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Sample records for alpine tectonic evolution

  1. Complex tectonic and tectonostratigraphic evolution of an Alpine foreland basin: The western Duero Basin and the related Tertiary depressions of the NW Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-González, F.; Heredia, N.

    2011-04-01

    The tectonic and tectonostratigaphic evolution of foreland basins and related Tertiary depressions are the key to investigate deformation history and the uplifting of the continental lithosphere of the Alpine-Pyrenean Orogeny. The northern part of the Duero basin is the foreland basin of the Cantabrian Mountains, which are, in turn, the western part of the Pyrenean Orogen. We have studied the western sharp end of the Duero foreland basin, and its relation to the Tertiary deposits of the NW Iberian Peninsula and the topography evolution. In order to propose a coherent tectonic and tectonosedimentary model that could explain all Tertiary deposits, we have analysed the depositional environment, stratigraphic sequences, paleocurrents and established a correlation of the main outcrops. Besides, a detailed structural mapping of the Alpine structures that limit and affect the main Tertiary outcrops has been carried out. The Tertiary deposits of the NW Iberian Peninsula depressions are affected and fragmented by Alpine structures that limit their extensions and locations. The stratigraphic succession is similar in the NW Tertiary outcrops; they are mainly terrigenous and carbonated continental deposits formed by assemblage of alluvial fans developed at the mountains front, in arid or semiarid conditions. Three formations can be identified in the main depressions: Toral Fm, Santalla Fm and Médulas Fm. The NW Tertiary outcrops were the western deposits of the Duero foreland basin that surrounded the lateral termination of the Pyrenean Orogen. These deposits were fragmented and eroded by the subsequent uplift of the Galaico-Leoneses Mountains and the NE-SW strike-slip faults activity (broken foreland basin). Only the latest stages of some of these outcrops can be considered as intramontane basins as traditionally have been interpreted. The sedimentation started in the northeast (Oviedo-Infiesto) during the Eocene and migrated to the west (As Pontes) during the Late Oligocene

  2. Magnetic fabric study of rock deformation during alpine tectonic evolution on a cross section through the Eastern Alps (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, K.; Scholger, R.; Pueyo, E. L.

    2010-05-01

    Measurements of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) were carried out on samples from more than seventy sites collected in the Eastern Alps. The sites were taken alongside a North-South transect (about 15°30` East Longitude) from Scheibbs in the North to Kapfenberg in the South, comprising most of the Northern Calcareous Alps (NCA) nappes, Helvetic and Penninic Flysh units as well as the greywacke zone. Samples were taken in detail mostly in Mesozoic rocks of the NCA, from North to South: Bajuvaric (Frankenfels, Lunz, Sulzbach and Reisalpen nappes), Tirolic (Ötscher, Göller, Rotwald-Gindelstein nappes) and Juvavic (Mürzalpen nappe) system. Two to six sites per thrust sheet or nappe were analysed for a structural investigation of the relationship between magnetic fabric and tectonic strain. Standard paleomagnetic drill cores were taken. All measurements were performed in the Petrophysics and Paleomagnetic laboratories of the University of Leoben using AGICO MFK1-Kappabridge susceptibility system and a 2-G cryogenic magnetometer. Statistical evaluation of the AMS data was perfomed using the software package AGICO ANISOFT 4.2. (Chadima et al., 2009). Throughout the Eastern Alps transect distinct changes of the magnetic fabric are observed. Primary sedimentary fabrics and very low susceptibility values are dominant in most cases in the northernmost and southernmost part of the transect. Some inverse fabrics were found in few sites of the nappes and the percentage increases towards the south which might be related to tectonic events. Contrastingly, isotropic fabrics dominate in the middle part. The Helvetic and Penninic Flysh units yield in general weak oblate fabrics. A few sites show a tendency to inverse fabrics which indicate the presence of a certain amount of strain within this unit. The oblate fabrics of the Helvetic and Flysh units show either shallow NE dipping or slightly steeper SW dipping k1-axis orientation. Within the inverse fabrics, even

  3. Tectonic Evolution of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Roger J.

    1992-01-01

    The Final Technical Report on tectonic evolution of Mars is presented. Two papers and an abstract are included. Topics addressed include: scientific rationale and requirements for a global seismic network on Mars, permanent uplift in magmatic systems with application to the Tharsis Region of Mars, and the geophysical signal of the Martian global dichotomy.

  4. Alpine topography in the light of tectonic uplift and glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robl, Jörg; Prasicek, Günther; Hergarten, Stefan; Stüwe, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    In steady-state orogens, topographic gradients are expected to increase with elevation whereas the European Alps feature a transition from increasing to decreasing slopes. This peculiar pattern has been interpreted to reflect either the critical slope stability angle or a premature fluvial landscape but is also consistent with the glacial buzz-saw hypothesis. To disentangle the contributions of each of these principles we split the Alps into contiguous domains of structural units and analyze their slope-elevation distributions emphasizing glaciated and non-glaciated realms. In comparable structural units within the extent of the last glacial maximum (LGM) the transition from increasing to decreasing slopes is located at the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) of the LGM and we interpret this to be evidence for the impact of glacial erosion. Decay rates of glacial landforms towards steady-state slopes depend on lithological properties leading to a landscape characterized by different transient states. Beyond the LGM limits the slope-elevation distributions show local maxima as well, but these are located at varying altitudes implying a tectonic driver. This observation and data from surrounding basins suggests that at least parts of the European Alps experienced a pre-Pleistocene pulse of tectonic uplift. The resulting presence of premature low-gradient terrain above the ELA during the global cooling in Plio-Pleistocene times would have heavily influenced the onset and the extent of an alpine ice cap.

  5. Venus magmatic and tectonic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.; Hansen, V. L.

    1993-01-01

    Two years beyond the initial mapping by the Magellan spacecraft, hypotheses for the magmatic and tectonic evolution of Venus have become refined and focused. We present our view of these processes, attempting to synthesize aspects of a model for the tectonic and magmatic behavior of the planet. The ideas presented should be taken collectively as an hypothesis subject to further testing. The quintessence of our model is that shear and buoyancy forces in the upper boundary layer of mantle convection give rise to a spatially and temporally complex pattern of strain in a one-plate Venusian lithosphere and modulate the timing and occurrence of magmatism on a global basis.

  6. Tectonic evolution and paleogeography of Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, P.O.; Norton, I.O.; Chuchla, R.J. ); Leary, D.A. )

    1993-09-01

    The goal of this study was to use the tectonic framework of European craton to constrain our understanding of the sedimentary basins of Europe. An understanding of the amalgamation of the crustal blocks of Europe during the Caledonian, Hercynian, and Alpine orogenies was accomplished using an Evans and Sutherland system. Paleogeographic maps were ;made and integrated with the plate reconstruction with an eye toward how regional plate-scale events affect play elements in the basins. Europe is an artifact of Phanerozoic tectonic history, an amalgamation of crustal blocks without a precambrian nucleus of it own. This is in direct contrast of Africa, Asia, and North America. Multiple riftings and collisions created extremely complex mountain building during the Caledonian, Hercynian, Cimmerian, and Alpine orogenies. Basins are diverse, superimposed, and have long-lived tectonic histories with complex structuring and highly variable play elements. The Hercynian orogene set up the framework for northern European hydrocarbon systems. Its collapse set up the Apulian Mesozoic hydrocarbon system. Alpine deformation and tectonically related extension in turn set up the Neogene hydrocarbon systems of the Carpathians Pannonian basin and the Apennines. Eleven paleogeographic maps were completed at a scale of 1:5,000,000. There are four for the Paleozoic to show the Hercynian orogeny and its subsequent foredeeps, and four for the Mesozoic, showing Tethyan rifting and associated subsidence, as well as the Cimmerian orogenies and start of Alpine deformation. The three time slices in the Cenozoic show the Alpine orogene and its foredeeps and the tectonically related extensional basins.

  7. Subglacial extensional fracture development and implications for Alpine Valley evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, Kerry; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Amann, Florian; Loew, Simon

    2014-01-01

    stresses induced through exhumation and tectonic processes play a key role in the topographic evolution of alpine valleys. Using a finite difference model combining the effects of tectonics, erosion, and long-term bedrock strength, we assess the development of near-surface in situ stresses and predict bedrock behavior in response to glacial erosion in an Alpine Valley (the Matter Valley, southern Switzerland). Initial stresses are derived from the regional tectonic history, which is characterized by ongoing transtensional or extensional strain throughout exhumation of the brittle crust. We find that bedrock stresses beneath glacial ice in an initial V-shaped topography are sufficient to induce localized extensional fracturing in a zone extending laterally 600 m from the valley axis. The limit of this zone is reflected in the landscape today by a valley "shoulder," separating linear upper mountain slopes from the deep U-shaped inner valley. We propose that this extensional fracture development enhanced glacial quarrying between the valley shoulder and axis and identify a positive feedback where enhanced quarrying promoted valley incision, which in turn increased in situ stress concentrations near the valley floor, assisting erosion and further driving rapid U-shaped valley development. During interglacial periods, these stresses were relieved through brittle strain or topographic modification, and without significant erosion to reach more highly stressed bedrock, subsequent glaciation caused a reduction in differential stress and suppressed extensional fracturing. A combination of stress relief during interglacial periods, and increased ice accumulation rates in highly incised valleys, will reduce the likelihood of repeat enhanced erosion events.

  8. In Review (Geology): Alpine Landscape Evolution Dominated by Cirque Retreat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oskin, Michael; Burbank, Doug

    2005-01-01

    Despite the abundance in alpine terrain of glacially dissected landscapes, the magnitude and geometry of glacial erosion can rarely be defined. In the eastern Kyrgyz Range, a widespread unconformity exhumed as a geomorphic surface provides a regional datum with which to calibrate erosion. As tectonically driven surface uplift has progressively pushed this surface into the zone of ice accumulation, glacial erosion has overprinted the landscape. With as little as 500 m of incision into rocks underlying the unconformity, distinctive glacial valleys display their deepest incision adjacent to cirque headwalls. The expansion of north-facing glacial cirques at the expense of south-facing valleys has driven the drainage divide southwards at rates up to 2 to 3 times the rate of valley incision. Existing ice-flux-based glacial erosion rules incompletely model expansion of glacial valleys via cirque retreat into the low-gradient unconformity remnants. Local processes that either directly sap cirque headwalls or inhibit erosion down-glacier appear to control, at least initially, alpine landscape evolution.

  9. Plio-Pleistocene evolution of the north Alpine drainage system: new constraints from detrital thermochronology of foreland deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Wolfgang; Elfert, Simon; Glotzbach, Christoph; Spiegel, Cornelia

    2015-04-01

    The evolution of drainage systems in and around active orogens may be strongly affected by climatic or tectonic processes. Information on the drainage evolution is stored in the sediments of the foreland depocentres. We investigated the provenance of two key deposits adjacent to the Central Alps, the Pliocene Sundgau gravels and the Pleistocene Höhere Deckenschotter by applying detrital thermochronology. Combined with provenance information from Rhine Graben deposits, we propose a reconstruction of the north Alpine drainage system since the middle Pliocene and discuss potential controlling mechanisms. Our data show that the Rhine Graben received detritus from the Alpine realm already during the Pliocene, indicating two different river systems—the proto-Rhine and the Aare-Doubs—draining the Alpine realm toward the North Sea and Mediterranean Sea. The investigated sediments contain detritus from two central Alpine sources, one showing a regional exhumational equilibrium and the other characterized by increasing exhumation rates. Discharge of the latter source ceased after ~2 Ma, reflecting a northward shift of the main Alpine drainage divide. Between ~2.0 and 1.2 Ma, the drainage system was affected by a major change, which we explain as resulting from a change in the Alpine stress field leading to tectonic exhumation and topography reduction in the area of the southern Aar massif. Generally, it seems that between ~4 and 1.2 Ma, the drainage system was mainly controlled by tectonic processes, despite first glaciations that already affected the north-Alpine foreland by ~2 Ma. The drainage system only seems to have reacted to the late Cenozoic climate changes after ~1.2 Ma, i.e., at the time of the most intense Alpine glaciation. At that time, the course of the Rhine River shifted toward the area of the Hegau volcanics, and the size of the Rhine River catchment became strongly reduced.

  10. Tectonics of the Northern Bresse region (France) during the Alpine cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocher, Muriel; Chevalier, Francis; Petit, Christophe; Guiraud, Michel

    2003-11-01

    Combining fieldwork and surface data, we have reconstructed the Cenozoic structural and tectonic evolution of the Northern Bresse. Analysis of drainage network geometry allowed to detect three major fault zones trending NE-SW, E-W and NW-SE, and smooth folds with NNE trending axes, all corroborated with shallow well data in the graben and fieldwork on edges. Cenozoic paleostress succession was determined through fault slip and calcite twin inversions, taking into account data of relative chronology. A N-S major compression, attributed to the Pyrenean orogenesis, has activated strike-slip faults trending NNE along the western edge and NE-SW in the graben. After a transitional minor E-W trending extension, the Oligocene WNW extension has structured the graben by a collapse along NNE to NE-SW normal faults. A local NNW extension closes this phase. The Alpine collision has led to an ENE compression at Early Miocene. The following WNW trending major compression has generated shallow deformation in Bresse, but no deformation along the western edge. The calculation of potential reactivation of pre-existing faults enables to propose a structural sketch map for this event, with a NE-SW trending transfer fault zone, inactivity of the NNE edge faults, and possibly large wavelength folding, which could explain the deposit agency and repartition of Miocene to Quaternary deformation.

  11. Caribbean paleomagnetism and tectonic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    Approximately fifty papers treating diverse aspects of Caribbean paleomagnetism have appeared since Creer's pioneering work in the early 1960s. Apparently anomalous early results were initially attributed to anomalous geomagnetic field behavior, to unusual mineralogic effects in rock magnetism and to complex remagnetizations. Eventually the importance of structural and tectonic influences were recognized in paleomagnetic data of the Caribbean area, as elsewhere. Large tectonic rotation is evident from the unusual paleomagnetic declination found at many Caribbean localities. Latitudinal transport, with its plate motion implications, is more subtly expressed in the paleomagnetic inclination parameter, with its typically large relative variance. A review of Caribbean paleomagnetic data is given to form a basis for composing realistic tectonic models.

  12. Structural evolution of Alpine salt deposits, Austria and Bavaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Ch.; Neubauer, F.; Genser, H.; Borojevic Sostaric, S.

    2009-04-01

    Structural evolution of Alpine salt deposits, Austria and Bavaria Alpine salt deposits consist of a tectonic melange of rocksalt and shale called haselgebirge representing the Haselgebirge Formation of Permian to Early Triassic age and mainly exposed within the central and eastern Northern Calcareous Alps. The initial evaporitic sediments were transformed into a breccia (protocataclasite, mylonite) during Alpine orogeny. Residual rocks of shale, anhydrite, polyhalite, sandstone and limestone float as isolated bodies in the haselgebirge matrix. Field investigations of foliation, halite mineral lineation, fold axis, veins and the overall present slickensides in shale revealed an individual history for all investigated mines (Dürrnberg, Berchtesgaden, Altaussee, in part Hallstatt). Ar-Ar dating of various micostructural types of polyhalite yield several preliminary age groups: 235 Ma, 180 Ma, and 110 Ma. Fluid inclusion measurements on anhydrite together with vitrinite reflectance data showed that temperatures of 140-180 °C were reached in Berchtesgaden and around 250° C in Altaussee. Microstructural analysis of anhydrite reveals strong stretching structures with lobate grain boundaries and the fomation of large anhydrite crystals in polyhalite (locally called muriazite). Rock salt and Haselgebirge samples were gamma-irradiated to intensify contrasts in thin section analysis. No primary structures like fluid inclusion bands or chevrons were found. The oldest visible parts are innner cores of large residual grains. All other types of grains suffered grain size reduction during the subsequent deformation. Using subgrain piezometry, high differential stresses of around 5 MPa formed the present microstructure. The Alpine rock salt deposits suffered a complex deformation history. A first peak was the formation of polyhalite veins, 235 Ma ago. The overburden was around 800 m (Rantitsch & Russegger, 2005) and first differentiation of the sea floor occurred (Mandl, 1984

  13. Basement lithostratigraphy of the Adula nappe: implications for Palaeozoic evolution and Alpine kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavargna-Sani, Mattia; Epard, Jean-Luc; Bussy, François; Ulianov, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The Adula nappe belongs to the Lower Penninic domain of the Central Swiss Alps. It consists mostly of pre-Triassic basement lithologies occurring as strongly folded and sheared gneisses of various types with mafic boudins. We propose a new lithostratigraphy for the northern Adula nappe basement that is supported by detailed field investigations, U-Pb zircon geochronology, and whole-rock geochemistry. The following units have been identified: Cambrian clastic metasediments with abundant carbonate lenses and minor bimodal magmatism (Salahorn Formation); Ordovician metapelites associated with amphibolite boudins with abundant eclogite relicts representing oceanic metabasalts (Trescolmen Formation); Ordovician peraluminous metagranites of calc-alkaline affinity ascribed to subduction-related magmatism (Garenstock Augengneiss); Ordovician metamorphic volcanic-sedimentary deposits (Heinisch Stafel Formation); Early Permian post-collisional granites recording only Alpine orogenic events (Zervreila orthogneiss). All basement lithologies except the Permian granites record a Variscan + Alpine polyorogenic metamorphic history. They document a complex Paleozoic geotectonic evolution consistent with the broader picture given by the pre-Mesozoic basement framework in the Alps. The internal consistency of the Adula basement lithologies and the stratigraphic coherence of the overlying Triassic sediments suggest that most tectonic contacts within the Adula nappe are pre-Alpine in age. Consequently, mélange models for the Tertiary emplacement of the Adula nappe are not consistent and must be rejected. The present-day structural complexity of the Adula nappe is the result of the intense Alpine ductile deformation of a pre-structured entity.

  14. Tectonic evolution of the terrestrial planets.

    PubMed

    Head, J W; Solomon, S C

    1981-07-01

    The style and evolution of tectonics on the terrestrial planets differ substantially. The style is related to the thickness of the lithosphere and to whether the lithosphere is divided into distinct, mobile plates that can be recycled into the mantle, as on Earth, or is a single spherical shell, as on the moon, Mars, and Mercury. The evolution of a planetary lithosphere and the development of plate tectonics appear to be influenced by several factors, including planetary size, chemistry, and external and internal heat sources. Vertical tectonic movement due to lithospheric loading or uplift is similar on all of the terrestrial planets and is controlled by the local thickness and rheology of the lithosphere. The surface of Venus, although known only at low resolution, displays features both similar to those on Earth (mountain belts, high plateaus) and similar to those on the smaller planets (possible impact basins). Improved understanding of the tectonic evolution of Venus will permit an evaluation of the relative roles of planetary size and chemistry in determining evolutionary style. PMID:17741171

  15. A review of Alpine tectonics in Portugal: Foreland detachment in basement and cover rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, A.; Kullberg, M. C.; Kullberg, J. C.; Manuppella, G.; Phipps, S.

    1990-12-01

    The Alpine foreland in Portugal was deformed by compressional tectonism during the Miocene. In the NNE-SSW oriented Lusitanian Basin, most folds and thrusts in the Meso-Cenozoic cover are oriented ENE-WSW, parallel to the Alpine front in the Betic Cordillera, and verge towards the north-northwest and south-southeast. The thrusts are connected by lateral ramps: most of these are oriented NNE-SSW to N-S and show sinistral movement, and some are transpressional. The lateral ramps result from reactivation of older extensional faults related to crustal thinning of the continental margin. In the E-W oriented Algarve Basin a simpler basin inversion occurred, with older E-W normal faults reactivated as essentially pure thrusts. In both basins Alpine structures formed above décollements in the Hettangian evaporite-clastic complex. Variscan basement was also deformed by ENE-WSW reverse faults during Miocene time. The similarity in orientation and style of the basement structures to those in the cover suggests that they also occurred by detachment, but their larger scale indicates that the detachment is deep and involves much of the crust. Thus, we interpret the Central Cordillera, in which basement rocks are thrust over Miocene sediments on both sides, as a "pop-up" of crustal scale, elevated above downward-flattening faults that dip towards each other and merge into a single deep detachment. Alpine structures in the Iberian foreland are therefore similar in structural style to those of the Appalachian and Laramide forelands of North America and the Alpine foreland of northwest Europe.

  16. Tectonic evolution of northwest Siberia

    SciTech Connect

    Natapov, L.P. )

    1993-09-01

    The ancient Siberian continent was split from early Pangen in early Riphean. The newly formed continent drifted from the southern to the northern hemisphere, reaching high altitudes only in the Late Paleozoic. Up to the Early Carboniferous, a typical passive margin of the Atlantic type, prograding to the ocean, developed along the present northern and eastern boundaries of this continent. In Upper Paleozoic, Triassic, and Jurassic, the carbonate sedimentation was replaced by the accumulation of thick terrigenous complexes along the northern and southern margins. Large submarine plains were formed by the merging of fans, while eustatic lowering of the ocean level enlarged the source area of detrital material. Distal facies, with time, were moving into the ocean. Rifting, penetrating inside the continent, conditioned for formation of large sedimentary basins. The development of the Sukhanskaya syneclise is associated with Riphean rifting, and Vilyuiskaya with Upper Devonian rifting. In the Upper Mesozoic, the covergent boundaries of lithospheric plates existed along the northern and eastern boundaries of the Siberian continent. As a result of the final collision of the continental margin with blocks of different nature (microcontinents, island arcs, etc.) transported by the Kula plate, and with chukchi and north Taimyr arctic blocks, Verkhoyansk and Taimyr fold belts appeared in the Upper Cretaceous. They were over-thrusted on clastic wedges, putting into shape the present-day structure of foredeeps. In the paper, principal attention is devoted to peculiarities of structure and development of sedimentary basins, formation of oil-producing complexes, and structures favorable for accumulation of hydrocarbons. All these features are analyzed at the background of this plate tectonic scenario.

  17. Phanerozoic tectonic evolution of Tarim Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Zhaocai; Zhang Yigang

    1995-08-01

    The tectonic evolution of Tarim Basin can be divided into two stages. In the first stage, there developed three Palaeozoic sequences (Pt3-01, O2-3-D and C1-P2), the deposition of which were controlled by Palaeoasian Tectonic Domain. In the second stage, there appeared five Meso-Cenozoic sequences (T1-2, T3, J, K2-E and N1-Q), controlled by Tethys Sea Tectonic Domain. Both of the first sequence of each stage (Pt3-01 and T1-2) are of typical rift-drift facies, overlain by flexural facies. The Palaeozoic tectonic style is characterized by basement-involved, back-thrusted uplifts and the pop-up held inbetween them. The main tectonic style since Late Triassic time has been thin-skin decoupling anticlines developed near the deep troughs in the foreland basins. Corresponding to the two above-mentioned stages, two major petroleum systems were formed. However, the early petroleum system was partly destroyed due to the marked overturn of the basin during Late Palaeozoic time.

  18. Tectonic Evolution of the Jurassic Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, M.; Ishihara, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present the tectonic evolution of the Jurassic Pacific plate based on magnetic anomly lineations and abyssal hills. The Pacific plate is the largest oceanic plate on Earth. It was born as a microplate aroud the Izanagi-Farallon-Phoenix triple junction about 192 Ma, Early Jurassic [Nakanishi et al., 1992]. The size of the Pacific plate at 190 Ma was nearly half that of the present Easter or Juan Fernandez microplates in the East Pacific Rise [Martinez et at, 1991; Larson et al., 1992]. The plate boundary surrounding the Pacific plate from Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous involved the four triple junctions among Pacific, Izanagi, Farallon, and Phoenix plates. The major tectonic events as the formation of oceanic plateaus and microplates during the period occurred in the vicinity of the triple junctions [e.g., Nakanishi and Winterer, 1998; Nakanishi et al., 1999], implying that the study of the triple junctions is indispensable for understanding the tectonic evolution of the Pacific plate. Previous studies indicate instability of the configuration of the triple junctions from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous (155-125 Ma). On the other hand, the age of the birth of the Pacific plate was determined assuming that all triple junctions had kept their configurations for about 30 m.y. [Nakanishi et al., 1992] because of insufficient information of the tectonic history of the Pacific plate before Late Jurassic.Increase in the bathymetric and geomagnetic data over the past two decades enables us to reveal the tectonic evolution of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction before Late Jurassic. Our detailed identication of magnetic anomaly lineations exposes magnetic bights before anomaly M25. We found the curved abyssal hills originated near the triple junction, which trend is parallel to magnetic anomaly lineations. These results imply that the configuration of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction had been RRR before Late Jurassic.

  19. The Tectonics and Evolution of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaula, William M.

    1997-01-01

    This shift corresponded to a focusing of research on Venus. Some work included comparison with other planets. Venus research is being continued. The research can be summarized under five headings: (1) Planet formation; (2) Thermal and Compositional Evolution; (3) Tectonic structures and processes; (4) Determination and interpretation of gravity; and (5) Analyses of Ishtar Terra. Thirty-four publications were produced. References to publications supporting the summary are by year and letter: e.g., (1990 c,d) for the emphasis on the terminal phases in formation studies.

  20. Mechanical model for subduction-collision tectonics of Alpine-type compressional orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Christopher; Ellis, Susan; Hamilton, Juliet; Fullsack, Philippe

    1996-08-01

    Alpine-type orogens are characterized by three distinct convergent tectonic phases: subduction with deformation that has primarily single vergence, a transition from subduction to collision, and continental collision with double vergence. Although the Cenozoic history of the European Alps has additional complexities, a mechanical explanation for these three phases would provide the necessary crustal-scale framework in which to develop an understanding of the smaller-scale processes. We present results from a simple numerical model, which explain the mechanics of these three phases as a consequence of the changing buoyancy of the lithosphere subducted beneath the orogen. The development and exhumation of a subduction complex, suture zone, and basement nappe stack (Piemont suture, Penninic Nappes); the presence of a crustal-scale back fold and thrust (Insubric Line); and uplift of basement on the pro- (European) side of the orogen (external basement massifs) may be explained as a simple consequence of changing dynamics during the transition from subduction to collision.

  1. Alpine tectonic wedging and crustal delamination in the Cantabrian Mountains (NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallastegui, Jorge; Pulgar, Javier A.; Gallart, Josep

    2016-07-01

    The Cantabrian Mountains have been interpreted as a Paleozoic basement block uplifted during an Alpine deformation event that led to the partial closure of the Bay of Biscay and the building of the Pyrenean range in the Cenozoic. A detailed interpretation of deep seismic reflection profile ESCIN-2 and the two-dimensional seismic modelling of the data allowed us to construct a N-S geological cross section along the southern border of the Cantabrian Mountains and the transition to the Duero Cenozoic foreland basin, highlighting the Alpine structure. The proposed geological cross section has been constrained by all geophysical data available, including a 2-D gravity model constructed for this study as well as refraction and magnetotelluric models from previous studies. A set of south-vergent thrusts dipping 30 to 36° to the north, cut the upper crust with a ramp geometry and sole in the boundary with the middle crust. These thrusts are responsible for the uplift and the main Alpine deformation in the Cantabrian Mountains. A conspicuous reflective Moho shows that the crust thickens northwards from the Duero basin, where subhorizontal Moho is 32 km deep, to 47 km in the northernmost end of ESCIN-2, where Moho dips to the north beneath the Cantabrian Mountains. Further north, out of the profile, Moho reaches a maximum depth of 55 km, according to wide-angle/refraction data. ESCIN-2 indicates the presence of a tectonic wedge of the crust of the Cantabrian margin beneath the Cantabrian Mountains, which is indented from north to south into the delaminated Iberian crust, forcing its northward subduction.

  2. Late Cenozoic tectonic evolution of southwestern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlock, Richard L.; Hamilton, Douglas H.

    1991-01-01

    Geologic and geophysical data from southern California and adjoining areas are used to reconstruct the tectonic evolution of the southern Coast Ranges, western Transverse Ranges, and borderland regions since 30 Myr ago. Premises include specified relative plate motions for times prior to 10.5 Myr ago and after 3 Myr ago, a mid-Tertiary bight in the continental margin, midcrustal detachment faults, rotation of the western Transverse Ranges about an eastern pivot, and specified fault displacement histories. Prior to 18 Myr ago, about 90 percent of the tangential component of Pacific-North America relative motion was accommodated on an offshore dextral fault system near the toe of the continental slope. From 18 to 5.5 Myr ago, dextral slip was accommodated predominantly on the offshore system but also on a second, inboard system that included the San Andreas fault.

  3. Sediment connectivity evolution on an alpine catchment undergoing glacier retreat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldin, Beatrice; Rudaz, Benjamin; Bardou, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Climate changes can result in a wide range of variations of natural environment including retreating glaciers. Melting from glaciers will have a significant impact on the sediment transport characteristics of glacierized alpine catchments that can affect downstream channel network. Sediment connectivity assessment, i.e. the degree of connections that controls sediment fluxes between different segments of a landscape, can be useful in order to address management activity on sediment fluxes changes of alpine streams. Through the spatial characterization of the connectivity patterns of a catchment and its potential evolution it is possible to both define sediment transport pathways and estimate different contributions of the sub-catchment as sediment sources. In this study, a topography based index (Cavalli et al., 2013) has been applied to assess spatial sediment connectivity in the Navisence catchment (35 km2), an alpine basin located in the southern Walliser Alps (Switzerland) characterized by a complex glacier system with well-developed lateral moraines on glacier margins already crossed by several lateral channels. Glacier retreat of the main glacial edifice will provide a new connectivity pattern. At present the glacier disconnects lateral slopes from the main talweg: it is expected that its retreat will experience an increased connectivity. In order to study this evolution, two high resolution (2 m) digital terrain models (DTMs) describing respectively the terrain before and after glacier retreat have been analyzed. The current DTM was obtained from high resolution photogrammetry (2 m resolution). The future DTM was derived from application of the sloping local base level (SLBL) routine (Jaboyedoff et al., 2004) on the current glacier system, allowing to remove the ice body by reconstituting a U-shaped polynomial bedrock surface. From this new surface a coherent river network was drawn and slight random noise was added. Finally the river network was burned into

  4. Relief Evolution in Tectonically Active Mountain Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, Kelin X.

    2004-01-01

    The overall aims of this 3-yr project, as originally proposed were to: (1) investigate quantitatively the roles of fluvial and glacial erosion in the evolution of relief in mountainous regions, and (2) test rigorously the quality and accuracy of SRTM topographic data in areas of rugged relief - both the most challenging and of greatest interest to geomorphic, neotectonic, and hazards applications. Natural laboratories in both the western US and the Southern Alps of New Zealand were identified as most promising. The project has been both successful and productive, despite the fact that no SRTM data for our primary field sites in New Zealand were released on the time frame of the work effort. Given the delayed release of SRTM data, we pursued the scientific questions of the roles of fluvial and, especially, glacial erosion in the evolution of relief in mountainous regions using available digital elevation models (DEMs) for the Southern Alps of New Zealand (available at both 25m and 50m pixel sizes), and USGS 10m and 30m DEMs within the Western US. As emphasized in the original proposal, we chose the emphasis on the role of glacial modification of topographic relief because there has been little quantitative investigation of glacial erosion processes at landscape scale. This is particularly surprising considering the dramatic sculpting of most mid- and high-latitude mountain ranges, the prodigious quantities of glacially-derived sediment in terrestrial and marine basins, and the current cross-disciplinary interest in the role of denudational processes in orogenesis and the evolution of topography in general. Moreover, the evolution of glaciated landscapes is not only a fundamental problem in geomorphology in its own right, but also is at the heart of the debate over Late Cenozoic linkages between climate and tectonics.

  5. Geodynamical Evolution and Tectonic Framework of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, Guangding

    In this paper, we show that the tectonic framework of mainland China consists of "three latitudinal strips", namely, Tianshan-Yinshan-Yanshan, Qinling-Dabie, and Nanling; "two longitudinal strips" namely, Daxing'anling Taihangshan Wulingshan, Helanshan-Longmenshan; and "two triangles", Songpan-Ganzi, and Chaidamu. The geodynamic evolution of China can be considered in five-stages, which can be summarised as a kind of "teeterboard-like" process. The evolutionary process is that in the Palaeozoic era, the China mainland had lower elevation in the west and higher in the east, with OrdosSichuan as an axis. After the Mesozoic era, because the blocks of Qiangtang, Gangdese, and India collided and sutured with the Tarim block. During this time closure of the Tethys ocean occurred, and the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau formed. In the Cenozoic subduction of the Pacific plate northwestwards under the Philippine Sea began, and the Philippine Sea block converged towards the Eurasian plate. This was associated with extension and thinning of the crust in East China, which resulted in the uplift of the land in the west and subsidence in the east of China. Finally, we point out that research on the geodynamic evolution of the terranes is of practical significance in prospecting for mineral deposits and hydrocarbon resources.

  6. MEVTV Workshop on Early Tectonic and Volcanic Evolution of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Although not ignored, the problems of the early tectonic and volcanic evolution of Mars have generally received less attention than those later in the evolution of the planet. Specifically, much attention was devoted to the evolution of the Tharsis region of Mars and to the planet itself at the time following the establishment of this major tectonic and volcanic province. By contrast, little attention was directed at fundamental questions, such as the conditions that led to the development of Tharsis and the cause of the basic fundamental dichotomy of the Martian crust. It was to address these and related questions of the earliest evolution of Mars that a workshop was organized under the auspices of the Mars: Evolution of Volcanism, Tectonism, and Volatiles (MEVTV) Program. Four sessions were held: crustal dichotomy; crustal differentiation/volcanism; Tharsis, Elysium, and Valles Marineris; and ridges and fault tectonics.

  7. Correlation between tectonic events in the most recent period of earth evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukina, N. V.; Makarov, V. I.; Trifonov, V. G.; Volchkova, G. I.

    Methods used in correlating various neotectonic events are described, together with a general discussion of short-lived changes in tectonic activity. Neotectonic events in the Carpathian-Caucasus-Kopetdag segment and in ancient folded areas (including Tien Shan and segments of Rhodope mountains) of the Alpine-Asian orogenic belt are analyzed. Correlation of neotectonic events of the earth's mobile belts revealed the presence in the earth crust of segments which are characterized by the synchronism of the most important events in tectonic activity. Common activating phases disclosed in these areas indicate the presence of global rhythmicity in tectogenesis. In addition, the studies have uncovered some specificities in the neotectonic stage of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic period of the earth evolution.

  8. Workshop on the Tectonic Evolution of Greenstone Belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Workshop on the Tectonic Evolution of Greenstone Belts, which is part of the Universities Space Research Association, Lunar and Planetary Institute, of Houston, Texas, met there on Jan. 16-18, 1986. A number of plate tectonic hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of Archean and Phanerozoic greenstone/ophiolite terranes. These hypotheses are explored in the abstracts.

  9. Alpine tectonics of granites in basement of Ysyk-Köl Basin, northern Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, M. G.; Przhiyalgovsky, E. S.; Lavrushina, E. V.; Poleshchuk, A. V.; Rybin, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    The Ysyk-Köl Basin filled with Lower Jurassic-Quaternary sedimentary rocks is the largest intermontane negative structural unit of the northern Tien Shan. The basement of this basin is composed of Precambrian-Paleozoic rocks, largely of Ordovician and Silurian granitoids exposed in mountain ranges of the basin framework and as separate anticlinal domes situated in areas occupied by the Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary cover. The postmagmatic tectonic internalstructure of the Chonkurchak (Chunkurchak), Kyzyl-Choku, Kyzyl-Bulak, and Prishib massifs emplaced in the basement, as well as their relationships to the sedimentary cover, are described in the paper. The study was carried out using the morphostructural method, detailed geological mapping, structural kinematic analysis, and petrographic examination of rocks. The internalstructure of Paleozoic granites in the basement and indications of their 3D tectonic flow are characterized. It is shown that granites underwent 3D deformation after their emplacement in the consolidated crust, and this process had a substantial influence on tectonic processes at the plate and orogenic stages of regional evolution.

  10. Tectonic evolution of Abu Gharadig basin

    SciTech Connect

    Meshref, W.M.; Beleity, A.E.H.; Hammouda, H.; Kamel, M.

    1988-08-01

    The Abu Gharadig basin, northwestern desert of Egypt, is considered the most petroliferous basin in the Western Desert as far as hydrocarbon production and potential. The basin is believed to be growing and developing throughout geologic time. Aeromagnteic data and subsurface information, derived from a set of isopach maps from wells including complete sections only, revealed that the Abu Gharadig basin was subjected to different tectonic events that resulted in different tectonic trends. These trends include (1) north-south to north-northwest-south-southeast of Precambrian age, (2) east-west (Y-trends) of Paleozoic to Jurassic age, (3) west-northwest (R-trends) of Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, and (4) east-northeast (P-trends) of Late Cretaceous to Eocene age. The previously mentioned tectonic trends can be explained by a convergent wrench model that affected northern Egypt.

  11. Late Tertiary paleogeographic and tectonic evolution of the Mediterranean area

    SciTech Connect

    Arnott, R.J.; Haan, E.A.

    1988-08-01

    The present geography of the Mediterranean Sea is the result of late Tertiary tectonic processes and hardly reflects its Mesozoic and early Tertiary evolution. This paper outlines a plate tectonics model for the Mediterranean area from the Oligocene to the Pliocene. Seismic and well data have been integrated into the regional structural framework to produce a set of paleogeographic maps, which includes the Oligocene, early and middle Miocene, late Miocene, and Pliocene. These maps highlight the changes in sedimentation patterns in response to the tectonic development of the Mediterranean area. Special attention will be given to the Messinian desiccation event.

  12. Rapid biological speciation driven by tectonic evolution in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craw, Dave; Upton, Phaedra; Burridge, Christopher P.; Wallis, Graham P.; Waters, Jonathan M.

    2016-02-01

    Collisions between tectonic plates lead to the rise of new mountain ranges that can separate biological populations and ultimately result in new species. However, the identification of links between tectonic mountain-building and biological speciation is confounded by environmental and ecological factors. Thus, there are surprisingly few well-documented examples of direct tectonic controls on terrestrial biological speciation. Here we present examples from New Zealand, where the rapid evolution of 18 species of freshwater fishes has resulted from parallel tectonic landscape evolution. We use numerical models to reconstruct changes in the deep crustal structure and surface drainage catchments of the southern island of New Zealand over the past 25 million years. We show that the island and mountain topography evolved in six principal tectonic zones, which have distinct drainage catchments that separated fish populations. We use new and existing phylogenetic analyses of freshwater fish populations, based on over 1,000 specimens from more than 400 localities, to show that fish genomes can retain evidence of this tectonic landscape development, with a clear correlation between geologic age and extent of DNA sequence divergence. We conclude that landscape evolution has controlled on-going biological diversification over the past 25 million years.

  13. A window for plate tectonics in terrestrial planet evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Craig; Lenardic, Adrian; Weller, Matthew; Moresi, Louis; Quenette, Steve; Zhang, Siqi

    2016-06-01

    The tectonic regime of a planet depends critically on the contributions of basal and internal heating to the planetary mantle, and how these evolve through time. We use viscoplastic mantle convection simulations, with evolving core-mantle boundary temperatures, and radiogenic heat decay, to explore how these factors affect tectonic regime over the lifetime of a planet. The simulations demonstrate (i) hot, mantle conditions, coming out of a magma ocean phase of evolution, can produce a "hot" stagnant-lid regime, whilst a cooler post magma ocean mantle may begin in a plate tectonic regime; (ii) planets may evolve from an initial hot stagnant-lid condition, through an episodic regime lasting 1-3 Gyr, into a plate-tectonic regime, and finally into a cold, senescent stagnant lid regime after ∼10 Gyr of evolution, as heat production and basal temperatures wane; and (iii) the thermal state of the post magma ocean mantle, which effectively sets the initial conditions for the sub-solidus mantle convection phase of planetary evolution, is one of the most sensitive parameters affecting planetary evolution - systems with exactly the same physical parameters may exhibit completely different tectonics depending on the initial state employed. Estimates of the early Earth's temperatures suggest Earth may have begun in a hot stagnant lid mode, evolving into an episodic regime throughout most of the Archaean, before finally passing into a plate tectonic regime. The implication of these results is that, for many cases, plate tectonics may be a phase in planetary evolution between hot and cold stagnant states, rather than an end-member.

  14. The Caspian megabasin: tectonics and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, V. E.; Bogdanov, N. A.

    2003-04-01

    The Caspian Sea occupies at longitudinally elongated depression, superimposed in the latest Miocene on different structural units, oriented in WNW-ESE direction and belonging to the southern edge of the East European Craton and to the Mediterranean mobile belt. The Caspian megabasin comprises three basins - Northern, Middle and Southern with different age of basement and sedimentary fill, structural style and recent tectonics. The evolution of the whole region could be followed from Neoproterozoic onwards. At that epoch, an oceanic basin-Prototethys appeared after the breakup of Rodinia between Baltica and Gondwana. Its volcano-sedimentary sequence outcrops in the Greater Caucasus and Dzirula massif in Transcaucasia. After the Baikalian (=Cadomian/Panafrican) orogeny the central and southern part of the region was cratonised and formed the northern rim of Gondwana, presumably separated from Baltica by a relic of Prototethys. In Ordovician two branches of the Paleotethys crossed the region - the northern passed through the Greater Caucasus, the southern through Talesh; they were separated by the Transcaucasian microcontinent. At the southern edge of Baltica the Donets-Karpinsky Ridge rift system was formed in mid-Devonian. The northern branch of the Paleotethys was severely deformed, intruded by granites and metamorphosed by the Hercynian orogeny; only a remnant marine basin persisted to the south of the orogen. It was deformed in its tour, along with the southern-Paleotethys branch by the Eocimmerian orogeny which also caused the final inversion of the Donets-Karpinsky rift system. After these events the Fore-Caucasus region became the young Scythian platform - part of the Eurasian continent. In the Early Jurassic rifting opened the Greater Caucasus basin, marginal in respect to the Neotethys, one of the main branch of which passed through the Lesser Caucasus and probably along the southern border of the Alborz Range, separating it from the Iranian microcontinent

  15. Strong coupling between tectonic fractures, postglacial erosion and sediment flux in alpine environment, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagnac, Jean-Daniel

    2014-05-01

    to an even larger extent between the deeper canyons and the preserved surfaces) imply that the erosion is highly not homogeneously distributed over the entire area. Field (and airplane) observations show that fracturing is dense, pervasive, associated with thick fault gouges, kakirite and cataclase to the Northeast, whereas rock is very compact, with only a few widely space fracture to the West. Remote sensing detection of more than 1000 fracture also exhibit a striking difference of the fracture density, very penetrative to the North East, and widely spaced to the south and SW. These fractures are preferably oriented ENE-WSW, and to a minor amount E-W and NW-SW. The two main river draining this range have similar drainage basin (~400km2) toward the North, but the one draining the densely fractured / incised landscape shows an impressive fan delta prograding onto the Chitina River floodplain. This study highlight the strong coupling between tectonic fracturing of rock, erosion and sediment transfer in alpine environments.

  16. History and Evolution of Precambrian plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Ria; Gerya, Taras

    2014-05-01

    Plate tectonics is a global self-organising process driven by negative buoyancy at thermal boundary layers. Phanerozoic plate tectonics with its typical subduction and orogeny is relatively well understood and can be traced back in the geological records of the continents. Interpretations of geological, petrological and geochemical observations from Proterozoic and Archean orogenic belts however (e.g., Brown, 2006), suggest a different tectonic regime in the Precambrian. Due to higher radioactive heat production the Precambrian lithosphere shows lower internal strength and is strongly weakened by percolating melts. The fundamental difference between Precambrian and Phanerozoic tectonics is therefore the upper-mantle temperature, which determines the strength of the upper mantle (Brun, 2002) and the further tectonic history. 3D petrological-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of oceanic subduction at an active plate at different upper-mantle temperatures show these different subduction regimes. For upper-mantle temperatures < 175 K above the present day value a subduction style appears which is close to present day subduction but with more frequent slab break-off. At upper-mantle temperatures 175 - 250 K above present day values steep subduction continues but the plates are weakened enough to allow buckling and also lithospheric delamination and drip-offs. For upper-mantle temperatures > 250 K above the present day value no subduction occurs any more. The whole lithosphere is delaminating and due to strong volcanism and formation of a thicker crust subduction is inhibited. This stage of 200-250 K higher upper mantle temperature which corresponds roughly to the early Archean (Abbott, 1994) is marked by strong volcanism due to sublithospheric decompression melting which leads to an equal thickness for both oceanic and continental plates. As a consequence subduction is inhibited, but a compressional setup instead will lead to orogeny between a continental

  17. Variscan tectonics in the Holy Cross Mountains (Poland) and the role of structural inheritance during Alpine tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarche, J.; Mansy, J. L.; Bergerat, F.; Averbuch, O.; Hakenberg, M.; Lewandowski, M.; Stupnicka, E.; Swidrowska, J.; Wajsprych, B.; Wieczorek, J.

