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Sample records for alter muscle carbohydrate

  1. Chronic oral ingestion of l-carnitine and carbohydrate increases muscle carnitine content and alters muscle fuel metabolism during exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Benjamin T; Stephens, Francis B; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Marimuthu, Kanagaraj; Macdonald, Ian A; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that insulin increases muscle total carnitine (TC) content during acute i.v. l-carnitine infusion. Here we determined the effects of chronic l-carnitine and carbohydrate (CHO; to elevate serum insulin) ingestion on muscle TC content and exercise metabolism and performance in humans. On three visits, each separated by 12 weeks, 14 healthy male volunteers (age 25.9 ± 2.1 years, BMI 23.0 ± 0.8 kg m−2) performed an exercise test comprising 30 min cycling at 50%, 30 min at 80%, then a 30 min work output performance trial. Muscle biopsies were obtained at rest and after exercise at 50% and 80% on each occasion. Following visit one, volunteers ingested either 80 g of CHO (Control) or 2 g of l-carnitine-l-tartrate and 80 g of CHO (Carnitine) twice daily for 24 weeks in a randomised, double blind manner. All significant effects reported occurred after 24 weeks. Muscle TC increased from basal by 21% in Carnitine (P < 0.05), and was unchanged in Control. At 50%, the Carnitine group utilised 55% less muscle glycogen compared to Control (P < 0.05) and 31% less pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activation compared to before supplementation (P < 0.05). Conversely, at 80%, muscle PDC activation was 38% higher (P < 0.05), acetylcarnitine content showed a trend to be 16% greater (P < 0.10), muscle lactate content was 44% lower (P < 0.05) and the muscle PCr/ATP ratio was better maintained (P < 0.05) in Carnitine compared to Control. The Carnitine group increased work output 11% from baseline in the performance trial, while Control showed no change. This is the first demonstration that human muscle TC can be increased by dietary means and results in muscle glycogen sparing during low intensity exercise (consistent with an increase in lipid utilisation) and a better matching of glycolytic, PDC and mitochondrial flux during high intensity exercise, thereby reducing muscle anaerobic ATP production. Furthermore, these changes were associated with an

  2. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  3. Muscle glycogen loading with a liquid carbohydrate supplement.

    PubMed

    Lamb, D R; Snyder, A C; Baur, T S

    1991-03-01

    This study compared two high carbohydrate (CHO) diets in 14 male runners for effects on muscle glycogen deposition, endurance, and sensations of gastrointestinal discomfort. Muscle glycogen was measured in the vastus lateralis at rest and run time to exhaustion at 75% VO2max was measured following 3-1/2 days on a 50% CHO diet. After 14 days the subjects consumed a 20% CHO diet and continued training to reduce glycogen. During the next 3-1/2 days, subjects ran less and consumed a 90% CHO diet emphasizing pasta and rice (Pasta, n = 7) or lesser amounts of pasta and rice supplemented by a maltodextrin beverage (Supplement, n = 7). Glycogen was again measured, followed by a second run to exhaustion. Compared to the 50% CHO diet, Pasta increased muscle glycogen by 27.1 +/- 12.2 mmoles/kg muscle (M +/- SE; P < 0.05) and run time by 15.7 +/- 5.9 min; Supplement increased glycogen by 43.2 +/- 13.5 mmoles/kg (P < 0.05) and run time by 29.0 +/- 7.4 min (P < 0.05). Total glycogen concentrations and run times were not significantly different for Pasta versus Supplement. Subjects reported less gastrointestinal discomfort and greater overall preference for Supplement than for Pasta. Thus, glycogen loading can be accomplished at least as effectively and more comfortably by substituting a maltodextrin drink for some of the pasta and rice in a glycogen loading diet. PMID:1844402

  4. Fat adaptation science: low-carbohydrate, high- fat diets to alter fuel utilization and promote training adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hawley, John A

    2011-01-01

    The effect of manipulating an individual's habitual diet on skeletal muscle fuel utilization has been of longstanding interest to scientists, and it is now well established that changes in dietary intake that alter the concentration of blood-borne substrates and hormones cause substantial perturbations in the macronutrient storage profile of muscle and exert profound effects on rates of substrate oxidation during exercise. Only recently, however, has it become appreciated that nutrient-exercise interventions can modulate many contraction- induced responses in muscle, and that fuel availability per se provides a 'trigger' for adaptation. Consumption of low-carbohydrate, high- fat diets in the face of endurance training alters patterns of fuel utilization and subsequent exercise responses. Human studies show how low-carbohydrate, fat-rich diets interact with specific contractile stimulus to modulate many of the acute responses to exercise, thereby promoting or inhibiting subsequent training adaptation. PMID:22301836

  5. Immunohistochemical alterations after muscle trauma.

    PubMed

    Fechner, G; Bajanowski, T; Brinkmann, B

    1993-01-01

    The proteins fibrin, fibrinogen, fibronectin and complement C5b-9 were investigated in mechanically damaged skeletal muscle. An accumulation of fibrin, fibrinogen and fibronectin could be observed immediately after intra-vital trauma in damaged fibre zones, later an accumulation at the torn edges of the fibres. The accumulation of complement C5b-9 began one hour after trauma. After post mortem trauma no positive reactions could be observed for any of the proteins. The degree of expression of these proteins can therefore be used to differentiate between vital and postmortem muscle damage as well as the estimation of wound age in the early antemortem time period. PMID:8431399

  6. Carbohydrate supplementation spares muscle glycogen during variable-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Yaspelkis, B B; Patterson, J G; Anderla, P A; Ding, Z; Ivy, J L

    1993-10-01

    Effects of carbohydrate (CHO) supplementation on muscle glycogen utilization and endurance were evaluated in seven well-trained male cyclists during continuous cycling exercise that varied between low [45% maximal O2 uptake (VO2 max)] and moderate intensity (75% VO2 max). During each exercise bout the subjects received either artificially flavored placebo (P), 10% liquid CHO supplement (L; 3 x 18 g CHO/h), or solid CHO supplement (S; 2 x 25 g CHO/h). Muscle biopsies were taken from vastus lateralis during P and L trials immediately before exercise and after first (124 min) and second set (190 min) of intervals. Subjects then rode to fatigue at 80% VO2 max. Plasma glucose and insulin responses during L treatment reached levels of 6.7 +/- 0.7 mM and 70.6 +/- 17.2 microU/ml, respectively, and were significantly greater than those of P treatment (4.4 +/- 0.1 mM and 17.7 +/- 1.6 microU/ml) throughout the exercise bout. Plasma glucose and insulin responses of S treatment were intermediate to those of L and P treatments. Times to fatigue for S (223.9 +/- 3.5 min) and L (233.4 +/- 7.5 min) treatments did not differ but were significantly greater than that of P treatment (202.4 +/- 9.8 min). After the first 190 min of exercise, muscle glycogen was significantly greater during L (79 +/- 3.5 mumol/g wet wt) than during P treatment (58.5 +/- 7.2 mumol/g wet wt). Furthermore, differences in muscle glycogen concentrations between L and P treatments after 190 min of exercise and in time to fatigue for these treatments were positively related (r = 0.76, P < 0.05). These results suggest that CHO supplementation can enhance prolonged continuous variable-intensity exercise by reducing dependency on muscle glycogen as a fuel source. PMID:8282593

  7. Altered Pharyngeal Muscles in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Liancai; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Chen, Jingming; Su, Hungxi; Sanders, Ira; Adler, Charles H.; Shill, Holly A.; Caviness, John N.; Samanta, Johan E.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia (impaired swallowing) is common in Parkinson disease (PD) patients and is related to aspiration pneumonia, the primary cause of death in PD. Therapies that ameliorate the limb motor symptoms of PD are ineffective for dysphagia. This suggests that the pathophysiology of PD dysphagia may differ from that affecting limb muscles but little is known about potential neuromuscular abnormalities in the swallowing muscles in PD. This study examined the fiber histochemistry of pharyngeal constrictor (PC) and cricopharyngeal (CP) sphincter muscles in postmortem specimens from 8 PD and 4 age-matched control patients. Pharyngeal muscles in PD patients exhibited many atrophic fibers, fiber type grouping, and fast-to-slow myosin heavy chain transformation. These alterations indicate that the pharyngeal muscles experienced neural degeneration and regeneration over the course of PD. Notably, the PD patients with dysphagia had a higher percentage of atrophic myofibers vs. with those without dysphagia and controls. The fast-to-slow fiber type transition is consistent with abnormalities in swallowing, slow movement of food and increased tone in the CP sphincter in PD patients. The alterations in the pharyngeal muscles may play a pathogenic role in the development of dysphagia in PD patients. PMID:22588389

  8. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    Carbohydrates are one of the main types of nutrients. They are the most important source of energy for your body. Your digestive system changes carbohydrates into glucose (blood sugar). Your body uses this ...

  9. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... beans Vegetables, such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, corn, potato with skin Fruits, such as raspberries, pears, apples, ... high in carbohydrates: Starchy vegetables: 1 cup mashed potato or sweet potato, 1 small ear of corn ...

  10. Carbohydrate supplementation during prolonged cycling exercise spares muscle glycogen but does not affect intramyocellular lipid use

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Hanneke; Gijsen, Annemie P.; Stegen, Jos H. C. H.; Kuipers, Harm; van Loon, Luc J. C.

    2007-01-01

    Using contemporary stable-isotope methodology and fluorescence microscopy, we assessed the impact of carbohydrate supplementation on whole-body and fiber-type-specific intramyocellular triacylglycerol (IMTG) and glycogen use during prolonged endurance exercise. Ten endurance-trained male subjects were studied twice during 3 h of cycling at 63 ± 4% of maximal O2 uptake with either glucose ingestion (CHO trial; 0.7 g CHO kg−1 h−1) or without (CON placebo trial; water only). Continuous infusions with [U-13C] palmitate and [6,6-2H2] glucose were applied to quantify plasma free fatty acids (FFA) and glucose oxidation rates and to estimate intramyocellular lipid and glycogen use. Before and after exercise, muscle biopsy samples were taken to quantify fiber-type-specific IMTG and glycogen content. Plasma glucose rate of appearance (Ra) and carbohydrate oxidation rates were substantially greater in the CHO vs CON trial. Carbohydrate supplementation resulted in a lower muscle glycogen use during the first hour of exercise in the CHO vs CON trial, resulting in a 38 ± 19 and 57 ± 22% decreased utilization in type I and II muscle-fiber glycogen content, respectively. In the CHO trial, both plasma FFA Ra and subsequent plasma FFA concentrations were lower, resulting in a 34 ± 12% reduction in plasma FFA oxidation rates during exercise (P < 0.05). Carbohydrate intake did not augment IMTG utilization, as fluorescence microscopy revealed a 76 ± 21 and 78 ± 22% reduction in type I muscle-fiber lipid content in the CHO and CON trial, respectively. We conclude that carbohydrate supplementation during prolonged cycling exercise does not modulate IMTG use but spares muscle glycogen use during the initial stages of exercise in endurance-trained men. PMID:17333244

  11. Protein and Carbohydrate Interactions Alter Ruminal Fermentation, Digesta Characteristics, and Behavior in Lactating Dairy Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of altering dietary nonfiber carbohydrate complement and ruminally degradable protein was evaluated in an incomplete partially balanced Latin square design with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments (trt) and two 21-d periods. Eight ruminally cannulated Holstein dairy cows were rand...

  12. Alterations in carbohydrate metabolism and its regulation in PPARalpha null mouse hearts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although a shift from fatty acids (FAs) to carbohydrates (CHOs) is considered beneficial for the diseased heart, it is unclear why subjects with FA beta-oxidation defects are prone to cardiac decompensation under stress conditions. The present study investigated potential alterations in the myocardi...

  13. Differential Expression of Lipid and Carbohydrate Metabolism Genes in Upper Airway versus Diaphragm Muscle

    PubMed Central

    van Lunteren, Erik; Spiegler, Sarah; Moyer, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Contractile properties of upper airway muscles influence upper airway patency, an issue of particular importance for subjects with obstructive sleep apnea. Expression of genes related to cellular energetics is, in turn, critical for the maintenance of contractile integrity over time during repetitive activation. We tested the hypothesis that sternohyoid has lower expression of genes related to lipid and carbohydrate energetic pathways than the diaphragm. Methods: Sternohyoid and diaphragm from normal adult rats were examined with gene expression arrays. Analysis focused on genes belonging to Gene Ontology (GO) groups carbohydrate metabolism and lipid metabolism. Results: There were 433 genes with at least ± 2-fold significant differential expression between sternohyoid and diaphragm, of which 192 had sternohyoid > diaphragm and 241 had diaphragm > sternohyoid expression. Among genes with higher sternohyoid expression, there was over-representation of the GO group carbohydrate metabolism (P = 0.0053, n = 13 genes, range of differential expression 2.1- to 6.2-fold) but not lipid metabolism (P = 0.44). Conversely, among genes with higher diaphragm expression, there was over-representation of the GO group lipid metabolism (P = 0.0000065, n = 32 genes, range of differential expression 2.0- to 37.9-fold) but not carbohydrate metabolism (P = 0.23). Nineteen genes with diaphragm > sternohyoid expression were related to fatty acid metabolism (P = 0.000000058), in particular fatty acid β oxidation and biosynthesis in the mitochondria. Conclusions: Sternohyoid has much lower gene expression than diaphragm for mitochondrial enzymes that participate in fatty acid oxidation and biosynthesis. This likely contributes to the lower fatigue resistance of pharyngeal upper airway muscles compared with the diaphragm. Citation: van Lunteren E; Spiegler S; Moyer M. Differential expression of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism genes in upper airway versus diaphragm

  14. beta-adrenergic effects on carbohydrate metabolism in the unweighted rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of unweighting on the response of the soleus-muscle carbohydrate metabolism to a beta-adrenergic agonist (isoproterenol) was investigated in rats that were subjected to three days of tail-cast suspension. It was found that isoproterenol promoted glycogen degradation in soleus from suspended rats to a higher degree than in weighted soleus from control rats, and had no effect in unweighted digitorum longus. However, isoproterenol did not have a greater inhibitory effect on the net uptake of tritium-labeled 2-deoxy-glucose by the unweighted soleus and that isoproterenol inhibited hexose phosphorylation less in the unweighted than in the control muscle.

  15. Carbohydrate supercompensation and muscle glycogen utilization during exhaustive running in highly trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Madsen, K; Pedersen, P K; Rose, P; Richter, E A

    1990-01-01

    Three female and three male highly trained endurance runners with mean maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) values of 60.5 and 71.5 ml.kg-1.min-1, respectively, ran to exhaustion at 75%-80% of VO2max on two occasions after an overnight fast. One experiment was performed after a normal diet and training regimen (Norm), the other after a diet and training programme intended to increase muscle glycogen levels (Carb). Muscle glycogen concentration in the gastrocnemius muscle increased by 25% (P less than 0.05) from 581 mmol.kg-1 dry weight, SEM 50 to 722 mmol.kg-1 dry weight, SEM 34 after Carb. Running time to exhaustion, however, was not significantly different in Carb and Norm, 77 min, SEM 13 vs 70 min, SEM 8, respectively. The average glycogen concentration following exhaustive running was 553 mmol.kg-1 dry weight, SEM 70 in Carb and 434 mmol.kg-1 dry weight, SEM 57 in Norm, indicating that in both tests muscle glycogen stores were decreased by about 25%. Periodic acid-Schiff staining for semi-quantitative glycogen determination in individual fibres confirmed that none of the fibres appeared to be glycogen-empty after exhaustive running. The steady-state respiratory exchange ratio was higher in Carb than in Norm (0.92, SEM 0.01 vs 0.89, SEM 0.01; P less than 0.05). Since muscle glycogen utilization was identical in the two tests, the indication of higher utilization of total carbohydrate appears to be related to a higher utilization of liver glycogen. We have concluded that glycogen depletion of the gastrocnemius muscle is unlikely to be the cause of fatigue during exhaustive running at 75%-80% of VO2max in highly trained endurance runners. Furthermore, diet- and training-induced carbohydrate super-compensation does not appear to improve endurance capacity in such individuals. PMID:2079068

  16. The influence of altered gravity on carbohydrate metabolism in excised wheat leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obenland, D. M.; Brown, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    We developed a system to study the influence of altered gravity on carbohydrate metabolism in excised wheat leaves by means of clinorotation. The use of excised leaves in our clinostat studies offered a number of advantages over the use of whole plants, most important of which were minimization of exogenous mechanical stress and a greater amount of carbohydrate accumulation during the time of treatment. We found that horizontal clinorotation of excised wheat leaves resulted in significant reductions in the accumulation of fructose, sucrose, starch and fructan relative to control, vertically clinorotated leaves. Photosynthesis, dark respiration and the extractable activities of ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.27), sucrose phosphate synthase (EC 2.4.4.14), sucrose sucrose fructosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.99), and fructan hydrolase (EC 3.2.1.80) were unchanged due to altered gravity treatment.

  17. Does mental exertion alter maximal muscle activation?

    PubMed Central

    Rozand, Vianney; Pageaux, Benjamin; Marcora, Samuele M.; Papaxanthis, Charalambos; Lepers, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    Mental exertion is known to impair endurance performance, but its effects on neuromuscular function remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mental exertion reduces torque and muscle activation during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors. Ten subjects performed in a randomized order three separate mental exertion conditions lasting 27 min each: (i) high mental exertion (incongruent Stroop task), (ii) moderate mental exertion (congruent Stroop task), (iii) low mental exertion (watching a movie). In each condition, mental exertion was combined with 10 intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensor muscles (one maximal voluntary contraction every 3 min). Neuromuscular function was assessed using electrical nerve stimulation. Maximal voluntary torque, maximal muscle activation and other neuromuscular parameters were similar across mental exertion conditions and did not change over time. These findings suggest that mental exertion does not affect neuromuscular function during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors. PMID:25309404

  18. Renal function alterations during skeletal muscle disuse in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Bryan J.

    1992-01-01

    This project was to examine the alterations in renal functions during skeletal muscle disuse in simulated microgravity. Although this area could cover a wide range of investigative efforts, the limited funding resulted in the selection of two projects. These projects would result in data contributing to an area of research deemed high priority by NASA and would address issues of the alterations in renal response to vasoactive stimuli during conditions of skeletal muscle disuse as well as investigate the contribution of skeletal muscle disuse, conditions normally found in long term human exposure to microgravity, to the balance of fluid and macromolecules within the vasculature versus the interstitium. These two projects selected are as follows: investigate the role of angiotensin 2 on renal function during periods of simulated microgravity and skeletal muscle disuse to determine if the renal response is altered to changes in circulating concentrations of angiotensin 2 compared to appropriate controls; and determine if the shift of fluid balance from vasculature to the interstitium, the two components of extracellular fluid volume, that occur during prolonged exposure to microgravity and skeletal muscle disuse is a result, in part, to alterations in the fluid and macromolecular balance in the peripheral capillary beds, of which the skeletal muscle contains the majority of recruitment capillaries. A recruitment capillary bed would be most sensitive to alterations in Starling forces and fluid and macromolecular permeability.

  19. Persistence of supercompensated muscle glycogen in trained subjects after carbohydrate loading.

    PubMed

    Goforth, H W; Arnall, D A; Bennett, B L; Law, P G

    1997-01-01

    Several carbohydrate (CHO)-loading protocols have been used to achieve muscle glycogen supercompensation and prolong endurance performance. This study assessed the persistence of muscle glycogen supercompensation over the 3 days after the supercompensation protocol. Trained male athletes completed a 6-day CHO-loading protocol that included cycle ergometer exercise and dietary manipulations. The 3-day depletion phase began with 115 min of cycling at 75% peak oxygen uptake followed by 3 x 60-s sprints and included the subjects consuming a low-CHO/high-protein/high-fat (10:41:49%) diet. Subjects cycled 40 min at the same intensity for the next 2 days. During the 3-day repletion phase, subjects rested and consumed a high-CHO/low-protein/low-fat (85:08:07%) diet, including a glucose-polymer beverage. A 3-day postloading phase followed, which involved a moderately high CHO diet (60%) and no exercise. Glycogen values for vastus lateralis biopsies at baseline and postloading days 1-3 were 408 +/- 168 (SD), 729 +/- 222, 648 +/- 186, and 714 +/- 196 mmol/kg dry wt, respectively. The CHO-loading protocol increased muscle glycogen by 1.79 times baseline, and muscle glycogen remained near this level during the 3-day postloading period. Results indicate that supercompensated muscle glycogen levels can be maintained for at least 3 days in a resting athlete when a moderate-CHO diet is consumed. PMID:9029236

  20. Attenuation of Helicteres isora L. bark extracts on streptozotocin-induced alterations in glycogen and carbohydrate metabolism in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G; Sharmila Banu, G; Murugesan, A G

    2009-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the effect of Helicteres isora L. on four important enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism (glucokinase [GK], hexokinase [HK] phosphofructokinase [PFK] and fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase [FBP]) along with glycogen content of insulin-dependent (skeletal muscle and liver) and insulin-independent tissues (kidneys and brain) in streptozotocin (STZ; 60 mg/kg)-induced model of diabetes for 30 days. Administration of bark extracts (100, 200 mg/kg) for 30 days led to decrease in plasma glucose levels by approximately 9.60% and 22.04% and 19.18% and 33.93% on 15th and 30th day, respectively, of the experiment. Liver and two-kidney weight expressed as percentage of body weight significantly increased in diabetics (P < 0.05) versus normal controls. Renal glycogen content increased by 10 folds while hepatic and skeletal muscle glycogen content decreased by 75% and 68% in diabetic controls versus controls. H. isora did not affect glycogen content in any tissue. The decreased activities of PFK, GK, FBP and HK in diabetic controls were 40%, 50%, 50% and 60% and bark extract of H. isora partially corrected this alteration. The efficacy of the bark extract was comparable with Tolbutamide, a well-known hypoglycemic drug. PMID:19812119

  1. Ethanolic extract of Commiphora mukul gum resin attenuates streptozotocin-induced alterations in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, B.; Karuna, R.; Sreenivasa Reddy, S.; Sudhakara, G.; Saralakumari, D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Commiphora mukul gum resin ethanolic extract (CMEEt) administration against altered activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism and changes in glycogen content (liver and muscle) and lipids (liver and heart) in streptozotocin (STZ) induced insulin deficient diabetic Wistar albino rats. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of STZ (55 mg/kg body wt) to male Wistar rats. The animals were divided into four groups: Control (C), control-treated (C+CM), diabetic (D) and diabetic-treated group (D+CM). Diabetic-treated and control-treated rats were treated with C. mukul gum resin ethanolic extract (CMEEt) in 2 ml distilled water, orally (200 mg/kg body weight/day for 60 days). At the end of the experimental period, biochemical parameters related to carbohydrate and lipid metabolism were assayed. The significant enhancement in tissue lipids (heart and liver) total cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids and free fatty acids of diabetic rats were nearer to normalized in diabetic treated rats (D+CM). Alterations in the activities of enzymes of glucose metabolism (hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) and lipid metabolism (fatty acid synthase, malic enzyme and lipoprotein lipase) as observed in diabetic (D) rats were prevented with CMEEt administration. In conclusion, our findings indicate improvement of glucose and lipid metabolisms in STZ induced diabetic rats by treatment with Commiphora mukul and suggest that the plant can be used as an adjuvant for the prevention and/or management of insulin deficiency and disorder related to it. PMID:27004047

  2. Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle fibers of rats after exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akuzawa, M.; Hataya, M.

    1982-01-01

    Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle fibers were electron microscopically studied in rats forced to run on the treadmill until all-out. When they were mild and limited to relatively small areas, the reconstruction of filaments ensued within 10 days without infiltration of cells. When they were severe and extensive, phagocytes infiltrated in the lesions and removed degenerative sacroplasmic debris from muscle fibers. A little later, myoblasts appeared and regeneration was accomplished in 30 days in much the same manner as in myogenesis.

  3. Bex1 knock out mice show altered skeletal muscle regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Jae Hyung Smiley, Mark A.; Lovering, Richard M.; Margolis, Frank L.

    2007-11-16

    Bex1 and Calmodulin (CaM) are upregulated during skeletal muscle regeneration. We confirm this finding and demonstrate the novel finding that they interact in a calcium-dependent manner. To study the role of Bex1 and its interaction with CaM in skeletal muscle regeneration, we generated Bex1 knock out (Bex1-KO) mice. These mice appeared to develop normally and are fertile, but displayed a functional deficit in exercise performance compared to wild type (WT) mice. After intramuscular injection of cardiotoxin, which causes extensive and reproducible myotrauma followed by recovery, regenerating muscles of Bex1-KO mice exhibited elevated and prolonged cell proliferation, as well as delayed cell differentiation, compared to WT mice. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that Bex1-KO mice show altered muscle regeneration, and allow us to propose that the interaction of Bex1 with Ca{sup 2+}/CaM may be involved in skeletal muscle regeneration.

  4. Regulation of skeletal muscle carbohydrate oxidation during steady-state contraction.

    PubMed

    Timmons, J A; Poucher, S M; Constantin-Teodosiu, D; Macdonald, I A; Greenhaff, P L

    1998-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activation status has been described as being central in the regulation of tissue substrate oxidation as outlined by the glucose fatty-acid cycle. In the present study we examined the effects of reduced lipolysis, with use of nicotinate, and increased PDC activation, with use of dichloroacetate (DCA), on substrate utilization during 20 min of submaximal steady-state contraction (approximately 80% of maximal O2 uptake) in canine gracilis skeletal muscle. At rest, PDC activation was unchanged by nicotinate but was approximately 2.5-fold higher in the DCA group than in the control group (P < 0.05). During contraction, PDC activation status increased to 3.5 mmol acetyl-CoA.min-1.kg-1 at 37 degrees C in the control group, remained at 4.5 mmol acetyl-CoA.min-1.kg-1 at 37 degrees C in the DCA group, but only increased to 2.2 mmol acetyl-CoA.min-1.kg-1 at 37 degrees C in the nicotinate group (P < 0.05). However, the estimated amount of carbohydrate oxidized during the 20-min contraction was similar across groups and did not follow the degree of PDC activation (81.2 +/- 22.9, 95.9 +/- 11.7, and 89.3 +/- 18.9 mmol glucosyl units/kg dry muscle for control, nicotinate, and DCA, respectively). Thus it would appear that, during steady-state contraction, PDC activation status does not determine the rate of carbohydrate oxidation in skeletal muscle. PMID:9612406

  5. Effect of palmitate on carbohydrate utilization and Na/K-ATPase activity in aortic vascular smooth muscle from diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Solar, S M; Paulson, D J; Hill, N M; Broderick, T L

    1999-04-01

    Several investigators have reported that carbohydrate metabolism is suppressed in blood vessels from diabetic (Db) rats. However, it is not known if metabolites from the reciprocal increase in oxidation of long-chain fatty acids that accompanies insulin-deficiency exacerbates the suppression of this pathway in the Db blood vessels. Such inhibition may have particularly deleterious consequences in vascular smooth muscle since aerobic glycolysis is believed to preferentially fuel the sarcolemmal Na/K ATPase in this tissue. Therefore, this study evaluated the effect of physiological (0.4 mM) and elevated (1.2 mM) concentrations of the long-chain fatty acid palmitate on both carbohydrate utilization and Na/K-ATPase activity in aorta from insulin-deficient Db rat. Thoracic aorta were removed from 10 week Db (streptozotocin 60 mg/Kg , i.v.) or control (C) rats and intima-media aortic preparations were incubated in the absence or presence of palmitate. Glycolysis (microM/g dry wt/h) and glucose oxidation (microM/g dry wt/h) were quantified using 3H-glucose and 14C-glucose, respectively. Na/K-ATPase activity was estimated by the measurement of 86rubidium uptake in the absence and presence of 2 mM ouabain. In the absence of exogenous palmitate, glycolysis (p < 0.05), glucose oxidation (p < 0.01) and the estimated ATP production from exogenous glucose were decreased in aorta from Db rat. However, despite this diminished rate of glycolysis, Na/K ATPase activity was similar in Db and C aorta. Palmitate (0.4 mM) inhibited Na/K ATPase activity and glucose oxidation to a similar extent in both Db and C but had no effect on glycolysis in either group. Elevation of palmitate to 1.2 mM had no additional inhibitory effect on glucose oxidation, Na/K ATPase activity or glycolysis in either the Db or C aorta. The metabolism of exogenous palmitate restored the ATP production in Db to control values. These data demonstrate that, despite the diminished glycolysis and glucose oxidation

  6. Dietary carbohydrates and endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Evans, W J; Hughes, V A

    1985-05-01

    Antecedent diet can greatly influence both substrate utilization during exercise and exercise performance itself. A number of studies have convincingly demonstrated that short-term (three to seven days) adaptation to a low carbohydrate diet results in greatly reduced liver and muscle glycogen stores. While carbohydrate utilization after such a diet is reduced, the limited glycogen stores can severely limit endurance exercise performance. High carbohydrate diets on the other hand expand carbohydrate stores which can limit performance. However, long-term adaptation to a low carbohydrate diet can greatly alter muscle and whole body energy metabolism to drastically limit the oxidation of limited carbohydrate stores with no adverse effect on performance. Glycogen loading techniques can result in supercompensation of muscle stores. Exercise induced depletion of muscle glycogen is the most important single factor in this phenomenon. Following the exercise a low carbohydrate diet for two to three days after which a high carbohydrate diet is eaten seemingly has the same effect on increasing muscle glycogen stores as simply eating a high carbohydrate diet. The form of the dietary carbohydrate during glycogen loading should be high in complex carbohydrates; however, the type of dietary starch that effects the greatest rate of resynthesis has not been investigated. Rapid resynthesis of glycogen following exercise is at least in part due to increased insulin sensitivity. The enhanced glucose transport caused by the increased sensitivity provides substrate for glycogen synthase. How rapidly this enhanced sensitivity returns to pre-exercise levels in humans is uncertain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3993621

  7. Muscle biopsies from human muscle diseases with myopathic pathology reveal common alterations in mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Sunitha, Balaraju; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Kumar, Manish; Keshava Prasad, Thottethodi Subrahmanya; Nalini, Atchayaram; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2016-07-01

    Muscle diseases are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and manifest as dystrophic, inflammatory and myopathic pathologies, among others. Our previous study on the cardiotoxin mouse model of myodegeneration and inflammation linked muscle pathology with mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether human muscle diseases display mitochondrial changes. Muscle biopsies from muscle disease patients, represented by dysferlinopathy (dysfy) (dystrophic pathology; n = 43), polymyositis (PM) (inflammatory pathology; n = 24), and distal myopathy with rimmed vacuoles (DMRV) (distal myopathy; n = 31) were analyzed. Mitochondrial damage (ragged blue and COX-deficient fibers) was revealed in dysfy, PM, and DMRV cases by enzyme histochemistry (SDH and COX-SDH), electron microscopy (vacuolation and altered cristae) and biochemical assays (significantly increased ADP/ATP ratio). Proteomic analysis of muscle mitochondria from all three muscle diseases by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis demonstrated down-regulation of electron transport chain (ETC) complex subunits, assembly factors and Krebs cycle enzymes. Interestingly, 80 of the under-expressed proteins were common among the three pathologies. Assay of ETC and Krebs cycle enzyme activities validated the MS data. Mitochondrial proteins from muscle pathologies also displayed higher tryptophan (Trp) oxidation and the same was corroborated in the cardiotoxin model. Molecular modeling predicted Trp oxidation to alter the local structure of mitochondrial proteins. Our data highlight mitochondrial alterations in muscle pathologies, represented by morphological changes, altered mitochondrial proteome and protein oxidation, thereby establishing the role of mitochondrial damage in human muscle diseases. We investigated whether human muscle diseases display mitochondrial changes. Muscle biopsies

  8. A computational model of skeletal muscle metabolism linking cellular adaptations induced by altered loading states to metabolic responses during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Ranjan K; DiBella, John A; Cabrera, Marco E

    2007-01-01

    Background The alterations in skeletal muscle structure and function after prolonged periods of unloading are initiated by the chronic lack of mechanical stimulus of sufficient intensity, which is the result of a series of biochemical and metabolic interactions spanning from cellular to tissue/organ level. Reduced activation of skeletal muscle alters the gene expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms to meet the functional demands of reduced mechanical load, which results in muscle atrophy and reduced capacity to process fatty acids. In contrast, chronic loading results in the opposite pattern of adaptations. Methods To quantify interactions among cellular and skeletal muscle metabolic adaptations, and to predict metabolic responses to exercise after periods of altered loading states, we develop a computational model of skeletal muscle metabolism. The governing model equations – with parameters characterizing chronic loading/unloading states- were solved numerically to simulate metabolic responses to moderate intensity exercise (WR ≤ 40% VO2 max). Results Model simulations showed that carbohydrate oxidation was 8.5% greater in chronically unloaded muscle compared with the loaded muscle (0.69 vs. 0.63 mmol/min), while fat oxidation was 7% higher in chronically loaded muscle (0.14 vs. 0.13 mmol/min), during exercise. Muscle oxygen uptake (VO2) and blood flow (Q) response times were 29% and 44% shorter in chronically loaded muscle (0.4 vs. 0.56 min for VO2 and 0.25 vs. 0.45 min for Q). Conclusion The present model can be applied to test complex hypotheses during exercise involving the integration and control of metabolic processes at various organizational levels (cellular to tissue) in individuals who have undergone periods of chronic loading or unloading. PMID:17448235

  9. Carbohydrate ingestion and glycogen utilization in different muscle fibre types in man.

    PubMed Central

    Tsintzas, O K; Williams, C; Boobis, L; Greenhaff, P

    1995-01-01

    1. The effect of carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion on muscle glycogen utilization during exercise was examined on seven male subjects completing two 60 min treadmill runs at 70% maximum oxygen uptake (VO2,max), 1 week apart. On each occasion the subjects consumed either water or a 5.5% CHO-electrolyte solution immediately before and during exercise. Muscle samples were obtained from the vastus lateralis by needle biopsy before and immediately after exercise. Venous blood samples were also collected from an ante-cubital vein at rest and at 10, 20, 40 and 60 min into the run. 2. Higher blood glucose concentrations (P < 0.01) were observed throughout the run during the CHO trial compared with the water trial. Serum insulin concentration was only higher after 20 min of exercise (P < 0.01). 3. A 28% reduction in mixed glycogen utilization was observed as a result of CHO ingestion when compared with water ingestion (108.7 +/- 16.3 vs. 150.9 +/- 19.9 mmol (kg dry matter)-1, respectively; P < 0.01). 4. The ingestion of the CHO solution resulted in sparing of glycogen in type I (slow twitch) fibres only (38 +/- 7% degradation of glycogen as opposed to 66 +/- 3% during the water trial; P = 0.01). PMID:8583408

  10. Decreased tumorigenicity correlates with expression of altered cell surface carbohydrates in Lec9 CHO cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ripka, J; Shin, S; Stanley, P

    1986-01-01

    To investigate a role for surface carbohydrates in cellular malignancy, 15 different glycosylation-defective CHO cell mutants were examined for their tumorigenic and metastatic capacities after subcutaneous injection into nude mice. Most of the glycosylation mutants displayed similar or slightly decreased tumorigenicity compared with parental CHO cells. Neither parental CHO cells nor any of the mutants were observed to metastasize. However, independent isolates of one mutant type, Lec9, showed a dramatic reduction in tumor formation. The altered carbohydrates expressed at the surface of Lec9 cells appeared to be responsible for their loss of tumorigenicity, because revertants for lectin resistance were able to form tumors, and a double mutant (Lec9.Lec1) that expressed a Lec1 glycosylation phenotype also formed tumors. Finally, Lec9 cells were able to form tumors in gamma-irradiated nude mice, suggesting that recognition by an irradiation-sensitive host cell(s) was responsible for their reduced tumorigenicity in untreated nude mice. PMID:3785164

  11. Statin Therapy Alters Lipid Storage in Diabetic Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Rebalka, Irena A.; Raleigh, Matthew J.; Snook, Laelie A.; Rebalka, Alexandra N.; MacPherson, Rebecca E. K.; Wright, David C.; Schertzer, Jonathan D.; Hawke, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    While statins significantly reduce cholesterol levels and thereby reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, the development of myopathy with statin use is a significant clinical side effect. Recent guidelines recommend increasing inclusion criteria for statin treatment in diabetic individuals; however, the impact of statins on skeletal muscle health in those with diabetes (who already suffer from impairments in muscle health) is ill defined. Here, we investigate the effects of fluvastatin treatment on muscle health in wild type (WT) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. WT and STZ-diabetic mice received diet enriched with 600 mg/kg fluvastatin or control chow for 24 days. Muscle morphology, intra and extracellular lipid levels, and lipid transporter content were investigated. Our findings indicate that short-term fluvastatin administration induced a myopathy that was not exacerbated by the presence of STZ-induced diabetes. Fluvastatin significantly increased ectopic lipid deposition within the muscle of STZ-diabetic animals, findings that were not seen with diabetes or statin treatment alone. Consistent with this observation, only fluvastatin-treated diabetic mice downregulated protein expression of lipid transporters FAT/CD36 and FABPpm in their skeletal muscle. No differences in FAT/CD36 or FABPpm mRNA content were observed. Altered lipid compartmentalization resultant of a downregulation in lipid transporter content in STZ-induced diabetic skeletal muscle was apparent in the current investigation. Given the association between ectopic lipid deposition in skeletal muscle and the development of insulin-resistance, our findings highlight the necessity for more thorough investigations into the impact of statins in humans with diabetes. PMID:27486434

  12. Statin Therapy Alters Lipid Storage in Diabetic Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Rebalka, Irena A; Raleigh, Matthew J; Snook, Laelie A; Rebalka, Alexandra N; MacPherson, Rebecca E K; Wright, David C; Schertzer, Jonathan D; Hawke, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    While statins significantly reduce cholesterol levels and thereby reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, the development of myopathy with statin use is a significant clinical side effect. Recent guidelines recommend increasing inclusion criteria for statin treatment in diabetic individuals; however, the impact of statins on skeletal muscle health in those with diabetes (who already suffer from impairments in muscle health) is ill defined. Here, we investigate the effects of fluvastatin treatment on muscle health in wild type (WT) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. WT and STZ-diabetic mice received diet enriched with 600 mg/kg fluvastatin or control chow for 24 days. Muscle morphology, intra and extracellular lipid levels, and lipid transporter content were investigated. Our findings indicate that short-term fluvastatin administration induced a myopathy that was not exacerbated by the presence of STZ-induced diabetes. Fluvastatin significantly increased ectopic lipid deposition within the muscle of STZ-diabetic animals, findings that were not seen with diabetes or statin treatment alone. Consistent with this observation, only fluvastatin-treated diabetic mice downregulated protein expression of lipid transporters FAT/CD36 and FABPpm in their skeletal muscle. No differences in FAT/CD36 or FABPpm mRNA content were observed. Altered lipid compartmentalization resultant of a downregulation in lipid transporter content in STZ-induced diabetic skeletal muscle was apparent in the current investigation. Given the association between ectopic lipid deposition in skeletal muscle and the development of insulin-resistance, our findings highlight the necessity for more thorough investigations into the impact of statins in humans with diabetes. PMID:27486434

  13. Regulation of metabolism by dietary carbohydrates in two lines of rainbow trout divergently selected for muscle fat content.

    PubMed

    Kamalam, Biju Sam; Medale, Françoise; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Polakof, Sergio; Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine; Panserat, Stephane

    2012-08-01

    Previous studies in two rainbow trout lines divergently selected for lean (L) or fat (F) muscle suggested that they differ in their ability to metabolise glucose. In this context, we investigated whether genetic selection for high muscle fat content led to a better capacity to metabolise dietary carbohydrates. Juvenile trout from the two lines were fed diets with or without gelatinised starch (17.1%) for 10 weeks, after which blood, liver, muscle and adipose tissues were sampled. Growth rate, feed efficiency and protein utilisation were lower in the F line than in the L line. In both lines, intake of carbohydrates was associated with a moderate post-prandial hyperglycaemia, a protein sparing effect, an enhancement of nutrient (TOR-S6) signalling cascade and a decrease of energy-sensing enzyme (AMPK). Gene expression of hepatic glycolytic enzymes was higher in the F line fed carbohydrates compared with the L line, but concurrently transcripts for the gluconeogenic enzymes was also higher in the F line, possibly impairing glucose homeostasis. However, the F line showed a higher gene expression of hepatic enzymes involved in lipogenesis and fatty acid bioconversion, in particular with an increased dietary carbohydrate intake. Enhanced lipogenic potential coupled with higher liver glycogen content in the F line suggests better glucose storage ability than the L line. Overall, the present study demonstrates the changes in hepatic intermediary metabolism resulting from genetic selection for high muscle fat content and dietary carbohydrate intake without, however, any interaction for an improved growth or glucose utilisation in the peripheral tissues. PMID:22786633

  14. Selenium Protects Retinal Cells from Cisplatin-Induced Alterations in Carbohydrate Residues

    PubMed Central

    Akşit, Dilek; Yazıcı, Alper; Akşit, Hasan; Sarı, Esin S.; Yay, Arzu; Yıldız, Onur; Kılıç, Adil; Ermiş, Sıtkı S.; Seyrek, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Investigate alterations in the expression and localization of carbohydrate units in rat retinal cells exposed to cisplatin toxicity. Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate putative protective effects of selenium on retinal cells subjected to cisplatin. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: Eighteen healthy Wistar rats were divided into three equal groups: 1. Control, 2. Cisplatin and 3. Cisplatin+selenium groups. After anesthesia, the right eye of each rat was enucleated. Results: Histochemically, retinal cells of control groups reacted with α-2,3-bound sialic acid-specific Maackia amurensis lectin (MAA) strongly, while cisplatin reduced the staining intensity for MAA. However, selenium administration alleviated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for MAA in retinal cells. The staining intensity for N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc residues) specific Griffonia simplicifolia-1 (GSL–1) was relatively slight in control animals and cisplatin reduced this slight staining for GSL-1 further. Selenium administration mitigated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for GSL-1. A diffuse staining for N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) specific wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was observed throughout the retina of the control animals. In particular, cells localized in the inner plexiform and photoreceptor layers are reacted strongly with WGA. Compared to the control animals, binding sites for WGA in the retina of rats given cisplatin were remarkably decreased. However, the retinal cells of rats given selenium reacted strongly with WGA. Conclusion: Cisplatin reduces α-2,3-bound sialic acid, GlcNAc and GalNAc residues in certain retinal cells. However, selenium alleviates the reducing effect of cisplatin on carbohydrate residues in retinal cells. PMID:27606141

  15. Segmental extracellular and intracellular water distribution and muscle glycogen after 72-h carbohydrate loading using spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Shiose, Keisuke; Yamada, Yosuke; Motonaga, Keiko; Sagayama, Hiroyuki; Higaki, Yasuki; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2016-07-01

    Body water content increases during carbohydrate loading because 2.7-4-g water binds each 1 g of glycogen. Bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS) allows separate assessment of extracellular and intracellular water (ECW and ICW, respectively) in the whole body and each body segment. However, BIS has not been shown to detect changes in body water induced by carbohydrate loading. Here, we aimed to investigate whether BIS had sufficient sensitivity to detect changes in body water content and to determine segmental water distribution after carbohydrate loading. Eight subjects consumed a high-carbohydrate diet containing 12 g carbohydrates·kg body mass(-1)·day(-1) for 72 h after glycogen depletion cycling exercise. Changes in muscle glycogen concentration were measured by (13)C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and total body water (TBW) was measured by the deuterium dilution technique (TBWD2O). ICW and ECW in the whole body (wrist-to-ankle) and in each body segment (arm, trunk, and leg) were assessed by BIS. Muscle glycogen concentration [72.7 ± 10.0 (SD) to 169.4 ± 55.9 mmol/kg wet wt, P < 0.001] and TBWD2O (39.3 ± 3.2 to 40.2 ± 3.0 kg, P < 0.05) increased significantly 72 h after exercise compared with baseline, respectively. Whole-body BIS showed significant increases in ICW (P < 0.05), but not in ECW. Segmental BIS showed significant increases in ICW in the legs (P < 0.05), but not in the arms or trunk. Our results suggest that increase in body water after carbohydrate loading can be detected by BIS and is caused by segment-specific increases in ICW. PMID:27231310

  16. Skeletal alteration to improve beef longissimus muscle tenderness.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, C J; Claus, J R; Marriott, N G; Johnson, J; Wang, H

    1997-09-01

    A prerigor cut was made through the 12th thoracic vertebra of one side of the beef carcasses (Tendercut) studied (five unbranded), and the other sides served as the controls (C). After 48 h postmortem, the longissimus from each side was removed starting from the junction between the 5th and 6th lumbar vertebrae to the point between the 5th and 6th thoracic vertebrae. The longissimus muscle was cut into four equal boneless sections to determine the effectiveness of this treatment on improving tenderness at different locations along this muscle. The effects of Tendercut upon yield grade, sensory attributes, and tenderness of longissimus steaks were determined. This treatment did not affect (P > .05) yield grade, CIE L* a* b* values, chemical states of myoglobin, purge and cooking losses, and total collagen. Steaks located closer to the treatment site were more juicy than controls. Peak force values were not significantly different. Sarcomere length was longer (P < .05) and sensory panel ratings for myofibrillar tenderness, connective tissue, and overall tenderness were higher (P < .05), indicating that this skeletal alteration technique increased tenderness. Sensory data revealed that skeletal and connective tissue cuts at a single site (12th thoracic vertebrae) on the beef rib improved the tenderness along the entire length of the longissimus muscle. This study demonstrated that Tendercut, a simple process that does not require any new equipment or alterations to existing facilities to implement, is a viable tenderness enhancement technique. PMID:9303458

  17. Dietary carbohydrate and postexercise synthesis of proglycogen and macroglycogen in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Adamo, K B; Tarnopolsky, M A; Graham, T E

    1998-08-01

    This study examined the role of carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion on the resynthesis of two pools of glycogen, proglycogen (PG) and macroglycogen (MG), in human skeletal muscle. Nine males completed an exhaustive glycogen depletion exercise bout at 70% maximal O2 consumption on two occasions. Subsequent 48-h dietary interventions consisted of either high (HC, 75% of energy intake) or low (LC, 32% of energy intake) CHO diets. Muscle biopsies were taken at exhaustion (EXH) and 4, 24, and 48 h later. The total muscle glycogen (Gt) at EXH for the HC and LC conditions was not significantly different, and the MG represented approximately 12% of the Gt. From EXH to 4 h, there was an increase in the PG only for HC and no change in MG in either diet (P < 0.05). From 4 to 24 h, the concentration of PG increased in both conditions (P < 0.05). Between 24 and 48 h, in HC the majority of the increase in Gt was due to the MG pool (P < 0.05). The MG and PG concentrations for HC were significantly greater than for LC at 24 and 48 h (P < 0.05). At 48 h the MG represented 40% of the Gt for the HC diet and only 21% for the LC diet. There was no change in the net rates of synthesis of PG or MG over 48 h for LC (P < 0.05). The net rate of PG synthesis from 0 to 4 h for HC was 16 +/- 1.68 mmol glucosyl units . kg dry wt-1 . h-1, which was threefold greater than for LC (P < 0. 05). The net rate of PG synthesis decreased significantly from 4 to 24 h for HC, whereas the net rate of MG synthesis was not different over 48 h but was significantly greater than in LC (P < 0.05). The two pools are synthesized at very different rates; both are sensitive to CHO, and the supercompensation associated with HC is due to a greater synthesis in the MG pool. PMID:9688623

  18. Increased dietary carbohydrate and endurance during single-leg cycling using a limb with normal muscle glycogen concentration.

