping theory (I-value) for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles based on a sum-rule constrained optical-data model energy loss function with improved asymptotic properties. Noticeable differences between MWCNTs, SWCNT bundles, and the three allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite, glassy carbon) are found. By means of Bethe's asymptotic approximation, the inelastic scattering cross section, the electronic stopping power, and the average energy transfer to target electrons in a single inelastic collision, are calculated analytically for a broad range of electron and proton beam energies using realistic excitation parameters.

  13. Analytic expressions for the inelastic scattering and energy loss of electron and proton beams in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Kyriakou, I.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Abril, I.; Kostarelos, K.

    2010-09-01

    We have determined "effective" Bethe coefficients and the mean excitation energy of stopping theory (I-value) for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles based on a sum-rule constrained optical-data model energy loss function with improved asymptotic properties. Noticeable differences between MWCNTs, SWCNT bundles, and the three allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite, glassy carbon) are found. By means of Bethe's asymptotic approximation, the inelastic scattering cross section, the electronic stopping power, and the average energy transfer to target electrons in a single inelastic collision, are calculated analytically for a broad range of electron and proton beam energies using realistic excitation parameters.

  14. Elastic and inelastic scattering of 16O and 18O ions from 64Zn at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salém-Vasconcelos, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Bechara, M. J.; Koide, K.; Dietzsch, O.; Bairrio Nuevo, A., Jr.; Takai, H.

    1994-08-01

    Coulomb-nuclear interference effects were investigated in the inelastic scattering of 16O and 18O by 64Zn. Measurements of elastic and inelastic angular distributions of 18O were performed at a laboratory energy of 49 MeV, over the angular range from θlab~30° to 85°. The excitation functions of 16O and 18O ions were measured at incident energies between 29 and 46 MeV at θlab=174°. The experimental angular distributions show structures which are more pronounced for projectile excitation than for target excitation. The interference minimum for the excitation of the 18O first 2+ state was found to be shifted towards forward angles by approximately 5° (c.m.) with respect to the distorted-wave Born approximation calculations and by approximately 3.5° (c.m.) with respect to the coupled-channels calculations. A pronounced Coulomb-nuclear interference minimum was seen in the excitation of 64Zn(2+) state by inelastic scattering of 16O projectiles, whereas no pronounced minimum was observed in target excitation by 18O projectiles. The elastic scattering data were analyzed with the optical model. The inelastic differential cross sections for the excitation of the first 2+ states in the target and in the 18O projectile were analyzed using the distorted-wave Born approximation and also the coupled-channels approach with collective form factors.

  15. Determination of neutron-induced alpha-particle cross sections on carbon using the response of a liquid scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Brede, H.J.; Dietze, G.; Klein, H.; Schoelermann, H. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the sums of the cross section {sup 12}C(n, {alpha}{sub 0}) {sup 9}Be and {sup 12}C(n, N{prime}3{alpha}) determined in the neutron energy range between 7.4 and 11 MeV. An NE-213 scintillation detector is simultaneously used as a carbon target, an alpha-particle detector, and a neutron fluence monitor. By comparing the measured and calculated response spectra, the neutron-induced alpha-particle events in the scintillation volume are separated and the cross sections {sigma}{sub n,{alpha}0} + {sigma}{sub n,n{prime}3{alpha}} are determined relative to the n-p scattering cross section. The pulse-height distribution due to alpha particles allows the angular distribution to be extracted on the basis of the reaction kinematics and an accurately determined light output function for alpha particles in the NE-213 detector.

  16. Inelastic electron and Raman scattering from the collective excitations in quantum wires: Zero magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2013-04-01

    The nanofabrication technology has taught us that an m-dimensional confining potential imposed upon an n-dimensional electron gas paves the way to a quasi-(n-m)-dimensional electron gas, with m ⩽ n and 1 ⩽ n, m ⩽ 3. This is the road to the (semiconducting) quasi-n dimensional electron gas systems we have been happily traversing on now for almost two decades. Achieving quasi-one dimensional electron gas (Q-1DEG) [or quantum wire(s) for more practical purposes] led us to some mixed moments in this journey: while the reduced phase space for the scattering led us believe in the route to the faster electron devices, the proximity to the 1D systems left us in the dilemma of describing it as a Fermi liquid or as a Luttinger liquid. No one had ever suspected the potential of the former, but it took quite a while for some to convince the others on the latter. A realistic Q-1DEG system at the low temperatures is best describable as a Fermi liquid rather than as a Luttinger liquid. In the language of condensed matter physics, a critical scrutiny of Q-1DEG systems has provided us with a host of exotic (electronic, optical, and transport) phenomena unseen in their higher- or lower-dimensional counterparts. This has motivated us to undertake a systematic investigation of the inelastic electron scattering (IES) and the inelastic light scattering (ILS) from the elementary electronic excitations in quantum wires. We begin with the Kubo's correlation functions to derive the generalized dielectric function, the inverse dielectric function, and the Dyson equation for the dynamic screened potential in the framework of Bohm-Pines' random-phase approximation. These fundamental tools then lead us to develop methodically the theory of IES and ILS for the Q-1DEG systems. As an application of the general formal results, which know no bounds regarding the subband occupancy, we compute the density of states, the Fermi energy, the full excitation spectrum [comprised of intrasubband and

  17. The design of the inelastic neutron scattering mode for the Extreme Environment Diffractometer with the 26 T High Field Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowiak, Maciej; Stüßer, Norbert; Prokhnenko, Oleksandr

    2015-10-01

    The Extreme Environment Diffractometer is a neutron time-of-flight instrument, designed to work with a constant-field hybrid magnet capable of reaching fields over 26 T, unprecedented in neutron science; however, the presence of the magnet imposes both spatial and technical limitations on the surrounding instrument components. In addition to the existing diffraction and small-angle neutron scattering modes, the instrument will operate also in an inelastic scattering mode, as a direct time-of-flight spectrometer. In this paper we present the Monte Carlo ray-tracing simulations, the results of which illustrate the performance of the instrument in the inelastic-scattering mode. We describe the focussing neutron guide and the chopper system of the existing instrument and the planned design for the instrument upgrade. The neutron flux, neutron spatial distribution, divergence distribution and energy resolution are calculated for standard instrument configurations.

  18. Parity Violation Inelastic Scattering Experiments at 6 GeV and 12 GeV Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkosky, Vincent A.; et. al.,

    2015-03-01

    We report on the measurement of parity-violating asymmetries in the deep inelastic scattering and nucleon resonance regions using inclusive scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from an unpolarized deuterium target. The effective weak couplings C$_{2q}$ are accessible through the deep-inelastic scattering measurements. Here we report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry, which yields a determination of 2C$_{2u}$ - C$_{2d}$ with an improved precision of a factor of five relative to the previous result. This result indicates evidence with 95% confidence that the 2C$_{2u}$ - C$_{2d}$ is non-zero. This experiment also provides the first parity-violation data covering the whole resonance region, which provide constraints on nucleon resonance models. Finally, the program to extend these measurements at Jefferson Lab in the 12 GeV era using the Solenoidal Large Intensity Device was also discussed.

  19. Proton vibrational dynamics in lithium imide investigated through incoherent inelastic and Compton neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, A; Colognesi, D; Catti, M; Nale, A-C; Adams, M A; Ramirez-Cuesta, A J; Mayers, J

    2012-11-28

    In the present study we report neutron spectroscopic measurements on polycrystalline lithium imide, namely, incoherent inelastic neutron scattering at 20 K, and neutron Compton scattering from 10 K up to room temperature. From the former technique the H-projected density of phonon states up to 100 meV is derived, while the latter works out the spherically averaged single-particle (i.e., H, Li, and N) momentum distributions and, from this, the mean kinetic energies. Only for H at the lowest investigated temperature, non-gaussian components of its momentum distribution are detected. However, these components do not seem directly connected to the system anharmonicity, being fully compatible with the simple N-H bond anisotropy. Neutron data are also complemented by ab initio lattice dynamics simulations, both harmonic and, at room temperature, carried out in the framework of the so-called "quantum colored noise thermostat" method. The single-particle mean kinetic energies in lithium imide as a function of temperature show a quite peculiar behavior at the moment not reproduced by ab initio lattice dynamics methods, at least as far as H and Li are concerned. As matter of fact, neither their low temperature values nor their temperature trends can be precisely explained in terms of standard phonon calculations. PMID:23206005

  20. Quantitative spectromicroscopy from inelastically scattered photoelectrons in the hard X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, O.; Zborowski, C.; Risterucci, P.; Wiemann, C.; Grenet, G.; Schneider, C. M.; Tougaard, S.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate quantitative, highly bulk-sensitive x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy by analysis of inelastically scattered photoelectrons in the hard X-ray range, enabling elemental depth distribution analysis in deeply buried layers. We show results on patterned structures used in electrical testing of high electron mobility power transistor devices with an epitaxial Al0.25Ga0.75N channel and a Ti/Al metal contact. From the image series taken over an energy range of up to 120 eV in the Ti 1s loss feature region and over a typical 100 μm field of view, one can accurately retrieve, using background analysis together with an optimized scattering cross-section, the Ti depth distribution from 14 nm up to 25 nm below the surface. The method paves the way to multi-elemental, bulk-sensitive 3D imaging and investigation of phenomena at deeply buried interfaces and microscopic scales by photoemission.

  1. Hydrophobic hydration of tert-butyl alcohol studied by Brillouin light and inelastic ultraviolet scattering.

    PubMed

    Lupi, L; Comez, L; Masciovecchio, C; Morresi, A; Paolantoni, M; Sassi, P; Scarponi, F; Fioretto, D

    2011-02-01

    The longitudinal viscosity of diluted water-tert-butyl alcohol solutions in the 10 GHz frequency region has been measured by means of Brillouin light scattering and inelastic ultraviolet scattering. The main advantage of our hypersonic investigation compared to more traditional ultrasonic measurements is that in the gigahertz frequency range slow relaxation processes involving the alcohol dynamics are completely unrelaxed, so that the measured viscosity mainly originates from the hydrogen bond restructuring of water. In contrast with previous determinations, we estimate an activation energy which is independent from the alcohol mole fraction up to X = 0.1, and comparable to that of bulk water. A simple two-component model is used to describe the steep increase of viscosity with increasing alcohol mole fraction, and a retardation factor 1.7 ± 0.2 is found between the relaxation times of hydration and bulk water. These findings endorse a dynamic scenario where the slowing down of hydration water is mainly due to a reduction of configurational entropy and does not involve an arrested, icelike, dynamics. PMID:21303164

  2. Properties of hadronic final states in diffractive deep inelastic ep scattering at DESY HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Pellegrino, A.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Romeo, G. Cara; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; de Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Brock, I.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Kind, O.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Wieber, H.; Bailey, D. S.; Brook, N. H.; Cole, J. E.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Robins, S.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Wing, M.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Jeoung, H. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Ma, K. J.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Helbich, M.; Liu, W.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Sampson, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Klimek, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Bednarek, B.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowal, M.; Kowalski, T.; Mindur, B.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Kotański, A.; Bauerdick, L. A.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Chiochia, V.; Crittenden, J.; Dannheim, D.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Geiser, A.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Graciani, R.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hebbel, K.; Hillert, S.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labes, H.; Löhr, B.; Mankel, R.; Martens, J.; Martínez, M.; Milite, M.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Petrucci, M. C.; Polini, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Stonjek, S.; Wolf, G.; Wollmer, U.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, R.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Coldewey, C.; Viani, A. Lopez-Duran; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Coppola, N.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Wölfle, S.; Bell, M.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Glasman, C.; Lee, S. W.; Lupi, A.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Bodmann, B.; Gendner, N.; Holm, U.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Yildirim, A.; Ziegler, A.; Carli, T.; Garfagnini, A.; Gialas, I.; Lohrmann, E.; Foudas, C.; Gonçalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Metlica, F.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, S. B.; Park, S. K.; Lim, H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; García, G.; González, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Vázquez, M.; Barbi, M.; Bertolin, A.; Corriveau, F.; Ochs, A.; Padhi, S.; Stairs, D. G.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Bashkirov, V.; Danilov, P.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korotkova, N. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Maddox, E.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Schagen, S.; Tassi, E.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Brümmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C.; Ferrando, J.; Große-Knetter, J.; Matsushita, T.; Rigby, M.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Corso, F. Dal; Dusini, S.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Parenti, A.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Adamczyk, L.; Iannotti, L.; Oh, B. Y.; Saull, P. R.; Toothacker, W. S.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Epperson, D.; Heusch, C.; Sadrozinski, H.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D. C.; Park, I. H.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Kohno, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Matsuzawa, K.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Bailey, D. C.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Mirea, A.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Butterworth, J. M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Hayes, M. E.; Heaphy, E. A.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; Lightwood, M. S.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Smalska, B.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, A.; Ukleja, J.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Sztuk, J.; Eisenberg, Y.; Gladilin, L. K.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Breitweg, J.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Kçira, D.; Lammers, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Straub, P. B.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Frisken, W. R.; Khakzad, M.; Menary, S.

    2002-03-01

    Characteristics of the hadronic final state of diffractive deep inelastic scattering events ep-->eXp were studied in the kinematic range 4scattered proton using the leading proton spectrometer. The properties of the hadronic final state X were studied in its center-of-mass frame using thrust, thrust angle, sphericity, energy flow, transverse energy flow, and ``seagull'' distributions. As the invariant mass of the system increases, the final state becomes more collimated, more aligned, and more asymmetric in the average transverse momentum with respect to the direction of the virtual photon. Comparisons of the properties of the hadronic final state with predictions from various Monte Carlo model generators suggest that the final state is dominated by qq&;g states at the parton level.

  3. Inelastic electron and Raman scattering from the collective excitations in quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir

    2014-03-01

    The nanofabrication technology has taught us that an m-dimensional confining potential imposed upon an n-dimensional electron gas paves the way to a quasi-(n- m)-dimensional electron gas, with m <= n and 1 <= n , m <= 3 . This is the road to the (semiconducting) quasi- n dimensional electron gas systems we have been happily traversing on now for almost two decades. Achieving quasi-one dimensional electron gas (Q-1DEG) led us to some mixed moments in this journey: while the reduced phase space for the scattering led us believe in the route to the faster electron devices, the proximity to the 1D systems left us in the dilemma of describing it as a Fermi liquid or as a Luttinger liquid. No one had ever suspected the potential of the former, but it took quite a while for some to convince the others on the latter. A realistic Q-1DEG system at the low temperatures is best describable as a Fermi liquid rather than as a Luttinger liquid. This has motivated us to employ the Bohm-Pines' full RPA to develop a systematic methodology for the inelastic electron and light scattering from the collective (plasmon) excitations in Q-1DEG [or quantum wires]. We will discuss in detail the results published in AIP Advances 3, 042103 (2013).

  4. Polarization transfer in inelastic scattering and pionic models of the EMC effect

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    At the 1982 Telluride Conference Magda Ericson spoke about the interest in a measurement of the sigma vector . q vector or spin-longitudinal nuclear response function. It inspired our collaboration to propose a LAMPF experiment, which was subsequently approved, and run in September 1983. In the intervening time the interest has increased dramatically in connection with the European Muon Collaboration (EMC) effect, and the exciting possibility that this ultra high-energy physics result may have to do with nuclear pions - and, hence, the isovector sigma vector . q vector nuclear response function. In this talk I will give a brief introduction to the EMC effect and its interpretation in terms of excess nuclear pions. This model establishes a connection between the vastly different scales of the EMC experiment (approx. 200 GeV deep-inelastic muon scattering) and the Los Alamos experiment (500 MeV polarized-proton quasifree scattering). Following this I will describe the Los Alamos experiment and its interpretation in terms of excess nuclear pions. Finally I will indulge in some speculation about quark effects in nuclei based on the EMC and Los Alamos experimental results. 29 refs.

  5. Final-state interactions in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cosyn, Wim; Melnitchouk, Wally; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2014-01-16

    We explore the role of final-state interactions (FSI) in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron. Relating the inclusive cross section to the deuteron forward virtual Compton scattering amplitude, a general formula for the FSI contribution is derived in the generalized eikonal approximation, utilizing the diffractive nature of the effective hadron-nucleon interaction. The calculation uses a factorized model with a basis of three resonances with mass W~<2 GeV and a continuum contribution for larger W as the relevant set of effective hadron states entering the final-state interaction amplitude. The results show sizeable on-shell FSI contributions for Bjorken x ~> 0.6 andmore » Q2 < 10 GeV2 increasing in magnitude for lower Q2, but vanishing in the high-Q2 limit due to phase space constraints. The off-shell rescattering contributes at x ~> 0.8 and is taken as an uncertainty on the on-shell result.« less

  6. Inelastic x-ray scattering in the vicinity of xenon L3 edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žitnik, M.; Kavčič, M.; Bučar, K.; Mihelič, A.; Štuhec, M.; Kokalj, J.; Szlachetko, J.

    2007-09-01

    A series of x-ray emission spectra of xenon in the region of L3M5,4(Lα1,2) and L3N5,4(Lβ2,15) lines were recorded along the polarization direction of the incoming photons with energies ranging from 4779.4 to 4804.4eV . A combination of monochromatic photon beam and high resolution x-ray spectrometer resulted in the experimental broadening of 1eV allowing the observation of resonantly enhanced and narrowed emission lines from the decay of [2p3/2]nd,ns states. The measured spectra are decomposed into the continuum and resonant contributions to determine their relative emission strengths and the energies of the lowest resonant excitations converging to the L3 edge. The calculated differential cross section for inelastically scattered photons is compared to the measured data. Each of the resonant states is described by a single relativistic configuration in the frame of the Dirac-Fock model, and the continuum contribution to the scattered light is evaluated within the Caldwell-Zare approach, which neglects anisotropic interaction of the ejected electron with the ion.

