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Sample records for altering phagocyte behavior

  1. Leptospira interrogans stably infects zebrafish embryos, altering phagocyte behavior and homing to specific tissues.

    PubMed

    Davis, J Muse; Haake, David A; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2009-01-01

    Leptospirosis is an extremely widespread zoonotic infection with outcomes ranging from subclinical infection to fatal Weil's syndrome. Despite the global impact of the disease, key aspects of its pathogenesis remain unclear. To examine in detail the earliest steps in the host response to leptospires, we used fluorescently labelled Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni to infect 30 hour post fertilization zebrafish embryos by either the caudal vein or hindbrain ventricle. These embryos have functional innate immunity but have not yet developed an adaptive immune system. Furthermore, they are optically transparent, allowing direct visualization of host-pathogen interactions from the moment of infection. We observed rapid uptake of leptospires by phagocytes, followed by persistent, intracellular infection over the first 48 hours. Phagocytosis of leptospires occasionally resulted in formation of large cellular vesicles consistent with apoptotic bodies. By 24 hours, clusters of infected phagocytes were accumulating lateral to the dorsal artery, presumably in early hematopoietic tissue. Our observations suggest that phagocytosis may be a key defense mechanism in the early stages of leptospirosis, and that phagocytic cells play roles in immunopathogenesis and likely in the dissemination of leptospires to specific target tissues. PMID:19547748

  2. Methamphetamine Alters the Antimicrobial Efficacy of Phagocytic Cells during Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mihu, Mircea Radu; Roman-Sosa, Jessica; Varshney, Avanish K.; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Shah, Bhavikkumar P.; Ham Lee, Hiu; Nguyen, Long N.; Guimaraes, Allan J.; Fries, Bettina C.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Methamphetamine (METH) is a major drug of abuse in the United States and worldwide. Furthermore, Staphylococcus aureus infections and METH use are coemerging public health problems. S. aureus is the single most important bacterial pathogen in infections among injection drug users, with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) being extremely common. Notably, the incidence of SSTI, especially in drug users, is difficult to estimate because such infections are often self-treated. Although there is substantial information on the behavioral and cognitive defects caused by METH in drug users, there is a dearth of knowledge regarding its impact on bacterial infections and immunity. Therefore, we hypothesized that METH exacerbates S. aureus skin infection. Using a murine model of METH administration and wound infection, we demonstrated that METH reduces wound healing and facilitates host-mediated collagen degradation by increased expression and production of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Additionally, we found that METH induces S. aureus biofilm formation and leads to detrimental effects on the functions of human and murine phagocytic cells, enhancing susceptibility to S. aureus infection. Our findings provide empirical evidence of the adverse impact of METH use on the antimicrobial efficacy of the cells that comprise innate immunity, the initial host response to combat microbial infection. PMID:26507236

  3. Effect of Estragole on Leukocyte Behavior and Phagocytic Activity of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wiirzler, Luiz Alexandre Marques; Silva-Filho, Saulo Euclides; Kummer, Raquel; Pedroso, Raissa Bocchi; Spironello, Ricardo Alexandre; Silva, Expedito Leite; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2014-01-01

    Estragole, a chemical constituent of the essential oils of many aromatic plants, is used as flavoring in beverage and food industries. In vivo and in vitro experimental assays have shown that EST has sedative, anticonvulsant, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anesthetic activity. In this work, we evaluate the effect of EST on leukocyte behavior and phagocytic activity of macrophages. In the peritonitis model, EST (500 and 750 mg/kg) decreased the infiltration of peritoneal exudate leukocytes. In vitro chemotaxis assay showed that EST (3, 10, 30, and 60 μg/mL) inhibited neutrophil migration toward fMLP. In the in vivo microcirculation assay, EST at doses of 250, 500, and 750 mg/kg significantly reduced the number of rolling and adherent leukocytes and at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg decreased number of leukocyte migrated to perivascular tissue. The results showed that EST (3, 10, and 30 μg/mL) was able to stimulate the macrophages phagocytosis but only at concentration of 10 μg/mL promoted an increase in nitric oxide (NO) production. In conclusion, this study showed that EST had potential anti-inflammatory effects, likely by inhibiting leukocyte migration and by stimulating macrophages phagocytosis. PMID:25152763

  4. Altered release of chemokines by phagocytes from fibromyalgia patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    García, Juan José; Carvajal-Gil, Julián; Guerrero-Bonmatty, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome characterized by widespread chronic pain and is associated with elevated systemic inflammatory biomarkers, and an elevated innate cellular response. The aim of this study was to determine if fibromyalgia patients have altered ability to release pro-inflammatory chemokines by isolated neutrophils and monocytes. The study participants were women diagnosed with FM (n = 6) and a control group of healthy women (HW) (n = 6). Supernatant concentrations of eotaxin (CCL11), human macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) (CCL22) and growth regulated-oncogene (GRO-α) (CXCL1) released by both monocytes and neutrophils either resting or stimulated by LPS were determined by ELISA and compared between the FM and HW groups. Both resting and activated monocytes from FM patients released more eotaxin, MDC and GRO-α than those from HW. However, there were no significant differences in the release of chemokines from neutrophils of FM patients and the ones from healthy women. In conclusion, monocytes from women with FM are deregulated, releasing higher amounts of eotaxin, MDC and GRO-α than healthy individuals. This fact does not occur in neutrophils from women with FM. PMID:26341115

  5. Cooperative Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Joly, Sandrine; Francke, Mike; Ulbricht, Elke; Beck, Susanne; Seeliger, Matthias; Hirrlinger, Petra; Hirrlinger, Johannes; Lang, Karl S.; Zinkernagel, Martin; Odermatt, Bernhard; Samardzija, Marijana; Reichenbach, Andreas; Grimm, Christian; Remé, Charlotte E.

    2009-01-01

    Phagocytosis is essential for the removal of photoreceptor debris following retinal injury. We used two mouse models, mice injected with green fluorescent protein-labeled bone marrow cells or green fluorescent protein-labeled microglia, to study the origin and activation patterns of phagocytic cells after acute blue light-induced retinal lesions. We show that following injury, blood-borne macrophages enter the eye via the optic nerve and ciliary body and soon migrate into the injured retinal area. Resident microglia are also activated rapidly throughout the entire retina and adopt macrophage characteristics only in the injured region. Both blood-borne- and microglia-derived macrophages were involved in the phagocytosis of dead photoreceptors. No obvious breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier was observed. Ccl4, Ccl12, Tgfb1, Csf1, and Tnf were differentially expressed in both the isolated retina and the eyecup of wild-type mice. Debris-laden macrophages appeared to leave the retina into the general circulation, suggesting their potential to become antigen-presenting cells. These experiments provide evidence that both local and immigrant macrophages remove apoptotic photoreceptors and cell debris in the injured retina. PMID:19435787

  6. Illuminating Phagocyte Biology: The View from Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cong; Niethammer, Philipp

    2016-07-25

    Many phagocyte behaviors, including vascular rolling and adhesion, migration, and oxidative bursting, are better measured in seconds or minutes than hours or days. Zebrafish is ideally suited for imaging such rapid biology within the intact animal. We discuss how this model has revealed unique insights into various aspects of phagocyte physiology. PMID:27459065

  7. Hypergravity-induced altered behavior in Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Wan, Judy; Marcu, Oana; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2012-07-01

    Microgravity and mechanical stress are important factors of the spaceflight environment, and affect astronaut health and behavior. Structural, functional, and behavioral mechanisms of all cells and organisms are adapted to Earth's gravitational force, 1G, while altered gravity can pose challenges to their adaptability to this new environment. On ground, hypergravity paradigms have been used to predict and complement studies on microgravity. Even small changes that take place at a molecular and genetic level during altered gravity may result in changes in phenotypic behavior. Drosophila provides a robust and simple, yet very reliable model system to understand the complexity of hypergravity-induced altered behavior, due to availability of a plethora of genetic tools. Locomotor behavior is a sensitive parameter that reflects the array of molecular adaptive mechanisms recruited during exposure to altered gravity. Thus, understanding the genetic basis of this behavior in a hypergravity environment could potentially extend our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in microgravity. In our laboratory we are trying to dissect out the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying hypergravity-induced oxidative stress, and its potential consequences on behavioral alterations by using Drosophila as a model system. In the present study, we employed pan-neuronal and mushroom body specific knock-down adult flies by using Gal4/UAS system to express inverted repeat transgenes (RNAi) to monitor and quantify the hypergravity-induced behavior in Drosophila. We established that acute hypergravity (3G for 60 min) causes a significant and robust decrease in the locomotor behavior in adult Drosophila, and that this change is dependent on genes related to Parkinson's disease, such as DJ-1α , DJ-1β , and parkin. In addition, we also showed that anatomically the control of this behavior is significantly processed in the mushroom body region of the fly brain. This work links a molecular

  8. Cytokines, phagocytes, and pentoxifylline.

    PubMed

    Mandell, G L

    1995-01-01

    Phagocytic cells, such as polymorphonuclear neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages, are essential for defense against infection caused by a variety of microorganisms. The mechanisms used by these cells to destroy microbes comprise a potent oxidative armamentarium including superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hypochlorous acid. In addition, granule contents such as proteolytic enzymes, lysozyme, lactoferrin, and myeloperoxidase are released into the phagosome to destroy ingested microorganisms. Inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6, enhance the phagocytic and microbicidal activity of the cells and increase their stickiness. It has been demonstrated in a variety of animal and clinical studies that activated phagocytes can damage the host they are designed to protect, using the mechanisms described above. Alkylxanthines, including pentoxifylline, are potent inhibitors of this inflammatory damage by two major actions: (a) reduction of the production of inflammatory cytokines (especially TNF) by phagocytes stimulated with a variety of microbial products (e.g., endotoxin); and (b) reversal of the effect of these cytokines on phagocytes. Thus, pentoxifylline counteracts the following effects of inflammatory cytokines on phagocytes: increased adherence, shape change resulting in larger size and rigidity, increased oxidative burst, priming for an enhanced oxidative burst, increased degranulation, and decreased chemotactic movement. In addition, these activities synergize with the normal anti-inflammatory mediator adenosine. Alkylxanthines have the potential to be effective therapy for conditions in which inflammatory cytokines and phagocytes cause damage, including the sepsis syndrome, ARDS, AIDS, and arthritis. PMID:8699856

  9. Algal toxins alter copepod feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiarong; Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph; Tester, Patricia A; Waggett, Rebecca J; Place, Allen R

    2012-01-01

    Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major) to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod's feeding appendages-a "sampling beating" that has short durations (<100 ms) and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration "grazing beating" that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod's grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod's feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods. PMID:22629336

  10. Chloride flux in phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun

    2016-09-01

    Phagocytes, such as neutrophils and macrophages, engulf microbes into phagosomes and launch chemical attacks to kill and degrade them. Such a critical innate immune function necessitates ion participation. Chloride, the most abundant anion in the human body, is an indispensable constituent of the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2 O2 -halide system that produces the potent microbicide hypochlorous acid (HOCl). It also serves as a balancing ion to set membrane potentials, optimize cytosolic and phagosomal pH, and regulate phagosomal enzymatic activities. Deficient supply of this anion to or defective attainment of this anion by phagocytes is linked to innate immune defects. However, how phagocytes acquire chloride from their residing environment especially when they are deployed to epithelium-lined lumens, and how chloride is intracellularly transported to phagosomes remain largely unknown. This review article will provide an overview of chloride protein carriers, potential mechanisms for phagocytic chloride preservation and acquisition, intracellular chloride supply to phagosomes for oxidant production, and methods to measure chloride levels in phagocytes and their phagosomes. PMID:27558337

  11. BEHAVIORAL ALTERATIONS DUE TO DIESEL EXHAUST EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several experiments examining the effects of diesel exhaust on the behavior of rats are reported. Animals were exposed either as adults or neonates. The spontaneous locomotor activity (SLA), measured in standard running wheel cages, of adult rats exposed for 8 h/day, 7 days/week ...

  12. How Menthol Alters Tobacco-Smoking Behavior: A Biological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wickham, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Mentholated cigarettes gained popularity in the 1950s and were often marketed as “healthy” cigarettes, attributable to their pleasurable mint flavor and cooling sensation in the mouth, lungs, and throat. While it is clear that nicotine is the primary psychoactive component in tobacco cigarettes, recent work has suggested that menthol may also play a role in exacerbating smoking behavior, despite original health claims. Recent evidence highlights four distinct biological mechanisms that can alter smoking behavior: 1) menthol acts to reduce the initially aversive experiences associated with tobacco smoking; 2) menthol can serve as a highly reinforcing sensory cue when associated with nicotine and promote smoking behavior; 3) menthol's actions on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors may change the reinforcing value of nicotine; and 4) menthol can alter nicotine metabolism, thus increasing nicotine bioavailability. The purpose of this review is to highlight and evaluate potential biological mechanisms by which menthol can alter smoking behavior. PMID:26339211

  13. Parathion alters incubation behavior of laughing gulls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; Mitchell, C.A.; Hill, E.F.

    1983-01-01

    One member of each pair of incubating laughing gulls at 9 nests was trapped, orally dosed with either 6 mg/kg parathion in corn oil or corn oil alone, and marked about the neck with red dye. Each nest was marked with a numbered stake and the treatment was recorded. A pilot study with captive laughing gulls had determined the proper dosage of parathion that would significantly inhibit their brain AChE activity (about 50% of normal) without overt signs of poisoning. After dosing, birds were released and the nests were observed for 2 1/2 days from a blind on the nesting island. The activities of the birds at each marked nest were recorded at 10-minute intervals. Results indicated that on the day of treatment there was no difference (P greater than 0.05, Chi-square test) in the proportion of time spent on the nest between treated and control birds. However, birds dosed with 6 mg/kg parathion spent significantly less time incubating on days 2 and 3 than did birds receiving only corn oil. By noon on the third day, sharing of nest duties between pair members in the treated group had approached normal, indicating recovery from parathion intoxication. These findings suggest that sublethal exposure of nesting birds to an organophosphate (OP) insecticide, such as parathion, may result in decreased nest attentiveness, thereby making the clutch more susceptible to predation or egg failure. Behavioral changes caused by sublethal OP exposure could be especially detrimental in avian species where only one pair member incubates or where both members are exposed in species sharing nest duties.

  14. Phagocytes and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Babior, B M

    2000-07-01

    Neutrophils and other phagocytes manufacture O(2)(-) (superoxide) by the one-electron reduction of oxygen at the expense of NADPH. Most of the O(2)(-) reacts with itself to form H(2)O(2) (hydrogen peroxide). From these agents a large number of highly reactive microbicidal oxidants are formed, including HOCl (hypochlorous acid), which is produced by the myeloperoxidase-catalyzed oxidation of Cl(-) by H(2)O(2); OH(*) (hydroxyl radical), produced by the reduction of H(2)O(2) by Fe(++) or Cu(+); ONOO(-) (peroxynitrite), formed by the reaction between O(2)(-) and NO(*); and many others. These reactive oxidants are manufactured for the purpose of killing invading microorganisms, but they also inflict damage on nearby tissues, and are thought to be of pathogenic significance in a large number of diseases. Included among these are emphysema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, atherosclerosis, reperfusion injury, malignancy and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:10936476

  15. Altered avoidance behavior of young black ducks fed cadmium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Haseltine, S.D.; Sileo, L.

    1983-01-01

    Pairs of adult black ducks (Anas rubripes) were fed a diet containing 0, 4 or 40 ppm cadmium as cadmium chloride. One-week-old ducklings that had been fed thc same dietary concentrations of cadmium as had their parents were tested for avoidance of a fright stimulus. Ducklings fed 4 ppm cadmium ran significantly farther from the stimulus than did controls or ducklings fed 40 ppm cadmium. Such an alteration in behavior could have harmful effects on wild birds.

