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Sample records for altered coenzyme preference

  1. Structural insights into substrate and coenzyme preference by SDR family protein Gox2253 from Gluconobater oxydans.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bo; Cui, Dongbing; Zhang, Lujia; Jiang, Shuiqin; Machida, Satoru; Yuan, Y Adam; Wei, Dongzhi

    2014-11-01

    Gox2253 from Gluconobacter oxydans belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases family, and catalyzes the reduction of heptanal, octanal, nonanal, and decanal with NADPH. To develop a robust working platform to engineer novel G. oxydans oxidoreductases with designed coenzyme preference, we adopted a structure based rational design strategy using computational predictions that considers the number of hydrogen bonds formed between enzyme and docked coenzyme. We report the crystal structure of Gox2253 at 2.6 Å resolution, ternary models of Gox2253 mutants in complex with NADH/short-chain aldehydes, and propose a structural mechanism of substrate selection. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that hydrogen bonds could form between 2'-hydroxyl group in the adenosine moiety of NADH and the side chain of Gox2253 mutant after arginine at position 42 is replaced with tyrosine or lysine. Consistent with the molecular dynamics prediction, Gox2253-R42Y/K mutants can use both NADH and NADPH as a coenzyme. Hence, the strategies here could provide a practical platform to engineer coenzyme selectivity for any given oxidoreductase and could serve as an additional consideration to engineer substrate-binding pockets. PMID:24825769

  2. Structural basis for the alteration of coenzyme specificity in a malate dehydrogenase mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Takeo; Fushinobu, Shinya; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto . E-mail: umanis@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-08-25

    To elucidate the structural basis for the alteration of coenzyme specificity from NADH toward NADPH in a malate dehydrogenase mutant EX7 from Thermus flavus, we determined the crystal structures at 2.0 A resolution of EX7 complexed with NADPH and NADH, respectively. In the EX7-NADPH complex, Ser42 and Ser45 form hydrogen bonds with the 2'-phosphate group of the adenine ribose of NADPH, although the adenine moiety is not seen in the electron density map. In contrast, although Ser42 and Ser45 occupy a similar position in the EX7-NADH complex structure, both the adenine and adenine ribose moieties of NADH are missing in the map. These results and kinetic analysis of site-directed mutant enzymes indicate (1) that the preference of EX7 for NADPH over NADH is ascribed to the recognition of the 2'-phosphate group by two Ser and Arg44, and (2) that the adenine moiety of NADPH is not recognized in this mutant.

  3. Oral Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation Does Not Prevent Cardiac Alterations During a High Altitude Trek to Everest Base Camp

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Cameron J.; Mitchell, Kay; Martin, Daniel S.; Johnson, Andrew W.; Cochlin, Lowri E.; Codreanu, Ion; Dhillon, Sundeep; Rodway, George W.; Ashmore, Tom; Levett, Denny Z.H.; Neubauer, Stefan; Montgomery, Hugh E.; Grocott, Michael P.W.; Clarke, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Holloway, Cameron J., Andrew J. Murray, Kay Mitchell, Daniel S. Martin, Andrew W. Johnson, Lowri E. Cochlin, Ion Codreanu, Sundeep Dhillon, George W. Rodway, Tom Ashmore, Denny Z.H. Levett, Stefan Neubauer, Hugh E. Montgomery, Michael P.W. Grocott, and Kieran Clarke, on behalf of the Caudwell Xtreme Everest 2009 Investigators. Oral Coenzyme Q supplementation does not prevent cardiac alterations during a high altitude trek to Everest Base Camp. High Alt Med Biol 15:000—000, 2014.—Exposure to high altitude is associated with sustained, but reversible, changes in cardiac mass, diastolic function, and high-energy phosphate metabolism. Whilst the underlying mechanisms remain elusive, tissue hypoxia increases generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can stabilize hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcription factors, bringing about transcriptional changes that suppress oxidative phosphorylation and activate autophagy. We therefore investigated whether oral supplementation with an antioxidant, Coenzyme Q10, prevented the cardiac perturbations associated with altitude exposure. Twenty-three volunteers (10 male, 13 female, 46±3 years) were recruited from the 2009 Caudwell Xtreme Everest Research Treks and studied before, and within 48 h of return from, a 17-day trek to Everest Base Camp, with subjects receiving either no intervention (controls) or 300 mg Coenzyme Q10 per day throughout altitude exposure. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography were used to assess cardiac morphology and function. Following altitude exposure, body mass fell by 3 kg in all subjects (p<0.001), associated with a loss of body fat and a fall in BMI. Post-trek, left ventricular mass had decreased by 11% in controls (p<0.05) and by 16% in Coenzyme Q10-treated subjects (p<0.001), whereas mitral inflow E/A had decreased by 18% in controls (p<0.05) and by 21% in Coenzyme Q10-treated subjects (p<0.05). Coenzyme Q10 supplementation did not, therefore, prevent

  4. Hypersexuality or altered sexual preference following brain injury.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, B L; Cummings, J L; McIntyre, H; Ebers, G; Grode, M

    1986-01-01

    Eight patients are described in whom either hypersexuality (four cases) or change in sexual preference (four cases) occurred following brain injury. In this series disinhibition of sexual activity and hypersexuality followed medial basal-frontal or diencephalic injury. This contrasted with the patients demonstrating altered sexual preference whose injuries involved limbic system structures. In some patients altered sexual behaviour may be the presenting or dominant feature of brain injury. Images PMID:3746322

  5. Derived relations and generalized alteration of preferences.

    PubMed

    Valdivia-Salas, Sonsoles; Dougher, Michael J; Luciano, Carmen

    2013-06-01

    The present study examined the role of derived relations in the generalizability of the evaluative conditioning effect. Healthy university students participated. Four geometrical shapes were first established as discriminative stimuli for the contingent presentation of pictograms (B1, B2, C1, and C2, respectively). We then assessed the reinforcing properties of B1 versus B2, and C1 versus C2 by using simultaneous discrimination tasks: at baseline (baseline assessment), after pairing B1 with aversive slides plus noise and B2 with pleasant slides (test I), and after employing equivalence training and testing to establish B1 as equivalent to C1 and B2 as equivalent to C2 (test II). Most participants (82%) in the experimental condition, as compared with the control conditions (17% and 10%), selected the discriminative shapes for B2 (test I) and C2 (test II) on most trials, replicating and extending previous findings. Subsequently, the geometrical shapes were established as equivalent to the letters X, Y, W, and Z, respectively, which then served as antecedent stimuli in simultaneous discrimination tasks as before (test III). As was expected, only participants in the experimental condition showed preference for the novel letters that were established as equivalent to B2-producing and C2-producing shapes. These findings suggest that the evaluative conditioning effect may extend far beyond the stimulus being de/valuated and narrow the behavioral repertoire. PMID:23242738

  6. Sleep deprivation alters choice strategy without altering uncertainty or loss aversion preferences

    PubMed Central

    Mullette-Gillman, O'Dhaniel A.; Kurnianingsih, Yoanna A.; Liu, Jean C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation alters decision making; however, it is unclear what specific cognitive processes are modified to drive altered choices. In this manuscript, we examined how one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) alters economic decision making. We specifically examined changes in uncertainty preferences dissociably from changes in the strategy with which participants engage with presented choice information. With high test-retest reliability, we show that TSD does not alter uncertainty preferences or loss aversion. Rather, TSD alters the information the participants rely upon to make their choices. Utilizing a choice strategy metric which contrasts the influence of maximizing and satisficing information on choice behavior, we find that TSD alters the relative reliance on maximizing information and satisficing information, in the gains domain. This alteration is the result of participants both decreasing their reliance on cognitively-complex maximizing information and a concomitant increase in the use of readily-available satisficing information. TSD did not result in a decrease in overall information use in either domain. These results show that sleep deprivation alters decision making by altering the informational strategies that participants employ, without altering their preferences. PMID:26500479

  7. High-Throughput Screening of Coenzyme Preference Change of Thermophilic 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase from NADP+ to NAD+

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Zhong, Chao; Kim, Jae Eung; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme engineering that changes NAD(P) selectivity of redox enzymes is an important tool in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis. Here we developed a high throughput screening method to identify mutants of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica with reversed coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. Colonies of a 6PGDH mutant library growing on the agar plates were treated by heat to minimize the background noise, that is, the deactivation of intracellular dehydrogenases, degradation of inherent NAD(P)H, and disruption of cell membrane. The melted agarose solution containing a redox dye tetranitroblue tetrazolium (TNBT), phenazine methosulfate (PMS), NAD+, and 6-phosphogluconate was carefully poured on colonies, forming a second semi-solid layer. More active 6PGDH mutants were examined via an enzyme-linked TNBT-PMS colorimetric assay. Positive mutants were recovered by direct extraction of plasmid from dead cell colonies followed by plasmid transformation into E. coli TOP10. By utilizing this double-layer screening method, six positive mutants were obtained from two-round saturation mutagenesis. The best mutant 6PGDH A30D/R31I/T32I exhibited a 4,278-fold reversal of coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. This screening method could be widely used to detect numerous redox enzymes, particularly for thermophilic ones, which can generate NAD(P)H reacted with the redox dye TNBT. PMID:27587230

  8. High-Throughput Screening of Coenzyme Preference Change of Thermophilic 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase from NADP(+) to NAD(.).

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Zhong, Chao; Kim, Jae Eung; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme engineering that changes NAD(P) selectivity of redox enzymes is an important tool in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis. Here we developed a high throughput screening method to identify mutants of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica with reversed coenzyme selectivity from NADP(+) to NAD(+). Colonies of a 6PGDH mutant library growing on the agar plates were treated by heat to minimize the background noise, that is, the deactivation of intracellular dehydrogenases, degradation of inherent NAD(P)H, and disruption of cell membrane. The melted agarose solution containing a redox dye tetranitroblue tetrazolium (TNBT), phenazine methosulfate (PMS), NAD(+), and 6-phosphogluconate was carefully poured on colonies, forming a second semi-solid layer. More active 6PGDH mutants were examined via an enzyme-linked TNBT-PMS colorimetric assay. Positive mutants were recovered by direct extraction of plasmid from dead cell colonies followed by plasmid transformation into E. coli TOP10. By utilizing this double-layer screening method, six positive mutants were obtained from two-round saturation mutagenesis. The best mutant 6PGDH A30D/R31I/T32I exhibited a 4,278-fold reversal of coenzyme selectivity from NADP(+) to NAD(+). This screening method could be widely used to detect numerous redox enzymes, particularly for thermophilic ones, which can generate NAD(P)H reacted with the redox dye TNBT. PMID:27587230

  9. Alteration of mitochondrial DNA and RNA level in human fibroblasts with impaired vitamin B12 coenzyme synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cantatore, P; Petruzzella, V; Nicoletti, C; Papadia, F; Fracasso, F; Rustin, P; Gadaleta, M N

    1998-08-01

    Alterations of mitochondrial (mt) nucleic acid metabolism in methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) were studied in two cell lines from skin fibroblasts of patients with mitochondrial (GM00595) or cytosolic (GM10011) defects in the biosynthesis pathways of cobalamin coenzymes. The mtDNA level increased two-fold in GM00595 cells, which carry a mt defect in the adenosylcobalamin synthesis, whereas no appreciable change was found in GM10011 cells. The content of the two rRNAs 16S and 12S mtRNAs, normalized for the mtDNA copy number, decreased by 70% and 50% in GM00595 and GM10011, respectively. The normalized content of ND1, ND2 and CO I mRNAs decreased in GM00595, but was unchanged in GM10011. Respiratory chain complex activities measured in these two cell lines were not different from control activities. These data suggest that the maintenance of the mt function is due to doubling of mtDNA and that this compensatory response takes place only in those cells in which the greater reduction of the level of rRNA might have brought the content of these transcripts below the threshold value for optimal expression of the mt genome. PMID:9720919

  10. Dominant mutations causing alterations in acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase confer tolerance to cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides in maize.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, W B; Marshall, L C; Burton, J D; Somers, D A; Wyse, D L; Gronwald, J W; Gengenbach, B G

    1990-01-01

    A partially dominant mutation exhibiting increased tolerance to cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides was isolated by exposing susceptible maize (Zea mays) tissue cultures to increasingly inhibitory concentrations of sethoxydim (a cyclohexanedione). The selected tissue culture (S2) was greater than 40-fold more tolerant to sethoxydim and 20-fold more tolerant to haloxyfop (an aryloxyphenoxypropionate) than the nonselected wild-type tissue culture. Regenerated S2 plants were heterozygous for the mutant allele and exhibited a high-level, but not complete, tolerance to both herbicides. Homozygous mutant families derived by self-pollinating the regenerated S2 plants exhibited no injury after treatment with 0.8 kg of sethoxydim per ha, which was greater than 16-fold the rate lethal to wild-type plants. Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase; EC 6.4.1.2) is the target enzyme of cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides. ACCase activities of the nonselected wild-type and homozygous mutant seedlings were similar in the absence of herbicide. ACCase activity from homozygous tolerant plants required greater than 100-fold more sethoxydim and 16-fold more haloxyfop for 50% inhibition than ACCase from wild-type plants. These results indicate that tolerance to sethoxydim and haloxyfop is controlled by a partially dominant nuclear mutation encoding a herbicide-insensitive alteration in maize ACCase. Images PMID:1976254

  11. Host stress hormones alter vector feeding preferences, success, and productivity.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Stephanie S; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan; Burgan, Sarah C; Schrey, Aaron W; Hassan, Hassan K; Unnasch, Thomas R; Martin, Lynn B

    2016-08-17

    Stress hormones might represent a key link between individual-level infection outcome, population-level parasite transmission, and zoonotic disease risk. Although the effects of stress on immunity are well known, stress hormones could also affect host-vector interactions via modification of host behaviours or vector-feeding patterns and subsequent reproductive success. Here, we experimentally manipulated songbird stress hormones and examined subsequent feeding preferences, feeding success, and productivity of mosquito vectors in addition to defensive behaviours of hosts. Despite being more defensive, birds with elevated stress hormone concentrations were approximately twice as likely to be fed on by mosquitoes compared to control birds. Moreover, stress hormones altered the relationship between the timing of laying and clutch size in blood-fed mosquitoes. Our results suggest that host stress could affect the transmission dynamics of vector-borne parasites via multiple pathways. PMID:27512147

  12. Oxalyl-Coenzyme A Reduction to Glyoxylate Is the Preferred Route of Oxalate Assimilation in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Kathrin; Skovran, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Oxalate catabolism is conducted by phylogenetically diverse organisms, including Methylobacterium extorquens AM1. Here, we investigate the central metabolism of this alphaproteobacterium during growth on oxalate by using proteomics, mutant characterization, and 13C-labeling experiments. Our results confirm that energy conservation proceeds as previously described for M. extorquens AM1 and other characterized oxalotrophic bacteria via oxalyl-coenzyme A (oxalyl-CoA) decarboxylase and formyl-CoA transferase and subsequent oxidation to carbon dioxide via formate dehydrogenase. However, in contrast to other oxalate-degrading organisms, the assimilation of this carbon compound in M. extorquens AM1 occurs via the operation of a variant of the serine cycle as follows: oxalyl-CoA reduction to glyoxylate and conversion to glycine and its condensation with methylene-tetrahydrofolate derived from formate, resulting in the formation of C3 units. The recently discovered ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway operates during growth on oxalate but is nevertheless dispensable, indicating that oxalyl-CoA reductase is sufficient to provide the glyoxylate required for biosynthesis. Analysis of an oxalyl-CoA synthetase- and oxalyl-CoA-reductase-deficient double mutant revealed an alternative, although less efficient, strategy for oxalate assimilation via one-carbon intermediates. The alternative process consists of formate assimilation via the tetrahydrofolate pathway to fuel the serine cycle, and the ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway is used for glyoxylate regeneration. Our results support the notion that M. extorquens AM1 has a plastic central metabolism featuring multiple assimilation routes for C1 and C2 substrates, which may contribute to the rapid adaptation of this organism to new substrates and the eventual coconsumption of substrates under environmental conditions. PMID:22493020

  13. Cocaine decreases saccharin preference without altering sweet taste sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Roebber, Jennifer K.; Izenwasser, Sari; Chaudhari, Nirupa

    2015-01-01

    In rodents, saccharin consumption is suppressed when the sweet taste stimulus is paired with moderate doses of cocaine. Several hypotheses have been used to explain the seemingly contradictory effect of decreased consumption of a normally preferred substance following a highly rewarding drug. A common theme across these hypotheses is that saccharin is interpreted as less rewarding after cocaine pairing. We considered the alternative possibility that suppression is caused not by a change in reward circuitry, but rather by a change in taste detection, for instance by altering the afferent taste response and decreasing sensitivity to sweet taste stimuli. To evaluate this possibility, we measured saccharin taste sensitivity of mice before and after a standard cocaine-pairing paradigm. We measured taste sensitivity using a brief-access lickometer equipped with multiple concentrations of saccharin solution and established concentration-response curves before and after saccharin-cocaine pairing. Our results indicate that the EC50 for saccharin was unaltered following pairing. Instead, the avidity of licking saccharin, an indicator of motivation, was depressed. Latency to first-lick, a negative indicator of motivation, was also dramatically increased. Thus, our findings are consistent with the interpretation that saccharin-cocaine pairing results in devaluing of the sweet taste reward. PMID:25812471

  14. Analysis and prediction of the physiological effects of altered coenzyme specificity in xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase during xylose fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Krahulec, Stefan; Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    An advanced strategy of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain development for fermentation of xylose applies tailored enzymes in the process of metabolic engineering. The coenzyme specificities of the NADPH-preferring xylose reductase (XR) and the NAD+-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) have been targeted in previous studies by protein design or evolution with the aim of improving the recycling of NADH or NADPH in their two-step pathway, converting xylose to xylulose. Yeast strains expressing variant pairs of XR and XDH that according to in vitro kinetic data were suggested to be much better matched in coenzyme usage than the corresponding pair of wild-type enzymes, exhibit widely varying capabilities for xylose fermentation. To achieve coherence between enzyme properties and the observed strain performance during fermentation, we explored the published kinetic parameters for wild-type and engineered forms of XR and XDH as possible predictors of xylitol by-product formation (Yxylitol) in yeast physiology. We found that the ratio of enzymatic reaction rates using NADP(H) and NAD(H) that was calculated by applying intracellular reactant concentrations to rate equations derived from bi-substrate kinetic analysis, succeeded in giving a statistically reliable forecast of the trend effect on Yxylitol. Prediction based solely on catalytic efficiencies with or without binding affinities for NADP(H) and NAD(H) were not dependable, and we define a minimum demand on the enzyme kinetic characterization to be performed for this purpose. An immediate explanation is provided for the typically lower Yxylitol in the current strains harboring XR engineered for utilization of NADH as compared to strains harboring XDH engineered for utilization of NADP+. The known XDH enzymes all exhibit a relatively high Km for NADP+ so that physiological boundary conditions are somewhat unfavorable for xylitol oxidation by NADP+. A criterion of physiological fitness is developed for engineered XR

  15. Oral coenzyme Q10 supplementation improves clinical symptoms and recovers pathologic alterations in blood mononuclear cells in a fibromyalgia patient.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Mario D; Cotán, David; del-Pozo-Martín, Yaiza; Carrión, Angel M; de Miguel, Manuel; Bullón, Pedro; Sánchez-Alcazar, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology. Recent studies have shown evidence demonstrating that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress may have a role in the pathophysiology of FM. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an essential electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and a strong antioxidant. Low CoQ10 levels have been detected in patients with FM, and a significant decrease of clinical symptoms has been reported after oral CoQ10 supplementation. In this report, we show the effect of CoQ10 treatment on clinical symptoms, blood mononuclear cells, and mitochondrial and oxidative stress markers from a woman with FM. After CoQ10 treatment, the patient reported a significant improvement of clinical symptoms. At the cellular level, CoQ10 treatment restored mitochondrial dysfunction and the mtDNA copy number, decreased oxidative stress, and increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Our results suggest that CoQ10 could be an alternative therapeutic approach for FM. PMID:22898267

  16. Production of a Brassica napus low-molecular mass acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein in Arabidopsis alters the acyl-coenzyme A pool and acyl composition of oil in seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-molecular mass (10 kD) cytosolic acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein (ACBP) has a substantial influence over fatty acid (FA) composition in oilseeds, possibly via an effect on the partitioning of acyl groups between elongation and desaturation pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that the expressio...

  17. Microglial Inhibitory Mechanism of Coenzyme Q10 Against Aβ (1-42) Induced Cognitive Dysfunctions: Possible Behavioral, Biochemical, Cellular, and Histopathological Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arti; Kumar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a debilitating disease with complex pathophysiology. Amyloid beta (Aβ) (1-42) is a reliable model of AD that recapitulates many aspects of human AD. Objective: The intent of the present study was to investigate the neuroprotective potential of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and its modulation by minocycline (microglial inhibitor) against Aβ (1-42) induced cognitive dysfunction in rats. Method: Intrahippocampal (i.h.) Aβ (1-42) (1 μg/μl; 4μl/site) were administered followed by drug treatment with galantamine (2 mg/kg), CoQ10 (20 and 40 mg/kg), minocycline (50 and 100 mg/kg) and their combinations for a period of 21 days. Various neurobehavioral parameters followed by biochemical, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) level, proinflammatory markers (TNF-α), mitochondrial respiratory enzyme complexes (I-IV) and histopathological examinations were assessed. Results: Aβ (1-42) administration significantly impaired cognitive performance in Morris water maze (MWM) performance test, causes oxidative stress, raised AChE level, caused neuroinflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction and histopathological alterations as compared to sham treatment. Treatment with CoQ10 (20 and 40 mg/kg) and minocycline (50 and 100 mg/kg) alone for 21 days significantly improved cognitive performance as evidenced by reduced transfer latency and increased time spent in target quadrant (TSTQ), reduced AChE activity, oxidative damage (reduced LPO, nitrite level and restored SOD, catalase and GHS levels), TNF-α level, restored mitochondrial respiratory enzyme complex (I, II, III, IV) activities and histopathological alterations as compared to Aβ (1-42) treated animals. Further, combinations of minocycline (50 and 100 mg/kg) with CoQ10 (20 and 40 mg/kg) significantly modulates the protective effect of CoQ10 dose dependently as compared to their effect alone. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the neuroprotective effect of CoQ10 could be due to its microglia

  18. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus alters the host preferences of its vector Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yong; Jiao, Xiaoguo; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Shi, Xiaobin; Chen, Gong; Su, Qi; Yang, Xin; Pan, Huipeng; Zhang, Youjun

    2013-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci, the whitefly vector of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), seriously reduces tomato production and quality. Here, we report the first evidence that infection by TYLCV alters the host preferences of invasive B. tabaci B (Middle East-Minor Asia 1) and Q (Mediterranean genetic group), in which TYLCV-free B. tabaci Q preferred to settle on TYLCV-infected tomato plants over healthy ones. TYLCV-free B. tabaci B, however, preferred healthy tomato plants to TYLCV-infected plants. In contrast, TYLCV-infected B. tabaci, either B or Q, did not exhibit a preference between TYLCV-infected and TYLCV-free tomato plants. Based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS)analysis of plant terpene volatiles, significantly more β-myrcene, thymene, β-phellandrene, caryophyllene, (+)-4-carene, and α-humulene were released from the TYLCV-free tomato plants than from the TYLCV-infected ones. The results indicate TYLCV can alter the host preferences of its vector Bemisia tabaci B and Q. PMID:24096821

  19. Oral Coenzyme Q10 supplementation does not prevent cardiac alterations during a high altitude trek to everest base cAMP.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Cameron J; Murray, Andrew J; Mitchell, Kay; Martin, Daniel S; Johnson, Andrew W; Cochlin, Lowri E; Codreanu, Ion; Dhillon, Sundeep; Rodway, George W; Ashmore, Tom; Levett, Denny Z H; Neubauer, Stefan; Montgomery, Hugh E; Grocott, Michael P W; Clarke, Kieran

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to high altitude is associated with sustained, but reversible, changes in cardiac mass, diastolic function, and high-energy phosphate metabolism. Whilst the underlying mechanisms remain elusive, tissue hypoxia increases generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can stabilize hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcription factors, bringing about transcriptional changes that suppress oxidative phosphorylation and activate autophagy. We therefore investigated whether oral supplementation with an antioxidant, Coenzyme Q10, prevented the cardiac perturbations associated with altitude exposure. Twenty-three volunteers (10 male, 13 female, 46±3 years) were recruited from the 2009 Caudwell Xtreme Everest Research Treks and studied before, and within 48 h of return from, a 17-day trek to Everest Base Camp, with subjects receiving either no intervention (controls) or 300 mg Coenzyme Q10 per day throughout altitude exposure. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography were used to assess cardiac morphology and function. Following altitude exposure, body mass fell by 3 kg in all subjects (p<0.001), associated with a loss of body fat and a fall in BMI. Post-trek, left ventricular mass had decreased by 11% in controls (p<0.05) and by 16% in Coenzyme Q10-treated subjects (p<0.001), whereas mitral inflow E/A had decreased by 18% in controls (p<0.05) and by 21% in Coenzyme Q10-treated subjects (p<0.05). Coenzyme Q10 supplementation did not, therefore, prevent the loss of left ventricular mass or change in diastolic function that occurred following a trek to Everest Base Camp. PMID:24661196

  20. Modality interactions alter the shape of acoustic mate preference functions in gray treefrogs.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Michael S; Höbel, Gerlinde

    2015-09-01

    Sexual selection takes place in complex environments where females evaluating male mating signals are confronted with stimuli from multiple sources and modalities. The pattern of expression of female preferences may be influenced by interactions between modalities, changing the shape of female preference functions, and thus ultimately altering the selective landscape acting on male signal evolution. We tested the hypothesis that the responses of female gray treefrogs, Hyla versicolor, to acoustic male advertisement calls are affected by interactions with visual stimuli. We measured preference functions for several call traits under two experimental conditions: unimodal (only acoustic signals presented), and multimodal (acoustic signals presented along with a video-animated calling male). We found that females were more responsive to multimodal stimulus presentations and, compared to unimodal playbacks, had weaker preferences for temporal call characteristics. We compared the preference functions obtained in these two treatments to the distribution of male call characteristics to make inferences on the strength and direction of selection expected to act on male calls. Modality interactions have the potential to influence the course of signal evolution and thus are an important consideration in sexual selection studies. PMID:26282702

  1. Biased embryos: Prenatal experience alters the postnatal malleability of auditory preferences in bobwhite quail.

    PubMed

    Harshaw, Christopher; Lickliter, Robert

    2011-04-01

    Many precocial birds show a robust preference for the maternal call of their own species before and after hatching. This differential responsiveness to species-specific auditory stimuli by embryos and neonates has been the subject of study for more than four decades, but much remains unknown about the dynamics of this ability. Gottlieb [Gottlieb [1971]. Development of species identification in birds: An enquiry into the prenatal determinants of perception. Chicago/London: University of Chicago Press.] demonstrated that prenatal exposure to embryonic vocalizations serves to canalize the formation of species-specific preferences in ducklings. Apart from this, little is known about the features of the developmental system that serve to canalize such species-typical preferences, on the one hand, and generate novel behavioral phenotypes, on the other. In the current study, we show that briefly exposing bobwhite quail embryos to a heterospecific Japanese quail (JQ) maternal call significantly enhanced their acquisition of a preference for that call when chicks were provided with subsequent postnatal exposure to the same call. This was true whether postnatal exposure involved playback of the maternal call contingent upon chick contact vocalizations or yoked, non-contingent exposure to the call. Chicks that received both passive prenatal and contingent postnatal exposure to the JQ maternal call redirected their species-typical auditory preference, showing a significant preference for JQ call over the call of their own species. In contrast, chicks receiving only prenatal or only postnatal exposure to the JQ call did not show this redirection of their auditory preference. Our results indicate that prenatal sensory stimulation can significantly bias postnatal responsiveness to social stimuli, thereby altering the course of early learning and memory. PMID:21400491

  2. Audience Effect Alters Male Mating Preferences in Zebra Finches (Taeniopygia guttata)

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Frédérique; Belzile, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The social environment of animals strongly influences the mating preferences of both the choosing and the observing individuals. Notably, there is recent evidence that polygamous males decrease their selectivity when being observed by competitors in order to direct their rivals’ attention away from their true interest and, consequently, reduce sperm competition risk. Yet, other mechanisms, whose importance remains unexplored, could induce similar effects. In monogamous species with mutual choice, particularly, if males adjust their selectivity according to the risk of being rejected by their preferred mate, they should as well become less selective when potential rivals are present. Here, we investigated whether the presence of bystanders modifies male mating preferences when the risk of sperm competition is low, by carrying out mate-choice experiments with male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) whose preferences for two females were measured twice: with and without an audience. We found that the presence of potential rivals had no effect on the males’ choosiness. However, with an audience, they spent more time with the female that was considered as the less attractive one in the control condition. These findings support the hypothesis that monogamous males alter their mate choice decisions in the presence of a male audience to reduce the risk of remaining unpaired. Thus, our results indicate that several explanations can account for the changes in male preferences due to the presence of competitors and highlight the importance of assessing the relative role of each mechanism potentially involved, to be able to make conclusions about the effect of an audience on signal evolution. PMID:22916298

  3. Coenzyme q 10 : a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deependra; Jain, Vandana; Saraf, Swarnlata; Saraf, S

    2002-10-01

    Ubiquinone or Co Q(10) is essentially a vitamin like substance and is a cofactor of an enzyme. It is an integral part of the memberanes of mitocondria where it is involved in the energy production. It is a nutrient necessary for the function of every cell of the body especially vital organs of the body like heart, liver, brain etc. Studies have shown that coenzyme Q(10) alters the natural history of cardiovascular illness and has the potential of prevention of cardiovascular diseases through the inhibition of LDL cholesterol oxidation by maintenance of optimal cellular and mitochondrial function throughout the ravages of time internal and external stress. PMID:22557086

  4. Interaction of Metabolic Stress with Chronic Mild Stress in Altering Brain Cytokines and Sucrose Preference

    PubMed Central

    Remus, Jennifer L.; Stewart, Luke T.; Camp, Robert M.; Novak, Colleen M.; Johnson, John D.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that metabolic stressors increase an organism’s risk of depression. Chronic mild stress is a popular animal model of depression and several serendipitous findings have suggested that food deprivation prior to sucrose testing in this model is necessary to observe anhedonic behaviors. Here, we directly tested this hypothesis by exposing animals to chronic mild stress and used an overnight two bottle sucrose test (food ad libitum) on day 5 and 10, then food and water deprive animals overnight and tested their sucrose consumption and preference in a 1h sucrose test the following morning. Approximately 65% of stressed animals consumed sucrose and showed a sucrose preference similar to non-stressed controls in an overnight sucrose test, while 35% showed a decrease in sucrose intake and preference. Following overnight food and water deprivation the previously ‘resilient’ animals showed a significant decrease in sucrose preference and greatly reduced sucrose intake. In addition, we evaluated whether the onset of anhedonia following food and water deprivation corresponds to alterations in corticosterone, epinephrine, circulating glucose, or interleukin-1 beta expression in limbic brain areas. While all stressed animals showed adrenal hypertrophy and elevated circulating epinephrine, only stressed animals that were food deprived were hypoglycemic compared to food deprived controls. Additionally, food and water deprivation significantly increased hippocampus IL-1β while food and water deprivation only increased hypothalamus IL-1β in stress susceptible animals. These data demonstrate that metabolic stress of food and water deprivation interacts with chronic stressor exposure to induce physiological and anhedonic responses. PMID:25914924

  5. Human-resource subsidies alter the dietary preferences of a mammalian top predator.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Thomas M; Ballard, Guy-Anthony; Fleming, Peter J S; van de Ven, Remy; Story, Georgeanna L; Dickman, Christopher R

    2014-05-01

    Resource subsidies to opportunistic predators may alter natural predator-prey relationships and, in turn, have implications for how these predators affect co-occurring prey. To explore this idea, we compared the prey available to and eaten by a top canid predator, the Australian dingo (Canis lupus dingo), in areas with and without human-provided food. Overall, small mammals formed the majority of dingo prey, followed by reptiles and then invertebrates. Where human-provided food resources were available, dingoes ate them; 17% of their diet comprised kitchen waste from a refuse facility. There was evidence of dietary preference for small mammals in areas where human-provided food was available. In more distant areas, by contrast, reptiles were the primary prey. The level of seasonal switching between small mammals and reptiles was also more pronounced in areas away from human-provided food. This reaffirmed concepts of prey switching but within a short, seasonal time frame. It also confirmed that the diet of dingoes is altered where human-provided food is available. We suggest that the availability of anthropogenic food to this species and other apex predators therefore has the potential to alter trophic cascades. PMID:24488213

  6. Virus Infection of Plants Alters Pollinator Preference: A Payback for Susceptible Hosts?

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Matthew P.; Bruce, Toby J. A.; Caulfield, John C.; Furzer, Oliver J.; Reed, Alison; Robinson, Sophie I.; Miller, Elizabeth; Davis, Christopher N.; Pickett, John A.; Whitney, Heather M.; Glover, Beverley J.; Carr, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Plant volatiles play important roles in attraction of certain pollinators and in host location by herbivorous insects. Virus infection induces changes in plant volatile emission profiles, and this can make plants more attractive to insect herbivores, such as aphids, that act as viral vectors. However, it is unknown if virus-induced alterations in volatile production affect plant-pollinator interactions. We found that volatiles emitted by cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-infected tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and Arabidopsis thaliana plants altered the foraging behaviour of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris). Virus-induced quantitative and qualitative changes in blends of volatile organic compounds emitted by tomato plants were identified by gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry. Experiments with a CMV mutant unable to express the 2b RNA silencing suppressor protein and with Arabidopsis silencing mutants implicate microRNAs in regulating emission of pollinator-perceivable volatiles. In tomato, CMV infection made plants emit volatiles attractive to bumblebees. Bumblebees pollinate tomato by ‘buzzing’ (sonicating) the flowers, which releases pollen and enhances self-fertilization and seed production as well as pollen export. Without buzz-pollination, CMV infection decreased seed yield, but when flowers of mock-inoculated and CMV-infected plants were buzz-pollinated, the increased seed yield for CMV-infected plants was similar to that for mock-inoculated plants. Increased pollinator preference can potentially increase plant reproductive success in two ways: i) as female parents, by increasing the probability that ovules are fertilized; ii) as male parents, by increasing pollen export. Mathematical modeling suggested that over a wide range of conditions in the wild, these increases to the number of offspring of infected susceptible plants resulting from increased pollinator preference could outweigh underlying strong selection pressures favoring pathogen resistance

  7. Virus Infection of Plants Alters Pollinator Preference: A Payback for Susceptible Hosts?

    PubMed

    Groen, Simon C; Jiang, Sanjie; Murphy, Alex M; Cunniffe, Nik J; Westwood, Jack H; Davey, Matthew P; Bruce, Toby J A; Caulfield, John C; Furzer, Oliver J; Reed, Alison; Robinson, Sophie I; Miller, Elizabeth; Davis, Christopher N; Pickett, John A; Whitney, Heather M; Glover, Beverley J; Carr, John P

    2016-08-01

    Plant volatiles play important roles in attraction of certain pollinators and in host location by herbivorous insects. Virus infection induces changes in plant volatile emission profiles, and this can make plants more attractive to insect herbivores, such as aphids, that act as viral vectors. However, it is unknown if virus-induced alterations in volatile production affect plant-pollinator interactions. We found that volatiles emitted by cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-infected tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and Arabidopsis thaliana plants altered the foraging behaviour of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris). Virus-induced quantitative and qualitative changes in blends of volatile organic compounds emitted by tomato plants were identified by gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry. Experiments with a CMV mutant unable to express the 2b RNA silencing suppressor protein and with Arabidopsis silencing mutants implicate microRNAs in regulating emission of pollinator-perceivable volatiles. In tomato, CMV infection made plants emit volatiles attractive to bumblebees. Bumblebees pollinate tomato by 'buzzing' (sonicating) the flowers, which releases pollen and enhances self-fertilization and seed production as well as pollen export. Without buzz-pollination, CMV infection decreased seed yield, but when flowers of mock-inoculated and CMV-infected plants were buzz-pollinated, the increased seed yield for CMV-infected plants was similar to that for mock-inoculated plants. Increased pollinator preference can potentially increase plant reproductive success in two ways: i) as female parents, by increasing the probability that ovules are fertilized; ii) as male parents, by increasing pollen export. Mathematical modeling suggested that over a wide range of conditions in the wild, these increases to the number of offspring of infected susceptible plants resulting from increased pollinator preference could outweigh underlying strong selection pressures favoring pathogen resistance

  8. Alterations of sucrose preference after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Bueter, M; Miras, A D; Chichger, H; Fenske, W; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R; Unwin, R J; Lutz, T A; Spector, A C; le Roux, C W

    2011-10-24

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (gastric bypass) patients reportedly have changes in perception and consumption of sweet-tasting foods. This study aimed to further investigate alterations in sweet food intake in rats and sucrose detection in humans after gastric bypass. Wistar rats were randomized to gastric bypass or sham-operations and preference for sucrose (sweet), sodium chloride (salty), citric acid (sour) and quinine hydrochloride (bitter) was assessed with standard two-bottle intake tests (vs. water). Intestinal T1R2 and T1R3 expression and plasma levels of glucagon-like-peptide 1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) were measured. Furthermore, obese patients and normal weight controls were tested for sucrose taste detection thresholds pre- and postoperatively. Visual analogue scales measuring hedonic perception were used to determine the sucrose concentration considered by patients and controls as "just about right" pre- and postoperatively. Gastric bypass reduced the sucrose intake relative to water in rats (p<0.001). Preoperative sucrose exposure reduced this effect. Preference or aversion for compounds representative of other taste qualities in naïve rats remained unaffected. Intestinal T1R2 and T1R3 expression was significantly decreased in the alimentary limb while plasma levels of GLP-1 and PYY were elevated after bypass in rats (p=0.01). Bypass patients showed increased taste sensitivity to low sucrose concentrations compared with controls (p<0.05), but both groups considered the same sucrose concentration as "just about right" postoperatively. In conclusion, gastric bypass reduces sucrose intake relative to water in sucrose-naïve rats, but preoperative sucrose experience attenuates this effect. Changes in sucrose taste detection do not predict hedonic taste ratings of sucrose in bypass patients which remain unchanged. Thus, factors other than the unconditional affective value of the taste may also play a role in determining food preferences after gastric bypass

  9. Arachidonic acid alters tomato HMG expression and fruit growth and induces 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase-independent lycopene accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Concepcion, M.; Gruissem, W.

    1999-01-01

    Regulation of isoprenoid end-product synthesis required for normal growth and development in plants is not well understood. To investigate the extent to which specific genes for the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) are involved in end-product regulation, the authors manipulated expression of the HMG1 and HMG2 genes in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit using arachidonic acid (AA). In developing young fruit AA blocked fruit growth, inhibited HMG1, and activated HMG2 expression. These results are consistent with other reports indicating that HMG1 expression is closely correlated with growth processes requiring phytosterol production. In mature-green fruit AA strongly induced the expression of HMG2, PSY1 (the gene for phytoene synthase), and lycopene accumulation before the normal onset of carotenoid synthesis and ripening. The induction of lycopene synthesis was not blocked by inhibition of HMGR activity using mevinolin, suggesting that cytoplasmic HMGR is not required for carotenoid synthesis. Their results are consistent with the function of an alternative plastid isoprenoid pathway (the Rohmer pathway) that appears to direct the production of carotenoids during tomato fruit ripening.

  10. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic alterations of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors: drug-drug interactions and interindividual differences in transporter and metabolic enzyme functions.

