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Sample records for altering mrna stability

  1. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense–antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis. PMID:23650872

  2. Estrogen-dependent activation of the avian very low density apolipoprotein II and vitellogenin genes. Transient alterations in mRNA polyadenylation and stability early during induction.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, A W; Deeley, R G

    1988-10-01

    Administration of estrogen to egg-laying vertebrates activates unscheduled, hepatic expression of major, egg-yolk protein genes in immature animals and mature males. Two avian yolk protein genes, encoding very low density apolipoprotein II (apoVLDLII) and vitellogenin II, are dormant prior to stimulation with estrogen, but within three days their cognate mRNAs accumulate to become two of the most abundant species in the liver. Accumulation of these mRNAs has been attributed to both induction of transcription and selective, estrogen-dependent mRNA stabilization. We have detected alterations in the size of apoVLDLII mRNA that occur during the first 24 hours that are attributable to a shift in the extent of polyadenylation as steady-state is approached. In vitro transcription assays indicate that primary activation of both genes takes place relatively slowly and that maximal rates of mRNA accumulation occur when the apoVLDLII and vitellogenin II genes are expressed at only 30% and 10% of their fully induced levels, respectively. Transcription data combined with the structural alteration of apoVLDLII mRNA suggest that stability of the two mRNAs may change as steady-state is approached. We have assessed the compatibility of this suggestion with earlier estimates of the kinetics of accumulation of both mRNAs by developing a generally useful algorithm that predicts approach to steady-state kinetics under conditions where both the rate of synthesis and mRNA stability change throughout the accumulation phase of the response. The results predict that the stability of both mRNAs decreases by at least two- to threefold during the approach to steady-state and that, although an additional destabilization of apoVLDLII mRNA may occur following withdrawal of estrogen, the steady-state stability of vitellogenin mRNA is not significantly decreased upon removal of hormone. PMID:3210227

  3. mRNA stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J

    1995-01-01

    This review concerns how cytoplasmic mRNA half-lives are regulated and how mRNA decay rates influence gene expression. mRNA stability influences gene expression in virtually all organisms, from bacteria to mammals, and the abundance of a particular mRNA can fluctuate manyfold following a change in the mRNA half-life, without any change in transcription. The processes that regulate mRNA half-lives can, in turn, affect how cells grow, differentiate, and respond to their environment. Three major questions are addressed. Which sequences in mRNAs determine their half-lives? Which enzymes degrade mRNAs? Which (trans-acting) factors regulate mRNA stability, and how do they function? The following specific topics are discussed: techniques for measuring eukaryotic mRNA stability and for calculating decay constants, mRNA decay pathways, mRNases, proteins that bind to sequences shared among many mRNAs [like poly(A)- and AU-rich-binding proteins] and proteins that bind to specific mRNAs (like the c-myc coding-region determinant-binding protein), how environmental factors like hormones and growth factors affect mRNA stability, and how translation and mRNA stability are linked. Some perspectives and predictions for future research directions are summarized at the end. PMID:7565413

  4. Conditional regulation of Puf1p, Puf4p, and Puf5p activity alters YHB1 mRNA stability for a rapid response to toxic nitric oxide stress in yeast.

    PubMed

    Russo, Joseph; Olivas, Wendy M

    2015-03-15

    Puf proteins regulate mRNA degradation and translation through interactions with 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). Such regulation provides an efficient method to rapidly alter protein production during cellular stress. YHB1 encodes the only protein to detoxify nitric oxide in yeast. Here we show that YHB1 mRNA is destabilized by Puf1p, Puf4p, and Puf5p through two overlapping Puf recognition elements (PREs) in the YHB1 3' UTR. Overexpression of any of the three Pufs is sufficient to fully rescue wild-type decay in the absence of other Pufs, and overexpression of Puf4p or Puf5p can enhance the rate of wild-type decay. YHB1 mRNA decay stimulation by Puf proteins is also responsive to cellular stress. YHB1 mRNA is stabilized in galactose and high culture density, indicating inactivation of the Puf proteins. This condition-specific inactivation of Pufs is overcome by Puf overexpression, and Puf4p/Puf5p overexpression during nitric oxide exposure reduces the steady-state level of endogenous YHB1 mRNA, resulting in slow growth. Puf inactivation is not a result of altered expression or localization. Puf1p and Puf4p can bind target mRNA in inactivating conditions; however, Puf5p binding is reduced. This work demonstrates how multiple Puf proteins coordinately regulate YHB1 mRNA to protect cells from nitric oxide stress. PMID:25631823

  5. Low-level laser irradiation alters mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Silva, C. L.; Carvalho, L.; Mencalha, A. L.; Stumbo, A. C.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Low-level lasers are used for the treatment of diseases in soft and bone tissues, but few data are available regarding their effects on genomic stability. In this study, we investigated mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts exposed to low-level infrared laser. C2C12 myoblast cultures in different fetal bovine serum concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35 and 70 J cm‑2), and collected for the evaluation of DNA repair gene expression. Laser exposure increased gene expression related to base excision repair (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1), nucleotide excision repair (excision repair cross-complementation group 1 and xeroderma pigmentosum C protein) and genomic stabilization (ATM serine/threonine kinase and tumor protein p53) in normal and low fetal bovine serum concentrations. Results suggest that genomic stability could be part of a biostimulation effect of low-level laser therapy in injured muscles.

  6. Stabilization of tubulin mRNA by inhibition of protein synthesis in sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Z Y; Brandhorst, B P

    1988-01-01

    An increased level of unpolymerized tubulin caused by depolymerization of microtubules in sea urchin larvae resulted in a rapid loss of tubulin mRNA, which was prevented by nearly complete inhibition of protein synthesis. Results of an RNA run-on assay indicated that inhibition of protein synthesis does not alter tubulin gene transcription. Analysis of the decay of tubulin mRNA in embryos in which RNA synthesis was inhibited by actinomycin D indicated that inhibition of protein synthesis prevents the destabilization of tubulin mRNA. The effect was similar whether mRNA was maintained on polysomes in the presence of emetine or anisomycin or displaced from the polysomes in the presence of puromycin or pactamycin; thus, the stabilization of tubulin mRNA is not dependent on the state of the polysomes after inhibition of protein synthesis. Even after tubulin mRNA declined to a low level after depolymerization of microtubules, it could be rescued by treatment of embryos with inhibitors of protein synthesis. Tubulin mRNA could be induced to accumulate prematurely in gastrulae but not in plutei if protein synthesis was inhibited, an observation that is indicative of the importance of the autogenous regulation of tubulin mRNA stability during embryogenesis. Possible explanations for the role of protein synthesis in the control of mRNA stability are discussed. Images PMID:3211150

  7. Changes in Chloroplast mRNA Stability during Leaf Development.

    PubMed Central

    Klaff, P; Gruissem, W

    1991-01-01

    During spinach leaf development, chloroplast-encoded mRNAs accumulate to different steady-state levels. Their relative transcription rates alone, however, cannot account for the changes in mRNA amount. In this study, we examined the importance of mRNA stability for the regulation of plastid mRNA accumulation using an in vivo system to measure mRNA decay in intact leaves by inhibiting transcription with actinomycin D. Decay of psbA and rbcL mRNAs was assayed in young and mature leaves. The psbA mRNA half-life was increased more than twofold in mature leaves compared with young leaves, whereas rbcL mRNA decayed with a similar relative half-life at both leaf developmental stages. The direct in vivo measurements demonstrated that differential mRNA stability in higher plant plastids can account for differences in mRNA accumulation during leaf development. The role of polysome association in mRNA decay was also investigated. Using organelle-specific translation inhibitors that force mRNAs into a polysome-bound state or deplete mRNAs of ribosomes, we measured mRNA decay in vivo in either state. The results showed that rbcL and psbA mRNAs are less stable when bound to polysomes relative to the polysome-depleted mRNAs and that their stabilities are differentially affected by binding to polysomes. The results suggested that ribosome binding and/or translation of the psbA and rbcL mRNAs may function to modulate the rate of their decay in chloroplasts. PMID:12324602

  8. Vibrational force alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Vincent, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3E1) cells were subjected to a vibrational force modeled by NASA to simulate a space shuttle launch (7.83 G rms). The mRNA levels for eight genes were investigated to determine the effect of vibrational force on mRNA expression. The mRNA levels of two growth-related protooncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, were up-regulated significantly within 30 min after vibration, whereas those of osteocalcin as well as transforming growth factor-beta1 were decreased significantly within 3 h after vibration. No changes were detected in the levels of beta-actin, histone H4, or cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 after vibration. No basal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 expression were detected. In addition, the extracellular concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent autocrine/paracrine growth factor in bone, were not significantly altered after vibration most likely due to the serum deprivation state of the osteoblasts. In comparison with the gravitational launch profile, vibrational-induced changes in gene expression were greater both in magnitude and number of genes activated. Taken together, these data suggest that the changes in mRNA expression are due to a direct mechanical effect of the vibrational force on the osteoblast cells and not to changes in the local PGE2 concentrations. The finding that launch forces induce gene expression is of utmost importance since many of the biological experiments do not dampen vibrational loads on experimental samples. This lack of dampening of vibrational forces may partially explain why 1-G onboard controls sometimes do not reflect 1-G ground controls. These data may also suggest that scientists use extra ground controls that are exposed to launch forces, have these forces dampened on launched samples, or use facilities such as Biorack that provide an onboard 1-G centrufuge in order to control for space shuttle launch forces.

  9. Alternative splicing of parathyroid hormone-related protein mRNA: expression and stability

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, R S; Luchin, A I; Richard, V; Brena, R M; Lima, D; Rosol, T J

    2011-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a multifunctional protein that is often dysregulated in cancer. The human PTHrP gene is alternatively spliced into three isoforms, each with a unique 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR), encoding 139, 173 and 141 amino acid proteins. The regulation of PTHrP mRNA isoform expression has not been completely elucidated, but it may be affected by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In this study, we examined differences in the PTHrP mRNA isoform expression in two squamous carcinoma cell lines (SCC2/88 and HARA), an immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT), and spontaneous human lung cancer with adjacent normal tissue. In addition, the effect of TGF-β1 on PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability was examined. Cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms occurred between the various cell lines, normal human lung, and immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). PTHrP isoform expression pattern was significantly altered between normal lung tissue and the adjacent lung cancer. In vitro studies revealed that TGF-β1 differentially altered the mRNA steady-state levels and mRNA stability of the PTHrP isoforms. Protein–RNA binding studies identified different proteins binding to the 3′-UTR of the PTHrP isoforms (139) and (141), which may be important in the differential mRNA stability and response to cytokines between the PTHrP isoforms. The data demonstrate that there is cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms, and disruption of the normal regulation during cancer progression may in part be associated with TGF-β1-induced changes in PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability. PMID:15291755

  10. Cyclin-dependent kinase 7 controls mRNA synthesis by affecting stability of preinitiation complexes, leading to altered gene expression, cell cycle progression, and survival of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kelso, Timothy W R; Baumgart, Karen; Eickhoff, Jan; Albert, Thomas; Antrecht, Claudia; Lemcke, Sarah; Klebl, Bert; Meisterernst, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) activates cell cycle CDKs and is a member of the general transcription factor TFIIH. Although there is substantial evidence for an active role of CDK7 in mRNA synthesis and associated processes, the degree of its influence on global and gene-specific transcription in mammalian species is unclear. In the current study, we utilize two novel inhibitors with high specificity for CDK7 to demonstrate a restricted but robust impact of CDK7 on gene transcription in vivo and in in vitro-reconstituted reactions. We distinguish between relative low- and high-dose responses and relate them to distinct molecular mechanisms and altered physiological responses. Low inhibitor doses cause rapid clearance of paused RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules and sufficed to cause genome-wide alterations in gene expression, delays in cell cycle progression at both the G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, and diminished survival of human tumor cells. Higher doses and prolonged inhibition led to strong reductions in RNAPII carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) phosphorylation, eventual activation of the p53 program, and increased cell death. Together, our data reason for a quantitative contribution of CDK7 to mRNA synthesis, which is critical for cellular homeostasis. PMID:25047832

  11. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 7 Controls mRNA Synthesis by Affecting Stability of Preinitiation Complexes, Leading to Altered Gene Expression, Cell Cycle Progression, and Survival of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, Timothy W. R.; Baumgart, Karen; Eickhoff, Jan; Albert, Thomas; Antrecht, Claudia; Lemcke, Sarah; Klebl, Bert

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) activates cell cycle CDKs and is a member of the general transcription factor TFIIH. Although there is substantial evidence for an active role of CDK7 in mRNA synthesis and associated processes, the degree of its influence on global and gene-specific transcription in mammalian species is unclear. In the current study, we utilize two novel inhibitors with high specificity for CDK7 to demonstrate a restricted but robust impact of CDK7 on gene transcription in vivo and in in vitro-reconstituted reactions. We distinguish between relative low- and high-dose responses and relate them to distinct molecular mechanisms and altered physiological responses. Low inhibitor doses cause rapid clearance of paused RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules and sufficed to cause genome-wide alterations in gene expression, delays in cell cycle progression at both the G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, and diminished survival of human tumor cells. Higher doses and prolonged inhibition led to strong reductions in RNAPII carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) phosphorylation, eventual activation of the p53 program, and increased cell death. Together, our data reason for a quantitative contribution of CDK7 to mRNA synthesis, which is critical for cellular homeostasis. PMID:25047832

  12. Connections Underlying Translation and mRNA Stability.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Aditya; Green, Rachel

    2016-09-11

    Gene expression and regulation in organisms minimally depends on transcription by RNA polymerase and on the stability of the RNA product (for both coding and non-coding RNAs). For coding RNAs, gene expression is further influenced by the amount of translation by the ribosome and by the stability of the protein product. The stabilities of these two classes of RNA, non-coding and coding, vary considerably: tRNAs and rRNAs tend to be long lived while mRNAs tend to be more short lived. Even among mRNAs, however, there is a considerable range in stability (ranging from seconds to hours in bacteria and up to days in metazoans), suggesting a significant role for stability in the regulation of gene expression. Here, we review recent experiments from bacteria, yeast and metazoans indicating that the stability of most mRNAs is broadly impacted by the actions of ribosomes that translate them. Ribosomal recognition of defective mRNAs triggers "mRNA surveillance" pathways that target the mRNA for degradation [Shoemaker and Green (2012) ]. More generally, even the stability of perfectly functional mRNAs appears to be dictated by overall rates of translation by the ribosome [Herrick et al. (1990), Presnyak et al. (2015) ]. Given that mRNAs are synthesized for the purpose of being translated into proteins, it is reassuring that such intimate connections between mRNA and the ribosome can drive biological regulation. In closing, we consider the likelihood that these connections between protein synthesis and mRNA stability are widespread or whether other modes of regulation dominate the mRNA stability landscape in higher organisms. PMID:27261255

  13. The role of cytokine mRNA stability in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Seko, Yuko; Cole, Steven; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Shapiro, Bruce A; Ragheb, Jack A

    2006-05-01

    Inflammatory cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-2, tumor-necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and IL-17 play an important role in the pathogenesis of cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Cytokine gene expression is tightly regulated at the post-transcriptional level. Cytokine mRNA decay is dependent not only upon cis-elements in the RNA but also upon trans-acting factors such as the RNA binding proteins TTP, HuR, AUF-1, Nucleolin and YB-1. Physiologic signals, for instance signaling through the CD28 receptor on T cells, can modulate the half-life of a select subset of cytokine mRNAs, such as IL-2. Distinct cis- and trans-acting elements in human and mouse IL-2 mRNA may account for the different pattern of CD28-mediated mRNA stabilization in these two species. TTP-deficient mice or mice with a deletion of the TNF-alpha mRNA ARE element develop a complex inflammatory syndrome that is associated with a prolonged TNF-alpha mRNA half-life and elevated levels of circulating TNF-alpha. This syndrome can be prevented by treatment with TNF-alpha blocking antibodies. Evidence from mice with altered cytokine mRNA stability, along with human data, suggests that imbalance between the stability and decay of inflammatory cytokine mRNAs could represent a basic mechanism leading to autoimmunity. PMID:16782553

  14. Effect of ribosome shielding on mRNA stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneke, Carlus; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Valleriani, Angelo

    2013-08-01

    Based on the experimental evidence that translating ribosomes stabilize the mRNAs, we introduce and study a theoretical model for the dynamic shielding of mRNA by ribosomes. We present an improved fitting of published decay assay data in E. coli and show that only one third of the decay patterns are exponential. Our new transcriptome-wide estimate of the average lifetimes and mRNA half-lives shows that these timescales are considerably shorter than previous estimates. We also explain why there is a negative correlation between mRNA length and average lifetime when the mRNAs are subdivided in classes sharing the same degradation parameters. As a by-product, our model indicates that co-transcriptional translation in E. coli may be less common than previously believed.

  15. Differential regulation of plastid mRNA stability. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, D.B.

    1993-09-01

    Our goal is to identify cis-acting sequences and transacting factors that function in plastid mRNA maturation, stabilization, and/or decay through an in vitro and in vivo analysis of mRNA:protein interactions. Our previous results emphasized the study of 3{prime}end inverted repeat sequences (IRs) that serve both as mRNA processing elements and stability determinants, and associate with plastid proteins that potentially play enzymatic, structural and/or regulatory roles. We seek to define, by single base and internal deletion mutagenesis, the sequence and structural requirements for protein binding to the 3{prime} IRs of petD and psbA mRNAs; to purify RNA-binding proteins that demonstrate gene- or sequence-specific binding, or that are implicated in RNA stabilization or decay; and to investigate the native form of mRNA in the plastid, by attempting to purify ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles from organelles. Our view of mRNA decay is that it is regulated by three interactive components: RNA structure, ribonucleases and RNA-binding proteins. We have used mutagenesis to study the role of RNA structure in regulating RNA decay rates, and to identify protein binding and endonuclease recognition sites. We have identified at least three endonuclease activities; one that cleaves psbA RNA; and two whose cleavage patterns with petD 3{prime} IR-RNA has been studied (endoC1 and endoC2). Additionally, we have continued to analyze the properties of the major RNA processing exoribonuclease. We have concentrated our efforts on three RNA-binding proteins. A 100 kd protein with properties suggestive of a mammalian RNP component has been purified. A protein of 55 kd that may also be an endonuclease has been partially purified. We have studied the interaction of a 29 kd protein with the petD stem/loop, and its role in RNA processing. Recently, we have used a novel gel shift/SDS-PAGE technique to identify new RNA-binding proteins.

  16. Rhythmic control of mRNA stability modulates circadian amplitude of mouse Period3 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Do-Yeon; Kwak, Eunyee; Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2015-03-01

    The daily oscillations observed in most living organisms are endogenously generated with a period of 24 h, and the underlying structure of periodic oscillation is an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop. The mechanisms of untranslated region (UTR)-mediated post-transcriptional regulation (e.g., mRNA degradation and internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation) have been suggested to fine-tune the expression of clock genes. Mouse Period3 (mPer3) is one of the paralogs of Period gene and its function is important in peripheral clocks and sleep physiology. mPer3 mRNA displays a circadian oscillation as well as a circadian phase-dependent stability, while the stability regulators still remain unknown. In this study, we identify three proteins - heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K, polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB), and hnRNP D - that bind to mPer3 mRNA 3'-UTR. We show that hnRNP K is a stabilizer that increases the amplitude of circadian mPer3 mRNA oscillation and hnRNP D is a destabilizer that decreases it, while PTB exhibits no effect on mPer3 mRNA expression. Our experiments describe their cytoplasmic roles for the mRNA stability regulation and the circadian amplitude formation. Moreover, our mathematical model suggests a mechanism through which post-transcriptional mRNA stability modulation provides not only the flexibility of oscillation amplitude, but also the robustness of the period and the phase for circadian mPer3 expression. Mouse Period3 (mPer3) is one of well-known clock genes. We identified three 3'-UTR-binding proteins that modulate the mRNA stability, and they influenced to the amplitude of circadian mPer3 mRNA oscillation. Our mathematical model not only showed the relationship between mRNA stability and its oscillation profile but provided the molecular mechanism for the robustness of the period and the phase in circadian oscillation. hnK, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K; hnD, hn

  17. A MYLK variant regulates asthmatic inflammation via alterations in mRNA secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Zhou, Tong; Saadat, Laleh; Garcia, Joe G N

    2015-06-01

    Myosin light-chain kinase (MYLK) is a gene known to be significantly associated with severe asthma in African Americans. Here we further examine the molecular function of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), located in the non-muscle myosin light-chain kinase isoform (nmMLCK), in asthma susceptibility and pathobiology. We identified nmMLCK variant (reference SNP: rs9840993, NM_053025: 721C>T, c.439C>T) with a distinct mRNA secondary structure from the other variants. The nmMLCK variant (721C) secondary structure exhibits increased stability with an elongated half-life in the human endothelial cell, and greater efficiency in protein translation initiation owing to an increased accessibility to translation start site. Finally, nmMLCK expression of 721C- and 721T-containing MYLK transgenes were compared in nmMLCK(-/-) mice and confirmed deleterious effects of nmMLCK expression on asthmatic indices and implicated the augmented influence of MYLK 721C>T (c.439C>T) SNP on asthma severity. The confirmation of the novel mechanism of the regulation of asthmatic inflammation by a MYLK advances knowledge of the genetic basis for asthma disparities, and further suggests the potential of nmMLCK as a therapeutic target. Our study suggests that in addition to altering protein structure and function, non-synonymous SNPs may also lead to phenotypic disparity by altering protein expression. PMID:25271083

  18. Glucocorticoid regulation of human pulmonary surfactant protein-B mRNA stability involves the 3'-untranslated region.

    PubMed

    Huang, Helen W; Bi, Weizhen; Jenkins, Gaye N; Alcorn, Joseph L

    2008-04-01

    Expression of pulmonary surfactant, a complex mixture of lipids and proteins that acts to reduce alveolar surface tension, is developmentally regulated and restricted to lung alveolar type II cells. The hydrophobic protein surfactant protein-B (SP-B) is essential in surfactant function, and insufficient levels of SP-B result in severe respiratory dysfunction. Glucocorticoids accelerate fetal lung maturity and surfactant synthesis both experimentally and clinically. Glucocorticoids act transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally to increase steady-state levels of human SP-B mRNA; however, the mechanism(s) by which glucocorticoids act post-transcriptionally is unknown. We hypothesized that glucocorticoids act post-transcriptionally to increase SP-B mRNA stability via sequence-specific mRNA-protein interactions. We found that glucocorticoids increase SP-B mRNA stability in isolated human type II cells and in nonpulmonary cells, but do not alter mouse SP-B mRNA stability in a mouse type II cell line. Deletion analysis of an artificially-expressed SP-B mRNA indicates that the SP-B mRNA 3'-untranslated region (UTR) is necessary for stabilization, and the region involved can be restricted to a 126-nucleotide-long region near the SP-B coding sequence. RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicate that cytosolic proteins bind to this region in the absence or presence of glucocorticoids. The formation of mRNA:protein complexes is not seen in other regions of the SP-B mRNA 3'-UTR. These results indicate that a specific 126-nucleotide region of human SP-B 3'-UTR is necessary for increased SP-B mRNA stability by glucocorticoids by a mechanism that is not lung cell specific and may involve mRNA-protein interactions. PMID:18006875

  19. Postural Stability is Altered by Blood Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, M.; Denise, P.; Guincetre, J. Y.; Normand, H.

    2008-06-01

    Non-vestibular influences as shift in blood volume changed perception of body posture. Then, factors affecting blood shift may alter postural control. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of leg venous contention on postural stability. Twelve subjects were studied on a balance plate for 5 minutes with the eyes closed, in 3 conditions: with no leg venous contention or grade 1 and 3 support stockings. Standard deviation of x and y position was calculated before and after the closure of the eyes. Strong venous contention altered postural stability, after the eyes were closed, during the first 10 s of standing. As support stockings prevent blood shift induced by upright posture, this result is in line with the hypothesis that blood shifts influence the perception of body orientation and postural control among others factors as vision, vestibular inputs... This strong venous contention could induce an increase of fall.

  20. Effects of herpes simplex virus on mRNA stability.

    PubMed Central

    Strom, T; Frenkel, N

    1987-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus virions contain one or more functions which mediate shutoff of host protein synthesis, disaggregation of host polyribosomes, and degradation of host mRNA. We studied aspects of the host shutoff mechanism by using herpes simplex virus type 1 mutants deficient in virion-induced shutoff of host protein synthesis (G. S. Read and N. Frenkel, J. Virol. 46:498-512, 1983). Shutoff of host protein synthesis by the wild-type virus was associated with degradation of host mRNAs, including beta-actin, alpha-tubulin, and heat shock protein 70. In contrast, the virion host shutoff (vhs) mutants were deficient to various degrees in their ability to induce host mRNA degradation; the extent of mRNA degradation correlated well with the extent of inhibition of host protein synthesis. This finding suggests that inhibition of host protein synthesis and degradation of host mRNA were mediated by the same virion-associated function. Virion-induced degradation of host mRNA was not prevented by inhibitors of ribosome translocation, nor could it be augmented, for mutant vhs-1, by drugs which disaggregate polyribosomes. This suggests that mRNA in polyribosomes, as well as nonpolyribosomal mRNA, is susceptible to virion-induced degradation. Finally, the half-life of viral transcripts was also prolonged in cells infected with the vhs-1 mutant virus, suggesting that the vhs function indiscriminately decreased the half-lives of both host and viral mRNAs. The vhs function may thus play a dual role in virus infection. (i) It inhibits host gene expression, and (ii) it enables rapid transitions in the expression of viral genes which are sequentially transcribed as infection progresses. Images PMID:3035220

  1. Gravitational loading of a simulated launch alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1996-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1a) were centrifuged under a regime designed to simulate a space shuttle launch (maximum of 3g). Messenger RNA levels for eight genes involved in bone growth and maintenance were determined using RT-PCR. Following 30 min of centrifugation, mRNA level for early response gene c-fos was significantly increased 89% (P < 0.05). The c-fos induction was transient and returned to control levels after 3 h. The mRNA level for the mineralization marker gene osteocalcin was significantly decreased to 44% of control level (P < 0.005) 3 h after centrifugation. No changes in mRNA levels were detected for c-myc, TGFbeta1, TGFbeta2, cyclophilin A, or actin. No basal mRNA level for TGFbeta3 was detected. In addition, no change in the steady-state synthesis of prostaglandin E2 was detected, possibly due to lack of lipid substrates in serum-deprived cells, suggesting that the increase in c-fos mRNA in response to gravitational loading is a result of mechanical stimulation. These results indicate that a small magnitude mechanical loading, such as that experienced during a shuttle launch, can alter mRNA levels in quiescent osteoblastic cells.

  2. Nucleolin links to arsenic-induced stabilization of GADD45alpha mRNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yadong; Bhatia, Deepak; Xia, Hongfeng; Castranova, Vince; Shi, Xianglin; Chen, Fei

    2006-01-01

    The present study shows that arsenic induces GADD45alpha (growth arrest and DNA damage inducible gene 45alpha) mainly through post-transcriptional mechanism. Treatment of the human bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B, with arsenic(III) chloride (As3+) resulted in a significant increase in GADD45alpha protein and mRNA. However, As3+ only exhibited a marginal effect on the transcription of the GADD45alpha gene. The accumulation of GADD45alpha mRNA is largely achieved by the stabilization of GADD45alpha mRNA in the cellular response to As3+. As3+ is able to induce binding of mRNA stabilizing proteins, nucleolin and less potently, HuR, to the GADD45alpha mRNA. Although As3+ was unable to affect the expression of nucleolin, treatment of the cells with As3+ resulted in re-distribution of nucleolin from nucleoli to nucleoplasm. Silencing of the nucleolin mRNA by RNA interference reversed As3+-induced stabilization of the GADD45alpha mRNA and accumulation of the GADD45alpha protein. Stabilization of GADD45alpha mRNA, thus, represents a novel mechanism contributing to the production of GADD45alpha and cell cycle arrest in response to As3+. PMID:16421274

  3. Nucleolin links to arsenic-induced stabilization of GADD45α mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yadong; Bhatia, Deepak; Xia, Hongfeng; Castranova, Vince; Shi, Xianglin; Chen, Fei

    2006-01-01

    The present study shows that arsenic induces GADD45α (growth arrest and DNA damage inducible gene 45α) mainly through post-transcriptional mechanism. Treatment of the human bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B, with arsenic(III) chloride (As3+) resulted in a significant increase in GADD45α protein and mRNA. However, As3+ only exhibited a marginal effect on the transcription of the GADD45α gene. The accumulation of GADD45α mRNA is largely achieved by the stabilization of GADD45α mRNA in the cellular response to As3+. As3+ is able to induce binding of mRNA stabilizing proteins, nucleolin and less potently, HuR, to the GADD45α mRNA. Although As3+ was unable to affect the expression of nucleolin, treatment of the cells with As3+ resulted in re-distribution of nucleolin from nucleoli to nucleoplasm. Silencing of the nucleolin mRNA by RNA interference reversed As3+-induced stabilization of the GADD45α mRNA and accumulation of the GADD45α protein. Stabilization of GADD45α mRNA, thus, represents a novel mechanism contributing to the production of GADD45α and cell cycle arrest in response to As3+. PMID:16421274

  4. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions–liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid–are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number–the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability. PMID:27256703

  5. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-06-01

    Emulsions–liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid–are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number–the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability.

  6. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G H; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions-liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid-are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number-the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability. PMID:27256703

  7. qPCR based mRNA quality score show intact mRNA after heat stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Oskar; Segerström, Lova; Sjöback, Robert; Nylander, Ingrid; Borén, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of multiple analytes from biological samples can be challenging as different analytes require different preservation measures. Heat induced enzymatic inactivation is an efficient way to preserve proteins and their modifications in biological samples but RNA quality, as measured by RIN value, has been a concern in such samples. Here, we investigate the effect of heat stabilization compared with standard snap freezing on RNA quality using two RNA extraction protocols, QiaZol with and without urea pre-solubilization, and two RNA quality measurements: RIN value, as defined by the Agilent Bioanalyzer, and an alternative qPCR based method. DNA extraction from heat stabilized brain samples was also examined. The snap frozen samples had RIN values about 1 unit higher than heat stabilized samples for the direct QiaZol extraction but equal with stabilized samples using urea pre-solubilization. qPCR based RNA quality measurement showed no difference in quality between snap frozen and heat inactivated samples. The probable explanation for this discrepancy is that the RIN value is an indirect measure based on rRNA, while the qPCR score is based on actual measurement of mRNA quality. The DNA yield from heat stabilized brain tissue samples was significantly increased, compared to the snap frozen tissue, without any effects on purity or quality. Hence, heat stabilization of tissues opens up the possibility for a two step preservation protocol, where proteins and their modifications can be preserved in the first heat based step, while in a second step, using standard RNA preservation strategies, mRNA be preserved. This collection strategy will enable biobanking of samples where the ultimate analysis is not determined without loss of sample quality. PMID:27077049

  8. qPCR based mRNA quality score show intact mRNA after heat stabilization.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Segerström, Lova; Sjöback, Robert; Nylander, Ingrid; Borén, Mats

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of multiple analytes from biological samples can be challenging as different analytes require different preservation measures. Heat induced enzymatic inactivation is an efficient way to preserve proteins and their modifications in biological samples but RNA quality, as measured by RIN value, has been a concern in such samples. Here, we investigate the effect of heat stabilization compared with standard snap freezing on RNA quality using two RNA extraction protocols, QiaZol with and without urea pre-solubilization, and two RNA quality measurements: RIN value, as defined by the Agilent Bioanalyzer, and an alternative qPCR based method. DNA extraction from heat stabilized brain samples was also examined. The snap frozen samples had RIN values about 1 unit higher than heat stabilized samples for the direct QiaZol extraction but equal with stabilized samples using urea pre-solubilization. qPCR based RNA quality measurement showed no difference in quality between snap frozen and heat inactivated samples. The probable explanation for this discrepancy is that the RIN value is an indirect measure based on rRNA, while the qPCR score is based on actual measurement of mRNA quality. The DNA yield from heat stabilized brain tissue samples was significantly increased, compared to the snap frozen tissue, without any effects on purity or quality. Hence, heat stabilization of tissues opens up the possibility for a two step preservation protocol, where proteins and their modifications can be preserved in the first heat based step, while in a second step, using standard RNA preservation strategies, mRNA be preserved. This collection strategy will enable biobanking of samples where the ultimate analysis is not determined without loss of sample quality. PMID:27077049

  9. Osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase mRNA is stabilized by binding to vimentin intermediary filaments.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Yvonne; Biniossek, Martin; Stark, G Björn; Finkenzeller, Günter; Simunovic, Filip

    2015-03-01

    Vascularization is essential in bone tissue engineering and recent research has focused on interactions between osteoblasts (hOBs) and endothelial cells (ECs). It was shown that cocultivation increases the stability of osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA. We investigated the mechanisms behind this observation, focusing on mRNA binding proteins. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we found that the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of ALP mRNA is necessary for human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)-mediated stabilization of osteoblastic ALP mRNA. Using pulldown experiments and nanoflow-HPLC mass spectrometry, vimentin was identified to bind to the 3'-UTR of ALP mRNA. Validation was performed by Western blotting. Functional experiments inhibiting intermediate filaments with iminodipropionitrile and specific inhibition of vimentin by siRNA transfection showed reduced levels of ALP mRNA and protein. Therefore, ALP mRNA binds to and is stabilized by vimentin. This data add to the understanding of intracellular trafficking of ALP mRNA, its function, and have possible implications in tissue engineering applications. PMID:25536665

  10. HDAC3 regulates stability of estrogen receptor α mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Oie, Shohei; Matsuzaki, Kazuya; Yokoyama, Wataru; Murayama, Akiko; Yanagisawa, Junn

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► HDAC inhibitors decrease the stability of ERα mRNA in MCF-7 cells. ► HDAC3 is involved in maintaining ERα mRNA stability in MCF-7 cells. ► ERα mRNA instability by knockdown of HDAC3 reduces the estrogen-dependent proliferation of ERα-positive MCF-7 cells. ► HDAC3 specific inhibitor will be one of new drugs for ERα-positive breast cancers. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) expression is a risk factor for breast cancer. HDAC inhibitors have been demonstrated to down-regulate ERα expression in ERα-positive breast cancer cell lines, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we showed that HDAC inhibitors decrease the stability of ERα mRNA, and that knockdown of HDAC3 decreases the stability of ERα mRNA and suppresses estrogen-dependent proliferation of ERα-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In the Oncomine database, expression levels of HDAC3 in ERα-positive tumors are higher than those in ERα-negative tumors, thus suggesting that HDAC3 is necessary for ERα mRNA stability, and is involved in the estrogen-dependent proliferation of ERα-positive tumors.

  11. 3'-modified antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides complementary to calmodulin mRNA alter behavioral responses in Paramecium.

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichsen, R D; Fraga, D; Reed, M W

    1992-01-01

    The calcium-binding protein calmodulin has been shown to modulate the Ca(2+)-dependent ion channels of Paramecium tetraurelia. Mutations in the calmodulin gene of Paramecium result in an altered pattern of behavioral responses. Antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs), complementary to calmodulin mRNA in Paramecium, were synthesized from a modified solid support that introduced a 3'-hydroxyhexyl phosphate. These 3'-modified ODNs were tested for their ability to alter the behavioral response of Paramecium. The microinjection of antisense ODNs temporarily reduced the backward swimming behavior of the cells in test solutions containing Na+. The injection of sense and random 3'-modified ODNs, or unmodified antisense ODNs, had no effect. The antisense ODN-induced effect was reversed by the injection of calmodulin protein. The pattern of response of the injected cells in various behavioral test solutions indicated that the calmodulin antisense ODNs reduce the Ca(2+)-dependent Na+ current. Antisense ODNs, complementary either to the 5' start site or to an internal sequence of the calmodulin mRNA, were similarly effective in altering behavior. These results show that antisense ODNs may be utilized in ciliated protozoa as a tool for reducing the expression of specific gene products. In addition, Paramecium represents a powerful model system with which to study and develop antisense ODN technology. PMID:1528867

  12. Stability regulation of mRNA and the control of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cheadle, Chris; Fan, Jinshui; Cho-Chung, Yoon S; Werner, Thomas; Ray, Jill; Do, Lana; Gorospe, Myriam; Becker, Kevin G

    2005-11-01

    Microarray technology has become highly valuable for identifying complex global changes in gene expression patterns. Standard techniques measure changes in total cellular poly(A) mRNA levels. The assumption that changes in gene expression as measured by these techniques are directly and well correlated with changes in rates of new gene synthesis form the basis of attempts to connect coordinated changes in gene expression with shared transcription regulatory elements. Yet systematic attempts at this approach remain difficult to demonstrate convincingly. One reason for this difficulty may result from the intricate convergence of both transcriptional and mRNA turnover events which, together, directly influence steady-state mRNA levels. Recent technical advances have led to the successful scale-up and application of nuclear run-on procedures directly to microarrays. This development has allowed a gene-by-gene comparison between new gene synthesis in the nucleus and measured changes in total cellular polyA mRNA. Results from these studies have begun to challenge the strict interpretation of changes in gene expression measured by conventional microarrays as being closely correlated with changes in mRNA transcription rate, but rather they tend to support the significant expansion of the role played by changes in mRNA stability regulation to standard analyses of gene expression. Gene expression profiles obtained from both polyA mRNA (whole-cell) and nuclear run-on (newly transcribed) RNA across a time course of one hour following the activation of human Jurkat T cells with PMA plus ionomycin revealed that regulation of mRNA stability may account for as much as 50% of all measurements of changes in total cellular polyA mRNA in this system. Stability regulation was inferred by the absence of corresponding regulation of nuclear gene transcription activity for groups of genes strongly regulated at the whole cell level and which were also resistant to inhibition by Actinomycin

  13. Oestradiol reduces Liver Receptor Homolog-1 mRNA transcript stability in breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, Kyren A.; Zhao, Zhe; Knower, Kevin C.; To, Sarah Q.; Chand, Ashwini L.; Clyne, Colin D.

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •LRH-1 is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates tumor proliferation. •In breast cancer, high mRNA expression is associated with ER+ status. •In ER−ve cells, despite very low mRNA, we found abundant LRH-1 protein. •Our data show distinctly different LRH-1 protein isoforms in ER− and ER+ breast cancer cells. •This is due to differences in LRH-1 mRNA and protein stability rates. -- Abstract: The expression of orphan nuclear receptor Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1) is elevated in breast cancer and promotes proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro. LRH-1 expression is regulated by oestrogen (E{sub 2}), with LRH-1 mRNA transcript levels higher in oestrogen receptor α (ERα) positive (ER+) breast cancer cells compared to ER− cells. However, the presence of LRH-1 protein in ER− cells suggests discordance between mRNA transcript levels and protein expression. To understand this, we investigated the impact of mRNA and protein stability in determining LRH-1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. LRH-1 transcript levels were significantly higher in ER+ versus ER− breast cancer cells lines; however LRH-1 protein was expressed at similar levels. We found LRH-1 mRNA and protein was more stable in ER− compared to ER+ cell lines. The tumor-specific LRH-1 variant isoform, LRH-1v4, which is highly responsive to E{sub 2}, showed increased mRNA stability in ER− versus ER+ cells. In addition, in MCF-7 and T47-D cell lines, LRH-1 total mRNA stability was reduced with E{sub 2} treatment, this effect mediated by ERα. Our data demonstrates that in ER− cells, increased mRNA and protein stability contribute to the abundant protein expression levels. Expression and immunolocalisation of LRH-1 in ER− cells as well as ER− tumors suggests a possible role in the development of ER− tumors. The modulation of LRH-1 bioactivity may therefore be beneficial as a treatment option in both ER− and ER+ breast cancer.

  14. Trichostatin A and 5 Aza-2' deoxycytidine decrease estrogen receptor mRNA stability in ER positive MCF7 cells through modulation of HuR.

    PubMed

    Pryzbylkowski, Peter; Obajimi, Oluwakemi; Keen, Judith Clancy

    2008-09-01

    Trichostatin A (TSA) and 5-Aza 2'deoxycytidine (AZA), two well characterized pharmacologic inhibitors of histone deacetylation and DNA methylation, affect estrogen receptor alpha (ER) levels differently in ER-positive versus ER-negative breast cancer cell lines. Whereas pharmacologic inhibition of these epigenetic mechanisms results in re-expression and increased estrogen receptor alpha (ER) levels in ER-negative cells, treatment in ER-positive MCF7 cells results in decreased ER mRNA and protein levels. This decrease is dependent upon protein interaction with the ER 3'UTR. Actinomycin D studies showed a 37.5% reduction in ER mRNA stability from 4 to 1.5 h in AZA/TSA treated MCF7 cell lines; an effect not seen in 231ER + cells transfected with the ER coding region but lacking incorporation of the 3'UTR. AZA/TSA do not appear to directly interact with the 3'UTR but rather decrease stability through altered subcellular localization of the RNA binding protein, HuR. siRNA inhibition of HuR expression reduces both the steady-state and stability of ER mRNA, suggesting that HuR plays a critical role in the control of ER mRNA stability. Our data suggest that epigenetic modulators can alter stability through modulation of HuR subcellular distribution. Taken together, these data provide a novel anti-estrogenic mechanism for AZA and TSA in ER positive human breast cancer cells. PMID:17891453

  15. LMO4 mRNA stability is regulated by extracellular ATP in F11 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hsiao-Huei . E-mail: hchen@uottawa.ca; Xu, Jin; Safarpour, Farzaneh; Stewart, Alexandre F.R.

    2007-05-25

    LIM only domain protein 4 (LMO4) interacts with many signaling and transcription factors to regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation and plasticity. In Drosophila, mutations in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the homologue dLMO cause a gain of function by increasing mRNA stability. LMO4 3'UTR contains several AU-rich elements (ARE) and is highly conserved among vertebrates, suggesting that RNA destabilizing mechanisms are evolutionarily conserved. Here, we found that extracellular ATP stabilized LMO4 mRNA in F11 cells. The LMO4 3'UTR added to a luciferase reporter markedly reduced reporter activity under basal conditions, but increased activity with ATP treatment. Two ARE motifs were characterized in the LMO4 3'UTR. ATP increased binding of HuD protein to ARE1. ARE1 conferred ATP and HuD-dependent mRNA stabilization. In contrast, sequences flanking ARE2 bound CUGBP1 and ATP destabilized this complex. Thus, our results suggest that ATP modulates recruitment of RNA-binding proteins to the 3'UTR to stabilize LMO4 mRNA.

  16. Controlling mRNA stability and translation with the CRISPR endoribonuclease Csy4.

    PubMed

    Borchardt, Erin K; Vandoros, Leonidas A; Huang, Michael; Lackey, Patrick E; Marzluff, William F; Asokan, Aravind

    2015-11-01

    The bacterial CRISPR endoribonuclease Csy4 has recently been described as a potential RNA processing tool. Csy4 recognizes substrate RNA through a specific 28-nt hairpin sequence and cleaves at the 3' end of the stem. To further explore applicability in mammalian cells, we introduced this hairpin at various locations in mRNAs derived from reporter transgenes and systematically evaluated the effects of Csy4-mediated processing on transgene expression. Placing the hairpin in the 5' UTR or immediately after the start codon resulted in efficient degradation of target mRNA by Csy4 and knockdown of transgene expression by 20- to 40-fold. When the hairpin was incorporated in the 3' UTR prior to the poly(A) signal, the mRNA was cleaved, but only a modest decrease in transgene expression (∼2.5-fold) was observed. In the absence of a poly(A) tail, Csy4 rescued the target mRNA substrate from degradation, resulting in protein expression, which suggests that the cleaved mRNA was successfully translated. In contrast, neither catalytically inactive (H29A) nor binding-deficient (R115A/R119A) Csy4 mutants were able to exert any of the effects described above. Generation of a similar 3' end by RNase P-mediated cleavage was unable to rescue transgene expression independent of Csy4. These results support the idea that the selective generation of the Csy4/hairpin complex resulting from cleavage of target mRNA might serve as a functional poly(A)/poly(A) binding protein (PABP) surrogate, stabilizing the mRNA and supporting translation. Although the exact mechanism(s) remain to be determined, our studies expand the potential utility of CRISPR nucleases as tools for controlling mRNA stability and translation. PMID:26354771

  17. hnRNP-U enhances the expression of specific genes by stabilizing mRNA.

    PubMed

    Yugami, Masato; Kabe, Yasuaki; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Wada, Tadashi; Handa, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) are thought to be involved in pre-mRNA processing. hnRNP-U, also termed scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), binds to pre-mRNA and nuclear matrix/scaffold attachment region DNA elements. However, its role in the regulation of gene expression is as yet poorly understood. In the present study, we show that hnRNP-U specifically enhances the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA by increasing its stability, possibly through binding to the 3' untranslated region. We also show that hnRNP-U enhances the expression of several other genes as well, including GADD45A, HEXIM1, HOXA2, IER3, NHLH2, and ZFY, by binding to and stabilizing these mRNAs. These results suggest that hnRNP-U enhances the expression of specific genes by regulating mRNA stability. PMID:17174306

  18. Inhibition of NF-kappaB stabilizes gadd45alpha mRNA.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xue; Zhang, Yadong; Chen, Yu-Quan; Castranova, Vince; Shi, Xianglin; Chen, Fei

    2005-04-01

    Growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible protein alpha (gadd45alpha) is an important regulator for cell cycle, genomic stability, and cell apoptosis. In the present report, we demonstrated that NF-kappaB inhibition due to Ikkbeta deficiency enhanced the stability of gadd45alpha mNRA. Using embryo fibroblast cells derived from wild type (wt) or Ikkbeta gene knockout (Ikkbeta(-/-)) mice, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed a three- to fourfold increase of gadd45alpha mRNA in Ikkbeta(-/-) cells compared with wt cells. The deficiency in Ikkbeta substantially decreased basal NF-kappaB activity and increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, such deficiency had no effect on the basal expression or activity of Akt, FoxO3a, p53, and c-myc that regulate the transcription of gadd45alpha gene positively or negatively. Analysis of gadd45alpha mRNA stability showed a ROS-dependent increase in the half-life of gadd45alpha mRNA in Ikkbeta(-/-) cells. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated an increased binding of a RNA stabilizing protein, nucleolin, to gadd45alpha mRNA in Ikkbeta(-/-) cells. The binding of nucleolin to gadd45alpha mRNA could be prevented by the antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine. Thus, these data are the first to suggest that inhibition of Ikkbeta-NF-kappaB signaling up-regulates the expression of gadd45alpha mNRA through a post-transcriptional, rather than a transcriptional, mechanism. PMID:15721278

  19. Enhanced stability of tristetraprolin mRNA protects mice against immune-mediated inflammatory pathologies.

    PubMed

    Patial, Sonika; Curtis, Alan D; Lai, Wi S; Stumpo, Deborah J; Hill, Georgette D; Flake, Gordon P; Mannie, Mark D; Blackshear, Perry J

    2016-02-16

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is an inducible, tandem zinc-finger mRNA binding protein that binds to adenylate-uridylate-rich elements (AREs) in the 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTRs) of specific mRNAs, such as that encoding TNF, and increases their rates of deadenylation and turnover. Stabilization of Tnf mRNA and other cytokine transcripts in TTP-deficient mice results in the development of a profound, chronic inflammatory syndrome characterized by polyarticular arthritis, dermatitis, myeloid hyperplasia, and autoimmunity. To address the hypothesis that increasing endogenous levels of TTP in an intact animal might be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, we generated a mouse model (TTPΔARE) in which a 136-base instability motif in the 3'UTR of TTP mRNA was deleted in the endogenous genetic locus. These mice appeared normal, but cultured fibroblasts and macrophages derived from them exhibited increased stability of the otherwise highly labile TTP mRNA. This resulted in increased TTP protein expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages and increased levels of TTP protein in mouse tissues. TTPΔARE mice were protected from collagen antibody-induced arthritis, exhibited significantly reduced inflammation in imiquimod-induced dermatitis, and were resistant to induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, presumably by dampening the excessive production of proinflammatory mediators in all cases. These data suggest that increased systemic levels of TTP, secondary to increased stability of its mRNA throughout the body, can be protective against inflammatory disease in certain models and might be viewed as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of human inflammatory diseases. PMID:26831084

  20. Enhanced stability of tristetraprolin mRNA protects mice against immune-mediated inflammatory pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Patial, Sonika; Curtis, Alan D.; Lai, Wi S.; Stumpo, Deborah J.; Hill, Georgette D.; Flake, Gordon P.; Mannie, Mark D.; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2016-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is an inducible, tandem zinc-finger mRNA binding protein that binds to adenylate-uridylate–rich elements (AREs) in the 3′-untranslated regions (3′UTRs) of specific mRNAs, such as that encoding TNF, and increases their rates of deadenylation and turnover. Stabilization of Tnf mRNA and other cytokine transcripts in TTP-deficient mice results in the development of a profound, chronic inflammatory syndrome characterized by polyarticular arthritis, dermatitis, myeloid hyperplasia, and autoimmunity. To address the hypothesis that increasing endogenous levels of TTP in an intact animal might be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, we generated a mouse model (TTPΔARE) in which a 136-base instability motif in the 3′UTR of TTP mRNA was deleted in the endogenous genetic locus. These mice appeared normal, but cultured fibroblasts and macrophages derived from them exhibited increased stability of the otherwise highly labile TTP mRNA. This resulted in increased TTP protein expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages and increased levels of TTP protein in mouse tissues. TTPΔARE mice were protected from collagen antibody-induced arthritis, exhibited significantly reduced inflammation in imiquimod-induced dermatitis, and were resistant to induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, presumably by dampening the excessive production of proinflammatory mediators in all cases. These data suggest that increased systemic levels of TTP, secondary to increased stability of its mRNA throughout the body, can be protective against inflammatory disease in certain models and might be viewed as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of human inflammatory diseases. PMID:26831084

  1. Ty1 Gag enhances the stability and nuclear export of Ty1 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Checkley, Mary Ann; Mitchell, Jessica A.; Eizenstat, Linda D.; Lockett, Stephen J.; Garfinkel, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Retrotransposon and retroviral RNA delivery to particle assembly sites is essential for their replication. mRNA and Gag from the Ty1 retrotransposon colocalize in cytoplasmic foci, which are required for transposition and may be sites for virus-like particle (VLP) assembly. To determine which Ty1 components are required to form mRNA/Gag foci, localization studies were performed in a Ty1-less strain expressing galactose-inducible Ty1 plasmids (pGTy1) containing mutations in GAG or POL. Ty1 mRNA/Gag foci remained unaltered in mutants defective in Ty1 protease or deleted for POL. However, Ty1 mRNA containing a frameshift mutation (Ty1fs) that prevents the synthesis of all proteins accumulated in the nucleus. Ty1fs RNA showed a decrease in stability that was mediated by the cytoplasmic exosome, nonsense mediated decay, and the processing-body. Localization of Ty1fs RNA remained unchanged in an nmd2Δ mutant. When Gag and Ty1fs mRNA were expressed independently, Gag provided in trans increased Ty1fs RNA level and restored localization of Ty1fs RNA in cytoplasmic foci. Endogenously expressed Gag also localized to the nuclear periphery independent of RNA export. These results suggest that Gag is required for Ty1 mRNA stability, efficient nuclear export, and localization into cytoplasmic foci. PMID:22998189

  2. Codon Usage and 3' UTR Length Determine Maternal mRNA Stability in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Yuichiro; Tomari, Yukihide

    2016-03-17

    The control of mRNA stability plays a central role in regulating gene expression. In metazoans, the earliest stages of development are driven by maternally supplied mRNAs. The degradation of these maternal mRNAs is critical for promoting the maternal-to-zygotic transition of developmental programs, although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood in vertebrates. Here, we characterized maternal mRNA degradation pathways in zebrafish using a transcriptome analysis and systematic reporter assays. Our data demonstrate that ORFs enriched with uncommon codons promote deadenylation by the CCR4-NOT complex in a translation-dependent manner. This codon-mediated mRNA decay is conditional on the context of the 3' UTR, with long 3' UTRs conferring resistance to deadenylation. These results indicate that the combined effect of codon usage and 3' UTR length determines the stability of maternal mRNAs in zebrafish embryos. Our study thus highlights the codon-mediated mRNA decay as a conserved regulatory mechanism in eukaryotes. PMID:26990990

  3. Cocaine treatment alters oxytocin receptor binding but not mRNA production in postpartum rat dams.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, T M; McMurray, M S; Walker, C H; Johns, J M

    2006-06-01

    Gestational cocaine treatment in rat dams results in decreased oxytocin (OT) levels, up-regulated oxytocin receptor (OTR) binding density and decreased receptor affinity in the whole amygdala, all concomitant with a significant increase in maternal aggression on postpartum day six. Rat dams with no gestational drug treatment that received an infusion of an OT antagonist directly into the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) exhibited similarly high levels of maternal aggression towards intruders. Additionally, studies indicate that decreased OT release from the hypothalamic division of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is coincident with heightened maternal aggression in rats. Thus, it appears that cocaine-induced alterations in OT system dynamics (levels, receptors, production, and/or release) may mediate heightened maternal aggression following cocaine treatment, but the exact mechanisms through which cocaine impacts the OT system have not yet been determined. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that two likely mechanisms of cocaine's action would be, increased OTR binding specifically in the CeA, and decreased OT mRNA production in the PVN. Autoradiography and in situ hybridization assays were performed on targeted nuclei in brain regions of rat dams on postpartum day six, following gestational treatment twice daily with cocaine (15 mg/kg) or normal saline (1 ml/kg). We now report cocaine-induced reductions in OTR binding density in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), but not the CeA. There was no significant change in OT mRNA production in the PVN following cocaine treatment. PMID:16677710

  4. Influenza A viruses suppress cyclooxygenase-2 expression by affecting its mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Sabine Eva; Nitzsche, Katja; Ludwig, Stephan; Ehrhardt, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Infection with influenza A viruses (IAV) provokes activation of cellular defence mechanisms contributing to the innate immune and inflammatory response. In this process the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in the induction of prostaglandin-dependent inflammation. While it has been reported that COX-2 is induced upon IAV infection, in the present study we observed a down-regulation at later stages of infection suggesting a tight regulation of COX-2 by IAV. Our data indicate the pattern-recognition receptor RIG-I as mediator of the initial IAV-induced COX-2 synthesis. Nonetheless, during on-going IAV replication substantial suppression of COX-2 mRNA and protein synthesis could be detected, accompanied by a decrease in mRNA half-life. Interestingly, COX-2 mRNA stability was not only imbalanced by IAV replication but also by stimulation of cells with viral RNA. Our results reveal tristetraprolin (TTP), which is known to bind COX-2 mRNA and promote its rapid degradation, as regulator of COX-2 expression in IAV infection. During IAV replication and viral RNA accumulation TTP mRNA synthesis was induced, resulting in reduced COX-2 levels. Accordingly, the down-regulation of TTP resulted in increased COX-2 protein expression after IAV infection. These findings indicate a novel IAV-regulated cellular mechanism, contributing to the repression of host defence and therefore facilitating viral replication. PMID:27265729

  5. The cell cycle-coupled expression of topoisomerase IIalpha during S phase is regulated by mRNA stability and is disrupted by heat shock or ionizing radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, P C; Roti Roti, J L; Hunt, C R

    1996-01-01

    Topoisomerase II is a multifunctional protein required during DNA replication, chromosome disjunction at mitosis, and other DNA-related activities by virtue of its ability to alter DNA supercoiling. The enzyme is encoded by two similar but nonidentical genes: the topoisomerase IIalpha and IIbeta genes. In HeLa cells synchronized by mitotic shake-off, topoisomeraseII alpha mRNA levels were found to vary as a function of cell cycle position, being 15-fold higher in late S phase (14 to 18 h postmitosis) than during G1 phase. Also detected was a corresponding increase in topoisomerase IIalpha protein synthesis at 14 to 18 h postmitosis which resulted in significantly higher accumulation of the protein during S and G2 phases. Topoisomerase IIalpha expression was not dependent on DNA synthesis during S phase, which could be inhibited without effect on the timing or level of mRNA expression. Mechanistically, topoisomerase IIalpha expression appears to be coupled to cell cycle position mainly through associated changes in mRNA stability. When cells are in S phase and mRNA levels are maximal, the half-life of topoisomerase IIalpha mRNA was determined to be approximately 30 min. A similar decrease in mRNA stability was also induced by two external factors known to delay cell cycle progression. Treatment of S-phase cells, at the time of maximum topoisomerase IIalpha mRNA stability, with either ionizing radiation (5 Gy) or heat shock (45 degrees C for 15 min) caused the accumulated topoisomerase IIalpha mRNA to decay. This finding suggests a potential relationship between stress-induced decreases in topoisomerase IIalpha expression and cell cycle progression delays in late S/G2. PMID:8657123

  6. Amphetamine-induced c-fos mRNA expression is altered in rats with neonatal ventral hippocampal damage.

    PubMed

    Lillrank, S M; Lipska, B K; Bachus, S E; Wood, G K; Weinberger, D R

    1996-08-01

    To further characterize the mechanisms underlying enhanced dopamine-related behaviors expressed during adulthood in rats with neonatal excitotoxic ventral hippocampal (VH) damage, we studied the expression of c-fos mRNA in these rats after a single saline or amphetamine (AMPH) (10 mg/kg, i.p.) injection using in situ hybridization. The VH of rat pups was lesioned with ibotenic acid on postnatal day 7 (PD7). At the age of 90 days, rats were challenged with AMPH or saline, and the expression of c-fos mRNA using an oligonucleotide probe was assessed 30, 90, and 180 min later. AMPH significantly increased c-fos mRNA expression in medial prefrontal cortex, piriform cortex, cingulate cortex, septal region, and dorsolateral and ventromedial striatum in control and lesioned rats. However, this response to AMPH was attenuated 30 min after AMPH injection in all of these regions in the lesioned as compared to the sham-operated rats. No significant changes were seen at other time points. These results indicate that the neonatal VH lesion alters time-dependent intracellular signal transduction mechanisms measured by AMPH-induced c-fos mRNA expression in cortical and subcortical brain regions. Changes in c-fos mRNA expression in this putative animal model of schizophrenia may have implications for long-term alterations in cellular phenotype because of altered regulation of certain target genes. PMID:8855514

  7. Stability of mRNA/DNA and DNA/DNA Duplexes Affects mRNA Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kraeva, Rayna I.; Krastev, Dragomir B.; Roguev, Assen; Ivanova, Anna; Nedelcheva-Veleva, Marina N.; Stoynov, Stoyno S.

    2007-01-01

    Nucleic acids, due to their structural and chemical properties, can form double-stranded secondary structures that assist the transfer of genetic information and can modulate gene expression. However, the nucleotide sequence alone is insufficient in explaining phenomena like intron-exon recognition during RNA processing. This raises the question whether nucleic acids are endowed with other attributes that can contribute to their biological functions. In this work, we present a calculation of thermodynamic stability of DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes across the genomes of four species in the genus Saccharomyces by nearest-neighbor method. The results show that coding regions are more thermodynamically stable than introns, 3′-untranslated regions and intergenic sequences. Furthermore, open reading frames have more stable sense mRNA/DNA duplexes than the potential antisense duplexes, a property that can aid gene discovery. The lower stability of the DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes of 3′-untranslated regions and the higher stability of genes correlates with increased mRNA level. These results suggest that the thermodynamic stability of DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes affects mRNA transcription. PMID:17356699

  8. Posttranscriptional control of Klebsiella pneumoniae nif mRNA stability by the nifL product.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J J; Roberts, G P; Brill, W J

    1986-01-01

    Posttranscriptional control of nif mRNA stability was demonstrated by functional and chemical analyses, using specific probes for four nif transcripts. In the wild type, nif transcripts (except nifLA) were stable during derepression, with half-lives of approximately 30 min. They were dramatically destabilized by O2 or elevated temperature (41 degrees C) and to a lesser extent by NH4+. In contrast, the nifLA message was not particularly stable, and posttranscriptional control was not evident. In NifL- strains, both forms of analysis indicated that the nifL product was involved in nif mRNA destabilization in the presence of O2 and NH4+. PMID:2428807

  9. Herpes simplex virus virion stimulatory protein mRNA leader contains sequence elements which increase both virus-induced transcription and mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Blair, E D; Blair, C C; Wagner, E K

    1987-08-01

    To investigate the role of 5' noncoding leader sequence of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) mRNA in infected cells, the promoter for the 65,000-dalton virion stimulatory protein (VSP), a beta-gamma polypeptide, was introduced into plasmids bearing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene together with various lengths of adjacent viral leader sequences. Plasmids containing longer lengths of leader sequence gave rise to significantly higher levels of CAT enzyme in transfected cells superinfected with HSV-1. RNase T2 protection assays of CAT mRNA showed that transcription was initiated from an authentic viral cap site in all VSP-CAT constructs and that CAT mRNA levels corresponded to CAT enzyme levels. Use of cis-linked simian virus 40 enhancer sequences demonstrated that the effect was virus specific. Constructs containing 12 and 48 base pairs of the VSP mRNA leader gave HSV infection-induced CAT activities intermediate between those of the leaderless construct and the VSP-(+77)-CAT construct. Actinomycin D chase experiments demonstrated that the longest leader sequences increased hybrid CAT mRNA stability at least twofold in infected cells. Cotransfection experiments with a cosmid bearing four virus-specified transcription factors (ICP4, ICP0, ICP27, and VSP-65K) showed that sequences from -3 to +77, with respect to the viral mRNA cap site, also contained signals responsive to transcriptional activation. PMID:3037112

  10. Codon optimality is a major determinant of mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Presnyak, Vladimir; Alhusaini, Najwa; Chen, Ying-Hsin; Martin, Sophie; Morris, Nathan; Kline, Nicholas; Olson, Sara; Weinberg, David; Baker, Kristian E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Coller, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA degradation represents a critical regulated step in gene expression. While the major pathways in turnover have been identified, accounting for disparate half-lives has been elusive. We show that codon optimality is one feature that contributes greatly to mRNA stability. Genome-wide RNA decay analysis revealed that stable mRNAs are enriched in codons designated optimal, whereas unstable mRNAs contain predominately non-optimal codons. Substitution of optimal codons with synonymous, non-optimal codons results in dramatic mRNA destabilization, while the converse substitution significantly increases stability. Further, we demonstrate that codon optimality impacts ribosome translocation, connecting the processes of translation elongation and decay through codon optimality. Finally, we show that optimal codon content accounts for the similar stabilities observed in mRNAs encoding proteins with coordinated physiological function. This work demonstrates that codon optimization exists as an mechanism to finely tune levels of mRNAs, and ultimately, proteins. PMID:25768907

  11. Time Course of Behavioral Alteration and mRNA Levels of Neurotrophic Factor Following Stress Exposure in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa, Naoya; Ogawa, Takumi; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Ogawa, Mami; Matsuo, Yumi; Zamami, Yoshito; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi

    2015-08-01

    Stress is known to affect neurotrophic factor expression, which induces depression-like behavior. However, whether there are time-dependent changes in neurotrophic factor mRNA expression following stress remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether chronic stress exposure induces long-term changes in depression-related behavior, serum corticosterone, and hippocampal proliferation as well as neurotrophic factor family mRNA levels, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), in the mouse hippocampus. The mRNA level of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, NGF, NT-3, and CNTF) was measured using the real-time PCR. The serum corticosterone level was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and, for each subject, the hippocampal proliferation was examined by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine immunostaining. Mice exhibited depression-like behavior in the forced-swim test (FST) and decreased BDNF mRNA and hippocampal proliferation in the middle of the stress exposure. After 15 days of stress exposure, we observed increased immobility in the FST, serum corticosterone levels, and BDNF mRNA levels and degenerated hippocampal proliferation, maintained for at least 2 weeks. Anhedonia-like behavior in the sucrose preference test and NGF mRNA levels were decreased following 15 days of stress. NGF mRNA levels were significantly higher 1 week after stress exposure. The current data demonstrate that chronic stress exposure induces prolonged BDNF and NGF mRNA changes and increases corticosterone levels and depression-like behavior in the FST, but does not alter other neurotrophic factors or performance in the sucrose preference test. PMID:25820756

  12. YB-1 and MTA1 protein levels and not DNA or mRNA alterations predict for prostate cancer recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Christine Moore; Grogan, Tristan R.; Nguyen, Hao G.; Galet, Colette; Rettig, Matthew B.; Hsieh, Andrew C.; Ruggero, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Attempts to identify biomarkers to detect prostate tumorigenesis, and thus minimize prostate cancer progression and inform treatment decisions have primarily focused on alterations at the DNA and mRNA levels, ignoring alterations at the level of protein synthesis control. We have previously shown that the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway, frequently deregulated in prostate cancer, specifically induces the synthesis of proteins that contribute to metastasis, most notably YB-1 and MTA1, without altering mRNA levels thereby demonstrating the importance of translation control in driving the expression of these genes in cancer. Here, we analyze genomic sequencing and mRNA expression databases, as well as protein expression employing an annotated tissue microarray generated from 332 prostate cancer patients with 15 years of clinical follow-up to determine the combined prognostic capability of YB-1 and MTA1 alterations in forecasting prostate cancer outcomes. Remarkably, protein abundance, but not genomic or transcriptional alterations of YB-1 and MTA1, is predictive of disease recurrence, exhibiting a dose-dependent effect on time to PSA recurrence, an indicator of tumor relapse. Moreover, high protein levels of YB-1 and MTA1 are associated with a 3-fold increased risk for requiring future hormone therapy or radiation therapy. Importantly, YB-1 and MTA1 protein levels significantly increase the predictive capacity of a clinical model for prostate cancer recurrence. These findings demonstrate that protein abundance of YB-1 and MTA1, irrespective of DNA or mRNA status, can predict for prostate cancer relapse and uncover a vast underappreciated repository of biomarkers regulated at the level of protein expression. PMID:25797255

  13. Estrogen does not regulate CD154 mRNA stability in systemic lupus erythematosus T cells.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Rider, V; Kimler, B F; Abdou, N I

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory showed a dose-dependent and hormone-specific increase in CD154 expression in T cells from females with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This present study investigates if the estrogen-dependent increase in CD154 expression is due to stabilization of the messenger RNA. T cells from female SLE patients and controls were cultured for 18 h in serum-free medium without and with estradiol 17-beta (10(-7) M). T cells were either unstimulated (resting) or were activated by further culture on anti-CD3 coated plates. Actinomycin D (25 microg/mL) was added to parallel cultures to inhibit new messenger RNA synthesis. CD154 messenger RNA stability was assessed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain amplification. Resting SLE (n = 10, P = 0.88) and normal (n = 7, P = 0.65) T cells showed no significant differences in message stability in response to estradiol. CD154 messenger RNA was also not significantly stabilized in activated SLE (n = 10, P = 0.15) or activated normal (n = 6, P = 0.077) T cells in response to estradiol. These findings indicate that the estrogen-dependent increase in CD154 in SLE T cells is not due to stability of the mRNA. These data are consistent with the postulate that estradiol stimulates CD154 transcription in SLE T cells. PMID:17211990

  14. Alteration of Na,K-ATPase subunit mRNA and protein levels in hypertrophied rat heart.

    PubMed

    Charlemagne, D; Orlowski, J; Oliviero, P; Rannou, F; Sainte Beuve, C; Swynghedauw, B; Lane, L K

    1994-01-14

    To determine if an altered expression of the Na,K-ATPase alpha isoform genes is responsible for an observed increase in cardiac glycoside sensitivity in compensatory hypertrophy, we performed Northern and slot blot analyses of RNA and specific immunological detection of Na,K-ATPase isoforms in rat hearts from normal and pressure overload-treated animals induced by abdominal aortic constriction. During the early phase of hypertrophy, the only alteration is a decrease in the alpha 2 mRNA isoform. In the compensated hypertrophied heart, the levels of the predominant alpha 1 isoform (mRNA and protein) and the beta 1 subunit mRNA are unchanged. In contrast, the alpha 2 isoform (mRNA and protein) is decreased by 35% and up to 61-64% in mild (< 55%) and severe (> 55%) hypertrophy, respectively. The alpha 3 isoform (mRNA and protein), which is extremely low in adult heart, is increased up to 2-fold during hypertrophy but accounts for only approximately equal to 5% of the total alpha isoform mRNA. These findings demonstrate that, in cardiac hypertrophy, the three alpha isoforms of the Na,K-ATPase are independently regulated and that regulation occurs at a pretranslational level. The pattern of expression in hypertrophied adult heart is similar to that of the neonatal heart where the inverse regulation between the alpha 2 and alpha 3 ouabain high affinity isoforms has been reported. This suggests that distinct regulatory mechanisms controlling Na,K-ATPase isoform expression may, at least in part, be involved in the sensitivity to cardiac glycosides. PMID:8288620

  15. Chronic food restriction and streptozotocin-induced diabetes differentially alter prodynorphin mRNA levels in rat brain regions.

    PubMed

    Berman, Y; Devi, L; Spangler, R; Kreek, M J; Carr, K D

    1997-06-01

    It was previously reported that chronic food restriction and streptozotocin-induced diabetes lead to brain region-specific changes in levels of Prodyn-derived peptides. These changes parallel behavioral adaptations that are reversed by opioid antagonists. In the present study, effects of food restriction and diabetes on Prodyn gene expression were measured in rat brain regions using a quantitative solution hybridization mRNA assay. Picogram amounts of Prodyn mRNA were determined in extracts of five brain regions. The highest density of Prodyn mRNA was observed in extracts of nucleus accumbens (4.68 pg/microg total RNA), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (4.18 pg/microg), and in caudate nucleus (3.51 pg/microg). Lower levels were observed in the lateral hypothalamus (1.87 pg/microg) and central nucleus of the amygdala (1.22 pg/microg). Food restriction and diabetes both markedly increased the levels of Prodyn mRNA in the central amygdala (163% and 93%, respectively). Levels in the lateral hypothalamus were also increased (35% and 29%, respectively), though only the food-restriction effect was statistically significant. Neither treatment altered prodynorphin mRNA levels in the caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens or bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. These results suggest that dynorphin neurons in central amygdala and lateral hypothalamus may be involved in behavioral or physiological adaptations to sustained metabolic need. PMID:9191075

  16. Heat shock protein 90 stabilizes nucleolin to increase mRNA stability in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-An; Li, Hao-Yi; Hsu, Tsung-I; Chen, Shu-Hui; Wu, Chin-Jen; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2011-12-23

    Most studies on heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) have focused on the involvement of Hsp90 in the interphase, whereas the role of this protein in the nucleus during mitosis remains largely unclear. In this study, we found that the level of the acetylated form of Hsp90 decreased dramatically during mitosis, which indicates more chaperone activity during mitosis. We thus probed proteins that interacted with Hsp90 by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and found that nucleolin was one of those interacting proteins during mitosis. The nucleolin level decreased upon geldanamycin treatment, and Hsp90 maintained the cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) activity to phosphorylate nucleolin at Thr-641/707. Mutation of Thr-641/707 resulted in the destabilization of nucleolin in mitosis. We globally screened the level of mitotic mRNAs and found that 229 mRNAs decreased during mitosis in the presence of geldanamycin. Furthermore, a bioinformatics tool and an RNA immunoprecipitation assay found that 16 mRNAs, including cadherin and Bcl-xl, were stabilized through the recruitment of nucleolin to the 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs) of those genes. Overall, strong correlations exist between the up-regulation of Hsp90, nucleolin, and the mRNAs related to tumorigenesis of the lung. Our findings thus indicate that nucleolin stabilized by Hsp90 contributes to the lung tumorigenesis by increasing the level of many tumor-related mRNAs during mitosis. PMID:21998300

  17. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibits EGF-induced cell transformation via reduction of cyclin D1 mRNA stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingjie; Ouyang, Weiming; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Yu, Yonghui; Wang, York; Li, Xuejun; Huang, Chuanshu

    2012-09-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibiting cancer cell growth has been associated with its downregulation of cyclin D1 protein expression at transcription level or translation level. Here, we have demonstrated that SAHA inhibited EGF-induced Cl41 cell transformation via the decrease of cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. We found that SAHA treatment resulted in the dramatic inhibition of EGF-induced cell transformation, cyclin D1 protein expression and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. Further studies showed that SAHA downregulation of cyclin D1 was only observed with endogenous cyclin D1, but not with reconstitutionally expressed cyclin D1 in the same cells, excluding the possibility of SAHA regulating cyclin D1 at level of protein degradation. Moreover, SAHA inhibited EGF-induced cyclin d1 mRNA level, whereas it did not show any inhibitory effect on cyclin D1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter activity under the same experimental conditions, suggesting that SAHA may decrease cyclin D1 mRNA stability. This notion was supported by the results that treatment of cells with SAHA decreased the half-life of cyclin D1 mRNA from 6.95 h to 2.57 h. Consistent with downregulation of cyclin D1 mRNA stability, SAHA treatment also attenuated HuR expression, which has been well-characterized as a positive regulator of cyclin D1 mRNA stability. Thus, our study identifies a novel mechanism responsible for SAHA inhibiting cell transformation via decreasing cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest in Cl41 cells. -- Highlights: ► SAHA inhibits cell transformation in Cl41 cells. ► SAHA suppresses Cyclin D1 protein expression. ► SAHA decreases cyclin D1 mRNA stability.