    1999-11-01

    The present study was carried out in the Holy Cross Mountains (HCM) of south-central Poland and includes computation of palaeostresses following Angelier's method and field structural analysis. The Palaeozoic basement of the HCM comprises two tectonic units separated by the major WNW-ESE-striking Holy Cross Fault (HCF). Fold analysis indicates a N-S to NNE-SSW direction of Variscan shortening. Micro-structures and fold analysis from Upper Devonian rocks further reveal: (1) a brittle tectonic event due to a NW-SE compression preceding folding that could be related to pre-Late Carboniferous tectonics, due to block transport within the Tornquist-Teisseyre Zone (TTZ), and (2) polyphase Variscan folding comprising (a) an early stage of N-S shortening marked by north-verging ramps, (b) a main folding event and axial cleavage formation involving N-S to NNE-SSW shortening, and (c) a late stage of shortening deforming older folds and cleavage. A mainly extensional tectonic regime dominated from the Permian until the Cretaceous, during which time the HCF was reactivated as a normal fault. Large NW-SE faults bordering the Mid-Polish Trough (MPT) developed. Subsequent tectonic inversion of the MPT resulted in basin uplift (`Mid-Polish Swell', MPS). Palaeostress computations from Mesozoic strata suggest a NE-SW direction for the main Maastrichtian-Paleocene shortening phase, in addition to two minor brittle events resulting from N-S and E-W compression. Analysis of local folds in the Mesozoic cover indicates a causal relationship with the Maastrichtian-Paleocene reactivation of older faults. In particular, en-échelon folds in the Radomsko Elevation suggest a sinistral reactivation of the Palaeozoic HCF. Folds in the southwestern part of the HCM argue for reactivation in the reverse mode of a NW-SE-trending fault bordering the MPS that originated in the Mesozoic. In Palaeozoic strata, post-Variscan brittle deformation and micro-fault reactivation are attributed to the tectonic

  18. Geochronological evidence for the Alpine tectono-thermal evolution of the Veporic Unit (Western Carpathians, Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojtko, Rastislav; Králiková, Silvia; Jeřábek, Petr; Schuster, Ralf; Danišík, Martin; Fügenschuh, Bernhard; Minár, Jozef; Madarás, Ján

    2016-01-01

    Tectono-thermal evolution of the Veporic Unit was revealed by multiple geochronological methods, including 87Rb/86Sr on muscovite and biotite, zircon and apatite fission-track, and apatite (U-Th)/He analysis. Based on the new data, the following Alpine tectono-thermal stages can be distinguished: The Eo-Alpine Cretaceous nappe stacking (~ 135-95 Ma) resulted in burial of the Veporic Unit beneath the northward overthrusting Gemeric Unit and overlying Jurassic Meliata accretionary wedge. During this process the Veporic Unit reached metamorphic peak of greenschist- to amphibolite facies accompanied by orogen-parallel flow in its lower and middle crust. The subsequent evolution of this crust is associated with two distinct exhumation mechanisms related to collision with the northerly Tatric-Fatric basement. The first mechanism (~ 90-80 Ma) is associated with internal subhorizontal shortening of the Veporic Unit reflected by large-scale upright folding and heterogeneous exhumation of the Veporic lower crust in the cores of crustal-scale antiforms. This led to juxtaposition of the higher and lower grade parts of basement, all cooled down to ~ 350 °C by ~ 80 Ma. The second mechanism is associated with the overthrusting of the Veporic Unit over the attenuated Fatric crust. This led to a passive en-block exhumation of the Veporic crust from ~ 350 °C to 60 °C between ~ 80 and 55 Ma followed by erosion (~ 55-35 Ma). The erosion processes resulted in formation of planation surface before the Late Eocene transgression. After erosion and planation, a new sedimentary cycle of the Central Carpathian Palaeogene Basin was deposited with the sedimentary strata thickness of ~ 1.5-2.0 km (~ 21-17 Ma). The early to middle Miocene is characterised by destruction tectonic disintegration and erosion of this basin (~ 20-13 Ma) and formation of the Neogene Vepor Stratovolcano (~ 13 Ma). The final shaping of the area has been linked to erosional processes of the volcanic structure since

  19. Structural-tectonic controls and geomorphology of the karst corridors in alpine limestone ridges: Southern Carpathians, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tîrlă, Laura; Vijulie, Iuliana

    2013-09-01

    The relationship between surface karst development and the geological frame is widely acknowledged in the study of karst landforms. It is of considerable interest especially in alpine environments (e.g. Alpine-Dinaric-Carpathian orogenic system). Karst corridors are generally known as kluftkarren or bogaz and form by solution of limestone along a lithoclase network. The Vânturariţa-Buila Massif (Carpathians, Romania) is a typical alpine karst ridge and a former carbonate platform of Upper Jurassic age in which geologically-controlled karst features have been developing over a geologic timescale. Field research and mapping were useful in extracting geologic features. Joint- and structure-controlled karst corridors are common in the upper section of the mountain, between 1600 and 1850 m. First, a complex system of lithoclases (fissures, joints and faults) occurred; then, surface runoff or meltwater solutionally enlarged them. Tension fractures strike in a northeast-southwest direction, parallel to homoclinal limestone layers. The exposed fault walls often preserve draperies and speleothem remnants. Further, statistical analysis of joint, fault and bogaz orientations has shown the close relation between the three datasets, and morphometric analysis centered only on the karst corridor system. Results derived from the statistical analysis of orientation data show that there is a strong preferred orientation of the bogaz or bogaz-like forms along the directional faults and that they commonly develop in extensional (tectonically active) environments. Additional features typical to fluviokarst are also present — subterranean connections between the karst corridors and the headwalls of the pocket valleys, generating headward recession both by continuous sapping of karst springs at the headwall base followed by collapses. An extremely poor surface drainage network developed in the upper pavement facing southeast, compared to that on the middle and lower sides.

  20. Tectonic Evolution of the Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Senski, David G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program supported a wide range of work on the geophysical evolution of the terrestrial planets during the period 1 April 1997 - 30 September 2001. We here provide highlights of the research carried out under this grant over the final year of the award, and we include a full listing of publications and scientific meeting presentations supported by this project. Throughout the grant period, our group consisted of the Principal Investigator and several Postdoctoral Associates, all at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (DTM) of the Carnegie Institution of Washington.

  1. Polyphase tectonic subsidence evolution of the Vienna Basin inferred from quantitative subsidence analysis of the northern and central parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun Young; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Vienna Basin is a tectonically complex Neogene basin situated at the Alpine-Carpathian transition. This study analyzes a detailed quantification of subsidence in the northern and central parts of the Vienna Basin to understand its tectonic subsidence evolution. About 200 wells were used to arrange stratigraphic setting, and wells reaching the pre-Neogene basement were analyzed for subsidence. To enhance the understanding of the regional subsidences, the wells were sorted into ten groups based on their position on major fault blocks. In the Early Miocene, subsidence was slow and along E-W to NE-SW trending axis, indicating the development of thrust-controlled piggyback basins. During the late Early Miocene data show abruptly increasing subsidence, making the initiation of the Vienna pull-apart basin system. From the Middle Miocene, the tectonic subsidence curves show regionally different patterns. The tectonic subsidence during the Middle Miocene varies laterally across the Vienna Basin, and the differential subsidence can be related to the changing tensional regime of weakening transtension and strengthening extension toward the late Middle Miocene. From the late Middle Miocene to the Late Miocene, the tectonic subsidence occurred dominantly along the regional active faults, and corresponds to the axis of E-W trending extension of the western parts of the Pannonian Basin system. In the Quaternary the Vienna Basin has been reactivated, and resulted in subsidence along the NE-SW trending Vienna Basin transfer fault system.

  2. Tectonic evolution of Bransfield Strait, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Daniel Hugh Njal

    Bransfield Strait is a young (<4 Ma?), actively extending marginal basin located between the NW Antarctic Peninsula and the South Shetland Islands, in the backarc region of the South Shetland Trench. Its structural evolution is probably influenced by both subduction-related processes at the trench and the Antarctic-Scotia strike-slip plate boundary to the NE. Previous studies suggest that Bransfield Strait is floored by thinned continental crust formed by rifting of the South Shetland Islands away from the Antarctic Peninsula, with axial neovolcanism interpreted as evidence of sea-floor spreading. New deep-penetration multichannel seismic (MCS) data reveal more complexity. The basin is in a transitional stage of rifting. Basin-opening occurs by propagation of rifting from NE to SW, evidenced by changes in the neovolcanic expression along the basin axial deep and by changes in structural style along the Antarctic Peninsula margin. A phase of magmatically-induced uplift is interpreted in the earlier stage of rifting (SW), followed by subsidence and extension on low-angle, NW-dipping detachment faults (NE). Local magmatism and footwall uplift is associated with the detachments. The structural asymmetry of Bransfield Strait and identification of detachment faults suggests that the basin is opening by simple-shear lithospheric extension. Comparison with the East African Rift system, Lau Basin-Havre Trough backarc, Woodlark basin and Mesozoic-age Rocas Verdes basin supports the contention that Bransfield Strait rifting is in a transitional stage between continental/arc rifting and organized sea-floor spreading, and that it is a useful modern analog for the Rocas Verdes basin. Furthermore, it suggests that detachment faulting may be a common feature of backarc basins. Recognition of low-angle detachment faulting and simple-shear extension is essential for estimating basin extension, and the amount of crustal shortening and thickening that may occur during inversion of a

  3. Comparative effects of tectonism on Silurian carbonate platform evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Soja, C.M. . Geology Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    Detailed comparisons of Silurian carbonates that formed under similar subtropical-tropical conditions in an island arc (Alexander terrane, Alaska), an orogenic belt (Oslo region, Norway), and on a stale craton (Gotland, Sweden) are used to evaluate tectonic controls on carbonate platform sedimentation. Silurian carbonates from Alaska record the evolution of a submarine platform in an island arc affected by late Silurian orogenesis. Silurian limestones that formed on the Baltoscandinavian epicontinental platform experienced Caledonian orogenesis in the Oslo region but accumulated on Gotland several 100 km east of the Caledonide front under quiescent tectonic conditions. This study shows that previous models for carbonate platform development do not predict the disproportionately thick carbonate sequences and characteristics of rocks preserved in the Alaskan island arc. High rates of subsidence and accumulation, steep submarine slopes, tectonic instability, and biogeographic isolation resulted in extraordinarily thick platform and periplatform carbonates, sequential evolution of fringing and barrier reefs, and patterns of faunal turnover that differentiate Silurian arc deposits from coeval carbonates that formed on the craton and in the orogenic belt. On the craton and in the orogenic belt, marine organisms were relatively unaffected by tectonic disturbances, but in the island arc marine biotas experienced regional extinction and faunal turnover. Similarities in the stages in carbonate platform development in the Oslo region and Alaska reflect comparable events involving compression, foreland basin evolution, and subsequent rejuvenation of carbonate depositional sites. Widespread destruction of carbonate environments correlated with orogenic activity and global marine regression eventually produced similar subaerial conditions in the Alexander terrane and across Baltoscandinavia by the late Silurian.

  4. Tectonic evolution of the Tobago Trough forearc basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speed, R.; Torrini, R., Jr.; Smith, P. L.

    1989-01-01

    The histories of configurational changes and sedimentation in the Tobago Trough, which is a modern bathymetric forearc basin of the Lesser Antilles island arc, were investigated using marine seismic data from the Tobago Trough. Special attention is given to two tectonic problems. The first is the evolution of the southeastern corner of the Caribbean as related to the finding that the early forearc basins had substantially different configurations from that of the modern forearc basin. The second is the interaction between the forearc basin and the accretionary prism within the Lesser Antilles system. It is pointed out that Miocene and younger features of the Tobago Trough might reflect a superposition of tectonism associated with the development of the Neogene Lesser Antilles arc on an older arc system.

  5. Plate tectonic evolution of circum-Antarctic passive margins

    SciTech Connect

    Scotese, C.R.; Lawver, L.A.; Sclater, J.G.; Mayes, C.L.; Norton, I.; Royer, J.

    1987-05-01

    Passive margins that formed during the Late Jurassic and Cretaceous account for approximately 80% of the 15,000-km circumference of Antarctica. There are no passive margins younger than Late Cretaceous. Approximately 28% of these margins are Late Jurassic in age, 24% are Early Cretaceous in age, and the remaining 48% formed during the Late Cretaceous. The tectonic style of the rifting events that formed these margins varies considerably along the perimeter of Antarctica. In several areas the initiation of sea-floor spreading was preceded by a long period of extension and predrift stretching (Wilkes Land). Along other portions of the margin, rifting proceeded rapidly with little evidence for a lengthy phase of pre-drift extension (Queen Maud Land). Though extension is the dominant tectonic style, there is evidence for large-scale strike-slip movement associated with the early phases of continental breakup along the coasts of Crown Princess Martha Land and Victoria Land. Except for a short segment of the margin between the West Antarctic peninsula and Marie Byrdland, the Antarctic passive margins have not been affected by subsequent subduction-related compressive deformation. This presentation will review the plate tectonic evolution of the Circum-Antarctic passive margins during five time intervals: Early Jurassic, Late Jurassic, Early Cretaceous, mid-Cretaceous, and latest Cretaceous. A map illustrating the relative amounts of extension along the margin of Antarctica will be presented, and a computer animation illustrating the breakup of Gondwana from an Antarctic perspective will be shown.

  6. Role of fluids in the tectonic evolution of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zac Yung-Chun; Radebaugh, Jani; Harris, Ron A.; Christiansen, Eric H.; Rupper, Summer

    2016-05-01

    Detailed analyses of slopes and arcuate planform morphologies of Titan's equatorial mountain ridge belts are consistent with formation by contractional tectonism. However, contractional structures in ice require large stresses (4-10 MPa), the sources of which are not likely to exist on Titan. Cassini spacecraft imagery reveals a methane-based hydrological cycle on Titan that likely includes movement of fluids through the subsurface. These crustal liquids may enable contractional tectonic features to form as groundwater has for thrust belts on Earth. In this study, we show that liquid hydrocarbons in Titan's near subsurface can lead to fluid overpressures that facilitate contractional deformation at smaller stresses (<1 MPa) by significantly reducing the shear strength of materials. Titan's crustal conditions with enhanced pore fluid pressures favor the formation of thrust faults and related folds in a contractional stress field. Thus, surface and near-surface hydrocarbon fluids made stable by a thick atmosphere may play a key role in the tectonic evolution of Titan.

  7. The tectonic evolution of Red Sea and Gulf of Aden

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.B. ); Sikander, A.H. ); Abouzakhm, A.G.

    1991-08-01

    The Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, formed by rifting of the Arabian plate away from Africa, have been the subjects of numerous studies since the 1960s. Geophysical and geological data gathered during hydrocarbon exploration by several companies are being synthesized as part of the World Bank-executed Red Sea/Gulf of Aden Regional Hydrocarbon Study Project. This synthesis provides an opportunity to study the regional variation in tectonic history and structural style within the two basins, particularly toward the basin margins, where data coverage is most complete and a thinner sedimentary cover allows more reliable interpretation of deeper horizons. Based on this data, most of the Red Sea shows a similar tectonic history to that of the Gulf of Suez. Widespread normal faulting developed contemporaneous with deposition of a dominantly clastic sequence of Oligocene( ) to middle Miocene age. The faulting often dies out within or below thick middle to upper Miocene evaporite deposits with only few faults affecting the younger units. The Gulf of Aden, on the other hand, shows a strong contrast between largely west-northwest-east-southeast oriented extensional structures on land, and generally more east-west oriented extensional structures on the continental shelves and slopes. The onshore extensional structures oriented oblique to the coast, and approximately perpendicular to transform fault trends in the oceanic crust of the central Gulf of Aden. This contrast is extensional structure orientations has important implications for the tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Aden.

  8. Phanerozoic tectonic evolution of the Circum-North Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nokleberg, Warren J.; Parfenov, Leonid M.; Monger, James W.H.; Norton, Ian O.; Khanchuk, Alexander I.; Stone, David B.; Scotese, Christopher R.; Scholl, David W.; Fujita, Kazuya

    2000-01-01

    The Phanerozoic tectonic evolution of the Circum-North Pacific is recorded mainly in the orogenic collages of the Circum-North Pacific mountain belts that separate the North Pacific from the eastern part of the North Asian Craton and the western part of the North American Craton. These collages consist of tectonostratigraphic terranes that are composed of fragments of igneous arcs, accretionary-wedge and subduction-zone complexes, passive continental margins, and cratons; they are overlapped by continental-margin-arc and sedimentary-basin assemblages. The geologic history of the terranes and overlap assemblages is highly complex because of postaccretionary dismemberment and translation during strike-slip faulting that occurred subparallel to continental margins.We analyze the complex tectonics of this region by the following steps. (1) We assign tectonic environments for the orogenic collages from regional compilation and synthesis of stratigraphic and faunal data. The types of tectonic environments include cratonal, passive continental margin, metamorphosed continental margin, continental-margin arc, island arc, oceanic crust, seamount, ophiolite, accretionary wedge, subduction zone, turbidite basin, and metamorphic. (2) We make correlations between terranes. (3) We group coeval terranes into a single tectonic origin, for example, a single island arc or subduction zone. (4) We group igneous-arc and subduction- zone terranes, which are interpreted as being tectonically linked, into coeval, curvilinear arc/subduction-zone complexes. (5) We interpret the original positions of terranes, using geologic, faunal, and paleomagnetic data. (6) We construct the paths of tectonic migration. Six processes overlapping in time were responsible for most of the complexities of the collage of terranes and overlap assemblages around the Circum-North Pacific, as follows. (1) During the Late Proterozoic, Late Devonian, and Early Carboniferous, major periods of rifting occurred along

  9. Tectonic evolution of Brazilian equatorial continental margin basins

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, R.P. )

    1993-02-01

    The structural style and stratigraphic relationships of sedimentary basins along the Brazilian Equatorial Atlantic Continental Margin were used to construct an empirical tectonic model for the development of ancient transform margins. The model is constrained by detailed structural and subsidence analyses of several basins along the margin. The structural framework of the basins was defined at shallow and deep levels by the integration of many geophysical and geological data sets. The Barreirinhas and Para-Maranhao Basins were divided in three tectonic domains: the Tutoia, Caete, and Tromai subbasins. The Caete area is characterized by northwest-southeast striking and northeast-dipping normal faults. A pure shear mechanism of basin formation is suggested for its development. The structure of the Tutoia and Tromai subbasins are more complex and indicative of a major strike-slip component with dextral sense of displacement, during early stages of basin evolution. These two later subbasins were developed on a lithosphere characterized by an abrupt transition (<50 km wide) from an unstretched continent to an oceanic lithosphere. The subsidence history of these basins do not comply with the classical models developed for passive margins or continental rifting. The thermo-mechanical model proposed for the Brazilian equatorial margin includes heterogeneous stretching combined with shearing at the plate margin. The tectonic history comprises: (1) Triassic-Jurassic limited extension associated with the Central Atlantic evolution; (2) Neocomian intraplate deformation consisting of strike-slip reactivation of preexisting shear zones; (3) Aptian-Cenomanian two-phase period of dextral shearing; and (4) Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic sea-floor spreading.

  10. Tectonic evolution of the Brooks Range ophiolite, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Detailed studies of the composition, internal structure, and age of the Brooks Range ophiolite (BRO) and its metamorphic sole reveal new constraints for its tectonic evolution. The BRO consists of six separate thrust masses of consanguineous composition, internal organization, structure and age. Subophiolite metamorphic rocks are locally preserved along its structural base, which is well exposed in several places. The metamorphic sole is locally transitional with mafic volcanic sequences, chert, tuffs, and minor clastic sedimentary material of the Copter Peak Complex, which is correlative with the Angayucham terrane. This terrane is much older than, and chemically distinct from the BRO. The internal structure of the BRO is characterized by NE-SW trending igneous layers that expose the transition zone from crust to mantle. Residual mantle material consists of tectonized peridotite in abrupt contact with dunite pods up to 4 km thick. Ductile and brittle structures of the BRO preserve various phases of its dynamic evolution from a magma body to a fragmented thrust sheet. The earliest deformational effects are recorded by ductile lattice and shape fabrics in dunites and the layered series of the BRO. Magmatic flow planes generally parallel the petrologic moho, and dip 40[degree]--70[degree] to the NW and SE. Flow lineations consistently plunge ESE-ENE from 39[degree]--54[degree]. Igneous laminations and compositional layers represent patterns of magmatic flow in, and plastic deformation of, a cumulate sequence -- not the deposition pattern of cumulate layers. In the upper layered series, amphiboles with a shape-preferred orientation yield Ar/Ar plateau ages of 163--169 Ma. These ages overlap with plateau ages of the same kind from amphibolite of the metamorphic sole. This concordance in age indicates that cooling of the BRO coincided with its tectonic emplacement.

  11. Tectonic, Climatic, and Cryospheric Evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-06-01

    For millennia, Antarctica has been a frozen continent, a land of ice and snow where complex life persists rather than thrives. But Antarctica has not always been this way. Millions of years ago the southern continent was teeming with life. Changing oceans and a plummeting atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration drove a dramatic evolution of the Antarctic continent. To provide a record of these ancient climatic shifts, the 2005-2006 SHALDRIL drilling program collected sediment cores from the bed of the iceberg-filled seas off the Antarctic Peninsula. In the AGU book Tectonic, Climatic, and Cryospheric Evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula, editors John B. Anderson and Julia S. Wellner draw on the findings garnered from SHALDRIL to explore the changing Antarctic Peninsula. In this interview, Eos talks to John B. Anderson.

  12. Structural and metamorphic evolution of serpentinites and rodingites recycled in the Alpine subduction wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanoni, D.; Rebay, G.; Spalla, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    Hydration-dehydration of mantle rocks affects the viscosity of the mantle wedge and plays a prominent role in subduction zone tectonics, facilitating marble cake-type instead of large-slice dynamics. An accurate structural and petrologic investigation of serpentinites from orogenic belts, supported by their long-lived structural memory, can help to recognize pressure-sensitive mineral assemblages for deciphering their P-prograde and -retrograde tectonic trajectories. The European Alps preserve large volumes of the hydrated upper part of the oceanic lithosphere that represents the main water carrier into the Alpine subduction zone. Therefore, it is important to understand what happens during subduction when these rocks reach P-T conditions proximal to those that trigger the break-down of serpentine, formed during oceanic metamorphism, to produce olivine and clinopyroxene. Rodingites associated with serpentinites are usually derived from metasomatic ocean floor processes but rodingitization can also happen in subduction environments. Multiscale structural and petrologic analyses of serpentinites and enclosed rodingites have been combined to define the HP mineral assemblages in the Zermatt-Saas ophiolites. They record 3 syn-metamorphic stages of ductile deformation during the Alpine cycle, following the ocean floor history that is testified by structural and metamorphic relics in both rock types. D1 and D2 developed under HP to UHP conditions and D3 under lower P conditions. Syn-D2 assemblages in serpentinites and rodingites indicate conditions of 2.5 ± 0.3 GPa and 600 ± 20°C. This interdisciplinary approach shows that the dominant structural and metamorphic imprint of the Zermatt-Saas eclogitized serpentinites and rodingites developed during the Alpine subduction and that subduction-related serpentinite de-hydration occurred exclusively at Pmax conditions, during D2 deformation. In contrast, in the favourable rodingite bulk composition (Ca-rich), hydrated minerals

  13. Tectonic escape in the evolution of the continental crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, K.; Sengor, C.

    1986-01-01

    The continental crust originated by processes similar to those operating today and continents consist of material most of which originated long ago in arc-systems that have later been modified, especially at Andean margins and in continental collisions where crustal thickening is common. Collision-related strike-slip motion is a general process in continental evolution. Because buoyant continental (or arc) material generally moves during collision toward a nearby oceanic margin where less buoyant lithosphere crops out, the process of major strike-slip dominated motion toward a 'free-face' is called 'tectonic escape'. Tectonic escape is and has been an element in continental evolution throughout recorded earth-history. It promotes: (1) rifting and the formation of rift-basins with thinning of thickened crust; (2) pervasive strike-slip faulting late in orogenic history which breaks up mountain belts across strike and may juxtapose unrelated sectors in cross-section; (3) localized compressional mountains and related foreland-trough basins.

  14. Tectonic subsidence history and thermal evolution of the Orange Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, K. K.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; van Wees, J.; Paton, D. A.; Kuhlmann, G.

    2008-12-01

    The Orange Basin offshore southwest Africa appears to represent a classical example of continental rifting and break up associated with large-scale, transient volcanism. The presence of lower crustal bodies of high seismic velocities indicates that large volumes of igneous crust formed as a consequence of lithospheric extension. We present results of a combined approach using subsidence analysis and basin history inversion models. Our results show that a classical uniform stretching model does not account for the observed tectonic subsidence. Moreover we find that that the thermal and subsidence implications of underplating need to be considered. Another departure from the uniform stretching model is re-newed sub-crustal stretching and linked to that uplift in the Cenozoic which is necessary to reproduce the observed phases of erosion and the present day depth of the basin. The dimension of these events has been examined and quantified in terms of tectonic uplift and sub-crustal stretching. Based on these forward models we predict the heat flow evolution not only for the available real wells but also for virtual wells over the entire study area. Finally the hydrocarbon potential and the temperature evolution is presented and shown in combination with inferred maturation of the sediments for depth intervals which comprise potential source rocks.

  15. A Lost Realm in the Internal Domains of the Betic-Rif Orogen (Spain and Morocco): Evidence from Conglomerates and Consequences for Alpine Geodynamic Evolution.

    PubMed

    Martín-Algarra; Messina; Perrone; Russo; Maate; Martín-Martín

    2000-07-01

    The Malaguide-Ghomaride Complex is capped by Upper Oligocene-Aquitanian clastic deposits postdating early Alpine orogenesis but predating the main tectonic-metamorphic evolution, end of nappe emplacement, unroofing, and exhumation of the metamorphic units of the Betic-Rif Orogen. Two conglomerate intervals within these deposits are characterized by clasts of sedimentary, epimetamorphic, and mafic volcanic rocks derived from Malaguide-Ghomaride units and by clasts of acidic magmatic and orthogneissic rocks of unknown provenance, here studied. Magmatic rocks originated from late-Variscan two-mica cordierite-bearing granitoids and, subordinately, from aplitic dikes. Orthogneisses derive from similar plutonic rocks but are affected by an Alpine metamorphic overprint evolving from greenschist (T=510&j0;-530 degrees C and P=5-6 kbar) to low-temperature amphibolite facies (T>550&j0;C and P<3 kbar). Such a plutonic rock suite is unknown in any Betic-Rif unit or in the basement of the Alboran Sea, and the metamorphic evolution in the orthogneisses is different from (and older than) that of Alpujarride-Sebtide rocks to which they were formerly ascribed. Magmatic and metamorphic rocks very similar to those studied characterize the basements of some Kabylia and Calabria-Peloritani units. Therefore, the source area is a currently lost continental-crust realm of Calabria-Peloritani-Kabylia type, located to the ESE of the Malaguide-Ghomaride Domain and affected by a pre-latest Oligocene Alpine metamorphism. Increasingly active tectonics transformed this realm into rising areas from which erosion fed small subsiding synorogenic basins formed on the Malaguide-Ghomaride Complex. This provenance analysis demonstrates that all these domains constituted a single continental-crust block until Aquitanian-Burdigalian times, before its dispersal around nascent western Mediterranean basins. PMID:10856014

  16. Geomorpho-tectonic evolution of the Jamaican restraining bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-González, Leomaris; Andreani, Louis; Stanek, Klaus P.; Gloaguen, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This work applies recent advances in tectonic geomorphology in order to understand the geomorphic evolution of the Jamaican restraining bend located along the Caribbean-Gonâve-North American plate boundary. We propose a classification of landscapes according to their erosional stages. The approach is mainly based on the combination of two DEM-based geomorphic indices: the hypsometric integral which highlights elevated surfaces, and the surface roughness which increases when the relief is incised by the drainage network. River longitudinal profiles were also analyzed as the drainage network responds quickly to base-level change triggered by external forcing such as tectonics. Anomalies in river profiles (knickpoints and convex segments) were mapped using stream length-gradient (SL) and normalized steepness (ksn) indices. The results provide new insights for understanding the complex evolution of the Jamaican restraining bend. Three main morphotectonic regions were identified in Jamaica: (1) the Blue Mountain-Wagwater unit located at the eastern tip of the island, (2) the Jamaican highlands plateau which covers most of the northern and central areas and (3) the tilted block province located along the southern part of Jamaica. Each region has a specific morphological signature which marks a different stage in the Late Miocene to present evolution of the Jamaican restraining bend. The evolution of the bend is mainly associated with the western propagation of major E-trending strike-slip faults and NW-trending thrusts. In the western and central parts of Jamaica the present-day motion between the Caribbean plate and the Gonâve microplate is broadly distributed along several structures, while in the easternmost part of the island this motion seems to be almost completely accommodated along the Blue Mountain range and the Plantain-Garden Fault.

  17. Role of structural heritage and global tectonics events in evolution of Algerian Triassic basin: Tectonic inversion and reservoir distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Boudjema, A.; Tremolieres, P.

    1988-01-01

    Fieldwork and subsurface studies (350 bore holes and more than 100 seismic profiles) show the structural evolution of the Triassic Saharian basin. This evolution is controlled by the successive motions of ancient faults of the Paleozoic basement during the different compressional and distensional tectonic phases. These movements led to some tectonic inversions. Depending on the strike of the faults, the present results correspond to normal throw or reverse throw at the level of hydrocarbon reservoirs. These tectonic phases clearly result from relative motions between African, American, and European lithospheric plates. The Triassic basin, a mobile zone between two rigid shields, constitutes a very good indication of the successive motions. The distribution and the nature of hydrocarbon fields are clearly related to the proximity of the faults, the post-tectonic erosion of a part of the source rocks, the burial and maturation of the organic matter, and the age of structural traps.

  18. The tectonic and volcanic evolution of Venus: Catastrophic or gradual?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1993-01-01

    different degree of layering, then the planet may in the last 500 My have attained lesser mantle temperatures, lower mantle heat flux, and a significantly lesser rate of magma production than Earth yet still display evidence for ongoing convection and active tectonics. Such a 'cold Venus' scenario would be broadly consistent with observations yet be characterized by a gradual volcanic and tectonic evolution.

  19. Tectonic evolution of Honey Lake basin, northeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, D.L. ); Saucedo, G.J. ); Grose, T.L.T. . Dept. of Geology and Geological Engineering)

    1993-04-01

    New geologic mapping in northeastern California provides additional data on the age and tectonic evolution of the Honey Lake Basin. Rhylitic ash flow tuffs of latest Oligocene to early Miocene age (30 to 22 Ma) occur in the Fort Sage Mountains and in the Sierra Nevada but are not apparent in wells drilled in the Honey Lake basin. Though other interpretations can be made, the authors take this as evidence that the basin did not exist at that time. Volcanic rocks as old as 12 Ma do occur in the basin indicating initiation in mid-Miocene time probably as a graben due to block faulting. Syntectonic andesitic and basaltic volcanism occurred along faults bounding the Sierra Nevada block at 9 to 10 Ma. Lava issuing from these fractures flowed westward along Tertiary drainages indicating that the Sierran block had been uplifted and tilted westward. Andesites erupted during this time north and east of the basin are lithologically distinct from Sierran andesites. Strike-slip faulting began to dominate the tectonic setting of the region during late Pliocene and Quaternary time with the development of the Honey Lake Fault Zone. Holocene strike-slip displacement is indicated by offsets of the 12,000 year old Lake Lahontan shoreline and deposits containing a 7,000 year old ash.

  20. A model for plate tectonic evolution of mantle layers.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, W R; Luth, W C

    1971-10-22

    In plate tectonic theory, lithosphere that descends into the mantle has a largely derivative composition, because it is produced as a refractory residue by partial melting, and cannot be resorbed readily by the parent mantle. We suggest that lithosphere sinks through the asthenosphere, or outer mantle, and accumulates progressively beneath to form an accretionary mesosphere, or inner mantle. According to this model, there is an irreversible physicochemical evolution of the mantle and its layers. We make the key assumption that the rate at which mass has been transferred from the lithosphere to the mesosphere is proportional to the rate of radiogenic heat production. Calculations of mass transfer with time demonstrate that the entire mass of the present mesosphere could have been produced in geologically reasonable times (3 x 10(9) to 4.5 x 10(9) years). The model is consistent with the generation of the continental crust during the last 3 x 1O(9) years and predicts an end to plate tectonic behavior within the next 10(9) years. PMID:17796091

  1. Tectonic evolution of Kashmir basin in northwest Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Akhtar; Ahmad, Shabir; Bhat, M. Sultan; Ahmad, Bashir

    2015-06-01

    Geomorphology has long been recognised as a key to evaluate the interplay between tectonics and landscape geometry in the regions of active deformation. We use geomorphic signatures at varied spatial scales interpreted from SRTM-DEM/Landsat-ETM data, supplemented with field observations to review the tectonic evolution of Kashmir basin in northwest Himalayas. Geomorphic evidence is persuasive of a credible NNW-SSE trending dextral strike-slip structure (central Kashmir Fault - CKF), with the strike length of ~ 165 km, stretched centrally over the NNW-SSE length of the Kashmir basin. As a result of the strike-slip motion and subsequent erosion, significant deformation has taken place along the CKF. In addition, broad geomorphic architecture of the basin reveals typical pull-apart characteristics. Hence, we deduce that the Kashmir basin has evolved as a pull-apart Quaternary sediment depression owing to the deformation along the central Kashmir Fault. The spatial distribution pattern of seismic events (NEIC-catalogue, 1973-2013) and GPS measurements (published), collectively substantiate our geomorphic interpretations.

  2. Tectonic evolution of the Archaean high-grade terrain of South India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, M.

    1988-01-01

    The southern Indian shield consists of three major tectonic provinces viz., (1) Dharwar Craton, (2) Eastern Ghat Mobile Belt, and (3) Pandyan Mobile Belt. An understanding of their mutual relations is crucial for formulating crustal evolution models. The tectonic evolution of these provinces is summarized.

  3. Evidence of adaptive evolution of alpine pheasants to high-altitude environment from mitogenomic perspective.

    PubMed

    Gu, Peng; Liu, Wei; Yao, Yong-fang; Ni, Qing-yong; Zhang, Ming-wang; Li, Di-yan; Xu, Huai-liang

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive evolutions to high-altitude adaptation have been intensively studied in mammals. However, considering the additional vertebrate groups, new perception regarding selection challenged by high-altitude stress on mitochondrial genome can be gained. To test this hypothesis, we compiled and analyzed the mitochondrial genomes of 5 alpine pheasants and 12 low-altitude species in Phasianidae. The results that evolutionary rates of ATP6 and ND6 showing significant fluctuation among branches when involved with five alpine pheasants revealed both genes might have implications with adapting to highland environment. The radical physico-chemical property changes identified by the modified MM01 model, including composition (C) and equilibrium constant (ionization of COOH) (Pk') in ATP6 and beta-structure tendencies (Pβ), Pk', and long-range non-bonded energy (El) in ND6, suggested that minor overall adjustments in size, protein conformation and relative orientation of reaction interfaces have been optimized to provide the ideal environments for electron transfer, proton translocation and generation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Additionally, three unique substitution sites were identified under selection in ND6, which could be potentially important adaptive changes contributing to cellular energy production. Our findings suggested that adaptive evolution may occur in alpine pheasants, which are an important complement to the knowledge of genetic mechanisms against the high-altitude environment in non-mammal animals. PMID:24708132

  4. The evolution of Tharsis: Implications of gravity, topography, and tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerdt, W. B.; Golombek, M. P.

    1990-01-01

    Dominating the Western Hemisphere of Mars, the Tharsis rise is an elongate area centered on Syria Planum that ascends as much as 8 to 10 km above the datum. It is intensely fractured by long, narrow grabens that extend radially hundreds of kilometers beyond the rise and is ringed by mostly concentric wrinkle ridges that formed over 2,000 km from the center of the rise. Its size, involving a full hemisphere of Mars, gives it a central role in the thermo-tectonic evolution of the planet and has stimulated a number of studies attempting to determine the sequence of events responsible for this feature. The constraints that gravity and topography data place on the current structure of Tharsis, along with insights into its development derived from comparisons of detailed regional mapping of faulting with theoretical deformation models are reviewed. Finally, a self-consistent model for the structure of Tharsis is proposed.

  5. Garnet Porphyroblasts and the Tectonic Evolution of Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerden, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    Porphyroblast inclusion trails constitute an exceptionally detailed record of deformation histories undergone by metamorphic rocks. Their orientations have been shown to be remarkably consistent in mountain belts and to relate to large-scale orogenic processes. For example, vertical and horizontal preferred orientations are almost universally developed and resulted from multiple gravitational collapse stages that periodically interrupted plate-driven (horizontal) crustal shortening. Over the past 20 years, a large body of orientation data has become available for Foliation Intersection Axes (FIA) defined by inclusion trails in orogenic belts around the world. This data reveals that FIAs in metamorphic regions generally can be grouped into a discrete number of age sets with distinctive geographic trends. Such FIA sequences apparently track shifts in the direction of crustal shortening with time. Garnet is a particularly useful porphyroblastic mineral where it comes to linking deformation and metamorphic paths, due to a unique combination of properties: (1) lengthy growth histories along extended P-T paths and in rocks with variable bulk compositions, (2) sub-spherical crystal shapes and rigid behavior favoring the nucleation of tectonic foliations against garnet edges and their preservation in continued garnet-growth stage, (3) chemical compositions sensitive to changes in metamorphic conditions that can be modeled thermodynamically, (4) abundance of datable micro-inclusions, such as monazite, and (5) the possibility of dating garnet itself via the Sm-Nd or Lu-Hf methods. In Iberia, integrated microstructural and petrological analysis of garnet porphyroblasts in the Betic Cordillera (European Alpine belt) has recently established a sequence of 4 FIA sets. The successive geographic trends of these FIA (NE-SW, NW-SE, ENE-WSW, and NNW-SSE) remarkably correlate with known changes in relative Iberia-Africa plate motion from ca. 50-10Ma. In Hercynian Iberia (Iberian

  6. Surge-tectonic evolution of southeastern Asia: a geohydrodynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyerhoff, Arthur A.

    The repeated need for ad hoc modifications in plate-tectonic models to explain the evolution of southeastern Asia reveals their inability to fully explain the complex features and dynamics of this region. As one example, the hypothesis does not provide a mechanism to explain the 180° turns and twists along the strike of several foldbelts and island arcs in the region (e.g. Banda arc). Convection-cell configuration renders such 180° contortions and Rayleigh-Bénard-type convection impossible. However, during the last 10 years, new data bearing on the convection-cell problem have become available in the form of seismotomographic images of the earth's interior. These images show that (i) mantle diapirs as proposed by traditional plate-tectonic models do not exist; (ii) there is no discernible pattern of upper or lower mantle convection, and thus no longer an adequate mechanism to move plates; and (iii) the lithosphere above a depth of about 80 km is permeated by an interconnected network of low-velocity channels. Seismic-reflection studies of the low-velocity channels discovered on the seismotomographic images reveal that these channels have walls with a 7.1-7.8 km s -1 P-wave velocity. Commonly, the interiors of the channels are acoustically transparent, with much slower P-wave velocities, in places as low as 5.4 km s -1. The author and co-workers have interpreted the low velocities as evidence for the presence of partial melt in the channels, and they postulated that this melt moves preferentially eastward as a result of the earth's rotation. They named these channels "surge channels" and their new hypothesis for earth dynamics "surge tectonics". Surge channels underlie every type of tectonic belt, which includes mid-ocean ridges, aseismic ridges, continental rifts, strike-slip fracture zones, and foldbelts. In southeastern Asia, surge channels—mainly foldbelts—lie between all platform and cratonic massifs. These massifs, platforms, and tectonics belts

  7. Scientific results of the NASA-sponsored study project on Mars: Evolution of volcanism, tectonics, and volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C. (Editor); Sharpton, Virgil L. (Editor); Zimbelman, James R. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the Mars: Evolution of Volcanism, Tectonics, and Volatiles (MEVTV) project are to outline the volcanic and tectonic history of Mars; to determine the influence of volatiles on Martian volcanic and tectonic processes; and to attempt to determine the compositional, thermal, and volatile history of Mars from its volcanic and tectonic evolution. Available data sets were used to test general models of the volcanic and tectonic history of Mars.

  8. The Cretaceous and Cenozoic tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahirovic, S.; Seton, M.; Müller, R. D.

    2014-04-01

    Tectonic reconstructions of Southeast Asia have given rise to numerous controversies that include the accretionary history of Sundaland and the enigmatic tectonic origin of the proto-South China Sea. We assimilate a diversity of geological and geophysical observations into a new regional plate model, coupled to a global model, to address these debates. Our approach takes into account terrane suturing and accretion histories, the location of subducted slabs imaged in mantle tomography in order to constrain the evolution of regional subduction zones, as well as plausible absolute and relative plate velocities and tectonic driving mechanisms. We propose a scenario of rifting from northern Gondwana in the latest Jurassic, driven by northward slab pull from north-dipping subduction of Tethyan crust beneath Eurasia, to detach East Java, Mangkalihat, southeast Borneo and West Sulawesi blocks that collided with a Tethyan intra-oceanic subduction zone in the mid-Cretaceous and subsequently accreted to the Sunda margin (i.e., southwest Borneo core) in the Late Cretaceous. In accounting for the evolution of plate boundaries, we propose that the Philippine Sea plate originated on the periphery of Tethyan crust forming this northward conveyor. We implement a revised model for the Tethyan intra-oceanic subduction zones to reconcile convergence rates, changes in volcanism and the obduction of ophiolites. In our model the northward margin of Greater India collides with the Kohistan-Ladakh intra-oceanic arc at ∼53 Ma, followed by continent-continent collision closing the Shyok and Indus-Tsangpo suture zones between ∼42 and 34 Ma. We also account for the back-arc opening of the proto-South China Sea from ∼65 Ma, consistent with extension along east Asia and the formation of supra-subduction zone ophiolites presently found on the island of Mindoro. The related rifting likely detached the Semitau continental fragment from South China, which accreted to northern Borneo in

  9. The efficiency of plate tectonics and nonequilibrium dynamical evolution of planetary mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, W. B.; Lenardic, A.

    2015-11-01

    Consideration of the structure of dynamical equilibria in terrestrial planets using simplified descriptions of the relevant heat transport processes (rigid-lid convection, plate tectonics, and heat pipe volcanism) reveals that if the efficiency of plate tectonic heat transport decreases at higher mantle temperature, then it cannot govern quasi-equilibrium dynamical evolution, and the system is always evolving away from the plate tectonic regime. A planet on which plate tectonics is less efficient at higher temperature stays in heat pipe mode longer, spends less time undergoing plate tectonics, and has a low and ever-decreasing Urey number during this phase. These conclusions are based solely on the structure of the equilibria in a system with less efficient plate tectonics in the past and are independent of the mechanisms leading to this behavior. Commonly used quasi-equilibrium approaches to planetary thermal evolution are likely not valid for planets in which heat transport becomes less efficient at higher temperature.

  10. Mesozoic Plate Tectonic Evolution of the Northern Margin of Pangea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    Asia joined Laurentia and Baltica during the formation of the Urals in the Early Permian. Subsequently, the northern margin of Pangea shared a paleo-Pacific facing margin. Analysis of events along this (mostly active) margin provides insight into the plate tectonic setting and evolution of the Arctic basins and their temporal links to Pacific margin events. A 3-phase tectonic evolution characterizes the northern margin of Pangea during the Mesozoic: 1. Permo-Triassic rifting (Siberian Trap magmatism)was linked to rifting in a series of back-arc basins developed along the northern margin of Pangea. Triassic-Jurasic deep-water sedimentary seqences deposited in these basins were subsequently deformed during phase 2 events. 2. Lithospheric shortening/convergence across this margin deformed these basinal sediments and shed syn-orogenic deposits cratonward in the Jura-Cretaceous. Syn-orogenic basinal successions are widespread from the Verkoyansk margin of Siberia to the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt. Their sources are well-characterized by U-Pb ages of detrital zircon suites and include Pennsylvanian-Permian, Triassic and Jurassic magmatic belts, implying convergence and emplacement of a long-lived arc system onto the continental margin. 3. Structures related to phase 2 are cut and overprinted by voluminous, syn-extensional, slab-related magmatism that developed during southward or Pacific-ward migration of a N-dipping subducting slab. It is inferred that the earliest part of the Amerasia Basin likely opened during part of this magmatic event, 135 to 90 Ma. The final culmination of this magmatic event is the Ohotsk-Chukotsk volcanic belt, ~90-75 Ma;after this, magmatism continues to migrate Pacific-ward in a series of steps. Utilizing plate models of the Arctic by Lawver et al.(2002) it can be shown that some of the differences in the timing and style of Mesozoic orogenesis along the northern paleo-Pacific margin of Pangea (and especially the differences between the

  11. Into thin air: Physiology and evolution of alpine insects.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Michael E; Frazier, Melanie R; Dudley, Robert

    2006-02-01

    Numerous physical parameters that influence insect physiology vary substantially with altitude, including temperature, air density, and oxygen partial pressure. Here, we review existing literature and present new empirical data to better characterize the high-altitude environment, and then consider how this environment affects the physiology and evolution of insects. Using weather balloon data from fifty-three sites across the globe, we estimate a mean altitudinal temperature lapse rate of 6.0 °C/km. We also present empirically determined lapse rates for P(o(2)) and air density. The temperature decline with elevation may substantially compromise insect thermoregulation at high altitude. However, heat-transfer models predict that lower air density at elevation reduces convective heat loss of insects by to a surprisingly large degree. This effect combined with behavioral thermoregulation and the availability of buffered microhabitats make the net thermal consequences of high-altitude residence strongly context-specific. The decline in P(o(2)) with elevation may compromise insect development and physiology, but its effects are difficult to predict without simultaneously considering temperature and air density. Flying insects compensate for low air densities with both short-term responses, such as increased stroke amplitude (but not wingbeat frequency), and with long-term developmental and/or evolutionary increases in wing size relative to body size. Finally, in contrast to predictions based on Bergmann's Rule, a literature survey of thirty-six insect species suggests that those living in colder, higher altitudes do not tend to have larger body sizes. PMID:21672722

  12. Surge-tectonic evolution of southeastern Asia: a geohydrodynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyerhoff, Arthur A.