  16. Atomic Layer Deposition Coating of Carbon Nanotubes with Aluminum Oxide Alters Pro-Fibrogenic Cytokine Expression by Human Mononuclear Phagocytes In Vitro and Reduces Lung Fibrosis in Mice In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alexia J.; McClure, Christina D.; Shipkowski, Kelly A.; Thompson, Elizabeth A.; Hussain, Salik; Garantziotis, Stavros; Parsons, Gregory N.; Bonner, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) pose a possible human health risk for lung disease as a result of inhalation exposure. Mice exposed to MWCNTs develop pulmonary fibrosis. Lung macrophages engulf MWCNTs and produce pro-fibrogenic cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and osteopontin (OPN). Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a novel process used to enhance functional properties of MWCNTs, yet the consequence of ALD-modified MWCNTs on macrophage biology and fibrosis is unknown. Methods The purpose of this study was to determine whether ALD coating with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) would alter the fibrogenic response to MWCNTs and whether cytokine expression in human macrophage/monocytes exposed to MWCNTs in vitro would predict the severity of lung fibrosis in mice. Uncoated (U)-MWCNTs or ALD-coated (A)-MWCNTs were incubated with THP-1 macrophages or human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cell supernatants assayed for cytokines by ELISA. C57BL6 mice were exposed to a single dose of A- or U-MWCNTs by oropharyngeal aspiration (4 mg/kg) followed by evaluation of histopathology, lung inflammatory cell counts, and cytokine levels at day 1 and 28 post-exposure. Results ALD coating of MWCNTs with Al2O3 enhanced IL-1β secretion by THP-1 and PBMC in vitro, yet reduced protein levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and OPN production by THP-1 cells. Moreover, Al2O3 nanoparticles, but not carbon black NPs, increased IL-1β but decreased OPN and IL-6 in THP-1 and PBMC. Mice exposed to U-MWCNT had increased levels of all four cytokines assayed and developed pulmonary fibrosis by 28 days, whereas ALD-coating significantly reduced fibrosis and cytokine levels at the mRNA or protein level. Conclusion These findings indicate that ALD thin film coating of MWCNTs with Al2O3 reduces fibrosis in mice and that in vitro phagocyte expression of IL-6, TNF-α, and OPN, but not IL-1β, predict MWCNT-induced fibrosis in the lungs of mice in vivo

  17. Methylglyoxal can mediate behavioral and neurochemical alterations in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Fernanda; Pandolfo, Pablo; Galland, Fabiana; Torres, Felipe Vasconcelos; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Batassini, Cristiane; Guerra, Maria Cristina; Leite, Marina Concli; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes is associated with loss of cognitive function and increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are elevated in diabetes and AD and have been suggested to act as mediators of the cognitive decline observed in these pathologies. Methylglyoxal (MG) is an extremely reactive carbonyl compound that propagates glycation reactions and is, therefore, able to generate AGEs. Herein, we evaluated persistent behavioral and biochemical parameters to explore the hypothesis that elevated exogenous MG concentrations, induced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion, lead to cognitive decline in Wistar rats. A high and sustained administration of MG (3μmol/μL; subdivided into 6days) was found to decrease the recognition index of rats, as evaluated by the object-recognition test. However, MG was unable to impair learning-memory processes, as shown by the habituation in the open field (OF) and Y-maze tasks. Moreover, a single high dose of MG induced persistent alterations in anxiety-related behavior, diminishing the anxiety-like parameters evaluated in the OF test. Importantly, MG did not alter locomotion behavior in the different tasks performed. Our biochemical findings support the hypothesis that MG induces persistent alterations in the hippocampus, but not in the cortex, related to glyoxalase 1 activity, AGEs content and glutamate uptake. Glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100B content, as well as S100B secretion (astroglial-related parameters of brain injury), were not altered by ICV MG administration. Taken together, our data suggest that MG interferes directly in brain function and that the time and the levels of exogenous MG determine the different features that can be seen in diabetic patients. PMID:27235733

  18. Altered anxiety and defensive behaviors in Bax knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Luedke, Angela C; Boucher, Pierre O; Niel, Lee; Holmes, Melissa M

    2013-02-15

    Developmental neuronal cell death is critically regulated by the pro-death protein Bax. Bax-/- mice exhibit increased neuron number, the elimination of several neural sex differences, and altered socio-sexual behaviors. Here we examined the effects of Bax gene deletion on anxiety and defensive behaviors by comparing the responses of male and female wildtype and Bax-/- mice to two different tests. On the elevated plus maze, Bax-/- mice of both sexes made more entries into and spent more time in the outer portion of open arms, indicating decreased anxiety compared to wildtype animals. Next, we exposed mice to two odors: trimethylthiazoline (TMT), an olfactory component of fox feces that rodents find aversive, and butyric acid (BA), an aversive odor without ecological significance. Each odor was presented individually and all animals were tested with both odors in a counterbalanced design. TMT was consistently more aversive than BA across a variety of behaviors (e.g., mice spent less time close to the odor source). Overall, Bax -/- mice showed fewer stretch approaches to both TMT and BA than wildtypes, but they avoided the odor source more (e.g., fewer contacts and less time spent in proximity). Finally, no effect of genotype was seen in baseline olfactory behavior; all mice were able to locate a buried food item, demonstrating that Bax-/- mice do not have impaired olfaction per se. Collectively, these data suggest a change in strategy with anxiety and defensive behaviors in Bax-/- mice, indicating that alterations in cell number affect more general mechanisms of fear and anxiety in addition to behaviors directly related to reproduction. PMID:23142367

  19. The renal mononuclear phagocytic system.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Peter J; Rees, Andrew J; Griffin, Matthew D; Hughes, Jeremy; Kurts, Christian; Duffield, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    The renal mononuclear phagocytic system, conventionally composed of macrophages (Mø) and dendritic cells (DCs), plays a central role in health and disease of the kidney. Overlapping definitions of renal DCs and Mø, stemming from historically separate research tracks and the lack of experimental tools to specifically study the roles of these cells in vivo, have generated confusion and controversy, however, regarding their immunologic function in the kidney. This brief review provides an appraisal of the current state of knowledge of the renal mononuclear phagocytic system interpreted from the perspective of immunologic function. Physical characteristics, ontogeny, and known functions of the main subsets of renal mononuclear phagocytes as they relate to homeostasis, surveillance against injury and infection, and immune-mediated inflammatory injury and repair within the kidney are described. Gaps and inconsistencies in current knowledge are used to create a roadmap of key questions to be answered in future research. PMID:22135312

  20. Perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls alters social behaviors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jolous-Jamshidi, Banafsheh; Cromwell, Howard C.; McFarland, Ashley M.; Meserve, Lee A.

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) leads to significant alterations of neural and hormonal systems. These alterations have been shown to impair motor and sensory development. Less is known about the influence of PCB exposure on developing emotional and motivational systems involved in social interactions and social learning. The present study examined the impact of perinatal PCB exposure (mixture of congeners 47 and 77) on social recognition in juvenile animals, conspecific-directed investigation in adults and on neural and hormonal systems involved in social functions. We used a standard habituation–dishabituation paradigm to evaluate juvenile recognition and a social port paradigm to monitor adult social investigation. Areal measures of the periventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus were obtained to provide correlations with related hormone and brain systems. PCB exposed rats were significantly impaired in social recognition as indicated by persistent conspecific-directed exploration by juvenile animals regardless of social experience. As adults, PCB exposure led to a dampening of the isolation-induced enhancement of social investigation. There was not a concomitant alteration of social investigation in pair-housed PCB exposed animals at this stage of development. Interestingly, PVN area was significantly decreased in juvenile animals exposed to PCB during the perinatal period. Shifts in hypothalamic regulation of hormones involved in social behavior and stress could be involved in the behavioral changes observed. Overall, the results suggest that PCB exposure impairs context or experience-dependent modulation of social approach and investigation. These types of social-context deficits are similar to behavioral deficits observed in social disorders such as autism and other pervasive developmental disorders. PMID:20813172

  1. Perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls alters social behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Jolous-Jamshidi, Banafsheh; Cromwell, Howard C; McFarland, Ashley M; Meserve, Lee A

    2010-11-30

    Perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) leads to significant alterations of neural and hormonal systems. These alterations have been shown to impair motor and sensory development. Less is known about the influence of PCB exposure on developing emotional and motivational systems involved in social interactions and social learning. The present study examined the impact of perinatal PCB exposure (mixture of congeners 47 and 77) on social recognition in juvenile animals, conspecific-directed investigation in adults and on neural and hormonal systems involved in social functions. We used a standard habituation-dishabituation paradigm to evaluate juvenile recognition and a social port paradigm to monitor adult social investigation. Areal measures of the periventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus were obtained to provide correlations with related hormone and brain systems. PCB exposed rats were significantly impaired in social recognition as indicated by persistent conspecific-directed exploration by juvenile animals regardless of social experience. As adults, PCB exposure led to a dampening of the isolation-induced enhancement of social investigation. There was not a concomitant alteration of social investigation in pair-housed PCB exposed animals at this stage of development. Interestingly, PVN area was significantly decreased in juvenile animals exposed to PCB during the perinatal period. Shifts in hypothalamic regulation of hormones involved in social behavior and stress could be involved in the behavioral changes observed. Overall, the results suggest that PCB exposure impairs context or experience-dependent modulation of social approach and investigation. These types of social-context deficits are similar to behavioral deficits observed in social disorders such as autism and other pervasive developmental disorders. PMID:20813172

  2. Chronic bisphenol A exposure alters behaviors of zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ju; Wang, Xia; Xiong, Can; Liu, Jian; Hu, Bing; Zheng, Lei

    2015-11-01

    The adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to treated-effluent concentration of bisphenol A (BPA) or 17β-estradiol (E2) for 6 months to evaluate their effects on behavioral characteristics: motor behavior, aggression, group preference, novel tank test and light/dark preference. E2 exposure evidently dampened fish locomotor activity, while BPA exposure had no marked effect. Interestingly, BPA-exposed fish reduced their aggressive behavior compared with control or E2. Both BPA and E2 exposure induced a significant decrease in group preference, as well as a weaker adaptability to new environment, exhibiting lower latency to reach the top, more entries to the top, longer time spent in the top, fewer frequent freezing, and fewer erratic movements. Furthermore, the circadian rhythmicity of light/dark preference was altered by either BPA or E2 exposure. Our results suggest that chronic exposure of treated-effluent concentration BPA or E2 induced various behavioral anomalies in adult fish and enhanced ecological risk to wildlife. PMID:26204572

  3. Galantamine reverses scopolamine-induced behavioral alterations in Dugesia tigrina.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Latha; Amatya, Christina; DeSaer, Cassie J; Dalhoff, Zachary; Eggerichs, Michael R

    2014-09-01

    In planaria (Dugesia tigrina), scopolamine, a nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist, induced distinct behaviors of attenuated motility and C-like hyperactivity. Planarian locomotor velocity (pLMV) displayed a dose-dependent negative correlation with scopolamine concentrations from 0.001 to 1.0 mM, and a further increase in scopolamine concentration to 2.25 mM did not further decrease pLMV. Planarian hyperactivity counts was dose-dependently increased following pretreatment with scopolamine concentrations from 0.001 to 0.5 mM and then decreased for scopolamine concentrations ≥ 1 mM. Planarian learning and memory investigated using classical Pavlovian conditioning experiments demonstrated that scopolamine (1 mM) negatively influenced associative learning indicated by a significant decrease in % positive behaviors from 86 % (control) to 14 % (1 mM scopolamine) and similarly altered memory retention, which is indicated by a decrease in % positive behaviors from 69 % (control) to 27 % (1 mM scopolamine). Galantamine demonstrated a complex behavior in planarian motility experiments since co-application of low concentrations of galantamine (0.001 and 0.01 mM) protected planaria against 1 mM scopolamine-induced motility impairments; however, pLMV was significantly decreased when planaria were tested in the presence of 0.1 mM galantamine alone. Effects of co-treatment of scopolamine and galantamine on memory retention in planaria via classical Pavlovian conditioning experiments showed that galantamine (0.01 mM) partially reversed scopolamine (1 mM)-induced memory deficits in planaria as the % positive behaviors increased from 27 to 63 %. The results demonstrate, for the first time in planaria, scopolamine's effects in causing learning and memory impairments and galantamine's ability in reversing scopolamine-induced memory impairments. PMID:24402079

  4. Molecular Determinants in Phagocyte-Bacteria Interactions.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Dorhoi, Anca

    2016-03-15

    Phagocytes are crucial for host defense against bacterial pathogens. As first demonstrated by Metchnikoff, neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes share the capacity to engulf, kill, and digest microbial invaders. Generally, neutrophils focus on extracellular, and mononuclear phagocytes on intracellular, pathogens. Reciprocally, extracellular pathogens often capitalize on hindering phagocytosis and killing of phagocytes, whereas intracellular bacteria frequently allow their engulfment and then block intracellular killing. As foreseen by Metchnikoff, phagocytes become highly versatile by acquiring diverse phenotypes, but still retaining some plasticity. Further, phagocytes engage in active crosstalk with parenchymal and immune cells to promote adjunctive reactions, including inflammation, tissue healing, and remodeling. This dynamic network allows the host to cope with different types of microbial invaders. Here we present an update of molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying phagocyte functions in antibacterial defense. We focus on four exemplary bacteria ranging from an opportunistic extracellular to a persistent intracellular pathogen. PMID:26982355

  5. Superoxide production by phagocytic leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Karnovsky, M L

    1975-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytic leukocytes, as well as polymorphonuclear leukocytes, produce and release superoxide at rest, and this is stimulated by phagocytosis. Of the mouse monocytic cells studied, alveolar macrophages released the largest amounts of superoxide during phagocytosis, followed by normal peritoneal macrophages. Casein-elicited and "activated" macrophages released smaller quantities. In the guinea pig, polymorphonuclear leukocytes and casein-elicited macrophages were shown to release superoxide during phagocytosis whereas alveolar macrophages did not. Superoxide release accounted for only a small fraction of the respiratory burst of phagocytosis in all but the normal mouse peritoneal macrophage, the guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocyte, and probably the mouse alveolar macrophage. There are obviously considerable species differences in O2-release by various leukocytes that might reflect both the production and/or destruction (e.g. by dismutase) of that substance. PMID:804030

  6. Manipulating the Behavior-Altering Effect of the Motivating Operation: Examination of the Influence on Challenging Behavior during Leisure Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lancioni, Giulio; Rispoli, Mandy; Lang, Russell; Chan, Jeff; Machalicek, Wendy; Langthorne, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We examined the behavior-altering effect of the motivating operation on challenging behavior during leisure activities for three individuals with severe disabilities. Prior functional analyses indicated that challenging behavior was maintained by positive reinforcement in the form of attention or tangible items for all participants. During leisure…

  7. Impairment of calcium mobilization in phagocytic cells in glycogen storage disease type 1b.

    PubMed

    Korchak, H M; Garty, B Z; Stanley, C A; Baker, L; Douglas, S D; Kilpatrick, L

    1993-01-01

    Patients with glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1b, in contrast to patients with GSD 1a, are susceptible to recurrent bacterial infections suggesting defective phagocytic function. We have demonstrated a selective defect in respiratory burst activity but not in degranulation by phagocytic cells in GSD 1b but not in GSD 1a. The respiratory burst abnormality in phagocytic cells from GSD 1b patients was associated with impaired calcium mobilization, whereas these processes were normal in GSD 1a patients. Therefore, the alteration in calcium mobilization was an indication of a signalling defect in phagocytic cells from GSD 1b. However, calcium mobilization was normal in lymphocytes, indicating that defective calcium mobilization was not a global finding in circulating leukocytes, but was specific to phagocytic cells. Calcium mobilization in response to ionomycin was reduced suggesting decreased calcium stores in GSD 1b neutrophils. Therefore, altered phagocytic cell function in GSD 1b patients appears to be associated with diminished calcium mobilization and defective calcium stores. This defective calcium signalling was associated with a selective defect in respiratory burst activity but not degranulation. PMID:8319725

  8. NEONATAL CHIORDECONE EXPOSURE ALTERS BEHAVIORAL SEX DIFFERENTIATION IN FEMALE HAMSTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study was designed in order to determine if exposure to the weakly estrogenic pesticide Chlordecone during a critical period of behavioral sex differentiation of the brain could masculinize and defeminize the behavior of female hamsters.

  9. Neonatal allopregnanolone levels alteration: effects on behavior and role of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Darbra, S; Mòdol, L; Llidó, A; Casas, C; Vallée, M; Pallarès, M

    2014-02-01

    Several works have pointed out the importance of the neurosteroid allopregnanolone for the maturation of the central nervous system and for adult behavior. The alteration of neonatal allopregnanolone levels in the first weeks of life alters emotional adult behavior and sensory gating processes. Without ruling out brain structures, some of these behavioral alterations seem to be related to a different functioning of the hippocampus in adult age. We focus here on the different behavioral studies that have revealed the importance of neonatal allopregnanolone levels for the adult response to novel environmental stimuli, anxiety-related behaviors and processing of sensory inputs (prepulse inhibition). An increase in neonatal physiological allopregnanolone levels decreases anxiety and increases novelty responses in adult age, thus affecting the individual response to environmental cues. These effects are also accompanied by a decrease in prepulse inhibition, indicating alterations in sensory gating that have been related to that present in disorders, such as schizophrenia. Moreover, behavioral studies have shown that some of these effects are related to a different functioning of the dorsal hippocampus, as the behavioral effects (decrease in anxiety and locomotion or increase in prepulse inhibition) of intrahippocampal allopregnanolone infusions in adult age are not present in those subjects in whom neonatal allopregnanolone levels were altered. Recent data indicated that this hippocampal involvement may be related to alterations in the expression of gamma-aminobutyric-acid receptors containing α4 and δ subunits, molecular alterations that can persist into adult age and that can, in part, explain the reported behavioral disturbances. PMID:23958467

  10. Phagocytic defense in the lung.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, H Y

    1985-01-01

    Phagocytic defense in the normal lung is shared principally by two kinds of cells - alveolar macrophages that reside on the air surface and roam the alveoli and PMNs that circulate in the intravascular space or are stored transiently in areas adjacent to the capillary-alveolar interface (marginated in capillaries) and can reach the alveolar space quickly. The nature of the stimulating microorganism or aerosol particle reaching the alveolar surface may determine which phagocytic cell ultimately responds to contain the intruder. Ingestion and containment (either intracellular killing or enzymatic degradation) are the goals, and an 'opsonin' may be necessary to enhance the efficiency of phagocytosis. In the lung this is very complex, reflecting the interdependence on immune and nonimmune opsonins. For immune mediated phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages, IgG antibody is preferable. Among the four subclasses of IgG, certain ones seem to bind preferentially to macrophages, whereas others are already adherent to the cells as cytophilic antibody. In the respiratory tract milieu of subjects with CF, the interaction of immune and nonimmune opsonins is much more complex because of proteolytic enzymes that can degrade antibodies creating various fragments. Now that we are in an era of very specific humoral replacement therapy with intravenous IgG that contains IgG subclasses and the potential for using monoclonal antibodies for very precisely directed replacement, special attention must be given to identifying the appropriate class and subclass of antibody that may be required. This may be relatively simple when forms of passive immune therapy are being considered. More difficult will be devising ways to actively immunize patients (or animals) and manipulate their antibody responses so that selective immunoglobulin subclasses are produced. To obtain such control over the humoral immune response will require much more basic work in animal models. More attention to the form of

  11. Effect of Calcium on Superoxide Production by Phagocytic Vesicles from Rabbit Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lew, P. Daniel; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1981-01-01

    Phagocytic vesicles from rabbit lung macrophages produced superoxide in the presence of NADH or NADPH. At 37°C, these vesicles generated 51±7.8 nmol O2−/min per mg protein in the presence of 0.5 mM NADPH. The apparent Km for NADPH and NADH (66 and 266 μM, respectively), the pH optimum for the reaction (6.9), and the cyanide insensitivity were similar to properties of plasma membrane-rich fractions of stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes studied by others. The activity of the phagocytic vesicles was trypsin sensitive. The specific superoxide-generating activity of macrophage phagocytic vesicles isolated from cells incubated up to 90 min with phagocytic particles remained constant. Calcium in micromolar concentrations inhibited the NADPH-dependent O2−-generating activity of phagocytic vesicles. In a physiological ionic medium (100 mM KCl, 2.5 mM MgCl2, 30 mM imidazole-HCl, pH 6.9), a maximal inhibition of O2− generation by phagocytic vesicles of 80% was observed at 40 μM free Ca2+. The half maximum inhibitory effect was at 0.7 μM Ca2+. Variations of the calcium concentration resulted in rapid and reversible alterations in O2−-forming activity. Preincubation of phagocytic vesicles in the presence of EGTA rendered their O2− generation rate in the presence of NADPH insensitive to alterations in the free calcium concentration. This desensitization by low EGTA concentrations (≤100 μM) was reversible by the addition of excess calcium, but desensitization by high EGTA concentrations (>1 mM) was not reversible by the addition of calcium either in the presence or absence of purified rabbit lung macrophage or bovine brain calmodulins. Furthermore, trifluoperazine, a drug that inhibits calmodulin-stimulated reactions, did not alter the activity or the calcium sensitivity of the superoxide-generating system of sensitive phagocytic vesicles. Peripheral plasma membrane vesicles (podosomes) prepared by gentle sonication of macrophages possessed on O2

  12. AN ENVIRONMENTAL ANTIANDROGEN, VINCLOZOLIN, ALTERS THE ORGANIZATION OF PLAY BEHAVIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    During mammalian sexual differentiation, the androgens, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are critical for the organization of the male phenotype. In rats, play behavior is sexually dimorphic. Administration of exogenous androgens during the perinatal period r...