    PubMed

    Hardman, A E; Williams, C

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that increased availability of blood-borne glucose would improve endurance after carbohydrate loading. A single-leg exercise model was employed, taking advantage of the fact that supercompensation of muscle glycogen occurs only in a previously exercised limb. Endurance time to exhaustion at 70% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) was determined for 11 males and three females who were then allocated to a control group or a high-carbohydrate (CHO) group. For 3 days following Test 1 the control group maintained a prescribed normal diet whilst the CHO group increased the proportion of energy derived from carbohydrate (62.1 +/- 4.3% cf. 43.9 +/- 2.0%, P less than 0.01). The endurance test was then repeated using the leg that was inactive during Test 1. Endurance time was increased on Test 2 (123.7 +/- 43.2 min cf. 98.5 +/- 21.9 min, P less than 0.05 one-tailed test) for the CHO group but not for the control group (101.8 +/- 21.7 min cf. 107.5 +/- 9.1 min, NS). There was no indication of enhanced carbohydrate metabolism during Test 2 for the CHO group but mean heart rate was lower during Test 2 than during Test 1 (145 +/- 14 beat min-1 cf. 152 +/- 12 beat min-1, P less than 0.05). These results suggest that the prior consumption of a high-carbohydrate diet improves endurance during high-intensity cycling with a limb with normal muscle glycogen concentration. PMID:2681820

  19. Effect of a carbohydrate-protein multi-ingredient supplement on intermittent sprint performance and muscle damage in recreational athletes.

    PubMed

    Naclerio, Fernando; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Cooper, Robert; Jimenez, Alfonso; Goss-Sampson, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Carbohydrate-protein-based multi-ingredient supplements have been proposed as an effective strategy for limiting the deleterious effects of exercise-induced muscle damage. This study compares the effects of a commercially available carbohydrate-protein supplement enriched with l-glutamine and l-carnitine-l-tartrate to carbohydrate alone or placebo on sprint performance, muscle damage markers, and recovery from intermittent exercise. On 3 occasions, 10 recreationally trained males ingested a multi-ingredient, a carbohydrate supplement, or a placebo before, during, and immediately after a 90-min intermittent repeated sprint test. Fifteen-metre sprint times, creatine kinase, myoglobin, and interleukin-6 were assessed before (pre), immediately after (post), 1 h after (1h), and 24 h after (24h) exercise. Total sprint time measured during the intermittent protocol was not different between conditions. Fifteen-metre sprint time was slower (p < 0.05) at post, 1h and 24h compared with pre without differences between conditions (p > 0.05). Creatine kinase at 24h was lower (p < 0.05) in the multi-ingredient (461.8 ± 271.8 U·L) compared with both carbohydrate and placebo (606 ± 314.5 U·L and 636 ± 344.6 U·L, respectively). Myoglobin increased (p < 0.05) in all 3 conditions at post and 1h compared with pre, showing lower values at 1h (p < 0.05) for the carbohydrate and a trend (p = 0.060) for multi-ingredient compared with the placebo condition (211.4 ± 127.2 ng·mL(-1) and 239.4 ± 103.8 ng·mL(-1) vs. 484.6 ± 200.0 ng·mL(-1), respectively). Interleukin-6 increased at both post and 1h compared with pre (p < 0.05) with no differences between conditions. In conclusion, ingesting a multi-ingredient supplement before, during, and immediately after a 90-min intermittent sprint test resulted in no effects on performance and fatigue while the accumulation of some biomarkers of muscle damage could be attenuated. PMID:25029675

  20. Manual therapy ameliorates delayed-onset muscle soreness and alters muscle metabolites in rats

    PubMed Central

    Urakawa, Susumu; Takamoto, Kouichi; Nakamura, Tomoya; Sakai, Shigekazu; Matsuda, Teru; Taguchi, Toru; Mizumura, Kazue; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) can be induced by lengthening contraction (LC); it can be characterized by tenderness and movement-related pain in the exercised muscle. Manual therapy (MT), including compression of exercised muscles, is widely used as physical rehabilitation to reduce pain and promote functional recovery. Although MT is beneficial for reducing musculoskeletal pain (i.e. DOMS), the physiological mechanisms of MT remain unclear. In the present study, we first developed an animal model of MT in DOMS; LC was applied to the rat gastrocnemius muscle under anesthesia, which induced mechanical hyperalgesia 2–4 days after LC. MT (manual compression) ameliorated mechanical hyperalgesia. Then, we used capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (CE-TOFMS) to investigate early effects of MT on the metabolite profiles of the muscle experiencing DOMS. The rats were divided into the following three groups; (1) normal controls, (2) rats with LC application (LC group), and (3) rats undergoing MT after LC (LC + MT group). According to the CE-TOFMS analysis, a total of 171 metabolites were detected among the three groups, and 19 of these metabolites were significant among the groups. Furthermore, the concentrations of eight metabolites, including branched-chain amino acids, carnitine, and malic acid, were significantly different between the LC + MT and LC groups. The results suggest that MT significantly altered metabolite profiles in DOMS. According to our findings and previous data regarding metabolites in mitochondrial metabolism, the ameliorative effects of MT might be mediated partly through alterations in metabolites associated with mitochondrial respiration. PMID:25713324

  1. Altering fatty acid availability does not impair prolonged, continuous running to fatigue: evidence for carbohydrate dependence.

    PubMed

    Leckey, Jill J; Burke, Louise M; Morton, James P; Hawley, John A

    2016-01-15

    We determined the effect of suppressing lipolysis via administration of nicotinic acid (NA) on fuel substrate selection and half-marathon running capacity. In a single-blinded, Latin square design, 12 competitive runners completed four trials involving treadmill running until volitional fatigue at a pace based on 95% of personal best half-marathon time. Trials were completed in a fed or overnight fasted state: 1) carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion before (2 g CHO·kg(-1)·body mass(-1)) and during (44 g/h) [CFED]; 2) CFED plus NA ingestion [CFED-NA]; 3) fasted with placebo ingestion during [FAST]; and 4) FAST plus NA ingestion [FAST-NA]. There was no difference in running distance (CFED, 21.53 ± 1.07; CFED-NA, 21.29 ± 1.69; FAST, 20.60 ± 2.09; FAST-NA, 20.11 ± 1.71 km) or time to fatigue between the four trials. Concentrations of plasma free fatty acids (FFA) and glycerol were suppressed following NA ingestion irrespective of preexercise nutritional intake but were higher throughout exercise in FAST compared with all other trials (P < 0.05). Rates of whole-body CHO oxidation were unaffected by NA ingestion in the CFED and FAST trials, but were lower in the FAST trial compared with the CFED-NA trial (P < 0.05). CHO was the primary substrate for exercise in all conditions, contributing 83-91% to total energy expenditure with only a small contribution from fat-based fuels. Blunting the exercise-induced increase in FFA via NA ingestion did not impair intense running capacity lasting ∼85 min, nor did it alter patterns of substrate oxidation in competitive athletes. Although there was a small but obligatory use of fat-based fuels, the oxidation of CHO-based fuels predominates during half-marathon running. PMID:26586912

  2. Cryotherapy Reduces Inflammatory Response Without Altering Muscle Regeneration Process and Extracellular Matrix Remodeling of Rat Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vieira Ramos, Gracielle; Pinheiro, Clara Maria; Messa, Sabrina Peviani; Delfino, Gabriel Borges; Marqueti, Rita de Cássia; Salvini, Tania de Fátima; Durigan, Joao Luiz Quagliotti

    2016-01-01

    The application of cryotherapy is widely used in sports medicine today. Cooling could minimize secondary hypoxic injury through the reduction of cellular metabolism and injury area. Conflicting results have also suggested cryotherapy could delay and impair the regeneration process. There are no definitive findings about the effects of cryotherapy on the process of muscle regeneration. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a clinical-like cryotherapy on inflammation, regeneration and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling on the Tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of rats 3, 7 and 14 days post-injury. It was observed that the intermittent application of cryotherapy (three 30-minute sessions, every 2 h) in the first 48 h post-injury decreased inflammatory processes (mRNA levels of TNF-α, NF-κB, TGF-β and MMP-9 and macrophage percentage). Cryotherapy did not alter regeneration markers such as injury area, desmin and Myod expression. Despite regulating Collagen I and III and their growth factors, cryotherapy did not alter collagen deposition. In summary, clinical-like cryotherapy reduces the inflammatory process through the decrease of macrophage infiltration and the accumulation of the inflammatory key markers without influencing muscle injury area and ECM remodeling. PMID:26725948

  3. The adipokine leptin increases skeletal muscle mass and significantly alters skeletal muscle miRNA expression profile in aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hamrick, Mark W.; Herberg, Samuel; Arounleut, Phonepasong; He, Hong-Zhi; Shiver, Austin; Qi, Rui-Qun; Zhou, Li; Isales, Carlos M.; and others

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Aging is associated with muscle atrophy and loss of muscle mass, known as the sarcopenia of aging. {yields} We demonstrate that age-related muscle atrophy is associated with marked changes in miRNA expression in muscle. {yields} Treating aged mice with the adipokine leptin significantly increased muscle mass and the expression of miRNAs involved in muscle repair. {yields} Recombinant leptin therapy may therefore be a novel approach for treating age-related muscle atrophy. -- Abstract: Age-associated loss of muscle mass, or sarcopenia, contributes directly to frailty and an increased risk of falls and fractures among the elderly. Aged mice and elderly adults both show decreased muscle mass as well as relatively low levels of the fat-derived hormone leptin. Here we demonstrate that loss of muscle mass and myofiber size with aging in mice is associated with significant changes in the expression of specific miRNAs. Aging altered the expression of 57 miRNAs in mouse skeletal muscle, and many of these miRNAs are now reported to be associated specifically with age-related muscle atrophy. These include miR-221, previously identified in studies of myogenesis and muscle development as playing a role in the proliferation and terminal differentiation of myogenic precursors. We also treated aged mice with recombinant leptin, to determine whether leptin therapy could improve muscle mass and alter the miRNA expression profile of aging skeletal muscle. Leptin treatment significantly increased hindlimb muscle mass and extensor digitorum longus fiber size in aged mice. Furthermore, the expression of 37 miRNAs was altered in muscles of leptin-treated mice. In particular, leptin treatment increased the expression of miR-31 and miR-223, miRNAs known to be elevated during muscle regeneration and repair. These findings suggest that aging in skeletal muscle is associated with marked changes in the expression of specific miRNAs, and that nutrient

  4. Simulated Hypergravity Alters Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Shameka; Bettis, Barika; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The cellular effects of gravity are poorly understood due to its constancy and nonavailability of altered gravitational models. Such an understanding is crucial for prolonged space flights. In these studies, we assessed the influence of centrifugation at 6G (HGrav) on vascular smooth muscle (SMC) mobility and proliferation. Cells were: (a) plated at low density and subjected to HGrav for 24-72 hr for proliferation studies, or (b) grown to confluency, subjected to HGrav, mechanically denuded and monitored for cell movement into the denuded area. Controls were maintained under normogravity. SMC showed a 50% inhibition of growth under HGrav and 10% serum; HGrav and low serum resulted in greater growth inhibition. The rate of movement of SMC into the denuded area was 2-3-fold higher under HGrav in low serum compared to controls, but similar in 10% serum. These studies show that HGrav has significant effects on SMC growth and mobility, which are dependent on serum levels.

  5. Muscle fatigue in frog semitendinosus: alterations in contractile function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. V.; Balog, E. M.; Riley, D. A.; Fitts, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the contractile properties of the frog semitendinosus (ST) muscle before and during recovery from fatigue, to relate the observed functional changes to alterations in specific steps in the crossbridge model of muscle contraction, and to determine how fatigue affects the force-frequency relationship. The frog ST (22 degrees C) was fatigued by direct electrical stimulation with 100-ms 150-Hz trains at 1/s for 5 min. The fatigue protocol reduced peak twitch (Pt) and tetanic (Po) force to 32 and 8.5% of initial force, respectively. The decline in Pt was less than Po, in part due to a prolongation in the isometric contraction time (CT), which increased to 300% of the initial value. The isometric twitch duration was greatly prolonged as reflected by the lengthened CT and the 800% increase in the one-half relaxation time (1/2RT). Both Pt and Po showed a biphasic recovery, a rapid initial phase (2 min) followed by a slower (40 min) return to the prefatigue force. CT and 1/2RT also recovered in two phases, returning to 160 and 265% of control in the first 5 min. CT returned to the prefatigue value between 35 and 40 min, whereas even at 60 min 1/2RT was 133% of control. The maximal velocity of shortening, determined by the slack test, was significantly reduced [from 6.7 +/- 0.5 to 2.5 +/- 0.4 optimal muscle length/s] at fatigue. The force-frequency relationship was shifted to the left, so that optimal frequency for generating Po was reduced.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  6. Muscle fatigue in frog semitendinosus: alterations in contractile function.

    PubMed

    Thompson, L V; Balog, E M; Riley, D A; Fitts, R H

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the contractile properties of the frog semitendinosus (ST) muscle before and during recovery from fatigue, to relate the observed functional changes to alterations in specific steps in the crossbridge model of muscle contraction, and to determine how fatigue affects the force-frequency relationship. The frog ST (22 degrees C) was fatigued by direct electrical stimulation with 100-ms 150-Hz trains at 1/s for 5 min. The fatigue protocol reduced peak twitch (Pt) and tetanic (Po) force to 32 and 8.5% of initial force, respectively. The decline in Pt was less than Po, in part due to a prolongation in the isometric contraction time (CT), which increased to 300% of the initial value. The isometric twitch duration was greatly prolonged as reflected by the lengthened CT and the 800% increase in the one-half relaxation time (1/2RT). Both Pt and Po showed a biphasic recovery, a rapid initial phase (2 min) followed by a slower (40 min) return to the prefatigue force. CT and 1/2RT also recovered in two phases, returning to 160 and 265% of control in the first 5 min. CT returned to the prefatigue value between 35 and 40 min, whereas even at 60 min 1/2RT was 133% of control. The maximal velocity of shortening, determined by the slack test, was significantly reduced [from 6.7 +/- 0.5 to 2.5 +/- 0.4 optimal muscle length/s] at fatigue. The force-frequency relationship was shifted to the left, so that optimal frequency for generating Po was reduced.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1535482

  7. Effects of xylitol on carbohydrate digesting enzymes activity, intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake: a multi-mode study.

    PubMed

    Chukwuma, Chika Ifeanyi; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated the possible mechanism(s) behind the effects of xylitol on carbohydrate digesting enzymes activity, muscle glucose uptake and intestinal glucose absorption using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experimental models. The effects of increasing concentrations of xylitol (2.5%-40% or 164.31 mM-2628.99 mM) on alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase activity in vitro and intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake were investigated under ex vivo conditions. Additionally, the effects of an oral bolus dose of xylitol (1 g per kg BW) on gastric emptying and intestinal glucose absorption and digesta transit in the different segments of the intestinal tract were investigated in normal and type 2 diabetic rats at 1 hour after dose administration, when phenol red was used as a recovery marker. Xylitol exhibited concentration-dependent inhibition of alpha amylase (IC₅₀ = 1364.04 mM) and alpha glucosidase (IC₅₀ = 1127.52 mM) activity in vitro and small intestinal glucose absorption under ex vivo condition. Xylitol also increased dose dependent muscle glucose uptake with and without insulin, although the uptake was not significantly affected by the addition of insulin. Oral single bolus dose of xylitol significantly delayed gastric emptying, inhibited intestinal glucose absorption but increased the intestinal digesta transit rate in both normal and diabetic rats compared to their respective controls. The data of this study suggest that xylitol reduces intestinal glucose absorption via inhibiting major carbohydrate digesting enzymes, slowing gastric emptying and fastening the intestinal transit rate, but increases muscle glucose uptake in normal and type 2 diabetic rats. PMID:25656339

  8. Carbohydrate Source and Protein Degradability Alter Lactation, Ruminal, and Blood Measures.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of nonfiber carbohydrate source (NFC) and protein degradability (RDP) in the diets of lactating dairy cattle on intake, production, efficiency, and ruminal measures were evaluated in a three period (21 d) partially balanced incomplete latin square design with a 3x2 factorial arrangement of t...

  9. Altered Carbohydrates Allocation by Associated Bacteria-fungi Interactions in a Bark Beetle-microbe Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fangyuan; Lou, Qiaozhe; Wang, Bo; Xu, Letian; Cheng, Chihang; Lu, Min; Sun, Jianghua

    2016-01-01

    Insect-microbe interaction is a key area of research in multiplayer symbiosis, yet little is known about the role of microbe-microbe interactions in insect-microbe symbioses. The red turpentine beetle (RTB) has destroyed millions of healthy pines in China and forms context-dependent relationships with associated fungi. The adult-associated fungus Leptographium procerum have played key roles in RTB colonization. However, common fungal associates (L. procerum and Ophiostoma minus) with RTB larvae compete for carbohydrates. Here, we report that dominant bacteria associated with RTB larvae buffer the competition by inhibiting the growth and D-glucose consumption of O. minus. However, they didn’t inhibit the growth of L. procerum and forced this fungus to consume D-pinitol before consuming D-glucose, even though D-glucose was available and a better carbon source not only for L. procerum but also for RTB larvae and associated bacteria. This suggests the most frequently isolated bacteria associated with RTB larvae could affect fungal growth and the sequence of carbohydrate consumption. Thus, this regulates carbohydrate allocation in the RTB larva-microbe community, which may in turn benefit RTB larvae development. We also discuss the mechanism of carbohydrate allocation in the RTB larva-microbe community, and its potential contribution to the maintenance of a symbiotic community. PMID:26839264

  10. Calcium homeostasis is altered in skeletal muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats: cytofluorimetric and gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Liantonio, Antonella; Camerino, Giulia M; Scaramuzzi, Antonia; Cannone, Maria; Pierno, Sabata; De Bellis, Michela; Conte, Elena; Fraysse, Bodvael; Tricarico, Domenico; Conte Camerino, Diana

    2014-10-01

    Hypertension is often associated with skeletal muscle pathological conditions related to function and metabolism. The mechanisms underlying the development of these pathological conditions remain undefined. Because calcium homeostasis is a biomarker of muscle function, we assessed whether it is altered in hypertensive muscles. We measured resting intracellular calcium and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers from normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) by cytofluorimetric technique and determined the expression of SOCE gene machinery by real-time PCR. Hypertension caused a phenotype-dependent dysregulation of calcium homeostasis; the resting intracellular calcium of extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles of SHRs were differently altered with respect to the related muscle of normotensive animals. In addition, soleus muscles of SHR showed reduced activity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and decreased sarcolemmal calcium permeability at rest and after SOCE activation. Accordingly, we found an alteration of the expression levels of some SOCE components, such as stromal interaction molecule 1, calcium release-activated calcium modulator 1, and transient receptor potential canonical 1. The hypertension-induced alterations of calcium homeostasis in the soleus muscle of SHRs occurred with changes of some functional outcomes as excitability and resting chloride conductance. We provide suitable targets for therapeutic interventions aimed at counterbalancing muscle performance decline in hypertension, and propose the reported calcium-dependent parameters as indexes to predict how the antihypertensive drugs could influence muscle function. PMID:25084345

  11. Chronic neck pain alters muscle activation patterns to sudden movements.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Shellie A; Falla, Deborah

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the activation of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and splenius capitis (SC) muscles in response to unanticipated, full body perturbations in individuals with chronic neck pain (NP) and age-matched healthy controls (HC). Individuals with NP had a history of NP for 8.9 ± 7.8 years, rated the intensity of NP as 4.2 ± 2.0 (score out of 10), and scored 15.3 ± 6.5 on the Neck Disability Index. Participants stood on a moveable platform during which 32 randomized postural perturbations (eight repetitions of four perturbation types: 8 cm forward slide (FS), 8 cm backward slides, 10° forward tilt, and 10° backward tilt) with varying inter-perturbation time intervals were performed over a period of 5 min. Bilateral surface electromyography (EMG) from the SCM and SC was recorded, and the onset time and the average rectified value of the EMG signal was determined for epochs of 100 ms; starting 100 ms prior to and 500 ms after the perturbation onset. Individuals with NP, as compared to HC, demonstrated delayed onset times and reduced EMG amplitude of the SCM and SC muscles in response to all postural perturbations. Such findings were most pronounced following the FS postural perturbation (healthy vs. NP for SCM 83.3 ± 8.0 vs. 86.3 ± 4.4 and SC 75.6 ± 3.5 vs. 89.3 ± 4.2), which was also associated with the greatest change (expressed in % relative to baseline) in EMG amplitude (healthy vs. NP for SCM 206.6 ± 50.4 vs. 115.9 ± 15.7 and SC 83.4 ± 19.2 vs. 69.2 ± 10.9) across all postural perturbations types. Individuals with NP display altered neural control of the neck musculature in response to rapid, unanticipated full body postural perturbations. Although the relative timing of neck musculature activity in individuals with NP appears to be intact, simultaneous co-activation of the neck musculature emerges for unanticipated anterior-posterior postural perturbations. PMID:24632836

  12. Apparent low ability of liver and muscle to adapt to variation of dietary carbohydrate:protein ratio in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine; Panserat, Stéphane; Larquier, Mélanie; Dias, Karine; Surget, Anne; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Seiliez, Iban

    2013-04-28

    The rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exhibits high dietary amino acid requirements and an apparent inefficiency to use dietary carbohydrates. Using this species, we investigated the metabolic consequences of long-term high carbohydrates/low protein feeding. Fish were fed two experimental diets containing either 20% carbohydrates/50% proteins (C20P50), or high levels of carbohydrates at the expense of proteins (35% carbohydrates/35% proteins--C35P35). The expression of genes related to hepatic and muscle glycolysis (glucokinase (GK), pyruvate kinase and hexokinase) illustrates the poor utilisation of carbohydrates irrespective of their dietary levels. The increased postprandial GK activity and the absence of inhibition of the gluconeogenic enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase activity support the hypothesis of the existence of a futile cycle around glucose phosphorylation extending postprandial hyperglycaemia. After 9 weeks of feeding, the C35P35-fed trout displayed lower body weight and feed efficiency and reduced protein and fat gains than those fed C20P50. The reduced activation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4-E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) in the muscle in this C35P35 group suggests a reduction in protein synthesis, possibly contributing to the reduction in N gain. An increase in the dietary carbohydrate:protein ratio decreased the expression of genes involved in amino acid catabolism (serine dehydratase and branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase E1α and E1β), and increased that of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, suggesting a higher reliance on lipids as energy source in fish fed high-carbohydrate and low-protein diets. This probably also contributes to the lower fat gain. Together, these results show that different metabolic pathways are affected by a high-carbohydrate/low-protein diet in rainbow trout. PMID:22951215

  13. Mechanically induced alterations in cultured skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.; Hatfaludy, S.; Karlisch, P.; Shansky, J.

    1991-01-01

    Model systems are available for mechanically stimulating cultured skeletal muscle cells by passive tensile forces which simulate those found in vivo. When applied to embryonic muscle cells in vitro these forces induce tissue organogenesis, metabolic adaptations, and muscle cell growth. The mechanical stimulation of muscle cell growth correlates with stretch-induced increases in the efflux of prostaglandins PGE2 and PGF2(alpha) in a time and frequency dependent manner. These prostaglandins act as mechanical 'second messengers' regulating skeletal muscle protein turnover rates. Since they also effect bone remodelling in response to tissue loading and unloading, secreted prostaglandins may serve as paracrine growth factors, coordinating the growth rates of muscle and bone in response to external mechanical forces. Cell culture model systems will supplement other models in understanding mechanical transduction processes at the molecular level.

  14. Alteration of the carbohydrate-binding specificity of a C-type lectin CEL-I mutant with an EPN carbohydrate-binding motif.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Ishimine, Tomohiro; Baba, Tomohiro; Kimura, Masanari; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro

    2013-07-01

    CEL-I is a Gal/GalNAc-specific C-type lectin isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of two carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) with the carbohydrate-recognition motif QPD (Gln-Pro- Asp), which is generally known to exist in galactose-specific C-type CRDs. In the present study, a mutant CEL-I with EPN (Glu-Pro-Asn) motif, which is thought to be responsible for the carbohydrate-recognition of mannose-specific Ctype CRDs, was produced in Escherichia coli, and its effects on the carbohydrate-binding specificity were examined using polyamidoamine dendrimer (PD) conjugated with carbohydrates. Although wild-type CEL-I effectively formed complexes with N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-PD but not with mannose-PD, the mutant CEL-I showed relatively weak but definite affinity for mannose-PD. These results indicated that the QPD and EPN motifs play a significant role in the carbohydrate-recognition mechanism of CEL-I, especially in the discrimination of galactose and mannose. Additional mutations in the recombinant CEL-I binding site may further increase its specificity for mannose, and should provide insights into designing novel carbohydrate-recognition proteins. PMID:23157284

  15. Daily Overfeeding from Protein and/or Carbohydrate Supplementation for Eight Weeks in Conjunction with Resistance Training Does not Improve Body Composition and Muscle Strength or Increase Markers Indicative of Muscle Protein Synthesis and Myogenesis in Resistance-Trained Males

    PubMed Central

    Spillane, Mike; Willoughby, Darryn S.

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the effects of heavy resistance training and daily overfeeding with carbohydrate and/or protein on blood and skeletal muscle markers of protein synthesis (MPS), myogenesis, body composition, and muscle performance. Twenty one resistance-trained males were randomly assigned to either a protein + carbohydrate [HPC (n = 11)] or a carbohydrate [HC (n = 10)] supplement group in a double-blind fashion. Body composition and muscle performance were assessed, and venous blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained before and after eight weeks of resistance training and supplementation. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). Total body mass, body water, and fat mass were significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training, but not supplementation (p < 0.05); however, lean mass was not significantly increased in either group (p = 0.068). Upper- (p = 0.024) and lower-body (p = 0.001) muscle strength and myosin heavy chain (MHC) 1 (p = 0.039) and MHC 2A (p = 0.027) were also significantly increased with resistance training. Serum IGF-1, GH, and HGF were not significantly affected (p > 0.05). Muscle total DNA, total protein, and c-Met were not significantly affected (p > 0.05). In conjunction with resistance training, the peri-exercise and daily overfeeding of protein and/or carbohydrate did not preferentially improve body composition, muscle performance, and markers indicative of MPS and myogenic activation. Key points In response to 56 days of heavy resistance training and HC or HPC supplementation, similar increases in muscle mass and strength in both groups occurred; however, the increases were not different between supplement groups. The supplementation of HPC had no preferential effect on augmenting serum IGF-1 GH, or HGF. The supplementation of HPC had no preferential effect on augmenting increases in total muscle protein content or the myogenic markers, total DNA and muscle cMet content. In response to 56 days of

  16. Daily Overfeeding from Protein and/or Carbohydrate Supplementation for Eight Weeks in Conjunction with Resistance Training Does not Improve Body Composition and Muscle Strength or Increase Markers Indicative of Muscle Protein Synthesis and Myogenesis in Resistance-Trained Males.

    PubMed

    Spillane, Mike; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2016-03-01

    This study determined the effects of heavy resistance training and daily overfeeding with carbohydrate and/or protein on blood and skeletal muscle markers of protein synthesis (MPS), myogenesis, body composition, and muscle performance. Twenty one resistance-trained males were randomly assigned to either a protein + carbohydrate [HPC (n = 11)] or a carbohydrate [HC (n = 10)] supplement group in a double-blind fashion. Body composition and muscle performance were assessed, and venous blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained before and after eight weeks of resistance training and supplementation. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). Total body mass, body water, and fat mass were significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training, but not supplementation (p < 0.05); however, lean mass was not significantly increased in either group (p = 0.068). Upper- (p = 0.024) and lower-body (p = 0.001) muscle strength and myosin heavy chain (MHC) 1 (p = 0.039) and MHC 2A (p = 0.027) were also significantly increased with resistance training. Serum IGF-1, GH, and HGF were not significantly affected (p > 0.05). Muscle total DNA, total protein, and c-Met were not significantly affected (p > 0.05). In conjunction with resistance training, the peri-exercise and daily overfeeding of protein and/or carbohydrate did not preferentially improve body composition, muscle performance, and markers indicative of MPS and myogenic activation. Key pointsIn response to 56 days of heavy resistance training and HC or HPC supplementation, similar increases in muscle mass and strength in both groups occurred; however, the increases were not different between supplement groups.The supplementation of HPC had no preferential effect on augmenting serum IGF-1 GH, or HGF.The supplementation of HPC had no preferential effect on augmenting increases in total muscle protein content or the myogenic markers, total DNA and muscle cMet content.In response to 56 days of a

  17. Altered microRNA expression in bovine skeletal muscle with age

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age dependent decline in skeletal muscle function leads to several inherited and acquired muscular disorders in elderly individuals. The levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) could be altered during muscle maintenance and repair. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive investigation for miRNAs from 5 differe...

  18. Adaptation of muscle coordination to altered task mechanics during steady-state cycling.

    PubMed

    Neptune, R R; Herzog, W

    2000-02-01

    The objective of this work was to increase our understanding of how motor patterns are produced during movement tasks by quantifying adaptations in muscle coordination in response to altered task mechanics. We used pedaling as our movement paradigm because it is a constrained cyclical movement that allows for a controlled investigation of test conditions such as movement speed and effort. Altered task mechanics were introduced using an elliptical chainring. The kinematics of the crank were changed from a relatively constant angular velocity using a circular chainring to a widely varying angular velocity using an elliptical chainring. Kinetic, kinematic and muscle activity data were collected from eight competitive cyclists using three different chainrings--one circular and two different orientations of an elliptical chainring. We tested the hypotheses that muscle coordination patterns (EMG timing and magnitude), specifically the regions of active muscle force production, would shift towards regions in the crank cycle in which the crank angular velocity, and hence muscle contraction speeds, were favorable to produce muscle power as defined by the skeletal muscle power-velocity relationship. The results showed that our hypothesis with regards to timing was not supported. Although there were statistically significant shifts in muscle timing, the shifts were minor in absolute terms and appeared to be the result of the muscles accounting for the activation dynamics associated with muscle force development (i.e. the delay in muscle force rise and decay). But, significant changes in the magnitude of muscle EMG during regions of slow crank angular velocity for the tibialis anterior and rectus femoris were observed. Thus, the nervous system used adaptations to the muscle EMG magnitude, rather than the timing, to adapt to the altered task mechanics. The results also suggested that cyclists might work on the descending limb of the power-velocity relationship when pedaling at

  19. Truncated CASK does not alter skeletal muscle or protein interactors.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Jamie L; Mays, Tessily A; Varian, Kenneth D; Wilson, Joanna B; Janssen, Paul M L; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A

    2008-09-01

    CASK (Ca2+, calmodulin-associated serine/threonine kinase) is an essential mammalian cell junction protein and is also crucial at Drosophila neuromuscular synapses. We have shown that CASK is present in mammalian skeletal muscle at the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction. CASK interacts biochemically with channels at central synapses, and studies in cultured cells have led to proposed functions for CASK. However, in vivo functions of CASK in skeletal muscle remain unknown. To test hypotheses of CASK functions, we generated two lines of transgenic mice, which overexpress full-length and truncated CASK protein in skeletal muscle. Extensive analyses showed that overexpression of CASK protein did not affect the morphology or physiology of skeletal muscle, the morphology of the neuromuscular junction, or the levels or distribution of protein interactors. These results contrast with previous cell culture experiments and emphasize the importance of in vivo analysis of protein function. PMID:18642383

  20. Altered macrophage phenotype transition impairs skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanzhou; Melton, David W; Porter, Laurel; Sarwar, Zaheer U; McManus, Linda M; Shireman, Paula K

    2014-04-01

    Monocyte/macrophage polarization in skeletal muscle regeneration is ill defined. We used CD11b-diphtheria toxin receptor transgenic mice to transiently deplete monocytes/macrophages at multiple stages before and after muscle injury induced by cardiotoxin. Fat accumulation within regenerated muscle was maximal when ablation occurred at the same time as cardiotoxin-induced injury. Early ablation (day 1 after cardiotoxin) resulted in the smallest regenerated myofiber size together with increased residual necrotic myofibers and fat accumulation. However, muscle regeneration after late (day 4) ablation was similar to controls. Levels of inflammatory cells in injured muscle following early ablation and associated with impaired muscle regeneration were determined by flow cytometry. Delayed, but exaggerated, monocyte [CD11b(+)(CD90/B220/CD49b/NK1.1/Ly6G)(-)(F4/80/I-Ab/CD11c)(-)Ly6C(+/-)] accumulation occurred; interestingly, Ly6C(+) and Ly6C(-) monocytes were present concurrently in ablated animals and control mice. In addition to monocytes, proinflammatory, Ly6C(+) macrophage accumulation following early ablation was delayed compared to controls. In both groups, CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells exhibited minimal expression of the M2 markers CD206 and CD301. Nevertheless, early ablation delayed and decreased the transient accumulation of CD11b(+)F4/80(+)Ly6C(-)CD301(-) macrophages; in control animals, the later tissue accumulation of these cells appeared to correspond to that of anti-inflammatory macrophages, determined by cytokine production and arginase activity. In summary, impairments in muscle regeneration were associated with exaggerated monocyte recruitment and reduced Ly6C(-) macrophages; the switch of macrophage/monocyte subsets is critical to muscle regeneration. PMID:24525152

  1. Altered Macrophage Phenotype Transition Impairs Skeletal Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hanzhou; Melton, David W.; Porter, Laurel; Sarwar, Zaheer U.; McManus, Linda M.; Shireman, Paula K.

    2015-01-01

    Monocyte/macrophage polarization in skeletal muscle regeneration is ill defined. We used CD11b-diphtheria toxin receptor transgenic mice to transiently deplete monocytes/macrophages at multiple stages before and after muscle injury induced by cardiotoxin. Fat accumulation within regenerated muscle was maximal when ablation occurred at the same time as cardiotoxin-induced injury. Early ablation (day 1 after cardiotoxin) resulted in the smallest regenerated myofiber size together with increased residual necrotic myofibers and fat accumulation. However, muscle regeneration after late (day 4) ablation was similar to controls. Levels of inflammatory cells in injured muscle following early ablation and associated with impaired muscle regeneration were determined by flow cytometry. Delayed, but exaggerated, monocyte [CD11b+(CD90/B220/CD49b/NK1.1/Ly6G)−(F4/80/I-Ab/CD11c)−Ly6C+/−] accumulation occurred; interestingly, Ly6C+ and Ly6C− monocytes were present concurrently in ablated animals and control mice. In addition to monocytes, proinflammatory, Ly6C+ macrophage accumulation following early ablation was delayed compared to controls. In both groups, CD11b+F4/80+ cells exhibited minimal expression of the M2 markers CD206 and CD301. Nevertheless, early ablation delayed and decreased the transient accumulation of CD11b+F4/80+Ly6C−CD301− macrophages; in control animals, the later tissue accumulation of these cells appeared to correspond to that of anti-inflammatory macrophages, determined by cytokine production and arginase activity. In summary, impairments in muscle regeneration were associated with exaggerated monocyte recruitment and reduced Ly6C− macrophages; the switch of macrophage/monocyte subsets is critical to muscle regeneration. PMID:24525152

  2. Alterations in innate immunity reactants and carbohydrate and lipid metabolism precede occurrence of metritis in transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Dervishi, Elda; Zhang, Guanshi; Hailemariam, Dagnachew; Goldansaz, Seyed Ali; Deng, Qilan; Dunn, Suzanna M; Ametaj, Burim N

    2016-02-01

    The overall purpose of the present study was to search for early screening biomarkers of disease state. Therefore the objectives of this study were to evaluate metabolites related to carbohydrate metabolism, acute phase proteins, and proinflammatory cytokines in the blood of transition dairy cows starting at -8 weeks before calving. Blood samples were collected from 100 multiparous Holstein dairy cows during -8, -4, disease diagnosis, +4 and +8 weeks relative to parturition. Six healthy cows and 6 cows that showed clinical signs of metritis were selected for serum analysis. Overall the results showed that cows with metritis had greater concentration of lactate, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and serum amyloid A (SAA) versus healthy cows throughout the experiment. The disease was associated with decrease in milk production and fat: protein ratio. Cows with metritis showed alteration in metabolites related to carbohydrate metabolism, acute phase proteins, and proinflammatory cytokines starting at -8 weeks prior to parturition and appearance of clinical signs of the disease. This study suggests a possible use of cytokines as early markers of disease in dairy cows. PMID:26850534

  3. Prevention of metabolic alterations caused by suspension hypokinesia in leg muscles of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Jaspers, S. R.; Fagan, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Rats were subjected to tail-cast suspension hypokinesia for 6 days with one leg immobilized in dorsal flexion by casting. Control animals were also tail-casted. The soleus, gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles of uncasted hypokinetic legs were smaller than control muscles. Dorsal flexion prevented atrophy of these muscles and caused the soleus to hypertrophy. The anterior muscles were unaffected by hypokinesia. The smaller size of the soleus of the uncasted leg relative to the dorsal flexed and weight bearing limbs correlated with slower protein synthesis and faster proteolysis. The capacity of this muscle to synthesize glutamine (gln), which carries nitrogenous waste from muscle was also measured. Although tissue homogenates showed higher activities of gln synthetase, the rate of de novo synthesis was not altered in intact muscle but the tissue ratio of gln/glutamate was decreased. Glutamate and ATP were not limiting for gln synthesis, but availability of ammonia may be a limiting factor for this process in hypokinesia.

  4. Alterations in upper limb muscle synergy structure in chronic stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Rymer, William Z.; Perreault, Eric J.; Yoo, Seng Bum; Beer, Randall F.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies in neurologically intact subjects have shown that motor coordination can be described by task-dependent combinations of a few muscle synergies, defined here as a fixed pattern of activation across a set of muscles. Arm function in severely impaired stroke survivors is characterized by stereotypical postural and movement patterns involving the shoulder and elbow. Accordingly, we hypothesized that muscle synergy composition is altered in severely impaired stroke survivors. Using an isometric force matching protocol, we examined the spatial activation patterns of elbow and shoulder muscles in the affected arm of 10 stroke survivors (Fugl-Meyer <25/66) and in both arms of six age-matched controls. Underlying muscle synergies were identified using non-negative matrix factorization. In both groups, muscle activation patterns could be reconstructed by combinations of a few muscle synergies (typically 4). We did not find abnormal coupling of shoulder and elbow muscles within individual muscle synergies. In stroke survivors, as in controls, two of the synergies were comprised of isolated activation of the elbow flexors and extensors. However, muscle synergies involving proximal muscles exhibited consistent alterations following stroke. Unlike controls, the anterior deltoid was coactivated with medial and posterior deltoids within the shoulder abductor/extensor synergy and the shoulder adductor/flexor synergy in stroke was dominated by activation of pectoralis major, with limited anterior deltoid activation. Recruitment of the altered shoulder muscle synergies was strongly associated with abnormal task performance. Overall, our results suggest that an impaired control of the individual deltoid heads may contribute to poststroke deficits in arm function. PMID:23155178

  5. Tissue sorbitol concentration can be altered by changing the type of dietary carbohydrate or copper status

    SciTech Connect

    Beal, T.; Lewis, C.G.; Fields, M. )

    1989-02-09

    This study was designed to determine whether rehabilitation of tissue sorbitol concentration occurs when rats consuming a high-fructose, low-copper diet are changed to diets containing starch or copper. Weanling male rats were provided with a diet which contained 62.7% fructose and 0.6 or 6.0 {mu}g Cu/g (F-Cu) for 4 weeks and then changed to either a fructose diet which contained 6.0 {mu}g Cu/g or a starch diet which contained either 0.6 or 6.0 {mu}g Cu/g for 2 weeks. Hepatic copper concentration of rats eating copper-deficient diets was about 30% of copper adequate rats regardless of the type of dietary carbohydrate. Pancreatic fructose, glucose and sorbitol concentrations were significantly lowered in rats changed to a starch diet. Kidney fructose and sorbitol concentrations were significantly lowered in rats changed to a starch diet. For all dietary groups, pancreatic and kidney sorbitol concentrations returned to normal after removal of rats from the F-Cu diet. In general, changing rats from a high-fructose, low-copper diet to a fructose diet with copper or a starch diet with or without copper improved the copper deficiency symptoms which changed in concert with tissue sorbitol levels.