  18. Stability and translation of TCR zeta mRNA are regulated by the adenosine-uridine-rich elements in splice-deleted 3' untranslated region of zeta-chain.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Bhabadeb; Krishnan, Sandeep; Tsokos, Christos G; Robertson, James W; Fisher, Carolyn U; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Tsokos, George C

    2006-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) T cells display reduced expression of TCR zeta protein. Recently, we reported that in SLE T cells, the residual TCR zeta protein is predominantly derived from an alternatively spliced form that undergoes splice deletion of 562 nt (from 672 to 1233 bases) within the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of TCR zeta mRNA. The stability and translation of the alternatively spliced form of TCR zeta mRNA are low compared with that of the wild-type TCR zeta mRNA. We report that two adenosine-uridine-rich sequence elements (AREs), defined by the splice-deleted 3' UTR region, but not an ARE located upstream are responsible for securing TCR zeta mRNA stability and translation. The stabilizing effect of the splice-deleted region-defined AREs extended to the luciferase mRNA and was not cell type-specific. The findings demonstrate distinct sequences within the splice-deleted region 672 to 1233 of the 3' UTR, which regulate the transcription, mRNA stability, and translation of TCR zeta mRNA. The absence of these sequences represents a molecular mechanism that contributes to altered TCR zeta-chain expression in lupus. PMID:17114503

  19. Embedding mRNA Stability in Correlation Analysis of Time-Series Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Lorenzo; De Santis, Alberto; Salvucci, Samanta; Morelli, Giorgio; Ruberti, Ida

    2008-01-01

    Current methods for the identification of putatively co-regulated genes directly from gene expression time profiles are based on the similarity of the time profile. Such association metrics, despite their central role in gene network inference and machine learning, have largely ignored the impact of dynamics or variation in mRNA stability. Here we introduce a simple, but powerful, new similarity metric called lead-lag R2 that successfully accounts for the properties of gene dynamics, including varying mRNA degradation and delays. Using yeast cell-cycle time-series gene expression data, we demonstrate that the predictive power of lead-lag R2 for the identification of co-regulated genes is significantly higher than that of standard similarity measures, thus allowing the selection of a large number of entirely new putatively co-regulated genes. Furthermore, the lead-lag metric can also be used to uncover the relationship between gene expression time-series and the dynamics of formation of multiple protein complexes. Remarkably, we found a high lead-lag R2 value among genes coding for a transient complex. PMID:18670596

  20. Continuous presence of phorbol ester is required for its IL-1 beta mRNA stabilizing effect.

    PubMed

    Siljander, P; Hurme, M

    1993-01-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) activating phorbol esters are known to prevent the decay of mRNA of several cytokines and proto-oncogenes. To examine whether the phorbol ester signal is continuously required for this stabilizing effect, THP-1 monocytic cells were stimulated either with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), which can be removed from the cells by washings, or with the more hydrophobic phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Both of these stimuli induced high levels of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) mRNA. When the cells were washed at the peak of the IL-1 beta mRNA expression, this mRNA decayed rapidly in the PDBu stimulated cells while in PMA stimulated cells the mRNA levels were not affected. Moreover, this mRNA degradation induced by the removal of PDBu could be inhibited by readdition of the phorbol ester. This restabilization could be prevented by pharmacologic inhibitors of PKC, but not by inhibiting protein or RNA synthesis. Thus these data suggest that the phorbol ester must be continuously present to exert its mRNA stabilizing effect and that its effect is PKC-mediated but does not require active protein or RNA synthesis. PMID:8416817

  1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA is stabilized in an mTORC1-dependent manner in Ras-transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    Origanti, Sofia; Nowotarski, Shannon L.; Carr, Theresa D.; Sass-Kuhn, Suzanne; Xiao, Lan; Wang, Jian-Ying; Shantz, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Upon ras activation, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is markedly induced, and numerous studies suggest that ODC expression is controlled by Ras effector pathways. ODC is therefore a potential target in the treatment and prevention of Ras-driven tumors. We compared ODC mRNA translation profiles and stability in normal and Ras12V-transformed rat intestinal epithelial (RIE-1) cells. While translation initiation of ODC increased modestly in Ras12V cells, ODC RNA was stabilized 8-fold. Treatment with the specific mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin or siRNA knockdown of mTOR destabilized the ODC message, but rapamycin had only a minor effect on ODC translation initiation. Inhibition of mTORC1 also reduced the association of the mRNA binding protein HuR with the ODC transcript. We have shown previously that HuR binding to the ODC 3′UTR results in significant stabilization of the ODC mRNA, which contains several AU-rich regions within its 3′UTR that may act as regulatory sequences. Analysis of ODC 3′UTR deletion constructs suggests that cis-acting elements between bases 1969 and 2141 of the ODC mRNA act to stabilize the ODC transcript. These experiments thus define a novel mechanism of ODC synthesis control. Regulation of ODC mRNA decay could be an important means of limiting polyamine accumulation and subsequent tumor development. PMID:22070140

  2. Isoeugenol destabilizes IL-8 mRNA expression in THP-1 cells through induction of the negative regulator of mRNA stability tristetraprolin.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, Valentina; Carne, Alice; Mitjans, Montserrat; Galli, Corrado Lodovico; Marinovich, Marina; Corsini, Emanuela

    2012-02-01

    We previously demonstrated in the human promyelocytic cell line THP-1 that all allergens tested, with the exception of the prohapten isoeugenol, induced a dose-related release of interleukin-8 (IL-8). In the present study, we investigated whether this abnormal behavior was regulated by the AU-rich element-binding proteins HuR and tristetraprolin (TTP) or by the downstream molecule suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3. The contact allergens isoeugenol, diethylmaleate (DEM), and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), and the irritant salicylic acid were used as reference compounds. Chemicals were used at concentrations that induced a 20% decrease in cell viability as assessed by propidium iodide staining, namely 100 μg/ml (0.61 mM) for isoeugenol, 100 μg/ml (0.58 mM) for DEM, 3 μg/ml (14.8 μM) for DNCB, and 250 μg/ml (1.81 mM) for salicylic acid. Time course experiments of IL-8 mRNA expression and assessment of IL-8 mRNA half-life, indicated a decreased IL-8 mRNA stability in isoeugenol-treated cells. We could demonstrate that a combination and regulation of HuR and TTP following exposure to contact allergens resulted in a different modulation of IL-8 mRNA half-life and release. The increased expression of TTP in THP-1 cells treated with isoeugenol results in destabilization of the IL-8 mRNA, which can account for the lack of IL-8 release. In contrast, the strong allergen DNCB failing to up-regulate TTP, while inducing HuR, resulted in longer IL-8 mRNA half-life and protein release. SOCS-3 was induced only in isoeugenol-treated cells; however, its modulation did not rescue the lack of IL-8 release, indicating that it is unlikely to be involved in the lack of IL-8 production. Finally, the destabilization effect of isoeugenol on IL-8 mRNA expression together with SOCS-3 expression resulted in an anti-inflammatory effect, as demonstrated by the ability of isoeugenol to modulate LPS or ionomycin-induced cytokine release. PMID:21969073

  3. Stage structure alters how complexity affects stability of ecological networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudolf, V.H.W.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    Resolving how complexity affects stability of natural communities is of key importance for predicting the consequences of biodiversity loss. Central to previous stability analysis has been the assumption that the resources of a consumer are substitutable. However, during their development, most species change diets; for instance, adults often use different resources than larvae or juveniles. Here, we show that such ontogenetic niche shifts are common in real ecological networks and that consideration of these shifts can alter which species are predicted to be at risk of extinction. Furthermore, niche shifts reduce and can even reverse the otherwise stabilizing effect of complexity. This pattern arises because species with several specialized life stages appear to be generalists at the species level but act as sequential specialists that are hypersensitive to resource loss. These results suggest that natural communities are more vulnerable to biodiversity loss than indicated by previous analyses.

  4. Rpb1 foot mutations demonstrate a major role of Rpb4 in mRNA stability during stress situations in yeast.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Godino, A I; García-López, M C; García-Martínez, J; Pelechano, V; Medina, D A; Pérez-Ortín, J E; Navarro, F

    2016-05-01

    The RPB1 mutants in the foot region of RNA polymerase II affect the assembly of the complex by altering the correct association of both the Rpb6 and the Rpb4/7 dimer. Assembly defects alter both transcriptional activity as well as the amount of enzyme associated with genes. Here, we show that the global transcriptional analysis of foot mutants reveals the activation of an environmental stress response (ESR), which occurs at a permissive temperature under optimal growth conditions. Our data indicate that the ESR that occurs in foot mutants depends mostly on a global post-transcriptional regulation mechanism which, in turn, depends on Rpb4-mRNA imprinting. Under optimal growth conditions, we propose that Rpb4 serves as a key to globally modulate mRNA stability as well as to coordinate transcription and decay. Overall, our results imply that post-transcriptional regulation plays a major role in controlling the ESR at both the transcription and mRNA decay levels. PMID:27001033

  5. Gle1 functions during mRNA export in an oligomeric complex that is altered in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Folkmann, Andrew W.; Collier, Scott E.; Zhan, Xiaoyan; Aditi; Ohi, Melanie D.; Wente, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    The conserved multifunctional protein Gle1 regulates gene expression at multiple steps: nuclear messenger (m)RNA export, translation initiation, and translation termination. A GLE1 mutation (FinMajor) is causally linked to human lethal congenital contracture syndrome-1 (LCCS1); however, the resulting perturbations on Gle1 molecular function were unknown. FinMajor results in a Proline-Phenylalanine-Glutamine peptide insertion within the uncharacterized Gle1 coiled-coil domain. Here we find that Gle1 self-associates both in vitro and in living cells via the coiled-coil domain. Electron microscopy reveals high molecular mass Gle1 oligomers form ∼26 nm in diameter disk-shaped particles. With the Gle1-FinMajor protein, these particles are malformed. Moreover, functional assays document a specific requirement for proper Gle1 oligomerization during mRNA export but not for Gle1’s roles in translation. These results identify a novel mechanistic step in Gle1’s mRNA export function at nuclear pore complexes, and directly implicate altered export in LCCS1 disease pathology. PMID:24243016

  6. Chronic stress alters glucocorticoid receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA expression in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) brain.

    PubMed

    Dickens, M; Romero, L M; Cyr, N E; Dunn, I C; Meddle, S L

    2009-10-01

    Although the glucocorticoid response to acute short-term stress is an adaptive physiological mechanism that aids in the response to and survival of noxious stimuli, chronic stress is associated with a negative impact on health. In wild-caught European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), chronic stress alters the responsiveness of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis as measured by the acute corticosterone response. In the present study, we investigated potential underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms by comparing glucocorticoid receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA expression in the brains of chronically and nonchronically-stressed starlings. Hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, but not hippocampal, glucocorticoid receptor mRNA expression in chronically-stressed birds was significantly lower compared to controls, suggesting changes in the efficacy of corticosterone negative feedback. In addition, chronically-stressed birds showed a significant decrease in hippocampal MR mRNA expression. Together, these results suggest that chronic stress changes the brain physiology of wild birds and provides important information for the understanding of the underlying mechanisms that result in dysregulation of the HPA axis in wild animals by chronic stress. PMID:19686439

  7. Wastewater treatment plant effluent alters pituitary gland gonadotropin mRNA levels in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch).

    PubMed

    Harding, Louisa B; Schultz, Irvin R; da Silva, Denis A M; Ylitalo, Gina M; Ragsdale, Dave; Harris, Stephanie I; Bailey, Stephanie; Pepich, Barry V; Swanson, Penny

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) present in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents interfere with reproduction in fish, including altered gonad development and induction of vitellogenin (Vtg), a female-specific egg yolk protein precursor produced in the liver. As a result, studies have focused on the effects of EDC exposure on the gonad and liver. However, impacts of environmental EDC exposure at higher levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad axis are less well understood. The pituitary gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh) and luteinizing hormone (Lh) are involved in all aspects of gonad development and are subject to feedback from gonadal steroids making them a likely target of endocrine disruption. In this study, the effects of WWTP effluent exposure on pituitary gonadotropin mRNA expression were investigated to assess the utility of Lh beta-subunit (lhb) as a biomarker of estrogen exposure in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). First, a controlled 72-h exposure to 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17β-trenbolone (TREN) was performed to evaluate the response of juvenile coho salmon to EDC exposure. Second, juvenile coho salmon were exposed to 0, 20 or 100% effluent from eight WWTPs from the Puget Sound, WA region for 72h. Juvenile coho salmon exposed to 2 and 10ng EE2L(-1) had 17-fold and 215-fold higher lhb mRNA levels relative to control fish. Hepatic vtg mRNA levels were dramatically increased 6670-fold, but only in response to 10ng EE2L(-1) and Fsh beta-subunit (fshb) mRNA levels were not altered by any of the treatments. In the WWTP effluent exposures, lhb mRNA levels were significantly elevated in fish exposed to five of the WWTP effluents. In contrast, transcript levels of vtg were not affected by any of the WWTP effluent exposures. Mean levels of natural and synthetic estrogens in fish bile were consistent with pituitary lhb expression, suggesting that the observed lhb induction may be due to

  8. Quercetin downregulates Mcl-1 by acting on mRNA stability and protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Spagnuolo, C; Cerella, C; Russo, M; Chateauvieux, S; Diederich, M; Russo, G L

    2011-01-01

    Background: We recently demonstrated that quercetin, a flavonoid naturally present in food and beverages belonging to the large class of phytochemicals, was able to sensitise leukaemic cells isolated from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) when associated with recombinant tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) or anti-CD95. We also showed that quercetin potentiated the effect of fludarabine on resistant B cells from CLL patients. Resistance to therapy in CLL depends on the expression and activity of anti-apoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2 family. Among these, myeloid cell leukaemia-1 (Mcl-1) has been associated with apoptotic resistance in CLL. Therefore, we investigate here whether the sensitising activity of this flavonoid, which leads to increased apoptosis in both cell lines and CLL, could be related to Mcl-1 expression and stability. Results: B cells isolated from CLL patients showed different levels of Mcl-1 protein expression, resulting, in several cases, in increased sensitivity to fludarabine. Quercetin significantly enhanced the downregulation of Mcl-1 in B cells isolated from selected patients expressing detectable levels of Mcl-1. In U-937 cells, quercetin increased Mcl-1 mRNA instability in the presence of actinomycin D. When cells were treated with MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor, Mcl-1 protein level increased. However, quercetin, in the presence of Z-Vad-FMK, continued to lower Mcl-1 protein expression, indicating its independence from caspase-mediated degradation. In contrast, co-treatment of quercetin and MG-132 did not revert the effect of MG-132 mono-treatment, thus suggesting a possible interference of quercetin in regulating the proteasome-dependent degradation of Mcl-1. Gossypol, a small-molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2 family members, mimics the activity of quercetin by lowering Mcl-1 expression and sensitising U-937 cells to apoptosis induced by recombinant TRAIL and the Fas-ligand. Conclusion: This study

  9. Brain-derived peptides increase blood-brain barrier GLUT1 glucose transporter gene expression via mRNA stabilization.

    PubMed

    Boado, R J

    1998-10-23

    The present investigation studied the effect of the brain-derived peptide preparation Cerebrolysin (CI, EBEWE, Austria) on the turnover rate and gene expression of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) GLUT1 glucose transporter mRNA. Studies were performed in brain endothelial cultured cells transfected with the human (h) GLUT1 transcript. In control cells, the full length 2.8 Kb hGLUT1 mRNA was rapidly degraded following transfection, and the abundance of this transcript at 4 and 6 h was comparable to background mRNA levels seen in cells transfected without hGLUT1 mRNA. On the contrary, the decay of the hGLUT1 mRNA was stabilized in CI-treated cells resulting in a marked reduction in the fractional turnover rate (72.4 and 4.0%/h, control and CI, respectively). In parallel experiments, CI induced a significant increase in the levels of immunoreactive GLUT1 protein measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In conclusion, data presented here demonstrate that factors in CI increase BBB-GLUT1 transcript stability, and that this is associated with an induction of BBB-GLUT1 gene expression in brain endothelial cultured cells. PMID:9832194

  10. Altered expression of mRNA profiles in blood of early-onset schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yong; Yao Shugart, Yin; Wang, Guoqiang; Cheng, Zaohuo; Jin, Chunhui; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Jun; Yu, Hao; Yue, Weihua; Zhang, Fuquan; Zhang, Dai

    2016-01-01

    To identify gene expression abnormalities in schizophrenia (SZ), we generated whole-genome gene expression profiles using microarrays on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 18 early-onset SZ cases and 12 controls. We detected 84 transcripts differentially expressed by diagnostic status, with 82 genes being upregulated and 2 downregulated. We identified two SZ associated gene coexpression modules (green and red), including 446 genes . The green module is positively correlated with SZ, encompassing predominantly up-regulated genes in SZ; while the red module was negatively correlated with disease status, involving mostly nominally down-regulated genes in SZ. The olfactory transduction pathway was the most enriched pathways for the genes within the two modules. The expression levels of several hub genes, including AKT1, BRCA1, CCDC134, UBD, and ZIC2 were validated using real-time quantitative PCR. Our findings indicate that mRNA coexpression abnormalities may serve as a promising mechanism underlying the development of SZ. PMID:26733343

  11. Transient responses via regulation of mRNA stability as an immuno-logical strategy for countering infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Junichi

    2008-12-01

    Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression plays a pivotal role as a fast control system for T-cells and B-cells operating in the defense reactions against rapidly growing infectious agents. The framework of this machinery involves cis-acting elements in the mRNAs of relevant cytokines and trans-acting factors interacting with these elements. The cis- and trans-acting factors enforce rapid mRNA decay with other proteins such as nucleases in the decay machinery. The most prominent cis-element contains A + U- rich sequence (ARE), and is located in the 3'-untranslated region of the target mRNAs. Some ARE-binding proteins promote the rapid decay, and others protect the mRNA from degradation. The 5'-end of nascent mRNA undergoes capping which protects the 5'-end together with the cap-binding protein, and the 3' end is protected with poly (A) tail and associating poly (A) binding protein. Unlike in classical drawing of linear structure of mRNA, the end structures interact with each other through a common platform composed of translation initiation factors, revealing the cross-talk of the 5'-end cap structure and 3'-end poly (A) tail on the translational machinery. The rapid degradation and stabilization of mRNA is triggered by a cellular signaling cascade through phosphorylation of associating protein factors in response to environmental stimuli, and a large nucleolytic complex for specific decay reaction called exosome is formed with the 3'-UTR of mRNA through interaction with the ARE-binding proteins. Possible therapeutic agents modifying stability of ARE-containing mRNA are being screened in order to treat immunological disorders. PMID:19075798

  12. Peptide fibrils with altered stability, activity, and cell selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F.

    2014-01-01

    Peptides have some unique and superior features compared to proteins. However, the use of peptides as therapeutics is hampered by their low stability and cell selectivity. In this study, a new lytic peptide (CL-1, FLGALFRALSRLL) was constructed. Under the physiological condition, peptide CL-1 self-assembled into dynamically stable aggregates with fibrils-like structures. Aggregated CL-1 demonstrated dramatically altered activity and stability in comparison with single molecule CL-1 and other lytic peptides: when incubated with co-cultured bacteria and tissue cells, CL-1 aggregates killed bacteria selectively but spared co-cultured human cells; CL-1 aggregates kept intact in human serum for more than five hours. Peptide-cell interaction studies performed on lipid monolayers and live human tissue cells revealed that in comparison with monomeric CL-1, aggregated CL-1 had decreased cell affinity and membrane insertion capability on tissue cells. A dynamic process involving aggregate dissociation and rearrangement seemed to be an essential step for membrane bound CL-1 aggregates to realize its cytotoxicity to tissue cells. Our study suggests that peptide aggregation could be as important as the charge and secondary structure of a peptide in affecting peptide-cell interactions. Controlling peptide self-assembly represents a new way to increase the stability and cell selectivity of bioactive peptides for wide biomedical applications. PMID:23713839

  13. The p53 target Wig-1 regulates p53 mRNA stability through an AU-rich element

    PubMed Central

    Vilborg, Anna; Glahder, Jacob A.; Wilhelm, Margareta T.; Bersani, Cinzia; Corcoran, Martin; Mahmoudi, Salah; Rosenstierne, Maiken; Grandér, Dan; Farnebo, Marianne; Norrild, Bodil; Wiman, Klas G.

    2009-01-01

    The p53 target gene Wig-1 encodes a double-stranded-RNA-binding zinc finger protein. We show here that Wig-1 binds to p53 mRNA and stabilizes it through an AU-rich element (ARE) in the 3′ UTR of the p53 mRNA. This effect is mirrored by enhanced p53 protein levels in both unstressed cells and cells exposed to p53-activating stress agents. Thus, the p53 target Wig-1 is a previously undescribed ARE-regulating protein that acts as a positive feedback regulator of p53, with implications both for the steady-state levels of p53 and for the p53 stress response. Our data reveal a previously undescribed link between the tumor suppressor p53 and posttranscriptional gene regulation via AREs in mRNA. PMID:19805223

  14. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27112822

  15. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J.; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27112822

  16. Achieving targeted and quantifiable alteration of mRNA splicing with Morpholino oligos

    SciTech Connect

    Morcos, Paul A. . E-mail: pmorcos@gene-tools.com

    2007-06-29

    This work represents the first guide for using steric-block antisense oligos as tools for effective and targeted modification of RNA splicing. Comparison of several steric-block oligo types shows the properties of Morpholinos provide significant advantages over other potential splice-blocking oligos. The procedures and complications of designing effective splice-blocking Morpholino oligos are described. The design process requires complete pre-mRNA sequence for defining suitable targets, which usually generate specific predictable messengers. To validate the targeting procedure, the level and nature of transcript alteration is characterized by RT-PCR analysis of splice modification in a {beta}-globin splice model system. An oligo-walking study reveals that while U1 and U2 small nuclear RiboNucleoProtein (snRNP) binding sites are the most effective targets for blocking splicing, inclusion of these sites is not required to achieve effective splice modifications. The most effective targeting strategy employs simultaneously blocking snRNP binding sites and splice-junctions. The work presented here continues to be the basis for most of the successful Morpholino oligos designed for the worldwide research community to block RNA splicing.

  17. Estrogenic environmental contaminants alter the mRNA abundance profiles of genes involved in gonadal differentiation of the American bullfrog

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Stephanie E.; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C.; Ramirez, Claire A.; Malpas, Janae M.; Propper, Catherine R.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife and human populations are exposed to anthropogenic mixtures of chemicals in the environment that may adversely influence normal reproductive function and development. We determined the effects of exposure to estrogenic chemicals and wastewater effluent (WWE) on developing gonads of the American bullfrog, Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana, a species whose widespread distribution make it an ideal model for environmental monitoring for endocrine effects of chemical contaminants. Premetamorphic bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to treatment vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 10−9 M) or 4-tert-octylphenol (OP; 10−9 M, 10−8 M, and 10−7 M). Additionally, gonadal differentiation was evaluated in bullfrog tadpoles from a WWE-containing site versus those from a reference location receiving no WWE. In both studies, phenotypic sex, steroidogenic factor-1 (nr5a1), and aromatase (cyp19a1) mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR were determined. Exposure to E2 or OP did not alter sex ratios. In controls, both nr5a1 and cyp19a1 transcript levels exhibited sexual dimorphism, with males demonstrating higher levels of nr5a1 and females greater abundance of cyp19a1. However, E2 exposure increased cyp19a1 mRNA abundance in testes and decreased levels in ovaries, eliminating the sexual dimorphism observed in controls. E2-exposed males exhibited increased nr5a1 transcript levels in the testes compared to controls, while females demonstrated no E2 effect. OP treatment had no effect on female cyp19a1 mRNA abundance, but exposure to 10−7 M OP increased testicular transcript levels. Treatment with 10−9 and 10−8 M OP, but not 10−7 M, resulted in decreased abundance of nr5a1 transcript in both ovaries and testes. Animals from the field had sexually dimorphic gonadal levels of cyp19a1, but both sexes from the WWE site exhibited elevated cyp19a1 transcript abundance compared to the reference location. Individual chemical compounds and anthropogenic wastewater effluent dispersed

  18. Induced transcription and stability of CELF2 mRNA drives widespread alternative splicing during T-cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mallory, Michael J.; Allon, Samuel J.; Qiu, Jinsong; Gazzara, Matthew R.; Tapescu, Iulia; Martinez, Nicole M.; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Lynch, Kristen W.

    2015-01-01

    Studies in several cell types have highlighted dramatic and diverse changes in mRNA processing that occur upon cellular stimulation. However, the mechanisms and pathways that lead to regulated changes in mRNA processing remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that expression of the splicing factor CELF2 (CUGBP, Elav-like family member 2) is regulated in response to T-cell signaling through combined increases in transcription and mRNA stability. Transcriptional induction occurs within 6 h of stimulation and is dependent on activation of NF-κB. Subsequently, there is an increase in the stability of the CELF2 mRNA that correlates with a change in CELF2 3′UTR length and contributes to the total signal-induced enhancement of CELF2 expression. Importantly, we uncover dozens of splicing events in cultured T cells whose changes upon stimulation are dependent on CELF2 expression, and provide evidence that CELF2 controls a similar proportion of splicing events during human thymic T-cell development. Taken together, these findings expand the physiologic impact of CELF2 beyond that previously documented in developing neuronal and muscle cells to T-cell development and function, identify unappreciated instances of alternative splicing in the human thymus, and uncover novel mechanisms for CELF2 regulation that may broadly impact CELF2 expression across diverse cell types. PMID:25870297

  19. Glucocorticoid regulation of human pulmonary surfactant protein-B (SP-B) mRNA stability is independent of activated glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Tillis, Ceá C; Huang, Helen W; Bi, Weizhen; Pan, Su; Bruce, Shirley R; Alcorn, Joseph L

    2011-06-01

    Adequate expression of surfactant protein-B (SP-B) is critical in the function of pulmonary surfactant to reduce alveolar surface tension. Expression of SP-B mRNA is restricted to specific lung-airway epithelial cells, and human SP-B mRNA stability is increased in the presence of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX). Although the mechanism of SP-B mRNA stabilization by DEX is unknown, studies suggest involvement of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). We developed a dual-cistronic plasmid-based expression assay in which steady-state levels of SP-B mRNA, determined by Northern analysis, reproducibly reflect changes in SP-B mRNA stability. Using this assay, we found that steady-state levels of SP-B mRNA increased greater than twofold in transfected human-airway epithelial cells (A549) incubated with DEX (10(-7) M). DEX-mediated changes in SP-B mRNA levels required the presence of the SP-B mRNA 3'-untranslated region but did not require ongoing protein synthesis. The effect of DEX on SP-B mRNA levels was dose dependent, with maximal effect at 10(-7) M. DEX increased levels of SP-B mRNA in cells lacking GR, and the presence of the GR antagonist RU486 did not interfere with the effect of DEX. Surprisingly, other steroid hormones (progesterone, estradiol, and vitamin D; 10(-7) M) significantly increased SP-B mRNA levels, suggesting a common pathway of steroid hormone action on SP-B mRNA stability. These results indicate that the effect of DEX to increase SP-B mRNA stability is independent of activated GR and suggests that the mechanism is mediated by posttranscriptional or nongenomic effects of glucocorticoids. PMID:21398497

  20. Altered Dimer Interface Decreases Stability in an Amyloidogenic Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Baden, Elizabeth M.; Owen, Barbara A.L.; Peterson, Francis C.; Volkman, Brian F.; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Thompson, James R.

    2008-07-21

    Amyloidoses are devastating and currently incurable diseases in which the process of amyloid formation causes fatal cellular and organ damage. The molecular mechanisms underlying amyloidoses are not well known. In this study, we address the structural basis of immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis, which results from deposition of light chains produced by clonal plasma cells. We compare light chain amyloidosis protein AL-09 to its wild-type counterpart, the kl O18/O8 light chain germline. Crystallographic studies indicate that both proteins form dimers. However, AL-09 has an altered dimer interface that is rotated 90 degrees from the kl O18/O8 dimer interface. The three non-conservative mutations in AL-09 are located within the dimer interface, consistent with their role in the decreased stability of this amyloidogenic protein. Moreover, AL-09 forms amyloid fibrils more quickly than kl O18/O8 in vitro. These results support the notion that the increased stability of the monomer and delayed fibril formation, together with a properly formed dimer, may be protective against amyloidogenesis. This could open a new direction into rational drug design for amyloidogenic proteins.

  1. Elevated Intracellular Calcium Increases Ferritin H Expression Through an NFAT-Independent Posttranscriptional Mechanism Involving mRNA Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, Elizabeth L.; Tsuji, Yoshiaki

    2009-01-01

    An increase in intracellular Ca2+ is one of the initiating events in T cell activation. A calcium-mediated signaling cascade in T cells involves activation of calcineurin and the dephosphorylation and translocation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT), resulting in the transcriptional activation of target genes such as IL-2. In the present study, we found that increased intracellular calcium leads to induction of the antioxidant protein ferritin H. We previously reported that the ferritin H gene is transcriptionally activated under oxidative stress conditions through an antioxidant responsive element (ARE). The facts that the ferritin H ARE contains a composite AP1 site, and that NFAT collaborates with AP1 transcription factors, led us to test whether calcium-activated NFAT is involved in the ferritin H induction through the ARE. Treatment of Jurkat T cells with the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, increased ferritin H mRNA and protein expression. Though NFAT translocated to the nucleus and bound a consensus NFAT sequence located in the IL-2 promoter following ionomycin treatment, it did not activate ferritin H transcription despite the presence of a putative NFAT binding sequence in the ferritin H ARE. In addition, the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A treatment blocked ionomycin-mediated NFAT nuclear translocation but failed to abrogate the increase in ferritin H mRNA. Analysis of mRNA stability following actinomycin D treatment revealed that ionomycin prolongs ferritin H mRNA half-life. Taken together, these results suggest that ionomycin-mediated induction of ferritin H may occur in an NFAT-independent manner but through posttranscriptional stabilization of the ferritin H mRNA. PMID:18076382

  2. Altered mRNA editing and expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors after kainic acid exposure in cyclooxygenase-2 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Caracciolo, Luca; Barbon, Alessandro; Palumbo, Sara; Mora, Cristina; Toscano, Christopher D; Bosetti, Francesca; Barlati, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) binds to the AMPA/KA receptors and induces seizures that result in inflammation, oxidative damage and neuronal death. We previously showed that cyclooxygenase-2 deficient (COX-2(-/-)) mice are more vulnerable to KA-induced excitotoxicity. Here, we investigated whether the increased susceptibility of COX-2(-/-) mice to KA is associated with altered mRNA expression and editing of glutamate receptors. The expression of AMPA GluR2, GluR3 and KA GluR6 was increased in vehicle-injected COX-2(-/-) mice compared to wild type (WT) mice in hippocampus and cortex, whereas gene expression of NMDA receptors was decreased. KA treatment decreased the expression of AMPA, KA and NMDA receptors in the hippocampus, with a significant effect in COX-2(-/-) mice. Furthermore, we analyzed RNA editing levels and found that the level of GluR3 R/G editing site was selectively increased in the hippocampus and decreased in the cortex in COX-2(-/-) compared with WT mice. After KA, GluR4 R/G editing site, flip form, was increased in the hippocampus of COX-2(-/-) mice. Treatment of WT mice with the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib for two weeks decreased the expression of AMPA/KA and NMDAR subunits after KA, as observed in COX-2(-/-) mice. After KA exposure, COX-2(-/-) mice showed increased mRNA expression of markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, such as cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), microglia (CD11b) and astrocyte (GFAP). Thus, COX-2 gene deletion can exacerbate the inflammatory response to KA. We suggest that COX-2 plays a role in attenuating glutamate excitotoxicity by modulating RNA editing of AMPA/KA and mRNA expression of all ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits and, in turn, neuronal excitability. These changes may contribute to the increased vulnerability of COX-2(-/-) mice to KA. The overstimulation of glutamate receptors as a consequence of COX-2 gene deletion suggests a functional coupling between COX-2 and the

  3. Triptolide inhibits COX-2 expression by regulating mRNA stability in TNF-{alpha}-treated A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Shuang; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Huang, Xin; Wang, Tao; Huang, Xiao; Li, Han; Zhang, Luyong

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression and the half-life of COX-2 mRNA is decreased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HuR protein shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm is inhibited by triptolide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited 3 Prime -UTR fluorescence reporter gene activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer COX-2 mRNA binding to HuR is decreased by triptolide in pull-down experiments. -- Abstract: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression is frequently associated with human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and involved in tumor proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and resistance to apoptosis. In the present study, the effects of triptolide on COX-2 expression in A549 cells were investigated and triptolide was found to inhibit TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 expression. In our further studies, it was found that triptolide decreased the half-life of COX-2 mRNA dramatically and that it inhibited 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) fluorescence reporter gene activity. Meanwhile, triptolide inhibited the HuR shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm. After triptolide treatment, decreased COX-2 mRNA in pull-down experiments with anti-HuR antibodies was observed, indicating that the decreased cytoplasmic HuR is responsible for the decreased COX-2 mRNA. Taken together, our results provided evidence for the first time that triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression by COX-2 mRNA stability modulation and post-transcriptional regulation. These results provide a novel mechanism of action for triptolide which may be important in the treatment of lung cancer.

  4. EhPgp5 mRNA stability is a regulatory event in the Entamoeba histolytica multidrug resistance phenotype.

    PubMed

    López-Camarillo, César; Luna-Arias, Juan Pedro; Marchat, Laurence A; Orozco, Esther

    2003-03-28

    The multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype in Entamoeba histolytica is characterized by the overexpression of the EhPgp5 gene in trophozoites grown in high drug concentrations. Here we evaluated the role of EhPgp5 mRNA stability on MDR using actinomycin D. EhPgp5 mRNA from trophozoites growing without emetine had a half-life of 2.1 h, which augmented to 3.1 h in cells cultured with 90 microM and to 7.8 h with 225 microM emetine. Polyadenylation sites were detected at 118-, 156-, and 189-nucleotide (nt) positions of the EhPgp5 mRNA 3'-untranslated region. Interestingly, trophozoites grown with 225 microM emetine exhibited an extra polyadenylation site at 19 nt. The 3'-untranslated region sequence is AU-rich and has putative consensus sequences for RNA-binding proteins. We detected a RNA-protein complex in a region that contains a polypyrimidine tract (142-159 nt) and a cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (146-154 nt). A longer poly(A) tail in the EhPgp5 mRNA was seen in trophozoites grown with 225 microM emetine. Emetine stress may affect factors involved in mRNA turnover, including polyadenylation/deadenylation proteins, which could induce changes in the EhPgp5 mRNA half-life and poly(A) tail length. Novel evidence on mechanisms participating in E. histolytica MDR phenotype is provided. PMID:12556531

  5. Cadmium Activates Multiple Signaling Pathways That Coordinately Stimulate Akt Activity to Enhance c-Myc mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jia-Shiuan; Chao, Cheng-Han; Lin, Lih-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium is a known environmental carcinogen. Exposure of Cd leads to the activation of several proto-oncogenes in cells. We investigated here the mechanism of c-Myc expression in hepatic cells under Cd treatment. The c-Myc protein and mRNA levels increased in dose- and time-dependent manners in HepG2 cells with Cd treatment. This increase was due to an increase in c-Myc mRNA stability. To explore the mechanism involved in enhancing the mRNA stability, several cellular signaling factors that evoked by Cd treatment were analyzed. PI3K, p38, ERK and JNK were activated by Cd. However, ERK did not participate in the Cd-induced c-Myc expression. Further analysis revealed that mTORC2 was a downstream factor of p38. PI3K, JNK and mTORC2 coordinately activated Akt. Akt was phosphorylated at Thr450 in the untreated cells. Cd treatment led to additional phosphorylation at Thr308 and Ser473. Blocking any of the three signaling factors resulted in the reduction of phosphorylation level at all three Akt sites. The activated Akt phosphorylated Foxo1 and allowed the modified protein to translocate into the cytoplasm. We conclude that Cd-induced accumulation of c-Myc requires the activation of several signaling pathways. The signals act coordinately for Akt activation and drive the Foxo1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Reduction of Foxo1 in the nucleus reduces the transcription of its target genes that may affect c-Myc mRNA stability, resulting in a higher accumulation of the c-Myc proteins. PMID:26751215

  6. The Role of Regulated mRNA Stability in Establishing Bicoid Morphogen Gradient in Drosophila Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Niranjan, Mahesan

    2011-01-01

    The Bicoid morphogen is amongst the earliest triggers of differential spatial pattern of gene expression and subsequent cell fate determination in the embryonic development of Drosophila. This maternally deposited morphogen is thought to diffuse in the embryo, establishing a concentration gradient which is sensed by downstream genes. In most model based analyses of this process, the translation of the bicoid mRNA is thought to take place at a fixed rate from the anterior pole of the embryo and a supply of the resulting protein at a constant rate is assumed. Is this process of morphogen generation a passive one as assumed in the modelling literature so far, or would available data support an alternate hypothesis that the stability of the mRNA is regulated by active processes? We introduce a model in which the stability of the maternal mRNA is regulated by being held constant for a length of time, followed by rapid degradation. With this more realistic model of the source, we have analysed three computational models of spatial morphogen propagation along the anterior-posterior axis: (a) passive diffusion modelled as a deterministic differential equation, (b) diffusion enhanced by a cytoplasmic flow term; and (c) diffusion modelled by stochastic simulation of the corresponding chemical reactions. Parameter estimation on these models by matching to publicly available data on spatio-temporal Bicoid profiles suggests strong support for regulated stability over either a constant supply rate or one where the maternal mRNA is permitted to degrade in a passive manner. PMID:21949782

  7. Sequences of a hairpin structure in the 3'-untranslated region mediate regulation of human pulmonary surfactant protein B mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Helen W; Payne, David E; Bi, Weizhen; Pan, Su; Bruce, Shirley R; Alcorn, Joseph L

    2012-05-15

    The ability of pulmonary surfactant to reduce alveolar surface tension requires adequate expression of surfactant protein B (SP-B). Dexamethasone (DEX, 10(-7) M) increases human SP-B mRNA stability by a mechanism that requires a 126-nt-long segment (the 7.6S region) of the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR). The objective of this study was to identify sequences in the 7.6S region that mediate regulation of SP-B mRNA stability. The 7.6S region was found to be sufficient for DEX-mediated stabilization of mRNA. Sequential substitution mutagenesis of the 7.6S region indicates that a 90-nt region is required for DEX-mediated stabilization and maintenance of intrinsic stability. In this region, one 30-nt-long element (002), predicted to form a stem-loop structure, is sufficient for DEX-mediated stabilization of mRNA and intrinsic mRNA stability. Cytosolic proteins specifically bind element 002, and binding activity is unaffected whether proteins are isolated from cells incubated in the absence or presence of DEX. While loop sequences of element 002 have no role in regulation of SP-B mRNA stability, the proximal stem sequences are required for DEX-mediated stabilization and specific binding of proteins. Mutation of the sequences that comprise the proximal or distal arm of the stem negates the destabilizing activity of element 002 on intrinsic SP-B mRNA stability. These results indicate that cytosolic proteins bind a single hairpin structure that mediates intrinsic and hormonal regulation of SP-B mRNA stability via mechanisms that involve sequences of the stems of the hairpin structure. PMID:22367784

  8. Plakophilins 1 and 3 Bind to FXR1 and Thereby Influence the mRNA Stability of Desmosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fischer-Kešo, Regina; Breuninger, Sonja; Hofmann, Sarah; Henn, Manuela; Röhrig, Theresa; Ströbel, Philipp; Stoecklin, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Plakophilins 1 and 3 (PKP1/3) are members of the arm repeat family of catenin proteins and serve as structural components of desmosomes, which are important for cell-cell-adhesion. In addition, PKP1/3 occur as soluble proteins outside desmosomes, yet their role in the cytoplasm is not known. We found that cytoplasmic PKP1/3 coprecipitated with the RNA-binding proteins FXR1, G3BP, PABPC1, and UPF1, and these PKP1/3 complexes also comprised desmoplakin and PKP2 mRNAs. Moreover, we showed that the interaction of PKP1/3 with G3BP, PABPC1, and UPF1 but not with FXR1 was RNase sensitive. To address the cytoplasmic function of PKP1/3, we performed gain-and-loss-of-function studies. Both PKP1 and PKP3 knockdown cell lines showed reduced protein and mRNA levels for desmoplakin and PKP2. Whereas global rates of translation were unaffected, desmoplakin and PKP2 mRNA were destabilized. Furthermore, binding of PKP1/3 to FXR1 was RNA independent, and both PKP3 and FXR1 stabilized PKP2 mRNA. Our results demonstrate that cytoplasmic PKP1/3 are components of mRNA ribonucleoprotein particles and act as posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. PMID:25225333

  9. T3 rapidly modulates TSHβ mRNA stability and translational rate in the pituitary of hypothyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Goulart-Silva, Francemilson; de Souza, Paula Bargi; Nunes, Maria Tereza

    2011-01-30

    Whereas it is well known that T3 inhibits TSHβ gene transcription, its effects on TSHβ mRNA stability and translation have been poorly investigated. This study examined these possibilities, by evaluating the TSHβ transcripts poly(A) tail length, translational rate and binding to cytoskeleton, in pituitaries of thyroidectomized and sham-operated rats treated with T3 or saline, and killed 30 min thereafter. The hypothyroidism induced an increase of TSHβ transcript poly(A) tail, as well as of its content in ribosomes and attachment to cytoskeleton. The hypothyroid rats acutely treated with T3 exhibited a reduction of TSHβ mRNA poly(A) tail length and recruitment to ribosomes, indicating that this treatment decreased the stability and translation rate of TSHβ mRNA. Nevertheless, acute T3 administration to sham-operated rats provoked an increase of TSHβ transcripts binding to ribosomes. These data add new insight to an important role of T3 in rapidly regulating TSH gene expression at posttranscriptional level. PMID:21078364

  10. Mitochondrial mRNA stability and polyadenylation during anoxia-induced quiescence in the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana.

    PubMed

    Eads, Brian D; Hand, Steven C

    2003-10-01

    Polyadenylation of messenger RNA is known to be an important mechanism for regulating mRNA stability in a variety of systems, including bacteria, chloroplasts and plant mitochondria. By comparison, little is known about the role played by polyadenylation in animal mitochondrial gene expression. We have used embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana to test hypotheses regarding message stability and polyadenylation under conditions simulating anoxia-induced quiescence. In response to anoxia, these embryos undergo a profound and acute metabolic downregulation, characterized by a steep drop in intracellular pH (pH(i)) and ATP levels. Using dot blots of total mitochondrial RNA, we show that during in organello incubations both O(2) deprivation and acidic pH (pH 6.4) elicit increases in half-lives of selected mitochondrial transcripts on the order of five- to tenfold or more, relative to normoxic controls at pH 7.8. Polyadenylation of these transcripts was measured under the same incubation conditions using a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based assay. The results demonstrate that low pH and anoxia promote significant deadenylation of the stabilized transcripts in several cases, measured either as change over time in the amount of polyadenylation within a given size class of poly(A)(+) tail, or as the total amount of polyadenylation at the endpoint of the incubation. This study is the first direct demonstration that for a metazoan mitochondrion, polyadenylation is associated with destabilized mRNA. This pattern has also been demonstrated in bacteria, chloroplasts and plant mitochondria and may indicate a conserved mechanism for regulating message half-life that differs from the paradigm for eukaryotic cytoplasm, where increased mRNA stability is associated with polyadenylation. PMID:12966060

  11. Syk interacts with and phosphorylates nucleolin to stabilize Bcl-x(L) mRNA and promote cell survival.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Horng; Childress, Michael O; Geahlen, Robert L

    2014-10-01

    The Syk protein tyrosine kinase, a well-characterized regulator of immune cell function, plays an increasingly recognized role in tumorigenesis as a promoter of cell survival in both hematological and nonhematological malignancies. We show here that the expression of Syk in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells or in DG75 B-lymphoma cells protects cells from apoptosis induced by oxidative or genotoxic stress by stabilizing the mRNA for Bcl-x(L), an antiapoptotic protein. Syk binds robustly to nucleolin and phosphorylates it on tyrosine, enhancing its ability to bind the Bcl-x(L) mRNA. Consequently, reducing the level of nucleolin by RNA interference attenuates the ability of Syk to protect cells from stress-induced cell death. PMID:25092868

  12. Multiplexed digital quantification of binge-like alcohol-mediated alterations in maternal uterine angiogenic mRNA transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Ramadoss, Jayanth; Magness, Ronald R

    2012-06-01

    Genomic studies on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) have utilized either genome-wide microarrays/bioinformatics or targeted real-time PCR (RT-PCR). We utilized herein for the first time a novel digital approach with high throughput as well as the capability to focus on one physiological system. The aim of the present study was to investigate alcohol-induced alterations in uterine angiogenesis-related mRNA abundance using digital mRNA technology. Four biological and three technical replicates of uterine arterial endothelial cells from third-trimester ewes were fluorescence-activated cell sorted, validated, and treated without or with binge-like alcohol. A capture probe covalently bound to an oligonucleotide containing biotin and a color-coded reporter probe were designed for 85 angiogenesis-related genes and analyzed with the Nanostring nCounter system. Twenty genes were downregulated (↓) and two upregulated (↑), including angiogenic growth factors/receptors (↓placental growth factor), adhesion molecules (↓angiopoietin-like-3; ↓collagen-18A1; ↓endoglin), proteases/matrix proteins/inhibitors (↓alanyl aminopeptidase; ↓collagen-4A3; ↓heparanase; ↓plasminogen, ↑plasminogen activator urokinase; ↓platelet factor-4; ↓plexin domain containing-1; ↓tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3), transcription/signaling molecules (↓heart and neural crest derivatives-2; ↓DNA-binding protein inhibitor; ↓NOTCH-4; ↓ribosomal protein-L13a1; ↓ribosomal protein large-P1), cytokines/chemokines (↓interleukin-1B), and miscellaneous growth factors (↓leptin; ↓platelet-derived growth factor-α); ↓transforming growth factor (TGF-α; ↑TGF-β receptor-1). These novel data show significant detrimental alcohol effects on genes controlling angiogenesis supporting a mechanistic role for abnormal uteroplacental vascular development in FASD. The tripartite digital gene expression system is therefore a valuable tool to answer many additional

  13. Assessment of mRNA and microRNA Stabilization in Peripheral Human Blood for Multicenter Studies and Biobanks

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Daniel Gilbert; Casjens, Swaantje; Rozynek, Peter; Lehnert, Martin; Zilch-Schöneweis, Sandra; Bryk, Oleksandr; Taeger, Dirk; Gomolka, Maria; Kreuzer, Michaela; Otten, Heinz; Pesch, Beate; Johnen, Georg; Brüning, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the suitability of two methods of RNA conservation in blood samples, PAXgene and RNAlater, in combination with variable shipping conditions for their application in multicenter studies and biobanking. RNA yield, integrity, and purity as well as levels of selected mRNA and microRNA species were analyzed in peripheral human blood samples stabilized by PAXgene or RNAlater and shipped on dry ice or at ambient temperatures from the study centers to the central analysis laboratory. Both examined systems were clearly appropriate for RNA stabilization in human blood independently of the shipping conditions. The isolated RNA is characterized by good quantity and quality and well suited for downstream applications like quantitative RT-PCR analysis of mRNA and microRNA. Superior yield and integrity values were received using RNAlater. It would be reasonable to consider the production and approval of blood collection tubes prefilled with RNAlater to facilitate the use of this excellent RNA stabilization system in large studies. PMID:20981139

  14. RNAIII of the Staphylococcus aureus agr system activates global regulator MgrA by stabilizing mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi Kr.; Luong, Thanh T.; Lee, Chia Y.

    2015-01-01

    RNAIII, the effector of the agr quorum-sensing system, plays a key role in virulence gene regulation in Staphylococcus aureus, but how RNAIII transcriptionally regulates its downstream genes is not completely understood. Here, we show that RNAIII stabilizes mgrA mRNA, thereby increasing the production of MgrA, a global transcriptional regulator that affects the expression of many genes. The mgrA gene is transcribed from two promoters, P1 and P2, to produce two mRNA transcripts with long 5′ UTR. Two adjacent regions of the mgrA mRNA UTR transcribed from the upstream P2 promoter, but not the P1 promoter, form a stable complex with two regions of RNAIII near the 5′ and 3′ ends. We further demonstrate that the interaction has several biological effects. We propose that MgrA can serve as an intermediary regulator through which agr exerts its regulatory function. PMID:26504242

  15. Modulation of TNF-α mRNA stability by human antigen R and miR181s in sepsis-induced immunoparalysis

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Cao; Jinjun, Bian; Zi-Chun, Hua; Lin, Ma; Wei, Chen; Xu, Zhang; Ri, Zhou; Shun, Cheng; Wen-Zhu, Sun; Qing-Cai, Jiao; Wu, Yin

    2015-01-01

    Immunoparalysis is an important pathological mechanism in sepsis. However, an effective small molecule therapy is lacking. Here, we show that ouabain, a Na+,K+-ATPase ligand, can reverse immunoparalysis in vitro, in vivo, and in clinical samples. Notably, the effect of ouabain was critically dependent on TNF-α expression. However, ouabain had opposing effects on the stability of TNF-α mRNA: Ouabain triggered miR-181 transcription, which promoted TNF-α mRNA degradation and induced immunoparalysis, and ouabain triggered the nuclear export of human antigen R (HuR), which stabilized TNF-α mRNA and suppressed immuno-paralysis. Interestingly, because the miR-181 binding site is located within the HuR binding site in the 3′-untranslated region of TNF-α, in ouabain-treated cells, HuR competed with miR-181 for binding to TNF-α mRNA and recruited TNF-α mRNA to stress granules, thereby stabilizing TNF-α mRNA and reversing immunoparalysis. Ouabain also induced GM-CSF and interferon-γ expression in a HuR-dependent manner. Hence, the fine-tuning of TNF-α mRNA stability by HuR and miR181 plays a crucial role in immunoparalysis, and Na+,K+-ATPase ligands are promising agents for immunoparalysis therapy. PMID:25535255

  16. Decrease in transient receptor potential melastatin 6 mRNA stability caused by rapamycin in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ikari, Akira; Sanada, Ayumi; Sawada, Hayato; Okude, Chiaki; Tonegawa, Chie; Sugatani, Junko

    2011-06-01

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is used in treatments for transplantation and cancer. Rapamycin causes hypomagnesemia, although precisely how has not been examined. Here, we investigated the effect of rapamycin on the expression of transient receptor potential melastatin 6 (TRPM6), a Mg2+ channel. Rapamycin and LY-294002, an inhibitor of phosphatidilinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) located upstream of mTOR, inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced expression of the TRPM6 protein without affecting TRPM7 expression in rat renal NRK-52E epithelial cells. Both rapamycin and LY-294002 decreased EGF-induced Mg2+ influx. U0126, a MEK inhibitor, inhibited EGF-induced increases in c-Fos, p-ERK, and TRPM6 levels. In contrast, neither rapamycin nor LY-294002 inhibited EGF-induced increases in p-ERK and c-Fos levels. EGF increased p-Akt level, an effect inhibited by LY-294002 and 1L-6-hydroxymethyl-chiro-inositol2-[(R)-2-O-methyl-3-O-octadecylcarbonate] (Akt inhibitor). Akt inhibitor decreased TRPM6 level similar to rapamycin and LY-294002. These results suggest that a PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is involved in the regulation of TRPM6 expression. Rapamycin inhibited the EGF-induced increase in TRPM6 mRNA but did not inhibit human TRPM6 promoter activity. In the presence of actinomycin D, a transcriptional inhibitor, rapamycin accelerated the decrease in TRPM6 mRNA. Rapamycin decreased the expression and activity of a luciferase linked with the 3'-untranslated region of human TRPM6 mRNA. These results suggest that TRPM6 expression is up-regulated by a PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and rapamycin reduces TRPM6 mRNA stability, resulting in a decrease in the reabsorption of Mg2+. PMID:21073857

  17. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human nescient helix-loop-helix 2 (NHLH2) gene reduce mRNA stability and DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Al Rayyan, Numan; Wankhade, Umesh D; Bush, Korie; Good, Deborah J

    2013-01-01

    Nescient helix-loop-helix-2 (NHLH2) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, which has been implicated, using mouse knockouts, in adult body weight regulation and fertility. A scan of the known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NHLH2 gene revealed one in the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR), which lies within an AUUUA RNA stability motif. A second SNP is nonsynonymous within the coding region of NHLH2, and was found in a genome-wide association study for obesity. Both of these SNPs were examined for their effect on NLHL2 by creating mouse mimics and examining mRNA stability, and protein function in mouse hypothalamic cell lines. The 3'UTR SNP causes increased instability and, when the SNP-containing Nhlh2 3'UTR is attached to luciferase mRNA, reduced protein levels in cells. The nonsynonymous SNP at position 83 in the protein changes an alanine residue, conserved in NHLH2 orthologs through the Drosophila sp. to a proline residue. This change affects migration of the protein on an SDS-PAGE gel, and appears to alter secondary structure of the protein, as predicted using in silico methods. These results provide functional information on two rare human SNPs in the NHLH2 gene. One of these has been linked to human obese phenotypes, while the other is present in a relatively high proportion of individuals. Given their effects on NHLH2 protein levels, both SNPs deserve further analysis in whether they are causative and/or additive for human body weight and fertility phenotypes. PMID:23026212

  18. FUS regulates AMPA receptor function and FTLD/ALS-associated behaviour via GluA1 mRNA stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Udagawa, Tsuyoshi; Fujioka, Yusuke; Tanaka, Motoki; Honda, Daiyu; Yokoi, Satoshi; Riku, Yuichi; Ibi, Daisuke; Nagai, Taku; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Katsuno, Masahisa; Inada, Toshifumi; Ohno, Kinji; Sokabe, Masahiro; Okado, Haruo; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Sobue, Gen

    2015-01-01

    FUS is an RNA/DNA-binding protein involved in multiple steps of gene expression and is associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). However, the specific disease-causing and/or modifying mechanism mediated by FUS is largely unknown. Here we evaluate intrinsic roles of FUS on synaptic functions and animal behaviours. We find that FUS depletion downregulates GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptor. FUS binds GluA1 mRNA in the vicinity of the 3′ terminus and controls poly (A) tail maintenance, thus regulating stability. GluA1 reduction upon FUS knockdown reduces miniature EPSC amplitude both in cultured neurons and in vivo. FUS knockdown in hippocampus attenuates dendritic spine maturation and causes behavioural aberrations including hyperactivity, disinhibition and social interaction defects, which are partly ameliorated by GluA1 reintroduction. These results highlight the pivotal role of FUS in regulating GluA1 mRNA stability, post-synaptic function and FTLD-like animal behaviours. PMID:25968143

  19. Nickel Ions Selectively Inhibit Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Interleukin-6 Production by Decreasing Its mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa, Sanki; Kishimoto, Yu; Takano, Takayuki; Okita, Kiyuki; Takakuwa, Shiho; Sato, Taiki; Hiratsuka, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Osamu; Hirasawa, Noriyasu

    2015-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) ions easily elute from many alloys and elicit inflammation and allergies. Previous studies have shown that infections due to the implantation of medical devices cause inflammation and enhance the elution of Ni ions (Ni2+). However, cross-talk between infection- and Ni2+-induced signaling pathways has not yet been elucidated in detail. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Ni2+ on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of cytokines in a LPS-induced air pouch-type inflammation model in BALB/c mice and the murine macrophage cell line RAW264. We demonstrated that Ni2+ inhibited the LPS-induced production of interleukin (IL)-6, but not that of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α both in vivo and in vitro. This inhibitory effect was also observed with cobalt ion (Co2+), but not with chloride ion (Cl-), zinc ion (Zn2+), or palladium ion (Pd2+), and was highly selective to the production of IL-6. Ni2+ did not inhibit the activation of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, or JNK. Although Ni2+ decreased IL-6 mRNA levels, it failed to inhibit the LPS-induced activation of the IL-6 promoter. An experiment using actinomycin D, a transcription inhibitor, revealed that Ni2+ decreased the stability of IL-6 mRNA. Moreover, Ni2+ inhibited the LPS-induced expression of Arid5a, but not regnase-1. These results demonstrated that Ni2+ may have selectively inhibited the LPS-induced production of IL-6 by decreasing the Arid5a-dependent stabilization of IL-6 mRNA. PMID:25742007

  20. Nickel ions selectively inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin-6 production by decreasing its mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Sanki; Kishimoto, Yu; Takano, Takayuki; Okita, Kiyuki; Takakuwa, Shiho; Sato, Taiki; Hiratsuka, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Osamu; Hirasawa, Noriyasu

    2015-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) ions easily elute from many alloys and elicit inflammation and allergies. Previous studies have shown that infections due to the implantation of medical devices cause inflammation and enhance the elution of Ni ions (Ni²⁺). However, cross-talk between infection- and Ni²⁺-induced signaling pathways has not yet been elucidated in detail. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Ni2+ on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of cytokines in a LPS-induced air pouch-type inflammation model in BALB/c mice and the murine macrophage cell line RAW264. We demonstrated that Ni²⁺ inhibited the LPS-induced production of interleukin (IL)-6, but not that of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α both in vivo and in vitro. This inhibitory effect was also observed with cobalt ion (Co²⁺), but not with chloride ion (Cl⁻), zinc ion (Zn²⁺), or palladium ion (Pd²⁺), and was highly selective to the production of IL-6. Ni²⁺ did not inhibit the activation of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, or JNK. Although Ni²⁺ decreased IL-6 mRNA levels, it failed to inhibit the LPS-induced activation of the IL-6 promoter. An experiment using actinomycin D, a transcription inhibitor, revealed that Ni²⁺ decreased the stability of IL-6 mRNA. Moreover, Ni²⁺ inhibited the LPS-induced expression of Arid5a, but not regnase-1. These results demonstrated that Ni²⁺ may have selectively inhibited the LPS-induced production of IL-6 by decreasing the Arid5a-dependent stabilization of IL-6 mRNA. PMID:25742007

  1. β-Amyloid-aluminum complex alters cytoskeletal stability and increases ROS production in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Bolognin, Silvia; Zatta, Paolo; Lorenzetto, Erika; Valenti, Maria Teresa; Buffelli, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Several lines of evidence have supported the potential involvement of metal ions in the etiology of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this interaction are still partially unknown. Previous work from our laboratory has shown that β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) aggregation was strongly influenced by the conjugation of the peptide with few metal ions (aluminum, copper, zinc, and iron) that are found in high concentrations in the senile plaque core. The binding of aluminum (Al) to Aβ specifically stabilized the peptide in an oligomeric conformation. Here, we show that the aggregation of Aβ-Al was boosted by sodium dodecyl sulfate, a detergent that mimics some characteristics of biological membrane, suggesting a potential role for membrane components in the Aβ aggregation process. Notably, we also found that Aβ-Al caused mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species production in primary cortical neurons. Aβ-Al strongly promoted also alterations in cytoskeleton network as shown by the increased F-actin expression and the occurrence of neuritic beading. Interestingly, the neurotoxic effect of this metal complex was associated with a decreased mRNA expression of ubiquitin thiolesterase, an ubiquitin-dependent protein involved in catabolic process, and by the increased expression of glutaminyl cyclase, responsible for pathological post-translational modification of Aβ. These results suggest that, in neuronal cells, Aβ-Al can induce relevant detrimental changes that resemble pathological hallmarks of AD. PMID:23416043

  2. Ventilation-induced increases in EGFR ligand mRNA are not altered by intra-amniotic LPS or ureaplasma in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Noah H; Gisslen, Tate; Polglase, Graeme R; Kallapur, Suhas G; Jobe, Alan H

    2014-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis and mechanical ventilation are associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preterm infants. Mechanical ventilation at birth activates both inflammatory and acute phase responses. These responses can be partially modulated by previous exposure to intra-amniotic (IA) LPS or Ureaplasma parvum (UP). Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands participate in lung development, and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) 1 and ACE2 contribute to lung inflammation. We asked whether brief mechanical ventilation at birth altered EGFR and ACE pathways and if antenatal exposure to IA LPS or UP could modulate these effects. Ewes were exposed to IA injections of UP, LPS or saline multiple days prior to preterm delivery at 85% gestation. Lambs were either immediately euthanized or mechanically ventilated for 2 to 3 hr. IA UP and LPS cause modest changes in the EGFR ligands amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), heparin binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF), and betacellulin (BTC) mRNA expression. Mechanical ventilation greatly increased mRNA expression of AREG, EREG, and HB-EGF, with no additional increases resulting from IA LPS or UP. With ventilation AREG and EREG mRNA localized to cells in terminal airspace. EGFR mRNA also increased with mechanical ventilation. IA UP and LPS decreased ACE1 mRNA and increased ACE2 mRNA, resulting in a 4 fold change in the ACE1/ACE2 ratio. Mechanical ventilation with large tidal volumes increased both ACE1 and ACE2 expression. The alterations seen in ACE with IA exposures and EGFR pathways with mechanical ventilation may contribute to the development of BPD in preterm infants. PMID:24788984

  3. Stabilization of Oncostatin-M mRNA by Binding of Nucleolin to a GC-Rich Element in Its 3'UTR.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sucharita; Chakraborty, Alina; Bandyopadhyay, Sumita Sengupta

    2016-04-01

    Oncostatin-M (OSM) is a patho-physiologically important pleiotropic, multifunctional cytokine. OSM mRNA sequence analysis revealed that its 3'UTR contains three highly conserved GC-rich cis-elements (GCREs) whose role in mRNA stability is unidentified. In the present study, the functional role of the proximal GC-rich region of osm 3'-UTR (GCRE-1) in post-transcriptional regulation of osm expression in U937 cells was assessed by transfecting construct containing GCRE-1 at 3'-end of a fairly stable reporter gene followed by analysis of the expression of the reporter. GCRE-1 showed mRNA destabilizing activity; however, upon PMA treatment the reporter message containing GCRE-1 was stabilized. This stabilization is owing to a time-dependent progressive binding of trans-factors (at least five proteins) to GCRE-1 post-PMA treatment. Nucleolin was identified as one of the proteins in the RNP complex of GCRE-1 with PMA-treated U937 cytosolic extracts by oligo-dT affinity chromatography of poly-adenylated GCRE-1. Immuno-blot revealed time-dependent enhancement of nucleolin in the cytoplasm which in turn directly binds GCRE-1. RNA co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the GCRE-1-nucleolin interaction in vivo. To elucidate the functional role of nucleolin in stabilization of osm mRNA, nucleolin was overexpressed in U937 cells and found to stabilize the intrinsic osm mRNA, where co-transfection with the reporter containing GCRE-1 confirms the role of GCRE-1 in stabilization of the reporter mRNA. Thus, in conclusion, the results asserted that PMA treatment in U937 cells leads to cytoplasmic translocation of nucleolin that directly binds GCRE-1, one of the major GC-rich instability elements, thereby stabilizing the osm mRNA. PMID:26399567

  4. The requirement of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 in regulation of hypoxia-inducing factor-1α mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongyun; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Min; Gao, Guangxun; Zuo, Zhenghong; Yu, Yonghui; Zhu, Linda; Gao, Jimin; Huang, Chuanshu

    2012-10-01

    The mRNA of hif-1α is considered as being constitutively and ubiquitously expressed, regardless of the level of oxygen tension. However many recent reports have showed that hif-1α mRNA could be regulated by natural antisense transcripts, potential microRNAs, and low O(2). In this study, it was found that a deficiency of JNK2 expression reduced HIF-1α protein induction in response to nickel treatment resulting from the impaired expression of hif-1α mRNA. Both the promoter luciferase assay and mRNA degradation assay clearly showed that depletion of JNK2 affected stability of hif-1α mRNA, rather than regulated its transcription. In addition, nucleolin, a classic histone chaperone, was demonstrated to physically bind to hif-1α mRNA and maintain its stability. Further investigation indicated that JNK2 regulated nucleolin expression and might in turn stabilize hif-1α mRNA. Collectively, we provided one more piece of evidence for the oncogenic role of JNK2 and nucleolin in regulating the cancer microenvironments by controlling HIF-1α expression. PMID:22910906

  5. Modulation of Ergot Alkaloids in a Grass-Endophyte Symbiosis by Alteration of mRNA Concentrations of an Ergot Alkaloid Synthesis Gene.

    PubMed

    Mulinti, Prashanthi; Florea, Simona; Schardl, Christopher L; Panaccione, Daniel G

    2016-06-22

    The profile of ergot alkaloids in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) containing the endophytic fungus Epichloë typhina × festucae includes high concentrations of the early pathway metabolites ergotryptamine and chanoclavine-I in addition to the pathway end-product ergovaline. Because these alkaloids differ in activity, we investigated strategies to alter their relative concentrations. An RNAi-based approach reduced the concentration of mRNA from the gene easA, which encodes an enzyme required for a ring closure that separates ergotryptamine and chanoclavine-I from ergovaline. Lower easA mRNA concentrations correlated with lower concentrations of ergovaline and higher concentrations of ergotryptamine and chanoclavine-I. Overexpression of easA led to higher concentrations of ergovaline in leaf blades but not in pseudostems; concentrations of the early pathway metabolites were not altered in overexpression strains. The data indicate that altering the concentration of mRNA from a single gene can change alkaloid flux, but the magnitude of the change was limited and variable. PMID:27248330

  6. Human eosinophil activin A synthesis and mRNA stabilization are induced by the combination of IL-3 plus TNF.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Elizabeth A; Esnault, Stephane; Johnson, Sean H; Liu, Lin Ying; Malter, James S; Burnham, Mandy E; Jarjour, Nizar N

    2016-08-01

    Eosinophils contribute to immune regulation and wound healing/fibrosis in various diseases, including asthma. Growing appreciation for the role of activin A in such processes led us to hypothesize that eosinophils are a source of this transforming growth factor-ß superfamily member. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) induces activin A by other cell types and is often present at the site of allergic inflammation along with the eosinophil-activating common ß (ßc) chain-signaling cytokines (interleukin (IL)-5, IL-3, granulocyte-macrophages colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)). Previously, we established that the combination of TNF plus a ßc chain-signaling cytokine synergistically induces eosinophil synthesis of the remodeling enzyme matrix metalloproteinase-9. Therefore, eosinophils were stimulated ex vivo by these cytokines and in vivo through an allergen-induced airway inflammatory response. In contrast to IL-5+TNF or GM-CSF+TNF, the combination of IL-3+TNF synergistically induced activin A synthesis and release by human blood eosinophils. IL-3+TNF enhanced activin A mRNA stability, which required sustained signaling of pathways downstream of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase mitogen-activated protein kinases. In vivo, following segmental airway allergen challenge of subjects with mild allergic asthma, activin A mRNA was upregulated in airway eosinophils compared with circulating eosinophils, and ex vivo, circulating eosinophils tended to release more activin A in response to IL-3+TNF. These data provide evidence that eosinophils release activin A and that this function is enhanced when eosinophils are present in an allergen-induced inflammatory environment. Moreover, these data provide the first evidence for posttranscriptional control of activin A mRNA. We propose that an environment rich in IL-3+TNF will lead to eosinophil-derived activin A, which has an important role in regulating inflammation and/or fibrosis. PMID:27001469

  7. LACK OF FUNCTIONAL GABAB RECEPTORS ALTERS Kiss1, Gnrh1 AND Gad1 mRNA EXPRESSION IN THE MEDIAL BASAL HYPOTHALAMUS AT POSTNATAL DAY 4

    PubMed Central

    Di Giorgio, Noelia P.; Catalano, Paolo N.; López, Paula V.; González, Betina; Semaan, Sheila J.; López, Gabriela C.; Kauffman, Alexander S.; Rulli, Susana B.; Somoza, Gustavo M.; Bettler, Bernhard; Libertun, Carlos; Lux-Lantos, Victoria A.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Adult mice lacking functional GABAB receptors (GABAB1KO) show altered Gnrh1 and Gad1 expressions in the preoptic area-anterior hypothalamus (POA-AH) and females display disruption of cyclicity and fertility. Here we addressed whether sexual differentiation of the brain and the proper wiring of the GnRH and kisspeptin systems were already disturbed in postnatal day 4 (PND4) GABAB1KO mice. Methods PND4 wild type (WT) and GABAB1KO mice of both sexes were sacrificed; tissues were collected to determine mRNA expression (qPCR), amino acids (HPLC), and hormones (RIA and/or IHC). Results GnRH neuron number (IHC) did not differ among groups in olfactory bulbs or OVLT-POA. Gnrh1 mRNA (qPCR) in POA-AH was similar among groups. Gnrh1 mRNA in medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) was similar in WTs but was increased in GABAB1KO females compared to GABAB1KO males. Hypothalamic GnRH (RIA) was sexually different in WTs (males > females) but this sex difference was lost in GABAB1KOs; the same pattern was observed when analyzing only the MBH, but not in the POA-AH. Arcuate nucleus Kiss1 mRNA (micropunch-qPCR) was higher in WT females than in WT males and GABAB1KO females. Gad1 mRNA in MBH was increased in GABAB1KO females compared to GABAB1KO males. Serum LH and gonadal estradiol content were also increased in GABAB1KOs. Conclusion We demonstrate that GABABRs participate in the sexual differentiation of the ARC/MBH, because sex differences in several reproductive genes, such as Gad1, Kiss1 and Gnrh1, are critically disturbed in GABAB1KO mice at PND4, probably altering the organization and development of neural circuits governing the reproductive axis. PMID:24080944

  8. Altered prefrontal cortical MARCKS and PPP1R9A mRNA expression in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Konopaske, Glenn T.; Subburaju, Sivan; Coyle, Joseph T.; Benes, Francine M.

    2015-01-01

    Background We previously observed dendritic spine loss in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) from schizophrenia and bipolar disorder subjects. In the current study, we sought to determine if the mRNA expression of genes known to regulate the actin cytoskeleton and spines correlated with spine loss. Methods Five candidate genes were identified using previously obtained microarray data from the DLPFC from schizophrenia and control subjects. The relative mRNA expression of the genes linked to dendritic spine growth and function, i.e. IGF1R, MARCKS, PPP1R9A, PTPRF, and ARHGEF2, were assessed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in the DLPFC from a second cohort including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and control subjects. Functional pathway analysis was conducted to determine which actin cytoskeleton-regulatory pathways the genes of interest interact with. Results MARCKS mRNA expression was increased in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder subjects. PPP1R9A mRNA expression was increased in bipolar disorder subjects. For IGF1R, mRNA expression did not differ significantly among groups; however, it did show a significant, negative correlation with dendrite length. MARCKS and PPP1R9A mRNA expression did not correlate with spine loss, but interact with NMDA receptor signaling pathways that regulate the actin cytoskeleton and spines. Conclusions MARCKS and PPP1R9A might contribute to spine loss in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder through their interactions, possibly indirect ones, with NMDA signaling pathways that regulate spine structure and function. PMID:25757715

  9. A Synonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in ΔF508 CFTR Alters the Secondary Structure of the mRNA and the Expression of the Mutant Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Bartoszewski, Rafal A.; Jablonsky, Michael; Bartoszewska, Sylwia; Stevenson, Lauren; Dai, Qun; Kappes, John; Collawn, James F.; Bebok, Zsuzsa

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of translational dynamics indicate that codon usage and mRNA secondary structure influence translation and protein folding. The most frequent cause of cystic fibrosis (CF) is the deletion of three nucleotides (CTT) from the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that includes the last cytosine (C) of isoleucine 507 (Ile507ATC) and the two thymidines (T) of phenylalanine 508 (Phe508TTT) codons. The consequences of the deletion are the loss of phenylalanine at the 508 position of the CFTR protein (ΔF508), a synonymous codon change for isoleucine 507 (Ile507ATT), and protein misfolding. Here we demonstrate that the ΔF508 mutation alters the secondary structure of the CFTR mRNA. Molecular modeling predicts and RNase assays support the presence of two enlarged single stranded loops in the ΔF508 CFTR mRNA in the vicinity of the mutation. The consequence of ΔF508 CFTR mRNA “misfolding” is decreased translational rate. A synonymous single nucleotide variant of the ΔF508 CFTR (Ile507ATC), that could exist naturally if Phe-508 was encoded by TTC, has wild type-like mRNA structure, and enhanced expression levels when compared with native ΔF508 CFTR. Because CFTR folding is predominantly cotranslational, changes in translational dynamics may promote ΔF508 CFTR misfolding. Therefore, we propose that mRNA “misfolding” contributes to ΔF508 CFTR protein misfolding and consequently to the severity of the human ΔF508 phenotype. Our studies suggest that in addition to modifier genes, SNPs may also contribute to the differences observed in the symptoms of various ΔF508 homozygous CF patients. PMID:20628052

  10. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1 globally alters mRNA and miRNA to enhance myoblast invasion

    PubMed Central

    Loupe, J M; Miller, P J; Bonner, B P; Maggi, E C; Vijayaraghavan, J; Crabtree, J S; Taylor, C M; Zabaleta, J; Hollenbach, A D

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma, one of the most common childhood sarcomas, is comprised of two main subtypes, embryonal and alveolar (ARMS). ARMS, the more aggressive subtype, is primarily characterized by the t(2;13)(p35;p14) chromosomal translocation, which fuses two transcription factors, PAX3 and FOXO1 to generate the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1. Patients with PAX3-FOXO1-postitive tumors have a poor prognosis, in part due to the enhanced local invasive capacity of these cells, which leads to the increased metastatic potential for this tumor. Despite this knowledge, little is known about the role that the oncogenic fusion protein has in this increased invasive potential. In this report we use large-scale comparative transcriptomic analyses in physiologically relevant primary myoblasts to demonstrate that the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 is sufficient to alter the expression of 70 mRNA and 27 miRNA in a manner predicted to promote cellular invasion. In contrast the expression of PAX3 alters 60 mRNA and 23 miRNA in a manner predicted to inhibit invasion. We demonstrate that these alterations in mRNA and miRNA translate into changes in the invasive potential of primary myoblasts with PAX3-FOXO1 increasing invasion nearly 2-fold while PAX3 decreases invasion nearly 4-fold. Taken together, these results allow us to build off of previous reports and develop a more expansive molecular model by which the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 alters global gene regulatory networks to enhance the local invasiveness of cells. Further, the global nature of our observed changes highlights the fact that instead of focusing on a single-gene target, we must develop multi-faceted treatment regimens targeting multiple genes of a single oncogenic phenotype or multiple genes that target different oncogenic phenotypes for tumor progression. PMID:27454080

  11. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1 globally alters mRNA and miRNA to enhance myoblast invasion.

    PubMed

    Loupe, J M; Miller, P J; Bonner, B P; Maggi, E C; Vijayaraghavan, J; Crabtree, J S; Taylor, C M; Zabaleta, J; Hollenbach, A D

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma, one of the most common childhood sarcomas, is comprised of two main subtypes, embryonal and alveolar (ARMS). ARMS, the more aggressive subtype, is primarily characterized by the t(2;13)(p35;p14) chromosomal translocation, which fuses two transcription factors, PAX3 and FOXO1 to generate the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1. Patients with PAX3-FOXO1-postitive tumors have a poor prognosis, in part due to the enhanced local invasive capacity of these cells, which leads to the increased metastatic potential for this tumor. Despite this knowledge, little is known about the role that the oncogenic fusion protein has in this increased invasive potential. In this report we use large-scale comparative transcriptomic analyses in physiologically relevant primary myoblasts to demonstrate that the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 is sufficient to alter the expression of 70 mRNA and 27 miRNA in a manner predicted to promote cellular invasion. In contrast the expression of PAX3 alters 60 mRNA and 23 miRNA in a manner predicted to inhibit invasion. We demonstrate that these alterations in mRNA and miRNA translate into changes in the invasive potential of primary myoblasts with PAX3-FOXO1 increasing invasion nearly 2-fold while PAX3 decreases invasion nearly 4-fold. Taken together, these results allow us to build off of previous reports and develop a more expansive molecular model by which the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 alters global gene regulatory networks to enhance the local invasiveness of cells. Further, the global nature of our observed changes highlights the fact that instead of focusing on a single-gene target, we must develop multi-faceted treatment regimens targeting multiple genes of a single oncogenic phenotype or multiple genes that target different oncogenic phenotypes for tumor progression. PMID:27454080

  12. Dysregulation of the Axonal Trafficking of Nuclear-encoded Mitochondrial mRNA alters Neuronal Mitochondrial Activity and Mouse Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Amar N.; Sun, Ching-Yu; Reichard, Kathryn; Gervasi, Noreen M.; Pickel, James; Nakazawa, Kazu; Gioio, Anthony E.; Kaplan, Barry B.