  13. Ginseng total saponin enhances the phagocytic capacity of canine peripheral blood phagocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kang, K A; Kang, J H; Yang, M P

    2008-01-01

    The clinical and pharmacological activities of ginseng are known to modulate immune function, metabolic processes and neuro-endocrine system activities. Ginseng saponins are the principle active ingredients in the formation of immune stimulating complexes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effect of ginseng total saponin (GTS) on the phagocytic capacity of canine peripheral blood phagocytes. GTS itself did not cause any direct effect on the phagocytic capacity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) but not peripheral blood monocytes. However, the phagocytic capacity of PMN and monocytes, but not PBMC, was enhanced by the culture supernatant from PBMC treated with GTS. The phagocytic capacity of PMN and monocytes was also increased by treatment with recombinant canine (rc) tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. The ability of the culture supernatant from GTS-treated PBMC to stimulate the phagocytic capacity of phagocytes was inhibited by addition of anti-rc TNF-alpha polyclonal antibody (pAb) prior to the culture. The amount of TNF-alpha in the culture supernatant from PBMC was shown to increase upon treatment of GTS as compared with that of vehicle-treated PBMC culture supernatant. These results suggest that GTS has an immunoenhancing effect on the phagocytic capacity of canine peripheral blood phagocytes, which is mainly mediated by TNF-alpha released from GTS-stimulated PBMC. PMID:18457364

  14. On the Behavior of Phosphorus During the Aqueous Alteration of CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brearley, Adrian J.; Chizmadia, Lysa J.

    2005-01-01

    During the earliest period of solar system formation, water played an important role in the evolution of primitive dust, both after accretion of planetesimals and possible before accretion within the protoplanetary disk. Many chondrites show evidence of variable degrees of aqueous alteration, the CM2 chondrites being among the most studied [1]. This group of chondrites is characterized by mineral assemblages of both primary and secondary alteration phases. Hence, these meteorites retain a particularly important record of the reactions that occurred between primary high temperature nebular phases and water. Studies of these chondrites can provide information on the conditions and environments of aqueous alteration and the mobility of elements during alteration. This latter question is at the core of a debate concerning the location of aqueous alteration, i.e. whether alteration occurred predominantly within a closed system after accretion (parent body alteration) or whether some degree of alteration occurred within the solar nebula or on ephemeral protoplanetary bodies prior to accretion. At the core of the parent body alteration model is the hypothesis that elemental exchange between different components, principally chondrules and matrix, must have occurred. chondrules and matrix, must have occurred. In this study, we focus on the behavior of the minor element, phosphorus. This study was stimulated by observations of the behavior of P during the earliest stages of alteration in glassy mesostasis in type II chondrules in CR chondrites and extends the preliminary observations of on Y791198 to other CM chondrites.

  15. Peripheral injury alters schooling behavior in squid, Doryteuthis pealeii.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Megumi; di Pauli von Treuheim, Theodor; Carroll, Julia; Hanlon, Roger T; Walters, Edgar T; Crook, Robyn J

    2016-07-01

    Animals with detectable injuries are at escalated threat of predation. The anti-predation tactic of schooling reduces individual predation risk overall, but it is not known how schooling behavior affects injured animals, or whether risks are reduced equally for injured animals versus other school members. In this laboratory study we examined the effects of minor fin injury on schooling decisions made by squid. Schooling behavior of groups of squid, in which one member was injured, was monitored over 24h. Injured squid were more likely to be members of a school shortly after injury (0.5-2h), but there were no differences compared with sham-injured squid at longer time points (6-24h). Overall, the presence of an injured conspecific increased the probability that a school would form, irrespective of whether the injured squid was a member of the school. When groups containing one injured squid were exposed to a predator cue, injured squid were more likely to join the school, but their position depended on whether the threat was a proximate visual cue or olfactory cue. We found no evidence that injured squid oriented themselves to conceal their injury from salient threats. Overall we conclude that nociceptive sensitization after injury changes grouping behaviors in ways that are likely to be adaptive. PMID:27108689

  16. Crocodylus siamensis serum and macrophage phagocytic activity.

    PubMed

    Aree, Kalaya; Siruntawineti, Jindawan; Chaeychomsri, Win

    2011-12-01

    Antimicrobial activity of sera from many crocodilian species has been recognized. This activity was proposed to be mediated, at least in part, by complement. Due to the fact that complement proteins have different functions in the immune system, they may be involved in phagocytic process of phagocytes. In the present study, the effects of Siamese crocodile serum on phagocytic activity of macrophages as well as the possible involvement of complement in this process were examined. The results showed increases in the phagocytosis of both Escherichia coli and to a lesser extent, Staphylococcus aureus upon incubation of murine macrophage cell line with fresh crocodile serum (FS). Similar to FS, other crocodile blood products, including freeze dried serum (DS) and freeze dried whole blood (DWB) exhibited phagocytosis-enhancing property. However the ability of DWB to enhance phagocytosis was less efficient than that of FS and DS, suggesting that serum factors were involved in this process. Treatment of FS with heat at 56 degrees C for 30 min deteriorated the effect of FS on bacterial uptake of macrophages, suggesting that complement proteins play a role in the modulation of the phagocytic process. Collectively, the results of the present study suggested that crocodile serum enhances the macrophage phagocytic activity through complement activity and, therefore, may be taken as an alternative medicine for supporting the human immune responses. PMID:22619919

  17. Hericium erinaceus extracts alter behavioral rhythm in mice.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Shoko; Kuwahara, Rika; Hiraki, Eri; Ohnuki, Koichiro; Yasuo, Shinobu; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Hericium erinaceus (HE), an edible mushroom, has been used as a herbal medicine in several Asian countries since ancient times. HE has potential as a medicine for the treatment and prevention of dementia, a disorder closely linked with circadian rhythm. This study investigated the effects of the intake of HE extracts on behavioral rhythm, photosensitivity of the circadian clock, and clock gene mRNA expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a central clock, in mice. Although the HE ethanol extract only affected the offset time of activity, the HE water extract advanced the sleep-wake cycle without affecting the free-running period, photosensitivity, or the clock gene mRNA expression in SCN. In addition, both extracts decreased wakefulness around end of active phase. The findings of the present study suggest that HE may serve as a functional food in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease and delayed sleep phase syndrome. PMID:27544998

  18. Withaferin a alters intermediate filament organization, cell shape and behavior.

    PubMed

    Grin, Boris; Mahammad, Saleemulla; Wedig, Tatjana; Cleland, Megan M; Tsai, Lester; Herrmann, Harald; Goldman, Robert D

    2012-01-01

    Withaferin A (WFA) is a steroidal lactone present in Withania somnifera which has been shown in vitro to bind to the intermediate filament protein, vimentin. Based upon its affinity for vimentin, it has been proposed that WFA can be used as an anti-tumor agent to target metastatic cells which up-regulate vimentin expression. We show that WFA treatment of human fibroblasts rapidly reorganizes vimentin intermediate filaments (VIF) into a perinuclear aggregate. This reorganization is dose dependent and is accompanied by a change in cell shape, decreased motility and an increase in vimentin phosphorylation at serine-38. Furthermore, vimentin lacking cysteine-328, the proposed WFA binding site, remains sensitive to WFA demonstrating that this site is not required for its cellular effects. Using analytical ultracentrifugation, viscometry, electron microscopy and sedimentation assays we show that WFA has no effect on VIF assembly in vitro. Furthermore, WFA is not specific for vimentin as it disrupts the cellular organization and induces perinuclear aggregates of several other IF networks comprised of peripherin, neurofilament-triplet protein, and keratin. In cells co-expressing keratin IF and VIF, the former are significantly less sensitive to WFA with respect to inducing perinuclear aggregates. The organization of microtubules and actin/microfilaments is also affected by WFA. Microtubules become wavier and sparser and the number of stress fibers appears to increase. Following 24 hrs of exposure to doses of WFA that alter VIF organization and motility, cells undergo apoptosis. Lower doses of the drug do not kill cells but cause them to senesce. In light of our findings that WFA affects multiple IF systems, which are expressed in many tissues of the body, caution is warranted in its use as an anti-cancer agent, since it may have debilitating organism-wide effects. PMID:22720028

  19. Comparative Anatomy of Phagocytic and Immunological Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Niedergang, Florence; Di Bartolo, Vincenzo; Alcover, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    The generation of phagocytic cups and immunological synapses are crucial events of the innate and adaptive immune responses, respectively. They are triggered by distinct immune receptors and performed by different cell types. However, growing experimental evidence shows that a very close series of molecular and cellular events control these two processes. Thus, the tight and dynamic interplay between receptor signaling, actin and microtubule cytoskeleton, and targeted vesicle traffic are all critical features to build functional phagosomes and immunological synapses. Interestingly, both phagocytic cups and immunological synapses display particular spatial and temporal patterns of receptors and signaling molecules, leading to the notion of “phagocytic synapse.” Here, we discuss both types of structures, their organization, and the mechanisms by which they are generated and regulated. PMID:26858721

  20. Brucella alters endocytic pathway in J774 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Graciela N; Grilli, Diego J; Samartino, Luis E; Magadán, Javier; Mayorga, Luis S

    2010-01-01

    Brucella is a facultative intracellular bacterium which causes chronic infections in mammals by surviving and replicating within host cells. The putative role of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in the formation of the phagosome in non-professional phagocytes is supported by several research groups, but still leaves open the question of the fate of Brucella inside professional phagocytes and its resistance mechanisms therein. Macrophages are particularly important for the survival and spreading of Brucella during infection. The intracellular transport of Brucella in these cells has not been thoroughly characterized. To study the maturation process of Brucella-containing phagosomes in phagocytes, we comparatively monitored the intracellular transport of a virulent strain (2308) with two vaccine strains (S19 and RB51) in J 774 macrophages. Then, we compared the behavior of all three strains studied through transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that the virulent strain not only occupies two different kinds of compartments but also alters the endocytic pathway of the cell it parasitizes, unlike what has been reported for non-professional phagocytes, like HeLa cell. Besides, differences are observed in the behavior of both Brucella abortus vaccine strains. PMID:21178473

  1. Norepinephrine Transporter Heterozygous Knockout Mice Exhibit Altered Transport and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fentress, HM; Klar, R; Krueger, JK; Sabb, T; Redmon, SN; Wallace, NM; Shirey-Rice, JK; Hahn, MK

    2013-01-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) regulates synaptic NE availability for noradrenergic signaling in the brain and sympathetic nervous system. Although genetic variation leading to a loss of NET expression has been implicated in psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders, complete NET deficiency has not been found in people, limiting the utility of NET knockout mice as a model for genetically-driven NET dysfunction. Here, we investigate NET expression in NET heterozygous knockout male mice (NET+/−), demonstrating that they display an ~50% reduction in NET protein levels. Surprisingly, these mice display no significant deficit in NET activity, assessed in hippocampal and cortical synaptosomes. We found that this compensation in NET activity was due to enhanced activity of surface-resident transporters, as opposed to surface recruitment of NET protein or compensation through other transport mechanisms, including serotonin, dopamine or organic cation transporters. We hypothesize that loss of NET protein in the NET+/− mouse establishes an activated state of existing, surface NET proteins. NET+/− mice exhibit increased anxiety in the open field and light-dark box and display deficits in reversal learning in the Morris Water Maze. These data suggest recovery of near basal activity in NET+/− mice appears to be insufficient to limit anxiety responses or support cognitive performance that might involve noradrenergic neurotransmission. The NET+/− mice represent a unique model to study the loss and resultant compensatory changes in NET that may be relevant to behavior and physiology in human NET deficiency disorders. PMID:24102798

  2. Norepinephrine transporter heterozygous knockout mice exhibit altered transport and behavior.

    PubMed

    Fentress, H M; Klar, R; Krueger, J J; Sabb, T; Redmon, S N; Wallace, N M; Shirey-Rice, J K; Hahn, M K

    2013-11-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) regulates synaptic NE availability for noradrenergic signaling in the brain and sympathetic nervous system. Although genetic variation leading to a loss of NET expression has been implicated in psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders, complete NET deficiency has not been found in people, limiting the utility of NET knockout mice as a model for genetically driven NET dysfunction. Here, we investigate NET expression in NET heterozygous knockout male mice (NET(+/-) ), demonstrating that they display an approximately 50% reduction in NET protein levels. Surprisingly, these mice display no significant deficit in NET activity assessed in hippocampal and cortical synaptosomes. We found that this compensation in NET activity was due to enhanced activity of surface-resident transporters, as opposed to surface recruitment of NET protein or compensation through other transport mechanisms, including serotonin, dopamine or organic cation transporters. We hypothesize that loss of NET protein in the NET(+/-) mouse establishes an activated state of existing surface NET proteins. The NET(+/-) mice exhibit increased anxiety in the open field and light-dark box and display deficits in reversal learning in the Morris water maze. These data suggest that recovery of near basal activity in NET(+/-) mice appears to be insufficient to limit anxiety responses or support cognitive performance that might involve noradrenergic neurotransmission. The NET(+/-) mice represent a unique model to study the loss and resultant compensatory changes in NET that may be relevant to behavior and physiology in human NET deficiency disorders. PMID:24102798

  3. Altered behavioral and metabolic circadian rhythms in mice with disrupted NAD+ oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Sahar, Saurabh; Nin, Veronica; Barbosa, Maria Thereza; Chini, Eduardo Nunes; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The Intracellular levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) are rhythmic and controlled by the circadian clock. However, whether NAD+ oscillation in turn contributes to circadian physiology is not fully understood. To address this question we analyzed mice mutated for the NAD+ hydrolase CD38. We found that rhythmicity of NAD+ was altered in the CD38-deficient mice. The high, chronic levels of NAD+ results in several anomalies in circadian behavior and metabolism. CD38-null mice display a shortened period length of locomotor activity and alteration in the rest-activity rhythm. Several clock genes and, interestingly, genes involved in amino acid metabolism were deregulated in CD38-null livers. Metabolomic analysis identified alterations in the circadian levels of several amino acids, specifically tryptophan levels were reduced in the CD38-null mice at a circadian time paralleling with elevated NAD+ levels. Thus, CD38 contributes to behavioral and metabolic circadian rhythms and altered NAD+ levels influence the circadian clock. PMID:21937766

  4. Zinc increases the phagocytic capacity of canine peripheral blood phagocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Joung; Kang, Ji-Houn; Yang, Mhan-Pyo

    2009-03-01

    Zinc is a trace element that plays a central role in the immune system. In the present study, the effect of zinc on the phagocytic capacity of canine peripheral blood phagocytes was examined in vitro by flow cytometry. Zinc was used at a concentration of 100 microM, which preserved cell viability. Treatment with zinc did not directly affect the phagocytic capacity of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) and mononuclear cells (PBMC). However, it did directly enhance the phagocytic capacity of peripheral blood monocyte-rich cells. Moreover, the phagocytic capacity of PMN and monocyte-rich cells but not PBMC was remarkably enhanced by culture supernatants from PBMC but not PMN treated with zinc. Anti-recombinant canine (rc) tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) polyclonal antibody (pAb) neutralized the enhancing effect of the culture supernatant from zinc-treated PBMC and this supernatant had higher TNF-alpha levels than the culture supernatant of untreated PBMC. Thus, zinc may stimulate canine PBMC to produce TNF-alpha, which enhances the phagocytic capacity of canine peripheral blood phagocytes. PMID:18780154