    PubMed

    Shitara, Yoshihisa; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2006-10-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Their efficacy in preventing cardiovascular events has been shown by a large number of clinical trials. However, myotoxic side effects, sometimes severe, including myopathy or rhabdomyolysis, are associated with the use of statins. In some cases, such toxicity is associated with pharmacokinetic alterations. In this review, the pharmacokinetic aspects and physicochemical properties of statins are reviewed in order to understand the mechanism governing their pharmacokinetic alterations. Among the statins, simvastatin, lovastatin and atorvastatin are metabolized by cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) while fluvastatin is metabolized by CYP2C9. Cerivastatin is subjected to 2 metabolic pathways mediated by CYP2C8 and 3A4. Pravastatin, rosuvastatin and pitavastatin undergo little metabolism. Their plasma clearances are governed by the transporters involved in the hepatic uptake and biliary excretion. Also for other statins, which are orally administered as open acid forms (i.e. fluvastatin, cerivastatin and atorvastatin), hepatic uptake transporter(s) play important roles in their clearances. Based on such information, pharmacokinetic alterations of statins can be predicted following coadministration of other drugs or in patients with lowered activities in drug metabolism and/or transport. We also present a quantitative analysis of the effect of some factors on the pharmacokinetics of statins based on a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. To avoid a pharmacokinetic alteration, we need to have information about the metabolizing enzyme(s) and transporter(s) involved in the pharmacokinetics of statins and, along with such information, model-based prediction is also useful. PMID:16714062

  11. Altering Entry Site Preference of Lentiviral Vectors into Neuronal Cells by Pseudotyping with Envelope Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kenta; Kato, Shigeki; Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Takada, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    A lentiviral vector system provides a powerful strategy for gene therapy trials against a variety of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders. Pseudotyping of lentiviral vectors with different envelope glycoproteins not only confers the neurotropism to the vectors, but also alters the preference of sites of vector entry into neuronal cells. One major group of lentiviral vectors is a pseudotype with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) that enters preferentially cell body areas (somata/dendrites) of neurons and transduces them. Another group contains lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with fusion envelope glycoproteins composed of different sets of rabies virus glycoprotein and VSV-G segments that enter predominantly axon terminals of neurons and are transported through axons retrogradely to their cell bodies, resulting in enhanced retrograde gene transfer. This retrograde gene transfer takes a considerable advantage of delivering the transgene into neuronal cell bodies situated in regions distant from the injection site of the vectors. The rational use of these two vector groups characterized by different entry mechanisms will further extend the strategy for gene therapy of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26611586

  12. Predator crypsis enhances behaviourally mediated indirect effects on plants by altering bumblebee foraging preferences

    PubMed Central

    Ings, Thomas C.; Chittka, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Predators of pollinators can influence pollination services and plant fitness via both consumptive (reducing pollinator density) and non-consumptive (altering pollinator behaviour) effects. However, a better knowledge of the mechanisms underlying behaviourally mediated indirect effects of predators is necessary to properly understand their role in community dynamics. We used the tripartite relationship between bumblebees, predatory crab spiders and flowers to ask whether behaviourally mediated effects are localized to flowers harbouring predators, or whether bees extend their avoidance to entire plant species. In a tightly controlled laboratory environment, bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) were exposed to a random mixture of equally rewarding yellow and white artificial flowers, but foraging on yellow flowers was very risky: bees had a 25 per cent chance of receiving a simulated predation attempt by ‘robotic’ crab spiders. As bees learnt to avoid ‘dangerous’ flowers, their foraging preferences changed and they began to visit fewer yellow flowers than expected by chance. Bees avoided spider-free yellow flowers as well as dangerous yellow flowers when spiders were more difficult to detect (the colour of yellow spiders was indistinguishable from that of yellow flowers). Therefore, this interaction between bee learning and predator crypsis could lead flower species harbouring cryptic predators to suffer from reduced reproductive success. PMID:19324797

  13. Early postpartum pup preference is altered by gestational cocaine treatment: associations with infant cues and oxytocin expression in the MPOA

    PubMed Central

    Cox Lippard, E.T.; Jarett, T.M.; McMurray, M.S.; Zeskind, P.S.; Garber, K.A.; Zoghby, C.R.; Glaze, K.; Tate, W.; Johns, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Cross-fostering studies suggest cocaine-induced deficits in maternal behavior could be associated with altered behavior of offspring following prenatal cocaine-exposure. Neonatal vocalizations are an important offspring cue facilitating early interactions between dam and rodent pup offspring and have been shown to be altered following prenatal cocaine-exposure. It is unclear how variations in acoustic parameters of USVs impact maternal behavior and the mechanism(s) underlying these processes. The present study examined differences in cocaine-exposed and control rodent dam maternal preference of cocaine-exposed or untreated pups in a dual choice apparatus. Relationship of preference-like behavior with pup USVs and dam oxytocin expression was explored. Gestational cocaine-exposure interfered with preference-like behavior of dams on postpartum day 1 with cocaine-exposure associated with decreased time spent on the cocaine-exposed pup side compared to the control pup side, and decreases in preference-like behavior associated in part with decreased number of USVs being emitted by cocaine-exposed pups. On postpartum day 5, decreased oxytocin expression in the medial preoptic area was associated with altered preference-like behavior in cocaine-exposed dams, including frequency and latency to touch/sniff pups. Results indicate cocaine’s effects on the mother-infant relationship is likely synergistic, in that cocaine influences mother and offspring both independently and concertedly and that variations within pup vocalizations and the oxytocin system may be potential mechanism(s) underlying this synergistic relationship during the postpartum period. PMID:25300467

  14. Early postpartum pup preference is altered by gestational cocaine treatment: associations with infant cues and oxytocin expression in the MPOA.

    PubMed

    Lippard, E T Cox; Jarrett, T M; McMurray, M S; Zeskind, P S; Garber, K A; Zoghby, C R; Glaze, K; Tate, W; Johns, J M

    2015-02-01

    Cross-fostering studies suggest cocaine-induced deficits in maternal behavior could be associated with altered behavior of offspring following prenatal cocaine-exposure. Neonatal vocalizations are an important offspring cue facilitating early interactions between dam and rodent pup offspring and have been shown to be altered following prenatal cocaine-exposure. It is unclear how variations in acoustic parameters of USVs impact maternal behavior and the mechanism(s) underlying these processes. The present study examined differences in cocaine-exposed and control rodent dam maternal preference of cocaine-exposed or untreated pups in a dual choice apparatus. Relationship of preference-like behavior with pup USVs and dam oxytocin expression was explored. Gestational cocaine-exposure interfered with preference-like behavior of dams on postpartum day 1 with cocaine-exposure associated with decreased time spent on the cocaine-exposed pup side compared to the control pup side, and decreases in preference-like behavior associated in part with decreased number of USVs being emitted by cocaine-exposed pups. On postpartum day 5, decreased oxytocin expression in the medial preoptic area was associated with altered preference-like behavior in cocaine-exposed dams, including frequency and latency to touch/sniff pups. Results indicate cocaine's effects on the mother-infant relationship is likely synergistic, in that cocaine influences mother and offspring both independently and concertedly and that variations within pup vocalizations and the oxytocin system may be potential mechanism(s) underlying this synergistic relationship during the postpartum period. PMID:25300467

  15. Diurnal lighting patterns and habitat alter opsin expression and colour preferences in a killifish

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ashley M.; Stanis, Shannon; Fuller, Rebecca C.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variation in lighting environments frequently leads to population variation in colour patterns, colour preferences and visual systems. Yet lighting conditions also vary diurnally, and many aspects of visual systems and behaviour vary over this time scale. Here, we use the bluefin killifish (Lucania goodei) to compare how diurnal variation and habitat variation (clear versus tannin-stained water) affect opsin expression and the preference to peck at different-coloured objects. Opsin expression was generally lowest at midnight and dawn, and highest at midday and dusk, and this diurnal variation was many times greater than variation between habitats. Pecking preference was affected by both diurnal and habitat variation but did not correlate with opsin expression. Rather, pecking preference matched lighting conditions, with higher preferences for blue at noon and for red at dawn/dusk, when these wavelengths are comparatively scarce. Similarly, blue pecking preference was higher in tannin-stained water where blue wavelengths are reduced. In conclusion, L. goodei exhibits strong diurnal cycles of opsin expression, but these are not tightly correlated with light intensity or colour. Temporally variable pecking preferences probably result from lighting environment rather than from opsin production. These results may have implications for the colour pattern diversity observed in these fish. PMID:23698009

  16. Menstrual cycle phase alters women's sexual preferences for composers of more complex music.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Benjamin D

    2014-06-01

    Over 140 years ago Charles Darwin first argued that birdsong and human music, having no clear survival benefit, were obvious candidates for sexual selection. Whereas the first contention is now universally accepted, his theory that music is a product of sexual selection through mate choice has largely been neglected. Here, I provide the first, to my knowledge, empirical support for the sexual selection hypothesis of music evolution by showing that women have sexual preferences during peak conception times for men that are able to create more complex music. Two-alternative forced-choice experiments revealed that woman only preferred composers of more complex music as short-term sexual partners when conception risk was highest. No preferences were displayed when women chose which composer they would prefer as a long-term partner in a committed relationship, and control experiments failed to reveal an effect of conception risk on women's preferences for visual artists. These results suggest that women may acquire genetic benefits for offspring by selecting musicians able to create more complex music as sexual partners, and provide compelling support for Darwin's assertion 'that musical notes and rhythm were first acquired by the male or female progenitors of mankind for the sake of charming the opposite sex'. PMID:24759864

  17. Menstrual cycle phase alters women's sexual preferences for composers of more complex music

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    Over 140 years ago Charles Darwin first argued that birdsong and human music, having no clear survival benefit, were obvious candidates for sexual selection. Whereas the first contention is now universally accepted, his theory that music is a product of sexual selection through mate choice has largely been neglected. Here, I provide the first, to my knowledge, empirical support for the sexual selection hypothesis of music evolution by showing that women have sexual preferences during peak conception times for men that are able to create more complex music. Two-alternative forced-choice experiments revealed that woman only preferred composers of more complex music as short-term sexual partners when conception risk was highest. No preferences were displayed when women chose which composer they would prefer as a long-term partner in a committed relationship, and control experiments failed to reveal an effect of conception risk on women's preferences for visual artists. These results suggest that women may acquire genetic benefits for offspring by selecting musicians able to create more complex music as sexual partners, and provide compelling support for Darwin's assertion ‘that musical notes and rhythm were first acquired by the male or female progenitors of mankind for the sake of charming the opposite sex’. PMID:24759864

  18. Systematic Analysis of Gene Expression Alterations and Clinical Outcomes for Long-Chain Acyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase Family in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ching; Wang, Chih-Yang; Hung, Yu-Hsuan; Weng, Tzu-Yang; Yen, Meng-Chi; Lai, Ming-Derg

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated lipid metabolism contributes to cancer progression. Our previous study indicates that long-chain fatty acyl-Co A synthetase (ACSL) 3 is essential for lipid upregulation induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress. In this report, we aimed to identify the role of ACSL family in cancer with systematic analysis and in vitro experiment. We explored the ACSL expression using Oncomine database to determine the gene alteration during carcinogenesis and identified the association between ACSL expression and the survival of cancer patient using PrognoScan database. ACSL1 may play a potential oncogenic role in colorectal and breast cancer and play a potential tumor suppressor role in lung cancer. Co-expression analysis revealed that ACSL1 was coexpressed with MYBPH, PTPRE, PFKFB3, SOCS3 in colon cancer and with LRRFIP1, TSC22D1 in lung cancer. In accordance with PrognoScan analysis, downregulation of ACSL1 in colon and breast cancer cell line inhibited proliferation, migration, and anchorage-independent growth. In contrast, increase of oncogenic property was observed in lung cancer cell line by attenuating ACSL1. High ACSL3 expression predicted a better prognosis in ovarian cancer; in contrast, high ACSL3 predicted a worse prognosis in melanoma. ACSL3 was coexpressed with SNUPN, TRIP13, and SEMA5A in melanoma. High expression of ACSL4 predicted a worse prognosis in colorectal cancer, but predicted better prognosis in breast, brain and lung cancer. ACSL4 was coexpressed with SERPIN2, HNRNPCL1, ITIH2, PROCR, LRRFIP1. High expression of ACSL5 predicted good prognosis in breast, ovarian, and lung cancers. ACSL5 was coexpressed with TMEM140, TAPBPL, BIRC3, PTPRE, and SERPINB1. Low ACSL6 predicted a worse prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia. ACSL6 was coexpressed with SOX6 and DARC. Altogether, different members of ACSLs are implicated in diverse types of cancer development. ACSL-coexpressed molecules may be used to further investigate the role of ACSL family in

  19. Systematic Analysis of Gene Expression Alterations and Clinical Outcomes for Long-Chain Acyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase Family in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Ching; Wang, Chih-Yang; Hung, Yu-Hsuan; Weng, Tzu-Yang; Yen, Meng-Chi; Lai, Ming-Derg

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated lipid metabolism contributes to cancer progression. Our previous study indicates that long-chain fatty acyl-Co A synthetase (ACSL) 3 is essential for lipid upregulation induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress. In this report, we aimed to identify the role of ACSL family in cancer with systematic analysis and in vitro experiment. We explored the ACSL expression using Oncomine database to determine the gene alteration during carcinogenesis and identified the association between ACSL expression and the survival of cancer patient using PrognoScan database. ACSL1 may play a potential oncogenic role in colorectal and breast cancer and play a potential tumor suppressor role in lung cancer. Co-expression analysis revealed that ACSL1 was coexpressed with MYBPH, PTPRE, PFKFB3, SOCS3 in colon cancer and with LRRFIP1, TSC22D1 in lung cancer. In accordance with PrognoScan analysis, downregulation of ACSL1 in colon and breast cancer cell line inhibited proliferation, migration, and anchorage-independent growth. In contrast, increase of oncogenic property was observed in lung cancer cell line by attenuating ACSL1. High ACSL3 expression predicted a better prognosis in ovarian cancer; in contrast, high ACSL3 predicted a worse prognosis in melanoma. ACSL3 was coexpressed with SNUPN, TRIP13, and SEMA5A in melanoma. High expression of ACSL4 predicted a worse prognosis in colorectal cancer, but predicted better prognosis in breast, brain and lung cancer. ACSL4 was coexpressed with SERPIN2, HNRNPCL1, ITIH2, PROCR, LRRFIP1. High expression of ACSL5 predicted good prognosis in breast, ovarian, and lung cancers. ACSL5 was coexpressed with TMEM140, TAPBPL, BIRC3, PTPRE, and SERPINB1. Low ACSL6 predicted a worse prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia. ACSL6 was coexpressed with SOX6 and DARC. Altogether, different members of ACSLs are implicated in diverse types of cancer development. ACSL-coexpressed molecules may be used to further investigate the role of ACSL family in

  20. A de novo NADPH generation pathway for improving lysine production of Corynebacterium glutamicum by rational design of the coenzyme specificity of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Bommareddy, Rajesh Reddy; Chen, Zhen; Rappert, Sugima; Zeng, An-Ping

    2014-09-01

    Engineering the cofactor availability is a common strategy of metabolic engineering to improve the production of many industrially important compounds. In this work, a de novo NADPH generation pathway is proposed by altering the coenzyme specificity of a native NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) to NADP, which consequently has the potential to produce additional NADPH in the glycolytic pathway. Specifically, the coenzyme specificity of GAPDH of Corynebacterium glutamicum is systematically manipulated by rational protein design and the effect of the manipulation for cellular metabolism and lysine production is evaluated. By a combinatorial modification of four key residues within the coenzyme binding sites, different GAPDH mutants with varied coenzyme specificity were constructed. While increasing the catalytic efficiency of GAPDH towards NADP enhanced lysine production in all of the tested mutants, the most significant improvement of lysine production (~60%) was achieved with the mutant showing similar preference towards both NAD and NADP. Metabolic flux analysis with (13)C isotope studies confirmed that there was no significant change of flux towards the pentose phosphate pathway and the increased lysine yield was mainly attributed to the NADPH generated by the mutated GAPDH. The present study highlights the importance of protein engineering as a key strategy in de novo pathway design and overproduction of desired products. PMID:24953302

  1. Puerperal and parental experiences alter rat preferences for pup odors via changes in the oxytocin system

    PubMed Central

    MUNETOMO, Arisa; ISHII, Hirotaka; MIYAMOTO, Takenori; SAKUMA, Yasuo; KONDO, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    In the rat, induction of maternal behavior depends on the parity of the female. For example, nulliparous (NP) females need longer exposure to pups than multiparous (MP) or lactating (L) females to exhibit similar maternal behavior. In this study, we investigated the role of brain oxytocin in the approaching behavior of these female rats. Olfactory preferences for pup odors were examined for 8 consecutive days. Each preference test was followed by direct overnight exposure to pups. On the 8th day, MP and L, but not NP females showed robust pup-odor preferences. After the behavioral test, half of the females were exposed to pups for 2 h, whereas the other half were not. The females were then sacrificed to analyze brain oxytocin (OXT) and vasopressin (AVP) activities by cFos immunohistochemistry and to quantify their receptor mRNA expression using real-time PCR. In the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), the percentage of cFos-positive OXT neurons was significantly larger in MP and L females than in NP females after pup exposure. No significant differences were found in cFos expression in OXT neurons of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) or in AVP neurons of either the PVN or SON. Expression of OXT receptor mRNA in the medial preoptic area and amygdala of the control groups was also higher in MP females than in NP females. Finally, we demonstrated that infusion of OXT into the lateral ventricle of NP females promoted preferences for pup odors. These results indicate that puerperal and parental experiences enhance the responsiveness of OXT neurons in the PVN to pup stimuli and establish olfactory preferences for these odors in a parity-dependent manner. PMID:26460689

  2. Incubation temperature alters thermal preference and response to heat stress of broiler chickens along the rearing phase.

    PubMed

    Morita, V S; Almeida, V R; Matos Junior, J B; Vicentini, T I; van den Brand, H; Boleli, I C

    2016-08-01

    The current study aimed to investigate whether embryonic temperature manipulation may alter thermal preference throughout the rearing phase of broiler chickens and how this manipulation may affect response to thermal challenge, metabolism, growth rate and feed intake rate. Eggs were exposed to a constant incubation temperature [machine temperatures: 36°C (Low), 37.5°C (Control), and 39°C (High); eggshell temperature of 37.4 ± 0.08°C, 37.8 ± 0.15°C, and 38.8 ± 0.33°C, respectively] from d 13 till hatching. Low treatment chickens showed lower plasma T3 and GH levels at d 1 of age and lower T3 level at d 42 of age compared to the Control treatment. Preferred ambient, rectal temperature, T4 level, growth rate, food intake rate, and response to thermal challenge were not altered in these chickens. On the other hand, High-treatment chickens exhibited high preferred ambient temperature and rectal temperature during the first 2 wk post-hatch, lower plasma T3 level at d 21 and 42 and a delayed increase in respiratory movement in response to thermal challenge compared to the Control treatment. However, chickens subjected to the Control and High treatments did not differ in T4 and GH level and performance. We conclude that exposure to high temperature during late embryonic development has long-lasting effects on the thermoregulatory system of broiler chickens by affecting the heat tolerance of these chickens. Moreover, the preferred ambient temperature of the chickens from heat-treated eggs correspond to those recommended for the strain under study, whereas for the cold-treated and control-chickens it was 1°C below, indicating that incubation temperature might have consequences on the ambient temperature chickens require during the rearing phase. PMID:26994196

  3. Aging in rhesus macaques is associated with changes in novelty preference and altered saccade dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Nathan; Ruiz-Luna, Maria Luisa; Permenter, Michelle; Vogt, Julie; Erickson, Cynthia A.; Barnes, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    Studies demonstrating recognition deficits with aging often use tasks in which subjects have an incentive to correctly encode or retrieve the experimental stimuli. In contrast to these tasks, which may engage strategic encoding and retrieval processes, the visual paired comparison (VPC) task measures spontaneous eye movements made toward a novel as compared with familiar stimulus. In the present study, seven rhesus macaques aged six to thirty years exhibited a dramatic age-dependent decline in preference for a novel image compared with one presented seconds earlier. The age effect could not be accounted for by memory deficits alone, since it was present even when familiarization preceded test by one second. It also could not be explained by an encoding deficit, since the effect persisted with increased familiarity of the sample stimulus. Reduced novelty preference did correlate with eye movement variables, including reaction time distributions and saccade frequency. At long delay intervals (24 or 48 hours) aging was paradoxically associated with increased novelty preference. Several explanations for the age effect are considered, including the possible role of dopamine. PMID:19045952

  4. Paternal alcohol exposure in mice alters brain NGF and BDNF and increases ethanol-elicited preference in male offspring.

    PubMed

    Ceccanti, Mauro; Coccurello, Roberto; Carito, Valentina; Ciafrè, Stefania; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Giacovazzo, Giacomo; Mancinelli, Rosanna; Tirassa, Paola; Chaldakov, George N; Pascale, Esterina; Ceccanti, Marco; Codazzo, Claudia; Fiore, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) exposure during pregnancy induces cognitive and physiological deficits in the offspring. However, the role of paternal alcohol exposure (PAE) on offspring EtOH sensitivity and neurotrophins has not received much attention. The present study examined whether PAE may disrupt nerve growth factor (NGF) and/or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and affect EtOH preference/rewarding properties in the male offspring. CD1 sire mice were chronically addicted for EtOH or administered with sucrose. Their male offsprings when adult were assessed for EtOH preference by a conditioned place preference paradigm. NGF and BDNF, their receptors (p75(NTR) , TrkA and TrkB), dopamine active transporter (DAT), dopamine receptors D1 and D2, pro-NGF and pro-BDNF were also evaluated in brain areas. PAE affected NGF levels in frontal cortex, striatum, olfactory lobes, hippocampus and hypothalamus. BDNF alterations in frontal cortex, striatum and olfactory lobes were found. PAE induced a higher susceptibility to the EtOH rewarding effects mostly evident at the lower concentration (0.5 g/kg) that was ineffective in non-PAE offsprings. Moreover, higher ethanol concentrations (1.5 g/kg) produced an aversive response in PAE animals and a significant preference in non-PAE offspring. PAE affected also TrkA in the hippocampus and p75(NTR) in the frontal cortex. DAT was affected in the olfactory lobes in PAE animals treated with 0.5 g/kg of ethanol while no differences were found on D1/D2 receptors and for pro-NGF or pro-BDNF. In conclusion, this study shows that: PAE affects NGF and BDNF expression in the mouse brain; PAE may induce ethanol intake preference in the male offspring. PMID:25940002

  5. Nutritional Ketosis Alters Fuel Preference and Thereby Endurance Performance in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Cox, Pete J; Kirk, Tom; Ashmore, Tom; Willerton, Kristof; Evans, Rhys; Smith, Alan; Murray, Andrew J; Stubbs, Brianna; West, James; McLure, Stewart W; King, M Todd; Dodd, Michael S; Holloway, Cameron; Neubauer, Stefan; Drawer, Scott; Veech, Richard L; Griffin, Julian L; Clarke, Kieran

    2016-08-01

    Ketosis, the metabolic response to energy crisis, is a mechanism to sustain life by altering oxidative fuel selection. Often overlooked for its metabolic potential, ketosis is poorly understood outside of starvation or diabetic crisis. Thus, we studied the biochemical advantages of ketosis in humans using a ketone ester-based form of nutrition without the unwanted milieu of endogenous ketone body production by caloric or carbohydrate restriction. In five separate studies of 39 high-performance athletes, we show how this unique metabolic state improves physical endurance by altering fuel competition for oxidative respiration. Ketosis decreased muscle glycolysis and plasma lactate concentrations, while providing an alternative substrate for oxidative phosphorylation. Ketosis increased intramuscular triacylglycerol oxidation during exercise, even in the presence of normal muscle glycogen, co-ingested carbohydrate and elevated insulin. These findings may hold clues to greater human potential and a better understanding of fuel metabolism in health and disease. PMID:27475046

  6. PrP Conformational Transitions Alter Species Preference of a PrP-specific Antibody*

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wen-Quan; Langeveld, Jan; Xiao, Xiangzhu; Chen, Shugui; McGeer, Patrick L.; Yuan, Jue; Payne, Michael C.; Kang, Hae-Eun; McGeehan, John; Sy, Man-Sun; Greenspan, Neil S.; Kaplan, David; Wang, Gong-Xian; Parchi, Piero; Hoover, Edward; Kneale, Geoff; Telling, Glenn; Surewicz, Witold K.; Kong, Qingzhong; Guo, Jian-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The epitope of the 3F4 antibody most commonly used in human prion disease diagnosis is believed to consist of residues Met-Lys-His-Met (MKHM) corresponding to human PrP-(109–112). This assumption is based mainly on the observation that 3F4 reacts with human and hamster PrP but not with PrP from mouse, sheep, and cervids, in which Met at residue 112 is replaced by Val. Here we report that, by brain histoblotting, 3F4 did not react with PrP of uninfected transgenic mice expressing elk PrP; however, it did show distinct immunoreactivity in transgenic mice infected with chronic wasting disease. Compared with human PrP, the 3F4 reactivity with the recombinant elk PrP was 2 orders of magnitude weaker, as indicated by both Western blotting and surface plasmon resonance. To investigate the molecular basis of these species- and conformer-dependent preferences of 3F4, the epitope was probed by peptide membrane array and antigen competition experiments. Remarkably, the 3F4 antibody did not react with MKHM but reacted strongly with KTNMK (corresponding to human PrP-(106–110)), a sequence that is also present in cervids, sheep, and cattle. 3F4 also reacted with elk PrP peptides containing KTNMKHV. We concluded that the minimal sequence for the 3F4 epitope consists of residues KTNMK, and the species- and conformer-dependent preferences of 3F4 arise largely from the interactions between Met112 (human PrP) or Val115 (cervid PrP) and adjacent residues. PMID:20194495

  7. Coenzyme Q10 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D.; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; Fernández Vega, Alejandro; de la Mata, Mario; Delgado Pavón, Ana; de Miguel, Manuel; Pérez Calero, Carmen; Villanueva Paz, Marina; Cotán, David; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A.

    2014-01-01

    For a number of years, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) was known for its key role in mitochondrial bioenergetics; later studies demonstrated its presence in other subcellular fractions and in blood plasma, and extensively investigated its antioxidant role. These 2 functions constitute the basis for supporting the clinical use of CoQ10. Also, at the inner mitochondrial membrane level, CoQ10 is recognized as an obligatory cofactor for the function of uncoupling proteins and a modulator of the mitochondrial transition pore. Furthermore, recent data indicate that CoQ10 affects the expression of genes involved in human cell signaling, metabolism and transport, and some of the effects of CoQ10 supplementation may be due to this property. CoQ10 deficiencies are due to autosomal recessive mutations, mitochondrial diseases, aging-related oxidative stress and carcinogenesis processes, and also statin treatment. Many neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, and muscular and cardiovascular diseases have been associated with low CoQ10 levels as well as different ataxias and encephalomyopathies. CoQ10 treatment does not cause serious adverse effects in humans and new formulations have been developed that increase CoQ10 absorption and tissue distribution. Oral administration of CoQ10 is a frequent antioxidant strategy in many diseases that may provide a significant symptomatic benefit. PMID:25126052

  8. Membrane reactors for continuous coenzyme regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandrey, C.; Wichmann, R.

    1982-12-01

    The importance of continuous coenzyme regeneration is discussed with respect to chemical reaction engineering. The benefit of coenzymes covalently bound to water soluble polymers is especially stressed. The performance of membrane reactors for coenzyme regeneration is discussed in comparison with other reactor concepts. The coenzyme dependent production of L-amino acids from the corresponding alpha-keto acids is used to illustrate how precise turnover numbers as a function of enzyme/coenzyme ratio, initial substrate concentration, and conversion are obtained. Thus, it becomes possible to develop a concept for optimal operating points with respect to enzyme, coenzyme, and substrate costs per unit weight of product.

  9. Blocking opioid receptors alters short-term feed intake and oro-sensorial preferences in weaned calves.

    PubMed

    Montoro, C; Ipharraguerre, I R; Bach, A

    2012-05-01

    during the first 4 h after feeding and tended to prefer SF only after 6 h from feeding. Plasma glucose, insulin, and cholecystokinin concentrations were greater in FED than in FAS calves. Injection of naloxone decreased plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in NAL calves. Blocking opioid receptors reduced intake the first 2 h after naloxone injection in FED calves, altered oro-sensorial preferences, and reduced plasma GLP-1 concentration. In conclusion, the opioid peptide system may control short-term feed intake by modulating the oro-sensorial response triggered by feed consumption, especially when calves are fed ad libitum. PMID:22541480

  10. Identification of an arginine residue in the dual coenzyme-specific glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides that plays a key role in binding NADP+ but not NAD+.

    PubMed

    Levy, H R; Vought, V E; Yin, X; Adams, M J

    1996-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides can utilize either NADP or NAD as coenzyme. The enzyme's three-dimensional structure has been solved (Rowland et al., 1994, Structure 2, 1073-1087) and shown to contain a conventional nucleotide binding domain. NADP+ was modeled into the structure by superimposing the beta alpha beta domain and that of coenzyme-bound 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (Adams et al., 1994, Structure 2, 651-658), enabling us to identify Arg-46 as a potentially important residue for NADP+ binding. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we constructed mutant enzymes in which Arg-46 was replaced by glutamine (R46Q) and alanine (R46A) and examined their kinetic properties. The principal effects in these mutant enzymes were that the Km and Ki values for NADP+ increased by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude over those of the wild-type enzyme. No other kinetic constant was altered more than 6.5-fold. Changing this single amino acid leads to mutant glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases with coenzyme specificities that favor NAD+, whereas the wild-type enzyme prefers NADP+ as coenzyme. These results confirm that Arg-46 plays a key role in NADP+ binding by contributing a positively charged planar residue that interacts primarily with the 2'-adenosine phosphate. The Arg residue corresponding to Arg-46 in L. mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase is conserved in all glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases and, presumably, plays the same role in all these enzymes. PMID:8579362

  11. Coenzyme Q and Mitochondrial Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinzii, Catarina M.; Hirano, Michio

    2010-01-01

    Coenzyme Q[subscript 10] (CoQ[subscript 10]) is an essential electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and an important antioxidant. Deficiency of CoQ[subscript 10] is a clinically and molecularly heterogeneous syndrome, which, to date, has been found to be autosomal recessive in inheritance and generally responsive to CoQ[subscript…

  12. Attenuating GABAA Receptor Signaling in Dopamine Neurons Selectively Enhances Reward Learning and Alters Risk Preference in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jones G.; Wanat, Matthew J.; Soden, Marta E.; Ahmad, Kinza; Zweifel, Larry S.; Bamford, Nigel S.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Phasic dopamine transmission encodes the value of reward-predictive stimuli and influences both learning and decision-making. Altered dopamine signaling is associated with psychiatric conditions characterized by risky choices such as pathological gambling. These observations highlight the importance of understanding how dopamine neuron activity is modulated. While excitatory drive onto dopamine neurons is critical for generating phasic dopamine responses, emerging evidence suggests that inhibitory signaling also modulates these responses. To address the functional importance of inhibitory signaling in dopamine neurons, we generated mice lacking the β3 subunit of the GABAA receptor specifically in dopamine neurons (β3-KO mice) and examined their behavior in tasks that assessed appetitive learning, aversive learning, and risk preference. Dopamine neurons in midbrain slices from β3-KO mice exhibited attenuated GABA-evoked inhibitory post-synaptic currents. Furthermore, electrical stimulation of excitatory afferents to dopamine neurons elicited more dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens of β3-KO mice as measured by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. β3-KO mice were more active than controls when given morphine, which correlated with potential compensatory upregulation of GABAergic tone onto dopamine neurons. β3-KO mice learned faster in two food-reinforced learning paradigms, but extinguished their learned behavior normally. Enhanced learning was specific for appetitive tasks, as aversive learning was unaffected in β3-KO mice. Finally, we found that β3-KO mice had enhanced risk preference in a probabilistic selection task that required mice to choose between a small certain reward and a larger uncertain reward. Collectively, these findings identify a selective role for GABAA signaling in dopamine neurons in appetitive learning and decision-making. PMID:22114279

  13. Altered CSMD1 Expression Alters Cocaine-Conditioned Place Preference: Mutual Support for a Complex Locus from Human and Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Drgonova, Jana; Walther, Donna; Singhal, Sulabh; Johnson, Kennedy; Kessler, Brice; Troncoso, Juan; Uhl, George R

    2015-01-01

    The CUB and sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) gene harbors signals provided by clusters of nearby SNPs with 10-2 > p > 10-8 associations in genome wide association (GWAS) studies of addiction-related phenotypes. A CSMD1 intron 3 SNP displays p < 10-8 association with schizophrenia and more modest associations with individual differences in performance on tests of cognitive abilities. CSDM1 encodes a cell adhesion molecule likely to influence development, connections and plasticity of brain circuits in which it is expressed. We tested association between CSMD1 genotypes and expression of its mRNA in postmortem human brains (n = 181). Expression of CSMD1 mRNA in human postmortem cerebral cortical samples differs 15-25%, in individuals with different alleles of simple sequence length and SNP polymorphisms located in the gene's third/fifth introns, providing nominal though not Bonferroni-corrected significance. These data support mice with altered CSMD1 expression as models for common human CSMD1 allelic variation. We tested baseline and/or cocaine-evoked addiction, emotion, motor and memory-related behaviors in +/- and -/- csmd1 knockout mice on mixed and on C57-backcrossed genetic backgrounds. Initial csmd1 knockout mice on mixed genetic backgrounds displayed a variety of coat colors and sizable individual differences in responses during behavioral testing. Backcrossed mice displayed uniform black coat colors. Cocaine conditioned place preference testing revealed significant influences of genotype (p = 0.02). Homozygote knockouts displayed poorer performance on aspects of the Morris water maze task. They displayed increased locomotion in some, though not all, environments. The combined data thus support roles for common level-of-expression CSMD1 variation in a drug reward phenotype relevant to addiction and in cognitive differences that might be relevant to schizophrenia. Mouse model results can complement data from human association findings of modest magnitude that

  14. Altered CSMD1 Expression Alters Cocaine-Conditioned Place Preference: Mutual Support for a Complex Locus from Human and Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Drgonova, Jana; Walther, Donna; Singhal, Sulabh; Johnson, Kennedy; Kessler, Brice; Troncoso, Juan; Uhl, George R.

    2015-01-01

    The CUB and sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) gene harbors signals provided by clusters of nearby SNPs with 10-2 > p > 10-8 associations in genome wide association (GWAS) studies of addiction-related phenotypes. A CSMD1 intron 3 SNP displays p < 10-8 association with schizophrenia and more modest associations with individual differences in performance on tests of cognitive abilities. CSDM1 encodes a cell adhesion molecule likely to influence development, connections and plasticity of brain circuits in which it is expressed. We tested association between CSMD1 genotypes and expression of its mRNA in postmortem human brains (n = 181). Expression of CSMD1 mRNA in human postmortem cerebral cortical samples differs 15–25%, in individuals with different alleles of simple sequence length and SNP polymorphisms located in the gene’s third/fifth introns, providing nominal though not Bonferroni-corrected significance. These data support mice with altered CSMD1 expression as models for common human CSMD1 allelic variation. We tested baseline and/or cocaine-evoked addiction, emotion, motor and memory-related behaviors in +/- and -/- csmd1 knockout mice on mixed and on C57-backcrossed genetic backgrounds. Initial csmd1 knockout mice on mixed genetic backgrounds displayed a variety of coat colors and sizable individual differences in responses during behavioral testing. Backcrossed mice displayed uniform black coat colors. Cocaine conditioned place preference testing revealed significant influences of genotype (p = 0.02). Homozygote knockouts displayed poorer performance on aspects of the Morris water maze task. They displayed increased locomotion in some, though not all, environments. The combined data thus support roles for common level-of-expression CSMD1 variation in a drug reward phenotype relevant to addiction and in cognitive differences that might be relevant to schizophrenia. Mouse model results can complement data from human association findings of modest magnitude

  15. Truncation of N-terminal regions of Digitalis lanata progesterone 5β-reductase alters catalytic efficiency and substrate preference.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Kristin; Bauer, Peter; Schmid, Benedikt; Mueller-Uri, Frieder; Kreis, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    N-Terminal truncated forms of progesterone 5β-reductase (P5βR) were synthesized taking a full-length cDNA encoding for Digitalis lanata P5βR with a hexa-histidine tag attached at the C-terminus (rDlP5βRc) as the starting point. Four pETite-c-His/DlP5βR constructs coding for P5βR derivatives truncated in the N-terminal region, termed rDlP5βRcn-10, rDlP5βRcn-20, rDlP5βRcn-30, and rDlP5βRcn-40 were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis. The cDNAs coding for full-length rDlP5βRc, rDlP5βRcn-10 and rDlP5βRcn-20 were over-expressed in Escherichia coli and the respective enzymes were soluble and catalytically active (progesterone and 2-cyclohexen-1-one as substrates). GST-tagged recombinant DlP5βR (rDlP5βR-GST) and rDlP5βR-GSTr, with the GST-tag removed by protease treatment were produced as well and served as controls. The Km values and substrate preferences considerably differed between the various DlP5βR derivatives. As for the C-terminal His-tagged rDlP5βR the catalytic efficiency for progesterone was highest for the full-length rDlP5βRc whereas the N-terminal truncated forms preferred 2-cyclohexen-1-one as the substrate. Affinity tags and artifacts resulting from the cloning strategy used may alter substrate specificity. Therefore enzyme properties determined with recombinant proteins should not be used to infer in vivo scenarios and should be considered for each particular case. PMID:24370479

  16. β-endorphin neuronal transplantation into the hypothalamus alters anxiety-like behaviors in prenatal alcohol exposed rats and non-preferring and preferring rats

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Ryan; Wynne, Olivia; Maglakelidze, George; Zhang, Changqing; O’Connell, Stephanie; Boyadjieva, Nadka I.; Sarkar, Dipak K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol exposure has adverse effects on stress physiology and behavioral reactivity. This is suggested to be due, in part, to the effect of alcohol on β-endorphin (β-EP) producing neurons in the hypothalamus. In response to stress, β-EP normally provides negative feedback to the HPA axis and interacts with other neurotransmitter systems in the amygdala to regulate behavior. We examined whether β-EP neuronal function in the hypothalamus reduces the corticosterone response to acute stress, attenuates anxiety-like behaviors, and modulates alcohol drinking in rats. Methods To determine if β-EP neuronal transplants modulate the stress response, anxiety behavior and alcohol drinking, we implanted differentiated β-EP neurons into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) of normal, prenatal alcohol exposed, and alcohol-preferring (P) and non-preferring (NP) rats. We then assessed corticosterone levels in response to acute restraint stress and other markers of stress response in the brain, and anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated plus maze and open-field assays. Results We showed that β-EP neuronal transplants into the PVN reduced the peripheral corticosterone response to acute stress and attenuated anxiety-like behaviors. Similar transplants completely reduced the hyper-corticosterone response and elevated anxiety behaviors in prenatal alcohol exposed adult rats. Moreover, we showed that β-EP reduced anxiety behavior in P rats with minimal effects on alcohol drinking during and following restraint stress. Conclusions These data further establish a role of β-EP neurons in the hypothalamus for regulating physiological stress response and anxiety behavior, and resembles a potential novel therapy for treating stress-related psychiatric disorders in prenatal alcohol exposed children and those genetically predisposed to increased alcohol consumption. PMID:25623413

  17. Differences in saccharin preference and genetic alterations of the Tas1r3 gene among senescence-accelerated mouse strains and their parental AKR/J strain.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Kimie; Takahashi, Eiki

    2014-05-10

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) is used as an animal model of senescence acceleration and age-associated disorders. SAM is derived from unexpected crosses between the AKR/J and unknown mouse strains. There are nine senescence-prone (SAMP) strains and three senescence-resistant (SAMR) strains. Although SAMP strains exhibit strain-specific and age-related pathological changes, the genes responsible for the pathologic changes in SAMP strains have not been comprehensively identified. In the present study, we evaluated sweet taste perception using the two-bottle test. We compared genotypes of the taste related gene, Tas1r3, using SAM strains and the parental AKR/J strain. The two-bottle test revealed that SAMR1 (R1), SAMP6 (P6), SAMP8 (P8), and SAMP10 (P10) mice were saccharin-preferring strains, whereas AKR/J did not prefer saccharin. All genotypes of the R1, P6, P8, and P10 strains at the polymorphic sites in Tas1r3, which is known to influence saccharin preference, were identical to those of C57BL6/J, a well-known saccharin-preferring strain, and were completely different from those of the parental AKR/J strain. These genetic alterations in SAM strains appear to arise from an unknown strain that is thought to have been crossed with AKR/J initially. PMID:24726396

  18. Self-Incorporation of Coenzymes by Ribozymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, Ronald R.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1995-01-01

    RNA molecules that are assembled from the four standard nucleotides contain a limited number of chemical functional groups, a characteristic that is generally thought to restrict the potential for catalysis by ribozymes. Although polypeptides carry a wider range of functional groups, many contemporary protein-based enzymes employ coenzymes to augment their capabilities. The coenzymes possess additional chemical moieties that can participate directly in catalysis and thereby enhance catalytic function. In this work, we demonstrate a mechanism by which ribozymes can supplement their limited repertoire of functional groups through RNAcatalyzed incorporation of various coenzymes and coenzyme analogues. The group I ribozyme of Tetrahymena thermophila normally mediates a phosphoester transfer reaction that results in the covalent attachment of guanosine to the ribozyme. Here, a shortened version of the ribozyme is shown to catalyze the self-incorporation of coenzymes and coenzyme analogues, such as NAD+ and dephosphorylated CoA-SH. Similar ribozyme activities may have played an important role in the "RNA world," when RNA enzymes are thought to have maintained a complex metabolism in the absence of proteins and would have benefited from the inclusion of additional functional groups.