  7. Band Structure of Helimagnons in MnSi Resolved by Inelastic Neutron Scattering.

    PubMed

    Kugler, M; Brandl, G; Waizner, J; Janoschek, M; Georgii, R; Bauer, A; Seemann, K; Rosch, A; Pfleiderer, C; Böni, P; Garst, M

    2015-08-28

    A magnetic helix realizes a one-dimensional magnetic crystal with a period given by the pitch length λh. Its spin-wave excitations-the helimagnons-experience Bragg scattering off this periodicity, leading to gaps in the spectrum that inhibit their propagation along the pitch direction. Using high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering, the resulting band structure of helimagnons was resolved by preparing a single crystal of MnSi in a single magnetic-helix domain. At least five helimagnon bands could be identified that cover the crossover from flat bands at low energies with helimagnons basically localized along the pitch direction to dispersing bands at higher energies. In the low-energy limit, we find the helimagnon spectrum to be determined by a universal, parameter-free theory. Taking into account corrections to this low-energy theory, quantitative agreement is obtained in the entire energy range studied with the help of a single fitting parameter. PMID:26371678

  8. Polarization transfer in inelastic scattering and pionic models of the EMC effect

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, T.A.; Jones, K.W.; McClelland, J.B.; Moss, J.M.; Rees, L.B.; Tanaka, N.; Bacher, A.D.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of the experiment reported was to make a precise test of the enhanced pion field model in a medium-energy scattering experiment. The quantity probed is the spin-longitudinal response function, a measure of the nuclear pion density which is used explicitly in the pion-excess models of the EMC effect. The point of reference used is deuterium. The spin-dependent response functions for heavy targets and /sup 2/H are compared using identical experimental techniques. The technique of complete polarization transfer is used to separate the spin-longitudinal and spin-transverse response in the continuum. The experiment consisted of precise determinations of the polarization transfer coefficients for 500 MeV protons inelastically scattered from Pb, Ca, and /sup 2/H. The experiment utilized longitudinal, sideways, and normal polarized beams in conjunction with final polarization analysis from the focal-plane polarimeter of the high-resolution spectrometer. Quantities constructed from these data are the longitudinal and transverse spin-flip probabilities. Calculations were performed of the ratio of longitudinal to transverse response functions and of the EMC effect with the same model. No evidence was found for collectivity in the isovector spin-longitudinal response function. 10 refs. (LEW)

  9. Evolution of the alpha particle driven toroidicity induced Alfven mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; White, R.B.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1994-04-01

    The interaction of alpha particles with a toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmode is investigated self-consistently by using a kinetic dispersion relation. All important poloidal harmonics and their radial mode profiles are included. A Hamiltonian guiding center code is used to simulate the alpha particle motion. The simulations include particle orbit width, nonlinear particle dynamics and the effects of the modes on the particles. Modification of the particle distribution leading to mode saturation is observed. There is no significant alpha particle loss.

  10. Alpha particle loss in the TFTR DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    Alpha particle loss was measured during the TFTR DT experiments using a scintillator detector located at the vessel bottom in the ion grad-B drift direction. The DT alpha particle loss to this detector was consistent with the calculated first-orbit loss over the whole range of plasma current I=0.6-2.7 MA. In particular, the alpha particle loss rate per DT neutron did not increase significantly with fusion power up to 10.7 MW, indicating the absence of any new ``collective`` alpha particle loss processes in these experiments.

  11. Alpha-Particle Gas-Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. C.; Bell, L. D.; Hecht, M. H.

    1996-01-01

    An approximate model was developed to establish design curves for the saturation region and a more complete model developed to characterize the current-voltage curves for an alpha-particle pressure sensor. A simple two-parameter current-voltage expression was developed to describe the dependence of the ion current on pressure. The parameters are the saturation-current pressure coefficient and mu/D, the ion mobility/diffusion coefficient. The sensor is useful in the pressure range between 0.1 and 1000 mb using a 1 - mu Ci(241) Am source. Experimental results, taken between 1 and up to 200 mb, show the sensor operates with an anode voltage of 5 V and a sensitivity of 20 fA/mb in nitrogen.

  12. Twist-four effects in deep inelastic neutrino scattering and sinStheta/sub w/

    SciTech Connect

    Fajfer, S.; Oakes, R.J.

    1985-07-01

    In addition to the standard perturbative QCD corrections to deep inelastic scattering, there are nonperturbative twist-four corrections which behave like 1/QS relative to the lnQS leading log corrections. We have calculated the twist-four, spin-one and spin-two corrections to sigma/sub NC/, sigma/sub CC/, R/sub nu/ and R/sub anti nu/ using the following procedure: The bilocal product of the weak currents is expanded into local operators using the Wilson operator product expansion. The coefficient functions obey the renormalization group equations and, neglecting the anomalous dimensions of the operators, were calculated using perturbative techniques. The nucleon matrix elements of the local operators can then be evaluated assuming some quark confinement model. We found that twist-four, spin-two corrections to the neutral current neutrino scattering decreases sinStheta/sub w/ by about 1%. Taking into account the twist-four, spin-two corrections for the charged current cross section, we found that they give a dominant contribution to the ratio R/sub nu/ and increased sinStheta/sub w/ by about 0.5%. We also have studied the model dependence of our results, and we have found that the twist-four, spin-two corrections to sinStheta/sub w/ are quite model dependent. The twist-four, spin-one corrections to the neutrino scattering were also calculated. These corrections come from two-quark, one-gluon operators and even at low QS their contribution was found to be considerably smaller than the twist-four, spin-two corrections.

  13. Inelastic neutron scattering and molecular simulation of the dynamics of interlayer water in smectite clay minerals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cygan, Randall T.; Daemen, Luke L.; Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Krumhansl, James L.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-11-16

    The study of mineral–water interfaces is of great importance to a variety of applications including oil and gas extraction, gas subsurface storage, environmental contaminant treatment, and nuclear waste repositories. Understanding the fundamentals of that interface is key to the success of those applications. Confinement of water in the interlayer of smectite clay minerals provides a unique environment to examine the interactions among water molecules, interlayer cations, and clay mineral surfaces. Smectite minerals are characterized by a relatively low layer charge that allows the clay to swell with increasing water content. Montmorillonite and beidellite varieties of smectite were investigated to comparemore » the impact of the location of layer charge on the interlayer structure and dynamics. Inelastic neutron scattering of hydrated and dehydrated cation-exchanged smectites was used to probe the dynamics of the interlayer water (200–900 cm–1 spectral region) and identify the shift in the librational edge as a function of the interlayer cation. Molecular dynamics simulations of equivalent phases and power spectra, derived from the resulting molecular trajectories, indicate a general shift in the librational behavior with interlayer cation that is generally consistent with the neutron scattering results for the monolayer hydrates. Both neutron scattering and power spectra exhibit librational structures affected by the location of layer charge and by the charge of the interlayer cation. Furthermore, divalent cations (Ba2+ and Mg2+) characterized by large hydration enthalpies typically exhibit multiple broad librational peaks compared to monovalent cations (Cs+ and Na+), which have relatively small hydration enthalpies.« less

  14. Inelastic neutron scattering and molecular simulation of the dynamics of interlayer water in smectite clay minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, Randall T.; Daemen, Luke L.; Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Krumhansl, James L.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-11-16

    The study of mineral–water interfaces is of great importance to a variety of applications including oil and gas extraction, gas subsurface storage, environmental contaminant treatment, and nuclear waste repositories. Understanding the fundamentals of that interface is key to the success of those applications. Confinement of water in the interlayer of smectite clay minerals provides a unique environment to examine the interactions among water molecules, interlayer cations, and clay mineral surfaces. Smectite minerals are characterized by a relatively low layer charge that allows the clay to swell with increasing water content. Montmorillonite and beidellite varieties of smectite were investigated to compare the impact of the location of layer charge on the interlayer structure and dynamics. Inelastic neutron scattering of hydrated and dehydrated cation-exchanged smectites was used to probe the dynamics of the interlayer water (200–900 cm–1 spectral region) and identify the shift in the librational edge as a function of the interlayer cation. Molecular dynamics simulations of equivalent phases and power spectra, derived from the resulting molecular trajectories, indicate a general shift in the librational behavior with interlayer cation that is generally consistent with the neutron scattering results for the monolayer hydrates. Both neutron scattering and power spectra exhibit librational structures affected by the location of layer charge and by the charge of the interlayer cation. Furthermore, divalent cations (Ba2+ and Mg2+) characterized by large hydration enthalpies typically exhibit multiple broad librational peaks compared to monovalent cations (Cs+ and Na+), which have relatively small hydration enthalpies.

  15. Analysis of inelastic x-ray scattering spectra of low-temperature water

    PubMed

    Liao; Chen; Sette

    2000-02-01

    We analyze a set of high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) spectra from H2O measured at T=259, 273, and 294 K using two different phenomenological models. Model I, called the "dynamic cage model," combines the short time in-cage dynamics described by a generalized Enskog kinetic theory with a long-time cage relaxation dynamics described by an alpha relaxation. This model is appropriate for supercooled water where the cage effect is dominant and the existence of an alpha relaxation is evident from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation data of extended simple point charge (SPC/E) model water. Model II is essentially a generalized hydrodynamic theory called the "three effective eigenmode theory" by de Schepper et al. 11. This model is appropriate for normal liquid water where the cage effect is less prominent and there is no evidence of the alpha relaxation from the MD data. We use the model I to analyze IXS data at T=259 K (supercooled water). We successfully extract the Debye-Waller factor, the cage relaxation time from the long-time dynamics, and the dispersion relation of high-frequency sound from the short time dynamics. We then use the model II to analyze IXS data at all three temperatures, from which we are able to extract the relaxation rate of the central mode and the damping of the sound mode as well as the dispersion relation for the high-frequency sound. It turns out that the dispersion relations extracted from the two models at their respective temperatures agree with each other giving the high-frequency sound speed of 2900+/-300 m/s. This is to be compared with a slightly higher value reported previously, 3200+/-320 m/s, by analyzing similar IXS data with a phenomenological-damped harmonic oscillator model 22. This latter model has traditionally been used exclusively for the analysis of inelastic scattering spectra of water. The k-dependent sound damping and central mode relaxation rate extracted from our model analyses are compared with the known

  16. Crystal fields in YbInNi4 determined with magnetic form factor and inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severing, A.; Givord, F.; Boucherle, J.-X.; Willers, T.; Rotter, M.; Fisk, Z.; Bianchi, A.; Fernandez-Diaz, M. T.; Stunault, A.; Rainford, B. D.; Taylor, J.; Goremychkin, E.

    2011-04-01

    The magnetic form factor of YbInNi4 has been determined via the flipping ratios R with polarized neutron diffraction, and the scattering function S(Q,ω) was measured in an inelastic neutron scattering experiment. Both experiments were performed with the aim of determining the crystal-field scheme. The magnetic form factor clearly excludes the possibility of a Γ7 doublet as the ground state. The inelastic neutron data exhibit two almost equally strong peaks at 3.2 meV and 4.4 meV which points, in agreement with earlier neutron data, toward a Γ8 quartet ground state. Further possibilities such as a quasiquartet ground state are discussed.

  17. Observation of isoscalar multipole strengths in exotic doubly-magic 56Ni in inelastic α scattering in inverse kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, S.; Gibelin, J.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Achouri, N. L.; Akimune, H.; Bastin, B.; Boretzky, K.; Bouzomita, H.; Caamaño, M.; Càceres, L.; Damoy, S.; Delaunay, F.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Fujiwara, M.; Garg, U.; Grinyer, G. F.; Kamalou, O.; Khan, E.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Lhoutellier, G.; Libin, J. F.; Lukyanov, S.; Mazurek, K.; Najafi, M. A.; Pancin, J.; Penionzhkevich, Y.; Perrot, L.; Raabe, R.; Rigollet, C.; Roger, T.; Sambi, S.; Savajols, H.; Senoville, M.; Stodel, C.; Suen, L.; Thomas, J. C.; Vandebrouck, M.; Van de Walle, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance (ISGMR) and the Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance (ISGDR) compression modes have been studied in the doubly-magic unstable nucleus 56Ni. They were measured by inelastic α-particle scattering in inverse kinematics at 50 MeV/u with the MAYA active target at the GANIL facility. The centroid of the ISGMR has been obtained at Ex = 19.1 ± 0.5 MeV. Evidence for the low-lying part of the ISGDR has been found at Ex = 17.4 ± 0.7 MeV. The strength distribution for the dipole mode shows similarity with the prediction from the Hartree-Fock (HF) based random-phase approximation (RPA) [1]. These measurements confirm inelastic α-particle scattering as a suitable probe for exciting the ISGMR and the ISGDR modes in radioactive isotopes in inverse kinematics.

  18. Cross sections for inelastic meson-meson scattering via quark-antiquark annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhen-Yu; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Weber, H. J.

    2016-08-01

    We study inelastic meson-meson scattering that is governed by quark-antiquark annihilation and creation involving a quark and an antiquark annihilating into a gluon, and subsequently the gluon creating another quark-antiquark pair. The resultant hadronic reactions include for I =1 : π π →ρ ρ , K K ¯→K*K¯*, K K¯*→K*K¯*, K*K ¯→K*K¯*, as well as π π →K K ¯, π ρ →K K¯*, π ρ →K*K ¯, and K K ¯→ρ ρ . In each reaction, one or two Feynman diagrams are involved in the Born approximation. We derive formulas for the unpolarized cross section, the transition amplitude, and the transition potential for quark-antiquark annihilation and creation. The unpolarized cross sections for the reactions are calculated at six temperatures, and prominent temperature dependence is found. It is due to differences among mesonic temperature dependence in hadronic matter.

  19. Nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at high pressure and low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Wenli; Zhao, Jiyong; Lin, Jung -Fu; Jia, Quanjie; Hu, Michael Y.; Jin, Changqing; Ferry, Richard; Yang, Wenge; Struzhkin, Viktor; Alp, E. Ercan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new synchrotron radiation experimental capability of coupling nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering with the cryogenically cooled high-pressure diamond anvil cell technique is presented. The new technique permits measurements of phonon density of states at low temperature and high pressure simultaneously, and can be applied to studies of phonon contribution to pressure- and temperature-induced magnetic, superconducting and metal–insulator transitions in resonant isotope-bearing materials. In this report, a pnictide sample, EuFe2As2, is used as an example to demonstrate this new capability at beamline 3-ID of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. A detailed description of the technical development is given. The Fe-specific phonon density of states and magnetism from the Fe sublattice in Eu57Fe2As2 at high pressure and low temperature were derived by using this new capability.

  20. Inelastic light scattering measurements of structural phase coexistence in ferrimagnetic spinel Mn3O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Samuel; Byrum, Taylor; Thaler, Alexander; MacDougall, Gregory; Cooper, S. Lance

    2015-03-01

    The ferrimagnetic spinel Mn3O4 has a number of functional properties, e.g., magnetodielectricity, that are ascribed to a coupling between the spins and lattice of this material. Such a coupling is manifested in the symmetry-lowering structural distortion that occurs when Mn3O4 magnetically orders at T = 33 K. A recent x-ray diffraction study2 of polycrystalline Mn3O4 found that this distortion is not fully realized, i.e., the high-symmetry and low-symmetry structures coexist below T = 33 K due to strains from lattice mismatch. To extend this work, we use variable-pressure and variable-magnetic-field inelastic light scattering spectroscopy to study structural phase coexistence in single crystals of Mn3O4. We confirm the coexistence of tetragonal (high-symmetry) and orthorhombic (low-symmetry) phases below T = 33 K. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the application of hydrostatic pressure suppresses the remnant tetragonal phase, while the application of magnetic field can bolster this phase. These results indicate that microscopic descriptions of functional behavior in Mn3O4 should consider effects due to structural phase coexistence. [2] M. C. Kemei, et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 174410 (2014). Research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Award DE-FG02-07ER46453. T. Byrum was partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number DGE-1144245.

  1. Electroweak higher-order effects and theoretical uncertainties in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, K.-P.O.; Dittmaier, S.; Hollik, W.

    2005-11-01

    A previous calculation of electroweak O({alpha}) corrections to deep-inelastic neutrino scattering, as e.g. measured by NuTeV and NOMAD, is supplemented by higher-order effects. In detail, we take into account universal two-loop effects from {delta}{alpha} and {delta}{rho} as well as higher-order final-state photon radiation off muons in the structure function approach. Moreover, we make use of the recently released O({alpha})-improved parton distributions MRST2004QED and identify the relevant QED factorization scheme, which is DIS-like. As a technical by-product, we describe slicing and subtraction techniques for an efficient calculation of a new type of real corrections that are induced by the generated photon distribution. A numerical discussion of the higher-order effects suggests that the remaining theoretical uncertainty from unknown electroweak corrections is dominated by nonuniversal two-loop effects and is of the order 0.0003 when translated into a shift in sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}=1-M{sub W}{sup 2}/M{sub Z}{sup 2}. The O({alpha}) corrections implicitly included in the parton distributions lead to a shift of about 0.0004.

  2. Raman and fluorescence characteristics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from doped superconducting cuprates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, H. Y.; Jia, C. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Wohlfeld, K.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Wu, W. B.; Okamoto, J.; Lee, W. S.; Hashimoto, M.; et al

    2016-01-22

    Measurements of spin excitations are essential for an understanding of spin-mediated pairing for superconductivity; and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) provides a considerable opportunity to probe high-energy spin excitations. However, whether RIXS correctly measures the collective spin excitations of doped superconducting cuprates remains under debate. Here we demonstrate distinct Raman- and fluorescence-like RIXS excitations of Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O8+δ. Combining photon-energy and momentum dependent RIXS measurements with theoretical calculations using exact diagonalization provides conclusive evidence that the Raman-like RIXS excitations correspond to collective spin excitations, which are magnons in the undoped Mott insulators and evolve into paramagnons in doped superconducting compounds. In contrast,more » the fluorescence-like shifts are due primarily to the continuum of particle-hole excitations in the charge channel. Our results show that under the proper experimental conditions RIXS indeed can be used to probe paramagnons in doped high-Tc cuprate superconductors.« less

  3. A new method to derive electronegativity from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Carniato, S.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Simon, M.; Stolte, W. C.; Lindle, D. W.