  5. Interactions of fungal pathogens with phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Erwig, Lars P; Gow, Neil A R

    2016-03-01

    The surveillance and elimination of fungal pathogens rely heavily on the sentinel behaviour of phagocytic cells of the innate immune system, especially macrophages and neutrophils. The efficiency by which these cells recognize, uptake and kill fungal pathogens depends on the size, shape and composition of the fungal cells and the success or failure of various fungal mechanisms of immune evasion. In this Review, we describe how fungi, particularly Candida albicans, interact with phagocytic cells and discuss the many factors that contribute to fungal immune evasion and prevent host elimination of these pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:26853116

  6. Caffeine triggers behavioral and neurochemical alterations in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Ardais, A P; Borges, M F; Rocha, A S; Sallaberry, C; Cunha, R A; Porciúncula, L O

    2014-06-13

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant most consumed worldwide but concerns arise about the growing intake of caffeine-containing drinks by adolescents since the effects of caffeine on cognitive functions and neurochemical aspects of late brain maturation during adolescence are poorly known. We now studied the behavioral impact in adolescent male rats of regular caffeine intake at low (0.1mg/mL), moderate (0.3mg/mL) and moderate/high (1.0mg/mL) doses only during their active period (from 7:00 P.M. to 7:00 A.M.). All tested doses of caffeine were devoid of effects on locomotor activity, but triggered anxiogenic effects. Caffeine (0.3 and 1mg/mL) improved the performance in the object recognition task, but the higher dose of caffeine (1.0mg/mL) decreased the habituation to an open-field arena, suggesting impaired non-associative memory. All tested doses of caffeine decreased the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein and synaptosomal-associated protein-25, but failed to modify neuron-specific nuclear protein immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Caffeine (0.3-1mg/mL) increased the density of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and proBDNF density as well as adenosine A1 receptor density in the hippocampus, whereas the higher dose of caffeine (1mg/mL) increased the density of proBDNF and BDNF and decreased A1 receptor density in the cerebral cortex. These findings document an impact of caffeine consumption in adolescent rats with a dual impact on anxiety and recognition memory, associated with changes in BDNF levels and decreases of astrocytic and nerve terminal markers without overt neuronal damage in hippocampal and cortical regions. PMID:24726984

  7. The mononuclear phagocyte system and lymphocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter outlines the cellular processes that are activated and interact during host immune responses including: (a) phagocytosis and antigen presentation by cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system (monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells), and (b) cell-mediated and humoral immunity ...

  8. Parasites alter freshwater communities in mesocosms by modifying invasive crayfish behavior.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Lindsey S; Lodge, David M

    2016-06-01

    Parasites can alter communities by reducing densities of keystone hosts, but few studies have examined how trait-mediated indirect effects of parasites can alter ecological communities. We test how trematode parasites (Microphallus spp.) that affect invasive crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) behavior alter how crayfish impact lake littoral communities. O. rusticus drive community composition in north temperate lakes, and predatory fish can reduce crayfish activity and feeding. In laboratory studies, Microphallus parasites also alter O. rusticus behavior: infected O. rusticus eat fewer macroinvertebrates and are bolder near predatory fish than uninfected individuals. We used a 2 x 2 factorial experiment to test how predatory fish and parasites affect O. rusticus impacts in large mesocosms over 4 weeks. We predicted (1) that when predators were absent, infected crayfish would have lower impacts than uninfected crayfish on macrophytes and macroinvertebrates (as well as reduced growth and higher mortality). However, (2) when predators were present but unable to consume crayfish, infected crayfish would have greater impacts (as well as greater growth and lower mortality) than uninfected crayfish because of increased boldness. Because of its effect on crayfish feeding behavior, we also predicted (3) that infection would alter macrophyte and macroinvertebrate community composition. In contrast to our first hypothesis, we found that infected and uninfected crayfish had similar impacts on lower trophic levels when predators were absent. Across all treatments, infected crayfish were more likely to be outside shelters and had greater growth than uninfected crayfish, suggesting that the reduced feeding observed in short-term experiments does not occur over longer timescales. However, in support of the second hypothesis, when predatory fish were present, infected crayfish ate more macroinvertebrates than did uninfected crayfish, likely due to increased boldness. We also observed a

  9. Alterations to Functional Analysis Methodology to Clarify the Functions of Low Rate, High Intensity Problem Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Barbara J; Kahng, SungWoo; Schmidt, Jonathan; Bowman, Lynn G; Boelter, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    Current research provides few suggestions for modifications to functional analysis procedures to accommodate low rate, high intensity problem behavior. This study examined the results of the extended duration functional analysis procedures of Kahng, Abt, and Schonbachler (2001) with six children admitted to an inpatient hospital for the treatment of severe problem behavior. Results of initial functional analyses (Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, & Richman, 1982/1994) were inconclusive for all children because of low levels of responding. The altered functional analyses, which changed multiple variables including the duration of the functional analysis (i.e., 6 or 7 hrs), yielded clear behavioral functions for all six participants. These results add additional support for the utility of an altered analysis of low rate, high intensity problem behavior when standard functional analyses do not yield differentiated results. PMID:23326628

  10. Post-weaning environmental enrichment alters affective responses and interacts with behavioral testing to alter nNOS immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Workman, Joanna L; Fonken, Laura K; Gusfa, James; Kassouf, Kathleen M; Nelson, Randy J

    2011-11-01

    Challenging early life events can dramatically affect mental health and wellbeing. Childhood trauma and neglect can increase the risk for developing depressive, anxiety, and substance abuse disorders. Early maternal separation in rodents has been extensively studied and induces long-lasting alterations in affective and stress responses. However, other developmental periods (e.g., the pubertal period) comprise a critical window whereby social and environmental complexity can exert lasting changes on the brain and behavior. In this study, we tested whether early life environmental complexity impacts affective responses, aggressive behaviors, and expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), the synthetic enzyme for nitric oxide, in adulthood. Mice were weaned into social+nonsocial enrichment, social only enrichment, or standard (isolated) laboratory environments and were tested in open field, elevated plus maze, forced swim, and resident-intruder aggression tests 60 days later. Social+nonsocial enrichment reduced locomotor behavior and anxiety-like responses in the open field and reduced depressive-like responses in the forced swim test. Social housing increased open arm exploration in the elevated plus maze. Both social+nonsocial enrichment and social housing only reduced aggressive behaviors compared with isolation. Social+nonsocial enrichment also increased body mass gain throughout the study. Finally, socially-housed mice had reduced corticosterone concentrations compared with social+nonsocial-enriched mice. Behavioral testing reduced nNOS-positive neurons in the basolateral amygdala and the ventral lateral septum, but not in the social+nonsocial-enriched mice, suggesting that environmental complexity may buffer the brain against some environmental perturbations. PMID:21777607

  11. Biological markers of macrophage activation: applications for fish phagocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Enane, N A; Frenkel, K; O'Connor, J M; Squibb, K S; Zelikoff, J T

    1993-01-01

    The immune defence mechanisms of fish seem to be related and similarly competent to those of mammals. Because of this, there is an increased interest in the immune responses of fish as models for higher vertebrates in immunological/immunotoxicological studies. Macrophages (M phi), phagocytic cells of the mammalian and teleost immune system which reside in tissues, represent a quiescent population of cells. However, upon stimulation, alterations in the physiology of these resident M phi occur which can be defined in terms of activation. This study was undertaken to determine whether biological markers used to assess mammalian M phi activation are applicable for use with fish M phi. Cells were recovered from the peritoneal cavity of non-injected and Aeromonas salmonicida-injected fish, and differences between resident and elicited M phi were evaluated with respect to protein content, phagocytic competence, enzyme activities and hydrogen peroxide production. Results demonstrate that biological markers used to assess mammalian M phi activation, with the exception of acid phosphatase activity, can be used to characterize the activation state of trout M phi, and that the activation process in both fish and mammals may occur by similar mechanism(s). PMID:8244466

  12. Context–Specific Social Behavior is Altered by Orbitofrontal Cortex Lesions in Adult Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Babineau, Brooke A.; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Machado, Christopher J.; Toscano, Jessica E.; Mason, William A.; Amaral, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Although the orbitofrontal cortex has been implicated in important aspects of social behavior, few studies have evaluated semi-naturalistic social behavior in nonhuman primates after discrete lesions of this cortical area. In the present report, we evaluated the behavior of adult rhesus monkeys during dyadic social interactions with novel animals following discrete lesions of the orbitofrontal cortex. In a constrained condition, in which animals could engage in only restricted social behaviors, there were no significant differences in social behavior between the lesion group and the sham-operated control group. When the experimental animals could freely interact with partner animals, however, lesioned animals differed from control animals in terms of social interest and fear-related behaviors. These alterations were contingent on the partner with which they interacted. The lesioned animals, when compared to the control animals, had a significantly greater propensity to approach some but not all of their social partners. They also grimaced more towards the partner animal that they did not approach. Behavioral alterations were more apparent during the initial interactions between animals. We discuss these findings in relation to the role of the orbitofrontal cortex in context dependent modulation of social behavior. PMID:21256192

  13. Neonatal handling alters the structure of maternal behavior and affects mother-pup bonding.

    PubMed

    Reis, A R; de Azevedo, M S; de Souza, M A; Lutz, M L; Alves, M B; Izquierdo, I; Cammarota, M; Silveira, P P; Lucion, A B

    2014-05-15

    During early life, a mother and her pups establish a very close relationship, and the olfactory learning of the nest odor is very important for the bond formation. The olfactory bulb (OB) is a structure that plays a fundamental role in the olfactory learning (OL) mechanism that also involves maternal behavior (licking and contact). We hypothesized that handling the pups would alter the structure of the maternal behavior, affect OL, and alter mother-pup relationships. Moreover, changes in the cyclic AMP-response element binding protein phosphorylation (CREB) and neurotrophic factors could be a part of the mechanism of these changes. This study aimed to analyze the effects of neonatal handling, 1 min per day from postpartum day 1 to 10 (PPD 1 to PPD 10), on the maternal behavior and pups' preference for the nest odor in a Y maze (PPD 11). We also tested CREB's phosphorylation and BDNF signaling in the OB of the pups (PPD 7) by Western blot analysis. The results showed that handling alters mother-pups interaction by decreasing mother-pups contact and changing the temporal pattern of all components of the maternal behavior especially the daily licking and nest-building. We found sex-dependent changes in the nest odor preference, CREB and BDNF levels in pups OB. Male pups were more affected by alterations in the licking pattern, and female pups were more affected by changes in the mother-pup contact (the time spent outside the nest and nursing). PMID:24598277

  14. Teaching Social Workers about Substance Use Problems via Temporary Abstinence from Normal Mood-Altering Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Paul Elliott

    2007-01-01

    Social work students enrolled in a graduate-level course in substance abuse (N = 450, over nine years) assessed their own "mood-altering" behaviors (i.e., stress-reduction strategies and leisure-time activities), abstained from one or more of these activities for one week, then completed a written summary of their personal bio-psycho-social…

  15. Adaptive Responses to Prochloraz Exposure That Alter Dose-Response and Time-Course Behaviors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose response and time-course (DRTC) are, along with exposure, the major determinants of health risk. Adaptive changes within exposed organisms in response to environmental stress are common, and alter DRTC behaviors to minimize the effects caused by stressors. In this project, ...

  16. The behavioral effects of enriched housing are not altered by serotonin depletion but enrichment alters hippocampal neurochemistry.

    PubMed

    Galani, Rodrigue; Berthel, Marie-Camille; Lazarus, Christine; Majchrzak, Monique; Barbelivien, Alexandra; Kelche, Christian; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2007-07-01

    To assess a possible role for serotonin in the mediation of the behavioral changes induced by enriched housing conditions (EC), adult female Long-Evans rats sustaining a serotonin depletion (150 microg of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, icv) and sham-operated rats were housed postoperatively for 30 days in enriched (12 rats/large cage containing various objects) or standard housing conditions (2 rats/standard laboratory cage). Thereafter, anxiety responses (elevated plus-maze), locomotor activity (in the home-cage), sensori-motor capabilities (beam-walking task), and spatial memory (eight-arm radial maze) were assessed. Monoamine levels were subsequently measured in the frontoparietal cortex and the hippocampus. Overall, EC reduced anxiety-related responses, enhanced sensori-motor performance and improved the memory span in the initial stage of the spatial memory task. Despite a substantial reduction of serotonergic markers in the hippocampus (82%) and the cortex (74%), these positive effects of EC were not altered by the lesion. EC reduced the serotonin levels in the ventral hippocampus (particularly in unlesioned rats: -23%), increased serotonin turnover in the entire hippocampus (particularly in lesioned rats: +36%) and augmented the norepinephrine levels in the dorsal hippocampus (+68% in unlesioned and +49% in lesioned rats); no such alterations were found in the frontoparietal cortex. Our data suggest that an intact serotonergic system is not a prerequisite for the induction of positive behavioral effects by EC. The neurochemical changes found in the hippocampus of EC rats, however, show that the monoaminergic innervation of the hippocampus is a target of EC. PMID:17493843

  17. 3'-modified antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides complementary to calmodulin mRNA alter behavioral responses in Paramecium.

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichsen, R D; Fraga, D; Reed, M W

    1992-01-01

    The calcium-binding protein calmodulin has been shown to modulate the Ca(2+)-dependent ion channels of Paramecium tetraurelia. Mutations in the calmodulin gene of Paramecium result in an altered pattern of behavioral responses. Antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs), complementary to calmodulin mRNA in Paramecium, were synthesized from a modified solid support that introduced a 3'-hydroxyhexyl phosphate. These 3'-modified ODNs were tested for their ability to alter the behavioral response of Paramecium. The microinjection of antisense ODNs temporarily reduced the backward swimming behavior of the cells in test solutions containing Na+. The injection of sense and random 3'-modified ODNs, or unmodified antisense ODNs, had no effect. The antisense ODN-induced effect was reversed by the injection of calmodulin protein. The pattern of response of the injected cells in various behavioral test solutions indicated that the calmodulin antisense ODNs reduce the Ca(2+)-dependent Na+ current. Antisense ODNs, complementary either to the 5' start site or to an internal sequence of the calmodulin mRNA, were similarly effective in altering behavior. These results show that antisense ODNs may be utilized in ciliated protozoa as a tool for reducing the expression of specific gene products. In addition, Paramecium represents a powerful model system with which to study and develop antisense ODN technology. PMID:1528867

  18. Altering the function of commands presented to boys with oppositional and hyperactive behavior

    PubMed Central

    Danforth, Jeffrey S.

    2002-01-01

    Mentalistic and behavioral analyses of noncompliance among children with hyperactive behavior are contrasted. Then, a behavioral training program for 3 boys with behavior characteristic of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and oppositional defiant disorder is described. The child-focused training was conducted in conjunction with parent training. In an effort to increase the rate of compliance, the child-training program was designed to alter the function of parent commands by teaching the boys to verbalize rules about parent commands and consequences in the context of observing parent—child role-plays. Training was conducted within a multiple baseline design across children. Direct observation of mother—child interactions, telephone interviews, and standardized rating scales showed that training resulted in clinically significant reductions in noncompliance and improved parenting behavior. A 6-month follow-up revealed stable outcomes. PMID:22477227

  19. Postnatal behavioral and inflammatory alterations in female pups prenatally exposed to valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskas, Nadia; Campolongo, Marcos; Lucchina, Luciana; Zappala, Cecilia; Depino, Amaicha Mara

    2016-10-01

    In Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), a bias to a higher incidence in boys than in girls has been reported. With the aim to identify biological mechanisms acting in female animals that could underlie this bias, we used an extensively validated mouse model of ASD: the prenatal exposure to valproic acid (VPA). We found postnatal behavioral alterations in female VPA pups: a longer latency in righting reflex at postnatal day (P) 3, and a delay in the acquisition of the acoustic startle response. We also analyzed the density of glial cells in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, in VPA and control animals. Female VPA pups showed alterations in the density of astrocytes and microglial cells between P21 and P42, with specific dynamics in each brain region. We also found a decrease in histone 3 acetylation in the cerebellum of female VPA pups at P14, suggesting that the changes in glial cell density could be due to alterations in the epigenetic developmental program. Finally, no differences in maternal behavior were found. Our results show that female VPA pups exhibit behavioral and inflammatory alterations postnatally, although they have been reported to have normal levels of sociability in adulthood. With our work, we contribute to the understanding of biological mechanisms underlying different effects of VPA on male and female rodents, and we hope to help elucidate whether there are factors increasing susceptibility to ASD in boys and/or resilience in girls. PMID:27337090