  19. Nociceptin receptor activation does not alter acquisition, expression, extinction and reinstatement of conditioned cocaine preference in mice.

    PubMed

    Sartor, G C; Powell, S K; Wiedner, H J; Wahlestedt, C; Brothers, S P

    2016-02-01

    Growing evidence indicates that targeting nociceptin receptor (NOP) signaling may have therapeutic efficacy in treating alcohol and opioid addiction. However, little is known about the therapeutic value of selective NOP agonists for the treatment of cocaine dependence. Recently, we identified a highly selective, brain-penetrant NOP small molecule agonist (SR-8993), and using this compound, we previously showed that nociceptin receptor activation attenuated consolidation of fear-related memories. Here, we sought to determine whether SR-8993 also affects the rewarding properties of cocaine. Using a conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure, we show that SR-8993 (3 or 10 mg/kg) failed to disrupt acquisition or expression of cocaine CPP (7.5 or 15 mg/kg) in C57BL/6 mice. Additionally, SR-8993 did not affect rate of extinction or reinstatement (yohimbine- and cocaine-induced) of cocaine CPP. These studies indicate that selective activation of NOP may not be sufficient in reducing behavioral responses to cocaine. PMID:26657743

  20. R(+)-Baclofen, but Not S(−)-Baclofen, Alters Alcohol Self-Administration in Alcohol-Preferring Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lorrai, Irene; Maccioni, Paola; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Racemic baclofen [(±)-baclofen] has repeatedly been reported to suppress several ­alcohol-motivated behaviors, including alcohol drinking and alcohol ­self-administration, in rats and mice. Recent data suggested that baclofen may have bidirectional, stereospecific effects, with the more active enantiomer, R(+)-baclofen, suppressing alcohol intake and the less active enantiomer, S(−)-baclofen, stimulating alcohol intake in mice. The present study was designed to investigate whether this enantioselectivity of baclofen effects may also extend to the reinforcing properties of alcohol in rats. To this end, selectively bred Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) rats were initially trained to lever respond on a fixed ratio 4 (FR4) schedule of reinforcement for alcohol (15%, v/v) in daily 30-min sessions. Once responding had stabilized, rats were tested with vehicle, (±)-baclofen (3 mg/kg), R(+)-baclofen (0.75, 1.5, and 3 mg/kg), and S(−)-baclofen (6, 12, and 24 mg/kg) under the FR4 schedule of reinforcement. Treatment with 3 mg/kg (±)-baclofen reduced the number of lever responses for alcohol and estimated amount of self-administered alcohol by approximately 60% in comparison to vehicle treatment. R(+)-baclofen was approximately twice as active as (±)-baclofen: treatment with 1.5 mg/kg R(+)-baclofen decreased both variables to an extent similar to that of the decreasing effect of 3 mg/kg (±)-baclofen. Conversely, treatment with all doses of S(−)-baclofen failed to affect alcohol self administration. These results (a) confirm that non-sedative doses of (±)-baclofen effectively suppressed the reinforcing properties of alcohol in sP rats and (b) apparently do not extend to operant alcohol self-administration in sP rats the capability of S(−)-baclofen to stimulate alcohol drinking in mice. PMID:27148096

  1. Relative Fluid Novelty Differentially Alters the Time Course of Limited-Access Ethanol and Water Intake in Selectively Bred High Alcohol Preferring Mice

    PubMed Central

    Linsenbardt, David N.; Boehm, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The influence of previous alcohol (ethanol) drinking experience on increasing the rate and amount of future ethanol consumption might be a genetically-regulated phenomenon critical to the development and maintenance of repeated excessive ethanol abuse. We have recently found evidence supporting this view, wherein inbred C57BL/6J (B6) mice develop progressive increases in the rate of binge-ethanol consumption over repeated Drinking-in-the-Dark (DID) ethanol access sessions (i.e. ‘front-loading’). The primary goal of the present study was to evaluate identical parameters in High Alcohol Preferring (HAP) mice to determine if similar temporal alterations in limited-access ethanol drinking develop in a population selected for high ethanol preference/intake under continuous (24hr) access conditions. Methods Using specialized volumetric drinking devices, HAP mice received 14 daily 2 hour DID ethanol or water access sessions. A subset of these mice was then given one day access to the opposite assigned fluid on day 15. Home cage locomotor activity was recorded concomitantly on each day of these studies. The possibility of behavioral/metabolic tolerance was evaluated on day 16 using experimenter administered ethanol. Results The amount of ethanol consumed within the first 15 minutes of access increased markedly over days. However, in contrast to previous observations in B6 mice, ethanol front-loading was also observed on day 15 in mice that only had previous DID experience with water. Furthermore, a decrease in the amount of water consumed within the first 15 minutes of access compared to animals given repeated water access was observed on day 15 in mice with 14 previous days of ethanol access. Conclusions These data further illustrate the complexity and importance of the temporal aspects of limited-access ethanol consumption, and suggest that previous procedural/fluid experience in HAP mice selectively alters the time course of ethanol and water consumption

  2. Impaired Coenzyme A metabolism affects histone and tubulin acetylation in Drosophila and human cell models of pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Siudeja, Katarzyna; Srinivasan, Balaji; Xu, Lanjun; Rana, Anil; de Jong, Jannie; Nollen, Ellen A A; Jackowski, Suzanne; Sanford, Lynn; Hayflick, Susan; Sibon, Ody C M

    2011-12-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN is a neurodegenerative disease with unresolved pathophysiology. Previously, we observed reduced Coenzyme A levels in a Drosophila model for PKAN. Coenzyme A is required for acetyl-Coenzyme A synthesis and acyl groups from the latter are transferred to lysine residues of proteins, in a reaction regulated by acetyltransferases. The tight balance between acetyltransferases and their antagonistic counterparts histone deacetylases is a well-known determining factor for the acetylation status of proteins. However, the influence of Coenzyme A levels on protein acetylation is unknown. Here we investigate whether decreased levels of the central metabolite Coenzyme A induce alterations in protein acetylation and whether this correlates with specific phenotypes of PKAN models. We show that in various organisms proper Coenzyme A metabolism is required for maintenance of histone- and tubulin acetylation, and decreased acetylation of these proteins is associated with an impaired DNA damage response, decreased locomotor function and decreased survival. Decreased protein acetylation and the concurrent phenotypes are partly rescued by pantethine and HDAC inhibitors, suggesting possible directions for future PKAN therapy development. PMID:21998097

  3. Impaired Coenzyme A metabolism affects histone and tubulin acetylation in Drosophila and human cell models of pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Siudeja, Katarzyna; Srinivasan, Balaji; Xu, Lanjun; Rana, Anil; de Jong, Jannie; Nollen, Ellen A A; Jackowski, Suzanne; Sanford, Lynn; Hayflick, Susan; Sibon, Ody C M

    2011-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN is a neurodegenerative disease with unresolved pathophysiology. Previously, we observed reduced Coenzyme A levels in a Drosophila model for PKAN. Coenzyme A is required for acetyl-Coenzyme A synthesis and acyl groups from the latter are transferred to lysine residues of proteins, in a reaction regulated by acetyltransferases. The tight balance between acetyltransferases and their antagonistic counterparts histone deacetylases is a well-known determining factor for the acetylation status of proteins. However, the influence of Coenzyme A levels on protein acetylation is unknown. Here we investigate whether decreased levels of the central metabolite Coenzyme A induce alterations in protein acetylation and whether this correlates with specific phenotypes of PKAN models. We show that in various organisms proper Coenzyme A metabolism is required for maintenance of histone- and tubulin acetylation, and decreased acetylation of these proteins is associated with an impaired DNA damage response, decreased locomotor function and decreased survival. Decreased protein acetylation and the concurrent phenotypes are partly rescued by pantethine and HDAC inhibitors, suggesting possible directions for future PKAN therapy development. PMID:21998097

  4. Characterization of an Archaeal Medium-Chain Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetase from Methanosarcina acetivorans▿

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yu; Ingram-Smith, Cheryl; Cooper, Leroy L.; Smith, Kerry S.

    2010-01-01

    Short- and medium-chain acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetases catalyze the formation of acyl-CoA from an acyl substrate, ATP, and CoA. These enzymes catalyze mechanistically similar two-step reactions that proceed through an enzyme-bound acyl-AMP intermediate. Here we describe the characterization of a member of this enzyme family from the methane-producing archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans. This enzyme, a medium-chain acyl-CoA synthetase designated MacsMa, utilizes 2-methylbutyrate as its preferred substrate for acyl-CoA synthesis but cannot utilize acetate and thus cannot catalyze the first step of acetoclastic methanogenesis in M. acetivorans. When propionate or other less favorable acyl substrates, such as butyrate, 2-methylpropionate, or 2-methylvalerate, were utilized, the acyl-CoA was not produced or was produced at reduced levels. Instead, acyl-AMP and PPi were released in the absence of CoA, whereas in the presence of CoA, the intermediate was broken down into AMP and the acyl substrate, which were released along with PPi. These results suggest that although acyl-CoA synthetases may have the ability to utilize a broad range of substrates for the acyl-adenylate-forming first step of the reaction, the intermediate may not be suitable for the thioester-forming second step. The MacsMa structure has revealed the putative acyl substrate- and CoA-binding pockets. Six residues proposed to form the acyl substrate-binding pocket, Lys256, Cys298, Gly351, Trp259, Trp237, and Trp254, were targeted for alteration. Characterization of the enzyme variants indicates that these six residues are critical in acyl substrate binding and catalysis, and even conservative alterations significantly reduced the catalytic ability of the enzyme. PMID:20851904

  5. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  6. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  7. Absence of malonyl coenzyme A decarboxylase in mice increases cardiac glucose oxidation and protects the heart from ischemic injury

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute pharmacological inhibition of cardiac malonyl coenzyme A decarboxylase (MCD) protects the heart from ischemic damage by inhibiting fatty acid oxidation and stimulating glucose oxidation. However, it is unknown whether chronic inhibition of MCD results in altered cardiac function, energy metabo...

  8. Mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) Preference and Behavioral Response to Animated Images of Conspecifics Altered in Their Color, Aspect Ratio, and Swimming Depth

    PubMed Central

    Polverino, Giovanni; Liao, Jian Cong; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) is an example of a freshwater fish species whose remarkable diffusion outside its native range has led to it being placed on the list of the world’s hundred worst invasive alien species (International Union for Conservation of Nature). Here, we investigate mosquitofish shoaling tendency using a dichotomous choice test in which computer-animated images of their conspecifics are altered in color, aspect ratio, and swimming level in the water column. Pairs of virtual stimuli are systematically presented to focal subjects to evaluate their attractiveness and the effect on fish behavior. Mosquitofish respond differentially to some of these stimuli showing preference for conspecifics with enhanced yellow pigmentation while exhibiting highly varying locomotory patterns. Our results suggest that computer-animated images can be used to understand the factors that regulate the social dynamics of shoals of Gambusia affinis. Such knowledge may inform the design of control plans and open new avenues in conservation and protection of endangered animal species. PMID:23342131

  9. [Coenzyme metabolic therapy in infectious allergic myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Mazurets, A F; Gurevich, M A; Kubyshkin, V F; Dziuba, M V; Vikharev, N P

    1995-01-01

    A trial was performed of clinical efficacy of the coenzyme complex incorporating piridoxalphosphate, cobamamide and phosphaden in patients with infectious allergic myocarditis. Myo- cardial dystrophy and correlations of the myocardial enzymatic status with blood lymphocytes in the above patients were taken in consideration. Corrective action of metabolic therapy on myocardial bioenergy was coupled with positive antiarrhythmic and cardiotonic effects. Cytochemical follow-up investigations enabled long-term monitoring over the patients' condition and further catamnesis. PMID:8815275

  10. Better than Nature: Nicotinamide Biomimetics That Outperform Natural Coenzymes.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Tanja; Paul, Caroline E; Levy, Colin W; de Vries, Simon; Mutti, Francesco G; Hollmann, Frank; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2016-01-27

    The search for affordable, green biocatalytic processes is a challenge for chemicals manufacture. Redox biotransformations are potentially attractive, but they rely on unstable and expensive nicotinamide coenzymes that have prevented their widespread exploitation. Stoichiometric use of natural coenzymes is not viable economically, and the instability of these molecules hinders catalytic processes that employ coenzyme recycling. Here, we investigate the efficiency of man-made synthetic biomimetics of the natural coenzymes NAD(P)H in redox biocatalysis. Extensive studies with a range of oxidoreductases belonging to the "ene" reductase family show that these biomimetics are excellent analogues of the natural coenzymes, revealed also in crystal structures of the ene reductase XenA with selected biomimetics. In selected cases, these biomimetics outperform the natural coenzymes. "Better-than-Nature" biomimetics should find widespread application in fine and specialty chemicals production by harnessing the power of high stereo-, regio-, and chemoselective redox biocatalysts and enabling reactions under mild conditions at low cost. PMID:26727612

  11. Prebiotic syntheses of vitamin coenzymes: I. Cysteamine and 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (coenzyme M)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, S. L.; Schlesinger, G.

    1993-01-01

    The reaction of NH3 and SO3(2-) with ethylene sulfide is shown to be a prebiotic synthesis of cysteamine and 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (coenzyme M). A similar reaction with ethylene imine would give cysteamine and taurine. Ethylene oxide would react with NH3 and N(CH3)3 to give the phospholipid components ethanolamine and choline. The prebiotic sources of ethylene sulfide, ethylene imine and ethylene oxide are discussed. Cysteamine itself is not a suitable thioester for metabolic processes because of acyl transfer to the amino group, but this can be prevented by using an amide of cysteamine. The use of cysteamine in coenzyme A may have been due to its prebiotic abundance. The facile prebiotic synthesis of both cysteamine and coenzyme M suggests that they were involved in very early metabolic pathways.

  12. Elucidation of methanogenic coenzyme biosyntheses: from spectroscopy to genomics.

    PubMed

    Graham, David E; White, Robert H

    2002-04-01

    Methanogenesis, the anaerobic production of methane from CO2 or simple carbon compounds, requires seven organic coenzymes. This review describes pathways for the biosynthesis of methanofuran, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydromethanopterin, coenzyme F420, coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid) and coenzyme B (7-mercaptoheptanoyl-L-threonine phosphate). Spectroscopic evidence for the pathways is reviewed and recent efforts are described to identify and characterize the biosynthetic enzymes from methanogenic archaea. The literature from 1971 to September 2001 is reviewed, and 169 references are cited. PMID:12013276

  13. Prebiotic syntheses of vitamin coenzymes: II. Pantoic acid, pantothenic acid, and the composition of coenzyme A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, S. L.; Schlesinger, G.

    1993-01-01

    Pantoic acid can by synthesized in good prebiotic yield from isobutyraldehyde or alpha-ketoisovaleric acid + H2CO + HCN. Isobutyraldehyde is the Strecker precursor to valine and alpha-ketoisovaleric acid is the valine transamination product. Mg2+ and Ca2+ as well as several transition metals are catalysts for the alpha-ketoisovaleric acid reaction. Pantothenic acid is produced from pantoyl lactone (easily formed from pantoic acid) and the relatively high concentrations of beta-alanine that would be formed on drying prebiotic amino acid mixtures. There is no selectivity for this reaction over glycine, alanine, or gamma-amino butyric acid. The components of coenzyme A are discussed in terms of ease of prebiotic formation and stability and are shown to be plausible choices, but many other compounds are possible. The gamma-OH of pantoic acid needs to be capped to prevent decomposition of pantothenic acid. These results suggest that coenzyme A function was important in the earliest metabolic pathways and that the coenzyme A precursor contained most of the components of the present coenzyme.

  14. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ta-Yuan; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Catherine C. Y.; Urano, Yasuomi

    2009-01-01

    The enzymes acyl-coenzyme A (CoA):cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs) are membrane-bound proteins that utilize long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and cholesterol as substrates to form cholesteryl esters. In mammals, two isoenzymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2, encoded by two different genes, exist. ACATs play important roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis in various tissues. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge on ACAT-related research in two areas: 1) ACAT genes and proteins and 2) ACAT enzymes as drug targets for atherosclerosis and for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19141679

  15. Effects of menopause and hormone replacement therapy on serum levels of coenzyme Q10 and other lipid-soluble antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Palan, Prabhudas R; Connell, Kathleen; Ramirez, Elizabeth; Inegbenijie, Christian; Gavara, Rachana Y; Ouseph, Jacob A; Mikhail, Magdy S

    2005-01-01

    The present study examines the influence of menopause and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on serum levels of coenzyme Q(10) and other lipid-soluble antioxidants in normal women. Serum levels of coenzyme Q(10), alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, beta-carotene and lycopene in 50 premenopausal women (not using oral contraceptives), 33 healthy postmenopausal and 15 postmenopausal women on HRT ("Prempo"; combination of 0.625 mg conjugated estrogen and 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate) were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Lipid profiles were also analyzed. Significantly higher serum coenzyme Q(10) and alpha-tocopherol levels were detected in postmenopausal compared with premenopausal women (P < 0.05, and < 0.001); whereas, in postmenopausal subjects on HRT, we detected a significant decrease in coenzyme Q(10) and gamma-tocopherol levels (P < 0.001, and < 0.05) and increased alpha-tocopherol levels (P < 0.05). Serum levels of beta-carotene, lycopene, LDL, HDL, cholesterol and triglyceride were comparable among the study groups. Coenzyme Q(10) is postulated to be involved in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD) because of its bioenergetics role in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and its antioxidant properties at the mitochondrial and extramitochondrial levels. The decrease in serum concentrations of coenzyme Q(10), produced by HRT, may promote oxygen free radical-induced membrane damage and may, thus alter cardiovascular risk in postmenopausal women. HRT-induced reductions in lipid-soluble antioxidant(s) levels, and its potential consequences on CVD, needs to be further investigated. PMID:16873930

  16. Ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) antagonism alters preference for ethanol and sucrose in a concentration-dependent manner in prairie voles.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J R; Francomacaro, L M; Bohidar, A E; Young, K A; Pesarchick, B F; Buirkle, J M; McMahon, E K; O'Bryan, C M

    2016-03-01

    Ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) activity has been implicated in reward for preferred foods and drugs; however, a recent study in our laboratory indicated that GHS-R1A antagonism reduces early (after only four exposures) preference for 20% ethanol, but not 10% sucrose in prairie voles, a genetically diverse high alcohol-consuming species. The purpose of the present study was to determine if these effects of GHS-R1A antagonism depend on the concentration of the rewarding solution being consumed. We first characterized preference for varying concentrations of ethanol and sucrose. Two bottle tests of each ethanol concentration versus water indicated that 10% and 20% ethanol are less preferred than 3% ethanol, and a follow-up direct comparison of 10% vs. 20% showed that 10% was preferred over 20%. Direct two-bottle comparisons of 2% vs. 5%, 2% vs. 10%, and 5% vs. 10% sucrose showed that 10% sucrose was most preferred, and 2% sucrose was least preferred. The effects of JMV 2959, a GHS-R1A antagonist, on preference for each concentration of ethanol and sucrose were then tested. In a between groups design prairie voles were given four two-hour drinking sessions in which animals had access to ethanol (3, 10, or 20%) versus water, or sucrose (2, 5, or 10%) versus water every other day. Saline habituation injections were given 30 min before the third drinking session. JMV 2959 (i.p.; 9 mg/kg), a GHS-R1A antagonist, or saline was administered 30 min before the fourth drinking session. JMV 2959 reduced preference for 20% ethanol and 2% sucrose, but had no significant effect on preference for the other ethanol and sucrose concentrations. These data identify constraints on the role of GHS-R1A in early preference for ethanol and sucrose, and the concentration-dependent effects suggest strong preference for a reward may limit the importance of GHS-R1A activity. PMID:26723269

  17. Novel Hydroxycinnamoyl-Coenzyme A Quinate Transferase Genes from Artichoke Are Involved in the Synthesis of Chlorogenic Acid1[W

    PubMed Central

    Sonnante, Gabriella; D'Amore, Rosalinda; Blanco, Emanuela; Pierri, Ciro L.; De Palma, Monica; Luo, Jie; Tucci, Marina; Martin, Cathie

    2010-01-01

    Artichoke (Cynara cardunculus subsp. scolymus) extracts have high antioxidant capacity, due primarily to flavonoids and phenolic acids, particularly chlorogenic acid (5-caffeoylquinic acid [CGA]), dicaffeoylquinic acids, and caffeic acid, which are abundant in flower bracts and bioavailable to humans in the diet. The synthesis of CGA can occur following different routes in plant species, and hydroxycinnamoyl-coenzyme A transferases are important enzymes in these pathways. Here, we report on the isolation and characterization of two novel genes both encoding hydroxycinnamoyl-coenzyme A quinate transferases (HQT) from artichoke. The recombinant proteins (HQT1 and HQT2) were assayed after expression in Escherichia coli, and both showed higher affinity for quinate over shikimate. Their preferences for acyl donors, caffeoyl-coenzyme A or p-coumaroyl-coenzyme A, were examined. Modeling and docking analyses were used to propose possible pockets and residues involved in determining substrate specificities in the HQT enzyme family. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of gene expression indicated that HQT1 might be more directly associated with CGA content. Transient and stable expression of HQT1 in Nicotiana resulted in a higher production of CGA and cynarin (1,3-dicaffeoylquinic acid). These findings suggest that several isoforms of HQT contribute to the synthesis of CGA in artichoke according to physiological needs and possibly following various metabolic routes. PMID:20431089

  18. Electronic Structure of B12 coenzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi; Ching, W. Y.; Randaccio, Lucio

    2001-06-01

    We have carried out an ab-initio local density functional calculations of the two most important B12 coenzymes, adoensyl-cobalamin (Ado-Cbl) and methyl-cobalamin (Me-Cbl). The crystal structures were determined by accurate X-ray synchrotron radiation measurements. Both crystals have space group P2121 with four molecules, or about 800 atoms, per unit cell. Our electronic structure calculation is based on one full molecule including the side chains. Results are analyzed in terms of atom and orbital resolved partial density of states (PDOS), Mulliken effective charges and bond orders. The PDOS analysis shows that the Co complexes of both B12 coenzymes had a HOMO/LUMO gap of about 1.5 eV. The Co-C bond order in Me-Cbl is smaller than that in Ado-Cbl. This appears to be in contradiction with the measured bond dissociated energies. However, this could also indicate the importance of the effects of solvents, which were not included in the calculation. We are investigating whether the effect of the solvents could dramatically modify the electronic structures of Ado-Cbl and Me-Cbl.

  19. Structure of a methyl-coenzyme M reductase from Black Sea mats that oxidize methane anaerobically.

    PubMed

    Shima, Seigo; Krueger, Martin; Weinert, Tobias; Demmer, Ulrike; Kahnt, Jörg; Thauer, Rudolf K; Ermler, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulphate, an area currently generating great interest in microbiology, is accomplished by consortia of methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulphate-reducing bacteria. The enzyme activating methane in methanotrophic archaea has tentatively been identified as a homologue of methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) that catalyses the methane-forming step in methanogenic archaea. Here we report an X-ray structure of the 280 kDa heterohexameric ANME-1 MCR complex. It was crystallized uniquely from a protein ensemble purified from consortia of microorganisms collected with a submersible from a Black Sea mat catalysing AOM with sulphate. Crystals grown from the heterogeneous sample diffract to 2.1 Å resolution and consist of a single ANME-1 MCR population, demonstrating the strong selective power of crystallization. The structure revealed ANME-1 MCR in complex with coenzyme M and coenzyme B, indicating the same substrates for MCR from methanotrophic and methanogenic archaea. Differences between the highly similar structures of ANME-1 MCR and methanogenic MCR include a F(430) modification, a cysteine-rich patch and an altered post-translational amino acid modification pattern, which may tune the enzymes for their functions in different biological contexts. PMID:22121022

  20. Preference Alters Consumptive Effects of Predators: Top-Down Effects of a Native Crab on a System of Native and Introduced Prey

    PubMed Central

    Grason, Emily W.; Miner, Benjamin G.

    2012-01-01

    Top-down effects of predators in systems depend on the rate at which predators consume prey, and on predator preferences among available prey. In invaded communities, these parameters might be difficult to predict because ecological relationships are typically evolutionarily novel. We examined feeding rates and preferences of a crab native to the Pacific Northwest, Cancer productus, among four prey items: two invasive species of oyster drill (the marine whelks Urosalpinx cinerea and Ocenebra inornata) and two species of oyster (Crassostrea gigas and Ostrea lurida) that are also consumed by U. cinerea and O. inornata. This system is also characterized by intraguild predation because crabs are predators of drills and compete with them for prey (oysters). When only the oysters were offered, crabs did not express a preference and consumed approximately 9 juvenile oysters crab−1 day−1. We then tested whether crabs preferred adult drills of either U. cinerea or O. inornata, or juvenile oysters (C. gigas). While crabs consumed drills and oysters at approximately the same rate when only one type of prey was offered, they expressed a strong preference for juvenile oysters over drills when they were allowed to choose among the three prey items. This preference for oysters might negate the positive indirect effects that crabs have on oysters by crabs consuming drills (trophic cascade) because crabs have a large negative direct effect on oysters when crabs, oysters, and drills co-occur. PMID:23236472

  1. Primary coenzyme Q10 deficiency presenting as fatal neonatal multiorgan failure.

    PubMed

    Desbats, Maria Andrea; Vetro, Annalisa; Limongelli, Ivan; Lunardi, Giada; Casarin, Alberto; Doimo, Mara; Spinazzi, Marco; Angelini, Corrado; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Burlina, Alberto; Rodriguez Hernandez, Maria Angeles; Chiandetti, Lino; Clementi, Maurizio; Trevisson, Eva; Navas, Placido; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Salviati, Leonardo

    2015-09-01

    Coenzyme Q10 deficiency is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder, with manifestations that may range from fatal neonatal multisystem failure, to adult-onset encephalopathy. We report a patient who presented at birth with severe lactic acidosis, proteinuria, dicarboxylic aciduria, and hepatic insufficiency. She also had dilation of left ventricle on echocardiography. Her neurological condition rapidly worsened and despite aggressive care she died at 23 h of life. Muscle histology displayed lipid accumulation. Electron microscopy showed markedly swollen mitochondria with fragmented cristae. Respiratory-chain enzymatic assays showed a reduction of combined activities of complex I+III and II+III with normal activities of isolated complexes. The defect was confirmed in fibroblasts, where it could be rescued by supplementing the culture medium with 10 μM coenzyme Q10. Coenzyme Q10 levels were reduced (28% of controls) in these cells. We performed exome sequencing and focused the analysis on genes involved in coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis. The patient harbored a homozygous c.545T>G, p.(Met182Arg) alteration in COQ2, which was validated by functional complementation in yeast. In this case the biochemical and morphological features were essential to direct the genetic diagnosis. The parents had another pregnancy after the biochemical diagnosis was established, but before the identification of the genetic defect. Because of the potentially high recurrence risk, and given the importance of early CoQ10 supplementation, we decided to treat with CoQ10 the newborn child pending the results of the biochemical assays. Clinicians should consider a similar management in siblings of patients with CoQ10 deficiency without a genetic diagnosis. PMID:25564041

  2. [Hplc estimation of coenzyme Q(10) redox status in plasma after intravenous coenzyme Q(10) administration].

    PubMed

    Kalenikova, E I; Kharitonova, E V; Gorodetskaya, E A; Tokareva, O G; Medvedev, O S

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the total pool of coenzyme Q(10) (Co(10)), its oxidized (ubiquinone) and reduced (ubiquinol, CoQ(10)H₂) forms have been investigated in rats plasma during 48 h after a single intravenous injection of a solution of solubilized CoQ(10) (10 mg/kg) to rats. Plasma levels of CoQ(10) were determined by HPLC with spectrophotometric and coulometric detection. In plasma samples taken during the first minutes after the CoQ(10) intravenous injection, the total pool of coenzyme Q(10) and proportion of CoQ(10)H₂ remained unchanged during two weeks of storage at -20°C. The kinetic curve of the total pool of coenzyme Q(10) corresponds to a one-part model (R² = 0.9932), while the corresponding curve of its oxidized form fits to the two-part model. During the first minutes after the injection a significant portion of plasma ubiquinone undergoes reduction, and after 7 h the concentration of ubiquinol predominates. The decrease in the total plasma coenzyme Q(10) content was accompanied by the gradual increase in plasma ubiquinol, which represented about 90% of total plasma CoQ(10) by the end of the first day. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of the organism to transform high concentrations of the oxidized form of CoQ(10) into the effective antioxidant (reduced) form and justify prospects of the development of parenteral dosage forms of CoQ(10) for the use in the treatment of acute pathological conditions. PMID:25762606

  3. Molecular diagnosis of coenzyme Q10 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yubero, Delia; Montero, Raquel; Armstrong, Judith; Espinós, Carmen; Palau, Francesc; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos; Salviati, Leonardo; Navas, Placido; Artuch, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) deficiency syndromes comprise a growing number of neurological and extraneurological disorders. Primary-genetic but also secondary CoQ deficiencies have been reported. The biochemical determination of CoQ is a good tool for the rapid identification of CoQ deficiencies but does not allow the selection of candidate genes for molecular diagnosis. Moreover, the metabolic pathway for CoQ synthesis is an intricate and not well-understood process, where a large number of genes are implicated. Thus, only next-generation sequencing techniques (either genetic panels of whole-exome and -genome sequencing) are at present appropriate for a rapid and realistic molecular diagnosis of these syndromes. The potential treatability of CoQ deficiency strongly supports the necessity of a rapid molecular characterization of patients, since primary CoQ deficiencies may respond well to CoQ treatment. PMID:26144946

  4. Structural determinants in bacterial 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-gluconate dehydrogenase KduD for dual-coenzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Takase, Ryuichi; Maruyama, Yukie; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-07-01

    Short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) is distributed in many organisms, from bacteria to humans, and has significant roles in metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and other biomolecules. An important intermediate in acidic polysaccharide metabolism is 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate (KDG). Recently, two short and long loops in Sphingomonas KDG-producing SDR enzymes (NADPH-dependent A1-R and NADH-dependent A1-R') involved in alginate metabolism were shown to be crucial for NADPH or NADH coenzyme specificity. Two SDR family enzymes-KduD from Pectobacterium carotovorum (PcaKduD) and DhuD from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpyDhuD)-prefer NADH as coenzyme, although only PcaKduD can utilize both NADPH and NADH. Both enzymes reduce 2,5-diketo-3-deoxy-d-gluconate to produce KDG. Tertiary and quaternary structures of SpyDhuD and PcaKduD and its complex with NADH were determined at high resolution (approximately 1.6 Å) by X-ray crystallography. Both PcaKduD and SpyDhuD consist of a three-layered structure, α/β/α, with a coenzyme-binding site in the Rossmann fold; similar to enzymes A1-R and A1-R', both arrange the two short and long loops close to the coenzyme-binding site. The primary structures of the two loops in PcaKduD and SpyDhuD were similar to those in A1-R' but not A1-R. Charge neutrality and moderate space at the binding site of the nucleoside ribose 2' coenzyme region were determined to be structurally crucial for dual-coenzyme specificity in PcaKduD by structural comparison of the NADH- and NADPH-specific SDR enzymes. The corresponding site in SpyDhuD was negatively charged and spatially shallow. This is the first reported study on structural determinants in SDR family KduD related to dual-coenzyme specificity. Proteins 2016; 84:934-947. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27028675

  5. Specificity and biological distribution of coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid).

    PubMed Central

    Balch, W E; Wolfe, R S

    1979-01-01

    The specificity of the growth requirement of Methanobacterium ruminantium strain M1 for a new coenzyme, 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (HS--CoM), was examined. A variety of derivatives, analogs, and potential biosynthetic precursors of coenzyme M were tested; only a restricted range of thioether, thioester, and thiocarbonate derivatives of the cofactor were found to replace the HS--CoM requirement. Bromoethanesulfonic acid (BrCH2CH2SO3-), a halogenated analog of HS--CoM, potently inhibited the growth response. No coenzyme was detectable in a wide range of nonmethanogenic eucaryotic tissues and procaryotic organisms. However, all methanogens available in pure culture exhibited high levels of coenzyme M which ranged from 0.3 to 16 nmol/mg of dry weight. PMID:104960

  6. Neutron study of B 12 coenzyme at 15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouquiere, J. P.

    1992-06-01

    This high resolution and low temperature study, at 15 K, of the vitamin B 12 coenzyme ( C72H100N18O17PCo) was undertaken to confirm and clarify the water networks identified at 279 K by Savage [1]. Details of the data collection and refinement of the low temperature structure are described, a comparison of the coenzyme molecule structures at 15 and 279 K is made, and that of solvent structures outlined.

  7. Better than Nature: Nicotinamide Biomimetics That Outperform Natural Coenzymes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The search for affordable, green biocatalytic processes is a challenge for chemicals manufacture. Redox biotransformations are potentially attractive, but they rely on unstable and expensive nicotinamide coenzymes that have prevented their widespread exploitation. Stoichiometric use of natural coenzymes is not viable economically, and the instability of these molecules hinders catalytic processes that employ coenzyme recycling. Here, we investigate the efficiency of man-made synthetic biomimetics of the natural coenzymes NAD(P)H in redox biocatalysis. Extensive studies with a range of oxidoreductases belonging to the “ene” reductase family show that these biomimetics are excellent analogues of the natural coenzymes, revealed also in crystal structures of the ene reductase XenA with selected biomimetics. In selected cases, these biomimetics outperform the natural coenzymes. “Better-than-Nature” biomimetics should find widespread application in fine and specialty chemicals production by harnessing the power of high stereo-, regio-, and chemoselective redox biocatalysts and enabling reactions under mild conditions at low cost. PMID:26727612

  8. Plasma membrane coenzyme Q: evidence for a role in autism

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Frederick L; Löw, Hans; Sun, Iris; Navas, Placido; Gvozdjáková, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background The Voltage Dependent Anion Channel (VDAC) is involved in control of autism. Treatments, including coenzyme Q, have had some success on autism control. Data sources Correlation of porin redox activity and expression of autism is based on extensive literature, especially studies of antibodies, identification of cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide reduced (NADH) dehydrogenase activity in the VDAC, and evidence for extreme sensitivity of the dehydrogenase to a mercurial. Evidence for a coenzyme Q requirement came from extraction and analog inhibition of NADH ferricyanide reductase in the erythrocyte plasma membrane, done in 1994, and reinterpreted when it was identified in VDAC in 2004. The effects of ubiquinol (the QH2 – reduced form of coenzyme Q) in children with autism were studied. Results A new role for coenzyme Q in the porin channels has implications on autism. Ubiquinol, the more active form of coenzyme Q, produces favorable response in children with autism. Agents which affected electron transport in porin show parallel effects in autism. Conclusion We propose a hypothesis that autism is controlled by a coenzyme Q-dependent redox system in the porin channels; this conclusion is based on the effects of agents that positively or negatively affect electron transport and the symptoms of autism. The full understanding of the mechanism of their control needs to be established. PMID:24920882

  9. Genetics of Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Doimo, Mara; Desbats, Maria A.; Cerqua, Cristina; Cassina, Matteo; Trevisson, Eva; Salviati, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an essential component of eukaryotic cells and is involved in crucial biochemical reactions such as the production of ATP in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, the biosynthesis of pyrimidines, and the modulation of apoptosis. CoQ10 requires at least 13 genes for its biosynthesis. Mutations in these genes cause primary CoQ10 deficiency, a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. To date mutations in 8 genes (PDSS1, PDSS2, COQ2, COQ4, COQ6, ADCK3, ADCK4, and COQ9) have been associated with CoQ10 deficiency presenting with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Onset can be at virtually any age, although pediatric forms are more common. Symptoms include those typical of respiratory chain disorders (encephalomyopathy, ataxia, lactic acidosis, deafness, retinitis pigmentosa, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy), but some (such as steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome) are peculiar to this condition. The molecular bases of the clinical diversity of this condition are still unknown. It is of critical importance that physicians promptly recognize these disorders because most patients respond to oral administration of CoQ10. PMID:25126048

  10. Biosynthesis of coenzyme Q in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kawamukai, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a component of the electron transport chain that participates in aerobic cellular respiration to produce ATP. In addition, CoQ acts as an electron acceptor in several enzymatic reactions involving oxidation-reduction. Biosynthesis of CoQ has been investigated mainly in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the findings have been extended to various higher organisms, including plants and humans. Analyses in yeast have contributed greatly to current understanding of human diseases related to CoQ biosynthesis. To date, human genetic disorders related to mutations in eight COQ biosynthetic genes have been reported. In addition, the crystal structures of a number of proteins involved in CoQ synthesis have been solved, including those of IspB, UbiA, UbiD, UbiX, UbiI, Alr8543 (Coq4 homolog), Coq5, ADCK3, and COQ9. Over the last decade, knowledge of CoQ biosynthesis has accumulated, and striking advances in related human genetic disorders and the crystal structure of proteins required for CoQ synthesis have been made. This review focuses on the biosynthesis of CoQ in eukaryotes, with some comparisons to the process in prokaryotes. PMID:26183239

  11. Coenzyme Q10 Deficiencies in Neuromuscular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Salviati, Leonardo; Jackson, Sandra; Hirano, Michio; Navas, Plácido

    2011-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is an essential component of the respiratory chain but also participates in other mitochondrial functions such as regulation of the transition pore and uncoupling proteins. Furthermore, this compound is a specific substrate for enzymes of the fatty acids β–oxidation pathway and pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis. Furthermore, CoQ is an antioxidant that acts in all cellular membranes and lipoproteins. A complex of at least ten nuclear (COQ) genes encoded proteins synthesizes CoQ but its regulation is unknown. Since 1989, a growing number of patients with multisystemic mitochondrial disorders and neuromuscular disorders showing deficiencies of CoQ have been identified. CoQ deficiency caused by muta-tion(s) in any of the COQ genes is designated primary deficiency. Other patients have displayed other genetic defects independent on the CoQ biosynthesis pathway, and are considered to have secondary deficiencies. This review updates the clinical and molecular aspects of both types of CoQ deficiencies and proposes new approaches to understanding their molecular bases. PMID:20225022

  12. Clinical applications of coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D; Oropesa-Avila, Manuel; Vega, Alejandro Fernandez; de la Mata, Mario; Pavon, Ana Delgado; Alcocer-Gomez, Elisabet; Calero, Carmen Perez; Paz, Marina Villanueva; Alanis, Macarena; de Lavera, Isabel; Cotan, David; Sanchez-Alcazar, Jose A

    2014-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) or ubiquinone was known for its key role in mitochondrial bioenergetics as electron and proton carrier; later studies demonstrated its presence in other cellular membranes and in blood plasma, and extensively investigated its antioxidant role. These two functions constitute the basis for supporting the clinical indication of CoQ10. Furthermore, recent data indicate that CoQ10 affects expression of genes involved in human cell signalling, metabolism and transport and some of the effects of CoQ10 supplementation may be due to this property. CoQ10 deficiencies are due to autosomal recessive mutations, mitochondrial diseases, ageing-related oxidative stress and carcinogenesis processes, and also a secondary effect of statin treatment. Many neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, fibromyalgia, muscular and cardiovascular diseases have been associated with low CoQ10 levels. CoQ10 treatment does not cause serious adverse effects in humans and new formulations have been developed that increase CoQ10 absorption and tissue distribution. Oral CoQ10 treatment is a frequent mitochondrial energizer and antioxidant strategy in many diseases that may provide a significant symptomatic benefit. PMID:24389208

  13. Social isolation in adolescence alters behaviors in the forced swim and sucrose preference tests in female but not in male rats.