    2012-10-14

    Electronegativity is a well-known property of atoms and substituent groups. Because there is no direct way to measure it, establishing a useful scale for electronegativity often entails correlating it to another chemical parameter; a wide variety of methods have been proposed over the past 80 years to do just that. This work reports a new approach that connects electronegativity to a spectroscopic parameter derived from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering. The new method is demonstrated using a series of chlorine-containing compounds, focusing on the Cl 2p{sup -1}LUMO{sup 1} electronic states reached after Cl 1s{yields} LUMO core excitation and subsequent KL radiative decay. Based on an electron-density analysis of the LUMOs, the relative weights of the Cl 2p{sub z} atomic orbital contributing to the Cl 2p{sub 3/2} molecular spin-orbit components are shown to yield a linear electronegativity scale consistent with previous approaches.

  4. Raman and fluorescence characteristics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from doped superconducting cuprates

    PubMed Central

    Huang, H. Y.; Jia, C. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Wohlfeld, K.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Wu, W. B.; Okamoto, J.; Lee, W. S.; Hashimoto, M.; He, Y.; Shen, Z. X.; Yoshida, Y.; Eisaki, H.; Mou, C. Y.; Chen, C. T.; Huang, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of spin excitations are essential for an understanding of spin-mediated pairing for superconductivity; and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) provides a considerable opportunity to probe high-energy spin excitations. However, whether RIXS correctly measures the collective spin excitations of doped superconducting cuprates remains under debate. Here we demonstrate distinct Raman- and fluorescence-like RIXS excitations of Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O8+δ. Combining photon-energy and momentum dependent RIXS measurements with theoretical calculations using exact diagonalization provides conclusive evidence that the Raman-like RIXS excitations correspond to collective spin excitations, which are magnons in the undoped Mott insulators and evolve into paramagnons in doped superconducting compounds. In contrast, the fluorescence-like shifts are due primarily to the continuum of particle-hole excitations in the charge channel. Our results show that under the proper experimental conditions RIXS indeed can be used to probe paramagnons in doped high-Tc cuprate superconductors. PMID:26794437

  5. Study of the magnon spectrum in FeV2O4 using inelastic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Y.; Gleason, S.; Byrum, T.; MacDougall, G. J.; Zhou, H. D.; Cooper, S. L.

    2014-03-01

    The interplay between orbital, spin and lattice dynamics create a rich environment for the study of novel properties and phases. Transition metal oxides with a spinel structure, AB2O4 are excellent systems in which to explore the interplay among these dynamics: By substituting on the A and B sites with various elements, various phenomena and ground states can be explored. FeV2O4 is a special spinel with two orbital-active A - and B - site cations. This material exhibits interesting magnetic and structural phenomena, such as multiferroic behavior and a strong dependence of its physical properties on external stimuli such as pressure and magnetic field. In this talk, we present an inelastic light (Raman) scattering study of the temperature- and magnetic field-dependence of the magnon spectrum of FeV2O4 . We compare these results to of the magnon spectrum of MnV2O4 in order to examine the role of A-site substitution on the spin dynamics. Research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award DE-FG02-07ER46453.

  6. Excitations in a thin liquid {sup 4}He film from inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, B.E. |; Godfrin, H.; Krotscheck, E. |; Lauter, H.J.; Leiderer, P.; Passiouk, V. |; Tymczak, C.J.

    1996-05-01

    We perform a thorough analysis of the experimental dynamic structure function measured by inelastic neutron scattering for a low-temperature ({ital T}=0.65 K) four-layer liquid {sup 4}He film. The results are interpreted in light of recent theoretical calculations of the (nonvortex) excitations in thin liquid Bose films. The experimental system consists of four outer liquid layers, adsorbed to two solid inner {sup 4}He layers, which are themselves adsorbed to a graphite substrate. Relatively intense surface (ripplon) and bulklike modes are observed. The analysis of the experimental data gives strong evidence for still other modes and supports the long-standing theoretical predictions of layerlike modes (layer phonons) associated with excitations propagating primarily within the liquid layers comprising the film. The results of the analysis are consistent with the occurrence of level crossings between modes, and the existence of a layer modes for which the theory predicts will propagate in the vicinity of the solid-liquid interface. The theory and experiment agree on the detailed nature of the ripplon; its dispersion at low momenta, its fall off in intensity at intermediate momenta, and the level crossings at high momentum. Similar to experiment, the theory yields an intense mode in the maxon-roton region which is intrepreted as the formation of the bulklike excitation. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Magnetic spectra in the tridiminished-icosahedron {Fe9} nanocluster by inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Vaknin, David; Demmel, Franz

    2014-05-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiments under applied magnetic field at low temperatures show detailed low-lying magnetic excitations in the so-called tridiminshed iron icosahedron magnetic molecule. The magnetic molecule consists of nine iron Fe3+ (s=5/2) and three phosphorous atoms that are situated on the 12 vertices of a nearly perfect icosahedron. The three phosphorous atoms form a plane that separates the iron cluster into two weakly coupled three- and six-ion fragments, {Fe3} and {Fe6}, respectively. The magnetic field INS results exhibit an S=1/2 ground state expected from a perfect equilateral triangle of the {Fe3} triad with a powder averaged g value =2.00. Two sets of triplet excitations whose temperature and magnetic field dependence indicate an S=0 ground state with two nondegenerate S=1 states are attributed to the {Fe6} fragment. The splitting may result from a finite coupling between the two fragments, single-ion anisotropy, antisymmetric exchange couplings, or from magnetic frustration of its triangular building blocks.

  8. Chemical reduction of actinides probed by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Butorin, Sergei M; Shuh, David K; Kvashnina, Kristina O; Guo, Jinghua; Werme, Lars; Nordgren, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    The study addresses the possibilities of immobilizing the mobile species of actinides in the geosphere using metallic iron. Sorption on corroding iron is well-known, but there have been uncertainties with regard to the possibilities of reducing the actinyl species to sparingly soluble oxides and, thereby, permanently immobilizing them. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements at the actinide 5d edges on Fe foils exposed to uranium(VI) and neptunium(V) solutions in groundwater unambigiously indicate reduction of actinides to, respectively, uranium(IV) and neptunium(IV) on iron surfaces. The reduction manifests itself in an appearance of distinct specific signatures of uranium(IV) and neptunium(IV) in the RIXS profile of 5f-5f excitations. Such signatures and RIXS intensity/cross-section behavior with varying energy of incident photons can be reproduced by model atomic-multiplet calculations of the RIXS spectra. By normalizing the RIXS signal of corresponding 5f-5f excitations to core-to-core 6p-to-5d characteristic fluorescence transitions of actinides, their reduction rates on Fe samples with different exposure to actinide solutions can be estimated. Observed reduction implies similar processes in the nuclear waste canister thus suggesting reduced probability of nuclear waste release with ground waters from the canister. PMID:24187957

  9. Spin structure of the proton from polarized inclusive deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Spin Muon Collaboration

    1997-11-01

    We have measured the spin-dependent structure function g{sub 1}{sup p} in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of polarized muons off polarized protons, in the kinematic range 0.003{lt}x{lt}0.7 and 1GeV{sup 2}{lt}Q{sup 2}{lt}60GeV{sup 2}. A next-to-leading order QCD analysis is used to evolve the measured g{sub 1}{sup p}(x,Q{sup 2}) to a fixed Q{sub 0}{sup 2}. The first moment of g{sub 1}{sup p} at Q{sub 0}{sup 2}=10GeV{sup 2} is {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p}=0.136{plus_minus}0.013 (stat) {plus_minus}0.009 (syst) {plus_minus}0.005 (evol). This result is below the prediction of the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule by more than two standard deviations. The singlet axial charge a{sub 0} is found to be 0.28{plus_minus}0.16. In the Adler-Bardeen factorization scheme, {Delta}g{approx_equal}2 is required to bring {Delta}{Sigma} in agreement with the quark-parton model. A combined analysis of all available proton, deuteron, and {sup 3}He data confirms the Bjorken sum rule. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Shockwaves and deep inelastic scattering within the gauge/gravity duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avsar, E.; Iancu, E.; McLerran, L.; Triantafyllopoulos, D. N.

    2009-11-01

    Within the gauge/gravity correspondence, we discuss the general formulation of the shockwave metric which is dual to a `nucleus' described by the strongly-coupled Script N = 4 SYM theory in the limit where the number of colors Nc is arbitrarily large. We emphasize that the `nucleus' must possess Nc2 degrees of freedom per unit volume, so like a finite-temperature plasma, in order for a supergravity description to exist. We critically reassess previous proposals for introducing transverse inhomogeneity in the shockwave and formulate a new proposal in that sense, which involves no external source but requires the introduction of an `infrared' cutoff which mimics confinement. This cutoff however plays no role when the shockwave is probed by a highly virtual projectile, so like in deep inelastic scattering. We consider two such projectiles, the dilaton and the Script R-current, and compute the respective structure functions including unitarity corrections. We find that there are no leading-twist contributions to the structure functions at high virtuality, meaning that there are no point-like constituents in the strongly coupled `nucleus'. In the black-disk regime at low virtuality, the structure functions are suggestive of parton saturation with occupation numbers of order one. The saturation momentum Qs grows with the energy like Qs2 ~ 1/x (with x the Bjorken variable), which is the hallmark of graviton exchanges and is also necessary for the fulfillment of the energy-momentum sum rules.

  11. Inelastic neutron scattering study on boson peaks of imidazolium-based ionic liquids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kofu, Maiko; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; Ehlers, Georg; Yamamuro, Osamu; Moriya, Yosuke

    2015-07-26

    Low energy excitations of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) have been investigated by means of neutron spectroscopy. In the spectra of inelastic scattering, a broad excitation peak referred to as a “boson peak” appeared at 1–3 meV in all of the ILs measured. The intensity of the boson peak was enhanced at the Q positions corresponding to the diffraction peaks, reflecting the in-phase vibrational nature of the boson peak. Furthermore the boson peak energy (EBP) was insensitive to the length of the alkyl-chain but changed depending on the radius of the anion. From the correlation among EBP, the anion radius, andmore » the glass transition temperature Tg, we conclude that both EBP and Tg in ILs are predominantly governed by the inter-ionic Coulomb interaction which is less influenced by the alkyl-chain length. Furthermore, we also found that the EBP is proportional to the inverse square root of the molecular weight as observed in molecular glasses.« less

  12. Structural and dynamical properties of chlorinated hydrocarbons studied with resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Bohinc, R; Žitnik, M; Bučar, K; Kavčič, M; Carniato, S; Journel, L; Guillemin, R; Marchenko, T; Kawerk, E; Simon, M; Cao, W

    2016-04-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering on a large group of chlorinated hydrocarbons: CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, CCl4, CH3CH2Cl, ClCH2CH2Cl, CH3CHCl2, CH3CCl3, C2H2Cl2-iso, C2H2Cl2-cis, C2H2Cl2-trans, and C6H5Cl. Differences in structural and dynamical properties of the molecules generated by diverse chemical environments are observed in the measured Cl(Kα) spectral maps as well as in the Cl(K) total fluorescence yield spectra. The energy position, relative intensity, and the width of the Franck-Condon distribution of low-lying σ(∗) and π(∗) resonances are extracted by a fitting procedure taking into account the experimental broadening. The theoretical values obtained with the transition potential and Δ Kohn-Sham methods are in good agreement with the experimental parameters indicating subtle differences due to variations in the molecular structure. PMID:27059572

  13. Structural and dynamical properties of chlorinated hydrocarbons studied with resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohinc, R.; Žitnik, M.; Bučar, K.; Kavčič, M.; Carniato, S.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Marchenko, T.; Kawerk, E.; Simon, M.; Cao, W.

    2016-04-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering on a large group of chlorinated hydrocarbons: CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, CCl4, CH3CH2Cl, ClCH2CH2Cl, CH3CHCl2, CH3CCl3, C2H2Cl2-iso, C2H2Cl2-cis, C2H2Cl2-trans, and C6H5Cl. Differences in structural and dynamical properties of the molecules generated by diverse chemical environments are observed in the measured Cl(Kα) spectral maps as well as in the Cl(K) total fluorescence yield spectra. The energy position, relative intensity, and the width of the Franck-Condon distribution of low-lying σ∗ and π∗ resonances are extracted by a fitting procedure taking into account the experimental broadening. The theoretical values obtained with the transition potential and Δ Kohn-Sham methods are in good agreement with the experimental parameters indicating subtle differences due to variations in the molecular structure.

  14. Momentum space saturation model for deep inelastic scattering and single inclusive hadron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, E. A. F.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; de Oliveira, E. G.

    2011-08-01

    We show how the Santana Amaral-Gay Ducati-Betemps-Soyez (AGBS) model, originally developed for deep inelastic scattering applied to HERA data on the proton structure function, can also describe the RHIC data on single inclusive hadron yield for d+Au and p+p collisions through a new simultaneous fit. The single inclusive hadron production is modeled through the color glass condensate, which uses the quark (and gluon) condensate amplitudes in momentum space. The AGBS model is also a momentum space model based on the asymptotic solutions of the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation, although a different definition of the Fourier transform is used. This aspect is overcome, and a description entirely in transverse momentum of both processes arises for the first time. The small difference between the simultaneous fit and the one for HERA data alone suggests that the AGBS model describes very well both kinds of processes and thus emerges as a good tool to investigate the inclusive hadron production data. We use this model for predictions at LHC energies, which agrees very well with available experimental data.

  15. Inclusive measurements of inelastic electron and positron scattering from unpolarized hydrogen and deuterium targets.

    SciTech Connect

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Augustyniak, W.; Jackson, H. E.; HERMES Collaboration

    2011-05-01

    Results of inclusive measurements of inelastic electron and positron scattering from unpolarized protons and deuterons at the HERMES experiment are presented. The structure functions F{sub 2}{sup p} and F{sub 2}{sup d} are determined using a parameterization of existing data for the longitudinal-to-transverse virtual-photon absorption cross-section ratio. The HERMES results provide data in the ranges 0.006 {le} x {le} 0.9 and 0.1 GeV{sup 2} {le} Q{sup 2} {le} 20 GeV{sup 2}, covering the transition region between the perturbative and the non-perturbative regimes of QCD in a so-far largely unexplored kinematic region. They are in agreement with existing world data in the region of overlap. The measured cross sections are used, in combination with data from other experiments, to perform fits to the photon-nucleon cross section using the functional form of the ALLM model. The deuteron-to-proton cross-section ratio is also determined.

  16. From deep inelastic scattering to proton-nucleus collisions in the color glass condensate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelis, François; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal

    2003-04-01

    We show that particle production in proton-nucleus (pA) collisions in the color glass condensate model can be related to deep inelastic scattering (DIS) of leptons on protons or nuclei. The common building block is the quark-antiquark (or gluon-gluon) dipole cross section which is present in both DIS and pA processes. This correspondence in a sense generalizes the standard leading twist approach to pA collisions based on collinear factorization and perturbative QCD, and allows one to express the pA cross sections in terms of a universal quantity (dipole cross section) which, in principle, can be measured in DIS or other processes. Therefore, using the parametrization of the dipole cross section at DESY HERA, one can calculate particle production cross sections in proton-nucleus collisions at high energies. Alternatively, one could use proton-nucleus experiments to further constrain models of the dipole cross section. We show that the McLerran-Venugopalan model predicts an enhancement of the cross sections at large p⊥ (Cronin effect) and a suppression of the cross sections at low p⊥. The crossover depends on rapidity and moves to higher p⊥ as one goes to more forward rapidities.

  17. Experimental inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of hydrogen hexagonal clathrate-hydrate compared with rigorous quantum simulations.

    PubMed

    Celli, Milva; Powers, Anna; Colognesi, Daniele; Xu, Minzhong; Bačić, Zlatko; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2013-10-28

    We have performed high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements on binary hydrogen clathrate hydrates exhibiting the hexagonal structure (sH). Two samples, differing only in the ortho/para fraction of hydrogen, were prepared using heavy water and methyl tert-butyl ether as the promoter in its perdeuterated form. The INS spectrum of the translation-rotation (TR) excitations of the guest H2 molecule was obtained by subtracting the very weak signal due to the D2O lattice modes. By means of a subtraction procedure, it has been possible to obtain separately the spectra of caged p-H2 and o-H2. sH clathrates are comprised of three distinct types of cages, two of which, differing in shape and size, are each occupied by one H2 molecule only. Both contribute to the measured INS spectrum which is, therefore, rather complex and challenging to assign unambiguously. To assist with the interpretation, the INS spectra are calculated accurately utilizing the quantum methodology which incorporates the coupled five-dimensional TR energy levels and wave functions of the H2 molecule confined in each type of nanocage. The computed INS spectra are highly realistic and reflect the complexity of the coupled TR dynamics of the guest H2 in the anisotropic confining environment. The simulated INS spectra of p-H2 and o-H2 in the small and medium cages are compared with the experimental data, and are indispensable for their interpretation. PMID:24182049

  18. Saturation in deep inelastic scattering from the AdS/CFT correspondence

    SciTech Connect

    Cornalba, Lorenzo; Costa, Miguel S.