  20. Role of oxygen in phagocyte microbicidal action.

    PubMed

    Allen, R C

    1994-12-01

    Immune information in the form of inflammatory mediators directs phagocyte locomotion and increases expression of opsonin receptors such that contact with an opsonized microbe results in receptor ligation and activation of microbicidal metabolism. Carbohydrate dehydrogenation and O2 consumption feed reactions that effectively lower the spin quantum number (S) of O2 from 1 to 1/2 and finally to 0. Oxidase-catalyzed univalent reduction of O2 (S = 1; triplet multiplicity) yields hydrodioxylic acid (HO2) and its conjugate base superoxide, O2- (S = 1/2; doublet multiplicity). Acid or enzymatic disproportionation of superoxide yields H2O2 (S = 0; singlet multiplicity). Haloperoxidase catalyzes H2O2-dependent oxidation of Cl- yielding HOCl (S = 0), and reaction of HOCl with H2O2 yields singlet molecular oxygen, 1O2 (S = 0; singlet multiplicity). The Wigner spin conservation rule restricts direct reaction of S = 1 O2 with S = 0 organic molecules. Lowering the S of O2 overcomes this spin restriction and allows microbicidal combustion. High exergonicity dioxygenation reactions yield electronically excited carbonyl products that relax by photon emission, i.e., phagocyte luminescence. Addition of high quantum yield substrates susceptible to spin allowed dioxygenation, i.e., chemiluminigenic substrates, greatly increases detection sensitivity and defines the nature of the oxygenating agent. Measurement of luminescence allows high sensitivity, real-time, and substrate-specific differential analysis of phagocyte dioxygenating activities. Under assay conditions where immune mediator and opsonin exposure are controlled, luminescence analysis of the initial phase of opsonin-stimulated oxygenation activity allows functional assessment of the opsonin receptor expression per circulating phagocyte and can be used to gauge the in vivo state of immune activation. PMID:7705297

  1. Early onset of behavioral alterations in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8).

    PubMed

    Yanai, Shuichi; Endo, Shogo

    2016-07-15

    Senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) is inbred lines of mice originally developed from AKR/J mice. Among the six SAM prone (SAMP) substrains, 8- to 12-month-old SAMP8 have long been used as a model of age-related cognitive impairments. However, little is still known for younger SAMP8 mice. Here, we examined the phenotypical characteristics of 4-month-old SAMP8 using a battery of behavioral tests. Four-month-old SAMP8 mice failed to recognize spatially displaced object in an object recognition task and performed poorly in the probe test of the Morris water maze task compared to SAMR1, suggesting that SAMP8 have impaired spatial memory. In addition, young SAMP8 exhibited enhanced anxiety-like behavior in an open field test and showed depression-like behavior in the forced-swim test. Their circadian rhythm was also disrupted. These abnormal behaviors of young SAMP8 are similar to behavioral alterations also observed in aged mice. In summary, age-related behavioral alterations occur in SAMP8 as young as 4 months old. PMID:27093926

  2. Behavioral alterations following blood-brain barrier disruption stimulated by focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Huang, Sheng-Fang; Cheng, Irene Han-Juo

    2016-05-10

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the behavioral alterations and histological changes of the brain after FUS-induced BBB disruption (BBBD). Rats were behaviorally tested using the open field, hole-board, and grip strength tests from day 1 through day 32 after undergoing BBBD induced by FUS with either a mild or heavy parameter. In the open field test, we found an increase in center entries on day 1 and day 9 following heavy FUS treatment and a decrease in center entries at day 18 following mild FUS treatment. With regard to memory-related alterations, rats subjected to heavy FUS treatment exhibited longer latency to start exploring and to find the first baited hole. However, rats subjected to mild FUS treatment exhibited no significant differences in terms of memory performance or grip force. The obtained data suggest that heavy FUS treatment might induce hyperactivity, spatial memory impairment, and forelimb gripping deficits. Furthermore, while mild FUS treatment may have an impact on anxiety-related behaviors, the data suggested it had no impact on locomotor activity, memory, or grip force. Thus, the behavioral alterations following FUS-induced BBBD require further investigation before clinical application. PMID:27034007

  3. Cyclic Regulation of Sensory Perception by a Female Hormone Alters Behavior.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sandeepa; Chamero, Pablo; Pru, James K; Chien, Ming-Shan; Ibarra-Soria, Ximena; Spencer, Kathryn R; Logan, Darren W; Matsunami, Hiroaki; Peluso, John J; Stowers, Lisa

    2015-06-01

    Females may display dramatically different behavior depending on their state of ovulation. This is thought to occur through sex-specific hormones acting on behavioral centers in the brain. Whether incoming sensory activity also differs across the ovulation cycle to alter behavior has not been investigated. Here, we show that female mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) are temporarily and specifically rendered "blind" to a subset of male-emitted pheromone ligands during diestrus yet fully detect and respond to the same ligands during estrus. VSN silencing occurs through the action of the female sex-steroid progesterone. Not all VSNs are targeted for silencing; those detecting cat ligands remain continuously active irrespective of the estrous state. We identify the signaling components that account for the capacity of progesterone to target specific subsets of male-pheromone responsive neurons for inactivation. These findings indicate that internal physiology can selectively and directly modulate sensory input to produce state-specific behavior. PAPERCLIP. PMID:26046438

  4. Altering the timing of academic prompts to treat destructive behavior maintained by escape.

    PubMed Central

    Ebanks, Mercedes E; Fisher, Wayne W

    2003-01-01

    Following a functional analysis showing that destructive behavior was reinforced by escape, we altered the aversiveness of task demands by interspersing easy and difficult tasks and by presenting a corrective prompt as an antecedent event the next time a previously failed item was presented; this procedure was compared with one in which the corrective prompt was provided as an immediate consequence. Results of a reversal design showed that the antecedent prompt acted as an establishing operation and reduced destructive behavior to zero. PMID:14596576

  5. Cortical Structure Alterations and Social Behavior Impairment in p50-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, Sara Anna; Mastinu, Andrea; Maccarinelli, Giuseppina; Mitola, Stefania; Premoli, Marika; La Rosa, Luca Rosario; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Grilli, Mariagrazia; Memo, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in genes that regulate neurodevelopment can lead to cortical malformations, resulting in malfunction during postnatal life. The NF-κB pathway has a key role during neurodevelopment by regulating the maintenance of the neural progenitor cell pool and inhibiting neuronal differentiation. In this study, we evaluated whether mice lacking the NF-κB p50 subunit (KO) present alterations in cortical structure and associated behavioral impairment. We found that, compared with wild type (WT), KO mice at postnatal day 2 present an increase in radial glial cells, an increase in Reelin protein expression levels, in addition to an increase of specific layer thickness. Moreover, adult KO mice display abnormal columnar organization in the somatosensory cortex, a specific decrease in somatostatin- and parvalbumin-expressing interneurons, altered neurite orientation, and a decrease in Synapsin I protein levels. Concerning behavior, KO mice, in addition to an increase in locomotor and exploratory activity, display impairment in social behaviors, with a reduction in social interaction. Finally, we found that risperidone treatment decreased hyperactivity of KO mice, but had no effect on defective social interaction. Altogether, these data add complexity to a growing body of data, suggesting a link between dysregulation of the NF-κB pathway and neurodevelopmental disorders pathogenesis. PMID:26946128

  6. Role of dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmitters in behavioral alterations observed in rodent model of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dhanda, Saurabh; Sandhir, Rajat

    2015-06-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the role of biogenic amines in behavioral alterations observed in rat model of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) following bile duct ligation (BDL). Male Wistar rats subjected to BDL developed biliary fibrosis after four weeks which was supported by altered liver function tests, increased ammonia levels and histological staining (Sirius red). Animals were assessed for their behavioral performance in terms of cognitive, anxiety and motor functions. The levels of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), epinephrine and norepinephrine (NE) were estimated in different regions of brain viz. cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum using HPLC along with activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO). Cognitive assessment of BDL rats revealed a progressive decline in learning, memory formation, retrieval, exploration of novel environment and spontaneous locomotor activity along with decrease in 5-HT and NE levels. This was accompanied by an increase in MAO activity. Motor functions of BDL rats were also altered which were evident from decrease in the time spent on the rotating rod and higher foot faults assessed using narrow beam walk task. A global decrease was observed in the DA content along with an increase in MAO activity. Histopathological studies using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) and cresyl violet exhibited marked neuronal degeneration, wherein neurons appeared more pyknotic, condensed and damaged. The results reveal that dopaminergic and serotonergic pathways are disturbed in chronic liver failure post-BDL which may be responsible for behavioral impairments observed in HE. PMID:25639545

  7. Cortical Structure Alterations and Social Behavior Impairment in p50-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Sara Anna; Mastinu, Andrea; Maccarinelli, Giuseppina; Mitola, Stefania; Premoli, Marika; La Rosa, Luca Rosario; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Grilli, Mariagrazia; Memo, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in genes that regulate neurodevelopment can lead to cortical malformations, resulting in malfunction during postnatal life. The NF-κB pathway has a key role during neurodevelopment by regulating the maintenance of the neural progenitor cell pool and inhibiting neuronal differentiation. In this study, we evaluated whether mice lacking the NF-κB p50 subunit (KO) present alterations in cortical structure and associated behavioral impairment. We found that, compared with wild type (WT), KO mice at postnatal day 2 present an increase in radial glial cells, an increase in Reelin protein expression levels, in addition to an increase of specific layer thickness. Moreover, adult KO mice display abnormal columnar organization in the somatosensory cortex, a specific decrease in somatostatin- and parvalbumin-expressing interneurons, altered neurite orientation, and a decrease in Synapsin I protein levels. Concerning behavior, KO mice, in addition to an increase in locomotor and exploratory activity, display impairment in social behaviors, with a reduction in social interaction. Finally, we found that risperidone treatment decreased hyperactivity of KO mice, but had no effect on defective social interaction. Altogether, these data add complexity to a growing body of data, suggesting a link between dysregulation of the NF-κB pathway and neurodevelopmental disorders pathogenesis. PMID:26946128

  8. Morphological changes and depressed phagocytic efficiency in Dictyostelium amoebae treated with toxic concentrations of cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.J.; Bernstein, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    The morphology and phagocytic efficiency of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae exposed to cadmium was investigated at two Cd concentrations: a low toxic concentration - 7 x 10/sup -5/ m, and a high toxic concentration - 2 x 10/sup -4/ m. Both concentrations inhibited growth completely; however, only in the culture containing a high toxic concentration of cadmium were severe ultrastructural anomalies observed, notably, nucleolar changes and autophagic vacuolar formation. Using biological indices it was concluded that the high concentration of cadmium was lethal and that morphological changes associated with this dose of cadmium may be secondary to cell death. In contrast, amoebae treated with a low toxic but nonlethal concentration of Cd showed an altered size distribution of cytoplasmic vacuoles and a decreased phagocytic efficiency. Cultures whose growth was completely inhibited with cobalt were also examined, as were untreated control cultures. By 24 hr Cd-treated amoebae showed a 20% decrease in the cytoplasmic mean-vacuolar diameter and a 69% decrease in phagocytic efficiency whereas Co and untreated controls showed no significant decrease in the cytoplasmic mean-vacuolar diameter. Phagocytic efficiency was only slightly diminished by Co. Changes in vacuolar profiles had been shown earlier to be related to membrane utilization in Dictyostelium amoebae. Cd at low toxic concentrations affects membrane function in Dictyostelium amoebae.

  9. Peptidoglycan from the gut microbiota governs the lifespan of circulating phagocytes at homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hergott, Christopher B; Roche, Aoife M; Tamashiro, Edwin; Clarke, Thomas B; Bailey, Aubrey G; Laughlin, Alice; Bushman, Frederic D; Weiser, Jeffrey N

    2016-05-19

    Maintenance of myeloid cell homeostasis requires continuous turnover of phagocytes from the bloodstream, yet whether environmental signals influence phagocyte longevity in the absence of inflammation remains unknown. Here, we show that the gut microbiota regulates the steady-state cellular lifespan of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes, the 2 most abundant circulating myeloid cells and key contributors to inflammatory responses. Treatment of mice with broad-spectrum antibiotics, or with the gut-restricted aminoglycoside neomycin alone, accelerated phagocyte turnover and increased the rates of their spontaneous apoptosis. Metagenomic analyses revealed that neomycin altered the abundance of intestinal bacteria bearing γ-d-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid, a ligand for the intracellular peptidoglycan sensor Nod1. Accordingly, signaling through Nod1 was both necessary and sufficient to mediate the stimulatory influence of the flora on myeloid cell longevity. Stimulation of Nod1 signaling increased the frequency of lymphocytes in the murine intestine producing the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 17A (IL-17A), and liberation of IL-17A was required for transmission of Nod1-dependent signals to circulating phagocytes. Together, these results define a mechanism through which intestinal microbes govern a central component of myeloid homeostasis and suggest perturbations of commensal communities can influence steady-state regulation of cell fate. PMID:26989200

  10. Cryptococcus and Phagocytes: Complex Interactions that Influence Disease Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Leopold Wager, Chrissy M.; Hole, Camaron R.; Wozniak, Karen L.; Wormley, Floyd L.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii are fungal pathogens that cause life-threatening disease. These fungi commonly enter their host via inhalation into the lungs where they encounter resident phagocytes, including macrophages and dendritic cells, whose response has a pronounced impact on the outcome of disease. Cryptococcus has complex interactions with the resident and infiltrating innate immune cells that, ideally, result in destruction of the yeast. These phagocytic cells have pattern recognition receptors that allow recognition of specific cryptococcal cell wall and capsule components. However, Cryptococcus possesses several virulence factors including a polysaccharide capsule, melanin production and secretion of various enzymes that aid in evasion of the immune system or enhance its ability to thrive within the phagocyte. This review focuses on the intricate interactions between the cryptococci and innate phagocytic cells including discussion of manipulation and evasion strategies used by Cryptococcus, anti-cryptococcal responses by the phagocytes and approaches for targeting phagocytes for the development of novel immunotherapeutics. PMID:26903984

  11. Gender and estrous cycle influences on behavioral and neurochemical alterations in adult rats neonatally administered ketamine.

    PubMed

    Célia Moreira Borella, Vládia; Seeman, Mary V; Carneiro Cordeiro, Rafaela; Vieira dos Santos, Júnia; Romário Matos de Souza, Marcos; Nunes de Sousa Fernandes, Ethel; Santos Monte, Aline; Maria Mendes Vasconcelos, Silvânia; Quinn, John P; de Lucena, David F; Carvalho, André F; Macêdo, Danielle

    2016-05-01

    Neonatal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blockade in rodents triggers schizophrenia (SCZ)-like alterations during adult life. SCZ is influenced by gender in age of onset, premorbid functioning, and course. Estrogen, the hormone potentially driving the gender differences in SCZ, is known to present neuroprotective effects such as regulate oxidative pathways and the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Thus, the aim of this study was to verify if differences in gender and/or estrous cycle phase during adulthood would influence the development of behavioral and neurochemical alterations in animals neonatally administered ketamine. The results showed that ketamine-treated male (KT-male) and female-in-diestrus (KTF-diestrus, the low estrogen phase) presented significant deficits in prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex and spatial working memory, two behavioral SCZ endophenotypes. On the contrary, female ketamine-treated rats during proestrus (KTF-proestrus, the high estradiol phase) had no behavioral alterations. This correlated with an oxidative imbalance in the hippocampus (HC) of both male and KTF-diestrus female rats, that is, decreased levels of GSH and increased levels of lipid peroxidation and nitrite. Similarly, BDNF was decreased in the KTF-diestrus rats while no alterations were observed in KTF-proestrus and male animals. The changes in the HC were in contrast to those in the prefrontal cortex in which only increased levels of nitrite in all groups studied were observed. Thus, there is a gender difference in the adult rat HC in response to ketamine neonatal administration, which is based on the estrous cycle. This is discussed in relation to neuropsychiatric conditions and in particular SCZ. PMID:26215537

  12. Minimal changes in hypothalamic temperature accompany microwave-induced alteration of thermoregulatory behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, E.R.; Adams, B.W.; Akel, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    This study probed the mechanisms underlying microwave-induced alterations of thermoregulatory behavior. Adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus), trained to regulate the temperature of their immediate environment (Ta) behaviorally, were chronically implanted with Teflon reentrant tubes in the medical preoptic/anterior hypothalamic area (PO/AH), the brainstem region considered to control normal thermoregulatory processes. A Vitek temperature probe inserted into the tube measured PO/AH temperature continuously while changes in thermoregulatory behavior were induced by either brief (10-min) or prolonged (2.5-h) unilateral exposures to planewave 2,450-MHz continuous wave (CW) microwaves (E polarization). Power densities explored ranged from 4 to 20 mW/cm2 (rate of energy absorption (SAR) . 0.05 (W/kg)/cm2)). Rectal temperature and four representative skin temperatures were also monitored, as was the Ta selected by the animal. When the power density was high enough to induce a monkey to select a cooler Ta (8 mW/cm2 and above), PO/AH temperature rose approximately 0.3 degrees C but seldom more. Lower power densities usually produced smaller increases in PO/AH temperature and no reliable change in thermoregulatory behavior. Rectal temperature remained constant while PO/AH temperature rose only 0.2-0.3 degrees C during 2.5-h exposures at 20 mW/cm2 because the Ta selected was 2-3 degrees C cooler than normally preferred. Sometimes PO/AH temperature increments greater than 0.3 degrees C were recorded, but they always accompanied inadequate thermoregulatory behavior. Thus, a PO/AH temperature rise of 0.2-0.3 degrees C, accompanying microwave exposure, appears to be necessary and sufficient to alter thermoregulatory behavior, which ensures in turn that no greater temperature excursions occur in this hypothalamic thermoregulatory center.