    2014-01-01

    Local translation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs is essential for mitochondrial activity, yet there is little insight into the role that axonal trafficking of these transcripts play in neuronal function and behavior. Previously, we identified a 38 nucleotide stem-loop structure (zipcode) in the 3′ untranslated region of the Cytochrome C oxidase IV (COXIV) mRNA that directs the transport of a reporter mRNA to the axon of superior cervical ganglion neurons (SCG). Over-expression of a chimeric reporter mRNA with the COXIV zipcode competed with the axonal trafficking of endogenous COXIV mRNA, and led to attenuated axon growth in SCG neurons. Here, we show that exogenous expression of the COXIV zipcode in cultured SCG neurons also results in the reduction of local ATP levels and increases levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the axon. We took advantage of this “competition” phenotype to investigate the in vivo significance of axonal transport of COXIV mRNA. Towards this end, we generated transgenic mice expressing a fluorescent reporter fused to COXIV zipcode under a forebrain-specific promoter. Immunohistological analyses and RT-PCR analyses of RNA from the transgenic mouse brain showed expression of the reporter in the deep layer neurons in the pre-frontal and frontal cortex. Consistent with the in vitro studies, we observed increased ROS levels in neurons of these transgenic animals. A battery of behavioral tests on transgenic mice expressing the COXIV zipcode revealed an “anxiety-like” behavioral phenotype, suggesting an important role for axonal trafficking of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs in neuronal physiology and animal behavior. PMID:24151253

  13. Stability of maternal mRNA in Xenopus embryos: role of transcription and translation.

    PubMed Central

    Duval, C; Bouvet, P; Omilli, F; Roghi, C; Dorel, C; LeGuellec, R; Paris, J; Osborne, H B

    1990-01-01

    The first 12 cell divisions of Xenopus laevis embryos do not require gene transcription. This means that the regulation of gene expression during this period is controlled at post transcriptional levels and makes Xenopus early development a potentially interesting biological system with which to study the mechanisms involved. We describe here the stability characteristics of several maternal Xenopus mRNAs which are deadenylated soon after fertilisation (J. Paris and M. Philippe, Dev. Biol., in press). We show that these mRNAs were only degraded in the embryo after the midblastula transition (MBT), when gene transcription was initiated. The kinetics with which the deadenylated maternal mRNAs decreased in the post-MBT embryos showed sequence specificity. The degradation of these mRNAs after the MBT was inhibited by cycloheximide but was not affected by dactinomycin. Therefore, the destabilization of these mRNAs does not appear to be initiated by new embryonic gene transcripts. Sequence comparisons of the 3' untranslated region of these mRNAs identified several motifs which may be involved in the posttranscriptional control of these gene products. Images PMID:1695321

  14. Linear stability analysis for hydrothermal alteration of kimberlitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey; Belyaeva, Ekaterina

    2016-06-01

    The influx of groundwater into hot kimberlite deposits results in the reaction of water with olivine-rich rocks. The products of the reaction are serpentine and release of latent heat. The rise of temperature due to the heat release increases the rate of the reaction. Under certain conditions, this self-speeding up of the reaction can result in instabilities associated with a significantly higher final serpentinization in slightly warmer regions of the kimberlite deposit. We conduct linear stability analysis of serpentinization in an isolated volume of porous kimberlitic rocks saturated with water and an inert gas. There is a counteracting interplay between the heat release tending to destabilize the uniform distribution of parameters and the heat conduction tending to stabilize it by smoothing out temperature perturbations. We determine the critical spatial scale separating the parameters where one phenomenon dominates over another. The perturbations of longer-than-critical length grow, whereas the perturbations of shorter-than-critical length fade. The analytical results of the linear stability analysis are supported by direct numerical simulations using a full nonlinear model.

  15. Integration of mRNA expression profile, copy number alterations, and microRNA expression levels in breast cancer to improve grade definition.

    PubMed

    Cava, Claudia; Bertoli, Gloria; Ripamonti, Marilena; Mauri, Giancarlo; Zoppis, Italo; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Castiglioni, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Defining the aggressiveness and growth rate of a malignant cell population is a key step in the clinical approach to treating tumor disease. The correct grading of breast cancer (BC) is a fundamental part in determining the appropriate treatment. Biological variables can make it difficult to elucidate the mechanisms underlying BC development. To identify potential markers that can be used for BC classification, we analyzed mRNAs expression profiles, gene copy numbers, microRNAs expression and their association with tumor grade in BC microarray-derived datasets. From mRNA expression results, we found that grade 2 BC is most likely a mixture of grade 1 and grade 3 that have been misclassified, being described by the gene signature of either grade 1 or grade 3. We assessed the potential of the new approach of integrating mRNA expression profile, copy number alterations, and microRNA expression levels to select a limited number of genomic BC biomarkers. The combination of mRNA profile analysis and copy number data with microRNA expression levels led to the identification of two gene signatures of 42 and 4 altered genes (FOXM1, KPNA4, H2AFV and DDX19A) respectively, the latter obtained through a meta-analytical procedure. The 42-based gene signature identifies 4 classes of up- or down-regulated microRNAs (17 microRNAs) and of their 17 target mRNA, and the 4-based genes signature identified 4 microRNAs (Hsa-miR-320d, Hsa-miR-139-5p, Hsa-miR-567 and Hsa-let-7c). These results are discussed from a biological point of view with respect to pathological features of BC. Our identified mRNAs and microRNAs were validated as prognostic factors of BC disease progression, and could potentially facilitate the implementation of assays for laboratory validation, due to their reduced number. PMID:24866763

  16. Tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate and triethyl phosphate alter embryonic development, hepatic mRNA expression, thyroid hormone levels, and circulating bile acid concentrations in chicken embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Egloff, Caroline; Crump, Doug; Porter, Emily; Williams, Kim L.; Letcher, Robert J.; Gauthier, Lewis T.; Kennedy, Sean W.

    2014-09-15

    The organophosphate flame retardants tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) and triethyl phosphate (TEP) are used in a wide range of applications to suppress or delay the ignition and spread of fire. Both compounds have been detected in the environment and TBOEP was recently measured in free-living avian species. In this study, TBOEP and TEP were injected into the air cell of chicken embryos at concentrations ranging from 0 to 45,400 ng/g and 0 to 241,500 ng/g egg, respectively. Pipping success, development, hepatic mRNA expression of 9 target genes, thyroid hormone levels, and circulating bile acid concentrations were determined. Exposure to the highest doses of TBOEP and TEP resulted in negligible detection of the parent compounds in embryonic contents at pipping indicating their complete metabolic degradation. TBOEP exposure had limited effects on chicken embryos, with the exception of hepatic CYP3A37 mRNA induction. TEP exposure decreased pipping success to 68%, altered growth, increased liver somatic index (LSI) and plasma bile acids, and modulated genes associated with xenobiotic and lipid metabolism and the thyroid hormone pathway. Plasma thyroxine levels were decreased at all TEP doses, including an environmentally-relevant concentration (8 ng/g), and gallbladder hypotrophy was evident at ≥ 43,200 ng/g. Tarsus length and circulating thyroxine concentration emerged as potential phenotypic anchors for the modulation of transthyretin mRNA. The increase in plasma bile acids and LSI, gallbladder hypotrophy, and discoloration of liver tissue represented potential phenotypic outcomes associated with modulation of hepatic genes involved with xenobiotic and lipid metabolism. - Highlights: • TBOEP is not embryolethal to chicken embryos. • TEP affected embryonic viability, morphometric endpoints, and thyroid hormone levels. • TEP altered mRNA levels of xenobiotic and lipid metabolism genes. • TEP increased plasma bile acids and caused gallbladder hypotrophy

  17. Hypoxia increases rate of transcription and stability of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Furnari, B A; Lawson, E E; Millhorn, D E

    1994-01-01

    Reduced arterial oxygen tension (i.e. hypoxia) is a powerful physiological stimulus that induces synthesis and release of dopamine from O2-sensitive (type I) cells in the mammalian carotid bodies. We reported recently that hypoxia stimulates gene expression for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine synthesis in type I cells of the carotid body. Efforts to identify the mechanisms regulating TH gene expression in O2-sensitive cells during hypoxia have been hampered by the lack of an appropriate model cell culture system. Here we report that TH gene expression in the rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12) is regulated during hypoxia in a manner similar to that measured in carotid body type I cells. PC12 cells might therefore be useful as an experimental model for identifying the molecular mechanisms that regulate TH gene expression during hypoxia. Nuclear runoff assays revealed that transcription of the wild type TH gene was enhanced during exposures to hypoxia lasting 12 h. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays with constructs that contained different fragments of TH promoter revealed that the regulatory sequences that mediate the hypoxia-induced increase in transcription are located between bases -272 and +27 of the TH gene. Findings from experiments in which transcription was inhibited either with actinomycin D or 5,6-dichloro-1-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, as well as pulse-chase experiments using 4-thiouridine showed that the half-life of TH mRNA was substantially increased during hypoxia. Thus, in the present paper we show that TH gene expression in PC12 cells during hypoxia is regulated by increases in both the rate of TH gene transcription and TH mRNA stability. PMID:7903970

  18. Differential regulation of mRNA stability controls the transient expression of genes encoding Drosophila antimicrobial peptide with distinct immune response characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Youheng; Xiao, Qianghai; Zhang, Ting; Mou, Zongchun; You, Jia; Ma, Wei-Jun

    2009-01-01

    The tight regulation of transiently expressed antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with a distinct antimicrobial spectrum and different expression kinetics contributes greatly to the properly regulated immune response for resistance to pathogens and for the maintenance of mutualistic microbiota in Drosophila. The important role of differential regulation of AMP expression at the posttranscriptional level needs to be elucidated. It was observed that the highly expressed Cecropin A1 (CecA1) mRNA encoding a broad antimicrobial spectrum AMP against both bacteria and fungi decayed more quickly than did the moderately expressed Diptericin mRNA encoding AMP against Gram negative bacteria. The mRNA stability of AMPs is differentially regulated and is attributed to the specific interaction between cis-acting ARE in 3′-UTR of AMP mRNA and the RNA destabilizing protein transactor Tis11 as shown in co-immunoprecipitation of the Tis11 RNP complex with CecA1 mRNA but not other AMP mRNA. The p38MAPK was further demonstrated to play a crucial role in stabilizing ARE-bearing mRNAs by inhibiting Tis11-mediated degradation in LPS induced AMP expression. This evidence suggests an evolutionarily conserved and functionally important molecular basis for and effective approach to exact control of AMP gene expression. These mechanisms thereby orchestrate a well balanced and dynamic antimicrobial spectrum of innate immunity to resist infection and maintain resident microbiota properly. PMID:19726583

  19. Differential regulation of mRNA stability controls the transient expression of genes encoding Drosophila antimicrobial peptide with distinct immune response characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wei, Youheng; Xiao, Qianghai; Zhang, Ting; Mou, Zongchun; You, Jia; Ma, Wei-Jun

    2009-10-01

    The tight regulation of transiently expressed antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with a distinct antimicrobial spectrum and different expression kinetics contributes greatly to the properly regulated immune response for resistance to pathogens and for the maintenance of mutualistic microbiota in Drosophila. The important role of differential regulation of AMP expression at the posttranscriptional level needs to be elucidated. It was observed that the highly expressed Cecropin A1 (CecA1) mRNA encoding a broad antimicrobial spectrum AMP against both bacteria and fungi decayed more quickly than did the moderately expressed Diptericin mRNA encoding AMP against Gram negative bacteria. The mRNA stability of AMPs is differentially regulated and is attributed to the specific interaction between cis-acting ARE in 3'-UTR of AMP mRNA and the RNA destabilizing protein transactor Tis11 as shown in co-immunoprecipitation of the Tis11 RNP complex with CecA1 mRNA but not other AMP mRNA. The p38MAPK was further demonstrated to play a crucial role in stabilizing ARE-bearing mRNAs by inhibiting Tis11-mediated degradation in LPS induced AMP expression. This evidence suggests an evolutionarily conserved and functionally important molecular basis for and effective approach to exact control of AMP gene expression. These mechanisms thereby orchestrate a well balanced and dynamic antimicrobial spectrum of innate immunity to resist infection and maintain resident microbiota properly. PMID:19726583

  20. Epithelial remodeling and claudin mRNA abundance in the gill and kidney of puffer fish (Tetraodon biocellatus) acclimated to altered environmental ion levels.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Nicole M; Bui, Phuong; Bagherie-Lachidan, Mazdak; Kelly, Scott P

    2011-02-01

    In water of varying ion content, the gills and kidney of fishes contribute significantly to the maintenance of salt and water balance. However, little is known about the molecular architecture of the tight junction (TJ) complex and the regulation of paracellular permeability characteristics in these tissues. In the current studies, puffer fish (Tetraodon biocellatus) were acclimated to freshwater (FW), seawater (SW) or ion-poor freshwater (IPW) conditions. Following acclimation, alterations in systemic endpoints of hydromineral status were examined in conjunction with changes in gill and kidney epithelia morphology/morphometrics, as well as claudin TJ protein mRNA abundance. T. biocellatus were able to maintain endpoints of hydromineral status within relatively tight limits across the broad range of water ion content examined. Both gill and kidney tissue exhibited substantial alterations in morphology as well as claudin TJ protein mRNA abundance. These responses were particularly pronounced when comparing fish acclimated to SW versus those acclimated to IPW. TEM observations of IPW-acclimated fish gills revealed the presence of cells that exhibited the typical characteristics of gill mitochondria-rich cells (e.g. voluminous, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-immunoreactive, exposed to the external environment at the apical surface), but were not mitochondria-rich. To our knowledge, this type of cell has not previously been described in hyperosmoregulating fish gills. Furthermore, modifications in the morphometrics and claudin mRNA abundance of kidney tissue support the notion that spatial alterations in claudin TJ proteins along the nephron of fishes will likely play an important role in the regulation of salt and water balance in these organisms. PMID:20976602

  1. Cholesterol Side-Chain Cleavage Gene Expression in Theca Cells: Augmented Transcriptional Regulation and mRNA Stability in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nelson-DeGrave, Velen L.; Legro, Richard S.; Strauss, Jerome F.; McAllister, Jan M.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperandrogenism is characteristic of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Ovarian theca cells isolated from PCOS follicles and maintained in long-term culture produce elevated levels of progestins and androgens compared to normal theca cells. Augmented steroid production in PCOS theca cells is associated with changes in the expression of genes for several steroidogenic enzymes, including CYP11A1, which encodes cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage. Here, we further examined CYP11A1 gene expression, at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level in normal and PCOS theca cells propagated in long-term culture utilizing quantitative RT-PCR, functional promoter analyses, and mRNA degradation studies. The minimal element(s) that conferred increased basal and cAMP-dependent CYP11A1 promoter function were determined. CYP11A1 mRNA half-life in normal and PCOS theca cells was compared. Results of these cumulative studies showed that basal and forskolin stimulated steady state CYP11A1 mRNA abundance and CYP11A1 promoter activity were increased in PCOS theca cells. Deletion analysis of the CYP11A1 promoter demonstrated that augmented promoter function in PCOS theca cells results from increased basal regulation conferred by a minimal sequence between −160 and −90 bp of the transcriptional start site. The transcription factor, nuclear factor 1C2, was observed to regulate basal activity of this minimal CYP11A1 element. Examination of mRNA stability in normal and PCOS theca cells demonstrated that CYP11A1 mRNA half-life increased >2-fold, from approximately 9.22+/−1.62 h in normal cells, to 22.38+/−0.92 h in PCOS cells. Forskolin treatment did not prolong CYP11A1 mRNA stability in either normal or PCOS theca cells. The 5′-UTR of CYP11A1 mRNA confers increased basal mRNA stability in PCOS cells. In conclusion, these studies show that elevated steady state CYP11A1 mRNA abundance in PCOS cells results from increased transactivation of the CYP

  2. The tRNA methyltransferase NSun2 stabilizes p16INK4 mRNA by methylating the 3′-untranslated region of p16

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Liu, Zhenyun; Yi, Jie; Tang, Hao; Xing, Junyue; Yu, Minqwei; Tong, Tanjun; Shang, Yongfeng; Gorospe, Myriam; Wang, Wengong

    2012-01-01

    The impact of methylation of the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of a messenger RNA (mRNA) remains largely unknown. Here we show that NSun2, a transfer RNA methyltransferase, inhibits the turnover of p16INK4 mRNA. Knockdown of NSun2 reduces p16 expression by shortening the half-life of the p16 mRNA, while overexpression of NSun2 stabilizes the p16 mRNA. In vitro methylation assays show that NSun2 methylates the p16 3′UTR at A988. Knockdown of NSun2 reduces the stability of the EGFP-p16 chimeric reporter transcripts bearing wild-type p16 3′UTR, but not p16 3′UTR with a mutant methylation site. Methylation by NSun2 prevents the association of p16 3′UTR with HuR, AUF1 and Ago2/RISC, and prevents the recruitment of EGFP-p16 3′UTR chimeric transcripts to processing bodies. In response to oxidative stress, NSun2 is essential for elevating p16 expression levels. We conclude that NSun2-mediated methylation of the p16 3′UTR is a novel mechanism to stabilize p16 mRNA. PMID:22395603

  3. Kaposin-B Enhances the PROX1 mRNA Stability during Lymphatic Reprogramming of Vascular Endothelial Cells by Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpes Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jaehyuk; Kang, Jinjoo; Lee, Ha Neul; Aguilar, Berenice; Kafka, Darren; Lee, Sunju; Choi, Inho; Lee, Juneyong; Ramu, Swapnika; Haas, Juergen; Koh, Chester J.; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most common cancer among HIV-positive patients. Histogenetic origin of KS has long been elusive due to a mixed expression of both blood and lymphatic endothelial markers in KS tumor cells. However, we and others discovered that Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) induces lymphatic reprogramming of blood vascular endothelial cells by upregulating PROX1, which functions as the master regulator for lymphatic endothelial differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that the KSHV latent gene kaposin-B enhances the PROX1 mRNA stability and plays an important role in KSHV-mediated PROX1 upregulation. We found that PROX1 mRNA contains a canonical AU-rich element (ARE) in its 3′-untranslated region that promotes PROX1 mRNA turnover and that kaposin-B stimulates cytoplasmic accumulation of the ARE-binding protein HuR through activation of the p38/MK2 pathway. Moreover, HuR binds to and stabilizes PROX1 mRNA through its ARE and is necessary for KSHV-mediated PROX1 mRNA stabilization. Together, our study demonstrates that kaposin-B plays a key role in PROX1 upregulation during lymphatic reprogramming of blood vascular endothelial cells by KSHV. PMID:20730087

  4. Regulation of c-myc mRNA stability in vitro by a labile destabilizer with an essential nucleic acid component.

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, G; Ross, J

    1989-01-01

    The turnover rates of some mRNAs vary by an order of magnitude or more when cells change their growth pattern or differentiate. To identify regulatory factors that might be responsible for this variability, we investigated how cytosolic fractions affect mRNA decay in an in vitro system. A 130,000 X g supernatant (S130) from the cytosol of exponentially growing erythroleukemia cells contains a destabilizer that accelerates the decay of polysome-bound c-myc mRNA by eightfold or more compared with reactions lacking S130. The destabilizer is deficient in or absent from the S130 of cycloheximide-treated cells, indicating that it is labile or is repressed when translation is blocked. It is not a generic RNase, because it does not affect the turnover of delta-globin, gamma-globin, or histone mRNA and does not destabilize a major portion of polysomal polyadenylated mRNA. The destabilizer accelerates the turnover of the c-myc mRNA 3' region, as well as subsequent 3'-to-5' degradation of the mRNA body. It is inactivated in vitro by mild heating and by micrococcal nuclease, suggesting that it contains a nucleic acid component. c-myb mRNA is also destabilized in S130-supplemented in vitro reactions. These results imply that the stability of some mRNAs is regulated by cytosolic factors that are not associated with polysomes. Images PMID:2747642

  5. Linear stability analysis for hydrothermal alteration of kimberlitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey; Belyaeva, Ekaterina

    2016-04-01

    The influx of groundwater into hot kimberlite deposits results in the reaction of water with olivine-rich rocks. The products of the reaction are serpentine and release of latent heat. The rise of temperature due to the heat release increases the rate of the reaction. Under certain conditions, this self-speeding up of the reaction can result in instabilities associated with a significantly higher final serpentinisation in slightly warmer regions of the kimberlite deposit. We conduct linear stability analysis of serpentinisation in an isolated volume of porous kimberlitic rocks saturated with water and an inert gas. There is a counteracting interplay between the heat release tending to destabilise the uniform distribution of parameters and the heat conduction tending to stabilise it by smoothing out temperature perturbations. We determine the critical spatial scale separating the parameters where one phenomenon dominates over another. The perturbations of longer-than-critical length grow, whereas the perturbations of shorter-than-critical length fade. The analytical results of the linear stability analysis are supported by direct numerical simulations using a full nonlinear model. Keywords: Hydrothermal systems, volcaniclastic deposits, phase transitions, instability analysis, numerical solutions

  6. miR-195 competes with HuR to modulate stim1 mRNA stability and regulate cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Ran; Rao, Jaladanki N; Zou, Tongtong; Liu, Lan; Xiao, Lan; Cao, Shan; Hansraj, Natasha Z; Gorospe, Myriam; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2013-09-01

    Stromal interaction molecule 1 (Stim1) functions as a sensor of Ca2+ within stores and plays an essential role in the activation of store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE). Although lowering Stim1 levels reduces store-operated Ca2+ entry and inhibits intestinal epithelial repair after wounding, the mechanisms that control Stim1 expression remain unknown. Here, we show that cellular Stim1 abundance is controlled posttranscriptionally via factors that associate with 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of stim1 mRNA. MicroRNA-195 (miR-195) and the RNA-binding protein HuR competed for association with the stim1 3'-UTR and regulated stim1 mRNA decay in opposite directions. Interaction of miR-195 with the stim1 3'-UTR destabilized stim1 mRNA, whereas the stability of stim1 mRNA increased with HuR association. Interestingly, ectopic miR-195 overexpression enhanced stim1 mRNA association with argonaute-containing complexes and increased the colocalization of tagged stim1 RNA with processing bodies (P-bodies); the translocation of stim1 mRNA was abolished by HuR overexpression. Moreover, decreased levels of Stim1 by miR-195 overexpression inhibited cell migration over the denuded area after wounding but was rescued by increasing HuR levels. In sum, Stim1 expression is controlled by two factors competing for influence on stim1 mRNA stability: the mRNA-stabilizing protein HuR and the decay-promoting miR-195. PMID:23804758

  7. Non-Invasive Analysis of Recombinant mRNA Stability in Escherichia coli by a Combination of Transcriptional Inducer Wash-Out and qRT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kucharova, Veronika; Strand, Trine Aakvik; Almaas, Eivind; Naas, Adrian E.; Brautaset, Trygve; Valla, Svein

    2013-01-01

    mRNA stability is one among many parameters that can potentially affect the level of recombinant gene expression in bacteria. Blocking of the entire prokaryotic transcription machinery by addition of rifampicin is commonly used in protocols for analysis of mRNA stability. Here we show that such treatment can be effectively replaced by a simple, non-invasive method based on removal of the relevant transcriptional inducers and that the mRNA decay can then be followed by qRT-PCR. To establish the methodology we first used the m-toluate-inducible XylS/Pm expression cassette as a model system and analyzed several examples of DNA modifications causing gene expression stimulation in Escherichia coli. The new method allowed us to clearly discriminate whether an improvement in mRNA stability contributes to observed increases in transcript amounts for each individual case. To support the experimental data a simple mathematical fitting model was developed to calculate relative decay rates. We extended the relevance of the method by demonstrating its application also for an IPTG-inducible expression cassette (LacI/Ptac) and by analyzing features of the bacteriophage T7-based expression system. The results suggest that the methodology is useful in elucidating factors controlling mRNA stability as well as other specific features of inducible expression systems. Moreover, as expression systems based on diffusible inducers are almost universally available, the concept can be most likely used to measure mRNA decay for any gene in any cell type that is heavily used in molecular biology research. PMID:23840466

  8. miR-143 decreases COX-2 mRNA stability and expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Hung; Ekaterina Rodriguez, C.; Donald, Graham W.; Hertzer, Kathleen M.; Jung, Xiaoman S.; Chang, Hui-Hua; Moro, Aune; Reber, Howard A.; Hines, O. Joe; Eibl, Guido

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •Pancreatic cancer cells express low miR-143 levels and elevated p-MEK, p-MAPK and RREB1. •MEK inhibitors U0126 and PD98059 increase miR-143 expression. •miR-143 decreases COX-2 mRNA stability and expression and PGE{sub 2}. •miR-143 decreases p-p38MAPK, p-MEK, p-MAPK and RREB1 expression. -- Abstract: Small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNA), inhibit the translation or accelerate the degradation of message RNA (mRNA) by targeting the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) in regulating growth and survival through gene suppression. Deregulated miRNA expression contributes to disease progression in several cancers types, including pancreatic cancers (PaCa). PaCa tissues and cells exhibit decreased miRNA, elevated cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and increased prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) resulting in increased cancer growth and metastases. Human PaCa cell lines were used to demonstrate that restoration of miRNA-143 (miR-143) regulates COX-2 and inhibits cell proliferation. miR-143 were detected at fold levels of 0.41 ± 0.06 in AsPC-1, 0.20 ± 0.05 in Capan-2 and 0.10 ± 0.02 in MIA PaCa-2. miR-143 was not detected in BxPC-3, HPAF-II and Panc-1 which correlated with elevated mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) and MAPK kinase (MEK) activation. Treatment with 10 μM of MEK inhibitor U0126 or PD98059 increased miR-143, respectively, by 187 ± 18 and 152 ± 26-fold in BxPC-3 and 182 ± 7 and 136 ± 9-fold in HPAF-II. miR-143 transfection diminished COX-2 mRNA stability at 60 min by 2.6 ± 0.3-fold in BxPC-3 and 2.5 ± 0.2-fold in HPAF-II. COX-2 expression and cellular proliferation in BxPC-3 and HPAF-II inversely correlated with increasing miR-143. PGE{sub 2} levels decreased by 39.3 ± 5.0% in BxPC-3 and 48.0 ± 3.0% in HPAF-II transfected with miR-143. Restoration of miR-143 in PaCa cells suppressed of COX-2, PGE{sub 2}, cellular proliferation and MEK/MAPK activation, implicating this pathway in regulating miR-143 expression.

  9. Altered mRNA expression of hepatic lipogenic enzyme and PPARalpha in rats fed dietary levan from Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soon Ah; Hong, Kyunghee; Jang, Ki-Hyo; Kim, Yun-Young; Choue, Ryowon; Lim, Yoongho

    2006-06-01

    Levan or high molecular beta-2,6-linked fructose polymer is produced extracellularly from sucrose-based substrates by bacterial levansucrase. In the present study, to investigate the effect of levan feeding on serum leptin, hepatic lipogenic enzyme and peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha expression in high-fat diet-induced obese rats, 4-week-old Sprague-Dawley male rats were fed high-fat diet (beef tallow, 40% of calories as fat), and, 6 weeks later, the rats were fed 0%, 1%, 5% or 10% levan-supplemented diets for 4 weeks. Serum leptin and insulin level were dose dependently reduced in levan-supplemented diet-fed rats. The mRNA expressions of hepatic fatty acid synthase and acetyl CoA carboxylase, which are the key enzymes in fatty acid synthesis, were down-regulated by dietary levan. However, dietary levan did not affect the gene expression of hepatic malic enzyme, phosphatidate phosphohydrolase and HMG CoA reductase. Also, the lipogenic enzyme gene expression in the white adipose tissue (WAT) was not affected by the diet treatments. However, hepatic PPARalpha mRNA expression was dose dependently up-regulated by dietary levan, whereas PPARgamma in the WAT was not changed. The results suggest that the in vivo hypolipidemic effect of dietary levan, including anti-obesity and lipid-lowering, may result from the inhibition of lipogenesis and stimulation of lipolysis, accompanied with regulation of hepatic lipogenic enzyme and PPARalpha gene expression. PMID:16214330

  10. Identification of sequences within the murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNA 3'-untranslated region that mediate mRNA stabilization induced by mitogen treatment of EL-4 thymoma cells.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Y; Bickel, M; Pluznik, D H; Cohen, R B

    1991-09-25

    Phorbol esters (TPA) and concanavalin A (ConA) are known to induce granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production in murine thymoma EL-4 cells by mRNA stabilization. The role of the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) in GM-CSF mRNA stabilization induced by TPA and ConA in EL-4 cells was examined by transfection studies using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) constructions. The GM-CSF 3'-UTR contains a 63-nucleotide region at its 3' end with repeating ATTTA motifs which is responsible for mRNA degradation in a variety of cell types (Shaw, G., and Kamen, R. (1986) Cell 46, 659-666). We produced constructs containing most of the GM-CSF 3'-UTR (303 nucleotides, pRSV-CATgm) or the 3'-terminal AT-rich region (116 nucleotides, pRSV-CATau) and measured CAT enzyme activity and CAT mRNA after transient transfection into EL-4 and NIH 3T3 cells. Low levels of CAT activity were seen in both cells with either plasmid compared with levels of CAT activity obtained with pRSV-CAT. TPA treatment caused an approximately 10-fold increase in CAT activity and mRNA in EL-4 cells transfected with pRSV-CATgm. No increases were seen in EL-4 cells transfected with pRSV-CATau or pRSV-CAT. No response to TPA was detected in transfected NIH 3T3 cells, indicating that the response to TPA is relatively cell-specific. There was no increase in CAT activity after ConA treatment in EL-4 or NIH 3T3 cells transfected with any of the constructs suggesting that the GM-CSF 3'-UTR lacks elements that can respond alone to ConA. Nuclear run-on and actinomycin D chase experiments in EL-4 cells showed that TPA induces CAT activity via mRNA stabilization. By linker-substitution mutagenesis we show that TPA inducibility depends on a 60-nucleotide region of the 3'-UTR whose 5' end is located 160 nucleotides upstream of the 5' end of the AU-rich region. PMID:1917935

  11. Engineered Covalent Inactivation of TFIIH-Kinase Reveals an Elongation Checkpoint and Results in Widespread mRNA Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Molina, Juan B; Tseng, Sandra C; Simonett, Shane P; Taunton, Jack; Ansari, Aseem Z

    2016-08-01

    During transcription initiation, the TFIIH-kinase Kin28/Cdk7 marks RNA polymerase II (Pol II) by phosphorylating the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Here we describe a structure-guided chemical approach to covalently and specifically inactivate Kin28 kinase activity in vivo. This method of irreversible inactivation recapitulates both the lethal phenotype and the key molecular signatures that result from genetically disrupting Kin28 function in vivo. Inactivating Kin28 impacts promoter release to differing degrees and reveals a "checkpoint" during the transition to productive elongation. While promoter-proximal pausing is not observed in budding yeast, inhibition of Kin28 attenuates elongation-licensing signals, resulting in Pol II accumulation at the +2 nucleosome and reduced transition to productive elongation. Furthermore, upon inhibition, global stabilization of mRNA masks different degrees of reduction in nascent transcription. This study resolves long-standing controversies on the role of Kin28 in transcription and provides a rational approach to irreversibly inhibit other kinases in vivo. PMID:27477907

  12. The p38 MAPK Regulates IL-24 Expression by Stabilization of the 3′ UTR of IL-24 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Otkjaer, Kristian; Holtmann, Helmut; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Paludan, Søren Riis; Johansen, Claus; Gaestel, Matthias; Kragballe, Knud; Iversen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Background IL-24 (melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7 (mda-7)), a member of the IL-10 cytokine family, possesses the properties of a classical cytokine as well as tumor suppressor effects. The exact role of IL-24 in the immune system has not been defined but studies have indicated a role for IL-24 in inflammatory conditions such as psoriasis. The tumor suppressor effects of IL-24 include inhibition of angiogenesis, sensitization to chemotherapy, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated apoptosis. Current knowledge on the regulation of IL-24 expression is sparse. Previous studies have suggested that mRNA stabilization is of major importance to IL-24 expression. Yet, the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of IL-24 mRNA stability remain unidentified. As p38 MAPK is known to regulate gene expression by interfering with mRNA degradation we examined the role of p38 MAPK in the regulation of IL-24 gene expression in cultured normal human keratinocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study we show that anisomycin- and IL-1β- induced IL-24 expression is strongly dependent on p38 MAPK activation. Studies of IL-24 mRNA stability in anisomycin-treated keratinocytes reveal that the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB 202190 accelerates IL-24 mRNA decay suggesting p38 MAPK to regulate IL-24 expression by mRNA-stabilizing mechanisms. The insertion of the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of IL-24 mRNA in a tet-off reporter construct induces degradation of the reporter mRNA. The observed mRNA degradation is markedly reduced when a constitutively active mutant of MAPK kinase 6 (MKK6), which selectively activates p38 MAPK, is co-expressed. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, we here report p38 MAPK as a regulator of IL-24 expression and determine interference with destabilization mediated by the 3′ UTR of IL-24 mRNA as mode of action. As discussed in the present work these findings have important implications for our understanding of IL-24 as a

  13. 5, 8, 11, 14-eicosatetraynoic acid suppresses CCL2/MCP-1 expression in IFN-γ-stimulated astrocytes by increasing MAPK phosphatase-1 mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α activator, 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), is an arachidonic acid analog. It is reported to inhibit up-regulation of pro-inflammatory genes; however, its underlying mechanism of action is largely unknown. In the present study, we focused on the inhibitory action of ETYA on the expression of the chemokine, CCL2/MCP-1, which plays a key role in the initiation and progression of inflammation. Methods To determine the effect of ETYA, primary cultured rat astrocytes and microglia were stimulated with IFN-γ in the presence of ETYA and then, expression of CCL2/MCP-1 and MAPK phosphatase (MKP-1) were determined using RT-PCR and ELISA. MKP-1 mRNA stability was evaluated by treating actinomycin D. The effect of MKP-1 and human antigen R (HuR) was analyzed by using specific siRNA transfection system. The localization of HuR was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and subcellular fractionation experiment. Results We found that ETYA suppressed CCL2/MCP-1 transcription and secretion of CCL2/MCP-1 protein through up-regulation of MKP-1mRNA levels, resulting in suppression of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and activator protein 1 (AP1) activity in IFN-γ-stimulated brain glial cells. Moreover, these effects of ETYA were independent of PPAR-α. Experiments using actinomycin D revealed that the ETYA-induced increase in MKP-1 mRNA levels reflected an increase in transcript stability. Knockdown experiments using small interfering RNA demonstrated that this increase in MKP-1 mRNA stability depended on HuR, an RNA-binding protein known to promote enhanced mRNA stability. Furthermore, ETYA-induced, HuR-mediated mRNA stabilization resulted from HuR-MKP-1 nucleocytoplasmic translocation, which served to protect MKP-1 mRNA from the mRNA degradation machinery. Conclusion ETYA induces MKP-1 through HuR at the post-transcriptional level in a receptor-independent manner. The mechanism revealed here suggests

  14. p85α promotes nucleolin transcription and subsequently enhances EGFR mRNA stability and EGF-induced malignant cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qipeng; Guo, Xirui; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haishan; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-03-29

    p85α is a regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) that is a key lipid enzyme for generating phosphatidylinositol 3, 4, 5-trisphosphate, and subsequently activates signaling that ultimately regulates cell cycle progression, cell growth, cytoskeletal changes, and cell migration. In addition to form a complex with the p110 catalytic subunit, p85α also exists as a monomeric form due to that there is a greater abundance of p85α than p110 in many cell types. Our previous studies have demonstrated that monomeric p85α exerts a pro-apoptotic role in UV response through induction of TNF-α gene expression in PI3K-independent manner. In current studies, we identified a novel biological function of p85α as a positive regulator of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and cell malignant transformation via nucleolin-dependent mechanism. Our results showed that p85α was crucial for EGFR and nucleolin expression and subsequently resulted in an increase of malignant cellular transformation by using both specific knockdown and deletion of p85α in its normal expressed cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that p85α upregulated EGFR protein expression mainly through stabilizing its mRNA, whereas nucleolin (NCL) was able to bind to egfr mRNA and increase its mRNA stability. Consistently, overexpression of NCL in p85α-/- cells restored EGFR mRNA stabilization, protein expression and cell malignant transformation. Moreover, we discovered that p85α upregulated NCL gene transcription via enhancing C-Jun activation. Collectively, our studies demonstrate a novel function of p85α as a positive regulator of EGFR mRNA stability and cell malignant transformation, providing a significant insight into the understanding of biomedical nature of p85α protein in mammalian cells and further supporting that p85α might be a potential target for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:26918608

  15. p85α promotes nucleolin transcription and subsequently enhances EGFR mRNA stability and EGF-induced malignant cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haishan; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-01-01

    p85α is a regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) that is a key lipid enzyme for generating phosphatidylinositol 3, 4, 5-trisphosphate, and subsequently activates signaling that ultimately regulates cell cycle progression, cell growth, cytoskeletal changes, and cell migration. In addition to form a complex with the p110 catalytic subunit, p85α also exists as a monomeric form due to that there is a greater abundance of p85α than p110 in many cell types. Our previous studies have demonstrated that monomeric p85α exerts a pro-apoptotic role in UV response through induction of TNF-α gene expression in PI3K-independent manner. In current studies, we identified a novel biological function of p85α as a positive regulator of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and cell malignant transformation via nucleolin-dependent mechanism. Our results showed that p85α was crucial for EGFR and nucleolin expression and subsequently resulted in an increase of malignant cellular transformation by using both specific knockdown and deletion of p85α in its normal expressed cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that p85α upregulated EGFR protein expression mainly through stabilizing its mRNA, whereas nucleolin (NCL) was able to bind to egfr mRNA and increase its mRNA stability. Consistently, overexpression of NCL in p85α−/− cells restored EGFR mRNA stabilization, protein expression and cell malignant transformation. Moreover, we discovered that p85α upregulated NCL gene transcription via enhancing C-Jun activation. Collectively, our studies demonstrate a novel function of p85α as a positive regulator of EGFR mRNA stability and cell malignant transformation, providing a significant insight into the understanding of biomedical nature of p85α protein in mammalian cells and further supporting that p85α might be a potential target for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:26918608

  16. Decreased RB1 mRNA, Protein, and Activity Reflect Obesity-Induced Altered Adipogenic Capacity in Human Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Petrov, Petar; Serrano, Marta; Ortega, Francisco; García-Ruiz, Estefanía; Oliver, Paula; Ribot, Joan; Ricart, Wifredo; Palou, Andreu; Bonet, Mª Luisa; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb1) has been described as an essential player in white adipocyte differentiation in mice. No studies have been reported thus far in human adipose tissue or human adipocytes. We aimed to investigate the possible role and regulation of RB1 in adipose tissue in obesity using human samples and animal and cell models. Adipose RB1 (mRNA, protein, and activity) was negatively associated with BMI and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) while positively associated with the expression of adipogenic genes (PPARγ and IRS1) in both visceral and subcutaneous human adipose tissue. BMI increase was the main contributor to adipose RB1 downregulation. In rats, adipose Rb1 gene expression and activity decreased in parallel to dietary-induced weight gain and returned to baseline with weight loss. RB1 gene and protein expression and activity increased significantly during human adipocyte differentiation. In fully differentiated adipocytes, transient knockdown of Rb1 led to loss of the adipogenic phenotype. In conclusion, Rb1 seems to play a permissive role for human adipose tissue function, being downregulated in obesity and increased during differentiation of human adipocytes. Rb1 knockdown findings further implicate Rb1 as necessary for maintenance of adipogenic characteristics in fully differentiated adipocytes. PMID:23315497

  17. Impact of hydrothermal alteration on lava dome stability: a numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detienne, Marie; Delmelle, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Lava domes are a common feature of many volcanoes worldwide. They represent a serious volcanic hazard as they are prone to repeated collapses, generating devastating debris avalanches and pyroclastic flows. While it has long been known that hydrothermal alteration degrades rock properties and weakens rock mass cohesion and strength, there is still little quantitative information allowing the description of this effect and its consequences for assessing the stability of a volcanic rock mass such as a lava dome. In this study, we use the finite difference numerical model FLAC 3D to investigate the impact of hydrothermal alteration on the stability of a volcanic dome lying on a flat surface. Different hydrothermal alteration distributions were tested to encompass the variability observed in natural lava domes. Rock shear strength parameters (minimum, maximum and mean cohesion "c" and friction angle "φ" values) representative of various degrees of hydrothermal rock alteration were used in the simulations. The model predicts that reduction of the basement rock's shear strength decreases the factor of safety significantly. A similar result is found by increasing the vertical and horizontal extension of hydrothermal alteration in the basement rocks. In addition, pervasive hydrothermal alteration within the lava dome is predicted to exert a strong negative influence on the factor of safety. Through reduction of rock porosity and permeability, hydrothermal alteration may also affect pore fluid pressure within a lava dome. The results of new FLAC 3D runs which simulate the effect of hydrothermal alteration-induced pore pressure changes on lava dome stability will be presented.

  18. The Association between Splenocyte Apoptosis and Alterations of Bax, Bcl-2 and Caspase-3 mRNA Expression, and Oxidative Stress Induced by Dietary Nickel Chloride in Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianying; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Wu, Bangyuan

    2013-01-01

    Two hundred and forty avian broilers were equally divided into four groups, and raised with a corn-soybean basal diet or the same diet supplemented with 300, 600, 900 mg/kg NiCl2 for 42 days. Numbers or percentages of apoptotic splenocytes by flow cytometry (FCM) and TUNEL were higher (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups than those in the control group. Results measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA showed that mRNA expression and contents were significantly higher (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in Bax and Caspase-3, and were significantly lower (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in Bcl-2 of the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups. Also, the SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activities, and the ability to inhibit hydroxyl radical, and GSH contents were significantly decreased (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01), and MDA contents were increased (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in all groups. In conclusion, dietary NiCl2 in excess of 300 mg/kg caused apoptosis, altered Bax, Bcl-2 and Caspase-3 mRNA expression levels and contents, and induced oxidative stress in the spleen. Also, splenocyte apoptosis was closely related to the alternations of Bax, Bcl-2 and Caspase-3 mRNA expression, and oxidative damage. The splenic immunity and blood filtration functions were impaired in broilers. PMID:24351749

  19. The Vibrio parahaemolyticus Small RNA RyhB Promotes Production of the Siderophore Vibrioferrin by Stabilizing the Polycistronic mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, Tatsuya; Nakao, Hiroshi; Maki, Jun; Yamamoto, Shigeo

    2013-01-01

    High-affinity iron acquisition in Vibrio parahaemolyticus is mediated by the cognate siderophore vibrioferrin. We have previously reported that the vibrioferrin biosynthesis operon (pvsOp) is regulated at the transcriptional level by the iron-responsive repressor Fur (T. Tanabe, T. Funahashi, H. Nakao, S. Miyoshi, S. Shinoda, and S. Yamamoto, J. Bacteriol. 185:6938–6949, 2003). In this study, we identified the Fur-regulated small RNA RyhB and the RNA chaperone Hfq protein as additional regulatory proteins of vibrioferrin biosynthesis. We found that vibrioferrin production was greatly impaired in both the ryhB and hfq deletion mutants, and a TargetRNA search (http://snowwhite.wellesley.edu/targetRNA/index2.html) revealed that the 5′-untranslated region of pvsOp mRNA (pvsOp 5′-UTR) contains a potential base-pairing region required for the formation of the RyhB-pvsOp 5′-UTR duplex. An electrophoresis mobility shift assay indicated that RyhB can directly bind to the pvsOp 5′-UTR with the aid of Hfq. Rifampin chase experiments indicated that the half-life of pvsOp mRNA in the ryhB and hfq mutants was approximately 3-fold shorter than that in the parental strain, suggesting that both RyhB and Hfq are engaged in the stabilization of pvsOp mRNA. Chrome azurol S assays followed by electrophoresis mobility shift assays and rifampin chase experiments carried out for mutant strains indicated that base pairing between RyhB and the pvsOp 5′-UTR results in an increase in the stability of pvsOp mRNA, thereby leading to the promotion of vibrioferrin production. It is unprecedented that RyhB confers increased stability on a polycistronic mRNA involved in siderophore biosynthesis as a direct target. PMID:23772063

  20. HIV-1 Gag Blocks Selenite-Induced Stress Granule Assembly by Altering the mRNA Cap-Binding Complex

    PubMed Central

    Cinti, Alessandro; Le Sage, Valerie; Ghanem, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stress granules (SGs) are dynamic accumulations of stalled preinitiation complexes and translational machinery that assemble under stressful conditions. Sodium selenite (Se) induces the assembly of noncanonical type II SGs that differ in morphology, composition, and mechanism of assembly from canonical SGs. Se inhibits translation initiation by altering the cap-binding activity of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein 1 (4EBP1). In this work, we show that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag is able to block the assembly of type II noncanonical SGs to facilitate continued Gag protein synthesis. We demonstrate that expression of Gag reduces the amount of hypophosphorylated 4EBP1 associated with the 5′ cap potentially through an interaction with its target, eIF4E. These results suggest that the assembly of SGs is an important host antiviral defense that HIV-1 has evolved for inhibition through several distinct mechanisms. PMID:27025252

  1. Berberine Decreased Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase mRNA Stability through Negative Regulation of Human Antigen R in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji-Sun; Choi, Hye-Eun; Seo, SeungHwan; Choi, Jung-Hye; Baek, Nam-In; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2016-07-01

    Berberine, a major isoquinoline alkaloid found in medicinal herbs, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory effects; however, the underlying mechanisms responsible for its actions are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of berberine and the molecular mechanisms involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophages and its effects in LPS-induced septic shock in mice. In both macrophage cell types, berberine inhibited the LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) protein expression, but it had no effect on iNOS mRNA transcription. Suppression of LPS-induced iNOS protein expression by berberine occurred via a human antigen R (HuR)-mediated reduction of iNOS mRNA stability. Molecular data revealed that the suppression on the LPS-induced HuR binding to iNOS mRNA by berberine was accompanied by a reduction in nucleocytoplasmic HuR shuttling. Pretreatment with berberine reduced LPS-induced iNOS protein expression and the cytoplasmic translocation of HuR in liver tissues and increased the survival rate of mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia. These results show that the suppression of iNOS protein expression by berberine under LPS-induced inflammatory conditions is associated with a reduction in iNOS mRNA stability resulting from inhibition of the cytoplasmic translocation of HuR. PMID:27189969

  2. Effects of Zidovudine Treatment on Heart mRNA Expression and Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Associated with Alterations in Deoxynucleoside Triphosphate Composition in a Neonatal Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Snowdin, Jacob W.; Hsiung, Chia-Heng; Kesterson, Daniel G.; Kamath, Vasudeva G.

    2015-01-01

    The prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV is a crucial component in HIV therapy. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), primarily 3′-azido-3′-thymidine (AZT [zidovudine]), have been used to treat both mothers and neonates. While AZT is being replaced with less toxic drugs in treating mothers in MTCT prevention, it is still commonly used to treat neonates. Problems related to mitochondrial toxicity and potential mutagenesis associated with AZT treatment have been reported in treated cohorts. Yet little is known concerning the metabolism and potential toxicity of AZT on embryonic and neonatal tissues, especially considering that the enzymes of nucleoside metabolism change dramatically as many tissues convert from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth during this period. AZT is known to inhibit thymidine phosphorylation and potentially alter deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pools in adults. This study examines the effects of AZT on dNTP pools, mRNA expression of deoxynucleoside/deoxynucleotide metabolic enzymes, and mitochondrial DNA levels in a neonatal rat model. Results show that AZT treatment dramatically altered dNTP pools in the first 7 days of life after birth, which normalized to age-matched controls in the second and third weeks. Additionally, AZT treatment dramatically increased the mRNA levels of many enzymes involved in deoxynucleotide synthesis and mitochondrial biogenesis during the first week of life, which normalized to age-matched controls by the third week. These results were correlated with depletion of mitochondrial DNA noted in the second week. Taken together, results demonstrated that AZT treatment has a powerful effect on the deoxynucleotide synthesis pathways that may be associated with toxicity and mutagenesis. PMID:26248377

  3. Invaded grassland communities have altered stability-maintenance mechanisms but equal stability compared to native communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theory predicts that stability should increase with diversity via several mechanisms. We tested predictions in a five-year experiment with exotic and native plant mixtures under two irrigation treatments. Diversity declined faster after planting in exotic than native mixtures. Variation in biomas...

  4. Defining a novel cis element in the 3'-untranslated region of mammalian ribonucleotide reductase component R2 mRNA: role in transforming growth factor-beta 1 induced mRNA stabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Amara, F M; Chen, F Y; Wright, J A

    1995-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase R2 gene expression is elevated in BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts treated with transforming growth factor beta 1. We investigated the possibility that the 3'-UTR of ribonucleotide reductase R2 mRNA contains regulatory information for TGF-beta 1 induced message stability. Using end-labeled RNA fragments in gel shift assays and UV cross-linking analyses, we detected in the 3'-UTR a novel 9 nucleotide (nt) cis element, 5'-GAGUUUGAG-3' site, which interacted specifically with a cytosolic protease sensitive factor to form a 75 kDa complex. The cis element protein binding activity was inducible and markedly up-regulated cross-link 4 h after TGF-beta 1 treatment of mouse BALB/c 3T3 cells. Other 3'-UTRs [IRE, GM-CSF, c-myc and homopolymer (U)] were poor competitors to the cis element with regard to forming the TGF-beta 1 dependent RNA-protein complex. However, the cis element effectively competed out the formation of the R2 3'-UTR protein complex. Cytosolic extracts from a variety of mammalian cell lines (monkey Cos7, several mouse fibrosarcomas and human HeLa S3) demonstrated similar TGF-beta 1 dependent RNA-protein band shifts as cell extract from BALB/c 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Binding was completely prevented by several different mutations within the cis element, and by substitution mutagenesis, we were able to predict the consensus sequences, 5'-GAGUUUNNN-3' and 5'-NNNUUUGAG-3' for optimal protein binding. These results support a model in which the 9 nt region functions in cis to destabilize R2 mRNA in cells; and upon activation, a TGF-beta 1 responsive protein is induced and interacts with the 9 nt cis element in a mechanism that leads to stabilization of the mRNA. This appears to be the first example of a mRNA binding site that is involved in TGF-beta 1-mediated effects. Images PMID:7784197

  5. LRPPRC mutation suppresses cytochrome oxidase activity by altering mitochondrial RNA transcript stability in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fenghao; Addis, Jane B L; Cameron, Jessie M; Robinson, Brian H

    2012-01-01

    LRPPRC (leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat-containing) has been shown to be essential for the maturation of COX (cytochrome c oxidase), possibly by stabilizing RNA transcripts of COXI, COXII and COXIII genes encoded in mtDNA (mitochondrial DNA). We established a mouse 'gene-trap' model using ES cells (embryonic stem cells) in which the C-terminus of LRPPRC has been replaced with a β-geo construct. Mice homozygous for this modification were found to be subject to embryonic lethality, with death before 12.5 dpc (days post-coitum). Biochemical analysis of MEFs (mouse embryonic fibroblasts) isolated from homozygous mutants showed a major decrease in COX activity, with slight reductions in other respiratory chain complexes with mtDNA encoded components. Constructs of LRPPRC containing different numbers of PPRs (pentatricopeptide repeats) were expressed as recombinant proteins and tested for their ability to bind to the COXI mRNA transcript. Full binding required the first 19 PPR motifs. A specific segment of COXI mRNA was identified as the binding target for LRPPRC, encoded by mouse mtDNA nucleotides 5961-6020. These data strongly suggest that LRPPRC is involved in the maturation of COX, and is involved in stabilizing of mitochondrial mRNAs encoding COX transcripts. PMID:21880015

  6. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by cAMP response element and mRNA stability in a human airway epithelial cell line exposed to zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong Silbajoris, Robert A.; Cao Dongsun; Bromberg, Philip A.; Zhang Qiao; Peden, David B.; Samet, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. Cyclooxygenase 2-derived eicosanoids are important modulators of airway inflammation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional and posttranscriptional events that regulate COX-2 expression in a human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B exposed to Zn{sup 2+}. Zn{sup 2+} exposure resulted in pronounced increases in COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, which were prevented by pretreatment with the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, implying the involvement of transcriptional regulation. This was supported by the observation of increased COX-2 promoter activity in Zn{sup 2+}-treated BEAS-2B cells. Mutation of the cAMP response element (CRE), but not the {kappa}B-binding sites in the COX-2 promoter markedly reduced COX-2 promoter activity induced by Zn{sup 2+}. Inhibition of NF{kappa}B activation did not block Zn{sup 2+}-induced COX-2 expression. Measurement of mRNA stability demonstrated that Zn{sup 2+} exposure impaired the degradation of COX-2 mRNA in BEAS-2B cells. This message stabilization effect of Zn{sup 2+} exposure was shown to be dependent on the integrity of the 3'-untranslated region found in the COX-2 transcript. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the CRE and mRNA stability regulates COX-2 expression induced in BEAS-2B cells exposed to extracellular Zn{sup 2+}.

  7. A novel post-translational modification of nucleolin, SUMOylation at Lys-294, mediates arsenite-induced cell death by regulating gadd45α mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongyun; Liang, Yuguang; Xie, Qipeng; Gao, Guangxun; Wei, Jinlong; Huang, Haishan; Li, Jingxia; Gao, Jimin; Huang, Chuanshu

    2015-02-20

    Nucleolin is a ubiquitously expressed protein and participates in many important biological processes, such as cell cycle regulation and ribosomal biogenesis. The activity of nucleolin is regulated by intracellular localization and post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, methylation, and ADP-ribosylation. Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is a category of recently verified forms of post-translational modifications and exerts various effects on the target proteins. In the studies reported here, we discovered SUMOylational modification of human nucleolin protein at Lys-294, which facilitated the mRNA binding property of nucleolin by maintaining its nuclear localization. In response to arsenic exposure, nucleolin-SUMO was induced and promoted its binding with gadd45α mRNA, which increased gadd45α mRNA stability and protein expression, subsequently causing GADD45α-mediated cell death. On the other hand, ectopic expression of Mn-SOD attenuated the arsenite-generated superoxide radical level, abrogated nucleolin-SUMO, and in turn inhibited arsenite-induced apoptosis by reducing GADD45α expression. Collectively, our results for the first time demonstrate that nucleolin-SUMO at K294R plays a critical role in its nucleus sequestration and gadd45α mRNA binding activity. This novel biological function of nucleolin is distinct from its conventional role as a proto-oncogene. Therefore, our findings here not only reveal a new modification of nucleolin protein and its novel functional paradigm in mRNA metabolism but also expand our understanding of the dichotomous roles of nucleolin in terms of cancer development, which are dependent on multiple intracellular conditions and consequently the appropriate regulations of its modifications, including SUMOylation. PMID:25561743

  8. A Novel Post-translational Modification of Nucleolin, SUMOylation at Lys-294, Mediates Arsenite-induced Cell Death by Regulating gadd45α mRNA Stability*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongyun; Liang, Yuguang; Xie, Qipeng; Gao, Guangxun; Wei, Jinlong; Huang, Haishan; Li, Jingxia; Gao, Jimin; Huang, Chuanshu

    2015-01-01

    Nucleolin is a ubiquitously expressed protein and participates in many important biological processes, such as cell cycle regulation and ribosomal biogenesis. The activity of nucleolin is regulated by intracellular localization and post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, methylation, and ADP-ribosylation. Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is a category of recently verified forms of post-translational modifications and exerts various effects on the target proteins. In the studies reported here, we discovered SUMOylational modification of human nucleolin protein at Lys-294, which facilitated the mRNA binding property of nucleolin by maintaining its nuclear localization. In response to arsenic exposure, nucleolin-SUMO was induced and promoted its binding with gadd45α mRNA, which increased gadd45α mRNA stability and protein expression, subsequently causing GADD45α-mediated cell death. On the other hand, ectopic expression of Mn-SOD attenuated the arsenite-generated superoxide radical level, abrogated nucleolin-SUMO, and in turn inhibited arsenite-induced apoptosis by reducing GADD45α expression. Collectively, our results for the first time demonstrate that nucleolin-SUMO at K294R plays a critical role in its nucleus sequestration and gadd45α mRNA binding activity. This novel biological function of nucleolin is distinct from its conventional role as a proto-oncogene. Therefore, our findings here not only reveal a new modification of nucleolin protein and its novel functional paradigm in mRNA metabolism but also expand our understanding of the dichotomous roles of nucleolin in terms of cancer development, which are dependent on multiple intracellular conditions and consequently the appropriate regulations of its modifications, including SUMOylation. PMID:25561743

  9. CNOT3 contributes to early B cell development by controlling Igh rearrangement and p53 mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takeshi; Morita, Masahiro; Hijikata, Atsushi; Fukuda-Yuzawa, Yoko; Adachi, Shungo; Isono, Kyoichi; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Natsume, Tohru; Fukao, Taro; Ohara, Osamu; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2015-08-24

    The CCR4-NOT deadenylase complex plays crucial roles in mRNA decay and translational repression induced by poly(A) tail shortening. Although the in vitro activities of each component of this complex have been well characterized, its in vivo role in immune cells remains unclear. Here we show that mice lacking the CNOT3 subunit of this complex, specifically in B cells, have a developmental block at the pro- to pre-B cell transition. CNOT3 regulated generation of germline transcripts in the VH region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus, compaction of the locus, and subsequent Igh gene rearrangement and destabilized tumor suppressor p53 mRNA. The developmental defect in the absence of CNOT3 could be partially rescued by ablation of p53 or introduction of a pre-rearranged Igh transgene. Thus, our data suggest that the CCR4-NOT complex regulates B cell differentiation by controlling Igh rearrangement and destabilizing p53 mRNA. PMID:26238124

  10. Apoptotic cell-derived sphingosine-1-phosphate promotes HuR-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA stabilization and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Johann, Axel M; Weigert, Andreas; Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Kuhn, Anne-Marie; Barra, Vera; von Knethen, Andreas; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Brüne, Bernhard

    2008-01-15

    Removal of apoptotic cells by phagocytes is considered a pivotal immune regulatory process. Although considerable knowledge has been obtained on the postphagocytic macrophage phenotype, there is little information on molecular mechanisms, which provoke macrophage polarization. In this study, we show that human apoptotic Jurkat cells (AC) or AC-conditioned medium (CM) rapidly induces cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in mouse RAW264.7 macrophages via sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Pharmacological inhibition of S1P release from AC or using CM from cells with a knockdown of sphingosine kinase 2 in human MCF-7 cells abrogates this effect. Expression of COX-2 resulted from an increase in mRNA stability via its 3'-untranslated region (UTR), shown by COX-2-3'-UTR and AU-rich element-driven reporter assays. Western analysis corroborated increased nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the RNA-binding protein HuR after CM treatment. RNA EMSA analysis revealed an S1P- and CM-mediated increase in HuR-RNA binding to a COX-2-specific UTR, whereas HuR knockdown pointed to its importance for S1P in CM-induced COX-2 expression. Immunofluorescence microscopy of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and ELISA analysis of PGE2 revealed activation of PLA2 and production of PGE2 in response to CM but not S1P. S1P, released from AC, uses HuR to stabilize COX-2 mRNA and thus to increase COX-2 protein expression. However, only CM also activates PLA2 to provide the substrate for COX-2. Our data underscore the importance of S1P in AC-mediated immune regulation, by stabilizing COX-2 mRNA in macrophages, a prerequisite for PGE2 formation. PMID:18178864

  11. Conjugation of D-glucosamine to bovine trypsin increases thermal stability and alters functional properties.

    PubMed

    Gizurarson, Jóhann Grétar Kröyer; Filippusson, Hörður

    2015-01-01

    D-Glucosamine was conjugated to bovine trypsin by carbodiimide chemistry, involving a water-soluble carbodiimide and a succinimide ester, with the latter being to increase the yield of the conjugation. Mass spectrometric data suggested that several glycoforms were formed, with around 12 D-glucosamine moieties coupled to each trypsin molecule on average. The moieties were probably coupled to eight carboxyl groups (of glutamyl and aspartyl residues) and to four tyrosyl residues on the surface of the enzyme. The glycated trypsin possessed increased thermal stability. When compared with its unmodified counterpart, T50% was increased by 7 °C, thermal inactivation of the first step was increased 34%, and long-term stability assay revealed 71-times higher residual activity at 25 °C (without stabilizing Ca(2+) ions in aqueous buffer) after 67 days. Furthermore, resistance against autolysis was increased almost two-fold. Altered functional properties of the glycated trypsin were also observed. The glycated trypsin was found to become increasingly basophilic, and was found to be slightly structurally altered. This was indicated by 1.2 times higher catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) than unmodified trypsin against the substrate N-α-benzoyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide. Circular dichroism spectropolarimetry suggested a minor change in spatial arrangement of α-helix/helices, resulting in an increased affinity of the glycated trypsin for this small synthetic substrate. PMID:26047909

  12. VEGF-A mRNA processing, stability and translation: a paradigm for intricate regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level

    PubMed Central

    Arcondéguy, Tania; Lacazette, Eric; Millevoi, Stefania; Prats, Hervé; Touriol, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A (VEGF-A) is a potent secreted mitogen crucial for physiological and pathological angiogenesis. Post-transcriptional regulation of VEGF-A occurs at multiple levels. Firstly, alternative splicing gives rise to different transcript variants encoding diverse isoforms that exhibit distinct biological properties with regard to receptor binding and extra-cellular localization. Secondly, VEGF-A mRNA stability is regulated by effectors such as hypoxia or growth factors through the binding of stabilizing and destabilizing proteins at AU-rich elements located in the 3′-untranslated region. Thirdly, translation of VEGF-A mRNA is a controlled process involving alternative initiation codons, internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs), an upstream open reading frame (uORF), miRNA targeting and a riboswitch in the 3′ untranslated region. These different levels of regulation cooperate for the crucial fine-tuning of the expression of VEGF-A variants. This review will be focused on our current knowledge of the complex post-transcriptional regulatory switches that modulate the cellular VEGF-A level, a paradigmatic model of post-transcriptional regulation. PMID:23851566

  13. Probing the transcription mechanisms of reovirus cores with molecules that alter RNA duplex stability.

    PubMed

    Demidenko, Alexander A; Nibert, Max L

    2009-06-01

    The mammalian reovirus (MRV) genome comprises 10 double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) segments, packaged along with transcriptase complexes inside each core particle. Effects of four small molecules on transcription by MRV cores were studied for this report, chosen for their known capacities to alter RNA duplex stability. Spermidine and spermine, which enhance duplex stability, inhibited transcription, whereas dimethyl sulfoxide and trimethylglycine, which attenuate duplex stability, stimulated transcription. Different mechanisms were identified for inhibition or activation by these molecules. With spermidine, one round of transcription occurred normally, but subsequent rounds were inhibited. Thus, inhibition occurred at the transition between the end of elongation in one round and initiation in the next round of transcription. Dimethyl sulfoxide or trimethylglycine, on the other hand, had no effect on transcription by a constitutively active fraction of cores in each preparation but activated transcription in another fraction that was otherwise silent for the production of elongated transcripts. Activation of this other fraction occurred at the transition between transcript initiation and elongation, i.e., at promoter escape. These results suggest that the relative stability of RNA duplexes is most important for certain steps in the particle-associated transcription cycles of dsRNA viruses and that small molecules are useful tools for probing these and probably other steps. PMID:19297468

  14. Alterations of Nonconserved Residues Affect Protein Stability and Folding Dynamics through Charge-Charge Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Swarnendu; Garcìa, Angel E; Makhatadze, George I

    2015-10-15

    Charge-charge interactions play an important role in thermal stability of proteins. We employed an all-atom, native-topology-based model with non-native electrostatics to explore the interplay between folding dynamics and stability of TNfn3 (the third fibronectin type III domain from tenascin-C). Our study elucidates the role of charge-charge interactions in modulating the folding energy landscape. In particular, we found that incorporation of explicit charge-charge interactions in the WT TNfn3 induces energetic frustration due to the presence of residual structure in the unfolded state. Moreover, optimization of the surface charge-charge interactions by altering the evolutionarily nonconserved residues not only increases the thermal stability (in agreement with previous experimental study) but also reduces the formation of residual structure and hence minimizes the energetic frustration along the folding route. We concluded that charge-charge interaction in the rationally designed TNfn3 plays an important role not only in enhancing the stability but also in assisting folding. PMID:26413861

  15. An RNA-seq Protocol to Identify mRNA Expression Changes in Mouse Diaphyseal Bone: Applications in Mice with Bone Property Altering Lrp5 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ayturk, Ugur M.; Jacobsen, Christina M.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Gorham, Joshua; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Robling, Alexander G.; Warman, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function and certain missense mutations in the Wnt co-receptor LRP5 significantly decrease or increase bone mass, respectively. These human skeletal phenotypes have been recapitulated in mice harboring Lrp5 knockout and knockin mutations. We hypothesized that measuring mRNA expression in diaphyseal bone from mice with Lrp5 wild-type (Lrp5+/+), knockout (Lrp5−/−), and high bone mass (HBM)-causing (Lrp5p.A214V/+) alleles could identify genes and pathways that regulate or are regulated by LRP5 activity. We performed RNA-seq on pairs of tibial diaphyseal bones from four 16-week-old mice with each of the aforementioned genotypes. We then evaluated different methods for controlling for contaminating non-skeletal tissue (i.e., blood, bone marrow, and skeletal muscle) in our data. These methods included pre-digestion of diaphyseal bone with collagenase and separate transcriptional profiling of blood, skeletal muscle and bone marrow. We found that collagenase digestion reduced contamination, but also altered gene expression in the remaining cells. In contrast, in silico filtering of the diaphyseal bone RNA-seq data for highly expressed blood, skeletal muscle, and bone marrow transcripts significantly increased the correlation between RNA-seq data from an animal’s right and left tibiae and from animals with the same Lrp5 genotype. We conclude that reliable and reproducible RNA-seq data can be obtained from mouse diaphyseal bone and that lack of LRP5 has a more pronounced effect on gene expression than the HBM-causing LRP5 missense mutation. We identified 84 differentially expressed protein-coding transcripts between LRP5 “sufficient” (i.e., Lrp5+/+ and Lrp5p.A214V/+) and “insufficient” (Lrp5−/−) diaphyseal bone, and far fewer differentially expressed genes between Lrp5p.A214V/+ and Lrp5+/+ diaphyseal bone. PMID:23553928

  16. GABA-A and NMDA receptor subunit mRNA expression is altered in the caudate but not the putamen of the postmortem brains of alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Bhandage, Amol K.; Jin, Zhe; Bazov, Igor; Kononenko, Olga; Bakalkin, Georgy; Korpi, Esa R.; Birnir, Bryndis

    2014-01-01

    Chronic consumption of alcohol by humans has been shown to lead to impairment of executive and cognitive functions. Here, we have studied the mRNA expression of ion channel receptors for glutamate and GABA in the dorsal striatum of post-mortem brains from alcoholics (n = 29) and normal controls (n = 29), with the focus on the caudate nucleus that is associated with the frontal cortex executive functions and automatic thinking and on the putamen area that is linked to motor cortices and automatic movements. The results obtained by qPCR assay revealed significant changes in the expression of specific excitatory ionotropic glutamate and inhibitory GABA-A receptor subunit genes in the caudate but not the putamen. Thus, in the caudate we found reduced levels of mRNAs encoding the GluN2A glutamate receptor and the δ, ε, and ρ2 GABA-A receptor subunits, and increased levels of the mRNAs encoding GluD1, GluD2, and GABA-A γ1 subunits in the alcoholics as compared to controls. Interestingly in the controls, 11 glutamate and 5 GABA-A receptor genes were more prominently expressed in the caudate than the putamen (fold-increase varied from 1.24 to 2.91). Differences in gene expression patterns between the striatal regions may underlie differences in associated behavioral outputs. Our results suggest an altered balance between caudate-mediated voluntarily controlled and automatic behaviors in alcoholics, including diminished executive control on goal-directed alcohol-seeking behavior. PMID:25538565

  17. Zolpidem withdrawal induced uncoupling of GABA(A) receptors in vitro associated with altered GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Jembrek, Maja Jazvinšćak; Vlainić, Josipa; Šuran, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Hypnotic zolpidem produces its effects via the benzodiazepine binding site in α1-containing GABAA receptors. The aim of the study was to assess the influence of duration of zolpidem treatment and its withdrawal, as well as the role of alpha1-containing GABAA receptors in the development of physical dependence and tolerance. Namely, recombinant receptors can be used to characterize mechanisms involved in different processes in the brain and to delineate the contribution of specific receptor subtypes. To address the influence of chronic zolpidem treatment we exposed HEK293 cells stably expressing alpha1beta2gamma2S recombinant GABAA receptors for seven consecutive days, while withdrawal periods lasted for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. Using radioligand binding studies we determined that chronic zolpidem treatment did not induce changes in either GABAA receptor number or in the expression of subunit mRNAs. We observed the enhancement of binding sites and upregulated expression of subunit mRNAs only following 96-hour withdrawal. Moreover, zolpidem treatment and its withdrawal (All time points) induced functional uncoupling between GABA and benzodiazepine binding sites in the GABAA receptor complex. Accordingly, it might be assumed that zolpidem withdrawal-induced uncoupling of GABAA receptors is associated with altered GABAA receptor subunit mRNA expression. The results presented here provide an insight into molecular and cellular mechanisms probably underlying adaptive changes of GABAA receptor function in response to chronic usage and withdrawal of zolpidem and perhaps the observed molecular changes could be linked to the tolerance and dependence produced upon prolonged treatment with other GABAergic drugs. PMID:26232993

  18. Analysis of miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiles Highlights Alterations in Ionizing Radiation Response of Human Lymphocytes under Modeled Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Casara, Silvia; Sales, Gabriele; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo; Celotti, Lucia; Mognato, Maddalena

    2012-01-01

    Background Ionizing radiation (IR) can be extremely harmful for human cells since an improper DNA-damage response (DDR) to IR can contribute to carcinogenesis initiation. Perturbations in DDR pathway can originate from alteration in the functionality of the microRNA-mediated gene regulation, being microRNAs (miRNAs) small noncoding RNA that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. In this study we gained insight into the role of miRNAs in the regulation of DDR to IR under microgravity, a condition of weightlessness experienced by astronauts during space missions, which could have a synergistic action on cells, increasing the risk of radiation exposure. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed miRNA expression profile of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) incubated for 4 and 24 h in normal gravity (1 g) and in modeled microgravity (MMG) during the repair time after irradiation with 0.2 and 2Gy of γ-rays. Our results show that MMG alters miRNA expression signature of irradiated PBL by decreasing the number of radio-responsive miRNAs. Moreover, let-7i*, miR-7, miR-7-1*, miR-27a, miR-144, miR-200a, miR-598, miR-650 are deregulated by the combined action of radiation and MMG. Integrated analyses of miRNA and mRNA expression profiles, carried out on PBL of the same donors, identified significant miRNA-mRNA anti-correlations of DDR pathway. Gene Ontology analysis reports that the biological category of “Response to DNA damage” is enriched when PBL are incubated in 1 g but not in MMG. Moreover, some anti-correlated genes of p53-pathway show a different expression level between 1 g and MMG. Functional validation assays using luciferase reporter constructs confirmed miRNA-mRNA interactions derived from target prediction analyses. Conclusions/Significance On the whole, by integrating the transcriptome and microRNome, we provide evidence that modeled microgravity can affects the DNA-damage response to IR in human PBL. PMID:22347458

  19. Maternal consumption of organic trace minerals alters calf systemic and neutrophil mRNA and microRNA indicators of inflammation and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jacometo, Carolina B; Osorio, Johan S; Socha, Michael; Corrêa, Marcio N; Piccioli-Cappelli, Fiorenzo; Trevisi, Erminio; Loor, Juan J

    2015-11-01

    Organic trace mineral (ORG) supplementation to dairy cows in substitution of sulfate (INO) sources has been associated with improvement in immune function during stressful states such as the peripartal period. However, the effect of supplemental ORG during pregnancy on the neonatal calf is unknown. Therefore, our aim was to investigate the effects of ORG supplementation during late pregnancy on the immune system and growth of the neonatal calf. Of specific interest was the evaluation of inflammation-related microRNA (miRNA) and target gene expression in blood neutrophils as indicators of possible nutritional programming. Forty multiparous cows were supplemented for 30d prepartum with 40 mg/kg of Zn, 20 mg/kg of Mn, 5 mg/kg of Cu, and 1mg/kg of Co from either organic (ORG) or sulfate (INO) sources (total diet contained supplemental 75 mg/kg of Zn, 65 mg/kg of Mn, 11 mg/kg of Cu, and 1 mg/kg of Co, and additional Zn, Mn, and Co provided by sulfates), and a subset of calves (n=8/treatment) was used for blood immunometabolic marker and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) gene and miRNA expression analyses. Samples were collected at birth (before colostrum feeding), 1d (24 h after colostrum intake), and 7 and 21d of age. Data were analyzed as a factorial design with the PROC MIXED procedure of SAS. No differences were detected in BW, but maternal ORG tended to increase calf withers height. Calves from INO-fed cows had greater concentrations of blood glucose, GOT, paraoxonase, myeloperoxidase, and reactive oxygen metabolites. Antioxidant capacity also was greater in INO calves. The PMNL expression of toll-like receptor pathway genes indicated a pro-inflammatory state in INO calves, with greater expression of the inflammatory mediators MYD88, IRAK1, TRAF6, NFKB, and NFKBIA. The lower expression of miR-155 and miR-125b in ORG calves indicated the potential for maternal organic trace minerals in regulating the PMNL inflammatory response at least via alterations in mRNA and

  20. The arabidopsis polyamine transporter LHRI/AtPUT3 modulates heat responsive gene expression by regulating mRNA stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyamines (PA) involve in the gene regulation by interacting with various anionic macromolecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins and modulating their structure and function. Previous studies have showed that changing in polyamine biosynthesis alters plant response to different abiotic stresses. Here,...