    PubMed

    Hong, Suzie; Flashner, Bess; Chiu, Melissa; ver Hoeve, Elizabeth; Luz, Sandra; Bhatnagar, Seema

    2012-01-18

    Social interactions in rodents are rewarding and motivating and social isolation is aversive. Accumulating evidence suggests that disruption of the social environment in adolescence has long-term effects on social interactions, on anxiety-like behavior and on stress reactivity. In previous work we showed that adolescent isolation produced increased reactivity to acute and to repeated stress in female rats, whereas lower corticosterone responses to acute stress and decreased anxiety-related behavior were noted in isolated males. These results indicate a sex specific impact on the effects of social stress in adolescence. However, little is known about whether social isolation impacts behaviors related to affect and whether it does so differently in male and female rats. The present study investigated the impact of adolescent social isolation from day 30-50 of age in male and female Sprague Dawley rats on behavior in the forced swim test at the end of adolescence and in adulthood and on behavior in the sucrose preference test in adulthood. Adult female rats that were isolated in adolescence exhibited increased climbing on the first and second day of the forced swim test and showed an increased preference for sucrose compared to adult females that were group-housed in adolescence. There were no effects in male rats. The results indicate that social isolation in adolescence produces a stable and active behavioral phenotype in adult female rats. PMID:21907226

  14. Biochemical Characterization and Complete Conversion of Coenzyme Specificity of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium longum

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shi-Ping; Cheng, Hong-Mei; Wang, Peng; Zhu, Guo-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum is a very important gram-positive non-pathogenic bacterium in the human gastrointestinal tract for keeping the digestive and immune system healthy. Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) from B. longum (BlIDH), a novel member in Type II subfamily, was overexpressed, purified and biochemically characterized in detail. The active form of BlIDH was an 83-kDa homodimer. Kinetic analysis showed BlIDH was a NADP+-dependent IDH (NADP-IDH), with a 567- and 193-fold preference for NADP+ over NAD+ in the presence of Mg2+ and Mn2+, respectively. The maximal activity for BlIDH occurred at 60 °C (with Mn2+) and 65 °C (with Mg2+), and pH 7.5 (with Mn2+) and pH 8.0 (with Mg2+). Heat-inactivation profiles revealed that BlIDH retained 50% of maximal activity after incubation at 45 °C for 20 min with either Mn2+ or Mg2+. Furthermore, the coenzyme specificity of BlIDH can be completely reversed from NADP+ to NAD+ by a factor of 2387 by replacing six residues. This current work, the first report on the coenzyme specificity conversion of Type II NADP-IDHs, would provide better insight into the evolution of NADP+ use by the IDH family. PMID:26927087

  15. Biochemical Characterization and Complete Conversion of Coenzyme Specificity of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium longum.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shi-Ping; Cheng, Hong-Mei; Wang, Peng; Zhu, Guo-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum is a very important gram-positive non-pathogenic bacterium in the human gastrointestinal tract for keeping the digestive and immune system healthy. Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) from B. longum (BlIDH), a novel member in Type II subfamily, was overexpressed, purified and biochemically characterized in detail. The active form of BlIDH was an 83-kDa homodimer. Kinetic analysis showed BlIDH was a NADP⁺-dependent IDH (NADP-IDH), with a 567- and 193-fold preference for NADP⁺ over NAD⁺ in the presence of Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), respectively. The maximal activity for BlIDH occurred at 60 °C (with Mn(2+)) and 65 °C (with Mg(2+)), and pH 7.5 (with Mn(2+)) and pH 8.0 (with Mg(2+)). Heat-inactivation profiles revealed that BlIDH retained 50% of maximal activity after incubation at 45 °C for 20 min with either Mn(2+) or Mg(2+). Furthermore, the coenzyme specificity of BlIDH can be completely reversed from NADP⁺ to NAD⁺ by a factor of 2387 by replacing six residues. This current work, the first report on the coenzyme specificity conversion of Type II NADP-IDHs, would provide better insight into the evolution of NADP⁺ use by the IDH family. PMID:26927087

  16. Maternal nicotine exposure during lactation alters food preference, anxiety-like behavior and the brain dopaminergic reward system in the adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, C R; Moura, E G; Manhães, A C; Fraga, M C; Claudio-Neto, S; Younes-Rapozo, V; Santos-Silva, A P; Lotufo, B M; Oliveira, E; Lisboa, P C

    2015-10-01

    The mesolimbic reward pathway is activated by drugs of abuse and palatable food, causing a sense of pleasure, which promotes further consumption of these substances. Children whose parents smoke are more vulnerable to present addictive-like behavior to drugs and food.We evaluated the association between maternal nicotine exposure during lactation with changes in feeding, behavior and in the dopaminergic reward system. On postnatal day (PN) 2,Wistar rat dams were implanted with minipumps releasing nicotine (N; 6 mg/kg/day, s.c.) or saline (C) for 14 days. On PN150 and PN160, offspring were divided into 4 groups for a food challenge: N and C that received standard chow(SC); and N and C that could freely self-select (SSD) between high-fat and high-sugar diets (HFD and HSD, respectively). Offspring were tested in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and open field (OF) arena on PN152–153. On PN170, offspring were euthanized for central dopaminergic analysis. SSD animals showed an increased food intake compared to SC ones and a preference for HFD. However, N-SSD animals consumed relatively more HSD than C-SSD ones. Regarding behavior, N animals showed an increase in the time spent in the EPM center and a reduction in relative activity in the OF center. N offspring presented lower dopamine receptor (D2R) and transporter (DAT) contents in the nucleus accumbens, and lower D2R in the arcuate nucleus. Postnatal exposure to nicotine increases preference for sugar and anxiety levels in the adult progeny possibly due to a decrease in dopaminergic action in the nucleus accumbens and arcuate nucleus. PMID:26048299

  17. Bioelectrochemical activity of an electroactive macromolecular weight coenzyme derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pu; Zheng, Haitao; Nie, Pingping; Wei, Yaotian; Feng, Zhenchao; Sun, Tao

    2009-07-01

    As coenzyme utilized by more than hundreds of dehydrogenases, the efficient immobilization and regeneration of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) are of great importance and have practical applications in industrial, analytical and biomedical field. In this paper, an electroactive macromolecular weight coenzyme derivative (PEI-DHBNAD) was prepared by attaching both NAD+ and 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (3,4-DHB) to a water-soluble polyelectrolyte, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI). The functional polymer exhibited both electrochemical properties of catechol unites and coenzymatic activity of NAD moieties. The macromolecular NAD analogue showed a substantial degree of efficiency relative to free NAD+ with alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and glucose-6-phophate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), and a litter higher Michaelis-Menton constant (Km) was obtained for the coenzyme derivative than free NAD+. The bioelectrochemical properties of PEI-DHB-NAD were investigated by using G6PDH as the model enzyme, and both of them were retained on electrode surface by ultrafiltration membrane. The modified electrode showed typical response to substrate without the addition of free coenzyme, which indicated that PEI-DHB-NAD can carry out the electron transfer between electrode and NAD-dependent dehydrogenase. The utilization of polymer-based PEI-DHB-NAD is convenient for the immobilization of both electron mediator and coenzyme, and offers a practical approach for the construction of reagentless biosensors.

  18. Coenzyme Q supplementation in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Jacqueline; Farha, Samar; Park, Margaret M.; Comhair, Suzy A.; Lundgrin, Erika L.; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Bongard, Robert D.; Merker, Marilyn P.; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a fundamental abnormality in the vascular endothelium and smooth muscle of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Because coenzyme Q (CoQ) is essential for mitochondrial function and efficient oxygen utilization as the electron carrier in the inner mitochondrial membrane, we hypothesized that CoQ would improve mitochondrial function and benefit PAH patients. To test this, oxidized and reduced levels of CoQ, cardiac function by echocardiogram, mitochondrial functions of heme synthesis and cellular metabolism were evaluated in PAH patients (N=8) in comparison to healthy controls (N=7), at baseline and after 12 weeks oral CoQ supplementation. CoQ levels were similar among PAH and control individuals, and increased in all subjects with CoQ supplementation. PAH patients had higher CoQ levels than controls with supplementation, and a tendency to a higher reduced-to-oxidized CoQ ratio. Cardiac parameters improved with CoQ supplementation, although 6-minute walk distances and BNP levels did not significantly change. Consistent with improved mitochondrial synthetic function, hemoglobin increased and red cell distribution width (RDW) decreased in PAH patients with CoQ, while hemoglobin declined slightly and RDW did not change in healthy controls. In contrast, metabolic and redox parameters, including lactate, pyruvate and reduced or oxidized gluthathione, did not change in PAH patients with CoQ. In summary, CoQ improved hemoglobin and red cell maturation in PAH, but longer studies and/or higher doses with a randomized placebo-controlled controlled design are necessary to evaluate the clinical benefit of this simple nutritional supplement. PMID:25180165

  19. Coenzyme Q biosynthesis in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Manuel Jesús; Vazquez Fonseca, Luis; Desbats, Maria Andrea; Cerqua, Cristina; Zordan, Roberta; Trevisson, Eva; Salviati, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ, or ubiquinone) is a remarkable lipid that plays an essential role in mitochondria as an electron shuttle between complexes I and II of the respiratory chain, and complex III. It is also a cofactor of other dehydrogenases, a modulator of the permeability transition pore and an essential antioxidant. CoQ is synthesized in mitochondria by a set of at least 12 proteins that form a multiprotein complex. The exact composition of this complex is still unclear. Most of the genes involved in CoQ biosynthesis (COQ genes) have been studied in yeast and have mammalian orthologues. Some of them encode enzymes involved in the modification of the quinone ring of CoQ, but for others the precise function is unknown. Two genes appear to have a regulatory role: COQ8 (and its human counterparts ADCK3 and ADCK4) encodes a putative kinase, while PTC7 encodes a phosphatase required for the activation of Coq7. Mutations in human COQ genes cause primary CoQ(10) deficiency, a clinically heterogeneous mitochondrial disorder with onset from birth to the seventh decade, and with clinical manifestation ranging from fatal multisystem disorders, to isolated encephalopathy or nephropathy. The pathogenesis of CoQ(10) deficiency involves deficient ATP production and excessive ROS formation, but possibly other aspects of CoQ(10) function are implicated. CoQ(10) deficiency is unique among mitochondrial disorders since an effective treatment is available. Many patients respond to oral CoQ(10) supplementation. Nevertheless, treatment is still problematic because of the low bioavailability of the compound, and novel pharmacological approaches are currently being investigated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27060254

  20. Genetic Confirmation of the Role of Sulfopyruvate Decarboxylase in Coenzyme M Biosynthesis in Methanococcus maripaludis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sarmiento, Felipe; Ellison, Courtney K.; Whitman, William B.

    2013-01-01

    Coenzyme M is an essential coenzyme for methanogenesis. The proposed biosynthetic pathway consists of five steps, of which the fourth step is catalyzed by sulfopyruvate decarboxylase (ComDE). Disruption of the gene comE by transposon mutagenesis resulted in a partial coenzyme M auxotroph, which grew poorly in the absence of coenzyme M and retained less than 3% of the wild type level of coenzyme M biosynthesis. Upon coenzyme M addition, normal growth of the mutant was restored. Moreover, complementation of the mutation with the wild type comE gene in trans restored full growth in the absence of coenzyme M. Thesemore » results confirm that ComE plays an important role in coenzyme M biosynthesis. The inability to yield a complete CoM auxotroph suggests that either the transposon insertion failed to completely inactivate the gene or M. maripaludis possesses a promiscuous activity that partially complemented the mutation.« less

  1. Structural Insight into Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase Chemistry Using Coenzyme B Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Cedervall, Peder E.; Dey, Mishtu; Pearson, Arwen R.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2010-09-07

    Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) catalyzes the final and rate-limiting step in methane biogenesis: the reduction of methyl-coenzyme M (methyl-SCoM) by coenzyme B (CoBSH) to methane and a heterodisulfide (CoBS-SCoM). Crystallographic studies show that the active site is deeply buried within the enzyme and contains a highly reduced nickel-tetrapyrrole, coenzyme F430. Methyl-SCoM must enter the active site prior to CoBSH, as species derived from methyl-SCoM are always observed bound to the F430 nickel in the deepest part of the 30 {angstrom} long substrate channel that leads from the protein surface to the active site. The seven-carbon mercaptoalkanoyl chain of CoBSH binds within a 16 {angstrom} predominantly hydrophobic part of the channel close to F430, with the CoBSH thiolate lying closest to the nickel at a distance of 8.8 {angstrom}. It has previously been suggested that binding of CoBSH initiates catalysis by inducing a conformational change that moves methyl-SCoM closer to the nickel promoting cleavage of the C-S bond of methyl-SCoM. In order to better understand the structural role of CoBSH early in the MCR mechanism, we have determined crystal structures of MCR in complex with four different CoBSH analogues: pentanoyl, hexanoyl, octanoyl, and nonanoyl derivatives of CoBSH (CoB5SH, CoB6SH, CoB8SH, and CoB9SH, respectively). The data presented here reveal that the shorter CoB5SH mercaptoalkanoyl chain overlays with that of CoBSH but terminates two units short of the CoBSH thiolate position. In contrast, the mercaptoalkanoyl chain of CoB6SH adopts a different conformation, such that its thiolate is coincident with the position of the CoBSH thiolate. This is consistent with the observation that CoB6SH is a slow substrate. A labile water in the substrate channel was found to be a sensitive indicator for the presence of CoBSH and HSCoM. The longer CoB8SH and CoB9SH analogues can be accommodated in the active site through exclusion of this water. These analogues

  2. 3-Hydroxybenzoate:coenzyme A ligase and 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase from cultured cells of Centaurium erythraea.

    PubMed

    Barillas, W; Beerhues, L

    1997-01-01

    3-Hydroxybenzoate:coenzyme A ligase, an enzyme involved in xanthone biosynthesis, was detected in cell-free extracts from cultured cells of Centaurium erythraea Rafn. The enzyme was separated from 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase by fractionated ammonium sulphate precipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The CoA ligases exhibited different substrate specificities. 3-Hydroxybenzoate:coenzyme A ligase activated 3-hydroxybenzoic acid most efficiently and lacked affinity for cinnamic acids. In contrast, 4-coumarate:CoA ligase mainly catalyzed the activation of 4-coumaric acid but did not act on benzoic acids. The two enzymes were similar with respect to their relative molecular weight, their pH and temperature optima, their specific activity and the changes in their activity during cell culture growth. PMID:9177055

  3. 4-Coumarate:coenzyme A ligase and isoperoxidase expression in Zinnia mesophyll cells induced to differentiate into tracheary elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, D. L.; Galston, A. W.

    1988-01-01

    When cultured in inductive medium containing adequate auxin and cytokinin, isolated mesophyll cells of Zinnia elegans L. cv Envy differentiate into tracheary elements with lignified secondary wall thickenings. Differentiation does not occur when cells are cultured in control medium, which has reduced levels of auxin and/or cytokinin. The activities of two enzymes involved in lignin synthesis, 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase and peroxidase, were examined. An induction-specific cationic isoperoxidase, visualized by low pH polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, is detectable in soluble and wall fractions of cultured Zinnia cells long before tracheary elements visibly differentiate and is thus an early marker of differentiation. Compounds (such as antiauxins, anticytokinins, and tunicamycin) that inhibit or delay differentiation alter the expression of this isoperoxidase. 4-Coumarate:coenzyme A ligase activity increases dramatically only as cells differentiate. Together, these results suggest that the onset of lignification in differentiating Zinnia cells might be controlled by the availability of precursors synthesized by way of 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase. These precursors would then be polymerized into lignin in the cell wall by the induction-specific isoperoxidase.

  4. Cardamom Bushy Dwarf Virus Infection in Large Cardamom Alters Plant Selection Preference, Life Stages, and Fecundity of Aphid Vector, Micromyzus kalimpongensis (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amalendu; Das, Amrita; Vijayanandraj, S; Mandal, Bikash

    2016-02-01

    Cardamom bushy dwarf virus (CBDV) causes foorkey disease of large cardamom (Ammomum subulatum Roxburgh) in the eastern sub-Himalayan mountains. Although the aphid Micromyzus kalimpongensis Basu (Hemiptera: Aphididae) is known as a vector of CBDV, its behavior in dissemination of CBDV has not been investigated. In the present study, M. kalimpongensis was observed to colonize in higher number on CBDV-infected large cardamom plants compared with the healthy plants in the several plantations in Sikkim and Darjeeling hills. The affinity of M. kalimpongensis to the diseased large cardamom plants was further confirmed in a contained field experiment with intact plant as well as in a laboratory bioassay with the plant extract, where significantly higher number of aphids settled on the diseased plants or extracts compared with the healthy counterparts. Aphids grown on CBDV-infected large cardamom plants had shortened nymphal period and increased longevity and fecundity compared with those grown on the healthy plants. In the contained field experiment, M. kalimpongensis migrated to the CBDV-infected plants, colonized there, acquired CBDV, and once the diseased plants withered, migrated to healthy plants, which eventually became diseased. Our results suggest a general pattern of spread of CBDV by M. kalimpongensis where CBDV-infected plants attract or arrest and stimulate emergence and migration of viruliferous aphids that otherwise are sedentary in the underground plant parts of large cardamom. To our knowledge, this is the first study that shows the influence of a plant virus from the family Nanoviridae in altering behavior of its insect vector that favors its dissemination. PMID:26518036

  5. Coenzyme Q10 Administration Increases Brain Mitochondrial Concentrations and Exerts Neuroprotective Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Russell T.; Yang, Lichuan; Browne, Susan; Baik, Myong; Flint Beal, M.

    1998-07-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is an essential cofactor of the electron transport chain as well as a potent free radical scavenger in lipid and mitochondrial membranes. Feeding with coenzyme Q10 increased cerebral cortex concentrations in 12- and 24-month-old rats. In 12-month-old rats administration of coenzyme Q10 resulted in significant increases in cerebral cortex mitochondrial concentrations of coenzyme Q10. Oral administration of coenzyme Q10 markedly attenuated striatal lesions produced by systemic administration of 3-nitropropionic acid and significantly increased life span in a transgenic mouse model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These results show that oral administration of coenzyme Q10 increases both brain and brain mitochondrial concentrations. They provide further evidence that coenzyme Q10 can exert neuroprotective effects that might be useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Identification and molecular characterization of the acetyl coenzyme A synthetase gene (acoE) of Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Priefert, H; Steinbüchel, A

    1992-01-01

    The gene locus acoE, which is involved in the utilization of acetoin in Alcaligenes eutrophus, was identified as the structural gene of an acetyl coenzyme A synthetase (acetate:coenzyme A ligase [AMP forming]; EC 6.2.1.1). This gene was localized on a 3.8-kbp SmaI-EcoRI subfragment of an 8.1-kbp EcoRI restriction fragment (fragment E) that was cloned recently (C. Fründ, H. Priefert, A. Steinbüchel, and H. G. Schlegel, J. Bacteriol. 171:6539-6548, 1989). The 1,983 bp acoE gene encoded a protein with a relative molecular weight of 72,519, and it was preceded by a putative Shine-Dalgarno sequence. A comparison analysis of the amino acid sequence deduced from acoE revealed a high degree of homology to primary structures of acetyl coenzyme A synthetases from other sources (amounting to up to 50.5% identical amino acids). Tn5 insertions in two transposon-induced mutants of A. eutrophus, that were impaired in the catabolism of acetoin were mapped 481 and 1,159 bp downstream from the translational start codon of acoE. The expression of acoE in Escherichia coli led to the formation of an acyl coenzyme A synthetase that accepted acetate as the preferred substrate (100% relative activity) but also reacted with propionate (46%) and hydroxypropionate (87%); fatty acids consisting of four or more carbon atoms were not accepted. In addition, evidence for the presence of a second acyl coenzyme A synthetase was obtained; this enzyme exhibited a different substrate specificity. The latter enzyme is obviously required for the activation of propionate, e.g., during the formation of the storage compound poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid-co-3-hydroxyvaleric acid) when propionate is provided as the sole carbon source. An analysis of mutants provided evidence that the expression of the uptake protein for propionate depends on the presence of alternate sigma factor sigma 54. Images PMID:1356967

  7. NADP+-Preferring d-Lactate Dehydrogenase from Sporolactobacillus inulinus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lingfeng; Xu, Xiaoling; Wang, Limin; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxy acid dehydrogenases, including l- and d-lactate dehydrogenases (L-LDH and D-LDH), are responsible for the stereospecific conversion of 2-keto acids to 2-hydroxyacids and extensively used in a wide range of biotechnological applications. A common feature of LDHs is their high specificity for NAD+ as a cofactor. An LDH that could effectively use NADPH as a coenzyme could be an alternative enzymatic system for regeneration of the oxidized, phosphorylated cofactor. In this study, a d-lactate dehydrogenase from a Sporolactobacillus inulinus strain was found to use both NADH and NADPH with high efficiencies and with a preference for NADPH as its coenzyme, which is different from the coenzyme utilization of all previously reported LDHs. The biochemical properties of the D-LDH enzyme were determined by X-ray crystal structural characterization and in vivo and in vitro enzymatic activity analyses. The residue Asn174 was demonstrated to be critical for NADPH utilization. Characterization of the biochemical properties of this enzyme will contribute to understanding of the catalytic mechanism and provide referential information for shifting the coenzyme utilization specificity of 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases. PMID:26150461

  8. Mouse Model for Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase D (PTPRD) Associations with Restless Leg Syndrome or Willis-Ekbom Disease and Addiction: Reduced Expression Alters Locomotion, Sleep Behaviors and Cocaine-Conditioned Place Preference

    PubMed Central

    Drgonova, Jana; Walther, Donna; Wang, Katherine J; Hartstein, G Luke; Lochte, Bryson; Troncoso, Juan; Uetani, Noriko; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Uhl, George R

    2015-01-01

    The receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase D (PTPRD) gene encodes a cell adhesion molecule likely to influence development and connections of addiction-, locomotion- and sleep-related brain circuits in which it is expressed. The PTPRD gene harbors genome-wide association signals in studies of restless leg syndrome (Willis-Ekbom disease [WED]/restless leg syndrome [RLS]; p < 10−8) and addiction-related phenotypes (clusters of nearby single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs] with 10−2 > p > 10−8 associations in several reports). We now report work that seeks (a) association between PTPRD genotypes and expression of its mRNA in postmortem human brains and (b) RLS-related, addiction-related and comparison behavioral phenotypes in hetero- and homozygous PTPRD knockout mice. We identify associations between PTPRD SNPs and levels of PTPRD mRNA in human brain samples that support validity of mouse models with altered PTPRD expression. Knockouts display less behaviorally defined sleep at the end of their active periods. Heterozygotes move more despite motor weakness/impersistence. Heterozygotes display shifted dose-response relationships for cocaine reward. They display greater preference for places paired with 5 mg/kg cocaine and less preference for places paired with 10 or 20 mg/kg. The combined data provide support for roles for common, level-of-expression PTPRD variation in locomotor, sleep and drug reward phenotypes relevant to RLS and addiction. Taken together, mouse and human results identify PTPRD as a novel therapeutic target for RLS and addiction phenotypes. PMID:26181631

  9. Coenzyme B12 can be produced by engineered Escherichia coli under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yeounjoo; Ashok, Somasundar; Ainala, Satish Kumar; Sankaranarayanan, Mugesh; Chun, Ah Yeong; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Park, Sunghoon

    2014-12-01

    Coenzyme B12 (Vitamin B12 ) is one of the most complex biomolecules and an essential cofactor required for the catalytic activity of many enzymes. Pseudomonas denitrificans synthesizes coenzyme B12 in an oxygen-dependent manner using a pathway encoded by more than 25 genes that are located in six different operons. Escherichia coli, a robust and suitable host for metabolic engineering was used to produce coenzyme B12 . These genes were cloned into three compatible plasmids and expressed heterologously in E. coli BL21 (DE3). Real-time PCR, SDS-PAGE analysis and bioassay showed that the recombinant E. coli expressed the coenzyme B12 synthetic genes and successfully produced coenzyme B12 . However, according to the quantitative determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, the amount of coenzyme B12 produced by the recombinant E. coli (0.21 ± 0.02 μg/g cdw) was approximately 13-fold lower than that by P. denitrificans (2.75 ± 0.22 μg/g cdw). Optimization of the culture conditions to improve the production of coenzyme B12 by the recombinant E. coli was successful, and the highest titer (0.65 ± 0.03 μg/g cdw) of coenzyme B12 was obtained. Interestingly, although the synthesis of coenzyme B12 in P. denitrificans is strictly oxygen-dependent, the recombinant E. coli could produce coenzyme B12 under anaerobic conditions. PMID:25146562

  10. Deregulated Coenzyme A, Loss of Metabolic Flexibility and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jackowski, Suzanne; Leonardi, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA) is an essential cofactor that is emerging as a global regulator of energy metabolism. Tissue CoA levels are tightly regulated and vary in response to different conditions including nutritional state and diabetes. Recent studies reveal the ability of this cofactor to control the output of key metabolic pathways. CoA regulation is important for the maintenance of metabolic flexibility and glucose homeostasis. PMID:25110012

  11. Coenzyme B12 Repurposed for Photoregulation of Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Karl; Kräutler, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    Old cofactor, new tricks: In enzymes, coenzyme B12 has a well-known function as a radical initiator through homolysis of the Co-C bond. It has recently been shown that nature has repurposed this cofactor as a photosensitive switch for the regulation of bacterial carotenoid biosynthesis. Co-C bond breakage is again the key event in this process, triggering huge conformational changes in the B12 -binding protein. PMID:27010518

  12. Mitofusin 2 is required to maintain mitochondrial coenzyme Q levels

    PubMed Central

    Mourier, Arnaud; Motori, Elisa; Brandt, Tobias; Lagouge, Marie; Atanassov, Ilian; Galinier, Anne; Rappl, Gunter; Brodesser, Susanne; Hultenby, Kjell; Dieterich, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria form a dynamic network within the cell as a result of balanced fusion and fission. Despite the established role of mitofusins (MFN1 and MFN2) in mitochondrial fusion, only MFN2 has been associated with metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases, which suggests that MFN2 is needed to maintain mitochondrial energy metabolism. The molecular basis for the mitochondrial dysfunction encountered in the absence of MFN2 is not understood. Here we show that loss of MFN2 leads to impaired mitochondrial respiration and reduced ATP production, and that this defective oxidative phosphorylation process unexpectedly originates from a depletion of the mitochondrial coenzyme Q pool. Our study unravels an unexpected and novel role for MFN2 in maintenance of the terpenoid biosynthesis pathway, which is necessary for mitochondrial coenzyme Q biosynthesis. The reduced respiratory chain function in cells lacking MFN2 can be partially rescued by coenzyme Q10 supplementation, which suggests a possible therapeutic strategy for patients with diseases caused by mutations in the Mfn2 gene. PMID:25688136

  13. Autotrophic acetyl coenzyme A biosynthesis in Methanococcus maripaludis.

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, J; Whitman, W B

    1988-01-01

    To detect autotrophic CO2 assimilation in cell extracts of Methanococcus maripaludis, lactate dehydrogenase and NADH were added to convert pyruvate formed from autotrophically synthesized acetyl coenzyme A to lactate. The lactate produced was determined spectrophotometrically. When CO2 fixation was pulled in the direction of lactate synthesis, CO2 reduction to methane was inhibited. Bromoethanesulfonate (BES), a potent inhibitor of methanogenesis, enhanced lactate synthesis, and methyl coenzyme M inhibited it in the absence of BES. Lactate synthesis was dependent on CO2 and H2, but H2 + CO2-independent synthesis was also observed. In cell extracts, the rate of lactate synthesis was about 1.2 nmol min-1 mg of protein-1. When BES was added, the rate of lactate synthesis increased to 2.3 nmol min-1 mg of protein-1. Because acetyl coenzyme A did not stimulate lactate synthesis, pyruvate synthase may have been the limiting activity in these assays. Radiolabel from 14CO2 was incorporated into lactate. The percentages of radiolabel in the C-1, C-2, and C-3 positions of lactate were 73, 33, and 11%, respectively. Both carbon monoxide and formaldehyde stimulated lactate synthesis. 14CH2O was specifically incorporated into the C-3 of lactate, and 14CO was incorporated into the C-1 and C-2 positions. Low concentrations of cyanide also inhibited autotrophic growth, CO dehydrogenase activity, and autotrophic lactate synthesis. These observations are in agreement with the acetogenic pathway of autotrophic CO2 assimilation. PMID:3133359

  14. The role of zinc in the methylation of the coenzyme M thiol group in methanol:coenzyme M methyltransferase from Methanosarcina barkeri.

    PubMed

    Krüer, Markus; Haumann, Michael; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Thauer, Rudolf K; Dau, Holger

    2002-04-01

    Methanol:coenzyme M methyltransferase from methanogenic archaea is a cobalamin-dependent enzyme composed of three different subunits: MtaA, MtaB and MtaC. MtaA is a zinc protein that catalyzes the methylation of coenzyme M (HS-CoM) with methylcob(III)alamin. We report zinc XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) results indicating that, in the absence of coenzyme M, zinc is probably coordinated by a single sulfur ligand and three oxygen or nitrogen ligands. In the presence of coenzyme M, one (N/O)-ligand was replaced by sulfur, most likely due to ligation of the thiol group of coenzyme M. Mutations in His237 or Cys239, which are proposed to be involved in ligating zinc, resulted in an over 90% loss in enzyme activity and in distinct changes in the zinc ligands. In the His237-->Ala and Cys239-->Ala mutants, coenzyme M also seemed to bind efficiently by ligation to zinc indicating that some aspects of the zinc ligand environment are surprisingly uncritical for coenzyme M binding. PMID:11985589

  15. Assay for methylmalonyl coenzyme A mutase activity based on determination of succinyl coenzyme A by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Kana; Nakajima, Yoko; Tajima, Go; Hotta, Yuji; Kataoka, Tomoya; Kawade, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Naruji; Ito, Tetsuya; Kimura, Kazunori; Maeda, Yasuhiro

    2015-07-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) is an inherited metabolic disease. In this condition, metabolism from methylmalonyl coenzyme A (CoA) to succinyl-CoA is inhibited because of either low methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM) activity or adenosylcobalamin deficiency owing to altered vitamin B12 metabolism. A high-precision assay for detecting MCM activity would facilitate not only MMA diagnosis but also the ability to determine the severity of MMA. We developed an MCM assay method based on ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) that involves the determination of succinyl-CoA, which is formed in an enzyme reaction, using peripheral lymphocytes. Using 0.05, 0.5, and 5 μmol/L succinyl-CoA, the intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) was less than 5.2% and the inter-assay CV was less than 8.7%. The MCM activities of five healthy individuals and four patients were investigated with this assay. The MCM activities of the patients were very low in relation to those of healthy individuals. Together, these results show that the UPLC-MS/MS method is useful for a detailed MCM activity assay. PMID:26018627

  16. 2,4-Dihydroxy and O2 Protonated Tautomers of dThd and Thd Coexist in the Gas Phase: Methylation Alters Protonation Preferences versus dUrd and Urd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, R. R.; Yang, Bo; Frieler, C. E.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2016-03-01

    The gas-phase structures of protonated thymidine, [dThd + H]+, and its modified form, protonated 5-methyluridine, [Thd + H]+, are examined by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy combined with electronic structure calculations. IRMPD action spectra are measured over the ranges extending from ~600 to 1900 cm-1 and ~2800 to 3800 cm-1 using the FELIX free electron laser and an optical parametric oscillator/amplifier (OPO/OPA) laser system, respectively. Comparisons between the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) linear IR spectra calculated for the stable low-energy conformers and the measured IRMPD spectra are used to determine the most favorable tautomeric conformations of [dThd + H]+ and [Thd + H]+ and to identify those populated in the experiments. Both B3LYP and MP2 levels of theory predict a minor 2,4-dihydroxy tautomer as the ground-state conformer of [dThd + H]+ and [Thd + H]+ indicating that the 2'-hydroxyl substituent of Thd does not exert a significant impact on the structural features. [dThd + H]+ and [Thd + H]+ share parallel IRMPD spectral profiles and yields in both the FELIX and OPO regions. Comparisons between the measured IRMPD and calculated IR spectra suggest that minor 2,4-dihydroxy tautomers and O2 protonated conformers of [dThd + H]+ and [Thd + H]+ are populated in the experiments. Comparison of this work to our previous IRMPD spectroscopy study of protonated 2'-deoxyuridine and uridine suggests that the 5-methyl substituent alters the preferences of O2 versus O4 protonation.

  17. Investigation of pyridine carboxylic acids in CM2 carbonaceous chondrites: Potential precursor molecules for ancient coenzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2014-07-01

    The distribution and abundances of pyridine carboxylic acids (including nicotinic acid) in eight CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 85013, DOM 03183, DOM 08003, EET 96016, LAP 02333, LAP 02336, LEW 85311, and WIS 91600) were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection and high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We find that pyridine monocarboxylic acids are prevalent in CM2-type chondrites and their abundance negatively correlates with the degree of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration that the meteorite parent body experienced. We also report the first detection of pyridine dicarboxylic acids in carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we carried out laboratory studies of proton-irradiated pyridine in carbon dioxide-rich ices (a 1:1 mixture) to serve as a model of the interstellar ice chemistry that may have led to the synthesis of pyridine carboxylic acids. Analysis of the irradiated ice residue shows that a comparable suite of pyridine mono- and dicarboxylic acids was produced, although aqueous alteration may still play a role in the synthesis (and ultimate yield) of these compounds in carbonaceous meteorites. Nicotinic acid is a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a likely ancient molecule used in cellular metabolism in all of life, and its common occurrence in CM2 chondrites may indicate that meteorites may have been a source of molecules for the emergence of more complex coenzymes on the early Earth.

  18. Investigation of Pyridine Carboxylic Acids in CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrites: Potential Precursor Molecules for Ancient Coenzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and abundances of pyridine carboxylic acids (including nicotinic acid) in eight CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 85013, DOM 03183, DOM 08003, EET 96016, LAP 02333, LAP 02336, LEW 85311, and WIS 91600) were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection and high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We find that pyridine monocarboxylic acids are prevalent in CM2-type chondrites and their abundance negatively correlates with the degree of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration that the meteorite parent body experienced. We lso report the first detection of pyridine dicarboxylic acids in carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we carried out laboratory studies of proton-irradiated pyridine in carbon dioxide-rich ices (a 1:1 mixture) to serve as a model of the interstellar ice chemistry that may have led to the synthesis of pyridine carboxylic acids. Analysis of the irradiated ice residue shows that a comparable suite of pyridine mono- and dicarboxylic acids was produced, although aqueous alteration may still play a role in the synthesis (and ultimate yield) of these compounds in carbonaceous meteorites. Nicotinic acid is a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a likely ancient molecule used in cellular metabolism in all of life, and its common occurrence in CM2 chondrites may indicate that meteorites may have been a source of molecules for the emergence of more complex coenzymes on the early Earth.

  19. Investigation of Pyridine Carboxylic Acids in CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrites: Potential Precursor Molecules for Ancient Coenzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and abundances of pyridine carboxylic acids (including nicotinic acid) in eight CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 85013, DOM 03183, DOM 08003, EET 96016, LAP 02333, LAP 02336, LEW 85311, and WIS 91600) were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection and high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We find that pyridine monocarboxylic acids are prevalent in CM2-type chondrites and their abundance negatively correlates with the degree of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration that the meteorite parent body experienced. We also report the first detection of pyridine dicarboxylic acids in carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we carried out laboratory studies of proton-irradiated pyridine in carbon dioxide-rich ices (a 1:1 mixture) to serve as a model of the interstellar ice chemistry that may have led to the synthesis of pyridine carboxylic acids. Analysis of the irradiated ice residue shows that a comparable suite of pyridine mono- and dicarboxylic acids was produced, although aqueous alteration may still play a role in the synthesis (and ultimate yield) of these compounds in carbonaceous meteorites. Nicotinic acid is a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a likely ancient molecule used in cellular metabolism in all of life, and its common occurrence in CM2 chondrites may indicate that meteorites may have been a source of molecules for the emergence of more complex coenzymes on the early Earth.

  20. Survival transcriptome in the coenzyme Q10 deficiency syndrome is acquired by epigenetic modifications: a modelling study for human coenzyme Q10 deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ayala, Daniel J M; Guerra, Ignacio; Jiménez-Gancedo, Sandra; Cascajo, Maria V; Gavilán, Angela; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio; Briones, Paz; Artuch, Rafael; De Cabo, Rafael; Salviati, Leonardo; Navas, Plácido

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency syndrome is a rare condition that causes mitochondrial dysfunction and includes a variety of clinical presentations as encephalomyopathy, ataxia and renal failure. First, we sought to set up what all have in common, and then investigate why CoQ10 supplementation reverses the bioenergetics alterations in cultured cells but not all the cellular phenotypes. Design Modelling study This work models the transcriptome of human CoQ10 deficiency syndrome in primary fibroblast from patients and study the genetic response to CoQ10 treatment in these cells. Setting Four hospitals and medical centres from Spain, Italy and the USA, and two research laboratories from Spain and the USA. Participants Primary cells were collected from patients in the above centres. Measurements We characterised by microarray analysis the expression profile of fibroblasts from seven CoQ10-deficient patients (three had primary deficiency and four had a secondary form) and aged-matched controls, before and after CoQ10 supplementation. Results were validated by Q-RT-PCR. The profile of DNA (CpG) methylation was evaluated for a subset of gene with displayed altered expression. Results CoQ10-deficient fibroblasts (independently from the aetiology) showed a common transcriptomic profile that promotes cell survival by activating cell cycle and growth, cell stress responses and inhibiting cell death and immune responses. Energy production was supported mainly by glycolysis while CoQ10 supplementation restored oxidative phosphorylation. Expression of genes involved in cell death pathways was partially restored by treatment, while genes involved in differentiation, cell cycle and growth were not affected. Stably demethylated genes were unaffected by treatment whereas we observed restored gene expression in either non-methylated genes or those with an unchanged methylation pattern. Conclusions CoQ10 deficiency induces a specific transcriptomic profile that promotes

  1. Strategies for regeneration of nicotinamide coenzymes emphasizing self-sufficient closed-loop recycling systems.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Werner; Gröger, Harald

    2014-12-10

    Biocatalytic reduction reactions depending on nicotinamide coenzymes require an additional reaction to regenerate the consumed cofactor. For preparative application the preferred method is the simultaneous coupling of an in situ regeneration reaction. There are different strategically advantageous routes to achieve this goal. The standard method uses a second enzyme and a second co-substrate, for example formate and formate dehydrogenase or glucose and glucose dehydrogenase. Alternatively, a second substrate is employed which is converted by the same enzyme used for the primary reaction. For example, alcohol dehydrogenase catalyzed reactions are often coupled with excess 2-propanol which is oxidized to acetone during the regeneration of NAD(P)H. A third method utilizes a reaction-internal sequence by the direct coupling of an oxidizing and a reducing enzyme reaction. Neither an additional substrate nor a further regenerating enzyme are required for the recycling reaction. This kind of "closed-loop" or "self-sufficient" redox process for cofactor regeneration has been used rarely so far. Its most intriguing advantage is that even redox reactions with unstable precursors can be realized provided that this compound is produced in situ by an opposite redox reaction. This elegant method is applicable in special cases only but increasing numbers of examples have been published during the last years. PMID:25102236

  2. l-Malyl-Coenzyme A/β-Methylmalyl-Coenzyme A Lyase Is Involved in Acetate Assimilation of the Isocitrate Lyase-Negative Bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Michael; Saum, Stephan; Alber, Birgit E.; Fuchs, Georg

    2005-01-01

    Cell extracts of Rhodobacter capsulatus grown on acetate contained an apparent malate synthase activity but lacked isocitrate lyase activity. Therefore, R. capsulatus cannot use the glyoxylate cycle for acetate assimilation, and a different pathway must exist. It is shown that the apparent malate synthase activity is due to the combination of a malyl-coenzyme A (CoA) lyase and a malyl-CoA-hydrolyzing enzyme. Malyl-CoA lyase activity was 20-fold up-regulated in acetate-grown cells versus glucose-grown cells. Malyl-CoA lyase was purified 250-fold with a recovery of 6%. The enzyme catalyzed not only the reversible condensation of glyoxylate and acetyl-CoA to l-malyl-CoA but also the reversible condensation of glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA to β-methylmalyl-CoA. Enzyme activity was stimulated by divalent ions with preference for Mn2+ and was inhibited by EDTA. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined, and a corresponding gene coding for a 34.2-kDa protein was identified and designated mcl1. The native molecular mass of the purified protein was 195 ± 20 kDa, indicating a homohexameric composition. A homologous mcl1 gene was found in the genomes of the isocitrate lyase-negative bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodospirillum rubrum in similar genomic environments. For Streptomyces coelicolor and Methylobacterium extorquens, mcl1 homologs are located within gene clusters implicated in acetate metabolism. We therefore propose that l-malyl-CoA/β-methylmalyl-CoA lyase encoded by mcl1 is involved in acetate assimilation by R. capsulatus and possibly other glyoxylate cycle-negative bacteria. PMID:15687206

  3. Molecular Insights into the Biosynthesis of the F420 Coenzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Forouhar,F.; Abashidze, M.; Xu, H.; Grochowski, L.; Seetharaman, J.; Hussain, M.; Kuzin, A.; Chen, Y.; Zhou, W.; et al

    2008-01-01

    Coenzyme F420, a hydride carrier, is found in Archaea and some bacteria and has crucial roles in methanogenesis, antibiotic biosynthesis, DNA repair, and activation of antitubercular compounds. CofD, 2-phospho-l-lactate transferase, catalyzes the last step in the biosynthesis of F420-0 (F420 without polyglutamate), by transferring the lactyl phosphate moiety of lactyl(2)diphospho-(5')guanosine to 7,8-didemethyl-8-hydroxy-5-deazariboflavin ribitol (Fo). CofD is highly conserved among F420-producing organisms, and weak sequence homologs are also found in non-F420-producing organisms. This superfamily does not share any recognizable sequence conservation with other proteins. Here we report the first crystal structures of CofD, the free enzyme and two ternary complexes, with Fo and Pi or with Fo and GDP, from Methanosarcina mazei. The active site is located at the C-terminal end of a Rossmann fold core, and three large insertions make significant contributions to the active site and dimer formation. The observed binding modes of Fo and GDP can explain known biochemical properties of CofD and are also supported by our binding assays. The structures provide significant molecular insights into the biosynthesis of the F420 coenzyme. Large structural differences in the active site region of the non-F420-producing CofD homologs suggest that they catalyze a different biochemical reaction.