  13. Neonatal isolation alters the estrous cycle interactions on the acute behavioral effects of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Kosten, Therese A; Sanchez, Hayde; Jatlow, Peter I; Kehoe, Priscilla

    2005-09-01

    We demonstrated that neonatal isolation (ISO) increases acquisition of cocaine self-administration and alters psychostimulant-induced ventral striatal dopamine and serotonin levels in female rats. Both dopamine and serotonin modulate the behavioral effects of cocaine and these effects can vary across estrous stages. We now test whether ISO modifies the manner in which estrous stage affects the acute behavioral responses to cocaine. Litters were assigned to ISO (1 h/day isolation; post-natal days 2-9) or non-handled (NH) conditions. In Experiment 1, the ability of cocaine (0.3-30 mg/kg; IP) to disrupt schedule-controlled responding for food was assessed in proestrus, estrus, and diestrus stages. Diestrus and proestrus NH females showed increased response rates at low cocaine doses and decreased rates at higher doses relative to baseline. In contrast, estrus NH females showed decreased responding across all doses. ISO eliminated this estrous stage distinction; only decreased responding to high cocaine doses were seen. Yet, estrous cyclicity during food restriction (Experiment 2) did not differ by group. To confirm this ISO effect, proestrus or estrus rats were administered cocaine (0, 5, 10 mg/kg; IP) and activity monitored in Experiment 3. Locomotor activity differed by estrous stage in NH but not ISO rats. Cocaine plasma levels (Experiment 4) at the time of peak behavioral activity did not differ by group or estrous stage. Results extend prior studies to show estrous stage alters the behavioral effects of cocaine. Neonatal isolation eliminates these effects perhaps reflecting alterations in accumbens monoamine levels or the effects of estrogen on this system. PMID:15919581

  14. Chronic social stress in puberty alters appetitive male sexual behavior and neural metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Bastida, Christel C; Puga, Frank; Gonzalez-Lima, Francisco; Jennings, Kimberly J; Wommack, Joel C; Delville, Yvon

    2014-07-01

    Repeated social subjugation in early puberty lowers testosterone levels. We used hamsters to investigate the effects of social subjugation on male sexual behavior and metabolic activity within neural systems controlling social and motivational behaviors. Subjugated animals were exposed daily to aggressive adult males in early puberty for postnatal days 28 to 42, while control animals were placed in empty clean cages. On postnatal day 45, they were tested for male sexual behavior in the presence of receptive female. Alternatively, they were tested for mate choice after placement at the base of a Y-maze containing a sexually receptive female in one tip of the maze and an ovariectomized one on the other. Social subjugation did not affect the capacity to mate with receptive females. Although control animals were fast to approach females and preferred ovariectomized individuals, subjugated animals stayed away from them and showed no preference. Cytochrome oxidase activity was reduced within the preoptic area and ventral tegmental area in subjugated hamsters. In addition, the correlation of metabolic activity of these areas with the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and anterior parietal cortex changed significantly from positive in controls to negative in subjugated animals. These data show that at mid-puberty, while male hamsters are capable of mating, their appetitive sexual behavior is not fully mature and this aspect of male sexual behavior is responsive to social subjugation. Furthermore, metabolic activity and coordination of activity in brain areas related to sexual behavior and motivation were altered by social subjugation. PMID:24852486

  15. Chronic Social Stress in Puberty Alters Appetitive Male Sexual Behavior and Neural Metabolic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bastida, Christel C.; Puga, Frank; Gonzalez-Lima, Francisco; Jennings, Kimberly J.; Wommack, Joel C.; Delville, Yvon

    2014-01-01

    Repeated social subjugation in early puberty lowers testosterone levels. We used hamsters to investigate the effects of social subjugation on male sexual behavior and metabolic activity within neural systems controlling social and motivational behaviors. Subjugated animals were exposed daily to aggressive adult males in early puberty for postnatal days 28 to 42, while control animals were placed in empty clean cages. On postnatal day 45, they were tested for male sexual behavior in the presence of receptive female. Alternatively, they were tested for mate choice after placement at the base of a Y-maze containing a sexually receptive female in one tip of the maze and an ovariectomized one on the other. Social subjugation did not affect the capacity to mate with receptive females. Although control animals were fast to approach females and preferred ovariectomized individuals, subjugated animals stayed away from them and showed no preference. Cytochrome oxidase activity was reduced within the preoptic area and ventral tegmental area in subjugated hamsters. In addition, the correlation of metabolic activity of these areas with the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and anterior parietal cortex changed significantly from positive in controls to negative in subjugated animals. These data show that at mid-puberty, while male hamsters are capable of mating, their appetitive sexual behavior is not fully mature and this aspect of male sexual behavior is responsive to social subjugation. Furthermore, metabolic activity and coordination of activity in brain areas related to sexual behavior and motivation was altered by social subjugation. PMID:24852486

  16. Influence of the acute alcoholism on the phagocytic function of the mononuclear phagocytic system

    PubMed Central

    Sabino, KR; Petroianu, A; Alberti, LR

    2011-01-01

    Rationale:Alcoholics are more likely to have infections, mainly in the respiratory system. Alcohol seems to inhibit the immune system. Despite the extensive literature related to alcoholism, data related to the immune system are still not conclusive. Objective: The purpose of this study was to verify the influence of acute alcohol intake on colloid distribution in the organs of the mononuclear phagocyte system. Methods and Results: Thirteen male Swiss mice were divided into two groups: Group 1 (n = 5) – control, and Group 2 (n = 8) – animals that received 0.5 ml ethanol 50%, 30 minutes before the experiment. Colloidal sulphur labeled with ⁸⁸mTc was used to evaluate colloid distribution in the liver, spleen and lungs. Colloid clearance was assessed as well. A gamma camera was used to measure the radioactivity of these organs and of a blood clot. No difference was found in the presence of colloid in the organs of both groups. The liver showed the highest phagocytic intake, followed by the spleen and lungs (p = 0.021 for Group 1 and p = 0.003 for Group 2). A minimum amount of radiation remained in the blood of both groups. Discussion: According to the experiential conditions of this work, acute ingestion of alcohol did not interfere with the phagocytic function of the mononuclear phagocyte system in mice. PMID:22514578

  17. Effect of lectins on mouse peritoneal macrophage phagocytic activity.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, G; Porras, F; Fernández, L; Vázquez, L; Zenteno, E

    1994-11-01

    We studied the in vitro ability of lectin-treated murine peritoneal macrophages to attach and phagocytize particulate antigens. Glucose and mannose specific lectins such as Con-A and lentil lectin, as well as complex lactosamine residues specific lectins, such as Phaseolus vulgaris var. cacahuate and Phaseolus coccineus var. alubia, increased the macrophage phagocytic activity towards heterologous erythrocytes, whereas peanut agglutinin, a galactose-specific lectin, diminished the macrophage phagocytic activity. These results suggest that a galactose-N-acetyl-D galactosamine-containing structure could participate as negative modulator of the phagocytic activity. PMID:7851961

  18. Fluconazole Alters the Polysaccharide Capsule of Cryptococcus gattii and Leads to Distinct Behaviors in Murine Cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Julliana Ribeiro Alves; Holanda, Rodrigo Assunção; Frases, Susana; Bravim, Mayara; Araujo, Glauber de S.; Santos, Patrícia Campi; Costa, Marliete Carvalho; Ribeiro, Maira Juliana Andrade; Ferreira, Gabriella Freitas; Baltazar, Ludmila Matos; Miranda, Aline Silva; Oliveira, Danilo Bretas; Santos, Carolina Maria Araújo; Fontes, Alide Caroline Lima; Gouveia, Ludmila Ferreira; Resende-Stoianoff, Maria Aparecida; Abrahão, Jonatas Santos; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Souza, Danielle G.; Santos, Daniel Assis

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus gattii is an emergent human pathogen. Fluconazole is commonly used for treatment of cryptococcosis, but the emergence of less susceptible strains to this azole is a global problem and also the data regarding fluconazole-resistant cryptococcosis are scarce. We evaluate the influence of fluconazole on murine cryptococcosis and whether this azole alters the polysaccharide (PS) from cryptococcal cells. L27/01 strain of C. gattii was cultivated in high fluconazole concentrations and developed decreased drug susceptibility. This phenotype was named L27/01F, that was less virulent than L27/01 in mice. The physical, structural and electrophoretic properties of the PS capsule of L27/01F were altered by fluconazole. L27/01F presented lower antiphagocytic properties and reduced survival inside macrophages. The L27/01F did not affect the central nervous system, while the effect in brain caused by L27/01 strain began after only 12 hours. Mice infected with L27/01F presented lower production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, with increased cellular recruitment in the lungs and severe pulmonary disease. The behavioral alterations were affected by L27/01, but no effects were detected after infection with L27/01F. Our results suggest that stress to fluconazole alters the capsule of C. gattii and influences the clinical manifestations of cryptococcosis. PMID:25392951

  19. Lysosomal and phagocytic activity is increased in astrocytes during disease progression in the SOD1 G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David J.; Blackburn, Daniel J.; Keatinge, Marcus; Sokhi, Dilraj; Viskaitis, Paulius; Heath, Paul R.; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Kirby, Janine; Shaw, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Previously, gene expression profiling of astrocytes from the pre-symptomatic stage of the SOD1G93A model of ALS has revealed reduced lactate metabolism and altered trophic support. Here, we have performed microarray analysis of symptomatic and late-stage disease astrocytes isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM) from the lumbar spinal cord of the SOD1G93A mouse to complete the picture of astrocyte behavior throughout the disease course. Astrocytes at symptomatic and late-stage disease show a distinct up-regulation of transcripts defining a reactive phenotype, such as those involved in the lysosome and phagocytic pathways. Functional analysis of hexosaminidase B enzyme activity in the spinal cord and of astrocyte phagocytic ability has demonstrated a significant increase in lysosomal enzyme activity and phagocytic activity in SOD1G93A vs. littermate controls, validating the findings of the microarray study. In addition to the increased reactivity seen at both stages, astrocytes from late-stage disease showed decreased expression of many transcripts involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Staining for the master regulator of cholesterol synthesis, SREBP2, has revealed an increased localization to the cytoplasm of astrocytes and motor neurons in late-stage SOD1G93A spinal cord, indicating that down-regulation of transcripts may be due to an excess of cholesterol in the CNS during late-stage disease possibly due to phagocytosis of neuronal debris. Our data reveal that SOD1G93A astrocytes are characterized more by a loss of supportive function than a toxic phenotype during ALS disease progression and future studies should focus upon restorative therapies. PMID:26528138

  20. Lipid Peroxidation by Human Blood Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stossel, Thomas P.; Mason, Robert J.; Smith, Arnold L.

    1974-01-01

    Cell suspensions enriched in human blood monocytes, obtained from normal peripheral blood by sedimentation on sodium diatrizoate-Ficoll gradients or from the blood of patients with neutropenia and monocytosis, accumulated malonyldialdehyde, a labile catabolite of lipid peroxidation, during incubations with polystyrene beads or heat-killed Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mixed blood leukocytes principally composed of granulocytes or granulocytes purified by density gradient sedimentation did not accumulate malonyldialdehyde during incubations with these particles, but did when ingesting particles containing linolenate. The phospholipid fatty acid composition of monocyte-enriched and purified granulocyte preparations from the same donors were compared. The molar fraction of arachidonate (20:4) in phospholipids from monocyte-rich preparations was 62% greater than that of purified granulocytes. The findings indicate that human monocytes, possibly because of a greater content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in their membranes, peroxidize a greater quantity of endogenous lipids than granulocytes during endocytosis. Normal human granulocytes have the capacity to peroxidize ingested lipids. However, mixed leukocytes from two patients with chronic granulomatous disease produced little malonyldialdehyde when engulfing linolenate-containing particles. Therefore the capacity to peroxidize lipid is related to cellular oxygen metabolism, a function in which chronic granulomatous disease granulocytes are dificient. Malonyldialdehyde chemically prepared by hydrolysis of tetramethoxypropane, by extraction from peroxidized linolenic acid, or purified from extracts of phagocytizing rabbit alveolar macrophages had bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli and S. epidermidis. Therefore, toxic catabolites of lipid hydroperoxides may potentiate the bactericidal activity of hydrogen peroxide in mononuclear phagocytes. PMID:4853010

  1. Fluoxetine alters behavioral consistency of aggression and courtship in male Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Dzieweczynski, Teresa L; Hebert, Olivia L

    2012-08-20

    The detrimental effects of steroid-mimics are well known but investigations on non-steroid pharmaceuticals are less common. In addition, most behavioral studies do not examine the effects at multiple time points. This study examined the effects of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on behavior when male Siamese fighting fish encounter female and male dummy conspecifics simultaneously. Thus, how chemical exposure impacts behavioral consistency and whether individuals differ in their sensitivity to exposure was assessed. Overall aggression was reduced after fluoxetine administration while courtship was unaffected. Fluoxetine affected behavioral consistency towards both the male and female, with individuals behaving less consistently to the male and more consistently to the female. In addition, males appeared to differ in their sensitivity to fluoxetine exposure as not all males reduced their aggression after administration. This has important implications for studying the effects of unintended pharmaceutical exposure. Exposure may have evolutionary implications as it may influence both territorial defense and mating success. In sum, these findings demonstrate that pharmaceutical exposure may alter more than just overall level of behavior and stress the importance of examining the effects of exposure on an individual level. PMID:22722098

  2. Altered behavioral aspects of aged mice lacking the cellular prion protein.

    PubMed

    Massimino, Maria Lina; Redaelli, Marco; Bertoli, Alessandro; Sorgato, Maria Catia; Mucignat-Caretta, Carla

    2013-07-01

    The biological function of the prion protein, which is intimately involved in the onset of prion diseases, remains unclear. To understand whether the prion protein could play a role in animal behavior, a battery of tests was applied to young and aged mice that express, or not, the prion protein. In contrast to the similar results obtained in all young animals, we found that aged mice lacking the prion protein reacted to new and stressful environments differently than their wild-type counterparts. This may suggest that, upon aging, the absence of the prion protein results in altered neural processing at the basis of adaptation to new situations. PMID:23770331

  3. Dynamical and Phase Behavior of a Phospholipid Membrane Altered by an Antimicrobial Peptide at Low Concentration.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V K; Mamontov, E; Tyagi, M; Qian, S; Rai, D K; Urban, V S

    2016-07-01

    The mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is traditionally attributed to the formation of pores in the lipid cell membranes of pathogens, which requires a substantial peptide to lipid ratio. However, using incoherent neutron scattering, we show that even at a concentration too low for pore formation, an archetypal antimicrobial peptide, melittin, disrupts the regular phase behavior of the microscopic dynamics in a phospholipid membrane, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). At the same time, another antimicrobial peptide, alamethicin, does not exert a similar effect on the DMPC microscopic dynamics. The melittin-altered lateral motion of DMPC at physiological temperature no longer resembles the fluid-phase behavior characteristic of functional membranes of the living cells. The disruptive effect demonstrated by melittin even at low concentrations reveals a new mechanism of antimicrobial action relevant in more realistic scenarios, when peptide concentration is not as high as would be required for pore formation, which may facilitate treatment with antimicrobial peptides. PMID:27232190

  4. Resistant Starch Alters the Microbiota-Gut Brain Axis: Implications for Dietary Modulation of Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lyte, Mark; Chapel, Ashley; Lyte, Joshua M; Ai, Yongfeng; Proctor, Alexandra; Jane, Jay-Lin; Phillips, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    The increasing recognition that the gut microbiota plays a central role in behavior and cognition suggests that the manipulation of microbial taxa through diet may provide a means by which behavior may be altered in a reproducible and consistent manner in order to achieve a beneficial outcome for the host. Resistant starch continues to receive attention as a dietary intervention that can benefit the host through mechanisms that include altering the intestinal microbiota. Given the interest in dietary approaches to improve health, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of dietary resistant starch in mice to alter the gut microbiota also results in a change in behavior. Forty-eight 6 week-old male Swiss-Webster mice were randomly assigned to 3 treatment groups (n = 16 per group) and fed either a normal corn starch diet (NCS) or diets rich in resistant starches HA7 diet (HA7) or octenyl-succinate HA7 diet (OS-HA7) for 6 week and monitored for weight, behavior and fecal microbiota composition. Animals fed an HA7 diet displayed comparable weight gain over the feeding period to that recorded for NCS-fed animals while OS-HA7 displayed a lower weight gain as compared to either NCS or HA7 animals (ANOVA p = 0.0001; NCS:HA7 p = 0.244; HA7:OS-HA7 p<0.0001; NCS:OS-HA7 p<0.0001). Analysis of fecal microbiota using 16s rRNA gene taxonomic profiling revealed that each diet corresponded with a unique gut microbiota. The distribution of taxonomic classes was dynamic over the 6 week feeding period for each of the diets. At the end of the feeding periods, the distribution of taxa included statistically significant increases in members of the phylum Proteobacteria in OS-HA7 fed mice, while the Verrucomicrobia increased in HA7 fed mice over that of mice fed OS-HA7. At the class level, members of the class Bacilli decreased in the OS-HA7 fed group, and Actinobacteria, which includes the genus Bifidobacteria, was enriched in the HA7 fed group compared to the control