  6. Group size modifies the patterns and muscle carbohydrate effects of aggression in Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Haller, J

    1992-08-01

    Aggressive encounters of previously isolated individuals were investigated in dyads and groups of five. Fights were longer and more intense when they were performed in dyads compared to fights involving five fishes. During aggressive encounters, an elevation in carbohydrate catabolism was noticed in both dyads and groups. Losing a fight resulted in a reduction in glycogen content and an increase in glycogen synthesis. Similar changes in winners did not appear; thus, the metabolic response in losers was different from that noticed in winners, both in dyads and groups. In dyadic contest winners, a marked increase in the free glucose content and glucose consumption was noticed (without changes in losers). In groups, free glucose content of the winners was not modified, while glucose consumption was enhanced both in winners and losers. Thus, the differences existing between winners and losers were greater in dyads compared to those noticed in groups. The energy cost of aggression seems to be different in dyads compared to groups of five. The rate of glucose oxidation was strongly reduced in dyads (there were no differences between winners and losers in this respect), while in groups, this parameter was not modified. PMID:1523255

  7. Altered signaling for mitochondrial and myofibrillar biogenesis in skeletal muscles of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Dominique; Wens, Inez; Vandenabeele, Frank; Verboven, Kenneth; Eijnde, Bert O

    2015-07-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) experience muscle weakness and lowered muscle oxidative capacity. To explore the etiology for the development of such muscle phenotype we studied skeletal muscle adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase phosphorylation (phospho-AMPKα, governing mitochondrial biogenesis) and mammalian target of rapamycin phosphorylation (phospho-mTOR, governing myofibrillar biogenesis) in pwMS. After assessment of body composition, muscle strength, exercise tolerance, and muscle fiber type, muscle phospho-AMPKα and phospho-mTOR were assessed in 14 pwMS and 10 healthy controls (part 1). Next, an endurance exercise bout was executed by 9 pwMS and 7 healthy subjects, with assessment of changes in muscle phospho-AMPKα and phospho-mTOR (part 2). Increased basal muscle phospho-AMPKα and phospho-mTOR were present in MS (P < 0.01) and independently related to MS. Correlations between muscle phospho-AMPKα or phospho-mTOR and whole-body fat mass, peak oxygen uptake, and expanded disability status scale (P < 0.05) were found. After endurance exercise muscle phospho-AMPKα and phospho-mTOR remained increased in pwMS (P < 0.01). Muscle signaling cascades for mitochondrial and myofibrillar biogenesis are altered in MS and related to the impairment and disability level. These findings indicate a link between muscle signaling cascades and the level of disability and impairment, and thus may open a new area for the development of novel therapies for peripheral muscle impairment in MS. PMID:25666356

  8. An Altered Phenotype in a Conditional Knockout of Pitx2 in Extraocular Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuefang; Cheng, Georgiana; Dieter, Lisa; Hjalt, Tord A.; Andrade, Francisco H.; Stahl, John S.; Kaminski, Henry J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the temporal and spatial expression of Pitx2, a bicoid-like homeobox transcription factor, during postnatal development of mouse extraocular muscle and to evaluate its role in the growth and phenotypic maintenance of postnatal extraocular muscle. Methods Mouse extraocular muscles of different ages were examined for the expression of Pitx2 by RT-PCR, q-PCR, and immunostaining. A conditional mutant mouse strain, in which Pitx2 function is inactivated at postnatal day (P)0, was generated with a Cre-loxP strategy. Histology, immunostaining, realtime PCR, in vitro muscle contractility, and in vivo ocular motility were used to study the effect of Pitx2 depletion on extraocular muscle. Results All three Pitx2 isoforms were expressed by extraocular muscle and at higher levels than in other striated muscles. Immunostaining demonstrated the presence of Pitx2 mainly in extraocular muscle myonuclei. However, no obvious expression patterns were observed in terms of anatomic region (orbital versus global layer), innervation zone, or muscle fiber types. The mutant extraocular muscle had no obvious pathology but had altered muscle fiber sizes. Expression levels of myosin isoforms Myh1, Myh6, Myh7, and Myh13 were reduced, whereas Myh2, Myh3, Myh4, and Myh8 were not affected by postnatal loss of Pitx2. In vitro, Pitx2 loss made the extraocular muscles stronger, faster, and more fatigable. Eye movement recordings found saccades to have a lower peak velocity. Conclusions Pitx2 is important in maintaining the mature extraocular muscle phenotype and regulating the expression of critical contractile proteins. Modulation of Pitx2 expression can influence extraocular muscle function with long-term therapeutic implications. PMID:19407022

  9. Creatine ingestion augments dietary carbohydrate mediated muscle glycogen supercompensation during the initial 24 h of recovery following prolonged exhaustive exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Paul A; Fox, John; Peirce, Nicholas; Jones, Simon W; Casey, Anna; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2016-08-01

    Muscle glycogen availability can limit endurance exercise performance. We previously demonstrated 5 days of creatine (Cr) and carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion augmented post-exercise muscle glycogen storage compared to CHO feeding alone in healthy volunteers. Here, we aimed to characterise the time-course of this Cr-induced response under more stringent and controlled experimental conditions and identify potential mechanisms underpinning this phenomenon. Fourteen healthy, male volunteers cycled to exhaustion at 70 % VO2peak. Muscle biopsies were obtained at rest immediately post-exercise and after 1, 3 and 6 days of recovery, during which Cr or placebo supplements (20 g day(-1)) were ingested along with a prescribed high CHO diet (37.5 kcal kg body mass(-1) day(-1), >80 % calories CHO). Oral-glucose tolerance tests (oral-GTT) were performed pre-exercise and after 1, 3 and 6 days of Cr and placebo supplementation. Exercise depleted muscle glycogen content to the same extent in both treatment groups. Creatine supplementation increased muscle total-Cr, free-Cr and phosphocreatine (PCr) content above placebo following 1, 3 and 6 days of supplementation (all P < 0.05). Creatine supplementation also increased muscle glycogen content noticeably above placebo after 1 day of supplementation (P < 0.05), which was sustained thereafter. This study confirmed dietary Cr augments post-exercise muscle glycogen super-compensation, and demonstrates this occurred during the initial 24 h of post-exercise recovery (when muscle total-Cr had increased by <10 %). This marked response ensued without apparent treatment differences in muscle insulin sensitivity (oral-GTT, muscle GLUT4 mRNA), osmotic stress (muscle c-fos and HSP72 mRNA) or muscle cell volume (muscle water content) responses, such that another mechanism must be causative. PMID:27193231

  10. Altered fibre types in gastrocnemius muscle of high wheel-running selected mice with mini-muscle phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Guderley, Helga; Joanisse, Denis R; Mokas, Sophie; Bilodeau, Geneviève M; Garland, Theodore

    2008-03-01

    Selective breeding of mice for high voluntary wheel running has favoured characteristics that facilitate sustained, aerobically supported activity, including a "mini-muscle" phenotype with markedly reduced hind limb muscle mass, increased mass-specific activities of oxidative enzymes, decreased % myosin heavy chain IIb, and, in the medial gastrocnemius, reduced twitch speed, reduced mass-specific isotonic power, and increased fatigue resistance. To evaluate whether selection has altered fibre type expression in mice with either "mini" or normal muscle phenotypes, we examined fibre types of red and white gastrocnemius. In both the medial and lateral gastrocnemius, the mini-phenotype increased activities of oxidative enzymes and decreased activities of glycolytic enzymes. In red muscle samples, the mini-phenotype markedly changed fibre types, with the % type I and type IIA fibres and the surface area of type IIA fibres increasing; in addition, mice from selected lines in general had an increased % type IIA fibres and larger type I fibres as compared with mice from control lines. White muscle samples from mini-mice showed dramatic structural alterations, with an atypical distribution of extremely small, unidentifiable fibres surrounded by larger, more oxidative fibres than normally present in white muscle. The increased proportion of oxidative fibres and these atypical small fibres together may explain the reduced mass and increased mitochondrial enzyme activities in mini-muscles. These and previous results demonstrate that extension of selective breeding beyond the time when the response of the selected trait (i.e. distance run) has levelled off can still modify the mechanistic underpinnings of this behaviour. PMID:18226573

  11. Multiple muscle cell alterations in a case of encephalomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Hisashi; Tandler, Bernard; Rosca, Mariana; McCandless, Shawn E; Katirji, Bashar; Cohen, Mark L; Rapisuwon, Suthee; Hoppel, Charles L

    2014-02-01

    Skeletal muscle from an encephalomyopathy was examined by morphological and biochemical modalities. Mitochondria displayed variability in size, numbers per myocyte, and morphology. Certain organelles had stacks of dense cristae, others contained variable numbers of crystalloids or several lipid droplets. In isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria, oxidative phosphorylation was reduced, but activities of the electron transport chain components were unaffected. This is the second case of adult onset encephalomyopathy with a phenotype overlapping MERRF and Kearns-Sayre syndrome associated with a heteroplasmic mtDNA 3255G > A mutation in the tRNA(UUR(LEU)). This study emphasizes the desirability of a multidisciplinary approach in the diagnosis of complex myopathies. PMID:24134831

  12. Altered lower leg muscle activation patterns in patients with cerebral palsy during cycling on an ergometer

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Pinto, Ana; Blumenstein, Tobias; Turova, Varvara; Lampe, Renée

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cycling on a recumbent ergometer constitutes one of the most popular rehabilitation exercises in cerebral palsy (CP). However, no control is performed on how muscles are being used during training. Given that patients with CP present altered muscular activity patterns during cycling or walking, it is possible that an incorrect pattern of muscle activation is being promoted during rehabilitation cycling. This study investigated patterns of muscular activation during cycling on a recumbent ergometer in patients with CP and whether those patterns are determined by the degree of spasticity and of mobility. Methods Electromyographic (EMG) recordings of lower leg muscle activation during cycling on a recumbent ergometer were performed in 14 adult patients diagnosed with CP and five adult healthy participants. EMG recordings were done with an eight-channel EMG system built in the laboratory. The activity of the following muscles was recorded: Musculus rectus femoris, Musculus biceps femoris, Musculus tibialis anterior, and Musculus gastrocnemius. The degree of muscle spasticity and mobility was assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale and the Gross Motor Function Classification System, respectively. Muscle activation patterns were described in terms of onset and duration of activation as well as duration of cocontractions. Results Muscle activation in CP was characterized by earlier onsets, longer periods of activation, a higher occurrence of agonist–antagonist cocontractions, and a more variable cycling tempo in comparison to healthy participants. The degree of altered muscle activation pattern correlated significantly with the degree of spasticity. Conclusion This study confirmed the occurrence of altered lower leg muscle activation patterns in patients with CP during cycling on a recumbent ergometer. There is a need to develop feedback systems that can inform patients and therapists of an incorrect muscle activation during cycling and support the training

  13. Winter warming delays dormancy release, advances budburst, alters carbohydrate metabolism and reduces yield in a temperate shrub.

    PubMed

    Pagter, Majken; Andersen, Uffe Brandt; Andersen, Lillie

    2015-01-01

    Global climate models predict an increase in the mean surface air temperature, with a disproportionate increase during winter. Since temperature is a major driver of phenological events in temperate woody perennials, warming is likely to induce changes in a range of these events. We investigated the impact of slightly elevated temperatures (+0.76 °C in the air, +1.35 °C in the soil) during the non-growing season (October-April) on freezing tolerance, carbohydrate metabolism, dormancy release, spring phenology and reproductive output in two blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum) cultivars to understand how winter warming modifies phenological traits in a woody perennial known to have a large chilling requirement and to be sensitive to spring frost. Warming delayed dormancy release more in the cultivar 'Narve Viking' than in the cultivar 'Titania', but advanced budburst and flowering predominantly in 'Titania'. Since 'Narve Viking' has a higher chilling requirement than 'Titania', this indicates that, in high-chilling-requiring genotypes, dormancy responses may temper the effect of warming on spring phenology. Winter warming significantly reduced fruit yield the following summer in both cultivars, corroborating the hypothesis that a decline in winter chill may decrease reproductive effort in blackcurrant. Elevated winter temperatures tended to decrease stem freezing tolerance during cold acclimation and deacclimation, but it did not increase the risk of freeze-induced damage mid-winter. Plants at elevated temperature showed decreased levels of sucrose in stems of both cultivars and flower buds of 'Narve Viking', which, in buds, was associated with increased concentrations of glucose and fructose. Hence, winter warming influences carbohydrate metabolism, but it remains to be elucidated whether decreased sucrose levels account for any changes in freezing tolerance. Our results demonstrate that even a slight increase in winter temperature may alter phenological traits in

  14. Over-Expressing Mitofusin-2 in Healthy Mature Mammalian Skeletal Muscle Does Not Alter Mitochondrial Bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Lally, James S. V.; Herbst, Eric A. F.; Matravadia, Sarthak; Maher, Amy C.; Perry, Christopher G. R.; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Holloway, Graham P.

    2013-01-01

    The role of mitofusin-2 (MFN-2) in regulating mitochondrial dynamics has been well-characterized in lower order eukaryotic cell lines through the complete ablation of MFN-2 protein. However, to support the contractile function of mature skeletal muscle, the subcellular architecture and constituent proteins of this tissue differ substantially from simpler cellular organisms. Such differences may also impact the role of MFN-2 in mature mammalian muscle, and it is unclear if minor fluctuations in MFN-2, as observed in response to physiological perturbations, has a functional consequence. Therefore, we have transiently transfected MFN-2 cDNA into rat tibialis anterior muscle to determine the effect of physiolgically relevant increases in MFN-2 protein on mitochondrial bioenergetics. Permeabilized muscle fibres generated from muscle following MFN-2-transfection were used for functional assessments of mitochondrial bioenergetics. In addition, we have further established a novel method for selecting fibre bundles that are positively transfected, and using this approach transient transfection increased MFN-2 protein ∼2.3 fold in selected muscle fibres. However, this did not alter maximal rates of oxygen consumption or the sensitivity for ADP-stimulated respiration. In addition, MFN-2 over-expression did not alter rates of H2O2 emission. Altogether, and contrary to evidence from lower order cell lines, our results indicate that over-expressing MFN-2 in healthy muscle does not influence mitochondrial bioenergetics in mature mammalian skeletal muscle. PMID:23383258

  15. Impedance Alterations in Healthy and Diseased Mice During Electrically Induced Muscle Contraction.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Benjamin; Li, Jia; Geisbush, Tom; Bardia, Ramon Bragos; Rutkove, Seward B

    2016-08-01

    Alterations in the health of muscles can be evaluated through the use of electrical impedance myography (EIM). To date, however, nearly all work in this field has relied upon the measurement of muscle at rest. To provide an insight into the contractile mechanisms of healthy and disease muscle, we evaluated the alterations in the spectroscopic impedance behavior of muscle during the active process of muscle contraction. The gastrocnemii from a total of 13 mice were studied (five wild type, four muscular dystrophy animals, and four amyotrophic lateral sclerosis animals). Muscle contraction was induced via monophasic current pulse stimulation of the sciatic nerve. Simultaneously, multisine EIM (1 kHz to 1 MHz) and force measurements of the muscle were performed. Stimulation was applied at three different rates to produce mild, moderate, and strong contractions. We identified changes in both single and multifrequency data, as assessed by the Cole impedance model parameters. The processes of contraction and relaxation were clearly identified in the impedance spectra and quantified via derivative plots. Reductions in the center frequency fc were observed during the contraction consistent with the increasing muscle fiber diameter. Different EIM stimulation rate-dependencies were also detected across the three groups of animals. PMID:24800834

  16. Altered carbohydrate, lipid, and xenobiotic metabolism by liver from rats flown on Cosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, A. H. Jr; Hoel, M.; Wang, E.; Mullins, R. E.; Hargrove, J. L.; Jones, D. P.; Popova, I. A.; Merrill AH, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    To determine the possible biochemical effects of prolonged weightlessness on liver function, samples of liver from rats that had flown aboard Cosmos 1887 were analyzed for protein, glycogen, and lipids as well as the activities of a number of key enzymes involved in metabolism of these compounds and xenobiotics. Among the parameters measured, the major differences were elevations in the glycogen content and hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase activities for the rats flown on Cosmos 1887 and decreases in the amount of microsomal cytochrome P-450 and the activities of aniline hydroxylase and ethylmorphine N-demethylase, cytochrome P-450-dependent enzymes. These results support the earlier finding of differences in these parameters and suggest that altered hepatic function could be important during spaceflight and/or the postflight recovery period.

  17. A mechanism for altered flexibility in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, S P; Simonsen, E B; Aagaard, P; Sørensen, H; Kjaer, M

    1996-01-01

    1. We investigated the effect of a long-term stretching regimen on the tissue properties and stretch tolerance of human skeletal muscle. 2. Resistance to stretch was measured as torque (in N m) offered by the hamstring muscle group during passive knee extension while electromyographic (EMG) activity, knee joint angle and velocity were continuously monitored during a standardized stretch manoeuvre. Seven healthy subjects were tested before and after a 3 week training period using two separate protocols. Protocol 1 consisted of a slow stretch at 0.087 rad s-1 to a predetermined angle followed by a 90 s holding phase. Subjects were brought to the same angle before and after the training period. Protocol 2 was a similar stretch, but continued to the point of pain. 3. During protocol 1 the torque rose during the stretch and then declined during the holding phase. EMG activity was small and did not change significantly during the protocol. No significant differences in stiffness, energy and peak torque about the knee joint were seen as a result of the training. During protocol 2 the angle to which the knee could be extended was significantly increased as a result of the training. This was accompanied by a comparable increase in peak torque and energy. EMG activity was small and not affected by training. 4. It is concluded that reflex EMG activity does not limit the range of movement during slow stretches and that the increased range of motion achieved from training is a consequence of increased stretch tolerance on the part of the subject rather than a change in the mechanical or viscoelastic properties of the muscle. PMID:8951730

  18. Altered muscle coordination when pedaling with independent cranks

    PubMed Central

    Hug, François; Boumier, Florian; Dorel, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    Pedaling with independent cranks ensures each leg cycles independently of the other, and thus eliminates the contribution of the contralateral leg during the upstroke phase. Consequently the subject is required to actively pull-up the pedal to complete the cycle. The present study aimed to determine the acute effect of the use of independent cranks on muscle coordination during a submaximal pedaling exercise. Ten healthy males were asked to perform submaximal pedaling exercises at 100 Watts with normal fixed cranks (control condition) or independent cranks. Both 2-D pedal forces and electromyographic (EMG) SIGNALS of 10 lower limb muscles were recorded. When the mean EMG activity across the cycle was considered, the use of independent cranks significantly increased the activity level compared to control for Tibialis anterior (TA) (P = 0.0017; +336 ± 302%), Gastrocnemius medialis (GM) (P = 0.0005; +47 ± 25%), Rectus femoris (RF) (P = 0.005; +123 ± 153%), Biceps femoris (BF)—long head (P = 0.0001; +162 ± 97%), Semimembranosus (SM) (P = 0.0001; +304 ± 192%), and Tensor fascia latae (P = 0.0001; +586 ± 262%). The analysis of the four pedaling sectors revealed that the increased activity of hip and knee flexors mainly occurred during the top dead center and the upstroke phase. In addition, a high inter-individual variability was found in the way the participants adapted to pedaling with independent cranks. The present results showed that the enforced pull-up action required when using independent cranks was achieved by increasing the activation of hip and knee flexors. Further studies are needed to determine whether training with independent cranks has the potential to induce long-term changes in muscle coordination, and, if so, whether these changes are beneficial for cycling performance. PMID:24009587

  19. Discordance in recovery between altered locomotion and muscle atrophy induced by simulated microgravity in rats.

    PubMed

    Tajino, Junichi; Ito, Akira; Nagai, Momoko; Zhang, Xiangkai; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Iijima, Hirotaka; Aoyama, Tomoki; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to a microgravity environment leads to adverse effects in motion and musculoskeletal properties. However, few studies have investigated the recovery of altered locomotion and muscle atrophy simultaneously. The authors investigated altered locomotion in rats submitted to simulated microgravity by hindlimb unloading for 2 weeks. Motion deficits were characterized by hyperextension of the knees and ankle joints and forward-shifted limb motion. Furthermore, these locomotor deficits did not revert to their original form after a 2-week recovery period, although muscle atrophy in the hindlimbs had recovered, implying discordance in recovery between altered locomotion and muscle atrophy, and that other factors such as neural drives might control behavioral adaptations to microgravity. PMID:25789843

  20. Skeletal muscle plasticity: cellular and molecular responses to altered physical activity paradigms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Kenneth M.; Haddad, Fadia

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine our current understanding of the chain of events known to be involved in the adaptive process whereby specific genes and their protein products undergo altered expression; specifically, skeletal muscle adaptation in response to altered loading states will be discussed, with a special focus on the regulation of the contractile protein, myosin heavy chain gene expression. This protein, which is both an important structural and regulatory protein comprising the contractile apparatus, can be expressed as different isoforms, thereby having an impact on the functional diversity of the muscle. Because the regulation of the myosin gene family is under the control of a complex set of processes including, but not limited to, activity, hormonal, and metabolic factors, this protein will serve as a cellular "marker" for studies of muscle plasticity in response to various mechanical perturbations in which the quantity and type of myosin isoform, along with other important cellular proteins, are altered in expression.

  1. Metabolic alterations induced in cultured skeletal muscle by stretch-relaxation activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfaludy, Sophia; Shansky, Janet; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1989-01-01

    Muscle cells differentiated in vitro are repetitively stretched and relaxed in order to determine the presence of short- and long-term alterations occurring in glucose uptake and lactate efflux that are similar to the metabolic alterations occurring in stimulated organ-cultured muscle and in vivo skeletal muscle during the active state. It is observed that whereas mechanical stimulation increases these metabolic parameters within 4-6 h of starting activity, unstimulated basal rates in control cultures also increase during this period of time, and by 8 h, their rates have reached or exceeded the rates in continuously stimulated cells. Measurements of these parameters in media of different compositions show that activity-induced long-term alterations in the parameters occur independently of growth factors in serium and embryo extracts.

  2. Skeletal Muscle Regeneration and Oxidative Stress Are Altered in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Neal X.; Organ, Jason M.; Zarse, Chad; O’Neill, Kalisha; Conway, Richard G.; Konrad, Robert J.; Bacallao, Robert L.; Allen, Matthew R.; Moe, Sharon M.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy and impaired muscle function are associated with lower health-related quality of life, and greater disability and mortality risk in those with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the pathogenesis of skeletal dysfunction in CKD is unknown. We used a slow progressing, naturally occurring, CKD rat model (Cy/+ rat) with hormonal abnormalities consistent with clinical presentations of CKD to study skeletal muscle signaling. The CKD rats demonstrated augmented skeletal muscle regeneration with higher activation and differentiation signals in muscle cells (i.e. lower Pax-7; higher MyoD and myogenin RNA expression). However, there was also higher expression of proteolytic markers (Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1) in CKD muscle relative to normal. CKD animals had higher indices of oxidative stress compared to normal, evident by elevated plasma levels of an oxidative stress marker, 8-hydroxy-2' -deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), increased muscle expression of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and Nox4 and altered mitochondria morphology. Furthermore, we show significantly higher serum levels of myostatin and expression of myostatin in skeletal muscle of CKD animals compared to normal. Taken together, these data show aberrant regeneration and proteolytic signaling that is associated with oxidative stress and high levels of myostatin in the setting of CKD. These changes likely play a role in the compromised skeletal muscle function that exists in CKD. PMID:27486747

  3. Age-related alterations in cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity in dystrophic mouse leg muscle.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Timothy J

    2005-11-01

    Previous reports have described both increased and decreased cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in dystrophic muscle. Total PDE activity was measured in hind leg muscle from a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (mdx) and a genetic control strain at 5, 8, 10, and 15 weeks of age. Total PDE activity declined in fractions isolated from mdx muscle over this time period, but was stable in fractions from control mice. Compared with age-matched controls, younger mdx muscle had higher cAMP and cGMP PDE activity. However, at 15 weeks, fractions from both strains had similar cGMP PDE activity and mdx fractions had lower cAMP PDE activity than controls. Particulate fractions from mdx muscle showed an age-related decline in sensitivity to the PDE4 inhibitor RO 20-1724. A similar loss of sensitivity to the PDE2 inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA) was seen in a particulate fraction from mdx muscle and to a lesser degree in control muscle. These results suggest that the earlier disagreement regarding altered cyclic nucleotide metabolism in dystrophic muscle may be due to changes with age in PDE activity of dystrophic tissue. The age-related decline in particulate PDE activity seen in dystrophic muscle appears to be isozyme-specific and not due to a generalized decrease in total PDE activity. PMID:16391714

  4. Muscle fluid shift does not alter EMG global variables during sustained isometric actions.

    PubMed

    von Walden, Ferdinand; Pozzo, Marco; Elman, Ted; Tesch, Per A

    2008-10-01

    Body fluid redistribution occurs in astronauts traveling in space, potentially altering interstitial water content and hence impedance. This in turn may impact the features of electromyographic (EMG) signals measured to compare in-flight muscle function with pre- and post-flight conditions. Thus, the current study aimed at investigating the influence of similar fluid shifts on EMG spectral variables during muscle contractile activity. Ten men performed sustained isometric actions (120 s) at 20% and 60% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) following 1-h rest in the vertical or supine position. From single differential EMG signals, recorded from the soleus (SOL), the medial (MG) and lateral (LG) gastrocnemius muscles, initial value and rate of change over time (slope) of mean power frequency (MNF) and average rectified value (ARV) were assessed. MNF initial value showed dependence on muscle (P<0.01), but was unaffected by body tilt. MNF rate of change increased (P<0.001) with increased force and differed across muscles (P<0.05), but was not influenced (P=0.85) by altered body position. Thus, fluid shift resulting from vertical to supine tilt had no impact on myoelectrical manifestations of muscle fatigue. Furthermore, since such alteration of body fluid distribution resembles that occurring in microgravity, our findings suggest this may not be a methodological limitation, when comparing EMG fatigue indices on Earth versus in space. PMID:17466537

  5. Fatigue alters in vivo function within and between limb muscles during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Higham, Timothy E; Biewener, Andrew A

    2009-03-22

    Muscle fatigue, a reduction in force as a consequence of exercise, is an important factor for any animal that moves, and can result from both peripheral and/or central mechanisms. Although much is known about whole-limb force generation and activation patterns in fatigued muscles under sustained isometric contractions, little is known about the in vivo dynamics of limb muscle function in relation to whole-body fatigue. Here we show that limb kinematics and contractile function in the lateral (LG) and medial (MG) gastrocnemius of helmeted guineafowl (Numida meleagris) are significantly altered following fatiguing exercise at 2ms-1 on an inclined treadmill. The two most significant findings were that the variation in muscle force generation, measured directly from the muscles' tendons, increased significantly with fatigue, and fascicle shortening in the proximal MG, but not the distal MG, decreased significantly with fatigue. We suggest that the former is a potential mechanism for decreased stability associated with fatigue. The region-specific alteration of fascicle behaviour within the MG as a result of fatigue suggests a complex response to fatigue that probably depends on muscle-aponeurosis and tendon architecture not previously explored. These findings highlight the importance of studying the integrative in vivo dynamics of muscle function in response to fatigue. PMID:19129096

  6. Alcohol consumption and hormonal alterations related to muscle hypertrophy: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Detrimental effects of acute and chronic alcohol (ethanol) consumption on human physiology are well documented in the literature. These adversely influence neural, metabolic, cardiovascular, and thermoregulatory functions. However, the side effects of ethanol consumption on hormonal fluctuations and subsequent related skeletal muscle alterations have received less attention and as such are not entirely understood. The focus of this review is to identify the side effects of ethanol consumption on the major hormones related to muscle metabolism and clarify how the hormonal profiles are altered by such consumption. PMID:24932207

  7. High temperature limits in vivo pollen tube growth rates by altering diurnal carbohydrate balance in field-grown Gossypium hirsutum pistils.

    PubMed

    Snider, John L; Oosterhuis, Derrick M; Loka, Dimitra A; Kawakami, Eduardo M

    2011-07-15

    It has recently been reported that high temperature slows in vivo pollen tube growth rates in Gossypium hirsutum pistils under field conditions. Although numerous physical and biochemical pollen-pistil interactions are necessary for in vivo pollen tube growth to occur, studies investigating the influence of heat-induced changes in pistil biochemistry on in vivo pollen tube growth rates are lacking. We hypothesized that high temperature would alter diurnal pistil biochemistry and that pollen tube growth rates would be dependent upon the soluble carbohydrate content of the pistil during pollen tube growth. G. hirsutum seeds were sown on different dates to obtain flowers exposed to contrasting ambient temperatures but at the same developmental stage. Diurnal pistil measurements included carbohydrate balance, glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.8.1.7), soluble protein, superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.1.1), NADPH oxidase (NOX; EC 1.6.3.1), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and water-soluble calcium. Soluble carbohydrate levels in cotton pistils were as much as 67.5% lower under high temperature conditions (34.6 °C maximum air temperature; August 4, 2009) than under cooler conditions (29.9 °C maximum air temperature; August 14, 2009). Regression analysis revealed that pollen tube growth rates were highly correlated with the soluble carbohydrate content of the pistil during pollen tube growth (r² = 0.932). Higher ambient temperature conditions on August 4 increased GR activity in the pistil only during periods not associated with in vivo pollen tube growth; pistil protein content declined earlier in the day under high temperatures; SOD and NOX were unaffected by either sample date or time of day; pistil ATP and water soluble calcium were unaffected by the warmer temperatures. We conclude that moderate heat stress significantly alters diurnal carbohydrate balance in the pistil and suggest that pollen tube growth rate through the style may be limited by soluble carbohydrate

  8. Morphological Alterations in Gastrocnemius and Soleus Muscles in Male and Female Mice in a Fibromyalgia Model

    PubMed Central

    Oezel, Lisa; Schwarzbach, Hans; Ocker, Matthias; Thieme, Kati; Di Fazio, Pietro; Kinscherf, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic musculoskeletal pain disorder, characterized by chronic widespread pain and bodily tenderness and is often accompanied by affective disturbances, however often with unknown etiology. According to recent reports, physical and psychological stress trigger FM. To develop new treatments for FM, experimental animal models for FM are needed to be development and characterized. Using a mouse model for FM including intermittent cold stress (ICS), we hypothesized that ICS leads to morphological alterations in skeletal muscles in mice. Methods Male and female ICS mice were kept under alternating temperature (4°C/room temperature [22°C]); mice constantly kept at room temperature served as control. After scarification, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were removed and snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen–cooled isopentane or fixed for electron microscopy. Results In gastrocnemius/soleus muscles of male ICS mice, we found a 21.6% and 33.2% decrease of fiber cross sectional area (FCSA), which in soleus muscle concerns the loss of type IIa and IIx FCSA. This phenomenon was not seen in muscles of female ICS mice. However, this loss in male ICS mice was associated with an increase in gastrocnemius of the density of MIF+ (8.6%)-, MuRF+ (14.7%)-, Fbxo32+ (17.8%)-cells, a 12.1% loss of capillary contacts/muscle fiber as well as a 30.7% increase of damaged mitochondria in comparison with male control mice. Moreover, significant positive correlations exist among densities (n/mm2) of MIF+, MuRF+, Fbxo32+-cells in gastrocnemius/ soleus muscles of male ICS mice; these cell densities inversely correlate with FCSA especially in gastrocnemius muscle of male ICS mice. Conclusion The ICS-induced decrease of FCSA mainly concerns gastrocnemius muscle of male mice due to an increase of inflammatory and atrogenic cells. In soleus muscle of male ICS and soleus/gastrocnemius muscles of female ICS mice morphological alterations seem to occur not at all or

  9. Altered motor unit discharge patterns in paretic muscles of stroke survivors assessed using surface electromyography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaogang; Suresh, Aneesha K.; Rymer, William Z.; Suresh, Nina L.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Hemispheric stroke survivors often show impairments in voluntary muscle activation. One potential source of these impairments could come from altered control of muscle, via disrupted motor unit (MU) firing patterns. In this study, we sought to determine whether MU firing patterns are modified on the affected side of stroke survivors, as compared with the analogous contralateral muscle. Approach. Using a novel surface electromyogram (EMG) sensor array, coupled with advanced template recognition software (dEMG) we recorded surface EMG signals over the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle on both paretic and contralateral sides. Recordings were made as stroke survivors produced isometric index finger abductions over a large force range (20%–60% of maximum). Utilizing the dEMG algorithm, MU firing rates, recruitment thresholds, and action potential amplitudes were estimated for concurrently active MUs in each trial. Main results. Our results reveal significant changes in the firing rate patterns in paretic FDI muscle, in that the discharge rates, characterized in relation to recruitment force threshold and to MU size, were less clearly correlated with recruitment force than in contralateral FDI muscles. Firing rates in the affected muscle also did not modulate systematically with the level of voluntary muscle contraction, as would be expected in intact muscles. These disturbances in firing properties also correlated closely with the impairment of muscle force generation. Significance. Our results provide strong evidence of disruptions in MU firing behavior in paretic muscles after a hemispheric stroke, suggesting that modified control of the spinal motoneuron pool could be a contributing factor to muscular weakness in stroke survivors.

  10. α-Actinin-3 deficiency alters muscle adaptation in response to denervation and immobilization.

    PubMed

    Garton, F C; Seto, J T; Quinlan, K G R; Yang, N; Houweling, P J; North, K N

    2014-04-01

    Homozygosity for a common null polymorphism (R577X) in the ACTN3 gene results in the absence of the fast fibre-specific protein, α-actinin-3 in ∼16% of humans worldwide. α-Actinin-3 deficiency is detrimental to optimal sprint performance and benefits endurance performance in elite athletes. In the general population, α-actinin-3 deficiency is associated with reduced muscle mass, strength and fast muscle fibre area, and poorer muscle function with age. The Actn3 knock-out (KO) mouse model mimics the human phenotype, with fast fibres showing a shift towards slow/oxidative metabolism without a change in myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform. We have recently shown that these changes are attributable to increased activity of the calcineurin-dependent signalling pathway in α-actinin-3 deficient muscle, resulting in enhanced response to exercise training. This led us to hypothesize that the Actn3 genotype influences muscle adaptation to disuse, irrespective of neural innervation. Separate cohorts of KO and wild-type mice underwent 2 weeks immobilization and 2 and 8 weeks of denervation. Absence of α-actinin-3 resulted in reduced atrophic response and altered adaptation to disuse, as measured by a change in MyHC isoform. KO mice had a lower threshold to switch from the predominantly fast to a slower muscle phenotype (in response to immobilization) and a higher threshold to switch to a faster muscle phenotype (in response to denervation). We propose that this change is mediated through baseline alterations in the calcineurin signalling pathway of Actn3 KO muscle. Our findings have important implications for understanding individual responses to muscle disuse/disease and training in the general population. PMID:24234654

  11. Studies on the possible role of thyroid hormone in altered muscle protein turnover during sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselgren, P.O.; Chen, I.W.; James, J.H.; Sperling, M.; Warner, B.W.; Fischer, J.E.

    1987-07-01

    Five days after thyroidectomy (Tx) or sham-Tx in young male Sprague-Dawley rats, sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Control animals underwent laparotomy and manipulation of the cecum without ligation or puncture. Sixteen hours after CLP or laparotomy, protein synthesis and degradation were measured in incubated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) muscles by determining rate of /sup 14/C-phenylalanine incorporation into protein and tyrosine release into incubation medium, respectively. Triiodothyronine (T3) was measured in serum and muscle tissue. Protein synthesis was reduced by 39% and 22% in EDL and SOL, respectively, 16 hours after CLP in sham-Tx rats. The response to sepsis of protein synthesis was abolished in Tx rats. Protein breakdown was increased by 113% and 68% in EDL and SOL, respectively, 16 hours after CLP in sham-Tx animals. The increase in muscle proteolysis during sepsis was blunted in hypothyroid animals and was 42% and 49% in EDL and SOL, respectively. T3 in serum was reduced by sepsis, both in Tx and sham-Tx rats. T3 in muscle, however, was maintained or increased during sepsis. Abolished or blunted response of muscle protein turnover after CLP in hypothyroid animals may reflect a role of thyroid hormones in altered muscle protein metabolism during sepsis. Reduced serum levels of T3, but maintained or increased muscle concentrations of the hormone, suggests that increased T3 uptake by muscle may be one mechanism of low T3 syndrome in sepsis, further supporting the concept of a role for thyroid hormone in metabolic alterations in muscle during sepsis.

  12. Structural and Functional Alterations of Skeletal Muscle Microvasculature in Dystrophin-Deficient mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Latroche, Claire; Matot, Béatrice; Martins-Bach, Aurea; Briand, David; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Wary, Claire; Carlier, Pierre G; Chrétien, Fabrice; Jouvion, Grégory

    2015-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive neuromuscular disease, caused by an absence of dystrophin, inevitably leading to death. Although muscle lesions are well characterized, blood vessel alterations that may have a major impact on muscle regeneration remain poorly understood. Our aim was to elucidate alterations of the vascular network organization, taking advantage of Flk1(GFP/+) crossed with mdx mice (model for human DMD where all blood vessels express green fluorescent protein) and functional repercussions using in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance, combining arterial spin-labeling imaging of perfusion, and (31)P-spectroscopy of phosphocreatine kinetics. For the first time, our study focused on old (12-month-old) mdx mice, displaying marked chronic muscle lesions, similar to the lesions observed in human DMD, in comparison to young-adult (3-month-old) mdx mice displaying only mild muscle lesions with no fibrosis. By using an original approach combining a specific animal model, state-of-the-art histology/morphometry techniques, and functional nuclear magnetic resonance, we demonstrated that the microvascular system is almost normal in young-adult in contrast to old mdx mice, displaying marked microvessel alterations, and the functional repercussions on muscle perfusion and bioenergetics after a hypoxic stress vary depending on stage of pathology. This original approach clarifies disease evolution and paves the way for setting up new diagnostic markers or therapeutic strategies. PMID:26193666

  13. Fatigue alters in vivo function within and between limb muscles during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Timothy E.; Biewener, Andrew A.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle fatigue, a reduction in force as a consequence of exercise, is an important factor for any animal that moves, and can result from both peripheral and/or central mechanisms. Although much is known about whole-limb force generation and activation patterns in fatigued muscles under sustained isometric contractions, little is known about the in vivo dynamics of limb muscle function in relation to whole-body fatigue. Here we show that limb kinematics and contractile function in the lateral (LG) and medial (MG) gastrocnemius of helmeted guineafowl (Numida meleagris) are significantly altered following fatiguing exercise at 2 m s−1 on an inclined treadmill. The two most significant findings were that the variation in muscle force generation, measured directly from the muscles' tendons, increased significantly with fatigue, and fascicle shortening in the proximal MG, but not the distal MG, decreased significantly with fatigue. We suggest that the former is a potential mechanism for decreased stability associated with fatigue. The region-specific alteration of fascicle behaviour within the MG as a result of fatigue suggests a complex response to fatigue that probably depends on muscle–aponeurosis and tendon architecture not previously explored. These findings highlight the importance of studying the integrative in vivo dynamics of muscle function in response to fatigue. PMID:19129096

  14. Altered Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Proteome As the Basis of Disruption of Mitochondrial Function in Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Zabielski, Piotr; Lanza, Ian R; Gopala, Srinivas; Heppelmann, Carrie J Holtz; Bergen, H Robert; Dasari, Surendra; Nair, K Sreekumaran

    2016-03-01

    Insulin plays pivotal role in cellular fuel metabolism in skeletal muscle. Despite being the primary site of energy metabolism, the underlying mechanism on how insulin deficiency deranges skeletal muscle mitochondrial physiology remains to be fully understood. Here we report an important link between altered skeletal muscle proteome homeostasis and mitochondrial physiology during insulin deficiency. Deprivation of insulin in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice decreased mitochondrial ATP production, reduced coupling and phosphorylation efficiency, and increased oxidant emission in skeletal muscle. Proteomic survey revealed that the mitochondrial derangements during insulin deficiency were related to increased mitochondrial protein degradation and decreased protein synthesis, resulting in reduced abundance of proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and β-oxidation. However, a paradoxical upregulation of proteins involved in cellular uptake of fatty acids triggered an accumulation of incomplete fatty acid oxidation products in skeletal muscle. These data implicate a mismatch of β-oxidation and fatty acid uptake as a mechanism leading to increased oxidative stress in diabetes. This notion was supported by elevated oxidative stress in cultured myotubes exposed to palmitate in the presence of a β-oxidation inhibitor. Together, these results indicate that insulin deficiency alters the balance of proteins involved in fatty acid transport and oxidation in skeletal muscle, leading to impaired mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress. PMID:26718503

  15. Chronic clenbuterol treatment compromises force production without directly altering skeletal muscle contractile machinery.

    PubMed

    Py, G; Ramonatxo, C; Sirvent, P; Sanchez, A M J; Philippe, A G; Douillard, A; Galbès, O; Lionne, C; Bonnieu, A; Chopard, A; Cazorla, O; Lacampagne, A; Candau, R B

    2015-04-15

    Clenbuterol is a β2 -adrenergic receptor agonist known to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy and a slow-to-fast phenotypic shift. The aim of the present study was to test the effects of chronic clenbuterol treatment on contractile efficiency and explore the underlying mechanisms, i.e. the muscle contractile machinery and calcium-handling ability. Forty-three 6-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to one of six groups that were treated with either subcutaneous equimolar doses of clenbuterol (4 mg kg(-1) day(-1) ) or saline solution for 9, 14 or 21 days. In addition to the muscle hypertrophy, although an 89% increase in absolute maximal tetanic force (Po ) was noted, specific maximal tetanic force (sPo) was unchanged or even depressed in the slow twitch muscle of the clenbuterol-treated rats (P < 0.05). The fit of muscle contraction and relaxation force kinetics indicated that clenbuterol treatment significantly reduced the rate constant of force development and the slow and fast rate constants of relaxation in extensor digitorum longus muscle (P < 0.05), and only the fast rate constant of relaxation in soleus muscle (P < 0.05). Myofibrillar ATPase activity increased in both relaxed and activated conditions in soleus (P < 0.001), suggesting that the depressed specific tension was not due to the myosin head alteration itself. Moreover, action potential-elicited Ca(2+) transients in flexor digitorum brevis fibres (fast twitch fibres) from clenbuterol-treated animals demonstrated decreased amplitude after 14 days (-19%, P < 0.01) and 21 days (-25%, P < 0.01). In conclusion, we showed that chronic clenbuterol treatment reduces contractile efficiency, with altered contraction and relaxation kinetics, but without directly altering the contractile machinery. Lower Ca(2+) release during contraction could partially explain these deleterious effects. PMID:25656230

  16. Chronic clenbuterol treatment compromises force production without directly altering skeletal muscle contractile machinery

    PubMed Central

    Py, G; Ramonatxo, C; Sirvent, P; Sanchez, A M J; Philippe, A G; Douillard, A; Galbès, O; Lionne, C; Bonnieu, A; Chopard, A; Cazorla, O; Lacampagne, A; Candau, R B

    2015-01-01

    Clenbuterol is a β2-adrenergic receptor agonist known to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy and a slow-to-fast phenotypic shift. The aim of the present study was to test the effects of chronic clenbuterol treatment on contractile efficiency and explore the underlying mechanisms, i.e. the muscle contractile machinery and calcium-handling ability. Forty-three 6-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to one of six groups that were treated with either subcutaneous equimolar doses of clenbuterol (4 mg kg−1 day−1) or saline solution for 9, 14 or 21 days. In addition to the muscle hypertrophy, although an 89% increase in absolute maximal tetanic force (Po) was noted, specific maximal tetanic force (sPo) was unchanged or even depressed in the slow twitch muscle of the clenbuterol-treated rats (P < 0.05). The fit of muscle contraction and relaxation force kinetics indicated that clenbuterol treatment significantly reduced the rate constant of force development and the slow and fast rate constants of relaxation in extensor digitorum longus muscle (P < 0.05), and only the fast rate constant of relaxation in soleus muscle (P < 0.05). Myofibrillar ATPase activity increased in both relaxed and activated conditions in soleus (P < 0.001), suggesting that the depressed specific tension was not due to the myosin head alteration itself. Moreover, action potential-elicited Ca2+ transients in flexor digitorum brevis fibres (fast twitch fibres) from clenbuterol-treated animals demonstrated decreased amplitude after 14 days (−19%, P < 0.01) and 21 days (−25%, P < 0.01). In conclusion, we showed that chronic clenbuterol treatment reduces contractile efficiency, with altered contraction and relaxation kinetics, but without directly altering the contractile machinery. Lower Ca2+ release during contraction could partially explain these deleterious effects. PMID:25656230

  17. Alterations in Skeletal Muscle Microcirculation of Head-Down Tilted Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Stepke, Bernhard; Fleming, John T.; Joshua, Irving G.