    2008-11-01

    We analyze deep inelastic scattering at small Bjorken x, using the approximate conformal invariance of QCD at high energies. Hard Pomeron exchanges are resummed eikonally, restoring unitarity at large values of the phase shift in the dual anti-de Sitter (AdS) geometry. At weak coupling this phase is imaginary, corresponding to a black disk in AdS space. In this saturated regime, cross sections exhibit geometric scaling and have a simple universal form, which we test against available experimental data for the proton structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}). We predict, in particular, the dependence of the cross section on the scaling variable (Q/Q{sub s}){sup 2} in the deeply saturated region, where Q{sub s} is the usual saturation scale. We find agreement with current data on F{sub 2} in the kinematical region 0.5

  19. Nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering: Methodology and extraction of vibrational properties of minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, M. Y.; Alp, E. E.; Bi, W.; Sturhahn, W.; Toellner, T. S.; Zhao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) is a synchrotron radiation based experimental method [1]. Since its introduction almost 20 years ago [2], NRIXS has found an expanding range of applications of studying lattice dynamics in condensed matter physics, materials science, high-pressure research, geosciences, and biophysics. After the first high pressure application in geophysics of measuring sound velocity of iron up to 153 GPa [3], it has become a widely used method to investigate deep earth compositions through sound velocity measurements [4,5]. Thermodynamic properties are also explored, in particular Grueneisen parameters [6]. Later, it was realized that isotope fractionaton factors can be derived from NRIXS measurements [7,8]. Sum rules and moments of NRIXS is a critical part of this methodology [9,10]. We will discuss this and in general the data analysis of NRIXS which enables the above mentioned applications. [1] Alp et al. Hyperfine Interactions 144/145, 3 (2002) [2] Sturhahn et al., PRL 74, 3832 (1995) [3] Mao et al., Science 292, 914 (2001) [4] Hu et al., PRB 67, 094304 (2003) [5] Sturhahn & Jackson, GSA special paper 421 (2007) [6] Murphy et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 38, L24306 (2011) [7] Polyakov, Science 323, 912 (2009) [8] Dauphas et al., Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 94, 254 (2012) [9] Lipkin, PRB 52, 10073 (1995) [10] Hu et al., PRB 87, 064301 (2013)

  20. Raman and fluorescence characteristics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from doped superconducting cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. Y.; Jia, C. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Wohlfeld, K.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Wu, W. B.; Okamoto, J.; Lee, W. S.; Hashimoto, M.; He, Y.; Shen, Z. X.; Yoshida, Y.; Eisaki, H.; Mou, C. Y.; Chen, C. T.; Huang, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of spin excitations are essential for an understanding of spin-mediated pairing for superconductivity; and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) provides a considerable opportunity to probe high-energy spin excitations. However, whether RIXS correctly measures the collective spin excitations of doped superconducting cuprates remains under debate. Here we demonstrate distinct Raman- and fluorescence-like RIXS excitations of Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O8+δ. Combining photon-energy and momentum dependent RIXS measurements with theoretical calculations using exact diagonalization provides conclusive evidence that the Raman-like RIXS excitations correspond to collective spin excitations, which are magnons in the undoped Mott insulators and evolve into paramagnons in doped superconducting compounds. In contrast, the fluorescence-like shifts are due primarily to the continuum of particle-hole excitations in the charge channel. Our results show that under the proper experimental conditions RIXS indeed can be used to probe paramagnons in doped high-Tc cuprate superconductors.

  1. Dynamical reconstruction of the exciton in LiF with inelastic x-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Abbamonte, Peter; Graber, Tim; Reed, James P.; Smadici, Serban; Yeh, Chen-Lin; Shukla, Abhay; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Ku, Wei

    2008-01-01

    The absorption of light by materials proceeds through the formation of excitons, which are states in which an excited electron is bound to the valence hole it vacated. Understanding the structure and dynamics of excitons is important, for example, for developing technologies for light-emitting diodes or solar energy conversion. However, there has never been an experimental means to study the time-dependent structure of excitons directly. Here, we use causality-inverted inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) to image the charge-transfer exciton in the prototype insulator LiF, with resolutions Δt = 20.67 as (2.067 × 10−17 s) in time and Δx = 0.533 Å (5.33 × 10−11 m) in space. Our results show that the exciton has a modulated internal structure and is coherently delocalized over two unit cells of the LiF crystal (≈8 Å). This structure changes only modestly during the course of its life, which establishes it unambiguously as a Frenkel exciton and thus amenable to a simplified theoretical description. Our results resolve an old controversy about excitons in the alkali halides and demonstrate the utility of IXS for imaging attosecond electron dynamics in condensed matter. PMID:18711146

  2. Rotationally inelastic scattering of OH by molecular hydrogen: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schewe, H. Christian Meijer, Gerard; Ma, Qianli; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Vanhaecke, Nicolas; Wang, Xingan; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H.; Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de; Avoird, Ad van der

    2015-05-28

    We present an experimental and theoretical investigation of rotationally inelastic transitions of OH, prepared in the X{sup 2}Π, v = 0, j = 3/2 F{sub 1}f level, in collisions with molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}). In a crossed beam experiment, the OH radicals were state selected and velocity tuned over the collision energy range 75–155 cm{sup −1} using a Stark decelerator. Relative parity-resolved state-to-state integral cross sections were determined for collisions with normal and para converted H{sub 2}. These cross sections, as well as previous OH–H{sub 2} measurements at 595 cm{sup −1} collision energy by Schreel and ter Meulen [J. Chem. Phys. 105, 4522 (1996)], and OH–D{sub 2} measurements for collision energies 100–500 cm{sup −1} by Kirste et al. [Phys. Rev. A 82, 042717 (2010)], were compared with the results of quantum scattering calculations using recently determined ab initio potential energy surfaces [Ma et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141, 174309 (2014)]. Good agreement between the experimental and computed relative cross sections was found, although some structure seen in the OH(j = 3/2 F{sub 1}f → j = 5/2 F{sub 1}e) + H{sub 2}(j = 0) cross section is not understood.

  3. Low-Energy Excitations in the Second LL: Fundamental Insights from Inelastic Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurstbauer, Ursula; Pinczuk, Aron; Levy, Antonio L.; Watson, John; Mondal, Sumit; Manfra, Michael J.; West, Ken; Pfeiffer, Loren

    2014-03-01

    The competition between quantum phases that dictates the physics in the second Landau level (SLL) results in striking phenomena. Our work explores this fascinating interaction physics by measurements of low-lying neutral excitation modes in the SLL from resonant inelastic light scattering experiments. We focus here on the marked differences of the low-lying collective excitation spectra of the even-denominator state at ν=5/2 with those in the range 5/2> ν>2. Filling factor 5/2 is characterized by the presence of gapped modes, a spin mode exactly at EZ and the absence of a continuum of low-lying excitations. In contrast, a continuum of low-lying excitations and gapped modes are coexistent at ν=2+1/3, 2+3/8 and 2+2/5 and the spin-modes appear significantly below EZ. All observed modes weakens with smallest variations in filling factor substantiating the transition from an incompressible quantum Hall fluid to compressible states. Supported by NSF and AvH.

  4. Parity Violating Deep Inelastic Electron Scattering from the Deuteron at 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kai

    2013-02-01

    An experiment that measured the parity violating (PV) asymmetry Ad in e-2H deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at Q2 ~ 1.10 and 1.90 (GeV/c)2 and xB ~ 0.3 was completed in experimental Hall A at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The asymmetry can be used to extract the neutral weak coupling combination (2C2u-C2d), providing a factor of five to six improvement over the current world data. To achieve this precision, asymmetries of the 10-4 level needed to be measured at event rates up to 500 kHz with high electron detection efficiency and high pion background rejection capability. A specialized scaler-based counting data acquisition system (DAQ) with hardware-based particle identification was successfully implemented. The statistical quality of the asymmetry measurement agreed with the Gaussian distribution to over five orders of magnitudes and the experimental goal of 3-4% statistical uncertainty was achieved. The design and performance of the new DAQ system is presented with the preliminary asymmetry results given in the end.

  5. Crystal electric field excitations in quasicrystal approximant TbCd6 studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Pinaki; Flint, R.; Kong, T.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.; de Boissieu, M.; Lory, P.-F.; Beutier, G.; Hiroto, T.

    All of the known quasicrystals with local moments exhibit frustration and spin glass-like behavior at low temperature. The onset of the spin freezing temperature is believed to be affected by the crystal electric field (CEF) splitting of the local moments. The quasicrystal approximant TbCd6 and its related icosahedral quasicrystal phase, i-Tb-Cd, form a set of model systems to explore how magnetism evolves from a conventional lattice (approximant phase) to an aperiodic quasicrystal. Though TbCd6 shows long-range antiferromagnetic ordering (TN = 24 K), only spin glass like behavior is observed in i-Tb-Cd with a spin freezing temperature of TF = 6 K. To investigate further, we have performed inelastic neutron scattering measurements on powder samples of TbCd6 and observed two distinct CEF excitations at low energies which points to a high degeneracy of the CEF levels related to the Tb surrounding with almost icosahedral symmetry. Work at Ames Laboratory was supported by the DOE, BES, Division of Materials Sciences & Engineering, under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358. This research used resources at Institut Laue-Langevin, France.

  6. Interaction of hydrogen with extraframework cations in zeolite hosts probed by inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Juergen; Trouw, Frans R; Mojet, Barbara; Forster, Paul; Lobo, Raul

    2010-01-01

    The hindered rotations of molecular hydrogen adsorbed at low loadings into a number of partially ion-exchanged zeolites A, Y and X have been studied at low temperatures with the use of inelastic neutron scattering (INS) techniques. The factors that determine the sorption sites and strength of the interaction with the host material are found to be a complex combination of the type, charge and size of the cations, their coordination to the host framework, and accessibility to the hydrogen molecule as well as the relative acidity of the framework, and lead to important criteria for the development of more effective hybrid materials for hydrogen storage. The highest barriers to rotation were found for the undercoordinated, exposed Li+ cations in LiA and in LiX. Interaction with the extra framework Cu2+ and Zn2+ cations in zeolite A is found to be noticeably stronger than with the neutral Zn- or Cu- containing clusters in metal-organic framework compounds. Our observation that binding of hydrogen in these charged frameworks is strongly enhanced relative to those that are neutral suggests an important approach to improvement of porous materials as ambient temperature hydrogen storage media. PMID:20352810

  7. ''Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Periodic Density Functional Studies of Hydrogen Bonded Structures''

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce S. Hudson

    2004-10-27

    This project is directed at a fundamental understanding of hydrogen bonding, the primary reversible interaction leading to defined geometries, networks and supramolecular aggregates formed by organic molecules. Hydrogen bonding is still not sufficiently well understood that the geometry of such supramolecular aggregates can be predicted. In the approach taken existing quantum chemical methods capable of treating periodic solids have been applied to hydrogen bonded systems of known structure. The equilibrium geometry for the given space group and packing arrangement were computed and compared to that observed. The second derivatives and normal modes of vibration will then be computed and from this inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra were computed using the normal mode eigenvectors to compute spectral intensities. Appropriate inclusion of spectrometer line width and shape was made in the simulation and overtones, combinations and phonon wings were be included. These computed spectra were then compared with experimental results obtained for low-temperature polycrystalline samples at INS spectrometers at several facilities. This procedure validates the computational methodology for describing these systems including both static and dynamic aspects of the material. The resulting description can be used to evaluate the relative free energies of two or more proposed structures and so ultimately to be able to predict which structure will be most stable for a given building block.

  8. Intruder structures observed in {sup 122}Te through inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, S.F.; Alexander, G.K.; Aubin, C.A.; Burns, M.C.; Collard, C.J.; Walbran, M.M.; Vanhoy, J.R.; Jensen, E.; Garrett, P.E.; Martin, A.; Warr, N.; Kadi, M.; Yates, S.W.

    2005-03-01

    The excited levels of {sup 122}Te to 3.3- MeV excitation have been studied using {gamma}-ray spectroscopy following inelastic neutron scattering. The decay characteristics of these levels have been determined from {gamma}-ray excitation functions, angular distributions at E{sub n}-1.72,2.80, and 3.35 MeV, Doppler shifts, and {gamma}{gamma} coincidences. Electromagnetic transition rates were deduced for many levels, as were multipole-mixing and branching ratios. Level energies and electromagnetic transition rates were compared to interacting boson model (IBM) calculations, both with and without intruder-state mixing, and to particle-core coupling model calculations. The energies of low-lying levels of {sup 122}Te are well described by the IBM with intruder-state mixing calculations, and observed transition rates support emerging intruder bands built on 0{sup +} levels. The other models considered do not produce enough low-lying positive parity states; however, U(5) energies to the four quadrupole-phonon level agree very well with observations when states with large intruder configurations are ignored. Mixed-symmetry and quadrupole-octupole excitations have been investigated, but mixing with other configurations and fragmentation of strength prohibit a clear identification of these states.

  9. Inelastic Scattering of Alphas on 24Mg as a Surrogate for Stellar Carbon Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munson, Justin; Norman, Eric; Burke, Jason; Casperson, Robert; McCleskey, Ellen; McCleskey, Matt; Hughes, Richard; Ota, Shuya; Czeszumska, Agnieszka; Saastamoinen, Antti; Spiridon, Alex

    2015-04-01

    Inelastic excitation of 24Mg is used as a surrogate for the 12C+12C reaction at stellar energies. The branching ratio for 12C+12C-->20Ne + α and 12C+12C-->23Na + p is determined by the ratio of decays via the alpha and proton decay channels of the excited 24Mg . An experiment was conducted at the Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute in November of 2014 using the STARLiTeR detector array and the K150 (88'') Cyclotron. The experiment used a 40 MeV alpha beam and a thin 24Mg target. The scattered alpha and the ejected alpha or proton were detected using silicon detectors while gammas from the often excited daughters were detected using an array of germanium ``clover'' detectors. This work was supported in part by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344; Texas A&M under DOE Office of Nuclear Physics grant DE-FG02-93ER40773 and NNSA grants DE-FG52-09NA29467 and DE-NA0000979.

  10. Momentum density of hcp and liquid helium-4 by inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hilleke, Russell Otto

    1983-01-01

    A measurement of the momentum density in hcp and liquid /sup 4/He by inelastic neutron scattering is reported. Using the Low Resolution Medium Energy Chopper Spectrometer at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source at Argonne National Laboratory, momentum transfers in the range 12 to 22.5 A/sup -1/ were attained. At these momentum transfers, the momentum density of the sample is related to the dynamic structure factor by the impulse approximation. The measured momentum distribution is Gaussian and the kinetic energy is larger than proposed by existing theories. Data were taken on two solid samples, the first was a 19.45 cm/sup 3//mole hcp solid, the second was 18.20 cm/sup 3// mole; both solid samples were maintained at 1.70 K during data collection. Data were also taken on a liquid sample with a molar volume of 18.20 cm/sup 3//mole at 4.00 K. At 1.70 K the two solid samples are essentially in their ground states so that the measurement is of the ground state momentum density. The liquid sample was included to see if the difference between the liquid and solid momentum density at the same molar volume was observable.

  11. Experimental inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of hydrogen hexagonal clathrate-hydrate compared with rigorous quantum simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Milva; Powers, Anna; Colognesi, Daniele; Xu, Minzhong; Bačić, Zlatko; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2013-10-01

    We have performed high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements on binary hydrogen clathrate hydrates exhibiting the hexagonal structure (sH). Two samples, differing only in the ortho/para fraction of hydrogen, were prepared using heavy water and methyl tert-butyl ether as the promoter in its perdeuterated form. The INS spectrum of the translation-rotation (TR) excitations of the guest H2 molecule was obtained by subtracting the very weak signal due to the D2O lattice modes. By means of a subtraction procedure, it has been possible to obtain separately the spectra of caged p-H2 and o-H2. sH clathrates are comprised of three distinct types of cages, two of which, differing in shape and size, are each occupied by one H2 molecule only. Both contribute to the measured INS spectrum which is, therefore, rather complex and challenging to assign unambiguously. To assist with the interpretation, the INS spectra are calculated accurately utilizing the quantum methodology which incorporates the coupled five-dimensional TR energy levels and wave functions of the H2 molecule confined in each type of nanocage. The computed INS spectra are highly realistic and reflect the complexity of the coupled TR dynamics of the guest H2 in the anisotropic confining environment. The simulated INS spectra of p-H2 and o-H2 in the small and medium cages are compared with the experimental data, and are indispensable for their interpretation.

  12. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic Gif-type oxidation from nuclear inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, S.; Asthalter, T.; Rabe, V.; Laschat, S.

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) of synchrotron radiation, also known as nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS), has been shown to provide valuable insights into metal-centered vibrations at Mössbauer-active nuclei. We present a study of the iron-centered vibrational density of states (VDOS) during the first step of the Gif-type oxidation of cyclohexene with a novel trinuclear Fe3(μ 3-O) complex as catalyst precursor. The experiments were carried out on shock-frozen solutions for different combinations of reactants: Fe3(μ 3-O) in pyridine solution, Fe3(μ 3-O) plus Zn/acetic acid in pyridine without and with addition of either oxygen or cyclohexene, and Fe3(μ 3-O)/Zn/acetic acid/pyridine/cyclohexene (reaction mixture) for reaction times of 1 min, 5 min, and 30 min. The projected VDOS of the Fe atoms was calculated on the basis of pseudopotential density functional calculations. Two possible reaction intermediates were identified as [Fe(III)(C5H5N)2(O2CCH3)2]+ and Fe(II)(C5H5N)4(O2CCH3)2, yielding evidence that NIS (NRVS) allows to identify the presence of iron-centered intermediates also in complex reaction mixtures.

  13. Signatures of strong correlation effects in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies on cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wan-Ju; Lin, Cheng-Ju; Lee, Ting-Kuo

    2016-08-01

    Recently, spin excitations in doped cuprates have been measured using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering. The paramagnon dispersions show the large hardening effect in the electron-doped systems and seemingly doping independence in the hole-doped systems, with the energy scales comparable to that of the antiferromagnetic (AFM) magnons. This anomalous hardening effect and the lack of softening were partially explained by using the strong-coupling t -J model but with a three-site term [Nat. Commun. 5, 3314 (2014), 10.1038/ncomms4314], although the hardening effect is already present even without the latter. By considering the t -t'-t''-J model and using the slave-boson mean-field theory, we obtain, via the spin-spin susceptibility, the spin excitations in qualitative agreement with the experiments. The doping-dependent bandwidth due to the strong correlation physics is the origin of the hardening effect. We also show that dispersions in the AFM regime, different from those in the paramagnetic (PM) regime, hardly vary with dopant density. These excitations are mainly collective in nature instead of particle-hole-like. We further discuss the interplay and different contributions of these two kinds of excitations in the PM phase and show that the dominance of the collective excitation increases with decreasing dopant concentrations.