  5. Resistant Starch Alters the Microbiota-Gut Brain Axis: Implications for Dietary Modulation of Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lyte, Mark; Chapel, Ashley; Lyte, Joshua M.; Ai, Yongfeng; Proctor, Alexandra; Jane, Jay-Lin; Phillips, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing recognition that the gut microbiota plays a central role in behavior and cognition suggests that the manipulation of microbial taxa through diet may provide a means by which behavior may be altered in a reproducible and consistent manner in order to achieve a beneficial outcome for the host. Resistant starch continues to receive attention as a dietary intervention that can benefit the host through mechanisms that include altering the intestinal microbiota. Given the interest in dietary approaches to improve health, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of dietary resistant starch in mice to alter the gut microbiota also results in a change in behavior. Forty-eight 6 week-old male Swiss-Webster mice were randomly assigned to 3 treatment groups (n = 16 per group) and fed either a normal corn starch diet (NCS) or diets rich in resistant starches HA7 diet (HA7) or octenyl-succinate HA7 diet (OS-HA7) for 6 week and monitored for weight, behavior and fecal microbiota composition. Animals fed an HA7 diet displayed comparable weight gain over the feeding period to that recorded for NCS-fed animals while OS-HA7 displayed a lower weight gain as compared to either NCS or HA7 animals (ANOVA p = 0.0001; NCS:HA7 p = 0.244; HA7:OS-HA7 p<0.0001; NCS:OS-HA7 p<0.0001). Analysis of fecal microbiota using 16s rRNA gene taxonomic profiling revealed that each diet corresponded with a unique gut microbiota. The distribution of taxonomic classes was dynamic over the 6 week feeding period for each of the diets. At the end of the feeding periods, the distribution of taxa included statistically significant increases in members of the phylum Proteobacteria in OS-HA7 fed mice, while the Verrucomicrobia increased in HA7 fed mice over that of mice fed OS-HA7. At the class level, members of the class Bacilli decreased in the OS-HA7 fed group, and Actinobacteria, which includes the genus Bifidobacteria, was enriched in the HA7 fed group compared to the control

  6. Bacterial-mediated DNA delivery to tumour associated phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Byrne, W L; Murphy, C T; Cronin, M; Wirth, T; Tangney, M

    2014-12-28

    Phagocytic cells including macrophages, dendritic cells and neutrophils are now recognised as playing a negative role in many disease settings including cancer. In particular, macrophages are known to play a pathophysiological role in multiple diseases and present a valid and ubiquitous therapeutic target. The technology to target these phagocytic cells in situ, both selectively and efficiently, is required in order to translate novel therapeutic modalities into clinical reality. We present a novel delivery strategy using non-pathogenic bacteria to effect gene delivery specifically to tumour-associated phagocytic cells. Non-invasive bacteria lack the ability to actively enter host cells, except for phagocytic cells. We exploit this natural property to effect 'passive transfection' of tumour-associated phagocytic cells following direct administration of transgene-loaded bacteria to tumour regions. Using an in vitro-differentiated human monocyte cell line and two in vivo mouse models (an ovarian cancer ascites and a solid colon tumour model) proof of delivery is demonstrated with bacteria carrying reporter constructs. The results confirm that the delivery strategy is specific for phagocytic cells and that the bacterial vector itself recruits more phagocytic cells to the tumour. While proof of delivery to phagocytic cells is demonstrated in vivo for solid and ascites tumour models, this strategy may be applied to other settings, including non-cancer related disease. PMID:25466954

  7. Awake Intranasal Insulin Delivery Modifies Protein Complexes and Alters Memory, Anxiety, and Olfactory Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Marks, D.R.; Tucker, K.; Cavallin, M.A.; Mast, T.G.; Fadool, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    The role of insulin pathways in olfaction is of significant interest with the widespread pathology of Diabetes mellitus and its associated metabolic and neuronal co-morbidities. The insulin receptor kinase (IR) is expressed at high levels in the olfactory bulb (OB), where it suppresses a dominant Shaker ion channel (Kv1.3) via tyrosine phosphorylation of critical N- and C-terminal residues. We optimized a seven day intranasal insulin delivery (IND) in awake mice to ascertain the biochemical and behavioral effects of insulin to this brain region, given that nasal sprays for insulin have been marketed notwithstanding our knowledge of the role of Kv1.3 in olfaction, metabolism, and axon targeting. IND evoked robust phosphorylation of Kv1.3, as well as increased channel protein-protein interactions with IR and post-synaptic density 95. IND-treated mice had an increased short- and long-term object memory recognition, increased anxiolytic behavior, and an increased odor-discrimination using an odor habituation protocol but only moderate change in odor threshold using a two-choice paradigm. Unlike Kv1.3 gene-targeted deletion that alters metabolism, adiposity, and axonal targeting to defined olfactory glomeruli, suppression of Kv1.3 via IND had no effect on body weight nor the size and number of M72 glomeruli or the route of its sensory axon projections. There was no evidence of altered expression of sensory neurons in the epithelium. In mice made pre-diabetic via diet-induced obesity, IND was no longer effective in increasing long-term object memory recognition nor increasing anxiolytic behavior, suggesting state dependency or a degree of insulin resistance related to these behaviors. PMID:19458242

  8. Altered Expression of Glial and Synaptic Markers in the Anterior Hippocampus of Behaviorally Depressed Female Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Willard, Stephanie L.; Hemby, Scott E.; Register, Thomas C.; McIntosh, Scot; Shively, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    The anterior hippocampus is associated with emotional functioning and hippocampal volume is reduced in depression. We reported reduced neuropil volume and number of glia in the dentate gyrus (DG) and cornu ammonis (CA)1 of the anterior hippocampus in behaviorally depressed adult female cynomolgus macaques. To determine the biochemical correlates of morphometric and behavioral differences between behaviorally depressed and nondepressed adult female monkeys, glial and synaptic transcripts and protein levels were assessed in the DG, CA3 and CA1 of the anterior hippocampus. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was increased whereas spinophilin and postsynaptic density (PSD)-95 protein were decreased in the CA1 of depressed monkeys. GFAP was reciprocally related to spinophilin and PSD-95 protein in the CA1. Gene expression of GFAP paralleled the protein changes observed in the CA1 and was inversely related to serum estradiol levels in depressed monkeys. These results suggest that behavioral depression in female primates is accompanied by astrocytic and synaptic protein alterations in the CA1. Moreover, these findings indicate a potential role for estrogen in modulating astrocyte-mediated impairments in synaptic plasticity. PMID:24440617

  9. Alteration of the Nonsystemic Behavior of the Pesticide Ferbam on Tea Leaves by Engineered Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ruyan; Zhang, Zhiyun; Pang, Shintaro; Yang, Tianxi; Clark, John M; He, Lili

    2016-06-21

    A model system consisting of a nonsystemic pesticide (ferbam), engineered gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and a plant tissue (tea leaves) was investigated using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Ferbam has no ability by itself to penetrate into tea leaves. When AuNPs were placed with ferbam onto the surface of tea leaves, however, the SERS signal of the ferbam-AuNPs complex was observed inside of the tea leaves. Within 1 h, the ferbam-AuNPs complex rapidly penetrated into the leaf to a depth of approximately 190 μm, about (1)/3 to (1)/2 of the leaf's thickness. The rate of penetration was dependent on the size of AuNPs, with 30 nm AuNPs-ferbam penetrating more rapidly when compared with complexes made with the 50 and 69 nm AuNPs. These results clearly demonstrated an alteration of the nonsystemic behavior of ferbam in the combined presence with AuNPs. This finding might lead to the development of some new pesticide formulations. Conversely, new toxicity issues may arise as the behaviors and fate of pesticides are altered significantly upon interaction with engineered NPs in the pesticide formulation or environment. PMID:27254832

  10. Mononuclear phagocyte proliferation, maturation and function.

    PubMed

    Territo, M C; Cline, M J

    1975-10-01

    The mononuclear phagocytic system is a continuum of cells beginning with the bone marrow monoblast and promonocyte, through the monocyte to the larger tissue macrophages and multinucleate giant cells. This system of cells is widely distributed throughout the body in the blood and bone marrow; the pleural, peritoneal, and alveolar spaces; the lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and other parenchymal organs. The activity and composition of the cell varies with the level of maturation, changes in cellular environment, and with various cellular activities. The monocyte-macrophage group of cells plays an active role in defense reactions against certain microorganisms, and in the removal of dying cells and cell debris. They are an integral part of both the inductive phase of the immune response, and of cell-mediated immune reactions. In addition, they probably play a role in the defence against spontaneously arising tumours, in the control of granulopoiesis, and possibly in erythropoiesis. PMID:53114

  11. Transcriptional Regulation of Mononuclear Phagocyte Development

    PubMed Central

    Tussiwand, Roxane; Gautier, Emmanuel L.

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (MP) are a quite unique subset of hematopoietic cells, which comprise dendritic cells (DC), monocytes as well as monocyte-derived and tissue-resident macrophages. These cells are extremely diverse with regard to their origin, their phenotype as well as their function. Developmentally, DC and monocytes are constantly replenished from a bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor. The ontogeny of macrophages is more complex and is temporally linked and specified by the organ where they reside, occurring early during embryonic or perinatal life. The functional heterogeneity of MPs is certainly a consequence of the tissue of residence and also reflects the diverse ontogeny of the subsets. In this review, we will highlight the developmental pathways of murine MP, with a particular emphasis on the transcriptional factors that regulate their development and function. Finally, we will discuss and point out open questions in the field. PMID:26539196

  12. Phagocyte NADPH oxidase and specific immunity.

    PubMed

    Cachat, Julien; Deffert, Christine; Hugues, Stephanie; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2015-05-01

    The phagocyte NADPH oxidase NOX2 produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is a well-known player in host defence. However, there is also increasing evidence for a regulatory role of NOX2 in adaptive immunity. Deficiency in phagocyte NADPH oxidase causes chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) in humans, a condition that can also be studied in CGD mice. Clinical observations in CGD patients suggest a higher susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, in particular lupus, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and rheumatoid arthritis. In mice, a strong correlation exists between a polymorphism in a NOX2 subunit and the development of autoimmune arthritis. NOX2 deficiency in mice also favours lupus development. Both CGD patients and CGD mice exhibit increased levels of immunoglobulins, including autoantibodies. Despite these phenotypes suggesting a role for NOX2 in specific immunity, mechanistic explanations for the typical increase of CGD in autoimmune disease and antibody levels are still preliminary. NOX2-dependent ROS generation is well documented for dendritic cells and B-lymphocytes. It is unclear whether T-lymphocytes produce ROS themselves or whether they are exposed to ROS derived from dendritic cells during the process of antigen presentation. ROS are signalling molecules in virtually any cell type, including T- and B-lymphocytes. However, knowledge about the impact of ROS-dependent signalling on T- and B-lymphocyte phenotype and response is still limited. ROS might contribute to Th1/Th2/Th17 cell fate decisions during T-lymphocyte activation and might enhance immunoglobulin production by B-lymphocytes. In dendritic cells, NOX2-derived ROS might be important for antigen processing and cell activation. PMID:25760962

  13. Behavior of nuclear waste elements during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite in an active geothermal system: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Sturchio, N.C.; Seitz, M.G.

    1984-12-31

    The behavior of a group of nuclear waste elements (U, Th, Sr, Zr, Sb, Cs, Ba, and Sm) during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite is investigated through geochemical analyses of whole rocks, glass and mineral separates, and thermal waters. Significant enrichments of U, Sr, Sb, Cs, and Ba are found in altered rock relative to unaltered rock. Excess Sr, Cs, and Ba are concentrated in zeolites in altered rock. Excess U is associated with titanomagnetite surfaces. Th, Zr, and Sm are relatively immobile during alteration, and are strongly concentrated in celadonite. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Behavioral performance altering effects of MK-801 in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Sison, Margarette; Gerlai, Robert

    2011-01-01

    MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA-R antagonist, has been utilized in the analysis of mammalian learning and memory. The zebrafish is a novel vertebrate study species that has been proposed for the analysis of the mechanisms of learning and memory. Although learning paradigms have been developed for this species, psychopharmacological characterization of its behavioral responses is rudimentary. Before one attempts the analysis of the effects of MK-801 on learning and memory in zebrafish, one needs to know whether this drug affects motor function, perception and/or motivation, factors that may influence performance in learning tasks. Here we conduct dose response analyses investigating the effects of 0, 2, 20 and 100 µM MK-801 administered 24 hours or 30 minutes before the behavioral test, or during the test. We analyze responses in the open tank to measure motor and posture patterns, in the light dark paradigm to evaluate visual perception, and in a group preference task to attempt to quantify motivation. Our results show a significant performance alteration only in the highest (100 µM) dose groups. These fish spent more time on the bottom of their tank, showed elevated erratic movement, increased their clockwise and counterclockwise turning frequency, and reduced the time spent near a shoal stimulus, behavioral alterations that also depended upon the timing of drug administration. Thus, using the current delivery procedures and outbred zebrafish population, the highest dose that may not lead to significant performance deficits is 20 µM, a concentration we propose to use in a future learning study in zebrafish. PMID:21333690

  15. ApoE2 Exaggerates PTSD-Related Behavioral, Cognitive, and Neuroendocrine Alterations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lance A; Zuloaga, Damian G; Bidiman, Erin; Marzulla, Tessa; Weber, Sydney; Wahbeh, Helane; Raber, Jacob

    2015-09-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is an essential component of lipoprotein particles in both the brain and periphery, and exists in three isoforms in the human population: E2, E3, and E4. ApoE has numerous, well-established roles in neurobiology. Most notably, E4 is associated with earlier onset and increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although possession of E2 is protective in the context of AD, E2 appears to confer an increased incidence and severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the biological processes underlying this link remain unclear. In this study, we began to elucidate these associations by examining the effects of apoE on PTSD severity in combat veterans, and on PTSD-like behavior in mice with human apoE. In a group of 92 veterans with PTSD, we observed significantly higher Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale and PTSD Checklist scores in E2+ individuals, as well as alterations in salivary cortisol levels. Furthermore, we measured behavioral and biological outcomes in mice expressing human apoE after a single stressful event as well as following a period of chronic variable stress, a model of combat-related trauma. Mice with E2 showed impairments in fear extinction, and behavioral, cognitive, and neuroendocrine alterations following trauma. To the best of our knowledge, these data constitute the first translational demonstration of PTSD severity in men and PTSD-like symptoms in mice with E2, and point to apoE as a novel biomarker of susceptibility, and potential therapeutic target, for PTSD. PMID:25857685

  16. Prenatal cigarette smoke exposure causes hyperactivity and aggressive behavior: role of altered catecholamines and BDNF.

    PubMed

    Yochum, Carrie; Doherty-Lyon, Shannon; Hoffman, Carol; Hossain, Muhammad M; Zelikoff, Judith T; Richardson, Jason R

    2014-04-01

    Smoking during pregnancy is associated with a variety of untoward effects on the offspring. However, recent epidemiological studies have brought into question whether the association between neurobehavioral deficits and maternal smoking is causal. We utilized an animal model of maternal smoking to determine the effects of prenatal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure on neurobehavioral development. Pregnant mice were exposed to either filtered air or mainstream CS from gestation day (GD) 4 to parturition for 4h/d and 5d/wk, with each exposure producing maternal plasma concentration of cotinine equivalent to smoking <1 pack of cigarettes per day (25ng/ml plasma cotinine level). Pups were weaned at postnatal day (PND) 21 and behavior was assessed at 4weeks of age and again at 4-6months of age. Male, but not female, offspring of CS-exposed dams demonstrated a significant increase in locomotor activity during adolescence and adulthood that was ameliorated by methylphenidate treatment. Additionally, male offspring exhibited increased aggression, as evidenced by decreased latency to attack and number of attacks in a resident-intruder task. These behavioral abnormalities were accompanied by a significant decrease in striatal and cortical dopamine and serotonin and a significant reduction in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein. Taken in concert, these data demonstrate that prenatal exposure to CS produces behavioral alterations in mice that are similar to those observed in epidemiological studies linking maternal smoking to neurodevelopmental disorders. Further, these data also suggest a role for monaminergic and BDNF alterations in these effects. PMID:24486851

  17. Prenatal Cigarette Smoke Exposure Causes Hyperactivity and Agressive Behavior: Role of Altered Catcholamines and BDNF

    PubMed Central

    Yochum, Carrie; Doherty-Lyon, Shannon; Hoffman, Carol; Hossain, Muhammad M.; Zellikoff, Judith T.; Richardson, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    Smoking during pregnancy is associated with a variety of untoward effects on the offspring. However, recent epidemiological studies have brought into question whether the association between neurobehavioral deficits and maternal smoking is causal. We utilized an animal model of maternal smoking to determine the effects of prenatal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure on neurobehavioral development. Pregnant mice were exposed to either filtered air or mainstream CS from gestation day (GD) 4 to parturition for 4 hr/d and 5 d/wk, with each exposure producing maternal plasma concentration of cotinine equivalent to smoking <1 pack of cigarettes per day (25 ng/ml plasma cotinine level). Pups were weaned at postnatal day (PND) 21 and behavior assessed on at 4 weeks of age and again at 4–6 months of age. Male, but not female, offspring of CS-exposed dams demonstrated a significant increase in locomotor activity during adolescence and adulthood that was ameliorated by methylphenidate treatment. Additionally, male offspring exhibited increased aggression, as evidenced by decreased latency to attack and number of attacks in a resident intruder task. These behavioral abnormalities were accompanied by a significant decrease in striatal and cortical dopamine and serotonin and a significant reduction in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein. Taken in concert, these data demonstrate that prenatal exposure to CS produces behavioral alterations in mice that are similar to those observed in epidemiological studies linking maternal smoking to neurodevelopmental disorders and suggest a role for monoaminergic and BDNF alterations in these effects. PMID:24486851