    The repeated need for ad hoc modifications in plate-tectonic models to explain the evolution of southeastern Asia reveals their inability to fully explain the complex features and dynamics of this region. As one example, the hypothesis does not provide a mechanism to explain the 180° turns and twists along the strike of several foldbelts and island arcs in the region (e.g. Banda arc). Convection-cell configuration renders such 180° contortions and Rayleigh-Bénard-type convection impossible. However, during the last 10 years, new data bearing on the convection-cell problem have become available in the form of seismotomographic images of the earth's interior. These images show that (i) mantle diapirs as proposed by traditional plate-tectonic models do not exist; (ii) there is no discernible pattern of upper or lower mantle convection, and thus no longer an adequate mechanism to move plates; and (iii) the lithosphere above a depth of about 80 km is permeated by an interconnected network of low-velocity channels. Seismic-reflection studies of the low-velocity channels discovered on the seismotomographic images reveal that these channels have walls with a 7.1-7.8 km s -1 P-wave velocity. Commonly, the interiors of the channels are acoustically transparent, with much slower P-wave velocities, in places as low as 5.4 km s -1. The author and co-workers have interpreted the low velocities as evidence for the presence of partial melt in the channels, and they postulated that this melt moves preferentially eastward as a result of the earth's rotation. They named these channels "surge channels" and their new hypothesis for earth dynamics "surge tectonics". Surge channels underlie every type of tectonic belt, which includes mid-ocean ridges, aseismic ridges, continental rifts, strike-slip fracture zones, and foldbelts. In southeastern Asia, surge channels—mainly foldbelts—lie between all platform and cratonic massifs. These massifs, platforms, and tectonics belts

  13. The Tectonic Evolution and Mineralization in Altay, Xinjiang, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Y.; Ding, R.; Zhang, C.

    2011-12-01

    China Altai located in the center of Altai belt and experienced a long history of complex tectonic evolution, and the rich mineral resources were formed in the belt. The copper-zinc, lead- zinc and other non-ferrous metals deposits are produced in 230 -380 Ma ago, gold deposits are produced in 260-310 Ma and 135 Ma ago, and the rare metal deposits produced mainly in 148 -198 Ma ago in the Altay, Xinjiang, China. These ore deposits were formed in zoning and can be classified into following ore-forming belts such as Irtysh belt, Ashele belt, Chonghuer-Maizi belt and Keketuohai1belt. As Siberia plate and Kazakhstan plate expansion in sinian Period, the paleo-Asia ocean was formed,and the paleo-Asia ocean subducted to Siberia plate in the same time, shallow sea clastic rock formation was developed in Altay in Early Palaeozoic (Cambrian to early Ordovician) . The Siberian block cracked open along the southwestern edge of Siberian block since early Hercynian (400-380Ma) to cause the bimodal magma eruptive and invasive activities occurred strongly along the rift zone at the floor. The volcanic activity center moved from east to west to form a series of volcanic basin such as Maizi, Kelan, Chonghuer and Ashele volcanic basins in southern Altay, and the iron, lead, zinc, copper and zinc deposit formed in these volcanic basins. Because of the Continental crust relaxation, the Nurt volcanic sedimentary basin was formed between 370-330Ma. Volcanic rock erupted, granite intruded, And the source bed of lead, zinc and epithermal gold deposits were formed. Early Carboniferous (Hercynian middle and late ,320-280Ma) Junggar plate collision to the Siberian plate, the collision zone at roughly the irtysh melange rock zone distribution area, and the deep tensile fracture occurred along this tectonic belt to cause mantle material intrusion along this belt because of pressure depressing and the partial melting of magma to form basic and ultrabasic rock to form copper, nickel, platinum

  14. Style of Alpine tectonic deformation in the Castellane fold-and-thrust belt, (SW Alps, France): Insights from balanced cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdon, Anthony; Rolland, Yann; Petit, Carole; Bellahsen, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    This study proposes a reappraisal of the role of the basement tectonics in the structuration of the Alpine foreland, across the Castellane fold-and-thrust belt located in southwestern Alps. We construct three 30 km length N-S balanced cross-sections across the entire fold-and-thrust belt, in order to quantify the amount of horizontal shortening due to the Pyrenean and Alpine deformations. We then assess the role of the basement inherited structures during the compressional phases which resulted in the exhumation of the Argentera-Mercantour External crystalline massif and the Barrot Dome. The construction of these balanced cross-sections suggests a dominant thick-skinned deformation style, which includes the reactivation of inherited Permian and Early Cretaceous basement normal faults. We reconstructed three restoration stages: the oldest one highlights the geometry of Permian and Early Cretaceous extensional structures; the intermediate one after the Late Cretaceous evidences a first compressional episode linked to the Pyrenean compression; the latest one in the Oligocene shows the first Alpine folds resulting from the southward thrusting of the internal units over the external ones along of the Penninic Frontal Thrust. Balanced cross-sections suggest very moderate crystalline basement - sedimentary cover decoupling. On the western and central cross-sections, the estimated amount of shortening ranges from 9.5 to 10 km (21%) whereas on the easternmost one shows ~5 km of shortening (9%). These shortening values are consistent with previously published estimates in the surrounding foreland subalpine chains. They highlight a decreasing value of Pyrenean shortening towards the east, while the Alpine shortening dominates and amplifies this first phase in a similar direction. We interpret this dominantly thick-skinned structural style as a possible consequence of the Neogene thermal weakening in the European passive margin above the Ligurian slab rollback.

  15. The Cretaceous and Cenozoic tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahirovic, S.; Seton, M.; Müller, R. D.

    2013-08-01

    Tectonic reconstructions of Southeast Asia have given rise to numerous controversies which include the accretionary history of Sundaland and the enigmatic tectonic origin of the Proto South China Sea. We assimilate a diversity of geological and geophysical observations into a new regional plate model, coupled to a global model, to address these debates. Our approach takes into account terrane suturing and accretion histories, the location of subducted slabs imaged in mantle tomography in order to constrain the opening and closure history of paleo-ocean basins, as well as plausible absolute and relative plate velocities and tectonic driving mechanisms. We propose a scenario of rifting from northern Gondwana in the Late Jurassic, driven by northward slab pull, to detach East Java, Mangkalihat, southeast Borneo and West Sulawesi blocks that collided with a Tethyan intra-oceanic subduction zone in the mid Cretaceous and subsequently accreted to the Sunda margin (i.e. southwest Borneo core) in the Late Cretaceous. In accounting for the evolution of plate boundaries, we propose that the Philippine Sea Plate originated on the periphery of Tethyan crust forming this northward conveyor. We implement a revised model for the Tethyan intra-oceanic subduction zones to reconcile convergence rates, changes in volcanism and the obduction of ophiolites. In our model the northward margin of Greater India collides with the Kohistan-Ladakh intra-oceanic arc at ∼53 Ma, followed by continent-continent collision closing the Shyok and Indus-Tsangpo suture zones between ∼42 and 34 Ma. We also account for the back-arc opening of the Proto South China Sea from ∼65 Ma, consistent with extension along east Asia and the emplacement of supra-subduction zone ophiolites presently found on the island of Mindoro. The related rifting likely detached the Semitau continental fragment from east China, which accreted to northern Borneo in the mid Eocene, to account for the Sarawak Orogeny

  16. Landscape evolution and bedrock incision in the northern Alpine Foreland since the last 2 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claude, Anne; Akçar, Naki; Schlunegger, Fritz; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Kubik, Peter; Christl, Marcus; Vockenhuber, Christof; Dehnert, Andreas; Kuhlemann, Joachim; Rahn, Meinert; Schlüchter, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The landscape evolution of the Swiss Alpine Foreland since the early Pleistocene is of utmost importance for modelling the long-term safety of deep geological repositories for nuclear waste disposal in the northern Alpine Foreland. The oldest Quaternary sediments in the northern foreland are proximal glaciofluvial sediments lying unconformably on Tertiary Molasse or Mesozoic carbonate bedrock. These deposits form topographically distinct and discontinuous isolated plateaus. Terrace morphostratigraphy has a reversed stratigraphic relationship, i.e. today older sediments are located at higher altitudes and vice versa. In this study, we focus on the landscape evolution and long-term bedrock incision in the Swiss Alpine Foreland. We reconstruct the terrace chronology in the foreland at six key locations at different altitudes ranging from 433 m a.s.l. to 675 m a.s.l. by applying cosmogenic depth-profile and isochron-burial dating techniques. First results from these sites indicate that the gravels at studied sites were accumulated in the foreland between 1 and 2 Ma. Based on this reconstructed chronology, long-term bedrock incision rates between 0.1 and 0.2 mm/a were calculated. Thus, we inferred a landscape at that time that was most likely characterized by smoother hillslopes than at present. During the Mid-Pleistocene Revolution (ca. 0.95 Ma), a re-organization of the drainage systems occurred in the Alpine Foreland with a significant lowering of the base level of stream channels. Existing data suggest slightly increased incision rates after this drainage network re-organisation compared to our results. The reconstruction of the chronology at the remaining sites may allow quantifying a pronounced incision as well as the exact timing of the acceleration in the incision rates. REFERENCES Heuberger, S. & Naef, H. (2014). NAB 12-35: Regionale GIS-Kompilation und -Analyse der Deckenschotter-Vorkommen im nördlichen Alpenvorland. Nagra Arbeitsbericht. Kuhlemann, J. & Rahn

  17. Tectonic evolution of Western Patagonia and hydrocarbon habitats

    SciTech Connect

    Urien, C.M. )

    1993-02-01

    In Devonian times, Western Patagonia was a Pericratonic Foreland basin. The rift-like, faulted platform underwent several marine transgressions-regressions related to tectonic episodes occurring mainly from Hercynian to Andean (Pyrenaic) times that modified the extension and nature of sedimentation in the region, due to the evolution of the Pacific Plate and Margin, and the accretion of successive acidic magmatic arcs. The marine sequences that flooded Patagonia, uneven in extension, shifted from North to South in accordance with differential subsidence in this margin, particularly in the three main sedimentary embayments: Neuquen, San Jorge and Magellan-Malvinas. Transversal ridges, following ancestral transtensional features, rejuvenated during the Atlantic opening separate these embayments. Marine sequences evolved into restricted circulation oxygen poor seas, whose organic matter rich sediments originated hydrocarbon source rocks, identified in the three most important basinal complexes of Patagonia. The beginning of the Andean Orogeny and the emplacement of the Andean Batholith, hindered the Pacific marine presence in western Patagonian basins. Subsequently, an Eastern elongated region-wide subsidence allowed the accumulation of molasse-like sequences over most foredeep sediments in the region, creating several hydrocarbons habitats grouped as follows: Neuquen: Proven: Liassic-Aptian; Potential: Triassic; San Jorge: Proven: U. Jurassic-L. Cretaceous; Unproven: L. Paleozoic-L. Jurassic; Magellan/Malvinas: Proven: L. Cretaceous; Unproven: Jurassic-U. Cretaceous During Laramic time, Atlantic highstand sea levels flooded a great part of Extra Andean Patagonia, while the Andean Chain started rising with an active magmatic arc.

  18. Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John Dewey will complete his term as editor-in-chief of Tectonics at the end of 1984. Clark Burchfiel's term as North American Editor will also end. Tectonics is published jointly with the European Geophysical Society. This newest of AGU's journals has already established itself as an important journal bridging the concerns of geophysics and geology.James A. Van Allen, president of AGU, has appointed a committee to recommend candidates for both editor-in-chief and North American editor for the 1985-1987 term.

  19. Pollen sensitivity to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) suggests floral structure evolution in alpine plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chan; Yang, Yong-Ping; Duan, Yuan-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Various biotic and abiotic factors are known to exert selection pressures on floral traits, but the influence of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) light on the evolution of flower structure remains relatively unexplored. We have examined the effectiveness of flower structure in blocking radiation and the effects of UV-B on pollen viability in 42 species of alpine plants in the Hengduan Mountains, China. Floral forms were categorized as either protecting or exposing pollen grains to UV-B. The floral materials of plants with exposed and protected pollen grains were able to block UV-B at similar levels. Exposure to UV-B radiation in vitro resulted in a significantly greater loss of viability in pollen from plant species with protective floral structures. The pronounced sensitivity of protected pollen to UV-B radiation was associated with the type of flower structure. These findings demonstrate that UV-B plays an important role in the evolution of protective floral forms in alpine plants. PMID:24682234

  20. Precambrrian crustal evolution in the great falls tectonic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, Jennifer N.

    The Great Falls Tectonic Zone (GFTZ) is a zone of northeast trending geological structures in central Montana that parallel structures in the underlying basement. U-Pb zircon and Nd isotopic data from the Little Belt Mountains (LBM) suggest that the GFTZ formed at ~1.86 to 1.80 Ga due to ocean subduction followed by collision between the Archean Wyoming Province (WP) and Medicine Hat Block (MHB). This study characterizes the GFTZ basement by geochronological and geochemical analysis of crustal xenoliths collected from Montana Alkali Province volcanics and exposed basement rock in the Little Rocky Mountains (LRM). Xenoliths collected from the Grassrange and Missouri Breaks diatremes and volcanics in the Bearpaw and Highwood Mountains have igneous crystallization ages from ~1.7 Ga to 1.9 Ga and 2.4 Ga to 2.7 Ga, and metamorphic ages from ~1.65 Ga to 1.84 Ga. Zircon Lu-Hf and whole-rock Sm-Nd data indicate that the xenoliths originated from reworked older continental crust mixed with mantle-derived components in all cases. Trace element patterns show fluid mobile element enrichments and fluid immobile element depletions suggestive of a subduction origin. Igneous ages in the LRM range older, from ~2.4 Ga to 3.2 Ga. Geochemical evidence suggests that the LRM meta-igneous units also formed in a subduction setting. Detrital zircon ages span the early Paleoproterozoic to Mesoarchean, with abundant 2.8 Ga ages. Zircon U-Pb igneous crystallization age data from xenoliths and the LRM are consistent with U-Pb zircon igneous crystallization ages from the MHB, suggesting that this segment of the GFTZ shares an affinity with concealed MHB crust. Published detrital zircon ages from the northern Wyoming Province reveal more abundant >3.0 Ga ages than the MHB or GFTZ samples. These geochronologic and geochemical data from the xenoliths and LRM samples allow for a refined model for crustal evolution in the GFTZ. Subduction under the Neoarchean to Paleoproterozoic crust of the MHB

  1. New tectonic concept of the Arctic region evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, O. V.; Morozov, A.; Grikurov, G.; Shokalsky, S.; Kashubin, S.; Sobolev, N. V.; Petrov, E.

    2012-12-01

    -Early Cretaceous continental rifting and volcanic activity. Reactivation of rifting in the Central Arctic at the beginning of Cenozoic led to the onset of spreading 56 million years ago along the emerging Gakkel Ridge and to the subsequent formation of the Eurasian Basin. Approximately 33 million years ago, the newly formed Eurasian oceanic basin connected with the Norwegian-Greenland Basin of the North Atlantic. Combined interpretation of seismostratigraphic data and drilling results suggests that during the Paleogene shallow-water sedimentation in the Central Arctic occurred, which indicates the high-standing sea level. Only in the Early Miocene (about 20 million years ago) the sea bottom sank sharply reaching its present-day depth and causing transition to deep-water deposition. This essential tectonic event is recorded throughout the Central Arctic elevations by a regional unconformity in seismostratigraphic sections. The Cenozoic expansion of the North Atlantic into the Central Arctic occurred across the structural assemblages whose formation was controlled by the preceding evolution of the Asian paleo-ocean.

  2. Post-Jurassic tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahirovic, Sabin; Seton, Maria; Dietmar Müller, R.; Flament, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    The accretionary growth of Asia, linked to long-term convergence between Eurasia, Gondwana-derived blocks and the Pacific, resulted in a mosaic of terranes for which conflicting tectonic interpretations exist. Here, we propose solutions to a number of controversies related to the evolution of Sundaland through a synthesis of published geological data and plate reconstructions that reconcile both geological and geophysical constraints with plate driving forces. We propose that West Sulawesi, East Java and easternmost Borneo rifted from northern Gondwana in the latest Jurassic, collided with an intra-oceanic arc at ~115 Ma and subsequently sutured to Sundaland by 80 Ma. Although recent models argue that the Southwest Borneo core accreted to Sundaland at this time, we use volcanic and biogeographic constraints to show that the core of Borneo was on the Asian margin since at least the mid Jurassic. This northward transfer of Gondwana-derived continental fragments required a convergent plate boundary in the easternmost Tethys that we propose gave rise to the Philippine Archipelago based on the formation of latest Jurassic-Early Cretaceous supra-subduction zone ophiolites on Halmahera, Obi Island and Luzon. The Late Cretaceous marks the shift from Andean-style subduction to back-arc opening on the east Asian margin. Arc volcanism along South China ceased by ~60 Ma due to the rollback of the Izanagi slab, leading to the oceanward migration of the volcanic arc and the opening of the Proto South China Sea (PSCS). We use the Apennines-Tyrrhenian system in the Mediterranean as an analogue to model this back-arc. Continued rollback detaches South Palawan, Mindoro and the Semitau continental blocks from the stable east Asian margin and transfers them onto Sundaland in the Eocene to produce the Sarawak Orogeny. The extrusion of Indochina and subduction polarity reversal along northern Borneo opens the South China Sea and transfers the Dangerous Grounds-Reed Bank southward to

  3. Tectonic structure and evolution of the Atlantic continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Klitgord, K.D.; Schouten, H.; Hutchinson, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Atlantic continental margin developed across the boundary between continental and oceanic crust as rifting and then sea-floor spreading broke apart and separated the North American and African plates, forming the Atlantic Ocean Basin. Continental rifting began in Late Triassic with reactivation of Paleozoic thrust faults as normal faults and with extension across a broad zone of subparallel rift basins. Extension became localized in Early to Middle Jurassic along the zone that now underlies the large marginal basins, and other rift zones, such as the Newark, Hartford, and Fundy basins, were abandoned. Rifting and crustal stretching between the two continents gave way to sea-floor spreading Middle Jurassic and the formation of oceanic crust. This tectonic evolution resulted in formation of distinctive structural features. The marginal basins are underlain by a thinner crust and contain a variety of fault-controlled structures, including half-grabens, seaward- and landward-tilted blocks, faults that die out within the crust, and faults that penetrate the entire crust. This variable structure probably resulted from the late Triassic-Early Jurassic pattern of normal, listric, and antithetic faults that evolved from the Paleozoic thrust fault geometry. The boundary between marginal basins and oceanic crust is marked approximately by the East Coast Magnetic Anomaly (ECMA). A major basement fault is located in the Baltimore Canyon trough at the landward edge of the ECMA and a zone of seaward dipping reflectors is found just seaward of the ECMA off Georges Bank. The fracture zone pattern in Mesozoic oceanic crust can be traced landward to the ECMA.

  4. Magmatic-tectonic evolution of a volcanic rifted margin

    SciTech Connect

    Eldholm, O. )

    1990-05-01

    Many North Atlantic margins are underlain by huge volcanic edifices near the continent-ocean boundary. A crustal hole drilled at the outer Voering Plateau during ODP (Ocean Drilling Project) Leg 104 has provided important constraints on the breakup history and the subsequent margin evolution by penetrating more than 900 m of igneous rocks and interbedded sediment below a post-early Eocene cover. The recovered basement rocks constitute two different volcanic series. The Upper Series, comprising a seaward-dipping reflector wedge, consists of transitional mid-oceanic tholeiitic lava flows and thin volcaniclastic sediments. Dacitic flows, some dikes and thicker sediments constitute the Lower Series. The margin evolved by Paleocene crustal extension, uplift and pervasive intrusion in the rift zone. Just prior to breakup, magma from shallow crustal melts produced the Lower Series. The Upper Series was constructed during an intense, rapidly waning subaerial surge following breakup in the earliest Eocene. The Upper Series covers both new oceanic crust and large areas of continental crust. The dipping wedge was formed by subsidence due to loading and thermal contraction probably amplified by a tectonic force. When the surge had abated, the injection center subsided and a normal oceanic crust was formed. A direct temporal and compositional relationship exists between the onshore North Atlantic Volcanic Province and the volcanic margins. Whereas the central transverse part of the province, near the Iceland hotspot has been active for 60 m.y., the volcanic margins reflect a 2,000-km-long transient phenomenon lasting only 3 m.y. The breakup volcanism and lack of initial subsidence are related to a regional, about 50C{degree}, increased temperature at the base of the lithosphere (hot carpet) combined with opening in previously extended crust.

  5. Eastern Ishtar Terra: Tectonic evolution derived from recognized features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorderbruegge, R. W.; Head, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Previous analyses have recognized several styles and orientations of compressional deformation, crustal convergence, and crustal thickening in Eastern Ishtar Terra. An east to west sense of crustal convergence through small scale folding, thrusting, and buckling is reflected in the high topography and ridge-and-valley morphology of Maxwell Montes and the adjacent portion of Fortuna Tessera. This east to west convergence was accompanied by up to 1000 km of lateral motion and large scale strike-slip faulting within two converging shear zones which has resulted in the present morphology of Maxwell Montes. A more northeast to southwest sense of convergence through large scale buckling and imbrication is reflected in large, northwest-trending scarps along the entire northern boundary of Ishtar Terra, with up to 2 km of relief present at many of the scarps. It was previously suggested that both styles of compression have occurred at the expense of pre-existing tessera regions which have then been overprinted by the latest convergence event. The difference in style is attributed mostly to differences in the properties of the crust converging with the tessera blocks. If one, presumably thick, tessera block converges with another tessera region, then the widespread, distributed style of deformation occurs, as observed in western Fortuna Tessera. However, if relatively thin crust (such as suggested for the North Polar Plains converges with thicker tessera regions, then localized deformation occurs, as reflected in the scarps along Northern Ishtar Terra. The purpose is to identify the types of features observed in Eastern Ishtar Terra. Their potential temporal and spatial relationships, is described, possible origins for them is suggested, and how the interpretation of some of these features has led to the multiple-style tectonic evolution model described is shown.

  6. Tectonic evolution and oil and gas of Tarim basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuzhu, Kang; Zhihong, Kang

    According to the new results achieved in the past ten years and more, using mobilism and the theory of polycycle by Huang Jiqing (1977, 1984), the formation of the basement of the Tarim basin and its characteristics are summarized. The prototype basins formed since Sinian times are classified into rift basin, continental marginal basin, cratonic basin, foreland basin and others. The Tarim basin is regarded as a huge oil- and gas-bearing basin superposed by prototype basins of different ages. The tectonic characteristics of these basins including tectonic movements, tectonic migrations, faults and trap types are summarized. In addition, structural control over oil and gas and oil-forming features are analysed.

  7. Tectonic and climatic control on geomorphological and sedimentary evolution of the Mercure basin, southern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robustelli, Gaetano; Ermolli, Elda Russo; Petrosino, Paola; Jicha, Brian; Sardella, Raffaele; Donato, Paola

    2014-06-01

    The morpho-tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the Mercure intramontane basin (Calabria-Lucania boundary, southern Apennines) has been assessed through facies analysis, morphostratigraphy and geomorphological correlation with adjacent areas. The Mercure basin, one of the most active seismogenic zones of the southern Apennines, is a favorable area for reconstructing the main stages of landscape evolution of the axial zone because of its capability to record changes in base level during the Quaternary. In addition, the presence of both erosional and depositional Palaeosurfaces is a useful marker for reconstructing tectonic and morphogenetic events, and hence to detect the role played by tectonics and climate in its genesis, evolution and extinction. The present study identifies the key role of tectonics and denudation, combined with high-frequency floods, as mechanisms controlling alluvial sedimentation in the study area. During endorheic conditions, denudational processes driven by pulses of extensional deformation of the basin margin caused strong alluvial inputs that resulted in the development of alluvial fans. Alluvial facies are mainly characterized by turbulent, subaerial, hyperconcentrated flood flows deposited during the glacial, semi-arid conditions of MIS 14. The retrogradational stacking pattern of the alluvial system indicates decreasing rates of tectonic activity along with declining river gradients. The Mercure coalescing alluvial fans were inundated by lake transgression during MIS 13 in response to (i) abrupt tectonic subsidence at the basin margins and (ii) large decrease of coarse sediment supply due to the interplay among climate, tectonics and catchment size changes. In this regard, it is suggested that tectonic control on the drainage network along with climate and long-term slope evolution may have caused marked pulses in sediment supply, thus influencing the arrangement of facies associations in the sedimentary succession. In addition, the

  8. Igneous and tectonic evolution of Venusian and terrestrial coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargel, J. S.; Komatsu, G.

    1992-01-01

    A great variety of tectonic and volcanic features have been documented on Venus. It is widely appreciated that there are close spatial associations among certain types of tectonic structures and some classes of volcanic flows and constructs. Coronae are endowed with a particularly rich variety of volcanism. It is thought that coupled tectonic and volcanic aspects of coronae are cogenetic manifestations of mantle plumes. An outstanding feature of most venusian coronae is their circular or elliptical shape defined by peripheral zones of fracturing and/or folding. Some coronae are composite, consisting of two or more small coronae within a larger enclosing corona, suggesting complex histories of structured diapirism analogous in some ways to salt dome tectonics. Coronae range widely in size, from smaller than 100 km to over 1000 km in diameter. Volcanic features associated with venusian coronae include lunar-like sinuous rilles, thin lava flows, cinder cone-like constructs, shield volcanos, and pancake domes. Several types of volcanic features are often situated within or near a single corona, in many instances including land-forms indicating effusions of both low- and high-viscosity lavas. In some cases stratigraphic evidence brackets emplacement of pancake domes during the period of tectonic development of the corona, thus supporting a close link between the igneous and tectonic histories of coronae. These associations suggest emplacement of huge diapirs and massive magmatic intrusions, thus producing the tectonic deformations defining these structures. Igneous differentiation of the intrusion could yield a range of lava compositions. Head and Wilson suggested a mechanism that would cause development of neutral buoyancy zones in the shallow subsurface of Venus, thereby tending to promote development of massive igneous intrusions.

  9. Geodynamic controls on a salt giant formation. The Messinian salinity crisis and the tectonic evolution of the westernmost Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Castellanos, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The landlocked location of the Mediterranean is presumed to be the result of the southward retreat of subducted Tethyan lithospheric slabs after the collision between Europe and Africa. The western end of the Alpine orogeny (the Gibraltar Arc) shaped the last marine connection to the ocean during the upper Miocene, but in this complex tectonic region, the dominant polarity of subduction (Tethys underneath Iberia/Europe/Anatolia) might not be accomplished, based on plate reconstructions, mantle tomography, and the present position of the Kabylies and the Alboran nappes. This tectonic evolution determined the vertical motions purportedly responsible for the restriction of the Mediterranean and the widespread salt accumulation during the Messinian Salinity Crisis. Following the concept of isostasy, the enormous and rapid mass redistribution implied by the crisis should have induced in turn remarkable vertical motions of the Mediterranean margins. While the predicted isostatic motions during the crisis range in the order of hundreds of meters, little evidence has been documented so far. The mechanical response of the Iberian margins can be inferred by using crustal and lithospheric cross sections derived from potential fields (gravity and geoid anomalies), heatflow, and topography modeling. The preliminary results are consistent with a low rigidity of the lithosphere, in agreement with their young thermomechanical age. These rigidity values are then used for a first-order estimation of the vertical motions associated to the accumulation of salt and the possible partial evaporation of the water column during the crisis. Recent seismic stratigraphic data show that the Balearic promontory hosts a unique set of intermediate-depth basins where halite deposited in smaller amounts than in the deeper basins. If future drillings provide more precise constraints on the paleobathymetry of the sedimentary units before and after the crisis, the various proposed models for its

  10. The Tectonic and Climatic Evolution of High Plateaux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bershaw, John

    High topography significantly affects climate and atmospheric circulation, often separating areas of intense precipitation from relatively arid rainshadows inland. Temporal variations in climate on high plateaux have been inferred from both rocks and ice and may be related to changes in global climate, local atmospheric circulation, and/or changes in surface elevation. Constraints on how and when surface topography was generated not only provide insight into the relationship between high plateaux and climate, but help us distinguish between different geodynamic mechanisms responsible for their formation. The following research employs multiple techniques across the Andean Plateau, the Pamir, and Tibetan Plateau, to better understand both the tectonic evolution of high plateaux and how they affect climate and atmospheric circulation, particularly in continental settings. The Andean Plateau in South America is the second highest and most extensive topographic feature on Earth. Paleoelevation constraints from fossil leaf physiognomy and stable isotopes of sedimentary carbonate suggest that significant surface uplift of the northern Andean plateau, on the order of 2.5 +/- 1 km, occurred between ˜10.3 and 6.4 million years ago (Ma). South American teeth from modem and extinct mammal taxa spanning from the Oligocene (˜29 Ma) to present were collected as they preserve a record of surface water isotopes and the type of plants that animals ingested. Previous studies have shown that the isotopic composition of oxygen (delta18O) in modern precipitation and surface waters decreases systematically with increasing elevations across the central Andes. Results from high elevation sites show substantially more positive delta18O values for late Oligocene tooth samples compared to <10 Ma tooth delta18O values. Late Oligocene teeth collected from low elevation sites in southeast Brazil show delta18O values within 2 per mil (‰) of contemporaneous teeth collected at high elevation

  11. Workshop on the Tectonic Evolution of Greenstone Belts (supplement containing abstracts of invited talks and late abstracts)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Topics addressed include: greenstone belt tectonics, thermal constaints, geological structure, rock components, crustal accretion model, geological evolution, synsedimentary deformation, Archean structures and geological faults.

  12. Holocene Tectonic and Sedimentary Evolution of Coastal San Diego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, J. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Brothers, D. S.; Babcock, J. M.; Kent, G.

    2010-12-01

    The shelf and nearshore region of San Diego, California, between La Jolla cove in the north and the U.S.- Mexico border in the south, is an important ecological and economic resource. It contains two of the largest kelp forests in southern California and lies offshore miles of popular beaches. Understanding the interplay between tectonic and sedimentary processes in this area is critical because it will allow us to assess how other forcing functions such as the rapid sea level rise (2 - 3 mm/yr) and predicted climate change associated with global warming are impacting the kelp and nearshore environments. The fault architecture and sedimentary deposits offshore San Diego have been mapped using high-resolution seismic CHIRP profiling. The mapped area lies within the inner California Continental Borderland (CCB), which is characterized by a system of basins and ridges and extensive strike-slip faulting. The CHIRP data clearly images several splays of the Coronado Bank Fault Zone (CBFZ), a major fault in the area, which show recent activity in the upper 30 m of sediment with the most recent deformation at ~4 m below seafloor. Several sediment packages as deep as 50 m below the seafloor are imaged and place important constraints on tectonic deformation and sediment dispersal in the region as well as the earthquake recurrence interval on the CBFZ. Exposed and buried wavecut terraces identified on numerous CHIRP profiles, which can be correlated to terraces mapped regionally, provide insight into tectonic uplift rates and sea-level fluctuations. Finally, the extensive kelp forests offshore Mount Soledad and Point Loma occur where hardgrounds are exposed at the seafloor as a consequence of tectonic uplift. High resolution mapping offshore San Diego is providing new insight into the complex interplay between tectonics, sedimentation, and biology in this ecologically diverse region.

  13. Sequence stratigraphy and paleogene tectonic evolution of the Transylvanian Basin (Romania, eastern Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proust, Jean-Noël; Hosu, Alexandru

    1996-09-01

    The Transylvanian Basin of Romania belongs to the 800 × 400 km wide Pannonian domain of the European Alpine megasuture bordered to the east and the north by the Carpathians. It represents a digitation of the epicontinental Tethyan seaways locally connected during the Palaeogene to the peripheral foredeep troughs. During that time, it was filled up by a 500-m-thick sediment pile organized into three shallow marine and non-marine facies alternations. Each evolved from alluvial fans to restricted marine and outer marine environments. They are dated from Lutetian to Chattian times. The study is focused on the lowermost alternation onlapping the basal, post-Maastrichtian unconformity. This alternation consists of the superimpossition of a thick retrogradational and a thin progradational depositional system. The retrogradational depositional system grades upwards from stacked, fault-controlled deposits of alluvial fan, ephemeral stream, salina and sabkha, and restricted marine bioclastic shales. The progradational depositional system is composed of outer marine to estuarine sandstones and shales. The two depositional systems are bounded at their tops by two baselevel change unconformities underlain by highly mobile, low relief sandstone bodies that were deposited in shoal belts. These two unconformities mark significant changes in the regime of the subsidence. These are, respectively, a baselevel rise or 'drowning' unconformity where the shoal deposits were associated with oolitic ironstones and glauconitic shales that typify basin starvation during a period of maximum basin drowning, and a baselevel fall or 'uplifting' unconformity where the bioclastic shoal deposits were buried by alluvial flood plain deposits that characterize periods of relief rejuvenation tentatively attributed to compressive events. This bimodal succession is interpreted in terms of underfilled-overfilled stages related to intraplate tectonic deformation. The underfilled stage corresponds to the

  14. Cenozoic tectonic evolution of Asia: A preliminary synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, An

    2010-06-01

    of east Asia was developed in two stages: initially in a widely distributed zone that has an east-west width of 500-800 km during 65-35 Ma, which was followed by localized extension and opening of back-arc basins associated with the development of spreading centers at 32-17 Ma (e.g., Japan Sea or East Korea Sea, Bohai Bay, and South China Sea). Opening of the back-arc basins could be induced by (1) rapid eastward migration of the western Pacific trench system or (2) oblique subduction of Pacific plate beneath Asia that had produced a series of en echelon right-slip primary shear zones linking with back-arc spreading centers oriented obliquely to the strike of the nearby trench. Since ~ 15 Ma, the eastern margin of Asia became contractional in the east-west direction, as indicated by the collapse of back-arc basins in the western Pacific and the development of fold-thrust belts along the eastern continental margin. Coeval with the contraction is widespread east-west extension in Siberia, North China, and the Tibetan plateau. The above observations can be explained by a change in boundary condition along the eastern margin of Asia that allowed the thickened Asian continent to spread eastward, causing east-west extension in its trailing edge and east-west compression in its leading edge. In west Asia, continental-margin extension started at about 25-20 Ma in the Aegean and Cretan regions, which was associated with a rapid southward retreat of the Hellenic arc. The complex evolution of Cenozoic deformation in Asia may be explained by a combined effect of temporal changes in plate boundary conditions, thermal evolution of the upper mantle perturbed by collisional tectonics, and the built-up of gravitational energy through crustal thickening and thermal heating. Although the past research in Asia has treated the India-Asia and Arabia-Asia convergence as separate collisional processes, their interaction may have controlled the far-field Cenozoic deformation in Asia. The

  15. Active tectonics west of New Zealand's Alpine Fault: South Westland Fault Zone activity shows Australian Plate instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pascale, Gregory P.; Chandler-Yates, Nicholas; Dela Pena, Federico; Wilson, Pam; May, Elijah; Twiss, Amber; Cheng, Che

    2016-04-01

    The 300 km long South Westland Fault Zone (SWFZ) is within the footwall of the Central Alpine Fault (<20 km away) and has 3500 m of dip-slip displacement, but it has been unknown if the fault is active. Here the first evidence for SWFZ thrust faulting in the "stable" Australian Plate is shown with cumulative dip-slip displacements up to 5.9 m (with 3 m throw) on Pleistocene and Holocene sediments and gentle hanging wall anticlinal folding. Cone penetration test (CPT) stratigraphy shows repeated sequences within the fault scarp (consistent with thrusting). Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating constrains the most recent rupture post-12.1 ± 1.7 ka with evidence for three to four events during earthquakes of at least Mw 6.8. This study shows significant deformation is accommodated on poorly characterized Australian Plate structures northwest of the Alpine Fault and demonstrates that major active and seismogenic structures remain uncharacterized in densely forested regions on Earth.

  16. The influence of tectonic grain to the Neogene evolution of the Mesopotamian basin: 3D tectonic-surface processes modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillon, Charlotte; Garcia-Castellanos, Daniel; Vergés, Jaume

    2015-04-01

    The Mesopotamian basin is a plate-scale foreland basin commonly linked to the tectonic load of the Zagros mountain belt. Its current drainage pattern shows the two main river systems (Tigris and Euphrates) draining the basin longitudinally from NW to SE, likely to be influenced by other large-scale geodynamic events, such as the uplift of the Anatolian Plateau (Middle Miocene) to the NW and/or the Arabian plate flank tilting to the W (from early Miocene). By using an integrated modeling of surface processes, lithospheric flexure and kinematic fault deformation, we test the influences of each main tectonic units on the basin evolution. The numerical model is particularly designed to study the 3D foreland basin evolution and to identify large-scale relationships between tectonic movements and sediment transport and deposition. We specifically aim at reproducing the drainage conditions in the basin, the flexural profile and the sediment thicknesses and geometry of deposition, by investigating the basin history at the scale of the Arabian plate (3000 km x 1200 km), over a long period of time (i.e. since 35 Ma to present day), and with integrating realistic climatic conditions. The main results reveal 1) the need for an external load in addition to the Zagros to reproduce the flexural profile of the basin and 2) the important contributions of both Arabian plate flank tilting and Anatolian plateau uplift to the drainage system, all of them suggesting a significant contribution from deep geodynamic events occurring in early to middle Miocene times in shaping the present day Mesopotamian basin.

  17. Tectonic evolution of the East Junggar terrane, CAOB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xing-Wang

    2016-04-01

    The East Junggar terrane is one of the important tectonic units of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB; Zonenshain et al., 1990). Debate surrounds the tectonics of the East Junggar area, including tectonic setting, age, basement nature, subduction polarity and collisional time between the East Junggar terrane and Junggar block (e.g., Xiao et al., 2008, 2011; Long et al., 2012; Huang et al., 2012). Among the two popular models, one suggests that the Junggar is a continental block (e.g. Zhang et al., 1984, 1993; Watson et al., 1987; Xiao et al., 1992; He et al., 1994; Li et al., 2000; Charvet et al., 2001, 2007; Xu et al., 2003; Zhao et al., 2003; Buslov et al., 2004; Xu and Ma, 2004; Dong et al., 2009; Bazhenov et al., 2012; Choulet et al., 2012; Zhang et al., 2012). The other model proposes that the Junggar has a basement of Paleozoic oceanic crust (e.g., Carroll et al., 1990; Zheng et al., 2007) or oceanic island arc complexes (e.g., Coleman, 1989; Chen and Jahn, 2004; Windley et al., 2007) of the Altaid Paleozoic rocks (e.g., Sengör et al., 1993; Sengör and Natal'in, 1996; Allen and Vincent, 1997; Filippova et al., 2001; Xiao et al., 2004a, 2004b, 2008, 2009, 2010a, 2010b, 2012). The tectonics in the Eastern Junggar area are interpreted to be related to late Paleozoic intra-oceanic accretion induced by northward subduction of the Junggar oceanic lithosphere (e.g. Xiao et al., 2008, 2009; Biske and Seltmann, 2010; Wan et al., 2011; Yang et al., 2011) or by the southward subduction of the Paleo-Asian oceanic lithosphere (Zhang et al., 2004; Wong et al., 2010; Su et al., 2012). Recently, we did detailed field survey and petrological, geochemical and chronological analysis of the metamorphosed volcanic rocks and magmatic rocks, and new discovered gneiss and magnetite quartzite enclaves from the Taheir tectonic window in the East Junggar region which is situated between the Zaisan-Erqis-the Main Mongolian Lineament-suture and the Kelameili suture. The new results

  18. Evolution of ancient Lake Ohrid: a tectonic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, N.; Reicherter, K.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Grützner, C.

    2010-06-01

    Lake Ohrid Basin is a graben structure situated in the Dinarides at the border of the Former Yugoslavian Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) and Albania. It hosts one of the oldest lakes in Europe and is characterized by a basin and range-like geological setting together with the half-graben basins of Korca, Erseka and Debar. The basin is surrounded by Palaeozoic metamorphics in the northeast and north and Mesozoic ultramafic, carbonatic and magmatic rocks in the east, northwest, west and south. Palaeocene to Pliocene units are present in the southwest. With the basin development, Neogene sediments from Pliocene to recent deposited in the lows. Three major deformation phases lead to the basin formation: A) NW-SE shortening from Late Cretaceous to Miocene; B) uplift and diminishing compression during Messinian - Pliocene; C) vertical uplift and (N)E-(S)W extension from Pliocene to recent. Neotectonic activity of the study area concentrates on N-S trending normal faults that flank the Ohrid Basin on the east and west. Seismic activity with moderate to strong events is documented during the last 2000 y; the seismic hazard level is among the highest of the Balkan Peninsula. Activity of the youngest faults is evidenced by earthquake data and field observations. Morphotectonic features like a wind-gap, fault scarps, a stepped series of active normal faults, deformed palaeosols, and fault-related hydrothermal activity are preserved around Lake Ohrid and allow delineating the tectonic history. It is shown that the Lake Ohrid Basin can be characterized as a seismogenic landscape. This paper presents a tectonic history of the Lake Ohrid Basin and describes tectonic features that are preserved in the recent landscape. The analysis of morphotectonic features is used to derive the deformation history. The stratigraphy of the area is summarized and concentrates on the main units.

  19. Evolution of ancient Lake Ohrid: a tectonic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, N.; Reicherter, K.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Grützner, C.

    2010-10-01

    Lake Ohrid Basin is a graben structure situated in the Dinarides at the border of the Former Yugoslavian Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) and Albania. It hosts one of the oldest lakes in Europe and is characterized by a basin and range-like geological setting together with the halfgraben basins of Korca, Erseka and Debar. The basin is surrounded by Paleozoic metamorphics in the northeast and north and Mesozoic ultramafic, carbonatic and magmatic rocks in the east, northwest, west and south. Paleocene to Pliocene units are present in the southwest. With the basin development, Neogene sediments from Pliocene to recent deposited in the lows. There are three major deformation phases: (A) NW-SE shortening from Late Cretaceous to Miocene; (B) uplift and diminishing compression during Messinian - Pliocene; (C) vertical uplift and (N)E-(S)W extension from Pliocene to recent led to the basin formation. Neotectonic activity of the study area concentrates on N-S trending normal faults that bound the Ohrid Basin eastwards and westwards. Seismic activity with moderate to strong events is documented during the last 2000 yrs; the seismic hazard level is among the highest in Albania and Macedonia. Activity of the youngest faults is evidenced by earthquake data and field observations. Morphotectonic features like fault scarps, a stepped series of active normal faults, deformed paleosols, a wind gap and fault-related hydrothermal activity are preserved around Lake Ohrid and allow delineating the tectonic history. It is shown that the Lake Ohrid Basin can be characterized as a seismogenic landscape. This paper presents a tectonic history of the Lake Ohrid Basin and describes tectonic features that are preserved in the recent landscape. The analysis of morphotectonic features is used to derive the deformation history. The stratigraphy of the area is summarized and concentrates on the main units.

  20. Understanding the Interior Evolution of Mercury from Its Tectonic History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, P. K.; Klimczak, C.; Sengor, A. M. C.; Hauck, S. A., II; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    The surface of Mercury provides compelling insight into the planet's interior. Excluding impact craters and basins, the most prominent landforms on Mercury are tectonic; these features are distributed globally and crosscut all major surface units. More than seven years of flyby and orbital observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft show that tectonism on Mercury is overwhelmingly shortening in nature; extensional structures occur only within volcanically flooded impact craters and basins, in part the result of thermal contraction of thick plains units. Shortening structures show no coherent, planet-wide pattern, although many have an approximately north-south orientation, and some form fold-and-thrust belts thousands of kilometers long. Even so, their widespread distribution points to a global source of stress, primarily from global contraction in response to secular interior cooling. Some of the largest such landforms are 2-3 km in relief and hundreds of kilometers long, their underlying thrust faults penetrating 30-40 km into the lithosphere. Shortening landforms as small as hundreds of meters in length have been identified during MESSENGER's low-altitude campaign; the crisp morphology of these features indicates that thrust faulting, and thus global contraction, continued until the geologically recent. Displacement-length scaling analysis shows that Mercury's shortening landforms have accommodated a reduction in planetary radius of up to 7 km since the end of the late heavy bombardment. Such a magnitude of contraction is more consistent with models of global contraction from interior cooling and partial core crystallization than pre-MESSENGER estimates of tectonic shortening. Notably, the emplacement of major volcanic plains deposits on Mercury ended globally by 3.6 Ga, consistent with the onset of a state of net horizontal lithospheric compression that served to inhibit the vertical ascent and

  1. Tectonic evolution of the East Junggar terrane, CAOB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xing-Wang

    2016-04-01

    The East Junggar terrane is one of the important tectonic units of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB; Zonenshain et al., 1990). Debate surrounds the tectonics of the East Junggar area, including tectonic setting, age, basement nature, subduction polarity and collisional time between the East Junggar terrane and Junggar block (e.g., Xiao et al., 2008, 2011; Long et al., 2012; Huang et al., 2012). Among the two popular models, one suggests that the Junggar is a continental block (e.g. Zhang et al., 1984, 1993; Watson et al., 1987; Xiao et al., 1992; He et al., 1994; Li et al., 2000; Charvet et al., 2001, 2007; Xu et al., 2003; Zhao et al., 2003; Buslov et al., 2004; Xu and Ma, 2004; Dong et al., 2009; Bazhenov et al., 2012; Choulet et al., 2012; Zhang et al., 2012). The other model proposes that the Junggar has a basement of Paleozoic oceanic crust (e.g., Carroll et al., 1990; Zheng et al., 2007) or oceanic island arc complexes (e.g., Coleman, 1989; Chen and Jahn, 2004; Windley et al., 2007) of the Altaid Paleozoic rocks (e.g., Sengör et al., 1993; Sengör and Natal'in, 1996; Allen and Vincent, 1997; Filippova et al., 2001; Xiao et al., 2004a, 2004b, 2008, 2009, 2010a, 2010b, 2012). The tectonics in the Eastern Junggar area are interpreted to be related to late Paleozoic intra-oceanic accretion induced by northward subduction of the Junggar oceanic lithosphere (e.g. Xiao et al., 2008, 2009; Biske and Seltmann, 2010; Wan et al., 2011; Yang et al., 2011) or by the southward subduction of the Paleo-Asian oceanic lithosphere (Zhang et al., 2004; Wong et al., 2010; Su et al., 2012). Recently, we did detailed field survey and petrological, geochemical and chronological analysis of the metamorphosed volcanic rocks and magmatic rocks, and new discovered gneiss and magnetite quartzite enclaves from the Taheir tectonic window in the East Junggar region which is situated between the Zaisan-Erqis-the Main Mongolian Lineament-suture and the Kelameili suture. The new results

  2. Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Bohai Bay Basin and its coupling relationship with Pacific Plate subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jintong; Wang, Hongliang; Bai, Ying; Ji, Xinyuan; Duo, Xuemei

    2016-09-01

    The Bohai Bay Basin is a Mesozoic-Cenozoic rift basin in eastern China. Based mainly on a balanced-section analysis, this study compares the spatio-temporal differences of tectonic evolution in relation to strike-slip faults among different depressions within the basin. In combination with the analysis of subsidence characteristics, the study also attempts to clarify the Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the basin and its coupling relationship with the subduction of the Pacific Plate. It was found that: (1) the strike-slip faults were activated generally from south to north and from west to east during the Cenozoic; (2) there is a negative correlation between the intensity of tectonic activity in the Bohai Bay Basin and subduction rate of the Pacific Plate; and (3) the migration direction of the basin depocenters is consistent with the direction of Pacific Plate subduction.