  4. Coenzyme-like ligands for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Lu, Liushen; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun; Wang, Wu

    2016-05-15

    Two coenzyme-like chemical ligands were designed and synthesized for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase (COD). To simulate the structure of natural coenzyme of COD (flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)), on Sepharose beads, 5-aminouracil, cyanuric chloride and 1, 4-butanediamine were composed and then modified. The COD gene from Brevibacterium sp. (DQ345780) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and then the sorbents were applied to adsorption analysis with the pure enzyme. Subsequently, the captured enzyme was applied to SDS-PAGE and activity analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax) of the two affinity sorbents (RL-1 and RL-2) were ∼83.5 and 46.3mg/g wet gel; and the desorption constant Kd of the two sorbents were ∼6.02×10(-4) and 1.19×10(-4)μM. The proteins after cell lysis were applied to affinity isolation, and then after one step of affinity binding on the two sorbents, the protein recoveries of RL-1 and RL-2 were 9.2% and 9.7%; the bioactivity recoveries were 92.7% and 91.3%, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the purities of COD isolated with the two affinity sorbents were approximately 95%. PMID:26856529

  5. Excited flavin and pterin coenzyme molecules in evolution.

    PubMed

    Kritsky, M S; Telegina, T A; Vechtomova, Y L; Kolesnikov, M P; Lyudnikova, T A; Golub, O A

    2010-10-01

    Excited flavin and pterin molecules are active in intermolecular energy transfer and in photocatalysis of redox reactions resulting in conservation of free energy. Flavin-containing pigments produced in models of the prebiotic environment are capable of converting photon energy into the energy of phosphoanhydride bonds of ATP. However, during evolution photochemical reactions involving excited FMN or FAD molecules failed to become participants of bioenergy transfer systems, but they appear in enzymes responsible for repair of UV-damaged DNA (DNA photolyases) and also in receptors of blue and UV-A light regulating vital functions of organisms. The families of these photoproteins (DNA-photolyases and cryptochromes, LOV-domain- and BLUF-domain-containing proteins) are different in the structure and in mechanisms of the photoprocesses. The excited flavin molecules are involved in photochemical processes in reaction centers of these photoproteins. In DNA photolyases and cryptochromes the excitation energy on the reaction center flavin is supplied from an antenna molecule that is bound with the same polypeptide. The role of antenna is played by MTHF or by 8-HDF in some DNA photolyases, i.e. also by molecules with known coenzyme functions in biocatalysis. Differences in the structure of chromophore-binding domains suggest an independent origin of the photoprotein families. The analysis of structure and properties of coenzyme molecules reveals some specific features that were significant in evolution for their being selected as chromophores in these proteins. PMID:21166638

  6. Coenzyme Q-10 in Human Health: Supporting Evidence?

    PubMed

    Saha, Sibu P; Whayne, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q-10 (CoQ10) is a widely used alternative medication or dietary supplement and one of its roles is as an antioxidant. It naturally functions as a coenzyme and component of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Decreased levels have been demonstrated in diseased myocardium and in Parkinson disease. Farnesyl pyrophosphate is a critical intermediate for CoQ10 synthesis and blockage of this step may be important in statin myopathy. Deficiency of CoQ10 also has been associated with encephalomyopathy, severe infantile multisystemic disease, cerebellar ataxia, nephrotic syndrome, and isolated myopathy. Although supplementation with CoQ10 has been reported to be beneficial in treating hypertension, congestive heart failure, statin myopathy, and problems associated with chemotherapy for cancer treatement, this use of CoQ10 as a supplement has not been confirmed in randomized controlled clinical trials. Nevertheless, it appears to be a safe supplementary medication where usage in selected clinical situations may not be inappropriate. This review is an attempt to actualize the available information on CoQ10 and define its potential benefit and appropriate usage. PMID:26741866

  7. Contexts, Gaming Pleasures, and Gendered Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Diane

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author explores computer gaming preferences of girls through observations of a games club at an all-girl state school in the United Kingdom. The author argues that gaming tastes are alterable and site specific. Gaming preferences certainly relate to the attributes of particular games, but they will also depend on the player's…

  8. Structure of NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli - reflections on the basis of coenzyme specificity in the family of glutamate dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, Michael A.; Oliveira, Tânia F.; Engel, Paul C.; Khan, Amir R.

    2013-09-05

    Glutamate dehydrogenases catalyse the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate, using NAD+ and/or NADP+ as a cofactor. Subunits of homo-hexameric bacterial enzymes comprise a substrate-binding domain I followed by a nucleotide-binding domain II. The reaction occurs in a catalytic cleft between the two domains. Although conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domains of various dehydrogenases have been linked to cofactor preferences, the structural basis for specificity in the GDH family remains poorly understood. Here, the refined crystal structure of Escherichia coli GDH in the absence of reactants is described at 2.5-Å resolution. Modelling of NADP+ in domain II reveals the potential contribution of positively charged residues from a neighbouring α-helical hairpin to phosphate recognition. In addition, a serine that follows the P7 aspartate is presumed to form a hydrogen bond with the 2'-phosphate. Mutagenesis and kinetic analysis confirms the importance of these residues in NADP+ recognition. Surprisingly, one of the positively charged residues is conserved in all sequences of NAD+-dependent enzymes, but the conformations adopted by the corresponding regions in proteins whose structure has been solved preclude their contribution to the coordination of the 2'-ribose phosphate of NADP+. These studies clarify the sequence–structure relationships in bacterial GDHs, revealing that identical residues may specify different coenzyme preferences, depending on the structural context. Primary sequence alone is therefore not a reliable guide for predicting coenzyme specificity. We also consider how it is possible for a single sequence to accommodate both coenzymes in the dual-specificity GDHs of animals.

  9. Preparation and physicochemical characterization of aqueous dispersions of coenzyme Q10 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Siekmann, B; Westesen, K

    1995-02-01

    The present study describes a novel pharmaceutical formulation of coenzyme Q10, viz. submicron-sized dispersions of the substance prepared by emulsification of molten coenzyme Q10 in an aqueous phase. Photon correlation spectroscopy reveals mean diameters of 60 to 300 nm depending on process parameters. Coenzyme Q10 nanoparticles remain stable on storage for more than 30 months. Lipophilic drugs can be incorporated into the nanoparticles demonstrating their potential use as a drug carrier system. Transmission electron micrographs of freeze-fractured replica show spherical particles with an amorphous core. Cryo-electron microscopy reveals the coexistence of small unilamellar vesicles in phospholipid stabilized dispersions. Thermoanalysis and X-ray studies indicate that the dispersed and emulsified coenzyme Q10 does not recrystallize even at 4 degrees C over 30 months. These agree with 1H NMR data which demonstrate that coenzyme Q10 molecules have a high mobility when formulated as nanoparticles and that colloidally dispersed coenzyme Q10 remains in the state of a supercooled melt. Despite the high melting point of the bulk material, coenzyme Q10 dispersions represent no suspensions but O/W emulsions according to the IUPAC definition (1). PMID:7784334

  10. Mechanistic implications from structures of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase complexed with coenzyme and an alcohol.

    PubMed

    Plapp, Bryce V; Charlier, Henry A; Ramaswamy, S

    2016-02-01

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I is a homotetramer of subunits with 347 amino acid residues, catalyzing the oxidation of alcohols using NAD(+) as coenzyme. A new X-ray structure was determined at 3.0 Å where both subunits of an asymmetric dimer bind coenzyme and trifluoroethanol. The tetramer is a pair of back-to-back dimers. Subunit A has a closed conformation and can represent a Michaelis complex with an appropriate geometry for hydride transfer between coenzyme and alcohol, with the oxygen of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol ligated at 2.1 Å to the catalytic zinc in the classical tetrahedral coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, and His-66. Subunit B has an open conformation, and the coenzyme interacts with amino acid residues from the coenzyme binding domain, but not with residues from the catalytic domain. Coenzyme appears to bind to and dissociate from the open conformation. The catalytic zinc in subunit B has an alternative, inverted coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, His-66 and the carboxylate of Glu-67, while the oxygen of trifluoroethanol is 3.5 Å from the zinc. Subunit B may represent an intermediate in the mechanism after coenzyme and alcohol bind and before the conformation changes to the closed form and the alcohol oxygen binds to the zinc and displaces Glu-67. PMID:26743849

  11. Potency of pre–post treatment of coenzyme Q10 and melatonin supplement in ameliorating the impaired fatty acid profile in rodent model of autism

    PubMed Central

    El-Ansary, Afaf; Al-Ghamdi, Mashael; Bhat, Ramesa Shafi; Al-daihan, Sooad; Al-Ayadhi, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Background Abnormalities in fatty acid metabolism and membrane fatty acid composition play a part in a wide range of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Altered fatty acid homeostasis as a result of insufficient dietary supplementation, genetic defects, the function of enzymes involved in their metabolism, or mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the development of autism. Objective This study evaluates the association of altered brain lipid composition and neurotoxicity related to autism spectrum disorders in propionic acid (PA)–treated rats. Design Forty-eight young male western albino rats were used in this study. They were grouped into six equal groups with eight rats in each. The first group received only phosphate buffered saline (control group). The second group received a neurotoxic dose of buffered PA (250 mg/kg body weight/day for 3 consecutive days). The third and fourth groups were intoxicated with PA as described above followed by treatment with either coenzyme Q (4.5 mg/kg body weight) or melatonin (10 mg/kg body weight) for 1 week (therapeutically treated groups). The fifth and sixth groups were administered both compounds for 1 week prior to PA (protected groups). Methyl esters of fatty acid were extracted with hexane, and the fatty acid composition of the extract was analyzed on a gas chromatography. Results The obtained data proved that fatty acids are altered in brain tissue of PA-treated rats. All saturated fatty acids were increased while all unsaturated fatty acids were significantly decreased in the PA-treated group and relatively ameliorated in the pre–post melatonin and coenzyme Q groups. Conclusions Melatonin and coenzyme Q were effective in restoring normal level of most of the impaired fatty acids in PA-intoxicated rats which could help suggest both as supplements to ameliorate the autistic features induced in rat pups. PMID:26945230

  12. Reduction and Methyl Transfer Kinetics of the Alpha Subunit from Acetyl-Coenzyme A Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Xiangshi Tan; Christopher Sewell; Qingwu Yang; Paul A. Lindahl

    2003-01-15

    OAK-B135 Stopped-flow was used to evaluate the methylation and reduction kinetics of the isolated alpha subunit of acetyl-Coenzyme A synthase from Moorella thermoacetica. This catalytically active subunit contains a novel Ni-X-Fe4S4 cluster and a putative unidentified n =2 redox site called D. The D-site must be reduced for a methyl group to transfer from a corrinoid-iron-sulfur protein, a key step in the catalytic synthesis of acetyl-CoA. The Fe4S4 component of this cluster is also redox active, raising the possibility that it is the D-site or a portion thereof. Results presented demonstrate that the D-site reduces far faster than the Fe4S4 component, effectively eliminating this possibility. Rather, this component may alter catalytically important properties of the Ni center. The D-site is reduced through a pathway that probably does not involve the Fe4S4 component of this active-site cluster.

  13. Dependence of brown adipose tissue function on CD36-mediated coenzyme Q uptake.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Courtney M; Kazantzis, Melissa; Wang, Jinshan; Venkatraman, Subramaniam; Goncalves, Renata L S; Quinlan, Casey L; Ng, Ryan; Jastroch, Martin; Benjamin, Daniel I; Nie, Biao; Herber, Candice; Van, An-Angela Ngoc; Park, Michael J; Yun, Dawee; Chan, Karen; Yu, Angela; Vuong, Peter; Febbraio, Maria; Nomura, Daniel K; Napoli, Joseph L; Brand, Martin D; Stahl, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) possesses the inherent ability to dissipate metabolic energy as heat through uncoupled mitochondrial respiration. An essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain is coenzyme Q (CoQ). While cells synthesize CoQ mostly endogenously, exogenous supplementation with CoQ has been successful as a therapy for patients with CoQ deficiency. However, which tissues depend on exogenous CoQ uptake as well as the mechanism by which CoQ is taken up by cells and the role of this process in BAT function are not well understood. Here, we report that the scavenger receptor CD36 drives the uptake of CoQ by BAT and is required for normal BAT function. BAT from mice lacking CD36 displays CoQ deficiency, impaired CoQ uptake, hypertrophy, altered lipid metabolism, mitochondrial dysfunction, and defective nonshivering thermogenesis. Together, these data reveal an important new role for the systemic transport of CoQ to BAT and its function in thermogenesis. PMID:25620701

  14. Polyunsaturated fatty acyl-coenzyme As are inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis in zebrafish and mice

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Santhosh; Tran, Vy My; Kuberan, Balagurunathan; Schlegel, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Lipid disorders pose therapeutic challenges. Previously we discovered that mutation of the hepatocyte β-hydroxybutyrate transporter Slc16a6a in zebrafish causes hepatic steatosis during fasting, marked by increased hepatic triacylglycerol, but not cholesterol. This selective diversion of trapped ketogenic carbon atoms is surprising because acetate and acetoacetate can exit mitochondria and can be incorporated into both fatty acids and cholesterol in normal hepatocytes. To elucidate the mechanism of this selective diversion of carbon atoms to fatty acids, we fed wild-type and slc16a6a mutant animals high-protein ketogenic diets. We find that slc16a6a mutants have decreased activity of the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (Hmgcr), despite increased Hmgcr protein abundance and relative incorporation of mevalonate into cholesterol. These observations suggest the presence of an endogenous Hmgcr inhibitor. We took a candidate approach to identify such inhibitors. First, we found that mutant livers accumulate multiple polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and PUFA-CoAs, and we showed that human HMGCR is inhibited by PUFA-CoAs in vitro. Second, we injected mice with an ethyl ester of the PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid and observed an acute decrease in hepatic Hmgcr activity, without alteration in Hmgcr protein abundance. These results elucidate a mechanism for PUFA-mediated cholesterol lowering through direct inhibition of Hmgcr. PMID:24057001

  15. Dependence of Brown Adipose Tissue Function on CD36-Mediated Coenzyme Q Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Courtney M.; Kazantzis, Melissa; Wang, Jinshan; Venkatraman, Subramaniam; Goncalves, Renata L. S.; Quinlan, Casey L.; Ng, Ryan; Jastroch, Martin; Benjamin, Daniel I.; Nie, Biao; Herber, Candice; Ngoc Van, An-Angela; Park, Michael J.; Yun, Dawee; Chan, Karen; Yu, Angela; Vuong, Peter; Febbraio, Maria; Nomura, Daniel; Napoli, Joseph; Brand, Martin D.; Stahl, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Brown adipose tissue (BAT) possesses the inherent ability to dissipate metabolic energy as heat through uncoupled mitochondrial respiration. An essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain is coenzyme Q (CoQ). While cells mostly synthesize CoQ endogenously, exogenous supplementation with CoQ has been successful as a therapy for patients with CoQ deficiency. However, which tissues depend on exogenous CoQ uptake as well as the mechanism by which CoQ is taken up by cells and the role of this process in BAT function is not well understood. Here we report that the scavenger receptor CD36 drives the uptake of CoQ by BAT and is required for normal BAT function. BAT from mice lacking CD36 displays CoQ deficiency, impaired CoQ uptake, hypertrophy, altered lipid metabolism, mitochondrial dysfunction, and defective non-shivering thermogenesis. Together, these data reveal an important new role for the systemic transport of CoQ to BAT and its function in thermogenesis. PMID:25620701

  16. Synthetic biology for engineering acetyl coenzyme A metabolism in yeast.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used cell factory for the production of fuels, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The use of this cell factory for cost-efficient production of novel fuels and chemicals requires high yields and low by-product production. Many industrially interesting chemicals are biosynthesized from acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), which serves as a central precursor metabolite in yeast. To ensure high yields in production of these chemicals, it is necessary to engineer the central carbon metabolism so that ethanol production is minimized (or eliminated) and acetyl-CoA can be formed from glucose in high yield. Here the perspective of generating yeast platform strains that have such properties is discussed in the context of a major breakthrough with expression of a functional pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the cytosol. PMID:25370498

  17. Pyridine nucleotide coenzymes: Chemical, biological, and medical aspects. Vol. 2, Pt. A

    SciTech Connect

    Dolphin, D.; Poulson, R.; Avramovic, O.

    1987-01-01

    This text contains the following: History of the Pyridine Nucleotides Nomenclature; Evolution of Pyridine Nucleotide; Relationship Between Biosynthesis and Evolution; Crystal Structure; Coenzyme Conformations; Protein Interactions; Optical Spectroscopy of the Pyridine Nucleotides; Excited States of Pyridine Nucleotide Coenzymes; Fluorescence and Phosphorescence; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Pyridine Nucleotides; Mass Spectrometry of Pyridine Nucleotides; Mechanism of Action of the Pyridine Nucleotides; Chemical Stability and Reactivity of Pyridine Nucleotide Coenzymes; Stereochemistry of Fatty Acid Biosynthesis and Metabolism; Kinetics of Pyridine Nucleotide-Utilizing Enzymes; Preparation and Properties of NAD and NADP Analogs; Model Studies and Biological Activity of Analogs; and Spin-Labeled Pyridine Nucleotide Derivatives.

  18. Tissue concentrations of coenzyme Q10 in the rat following its oral and intraperitoneal administration.

    PubMed

    Reahal, S; Wrigglesworth, J

    1992-01-01

    Daily oral or ip administration of coenzyme Q10 to rats for time periods of 2 to 10 weeks leads to its accumulation in liver, concentrating in the soluble fraction of the liver cells. No uptake of coenzyme Q10 can be detected in the heart or kidney. Intraperitoneal administration also results in the accumulation of coenzyme Q10 in the spleen. It is concluded that the normal endogenous levels of quinone in the rat heart and kidney cannot be supplemented over the long term by administration of exogenous quinone. PMID:1355718

  19. Coenzyme world model of the origin of life.

    PubMed

    Sharov, Alexei A

    2016-06-01

    The origin of life means the emergence of heritable and evolvable self-reproduction. However the mechanisms of primordial heredity were different from those in contemporary cells. Here I argue that primordial life had no nucleic acids; instead heritable signs were represented by isolated catalytically active self-reproducing molecules, similar to extant coenzymes, which presumably colonized surfaces of oil droplets in water. The model further assumes that coenzyme-like molecules (CLMs) changed surface properties of oil droplets (e.g., by oxidizing terminal carbons), and in this way created and sustained favorable conditions for their own self-reproduction. Such niche-dependent self-reproduction is a necessary condition for cooperation between different kinds of CLMs because they have to coexist in the same oil droplets and either succeed or perish together. Additional kinds of hereditary molecules were acquired via coalescence of oil droplets carrying different kinds of CLMs or via modification of already existing CLMs. Eventually, polymerization of CLMs became controlled by other polymers used as templates; and this kind of template-based synthesis eventually resulted in the emergence of RNA-like replicons. Apparently, oil droplets transformed into the outer membrane of cells via engulfing water, stabilization of the surface, and osmoregulation. In result, the metabolism was internalized allowing cells to accumulate free-floating resources (e.g., animoacids, ATP), which was a necessary condition for the development of protein synthesis. Thus, life originated from simple but already functional molecules, and its gradual evolution towards higher complexity was driven by cooperation and natural selection. PMID:26968100

  20. The Reaction Mechanism of Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Wongnate, Thanyaporn; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) is a nickel tetrahydrocorphinoid (coenzyme F430) containing enzyme involved in the biological synthesis and anaerobic oxidation of methane. MCR catalyzes the conversion of methyl-2-mercaptoethanesulfonate (methyl-SCoM) and N-7-mercaptoheptanoylthreonine phosphate (CoB7SH) to CH4 and the mixed disulfide CoBS-SCoM. In this study, the reaction of MCR from Methanothermobacter marburgensis, with its native substrates was investigated using static binding, chemical quench, and stopped-flow techniques. Rate constants were measured for each step in this strictly ordered ternary complex catalytic mechanism. Surprisingly, in the absence of the other substrate, MCR can bind either substrate; however, only one binary complex (MCR·methyl-SCoM) is productive whereas the other (MCR·CoB7SH) is inhibitory. Moreover, the kinetic data demonstrate that binding of methyl-SCoM to the inhibitory MCR·CoB7SH complex is highly disfavored (Kd = 56 mm). However, binding of CoB7SH to the productive MCR·methyl-SCoM complex to form the active ternary complex (CoB7SH·MCR(NiI)·CH3SCoM) is highly favored (Kd = 79 μm). Only then can the chemical reaction occur (kobs = 20 s−1 at 25 °C), leading to rapid formation and dissociation of CH4 leaving the binary product complex (MCR(NiII)·CoB7S−·SCoM), which undergoes electron transfer to regenerate Ni(I) and the final product CoBS-SCoM. This first rapid kinetics study of MCR with its natural substrates describes how an enzyme can enforce a strictly ordered ternary complex mechanism and serves as a template for identification of the reaction intermediates. PMID:25691570

  1. Sunflower Oil but Not Fish Oil Resembles Positive Effects of Virgin Olive Oil on Aged Pancreas after Life-Long Coenzyme Q Addition.

    PubMed

    González-Alonso, Adrián; Ramírez-Tortosa, César L; Varela-López, Alfonso; Roche, Enrique; Arribas, María I; Ramírez-Tortosa, M Carmen; Giampieri, Francesca; Ochoa, Julio J; Quiles, José L

    2015-01-01

    An adequate pancreatic structure is necessary for optimal organ function. Structural changes are critical in the development of age-related pancreatic disorders. In this context, it has been reported that different pancreatic compartments from rats were affected according to the fat composition consumed. Since there is a close relationship between mitochondria, oxidative stress and aging, an experimental approach has been developed to gain more insight into this process in the pancreas. A low dosage of coenzyme Q was administered life-long in rats in order to try to prevent pancreatic aging-related alterations associated to some dietary fat sources. According to that, three groups of rats were fed normocaloric diets containing Coenzyme Q (CoQ) for two years, where virgin olive, sunflower, or fish oil was included as unique fat source. Pancreatic samples for microscopy and blood samples were collected at the moment of euthanasia. The main finding is that CoQ supplementation gives different results according to fat used in diet. When sunflower oil was the main fat in the diet, CoQ supplementation seems to improve endocrine pancreas structure and in particular β-cell mass resembling positive effects of virgin olive oil. Conversely, CoQ intake does not seem to improve the structural alterations of exocrine compartment previously observed in fish oil fed rats. Therefore CoQ may improve pancreatic alterations associated to the chronic intake of some dietary fat sources. PMID:26426013

  2. Sunflower Oil but Not Fish Oil Resembles Positive Effects of Virgin Olive Oil on Aged Pancreas after Life-Long Coenzyme Q Addition

    PubMed Central

    González-Alonso, Adrián; Ramírez-Tortosa, César L.; Varela-López, Alfonso; Roche, Enrique; Arribas, María I.; Ramírez-Tortosa, M. Carmen; Giampieri, Francesca; Ochoa, Julio J.; Quiles, José L.

    2015-01-01

    An adequate pancreatic structure is necessary for optimal organ function. Structural changes are critical in the development of age-related pancreatic disorders. In this context, it has been reported that different pancreatic compartments from rats were affected according to the fat composition consumed. Since there is a close relationship between mitochondria, oxidative stress and aging, an experimental approach has been developed to gain more insight into this process in the pancreas. A low dosage of coenzyme Q was administered life-long in rats in order to try to prevent pancreatic aging-related alterations associated to some dietary fat sources. According to that, three groups of rats were fed normocaloric diets containing Coenzyme Q (CoQ) for two years, where virgin olive, sunflower, or fish oil was included as unique fat source. Pancreatic samples for microscopy and blood samples were collected at the moment of euthanasia. The main finding is that CoQ supplementation gives different results according to fat used in diet. When sunflower oil was the main fat in the diet, CoQ supplementation seems to improve endocrine pancreas structure and in particular β-cell mass resembling positive effects of virgin olive oil. Conversely, CoQ intake does not seem to improve the structural alterations of exocrine compartment previously observed in fish oil fed rats. Therefore CoQ may improve pancreatic alterations associated to the chronic intake of some dietary fat sources. PMID:26426013

  3. How Are Preferences Revealed?

    PubMed Central

    Beshears, John; Choi, James J.; Laibson, David; Madrian, Brigitte C.

    2009-01-01

    Revealed preferences are tastes that rationalize an economic agent’s observed actions. Normative preferences represent the agent’s actual interests. It sometimes makes sense to assume that revealed preferences are identical to normative preferences. But there are many cases where this assumption is violated. We identify five factors that increase the likelihood of a disparity between revealed preferences and normative preferences: passive choice, complexity, limited personal experience, third-party marketing, and intertemporal choice. We then discuss six approaches that jointly contribute to the identification of normative preferences: structural estimation, active decisions, asymptotic choice, aggregated revealed preferences, reported preferences, and informed preferences. Each of these approaches uses consumer behavior to infer some property of normative preferences without equating revealed and normative preferences. We illustrate these issues with evidence from savings and investment outcomes. PMID:24761048

  4. Component A of the methyl coenzyme M methylreductase system of Methanobacterium: resolution into four components.

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, D P; Wolfe, R S

    1983-01-01

    Component A, the oxygen-sensitive protein fraction of the methyl coenzyme M methylreductase system of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, has been stabilized and resolved into three protein fractions and one cofactor that are required to reconstitute component A activity. Component A1 is oxygen-stable and contains hydrogen-dependent deazaflavin (coenzyme F420)-reducing activity. Component A2 is acidic; components A2 and A3 are oxygen sensitive. The specific functions of each component in methyl group reduction are unknown. Resolution of component A revealed a new cofactor requirement of the methylreductase system for FAD. Hydrogen-dependent reduction of methyl coenzyme M to methane and coenzyme M, the terminal step of CO2 reduction by methanogenic bacteria, requires protein components A1, A2, A3, and C in addition to component B, FAD, ATP, and Mg2+. PMID:6403944

  5. Supplementation of Coenzyme Q10 among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qiuhua; Pierce, Janet D.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality with ever increasing prevalence in the United States and worldwide. There is growing body of evidence suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction secondary to oxidative stress plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of T2DM. Coenzyme Q10 is an important micronutrient acting on the electron transport chain of the mitochondria with two major functions: (1) synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP); and (2) a potent antioxidant. Deficiency in coenzyme Q10 is often seen in patients with T2DM. Whether restoration of coenzyme Q10 will help alleviate oxidative stress, preserve mitochondrial function, and thus improve glycemic control in T2DM is unclear. This article reviews the relationships among oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and T2DM and examines the evidence for potential use of coenzyme Q10 as a supplement for the treatment of T2DM. PMID:27417763

  6. Coenzyme Q10 and periodontal treatment: is there any beneficial effect?

    PubMed

    Watts, T L

    1995-03-25

    Many dentists have been surprised by recent media claims of periodontal benefits with a purportedly revolutionary dietary supplement. The research literature on coenzyme Q10's periodontal effects does not extend to the international English language dental literature, which perhaps explains the surprise. A review of the available literature does not give any ground for the claims made, and selected papers are discussed to show that there is actually some evidence that coenzyme Q10 has no place in periodontal treatment. PMID:7718355

  7. Observational Effects on the Preferences of Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaf, Justin B.; Oppenheim-Leaf, Misty L.; Leaf, Ronald; Courtemanche, Andrea B.; Taubman, Mitchell; McEachin, John; Sheldon, Jan B.; Sherman, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may play with limited objects or toys, making it difficult for teachers to identify reinforcers to use in teaching new skills. The goal of this study was to alter children's preferences from highly preferred toys to toys that were originally less preferred using an observational pairing procedure.…

  8. Octopamine influences honey bee foraging preference.

    PubMed

    Giray, Tugrul; Galindo-Cardona, Alberto; Oskay, Devrim

    2007-07-01

    Colony condition and differences in individual preferences influence forage type collected by bees. Physiological bases for the changing preferences of individual foragers are just beginning to be examined. Recently, for honey bees octopamine is shown to influence age at onset of foraging and probability of dance for rewards. However, octopamine has not been causally linked with foraging preference in the field. We tested the hypothesis that changes in octopamine may alter forage type (preference hypothesis). We treated identified foragers orally with octopamine or its immediate precursor, tyramine, or sucrose syrup (control). Octopamine-treated foragers switched type of material collected; control bees did not. Tyramine group results were not different from the control group. In addition, sugar concentrations of nectar collected by foragers after octopamine treatment were lower than before treatment, indicating change in preference. In contrast, before and after nectar concentrations for bees in the control group were similar. These results, taken together, support the preference hypothesis. PMID:17574568

  9. Octopamine influences honey bee foraging preference

    PubMed Central

    Giray, Tugrul; Galindo, Alberto; Oskay, Devrim

    2010-01-01

    Colony condition and differences in individual preferences influence forage type collected by bees. Physiological bases for the changing preferences of individual foragers are just beginning to be examined. Recently, for honey bees octopamine is shown to influence age at onset of foraging and probability of dance for rewards. However, octopamine has not been causally linked with foraging preference in the field. We tested the hypothesis that changes in octopamine may alter forage type (preference hypothesis). We treated identified foragers orally with octopamine or its immediate precursor, tyramine, or sucrose syrup (control). Octopamine treated foragers switched type of material collected, control bees did not. Tyramine group results were not different from the control group. In addition, sugar concentrations of nectar collected by foragers after octopamine treatment were lower than before treatment, indicating change in preference. In contrast, before and after nectar concentrations for bees in the control group were similar. These results, taken together, support the preference hypothesis. PMID:17574568

  10. Purification and Characterization of Cinnamoyl-Coenzyme A:NADP Oxidoreductase in Eucalyptus gunnii.

    PubMed Central

    Goffner, D.; Campbell, M. M.; Campargue, C.; Clastre, M.; Borderies, G.; Boudet, A.; Boudet, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    Cinnamoyl-coenzyme A:NADP oxidoreductase (CCR, EC 1.2.1.44), the entry-point enzyme into the monolignol biosynthetic pathway, was purified to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity from differentiating xylem of Eucalyptus gunnii Hook. The purified protein is a monomer of 38 kD and has an isoelectric point of 7. Although Eucalyptus gunnii CCR has approximately equal affinities for all possible substrates (p-coumaroyl-coenzyme A, feruloyl-coenzyme A, and sinapoyl-coenzyme A), it is approximately three times more effective at converting feruloyl-coenzyme A than the other substrates. To gain a better understanding of the catalytic regulation of Eucalyptus CCR, a variety of compounds were tested to determine their effect on CCR activity. CCR activity is inhibited by NADP and coenzyme A. Effectors that bind lysine and cysteine residues also inhibit CCR activity. As a prerequisite to the study of the regulation of CCR at the molecular level, polyclonal antibodies were obtained. PMID:12232355

  11. The Relationship between Coenzyme Q10, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Enzymes Activities and Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bor-Jen; Lin, Yi-Chin; Huang, Yi-Chia; Ko, Ya-Wen; Hsia, Simon; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2012-01-01

    A higher oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between coenzyme Q10 concentration and lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes activities and the risk of CAD. Patients who were identified by cardiac catheterization as having at least 50% stenosis of one major coronary artery were assigned to the case group (n = 51). The control group (n = 102) comprised healthy individuals with normal blood biochemical values. The plasma coenzyme Q10, malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzymes activities (catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)) were measured. Subjects with CAD had significant lower plasma coenzyme Q10, CAT and GPx activities and higher MDA and SOD levels compared to those of the control group. The plasma coenzyme Q10 was positively correlated with CAT and GPx activities and negatively correlated with MDA and SOD. However, the correlations were not significant after adjusting for the potential confounders of CAD with the exception of SOD. A higher level of plasma coenzyme Q10 (≥0.52 μmol/L) was significantly associated with reducing the risk of CAD. Our results support the potential cardioprotective impact of coenzyme Q10. PMID:22645453

  12. Transitivity of Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regenwetter, Michel; Dana, Jason; Davis-Stober, Clintin P.

    2011-01-01

    Transitivity of preferences is a fundamental principle shared by most major contemporary rational, prescriptive, and descriptive models of decision making. To have transitive preferences, a person, group, or society that prefers choice option "x" to "y" and "y" to "z" must prefer "x" to "z". Any claim of empirical violations of transitivity by…

  13. Decreased Coenzyme Q10 Levels in Multiple System Atrophy Cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Barca, Emanuele; Kleiner, Giulio; Tang, Guomei; Ziosi, Marcello; Tadesse, Saba; Masliah, Eliezer; Louis, Elan D; Faust, Phyllis; Kang, Un J; Torres, Jose; Cortes, Etty P; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul G; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Quinzii, Catarina M

    2016-07-01

    In familial and sporadic multiple system atrophy (MSA) patients, deficiency of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has been associated with mutations in COQ2, which encodes the second enzyme in the CoQ10 biosynthetic pathway. Cerebellar ataxia is the most common presentation of CoQ10 deficiency, suggesting that the cerebellum might be selectively vulnerable to low levels of CoQ10 To investigate whether CoQ10 deficiency represents a common feature in the brains of MSA patients independent of the presence of COQ2 mutations, we studied CoQ10 levels in postmortem brains of 12 MSA, 9 Parkinson disease (PD), 9 essential tremor (ET) patients, and 12 controls. We also assessed mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activities, oxidative stress, mitochondrial mass, and levels of enzymes involved in CoQ biosynthesis. Our studies revealed CoQ10 deficiency in MSA cerebellum, which was associated with impaired CoQ biosynthesis and increased oxidative stress in the absence of COQ2 mutations. The levels of CoQ10 in the cerebella of ET and PD patients were comparable or higher than in controls. These findings suggest that CoQ10 deficiency may contribute to the pathogenesis of MSA. Because no disease modifying therapies are currently available, increasing CoQ10 levels by supplementation or upregulation of its biosynthesis may represent a novel treatment strategy for MSA patients. PMID:27235405

  14. The cobalamin (coenzyme B12) biosynthetic genes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J G; Roth, J R

    1995-01-01

    The enteric bacterium Escherichia coli synthesizes cobalamin (coenzyme B12) only when provided with the complex intermediate cobinamide. Three cobalamin biosynthetic genes have been cloned from Escherichia coli K-12, and their nucleotide sequences have been determined. The three genes form an operon (cob) under the control of several promoters and are induced by cobinamide, a precursor of cobalamin. The cob operon of E. coli comprises the cobU gene, encoding the bifunctional cobinamide kinase-guanylyltransferase; the cobS gene, encoding cobalamin synthetase; and the cobT gene, encoding dimethylbenzimidazole phosphoribosyltransferase. The physiological roles of these sequences were verified by the isolation of Tn10 insertion mutations in the cobS and cobT genes. All genes were named after their Salmonella typhimurium homologs and are located at the corresponding positions on the E. coli genetic map. Although the nucleotide sequences of the Salmonella cob genes and the E. coli cob genes are homologous, they are too divergent to have been derived from an operon present in their most recent common ancestor. On the basis of comparisons of G+C content, codon usage bias, dinucleotide frequencies, and patterns of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions, we conclude that the cob operon was introduced into the Salmonella genome from an exogenous source. The cob operon of E. coli may be related to cobalamin synthetic genes now found among non-Salmonella enteric bacteria. PMID:7592411

  15. Neutron Laue diffraction studies of coenzyme cob(II)alamin.

    PubMed

    Langan, P; Lehmann, M; Wilkinson, C; Jogl, G; Kratky, C

    1999-01-01

    Using a recently designed neutron single-crystal diffractometer utilizing a narrow-band Laue concept (LADI), diffraction data were collected from a crystal of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin (B12r), crystallized from a mixture of D2O and perdeuterated acetone. The instrument was placed at the end of a cold neutron guide at the Institute Laue Langevin (ILL, Grenoble, France), and data collection with neutrons of 1.8-8.0 A wavelength to a crystallographic resolution of 1.43 A was complete after about 36 h. This compares favourably with a previous experiment utilizing the same crystal specimen, where more than four weeks were required to collect monochromatic diffraction data to about 1 A resolution. Using the Laue data, the structure was solved by molecular replacement with the known X-ray crystal structure. Difference density maps revealed the atomic positions (including deuterium atoms) of seven ordered solvent water molecules and two (partially disordered) acetone molecules. These density maps were compared with corresponding maps computed with monochromatic neutron-diffraction data collected to 1. 0 A resolution using the same crystal specimen, as well as to maps derived from high-resolution (0.90 A) synchrotron X-ray data. In spite of the better definition of atomic positions in the two high-resolution maps, the 1.43 A LADI maps show considerable power for the determination of the location of hydrogen and deuterium positions. PMID:10089394

  16. Coenzyme Q10 analytical determination in biological matrices and pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Lucangioli, Silvia; Martinefski, Manuela; Tripodi, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the analytical determination of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has gained importance in clinical diagnosis and in pharmaceutical quality control. CoQ10 is an important cofactor in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and a potent endogenous antioxidant. CoQ10 deficiency is often associated with numerous diseases and patients with these conditions may benefit from administration of supplements of CoQ10. In this regard, it has been observed that the best benefits are obtained when CoQ10 deficiency is diagnosed and treated early. Therefore, it is of great value to develop analytical methods for the detection and quantification of CoQ10 in this type of disease. The methods above mentioned should be simple enough to be used in routine clinical laboratories as well as in quality control of pharmaceutical formulations containing CoQ10. Here, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different methods of CoQ10 analysis. PMID:27100710

  17. Protein Acetylation and Acetyl Coenzyme A Metabolism in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Galdieri, Luciano; Zhang, Tiantian; Rogerson, Daniella; Lleshi, Rron

    2014-01-01

    Cells sense and appropriately respond to the physical conditions and availability of nutrients in their environment. This sensing of the environment and consequent cellular responses are orchestrated by a multitude of signaling pathways and typically involve changes in transcription and metabolism. Recent discoveries suggest that the signaling and transcription machineries are regulated by signals which are derived from metabolism and reflect the metabolic state of the cell. Acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) is a key metabolite that links metabolism with signaling, chromatin structure, and transcription. Acetyl-CoA is produced by glycolysis as well as other catabolic pathways and used as a substrate for the citric acid cycle and as a precursor in synthesis of fatty acids and steroids and in other anabolic pathways. This central position in metabolism endows acetyl-CoA with an important regulatory role. Acetyl-CoA serves as a substrate for lysine acetyltransferases (KATs), which catalyze the transfer of acetyl groups to the epsilon-amino groups of lysines in histones and many other proteins. Fluctuations in the concentration of acetyl-CoA, reflecting the metabolic state of the cell, are translated into dynamic protein acetylations that regulate a variety of cell functions, including transcription, replication, DNA repair, cell cycle progression, and aging. This review highlights the synthesis and homeostasis of acetyl-CoA and the regulation of transcriptional and signaling machineries in yeast by acetylation. PMID:25326522

  18. Coenzyme Q10 protects hair cells against aminoglycoside.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Kazuma; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Mikuriya, Takefumi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Kanagawa, Eiju; Hara, Hirotaka; Shimogori, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the production of free radicals is associated with sensory cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. Many researchers have reported that antioxidant reagents protect sensory cells in the inner ear, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an antioxidant that is consumed as a health food in many countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CoQ10 in mammalian vestibular hair cell death induced by aminoglycoside. Cultured utricles of CBA/CaN mice were divided into three groups (control group, neomycin group, and neomycin + CoQ10 group). In the neomycin group, utricles were cultured with neomycin (1 mM) to induce hair cell death. In the neomycin + CoQ10 group, utricles were cultured with neomycin and water-soluble CoQ10 (30-0.3 µM). Twenty-four hours after exposure to neomycin, the cultured tissues were fixed, and vestibular hair cells were labeled using an anti-calmodulin antibody. Significantly more hair cells survived in the neomycin + CoQ10 group than in the neomycin group. These data indicate that CoQ10 protects sensory hair cells against neomycin-induced death in the mammalian vestibular epithelium; therefore, CoQ10 may be useful as a protective drug in the inner ear. PMID:25265538

  19. Apolipoprotein A1 regulates coenzyme Q10 absorption, mitochondrial function, and infarct size in a mouse model of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Dadabayev, Alisher R; Yin, Guotian; Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; McIntyre, Thomas M; Lesnefsky, Edward J; Penn, Marc S

    2014-07-01

    HDL and apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) concentrations inversely correlate with risk of death from ischemic heart disease; however, the role of apoA1 in the myocardial response to ischemia has not been well defined. To test whether apoA1, the primary HDL apolipoprotein, has an acute anti-inflammatory role in ischemic heart disease, we induced myocardial infarction via direct left anterior descending coronary artery ligation in apoA1 null (apoA1(-/-)) and apoA1 heterozygous (apoA1(+/-)) mice. We observed that apoA1(+/-) and apoA1(-/-) mice had a 52% and 125% increase in infarct size as a percentage of area at risk, respectively, compared with wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice. Mitochondrial oxidation contributes to tissue damage in ischemia-reperfusion injury. A substantial defect was present at baseline in the electron transport chain of cardiac myocytes from apoA1(-/-) mice localized to the coenzyme Q (CoQ) pool with impaired electron transfer (67% decrease) from complex II to complex III. Administration of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) to apoA1 null mice normalized the cardiac mitochondrial CoQ pool and reduced infarct size to that observed in WT mice. CoQ10 administration did not significantly alter infarct size in WT mice. These data identify CoQ pool content leading to impaired mitochondrial function as major contributors to infarct size in the setting of low HDL/apoA1. These data suggest a previously unappreciated mechanism for myocardial stunning, cardiac dysfunction, and muscle pain associated with low HDL and low apoA1 concentrations that can be corrected by CoQ10 supplementation and suggest populations of patients that may benefit particularly from CoQ10 supplementation. PMID:24759932

  20. MeaA, a Putative Coenzyme B12-Dependent Mutase, Provides Methylmalonyl Coenzyme A for Monensin Biosynthesis in Streptomyces cinnamonensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiwen; Reynolds, Kevin A.