    1992-01-01

    In this study we assessed the function of microscopic blood vessels in skeletal muscle (cremaster muscle) for alterations which may contribute to the observed elevation of blood pressure associated with head-down tilted whole body suspension (HDT/WBS), a model of weightlessness. Arteriolar baseline diameters, vasoconstrictor responses to norepinephrine (NE) and vasodilation to nitroprusside (NP) were assessed in control rats, rats suspended for 7 or 14 day HDT/WBS rats, and rats allowed to recover for 1 day after 7 days HDT/WBS. Neither baseline diameters nor ability to dilate were influenced by HDT/WBS. Maximum vasoconstriction to norepinephrine was significantly greater in arterioles of hypertensive 14 day HDT/WBS rats. This first study of the intact microvasculature in skeletal muscle indicates that an elevated contractility of arterioles to norepinephrine in suspended rats, and suggests an elevated peripheral resistance in striated muscle may contribute to the increase in blood pressures among animals subjected to HDT/WBS.

  18. Mechano- and metabosensitive alterations after injection of botulinum toxin into gastrocnemius muscle.

    PubMed

    Caron, Guillaume; Rouzi, Talifujiang; Grelot, Laurent; Magalon, Guy; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2014-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate effects of motor denervation by Clostridium botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A) on the afferent activity of fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were randomized in two groups, 1) untreated animals acting as control and 2) treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle. Locomotor activity was evaluated once per day during 12 days with a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats (sciatic functional index). At the end of the functional assessment period, electrophysiological tests were used to measure muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to chemical (KCl and lactic acid) injections, electrically induced fatigue (EIF), and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations. Additionally, ventilatory response was recorded during repetitive muscle contractions. Then, rats were sacrificed, and the BoNT/A-injected muscles were weighed. Twelve days postinjection we observed a complete motor denervation associated with a significant muscle atrophy and loss of force to direct muscle stimulation. In the BoNT/A group, the metabosensitive responses to KCl injections were unaltered. However, we observed alterations in responses to EIF and to 1 mM of lactic acid (which induces the greatest activation). The ventilatory adjustments during repetitive muscle activation were abolished, and the mechanosensitive fiber responses to tendon vibrations were reduced. These results indicate that BoNT/A alters the sensorimotor loop and may induce insufficient motor and physiological adjustments in patients in whom a motor denervation with BoNT/A was performed. PMID:24615939

  19. Cyclic GMP alters Ca exchange in vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Magliola, L.; Bailey, B.; Jones, A.W.

    1986-03-05

    Contraction and /sup 42/K efflux from vascular smooth muscle stimulated either by norepinephrine (NE) or by K-depolarization is dependent on an increase in cytosolic Ca concentration. The purpose of this study was to determine if cyclic GMP (cGMP) inhibited these processes and if inhibition was secondary to the action of cGMP on Ca movements. Basal cGMP content of rat aorta was 1.2 fmol/mg wet wt. Sodium nitroprusside (NP) increased cGMP approx.2-fold at 1 nM and approx.750-fold at 1 ..mu..M with no effect on cAMP levels. A 5 min pretreatment with NP (1 ..mu..M) completely prevented tension development induced by 3 ..mu..M NE. The same concentration of NP also inhibited NE-stimulated /sup 42/K and /sup 45/Ca efflux > 90 and > 80%, respectively. Removal of NP in the continued presence of NE (3 ..mu..M) caused recovery of the /sup 42/K efflux response to approx.75% of control with a half-time of approx.2.5 min. NP (1 ..mu..M) also caused a rapid relaxation of aorta contracted with 3 ..mu..M NE and a loss of the /sup 42/K efflux response with half-times of 2-3 min. In contrast, 100 ..mu..M NP produced only a 50% inhibition of contraction induced by high K (55 mM). Also, NP (1 ..mu..M) inhibited K-stimulated /sup 42/K efflux only approx.25%. These results demonstrate both a concentration- and a time-dependent relationship between increases in cGMP induced by NP and decreases in NE-stimulated contraction, /sup 42/K and /sup 45/Ca effluxes. They also indicate that the sensitivity of NE-induced contraction and /sup 42/K efflux to NP is greater than that induced by high K. These studies suggest that cGMP modulates the control sites for Ca exchange in the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  20. Molecular and kinetic alterations of muscle AMP deaminase during chronic creatine depletion.

    PubMed

    Rush, J W; Tullson, P C; Terjung, R L

    1998-02-01

    We examined a possible mechanism to account for the maintenance of peak AMP deamination rate in fast-twitch muscle of rats fed the creatine analog beta-guanidinopropionic acid (beta-GPA), in spite of reduced abundance of the enzyme AMP deaminase (AMPD). AMPD enzymatic capacity (determined at saturating AMP concentration) and AMPD protein abundance (Western blot) were coordinately reduced approximately 80% in fast-twitch white gastrocnemius muscle by beta-GPA feeding over 7 wk. Kinetic analysis of AMPD in the soluble cell fraction demonstrated a single Michaelis-Menten constant (Km; approximately 1.5 mM) in control muscle extracts. An additional high-affinity Km (approximately 0.03 mM) was revealed at low AMP concentrations in extracts of beta-GPA-treated muscle. The kinetic alteration in AMPD reflects increased molecular activity at low AMP concentrations; this could account for high rates of deamination in beta-GPA-treated muscle in situ, despite the loss of AMPD enzyme protein. The elimination of this kinetic effect by treatment of beta-GPA-treated muscle extracts with acid phosphatase in vitro suggests that phosphorylation is involved in the kinetic control of skeletal muscle AMPD in vivo. PMID:9486137

  1. Effects of altered loading states on muscle plasticity: what have we learned from rodents?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the key findings concerning the adaptive properties of rodent muscle in response to altered loading states. When the mechanical stress on the muscle is chronically increased, the muscle adapts by hypertrophying its fibers. This response is regulated by processes resulting in contractile protein expression reflecting slower phenotypes, thereby enabling the muscle to better support load-hearing activity. In contrast, reducing the load-bearing activity induces an opposite response whereby muscles used for both antigravity function and locomotion atrophy while transforming some of the slow fibers into faster contractile phenotypes. Accompanying the atrophy is both a reduced power generating and activity sustaining capability. These adaptive processes are regulated by both transcriptional and translational processes. Available evidence further suggests that the interaction of heavy resistance activity and hormonal/growth factors (insulin-like growth factor, growth hormone, glucocorticoids, etc.) are critical in the maintenance of muscle mass and function. Also resistance training, in contrast to other activities such as endurance running, provides a more economical form of stress because less mechanical activity is required to maintain muscle homeostasis in the context of chronic states of weightlessness.

  2. Selection for divergent body size alters rates of embryonic skeletal muscle formation and muscle gene expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Bradley, Jennifer S; Siegel, Paul B; Yang, Ning; Johnson, Sally E

    2015-12-01

    The impact of divergent selection for body size on embryogenesis is poorly understood. The objective of this experiment was to document skeletal muscle development during embryogenesis in two lines of chickens that display divergent growth as adults. Results reveal that after 54 generations of opposing selection from a common founder population, the embryos from the low weight select (LWS) line develop more rapidly during early embryogenesis than those from the high weight select (HWS) line. Muscle formation during the late embryonic period is more rapid and extensive in the HWS embryo than in the LWS contemporary. Isolated muscle progenitors from embryonic day 10 HWS embryos proliferated more rapidly, forming fibers sooner with a larger size than the LWS cells. The limited myogenic capacity of the LWS progenitor cells is not attributed to altered patterns of expression of Pax7, Pax3 or the myogenic regulatory factor genes. Members of the fibroblast growth factor family are potent mitogens and inhibitors of myoblast differentiation. Transcript abundance of FGF2 and FGF4 was measured in cultures of HWS and LWS progenitors as a function of time. The pattern of expression of FGF4 was similar between HWS and LWS with a large increase between days 1 and 3 followed by a reduction at day 5 of culture. Expression of FGF2 in LWS muscle cells did not change while a significant reduction in FGF2 expression was observed by day 5 in the HWS. Our results indicate that divergent selection for postnatal growth has altered embryonic development. PMID:26660844

  3. Investigations of the Effects of Altered Vestibular System Function on Hindlimb Anti-Gravity Muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, Mary Sue

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to different gravitational environments, both the microgravity of spaceflight and the hypergravity of centrifugation, result in altered vestibulo-spinal function which can be reversed by reacclimation to earth gravity (2). Control of orientation, posture, and locomotion are functions of the vestibular system which are altered by changes in gravitational environment. Not only is the vestibular system involved with coordination and proprioception, but the gravity sensing portion of the vestibular system also plays a major role in maintaining muscle tone through projections to spinal cord motoneurons that control anti-gravity muscles. I have been involved with investigations of several aspects of the link between vestibular inputs and muscle morphology and function during my work with Dr. Nancy Daunton this summer and the previous summer. We have prepared a manuscript for submission (4) to Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine based on work that I performed last summer in Dr. Daunton's lab. Techniques developed for that project will be utilized in subsequent experiments begun in the summer of 1998. I have been involved with the development of a pilot project to test the effects of vestibular galvanic stimulation (VGS) on anti-gravity muscles and in another project testing the effects of the ototoxic drug streptomycin on the otolith-spinal reflex and anti-gravity muscle morphology.

  4. Hemiparetic Stroke Alters Vastus Lateralis Myosin Heavy Chain Profiles Between the Paretic and Nonparetic Muscles

    PubMed Central

    McKENZIE, MICHAEL J.; YU, SHUZHEN; PRIOR, STEVEN J.; MACKO, RICHARD F.; HAFER-MACKO, CHARLENE E.

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle phenotype alterations following hemiparetic stroke contribute to disabilities associated with stroke. The phenotypic response following stroke is undefined. This investigation examined the myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of the vastus lateralis (VL) of stroke survivors in paretic (P) and nonparetic (NP) muscle. Protein obtained from VL of 10 stroke survivors was isolated and purified, and MHC gel electrophoresis was performed. The MHC bands were quantified, and a paired sample two-tailed T test with significance set at p ≤ 0.05 was performed. MHC I expression was significantly less in P versus NP VL (.93 vs. 1.00 arbitrary units [AU]). Significantly more IIx MHC was found in the P versus NP VL (1.33 vs. 1.0). No significant differences in type IIa MHC (1.07 P vs. 1.00 NP) were found. These changes in MHC composition suggest an alteration in muscle function due to stroke or the altered activity patterns of muscle following stroke. PMID:19266390

  5. Altered microRNA expression in bovine skeletal muscle with age.

    PubMed

    Sun, J; Sonstegard, T S; Li, C; Huang, Y; Li, Z; Lan, X; Zhang, C; Lei, C; Zhao, X; Chen, H

    2015-06-01

    Age-dependent decline in skeletal muscle function leads to several inherited and acquired muscular disorders in elderly individuals. The levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) could be altered during muscle maintenance and repair. We therefore performed a comprehensive investigation for miRNAs from five different periods of bovine skeletal muscle development using next-generation small RNA sequencing. In total, 511 miRNAs, including one putatively novel miRNA, were identified. Thirty-six miRNAs were differentially expressed between prenatal and postnatal stages of muscle development including several myomiRs (miR-1, miR-206 and let-7 families). Compared with miRNA expression between different muscle tissues, 14 miRNAs were up-regulated and 22 miRNAs were down-regulated in the muscle of postnatal stage. In addition, a novel miRNA was predicted and submitted to the miRBase database as bta-mir-10020. A dual luciferase reporter assay was used to demonstrate that bta-mir-10020 directly targeted the 3'-UTR of the bovine ANGPT1 gene. The overexpression of bta-mir-10020 significantly decreased the DsRed fluorescence in the wild-type expression cassette compared to the mutant type. Using three computational approaches - miranda, pita and rnahybrid - these differentially expressed miRNAs were also predicted to target 3609 bovine genes. Disease and biological function analyses and the KEGG pathway analysis revealed that these targets were statistically enriched in functionality for muscle growth and disease. Our miRNA expression analysis findings from different states of muscle development and aging significantly expand the repertoire of bovine miRNAs now shown to be expressed in muscle and could contribute to further studies on growth and developmental disorders in this tissue type. PMID:25703017

  6. Hypercortisolemia alters muscle protein anabolism following ingestion of essential amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Creson, Daniel L.; Sanford, Arthur P.; Wolf, Steven E.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Ferrando, Arny A.

    2003-01-01

    Debilitating injury is accompanied by hypercortisolemia, muscle wasting, and disruption of the normal anabolic response to food. We sought to determine whether acute hypercortisolemia alters muscle protein metabolism following ingestion of a potent anabolic stimulus: essential amino acids (EAA). A 27-h infusion (80 microg. kg(-1). h(-1)) of hydrocortisone sodium succinate mimicked cortisol (C) levels accompanying severe injury (>30 microg/dl), (C + AA; n = 6). The control group (AA) received intravenous saline (n = 6). Femoral arteriovenous blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained during a primed (2.0 micromol/kg) constant infusion (0.05 micromol. kg(-1). min(-1)) of l-[ring-(2)H(5)]phenylalanine before and after ingestion of 15 g of EAA. Hypercortisolemia [36.5 +/- 2.1 (C + AA) vs. 9.0 +/- 1.0 microg/dl (AA)] increased postabsorptive arterial, venous, and muscle intracellular phenylalanine concentrations. Hypercortisolemia also increased postabsorptive and post-EAA insulin concentrations. Net protein balance was blunted (40% lower) following EAA ingestion but remained positive for a greater period of time (60 vs. 180 min) in the C + AA group. Thus, although differences in protein metabolism were evident, EAA ingestion improved muscle protein anabolism during acute hypercortisolemia and may help minimize muscle loss following debilitating injury.

  7. Altered Ca2+ homeostasis in the skeletal muscle of DJ – 1 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Shtifman, Alexander; Zhong, Nan; Lopez, Jose R.; Shen, Jie; Xu, Jin

    2009-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in DJ – 1 are associated with early-onset of Parkinson’s disease. Although DJ – 1 is ubiquitously expressed, the functional pathways affected by it remain unresolved. Here we demonstrate an involvement of DJ – 1 in the regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis in mouse skeletal muscle. Using enzymatically dissociated flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers from wild-type (wt) and DJ – 1 null mice, we examined the effects of DJ – 1 protein on resting, cytoplasmic [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i) and depolarization-evoked Ca2+ release in the mouse skeletal muscle. The loss of DJ – 1 resulted in a more than two-fold increase in resting [Ca2+]i. While there was no alteration in the resting membrane potential, there was a significant decrease in depolarization-evoked Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in the DJ – 1 null muscle cells. Consistent with the role of DJ – 1 in oxidative stress regulation and mitochondrial functional maintenance, treatments of DJ – 1 null muscle cells with resveratrol, a mitochondrial activator, or glutathione, a potent antioxidant, reversed the effects of the loss of DJ – 1 on Ca2+ homeostasis. These results provide evidence of DJ – 1’s association with Ca2+ regulatory pathways in mouse skeletal muscle, and suggest the potential benefit of resveratrol to functionally compensate for the loss of DJ – 1. PMID:19683835

  8. Combination of exercise training and erythropoietin prevents cancer-induced muscle alterations

    PubMed Central

    Pin, Fabrizio; Busquets, Silvia; Toledo, Miriam; Camperi, Andrea; Lopez-Soriano, Francisco J.; Costelli, Paola; Argilés, Josep M.; Penna, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a syndrome characterized by loss of skeletal muscle mass, inflammation, anorexia and anemia, contributing to patient fatigue and reduced quality of life. In addition to nutritional approaches, exercise training (EX) has been proposed as a suitable tool to manage cachexia. In the present work the effect of mild exercise training, coupled to erythropoietin (EPO) administration to prevent anemia, has been tested in tumor-bearing mice. In the C26 hosts, acute exercise does not prevent and even worsens muscle wasting. Such pattern is prevented by EPO co-administration or by the adoption of a chronic exercise protocol. EX and EPO co-treatment spares oxidative myofibers from atrophy and counteracts the oxidative to glycolytic shift, inducing PGC-1α. LLC hosts are responsive to exercise and their treatment with the EX-EPO combination prevents the loss of muscle strength and the onset of mitochondrial ultrastructural alterations, while increases muscle oxidative capacity and intracellular ATP content, likely depending on PGC-1α induction and mitophagy promotion. Consistently, muscle-specific PGC-1α overexpression prevents LLC-induced muscle atrophy and Atrogin-1 hyperexpression. Overall, the present data suggest that low intensisty exercise can be an effective tool to be included in combined therapeutic approaches against cancer cachexia, provided that anemia is coincidently treated in order to enhance the beneficial action of exercise. PMID:26636649

  9. Lingual Muscle Activity Across Sleep–Wake States in Rats with Surgically Altered Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Rukhadze, Irma; Kalter, Julie; Stettner, Georg M.; Kubin, Leszek

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients have increased upper airway muscle activity, including such lingual muscles as the genioglossus (GG), geniohyoid (GH), and hyoglossus (HG). This adaptation partially protects their upper airway against obstructions. Rodents are used to study the central neural control of sleep and breathing but they do not naturally exhibit OSA. We investigated whether, in chronically instrumented, behaving rats, disconnecting the GH and HG muscles from the hyoid (H) apparatus would result in a compensatory increase of other upper airway muscle activity (electromyogram, EMG) and/or other signs of upper airway instability. We first determined that, in intact rats, lingual (GG and intrinsic) muscles maintained stable activity levels when quantified based on 2 h-long recordings conducted on days 6 through 22 after instrumentation. We then studied five rats in which the tendons connecting the GH and HG muscles to the H apparatus were experimentally severed. When quantified across all recording days, lingual EMG during slow-wave sleep (SWS) was modestly but significantly increased in rats with surgically altered upper airway [8.6 ± 0.7% (SE) vs. 6.1 ± 0.7% of the mean during wakefulness; p = 0.012]. Respiratory modulation of lingual EMG occurred mainly during SWS and was similarly infrequent in both groups, and the incidence of sighs and central apneas also was similar. Thus, a weakened action of selected lingual muscles did not produce sleep-disordered breathing but resulted in a relatively elevated activity in other lingual muscles during SWS. These results encourage more extensive surgical manipulations with the aim to obtain a rodent model with collapsible upper airway. PMID:24803913

  10. MCP-1 deficiency causes altered inflammation with impaired skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Shireman, Paula K; Contreras-Shannon, Verónica; Ochoa, Oscar; Karia, Bijal P; Michalek, Joel E; McManus, Linda M

    2007-03-01

    We examined the role of MCP-1, a potent chemotactic and activating factor for macrophages, in perfusion, inflammation, and skeletal muscle regeneration post-ischemic injury. MCP-1-/- or C57Bl/6J control mice [wild-type (WT)] underwent femoral artery excision (FAE). Muscles were collected for histology, assessment of tissue chemokines, and activity measurements of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and myeloperoxidase. In MCP-1-/- mice, restoration of perfusion was delayed, and LDH and fiber size, indicators of muscle regeneration, were decreased. Altered inflammation was observed with increased neutrophil accumulation in MCP-1-/- versus WT mice at Days 1 and 3 (P< or =0.003), whereas fewer macrophages were present in MCP-1-/- mice at Day 3. As necrotic tissue was removed in WT mice, macrophages decreased (Day 7). In contrast, macrophage accumulation in MCP-1-/- was increased in association with residual necrotic tissue and impaired muscle regeneration. Consistent with altered inflammation, neutrophil chemotactic factors (keratinocyte-derived chemokine and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) were increased at Day 1 post-FAE. The macrophage chemotactic factor MCP-5 was increased significantly in WT mice at Day 3 compared with MCP-1-/- mice. However, at post-FAE Day 7, MCP-5 was significantly elevated in MCP-1-/- mice versus WT mice. Addition of exogenous MCP-1 did not induce proliferation in murine myoblasts (C2C12 cells) in vitro. MCP-1 is essential for reperfusion and the successful completion of normal skeletal muscle regeneration after ischemic tissue injury. Impaired muscle regeneration in MCP-1-/- mice suggests an important role for macrophages and MCP-1 in tissue reparative processes. PMID:17135576

  11. Overexpression of antioxidant enzymes in diaphragm muscle does not alter contraction-induced fatigue or recovery.

    PubMed

    McClung, Joseph M; Deruisseau, Keith C; Whidden, Melissa A; Van Remmen, Holly; Richardson, Arlan; Song, Wook; Vrabas, Ioannis S; Powers, Scott K

    2010-01-01

    contractile dysfunction. Finally, the transgenic overexpression of independent endogenous antioxidants alters diaphragm skeletal muscle morphology, and these changes may also contribute to the diminished specific force production observed in these animals. PMID:19783618

  12. Altered Myokine Secretion Is an Intrinsic Property of Skeletal Muscle in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ciaraldi, Theodore P.; Ryan, Alexander J.; Mudaliar, Sunder R.; Henry, Robert R.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle secretes factors, termed myokines. We employed differentiated human skeletal muscle cells (hSMC) cultured from Type 2 diabetic (T2D) and non-diabetic (ND) subjects to investigate the impact of T2D on myokine secretion. Following 24 hours of culture concentrations of selected myokines were determined to range over 4 orders of magnitude. T2D hSMC released increased amounts of IL6, IL8, IL15, TNFa, Growth Related Oncogene (GRO)a, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, and follistatin compared to ND myotubes. T2D and ND hSMC secreted similar levels of IL1ß and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Treatment with the inflammatory agents lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or palmitate augmented the secretion of many myokines including: GROa, IL6, IL8, IL15, and TNFa, but did not consistently alter the protein content and/or phosphorylation of IkBa, p44/42 MAPK, p38 MAPK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and NF-kB, nor lead to consistent changes in basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake or free fatty acid oxidation. Conversely, treatment with pioglitazone or oleate resulted in modest reductions in the secretion of several myokines. Our results demonstrate that altered secretion of a number of myokines is an intrinsic property of skeletal muscle in T2D, suggesting a putative role of myokines in the response of skeletal muscle to T2D. PMID:27453994

  13. Alterations in carbohydrate composition of serum IgG from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and from pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Pekelharing, J M; Hepp, E; Kamerling, J P; Gerwig, G J; Leijnse, B

    1988-02-01

    The carbohydrate composition of IgG purified from serum of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), pregnant women, and blood donors has been determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Comparison of the results indicates that IgG from patients with RA contains significantly less galactose but more N-acetylglucosamine than normal IgG, whereas the fucose and sialic acid contents are not changed. The carbohydrate content of IgG in RA is reduced. IgG in pregnancy contains more galactose and more sialic acid than normal IgG, whereas fucose, N-acetylglucosamine, and the total carbohydrate content are not changed. These data suggest a temporal compensation of the RA associated undergalactosylation of IgG in female patients with RA during pregnancy, a period during which remission of the disease is often observed. PMID:3355256

  14. Comparison of Watermelon and Carbohydrate Beverage on Exercise-Induced Alterations in Systemic Inflammation, Immune Dysfunction, and Plasma Antioxidant Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Shanely, R. Andrew; Nieman, David C.; Perkins-Veazie, Penelope; Henson, Dru A.; Meaney, Mary P.; Knab, Amy M.; Cialdell-Kam, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Consuming carbohydrate- and antioxidant-rich fruits during exercise as a means of supporting and enhancing both performance and health is of interest to endurance athletes. Watermelon (WM) contains carbohydrate, lycopene, l-citrulline, and l-arginine. WM may support exercise performance, augment antioxidant capacity, and act as a countermeasure to exercise-induced inflammation and innate immune changes. Trained cyclists (n = 20, 48 ± 2 years) participated in a randomized, placebo controlled, crossover study. Subjects completed two 75 km cycling time trials after either 2 weeks ingestion of 980 mL/day WM puree or no treatment. Subjects drank either WM puree containing 0.2 gm/kg carbohydrate or a 6% carbohydrate beverage every 15 min during the time trials. Blood samples were taken pre-study and pre-, post-, 1 h post-exercise. WM ingestion versus no treatment for 2-weeks increased plasma l-citrulline and l-arginine concentrations (p < 0.0125). Exercise performance did not differ between WM puree or carbohydrate beverage trials (p > 0.05), however, the rating of perceived exertion was greater during the WM trial (p > 0.05). WM puree versus carbohydrate beverage resulted in a similar pattern of increase in blood glucose, and greater increases in post-exercise plasma antioxidant capacity, l-citrulline, l-arginine, and total nitrate (all p < 0.05), but without differences in systemic markers of inflammation or innate immune function. Daily WM puree consumption fully supported the energy demands of exercise, and increased post-exercise blood levels of WM nutritional components (l-citrulline and l-arginine), antioxidant capacity, and total nitrate, but without an influence on post-exercise inflammation and changes in innate immune function. PMID:27556488

  15. Comparison of Watermelon and Carbohydrate Beverage on Exercise-Induced Alterations in Systemic Inflammation, Immune Dysfunction, and Plasma Antioxidant Capacity.

    PubMed

    Shanely, R Andrew; Nieman, David C; Perkins-Veazie, Penelope; Henson, Dru A; Meaney, Mary P; Knab, Amy M; Cialdell-Kam, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Consuming carbohydrate- and antioxidant-rich fruits during exercise as a means of supporting and enhancing both performance and health is of interest to endurance athletes. Watermelon (WM) contains carbohydrate, lycopene, l-citrulline, and l-arginine. WM may support exercise performance, augment antioxidant capacity, and act as a countermeasure to exercise-induced inflammation and innate immune changes. Trained cyclists (n = 20, 48 ± 2 years) participated in a randomized, placebo controlled, crossover study. Subjects completed two 75 km cycling time trials after either 2 weeks ingestion of 980 mL/day WM puree or no treatment. Subjects drank either WM puree containing 0.2 gm/kg carbohydrate or a 6% carbohydrate beverage every 15 min during the time trials. Blood samples were taken pre-study and pre-, post-, 1 h post-exercise. WM ingestion versus no treatment for 2-weeks increased plasma l-citrulline and l-arginine concentrations (p < 0.0125). Exercise performance did not differ between WM puree or carbohydrate beverage trials (p > 0.05), however, the rating of perceived exertion was greater during the WM trial (p > 0.05). WM puree versus carbohydrate beverage resulted in a similar pattern of increase in blood glucose, and greater increases in post-exercise plasma antioxidant capacity, l-citrulline, l-arginine, and total nitrate (all p < 0.05), but without differences in systemic markers of inflammation or innate immune function. Daily WM puree consumption fully supported the energy demands of exercise, and increased post-exercise blood levels of WM nutritional components (l-citrulline and l-arginine), antioxidant capacity, and total nitrate, but without an influence on post-exercise inflammation and changes in innate immune function. PMID:27556488

  16. Alterations in skeletal muscle related to impaired physical mobility: an empirical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, C. E.; McNulty, A. L.; Otto, A. J.; Thomas, D. P.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to study impaired physical mobility and the resulting skeletal muscle atrophy. An animal model was used to study morphological adaptations of the soleus and plantaris muscles to decreased loading induced by hindlimb suspension of an adult rat for 7, 14, and 28 consecutive days. Alterations in weight, skeletal muscle growth, and changes in fiber type composition were studied in synergistic plantar flexors of the rat hindlimb. Body weight and the soleus muscle mass to body mass ratio demonstrated significant progressive atrophy over th 28-day experimental period with the most significant changes occurring in the first 7 days of hindlimb suspension. Hindlimb suspension produced atrophy of Type I and Type IIa muscle fibers as demonstrated by significant decreases in fiber cross-sectional area (micron 2). These latter changes account for the loss of contractile force production reported in the rat following hindlimb unloading. When compared to traditional models of hindlimb suspension and immobilization, the ISC model produces a less severe atrophy while maintaining animal mobility and health. We conclude that it is the preferred animal model to address nursing questions of impaired physical mobility.

  17. Alteration of gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle of rats exposed to microgravity during a spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Wayne E.; Bhasin, Shalender; Lalani, Rukhsana; Datta, Anuj; Gonzalez-Cadavid, Nestor F.

    2002-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism of skeletal muscle wasting during spaceflights, we investigated whether intramuscular gene expression profiles are affected, by using DNA microarray methods. Male rats sent on the 17-day NASA STS-90 Neurolab spaceflight were sacrificed 24 hours after return to earth (MG group). Ground control rats were maintained for 17 days in flight-simulated cages (CS group). Spaceflight induced a 19% and 23% loss of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscle mass, respectively, as compared to ground controls. Muscle RNA was analyzed by the Clontech Atlas DNA expression array in four rats, with two MG/ CS pairs for the tibialis anterior, and one pair for the gastrocnemius. Alterations in gene expression were verified for selected genes by reverse-transcription PCR. In both muscles of MG rats, mRNAs for 12 genes were up-regulated by over 2-fold, and 38 were down-regulated compared to controls. There was inhibition of genes for cell proliferation and growth factor cascades, including cell cycle genes and signal transduction proteins, such as p21 Cip1, retinoblastoma (Rb), cyclins G1/S, -E and -D3, MAP kinase 3, MAD3, and ras related protein RAB2. These data indicate that following exposure to microgravity, there is downregulation of genes involved in regulation of muscle satellite cell replication.

  18. A high carbohydrate diet coordinately alters transcriptomic profiles in the adipose tissue leading to enhanced lipid biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To assess the role of dietary macronutrient composition on adipose gene expression we evaluated changes in transcriptomic profiles in the WAT of rats following high carbohydrate (HC) diets. Female Sprague-Dawley rats received liquid diets at 187 or 220 kcal/kg3/4/d via intragastric infusion. Diets w...

  19. Characterizing the glycocalyx of poultry spermatozoa; semen cryopreservation methods alter the carbohydrate component of rooster sperm membrane glycoconjugates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The carbohydrate-rich zone on the sperm surface is essential for inmunoprotection in the female tract and early gamete interactions. We recently have shown the glycocalyx of chicken sperm to be extensively sialylated and contain residues of mannose, glucose, galactose, fucose, N-acetyl-galactosamine...

  20. Altered Skeletal Muscle Lipase Expression and Activity Contribute to Insulin Resistance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Badin, Pierre-Marie; Louche, Katie; Mairal, Aline; Liebisch, Gerhard; Schmitz, Gerd; Rustan, Arild C.; Smith, Steven R.; Langin, Dominique; Moro, Cedric

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin resistance is associated with elevated content of skeletal muscle lipids, including triacylglycerols (TAGs) and diacylglycerols (DAGs). DAGs are by-products of lipolysis consecutive to TAG hydrolysis by adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and are subsequently hydrolyzed by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). We hypothesized that an imbalance of ATGL relative to HSL (expression or activity) may contribute to DAG accumulation and insulin resistance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We first measured lipase expression in vastus lateralis biopsies of young lean (n = 9), young obese (n = 9), and obese-matched type 2 diabetic (n = 8) subjects. We next investigated in vitro in human primary myotubes the impact of altered lipase expression/activity on lipid content and insulin signaling. RESULTS Muscle ATGL protein was negatively associated with whole-body insulin sensitivity in our population (r = −0.55, P = 0.005), whereas muscle HSL protein was reduced in obese subjects. We next showed that adenovirus-mediated ATGL overexpression in human primary myotubes induced DAG and ceramide accumulation. ATGL overexpression reduced insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis (−30%, P < 0.05) and disrupted insulin signaling at Ser1101 of the insulin receptor substrate-1 and downstream Akt activation at Ser473. These defects were fully rescued by nonselective protein kinase C inhibition or concomitant HSL overexpression to restore a proper lipolytic balance. We show that selective HSL inhibition induces DAG accumulation and insulin resistance. CONCLUSIONS Altogether, the data indicate that altered ATGL and HSL expression in skeletal muscle could promote DAG accumulation and disrupt insulin signaling and action. Targeting skeletal muscle lipases may constitute an interesting strategy to improve insulin sensitivity in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:21498783

  1. Effects of Carbohydrate Intake Before and During An Ice Hockey Game on Blood and Muscle Energy Substrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simard, Clermont; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Study of the effect of a supplemental carbohydrate intake for seven elite ice hockey players before and during a game demonstrated that the supplement could result in less glycogen usage per distance skated, which had important implications for athletes who may participate in more than one game a day. (Author/CB)

  2. The contribution of starvation, deconditioning and ageing to the observed alterations in peripheral skeletal muscle in chronic organ diseases.

    PubMed

    Franssen, F M E; Wouters, E F M; Schols, A M W J

    2002-02-01

    Muscle weakness and early fatigue are common symptoms of chronic organ diseases, like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic heart failure (CHF) and chronic renal failure (CRF). It is becoming more and more clear that symptom intensities and exercise intolerance are related to muscle wasting and intrinsic alterations in peripheral skeletal muscle in these patient populations, while correlations with parameters of organ functioning are poor. Also, changes in muscle structure and function in COPD, CHF and CRF show much resemblance. Semi-starvation, reduced physical activity and ageing are external factors possibly confounding a direct relationship between the primary organ impairments and alterations in peripheral skeletal muscle and exercise capacity. Reducing the catabolic effects of the various contributing factors might improve muscle function and health status in chronic disease. In this review, we present a systematic overview of human studies on alterations in skeletal muscle function, morphology and energy metabolism in COPD, CHF, CRF and we compare the results with comparable studies in anorexia nervosa, disuse or inactivity and ageing. Unravelling the relative contributions of these external factors to the observed alterations in the various diseases may contribute to targeted intervention strategies to improve muscle function in selected groups of patients. PMID:11884007

  3. Mitochondrial Alterations and Oxidative Stress in an Acute Transient Mouse Model of Muscle Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ramadasan-Nair, Renjini; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Mishra, Sudha; Sunitha, Balaraju; Mythri, Rajeswara Babu; Nalini, Atchayaram; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Harsha, Hindalahalli Chandregowda; Kolthur-Seetharam, Ullas; Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) and inflammatory myopathies (IMs) are debilitating skeletal muscle disorders characterized by common pathological events including myodegeneration and inflammation. However, an experimental model representing both muscle pathologies and displaying most of the distinctive markers has not been characterized. We investigated the cardiotoxin (CTX)-mediated transient acute mouse model of muscle degeneration and compared the cardinal features with human MDs and IMs. The CTX model displayed degeneration, apoptosis, inflammation, loss of sarcolemmal complexes, sarcolemmal disruption, and ultrastructural changes characteristic of human MDs and IMs. Cell death caused by CTX involved calcium influx and mitochondrial damage both in murine C2C12 muscle cells and in mice. Mitochondrial proteomic analysis at the initial phase of degeneration in the model detected lowered expression of 80 mitochondrial proteins including subunits of respiratory complexes, ATP machinery, fatty acid metabolism, and Krebs cycle, which further decreased in expression during the peak degenerative phase. The mass spectrometry (MS) data were supported by enzyme assays, Western blot, and histochemistry. The CTX model also displayed markers of oxidative stress and a lowered glutathione reduced/oxidized ratio (GSH/GSSG) similar to MDs, human myopathies, and neurogenic atrophies. MS analysis identified 6 unique oxidized proteins from Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples (n = 6) (versus controls; n = 6), including two mitochondrial proteins. Interestingly, these mitochondrial proteins were down-regulated in the CTX model thereby linking oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. We conclude that mitochondrial alterations and oxidative damage significantly contribute to CTX-mediated muscle pathology with implications for human muscle diseases. PMID:24220031

  4. Alteration by phosphatidyl serine of tension responses and 45Ca distribution in aortic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Goodman, F R; Weiss, G B; Goth, A

    1976-07-01

    The effects of phosphatidyl serine (PS) on 45Ca distribution, 45Ca movements and contractions were examined in rabbit aortic smooth muscle. Contractile responses to submaximal concentrations of norepinephrine and histamine were potentiated by prior exposure to PS, but equivalent responses to potassium were unaffected. Addition of PS to the incubation solution decreased 45Ca uptake; exposure of aortic strips to PS during washout of either 45Ca or promethium (147Pm) resulted in maintained increases in efflux. These PS-induced alterations in net loss of 45Ca or 147Pm can be attributed to a decreased membrane reuptake and/or rebinding. However, the presence of PS during the washout significantly reduced the increases in 45Ca efflux rate elicited with either 0.05 mM concentrations of Ca++ or ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid. Thus, in rabbit aortic smooth muscle, exogenous PS can alter the availability and/or exchangeability of a membrane-bound Ca++ fraction. By specifically increasing the affinity for Ca++ at relevant membrane sites or stores. PS may enhance the ability of vascular smooth muscle to respond to stimulatory agents that mobilize Ca++ from these sites and, in this manner, potentiate contractile responses. PMID:933004

  5. Low-intensity infrared lasers alter actin gene expression in skin and muscle tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Mencalha, A. L.; Campos, V. M. A.; Ferreira-Machado, S. C.; Peregrino, A. A. F.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2013-02-01

    The biostimulative effect of low-intensity lasers is the basis for treatment of diseases in soft tissues. However, data about the influence of biostimulative lasers on gene expression are still scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of low-intensity infrared lasers on the expression of actin mRNA in skin and muscle tissue. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats was exposed to low-intensity infrared laser radiation at different fluences and frequencies. One and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and evaluation of actin gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The data obtained show that laser radiation alters the expression of actin mRNA differently in skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats depending of the fluence, frequency and time after exposure. The results could be useful for laser dosimetry, as well as to justify the therapeutic protocols for treatment of diseases of skin and muscle tissues based on low-intensity infrared laser radiation.

  6. Altering the Structure of Carbohydrate Storage Granules in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 through Branching-Enzyme Truncations

    PubMed Central

    Welkie, David G.; Lee, Byung-Hoo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Carbohydrate storage is an important element of metabolism in cyanobacteria and in the chloroplasts of plants. Understanding how to manipulate the metabolism and storage of carbohydrate is also an important factor toward harnessing cyanobacteria for energy production. While most cyanobacteria produce glycogen, some have been found to accumulate polysaccharides in the form of water-insoluble α-glucan similar to amylopectin. Notably, this alternative form, termed “semi-amylopectin,” forms in cyanobacterial species harboring three branching-enzyme (BE) homologs, designated BE1, BE2, and BE3. In this study, mutagenesis of the branching genes found in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 was performed in order to characterize their possible impact on polysaccharide storage granule morphology. N-terminal truncations were made to the native BE gene of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. In addition, one of the two native debranching enzyme genes was replaced with a heterologous debranching enzyme gene from a semi-amylopectin-forming strain. Growth and glycogen content of mutant strains did not significantly differ from those of the wild type, and ultrastructure analysis revealed only slight changes to granule morphology. However, analysis of chain length distribution by anion-exchange chromatography revealed modest changes to the branched-chain length profile. The resulting glycogen shared structure characteristics similar to that of granules isolated from semi-amylopectin-producing strains. IMPORTANCE This study is the first to investigate the impact of branching-enzyme truncations on the structure of storage carbohydrates in cyanobacteria. The results of this study are an important contribution toward understanding the relationship between the enzymatic repertoire of a cyanobacterial species and the morphology of its storage carbohydrates. PMID:26668264

  7. Effects of altered carbohydrate availability on whole-plant assimilation of sup 15 NO sub 3 sup minus 1

    SciTech Connect

    Rufty, T.W. Jr.; Volk, R.J. ); MacKown, C.T. )

    1989-02-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the relative changes in NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} assimilatory processes which occurred in response to decreasing carbohydrate availability. Young tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum (L.), cv NC 2326) growing in solution culture were exposed to 1.0 millimolar {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} for 6 hour intervals during a normal 12 hour light period and a subsequent period of darkness lasting 42 hours. Uptake of {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} decreased to 71 to 83% of the uptake rate in the light during the initial 18 hours of darkness; uptake then decreased sharply over the next 12 hours of darkness to 11 to 17% of the light rate, coincident with depletion of tissue carbohydrate reserves and a marked decline in root respiration. Changes also occurred in endogenous {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} assimilation processes, which were distinctly different than those in {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} uptake. During the extended dark period, translocation of absorbed {sup 15}N out of the root to the shoot varied rhythmically. The adjustments were independent of {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} uptake rate and carbohydrate status, but were reciprocally related to rhythmic adjustments in stomatal resistance and, presumably, water movement through the root system. Whole plant reduction of {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} always was limited more than uptake. The assimilation of {sup 15}N into insoluble reduced-N in roots remained a constant proportion of uptake throughout, while assimilation in the shoot declined markedly in the first 18 hours of darkness before stabilizing at a low level. The plants clearly retained a capacity for {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} reduction and synthesis of insoluble reduced-{sup 15}N even when {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} uptake was severely restricted and minimal carbohydrate reserves remained in the tissue.

  8. Ultrastructural features of masseter muscle exhibiting altered occlusal relationship - a study in a rodent model

    SciTech Connect

    Lisboa, Marcio V.; Aciole, Gilberth T. S.; Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Marques, Aparecida M. C.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Santos, Jean N.; Baptista, Abrahao F.; Aguiar, Marcio C.

    2010-05-31

    The role of occlusion on Tempormandibular Disorders (TMD) is still unclear, mainly regarding muscular function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occlusion highlights on masseter ultra morphology. Twenty Wistar rats were randomly divided in four groups: 10 for control group, 10 for occlusal alteration group (CCO). Rats underwent unilateral amputation of the left inferior and superior molar cusps to simulate an occlusal wear situation. The rats of control group had no occlusal wear. Half of the animals of each group was sacrificed in 14 days after the occlusal consuming and half 30 days after the occlusal consuming. The masseter muscles ipsilateral to the amputated molars were excised and processed for light microscopy, electron microscopy. The light microscopy did not show differences between the groups. The electron microscopy was able to detect a degree of intracellular damage in muscle fibers of CCO group: swollen mitochondria with disrupted cristae and cleared matrix, signs of hypercontraction of I bands and myofibril disorganization.

  9. Altered distribution of mitochondria in rat soleus muscle fibers after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Gordon J.; Martin, Thomas P.; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.; Oganov, V. S.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of an exposure to microgravity on the distribution of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity throughout the soleus muscle fibers was investigated by measuring SDH activity throughout the cross section of 20-30 fibers each of the slow-twitch oxidative and fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic types of fibers in rats exposed to 12.5 days in space aboard Cosmos 1887. It was found that, after the spaceflight, the entire regional distribution of SDH activity was significantly altered (as compared to ground controls) in the slow-twitch oxidative fibers, whereas the fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic fibers from muscles of flown rats exhibited a significantly lower SDH activity only in their subsarcolemmal region.