  3. Natural selection and neutral evolution jointly drive population divergence between alpine and lowland ecotypes of the allopolyploid plant Anemone multifida (Ranunculaceae).

    PubMed

    McEwen, Jamie R; Vamosi, Jana C; Rogers, Sean M

    2013-01-01

    Population differentiation can be driven in large part by natural selection, but selectively neutral evolution can play a prominent role in shaping patters of population divergence. The decomposition of the evolutionary history of populations into the relative effects of natural selection and selectively neutral evolution enables an understanding of the causes of population divergence and adaptation. In this study, we examined heterogeneous genomic divergence between alpine and lowland ecotypes of the allopolyploid plant, Anemone multifida. Using peak height and dominant AFLP data, we quantified population differentiation at non-outlier (neutral) and outlier loci to determine the potential contribution of natural selection and selectively neutral evolution to population divergence. We found 13 candidate loci, corresponding to 2.7% of loci, with signatures of divergent natural selection between alpine and lowland populations and between alpine populations (Fst  = 0.074-0.445 at outlier loci), but neutral population differentiation was also evident between alpine populations (FST  = 0.041-0.095 at neutral loci). By examining population structure at both neutral and outlier loci, we determined that the combined effects of selection and neutral evolution are associated with the divergence of alpine populations, which may be linked to extreme abiotic conditions and isolation between alpine sites. The presence of outlier levels of genetic variation in structured populations underscores the importance of separately analyzing neutral and outlier loci to infer the relative role of divergent natural selection and neutral evolution in population divergence. PMID:23874801

  4. Natural Selection and Neutral Evolution Jointly Drive Population Divergence between Alpine and Lowland Ecotypes of the Allopolyploid Plant Anemone multifida (Ranunculaceae)

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Jamie R.; Vamosi, Jana C.; Rogers, Sean M.

    2013-01-01

    Population differentiation can be driven in large part by natural selection, but selectively neutral evolution can play a prominent role in shaping patters of population divergence. The decomposition of the evolutionary history of populations into the relative effects of natural selection and selectively neutral evolution enables an understanding of the causes of population divergence and adaptation. In this study, we examined heterogeneous genomic divergence between alpine and lowland ecotypes of the allopolyploid plant, Anemone multifida. Using peak height and dominant AFLP data, we quantified population differentiation at non-outlier (neutral) and outlier loci to determine the potential contribution of natural selection and selectively neutral evolution to population divergence. We found 13 candidate loci, corresponding to 2.7% of loci, with signatures of divergent natural selection between alpine and lowland populations and between alpine populations (Fst  = 0.074–0.445 at outlier loci), but neutral population differentiation was also evident between alpine populations (FST  = 0.041–0.095 at neutral loci). By examining population structure at both neutral and outlier loci, we determined that the combined effects of selection and neutral evolution are associated with the divergence of alpine populations, which may be linked to extreme abiotic conditions and isolation between alpine sites. The presence of outlier levels of genetic variation in structured populations underscores the importance of separately analyzing neutral and outlier loci to infer the relative role of divergent natural selection and neutral evolution in population divergence. PMID:23874801

  5. The geology and tectonic evolution of Waigeo Island, NE Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, T. R.; Hall, R.; Partoyo, E.

    Waigeo occupies a critical position between the Halmahera-Philippine arcs to the northwest and Australia-New Guinea to the southeast. The island consists of a deformed ophiolitic basement of supra-subduction zone type overlain by probable Paleogene forearc sedimentary rocks. The forerarc basement is cut by mylonite shear zones and the basement and sedimentary cover rocks were deformed by southward-directed thrusts and associated folds during the Oligocene. The deformed sequences are intruded by basic dykes, thought to be coeval with basalts and andesites of Late Oligocene age. The entire Paleogene sequence is overlain unconformably by a thick (up to 2000 m) sequence of Miocene limestones which accumulated during a tectonically quiet period. A final phase of deformation occurred during the Pliocene which caused the development of two very large anticlines and an intervening syncline, associated with left-lateral wrench faults. Waigeo is interpreted to have been situated in a forearc position in an intra-oceanic island arc during the early Paleogene, forming part of the East Halmahera-Waigeo forearc terrane. The Waigeo arc terrane collided with a continental block in about the Middle Oligocene, contemporaneous with similar arc-continent collision in northern New Guinea. A period of tectonic quiescence during the Miocene was followed by Pliocene deformation in Waigeo related to a left-lateral wrench faulting on splays of the Sorong Fault in northern New Guinea. The Pliocene deformation is interpreted as resulting from compression on a right-stepping restraining bend in this wrench fault system.

  6. The tectonic evolution of a critical segment of the Dinarides-Alps connection: Kinematic and geochronological inferences from the Medvednica Mountains, NE Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelder, I. E.; Matenco, L.; Willingshofer, E.; Tomljenović, B.; Andriessen, P. A. M.; Ducea, M. N.; Beniest, A.; Gruić, A.

    2015-09-01

    The transition zone between the Alps and Dinarides is a key area to investigate kinematic interactions of neighboring orogens with different subduction polarities. A study combining field kinematic and sedimentary data, microstructural observations, thermochronological data (Rb-Sr and fission track), and regional structures in the area of Medvednica Mountains has revealed a complex polyphase tectonic evolution. We document two novel stages of extensional exhumation. The first stage of extension took place along a Late Cretaceous detachment following the late Early Cretaceous nappe stacking, burial, and greenschist facies metamorphism. Two other shortening events that occurred during the latest Cretaceous-Oligocene were followed by a second event of extensional exhumation, characterized by asymmetric top-NE extension during the Miocene. Top-NW thrusting took place subsequently during the Pliocene inversion of the Pannonian Basin. The Cretaceous nappe burial, Late Cretaceous extension, and the Oligocene(-Earliest Miocene) contraction are events driven by the Alps evolution. In contrast, the latest Cretaceous-Eocene deformation reflects phases of Dinaridic contraction. Furthermore, the Miocene extension and subsequent inversion display kinematics similar with observations elsewhere in the Dinarides and Eastern Alps. All these processes demonstrate that the Medvednica Mountains were affected by Alpine phases of deformations to a much higher degree than previously thought. Similarly with what has been observed in other areas of contractional polarity changes, such as the Mediterranean, Black Sea, or New Guinea systems, the respective tectonic events are triggered by rheological weak zones which are critical for localizing the deformation created by both orogens.

  7. Tectonic Evolution of Western Ishtar Terra (Akna Montes-Atropos Tessera), Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinangeli, L.

    1996-09-01

    The Akna Montes-Atropos Tessera region appears to have undergone three phases of tectonic evolution. The first one consists of compressional deformations, folds and thrust faults trending NE, that formed the Akna Montes and most of the compressional features in western Atropos Tessera. A second phase, likely contemporaneous with the first one, is dominated by shear stress deformations which involved most of the Atropos Tessera and probably developed along NW planes. The tectonic pattern is expressed as sinuous, tightly closed ridges arranged in an "en-echelon"; similar tectonic pattern has been previously recognised in Itzpapalotl Tessera (1). The third phase consists of extension probably related to the gravitational spreading of the Akna Montes that strongly involved the western portion of the Akna belt and the part of Atropos close to the mountain. A major consequence of the spreading is the splitting of the Akna Montes in two portions separated by a lava flooded valley which parallel the compressional deformation of the Akna belt. Also, many grabens trending NW developed in the western Akna during this phase (2). Minor evidences of extension have been found in the western Atropos Tessera and interpreted as related to the pro-gradation to the West of the relaxation of the mountain belt (3). This scenario is quite similar to the tectonic of terrestrial high plateaus associated with mountain belts (Tibet, Altiplano, Basin and Range) where compression, shear and extension represent the tectonic evolution of the plateau over time (4). This tectonic evolution is explained by the variations of the values of principal average stresses due to the gradual thickening of the crust. References: (1) Kaula et al. (1992), Jour. Geophys. Res., 97:16,085-16,120 (2) Smerekar & Solomon (1992), Jour. Geophys. Res., 97:16,121-16,148 (3) Ori & Marinangeli (1996), LPSC XXVI:985-986 (4) Froidevaux & Ricard (1987), Tectonophysics:227-238

  8. Multiphase salt tectonic evolution in NW Germany: seismic interpretation and retro-deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, M.; Kukla, P. A.; Urai, J. L.; Bresser, G.

    2005-12-01

    The Central European Basin is a classic area of salt tectonics, characterized by heterogeneous structural evolution and complex salt movement history. We studied an area on its SW margin, based on prestack depth-migrated 2D and 3D seismic data. We use seismic interpretation and retro-deformation to obtain a better understanding of salt tectonics, structural control, and sedimentary response in this region. The first phase of salt tectonic evolution started with two main events of NW-SE extension and rafting in the Triassic before the Upper Bunter and before the Upper Muschelkalk. Rafting was accompanied by first salt diapirism and an increased sedimentary thickness adjacent to the salt structure. After salt supply ceased updip to the salt structure, a mini-basin grew in the intra-raft area. This sedimentary differential loading caused salt movement and growth of a pillow structure basinward. The second phase of salt movement was initiated by the formation of a NNW-SSE striking basement graben in the Middle Keuper that triggered reactive diapirism, the breakthrough of the pillow’s roof and salt extrusion. The following downbuilding process was characterized by sedimentary wedges with basal unconformities, onlap structures and salt extrusions that ceased in the Jurassic. The third and latest phase of salt tectonic evolution was activated in the Late Cretaceous to Lower Tertiary by compressional tectonics indicated by salt rise and a small horizontal shortening of the diapir. The interpreted salt tectonic processes and the resulting geometries can now be better tied in with the regional heterogeneous framework of the basin.

  9. Forearc tectonic evolution of the South Shetland Margin, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, A.; Larter, R. D.; Aldaya, F.

    1994-12-01

    The main provinces of the South Shetland margin, Antarctic Peninsula characterized on the basis of multichannel seismic, long-range side scan sonar and swath bathymetry data, include from northwest to southeast (1) the oceanic crust of the former Phoenix Plate, flexed down toward the margin and affected by normal faulting in the upper crust; (2) a narrow trench, with a horizontally layered sediment fill which onlaps the thin sedimentary cover on the oceanic crust and shows incipient deformation near its landward edge; (3) an accretionary prism with a complex internal structure, the toe of which is overthrust above the youngest trench deposits; (4) a midslope forearc basin, with an asymmetric synformal structure; and (5) the continental shelf, which includes two distinct tectonic provinces. Calculations of the late Cenozoic convergence history at the trench indicate a rapid decrease in convergence rate after 6.7 Ma from about 60 mm/yr, resulting from the slowing and eventual cessation of spreading on the Antarctic-Phoenix ridge. Once spreading had completely ceased (3.5-2.4 Ma), the convergence rate at the trench equalled the rate of extension in Bransfield Strait, which was probably less than 10 mm/yr at first but may have increased since 1.3 Ma, and this, in turn, would imply a corresponding increase in convergence rate. Above the basal detachment the toe of the accretionary prism is composed of a stack of thrust fault bounded wedges, laterally and vertically segmented by normal faults. Most of the trench fill sediments are overthrust by the toe of the accretionary prism and subducted beneath it for as far as they can be traced on the seismic profiles. This suggests that there may be tectonic erosion of the forearc since a large part of the trench sediment appears to be derived from erosion on the forearc slope. The forearc basin records a long history of subsidence, during which the depocenter migrated landward, paralleling retrogradational erosion of the distal

  10. Tectonic evolution of the frontal Longmen San thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.-P.; Xu, X.-W.; Yuan, R.-M.; Li, K.; Sun, X.-Z.; Chen, W.-S.

    2012-04-01

    The Longmen Shan thrust belt in the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau underwent deformation associated with the eastward growth of the Tibetan Plateau. Many geological features indicate that this range is not a typical active convergent mountain belt. Some of the features that indicated that this range is atypical are the fact that it is a young, high mountain, has a thickened crust with a very low GPS shortening rate, and has no corresponding foreland subsidence. Many geologists believe that the crustal thickening that occurred in this area is caused by ductile deformation rather than by thrust faulting or crustal shortening. This hypothesis successfully explains why the upper crust is largely uplifted although the horizontal shortening at the surface is still very small. However, some recent studies based on quantitative structural analysis and a balanced cross-section indicates that a large increase in shortening occurs near the range front, and the structural relief produced by folds and faults is also closely related to the topography of this front. These imply that upper-crustal deformation is the primary mechanism for generating uplift and topography in the foothills of Longmen Shan Range. This idea obviates the need for lower-crustal flow and inflation to produce and maintain the Longmen Shan Range. Scientists have created many different conceptions for the mode of tectonic deformation across the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. However, almost all scientists agree that the eastern Tibetan Plateau has an exceptionally low mechanical strength, inherited from Mesozoic tectonics of the region. On the 12th of May 2008, Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake occurred in this area provides a direct manifestation of the active crustal shortening and documents the importance of active crustal shortening in developing and supporting the Longmen Shan Range. The co-seismic surface rupture pattern of Wenchuan earthquake, involving multiple structures, is one of the most

  11. Tectonic evolution and mantle structure of the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Benthem, Steven; Govers, Rob; Spakman, Wim; Wortel, Rinus

    2013-04-01

    In the broad context of investigating the relationship between deep structure & processes and surface expressions, we study the Caribbean plate and underlying mantle. We investigate whether predictions of mantle structure from tectonic reconstructions are in agreement with a detailed tomographic image of seismic P-wave velocity structure under the Caribbean region. In the upper mantle, positive seismic anomalies are imaged under the Lesser Antilles and Puerto Rico. These anomalies are interpreted as remnants of Atlantic lithosphere subduction and confirm tectonic reconstructions that suggest at least 1100 km of convergence at the Lesser Antilles island arc during the past ~45 Myr. The imaged Lesser-Antilles slab consists of a northern and southern anomaly, separated by a low velocity anomaly across most of the upper mantle, which we interpret as the subducted North-South America plate boundary. The southern edge of the imaged Lesser Antilles slab agrees with vertical tearing of South America lithosphere. The northern Lesser Antilles slab is continuous with the Puerto Rico slab along the northeastern plate boundary. This results in an amphitheater-shaped slab and it is interpreted as westward subducting North America lithosphere that remained attached to the surface along the northern boundary. At the Muertos Trough, however, material is imaged until a depth of only 100 km, suggesting a small amount of subduction. The location and length of the imaged South Caribbean slab agrees with proposed subduction of Caribbean lithosphere under the northern South America plate. An anomaly related to proposed Oligocene subduction at the Nicaragua rise is absent in the tomographic model. Beneath Panama, a subduction window exists across the upper mantle, which is related to the cessation of subduction of the Nazca plate under Panama since 9.5 Ma and possibly the preceding subduction of the extinct Cocos-Nazca spreading center. In the lower mantle two large anomaly patterns are

  12. Tectonic evolution and mantle structure of the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benthem, Steven; Govers, Rob; Spakman, Wim; Wortel, Rinus

    2013-06-01

    investigate whether predictions of mantle structure from tectonic reconstructions are in agreement with a detailed tomographic image of seismic P wave velocity structure under the Caribbean region. In the upper mantle, positive seismic anomalies are imaged under the Lesser Antilles and Puerto Rico. These anomalies are interpreted as remnants of Atlantic lithosphere subduction and confirm tectonic reconstructions that suggest at least 1100 km of convergence at the Lesser Antilles island arc during the past ~45 Myr. The imaged Lesser Antilles slab consists of a northern and southern anomaly, separated by a low-velocity anomaly across most of the upper mantle, which we interpret as the subducted North America-South America plate boundary. The southern edge of the imaged Lesser Antilles slab agrees with vertical tearing of South America lithosphere. The northern Lesser Antilles slab is continuous with the Puerto Rico slab along the northeastern plate boundary. This results in an amphitheater-shaped slab, and it is interpreted as westward subducting North America lithosphere that remained attached to the surface along the northeastern boundary of the Caribbean plate. At the Muertos Trough, however, material is imaged until a depth of only 100 km, suggesting a small amount of subduction. The location and length of the imaged South Caribbean slab agrees with proposed subduction of Caribbean lithosphere under the northern South America plate. An anomaly related to proposed Oligocene subduction at the Nicaragua rise is absent in the tomographic model. Beneath Panama, a subduction window exists across the upper mantle, which is related to the cessation of subduction of the Nazca plate under Panama since 9.5 Ma and possibly the preceding subduction of the extinct Cocos-Nazca spreading center. In the lower mantle, two large anomaly patterns are imaged. The westernmost anomaly agrees with the subduction of Farallon lithosphere. The second lower mantle anomaly is found east of

  13. Renewal: Continential lithosphere evolution as a function of tectonic environment

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, N.J.; Baldridge, W.S.

    1995-06-01

    The Cenozoic tectonic environment and stress regime of the southwestern United States have changed dramatically from compression during shallow-angle subduction during the Laramide orogeny in the early Cenozoic to the current mode of Basin and Range extension. Questions remain unresolved concerning the causes of this transition, including the timing of the initiation of extension (estimates range from 36 to 25 Ma), and is the Basin and Range simply an mega-example of back-arc extension, or is extension related to the subduction of an oceanic spreading center about 30 Ma? We have examined the patterns of magmagenesis and geochemical composition through Cenozoic time in southern New Mexico. We have defined four magma sources that have contributed to Cenozoic magmas. Immediately following the Laramide, magmas contain substantial contributions from the lower crust. Mid-Tertiary extension is related to the eruption of rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs and basalts. The basalts were generated by melting of the lithospheric mantle; intercalated rhyolites have a strong upper crustal signature. Eruption of basalts and andesites with sources in the lithospheric mantle and lower crust continued for several million years after rhyolitic volcanism ceased. The region was nearly void of volcanic activity for 16 million years despite continued extension, but at 10 Ma, basalts derived from the asthenosphere began to erupt.

  14. Renewal: Continental lithosphere evolution as a function of tectonic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, N. J.; Baldridge, W. S.

    1995-04-01

    The Cenozoic tectonic environment and stress regime of the southwestern United States have changed dramatically from compression during shallow-angle subduction during the Laramide orogeny in the early Cenozoic to the current mode of Basin and Range extension. Questions remain unresolved concerning the causes of this transition, including the timing of the initiation of extension (estimates range from 36 to 25 Ma), and is the Basin and Range simply an mega-example of back-arc extension, or is extension related to the subduction of an oceanic spreading center about 30 Ma? We have examined the patterns of magmagenesis and geochemical composition through Cenozoic time in southern New Mexico. We have defined four magma sources that have contributed to Cenozoic magmas. Immediately following the Laramide, magmas contain substantial contributions from the lower crust. Mid-Tertiary extension is related to the eruption of rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs and basalts. The basalts were generated by melting of the lithospheric mantle; intercalated rhyolites have a strong upper crustal signature. Eruption of basalts and andesites with sources in the lithospheric mantle and lower crust continued for several million years after rhyolitic volcanism ceased. The region was nearly void of volcanic activity for 16 million years despite continued extension, but at 10 Ma, basalts derived from the asthenosphere began to erupt.

  15. Phanerozoic tectonic and paleogeologic evolution of southern South America

    SciTech Connect

    Urien, C.M. ); Zambrano, J.J. )

    1991-03-01

    Before pre-Variscan time, southern South America had a quasicratonic nature. New structural alignments were overimposed due to Gondwana breakup and South Atlantic opening. Phanerozoic tectonic history is divided as follows: (1) 'Caledonian Geosyncline.' Situated west of Brazilian shield and massives, consists of Cambrian to mid-Devonian clastics, carbonates, and intrusives. (2) Variscan Intracratonic Rifting and Foreland Basins. Alluvial and glaciolacustrine sediments accumulated in grabens and marine clastics accumulated in marginal basins along the western continental edge. This period ends in Late Jurassic time (Gondwana breakup) with basaltic extrusions along rifting zones. (3) Inter Malm Taphogenesis. Basement fracturing and Proto-Atlantic opening took place and marine flooding advanced from the south. Along the western margin, a magmatic arc existed since Early Jurassic. The back-arc basins were filled by marine clastics and evaporites, alternating with acidic volcanics and making up the 'Andine Geosyncline.' (4) Subhercynian Drifting. Sedimentary prisms were formed on the Atlantic margin. On the western margin, continental clastics were laid during the Middle and Late Cretaceous. Acidic extrusions and Andean batholith intrusion began during this time. (5) Laramic Flooding. An Atlantic transgression covered a great part of the extra-Andean region and Andean chains were formed. (6) Cenozoic Mountain Building. A new transgression expanded again over Argentine plains and Patagonia. New Andean uplifting phases, sub-Andean belt folding, and basement fracturing originated intermontane basins. Thick, alluvial, and piedmont sediments accumulated here.

  16. Tectonic evolution of the southeastern Caribbean in Cenozoic time

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Oblique collision between the southern Lesser Antilles arc and continental South America controlled tectonics from end Eocene to present in the S.E. Caribbean. There, terranes are from N to S: 1. magmatic arc platform (Margarita to Grenadines); 2. forearc basin; 3. ophiolite belt that may be basement to the forearc basin; 4. accretionary prism whose structurally shallow rocks near Barbados may be equivalent to formerly deep-seated metasediments exposed in Tobago, Trinidad, Paria, and Araya; 5. foreland thrust belt in the slope and shelf cover of S. America; 6. E. Venezuelan-Trinidad foreland basin; and 7. S. American shield. The boundary between terranes 4 and 5 is probably a N-dipping thrust. Early in the Eocene, the southern L.A. arc was probably intra-Atlantic, NE-trending, and positioned offshore of the N-facing passive margin of northern S. America. The arc moved SE relative to S. America, first consuming Mesozoic oceanic lithosphere and accreting sediment of S. American provenance to its forearc, then riding obliquely over the slope and outer shelf of the continental passive margin. Major effects of the collision are uplift of deep-seated arc rocks, imbrication of arc elements, generation of the El Pilar tear fault, and foreland contraction and basining. The southern Lesser Antilles arc was not attached to a far traveled Caribbean plate of Pacific provenance. This implies the existence of boundaries within the Caribbean between an exotic Caribbean plate and the southern Antillean arc.

  17. Escape tectonics and foreland basin evolution: The Austrian-German Molasse basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortner, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    The Alpine peripheral foreland basin formed during Eocene collision of the lower, European plate and the upper, Adriatic plate. Two marine to continental megasequences fill the basin. The transition form deep marine to continental deposits of the first megasequence at the Early - Late Oligocene boundary has been related to a change from predominant horizontal to vertical movements in the core of the orogenic wedge. The second megasequence is, however, poorly understood, and different models have been put forward. I present an alternative explanation for the development of this second megacycle, based on an analysis of the Subalpine Molasse thrust belt east of the Rhine river (Ortner et al., 2015). The main characteristics of the Subalpine Molasse thrust belt are: 1) A frontal anticline/thrust started to develop during deposition of the older, marine portion of the second megasequence. Structures continued to grow throughout deposition of the younger, continental part of the megasequence. Structural growth is documented by growth strata. 2) The thrusts in the Subalpine Molasse evolved in a break-back sequence. 3) The amount of shortening during depositon of the second megasequence reduces from 40-50 km near the Rhine valley to zero in the east in the Salzburg area. The onset of the second megasequence in the foreland north of the Subalpine Molasse thrust belt is characterized by an angular unconformity documenting a tilt of the foreland toward the orogen, and therefore ongoing flexure of the lower plate. East of the eastern end of the Subalpine Molasse thrust belt, the deposits of the second megasequence are in a horizontal position, lower plate flexure had stopped. In the internal part of the Alpine orogenic wedge, shortening, exhumation and E-directed stretching of the Tauern Window as a consequence of escape tectonics was active. Most probably shortening was transferred from the Alpine front into the zone of lateral escape, causing the break-back thrust sequence

  18. The Effects of Gravitational Instability on the Tectonic Evolution of Continental Orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmer, L.; Houseman, G. A.

    2005-05-01

    Convergent continental orogens have been the research focus of numerous geological and geophysical surveys and dynamical modeling studies, but the mechanisms controlling the evolution of these systems are still under debate. The temporal and spatial distribution of tectonic processes in orogenic regions is complex, and the interplay between buoyancy forces and regional tectonics in some of these systems is still not well understood. In several cases the extensional collapse of mountain belts is associated with dramatic thinning of the mantle part of the lithosphere, more so than the crust. A key region for investigating these processes is the Carpathian-Pannonian system of eastern Europe, where rapid extension took place in the Pannonian Basin simultaneously with contractional deformation in the surrounding orogens. Previous studies show that gravitational instabilities may play a fundamental role in the tectonics of mountain ranges. In general, the lithosphere is colder and thereby denser than the underlying asthenosphere. Under some circumstances this may cause the lithosphere to sink into the underlying asthenosphere. We use dynamic numerical models to investigate how such gravitational instabilities may affect the evolution of continental orogens. We show how a crust initially thickened by localized convergence may promote lithospheric gravitational instabilities that cause the collapse of high topography and focused, depth-variable lithospheric thinning developing simultaneously with contractional deformation and lithospheric downwelling in the adjacent areas. We investigate the relative importance of buoyancy and regional tectonics in convergent continental orogens and show how density and viscosity (Newtonian or non-Newtonian) affect the evolution of a model system. We investigate the distribution and amplitude of lithospheric downwelling and examine how the instability develops adjacent to the corner of an initially rectangular region of thickened crust in

  19. The tectonic evolution of the greater South China Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, D.E. )

    1990-06-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) basin is composed of two major subbasins. The eastern subbasin was formed by seafloor spreading in the middle Tertiary and is associated with roughly E-W-trending magnetic lineations. The southwestern subbasin of the South China Sea is characterized by NE-SW tectonic and magnetic trends and is considerably narrower than the eastern subbasin. There is no obvious structural discontinuity between the two subbasins; hence the initial opening of the eastern subbasin was likely accommodated to the west by a prolonged period of extension of the continental crust that was not accompanied by the formation of normal oceanic crust. The southwest subbasin was eventually also formed by seafloor spreading processes. Although the sequence of magnetic lineations recorded there is relatively short, these data coupled with heatflow and crustal depth data strongly suggest that the southwestern subbasin was not formed until the early-middle Miocene, coincident with the last phase of spreading in the adjacent eastern subbasin. It is still unclear whether or not a significant change in spreading direction occurred within the SCS basin during the early Miocene. The geometry of the deep SCS basin as defined by the seaward limit of the continent-ocean boundary zone provides important constraints on the east-to-west variations in the total crustal extension manifested in the rifted margins of the South China Sea. The amount of new oceanic crust created by seafloor spreading plus the amount of crustal extension accommodated within the continental crust must be nearly the same for all points along the rifted margins. Because the amount of oceanic crust present is quite variable, it follows that the amount of crustal extension must be similarly variable and in a predictable way.

  20. Tectonic evolution of the west Spitsbergen fold belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, C.; Hauser, E. C.; Maher, H. D.; Sun, A. Y.; Guo-Qiang, Zhu

    1985-04-01

    The west Spitsbergen fold belt has a complex tectonic history which is recorded in a thick, nearly complete upper Proterozoic-Phanerozoic layered sequence. Work since 1977 near Bellsund allows recognition of the main deformational events in that segment of the fold belt. The strata are grouped informally into the metamorphosed Hecla Hoek (HH) sequence (Proterozoic) and the Van Keulenfjorden (VK) sequence (Carboniferous-Cretaceous), separated by a pronounced unconformity. The HH is divided into the Antoniabreen succession, the Chamberlindalen succession, and the Kapp Lyell tillite; the first two consist of diverse clastic and carbonate rocks, along with some volcanic rocks. The VK is a platform sequence of shallow marine and terrestrial sedimentary rocks. These layered rocks are intruded by a few Mesozoic dolerite sills and dikes. Subhorizontal Paleogene sedimentary rocks are preserved in a small graben. Both layered sequences have undergone strong deformation. Structures (mainly Caledonian age) in the HH can be grouped as phase 1 (small isoclinal folds, subhorizontal axial planar foliation, ridge-groove lineation in the foliation, and large recumbent folds), phase 2 (tight to isoclinal folds, axial planar foliation), and younger (weak folds and foliations, kink bands, crinkles). Structures (mainly Tertiary age) in the VK include faults (thrust, reverse, down-to-the-east bedding-plane normal, other normal); folds (symmetric, asymmetric, overturned, recumbent, isoclinal); and foliation (in some tightly folded Triassic shales). Six deformational events can be identified here, each described below in terms of age, intensity, and kinematic pattern: D 1 - Vendian or early Paleozoic; very strong; NNW-SSE shortening?, NNW transport? D 2 - Early Paleozoic (pre-Carboniferous); strong; NE-SW shortening, NE vergence. D 3 - Middle (?) Carboniferous; moderate; unclear (limited exposure). D 4 - Early Cretaceous (?); weak; extension, direction unclear. D 5 - Early (?) Tertiary

  1. High-resolution seismic analysis of the coastal Mecklenburg Bay (North German Basin): the pre-Alpine evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöllner, H.; Reicherter, K.; Schikowsky, P.

    2008-09-01

    The pre-Alpine structural and geological evolution in the northern part of the North German Basin have been revealed on the basis of a very dense reflection seismic profile grid. The study area is situated in the coastal Mecklenburg Bay (Germany), part of the southwestern Baltic Sea. From the central part of the North German Basin to the northern basin margin in the Grimmen High area a series of high-resolution maps show the evolution from the base Zechstein to the Lower Jurassic. We present a map of basement faults affecting the pre-Zechstein. The pre-Alpine structural evolution of the region has been determined from digital mapping of post-Permian key horizons traced on the processed seismic time sections. The geological evolution of the North German Basin can be separated into four distinct periods in the Rerik study area. During Late Permian and Early Triassic evaporites and clastics were deposited. Salt movement was initiated after the deposition of the Middle Triassic Muschelkalk. Salt pillows, which were previously unmapped in the study area, are responsible for the creation of smaller subsidence centers and angular unconformities in the Late Triassic Keuper, especially in the vicinity of the fault-bounded Grimmen High. In this area, partly Lower Jurassic sediments overlie the Keuper unconformably. The change from extension to compression in the regional stress field remobilized the salt, leading to a major unconformity marked at the base of the Late Cretaceous.

  2. A review of the tectonic evolution of the Northern Pacific and adjacent Cordilleran Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Johannes; Gaina, Carmen; Johnston, Stephen T.

    2014-05-01

    Numerous plate kinematic models for the North Pacific realm have been developed since the advent of plate tectonics in the early seventies (e.g Atwater (1970), Mammerickx and Sharman (1988)). Although published kinematic models are consistent with the broad scale features of the North Pacific, the link between plate motions and the evolution of the North American Cordillera remains poorly understood. Part of the problem lies in conflicting interpretations of geological versus paleomagnetic data sets, with the result being a lack of consensus regarding: the paleolocation of key geological units; the paleogeography of terrane formation and amalgamation; the motion, boundaries and even existence of oceanic plates; and the character (e.g. trend of subduction) and position of plate boundaries within the northern Pacific basin. Remnants of the Farallon and Kula plates, and some short-lived microplates, demonstrate the complicated tectonic evolution of the oceanic realm west of the North American margin (e.g. Rea and Dixon (1983); McCrory and Wilson (2013); Shephard et al. (2013)). The creation and destruction of major tectonic plates and microplates has presumably left a record in the Cordilleran orogen of western North America. However, working backward from the geological relationships to plate reconstructions remains difficult. Here we investigate the relationship between the plate motions of the Pacific Ocean and the terrane movements in the North American Cordillera by revising the marine magnetic and gravity anomalies of the northern Pacific. In particular, we reevaluate plate boundaries at times of major changes in plate geometry of the Pacific, Kula, Chinook and Farallon plates from C34n onward. Our focus is also on the plate geometries of the Resurrection, Eshamy and Siletz-Crescent plates during the time between anomaly C26 and C12, and the links between plate interactions and on-shore tectonic events recorded in the geological record of Vancouver Island

  3. Tectonic Evolution of the Çayirhan Neogene Basin (Ankara), Central Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzad, Bezhan; Koral, Hayrettin; İşb&idot; l, Duygu; Karaaǧa; ç, Serdal

    2016-04-01

    Çayırhan (Ankara) is located at crossroads of the Western Anatolian extensional region, analogous to the Basin and Range Province, and suture zone of the Neotethys-Ocean, which is locus of the North Anatolian Transform since the Late Miocene. To the north of Çayırhan (Ankara), a Neogene sedimentary basin comprises Lower-Middle Miocene and Upper Miocene age formations, characterized by swamp, fluvial and lacustrine settings respectively. This sequence is folded and transected by neotectonic faults. The Sekli thrust fault is older than the Lower-Middle Miocene age formations. The Davutoǧlan fault is younger than the Lower-Middle Miocene formations and is contemporaneous to the Upper Miocene formation. The Çatalkaya fault is younger than the Upper Miocene formation. The sedimentary and tectonic features provide information on mode, timing and evolution of this Neogene age sedimentary basin in Central Turkey. It is concluded that the region underwent a period of uplift and erosion under the influence of contractional tectonics prior to the Early-Middle Miocene, before becoming a semi-closed basin under influence of transtensional tectonics during the Early-Middle Miocene and under influence of predominantly extensional tectonics during the post-Late Miocene times. Keywords: Tectonics, Extension, Transtension, Stratigraphy, Neotectonic features.

  4. Tectonics, fluvial transport, and long-term episodicity in landscape evolution. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Castellanos, D.

    2010-12-01

    Modelling studies of the long-term evolution (>1 Myr) of tectonic sedimentary basins are generally based on the assumption that both tectonics and surface transport act as gradual mechanisms, if not at constant rates or conditions. Even under this premise, recent models predict geologically rapid changes in landscape evolution related to changes in basin connectivity that result from non-linear interplay between climate, tectonics, and transport. These results underline the importance of the development of internal drainage (endorheism) in controlling abrupt, non-tectonic changes in sedimentary basins such as the Ebro Basin (Pyrenees, Spain), the Sichuan Basin (Tibetan Plateau, China), or the Pannonian-Dacic system (Carpathian Mountains). These basins underwent long, lacustrine, endorheic periods followed by fast basin erosion, suggesting that, also in the large spatial and temporal scales, pulses in sedimentary infill, usually interpreted as the result of accelerated tectonic activity, may often be linked to hydrological reorganization. However, these long-term landscape evolution models are based on the assumption of steady flow, while abrupt changes in connectivity (e.g., overtopping of lacustrine basins) take place under very non-steady conditions. Accordingly, existing mathematical models cannot estimate the rapidity of the transition from lacustrine to erosional stages after basin overflow. Pleistocene scenarios such as the overspill of Lake Bonneville show that at least the largest basins are likely to trigger large floods when overspilling, leaving a significant imprint on landscape in a very short period of time. Numerical modelling can reveal whether the complexity observed in landscape can be explained as the result of the interaction between simple processes. Results so far suggest a need for implementing episodicity and non-steady flow in surface processes models, and to consider the statistical distribution of discrete meteorological events to better

  5. Geology and Tectonic Evolution of the Kazdaǧ Massif (NW Anatolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdoğan, B.; Akay, E.; Hasözbek, A.; Satır, M.; Siebel, W.

    2009-04-01

    and paleogeographic evolution of the southern part of the northwestern Anatolia. Geologica Romana 27, 13-80 Bingöl, E. (1971) Classification of age determination methods and application of Rb/Sr and K/Ar methods in Kazdağ. Bulletin of the Mineral Research and Exploration Institute of Turkey 14, 1-16 (in Turkish) Duru, M., Pehlivan, Ş., Şentürk, Y., Yavaş, F. ve Kar, H. (2004) New results on the lithostratigraphy of the Kazdağ Massif in northwest Turkey. Turkish Journal of Earth Sciences 13, 177-186 Okay, A.I and Monie, P. (1997) Early Mesozoic subduction in the eastern Mediterranean: Evidence from Triassic eclogite in northwest Turkey. Geology 25, 595-598 Okay, A.I and Satır, M. (2000) Coeval plutonism and metamorphism in a latest Oligocene metamorphic core complex in northwestern Turkey. Geological Magazine 137, 495-516 Okay, A.I, Siyako, M and Burkan, K.A. (1991) Geology and tectonic evolution of the Biga Peninsula, northwestern Turkey. Bulletin of the Technical University of İstanbul 44, 191-256 Okay, A.I, Monod, O and Monie, P. (2002) Triaasic blueschists and eclogites from northwestern Turkey: vestiges of the Paleo-Tethyan subduction. Lithos 64, 155-178 Okay, A.I, Satır, M., Maluski, H., Sıyako, M., Monie, P., Metzger, R., Akyüz, S., (1996) Paleo- and Neo-Tethyan events in northwestern Turkey: Geologic and geochronologic constrains. The Tectonic Evolution of Asia, 420-441 Topuz, G, Altıner, D, Satır, M, and Schwartz, W.H. (2004) Low-grade metamorphic rocks from the Pulur Complex, NE Turkey: implications for the pre-Liassic evolution of the Eastern Pontides. International Journal of Earth Science, 93, 72-91 Yaltırak C. and Okay A.İ (1994) Geology of the Paleo-Tethyan units in the north of Edremit Bay. Bulletin of the Technical University of İstanbul , 3/1, 67-79 (in Turkish)

  6. Traces of Late Miocene and Pleistocene tectonics on recent surface morphology in the Western Pannonian Alpine Foothills - a case study of geomorphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, Gábor; Telbisz, Tamás; Székely, Balázs

    2014-05-01

    effective method on apparently totally flat area in showing location of tectonic forces. We compared the revealed features with the basement morphology using previously composed basement maps and industrial seismic sections. Latter proved that morphological similarities are not only observable between the basement and the surface, but the geometry of basin-fill lacustrine sediment horizons strengthen the correspondence and in some cases explain the root causes. Our results provide additional information to the geodynamic sketch of the Alpine-Pannonian transition zone and emphasize the applicability of geomorphometry in tectonic studies. The study was supported by Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA NK83400) and was realized in the frames of TÁMOP 4.2.4.A/2-11-1-2012-0001 high priority "National Excellence Program - Elaborating and Operating an Inland Student and Researcher Personal Support System convergence program" project's scholarship support.

  7. Overview of geology and tectonic evolution of the Baikal-Tuva area.

    PubMed

    Gladkochub, Dmitry; Donskaya, Tatiana

    2009-01-01

    This chapter provides the results of geological investigations of the main tectonic units of the Baikal-Tuva region (southwestern part of Siberia) during the last decades: the ancient Siberian craton and adjacent areas of the Central Asian Orogenic belt. In the framework of these main units we describe small-scale blocks (terranes) with focus on details of their inner structure and evolution through time. As well as describing the geology and tectonics of the area studied, we give an overview of underwater sediments, neotectonics, and some phenomena of history and development of the Baikal, Khubsugul, Chargytai, and Tore-Chol Lakes basins of the Baikal-Tuva region. It is suggested that these lakes' evolution was controlled by neotectonic processes, modern seismic activity, and global climate changes. PMID:19198771

  8. Paleozoic plate-tectonic evolution of the Tarim and western Tianshan regions, western China

    SciTech Connect

    Yangshen, S.; Huafu, L.; Dong, J.

    1994-11-01

    The plate-tectonic evolution of the Tarim basin and nearby western Tianshan region during Paleozoic time is reconstructed in an effort to further constrain the tectonic evolution of Central Asia, providing insights into the formation and distribution of oil and gas resources. The Tarim plate developed from continental rifting that progressed during early Paleozoic time into a passive continental margin. The Yili terrane (central Tianshan) broke away from the present eastern part of Tarim and became a microcontinent located somewhere between the Junggar ocean and the southern Tianshan ocean. The southern Tianshan ocean, between the Tarim craton and the Yili terrane, was subducting beneath the Yili terrane from Silurian to Devonian time. During the Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous, the Tarim plate collided with the Yili terrane by sinistral accretional docking that resulted in a late Paleozoic deformational episode. Intracontinental shortening (A-type subduction) continued through the Permian with the creation of a magmatic belt. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Pele III, plate tectonics, atmospheric and biotic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, R.E. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1994-04-01

    This paper is an elaboration of Pele I and II, Landis et al GSA Abstr. V. 25 No.6, and Hengst et al GSA Abstr. V. 25 No.6. The Pele hypothesis is that CO[sub 2] concentration in the atmosphere is directly related to the rate of seafloor spreading and the existence of superplumes. Excess CO[sub 2] favors expansion of plants and is converted to O[sub 2] by photosynthesis and deposition of buried carbon and carbonate. O[sub 2] is removed from the atmosphere by weathering. Resulting major variations in atmospheric CO[sub 2] and O[sub 2] have significant impact on the evolution and extinction of organisms.

  10. Tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Pindell, J.L.; Barrett, S.F.; Dewey, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The authors propose a three-phase geologic-kinematic model for the evolution of the Gulf of Mexico/Caribbean region starting with a detailed Late Paleozoic (Alleghenian) plate reconstruction and using a revised relative-motion history for North America (NOAM) and South American (SOAM). The completely closed initial reconstruction incorporates the effects of Jurassic syn-rift crustal extension, an improved Equatorial Atlantic fit, and the post-rift accretion and deformation in northwestern South America. The Yucatan block and western Bahamas continental basement occupied the area of the present Gulf of Mexico. The three phases of evolution are: MIDDLE JURASSIC-CHAMPANIAN; SOAM migrated east-southeast from NOAM, and the Yucatan block rotated 43/sup 0/CCW about a pole in northern Florida reaching its present position by the Berriasian. Carbonate shelves formed along the rifted margins of the Gulf of Mexico and proto-Caribbean. Early Cretaceous crust of the Caribbean Plate (CARIB) formed in the Pacific Basin and was intruded by medial Cretaceous basalts (B'') somewhere to the west of South America. CARIB partially collided with southern Yucatan and northwest SOAM in the Late Cretaceous, and with the Bahamas in the late Paleocene-Middle Eocene. POST-MIDDLE EOCENE: Minor west-northwest NOAM-SOAM convergence occurred along preexisting Atlantic fracture zones. CARIB has migrated eastward by 1200 km, subducting proto-Caribbean crust and forming the Lesser Antilles arc. The original Greater Antilles-Aves Ridge arc has been dissected by anastomosing transforms connecting the Middle American and Lesser Antilles trenches.

  11. Simulation of Evolutive Plate Tectonics: the Size of Plates Depends on Mantle Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigne, C.; Combes, M.

    2013-12-01

    We use a dynamic model of plate tectonics based on a multiagent approach, in a 2D cylindrical geometry (Combes et al., 2012), to study how evolutive plate tectonics affect the long term thermal state of the mantle, and in return, to analyze the relationship between the mantle mean temperature and the geometry of plate tectonics. Our model accounts for first-order features of plate tectonics: (a) all plates on Earth do not have the same size, (b) subduction zones are asymmetric, (c) plates driven by subducting slabs and upper plates do not exhibit the same velocities, and (d) plate boundaries are mobile, can collide, merge and disappear, and new plate boundaries can be created. We show that when processes for plate boundary creation (subduction initiation and ridge creation) are relying on a brittle criterion, namely when a fixed yield strength has to be reached, the average size of plates adapts to the mantle thermal state: longer plates are obtained for a hotter mantle, which implies a maximum seafloor age that remains fairly high throughout Earth's thermal history and limits mantle heat loss. This is consistent with petrological and geochemical constraints on Earth's cooling history. Important fluctuations in the mantle heat flux and velocities of plates are obtained on a timescale of a few hundred Myr, but on the long term, the relationship between the average wavelength of plate tectonics and mantle temperature can be explained by a simple scaling law. Recent compilations of geological records infer that passive margins had longer lifespans in the past (e.g. Bradley 2008; 2011), which has been linked to 'sluggish' plate tectonics and slow plates in the Precambrian (Korenaga, 2006). Our simulations outputs include lifespans of tectonic entities such as passive margins, as well as statistical data about events of plates reorganizations. We obtain faster plates in the past than at present day, but counterintuitively we also observe a low episodicity of tectonic

  12. Tectonic activity and the evolution of submarine canyons: The Cook Strait Canyon system, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micallef, Aaron; Mountjoy, Joshu; Barnes, Philip; Canals, Miquel; Lastras, Galderic

    2016-04-01

    Submarine canyons are Earth's most dramatic erosional features, comprising steep-walled valleys that originate in the continental shelf and slope. They play a key role in the evolution of continental margins by transferring sediments into deep water settings and are considered important biodiversity hotspots, pathways for nutrients and pollutants, and analogues of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Although comprising only one third of continental margins worldwide, active margins host more than half of global submarine canyons. We still lack of thorough understanding of the coupling between active tectonics and submarine canyon processes, which is necessary to improve the modelling of canyon evolution in active margins and derive tectonic information from canyon morphology. The objectives of this study are to: (i) understand how tectonic activity influences submarine canyon morphology, processes, and evolution in an active margin, and (2) formulate a generalised model of canyon development in response to tectonic forcing based on morphometric parameters. We fulfil these objectives by analysing high resolution geophysical data and imagery from Cook Strait Canyon system, offshore New Zealand. Using these data, we demonstrate that tectonic activity, in the form of major faults and structurally-generated tectonic ridges, leaves a clear topographic signature on submarine canyon location and morphology, in particular their dendritic and sinuous planform shapes, steep and linear longitudinal profiles, and cross-sectional asymmetry and width. We also report breaks/changes in canyon longitudinal slope gradient, relief and slope-area regression models at the intersection with faults. Tectonic activity gives rise to two types of knickpoints in the Cook Strait Canyon. The first type consists of low slope gradient, rounded and diffusive knickpoints forming as a result of short wavelength folds or fault break outs and being restored to an equilibrium profile by upstream erosion and

  13. Towards an Integrated Model of Earth's Thermo-Chemical Evolution and Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, P. J.; Xie, S.