    2001-01-01

    The ratio of the major monensin analogs produced by Streptomyces cinnamonensis is dependent upon the relative levels of the biosynthetic precursors methylmalonyl-coenzyme A (CoA) (monensin A and monensin B) and ethylmalonyl-CoA (monensin A). The meaA gene of this organism was cloned and sequenced and was shown to encode a putative 74-kDa protein with significant amino acid sequence identity to methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM) (40%) and isobutyryl-CoA mutase (ICM) large subunit (36%) and small subunit (52%) from the same organism. The predicted C terminus of MeaA contains structural features highly conserved in all coenzyme B12-dependent mutases. Plasmid-based expression of meaA from the ermE∗ promoter in the S. cinnamonensis C730.1 strain resulted in a decreased ratio of monensin A to monensin B, from 1:1 to 1:3. Conversely, this ratio increased to 4:1 in a meaA mutant, S. cinnamonensis WM2 (generated from the C730.1 strain by insertional inactivation of meaA by using the erythromycin resistance gene). In both of these experiments, the overall monensin titers were not significantly affected. Monensin titers, however, did decrease over 90% in an S. cinnamonensis WD2 strain (an icm meaA mutant). Monensin titers in the WD2 strain were restored to at least wild-type levels by plasmid-based expression of the meaA gene or the Amycolatopsis mediterranei mutAB genes (encoding MCM). In contrast, growth of the WD2 strain in the presence of 0.8 M valine led only to a partial restoration (<25%) of monensin titers. These results demonstrate that the meaA gene product is significantly involved in methylmalonyl-CoA production in S. cinnamonensis and that under the tested conditions the presence of both MeaA and ICM is crucial for monensin production in the WD2 strain. These results also indicate that valine degradation, implicated in providing methylmalonyl-CoA precursors for many polyketide biosynthetic processes, does not do so to a significant degree for monensin biosynthesis

  1. Changes in concentrations of coenzyme F420 analogs during batch growth of Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanosarcina mazei.

    PubMed Central

    Peck, M W

    1989-01-01

    Coenzyme F420 has been assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorimetric detection; this permits quantification of individual coenzyme F420 analogs whilst avoiding the inclusion of interfering material. The total intracellular coenzyme F420 content of Methanosarcina barkeri MS cultivated on methanol and on H2-CO2 and of Methanosarcina mazei S-6 cultured on methanol remained relatively constant during batch growth. The most abundant analogs in M. barkeri were coenzymes F420-2 and F420-4, whilst in M. mazei coenzymes F420-2 and F420-3 predominated. Significant changes in the relative proportions of the coenzyme F420 analogs were noted during batch growth, with coenzymes F420-2 and F420-4 showing opposite responses to each other and the same being also true for coenzymes F420-3 and F420-5. This suggests that an enzyme responsible for transferring pairs of glutamic acid residues may be active. The degradation fragment FO was also detected in cells in late exponential and stationary phase. Coenzyme F420 analogs were present in the culture supernatant of both methanogens, in similar proportions to that in the cells, except for FO which was principally located in the supernatant. PMID:2729992

  2. Coenzyme Q10 protects ischemic myocardium in an open-chest swine model.

    PubMed

    Atar, D; Mortensen, S A; Flachs, H; Herzog, W R

    1993-01-01

    Myocardial stunning, defined as a reversible decrease in contractility after ischemia and reperfusion, may be a manifestation of reperfusion injury caused by free oxygen radical damage. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that pretreatment with coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone), believed to act as a free radical scavenger, reduces myocardial stunning in a porcine model. Twelve swine were randomized to receive either oral supplementation with coenzyme Q10 or placebo for 20 days. A normothermic open-chest model was used with short occlusion (8 min) of the distal left descending coronary artery followed by reperfusion. Regional contractile function was measured with epicardial Doppler crystals in ischemic and nonischemic segments by measuring thickening fraction of the left ventricular wall during systole. Stunning time was defined as the elapsed time of reduced contractility until return to baseline. Coenzyme Q10 concentrations were measured in blood and homogenized myocardial tissue by high performance liquid chromatography. Plasma levels of reduced coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinol) were higher in swine pretreated with the experimental medication as compared to placebo (mean 0.45 mg/l versus 0.11 mg/l, respectively). Myocardial tissue concentrations, however, did not show any changes (mean 0.79 micrograms/mg dry weight versus 0.74 micrograms/mg). Stunning time was significantly reduced in coenzyme Q10 pretreated animals (13.7 +/- 7.7 min versus 32.8 +/- 3.1 min, P < 0.01). In conclusion, chronic pretreatment with coenzyme Q10 protects ischemic myocardium in an open-chest swine model. The beneficial effect of coenzyme Q10 on myocardial stunning may be due to protection from free radical mediated reperfusion injury. This protective effect seems to be generated by a humoral rather than intracellular mechanism. PMID:8241692

  3. Decreased hepatic contents of coenzyme A molecular species in mice after subchronic mild social defeat stress.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoshifumi; Goto, Tatsuhiko; Hagiya, Yuki; Chohnan, Shigeru; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2016-03-01

    Social stress may precipitate psychiatric disorders such as depression, which is related to the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. We have evaluated the effects of social stress on central and peripheral metabolism using a model of depression in mice. In the present study, we focused on coenzyme A (CoA) molecular species [i.e. non-esterified CoA (CoASH), acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA] which play important roles in numerous metabolic pathways, and we analyzed changes in expression of these molecules in the hypothalamus and liver of adult male mice (C57BL/6J) subjected to 10 days of subchronic mild social defeat stress (sCSDS) with ICR mice as aggressors. Mice (n = 12) exposed to showed hyperphagia- and polydipsia-like symptoms and increased body weight gain compared with control mice which were not affected by exposure to ICR mice (n = 12). To elucidate the underlying metabolic features in the sCSDS model, acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and CoASH tissue levels were analyzed using the acyl-CoA cycling method. The levels of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, which decreases feeding behavior, were not influenced by sCSDS. However, sCSDS reduced levels of acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and total CoA (sum of the three CoA molecular species) in the liver. Hence, hyperphagia-like symptoms in sCSDS mice evidently occurred independently of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, but might consequently lead to down-regulation of hepatic CoA via altered expression of nudix hydrolase 7. Future studies should investigate the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the down-regulation of liver CoA pools in sCSDS mice. PMID:26864137

  4. Promotion of growth by Coenzyme Q10 is linked to gene expression in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Alexandra; Niklowitz, Petra; Menke, Thomas; Döring, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ, ubiquinone) is an essential component of the respiratory chain, a cofactor of pyrimidine biosynthesis and acts as an antioxidant in extra mitochondrial membranes. More recently CoQ has been identified as a modulator of apoptosis, inflammation and gene expression. CoQ deficient Caenorhabditis elegans clk-1 mutants show several phenotypes including a delayed postembryonic growth. Using wild type and two clk-1 mutants, here we established an experimental set-up to study the consequences of endogenous CoQ deficiency or exogenous CoQ supply on gene expression and growth. We found that a deficiency of endogenous CoQ synthesis down-regulates a cluster of genes that are important for growth (i.e., RNA polymerase II, eukaryotic initiation factor) and up-regulates oxidation reactions (i.e., cytochrome P450, superoxide dismutase) and protein interactions (i.e., F-Box proteins). Exogenous CoQ supply partially restores the expression of these genes as well as the growth retardation of CoQ deficient clk-1 mutants. On the other hand exogenous CoQ supply does not alter the expression of a further sub-set of genes. These genes are involved in metabolism (i.e., succinate dehydrogenase complex), cell signalling or synthesis of lectins. Thus, our work provides a comprehensive overview of genes which can be modulated in their expression by endogenous or exogenous CoQ. As growth retardation in CoQ deficiency is linked to the gene expression profile we suggest that CoQ promotes growth via gene expression. PMID:25234594

  5. Properties of succinyl-coenzyme A:D-citramalate coenzyme A transferase and its role in the autotrophic 3-hydroxypropionate cycle of Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, Silke; Alber, Birgit E; Fuchs, Georg

    2006-09-01

    The phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus uses the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle for autotrophic CO(2) fixation. This cycle starts with acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and produces glyoxylate. Glyoxylate is an unconventional cell carbon precursor that needs special enzymes for assimilation. Glyoxylate is combined with propionyl-CoA to beta-methylmalyl-CoA, which is converted to citramalate. Cell extracts catalyzed the succinyl-CoA-dependent conversion of citramalate to acetyl-CoA and pyruvate, the central cell carbon precursor. This reaction is due to the combined action of enzymes that were upregulated during autotrophic growth, a coenzyme A transferase with the use of succinyl-CoA as the CoA donor and a lyase cleaving citramalyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA and pyruvate. Genomic analysis identified a gene coding for a putative coenzyme A transferase. The gene was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to code for succinyl-CoA:d-citramalate coenzyme A transferase. This enzyme, which catalyzes the reaction d-citramalate + succinyl-CoA --> d-citramalyl-CoA + succinate, was purified and studied. It belongs to class III of the coenzyme A transferase enzyme family, with an aspartate residue in the active site. The homodimeric enzyme composed of 44-kDa subunits was specific for succinyl-CoA as a CoA donor but also accepted d-malate and itaconate instead of d-citramalate. The CoA transferase gene is part of a cluster of genes which are cotranscribed, including the gene for d-citramalyl-CoA lyase. It is proposed that the CoA transferase and the lyase catalyze the last two steps in the glyoxylate assimilation route. PMID:16952935

  6. The Antioxidant Status and Concentrations of Coenzyme Q10 and Vitamin E in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Chi-Hua; Yang, Nae-Cherng; Lee, Bor-Jen; Lin, Jui-Yuan; Hsia, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E and the antioxidant status in subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS). Subjects with MS (n = 72) were included according to the criteria for MS. The non-MS group (n = 105) was comprised of healthy individuals with normal blood biochemical values. The plasma coenzyme Q10, vitamin E concentrations, lipid profiles, and antioxidant enzymes levels (catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase) were measured. The subjects with MS had significantly higher concentrations of plasma coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E than those in the non-MS group, but these differences were not significant after being normalized for triglyceride level. The levels of antioxidant enzymes were significantly lower in the MS group than in the non-MS group. The subjects with the higher antioxidant enzymes activities had significant reductions in the risk of MS (P < 0.01) after being adjusted for coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E. In conclusion, the subjects with MS might be under higher oxidative stress resulting in low levels of antioxidant enzyme activities. A higher level of antioxidant enzymes activities was significantly associated with a reduction in the risk of MS independent of the levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E. PMID:24082857

  7. Rotational preference in gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Thomas; Jeraj, Damian; Vinken, Pia M; Velentzas, Konstantinos

    2012-06-01

    In gymnastics, most skills incorporate rotations about one or more body axes. At present, the question remains open if factors such as lateral preference and/or vestibulo-spinal asymmetry are related to gymnast's rotational preference. Therefore, we sought to explore relationships in gymnast's rotation direction between different gymnastic skills. Furthermore, we sought to explore relationships between rotational preference, lateral preference, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry. In the experiment n = 30 non-experts, n = 30 near-experts and n = 30 experts completed a rotational preference questionnaire, a lateral preference inventory, and the Unterberger-Fukuda Stepping Test. The results revealed, that near-experts and experts more often rotate rightward in the straight jump with a full turn when rotating leftward in the round-off and vice versa. The same relationship was found for experts when relating the rotation preference in the handstand with a full turn to the rotation preference in the straight jump with a full turn. Lateral preference was positively related to rotational preference in non-expert gymnasts, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry was positively related to rotational preference in experts. We suggest, that gymnasts should explore their individual rotational preference by systematically practicing different skills with a different rotation direction, bearing in mind that a clearly developed structure in rotational preference between different skills may be appropriate to develop more complex skills in gymnastics. PMID:23486362

  8. Rotational Preference in Gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Heinen, Thomas; Jeraj, Damian; Vinken, Pia M.; Velentzas, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    In gymnastics, most skills incorporate rotations about one or more body axes. At present, the question remains open if factors such as lateral preference and/or vestibulo-spinal asymmetry are related to gymnast’s rotational preference. Therefore, we sought to explore relationships in gymnast’s rotation direction between different gymnastic skills. Furthermore, we sought to explore relationships between rotational preference, lateral preference, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry. In the experiment n = 30 non-experts, n = 30 near-experts and n = 30 experts completed a rotational preference questionnaire, a lateral preference inventory, and the Unterberger-Fukuda Stepping Test. The results revealed, that near-experts and experts more often rotate rightward in the straight jump with a full turn when rotating leftward in the round-off and vice versa. The same relationship was found for experts when relating the rotation preference in the handstand with a full turn to the rotation preference in the straight jump with a full turn. Lateral preference was positively related to rotational preference in non-expert gymnasts, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry was positively related to rotational preference in experts. We suggest, that gymnasts should explore their individual rotational preference by systematically practicing different skills with a different rotation direction, bearing in mind that a clearly developed structure in rotational preference between different skills may be appropriate to develop more complex skills in gymnastics. PMID:23486362

  9. Nutritional programming of coenzyme Q: potential for prevention and intervention?

    PubMed

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Chen, Jian-Hua; Hargreaves, Iain P; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S; McConnell, Josie M; Ozanne, Susan E

    2014-12-01

    Low birth weight and rapid postnatal growth increases risk of cardiovascular-disease (CVD); however, underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that rats exposed to a low-protein diet in utero that underwent postnatal catch-up growth (recuperated) have a programmed deficit in cardiac coenzyme Q (CoQ) that was associated with accelerated cardiac aging. It is unknown whether this deficit occurs in all tissues, including those that are clinically accessible. We investigated whether aortic and white blood cell (WBC) CoQ is programmed by suboptimal early nutrition and whether postweaning dietary supplementation with CoQ could prevent programmed accelerated aging. Recuperated male rats had reduced aortic CoQ [22 d (35±8.4%; P<0.05); 12 m (53±8.8%; P<0.05)], accelerated aortic telomere shortening (P<0.01), increased DNA damage (79±13% increase in nei-endonucleaseVIII-like-1), increased oxidative stress (458±67% increase in NAPDH-oxidase-4; P<0.001), and decreased mitochondrial complex II-III activity (P<0.05). Postweaning dietary supplementation with CoQ prevented these detrimental programming effects. Recuperated WBCs also had reduced CoQ (74±5.8%; P<0.05). Notably, WBC CoQ levels correlated with aortic telomere-length (P<0.0001) suggesting its potential as a diagnostic marker of vascular aging. We conclude that early intervention with CoQ in at-risk individuals may be a cost-effective and safe way of reducing the global burden of CVDs. PMID:25172893

  10. Identification of mitochondrial coenzyme a transporters from maize and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zallot, Rémi; Agrimi, Gennaro; Lerma-Ortiz, Claudia; Teresinski, Howard J; Frelin, Océane; Ellens, Kenneth W; Castegna, Alessandra; Russo, Annamaria; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Mullen, Robert T; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Hanson, Andrew D

    2013-06-01

    Plants make coenzyme A (CoA) in the cytoplasm but use it for reactions in mitochondria, chloroplasts, and peroxisomes, implying that these organelles have CoA transporters. A plant peroxisomal CoA transporter is already known, but plant mitochondrial or chloroplastic CoA transporters are not. Mitochondrial CoA transporters belonging to the mitochondrial carrier family, however, have been identified in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae; Leu-5p) and mammals (SLC25A42). Comparative genomic analysis indicated that angiosperms have two distinct homologs of these mitochondrial CoA transporters, whereas nonflowering plants have only one. The homologs from maize (Zea mays; GRMZM2G161299 and GRMZM2G420119) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; At1g14560 and At4g26180) all complemented the growth defect of the yeast leu5Δ mitochondrial CoA carrier mutant and substantially restored its mitochondrial CoA level, confirming that these proteins have CoA transport activity. Dual-import assays with purified pea (Pisum sativum) mitochondria and chloroplasts, and subcellular localization of green fluorescent protein fusions in transiently transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 cells, showed that the maize and Arabidopsis proteins are targeted to mitochondria. Consistent with the ubiquitous importance of CoA, the maize and Arabidopsis mitochondrial CoA transporter genes are expressed at similar levels throughout the plant. These data show that representatives of both monocotyledons and eudicotyledons have twin, mitochondrially located mitochondrial carrier family carriers for CoA. The highly conserved nature of these carriers makes possible their reliable annotation in other angiosperm genomes. PMID:23590975

  11. Reduction of ascites mortality in broilers by coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Geng, A L; Guo, Y M; Yang, Y

    2004-09-01

    Effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on growth performance and ascites were studied in broilers. One hundred eighty 1-d-old Arbor Acre male broiler chicks were randomly allocated into 3 groups with 6 replicates each. From d 8, the diets were supplemented with CoQ10 at levels of 0, 20, and 40 mg/kg, respectively. From d 15 to 21, all the chicks were exposed to low ambient temperature (15 to 18 degrees C) to induce ascites. Average feed intake, BW gain, and feed conversion ratio of the broilers during 0 to 3 wk, 3 to 6 wk, and 0 to 6 wk were measured. The results showed that there were no influences observed on broilers' growth performance, but the mortality due to ascites was reduced by CoQ10 supplementation (P < or = 0.05). Erythrocyte osmotic fragility (EOF) was significantly decreased by 40 mg/kg CoQ10 compared with the control, but no significant changes were observed on blood packed cell volume (PCV) among the treatments. Pulmonary arterial diastolic pressure was significantly decreased on d 36, but no significant changes were observed on right ventricular pressure (RVP), pulmonary arterial systolic pressure, and the maximum change ratio of right intraventricular pressure (+/- dp/ dtmax). Ascites heart index (AHI) was significantly decreased by 40 mg/kg CoQ10 supplementation (P < or = 0.05). The results of this study suggested that CoQ10 has a beneficial effect in reducing ascites mortality in broilers, and 40 mg/kg CoQ10 seems to be more effective than 20 mg/ kg CoQ10. PMID:15384911

  12. Measuring Children's Food Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birch, Leann L.; Sullivan, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    Measures of preference are useful predictors of children's food consumption patterns. The paper discusses children's affective response to food and describes the preference assessment procedure which obtains information on children's likes and dislikes. The methodology helps investigate factors influencing development of preferences and food…

  13. Regulation of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Activity in Human Fibroblasts by Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael S.; Dana, Suzanna E.; Goldstein, Joseph L.

    1973-01-01

    The activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.34), the rate-limiting enzyme of hepatic cholesterol biosynthesis, is suppressed in human fibroblasts cultured in the presence of serum. This enzyme activity increases by more than 10-fold after the removal of serum from the medium. The rise in enzyme activity requires de novo protein synthesis and is not accompanied by changes in the activities of several other cellular enzymes. The factor responsible for the suppression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity in cultured fibroblasts is present in the sera of at least four mammalian species, and in human serum it is found in the low-density lipoproteins. Human high-density lipoproteins, very low-density lipoproteins from chicken egg yolk, and the fraction of human serum containing no lipoproteins do not suppress the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. PMID:4352976

  14. The effect of simvastatin on coenzyme Q and antioxidant/oxidant balance in diabetic-hypercholesterolaemic rats.

    PubMed

    Kuzelová, Magdaléna; Adameová, Adriana; Sumbalová, Zuzana; Paulíková, Ingrid; Harcárová, Anna; Svec, Pavel; Kucharská, Jarmila

    2008-12-01

    The effect of simvastatin administered for 10 days on coenzyme Q and antioxidant/oxidant balance in a rat model of diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolaemia was studied. In the diabetic-hypercholesterolaemic rats the signs of oxidative stress-decreased alpha-tocopherol/cholesterol in the plasma (p < 0.01) and alpha-tocopherol in liver (p < 0.001) together with increased lipid peroxidation in the liver (TBARS, p < 0.05) were found. Increased coenzyme Q9 concentrations in the plasma (p < 0.05) and liver (p < 0.01), coenzyme Q10 in the myocardium (p < 0.05) and in the liver (p < 0.01) may indicate adaptation to oxidative stress. Administration of simvastatin (10 mg/kg) to the diabetic-hypercholesterolaemic rats counteracted increased myocardial (coenzyme Q10, p < 0.05) and liver (total coenzyme Q9, p < 0.05) coenzyme Q concentrations but did not improve alpha-tocopherol depletion and increased formation of TBARS in the liver. Even though simvastatin treatment did not induce coenzyme Q deficiency in plasma, heart and liver of the diabetic-hypercholesterolaemic rats as compared to the control levels, it was not able to prevent completely the changes in antioxidant/oxidant balance induced by diabetes and hypercholesterolaemia. The results highlight the importance of studying the effect of statins on the coenzyme Q levels in the animal models of pathological conditions known to change the initial antioxidant defence system. PMID:19202203

  15. Effects of fluvastatin and coenzyme Q10 on skeletal muscle in normo- and hypercholesterolaemic rats.

    PubMed

    Vincze, J; Jenes, Á; Füzi, M; Almássy, J; Németh, R; Szigeti, G; Dienes, B; Gaál, Z; Szentesi, P; Jóna, I; Kertai, P; Paragh, G; Csernoch, L

    2015-06-01

    Myalgia and muscle weakness may appreciably contribute to the poor adherence to statin therapy. Although the pathomechanism of statin-induced myopathy is not completely understood, changes in calcium homeostasis and reduced coenzyme Q10 levels are hypothesized to play important roles. In our experiments, fluvastatin and/or coenzyme Q10 was administered chronically to normocholesterolaemic or hypercholaestherolaemic rats, and the modifications of the calcium homeostasis and the strength of their muscles were investigated. While hypercholesterolaemia did not change the frequency of sparks, fluvastatin increased it on muscles both from normocholesterolaemic and from hypercholesterolaemic rats. This effect, however, was not mediated by a chronic modification of the ryanodine receptor as shown by the unchanged ryanodine binding in the latter group. While coenzyme Q10 supplementation significantly reduced the frequency of the spontaneous calcium release events, it did not affect their amplitude and spatial spread in muscles from fluvastatin-treated rats. This indicates that coenzyme Q10 supplementation prevented the spark frequency increasing effect of fluvastatin without having a major effect on the amount of calcium released during individual sparks. In conclusion, we have found that fluvastatin, independently of the cholesterol level in the blood, consistently and specifically increased the frequency of calcium sparks in skeletal muscle cells, an effect which could be prevented by the addition of coenzyme Q10 to the diet. These results support theories favouring the role of calcium handling in the pathophysiology of statin-induced myopathy and provide a possible pathway for the protective effect of coenzyme Q10 in statin treated patients symptomatic of this condition. PMID:25920381

  16. Cloning and characterization of the methyl coenzyme M reductase genes from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum.

    PubMed Central

    Bokranz, M; Bäumner, G; Allmansberger, R; Ankel-Fuchs, D; Klein, A

    1988-01-01

    The genes coding for methyl coenzyme M reductase were cloned from a genomic library of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum Marburg into Escherichia coli by using plasmid expression vectors. When introduced into E. coli, the reductase genes were expressed, yielding polypeptides identical in size to the three known subunits of the isolated enzyme, alpha, beta, and gamma. The polypeptides also reacted with the antibodies raised against the respective enzyme subunits. In M. thermoautotrophicum, the subunits are encoded by a gene cluster whose transcript boundaries were mapped. Sequence analysis revealed two more open reading frames of unknown function located between two of the methyl coenzyme M reductase genes. Images PMID:2448287

  17. Crystal structure of AibC, a reductase involved in alternative de novo isovaleryl coenzyme A biosynthesis in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Bock, Tobias; Müller, Rolf; Blankenfeldt, Wulf

    2016-08-01

    Isovaleryl coenzyme A (IV-CoA) performs a crucial role during development and fruiting-body formation in myxobacteria, which is reflected in the existence of a de novo biosynthetic pathway that is highly upregulated when leucine, the common precursor of IV-CoA, is limited. The final step in de novo IV-CoA biosynthesis is catalyzed by AibC, a medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase. Here, the crystal structure of AibC from Myxococcus xanthus refined to 2.55 Å resolution is presented. The protein adopts two different conformations in the crystal lattice, which is a consequence of partial interaction with the purification tag. Based on this structure, it is suggested that AibC most probably uses a Zn(2+)-supported catalytic mechanism in which NADPH is preferred over NADH. Taken together, this study reveals structural details of the alternative IV-CoA-producing pathway in myxobacteria, which may serve as a base for further biotechnological research and biofuel production. PMID:27487931

  18. Effects of stress on human mating preferences: stressed individuals prefer dissimilar mates

    PubMed Central

    Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Deuter, Christian E.; Kuehl, Linn K.; Schulz, André; Blumenthal, Terry D.; Schachinger, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    Although humans usually prefer mates that resemble themselves, mating preferences can vary with context. Stress has been shown to alter mating preferences in animals, but the effects of stress on human mating preferences are unknown. Here, we investigated whether stress alters men's preference for self-resembling mates. Participants first underwent a cold-pressor test (stress induction) or a control procedure. Then, participants viewed either neutral pictures or pictures of erotic female nudes whose facial characteristics were computer-modified to resemble either the participant or another participant, or were not modified, while startle eyeblink responses were elicited by noise probes. Erotic pictures were rated as being pleasant, and reduced startle magnitude compared with neutral pictures. In the control group, startle magnitude was smaller during foreground presentation of photographs of self-resembling female nudes compared with other-resembling female nudes and non-manipulated female nudes, indicating a higher approach motivation to self-resembling mates. In the stress group, startle magnitude was larger during foreground presentation of self-resembling female nudes compared with other-resembling female nudes and non-manipulated female nudes, indicating a higher approach motivation to dissimilar mates. Our findings show that stress affects human mating preferences: unstressed individuals showed the expected preference for similar mates, but stressed individuals seem to prefer dissimilar mates. PMID:20219732

  19. Effects of stress on human mating preferences: stressed individuals prefer dissimilar mates.

    PubMed

    Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Deuter, Christian E; Kuehl, Linn K; Schulz, André; Blumenthal, Terry D; Schachinger, Hartmut

    2010-07-22

    Although humans usually prefer mates that resemble themselves, mating preferences can vary with context. Stress has been shown to alter mating preferences in animals, but the effects of stress on human mating preferences are unknown. Here, we investigated whether stress alters men's preference for self-resembling mates. Participants first underwent a cold-pressor test (stress induction) or a control procedure. Then, participants viewed either neutral pictures or pictures of erotic female nudes whose facial characteristics were computer-modified to resemble either the participant or another participant, or were not modified, while startle eyeblink responses were elicited by noise probes. Erotic pictures were rated as being pleasant, and reduced startle magnitude compared with neutral pictures. In the control group, startle magnitude was smaller during foreground presentation of photographs of self-resembling female nudes compared with other-resembling female nudes and non-manipulated female nudes, indicating a higher approach motivation to self-resembling mates. In the stress group, startle magnitude was larger during foreground presentation of self-resembling female nudes compared with other-resembling female nudes and non-manipulated female nudes, indicating a higher approach motivation to dissimilar mates. Our findings show that stress affects human mating preferences: unstressed individuals showed the expected preference for similar mates, but stressed individuals seem to prefer dissimilar mates. PMID:20219732

  20. Estimation of Methanogen Biomass by Quantitation of Coenzyme M

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Krumholz, Lee R.; Tanner, Ralph S.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    1999-01-01

    Determination of the role of methanogenic bacteria in an anaerobic ecosystem often requires quantitation of the organisms. Because of the extreme oxygen sensitivity of these organisms and the inherent limitations of cultural techniques, an accurate biomass value is very difficult to obtain. We standardized a simple method for estimating methanogen biomass in a variety of environmental matrices. In this procedure we used the thiol biomarker coenzyme M (CoM) (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid), which is known to be present in all methanogenic bacteria. A high-performance liquid chromatography-based method for detecting thiols in pore water (A. Vairavamurthy and M. Mopper, Anal. Chim. Acta 78:363–370, 1990) was modified in order to quantify CoM in pure cultures, sediments, and sewage water samples. The identity of the CoM derivative was verified by using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The assay was linear for CoM amounts ranging from 2 to 2,000 pmol, and the detection limit was 2 pmol of CoM/ml of sample. CoM was not adsorbed to sediments. The methanogens tested contained an average of 19.5 nmol of CoM/mg of protein and 0.39 ± 0.07 fmol of CoM/cell. Environmental samples contained an average of 0.41 ± 0.17 fmol/cell based on most-probable-number estimates. CoM was extracted by using 1% tri-(N)-butylphosphine in isopropanol. More than 90% of the CoM was recovered from pure cultures and environmental samples. We observed no interference from sediments in the CoM recovery process, and the method could be completed aerobically within 3 h. Freezing sediment samples resulted in 46 to 83% decreases in the amounts of detectable CoM, whereas freezing had no effect on the amounts of CoM determined in pure cultures. The method described here provides a quick and relatively simple way to estimate methanogenic biomass. PMID:10584015

  1. Characterization of Novel Acyl Coenzyme A Dehydrogenases Involved in Bacterial Steroid Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ruprecht, Amanda; Maddox, Jaymie; Stirling, Alexander J.; Visaggio, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) dehydrogenases (ACADs) FadE34 and CasC, encoded by the cholesterol and cholate gene clusters of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, respectively, were successfully purified. Both enzymes differ from previously characterized ACADs in that they contain two fused acyl-CoA dehydrogenase domains in a single polypeptide. Site-specific mutagenesis showed that only the C-terminal ACAD domain contains the catalytic glutamate base required for enzyme activity, while the N-terminal ACAD domain contains an arginine required for ionic interactions with the pyrophosphate of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor. Therefore, the two ACAD domains must associate to form a single active site. FadE34 and CasC were not active toward the 3-carbon side chain steroid metabolite 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oyl-CoA (4BNC-CoA) but were active toward steroid CoA esters containing 5-carbon side chains. CasC has similar specificity constants for cholyl-CoA, deoxycholyl-CoA, and 3β-hydroxy-5-cholen-24-oyl-CoA, while FadE34 has a preference for the last compound, which has a ring structure similar to that of cholesterol metabolites. Knockout of the casC gene in R. jostii RHA1 resulted in a reduced growth on cholate as a sole carbon source and accumulation of a 5-carbon side chain cholate metabolite. FadE34 and CasC represent unique members of ACADs with primary structures and substrate specificities that are distinct from those of previously characterized ACADs. IMPORTANCE We report here the identification and characterization of acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACADs) involved in the metabolism of 5-carbon side chains of cholesterol and cholate. The two homologous enzymes FadE34 and CasC, from M. tuberculosis and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, respectively, contain two ACAD domains per polypeptide, and we show that these two domains interact to form a single active site. FadE34 and CasC are therefore representatives of a new class of

  2. Evidence for acetyl coenzyme A and cinnamoyl coenzyme A in the anaerobic toluene mineralization pathway in Azoarcus tolulyticus Tol-4.

    PubMed Central

    Chee-Sanford, J C; Frost, J W; Fries, M R; Zhou, J; Tiedje, J M

    1996-01-01

    A toluene-degrading denitrifier, Azoarcus tolulyticus Tol-4, was one of eight similar strains isolated from three petroleum-contaminated aquifer sediments. When the strain was grown anaerobically on toluene, 68% of the carbon from toluene was found as CO2 and 30% was found as biomass. Strain Tol-4 had a doubling time of 4.3 h, a Vmax of 50 micromol x min-1 x g of protein-1, and a cellular yield of 49.6 g x mol of toluene-1. Benzoate appeared to be an intermediate, since F-benzoates accumulated from F-toluenes and [14C]benzoate was produced from [14C]toluene in the presence of excess benzoate. Two metabolites, E-phenylitaconic acid (1 to 2%) and benzylsuccinic acid (<1%), accumulated from anaerobic toluene metabolism. These same products were also produced when cells were grown on hydrocinnamic acid and trans-cinnamic acid but were not produced from benzylalcohol, benzaldehyde, benzoate, p-cresol, or their hydroxylated analogs. The evidence supports an anaerobic toluene degradation pathway involving an initial acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) attack in strain Tol-4, as proposed by Evans and coworkers (P. J. Evans, W. Ling, B. Goldschmidt, E. R. Ritter, and L. Y. Young, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:496-501, 1992) for another toluene-degrading denitrifier, strain T1. Our findings support a modification of the proposed pathway in which cinnamoyl-CoA follows the oxidation of hydrocinnamoyl-CoA, analogous to the presumed oxidation of benzylsuccinic acid to form E-phenylitaconic acid. Cinnamic acid was detected in Tol-4 cultures growing in the presence of toluene and [14C]acetate. We further propose a second acetyl-CoA addition to cinnamoyl-CoA as the source of benzylsuccinic acid and E-phenylitaconic acid. This pathway is supported by the finding that monofluoroacetate added to toluene-growing cultures resulted in a significant increase in production of benzylsuccinic acid and E-phenylitaconic acid and by the finding that [14C]benzylsuccinic acid was detected after

  3. Nano-encapsulation of coenzyme Q10 using octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch (OSA-ST) was used to encapsulate Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). CoQ10 was dissolved in rice bran oil (RBO), and incorporated into an aqueous OSA-ST solution. High pressure homogenization (HPH) of the mixture was conducted at 170 MPa for 5-6 cycles. The resulting ...

  4. Aldose and aldehyde reductases : structure-function studies on the coenzyme and inhibitor-binding sites.

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kabbani, O.; Old, S. E.; Ginell, S. L.; Carper, D. A.; Biosciences Division; Monash Univ.; NIH

    1999-09-03

    PURPOSE: To identify the structural features responsible for the differences in coenzyme and inhibitor specificities of aldose and aldehyde reductases. METHODS: The crystal structure of porcine aldehyde reductase in complex with NADPH and the aldose reductase inhibitor sorbinil was determined. The contribution of each amino acid lining the coenzyme-binding site to the binding of NADPH was calculated using the Discover package. In human aldose reductase, the role of the non-conserved Pro 216 (Ser in aldehyde reductase) in the binding of coenzyme was examined by site-directed mutagenesis. RESULTS: Sorbinil binds to the active site of aldehyde reductase and is hydrogen-bonded to Trp 22, Tyr 50, His 113, and the non-conserved Arg 312. Unlike tolrestat, the binding of sorbinil does not induce a change in the side chain conformation of Arg 312. Mutation of Pro 216 to Ser in aldose reductase makes the binding of coenzyme more similar to that of aldehyde reductase. CONCLUSIONS: The participation of non-conserved active site residues in the binding of inhibitors and the differences in the structural changes required for the binding to occur are responsible for the differences in the potency of inhibition of aldose and aldehyde reductases. We report that the non-conserved Pro 216 in aldose reductase contributes to the tight binding of NADPH.

  5. A possible prebiotic synthesis of pantetheine, a precursor to coenzyme A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefe, A. D.; Newton, G. L.; Miller, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    The involvement of coenzyme A in many enzyme reactions suggests that it acted in this capacity very early in the development of life on Earth. Particularly relevant in this regard is its role in the activation of amino acids and hydroxy acids in the biosynthesis of some peptide antibiotics--a mechanism of peptide synthesis that forms the basis for the proposal that a thioester world could have preceded the RNA world. The components of coenzyme A have been shown to be probable prebiotic compounds: beta-alanine, pantoyl lactone and cysteamine and possibly adenosine. We show here that the pantetheine moiety of coenzyme A (which also occurs in a number of enzymes) can be synthesized in yields of several per cent by heating pantoyl lactone, beta-alanine and cysteamine at temperatures as low as 40 degrees C. These components are extremely soluble and so would have been preferentially concentrated in evaporating bodies of water, for example on beaches and at lagoon margins. Our results show that amide bonds can be formed at temperatures as low as 40 degrees C, and provide circumstantial support for the suggestion that pantetheine and coenzyme A were important in the earliest metabolic systems.