  10. Ultrastructural features of masseter muscle exhibiting altered occlusal relationship—a study in a rodent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisboa, Marcio V.; Aciole, Gilberth T. S.; Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Marques, Aparecida M. C.; Baptista, Abrahão F.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Aguiar, Marcio C.; Santos, Jean N.

    2010-05-01

    The role of occlusion on Tempormandibular Disorders (TMD) is still unclear, mainly regarding muscular function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occlusion highlights on masseter ultra morphology. Twenty Wistar rats were randomly divided in four groups: 10 for control group, 10 for occlusal alteration group (CCO). Rats underwent unilateral amputation of the left inferior and superior molar cusps to simulate an occlusal wear situation. The rats of control group had no occlusal wear. Half of the animals of each group was sacrificed in 14 days after the occlusal consuming and half 30 days after the occlusal consuming. The masseter muscles ipsilateral to the amputated molars were excised and processed for light microscopy, electron microscopy. The light microscopy did not show differences between the groups. The electron microscopy was able to detect a degree of intracellular damage in muscle fibers of CCO group: swollen mitochondria with disrupted cristae and cleared matrix, signs of hypercontraction of I bands and myofibril disorganization.

  11. Omega-3 supplementation alters mitochondrial membrane composition and respiration kinetics in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Herbst, E A F; Paglialunga, S; Gerling, C; Whitfield, J; Mukai, K; Chabowski, A; Heigenhauser, G J F; Spriet, L L; Holloway, G P

    2014-03-15

    Studies have shown increased incorporation of omega-3 fatty acids into whole skeletal muscle following supplementation, although little has been done to investigate the potential impact on the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes and the functional consequences on mitochondrial bioenergetics. Therefore, we supplemented young healthy male subjects (n = 18) with fish oils [2 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 1 g docosahexanoic acid (DHA) per day] for 12 weeks and skeletal muscle biopsies were taken prior to (Pre) and following (Post) supplementation for the analysis of mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition and various assessments of mitochondrial bioenergetics. Total EPA and DHA content in mitochondrial membranes increased (P < 0.05) ∼450 and ∼320%, respectively, and displaced some omega-6 species in several phospholipid populations. Mitochondrial respiration, determined in permeabilized muscle fibres, demonstrated no change in maximal substrate-supported respiration, or in the sensitivity (apparent Km) and maximal capacity for pyruvate-supported respiration. In contrast, mitochondrial responses during ADP titrations demonstrated an enhanced ADP sensitivity (decreased apparent Km) that was independent of the creatine kinase shuttle. As the content of ANT1, ANT2, and subunits of the electron transport chain were unaltered by supplementation, these data suggest that prolonged omega-3 intake improves ADP kinetics in human skeletal muscle mitochondria through alterations in membrane structure and/or post-translational modification of ATP synthase and ANT isoforms. Omega-3 supplementation also increased the capacity for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species emission without altering the content of oxidative products, suggesting the absence of oxidative damage. The current data strongly emphasize a role for omega-3s in reorganizing the composition of mitochondrial membranes while promoting improvements in ADP sensitivity. PMID:24396061

  12. High-Intensity Interval Training Alters ATP Pathway Flux During Maximal Muscle Contractions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Ryan G.; Maynard, Logan; Kent, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim High-intensity interval training (HIT) results in potent metabolic adaptations in skeletal muscle, however little is known about the influence of these adaptations on energetics in vivo. We used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to examine the effects of HIT on ATP synthesis from net PCr breakdown (ATPCK), oxidative phosphorylation (ATPOX) and non-oxidative glycolysis (ATPGLY) in vivo in vastus lateralis during a 24-s maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Methods Eight young men performed 6 sessions of repeated, 30-s “all-out” sprints on a cycle ergometer; measures of muscle energetics were obtained at baseline, and after the first and sixth sessions. Results Training increased peak oxygen consumption (35.8±1.4 to 39.3±1.6 ml·min−1·kg−1, p=0.01) and exercise capacity (217.0±11.0 to 230.5±11.7 W, p=0.04) on the ergometer, with no effects on total ATP production or force-time integral during the MVC. While ATP production by each pathway was unchanged after the first session, 6 sessions increased the relative contribution of ATPOX (from 31±2 to 39±2% of total ATP turnover, p<0.001), and lowered the relative contribution from both ATPCK (49±2 to 44±1%, p=0.004) and ATPGLY (20±2 to 17±1%, p=0.03). Conclusion These alterations to muscle ATP production in vivo indicate that brief, maximal contractions are performed with increased support of oxidative ATP synthesis, and relatively less contribution from anaerobic ATP production following training. These results extend previous reports of molecular and cellular adaptations to HIT and show that 6 training sessions are sufficient to alter in vivo muscle energetics, which likely contributes to increased exercise capacity after short-term HIT. PMID:24612773

  13. Omega-3 supplementation alters mitochondrial membrane composition and respiration kinetics in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, E A F; Paglialunga, S; Gerling, C; Whitfield, J; Mukai, K; Chabowski, A; Heigenhauser, G J F; Spriet, L L; Holloway, G P

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown increased incorporation of omega-3 fatty acids into whole skeletal muscle following supplementation, although little has been done to investigate the potential impact on the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes and the functional consequences on mitochondrial bioenergetics. Therefore, we supplemented young healthy male subjects (n = 18) with fish oils [2 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 1 g docosahexanoic acid (DHA) per day] for 12 weeks and skeletal muscle biopsies were taken prior to (Pre) and following (Post) supplementation for the analysis of mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition and various assessments of mitochondrial bioenergetics. Total EPA and DHA content in mitochondrial membranes increased (P < 0.05) ∼450 and ∼320%, respectively, and displaced some omega-6 species in several phospholipid populations. Mitochondrial respiration, determined in permeabilized muscle fibres, demonstrated no change in maximal substrate-supported respiration, or in the sensitivity (apparent Km) and maximal capacity for pyruvate-supported respiration. In contrast, mitochondrial responses during ADP titrations demonstrated an enhanced ADP sensitivity (decreased apparent Km) that was independent of the creatine kinase shuttle. As the content of ANT1, ANT2, and subunits of the electron transport chain were unaltered by supplementation, these data suggest that prolonged omega-3 intake improves ADP kinetics in human skeletal muscle mitochondria through alterations in membrane structure and/or post-translational modification of ATP synthase and ANT isoforms. Omega-3 supplementation also increased the capacity for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species emission without altering the content of oxidative products, suggesting the absence of oxidative damage. The current data strongly emphasize a role for omega-3s in reorganizing the composition of mitochondrial membranes while promoting improvements in ADP sensitivity. PMID:24396061

  14. Musculoskeletal Sensitization and Sleep: Chronic Muscle Pain Fragments Sleep of Mice without Altering Its Duration

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Blair C.; Opp, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Musculoskeletal pain in humans is often associated with poor sleep quality. We used a model in which mechanical hypersensitivity was induced by injection of acidified saline into muscle to study the impact of musculoskeletal sensitization on sleep of mice. Design: A one month pre-clinical study was designed to determine the impact of musculoskeletal sensitization on sleep of C57BL/6J mice. Methods: We instrumented mice with telemeters to record the electroencephalogram (EEG) and body temperature. We used an established model of musculoskeletal sensitization in which mechanical hypersensitivity was induced using two unilateral injections of acidified saline (pH 4.0). The injections were given into the gastrocnemius muscle and spaced five days apart. EEG and body temperature recordings started prior to injections (baseline) and continued for three weeks after musculoskeletal sensitization was induced by the second injection. Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed using von Frey filaments at baseline (before any injections) and on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after the second injection. Results: Mice injected with acidified saline developed bilateral mechanical hypersensitivity at the hind paws as measured by von Frey testing and as compared to control mice and baseline data. Sleep during the light period was fragmented in experimental mice injected with acidified saline, and EEG spectra altered. Musculoskeletal sensitization did not alter the duration of time spent in wakefulness, non-rapid eye movement sleep, or rapid eye movement sleep. Conclusions: Musculoskeletal sensitization in this model results in a distinct sleep phenotype in which sleep is fragmented during the light period, but the overall duration of sleep is not changed. This study suggests the consequences of musculoskeletal pain include sleep disruption, an observation that has been made in the clinical literature but has yet to be studied using preclinical models. Citation: Sutton BC

  15. Dairy cows affected by ketosis show alterations in innate immunity and lipid and carbohydrate metabolism during the dry off period and postpartum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanshi; Hailemariam, Dagnachew; Dervishi, Elda; Goldansaz, Seyed Ali; Deng, Qilan; Dunn, Suzanna M; Ametaj, Burim N

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this investigation was to search for alterations in blood variables related to innate immunity and carbohydrate and lipid metabolism during the transition period in cows affected by ketosis. One hundred multiparous Holstein dairy cows were involved in the study. Blood samples were collected at -8, -4, week of disease diagnosis (+1 to +3weeks), and +4weeks relative to parturition from 6 healthy cows (CON) and 6 cows with ketosis and were analyzed for serum variables. Results showed that cows with ketosis had greater concentrations of serum β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA), interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), serum amyloid A (SAA), and lactate in comparison with the CON animals. Serum concentrations of BHBA, IL-6, TNF, and lactate were greater starting at -8 and -4weeks prior to parturition in cows with ketosis vs those of CON group. Cows with ketosis also had lower DMI and milk production vs CON cows. Milk fat also was lower in ketotic cows at diagnosis of disease. Cows affected by ketosis showed an activated innate immunity and altered carbohydrate and lipid metabolism several weeks prior to diagnosis of disease. Serum IL-6 and lactate were the strongest discriminators between ketosis cows and CON ones before the occurrence of ketosis, which might be useful as predictive biomarkers of the disease state. PMID:27474003

  16. Scapular Bracing and Alteration of Posture and Muscle Activity in Overhead Athletes With Poor Posture

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Ashley K; McGrath, Melanie L; Harrington, Shana E; Padua, Darin A; Rucinski, Terri J; Prentice, William E

    2013-01-01

    Context Overhead athletes commonly have poor posture. Commercial braces are used to improve posture and function, but few researchers have examined the effects of shoulder or scapular bracing on posture and scapular muscle activity. Objective To examine whether a scapular stabilization brace acutely alters posture and scapular muscle activity in healthy overhead athletes with forward-head, rounded-shoulder posture (FHRSP). Design Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting Applied biomechanics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Thirty-eight healthy overhead athletes with FHRSP. Intervention(s) Participants were assigned randomly to 2 groups: compression shirt with no strap tension (S) and compression shirt with the straps fully tensioned (S + T). Posture was measured using lateral-view photography with retroreflective markers. Electromyography (EMG) of the upper trapezius (UT), middle trapezius (MT), lower trapezius (LT), and serratus anterior (SA) in the dominant upper extremity was measured during 4 exercises (scapular punches, W's, Y's, T's) and 2 glenohumeral motions (forward flexion, shoulder extension). Posture and exercise EMG measurements were taken with and without the brace applied. Main Outcome Measure(s) Head and shoulder angles were measured from lateral-view digital photographs. Normalized surface EMG was used to assess mean muscle activation of the UT, MT, LT, and SA. Results Application of the brace decreased forward shoulder angle in the S + T condition. Brace application also caused a small increase in LT EMG during forward flexion and Y's and a small decrease in UT and MT EMG during shoulder extension. Brace application in the S + T group decreased UT EMG during W's, whereas UT EMG increased during W's in the S group. Conclusions Application of the scapular brace improved shoulder posture and scapular muscle activity, but EMG changes were highly variable. Use of a scapular brace might improve shoulder posture and muscle activity in

  17. The Invalidation of HspB1 Gene in Mouse Alters the Ultrastructural Phenotype of Muscles.

    PubMed

    Kammoun, Malek; Picard, Brigitte; Astruc, Thierry; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Aubert, Denise; Bonnet, Muriel; Blanquet, Véronique; Cassar-Malek, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Even though abundance of Hsp27 is the highest in skeletal muscle, the relationships between the expression of HspB1 (encoding Hsp27) and muscle characteristics are not fully understood. In this study, we have analysed the effect of Hsp27 inactivation on mouse development and phenotype. We generated a mouse strain devoid of Hsp27 protein by homologous recombination of the HspB1 gene. The HspB1-/- mouse was viable and fertile, showing neither apparent morphological nor anatomical alterations. We detected a gender dimorphism with marked effects in males, a lower body weight (P < 0.05) with no obvious changes in the growth rate, and a lower plasma lipids profile (cholesterol, HDL and triglycerides, 0.001 < P< 0.05). The muscle structure of the animals was examined by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Not any differences in the characteristics of muscle fibres (contractile and metabolic type, shape, perimeter, cross-sectional area) were detected except a trend for a higher proportion of small fibres. Different myosin heavy chains electrophoretic profiles were observed in the HspB1-/- mouse especially the presence of an additional isoform. Electron microscopy revealed ultrastructural abnormalities in the myofibrillar structure of the HspB1-/- mouse mutant mice (e.g. destructured myofibrils and higher gaps between myofibrils) especially in the m. Soleus. Combined with our previous data, these findings suggest that Hsp27 could directly impact the organization of muscle cytoskeleton at the molecular and ultrastructural levels. PMID:27512988

  18. The Invalidation of HspB1 Gene in Mouse Alters the Ultrastructural Phenotype of Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Kammoun, Malek; Picard, Brigitte; Astruc, Thierry; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Aubert, Denise; Bonnet, Muriel; Blanquet, Véronique; Cassar-Malek, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Even though abundance of Hsp27 is the highest in skeletal muscle, the relationships between the expression of HspB1 (encoding Hsp27) and muscle characteristics are not fully understood. In this study, we have analysed the effect of Hsp27 inactivation on mouse development and phenotype. We generated a mouse strain devoid of Hsp27 protein by homologous recombination of the HspB1 gene. The HspB1-/- mouse was viable and fertile, showing neither apparent morphological nor anatomical alterations. We detected a gender dimorphism with marked effects in males, a lower body weight (P < 0.05) with no obvious changes in the growth rate, and a lower plasma lipids profile (cholesterol, HDL and triglycerides, 0.001 < P< 0.05). The muscle structure of the animals was examined by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Not any differences in the characteristics of muscle fibres (contractile and metabolic type, shape, perimeter, cross-sectional area) were detected except a trend for a higher proportion of small fibres. Different myosin heavy chains electrophoretic profiles were observed in the HspB1-/- mouse especially the presence of an additional isoform. Electron microscopy revealed ultrastructural abnormalities in the myofibrillar structure of the HspB1-/- mouse mutant mice (e.g. destructured myofibrils and higher gaps between myofibrils) especially in the m. Soleus. Combined with our previous data, these findings suggest that Hsp27 could directly impact the organization of muscle cytoskeleton at the molecular and ultrastructural levels. PMID:27512988

  19. The impact of altered task mechanics on timing and duration of eccentric bi-articular muscle contractions during cycling.

    PubMed

    Connick, Mark J; Li, François-Xavier

    2013-02-01

    In order to understand muscle adaptations to altered task mechanics during cycling, this study investigated the impact of altered seat height and cadence on timing and duration of gastrocnemius (GAST), biceps femoris (BF) and vastus lateralis (VL) eccentric contractions and muscle activation patterns, and cycling economy. Ten male cyclists completed 9 × 5 min of cycling at 3 seat heights and 3 cadences. Three-dimensional leg kinematics and muscle activation patterns were recorded to estimate timing of eccentric muscle contractions. Onset, offset and duration of eccentric contractions and, onset, offset and duration of muscle activation were calculated, along with cycling economy. Duration of GAST and VL eccentric contractions decreased with increasing seat height due to earlier offset of eccentric muscle contractions. Duration of BF eccentric contractions significantly increased with seat height due to a later eccentric contraction offset. Offset of GAST and BF muscle activation occurred earlier with increasing cadence. Cycling economy was significantly affected by cadence but not seat height. The results suggest that as a consequence of altered seat height, proprioceptive feedback is used to fine-tune the timing of bi-articular eccentric muscle contractions. These results may have implications for seat height self-selection. PMID:23010605

  20. Chronic stress effects in contralateral medial pterygoid muscle of rats with occlusion alteration.

    PubMed

    Loyola, Bruno Melo; Nascimento, Glauce Crivelaro; Fernández, Rodrigo Alberto Restrepo; Iyomasa, Daniela Mizusaki; Pereira, Yamba Carla Lara; Leite-Panissi, Christie Ramos Andrade; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; Iyomasa, Mamie Mizusaki

    2016-10-01

    +US groups, the deeply stained fibers increased compared to NO+C.·The exodontia factor was able to increase the ROS activity in muscle, whereas the stress factor does not significantly alter ROS in this tissue. It was concluded that both unpredictable chronic stress and the extraction induce metabolic and density of capillary changes in the contralateral medial pterygoid muscle to extraction, suggesting that these factors for a longer period of this experiment could induce muscle damage related to TMD. PMID:27342425

  1. Chronic sleep deprivation alters the myosin heavy chain isoforms in the masseter muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruihua; Huang, Fei; Wang, Peihuan; Chen, Chen; Zhu, Guoxiong; Chen, Lei; Wu, Gaoyi

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the changes in myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms of rat masseter muscle fibres caused by chronic sleep deprivation and a possible link with the pathogenesis of disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A total of 180 male rats were randomly divided into three groups (n=60 in each): cage controls, large platform controls, and chronic sleep deprivation group. Each group was further divided into three subgroups with different observation periods (7, 14, and 21 days). We investigated he expression of MyHC isoforms in masseter muscle fibres by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining. In rats with chronic sleep deprivation there was increased MyHC-I expression in layers of both shallow and deep muscles at 7 and 21 days compared with the control groups, whereas sleep deprivation was associated with significantly decreased MyHC-II expression. At 21 days, there were no differences in MyHC-I or MyHC-II expression between the groups and there were no differences between the two control groups at any time point. These findings suggest that chronic sleep deprivation alters the expression of MyHC isoforms, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of disorders of the TMJ. PMID:25804396

  2. IGF-1 Has Plaque-Stabilizing Effects in Atherosclerosis by Altering Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    von der Thüsen, Jan H.; Borensztajn, Keren S.; Moimas, Silvia; van Heiningen, Sandra; Teeling, Peter; van Berkel, Theo J.C.; Biessen, Erik A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling is important for the maintenance of plaque stability in atherosclerosis due to its effects on vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) phenotype. To investigate this hypothesis, we studied the effects of the highly inflammatory milieu of the atherosclerotic plaque on IGF-1 signaling and stability-related phenotypic parameters of murine vSMCs in vitro, and the effects of IGF-1 supplementation on plaque phenotype in an atherosclerotic mouse model. M1-polarized, macrophage-conditioned medium inhibited IGF-1 signaling by ablating IGF-1 and increasing IGF-binding protein 3, increased vSMC apoptosis, and decreased proliferation. Expression of α-actin and col3a1 genes was strongly attenuated by macrophage-conditioned medium, whereas expression of matrix-degrading enzymes was increased. Importantly, all of these effects could be corrected by supplementation with IGF-1. In vivo, treatment with the stable IGF-1 analog Long R3 IGF-1 in apolipoprotein E knockout mice reduced stenosis and core size, and doubled cap/core ratio in early atherosclerosis. In advanced plaques, Long R3 IGF-1 increased the vSMC content of the plaque by more than twofold and significantly reduced the rate of intraplaque hemorrhage. We believe that IGF-1 in atherosclerotic plaques may have a role in preventing plaque instability, not only by modulating smooth muscle cell turnover, but also by altering smooth muscle cell phenotype. PMID:21281823

  3. IGF-1 has plaque-stabilizing effects in atherosclerosis by altering vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    von der Thüsen, Jan H; Borensztajn, Keren S; Moimas, Silvia; van Heiningen, Sandra; Teeling, Peter; van Berkel, Theo J C; Biessen, Erik A L

    2011-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling is important for the maintenance of plaque stability in atherosclerosis due to its effects on vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) phenotype. To investigate this hypothesis, we studied the effects of the highly inflammatory milieu of the atherosclerotic plaque on IGF-1 signaling and stability-related phenotypic parameters of murine vSMCs in vitro, and the effects of IGF-1 supplementation on plaque phenotype in an atherosclerotic mouse model. M1-polarized, macrophage-conditioned medium inhibited IGF-1 signaling by ablating IGF-1 and increasing IGF-binding protein 3, increased vSMC apoptosis, and decreased proliferation. Expression of α-actin and col3a1 genes was strongly attenuated by macrophage-conditioned medium, whereas expression of matrix-degrading enzymes was increased. Importantly, all of these effects could be corrected by supplementation with IGF-1. In vivo, treatment with the stable IGF-1 analog Long R3 IGF-1 in apolipoprotein E knockout mice reduced stenosis and core size, and doubled cap/core ratio in early atherosclerosis. In advanced plaques, Long R3 IGF-1 increased the vSMC content of the plaque by more than twofold and significantly reduced the rate of intraplaque hemorrhage. We believe that IGF-1 in atherosclerotic plaques may have a role in preventing plaque instability, not only by modulating smooth muscle cell turnover, but also by altering smooth muscle cell phenotype. PMID:21281823

  4. Responses of Electromyogram Activity in Adductor Longus Muscle of Rats to the Altered Gravity Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Takashi; Wang, Xiao Dong; Terada, Masahiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Higo, Yoko; Nakai, Naoya; Ochiai, Toshimasa; Gyotoku, Jyunichirou; Nishimoto, Norihiro; Ogura, Akihiko; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2008-06-01

    Responses of electromyogram (EMG) activities in the rostral and caudal regions of adductor longus (AL) muscle to altered gravity levels during parabolic flight of a jet airplane, as well as hindlimb suspension, were investigated in adult rats. Tonic EMGs in both regions were noted when the rats were exposed to hyper-G, as well as 1-G. The hip joints were adducted and the sedental quadrupedal position was maintained at these G levels. However, the EMG activities in these regions decreased and became phasic, when the hip joints were abducted and extended backward in μ-G environment. Such changes of joint angles caused passive shortening of sarcomeres only in the caudal region of AL. Atrophy and shift toward fast-twitch type were noted in fibers of the caudal region after 16-day unloading. Although fiber transformation was also induced in the rostral region, no atrophy was seen in fast-twitch fibers. The data may suggest that the atrophy and shift of phenotype caused by gravitational unloading in fibers of the caudal region may be related to the decrease in the neural and mechanical activities. Fiber type transformation toward fast-twitch type may be also related to the change of muscle activity from tonic to phasic patterns, which are the typical characteristics of fast-twitch muscle. However, the responses to unloading in fibers of rostral region were not related to the reduction of mechanical load.

  5. Caloric Restriction Normalizes Obesity-Induced Alterations on Regulators of Skeletal Muscle Growth Signaling.

    PubMed

    Dungan, Cory M; Li, Ji; Williamson, David L

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the impact of caloric restriction on high fat diet-induced alterations on regulators of skeletal muscle growth. We hypothesized that caloric restriction would reverse the negative effects of high fat diet-induced obesity on REDD1 and mTOR-related signaling. Following an initial 8 week period of HF diet-induced obesity, caloric restriction (CR ~30 %) was employed while mice continued to consume either a low (LF) or high fat (HF) diet for 8 weeks. Western analysis of skeletal muscle showed that CR reduced (p < 0.05) the obesity-related effects on the lipogenic protein, SREBP1. Likewise, CR reduced (p < 0.05) the obesity-related effects on the hyperactivation of mTORC1 and ERK1/2 signaling to levels comparable to the LF mice. CR also reduced (p < 0.05) obesity-induced expression of negative regulators of growth, REDD1 and cleaved caspase 3. These findings have implications for on the reversibility of dysregulated growth signaling in obese skeletal muscle, using short-term caloric restriction. PMID:27289530

  6. Deregulation of the Protocadherin Gene FAT1 Alters Muscle Shapes: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Nathalie; Herberth, Balàzs; Bartoli, Marc; Puppo, Francesca; Dumonceaux, Julie; Zimmermann, Angela; Denadai, Simon; Lebossé, Marie; Roche, Stephane; Geng, Linda; Magdinier, Frederique; Attarian, Shahram; Bernard, Rafaelle; Maina, Flavio; Levy, Nicolas; Helmbacher, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Generation of skeletal muscles with forms adapted to their function is essential for normal movement. Muscle shape is patterned by the coordinated polarity of collectively migrating myoblasts. Constitutive inactivation of the protocadherin gene Fat1 uncoupled individual myoblast polarity within chains, altering the shape of selective groups of muscles in the shoulder and face. These shape abnormalities were followed by early onset regionalised muscle defects in adult Fat1-deficient mice. Tissue-specific ablation of Fat1 driven by Pax3-cre reproduced muscle shape defects in limb but not face muscles, indicating a cell-autonomous contribution of Fat1 in migrating muscle precursors. Strikingly, the topography of muscle abnormalities caused by Fat1 loss-of-function resembles that of human patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD). FAT1 lies near the critical locus involved in causing FSHD, and Fat1 mutant mice also show retinal vasculopathy, mimicking another symptom of FSHD, and showed abnormal inner ear patterning, predictive of deafness, reminiscent of another burden of FSHD. Muscle-specific reduction of FAT1 expression and promoter silencing was observed in foetal FSHD1 cases. CGH array-based studies identified deletion polymorphisms within a putative regulatory enhancer of FAT1, predictive of tissue-specific depletion of FAT1 expression, which preferentially segregate with FSHD. Our study identifies FAT1 as a critical determinant of muscle form, misregulation of which associates with FSHD. PMID:23785297

  7. Alteration of carbohydrates metabolism and midgut glucose absorption in Gromphadorhina portentosa after subchronic exposure to imidacloprid and fenitrothion.

    PubMed

    Sawczyn, Tomasz; Dolezych, Bogdan; Klosok, Marcin; Augustyniak, Maria; Stygar, Dominika; Buldak, Rafal J; Kukla, Michal; Michalczyk, Katarzyna; Karcz-Socha, Iwona; Zwirska-Korczala, Krystyna

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that following exposure to insecticides, changes take place in the metabolism of carbohydrates and absorption in the midgut of insects. The Madagascar hissing cockroach (Gromphadorhina portentosa) was chosen for the experiment as a model organism, due to it being easy to breed and its relatively large alimentary tract, which was important when preparing the microperfusion midgut bioassay. In each group of cockroaches treated with imidacloprid and fenitrothion, absorption of glucose, expressed as the area under the curve (AUC), was elevated compared to the control group. Glucose in the hemolymph of the examined insects was present in a vestigial amount, often below the threshold of determination, so the determinable carbohydrate indices were: hemolymph trehalose concentration and fat body glycogen content. The level of trehalose found in the hemolymph of insects when exposed to fenitrothion, and irrespective of the level of concentration mixed into food, were significantly lower when comparing to the control samples. Imidacloprid acted analogically with one exception at the concentration of 10 mg·kg(-1) dry food where trehalose concentration did not differ from the control values. Coupling with fat body glycogen concentration was less visible and appeared only at the concentrations of 5 and 10 mg imidacloprid·kg(-1) dry food. As described in this study changes in the sugar distribution and midgut glucose absorption indicate that insects cover the increased energy needs induced by insecticides; also at the gastrointestinal tract level. The result indicates that the midgut glucose absorption parameters could be considered as a non-specific biomarker of insecticide toxicity. PMID:22702824

  8. Niacin in Pharmacological Doses Alters MicroRNA Expression in Skeletal Muscle of Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Most, Erika; Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Administration of pharmacological niacin doses was recently reported to have pronounced effects on skeletal muscle gene expression and phenotype in obese Zucker rats, with the molecular mechanisms underlying the alteration of gene expression being completely unknown. Since miRNAs have been shown to play a critical role for gene expression through inducing miRNA-mRNA interactions which results in the degradation of specific mRNAs or the repression of protein translation, we herein aimed to investigate the influence of niacin at pharmacological doses on the miRNA expression profile in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats fed either a control diet with 30 mg supplemented niacin/kg diet or a high-niacin diet with 780 mg supplemented niacin/kg diet for 4 wk. miRNA microarray analysis revealed that 42 out of a total of 259 miRNAs were differentially expressed (adjusted P-value <0.05), 20 being down-regulated and 22 being up-regulated, between the niacin group and the control group. Using a biostatistics approach, we could demonstrate that the most strongly up-regulated (log2 ratio ≥0.5) and down-regulated (log2 ratio ≤−0.5) miRNAs target approximately 1,800 mRNAs. Gene-term enrichment analysis showed that many of the predicted target mRNAs from the most strongly regulated miRNAs were involved in molecular processes dealing with gene transcription such as DNA binding, transcription regulator activity, transcription factor binding and in important regulatory pathways such as Wnt signaling and MAPK signaling. In conclusion, the present study shows for the first time that pharmacological niacin doses alter the expression of miRNAs in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats and that the niacin-regulated miRNAs target a large set of genes and pathways which are involved in gene regulatory activity indicating that at least some of the recently reported effects of niacin on skeletal muscle gene expression and phenotype in obese Zucker rats are mediated through mi

  9. Alterations in Skeletal Muscle Function with Microgravity, and the Protective Effects of High Resistance Isometric and Isotonic Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Hurst, J. E.; Norenberg, K. M.; Widrick, J. J.; Riley, D. A.; Bain, J. L. W.; Trappe, S. W.; Trappe, T. A.; Costill, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity or models designed to mimic the unloaded condition, such as bed rest in humans and hindlimb unloading (HU) in rats leads to skeletal muscle atrophy, a loss in peak force and power, and an increased susceptibility to fatigue. The posterior compartment muscles of the lower leg (calf muscle group) appear to be particularly susceptible. Following only 1 wk in space or HU, rat soleus muscle showed a 30 to 40% loss in wet weight. After 3 wk of HU, almost all of the atrophied soleus fibers showed a significant increase in maximal shortening velocity (V(sub 0)), while only 25 to 30 % actually transitioned to fast fibers. The increased V(sub 0), was protective in that it reduced the decline in peak power associated with the reduced peak force. When the soleus is stimulated in situ following HU or zero-g one observes an increased rate and extent of fatigue, and in the former the increased fatigue is associated with a more rapid depletion of muscle glycogen and lactate production. Our working hypothesis is that following HU or spaceflight in rats and bed rest or spaceflight in humans limb skeletal muscles during contractile activity depend more on carbohydrates and less on fatty acids for their substrate supply. Baldwin et al. found 9 days of spaceflight to reduce by 37% the ability of both the high and low oxidative regions of the vastus muscle to oxidize long-chain fatty acids. This decline was not associated with any change in the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle or oxidation pathway. The purpose of the current research was to establish the extent of functional change in the slow type I and fast type H fibers of the human calf muscle following 17 days of spaceflight, and determine the cellular mechanisms of the observed changes. A second goal was to study the effectiveness of high resistance isotonic and isometric exercise in preventing the deleterious functional changes associated with unloading.

  10. Reducing dietary fat from a meal increases the bioavailability of exogenous carbohydrate without altering plasma glucose concentration.

    PubMed

    Knuth, Nicolas D; Shrivastava, Cara R; Horowitz, Jeffrey F

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to determine the acute glycemic and endocrine responses to the reduction of fat content from a meal. On three separate occasions, nine overweight subjects (body mass index = 30 +/- 1 kg/m(2); 5 men, 4 women) consumed 1) a control meal ( approximately 800 kcal; 100 g of carbohydrate, 31 g of fat, and 30 g of protein), 2) a low-fat meal ( approximately 530 kcal; 100 g of carbohydrate, 1 g of fat, and 30 g of protein), or 3) a low-fat meal plus lipid infusion [same meal as low-fat meal, but the total energy provided was the same as control (800 kcal), with the "missing" fat ( approximately 30 g) provided via an intravenous lipid infusion]. All three meals contained [(13)C]glucose (3 mg/kg body wt) to assess the bioavailability of ingested glucose. During the 5-h period after each meal, we measured the recovery of [(13)C]glucose in plasma, plasma glucose, and insulin concentrations. We also measured plasma concentration of the gastrointestinal peptides: glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and peptide YY(3-36) (PYY(3-36)). The recovery of the ingested [(13)C]glucose in the hour after ingestion was greater (P < 0.05) after the low-fat than after the control meal [area under the curve (AUC): 1,206 +/- 252 and 687 +/- 161 microM.h, respectively]. However, removing dietary fat from the meal did not affect the plasma concentration of glucose or insulin. Importantly, [(13)C]glucose recovery was not different during the low-fat and lipid infusion trials (AUC: 1,206 +/- 252 and 1,134 +/- 247 microM.h, respectively), indicating that the accelerated delivery of exogenous glucose found after removing fat from the meal is due exclusively to the reduction of fat in the gastrointestinal tract. In parallel with these findings, the reduction in fat calories from the meal reduced plasma concentration of GIP, GLP-1, and PYY(3-36). In summary, these data suggest that removing fat from the diet expedited

  11. How does α-actinin-3 deficiency alter muscle function? Mechanistic insights into ACTN3, the 'gene for speed'.

    PubMed

    Lee, Fiona X Z; Houweling, Peter J; North, Kathryn N; Quinlan, Kate G R

    2016-04-01

    An estimated 1.5 billion people worldwide are deficient in the skeletal muscle protein α-actinin-3 due to homozygosity for the common ACTN3 R577X polymorphism. α-Actinin-3 deficiency influences muscle performance in elite athletes and the general population. The sarcomeric α-actinins were originally characterised as scaffold proteins at the muscle Z-line. Through studying the Actn3 knockout mouse and α-actinin-3 deficient humans, significant progress has been made in understanding how ACTN3 genotype alters muscle function, leading to an appreciation of the diverse roles that α-actinins play in muscle. The α-actinins interact with a number of partner proteins, which broadly fall into three biological pathways-structural, metabolic and signalling. Differences in functioning of these pathways have been identified in α-actinin-3 deficient muscle that together contributes to altered muscle performance in mice and humans. Here we discuss new insights that have been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie the consequences of α-actinin-3 deficiency. PMID:26802899

  12. Adding protein to a carbohydrate supplement provided after endurance exercise enhances 4E-BP1 and RPS6 signaling in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Paul J; Hara, Daisuke; Ding, Zhenping; Ivy, John L

    2008-04-01

    To examine the role of both endurance exercise and nutrient supplementation on the activation of mRNA translation signaling pathways postexercise, rats were subjected to a 3-h swimming protocol. Immediately following exercise, the rats were provided with a solution containing either 23.7% wt/vol carbohydrates (CHO), 7.9% wt/vol protein (Pro), 31.6% wt/vol (23.7% wt/vol CHO + 7.9% wt/vol Pro) carbohydrates and Pro (CP), or a placebo (EX). The rats were then killed at 0, 30, and 90 min postexercise, and phosphorylation states of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), ribosomal S6 kinase (p70(S6K)), ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6), and 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), were analyzed by immunoblot analysis in the red and white quadriceps muscle. Results demonstrated that rat groups provided with any of the three nutritional supplements (CHO, Pro, CP) transiently increased the phosphorylation states of mTOR, 4E-BP1, rpS6, and p70(S6K) compared with EX rats. Although CHO, Pro, and CP supplements phosphorylated mTOR and p70(S6K) after exercise, only CP elevated the phosphorylation of rpS6 above all other supplements 30 min postexercise and 4E-BP1 30 and 90 min postexercise. Furthermore, the phosphorylation states of 4E-BP1 (r(2) = 0.7942) and rpS6 (r(2) = 0.760) were highly correlated to insulin concentrations in each group. These results suggest that CP supplementation may be most effective in activating the mTOR-dependent signaling pathway in the postprandial state postexercise, and that there is a strong relationship between the insulin concentration and the activation of enzymes critical for mRNA translation. PMID:18239077

  13. Beta-endorphin infusion during exercise in rats does not alter hepatic or muscle glycogen.

    PubMed

    Jamurtas, A Z; Goldfarb, A H; Chung, S C; Hegde, S; Marino, C; Fatouros, I G

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether beta-endorphin infusion influences liver or muscle glycogen concentration during exercise. Thirty-two rats (Harlan Co., IN, USA) with a body mass of 265-290 g were assigned at random to four groups, each of eight rats: (1) beta-endorphin infusion for 90 min at rest; (2) beta-endorphin infusion for 90 min while running on a rodent treadmill at 22 m x min(-1) and 0% grade; (3) saline infusion (0.9% NaCl) for 90 min at rest; and (4) saline infusion for 90 min while running on a rodent treadmill at 22 m x min(-1) and 0% grade. Beta-endorphin infusion elevated plasma beta-endorphin concentration by 2.5-fold at rest compared with saline infusion at rest, and by two-fold after exercise compared with saline infusion after exercise. Beta-endorphin infusion attenuated exercise-induced glucose concentration but did not alter the fasting hepatic glycogen concentration at rest or after exercise compared with saline infusion. Fasting hepatic glycogen decreased significantly as a result of 90 min of exercise independent of treatment. Deep intermedius muscle glycogen concentration at rest was similar after 90 min of both beta-endorphin and saline infusion and decreased significantly as a result of 90 min of exercise independent of treatment. Our results suggest that liver and muscle glycogenolysis is not responsible for the differences in plasma glucose with beta-endorphin infusion during exercise. PMID:11820687

  14. Primary motor cortex of the parkinsonian monkey: altered neuronal responses to muscle stretch

    PubMed Central

    Pasquereau, Benjamin; Turner, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Exaggeration of the long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) is a characteristic neurophysiologic feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) that contributes to parkinsonian rigidity. To explore one frequently-hypothesized mechanism, we studied the effects of fast muscle stretches on neuronal activity in the macaque primary motor cortex (M1) before and after the induction of parkinsonism by unilateral administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). We compared results from the general population of M1 neurons and two antidromically-identified subpopulations: distant-projecting pyramidal-tract type neurons (PTNs) and intra-telecenphalic-type corticostriatal neurons (CSNs). Rapid rotations of elbow or wrist joints evoked short-latency responses in 62% of arm-related M1 neurons. As in PD, the late electromyographic responses that constitute the LLSR were enhanced following MPTP. This was accompanied by a shortening of M1 neuronal response latencies and a degradation of directional selectivity, but surprisingly, no increase in single unit response magnitudes. The results suggest that parkinsonism alters the timing and specificity of M1 responses to muscle stretch. Observation of an exaggerated LLSR with no change in the magnitude of proprioceptive responses in M1 is consistent with the idea that the increase in LLSR gain that contributes to parkinsonian rigidity is localized to the spinal cord. PMID:24324412

  15. Structural Analysis of Alterations in Zebrafish Muscle Differentiation Induced by Simvastatin and Their Recovery with Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Laise M.; Rios, Eduardo A.; Midlej, Victor; Atella, Georgia C.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Benchimol, Marlene; Mermelstein, Claudia; Costa, Manoel Luís

    2015-01-01

    In vitro studies show that cholesterol is essential to myogenesis. We have been using zebrafish to overcome the limitations of the in vitro approach and to study the sub-cellular structures and processes involved during myogenesis. We use simvastatin—a drug widely used to prevent high levels of cholesterol and cardiovascular disease—during zebrafish skeletal muscle formation. Simvastatin is an efficient inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis that has various myotoxic consequences. Here, we employed simvastatin concentrations that cause either mild or severe morphological disturbances to observe changes in the cytoskeleton (intermediate filaments and microfilaments), extracellular matrix and adhesion markers by confocal microscopy. With low-dose simvastatin treatment, laminin was almost normal, and alpha-actinin was reduced in the myofibrils. With high simvastatin doses, laminin and vinculin were reduced and appeared discontinuous along the septa, with almost no myofibrils, and small amounts of desmin accumulating close to the septa. We also analyzed sub-cellular alterations in the embryos by electron microscopy, and demonstrate changes in embryo and somite size, septa shape, and in myofibril structure. These effects could be reversed by the addition of exogenous cholesterol. These results contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of action of simvastatin in muscle cells in particular, and in the study of myogenesis in general. PMID:25786435

  16. Using broadband spatially resolved NIRS to assess muscle oxygenation during altered running protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukourakis, Georg; Vafiadou, Maria; Steimers, André; Geraskin, Dmitri; Neary, Patrick; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias

    2009-07-01

    We used spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (SRS-NIRS) to assess calf and thigh muscle oxygenation during running on a motor-driven treadmill. Two protocols were used: An incremental speed protocol (velocity = 6 - 12 km/h, ▵v = 2 km/h) was performed in 3 minute stages, while a pacing paradigm modulated step frequency alternatively (2.3 Hz [SLow]; 3.3 Hz [SHigh]) during a constant velocity for 2 minutes each. A SRS-NIRS broadband system (600 - 1000 nm) was used to measure total haemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation (SO2). An accelerometer was placed on the hip joints to measure limb acceleration through the experiment. The data showed that the calf (SO2 58 to 42%) desaturated to a significantly lower level than the thigh (61 to 54%). During the pacing protocol, SO2 was significantly different between the SLow vs. SHigh trials. Additionally, physiological data as measured by spirometry were different between the SLow vs. SHigh pacing trials (VO2 (2563+/- 586 vs. 2503 +/- 605 mL/min). Significant differences in VO2 at the same workload (speed) indicate alterations in mechanical efficiency. These data suggest that SRS broadband NIRS can be used to discern small changes in muscle oxygenation, making this device useful for metabolic exercise studies in addition to spirometry and movement monitoring by accelerometers.