    2001-05-01

    It has long been a challenge for geodynamicists, who have typically modeled homogeneous mantles, to explain the geochemical evidence for the existence of several distinct chemical reservoirs, in terms of a dynamically and chemically self-consistent model. While the mixing behavior of generalized tracers has received much attention in the modeling community, a recent trend has been towards mantle convection models that track the evolution of specific chemical species, both major and minor, and can thus be related to geochemical observations. However, obtaining realistic chemical evolution in such models is dependent on their having a reasonable representation of plate tectonic behavior since the recycling of oceanic crust and complementary depleted residuum is a key process in Earth that other terrestrial planets may lack. In general, this has required inserting plate motions by hand in models. In recent years, however, we have learned how to perform numerical simulations of mantle convection in which plate tectonic behavior is introduced self-consistently through plastic yielding of the lithosphere. In this presentation, models of mantle convection that combine a treatment of geochemical evolution with self-consistently generated plate tectonics, will be presented. Preliminary results indicate that the system can self-consistently evolve regions which have a HIMU-like signature as well as regions with a high He3/He4 ratio.

  14. Tectonic activity evolution of the Scotia-Antarctic Plate boundary from mass transport deposit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Lara F.; Bohoyo, Fernando; Hernández-Molina, F. Javier; Casas, David; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Ruano, Patricia; Maldonado, Andrés.

    2016-04-01

    The spatial distribution and temporal occurrence of mass transport deposits (MTDs) in the sedimentary infill of basins and submerged banks near the Scotia-Antarctic plate boundary allowed us to decode the evolution of the tectonic activity of the relevant structures in the region from the Oligocene to present day. The 1020 MTDs identified in the available data set of multichannel seismic reflection profiles in the region are subdivided according to the geographic and chronological distributions of these features. Their spatial distribution reveals a preferential location along the eastern margins of the eastern basins. This reflects local deformation due to the evolution of the Scotia-Antarctic transcurrent plate boundary and the impact of oceanic spreading along the East Scotia Ridge (ESR). The vertical distribution of the MTDs in the sedimentary record evidences intensified regional tectonic deformation from the middle Miocene to Quaternary. Intensified deformation started at about 15 Ma, when the ESR progressively replaces the West Scotia Ridge (WSR) as the main oceanic spreading center in the Scotia Sea. Coevally with the WSR demise at about 6.5 Ma, increased spreading rates of the ESR and numerous MTDs were formed. The high frequency of MTDs during the Pliocene, mainly along the western basins, is also related to greater tectonic activity due to uplift of the Shackleton Fracture Zone by tectonic inversion and extinction of the Antarctic-Phoenix Ridge and involved changes at late Pliocene. The presence of MTDs in the southern Scotia Sea basins is a relevant indicator of the interplay between sedimentary instability and regional tectonics.

  15. Basaltic Magmatism: The Dominant Factor in the Petrologic and Tectonic Evolution of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Silicate bodies such as the Moon, Mars, probably Mercury, and possibly Venus, appear to have evolved in three main stages: a first (felsic) differentiation, a late heavy bombardment, and a second (basaltic) differentiation. It has been proposed that the Earth underwent a similar sequence. This paper argues that the second differentiation, basaltic magmatism, has dominated the petrologic and tectonic evolution of the Earth for four billion years. A global andesitic crust, formed during and after accretion of the planet, was disrupted by major impacts that triggered mantle upwelling and sea-floor spreading about 4 billion years ago. The oceanic crust collectively has since been formed by basaltic volcanism, from spreading centers and mantle plumes. However, the continental crust has also been greatly affected. Basaltic underplating has promoted anatexis and diapiric intrusion of granitoids in granite-greenstone terrains, as well as providing heat for regional metamorphism. Basaltic intrusions, such as the Nipissing diabase of the Sudbury area, have added to the thickness of continental crust. Satellite magnetic surveys suggest that there are more such basaltic intrusions than previously realized; examples include the Bangui anomaly of central Africa and the Kentucky anomaly. Basaltic overplating from mafic dike swarms has repeatedly flooded continents; had it not been for erosion, they would be covered with basalt as Venus is today. The tectonic effects of basaltic volcanism on continents have only recently been realized. The World Stress Map project has discovered that continents are under horizontal compressive stress, caused by push from mid-ocean ridges, i.e., by basaltic volcanism. The stress fields are generally uniform over large intraplate areas, and could contribute to intraplate tectonism. Seafloor spreading has demonstrably been effective for at least 200 million years, and ridge push thus a contributor to tectonic activity for that long. Collectively, the

  16. A unit of instruction on the plate tectonic evolution of New England

    SciTech Connect

    Reusch, D. )

    1993-03-01

    A unit of instruction has been developed which enables high school students to decipher the plate tectonic evolution of a typical mountain belt, the New England segment of the Appalachian Orogen. It integrates a wide variety of geological topics including: geological time, the fossil record, global tectonics, geological environments, rocks, minerals, and representative sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic processes. Students are provided with a simplified tectonic map of the New England area and data cards on each of 12 units. They use fossils and radiometric dates to sort the units chronologically and the map to sort them geographically. Next, they compare the fossil and geological data for each unit with modern tectonic settings and interpret each unit as either oceanic crust [+-] mantle, volcanic arc, arc margin, continental crust, passive margin (rift, shelf, or slope), granite system, or collision margin. Finally, they reconstruct the paleogeography for each time period which reveals the cycle of Iapetus Ocean growth and destruction and the initiation of the Atlantic Ocean cycle.

  17. Differentiating tectonic from climatic factors in the evolution of alluvial fans

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.S.; West, R.B. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Alluvial fans are integral parts of landscapes of arid and semi-arid regions and are most commonly found along the flanks of tectonically active mountain ranges. Alluvial fans are sensitive indicators of tectonic and climatic activity through time. Three dimensional fan modelling has the potential to discriminate between these two forces and provide quantitative estimates of deformation of fan surfaces due to tilting, faulting, or folding. The model has tremendous potential for seismic hazard evaluation at both the reconnaissance and detailed level of investigation. The ability to recognize deformation of alluvial fans alleviates the need for postulation of complex interactions between climate and internal variables in the depositional system leading to present fan morphology. The greatest problems associated with fan modelling come from failure to identify individual segments. Inclusion of more than one segment can lead to poor model performance or, more likely, inaccurate results. The long term tectonic influence on a fan's evolution can be assessed from the differences in deformation of different segments. Reliable correlations of segments from different fans along the same mountain front can provide a means to asses regional deformation. Once tectonic effects are taken into account, then climatic effects can be evaluated. Previous fan models have failed to recognize areal limitations, failed to account for deformation, or assumed deformation geometry.

  18. How do Early Impacts Modulate the Tectonic, Magnetic and Climatic Evolutions of Terrestrial Planets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jellinek, M.; Jackson, M. G.; Lenardic, A.; Weller, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    The landmark discovery showing that the 142Nd/144Nd ratio of the accessible modern terrestrial mantle is greater than ordinary-chondrites has remarkable implications for the formation, as well as the geodynamic, magnetic and climatic histories of Earth. If Earth is derived from ordinary chondrite precursors, mass balance requires that a missing reservoir with 142Nd/144Nd lower than ordinary chondrites was isolated from the accessible mantle within 20-30 Myr following accretion. Critically for Earth evolution, this reservoir hosts the equivalent of the modern continents' budget of radioactive heat-producing elements (U, Th and K). If this reservoir was lost to space through mechanical erosion by early impactors, the planet's radiogenic heat generation is 18-45% lower than chondrite-based compositional estimates. Recent geodynamic calculations suggest that this reduced heat production will favor the emergence of Earth-like plate tectonics. However, parameterized thermal history calculations favor a relatively recent transition from mostly Atlantic-sized plates to the current plate tectonic mode characterized predominantly by the subduction of Pacific-sized plates. Such a transition in the style of Earth's plate tectonics is also consistent with a delayed dynamo and an evolving rate of volcanic outgassing that ultimately favors Earth's long-term clement climate. By contrast, relatively enhanced radiogenic heat production related to a less early impact erosion reduces the likelihood of present day plate tectonics: A chondritic Earth has a stronger likelihood to evolve as a Venus-like planet characterized by potentially wild swings in tectonic and climatic regime. Indeed, differences in internal heat production related to varying extents of impact erosion may exert strong control over Earth's climate and explain aspects of the differences among the current climatic regimes of Earth, Venus and Mars.

  19. The evolution of volcanism, tectonics, and volatiles on Mars - An overview of recent progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, James R.; Solomon, Sean C.; Sharpton, Virgil L.

    1991-01-01

    Significant results of the 'Mars: Evolution of Volcanism, Tectonics, and Volatiles' (MEVTV) project are presented. The data for the project are based on geological mapping from the Viking images, petrologic and chemical analyses of SNC meteorites, and both mapping and temporal grouping of major fault systems. The origin of the planet's crustal dichotomy is examined in detail, the kinematics and formation of wrinkle ridges are discussed, and some new theories are set forth. Because the SNC meteorites vary petrologically and isotopically, the sources of the parental Martian magma are heterogeneous. Transcurrent faulting coupled with the extensional strains that form Valles Marineris suggest early horizontal movement of lithospheric blocks. A theory which connects the formation of the crustal dichotomy to the Tharsis region associates the horizontal motions with plate tectonics that generated a new lithosphere.

  20. Plio-Quaternary canyons evolution on South Colombian convergent margin : Tectonic causes and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratzov, Gueorgui; Sosson, Marc; Collot, Jean-Yves; Migeon, Sebastien

    2010-05-01

    Investigations of seafloor morphology and sediment deposits associated with the incision of the South Colombia active margin by a major submarine canyon system are used to reveal out-of-sequence fault activity at least since the Middle Pleistocene. The South Colombian convergent margin is located along Northwestern South America, where the Nazca plate underthrusts eastward the South America plate with a 58 mm.yr-1 convergence rate. The morphology and deep multichannel seismic reflection lines obtained across the margin reflect a frontal accretionnary wedge, as well as antiform and faulted internal structural highs that locally extend up to near the continental shelf, suggesting wide-spread Plio-Quaternary tectonic activity. The Amadeus cruise conduced in 2005 brought new seismic and sedimentary data together with 150m and 60m-resolution EM12D multibeam bathymetry. The newly mapped Mira and Patia canyons system incises the South Colombian margin slope over a distance of ~90 and ~150 km respectively, forming an unequivocal Z-shape in map view, breaching the deformation front and feeding a 30-km wide trench fan system. The morphology of the canyon exhibits meanders, steep over-incised walls (~25-30 degrees), alternation between concave-up and convex-up downstream profiles, slope failures scars, and buried channels. These features reflect interactions between tectonics, sedimentation and the canyon evolution. A synthesis of all the data reveals that: A) Uplifting structural highs control canyons path and incision stages. B) Canyons developed asynchronously across the upper, mid and lower margin slopes according to three main stages: a) upper slope incision by downward cutting during Pleistocene, and possibly by retrogressive headward erosion, b) infill of a mid-slope basin bounded by uplifting structural highs, and c) overspill of the slope basin, and breaching its seaward bounding ridge, and the accretionary prism ~150 kyr ago. These processes led to the construction

  1. Evidence of Variscan and Alpine tectonics in the structural and thermochronological record of the central Serbo-Macedonian Massif (south-eastern Serbia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antić, Milorad D.; Kounov, Alexandre; Trivić, Branislav; Spikings, Richard; Wetzel, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    The Serbo-Macedonian Massif (SMM) represents a composite crystalline belt within the Eastern European Alpine orogen, outcropping from the Pannonian basin in the north to the Aegean Sea in the south. The central parts of this massif (south-eastern Serbia) consist of the medium- to high-grade Lower Complex and the low-grade Vlasina Unit. Outcrop- and micro-scale ductile structures in this area document three major stages of ductile deformation. The earliest stage D1 is related to isoclinal folding, commonly preserved as up to decimetre-scale quartz-feldspar rootless fold hinges. D2 is associated with general south-eastward tectonic transport and refolding of earlier structures into recumbent metre- to kilometre-scale tight to isoclinal folds. Stages D1 and D2 could not be temporally separated and probably took place in close sequence. The age of these two ductile deformation stages was constrained to the Variscan orogeny based on indirect geological evidence (i.e. ca. 408-ca. 328). During this period, the SMM was involved in a transpressional amalgamation of the western and eastern parts of the Galatian super-terrane and subsequent collision with Laurussia. Outcrop-scale evidence of the final stage D3 is limited to spaced and crenulation cleavage, which are probably related to formation of large-scale open upright folds as reported previously. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology was applied on hornblende, muscovite, and biotite samples in order to constrain the age of tectonothermal events and activity along major shear zones. These 40Ar/39Ar data reveal three major cooling episodes affecting the central SMM. Cooling below greenschist facies conditions in the western part of the Vlasina Unit took place in a post-orogenic setting (extensional or transtensional) in the early Permian (284 ± 1 Ma). The age of activity along the top-to-the-west shear zone formed within the orthogneiss in the Božica area of the Vlasina Unit was constrained to Middle Triassic (246 ± 1 Ma). This

  2. Andean subduction orogeny: feedbacks between tectonics, relief evolution and global climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacassin, Robin; Armijo, Rolando; Coudurier-Curveur, Aurélie; Carrizo, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The Andean subduction margin, largest tectonic relief on the Earth (13 km vertically from the trench to the Altiplano) has a stepped morphology, which results of the evolution over the past 50 Myr of two parallel flat-ramp thrust systems, at the - previously unidentified - West Andean Thrust (WAT), and at the subduction interface. The evolution of those thrusts appears concomitant with increasing aridity in the Atacama Desert, which keeps a large-scale record of interplaying tectonics and Cenozoic climate change. The coastal morphology is dominated by the Atacama Bench, a giant uplifted terrace at 1-2km asl. Geomorphic and climatic data, numerical experiments of drainage formation are consistent with the development of a flat Atacama morphology close to sea level, interrupted at ≤10 Ma by tectonic uplift prevailing to the present. This suggests recent trench-ward relief growth by incorporation of the coastal Atacama Bench to the Andes reliefs. Thrust splay structures and other complexities above the subduction interface may explain this relief growth, as well as the distribution of asperities under the oceanward forearc, and the down-dip segmentation of coupling and seismicity on the megathrust. Combining those results with geological knowledge at the scale of the whole Central Andes, we show that the Andean orogeny results from protracted processes of bivergent crustal shortening in a wide region squeezed between the rigid Marginal Block and the S America Plate. The overall growth curve of Andean orogeny over the past 50 Myr appears synchronous with the onset of the "ramp-shaped" temperature decrease since the Early Eocene climatic optimum. Andean growth and global cooling may have operated under the same forcing mechanism at plate-scale, involving viscous flow in the mantle. But Andean growth appears modulated by climatic feedbacks causative of stepwise reductions of erosive power over the Andean margin. The first of such events is coeval with Late Eocene

  3. Integrating Geochemical and Geodynamic Numerical Models of Mantle Evolution and Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, P. J.; Xie, S.

    2001-12-01

    The thermal and chemical evolution of Earth's mantle and plates are inextricably coupled by the plate tectonic - mantle convective system. Convection causes chemical differentiation, recycling and mixing, while chemical variations affect the convection through physical properties such as density and viscosity which depend on composition. It is now possible to construct numerical mantle convection models that track the thermo-chemical evolution of major and minor elements, and which can be used to test prospective models and hypotheses regarding Earth's chemical and thermal evolution. Model thermal and chemical structures can be compared to results from seismic tomography, while geochemical signatures (e.g., trace element ratios) can be compared to geochemical observations. The presented, two-dimensional model combines a simplified 2-component major element model with tracking of the most important trace elements, using a tracer method. Melting is self-consistently treated using a solidus, with melt placed on the surface as crust. Partitioning of trace elements occurs between melt and residue. Decaying heat-producing elements and secular cooling of the mantle and core provide the driving heat sources. Pseudo-plastic yielding of the lithosphere gives a first-order approximation of plate tectonics, and also allows planets with a rigid lid or intermittent plate tectonics to be modeled simply by increasing the yield strength. Preliminary models with an initially homogeneous mantle show that regions with a HIMU-like signature can be generated by crustal recycling, and regions with high 3He/4He ratios can be generated by residuum recycling. Outgassing of Argon is within the observed range. Models with initially layered mantles will also be investigated. In future it will be important to include a more realistic bulk compositional model that allows continental crust as well as oceanic crust to form, and to extend the model to three dimensions since toroidal flow may alter

  4. Unraveling the Interaction Between Mantle Processes and the Tectono-Sedimentary Evolution During Final Rifting Based on the Study of Remnants of the Alpine Tethys Rifted Margins Exposed in the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohn, G.; Masini, E.; Manatschal, G.; Muntener, O.; Kusznir, N.

    2007-12-01

    The tectonic, sedimentary and isostatic evolution of distal rifted margins are poorly constrained and the available data from present-day magma-poor rifted margins, such as the Iberia-Newfoundland or the Southern Atlantic margins suggest that its evolution is complex and very different from that of proximal margins. In contrast to present-day rifted margins, where rift structures are covered by sediments and are at abyssal depth, remnants of ancient margins preserved in collisional orogens bear, if not overprinted by later deformation, important information on the stratigraphic, tectonic and mantle evolution during rifting. This is particularly true for the Adriatic and parts of the European margins exposed in the Alps in Central Europe. From these margins remnants of the first oceanic crust, the subcontinental mantle, from lower crustal rocks, detachment systems, remnants of the distal and proximal margins and the stratigraphic record of rifting, including pre-, syn- and post-rift sediments are preserved. A paleogeographic reconstruction of all these structures including the associated stratigraphy and the underlying basement represents a unique opportunity to study the relations between shallow crustal and mantle processes during rifting. Previous studies suggested that the margins in the Alps resulted from a complex poly-phase evolution that initiated with distributed stretching (220 to 190 Ma), continued with localized thinning (around 180 Ma) and terminated with exhumation of mantle rocks and first MOR-type magmatism (at 160 Ma). Thus, rifting leading to breakup and opening of the Alpine Tethys was shown to be the result of strain localization and to include a transition from decoupled to coupled deformation in which detachment faulting played an important role. How crustal thinning is linked in detail with strain localization, uplift of distal domains and melt infiltration in the rising mantle during crustal thinning is, however, not yet understood. We will

  5. Geomorphological evolution of the Tilcara alluvial fan (Jujuy Province, NW Argentina): Tectonic implications and palaeoenvironmental considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Carlos; Peña, José Luis; Rivelli, Felipe; Rhodes, Ed; Muñoz, Arsenio

    2008-07-01

    The development and evolution of the Tilcara alluvial fan, in the Quebrada de Humahuaca (Andean Eastern Cordillera, NW Argentina), has been analysed by using geomorphological mapping techniques, sedimentological characterisation of the deposits and OSL chronological methods. It is a complex segmented alluvial fan made up of five evolutionary stages (units Qf1, Qf2, Qf3, Qf4 and Qf5) developed under arid climatic environments as well as compressive tectonic conditions. Segmentation processes, including aggradation/entrenchment cycles and changes in the location of the depositional lobe, are mainly controlled by climatic and/or tectonic changes as well as channel piracy processes in the drainage system. Alluvial fan deposits include debris flows, sheet flows and braided channel facies associated with high water discharge events in an arid environment. The best mean OSL age estimated for stage Qf2 is 84.5 ± 7 ka BP. In addition, a thrust fault affecting these deposits has been recognized and, as a consequence, the compressive tectonics must date from the Upper Pleistocene in this area of the Andean Eastern Cordillera.

  6. Miocene to recent tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the Anaximander Seamounts; eastern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranshaw, Jennifer

    This thesis is focused on the Messinian to Recent tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the Anaximander Mountains and surrounding environs in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. It is based on processing of high-resolution seismic reflection data and the interpretation and mapping of seismic reflection profiles collected from this area during the 2001 and 2007 research cruises. The data show that the greater Anaximander Mountains region experienced a short interval of tectonic quiescence during the Messinian when a thin evaporite unit was deposited across a major erosional surface. This phase of limited tectonic activity ended in the latest Miocene and was replaced by an erosional phase. Major unconformities in the area are interpreted to develop during the desiccation of the eastern Mediterranean associated with the so-called Messinian salinity crisis. During the early Pliocene, the region experienced an increase in tectonic activity, dominated by transpression. Small amounts of growth observed in Pliocene-Quaternary sediments suggested that the tectonic activity remained low during the early Pliocene-Quaternary. However, the extensive growth strata wedges developed in older sediments indicate a period of accelerated tectonic activity during the mid-late Pliocene-Quaternary. This study suggests that the Anaximander Mountain (sensu stricto ) and the Anaximenes Mountain developed during the Pliocene-Quaternary as the result of a crustal-scale thick-skinned linked imbricate thrust fan. The development of back thrusts in both mountains heightened the seafloor morphology of these submarine mountains and brought Eocene-Oligocene sediments into the core of these mountains. The Sim Erinc Plateau represents a 30-40 km wide transpressional fault zone developed during the Pliocene-Quaternary. In this region the corrugated seafloor morphology observed in the multibeam bathymetry map is the reflection of high-angle faults. It is speculated that this transpressional fault zone

  7. New constraints on the tectonic and thermal evolution of the Central-Western Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelluccio, Ada; Andreucci, Benedetta; Grigo, Domenico; Jankowski, Leszek; Ketcham, Richard A.; Mazzoli, Stefano; Szaniawski, Rafal; Zattin, Massimiliano

    2014-05-01

    The Central-Western Carpathians have been studied for long time but they are a still matter of discussion. In addition, they are one of the principal East European targets for oil and gas exploration. Understanding the tectonic evolution and the spatial and temporal variation of the thermal regime is crucial for this purpose. This orogene formed after the collision between the European Platform and the ALCAPA and Tisza-Dacia microplates from the Upper Jurassic to the Neogene. The widely accepted interpretation suggests the occurrence of the oceanic lithosphere subducting under the two microplates and the development of the oceanic suture in the Pieniny Klippen Belt area during the Paleocene. The subduction ends when the accretionary wedge reaches its present-day position on top of the southern border of the European Platform. The Carpathian arc can be subdivided into three tectonic domains: • Outer Carpathians made up of Upper Jurassic to Lower Miocene siliciclastic deposits intercalated with shales and sandstones; • Pieniny Klippen Belt formed by Mesozoic olistoliths and olistostromes in a sandy-clay Cretaceous sheared matrix; • Inner Carpathians consisting in Variscan allochthonous crystalline basement with its Mesozoic cover involved in the late Cretaceous folding and thrusting These deposits are unconformably overlain by the undeformed Central Carpathian Paleogene Basin successions. Cross-section balancing and sequential restoration integrated with low-temperature thermochronometry (apatite fission track and apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He analysis) can better constrain the tectonic evolution of this area and, in particular, its exhumation history. Seven balanced sections have been constructed across the Polish and Ukrainian Carpathians. The sequential restoration shows a thick-skinned tectonics during the Upper Cretaceous, involving the Inner Carpathian basin. The erosion of the Mesozoic basement cover and the sedimentation of these deposits in the foreland basin

  8. Tectonic evolution of the western boundary of the Attico-Cycladic complex (Lavrio, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffer, Christophe; Vanderhaeghe, Olivier; Tarantola, Alexandre; Lanari, Pierre; Ponthus, Leandre; France, Lyderic; Photiades, Adonis

    2015-04-01

    The Lavrio peninsula, South East of Athens, is located along the western boundary of the Attic-Cycladic Metamorphic Complex in the internal zone of the Hellenic orogenic belt, at the intersection between thrusts and detachments. It is thus a perfect target to decipher the tectonic evolution of an orogenic wedge from tectonic accretion to gravitational collapse. The nappe stack is overlain by a non-metamorphic limestone and is made, from top to bottom by (i) an ophiolitic melange, (ii) the Lavrio tectonic unit dominated by schists and displaying mineral paragenesis typical of blueschist facies, (iii) the Kamariza tectonic unit dominated by marbles and affected by pervasive greenschist facies metamorphism. The Lavrio and Kamariza tectonic units are juxtaposed by a low-angle mylonitic to cataclastic detachement. A more detailed investigation of the relationships between mineral paragenesis and microstructures indicates that the transition from the Lavrio to the Kamariza tectonic units, across the low-angle detachment, is marked by progressive transposition of the blueschist facies fabric coeval with retrogression under greenschist facies conditions. Indeed, the Kamariza unit is characterized by a relatively steep foliation associated with isoclinal folds of weakly organized axial orientation that is partially to totally transposed into a shallow dipping foliation bearing a N-S trending lineation. The degree of transposition increases from top to bottom and is particularly marked at the transition from the Lavrio to the Kamariza unit across the low-angle detachement. The blueschist facies foliation of the Lavrio schists is underlined by glaucophane and HP phengite intergrown with chlorite crystals. The Kamariza tectonic unit is dominated by LP phengite intergrown with chlorite but contains relics of the blueschist mineral paragenesis. Detailed microprobe mapping of the composition of the phengite and chlorite crystals reveal distinct variations of the PT conditions

  9. Main Stages of Geodynamic Evolution of the Caucasian Segment of the Alpine-Mediterranean Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamkrelidze, Irakli; Shengelia, David; Maisadze, Ferando; Tsutsunava, Tamara; Chichinadze, Giorgi

    2013-04-01

    Within the oceanic area of Tethys, with a typical oceanic crust, in geological past relatively small continental or subcontinental plates (terranes) were situated. The Greater Caucasian, Black Sea - Central Transcaucasian, Baiburt - Sevanian and Iran - Afghanian accretionary terranes, which in geological past represented island arcs or microcontinents, are identified in the Caucasian segment of the Alpine-Mediterranean belt. They are separated by ophiolite sutures (relics of small or large oceanic basins) of different age. During the Late Precambrian, Paleozoic and Early Mesozoic these terranes underwent horizontal displacement in different directions and ultimately they joined the Eurasian continent. New LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon dating along with available geologic, petrologic and geochemical investigations, allow to trace with confidence the main stages of regional metamorphism, granite formation and, consequently, pre-Alpine continental crust making within the Caucasus. At the pre-Grenville stage (1200 Ma and more) between the Baltica and Gondvana ancient continents, on the oceanic crust of Prototethys accumulation mainly of terrigenous sediments and of basic volcanites took place. At the Grenville stage (1000-800 Ma) subcontinental or primitive continental crust (gneiss-migmatite complex and synmetamorphic grenitoids of sodium series) were formed in suprasubduction conditions by both sides of Proto-Paleotethys and along the northern peripheries of comparatively small oceanic basins of the Arkhiz and Southern Slope of the Greater Caucasus. At the Baikalian stage (650-550 Ma) plagiogneissic complex has been cut by Precambrian gabbroids and intruded by large bodies of quartz-diorites. The next, Late Baikalian stage (540-500 Ma) is determined by the intrusion of Cambrian basites and Late Baikalian granitoids and by manifestation of intensive suprasubduction regional metamorphism. Late Baikalian tectogenesis is accompanied by contraction of the small oceanic basin of

  10. Hinterland tectonics and drainage evolution recorded by foreland basin archives: the Neogene Siwaliks of the Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huyghe, Pascale; van der Beek, Peter; Matthias, Bernet; Catherine, Chauvel; Jean-Louis, Mugnier; Laurent, Husson; François, Chirouze

    2014-05-01

    Provenance analysis and detrital thermochronology of detrital synorogenic sediments, derived from erosion of mountain belts and deposited in surrounding sedimentary basins, are well-established methods to examine the exhumation history of convergent zones, tectonic activity and the associated evolution of the drainage network. We have conducted multidisciplinary studies on magnetostratigraphically dated sections throughout the Neogene Siwalik foreland basin of the Himalayan belt since more than 10 years. Sr, Nd and Hf isotopes are used as provenance indicators, providing information on the nature and size of catchment basins and their evolution through time in response to tectonics. Detrital zircon and apatite thermochronology provides constraints on exhumation rates in the hinterland of the Himalaya and the deformation of the Sub-Himalayan foreland basin. Throughout the Himalaya, detrital zircons from the Siwaliks generally show three age peaks: two static peaks (i.e., displaying constant peak ages through time), and a moving peak. The latter shows a constant lag time of ~4 m.y. corresponding to source-area exhumation rates on the order of 1.8 km/my, while the two static peaks respectively reveal a major 15-20 Ma exhumation event in the belt, the significance of which is still debated, and inheritance of pre-Himalayan ages that indicate recycling of Tethyan sediments. Therefore, our ZFT results suggest that the exhumation dynamics are broadly similar throughout the Himalaya since at least 13 m.y, as also shown by the Bengal Fan detrital sediment record. We relate this switch in tectonic regime to the destabilization of the Himalayan wedge that is rendered overcritical as a response to the transience of dynamic topography caused by the deforming underlying Indian slab. Nonetheless, in detail, the timing of thrusting in the Siwalik domain is delayed by about 1 my eastward as demonstrated by both structural and apatite fission-track data, suggesting overall eastward

  11. The role of salt tectonics in the evolution of the northeastern Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Mary; Christophoul, Frédéric; Menzer, Lionel; Simonis, Jules; Saura, Eduard; Vergés, Jaume

    2016-04-01

    Evaporites can play a major role in controlling the architecture of external orogenic belts, both during extensional and subsequent compressional phases. However, salt can also 'hide' deformation due to its ability to flow and dissolve. The challenge is to recognise the imprint of its past presence and influence. In the NE Pyrenees multiple deformation phases have been identified based on locally anomalous stratigraphic and structural relationships. This has resulted in complex, sometimes incoherent and often conflictual models of orogenic history. For example, a pre-Cenomanian deformation phase has been interpreted as either extensional or compressional. As part of the ANR-PYRAMID project, we have re-examined key localities around the eastern Mouthoumet massif, in the Corbières foreland and along the Corbières thrust front to reconstruct a coherent deformation history involving salt tectonics. Keuper (Carnian - Rhetian) evaporitic deposits gave rise to diapirs and detachments that were particularly active during Early to Late Cretaceous extension and later during Late Cretaceous to Eocene compression. Growth unconformities and rapid thickness changes in the Aptian Quillan basin indicate that it developed as a salt controlled minibasin. Olistoliths, gypsum breccias and presence of bipyramidal quartz in Albian strata preserved as footwall imbricates along the North Pyrenean thrust front (e.g. around Cucugnan) attest to the proximity of a large diapiric body. Below the Cenomanian unconformity, rotated fault blocks of Liassic to Albian strata lie above a Keuper detachment. These extensional fault blocks have already been recognised at the Serre de Bouchard. They are also preserved north of Cucugnan, in the Montagne de Tauch and in the Fontfroide massif with little or no alpine inversion. In the Corbières foreland area salt-influenced extensional and compressional deformation generated growth folds, with completely overturned limbs (flaps), welds, growth

  12. Geohistory analysis of the Santa Maria basin, California, and its relationship to tectonic evolution of the continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    McCrory, P.A.; Arends, R.G. ); Ingle, J.C. Jr. ); Isaacs, C.M.; Stanley, R.G. ); Thornton, M.L.C. )

    1991-02-01

    The Santa Maria basin of central California is a geologically complex area located along the tectonically active California continental margin. The record of Cenozoic tectonism preserved in Santa Maria strata provides an opportunity to compare the evolution of the region with plate tectonic models for Cenozoic interactions along the margin. Geohistory analysis of Neogene Santa Maria basin strata provides important constraints for hypotheses of the tectonic evolution of the central California margin during its transition from a convergent to a transform plate boundary. Preliminary analyses suggest that the tectonic evolution of the Santa Maria area was dominated by coupling between adjacent oceanic plates and the continental margin. This coupling is reflected in the timing of major hiatuses within the basin sedimentary sequence and margin subsidence and uplift which occurred during periods of tectonic plate adjustment. Stratigraphic evidence indicates that the Santa Maria basin originated on the continental shelf in early Miocene time. A component of margin subsidence is postulated to have been caused by cessation of spreading on adjacent offshore microplates approximately 19-18 ma. A sharp reduction in rate of tectonic subsidence in middle Miocene time, observed in the Santa Maria basin both onshore and offshore, was coeval with rotation of crustal blocks as major shearing shifts shoreward. Tectonic uplift of two eastern sites, offshore Point Arguello and near Point Sal, in the late Miocene may have been related to a change to transpressional motion between the Pacific and North American plates, as well as to rotation of the western Transverse Ranges in a restraining geometry.

  13. The Neogene tectonic evolution and climatic change of the Tianshui Basin, NE Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, T.; Li, J.; Song, C.; Zhao, Z.; Zhang, J.; Wang, X.; Hui, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The Tianshui Basin, located at the conjunction of NE Tibetan Plateau and Chinese Loess Plateau, has received intensive attention recently. Fine-grained Miocene sediment was identified as loess in its north part and this pushes the onset of Asian aridification into 22 Ma. However, our sedimentological, biomarker, pollen, diatom and mammalian fossils evidence propose that these sediments were suggested to be mudflat/distal fan and floodplain deposit instead of eolian deposit. So detailed tectonic background and climate reconstruction may illustrate the controversy and shed light on the tectonic, climate and ecology interactions. Here we report our integrated studies on the tectonic evolution, climate change and paleoecology reconstruction in the Tianshui basin. Based on the magnetostratigraphy and fossil mammal ages, sedimentological and detrital fission-track thermochronologic (DFT) analysis reveals four episodic tectonic uplift events occurred at ~20 Ma, ~14 Ma, ~9.2-7.4 Ma and ~3.6 Ma along the basin and its adjacent mountains. The timing of these activities at Western Qinling have been documented at many segments of the Tibetan Plateau, so most likely they were the remote response to the ongoing India-Asia collision. Pollen, mammalian fossils and biomarker data permit us to illustrate the paleoenvironment in the Tianshui Basin. During the period of ~17-10 Ma, the climate was generally warm-humid revealed by the broad-leaved forest and low Average Chain Length (ACL) values, when the Paltybelodon and Gomphotherium were roaming near an extensive aquatic setting. In addition, the observed Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum and Middle Miocene Climatic Transition events may be a terrestrial response to global climate changes. During the interval of ~10-6 Ma, the climate was relatively arid characterized by the rapid development of steppe and appearance of the Hipparion fauna, consistent with the biomarker proxy. Although the NE Tibetan Plateau experienced a phase of

  14. The relationship between tectonic evolution and oil-cracking gas accumulation in late stage for marine superimposed basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Min; Wu, Xiaozhi

    2015-04-01

    The marine superimposed basins are rich in oil-cracking gas resources. Their hydrocarbon accumulation processes of late stage have experienced early paleo-oil reservoir accumulation period and late oil-cracking gas period, which are apparently controlled by tectonic evolution. Studying the relationship between tectonic evolution and oil-cracking gas accumulation of late stage has great significance to guide the exploration of oil-cracking gas reservoirs. Taking the relationship between tectonic evolution and oil-cracking gas accumulation of late stage for the Shunan area in the Sichuan Basin as example, through the analysis on the respons of structural evolution to deposition, the relationship between hydrocarbon generation process of ancient source rocks, initial hydrocarbon accumulation, oil cracking and gas accumulation of late stage was studied. The source rocks of the Cambrian Qiongzhusi Fm in the Shunan area experienced three periods of hydrocarbon generation and two periods of hydrocarbon generation lag. During the large-scale tectonic uplift and thick erosion event in the periods of the Caledonian and the Hercynian, the source rocks of the Qiongzhusi Fm had experienced two times of hydrocarbon generation and two times of hydrocarbon generation lag. The overlying super-thick strata deposited during the Indosinian and Yanshan periods made the source rocks of the Qiongzhusi Fm continuously generate oil and gas. The crude oil in the paleo-reservoir of the Longwangmiao Fm had experienced one time of oil-cracking gas process. After the Indo-Chinese epoch, the burial depth of the Triassic strata was deep enough to promote the crude oil in the paleo-reservoir of the Longwangmiao Fm to be cracked gas. This process continued to the late Yanshan period, providing sufficient gas source. The following five conclusions are obtained: The tectonic and depositional evolution of the marine superimposed basins controlled the development of the basic hydrocarbon geology

  15. Structure and tectonic evolution of the Fuegian Andes (southernmost South America) in the framework of the Scotia Arc development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Carbonell, Pablo J.; Dimieri, Luis V.; Olivero, Eduardo B.; Bohoyo, Fernando; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús

    2014-12-01

    The major structural and tectonic features of the Fuegian Andes provide an outstanding onshore geological framework that aids in the understanding of the tectonic evolution of the Scotia Arc, mainly known from offshore studies. The orogenic history of the Fuegian Andes (Late Cretaceous-Miocene) is thus compared and integrated with the tectonic history of the Scotia Sea. Late Cretaceous-Paleocene structures in the Fuegian Andes suggest a N-directed contraction consistent with an oroclinal bending of the southernmost South America-Antarctic Peninsula continental bridge. This N-directed contraction in the Fuegian Andes continued during the spreading of the West Scotia Ridge, between 40-50 and 10 Ma ago. The onset of major strike-slip faulting in Tierra del Fuego is considered here to be not older than the late Miocene, consistent with the recent history of the North Scotia Ridge; thus forming part of a tectonic regime superposed to the prior contraction in the Fuegian Andes.

  16. Ionian marine terraces of southern Italy: Insights into the Quaternary tectonic evolution of the area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, R.; Bianca, M.; D'Onofrio, R.

    2010-08-01

    New detailed morphotectonic analyses of a well exposed flight of marine terraces along the Ionian coast of southern Italy has been carried out. The area represents a key transect for investigating the middle-late Quaternary evolution of the Southern Apennines chain-foredeep-foreland geodynamic system. A major result of the research is the reconstruction of a virtually complete 3D geometry of the marine surfaces along a coastal sector of ca. 70 km, which (1) documents the occurrence of 18 paleo-shorelines and (2) provides evidence for a strong regional uplift affecting the investigated area. Following a systematic critical review of literature relating to geochronological data, integrated with a morphogenetic model based on the interaction between tectonic uplift and eustatic sea level changes, the different terraces are correlated to as many highstand sea level peaks, dating the highest/oldest terrace to ca. 600 ka (MIS 15). The vertical and horizontal distribution of the terraces show a general convergence of the paleo-shorelines toward NNE, which indicates a decreasing trend in differential uplift in that direction ranging from almost 2 mm/a in the southwestern sector to about 0.2 mm/a in the northeastern sector. Detailed mapping and 3D reconstruction also emphasize the partitioning of the area into three distinct sectors characterized by different tilting rates. This behavior is likely caused by the combined role and activity of three major tectonic structures working at different scales and rates including (1) the reactivation of an out-of-sequence thrust, (2) sliding along the basal detachment of the external Apennines wedge and (3) a lithospheric-scale duplexing (crustal or deeper). As a major conclusion, within the external sector of the Southern Apennines chain and its foredeep, regional shortening and a contractional tectonic regime persisted throughout the whole Quaternary and it is probably still active.

  17. Dating tectonic structures on Mercury: new clues to understand the planet's thermal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, Lorenza; Massironi, Matteo; Marchi, Simone; Fassett, Caleb I.; Di Achille, Gaetano; Cremonese, Gabriele

    2014-05-01

    The global tectonic scenario of Mercury is dominated by contractional features mainly represented by lobate scarps and related to planetary cooling (Watters et al., 1998, Geology, 26, 991-994). Topography of lobate scarps on Mercury: New constraints on the planet's contraction. These structures are the expression of surface-breaking thrust faults and are linear or arcuate features widely distributed on Mercury. Since they display a broad distribution of orientations, lobate scarps are thought to be related to a global contractional strain. The MESSENGER MDIS camera (with a wide-angle and a narrow-angle channels), acquired images of new regions of the Mercury surface that allowed us to detect several new lobate scarps especially where the illumination geometry is more favorable for structural analysis. Among them a 2000-km long thrust system, located between 80° and 100°E of longitude, has been detected. This system consists of several lobate scarps all exhibiting a N-S orientation and a westward vergence. Due to its considerable extension, this feature can give clues to the stress field affecting the surface in a wide sector of the planet. Dating these features and comparing the results with independent age determinations, and structural and stratigraphic evidences might concur to further constrain the age of tectonic deformation on Mercury and possibly increase our knowledge on the thermal evolution of the planet. The dating of the system was performed with different methods. Indeed, traditional stratigraphic study was accompanied by crater counts of geological units overlapping the thrust and the buffered crater counting technique, allowing us to determine an absolute model age determination for the tectonic feature. The employment of these different methods gave consistent results suggesting that thrust activity ended between 3.7-3.8 Ga, with Neukum Production Function (NPF), and 3.5-3.7 Ga, with Model Production Function (MPF), respectively.

  18. Structural characteristics of Pavonis Mons, Mars, and implications for its volcano-tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwinner, Klaus; Head, James W.; Wilson, Lionel

    2010-05-01

    Pavonis Mons is the smallest of the three large Tharsis Montes volcanic edifices on Mars. While Viking-based studies have already revealed main structural features of these shields and have provided a framework on their evolution, detailed information on major aspects of their volcano-tectonic structure and evolution is still incomplete. In particular this is the case for the nature of asymmetries that develop along a NE direction, roughly coincident with the crest line of the Tharsis rise, as well as the evolution of the magma reservoir as the shields were built above the ground, and the related consequences for caldera formation and edifice stability. In addition, different morpho-structural features of the Martian shields have been discussed controversially, such as flank "terraces", rillelike channels, and evidence of flank instabilities. We have analyzed recently available high-resolution data, in particular DTMs with up to 50 m grid spacing derived from HRSC data, as well as high-resolution imagery (HRSC, CTX, HIRISE) and regional-scale MOLA DTMs for obtaining new constraints on the volcano-tectonic structure and evolution of Pavonis. We mapped tectonic elements (faults and fractures, wrinkle ridges, collapse pits), main volcanic elements (vent locations, limits of shield, apron and caldera floor units), and elements of flank morphology. Analysis of edifice morphometry is based on slope maps and slope statistics. We were able to identify several major fault systems affecting flanks and base of the edifice. Widespread occurrence of normal faulting from 2-3 km below the summit plateau to the base shows that the middle and lower flanks are characterized by extension. While the summit plateau and uppermost flanks show evidence for compressional deformation, including wrinkle ridges and downslope-convex flank facets interpreted as surface expression of flank thrusts, the system of intersecting flank facets that have been denoted as compressional "terraces" instead

  19. Tectonic evolution of the Anadyr Basin, northeastern Eurasia, and its petroleum resource potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, M. P.; Bondarenko, G. E.; Bordovskaya, T. O.; Shipilov, E. V.