  1. Carrying shopping bags does not alter static postural stability and gait parameters in healthy older females.

    PubMed

    Bampouras, Theodoros M; Dewhurst, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Food shopping is an important aspect of maintaining independence and social interaction in older age. Carriage of shopping bags alters the body's weight distribution which, depending on load distribution, could potentially increase instability during standing and walking. The study examined the effect of carrying UK style shopping bags on static postural stability and gait in healthy older and young females. Nine older (71.0±6.0 years) and 10 young (26.7±5.2 years) females were assessed in five conditions carrying no bags, one 1.5kg bag in each hand, one 3kg bag in each hand, one 1.5kg bag in preferred hand, one 3kg bag in preferred hand. Antero-posterior and medio-lateral displacement, and 95% ellipse area from a 30s quiet standing were used for postural stability assessment. Stride length and its coefficient of variation, total double support time, step asymmetry and gait stability ratio were calculated from 1min treadmill walking at self-selected speed for gait assessment. Carrying shopping bags did not negatively affect postural stability or gait variables, in either group. Further, in older individuals, a decrease in sway velocity was found when holding bags during the postural stability assessment (p<0.05), suggesting that carriage of bags, irrespective of the load distribution, may have a stabilising effect during quiet standing. These results should help to alleviate concerns regarding safety of carrying shopping bags and help encourage shopping, both as a social and as a physical activity. PMID:27131182

  2. Basal expression of nucleoside transporter mRNA differs among small intestinal epithelia of beef steers and is differentially altered by ruminal or abomasal infusion of starch hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Liao, S F; Alman, M J; Vanzant, E S; Miles, E D; Harmon, D L; McLeod, K R; Boling, J A; Matthews, J C

    2008-04-01

    In ruminants, microbial-derived nucleic acids are a major source of N and are absorbed as nucleosides by small intestinal epithelia. Although the biochemical activities of 2 nucleoside transport systems have been described for cattle, little is known regarding the regulation of their gene expression. This study was conducted to test 2 hypotheses: (1) the small intestinal epithelia of beef cattle differentially express mRNA for 3 concentrative (CNT1, 2, 3) and 2 equilibrative (ENT1, 2) nucleoside transporters (NT), and (2) expression of these NT is responsive to small intestine luminal supply of rumen-derived microbes (hence, nucleosides), energy (cornstarch hydrolysate, SH), or both. Eighteen ruminally and abomasally catheterized Angus steers (260 +/- 17 kg of BW) were fed an alfalfa cube-based diet at 1.33x NE(m) requirement. Six steers in each of 3 periods were blocked by BW (heavy vs. light). Within each block, 3 steers were randomly assigned to 3 treatments (n = 6): ruminal and abomasal water infusion (control), ruminal SH infusion/abomasal water infusion, or ruminal water infusion/abomasal SH infusion. The dosage of SH infusion amounted to 20% of ME intake. After a 14-or 16-d infusion period, steers were slaughtered, and duodenal, jejunal, and ileal epithelia were harvested for total RNA extraction and the relative amounts of mRNA expressed were determined using real-time RT-PCR quantification methodologies. All 5 NT mRNA were found expressed by each epithelium, but their abundance differed among epithelia. Specifically, jejunal expression of all 5 NT mRNA was higher than that by the ileum, whereas jejunal expression of CNT1, CNT3, and ENT1 mRNA was higher, or tended to be higher, than duodenal expression. Duodenal expression of CNT2, CNT3, and ENT2 mRNA was higher than ileal expression. With regard to SH infusion treatments, ruminal infusion increased duodenal expression of CNT3 (67%), ENT1 (51%), and ENT2 (39%) mRNA and ileal expression of CNT3 (210%) and

  3. Altered mRNA Levels of Glucocorticoid Receptor, Mineralocorticoid Receptor, and Co-Chaperones (FKBP5 and PTGES3) in the Middle Frontal Gyrus of Autism Spectrum Disorder Subjects.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neil; Crider, Amanda; Pandya, Chirayu D; Ahmed, Anthony O; Pillai, Anilkumar

    2016-05-01

    Although stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), it is not known whether glucocorticoid receptor (GR) levels are altered in the brain of subjects with ASD. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of GR isoforms (GRα, GRβ, GRγ, and GRP), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), GR co-chaperones (FKBP5, PTGES3, and BAG1), and inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β, and IFN-γ) were examined in the postmortem middle frontal gyrus tissues of 13 ASD and 13 age-matched controls by qRT-PCR. The protein levels were examined by Western blotting. We found significant decreases in GRα (64 %), GRγ (48 %), GRP (20 %) and MR (46 %) mRNA levels in ASD subjects as compared to controls. However, significant increases in FKBP5 (42 %) and PTGES3 (35 %) mRNA levels were observed in ASD subjects. There were no differences in the mRNA levels of GRβ and BAG1 in ASD subjects as compared to controls. MR mRNA was found to be negatively correlated with the diagnostic score for abnormality of development. On the protein level, significant reductions in GR and MR, but no change in FKBP5 and PTGES3 were found in ASD subjects as compared to controls. Moreover, we observed significant increases in IL-1β and IFN-γ mRNA levels in ASD subjects, and these cytokines were negatively associated with GR levels. Our data, for the first time, reports dysregulation of GR, MR, FKBP5, and PTGES3 in ASD and suggest a possible role of inflammation in altered GR function in ASD. PMID:25912394

  4. Alterations in hepatic mRNA expression of phase II enzymes and xenobiotic transporters after targeted disruption of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Gonzalez, Frank J; Klaassen, Curtis

    2010-12-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4a) is a liver-enriched master regulator of liver function. HNF4a is important in regulating hepatic expression of certain cytochrome P450s. The purpose of this study was to use mice lacking HNF4a expression in liver (HNF4a-HNull) to elucidate the role of HNF4a in regulating hepatic expression of phase II enzymes and transporters in mice. Compared with male wild-type mice, HNF4a-HNull male mouse livers had (1) markedly lower messenger RNAs (mRNAs) encoding the uptake transporters sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide, organic anion transporting polypeptide (Oatp) 1a1, Oatp2b1, organic anion transporter 2, sodium phosphate cotransporter type 1, sulfate anion transporter 1, sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 1, the phase II enzymes Uridine 5'-diphospho (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase (Ugt) 2a3, Ugt2b1, Ugt3a1, Ugt3a2, sulfotransferase (Sult) 1a1, Sult1b1, Sult5a1, the efflux transporters multidrug resistance-associated protein (Mrp) 6, and multidrug and toxin extrusion 1; (2) moderately lower mRNAs encoding Oatp1b2, organic cation transporter (Oct) 1, Ugt1a5, Ugt1a9, glutathione S-transferase (Gst) m4, Gstm6, and breast cancer resistance protein; but (3) higher mRNAs encoding Oatp1a4, Octn2, Ugt1a1, Sult1e1, Sult2a2, Gsta4, Gstm1-m3, multidrug resistance protein (Mdr) 1a, Mrp3, and Mrp4. Hepatic signaling of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 and pregnane X receptor appear to be activated in HNF4a-HNull mice. In conclusion, HNF4a deficiency markedly alters hepatic mRNA expression of a large number of phase II enzymes and transporters, probably because of the loss of HNF4a, which is a transactivator and a determinant of gender-specific expression and/or adaptive activation of signaling pathways important in hepatic regulation of these phase II enzymes and transporters. PMID:20935164

  5. Chloroquine enhances TRAIL-mediated apoptosis through up-regulation of DR5 by stabilization of mRNA and protein in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Jung; Min, Kyoung-jin; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Kubatka, Peter; Kruzliak, Peter; Kim, Dong Eun; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ), an anti-malarial drug, has immune-modulating activity and lysosomotropic activity. In this study, we investigated CQ sensitizes TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in human renal cancer Caki cells. Combination of CQ and TRAIL significantly induces apoptosis in human renal cancer Caki cells and various human cancer cells, but not in normal mouse kidney cells (TMCK-1) and human mesangial cells (MC). CQ up-regulates DR5 mRNA and protein expression in a dose- and time- dependent manner. Interestingly, CQ regulates DR5 expression through the increased stability in the mRNA and protein of DR5, rather than through the increased transcriptional activity of DR5. Moreover, we found that CQ decreased the expression of Cbl, an E3 ligase of DR5, and knock-down of Cbl markedly enhanced DR5 up-regulation. Other lysosomal inhibitors, including monensin and nigericin, also up-regulated DR5 and sensitized TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Therefore, this study demonstrates that lysosomal inhibition by CQ may sensitize TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in human renal cancer Caki cells via DR5 up-regulation. PMID:26964637

  6. RNA Processing Factor 7 and Polynucleotide Phosphorylase Are Necessary for Processing and Stability of nad2 mRNA in Arabidopsis Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Birgit; Zendler, Daniel; Binder, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional maturation of plant mitochondrial transcripts requires several steps. Among these, the generation of mature 5′ ends is still one of the most enigmatic processes. Toward a characterization of proteins involved in 5′ processing of mitochondrial transcripts in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we now analyzed 5′ maturation of nad2 transcripts. Based on natural genetic variation affecting 5′ ends of nad2 transcripts in ecotype Can-0 and complementation studies we now identified RNA processing factor 7, which takes part in the generation of the 5′ terminus of the mature nad2 mRNA. RPF7 is a relatively short regular P-class pentatricopeptide repeat protein comprising seven canonical P repeats and a single short S repeat. The corresponding allele in Can-0 encodes a truncated version of this protein lacking two C-terminal repeats, which are essential for the function of RPF7. Furthermore we established transgenic plants expressing artifical microRNAs targeting the mitochondrial polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), which results in substantial reduction of the PNPase mRNA levels and strong knockdown of this gene. Detailed quantitative studies of 5′ and 3′ extended nad2 precursor RNAs in these knockdown plants as well as in the rpf7–1 knockout mutant suggest that 5′ processing contributes to the stability of mitochondrial transcripts in plants. PMID:25181358

  7. Estrogen receptor is not primarily responsible for altered responsiveness of ovalbumin mRNA induction in the oviduct from genetically selected high- and low-albumen chicken lines.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, T; Hiramatsu, H; Park, H M; Okumura, J; Kawashima, M; Miyoshi, S

    1997-04-01

    The role of estrogen receptor on ovalbumin mRNA induction by steroid hormones was investigated in primary cultures of oviduct cells from estrogen-stimulated immature chicks of genetically selected high- and low-albumen egg laying lines (H- and L-lines). In experiment 1, the extent of ovalbumin mRNA induction and changes in estrogen and progesterone receptors were compared between the oviduct cells from H- and L-lines with or without steroid hormones in the culture medium. In experiment 2, the effect of estrogen receptor gene transfection on the induction of ovalbumin mRNA was studied in the oviduct cells from the L-line chicks. The results showed a close correlation of the changes in ovalbumin mRNA with the numbers of nuclear and total estrogen receptors in the oviduct cells but not with the numbers of nuclear and total progesterone receptors. Estrogen receptor gene transfection induced ovalbumin mRNA to a moderate extent in the absence of the steroid hormones. To our surprise, however, estrogen receptor gene transfection apparently suppressed the ovalbumin mRNA responsiveness to estrogen to a considerable extent. It was concluded, therefore, that the extent of estrogen receptor expression might not be primarily responsible for the differences in responsiveness to steroid hormones of oviduct cells from genetically selected H- and L-line chickens. PMID:9149392

  8. Examining the effect of altered redox conditions on deep soil organic matter stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, C.; Kellman, L. M.; Ziegler, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Since subsoil horizons contribute significantly to terrestrial carbon (C) budgets, understanding the influence of disturbances such as forest harvesting on subsoil C stability is critical. Clearcut harvesting leads to changes in the soil physico-chemical environment, including altering redox conditions arising from changes in soil hydrology that increase soil saturation, soil temperature, and pH. These physico-chemical changes have the potential to alter the adsorption of soil organic matter (SOM) to minerals, particularly at depth where SOM is primarily associated with mineral phases. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of differing redox states (aerobic vs. anaerobic) and temperature upon SOM stability of forested soils representative of the Acadian Forest Region of Eastern North America. Composite soil samples through depth (0-10, 10-20, 20-35, and 35-50 cm) from a mature red spruce forest (110 years) were incubated under optimum (aerobic) or saturated (anaerobic) conditions for 1 or 4 months at two temperatures (5 and 15 C). Following incubation, soil leachate was analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and UV-vis absorbance in order to determine soil C losses and its optical character. Specific UV-vis absorbance SUVA (254 nm) and spectral slope ratios were calculated in order to assess the composition of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). Preliminary results from the 1 month incubation indicate that under anaerobic conditions, all depths released DOC with a higher SUVA than under aerobic conditions, with the largest change observed in the 0-10 cm depth increment. Soil incubated at 5 C produced leachate with significantly less DOC and with a lower absorbance compared to 15 C under both redox conditions. These results suggest that both temperature and redox state are important in determining the aromaticity of DOC released from soils. Spectral slope ratios revealed that a greater proportion of CDOM of lower molecular weight

  9. mRNA and Protein Levels for GABA[subscript A][alpha]4, [alpha]5, [beta]1 and GABA[subscript B]R1 Receptors are Altered in Brains from Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Rooney, Robert J.; Patel, Diven H.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    We have shown altered expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) and gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABA[subscript B]) receptors in the brains of subjects with autism. In the current study, we sought to verify our western blotting data for GABBR1 via qRT-PCR and to expand our previous work to measure mRNA and protein levels of 3…

  10. Water making hot rocks soft: How hydrothermal alteration affects volcano stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    My research involves using numerical models of groundwater flow and slope stability to determine how long-term hydrothermal alteration in stratovolcanoes can cause increases in pore fluid pressure that lead to edifice collapse. Or in simpler terms: We can use computers to figure out how and why water that moves through hot rocks changes them into softer rocks that want to fall down. It's important to pay attention to the soft rocks even if they look safe because this can happen a long time after the stuff that makes them hot goes away or becomes cool. Wet soft rocks can go very far from high places and run over people in their way. I want show where the soft wet rocks are and how they might fall down so people will be safer.

  11. Photoelectrochemical Stability and Alteration Products of n-Type Single-Crystal ZnO Photoanodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Paulauskas, I. E.; Jellison, G. E.; Boatner, L. A.; Brown, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    The photoelectrochemical stability and surface-alteration characteristics of doped and undoped n-type ZnO single-crystal photoanode electrodes were investigated. The single-crystal ZnO photoanode properties were analyzed using current-voltage measurements plus spectral and time-dependent quantum-yield methods. These measurements revealed a distinct anodic peak and an accompanying cathodic surface degradation process at negative potentials. The features of this peak depended on time and the NaOH concentration in the electrolyte, but were independent of the presence of electrode illumination. Current measurements performed at the peak indicate that charging and discharging effects are apparently taking place at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface. This result is consistent with themore » significant reactive degradation that takes place on the ZnO single crystal photoanode surface and that ultimately leads to the reduction of the ZnO surface to Zn metal. The resulting Zn-metal reaction products create unusual, dendrite-like, surface alteration structural features that were analyzed using x-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. ZnO doping methods were found to be effective in increasing the n-type character of the crystals. Higher doping levels result in smaller depletion widths and lower quantum yields, since the minority carrier diffusion lengths are very short in these materials.« less

  12. Microtubule modifications and stability are altered by cilia perturbation and in cystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Berbari, Nicolas F.; Sharma, Neeraj; Malarkey, Erik B.; Pieczynski, Jay N.; Boddu, Ravindra; Gaertig, Jacek; Guay-Woodford, Lisa; Yoder, Bradley K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Disruption of the primary cilium is associated with a growing number of human diseases collectively termed ciliopathies. Ciliopathies present with a broad range of clinical features consistent with the near ubiquitous nature of the organelle and its role in diverse signaling pathways throughout development and adult homeostasis. The clinical features associated with cilia dysfunction can include such phenotypes as polycystic kidneys, skeletal abnormalities, blindness, anosmia, and obesity. Although the clinical relevance of the primary cilium is evident, the effects that cilia dysfunction has on the cell and how this contributes to disease remains poorly understood. Here, we show that loss of ciliogenesis genes such as Ift88 and Kif3a lead to increases in post-translational modifications on cytosolic microtubules. This effect was observed in cilia mutant kidney cells grown in vitro and in vivo in cystic kidneys. The hyper-acetylation of microtubules resulting from cilia loss is associated with both altered microtubule stability and increased α-tubulin acetyl-transferase activity. Intriguingly, the effect on microtubules was also evident in renal samples from patients with autosomal recessive polycystic kidneys. These findings indicate that altered microtubule post-translational modifications may influence some of the phenotypes observed in ciliopathies. PMID:23124988

  13. Siderophore production by streptomycetes-stability and alteration of ferrihydroxamates in heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Eileen; Ahmed, Engy; Voit, Annekatrin; Klose, Michael; Greyer, Matthias; Svatoš, Aleš; Merten, Dirk; Roth, Martin; Holmström, Sara J M; Kothe, Erika

    2015-12-01

    Heavy metal-contaminated soil derived from a former uranium mining site in Ronneburg, Germany, was used for sterile mesocosms inoculated with the extremely metal-resistant Streptomyces mirabilis P16B-1 or the sensitive control strain Streptomyces lividans TK24. The production and fate of bacterial hydroxamate siderophores in soil was analyzed, and the presence of ferrioxamines E, B, D, and G was shown. While total ferrioxamine concentrations decreased in water-treated controls after 30 days of incubation, the sustained production by the bacteria was seen. For the individual molecules, alteration between neutral and cationic forms and linearization of hydroxamates was observed for the first time. Mesocosms inoculated with biomass of either strain showed changes of siderophore contents compared with the non-treated control indicating for auto-alteration and consumption, respectively, depending on the vital bacteria present. Heat stability and structural consistency of siderophores obtained from sterile culture filtrate were shown. In addition, low recovery (32 %) from soil was shown, indicating adsorption to soil particles or soil organic matter. Fate and behavior of hydroxamate siderophores in metal-contaminated soils may affect soil properties as well as conditions for its inhabiting (micro)organisms. PMID:25414032

  14. Photoelectrochemical Stability and Alteration Products of n-Type Single-Crystal ZnO Photoanodes

    SciTech Connect

    Paulauskas, Irene E.; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Boatner, Lynn A; Brown, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    The photoelectrochemical stability and surface-alteration characteristics of both doped and undoped n-type ZnO single-crystal photoanode electrodes have been investigated. The single-crystal ZnO photoanode properties were analyzed using current-voltage measurements plus spectral and time-dependent quantum-yield methods. These measurements revealed the presence of a distinct anodic peak and an accompanying cathodic surface degradation process at negative potentials. The features of this peak were found to depend on time as well as the NaOH concentration in the electrolyte, but they were independent of the presence of electrode illumination. Current measurements performed at the peak indicate that charging and discharging effects are apparently taking place at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface. This result is consistent with the significant reactive degradation that takes place on the ZnO single crystal photoanode surface and that ultimately leads to the reduction of the ZnO surface to Zn metal. The resulting Zn-metal reaction products create unusual, dendrite-like, surface alteration structural features that were analyzed using x-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. The ZnO doping methods employed here are also shown to be an effective way of increasing the n-type character of the crystals. Higher doping levels result in smaller depletion widths and lower quantum yields, since the minority carrier diffusion lengths are very short in these materials.

  15. IGF-1 Has Plaque-Stabilizing Effects in Atherosclerosis by Altering Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    von der Thüsen, Jan H.; Borensztajn, Keren S.; Moimas, Silvia; van Heiningen, Sandra; Teeling, Peter; van Berkel, Theo J.C.; Biessen, Erik A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling is important for the maintenance of plaque stability in atherosclerosis due to its effects on vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) phenotype. To investigate this hypothesis, we studied the effects of the highly inflammatory milieu of the atherosclerotic plaque on IGF-1 signaling and stability-related phenotypic parameters of murine vSMCs in vitro, and the effects of IGF-1 supplementation on plaque phenotype in an atherosclerotic mouse model. M1-polarized, macrophage-conditioned medium inhibited IGF-1 signaling by ablating IGF-1 and increasing IGF-binding protein 3, increased vSMC apoptosis, and decreased proliferation. Expression of α-actin and col3a1 genes was strongly attenuated by macrophage-conditioned medium, whereas expression of matrix-degrading enzymes was increased. Importantly, all of these effects could be corrected by supplementation with IGF-1. In vivo, treatment with the stable IGF-1 analog Long R3 IGF-1 in apolipoprotein E knockout mice reduced stenosis and core size, and doubled cap/core ratio in early atherosclerosis. In advanced plaques, Long R3 IGF-1 increased the vSMC content of the plaque by more than twofold and significantly reduced the rate of intraplaque hemorrhage. We believe that IGF-1 in atherosclerotic plaques may have a role in preventing plaque instability, not only by modulating smooth muscle cell turnover, but also by altering smooth muscle cell phenotype. PMID:21281823

  16. IGF-1 has plaque-stabilizing effects in atherosclerosis by altering vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    von der Thüsen, Jan H; Borensztajn, Keren S; Moimas, Silvia; van Heiningen, Sandra; Teeling, Peter; van Berkel, Theo J C; Biessen, Erik A L

    2011-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling is important for the maintenance of plaque stability in atherosclerosis due to its effects on vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) phenotype. To investigate this hypothesis, we studied the effects of the highly inflammatory milieu of the atherosclerotic plaque on IGF-1 signaling and stability-related phenotypic parameters of murine vSMCs in vitro, and the effects of IGF-1 supplementation on plaque phenotype in an atherosclerotic mouse model. M1-polarized, macrophage-conditioned medium inhibited IGF-1 signaling by ablating IGF-1 and increasing IGF-binding protein 3, increased vSMC apoptosis, and decreased proliferation. Expression of α-actin and col3a1 genes was strongly attenuated by macrophage-conditioned medium, whereas expression of matrix-degrading enzymes was increased. Importantly, all of these effects could be corrected by supplementation with IGF-1. In vivo, treatment with the stable IGF-1 analog Long R3 IGF-1 in apolipoprotein E knockout mice reduced stenosis and core size, and doubled cap/core ratio in early atherosclerosis. In advanced plaques, Long R3 IGF-1 increased the vSMC content of the plaque by more than twofold and significantly reduced the rate of intraplaque hemorrhage. We believe that IGF-1 in atherosclerotic plaques may have a role in preventing plaque instability, not only by modulating smooth muscle cell turnover, but also by altering smooth muscle cell phenotype. PMID:21281823

  17. Wheel running alters patterns of uncontrollable stress-induced cfos mRNA expression in rat dorsal striatum direct and indirect pathways: a possible role for plasticity in adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter J.; Ghasem, Parsa R.; Mika, Agnieszka; Day, Heidi E.; Herrera, Jonathan J.; Greenwood, Benjamin N.; Fleshner, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that adenosine is a major regulator of striatum activity, in part, through the antagonistic modulation of dopaminergic function. Exercise can influence adenosine and dopamine activity, which may subsequently promote plasticity in striatum adenosine and dopamine systems. Such changes could alter activity of medium spiny neurons and impact striatum function. The purpose of this study was two-fold. The first was to characterize the effect of long-term wheel running on adenosine 1 (A1R), adenosine 2A (A2AR), dopamine 1 (D1R), and dopamine 2 (D2R) receptor mRNA expression in adult rat dorsal and ventral striatum structures using in situ hybridization. The second was to determine if changes to adenosine and dopamine receptor mRNA from running are associated with altered cfos mRNA induction in dynorphin- (direct pathway) and enkephalin- (indirect pathway) expressing neurons of the dorsal striatum following stress exposure. We report that chronic running, as well as acute uncontrollable stress, reduced A1R and A2AR mRNA levels in the dorsal and ventral striatum. Running also modestly elevated D2R mRNA levels in striatum regions. Finally, stress-induced cfos was potentiated in dynorphin and attenuated in enkephalin expressing neurons of running rats. These data suggest striatum adenosine and dopamine systems are targets for neuroplasticity from exercise, which may contribute to changes in direct and indirect pathway activity. These findings may have implications for striatum mediated motor and cognitive processes, as well as exercise facilitated stress-resistance. PMID:25017571

  18. MDR1 synonymous polymorphisms alter transporter specificity and protein stability in a stable epithelial monolayer.

    PubMed

    Fung, King Leung; Pan, James; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Lund, Paul E; Pixley, Jessica N; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Gottesman, Michael M

    2014-01-15

    The drug efflux function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded by MDR1 can be influenced by genetic polymorphisms, including two synonymous changes in the coding region of MDR1. Here we report that the conformation of P-gp and its drug efflux activity can be altered by synonymous polymorphisms in stable epithelial monolayers expressing P-gp. Several cell lines with similar MDR1 DNA copy number were developed and termed LLC-MDR1-WT (expresses wild-type P-gp), LLC-MDR1-3H (expresses common haplotype P-gp), and LLC-MDR1-3HA (a mutant that carries a different valine codon in position 3435). These cell lines express similar levels of recombinant mRNA and protein. P-gp in each case is localized on the apical surface of polarized cells. However, the haplotype and its mutant P-gps fold differently from the wild-type, as determined by UIC2 antibody shift assays and limited proteolysis assays. Surface biotinylation experiments suggest that the non-wild-type P-gps have longer recycling times. Drug transport assays show that wild-type and haplotype P-gp respond differently to P-gp inhibitors that block efflux of rhodamine 123 or mitoxantrone. In addition, cytotoxicity assays show that the LLC-MDR1-3H cells are more resistant to mitoxantrone than the LLC-MDR1-WT cells after being treated with a P-gp inhibitor. Expression of polymorphic P-gp, however, does not affect the host cell's morphology, growth rate, or monolayer formation. Also, ATPase activity assays indicate that neither basal nor drug-stimulated ATPase activities are affected in the variant P-gps. Taken together, our findings indicate that "silent" polymorphisms significantly change P-gp function, which would be expected to affect interindividual drug disposition and response. PMID:24305879

  19. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  20. GSK3β negatively regulates HIF1α mRNA stability via nucleolin in the MG63 osteosarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dong-dong; Zhao, Hai-guang; Yang, Yun-song; Hu, Tu; Yang, Qing-cheng

    2014-01-10

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) is a transcription factor involved in the growth, invasion and metastasis of malignant tumors. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) is a protein kinase involved in a variety of signaling pathways, such as the Wnt and NF-κB pathways; this kinase can affect tumor progress through the regulation of transcription factor expression and apoptosis. Recent studies showed that GSK3β was involved in the expression of HIF1α. However, the effect of GSK3β on HIF1α expression in osteosarcoma cells remains unknown. To understand the relationship between GSK3β and HIF1α comprehensively, small RNA interference techniques, Western blot analyses, quantitative real-time PCR analyses and luciferase assays were used in our study. Experimental data revealed that inhibition of GSK3β could increase HIF1α protein levels and expression of its target genes by increasing the stability of the HIF1α mRNA, not by affecting the HIF1α protein stability, and that this process could be mediated by nucleolin. PMID:24333432

  1. Intrafetal glucose infusion alters glucocorticoid signaling and reduces surfactant protein mRNA expression in the lung of the late-gestation sheep fetus.

    PubMed

    McGillick, Erin V; Morrison, Janna L; McMillen, I Caroline; Orgeig, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    Increased circulating fetal glucose and insulin concentrations are potential inhibitors of fetal lung maturation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in infants of diabetic mothers. In this study, we examined the effect of intrafetal glucose infusion on mRNA expression of glucose transporters, insulin-like growth factor signaling, glucocorticoid regulatory genes, and surfactant proteins in the lung of the late-gestation sheep fetus. The numerical density of the cells responsible for producing surfactant was determined using immunohistochemistry. Glucose infusion for 10 days did not affect mRNA expression of glucose transporters or IGFs but did decrease IGF-1R expression. There was reduced mRNA expression of the glucocorticoid-converting enzyme HSD11B-1 and the glucocorticoid receptor, potentially reducing glucocorticoid responsiveness in the fetal lung. Furthermore, surfactant protein (SFTP) mRNA expression was reduced in the lung following glucose infusion, while the number of SFTP-B-positive cells remained unchanged. These findings suggest the presence of a glucocorticoid-mediated mechanism regulating delayed maturation of the surfactant system in the sheep fetus following glucose infusion and provide evidence for the link between abnormal glycemic control during pregnancy and the increased risk of RDS in infants of uncontrolled diabetic mothers. PMID:24990855

  2. Sodium lauryl sulphate alters the mRNA expression of lipid-metabolizing enzymes and PPAR signalling in normal human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Törmä, Hans; Berne, Berit

    2009-12-01

    Detergents irritate skin and affect skin barrier homeostasis. In this study, healthy skin was exposed to 1% sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) in water for 24 h. Biopsies were taken 6 h to 8 days post exposure. Lipid patterns were stained in situ and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to examine mRNA expression of enzymes synthesizing barrier lipids, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) and lipoxygenases. The lipid pattern was disorganized from 6 h to 3 days after SLS exposure. Concomitant changes in mRNA expression included: (i) reduction, followed by induction, of ceramide-generating beta-glucocerebrosidase, (ii) increase on day 1 of two other enzymes for ceramide biosynthesis and (iii) persistent reduction of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-B, a key enzyme in fatty acid synthesis. Surprisingly, the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis, HMG-CoA reductase, was unaltered. Among putative regulators of barrier lipids synthesis, PPARalpha and PPARgamma exhibited reduced mRNA expression, while PPARbeta/delta and LXRbeta were unaltered. Epidermal lipoxygenase-3, which may generate PPARalpha agonists, exhibited reduced expression. In conclusion, SLS induces reorganization of lipids in the stratum corneum, which play a role in detergents' destruction of the barrier. The changes in mRNA expression of enzymes involved in synthesizing barrier lipids are probably important for the restoration of the barrier. PMID:19366370

  3. Dietary supplementation of boron differentially alters expression of borate transporter (NaBCl) mRNA by jejunum and kidney of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shengfa F; Monegue, James S; Lindemann, Merlin D; Cromwell, Gary L; Matthews, James C

    2011-11-01

    Inorganic boron (B), in the form of various borates, is readily absorbed across gastrointestinal epithelia. Although there is no stated B requirement, dietary B supplementation is thought to positively affect animal growth and metabolism, including promotion of bone strength and cell proliferation. Because of effective homeostatic control of plasma B levels, primarly by renal excretion, B toxicity in animals and humans is rare. The mechanisms responsible for improved animal performance and borate homeostasis are incompletely understood. Although a Na+-coupled borate transporter (NaBC1) has been identified, the effect of dietary B supplementation on expression of NaBCl has not been evaluated. An experiment was conducted with growing pigs to determine if NaBC1 mRNA was expressed by small intestinal epithelia and kidney of growing barrows and whether dietary B (as borate) supplementation would affect expression of NaBC1 mRNA. A concomitant objective was to test the hypothesis that B supplementation of a phosphorus (P)-deficient diet would improve calcium, phosphorus, or nitrogen retention. Twenty-four crossbred growing barrows (body weight=74.0±9.8 kg) were selected and used in a randomized complete block design experiment with a total of eight blocks and three B supplementation treatments (n=8/treatment). A typical corn-soybean meal basal diet (calculated to contain 41 mg intrinsic B/kg) was formulated to meet or exceed nutrient requirements, except for P, and fed to all pigs for 12 days. The basal diet plus 0, 50, or 100 mg/kg of B (prilled sodium borate pentahydrate, Na₂B₄O₇·5H₂O) was then fed for 18 more days. Feces and urine were collected during days 6 to 16 of the B supplementation, and pigs were killed for collection of jejunal and ileal epithelia and kidney tissue. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that NaBC1 mRNA was expressed by these tissues, a novel finding for jejunal and ileal epithelia. Boron supplementation increased

  4. Lung Altered Expression of IL-1β mRNA and Its Signaling Pathway Molecules in Obese-asthmatic Male Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Mohammad Reza; Keyhanmanesh, Rana; Khamaneh, Amir Mehdi; Ebrahimi Saadatlou, Mohammad Ali; Mesgari Abbasi, Mehran; Alipour, Mohammad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies indicate a close relationship between obesity and asthma. Here, we determined the impact of diet-induced obesity on the expression levels of IL-1β, IRAK-1 and TRAF-6 mRNA as well as IL-1β protein level and pathological changes in male Wistar rat's lung after sensitization with ovalbumin (OVA). Twenty male Wistar rats divided into four groups, control with normal diet (C+ND), OVA-sensitized with normal diet (S+ND), control with high-fat diet (C+HFD), and OVA-sensitized with high-fat diet (S+HFD). All rats fed for 12 weeks with standard pellets or high-fat diet while sensitization and challenging with OVA or saline were done for groups in the last month. In the end of intervention, lung was isolated and tested for the expression levels of IL-1β, IRAK-1 and TRAF-6 mRNA with real time-PCR method, and pathological changes were determined. Diet-induced obesity groups showed increased weight, obesity indexes and lipid profiles The expression levels of IL-1β mRNA in OVA-sensitization groups (S+ND and S+HFD) showed a significant increase compared with other groups. Also in S+HFD group, expression level of IRAK-1 and TRAF-6 mRNA were markedly higher than other groups (p<0.001). The pathological changes were marked in sensitized groups compared to non-sensitized groups; with marked increase in obese sensitized rat. The results showed that high fat diet caused overexpression of IL-1β, IRAK-1 and TRAF-6 mRNA as well as IL-1β protein in an experimental model of asthma. Our results suggest that obese-asthmatic conditions may lead to the local production and activation of pro-inflammatory agents. PMID:27424133

  5. Altered mRNA expression of the Rb and p16 tumor suppressor genes and of CDK4 in transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder associated with tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Quentin, Thomas; Henke, Christian; Korabiowska, Monika; Schlott, Thilo; Zimmerman, Britt; Kunze, Ekkehard

    2004-01-01

    and adhesives displayed altered partly elevated, partly reduced levels of Rb, p16 and CDK4 mRNA compared to non-exposed subjects. Although the underlying molecular-genetic pathways are not yet fully understood, the current results suggest functional reduction of the tumor suppressor genes Rb and p16 to be associated with progression of bladder cancer to a more malignant and aggressive behaviour. PMID:15161057

  6. Alterations in trace element levels and mRNA expression of Hsps and inflammatory cytokines in livers of duck exposed to molybdenum or/and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huabin; Gao, Feiyan; Xia, Bing; Zhang, Mengmeng; Liao, Yilin; Yang, Zhi; Hu, Guoliang; Zhang, Caiying

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of dietary Molybdenum (Mo) or/and Cadmium (Cd) on trace elements and the mRNA expression levels of heat shock proteins (Hsps) and inflammatory cytokines in duck livers. 240 healthy 11-day-old ducks were randomly divided into six groups with 40 ducks in each group, which were treated with Mo or/and Cd at different doses on the basal diet for 120 days. On days 30, 60, 90 and 120, 10 birds in each group were randomly selected and euthanized and then the livers were collected to determine the contents of Mo, Cd, copper (Cu), iron (Fe), zine (Zn), Selenium (Se) and the mRNA expression levels of Hsps, inflammatory cytokines. In addition, liver tissues at 120 days were subjected to histopathological analysis with the optical microscope. The results showed that the mRNA expression of Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were significantly (P<0.01) upregulated in combination groups; Contents of Cu, Fe, Zn, and Se decreased in combined groups (P<0.05) in the later period of the test while contents of Mo and Cd significantly increased (P<0.01); Furthermore severe hepatocyte diffuse fatty, hepatic cords swelling, hepatic sinusoid disappeared, and inflammatory cells infiltrated around the hepatic central vein were observed in Mo combined with Cd groups. The results indicated that dietary Mo or/and Cd might lead to stress, inflammatory response, tissue damage and disturb homeostasis of trace elements in duck livers. Moreover the two elements showed a possible synergistic relationship. And the high mRNA expression of HSPs and inflammatory cytokines may play a role in the resistance of liver toxicity induced by Mo and Cd. PMID:26682514

  7. Physiological and biochemical responses of transgenic potato plants with altered expression of PSII manganese stabilizing protein.

    PubMed

    Gururani, Mayank Anand; Upadhyaya, Chandrama Prakash; Strasser, Reto J; Woong, Yu Jae; Park, Se Won

    2012-09-01

    Manganese-stabilizing protein (MSP) represents a key component of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Transgenic potato plants with both enhanced (sense) and reduced (anti-sense) MSP expression levels were generated to investigate the possible physiological role of MSP in overall plant growth, particularly in tuber development. MSP antisense plants exhibited both higher tuberization frequency and higher tuber yield with increased total soluble carbohydrates. The photosynthetic efficiencies of the plants were examined using the OJIP kinetics; MSP-antisense plants were photosynthetically more active than the MSP-sense and UT (untransformed) control plants. The oxygen measurements indicated that the relative oxygen evolution was directly proportional to the MSP expression, as MSP-antisense plants showed much lower oxygen evolution compared to MSP-sense as well as UT plants. MSP-sense plants behaved like the UT plants with respect to morphology, tuber yield, and photosynthetic performance. Chlorophyll a fluorescence analyses indicate a possible lack of intact Oxygen Evolving Complexes (OECs) in MSP antisense plants, which allow access to internal non-water electron donors (e.g., ascorbate and proline) and consequently increase the Photosystem II (PSII) activity of those plants. These findings further indicate that this altered photosynthetic machinery may be associated with early tuberization and increased tuberization frequency. PMID:22824424

  8. A large-scale forest fragmentation experiment: the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems Project

    PubMed Central

    Ewers, Robert M.; Didham, Raphael K.; Fahrig, Lenore; Ferraz, Gonçalo; Hector, Andy; Holt, Robert D.; Kapos, Valerie; Reynolds, Glen; Sinun, Waidi; Snaddon, Jake L.; Turner, Edgar C.

    2011-01-01

    Opportunities to conduct large-scale field experiments are rare, but provide a unique opportunity to reveal the complex processes that operate within natural ecosystems. Here, we review the design of existing, large-scale forest fragmentation experiments. Based on this review, we develop a design for the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) Project, a new forest fragmentation experiment to be located in the lowland tropical forests of Borneo (Sabah, Malaysia). The SAFE Project represents an advance on existing experiments in that it: (i) allows discrimination of the effects of landscape-level forest cover from patch-level processes; (ii) is designed to facilitate the unification of a wide range of data types on ecological patterns and processes that operate over a wide range of spatial scales; (iii) has greater replication than existing experiments; (iv) incorporates an experimental manipulation of riparian corridors; and (v) embeds the experimentally fragmented landscape within a wider gradient of land-use intensity than do existing projects. The SAFE Project represents an opportunity for ecologists across disciplines to participate in a large initiative designed to generate a broad understanding of the ecological impacts of tropical forest modification. PMID:22006969

  9. Prenatal ethanol increases ethanol intake throughout adolescence, alters ethanol-mediated aversive learning, and affects μ but not δ or κ opioid receptor mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Fabio, María Carolina; Macchione, Ana Fabiola; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2015-06-01

    Animal models of prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) have indicated a facilitatory effect of PEE on adolescent ethanol intake, but few studies have assessed the effects of moderate PEE throughout adolescence. The mechanisms underlying this facilitatory effect remain largely unknown. In the present study, we analysed ethanol intake in male and female Wistar rats with or without PEE (2.0 g/kg, gestational days 17-20) from postnatal days 37 to 62. The results revealed greater ethanol consumption in PEE rats than in controls, which persisted throughout adolescence. By the end of testing, ethanol ingestion in PEE rats was nearly 6.0 g/kg. PEE was associated with insensitivity to ethanol-induced aversion. PEE and control rats were further analysed for levels of μ, δ and κ opioid receptor mRNA in the infralimbic cortex, nucleus accumbens shell, and ventral tegmental area. Similar levels of mRNA were observed across most areas and opioid receptors, but μ receptor mRNA in the ventral tegmental area was significantly increased by PEE. Unlike previous studies that assessed the effects of PEE on ethanol intake close to birth, or in only a few sessions during adolescence, the present study observed a facilitatory effect of PEE that lasted throughout adolescence. PEE was associated with insensitivity to the aversive effect of ethanol, and increased levels of μ opioid receptor transcripts. PEE is a prominent vulnerability factor that probably favors the engagement of adolescents in risky trajectories of ethanol use. PMID:25865037

  10. The group A Streptococcus small regulatory RNA FasX enhances streptokinase activity by increasing the stability of the ska mRNA transcript

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Peña, Esmeralda; Treviño, Jeanette; Liu, Zhuyun; Perez, Nataly; Sumby, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Summary Small RNA molecules play key regulatory roles in many bacterial species. However, little mechanistic data exists for the action of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) in the human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS). Here, we analyzed the relationship between a putative GAS sRNA and production of the secreted virulence factor streptokinase (SKA). SKA promotes GAS dissemination by activating conversion of host plasminogen into the fibrin-degrading protease plasmin. Homologues of the putative sRNA-encoding gene fibronectin/fibrinogen-binding/hemolytic-activity/streptokinase-regulator-X (fasX) were identified in four different pyogenic streptococcal species. However, despite 79% fasX nucleotide identity, a fasX allele from the animal pathogen Streptococcus zooepidemicus failed to complement a GAS fasX mutant. Using a series of precisely-constructed fasX alleles we discovered that FasX is a bona-fide sRNA that post-transcriptionally regulates SKA production in GAS. By base-pairing to the 5’ end of ska mRNA, FasX enhances ska transcript stability, resulting in a ~10-fold increase in SKA activity. Our data provide new insights into the mechanisms used by sRNAs to activate target mRNAs, and enhances our understanding of the regulation of a key GAS virulence factor. PMID:21143309

  11. Tumor-suppressor NFκB2 p100 interacts with ERK2 and stabilizes PTEN mRNA via inhibition of miR-494.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Xu, J; Gao, G; Li, J; Huang, H; Jin, H; Zhu, J; Che, X; Huang, C

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence from The Cancer Genome Atlas has revealed that nuclear factor κB2 (nfκb2) gene encoding p100 is genetically deleted or mutated in human cancers, implicating NFκB2 as a potential tumor suppressor. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the antitumorigenic action of p100 remains poorly understood. Here we report that p100 inhibits cancer cell anchorage-independent growth, a hallmark of cellular malignancy, by stabilizing the tumor-suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mRNA via a mechanism that is independent of p100's inhibitory role in NFκB activation. We further demonstrate that the regulatory effect of p100 on PTEN expression is mediated by its downregulation of miR-494 as a result of the inactivation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2), in turn leading to inhibition of c-Jun/activator protein-1-dependent transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we identify that p100 specifically interacts with non-phosphorylated ERK2 and prevents ERK2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Moreover, the death domain at C-terminal of p100 is identified as being crucial and sufficient for its interaction with ERK2. Taken together, our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into the understanding of the tumor-suppressive role for NFκB2 p100. PMID:26686085

  12. Aggressive Encounters Alter the Activation of Serotonergic Neurons and the Expression of 5-HT1A mRNA in the Hamster Dorsal Raphe Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Matthew A.; Grober, Matthew S.; Nicholas, Christopher; Huhman, Kim L.

    2009-01-01

    Serotonergic (5-HT) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) have been implicated in stress-induced changes in behavior. Previous research indicates that stressful stimuli activate 5-HT neurons in select subregions of the DRN. Uncontrollable stress is thought to sensitize 5-HT neurons in the DRN and allow for an exaggerated 5-HT response to future stimuli. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that following aggressive encounters, losing male Syrian hamsters would exhibit increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in 5-HT DRN neurons compared to winners or controls. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that losers would have decreased 5-HT1A mRNA levels in the DRN compared to winners or controls. We found that a single 15-min aggressive encounter increased c-Fos expression in 5-HT and non-5-HT neurons in losers compared to winners and controls. The increased c-Fos expression in losers was restricted to ventral regions of the rostral DRN. We also found that four 5-min aggressive encounters reduced total 5-HT1A mRNA levels in the DRN in losers compared to winners and controls, and that differences in mRNA levels were not restricted to specific DRN subregions. These results suggest that social defeat activates neurons in select subregions of the DRN and reduces message for DRN 5-HT1A autoreceptors. Our results support the hypothesis that social stress can activate 5-HT neurons in the DRN, reduce 5-HT1A autoreceptor-mediated inhibition, and lead to hyperactivity of 5-HT neurons. PMID:19362123

  13. Runx3 Expression Inhibits Proliferation and Distinctly Alters mRNA Expression of Bax in AGS and A549 Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Torshabi, Maryam; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Tabatabaei Yazdi, Mojtaba; Ostad, Seyyed Naser; Gharemani, Mohammad Hosein

    2011-01-01

    Runx3, a member of Runt-related transcription factor (Runx) proteins with tumor suppressor effect, is a tissue–restricted and cancer related transcription factor that regulate cell proliferation and growth, as well as differentiation. In the present study, exogenous Run3 was transiently expressed in AGS (human gastric adenocarcinoma), with undetectable Runx3 protein and in A549 (human lung carcinoma) with low levels of endogenous Runx3 protein. The GFP tagged Runx3 was transfected into AGS and A549 cells using fugene6 and PolyFect and Runx3 expression was confirmed by fluorescent microscopy and RT-PCR. The effect of Runx3 transfection on cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay and the results were confirmed by the trypan blue dye exclusion method. The effect of Runx3 expression on mRNA expression of BCL2-associated X protein (Bax) was evaluated using RT-PCR. In AGS and A549 cells, Runx3 expression inhibited cell proliferation (p < 0.01). The growth inhibition was less in A549 cells. We show that Runx3 expression increases Bax mRNA expression in AGS cells when compared with control (p < 0.05), but no significant differences in mRNA expression was observed in both examined cells. Runx3 expression has antiproliferative effect in AGS cell perhaps via increase in expression of Bax. The effect of Runx3 on A549 cells’ viability which has endogenous level of Runx3 is not related to Bax. These findings implicate a complex regulation by Runx3 in inhibition of cell proliferation utilizing Bax. PMID:24250365

  14. Embryonic Lethal Abnormal Vision-like HuR-dependent mRNA Stability Regulates Post-transcriptional Expression of Cyclin-dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    Ziegeler, Gudrun; Ming, Jie; Koseki, Jana C.; Sevinc, Sema; Chen, Ting; Ergun, Suleyman; Qin, Xuebin; Aktas, Bertal H.

    2010-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 plays a critical role in regulating entry into and exit from the cell cycle. Post-transcriptional regulation of p27Kip1 expression is of significant interest. The embryonic lethal abnormal vision (ELAV)-like RNA-binding protein HuR is thought be important for the translation of p27Kip1, however, different reports attributed diametrically opposite roles to HuR. We report here an alternative mechanism wherein HuR regulates stability of the p27Kip1 mRNA. Specifically, human and mouse p27Kip1 mRNAs interact with HuR protein through multiple U-rich elements in both 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTR). These interactions, which occur in vitro and in vivo, stabilize p27Kip1 mRNA and play a critical role in its accumulation. Deleting HuR binding sites or knocking down HuR expression destabilizes p27Kip1 mRNA and reduces its accumulation. We also identified a CT repeat in the 5′ UTR of full-length p27Kip1 mRNA isoforms that interact with a ∼41-kDa protein and represses p27Kip1 expression. This CT-rich element and diffuse elements in the 3′ UTR regulate post-transcriptional expression of p27Kip1 at the level of translation. This is the first demonstration that HuR-dependent mRNA stability and HuR-independent mRNA translation plays a critical role in the regulation of post-transcriptional p27Kip1 expression. PMID:20332085

  15. Penicillin-Binding Protein 5 Sequence Alteration and Levels of plp5 mRNA Expression in Clinical Isolates of Enterococcus faecium with Different Levels of Ampicillin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Belhaj, Mondher; Boutiba-Ben Boubaker, Ilhem; Slim, Amin

    2016-04-01

    Eighty-two nonduplicated ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (AREF) isolates from clinical infections at the Charles Nicolle Hospital of Tunisia were investigated. They were collected from January 2001 to December 2009. Genetic relationship between them was studied using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The amino acid sequence difference variations of the C-terminal part of penicillin-binding protein 5 (PBP5) versus levels of expressed mRNA were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequencing, and real-time PCR quantification of (PBP5), respectively. No β-lactamase activity was detected and none of our strains showed resistance to glycopeptides, which retain their therapeutic efficiency against enterococcal infections in our hospital. Pattern analysis of the strains revealed six main clones disseminating in different wards. Sequence data revealed the existence of 19 different plp5 alleles with a difference in 16 amino acid positions spanning from residue 414 to 632. Each allele presented at least five amino acid substitutions (His-470→Gln, Asn-496→Lys, Ala-499→Thr, Glu-525→Asp, and Glu-629→Val). No correlation between amino acid sequence polymorphism of PBP5 and levels of ampicillin resistance was detected. The levels of plp5 mRNA expression varied between strains and did not always correlate with levels of ampicillin resistance in clinical AREF. PMID:26618475

  16. Intra-cervical application of Misoprostol at estrus alters the content of cervical hyaluronan and the mRNA expression of follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) and cyclooxygenase-2 in the ewe.

    PubMed

    Leethongdee, S; Kershaw-Young, C M; Scaramuzzi, R J; Khalid, M

    2010-06-01

    The complex anatomy the of ovine cervix limits the success of transcervical artificial insemination in sheep, but Misoprostol (a PGE(1) analogue) relaxes the cervix and facilitates transcervical artificial insemination. However, the mechanism by which Misoprostol causes cervical relaxation is not known. This study examined if intra-cervical Misoprostol altered the hyaluronan content and the mRNA expression of COX-2, LHR, or FSHR in the cervix of the estrus ewe. Estrus was synchronized in cyclic ewes with progestagen pessaries and 48 h after sponge removal ewes were treated intra-cervically with 0 (controls), 200, or 400 microg Misoprostol. Hyaluronan content was determined by ELISA and mRNA expression of LHR, FSHR, and COX-2 was analyzed by in situ hybridization using digoxigenin-11-uridine-5'-triphosphate labeled riboprobes. The hyaluronan content of the cervix was significantly higher in sheep that received 200 (P<0.05) or 400 (P<0.05) microg Misoprostol compared to controls. Moreover, it was significantly (P<0.05) higher in the vaginal region compared to mid and uterine regions. Misoprostol increased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression of LHR and COX-2 but not FSHR. The expression for all three genes was highest in the vaginal region and lowest in uterine region. The luminal epithelium and circular smooth muscle layers had higher (P<0.05) expression for LHR, FSHR, and COX-2 mRNAs, and the sub-epithelial stroma had the lowest (P<0.05). We propose that the intra-cervical application of Misoprostol induces the mRNA expression of LHR, FSHR, and COX-2 through a positive feedback loop. The data suggest that softening of the cervix by Misoprostol is caused by an increase in the hyaluronan content of the cervix. PMID:20171717

  17. Alterations of auxin perception in rolB-transformed tobacco protoplasts. Time course of rolB mRNA expression and increase in auxin sensitivity reveal multiple control by auxin.

    PubMed Central

    Maurel, C; Leblanc, N; Barbier-Brygoo, H; Perrot-Rechenmann, C; Bouvier-Durand, M; Guern, J

    1994-01-01

    Expression and physiological effects of the root-inducing rolB gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes T-DNA were studied simultaneously in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mesophyll protoplasts. The kinetic study of the expression of rolB mRNA following exogenous auxin application showed that auxin transiently stimulated rolB expression, with mRNA levels starting to accumulate 6 to 9 h after auxin was supplied and increasing 300-fold after 12 to 18 h. The parallel study of the auxin sensitivity of rolB-transformed protoplasts, as assayed by their electrical response to the hormone, showed that the auxin treatment generated an increase in sensitivity by a factor of up to 100,000, whereas in untransformed protoplasts the same auxin treatment induced an increase in auxin sensitivity that never exceeded 30- to 50-fold. This reflects a strong cooperative effect of auxin and rolB in transformed protoplasts. Surprisingly, the maximal increase in sensitivity was observed several hours before the maximal accumulation of rolB mRNA, suggesting that the dramatic control of auxin sensitivity by auxin in rolB-transformed protoplasts requires only low levels of rolB expression. Antibodies directed against ZmER-abp1, the major auxin-binding protein from maize, differentially altered the auxin sensitivity of the electrical response of rolB-transformed and normal protoplasts. This suggests that alterations of the auxin reception-transduction pathway at the plasma membrane of rolB-transformed protoplasts may account for their increased auxin sensitivity. PMID:7972494

  18. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus RnpA Alter Cellular mRNA Turnover, Exhibit Antimicrobial Activity, and Attenuate Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Patrick D.; Kuechenmeister, Lisa J.; Anderson, Kelsi L.; Daily, Sonja; Beenken, Karen E.; Roux, Christelle M.; Reniere, Michelle L.; Lewis, Tami L.; Weiss, William J.; Pulse, Mark; Nguyen, Phung; Simecka, Jerry W.; Morrison, John M.; Sayood, Khalid; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Smeltzer, Mark S.; Skaar, Eric P.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is estimated to cause more U.S. deaths annually than HIV/AIDS. The emergence of hypervirulent and multidrug-resistant strains has further amplified public health concern and accentuated the need for new classes of antibiotics. RNA degradation is a required cellular process that could be exploited for novel antimicrobial drug development. However, such discovery efforts have been hindered because components of the Gram-positive RNA turnover machinery are incompletely defined. In the current study we found that the essential S. aureus protein, RnpA, catalyzes rRNA and mRNA digestion in vitro. Exploiting this activity, high through-put and secondary screening assays identified a small molecule inhibitor of RnpA-mediated in vitro RNA degradation. This agent was shown to limit cellular mRNA degradation and exhibited antimicrobial activity against predominant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) lineages circulating throughout the U.S., vancomycin intermediate susceptible S. aureus (VISA), vancomycin resistant S. aureus (VRSA) and other Gram-positive bacterial pathogens with high RnpA amino acid conservation. We also found that this RnpA-inhibitor ameliorates disease in a systemic mouse infection model and has antimicrobial activity against biofilm-associated S. aureus. Taken together, these findings indicate that RnpA, either alone, as a component of the RNase P holoenzyme, and/or as a member of a more elaborate complex, may play a role in S. aureus RNA degradation and provide proof of principle for RNA catabolism-based antimicrobial therapy. PMID:21347352

  19. Syndromic deafness mutations at Asn 14 differentially alter the open stability of Cx26 hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Helmuth A; Slavi, Nefeli; Srinivas, Miduturu; Verselis, Vytas K

    2016-07-01

    Connexin 26 (Cx26) is a transmembrane protein that forms hexameric hemichannels that can function when unopposed or dock to form intercellular gap junction channels. Aberrantly functioning unopposed hemichannels are a common feature of syndromic deafness associated with mutations in Cx26. In this study, we examine two different mutations at the same position in the N-terminal domain of Cx26, N14K and N14Y, which have been reported to produce different phenotypes in patients. We find that both N14K and N14Y, when expressed alone or together with wild-type (WT) Cx26, result in functional hemichannels with widely disparate functional properties. N14K currents are robust, whereas N14Y currents are small. The two mutants also exhibit opposite shifts in voltage-dependent loop gating, such that activation of N14K and N14Y is shifted in the hyperpolarizing and depolarizing directions, respectively. Deactivation kinetics suggests that N14K stabilizes and N14Y destabilizes the open state. Single N14K hemichannel recordings in low extracellular Ca(2+) show no evidence of stable closing transitions associated with loop gating, and N14K hemichannels are insensitive to pH. Together, these properties cause N14K hemichannels to be particularly refractory to closing. Although we find that the unitary conductance of N14K is indistinguishable from WT Cx26, mutagenesis and substituted cysteine accessibility studies suggest that the N14 residue is exposed to the pore and that the differential properties of N14K and N14Y hemichannels likely result from altered electrostatic interactions between the N terminus and the cytoplasmic extension of TM2 in the adjacent subunit. The combined effects that we observe on loop gating and pH regulation may explain the unusual buccal cutaneous manifestations in patients carrying the N14K mutation. Our work also provides new considerations regarding the underlying molecular mechanism of loop gating, which controls hemichannel opening in the plasma

  20. Decreased stability and translation of T cell receptor zeta mRNA with an alternatively spliced 3'-untranslated region contribute to zeta chain down-regulation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Bhabadeb; Tsokos, Christos G; Krishnan, Sandeep; Robertson, James; Fisher, Carolyn U; Warke, Rahul G; Warke, Vishal G; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Tsokos, George C

    2005-05-13

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the aberrant expression of T cell receptor (TCR) zeta chain of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus are not known. Previously we demonstrated that although normal T cells express high levels of TCR zeta mRNA with wild-type (WT) 3' untranslated region (3' UTR), systemic lupus erythematosus T cells display significantly high levels of TCR zeta mRNA with the alternatively spliced (AS) 3' UTR form, which is derived by splice deletion of nucleotides 672-1233 of the TCR zeta transcript. Here we report that the stability of TCR zeta mRNA with an AS 3' UTR is low compared with TCR zeta mRNA with WT 3' UTR. AS 3' UTR, but not WT 3' UTR, conferred similar instability to the luciferase gene. Immunoblotting of cell lysates derived from transfected COS-7 cells demonstrated that TCR zeta with AS 3' UTR produced low amounts of 16-kDa protein. In vitro transcription and translation also produced low amounts of protein from TCR zeta with AS 3' UTR. Taken together our findings suggest that nucleotides 672-1233 bp of TCR zeta 3' UTR play a critical role in its stability and also have elements required for the translational regulation of TCR zeta chain expression in human T cells. PMID:15743765

  1. Shared ancestry influences community stability by altering competitive interactions: evidence from a laboratory microcosm experiment using freshwater green algae

    PubMed Central

    Venail, Patrick A.; Alexandrou, Markos A.; Oakley, Todd H.; Cardinale, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of biodiversity on the stability of ecological communities has been debated among biologists for more than a century. Recently summarized empirical evidence suggests that biodiversity tends to enhance the temporal stability of community-level properties such as biomass; however, the underlying mechanisms driving this relationship remain poorly understood. Here, we report the results of a microcosm study in which we used simplified systems of freshwater microalgae to explore how the phylogenetic relatedness of species influences the temporal stability of community biomass by altering the nature of their competitive interactions. We show that combinations of two species that are more evolutionarily divergent tend to have lower temporal stability of biomass. In part, this is due to negative ‘selection effects’ in which bicultures composed of distantly related species are more likely to contain strong competitors that achieve low biomass. In addition, bicultures of distantly related species had on average weaker competitive interactions, which reduced compensatory dynamics and decreased the stability of community biomass. Our results demonstrate that evolutionary history plays a key role in controlling the mechanisms, which give rise to diversity–stability relationships. As such, patterns of shared ancestry may help us predict the ecosystem-level consequences of biodiversity loss. PMID:23945692

  2. Snf1-Dependent Transcription Confers Glucose-Induced Decay upon the mRNA Product

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Katherine A.; Dombek, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the switch from respiratory metabolism to fermentation causes rapid decay of transcripts encoding proteins uniquely required for aerobic metabolism. Snf1, the yeast ortholog of AMP-activated protein kinase, has been implicated in this process because inhibiting Snf1 mimics the addition of glucose. In this study, we show that the SNF1-dependent ADH2 promoter, or just the major transcription factor binding site, is sufficient to confer glucose-induced mRNA decay upon heterologous transcripts. SNF1-independent expression from the ADH2 promoter prevented glucose-induced mRNA decay without altering the start site of transcription. SNF1-dependent transcripts are enriched for the binding motif of the RNA binding protein Vts1, an important mediator of mRNA decay and mRNA repression whose expression is correlated with decreased abundance of SNF1-dependent transcripts during the yeast metabolic cycle. However, deletion of VTS1 did not slow the rate of glucose-induced mRNA decay. ADH2 mRNA rapidly dissociated from polysomes after glucose repletion, and sequences bound by RNA binding proteins were enriched in the transcripts from repressed cells. Inhibiting the protein kinase A pathway did not affect glucose-induced decay of ADH2 mRNA. Our results suggest that Snf1 may influence mRNA stability by altering the recruitment activity of the transcription factor Adr1. PMID:26667037

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL AND MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF SYSTEMS WHICH ALTER GENOME STABILITY IN PSEUDOMONAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was used a model organism to study mechanisms that lead to genome alteration in freshwater microbial populations. ur studies demonstrated horizontal transmission by both transduction and conjugation in freshwater ecosystems and provided data that suggest th...

  4. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in Drinking Water Causes Alterations in Locomotor Activity and Decreases Striatal mRNA for the D2 Dopamine Receptor in CD1 Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Moreno Ávila, Claudia Leticia; Limón-Pacheco, Jorge H; Giordano, Magda; Rodríguez, Verónica M

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with sensory, motor, memory, and learning alterations in humans and alterations in locomotor activity, behavioral tasks, and neurotransmitters systems in rodents. In this study, CD1 mice were exposed to 0.5 or 5.0 mg As/L of drinking water for 6 months. Locomotor activity, aggression, interspecific behavior and physical appearance, monoamines levels, and expression of the messenger for dopamine receptors D1 and D2 were assessed. Arsenic exposure produced hypoactivity at six months and other behaviors such as rearing and on-wall rearing and barbering showed both increases and decreases. No alterations on aggressive behavior or monoamines levels in striatum or frontal cortex were observed. A significant decrease in the expression of mRNA for D2 receptors was found in striatum of mice exposed to 5.0 mg As/L. This study provides evidence for the use of dopamine receptor D2 as potential target of arsenic toxicity in the dopaminergic system. PMID:27375740

  5. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in Drinking Water Causes Alterations in Locomotor Activity and Decreases Striatal mRNA for the D2 Dopamine Receptor in CD1 Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Ávila, Claudia Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with sensory, motor, memory, and learning alterations in humans and alterations in locomotor activity, behavioral tasks, and neurotransmitters systems in rodents. In this study, CD1 mice were exposed to 0.5 or 5.0 mg As/L of drinking water for 6 months. Locomotor activity, aggression, interspecific behavior and physical appearance, monoamines levels, and expression of the messenger for dopamine receptors D1 and D2 were assessed. Arsenic exposure produced hypoactivity at six months and other behaviors such as rearing and on-wall rearing and barbering showed both increases and decreases. No alterations on aggressive behavior or monoamines levels in striatum or frontal cortex were observed. A significant decrease in the expression of mRNA for D2 receptors was found in striatum of mice exposed to 5.0 mg As/L. This study provides evidence for the use of dopamine receptor D2 as potential target of arsenic toxicity in the dopaminergic system. PMID:27375740

  6. Yak response to high-altitude hypoxic stress by altering mRNA expression and DNA methylation of hypoxia-inducible factors.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xianrong; Fu, Mei; Lan, Daoliang; Li, Jian; Zi, Xiangdong; Zhong, Jincheng

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are oxygen-dependent transcriptional activators, which play crucial roles in tumor angiogenesis and mammalian development, and regulate the transcription of genes involved in oxygen homeostasis in response to hypoxia. However, information on HIF-1α and HIF-2α in yak (Bos grunniens) is scarce. The complete coding region of yak HIF-2α was cloned, its mRNA expression in several tissues were determined, and the expression levels were compared with those of closely related low-altitude cattle (Bos taurus), and the methylation status of promoter regions were analyzed to better understand the roles of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in domesticated yak. The yak HIF-2α cDNA was cloned and sequenced in the present work reveals the evolutionary conservation through multiple sequence alignment, although 15 bases changed, resulting in 8 amino acid substitutions in the translated proteins in cattle. The tissue-specific expression results showed that HIF-1α is ubiquitously expressed, whereas HIF-2α expression is limited to endothelial tissues (kidney, heart, lung, spleen, and liver) and blood in yak. Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α expressions were higher in yak tissues than in cattle. The HIF-1α expression level is much higher in yak than cattle in these organs, except for the lung (P < 0.05), but the HIF-2α gene is significantly different in the heart, spleen, and kidney (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the methylation levels in the 5' flanking regulatory regions of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in yak kidney were significantly decreased than cattle counterparts (P < 0.05). Identifying these genes and the comparison of different expressions facilitates the understanding of the biological high-altitude hypoxic stress response mechanism and may assist current medical research to understand hypoxia-related diseases. PMID:25927169

  7. Stability of Grassland Communities to Altered Precipitation: A Meta-Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Shi, Z.; Collins, S. L.; Knapp, A.; Pockman, W.; Smith, M.

    2014-12-01

    Species-specific responses to changes in precipitation can alter plant community structure and composition potentially altering ecosystem functioning. The latter will further feed back to climate change. Here, we synthesized results from more than 50 experimental studies that either increased or decreased precipitation in grasslands to assess productivity responses of different species and plant functional types (PFT) as well as changes in community structure. Our results showed that increased precipitation enhanced aboveground net primary production (ANPP) of the dominant PFT but had no effect on ANPP of the subordinate species. Similarly, decreased precipitation reduced ANPP of the dominant species but not that of subordinate species. Individual C3 species were highly responsive to alterations in precipitation, but C4 species were not. Altered precipitation had no effect on species richness, evenness or diversity. Overall, ANPP and belowground net primary productivity (BNPP) responded to both increased and reduced precipitation, but relative responses of ANPP to increased precipitation diminished with increasing mean annual precipitation (MAP) whereas the relative responses to reduced precipitation did not change with MAP. BNPP responses to altered precipitation did not vary with MAP. Our findings suggest that the dominant PFT in grasslands can be used as a proxy for community responses in ecosystem biogeochemical models. Further, grassland community composition and structure appear to be relatively stable in response to alterations in precipitation of the duration and magnitude encompassed by these experiments.

  8. Phosphate Stability in Diagenetic Fluids Constrains the Acidic Alteration Model for Lower Mt. Sharp Sedimentary Rocks in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, J. A.; Schmidt, M. E.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Gellert, R.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; VanBommel, S. J.; McAdam, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars rover Curiosity has encountered silica-enriched bedrock (as strata and as veins and associated halos of alteration) in the largely basaltic Murray Fm. of Mt. Sharp in Gale Crater. Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) investigations of the Murray Fm. revealed decreasing Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, and Al, and higher S, as silica increased (Fig. 1). A positive correlation between SiO2 and TiO2 (up to 74.4 and 1.7 wt %, respectively) suggests that these two insoluble elements were retained while acidic fluids leached more soluble elements. Other evidence also supports a silica-retaining, acidic alteration model for the Murray Fm., including low trace element abundances consistent with leaching, and the presence of opaline silica and jarosite determined by CheMin. Phosphate stability is a key component of this model because PO4 3- is typically soluble in acidic water and is likely a mobile ion in diagenetic fluids (pH less than 5). However, the Murray rocks are not leached of P; they have variable P2O5 (Fig. 1) ranging from average Mars (0.9 wt%) up to the highest values in Gale Crater (2.5 wt%). Here we evaluate APXS measurements of Murray Fm. bedrock and veins with respect to phosphate stability in acidic fluids as a test of the acidic alteration model for the Lower Mt. Sharp rocks.

  9. Alteration of the stability of Bag-1 protein in the control of olfactory neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sourisseau, T; Desbois, C; Debure, L; Bowtell, D D; Cato, A C; Schneikert, J; Moyse, E; Michel, D

    2001-04-01

    Normal apoptosis occurs continuously in the olfactory neuroepithelium of adult vertebrates, making it a useful model for studying neuronal apoptosis. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of the anti-apoptotic Bag-1 gene in olfactory neuronal cells confers a strong resistance to apoptosis. Conversely decreased levels of Bag-1 were found to precede a massive wave of olfactory neuronal apoptosis triggered by synaptic target ablation. We show that the decrease is brought about by ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of the Bag-1 protein. The ring finger protein Siah-2 is a likely candidate for the ubiquitination reaction since Siah-2 mRNA accumulated in lesioned olfactory neuroepithelium and overexpression of Siah-2 stimulated Bag-1 ubiquitination and degradation in transient expression assays. These results together identify destabilization of Bag-1 as a necessary step in olfactory neuronal apoptosis. PMID:11257006

  10. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  11. Xyloglucan Deficiency Disrupts Microtubule Stability and Cellulose Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, Altering Cell Growth and Morphogenesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chaowen; Zhang, Tian; Zheng, Yunzhen

    2016-01-01

    Xyloglucan constitutes most of the hemicellulose in eudicot primary cell walls and functions in cell wall structure and mechanics. Although Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) xxt1 xxt2 mutants lacking detectable xyloglucan are viable, they display growth defects that are suggestive of alterations in wall integrity. To probe the mechanisms underlying these defects, we analyzed cellulose arrangement, microtubule patterning and dynamics, microtubule- and wall-integrity-related gene expression, and cellulose biosynthesis in xxt1 xxt2 plants. We found that cellulose is highly aligned in xxt1 xxt2 cell walls, that its three-dimensional distribution is altered, and that microtubule patterning and stability are aberrant in etiolated xxt1 xxt2 hypocotyls. We also found that the expression levels of microtubule-associated genes, such as MAP70-5 and CLASP, and receptor genes, such as HERK1 and WAK1, were changed in xxt1 xxt2 plants and that cellulose synthase motility is reduced in xxt1 xxt2 cells, corresponding with a reduction in cellulose content. Our results indicate that loss of xyloglucan affects both the stability of the microtubule cytoskeleton and the production and patterning of cellulose in primary cell walls. These findings establish, to our knowledge, new links between wall integrity, cytoskeletal dynamics, and wall synthesis in the regulation of plant morphogenesis. PMID:26527657

  12. Interleukin-1β induced Stress Granules Sequester COX-2 mRNA and Regulates its Stability and Translation in Human OA Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohammad Y.; Haqqi, Tariq M.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced and immediate expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA is observed in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes but the synthesis of protein found significantly delayed. Here we investigated the role of stress granules (SGs), ribonucleoprotein complexes that regulate mRNA translation, in the delayed translation of COX-2 mRNAs in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Stimulation of human chondrocytes with IL-1β activated the stress response genes and the phosphorylation of eIF2α that triggered the assembly of SGs. Using combined immunofluorescence staining of SGs markers and COX-2 protein, RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization and RNA immunoprecipitation, the COX-2 mRNAs were found sequestered in SGs in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. No increase in COX-2 protein expression was observed during the persistence of SGs but enhanced expression of COX-2 protein was noted upon clearance of the SGs. Inhibition of SGs clearance blocked COX-2 mRNA translation whereas blocking the assembly of SGs by TIA-1 depletion resulted in rapid and increased production of COX-2 and PGE2. Our findings show for the first time assembly of SGs and sequestration of COX-2 mRNAs in human OA chondrocytes under pathological conditions. Post-transcriptional regulation of COX-2 mRNAs translation by SGs indicates a role in IL-1β-mediated catabolic response that could be therapeutically targeted in OA. PMID:27271770

  13. Detecting altered postural control after cerebral concussion in athletes with normal postural stability

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, J; Guskiewicz, K; Giuliani, C; Marshall, S; Mercer, V; Stergiou, N

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine if approximate entropy (ApEn), a regularity statistic from non-linear dynamics, could detect changes in postural control during quiet standing in athletes with normal postural stability after cerebral concussion. Methods: The study was a retrospective, case series analysis of centre of pressure (COP) data collected during the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) from NCAA Division I (USA) athletes prior to and within 48 h after injury. Subjects were 21 male and six female athletes from a variety of sports who sustained a cerebral concussion between 1997 and 2003. After injury, athletes displayed normal postural stability equivalent to preseason levels. For comparison, COP data also were collected from 15 male and 15 female healthy non-athletes on two occasions. ApEn values were calculated for COP anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) time series. Results: Compared to healthy subjects, COP oscillations among athletes generally became more regular (lower ApEn value) after injury despite the absence of postural instability. For AP time series, declines in ApEn values were much larger in SOT conditions 1 and 2 (approximately three times as large as the standard error of the mean) than for all other conditions. For ML time series, ApEn values declined after injury in all sensory conditions (F1,55 = 6.36, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Athletes who demonstrated normal postural stability after concussion nonetheless displayed subtle changes in postural control. Changes in ApEn may have represented a clinically abnormal finding. ApEn analysis of COP oscillations may be a valuable supplement to existing concussion assessment protocols for athletes. PMID:16244188

  14. Identification of the cis-elements mediating the autogenous control of ribosomal protein L2 mRNA stability in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Presutti, C; Villa, T; Hall, D; Pertica, C; Bozzoni, I

    1995-01-01

    The ribosomal protein L2 (rpL2) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae regulates the accumulation of its own mRNA by a feedback mechanism. An RNA sequence is responsible for this control, initially characterized as a 360 nucleotide-long region, localized at the 5' end of the transcript. This region, fused to an unrelated coding sequence, is able to down-regulate the accumulation of the chimeric transcript when increased levels of rpL2 are induced in the cell. The target regulatory region also responds to regulation when inserted inside an intron, demonstrating that the control process can take place inside the nucleus. Deletion analysis from the 5' and 3' borders have restricted the responsive region to approximately 200 nt. The insertion of a poly-G cassette downstream of the regulatory region allowed the identification of truncated 3' cut-off poly(A)+ RNA molecules. The parallel identification of cut-off molecules containing the 5' portion of the transcript allowed us to deduce that the truncated products originate by endonucleolytic cleavage. Altogether, these results are consistent with a mechanism by which the presence of excess amounts of rpL2 in the cell triggers its own mRNA to a degradative pathway; this involves an initial endonucleolytic cleavage that is followed by exonucleolytic trimming. Such a regulatory mechanism shows interesting analogies with the translational regulation of r-proteins in Escherichia coli. Images PMID:7664741

  15. The role of mRNA and protein stability in the function of coupled positive and negative feedback systems in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Moss Bendtsen, Kristian; Jensen, Mogens H; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    Oscillators and switches are important elements of regulation in biological systems. These are composed of coupling negative feedback loops, which cause oscillations when delayed, and positive feedback loops, which lead to memory formation. Here, we examine the behavior of a coupled feedback system, the Negative Autoregulated Frustrated bistability motif (NAF). This motif is a combination of two previously explored motifs, the frustrated bistability motif (FBM) and the negative auto regulation motif (NAR), which both can produce oscillations. The NAF motif was previously suggested to govern long term memory formation in animals, and was used as a synthetic oscillator in bacteria. We build a mathematical model to analyze the dynamics of the NAF motif. We show analytically that the NAF motif requires an asymmetry in the strengths of activation and repression links in order to produce oscillations. We show that the effect of time delays in eukaryotic cells, originating from mRNA export and protein import, are negligible in this system. Based on the reported protein and mRNA half-lives in eukaryotic cells, we find that even though the NAF motif possesses the ability for oscillations, it mostly promotes constant protein expression at the biologically relevant parameter regimes. PMID:26365394

  16. The role of mRNA and protein stability in the function of coupled positive and negative feedback systems in eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Moss Bendtsen, Kristian; Jensen, Mogens H.; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    Oscillators and switches are important elements of regulation in biological systems. These are composed of coupling negative feedback loops, which cause oscillations when delayed, and positive feedback loops, which lead to memory formation. Here, we examine the behavior of a coupled feedback system, the Negative Autoregulated Frustrated bistability motif (NAF). This motif is a combination of two previously explored motifs, the frustrated bistability motif (FBM) and the negative auto regulation motif (NAR), which both can produce oscillations. The NAF motif was previously suggested to govern long term memory formation in animals, and was used as a synthetic oscillator in bacteria. We build a mathematical model to analyze the dynamics of the NAF motif. We show analytically that the NAF motif requires an asymmetry in the strengths of activation and repression links in order to produce oscillations. We show that the effect of time delays in eukaryotic cells, originating from mRNA export and protein import, are negligible in this system. Based on the reported protein and mRNA half-lives in eukaryotic cells, we find that even though the NAF motif possesses the ability for oscillations, it mostly promotes constant protein expression at the biologically relevant parameter regimes. PMID:26365394

  17. How Mechanical Deformation of Polymers during Vitrification Alters the Subsequent Stability of the Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Laura A. G.; Roth, Connie B.

    2015-03-01

    How stress and mechanical deformation impart mobility to polymer glasses have been studied primarily for materials where the glassy state was formed stress free. Here, we investigate the stability of polymer glasses where a constant stress is applied during the formation of the glassy state (thermal quench). Previously we found that physical aging is strongly dependent on the conditions during glass formation, including cooling rate and (often unintended) stress [Macromolecules 2012, 45, 1701]. We constructed a unique jig to apply a known stress to free-standing films during the thermal quench. We used ellipsometry to measure the physical aging rate of polystyrene films by quantifying the time-dependent decrease in film thickness that results from an increase in average film density during aging. As the magnitude of stress during vitrification increases, the physical aging rate quickly transitions over a small range of stresses to a faster aging rate, indicating the resulting glass is less stable [Soft Matter 2014, 10, 1572]. To explore this unique finding, we have constructed a computer-controlled apparatus to measure and apply stress and strain to polymer films during vitrification in order to characterize the temperature-dependent stress build up.