  17. Aortic smooth muscle cell alterations in mice systemically exposed to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Shin-Yin; Lin, Wen-Ting; Yang, Rei-Cheng; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2016-05-01

    Previous epidemiological studies showed that chronic arsenic exposure is related to increased cardiovascular disease incidence. The detailed biochemical mechanisms by which arsenic exerts its effects remain unknown. Vascular disease progression is characterized by smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypic switching, vessel wall reorganization, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) production. The objective of this study was to examine early biochemical and structural changes in the aortas of ICR mice systemically exposed to arsenic. Animals were fed sodium arsenite (20 mg/kg) via gavage 5 days/week or Milli-Q water only (control) for 8 weeks. Aortic proteins were subjected to two-dimensional (2-D) differential gel electrophoresis and proteomic studies. Two 2-D gel protein spots were identified as the same protein, smooth muscle (SM)22α, using proteomics. SM22α and Rho kinase 2 gene and protein expression were significantly decreased in the aortic tissue of arsenic-exposed mice compared with that of control mice. No atherosclerotic lesion formation or tissue injury was detected in the aortic wall of either the arsenic-fed or the control group. However, the percent (%) SMC area of the aortic wall was significantly decreased in arsenic-fed mice compared with that in control mice. Additionally, the expression levels of PDGF-BB and early growth response-1 (Egr-1) were significantly higher in the arsenic group than that in the control group. These findings reveal biochemical alterations of SM22α, PDGF, and Egr-1 in conjunction with decreased SMC area in the aortic wall of arsenic-fed mice. Arsenic may initiate aortic SMC alterations that subsequently lead to vascular dysfunction. PMID:26135927

  18. Effect of alterations in the thyroid state on the intrinsic contractile properties of isolated rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Herman K.; Spann, James F.; Braunwald, Eugene

    1970-01-01

    Contractile properties of soleus muscles isolated from 31 euthyroid (EU), 20 hyperthyroid (HT), and 18 myxedematous (MY) rats were studied in a myograph. At 100 stimuli/sec maximum isometric tension was essentially identical in EU (17.2 ±0.5 g/mm2) and HT (17.7 ±0.5 g/mm2) muscles, but was significantly depressed in MY muscles (11.5 ±0.7 g/mm2). The rate of tension development was increased in HT (103 ±4.5 g/sec per mm2) as compared to both EU (86.2 ±4.6 g/sec per mm2) and MY (38.4 ±2.2 g/sec per mm2) muscles, while the duration of the active state was shortened in HT (77.1 ±2.3 msec) as compared to EU (105.1 ±1.1 msec) muscles and was prolonged in MY muscles (153.3 ±6.0 msec). The mean rate of isometric relaxation was 26.5 ±4.9 g/mm2 per sec in EU muscles, more rapid in HT muscles (33.1 ±1.3 g/sec per mm2), and slower in MY muscles (16.0 ± g/mm2 per sec). The fusion frequency was greater in HT muscles, averaging 68.5 ±3.6 stimuli/sec compared to EU muscles (38.1 ±1.2 stimuli/sec) and to MY muscles (33.3 ±4.0 stimuli/sec). At 40 stimuli/sec tension averaged 16.4 ±0.8 g/mm2 in EU muscles while at the same frequency tension was reduced in HT muscle, averaging 14.2 ±0.5 g/mm2. All differences were significant (P < 0.01). In conclusion, HT and MY result in profound alterations in the intrinsic contractile properties of skeletal muscle. While tension in HT muscles is maintained in vitro at a stimulus frequency of 100 stimuli/sec, the reduction in duration of active state may lower tension in vivo by preventing complete fusion of contractile events. In MY tension is reduced as a consequence of the lowered intensity of the active state. These changes explain, at least in part, the weakness of muscle activity in both HT and MY. PMID:5443184

  19. Muscle imaging data in late-onset Pompe disease reveal a correlation between the pre-existing degree of lipomatous muscle alterations and the efficacy of long-term enzyme replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gruhn, Kai Michael; Heyer, Christoph Malte; Güttsches, Anne-Katrin; Rehmann, Robert; Nicolas, Volkmar; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Tegenthoff, Martin; Vorgerd, Matthias; Kley, Rudolf Andre

    2015-01-01

    Background Late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD) is a metabolic myopathy caused by mutations in GAA and characterized by proximal muscle weakness and respiratory insufficiency. There is evidence from clinical studies that enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with human recombinant alpha-glucosidase improves motor performance and respiratory function in LOPD. Objective We analyzed quantitative muscle MRI data of lower limbs to evaluate the effects of long-term ERT on muscle parameters. Methods Three symptomatic LOPD patients who received ERT for five years and four untreated presymptomatic LOPD patients were included in the study. T1-weighted MRI images were used to determine volumes of thigh and lower leg muscles. In addition, mean gray values of eight individual thigh muscles were calculated to assess the degree of lipomatous muscle alterations. Results We detected a decrease in thigh muscle volume of 6.7% (p < 0.001) and an increase in lower leg muscle volume of 8.2% (p = 0.049) after five years of ERT. Analysis of individual thigh muscles revealed a positive correlation between the degree of lipomatous muscle alterations at baseline and the increase of gray values after five years of ERT (R2 = 0.68, p < 0.001). Muscle imaging in presymptomatic patients showed in one case pronounced lipomatous alteration of the adductor magnus muscle and mild to moderate changes in further thigh muscles. Conclusions The results demonstrate that fatty muscle degeneration can occur before clinical manifestation of muscle weakness and suggest that mildly affected muscles may respond better to ERT treatment than severely involved muscles. If these findings can be validated by further studies, it should be discussed if muscle alterations detected by muscle MRI may be an objective sign of disease manifestation justifying an early start of ERT in clinically asymptomatic patients in order to improve the long-term outcome. PMID:26937398

  20. The maximum activities of hexokinase, phosphorylase, phosphofructokinase, glycerol phosphate dehydrogenases, lactate dehydrogenase, octopine dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, nucleoside diphosphatekinase, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase and arginine kinase in relation to carbohydrate utilization in muscles from marine invertebrates.

    PubMed Central

    Zammit, V A; Newsholme, E A

    1976-01-01

    Comparison of the activities of hexokinase, phosphorylase and phosphofructokinase in muscles from marine invertebrates indicates that they can be divided into three groups. First, the activities of the three enzymes are low in coelenterate muscles, catch muscles of molluscs and muscles of echinoderms; this indicates a low rate of carbohydrate (and energy) utilization by these muscles. Secondly, high activities of phosphorylase and phosphofructokinase relative to those of hexokinase are found in, for example, lobster abdominal and scallop snap muscles; this indicates that these muscles depend largely on anaerobic degradation of glycogen for energy production. Thirdly, high activities of hexokinase are found in the radular muscles of prosobranch molluscs and the fin muscles of squids; this indicates a high capacity for glucose utilization, which is consistent with the high activities of enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in these muscles [Alp, Newsholme & Zammit (1976) Biochem. J. 154, 689-700]. 2. The activities of lactate dehydrogenase, octopine dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, cytosolic and mitochondrial glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase were measured in order to provide a qualitative indication of the importance of different processes for oxidation of glycolytically formed NADH. The muscles are divided into four groups: those that have a high activity of lactate dehydrogenase relative to the activities of phosphofructokinase (e.g. crustacean muscles); those that have high activities of octopine dehydrogenase but low activities of lactate dehydrogenase (e.g. scallop snap muscle); those that have moderate activities of both lactate dehydrogenase and octopine dehydrogenase (radular muscles of prosobranchs), and those that have low activities of both lactate dehydrogenase and octopine dehydrogenase, but which possess activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (oyster adductor muscles). It is

  1. Continuous light increases growth, daily carbon gain, antioxidants, and alters carbohydrate metabolism in a cultivated and a wild tomato species

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Mohammad S.; Kjaer, Katrine H.; Rosenqvist, Eva; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    Cultivated tomato species develop leaf injury while grown in continuous light (CL). Growth, photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism and antioxidative enzyme activities of a cultivated (Solanum lycopersicum L. ‘Aromata’) and a wild tomato species (Solanum pimpinellifolium L.) were compared in this study aiming to analyze the species-specific differences and thermoperiod effects in responses to CL. The species were subjected to three photoperiodic treatments for 12 days in climate chambers: 16-h photoperiod with a light/dark temperature of 26/16°C (P16D10 or control); CL with a constant temperature of 23°C (P24D0); CL with a variable temperature of 26/16°C (P24D10). The results showed that both species grown in CL had higher dry matter production due to the continuous photosynthesis and a subsequent increase in carbon gain. In S. lycopersicum, the rate of photosynthesis and the maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II declined in CL with the development of leaf chlorosis, reduction in the leaf chlorophyll content and a higher activity of antioxidative enzymes. The normal diurnal patterns of starch and sugar were only present under control conditions. The results demonstrated that CL conditions mainly affected the photosynthetic apparatus of a cultivated species (S. lycopersicum), and to a less degree to the wild species (S. pimpinellifolium). The negative effects of the CL could be alleviated by diurnal temperature variations, but the physiological mechanisms behind these are less clear. The results also show that the genetic potential for reducing the negative effects of CL does exist in the tomato germplasm. PMID:26217371

  2. Metal-supplemented diets alter carbohydrate levels in tissue and hemolymph of gypsy moth larvae (Lymantria dispar, Lymantriidae, Lepidoptera)

    SciTech Connect

    Ortel, J.

    1996-07-01

    Larvae of Lymantria dispar were exposed to two concentrations each of Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn from hatching to day 3 of the fourth instar. The metals were applied via artificial diet (wheat germ diet); two control groups were reared on either an uncontaminated artificial diet (C) or on a natural diet (oak leaves, EF). High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) was employed to analyze the hemolymph carbohydrates, whereas body glycogen and glucose were determined enzymatically. The results were analyzed with respect to diet-specific differences (oak leaves versus wheat germ diet) and metal exposure compared with the uncontaminated artificial diet. Hemolymph trehalose levels were higher in oak leaf-reared individuals than in those fed on the wheat germ diet (p < 0.01), whereas the opposite applied to the body glycogen and free glucose levels (p < 0.01). The average trehalose value of the control (C) (4.3 mg/ml) was reduced by metal contamination, dependent on both the metal itself and the concentration (Cd, Cu, Zn; 1.4--3.3 mg/ml). Sorbitol was not detected in the hemolymph of EF specimens, whereas it occurred in all artificial diet-fed groups. Metal- and dose-dependent differences in the hemolymph sorbitol levels were observed in the treatment groups, but not in the controls. Glycogen content increased in the low concentration of Cd, Pb, and Cu, whereas a decrease was observed for the low Cd and both Zn concentrations. Tissue free glucose was enhanced only in three of the metal groups. Generally, fresh and dry weights of larvae were reduced in all groups except the high Cu-contaminated one. The results may indicate that mass outbreaks of an important forest pest insect like L. dispar may be facilitated in metal-contaminated areas because parasitization success of antagonistic species may decline due to deterioration of nourishment within the metal-stressed host.

  3. Continuous light increases growth, daily carbon gain, antioxidants, and alters carbohydrate metabolism in a cultivated and a wild tomato species.

    PubMed

    Haque, Mohammad S; Kjaer, Katrine H; Rosenqvist, Eva; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    Cultivated tomato species develop leaf injury while grown in continuous light (CL). Growth, photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism and antioxidative enzyme activities of a cultivated (Solanum lycopersicum L. 'Aromata') and a wild tomato species (Solanum pimpinellifolium L.) were compared in this study aiming to analyze the species-specific differences and thermoperiod effects in responses to CL. The species were subjected to three photoperiodic treatments for 12 days in climate chambers: 16-h photoperiod with a light/dark temperature of 26/16°C (P16D10 or control); CL with a constant temperature of 23°C (P24D0); CL with a variable temperature of 26/16°C (P24D10). The results showed that both species grown in CL had higher dry matter production due to the continuous photosynthesis and a subsequent increase in carbon gain. In S. lycopersicum, the rate of photosynthesis and the maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II declined in CL with the development of leaf chlorosis, reduction in the leaf chlorophyll content and a higher activity of antioxidative enzymes. The normal diurnal patterns of starch and sugar were only present under control conditions. The results demonstrated that CL conditions mainly affected the photosynthetic apparatus of a cultivated species (S. lycopersicum), and to a less degree to the wild species (S. pimpinellifolium). The negative effects of the CL could be alleviated by diurnal temperature variations, but the physiological mechanisms behind these are less clear. The results also show that the genetic potential for reducing the negative effects of CL does exist in the tomato germplasm. PMID:26217371

  4. Inactivation of nitrate reductase alters metabolic branching of carbohydrate fermentation in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiao; Kumaraswamy, G Kenchappa; Zhang, Shuyi; Gates, Colin; Ananyev, Gennady M; Bryant, Donald A; Dismukes, G Charles

    2016-05-01

    To produce cellular energy, cyanobacteria reduce nitrate as the preferred pathway over proton reduction (H2 evolution) by catabolizing glycogen under dark anaerobic conditions. This competition lowers H2 production by consuming a large fraction of the reducing equivalents (NADPH and NADH). To eliminate this competition, we constructed a knockout mutant of nitrate reductase, encoded by narB, in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. As expected, ΔnarB was able to take up intracellular nitrate but was unable to reduce it to nitrite or ammonia, and was unable to grow photoautotrophically on nitrate. During photoautotrophic growth on urea, ΔnarB significantly redirects biomass accumulation into glycogen at the expense of protein accumulation. During subsequent dark fermentation, metabolite concentrations--both the adenylate cellular energy charge (∼ATP) and the redox poise (NAD(P)H/NAD(P))--were independent of nitrate availability in ΔnarB, in contrast to the wild type (WT) control. The ΔnarB strain diverted more reducing equivalents from glycogen catabolism into reduced products, mainly H2 and d-lactate, by 6-fold (2.8% yield) and 2-fold (82.3% yield), respectively, than WT. Continuous removal of H2 from the fermentation medium (milking) further boosted net H2 production by 7-fold in ΔnarB, at the expense of less excreted lactate, resulting in a 49-fold combined increase in the net H2 evolution rate during 2 days of fermentation compared to the WT. The absence of nitrate reductase eliminated the inductive effect of nitrate addition on rerouting carbohydrate catabolism from glycolysis to the oxidative pentose phosphate (OPP) pathway, indicating that intracellular redox poise and not nitrate itself acts as the control switch for carbon flux branching between pathways. PMID:26479976

  5. Oxidation of the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel alters calmodulin binding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, J. Z.; Wu, Y.; Williams, B. Y.; Rodney, G.; Mandel, F.; Strasburg, G. M.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    This study presents evidence for a close relationship between the oxidation state of the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel (RyR1) and its ability to bind calmodulin (CaM). CaM enhances the activity of RyR1 in low Ca2+ and inhibits its activity in high Ca2+. Oxidation, which activates the channel, blocks the binding of 125I-labeled CaM at both micromolar and nanomolar Ca2+ concentrations. Conversely, bound CaM slows oxidation-induced cross-linking between subunits of the RyR1 tetramer. Alkylation of hyperreactive sulfhydryls (<3% of the total sulfhydryls) on RyR1 with N-ethylmaleimide completely blocks oxidant-induced intersubunit cross-linking and inhibits Ca2+-free 125I-CaM but not Ca2+/125I-CaM binding. These studies suggest that 1) the sites on RyR1 for binding apocalmodulin have features distinct from those of the Ca2+/CaM site, 2) oxidation may alter the activity of RyR1 in part by altering its interaction with CaM, and 3) CaM may protect RyR1 from oxidative modifications during periods of oxidative stress.

  6. Mitochondrial Morphofunctional Alterations in Smooth Muscle Cells of Aorta in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tarán, Mariana; Llorens, Candelaria; Balceda, Ariel; Scribano, María de La Paz; Pons, Patricia; Moya, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    In an experimental model of atherogenesis induced by hyperfibrinogenemia (HF), the pharmacological response of vitamin E was studied in order to assess its antioxidant effect on the mitochondrial morphofunctional alterations in aortic smooth muscle cells. Three groups of male rats were used: (Ctr) control, (AI) atherogenesis induced for 120 days, and (AIE) atherogenesis induced for 120 days and treated with vitamin E. HF was induced by adrenalin injection (0.1 mg/day/rat) for 120 days. AIE group was treated with the administration of 3.42 mg/day/rat of vitamin E for 105 days after the first induction. Mitochondria morphology was analyzed by electronic microscopy (EM) and mitochondrial complexes (MC) by spectrophotometry. In group AI the total and mean number of mitochondria reduced significantly, the intermembranous matrix increased, and swelling was observed with respect to Ctr and AIE (P < 0.01). These damages were related to a significant decrease in the activity of citrate synthase and complexes I, II, III, and IV in group AI in comparison to Ctr (P < 0.001). Similar behavior was presented by group AI compared to AIE (P < 0.001). These results show that vitamin E produces a significative regression of inflammatory and oxidative stress process and it resolved the morphofunctional mitochondrial alterations in this experimental model of atherogenic disease. PMID:24653842

  7. Endocrine alterations from concentric vs. eccentric muscle actions: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Robert R; Castracane, V Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Resistance exercise has a positive effect on many tissues, including heart, bone, skeletal muscle, and nervous tissue. Eccentric muscle actions offer a unique and a potentially beneficial form of exercise for maintaining and improving health. During resistance exercise, the effects of gravity, and mechanical properties of the sarcomere and connective tissue in skeletal muscle allow a greater muscle load during an eccentric (lengthening) muscle contraction than a concentric (shortening) muscle contraction. Consequently, older patients, patients with muscle or limb movement limitations or injuries, as well as cancer patients may be able to benefit from isolated eccentric muscle actions. There are specific physiological responses to eccentric muscle contractions. This review will describe the effects of different eccentric muscle contraction protocols on endocrine responses that could have positive effects on different tissues and recommend direction for future research. PMID:25467839

  8. Inhibition of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), an Enzyme Essential for NAD+ Biosynthesis, Leads to Altered Carbohydrate Metabolism in Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bo; Dong, Sucai; Shepard, Robert L.; Kays, Lisa; Roth, Kenneth D.; Geeganage, Sandaruwan; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Zhao, Genshi

    2015-01-01

    erythrose levels in the cell. Finally, glucose-labeling studies showed accumulated fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in FK866-treated cells mainly derived from dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. Taken together, this study shows that NAMPT inhibition leads to attenuation of glycolysis, resulting in further perturbation of carbohydrate metabolism in cancer cells. The potential clinical implications of these findings are also discussed. PMID:25944913

  9. Inhibition of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), an Enzyme Essential for NAD+ Biosynthesis, Leads to Altered Carbohydrate Metabolism in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bo; Dong, Sucai; Shepard, Robert L; Kays, Lisa; Roth, Kenneth D; Geeganage, Sandaruwan; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Zhao, Genshi

    2015-06-19

    erythrose levels in the cell. Finally, glucose-labeling studies showed accumulated fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in FK866-treated cells mainly derived from dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. Taken together, this study shows that NAMPT inhibition leads to attenuation of glycolysis, resulting in further perturbation of carbohydrate metabolism in cancer cells. The potential clinical implications of these findings are also discussed. PMID:25944913

  10. Altered Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Handling in Subjects with Impaired Glucose Tolerance as Compared to Impaired Fasting Glucose.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Gijs H; Moors, Chantalle C M; Jocken, Johan W E; van der Zijl, Nynke J; Jans, Anneke; Konings, Ellen; Diamant, Michaela; Blaak, Ellen E

    2016-03-01

    Altered skeletal muscle fatty acid (FA) metabolism contributes to insulin resistance. Here, we compared skeletal muscle FA handling between subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG; n = 12 (7 males)) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 14 (7 males)) by measuring arterio-venous concentration differences across forearm muscle. [²H₂]-palmitate was infused intravenously, labeling circulating endogenous triacylglycerol (TAG) and free fatty acids (FFA), whereas [U-(13)C]-palmitate was incorporated in a high-fat mixed-meal, labeling chylomicron-TAG. Skeletal muscle biopsies were taken to determine muscle TAG, diacylglycerol (DAG), FFA, and phospholipid content, their fractional synthetic rate (FSR) and degree of saturation, and gene expression. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Net skeletal muscle glucose uptake was lower (p = 0.018) and peripheral insulin sensitivity tended to be reduced (p = 0.064) in IGT as compared to IFG subjects. Furthermore, IGT showed higher skeletal muscle extraction of VLDL-TAG (p = 0.043), higher muscle TAG content (p = 0.025), higher saturation of FFA (p = 0.004), lower saturation of TAG (p = 0.017) and a tendency towards a lower TAG FSR (p = 0.073) and a lower saturation of DAG (p = 0.059) versus IFG individuals. Muscle oxidative gene expression was lower in IGT subjects. In conclusion, increased liver-derived TAG extraction and reduced lipid turnover of saturated FA, rather than DAG content, in skeletal muscle accompany the more pronounced insulin resistance in IGT versus IFG subjects. PMID:26985905

  11. Carbohydrate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemiller, James N.

    Carbohydrates are important in foods as a major source of energy, to impart crucial textural properties, and as dietary fiber which influences physiological processes. Digestible carbohydrates, which are converted into monosaccharides, which are absorbed, provide metabolic energy. Worldwide, carbohydrates account for more than 70% of the caloric value of the human diet. It is recommended that all persons should limit calories from fat (the other significant source) to not more than 30% and that most of the carbohydrate calories should come from starch. Nondigestible polysaccharides (all those other than starch) comprise the major portion of dietary fiber (Sect. 10.5). Carbohydrates also contribute other attributes, including bulk, body, viscosity, stability to emulsions and foams, water-holding capacity, freeze-thaw stability, browning, flavors, aromas, and a range of desirable textures (from crispness to smooth, soft gels). They also provide satiety. Basic carbohydrate structures, chemistry, and terminology can be found in references (1, 2).

  12. Geniohyoid muscle properties and myosin heavy chain composition are altered after short-term intermittent hypoxic exposure.

    PubMed

    Pae, Eung-Kwon; Wu, Jennifer; Nguyen, Daniel; Monti, Ryan; Harper, Ronald M

    2005-03-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) often exhibit fatigued or inefficient upper airway dilator and constrictor muscles; an upper airway dilator, the geniohyoid (GH) muscle, is a particular example. Intermittent hypoxia (IH) is a frequent concomitant of OSA, and it may trigger muscle fiber composition changes that are characteristic of a fatigable nature. We examined effects of short-term IH on diaphragmatic and GH muscle fiber composition and fatigue properties by exposing 24 rats to alternating 10.3% O(2)-balance N(2) and room air every 480 s (240 s duty cycle) for a total duration of 5, 10, 15, 20, or 30 h. Sternohyoid fiber composition was also examined. Control animals were exposed to room air on the same schedule. Single-fiber analyses showed that GH muscle fiber types changed completely from myosin heavy chain (MHC) type 2A to MHC type 2B after 10 h of exposure, and the conversion was maintained for at least 30 h. Sternohyoid muscle fibers showed a delayed transition from MHC type 2A/2B to MHC type 2B. In contrast, major fiber types of the diaphragm were not significantly altered. The GH muscles showed similar tension-frequency relationships in all groups, but an increased fatigability developed, proportional to the duration of IH treatment. We conclude that short-term IH exposure alters GH muscle composition and physical properties toward more fatigable, fast-twitch types and that it may account for the fatigable upper airway fiber types found in sleep-disturbed breathing. PMID:15557011

  13. Aging is associated with altered vasodilator kinetics in dynamically contracting muscle: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Casey, Darren P; Ranadive, Sushant M; Joyner, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that aging would be associated with slowed vasodilator kinetics in contracting muscle in part due to a reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Young (n = 10; 24 ± 2 yr) and older (n = 10; 67 ± 2 yr) adults performed rhythmic forearm exercise (4 min each) at 10, 20, and 30% of max during saline infusion (control) and NO synthase (NOS) inhibition. Brachial artery diameter and velocities were measured using Doppler ultrasound. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC) was calculated for each duty cycle (1 s contraction/2 s relaxation) from forearm blood flow (FBF; ml/min) and blood pressure (mmHg) and fit with a monoexponential model. The main parameters derived from the model were the amplitude of the FBF and FVC response and the number of duty cycles for FBF and FVC to change 63% of the steady-state amplitude (τFBF and τFVC). Under control conditions 1) the amplitude of the FVC response at 30% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) was lower in older compared with young adults (319 ± 33 vs. 462 ± 52 ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1); P < 0.05) and 2) τFVC was slower in older (10 ± 1, 13 ± 1, and 15 ± 1 duty cycles) compared with young (6 ± 1, 9 ± 1, and 11 ± 1 duty cycles) adults at all intensities (P < 0.05). In young adults, NOS inhibition blunted the amplitude of the FVC response at 30% MVC and prolonged the τFVC at all intensities (10 ± 2, 12 ± 1, and 16 ± 2 duty cycles; P < 0.05), whereas it did not change in older adults. Our data indicate that the blood flow and vasodilator kinetics in exercising muscle are altered with aging possibly due to blunted NO signaling. PMID:26023230

  14. Aging alters muscle reflex control of autonomic cardiovascular responses to rhythmic contractions in humans.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Simranjit K; Weavil, Joshua C; Venturelli, Massimo; Rossman, Matthew J; Gmelch, Benjamin S; Bledsoe, Amber D; Richardson, Russell S; Amann, Markus

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the influence of aging on the group III/IV muscle afferents in the exercise pressor reflex-mediated cardiovascular response to rhythmic exercise. Nine old (OLD; 68 ± 2 yr) and nine young (YNG; 24 ± 2 yr) males performed single-leg knee extensor exercise (15 W, 30 W, 80% max) under control conditions and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl impairing feedback from group III/IV leg muscle afferents. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output, leg blood flow (QL), systemic (SVC) and leg vascular conductance (LVC) were continuously determined. With no hemodynamic effect at rest, fentanyl blockade during exercise attenuated both cardiac output and QL ∼17% in YNG, while the decrease in cardiac output in OLD (∼5%) was significantly smaller with no impact on QL (P = 0.8). Therefore, in the face of similar significant ∼7% reduction in MAP during exercise with fentanyl blockade in both groups, LVC significantly increased ∼11% in OLD, but decreased ∼8% in YNG. The opposing direction of change was reflected in SVC with a significant ∼5% increase in OLD and a ∼12% decrease in YNG. Thus while cardiac output seems to account for the majority of group III/IV-mediated MAP responses in YNG, the impact of neural feedback on the heart may decrease with age and alterations in SVC become more prominent in mediating the similar exercise pressor reflex in OLD. Interestingly, in terms of peripheral hemodynamics, while group III/IV-mediated feedback plays a clear role in increasing LVC during exercise in the YNG, these afferents seem to actually reduce LVC in OLD. These peripheral findings may help explain the limited exercise-induced peripheral vasodilation often associated with aging. PMID:26386110

  15. Alterations in 18F-FDG accumulation into neck-related muscles after neck dissection for patients with oral cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kito, Shinji; Koga, Hirofumi; Kodama, Masaaki; Habu, Manabu; Kokuryo, Shinya; Oda, Masafumi; Matsuo, Kou; Nishino, Takanobu; Matsumoto-Takeda, Shinobu; Uehara, Masataka; Yoshiga, Daigo; Tanaka, Tatsurou; Nishimura, Shun; Miyamoto, Ikuya; Sasaguri, Masaaki; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Yoshioka, Izumi; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) accumulations are commonly seen in the neck-related muscles of the surgical and non-surgical sides after surgery with neck dissection (ND) for oral cancers, which leads to radiologists having difficulty in diagnosing the lesions. To examine the alterations in 18F-FDG accumulation in neck-related muscles of patients after ND for oral cancer. Material and Methods 18F-FDG accumulations on positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) in neck-related muscles were retrospectively analyzed after surgical dissection of cervical lymph nodes in oral cancers. Results According to the extent of ND of cervical lymph nodes, the rate of patients with 18F-FDG-PET-positive areas increased in the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and posterior neck muscles of the surgical and/or non-surgical sides. In addition, SUVmax of 18F-FDG-PET-positive areas in the trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles were increased according to the extent of the ND. Conclusions In evaluating 18F-FDG accumulations after ND for oral cancers, we should pay attention to the 18F-FDG distributions in neck-related muscles including the non-surgical side as false-positive findings. Key words:18F-FDG, PET-CT, oral cancers, muscles. PMID:27031062

  16. Altered gene expression patterns in muscle ring finger 1 null mice during denervation- and dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Monica L.; Waddell, David S.; Neff, Eric S.; Baehr, Leslie M.; Ross, Adam P.; Bodine, Sue C.

    2013-01-01

    Muscle atrophy can result from inactivity or unloading on one hand or the induction of a catabolic state on the other. Muscle-specific ring finger 1 (MuRF1), a member of the tripartite motif family of E3 ubiquitin ligases, is an essential mediator of multiple conditions inducing muscle atrophy. While most studies have focused on the role of MuRF1 in protein degradation, the protein may have other roles in regulating skeletal muscle mass and metabolism. We therefore systematically evaluated the effect of MuRF1 on gene expression during denervation and dexamethasone-induced atrophy. We find that the lack of MuRF1 leads to few differences in control animals, but there were several significant differences in specific sets of genes upon denervation- and dexamethasone-induced atrophy. For example, during denervation, MuRF1 knockout mice showed delayed repression of metabolic and structural genes and blunted induction of genes associated with the neuromuscular junction. In the latter case, this pattern correlates with blunted HDAC4 and myogenin upregulation. Lack of MuRF1 caused fewer changes in the dexamethasone-induced atrophy program, but certain genes involved in fat metabolism and intracellular signaling were affected. Our results demonstrate a new role for MuRF1 in influencing gene expression in two important models of muscle atrophy. PMID:24130153

  17. Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation Emitted from Common Mobile Phone Jammers Alters the Pattern of Muscle Contractions: an Animal Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Rafati, A.; Rahimi, S.; Talebi, A.; Soleimani, A.; Haghani, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The rapid growth of wireless communication technologies has caused public concerns regarding the biological effects of electromagnetic radiations on human health. Some early reports indicated a wide variety of non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation on amphibians such as the alterations of the pattern of muscle extractions. This study is aimed at investigating the effects of exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation emitted from mobile phone jammers on the pulse height of contractions, the time interval between two subsequent contractions and the latency period of frog’s isolated gastrocnemius muscle after stimulation with single square pulses of 1V (1 Hz). Materials and Methods Frogs were kept in plastic containers in a room. Animals in the jammer group were exposed to radiofrequency (RF) radiation emitted from a common Jammer at a distance of 1m from the jammer’s antenna for 2 hours while the control frogs were only sham exposed. Then animals were sacrificed and isolated gastrocnemius muscles were exposed to on/off jammer radiation for 3 subsequent 10 minute intervals. Isolated gastrocnemius muscles were attached to the force transducer with a string. Using a PowerLab device (26-T), the pattern of muscular contractions was monitored after applying single square pulses of 1V (1 Hz) as stimuli. Results The findings of this study showed that the pulse height of muscle contractions could not be affected by the exposure to electromagnetic fields. However, the latency period was effectively altered in RF-exposed samples. However, none of the experiments could show an alteration in the time interval between two subsequent contractions after exposure to electromagnetic fields. Conclusion These findings support early reports which indicated a wide variety of non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation on amphibians including the effects on the pattern of muscle extractions. PMID:26396969

  18. Reduced Neck Muscle Strength and Altered Muscle Mechanical Properties in Cervical Dystonia Following Botulinum Neurotoxin Injections: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Mustalampi, Sirpa; Ylinen, Jari; Korniloff, Katariina; Weir, Adam; Häkkinen, Arja

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate changes in the strength and mechanical properties of neck muscles and disability in patients with cervical dystonia (CD) during a 12-week period following botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injections. Methods Eight patients with CD volunteered for this prospective clinical cohort study. Patients had received BoNT injections regularly in neck muscles at three-month intervals for several years. Maximal isometric neck strength was measured by a dynamometer, and the mechanical properties of the splenius capitis were evaluated using two myotonometers. Clinical assessment was performed using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) before and at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the BoNT injections. Results Mean maximal isometric neck strength at two weeks after the BoNT injections decreased by 28% in extension, 25% in rotation of the affected side and 17% in flexion. At four weeks, muscle stiffness of the affected side decreased by 17% and tension decreased by 6%. At eight weeks, the muscle elasticity on the affected side increased by 12%. At two weeks after the BoNT injections, the TWSTRS-severity and TWSTRS-total scores decreased by 4.3 and 6.4, respectively. The strength, muscle mechanical properties and TWSTRS scores returned to baseline values at 12 weeks. Conclusions Although maximal neck strength and muscle tone decreased after BoNT injections, the disability improved. The changes observed after BoNT injections were temporary and returned to pre-injection levels within twelve weeks. Despite having a possible negative effect on function and decreasing neck strength, the BoNT injections improved the patients reported disability. PMID:26828215

  19. Detection of ultrastructural changes in genetically altered and exercised skeletal muscle using PS-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquesi, James J.; Schlachter, Simon C.; Boppart, Marni D.; Chaney, Eric; Kaufman, Stephen J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2006-02-01

    Birefringence of skeletal muscle has been associated with the ultrastructure of individual sarcomeres, specifically the arrangement of A-bands corresponding to the thick myosin filaments. Murine skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) was imaged with a fiber-based PS-OCT imaging system to determine the level of birefringence present in the tissue under various conditions. In addition to muscle controls from wild-type mice, muscle from abnormal mice included: genetically-modified (mdx) mice which model human muscular dystrophy, transgenic mice exhibiting an overexpression of integrin (α7β1), and transgenic integrin (α7β1)knockout mice. Comparisons were also made between rested and exercised muscles to determine the effects of exercise on muscle birefringence for each of these normal and abnormal conditions. The PS-OCT images revealed that the presence of birefringence was similar in the rested muscle with dystrophy-like features (i.e., lacking the structural protein dystrophin - mdx) and in the integrin (α7β1)knockout muscle when compared to the normal (wild-type) control. However, exercising these abnormal muscle tissues drastically reduced the presence of birefringence detected by the PS-OCT system. The muscle exhibiting an overexpression of integrin (α7β1) remained heavily birefringent before and after exercise, similar to the normal (wild-type) muscle. These results suggest that there is a distinct relationship between the degree of birefringence detected using PS-OCT and the sarcomeric ultrastructure present within skeletal muscle.

  20. Castration differentially alters basal and leucine-stimulated tissue protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qianning; Pruznak, Anne M; Huber, Danuta; Vary, Thomas C; Lang, Charles H

    2009-11-01

    Reduced testosterone as a result of catabolic illness or aging is associated with loss of muscle and increased adiposity. We hypothesized that these changes in body composition occur because of altered rates of protein synthesis under basal and nutrient-stimulated conditions that are tissue specific. The present study investigated such mechanisms in castrated male rats (75% reduction in testosterone) with demonstrated glucose intolerance. Over 9 wk, castration impaired body weight gain, which resulted from a reduced lean body mass and preferential sparing of adipose tissue. Castration decreased gastrocnemius weight, but this atrophy was not associated with reduced basal muscle protein synthesis or differences in plasma IGF-I, insulin, or individual amino acids. However, oral leucine failed to normally stimulate muscle protein synthesis in castrated rats. In addition, castration-induced atrophy was associated with increased 3-methylhistidine excretion and in vitro-determined ubiquitin proteasome activity in skeletal muscle, changes that were associated with decreased atrogin-1 or MuRF1 mRNA expression. Castration decreased heart and kidney weight without reducing protein synthesis and did not alter either cardiac output or glomerular filtration. In contradistinction, the weight of the retroperitoneal fat depot was increased in castrated rats. This increase was associated with an elevated rate of basal protein synthesis, which was unresponsive to leucine stimulation. Castration also decreased whole body fat oxidation. Castration increased TNFα, IL-1α, IL-6, and NOS2 mRNA in fat but not muscle. In summary, the castration-induced muscle wasting results from an increased muscle protein breakdown and the inability of leucine to stimulate protein synthesis, whereas the expansion of the retroperitoneal fat depot appears mediated in part by an increased basal rate of protein synthesis-associated increased inflammatory cytokine expression. PMID:19755668

  1. Fat accumulation with altered inflammation and regeneration in skeletal muscle of CCR2-/- mice following ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Shannon, Verónica; Ochoa, Oscar; Reyes-Reyna, Sara M; Sun, Dongxu; Michalek, Joel E; Kuziel, William A; McManus, Linda M; Shireman, Paula K

    2007-02-01

    Chemokines recruit inflammatory cells to sites of injury, but the role of the CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) during regenerative processes following ischemia is poorly understood. We studied injury, inflammation, perfusion, capillary formation, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) levels, muscle regeneration, fat accumulation, and transcription factor activation in hindlimb muscles of CCR2-/- and wild-type (WT) mice following femoral artery excision (FAE). In both groups, muscle injury and restoration of vascular perfusion were similar. Nevertheless, edema and neutrophil accumulation were significantly elevated in CCR2-/- compared with WT mice at day 1 post-FAE and fewer macrophages were present at day 3. MCP-1 levels in post-ischemic calf muscle of CCR2-/- animals were significantly elevated over baseline through 14 days post-FAE and were higher than WT mice at days 1, 7, and 14. In addition, CCR2-/- mice exhibited impaired muscle regeneration, decreased muscle fiber size, and increased intermuscular adipocytes with similar capillaries/mm(2) postinjury. Finally, the transcription factors, MyoD and signal transducers of and activators of transcription-3 (STAT3), were significantly increased above baseline but did not differ significantly between groups at any time point post-FAE. These findings suggest that increases in MCP-1, and possibly, MyoD and STAT3, may modulate molecular signaling in CCR2-/- mice during inflammatory and regenerative events. Furthermore, alterations in neutrophil and macrophage recruitment in CCR2-/- mice may critically alter the normal progression of downstream regenerative events in injured skeletal muscle and may direct myogenic precursor cells in the regenerating milieu toward an adipogenic phenotype. PMID:17020936

  2. Streptococcus iniae cpsG alters capsular carbohydrate composition and is a cause of serotype switching in vaccinated fish.

    PubMed

    Heath, Candice; Gillen, Christine M; Chrysanthopoulos, Panagiotis; Walker, Mark J; Barnes, Andrew C

    2016-09-25

    Streptococcus iniae causes septicaemia and meningitis in marine and freshwater fish wherever they are farmed in warm-temperate and tropical regions. Although serotype specific, vaccination with bacterins (killed bacterial cultures) is largely successful and vaccine failure occurs only occasionally through emergence of new capsular serotypes. Previously we showed that mutations in vaccine escapes are restricted to a limited repertoire of genes within the 20-gene capsular polysaccharide (cps) operon. cpsG, a putative UDP-galactose 4-epimerase, has three sequence types based on the insertion or deletion of the three amino acids leucine, serine and lysine in the substrate binding site of the protein. To elucidate the role of cpsG in capsular polysaccharide (CPS) biosynthesis and capsular composition, we first prepared isogenic knockout and complemented mutants of cpsG by allelic exchange mutagenesis. Deletion of cpsG resulted in changes to colony morphology and cell buoyant density, and also significantly decreased galactose content relative to glucose in the capsular polysaccharide as determined by GC-MS, consistent with epimerase activity of CpsG. There was also a metabolic penalty of cpsG knockout revealed by slower growth in complex media, and reduced proliferation in whole fish blood. Moreover, whilst antibodies raised in fish against the wild type cross-reacted in whole cell and cps ELISA, they did not cross-opsonise the mutant in a peripheral blood neutrophil opsonisation assay, consistent with reported vaccine escape. We have shown here that mutation in cpsG results in altered CPS composition and this in turn results in poor cross-opsonisation that explains some of the historic vaccination failure on fish farms in Australia. PMID:27599938

  3. Mutation of a family 8 glycosyltransferase gene alters cell wall carbohydrate composition and causes a humidity-sensitive semi-sterile dwarf phenotype in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lao, Nga T; Long, Debbie; Kiang, Sophie; Coupland, George; Shoue, Douglas A; Carpita, Nicholas C; Kavanagh, Tony A

    2003-11-01

    The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana contains about 400 genes coding for glycosyltransferases, many of which are predicted to be involved in the synthesis and remodelling of cell wall components. We describe the isolation of a transposon-tagged mutant, parvus, which under low humidity conditions exhibits a severely dwarfed growth phenotype and failure of anther dehiscence resulting in semi-sterility. All aspects of the mutant phenotype were partially rescued by growth under high-humidity conditions, but not by the application of growth hormones or jasmonic acid. The mutation is caused by insertion of a maize Dissociation (Ds) element in a gene coding for a putative Golgi-localized glycosyltransferase belonging to family 8. Members of this family, originally identified on the basis of similarity to bacterial lipooligosaccharide glycosyltransferases, include enzymes known to be involved in the synthesis of bacterial and plant cell walls. Cell-wall carbohydrate analyses of the parvus mutant indicated reduced levels of rhamnogalacturonan I branching and alterations in the abundance of some xyloglucan linkages that may, however, be indirect consequences of the mutation. PMID:15010604

  4. Mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress in an acute transient mouse model of muscle degeneration: implications for muscular dystrophy and related muscle pathologies.

    PubMed

    Ramadasan-Nair, Renjini; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Mishra, Sudha; Sunitha, Balaraju; Mythri, Rajeswara Babu; Nalini, Atchayaram; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Harsha, Hindalahalli Chandregowda; Kolthur-Seetharam, Ullas; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) and inflammatory myopathies (IMs) are debilitating skeletal muscle disorders characterized by common pathological events including myodegeneration and inflammation. However, an experimental model representing both muscle pathologies and displaying most of the distinctive markers has not been characterized. We investigated the cardiotoxin (CTX)-mediated transient acute mouse model of muscle degeneration and compared the cardinal features with human MDs and IMs. The CTX model displayed degeneration, apoptosis, inflammation, loss of sarcolemmal complexes, sarcolemmal disruption, and ultrastructural changes characteristic of human MDs and IMs. Cell death caused by CTX involved calcium influx and mitochondrial damage both in murine C2C12 muscle cells and in mice. Mitochondrial proteomic analysis at the initial phase of degeneration in the model detected lowered expression of 80 mitochondrial proteins including subunits of respiratory complexes, ATP machinery, fatty acid metabolism, and Krebs cycle, which further decreased in expression during the peak degenerative phase. The mass spectrometry (MS) data were supported by enzyme assays, Western blot, and histochemistry. The CTX model also displayed markers of oxidative stress and a lowered glutathione reduced/oxidized ratio (GSH/GSSG) similar to MDs, human myopathies, and neurogenic atrophies. MS analysis identified 6 unique oxidized proteins from Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples (n = 6) (versus controls; n = 6), including two mitochondrial proteins. Interestingly, these mitochondrial proteins were down-regulated in the CTX model thereby linking oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. We conclude that mitochondrial alterations and oxidative damage significantly contribute to CTX-mediated muscle pathology with implications for human muscle diseases. PMID:24220031

  5. Synergistic ablation does not affect atrophy or altered myosin heavy chain expression in the non-weight bearing soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linderman, J. K.; Talmadge, R. J.; Gosselink, K. L.; Tri, P. N.; Roy, R. R.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the soleus muscle undergoes atrophy and alterations in myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition during non-weight bearing in the absence of synergists. Thirty-two female rats were randomly assigned to four groups: control (C), synergistic ablation (ABL) of the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles to overload the soleus muscle, hindlimb suspension (HLS), or a combination of synergistic ablation and hindlimb suspension (HLS-ABL). After 28 days of hindlimb suspension, soleus atrophy was more pronounced in HLS (58%) than in HLS-ABL (43%) rats. Compared to C rats, non-weight bearing decreased mixed and myofibrillar protein contents and Type I MHC 49%, 45%, and 7%, respectively, in HLS animals. In addition, de novo expression of fast Type IIx and Type IIb MHC (5% and 2%, respectively) was observed in HLS animals. Similarly, when compared to C rats, mixed and myofibrillar protein contents and Type I MHC decreased 43%, 46%, and 4%, respectively, in HLS-ABL animals. Also, de novo expression of Type IIx (4%) and IIb (1%) MHC was observed. Collectively, these data indicate that the loss of muscle protein and Type I MHC, and the de novo expression of Type IIx and Type IIb MHC in the rat soleus occur independently of the presence of synergists during non-weight bearing. Furthermore, these results confirm the contention that soleus mass and MHC expression are highly sensitive to alterations in mechanical load.

  6. Major alteration of the pathological phenotype in gamma irradiated mdx soleus muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, B.; Karpati, G.; Lehnert, S.; Carpenter, S. )

    1991-07-01

    Two thousand rads of gamma irradiation delivered to the lower legs of ten day old normal and x-chromosome linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mice caused significant inhibition of tibial bone and soleus muscle fiber growth. In the irradiated mdx solei, there was a major loss of muscle fibers, lack of central nucleation, and some endomysial fibrosis. These features were caused by a failure of regeneration of muscle fibers due to impaired proliferative capacity of satellite cells. Gamma irradiation transforms the late pathological phenotype of mdx muscles, so that in one major aspect (muscle fiber loss) they resemble muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, extensive endomysial fibrosis which is another characteristic feature of Duchenne muscular dystrophy did not develop. This experimental model could be useful for the functional investigation of possible beneficial effects of therapeutic interventions in mdx dystrophy.