    2009-09-01

    The published data on the sedimentation conditions, structure, and tectonic evolution of the Anadyr Basin in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic are reviewed. These data are re-examined in the context of modern tectonic concepts concerning the evolution of the northwestern Circum-Pacific Belt. The re-examination allows us not only to specify the regional geology and tectonic history, but also to forecast of the petroleum resource potential of the sedimentary cover based on a new concept. The sedimentary cover formation in the Anadyr Basin is inseparably linked with the regional tectonic evolution. The considered portion of the Chukchi Peninsula developed in the Late Mesozoic at the junction of the ocean-type South Anyui Basin, the Asian continental margin, and convergent zones of various ages extending along the Asia-Pacific interface. Strike-slip faulting and pulses of extension dominated in the Cenozoic largely in connection with oroclinal bending of structural elements pertaining to northeastern Eurasia and northwestern North America against the background of accretion of terranes along the zone of convergence with the Pacific oceanic plates. Three main stages are recognized in the formation of the sedimentary cover in the Anadyr Basin. (1) The lower portion of the cover was formed in the Late Cretaceous-Early Eocene under conditions of alternating settings of passive and active continental margins. The Cenomanian-lower Eocene transitional sedimentary complex is located largely in the southern Anadyr Basin (Main River and Lagoonal troughs). (2) In the middle Eocene and Oligocene, sedimentation proceeded against the background of extension and rifting in the northern part of the paleobasin and compression in its southern part. The compression was caused by northward migration of the foredeep in front of the accretionary Koryak Orogen. The maximum thickness of the Eocene-Oligocene sedimentary complex is noted mainly in the southern part of the basin and in the Central and

  20. Late Paleozoic-Mesozoic tectonic evolution of SW Japan: A review - Reappraisal of the accretionary orogeny and revalidation of the collisional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvet, Jacques

    2013-08-01

    This paper makes a review of the interpretations of the tectonic evolution of SW Japan during the last three decades. In the late 1970s, the dominant model was the so-called "Pacific-type orogeny", emphasizing the purported absence of nappes and the contrast with the alpine chains, and interpreting the evolution as due to a steady oceanic subduction since the Paleozoic time. In the 80s, the discovery of the actual structure made of a pile of large thrust sheets led authors to propose collisional models, involving the intermittent underthrusting of buoyant blocks like micro-continents. At the same time, the use of high-resolution biostratigraphy allowed several authors to recognize ancient accretionary wedges, with a reconstructed ocean plate stratigraphy of individual accreted units, especially in the Tanba and Shimanto zones. Also, precise radiometric dating permitted the distinction of metamorphosed units, especially in Sanbagawa and Shimanto belts. As a result of these new data, since the 1990s, the plate tectonic interpretation of the history of the Japanese Islands was revised by Japanese scientists and presented again in terms of accretionary processes linked to a steadily oceanic subduction, with an episodic ridge subduction: the so-called "Miyashiro-type orogeny". The review of different data leads to the following conclusions. The structure of SW Japan is made of a pile of sub-horizontal nappes, polydeformed, with a geometry similar to the one encountered in collisional orogens. The geodynamic mechanisms advocated for the tectonic building within the accretionary orogeny concept (Miyashiro-type orogeny) are inappropriate. A permanent oceanic subduction with the intermittent "collision" (actually subduction) of an active ridge or seamount chain is unable to build such structures, as this process induces in fact an acceleration of the tectonic erosion and collapse of the upper plate; the underthrusting of a micro-continent or mature arc is likely needed. The

  1. Tectonic and stratigraphic evolution of the Western Alboran Sea Basin in the last 25 Myrs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Couto, Damien; Gorini, Christian; Jolivet, Laurent; Lebret, Noëmie; Augier, Romain; Gumiaux, Charles; d'Acremont, Elia; Ammar, Abdellah; Jabour, Haddou; Auxietre, Jean-Luc

    2016-05-01

    The Western Alboran Basin (WAB) formation has always been the subject of debate and considered either as a back-arc or a forearc basin. Stratigraphic analyses of high-resolution 2D seismic profiles mostly located offshore Morocco, enabled us to clarify the tectonic and stratigraphic history of the WAB. The thick pre-rift sequence located beneath the Miocene basin is interpreted as the topmost Malaguide/Ghomaride complex composing the Alboran domain. The structural position of this unit compared with the HP-LT exhumed Alpujarride/Sebtide metamorphic basement, leads us to link the Early Miocene subsidence of the basin with an extensional detachment. Above the Early Miocene, a thick Serravallian sequence marked by siliciclastic deposits is nearly devoid of extensional structures. Its overall landward to basinward onlap geometry indicates that the WAB has behaved as a sag basin during most of its evolution from the Serravallian to the late Tortonian. Tectonic reconstructions in map view and in cross section further suggest that the basin has always represented a strongly subsiding topographic low without internal deformation that migrated westward together with the retreating slab. We propose that the subsidence of the WAB was controlled by the pull of the dipping subducting lithosphere hence explaining the considerable thickness (10 km) of the mostly undeformed sedimentary infill.

  2. Tectonic and stratigraphic evolution of the Western Alboran Sea basin since the last 25 Myrs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Couto, Damien; Gorini, Christian; Jolivet, Laurent; Lebret, Noëmie; Augier, Romain; Gumiaux, Charles; D'Acremont, Elia; Ammar, Abdellah; Auxietre, Jean-Luc

    2016-04-01

    The Western Alboran Basin (WAB) formation has always been a matter of debate and was either considered as a backarc or a forearc basin. Based on stratigraphic analysis of high-resolution 2D seismic profiles mostly located offshore Morocco, the tectonic and stratigraphic history of the WAB is clarified. A thick pre-rift sequence is observed beneath the Miocene basin and interpreted as the topmost Malaguide/Ghomaride complex composing the Alboran domain. The structural position of this unit compared with the HP-LT exhumed Alpujarride/Sebtide metamorphic basement, leads us to link the Early Miocene subsidence of the basin with an extensional detachment. Above the Early Miocene, a thick Serravallian sequence marked by siliciclastic deposits is nearly devoid of extensional structures. Its overall landward to basinward onlap geometry indicates that the WAB has behaved as a sag basin during most of its evolution, from the Serravallian to the Late Tortonian. Tectonic reconstructions in map view and cross-section further suggest that the basin has always represented a strongly subsiding topographic low without internal deformation that has migrated westward together with the retreating slab. We propose that the subsidence of the WAB was controlled by the pull of the dipping subducting lithosphere explaining the large thickness (10 km) of the mostly undeformed sedimentary infill.

  3. Tectonic evolution of the El Salvador Fault Zone. Insights from analogue experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Henar, Jorge; Schreurs, Guido; Jesús Martínez-Díaz, José; Álvarez-Gómez, José Antonio

    2014-05-01

    The El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ) is an active, c. 150 km long and 20 km wide segmented, dextral strike-slip fault zone within the El Salvador Volcanic Arc striking N90°-100°E. Although several studies have investigated the surface expression of the ESFZ, little is known about its structure at depth and its kinematic evolution. Our analysis of structural field data, remote sensing images and morphometric indices reveals a trenchward migration of the volcanic arc and furthermore suggests that not all structures within the ESFZ can be explained within the current tectonic context, but require a phase of extension or an extensional component of deformation at some stage in the evolution of the ESFZ. Such an extension and trenchward migration of the volcanic arc could be related to subduction roll-back of the Cocos Plate beneath the Chortis Block in Mio-Pliocene times. Such a possible evolution leads to open questions that we address in our research: Is the ESFZ a neo-formed fault zone, i.e. did it form during one phase of strike-slip or transtensional deformation, or do the structures in the ESFZ reflect a two-phase evolution, i.e. an early phase of extension overprinted by a later phase of strike-slip or transtension? Did subduction roll-back occur beneath El Salvador? We carried out analogue model experiments to test whether or not an early phase of extension is required to form the present-day fault pattern in the ESFZ. Analogue modeling is an effective tool in testing various hypotheses, as it allows the experimenter to control specific parameters and to test their influence on the resulting structures. Our experiments suggest that a two-phase tectonic evolution best explains the ESFZ: an early pure extensional phase linked to a segmented volcanic arc is necessary to form the main structures of the ESFZ and can explain the shallow geometry of the fault zone. This extensional phase is followed by a strike-slip dominated regime, which results in inter

  4. Ice-load induced tectonics controlled tunnel valley evolution - instances from the southwestern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Hseinat, M.; Hübscher, C.

    2014-08-01

    Advancing ice sheets have a strong impact on the earth's topography. For example, they leave behind an erosional unconformity, bulldozer the underlying strata and form tunnel valleys, primarily by subglacial melt-water erosion and secondarily by direct glacial erosion. The conceptual models of the reactivation of faults within the upper crust, due to the ice sheets' load, are also established. However, this phenomenon is also rather under-explored. Here, we propose a causal link between ice-load induced tectonics, the generation of near-vertical faults in the upper crust above an inherited deep-rooted fault and the evolution of tunnel valleys. The Kossau tunnel valley in the southeastern Bay of Kiel has been surveyed by means of high-resolution multi-channel seismic and echosounder data. It strikes almost south to north and can be mapped over a distance of ca 50 km. It is 1200-8000 m wide with a valley of up to 200 m deep. Quaternary deposits fill the valley and cover the adjacent glaciogenic unconformity. A near-vertical fault system with an apparent dip angle of >80°, which reaches from the top Zechstein upwards into the Quaternary, underlies the valley. The fault partially pierces the seafloor and growth is observed within the uppermost Quaternary strata only. Consequently, the fault evolved in the Late Quaternary. The fault is associated with an anticline that is between 700 and 3000 m wide and about 20-40 m high. The fault-anticline assemblage neither resembles any typical extensional, compressional or strike-slip deformation pattern, nor is it related to salt tectonics. Based on the observed position and deformation pattern of the fault-anticline assemblage, we suggest that these structures formed as a consequence of the differential ice-load induced tectonics above an inherited deep-rooted sub-salt fault related to the Glückstadt Graben. Lateral variations in the ice-load during the ice sheet's advance caused differential subsidence, thus rejuvenating the

  5. Early Paleozoic sedimentary record of the Chinese Altai: Implications for its tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xiaoping; Sun, Min; Yuan, Chao; Xiao, Wenjiao; Cai, Keda

    The Chinese Altai is a typical part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), but its tectonic evolution is not well understood. Geochemical study of Early Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks was conducted to better constrain their provenance and tectonic environment. These rocks have relatively low CIA values (49 to 79), with ICV values (0.73-1.36) higher than that of post-Archean Australian average shale (PAAS), suggesting that they experienced relatively weak chemical weathering and were mainly derived from an immature source. Compared to PAAS and upper crust, the samples mostly have relatively lower high field strength elements (HFSE) (e.g. Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta) and large ion lithophile element (LILE) contents (e.g. Rb, Sr, Ba, Th, U, Pb). However, their relatively high Rb concentrations (> 40 ppm), low Rb/Sr (0.04-3.24) and Th/U (Th/U = 3-8) ratios are indicative of an acidic-intermediate igneous source that had undergone weak chemical weathering. All of the samples are moderately enriched in LREE (light REE) and show relatively flat Chondrite-normalized HREE (heavy REE) patterns (La N/Yb N = 3.2-12.6) with various negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.4-0.9). Meta-arenaceous samples have moderate SiO 2 (average 72.9 wt.%), Al 2O 3 (average 11.5 wt.%), Fe 2O 3T + MgO (average 7.16 wt.%) contents and moderate Al 2O 3/SiO 2 (average 0.16), K 2O/Na 2O (average 0.93) ratios, similar to those of graywackes from continental island arcs or active continental margins. However, meta-argillaceous samples have high SiO 2 (average 60.8 wt.%), Al 2O 3 (average 17.2 wt.%), Fe 2O 3T + MgO (average 12.2 wt.%) contents and high K 2O/Na 2O (average 3.45), Al 2O 3/SiO 2 (average 0.28) ratios similar to mudstones from continental arc basins. This kind of tectonic environment is also manifested in tectonic discrimination diagrams including Th-Sc-Zr/10 and La-Th-Sc. These geochemical characteristics suggest that the metasedimentary rocks were deposited in an active continental margin or

  6. Cenozoic tectonic evolution and petroleum exploration in Perl River Mouth basin, South China Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Chi Yukun; Xu Shice )

    1990-06-01

    The Pearl River Mouth basin is a large Cenozoic continental margin basin that is rich in hydrocarbon potential. Fluvial-lake sequences were deposited before Oligocene, but all were covered by Miocene marine clastic and carbonate rocks. Both paleo-Pearl River delta system and reef/bank carbonate system were widely developed. At the early stage of the evolution, two subsidence belts and one uplift between them distributed in NE regional direction; grabens occurred in the north belt and depressions in the south belt. Tectonic movement was stronger in the east than the west. The main production zones have been drilled both in Miocene sandstone and carbonate rocks. As the exploration activities are developing, the basin will be one of the most significant China offshore oil production areas.

  7. Tectonic evolution of Kazakhstan and Tien Shan in Neoproterozoic and Early-Middle Paleozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samygin, S. G.; Kheraskova, T. N.; Kurchavov, A. M.

    2015-05-01

    Geological information on Kazakhstan and the Tien Shan obtained up to the present time has been considered and integrated in order to demonstrate the main features of continental massifs, basins with oceanic crust, island arcs, marginal volcanic-plutonic belts, and transform fault zones differing in type and age. We ascertained the character and probable causes of their evolution and transformations resulting in the origination and development of mosaic structural assembly at margin of the Paleoasian ocean that existed from Neoproterozoic. The main stages of the geodynamic history of Paleozoides in Kazakhstan and Tien Shan are characterized, and a model of the probable course of regional tectonic events has been proposed. This model is illustrated by published paleomagnetic data and a series of paleotectonic reconstructions for time intervals 950-900, 850-800, 750-700, 650-630, 570-550, 530-515, 500-470, 460-440, and 390-380 Ma.

  8. Neogene marine isotopic evolution and the erosion of Lesser Himalayan strata: Implications for Cenozoic tectonic history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrow, Paul M.; Hughes, Nigel C.; Derry, Louis A.; Ryan McKenzie, N.; Jiang, Ganqing; Webb, A. Alexander G.; Banerjee, Dhiraj M.; Paulsen, Timothy S.; Singh, Birendra P.

    2015-05-01

    An extensive, northward deepening blanket of Neoproterozoic and Cambrian sedimentary rocks once extended from the Himalayan margin far onto the Indian craton. Cambrian deposits of this "upper Lesser Himalayan" succession, which include deposits of the "outer" Lesser Himalaya tectonic unit, are enriched in radiogenic 187Os. They make up part of a proximal marine facies belt that extends onto the craton and along strike from India to Pakistan. By contrast, age-equivalent facies in the Tethyan Himalaya are more distal in nature. Neoproterozoic to Cambrian strata of the upper Lesser Himalayan succession are now missing in much of the Lesser Himalaya, with their erosion exposing older Precambrian Lesser Himalayan strata. We suggest that exhumation and weathering of the upper Lesser Himalaya and related strata caused dramatic changes in the 187Os/188Os and 87Sr/86Sr Neogene record of seawater starting at ∼ 16 Ma. First-order estimates for the volume of upper Himalayan strata, as well as the volume of all LH rock eroded since this time, and geochemical box modeling, support this idea. Exhumation at 16 Ma is a fundamental event in the evolution of the Himalayan orogeny and the geochemical evolution of the oceans, and will be a critical part of the construction of future models of Himalayan thrust belt evolution.

  9. Origin and Evolution of Limestone Caves of Chhattisgarh and Orissa, India: Role of Geomorphic, Tectonic and Hydrological Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, P. K.; Allu, N. C.; Ramesh, R.; Yadava, M. G.; Panigrahi, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate rocks undergo karstic process and karst morphology is a key to understand the nature and genesis of caves. The primary energy source for the formation of karst landforms is hydrological cycle. Geomorphic features along with hydrological characteristics provide important information not only on karst formation but also climate and environmental conditions. In this paper, we present the tectonic and geomorphic features that played a role in evolution of caves located in Chhattisgarh and Orissa States of India. The geomorphic and tectonic aspects of Kotumsar, Kailash, and Gupteshwar caves are discussed in relation to the origin and evolution of these caves. Caves are located near the water falls. The area is folded and faulted along the Eastern Ghat Mobile Belt (EGMB) due to tectonic reactivation. Shaly-limestone beds exhibit vertical dipping near Gupteshwar cave, and steeply inclined near Kotumsar and Kailash caves. Indrāvati and Sabari/Kolab tributaries of the Godavari River drain the area. The landscape evolution and the origin of caves in the region is a multistage process, where the lithology, orogeny, fluvial action, and monsoon are the main agents, which is similar to the four state model (Ford and Ewers, 1978). The river basin evolution and regional tectonism also caused the initiation of karstification in the region. The evolution of caves is believed to have taken place in Pre-Pliocene under more humid conditions that coincided with the initiation of monsoon in India. Further, during the Quaternary wet-dry/cold-warm phases altered physical and chemical weathering of limestone rocks. Contrasting relief features of Bastar plateau have also helped the extensive cave formation in the region. The dissolution along weak planes initiated the openings of caves, further enlarged by geomorphic agents. Both monsoon and tectonics have caused fluctuations in water levels along river courses, which acted as active agents in evolution of caves.

  10. Southern African perspectives on the long-term morpho-tectonic evolution of cratonic interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kounov, Alexandre; Viola, Giulio; Dunkl, István; Frimmel, Hartwig E.

    2013-08-01

    We propose a refined conceptual model for the Paleo- and Mesozoic morpho-tectonic evolution of the southern African cratonic interior. Constraints are derived from new zircon and apatite fission-track and (U-Th-[Sm])/He dates (ZFT, AFT, ZHe and AHe) of rocks from the Augrabies Falls and Fish River Canyon regions in South Africa and southern Namibia, respectively. The combined ZFT and ZHe thermochronological results suggest a smooth and simple tectonic evolution, wherein the study area cooled monotonically as one coherent block from the Early Silurian to the Mid Triassic in response to very low denudation rates of less than 5 m/myr. Some of the new zircon ages may indicate a discrete and short-lived period of enhanced cooling interrupting this monotonic cooling during the Mid Devonian-Early Carboniferous. We tentatively correlate this episode to the events that caused the regional hiatus that separates the Cape Supergroup from the overlying Karoo Supergroup. Apatite fission-track and (U-Th-[Sm])/He data joint modeling reveals a period of accelerated regional cooling through 120 to 40 °C between 100 and 65 Ma ago. We interpret the latter as most probably due to regional uplift in combination with high river gradients and enhanced erosion rates in the Orange and Fish River basins, which, during the Cretaceous, were probably part of the greater Kalahari River catchment area. Based on the apatite results, a denudation rate of ca. 25 m/myr was calculated for the Late Cretaceous. At that time the area was probably characterized by an elevated average altitude and low relief, as indicated by the AFT and AHe age patterns.

  11. Tectonic, magmatic, and metallogenic evolution of the Late Cretaceous arc in the Carpathian-Balkan orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallhofer, Daniela; Quadt, Albrecht von; Peytcheva, Irena; Schmid, Stefan M.; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2015-09-01

    The Apuseni-Banat-Timok-Srednogorie Late Cretaceous magmatic arc in the Carpathian-Balkan orogen formed on the European margin during closure of the Neotethys Ocean. It was subsequently deformed into a complex orocline by continental collisions. The Cu-Au mineralized arc consists of geologically distinct segments: the Apuseni, Banat, Timok, Panagyurishte, and Eastern Srednogorie segments. New U-Pb zircon ages and geochemical whole rock data for the Banat and Apuseni segments are combined with previously published data to reconstruct the original arc geometry and better constrain its tectonic evolution. Trace element and isotopic signatures of the arc magmas indicate a subduction-enriched source in all segments and variable contamination by continental crust. The magmatic arc was active for 25 Myr (~92-67 Ma). Across-arc age trends of progressively younger ages toward the inferred paleo-trench indicate gradual steepening of the subducting slab away from the upper plate European margin. This leads to asthenospheric corner flow in the overriding plate, which is recorded by decreasing 87Sr/86Sr (0.70577 to 0.70373) and increasing 143Nd/144Nd (0.51234 to 0.51264) ratios over time in some segments. The close spatial relationship between arc magmatism, large-scale shear zones, and related strike-slip sedimentary basins in the Timok and Pangyurishte segments indicates mild transtension in these central segments of the restored arc. In contrast, the Eastern Srednogorie segment underwent strong orthogonal intraarc extension. Segmental distribution of tectonic stress may account for the concentration of rich porphyry Cu deposits in the transtensional segments, where lower crustal magma storage and fractionation favored the evolution of volatile-rich magmas.

  12. Hydrological modelling of alpine headwaters using centurial glacier evolution, snow and long-term discharge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Irene; Vis, Marc; Freudiger, Daphné; Seibert, Jan; Weiler, Markus; Stahl, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    The response of alpine streamflows to long-term climate variations is highly relevant for the supply of water to adjacent lowlands. A key challenge in modelling high-elevation catchments is the complexity and spatial variability of processes, whereas data availability is rather often poor, restricting options for model calibration and validation. Glaciers represent a long-term storage component that changes over long time-scales and thus introduces additional calibration parameters into the modelling challenge. The presented study aimed to model daily streamflow as well as the contributions of ice and snow melt for all 49 of the River Rhine's glaciated headwater catchments over the long time-period from 1901 to 2006. To constrain the models we used multiple data sources and developed an adapted modelling framework based on an extended version of the HBV model that also includes a time-variable glacier change model and a conceptual representation of snow redistribution. In this study constraints were applied in several ways. A water balance approach was applied to correct precipitation input in order to avoid calibration of precipitation; glacier area change from maps and satellite products and information on snow depth and snow covered area were used for the calibration of each catchment model; and finally, specific seasonal and dynamic aspects of discharge were used for calibration. Additional data like glacier mass balances were used to evaluate the model in selected catchments. The modelling experiment showed that the long-term development of the coupled glacier and streamflow change was particularly important to constrain the model through an objective function incorporating three benchmarks of glacier retreat during the 20th Century. Modelling using only streamflow as calibration criteria had resulted in disproportionate under and over estimation of glacier retreat, even though the simulated and observed streamflow agreed well. Also, even short discharge time

  13. Plio-Quaternary tectonic evolution of the western Catanzaro Trough (Calabria, South Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutto, Fabrizio; Muto, Francesco; Loreto, Maria Filomena; Tripodi, Vincenzo; Critelli, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    controlled the post-Tortonian evolution of Calabrian Arc. In the frame of the basin evolution, the right-lateral faults, which are subordinate on respect to left- lateral faults, show a N-S and NW-SE oriented fault systems. The WNW-ESE oriented faults can be considered responsible for opening of a NW-SE palaeo-strait that connected the Tyrrhenian area to the Ionian Sea during multiphase tectonics until Early Pleistocene. While the NE-SW and N-S fault systems confine and control the western portion of Catanzaro Basin, also named Catanzaro Trough Sub-basin, arranged as a Graben System with conjugate fault located in the offshore of S. Eufemia Gulf. Keywords: fault planes, slickensides, rotaxes, Calabria arc

  14. Studies of the proterozoic tectonic evolution of the southwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeley, John Martin

    proximal portions, while storm processes dominated on distal portions. Chapter 5 of this manuscript presents a hypothesis for the Proterozoic tectonic evolution of southwestern Laurentia during the Mesoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic. Recent tectonic models of Grenville-age rocks along this margin document arc-continent and continent-continent collision ca. 1150--1120 Ma. Current interpretations, however, do not take into account the prior, and coeval tectonic history of Proterozoic rocks of southwestern regions of Laurentia that currently comprise the southwestern United States.

  15. Past and present seafloor age distributions and the temporal evolution of plate tectonic heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. W.; Conrad, C. P.; Buffett, B.; Muller, D.; Loyd, S.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.; Corsetti, F.

    2008-12-01

    Variations in the rates of seafloor generation and recycling have potentially far-reaching consequences for sea level, ocean chemistry and climate. A parameterized framework to describe such variations could guide the study of non-uniformitarian plate tectonic activity, but there is little agreement on the appropriate mechanical description of the surface boundary layer. A strong constraint on the statistics of oceanic convection systems comes from the preserved seafloor age distribution, and additional inferences are possible when paleo-seafloor is modeled based on plate motion reconstructions. Based on previously reconstructed seafloor ages, we recently inferred that oceanic heat flow was larger by ~15% at 60~Ma than today. This signal is mainly caused by the smaller plates that existed previously in the Pacific basin with relatively larger ridge-proximal area of young seafloor. The associated decrease in heat flow is larger than any plausible decrease due to cooling, and therefore hint at cyclic behavior in plate tectonics. We also consider area-per-age statistics for the present-day and back to 140~Ma from new paleo-age reconstructions. Using a simplified seafloor age evolution model we explore which physical parameterizations for the average behavior of the oceanic lithosphere are compatible with broad trends in the data. In particular, we show that a subduction probability based on lithospheric buoyancy ("sqrt(age)") leads to results that are comparable to, or better than, that of the probability distribution that is required to obtain the "triangular" age distribution with age-independent destruction of ocean floor. The current, near triangular distribution of ages and the relative lull in heat flow are likely only snapshots of a transient state during the Wilson cycle. Current seafloor ages still contain hints of a ≤sssim 60~Myr period, cyclic variation of seafloor production, and using paleo-ages for 140~Ma, we find a ~ 400~Myr best-fitting variation

  16. Metamorphic and tectonic evolution of Ceuta peninsula (Internal Rif): new interpretation in the framework of arc and back arc evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homonnay, Emmanuelle; Lardeaux, Jean-Marc; Corsini, Michel; Cenki-Tok, Bénédicte; Bosch, Delphine; Munch, Philippe; Romagny, Adrien; Ouazzani-Touhami, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    In the last twenty years, various geophysical investigations have established that the Western Mediterranean opened in a subduction context as a back arc domain. In the Alboran basin the dip of the subduction plane is eastwards or southeastwards depending of considered models. If the geological records of back-arc opening are well-known, the arc-related tectonic and petrologic evolutions are still poorly documented. In order to decipher these markers, we focalised structural, petrological and thermo-chronological studies on the Ceuta peninsula located in the Rif belt, on the western part of the Gibraltar arc to the North of Morocco. The present-day tectonic pile is constituted by: (1) the upper Ceuta unit, composed of High Pressure and High Temperature metapelites retromorphosed under Amphibolite-facies condition, with Ultra-High Pressure relicts, and pyrigarnite and spinel bearing peridotites boudins at its base, (2) the lower Monte Hacho unit, with orthogneisses metamorphosed under Amphibolite-facies conditions. Structural analysis indicates a polyphase tectonic evolution: (1) an earlier deformation phase only observed in the UHP metapelites and characterized by a steep S1 foliation plane, (2) a main deformation phase associated to a pervasive gently dipping S2 foliation plane bearing a L2 stretching lineation and synschistose folds whose axes are parallel to L2 and (3) a late deformation phase which developed S3 foliation plane and L3 stretching lineation coeval with development of narrow normal ductile shear zones. A zone of increasing deformation, several dozen meters wide, is identified as a major ductile shear zone involving the peridotitic lenses at the base of the metapelites of the Ceuta unit and overlaying this upper unit on top of the orthogneisses of the Monte Hacho lower unit. The attitude of mylonitic foliation and stretching and mineral lineations as well as the numerous shear sense indicators observed in the shear zone are consistent with a

  17. Tectonic Evolution of the Cretaceous Sava-Klepa Massif, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, based on field observations and microstructural analysis - Towards a new geodynamic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmeyer, Tobias; Peternell, Mark; Prelević, Dejan; Köpping, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    the deformation history, i.e. the switch from compressive to extensional, rift forming, regime. REFERENCES Ferrill, D.A. et al. (2004). Calcite twin morphology: a low-temperature deformation geothermometer. Journal of Structural Geology 26: 1521-1529. Peternell, M. et al. (2010). Evaluating quartz crystallographic preferred orientations and the role of deformation partitioning using EBSD and fabric analyser techniques. Journal of Structural Geology 32: 803-817. Robertson, A.H.F. & Karamata, S. (1994). The role of subduction-accretion processes in the tectonic evolution of the Mesozoic Tethys in Serbia. Tectonophysics, 234:73-94. Schmid, S.M. et al. (2008). The Alpine-Carpathian-Dinaridic orogenic system: correlation and evolution of tectonic units. Swiss Journal of Geoscience, 101:139-183.

  18. Diagenetic Evolution and Reservoir Quality of Sandstones in the North Alpine Foreland Basin: A Microscale Approach.

    PubMed

    Gross, Doris; Grundtner, Marie-Louise; Misch, David; Riedl, Martin; Sachsenhofer, Reinhard F; Scheucher, Lorenz

    2015-10-01

    Siliciclastic reservoir rocks of the North Alpine Foreland Basin were studied focusing on investigations of pore fillings. Conventional oil and gas production requires certain thresholds of porosity and permeability. These parameters are controlled by the size and shape of grains and diagenetic processes like compaction, dissolution, and precipitation of mineral phases. In an attempt to estimate the impact of these factors, conventional microscopy, high resolution scanning electron microscopy, and wavelength dispersive element mapping were applied. Rock types were established accordingly, considering Poro/Perm data. Reservoir properties in shallow marine Cenomanian sandstones are mainly controlled by the degree of diagenetic calcite precipitation, Turonian rocks are characterized by reduced permeability, even for weakly cemented layers, due to higher matrix content as a result of lower depositional energy. Eocene subarkoses tend to be coarse-grained with minor matrix content as a result of their fluvio-deltaic and coastal deposition. Reservoir quality is therefore controlled by diagenetic clay and minor calcite cementation.Although Eocene rocks are often matrix free, occasionally a clay mineral matrix may be present and influence cementation of pores during early diagenesis. Oligo-/Miocene deep marine rocks exhibit excellent quality in cases when early cement is dissolved and not replaced by secondary calcite, mainly bound to the gas-water contact within hydrocarbon reservoirs. PMID:26365327

  19. Alpine endemic spiders shed light on the origin and evolution of subterranean species.

    PubMed

    Mammola, Stefano; Isaia, Marco; Arnedo, Miquel A

    2015-01-01

    We designed a comparative study to unravel the phylogeography of two Alpine endemic spiders characterized by a different degree of adaptation to subterranean life: Troglohyphantes vignai (Araneae, Linyphiidae) and Pimoa rupicola (Araneae, Pimoidae), the latter showing minor adaptation to hypogean life. We sampled populations of the model species in caves and other subterranean habitats across their known geographical range in the Western Alps. By combining phylogeographic inferences and Ecological Niche Modeling techniques, we inferred the biogeographic scenario that led to the present day population structure of the two species. According to our divergent time estimates and relative uncertainties, the isolation of T. vignai and P. rupicola from their northern sister groups was tracked back to Middle-Late Miocene. Furthermore, the fingerprint left by Pleistocene glaciations on the population structure revealed by the genetic data, led to the hypothesis that a progressive adaptation to subterranean habitats occurred in T. vignai, followed by strong population isolation. On the other hand, P. rupicola underwent a remarkable genetic bottleneck during the Pleistocene glaciations, that shaped its present population structure. It seems likely that such shallow population structure is both the result of the minor degree of specialization to hypogean life and the higher dispersal ability characterizing this species. The simultaneous study of overlapping spider species showing different levels of adaptation to hypogean life, disclosed a new way to clarify patterns of biological diversification and to understand the effects of past climatic shift on the subterranean biodiversity. PMID:26734503

  20. Alpine endemic spiders shed light on the origin and evolution of subterranean species

    PubMed Central

    Mammola, Stefano; Arnedo, Miquel A.

    2015-01-01

    We designed a comparative study to unravel the phylogeography of two Alpine endemic spiders characterized by a different degree of adaptation to subterranean life: Troglohyphantes vignai (Araneae, Linyphiidae) and Pimoa rupicola (Araneae, Pimoidae), the latter showing minor adaptation to hypogean life. We sampled populations of the model species in caves and other subterranean habitats across their known geographical range in the Western Alps. By combining phylogeographic inferences and Ecological Niche Modeling techniques, we inferred the biogeographic scenario that led to the present day population structure of the two species. According to our divergent time estimates and relative uncertainties, the isolation of T. vignai and P. rupicola from their northern sister groups was tracked back to Middle–Late Miocene. Furthermore, the fingerprint left by Pleistocene glaciations on the population structure revealed by the genetic data, led to the hypothesis that a progressive adaptation to subterranean habitats occurred in T. vignai, followed by strong population isolation. On the other hand, P. rupicola underwent a remarkable genetic bottleneck during the Pleistocene glaciations, that shaped its present population structure. It seems likely that such shallow population structure is both the result of the minor degree of specialization to hypogean life and the higher dispersal ability characterizing this species. The simultaneous study of overlapping spider species showing different levels of adaptation to hypogean life, disclosed a new way to clarify patterns of biological diversification and to understand the effects of past climatic shift on the subterranean biodiversity. PMID:26734503

  1. The Eocene-Miocene tectonic evolution of the Rif chain (Morocco): new data from the Jebha area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Assisi Tramparulo, Francesco; Ciarcia, Sabatino; El Ouaragli, Bilal; Vitale, Stefano; Najib Zaghloul, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Keywords: structural analysis, tectonics, shear bands, Miocene, Jebha Fault The Jebha area, located in the Central Rif, is a key sector to understand the orogenic evolution of the Rif chain. Here, the left lateral Jebha-Chrafate transfer fault, allowed, in the Miocene time, the westward migration of the internal thrust front. The structural analysis of the area revealed a complex tectonic history. The Eocene orogenic pulse produced the tectonic stacking of the Ghomaride thrust sheets. During the late Aquitanian and Langhian, under a dominant ENE-WSW shortening, imbrication of several Internal Dorsale Calcaire slices occurred. The following orogenic stage, characterized by a main SE tectonic transport, allowed the External Dorsale Calcaire to overthrust the Maghrebian Flysch Basin Units by means of a dominant thin-skinned tectonics. Synchronously with the buttressing following the collision of the allochthonous wedge against the External Rif domain, an out-of-sequence thrusting stage involved the Ghomaride and Dorsale Calcaire Units and a general back-thrusting deformed the entire tectonic pile. A renewal of the NE-SW shortening produced strike-slip faults and SW-verging folds and finally a radial extension affected the whole chain.

  2. Interactions between recent tectonic activity and the evolution of mountain relief of the Inner Cottians Alps (Western Alps): preliminary morphotectonic map.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacenetti, Marco; Morelli, Michele; Cadoppi, Paola; Giardino, Marco; Perotti, Luigi; Perrone, Gianluigi

    2014-05-01

    Possible interactions between recent tectonic activity and the evolution of mountain relief have been investigated at the regional (1:50,000) and local (1:5,000) scale in the Germanasca Valley (Cottian Alps, NW-Italy) through an integrated, multidisciplinary approach combining Structural analysis, Quaternary Geology, Geomorphology and Geomatics. The inner edge of the Cottians Alps and the adjacent Po Plain are among the most densely populated portions of the Piemonte Region (NW-Italy). This area corresponds to the junction between the Alpine and Apennine chains and it is affected by a diffuse low- to moderate- seismicity (Ml<5) and hypocenters at a shallow crustal level (< 20 Km). Available apatite fission track data indicate that this sector reached shallow crustal levels, where brittle deformation mechanisms prevail since Late Oligocene times. Historical earthquakes (e.g. Prarostino's earthquakes, 1808 Ml=5.5; Cumiana's earthquakes, 1980 Ml=4.8) caused both material and social damage in the area. Since faults activity is often associated with characteristic geomorphological features, linear valleys, ridgelines, slope-breaks, steep slopes of uniform aspect, regional anisotropy and tilt of terrain, have been detected in the area. Analysis of digital elevation models, by means of numerical geomorphology, provides a tool to recognize linear features and characterizing the tectonics of an area in a quantitative way. Geomorphology and morphotectonic analyses have been performed using digital orthophotos (AGEA Orthophoto 2009), aerial stereo couples and DEMs (LiDAR5x5 meters, Regione Piemonte 2009). The morphotectonic lineament analysis was conducted using TerraExplorer® Software Systems, Inc. For the field mapping activities, it was used an application called "SRG2" (Support to Geological / Geomorphological Surveys), an extension for ArcPad (ESRI mobile GIS). Into ArcPad, the SRG2 application adds a toolbar made up of several functions for a useful mapping and

  3. Tectonic evolution of the eastern margin of the Thaumasia Plateau (Mars) as inferred from detailed structural mapping and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borraccini, F.; Di Achille, G.; Ori, G. G.; Wezel, F. C.

    2007-05-01

    The eastern margin of the Thaumasia Plateau (EMTP) is characterized by a diversity of tectonic features, which recorded its complex, and still controversial, tectonic history. A detailed structural survey and analyses have been carried out in order to assess the kinematics and relative age of the main deformational events. Combining results from statistics of lineament orientations and density of fault length for each geologic unit and taking into account crosscutting relationships among tectonic structures, three main deformational events have been recognized. The early stage of the tectonic evolution of EMTP is recorded by Noachian units at the southern edge of Melas Dorsa and is represented by N-S oriented grabens sutured by Early Hesperian formations. Starting from Late Noachian, the extensional stress field became NE-SW oriented and resulted in the formation of NW-SE striking sets of grabens. At the boundary between Noachian and Hesperian, the most important change in tectonic regime occurred. The Hesperian tectonics are characterized by an E-W shortening possibly related to an eastward motion of the Thaumasia Plateau. This tectonic phase likely produced a N-S-oriented wrinkle ridges as well as regional folds and thrust faults. E-W-oriented preexisting tectonic lineaments could have been reactivated forming regional transfer zones. In this scenario, Coprates Rise, Melas Dorsa, and Thaumasia Ridge could be interpreted as mountain belts resulting from buckling and thrust faulting of the eastern and southern margins of the Thaumasia plateau. The proto-Valles Marineris could have experienced a left-lateral component of displacement and played a role of a transfer shear zone.

  4. Deep Structure and Evolution of the Cyprus Arc, With Implications for the Tectonic Evolution of Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortel, M. J.; Spakman, W.; Govers, R.; Ben-Avraham, Z.

    2006-12-01

    Eratosthenes Seamoumt may explain the moderate development of the Cyprus (back-)arc relative to the Hellenic arc. The deep mantle anomalies below Anatolia are very similar to those below the Aegean region, pointing to a largely common earlier (pre-Oligo-Miocene) convergence history. Implications of the lateral and temporal variations in plate boundary configuration for the tectonics of Anatolia are addressed.

  5. Drainage response to active tectonics and evolution of tectonic geomorphology across the Himalayan Frontal Thrust, Kumaun Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luirei, Khayingshing; Bhakuni, Surendra S.; Kothyari, Girish Ch.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of integrated studies of geomorphic indices of drainage networks and landforms developed across the mountain front along the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT) between the Dabka and Baur rivers, Kumaun Himalaya. The HFT is a morphogenic structure in nature, creating a 100-m-high E-W trending escarpment that extends ~ 21 km. Geomorphological evidence indicates ~ 10.5 km westward migration of the Dabka River and ~ 5.2 km eastward migration of the Baur River. These migrations are a result of uplift of the hanging wall along the HFT. The HFT is offset by a transverse fault, which suggests that the latter postdates the reactivation of the HFT between 500 and 100 ka. Presence of different levels of strath terraces along the mountain front suggests the active nature of the HFT. To assess the relative tectonic activity, morphometric indices such as stream-gradient (SL) index, mountain front sinuosity (Smf) index, and ratio of valley floor width to valley height (Vf) have been analyzed. Results of the former two are consistent with the tectonic landforms developed in thrust zones. Paleochannels of the Dabka and Baur rivers are characterized by high Vf values while other valleys show low Vf values. Quaternary alluvial sediments have been deformed along the Pawalgarth Thrust, a splay of the HFT. Deformation has resulted in the formation of the Pawalgarh Anticline, a thrust-related asymmetric fold.

  6. Genome evolution in alpine oat-like grasses through homoploid hybridization and polyploidy

    PubMed Central

    Winterfeld, Grit; Wölk, Alexandra; Röser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Hybridization and polyploidization can radically impact genome organization from sequence level to chromosome structure. As a result, often in response to environmental change and species isolation, the development of novel traits can arise and will tend to result in the formation of homoploid or polyploid hybrid species. In this study we focus on evidence of hybridization and polyploidization by ascertaining the species parentage of the endemic alpine Helictotrichon parlatorei group. This group comprises five taxa; the diploids H. parlatorei, Helictotrichon setaceum subsp. setaceum and subsp. petzense, their putative hybrid Helictotrichon ×krischae and the hexaploid Helictotrichon sempervirens. For molecular analyses, cloned nuclear Topoisomerase VI genes of H. sempervirens and H. ×krischae were sequenced and compared with sequences of the diploids to estimate the evolutionary history in this group. In addition, detailed chromosome studies were carried out including fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S and 45S ribosomal and satellite DNA probes, and fluorochrome staining with chromomycin and DAPI. Two distinct types of Topoisomerase VI sequences were identified. One of them (SET) occurs in both subspecies of H. setaceum, the other (PAR) in H. parlatorei. Both types were found in H. ×krischae and H. sempervirens. Karyotypes of H. parlatorei and H. setaceum could be distinguished by chromosomes with a clearly differentiated banding pattern of ribosomal DNAs. Both patterns occurred in the hybrid H. ×krischae. Hexaploid H. sempervirens shares karyotype features with diploid H. parlatorei, but lacks the expected chromosome characteristics of H. setaceum, possibly an example of beginning diploidization after polyploidization. The geographic origin of the putative parental species and their hybrids and the possible biogeographical spread through the Alps are discussed. PMID:27255513

  7. Genome evolution in alpine oat-like grasses through homoploid hybridization and polyploidy.

    PubMed

    Winterfeld, Grit; Wölk, Alexandra; Röser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Hybridization and polyploidization can radically impact genome organization from sequence level to chromosome structure. As a result, often in response to environmental change and species isolation, the development of novel traits can arise and will tend to result in the formation of homoploid or polyploid hybrid species. In this study we focus on evidence of hybridization and polyploidization by ascertaining the species parentage of the endemic alpine Helictotrichon parlatorei group. This group comprises five taxa; the diploids H. parlatorei, Helictotrichon setaceum subsp. setaceum and subsp. petzense, their putative hybrid Helictotrichon ×krischae and the hexaploid Helictotrichon sempervirens. For molecular analyses, cloned nuclear Topoisomerase VI genes of H. sempervirens and H. ×krischae were sequenced and compared with sequences of the diploids to estimate the evolutionary history in this group. In addition, detailed chromosome studies were carried out including fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S and 45S ribosomal and satellite DNA probes, and fluorochrome staining with chromomycin and DAPI. Two distinct types of Topoisomerase VI sequences were identified. One of them (SET) occurs in both subspecies of H. setaceum, the other (PAR) in H. parlatorei. Both types were found in H. ×krischae and H. sempervirens Karyotypes of H. parlatorei and H. setaceum could be distinguished by chromosomes with a clearly differentiated banding pattern of ribosomal DNAs. Both patterns occurred in the hybrid H. ×krischae Hexaploid H. sempervirens shares karyotype features with diploid H. parlatorei, but lacks the expected chromosome characteristics of H. setaceum, possibly an example of beginning diploidization after polyploidization. The geographic origin of the putative parental species and their hybrids and the possible biogeographical spread through the Alps are discussed. PMID:27255513

  8. Tectonic evolution and hydrocarbon potential of the southern Moesian platform and Balkan-Forebalken regions of northern Bulgaria

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, M. ); Georgiev, G. )

    1993-09-01

    The major tectonic elements of northern Bulgaria are the east-west-trending Balkan-Forebalkan fold belt and the Moesian platform. Moderate hydrocarbon exploration potential exists in trapping geometries generated during the tectonic evolution of the region coupled with reservoir/seal pairs and source rocks within Mesozoic strata. The tectonic evolution of the region includes Early Triassic to Early Jurassic intracratonic rifting followed by multiphase compression that contracted the rift basin and produced a north vergent fold and thrust belt along the southern margin of the stable Moesian platform. Compression began during the Early Cretaceous, continued during the Paleocene, and concluded during the middle Eocene. Trap types generated during the tectonic evolution include normal fault-bounded rotated blocks in the autochthonous section and elongate, asymmetric anticlines in the allochthonous section. Triassic to Upper Jurassic Marine facies were deposited in an east-west-trending rift. Sediments deposited in a shallow foredeep, which evolved during Lower cretaceous compression, overlay the rift sequence. The Early Mesozoic rift sequence provides the depositional settings for Middle Triassic and lower Middle Jurassic source rock shales and sandstone/carbonate reservoirs ranging from Middle Triassic to Lower Cretaceous. Carbonate reservoirs generally are porous dolomites with intercrystalline, moldic, and vugular pore types interbedded with nonporous limestones. Clastic reservoirs are quartz-rich sandstones with pore types that are reduced intergranular, dissolution, and microporosity. These heterogeneous reservoir targets exhibit poor to good reservoir characteristics and are overlain with sealing lithologies of variable thicknesses.

  9. Mesozoic Tertiary tectonic evolution of Albania in its regional Eastern Mediterranean context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alastair; Shallo, Minella

    2000-01-01

    Research carried out since the opening of Albania to the 'western' geological community in the 1990s allows the geology and tectonics of this small Balkan country to be integrated into an overall interpretation of Neotethys in the Eastern Mediterranean region, specifically Greece and the former Yugoslavia region. Albanian geology is most famous for the occurrence of contrasting ophiolites of Jurassic age. The country is sub-divided into three main geotectonic units. Those in the west (i.e. Sazani, Ionian, Kruja, Krasta-Cukali and the Albanian Alps) relate to the western margin of Apulia, effectively part of North Africa from Early Mesozoic time onwards. In the east is the Korabi zone, interpreted as a microcontinent located further northeast within Neotethys. Between the two is the Mirdita zone, dominated by two contrasting Jurassic ophiolites: the 'Western-type' ophiolite and the 'Eastern-type' ophiolite. Taking account of evidence from Greece and former Yugoslavia, the following tectonic evolution is proposed. From Early Mesozoic time onwards, Neotethys in Albania existed as a northward continuation of the Pindos oceanic basin in Greece (Pindos-Mirdita ocean). A Korabi microcontinent was rifted off Apulia in the Early-Mid Triassic, followed by passive margin subsidence until late Middle Jurassic time. A rifted, slow-spreading, MOR-type ophiolite formed within the western Pindos-Mirdita oceanic basin in Late Triassic?-early Late Jurassic time (using present co-ordinates). The Shkoder-Peje (Scutari-Peć) lineament in the north of Albania is interpreted as an important transform fault zone that influenced the regional tectonic evolution during the entire Mesozoic-Early Tertiary rift/drift/emplacement history of the Pindos-Mirdita ocean. Taking account of evidence from the Greek and former Yugoslavia ophiolites, the easterly Albanian ophiolites formed within the Pindos-Mirdita ocean above a westward-dipping intra-oceanic subduction zone in the early Late Jurassic

  10. Origin, mobility, and temporal evolution of arsenic from a low-contamination catchment in Alpine crystalline rocks.

    PubMed

    Pili, Eric; Tisserand, Delphine; Bureau, Sarah

    2013-11-15

    The reduction to 10 μg/l of the limit for arsenic in drinking water led many resource managers to deal with expensive treatments. In the very common case of arsenic levels close to the recommended maximum concentration, knowing the origin and temporal evolution of As has become of great importance. Here we present a case study from an alpine basin. Arsenic speciation, isotopic compositions of pyrite, sulfate and water, and concentrations of major and trace elements demonstrate a geogenic source for arsenic linked to the dissolution of pyrite. We provide new tools to further study As at low concentrations where many processes may be masked. The observed negative correlation between δ(34)SSO4 and [As] is interpreted as a Rayleigh-type sulfur-isotope fractionation during increasing pyrite dissolution. The observed positive correlation between δ(18)OSO4 and As(V)/As(III) could help to retrieve initial redox conditions. A 3-year long monitoring at high-resolution demonstrated that drought conditions enhance pyrite dissolution whose degradation products are scavenged by recharge water. An increase in As in groundwater may result from droughts due to enhanced oxygen entry in the unsaturated zone. The 2003 European heatwave had a major effect. PMID:22819960

  11. Melting and Tectonics from Coupled Orbital and Thermal Evolution of the Pluto-Charon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, G. C.; Barr, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    As New Horizons data is returned, we should consider the possibility that Pluto and Charon went through an intense period of activity following the Charon-forming impact. Our prior work (Barr and Collins 2015) shows that if the deep layer of Pluto's ice shell is initially warmer than ~200 K after the impact, energy dissipation within Pluto can lead to melting and rapid thinning of the ice shell and tidal stresses can drive tectonics on both bodies. Here, we build upon our prior work to simulate the coupled thermal and orbital evolution of the Pluto/Charon system after the Charon-forming impact, taking into account the growth/freezing of an ocean, the onset/cessation of solid-state ice shell convection, and how the changing interior state of Pluto changes the magnitude of tidal deformation and dissipation. We track the heat flow in Pluto as a function of time for a variety of starting conditions after Charon is formed. We find that if Pluto has even a small ocean after Charon forms, the system can readily evolve to its present dual synchronous state. A feedback mechanism exists in which tidal dissipation in the basal ice above the ocean increases its temperature, which in turn leads to faster tidal dissipation. This feedback leads to a heat pulse within Pluto and rapid buildup of tectonic stresses on Pluto and Charon. If Pluto never had any liquid at the base of its ice shell, the tidal dissipation is too small to keep Pluto's interior warm. Without a starting ocean, it is difficult to start the thermal-orbital feedback process, and difficult for Charon to evolve to its presently observed orbital state within the timespan of solar system history.