  18. Alteration/deficiency in activation-3 (Ada3) plays a critical role in maintaining genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Sameer; Katafiasz, Bryan J; Kumar, Rakesh; Wang, Jun; Mohibi, Shakur; Jain, Smrati; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah Basavaraju; Pandita, Tej K; Dave, Bhavana J; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2012-11-15

    Cell cycle regulation and DNA repair following damage are essential for maintaining genome integrity. DNA damage activates checkpoints in order to repair damaged DNA prior to exit to the next phase of cell cycle. Recently, we have shown the role of Ada3, a component of various histone acetyltransferase complexes, in cell cycle regulation, and loss of Ada3 results in mouse embryonic lethality. Here, we used adenovirus-Cre-mediated Ada3 deletion in Ada3(fl/fl) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to assess the role of Ada3 in DNA damage response following exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). We report that Ada3 depletion was associated with increased levels of phospho-ATM (pATM), γH2AX, phospho-53BP1 (p53BP1) and phospho-RAD51 (pRAD51) in untreated cells; however, radiation response was intact in Ada3(-/-) cells. Notably, Ada3(-/-) cells exhibited a significant delay in disappearance of DNA damage foci for several critical proteins involved in the DNA repair process. Significantly, loss of Ada3 led to enhanced chromosomal aberrations, such as chromosome breaks, fragments, deletions and translocations, which further increased upon DNA damage. Notably, the total numbers of aberrations were more clearly observed in S-phase, as compared with G₁ or G₂ phases of cell cycle with IR. Lastly, comparison of DNA damage in Ada3(fl/fl) and Ada3(-/-) cells confirmed higher residual DNA damage in Ada3(-/-) cells, underscoring a critical role of Ada3 in the DNA repair process. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for a novel role for Ada3 in maintenance of the DNA repair process and genomic stability. PMID:23095635

  19. A Mutation in the 5′ Untranslated Region Increases Stability of norA mRNA, Encoding a Multidrug Resistance Transporter of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Bénédicte; Truong-Bolduc, Que Chi; Zhang, Xiamei; Hooper, David C.

    2001-01-01

    NorA, a multidrug efflux pump in Staphylococcus aureus, protects the cell from multiple drugs, including quinolones. The flqB mutation (T→G) in the 5′ untranslated region upstream of norA causes norA overexpression of 4.9-fold in cis, as measured in norA::blaZ fusions. The transcriptional initiation site of norA was unchanged in mutant and wild-type strains, but the half-life of norA mRNA was increased 4.8-fold in the flqB mutant compared to the wild-type strain. Computer-generated folding of the first 68 nucleotides of the norA transcript predicts an additional stem-loop and changes in a putative RNase III cleavage site in the flqB mutant. PMID:11244079

  20. TATA boxes in gene transcription and poly (A) tails in mRNA stability: New perspective on the effects of berberine

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhi-Yi; Lu, Xi; Lei, Fan; Chai, Yu-Shuang; Wang, Yu-Gang; Jiang, Jing-Fei; Feng, Tian-Shi; Wang, Xin-Pei; Yu, Xuan; Yan, Xiao-Jin; Xing, Dong-Ming; Du, Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Berberine (BBR) is a natural compound with variable pharmacological effects and a broad panel of target genes. We investigated berberine’s pharmacological activities from the perspective of its nucleotide-binding ability and discovered that BBR directly regulates gene expression by targeting TATA boxes in transcriptional regulatory regions as well as the poly adenine (poly (A)) tail at the mRNA terminus. BBR inhibits gene transcription by binding the TATA boxes in the transcriptional regulatory region, but it promotes higher levels of expression by targeting the poly (A) tails of mRNAs. The present study demonstrates that TATA boxes and poly (A) tails are the first and second primary targets by which BBR regulates gene expression. The final outcome of gene regulation by BBR depends on the structure of the individual gene. This is the first study to reveal that TATA boxes and poly (A) tails are direct targets for BBR in its regulation of gene expression. Our findings provide a novel explanation for the complex activities of a small molecule compound in a biological system and a novel horizon for small molecule-compound pharmacological studies. PMID:26671652

  1. Biological soil crust as a bio-mediator alters hydrological processes in stabilized dune system of the Tengger Desert, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinrong

    2016-04-01

    Biological soil crust (BSC) is a vital component in the stabilized sand dunes with a living cover up to more than 70% of the total, which has been considered as a bio-mediator that directly influences and regulates the sand dune ecosystem processes. However, its influences on soil hydrological processes have been long neglected in Chinese deserts. In this study, BSCs of different successional stages were chose to test their influence on the hydrological processes of stabilized dune, where the groundwater deep exceeds 30m, further to explore why occur the sand-binding vegetation replacement between shrubs and herbs. Our long-term observation (60 years) shows that cyanobacteria crust has been colonized and developed after 3 years since the sand-binding vegetation has been established and dune fixation using planted xerophytic shrubs and made sand barrier (straw-checkerboard) on shifting dune surface, lichen and moss crust occurred after 20 years, and the cover of moss dominated crust could reach 70 % after 50 years. The colonization and development of BSC altered the initial soil water balance of revegetated areas by influencing rainfall infiltration, soil evaporation and dew water entrapment. The results show that BSC obviously reduced the infiltration that occurred during most rainfall events (80%), when rainfall was greater than 5 mm or less than 20 mm. The presence of BSC reduced evaporation of topsoil after small rainfall (<5 mm) because its high proportion of finer particles slowed the evaporation rate, thus keeping the water in the soil surface longer, and crust facilitated topsoil evaporation when rainfall reached 10 mm. The amount of dew entrapment increases with the succession of BSC. Moreover, the effect of the later successional BSC to dew entrapment, rainfall infiltration and evaporation was more obvious than the early successional BSC on stabilized dunes. In general, BSC reduced the amount of rainfall water that reached deeper soil (0.4-3m), which is

  2. RNS60, a charge-stabilized nanostructure saline alters Xenopus Laevis oocyte biophysical membrane properties by enhancing mitochondrial ATP production

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Kim, Duk-Soo; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2015-01-01

    We have examined the effects of RNS60, a 0.9% saline containing charge-stabilized oxygen nanobubble-based structures. RNS60 is generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor–Couette–Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. This study, implemented in Xenopus laevis oocytes, addresses both the electrophysiological membrane properties and parallel biological processes in the cytoplasm. Intracellular recordings from defolliculated X. laevis oocytes were implemented in: (1) air oxygenated standard Ringer's solution, (2) RNS60-based Ringer's solution, (3) RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen)-based Ringer's, and (4) ONS60 (saline containing high pressure oxygen without TCP modification)-based Ringer's. RNS60-based Ringer's solution induced membrane hyperpolarization from the resting membrane potential. This effect was prevented by: (1) ouabain (a blocker of the sodium/potassium ATPase), (2) rotenone (a mitochondrial electron transfer chain inhibitor preventing usable ATP synthesis), and (3) oligomycin A (an inhibitor of ATP synthase) indicating that RNS60 effects intracellular ATP levels. Increased intracellular ATP levels following RNS60 treatment were directly demonstrated using luciferin/luciferase photon emission. These results indicate that RNS60 alters intrinsic the electrophysiological properties of the X. laevis oocyte membrane by increasing mitochondrial-based ATP synthesis. Ultrastructural analysis of the oocyte cytoplasm demonstrated increased mitochondrial length in the presence of RNS60-based Ringer's solution. It is concluded that the biological properties of RNS60 relate to its ability to optimize ATP synthesis. PMID:25742953

  3. RNS60, a charge-stabilized nanostructure saline alters Xenopus Laevis oocyte biophysical membrane properties by enhancing mitochondrial ATP production.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Kim, Duk-Soo; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2015-03-01

    We have examined the effects of RNS60, a 0.9% saline containing charge-stabilized oxygen nanobubble-based structures. RNS60 is generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. This study, implemented in Xenopus laevis oocytes, addresses both the electrophysiological membrane properties and parallel biological processes in the cytoplasm. Intracellular recordings from defolliculated X. laevis oocytes were implemented in: (1) air oxygenated standard Ringer's solution, (2) RNS60-based Ringer's solution, (3) RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen)-based Ringer's, and (4) ONS60 (saline containing high pressure oxygen without TCP modification)-based Ringer's. RNS60-based Ringer's solution induced membrane hyperpolarization from the resting membrane potential. This effect was prevented by: (1) ouabain (a blocker of the sodium/potassium ATPase), (2) rotenone (a mitochondrial electron transfer chain inhibitor preventing usable ATP synthesis), and (3) oligomycin A (an inhibitor of ATP synthase) indicating that RNS60 effects intracellular ATP levels. Increased intracellular ATP levels following RNS60 treatment were directly demonstrated using luciferin/luciferase photon emission. These results indicate that RNS60 alters intrinsic the electrophysiological properties of the X. laevis oocyte membrane by increasing mitochondrial-based ATP synthesis. Ultrastructural analysis of the oocyte cytoplasm demonstrated increased mitochondrial length in the presence of RNS60-based Ringer's solution. It is concluded that the biological properties of RNS60 relate to its ability to optimize ATP synthesis. PMID:25742953

  4. Endoglin regulates PI3-kinase/Akt trafficking and signaling to alter endothelial capillary stability during angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nam Y.; Golzio, Christelle; Gatza, Catherine E.; Sharma, Arun; Katsanis, Nicholas; Blobe, Gerard C.

    2012-01-01

    Endoglin (CD105) is an endothelial-specific transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) coreceptor essential for angiogenesis and vascular homeostasis. Although endoglin dysfunction contributes to numerous vascular conditions, the mechanism of endoglin action remains poorly understood. Here we report a novel mechanism in which endoglin and Gα-interacting protein C-terminus–interacting protein (GIPC)–mediated trafficking of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) regulates endothelial signaling and function. We demonstrate that endoglin interacts with the PI3K subunits p110α and p85 via GIPC to recruit and activate PI3K and Akt at the cell membrane. Opposing ligand-induced effects are observed in which TGF-β1 attenuates, whereas bone morphogenetic protein-9 enhances, endoglin/GIPC-mediated membrane scaffolding of PI3K and Akt to alter endothelial capillary tube stability in vitro. Moreover, we employ the first transgenic zebrafish model for endoglin to demonstrate that GIPC is a critical component of endoglin function during developmental angiogenesis in vivo. These studies define a novel non-Smad function for endoglin and GIPC in regulating endothelial cell function during angiogenesis. PMID:22593212

  5. Effect of pH on Structural Changes in Perch Hemoglobin that Can Alter Redox Stability and Heme Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Mark P.; Aranda, IV, Roman; He, Cai; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-01-07

    pH can be manipulated to alter the oxidative stability of fish-based foods during storage. X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the ability of reduced pH to cause structural changes in fish hemoglobins that lead to enhanced oxidative degradation. Decreasing pH from 8.0 to 6.3 and 5.7 created a large channel for solvent entry into the heme crevice of perch hemoglobin beta chains. The proton-induced opening of this channel occurred between site CD3 and the heme-6-propionate. Solvent entry into the heme crevice can enhance metHb formation and hemin loss, processes that accelerate lipid oxidation. Reduced pH also decreased the distance between Ile at E11 in one of the alpha chains and the ligand above the heme iron atom. This sterically displaces O{sub 2} and protonated O{sub 2} which increases metHb formation. These studies demonstrate that pH reduction causes structural changes in perch hemoglobin which increase oxidative degradation of the heme pigment.

  6. XRN1 Stalling in the 5’ UTR of Hepatitis C Virus and Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Is Associated with Dysregulated Host mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Stephanie L.; Blackinton, Jeffrey G.; Anderson, John R.; Dozier, Mary K.; Dodd, Benjamin J. T.; Keene, Jack D.; Wilusz, Carol J.; Bradrick, Shelton S.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that both Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and Bovine Viral Diarrhea virus (BVDV) contain regions in their 5’ UTRs that stall and repress the enzymatic activity of the cellular 5’-3’ exoribonuclease XRN1, resulting in dramatic changes in the stability of cellular mRNAs. We used biochemical assays, virus infections, and transfection of the HCV and BVDV 5’ untranslated regions in the absence of other viral gene products to directly demonstrate the existence and mechanism of this novel host-virus interaction. In the context of HCV infection, we observed globally increased stability of mRNAs resulting in significant increases in abundance of normally short-lived mRNAs encoding a variety of relevant oncogenes and angiogenesis factors. These findings suggest that non-coding regions from multiple genera of the Flaviviridae interfere with XRN1 and impact post-transcriptional processes, causing global dysregulation of cellular gene expression which may promote cell growth and pathogenesis. PMID:25747802

  7. Short interfering RNA induced generation and translation of stable 5' mRNA cleavage intermediates.

    PubMed

    Singhania, Richa; Pavey, Sandra; Payne, Elizabeth; Gu, Wenyi; Clancy, Jennifer; Jubair, Luqman; Preiss, Thomas; Saunders, Nicholas; McMillan, Nigel A J

    2016-08-01

    Sequence-specific degradation of homologous mRNA is the main mechanism by which short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) suppress gene expression. Generally, it is assumed that the mRNA fragments resulting from Ago2 cleavage are rapidly degraded, thus making the transcript translation-incompetent. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the post-cleavage mRNA decay are not completely understood and the fate of cleavage intermediates has been poorly studied. Using specific siRNAs and short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) we show that the 5' and 3' mRNA cleavage fragments of human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) E6/7 mRNA, over-expressed in cervical malignancies, are unevenly degraded. Intriguingly, the 5' mRNA fragment was more abundant and displayed a greater stability than the corresponding 3' mRNA fragment in RNAi-treated cells. Further analysis revealed that the 5' mRNA fragment was polysome-associated, indicating its active translation, and this was further confirmed by using tagged E7 protein to show that C-terminally truncated proteins were produced in treated cells. Overall, our findings provide new insight into the degradation of siRNA-targeted transcripts and show that RNAi can alter protein expression in cells as a result of preferential stabilization and translation of the 5' cleavage fragment. These results challenge the current model of siRNA-mediated RNAi and provide a significant step forward towards understanding non-canonical pathways of siRNA gene silencing. PMID:27321990

  8. Hfq affects mRNA levels independently of degradation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterial Lsm protein, Hfq, is an RNA chaperone involved in many reactions related to RNA metabolism, such as replication and stability, control of small RNA activity and polyadenylation. Despite this wide spectrum of known functions, the global role of Hfq is almost certainly undervalued; its capacity to bind DNA and to interact with many other proteins are only now beginning to be taken into account. Results The role of Hfq in the maturation and degradation of the rpsO mRNA of E. coli was investigated in vivo. The data revealed a decrease in rpsO mRNA abundance concomitant to an increase in its stability when Hfq is absent. This indicates that the change in mRNA levels in hfq mutants does not result from its modification of RNA stability. Moreover, a series of independent experiments have revealed that the decrease in mRNA level is not a consequence of a reduction of translation efficiency and that Hfq is not directly implicated in translational control of rpsO expression. Reduced steady-state mRNA levels in the absence of Hfq were also shown for rpsT, rpsB and rpsB-tsf, but not for lpp, pnp or tRNA transcripts. The abundance of chimeric transcripts rpsO-lacZ and rpsB-lacZ, whose expression was driven by rpsO and rpsB promoters, respectively, was also lower in the hfq null-mutants, while the β-galactosidase yield remained about the same as in the parent wild-type strain. Conclusions The data obtained suggest that alteration of rpsO, rpsT and rpsB-tsf transcript levels observed under conditions of Hfq deficiency is not caused by the post-transcriptional events, such as mRNA destabilization or changes in translation control, and may rather result from changes in transcriptional activity. So far, how Hfq affects transcription remains unclear. We propose that one of the likely mechanisms of Hfq-mediated modulation of transcription might operate early in the elongation step, when interaction of Hfq with a nascent transcript would help to overcome

  9. An AU-Rich Sequence Element (UUUN[A/U]U) Downstream of the Edited C in Apolipoprotein B mRNA Is a High-Affinity Binding Site for Apobec-1: Binding of Apobec-1 to This Motif in the 3′ Untranslated Region of c-myc Increases mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Anant, Shrikant; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2000-01-01

    Apobec-1, the catalytic subunit of the mammalian apolipoprotein B (apoB) mRNA-editing enzyme, is a cytidine deaminase with RNA binding activity for AU-rich sequences. This RNA binding activity is required for Apobec-1 to mediate C-to-U RNA editing. Filter binding assays, using immobilized Apobec-1, demonstrate saturable binding to a 105-nt apoB RNA with a Kd of ∼435 nM. A series of AU-rich templates was used to identify a high-affinity (∼50 nM) binding site of consensus sequence UUUN[A/U]U, with multiple copies of this sequence constituting the high-affinity binding site. In order to determine whether this consensus site could be functionally demonstrated from within an apoB RNA, circular-permutation analysis was performed, revealing one major (UUUGAU) and one minor (UU) site located 3 and 16 nucleotides, respectively, downstream of the edited base. Secondary-structure predictions reveal a stem-loop flanking the edited base with Apobec-1 binding to the consensus site(s) at an open loop. A similar consensus (AUUUA) is present in the 3′ untranslated regions of several mRNAs, including that of c-myc, that are known to undergo rapid degradation. In this context, it is presumed that the consensus motif acts as a destabilizing element. As an independent test of the ability of Apobec-1 to bind to this sequence, F442A cells were transfected with Apobec-1 and the half-life of c-myc mRNA was determined following actinomycin D treatment. These studies demonstrated an increase in the half-life of c-myc mRNA from 90 to 240 min in control versus Apobec-1-expressing cells. Apobec-1 expression mutants, in which RNA binding activity is eliminated, failed to alter c-myc mRNA turnover. Taken together, the data establish a consensus binding site for Apobec-1 embedded in proximity to the edited base in apoB RNA. Binding to this site in other target RNAs raises the possibility that Apobec-1 may be involved in other aspects of RNA metabolism, independent of its role as an apoB RNA

  10. Altered soil organic carbon stability in eastern deciduous forest: interplay between forest successional Stage and invasive earthworm activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Filley, T. R.; McCormick, M.; Szlavecz, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Detritivore -mediated decomposition and incorporation of aboveground litter is an important processes in soil carbon cycle of forest ecosystems that can be a major control on the proportion of stable and unstable soil carbon pools. We investigated how earthworm activity interacts with litter type to alter the stability of soil organic carbon (SOC) in an eastern deciduous successional forest within at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC). Soil C and N content and chemistry (lignin and fatty acids) among particulate and mineral-bound fractions was shifted after 5 years of litter (wood and leaf) addition but with significant differences among the forest successional stages and with earthworm activity. Results from a 6 month laboratory incubation (25°C and 15°C) of bulk soil samples taken from the treatments and incubated at 25°C and 15°C demonstrate that litter addition type and earthworm activity interacted to control the proportion of labile and stable carbon. Specifically, the labile C pools in double wood and control treatments were highest in young successional forest with higher earthworm activity. However, in the double leaf treatment, the labile C pool was higher in old successional forests with less worm activity. In general, the stable C pool, released after one month, was higher in old successional forests for all three treatments. The difference of the stable pool between young and old successional forest was the largest with double wood treatment, followed by control treatment and the lowest with double leaf treatment. In summary, wood treatment shifted SOC pool to relatively more stable pool in old successional forests decreasing labile C pool but not the young sites. While double leaf treatment increased the labile pool in old forests but in young successional forests, SOC shifted to relatively more stable pool by decreasing the labile pool and increasing the stable pool. This result indicates that the type of aboveground litter

  11. Alterations of BDNF and trkB mRNA Expression in the 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Model of Preclinical Stages of Parkinson’s Disease: An Influence of Chronic Pramipexole in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Berghauzen-Maciejewska, Klemencja; Wardas, Jadwiga; Kosmowska, Barbara; Głowacka, Urszula; Kuter, Katarzyna; Ossowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Our recent study has indicated that a moderate lesion of the mesostriatal and mesolimbic pathways in rats, modelling preclinical stages of Parkinson’s disease, induces a depressive-like behaviour which is reversed by chronic treatment with pramipexole. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in the aforementioned model of depression. Therefore, we investigated the influence of 6-hydoxydopamine (6-OHDA) administration into the ventral region of the caudate-putamen on mRNA levels of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptor. The BDNF and trkB mRNA levels were determined in the nigrostriatal and limbic structures by in situ hybridization 2 weeks after the operation. Pramipexole (1 mg/kg sc twice a day) and imipramine (10 mg/kg ip once a day) were injected for 2 weeks. The lesion lowered the BDNF and trkB mRNA levels in the hippocampus [CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG)] and amygdala (basolateral/lateral) as well as the BDNF mRNA content in the habenula (medial/lateral). The lesion did not influence BDNF and trkB expression in the caudate-putamen, substantia nigra, nucleus accumbens (shell and core) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). Chronic imipramine reversed the lesion-induced decreases in BDNF mRNA in the DG. Chronic pramipexole increased BDNF mRNA, but decreased trkB mRNA in the VTA in lesioned rats. Furthermore, it reduced BDNF and trkB mRNA expression in the shell and core of the nucleus accumbens, BDNF mRNA in the amygdala and trkB mRNA in the caudate-putamen in these animals. The present study indicates that both the 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic lesion and chronic pramipexole influence BDNF signalling in limbic structures, which may be related to their pro-depressive and antidepressant activity in rats, respectively. PMID:25739024

  12. Altered stability of etoposide-induced topoisomerase II-DNA complexes in resistant human leukaemia K562 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ritke, M. K.; Roberts, D.; Allan, W. P.; Raymond, J.; Bergoltz, V. V.; Yalowich, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    K562 leukaemia cells were selected for resistance using 0.5 microM etoposide (VP-16). Cloned K/VP.5 cells were 30-fold resistant to growth inhibition by VP-16 and 5- to 13-fold resistant to m-AMSA, adriamycin and mitoxantrone. K/VP.5 cells did not overexpress P-glycoprotein; VP-16 accumulation was similar to that in K562 cells. VP-16-induced DNA damage was reduced in cells and nuclei from K/VP.5 cells compared with K562 cells. Topoisomerase II protein was reduced 3- to 7-fold and topoisomerase II alpha and topoisomerase II beta mRNAs were each reduced 3-fold in resistant cells. After drug removal, VP-16-induced DNA damage disappeared 1.7 times more rapidly and VP-16-induced DNA-topoisomerase II adducts dissociated 1.5 times more rapidly in K/VP.5 cells than in K562 cells. ATP (1 mM) was more effective in enhancing VP-16-induced DNA damage in nuclei isolated from sensitive cells than in nuclei from resistant cells. In addition, ATP (0.3-5 mM) stimulated VP-16-induced DNA-topoisomerase II adducts to a greater extent in K562 nuclei than in K/VP.5 nuclei. Taken together, these results indicate that resistance to VP-16 in a K562 subline is associated with a quantitative reduction in topoisomerase II protein and, in addition, a distinct qualitative alteration in topoisomerase II affecting the stability of drug-induced DNA-topoisomerase II complexes. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8142256

  13. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) mRNA Isoforms are Altered in Bovine Granulosa Cells (GC) by Circulating Progestin Concentrations (P4) and May Indicate Follicle Status and Oocyte Competence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously, Melengestrol Acetate (MGA) fed for 14 d (0.5mg/cow/d; < 1 ng/ml P4) resulted in persistent follicles with increased size, decreased number of GC/follicular fluid (FF) volume, and less fertile oocytes. An experiment was conducted to determine effects of circulating P4 on amount of mRNA fo...

  14. mRNA imprinting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Following its synthesis in the nucleus, mRNA undergoes various stages that are critical for the proper synthesis, localization and possibly functionality of its encoded protein. Recently, we have shown that two RNA polymerase II (Pol II) subunits, Rpb4p and Rpb7p, associate with the nascent transcript co-transcriptionally. This “mRNA imprinting” lasts throughout the mRNA lifetime and is required for proper regulation of all major stages that the mRNA undergoes. Other possible cases of co-transcriptional imprinting are discussed. Since mRNAs can be transported from the synthesizing cell to other cells, we propose that mRNA imprinting can also affect the phenotype of the recipient cells. This can be viewed as “mRNA-based epigenetics.” PMID:21686103

  15. The functional half-life of an mRNA depends on the ribosome spacing in an early coding region.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Margit; Nissen, Søren; Mitarai, Namiko; Lo Svenningsen, Sine; Sneppen, Kim; Pedersen, Steen

    2011-03-18

    Bacterial mRNAs are translated by closely spaced ribosomes and degraded from the 5'-end, with half-lives of around 2 min at 37 °C in most cases. Ribosome-free or "naked" mRNA is known to be readily degraded, but the initial event that inactivates the mRNA functionally has not been fully described. Here, we characterize a determinant of the functional stability of an mRNA, which is located in the early coding region. Using literature values for the mRNA half-lives of variant lacZ mRNAs in Escherichia coli, we modeled how the ribosome spacing is affected by the translation rate of the individual codons. When comparing the ribosome spacing at various segments of the mRNA to its functional half-life, we found a clear correlation between the functional mRNA half-life and the ribosome spacing in the mRNA region approximately between codon 20 and codon 45. From this finding, we predicted that inserts of slowly translated codons before codon 20 or after codon 45 should shorten or prolong, respectively, the functional mRNA half-life by altering the ribosome density in the important region. These predictions were tested on eight new lacZ variants, and their experimentally determined mRNA half-lives all supported the model. We thus suggest that translation-rate-mediated differences in the spacing between ribosomes in this early coding region is a parameter that determines the mRNAs functional half-life. We present a model that is in accordance with many earlier observations and that allows a prediction of the functional half-life of a given mRNA sequence. PMID:21255584

  16. Sex- and region-specific alterations of progesterone receptor mRNA levels and estrogen sensitivity in rat brain following developmental exposure to the estrogenic UV filter 4-methylbenzylidene camphor.

    PubMed

    Maerkel, Kirsten; Lichtensteiger, Walter; Durrer, Stefan; Conscience, Marianne; Schlumpf, Margret

    2005-05-01

    Recently, we reported on in vitro and in vivo estrogenic activity of UV filters and on developmental toxicity of 4-methylbenzylidene (4-MBC) camphor [Schlumpf, M., Cotton, B., Conscience, M., Haller, V., Steinmann, B., Lichtensteiger, W., 2001a. In vitro and in vivo estrogenicity of UV screens. Environ. Health Perspect. 109, 239; Schlumpf, M., Berger, L., Cotton, B., Conscience-Egli, M., Durrer, S., Fleischmann, I., Haller, V., Maerkel, K., Lichtensteiger, W., 2001b. Estrogen active UV screens. SÖFW-J. 7, 10]. 4-MBC (7, 24, 47mg/(kgday)) was administered in chow to long Evans rats from 10 weeks before mating of the parent (F0) generation until adulthood of the F1 generation. Peripheral reproductive organs and central nervous system were studied in adult offspring. mRNA expression of progesterone receptor (PR), an estrogen-regulated gene, was investigated in medial preoptic area (MPO) and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) by real-time RT-PCR. We analyzed intact 12-week-old male and female offspring under steady state conditions and adult gonadectomized offspring 6h after a single s.c. injection of estradiol-17β (E2) (10 or 50μg/kg) in order to assess estrogen sensitivity. At steady state conditions we observed significantly higher PR mRNA expression in VMH of control females versus control males. 4-MBC exposed females exhibited a decrease in PR mRNA to levels of control males. The increase in PR mRNA in response to E2 was higher in VMH of males of both 4-MBC groups as compared to control males. PR mRNA levels were similar in MPO of control males and females. Developmental 4-MBC exposure increased PR mRNA levels in male MPO, but did not significantly change female levels. The acute response to the lower E2 dose was decreased in MPO of 4-MBC-exposed males, whereas females of the 7mg/kg dose group exhibited an increased reaction to 50μg/kg of E2. Our data indicate that developmental exposure to endocrine active chemicals such as the UV filter 4-MBC can

  17. Biomaterials for mRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K G; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R; Zetter, Bruce R; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-12-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  18. Biomaterials for mRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K. G.; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R.; Zetter, Bruce R.; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  19. Regulation of LPS-induced mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines via alteration of NF-κB activity in mouse peritoneal macrophages exposed to fluoride.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuhu; Huo, Meijun; Li, Guangsheng; Li, Yanyan; Wang, Jundong

    2016-10-01

    F toxicity to immune system, especially to macrophage, has been studied a lot recently. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), as a transcription factor, plays a central role in immune and inflammatory responses via the regulation of downstream gene expression. Recent studies indicated that fluoride effect on inflammatory cytokine secretion, however, the molecular mechanism was less understood. In our study, peritoneal macrophages (PMs) were divided several groups and were administrated sodium fluoride (NaF, 50, 100, 200, 400, 800 μM) and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 30 ng/mg). The mRNA expression of p65, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in macrophages exposed to fluoride was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR respectively. The translocation of NF-κB from cytoplasm to nucleus, which in a way reflects NF-κB activity, was demonstrated by Immunofluorescence and ELISA. Our results showed that fluoride had a dose-dependent effect on NF-κB activity, which coincided with LPS-induced mRNA expression of its downstream genes, iNOS and IL-1β. Fluoride alone causes no effect on gene expression. However, the mRNA expression of TNF-α showed non-NF-κB-dependent manner. Therefore, we come to the conclusion that fluoride can regulate LPS-induced mRNA expression of iNOS and IL-1β via NF-κB pathway in mouse peritoneal macrophages. PMID:27421105

  20. GnRH-1 mRNA, LH surges, steroid hormones, egg production, and intersequence pause days alter in birds exposed to longer wavelength of light in the later stages of production in Gallus gallus domesticus.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Ippala Janardhan; David, Corbon Godfrey; Selvaraju, Sellen; Mondal, Sunato; Ravi Kiran, Gorti

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this was to establish the effects of red spectrum of light (650 nm, treated n = 12) and normal spectrum of light (450 nm control = 12) on GnRH-I mRNA expression, amplitude and frequency of luteinizing hormone (LH), and egg production from 72-82 weeks of age in white leghorn hens. Birds exposed to red spectrum of wavelength significantly improved (P < 0.01) steroid hormone, and egg production improved over old laying 72 to 82 weeks. Weekly interval profiles followed the same pattern. At 77th weeks of age blood, samples from both the groups were collected at every 3 h for 36 h to study the pulsatile secretion of LH surges. Plasma LH concentration was higher (P < 0.01) in treated birds with more number of frequencies and amplitude LH surges in plasma of treated birds. LH frequencies were more pronounced and advanced during 36 h of sampling at 3 h interval in treated birds. Weekly interval of plasma LH, E2β, and P(4) concentrations increased (P < 0.01) in treated birds from 72 to 82 weeks of age. GnRH-I mRNA concentration was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in birds exposed to red spectrum of light compared to controls. It is hypothesized that exposure of birds to red spectrum of light-enhanced (P < 0.01) GnRH-I mRNA with more number of yellow yolky follicles was found in birds exposed to red spectrum of light during 77 days (72-82 weeks of age) of experimental period. It is concluded that higher levels of GnRH-I mRNA, LH, E2β, and P(4) concentration with lower incidence of pause days enabled the birds to lay more eggs even later in the productive period by modulating the wavelengths of light under normal husbandry conditions. PMID:22532077

  1. Unexpected effects of the alteration of structure and stability of myoglobin and hemoglobin in ammonium-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Jha, Indrani; Attri, Pankaj; Venkatesu, Pannuru

    2014-03-28

    The nature of solvent-biomolecule interactions is generally weak and non-specific. The addition of ionic liquids (ILs), which have emerged as a new class of solvents, strengthen the stability of some proteins whereas the same ILs weaken the stability of some other proteins. Although ILs are commonly used for the stabilization of biomolecules, the bimolecular interactions of their stabilization-destabilization is still an active subject of considerable interest and studies on this topic have been limited. To reveal the impact of ILs on the stability of proteins, a series of protic ILs possessing a tetra-alkyl ammonium cation [R4N](+) with a hydroxide [OH](-) anion were synthesized. In this study, we report the structural stability of heme proteins such as myoglobin (Mb) and hemoglobin (Hb) in a series of ammonium-based ILs such as tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide [(CH3)4N](+)[OH](-) (TMAH), tetraethyl ammonium hydroxide [(C2H5)4N](+)[OH](-) (TEAH), tetrapropyl ammonium hydroxide [(C3H7)4N](+)[OH](-) (TPAH) and tetrabutyl ammonium hydroxide [(C4H9)4N](+)[OH](-) (TBAH) by fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies. Our experimental results reveal that less viscous ILs carrying smaller alkyl chain such as TMAH are strong destabilizers of the heme proteins as compared to the ILs carrying bulkier alkyl chains which are more viscous ILs, such as TBAH. Therefore, our results demonstrate that the addition of these ILs to the heme proteins decreases their thermal stability allowing the protein to be in an unfolded state at lower temperatures. Further, we describe the molecular-structural interaction of the heme proteins with the ILs (molecule like a ligand) by the PatchDocking method. PMID:24501743

  2. Maternal dietary vitamin D carry-over alters offspring growth, skeletal mineralisation and tissue mRNA expressions of genes related to vitamin D, calcium and phosphorus homoeostasis in swine.

    PubMed

    Amundson, Laura A; Hernandez, Laura L; Laporta, Jimena; Crenshaw, Thomas D

    2016-09-01

    Maternal dietary vitamin D carry-over effects were assessed in young pigs to characterise skeletal abnormalities in a diet-induced model of kyphosis. Bone abnormalities were previously induced and bone mineral density (BMD) reduced in offspring from sows fed diets with inadequate vitamin D3. In a nested design, pigs from sows (n 23) fed diets with 0 (-D), 8·125 (+D) or 43·750 (++D) µg D3/kg from breeding through lactation were weaned and, within litter, fed nursery diets arranged as a 2×2 factorial design with 0 (-D) or 7·0 (+D) µg D3/kg, each with 95 % (95P) or 120 % (120P) of P requirements. Selected pigs were euthanised before colostrum consumption at birth (0 weeks, n 23), weaning (3 weeks, n 22) and after a growth period (8 weeks, n 185) for BMD, bone mechanical tests and tissue mRNA analysis. Pigs produced by +D or ++D sows had increased gain at 3 weeks (P<0·05), and at 8 weeks had increased BMD and improved femur mechanical properties. However, responses to nursery diets depended on maternal diets (P<0·05). Relative mRNA expressions of genes revealed a maternal dietary influence at birth in bone osteocalcin and at weaning in kidney 24-hydroxylase (P<0·05). Nursery treatments affected mRNA expressions at 8 weeks. Detection of a maternal and nursery diet interaction (P<0·05) provided insights into the long-term effects of maternal nutritional inputs. Characterising early stages of bone abnormalities provided inferences for humans and animals about maternal dietary influence on offspring skeletal health. PMID:27480125

  3. Triosephosphate Isomerase I170V Alters Catalytic Site, Enhances Stability and Induces Pathology in a Drosophila Model of TPI Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Kammerer, Charles J.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Rode, Sascha; Aslam, Anoshé A.; Heroux, Annie; Wetzel, Ronald; VanDemark, Andrew P.; Palladino, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is a glycolytic enzyme which homodimerizes for full catalytic activity. Mutations of the TPI gene elicit a disease known as TPI Deficiency, a glycolytic enzymopathy noted for its unique severity of neurological symptoms. Evidence suggests that TPI Deficiency pathogenesis may be due to conformational changes of the protein, likely affecting dimerization and protein stability. In this report, we genetically and physically characterize a human disease-associated TPI mutation caused by an I170V substitution. Human TPII170V elicits behavioral abnormalities in Drosophila. An examination of hTPII170V enzyme kinetics revealed this substitution reduced catalytic turnover, while assessments of thermal stability demonstrated an increase in enzyme stability. The crystal structure of the homodimeric I170V mutant reveals changes in the geometry of critical residues within the catalytic pocket. Collectively these data reveal new observations of the structural and kinetic determinants of TPI deficiency pathology, providing new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:25463631

  4. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  5. Cytoplasmic mRNA turnover and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Borbolis, Fivos; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover that determines the lifetime of cytoplasmic mRNAs is a means to control gene expression under both normal and stress conditions, whereas its impact on ageing and age-related disorders has just become evident. Gene expression control is achieved at the level of the mRNA clearance as well as mRNA stability and accessibility to other molecules. All these processes are regulated by cis-acting motifs and trans-acting factors that determine the rates of translation and degradation of transcripts. Specific messenger RNA granules that harbor the mRNA decay machinery or various factors, involved in translational repression and transient storage of mRNAs, are also part of the mRNA fate regulation. Their assembly and function can be modulated to promote stress resistance to adverse conditions and over time affect the ageing process and the lifespan of the organism. Here, we provide insights into the complex relationships of ageing modulators and mRNA turnover mechanisms. PMID:26432921

  6. Designing excipient emulsions to increase nutraceutical bioavailability: emulsifier type influences curcumin stability and bioaccessibility by altering gastrointestinal fate.

    PubMed

    Zou, Liqiang; Liu, Wei; Liu, Chengmei; Xiao, Hang; McClements, David Julian

    2015-08-01

    The influence of emulsifier type on the ability of excipient emulsions to improve the solubility, stability, and bioaccessibility of powdered curcumin was examined. Oil-in-water emulsions prepared using three different emulsifiers (whey protein isolate, caseinate, or Tween 80) were mixed with curcumin powder and then incubated at either 30 °C (to simulate applications of salad dressings) or 100 °C (to simulate applications of cooking sauces). The transfer of curcumin into the excipient emulsions was appreciably higher for excipient emulsions held at 100 °C than those held at 30 °C, and was appreciably higher for surfactant-stabilized emulsions than protein-stabilized emulsions. For example, the amounts of curcumin transferred into emulsions held at 30 and 100 °C were 66 and 280 μg mL(-1) for Tween 80, but only 17 and 208 μg mL(-1) for caseinate. The total curcumin concentration in the digesta and mixed micelle phases collected after excipient emulsions were exposed to a simulated gastrointestinal tract (mouth, stomach, and small intestine) depended on emulsifier type. The total amount of curcumin within the digesta was higher for protein-stabilized emulsions than surfactant-stabilized ones, which was attributed to the ability of the proteins to protect curcumin from chemical degradation. For example, the digesta contained 204 μg mL(-1) curcumin for caseinate emulsions, but only 111 μg mL(-1) for Tween 80 emulsions. This study shows the potential of designing excipient emulsions to increase the oral bioavailability of curcumin for food and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:26165514

  7. N-3 fatty acid intake altered fat content and fatty acid distribution in chicken breast muscle, but did not influence mRNA expression of lipid-related enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The conversions of the n-3 and n-6 fatty acid of plant origin to the C20 and C22 very long chain fatty acids (LCPUFAs) is regulated by several cellular enzymes such as elongases and desaturases. Methods Sixty-five male one-day old chickens (Ross 308) were randomly divided into four groups and given one of four diets; with or without linseed oil (LO), (the diets contained equal amounts of fat) and with low or high selenium (Se). Final body weight, amount of Se and fat in breast muscle, fatty acid profile, and gene expression for fatty acid desaturases (Fads1, Fads2, Fads9), HMG-CoA reductase, Acyl-CoA oxidase (Acox), carnitine palmitoyl transferase1 (Cpt1), superoxide dismutase (Sod) and glutathione peroxidase4 (Gpx4) were analyzed in all animals, and Gpx activity in whole blood was determined. Results mRNA expression of elongases and desaturases in chicken breast muscle was not affected by feed rich in C18:3n-3. The highly positive correlation between amount of fat in breast muscle and the product/precursor indices of monounsaturated fatty acid synthesis, and the negative correlation between muscle fat and indices of LCPUFA synthesis should be further studied. Conclusion mRNA expression in chicken breast muscle of elongases and desaturases was not affected by feed rich in C18:3n-3. The highly positive correlation between amount of fat in breast muscle and the product/precursor indices of monounsaturated fatty acid synthesis, and the negative correlation between muscle fat and indices of LCPUFA synthesis should be further studied. PMID:24894510

  8. Poly(A)-binding proteins and mRNA localization: who rules the roost?

    PubMed

    Gray, Nicola K; Hrabálková, Lenka; Scanlon, Jessica P; Smith, Richard W P

    2015-12-01

    RNA-binding proteins are often multifunctional, interact with a variety of protein partners and display complex localizations within cells. Mammalian cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) are multifunctional RNA-binding proteins that regulate multiple aspects of mRNA translation and stability. Although predominantly diffusely cytoplasmic at steady state, they shuttle through the nucleus and can be localized to a variety of cytoplasmic foci, including those associated with mRNA storage and localized translation. Intriguingly, PABP sub-cellular distribution can alter dramatically in response to cellular stress or viral infection, becoming predominantly nuclear and/or being enriched in induced cytoplasmic foci. However, relatively little is known about the mechanisms that govern this distribution/relocalization and in many cases PABP functions within specific sites remain unclear. Here we discuss the emerging evidence with respect to these questions in mammals. PMID:26614673

  9. Triosephosphate isomerase I170V alters catalytic site, enhances stability and induces pathology in a Drosophila model of TPI deficiency

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Kammerer, Charles J.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Rode, Sascha; Aslam, Anoshe A.; Heroux, Annie; Wetzel, Ronald; VanDemark, Andrew P.; et al

    2014-10-16

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is a glycolytic enzyme which homodimerizes for full catalytic activity. Mutations of the TPI gene elicit a disease known as TPI Deficiency, a glycolytic enzymopathy noted for its unique severity of neurological symptoms. Evidence suggests that TPI Deficiency pathogenesis may be due to conformational changes of the protein, likely affecting dimerization and protein stability. In this report, we genetically and physically characterize a human disease-associated TPI mutation caused by an I170V substitution. Human TPII170V elicits behavioral abnormalities in Drosophila. An examination of hTPII170V enzyme kinetics revealed this substitution reduced catalytic turnover, while assessments of thermal stability demonstratedmore » an increase in enzyme stability. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the homodimeric I170V mutant reveals changes in the geometry of critical residues within the catalytic pocket. In the end, collectively these data reveal new observations of the structural and kinetic determinants of TPI deficiency pathology, providing new insights into disease pathogenesis.« less

  10. Antisense targeting of 3' end elements involved in DUX4 mRNA processing is an efficient therapeutic strategy for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a new gene-silencing approach.

    PubMed

    Marsollier, Anne-Charlotte; Ciszewski, Lukasz; Mariot, Virginie; Popplewell, Linda; Voit, Thomas; Dickson, George; Dumonceaux, Julie

    2016-04-15

    Defects in mRNA 3'end formation have been described to alter transcription termination, transport of the mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, stability of the mRNA and translation efficiency. Therefore, inhibition of polyadenylation may lead to gene silencing. Here, we choose facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) as a model to determine whether or not targeting key 3' end elements involved in mRNA processing using antisense oligonucleotide drugs can be used as a strategy for gene silencing within a potentially therapeutic context. FSHD is a gain-of-function disease characterized by the aberrant expression of the Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) transcription factor leading to altered pathogenic deregulation of multiple genes in muscles. Here, we demonstrate that targeting either the mRNA polyadenylation signal and/or cleavage site is an efficient strategy to down-regulate DUX4 expression and to decrease the abnormally high-pathological expression of genes downstream of DUX4. We conclude that targeting key functional 3' end elements involved in pre-mRNA to mRNA maturation with antisense drugs can lead to efficient gene silencing and is thus a potentially effective therapeutic strategy for at least FSHD. Moreover, polyadenylation is a crucial step in the maturation of almost all eukaryotic mRNAs, and thus all mRNAs are virtually eligible for this antisense-mediated knockdown strategy. PMID:26787513

  11. INTERMEDIATE CLEAVAGE PEPTIDASE55 Modifies Enzyme Amino Termini and Alters Protein Stability in Arabidopsis Mitochondria1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shaobai; Nelson, Clark J.; Li, Lei; Taylor, Nicolas L.; Ströher, Elke; Petereit, Jakob; Millar, A. Harvey

    2015-01-01

    Precursor proteins containing mitochondrial peptide signals are cleaved after import by a mitochondrial processing peptidase. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and human (Homo sapiens), INTERMEDIATE CLEAVAGE PEPTIDASE55 (ICP55) plays a role in stabilizing mitochondrial proteins by the removal of single amino acids from mitochondrial processing peptidase-processed proteins. We have investigated the role of a metallopeptidase (At1g09300) from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that has sequence similarity to yeast ICP55. We identified this protein in mitochondria by mass spectrometry and have studied its function in a transfer DNA insertion line (icp55). Monitoring of amino-terminal peptides showed that Arabidopsis ICP55 was responsible for the removal of single amino acids, and its action explained the −3 arginine processing motif of a number of mitochondrial proteins. ICP55 also removed single amino acids from mitochondrial proteins known to be cleaved at nonconserved arginine sites, a subset of mitochondrial proteins specific to plants. Faster mitochondrial protein degradation rates not only for ICP55 cleaved protein but also for some non-ICP55 cleaved proteins were observed in Arabidopsis mitochondrial samples isolated from icp55 than from the wild type, indicating that a complicated protease degradation network has been affected. The lower protein stability of isolated mitochondria and the lack of processing of target proteins in icp55 were complemented by transformation with the full-length ICP55. Analysis of in vitro degradation rates and protein turnover rates in vivo of specific proteins indicated that serine hydroxymethyltransferase was affected in icp55. The maturation of serine hydroxymethyltransferase by ICP55 is unusual, as it involves breaking an amino-terminal diserine that is not known as an ICP55 substrate in other organisms and that is typically considered a sequence that stabilizes rather than destabilizes a protein. PMID:25862457

  12. Thermoregulation in rats exposed perinatally to dioxin: core temperature stability to altered ambient temperature, behavioral thermoregulation, and febrile response to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Miller, D B

    1998-08-21

    Recent studies have shown that perinatal exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) alters thermoregulatory function in adult rats and hamsters, indicated by a reduced body temperature during the animal's nocturnal phase. The present study was designed to assess the behavioral thermoregulation, ability to develop a fever, and thermoregulatory stability as a function of ambient temperature (Ta) in rats exposed perinatally to TCDD. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed on gestational day (GD) 15 to 1 microg TCDD/kg (po). The male offspring were implanted with transmitters to monitor core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA). The 24-h pattern of core temperature was affected by TCDD exposure, characterized by a reduced nocturnal Tc. At some ages, the diurnal Tc of the TCDD group was elevated. This dysfunction in temperature regulation was most apparent at 7 and 11 mo of age. The 24-h pattern of MA was also altered by TCDD. The hypothermic effects of TCDD were most pronounced at cooler Ta values of 10 to 22 degrees C. In contrast, behavioral thermoregulation, assessed by measuring the selected Ta and Tc of rats in a temperature gradient, was unaffected by TCDD. The ability to develop a fever following administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin (Escherichia coli; 50 microg/kg) was accentuated in the TCDD-treated animals. The data confirm a nocturnal hypothermia in rats prenatally exposed to TCDD. However, the normal behavioral regulation of Tc suggests that hypothalamic thermoregulatory centers are not permanently altered. The accentuated fever in TCDD animals shows possible functional alterations in the neuroimmune and/or thermoregulatory axes involved in fever. PMID:9726785

  13. Neurotrophin-3 mRNA a putative target of miR21 following status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Risbud, Rashmi M.; Lee, Carolyn; Porter, Brenda E.

    2014-01-01

    Status epilepticus induces a cascade of protein expression changes contributing to the subsequent development of epilepsy. By identifying the cascade of molecular changes that contribute to the development of epilepsy we hope to be able to design therapeutics for preventing epilepsy. MicroRNAs influence gene expression by altering mRNA stability and/or translation and have been implicated in the pathology of multiple diseases. MiR21 and its co-transcript miR21*, microRNAs produced from either the 5″ or 3′ ends of the same precursor RNA strand, are increased in the hippocampus following status epilepticus. We have identified a miR21 binding site, in the 3′ UTR of neurotrophin-3 that inhibits translation. Neurotrophin-3 mRNA levels decrease in the hippocampus following SE concurrent with the increase in miR21. MiR21 levels in cultured hippocampal neurons inversely correlate with neurotrophin-3 mRNA levels. Treatment of hippocampal neuronal cultures with excess K+Cl−, a depolarizing agent mimicking the episode of status epilepticus, also results in an increase in miR21 and a decrease in neurotrophin-3 mRNA. MiR21 is a candidate for regulating neurotrophin-3 signaling in the hippocampus following status epilepticus. PMID:22019057

  14. Enhanced stability of maize endosperm ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is gained through mutants that alter subunit interactions.

    PubMed

    Greene, T W; Hannah, L C

    1998-10-27

    Temperature lability of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP; glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase; ADP: alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase, EC 2.7.7.27), a key starch biosynthetic enzyme, may play a significant role in the heat-induced loss in maize seed weight and yield. Here we report the isolation and characterization of heat-stable variants of maize endosperm AGP. Escherichia coli cells expressing wild type (WT) Shrunken2 (Sh2), and Brittle2 (Bt2) exhibit a reduced capacity to produce glycogen when grown at 42 degreesC. Mutagenesis of Sh2 and coexpression with WT Bt2 led to the isolation of multiple mutants capable of synthesizing copious amounts of glycogen at this temperature. An increase in AGP stability was found in each of four mutants examined. Initial characterization revealed that the BT2 protein was elevated in two of these mutants. Yeast two-hybrid studies were conducted to determine whether the mutant SH2 proteins more efficiently recruit the BT2 subunit into tetramer assembly. These experiments showed that replacement of WT SH2 with the heat-stable SH2HS33 enhanced interaction between the SH2 and BT2 subunits. In agreement, density gradient centrifugation of heated and nonheated extracts from WT and one of the mutants, Sh2hs33, identified a greater propensity for heterotetramer dissociation in WT AGP. Sequencing of Sh2hs33 and several other mutants identified a His-to-Tyr mutation at amino acid position 333. Hence, a single point mutation in Sh2 can increase the stability of maize endosperm AGP through enhanced subunit interactions. PMID:9789090

  15. The MuLV 4070A G541R Env mutation decreases the stability and alters the conformation of the TM ectodomain

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, William M. Zheng, Haiyan Cote, Marie L. Roth, Monica J.

    2008-02-05

    Virus-cell and cell-cell fusion events are affected by various properties of the fusogenic Env protein on the cell surface. The G541R mutation within the TM ectodomain of murine leukemia virus (MuLV) 4070A arose by positive selection in viral passage and results in a reduction of cell-cell fusion events while maintaining viral titer. Size exclusion chromatography shows that the multimerization properties are similar among expressed wild-type and mutant ectodomain peptides. Circular dichroism measurements reveal decreased thermal stability of the G541R mutant as compared to wild type. The G541R mutant also renders the peptide more susceptible to Lys-C protease cleavage. The 42-114 monoclonal antibody does not bind to the G541R mutant peptides, suggesting a structural difference from wild type. These altered physical properties result in productive viral infection of G541R bearing virus with decreased syncytia.

  16. A Mutation in the N Domain of Escherichia coli Lon Stabilizes Dodecamers and Selectively Alters Degradation of Model Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Wohlever, Matthew L.; Baker, Tania A.

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli Lon, an ATP-dependent AAA+ protease, recognizes and degrades many different substrates, including the RcsA and SulA regulatory proteins. More than a decade ago, the E240K mutation in the N domain of Lon was shown to prevent degradation of RcsA but not SulA in vivo. Here, we characterize the biochemical properties of the E240K mutant in vitro and present evidence that the effects of this mutation are complex. For example, LonE240K exists almost exclusively as a dodecamer, whereas wild-type Lon equilibrates between hexamers and dodecamers. Moreover, LonE240K displays degradation defects in vitro that do not correlate in any simple fashion with degron identity, substrate stability, or dodecamer formation. The Lon sequence segment near residue 240 is known to undergo nucleotide-dependent conformational changes, and our results suggest that this region may be important for coupling substrate binding with allosteric activation of Lon protease and ATPase activity. PMID:24123818

  17. p130Cas scaffold protein regulates ErbB2 stability by altering breast cancer cell sensitivity to autophagy.

    PubMed

    Bisaro, Brigitte; Sciortino, Marianna; Colombo, Shana; Camacho Leal, Maria Pilar; Costamagna, Andrea; Castellano, Isabella; Montemurro, Filippo; Rossi, Valentina; Valabrega, Giorgio; Turco, Emilia; Defilippi, Paola; Cabodi, Sara

    2016-01-26

    Overexpression of the ErbB2/HER2 receptor tyrosine kinase occurs in up to 20% of human breast cancers and correlates with aggressive disease. Several efficacious targeted therapies, including antibodies and kinase inhibitors, have been developed but the occurring of resistance to these agents is often observed. New therapeutic agents targeting the endocytic recycling and intracellular trafficking of membrane in tumor cells overexpressing ErbB2 are actually in clinical development. Nevertheless the mechanisms underlying ErbB2 downregulation are still obscure. We have previously demonstrated that the overexpression of the p130Cas adaptor protein in ErbB2 positive breast cancer, promotes tumor aggressiveness and progression. Here we demonstrate that lowering p130Cas expression in breast cancer cells is sufficient to induce ErbB2 degradation by autophagy. Conversely, p130Cas overexpression protects ErbB2 from degradation by autophagy. Furthermore, this autophagy-dependent preferential degradation of ErbB2 in absence of p130Cas is due to an increased ErbB2 ubiquitination. Indeed, the overexpression of p130Cas impairs ErbB2 ubiquitination by inhibiting the binding of Cbl and CHIP E3 ligases to ErbB2. Finally, our results indicate that p130Cas-dependent ErbB2 protection from degradation by autophagy may alter the sensitivity to the humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. Consistently, in human ErbB2 positive breast cancers that develop resistance to trastuzumab, p130Cas expression is significantly increased suggesting that elevated levels of p130Cas can be involved in trastuzumab resistance. PMID:26716506

  18. Phosphatidylserine-containing membranes alter the thermal stability of prothrombin's catalytic domain: a differential scanning calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Lentz, B R; Zhou, C M; Wu, J R

    1994-05-10

    Denaturation profiles of bovine prothrombin and its isolated fragments were examined in the presence of Na2EDTA, 5 mM CaCl2, and CaCl2 plus membranes containing 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-3-sn-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) in combination with bovine brain phosphatidylserine (PS). We have shown previously [Lentz, B. R., Wu, J. R., Sorrentino, A. M., & Carleton, J. A. (1991) Biophys. J. 60, 70] that binding to PS/POPC (25/75) large unilamellar vesicles resulted in an enthalpy loss in the main endotherm of prothrombin denaturation (Tm approximately 57-58 degrees C) and a comparable enthalpy gain in a minor endotherm (Tm approximately 59 degrees C) accompanying an upward shift in peak temperature (Tm approximately 73 degrees C). This minor endotherm was also responsive to Ca2+ binding and, in the absence of PS/POPC membranes, corresponded to melting of the N-terminal, Ca2+ and membrane binding domain (fragment 1). Peak deconvolution analysis of the prothrombin denaturation profile and extensive studies of the denaturation of isolated prothrombin domains in the presence and absence of PS/POPC vesicles suggested that membrane binding induced changes in the C-terminal catalytic domain of prothrombin (prethrombin 2) and in a domain that links fragment 1 with the catalytic domain (fragment 2). Specifically, the results have confirmed that the fragment 2 domain interacts with the stabilizes the prethrombin 2 domain and also have shown that fragment 2 interacts directly with the membrane. In addition, the results have demonstrated a heretofore unrecognized interaction between the catalytic and membrane binding domains. This interaction can account for another portion of the denaturation enthalpy that appears at high temperatures in the presence of membranes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8180168

  19. Posttranscriptional regulation of sodium-iodide symporter mRNA expression in the rat thyroid gland by acute iodide administration.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Nascimento, Caroline; Calil-Silveira, Jamile; Nunes, Maria Tereza

    2010-04-01

    Iodide is an important regulator of thyroid activity. Its excess elicits the Wolff-Chaikoff effect, characterized by an acute suppression of thyroid hormone synthesis, which has been ascribed to serum TSH reduction or TGF-beta increase and production of iodolipids in the thyroid. These alterations take hours/days to occur, contrasting with the promptness of Wolff-Chaikoff effect. We investigated whether acute iodide administration could trigger events that precede those changes, such as reduction of sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) mRNA abundance and adenylation, and if perchlorate treatment could counteract them. Rats subjected or not to methylmercaptoimidazole treatment (0.03%) received NaI (2,000 microg/0.5 ml saline) or saline intraperitoneally and were killed 30 min up to 24 h later. Another set of animals was treated with iodide and perchlorate, in equimolar doses. NIS mRNA content was evaluated by Northern blotting and real-time PCR, and NIS mRNA poly(A) tail length by rapid amplification of cDNA ends-poly(A) test (RACE-PAT). We observed that NIS mRNA abundance and poly(A) tail length were significantly reduced in all periods of iodide treatment. Perchlorate reversed these effects, indicating that iodide was the agent that triggered the modifications observed. Since the poly(A) tail length of mRNAs is directly associated with their stability and translation efficiency, we can assume that the rapid decay of NIS mRNA abundance observed was due to a reduction of its stability, a condition in which its translation could be impaired. Our data show for the first time that iodide regulates NIS mRNA expression at posttranscriptional level, providing a new mechanism by which iodide exerts its autoregulatory effect on thyroid. PMID:20107044

  20. Oxidized frying oil and its polar fraction fed to pregnant mice are teratogenic and alter mRNA expressions of vitamin A metabolism genes in the liver of dams and their fetuses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chin-Fang; Lin, Yu-Shun; Chiang, Zong-Cian; Lu, Shui-Yuan; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Chang, Sunny Li-Yun; Chao, Pei-Min

    2014-05-01

    We previously observed a higher incidence of congenital malformations in the fetuses of dams fed an oxidized frying oil (OFO)-containing diet during pregnancy. In this study, we hypothesized that, during pregnancy, maternal ingestion of OFO, specifically the oxidized components (i.e. the polar fraction), modulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARα) or aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transactivity, altering the metabolism of retinoic acid (RA), a well-characterized morphogen, resulting in teratogenesis. Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were divided into four groups which, from d1 (conception) to d18, were fed a diet containing 10 g/100 g of fresh soybean oil (SO), OFO or the non-polar (NP) or polar (PO) fraction of OFO. Reporter assays testing the transactivity of PPARα and AhR showed that free fatty acids from OFO, specifically the PO fraction, up-regulated PPARα transactivity and down-regulated AhR transactivity. In vivo study showed that the PO fraction group had a significantly higher number of dead fetuses and resorptions per litter than the SO and NP fraction groups. The incidence of abnormalities in terms of gross morphology and skeletal ossification of the fetus was greatest in the PO fraction group, followed by the OFO group, both values being significantly higher than in the other two groups. Hepatic expression of genes encoding enzymes associated with RA synthesis and catabolism in dams and fetuses was differentially affected by PO fraction assault. We conclude that OFO-mediated teratogenesis is associated with disturbed RA metabolism in the dams and fetuses caused, at least in part, by modulation of PPARα and AhR transactivity by the oxidized components in OFO. PMID:24656387

  1. Synthetic mRNA with Superior Properties that Mimics the Intracellular Fates of Natural Histone mRNA.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei; Slevin, Michael K; Marzluff, William F; Rhoads, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Since DNA and histone levels must be closely balanced for cell survival, histone expressions are highly regulated. The regulation of replication-dependent histone expression is mainly achieved at the mRNA level, as the mRNAs are rapidly removed when DNA replication is inhibited during S-phase. Histone mRNA degradation initiates with addition of multiple uridines (oligouridylation) following the 3' stem-loop (SL) catalyzed by terminal uridyltransferase (TUTase). Previous studies showed that histone mRNA degradation occurs through both 5' → 3' and 3' → 5' processes, but the relative contributions are difficult to dissect due to lack of established protocols. The translational efficiency and stability of synthetic mRNA in both cultured cells and whole animals can be improved by structural modifications at the both 5' and 3' termini. In this chapter, we present methods of utilizing modified cap dinucleotide analogs to block 5' → 3' degradation of a reporter mRNA containing canonical histone mRNA 3' SL and monitoring how oligouridylation and 3' → 5' degradation occur. Protocols are presented for synthesis of reporter mRNA containing the histone 3' SL and modified cap analogs, monitoring mRNA stability and unidirectional degradation either from 5' or 3' termini, and detection of oligo(U) tracts from degradation products by either traditional or deep sequencing. PMID:27236794

  2. Quantitative Effect of Suboptimal Codon Usage on Translational Efficiency of mRNA Encoding HIV-1 gag in Intact T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ngumbela, Kholiswa C.; Ryan, Kieran P.; Sivamurthy, Rohini; Brockman, Mark A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Bhardwaj, Nina; Kavanagh, Daniel G.

    2008-01-01

    Background The sequences of wild-isolate strains of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) are characterized by low GC content and suboptimal codon usage. Codon optimization of DNA vectors can enhance protein expression both by enhancing translational efficiency, and by altering RNA stability and export. Although gag codon optimization is widely used in DNA vectors and experimental vaccines, the actual effect of altered codon usage on gag translational efficiency has not been quantified. Methodology and Principal Findings To quantify translational efficiency of gag mRNA in live T cells, we transfected Jurkat cells with increasing doses of capped, polyadenylated synthetic mRNA corresponding to wildtype or codon-optimized gag sequences, measured Gag production by quantitative ELISA and flow cytometry, and estimated the translational efficiency of each transcript as pg of Gag antigen produced per µg of input mRNA. We found that codon optimization yielded a small increase in gag translational efficiency (approximately 1.6 fold). In contrast when cells were transfected with DNA vectors requiring nuclear transcription and processing of gag mRNA, codon optimization resulted in a very large enhancement of Gag production. Conclusions We conclude that suboptimal codon usage by HIV-1 results in only a slight loss of gag translational efficiency per se, with the vast majority of enhancement in protein expression from DNA vectors due to altered processing and export of nuclear RNA. PMID:18523584

  3. Antagonistic regulation of mRNA expression and splicing by CELF and MBNL proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eric T.; Ward, Amanda J.; Cherone, Jennifer M.; Giudice, Jimena; Wang, Thomas T.; Treacy, Daniel J.; Lambert, Nicole J.; Freese, Peter; Saxena, Tanvi; Cooper, Thomas A.; Burge, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    RNA binding proteins of the conserved CUGBP1, Elav-like factor (CELF) family contribute to heart and skeletal muscle development and are implicated in myotonic dystrophy (DM). To understand their genome-wide functions, we analyzed the transcriptome dynamics following induction of CELF1 or CELF2 in adult mouse heart and of CELF1 in muscle by RNA-seq, complemented by crosslinking/immunoprecipitation-sequencing (CLIP-seq) analysis of mouse cells and tissues to distinguish direct from indirect regulatory targets. We identified hundreds of mRNAs bound in their 3′ UTRs by both CELF1 and the developmentally induced MBNL1 protein, a threefold greater overlap in target messages than expected, including messages involved in development and cell differentiation. The extent of 3′ UTR binding by CELF1 and MBNL1 predicted the degree of mRNA repression or stabilization, respectively, following CELF1 induction. However, CELF1's RNA binding specificity in vitro was not detectably altered by coincubation with recombinant MBNL1. These findings support a model in which CELF and MBNL proteins bind independently to mRNAs but functionally compete to specify down-regulation or localization/stabilization, respectively, of hundreds of mRNA targets. Expression of many alternative 3′ UTR isoforms was altered following CELF1 induction, with 3′ UTR binding associated with down-regulation of isoforms and genes. The splicing of hundreds of alternative exons was oppositely regulated by these proteins, confirming an additional layer of regulatory antagonism previously observed in a handful of cases. The regulatory relationships between CELFs and MBNLs in control of both mRNA abundance and splicing appear to have evolved to enhance developmental transitions in major classes of heart and muscle genes. PMID:25883322

  4. Functional Integration of mRNA Translational Control Programs.

    PubMed

    MacNicol, Melanie C; Cragle, Chad E; Arumugam, Karthik; Fosso, Bruno; Pesole, Graziano; MacNicol, Angus M

    2015-01-01

    Regulated mRNA translation plays a key role in control of cell cycle progression in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, including in the self-renewal and survival of stem cells and cancer stem cells. While targeting mRNA translation presents an attractive strategy for control of aberrant cell cycle progression, mRNA translation is an underdeveloped therapeutic target. Regulated mRNAs are typically controlled through interaction with multiple RNA binding proteins (RBPs) but the mechanisms by which the functions of distinct RBPs bound to a common target mRNA are coordinated are poorly understood. The challenge now is to gain insight into these mechanisms of coordination and to identify the molecular mediators that integrate multiple, often conflicting, inputs. A first step includes the identification of altered mRNA ribonucleoprotein complex components that assemble on mRNAs bound by multiple, distinct RBPs compared to those recruited by individual RBPs. This review builds upon our knowledge of combinatorial control of mRNA translation during the maturation of oocytes from Xenopus laevis, to address molecular strategies that may mediate RBP diplomacy and conflict resolution for coordinated control of mRNA translational output. Continued study of regulated ribonucleoprotein complex dynamics promises valuable new insights into mRNA translational control and may suggest novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of disease. PMID:26197342

  5. Screening of mRNA Chemical Modification to Maximize Protein Expression with Reduced Immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Itaka, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification of nucleosides in mRNA is an important technology to regulate the immunogenicity of mRNA. In this study, various previously reported mRNA formulations were evaluated by analyzing in vitro protein expression and immunogenicity in multiple cell lines. For the macrophage-derived cell line, RAW 264.7, modified mRNA tended to have reduced immunogenicity and increased protein expression compared to the unmodified mRNA. In contrast, in some cell types, such as hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HuH-7) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), protein expression was decreased by mRNA modification. Further analyses revealed that mRNA modifications decreased translation efficiency but increased nuclease stability. Thus, mRNA modification is likely to exert both positive and negative effects on the efficiency of protein expression in transfected cells and optimal mRNA formulation should be determined based on target cell types and transfection purposes. PMID:26213960

  6. Screening of mRNA Chemical Modification to Maximize Protein Expression with Reduced Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Itaka, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification of nucleosides in mRNA is an important technology to regulate the immunogenicity of mRNA. In this study, various previously reported mRNA formulations were evaluated by analyzing in vitro protein expression and immunogenicity in multiple cell lines. For the macrophage-derived cell line, RAW 264.7, modified mRNA tended to have reduced immunogenicity and increased protein expression compared to the unmodified mRNA. In contrast, in some cell types, such as hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HuH-7) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), protein expression was decreased by mRNA modification. Further analyses revealed that mRNA modifications decreased translation efficiency but increased nuclease stability. Thus, mRNA modification is likely to exert both positive and negative effects on the efficiency of protein expression in transfected cells and optimal mRNA formulation should be determined based on target cell types and transfection purposes. PMID:26213960

  7. SNP Detection in mRNA in Living Cells Using Allele Specific FRET Probes

    PubMed Central

    Dahan, Liya; Huang, Lingyan; Kedmi, Ranit; Behlke, Mark A.; Peer, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Live mRNA detection allows real time monitoring of specific transcripts and genetic alterations. The main challenge of live genetic detection is overcoming the high background generated by unbound probes and reaching high level of specificity with minimal off target effects. The use of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) probes allows differentiation between bound and unbound probes thus decreasing background. Probe specificity can be optimized by adjusting the length and through use of chemical modifications that alter binding affinity. Herein, we report the use of two oligonucleotide FRET probe system to detect a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in murine Hras mRNA, which is associated with malignant transformations. The FRET oligonucleotides were modified with phosphorothioate (PS) bonds, 2′OMe RNA and LNA residues to enhance nuclease stability and improve SNP discrimination. Our results show that a point mutation in Hras can be detected in endogenous RNA of living cells. As determined by an Acceptor Photobleaching method, FRET levels were higher in cells transfected with perfect match FRET probes whereas a single mismatch showed decreased FRET signal. This approach promotes in vivo molecular imaging methods and could further be applied in cancer diagnosis and theranostic strategies. PMID:24039756

  8. Highly metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas induced in male F344 rats treated with N-nitrosomorpholine in combination with other hepatocarcinogens show a high incidence of p53 gene mutations along with altered mRNA expression of tumor-related genes.

    PubMed

    Masui, T; Nakanishi, H; Inada, K; Imai, T; Mizoguchi, Y; Yada, H; Futakuchi, M; Shirai, T; Tatematsu, M

    1997-01-15

    The carcinogenic and metastatic processes are thought to consist of a sequence of steps, and animal models featuring highly metastatic lesions are clearly necessary to allow analysis of the whole process of transformation from preneoplastic changes to high grade metastatic tumors, and to access effectiveness of therapeutic treatments of advanced cancers in vivo. The purpose of the present study was to establish a model and to screen for reported genetic alterations in induced lesions. In the present study, it was confirmed that lung metastasis of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) induced in male F344 rats by N-nitrosomorpholine (NNM), given in the drinking water at a dose of 120 ppm for 24 weeks, was significantly enhanced by additional carcinogenic pretreatments and that a single i.p. injection of 100 mg/kg body weight N-diethylnitrosamine (DEN) alone was sufficient for that purpose. Molecular biological analyses of the induced lesions revealed point mutations in the p53 gene in 60.9% of HCCs, and elevated expression of mRNAs for p53, c-myc, c-fos, TGF-alpha, TGF-beta1, alpha-fetoprotein, GST-P, and GGT, and decreased mRNA expression of EGF and EGFR in HCCs when compared to controls. No obvious association of gene alterations with metastatic potential of primary tumors was found except for an increase in the incidence of p53 mutations. Since the process of metastasis is thought to be sequential and selective, further comparative analysis of metastatic and primary lesions should clarify the mechanisms involved in the multi-step process of metastasis. PMID:9029167

  9. Signaling Pathways That Control mRNA Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Denmon, Andria P.

    2013-01-01

    Cells regulate their genomes mainly at the level of transcription and at the level of mRNA decay. While regulation at the level of transcription is clearly important, the regulation of mRNA turnover by signaling networks is essential for a rapid response to external stimuli. Signaling pathways result in posttranslational modification of RNA binding proteins by phosphorylation, ubiquitination, methylation, acetylation etc. These modifications are important for rapid remodeling of dynamic ribonucleoprotein complexes and triggering mRNA decay. Understanding how these posttranslational modifications alter gene expression is therefore a fundamental question in biology. In this review we highlight recent findings on how signaling pathways and cell cycle checkpoints involving phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and arginine methylation affect mRNA turnover. PMID:23602935

  10. Accelerated mRNA decay in conditional mutants of yeast mRNA capping enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Schwer, B; Mao, X; Shuman, S

    1998-01-01

    Current models of mRNA decay in yeast posit that 3' deadenylation precedes enzymatic removal of the 5' cap, which then exposes the naked end to 5' exonuclease action. Here, we analyzed gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells bearing conditional mutations of Ceg1 (capping enzyme), a 52 kDa protein that transfers GMP from GTP to the 5' end of mRNA to form the GpppN cap structure. Shift of ceg1 mutants to restrictive temperature elicited a rapid decline in the rate of protein synthesis, which correlated with a sharp reduction in the steady-state levels of multiple individual mRNAs. ceg1 mutations prevented the accumulation of SSA1 and SSA4 mRNAs that were newly synthesized at the restrictive temperature. Uncapped poly(A)+ SSA4 mRNA accumulated in cells lacking the 5' exoribonuclease Xrn1. These findings provide genetic evidence for the long-held idea that the cap guanylate is critical for mRNA stability. The deadenylation-decapping-degradation pathway appears to be short-circuited when Ceg1 is inactivated. PMID:9547258

  11. mRNA transcript therapy.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Drew

    2015-02-01

    mRNA is the central molecule of all forms of life. It is generally accepted that current life on Earth descended from an RNA world. mRNA, after its first therapeutic description in 1992, has recently come into increased focus as a method to deliver genetic information. The recent solution to the two main difficulties in using mRNA as a therapeutic, immune stimulation and potency, has provided the basis for a wide range of applications. While mRNA-based cancer immunotherapies have been in clinical trials for a few years, novel approaches; including, in vivo delivery of mRNA to replace or supplement proteins, mRNA-based generation of pluripotent stem cells, or genome engineering using mRNA-encoded meganucleases are beginning to be realized. This review presents the current state of mRNA drug technologies and potential applications, as well as discussing the challenges and prospects in mRNA development and drug discovery. PMID:25359562

  12. Isolation of ribosome bound nascent polypeptides in vitro to identify translational pause sites along mRNA.

    PubMed

    Jha, Sujata S; Komar, Anton A

    2012-01-01

    The rate of translational elongation is non-uniform. mRNA secondary structure, codon usage and mRNA associated proteins may alter ribosome movement on the message(for review see 1). However, it's now widely accepted that synonymous codon usage is the primary cause of non-uniform translational elongation rates(1). Synonymous codons are not used with identical frequency. A bias exists in the use of synonymous codons with some codons used more frequently than others(2). Codon bias is organism as well as tissue specific(2,3). Moreover, frequency of codon usage is directly proportional to the concentrations of cognate tRNAs(4). Thus, a frequently used codon will have higher multitude of corresponding tRNAs, which further implies that a frequent codon will be translated faster than an infrequent one. Thus, regions on mRNA enriched in rare codons (potential pause sites) will as a rule slow down ribosome movement on the message and cause accumulation of nascent peptides of the respective sizes(5-8). These pause sites can have functional impact on the protein expression, mRNA stability and protein folding(for review see 9). Indeed, it was shown that alleviation of such pause sites can alter ribosome movement on mRNA and subsequently may affect the efficiency of co-translational (in vivo) protein folding(1,7,10,11). To understand the process of protein folding in vivo, in the cell, that is ultimately coupled to the process of protein synthesis it is essential to gain comprehensive insights into the impact of codon usage/tRNA content on the movement of ribosomes along mRNA during translational elongation. Here we describe a simple technique that can be used to locate major translation pause sites for a given mRNA translated in various cell-free systems(6-8). This procedure is based on isolation of nascent polypeptides accumulating on ribosomes during in vitro translation of a target mRNA. The rationale is that at low-frequency codons, the increase in the residence time of the

  13. mRNA modifications: Dynamic regulators of gene expression?