  14. Inelastic Neutron Scattering studies of pure and Mo doped VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Arnab; Granroth, Garrett E.; Yiu, Yuen; Aczel, Adam A.; Koleshnikov, Alexander I.; Luo, Huxia; Cava, Robert J.; Nagler, Stephen E.; Princeton University Collaboration; Sequoia Team

    2014-03-01

    For the last half-century VO2 has been viewed as an archetypal system for studying the metal-insulator transition (MIT). Moreover, there is currently intense interest in this material arising from its promising use in fast energy efficient electronic devices. There are key unresolved issues connected with the origin of the MIT, including the role of magnetism arising from the S =1/2 V4+ ions. It is known that below 340 K in undoped VO2 the V ions form structural dimers in the insulating M1 monoclinic phase. Here we report the results of new inelastic neutron scattering measurements of VO2 and V0.75Mo0.25O2. Using the SEQUOIA chopper spectrometer at the SNS possible lattice and magnetic excitations for energies up to 600 meV were investigated. We discuss the results in the context of current ideas concerning the MIT in VO2. The research at ORNL is supported by the DOE BES, Division of Scientific User Facilities. Work at Princeton University is supported by the DOE grant number DE-FG02-98ER45706.

  15. Dynamics of confined water reconstructed from inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of bulk response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coridan, Robert H.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Lai, Ghee Hwee; Abbamonte, Peter; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2012-03-01

    Nanoconfined water and surface-structured water impacts a broad range of fields. For water confined between hydrophilic surfaces, measurements and simulations have shown conflicting results ranging from “liquidlike” to “solidlike” behavior, from bulklike water viscosity to viscosity orders of magnitude higher. Here, we investigate how a homogeneous fluid behaves under nanoconfinement using its bulk response function: The Green's function of water extracted from a library of S(q,ω) inelastic x-ray scattering data is used to make femtosecond movies of nanoconfined water. Between two confining surfaces, the structure undergoes drastic changes as a function of surface separation. For surface separations of ≈9 Å, although the surface-associated hydration layers are highly deformed, they are separated by a layer of bulklike water. For separations of ≈6 Å, the two surface-associated hydration layers are forced to reconstruct into a single layer that modulates between localized “frozen’ and delocalized “melted” structures due to interference of density fields. These results potentially reconcile recent conflicting experiments. Importantly, we find a different delocalized wetting regime for nanoconfined water between surfaces with high spatial frequency charge densities, where water is organized into delocalized hydration layers instead of localized hydration shells, and are strongly resistant to `freezing' down to molecular distances (<6 Å).

  16. Inelastic neutron scattering study of Pt(II) complexes displaying anticancer properties.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Luís A E Batista; Marques, M Paula M; Martin, Christine; Parker, Stewart F; Tomkinson, John

    2011-05-01

    The well-known platinum(II) chemotherapeutic drugs cisplatin [cis-(NH(3))(2)PtCl(2)] and carboplatin [Pt(NH(3))(2)C(6)O(4)H(6)], as well as the analogous transplatin [trans-(NH(3))(2)PtCl(2)], were studied by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy, coupled to quantum mechanical methods, and some ancillary work with X-ray diffraction on powders. An assignment of the experimental spectra was carried out based on the calculated INS transition frequencies and intensities (at the DFT level), thereby achieving a good correspondence between the calculated and observed data. Unusually good-quality INS spectra were obtained from about 250 mg, which is the smallest sample of a hydrogenous compound for which a successful INS interpretation has been reported. The knowledge of the local configuration of this kind of complexes is essential for an accurate understanding of their activity, which will pave the way for the rational design of novel third-generation drugs comprising cisplatin- and carboplatin-like moieties. PMID:21523878

  17. Inelastic Scattering of CO with He: Polarization Dependent Differential State-to-State Cross Sections.

    PubMed

    Song, Lei; Groenenboom, Gerrit C; van der Avoird, Ad; Bishwakarma, Chandan Kumar; Sarma, Gautam; Parker, David H; Suits, Arthur G

    2015-12-17

    A joint theoretical and experimental study of state-to-state rotationally inelastic polarization dependent differential cross sections (PDDCSs) for CO (v = 0, j = 0, 1, 2) molecules colliding with helium is reported for collision energies of 513 and 840 cm(-1). In a crossed molecular beam experiment, velocity map imaging (VMI) with state-selective detection by (2 + 1) and (1 + 1') resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) is used to probe rotational excitation of CO due to scattering. By taking account of the known fractions of the j = 0, 1, and 2 states of CO in the rotationally cold molecular beam (Trot ≈ 3 K), close-coupling theory based on high-quality ab initio potential energy surfaces for the CO-He interaction is used to simulate the differential cross sections for the mixed initial states. With polarization-sensitive 1 + 1' REMPI detection and a direct analysis procedure described by Suits et al. ( J. Phys, Chem. A 2015 , 119 , 5925 ), alignment moments are extracted from the images and the latter are compared with images simulated by theory using the calculated DCS and alignment moments. In general, good agreement of theory with the experimental results is found, indicating the reliability of the experiment in reproducing state-to-state differential and polarization-dependent differential cross sections. PMID:26473516

  18. Partially coherent wavefront propagation simulations for inelastic x-ray scattering beamline including crystal optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, Alexey; Cai, Yong Q.; Sutter, John P.; Chubar, Oleg

    2014-09-01

    Up to now simulation of perfect crystal optics in the "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) wave-optics computer code was not available, thus hindering the accurate modelling of synchrotron radiation beamlines containing optical components with multiple-crystal arrangements, such as double-crystal monochromators and high-energy-resolution monochromators. A new module has been developed for SRW for calculating dynamical diffraction from a perfect crystal in the Bragg case. We demonstrate its successful application to the modelling of partially-coherent undulator radiation propagating through the Inelastic X-ray Scattering (IXS) beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The IXS beamline contains a double-crystal and a multiple-crystal highenergy- resolution monochromator, as well as complex optics such as compound refractive lenses and Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors for the X-ray beam transport and shaping, which makes it an excellent case for benchmarking the new functionalities of the updated SRW codes. As a photon-hungry experimental technique, this case study for the IXS beamline is particularly valuable as it provides an accurate evaluation of the photon flux at the sample position, using the most advanced simulation methods and taking into account parameters of the electron beam, details of undulator source, and the crystal optics.

  19. Inelastic Neutron Scattering on Multiferroics NdFe3(BO3)4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, Shohei; Soda, Minoru; Itoh, Shinichi; Yokoo, Tetsuya; Ohgushi, Kenya; Kawana, Daichi; Masuda, Takatsugu

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiment is performed on single crystals of multiferroics NdFe3(11BO3)4 to explore the magnetic excitations. Fe-centered dispersive excitation with the band width of 5 meV is observed along the crystallographic c∗ direction and that of 3 meV is along the a∗ direction. The energy gap of 0.57 meV due to an axial-type anisotropy is ob- served at the AF zone center. The energy of Nd-centered flat excitation is 1 meV. Furthermore, anticrossing of the Fe- and Nd-centered excitations is observed, meaning the existence of the f -d coupling, i.e., the interaction between the Nd3+ and Fe3+ moments. Spin-wave analysis on the observed neutron spectrum revealed the underlying magnetic Hamiltonian in NdFe3(11BO3)4. Discussion on the axial-type anisotropy in the ab - plane based on the magnetic model leads to the conclusion that the anisotropy of the Nd3+ ion plays a main role in the determination of the structures of both magnetic moment and electric polarization in NdFe3(BO3)4.

  20. Raman and fluorescence characteristics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from doped superconducting cuprates.

    PubMed

    Huang, H Y; Jia, C J; Chen, Z Y; Wohlfeld, K; Moritz, B; Devereaux, T P; Wu, W B; Okamoto, J; Lee, W S; Hashimoto, M; He, Y; Shen, Z X; Yoshida, Y; Eisaki, H; Mou, C Y; Chen, C T; Huang, D J

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of spin excitations are essential for an understanding of spin-mediated pairing for superconductivity; and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) provides a considerable opportunity to probe high-energy spin excitations. However, whether RIXS correctly measures the collective spin excitations of doped superconducting cuprates remains under debate. Here we demonstrate distinct Raman- and fluorescence-like RIXS excitations of Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O(8+δ). Combining photon-energy and momentum dependent RIXS measurements with theoretical calculations using exact diagonalization provides conclusive evidence that the Raman-like RIXS excitations correspond to collective spin excitations, which are magnons in the undoped Mott insulators and evolve into paramagnons in doped superconducting compounds. In contrast, the fluorescence-like shifts are due primarily to the continuum of particle-hole excitations in the charge channel. Our results show that under the proper experimental conditions RIXS indeed can be used to probe paramagnons in doped high-Tc cuprate superconductors. PMID:26794437

  1. Longitudinal-Transverse Separation of Deep-Inelastic Scattering at Low Q² on Nucleons and Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tvaskis, Vladas

    2004-12-09

    Since the early experiments at SLAC, which discovered the nucleon substructure and led to the development of the quark parton model, deep inelastic scattering (DIS) has been the most powerful tool to investigate the partonic substructure of the nucleon. After about 30 years of experiments with electron and muon beams the nucleon structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) is known with high precision over about four orders of magnitude in x and Q{sup 2}. In the region of Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2} the results of the DIS measurements are interpreted in terms of partons (quarks and gluons). The theoretical framework is provided in this case by perturbative Quantum Chromo Dynamics (pQCD), which includes scaling violations, as described by the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (DGLAP) equations. The description starts to fail when Q{sup 2} becomes of the order of 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}, where non-perturbative effects (higher-twist effects), which are still not fully understood, become important (non-pQCD). The sensitivity for order-n twist effects increases with decreasing Q{sup 2}, since they include a factor 1/(Q{sup 2}{sup n}) (n {ge} 1).

  2. Inelastic neutron scattering study on boson peaks of imidazolium-based ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kofu, Maiko; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; Ehlers, Georg; Yamamuro, Osamu; Moriya, Yosuke

    2015-07-26

    Low energy excitations of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) have been investigated by means of neutron spectroscopy. In the spectra of inelastic scattering, a broad excitation peak referred to as a “boson peak” appeared at 1–3 meV in all of the ILs measured. The intensity of the boson peak was enhanced at the Q positions corresponding to the diffraction peaks, reflecting the in-phase vibrational nature of the boson peak. Furthermore the boson peak energy (EBP) was insensitive to the length of the alkyl-chain but changed depending on the radius of the anion. From the correlation among EBP, the anion radius, and the glass transition temperature Tg, we conclude that both EBP and Tg in ILs are predominantly governed by the inter-ionic Coulomb interaction which is less influenced by the alkyl-chain length. Furthermore, we also found that the EBP is proportional to the inverse square root of the molecular weight as observed in molecular glasses.

  3. Neutron inelastic scattering in natural Pb as a background in neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Guiseppe, Vincente E; Elliott, Steve R; Hime, Andrew; Perepelitsa, Dennis V

    2008-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering on Pb isotopes can result in {gamma} rays near the signature endpoint energy in a number of {beta}{beta} isotopes. In particular, there are {gamma}-ray transitions in {sup 206}Pb and {sup 207}Pb that might produce energy deposits at the {sup 76}Ge Q{sub {beta}{beta}} in Ge detectors used for 0{nu}{beta}{beta} searches. The levels that produce these {gamma} rays can be excited by n,n'{gamma} reactions, but the cross sections are small and previously unmeasured. The cross section on {sup nat}Pb to produce the 2041-keV {gamma} ray from {sup 206}Pb is measured to be 3.1 {+-} 0.6 (stat.) {+-} 0.3 (syst.) mb at {approx} 9.6 MeV. The cross section on {sup nat}Pb to produce the 3062-keV {gamma} ray from {sup 207}Pb is measured to be 4.3 {+-} 0.8 (stat.) {+-} 0.4 (syst.) mb at the same energy. We place upper limits on the cross sections for exciting some other levels in Pb that have transition energies corresponding to Q{sub {beta}{beta}} in orhter {beta}{beta} isotopes.

  4. Collective dynamics of hydrated β-lactoglobulin by inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Koji; Hosokawa, Shinya; Baron, Alfred Q R; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2010-10-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of hydrated β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) were performed to investigate the collective dynamics of hydration water and hydrated protein on a picosecond time scale. Samples with different hydration levels h [=mass of water (g)/mass of protein (g)] of 0 (dry), 0.5, and 1.0 were measured at ambient temperature. The observed dynamical structure factor S(Q,ω)/S(Q) was analyzed by a model composed of a Lorentzian for the central peak and a damped harmonic oscillator (DHO) for the side peak. The dispersion relation between the excitation energy in the DHO model and the momentum transfer Q was obtained for the hydrated β-lg at both hydration levels, but no DHO excitation was found for the dry β-lg. The high-frequency sound velocity was similar to that previously observed in pure water. The ratio of the high-frequency sound velocity of hydrated β-lg to the adiabatic one of hydrated lysozyme (h=0.41) was estimated as ∼1.6 for h=0.5. The value is significantly smaller than that (∼2) of pure water that has the tetrahedral network structure. The present finding thus suggests that the tetrahedral network structure of water around the β-lg is partially disrupted by the perturbation from protein surface. These results are consistent with those reported from Brillouin neutron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation studies of hydrated ribonuclease A. PMID:20942540

  5. Measurement of parity-violating asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaochao

    2015-04-01

    Symmetry permeates nature and is fundamental to all laws of physics. One example is mirror symmetry, also called ``parity symmetry''. It implies that flipping left and right does not change the laws of physics. Laws for electromagnetism, gravity and the subatomic strong force respect parity symmetry, but the subatomic weak force does not. Historically, parity violation in electron scattering played a key role in establishing, and now testing, the Standard Model of particle physics. One particular set of the quantities accessible through measurements of parity-violating electron scattering are the vector-electron axial-vector-quark weak couplings, called C2 q's, measured directly only once in the past 40 years. We report here on a new measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in electron-quark scattering, that has yielded a specific combination 2C2 u -C2 d five times more precise than the earlier result. (Here u and d stand respectively for the up and the down quarks.) These results are the first evidence, at more than the 95% confidence level, that the C2 q's are non-zero as predicted by the electroweak theory. They lead to constraints on new interactions beyond the Standard Model, particularly on those whose laws change when the quark chirality is flipped between left and right. In today's particle physics research that is focused on colliders such as the LHC, our results provide specific chirality information on electroweak theory that is difficult to obtain at high energies. In addition to deep inelastic scattering, we will report on measurement of the asymmetry in the nucleon resonance region. These data exhibit for the first time that the quark-hadron duality may work for electroweak observables at the (10--15)% level throughout the whole resonance region. At the end I will give a brief outlook on the future PVDIS program using the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV beam, which will not only provide more precise measurement of C2 q, but also for sin2 θW and for

  6. Observation of rotationally mediated focused inelastic resonances in D{sub 2} scattering from Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Bertino, M.F.; Miret-Artes, S.; Toennies, J.P.; Benedek, G.

    1997-10-01

    Rotationally mediated focused inelastic resonances (RMFIR{close_quote}s) in the angular distributions of D{sub 2} scattered from Cu(001) are observed. The FIR effect involves a phonon-assisted focusing of an incident beam of arbitrary energy and direction into a final channel of one single well-defined energy and direction. Surprisingly for an incident energy E{sub i}=27meV the RMFIR conditions for the scattered beam coincide with the kinematic conditions required for a further elastic selective adsorption mechanism called the rotationally mediated critical kinematic (RMCK) effect. By taking advantage of the RMFIR and elastic RMCK effects, three effective bound states of energy {epsilon}{sub n,J}={minus}21.5meV, {minus}12.4meV, and {minus}10.3meV are determined. They are attributed to the lowest bound states {epsilon}{sub 0}={minus}28.9meV and {epsilon}{sub 1}={minus}19.8meV combined with the rotational excitation energy for J=1 to be B{sub rot}J(J+1)=7.41meV, respectively, and {epsilon}{sub 3}={minus}10.3meV combined with the rotational ground state (J=0). While the {epsilon}{sub 1} and {epsilon}{sub 3} states appear as maxima in the angular distribution at RMFIR conditions, the {epsilon}{sub 0} yields a striking minimum which represents the first evidence of what we call an anti-FIR feature. Theoretical arguments to explain the different FIR signatures observed are provided. A fit of a phenomenological interaction potential to the experimental bound-state values yields a value for the well depth D=32.5meV which is somewhat deeper than that found previously. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Molecular Orbital Simulations of Metal 1s2p Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meiyuan; Källman, Erik; Sørensen, Lasse Kragh; Delcey, Mickaël G; Pinjari, Rahul V; Lundberg, Marcus

    2016-07-28

    For first-row transition metals, high-resolution 3d electronic structure information can be obtained using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). In the hard X-ray region, a K pre-edge (1s→3d) excitation can be followed by monitoring the dipole-allowed Kα (2p→1s) or Kβ (3p→1s) emission, processes labeled 1s2p or 1s3p RIXS. Here the restricted active space (RAS) approach, which is a molecular orbital method, is used for the first time to study hard X-ray RIXS processes. This is achieved by including the two sets of core orbitals in different partitions of the active space. Transition intensities are calculated using both first- and second-order expansions of the wave vector, including, but not limited to, electric dipoles and quadrupoles. The accuracy of the approach is tested for 1s2p RIXS of iron hexacyanides [Fe(CN)6](n-) in ferrous and ferric oxidation states. RAS simulations accurately describe the multiplet structures and the role of 2p and 3d spin-orbit coupling on energies and selection rules. Compared to experiment, relative energies of the two [Fe(CN)6](3-) resonances deviate by 0.2 eV in both incident energy and energy transfer directions, and multiplet splittings in [Fe(CN)6](4-) are reproduced within 0.1 eV. These values are similar to what can be expected for valence excitations. The development opens the modeling of hard X-ray scattering processes for both solution catalysts and enzymatic systems. PMID:27398775

  8. [alpha]-particle transport-driven current in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A. ); Sipilae, S.K. )

    1995-03-01

    It is shown that the radial transport of fusion-born energetic [alpha] particles, induced by electrostatic waves traveling in one poloidal direction, is directly connected to a net momentum of [alpha] particles in the toroidal direction in tokamaks. Because the momentum change is almost independent of toroidal velocity, the energy required for the momentum generation remains small on an [alpha]-particle population sustained by an isotropic time-independent source. By numerical toroidal Monte Carlo calculations it is shown that the current carried by [alpha] particles in the presence of intense well penetrated waves can reach several mega-amperes in reactor-sized tokamaks. The current obtained can greatly exceed the neoclassical bootstrap current of the [alpha] particles.