  12. Tectonic evolution of the Perth Abyssal Plain's Quiet Zone, Southeast Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, Zohar Louis; Granot, Roi; Williams, Simon E.

    2013-04-01

    During the Late Jurassic period, the Greater-Indian plate was torn away from Australia, dissociating East Gondwanaland. The Perth Abyssal Plain (PAP) is the southernmost rift segment along the western Australian margin, and has an onset age of ~136 Ma. New marine magnetic and swath bathymetry data, crossing the entire PAP, were acquired recently on geophysical cruise ss2011v06 aboard the R/V Southern Surveyor. These have lead to the outline of conjugate Indian and Australian M-series isochrons in the east and west PAP, respectively [1]. Yet, most of the PAP was created during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (CNS, 121-83 Ma), a period of no geomagnetic field reversals, hence no comprehensive tectonic model for the PAP exists . Here we present preliminary findings of an analytic bathymetric and magnetic investigation aimed at elucidating the PAP's quiet zone. Recent discoveries regarding the evolution of the geomagnetic field during the CNS [2] provide new time markers that can be utilized to date the oceanic crust. The magnetic anomaly data exhibit the Q2 anomaly marker (~108 Ma), further constraining the spreading history of the PAP. Together with the ridgelet transform method [3] for automated abyssal hill delineation, we present new constraints on the development of crustal construction processes (spreading location, direction and rates) that took place along the PAP spreading center. References: [1] S.E. Williams, J.M. Whittaker, R. Granot, R.D. Muller (in preparation), New constraints on the seafloor spreading history in the Perth Abyssal Plain. [2] Granot, R., J. Dyment, and Y. Gallet (2012), Geomagnetic field variability during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron, Nature Geoscience, 5(3), 220-223. [3] Downey, N. J. and R. W. Clayton (2007), A ridgelet transform method for constraining tectonic models via abyssal-hill morphology, Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems, 8, Q03004, doi: 10.1029/2006GC001440.

  13. Tectonic evolution of the Gaoua region, Burkina Faso: Implications for mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratoux, L.; Metelka, V.; Naba, S.; Ouiya, P.; Siebenaller, L.; Jessell, M. W.; Naré, A.; Salvi, S.; Béziat, D.; Franceschi, G.

    2015-12-01

    The interpretation of high-resolution airborne geophysical data integrated with field structural and lithological observations were employed in the creation of a litho-structural framework for the Gaoua region, Burkina Faso. The granite-greenstone domain of Paleoproterozoic age was affected by multiple deformation and mineralization events. The early tectonic phase is characterized by the emplacement of voluminous tholeiitic and calc-alkaline lavas, probably in a volcanic arc setting. The copper mineralization in Gongondy, Dienemera and Mt Biri is concentrated in a diorite/andesite breccia, and is interpreted as porphyry-copper style formed at an early stage of the evolution of the area. Evidence for the first deformation event D1Ga corresponding to N-S shortening was only found in the E-W trending mafic unit bordering the Gaoua batholith to the south. A second deformation phase D2Ga occurred under greenschist facies conditions and lead to a development of more or less penetrative metamorphic foliation and its subsequent folding under overall E-W compression. At later stages, the D2Ga switched to a transcurrent regime characterized by intense N-S to NW-trending steeply dipping shear zones. The first significant gold mineralization event is related to this transcurrent tectonic phase. During subsequent D3Ga, intense network of brittle to brittle-ductile NW and NE faults developed. Economic gold concentrations are attributed to the D3Ga event and are associated with the remobilization of early disseminated low grade gold concentrations. Significant deposits in the area are Nassara, Gomblora, Batié West and Kampti. The last deformation event D4Ga resulted in E-W trending thrust faults and crenulation cleavage planes, under overall N-S compression. No mineralization events related to this stage have been seen.

  14. The late Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the South China Sea: A petrologic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Quanshu; Shi, Xuefa; Castillo, Paterno R.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a review of available petrological, geochonological and geochemical data for late Mesozoic to Recent igneous rocks in the South China Sea (SCS) and adjacent regions and a discussion of their petrogeneses and tectonic implications. The integration of these data with available geophysical and other geologic information led to the following tectono-magmatic model for the evolution of the SCS region. The geochemical characteristics of late Mesozoic granitic rocks in the Pearl River Mouth Basin (PRMB), micro-blocks in the SCS, the offshore continental shelf and Dalat zone in southern Vietnam, and the Schwaner Mountains in West Kalimantan, Borneo indicate that these are mainly I-type granites plus a small amount of S-type granites in the PRMB. These granitoids were formed in a continental arc tectonic setting, consistent with the ideas proposed by Holloway (1982) and Taylor and Hayes (1980, 1983), that there existed an Andean-type volcanic arc during later Mesozoic era in the SCS region. The geochonological and geochemical characteristics of the volcanics indicate an early period of bimodal volcanism (60-43 Ma or 32 Ma) at the northern margin of the SCS, followed by a period of relatively passive style volcanism during Cenozoic seafloor spreading (37 or 30-16 Ma) within the SCS, and post-spreading volcanism (tholeiitic series at 17-8 Ma, followed by alkali series from 8 Ma to present) in the entire SCS region. The geodynamic setting of the earlier volcanics was an extensional regime, which resulted from the collision between India and Eurasian plates since the earliest Cenozoic, and that of the post-spreading volcanics may be related to mantle plume magmatism in Hainan Island. In addition, the nascent Hainan plume may have played a significant role in the extension along the northern margin and seafloor spreading in the SCS.

  15. Thermochronology and tectonics of the Leeward Antilles: Evolution of the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van der Lelij, Roelant; Spikings, Richard A.; Kerr, Andrew C.; Kounov, Alexandre; Cosca, Michael; Chew, David; Villagomez, Diego

    2010-01-01

    Tectonic reconstructions of the Caribbean Plate are severely hampered by a paucity of geochronologic and exhumation constraints from anastomosed basement blocks along its southern margin. New U/Pb, 40Ar/39Ar, apatite fission track, and apatite (U-Th)/He data constrain quantitative thermal and exhumation histories, which have been used to propose a model for the tectonic evolution of the emergent parts of the Bonaire Block and the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone. An east facing arc system intruded through an oceanic plateau during ~90 to ~87 Ma and crops out on Aruba. Subsequent structural displacements resulted in >80°C of cooling on Aruba during 70–60 Ma. In contrast, exhumation of the island arc sequence exposed on Bonaire occurred at 85–80 Ma and 55–45 Ma. Santonian exhumation on Bonaire occurred immediately subsequent to burial metamorphism and may have been driven by the collision of a west facing island arc with the Caribbean Plate. Island arc rocks intruded oceanic plateau rocks on Gran Roque at ~65 Ma and exhumed rapidly at 55–45 Ma. We attribute Maastrichtian-Danian exhumation on Aruba and early Eocene exhumation on Bonaire and Gran Roque to sequential diachronous accretion of their basement units to the South American Plate. Widespread unconformities indicate late Eocene subaerial exposure. Late Oligocene–early Miocene dextral transtension within the Bonaire Block drove subsidence and burial of crystalline basement rocks of the Leeward Antilles to ≤1 km. Late Miocene–recent transpression caused inversion and ≤1 km of exhumation, possibly as a result of the northward escape of the Maracaibo Block.

  16. Granitoid generation and laxfordian tectonic evolution in the northern part of the lewisian complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, A.; Lopez, S.; Fernandez, C.

    2003-04-01

    transpression episode, with the southern block (Assynt terrane) overthrusting the northern block (Rhiconich terrane). The described process of in-situ granitization was favoured by tectonic deformation in the footwall to this transpressional zone, where large volumes of basic magma were emplaced. Therefore, the generation of granitoids seems to be intimately linked to the tectonic evolution of the Early Proterozoic orogenic belts.

  17. The climatic, biotic and tectonic evolution of the Paleogene Renova formation of southwestern Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lielke, Kevin John

    The Renova Formation of southwestern Montana contains an important record of Paleogene floral, faunal, climate and tectonic change in the northern Rocky Mountains. The period between the end of the early Eocene and the early Oligocene (˜49--32 Ma) was a time of rapid and far-reaching climate change. This period saw the end of global greenhouse climate and the establishment of icehouse conditions across the Earth. These changes led to profound alterations in both marine and terrestrial ecosystems. This study examines the late Eocene/early Oligocene history of the northern Rocky Mountains by means of an integrated study of the sedimentology, tectonics and fossil content of the Renova Formation. The first part of this study examines plant fossils found in the Renova Formation in order to examine changes in the composition of the vegetation across the late Eocene/ early Oligocene (E/O) boundary. Plant remains are an effective proxy for climate and are used to estimate multiple climatic parameters across the E/O boundary. The second part of this study examines the paleotopography and paleodrainage patterns of the basins which accumulated the Renova sediments. This is accomplished by a combination of sedimentary facies and detrital zircon analysis. The third part of this study examines the tectonic underpinnings of Paleogene southwestern Montana through a combination of geologic field work and geodynamic modeling. The results of this study indicate that a seasonal summer dry climate became established in the northern Rocky Mountains by early Oligocene time. This is indicated by the elimination of subtropical plant species, the establishment of dry-adapted species and by paleoclimate parameters calculated from leaf physiognomy. Geodynamic calculations and field data indicate that the Renova Formation was deposited in a series of sub-basins separated by relict paleotopography and inverted topography formed by contemporary lava flows. Normal faulting was not active until

  18. Integrating seismological and tectonic studies to constrain lithospheric evolution at complex plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Gavin Peter

    The relative motion of tectonic plates across their boundaries generates deformation in the surrounding lithosphere. How this deformation is expressed reflects both present-day plate configurations and how plate boundaries evolve. To understand the behavior of plate boundaries, we must study how they have developed. The advances made in seismology over the past fifty years---both in observation and application---provide tools ideal for such analysis. Here, I use these tools to investigate the tectonic evolution of complex plate boundaries. I focus on two areas that have experienced geologically recent plate tectonic variations---the Mendocino triple junction in northern California, and the Australia:Pacific plate boundary south of New Zealand. In northern California, the northward migration of the Mendocino triple junction over the past ˜10Ma has driven a synchronous pattern of thickening and thinning of North American crust. In studying this deformation I find major thinning is localized to a narrow region of crust in the Redwood Valley area. This thinning is accompanied by a steeply dipping Moho (>15°), and by high Poisson's Ratio's in the lower crust, characteristic of layers of melt. These melts may link to shallow (˜10km) dike injections that drive a migrating sequence of seismicity in the shallow crust near Lake Pillsbury. The limited data sets available led me to develop new tools in receiver function and crustal velocity ratio analyses that significantly improve our ability to resolve spatial changes in crustal properties. The application of these techniques forms a second major aspect of this thesis. Finally, I analyze the deformation of Australian lithosphere adjacent to the plate boundary south of New Zealand. I perform earthquake relocations on the distribution of intra- and inter-plate seismicity, and combined with plate reconstructions since the late Oligocene show that deformation occurs over a ˜150km wide area west of the current plate boundary

  19. Past and present seafloor age distributions and the temporal evolution of plate tectonic heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Thorsten W.; Conrad, Clinton P.; Buffett, Bruce; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2009-02-01

    Variations in Earth's rates of seafloor generation and recycling have far-reaching consequences for sea level, ocean chemistry, and climate. However, there is little agreement on the correct parameterization for the time-dependent evolution of plate motions. A strong constraint is given by seafloor age distributions, which are affected by variations in average spreading rate, ridge length, and the age distribution of seafloor being removed by subduction. Using a simplified evolution model, we explore which physical parameterizations of these quantities are compatible with broad trends in the area per seafloor age statistics for the present-day and back to 140 Ma from paleo-age reconstructions. We show that a probability of subduction based on plate buoyancy (slab-pull, or "sqrt(age)") and a time-varying spreading rate fits the observed age distributions as well as, or better than, a subduction probability consistent with an unvarying "triangular" age distribution and age-independent destruction of ocean floor. Instead, we interpret the present near-triangular distribution of ages as a snapshot of a transient state of the evolving oceanic plate system. Current seafloor ages still contain hints of a ˜ 60 Myr periodicity in seafloor production, and using paleoages, we find that a ˜ 250 Myr period variation is consistent with geologically-based reconstructions of production rate variations. These long-period variations also imply a decrease of oceanic heat flow by ˜ - 0.25%/Ma during the last 140 Ma, caused by a 25-50% decrease in the rate of seafloor production. Our study offers an improved understanding of the non-uniformitarian evolution of plate tectonics and the interplay between continental cycles and the self-organization of the oceanic plates.

  20. Evolution of an Alpine fluvioglacial system at the LGM decay: The Cormor megafan (NE Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Alessandro; Monegato, Giovanni; Zavagno, Enrico; Devoto, Stefano; Burla, Ivonne; Cucchi, Franco

    2014-01-01

    within the glacial amphitheatre. After this depositional phase, the Cormor megafan was deactivated because of water and sediment discharge concentration of the Tagliamento catchment in the Tagliamento River. This study demonstrates the possibility to reconstruct the timing of the decline of the Tagliamento moraine amphitheatre by studying the distal portion of the related outwash plain. Moreover, new geochronological dating allows chronological comparison of the glacial withdrawal in the eastern sector of the Southern Alps with the global chronology. The results suggest that we can apply this approach also in the distal part of the other alluvial megafans formed by Alpine glacial outwashes in the central part of the Po plain where radiocarbon chronology is almost lacking.

  1. Erosive processes after tectonic uplift stimulate vicariant and adaptive speciation: evolution in an Afrotemperate-endemic paper daisy genus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of tectonic uplift in stimulating speciation in South Africa’s only alpine zone, the Drakensberg, has not been explicitly examined. Tectonic processes may influence speciation both through the creation of novel habitats and by physically isolating plant populations. We use the Afrotemperate endemic daisy genus Macowania to explore the timing and mode (geographic versus adaptive) of speciation in this region. Between sister species pairs we expect high morphological divergence where speciation has happened in sympatry (adaptive) while with geographic (vicariant) speciation we may expect to find less morphological divergence and a greater degree of allopatry. A dated molecular phylogenetic hypothesis for Macowania elucidates species’ relationships and is used to address the potential impact of uplift on diversification. Morphological divergence of a small sample of reproductive and vegetative characters, used as a proxy for adaptive divergence, is measured against species’ range distributions to estimate mode of speciation across two subclades in the genus. Results The Macowania crown age is consistent with the hypothesis of post-uplift diversification, and we find evidence for both vicariant and adaptive speciation between the two subclades within Macowania. Both subclades exhibit strong signals of range allopatry, suggesting that geographic isolation was important in speciation. One subclade, associated with dry, rocky environments at high altitudes, shows very little morphological and ecological differentiation but high range allopatry. The other subclade occupies a greater variety of habitats and exhibits far greater morphological differentiation, but contains species with overlapping distribution ranges. Conclusions Species in Macowania are likely to have diversified in response to tectonic uplift, and we invoke uplift and uplift-mediated erosion as the main drivers of speciation. The greater relative morphological divergence in

  2. Tectonic versus climate influence on landscape evolution: A case study from the upper Spiti valley, NW Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anoop, A.; Prasad, S.; Basavaiah, N.; Brauer, A.; Shahzad, F.; Deenadayalan, K.

    2012-04-01

    We have undertaken structural, geomorphological, and morphometric analyses to investigate the role of tectonism and climate in the landscape evolution in the upper Spiti valley, NW Himalayas. Geomorphometric analyses coupled with field investigations reveal active tectonic deformation in the Spiti region. The calculated geomorphic indices (steepness, concavity and Hack) demonstrate uplift/subsidence along the Kaurik-Chango fault, whereas transverse topographic index (T-index) reveals basin tilting associated with active faulting near Hansa and Lingti valley. Investigation of well-dated Mane palaeolake sediments also provides evidence of regional tectonic instability. Four episodes (ca. 7.8, 7.4, 6.5 and 6.1 cal ka) of neotectonic activity have been identified during the period of the lake's existence. We have also compiled data on the regional climate variability and compared it with the age of the Mane palaeo-landslide. Our results indicate that the landslide occurred towards the end of the early Holocene intensified monsoon phase and is located near an active fault. Our data on regional tectonic instability and the coincidences of modern and palaeo-landslides with zones of active deformation suggest that tectonism is an important factor governing landscape stability in the Spiti region.

  3. New aerogeophysical survey targets crustal architecture and tectonic evolution of East Antarctica in the Recovery frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraccioli, F.; Forsberg, R.; Jordan, T. A.; Matsuoka, K.; Olesen, A. V.; Ghidella, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    East Antarctica is the size of the conterminous US; it represents the least known continent on Earth despite being regarded as a keystone in Gondwana, Rodinia and possibly even earlier Columbia/Nuna supercontinents. Significant progress has however been made in recent years in the exploration of East Antarctica using airborne geophysical techniques. Spurred by the International Polar Year major collaborative international aerogeophysical campaigns have been performed over the Wilkes Subglacial Basin, the Aurora Subglacial Basin and the Gamburtsev Mountains in recent years, and these are continuing to provide fundamental new glimpses into the crustal architecture in interior East Antarctica, as well as several new interpretations regarding its linkages with tectonic and geodynamic evolution from Precambrian to Mesozoic/Cenozoic times. Here we present the first results of a major reconnaissance aerogeophysical survey over the largely unexplored Recovery ice stream catchment in East Antarctica completed during the IceGRAV 2012-13 field campaign, as part of an international Danish, Norwegian, UK and Argentine collaboration. Over 29,000 line km of new radio-echo sounding, laser altimetry, gravity and magnetic data were acquired using a British Antarctic Survey Twin Otter that surveyed the region. We focus primarily on the new potential field datasets for the area. Specifically, we present the first aeromagnetic anomaly maps, free air and Bouguer and isostatic residual maps obtained for the region. These images provide new geophysical perspectives that are required in order to address a cascade of open questions over this region. Where are the major tectonic boundaries between the Coats Land Block, the Shackleton Range, and the collage of different provinces recently proposed from aeromagnetic studies in Dronning Maud Land (Mieth and Jokat, 2013, GR)? Is the Coats Land crustal block a tectonic tracer for Laurentia (Loewy et al., 2011, Geology), and how and when was this

  4. Volcano-tectonic evolution of the polygenetic Kolumbo submarine volcano/Santorini (Aegean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübscher, Christian; Ruhnau, M.; Nomikou, P.

    2015-01-01

    Here we show for the first time the 3D-structural evolution of an explosive submarine volcano by means of reflection seismic interpretation. Four to five vertically stacked circular and cone-shaped units consisting mainly of volcaniclastics build the Kolumbo underwater volcano which experienced its first eruption > 70 ka ago and its last explosive eruption 1650 AD, 7 km NE of Santorini volcano (southern Aegean Sea). The summed volume of volcaniclastics is estimated to range between 13-22 km3. The entire Kolumbo volcanic complex has a height of ≥ 1 km and a diameter of ≥ 11 km. All volcaniclastic units reveal the same transparent reflection pattern strongly suggesting that explosive underwater volcanism was the prevalent process. Growth faults terminate upwards at the base of volcaniclastic units, thus representing a predictor to an eruption phase. Similarities in seismic reflection pattern between Kolumbo and near-by volcanic cones imply that the smaller cones evolved through explosive eruptions as well. Hence, the central Aegean Sea experienced several more explosive eruptions (≥ 23) than previously assumed, thus justifying further risk assessment. However, the eruption columns from the smaller volcanic cones did not reach the air and- consequently - no sub-aerial pyroclastic surge was created. The Anydros basin that hosts Kolumbo volcanic field opened incrementally NW to SE and parallel to the Pliny and Strabo trends during four major tectonic pulses prior to the onset of underwater volcanism.

  5. Structural synthesis and tectonic evolution of the Maracaibo and Barinas-Apure basins, Western Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    De Toni, B.; Loureiro, D.; Colletta, B.; Rourke, F.

    1996-08-01

    Seismic profiles have imaged the complex and multiphase geometry of major structures in the Maracaibo and Barinas-Apure basins and foothills of the adjacent orogens. Pre-Mesozoic structuring can be documented in subsurface as a peneplaned south-southeast vergent fold-thrust-belt of Hercynian or Caledonian age. In Jurassic times, rifting developed in connection with the opening of western Tethys and thick continental red beds were deposited in the rift grabens. In Late Cretaceous times, postrift thermal subsidence was subsequently recorded. From Maastrichtian through Eocene times, the obduction of the Tethyan ophiolites and the coeval tectonic accretion of the Caribbean allocthon loaded the South American foreland lithosphere, inducing the development of a flexural basin in the northeastern part of the Maracaibo basin. In Late Eocene and Oligocene times, a major extensional event took place in the East Zulia and Falcon area soon after the Caribbean compressional deformation ceased. Since the Neogene, structuring was related to the Andean orogeny, and the deformation was partially superimposed onto older Paleogene and Jurassic structures. These results, integrated with geochemical and chronostratigraphic models, have been used to understand the evolution of the petroleum system and to improve the play fairway risk assessment for exploration.

  6. Periodic Vesicle Formation in Tectonic Fault Zones--an Ideal Scenario for Molecular Evolution.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christian; Schreiber, Ulrich; Dávila, María J

    2015-06-01

    Tectonic fault systems in the continental crust offer huge networks of interconnected channels and cavities. Filled mainly with water and carbon dioxide (CO2), containing a wide variety of hydrothermal chemistry and numerous catalytic surfaces, they may offer ideal reaction conditions for prebiotic chemistry. In these systems, an accumulation zone for organic compounds will develop at a depth of approximately 1 km where CO2 turns sub-critical and dissolved components precipitate. At this point, periodic pressure changes caused for example by tidal influences or geyser activity may generate a cyclic process involving repeated phase transitions of carbon dioxide. In the presence of amphiphilic compounds, this will necessarily lead to the transient formation of coated water droplets in the gas phase and corresponding vesicular structures in the aqueous environment. During this process, the concentration of organic components inside the droplets and vesicles would be drastically increased, allowing for favorable reaction conditions and, in case of the vesicles generated, large trans-membrane concentration gradients. Altogether, the process of periodic formation and destruction of vesicles could offer a perfect environment for molecular evolution in small compartments and for the generation of protocells. The basic process of vesicle formation is reproduced experimentally with a lipid in a water/CO2 system. PMID:25716918

  7. Periodic Vesicle Formation in Tectonic Fault Zones—an Ideal Scenario for Molecular Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Christian; Schreiber, Ulrich; Dávila, María J.

    2015-06-01

    Tectonic fault systems in the continental crust offer huge networks of interconnected channels and cavities. Filled mainly with water and carbon dioxide (CO2), containing a wide variety of hydrothermal chemistry and numerous catalytic surfaces, they may offer ideal reaction conditions for prebiotic chemistry. In these systems, an accumulation zone for organic compounds will develop at a depth of approximately 1 km where CO2 turns sub-critical and dissolved components precipitate. At this point, periodic pressure changes caused for example by tidal influences or geyser activity may generate a cyclic process involving repeated phase transitions of carbon dioxide. In the presence of amphiphilic compounds, this will necessarily lead to the transient formation of coated water droplets in the gas phase and corresponding vesicular structures in the aqueous environment. During this process, the concentration of organic components inside the droplets and vesicles would be drastically increased, allowing for favorable reaction conditions and, in case of the vesicles generated, large trans-membrane concentration gradients. Altogether, the process of periodic formation and destruction of vesicles could offer a perfect environment for molecular evolution in small compartments and for the generation of protocells. The basic process of vesicle formation is reproduced experimentally with a lipid in a water/CO2 system.

  8. Tracing long term tectonic evolution of accretionary orogens by U-Pb zircon geochronology: Proterozoic to Jurassic tectonics of the Santander Massif, northern Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, V. A.; Cardona, A.; Gehrels, G. E.; Ruiz, J.; Ibañez, M.

    2009-12-01

    Accurate orogenic models are nedded to reconstruct complex tectonic histories of long lived convergent margins. Integrated zircon U-Pb geochronology on igneous, sedimentary and metasedimentry rocks within single crustal domains is a powerful tool, as it can be used to trace the timing of rock forming events, magmatic style and episodity, and identify crustal recycling. U-Pb detrital zircon and magmatic geochronology was carried on multiple litostratigraphic units of the Santander Massif in the northeastern Andes, in order to reconstruct its long term Late Proterozoic to Early Mesozoic tectonic evolution. Major zircon forming events includ well defined Grenvillian, Late Neoproterozoic to Ordovician, Silurian, Early Permian and Jurassic events. Major peaks of activity at ca. 197 Ma, 440-410 Ma and 470-490 Ma and 950-1052 Ma, support the existence of continental scale tectonic cycles. Older Mesoproterozoic (1.3-1.5 Ga) crustal input in metasediments and magmatic rocks link these units to crustal recycling on the margins of the Amazon Craton, whereas the older 950-1052 Ma peak indicates the link of this crustal segment with other Andean Grenvillian remnant. Previous interpretations of the Paleozoic Silgara Formation seem incorrect, as acquired dates from this study includ different metamorphic units, deposited and formed after the Silurian and Permian during final stages of Pangea's assemblage, probably as Laurentia migrated to its final Alleghanian position. Finally the presence of the NW South America Jurassic arc is also present in the region by granitoid ages. The limited input of this arc signature within the contemporaneous and overlapping Early Cretaceous sedimentary rocks suggest that this arc was developed in a back arc setting.

  9. Tectonic evolution of the Brusque Group, Dom Feliciano belt, Santa Catarina, Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basei, M. A. S.; Campos Neto, M. C.; Castro, N. A.; Nutman, A. P.; Wemmer, K.; Yamamoto, M. T.; Hueck, M.; Osako, L.; Siga, O.; Passarelli, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    The Dom Feliciano Belt constitutes the main geotectonic unit of the southeastern portion of Brazil and Uruguay. It was formed by the end of the Neoproterozoic as a result of the interaction among the Rio de La Plata, Paranapanema, Congo and Kalahari cratons during the formation of Western Gondwana. The Brusque Group represents the supracrustal units of the Dom Feliciano Belt that occur in its northernmost part, which ends in the Brazilian coast and probable continuity in the Kaoko Belt in southwestern Africa. It is possible to constrain the evolution of the Brusque Group paleobasin to the Neoproterozoic, with the rift phase starting in the Tonian (940-840 Ma) and the main sedimentation occurring until 640 Ma, as indicated by the ages of the acid volcanic rocks intercalated with the metasedimentary sequence. The supracrustal rocks can be grouped in three main units lithostratigraphically organized from the oldest to the youngest: Rio Oliveira Formation (rift phase, predominating metavolcanic units), Botuverá Formation (metasedimentary) and Rio da Areia Formation (metavolcano-carbonatic). Between 640 and 600 Ma several metamorphism and deformation phases affected the Brusque Group. Around 600 ± 10 Ma the three granitic suites (São João Batista, Valsungana and Nova Trento) were emplaced within regional metamorphites, producing post-foliation S2 metamorphic aureoles. S2 represents the main foliation observed in the metavolcanosedimentary rocks that constitute the Brusque Group. The tectonic model for the evolution of Brusque Group can be better achieved only when the geochemical, isotopic and geochronologic information available for the Dom Feliciano Belt in Santa Catarina, is considered as a whole. Therefore it is here suggested that the Brusque Group initially evolved in an independent peri-cratonic basin setting separated from the Florianópolis - Pelotas-Aiguá magmatic arc by the Adamastor ocean, having been juxtaposed to it only around 600 Ma, when Brusque

  10. Tectonics and sedimentary evolution of the Sandino forearc basin off Nicaragua, Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Pisani, P.; Silver, E.; McIntosh, K.; Ahmed, I.; Ranero, C. R.; Taylor, B.

    2003-04-01

    The Sandino basin is the Nicaragua sector of the Central American forearc, where the Cocos plate subducts beneath the Middle America trench. Recently, Ranero et al. have interpreted a seismic section across the margin and proposed a history of formation of the forearc which is constrained by industry drilling in the basin. They suggested a late Cretaceous to Paleocene accretion event, followed by later subduction erosion processes. The margin wedge consists of the ophiolitic Nicoya complex. The seismic units, unconformities and tectonic features record a rich history of both local and regional vertical movements occurring since the Middle Eocene, which are linked to the evolution of the Pacific convergent margin. During June, 2000, 2800 kms of multichannel seismic reflection data were collected on the R/V Ewing off Nicaragua. Analysis of the 240 channels dataset indicates rapid changes along strike in the Sandino basin. The basin is relatively thin in the southern part, thinning quite rapidly southward against the Nicoya complex of the Santa Elena peninsula of Costa Rica. The forearc sediments thickness approaches and locally exceeds 10 kms in the central and northern parts of the Sandino basin. The oldest units (Upper Cretaceous-Middle Eocene) are very thick off northern Nicaragua, with relatively thin middle to late Cenozoic deposits. However, off central Nicaragua the latter units (Middle-Upper Miocene) attain great thicknesses and the older units appear to thin. This pattern suggests a history of successive deepening of the basin from north to south, after the convergent system evolved from accretion to subduction erosion processes. Present efforts are devoted to quantifying this change in development and using it to understand the dynamics of forearc basin evolution offshore of Central America.

  11. The tectonic evolution of western Central Iran seen through detrital white mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargaranbafghi, Fariba; Neubauer, Franz; Genser, Johann

    2015-05-01

    A first order survey of 40Ar/39Ar dating of detrital white mica from Jurassic to Pliocene sandstones has been carried out in order to reveal the tectonic evolution of blocks in Central Iran. The Central Iran block was believed to represent a stable Precambrian block. Our results indicate that: (1) Only a very small proportion of Precambrian but abundant Paleozoic and Mesozoic detrital white mica indicate the Phanerozoic, mostly Mesozoic age of metamorphic crust exposed in Central Iran. The oldest but scarce detrital white mica grains have ages ranging from 524 to 826 Ma heralding a Late Precambrian and Cambrian crystalline basement or cannibalism from older clastic successions. (2) Jurassic and Cretaceous sandstones from the west and east of the Chapedony fault yield different age spectra, with a dominance of Variscan ages (ca. 308-385 Ma) in the Biabanak unit west of the Chapedony fault compared to coeval sandstones from the block east of the Chapedony fault, where Variscan ages are subordinate and Cimmerian ages predominate. The micas from the Biabanak unit are most likely derived from the Variscan accretionary complex exposed in the Anarak-Jandaq areas further northwest. This result underlines the importance of a major block boundary identified as the Chapedony fault, which is in extension of a fault previously proposed. (3) Two stages of Cimmerian events are visible in our data set from Cretaceous and Paleogene sandstones, a cluster around 170 Ma and at ca. 205 Ma. These clusters suggest a two-stage Cimmerian evolution of the largely amphibolite-grade metamorphic Posht-e-Badam and Boneh Shurow complexes. (4) The youngest micas in Paleogene conglomerates have an age of ca. 100 Ma and are most likely derived from the base of the Posht-e-Badam complex. No record of the uplifted Eocene Chapedony metamorphic core complex has been found in Eocene and Pliocene clastic rocks.

  12. The deformation and tectonic evolution of the Huahui Basin, northeast China, during the Cretaceous-Early Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shiqi; Dong, Shuwen; Zhang, Yueqiao; Zhang, Fuqin; Huang, Dezhi; Wei, Shi; Li, Zhenhong; Miao, Laicheng; Zhu, Mingshuai

    2015-12-01

    The Cretaceous Huahui basin lies along the Dunhua-Mishan fault (Dun-Mi fault), which is one of the northern branches of Tan-Lu fault in northeastern China. The study of the formation and the tectonic movements that took place in the basin can provide very important information for deciphering the tectonic evolution of northeastern China during Cretaceous-Early Cenozoic. The field analysis of fault-slip data collected from different units in the basin, demonstrates changes in the paleo-stress state that reveals a three-stage tectonic movement during the Cretaceous-Early Cenozoic. The earliest tectonic movement was NW-SE extension, which was responsible for the formation of the basin and sedimentary infilling during the Early Cretaceous. Dating of the andesite in the fill indicates it began during about 119.17 ± 0.80 Ma. The extensional structures formed in the Latest Early Cretaceous imply that this tectonic movement lasted until the beginning of the Late Cretaceous. The second stage began during the Late Cretaceous when the tectonic stress state changed and was dominated by NW-SE compression and NE-SW extension, which caused the inversion of the extensional basin. This compression folded the Early Cretaceous deposits and reactivated pre-existing faults and uplifted pre-existing granite in the basin. The strata and the unconformity in the basin shows that this compressive phase probably took place during the Late Cretaceous and ended in the Early Paleogene by a compressional regime with NE-SW compression and NW-SE extension that constitutes the third stage. The tectonic stress fields documented in the Huahui basin provide insight into the influences of plate tectonics on the crustal evolution of northeastern China during the Cretaceous to Early Cenozoic. These results show that the development of Huahui basin was controlled by the northwestward subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate during the Cretaceous, and later by the far-field effects of India-Asia collision in

  13. Composition and tectonic evolution of the Chinese continental crust constrained by Poisson's ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shaocheng; Wang, Qian; Salisbury, Matthew H.

    2009-01-01

    We have measured both P- and S-wave velocities ( Vp and Vs) and Poisson's ratios ( υ) of 60 typical ultrahigh pressure (UHP) metamorphic rock samples from the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling (CCSD) main and pre-pilot holes and surface outcrops in the Sulu-Dabie orogenic belt at hydrostatic confining pressures up to 850 MPa. The experimental results, together with those compiled in Handbook of Seismic Properties of Minerals, Rocks and Ores [ Ji, S.C., Wang, Q., Xia, B., 2002. Handbook of Seismic Properties of Minerals, Rocks and Ores. Polytechnic International Press, Montreal, 630 pp.], reveal that except for monomineralic rocks such as quartzite, serpentinite, anorthosite, limestone, and marble the rest of the rock types have Poisson's ratios falling along an upward convex curve determined from the correlations between elastic moduli and density. Poisson's ratios increase with density as the lithology changes from granite, felsic gneiss and schist, through diorite-syenite, intermediate gneiss and metasediment, to gabbro-diabase, amphibolite, and mafic gneiss, and then decrease as the rocks become ultramafic in composition. Eclogite has a higher density but a lower Poisson's ratio than peridotite. The results were applied to constrain the crustal composition and tectonic evolution of the Chinese continental crust based on crustal thickness ( H) and Poisson's ratio ( υ) from 248 broadband seismic stations, measured using teleseismic receiver function techniques. The North China, Yangtze, South China and Northeast China blocks and Songpan-Ganzi Terrane are dominated by low ( υ < 0.26) and moderate (0.26 ≤ υ < 0.28) υ values (> 70%), suggesting the dominance of felsic composition in the crust. The Lhasa terrane, Qiangtang terrane, and Indochina block are characterized by high proportions (33-42%) of measurements with very high υ values (≥ 0.30 and H is found for the South China block, Northeast block, Lhasa block, Qiangtang terrane and Indochina block

  14. Teaching about the Early Earth: Evolution of Tectonics, Life, and the Early Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogk, D. W.; Manduca, C. A.; Kirk, K.; Williams, M. L.

    2007-12-01

    The early history of the Earth is the subject of some of the most exciting and innovative research in the geosciences, drawing evidence from virtually all fields of geoscience and using a variety of approaches that include field, analytical, experimental, and modeling studies. At the same time, the early Earth presents unique opportunities and challenges in geoscience education: how can we best teach "uncertain science" where the evidence is either incomplete or ambiguous? Teaching about early Earth provides a great opportunity to help students understand the nature of scientific evidence, testing, and understanding. To explore the intersection of research and teaching about this enigmatic period of Earth history, a national workshop was convened for experts in early Earth research and undergraduate geoscience education. The workshop was held in April, 2007 at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst as part of the On the Cutting Edge faculty professional development program. The workshop was organized around three scientific themes: evolution of global tectonics, life, and the early atmosphere. The "big scientific questions" at the forefront of current research about the early Earth were explored by keynote speakers and follow-up discussion groups: How did plate tectonics as we know it today evolve? Were there plates in the Hadean Eon? Was the early Earth molten? How rapidly did it cool? When and how did the atmosphere and hydrosphere evolve? How did life originate and evolve? How did all these components interact at the beginning of Earth's history and evolve toward the Earth system we know today? Similar "big questions" in geoscience education were addressed: how to best teach about "deep time;" how to help students make appropriate inferences when geologic evidence is incomplete; how to engage systems thinking and integrate multiple lines of evidence, across many scales of observation (temporal and spatial), and among many disciplines. Workshop participants

  15. Tectonic Evolution of Chingshui Geothermal Field Inferred from Evidence of Quartz and Calcite Veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. C.; Song, S. R.; Wang, P. L.; Liu, C. M.; Yeh, E. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Chingshui geothermal field is located in the valley of Chingshui stream, where is about 27 km SW of Ilan, northeastern Taiwan. It is a tectonically complex area occurred by the Philippine Plate subducting beneath the Eurasian plate in the south with Okinawa Trough opening in the Ilan Plain. Owing to complicated geological structure, the heat source of Chingshui geothermal field is still controversial. For understanding hot fluid sources and tectonic evolution, this study focuses on field survey of veins and scaling in the Chingshui geothermal field, and the results inferred from the data of SEM, XRD, carbon and oxygen isotope, and Uranium-thorium dating. The Chingshui hot fluid contains both high concentrations of SiO­2 and HCO3-, therefore, temperature and pressure both drop when the hot fluids inject into shallower fractures, and calcite and quartz both could be precipitated with competition or simultaneously. In Chilukeng River, many euhedral quartz crystals occurred in large damage zone of Xioananao fault that indicated the temperature drop played the dominated role when the hot fluids injected into the shallow. It inferred that the quartz crystal precipitated under compression stress, evidenced by the Xioananao thrust fault with no surface rupture. Whiles, there are gouges in normal fault with abundant calcite or calcite with quartz veins cropped out in the confluence of Chingshui River and Chilukeng River. The results indicate that those veins occurred in more recent period by U-Th dating data, because of degassing CO2 occurred in open fractures by normal faulting or the stress changing from compression to extension. The standard oxygen isotopes range from 1.29 to 20.73 permil of SMOW and the clumped isotope of Δ47 outcrop is 0.385 in calcite veins, suggest that the highest temperature of thermal fulids with calcite precipitations is 222℃±9℃ by calibrated equation of Passey and Henkes 2012. Meanwhile, it also indicates that the oxygen isotope of

  16. Cenozoic Tectonics and Magmatic Evolution of Central Anatolia (Turkey): From Collision to Slab Breakoff to Delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadioglu, Yusuf K.; Dilek, Yildirim

    2010-05-01

    The latest Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of Central Anatolia was controlled largely by the behavior of the subducting lithosphere of the Inner-Tauride Ocean and the mantle response to it. Following the demise of the Inner-Tauride oceanic lithosphere at a NE-dipping subduction zone and the emplacement of the late Cretaceous, incipient arc-forearc ophiolites onto the northern edge of the Tauride ribbon continent, subduction was arrested by the underplating of the buoyant Tauride continental crust. The leading edge of the subducted Tethyan slab broke off from the rest of the Tauride continental lithosphere, resulting in the development of an asthenospheric window. The juxtaposition of this asthenospheric heat source against the overlying continental lithosphere caused melting of the metasomatized mantle layers, producing the high-K shoshonitic magmas of the latest Cretaceous monzonitic plutons and then the more-enriched alkaline magmas of the syenitic plutons in the Central Anatolian Crystalline Complex (CACC). Continued convergence between the Tauride and CACC blocks resulted in a continental collision in the Paleocene that led to deformation, crustal thickening, and metamorphism in the hinterland, and to southward transport of the already-emplaced Tauride ophiolites and mélanges and flysch formation together with fold and thrust belt development in the foreland. Significant crustal thickening and development of a dense mafic lower crust beneath the young orogenic belt resulted in foundering of the orogenic root and eventually in partial delamination of the thickened lithosphere. Asthenospheric upwelling around and above the delaminated root provided excess heat and enhanced geothermal gradient that triggered partial melting of the hydrated lithospheric mantle and mafic lower crustal rocks. This melting event produced the high-Al adakitic magmas of the Horoz granitoid (55 Ma) and other similar plutons along the northern edge of the Tauride micro

  17. Distribution and erosion of the Paleozoic tectonic unconformities in the Tarim Basin, Northwest China: Significance for the evolution of paleo-uplifts and tectonic geography during deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Changsong; Yang, Haijun; Liu, Jingyan; Rui, Zhifeng; Cai, Zhenzhong; Zhu, Yongfeng

    2012-03-01

    The distribution and erosional features of the Paleozoic major tectonic unconformities in the Tarim Basin, and their genetic relation to the development of paleo-uplifts as well as the evolution of geodynamic settings, are documented in this paper based on the integral analysis of seismic, drilling, and outcrop data. During the Paleozoic, the Tarim Basin underwent three major tectonic deformation stages, which resulted in three angular unconformities and in significant changes in basin geomorphology and paleogeography. The tectonic deformation at the end of the Middle Ordovician was characterized by development of the southern central paleo-uplift, the northern depression, and the southeastern Tangguzibasi depression in the basin. The thickest denudation belts of the unconformity (Tg5-2) are distributed mainly along the thrust structural highs. A stronger deformation event took place at the end of the Late Ordovician and formed a huge uplift along the southwestern and southeastern basin margins and the western part of the Tabei uplift along the northern basin margin, producing an extensive angular unconformity (Tg5) with maximum erosion thickness of 1500-2000 m. This tectonic event resulted in an abrupt change in overall geography of the basin, from a deepwater marine environment at the late stages of the Late Ordovician to a littoral and neritic basin in the Early Silurian. The deformation that occurred at the end of the Middle Devonian was the strongest in the Paleozoic. It generated the most widespread angular unconformity (Tg3) within the basin and led to extensive erosion, with maximum denudation thickness of 3000-5000 m in the northern and northeastern parts of the basin. The topography of the basin during the late Devonian was characterized by a high in the northeast and a low in the southwest, forming an embayment basin opening to the southwest during the Early Devonian to Carboniferous. The transgression in general from southwest to northeast deposited

  18. Determination of the tectonic evolution from fractures, faults, and calcite twins on the southwestern margin of the Indochina Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arboit, Francesco; Amrouch, Khalid; Collins, Alan S.; King, Rosalind; Morley, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    In polyphase tectonic zones, integrating a study of fault and fracture with calcite twin analysis can determine the evolving paleostress magnitudes and principle stress directions that affected the area. This paper presents the results of the analyses of fractures, striated faults, and calcite twins collected within the Khao Khwang Fold-Thrust Belt in central Thailand (SE Asia). Here we attempt to reconstruct the orientation of the principal stresses that developed during the tectonic evolution of this highly deformed, polyphase orogen. Tectonic data were collected in the Permian carbonates of the Khao Khad Formation of the Saraburi Group, and five successive tectonic stages are determined that are interpreted to have developed before, during, and after, the Triassic Indosinian Orogeny. The first three stages predate the main deformation event: the first stage is interpreted as a pre-Indosinian N-S extensional stage, the second stage described a N-S strike-slip and compressional regime, largely perpendicular to the fold axes of the main structures, while the third stage is associated with an E-W compressional strike-slip phase. A further two stages took place after, or during, the main folding event and correspond to N-S compression and to an E-W composite strike-slip/contractional stage, the latter which is interpreted to represent Cenozoic deformation related to the India-Asia collision.