    PubMed Central

    Hoernes, Thomas Philipp; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Erlacher, Matthias David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The expression of a gene is a tightly regulated process and is exerted by a myriad of different mechanisms. Recently, RNA modifications located in coding sequences of mRNAs, have been identified as potential regulators of gene expression. N6-methyladenosine (m6A), 5-methylcytosine (m5C), pseudouridine (Ψ) and N1-methyladenosine (m1A) have been found within open reading frames of mRNAs. The presence of these mRNA modifications has been implicated to modulate the fate of an mRNA, ranging from maturation to its translation and even degradation. However, many aspects concerning the biological functions of mRNA modifications remain elusive. Recently, systematic in vitro studies allowed a first glimpse of the direct interplay of mRNA modifications and the efficiency and fidelity of ribosomal translation. It thereby became evident that the effects of mRNA modifications were, astonishingly versatile, depending on the type, position or sequence context. The incorporation of a single modification could either prematurely terminate protein synthesis, reduce the peptide yield or alter the amino acid sequence identity. These results implicate that mRNA modifications are a powerful mechanism to post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. PMID:27351916

  14. Motifs within the CA-repeat-rich region of Surfactant Protein B (SFTPB) intron 4 differentially affect mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenjun; Ni, Lan; Silveyra, Patricia; Wang, Guirong; Noutsios, Georgios T; Singh, Anamika; DiAngelo, Susan L; Sanusi, Olabisi; Raval, Manmeet; Floros, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    The first half of the surfactant protein B (SP-B) gene intron 4 is a CA-repeat-rich region that contains 11 motifs. To study the role of this region on SP-B mRNA splicing, minigenes were generated by systematic removal of motifs from either the 5′ or 3′ end. These were transfected in CHO cells to study their splicing efficiency. The latter was determined as the ratio of completely to incompletely spliced SP-B RNA. Our results indicate that SP-B intron 4 motifs differentially affect splicing. Motifs 8 and 9 significantly enhanced and reduced splicing of intron 4, respectively. RNA mobility shift assays performed with a Motif 8 sequence that contains a CAUC cis-element and cell extracts resulted in a RNA:protein shift that was lost upon mutation of the element. Furthermore, in silico analysis of mRNA secondary structure stability for minigenes with and without motif 8 indicated a correlation between mRNA stability and splicing ratio. We conclude that differential loss of specific intron 4 motifs results in one or more of the following: a) altered splicing, b) differences in RNA stability and c) changes in secondary structure. These, in turn, may affect SP-B content in lung health or disease. PMID:23687636

  15. Myc and mRNA capping.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Sianadh; Cowling, Victoria H

    2015-05-01

    c-Myc is upregulated in response to growth factors and transmits the signal to proliferate by altering the gene expression landscape. When genetic alterations result in growth factor-independent c-Myc expression, it can become an oncogene. The majority of human tumour types exhibit a degree of c-Myc deregulation, resulting in unrestrained cell proliferation. c-Myc binds proximal to the promoter region of genes and recruits co-factors including histone acetyltransferases and RNA pol II kinases, which promote transcription. c-Myc also promotes formation of the cap structure at the 5' end of mRNA. The cap is 7-methylguanosine linked to the first transcribed nucleotide of RNA pol II transcripts via a 5' to 5' triphosphate bridge. The cap is added to the first transcribed nucleotide by the capping enzymes, RNGTT and RNMT-RAM. During the early stages of transcription, the capping enzymes are recruited to RNA pol II phosphorylated on Serine-5 of the C-terminal domain. The mRNA cap protects transcripts from degradation during transcription and recruits factors which promote RNA processing including, splicing, export and translation initiation. The proportion of transcripts with a cap structure is increased by elevating c-Myc expression, resulting in increased rates of translation. c-Myc promotes capping by promoting RNA pol II phosphorylation and by upregulating the enzyme SAHH which neutralises the inhibitory bi-product of methylation reactions, SAH. c-Myc-induced capping is required for c-Myc-dependent gene expression and cell proliferation. Targeting capping may represent a new therapeutic opportunity to inhibit c-Myc function in tumours. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Myc proteins in cell biology and pathology. PMID:24681440

  16. Messenger RNA (mRNA) Nanoparticle Tumour Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Kyle K.L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-01-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA’s biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research. PMID:24904987

  17. GBR 12909 administration as an animal model of bipolar mania: time course of behavioral, brain oxidative alterations and effect of mood stabilizing drugs.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Ana Isabelle G; de Araújo, Maíra Moraes; da Silva Araújo, Tatiane; de Souza, Greicy Coelho; Cavalcante, Lígia Menezes; de Jesus Souza Machado, Michel; de Lucena, David Freitas; Quevedo, João; Macêdo, Danielle

    2015-10-01

    Polymorphisms in the human dopamine transporter (DAT) are associated with bipolar endophenotype. Based on this, the acute inhibition of DAT using GBR12909 causes behavioral alterations that are prevented by valproate (VAL), being related to a mania-like model. Herein our first aim was to analyze behavioral and brain oxidative alterations during a 24 h period post-GBR12909 to better characterize this model. Our second aim was to determine the preventive effects of lithium (Li) or VAL 2 h post-GBR12909. For this, adult male mice received GBR12909 or saline being evaluated at 2, 4, 8, 12 or 24 h post-administration. Hyperlocomotion, levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation in brain areas were assessed at all these time-points. GBR12909 caused hyperlocomotion at 2 and 24 h. Rearing behavior increased only at 2 h. GSH levels decreased in the hippocampus and striatum at the time points of 2, 4, 8 and 12 h. Increased lipid peroxidation was detected at the time-points of 2 and 12 h in all brain areas studied. At the time-point of 2 h post-GBR12909 Li prevented the hyperlocomotion and rearing alterations, while VAL prevented only rearing alterations. Both drugs prevented pro-oxidative changes. In conclusion, we observed that the main behavioral and oxidative alterations took place at the time-period of 2 h post-GBR12909, what points to this time-period as the best for the assessment of alterations in this model. Furthermore, the present study expands the predictive validity of the model by the determination of the preventive effects of Li. PMID:26073232

  18. Futsch/MAP1B mRNA Is a Translational Target of TDP-43 and Is Neuroprotective in a Drosophila Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, Alyssa N.; Siddegowda, Bhavani Bagevalu; Estes, Patricia S.; Johannesmeyer, Jeffrey; Kovalik, Tina; Daniel, Scott G.; Pearson, Antony; Bowser, Robert

    2014-01-01

    TDP-43 is an RNA-binding protein linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) that is known to regulate the splicing, transport, and storage of specific mRNAs into stress granules. Although TDP-43 has been shown to interact with translation factors, its role in protein synthesis remains unclear, and no in vivo translation targets have been reported to date. Here we provide evidence that TDP-43 associates with futsch mRNA in a complex and regulates its expression at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in Drosophila. In the context of TDP-43-induced proteinopathy, there is a significant reduction of futsch mRNA at the NMJ compared with motor neuron cell bodies where we find higher levels of transcript compared with controls. TDP-43 also leads to a significant reduction in Futsch protein expression at the NMJ. Polysome fractionations coupled with quantitative PCR experiments indicate that TDP-43 leads to a futsch mRNA shift from actively translating polysomes to nontranslating ribonuclear protein particles, suggesting that in addition to its effect on localization, TDP-43 also regulates the translation of futsch mRNA. We also show that futsch overexpression is neuroprotective by extending life span, reducing TDP-43 aggregation, and suppressing ALS-like locomotor dysfunction as well as NMJ abnormalities linked to microtubule and synaptic stabilization. Furthermore, the localization of MAP1B, the mammalian homolog of Futsch, is altered in ALS spinal cords in a manner similar to our observations in Drosophila motor neurons. Together, our results suggest a microtubule-dependent mechanism in motor neuron disease caused by TDP-43-dependent alterations in futsch mRNA localization and translation in vivo. PMID:25429138

  19. Triosephosphate isomerase I170V alters catalytic site, enhances stability and induces pathology in a Drosophila model of TPI deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Kammerer, Charles J.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Rode, Sascha; Aslam, Anoshe A.; Heroux, Annie; Wetzel, Ronald; VanDemark, Andrew P.; Palladino, Michael J.

    2014-10-16

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is a glycolytic enzyme which homodimerizes for full catalytic activity. Mutations of the TPI gene elicit a disease known as TPI Deficiency, a glycolytic enzymopathy noted for its unique severity of neurological symptoms. Evidence suggests that TPI Deficiency pathogenesis may be due to conformational changes of the protein, likely affecting dimerization and protein stability. In this report, we genetically and physically characterize a human disease-associated TPI mutation caused by an I170V substitution. Human TPII170V elicits behavioral abnormalities in Drosophila. An examination of hTPII170V enzyme kinetics revealed this substitution reduced catalytic turnover, while assessments of thermal stability demonstrated an increase in enzyme stability. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the homodimeric I170V mutant reveals changes in the geometry of critical residues within the catalytic pocket. In the end, collectively these data reveal new observations of the structural and kinetic determinants of TPI deficiency pathology, providing new insights into disease pathogenesis.

  20. Extensive modifications for methionine enhancement in the beta-barrels do not alter the structural stability of the bean seed storage protein phaseolin.

    PubMed

    Dyer, J M; Nelson, J W; Murai, N

    1995-11-01

    Common beans are widely utilized as a food source, yet are low in the essential amino acid methionine. As an initial step to overcome this defect the methionine content of the primary bean seed storage protein phaseolin was increased by replacing 20 evolutionarily variant hydrophobic residues with methionine and inserting short, methionine-rich sequences into turn and loop regions of the protein structure. Methionine enhancement ranged from 5 to 30 residues. An Escherichia coli expression system was developed to characterize the structural stability of the mutant proteins. Proteins of expected sizes were obtained for all constructs except for negative controls, which were rapidly degraded in E. coli. Thermal denaturation of the purified proteins demonstrated that both wild-type and mutant phaseolin proteins denatured reversibly at approximately 61 degrees C. In addition, urea denaturation experiments of the wild-type and a mutant protein (with 30 additional methionines) confirmed that the structural stability of the proteins was very similar. Remarkably, these results indicate that the phaseolin protein tolerates extensive modifications, including 20 substitutions and two loop inserts for methionine enhancement in the beta-barrel and loop structures, with extremely small effects on protein stability. PMID:8747427

  1. Regulation of the mRNA half-life in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Griseri, Paola; Pagès, Gilles

    2014-08-10

    The control of the half-life of mRNA plays a central role in normal development and in disease progression. Several pathological conditions, such as breast cancer, correlate with deregulation of the half-life of mRNA encoding growth factors, oncogenes, cell cycle regulators and inflammatory cytokines that participate in cancer. Substantial stability means that a mRNA will be available for translation for a longer time, resulting in high levels of protein gene products, which may lead to prolonged responses that subsequently result in over-production of cellular mediators that participate in cancer. The stability of these mRNA is regulated at the 3'UTR level by different mechanisms involving mRNA binding proteins, micro-RNA, long non-coding RNA and alternative polyadenylation. All these events are tightly inter-connected to each other and lead to steady state levels of target mRNAs. Compelling evidence also suggests that both mRNA binding proteins and regulatory RNAs which participate to mRNA half-life regulation may be useful prognostic markers in breast cancers, pointing to a potential therapeutic approach to treatment of patients with these tumors. In this review, we summarize the main mechanisms involved in the regulation of mRNA decay and discuss the possibility of its implication in breast cancer aggressiveness and the efficacy of targeted therapy. PMID:25114848

  2. Regulation of the mRNA half-life in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Griseri, Paola; Pagès, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    The control of the half-life of mRNA plays a central role in normal development and in disease progression. Several pathological conditions, such as breast cancer, correlate with deregulation of the half-life of mRNA encoding growth factors, oncogenes, cell cycle regulators and inflammatory cytokines that participate in cancer. Substantial stability means that a mRNA will be available for translation for a longer time, resulting in high levels of protein gene products, which may lead to prolonged responses that subsequently result in over-production of cellular mediators that participate in cancer. The stability of these mRNA is regulated at the 3’UTR level by different mechanisms involving mRNA binding proteins, micro-RNA, long non-coding RNA and alternative polyadenylation. All these events are tightly inter-connected to each other and lead to steady state levels of target mRNAs. Compelling evidence also suggests that both mRNA binding proteins and regulatory RNAs which participate to mRNA half-life regulation may be useful prognostic markers in breast cancers, pointing to a potential therapeutic approach to treatment of patients with these tumors. In this review, we summarize the main mechanisms involved in the regulation of mRNA decay and discuss the possibility of its implication in breast cancer aggressiveness and the efficacy of targeted therapy. PMID:25114848

  3. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Cross-Linked Intact Multiprotein Complexes: Enhanced Gas-Phase Stabilities and Altered Dissociation Pathways.

    PubMed

    Samulak, Billy M; Niu, Shuai; Andrews, Philip C; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2016-05-17

    Analysis of protein complexes by ion mobility-mass spectrometry is a valuable method for the rapid assessment of complex composition, binding stoichiometries, and structures. However, capturing labile, unknown protein assemblies directly from cells remains a challenge for the technology. Furthermore, ion mobility-mass spectrometry measurements of complexes, subcomplexes, and subunits are necessary to build complete models of intact assemblies, and such data can be difficult to acquire in a comprehensive fashion. Here, we present the use of novel mass spectrometry cleavable cross-linkers and tags to stabilize intact protein complexes for ion mobility-mass spectrometry. Our data reveal that tags and linkers bearing permanent charges are superior stabilizers relative to neutral cross-linkers, especially in the context of retaining compact forms of the assembly under a wide array of activating conditions. In addition, when cross-linked protein complexes are collisionally activated in the gas phase, a larger proportion of the product ions produced are often more compact and reflect native protein subcomplexes when compared with unmodified complexes activated in the same fashion, greatly enabling applications in structural biology. PMID:27078797

  4. Fatty acids attached to all-trans-astaxanthin alter its cis-trans equilibrium, and consequently its stability, upon light-accelerated autoxidation.

    PubMed

    de Bruijn, Wouter J C; Weesepoel, Yannick; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Gruppen, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Fatty acid esterification, common in naturally occurring astaxanthin, has been suggested to influence both colour stability and degradation of all-trans-astaxanthin. Therefore, astaxanthin stability was studied as influenced by monoesterification and diesterification with palmitate. Increased esterification decelerated degradation of all-trans-astaxanthin (RP-UHPLC-PDA), whereas, it had no influence on colour loss over time (spectrophotometry). This difference might be explained by the observation that palmitate esterification influenced the cis-trans equilibrium. Free astaxanthin produced larger amounts of 9-cis isomer whereas monopalmitate esterification resulted in increased 13-cis isomerization. The molar ratios of 9-cis:13-cis after 60min were 1:1.7 (free), 1:4.8 (monopalmitate) and 1:2.6 (dipalmitate). The formation of 9-cis astaxanthin, with its higher molar extinction coefficient than that of all-trans-astaxanthin, might compensate for colour loss induced by conjugated double bond cleavage. As such, it was concluded that spectrophotometry is not an accurate measure of the degradation of the all-trans-astaxanthin molecule. PMID:26471660

  5. Cigarette Smoking and Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 mRNA in the Dorsal Raphe Nucleus in Suicides

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Helene; Arango, Victoria; Kassir, Suham A.; Dwork, Andrew J.; Mann, J. John; Underwood, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with suicide and mood disorders and stimulates serotonin release. Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH2) synthesizes serotonin and is over-expressed in suicides. We determined whether smoking is associated with TPH2 mRNA in suicides and controls. TPH2 mRNA was measured postmortem in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) of controls (N=26, 17 nonsmokers and nine smokers) and suicides (N=23, 5 nonsmokers and 18 smokers). Psychiatric history was obtained by psychological autopsy. TPH2 mRNA was greater in suicide nonsmokers than suicide smokers, control smokers and control nonsmokers (p=0.006). There was more TPH2 mRNA throughout the DRN. Smoking interferes with the TPH2 mRNA increase observed in suicide nonsmokers. The absence of altered TPH2 expression in non-suicide smokers suggests no pharmacological effect of smoking. PMID:26954509

  6. Translational activity and functional stability of human fibroblast beta 1 and beta 2 interferon mRNAs lacking 3'-terminal RNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Soreq, H; Sagar, A D; Sehgal, P B

    1981-01-01

    Polyadenylylated mRNA was purified from poly(I).poly(C)- and cycloheximide-superinduced human fibroblast (FS-4) cultures. The mRNA was subjected to electrophoresis through an agarose/CH3HgOH gel, and human fibroblast beta 1 and beta 2 interferon mRNAs were isolated. Each mRNA preparation was phosphorolyzed at 0 degrees C for 20 min by using a molar excess of polynucleotide phosphorylase to produce RNAs lacking poly(A) and then incubated at 37 degrees C for varying lengths of time to allow the phosphorylase to further digest the deadenylylated RNA from the 3' end in a processive and synchronous manner. Removal of the poly(A) (less than or equal to 100 residues) and approximately 100 adjacent residues from human fibroblast beta 1 interferon mRNA (native length, 900 residues, including a 3'-noncoding region of 203 residues) did not alter the translational activity or the functional stability of this mRNA in Xenopus oocytes, whereas deletion of the poly(A) and approximately 200 adjacent residues decreased its translational efficiency. On the other hand, removal of the poly(A) (approximately 200 residues) and approximately 200 adjacent residues from human fibroblast beta 2 interferon mRNA (native length, 1300 residues) did not alter the translational activity or the functional stability of this molecule in oocytes. Thus, neither the poly(A) nor large segments of the 3'-noncoding region (which includes the hexanucleotide A-A-U-A-A-A sequence, at least in the case of beta 1 mRNA) are required for the maintenance of the functional stability of human beta 1 and beta 2 interferon mRNAs in Xenopus oocytes. Images PMID:6165016

  7. The cellular growth rate controls overall mRNA turnover, and modulates either transcription or degradation rates of particular gene regulons

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, José; Delgado-Ramos, Lidia; Ayala, Guillermo; Pelechano, Vicent; Medina, Daniel A.; Carrasco, Fany; González, Ramón; Andrés-León, Eduardo; Steinmetz, Lars; Warringer, Jonas; Chávez, Sebastián; Pérez-Ortín, José E.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed 80 different genomic experiments, and found a positive correlation between both RNA polymerase II transcription and mRNA degradation with growth rates in yeast. Thus, in spite of the marked variation in mRNA turnover, the total mRNA concentration remained approximately constant. Some genes, however, regulated their mRNA concentration by uncoupling mRNA stability from the transcription rate. Ribosome-related genes modulated their transcription rates to increase mRNA levels under fast growth. In contrast, mitochondria-related and stress-induced genes lowered mRNA levels by reducing mRNA stability or the transcription rate, respectively. We also detected these regulations within the heterogeneity of a wild-type cell population growing in optimal conditions. The transcriptomic analysis of sorted microcolonies confirmed that the growth rate dictates alternative expression programs by modulating transcription and mRNA decay. The regulation of overall mRNA turnover keeps a constant ratio between mRNA decay and the dilution of [mRNA] caused by cellular growth. This regulation minimizes the indiscriminate transmission of mRNAs from mother to daughter cells, and favors the response capacity of the latter to physiological signals and environmental changes. We also conclude that, by uncoupling mRNA synthesis from decay, cells control the mRNA abundance of those gene regulons that characterize fast and slow growth. PMID:26717982

  8. The cellular growth rate controls overall mRNA turnover, and modulates either transcription or degradation rates of particular gene regulons.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, José; Delgado-Ramos, Lidia; Ayala, Guillermo; Pelechano, Vicent; Medina, Daniel A; Carrasco, Fany; González, Ramón; Andrés-León, Eduardo; Steinmetz, Lars; Warringer, Jonas; Chávez, Sebastián; Pérez-Ortín, José E

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed 80 different genomic experiments, and found a positive correlation between both RNA polymerase II transcription and mRNA degradation with growth rates in yeast. Thus, in spite of the marked variation in mRNA turnover, the total mRNA concentration remained approximately constant. Some genes, however, regulated their mRNA concentration by uncoupling mRNA stability from the transcription rate. Ribosome-related genes modulated their transcription rates to increase mRNA levels under fast growth. In contrast, mitochondria-related and stress-induced genes lowered mRNA levels by reducing mRNA stability or the transcription rate, respectively. We also detected these regulations within the heterogeneity of a wild-type cell population growing in optimal conditions. The transcriptomic analysis of sorted microcolonies confirmed that the growth rate dictates alternative expression programs by modulating transcription and mRNA decay.The regulation of overall mRNA turnover keeps a constant ratio between mRNA decay and the dilution of [mRNA] caused by cellular growth. This regulation minimizes the indiscriminate transmission of mRNAs from mother to daughter cells, and favors the response capacity of the latter to physiological signals and environmental changes. We also conclude that, by uncoupling mRNA synthesis from decay, cells control the mRNA abundance of those gene regulons that characterize fast and slow growth. PMID:26717982

  9. Differential protein occupancy profiling of the mRNA transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) mediate mRNA biogenesis, translation and decay. We recently developed an approach to profile transcriptome-wide RBP contacts on polyadenylated transcripts by next-generation sequencing. A comparison of such profiles from different biological conditions has the power to unravel dynamic changes in protein-contacted cis-regulatory mRNA regions without a priori knowledge of the regulatory protein component. Results We compared protein occupancy profiles of polyadenylated transcripts in MCF7 and HEK293 cells. Briefly, we developed a bioinformatics workflow to identify differential crosslinking sites in cDNA reads of 4-thiouridine crosslinked polyadenylated RNA samples. We identified 30,000 differential crosslinking sites between MCF7 and HEK293 cells at an estimated false discovery rate of 10%. 73% of all reported differential protein-RNA contact sites cannot be explained by local changes in exon usage as indicated by complementary RNA-seq data. The majority of differentially crosslinked positions are located in 3′ UTRs, show distinct secondary-structure characteristics and overlap with binding sites of known RBPs, such as ELAVL1. Importantly, mRNA transcripts with the most significant occupancy changes show elongated mRNA half-lives in MCF7 cells. Conclusions We present a global comparison of protein occupancy profiles from different cell types, and provide evidence for altered mRNA metabolism as a result of differential protein-RNA contacts. Additionally, we introduce POPPI, a bioinformatics workflow for the analysis of protein occupancy profiling experiments. Our work demonstrates the value of protein occupancy profiling for assessing cis-regulatory RNA sequence space and its dynamics in growth, development and disease. PMID:24417896

  10. Fenproporex increases locomotor activity and alters energy metabolism, and mood stabilizers reverse these changes: a proposal for a new animal model of mania.

    PubMed

    Rezin, Gislaine T; Furlanetto, Camila B; Scaini, Giselli; Valvassori, Samira S; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Jeremias, Isabela C; Resende, Wilson R; Cardoso, Mariane R; Varela, Roger B; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2014-04-01

    Fenproporex (Fen) is converted in vivo into amphetamine, which is used to induce mania-like behaviors in animals. In the present study, we intend to present a new animal model of mania. In order to prove through face, construct, and predictive validities, we evaluated behavioral parameters (locomotor activity, stereotypy activity, and fecal boli amount) and brain energy metabolism (enzymes citrate synthase; malate dehydrogenase; succinate dehydrogenase; complexes I, II, II-III, and IV of the mitochondrial respiratory chain; and creatine kinase) in rats submitted to acute and chronic administration of fenproporex, treated with lithium (Li) and valproate (VPA). The administration of Fen increased locomotor activity and decreased the activity of Krebs cycle enzymes, mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, and creatine kinase, in most brain structures evaluated. In addition, treatment with mood stabilizers prevented and reversed this effect. Our results are consistent with the literature that demonstrates behavioral changes and mitochondrial dysfunction caused by psychostimulants. These findings suggest that chronic administration of Fen may be a potential animal model of mania. PMID:24126971

  11. Channel widening due to urbanization and a major flood can alter bed particle organization and bed stability in an urban boulder-bed channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestegaard, K. L.; Behrns, K.; Blanchet, Z.; Hankin, E.

    2007-12-01

    The Anacostia River is a tributary of the Potomac River north of Washington D.C. that has become progressively more urbanized in the past 50 years. Bankfull discharge and bankfull width in the Anacostia have increased by 3- 4x in the past 50 years. Nearby watersheds of similar size and geology, but without significant urbanization, contain threshold gravel-bed streams. The Anacostia, however, is not a threshold channel; it exhibits break-up of boulder-bed channels in upstream reaches and significant gravel bar formation in downstream reaches. These gravel bars have grown and migrated considerably in the past 10-15 years, contributing significantly to local channel widening that can be twice that of adjacent reaches. The purpose of this study is to determine bedload transport rates and grain size distributions and their relationship to discharge, bed organization and sediment supply. Bed mobility data come from both bedload transport measurements and measurements of channel bed changes. Channel bed changes were obtained from a) repeated channel cross section surveys, b) surface and subsurface size distributions, and c) bed particle organization measurements (measurements of location of particles within reaches). These measurements were made prior to and after the floods of 2006, which equalled the largest floods on record for most parts of the Anacostia River. In some boulder bed reaches, boulders were removed from the center of the channel and deposited along and on the channel banks. The mid-channel boulders were replaced by sheets of gravel and cobbles, significantly altering the bed mobility of the channels.

  12. Posttranscriptional regulation of urokinase receptor mRNA: identification of a novel urokinase receptor mRNA binding protein in human mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, S; Kumar, A; Idell, S

    1997-01-01

    Treatment of human pleural mesothelioma (MS-1) cells with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and cycloheximide results in 17- and 10-fold, respectively, increases in steady-state expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) mRNA. Studies of transcriptional inhibition by actinomycin D showed four- and sixfold extensions of uPAR mRNA half-life in MS-1 cells treated with PMA and cycloheximide, respectively, suggesting that uPAR gene expression involves a posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism. Using gel mobility shift and UV cross-linking assays, we identified a 50-kDa uPAR mRNA binding protein (uPAR mRNABp) that selectively bound to a 51-nucleotide (nt) fragment of mRNA corresponding to the uPAR coding region. We investigated the possibility that this 51-nt protein binding fragment of uPAR mRNA contains regulatory information for message stability. Chimeric beta-globin/uPAR/beta-globin mRNA containing the 51-nt protein binding fragment was able to destabilize otherwise stable beta-globin mRNA. Conversely, a control chimeric beta-globin/uPAR/beta-globin mRNA containing a 51-nt fragment of the uPAR coding region that does not bind uPAR mRNABp was stable under identical conditions. Binding of uPAR mRNABp to uPAR mRNA was abolished after treatment with cycloheximide and rapidly down-regulated by PMA. These data suggest that the 51-nt protein binding fragment of uPAR mRNA may be involved in mRNA turnover as well as in cycloheximide-induced uPAR message stabilization. Our results indicate a novel mechanism of uPAR gene regulation in which cis elements within a 51-nt coding region interact with a uPAR mRNABp to regulate uPAR message stability. PMID:9032234

  13. Acute intermittent morphine increases preprodynorphin and kappa opioid receptor mRNA levels in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, X M; Zhou, Y; Spangler, R; Ho, A; Han, J S; Kreek, M J

    1999-03-20

    We determined the effects of morphine on mRNA levels for the opioid ligands preprodynorphin (PPD) and preproenkephalin (PPE) and the kappa opioid receptor (KOR). Rats received six injections of morphine (6.25 mg/kg/injection) every 2 h, and were sacrificed 30 min later. mRNA levels were measured in brain tissue after removal of the cortex, cerebellum and brainstem. There were increases in PPD and KOR mRNA levels (P<0.05 and P<0.005, respectively), with no alteration of PPE. These alterations in the kappa/dynorphin system may counter morphine-induced effects on the brain. PMID:10095091

  14. Regulation of luteinizing hormone receptor mRNA expression by a specific RNA binding protein in the ovary*

    PubMed Central

    Menon, K.M.J.; Nair, Anil K.; Wang, Lei; Peegel, Helle

    2009-01-01

    Summary The expression of LH receptor mRNA shows significant changes during different physiological states of the ovary. Previous studies from our laboratory have identified a post-transcriptional mechanism by which LH receptor mRNA is regulated following preovulatory LH surge or in response to hCG administration. A specific binding protein, identified as mevalonate kinase, binds to the open reading frame of LH receptor mRNA. The protein binding site is localized to nucleotides 203–220 of the LH receptor mRNA and exhibits a high degree of specificity. The expression levels of the protein show an inverse relationship to the LH receptor mRNA levels. The hCG-induced down-regulation of LH receptor mRNA can be mimicked by increasing the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP by a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. An in vitro mRNA decay assay showed that addition of the binding protein to the decay system caused accelerated LH receptor mRNA decay. Our results therefore show that LH receptor mRNA expression in the ovary is regulated post-transcriptionally by altering the rate of mRNA degradation by a specific mRNA binding protein. PMID:17055149

  15. T3 acutely increases GH mRNA translation rate and GH secretion in hypothyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, F Goulart da; Giannocco, G; Luchessi, A D; Curi, R; Nunes, M T

    2010-04-12

    Cytoskeleton controls the stability of transcripts, by mechanisms that involve mRNAs and eEF1A attachment to it. Besides, it plays a key role in protein synthesis and secretion, which seems to be impaired in somatotrophs of hypothyroid rats, whose cytoskeleton is disarranged. This study investigated the: eEF1A and GH mRNA binding to cytoskeleton plus GH mRNA translation rate and GH secretion, in sham-operated and thyroidectomized rats treated with T3 or saline, and killed 30min thereafter. Thyroidectomy reduced: (a) pituitary F-actin content, and eEF1A plus GH mRNA binding to it; (b) GH mRNA recruitment to polysome; and (c) liver IGF-I mRNA expression, indicating that GH mRNA stability and translation rate, as well as GH secretion were impaired. T3 acutely reversed all these changes, which points toward a nongenomic action of T3 on cytoskeleton rearrangement, which might contribute to the increase on GH mRNA translation rate and GH secretion. PMID:20015464

  16. Sirt1 AS lncRNA interacts with its mRNA to inhibit muscle formation by attenuating function of miR-34a

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-qiang; Wang, Yu; Xiong, Yan; Chen, Xiao-Chang; Ma, Mei-ling; Cai, Rui; Gao, Yun; Sun, Yun-mei; Yang, Gong-She; Pang, Wei-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate the functions of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in mediating gene expression at the transcriptional or translational level. Our previous study identified a Sirt1 antisense (AS) lncRNA transcribed from the Sirt1 AS strand. However, its role and regulatory mechanism is still unknown in myogenesis. Here, functional analyses showed that Sirt1 AS lncRNA overexpression promoted myoblast proliferation, but inhibited differentiation. Mechanistically, Sirt1 AS lncRNA was found to activate its sense gene, Sirt1. The luciferase assay provided evidences that Sirt1 AS lncRNA interacted with Sirt1 3′ UTR and rescued Sirt1 transcriptional suppression by competing with miR-34a. In addition, RNA stability assay showed that Sirt1 AS lncRNA prolonged Sirt1 mRNA half-life from 2 to 10 h. Ribonuclease protection assay further indicated that it fully bound to Sirt1 mRNA in the myoblast cytoplasm. Moreover, Sirt1 AS overexpression led to less mouse weight than the control because of less lean mass and greater levels of Sirt1, whereas the fat mass and levels of miR-34a were not altered. Based on the findings, a novel regulatory mechanism was found that Sirt1 AS lncRNA preferably interacted with Sirt1 mRNA forming RNA duplex to promote Sirt1 translation by competing with miR-34a, inhibiting muscle formation. PMID:26902620

  17. Bioinspired Nanocomplex for Spatiotemporal Imaging of Sequential mRNA Expression in Differentiating Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA plays a pivotal role in regulating cellular activities. The expression dynamics of specific mRNA contains substantial information on the intracellular milieu. Unlike the imaging of stationary mRNAs, real-time intracellular imaging of the dynamics of mRNA expression is of great value for investigating mRNA biology and exploring specific cellular cascades. In addition to advanced imaging methods, timely extracellular stimulation is another key factor in regulating the mRNA expression repertoire. The integration of effective stimulation and imaging into a single robust system would significantly improve stimulation efficiency and imaging accuracy, producing fewer unwanted artifacts. In this study, we developed a multifunctional nanocomplex to enable self-activating and spatiotemporal imaging of the dynamics of mRNA sequential expression during the neural stem cell differentiation process. This nanocomplex showed improved enzymatic stability, fast recognition kinetics, and high specificity. With a mechanism regulated by endogenous cell machinery, this nanocomplex realized the successive stimulating motif release and the dynamic imaging of chronological mRNA expression during neural stem cell differentiation without the use of transgenetic manipulation. The dynamic imaging montage of mRNA expression ultimately facilitated genetic heterogeneity analysis. In vivo lateral ventricle injection of this nanocomplex enabled endogenous neural stem cell activation and labeling at their specific differentiation stages. This nanocomplex is highly amenable as an alternative tool to explore the dynamics of intricate mRNA activities in various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25494492

  18. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Cristian; Bartholomäus, Alexander; Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-10-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation. PMID:26495981

  19. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation. PMID:26495981

  20. Overexpression of Tau Downregulated the mRNA Levels of Kv Channels and Improved Proliferation in N2A Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiantao; Hu, Ximu; Li, Xiaoqing; Hao, Xuran

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule binding protein tau has a crucial function in promoting the assembly and stabilization of microtubule. Besides tuning the action potentials, voltage-gated K+ channels (Kv) are important for cell proliferation and appear to play a role in the development of cancer. However, little is known about the possible interaction of tau with Kv channels in various tissues. In the present study, tau plasmids were transiently transfected into mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to explore the possible linkages between tau and Kv channels. This treatment led to a downregulation of mRNA levels of several Kv channels, including Kv2.1, Kv3.1, Kv4.1, Kv9.2, and KCNH4, but no significant alteration was observed for Kv5.1 and KCNQ4. Furthermore, the macroscopic currents through Kv channels were reduced by 36.5% at +60 mV in tau-tranfected N2A cells. The proliferation rates of N2A cells were also improved by the induction of tau expression and the incubation of TEA (tetraethylammonium) for 48 h by 120.9% and 149.3%, respectively. Following the cotransfection with tau in HEK293 cells, the mRNA levels and corresponding currents of Kv2.1 were significantly declined compared with single Kv2.1 transfection. Our data indicated that overexpression of tau declined the mRNA levels of Kv channels and related currents. The effects of tau overexpression on Kv channels provided an alternative explanation for low sensitivity to anti-cancer chemicals in some specific cancer tissues. PMID:25590133

  1. Endonuclease-mediated mRNA Decay Requires Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Polysomal Ribonuclease 1 (PMR1) for the Targeting and Degradation of Polyribosome-bound Substrate mRNA*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng; Peng, Yong; Schoenberg, Daniel R.

    2006-01-01

    PMR1 is an endonuclease that is activated by estrogen to degrade Xenopus albumin mRNA. A previous report showed that the functional unit of endonuclease-mediated mRNA decay is a ~680-kDa polysome-bound complex that contains both PMR1 and substrate mRNA. PMR1 contains two domains involved in endonuclease targeting to polysomes, an N-terminal domain that lies between residues 200 and 250, and a C-terminal domain that lies within the last 100 residues. Loss of either domain inactivated PMR1 targeting to polysomes and stabilized albumin mRNA. The current study identified a phosphorylated tyrosine residue within the C-terminal polysome-targeting domain and showed that this modification is required for PMR1-mediated mRNA decay. Changing this tyrosine to phenylalanine inactivated the targeting of PMR1 to polysomes, blocked binding of PMR1 to the functional complex containing its substrate mRNA, prevented the targeting of a green fluorescent protein fusion protein to this complex, and stabilized albumin mRNA to degradation by PMR1 in vivo. A general tyrosine kinase inhibitor inhibited the phosphorylation of PMR1, which in turn inhibited PMR1-catalyzed degradation of albumin mRNA. These results indicate that one or more tyrosine kinases functions as a regulator of endonuclease-mediated mRNA decay. PMID:15375158

  2. Sequence specificity of mRNA N6-adenosine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Csepany, T; Lin, A; Baldick, C J; Beemon, K

    1990-11-25

    The sequence specificity of chicken mRNA N6-adenosine methyltransferase has been investigated in vivo. Localization of six new N6-methyladenosine sites on Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) virion RNA has confirmed our extended consensus sequence for methylation: RGACU, where R is usually a G (7/12). We have also observed A (2/12) and U (3/12) at the -2 position (relative to m6A at +1) but never a C. At the +3 position, the U was observed 10/12 times; an A and a C were observed once each in weakly methylated sequences. The extent of methylation varied between the different sites up to a maximum of about 90%. To test the significance of this consensus sequence, it was altered by site-specific mutagenesis, and methylation was assayed after transfection of mutated RSV DNA into chicken embryo fibroblasts. We found that changing the G at -1 or the U at +3 to any other residue inhibited methylation. However, inhibition of methylation at all four of the major sites in the RSV src gene did not detectably alter the steady-state levels of the three viral RNA species or viral infectivity. Additional mutants that inactivated the src protein kinase activity produced less virus and exhibited relatively less src mRNA in infected cells. PMID:2173695

  3. The global structures of a wild-type and poorly functional plant luteoviral mRNA pseudoknot are essentially identical.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Peter V; Stammler, Suzanne N; Giedroc, David P

    2006-11-01

    The helical junction region of a -1 frameshift stimulating hairpin-type mRNA pseudoknot from sugarcane yellow leaf virus (ScYLV) is characterized by a novel C27.(G7-C14) loop 2-stem 1 minor groove base triple, which is stacked on a C8+.(G12-C28) loop 1-stem 2 major groove base triple. Substitution of C27 with adenosine reduces frameshifting efficiency to a level just twofold above the slip-site alone. Here, we show that the global structure of the C27A ScYLV RNA is nearly indistinguishable from the wild-type counterpart, despite the fact that the helical junction region is altered and incorporates the anticipated isostructural A27.(G7-C14) minor groove base triple. This interaction mediates a 2.3-A displacement of C8+ driven by an A27 N6-C8+ O2 hydrogen bond as part of an A(n-1).C+.G-Cn base quadruple. The helical junction regions of the C27A ScYLV and the beet western yellows virus (BWYV) pseudoknots are essentially superimposable, the latter of which contains an analogous A25.(G7-C14) minor groove base triple. These results reveal that the global ground-state structure is not strongly correlated with frameshift stimulation and point to a reduced thermodynamic stability and/or enhanced kinetic lability that derives from an altered helical junction architecture in the C27A ScYLV RNA as a significant determinant for setting frameshifting efficiencies in plant luteoviral mRNA pseudoknots. PMID:17000902

  4. Exaptive origins of regulated mRNA decay in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Fursham M; Makeyev, Eugene V

    2016-09-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is extensively controlled at the level of mRNA stability and the mechanisms underlying this regulation are markedly different from their archaeal and bacterial counterparts. We propose that two such mechanisms, nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) and motif-specific transcript destabilization by CCCH-type zinc finger RNA-binding proteins, originated as a part of cellular defense against RNA pathogens. These branches of the mRNA turnover pathway might have been used by primeval eukaryotes alongside RNA interference to distinguish their own messages from those of RNA viruses and retrotransposable elements. We further hypothesize that the subsequent advent of "professional" innate and adaptive immunity systems allowed NMD and the motif-triggered mechanisms to be efficiently repurposed for regulation of endogenous cellular transcripts. This scenario explains the rapid emergence of archetypical mRNA destabilization pathways in eukaryotes and argues that other aspects of post-transcriptional gene regulation in this lineage might have been derived through a similar exaptation route. PMID:27438915

  5. Synthetic mRNA: Production, Introduction into Cells, and Physiological Consequences.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances have made it possible to synthesize mRNA in vitro that is relatively stable when introduced into mammalian cells, has a diminished ability to activate the innate immune response against exogenous (virus-like) RNA, and can be efficiently translated into protein. Synthetic methods have also been developed to produce mRNA with unique investigational properties such as photo-cross-linking, fluorescence emission, and attachment of ligands through click chemistry. Synthetic mRNA has been proven effective in numerous applications beneficial for human health such as immunizing patients against cancer and infections diseases, alleviating diseases by restoring deficient proteins, converting somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells to use in regenerative medicine therapies, and engineering the genome by making specific alterations in DNA. This introductory chapter provides background information relevant to the following 20 chapters of this volume that present protocols for these applications of synthetic mRNA. PMID:27236789

  6. DNA ALTERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The exposure of an organism to genotoxic chemicals may induce a cascade of genetic events. nitially, structural alterations to DNA are formed. ext, the DNA damage is processed and subsequently expressed in mutant gene products. inally, diseases result from the genetic damage. he ...

  7. Impact of STAT/SOCS mRNA Expression Levels after Major Injury

    PubMed Central

    Brumann, M.; Matz, M.; Kusmenkov, T.; Stegmaier, J.; Biberthaler, P.; Kanz, K.-G.; Mutschler, W.; Bogner, V.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Fulminant changes in cytokine receptor signalling might provoke severe pathological alterations after multiple trauma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the posttraumatic imbalance of the innate immune system with a special focus on the STAT/SOCS family. Methods. 20 polytraumatized patients were included. Blood samples were drawn 0 h–72 h after trauma; mRNA expression profiles of IL-10, STAT 3, SOCS 1, and SOCS 3 were quantified by qPCR. Results. IL-10 mRNA expression increased significantly in the early posttraumatic period. STAT 3 mRNA expressions showed a significant maximum at 6 h after trauma. SOCS 1 levels significantly decreased 6 h–72 h after trauma. SOCS 3 levels were significantly higher in nonsurvivors 6 h after trauma. Conclusion. We present a serial, sequential investigation in human neutrophil granulocytes of major trauma patients evaluating mRNA expression profiles of IL-10, STAT 3, SOCS 1, and SOCS 3. Posttraumatically, immune disorder was accompanied by a significant increase of IL-10 and STAT 3 mRNA expression, whereas SOCS 1 mRNA levels decreased after injury. We could demonstrate that death after trauma was associated with higher SOCS 3 mRNA levels already at 6 h after trauma. To support our results, further investigations have to evaluate protein levels of STAT/SOCS family in terms of posttraumatic immune imbalance. PMID:24648661

  8. Membrane-association of mRNA decapping factors is independent of stress in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Huch, Susanne; Gommlich, Jessie; Muppavarapu, Mridula; Beckham, Carla; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that the degradation of mRNA occurs on translating ribosomes or alternatively within RNA granules called P bodies, which are aggregates whose core constituents are mRNA decay proteins and RNA. In this study, we examined the mRNA decapping proteins, Dcp1, Dcp2, and Dhh1, using subcellular fractionation. We found that decapping factors co-sediment in the polysome fraction of a sucrose gradient and do not alter their behaviour with stress, inhibition of translation or inhibition of the P body formation. Importantly, their localisation to the polysome fraction is independent of the RNA, suggesting that these factors may be constitutively localised to the polysome. Conversely, polysomal and post-polysomal sedimentation of the decapping proteins was abolished with the addition of a detergent, which shifts the factors to the non-translating RNP fraction and is consistent with membrane association. Using a membrane flotation assay, we observed the mRNA decapping factors in the lower density fractions at the buoyant density of membrane-associated proteins. These observations provide further evidence that mRNA decapping factors interact with subcellular membranes, and we suggest a model in which the mRNA decapping factors interact with membranes to facilitate regulation of mRNA degradation. PMID:27146487

  9. Membrane-association of mRNA decapping factors is independent of stress in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Huch, Susanne; Gommlich, Jessie; Muppavarapu, Mridula; Beckham, Carla; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that the degradation of mRNA occurs on translating ribosomes or alternatively within RNA granules called P bodies, which are aggregates whose core constituents are mRNA decay proteins and RNA. In this study, we examined the mRNA decapping proteins, Dcp1, Dcp2, and Dhh1, using subcellular fractionation. We found that decapping factors co-sediment in the polysome fraction of a sucrose gradient and do not alter their behaviour with stress, inhibition of translation or inhibition of the P body formation. Importantly, their localisation to the polysome fraction is independent of the RNA, suggesting that these factors may be constitutively localised to the polysome. Conversely, polysomal and post-polysomal sedimentation of the decapping proteins was abolished with the addition of a detergent, which shifts the factors to the non-translating RNP fraction and is consistent with membrane association. Using a membrane flotation assay, we observed the mRNA decapping factors in the lower density fractions at the buoyant density of membrane-associated proteins. These observations provide further evidence that mRNA decapping factors interact with subcellular membranes, and we suggest a model in which the mRNA decapping factors interact with membranes to facilitate regulation of mRNA degradation. PMID:27146487

  10. Spatial behavior and seizure-induced changes in c-fos mRNA expression in young and old rats.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Monica K; Penner, Marsha R; Olson, Kathy M; Sutherland, Vicki L; Mittelman-Smith, Melinda A; Barnes, Carol A

    2013-04-01

    The subcellular processes of gene induction and expression in the hippocampus are likely to underlie some of the known age-related impairments in spatial learning and memory. It is well established that immediate-early genes are rapidly and transiently induced in response to neuronal activity and this expression is required for stabilization of durable memories. To examine whether age-related memory impairment might be caused, in part, by differences in the level of cellular activation or subcellular processing, c-fos expression in CA1 pyramidal and dentate gyrus granule cells in the dorsal hippocampus of young and old rats was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. No significant age differences were found in the numbers of pyramidal or granule cells that show c-fos expression; however, c-fos mRNA transcripts were altered in these 2 cell types in aged animals. These findings suggest that though the networks of cells that participate in behavior or seizure-induced activity are largely maintained in aged rats, their RNA transcript levels are altered. This might, in part, contribute to cognitive deficits frequently observed with advancing age. PMID:23158763

  11. Changed in translation: mRNA recoding by -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting.

    PubMed

    Caliskan, Neva; Peske, Frank; Rodnina, Marina V

    2015-05-01

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1PRF) is an mRNA recoding event commonly utilized by viruses and bacteria to increase the information content of their genomes. Recent results have implicated -1PRF in quality control of mRNA and DNA stability in eukaryotes. Biophysical experiments demonstrated that the ribosome changes the reading frame while attempting to move over a slippery sequence of the mRNA--when a roadblock formed by a folded downstream segment in the mRNA stalls the ribosome in a metastable conformational state. The efficiency of -1PRF is modulated not only by cis-regulatory elements in the mRNA but also by trans-acting factors such as proteins, miRNAs, and antibiotics. These recent results suggest a molecular mechanism and new important cellular roles for -1PRF. PMID:25850333

  12. Subgenomic mRNA regulation by a distal RNA element in a (+)-strand RNA virus.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, G; Slowinski, V; White, K A

    1999-01-01

    Subgenomic (sg) mRNAs are synthesized by (+)-strand RNA viruses to allow for efficient translation of products encoded 3' in their genomes. This strategy also provides a means for regulating the expression of such products via modulation of sg mRNA accumulation. We have studied the mechanism by which sg mRNAs levels are controlled in tomato bushy stunt virus, a small (+)-strand RNA virus which synthesizes two sg mRNAs during infections. Neither the viral capsid nor movement proteins were found to play any significant role in modulating the accumulation levels of either sg mRNA. Deletion analysis did, however, identify a 12-nt-long RNA sequence located approximately 1,000 nt upstream from the site of initiation of sg mRNA2 synthesis that was required specifically for accumulation of sg mRNA2. Further analysis revealed a potential base-pairing interaction between this sequence and a sequence located just 5' to the site of initiation for sg mRNA2 synthesis. Mutant genomes in which this interaction was either disrupted or maintained were analyzed and the results indicated a positive correlation between the predicted stability of the base-pairing interaction and the efficiency of sg mRNA2 accumulation. The functional significance of the long-distance interaction was further supported by phylogenetic sequence analysis which revealed conservation of base-pairing interactions of similar stability and relative position in the genomes of different tombusviruses. It is proposed that the upstream sequence represents a cis-acting RNA element which facilitates sg mRNA accumulation by promoting efficient synthesis of sg mRNA2 via a long-distance RNA-RNA interaction. PMID:10199571

  13. Epidermal growth factor increases the interaction between nucleolin and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K/poly(C) binding protein 1 complex to regulate the gastrin mRNA turnover.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pin-Tse; Liao, Pao-Chi; Chang, Wen-Chang; Tseng, Joseph T

    2007-12-01

    Gastrin, a gastrointestinal hormone responsible for gastric acid secretion, has been confirmed as a growth factor for gastrointestinal tract malignancies. High expression of gastrin mRNA was observed in pancreatic and colorectal cancer; however, the mechanism is unclear. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) was found to increase gastrin mRNA stability, indicating mRNA turnover regulation mechanism is involved in the control of gastrin mRNA expression. Using biotin-labeled RNA probe pull-down assay combined with mass spectrometry analysis, we identified the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) and poly(C) binding protein 1 (PCBP1) bound with the C-rich region in gastrin mRNA 3' untranslated region. Nucleolin bound with the AGCCCU motif and interacted with hnRNP K were also demonstrated. Under EGF treatment, we observed the amount of nucleolin interacting with hnRNP K and gastrin mRNA increased. Using small interfering RNA technology to define their functional roles, we found hnRNP K, PCBP1, and nucleolin were all responsible for stabilizing gastrin mRNA. Moreover, nucleolin plays a crucial role in mediating the increased gastrin mRNA stability induced by EGF signaling. Besides, we also observed hnRNP K/PCBP1 complex bound with the C-rich region in the gastrin mRNA increased nucleolin binding with gastrin mRNA. Finally, a novel binding model was proposed. PMID:17928403

  14. Altered cell function in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    1991-01-01

    The paper overviews published results from investigations of changes in basic biological parameters taking place as a result of spaceflight exposure. These include changes in the rates of the DNA, mRNA, and protein biosyntheses; changes in the growth rate of an organism; and alterations in the cytoskeleton structure, differentiation, hormone accumulation, and collagen matrix secretion. These results, obtained both in complex biological organisms and on cultured cells, suggest that a basic cellular function is influenced and changed by microgravity. Many of the above mentioned changes are also found to take place in aging cells.

  15. Body Condition Score and Day of Lactation Affect Lipogenic mRNA Abundance and Transpription Factors in Adipose Tissue of Beef Cows Fed Supplemental Fat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that BCS at parturition and postpartum dietary fat supplementation will alter transcription factors and mRNA abundance of adipose tissue lipogenic and lipolytic enzymes during lactation in beef cows. Our objective was to determine abundance of mRNA for acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), h...

  16. Effect of protein synthesis inhibitors on viral mRNA's synthesized early in adenovirus type 2 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Eggerding, F; Raskas, H J

    1978-01-01

    Viral mRNA species synthesized early in adenovirus type 2 infection in the presence of cycloheximide were compared with those synthesized in the absence of drug or in the presence of the DNA synthesis inhibitor 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine. Cycloheximide caused approximately a 10-fold stimulation in the accumulation of [3H]uridine into early viral mRNA species. The only exception was a 24s mRNA transcribed from the transforming end of the genome; in the presence of cycloheximide, accumulation of this mRNA species was stimulated no more than 2-fold. Treatment with cycloheximide also resulted in the accumulation of polyadenylated RNAs transcribed from EcoRI-C that are heterogeneous and smaller than the 20S mRNA. Other translation inhibitors were shown to have similar effects, suggesting that inhibition of protein synthesis early after infection induces alterations in the metabolism of specific RNA sequences. PMID:621786

  17. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization. PMID:25620012

  18. Isolation of mRNA from specific tissues of Drosophila by mRNA tagging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Edenberg, Howard J; Davis, Ronald L

    2005-01-01

    To study the function of specific cells or tissues using genomic tools like microarray analyses, it is highly desirable to obtain mRNA from a homogeneous source. However, this is particularly challenging for small organisms, like Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. We have optimized and applied a new technique, mRNA tagging, to isolate mRNA from specific tissues of D.melanogaster. A FLAG-tagged poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) is expressed in a specific tissue and mRNA from that tissue is thus tagged by the recombinant PABP and separated from mRNA in other tissues by co-immunoprecipitation with a FLAG-tag specific antibody. The fractionated mRNA is then amplified and used as probe in microarray experiments. As a test system, we employed the procedures to identify genes expressed in Drosophila photoreceptor cells. We found that most known photoreceptor cell-specific mRNAs were identified by mRNA tagging. Furthermore, at least 11 novel genes have been identified as enriched in photoreceptor cells. mRNA tagging is a powerful general method for profiling gene expression in specific tissues and for identifying tissue-specific genes. PMID:16204451

  19. Determination of the Absolute Number of Cytokine mRNA Molecules within Individual Activated Human T Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel J.; Marshall, Gwen; Hockett, Richard D.; Bucy, R. Pat; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A primary function of activated T cells is the expression and subsequent secretion of cytokines, which orchestrate the differentiation of other lymphocytes, modulate antigen presenting cell activity, and alter vascular endothelium to mediate an immune response. Since many features of immune regulation probably result from modest alterations of endogenous rates of multiple interacting processes, quantitative analysis of the frequency and specific activity of individual T cells is critically important. Using a coordinated set of quantitative methods, the absolute number of molecules of several key cytokine mRNA species in individual T cells has been determined. The frequency of human blood T cells activated in vitro by mitogens and recall protein antigens was determined by intracellular cytokine protein staining, in situ hybridization for cytokine mRNA, and by limiting dilution analysis for cytokine mRNA+ cells. The absolute number of mRNA molecules was simultaneously determined in both homogenates of the entire population of cells and in individual cells obtained by limiting dilution, using a quantitative, competitive RT-PCR assay. The absolute numbers of mRNA molecules in a population of cells divided by the frequency of individual positive cells, yielded essentially the same number of mRNA molecules per cell as direct analysis of individual cells by limiting dilution analysis. Mean numbers of mRNA per positive cell from both mitogen and antigen activated T cells, using these stimulation conditions, were 6000 for IL-2, 6300 for IFN-gamma, and 1600 for IL-4.

  20. RNase E Enzymes from Rhodobacter capsulatus and Escherichia coli Differ in Context- and Sequence-Dependent In Vivo Cleavage within the Polycistronic puf mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Claudia; Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena; Balzer, Angelika; Klug, Gabriele

    1999-01-01

    The 5′ pufQ mRNA segment and the pufLMX mRNA segment of Rhodobacter capsulatus exhibit different stabilities. Degradation of both mRNA segments is initiated by RNase E-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage. While Rhodobacter RNase E does not discriminate between the different sequences present around the cleavage sites within pufQ and pufL, Escherichia coli RNase E shows preference for the sequence harboring more A and U residues. PMID:10601223

  1. Differential Control of Interleukin-6 mRNA Levels by Cellular Distribution of YB-1

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sujin; Lee, Taeyun A.; Ra, Eun A.; Lee, Eunhye; Choi, Hyun jin; Lee, Sungwook; Park, Boyoun

    2014-01-01

    Cytokine production is essential for innate and adaptive immunity against microbial invaders and must be tightly controlled. Cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA) is in constant flux between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and in transcription, splicing, or decay; such processes must be tightly controlled. Here, we report a novel function of Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) in modulating interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA levels in a cell type-specific manner. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages, YB-1 interacts with IL-6 mRNA and actively transports it to the extracellular space by YB-1-enriched vesicles, resulting in the proper maintenance of intracellular IL-6 mRNA levels. YB-1 secretion occurs in a cell type-specific manner. Whereas macrophages actively secret YB-1, dendritic cells maintain it predominantly in the cytoplasm even in response to LPS. Intracellular YB-1 has the distinct function of regulating IL-6 mRNA stability in dendritic cells. Moreover, because LPS differentially regulates the expression of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in macrophages and dendritic cells, this stimulus might control YB-1 acetylation differentially in both cell types. Taken together, these results suggest a unique feature of YB-1 in controlling intracellular IL-6 mRNA levels in a cell type-specific manner, thereby leading to functions that are dependent on the extracellular and intracellular distribution of YB-1. PMID:25398005

  2. Sensitivity of mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Poker, Gilad; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    Using the dynamic mean-field approximation of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we investigate the effect of small changes in the initiation, elongation, and termination rates along the mRNA strand on the steady-state protein translation rate. We show that the sensitivity of mRNA translation is equal to the sensitivity of the maximal eigenvalue of a symmetric, nonnegative, tridiagonal, and irreducible matrix. This leads to new analytical results as well as efficient numerical schemes that are applicable for large-scale models. Our results show that in the usual endogenous case, when initiation is more rate-limiting than elongation, the sensitivity of the translation rate to small mutations rapidly increases towards the 5′ end of the ORF. When the initiation rate is high, as may be the case for highly expressed and/or heterologous optimized genes, the maximal sensitivity is with respect to the elongation rates at the middle of the mRNA strand. We also show that the maximal possible effect of a small increase/decrease in any of the rates along the mRNA is an increase/decrease of the same magnitude in the translation rate. These results are in agreement with previous molecular evolutionary and synthetic biology experimental studies. PMID:26238363

  3. Role of miRNAs and alternative mRNA 3'-end cleavage and polyadenylation of their mRNA targets in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Soetanto, R; Hynes, C J; Patel, H R; Humphreys, D T; Evers, M; Duan, G; Parker, B J; Archer, S K; Clancy, J L; Graham, R M; Beilharz, T H; Smith, N J; Preiss, T

    2016-05-01

    miRNAs play critical roles in heart disease. In addition to differential miRNA expression, miRNA-mediated control is also affected by variable miRNA processing or alternative 3'-end cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) of their mRNA targets. To what extent these phenomena play a role in the heart remains unclear. We sought to explore miRNA processing and mRNA APA in cardiomyocytes, and whether these change during cardiac hypertrophy. Thoracic aortic constriction (TAC) was performed to induce hypertrophy in C57BL/6J mice. RNA extracted from cardiomyocytes of sham-treated, pre-hypertrophic (2 days post-TAC), and hypertrophic (7 days post-TAC) mice was subjected to small RNA- and poly(A)-test sequencing (PAT-Seq). Differential expression analysis matched expectations; nevertheless we identified ~400 mRNAs and hundreds of noncoding RNA loci as altered with hypertrophy for the first time. Although multiple processing variants were observed for many miRNAs, there was little change in their relative proportions during hypertrophy. PAT-Seq mapped ~48,000 mRNA 3'-ends, identifying novel 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs) for over 7000 genes. Importantly, hypertrophy was associated with marked changes in APA with a net shift from distal to more proximal mRNA 3'-ends, which is predicted to decrease overall miRNA repression strength. We independently validated several examples of 3'UTR proportion change and showed that alternative 3'UTRs associate with differences in mRNA translation. Our work suggests that APA contributes to altered gene expression with the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and provides a rich resource for a systems-level understanding of miRNA-mediated regulation in physiological and pathological states of the heart. PMID:27032571

  4. Posttranscriptional regulation of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, B; Hellerbrand, C; Holcik, M; Briendl, M; Aliebhaber, S; Brenner, D A

    1997-01-01

    The hepatic stellate cell (HSC) is the primary cell responsible for the dramatic increase in the synthesis of type I collagen in the cirrhotic liver. Quiescent HSCs contain a low level of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA, while activated HSCs contain about 60- to 70-fold more of this mRNA. The transcription rate of the collagen alpha1(I) gene is only two fold higher in activated HSCs than in quiescent HSCs. In assays using actinomycin D or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside collagen alpha1(I) mRNA has estimated half-lives of 1.5 h in quiescent HSCs and 24 h in activated HSCs. Thus, this 16-fold change in mRNA stability is primarily responsible for the increase in collagen alpha1(I) mRNA steady-state level in activated HSCs. We have identified a novel RNA-protein interaction targeted to the C-rich sequence in the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR). This sequence is localized 24 nucleotides 3' to the stop codon. In transient transfection experiments, mutation of this sequence diminished accumulation of an mRNA transcribed from a collagen alpha1(I) minigene and in stable transfections decreased the half-life of collagen alpha1(I) minigene mRNA. Binding to the collagen alpha1(I) 3' UTR is present in cytoplasmic extracts of activated but not quiescent HSCs. It contains as a subunit alphaCP, which is also found in the complex involved in stabilization of alpha-globin mRNA. The auxiliary factors necessary to promote binding of alphaCP to the collagen 3' UTR are distinct from the factors necessary for binding to the alpha-globin sequence. Since alphaCP is expressed in both quiescent and activated HSCs, these auxiliary factors are responsible for the differentially expressed RNA-protein interaction at the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' UTR. PMID:9271398

  5. 46 CFR 28.501 - Substantial alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Substantial alterations. 28.501 Section 28.501 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.501 Substantial alterations. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a vessel that is...

  6. The transcription factor ERG recruits CCR4-NOT to control mRNA decay and mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Rambout, Xavier; Detiffe, Cécile; Bruyr, Jonathan; Mariavelle, Emeline; Cherkaoui, Majid; Brohée, Sylvain; Demoitié, Pauline; Lebrun, Marielle; Soin, Romuald; Lesage, Bart; Guedri, Katia; Beullens, Monique; Bollen, Mathieu; Farazi, Thalia A; Kettmann, Richard; Struman, Ingrid; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Kruys, Véronique; Simonis, Nicolas; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Dequiedt, Franck

    2016-07-01

    Control of mRNA levels, a fundamental aspect in the regulation of gene expression, is achieved through a balance between mRNA synthesis and decay. E26-related gene (Erg) proteins are canonical transcription factors whose previously described functions are confined to the control of mRNA synthesis. Here, we report that ERG also regulates gene expression by affecting mRNA stability and identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this function in human cells. ERG is recruited to mRNAs via interaction with the RNA-binding protein RBPMS, and it promotes mRNA decay by binding CNOT2, a component of the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complex. Transcriptome-wide mRNA stability analysis revealed that ERG controls the degradation of a subset of mRNAs highly connected to Aurora signaling, whose decay during S phase is necessary for mitotic progression. Our data indicate that control of gene expression by mammalian transcription factors may follow a more complex scheme than previously anticipated, integrating mRNA synthesis and degradation. PMID:27273514

  7. mRNA expression pattern of gonadotropin receptors in bovine follicular cysts.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Belkis E; Diaz, Pablo U; Salvetti, Natalia R; Rey, Florencia; Ortega, Hugo H

    2014-12-01

    Follicular growth and steroidogenesis are dependent on gonadotropin binding to their receptors in granulosa and theca cells of ovarian follicles. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression patterns of follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) and luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR) in ovarian follicular structures from cows with cystic ovarian disease (COD) as compared with those of regularly cycling cows. Relative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of FSHR mRNA in granulosa cells was highest in small antral follicles, then decreased significantly as follicles increased in size, and was lowest in cysts. FSHR mRNA was not detected in the theca cells of any follicular category, including cysts. LHCGR mRNA expression in granulosa cells was significantly higher in large antral follicles than in cysts, and not detected in granulosa cells of small and medium antral follicles. In theca cells, the expression level of LHCGR mRNA in medium antral follicles was higher than in small and large antral follicles, whereas that in follicular cysts it was similar to those in small and medium antral follicles, but higher than that in large antral follicles. Our findings provide evidence that there is an altered gonadotropin receptor expression in bovine cystic follicles, and suggest that in conditions characterized by altered ovulation, such as COD, changes in the signaling system of gonadotropins may play a fundamental role in their pathogenesis. PMID:25454493

  8. Steroid receptor mRNA expression in the ovarian follicles of cows with cystic ovarian disease.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Natalia S; Salvetti, Natalia R; Velazquez, Melisa M; Stangaferro, Matías L; Rey, Florencia; Ortega, Hugo H

    2012-06-01

    Steroid receptors have been demonstrated to be important intra-ovarian regulators of follicular development and ovulatory processes. The aim of the present study was to determine the expression of steroid receptor mRNA in ovarian follicular structures from cows with cystic ovarian disease (COD) compared with ovarian structures from regularly cycling cows using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The cystic follicles showed a higher estrogen receptor α (ESR1) mRNA expression in the theca and granulosa and a lower estrogen receptor β (ESR2) expression. The cystic follicles also showed a strong expression of androgen receptor mRNA in the granulosa. No changes were observed in total progesterone receptor mRNA, but a very significant increase in the B isoform was found in the granulosa of the cystic follicles. The findings of the current study provide evidence that an altered steroid signaling system may be present in bovine follicular cysts, and we suggest that in conditions characterized by altered ovulation, such as COD, changes in the expression of ovarian steroid receptors could play a fundamental role in the pathogeny of this disease. PMID:21536311

  9. Mechanism of Cytoplasmic mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a fundamental process in gene expression that depends upon the abundance and accessibility of the mRNA transcript as well as the activity of many protein and RNA-protein complexes. Here we focus on the intricate mechanics of mRNA translation in the cytoplasm of higher plants. This chapter includes an inventory of the plant translational apparatus and a detailed review of the translational processes of initiation, elongation, and termination. The majority of mechanistic studies of cytoplasmic translation have been carried out in yeast and mammalian systems. The factors and mechanisms of translation are for the most part conserved across eukaryotes; however, some distinctions are known to exist in plants. A comprehensive understanding of the complex translational apparatus and its regulation in plants is warranted, as the modulation of protein production is critical to development, environmental plasticity and biomass yield in diverse ecosystems and agricultural settings. PMID:26019692

  10. Viral Nucleases Induce an mRNA Degradation-Transcription Feedback Loop in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Abernathy, Emma; Gilbertson, Sarah; Alla, Ravi; Glaunsinger, Britt

    2015-08-12

    Gamma-herpesviruses encode a cytoplasmic mRNA-targeting endonuclease, SOX, that cleaves most cellular mRNAs. Cleaved fragments are subsequently degraded by the cellular 5'-3' mRNA exonuclease Xrn1, thereby suppressing cellular gene expression and facilitating viral evasion of host defenses. We reveal that mammalian cells respond to this widespread cytoplasmic mRNA decay by altering RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription in the nucleus. Measuring RNAPII recruitment to promoters and nascent mRNA synthesis revealed that the majority of affected genes are transcriptionally repressed in SOX-expressing cells. The transcriptional feedback does not occur in response to the initial viral endonuclease-induced cleavage, but instead to degradation of the cleaved fragments by cellular exonucleases. In particular, Xrn1 catalytic activity is required for transcriptional repression. Notably, viral mRNA transcription escapes decay-induced repression, and this escape requires Xrn1. Collectively, these results indicate that mRNA decay rates impact transcription and that gamma-herpesviruses use this feedback mechanism to facilitate viral gene expression. PMID:26211836

  11. Relationship of serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and haplotypes to mRNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Sarah L; Dodelzon, Katerina; Sandhu, Harinder K; Philibert, Robert A

    2005-07-01

    The serotonin transporter (5HTT; chromosomal location 17q12) is an important regulator of serotonergic neurotransmission and is the site of action for a number of antidepressant medications. Sequence variation at a VNTR known as the 5HTTLPR, which is 1.4 kb upstream of the translation start of 5HTT, has been associated in some studies with increased vulnerability to depression, neuroticism, and autism. Support for these clinical observations has included laboratory findings that 5HTTLPR variation is associated with changes in 5HTT gene translation. We re-examined these earlier laboratory findings by directly measuring 5HTT mRNA levels and genotyping four loci spanning the 5HTT gene using RNA and DNA prepared from 85 independent lymphoblast cell lines. Using this data, haplotypes were inferred and the resulting single point and haplotypes data analyzed by univariate and regression analyses. Consistent with the original findings, we found a significant effect of the 5HTTLPR on mRNA production. In contrast to previous reports, the effect on 5HTT mRNA production appeared to be mediated through an additive, not dominant, mechanism. Neither genotype nor haplotype at three other 5HTT loci were associated with alterations in mRNA production, although the small number of samples homozygous for the three most common haplotypes limits these findings. We conclude that further examination of the role of 5HTT sequence variation in regulating 5HTT mRNA production is warranted. PMID:15858822

  12. Osteoblast fibronectin mRNA, protein synthesis, and matrix are unchanged after exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Gilbertson, V.

    1999-01-01

    The well-defined osteoblast line, MC3T3-E1 was used to examine fibronectin (FN) mRNA levels, protein synthesis, and extracellular FN matrix accumulation after growth activation in spaceflight. These osteoblasts produce FN extracellular matrix (ECM) known to regulate adhesion, differentiation, and function in adherent cells. Changes in bone ECM and osteoblast cell shape occur in spaceflight. To determine whether altered FN matrix is a factor in causing these changes in spaceflight, quiescent osteoblasts were launched into microgravity and were then sera activated with and without a 1-gravity field. Synthesis of FN mRNA, protein, and matrix were measured after activation in microgravity. FN mRNA synthesis is significantly reduced in microgravity (0-G) when compared to ground (GR) osteoblasts flown in a centrifuge simulating earth's gravity (1-G) field 2.5 h after activation. However, 27.5 h after activation there were no significant differences in mRNA synthesis. A small but significant reduction of FN protein was found in the 0-G samples 2.5 h after activation. Total FN protein 27.5 h after activation showed no significant difference between any of the gravity conditions, however, there was a fourfold increase in absolute amount of protein synthesized during the incubation. Using immunofluorescence, we found no significant differences in the amount or in the orientation of the FN matrix after 27.5 h in microgravity. These results demonstrate that FN is made by sera-activated osteoblasts even during exposure to microgravity. These data also suggest that after a total period of 43 h of spaceflight FN transcription, translation, or altered matrix assembly is not responsible for the altered cell shape or altered matrix formation of osteoblasts.

  13. METHOD FOR STABILIZING KLYSTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Magnuson, D.W.; Smith, D.F.

    1959-04-14

    High-frequency oscillators for the generation of microwaves, particularly a system for stabilizing frequency-modulated klystron oscillators of the reflex type, are described. The system takos advantage of the fact that a change in oscillator frequency will alter the normal phase displacement between the cavity and its modulator, creating an error voltage which is utilized to regulate the frequency of the oscillator and stabilize it.

  14. Influenza virus NS1 protein inhibits pre-mRNA splicing and blocks mRNA nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, P; Beloso, A; Ortín, J

    1994-01-01

    The influenza virus RNA segment 8 encodes two proteins, NS1 and NS2, by differential splicing. The collinear transcript acts as mRNA for NS1 protein, while the spliced mRNA encodes NS2 protein. The splicing of NS1 mRNA was studied in cells transfected with a recombinant plasmid that has the cDNA of RNA segment 8 cloned under the SV40 late promoter and polyadenylation signals. As described for influenza virus-infected cells, NS1 mRNA was poorly spliced to yield NS2 mRNA. However, inactivation of the NS1 gene, but not the NS2 gene, led to a substantial increase in the splicing efficiency, as shown by the relative accumulations of NS1 and NS2 mRNAs. This effect was not specific for NS1 mRNA, since the splicing of the endogenous SV40 early transcript was altered in such a way that t-Ag mRNA was almost eliminated. These changes in the splicing pattern coincided with a strong inhibition of the mRNA nucleocytoplasmic transport. Both NS1 and NS2 mRNAs were retained in the nucleus of cells expressing NS1 protein, but no effect was observed when only NS2 protein was expressed. Furthermore, other mRNAs tested, such as T-Ag mRNA and the non-spliceable nucleoprotein transcript, were also retained in the nucleus upon expression of NS1 protein, suggesting that it induced a generalized block of mRNA export from the nucleus. Images PMID:8313914

  15. Binding of TDP-43 to the 3'UTR of its cognate mRNA enhances its solubility.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yulong; Arslan, Pharhad E; Won, Amy; Yip, Christopher M; Chakrabartty, Avi

    2014-09-23

    TAR DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a broad range of neurodegenerative diseases termed TDP-43 proteinopathies, which encompass a spectrum of diseases ranging from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis to frontotemporal dementia. Pathologically misfolded and aggregated forms of TDP-43 are found in cytoplasmic inclusion bodies of affected neurons in these diseases. The mechanism by which TDP-43 misfolding causes disease is not well-understood. Current hypotheses postulate that the TDP-43 aggregation process plays a major role in pathogenesis. We amplify that hypothesis and suggest that binding of cognate ligands to TDP-43 can stabilize the native functional state of the protein and ameliorate aggregation. We expressed recombinant TDP-43 containing an N-terminal Venus yellow fluorescent protein tag in Escherichia coli and induced its aggregation by altering solvent salt concentrations and examined the extent to which various oligonucleotide molecules affect its aggregation in vitro using aggregation-induced turbidity assays. We show that vYFP-TDP-43 binding to its naturally occurring RNA target that comprises a sequence on the 3'UTR region of its mRNA improves its solubility, suggesting interplay among TDP-43 solubility, oligonucleotide binding, and TDP-43 autoregulation. PMID:25171271

  16. mRNA as gene therapeutic: how to control protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tavernier, Geertrui; Andries, Oliwia; Demeester, Jo; Sanders, Niek N; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Rejman, Joanna

    2011-03-30

    For many years, it was generally accepted that mRNA is too unstable to be efficiently used for gene therapy purposes. In the last decade, however, several research groups faced this challenge and not only proved the feasibility of mRNA-mediated transfection with surprising results regarding transfection efficiency and duration of protein expression, but also were able to demonstrate major advantages over the use of pDNA. These advantages will be the first issue discussed in this review, which first of all addresses the notions that mRNA does not need to cross the nuclear barrier to exert its biological activity and in addition lacks CpG motifs, which reduces its immunogenicity. Secondly, it provides insight in the (in)stability of the mRNA molecule, in how mRNA can be modified to increase its half-life and in the necessities of exogenously produced mRNA to be successfully used in transfection protocols. Furthermore, this review gives an in-depth overview of the different techniques and vehicles for intracellular mRNA delivery exploited by us and other groups, comprising electroporation, gene gun injection, lipo- and polyplexes. Finally, it covers recent literature describing specific applications for mRNA based gene delivery, showing that until now most attention has been paid to vaccination strategies. This review offers a comprehensive overview of current knowledge of the major theoretical as well as practical aspects of mRNA-mediated transfection, showing both its possibilities and its pitfalls and should therefore be useful for a diverse scientific audience. PMID:20970469

  17. A Ribonucleoprotein Complex Protects the Interleukin-6 mRNA from Degradation by Distinct Herpesviral Endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Mandy; Hutin, Stephanie; Marigold, Oliver; Li, Kathy H.; Burlingame, Al; Glaunsinger, Britt A.