  9. Genotoxicity of alpha particles in human embryonic skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.; Strniste, G.F.; Tokita, N.

    1984-11-01

    Cell inactivation and induced mutation frequencies at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus have been measured in cultured human fibroblasts (GM10) exposed to ..cap alpha.. particles from /sup 238/ Pu and 250 kVp X rays. The survival curves resulting from exposure to ..cap alpha.. particles are exponential. The mean lethal dose, D/sub 0/, is approximately 1.3 Gy for X rays and 0.25 Gy for ..cap alpha.. particles. As a function of radiation dose, mutation induction at the HGPRT locus was linear for ..cap alpha.. particles whereas the X-ray-induced mutation data were better fitted by a quadratic function. When mutation frequencies were plotted against the log of survival, mutation frequency at a given survival level was greater in cells exposed to ..cap alpha.. particles than to X rays.

  10. First measurement of the transverse spin asymmetries of the deuteron in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering.

    PubMed

    Alexakhin, V Yu; Alexandrov, Yu; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Badełek, B; Balestra, F; Ball, J; Baum, G; Bedfer, Y; Berglund, P; Bernet, C; Bertini, R; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bradamante, F; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Burtin, E; Bussa, M P; Cerini, L; Chapiro, A; Cicuttin, A; Colantoni, M; Colavita, A A; Costa, S; Crespo, M L; d'Hose, N; Dalla Torre, S; Dasgupta, S S; De Masi, R; Dedek, N; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Diaz Kavka, V; Dolgopolov, A V; Donskov, S V; Dorofeev, V A; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dünnweber, W; Efremov, A; Ehlers, J; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Fabro, M; Faessler, M; Fauland, P; Ferrero, A; Ferrero, L; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fischer, H; Franz, J; Friedrich, J M; Frolov, V; Fuchs, U; Garfagnini, R; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gerassimov, S; Geyer, R; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Goertz, S; Grajek, O A; Grasso, A; Grube, B; Grünemaier, A; Gustafsson, K; Hannappel, J; von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hedicke, S; Heinsius, F H; Hinterberger, F; von Hodenberg, M; Horikawa, N; Horikawa, S; Ijaduola, R B; Ilgner, C; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Janata, A; Joosten, R; Jouravlev, N I; Kabuss, E; Kalinnikov, V; Kang, D; Karstens, F; Kastaun, W; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Komissarov, E V; Kondo, K; Königsmann, K; Konoplyannikov, A K; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Korentchenko, A S; Korzenev, A; Kotzinian, A M; Koutchinski, N A; Kowalik, K; Kravchuk, N P; Krivokhizhin, G V; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kuhn, R; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Lamanna, M; Le Goff, J M; Leberig, M; Lichtenstadt, J; Maggiora, A; Maggiora, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Manuilov, I V; Marchand, C; Marroncle, J; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Matsuda, T; Maximov, A N; Medved, K S; Meyer, W; Mielech, A; Mikhailov, Yu V; Moinester, M A; Nähle, O; Nassalski, J; Neyret, D P; Nikolaenko, V I; Nozdrin, A A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevsky, A G; Ostrick, M; Padee, A; Pagano, P; Panebianco, S; Panzieri, D; Paul, S; Pereira, H D; Peshekhonov, D V; Peshekhonov, V D; Piragino, G; Platchkov, S; Platzer, K; Pochodzalla, J; Polyakov, V A; Popov, A A; Pretz, J; Rebourgeard, P C; Reicherz, G; Reymann, J; Rozhdestvensky, A M; Rondio, E; Sadovski, A B; Saller, E; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Sans, M; Sapozhnikov, M G; Savin, I A; Schiavon, P; Schmidt, T; Schmitt, H; Schmitt, L; Shishkin, A A; Siebert, H; Sinha, L; Sissakian, A N; Skachkova, A; Slunecka, M; Smirnov, G I; Sugonyaev, V P; Stinzing, F; Sulej, R; Takabayashi, N; Tchalishev, V V; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Thers, D; Tkatchev, L G; Toeda, T; Tretyak, V I; Trousov, S; Vlassov, N V; Webb, R; Weise, E; Wiesmann, M; Windmolders, R; Wirth, S; Wiślicki, W; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zhao, J; Ziegler, R; Zvyagin, A

    2005-05-27

    First measurements of the Collins and Sivers asymmetries of charged hadrons produced in deep-inelastic scattering of muons on a transversely polarized 6LiD target are presented. The data were taken in 2002 with the COMPASS spectrometer using the muon beam of the CERN SPS at 160 GeV/c. The Collins asymmetry turns out to be compatible with zero, as does the measured Sivers asymmetry within the present statistical errors. PMID:16090237

  11. First Measurement of the Transverse Spin Asymmetries of the Deuteron in Semi-inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Alexakhin, V.Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Efremov, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M. Jr.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Janata, A.; Jouravlev, N.I.; Komissarov, E.V.; Korentchenko, A.S.; Koutchinski, N.A.; Kravchuk, N.P.; Krivokhizhin, G.V.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Maximov, A.N.; Medved, K.S.; Nozdrin, A.A.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.

    2005-05-27

    First measurements of the Collins and Sivers asymmetries of charged hadrons produced in deep-inelastic scattering of muons on a transversely polarized {sup 6}LiD target are presented. The data were taken in 2002 with the COMPASS spectrometer using the muon beam of the CERN SPS at 160 GeV/c. The Collins asymmetry turns out to be compatible with zero, as does the measured Sivers asymmetry within the present statistical errors.

  12. Distribution of Linearly Polarized Gluons and Elliptic Azimuthal Anisotropy in Deep Inelastic Scattering Dijet Production at High Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, Adrian; Lappi, Tuomas; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    We determine the distribution of linearly polarized gluons of a dense target at small x by solving the Balitsky-Jalilian-Marian-Iancu-McLerran-Weigert-Leonidov-Kovner rapidity evolution equations. From these solutions, we estimate the amplitude of ˜cos 2 ϕ azimuthal asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering dijet production at high energies. We find sizable long-range in rapidity azimuthal asymmetries with a magnitude in the range of v2=⟨cos 2 ϕ ⟩˜10 % .

  13. Evaluation of ZnO(Ga)Coatings as Alpha Particle Transducers Within a Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J. T.; Neal, J. S.; Cooper, J. C.; Koltick, D. S.

    2002-05-02

    We report investigations and preliminary results from efforts to develop a recoil alpha particle detector for use in a portable neutron generator. The associated particle sealed tube neutron generator (APSTNG) will be used as an interrogation source for the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS). With the emission of 14.1 MeV neutrons produced by the D-T reaction, associated 3.5 MeV alpha particles are emitted. These neutrons and alphas may then be correlated in time and direction, thus effectively ''tagging'' the neutrons of interest for subsequent use as an active nuclear materials interrogation source. The alpha particle detector uses a ZnO(Ga) scintillator coating applied to a fiber optic face plate. Gallium-doped zinc oxide is a fast (1.5 ns decay time), inorganic scintillator with a high melting point (1975C) and an absolute light yield of 1.5% of NaI(Tl). The scintillator is coated with a thin layer of nickel in order to screen out light produced in the tube and scattered deuterons and tritons. This coating also serves to prevent the buildup of charge on the detector surface. Results to date indicate promise as an effective alpha particle detector for the APSTNG for future use in the NMIS.

  14. Alpha particle analysis using PEARLS spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McKlveen, J.W.; Klingler, G.W.; McDowell, W.J.; Case, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    Alpha particle assay by conventional plate-counting methods is difficult because chemical separation, tracer techniques, and/or self-absorption losses in the final sample may cause either non-reproducible results or create unacceptable errors. PEARLS (Photon-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation) Spectrometry is an attractive alternative since radionuclides may be extracted into a scintillator in which there would be no self-absorption or geometry problems and in which up to 100% chemical recovery and counting efficiency is possible. Sample preparation may include extraction of the alpha emitter of interest by a specific organic-phase-soluble compound directly into the liquid scintillator. Detection electronics use energy and pulse-shape discrimination to provide discrete alpha spectra and virtual absence of beta and gamma backgrounds. Backgrounds on the order of 0.01 cpm are readily achievable. Accuracy and reproducibility are typically in the 100 +-1% range. Specific procedures have been developed for gross alpha, uranium, plutonium, thorium, and polonium assay. This paper will review liquid scintillation alpha counting methods and reference some of the specific applications. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Demonstrating Photoluminescence from Au is Electronic Inelastic Light Scattering of a Plasmonic Metal: The Origin of SERS Backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Temperature-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is used to investigate the photoluminescence and background continuum always present in SERS but whose origin remains controversial. Both the Stokes and anti-Stokes background is found to be dominated by inelastic light scattering (ILS) from the electrons in the noble metal nanostructures supporting the plasmon modes. The anti-Stokes background is highly temperature dependent and is shown to be related to the thermal occupation of electronic states within the metal via a simple model. This suggests new routes to enhance SERS sensitivities, as well as providing ubiquitous and calibrated real-time temperature measurements of nanostructures. PMID:25734469

  16. Distributions of charged hadrons observed in deep-inelastic muon-deuterium scattering at 490 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G. E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H.-J.; Vidal, M.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Venkataramania, H.; Wilson, Richard; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1991-11-01

    Longitudinal and transverse momentum spectra of final state hadrons produced in deep-inelastic muon-deuterium scattering at incident muon energy of 490 GeV have been measured up to a hadronic center of mass energy of 30 GeV. The longitudinal distributions agree well with data from earlier muon-nucleon scattering experiments; these distributions tend to increase in steepness as the center of mass energy increases. Comparisons with e+e- data at comparable center of mass energies indicate slight differences. The transverse momentum distributions show an increase in mean pT2 with an increase in the center of mass energy.

  17. Charm-Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Edmond L.; Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Liu, Ze Long; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-05-01

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of charm-quark production in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering, with full charm-quark mass dependence. The next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are found to be comparable in size to the next-to-leading order corrections in certain kinematic regions. We compare our predictions with data on dimuon production in (anti)neutrino scattering from a heavy nucleus. Our results can be used to improve the extraction of the parton distribution function of a strange quark in the nucleon.

  18. Charm-Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD.

    PubMed

    Berger, Edmond L; Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Liu, Ze Long; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-05-27

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of charm-quark production in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering, with full charm-quark mass dependence. The next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are found to be comparable in size to the next-to-leading order corrections in certain kinematic regions. We compare our predictions with data on dimuon production in (anti)neutrino scattering from a heavy nucleus. Our results can be used to improve the extraction of the parton distribution function of a strange quark in the nucleon. PMID:27284650

  19. Simultaneous, noninvasive observation of elastic scattering, fluorescence and inelastic scattering as a monitor of blood flow and hematocrit in human fingertip capillary beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaiken, Joseph; Goodisman, Jerry; Deng, Bin; Bussjager, Rebecca J.; Shaheen, George

    2009-09-01

    We report simultaneous observation of elastic scattering, fluorescence, and inelastic scattering from in vivo near-infrared probing of human skin. Careful control of the mechanical force needed to obtain reliable registration of in vivo tissue with an appropriate optical system allows reproducible observation of blood flow in capillary beds of human volar side fingertips. The time dependence of the elastically scattered light is highly correlated with that of the combined fluorescence and Raman scattered light. We interpret this in terms of turbidity (the impeding effect of red blood cells on optical propagation to and from the scattering centers) and the changes in the volume percentages of the tissues in the irradiated volume with normal homeostatic processes. By fitting to a model, these measurements may be used to determine volume fractions of plasma and RBCs.

  20. Fully quantum state-resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) + Kr: differential cross sections and product rotational alignment.

    PubMed

    Brouard, M; Chadwick, H; Gordon, S D S; Hornung, B; Nichols, B; Kłos, J; Aoiz, F J; Stolte, S

    2014-10-28

    Fully quantum state selected and resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) by krypton has been investigated. Initial Λ-doublet state selection is achieved using an inhomogeneous hexapole electric field. Differential cross sections and even-moment polarization dependent differential cross sections have been obtained at a collision energy of 514 cm(-1) for both spin-orbit and parity conserving and changing collisions. Experimental results are compared with those obtained from quantum scattering calculations and are shown to be in very good agreement. Hard shell quantum scattering calculations are also performed to determine the effects of the different parts of the potential on the scattering dynamics. Comparisons are also made with the NO(X) + Ar system. PMID:25362298

  1. Fully quantum state-resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) + Kr: Differential cross sections and product rotational alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Brouard, M. Chadwick, H.; Gordon, S. D. S.; Hornung, B.; Nichols, B.; Kłos, J.; Aoiz, F. J.; Stolte, S.

    2014-10-28

    Fully quantum state selected and resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) by krypton has been investigated. Initial Λ-doublet state selection is achieved using an inhomogeneous hexapole electric field. Differential cross sections and even-moment polarization dependent differential cross sections have been obtained at a collision energy of 514 cm{sup −1} for both spin-orbit and parity conserving and changing collisions. Experimental results are compared with those obtained from quantum scattering calculations and are shown to be in very good agreement. Hard shell quantum scattering calculations are also performed to determine the effects of the different parts of the potential on the scattering dynamics. Comparisons are also made with the NO(X) + Ar system.

  2. Contemporary Issues in Ultra-Low Alpha Particle Counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael

    Single-Event Upsets (SEU) in CMOS devices are caused by the passage of ionizing radiation either from terrestrial neutrons or from the natural alpha particle radiation within the materials surrounding the transistors. Interactions of the neutrons with the silicon cause spallation reactions which emit energetic highly ionizing elements. Alpha particles, on the other hand, can upset the devices through direct ionization rather than through a nuclear reaction as in the case of the neutrons. In order to minimize the alpha-particle component of SEU, the radiation from the materials within a distance 100 μm of the transistors, currently needs to have an alpha particle emissivity of less than 2 alpha particles per khr per square centimeter. Many alpha particle detectors have background levels that are larger than this, which can make these measurements inaccurate and time consuming. This talk will discuss what is involved in making alpha particle emissivity measurements of materials used in the semiconductor industry using an ultra-low background commercially-available ionization detector. Detector calibration and efficiency, radon adsorption on the samples, and the effect of surface charge on electrically insulating samples will be discussed.

  3. Alpha particle destabilization of the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-10-01

    The high frequency, low mode number toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) are shown to be driven unstable by the circulating and/or trapped {alpha}-particles through the wave-particle resonances. Satisfying the resonance condition requires that the {alpha}-particle birth speed v{sub {alpha}} {ge} v{sub A}/2{vert bar}m-nq{vert bar}, where v{sub A} is the Alfven speed, m is the poloidal model number, and n is the toroidal mode number. To destabilize the TAE modes, the inverse Landau damping associated with the {alpha}-particle pressure gradient free energy must overcome the velocity space Landau damping due to both the {alpha}-particles and the core electrons and ions. The growth rate was studied analytically with a perturbative formula derived from the quadratic dispersion relation, and numerically with the aid of the NOVA-K code. Stability criteria in terms of the {alpha}-particle beta {beta}{sub {alpha}}, {alpha}-particle pressure gradient parameter ({omega}{sub {asterisk}}/{omega}{sub A}) ({omega}{sub {asterisk}} is the {alpha}-particle diamagnetic drift frequency), and (v{sub {alpha}}/v{sub A}) parameters will be presented for TFTR, CIT, and ITER tokamaks. The volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold for TAE instability also depends sensitively on the core electron and ion temperature. Typically the volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold is in the order of 10{sup {minus}4}. Typical growth rates of the n=1 TAE mode can be in the order of 10{sup {minus}2}{omega}{sub A}, where {omega}{sub A}=v{sub A}/qR. Other types of global Alfven waves are stable in D-T tokamaks due to toroidal coupling effects.

  4. Electronic Structure of Doped Lanthanum Cuprates Studied with Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.P.; Ellis, D.S.; Kim, J.; Zhang, H.; Gu, G.; Komiya, S.; Ando, Y.; Casa, D.; Gog, T.; Kim, Y.-J.

    2011-02-24

    We report a comprehensive Cu K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) investigation of La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (LSCO) for 0 {le} x {le} 0.35, stripe-ordered La{sub 1.875}Ba{sub 0.125}CuO{sub 4} (LBCO), and La{sub 2}Cu{sub 0.96}Ni{sub 0.04}O{sub 4} (LCNO) crystals. The RIXS spectra measured at three high-symmetry momentum-transfer (q) positions are compared as a function of doping and for the different dopants. The spectra in the energy range 1-6 eV can be described with three broad peaks, which evolve systematically with increased doping. The most systematic trend was observed for q = ({pi},0) corresponding to the zone boundary. As hole doping increased, the spectral weight transfer from high energies to low energies is nearly linear with x at this q. We interpret the peaks as interband transitions in the context of existing band models for this system, assigning them to Zhang-Rice band {yields} upper Hubbard band, lower-lying band {yields} upper Hubbard band, and lower-lying band {yields} Zhang-Rice band transitions. The spectrum of stripe-ordered LBCO was also measured, and found to be identical to the correspondingly doped LSCO, except for a relative enhancement of the near-infrared peak intensity at {approx}1.5-1.7 eV. The temperature dependence of this near-infrared peak in LBCO was more pronounced than for other parts of the spectrum, continuously decreasing in intensity as the temperature was raised from 25 to 300 K. Finally, we find that 4% Ni substitution in the Cu site has a similar effect on the spectra as does Sr substitution in the La site.

  5. Inelastic neutron scattering studies of the spin and lattice dynamics in iron arsenide compounds.

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, R.; Rosenkranz, S.; Goremychkin, E. A.; Christianson, A. D.