  7. Quadriceps exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the potential role of altered skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Jayson R; Trinity, Joel D; Layec, Gwenael; Garten, Ryan S; Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J; Larsen, Steen; Dela, Flemming; Richardson, Russell S

    2015-10-15

    This study sought to determine if qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration, associated with decreased mitochondrial efficiency, contribute to exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using permeabilized muscle fibers from the vastus lateralis of 13 patients with COPD and 12 healthy controls, complex I (CI) and complex II (CII)-driven State 3 mitochondrial respiration were measured separately (State 3:CI and State 3:CII) and in combination (State 3:CI+CII). State 2 respiration was also measured. Exercise tolerance was assessed by knee extensor exercise (KE) time to fatigue. Per milligram of muscle, State 3:CI+CII and State 3:CI were reduced in COPD (P < 0.05), while State 3:CII and State 2 were not different between groups. To determine if this altered pattern of respiration represented qualitative changes in mitochondrial function, respiration states were examined as percentages of peak respiration (State 3:CI+CII), which revealed altered contributions from State 3:CI (Con 83.7 ± 3.4, COPD 72.1 ± 2.4%Peak, P < 0.05) and State 3:CII (Con 64.9 ± 3.2, COPD 79.5 ± 3.0%Peak, P < 0.05) respiration, but not State 2 respiration in COPD. Importantly, a diminished contribution of CI-driven respiration relative to the metabolically less-efficient CII-driven respiration (CI/CII) was also observed in COPD (Con 1.28 ± 0.09, COPD 0.81 ± 0.05, P < 0.05), which was related to exercise tolerance of the patients (r = 0.64, P < 0.05). Overall, this study indicates that COPD is associated with qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondria that affect the contribution of CI and CII-driven respiration, which potentially contributes to the exercise intolerance associated with this disease. PMID:26272320

  8. Effect of taurine supplementation on the alterations in amino Acid content in skeletal muscle with exercise in rat.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, Keisuke; Miyazaki, Teruo; Ra, Song-Gyu; Endo, Shoji; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Miyakawa, Shumpei; Ohmori, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    precursor for gluconeogenesis.The alteration of three amino acids in muscles was maintained after exhausted exercise.The muscular alterations of them might be one of taurine-induced roles on exercise performance. PMID:24149876

  9. Scapular and rotator cuff muscle activity during arm elevation: A review of normal function and alterations with shoulder impingement

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, V; Camargo, PR; Ludewig, PM

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this manuscript is to review current knowledge of how muscle activation and force production contribute to shoulder kinematics in healthy subjects and persons with shoulder impingement. Results The middle and lower serratus anterior muscles produce scapular upward rotation, posterior tilting, and external rotation. Upper trapezius produces clavicular elevation and retraction. The middle trapezius is primarily a medial stabilizer of the scapula. The lower trapezius assists in medial stabilization and upward rotation of the scapula. The pectoralis minor is aligned to resist normal rotations of the scapula during arm elevation. The rotator cuff is critical to stabilization and prevention of excess superior translation of the humeral head, as well as production of glenohumeral external rotation during arm elevation. Alterations in activation amplitude or timing have been identified across various investigations of subjects with shoulder impingement as compared to healthy controls. These include decreased activation of the middle or lower serratus anterior and rotator cuff, delayed activation of middle and lower trapezius, and increased activation of the upper trapezius and middle deltoid in impingement subjects. In addition, subjects with a short resting length of the pectoralis minor exhibit altered scapular kinematic patterns similar to those found in persons with shoulder impingement. Conclusion These normal muscle functional capabilities and alterations in patient populations should be considered when planning exercise approaches for the rehabilitation of these patients. PMID:20411160

  10. Counting carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are 3 major types of carbohydrates: Sugars Starches Fiber Sugars are found naturally in some foods ... syrups, such as those added to canned fruit Starches are found naturally in foods. Your body breaks ...

  11. Alterations at the Cross-Bridge Level Are Associated with a Paradoxical Gain of Muscle Function In Vivo in a Mouse Model of Nemaline Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gineste, Charlotte; Ottenheijm, Coen; Le Fur, Yann; Banzet, Sébastien; Pecchi, Emilie; Vilmen, Christophe; Cozzone, Patrick J.; Koulmann, Nathalie; Hardeman, Edna C.; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is the most common disease entity among non-dystrophic skeletal muscle congenital diseases. The first disease causing mutation (Met9Arg) was identified in the gene encoding α-tropomyosinslow gene (TPM3). Considering the conflicting findings of the previous studies on the transgenic (Tg) mice carrying the TPM3Met9Arg mutation, we investigated carefully the effect of the Met9Arg mutation in 8–9 month-old Tg(TPM3)Met9Arg mice on muscle function using a multiscale methodological approach including skinned muscle fibers analysis and in vivo investigations by magnetic resonance imaging and 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy. While in vitro maximal force production was reduced in Tg(TPM3)Met9Arg mice as compared to controls, in vivo measurements revealed an improved mechanical performance in the transgenic mice as compared to the former. The reduced in vitro muscle force might be related to alterations occuring at the cross-bridges level with muscle-specific underlying mechanisms. In vivo muscle improvement was not associated with any changes in either muscle volume or energy metabolism. Our findings indicate that TPM3(Met9Arg) mutation leads to a mild muscle weakness in vitro related to an alteration at the cross-bridges level and a paradoxical gain of muscle function in vivo. These results clearly point out that in vitro alterations are muscle-dependent and do not necessarily translate into similar changes in vivo. PMID:25268244

  12. Alterations in multidimensional motor unit number index of hand muscles after incomplete cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Le; Li, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jie; Zhou, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to apply a novel multidimensional motor unit number index (MD-MUNIX) technique to examine hand muscles in patients with incomplete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The MD-MUNIX was estimated from the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and different levels of surface interference pattern electromyogram (EMG) at multiple directions of voluntary isometric muscle contraction. The MD-MUNIX was applied in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI), thenar and hypothenar muscles of SCI (n = 12) and healthy control (n = 12) subjects. The results showed that the SCI subjects had significantly smaller CMAP and MD-MUNIX in all the three examined muscles, compared to those derived from the healthy control subjects. The multidimensional motor unit size index (MD-MUSIX) demonstrated significantly larger values for the FDI and hypothenar muscles in SCI subjects than those from healthy control subjects, whereas the MD-MUSIX enlargement was marginally significant for the thenar muscles. The findings from the MD-MUNIX analyses provide an evidence of motor unit loss in hand muscles of cervical SCI patients, contributing to hand function deterioration. PMID:26005410

  13. Differences in Age-Related Alterations in Muscle Contraction Properties in Rat Tongue and Hindlimb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Nadine P.; Ota, Fumikazu; Nagai, Hiromi; Russell, John A.; Leverson, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Because of differences in muscle architecture and biomechanics, the purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle contractile properties of rat hindlimb and tongue were differentially affected by aging. Method: Deep peroneal and hypoglossal nerves were stimulated in 6 young and 7 old Fischer 344-Brown Norway rats to allow…

  14. Resistance training alters cytokine gene expression in skeletal muscle of adults with type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance training results in muscle hypertrophy and improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Whether resistance training modulates inflammation in muscles of diabetic patients remains unknown. We examined the expression of genes encoding the cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-al...

  15. Alteration of Muscle Function After Electrical Stimulation Bout of Knee Extensors and Flexors

    PubMed Central

    Vanderthommen, Marc; Triffaux, Mylène; Demoulin, Christophe; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Croisier, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose was to study the effects on muscle function of an electrical stimulation bout applied unilaterally on thigh muscles in healthy male volunteers. One group (ES group, n = 10) received consecutively 100 isometric contractions of quadriceps and 100 isometric contractions of hamstrings (on-off ratio 6-6 s) induced by neuromuscular electrical stimulations (NMES). Changes in muscle torque, muscle soreness (0-10 VAS), muscle stiffness and serum creatine kinase (CK) activity were assessed before the NMES exercise (pre-ex) as well as 24h (d+1), 48h (d+2) and 120h (d+5) after the bout. A second group (control group, n = 10) were submitted to the same test battery than the ES group and with the same time-frame. The between-group comparison indicated a significant increase in VAS scores and in serum levels of CK only in the ES group. In the ES group, changes were more pronounced in hamstrings than in quadriceps and peaked at d+2 (quadriceps VAS scores = 2.20 ± 1.55 a.u. (0 at pre-ex); hamstrings VAS scores = 3.15 ± 2.14 a.u. (0 at pre-ex); hip flexion angle = 62 ± 5° (75 ± 6° at pre-ex); CK activity = 3021 ± 2693 IU·l-1 (136 ± 50 IU·l-1 at pre-ex)). The results of the present study suggested the occurrence of muscle damage that could have been induced by the peculiar muscle recruitment in NMES and the resulting overrated mechanical stress. The sensitivity to the damaging effects of NMES appeared higher in the hamstrings than in quadriceps muscles. Key points A stimulation bout of quadriceps and hamstrings that reflects usual application of NMES, increases indirect markers of muscle damage (muscle soreness, muscle weakness and stiffness and serum CK activity). The occurrence of muscle damage could have been induced by the peculiar muscle recruitment in NMES and the resulting overrated mechanical stress. The sensitivity to the damaging effects of NMES appears higher in the hamstrings than in quadriceps muscles. PMID:24150067

  16. Alterations of cAMP-dependent signaling in dystrophic skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Rudolf, Rüdiger; Khan, Muzamil M.; Lustrino, Danilo; Labeit, Siegfried; Kettelhut, Ísis C.; Navegantes, Luiz C. C.

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic regulation processes in striated muscles are largely mediated by cAMP/PKA-signaling. In order to achieve specificity of signaling its spatial-temporal compartmentation plays a critical role. We discuss here how specificity of cAMP/PKA-signaling can be achieved in skeletal muscle by spatio-temporal compartmentation. While a microdomain containing PKA type I in the region of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is important for postsynaptic, activity-dependent stabilization of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR), PKA type I and II microdomains in the sarcomeric part of skeletal muscle are likely to play different roles, including the regulation of muscle homeostasis. These microdomains are due to specific A-kinase anchoring proteins, like rapsyn and myospryn. Importantly, recent evidence indicates that compartmentation of the cAMP/PKA-dependent signaling pathway and pharmacological activation of cAMP production are aberrant in different skeletal muscles disorders. Thus, we discuss here their potential as targets for palliative treatment of certain forms of dystrophy and myasthenia. Under physiological conditions, the neuropeptide, α-calcitonin-related peptide, as well as catecholamines are the most-mentioned natural triggers for activating cAMP/PKA signaling in skeletal muscle. While the precise domains and functions of these first messengers are still under investigation, agonists of β2-adrenoceptors clearly exhibit anabolic activity under normal conditions and reduce protein degradation during atrophic periods. Past and recent studies suggest direct sympathetic innervation of skeletal muscle fibers. In summary, the organization and roles of cAMP-dependent signaling in skeletal muscle are increasingly understood, revealing crucial functions in processes like nerve-muscle interaction and muscle trophicity. PMID:24146652

  17. Alterations in Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Phenotype in Mice Exposed to 3 Weeks of Normobaric Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Slot, Ilse G M; Schols, Annemie M W J; de Theije, Chiel C; Snepvangers, Frank J M; Gosker, Harry R

    2016-02-01

    Skeletal muscle of patients with chronic respiratory failure is prone to loss of muscle mass and oxidative phenotype. Tissue hypoxia has been associated with cachexia and emphysema in humans. Experimental research on the role of hypoxia in loss of muscle oxidative phenotype, however, has yielded inconsistent results. Animal studies are frequently performed in young animals, which may hinder translation to generally older aged patients. Therefore, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that hypoxia induces loss of skeletal muscle oxidative phenotype in a model of aged (52 weeks) mice exposed to 3 weeks of hypoxia. Additional groups of young (4 weeks) and adult (12 weeks) mice were included to examine age effects. To verify hypoxia-induced cachexia, fat pad and muscle weights as well as muscle fiber cross-sectional areas were determined. Muscle oxidative phenotype was assessed by expression and activity of markers of mitochondrial metabolism and fiber-type distribution. A profound loss of muscle and fat was indeed accompanied by a slightly lower expression of markers of muscle oxidative capacity in the aged hypoxic mice. In contrast, hypoxia-associated changes of fiber-type composition were more prominent in the young mice. The differential response of the muscle of young, adult, and aged mice to hypoxia suggests that age matters and that the aged mouse is a better model for translation of findings to elderly patients with chronic respiratory disease. Furthermore, the findings warrant further mechanistic research into putative accelerating effects of hypoxia-induced loss of oxidative phenotype on the cachexia process in chronic respiratory disease. PMID:26129845

  18. Characterization of muscle alteration in oral submucous fibrosis-seeking new evidence

    PubMed Central

    Urs, Aadithya-Basavaraj; Augustine, Jeyaseelan; Kumar, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to assess the progression of Oral Submucous Fibrosis (OSF) by investigating the correlation between clinical mouth opening and muscle-epithelial distance in tissue sections. Characterization of changes involving muscle was ascertained. Material and Methods 50 cases and 10 controls were included in this case-control study. Inter-incisal mouth opening was measured and classified according to Lai et al. as Group A (more than 35mm), Group B (30 to 35mm), Group C (20 to 30mm), Group D (less than 20mm). Histopathological sections were graded as very early, early, moderately advanced, advanced OSF. Muscle-epithelial distance was calculated using image analysis software. The four most common degenerative changes observed in muscles, namely fragmentation, highly eosinophilic areas with loss of striations, nucleus internalization and multiple pyknotic nuclei were also assessed. Results Comparisons of muscle-epithelial distance were made between the clinical and histopathological groups to those of controls. The mean muscle-epithelial distance was: Group A-626.8±309.36 µm, B-827.5±549.72 µm, C-673.2±321.93 µm, D-439.9±173.84µm, Controls-1222.19 ±441.7µm. Post-hoc Bonferroni Test revealed a statistically significant reduction in the muscle-epithelial distance in Group C (p-value = 0.001) and D (p-value = 0.001) as compared to controls. The mean muscle-epithelial distance in very early, early, moderately advanced and advanced OSF was 732.73±232.81µm, 726.54±361.63 µm, 548.36±273.13 and 172.40±58.41 µm respectively. Highly significant difference in muscle-epithelial distance was seen between controls as compared to early (p-value =0.002), moderately advanced (p-value = 0.001) and advanced OSF (p-value = 0.001. Fragmentation and highly eosinophilic areas were invariably noticed in advanced OSF. Multiple pyknotic nuclei were variable with no specificity. Conclusions Reduction in muscle-epithelial distance may prove to be a

  19. Cryptorchidism in the Orl Rat Is Associated with Muscle Patterning Defects in the Fetal Gubernaculum and Altered Hormonal Signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Barthold, Julia S.; Robbins, Alan; Wang, Yanping; Pugarelli, Joan; Mateson, Abigail; Anand-Ivell, Ravinder; Ivell, Richard; McCahan, Suzanne M.; Akins, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptorchidism, or undescended testis, is a common male genital anomaly of unclear etiology. Hormonal stimulation of the developing fetal gubernaculum by testicular androgens and insulin-like 3 (INSL3) is required for testicular descent. In studies of the orl fetal rat, one of several reported strains with inherited cryptorchidism, we studied hormone levels, gene expression in intact and hormone-stimulated gubernaculum, and imaging of the developing cremaster muscle facilitated by a tissue clearing protocol to further characterize development of the orl gubernaculum. Abnormal localization of the inverted gubernaculum was visible soon after birth. In the orl fetus, testicular testosterone, gubernacular androgen-responsive transcript levels, and muscle-specific gene expression were reduced. However, the in vitro transcriptional response of the orl gubernaculum to androgen was largely comparable to wild type (wt). In contrast, increases in serum INSL3, gubernacular INSL3-responsive transcript levels, expression of the INSL3 receptor, Rxfp2, and the response of the orl gubernaculum to INSL3 in vitro all suggest enhanced activation of INSL3/RXFP2 signaling in the orl rat. However, DNA sequence analysis did not identify functional variants in orl Insl3. Finally, combined analysis of the present and previous studies of the orl transcriptome confirmed altered expression of muscle and cellular motility genes, and whole mount imaging revealed aberrant muscle pattern formation in the orl fetal gubernaculum. The nature and prevalence of developmental muscle defects in the orl gubernaculum are consistent with the cryptorchid phenotype in this strain. These data suggest impaired androgen and enhanced INSL3 signaling in the orl fetus accompanied by defective cremaster muscle development. PMID:24966393

  20. Inflammatory cytokines cause coronary arteriosclerosis-like changes and alterations in the smooth-muscle phenotypes in pigs.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Y; Shimokawa, H; Ito, A; Kadokami, T; Yonemitsu, Y; Aikawa, M; Owada, M K; Egashira, K; Sueishi, K; Nagai, R; Yazaki, Y; Takeshita, A

    1997-02-01

    We recently developed a porcine model in which chronic, local treatment with interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) causes coronary arteriosclerosis-like changes and hyperconstrictive responses. This study was designed to examine whether or not other major inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) might also cause similar coronary responses and whether those responses are associated with alterations in the smooth-muscle phenotypes. A segment of the porcine coronary artery was aseptically wrapped with cotton mesh, absorbing IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and IL-1 alpha. Two weeks after the operation, coronary arteriography showed the development of mild stenotic lesions at the cytokine-treated sites, where hyperconstrictive responses were repeatedly induced by intracoronary serotonin or histamine. Histologically mild intimal thickening was noted at those cytokine-treated sites. Immunostaining and immunoblotting demonstrated that all three myosin heavy chain isoforms, SM1, SM2 (smooth-muscle type), and SMemb (nonmuscle type), were noted in the normal coronary segments, whereas in the segments treated with inflammatory cytokines, SM1 and SM2 were markedly reduced, and only SMemb was noted. These results indicate that inflammatory cytokines all have a similar ability to induce coronary arteriosclerosis-like changes and hyperconstrictive responses, which are associated with alterations in smooth-muscle phenotypes toward dedifferentiation. PMID:9057072

  1. Fourier analysis of wing beat signals: assessing the effects of genetic alterations of flight muscle structure in Diptera.

    PubMed Central

    Hyatt, C J; Maughan, D W

    1994-01-01

    A method for determining and analyzing the wing beat frequency in Diptera is presented. This method uses an optical tachometer to measure Diptera wing movement during flight. The resulting signal from the optical measurement is analyzed using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) technique, and the dominant frequency peak in the Fourier spectrum is selected as the wing beat frequency. Also described is a method for determining quantitatively the degree of variability of the wing beat frequency about the dominant frequency. This method is based on determination of a quantity called the Hindex, which is derived using data from the FFT analysis. Calculation of the H index allows computer-based selection of the most suitable segment of recorded data for determination of the representative wing beat frequency. Experimental data suggest that the H index can also prove useful in examining wing beat frequency variability in Diptera whose flight muscle structure has been genetically altered. Examples from Drosophila indirect flight muscle studies as well as examples of artificial data are presented to illustrate the method. This method fulfills a need for a standardized method for determining wing beat frequencies and examining wing beat frequency variability in insects whose flight muscles have been altered by protein engineering methods. PMID:7811927

  2. Exercise-Induced Skeletal Muscle Adaptations Alter the Activity of Adipose Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise decreases adiposity and improves metabolic health; however, the physiological and molecular underpinnings of these phenomena remain unknown. Here, we investigate the effect of endurance training on adipose progenitor lineage commitment. Using mice with genetically labeled adipose progenitors, we show that these cells react to exercise by decreasing their proliferation and differentiation potential. Analyses of mouse models that mimic the skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise indicate that muscle, in a non-autonomous manner, regulates adipose progenitor homeostasis, highlighting a role for muscle-derived secreted factors. These findings support a humoral link between skeletal muscle and adipose progenitors and indicate that manipulation of adipose stem cell function may help address obesity and diabetes. PMID:27015423

  3. Exercise-Induced Skeletal Muscle Adaptations Alter the Activity of Adipose Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zeve, Daniel; Millay, Douglas P; Seo, Jin; Graff, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    Exercise decreases adiposity and improves metabolic health; however, the physiological and molecular underpinnings of these phenomena remain unknown. Here, we investigate the effect of endurance training on adipose progenitor lineage commitment. Using mice with genetically labeled adipose progenitors, we show that these cells react to exercise by decreasing their proliferation and differentiation potential. Analyses of mouse models that mimic the skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise indicate that muscle, in a non-autonomous manner, regulates adipose progenitor homeostasis, highlighting a role for muscle-derived secreted factors. These findings support a humoral link between skeletal muscle and adipose progenitors and indicate that manipulation of adipose stem cell function may help address obesity and diabetes. PMID:27015423

  4. Different alterations in the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the athlete's heart and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Nuutila, P; Knuuti, M J; Heinonen, O J; Ruotsalainen, U; Teräs, M; Bergman, J; Solin, O; Yki-Järvinen, H; Voipio-Pulkki, L M; Wegelius, U

    1994-01-01

    Physical training increases skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity. Since training also causes functional and structural changes in the myocardium, we compared glucose uptake rates in the heart and skeletal muscles of trained and untrained individuals. Seven male endurance athletes (VO2max 72 +/- 2 ml/kg/min) and seven sedentary subjects matched for characteristics other than VO2max (43 +/- 2 ml/kg/min) were studied. Whole body glucose uptake was determined with a 2-h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, and regional glucose uptake in femoral and arm muscles, and myocardium using 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography. Glucose uptake in the athletes was increased by 68% in whole body (P < 0.0001), by 99% in the femoral muscles (P < 0.01), and by 62% in arm muscles (P = 0.06), but it was decreased by 33% in the heart muscle (P < 0.05) as compared with the sedentary subjects. The total glucose uptake rate in the heart was similar in the athletes and control subjects. Left ventricular mass in the athletes was 79% greater (P < 0.001) and the meridional wall stress smaller (P < 0.001) as estimated by echocardiography. VO2max correlated directly with left ventricular mass (r = 0.87, P < 0.001) and inversely with left ventricular wall stress (r = -0.86, P < 0.001). Myocardial glucose uptake correlated directly with the rate-pressure product (r = 0.75, P < 0.02) and inversely with left ventricular mass (r = -0.60, P < 0.05) or with the whole body glucose disposal (r = -0.68, P < 0.01). Thus, in athletes, (a) insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is enhanced in the whole body and skeletal muscles, (b) whereas myocardial glucose uptake per muscle mass is reduced possibly due to decreased wall stress and energy requirements or the use of alternative fuels, or both. Images PMID:8182160

  5. A Four-Compartment Metabolomics Analysis of the Liver, Muscle, Serum, and Urine Response to Polytrauma with Hemorrhagic Shock following Carbohydrate Prefeed

    PubMed Central

    Witowski, Nancy; Lusczek, Elizabeth; Determan, Charles; Lexcen, Daniel; Mulier, Kristine; Ostrowski, Beverly; Beilman, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hemorrhagic shock accompanied by injury represents a major physiologic stress. Fasted animals are often used to study hemorrhagic shock (with injury). A fasted state is not guaranteed in the general human population. The objective of this study was to determine if fed animals would exhibit a different metabolic profile in response to hemorrhagic shock with trauma when compared to fasted animals. Methods Proton (1H) NMR spectroscopy was used to determine concentrations of metabolites from four different compartments (liver, muscle, serum, urine) taken at defined time points throughout shock/injury and resuscitation. PLS-DA was performed and VIP lists established for baseline, shock and resuscitation (10 metabolites for each compartment at each time interval) on metabolomics data from surviving animals. Results Fed status prior to the occurrence of hemorrhagic shock with injury alters the metabolic course of this trauma and potentially affects mortality. The death rate for CPF animals is higher than FS animals (47 vs 28%). The majority of deaths occur post-resuscitation suggesting reperfusion injury. The metabolomics response to shock reflects priorities evident at baseline. FS animals raise the baseline degree of proteolysis to provide additional amino acids for energy production while CPF animals rely on both glucose and, to a lesser extent, amino acids. During early resuscitation levels of metabolites associated with energy production drop, suggesting diminished demand. Conclusions Feeding status prior to the occurrence of hemorrhagic shock with injury alters the metabolic course of this trauma and potentially affects mortality. The response to shock reflects metabolic priorities at baseline. PMID:25875111

  6. Muscle Protein Alterations in LGMD2I Patients With Different Mutations in the Fukutin-related Protein Gene

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Lydia U.; Velloso, Fernando J.; Lima, Bruno L.; Fogaça, Luciana L.Q.; de Paula, Flávia; Vieira, Natássia M.; Zatz, Mayana; Vainzof, Mariz

    2008-01-01

    Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) is a protein involved in the glycosylation of cell surface molecules. Pathogenic mutations in the FKRP gene cause both the more severe congenital muscular dystrophy Type 1C and the milder Limb-Girdle Type 2I form (LGMD2I). Here we report muscle histological alterations and the analysis of 11 muscle proteins: dystrophin, four sarcoglycans, calpain 3, dysferlin, telethonin, collagen VI, α-DG, and α2-laminin, in muscle biopsies from 13 unrelated LGMD2I patients with 10 different FKRP mutations. In all, a typical dystrophic pattern was observed. In eight patients, a high frequency of rimmed vacuoles was also found. A variable degree of α2-laminin deficiency was detected in 12 patients through immunofluorescence analysis, and 10 patients presented α-DG deficiency on sarcolemmal membranes. Additionally, through Western blot analysis, deficiency of calpain 3 and dystrophin bands was found in four and two patients, respectively. All the remaining proteins showed a similar pattern to normal controls. These results suggest that, in our population of LGMD2I patients, different mutations in the FKRP gene are associated with several secondary muscle protein reductions, and the deficiencies of α2-laminin and α-DG on sections are prevalent, independently of mutation type or clinical severity. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:995–1001, 2008) PMID:18645206

  7. Pseudouridine synthase 1 deficient mice, a model for Mitochondrial Myopathy with Sideroblastic Anemia, exhibit muscle morphology and physiology alterations

    PubMed Central

    Mangum, Joshua E.; Hardee, Justin P.; Fix, Dennis K.; Puppa, Melissa J.; Elkes, Johnathon; Altomare, Diego; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Campagna, Dean R.; Schmidt, Paul J.; Sendamarai, Anoop K.; Lidov, Hart G. W.; Barlow, Shayne C.; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Fleming, Mark D.; Carson, James A.; Patton, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy with lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) is an oxidative phosphorylation disorder, with primary clinical manifestations of myopathic exercise intolerance and a macrocytic sideroblastic anemia. One cause of MLASA is recessive mutations in PUS1, which encodes pseudouridine (Ψ) synthase 1 (Pus1p). Here we describe a mouse model of MLASA due to mutations in PUS1. As expected, certain Ψ modifications were missing in cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs from Pus1−/− animals. Pus1−/− mice were born at the expected Mendelian frequency and were non-dysmorphic. At 14 weeks the mutants displayed reduced exercise capacity. Examination of tibialis anterior (TA) muscle morphology and histochemistry demonstrated an increase in the cross sectional area and proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIB and low succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) expressing myofibers, without a change in the size of MHC IIA positive or high SDH myofibers. Cytochrome c oxidase activity was significantly reduced in extracts from red gastrocnemius muscle from Pus1−/− mice. Transmission electron microscopy on red gastrocnemius muscle demonstrated that Pus1−/− mice also had lower intermyofibrillar mitochondrial density and smaller mitochondria. Collectively, these results suggest that alterations in muscle metabolism related to mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity may account for the reduced exercise capacity in Pus1−/− mice. PMID:27197761

  8. Age-associated miRNA Alterations in Skeletal Muscle from Rhesus Monkeys reversed by caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Mercken, Evi M.; Majounie, Elisa; Ding, Jinhui; Guo, Rong; Kim, Jiyoung; Bernier, Michel; Mattison, Julie; Cookson, Mark R.; Gorospe, Myriam; de Cabo, Rafael; Abdelmohsen, Kotb

    2013-01-01

    The levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) are altered under different conditions such as cancer, senescence, and aging. Here, we have identified differentially expressed miRNAs in skeletal muscle from young and old rhesus monkeys using RNA sequencing. In old muscle, several miRNAs were upregulated, including miR-451, miR-144, miR-18a and miR-15a, while a few miRNAs were downregulated, including miR-181a and miR-181b. A number of novel miRNAs were also identified, particularly in old muscle. We also examined the impact of caloric restriction (CR) on miRNA abundance by reverse transcription (RT) followed by real-time, quantitative (q)PCR analysis and found that CR rescued the levels of miR-181b and chr1:205580546, and also dampened the age-induced increase in miR-451 and miR-144 levels. Our results reveal that there are changes in expression of known and novel miRNAs with skeletal muscle aging and that CR may reverse some of these changes to a younger phenotype. PMID:24036467

  9. Muscle protein alterations in LGMD2I patients with different mutations in the Fukutin-related protein gene.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Lydia U; Velloso, Fernando J; Lima, Bruno L; Fogaça, Luciana L Q; de Paula, Flávia; Vieira, Natássia M; Zatz, Mayana; Vainzof, Mariz

    2008-11-01

    Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) is a protein involved in the glycosylation of cell surface molecules. Pathogenic mutations in the FKRP gene cause both the more severe congenital muscular dystrophy Type 1C and the milder Limb-Girdle Type 2I form (LGMD2I). Here we report muscle histological alterations and the analysis of 11 muscle proteins: dystrophin, four sarcoglycans, calpain 3, dysferlin, telethonin, collagen VI, alpha-DG, and alpha2-laminin, in muscle biopsies from 13 unrelated LGMD2I patients with 10 different FKRP mutations. In all, a typical dystrophic pattern was observed. In eight patients, a high frequency of rimmed vacuoles was also found. A variable degree of alpha2-laminin deficiency was detected in 12 patients through immunofluorescence analysis, and 10 patients presented alpha-DG deficiency on sarcolemmal membranes. Additionally, through Western blot analysis, deficiency of calpain 3 and dystrophin bands was found in four and two patients, respectively. All the remaining proteins showed a similar pattern to normal controls. These results suggest that, in our population of LGMD2I patients, different mutations in the FKRP gene are associated with several secondary muscle protein reductions, and the deficiencies of alpha2-laminin and alpha-DG on sections are prevalent, independently of mutation type or clinical severity. PMID:18645206

  10. Pseudouridine synthase 1 deficient mice, a model for Mitochondrial Myopathy with Sideroblastic Anemia, exhibit muscle morphology and physiology alterations.

    PubMed

    Mangum, Joshua E; Hardee, Justin P; Fix, Dennis K; Puppa, Melissa J; Elkes, Johnathon; Altomare, Diego; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Campagna, Dean R; Schmidt, Paul J; Sendamarai, Anoop K; Lidov, Hart G W; Barlow, Shayne C; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Fleming, Mark D; Carson, James A; Patton, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy with lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) is an oxidative phosphorylation disorder, with primary clinical manifestations of myopathic exercise intolerance and a macrocytic sideroblastic anemia. One cause of MLASA is recessive mutations in PUS1, which encodes pseudouridine (Ψ) synthase 1 (Pus1p). Here we describe a mouse model of MLASA due to mutations in PUS1. As expected, certain Ψ modifications were missing in cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs from Pus1(-/-) animals. Pus1(-/-) mice were born at the expected Mendelian frequency and were non-dysmorphic. At 14 weeks the mutants displayed reduced exercise capacity. Examination of tibialis anterior (TA) muscle morphology and histochemistry demonstrated an increase in the cross sectional area and proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIB and low succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) expressing myofibers, without a change in the size of MHC IIA positive or high SDH myofibers. Cytochrome c oxidase activity was significantly reduced in extracts from red gastrocnemius muscle from Pus1(-/-) mice. Transmission electron microscopy on red gastrocnemius muscle demonstrated that Pus1(-/-) mice also had lower intermyofibrillar mitochondrial density and smaller mitochondria. Collectively, these results suggest that alterations in muscle metabolism related to mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity may account for the reduced exercise capacity in Pus1(-/-) mice. PMID:27197761

  11. Altered feeding differentially regulates circadian rhythms and energy metabolism in liver and muscle of rats.

    PubMed

    Reznick, Jane; Preston, Elaine; Wilks, Donna L; Beale, Susan M; Turner, Nigel; Cooney, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Energy metabolism follows a diurnal pattern responding to the light/dark cycle and food availability. This study investigated the impact of restricting feeding to the daylight hours and feeding a high fat diet on circadian clock (bmal1, dbp, tef and e4bp4) and metabolic (pepck, fas, ucp3, pdk4) gene expression and markers of energy metabolism in muscle and liver of rats. The results show that in chow-fed rats switched to daylight feeding, the peak diurnal expression of genes in liver was shifted by 6-12h while expression of these genes in muscle remained in a similar phase to rats feeding ad libitum. High fat feeding during the daylight hours had limited effect on clock gene expression in liver or muscle but shifted the peak expression of metabolic genes (pepck, fas) in liver by 6-12h. The differential effects of daylight feeding on gene and protein expression in muscle and liver were accompanied by an 8% reduction in whole body energy expenditure, a 20-30% increased glycogen content during the light phase in muscle of day-fed rats and increased adipose tissue deposition per gram food consumed. These data demonstrate that a mismatch of feeding and light/dark cycle disrupts tissue metabolism in muscle with significant consequences for whole body energy homeostasis. PMID:22952003

  12. Higher insulin sensitivity in EDL muscle of rats fed a low-protein, high-carbohydrate diet inhibits the caspase-3 and ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic systems but does not increase protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Maísa Pavani; Batistela, Emanuele; Pereira, Mayara Peron; Paula-Gomes, Silvia; Zanon, Neusa Maria; Kettelhut, Isis do Carmo; Karatzaferi, Christina; Andrade, Claudia Marlise Balbinotti; de França, Suélem Aparecida; Baviera, Amanda Martins; Kawashita, Nair Honda

    2016-08-01

    Compared with the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of control rats (C), the EDL muscle of rats fed a low-protein, high-carbohydrate diet (LPHC) showed a 36% reduction in mass. Muscle mass is determined by the balance between protein synthesis and proteolysis; thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate the components involved in these processes. Compared with the muscle from C rats, the EDL muscle from LPHC diet-fed rats showed a reduction (34%) in the in vitro basal protein synthesis and a 22% reduction in the in vitro basal proteolysis suggesting that the reduction in the mass can be associated with a change in the rate of the two processes. Soon after euthanasia, in the EDL muscles of the rats fed the LPHC diet for 15days, the activity of caspase-3 and that of components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (atrogin-1 content and chymotrypsin-like activity) were decreased. The phosphorylation of p70(S6K) and 4E-BP1, proteins involved in protein synthesis, was also decreased. We observed an increase in the insulin-stimulated protein content of p-Akt. Thus, the higher insulin sensitivity in the EDL muscle of LPHC rats seemed to contribute to the lower proteolysis in LPHC rats. However, even with the higher insulin sensitivity, the reduction in p-E4-BP1 and p70(S6K) indicates a reduction in protein synthesis, showing that factors other than insulin can have a greater effect on the control of protein synthesis. PMID:27239756

  13. Migratory preparation associated alterations in pectoralis muscle biochemistry and proteome in Palearctic-Indian emberizid migratory finch, red-headed bunting, Emberiza bruniceps.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Somanshu; Chaturvedi, Chandra Mohini

    2016-03-01

    Avian migration is an exceptionally high-energy-demanding process, which is met by the accumulation and utilization of fuel stores as well as the alterations in muscle physiology prior to their flight. Pre-migratory fattening coupled with changes in flight muscle metabolic enzymes and proteome is required to provide the necessary fuel and muscle performance required for migration. We studied how the serum metabolites (urea, uric acid, and creatinine), pectoralis muscle metabolites (glycogen, glucose, and cholesterol), muscle metabolic enzymes (CPT, HOAD, CS, MDH, CCO, CK, LDH, PFK, MLPL, and PK), liver lipogenic enzyme (FAS), and pectoralis muscle proteins get altered in pre-migratory and non-migratory buntings. Significantly increased pectoralis muscle fatty acid oxidation (CPT and HOAD activity), aerobic/anaerobic capacity (CS, CCO, and MDH activity), glycolytic capacity (PFK and PK activity), lipolysis (muscle LPL), and burst power (CK activity) were observed prior to the spring migration in pre-migratory buntings, whereas significantly increased pectoralis muscle anaerobic capacity (LDH activity) was observed in non-migratory buntings. Significant increase in the liver FAS showed profound lipogenesis prior to the spring migration. In this study, we have also investigated whether muscle has differential protein content during the pre-migratory and non-migratory phases of the annual migratory cycle. Twenty-nine proteins are identified and well characterized varying in expression significantly during the pre-migratory and non-migratory phases. These findings indicate that significant pre-migratory fattening and alterations in flight (pectoralis) muscle biochemistry and proteome in between the non- and pre-migratory phases may play a significant role in pre-migratory flight muscle preparation in these long-route migrants. PMID:26656601

  14. Assessing altered motor unit recruitment patterns in paretic muscles of stroke survivors using surface electromyography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaogang; Suresh, Aneesha K.; Rymer, William Z.; Suresh, Nina L.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. The advancement of surface electromyogram (sEMG) recording and signal processing techniques has allowed us to characterize the recruitment properties of a substantial population of motor units (MUs) non-invasively. Here we seek to determine whether MU recruitment properties are modified in paretic muscles of hemispheric stroke survivors. Approach. Using an advanced EMG sensor array, we recorded sEMG during isometric contractions of the first dorsal interosseous muscle over a range of contraction levels, from 20% to 60% of maximum, in both paretic and contralateral muscles of stroke survivors. Using MU decomposition techniques, MU action potential amplitudes and recruitment thresholds were derived for simultaneously activated MUs in each isometric contraction. Main results. Our results show a significant disruption of recruitment organization in paretic muscles, in that the size principle describing recruitment rank order was materially distorted. MUs were recruited over a very narrow force range with increasing force output, generating a strong clustering effect, when referenced to recruitment force magnitude. Such disturbances in MU properties also correlated well with the impairment of voluntary force generation. Significance. Our findings provide direct evidence regarding MU recruitment modifications in paretic muscles of stroke survivors, and suggest that these modifications may contribute to weakness for voluntary contractions.

  15. mTOR signaling response to resistance exercise is altered by chronic resistance training and detraining in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Riki; Kobayashi, Koji; Tsutaki, Arata; Lee, Kihyuk; Abe, Takashi; Fujita, Satoshi; Nakazato, Koichi; Ishii, Naokata

    2013-04-01

    Resistance training-induced muscle anabolism and subsequent hypertrophy occur most rapidly during the early phase of training and become progressively slower over time. Currently, little is known about the intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying changes in the sensitivity of muscles to training stimuli. We investigated the changes in the exercise-induced phosphorylation of hypertrophic signaling proteins during chronic resistance training and subsequent detraining. Male rats were divided into four groups: 1 bout (1B), 12 bouts (12B), 18 bouts (18B), and detraining (DT). In the DT group, rats were subjected to 12 exercise sessions, detrained for 12 days, and then were subjected to 1 exercise session before being killed. Isometric training consisted of maximum isometric contraction, which was produced by percutaneous electrical stimulation of the gastrocnemius muscle every other day. Muscles were removed 24 h after the final exercise session. Levels of total and phosphorylated p70S6K, 4E-BP1, rpS6, and p90RSK levels were measured, and phosphorylation of p70S6K, rpS6, and p90RSK was elevated in the 1B group compared with control muscle (CON) after acute resistance exercise, whereas repeated bouts of exercise suppressed those phosphorylation in both 12B and 18B groups. Interestingly, these phosphorylation levels were restored after 12 days of detraining in the DT group. On the contrary, phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 was not altered with chronic training and detraining, indicating that, with chronic resistance training, anabolic signaling becomes less sensitive to resistance exercise stimuli but is restored after a short detraining period. PMID:23372143

  16. Healthy carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional foods include dietary fiber consisting of health-promoting carbohydrates. We have produced novel prebiotics from orange peel and observed that they extend the shelf life of probiotic bacteria in synbiotics. Some pectic-oligosaccharides and xyloglucan-oligosaccharides also have anti-adhesi...

  17. Slow to fast alterations in skeletal muscle fibers caused by clenbuterol, a beta(2)-receptor agonist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Ludemann, Robert; Easton, Thomas G.; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of a beta(2)-receptor agonist, clenbuterol, and a beta(2) antagonist, butoxamine, on the skeletal muscle fibers of rats were investigated. It was found that chronic treatment of rats with clenbuterol caused hypertrophy of histochemically identified fast-twitch, but not slow-twitch, fibers within the soleus, while in the extensor digitorum longus the mean areas of both fiber types were increased; in both muscles, the ratio of the number of fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was increased. In contrast, a treatment with butoxamine caused a reduction of the fast-twitch fiber size in both muscles, and the ratio of the fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was decreased.

  18. Alcohol differentially alters extracellular matrix and adhesion molecule expression in skeletal muscle and heart

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Jennifer L.; Pruznak, Anne M.; Navaratnarajah, Maithili; Lang, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The production of fibrosis in response to chronic alcohol abuse is well recognized in liver but has not been fully characterized in striated muscle and may contribute to functional impairment. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use an unbiased discovery-based approach to determine the effect of chronic alcohol consumption on the expression profile of genes important for cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions in both skeletal and cardiac muscle. Methods Adult male rats were pair-fed an alcohol-containing liquid diet or control diet for 24 wks, and skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) and heart collected in the freely fed state. A pathway-focused gene expression PCR array was performed on these tissues to assess mRNA content for 84 ECM proteins, and selected proteins were confirmed by Western analysis. Results In gastrocnemius, alcohol feeding up-regulated expression of 11 genes and down-regulated expression of 1 gene. Alcohol increased fibrosis as indicated by increased mRNA and/or protein for collagen α1(I), α2(I), α1(III) and α2(IV) as well as hydroxyproline. Alcohol also increased α-smooth muscle actin protein, an index of myofibroblast activation, but no concomitant change in TGF-β was detected. The mRNA and protein content for other ECM components, such as integrin α-5, L-selectin, PECAM, Sparc and Adamts2 was also increased by alcohol. Only laminin α-3 mRNA was decreased in gastrocnemius from alcohol-fed rats, while 66 ECM- or cell adhesion-related mRNAs were unchanged by alcohol. For heart, expression of 16 genes was up-regulated, expression of 3 genes was down-regulated, and 65 mRNAs were unchanged by alcohol; there were no common alcohol-induced gene expression changes between heart and skeletal muscle. Finally, alcohol increased TNFα and IL-12 mRNA in both skeletal and cardiac muscle, but IL-6 mRNA was increased and IL-10 mRNA decreased only in skeletal muscle. Conclusions These data demonstrate a fibrotic

  19. A Calsequestrin-1 Mutation Associated with a Skeletal Muscle Disease Alters Sarcoplasmic Ca2+ Release

    PubMed Central

    D’Adamo, Maria Cristina; Sforna, Luigi; Visentin, Sergio; Grottesi, Alessandro; Servettini, llenio; Guglielmi, Luca; Macchioni, Lara; Saredi, Simona; Curcio, Maurizio; De Nuccio, Chiara; Hasan, Sonia; Corazzi, Lanfranco; Franciolini, Fabio; Mora, Marina; Catacuzzeno, Luigi; Pessia, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    An autosomal dominant protein aggregate myopathy, characterized by high plasma creatine kinase and calsequestrin-1 (CASQ1) accumulation in skeletal muscle, has been recently associated with a missense mutation in CASQ1 gene. The mutation replaces an evolutionarily-conserved aspartic acid with glycine at position 244 (p.D244G) of CASQ1, the main sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ binding and storage protein localized at the terminal cisternae of skeletal muscle cells. Here, immunocytochemical analysis of myotubes, differentiated from muscle-derived primary myoblasts, shows that sarcoplasmic vacuolar aggregations positive for CASQ1 are significantly larger in CASQ1-mutated cells than control cells. A strong co-immuno staining of both RyR1 and CASQ1 was also noted in the vacuoles of myotubes and muscle biopsies derived from patients. Electrophysiological recordings and sarcoplasmic Ca2+ measurements provide evidence for less Ca2+ release from the SR of mutated myotubes when compared to that of controls. These findings further clarify the pathogenic nature of the p.D244G variant and point out defects in sarcoplasmic Ca2+ homeostasis as a mechanism underlying this human disease, which could be distinctly classified as “CASQ1-couplonopathy”. PMID:27196359

  20. Severe COPD Alters Muscle Fiber Conduction Velocity During Knee Extensors Fatiguing Contraction.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Gennaro; Coratella, Giuseppe; Dardanello, Davide; Rinaldo, Nicoletta; Lanza, Massimo; Schena, Federico; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the changes in muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV), as a sign of fatigue during knee extensor contraction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as compared with healthy controls. Eleven male patients (5 with severe and 6 with moderate COPD; age 67 ± 5 years) and 11 age-matched healthy male controls (age 65 ± 4 years) volunteered for the study. CV was obtained by multichannel surface electromyography (EMG) from the vastus lateralis (VL) and medialis (VM) of the quadriceps muscle during isometric, 30-second duration knee extension at 70% of maximal voluntary contraction. The decline in CV in both the VL and VM was steeper in the severe COPD patients than in healthy controls (for VL: severe COPD vs. controls -0.45 ± 0.07%/s; p < 0.001, and for VM: severe COPD vs. controls -0.54 ± 0.09%/s, p < 0.001). No difference in CV decline was found between the moderate COPD patients and the healthy controls. These findings suggest that severe COPD may impair muscle functions, leading to greater muscular fatigue, as expressed by CV changes. The results may be due to a greater involvement of anaerobic metabolism and a shift towards fatigable type II fibers in the muscle composition of the severe COPD patients. PMID:27007486

  1. Alterations in muscle metabolism and growth during nutritional restrictions and refeeding in rainbow trout.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rainbow trout, as well as many other species of fish, demonstrate the ability to survive starvation for long periods of time. During starvation, growth rate is decreased and muscle exhibits signs of wasting. However, upon resumption of feeding, accelerated growth (also known as compensatory growth) ...