    2015-01-01

    During lytic Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection, the viral endonuclease SOX promotes widespread degradation of cytoplasmic messenger RNA (mRNA). However, select mRNAs escape SOX-induced cleavage and remain robustly expressed. Prominent among these is interleukin-6 (IL-6), a growth factor important for survival of KSHV infected B cells. IL-6 escape is notable because it contains a sequence within its 3’ untranslated region (UTR) that can confer protection when transferred to a SOX-targeted mRNA, and thus overrides the endonuclease targeting mechanism. Here, we pursued how this protective RNA element functions to maintain mRNA stability. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified a set of proteins that associate specifically with the protective element. Although multiple proteins contributed to the escape mechanism, depletion of nucleolin (NCL) most severely impacted protection. NCL was re-localized out of the nucleolus during lytic KSHV infection, and its presence in the cytoplasm was required for protection. After loading onto the IL-6 3’ UTR, NCL differentially bound to the translation initiation factor eIF4H. Disrupting this interaction, or depleting eIF4H, reinstated SOX targeting of the RNA, suggesting that interactions between proteins bound to distant regions of the mRNA are important for escape. Finally, we found that the IL-6 3’ UTR was also protected against mRNA degradation by the vhs endonuclease encoded by herpes simplex virus, despite the fact that its mechanism of mRNA targeting is distinct from SOX. These findings highlight how a multitude of RNA-protein interactions can impact endonuclease targeting, and identify new features underlying the regulation of the IL-6 mRNA. PMID:25965334

  18. A ribonucleoprotein complex protects the interleukin-6 mRNA from degradation by distinct herpesviral endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Muller, Mandy; Hutin, Stephanie; Marigold, Oliver; Li, Kathy H; Burlingame, Al; Glaunsinger, Britt A

    2015-05-01

    During lytic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection, the viral endonuclease SOX promotes widespread degradation of cytoplasmic messenger RNA (mRNA). However, select mRNAs escape SOX-induced cleavage and remain robustly expressed. Prominent among these is interleukin-6 (IL-6), a growth factor important for survival of KSHV infected B cells. IL-6 escape is notable because it contains a sequence within its 3' untranslated region (UTR) that can confer protection when transferred to a SOX-targeted mRNA, and thus overrides the endonuclease targeting mechanism. Here, we pursued how this protective RNA element functions to maintain mRNA stability. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified a set of proteins that associate specifically with the protective element. Although multiple proteins contributed to the escape mechanism, depletion of nucleolin (NCL) most severely impacted protection. NCL was re-localized out of the nucleolus during lytic KSHV infection, and its presence in the cytoplasm was required for protection. After loading onto the IL-6 3' UTR, NCL differentially bound to the translation initiation factor eIF4H. Disrupting this interaction, or depleting eIF4H, reinstated SOX targeting of the RNA, suggesting that interactions between proteins bound to distant regions of the mRNA are important for escape. Finally, we found that the IL-6 3' UTR was also protected against mRNA degradation by the vhs endonuclease encoded by herpes simplex virus, despite the fact that its mechanism of mRNA targeting is distinct from SOX. These findings highlight how a multitude of RNA-protein interactions can impact endonuclease targeting, and identify new features underlying the regulation of the IL-6 mRNA. PMID:25965334

  19. Serum Stable Natural Peptides Designed by mRNA Display

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Shannon M.; Fiacco, Stephen V.; Takahashi, Terry T.; Jalali-Yazdi, Farzad; Millward, Steven W.; Hu, Biliang; Wang, Pin; Roberts, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Peptides constructed with the 20 natural amino acids are generally considered to have little therapeutic potential because they are unstable in the presence of proteases and peptidases. However, proteolysis cleavage can be idiosyncratic, and it is possible that natural analogues of functional sequences exist that are highly resistant to cleavage. Here, we explored this idea in the context of peptides that bind to the signaling protein Gαi1. To do this, we used a two-step in vitro selection process to simultaneously select for protease resistance while retaining function–first by degrading the starting library with protease (chymotrypsin), followed by positive selection for binding via mRNA display. Starting from a pool of functional sequences, these experiments revealed peptides with 100–400 fold increases in protease resistance compared to the parental library. Surprisingly, selection for chymotrypsin resistance also resulted in similarly improved stability in human serum (~100 fold). Mechanistically, the decreases in cleavage results from both a lower rate of cleavage (kcat) and a weaker interaction with the protease (Km). Overall, our results demonstrate that the hydrolytic stability of functional, natural peptide sequences can be improved by two orders of magnitude simply by optimizing the primary sequence. PMID:25234472

  20. Control of adenovirus E1B mRNA synthesis by a shift in the activities of RNA splice sites.

    PubMed Central

    Montell, C; Fisher, E F; Caruthers, M H; Berk, A J

    1984-01-01

    The primary transcript from adenovirus 2 early region 1B (E1B) is processed by differential RNA splicing into two overlapping mRNAs, 13S and 22S. The 22S mRNA is the major E1B mRNA during the early phase of infection, whereas the 13S mRNA predominates during the late phase. In previous work, it has been shown that this shift in proportions of the E1B mRNAs is influenced by increased cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA at late times in infection. Two observations presented here demonstrate that the increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA at late times is also regulated by a change in the specificity of RNA splicing. First, the relative concentrations of the 13S to 22S nuclear RNAs were not constant throughout infection but increased at late times. Secondly, studies with the mutant, adenovirus 2 pm2250 , provided evidence that there was an increased propensity to utilize a 5' splice in the region of the 13S 5' splice site at late times in infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 has a G----C transversion in the first base of E1B 13S mRNA intron preventing splicing of the 13S mRNA but not of the 22S mRNA. During the early phase of a pm2250 infection, the E1B primary transcripts were processed into the 22S mRNA only. However, during the late phase, when the 13S mRNA normally predominates, E1B primary transcripts were also processed by RNA splicing at two formerly unused or cryptic 5' splice sites. Both cryptic splice sites were located much closer to the disrupted 13S 5' splice site than to the 22S 5' splice site. Thus, the temporal increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA to the 22S mRNA is regulated by two processes, an increase in cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA and an increased propensity to utilize the 13S 5' splice site during the late phase of infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 was not defective for productive infection of HeLa cells or for transformation of rat cells. Images PMID:6727875

  1. Expression of preproenkephalin-like mRNA and its peptide products in mammalian testis and ovary.

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, D L; Howells, R D; Noe, M; Bailey, L C; Udenfriend, S

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of preproenkephalin mRNA and proenkephalin-derived peptides have been examined in gonadal tissues from rats, hamsters, and cattle. A preproenkephalin mRNA band was detected in the ovaries of all three species and in hamster testis that is identical in size to the 1450-nucleotide mRNA typically found in tissues that express proenkephalin. Rat testis, on the other hand, expresses at least one preproenkephalin-like mRNA that is substantially greater in size (1900 nucleotides). [Met]enkephalin-containing peptides were also detected in each of the gonadal tissues examined. Although the abundance of preproenkephalin-like mRNA in rat testis was comparable to that in rat brain, the testicular content of proenkephalin-derived [Met]enkephalin sequences was less than 4% of the rat brain content. Together these data suggest that preproenkephalin-like mRNA in rat testis is not efficiently translated, proenkephalin-derived peptides undergo rapid turnover in this tissue, or the mRNA in rat testis has a frameshift resulting in an altered coding sequence. Images PMID:3864164

  2. CNS development under altered gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E.

    The future of space exploration depends on a solid understanding of the developmental process under microgravity. In furtherance of this goal, the present studies assessed the impact of altered gravity on the developing rat cerebellum. Specifically, the expression of selected cerebellar proteins and corresponding genes was compared in rat neonates exposed to hypergravity (1.5G) from embryonic day (E) 11 to postnatal day (P) 6 and P9 against their expression in rat neonates developing under normal gravity. Cerebellar proteins were analyzed by quantitative western blots of cerebellar homogenates; RNA analysis was performed in the same samples using ribonuclease protection assay (RPA). Densitometric analysis of western blots suggested 21% to 31% reduction in neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and 31% to 45% reduction in glial acidic protein (GFAP). RPA results suggested a small reduction (<10%) in NCAM mRNA and a moderate reduction (<25%) in GFAP mRNA. These data indicate that the expression of selected cerebellar proteins may be affected at both the transcriptional and translational/postranslational level. Furthermore, these results suggest that changes in expression of selected genes may underlie hypergravity's effect on the developing CNS. (Supported by NASA grant NCC2-1042 and BWH Psychiatry Fund).

  3. Dual Posttranscriptional Regulation via a Cofactor-Responsive mRNA Leader

    PubMed Central

    Patterson-Fortin, Laura M.; Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitches are cis-acting mRNA elements that regulate gene expression in response to ligand binding. Recently, a class of riboswitches was proposed to respond to the molybdenum cofactor (Moco), which serves as a redox center for metabolic enzymes. The 5′ leader of the Escherichia coli moaABCDE transcript exemplifies this candidate riboswitch class. This mRNA encodes enzymes for Moco biosynthesis, and moaA expression is feedback inhibited by Moco. Previous RNA-seq analyses showed that moaA mRNA copurified with the RNA binding protein CsrA (carbon storage regulator), suggesting that CsrA binds to this RNA in vivo. Among its global regulatory roles, CsrA represses stationary phase metabolism and activates central carbon metabolism. Here, we used gel mobility shift analysis to determine that CsrA binds specifically and with high affinity to the moaA 5′ mRNA leader. Northern blotting and studies with a series of chromosomal lacZ reporter fusions showed that CsrA posttranscriptionally activates moaA expression without altering moaA mRNA levels, indicative of translation control. Deletion analyses, nucleotide replacement studies and footprinting with CsrA-FeBABE identified two sites for CsrA binding. Toeprinting assays suggested that CsrA binding causes changes in moaA RNA structure. We propose that the moaA mRNA leader forms an aptamer, which serves as a target of posttranscriptional regulation by at least two different factors, Moco and the protein CsrA. While we are not aware of similar dual posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms, additional examples are likely to emerge. PMID:23274138

  4. OPIATE EXPOSURE AND WITHDRAWAL DYNAMICALLY REGULATE mRNA EXPRESSION IN THE SEROTONERGIC DORSAL RAPHE NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Lunden, Jason; Kirby, Lynn G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous results from our lab suggest that hypofunctioning of the serotonergic (5-HT) dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is involved in stress-induced opiate reinstatement. To further investigate the effects of morphine dependence and withdrawal on the 5-HT DRN system, we measured gene expression at the level of mRNA in the DRN during a model of morphine dependence, withdrawal and post withdrawal stress exposure in rats. Morphine pellets were implanted for 72h and then either removed or animals were injected with naloxone to produce spontaneous or precipitated withdrawal, respectively. Animals exposed to these conditions exhibited withdrawal symptoms including weight loss, wet dog shakes and jumping behavior. Gene expression for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, corticotrophin releasing-factor (CRF)-R1, CRF-R2, GABAA-α1, μ-opioid receptor (MOR), 5-HT1A, tryptophan hydroxylase2 and the 5-HT transporter was then measured using quantitative real-time PCR at multiple time-points across the model of morphine exposure, withdrawal and post withdrawal stress. Expression levels of BDNF, TrkB and CRF-R1 mRNA were decreased during both morphine exposure and following seven days of withdrawal. CRF-R2 mRNA expression was elevated after seven days of withdrawal. 5-HT1A receptor mRNA expression was decreased following 3 hours of morphine exposure, while TPH2 mRNA expression was decreased after seven days of withdrawal with swim stress. There were no changes in the expression of GABAA-α1, MOR or 5-HT transporter mRNA. Collectively these results suggest that alterations in neurotrophin support, CRF-dependent stress signaling, 5-HT synthesis and release may underlie 5-HT DRN hypofunction that can potentially lead to stress-induced opiate relapse. PMID:24055683

  5. Chronic morphine exposure during puberty induces long-lasting changes in opioid-related mRNA expression in the mediobasal hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Elizabeth M

    2008-01-23

    Substance abuse in developing females may have significant long-term effects on reproductive competency. Chronic morphine exposure during puberty has been shown to reduce prolactin secretion in lactating rats. Opioid activity within the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) regulates suckling-induced prolactin secretion. Thus, the current study was conducted to determine whether chronic pubertal morphine exposure alters the expression of mu- and/or kappa-opioid receptor mRNA or pro-opioimelanocortin (POMC) mRNA within the MBH. Using an increasing dose regimen, female Sprague-Dawley rats were injected twice daily for a total of 20 days with morphine sulfate or saline beginning at 30 days of age. Several weeks later, quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine mRNA expression within the MBH in diestrus, never pregnant (nulliparous) controls, postpartum day 5 (PPD5), PPD10, PPD18, and diestrus, reproductively experienced (primiparous) females. Pubertal morphine exposed females had increased mu- and kappa-receptor mRNA expression as well as decreased POMC mRNA expression on diestrus. During lactation, mu- and kappa-receptor mRNA expression in the MBH decreased while POMC mRNA expression increased in similarly treated females. No changes in mRNA expression were observed during lactation in pubertal saline-treated females; however, increased mu- and kappa-receptor mRNA expression as well as decreased POMC mRNA expression was observed in primiparous, pubertal saline-treated females when compared to nulliparous controls. Thus, chronic morphine exposure during puberty results in long-term alterations in mu- and kappa-receptor as well as POMC mRNA expression in the MBH which are similar to the changes observed following reproductive experience. These changes do not correlate with the decreased prolactin secretion observed during early lactation; however, they do demonstrate the enduring nature of the effects of chronic opiate exposure during puberty on hypothalamic opioid systems in

  6. Increase in plasma leptin and Lep mRNA concentrations by food intake is dependent on insulin.

    PubMed

    Patel, B K; Koenig, J I; Kaplan, L M; Hooi, S C

    1998-05-01

    Obese (Lep) gene expression and leptin secretion are regulated by changes in food intake. However, the mechanism by which leptin concentrations are altered by fasting and feeding is unclear. Since these changes occur in parallel with changes in plasma insulin, it is possible that the changes observed are mediated by insulin. To test this hypothesis, we studied the role of insulin in the regulation of Lep gene expression in epididymal fat and leptin secretion during feeding. As shown previously, fasted animals showed significant reductions in Lep mRNA, plasma leptin, and plasma insulin concentrations. Conversely, feeding increased plasma insulin, Lep mRNA, and plasma leptin. In streptozotocin (STZ)-treated animals, plasma insulin concentrations were low. This was associated with low Lep mRNA and plasma leptin concentrations. Changes in food intake, whether fasting or feeding, did not significantly alter plasma insulin levels in STZ-treated animals. Under these circumstances, Lep mRNA and plasma leptin concentrations also remained low. Our results demonstrate that the decrease in Lep mRNA and plasma leptin during fasting and the increase with feeding are dependent on changes in the plasma insulin concentration. PMID:9591754

  7. PABPN1-Dependent mRNA Processing Induces Muscle Wasting

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Yotam; van Putten, Maaike; Paniagua-Soriano, Guillem; Krom, Yvonne D.; Florea, Bogdan I.; Raz, Vered

    2016-01-01

    Poly(A) Binding Protein Nuclear 1 (PABPN1) is a multifunctional regulator of mRNA processing, and its expression levels specifically decline in aging muscles. An expansion mutation in PABPN1 is the genetic cause of oculopharyngeal muscle dystrophy (OPMD), a late onset and rare myopathy. Moreover, reduced PABPN1 expression correlates with symptom manifestation in OPMD. PABPN1 regulates alternative polyadenylation site (PAS) utilization. However, the impact of PAS utilization on cell and tissue function is poorly understood. We hypothesized that altered PABPN1 expression levels is an underlying cause of muscle wasting. To test this, we stably down-regulated PABPN1 in mouse tibialis anterior (TA) muscles by localized injection of adeno-associated viruses expressing shRNA to PABPN1 (shPab). We found that a mild reduction in PABPN1 levels causes muscle pathology including myofiber atrophy, thickening of extracellular matrix and myofiber-type transition. Moreover, reduced PABPN1 levels caused a consistent decline in distal PAS utilization in the 3’-UTR of a subset of OPMD-dysregulated genes. This alternative PAS utilization led to up-regulation of Atrogin-1, a key muscle atrophy regulator, but down regulation of proteasomal genes. Additionally reduced PABPN1 levels caused a reduction in proteasomal activity, and transition in MyHC isotope expression pattern in myofibers. We suggest that PABPN1-mediated alternative PAS utilization plays a central role in aging-associated muscle wasting. PMID:27152426

  8. PABPN1-Dependent mRNA Processing Induces Muscle Wasting.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Muhammad; Raz, Yotam; van Putten, Maaike; Paniagua-Soriano, Guillem; Krom, Yvonne D; Florea, Bogdan I; Raz, Vered

    2016-05-01

    Poly(A) Binding Protein Nuclear 1 (PABPN1) is a multifunctional regulator of mRNA processing, and its expression levels specifically decline in aging muscles. An expansion mutation in PABPN1 is the genetic cause of oculopharyngeal muscle dystrophy (OPMD), a late onset and rare myopathy. Moreover, reduced PABPN1 expression correlates with symptom manifestation in OPMD. PABPN1 regulates alternative polyadenylation site (PAS) utilization. However, the impact of PAS utilization on cell and tissue function is poorly understood. We hypothesized that altered PABPN1 expression levels is an underlying cause of muscle wasting. To test this, we stably down-regulated PABPN1 in mouse tibialis anterior (TA) muscles by localized injection of adeno-associated viruses expressing shRNA to PABPN1 (shPab). We found that a mild reduction in PABPN1 levels causes muscle pathology including myofiber atrophy, thickening of extracellular matrix and myofiber-type transition. Moreover, reduced PABPN1 levels caused a consistent decline in distal PAS utilization in the 3'-UTR of a subset of OPMD-dysregulated genes. This alternative PAS utilization led to up-regulation of Atrogin-1, a key muscle atrophy regulator, but down regulation of proteasomal genes. Additionally reduced PABPN1 levels caused a reduction in proteasomal activity, and transition in MyHC isotope expression pattern in myofibers. We suggest that PABPN1-mediated alternative PAS utilization plays a central role in aging-associated muscle wasting. PMID:27152426

  9. Identification of European starling GnRH-I precursor mRNA and its seasonal regulation.

    PubMed

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Cadigan, Penelope A; Wang, Ariel; Liu, Jennifer; Bentley, George E

    2009-07-01

    Songbirds show dynamic seasonal changes in their reproductive activities during the year. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I) is critical for the control of reproduction in vertebrates. The molecular mechanisms controlling reproduction are not well understood in songbirds, largely because the GnRH-I precursor polypeptide gene was unknown until now. Here, we report the complete sequence and seasonal regulation of GnRH-I precursor polypeptide mRNA in a songbird, European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). The translated starling GnRH-I precursor polypeptide contained an amino acid sequence that can be processed into chicken GnRH-I peptide (pEHWSYGLQPG-NH(2)). However, the overall homology of GnRH-I precursor polypeptide (including a 23 amino acid signal peptide, the decapeptide hormone and Gly-Lys-Arg cleavage site followed by 55 amino acid GnRH-associated peptide sequences) between starling and chicken was only 58%. GnRH-I mRNA and GnRH-I peptide were observed to be co-localized in the preoptic area of sexually mature birds using in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. GnRH-I mRNA exhibited large variance in photosensitive birds, and converged to a high level in photostimulated birds. Subsequently, GnRH-I mRNA decreased to below detectability in most of the photorefractory birds. Changes were also observed in GnRH-I peptide levels, although changes in GnRH-I peptide were not as marked. Our data indicate that GnRH-I mRNA synthesis commences but is variable in photosensitive birds, stabilizes in photostimulated birds, then ceases when birds become photorefractory. Finer-scale investigation into temporal regulation of GnRH-I precursor polypeptide mRNA will provide insight into its regulation by environmental, social and physiological cues. PMID:19362556

  10. Dimerization of the 3'UTR of bicoid mRNA involves a two-step mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wagner, C; Palacios, I; Jaeger, L; St Johnston, D; Ehresmann, B; Ehresmann, C; Brunel, C

    2001-10-26

    The proper localization of bicoid (bcd) mRNA requires cis-acting signals within its 3' untranslated region (UTR) and trans-acting factors such as Staufen. Dimerization of bcd mRNA through intermolecular base-pairing between two complementary loops of domain III of the 3'UTR was proposed to be important for particle formation in the embryo. The participation in the dimerization process of each domain building the 3'UTR was evaluated by thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of various mutated and truncated RNAs. Although sequence complementarity between the two loops of domain III is required for initiating mRNA dimerization, the initial reversible loop-loop complex is converted rapidly into an almost irreversible complex. This conversion involves parts of RNA outside of domain III that promote initial recognition, and dimerization can be inhibited by sense or antisense oligonucleotides only before conversion has proceeded. Injection of the different bcd RNA variants into living Drosophila embryos shows that all elements that inhibit RNA dimerization in vitro prevent formation of localized particles containing Staufen. Particle formation appeared to be dependent on both mRNA dimerization and other element(s) in domains IV and V. Domain III of bcd mRNA could be substituted by heterologous dimerization motifs of different geometry. The resulting dimers were converted into stable forms, independently of the dimerization module used. Moreover, these chimeric RNAs were competent in forming localized particles and recruiting Staufen. The finding that the dimerization domain of bcd mRNA is interchangeable suggests that dimerization by itself, and not the precise geometry of the intermolecular interactions, is essential for the localization process. This suggests that the stabilizing interactions that are formed during the second step of the dimerization process might represent crucial elements for Staufen recognition and localization. PMID:11676536

  11. DDX6 recruits translational silenced human reticulocyte 15-lipoxygenase mRNA to RNP granules

    PubMed Central

    Naarmann, Isabel S.; Harnisch, Christiane; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Urlaub, Henning; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Ostareck, Dirk H.

    2010-01-01

    Erythroid precursor cells lose the capacity for mRNA synthesis due to exclusion of the nucleus during maturation. Therefore, the stability and translation of mRNAs that code for specific proteins, which function in late stages of maturation when reticulocytes become erythrocytes, are controlled tightly. Reticulocyte 15-lipoxygenase (r15-LOX) initiates the breakdown of mitochondria in mature reticulocytes. Through the temporal restriction of mRNA translation, the synthesis of r15-LOX is prevented in premature cells. The enzyme is synthesized only in mature reticulocytes, although r15-LOX mRNA is already present in erythroid precursor cells. Translation of r15-LOX mRNA is inhibited by hnRNP K and hnRNP E1, which bind to the differentiation control element (DICE) in its 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR). The hnRNP K/E1-DICE complex interferes with the joining of the 60S ribosomal subunit to the 40S subunit at the AUG. We took advantage of the inducible human erythroid K562 cell system that fully recapitulates this process to identify so far unknown factors, which are critical for DICE-dependent translational regulation. Applying RNA chromatography with the DICE as bait combined with hnRNP K immunoprecipitation, we specifically purified the DEAD-box RNA helicase 6 (DDX6) that interacts with hnRNP K and hnRNP E1 in a DICE-dependent manner. Employing RNA interference and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we show that DDX6 colocalizes with endogenous human (h)r15-LOX mRNA to P-body–like RNP granules, from which 60S ribosomal subunits are excluded. Our data suggest that in premature erythroid cells translational silencing of hr15-LOX mRNA is maintained by DDX6 mediated storage in these RNP granules. PMID:20884783

  12. Quantitative studies of mRNA recruitment to the eukaryotic ribosome.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Christopher S

    2015-07-01

    The process of peptide bond synthesis by ribosomes is conserved between species, but the initiation step differs greatly between the three kingdoms of life. This is illustrated by the evolution of roughly an order of magnitude more initiation factor mass found in humans compared with bacteria. Eukaryotic initiation of translation is comprised of a number of sub-steps: (i) recruitment of an mRNA and initiator methionyl-tRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit; (ii) migration of the 40S subunit along the 5' UTR to locate the initiation codon; and (iii) recruitment of the 60S subunit to form the 80S initiation complex. Although the mechanism and regulation of initiation has been studied for decades, many aspects of the pathway remain unclear. In this review, I will focus discussion on what is known about the mechanism of mRNA selection and its recruitment to the 40S subunit. I will summarize how the 43S preinitiation complex (PIC) is formed and stabilized by interactions between its components. I will discuss what is known about the mechanism of mRNA selection by the eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex and how the selected mRNA is recruited to the 43S PIC. The regulation of this process by secondary structure located in the 5' UTR of an mRNA will also be discussed. Finally, I present a possible kinetic model with which to explain the process of mRNA selection and recruitment to the eukaryotic ribosome. PMID:25742741

  13. Kinetin improves IKBKAP mRNA splicing in patients with familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Felicia B; Liebes, Leonard; Gold-Von Simson, Gabrielle; Mendoza, Sandra; Mull, James; Leyne, Maire; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2011-11-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is caused by an intronic splice mutation in the IKBKAP gene that leads to partial skipping of exon 20 and tissue-specific reduction in I-κ-B kinase complex-associated protein/elongation protein 1 (IKAP/ELP-1) expression. Kinetin (6-furfurylaminopurine) has been shown to improve splicing and increase WT IKBKAP mRNA and IKAP protein expression in FD cell lines and carriers. To determine whether oral kinetin treatment could alter mRNA splicing in FD subjects and was tolerable, we administered kinetin to eight FD individuals homozygous for the splice mutation. Subjects received 23.5 mg/Kg/d for 28 d. An increase in WT IKBKAP mRNA expression in leukocytes was noted after 8 d in six of eight individuals; after 28 d, the mean increase compared with baseline was significant (p = 0.002). We have demonstrated that kinetin is tolerable in this medically fragile population. Not only did kinetin produce the desired effect on splicing in FD patients but also that effect seems to improve with time despite lack of dose change. This is the first report of a drug that produces in vivo mRNA splicing changes in individuals with FD and supports future long-term trials to determine whether kinetin will prove therapeutic in FD patients. PMID:21775922

  14. Asymmetric mRNA localization contributes to fidelity and sensitivity of spatially localized systems

    PubMed Central

    Weatheritt, Robert J.; Gibson, Toby J; Babu, M. Madan

    2014-01-01

    While many proteins are localized after translation, asymmetric-protein distribution is also achieved by translation after mRNA localization. Why are certain mRNA transported to a distal location and translated on-site? Here we undertake a systematic, genome-scale study of asymmetrically distributed protein and mRNA in mammalian cells. Our findings suggest that asymmetric-protein distribution by mRNA localization enhances interaction fidelity and signaling sensitivity. Proteins synthesized at distal locations frequently contain intrinsically disordered segments. These regions are generally rich in assembly-promoting modules and are often regulated by post-translational modification sites. Such proteins are tightly regulated but display distinct temporal dynamics upon stimulation with growth factors. Thus proteins synthesized on-site may rapidly alter proteome composition and act as dynamically regulated scaffolds to promote the formation of reversible cellular assemblies. Our observations are consistent across multiple mammalian species, cell types, and developmental stages suggesting that localized translation is a recurring feature of cell signaling and regulation. PMID:25150862

  15. Final report: FASEB Summer Research Conference on ''Post-transcriptional control of gene expression: Effectors of mRNA decay'' [agenda and attendees list

    SciTech Connect

    Maquat, Lynne

    2002-12-01

    The goal of this meeting was to provide an interactive forum for scientists working on prokaryotic and eukaryotic mRNA decay. A special seminar presented by a leader in the field of mRNA decay in S. cerevisiae focused on what is known and what needs to be determined, not only for yeast but for other organisms. The large attendance (110 participants) reflects the awareness that mRNA decay is a key player in gene regulation in a way that is affected by the many steps that precede mRNA formation. Sessions were held on the following topics: mRNA transport and mRNP; multicomponent eukaryotic nucleases; nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and nonsense-associated altered splicing; Cis-acting sequences/Trans-acting factors of mRNA decay; translational accuracy; multicomponent bacterial nucleases; interplay between mRNA polyadenylation, translation and decay in prokaryotes and prokaryotic organelles; and RNA interference and other RNA mediators of gene expression. In addition to the talks and two poster sessions, there were three round tables: (1) Does translation occur in the nucleus? (2) Differences and similarities in the mechanisms of mRNA decay in different eukaryotes, and (3) RNA surveillance in bacteria?

  16. mRNA quality control goes transcriptional

    PubMed Central

    Kilchert, Cornelia; Vasiljeva, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs are extensively processed to generate functional transcripts, which are 5′ capped, spliced and 3′ polyadenylated. Accumulation of unprocessed (aberrant) mRNAs can be deleterious for the cell, hence processing fidelity is closely monitored by QC (quality control) mechanisms that identify erroneous transcripts and initiate their selective removal. Nucleases including Xrn2/Rat1 and the nuclear exosome have been shown to play an important role in the turnover of aberrant mRNAs. Recently, with the growing appreciation that mRNA processing occurs concomitantly with polII (RNA polymerase II) transcription, it has become evident that QC acts at the transcriptional level in addition to degrading aberrant RNAs. In the present review, we discuss mechanisms that allow cells to co-transcriptionally initiate the removal of RNAs as well as down-regulate transcription of transcripts where processing repeatedly fails. PMID:24256272

  17. Rational manipulation of mRNA folding free energy allows rheostat control of pneumolysin production by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Fábio E; Parker, Dane; Randis, Tara M; Kulkarni, Ritwij; Prince, Alice S; Shirasu-Hiza, Mimi M; Ratner, Adam J

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of specific factors to bacterial virulence is generally investigated through creation of genetic "knockouts" that are then compared to wild-type strains or complemented mutants. This paradigm is useful to understand the effect of presence vs. absence of a specific gene product but cannot account for concentration-dependent effects, such as may occur with some bacterial toxins. In order to assess threshold and dose-response effects of virulence factors, robust systems for tunable expression are required. Recent evidence suggests that the folding free energy (ΔG) of the 5' end of mRNA transcripts can have a significant effect on translation efficiency and overall protein abundance. Here we demonstrate that rational alteration of 5' mRNA folding free energy by introduction of synonymous mutations allows for predictable changes in pneumolysin (PLY) expression by Streptococcus pneumoniae without the need for chemical inducers or heterologous promoters. We created a panel of isogenic S. pneumoniae strains, differing only in synonymous (silent) mutations at the 5' end of the PLY mRNA that are predicted to alter ΔG. Such manipulation allows rheostat-like control of PLY production and alters the cytotoxicity of whole S. pneumoniae on primary and immortalized human cells. These studies provide proof-of-principle for further investigation of mRNA ΔG manipulation as a tool in studies of bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:25798590

  18. Protein kinase A alterations in endocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, B; Ragazzon, B; Rizk-Rabin, M; Bertherat, J

    2012-09-01

    Various molecular and cellular alterations of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway have been observed in endocrine tumors. Since protein kinase A (PKA) is a central key component of the cAMP pathway, studies of the alterations of PKA subunits in endocrine tumors reveal new aspects of the mechanisms of cAMP pathway alterations in human diseases. So far, most alterations have been observed for the regulatory subunits, mainly PRKAR1A and to a lower extent, PRKAR2B. One of the best examples of such alteration today is the multiple neoplasia syndrome Carney complex (CNC). The most common endocrine gland manifestations of CNC are pituitary GH-secreting adenomas, thyroid tumors, testicular tumors, and ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). Heterozygous germline inactivating mutations of the PKA regulatory subunit RIα gene (PRKAR1A) are observed in about two-third of CNC patients, and also in patients with isolated PPNAD. PRKAR1A is considered as a tumor suppressor gene. Interestingly, these mutations can also be observed as somatic alterations in sporadic endocrine tumors. More than 120 different PRKAR1A mutations have been found today. Most of them lead to an unstable mutant mRNA, which will be degraded by nonsense mediated mRNA decay. In vitro and in vivo functional studies are in progress to understand the mechanisms of endocrine tumor development due to PKA regulatory subunits inactivation. PRKAR1A mutations stimulate in most models PKA activity, mimicking in some way cAMP pathway constitutive activation. Cross-talks with other signaling pathways summarized in this review have been described and might participate in endocrine tumorigenesis. PMID:22752956

  19. Increases of CCK mRNA and peptide in different brain areas following acute and chronic administration of morphine.

    PubMed

    Ding, X Z; Bayer, B M

    1993-10-15

    The present study examined whether either acute or chronic administration of morphine resulted in changes in the content of CCK mRNA and CCK immunoactive peptide in selective areas of the rat brain and spinal cord. Two hours after a single injection of morphine (10 mg/kg, s.c.), CCK mRNA significantly increased in the hypothalamus (0.8-fold) and spinal cord (2-fold) relative to the CCK mRNA content in saline-injected controls. No significant differences in CCK mRNA were observed in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, midbrain or brainstem. There were no significant alterations in CCK immunoreactivity in any brain regions and spinal cord after the acute treatment with morphine. Upon repeated morphine administration, the content of CCK mRNA in both the hypothalamus and the spinal cord was further elevated by at least 3-fold. A significant increase of CCK mRNA content in brain stem (2.8-fold) was also observed following chronic morphine administration. In contrast to the acute exposure to morphine, chronic administration resulted in significant increases in CCK immunoactive peptide in hypothalamus (2.6-fold), spinal cord (2.1-fold) and brainstem (1.6-fold), but not in the other brain areas. These results demonstrate that morphine, especially following repeated administrations, stimulates endogenous CCK biosynthesis in selective brain regions. PMID:8242392

  20. Selective translation of heat shock mRNA in Drosophila melanogaster depends on sequence information in the leader.

    PubMed Central

    Klemenz, R; Hultmark, D; Gehring, W J

    1985-01-01

    One of the effects of a temperature increase above 35 degrees C on Drosophila melanogaster is a rapid switch in selectivity of the translational apparatus. Protein synthesis from normal, but not from heat shock, mRNA is much reduced. Efficient translation at high temperature might be a result of the primary sequence of heat shock genes. Alternatively a mRNA modification mechanism, altered as a consequence of heat shock, might allow for efficient high temperature translation of any mRNA synthesized during a heat shock. The gene for alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) was fused to the controlling elements of a heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) gene. Authentic Adh mRNA, synthesized from this fusion gene at elevated temperatures was not translated during heat shock. A second Adh fusion gene in which the mRNA synthesized contained the first 95 nucleotides of the Hsp70 non-translated leader sequence gave rise, at high temperature, to mRNA which was translated during the heat shock. Thus, the signal(s) in the mRNAs controlling translation efficiency at heat shock temperatures is encoded within the heat shock genes. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. PMID:2933251

  1. Effects of simulated microgravity on microRNA and mRNA expression profile of rat soleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongjie; Wu, Feng; Cao, Hongqing; Kan, Guanghan; Zhang, Hongyu; Yeung, Ella W.; Shang, Peng; Dai, Zhongquan; Li, Yinghui

    2015-02-01

    Spaceflight induces muscle atrophy but mechanism is not well understood. Here, we quantified microRNAs (miRNAs) and mRNA shifts of rat soleus in response to microgravity. MiRNAs and mRNA microarray of soleus after tail suspension (TS) for 7 and 14 days were performed followed by target gene and function annotation analysis and qRT-PCR. Relative muscle mass lost by 37.0% in TS-7 but less than 10% in the following three weeks. TS altered 23 miRNAs and 1313 mRNAs with at least 2-fold. QRT-PCR confirmed some of these changes. MiR-214, miR-486-5p and miR-221 continuously decreased. MiR-674 and Let-7e decreased only in TS-7, while miR-320b and miR-187 decreased only in TS-14. But there was no alteration of miR-320 and miR-206 in both time point. For mRNA detection, actn3 (5.1-fold and 13.8-fold) and myh4 (38-fold and 51.6-fold) increased abundantly and a3galt2 decreased. Predicted targeted genes (whyz, ywhaz and SFRP2) of altered miRNAs decreased. GO terms and cellular pathway of these alteration showed enrichment in regulation of muscle metabolism. Integration analysis of the miRNA and mRNA expression profiles confirmed that eleven genes were differently regulated by four miRNAs. This is the first study that showed expression pattern and synergistical regulation of miRNA and mRNA in rat soleus of TS for up to 14 days.

  2. Structure of an RNA dimer of a regulatory element from human thymidylate synthase mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey; McLean, Jaime; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-09-27

    A sequence around the start codon of the mRNA of human thymidylate synthase (TS) folds into a secondary-structure motif in which the initiation site is sequestered in a metastable hairpin. Binding of the protein to its own mRNA at the hairpin prevents the production of TS through a translation-repression feedback mechanism. Stabilization of the mRNA hairpin by other ligands has been proposed as a strategy to reduce TS levels in anticancer therapy. Rapidly proliferating cells require high TS activity to maintain the production of thymidine as a building block for DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of a model oligonucleotide (TS1) that represents the TS-binding site of the mRNA has been determined. While fluorescence studies showed that the TS1 RNA preferentially adopts a hairpin structure in solution, even at high RNA concentrations, an asymmetric dimer of two hybridized TS1 strands was obtained in the crystal. The TS1 dimer contains an unusual S-turn motif that also occurs in the 'off' state of the human ribosomal decoding site RNA.

  3. A conserved mechanism of TOR-dependent RCK-mediated mRNA degradation regulates autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon-Dong; Qiu, Jin; Vural, Ali; Zhang, Nannan; Waterman, Scott R.; Blewett, Nathan H.; Myers, Timothy G.; Maraia, Richard J.; Kehrl, John H.; Uzel, Gulbu; Klionsky, Daniel J.; Williamson, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential eukaryotic pathway requiring tight regulation to maintain homeostasis and preclude disease. Using yeast and mammalian cells, we report a conserved mechanism of autophagy regulation by RNA helicase RCK family members in association with the decapping enzyme Dcp2. Under nutrient-replete conditions, Dcp2 undergoes TOR-dependent phosphorylation and associates with RCK members to form a complex with autophagy-related (ATG) mRNA transcripts, leading to decapping, degradation and autophagy suppression. Simultaneous with the induction of ATG mRNA synthesis, starvation reverses the process, facilitating ATG mRNA accumulation and autophagy induction. This conserved post-transcriptional mechanism modulates fungal virulence and the mammalian inflammasome, the latter providing mechanistic insight into autoimmunity reported in a patient with a PIK3CD/p110δ gain-of-function mutation. We propose a dynamic model wherein RCK family members, in conjunction with Dcp2, function in controlling ATG mRNA stability to govern autophagy, which in turn modulates vital cellular processes affecting inflammation and microbial pathogenesis. PMID:26098573

  4. Pseudouridine profiling reveals regulated mRNA pseudouridylation in yeast and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Carlile, Thomas M.; Rojas-Duran, Maria F.; Zinshteyn, Boris; Shin, Hakyung; Bartoli, Kristen M.; Gilbert, Wendy V.

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional modification of RNA nucleosides occurs in all living organisms. Pseudouridine, the most abundant modified nucleoside in non-coding RNAs1, enhances the function of transfer RNA and ribosomal RNA by stabilizing RNA structure2–8. mRNAs were not known to contain pseudouridine, but artificial pseudouridylation dramatically affects mRNA function – it changes the genetic code by facilitating non-canonical base pairing in the ribosome decoding center9,10. However, without evidence of naturally occurring mRNA pseudouridylation, its physiological was unclear. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of pseudouridylation in yeast and human RNAs using Pseudo-seq, a genome-wide, single-nucleotide-resolution method for pseudouridine identification. Pseudo-seq accurately identifies known modification sites as well as 100 novel sites in non-coding RNAs, and reveals hundreds of pseudouridylated sites in mRNAs. Genetic analysis allowed us to assign most of the new modification sites to one of seven conserved pseudouridine synthases, Pus1–4, 6, 7 and 9. Notably, the majority of pseudouridines in mRNA are regulated in response to environmental signals, such as nutrient deprivation in yeast and serum starvation in human cells. These results suggest a mechanism for the rapid and regulated rewiring of the genetic code through inducible mRNA modifications. Our findings reveal unanticipated roles for pseudouridylation and provide a resource for identifying the targets of pseudouridine synthases implicated in human disease11–13. PMID:25192136

  5. Post-transcriptional regulation of satellite cell quiescence by TTP-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Hausburg, Melissa A; Doles, Jason D; Clement, Sandra L; Cadwallader, Adam B; Hall, Monica N; Blackshear, Perry J; Lykke-Andersen, Jens; Olwin, Bradley B

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells in their niche are quiescent and upon muscle injury, exit quiescence, proliferate to repair muscle tissue, and self-renew to replenish the satellite cell population. To understand the mechanisms involved in maintaining satellite cell quiescence, we identified gene transcripts that were differentially expressed during satellite cell activation following muscle injury. Transcripts encoding RNA binding proteins were among the most significantly changed and included the mRNA decay factor Tristetraprolin. Tristetraprolin promotes the decay of MyoD mRNA, which encodes a transcriptional regulator of myogenic commitment, via binding to the MyoD mRNA 3′ untranslated region. Upon satellite cell activation, p38α/β MAPK phosphorylates MAPKAP2 and inactivates Tristetraprolin, stabilizing MyoD mRNA. Satellite cell specific knockdown of Tristetraprolin precociously activates satellite cells in vivo, enabling MyoD accumulation, differentiation and cell fusion into myofibers. Regulation of mRNAs by Tristetraprolin appears to function as one of several critical post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms controlling satellite cell homeostasis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03390.001 PMID:25815583

  6. Neutrophil-derived alpha defensins control inflammation by inhibiting macrophage mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Brook, Matthew; Tomlinson, Gareth H; Miles, Katherine; Smith, Richard W P; Rossi, Adriano G; Hiemstra, Pieter S; van 't Wout, Emily F A; Dean, Jonathan L E; Gray, Nicola K; Lu, Wuyuan; Gray, Mohini

    2016-04-19

    Neutrophils are the first and most numerous cells to arrive at the site of an inflammatory insult and are among the first to die. We previously reported that alpha defensins, released from apoptotic human neutrophils, augmented the antimicrobial capacity of macrophages while also inhibiting the biosynthesis of proinflammatory cytokines. In vivo, alpha defensin administration protected mice from inflammation, induced by thioglychollate-induced peritonitis or following infection withSalmonella entericaserovar Typhimurium. We have now dissected the antiinflammatory mechanism of action of the most abundant neutrophil alpha defensin, Human Neutrophil Peptide 1 (HNP1). Herein we show that HNP1 enters macrophages and inhibits protein translation without inducing the unfolded-protein response or affecting mRNA stability. In a cell-free in vitro translation system, HNP1 powerfully inhibited both cap-dependent and cap-independent mRNA translation while maintaining mRNA polysomal association. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of a peptide released from one cell type (neutrophils) directly regulating mRNA translation in another (macrophages). By preventing protein translation, HNP1 functions as a "molecular brake" on macrophage-driven inflammation, ensuring both pathogen clearance and the resolution of inflammation with minimal bystander tissue damage. PMID:27044108

  7. Post-transcriptional regulation of satellite cell quiescence by TTP-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Hausburg, Melissa A; Doles, Jason D; Clement, Sandra L; Cadwallader, Adam B; Hall, Monica N; Blackshear, Perry J; Lykke-Andersen, Jens; Olwin, Bradley B

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells in their niche are quiescent and upon muscle injury, exit quiescence, proliferate to repair muscle tissue, and self-renew to replenish the satellite cell population. To understand the mechanisms involved in maintaining satellite cell quiescence, we identified gene transcripts that were differentially expressed during satellite cell activation following muscle injury. Transcripts encoding RNA binding proteins were among the most significantly changed and included the mRNA decay factor Tristetraprolin. Tristetraprolin promotes the decay of MyoD mRNA, which encodes a transcriptional regulator of myogenic commitment, via binding to the MyoD mRNA 3' untranslated region. Upon satellite cell activation, p38α/β MAPK phosphorylates MAPKAP2 and inactivates Tristetraprolin, stabilizing MyoD mRNA. Satellite cell specific knockdown of Tristetraprolin precociously activates satellite cells in vivo, enabling MyoD accumulation, differentiation and cell fusion into myofibers. Regulation of mRNAs by Tristetraprolin appears to function as one of several critical post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms controlling satellite cell homeostasis. PMID:25815583

  8. Destabilization of Nucleophosmin mRNA by the HuR/KSRP complex is required for muscle fiber formation

    PubMed Central

    Cammas, Anne; Sanchez, Brenda Janice; Lian, Xian Jin; Dormoy-Raclet, Virginie; van der Giessen, Kate; de Silanes, Isabel López; Ma, Jennifer; Wilusz, Carol; Richardson, John; Gorospe, Myriam; Millevoi, Stefania; Giovarelli, Matteo; Gherzi, Roberto; Di Marco, Sergio; Gallouzi, Imed-Eddine

    2014-01-01

    HuR promotes myogenesis by stabilizing the MyoD, Myogenin and p21 mRNAs during the fusion of muscle cells to form myotubes. Here we show that HuR, via a novel mRNA destabilizing activity, promotes the early steps of myogenesis by reducing the expression of the cell cycle promoter nucleophosmin (NPM). Depletion of HuR stabilizes the NPM mRNA, increases NPM protein levels and inhibits myogenesis, while its overexpression elicits the opposite effects. NPM mRNA destabilization involves the association of HuR with the decay factor KSRP as well as the ribonuclease PARN and the exosome. The C-terminus of HuR mediates the formation of the HuR-KSRP complex and is sufficient for maintaining a low level of the NPM mRNA as well as promoting the commitment of muscle cells to myogenesis. We therefore propose a model whereby the downregulation of the NPM mRNA, mediated by HuR, KSRP and its associated ribonucleases, is required for proper myogenesis. PMID:24969639

  9. Arabidopsis thaliana LSM proteins function in mRNA splicing and degradation

    PubMed Central

    Golisz, Anna; Sikorski, Pawel J.; Kruszka, Katarzyna; Kufel, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Sm-like (Lsm) proteins have been identified in all organisms and are related to RNA metabolism. Here, we report that Arabidopsis nuclear AtLSM8 protein, as well as AtLSM5, which localizes to both the cytoplasm and nucleus, function in pre-mRNA splicing, while AtLSM5 and the exclusively cytoplasmic AtLSM1 contribute to 5′–3′ mRNA decay. In lsm8 and sad1/lsm5 mutants, U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) was reduced and unspliced mRNA precursors accumulated, whereas mRNA stability was mainly affected in plants lacking AtLSM1 and AtLSM5. Some of the mRNAs affected in lsm1a lsm1b and sad1/lsm5 plants were also substrates of the cytoplasmic 5′–3′ exonuclease AtXRN4 and of the decapping enzyme AtDCP2. Surprisingly, a subset of substrates was also stabilized in the mutant lacking AtLSM8, which supports the notion that plant mRNAs are actively degraded in the nucleus. Localization of LSM components, purification of LSM-interacting proteins as well as functional analyses strongly suggest that at least two LSM complexes with conserved activities in RNA metabolism, AtLSM1-7 and AtLSM2-8, exist also in plants. PMID:23620288

  10. Genome-wide identification of Wig-1 mRNA targets by RIP-Seq analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bersani, Cinzia; Huss, Mikael; Giacomello, Stefania; Xu, Li-Di; Bianchi, Julie; Eriksson, Sofi; Jerhammar, Fredrik; Alexeyenko, Andrey; Vilborg, Anna; Lundeberg, Joakim; Lui, Weng-Onn; Wiman, Klas G.

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles in the regulation of gene expression through a variety of post-transcriptional mechanisms. The p53-induced RBP Wig-1 (Zmat3) binds RNA through its zinc finger domains and enhances stability of p53 and N-Myc mRNAs and decreases stability of FAS mRNA. To identify novel Wig-1-bound RNAs, we performed RNA-immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (RIP-Seq) in HCT116 and Saos-2 cells. We identified 286 Wig-1-bound mRNAs common between the two cell lines. Sequence analysis revealed that AU-rich elements (AREs) are highly enriched in the 3′UTR of these Wig-1-bound mRNAs. Network enrichment analysis showed that Wig-1 preferentially binds mRNAs involved in cell cycle regulation. Moreover, we identified a 2D Wig-1 binding motif in HIF1A mRNA. Our findings confirm that Wig-1 is an ARE-BP that regulates cell cycle-related processes and provide a novel view of how Wig-1 may bind mRNA through a putative structural motif. We also significantly extend the repertoire of Wig-1 target mRNAs. Since Wig-1 is a transcriptional target of the tumor suppressor p53, these results have implications for our understanding of p53-dependent stress responses and tumor suppression. PMID:26672765

  11. Dietary copper can regulate the level of mRNA for dopamine B-hydroxylase in rat adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Sabban, E.L.; Failla, M.L.; McMahon, A.; Seidel, K.E. Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD )

    1991-03-15

    Recent studies have shown that Cu deficiency markedly alters the levels of dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) in several peripheral tissues of rodents. Conversion of DA to NE is mediated by dopamine B-hydroxylase (DBM). Here the authors examined the effect of dietary Cu deficiency on the levels of DA, NE and DBM mRNA in rat adrenal gland. Severe Cu deficiency was induced by feeding low Cu diet to dams beginning at 17d gestation and weaning pups to the same diet. At 7 wks of age rats fed {minus}Cu diet were characterized by depressed growth, low tissue Cu, enlarged hearts and moderate anemia. Concentrations of DA were higher in adrenals and hearts of {minus}Cu rats compared to +Cu controls. While cardiac level of NE in {minus}Cu rats were reduced to 17% that of controls, adrenal NE was unchanged by Cu deficiency. To investigate possible mechanisms responsible for the response of adrenal gland to Cu deficiency, RNA was isolated and the levels of DBH mRNA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA were analyzed by Northern blots. Steady state levels of adrenal DBH mRNA was increased 2-3 fold in {minus}Cu rats, whereas TH mRNA were unchanged by dietary Cu status. Upon feeding the {minus}Cu rats the Cu adequate diet overnight, there was a further increase in DBH mRNA and a slight elevation of TH mRNA levels. The results indicate that dietary copper can markedly affect the level of DBH mRNA in rat adrenal gland.

  12. Contributions of transcription and mRNA decay to gene expression dynamics of fission yeast in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Marguerat, Samuel; Lawler, Katherine; Brazma, Alvis; Bähler, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    The cooperation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels of control to shape gene regulation is only partially understood. Here we show that a combination of two simple and non-invasive genomic techniques, coupled with kinetic mathematical modeling, affords insight into the intricate dynamics of RNA regulation in response to oxidative stress in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This study reveals a dominant role of transcriptional regulation in response to stress, but also points to the first minutes after stress induction as a critical time when the coordinated control of mRNA turnover can support the control of transcription for rapid gene regulation. In addition, we uncover specialized gene expression strategies associated with distinct functional gene groups, such as simultaneous transcriptional repression and mRNA destabilization for genes encoding ribosomal proteins, delayed mRNA destabilization with varying contribution of transcription for ribosome biogenesis genes, dominant roles of mRNA stabilization for genes functioning in protein degradation, and adjustment of both transcription and mRNA turnover during the adaptation to stress. We also show that genes regulated independently of the bZIP transcription factor Atf1p are predominantly controlled by mRNA turnover, and identify putative cis-regulatory sequences that are associated with different gene expression strategies during the stress response. This study highlights the intricate and multi-faceted interplay between transcription and RNA turnover during the dynamic regulatory response to stress. PMID:25007214

  13. Adult rat brain is sensitive to thyroid hormone. Regulation of RC3/neurogranin mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Iñiguez, M A; Rodriguez-Peña, A; Ibarrola, N; Morreale de Escobar, G; Bernal, J

    1992-01-01

    The mammalian brain is considered to be poorly responsive to thyroid hormone after the so called "critical periods" of brain development, which occur in the rat before postnatal days 15-20. In a previous work (Muñoz, A., A. Rodriguez-Peña, A. Perez-Castillo, B. Ferreiro, J.G. Sutcliffe, and J. Bernal. 1991. Mol. Endocrinol. 5:273-280) we have identified one neuronal gene, RC3, whose expression is influenced by early neonatal hypothyroidism and thyroid hormone treatment. In the present work we show that adult-onset hypothyroidism leads to a reversible decrease of RC3 mRNA. Rats thyroidectomized on postnatal day 40 and killed three months later showed a decreased RC3 mRNA concentration in the cerebral cortex and striatum. The same effect was observed in animals made hypothyroid on postnatal day 32 and killed on postnatal day 52. RC3 expression was normal when hypothyroid animals were treated with T4 five days before being killed. In contrast, the mRNA encoding myelin proteolipid protein showed no changes in either experimental situation. RC3 mRNA levels were not affected by food restriction demonstrating that the effect of hypothyroidism was not related to the lack of weight gain. The control of RC3 mRNA is so far the only molecular event known to be regulated by thyroid hormone once the critical periods of brain development are over and could represent a molecular correlate for the age-independent, reversible alterations induced by hypothyroidism in the adult brain. Images PMID:1379612

  14. Feedback regulation of the spc operon in Escherichia coli: translational coupling and mRNA processing.

    PubMed Central

    Mattheakis, L C; Nomura, M

    1988-01-01

    The spc operon of Escherichia coli encodes 10 ribosomal proteins in the order L14, L24, L5, S14, S8, L6, L18, S5, L30, and L15. This operon is feedback regulated by S8, which binds near the translation start site of L5 and inhibits translation of L5 directly and that of the distal genes indirectly. We constructed plasmids carrying a major portion of the spc operon genes under lac transcriptional control. The plasmids carried a point mutation in the S8 target site which abolished regulation and resulted in overproduction of plasmid-encoded ribosomal proteins upon induction. We showed that alteration of the AUG start codon of L5 to UAG decreased the synthesis rates of plasmid-encoded distal proteins, as well as L5, by approximately 20-fold, with a much smaller (if any) effect on mRNA synthesis rates, indicating coupling of the distal cistrons' translation with the translation of L5. This conclusion was also supported by experiments in which S8 was overproduced in trans. In this case, there was a threefold reduction in the synthesis rates of chromosome-encoded L5 and the distal spc operon proteins, but no decrease in the mRNA synthesis rate. These observations also suggest that transcription from ribosomal protein promoters may be special, perhaps able to overcome transcription termination signals. We also analyzed the state of ribosomal protein mRNA after overproduction of S8 in these experiments and found that repression of ribosomal protein synthesis was accompanied by stimulation of processing (and degradation) of spc operon mRNA. The possible role of mRNA degradation in tightening the regulation is discussed. Images PMID:3049533

  15. Stability of regional configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1998-08-13

    At moderate force levels the first strike stability index is proportional to the first strike cost, so as the attacker minimizes attack costs, he automatically minimizes stability. Weapons grow rapidly and saturate to levels comparable to the number of value targets held at risk. This growth could appear destabilizing to dominant regional powers, whose response could in turn appear threatening to the major nuclear powers, which could slow or halt efforts towards deep reductions. The fundamental way to alter these pressures appears to be through reducing the likelihood of regional crises by removing these fundamental antagonisms.

  16. Single mRNA Tracking in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Yoon; Buxbaum, Adina R.; Singer, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetric distribution of mRNA is a prevalent phenomenon observed in diverse cell types. The posttranscriptional movement and localization of mRNA provides an important mechanism to target certain proteins to specific cytoplasmic regions of their function. Recent technical advances have enabled real-time visualization of single mRNA molecules in living cells. Studies analyzing the motion of individual mRNAs have shed light on the complex RNA transport system. This chapter presents an overview of general approaches for single particle tracking and some methodologies that are used for single mRNA detection. PMID:20580973

  17. mRNA Localization and Translational Control in Drosophila Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lasko, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Localization of an mRNA species to a particular subcellular region can complement translational control mechanisms to produce a restricted spatial distribution of the protein it encodes. mRNA localization has been studied most in asymmetric cells such as budding yeast, early embryos, and neurons, but the process is likely to be more widespread. This article reviews the current state of knowledge about the mechanisms of mRNA localization and its functions in early embryonic development, focusing on Drosophila where the relevant knowledge is most advanced. Links between mRNA localization and translational control mechanisms also are examined. PMID:22865893

  18. Light-regulated protein and poly(A)+ mRNA synthesis in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, J A; Hinkelammert, K; Russo, V E

    1985-01-01

    We have examined the effect of illumination upon the patterns of protein synthesis in the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora crassa by pulse labelling and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Light did not affect overall rates of protein synthesis but did induce the synthesis of six novel polypeptides whose appearance followed a temporally regulated pattern. When translation products of mRNA from illuminated cultures and dark control cultures were compared it was found that the synthesis of five out of six of the polypeptides specific to illuminated cultures could be seen in vitro. We believe that this is consistent with the hypothesis that light regulates the transcription of some genes in N. crassa, although we cannot exclude effects on mRNA stability or the control of precursor splicing. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2868891

  19. hnRNP-Q1 represses nascent axon growth in cortical neurons by inhibiting Gap-43 mRNA translation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kathryn R.; McAninch, Damian S.; Stefanovic, Snezana; Xing, Lei; Allen, Megan; Li, Wenqi; Feng, Yue; Mihailescu, Mihaela Rita; Bassell, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by mRNA-binding proteins is critical for neuronal development and function. hnRNP-Q1 is an mRNA-binding protein that regulates mRNA processing events, including translational repression. hnRNP-Q1 is highly expressed in brain tissue, suggesting a function in regulating genes critical for neuronal development. In this study, we have identified Growth-associated protein 43 (Gap-43) mRNA as a novel target of hnRNP-Q1 and have demonstrated that hnRNP-Q1 represses Gap-43 mRNA translation and consequently GAP-43 function. GAP-43 is a neuronal protein that regulates actin dynamics in growth cones and facilitates axonal growth. Previous studies have identified factors that regulate Gap-43 mRNA stability and localization, but it remains unclear whether Gap-43 mRNA translation is also regulated. Our results reveal that hnRNP-Q1 knockdown increased nascent axon length, total neurite length, and neurite number in mouse embryonic cortical neurons and enhanced Neuro2a cell process extension; these phenotypes were rescued by GAP-43 knockdown. Additionally, we have identified a G-quadruplex structure in the 5′ untranslated region of Gap-43 mRNA that directly interacts with hnRNP-Q1 as a means to inhibit Gap-43 mRNA translation. Therefore hnRNP-Q1–mediated repression of Gap-43 mRNA translation provides an additional mechanism for regulating GAP-43 expression and function and may be critical for neuronal development. PMID:26658614

  20. Regional induction of c-fos and heat shock protein-72 mRNA following fluid-percussion brain injury in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Raghupathi, R.; Welsh, F.A.; Gennarelli, T.A.

    1995-05-01

    To evaluate the cellular response to traumatic brain injury, the expression of mRNA for c-fos and the 72-kDa heat shock protein (hsp72) was determined using in situ hybridization following lateral fluid-percussion injury (2.2-2.4 atm) in rat brain. At 2 h after injury, induction of c-fos mRNA was restricted to regions of the cortex surrounding the contusion area. An increase in c-fos mRNA, but not hsp72 mRNA, was observed bilaterally in the CA{sub 3} subfield of the hippocampus and the granule cells of the dentate gyrus and in the thalamus ipsilateral to the impact site. By 6 h, increased expression of c-fos mRNA was observed only in the corpus callosum on the impact side; hsp72 mRNA persisted in the deep cortical layers and upper layers of the subcortical white matter below the site of maximal injury. By 24 h, both c-fos and hsp72 mRNA had returned to control levels in all regions of the brain. These results demonstrate that lateral fluid-percussion brain injury triggers regionally and temporally specific expression of c-fos and hsp72 mRNA, which may be suggestive of differential neurochemical alterations in neurons and glia following experimental brain injury. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Differential regulation of amyloid-. beta. -protein mRNA expression within hippocampal neuronal subpopulations in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, G.A.; Lewis, D.A.; Bahmanyar, S.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Young, W.G.; Morrison, J.H.; Wilson, M.C.

    1988-02-01

    The authors have mapped the neuroanatomical distribution of amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA within neuronal subpopulations of the hippocampal formation in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), normal aged human, and patients with Alzheimer disease. Amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA appears to be expressed in all hippocampal neurons, but at different levels of abundance. In the central nervous system of monkey and normal aged human, image analysis shows that neurons of the dentate gyrus and cornu Ammonis fields contain a 2.5-times-greater hybridization signal than is present in neurons of the subiculum and entorhinal cortex. In contrast, in the Alzheimer disease hippocampal formation, the levels of amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA in the cornu Ammonis field 3 and parasubiculum are equivalent. These findings suggest that within certain neuronal subpopulations cell type-specific regulation of amyloid-..beta..-protein gene expression may be altered in Alzheimer disease.

  2. Mediator and TREX-2: Emerging links between transcription initiation and mRNA export

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Tobias; Köhler, Alwin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nuclear pore proteins interact dynamically with chromatin to regulate gene activities. A key question is how nucleoporin interactions mechanistically alter a gene's intranuclear position and transcriptional output. We reported recently on a direct interaction between the nuclear pore-associated TREX-2 complex and promoter-bound Mediator. This highlights how nuclear-pore associated adaptors gain regulatory access to the core transcription machinery. In this Extra View, we discuss an additional implication that arises from our work and the recent literature: how promoter elements may regulate mRNA metabolism beyond transcription initiation. PMID:27028218

  3. Regulation of bovine pyruvate carboxylase mRNA and promoter expression by thermal stress.

    PubMed

    White, H M; Koser, S L; Donkin, S S

    2012-09-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in gluconeogenesis from lactate and is a determinant of tricarboxylic acid cycle carbon flux. Bovine PC 5' untranslated region (UTR) mRNA variants are the products of a single PC gene containing 3 promoter regions (P3, P2, and P1, 5' to 3') that are responsive to physiological and nutritional stressors. The objective of this study was to determine the direct effects of thermal stress on PC mRNA and gene expression in bovine hepatocyte monolayer cultures, rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells, and Madin-Darby bovine kidney epithelial (MDBK) cells. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3 Holstein bull calves and used to prepare monolayer cultures. Rat hepatoma cells and MDBK cells were obtained from American Type Culture Collection, Manassas, VA. Beginning 24 h after initial seeding, cells were subjected to either 37°C (control) or 42°C (thermal stress) for 24 h. Treatments were applied in triplicate in a minimum of 3 independent cell preparations. For bovine primary hepatocytes, endogenous expression of bovine PC mRNA increased (P < 0.1) with 24 h of thermal stress (1.31 vs. 2.79 ± 0.49, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively), but there was no change (P ≥ 0.1) in cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) mRNA expression. Similarly, exposure of MDBK cells to thermal stress increased (P < 0.1) expression of bovine PC mRNA without altering (P ≥ 0.1) PEPCK-C mRNA expression. Conversely, there was no effect (P ≥ 0.1) of thermal stress on endogenous rat PC (0.47 vs. 0.30 ± 0.08, control vs. thermal stress) or PEPCK-C (1.61 vs. 1.20 ± 0.48, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively) mRNA expressions in H4IIE cells. To further investigate the regulation of PC, H4IIE cells were transiently transfected with bovine promoter-luciferase constructs containing either P1, P2, or P3, and exposed to thermal stress for 23 h. Activity of P1 was suppressed (P < 0.1) 5-fold, activity of P2

  4. Age-related changes in mRNA levels of hepatic transporters, cytochrome P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase in female rats.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Atsushi; Ito, Ayami; Yamada, Ayano; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    Hepatic transporters and metabolic enzymes affect drug pharmacokinetics. Limited information exists on the alteration in mRNA levels of hepatic transporters and metabolic enzymes with aging. We examined the effects of aging on the mRNA levels of representative hepatic drug transporters and metabolic enzymes by analyzing their levels in 10-, 30- and 50-week-old male and female rats. Levels of mRNA of drug transporters including multidrug resistance protein (Mdr)1a, multidrug resistance-associated protein (Mrp)2, breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) and organic anion-transporting polypeptide (Oatp)1a1, and the metabolic enzymes cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A1, CYP3A2 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A1 were analyzed using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The mRNA levels of transporters in male rats did not decrease with age, while the mRNA levels of Bcrp and Oatp1a1 in female rats decreased with age. The mRNA levels of CYP3A1 and CYP3A2 in male rats were higher than those in female rats. The mRNA levels of metabolic enzymes decreased with age in female but not male rats. In particular, the mRNA levels of UGT1A1 in 10-week-old female rats were higher than those in male rats. mRNA expression of hepatic transporters and metabolic enzymes are more susceptible to aging in female than male rats. The age-related decreases in the mRNA levels of Bcrp, Oatp1a1, CYP3A1 and CYP3A2 in female rats may affect the metabolism and transport of substrates. This study showed that aging affected the mRNA expression of hepatic transporters and metabolic enzymes in rats. PMID:24899460

  5. Finding the right RNA: identification of cellular mRNA substrates for RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Trifillis, P; Day, N; Kiledjian, M

    1999-01-01

    Defects in RNA-binding proteins have been implicated in human genetic disorders. However, efforts in understanding the functions of these proteins have been hampered by the inability to obtain their mRNA substrates. To identify cognate cellular mRNAs associated with an RNA-binding protein, we devised a strategy termed isolation of specific nucleic acids associated with proteins (SNAAP). The SNAAP technique allows isolation and subsequent identification of these mRNAs. To assess the validity of this approach, we utilized cellular mRNA and protein from K562 cells and alphaCP1, a protein implicated in a-globin mRNA stability, as a model system. Immobilization of an RNA-binding protein with the glutathione-S-transferase (GST) domain enables isolation of mRNA within an mRNP context and the identity of the bound mRNAs is determined by the differential display assay. The specificity of protein-RNA interactions was considerably enhanced when the interactions were carried out in the presence of cellular extract rather than purified components. Two of the mRNAs specifically bound by alphaCP1 were mRNAs encoding the transmembrane receptor protein, TAPA-1, and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II enzyme, coxII. A specific poly(C)-sensitive complex formed on the TAPA-1 and coxII 3' UTRs consistent with the binding of aCP1. Furthermore, direct binding of purified alphaCP proteins to these 3' UTRs was demonstrated and the binding sites determined. These results support the feasibility of the SNAAP technique and suggest a broad applicability for the approach in identifying mRNA targets for clinically relevant RNA-binding proteins that will provide insights into their possible functions. PMID:10445881

  6. Effect of propionate on mRNA expression of key genes for gluconeogenesis in liver of dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Koser, Stephanie L; Bequette, Brian J; Donkin, Shawn S

    2015-12-01

    Elevated needs for glucose in lactating dairy cows are met through a combination of increased capacity for gluconeogenesis and increased supply of gluconeogenic precursors, primarily propionate. This study evaluated the effects of propionate on mRNA expression of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1), mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK2), pyruvate carboxylase (PC), and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC), key gluconeogenic enzymes, and capacity for glucose synthesis in liver of dairy cattle. In experiment 1, six multiparous mid-lactation Holstein cows were used in a replicated 3×3 Latin square design consisting of a 6-d acclimation or washout phase followed by 8h of postruminal infusion of either propionate (1.68mol), glucose (0.84mol), or an equal volume (10mL/min) of water. In experiment 2, twelve male Holstein calves [39±4 kg initial body weight (BW)] were blocked by birth date and assigned to receive, at 7d of age, either propionate [2mmol·h(-1)·(BW(0.75))(-1)], acetate [3.5mmol·h(-1)·(BW(.75))(-1)], or an equal volume (4mL/min) of saline. In both experiments, blood samples were collected at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8h relative to the start of infusion and liver biopsy samples were collected at the end of the infusion for mRNA analysis. Liver explants from experiment 1 were used to measure tricarboxylic acid cycle flux and gluconeogenesis using (13)C mass isotopomer distribution analysis from (13)C3 propionate. Dry matter intake and milk yield were not altered by infusions in cows. Serum insulin concentration in cows receiving propionate was elevated than cows receiving water, but was not different from cows receiving glucose. Hepatic expression of PCK1 and G6PC mRNA and glucose production in cows receiving propionate were not different from cows receiving water, but tended to be higher compared with cows receiving glucose. Hepatic expression of PCK2 and PC mRNA was not altered by propionate infusion in cows. Blood glucose, insulin, and

  7. N-glycosylation Profiling of Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines Reveals Association of Fucosylation with Differentiation and Caudal Type Homebox 1 (CDX1)/Villin mRNA Expression.

    PubMed

    Holst, Stephanie; Deuss, Anna J M; van Pelt, Gabi W; van Vliet, Sandra J; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; Koeleman, Carolien A M; Deelder, André M; Mesker, Wilma E; Tollenaar, Rob A; Rombouts, Yoann; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Various cancers such as colorectal cancer (CRC) are associated with alterations in protein glycosylation. CRC cell lines are frequently used to study these (glyco)biological changes and their mechanisms. However, differences between CRC cell lines with regard to their glycosylation have hitherto been largely neglected. Here, we comprehensively characterized the N-glycan profiles of 25 different CRC cell lines, derived from primary tumors and metastatic sites, in order to investigate their potential as glycobiological tumor model systems and to reveal glycans associated with cell line phenotypes. We applied an optimized, high-throughput membrane-based enzymatic glycan release for small sample amounts. Released glycans were derivatized to stabilize and differentiate between α2,3- and α2,6-linked N-acetylneuraminic acids, followed by N-glycosylation analysis by MALDI-TOF(/TOF)-MS. Our results showed pronounced differences between the N-glycosylation patterns of CRC cell lines. CRC cell line profiles differed from tissue-derived N-glycan profiles with regard to their high-mannose N-glycan content but showed a large overlap for complex type N-glycans, supporting their use as a glycobiological cancer model system. Importantly, we could show that the high-mannose N-glycans did not only occur as intracellular precursors but were also present at the cell surface. The obtained CRC cell line N-glycan features were not clearly correlated with mRNA expression levels of glycosyltransferases, demonstrating the usefulness of performing the structural analysis of glycans. Finally, correlation of CRC cell line glycosylation features with cancer cell markers and phenotypes revealed an association between highly fucosylated glycans and CDX1 and/or villin mRNA expression that both correlate with cell differentiation. Together, our findings provide new insights into CRC-associated glycan changes and setting the basis for more in-depth experiments on glycan function and regulation

  8. Second-Generation HSP90 Inhibitor Onalespib Blocks mRNA Splicing of Androgen Receptor Variant 7 in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Welti, Jonathan; Powers, Marissa V; Yuan, Wei; Smyth, Tomoko; Seed, George; Riisnaes, Ruth; Hedayat, Somaieh; Wang, Hannah; Crespo, Mateus; Nava Rodrigues, Daniel; Figueiredo, Ines; Miranda, Susana; Carreira, Suzanne; Lyons, John F; Sharp, Swee; Plymate, Stephen R; Attard, Gerhardt; Wallis, Nicola; Workman, Paul; de Bono, Johann S

    2016-05-01

    Resistance to available hormone therapies in prostate cancer has been associated with alternative splicing of androgen receptor (AR) and specifically, the expression of truncated and constitutively active AR variant 7 (AR-V7). The transcriptional activity of steroid receptors, including AR, is dependent on interactions with the HSP90 chaperone machinery, but it is unclear whether HSP90 modulates the activity or expression of AR variants. Here, we investigated the effects of HSP90 inhibition on AR-V7 in prostate cancer cell lines endogenously expressing this variant. We demonstrate that AR-V7 and full-length AR (AR-FL) were depleted upon inhibition of HSP90. However, the mechanisms underlying AR-V7 depletion differed from those for AR-FL. Whereas HSP90 inhibition destabilized AR-FL and induced its proteasomal degradation, AR-V7 protein exhibited higher stability than AR-FL and did not require HSP90 chaperone activity. Instead, HSP90 inhibition resulted in the reduction of AR-V7 mRNA levels but did not affect total AR transcript levels, indicating that HSP90 inhibition disrupted AR-V7 splicing. Bioinformatic analyses of transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing data confirmed that the second-generation HSP90 inhibitor onalespib altered the splicing of at least 557 genes in prostate cancer cells, including AR. These findings indicate that the effects of HSP90 inhibition on mRNA splicing may prove beneficial in prostate cancers expressing AR-V7, supporting further clinical investigation of HSP90 inhibitors in malignancies no longer responsive to androgen deprivation. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2731-42. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197266

  9. N-glycosylation Profiling of Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines Reveals Association of Fucosylation with Differentiation and Caudal Type Homebox 1 (CDX1)/Villin mRNA Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Holst, Stephanie; Deuss, Anna J. M.; van Pelt, Gabi W.; van Vliet, Sandra J.; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Koeleman, Carolien A. M.; Deelder, André M.; Mesker, Wilma E.; Tollenaar, Rob A.; Rombouts, Yoann; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Various cancers such as colorectal cancer (CRC) are associated with alterations in protein glycosylation. CRC cell lines are frequently used to study these (glyco)biological changes and their mechanisms. However, differences between CRC cell lines with regard to their glycosylation have hitherto been largely neglected. Here, we comprehensively characterized the N-glycan profiles of 25 different CRC cell lines, derived from primary tumors and metastatic sites, in order to investigate their potential as glycobiological tumor model systems and to reveal glycans associated with cell line phenotypes. We applied an optimized, high-throughput membrane-based enzymatic glycan release for small sample amounts. Released glycans were derivatized to stabilize and differentiate between α2,3- and α2,6-linked N-acetylneuraminic acids, followed by N-glycosylation analysis by MALDI-TOF(/TOF)-MS. Our results showed pronounced differences between the N-glycosylation patterns of CRC cell lines. CRC cell line profiles differed from tissue-derived N-glycan profiles with regard to their high-mannose N-glycan content but showed a large overlap for complex type N-glycans, supporting their use as a glycobiological cancer model system. Importantly, we could show that the high-mannose N-glycans did not only occur as intracellular precursors but were also present at the cell surface. The obtained CRC cell line N-glycan features were not clearly correlated with mRNA expression levels of glycosyltransferases, demonstrating the usefulness of performing the structural analysis of glycans. Finally, correlation of CRC cell line glycosylation features with cancer cell markers and phenotypes revealed an association between highly fucosylated glycans and CDX1 and/or villin mRNA expression that both correlate with cell differentiation. Together, our findings provide new insights into CRC-associated glycan changes and setting the basis for more in-depth experiments on glycan function and regulation

  10. [Altered states of consciousness].

    PubMed

    Gora, E P

    2005-01-01

    The review of modern ideas concerning the altered states of consciousness is presented in this article. Various methods of entry into the altered states of consciousness are looked over. It is shown that the altered states of consciousness are insufficiently known, but important aspects of human being existence. The role of investigation of the altered states of consciousness for the creation of integrative scientific conception base is discussed. PMID:15810684

  11. Seasonal changes in hepatic progesterone receptor mRNA, estrogen receptor mRNA, and vitellogenin mRNA in the painted turtle, Chrysemys picta.