    2009-03-20

    Although neutrons do not couple directly to the superconducting order parameter, they have nevertheless played an important role in advancing our understanding of the pairing mechanism and the symmetry of the superconducting energy gap in the iron arsenide compounds. Measurements of the spin and lattice dynamics have been performed on non-superconducting 'parent' compounds based on the LaFeAsO ('1111') and BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} ('122') crystal structures, and on electron and hole-doped superconducting compounds, using both polycrystalline and single crystal samples. Neutron measurements of the phonon density-of-state, subsequently supported by single crystal inelastic X-ray scattering, are in good agreement with ab initio calculations, provided the magnetism of the iron atoms is taken into account. However, when combined with estimates of the electron-phonon coupling, the predicted superconducting transition temperatures are less than 1 K, making a conventional phononic mechanism for superconductivity highly unlikely. Measurements of the spin dynamics within the spin density wave phase of the parent compounds show evidence of strongly dispersive spin waves with exchange interactions consistent with the observed magnetic order and a large anisotropy gap. Antiferromagnetic fluctuations persist in the normal phase of the superconducting compounds, but they are more diffuse. Below T{sub c}, there is evidence in three '122' compounds that these fluctuations condense into a resonant spin excitation at the antiferromagnetic wavevector with an energy that scales with T{sub c}. Such resonances have been observed in the high-T{sub c} copper oxides and a number of heavy fermion superconductors, where they are considered to be evidence of d-wave symmetry. In the iron arsenides, they also provide evidence of unconventional superconductivity, but a comparison with ARPES and other measurements, which indicate that the gaps are isotropic, suggests that the symmetry is more likely

  6. Inelastic Neutron Scattering Studies of the Spin and Lattice Dynamics inIron Arsenide Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, Andrew D; Osborn, R.; Rosenkranz, Stephen; Goremychkin, E. A.

    2009-01-01

    Although neutrons do not couple directly to the superconducting order parameter, they have nevertheless played an important role in advancing our understanding of the pairing mechanism and the symmetry of the superconducting energy gap in the iron arsenide compounds. Measurements of the spin and lattice dynamics have been performed on non-superconducting 'parent' compounds based on the LaFeAsO ('1111') and BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} ('122') crystal structures, and on electron and hole-doped superconducting compounds, using both polycrystalline and single crystal samples. Neutron measurements of the phonon density-of-state, subsequently supported by single crystal inelastic X-ray scattering, are in good agreement with ab initio calculations, provided the magnetism of the iron atoms is taken into account. However, when combined with estimates of the electron-phonon coupling, the predicted superconducting transition temperatures are less than 1 K, making a conventional phononic mechanism for superconductivity highly unlikely. Measurements of the spin dynamics within the spin density wave phase of the parent compounds show evidence of strongly dispersive spin waves with exchange interactions consistent with the observed magnetic order and a large anisotropy gap. Antiferromagnetic fluctuations persist in the normal phase of the superconducting compounds, but they are more diffuse. Below T{sub c}, there is evidence in three '122' compounds that these fluctuations condense into a resonant spin excitation at the antiferromagnetic wavevector with an energy that scales with T{sub c}. Such resonances have been observed in the high-T{sub c} copper oxides and a number of heavy fermion superconductors, where they are considered to be evidence of d-wave symmetry. In the iron arsenides, they also provide evidence of unconventional superconductivity, but a comparison with ARPES and other measurements, which indicate that the gaps are isotropic, suggests that the symmetry is more likely

  7. Effect of alpha particles on Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-11-01

    An overview is given of the analytic structure for the linear theory of the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE), where multiple gap structures occur. A discussion is given of the alpha particle drive and the various dissipation mechanisms that can stabilize the system. A self-consistent calculation of the TAE mode, for a low-beta high-aspect-ratio plasma, indicates that though the alpha particle drive is comparable to the dissipation mechanisms, overall stability is still achieved for ignited ITER-like plasma. A brief discussion is given of the nonlinear theory for the TAE mode and how nonlinear alpha particle dynamics can be treated by mapping methods.

  8. Peripheral elastic and inelastic scattering of {sup 17,18}O on light targets at 12 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Carstoiu, F.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Trache, L.

    2015-02-24

    The elastic and inelastic scattering of {sup 17,18}O with light targets has been undertaken at 12 MeV/nucleon in order to determine the optical potentials needed for the transfer reaction {sup 13}C({sup 17}O,{sup 18}O){sup 12}C. Optical potentials in both incoming and outgoing channels have been determined in a single experiment. This transfer reaction was used to infer the direct capture rate to the {sup 17}F(p,γ){sup 18}Ne which is essential to estimate the production of {sup 18}F at stellar energies in ONe novae. We demonstrate the stability of the ANC method and OMP results using good quality elastic and inelastic scattering data with stable beams. The peripherality of our reaction is inferred from a semiclassical decomposition of the total scattering amplitude into barrier and internal barrier components. Comparison between elastic scattering of {sup 17}O, {sup 18}O and {sup 16}O projectiles is made.

  9. Transverse dynamics of water across the melting point: A parallel neutron and x-ray inelastic scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Cunsolo A.; Kodituwakku C.; Bencivenga, F.; Frontzek, M.; Leu, b.M.; Said, A.H.

    2012-05-29

    Joint inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering measurements have been performed on heavy water across the melting point. The spectra bear clear evidence of low- and high-frequency inelastic shoulders related to transverse and longitudinal modes, respectively. Upon increasing the momentum transfer, the spectral shape evolves from a viscoelastic regime, where the low-frequency mode is clearly over-damped, toward an elastic one where its propagation becomes instead allowed. The crossover between the two regimes occurs whenever both the characteristic frequency and the linewidth of the low-frequency mode match the inverse of the structural relaxation time. Furthermore, we observe that the frequency of the transverse mode undergoes a discontinuity across the melting, whose extent reduces upon increasing the exchanged momentum.

  10. Vibrational dynamics of plant light-harvesting complex LHC II investigated by quasi- and inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, Maksym; Irrgang, Klaus-Dieter; Rusevich, Leonid; Pieper, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Vibrational dynamics of the light-harvesting complex II (LHC II) from spinach was investigated by quasi- and inelastic neutron scattering (QENS and INS) at three different temperatures of 80, 160, and 285 K. QENS/INS spectra of solubilised LHC II and of the corresponding buffer solution were obtained separately and exhibit characteristic inelastic features. After subtraction of the buffer contribution, the INS spectrum of LHC II reveals a distinct Boson peak at ˜ 2.5 meV at 80 K that shifts towards lower energies if the temperature is increased to 285 K. This effect is interpreted in terms of a "softening" of the protein matrix along with the dynamical transition at ˜ 240 K. Our findings indicate that INS is a valuable method to obtain the density of vibrational states not only at cryogenic, but also at physiological temperatures.

  11. Phonon softening near the structural transition in BaFe2As2 observed by inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Niedziela, Jennifer L; Parshall, D; Lokshin, Konstantin A; Safa-Sefat, Athena; Alatas, A; Egami, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present the results of an inelastic x-ray scattering experiment detailing the behavior of the transverse acoustic [110] phonon in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} as a function of temperature. When cooling through the structural transition temperature, the transverse acoustic phonon energy is reduced from the value at room temperature, reaching a maximum shift near inelastic momentum transfer q = 0.1. This softening of the lattice results in a change of the symmetry from tetragonal to orthorhombic at the same temperature as the transition to long-range antiferromagnetic order. While the lattice distortion is minor, the anisotropy in the magnetic exchange constants in pnictide parent compounds is large. We suggest mechanisms of electron-phonon coupling to describe the interaction between the lattice softening and the onset of magnetic ordering.

  12. Combination of differential D∗± cross-section measurements in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Belousov, A.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Buniatyan, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Avila, K. B. Cantun; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Figiel, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hladky, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kiesling, C.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Morozov, A.; Muhammad Nasir, N.; Müller, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Paul, E.; Perez, E.; Perlanski, W.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Przybycien, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Šálek, D.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shushkevich, S.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Stanco, L.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Thompson, P. D.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Traynor, D.; Trofymov, A.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wegener, D.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Wünsch, E.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Žáček, J.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2015-09-01

    H1 and ZEUS have published single-differential cross sections for inclusive D ∗±-meson production in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from their respective final data sets. These cross sections are combined in the common visible phase-space region of photon virtuality Q 2 > 5 GeV2, electron inelasticity 0 .02 < y < 0 .7 and the D ∗± meson's transverse momentum p T( D ∗) > 1 .5 GeV and pseudorapidity | η( D ∗)| < 1 .5. The combination procedure takes into account all correlations, yielding significantly reduced experimental uncertainties. Double-differential cross sections d2 σ/d Q 2d y are combined with earlier D ∗± data, extending the kinematic range down to Q 2 > 1 .5 GeV2. Perturbative next-to-leading-order QCD predictions are compared to the results.

  13. Theory of inelastic multiphonon scattering and carrier capture by defects in semiconductors: Application to capture cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmparis, Georgios D.; Puzyrev, Yevgeniy S.; Zhang, X.-G.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-12-01

    Inelastic scattering and carrier capture by defects in semiconductors are the primary causes of hot-electron-mediated degradation of power devices, which holds up their commercial development. At the same time, carrier capture is a major issue in the performance of solar cells and light-emitting diodes. A theory of nonradiative (multiphonon) inelastic scattering by defects, however, is nonexistent, while the theory for carrier capture by defects has had a long and arduous history. Here we report the construction of a comprehensive theory of inelastic scattering by defects, with carrier capture being a special case. We distinguish between capture under thermal equilibrium conditions and capture under nonequilibrium conditions, e.g., in the presence of an electrical current or hot carriers where carriers undergo scattering by defects and are described by a mean free path. In the thermal-equilibrium case, capture is mediated by a nonadiabatic perturbation Hamiltonian, originally identified by Huang and Rhys and by Kubo, which is equal to linear electron-phonon coupling to first order. In the nonequilibrium case, we demonstrate that the primary capture mechanism is within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (adiabatic transitions), with coupling to the defect potential inducing Franck-Condon electronic transitions, followed by multiphonon dissipation of the transition energy, while the nonadiabatic terms are of secondary importance (they scale with the inverse of the mass of typical atoms in the defect complex). We report first-principles density-functional-theory calculations of the capture cross section for a prototype defect using the projector-augmented wave, which allows us to employ all-electron wave functions. We adopt a Monte Carlo scheme to sample multiphonon configurations and obtain converged results. The theory and the results represent a foundation upon which to build engineering-level models for hot-electron degradation of power devices and the performance

  14. Thulium-169 neutron inelastic scattering cross section measurements via the (169)Tm(n,n'gamma) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Young June

    1999-11-01

    A neutron inelastic scattering study for low-lying states of thulium-169 below 1 MeV has been pursued by the detection of gamma rays from the 169Tm(n,n'γ) reaction. The inelastic level cross sections, which are important to obtain nuclear potential parameters and to understand reaction mechanisms, were obtained in this study. Incident neutrons were generated by bombarding a metallic lithium target with protons from the Lowell Van de Graaff accelerator. A germanium detector was used for gamma-ray observation. Excitation functions were measured from 0.2 to 1 MeV in 50 keV intervals at a scattering angle of 125°. Gamma-ray production cross sections were obtained for 37 observed transitions from 16 levels. Gamma-ray angular distributions from 35° to 135°, in 10° steps were measured at a neutron energy of 750 keV. The angular distributions were fitted with Legendre polynomials of even (up to fourth) order. Neutron inelastic level cross sections were inferred from the excitation functions and the angular distributions. Because cross-section data from previous experimental or theoretical work were not available, no direct comparison with previous work was made. A comparison of the magnitude and behavior of the (n,inelastic) cross section for thulium with those of neighboring odd-A nuclei indicated reasonable agreement. A classical model for angular momentum transfer indicates that states with spin >=/(+) may be excited only through the compound nucleus process, but for states with spin <=/(-) compound nucleus and direct interaction processes may both participate in the excitation.

  15. Turbulent transport of alpha particles in reactor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2006-11-15

    A systematic study of the behavior of energetic ions in reactor plasmas is presented. Using self-consistent gyrokinetic simulations, in concert with an analytic asymptotic theory, it is found that alpha particles can interact significantly with core ion-temperature-gradient turbulence. Specifically, the per-particle flux of energetic alphas is comparable to the per-particle flux of thermal species (deuterium or helium ash). This finding opposes the conventional wisdom that energetic ions, because of their large gyroradii, do not interact with the turbulence. For the parameters studied, a turbulent modification of the alpha-particle density profile appears to be stronger than turbulent modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile. Crude estimates indicate that the alpha density modification, which is directly proportional to the core turbulence intensity, could be in the range of 15% at midradius in a reactor. The corresponding modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile is predicted to be smaller (in the 1% range)

  16. Alpha particle nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) for device applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jun, Insoo; Xapsos, Michael A.; Messenger, Scott R.; Burke, Edward A.; Walters, Robert J.; Summers, Geoff; Jordan, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    A method developed for the proton NIEL calculation previously is extended to incident alpha particles in this study: ZBL screened potential for Coulomb interactions and MCNPX 'thin target approximation' for nuclear interactions.

  17. Alpha-particle effects on ballooning flute modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Andrushchenko, Z.N.; Bijko, A.Y.; Cheremnykh, O.K. )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper a more accurate dispersion equation for ideal ballooning flute modes in a plasma with alpha particles is obtained. It is shown that circulating and trapped alpha particles generate the eigenbranches of the mode oscillations with frequencies {omega} {approx lt} {omega}{sub *i}, where {omega}{sub *i}, is the ion drift frequency. The relevant growth rates and frequencies are found. It is ascertained that in the frequency range {omega}{sub *i} {lt} {omega} {lt} {bar {omega}{sub Db}}, where {bar {omega}{sub Db}} is the magnetic drift frequency average over a bounce period, trapped alpha particles may generate forced oscillations that influence the ideal ballooning flute mode stability boundary. It is shown that the stability may be improved for certain plasma parameters and trapped alpha-particle pressures.

  18. Full orbit calculation for lost alpha particle measurement on ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Funaki, D.; Isobe, M.; Nishiura, M.; Sato, Y.; Okamoto, A.; Kobuchi, T.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.

    2008-10-15

    An orbit following calculation code with full gyromotion under the ITER magnetic field configuration has been developed to investigate escaping alpha particle orbits in ITER and to determine the geometrical arrangement for alpha particle detection. The code contained the full geometrical information of the first wall panels. It was carefully investigated whether an alpha particle escaping from the plasma through the last closed flux surface does not touch or intersect the first wall boundary before reaching the detection point. Candidates of blanket module modification have been studied to achieve effective measurement geometry for escaping alpha particle detection. The calculations showed that direct orbit loss and banana diffusion can be detected with a probe head recessed from the first wall surface.

  19. Shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.; Santoro, R. T.; Barish, J.; Claiborne, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    The available information on the shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles is summarized. The emphasis is placed on shielding against Van Allen belt protons and against solar-flare protons and alpha particles, but information on shielding against galactic cosmic rays is also presented. The approximation methods for use by nonexperts in the space shielding field are those that are standard in the space shielding literature.

  20. Variation of the track etch rates of alpha-particle trajectory in PADC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, M. F.; Hegazy, T. M.; Seddik, U.; Morsy, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    The formation of etched tracks in solid-state nuclear track detectors is usually described by assuming an unequivocal correlation of the etch-rate ratio with the energy loss of charged particles. For alpha particles, this assumption could be verified within the scatter of the experimental data. In this article, the dependence of the depth (x) on the track etch rate (V-T) was determined experimentally by track length measurement. It is found that the track etch rate as a function of the depth within the detector follows the Bragg curve. The track etch rate has been found to be described by a generalization of the restricted energy loss, in good approximation along the trajectories of alpha particles.

  1. Inelastic electron scattering off a quantum dot in the cotunneling regime: The signature of mesoscopic Stoner instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repin, E. V.; Burmistrov, I. S.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the inelastic electron-scattering cross section off a metallic quantum dot close to the Stoner instability. We focus on the regime of strong Coulomb blockade in which the scattering cross section is dominated by the cotunneling processes. For large enough exchange interaction, the quantum dot acquires a finite total spin in the ground state. In this so-called mesoscopic Stoner instability regime, we find that at low enough temperatures, the inelastic scattering cross section (including the contribution due to an elastic electron spin flip) for an electron with an energy close to the chemical potential is different from the case of a magnetic impurity with the same spin. This difference stems from (i) the presence of low-lying many-body states of a quantum dot and (ii) the correlations of the tunneling amplitudes. Our results provide a possible explanation for the absence of the dephasing rate saturation at low temperatures in a recent experiment [N. Teneh, A. Yu. Kuntsevich, V. M. Pudalov, and M. Reznikov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 226403 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.226403] in which the existence of local spin droplets in disordered electron liquid has been unraveled.

  2. Structure of low-lying states of {sup 10,11}C from proton elastic and inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Jouanne, C.; Lapoux, V.; Auger, F.; Alamanos, N.; Drouart, A.; Gillibert, A.; Lobo, G.; Musumarra, A.; Nalpas, L.; Pollacco, E.; Sida, J.-L.; Trotta, M.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Khan, E.; Suomijaervi, T.; Zerguerras, T.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Lagoyannis, A.; Pakou, A.

    2005-07-01

    To probe the ground state and transition densities, elastic and inelastic scattering on a proton target were measured in inverse kinematics for the unstable {sup 10}C and {sup 11}C nuclei at 45.3 and 40.6 MeV/nucleon, respectively. The detection of the recoil proton was performed by the MUST telescope array, in coincidence with a wall of scintillators for the quasiprojectile. The differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering to the first excited states are compared to the optical model calculations performed within the framework of the microscopic nucleon-nucleus Jeukenne-Lejeune-Mahaux potential. Elastic scattering is sensitive to the matter-root-mean square radius found to be 2.42{+-}0.1 and 2.33{+-}0.1 fm, for {sup 10,11}C, respectively. The transition densities from cluster and mean-field models are tested, and the cluster model predicts the correct order of magnitude of cross sections for the transitions of both isotopes. Using the Bohr-Mottelson prescription, a profile for the {sup 10}C transition density from the 0{sup +} ground to the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state is deduced from the data. The corresponding neutron transition matrix element is extracted: M{sub n}=5.51{+-}1.09 fm{sup 2}.