  6. A coenzyme-independent decarboxylase/oxygenase cascade for the efficient synthesis of vanillin.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Miura, Misa; Kino, Kuniki

    2014-10-13

    Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavor compounds in the world as well as a promising versatile building block. The biotechnological production of vanillin from plant-derived ferulic acid has attracted much attention as a new alternative to chemical synthesis. One limitation of the known metabolic pathway to vanillin is its requirement for expensive coenzymes. Here, we developed a novel route to vanillin from ferulic acid that does not require any coenzymes. This artificial pathway consists of a coenzyme-independent decarboxylase and a coenzyme-independent oxygenase. When Escherichia coli cells harboring the decarboxylase/oxygenase cascade were incubated with ferulic acid, the cells efficiently synthesized vanillin (8.0 mM, 1.2 g L(-1) ) via 4-vinylguaiacol in one pot, without the generation of any detectable aromatic by-products. The efficient method described here might be applicable to the synthesis of other high-value chemicals from plant-derived aromatics. PMID:25164030

  7. 4-Hydroxybenzoate-coenzyme A ligase from Rhodopseudomonas palustris: purification, gene sequence, and role in anaerobic degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, J; Dispensa, M; Fogg, G C; Evans, D T; Harwood, C S

    1994-01-01

    Anaerobic metabolism of most aromatic acids is initiated by coenzyme A thioester formation. Rhodopseudomonas palustris grows well under anaerobic, phototrophic conditions with many aromatic acids, including benzoate and 4-hydroxybenzoate, as a carbon source. A coenzyme A ligase that reacts with 4-hydroxybenzoate was purified from 4-hydroxybenzoate-grown cells of R. palustris. This enzyme required MgATP, reduced coenzyme A, and 4-hydroxybenzoate, benzoate, or cyclohex-1,4-dienecarboxylate for optimal activity but also used phosphopantetheine, cyclohex-2,5-dienecarboxylate, and 4-fluorobenzoate at lower rates. The 4-hydroxybenzoate-coenzyme A ligase differed in molecular characteristics from a previously described benzoate-coenzyme A ligase from R. palustris, and the two ligases did not cross-react immunologically. The gene encoding the 4-hydroxybenzoate enzyme was cloned and sequenced. The deduced gene product showed about 20% amino acid identity with bacterial coenzyme A ligases involved in aerobic degradation of aromatic acids. An R. palustris mutant carrying a disrupted 4-hydroxybenzoate-coenzyme A ligase gene was unable to grow with 4-hydroxybenzoate under anaerobic conditions, indicating that the enzyme is essential for anaerobic degradation of this compound. Images PMID:8300518

  8. The Regulation of Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis in Eukaryotic Cells: All That Yeast Can Tell Us

    PubMed Central

    González-Mariscal, Isabel; García-Testón, Elena; Padilla, Sergio; Martín-Montalvo, Alejandro; Pomares Viciana, Teresa; Vazquez-Fonseca, Luis; Gandolfo Domínguez, Pablo; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a mitochondrial lipid, which functions mainly as an electron carrier from complex I or II to complex III at the mitochondrial inner membrane, and also as antioxidant in cell membranes. CoQ is needed as electron acceptor in β-oxidation of fatty acids and pyridine nucleotide biosynthesis, and it is responsible for opening the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. The yeast model has been very useful to analyze the synthesis of CoQ, and therefore, most of the knowledge about its regulation was obtained from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae model. CoQ biosynthesis is regulated to support 2 processes: the bioenergetic metabolism and the antioxidant defense. Alterations of the carbon source in yeast, or in nutrient availability in yeasts or mammalian cells, upregulate genes encoding proteins involved in CoQ synthesis. Oxidative stress, generated by chemical or physical agents or by serum deprivation, modifies specifically the expression of some COQ genes by means of stress transcription factors such as Msn2/4p, Yap1p or Hsf1p. In general, the induction of COQ gene expression produced by metabolic changes or stress is modulated downstream by other regulatory mechanisms such as the protein import to mitochondria, the assembly of a multi-enzymatic complex composed by Coq proteins and also the existence of a phosphorylation cycle that regulates the last steps of CoQ biosynthesis. The CoQ biosynthetic complex assembly starts with the production of a nucleating lipid such as HHB by the action of the Coq2 protein. Then, the Coq4 protein recognizes the precursor HHB acting as the nucleus of the complex. The activity of Coq8p, probably as kinase, allows the formation of an initial pre-complex containing all Coq proteins with the exception of Coq7p. This pre-complex leads to the synthesis of 5-demethoxy-Q6 (DMQ6), the Coq7p substrate. When de novo CoQ biosynthesis is required, Coq7p becomes dephosphorylated by the action of Ptc7p increasing the synthesis

  9. Characterization of the enzymatic conversion of sulfoacetaldehyde and L-cysteine into coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid)

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.H. )

    1988-09-20

    Sulfoacetaldehyde was shown to be converted enzymatically into coenzyme M by cell-free extracts of methanogenic bacteria. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of the S-methyl methyl ester derivative of the coenzyme M isolated from the extracts was used to measure both the extent and position of the deuterium incorporated into coenzyme M from (2,2-{sup 2}H{sub 2})sulfoacetaldehyde. The conversion of sulfoacetaldehyde into coenzyme M was greatly stimulated by the addition of L-cysteine (20 mM) to the extracts and/or by incubating the extracts under hydrogen, whereas incubation in the presence of sulfide (20 mM) greatly reduced coenzyme M synthesis. Incubation of a cell-free extract from Methanobacterium formicicum with (2,2-{sup 2}H{sub 2})sulfoacetaldehyde and ({sup 34}S)-L-cysteine (92.6 atom % {sup 34}S) led to the production of coenzyme M in which the thiol portion of the molecule contained 90 atom % {sup 34}S. (ethylene-{sup 2}H{sub 4})-S-(2-Sulfoethyl)cysteine, incubated with this cell-free extract at a concentration of 22 mM, readily cleaved to coenzyme M. On the basis of these observations, it is concluded that sulfoacetaldehyde is converted into coenzyme M by reacting with cysteine to form the thiazolidine adduct (2-(sulfomethyl)thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid), which undergoes a reductive cleavage of the heterocyclic C(2)-N bond to form S-(2-sulfoethyl)cysteine, which, in turn, undergoes a {beta}-elimination to produce coenzyme M.

  10. Roots of sex preference.

    PubMed

    Lee H-t; Choe, E H

    1982-12-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of not yet fully analyzed 1974 World Fertility Survey for Korea data on sex preference, and also parental gender role stereotyping and gender preference, as they relate to sex preference and fertility behavior of the individual parents of childbearing age. The data includes the mother's background and numbers of children desired. Fertility preferences reflect sociocultural, economic and psychological aspects of individual parents' habits and perceptions of the world. Attitude, which is difficult to measure, is often connected to and can predict behavior. Age, residence, educational level, and spouse's occupation are related. Sex preference for sons is affected by how many parents hope to send a son to college (75.2%), compared to those hoping to send a daughter to college (52%). Parents under 25 also prefer boys. Gender preference is the pattern of sociocultural behavior associated with the awareness of being masculine or feminine. Sex preference is the patterns arising from the biological fact of being male or female. A 1981 son preference survey covered the province of Kyongbuk, conservative in gender preference, polling 832 women, ages 15 to 49. The survey covered questions about gender associated activities, occupations and personality traits. These items were divided into 4 gender role discriminant scales, covering most and least masculine or feminine degrees within each category. Respondents with less extreme gender role stereotyping are less sex biased; extreme sex preference is closely related to the respondents' extreme gender role stereotypic traits. Korean society has conferred differential value upon gender specific work and the main criterion for the division of labor is gender, not biological sex. This contributes to a parent's sex preferential attitude, which is unlikely to change without a modification of premodern neoconfucian gender based behaviors. PMID:12264918

  11. Acetyl Coenzyme A Stimulates RNA Polymerase II Transcription and Promoter Binding by Transcription Factor IID in the Absence of Histones

    PubMed Central

    Galasinski, Shelly K.; Lively, Tricia N.; Grebe de Barron, Alexandra; Goodrich, James A.

    2000-01-01

    Protein acetylation has emerged as a means of controlling levels of mRNA synthesis in eukaryotic cells. Here we report that acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) stimulates RNA polymerase II transcription in vitro in the absence of histones. The effect of acetyl-CoA on basal and activated transcription was studied in a human RNA polymerase II transcription system reconstituted from recombinant and highly purified transcription factors. Both basal and activated transcription were stimulated by the addition of acetyl-CoA to transcription reaction mixtures. By varying the concentrations of general transcription factors in the reaction mixtures, we found that acetyl-CoA decreased the concentration of TFIID required to observe transcription. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting revealed that acetyl-CoA increased the affinity of the general transcription factor TFIID for promoter DNA in a TBP-associated factor (TAF)-dependent manner. Interestingly, acetyl-CoA also caused a conformational change in the TFIID-TFIIA-promoter complex as assessed by DNase I footprinting. These results show that acetyl-CoA alters the DNA binding activity of TFIID and indicate that this biologically important cofactor functions at multiple levels to control gene expression. PMID:10688640

  12. Changing Less-Preferred Duties to More-Preferred: A Potential Strategy for Improving Supervisor Work Enjoyment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Carolyn W.; Reid, Dennis H.; Passante, Susan; Canipe, Vicki

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated a strategy for making highly nonpreferred work duties more preferred as a potential means of enhancing work enjoyment among supervisors in a human service setting. Repeated preference ratings and rankings were completed by 4 supervisors during baseline to identify their most disliked work tasks. These tasks were then altered by…

  13. The Learning Preference Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezler, Agnes G.; Rezmovic, Victor

    1981-01-01

    Describes the development, validity, and reliability of the Learning Preference Inventory (LPI) and its use with health professions students and practitioners. Use of the LPI allows identification of individual learning preferences with a fair degree of accuracy. Ways to improve motivation for learning are suggested. (JOW)

  14. Class Scheduling Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Irving E.; And Others

    In order to ascertain students' preferences for the number of times a class should meet each week, 375 questionnaires administered to students during the 1989 summer session at Cuyahoga Community College, Western Campus (Ohio) were evaluated. Results indicated that 49% of respondents preferred classes meeting twice each week, and 29% preferred…

  15. Incorporation of coenzyme Q10 into bovine oocytes improves mitochondrial features and alleviates the effects of summer thermal stress on developmental competence.

    PubMed

    Gendelman, Mirit; Roth, Zvi

    2012-11-01

    Environmental stress-induced alterations in oocyte mitochondria are suggested to deleteriously affect developmental competence of the ovarian pool of oocytes. We examined the association between seasonal effects on oocyte developmental competence and mitochondrial distribution, polarization, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content, and RNA expression, and whether the incorporation of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) might improve these effects. Bovine oocytes were collected during the summer (June-August), fall (September-November), and winter (December-May), matured in vitro with or without 50 μM CoQ10, fertilized, and cultured for 8 days. The proportion of developed blastocysts was highest in the winter, intermediate in the fall, and lowest in the summer. Matured oocytes were classified into categories I-IV according to their mitochondrial distribution pattern (MitoTracker green). The proportion of high- and low-polarized mitochondria (JC-1 assay) differed between oocyte categories but was not affected by season. On the other hand, oocyte distribution into categories differed between seasons and was affected by CoQ10, with an increased proportion of category I oocytes in the fall. Oocyte mtDNA did not differ between seasons, but expression of mitochondrion-associated genes involved in the respiratory chain (ND2, SDHD, CYTB, COXII, ATP5B, and TFAM) did. Coenzyme Q10 increased the expression of CYTB, COXII, and ATP5B and the proportions of blastocysts developed in the fall. In summary, season-induced alterations in mitochondrial functions might explain, in part, the reduced oocyte developmental competence. It seems that in the fall, under modest harm, CoQ10 incorporation can alleviate these deleterious effects somewhat. PMID:23018185

  16. Benzoate-coenzyme A ligase, encoded by badA, is one of three ligases able to catalyze benzoyl-coenzyme A formation during anaerobic growth of Rhodopseudomonas palustris on benzoate.

    PubMed Central

    Egland, P G; Gibson, J; Harwood, C S

    1995-01-01

    The first step of anaerobic benzoate degradation is the formation of benzoyl-coenzyme A by benzoate-coenzyme A ligase. This enzyme, purified from Rhodopseudomonas palustris, is maximally active with 5 microM benzoate. To study the molecular basis for this reaction, the benzoate-coenzyme A ligase gene (badA) was cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of badA showed substantial similarity to other coenzyme A ligases, with the highest degree of similarity being that to 4-hydroxybenzoate-coenzyme A ligase (50% amino acid identity) from R. palustris. A badA mutant that was constructed had barely detectable levels of ligase activity when cell extracts were assayed at 10 microM benzoate. Despite this, the mutant grew at wild-type rates on benzoate under laboratory culture conditions (3 mM benzoate), and mutant cell extracts had high levels of ligase activity when assayed at a high concentration of benzoate (1 mM). This suggested that R. palustris expresses, in addition to BadA, a benzoate-activating enzyme(s) with a relatively low affinity for benzoate. A possible role of 4-hydroxybenzoate-coenzyme A ligase (encoded by hbaA) in this capacity was investigated by constructing a badA hbaA double mutant. Although the double mutant grew more slowly on benzoate than badA cells, growth rates were still significant, suggesting the involvement of a third enzyme in benzoate activation. Competition experiments involving the addition of a small amount of cyclohexanecarboxylate to ligase assay mixtures implicated cyclohexanecarboxylate-coenzyme A ligase as being this third enzyme. These results show that wild-type R. palustris cells synthesize at least three enzymes that can catalyze the initial step in anaerobic benzoate degradation during growth on benzoate. This observation supports previous suggestions that benzoyl-coenzyme A formation plays a central role in anaerobic aromatic compound biodegradation. PMID:7592432

  17. Redesign of coenzyme B(12) dependent diol dehydratase to be resistant to the mechanism-based inactivation by glycerol and act on longer chain 1,2-diols.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Mamoru; Kinoshita, Koichiro; Fukuoka, Masaki; Saito, Takuya; Tanokuchi, Aya; Ikeda, Yuuki; Obayashi, Hirokazu; Mori, Koichi; Shibata, Naoki; Tobimatsu, Takamasa; Toraya, Tetsuo

    2012-03-01

    Coenzyme B(12) dependent diol dehydratase undergoes mechanism-based inactivation by glycerol, accompanying the irreversible cleavage of the coenzyme Co-C bond. Bachovchin et al. [Biochemistry16, 1082-1092 (1977)] reported that glycerol bound in the G(S) conformation, in which the pro-S-CH(2) OH group is oriented to the hydrogen-abstracting site, primarily contributes to the inactivation reaction. To understand the mechanism of inactivation by glycerol, we analyzed the X-ray structure of diol dehydratase complexed with cyanocobalamin and glycerol. Glycerol is bound to the active site preferentially in the same conformation as that of (S)-1,2-propanediol, i.e. in the G(S) conformation, with its 3-OH group hydrogen bonded to Serα301, but not to nearby Glnα336. k(inact) of the Sα301A, Qα336A and Sα301A/Qα336A mutants with glycerol was much smaller than that of the wild-type enzyme. k(cat) /k(inact) showed that the Sα301A and Qα336A mutants are substantially more resistant to glycerol inactivation than the wild-type enzyme, suggesting that Serα301 and Glnα336 are directly or indirectly involved in the inactivation. The degree of preference for (S)-1,2-propanediol decreased on these mutations. The substrate activities towards longer chain 1,2-diols significantly increased on the Sα301A/Qα336A double mutation, probably because these amino acid substitutions yield more space for accommodating a longer alkyl group on C3 of 1,2-diols. Database Structural data are available in the Protein Data Bank under the accession number 3AUJ. Structured digital abstract • Diol dehydrase gamma subunit, Diol dehydrase beta subunit and Diol dehydrase alpha subunit physically interact by X-ray crystallography (View interaction). PMID:22221669

  18. Contribution of the Distal Pocket Residue to the Acyl-Chain-Length Specificity of (R)-Specific Enoyl-Coenzyme A Hydratases from Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shun; Hiroe, Ayaka; Ishizuka, Koya; Kanazawa, Hiromi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    (R)-Specific enoyl-coenzyme A (enoyl-CoA) hydratases (PhaJs) are capable of supplying monomers from fatty acid β-oxidation to polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biosynthesis. PhaJ1Pp from Pseudomonas putida showed broader substrate specificity than did PhaJ1Pa from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, despite sharing 67% amino acid sequence identity. In this study, the substrate specificity characteristics of two Pseudomonas PhaJ1 enzymes were investigated by site-directed mutagenesis, chimeragenesis, X-ray crystallographic analysis, and homology modeling. In PhaJ1Pp, the replacement of valine with isoleucine at position 72 resulted in an increased preference for enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) elements with shorter chain lengths. Conversely, at the same position in PhaJ1Pa, the replacement of isoleucine with valine resulted in an increased preference for enoyl-CoAs with longer chain lengths. These changes suggest a narrowing and broadening in the substrate specificity range of the PhaJ1Pp and PhaJ1Pa mutants, respectively. However, the substrate specificity remains broader in PhaJ1Pp than in PhaJ1Pa. Additionally, three chimeric PhaJ1 enzymes, composed from PhaJ1Pp and PhaJ1Pa, all showed significant hydratase activity, and their substrate preferences were within the range exhibited by the parental PhaJ1 enzymes. The crystal structure of PhaJ1Pa was determined at a resolution of 1.7 Å, and subsequent homology modeling of PhaJ1Pp revealed that in the acyl-chain binding pocket, the amino acid at position 72 was the only difference between the two structures. These results indicate that the chain-length specificity of PhaJ1 is determined mainly by the bulkiness of the amino acid residue at position 72, but that other factors, such as structural fluctuations, also affect specificity. PMID:26386053

  19. Ni/sup II/(dioxo(16)aneN/sub 5/)-induced methane formation from methyl coenzyme M

    SciTech Connect

    Drain, C.M.; Sable, D.B.; Corden, B.B.

    1988-07-13

    A mechanism has been previously proposed for methyl-coenzyme M (H/sub 3/CSCH/sub 2/CH/sub 2/SO/sub 3//sup /minus//) reductase where Ni/sup II/F/sub 430/ is first reduced to NiF/sub 430/, which homolytically cleaves the methyl-coenzyme M to produce methyl-Ni/sup I/F/sub 430/ followed by the protonation of methyl-Ni/sup I/F/sub 430/ to yield CH/sub 4/ and Ni/sup II/F/sub 430/. The role of the nickel ion oxidation state in methyl-coenzyme M catalysis has been examined. It was found that both the mono- and divalent oxidation states of the water soluble Ni (dioxo(16)-aneN/sub 5/), NiL, complex catalyze the methyl-coenzyme M to methane and coenzyme M. Some aqueous solutions of other nickel compounds, e.g. nickel (II) acetate, nickel(II) tetraethylenepentamine, or nickel(II) 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-5,7-dione, do not convert methyl-coenzyme M to methane under argon or hydrogen. 30 references, 1 figure.

  20. DNA sequencing and expression of the formyl coenzyme A transferase gene, frc, from Oxalobacter formigenes.

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, H; Ogden, S D; Lung, H Y; Luttge, B G; Baetz, A L; Peck, A B

    1997-01-01

    Oxalic acid, a highly toxic by-product of metabolism, is catabolized by a limited number of bacterial species utilizing an activation-decarboxylation reaction which yields formate and CO2. frc, the gene encoding formyl coenzyme A transferase, an enzyme which transfers a coenzyme A moiety to activate oxalic acid, was cloned from the bacterium Oxalobacter formigenes. DNA sequencing revealed a single open reading frame of 1,284 bp capable of encoding a 428-amino-acid protein. A presumed promoter region and a rho-independent termination sequence suggest that this gene is part of a monocistronic operon. A PCR fragment containing the open reading frame, when overexpressed in Escherichia coli, produced a product exhibiting enzymatic activity similar to the purified native enzyme. With this, the two genes necessary for bacterial catabolism of oxalate, frc and oxc, have now been cloned, sequenced, and expressed. PMID:9150242

  1. Probing reversible chemistry in coenzyme B12 -dependent ethanolamine ammonia lyase with kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alex R; Rentergent, Julius; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam

    2015-06-01

    Coenzyme B12 -dependent enzymes such as ethanolamine ammonia lyase have remarkable catalytic power and some unique properties that enable detailed analysis of the reaction chemistry and associated dynamics. By selectively deuterating the substrate (ethanolamine) and/or the β-carbon of the 5'-deoxyadenosyl moiety of the intrinsic coenzyme B12 , it was possible to experimentally probe both the forward and reverse hydrogen atom transfers between the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical and substrate during single-turnover stopped-flow measurements. These data are interpreted within the context of a kinetic model where the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate may be quasi-stable and rearrangement of the substrate radical is essentially irreversible. Global fitting of these data allows estimation of the intrinsic rate constants associated with CoC homolysis and initial H-abstraction steps. In contrast to previous stopped-flow studies, the apparent kinetic isotope effects are found to be relatively small. PMID:25950663

  2. Role of Heme Oxygenase, Leptin, Coenzyme Q10 and Trace Elements in Pre-eclamptic Women.

    PubMed

    Abo-Elmatty, Dina M; Badawy, Ehsan A; Hussein, Jihan S; Elela, Somaya Abo; Megahed, Hoda A

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study to evaluate heme oxygenase (COHb), leptin and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in pre-eclamptic women. Also Zinc, copper, Iron, total iron binding capacity, Ferritin and uric acid were assessed. 120 female subjects were included in this study. They were divided into, 60 female with normal pregnancy attending the outpatient clinic, 60 pre-eclamptic patients were recruited from obstetrics and gynaecology department El-kasr El-Aini hospital. The results showed that in pre-eclampatic group, leptin level was significantly increased while COHb and CoQ10 was significantly decreased. It is concluded that hemeoxygenase, leptin and coenzyme CoQ10 can be considered as new markers for prediction of pre-eclampsia. PMID:24082464

  3. Diol Dehydratase-Reactivase Is Essential for Recycling of Coenzyme B12 in Diol Dehydratase.

    PubMed

    Toraya, Tetsuo; Tanokuchi, Aya; Yamasaki, Ai; Nakamura, Takehiro; Ogura, Kenichi; Tobimatsu, Takamasa

    2016-01-12

    Holoenzymes of adenosylcobalamin-dependent diol and glycerol dehydratases undergo mechanism-based inactivation by glycerol and O2 inactivation in the absence of substrate, which accompanies irreversible cleavage of the coenzyme Co-C bond. The inactivated holodiol dehydratase and the inactive enzyme·cyanocobalamin complex were (re)activated by incubation with NADH, ATP, and Mg(2+) (or Mn(2+)) in crude extracts of Klebsiella oxytoca, suggesting the presence of a reactivating system in the extract. The reducing system with NADH could be replaced by FMNH2. When inactivated holoenzyme or the enzyme·cyanocobalamin complex, a model of inactivated holoenzyme, was incubated with purified recombinant diol dehydratase-reactivase (DD-R) and an ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase in the presence of FMNH2, ATP, and Mg(2+), diol dehydratase activity was restored. Among the three adenosyltransferases (PduO, EutT, and CobA) of this bacterium, PduO and CobA were much more efficient for the reactivation than EutT, although PduO showed the lowest adenosyltransfease activity toward free cob(I)alamin. These results suggest that (1) diol dehydratase activity is maintained through coenzyme recycling by a reactivating system for diol dehydratase composed of DD-R, PduO adenosyltransferase, and a reducing system, (2) the releasing factor DD-R is essential for the recycling of adenosycobalamin, a tightly bound, prosthetic group-type coenzyme, and (3) PduO is a specific adenosylating enzyme for the DD reactivation, whereas CobA and EutT exert their effects through free synthesized coenzyme. Although FMNH2 was mainly used as a reductant in this study, a natural reducing system might consist of PduS cobalamin reductase and NADH. PMID:26704729

  4. The complete coenzyme B12 biosynthesis gene cluster of Lactobacillus reuteri CRL1098.

    PubMed

    Santos, Filipe; Vera, Jose L; van der Heijden, René; Valdez, Graciela; de Vos, Willem M; Sesma, Fernando; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    2008-01-01

    The coenzyme B(12) production pathway in Lactobacillus reuteri has been deduced using a combination of genetic, biochemical and bioinformatics approaches. The coenzyme B(12) gene cluster of Lb. reuteri CRL1098 has the unique feature of clustering together the cbi, cob and hem genes. It consists of 29 ORFs encoding the complete enzymic machinery necessary for de novo biosynthesis. Transcriptional analysis showed it to be expressed as two tandem transcripts of approximately 22 and 4 kb, carrying cobD, cbiABCDETFGHJ, cobA/hemD, cbiKLMNQOP, sirA, hemACBL, and cobUSC, hemD, cobT, respectively. Both transcripts appear to be similarly regulated, and under the conditions assayed are induced in the late-exponential growth phase. Evidence for a regulatory mechanism of negative feedback inhibition by vitamin B(12) itself was observed. Comparative genomics analysis of the coding sequences showed them to be most similar to those coding for the anaerobic coenzyme B(12) pathways previously characterized in a few representatives of the genera Listeria and Salmonella. This contrasts with the trusted species phylogeny and suggests horizontal gene transfer of the B(12) biosynthesis genes. G+C content and codon adaptation index analysis is suggestive that the postulated transfer of these genes was not a recent event. Additional comparative genomics and transcriptional analysis of the sequences acquired during this study suggests a functional link between coenzyme B(12) biosynthesis and reuterin production, which might be implicated in Lb. reuteri's success in colonizing the gastrointestinal tract. This information on gene organization, gene transcription and gene acquisition is relevant for the development of (fermented) foods and probiotics enriched in B(12). PMID:18174128

  5. Metal plasmon-coupled fluorescence imaging and label free coenzyme detection in cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge; Zhao, Richard Y.

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal nanoparticle for fluorescence cell imaging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-invasive emission detection of coenzyme in cell on time-resolved confocal microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Near-field interaction of flavin adenine dinucleotide with silver substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolation of emissions by coenzymes from cellular autofluorescence on fluorescence cell imaging. -- Abstract: Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is a key metabolite in cellular energy conversion. Flavin can also bind with some enzymes in the metabolic pathway and the binding sites may be changed due to the disease progression. Thus, there is interest on studying its expression level, distribution, and redox state within the cells. FAD is naturally fluorescent, but it has a modest extinction coefficient and quantum yield. Hence the intrinsic emission from FAD is generally too weak to be isolated distinctly from the cellular backgrounds in fluorescence cell imaging. In this article, the metal nanostructures on the glass coverslips were used as substrates to measure FAD in cells. Particulate silver films were fabricated with an optical resonance near the absorption and the emission wavelengths of FAD which can lead to efficient coupling interactions. As a result, the emission intensity and quantum yield by FAD were greatly increased and the lifetime was dramatically shortened resulting in less interference from the longer lived cellular background. This feature may overcome the technical limits that hinder the direct observation of intrinsically fluorescent coenzymes in the cells by fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence cell imaging on the metallic particle substrates may provide a non-invasive strategy for collecting the information of coenzymes in cells.

  6. Catalytic Formation of Hydrogen Peroxide from Coenzyme NADH and Dioxygen with a Water-Soluble Iridium Complex and a Ubiquinone Coenzyme Analogue.

    PubMed

    Suenobu, Tomoyoshi; Shibata, Satoshi; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2016-08-01

    A ubiquinone coenzyme analogue (Q0: 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone) was reduced by coenzyme NADH to yield the corresponding reduced form of Q0 (Q0H2) in the presence of a catalytic amount of a [C,N] cyclometalated organoiridium complex (1: [Ir(III)(Cp*)(4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl-κN(2))benzoic acid-κC(3))(H2O)]2SO4) in water at ambient temperature as observed in the respiratory chain complex I (Complex I). In the catalytic cycle, the reduction of 1 by NADH produces the corresponding iridium hydride complex that in turn reduces Q0 to produce Q0H2. Q0H2 reduced dioxygen to yield hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) under slightly basic conditions. Catalytic generation of H2O2 was made possible in the reaction of O2 with NADH as the functional expression of NADH oxidase in white blood cells utilizing the redox cycle of Q0 as well as 1 for the first time in a nonenzymatic homogeneous reaction system. PMID:27403568

  7. Determination of coenzyme Q10, coenzyme Q9, and melatonin contents in virgin argan oils: comparison with other edible vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Venegas, Carmen; Cabrera-Vique, Carmen; García-Corzo, Laura; Escames, Germaine; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; López, Luis Carlos

    2011-11-23

    Virgin argan oil possesses high antioxidant capacity (AC), which may be partially explained by its high content in antioxidant molecules such as polyphenols and tocopherols. However, the content in other antioxidant molecules, for example, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ(10)), coenzyme Q9 (CoQ(9)), and melatonin (Mel), which have been identified in other edible vegetable oils, have not been evaluated in virgin argan oil. Consequently, it was decided to evaluate the contents of CoQ(10), CoQ(9), and Mel in virgin argan oils and compare the results to those obtained in extra virgin olive oils and some varieties of seed oils. By the use of sensitive HPLC-EC/F methods, the results showed that virgin argan oil is a rich source of CoQ(10) and Mel, but no CoQ(9) was detected. Extra virgin olive oil showed higher levels of CoQ(10) and lower levels of Mel than virgin argan oil. Between the seed oil samples, only virgin soybean oil showed higher CoQ(10) and Mel levels than virgin argan oil. The results may be relevant for the contribution of CoQ(10) and Mel to the biological activities of virgin argan oil. PMID:22007968

  8. The Phosphatase Ptc7 Induces Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis by Activating the Hydroxylase Coq7 in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Montalvo, Alejandro; González-Mariscal, Isabel; Pomares-Viciana, Teresa; Padilla-López, Sergio; Ballesteros, Manuel; Vazquez-Fonseca, Luis; Gandolfo, Pablo; Brautigan, David L.; Navas, Placido; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The study of the components of mitochondrial metabolism has potential benefits for health span and lifespan because the maintenance of efficient mitochondrial function and antioxidant capacity is associated with improved health and survival. In yeast, mitochondrial function requires the tight control of several metabolic processes such as coenzyme Q biosynthesis, assuring an appropriate energy supply and antioxidant functions. Many mitochondrial processes are regulated by phosphorylation cycles mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases. In this study, we determined that the mitochondrial phosphatase Ptc7p, a Ser/Thr phosphatase, was required to regulate coenzyme Q6 biosynthesis, which in turn activated aerobic metabolism and enhanced oxidative stress resistance. We showed that Ptc7p phosphatase specifically activated coenzyme Q6 biosynthesis through the dephosphorylation of the demethoxy-Q6 hydroxylase Coq7p. The current findings revealed that Ptc7p is a regulator of mitochondrial metabolism that is essential to maintain proper function of the mitochondria by regulating energy metabolism and oxidative stress resistance. PMID:23940037

  9. Cloning, expression, and characterization of coenzyme-B12-dependent diol dehydratase from Lactobacillus diolivorans.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xuqin; Meng, Xiaolei; Chen, Yunlai; Wei, Yutuo; Du, Liqin; Huang, Ribo

    2014-01-01

    The three gldCDE genes from Lactobacillus diolivorans, that encode the three subunits of the glycerol dehydratase, were cloned and the proteins were co-expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli with added sorbitol and betaine hydrochloride. The purified enzyme exists as a heterohexamer (α2β2γ2) structure with a native molecular mass of 210 kDa. It requires coenzyme B12 for catalytic activity and is subject to suicide inactivation by glycerol during catalysis. The enzyme had maximum activity at pH 8.6 and 37 °C. The apparent K m values for coenzyme B12, 1,2-ethanediol, 1,2-propanediol, and glycerol were 1.5 μM, 10.5 mM, 1.3 mM, and 5.8 mM, respectively. Together, these results indicated that the three genes gldCDE encoding the proteins make up a coenzyme B12-dependent diol dehydratase and not a glycerol dehydratase. PMID:24078133

  10. An in vitro evolved glmS ribozyme has the wildtype fold but loses coenzyme dependence

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Matthew W. L.; Ferré-D’Amaré, Adrian R.

    2014-01-01

    Uniquely among known ribozymes, the glmS ribozyme-riboswitch requires a small-molecule coenzyme, glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P). Although consistent with its gene-regulatory function, use of GlcN6P is unexpected because all other characterized self-cleaving ribozymes employ RNA functional groups or divalent cations for catalysis. To determine what active site features make this ribozyme reliant on GlcN6P, and to evaluate whether it might have evolved from a coenzyme-independent ancestor, we isolated a GlcN6P-independent variant through in vitro selection. Three active site mutations suffice to generate a highly reactive RNA that adopts the wildtype fold but employs divalent cations for catalysis and is insensitive to GlcN6P. Biochemical and crystallographic comparisons of wildtype and mutant ribozymes show that a handful of functional groups fine-tune the RNA to be either coenzyme- or cation-dependent. These results indicate that a few mutations can confer novel biochemical activities on structured RNAs. Thus, families of structurally related ribozymes with divergent function may exist. PMID:24096303

  11. Coenzyme Q{sub 10} and alpha-tocopherol protect against amitriptyline toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cordero, Mario D.; Moreno-Fernandez, Ana Maria; Gomez-Skarmeta, Jose Luis; Miguel, Manuel de; Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Oropesa-Avila, Manuel; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Angeles; Navas, Placido; Sanchez-Alcazar, Jose Antonio

    2009-03-15

    Since amitriptyline is a very frequently prescribed antidepressant drug, it is not surprising that amitriptyline toxicity is relatively common. Amitriptyline toxic systemic effects include cardiovascular, autonomous nervous, and central nervous systems. To understand the mechanisms of amitriptyline toxicity we studied the cytotoxic effects of amitriptyline treatment on cultured primary human fibroblasts and zebrafish embryos, and the protective role of coenzyme Q{sub 10} and alpha-tocopherol, two membrane antioxidants. We found that amitriptyline treatment induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in primary human fibroblasts. Mitochondrial dysfunction in amitriptyline treatment was characterized by reduced expression levels of mitochondrial proteins and coenzyme Q{sub 10}, decreased NADH:cytochrome c reductase activity, and a drop in mitochondrial membrane potential. Moreover, and as a consequence of these toxic effects, amitriptyline treatment induced a significant increase in apoptotic cell death activating mitochondrial permeability transition. Coenzyme Q{sub 10} and alpha-tocopherol supplementation attenuated ROS production, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cell death, suggesting that oxidative stress affecting cell membrane components is involved in amitriptyline cytotoxicity. Furthermore, amitriptyline-dependent toxicity and antioxidant protection were also evaluated in zebrafish embryos, a well established vertebrate model to study developmental toxicity. Amitriptyline significantly increased embryonic cell death and apoptosis rate, and both antioxidants provided a significant protection against amitriptyline embryotoxicity.

  12. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase in rainbow trout: effects of fasting and statin drugs on activities and mRNA transcripts.

    PubMed

    Estey, Chelsie; Chen, Xi; Moon, Thomas W

    2008-04-01

    Human pharmaceuticals including statin drugs are found in effluents post-waste water treatment plant. In order to establish whether statin drugs could affect an aquatic species, we initially characterized in the rainbow trout the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase or HMGCoAR which is the mammalian target of statin drugs. Two HMGCoAR transcripts (-1 and -2) were isolated to trout tissues and given their prevalence in liver and brain, these two tissues were used in activity assays. HMGCoAR activities were 87.2 and 66.0 pmol/min/mg protein for liver microsomes and whole brain homogenates. Liver activities were affected by conditions promoting phosphorylation but not by a 14 day fast; brain activities were differentially altered by fasting and re-feeding. Even though activities were altered by fasting, HMGCoAR-1 (but not -2) mRNA was reduced by fasting in both the liver and hypothalamus/pituitary. Both statin drugs (cerivastatin and atorvastatin) significantly decreased HMGCoAR activities in vitro and cerivastatin when injected significantly decreased hepatic but not brain activities; some changes in mRNA levels were noted. These studies demonstrate that at the concentrations of statins used in this study, effects on HMGCoAR activities and transcripts occur. Such changes could affect cholesterol content and may alter cholesterol dynamics in this species. PMID:18280795

  13. Polarization signaling in swordtails alters female mate preference.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Gina M; Brady, Parrish C; Gruev, Viktor; Cummings, Molly E

    2014-09-16

    Polarization of light, and visual sensitivity to it, is pervasive across aquatic and terrestrial environments. Documentation of invertebrate use of polarized light is widespread from navigation and foraging to species recognition. However, studies demonstrating that polarization body patterning serves as a communication signal (e.g., with evidence of changes in receiver behavior) are rare among invertebrate taxa and conspicuously absent among vertebrates. Here, we investigate polarization-mediated communication by northern swordtails, Xiphophorus nigrensis, using a custom-built videopolarimeter to measure polarization signals and an experimental paradigm that manipulates polarization signals without modifying their brightness or color. We conducted mate choice trials in an experimental tank that illuminates a pair of males with light passed through a polarization filter and a diffusion filter. By alternating the order of these filters between males, we presented females with live males that differed in polarization reflectance by >200% but with intensity and color differences below detection thresholds (∼5%). Combining videopolarimetry and polarization-manipulated mate choice trials, we found sexually dimorphic polarized reflectance and polarization-dependent female mate choice behavior with no polarization-dependent courtship behavior by males. Male swordtails exhibit greater within-body and body-to-background polarization contrast than females, and females preferentially associate with high-polarization-reflecting males. We also found limited support that males increase polarization contrast in social conditions over asocial conditions. Polarization cues in mate choice contexts may provide aquatic vertebrates with enhanced detection of specific display features (e.g., movements, angular information), as well as a signaling mechanism that may enhance detection by intended viewers while minimizing detection by others. PMID:25197061

  14. Polarization signaling in swordtails alters female mate preference

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Gina M.; Brady, Parrish C.; Gruev, Viktor; Cummings, Molly E.

    2014-01-01

    Polarization of light, and visual sensitivity to it, is pervasive across aquatic and terrestrial environments. Documentation of invertebrate use of polarized light is widespread from navigation and foraging to species recognition. However, studies demonstrating that polarization body patterning serves as a communication signal (e.g., with evidence of changes in receiver behavior) are rare among invertebrate taxa and conspicuously absent among vertebrates. Here, we investigate polarization-mediated communication by northern swordtails, Xiphophorus nigrensis, using a custom-built videopolarimeter to measure polarization signals and an experimental paradigm that manipulates polarization signals without modifying their brightness or color. We conducted mate choice trials in an experimental tank that illuminates a pair of males with light passed through a polarization filter and a diffusion filter. By alternating the order of these filters between males, we presented females with live males that differed in polarization reflectance by >200% but with intensity and color differences below detection thresholds (∼5%). Combining videopolarimetry and polarization-manipulated mate choice trials, we found sexually dimorphic polarized reflectance and polarization-dependent female mate choice behavior with no polarization-dependent courtship behavior by males. Male swordtails exhibit greater within-body and body-to-background polarization contrast than females, and females preferentially associate with high-polarization–reflecting males. We also found limited support that males increase polarization contrast in social conditions over asocial conditions. Polarization cues in mate choice contexts may provide aquatic vertebrates with enhanced detection of specific display features (e.g., movements, angular information), as well as a signaling mechanism that may enhance detection by intended viewers while minimizing detection by others. PMID:25197061

  15. Qualified answers that reflect user needs and preferences

    SciTech Connect

    Gaasterland, T.; Lobo, J.