  19. Structural style and tectonic evolution of the easternmost Gulf of Aden conjugate margins (Socotra - Southern Oman)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonn, Chloe; Leroy, Sylvie; Castilla, Raymi; de Clarens, Philippe; Lescanne, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Observations from distal rifted margins in present day magma-poor rifted margins led to the discovery of hyperextended crust and exhumed sub-continental mantle. This finding allowed to better figure out how thinning process are accommodate by tectonic structures, forming various crustal domains, as the deformation localized towards the future area of breakup. However, some of the current challenges are about clarifying how factors as oblique kinematic, pre-existing structures and volcanism can control the 3D geometry and crustal architecture of the passive margins? A key to better understand the rifting evolution in its entirety is to study conjugate margins. The gulf of Aden is a young oceanic basin (with a global trend about N75°E) oblique to the divergence (about 30°N), separating Arabia from Somalia of less than 800 km. Thanks to its immerged margins and its thin post-rift sediment cover, the gulf of Aden basin is a natural laboratory to investigate conjugate margins and strain localisation throughout the rift history. In this contribution, we focus our interest on offshore Socotra Island (Yemen) and its conjugate in Southeastern Oman. This area extends from Socotra-Hadbeen (SHFZ) and the eastern Gulf of Aden fault zones (EGAFZ). In the easternmost part of the gulf of Aden, we provide new insights into crustal deformation and emplacement of the new oceanic crust thanks to bathymetric, magnetic, gravimetric data and single-, multi-channel, high speed seismic reflection data collected during Encens-Sheba (2000), Encens (2006) and the more recent Marges-Aden (2012) cruises respectively. The results obtained after compilation of these data, previous geological (field works) and geophysical (receiver functions, Pn-tomography, magnetic anomalies, heat flow) studies on the focused area, allowed us to provide new structural mapping and stratigraphic correlation between onshore and offshore parts of Socotra and Oman margins. We precisely defined and map crustal

  20. Geomorphic evolution of Dehra Dun, NW Himalaya: Tectonics and climatic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Swati; Sinha, Rajiv

    2016-08-01

    The Dehra Dun is a good example of a piggyback basin formed from the growth of the Siwalik hills. Two large rivers, the Ganga and the Yamuna, and their tributaries deposit a significant part of their sediment load in the Dun before they enter the Gangetic plains. This work documents the geomorphic complexities and landform evolution of the Dehra Dun through geomorphic mapping and chronostratigraphic investigation of the incised fan sections. Lesser Himalayan hills, inner and outer dissected hills, isolated hills, proximal fan, distal fan, dip slope unit, floodplains, and terraces are the major geomorphic units identified in the area. Isolated hills of fan material (IHF), proximal fan (PF), and distal fan (DF) are identified as fan surfaces from north to south of the valley. The OSL based chronology of the fan sediments suggests that the IHF is the oldest fan consisting of debris flow deposits with a maximum age of ~ 43 ka coinciding with the precipitation minima. The proximal fan consisting of sheet flow deposits represents the second phase of aggradation between 34 and 21 ka caused by shifting of deposition locus downstream triggered by high sediment supply that exceeded the transport capacity. The distal fan was formed by braided river deposits during 20-11 ka coinciding with the deglacial period. The IHF, PF and DF surfaces were abandoned by distinct incision phases during ~ 40-35, ~ 20-17, and ~ 11-4 ka respectively. A minor phase of terrace deposition in Dehra Dun was documented during 3-2 ka. Our results thus show that the evolutionary history of the alluvial fans in Dehra Dun was primarily controlled by climatic forcing with tectonics playing a minimum role in terms of providing accommodation space and sediment production.

  1. Exploring the Influence of Ice Temperature in Alpine Glaciers on the Evolution of Longitudinal Valley Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhnforth, M.; Anderson, R. S.; Colgan, W.

    2012-12-01

    The erosional signature of a glacier is often characterized by a longitudinal valley profile that exhibits a stepped morphology, decreased valley floor slope, and overdeepened basin. Numerical modeling experiments have demonstrated that the evolution of such profiles is highly dependent on ice discharge, and hence subglacial water pressure-dependent sliding speed, as well as the material properties of the underlying bedrock. While there are abundant examples of landscapes that demonstrate the valley profile characteristic of efficient glacial erosion, some highly glaciated mountain ranges such as the Himalayas maintain exceptionally tall peaks. These exceptionally tall peaks may be interpreted as evidence for the absence of efficient glacial erosion. One possible explanation for the absence of efficient glacial erosion is the presence of cold-based glacial conditions. Alternatively, the presence of erosionally resistant bedrock with wide fracture spacing may limit erosion. In temperate glaciers, in which basal ice temperatures are warm, or at the pressure melting point (PMP), sliding and erosion occur whenever and wherever high subglacial water pressures exist. In polythermal glaciers, by contrast, erosion efficiency is strongly modulated by basal ice temperature. Sliding, and hence erosion, is prevented when and where basal ice temperatures are cold, or below the PMP. To date, the influence of spatial and temporal variations in basal ice temperature on the efficiency of glacial erosion over long timescales (>1 Ma) remains largely unexplored. We present numerical model results in which we explore the influence of glacier ice temperature on the longitudinal valley profile that emerges during long-term glacial erosion. We focus on identifying conditions that maintain polythermal glaciers in which the basal ice at high elevations is cold, while the basal ice at lower elevations is at the PMP. These unique conditions limit sliding and erosion to low elevations. In

  2. Simulating the Thermochemical Magmatic and Tectonic Evolution of Venus's Mantle and Lithosphere: Intrusive vs. Extrusive Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, Paul; Armann, Marina

    2013-04-01

    the purely extrusive magmatism assumed in [1]. Intrusive magmatism warms and weakens the crust, resulting in substantial surface deformation and a thinner crust. This is further enhanced by using a basaltic rheology for the crust instead of assuming the same rheological parameters as for the mantle. Here we quantitatively analyse the resulting surface deformation and other signatures, and compare to observations in order to constrain the likely ratio of intrusive to extrusive magmatism. [1] Armann, M., and P. J. Tackley (2012), Simulating the thermochemical magmatic and tectonic evolution of Venus's mantle and lithosphere: Two-dimensional models, J. Geophys. Res., 117, E12003, doi:10.1029/2012JE004231.

  3. The Alegre Lineament and its role over the tectonic evolution of the Campos Basin and adjacent continental margin, Southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calegari, Salomão Silva; Neves, Mirna Aparecida; Guadagnin, Felipe; França, George Sand; Vincentelli, Maria Gabriela Castillo

    2016-08-01

    The structural framework and tectonic evolution of the sedimentary basins along the eastern margin of the South American continent are closely associated with the tectonic framework and crustal heterogeneities inherited from the Precambrian basement. However, the role of NW-SE and NNW-SSE structures observed at the outcropping basement in Southeastern Brazil and its impact over the development of those basins have not been closely investigated. In the continental region adjacent to the Campos Basin, we described a geological feature with NNW-SSE orientation, named in this paper as the Alegre Fracture Zone (AFZ), which is observed in the onshore basement and can be projected to the offshore basin. The main goal of this work was to study this structural lineament and its influence on the tectonic evolution of the central portion of the Campos Basin and adjacent mainland. The onshore area was investigated through remote sensing data joint with field observations, and the offshore area was studied through the interpretation of 2-D seismic data calibrated by geophysical well logs. We concluded that the AFZ occurs in both onshore and offshore as a brittle deformation zone formed by multiple sets of fractures that originated in the Cambrian and were reactivated mainly as normal faults during the rift phase and in the Cenozoic. In the Campos Basin, the AFZ delimitates the western side of the Corvina-Parati Low, composing a complex fault system with the NE-SW faults and the NW-SE transfer faults.

  4. Late Pliocene-Quaternary evolution of outermost hinterland basins of the Northern Apennines (Italy), and their relevance to active tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, Federico; Bonini, Marco; Piccardi, Luigi; Vannucci, Gianfranco; Delle Donne, Dario; Benvenuti, Marco; Moratti, Giovanna; Corti, Giacomo; Montanari, Domenico; Sedda, Lorenzo; Tanini, Chiara

    2009-10-01

    We examine the tectonic evolution and structural characteristics of the Quaternary intermontane Mugello, Casentino, and Sansepolcro basins, in the Northern Apennines fold-and-thrust belt. These basins have been classically interpreted to have developed under an extensional regime, and to mark the extension-compression transition. The results of our study have instead allowed framing the formation of these basins into a compressive setting tied to the activity of backthrust faults at their northeastern margin. Syndepositional activity of these structures is manifested by consistent architecture of sediments and outcrop-scale deformation. After this phase, the Mugello and Sansepolcro basins experienced a phase of normal faulting extending from the middle Pleistocene until Present. Basin evolution can be thus basically framed into a two-phase history, with extensional tectonics superposed onto compressional structures. Analysis of morphologic features has revealed the occurrence of fresh fault scarps and interaction of faulting with drainage systems, which have been interpreted as evidence for potential ongoing activity of normal faults. Extensional tectonics is also manifested by recent seismicity, and likely caused the strong historical earthquakes affecting the Mugello and Sansepolcro basins. Qualitative comparison of surface information with depth-converted seismic data suggests the basins to represent discrete subsiding areas within the seismic belt extending along the axial zone of the Apennines. The inferred chronology of deformation and the timing of activity of normal faults have an obvious impact on the elaboration of seismic hazard models.

  5. Structural setting and tectonic evolution of the Apennine Units of northern Calabria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannace, Alessandro; Bonardi, Glauco; D'Errico, Marco; Mazzoli, Stefano; Perrone, Vincenzo; Vitale, Stefano

    2005-12-01

    A new structural-stratigraphic synthesis of the Apennine units of northern Calabria is presented. The Meso-Cenozoic successions are grouped into two tectonic units, named Pollino-Ciagola Unit (PCU) and Lungro-Verbicaro Unit (LVU), comprising terrains formerly attributed to five different tectonic units. Fe sbnd Mg carpholite and blue amphibole record HP-LT metamorphism in the LVU, followed by progressive decompression leading to final greenschist facies re-equilibration during dominantly extensional deformation. Final tectonic emplacement of the LVU over the PCU post-dated the metamorphism of the LVU and was accompanied by intense ductile deformation along zones of strain localisation in footwall rocks. All of the units were later affected by folding and minor thrusting during subsequent Apennine tectonics. To cite this article: A. Iannace et al., C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  6. Apollo 17: One giant step toward understanding the tectonic evolution of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpton, Virgil L.

    1992-01-01

    Our present understanding of the tectonic history of the Moon has been shaped in large measure by the Apollo Program, and particularly the Apollo 17 Mission. I attempt to summarize some of the interpretations that have emerged since Apollo 17, focusing on some of the problems and uncertainties that remain to stimulate future exploration of the Moon. The topics covered include: (1) Taurus-Littrow Valley; (2) origin of mare ridges; and (3) nature and timing of tectonic rille formation.

  7. The role of the Anaxagoras Mountain in the Miocene to Recent tectonic evolution of the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbourne, Mark; Hall, Jeremy; Aksu, Ali; Çifçi, Günay

    2014-05-01

    The Anaximander Mountains are one of the many enigmatic structures situated along the morphologically and structurally complicated junction between the Hellenic and Cyprus Arcs, in the eastern Mediterranean. Interpretation of ~750 km of marine multi-channel seismic reflection data show that the present day Anaximander Mountains underwent several distinct phases of tectonic activity since Miocene. During the mid-late Miocene, a protracted, contractional tectonic regime produced the east-west trending, south-verging fold-thrust belt observed in the area. The Messinian was a period of relatively low tectonic activity, and is marked by the deposition of an evaporite layer. This phase lasted until the latest Miocene - earliest Pliocene, when a major erosional event associated with the Messinian salinity crisis occurred. Beginning in the early-mid Pliocene-Quaternary a transpressional and rotational tectonic regime prevailed over the area. The Anaximander Mountain (sensu stricto) and Anaximenes Mountain developed in the Pliocene-Quaternary associated with the reactivation, uplift and rotation of a linked, thick skinned pre-Messinian imbricate thrust fan. Back thrusting in the region accentuated the morphology of these mountains. The Anaxagoras Mountain differs both lithologically and morphologically from the Anaximander Mountain (sensu stricto) and the Anaximenes Mountain. It is probably developed associated with the emplacement of the ophiolitic Antalya Nappe Complex. Faulting in the Anaxagoras region is characterized by southwest striking thrust and/or oblique thrust faults. Due to the similarities in morphology between the Isparta Angle of southwestern Turkey and the Anaximander Mountains (sensu lato), it is hypothesized that the tectonic evolution of the two regions are similar in nature. The Anaximander Mountains (sensu lato) can thus be considered the offshore replication of the Isparta Angle, produced by similar mechanisms, but being of a younger age.

  8. Influence of substrate tectonic heritage on the evolution of composite volcanoes: Predicting sites of flank eruption, lateral collapse, and erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibaldi, Alessandro; Corazzato, Claudia; Kozhurin, Andrey; Lagmay, Alfredo F. M.; Pasquarè, Federico A.; Ponomareva, Vera V.; Rust, Derek; Tormey, Daniel; Vezzoli, Luigina

    2008-04-01

    This paper aims to aid understanding of the complicated interplay between construction and destruction of volcanoes, with an emphasis on the role of substrate tectonic heritage in controlling magma conduit geometry, lateral collapse, landslides, and preferential erosion pathways. The influence of basement structure on the development of six composite volcanoes located in different geodynamic/geological environments is described: Stromboli (Italy), in an island arc extensional tectonic setting, Ollagüe (Bolivia-Chile) in a cordilleran extensional setting, Kizimen (Russia) in a transtensional setting, Pinatubo (Philippines) in a transcurrent setting, Planchon (Chile) in a compressional cordilleran setting, and Mt. Etna (Italy) in a complex tectonic boundary setting. Analogue and numerical modelling results are used to enhance understanding of processes exemplified by these volcanic centres. We provide a comprehensive overview of this topic by considering a great deal of relevant, recently published studies and combine these with the presentation of new results, in order to contribute to the discussion on substrate tectonics and its control on volcano evolution. The results show that magma conduits in volcanic rift zones can be geometrically controlled by the regional tectonic stress field. Rift zones produce a lateral magma push that controls the direction of lateral collapse and can also trigger collapse. Once lateral collapse occurs, the resulting debuttressing produces a reorganization of the shallow-level magma migration pathways towards the collapse depression. Subsequent landslides and erosion tend to localize along rift zones. If a zone of weakness underlies a volcano, long-term creep can occur, deforming a large sector of the cone. This deformation can trigger landslides that propagate along the destabilized flank axis. In the absence of a rift zone, normal and transcurrent faults propagating from the substrate through the volcano can induce flank

  9. Tectonic evolution of the outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc system: initial results from IODP Expedition 352

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, W.; Ferre, E. C.; Robertson, A. H. F.; Avery, A. J.; Kutterolf, S.

    2015-12-01

    During International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 352, a section through the volcanic stratigraphy of the outer fore arc of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) system was drilled to trace magmatism, tectonics, and crustal accretion associated with subduction initiation. Structures within drill cores, borehole and site survey seismic data indicate that tectonic deformation in the outer IBM fore arc is mainly post-magmatic. Extension generated asymmetric sediment basins such as half-grabens at sites 352-U1439 and 352-U1442 on the upper trench slope. Along their eastern margins the basins are bounded by west-dipping normal faults. Deformation was localized along multiple sets of faults, accompanied by syn-tectonic pelagic and volcaniclastic sedimentation. The lowermost sedimentary units were tilted eastward by ~20°. Tilted beds were covered by sub-horizontal beds. Biostratigraphic constraints reveal a minimum age of the oldest sediments at ~ 35 Ma; timing of the sedimentary unconformities is between ~ 27 and 32 Ma. At sites 352-U1440 and 352-U1441 on the outer fore arc strike-slip faults are bounding sediment basins. Sediments were not significantly affected by tectonic tilting. Biostratigraphy gives a minimum age of the basement-cover contact between ~29.5 and 32 Ma. The post-magmatic structures reveal a multiphase tectonic evolution of the outer IBM fore arc. At sites 352-U1439 and 352-U1442, shear with dominant reverse to oblique reverse displacement was localized along subhorizontal fault zones, steep slickensides and shear fractures. These were either re-activated as or cut by normal-faults and strike-slip faults. Extension was also accommodated by steep to subvertical mineralized veins and extensional fractures. Faults at sites 352-U1440 and 352-U1441 show mainly strike-slip kinematics. Sediments overlying the igneous basement(maximum Late Eocene to Recent age), document ash and aeolian input, together with mass wasting of the fault-bounded sediment ponds.

  10. The influence of surface and tectonic processes on landscape evolution of the Iberian Chain (Spain): Quantitative geomorphological analysis and geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotti, V. N.; Molin, P.; Faccenna, C.; Soligo, M.; Casas-Sainz, A.

    2014-02-01

    In tectonically active areas, the landscape response to tectonic forcing is described and possibly quantified by regional topographic and hydrographic features as well as by spatial variation in rates of surface processes. We investigated the recent landscape evolution of the Iberian Chain (NE Spain), an intraplate thrust-belt formed in Cenozoic times and characterized by a dome-shaped topography. In its central sector the landscape is dominated by low relief surfaces, Late Neogene (?) in age, presently standing at an average altitude of 1300 m. A recent regional uplift controlled the organization of the present fluvial network and dissection of the landscape. In this framework we investigated the geomorphic responses to tectonic forcing by the calculation of morphometric parameters, focusing on topography (map of local relief, swath profiles) and hydrography (basin hypsometric curve and integral, basin asymmetry factor, river longitudinal profiles and relative indices), and using SRTM DEM. The results of morphometric analysis have been coupled with radiometric uranium-series dating of calcareous tufas lying on fluvial strath terraces. The obtained ages allow the estimation of incision rate along the High Tajo and Martín rivers. Our results indicate that uplift and rock-type erodibility are the main factors influencing landscape evolution of the study area. The incision rates are very similar throughout the central sector of the range, indicating that, despite subtle local variation, the rivers are responding to a main tectonic input: the regional uplift. In conclusion, the Iberian Chain landscape is in a transient state in response to a recent dome-like uplift. Indeed, the fluvial processes that weakly incised this landscape at a rate of ~ 0.6 mm/yr are approaching a radial pattern. On the basis of geological and geomorphic constraints, we hypothesize that the uplift started around or after 3 Ma.

  11. A decade of aerogeophysical exploration provides new perspectives on crustal architecture and tectonic evolution in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraccioli, Fausto

    2013-04-01

    Antarctica stands out as the least understood continent on Earth, despite being a keystone within the Gondwana and Rodinia supercontinents. Here I review several major results from a decade of intense aerogeophysical exploration that significantly advance our knowledge of Antarctica by unveiling crustal architecture and tectonic evolution, in particular in the interior of the continent. In western Dronning Maud, high-resolution aerogeophysical data have enabled analyses of the subglacial Jutulstraumen rift that heralded Gondwana break up, and also identified remnants of a Grenvillian-age (ca 1.1. Ga) igneous province and magmatic arc along its flanks. Further in the interior of East Antarctica, a mosaic of largely unknown Precambrian provinces has recently been recognised from aeromagnetic and satellite magnetic patterns, coupled with new models of crustal thickness and lithospheric strength (Ferraccioli et al., 2011, Nature). A major suture is marked by a 20 km step in Moho depth and a major change in crustal density and effective elastic thickness and separates the Archean Ruker Province from an inferred Meso-Paleoproterozoic Gamburtsev Province. Geophysical interpretations favour the hypothesis for Grenville-age accretion and collision of these provinces linked to Rodinia assembly and/or older Paleoproteroic events related to Nuna/Columbia assembly. Rather that new lithosphere formation in late Pan-African times, this interpretation favours the hypothesis for reactivation of the proposed suture in a more intraplate setting. Independently of the hotly debated timing of the assembly of interior East Antarctica, 3D models of effective elastic thickness indicate that the inherited mosaic of Precambrian provinces clearly influenced the location of the newly identified East Antarctic Rift System, which extends for 3,500 km from India to the Recovery Highlands. Continental rifting has been modelled as a key tectonic trigger for uplift of the Gamburtsev Subglacial

  12. Metamorphic and tectonic evolution of the Greater Himalayan Crystalline Complex in Nyalam region, south Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia-Min; Zhang, Jin-Jiang; Rubatto, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies evoke dispute whether the Himalayan metamorphic core - Greater Himalayan Crystalline Complex (GHC) - was exhumed as a lateral crustal flow or a critical taper wedge during the India-Asia collision. This contribution investigated the evolution of the GHC in the Nyalam region, south Tibet, with comprehensive studies on structural kinematics, metamorphic petrology and geochronology. The GHC in the Nyalam region can be divided into the lower and upper GHC. Phase equilibria modelling and conventional thermobarometric results show that peak temperature conditions are lower in the lower GHC (~660-700°C) and higher in the upper GHC (~740-780°C), whereas corresponding pressure conditions at peak-T decrease from ~9-13 kbar to ~4 kbar northward. Monazite, zircon and rutile U-Pb dating results reveal two distinct blocks within the GHC of the Nyalam region. The upper GHC underwent higher degree of partial melting (15-25%, via muscovite dehydration melting) that initiated at ~32 Ma, peaked at ~29 Ma to 25 Ma, possibly ended at ~20 Ma. The lower GHC underwent lower degree of melting (0-10%) that lasted from 19 to 16 Ma, which was produced mainly via H2O-saturated melting. At different times, both the upper and lower blocks underwent initial slow cooling (35 ± 8 and 10 ± 5°C/Myr, respectively) and subsequent rapid cooling (120 ± 40°C/Myr). The established timescale of metamorphism suggests that high-temperature metamorphism within the GHC lasted a long duration (~15 Myr), whereas duration of partial melting lasted for ~3 Myr in the lower GHC and lasted for 7-12 Myr in the upper GHC. The documented diachronous metamorphism and discontinuity of peak P-T conditions implies the presence of the Nyalam Thrust in the study area. This thrust is probably connected to the other thrusts in Nepal and Sikkim Himalaya, which extends over ~800 km and is named the "High Himalayan Thrust". Timing of activity along this thrust is at ~25-16 Ma, which is coeval with active

  13. Rift architecture and evolution: The Sirt Basin, Libya: The influence of basement fabrics and oblique tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdunaser, K. M.; McCaffrey, K. J. W.

    2014-12-01

    zones and adjoining highs. Late Eocene rocks exposed in the western part of the basin exhibit a complex network of branching segmented normal and strike-slip faults, generally with a NNW-SSE structural orientations. Many surface structural features have been interpreted from satellite images which confirm sinistral strike-slip kinematics. Relay ramp structures, numerous elongate asymmetric synclines associated with shallow west limbs and steeper dipping east limbs are developed in the hangingwalls adjacent to west downthrowing normal faults. These structural patterns reflect Cretaceous/Tertiary extensional tectonics with additional control by underlying pre-existing Pan-African basement fabrics and ENE-WSW trending Hercynian structures. We relate the Sirt Basin rift development as exemplified in our study area to the break-up of Gondwana represented by the structural evolution of the West-Central African rift system, and the South and Central Atlantic, the Tethys and the Indian Oceans.

  14. Quantifying Tectonic Controls on Regional Cenozoic Surface Evolution in the Eastern Lhasa Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. L.; Zeitler, P. K.; Shuster, D. L.; Tremblay, M. M.; Harrison, M.

    2013-12-01

    and their frequent coincidence with major N-S trending rifts suggests a coupling of plateau-scale tectonics and local-scale erosional patterns. We propose that a change in river base level drove Jiacha knickpoint formation and subsequent upstream migration and that its present-day spatial correlation with the Nari Yun Chu Rift indicates that additional headward cutting is accommodated by motion on the rift, thereby pinning the knickpoint and preventing further incision of the Tsangpo and dissection of the Tibetan plateau. Preliminary geomorphic analysis of the Tsangpo and Nyang rivers and their tributaries including SL-indices and slope-area plots indicates that a set of ~3500 m elevation knickpoints remnant of the migration of the Jiacha knickpoint exists through the drainage network. Additional 4He/3He apatite analyses are in progress to determine the time-temperature evolution of bedrock samples downstream of the knickpoint to constrain the timing of gorge incision along the Yarlung Tsangpo, testing the hypothesis that if the knickpoint evolved by upstream migration samples downstream of the knickpoint, the onset of rapid cooling should be positively correlated with distance from the knickpoint.

  15. Quaternary landscape evolution of tectonically active intermontane basins: the case of the Middle Aterno River Valley (Abruzzo, Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcucci, Emanuela; Gori, Stefano; Della Seta, Marta; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Fredi, Paola

    2014-05-01

    The Middle Aterno River Valley is characterised by different Quaternary tectonic depressions localised along the present course of the Aterno River (Central Apennine) .This valley includes the L'Aquila and Paganica-Castelnuovo-San Demetrio tectonic basins, to the North, the Middle Aterno Valley and the Subequana tectonic basin, to the South. The aim of this contribution is to improve the knowledge about the Quaternary geomorphological and tectonic evolution of this portion of the Apennine chain. A synchronous lacustrine depositional phase is recognized in all these basins and attributed to the Early Pleistocene by Falcucci et al. (2012). At that time, this sector of the chain showed four distinct closed basins, hydrologically separated from each other and from the Sulmona depression. This depression, actually a tectonic basin too, was localized South of the Middle Aterno River Valley and it was drained by an endorheic hydrographic network. The formation of these basins was due to the activity of different fault systems, namely the Upper Aterno River Valley-Paganica system and San Pio delle Camere fault, to the North, and the Middle Aterno River Valley-Subequana Valley fault system to the South. These tectonic structures were responsible for the origin of local depocentres inside the depressions which hosted the lacustrine basins. Ongoing surveys in the uppermost sectors of the Middle Aterno River Valley revealed the presence of sub-horizontal erosional surfaces that are carved onto the carbonate bedrock and suspended several hundreds of metres over the present thalweg. Gently dipping slope breccias referred to the Early Pleistocene rest on these surfaces, thus suggesting the presence of an ancient low-gradient landscape adjusting to the local base level.. Subsequently, this ancient low relief landscape underwent a strong erosional phase during the Middle Pleistocene. This erosional phase is testified by the occurrence of valley entrenchment and of coeval fluvial

  16. Tectonic Evolution of the Banda Arc-Continent Collision in the Timor Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Recent detailed studies of the active Banda arc-continent collision reveal many new features about its tectonic evolution, such as (1) when collision initiated, (2) conditions and age of metamorphism, (3) timing of island emergence and exhumation, (4) how the arc is affected by collision, (5) differences between rock and surface uplift rates, (6) the temporal distribution of strain and (7) natural hazards. (1) The youngest Australian continental margin material incorporated into the Banda orogen is 7-8 Ma in East Timor and 6 Ma in West Timor. (2) Collision-related metamorphic rocks in East Timor yield max. temperatures of 850 °C and pressures of 12 kb. The age of the metamorphism is constrained by zircon U/Pb ages of 6.7 Ma. (3) Island emergence and erosional exhumation is constrained by foraminifera depth vs. age estimates of the transition from deep marine chalk to distal turbidite deposition at 4.2 Ma in East Timor and younger to the east and west. Exhumation of metamorphic rocks is constrained by amphibole with Ar/Ar cooling ages of ~6 Ma (~525°C), zircons with U/He ages of 4.5 Ma (215°C), and apatite with U/He ages of 3.5 Ma (90°C). Younger exhumation ages are found to the south. (4) Contamination of the volcanic arc by subducted continental material is first detected in eroded arc islands near East Timor at 5 Ma. The age of contamination youngs both east and west in less eroded, active arc islands. The main arc edifice north of East Timor is abandoned at 1-3 Ma and is shifted 30 km to the north by the Wetar backarc thrust. A new volcanic center emerges further north. (5) Coral terraces encrust the rising islands and yield highly variable uplift rates, with some as high as 1.5 mm/a. The highest rates correspond with active thrust faults and diapirs. Rock uplift rates associated with exhumation of the schist belt are as high as 8 mm/a. (6) GPS velocities in the most advanced part of the collision (central Timor) show that 70% of the 70 mm/a convergence

  17. The Qartaba Anticline (central Mount Lebanon): Implications for the tectonic evolution of onshore Lebanon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmar, Chloe; Grasemann, Bernhard; Nader, Fadi; Tari, Gabor

    2013-04-01

    . In this study, contours were digitized from available maps as well as stratigraphic and structural cross sections. Dip/strike measurements taken in the field combined with measurements derived from high-resolution satellite images were also utilized in the digitized maps. The new three dimensional structural model of the Qartaba Anticline contains important information about the subsurface geology and features susbtantial implications for the tectonic evolution of the broader area in Lebanon (part of eastern margin of the Levant Basin).

  18. Tectonic Evolution of Tarim Basin in Cambrian-Ordovician and the Implication for Reservoir Development, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yinglu, Pan; Bingsong, Yu

    2015-04-01

    In order to search after the control of regional tectonic evolution of Tarim basin on the inside distribution of sedimentary facies and reservoir development, this paper, based on the research of plate-tectonic evolution of Tarim basin, conducts an in-depth analysis on the basin's inside sedimentary response to the Eopaleozoic regional geodynamic reversion from extension to convergence around Tarim plate, and concludes that the regional geodynamic environment of surrounding areas closely contributes to the formation and evolution of paleo-uplifts, differentiation of sedimentary facies in platform, distribution of high-energy reef and bank facies belts, conversion of sedimentary base level from fall to rise, obvious change of lithology from dolomite to limestone, and formation of several unconformity surfaces in Ordovician System in the basin. A series of sedimentary responses in the basin are controlled by the regional dynamic setting, which not only controls the distribution of reservoirs in reef and bank facies but also restricts the development and distribution of karst reservoirs controlled by the unconformity surfaces. This offers the macro geological evidences for us to further analyze and evaluate the distribution of favorable reservoirs.

  19. Tectonic evolution of Tarim basin in Cambrian-Ordovician and its implication for reservoir development, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingsong, Yu; Zhuang, Ruan; Cong, Zhang; Yinglu, Pan; Changsong, Lin; Lidong, Wang

    2016-03-01

    In order to find the impact of regional tectonic evolution of Tarim basin on the inside distribution of sedimentary facies and reservoir development, this paper, based on the research of plate-tectonic evolution of Tarim basin, conducts an in-depth analysis on the basin's inside sedimentary response to the Eopaleozoic regional geodynamic reversion from extension to convergence around Tarim plate, and concludes that the regional geodynamic environment of surrounding areas closely contributes to the formation and evolution of paleo-uplifts, differentiation of sedimentary facies in platform, distribution of high-energy reef and bank facies belts, conversion of sedimentary base level from fall to rise, obvious change of lithology from dolomite to limestone, and formation of several unconformity surfaces in Ordovician system in the basin. A series of sedimentary responses in the basin are controlled by regional dynamic setting, which not only controls the distribution of reservoirs in reef and bank facies but also restricts the development and distribution of karst reservoirs controlled by the unconformity surfaces. This offers the macro geological evidences for us to further analyze and evaluate the distribution of favorable reservoirs.

  20. Geophysical and seismo-tectonic evolution in Dahshure area, SW Cairo-Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekkawi, Mahmoud; Abdel Aziz, Khiry; Mohamed, Abuela; Elbuieb, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    The study of seismic hazard assessment around greater Cairo-Egypt is very important due to condense population (more than 20 million) in that area. Although, Egypt is characterized by low seismic activity. The seismotectonic zones and high activity are occurred along the Gulf of Aqaba-Dead Sea transform, the Northern Red Sea triple junction point, Aswan, Dahshur, and Cairo-Suez District . In this study, earthquake catalogue (up to 2015) of all seismo-tectonic zones in Egypt and its surroundings are used. Beside the seismicity analysis, gravity and magnetic maps of Dahshur area are analyses for tracing active subsurface faults that are responsible of earthquakes activity. The surface geology and subsurface faults are used to evaluate the tectonic framework in the area under study. Also, The seismicity maps, focal depths and seismic hazards values are calculated. Keyword: Seismo-tectonic, seismic hazards assessment, potential fields, Greater Cairo-Egypt

  1. Tectonic-sedimentary evolution of the eastern Brazilian marginal basins: Implications in their petroleum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Francisco, N.F.; Azambuja, N.C.; Mello, M.R. )

    1993-02-01

    A geological survey of eastern Brazilian marginal basins using sedimentological, tectonic and geochemical data has been carried out. The almost 4000 km long set of basins can be classified as component of a typical divergent, mature Atlantic-continental margin. Based on their tectonic-sedimentary sequence, they can be linked to a single evolutionary history, which can be divided in three main stages: pre-rift, rift, and drift. The integration of all data allowed the characterization of two major petroleum systems that represent about 90% of the known Brazilian hydrocarbons reserves: (1) the rift (Early Cretaceous) and the drift (Late Cretaceous-Paleogene). With respect to the oil-in-place volume and production, the most significant one is the drift system associated with the siliciclastic deep water turbidites reservoirs deposited in bathyal environments. Such reservoirs are clearly controlled by a favorable relationship of stratigraphic and tectonic settings.

  2. Topography, surface properties, and tectonic evolution. [of Venus and comparison with earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgill, G. E.; Warner, J. L.; Malin, M. C.; Arvidson, R. E.; Eliason, E.; Nozette, S.; Reasenberg, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Differences in atmospheric composition, atmospheric and lithospheric temperature, and perhaps mantle composition, suggest that the rock cycle on Venus is not similar to the earth's. While radar data are not consistent with a thick, widespread and porous regolith like that of the moon, wind-transported regolith could be cemented into sedimentary rock that would be indistinguishable from other rocks in radar returns. The elevation spectrum of Venus is strongly unimodal, in contrast to the earth. Most topographic features of Venus remain enigmatic. Two types of tectonic model are proposed: a lithosphere too thick or buoyant to participate in convective flow, and a lithosphere which, in participating in convective flow, implies the existence of plate tectonics. Features consistent with earth-like plate tectonics have not been recognized.

  3. Tectonic Geomorphology in the Laboratory: Evolution of landscape along an active thrust, normal and strike-slip fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graveleau, Fabien; Strak, Vincent; Dominguez, Stéphane; Malavieille, Jacques; Chatton, Marina; Manighetti, Isabelle; Petit, Carole

    2015-04-01

    Tectonically controlled landforms develop morphologic features that provide useful markers to investigate crustal deformation and relief growth dynamics. We present here results of morphotectonic experiments obtained with an innovative approach combining tectonic and surface processes (erosion, transport and sedimentation), coupled with accurate model monitoring techniques. This approach allows for a qualitative and quantitative analysis of landscape evolution in response to active deformation in the three end-member geological settings: compression, extension and strike-slip. Experimental results outline first that experimental morphologies evolve significantly at a short timescale. Numerous morphologic markers form continuously, but their lifetime is generally short because erosion and sedimentation processes tend to destroy or bury them. For the compressional setting, the formation of terraces above an active thrust appears mainly controlled by narrowing and incision of the main channel through the uplifting hanging-wall and by avulsion of deposits on fan-like bodies. Terrace formation is irregular even under steady tectonic rates and erosional conditions. Terrace deformation analysis allows retrieving the growth history of the structure and the fault slip rate evolution. For the extensional setting, the dynamics of hanging-wall sedimentary filling appears to control the position of the base level, which in turn controls footwall erosion. Two phases of relief evolution can be evidenced: the first is a phase of relief growth and the second is a phase of upstream propagation of topographic equilibrium that is reached first in the sedimentary basin. During the phase of relief growth, the formation of triangular facets occurs by degradation of the fault scarp and their geometry (height) becomes stationary during the phase of upstream propagation of the topographic equilibrium. For the strike-slip setting, the complex morphology of the wrench zone, composed of

  4. Tectonic evolution of Bell Regio, Venus: Regional stress, lithospheric flexure, and edifice stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Patricia G.; Zuber, Maria T.

    1998-07-01

    In order to understand the relationship between volcanic and tectonic processes and the stress state in the lithosphere of Venus, we analyzed the stress environments and resulting tectonic features associated with the major volcanic edifices in Bell Regio, using Magellan synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and altimeter measurements of topography. The major volcanoes of Bell Regio, Tepev Mons and Nyx Mons, exhibit tectonic characteristics that are unique relative to other volcanic edifices on Venus. The most prominent distinction is the lack of large rift zones within the overall highland uplift, which characterize many other highland rises on Venus. Also, previous studies have determined that many large Venus volcanoes exhibit radial tectonic structures on their flanks but generally lack the circumferential graben which surround volcanoes on Earth and Mars. Tepev and Nyx Montes exhibit both the radial tectonic features associated with other Venusian edifices and numerous concentric graben. Nyx Mons implies a more distributed magmatic system by its broad shape, radial chains of pit craters, and expansive flow fields, whereas Tepev Mons is a more centralized volcanic system, with limited associated long flows. We investigate the regional stresses associated with Bell Regio and structural features believed to be a consequence of lithospheric flexure due to volcanic loading, modeling both Nyx Mons and Tepev Mons as axisymmetric loads with Gaussian mass distributions on an elastic plate. The relationship between the tectonic features surrounding Tepev Mons and stresses associated with magma chamber inflation are also examined through finite element analysis. Using topography data to model the shape of the volcano, we determine that a horizontally ellipsoidal or tabular reservoir at a range of depths from approximately 20 to 40 km can satisfy the locations of graben formation observed in Magellan images. These results imply a shift in volcanic style within Bell Regio

  5. Thermal and tectonic evolution of the central and southern Appalachians: evidence from distribution, age, and origin of granitic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, A.K.; Guy, R.; Hund, E.; Tamburro, E.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution and resolution of thermal events and associated igneous activity can discriminate between tectonic processes that form orogenic terrains, i.e., accretion of terranes, overthrusting of terranes versus thrust stacking within terranes. Reinterpretation of regional tectonics (Higgins et al., 1984) coupled with the authors interpretation of the age, origin, and distribution of granitic rocks suggest a very different mechanism for the evolution of the central and southern Appalachian orogenic belt. The Cambro-Ordovician magmatic arc (weakly bimodal) separated from the North American Margin by a Back arc basin, was thrust over the North American plate margin during the middle Ordovician. The Avalon terrane (Little River allochthon of Higgins et al., 1984) arrived during the late Silurian - but unlike earlier models that require subduction zone related with its arrival, the authors postulate strike-slip tectonics. The gabbro-diorite-syenite association in the Charlotte belt (Macon melange of Higgins) is probably related to grabens associated with the strike-slip accretion. Rocks of similar age (Siluro-Devonian) in the present day Blue Ridge and Inner Piedmont blocks are related to decompressional melting after the Ordovician thrusting. The high pressure metamorphism and associated melting show a range in ages indicating variations in uplift rates or thickness of the crust caused by the initial overthrusting, and do not require a discrete subduction or orogenic event. The Permo-Carboniferous igneous activity, and associated uplift and thrusting with a strike-slip component are related to oblique subduction and post-subduction collision processes.

  6. Plate Tectonics: Geodynamic models of evolution of oil and gas bearing basins of Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect

    Zholtayev, G. )

    1994-07-01

    Five types of sedimentary basins in Kazakhstan have been recognized by using plate tectonics to reinterpret geological and geophysical data: (1) intracontinental, central pre-Caspian, above rift, south pre-Caspian; (2) passive margin, east pre-Caspian; (3) back-arc, Turgan and Sir-Daria; (4) intra-arc, north Kisil-Koum, interior, Tengis and Chu-Sarisiu; and (5) marginal, north Usturt. Paleozoic history of these basins was connected with the spreading and collision of two lithospheric plates: east European and Kazakhstanian, which were separated by the paleo-Ural Ocean. Different tectonic positions of sedimentary basins were the reason for their different oil and gas potential.

  7. Cenozoic paleoaltimetry of the SE margin of the Tibetan Plateau: Constraints on the tectonic evolution of the region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shanying; Currie, Brian S.; Rowley, David B.; Ingalls, Miquela

    2015-12-01

    An improved understanding of the elevation history of the Tibetan Plateau is crucial in discriminating among the various tectonic models for the evolution of the India-Asia continental collision. We reconstruct the paleoelevation history for three Cenozoic sedimentary basins from SE Tibet and Yunnan, China, to provide more constraints on the tectonic processes for raising the SE margin of the Tibetan Plateau. The results presented here, together with those of previous studies, indicate that (1) the plateau margin of NW Yunnan was near its elevation (˜ 2.6 km) by the latest middle Eocene (˜ 40 Ma); (2) the plateau margin of SE Yunnan reached its current elevation (˜ 1.6 km) by the middle Miocene (˜ 13 Ma). Interpretations of the tectonic processes responsible for this inferred surface uplift of the region are made in the context of well-documented surface geology. We conclude that high landscape (˜ 2.6 km elevation) in NW Yunnan may represent the remnants of the Eocene Tibetan plateau that originally formed in the northeastern Qiangtang Block by crustal thickening associated with the India-Asia continental collision. The near-modern elevation of SE Yunnan since ˜ 13 Ma probably reflects the initiation of lower crustal flow in this area by at least that time. Collectively, our paleoaltimetric interpretations disagree with previously proposed models of middle Miocene to Pliocene crustal flow acting as a sole tectonic process for raising the SE margin of the plateau, but support a protracted history of surface uplift that most likely involved crustal thickening during the Eocene, southeastward extrusion of a portion of Eocene Tibetan plateau during the Oligocene to early Miocene, and lower crustal flow beneath this region since at least the early Miocene.

  8. The inverted Lamar sub-basin, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela: Tectonic evolution and hydrocarbon habitat

    SciTech Connect

    Arminio, J.F.; Growcott, A.M.

    1996-08-01

    In the central part of the Maracaibo basin, integration of recently acquired 3-D seismic and existing geological data has led to the definition of the Lamar sub-basin as an array of partially inverted half grabens which formed during Late Cretaceous and Early to Middle Eocene times as a result of transtensional episodes along older rift structures. This integration exercise has also led to the addition of new reserves in a mature oil province. Six major tectonic phases can be distinguished: (a.) Extension of the existing Paleozoic substrate during Jurassic rifting; (b.) Passive margin tectonic quiescence from Middle to Late Cretaceous; (c.) Paleocene uplift and erosion; (d.) Eocene transtension along reactivated Jurassic lineaments; (e.) Late Eocene to Mid Miocene inversion; (f.) Late Miocene to Recent post inversion and regional tilt. Distinctive tectonically induced unconformities within the Eocene sedimentary fill imply tectonic overprint rather than eustatic controls. The Eocene extensional structures were inverted in a selective manner depending upon their orientation relative to the dominant compressional vector. This in turn resulted in significant hydrocarbon re-migration and a rather complex fluid distribution throughout the area.

  9. Tectonic evolution, structural styles, and oil habitat in Campeche Sound, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Angeles-Aquino, F.J.; Reyes-Nunez, J.; Quezada-Muneton, J.M.; Meneses-Rocha, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    Campeche Sound is located in the southern part of the Gulf of Mexico. This area is Mexico`s most important petroleum province. The Mesozoic section includes Callovian salt deposits; Upper Jurassic sandstones, anhydrites, limestones, and shales; and Cretaceous limestones, dolomites, shales, and carbonate breccias. The Cenozoic section is formed by bentonitic shales and minor sandstones and carbonate breccias. Campeche Sound has been affected by three episodes of deformation: first extensional tectonism, then compressional tectonism, and finally extensional tectonism again. The first period of deformation extended from the middle Jurassic to late Jurassic and is related to the opening of the Gulf of Mexico. During this regime, tilted block faults trending northwest-southwest were dominant. The subsequent compressional regime occurred during the middle Miocene, and it was related to northeast tangential stresses that induced further flow of Callovian salt and gave rise to large faulted, and commonly overturned, anticlines. The last extensional regime lasted throughout the middle and late Miocene, and it is related to salt tectonics and growth faults that have a middle Miocene shaly horizon as the main detachment surface. The main source rocks are Tithonian shales and shaly limestones. Oolite bars, slope and shelf carbonates, and regressive sandstones form the main reservoirs. Evaporites and shales are the regional seals. Recent information indicates that Oxfordian shaly limestones are also important source rocks.

  10. Early Diagenesis of Lower Pliensbachian Sediments from the Algarve Basin (Portugal): Characterisation and Relation with Tectonic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Carlos; Terrinha, Pedro; Rosario Azevedo, M.; Ouajhain, Brahim

    2010-05-01

    The Lower Jurassic (Lower Pliensbachian) sedimentary record of the western end of the Algarve Basin (Portugal) is made of decimetric thick layers of limestone and dolomitized limestone with chert nodules and inter-layered chert beds. Most of the observable lithologies are the product of an early diagenetic evolution and the original lithological content of the formation included limestones, marls and calciclastic limestones. In this area the sedimentation was controlled by the tectonic stretching responsible for the evolution of the Algarve Basin, as well as by short-lived events of tectonic inversion. These episodes of tectonic inversion were responsible for the some uplift with the development of unconformities, sometimes with erosional surfaces separating the different sedimentary packages. The early diagenesis affecting the Lower Pliensbachian sediments is characterized by: (i) a mechanical event controlled by the syn-sedimentary stretching, responsible for the development of calciclastic dikes and nodules alignements; (ii) the substitution of the carbonates from the most permeable calciclastic limestone layers by silica, leading to the development of the observed cherts; (iii) the dolomitization of the preserved limestones; and (iv) the infilling of joints and normal fault planes by silica-rich fluids leading to the development of quartz veins. This set of diagenetic transformations took place before the Upper Pliensbachian which lacks the evidences of their occurrence. The whole-rock geochemical data of the carbonate and siliceous sediments of the Lower Pliensbachian revealed some affinities between both lithological types namely the lack of Ce anomalies and the presence of La anomalies in the REE patterns of all samples. The similarities between the carbonate lithologies which diagenetic evolution is marked by the replacement of calcite by dolomite and the siliceous sediments derived from the replacement of calcite by quartz establish a chemical connection