    PubMed

    Custodia-Lora, Noemí; Callard, Ian P

    2002-10-01

    Previous studies using the fresh water turtle Chrysemys picta have demonstrated that progesterone (P) inhibits estradiol (E)-induced vitellogenin (vtg) secretion in this species. Further, there is evidence for the differential expression of the two P receptor isoforms (PRA and PRB) in the liver during the turtle seasonal cycle, correlating with hepatic vitellogenesis. In this study we report changes in the hepatic PR mPNA, ER mRNA, and vitellogenin (vtg) mRNA transcripts during the reproductive cycle of the turtle. Fragments of the turtle hepatic PR and ER cDNAs were cloned and sequenced and a previously cloned turtle vtg cDNA were used as probes in Northern blotting. No 3.7-kb PR mRNA, corresponding to the smaller PR transcript, PRA of other species was found, although, a smaller 1.8-kb transcript (putative PRC mRNA) was present. These observations suggest that the turtle as in the chicken and human, the 4.5-kb PR mRNA transcript encodes both PRA and PRB proteins. Only the larger PR mRNA transcript (4.5-kb), was found to vary significantly during the annual cycle, being highest when vitellogenesis was inhibited in winter and summer. Vtg mRNA could not be detected during the summer or winter, was highest during vitellogenesis in the spring, and reappeared during the fall period of vitellogenesis and ovarian recrudescence. ER mRNA followed a similar pattern, being highest during spring and early fall, when vtg synthesis is high. The data suggest that P/PR, as well as E/ER, may be involved in the seasonal regulation of hepatic vitellogenesis in this species. PMID:12392693

  12. Herpes simplex virus infection selectively stimulates accumulation of beta interferon reporter gene mRNA by a posttranscriptional mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, J D; Pitha, P M; Hayward, G S

    1992-01-01

    To study the mechanism of a novel herpes simplex virus (HSV) activity that stimulates expression of reporter genes containing beta interferon (IFN-beta)-coding sequences, we have established permanent DNA-transfected cell lines that each contain two distinct hybrid genes encoding mRNA species with different half-lives. These reporter genes comprised either the human IFN-beta- or bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT)-coding and 3' untranslated regions placed under the transcriptional control of the powerful major immediate-early promoter-enhancer region (IE94) from simian cytomegalovirus. Most of the dual-transfected cell lines yielded significant levels of steady-state IE94-CAT mRNA and abundant constitutive synthesis of CAT enzyme activity, whereas no accumulation of IE94-IFN mRNA could be detected. However, infection with HSV type 1 resulted in a 300-fold increase in IE94-IFN-specific mRNA transcripts, compared with no more than 3- to 5-fold stimulation of IE94-CAT-specific mRNA. In contrast, cycloheximide treatment increased stable mRNA levels and transcription initiation rates from both the IE94-IFN and IE94-CAT hybrid genes. Run-on transcription assays in isolated nuclei suggested that induction of IE94-IFN gene expression by HSV type 1 occurred predominantly at the posttranscriptional level. Enhancement of the unstable IFN mRNA species after HSV infection was also observed in cell lines containing a simian virus 40 enhancer-driven IFN gene (SV2-IFN). Similarly, in transient-transfection assays, both SV2-IFN and IE94-IFN gave only low basal mRNA synthesis, but superinfection with HSV again led to high-level accumulation of IFN mRNA. Finally, substitution of the SV2-IFN gene 3' region with poly(A) and splicing signals from the SV2-CAT gene cassette led to stabilization of the IFN mRNA even in the absence of HSV. Therefore, we conclude that HSV infection leads to selective accumulation of IFN-beta mRNA by a posttranscriptional mechanism that is

  13. Here, there, everywhere. mRNA localization in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Singer-Krüger, Birgit; Jansen, Ralf-Peter

    2014-01-01

    mRNA localization and localized translation is a common mechanism that contributes to cell polarity and cellular asymmetry. In metazoan, mRNA transport participates in embryonic axis determination and neuronal plasticity. Since the mRNA localization process and its molecular machinery are rather complex in higher eukaryotes, the unicellular yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has become an attractive model to study mRNA localization. Although the focus has so far been on the mechanism of ASH1 mRNA transport, it has become evident that mRNA localization also assists in protein sorting to organelles, as well as in polarity establishment and maintenance. A diversity of different pathways has been identified that targets mRNA to their destination site, ranging from motor protein-dependent trafficking of translationally silenced mRNAs to co-translational targeting, in which mRNAs hitch-hike to organelles on ribosomes during nascent polypeptide chain elongation. The presence of these diverse pathways in yeast allows a systemic analysis of the contribution of mRNA localization to the physiology of a cell. PMID:25482891

  14. Sodium Channel Inhibitors Reduce DMPK mRNA and Protein.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, Luke; O'Reilly, Sean; Hadwen, Jeremiah; Tasnim, Nafisa; MacKenzie, Alex; Farooq, Faraz

    2015-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an expanded trinucleotide (CTG)n tract in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene. This results in the aggregation of an expanded mRNA forming toxic intranuclear foci which sequester splicing factors. We believe down-regulation of DMPK mRNA represents a potential, and as yet unexplored, DM1 therapeutic avenue. Consequently, a computational screen for agents which down-regulate DMPK mRNA was undertaken, unexpectedly identifying the sodium channel blockers mexiletine, prilocaine, procainamide, and sparteine as effective suppressors of DMPK mRNA. Analysis of DMPK mRNA in C2C12 myoblasts following treatment with these agents revealed a reduction in the mRNA levels. In vivo analysis of CD1 mice also showed DMPK mRNA and protein down-regulation. The role of DMPK mRNA suppression in the documented efficacy of this class of compounds in DM1 is worthy of further investigation. PMID:26011798

  15. Probing dimensionality beyond the linear sequence of mRNA.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Cristian; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-05-01

    mRNA is a nexus entity between DNA and translating ribosomes. Recent developments in deep sequencing technologies coupled with structural probing have revealed new insights beyond the classic role of mRNA and place it more centrally as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation, cellular localization, and mRNA degradation. Here, we highlight emerging approaches to probe mRNA secondary structure on a global transcriptome-wide level and compare their potential and resolution. Combined approaches deliver a richer and more complex picture. While our understanding on the effect of secondary structure for various cellular processes is quite advanced, the next challenge is to unravel more complex mRNA architectures and tertiary interactions. PMID:26650615

  16. Integrated microRNA and mRNA Signature Associated with the Transition from the Locally Confined to the Metastasized Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Exemplified by miR-146-5p

    PubMed Central

    Wotschofsky, Zofia; Gummlich, Linda; Liep, Julia; Stephan, Carsten; Kilic, Ergin; Jung, Klaus; Billaud, Jean-Noel; Meyer, Hellmuth-Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by interfering translation or stability of target transcripts. This interplay between miRNA and their mRNA has been proposed as an important process in cancer development and progression. We have investigated molecular networks impacted by predicted mRNA targets of differentially expressed miRNAs in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) diagnosed with or without metastasis. Material and Methods miRNA and mRNA microarray expression profiles derived from primary ccRCC from patients with (16 samples) or without diagnosed metastasis (22 samples) were used to identify anti-correlated miRNA-mRNA interaction in ccRCC. For this purpose, Ingenuity pathway analysis microRNA Target Filter, which enables prioritization of experimentally validated and predicted mRNA targets was used. By applying an expression pairing tool, the analysis was focused on targets exhibiting altered expression in our analysis, finding miRNAs and their target genes with opposite or same expression. The resulting identified interactions were revalidated by RT-qPCR in another cohort of ccRCC patients. A selection of the predicted miRNA-mRNA interactions was tested by functional analyses using miRNA knockdown and overexpression experiments in renal cancer cell lines. Results Among the significantly differentially expressed miRNAs, we have identified three miRNAs (miR-146a-5p, miR-128a-3p, and miR-17-5p) that were upregulated in primary tumors from patients without metastasis and downregulated in primary tumors from patients with metastasis. We have further identified mRNA targets, which expression were inversely correlated to these 3 miRNAs, and have been previously experimentally demonstrated in cancer setting in humans. Specifically, we showed that CXCL8/IL8, UHRF1, MCM10, and CDKN3 were downregulated and targeted by miR-146a-5p. The interaction between miR-146a-5p and their targets CXCL8 and UHRF1 was validated in cell culture

  17. Successful personalized chemotherapy for metastatic gastric cancer based on quantitative BRCA1 mRNA expression level: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YING; WU, PUYUAN; LIU, BAORUI; DU, JUAN

    2016-01-01

    Personalized chemotherapy is based on the specific genetic profile of individual patients and is replacing the traditional ‘one size fits all’ medicine. Breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) plays a central role in the chemotherapy-induced DNA damage response. It has been repeatedly demonstrated that BRCA1 mRNA levels were negatively associated with cisplatin sensitivity, but positively associated with docetaxel sensitivity in patients with gastric cancer in experimental and clinical studies. This feature leads to customized chemotherapy based on the BRCA1 mRNA expression level and results in a high efficacy of treatment. The present study describes the case of a 77-year-old patient with metastatic gastric cancer who was treated with personalized chemotherapy based on quantitative BRCA1 mRNA expression level. This study and the available literature data suggest that the expression level of BRCA1 mRNA is dynamic to BRCA1-based chemotherapy. More importantly, de novo assessment of BRCA1 status is a preferable option for ciscisplatin- or docetaxel-resistant patients, since the expression levels of BRCA1 mRNA in certain patients may alter significantly following treatment. Therefore, BRCA1 expression should be assessed for predicting differential chemosensitivity and tailoring chemotherapy in gastric cancer. PMID:27313763

  18. Effect of atrophy and contractions on myogenin mRNA concentration in chick and rat myoblast omega muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, J. M.; Denney, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    The skeletal rat myoblast omega (RMo) cell line forms myotubes that exhibit spontaneous contractions under appropriate conditions in culture. We examined if the RMo cells would provide a model for studying atrophy and muscle contraction. To better understand how to obtain contractile cultures, we examined levels of contraction under different growing conditions. The proliferation medium and density of plating affected the subsequent proportion of spontaneously contracting myotubes. Using a ribonuclease protection assay, we found that exponentially growing RMo myoblasts contained no detectable myogenin or herculin mRNA, while differentiating myoblasts contained high levels of myogenin mRNA but no herculin mRNA. There was no increase in myogenin mRNA concentration in either primary chick or RMo myotubes whose contractions were inhibited by depolarizing concentrations of potassium (K+). Thus, altered myogenin mRNA concentrations are not involved in atrophy of chick myotubes. Depolarizing concentrations of potassium inhibited spontaneous contractions in both RMo cultures and primary chick myotube cultures. However, we found that the myosin concentration of 6-d-old contracting RMo cells fed medium plus AraC was 11 +/- 3 micrograms myosin/microgram DNA, not significantly different from 12 +/- 4 micrograms myosin/microgram DNA (n = 3), the myosin concentration of noncontracting RMo cells (treated with 12 mM K+ for 6 d). Resolving how RMo cells maintained their myosin content when contraction is inhibited may be important for understanding atrophy.

  19. Changes in mRNA and protein content of SO sub 2 -fumigated maple leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Stinemetz, C.L. ); Roberts, B.R.; Schnipke, V.M. )

    1989-04-01

    The effect of acute SO{sub 2} fumigation on foliar DNA, RNA, and protein levels in 2-yr-old containerized Acer seedlings was examined. While DNA content did not change appreciably in either SO{sub 2}-sensitive red maple (A. rubrum L.) or SO{sub 2}-tolerant silver maple (A. saccharinum L.), significant reductions in mRNA (35% for red maple; 21% for silver maple) were observed after 54 h fumigation (6 h/day {times} 3 days/wk {times} 3 wk) at 2.5 ppm SO{sub 2}. Reductions in mRNA and protein content were accompanied by a corresponding decline in net photosynthesis (Pn). The data from this study suggest that acute SO{sub 2} fumigation alters Pn in red and silver maple by disrupting molecular events, and that species sensitivity for these particular Acer spp may be related to the degree of change associated with mRNA and total protein content.

  20. An intronic RNA structure modulates expression of the mRNA biogenesis factor Sus1

    PubMed Central

    AbuQattam, Ali; Gallego, José; Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Sus1 is a conserved protein involved in chromatin remodeling and mRNA biogenesis. Unlike most yeast genes, the SUS1 pre-mRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two introns and is alternatively spliced, retaining one or both introns in response to changes in environmental conditions. SUS1 splicing may allow the cell to control Sus1 expression, but the mechanisms that regulate this process remain unknown. Using in silico analyses together with NMR spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and UV thermal denaturation experiments, we show that the downstream intron (I2) of SUS1 forms a weakly stable, 37-nucleotide stem–loop structure containing the branch site near its apical loop and the 3′ splice site after the stem terminus. A cellular assay revealed that two of four mutants containing altered I2 structures had significantly impaired SUS1 expression. Semiquantitative RT-PCR experiments indicated that all mutants accumulated unspliced SUS1 pre-mRNA and/or induced distorted levels of fully spliced mRNA relative to wild type. Concomitantly, Sus1 cellular functions in histone H2B deubiquitination and mRNA export were affected in I2 hairpin mutants that inhibited splicing. This work demonstrates that I2 structure is relevant for SUS1 expression, and that this effect is likely exerted through modulation of splicing. PMID:26546116

  1. Decreased parvalbumin mRNA expression in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lanoue, Amélie C.; Blatt, Gene J.; Soghomonian, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been shown that expression of the rate-limiting GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is decreased in Brodmann area 9 (BA9) of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) compared to control brains (Lanoue, A.C., Dumitriu, A., Myers, R.H., Soghomonian, JJ., 2010. Exp Neurol. 206(1), 207–217). A subpopulation of cortical GABAergic interneurons expresses the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin and plays a critical role in the control of pyramidal neuron excitability and the generation of cortical gamma frequency oscillations. In view of its key role in the physiology of the cerebral cortex, we sought to determine whether the expression of parvalbumin and the number of parvalbumin-expressing neurons are altered in BA9 of PD brains. First, isotopic in situ hybridization histochemistry was used to examine mRNA expression of parvalbumin on post-mortem brain sections. Second, immunohistochemistry and design-based stereology were used to determine the density of parvalbumin-positive interneurons in BA9. Quantification of mRNA labeling at the single cell level showed a significant decrease in parvalbumin expression in PD cases. In contrast, neuronal density of parvalbumin-positive neurons was not significantly different between PD and controls. Results confirm that the GABAergic system is altered in the DLPFC in PD and identify the contribution of parvalbumin-expressing neurons in these alterations. We speculate that these effects could contribute to altered cortical excitability and oscillatory activity previously documented in PD. PMID:23891794

  2. DNA Micelle Flares for Intracellular mRNA Imaging and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Sam Wu, Cuichen; Jimenez, Elizabeth; Zhu, Zhi; Dajac, Joshua G.; You, Mingxu; Han, Da

    2013-01-01

    Multifunctional DNA micelles: Molecular beacon micelle flares (MBMFs), based on diacyllipid-molecular beacon conjugate (L-MB) self-assembly, have been developed for combined mRNA detection and gene therapy. The advantages of these micelle flares include easy probe synthesis, efficient cellular uptake, enhanced enzymatic stability, high signal-to-background ratio, excellent target selectivity, and superior biocompatibility. In addition, these probes possess a hydrophobic cavity that can be used for additional hydrophobic agents, holding great promise for constructing an all-in-one nucleic acid probe. PMID:23319350

  3. Slope stability and stabilization methods

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, L.W.; Lee, T.S.; Boyce, G.M.; Sharma, S.S.

    1995-12-01

    Slope stability can be a major problem during the construction of surface facilities. Cutting into existing ground disturbs the mechanics of the surrounding area, which can result in landslides and rock falls. This practical reference gives you the comprehensive information you need for slope stability analysis, suitable methods of analysis with and without the use of computers, and examples of common stability problems and stabilization methods for cuts and fills. It includes detailed discussions of methods used in slope stability analysis, including the Ordinary Method of Slices, Simplified Janbu Method, Simplified Bishop Method, Spencer`s Method, other limit equilibrium methods, numerical methods, total stress analysis, effective stress analysis, and the use of computer programs to solve problems. Chapters include: General Slope Stability Concepts; Engineering Geology Principles; Groundwater Conditions; Geologic Site Exploration; Laboratory Testing Interpretation; Slope Stability Concepts; Slope Stabilization Methods; and Design, Construction and Maintenance.

  4. Cis-acting elements are required for selenium regulation of glutathione peroxidase-1 mRNA levels.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, S L; Sunde, R A

    1998-01-01

    Classical glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) mRNA levels can decrease to less than 10% in selenium (Se)-deficient rat liver. The cis-acting nucleic acid sequence requirements for Se regulation of GPX1 mRNA levels were studied by transfecting Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with GPX1 DNA constructs in which specific regions of the GPX1 gene were mutated, deleted, or replaced by comparable regions from unregulated genes such as phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (GPX4). For each construct, stable transfectants were pooled two weeks after transfection, divided into Se-deficient (2 nM Se) or Se-adequate (200 nM Se) medium, and grown for an additional four days. On day of harvest, Se-deficient GPX1 and GPX4 activities averaged 13 +/- 2% and 15 +/- 2% of Se adequate levels, confirming that cellular Se status was dramatically altered by Se supplementation. RNA was isolated from replicate plates of cells and transfected mRNA levels were specifically determined by RNase protection assay. Analysis of chimeric GPX1/GPX4 constructs showed that the GPX4 3'-UTR can completely replace the GPX1 3'-UTR in Se regulation of GPX1 mRNA. We did not find any GPX1 coding regions that could be replaced by the corresponding GPX4 coding regions without diminishing or eliminating Se regulation of the transfected GPX1 mRNA. Further analysis of the GPX1 coding region demonstrated that the GPX1 Sec codon (UGA) and the GPX1 intron sequences are required for full Se regulation of transfected GPX1 mRNA levels. Mutations that moved the GPX1 Sec codon to three different positions within the GPX1 coding region suggest that the mechanism for Se regulation of GPX1 mRNA requires a Sec codon within exon 1. Lastly, we found that addition of the GPX1 3'-UTR to beta-globin mRNA can convey significant Se regulation to beta-globin mRNA levels when a UGA codon is placed within exon 1. We conclude that Se regulation of GPX1 mRNA requires a functional selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) in the 3

  5. Regulation of heme oxygenase-1 mRNA deadenylation and turnover in NIH3T3 cells by nitrosative or alkylation stress

    PubMed Central

    Leautaud, Veronica; Demple, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Background Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalizes heme degradation, and is considered one of the most sensitive indicators of cellular stress. Previous work in human fibroblasts has shown that HO-1 expression is induced by NO, and that transcriptional induction is only partially responsible; instead, the HO-1 mRNA half-life is substantially increased in response to NO. The mechanism of this stabilization remains unknown. Results In NIH3T3 murine fibroblasts, NO exposure increased the half-life of the HO-1 transcript from ~1.6 h to 11 h, while treatments with CdCl2, NaAsO2 or H2O2 increased the half-life only up to 5 h. Although poly(A) tail shortening can be rate-limiting in mRNA degradation, the HO-1 mRNA deadenylation rate in NO-treated cells was ~65% of that in untreated controls. In untreated cells, HO-1 poly(A) removal proceeded until 30–50 nt remained, followed by rapid mRNA decay. In NO-treated cells, HO-1 deadenylation stopped with the mRNA retaining poly(A) tails 30–50 nt long. We hypothesize that NO treatment stops poly(A) tail shortening at the critical 30- to 50-nt length. This is not a general mechanism for the post-transcriptional regulation of HO-1 mRNA. Methyl methane sulfonate also stabilized HO-1 mRNA, but that was associated with an 8-fold decrease in the deadenylation rate compared to that of untreated cells. Another HO-1 inducer, CdCl2, caused a strong increase in the mRNA level without affecting the HO-1 mRNA half-life. Conclusion The regulation of HO-1 mRNA levels in response to cellular stress can be induced by transcriptional and different post-transcriptional events that act independently, and vary depending on the stress inducer. While NO appears to stabilize HO-1 mRNA by preventing the final steps of deadenylation, methyl methane sulfonate achieves stabilization through the regulation of earlier stages of deadenylation. PMID:18096048

  6. Transcriptome-wide analysis of trypanosome mRNA decay reveals complex degradation kinetics and suggests a role for co-transcriptional degradation in determining mRNA levels

    PubMed Central

    Fadda, Abeer; Ryten, Mark; Droll, Dorothea; Rojas, Federico; Färber, Valentin; Haanstra, Jurgen R; Merce, Clemetine; Bakker, Barbara M; Matthews, Keith; Clayton, Christine

    2014-01-01

    African trypanosomes are an excellent system for quantitative modelling of post-transcriptional mRNA control. Transcription is constitutive and polycistronic; individual mRNAs are excised by trans splicing and polyadenylation. We here measure mRNA decay kinetics in two life cycle stages, bloodstream and procyclic forms, by transcription inhibition and RNASeq. Messenger RNAs with short half-lives tend to show initial fast degradation, followed by a slower phase; they are often stabilized by depletion of the 5′–3′ exoribonuclease XRNA. Many longer-lived mRNAs show initial slow degradation followed by rapid destruction: we suggest that the slow phase reflects gradual deadenylation. Developmentally regulated mRNAs often show regulated decay, and switch their decay pattern. Rates of mRNA decay are good predictors of steady state levels for short mRNAs, but mRNAs longer than 3 kb show unexpectedly low abundances. Modelling shows that variations in splicing and polyadenylation rates can contribute to steady-state mRNA levels, but this is completely dependent on competition between processing and co-transcriptional mRNA precursor destruction. PMID:25145465

  7. Hypoxia stimulates binding of a cytoplasmic protein to a pyrimidine-rich sequence in the 3'-untranslated region of rat tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Dominski, Z; Kole, R; Millhorn, D E

    1994-04-01

    Reduced oxygen tension (hypoxia) induces a 3-fold increase in stability of mRNA for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine synthesis, in the pheochromocytoma (PC12) clonal cell line. To investigate the possibility that RNA-protein interactions are involved in mediating this increase in stability, RNA gel shift assays were performed using different fragments of labeled TH mRNA and the S-100 fraction of PC12 cytoplasmic protein extracts. We identified a sequence within the 3'-untranslated region of TH mRNA that binds cytoplasmic protein. RNase T1 mapping revealed that the protein was bound to a 28 nucleotide long sequence that is located between bases 1551-1579 of TH mRNA. Moreover, protein binding to this fragment was prevented with an antisense oligonucleotide directed against bases 1551-1579 and subsequent RNase H digestion. This fragment of the 3'-untranslated region of TH mRNA is rich in pyrimidine nucleotides, and the binding of cytoplasmic protein to this fragment was reduced by competition with other polypyrimidine sequences including poly(C) but not poly(U) polymers. The binding of the protein to TH mRNA was increased when cytoplasmic proteins were extracted from PC12 cells exposed to hypoxia (5% O2) for 24 h. Electrophoresis of the UV cross-linked RNA-protein complex on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a complex of 74 kDa. The potential role of this protein-TH mRNA interaction in regulation of TH mRNA stability during hypoxia is discussed. PMID:7908289

  8. Effects of DNA replication on mRNA noise.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Joseph R; Cole, John A; Fei, Jingyi; Ha, Taekjip; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida A

    2015-12-29

    There are several sources of fluctuations in gene expression. Here we study the effects of time-dependent DNA replication, itself a tightly controlled process, on noise in mRNA levels. Stochastic simulations of constitutive and regulated gene expression are used to analyze the time-averaged mean and variation in each case. The simulations demonstrate that to capture mRNA distributions correctly, chromosome replication must be realistically modeled. Slow relaxation of mRNA from the low copy number steady state before gene replication to the high steady state after replication is set by the transcript's half-life and contributes significantly to the shape of the mRNA distribution. Consequently both the intrinsic kinetics and the gene location play an important role in accounting for the mRNA average and variance. Exact analytic expressions for moments of the mRNA distributions that depend on the DNA copy number, gene location, cell doubling time, and the rates of transcription and degradation are derived for the case of constitutive expression and subsequently extended to provide approximate corrections for regulated expression and RNA polymerase variability. Comparisons of the simulated models and analytical expressions to experimentally measured mRNA distributions show that they better capture the physics of the system than previous theories. PMID:26669443

  9. Effects of DNA replication on mRNA noise

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Joseph R.; Cole, John A.; Fei, Jingyi; Ha, Taekjip; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida A.

    2015-01-01

    There are several sources of fluctuations in gene expression. Here we study the effects of time-dependent DNA replication, itself a tightly controlled process, on noise in mRNA levels. Stochastic simulations of constitutive and regulated gene expression are used to analyze the time-averaged mean and variation in each case. The simulations demonstrate that to capture mRNA distributions correctly, chromosome replication must be realistically modeled. Slow relaxation of mRNA from the low copy number steady state before gene replication to the high steady state after replication is set by the transcript’s half-life and contributes significantly to the shape of the mRNA distribution. Consequently both the intrinsic kinetics and the gene location play an important role in accounting for the mRNA average and variance. Exact analytic expressions for moments of the mRNA distributions that depend on the DNA copy number, gene location, cell doubling time, and the rates of transcription and degradation are derived for the case of constitutive expression and subsequently extended to provide approximate corrections for regulated expression and RNA polymerase variability. Comparisons of the simulated models and analytical expressions to experimentally measured mRNA distributions show that they better capture the physics of the system than previous theories. PMID:26669443

  10. PARN deadenylase is involved in miRNA-dependent degradation of TP53 mRNA in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaokan; Devany, Emral; Murphy, Michael R.; Glazman, Galina; Persaud, Mirjana; Kleiman, Frida E.

    2015-01-01

    mRNA deadenylation is under the control of cis-acting regulatory elements, which include AU-rich elements (AREs) and microRNA (miRNA) targeting sites, within the 3′ untranslated region (3′ UTRs) of eukaryotic mRNAs. Deadenylases promote miRNA-induced mRNA decay through their interaction with miRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC). However, the role of poly(A) specific ribonuclease (PARN) deadenylase in miRNA-dependent mRNA degradation has not been elucidated. Here, we present evidence that not only ARE- but also miRNA-mediated pathways are involved in PARN-mediated regulation of the steady state levels of TP53 mRNA, which encodes the tumor suppressor p53. Supporting this, Argonaute-2 (Ago-2), the core component of miRISC, can coexist in complexes with PARN resulting in the activation of its deadenylase activity. PARN regulates TP53 mRNA stability through not only an ARE but also an adjacent miR-504/miR-125b-targeting site in the 3′ UTR. More importantly, we found that miR-125b-loaded miRISC contributes to the specific recruitment of PARN to TP53 mRNA, and that can be reverted by the ARE-binding protein HuR. Together, our studies provide new insights into the role of PARN in miRNA-dependent control of mRNA decay and into the mechanisms behind the regulation of p53 expression. PMID:26400160

  11. CNP2 mRNA directs synthesis of both CNP1 and CNP2 polypeptides.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, R C; Minuk, J; Cox, M E; Braun, P E; Gravel, M

    1997-10-15

    The ribosome scanning model for translational initiation predicts that eukaryotic mRNAs should, as a rule, be monocistronic. However, cases have recently been described of eukaryotic mRNAs producing more than one protein through alternative translational initiation at several different AUG codons. The present work reports the occurrence of two translational start sites on the mRNA encoding isoform 2 of the myelin marker enzyme 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) in rat and mouse. We show that the CNP2 mRNA is able to direct synthesis of not only CNP2, but also CNP1 polypeptide. Immunoprecipitation experiments using a polyclonal antibody directed against CNP detect both CNP isoforms in tissues or cell lines expressing only the CNP2 transcript. Thus, the synthesis of CNP1 and CNP2 polypeptides must be encoded by the CNP2 transcript. In vitro translation of synthetic CNP2 mRNA demonstrates that both CNP isoforms are synthesized by initiation at different AUG codons. Furthermore, by introducing mutations to "switch off" translation from the second in-frame AUG codon in the CNP2 cDNA, and transfecting 293T cells with those constructs, we are able to correlate the production of CNP1 and CNP2 with different translational start sites. These results lead us to conclude that the CNP2 mRNA is able to produce both CNP1 and CNP2 polypeptides. This investigation has altered our understanding of the temporal expression of the CNP protein isoforms during development of the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:9373034

  12. IPLA2 mRNA expression by human neutrophils in type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Ayilavarapu, Srinivas; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Hasturk, Hatice; Van Dyke, Thomas E

    2014-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide and complications of T2D cause significant systemic and dental morbidity in the susceptible individual. Although T2D has been linked as a significant risk factor for chronic periodontitis (CP), molecular mechanisms explaining the pathogenesis and inflammatory impact of CP in T2D are lacking. iPLA2 is the calcium-independent form of phospholipase A2. In previous studies, we demonstrated that iPLA2 enzyme activity is altered in T2D. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the level of the iPLA2 abnormality in T2D by measuring messenger RNA levels in T2D-associated CP. A total of 53 healthy and T2D subjects with CP were recruited for this study. The clinical periodontal exam included probing pocket depth, clinical attachment levels and bleeding on probing. Peripheral venous blood was collected and neutrophils were isolated. Real time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify iPLA2 mRNA in neutrophils from healthy controls and people with diabetes. Results revealed that the prevalence of moderate to severe CP was increased in people with T2D. The iPLA, mRNA levels in diabetics with different severity of CP were not significantly different compared to healthy controls; 1.07 vs 0.97 (mild CP), 1.07 vs 0.85 (moderate CP) and 1.07 vs 1.05 (severe CP). Collectively, the data suggest that levels of iPLA2 mRNA in T2D are not different than in health and are not directly influenced by periodontal disease status. The impact of inflammation on iPLA2 regulation is at the level of activation of the enzyme rather than expression at the mRNA level. PMID:25654966

  13. Complementary change in cis determinants and trans factors in the evolution of an mRNP stability complex.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Liebhaber, S A

    1996-01-01

    RNA-protein (RNP) complexes play significant roles in the fate and expression of mRNAs. The prolonged half-life of human alpha-globin mRNA, a major determinant of normal erythroid differentiation, is dependent on the assembly of a sequence-specific 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) RNP (alpha-complex). We demonstrate that the stability of murine alpha-globin mRNA is controlled by a parallel mechanism. Unexpectedly, however, the respective 3'UTR RNP complexes that stabilize the h(alpha)- and m(alpha)-globin mRNAs differ in structure. While the cis determinants in both species are encoded in polypyrimidine tracks, the human determinant is C-rich (CCUCC motif) while the mouse alpha-3'UTR consists of an equal distribution of Cs and Us (CCUUCU motif). The protein components of the corresponding human and murine alpha-complexes differ in a complementary manner: the previously described 39 kDa poly(C) binding protein (PCBP) present in the human alpha-complex is replaced in the mouse alpha-complex by a 48 kDa cytoplasmic poly(CU) binding protein (CUBP). These results reveal that drift in the primary sequences of the alpha-globin mRNA 3'UTR polypyrimidine tracks in a comparison between mouse and human is paralleled by an alteration in the composition of the corresponding trans-acting components. Surprisingly, these structurally distinct complexes appear to perform the identical function of stabilizing the corresponding alpha-globin mRNAs. Images PMID:8890177

  14. CART mRNA expression in rat monkey and human brain: relevance to cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Fagergren, Pernilla; Hurd, Yasmin

    2007-09-10

    The neuropeptide CART (cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript) is suggested to be regulated by psychostimulant administration. We review here the localization of CART mRNA expression in the human brain and its possible relevance to human cocaine abuse. Except for strong hypothalamic expression, the CART transcript is predominately expressed in target regions of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system, such as the nucleus accumbens shell, amygdala complex, extended amygdala and orbitofrontal, enthorhinal and piriform cortices. The discrete limbic localization strongly implies involvement in reward and reinforcement behaviors. We therefore examined CART mRNA expression in both Sprague Dawley rats and Rhesus monkeys that had self-administered cocaine. Cocaine self-administration in the rat (1.5 mg/kg/inj, on a fixed ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement for 1 week) and monkey (0.03 or 0.3 mg/kg/inj on a fixed 3 min interval schedule of reinforcement for 5 or 100 days) did not alter transcript levels in CART expressing nucleus accumbens (monkey not studied), amygdala nuclei or cortical areas. However, in the monkey sublenticular extended amygdala, low dose cocaine self-administration resulted in increased CART transcript levels after both 5 and 100 days of self-administration, whereas no difference was found after high dose self-administration. In conclusion, we found no substantial alterations CART mRNA expression during cocaine self-administration, but this neuropeptide has the anatomical and functional potential to modulate brain areas relevant for cocaine abuse. Further studies are needed to evaluate the involvement of CART in other components of the cocaine abuse cycle. PMID:17631364

  15. The Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Tax Protein Inhibits Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay by Interacting with INT6/EIF3E and UPF1

    PubMed Central

    Mocquet, Vincent; Neusiedler, Julia; Rende, Francesca; Cluet, David; Robin, Jean-Philippe; Terme, Jean-Michel; Duc Dodon, Madeleine; Wittmann, Jürgen; Morris, Christelle; Le Hir, Hervé; Ciminale, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we analyzed whether the degradation of mRNAs by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway was affected in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected cells. This pathway was indeed strongly inhibited in C91PL, HUT102, and MT2 cells, and such an effect was also observed by the sole expression of the Tax protein in Jurkat and HeLa cells. In line with this activity, Tax binds INT6/EIF3E (here called INT6), which is a subunit of the translation initiation factor eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) required for efficient NMD, as well as the NMD core factor upstream frameshift protein 1 (UPF1). It was also observed that Tax expression alters the morphology of processing bodies (P-bodies), the cytoplasmic structures which concentrate RNA degradation factors. The presence of UPF1 in these subcellular compartments was increased by Tax, whereas that of INT6 was decreased. In line with these effects, the level of the phosphorylated form of UPF1 was increased in the presence of Tax. Analysis of several mutants of the viral protein showed that the interaction with INT6 is necessary for NMD inhibition. The alteration of mRNA stability was observed to affect viral transcripts, such as that coding for the HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor (HBZ), and also several cellular mRNAs sensitive to the NMD pathway. Our data indicate that the effect of Tax on viral and cellular gene expression is not restricted to transcriptional control but can also involve posttranscriptional regulation. PMID:22553336

  16. N6-methyladenosine modification in mRNA: machinery, function and implications for health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Maity, Arpita; Das, Biswadip

    2016-05-01

    N6-methyladenosine (m(6) A) modification in mRNA is extremely widespread, and functionally modulates the eukaryotic transcriptome to influence mRNA splicing, export, localization, translation, and stability. Methylated adenines are present in a large subset of mRNAs and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). Methylation is reversible, and this is accomplished by the orchestrated action of highly conserved methyltransferase (m(6) A writer) and demethylase (m(6) A eraser) enzymes to shape the cellular 'epitranscriptome'. The engraved 'methyl code' is subsequently decoded and executed by a group of m(6) A reader/effector components, which, in turn, govern the fate of the modified transcripts, thereby dictating their potential for translation. Reversible mRNA methylation thus adds another layer of regulation at the post-transcriptional level in the gene expression programme of eukaryotes that finely sculpts a highly dynamic proteome in order to respond to diverse cues during cellular differentiation, immune tolerance, and neuronal signalling. PMID:26645578

  17. Translational control of germ cell-expressed mRNA imposed by alternative splicing: opioid peptide gene expression in rat testis.

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, J E; Collard, M W; Douglass, J O

    1989-01-01

    The three genes encoding the opioid peptide precursors (prodynorphin, proenkephalin, and proopiomelanocortin) are expressed in the rat testis. The sizes of the three opioid mRNAs in the testis differ from the sizes of the corresponding mRNAs in other rat tissues in which these genes are expressed. The smaller testicular proopiomelanocortin mRNA has previously been demonstrated to arise from alternative transcriptional initiation. In the present study, we found that the smaller testicular prodynorphin mRNA, expressed in Sertoli cells, results from alternative mRNA processing. Exon 2, which makes up 5' untranslated sequence, is removed from the mature transcript. Polysome analysis of brain and testis RNA indicates that the alteration of the prodynorphin leader sequence in the testis-specific transcript does not affect the efficiency of translation of this mRNA. The larger testicular proenkephalin transcript, expressed in developing germ cells, also results from alternative mRNA processing. Alternative acceptor site usage in the splicing of intron A results in a germ cell-specific proenkephalin transcript with a 491-nucleotide 5' untranslated leader sequence preceding the preproenkephalin-coding sequence. Polysome analysis indicates that this germ cell-specific proenkephalin mRNA is not efficiently translated. Mechanisms by which alternative mRNA splicing may serve to confer translational regulation upon the testicular proenkephalin transcript are discussed. Images PMID:2573832

  18. Alteration of POLDIP3 Splicing Associated with Loss of Function of TDP-43 in Tissues Affected with ALS

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, Atsushi; Ishihara, Tomohiko; Miyashita, Akinori; Kuwabara, Misaki; Kato, Taisuke; Watanabe, Norihiro; Yamahira, Akie; Kondo, Chigusa; Yokoseki, Akio; Takahashi, Masuhiro; Kuwano, Ryozo; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Onodera, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease caused by selective loss of motor neurons. In the ALS motor neurons, TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) is dislocated from the nucleus to cytoplasm and forms inclusions, suggesting that loss of a nuclear function of TDP-43 may underlie the pathogenesis of ALS. TDP-43 functions in RNA metabolism include regulation of transcription, mRNA stability, and alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. However, a function of TDP-43 in tissue affected with ALS has not been elucidated. We sought to identify the molecular indicators reflecting on a TDP-43 function. Using exon array analysis, we observed a remarkable alteration of splicing in the polymerase delta interacting protein 3 (POLDIP3) as a result of the depletion of TDP-43 expression in two types of cultured cells. In the cells treated with TDP-43 siRNA, wild-type POLDIP3 (variant-1) decreased and POLDIP3 lacking exon 3 (variant-2) increased. The RNA binding ability of TDP-43 was necessary for inclusion of POLDIP3 exon 3. Moreover, we found an increment of POLDIP3 variant-2 mRNA in motor cortex, spinal cord and spinal motor neurons collected by laser capture microdissection with ALS. Our results suggest a loss of TDP-43 function in tissues affected with ALS, supporting the hypothesis that a loss of function of TDP-43 underlies the pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:22900096

  19. Changes in apoptotic microRNA and mRNA expression profiling in Caenorhabditis elegans during the Shenzhou-8 mission.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Li, Shuai; Xu, Dan; Wang, Junjun; Sun, Yeqing

    2015-11-01

    Radiation and microgravity exposure have been proven to induce abnormal apoptosis in microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA expression, but whether space conditions, including radiation and microgravity, activate miRNAs to regulate the apoptosis is undetermined. For that purpose, we investigated miRNome and mRNA expression in the ced-1 Caenorhabditis elegans mutant vs the wild-type, both of which underwent spaceflight, spaceflight 1g-centrifuge control and ground control conditions during the Shenzhou-8 mission. Results showed that no morphological changes in the worms were detected, but differential miRNA expression increased from 43 (ground control condition) to 57 and 91 in spaceflight and spaceflight control conditions, respectively. Microgravity altered miRNA expression profiling by decreasing the number and significance of differentially expressed miRNA compared with 1 g incubation during spaceflight. Alterations in the miRNAs were involved in alterations in apoptosis, neurogenesis larval development, ATP metabolism and GTPase-mediated signal transduction. Among these, 17 altered miRNAs potentially involved in apoptosis were screened and showed obviously different expression signatures between space conditions. By integrated analysis of miRNA and mRNA, miR-797 and miR-81 may be involved in apoptosis by targeting the genes ced-10 and both drp-1 and hsp-1, respectively. Compared with ground condition, space conditions regulated apoptosis though a different manner on transcription, by altering expression of seven core apoptotic genes in spaceflight condition, and eight in spaceflight control condition. Results indicate that, miRNA of Caenorhabditis elegans probably regulates apoptotic gene expression in response to space environmental stress, and shows different behavior under microgravity condition compared with 1 g condition in the presence of space radiation. PMID:26286471

  20. Changes in apoptotic microRNA and mRNA expression profiling in Caenorhabditis elegans during the Shenzhou-8 mission

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Li, Shuai; Xu, Dan; Wang, Junjun; Sun, Yeqing

    2015-01-01

    Radiation and microgravity exposure have been proven to induce abnormal apoptosis in microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA expression, but whether space conditions, including radiation and microgravity, activate miRNAs to regulate the apoptosis is undetermined. For that purpose, we investigated miRNome and mRNA expression in the ced-1 Caenorhabditis elegans mutant vs the wild-type, both of which underwent spaceflight, spaceflight 1g-centrifuge control and ground control conditions during the Shenzhou-8 mission. Results showed that no morphological changes in the worms were detected, but differential miRNA expression increased from 43 (ground control condition) to 57 and 91 in spaceflight and spaceflight control conditions, respectively. Microgravity altered miRNA expression profiling by decreasing the number and significance of differentially expressed miRNA compared with 1 g incubation during spaceflight. Alterations in the miRNAs were involved in alterations in apoptosis, neurogenesis larval development, ATP metabolism and GTPase-mediated signal transduction. Among these, 17 altered miRNAs potentially involved in apoptosis were screened and showed obviously different expression signatures between space conditions. By integrated analysis of miRNA and mRNA, miR-797 and miR-81 may be involved in apoptosis by targeting the genes ced-10 and both drp-1 and hsp-1, respectively. Compared with ground condition, space conditions regulated apoptosis though a different manner on transcription, by altering expression of seven core apoptotic genes in spaceflight condition, and eight in spaceflight control condition. Results indicate that, miRNA of Caenorhabditis elegans probably regulates apoptotic gene expression in response to space environmental stress, and shows different behavior under microgravity condition compared with 1 g condition in the presence of space radiation. PMID:26286471

  1. Effects of tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate and triphenyl phosphate on receptor-associated mRNA expression in zebrafish embryos/larvae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunsheng; Wang, Qiangwei; Liang, Kang; Liu, Jingfu; Zhou, Bingsheng; Zhang, Xiaowei; Liu, Hongling; Giesy, John P; Yu, Hongxia

    2013-03-15

    Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) are frequently detected in biota, including fish. However, knowledge of the toxicological and molecular effects of these currently used flame retardants is limited. In the present study, an in vivo screening approach was developed to evaluate effects of TDCPP and TPP on developmental endpoints and receptor-associated expression of mRNA in zebrafish embryos/larvae. Exposure to TDCPP or TPP resulted in significantly smaller rates of hatching and survival, in dose- and time-dependent manners. The median lethal concentration (LC(50)) was 7.0 mg/L for TDCPP and 29.6 mg/L for TPP at 120 hour post-fertilization (hpf). Real-time PCR revealed alterations in expression of mRNAs involved in aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs)-, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα)-, estrogenic receptors (ERs)-, thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRα)-, glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-, and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR)-centered gene networks. Exposure to positive control chemicals significantly altered abundances of mRNA in corresponding receptor-centered gene networks, a result that suggests that it is feasible to use zebrafish embryos/larvae to evaluate effects of chemicals on mRNA expression in these gene networks. Exposure to TDCPP altered transcriptional profiles in all six receptor-centered gene networks, thus exerting multiple toxic effects. TPP was easily metabolized and its potency to change expression of mRNA involved in receptor-centered gene networks was weaker than that of TDCPP. The PPARα- and TRα-centered gene networks might be the primary pathways affected by TPP. Taken together, these results demonstrated that TDCPP and TPP could alter mRNA expression of genes involved in the six receptor-centered gene networks in zebrafish embryos/larvae, and TDCPP seemed to have higher potency in changing the mRNA expression of these genes. PMID:23306105

  2. Metastasis-suppressor transcript destabilization through TARBP2 binding of mRNA hairpins.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, Hani; Zhang, Steven; Buss, Colin G; Fish, Lisa; Tavazoie, Saeed; Tavazoie, Sohail F

    2014-09-11

    Aberrant regulation of RNA stability has an important role in many disease states. Deregulated post-transcriptional modulation, such as that governed by microRNAs targeting linear sequence elements in messenger RNAs, has been implicated in the progression of many cancer types. A defining feature of RNA is its ability to fold into structures. However, the roles of structural mRNA elements in cancer progression remain unexplored. Here we performed an unbiased search for post-transcriptional modulators of mRNA stability in breast cancer by conducting whole-genome transcript stability measurements in poorly and highly metastatic isogenic human breast cancer lines. Using a computational framework that searches RNA sequence and structure space, we discovered a family of GC-rich structural cis-regulatory RNA elements, termed sRSEs for structural RNA stability elements, which are significantly overrepresented in transcripts displaying reduced stability in highly metastatic cells. By integrating computational and biochemical approaches, we identified TARBP2, a double-stranded RNA-binding protein implicated in microRNA processing, as the trans factor that binds the sRSE family and similar structural elements--collectively termed TARBP2-binding structural elements (TBSEs)--in transcripts. TARBP2 is overexpressed in metastatic cells and metastatic human breast tumours and destabilizes transcripts containing TBSEs. Endogenous TARBP2 promotes metastatic cell invasion and colonization by destabilizing amyloid precursor protein (APP) and ZNF395 transcripts, two genes previously associated with Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease, respectively. We reveal these genes to be novel metastasis suppressor genes in breast cancer. The cleavage product of APP, extracellular amyloid-α peptide, directly suppresses invasion while ZNF395 transcriptionally represses a pro-metastatic gene expression program. The expression levels of TARBP2, APP and ZNF395 in human breast carcinomas support

  3. BAY11 enhances OCT4 synthetic mRNA expression in adult human skin cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The OCT4 transcription factor is involved in many cellular processes, including development, reprogramming, maintaining pluripotency and differentiation. Synthetic OCT4 mRNA was recently used (in conjunction with other reprogramming factors) to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells. Here, we discovered that BAY 11-7082 (BAY11), at least partially through an NF-κB-inhibition based mechanism, could significantly increase the expression of OCT4 following transfection of synthetic mRNA (synRNA) into adult human skin cells. Methods We tested various chemical and molecular small molecules on their ability to suppress the innate immune response seen upon synthetic mRNA transfection. Three molecules - B18R, BX795, and BAY11 - were used in immunocytochemical and proliferation-based assays. We also utilized global transcriptional meta-analysis coupled with quantitative PCR to identify relative gene expression downstream of OCT4. Results We found that human skin cells cultured in the presence of BAY11 resulted in reproducible increased expression of OCT4 that did not inhibit normal cell proliferation. The increased levels of OCT4 resulted in significantly increased expression of genes downstream of OCT4, including the previously identified SPP1, DUSP4 and GADD45G, suggesting the expressed OCT4 was functional. We also discovered a novel OCT4 putative downstream target gene SLC16A9 which demonstrated significantly increased expression following elevation of OCT4 levels. Conclusions For the first time we have shown that small molecule-based stabilization of synthetic mRNA expression can be achieved with use of BAY11. This small molecule-based inhibition of innate immune responses and subsequent robust expression of transfected synthetic mRNAs may have multiple applications for future cell-based research and therapeutics. PMID:23388106

  4. Polyadenylation of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    1974-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) mRNA isolated from infected cell polysomes contains polyadenylic acid [poly(A)] sequences. Detergent-activated purified virions in vitro can transcribe complementary RNA, which has sedimentation properties similar to mRNA, and this RNA also contains poly(A) sequences. Digestion of virion RNA with U2 RNase under conditions where hydrolysis is specific for purine linkages leaves no sequences of polyuridylic acid corresponding in length to the poly(A) on the transcripts. Growth of infectious virus is not inhibited by 3-deoxyadenosine (cordycepin) under conditions in which it inhibits polyadenylation of cellular mRNA. The virus-specific mRNA produced in the presence of cordycepin has poly(A) sequences of the same size distribution as that synthesized in the absence of cordycepin. PMID:4363251

  5. Icaritin Inhibits Collagen Degradation-Related Factors and Facilitates Collagen Accumulation in Atherosclerotic Lesions: A Potential Action for Plaque Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zong-Kang; Li, Jie; Yan, De-Xin; Leung, Wing-Nang; Zhang, Bao-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Most acute coronary syndromes result from rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. The collagen content of plaques may critically affect plaque stability. This study tested whether Icaritin (ICT), an intestinal metabolite of Epimedium-derived flavonoids, could alter the collagen synthesis/degradation balance in atherosclerotic lesions. Rabbits were fed with an atherogenic diet for four months. Oral administration of ICT (10 mg·kg−1·day−1) was started after two months of an atherogenic diet and lasted for two months. The collagen degradation-related parameters, including macrophages accumulation, content and activity of interstitial collagenase-1 (MMP-1), and the collagen synthesis-related parameters, including amount and distribution of smooth muscle cells (SMC) and collagen mRNA/protein levels, were evaluated in the aorta. ICT reduced plasma lipid levels, inhibited macrophage accumulation, lowered MMP-1 mRNA and protein expression, and suppressed proteolytic activity of pro-MMP-1 and MMP-1 in the aorta. ICT changed the distribution of the SMCs towards the fibrous cap of lesions without increasing the amount of SMCs. Higher collagen protein content in lesions and aorta homogenates was observed with ICT treatment compared with the atherogenic diet only, without altered collagen mRNA level. These results suggest that ICT could inhibit the collagen degradation-related factors and facilitate collagen accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions, indicating a new potential of ICT in atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:26828485

  6. Amazing Altered Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieling, Linda W.

    2006-01-01

    Linda Kieling, an art teacher at Rosemont Ridge Middle school in West Linn, Oregon, describes an altered book art project she introduced to her students. Alteration of books is a form of recycling that started in the eleventh century when Italian monks recycled old manuscripts written on vellum by scraping off the ink and adding new text and…

  7. The roles of 3′-exoribonucleases and the exosome in trypanosome mRNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Fadda, Abeer; Färber, Valentin; Droll, Dorothea; Clayton, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of eukaryotic mRNAs can be initiated by deadenylation, decapping, or endonuclease cleavage. This is followed by 5′–3′ degradation by homologs of Xrn1, and/or 3′–5′ degradation by the exosome. We previously reported that, in African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei, most mRNAs are deadenylated prior to degradation, and that depletion of the major 5′–3′ exoribonuclease XRNA preferentially stabilizes unstable mRNAs. We now show that depletion of either CAF1 or CNOT10, two components of the principal deadenylation complex, strongly inhibits degradation of most mRNAs. RNAi targeting another deadenylase, PAN2, or RRP45, a core component of the exosome, preferentially stabilized mRNAs with intermediate half-lives. RRP45 depletion resulted in a 5′ bias of mRNA sequences, suggesting action by a distributive 3′–5′ exoribonuclease. Results suggested that the exosome is involved in the processing of trypanosome snoRNAs. There was no correlation between effects on half-lives and on mRNA abundance. PMID:23697549

  8. mRNA redistribution during permanent focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Monique K; Jamison, Jill T; Dunbar, Joseph C; DeGracia, Donald J

    2013-12-01

    Translation arrest occurs in neurons following focal cerebral ischemia and is irreversible in penumbral neurons destined to die. Following global cerebral ischemia, mRNA is sequestered away from 40S ribosomal subunits as mRNA granules, precluding translation. Here, we investigated mRNA granule formation using fluorescence in situ histochemistry out to 8 h permanent focal cerebral ischemia using middle cerebral artery occlusion in Long Evans rats with and without diabetes. Neuronal mRNA granules colocalized with PABP, HuR, and NeuN, but not 40S or 60S ribosomal subunits, or organelle markers. The volume of brain with mRNA granule-containing neurons decreased exponentially with ischemia duration, and was zero after 8 h permanent focal cerebral ischemia or any duration of ischemia in diabetic rats. These results show that neuronal mRNA granule response has a limited range of insult intensity over which it is expressed. Identifying the limits of effective neuronal stress response to ischemia will be important for developing effective stroke therapies. PMID:24323415

  9. Conventional and unconventional mechanisms for capping viral mRNA.

    PubMed

    Decroly, Etienne; Ferron, François; Lescar, Julien; Canard, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell, capping of mRNA 5' ends is an essential structural modification that allows efficient mRNA translation, directs pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA export from the nucleus, limits mRNA degradation by cellular 5'-3' exonucleases and allows recognition of foreign RNAs (including viral transcripts) as 'non-self'. However, viruses have evolved mechanisms to protect their RNA 5' ends with either a covalently attached peptide or a cap moiety (7-methyl-Gppp, in which p is a phosphate group) that is indistinguishable from cellular mRNA cap structures. Viral RNA caps can be stolen from cellular mRNAs or synthesized using either a host- or virus-encoded capping apparatus, and these capping assemblies exhibit a wide diversity in organization, structure and mechanism. Here, we review the strategies used by viruses of eukaryotic cells to produce functional mRNA 5'-caps and escape innate immunity. PMID:22138959

  10. 3[prime] end maturation of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast atpB mRNA is a two-step process

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, D.B.; Kindle, K.L. )

    1993-04-01

    The research studied the 3[prime] end maturation of green algae chloroplast atpB mRNA. Most data on transcription termination and 3[prime] end maturation in chloroplasts have been based on in vitro experiments. Newly developed chloroplast transformation techniques have allowed the use of a green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, to examine chloroplast mRNA 3[prime] end stability determinants and mRNA processing both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this research showed that Chlamydomonas chloroplast protein extracts contain an endonuclease activity that cleaves a synthetic precursor of atpB mRNA 10 nucleotides downstream on the mature 3[prime] end in vitro. Rapid cleavage by this endonuclease is followed by exonucleolytic removal of 10 nucleotides to yield the mature 3[prime] end.

  11. Flight crew health stabilization program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooley, B. C.; Mccollum, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The flight crew health stabilization program was developed to minimize or eliminate the possibility of adverse alterations in the health of flight crews during immediate preflight, flight, and postflight periods. The elements of the program, which include clinical medicine, immunology, exposure prevention, and epidemiological surveillance, are discussed briefly. No crewmember illness was reported for the missions for which the program was in effect.

  12. Nucleolin stabilizes Bcl-X L messenger RNA in response to UVA irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jack; Tsaprailis, George; Bowden, G Tim

    2008-02-15

    Our laboratory has previously reported that UVA irradiation can increase the expression of Bcl-X(L), an antiapoptotic molecule, by stabilizing its mRNA in cultured immortalized human keratinocytes. To understand the mechanism by which the Bcl-X(L) message is stabilized, we used a synthetic Bcl-X(L) 3'-untranslated region (UTR) to capture RNA-binding proteins. Nucleolin was identified as one of the binding proteins as determined by tandem mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography analysis. Further study showed that nucleolin specifically recognized the AU-rich elements (AUUUA) in the 3'-UTR of the Bcl-X(L) mRNA and could stabilize the mRNA in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of nucleolin stabilizes the Bcl-X(L) mRNA in HeLa cells, whereas reducing nucleolin by small interfering RNA shortens the Bcl-X(L) mRNA half-life. Interestingly, nucleolin physically interacted with polyadenylate [poly(A)]-binding protein through it RGG motifs. Its stabilizing effect on the Bcl-X(L) mRNA was dependent upon the presence of poly(A) tail. Based on these data, we propose a model in which nucleolin protects the Bcl-X(L) mRNA from nuclease degradation by enhancing the stability of the ribonucleoprotein loop structure. PMID:18281479

  13. Mucin 1 and cytokines mRNA in endometrium of dairy cows with postpartum uterine disease or repeat breeding.

    PubMed

    Kasimanickam, R; Kasimanickam, V; Kastelic, J P

    2014-04-15

    Mucin (MUC) 1 is an inducible innate immune effector, an important component of defense against bacterial invasion, and is linked with infertility in humans. The objectives were to evaluate messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of MUC1 and cytokine genes in the endometrium of cows with various postpartum uterine inflammatory conditions or with a history of repeat breeding. Endometrial samples were collected from lactating dairy cows diagnosed with metritis (n = 4), endometritis (n = 4), subclinical endometritis (n = 4), or no uterine pathology (normal; n = 4). In addition, endometrial samples were collected from repeat breeder cows with (n = 4) or without (n = 4) subclinical endometritis, and unaffected cows (n = 4). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine mRNA abundances of MUC1, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, interleukin (IL) 1β, IL6, IL8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1, and IGF-binding protein (BP) 2. The mRNA expressions were significantly greater for cows with metritis and clinical endometritis compared with cows with no uterine inflammation, except for IL6. However, mRNA expressions for these target genes were not different for cows with subclinical endometritis, compared with cows without uterine inflammation, except for IL1β and TNFα mRNA (P < 0.01). All mRNA expressions were greater (P < 0.001) for repeat breeder cows with subclinical endometritis compared with normal cows. However, in repeat breeder cows without subclinical endometritis, only expressions of MUC1, IGF1, and IGF BP2 were greater compared with normal cows (P < 0.01). Based on functional protein networks, there were significant associations between these transcripts. In conclusion, endometrial expressions of MUC1 and cytokine genes differed among normal, fertile versus diseased, and subfertile dairy cows. Perhaps, these altered gene expressions contribute to endometrial insufficiency and consequently pregnancy wastage. PMID:24576715

  14. Sequence analysis of bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II mRNA from ascitic and nonascitic commercial broilers.

    PubMed

    Cisar, C R; Balog, J M; Anthony, N B; Donoghue, A M

    2003-10-01

    Ascites syndrome, also known as pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS), is a common metabolic disorder in rapidly growing meat-type chickens. Environmental factors, such as cold, altitude, and diet, play significant roles in development of the disease, but there is also an important genetic component to PHS susceptibility. The human disease familial primary pulmonary hypertension (FPPH) is similar to PHS in broilers both genetically and physiologically. Several recent studies have shown that mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II (BMPR2) gene are a cause of FPPH in humans. To determine whether mutations in the chicken BMPR2 gene play a similar role in PHS susceptibility, BMPR-II mRNA from ascitic and nonascitic commercial broilers were sequenced and compared with the published Leghorn chicken BMPR-II mRNA sequence. Fourteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were identified in the commercial broiler BMPR-II mRNA. No mutations unique to ascites-susceptible broilers were present in the coding, 5' untranslated or 3' untranslated regions of BMPR-II mRNA. The twelve SNP present within the coding region of BMPR-II mRNA were synonymous substitutions and did not alter the BMPR-II protein sequence. In addition, analysis of BMPR2 gene expression by reverse transcriptase-PCR indicated that there were no differences in BMPR-II mRNA levels in ascitic and nonascitic birds. Therefore, it appears unlikely that mutations in the BMPR2 gene were responsible for susceptibility to PHS in these commercial broilers. PMID:14601724

  15. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material.

  16. Expression of the two mRNA isoforms of the iron transporter Nramp2/DMTI in mice and function of the iron responsive element.

    PubMed Central

    Tchernitchko, Dimitri; Bourgeois, Monique; Martin, Marie-Elise; Beaumont, Carole

    2002-01-01

    Nramp2/DMT1 is a transmembrane proton-coupled Fe(2+) transporter. Two different mRNAs are generated by alternative splicing; isoform I contains an iron responsive element (IRE), whereas isoform II does not. They encode two proteins differing at their C-terminal end and by their subcellular localization. IRE-mediated stabilization of isoform I mRNA is thought to stimulate DMT1 expression in response to iron deficiency. We have measured the two mRNAs by real-time quantitative PCR in several mouse tissues, in normal conditions or following injection of phenylhydrazine, a potent haemolytic agent. Isoform I mRNA is expressed in the duodenum and is induced by stimulation of erythropoiesis, whereas the non-IRE isoform is mostly induced in erythropoietic spleen. Surprisingly, both isoforms are highly expressed in the kidney and are not regulated by erythropoiesis. To evaluate the role of the IRE in regulating isoform I mRNA stability, in response to variations in cell iron status, several constructs were made in pCDNA3 with either a normal or a mutated IRE placed at the 3' end of a stable mRNA. These constructs were transfected into HT29 cells and mRNAs were analysed after growing cells in the presence or absence of exogenous iron. There was no difference in the level of expression of the different messages, suggesting that the IRE does not regulate stability of isoform I mRNA. The half-life of the endogenous IRE-mRNA was also measured following actinomycin D addition in iron- or desferrioxamine-treated cells. Decay of the mRNA was very similar in both conditions. These results suggest that additional transcriptional regulations at the promoter level, or iron-dependent regulation of alternative splicing are likely to participate in the induction of isoform I mRNA by iron deficiency. PMID:11964145

  17. Mechanism of regulation of bcl-2 mRNA by nucleolin and A+U-rich element-binding factor 1 (AUF1).

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Daniella; Zuraw, Lisa; Ramalingam, Sivakumar; Sengupta, Tapas K; Bandyopadhyay, Sumita; Reuben, Adrian; Fernandes, Daniel J; Spicer, Eleanor K

    2010-08-27

    The antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein is overexpressed in a variety of cancers, particularly leukemias. In some cell types this is the result of enhanced stability of bcl-2 mRNA, which is controlled by elements in its 3'-untranslated region. Nucleolin is one of the proteins that binds to bcl-2 mRNA, thereby increasing its half-life. Here, we examined the site on the bcl-2 3'-untranslated region that is bound by nucleolin as well as the protein binding domains important for bcl-2 mRNA recognition. RNase footprinting and RNA fragment binding assays demonstrated that nucleolin binds to a 40-nucleotide region at the 5' end of the 136-nucleotide bcl-2 AU-rich element (ARE(bcl-2)). The first two RNA binding domains of nucleolin were sufficient for high affinity binding to ARE(bcl-2). In RNA decay assays, ARE(bcl-2) transcripts were protected from exosomal decay by the addition of nucleolin. AUF1 has been shown to recruit the exosome to mRNAs. When MV-4-11 cell extracts were immunodepleted of AUF1, the rate of decay of ARE(bcl-2) transcripts was reduced, indicating that nucleolin and AUF1 have opposing roles in bcl-2 mRNA turnover. When the function of nucleolin in MV-4-11 cells was impaired by treatment with the nucleolin-targeting aptamer AS1411, association of AUF1 with bcl-2 mRNA was increased. This suggests that the degradation of bcl-2 mRNA induced by AS1411 results from both interference with nucleolin protection of bcl-2 mRNA and recruitment of the exosome by AUF1. Based on our findings, we propose a model that illustrates the opposing roles of nucleolin and AUF1 in regulating bcl-2 mRNA stability. PMID:20571027

  18. Final Report [Regulated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis: A global analysis of differential control by hormones and the circadian clock

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Pamela J.

    2010-03-18

    The long-term goal of this research was to better understand the influence of mRNA stability on gene regulation, particularly in response to hormones and the circadian clock. The primary aim of this project was to examine this using DNA microarrays, small RNA analysis and other approaches. We accomplished these objectives, although we were only able to detect small changes in mRNA stability in response to these stimuli. However, the work also contributed to a major breakthrough allowing the identification of small RNAs on a genomic scale in eukaryotes. Moreover, the project prompted us to develop a new way to analyze mRNA decay genome wide. Thus, the research was hugely successful beyond our objectives.

  19. mRNA Composition and Control of Bacterial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liang, S.-T.; Xu, Y.-C.; Dennis, P.; Bremer, H.

    2000-01-01

    The expression of any given bacterial protein is predicted to depend on (i) the transcriptional regulation of the promoter and the translational regulation of its mRNA and (ii) the synthesis and translation of total (bulk) mRNA. This is because total mRNA acts as a competitor to the specific mRNA for the binding of initiation-ready free ribosomes. To characterize the effects of mRNA competition on gene expression, the specific activity of β-galactosidase expressed from three different promoter-lacZ fusions (Pspc-lacZ, PRNAI-lacZ, and PRNAII-lacZ) was measured (i) in a relA+ background during exponential growth at different rates and (ii) in relA+ and ΔrelA derivatives of Escherichia coli B/r after induction of a mild stringent or a relaxed response to raise or lower, respectively, the level of ppGpp. Expression from all three promoters was stimulated during slow exponential growth or at elevated levels of ppGpp and was reduced during fast exponential growth or at lower levels of ppGpp. From these observations and from other considerations, we propose (i) that the concentration of free, initiation-ready ribosomes is approximately constant and independent of the growth rate and (ii) that bulk mRNA made during slow growth and at elevated levels of ppGpp is less efficiently translated than bulk mRNA made during fast growth and at reduced levels of ppGpp. These features lead to an indirect enhancement in the expression of LacZ (or of any other protein) during growth in media of poor nutritional quality and at increased levels of ppGpp. PMID:10809680

  20. Assembly Properties of Divergent Tubulin Isotypes and Altered Tubulin Polypeptides in Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Wei

    1990-01-01

    Mbeta1 is one of the closely related (though distinct) gene products termed isotypes encoded by the mouse beta-tubulin multigene family. These isotypes typically share 95%-98% homology at the amino acid level. However, Mbeta 1 is unusual in its relatively high degree of divergence compared to other beta-tubulin isotypes; furthermore, its tissue-restricted pattern of expression (Mbeta1 is only expressed in hematopoietic tissue) led to speculation that this isotype might be specialized for assembly into unique microtubule structures (such as the marginal band in some erythropoietic cell types). To test if this isotype is capable of coassembly into microtubules in cell types other than those in which it is normally expressed, a method was developed for the generation of an anti-Mbeta1 specific antibody. The Mbeta1 tubulin isotype was introduced into tissue culture cells by transfection and its expression and assembly properties were studied in both transiently transfected cells and stable cell lines using the anti -Mbeta1 specific antibody. The successful expression and coassembly of a 'foreign' tubulin isotype into microtubules in tissue culture cells and the generation of an antibody that can specifically recognize this isotype provided an approach to study the properties of altered beta-tubulin polypeptides in vivo. beta-tubulin synthesis in eukaryotic cells is autoregulated by a posttranscriptional mechanism in which the first four amino acids are responsible for determining the stability of beta -tubulin mRNA. To test if the beta -tubulin amino-terminal regulatory domain also contributes to the capacity of the tubulin monomer to polymerize into microtubules, altered sequences encoding Mbeta 1 but containing deletions encompassing amino acids 2-5 were expressed in HeLa cells. Stable cell lines expressing the altered Mbeta1 isotype were also generated. The assembly properties and stability of these altered Mbeta1 tubulin polypeptides were tested using the anti

  1. Disruption of subcellular Arc/Arg 3.1 mRNA expression in striatal efferent neurons following partial monoamine loss induced by methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Barker-Haliski, Melissa L.; Oldenburger, Katharina; Keefe, Kristen A.

    2012-01-01

    The immediate-early gene Arc (activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein) is provocative in the context of neuroplasticity because of its experience-dependent regulation and mRNA transport to and translation at activated synapses. Normal rats have more preproenkephalin-negative (ppe-neg; presumed striatonigral) neurons with cytoplasmic Arc mRNA than ppe-positive (ppe-pos; striatopallidal) neurons, despite equivalent numbers of these neurons showing novelty-induced transcriptional activation of Arc. Furthermore, rats with partial monoamine loss induced by methamphetamine (METH) show impaired Arc mRNA expression in both ppe-neg and ppe-pos neurons relative to normal animals following response-reversal learning. In this study, Arc expression induced by exposure to a novel environment was used to assess transcriptional activation and cytoplasmic localization of Arc mRNA in striatal efferent neuron subpopulations subsequent to METH-induced neurotoxicity. Partial monoamine depletion significantly altered Arc expression. Specifically, basal Arc expression was elevated, but novelty-induced transcriptional activation was abolished. Without novelty-induced Arc transcription, METH-pretreated rats also had fewer neurons with cytoplasmic Arc mRNA expression, with the effect being greater for ppe-neg neurons. Thus, METH-induced neurotoxicity substantially alters striatal efferent neuron function at the level of Arc transcription, suggesting a long-term shift in basal ganglia neuroplasticity processes subsequent to METH-induced neurotoxicity. Such changes potentially underlie striatally-based learning deficits associated with METH-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:22978492

  2. Interactions of nucleolin and ribosomal protein L26 (RPL26) in translational control of human p53 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Guo, Kexiao; Kastan, Michael B

    2012-05-11

    Ribosomal protein RPL26 enhances p53 translation after DNA damage, and this regulation depends upon interactions between the 5'- and 3'-UTRs of human p53 mRNA (Takagi, M., Absalon, M. J., McLure, K. G., and Kastan, M. B. (2005) Cell 123, 49-63; Chen, J., and Kastan, M. B. (2010) Genes Dev. 24, 2146-2156). In contrast, nucleolin (NCL) suppresses the translation of p53 mRNA and its induction after DNA damage. We confirmed reports that RPL26 and NCL interact with each other and then explored the potential role of this interaction in the translational control of p53 after stress. NCL repression of p53 translation utilizes both the 5'- and 3'-UTRs of p53 mRNA, and NCL binds to the same 5'-3'-UTR interaction region that is critical for the recruitment of RPL26 to p53 mRNA after DNA damage. We also found that NCL is able to oligomerize, consistent with a model in which NCL stabilizes this double-stranded RNA structure. We found that the RNA-binding domain of NCL participates in binding to p53 mRNA, is required for both NCL dimerization and NCL-mediated translational repression, and is the domain of NCL that interacts with RPL26. Excessive RPL26 disrupts NCL dimerization, and point mutations in the NCL-interacting region of RPL26 reduce NCL-RPL26 interactions and attenuate both RPL26 binding to human p53 mRNA and p53 induction by RPL26. These observations suggest a model in which the base pairings in the p53 UTR interaction regions are critical for both translational repression and stress induction of p53 by NCL and RPL26, respectively, and that disruption of a NCL-NCL homodimer by RPL26 may be the switch between translational repression and activation after stress. PMID:22433872

  3. Dynamic proteomics emphasizes the importance of selective mRNA translation and protein turnover during Arabidopsis seed germination.

    PubMed

    Galland, Marc; Huguet, Romain; Arc, Erwann; Cueff, Gwendal; Job, Dominique; Rajjou, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    During seed germination, the transition from a quiescent metabolic state in a dry mature seed to a proliferative metabolic state in a vigorous seedling is crucial for plant propagation as well as for optimizing crop yield. This work provides a detailed description of the dynamics of protein synthesis during the time course of germination, demonstrating that mRNA translation is both sequential and selective during this process. The complete inhibition of the germination process in the presence of the translation inhibitor cycloheximide established that mRNA translation is critical for Arabidopsis seed germination. However, the dynamics of protein turnover and the selectivity of protein synthesis (mRNA translation) during Arabidopsis seed germination have not been addressed yet. Based on our detailed knowledge of the Arabidopsis seed proteome, we have deepened our understanding of seed mRNA translation during germination by combining two-dimensional gel-based proteomics with dynamic radiolabeled proteomics using a radiolabeled amino acid precursor, namely [(35)S]-methionine, in order to highlight de novo protein synthesis, stability, and turnover. Our data confirm that during early imbibition, the Arabidopsis translatome keeps reflecting an embryonic maturation program until a certain developmental checkpoint. Furthermore, by dividing the seed germination time lapse into discrete time windows, we highlight precise and specific patterns of protein synthesis. These data refine and deepen our knowledge of the three classical phases of seed germination based on seed water uptake during imbibition and reveal that selective mRNA translation is a key feature of seed germination. Beyond the quantitative control of translational activity, both the selectivity of mRNA translation and protein turnover appear as specific regulatory systems, critical for timing the molecular events leading to successful germination and seedling establishment. PMID:24198433

  4. Dynamic Proteomics Emphasizes the Importance of Selective mRNA Translation and Protein Turnover during Arabidopsis Seed Germination*

    PubMed Central

    Galland, Marc; Huguet, Romain; Arc, Erwann; Cueff, Gwendal; Job, Dominique; Rajjou, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    During seed germination, the transition from a quiescent metabolic state in a dry mature seed to a proliferative metabolic state in a vigorous seedling is crucial for plant propagation as well as for optimizing crop yield. This work provides a detailed description of the dynamics of protein synthesis during the time course of germination, demonstrating that mRNA translation is both sequential and selective during this process. The complete inhibition of the germination process in the presence of the translation inhibitor cycloheximide established that mRNA translation is critical for Arabidopsis seed germination. However, the dynamics of protein turnover and the selectivity of protein synthesis (mRNA translation) during Arabidopsis seed germination have not been addressed yet. Based on our detailed knowledge of the Arabidopsis seed proteome, we have deepened our understanding of seed mRNA translation during germination by combining two-dimensional gel-based proteomics with dynamic radiolabeled proteomics using a radiolabeled amino acid precursor, namely [35S]-methionine, in order to highlight de novo protein synthesis, stability, and turnover. Our data confirm that during early imbibition, the Arabidopsis translatome keeps reflecting an embryonic maturation program until a certain developmental checkpoint. Furthermore, by dividing the seed germination time lapse into discrete time windows, we highlight precise and specific patterns of protein synthesis. These data refine and deepen our knowledge of the three classical phases of seed germination based on seed water uptake during imbibition and reveal that selective mRNA translation is a key feature of seed germination. Beyond the quantitative control of translational activity, both the selectivity of mRNA translation and protein turnover appear as specific regulatory systems, critical for timing the molecular events leading to successful germination and seedling establishment. PMID:24198433

  5. Spaceflight has compartment- and gene-specific effects on mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins in rat femur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, G. L.; Morey-Holton, E.; Turner, R. T.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the possibility that the abnormal bone matrix produced during spaceflight may be associated with reduced expression of bone matrix protein genes. To test this possibility, we investigated the effects of a 14-day spaceflight (SLS-2 experiment) on steady-state mRNA levels for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), osteocalcin, osteonectin, and prepro-alpha(1) subunit of type I collagen in the major bone compartments of rat femur. There were pronounced site-specific differences in the steady-state levels of expression of the mRNAs for the three bone matrix proteins and GAPDH in normal weight-bearing rats, and these relationships were altered after spaceflight. Specifically, spaceflight resulted in decreases in mRNA levels for GAPDH (decreased in proximal metaphysis), osteocalcin (decreased in proximal metaphysis), osteonectin (decreased in proximal and distal metaphysis), and collagen (decreased in proximal and distal metaphysis) compared with ground controls. There were no changes in mRNA levels for matrix proteins or GAPDH in the shaft and distal epiphysis. These results demonstrate that spaceflight leads to site- and gene-specific decreases in mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that spaceflight-induced decreases in bone formation are caused by concomitant decreases in expression of genes for bone matrix proteins.

  6. Limb segment vibration modulates spinal reflex excitability and muscle mRNA expression after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Tseng, Shih-Chiao; McHenry, Colleen L.; Littmann, Andrew E.; Suneja, Manish; Shields, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We investigated the effect of various doses of vertical oscillation (vibration) on soleus H-reflex amplitude and post-activation depression in individuals with and without SCI. We also explored the acute effect of short-term limb vibration on skeletal muscle mRNA expression of genes associated with spinal plasticity. Methods Six healthy adults and five chronic complete SCI subjects received vibratory stimulation of their tibia over three different gravitational accelerations (0.3g, 0.6g, and 1.2g) at a fixed frequency (30 Hz). Soleus H-reflexes were measured before, during, and after vibration. Two additional chronic complete SCI subjects had soleus muscle biopsies 3 h following a single bout of vibration. Results H-reflex amplitude was depressed over 83% in both groups during vibration. This vibratory-induced inhibition lasted over 2 min in the control group, but not in the SCI group. Post-activation depression was modulated during the long-lasting vibratory inhibition. A single bout of mechanical oscillation altered mRNA expression from selected genes associated with synaptic plasticity. Conclusions Vibration of the lower leg inhibits the H-reflex amplitude, influences post-activation depression, and alters skeletal muscle mRNA expression of genes associated with synaptic plasticity. Significance Limb segment vibration may offer a long term method to reduce spinal reflex excitability after SCI. PMID:21963319

  7. Automatic stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, FR

    1936-01-01

    This report concerns the study of automatic stabilizers and extends it to include the control of the three-control system of the airplane instead of just altitude control. Some of the topics discussed include lateral disturbed motion, static stability, the mathematical theory of lateral motion, and large angles of incidence. Various mechanisms and stabilizers are also discussed. The feeding of Diesel engines by injection pumps actuated by engine compression, achieves the required high speeds of injection readily and permits rigorous control of the combustible charge introduced into each cylinder and of the peak pressure in the resultant cycle.

  8. Quantification of aggrecan and link-protein mRNA in human articular cartilage of different ages by competitive reverse transcriptase-PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, M C; Dudhia, J; Bayliss, M T

    1996-01-01

    A competitive reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) assay has been developed for the quantification of particular mRNA species in human articular cartilage. Competitor RNA species were synthesized that differed from the amplified target sequence only by the central insertion of an EcoRI restriction site. By using known amounts of synthetic target and competitor RNA, it was shown that competitor RNA molecules designed in this way are reverse-transcribed and amplified with equal efficiency to the target of interest. Furthermore quantification could be performed during the plateau phase of the PCR, which was necessary when using ethidium bromide fluorescence as a detection system. The inhibition of aggrecan and link-protein mRNA expression by interleukin 1 or tumour necrosis factor in monolayers of human articular chondrocytes quantified by this competitive RT-PCR method compared favourably with Northern hybridization studies. The main advantage of this technique is that it can be used to quantify levels of mRNA with RNA extracted directly from 100 mg wet weight of human articular cartilage. Age-related changes in aggrecan and link-protein mRNA were therefore quantified in human articular cartilage directly after dissection from the joint. The concentration of link-protein mRNA was higher in immature cartilage than in mature cartilage when expressed relative to the amount of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA, but no age-related changes were observed in aggrecan mRNA expression. The ratio of aggrecan to link-protein mRNA was higher in mature cartilage than in immature tissue. These age-related differences in the molecular stoichiometry of aggrecan and link-protein mRNA might have implications with respect to the regulation of the formation and the stability of the proteoglycan aggregates in cartilage. PMID:8912686

  9. Nuclear Retention of mRNA in Mammalian Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bahar Halpern, Keren; Caspi, Inbal; Lemze, Doron; Levy, Maayan; Landen, Shanie; Elinav, Eran; Ulitsky, Igor; Itzkovitz, Shalev

    2015-01-01

    Summary mRNA is thought to predominantly reside in the cytoplasm, where it is translated and eventually degraded. Although nuclear retention of mRNA has a regulatory potential, it is considered extremely rare in mammals. Here, to explore the extent of mRNA retention in metabolic tissues, we combine deep sequencing of nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA fractions with single-molecule transcript imaging in mouse beta cells, liver, and gut. We identify a wide range of protein-coding genes for which the levels of spliced polyadenylated mRNA are higher in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm. These include genes such as the transcription factor ChREBP, Nlrp6, Glucokinase, and Glucagon receptor. We demonstrate that nuclear retention of mRNA can efficiently buffer cytoplasmic transcript levels from noise that emanates from transcriptional bursts. Our study challenges the view that transcripts predominantly reside in the cytoplasm and reveals a role of the nucleus in dampening gene expression noise. PMID:26711333