  2. Deletion of Kinin B2 Receptor Alters Muscle Metabolism and Exercise Performance

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Felipe C. G.; Haro, Anderson S.; Bacurau, Aline V. N.; Hirabara, Sandro M.; Wasinski, Frederick; Ormanji, Milene S.; Moreira, José B. N.; Kiyomoto, Beatriz H.; Bertoncini, Clelia R. A.; Brum, Patricia C.; Curi, Rui; Bader, Michael; Bacurau, Reury F. P.; Pesquero, João B.; Araújo, Ronaldo C.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic risk factors such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Mitochondria is the main site of ATP production and its dysfunction leads to decreased oxidative phosphorylation, resulting in lipid accumulation and insulin resistance. Our group has demonstrated that kinins can modulate glucose and lipid metabolism as well as skeletal muscle mass. By using B2 receptor knockout mice (B2R-/-) we investigated whether kinin action affects weight gain and physical performance of the animals. Our results show that B2R-/- mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced obesity, have higher glucose tolerance as well as increased mitochondrial mass. These features are accompanied by higher energy expenditure and a lower feed efficiency associated with an increase in the proportion of type I fibers and intermediary fibers characterized by higher mitochondrial content and increased expression of genes related to oxidative metabolism. Additionally, the increased percentage of oxidative skeletal muscle fibers and mitochondrial apparatus in B2R-/- mice is coupled with a higher aerobic exercise performance. Taken together, our data give support to the involvement of kinins in skeletal muscle fiber type distribution and muscle metabolism, which ultimately protects against fat-induced obesity and improves aerobic exercise performance. PMID:26302153

  3. Zearalenone enhances reproductive tract development, but does not alter skeletal muscle signaling in prepubertal gilts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zearalenone is a potent mycotoxin that has estrogenic properties. In vitro results indicate that zearalenone metabolites are capable of down-regulating proteins associated with protein synthesis (protein kinase B, Akt) and cellular proliferation (extracellular signal-regulated kinase, ERK) in muscl...

  4. Learning about Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Learning About Carbohydrates KidsHealth > For Kids > Learning About Carbohydrates Print A ... of energy for the body. Two Types of Carbohydrates There are two major types of carbohydrates (or ...

  5. Contributions of working muscle to whole body lipid metabolism are altered by exercise intensity and training.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Anne L; Jacobs, Kevin A; Fattor, Jill A; Horning, Michael A; Hagobian, Todd A; Bauer, Timothy A; Wolfel, Eugene E; Brooks, George A

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the contribution of working muscle to whole body lipid oxidation, we examined the effects of exercise intensity and endurance training (9 wk, 5 days/wk, 1 h, 75% Vo(2 peak)) on whole body and leg free fatty acid (FFA) kinetics in eight male subjects (26 +/- 1 yr, means +/- SE). Two pretraining trials [45 and 65% Vo(2 max) (45UT, 65UT)] and two posttraining trials [65% of pretraining Vo(2 peak) (ABT), and 65% of posttraining Vo(2 peak) (RLT)] were performed using [1-(13)C]palmitate infusion and femoral arteriovenous sampling. Training increased Vo(2 peak) by 15% (45.2 +/- 1.2 to 52.0 +/- 1.8 ml.kg(-1).min(-1), P < 0.05). Muscle FFA fractional extraction was lower during exercise (EX) compared with rest regardless of workload or training status ( approximately 20 vs. 48%, P < 0.05). Two-leg net FFA balance increased from net release at rest ( approximately -36 micromol/min) to net uptake during EX for 45UT (179 +/- 75), ABT (236 +/- 63), and RLT (136 +/- 110) (P < 0.05), but not 65UT (51 +/- 127). Leg FFA tracer measured uptake was higher during EX than rest for all trials and greater during posttraining in RLT (716 +/- 173 micromol/min) compared with pretraining (45UT 450 +/- 80, 65UT 461 +/- 72, P < 0.05). Leg muscle lipid oxidation increased with training in ABT (730 +/- 163 micromol/min) vs. 65UT (187 +/- 94, P < 0.05). Leg muscle lipid oxidation represented approximately 62 and 30% of whole body lipid oxidation at lower and higher relative intensities, respectively. In summary, training can increase working muscle tracer measured FFA uptake and lipid oxidation for a given power output, but both before and after training the association between whole body and leg lipid metabolism is reduced as exercise intensity increases. PMID:16896167

  6. Increasing blood flow before exercise in spinal cord-injured individuals does not alter muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Olive, Jennifer L; Slade, Jill M; Bickel, C Scott; Dudley, Gary A; McCully, Kevin K

    2004-02-01

    Previous studies have shown increased fatigue in paralyzed muscle of spinal cord-injured (SCI) patients (Castro M, Apple D Jr, Hillegass E, and Dudley GA. Eur J Appl Physiol 80: 373-378, 1999; Gerrits H, Hopman MTE, Sargeant A, and de Haan A. Clin Physiol 21: 105-113, 2001). Our purpose was to determine whether the increased muscle fatigue could be due to a delayed rise in blood flow at the onset of exercise in SCI individuals. Isometric electrical stimulation was used to induce fatigue in the quadriceps femoris muscle of seven male, chronic (>1 yr postinjury), complete (American Spinal Injury Association, category A) SCI subjects. Cuff occlusion was used to elevate blood flow before electrical stimulation, and the magnitude of fatigue was compared with a control condition of electrical stimulation without prior cuff occlusion. Blood flow was measured in the femoral artery by Doppler ultrasound. Prior cuff occlusion increased blood flow in the first 30 s of stimulation compared with the No-Cuff condition (1,350 vs. 680 ml/min, respectively; P < 0.001), although blood flow at the end of stimulation was the same between conditions (1,260 +/- 140 vs. 1,160 +/- 370 ml/min, Cuff and No-Cuff condition, respectively; P = 0.511). Muscle fatigue was not significantly different between prior cuff occlusion and the control condition (32 +/- 13 vs. 35 +/- 10%; P = 0.670). In conclusion, increased muscle fatigue in SCI individuals is not associated with the prolonged time for blood flow to increase at the onset of exercise. PMID:14506095

  7. Insulin sensitivity of muscle protein metabolism is altered in patients with chronic kidney disease and metabolic acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Garibotto, Giacomo; Sofia, Antonella; Russo, Rodolfo; Paoletti, Ernesto; Bonanni, Alice; Parodi, Emanuele L; Viazzi, Francesca; Verzola, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    An emergent hypothesis is that a resistance to the anabolic drive by insulin may contribute to loss of strength and muscle mass in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We tested whether insulin resistance extends to protein metabolism using the forearm perfusion method with arterial insulin infusion in 7 patients with CKD and metabolic acidosis (bicarbonate 19 mmol/l) and 7 control individuals. Forearm glucose balance and protein turnover (2H-phenylalanine kinetics) were measured basally and in response to insulin infused at different rates for 2 h to increase local forearm plasma insulin concentration by approximately 20 and 50 μU/ml. In response to insulin, forearm glucose uptake was significantly increased to a lesser extent (−40%) in patients with CKD than controls. In addition, whereas in the controls net muscle protein balance and protein degradation were decreased by both insulin infusion rates, in patients with CKD net protein balance and protein degradation were sensitive to the high (0.035 mU/kg per min) but not the low (0.01 mU/kg per min) insulin infusion. Besides blunting muscle glucose uptake, CKD and acidosis interfere with the normal suppression of protein degradation in response to a moderate rise in plasma insulin. Thus, alteration of protein metabolism by insulin may lead to changes in body tissue composition which may become clinically evident in conditions characterized by low insulinemia. PMID:26308671

  8. Glucose-induced alterations of cytosolic free calcium in cultured rat tail artery vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Barbagallo, M; Shan, J; Pang, P K; Resnick, L M

    1995-01-01

    We have previously suggested that hyperglycemia per se may contribute to diabetic hypertensive and vascular disease by altering cellular ion content. To more directly investigate the potential role of glucose in this process, we measured cytosolic free calcium in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells isolated from Sprague-Dawley rat tail artery before and after incubation with 5 (basal), 10, 15, and 20 mM glucose. Glucose significantly elevated cytosolic free calcium in a dose- and time-dependent manner, from 110.0 +/- 5.4 to 124.5 +/- 9.0, 192.7 +/- 20.4, and 228.4 +/- 21.9 nM at 5, 10, 15, and 20 mM glucose concentrations, respectively. This glucose-induced cytosolic free calcium elevation was also specific, no change being observed after incubation with equivalent concentrations of L-glucose or mannitol. This glucose effect was also dependent on extracellular calcium and pH, since these calcium changes were inhibited in an acidotic or a calcium-free medium, or by the competitive calcium antagonist lanthanum. We conclude that ambient glucose concentrations within clinically observed limits may alter cellular calcium ion homeostasis in vascular smooth muscle cells. We suggest that these cellular ionic effects of hyperglycemia may underlie the predisposition to hypertension and vascular diseases among diabetic subjects and/or those with impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:7860758

  9. Carbohydrate intake.

    PubMed

    Leturque, Armelle; Brot-Laroche, Edith; Le Gall, Maude

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrates represent more than 50% of the energy sources present in most human diets. Sugar intake is regulated by metabolic, neuronal, and hedonic factors, and gene polymorphisms are involved in determining sugar preference. Nutrigenomic adaptations to carbohydrate availability have been evidenced in metabolic diseases, in the persistence of lactose digestion, and in amylase gene copy number. Furthermore, dietary oligosaccharides, fermentable by gut flora, can modulate the microbiotal diversity to the benefit of the host. Genetic diseases linked to mutations in the disaccharidase genes (sucrase-isomaltase, lactase) and in sugar transporter genes (sodium/glucose cotransporter 1, glucose transporters 1 and 2) severely impact carbohydrate intake. These diseases are revealed upon exposure to food containing the offending sugar, and withdrawal of this sugar from the diet prevents disease symptoms, failure to thrive, and premature death. Tailoring the sugar composition of diets to optimize wellness and to prevent the chronic occurrence of metabolic diseases is a future goal that may yet be realized through continued development of nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics approaches. PMID:22656375

  10. In vivo detection of exercised-induced ultrastructural changes in genetically-altered murine skeletal muscle using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppart, Stephen

    2006-02-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers are a known source of form birefringence in biological tissue. The birefringence present in skeletal muscle is associated with the ultrastructure of individual sarcomeres, specifically the arrangement of A-bands corresponding to the thick myosin filaments. Certain structural proteins that prevent damage and maintain the structural and functional health of the muscle fiber preserve the organization of the Abands in skeletal muscle. Therefore, the level of birefringence detected can estimate the health of the muscle as well as the damage incurred during exercise. Murine skeletal muscle from both genetically-altered (mdx) and normal (wild-type) specimens were imaged in vivo with a fiber-based PSOCT imaging system to quantitatively determine the level of birefringence present in the tissue before and after exercise. The mdx muscle lacks dystrophin, a structural protein that is mutated in Duchenne muscular dystrophy in humans. Muscle from these mdx mice exhibited a marked decrease in birefringence after exercise, whereas the wild-type muscle was highly birefringent before and after exercise. The quantitative results from this tissue optics study suggest for the first time that there is a distinct relationship between the degree of birefringence detected using PS-OCT and the sarcomeric ultrastructure present within skeletal muscle.

  11. Glucocorticoids Alter CRTC-CREB Signaling in Muscle Cells: Impact on PGC-1α Expression and Atrophy Markers

    PubMed Central

    Rahnert, Jill A.; Zheng, Bin; Hudson, Matthew B.; Woodworth-Hobbs, Myra E.; Price, S. Russ

    2016-01-01

    Muscle wasting associated with chronic diseases has been linked to decreased expression of PGC-1α and overexpression of PGC-1α counters muscle loss. CREB, in conjunction with the CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC2), is a positive modulator of PGC-1α transcription. We previously reported that PGC-1α expression is decreased in skeletal muscle of diabetic rats despite a high level of CREB phosphorylation (i.e., activation), suggesting that CRTC2-CREB signaling may be dysregulated. In this study, the relationship between CREB/CRTC signaling and PGC-1α expression was examined in L6 myotubes treated with dexamethasone (Dex, 48h) to induce atrophy. Dex decreased PGC-1α mRNA and protein as well as the levels of CRTC1 and CRTC2 in the nucleus. Dex also altered the nuclear levels of two known regulators of CRTC2 localization; the amount of calcinuerin catalytic A subunit (CnA) was decreased whereas SIK was increased. To assess PGC-1α transcription, muscle cells were transfected with a PGC-1α luciferase reporter plasmid (PGC-1α-Luc). Dex suppressed PGC-1α luciferase activity while both isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) and over-expression of CRTC1 or CRTC2 increased PGC-1α-Luc activity. Mutation of the CRE binding site from PGC-1α-Luc reporter attenuated the responses to both IBMX and the CRTC proteins. Consistent with the reporter gene results, overexpression of CRTC2 produced an increase in CRTC2 in the nucleus and in PGC-1α mRNA and PGC-1α protein. Overexpression of CRTC2 was not sufficient to prevent the decrease in PGC-1α mRNA or protein by Dex. In summary, these data suggest that attenuated CREB/CRTC signaling contributes to the decrease in PGC-1α expression during atrophy. PMID:27404111

  12. Alterations in Skeletal Muscle With Disuse Atrophy: The Effects of Countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    The specific aims of this project concerned three general areas: (1) studies on the contractile function of single skinned fibers designed to determine the time course and cellular basis of the Hindlimb Suspension (HS) induced increase in fiber Vo (maximal shortening velocity), and the decrease in peak tension (Po); (2) studies designed to understand the effect of HS on single fiber substrate utilization during contractile activity, and how if at all such changes contribute to the increased muscle fatigue associated with HS; and (3) studies evaluating the effectiveness of standing and ladder climbing as countermeasures to the deleterious effects of HS. We have constructed all of the necessary equipment, and are currently conducting preliminary studies on T-tubular charge movement. A list of publications from this contract is included at the end of this report. The three objectives are (1) Functional Studies on the Single Skinned Fiber; (2) Fiber Substrate Utilization and Muscle Fatugue with Contracting Activity and (3) Exercise Countermeasures.

  13. Overexpression of neurotrophin-3 in skeletal muscle alters normal and injury-induced limb control.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M D; Vancura, R; Williams, J M; Riekhof, J T; Taylor, B K; Wright, D E

    2001-01-01

    Transgenic overexpression of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in mice increases the number of surviving proprioceptive sensory components, including primary sensory neurons, gamma motoneurons and muscle spindles. The numbers of surviving alpha motoneurons are not affected by NT-3 overexpression (Wright et al., Neuron 19: 503-517, 1997). We have assessed the consequences NT-3-stimulated increase in the proprioceptive sensory system by measuring locomotive abilities of mice that overexpress NT-3 in all skeletal muscles (myo/NT-3 mice). In adulthood, one myo/NT-3 transgenic line continues to express NT-3 at high levels in muscle and maintains a hypertrophied proprioceptive system (high-OE myo/NT-3 mice). Compared to wildtypes, high-OE myo/NT-3 mice have nine times the amount of NT-3 protein in the medial gastrocnemius at six weeks of age. Although appearing normal during ordinary activity, high-OE myo/NT-3 mice display a distinct clasping phenotype when lifted by the tail. High-OE myo/NT-3 mice show severe locomotor deficits when performing beam walking and rotorod testing. These mice also demonstrate aberrant foot positioning during normal walking. However, following sciatic nerve crush, overexpression of NT-3 prevents further abnormalities in paw positioning, suggesting NT-3 may attenuate sensorimotor deficits that occur in response to sciatic nerve injury. Our results suggest that increases in proprioceptive sensory neurons, spindles and gamma motoneurons, along with continued postnatal NT-3 overexpression in muscle significantly disrupt normal locomotor control. Importantly, however, NT-3 may lessen initial deficits and thus improve functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury, suggesting these mice may serve as a good model to study NT-3's role in neuroprotection of proprioceptive afferents. PMID:11794730

  14. Bone adaptation to altered loading after spinal cord injury: a study of bone and muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Rittweger, J; Gerrits, K; Altenburg, T; Reeves, N; Maganaris, C N; de Haan, A

    2006-01-01

    Bone loss from the paralysed limbs after spinal cord injury (SCI) is well documented. Under physiological conditions, bones are adapted to forces which mainly emerge from muscle pull. After spinal cord injury (SCI), muscles can no longer contract voluntarily and are merely activated during spasms. Based on the Ashworth scale, previous research has suggested that these spasms may mitigate bone losses. We therefore wished to assess muscle forces after SCI with a more direct measure and compare it to measures of bone strength. We hypothesized that the bones in SCI patients would be in relation to the loss of muscle forces. Six male patients with SCI 6.4 (SD 4.3) years earlier and 6 age-matched, able-bodied control subjects were investigated. Bone scans from the right knee were obtained by pQCT. The knee extensor muscles were electrically stimulated via the femoral nerve, isometric knee extension torque was measured and patellar tendon force was estimated. Tendon force upon electrical stimulation in the SCI group was 75% lower than in the control subjects (p<0.01). Volumetric bone mineral density of the patella and of the proximal tibia epiphysis were 50% lower in the SCI group than in the control subjects (p<0.01). Cortical area was lower by 43% in the SCI patients at the proximal tibia metaphysis, and by 33% at the distal femur metaphysis. No group differences were found in volumetric cortical density. Close curvilinear relationships were found between stress and volumetric density for the tibia epiphysis (r(2)=0.90) and for the patella (r(2)=0.91). A weaker correlation with the tendon force was found for the cortical area of the proximal tibia metaphysis (r(2)=0.63), and none for the distal femur metaphysis. These data suggest that, under steady state conditions after SCI, epiphyseal bones are well adapted to the muscular forces. For the metaphysis of the long bones, such an adaptation appears to be less evident. The reason for this remains unclear. PMID:17142949

  15. Carbohydrates and dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Suter, P M

    2005-01-01

    The most widely spread eating habit is characterized by a reduced intake of dietary fiber, an increased intake of simple sugars, a high intake of refined grain products, an altered fat composition of the diet, and a dietary pattern characterized by a high glycemic load, an increased body weight and reduced physical activity. In this chapter the effects of this eating pattern on disease risk will be outlined. There are no epidemiological studies showing that the increase of glucose, fructose or sucrose intake is directly and independently associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis or coronary heart disease (CHD). On the other hand a large number of studies has reported a reduction of fatal and non-fatal CHD events as a function of the intake of complex carbohydrates--respectively 'dietary fiber' or selected fiber-rich food (e.g., whole grain cereals). It seems that eating too much 'fast' carbohydrate [i.e., carbohydrates with a high glycemic index (GI)] may have deleterious long-term consequences. Indeed the last decades have shown that a low fat (and consecutively high carbohydrate) diet alone is not the best strategy to combat modern diseases including atherosclerosis. Quantity and quality issues in carbohydrate nutrient content are as important as they are for fat. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that for cardiovascular disease prevention a high sugar intake should be avoided. There is growing evidence of the high impact of dietary fiber and foods with a low GI on single risk factors (e.g., lipid pattern, diabetes, inflammation, endothelial function etc.) as well as also the development of the endpoints of atherosclerosis especially CHD. PMID:16596802

  16. Combined MRI and 31P-MRS Investigations of the ACTA1(H40Y) Mouse Model of Nemaline Myopathy Show Impaired Muscle Function and Altered Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gineste, Charlotte; Le Fur, Yann; Vilmen, Christophe; Le Troter, Arnaud; Pecchi, Emilie; Cozzone, Patrick J.; Hardeman, Edna C.; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is the most common disease entity among non-dystrophic skeletal muscle congenital diseases. Mutations in the skeletal muscle α-actin gene (ACTA1) account for ∼25% of all NM cases and are the most frequent cause of severe forms of NM. So far, the mechanisms underlying muscle weakness in NM patients remain unclear. Additionally, recent Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies reported a progressive fatty infiltration of skeletal muscle with a specific muscle involvement in patients with ACTA1 mutations. We investigated strictly noninvasively the gastrocnemius muscle function of a mouse model carrying a mutation in the ACTA1 gene (H40Y). Skeletal muscle anatomy (hindlimb muscles and fat volumes) and energy metabolism were studied using MRI and 31Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Skeletal muscle contractile performance was investigated while applying a force-frequency protocol (from 1–150 Hz) and a fatigue protocol (80 stimuli at 40 Hz). H40Y mice showed a reduction of both absolute (−40%) and specific (−25%) maximal force production as compared to controls. Interestingly, muscle weakness was associated with an improved resistance to fatigue (+40%) and an increased energy cost. On the contrary, the force frequency relationship was not modified in H40Y mice and the extent of fatty infiltration was minor and not different from the WT group. We concluded that the H40Y mouse model does not reproduce human MRI findings but shows a severe muscle weakness which might be related to an alteration of intrinsic muscular properties. The increased energy cost in H40Y mice might be related to either an impaired mitochondrial function or an alteration at the cross-bridges level. Overall, we provided a unique set of anatomic, metabolic and functional biomarkers that might be relevant for monitoring the progression of NM disease but also for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions at a preclinical level. PMID:23613869

  17. IL-15Rα deficiency in skeletal muscle alters respiratory function and the proteome of mitochondrial subpopulations independent of changes to the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Grant C; Nichols, Cody; Guo, Ge; Croston, Tara L; Thapa, Dharendra; Hollander, John M; Pistilli, Emidio E

    2015-11-01

    Interleukin-15 receptor alpha knockout (IL15RαKO) mice exhibit a greater skeletal muscle mitochondrial density with an altered mitochondrial morphology. However, the mechanism and functional impact of these changes have not been determined. In this study, we characterized the functional, proteomic, and genomic alterations in mitochondrial subpopulations isolated from the skeletal muscles of IL15RαKO mice and B6129 background control mice. State 3 respiration was greater in interfibrillar mitochondria and whole muscle ATP levels were greater in IL15RαKO mice supporting the increases in respiration rate. However, the state 3/state 4 ratio was lower, suggesting some degree of respiratory uncoupling. Proteomic analyses identified several markers independently in mitochondrial subpopulations that are associated with these functional alterations. Next Generation Sequencing of mtDNA revealed a high degree of similarity between the mitochondrial genomes of IL15RαKO mice and controls in terms of copy number, consensus coding and the presence of minor alleles, suggesting that the functional and proteomic alterations we observed occurred independent of alterations to the mitochondrial genome. These data provide additional evidence to implicate IL-15Rα as a regulator of skeletal muscle phenotypes through effects on the mitochondrion, and suggest these effects are driven by alterations to the mitochondrial proteome. PMID:26458787

  18. The potential use of spectral electromyographic fatigue as a screening and outcome monitoring tool of sarcopenic back muscle alterations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To examine whether or not median frequency surface electromyographic (MF-EMG) back muscle fatigue monitoring would be able to identify alterations in back muscle function in elderly muscles, if a protocol was used that allowed optimum standardization of the processes underlying electromyographic fatigue, and whether these tests were reliable from day to day. Methods A total of 42 older (21 females; 67 (±10.5) years old) and 44 younger persons (19 females; 33 (±10) years) performed maximum isometric back extensions which were followed by one 30 s lasting 80% submaximum extension. Participants were seated on a dynamometer with their trunks 30° anteflexed, and they repeated all tests after 1-2 days and 6 weeks. SEMG was recorded bilaterally from the L1 (iliocostalis lumborum), L2 (longissimus), and L5 (multifidus) recording sites. Outcome variables included maximum back extension torque, initial MF-EMG (IMF-EMG), MF-EMG slope declines, and individual MF-EMG muscular imbalance scores. Two-factorial ANOVAs served to examine the age and gender-specific effects, and models from Generalizability Theory (G-Theory) were used for assessing retest-reliability. Results Maximum back extension moment was non-significantly smaller in elders. IMF-EMG was overall higher in elders, with significant differences at the L5 recordings sites. In the elderly, MF-EMG fatigue declines were significantly smaller in L5, in the recording with the most negative slope, or if the slope of all electrodes was considered. Retest reliability was unanimous in young and older persons. ICC-type measurements from G-Theory of both the IMF and the fatigue slopes ranged from 0.7 to 0.85. Absolute SEM values were found clinically acceptable for the IMF-EMG, but relatively high for the fatigue slope declines. Conclusions The MF-EMG fatigue method is able to elucidate alterations of aging back muscles. This method, thus, might be suggested as a potential biomarker to objectively identify

  19. Arsenic alters vascular smooth muscle cell focal adhesion complexes leading to activation of FAK-src mediated pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Pysher, Michele D. Chen, Qin M.; Vaillancourt, Richard R.

    2008-09-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been linked to tumorigenesis, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and peripheral vascular disease; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathological effects remain elusive. In this study, we investigated arsenic-induced alteration of focal adhesion protein complexes in normal, primary vascular smooth muscle cells. We demonstrate that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenic (50 ppb As{sup 3+}) can alter focal adhesion protein co-association leading to activation of downstream pathways. Co-associated proteins were identified and quantitated via co-immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis followed by scanning densitometry. Activation of MAPK pathways in total cell lysates was evaluated using phosphor-specific antibodies. In our model, arsenic treatment caused a sustained increase in FAK-src association and activation, and induced the formation of unique signaling complexes (beginning after 3-hour As{sup 3+} exposure and continuing throughout the 12-hour time course studied). The effects of these alterations were manifested as chronic stimulation of downstream PAK, ERK and JNK pathways. Past studies have demonstrated that these pathways are involved in cellular survival, growth, proliferation, and migration in VSMCs.

  20. Prolonged space flight-induced alterations in the structure and function of human skeletal muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Fitts, R H; Trappe, S W; Costill, D L; Gallagher, P M; Creer, A C; Colloton, P A; Peters, J R; Romatowski, J G; Bain, J L; Riley, D A

    2010-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to determine the effects of prolonged space flight (∼180 days) on the structure and function of slow and fast fibres in human skeletal muscle. Biopsies were obtained from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of nine International Space Station crew members ∼45 days pre- and on landing day (R+0) post-flight. The main findings were that prolonged weightlessness produced substantial loss of fibre mass, force and power with the hierarchy of the effects being soleus type I > soleus type II > gastrocnemius type I > gastrocnemius type II. Structurally, the quantitatively most important adaptation was fibre atrophy, which averaged 20% in the soleus type I fibres (98 to 79 μm diameter). Atrophy was the main contributor to the loss of peak force (P0), which for the soleus type I fibre declined 35% from 0.86 to 0.56 mN. The percentage decrease in fibre diameter was correlated with the initial pre-flight fibre size (r = 0.87), inversely with the amount of treadmill running (r = 0.68), and was associated with an increase in thin filament density (r = 0.92). The latter correlated with reduced maximal velocity (V0) (r = −0.51), and is likely to have contributed to the 21 and 18% decline in V0 in the soleus and gastrocnemius type I fibres. Peak power was depressed in all fibre types with the greatest loss (∼55%) in the soleus. An obvious conclusion is that the exercise countermeasures employed were incapable of providing the high intensity needed to adequately protect fibre and muscle mass, and that the crew's ability to perform strenuous exercise might be seriously compromised. Our results highlight the need to study new exercise programmes on the ISS that employ high resistance and contractions over a wide range of motion to mimic the range occurring in Earth's 1 g environment. PMID:20660569

  1. The effect of altered peripheral field on motoneurone function in developing rat soleus muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Lowrie, M B; O'Brien, R A; Vrbová, G

    1985-01-01

    In soleus muscles of 4- to 5-day-old rats the quantum content of axon terminals from L4 spinal roots is less than half that from L5. With development the size of L4 motor units decreases and the quantum content of L4 nerves increases to become similar to that of L5 axons. During this time the overlap of territories of L4 and L5 axons is reduced from 46% at 4-6 days to 2% at 18-20 days. This reduction occurs entirely at the expense of L4 territory. Removal of the L5 ventral ramus (v.r.) at 4-6 days prevents the reduction of L4 territory so that at 18 days L4 motor units are about 4 X normal size. In spite of this enlarged peripheral field of L4 axons the quantum content of their terminals increases to normal levels. When L5 v.r. was removed at 16-18 days, i.e. when the reduction of the L4 peripheral field was complete, expansion of L4 motor units was also seen, but in this case the quantum content of L4 terminals was less than normal. Thus it appears that during early stages of development, before synaptic reorganization within the muscle is complete, motoneurones are able to adapt their function to increased peripheral demands more effectively than at later stages of post-natal development. Retrograde labelling of soleus motor pool with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) showed that removal of L5 v.r. either at 4 or 15 days of age reduced the number of motoneurones supplying soleus muscle to less than 20%. No change in size of the remaining motoneurones was seen, indicating that the adjustment of transmitter output at the neuromuscular junctions in the younger group had no effect on the size of the cell. PMID:2867219

  2. Time Course of Central and Peripheral Alterations after Isometric Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation-Induced Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Fouré, Alexandre; Nosaka, Kazunori; Wegrzyk, Jennifer; Duhamel, Guillaume; Le Troter, Arnaud; Boudinet, Hélène; Mattei, Jean-Pierre; Vilmen, Christophe; Jubeau, Marc; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Isometric contractions induced by neuromuscular electrostimulation (NMES) have been shown to result in a prolonged force decrease but the time course of the potential central and peripheral factors have never been investigated. This study examined the specific time course of central and peripheral factors after isometric NMES-induced muscle damage. Twenty-five young healthy men were subjected to an NMES exercise consisting of 40 contractions for both legs. Changes in maximal voluntary contraction force of the knee extensors (MVC), peak evoked force during double stimulations at 10 Hz (Db10) and 100 Hz (Db100), its ratio (10∶100), voluntary activation, muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase activity were assessed before, immediately after and throughout four days after NMES session. Changes in knee extensors volume and T2 relaxation time were also assessed at two (D2) and four (D4) days post-exercise. MVC decreased by 29% immediately after NMES session and was still 19% lower than the baseline value at D4. The decrease in Db10 was higher than in Db100 immediately and one day post-exercise resulting in a decrease (−12%) in the 10∶100 ratio. On the contrary, voluntary activation significantly decreased at D2 (−5%) and was still depressed at D4 (−5%). Muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase activity increased after NMES and peaked at D2 and D4, respectively. T2 was also increased at D2 (6%) and D4 (9%). Additionally, changes in MVC and peripheral factors (e.g., Db100) were correlated on the full recovery period, while a significant correlation was found between changes in MVC and VA only from D2 to D4. The decrease in MVC recorded immediately after the NMES session was mainly due to peripheral changes while both central and peripheral contributions were involved in the prolonged force reduction. Interestingly, the chronological events differ from what has been reported so far for voluntary exercise-induced muscle damage. PMID:25215511

  3. Alteration of excitation-contraction coupling mechanism in extensor digitorum longus muscle fibres of dystrophic mdx mouse and potential efficacy of taurine

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Annamaria; Pierno, Sabata; Liantonio, Antonella; Cetrone, Michela; Camerino, Claudia; Simonetti, Simonetta; Papadia, Francesco; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2001-01-01

    No clear data is available about functional alterations in the calcium-dependent excitation-contraction (e-c) coupling mechanism of dystrophin-deficient muscle of mdx mice. By means of the intracellular microelectrode ‘point' voltage clamp method, we measured the voltage threshold for contraction (mechanical threshold; MT) in intact extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle fibres of dystrophic mdx mouse of two different ages: 8–12 weeks, during the active regeneration of hind limb muscles, and 6–8 months, when regeneration is complete. The EDL muscle fibres of 8–12-week-old wildtype animals had a more negative rheobase voltage (potential of equilibrium for contraction- and relaxation-related calcium movements) with respect to control mice of 6–8 months. However, at both ages, the EDL muscle fibres of mdx mice contracted at more negative potentials with respect to age-matched controls and had markedly slower time constants to reach the rheobase. The in vitro application of 60 mM taurine, whose normally high intracellular muscle levels play a role in e-c coupling, was without effect on 6–8-month-old wildtype EDL muscle, while it significantly ameliorated the MT of mdx mouse. HPLC determination of taurine content at 6–8 months showed a significant 140% rise of plasma taurine levels and a clear trend toward a decrease in amino acid levels in hind limb muscles, brain and heart, suggesting a tissue difficulty in retaining appropriate levels of the amino acid. The data is consistent with a permanent alteration of e-c coupling in mdx EDL muscle fibres. The alteration could be related to the proposed increase in intracellular calcium, and can be ameliorated by taurine, suggesting a potential therapeutic role of the amino acid. PMID:11226135

  4. Caloric restriction induces energy-sparing alterations in skeletal muscle contraction, fiber composition and local thyroid hormone metabolism that persist during catch-up fat upon refeeding

    PubMed Central

    De Andrade, Paula B. M.; Neff, Laurence A.; Strosova, Miriam K.; Arsenijevic, Denis; Patthey-Vuadens, Ophélie; Scapozza, Leonardo; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Ruegg, Urs T.; Dulloo, Abdul G.; Dorchies, Olivier M.

    2015-01-01

    Weight regain after caloric restriction results in accelerated fat storage in adipose tissue. This catch-up fat phenomenon is postulated to result partly from suppressed skeletal muscle thermogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated whether the reduced rate of skeletal muscle contraction-relaxation cycle that occurs after caloric restriction persists during weight recovery and could contribute to catch-up fat. Using a rat model of semistarvation-refeeding, in which fat recovery is driven by suppressed thermogenesis, we show that contraction and relaxation of leg muscles are slower after both semistarvation and refeeding. These effects are associated with (i) higher expression of muscle deiodinase type 3 (DIO3), which inactivates tri-iodothyronine (T3), and lower expression of T3-activating enzyme, deiodinase type 2 (DIO2), (ii) slower net formation of T3 from its T4 precursor in muscles, and (iii) accumulation of slow fibers at the expense of fast fibers. These semistarvation-induced changes persisted during recovery and correlated with impaired expression of transcription factors involved in slow-twitch muscle development. We conclude that diminished muscle thermogenesis following caloric restriction results from reduced muscle T3 levels, alteration in muscle-specific transcription factors, and fast-to-slow fiber shift causing slower contractility. These energy-sparing effects persist during weight recovery and contribute to catch-up fat. PMID:26441673

  5. Caloric restriction induces energy-sparing alterations in skeletal muscle contraction, fiber composition and local thyroid hormone metabolism that persist during catch-up fat upon refeeding.

    PubMed

    De Andrade, Paula B M; Neff, Laurence A; Strosova, Miriam K; Arsenijevic, Denis; Patthey-Vuadens, Ophélie; Scapozza, Leonardo; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Ruegg, Urs T; Dulloo, Abdul G; Dorchies, Olivier M

    2015-01-01

    Weight regain after caloric restriction results in accelerated fat storage in adipose tissue. This catch-up fat phenomenon is postulated to result partly from suppressed skeletal muscle thermogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated whether the reduced rate of skeletal muscle contraction-relaxation cycle that occurs after caloric restriction persists during weight recovery and could contribute to catch-up fat. Using a rat model of semistarvation-refeeding, in which fat recovery is driven by suppressed thermogenesis, we show that contraction and relaxation of leg muscles are slower after both semistarvation and refeeding. These effects are associated with (i) higher expression of muscle deiodinase type 3 (DIO3), which inactivates tri-iodothyronine (T3), and lower expression of T3-activating enzyme, deiodinase type 2 (DIO2), (ii) slower net formation of T3 from its T4 precursor in muscles, and (iii) accumulation of slow fibers at the expense of fast fibers. These semistarvation-induced changes persisted during recovery and correlated with impaired expression of transcription factors involved in slow-twitch muscle development. We conclude that diminished muscle thermogenesis following caloric restriction results from reduced muscle T3 levels, alteration in muscle-specific transcription factors, and fast-to-slow fiber shift causing slower contractility. These energy-sparing effects persist during weight recovery and contribute to catch-up fat. PMID:26441673

  6. Altered antioxidant status in peripheral skeletal muscle of patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Gosker, Harry R; Bast, Aalt; Haenen, Guido R M M; Fischer, Marc A J G; van der Vusse, Ger J; Wouters, Emiel F M; Schols, Annemie M W J

    2005-01-01

    Despite the growing field of interest in the role of pulmonary oxidative stress in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), barely any data are available with respect to antioxidant capacity in the peripheral musculature of these patients. The main objective of this study was to assess in detail the antioxidant status in skeletal muscle of patients with COPD. Biopsies from the vastus lateralis of 21 patients with COPD and 12 healthy age-matched controls were analysed. Total antioxidant capacity, vitamin E, glutathione, and uric acid levels were determined and the enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione-S-transferase were measured. Malondialdehyde was measured as an index of lipid peroxidation. The total antioxidant capacity and the uric acid levels were markedly higher in COPD patients than in healthy controls (25%, P = 0.006 and 24%, P = 0.029, respectively). Glutathione-S-transferase activity was also increased (35%; P = 0.044) in patients compared to healthy subjects. Vitamin E level was lower in patients than in controls (P < 0.05). The malondialdehyde level was not different between the two groups. It can be concluded that the muscle total antioxidant capacity is increased in patients with COPD. Together with the reduced vitamin E levels, the increased glutathione-S-transferase activity and normal levels of lipid peroxidation products, these findings suggest that the antioxidant system may be exposed to and subsequently triggered by elevated levels of reactive oxygen species. PMID:15672860

  7. Training-induced alterations in young and senescent rat diaphragm muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, Luc E.; Betlach, Michael; Vailas, Arthur C.; Thomas, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of progressive treadmill exercise on oxidative capacity in three specific diaphragm muscle fiber types and on the capillary density of known fiber types was investigated in young (5 month) and senescent (23 months or older) rats. All animals were trained for 1 hr/day, 5 days weekly, for 10 weeks. Measurements of succinate dehydrogenase activity showed significant increases in all three fiber types in both the young and the senescent trained animals, compared with their sedentary controls. Fiber size and capillary density were not affected by exercise or age. The results demonstrate that the senescent costal diaphragm maintains its ability to adapt to an increased metabolic demand brought about by locomotor exercises.

  8. Effects of Stable and Unstable Resistance Training in an Altered-G Environment on Muscle Power.

    PubMed

    Zemková, E; Oddsson, L

    2016-04-01

    The study evaluated the effect of 4 weeks of combined resistance-balance training and resistance training alone in a 90° tilted environment on muscle power. Two groups of healthy young subjects performed leg extensions while in a supine position, either on a firm surface along a linear track or on an unstable surface requiring mediolateral balancing movements. Power and force during squats were measured at isokinetic velocities of 10 and 35 deg/s. Results showed significantly greater gains in peak force (44.1%; F(1,21)=8.876, p=0.026), mean force (58.6%; F(1,21)=16.136, p=0.013), peak power (58.7%; F(1,21)=18.754, p=0.009), and mean power (59.2%; F(1,21)=23.114, p=0.007) at the velocity of 35 deg/s after stable than unstable resistance training. However, there were no significant between-groups differences in pre-post training gains in peak force (10.4%; F(1,21)=1.965, p=0.74), mean force (10.3%; F(1,21)=1.889, p=0.80), peak power (12.9%; F(1,21)=2.980, p=0.49), and mean power (19.1%; F(1,21)=3.454, p=0.36) during squats at the velocity of 10 deg/s. Resistance exercises under stable conditions performed in a 90° tilted environment are more effective in the improvement of high velocity muscle power than their use in combination with balance exercises. Such training may be applicable in pre- and in-flight exercise regimens for astronauts and in functional rehabilitation of bed-ridden patients. PMID:26667929

  9. Carbohydrate Nutrition and Team Sport Performance.

    PubMed

    Williams, Clyde; Rollo, Ian

    2015-11-01

    The common pattern of play in 'team sports' is 'stop and go', i.e. where players perform repeated bouts of brief high-intensity exercise punctuated by lower intensity activity. Sprints are generally 2-4 s long and recovery between sprints is of variable length. Energy production during brief sprints is derived from the degradation of intra-muscular phosphocreatine and glycogen (anaerobic metabolism). Prolonged periods of multiple sprints drain muscle glycogen stores, leading to a decrease in power output and a reduction in general work rate during training and competition. The impact of dietary carbohydrate interventions on team sport performance have been typically assessed using intermittent variable-speed shuttle running over a distance of 20 m. This method has evolved to include specific work to rest ratios and skills specific to team sports such as soccer, rugby and basketball. Increasing liver and muscle carbohydrate stores before sports helps delay the onset of fatigue during prolonged intermittent variable-speed running. Carbohydrate intake during exercise, typically ingested as carbohydrate-electrolyte solutions, is also associated with improved performance. The mechanisms responsible are likely to be the availability of carbohydrate as a substrate for central and peripheral functions. Variable-speed running in hot environments is limited by the degree of hyperthermia before muscle glycogen availability becomes a significant contributor to the onset of fatigue. Finally, ingesting carbohydrate immediately after training and competition will rapidly recover liver and muscle glycogen stores. PMID:26553494

  10. [Carbohydrates and fiber].

    PubMed

    Lajolo, F M; de Menezes, E W; Filisetti-Cozzi, T M

    1988-09-01

    Dietary carbohydrates comprise two fractions that may be classified as digestible, and which are useful as energy sources (simple and complex carbohydrates) and fiber, which is presumed to be of no use to the human body. There are insufficient epidemiologic data on the metabolic effects of simple carbohydrates and it is not advisable to make quantitative recommendations of intake. It is questionable to recommend in developing countries that a fixed proportion of dietary energy be derived from simple sugars, due to the high prevalence of deficient energy intake, cultural habits, and regional differences in food intake and physical activity. In relation to recommendations of complex carbohydrates, it should be considered that their absorption is influenced by many factors inherent to the individual and to the foods. Fiber is defined as a series of different substances derived from tissue structures, cellular residues and undigested chemical substances that may be partially utilized after intestinal bacteria have acted on them. There is not a clear definition of the chemical composition of fiber, but it consists mainly of polysaccharides (such as cellulose, hemicellulose and pectins), lignin and end products of the interactions of various food components. The effects of fiber, such as control of food intake, regulation of gastrointestinal transit, post-prandial blood concentrations of cholesterol, glucose and insulin, flatulence and alterations in nutrient bioavailability are due to various physical properties inherent to its chemical components. Impairment of nutrient absorption may be harmful, mainly among populations whose food intake is lower than their energy needs, and with a high fiber content. This may be particularly important in pregnant women, growing children and the elderly, and should be considered when making nutrient recommendations. A precise knowledge of fiber is also important to calculate the real energy value of foods, mainly for two reasons: 1