    1994-12-31

    This paper introduces a formalism to describe the needs and preferences of database users. Because of the precise formulation of these concepts, we have found an automatic and {ital very simple} mechanism to incorporate user needs and preferences into the query answering process. In the formalism, the user provides a lattice of domain independent values that define preferences and needs and a set of domain specific {ital user constraints} qualified with lattice values. The constraints are automatically incorporated into a relational or deductive database through a series of syntactic transformations that produces an annotated deductive database. Query answering procedures for deductive databases are then used, with minor modifications, to obtain annotated answers to queries. Because preference declaration is separated from data representation and management, preferences can be easily altered without touching the database. Also, the query language allows users to ask for answers at different preference levels. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation Modulates NFκB and Nrf2 Pathways in Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Pala, Ragip; Orhan, Cemal; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Nurhan; Ali, Shakir; Cinar, Vedat; Atalay, Mustafa; Sahin, Kazim

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the effects of Q10, coenzyme Q10 or ubiquinone, a component of the electron transport chain in mitochondria, on nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), inhibitors of kappa B (IκB), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and hemeoxygenase 1 (HO-1) in rats after chronic exercise training for 6 weeks. 8-week old male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to one of four treatments planned in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of two condition (sedentary vs. exercise training), and two coenzyme Q10 levels (0 and 300 mg/kg per day for 6 weeks). The expression levels of the target proteins were determined in the heart, liver and muscle, and biochemical parameters including creatinine, urea, glucose and lipid profile were investigated in plasma. When compared with sedentary group, significant decreases in heart, liver and muscle NFκB levels by 45%, 26% and 44% were observed in Q10 supplemented rats after exercise training, respectively, while the inhibitory protein IκB increased by 179%, 111% and 127% in heart, liver and muscle tissues. Q10 supplementation caused an increase in Nrf2 (167%, 165% and 90%) and HO-1 (107%, 156% and 114%) after exercise training in heart, liver and muscle tissues (p < 0.05). No significant change was observed in any of the parameters associated with protein, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, except that exercise caused a decrease in plasma triglyceride, which was further decreased by Q10. In conclusion, these results suggest that Q10 modulates the expression of NFκB, IκB, Nrf2 and HO-1 in exercise training, indicating an anti-inflammatory effect of Q10 and emphasizes its role in antioxidant defense. Key points Coenzyme Q10 is a component of the electron transport chain in mitochondria which is linked to the generation of energy in the cell. Coenzyme Q10 may inhibit the peroxidation of lipids, thus acting as an antioxidant and protects tissue against oxidative injury. Using of coenzyme

  17. The PduL Phosphotransacylase Is Used To Recycle Coenzyme A within the Pdu Microcompartment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Jorda, Julien; Yeates, Todd O.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Salmonella enterica, 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) utilization (Pdu) is mediated by a bacterial microcompartment (MCP). The Pdu MCP consists of a multiprotein shell that encapsulates enzymes and cofactors for 1,2-PD catabolism, and its role is to sequester a reactive intermediate (propionaldehyde) to minimize cellular toxicity and DNA damage. For the Pdu MCP to function, the enzymes encapsulated within must be provided with a steady supply of substrates and cofactors. In the present study, Western blotting assays were used to demonstrate that the PduL phosphotransacylase is a component of the Pdu MCP. We also show that the N-terminal 20-residue-long peptide of PduL is necessary and sufficient for targeting PduL and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) to the lumen of the Pdu MCP. We present the results of genetic tests that indicate that PduL plays a role in the recycling of coenzyme A internally within the Pdu MCP. However, the results indicate that some coenzyme A recycling occurs externally to the Pdu MCP. Hence, our results support a model in which a steady supply of coenzyme A is provided to MCP lumen enzymes by internal recycling by PduL as well as by the movement of coenzyme A across the shell by an unknown mechanism. These studies expand our understanding of the Pdu MCP, which has been linked to enteric pathogenesis and which provides a possible basis for the development of intracellular bioreactors for use in biotechnology. IMPORTANCE Bacterial MCPs are widespread organelles that play important roles in pathogenesis and global carbon fixation. Here we show that the PduL phosphotransacylase is a component of the Pdu MCP. We also show that PduL plays a key role in cofactor homeostasis by recycling coenzyme A internally within the Pdu MCP. Further, we identify a potential N-terminal targeting sequence using a bioinformatic approach and show that this short sequence extension is necessary and sufficient for directing PduL as well as heterologous

  18. Effects of decylubiquinone (coenzyme Q10 analog) supplementation on SHRSP.

    PubMed

    Murad, Leonardo Borges; Guimarães, Marcela Rodrigues Moreira; Vianna, Lucia Marques

    2007-01-01

    Decylubiquinone treatment in vitro has demonstrated a potent inhibitor effect on reactive oxidative species production. However, the effectin vivo has not been demonstrated yet. Thus, rats SHRSP male were divided in two groups: treated and controls (n=6, each). The treated group received 10 mg/Kg(-)/body weight of decylubiquinone diluted in coconut oil by oral gavage during four weeks. Control rats just received the vehicle. Body weight, diuresis, food and water intake, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, blood glucose levels and malondialdehyde were determined. There were a significant (p<0.05) reduction on systolic blood pressure, plasma malondialdehyde, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol in the treated group. Additionally, HDL-cholesterol also increased significantly. However, body weight, diuresis, food and water intake, blood glucose levels and triglycerides did not alter after treatment. Thus, decylubiquinone can be a new antihypertensive, hypolipidemic and antioxidant agent on the prevention and treatment of diseases linked to oxidative stress. PMID:18198397

  19. [Food preferences among students].

    PubMed

    Maldonado, R; Villalbí, J R

    1993-07-01

    The results of a food preference survey using a questionnaire on 2,567 schoolchildren of sixth, seventh and eighth grade (11 to 14 years of age) from 26 public schools in the city of Barcelona (Spain) are presented. Foods based on potatoes and cereals have the maximum acceptability, followed by dairy and meat products. Chicken is the meat with highest acceptance. Fish has a medium acceptance, and preference for dry beans and peas, fruits and vegetables is lower, although it is high for some specific foods. Important differences among sexes are observed. Boys have higher preference for meat, milk and yogurt, and girls for fish and some vegetables. Differences among genders increase with increasing age. These results are relevant for planning interventions on diet in schools from a health promotion perspective, and for the planning of school lunch programs. PMID:8363142

  20. The preference for potential.

    PubMed

    Tormala, Zakary L; Jia, Jayson S; Norton, Michael I

    2012-10-01

    When people seek to impress others, they often do so by highlighting individual achievements. Despite the intuitive appeal of this strategy, we demonstrate that people often prefer potential rather than achievement when evaluating others. Indeed, compared with references to achievement (e.g., "this person has won an award for his work"), references to potential (e.g., "this person could win an award for his work") appear to stimulate greater interest and processing, which can translate into more favorable reactions. This tendency creates a phenomenon whereby the potential to be good at something can be preferred over actually being good at that very same thing. We document this preference for potential in laboratory and field experiments, using targets ranging from athletes to comedians to graduate school applicants and measures ranging from salary allocations to online ad clicks to admission decisions. PMID:22775472

  1. DNA ALTERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The exposure of an organism to genotoxic chemicals may induce a cascade of genetic events. nitially, structural alterations to DNA are formed. ext, the DNA damage is processed and subsequently expressed in mutant gene products. inally, diseases result from the genetic damage. he ...

  2. Metal Preferences and Metallation*

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Andrew W.; Osman, Deenah; Robinson, Nigel J.

    2014-01-01

    The metal binding preferences of most metalloproteins do not match their metal requirements. Thus, metallation of an estimated 30% of metalloenzymes is aided by metal delivery systems, with ∼25% acquiring preassembled metal cofactors. The remaining ∼70% are presumed to compete for metals from buffered metal pools. Metallation is further aided by maintaining the relative concentrations of these pools as an inverse function of the stabilities of the respective metal complexes. For example, magnesium enzymes always prefer to bind zinc, and these metals dominate the metalloenzymes without metal delivery systems. Therefore, the buffered concentration of zinc is held at least a million-fold below magnesium inside most cells. PMID:25160626

  3. Beta-oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids and their coenzyme A derivatives by human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Singh, H; Derwas, N; Poulos, A

    1987-05-01

    The beta-oxidation of lignoceric acid (C24:0), hexacosanoic acid (C26:0), and their coenzyme A derivatives was investigated in human skin fibroblast homogenates. The cofactor requirements for oxidation of lignoceric acid and hexacosanoic acid were identical but were different from their coenzyme A derivatives. For example, lignoceric acid and hexacosanoic acid oxidation was strictly ATP dependent whereas the oxidation of the corresponding coenzyme A derivatives was ATP independent. Also the rate of oxidation of coenzyme A derivatives of lignoceric acid or hexacosanoic acid was much higher compared to the free fatty acids. In patients with Zellweger's syndrome, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and infantile Refsum's disease, the beta-oxidation of lignoceric and hexacosanoic acids was defective whereas the oxidation of their corresponding coenzyme A derivatives was nearly normal. The results presented in this communication suggest strongly that the beta-oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids occurs exclusively in peroxisomes. However, the coenzyme A derivatives of very-long-chain fatty acids can be oxidized in mitochondria as well as in peroxisomes. The inability of the mitochondrial system to oxidize free fatty acids may be due to its inability to convert them to their corresponding coenzyme A derivatives. Our results suggest that a specific very-long-chain fatty acyl CoA synthetase may be required for the activation of the free fatty acids and that this synthetase may be deficient in patients with Zellweger's syndrome and possibly X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, as well. The results presented suggest that substrate specificity and the subcellular localization of the synthetase may regulate the beta-oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids in the cell. PMID:2437859

  4. Thermodynamics of various F420 coenzyme models as sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke; Shen, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-06-14

    32 F420 coenzyme models with alkylation of the three different N atoms (N1, N3 and N10) in the core structure (XFH(-)) were designed and synthesized and the thermodynamic driving forces (defined in terms of the molar enthalpy changes or the standard redox potentials in this work) of the 32 XFH(-) releasing hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and electrons, the thermodynamic driving forces of the 32 XFH˙ releasing protons and hydrogen atoms and the thermodynamic driving forces of XF(-)˙ releasing electrons in acetonitrile were determined using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The effects of the methyl group at N1, N3 and N10 and a negative charge on N1 and N10 atoms on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were examined; the results show that seating arrangements of the methyl group and the negative charge have remarkably different effects on the thermodynamic properties of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates. The effects of the substituents at C7 and C8 on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were also examined; the results show that the substituents at C7 and C8 have good Hammett linear free energy relationships with the six thermodynamic parameters. Meanwhile, a reasonable determination of possible reactions between members of the F420 family and NADH family in vivo was given according to a thermodynamic analysis platform constructed using the elementary step thermodynamic parameter of F420 coenzyme model 2FH(-) and NADH model MNAH releasing hydride ions in acetonitrile. The information disclosed in this work can not only fill a gap in the chemical thermodynamics of F420 coenzyme models as a class of very important organic sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons, but also strongly promote the fast development of the chemistry and applications of F420 coenzyme

  5. Spectroscopic and computational studies of reduction of the metalversus the tetrapyrrole ring of coenzyme F-430 from methyl-coenzyme Mreductase

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Mishtu; Kunz, Ryan C.; van Heuvelen, Katherine M.; Craft,Jennifer L.; Horng, Yih-Chern; Tang, Qun; Bocian, David F.; George, SimonJ.; Brunold, Thomas C.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2006-06-30

    Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) catalyzes the final stepin methane biosynthesis by methanogenic archaea and contains aredox-active nickel tetrahydrocorphin, coenzyme F430, at its active site.Spectroscopic and computational methods have been used to study a novelform of the coenzyme, called F330, which is obtained by reducing F430with sodium borohydride (NaBH4). F330 exhibits a prominent absorptionpeak at 330 nm, which is blue shifted by 100 nm relative to F430. Massspectrometric studies demonstrate that the tetrapyrrole ring in F330 hasundergone reduction, on the basis of the incorporation of protium (ordeuterium), upon treatment of F430 with NaBH4 (or NaBD4). One- andtwo-dimensional NMR studies show that the site of reduction is theexocyclic ketone group of the tetrahydrocorphin. Resonance Raman studiesindicate that elimination of this pibond increases the overall pi-bondorder in the conjugative framework. X-ray absorption, magnetic circulardichroism, and computational results show that F330 contains low-spinNi(II). Thus, conversion of F430 to F330 reduces the hydrocorphin ringbut not the metal. Conversely, reduction of F430 with Ti(III) citrate togenerate F380 (corresponding to the active MCRred1 state) reduces theNi(II) to Ni(I) but does not reduce the tetrapyrrole ring system, whichis consistent with other studies [Piskorski, R., and Jaun, B. (2003) J.Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 13120-13125; Craft, J. L., et al. (2004) J. Biol.Inorg. Chem. 9, 77-89]. The distinct origins of the absorption bandshifts associated with the formation of F330 and F380 are discussedwithin the framework of our computational results. These studies on thenature of the product(s) of reduction of F430 are of interest in thecontext of the mechanism of methane formation by MCR and in relation tothe chemistry of hydroporphinoid systems in general. The spectroscopicand time-dependent DFT calculations add important insight into theelectronic structure of the nickel hydrocorphinate in its Ni(II) and

  6. Host Acyl Coenzyme A Binding Protein Regulates Replication Complex Assembly and Activity of a Positive-Strand RNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiantao; Diaz, Arturo; Mao, Lan; Ahlquist, Paul

    2012-01-01

    All positive-strand RNA viruses reorganize host intracellular membranes to assemble their replication complexes. Similarly, brome mosaic virus (BMV) induces two alternate forms of membrane-bound RNA replication complexes: vesicular spherules and stacks of appressed double-membrane layers. The mechanisms by which these membrane rearrangements are induced, however, remain unclear. We report here that host ACB1-encoded acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) binding protein (ACBP) is required for the assembly and activity of both BMV RNA replication complexes. ACBP is highly conserved among eukaryotes, specifically binds to long-chain fatty acyl-CoA, and promotes general lipid synthesis. Deleting ACB1 inhibited BMV RNA replication up to 30-fold and resulted in formation of spherules that were ∼50% smaller but ∼4-fold more abundant than those in wild-type (wt) cells, consistent with the idea that BMV 1a invaginates and maintains viral spherules by coating the inner spherule membrane. Furthermore, smaller and more frequent spherules were preferentially formed under conditions that induce layer formation in wt cells. Conversely, cellular karmella structures, which are arrays of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes formed upon overexpression of certain cellular ER membrane proteins, were formed normally, indicating a selective inhibition of 1a-induced membrane rearrangements. Restoring altered lipid composition largely complemented the BMV RNA replication defect, suggesting that ACBP was required for maintaining lipid homeostasis. Smaller and more frequent spherules are also induced by 1a mutants with specific substitutions in a membrane-anchoring amphipathic α-helix, implying that the 1a-lipid interactions play critical roles in viral replication complex assembly. PMID:22345450

  7. Levels of acyl-coenzyme A synthetase 5 in urothelial cells and corresponding neoplasias reflect cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gaisa, Nadine T; Reinartz, Andrea; Schneider, Ursula; Klaus, Christina; Heidenreich, Axel; Jakse, Gerhard; Kaemmerer, Elke; Klinkhammer, Barbara Mara; Knuechel, Ruth; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2013-03-01

    Metabolic components like fatty acids and acyl-Coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesters have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various tumours. The activation of fatty acids to acyl-CoAs is catalysed by long chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs), and impairment of ACSL expression levels has been associated with tumourigenesis and progression. Since ACSLs have never been investigated in bladder tissues, the study aims to characterize ACSL expression and acyl-CoA synthesis in normal and neoplastic bladder tissues, as well as cell lines. ACSL isoforms 1, 3, 4 and 5 and synthesis of acyl-CoAs were analysed using qRT-PCR, western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry and lipid mass spectrometry. In normal urothelium, expression of ACSL1, 3, 4 and 5, with highest levels of ACSL isoform 5 was found. However, ACSL5 expression was reduced in corresponding neoplastic tissues and urothelial cell lines depending on the grade of cellular differentiation. Anti-ACSL5 immunostainings showed expression in normal urothelium and a gradual loss of ACSL5 protein via pre-invasive lesions to invasive carcinomas. High expression of ACSL5 correlated with increased α-galactosidase activity and positive Uroplakin III staining in tumours. In contrast, synthesis of acyl-CoAs was enhanced in neoplastic bladder tissues compared to normal urothelium, and reflected an increase with respect to cellular differentiation. These results confirm an expression of ACSLs, especially isoform 5, in human urothelium, prove enzymatic/lipidomic changes in bladder cancer tissues, and suggest an involvement of ACSL5 in cellular maturation and/or senescence with possible effects onto induction of tumour formation or progression. Further work may identify responsible pathway alterations, and attempting to re-balance the metabolic equilibrium of the urothelium may offer a further opportunity for tumour treatment and prevention. PMID:23348389

  8. Coenzyme Q10 serum concentration and redox status in European adults: influence of age, sex, and lipoprotein concentration

    PubMed Central

    Niklowitz, Petra; Onur, Simone; Fischer, Alexandra; Laudes, Matthias; Palussen, Michael; Menke, Thomas; Döring, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is synthesized in almost all human tissues and presumably involved in age-related alterations and diseases. Here, we examined the impact of aging and sex on the serum CoQ10 status in 860 European adults ranging in age from 18 to 82 years. We identified an inverse U-shaped relationship between CoQ10 concentration and age. Women showed lower cholesterol-adjusted CoQ10 levels than men, irrespective of age. As observed in both sexes, the decrease in CoQ10 concentration in older subjects was accompanied by a shift in the redox status in favour of the oxidized form. A strong positive correlation was found for total CoQ10 and cholesterol concentrations (Spearman’s, p≤1E-74). We found strong negative correlations between total (Spearman’s, p≤1E-07) and between cholesterol-adjusted CoQ10 concentration (Spearman’s, p≤1E-14) and the proportion of the oxidized form of CoQ10. These correlations were not dependent on age and sex and were attenuated by supplementation with 150 mg/day reduced CoQ10 for 14 days. Overall, our results are useful to define risk groups with critical CoQ10 status in humans. In particular, older subjects were characterized by impaired CoQ10 status due to their lowered serum CoQ10 concentration and concomitant decrease of CoQ10 redox capacity. PMID:27257350

  9. Preferring the Contemporary Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Marc

    1980-01-01

    Describes a study that indicated that readers of college newspapers prefer a front page style that is contemporary and emphasizes a horizontal layout to either an avant-garde style that features an entirely horizontal layout or a traditional layout having a vertical page. (TJ)

  10. Cognitive Preferences and Ethnicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, William J.; O'Donnell, Teresa Flores

    This document reports on a study into the relationships between cognitive preferences, achievement, and ethnicity of first year algebra students. The sample consisted of 175 students from two high schools in the Denver (Colorado) metropolitan area. The two schools were chosen because of the diversity of ethnic groups in the student populations.…

  11. Monolignol Pathway 4-Coumaric Acid:Coenzyme A Ligases in Populus. trichocarpa: Novel Specificity, Metabolic Regulation, and Simulation of Coenzyme A Ligation Fluxes1[W

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsi-Chuan; Song, Jina; Williams, Cranos M.; Shuford, Christopher M.; Liu, Jie; Wang, Jack P.; Li, Quanzi; Shi, Rui; Gokce, Emine; Ducoste, Joel; Muddiman, David C.; Sederoff, Ronald R.; Chiang, Vincent L.

    2013-01-01

    4-Coumaric acid:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) is involved in monolignol biosynthesis for lignification in plant cell walls. It ligates coenzyme A (CoA) with hydroxycinnamic acids, such as 4-coumaric and caffeic acids, into hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA thioesters. The ligation ensures the activated state of the acid for reduction into monolignols. In Populus spp., it has long been thought that one monolignol-specific 4CL is involved. Here, we present evidence of two monolignol 4CLs, Ptr4CL3 and Ptr4CL5, in Populus trichocarpa. Ptr4CL3 is the ortholog of the monolignol 4CL reported for many other species. Ptr4CL5 is novel. The two Ptr4CLs exhibited distinct Michaelis-Menten kinetic properties. Inhibition kinetics demonstrated that hydroxycinnamic acid substrates are also inhibitors of 4CL and suggested that Ptr4CL5 is an allosteric enzyme. Experimentally validated flux simulation, incorporating reaction/inhibition kinetics, suggested two CoA ligation paths in vivo: one through 4-coumaric acid and the other through caffeic acid. We previously showed that a membrane protein complex mediated the 3-hydroxylation of 4-coumaric acid to caffeic acid. The demonstration here of two ligation paths requiring these acids supports this 3-hydroxylation function. Ptr4CL3 regulates both CoA ligation paths with similar efficiencies, whereas Ptr4CL5 regulates primarily the caffeic acid path. Both paths can be inhibited by caffeic acid. The Ptr4CL5-catalyzed caffeic acid metabolism, therefore, may also act to mitigate the inhibition by caffeic acid to maintain a proper ligation flux. A high level of caffeic acid was detected in stem-differentiating xylem of P. trichocarpa. Our results suggest that Ptr4CL5 and caffeic acid coordinately modulate the CoA ligation flux for monolignol biosynthesis. PMID:23344904

  12. The use of coenzyme Q0 as a template in the development of a molecularly imprinted polymer for the selective recognition of coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Contin, Mario; Flor, Sabrina; Martinefski, Manuela; Lucangioli, Silvia; Tripodi, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for use as a solid phase extraction sorbent was developed for the determination of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in liver extract. CoQ10 is an essential cofactor in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and a powerful antioxidant agent found in low concentrations in biological samples. This fact and its high hydrophobicity make the analysis of CoQ10 technically challenging. Accordingly, a MIP was synthesised using coenzyme Q0 as the template, methacrylic acid as the functional monomer, acetonitrile as the porogen, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the crosslinker and benzoyl peroxide as the initiator. Various parameters affecting the polymer preparation and extraction efficiency were evaluated. Morphological characterisation of the MIP and its proper comparison with C18 as a sorbent in solid phase extraction were performed. The optimal conditions for the molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) consisted of 400 μL of sample mixed with 30 mg of MIP and 600 μL of water to reach the optimum solution loading. The loading was followed by a washing step consisting of 1 mL of a 1-propanol solution (1-propanol:water, 30:70,v/v) and elution with 1 mL of 1-propanol. After clean-up, the CoQ10 in the samples was analysed by high performance liquid chromatography. The extraction recoveries were higher than 73.7% with good precision (3.6-8.3%). The limits of detection and quantification were 2.4 and 7.5 μg g(-1), respectively, and a linear range between 7.5 and 150 μg g(-1) of tissue was achieved. The new MISPE procedure provided a successful clean-up for the determination of CoQ10 in a complex matrix. PMID:24356222

  13. Properties of succinyl-coenzyme A:L-malate coenzyme A transferase and its role in the autotrophic 3-hydroxypropionate cycle of Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, Silke; Steindorf, Astrid; Alber, Birgit E; Fuchs, Georg

    2006-04-01

    The 3-hydroxypropionate cycle has been proposed to operate as the autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in the phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. In this pathway, acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and two bicarbonate molecules are converted to malate. Acetyl-CoA is regenerated from malyl-CoA by L-malyl-CoA lyase. The enzyme forming malyl-CoA, succinyl-CoA:L-malate coenzyme A transferase, was purified. Based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of its two subunits, the corresponding genes were identified on a gene cluster which also contains the gene for L-malyl-CoA lyase, the subsequent enzyme in the pathway. Both enzymes were severalfold up-regulated under autotrophic conditions, which is in line with their proposed function in CO2 fixation. The two CoA transferase genes were cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was purified and studied. Succinyl-CoA:L-malate CoA transferase forms a large (alphabeta)n complex consisting of 46- and 44-kDa subunits and catalyzes the reversible reaction succinyl-CoA + L-malate --> succinate + L-malyl-CoA. It is specific for succinyl-CoA as the CoA donor but accepts L-citramalate instead of L-malate as the CoA acceptor; the corresponding d-stereoisomers are not accepted. The enzyme is a member of the class III of the CoA transferase family. The demonstration of the missing CoA transferase closes the last gap in the proposed 3-hydroxypropionate cycle. PMID:16547052

  14. Sensitive non-radioactive determination of aminotransferase stereospecificity for C-4' hydrogen transfer on the coenzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Jomrit, Juntratip; Summpunn, Pijug; Meevootisom, Vithaya; Wiyakrutta, Suthep

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Stereochemical mechanism of PLP enzymes is important but difficult to determine. {yields} This new method is significantly less complicated than the previous ones. {yields} This assay is as sensitive as the radioactive based method. {yields} LC-MS/MS positively identify the analyte coenzyme. {yields} The method can be used with enzyme whose apo form is unstable. -- Abstract: A sensitive non-radioactive method for determination of the stereospecificity of the C-4' hydrogen transfer on the coenzymes (pyridoxal phosphate, PLP; and pyridoxamine phosphate, PMP) of aminotransferases has been developed. Aminotransferase of unknown stereospecificity in its PLP form was incubated in {sup 2}H{sub 2}O with a substrate amino acid resulted in PMP labeled with deuterium at C-4' in the pro-S or pro-R configuration according to the stereospecificity of the aminotransferase tested. The [4'-{sup 2}H]PMP was isolated from the enzyme protein and divided into two portions. The first portion was incubated in aqueous buffer with apo-aspartate aminotransferase (a reference si-face specific enzyme), and the other was incubated with apo-branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase (a reference re-face specific enzyme) in the presence of a substrate 2-oxo acid. The {sup 2}H at C-4' is retained with the PLP if the aminotransferase in question transfers C-4' hydrogen on the opposite face of the coenzyme compared with the reference aminotransferase, but the {sup 2}H is removed if the test and reference aminotransferases catalyze hydrogen transfer on the same face. PLP formed in the final reactions was analyzed by LC-MS/MS for the presence or absence of {sup 2}H. The method was highly sensitive that for the aminotransferase with ca. 50 kDa subunit molecular weight, only 2 mg of the enzyme was sufficient for the whole test. With this method, the use of radioactive substances could be avoided without compromising the sensitivity of the assay.

  15. Rapid ethanol production at elevated temperatures by engineered thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus via the NADP(H)-preferring xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Sun, Lianhong; Hong, Jiong

    2015-09-01

    Conversion of xylose to ethanol by yeasts is a challenge because of the redox imbalances under oxygen-limited conditions. The thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus grows well with xylose as a carbon source at elevated temperatures, but its xylose fermentation ability is weak. In this study, a combination of the NADPH-preferring xylose reductase (XR) from Neurospora crassa and the NADP(+)-preferring xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) mutant from Scheffersomyces stipitis (Pichia stipitis) was constructed. The xylose fermentation ability and redox balance of the recombinant strains were improved significantly by over-expression of several downstream genes. The intracellular concentrations of coenzymes and the reduced coenzyme/oxidized coenzyme ratio increased significantly in these metabolic strains. The byproducts, such as glycerol and acetic acid, were significantly reduced by the disruption of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1). The resulting engineered K. marxianus YZJ088 strain produced 44.95 g/L ethanol from 118.39 g/L xylose with a productivity of 2.49 g/L/h at 42 °C. Additionally, YZJ088 realized glucose and xylose co-fermentation and produced 51.43 g/L ethanol from a mixture of 103.97 g/L xylose and 40.96 g/L glucose with a productivity of 2.14 g/L/h at 42 °C. These promising results validate the YZJ088 strain as an excellent producer of ethanol from xylose through the synthetic xylose assimilation pathway. PMID:26253204

  16. Son preference in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Haughton, J; Haughton, D

    1995-01-01

    This article assesses the strength of son preference in Vietnam, as reflected in fertility behavior. It formulates and estimates a proportional hazards model applied to birth intervals, and a contraceptive prevalence model, using household survey data from 2,636 ever-married women aged 15-49 with at least one living child who were interviewed for the Vietnam Living Standards Survey 1992-1993. Son preference is found to be strong by world standards, but nevertheless, it has a minor effect on fertility; in its absence, the total fertility rate would fall by roughly 10 percent from the current level of about 3.2 children per woman of reproductive age. PMID:8826072

  17. Preferences, needs and QALYs.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, J

    1996-01-01

    Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) have become a household word among health economists. Their use as a means of comparing the value of health programmes and medical interventions has stirred up controversy in the medical profession and the academic community. In this paper, I argue that QALY analysis does not adequately take into account the differentiated nature of the health state values it measures. Specifically, it does not distinguish between needs and preferences with respect to its valuation of health states. I defend the view that needs and preferences are clearly distinguishable, and that the concept of needs cannot be dispensed with, as many health economists suggest. It is argued that the scale along which health states are measured in QALY analysis is not a continuous interval scale, but one which concerns two distinctly different value dimensions. Measuring the values of health state intervals may reveal the weighting attached to the different value dimensions. PMID:8910777

  18. A new role for coenzyme F420 in aflatoxin reduction by soil mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Graham, David E

    2010-11-01

    Hepatotoxic aflatoxins have found a worthy adversary in two new families of bacterial oxidoreductases. These enzymes use the reduced coenzyme F420 to initiate the degradation of furanocoumarin compounds, including the major mycotoxin products of Aspergillus flavus. Along with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate synthases and aryl nitroreductases, these proteins form a large and versatile superfamily of flavin and deazaflavin-dependent oxidoreductases. F420-dependent members of this family appear to share a common mechanism of hydride transfer from the reduced, low-potential deazaflavin to the electron-deficient ring systems of their substrates. PMID:21038477

  19. Regeneration of Nicotinamide Coenzymes: Principles and Applications for the Synthesis of Chiral Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckbecker, Andrea; Gröger, Harald; Hummel, Werner

    Dehydrogenases which depend on nicotinamide coenzymes are of increasing interest for the preparation of chiral compounds, either by reduction of a prochiral precursor or by oxidative resolution of their racemate. The regeneration of oxidized and reduced nicotinamide cofactors is a very crucial step because the use of these cofactors in stoichiometric amounts is too expensive for application. There are several possibilities to regenerate nicotinamide cofactors: established methods such as formate/formate dehydrogenase (FDH) for the regeneration of NADH, recently developed electrochemical methods based on new mediator structures, or the application of gene cloning methods for the construction of "designed" cells by heterologous expression of appropriate genes.

  20. MicroCommentary: A New Role for Coenzyme F420 in Aflatoxin Reduction by Soil Mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, David E

    2010-01-01

    Hepatotoxic aflatoxins have found a worthy adversary in two new families of bacterial oxidoreductases. These enzymes use the reduced coenzyme F420 to initiate the degradation of furanocoumarin compounds, including the major mycotoxin products of Aspergillus flavus. Along with pyridoxalamine 5 -phosphate oxidases and aryl nitroreductases, these proteins form a large and versatile superfamily of flavin and deazaflavin-dependent oxidoreductases. F420-dependent members of this family appear to share a common mechanism of hydride transfer from the reduced deazaflavin to the electron-deficient ring systems of their substrates.

  1. Site-Selective Synthesis of (15)N- and (13)C-Enriched Flavin Mononucleotide Coenzyme Isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Neti, Syam Sundar; Poulter, C Dale

    2016-06-17

    Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is a coenzyme for numerous proteins involved in key cellular and physiological processes. Isotopically labeled flavin is a powerful tool for studying the structure and mechanism of flavoenzyme-catalyzed reactions by a variety of techniques, including NMR, IR, Raman, and mass spectrometry. In this report, we describe the preparation of labeled FMN isotopologues enriched with (15)N and (13)C isotopes at various sites in the pyrazine and pyrimidine rings of the isoalloxazine core of the cofactor from readily available precursors by a five-step chemo-enzymatic synthesis. PMID:27176708

  2. Structure of the corrinoid:coenzyme M methyltransferase MtaA from Methanosarcina mazei.

    PubMed

    Hoeppner, Astrid; Thomas, Frank; Rueppel, Alma; Hensel, Reinhard; Blankenfeldt, Wulf; Bayer, Peter; Faust, Annette

    2012-11-01

    The zinc-containing corrinoid:coenzyme M methyltransferase MtaA is part of the methanol-coenzyme M-methyltransferase complex of Methanosarcina mazei. The whole complex consists of three subunits: MtaA, MtaB and MtaC. The MtaB-MtaC complex catalyses the cleavage of methanol (bound to MtaB) and the transfer of the methyl group onto the cobalt of cob(I)alamin (bound to MtaC). The MtaA-MtaC complex catalyses methyl transfer from methyl-cob(III)alamin (bound to MtaC) to coenzyme M (bound to MtaA). The crystal structure of the MtaB-MtaC complex from M. barkeri has previously been determined. Here, the crystal structures of MtaA from M. mazei in a substrate-free but Zn(2+)-bound state and in complex with Zn(2+) and coenzyme M (HS-CoM) are reported at resolutions of 1.8 and 2.1 Å, respectively. A search for homologous proteins revealed that MtaA exhibits 23% sequence identity to human uroporphyrinogen III decarboxylase, which has also the highest structural similarity (r.m.s.d. of 2.03 Å for 306 aligned amino acids). The main structural feature of MtaA is a TIM-barrel-like fold, which is also found in all other zinc enzymes that catalyse thiol-group alkylation. The active site of MtaA is situated at the narrow bottom of a funnel such that the thiolate group of HS-CoM points towards the Zn(2+) ion. The Zn(2+) ion in the active site of MtaA is coordinated tetrahedrally via His240, Cys242 and Cys319. In the substrate-free form the fourth ligand is Glu263. Binding of HS-CoM leads to exchange of the O-ligand of Glu263 for the S-ligand of HS-CoM with inversion of the zinc geometry. The interface between MtaA and MtaC for transfer of the methyl group from MtaC-bound methylcobalamin is most likely to be formed by the core complex of MtaB-MtaC and the N-terminal segment (a long loop containing three α-helices and a β-hairpin) of MtaA, which is not part of the TIM-barrel core structure of MtaA. PMID:23090404

  3. 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase: a new biomarker of fish exposure to water pollution.

    PubMed

    Pallottini, Valentina; Scalici, Massimiliano; Gibertini, Giancarlo; Marino, Maria; Trentalance, Anna

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a new putative biomarker in Salmo trutta exposed to water pollution. Variations in the levels of hepatic 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR), the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis, were compared to heat shock protein 70 and hypoxia inducible factor α, biomarkers of pollution exposure and lowered O₂, respectively. The results confirm that HMG-CoAR levels increase in polluted water irrespective of water temperature or O₂ content, indicating that HMG-CoAR could be used as a specific biomarker for water pollution. PMID:20835703

  4. Perspectives on Preference Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Regenwetter, Michel

    2009-07-01

    For centuries, the mathematical aggregation of preferences by groups, organizations, or society itself has received keen interdisciplinary attention. Extensive theoretical work in economics and political science throughout the second half of the 20th century has highlighted the idea that competing notions of rational social choice intrinsically contradict each other. This has led some researchers to consider coherent democratic decision making to be a mathematical impossibility. Recent empirical work in psychology qualifies that view. This nontechnical review sketches a quantitative research paradigm for the behavioral investigation of mathematical social choice rules on real ballots, experimental choices, or attitudinal survey data. The article poses a series of open questions. Some classical work sometimes makes assumptions about voter preferences that are descriptively invalid. Do such technical assumptions lead the theory astray? How can empirical work inform the formulation of meaningful theoretical primitives? Classical "impossibility results" leverage the fact that certain desirable mathematical properties logically cannot hold in all conceivable electorates. Do these properties nonetheless hold true in empirical distributions of preferences? Will future behavioral analyses continue to contradict the expectations of established theory? Under what conditions do competing consensus methods yield identical outcomes and why do they do so? PMID:26158988

  5. Coaching preferences of athletes.

    PubMed

    Terry, P C; Howe, B L

    1984-12-01

    The study examined the coaching preferences of 80 male and 80 female athletes, as measured by the Leadership Scale for Sports (Chelladurai and Saleh, 1978, 1980). In addition, it attempted to assess the applicability to sport of the Life-cycle and Path-goal theories of leadership. Comparisons between groups were made on the basis of sex, age, and type of sport. A MANOVA indicated that athletes in independent sports preferred more democratic behaviour (p less than .001) and less autocratic behaviour (p = .028) than athletes in interdependent sports. No differences in coaching preferences were found which could be attributed to the age or sex of the athlete, or the variability of the sports task. These results partially supported the Path-goal theory, but did not support the Life-cycle theory. Athletes of all groups tended to favour coaches who displayed training behaviour and rewarding behaviour "often", democratic behaviour and social support behaviour "occasionally", and autocratic behaviour "seldom". This consistency may be a useful finding for those organizations and institutions interested in preparing coaches. PMID:6525751

  6. Clay Mineral Preferred Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Stirrat, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Anisotropy of the orientation of clay minerals, often referred to as texture, may be unique to sediments' deposition, composition, deformation or diagenetic history. The literature is rich with studies that include preferred orientation generation in fault gouge, low-grade metamorphic rocks, sediments with variable clay content and during the smectite-to-illite transformation. Untangling the interplay between many competing factors in any one geologic situation has proven a significant challenge over many years. Understanding how, where and when clay minerals develop a preferred orientation has significant implications for permeability anisotropy in shallow burial, the way mechanical properties are projected from shallower to deeper settings in basin modeling packages and the way velocity anisotropy is accounted for in seismic data processing. The assessment of the anisotropic properties of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks is gaining significant momentum in rock physics research. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of how clay minerals develop a preferred orientation in space and time is crucial to the understanding of anisotropy of physical properties. The current study brings together a wealth of data that may be used in a predictive sense to account for fabric anisotropy that may impact any number of rock properties.

  7. An Improvement of Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Rats by Ubiquinone-10 and Ubiquinol-10 and Bioavailability after Short- and Long-Term Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Prangthip, Pattaneeya; Kettawan, Aikkarach; Posuwan, Juthathip; Okuno, Masaaki; Okamoto, Tadashi

    2016-11-01

    This study explored effects of ubiquinol-10 and ubiquinone-10, two different forms of coenzyme Q10, in diabetic rats. Oxidative stress is characterized by the depletion of antioxidant defenses and overproduction of free radicals that might contribute to, and even accelerate, the development of diabetes mellitus (DM) complications. Coenzyme Q10 was administered orally to diabetic rats and oxidative stress markers were then assessed. Bioavailability in normal rats was additionally assessed in various tissues and subcellular fractions after short-term and long-term coenzyme Q10 supplementation. Elevated nonfasting blood glucose and blood pressure in diabetic rats were decreased by ubiquinone-10. Both ubiquinol-10 and ubiquinone-10 ameliorated oxidative stress, based on assays for reactive oxygen metabolites and malondialdehyde. Coenzyme Q10 levels increased with both treatments and liver nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) coenzyme Q reductase with ubiquinone-10. Ubiquinol-10 was better absorbed in the liver and pancreas than ubiquinone-10, though both were similarly effective. In bioavailability study, a longer period of coenzyme Q10 supplementation did not lead to its accumulation in tissues or organelles. Both forms of coenzyme Q10 reduced oxidative stress in diabetic rats. Long-term supplementation of coenzyme Q10 appeared to be safe. PMID:27064932

  8. Critical period for acoustic preference in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eun-Jin; Lin, Eric W; Hensch, Takao K

    2012-10-16

    Preference behaviors are often established during early life, but the underlying neural circuit mechanisms remain unknown. Adapting a unique nesting behavior assay, we confirmed a "critical period" for developing music preference in C57BL/6 mice. Early music exposure between postnatal days 15 and 24 reversed their innate bias for silent shelter, which typically could not be altered in adulthood. Instead, exposing adult mice treated acutely with valproic acid or carrying a targeted deletion of the Nogo receptor (NgR(-/-)) unmasked a strong plasticity of preference consistent with a reopening of the critical period as seen in other systems. Imaging of cFos expression revealed a prominent neuronal activation in response to the exposed music in the prelimbic and infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex only under conditions of open plasticity. Neither behavioral changes nor selective medial prefrontal cortex activation was observed in response to pure tone exposure, indicating a music-specific effect. Open-field center crossings were increased concomitant with shifts in music preference, suggesting a potential anxiolytic effect. Thus, music may offer both a unique window into the emotional state of mice and a potentially efficient assay for molecular "brakes" on critical period plasticity common to sensory and higher order brain areas. PMID:23045690

  9. Critical period for acoustic preference in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eun-Jin; Lin, Eric W.; Hensch, Takao K.

    2012-01-01

    Preference behaviors are often established during early life, but the underlying neural circuit mechanisms remain unknown. Adapting a unique nesting behavior assay, we confirmed a “critical period” for developing music preference in C57BL/6 mice. Early music exposure between postnatal days 15 and 24 reversed their innate bias for silent shelter, which typically could not be altered in adulthood. Instead, exposing adult mice treated acutely with valproic acid or carrying a targeted deletion of the Nogo receptor (NgR−/−) unmasked a strong plasticity of preference consistent with a reopening of the critical period as seen in other systems. Imaging of cFos expression revealed a prominent neuronal activation in response to the exposed music in the prelimbic and infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex only under conditions of open plasticity. Neither behavioral changes nor selective medial prefrontal cortex activation was observed in response to pure tone exposure, indicating a music-specific effect. Open-field center crossings were increased concomitant with shifts in music preference, suggesting a potential anxiolytic effect. Thus, music may offer both a unique window into the emotional state of mice and a potentially efficient assay for molecular “brakes” on critical period plasticity common to sensory and higher order brain areas. PMID:23045690

  10. Structural Analysis of a Ni-Methyl Species in Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase from Methanothermobacter marburgensis

    SciTech Connect

    Cedervall, Peder E.; Dey, Mishtu; Li, Xianghui; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Hedman, Britt; Ragsdale, Stephen W.; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2012-02-15

    We present the 1.2 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structure of a Ni-methyl species that is a proposed catalytic intermediate in methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR), the enzyme that catalyzes the biological formation of methane. The methyl group is situated 2.1 {angstrom} proximal of the Ni atom of the MCR coenzyme F{sub 430}. A rearrangement of the substrate channel has been posited to bring together substrate species, but Ni(III)-methyl formation alone does not lead to any observable structural changes in the channel.