  3. Measurement of the longitudinal deuteron spin-structure function in deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, J.M.

    1996-09-01

    Experiment E143 at SLAC performed deep-inelastic scattering measurements with polarized electrons incident on polarized protons and deuterons. The data for the beam energy of 29 GeV cover the kinematical range of x{sub Bj} > 0.03 and 1 < Q{sup 2} < 12 GeV{sup 2}. From these data, the spin-dependent structure functions g{sub 1} were determined. This dissertation describes the experiment and its analysis and discusses the results. The measured integral of g{sub 1}{sup d} over x from x = 0 to x = 1 is {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup d} = 0.046 {+-} 0.003 (stat){+-}0.004 (syst) at Q{sup 2} = 3 GeV{sup 2} and disagrees by more than three standard deviations with the prediction of the Ellis-Jaffe, sum rule. The data suggest that the quark contribution to the nucleon helicity is 0.35 {+-} 0.05. From the proton data of the same experiment, the integral over the proton spin-structure functional g{sub 1}{sup d} was determined to be {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p} = 0.127 {+-} 0.003(stat){+-}0.008(syst). By Combining the deuteron data with the proton data, the integral {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup n} was extracted as {minus}0.027 {+-} 0.008 (stat){+-}0.010 (syst). The integral {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p} {minus} {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup n} is 0.154{+-}0.010(stat) {+-}0.016 (syst) according to the E143 analysis. This result agrees with the important Bjorken sum rule of 0.171 {+-} 0.009 at Q{sup 2} = 3 GeV{sup 2} within less than one standard deviation. Furthermore, results of a separate analysis involving GLAP evolution equations are shown. Data were also collected for beam energies of 16.2 and 9.7 GeV, Results for g{sub 1} at these energies are presented.

  4. Vibrational dynamics in dendridic oligoarylamines by Raman spectroscopy and incoherent inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Kulszewicz-Bajer, Irena; Louarn, Guy; Djurado, David; Skorka, Lukasz; Szymanski, Marek; Mevellec, Jean Yves; Rols, Stephane; Pron, Adam

    2014-05-15

    Vibrational dynamics in triarylamine dendrimers was studied in a complementary way by Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopies and incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (IINS). Three molecules were investigated, namely, unsubstituted triarylamine dendrimer of the first generation and two dendrimers of the first and second generation, substituted in the crown with butyl groups. To facilitate the assignment of the observed IR and Raman modes as well as the IINS peaks, vibrational models, based on the general valence force field method (GVFF), were calculated for all three compounds studied. A perfect consistency between the calculated and experimental results was found. Moreover, an important complementarity of the vibrational spectroscopies and IINS was established for the investigated dendrimers. The IINS peaks originating mainly from the C-H motions were not restricted by particular selection rules and only dependent on the IINS cross section. To the contrary, Raman and IR bands were imposed by the selection rules and the local geometry of the dendrimers yielding mainly C-C and C-N deformation modes with those of C-H nature of much lower intensity. Raman spectroscopy was also applied to the studies of the oxidation of dendrimers to their cationic forms. A strong Raman resonance effect was observed, since the spectra of the studied compounds, registered at different levels of their oxidation, strongly depended on the position of the excitation line with respect to their electronic spectrum. In particular, the blue (458 nm) excitation line turned out to be insensitive toward the cationic forms yielding very limited spectral information. To the contrary, the use of the red (647 nm) and infrared (1064 nm) excitation lines allowed for an unambiguous monitoring of the spectral changes in dendrimers oxidized to nominally monocationic and tricationic states. The analysis of oxidation-induced spectral changes in the tricationic state indicated that the charge storage

  5. Low energy excitations in iridates studied with Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuerong

    2013-03-01

    In the iridium oxides, the strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) of the 5d iridium electrons entangles the orbital and spin degrees of freedom, providing opportunities for exotic magnetic states with highly anisotropic exchange interactions. At the same time, the spatially extended 5d electrons are expected to have much stronger hybridization with the oxygen 2p orbitals, comparing with that in 3d transition element compounds. Both factors make crystal symmetry and local environment crucial in determining the electronic and magnetic properties of the iridates. We present here our resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) studies of a number of octahedrally coordinated iridates with special structures, exploring these effects. In particular, for the 1-D spin 1/2 chain compound, Sr3CuIrO6, the wavefunction of the hole in the t2g manifold was reconstructed based on the RIXS spectra. Our results show that it is significantly modified from the isotropic shape expected for Jeff = 1 / 2 states in the strong SOC limit, due to the distortion of the oxygen octahedral cage. This distortion is comparable to, or smaller than, that present in most iridates and thus this work emphasizes the importance of local symmetry for the iridate families. Further, the magnetic excitations of this material were also measured. A large gap of ~30 meV, was found, comparable to the magnetic dispersion bandwidth. This is in contrast to the gapless dispersion expected for linear chain with isotropic Heisenberg exchange interaction. We also studied Na4Ir3O8 which has a hyperkagome lattice, and is a candidate quantum spin liquid. Here, a low energy continuum is observed below the d-d excitations. Optical conductivity measurements performed on the same sample and polarization dependence of the RIXS signal suggest that these excitations are magnetic in origin, agreeing with the spin-liquid state prediction. The work at Brookhaven was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Materials Science

  6. Contribution of twist-3 multigluon correlation functions to single spin asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Beppu, Hiroo; Yoshida, Shinsuke; Koike, Yuji; Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2010-09-01

    As a possible source of the single transverse-spin asymmetry, we study the contribution from purely gluonic correlation represented by the twist-3 ''three-gluon correlation'' functions in the transversely polarized nucleon. We first define a complete set of the relevant three-gluon correlation functions, and then derive its contribution to the twist-3 single-spin-dependent cross section for the D-meson production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, which is relevant to determine the three-gluon correlations. Our cross-section formula differs from the corresponding result in the literature, and the origin of the discrepancy is clarified.

  7. The single particle dynamics of iodine in the Sachs-Teller regime: An inelastic x-ray scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Izzo, M. G.; Bencivenga, F.; Di Fonzo, S.; Cunsolo, A.; Verbeni, R.; De Lorenzo, R. Gimenez

    2010-09-28

    The high frequency dynamics of liquid iodine has been investigated by deep inelastic x-ray scattering at exchanged wave-vectors (q) ranging from 2.5 to 15 A{sup -1}. The experimental data have been analyzed in the frame of the Sachs-Teller theory of the molecular spectrum while accounting for final state corrections to the lineshape. The performed data analysis carries insights on physical quantities as relevant as the mean rototranslational kinetic energy and the mean square Laplacian of the intermolecular potential. In both cases the measured values are consistent with corresponding theoretical expectations.

  8. Nuclear dynamics in the core-excited state of aqueous ammonia probed by resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Weinhardt, L.; Weigand, M.; Fuchs, O.; Baer, M.; Blum, M.; Denlinger, J. D.; Yang, W.; Umbach, E.; Heske, C.

    2011-09-01

    The electronic structure of aqueous NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} has been investigated using resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering. Spectral features of different processes involving nuclear dynamics in the core-excited state can be identified. When exciting into the lowest core-excited state, we find a strong isotope effect and clear evidence for ultrafast proton dynamics. Furthermore, a strong vibronic coupling is observed and, in the case of aqueous NH{sub 3}, a vibrational fine structure can be resolved.

  9. Measurement of diffractive production of D ∗±(2010) mesons in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekanov, S.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; De Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Crittenden, J.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Kind, O.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Renner, R.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Bailey, D. S.; Brook, N. H.; Cole, J. E.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Robins, S.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Wing, M.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Helbich, M.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowal, M.; Kowalski, T.; Mindur, B.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Kotański, A.; Słomiński, W.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Chiochia, V.; Dannheim, D.; Derrick, M.; Drews, G.; Fourletova, J.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Geiser, A.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Gutsche, O.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hillert, S.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labes, H.; Lelas, D.; Löhr, B.; Mankel, R.; Martínez, M.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Pellmann, I.-A.; Petrucci, M. C.; Polini, A.; Raval, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Surrow, B.; Wessoleck, H.; Wichmann, R.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Lopez-Duran Viani, A.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Genta, C.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Coppola, N.; Raach, H.; Bell, M.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Glasman, C.; Hanlon, S.; Lee, S. W.; Lupi, A.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Gialas, I.; Bodmann, B.; Carli, T.; Holm, U.; Klimek, K.; Krumnack, N.; Lohrmann, E.; Milite, M.; Salehi, H.; Stonjek, S.; Wick, K.; Ziegler, A.; Ziegler, Ar; Collins-Tooth, C.; Foudas, C.; Gonçalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Metlica, F.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Lim, H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; González, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Vázquez, M.; Barbi, M.; Bertolin, A.; Corriveau, F.; Ochs, A.; Padhi, S.; Stairs, D. G.; St-Laurent, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Bashkirov, V.; Danilov, P.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Maddox, E.; Pellegrino, A.; Schagen, S.; Tassi, E.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Brümmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Ferrando, J.; Grzelak, G.; Matsushita, T.; Rigby, M.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Parenti, A.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Heaphy, E. A.; Oh, B. Y.; Saull, P. R. B.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Heusch, C.; Park, I. H.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Kohno, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Matsuzawa, K.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Mirea, A.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Butterworth, J. M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; Lightwood, M. S.; Loizides, J. H.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Smalska, B.; Sztuk, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, A.; Ukleja, J.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Eisenberg, Y.; Gladilin, L. K.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Kçira, D.; Lammers, S.; Li, L.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Straub, P. B.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Fourletov, S.; Menary, S.; Soares, M.; Standage, J.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2002-10-01

    Diffractive production of D∗±(2010) mesons in deep inelastic scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 44.3 pb-1. Diffractive charm production is identified by the presence of a large rapidity gap in the final state of events in which a D∗±(2010) meson is reconstructed in the decay channel D∗+→(D0→K-π+)π+s (+ charge conjugate). Differential cross sections when compared with theoretical predictions indicate the importance of gluons in such diffractive interactions.

  10. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometer with 25meV resolution at the Cu K -edge

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ketenoglu, Didem; Harder, Manuel; Klementiev, Konstantin; Upton, Mary; Taherkhani, Mehran; Spiwek, Manfred; Dill, Frank-Uwe; Wille, Hans-Christian; Yavaş, Hasan

    2015-06-27

    An unparalleled resolution is reported with an inelastic X-ray scattering instrument at the CuK-edge. Based on a segmented concave analyzer, featuring single-crystal quartz (SiO2) pixels, the spectrometer delivers a resolution near 25meV (FWHM) at 8981eV. Besides the quartz analyzer, the performance of the spectrometer relies on a four-bounce Si(553) high-resolution monochromator and focusing Kirkpatrick–Baez optics. The measured resolution agrees with the ray-tracing simulation of an ideal spectrometer. The performance of the spectrometer is demonstrated by reproducing the phonon dispersion curve of a beryllium single-crystal.

  11. Next-to-leading order weighted Sivers asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering: three-gluon correlator

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Lingyun; Prokudin, Alexei; Kang, Zhong-Bo; Vitev, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    We study the three-gluon correlation function contribution to the Sivers asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. We first establish the matching between the usual twist-3 collinear factorization approach and transverse momentum dependent factorization formalism for the moderate transverse momentum region. We then derive the so-called coefficient functions used in the usual TMD evolution formalism. Finally, we perform the next-to-leading order calculation for the transverse-momentum-weighted spin-dependent differential cross section, from which we identify the QCD collinear evolution of the twist-3 Qiu-Sterman function: the off-diagonal contribution from the three-gluon correlation functions.

  12. Neutron Emission Spectra from Inelastic Scattering on 58,60Ni with a White Neutron Source at FIGARO

    SciTech Connect

    Rochman, D.; Haight, R.C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Devlin, M.; Ethvignot, T.; Granier, T.; Grimes, S.M.; Talou, P.

    2005-05-24

    Neutron emission spectra from inelastic neutron scattering on natural nickel at the FIGARO facility have been measured by a double time-of-flight technique. The incident neutrons are produced from the spallation source of the Weapons Neutron Research facility, and their energies are determined by time of flight. The emitted neutrons and gamma rays are detected by 16 liquid scintillators and one high-resolution germanium or one barium-fluoride detector, respectively. The results for incident neutron energies from 2 to 10 MeV are compared with predictions of nuclear model calculations performed with the code EMPIRE-II. Finally, the level density parameters 'a' and ''{delta}'' are extracted.

  13. Ab initio calculations as a quantitative tool in the inelastic neutron scattering study of a single-molecule magnet analogue.

    PubMed

    Vonci, Michele; Giansiracusa, Marcus J; Gable, Robert W; Van den Heuvel, Willem; Latham, Kay; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S; Yu, Dehong; Mole, Richard A; Soncini, Alessandro; Boskovic, Colette

    2016-02-01

    Ab initio calculations carried out on the Tb analogue of the single-molecule magnet family Na9[Ln(W5O18)2] (Ln = Nd, Gd, Ho and Er) have allowed interpretation of the inelastic neutron scattering spectra. The combined experimental and theoretical approach sheds new light on the sensitivity of the electronic structure of the Tb(III) ground and excited states to small structural distortions from axial symmetry, thus revealing the subtle relationship between molecular geometry and magnetic properties of the two isostructural species that comprise the sample. PMID:26690503

  14. Encapsulation of paclitaxel into a bio-nanocomposite. A study combining inelastic neutron scattering to thermal analysis and infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Murillo L.; Orecchini, Andrea; Aguilera, Luis; Eckert, Juergen; Embs, Jan; Matic, Aleksander; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2015-01-01

    The anticancer drug paclitaxel was encapsulated into a bio-nanocomposite formed by magnetic nanoparticles, chitosan and apatite. The aim of this drug carrier is to provide a new perspective against breast cancer. The dynamics of the pure and encapsulated drug were investigated in order to verify possible molecular changes caused by the encapsulation, as well as to follow which interactions may occur between paclitaxel and the composite. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments were performed. These very preliminary results suggest the successful encapsulation of the drug.

  15. A setup for resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering on liquids at free electron laser light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Schreck, Simon; Foehlisch, Alexander; Eckert, Sebastian; Beye, Martin; Suljoti, Edlira; Weniger, Christian; Wernet, Philippe; Kalus, Christian; Nordlund, Dennis; Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J.; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.; Kennedy, Brian; and others

    2012-12-15

    We present a flexible and compact experimental setup that combines an in vacuum liquid jet with an x-ray emission spectrometer to enable static and femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements from liquids at free electron laser (FEL) light sources. We demonstrate the feasibility of this type of experiments with the measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source FEL facility. At the FEL we observed changes in the RIXS spectra at high peak fluences which currently sets a limit to maximum attainable count rate at FELs. The setup presented here opens up new possibilities to study the structure and dynamics in liquids.

  16. Resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering of CdS: a two-dimensional electronic structure map approach

    SciTech Connect

    Weinhardt, L.; Fuchs, O.; Fleszar, A.; Bar, M.; Blum, M.; Weigand, M.; Denlinger, J.D.; Yang, W.; Hanke, W.; Umbach, E.; Heske, C.

    2008-09-24

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) with soft x-rays is uniquely suited to study the elec-tronic structure of a variety of materials, but is currently limited by low (fluorescence yield) count rates. This limitation is overcome with a new high-transmission spectrometer that allows to measure soft x-ray RIXS"maps." The S L2,3 RIXS map of CdS is discussed and compared with density functional calculations. The map allows the extraction of decay channel-specific"absorp-tion spectra," giving detailed insight into the wave functions of occupied and unoccupied elec-tronic states.

  17. Theory of inelastic ion-atom scattering at low and intermediate energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, G. B.; Garcia, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are presented of inelastic energy loss and ionization phenomena associated with Ar(+)-Ar collisions at small distances of closest approach and for laboratory collision energies ranging from several keV to several hundred keV. Outer-shell excitations are handled statistically; inner-shell excitations are calculated from the viewpoint of quasidiabatic molecular orbital promotion. Auger electron yield, average state of ionization, and average inelastic energy loss are calculated per collision as a function of distance of closest approach of the collision partners for several laboratory collision energies. Average charge-state probabilities per collision partner are calculated as a function of the average inelastic energy loss per atom. It is shown that the structure in the data is due to the underlying structure in the inner-shell independent-electron quasimolecular promotion probabilities.

  18. The Effects of Alpha Particle Confinement on Burning Plasma Tokamak Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormley, Robert P.

    thermal stability of a fusion reactor are also discussed. Lastly, we calculate the alpha particle induced bootstrap current produced, while retaining the effects of slowing-down drag, pitch-angle scattering, and arbitrary aspect ratio. The alpha drift kinetic equation is solved for the alpha bootstrap current density; and the resulting expression inserted into a simple cylindrical Ampere's Law. In addition, the alpha bootstrap current is more rigorously solved, self-consistently, with the full 2-D Grad-Shafranov equilibrium equations for three currently conceived tokamaks: TPX, ITER-CDA and ITER-EDA. In particular, the effect of varying plasma Zeff on the alpha bootstrap current is investigated. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617 -253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.).

  19. Advanced in-situ measurement of soil carbon content using inelastic neutron scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurement and mapping of natural and anthropogenic variations in soil carbon stores is a critical component of any soil resource evaluation process. Emerging modalities for soil carbon analysis in the field is the registration of gamma rays from soil under neutron irradiation. The inelastic neutro...

  20. Soil carbon measurement using non-invasive inelastic neutron scattering technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid and accurate procedures are needed to not only quantify but also to assess changes in soil C due to changes in adopted management systems. Current procedures that are used to evaluate soil C are invasive, costly, and are time and labor intensive. Emerging technologies including Inelastic Neutr...