  18. Interactions between behaviorally relevant rhythms and synaptic plasticity alter coding in the piriform cortex

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Nathaniel N.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how neural and behavioral timescales interact to influence cortical activity and stimulus coding is an important issue in sensory neuroscience. In air-breathing animals, voluntary changes in respiratory frequency alter the temporal patterning olfactory input. In the olfactory bulb, these behavioral timescales are reflected in the temporal properties of mitral/tufted (M/T) cell spike trains. As the odor information contained in these spike trains is relayed from the bulb to the cortex, interactions between presynaptic spike timing and short-term synaptic plasticity dictate how stimulus features are represented in cortical spike trains. Here we demonstrate how the timescales associated with respiratory frequency, spike timing and short-term synaptic plasticity interact to shape cortical responses. Specifically, we quantified the timescales of short-term synaptic facilitation and depression at excitatory synapses between bulbar M/T cells and cortical neurons in slices of mouse olfactory cortex. We then used these results to generate simulated M/T population synaptic currents that were injected into real cortical neurons. M/T population inputs were modulated at frequencies consistent with passive respiration or active sniffing. We show how the differential recruitment of short-term plasticity at breathing versus sniffing frequencies alters cortical spike responses. For inputs at sniffing frequencies, cortical neurons linearly encoded increases in presynaptic firing rates with increased phase locked, firing rates. In contrast, at passive breathing frequencies, cortical responses saturated with changes in presynaptic rate. Our results suggest that changes in respiratory behavior can gate the transfer of stimulus information between the olfactory bulb and cortex. PMID:22553016

  19. Limited Nesting Stress Alters Maternal Behavior and In Vivo Intestinal Permeability in Male Wistar Pup Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moussaoui, Nabila; Larauche, Muriel; Biraud, Mandy; Molet, Jenny; Million, Mulugeta; Mayer, Emeran; Taché, Yvette

    2016-01-01

    A few studies indicate that limited nesting stress (LNS) alters maternal behavior and the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis of dams and offspring in male Sprague Dawley rats. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of LNS on maternal behavior in Wistar rats, and on the HPA axis, glycemia and in vivo intestinal permeability of male and female offspring. Intestinal permeability is known to be elevated during the first week postnatally and influenced by glucocorticoids. Dams and neonatal litters were subjected to LNS or normal nesting conditions (control) from days 2 to 10 postnatally. At day 10, blood was collected from pups for determination of glucose and plasma corticosterone by enzyme immunoassay and in vivo intestinal permeability by oral gavage of fluorescein isothiocyanate–dextran 4kDa. Dams exposed to LNS compared to control showed an increase in the percentage of time spent building a nest (118%), self-grooming (69%), and putting the pups back to the nest (167%). LNS male and female pups exhibited a reduction of body weight by 5% and 4%, adrenal weights/100g body weight by 17% and 18%, corticosterone plasma levels by 64% and 62% and blood glucose by 11% and 12% respectively compared to same sex control pups. In male LNS pups, intestinal permeability was increased by 2.7-fold while no change was observed in females compared to same sex control. There was no sex difference in any of the parameters in control pups except the body weight. These data indicate that Wistar dams subjected to LNS during the first postnatal week have an altered repertoire of maternal behaviors which affects the development of the HPA axis in both sexes and intestinal barrier function in male offspring. PMID:27149676

  20. Alteration of behavior in mice by muscimol is associated with regional electroencephalogram synchronization.

    PubMed

    Vyazovskiy, V V; Tobler, I; Winsky-Sommerer, R

    2007-07-13

    We tested the hypothesis that the effects of GABAergic agonists on behavior and the electroencephalogram (EEG) result from an increased regional synchronization in cortical circuits. The relationship between regional EEG topography, EEG synchronization and alteration of behavior was investigated by administering male C57BL/6 mice (n=7) a high, 3 mg/kg i.p. dose of muscimol, a selective GABA(A) agonist. Parietal and frontal cortical EEG, electromyogram, infrared and running wheel activity were recorded for 3 h before and 9 h after injection. Muscimol consistently elicited biphasic behavioral changes. Initially, it induced a catalepsy-like state lasting 96.0+/-12.4 min. This state was followed by a hyperactivity period of 49.7+/-5.4 min, during which the mice engaged in vigorous wheel running. During catalepsy, the EEG exhibited high amplitude waves which showed a consistent phase relationship between the frontal and parietal derivation. Moreover, the typical regional differences between the EEG spectra of the two derivations were abolished, and a redistribution of EEG power toward lower frequencies (<3 Hz) occurred in both derivations. In contrast, during hyperactivity the parietal EEG was dominated by theta-activity (7-9 Hz), which is typical for running behavior, while high amplitude slow waves, resembling the normal non-rapid eye movement sleep EEG pattern, predominated in the frontal EEG. The data indicate that the GABAergic system is involved in the regulation of cortical synchronization of neuronal activity and suggest a link between regional EEG synchronization and behavioral states. PMID:17570598

  1. Aniracetam Does Not Alter Cognitive and Affective Behavior in Adult C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Elston, Thomas W.; Pandian, Ashvini; Smith, Gregory D.; Holley, Andrew J.; Gao, Nanjing; Lugo, Joaquin N.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing community of individuals who self-administer the nootropic aniracetam for its purported cognitive enhancing effects. Aniracetam is believed to be therapeutically useful for enhancing cognition, alleviating anxiety, and treating various neurodegenerative conditions. Physiologically, aniracetam enhances both glutamatergic neurotransmission and long-term potentiation. Previous studies of aniracetam have demonstrated the cognition-restoring effects of acute administration in different models of disease. No previous studies have explored the effects of aniracetam in healthy subjects. We investigated whether daily 50 mg/kg oral administration improves cognitive performance in naïve C57BL/6J mice in a variety of aspects of cognitive behavior. We measured spatial learning in the Morris water maze test; associative learning in the fear conditioning test; motor learning in the accelerating rotarod test; and odor discrimination. We also measured locomotion in the open field test, anxiety through the elevated plus maze test and by measuring time in the center of the open field test. We measured repetitive behavior through the marble burying test. We detected no significant differences between the naive, placebo, and experimental groups across all measures. Despite several studies demonstrating efficacy in impaired subjects, our findings suggest that aniracetam does not alter behavior in normal healthy mice. This study is timely in light of the growing community of healthy humans self-administering nootropic drugs. PMID:25099639

  2. Exposition to tannery wastewater did not alter behavioral and biochemical parameters in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Moysés, Felipe dos Santos; Bertoldi, Karine; Spindler, Christiano; Sanches, Eduardo Farias; Elsner, Viviane Rostirola; Rodrigues, Marco Antonio Siqueira; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2014-04-22

    There are scarce data on the neurotoxicity in mammalian induced by tannery wastewaters. Previously, the anxiogenic effect of tannery wastewater was demonstrated in mice, while wastewater submitted to photoelectrooxidation (PEO) process treatment did not affect the anxiety state. Considering that species may response differently to xenobiotics, the aim of the present work was to study the effects of exposure to tannery wastewaters (non-PEO or PEO-treated) on behavioral and neurochemical markers in another species of laboratory animals, specifically Wistar rats. Male Wistar rats were given free access to water bottles containing non-PEO or PEO-treated tannery wastewaters (0.1, 1 and 5% in drinking water). During the exposure, behavioral tests of anxiety (elevated plus-maze, neophobia, open field and light-dark box), depression (forced swimming) and memory (inhibitory avoidance, novel object and discriminative avoidance) were performed. On the 30th day, brain structures were dissected out to evaluate cellular oxidative state (hippocampus, cerebellum and striatum) and acetylcholinesterase activity (hippocampus and striatum). Exposure to tannery effluent with or without photoelectrochemical treatment did not alter any behavioral and neurochemical parameters evaluated. Our data indicate that Wistar rats may not be an adequate species for ecotoxicological studies involving tannery effluents and that POE treatment did not generate other toxic compounds. PMID:24548682

  3. Removal of GABAA Receptor γ2 Subunits from Parvalbumin Neurons Causes Wide-Ranging Behavioral Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Leppä, Elli; Linden, Anni-Maija; Vekovischeva, Olga Y.; Swinny, Jerome D.; Rantanen, Ville; Toppila, Esko; Höger, Harald; Sieghart, Werner; Wulff, Peer; Wisden, William; Korpi, Esa R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the behavioral significance of fast synaptic inhibition by αβγ2-type GABAA receptors on parvalbumin (Pv) cells. The GABAA receptor γ2 subunit gene was selectively inactivated in Pv-positive neurons by Cre/loxP recombination. The resulting Pv-Δγ2 mice were relatively healthy in the first postnatal weeks; but then as Cre started to be expressed, the mice progressively developed wide-ranging phenotypic alterations including low body weight, motor deficits and tremor, decreased anxiety levels, decreased pain sensitivity and deficient prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex and impaired spatial learning. Nevertheless, the deletion was not lethal, and mice did not show increased mortality even after one year. Autoradiography with t-butylbicyclophosphoro[35S]thionate suggested an increased amount of GABAA receptors with only α and β subunits in central nervous system regions that contained high levels of parvalbumin neurons. Using BAC-transgenesis, we reduced some of the Pv-Δγ2 phenotype by selectively re-expressing the wild-type γ2 subunit back into some Pv cells (reticular thalamic neurons and cerebellar Pv-positive neurons). This produced less severe impairments of motor skills and spatial learning compared with Pv-Δγ2 mice, but all other deficits remained. Our results reveal the widespread significance of fast GABAergic inhibition onto Pv-positive neurons for diverse behavioral modalities, such as motor coordination, sensorimotor integration, emotional behavior and nociception. PMID:21912668

  4. Chemosensory cues affect amygdaloid neurogenesis and alter behaviors in the socially monogamous prairie vole.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Lieberwirth, C; Jia, X; Curtis, J T; Meredith, M; Wang, Z X

    2014-05-01

    The current study examined the effects of pheromonal exposure on adult neurogenesis and revealed the role of the olfactory pathways on adult neurogenesis and behavior in the socially monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). Subjects were injected with a cell proliferation marker [5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)] and then exposed to their own soiled bedding or bedding soiled by a same- or opposite-sex conspecific. Exposure to opposite-sex bedding increased BrdU labeling in the amygdala (AMY), but not the dentate gyrus (DG), of female, but not male, voles, indicating a sex-, stimulus-, and brain region-specific effect. The removal of the main olfactory bulbs or lesioning of the vomeronasal organ (VNOX) in females reduced BrdU labeling in the AMY and DG, and inhibited the male bedding-induced BrdU labeling in the AMY, revealing the importance of an intact olfactory pathway for amygdaloid neurogenesis. VNOX increased anxiety-like behavior and altered social preference, but it did not affect social recognition memory in female voles. VNOX also reduced the percentage of BrdU-labeled cells that co-expressed the neuronal marker TuJ1 in the AMY, but not the DG. Together, our data indicate the importance of the olfactory pathway in mediating brain plasticity in the limbic system as well as its role in behavior. PMID:24641515

  5. Insulin resistance in brain alters dopamine turnover and causes behavioral disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kleinridders, Andre; Cai, Weikang; Cappellucci, Laura; Ghazarian, Armen; Collins, William R.; Vienberg, Sara G.; Pothos, Emmanuel N.; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and insulin resistance are associated with altered brain imaging, depression, and increased rates of age-related cognitive impairment. Here we demonstrate that mice with a brain-specific knockout of the insulin receptor (NIRKO mice) exhibit brain mitochondrial dysfunction with reduced mitochondrial oxidative activity, increased levels of reactive oxygen species, and increased levels of lipid and protein oxidation in the striatum and nucleus accumbens. NIRKO mice also exhibit increased levels of monoamine oxidase A and B (MAO A and B) leading to increased dopamine turnover in these areas. Studies in cultured neurons and glia cells indicate that these changes in MAO A and B are a direct consequence of loss of insulin signaling. As a result, NIRKO mice develop age-related anxiety and depressive-like behaviors that can be reversed by treatment with MAO inhibitors, as well as the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, which inhibits MAO activity and reduces oxidative stress. Thus, insulin resistance in brain induces mitochondrial and dopaminergic dysfunction leading to anxiety and depressive-like behaviors, demonstrating a potential molecular link between central insulin resistance and behavioral disorders. PMID:25733901

  6. Crickets in space: morphological, physiological and behavioral alterations induced by space flight and hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, E.; Agricola, H.; Böser, S.; Förster, S.; Kämper, G.; Riewe, P.; Sebastian, C.

    "Crickets in Space" was a Neurolab experiment by which the balance between genetic programs and the gravitational environment for the development of a gravity sensitive neuronal system was studied. The model character of crickets was justified by their external gravity receptors, identified position-sensitive interneurons (PSI) and gravity-related compensatory head response, and by the specific relation of this behavior to neuronal arousal systems activated by locomotion. These advantages allowed to study the impact of modified gravity on cellular processes in a complex organism. Eggs, 1st, 4th and 6th stage larvae of Acheta domesticus were used. Post-flight experiments revealed a low susceptibility of the behavior to micro- and hypergravity while the physiology of the PSI was significantly affected. Immunocytological investigations revealed a stage-dependent sensitivity of thoracic GABAergic motoneurons to 3g-conditions concerning their soma sizes but not their topographical arrangement. The morphology of neuromuscular junctions was not affected by 3g-hypergravity. Peptidergic neurons from cerebral sensorimotor centers revealed no significant modifications by microgravity (μg). The contrary physiological and behavioral results indicate a facilitation of 1g-readaptation originating from accessory gravity, proprioceptive and visual sense organs. Absence of anatomical modifications point to an effective time window of μg- or 3g-expo-sure related to the period of neuronal proliferation. The analysis of basic mechanisms of how animals and man adapt to altered gravitational conditions will profit from a continuation of the project "Crickets in Space".

  7. Ethanol exposure during gastrulation alters neuronal morphology and behavior in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shubham D; Boutin, Savanna; Ferdous, Jannatul; Ali, Declan W

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) exposure during development has been shown to lead to deficits in fine and gross motor control. In this study we used zebrafish embryos to determine the effects of EtOH treatment during gastrulation. We treated embryos in the gastrulation stage (5.25 hours post fertilization (hpf) to 10.75 hpf) with 10 mM, 50 mM or 100 mM EtOH and examined the effects on general animal morphology, the c-start reflex behavior, Mauthner cell (M-cell) morphology and motor neuron morphology. EtOH treated fish exhibited a minor but significant increase in gross morphological deformities compared with untreated fish. Behavioral studies showed that EtOH treatment resulted in an increase in the peak speed of the tail during the escape response. Furthermore, there was a marked increase in abnormally directed c-starts, with treated fish showing greater incidences of c-starts in inappropriate directions. Immunolabeling of the M-cells, which are born during gastrulation, revealed that they were significantly smaller in fish treated with 100 mM EtOH compared with controls. Immunolabeling of primary motor neurons using anti-znp1, showed no significant effect on axonal branching, whereas secondary motor axons had a greater number of branches in ethanol treated fish compared with controls. Together these findings indicate that ethanol exposure during gastrulation can lead to alterations in behavior, neuronal morphology and possibly function. PMID:25599605

  8. Prenatal Stress Alters the Development of Socioemotional Behavior and Amygdala Neuron Excitability in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, David E; Rainnie, Donald G

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal stress (PS) is a risk factor for neurodevelopmental disorders with diverse ages of onset and socioemotional symptoms. Some PS-linked disorders involve characteristic social deficits, such as autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia, but PS also promotes anxiety disorders. We propose the diversity of symptoms following PS arises from perturbations to early brain development. To this end, we characterized the effects of PS on the developmental trajectory of physiology of the amygdala, a late-developing center for socioemotional control. We found that PS dampened socioemotional behavior and reduced amygdala neuron excitability in offspring during infancy (at postnatal days (P)10, 14, 17 and 21), preadolescence (day 28), and adulthood (day 60). PS offspring in infancy produced fewer isolation-induced vocalizations and in adulthood exhibited less anxiety-like behavior and deficits in social interaction. PS neurons had a more hyperpolarized resting membrane potential from infancy to adulthood and produced fewer action potentials. Moreover, adult amygdala neurons from PS animals expressed larger action potential afterhyperpolarizations and H-current relative to controls, further limiting excitability. Our results suggest that PS can suppress socioemotional behavior throughout development and produce age-specific alterations to amygdala physiology. PMID:25716930

  9. Functional genomics identifies negative regulatory nodes controlling phagocyte oxidative burst

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Daniel B.; Becker, Christine E.; Doan, Aivi; Goel, Gautam; Villablanca, Eduardo J.; Knights, Dan; Mok, Amanda; Ng, Aylwin C.Y.; Doench, John G.; Root, David E.; Clish, Clary B.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2015-01-01

    The phagocyte oxidative burst, mediated by Nox2 NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species, confers host defense against a broad spectrum of bacterial and fungal pathogens. Loss-of-function mutations that impair function of the Nox2 complex result in a life-threatening immunodeficiency, and genetic variants of Nox2 subunits have been implicated in pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Thus, alterations in the oxidative burst can profoundly impact host defense, yet little is known about regulatory mechanisms that fine-tune this response. Here we report the discovery of regulatory nodes controlling oxidative burst by functional screening of genes within loci linked to human inflammatory disease. Implementing a multi-omics approach, we define transcriptional, metabolic and ubiquitin-cycling nodes controlled by Rbpj, Pfkl and Rnf145, respectively. Furthermore, we implicate Rnf145 in proteostasis of the Nox2 complex by endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Consequently, ablation of Rnf145 in murine macrophages enhances bacterial clearance, and rescues the oxidative burst defects associated with Ncf4 haploinsufficiency. PMID:26194095

  10. Altered behavioral development in Nrf2 knockout mice following early postnatal exposure to valproic acid

    PubMed Central

    Furnari, Melody A.; Saw, Constance Lay-Lay; Kong, Ah-Ng; Wagner, George C

    2015-01-01

    Early exposure to valproic acid results in autism-like neural and behavioral deficits in humans and other animals through oxidative stress-induced neural damage. In the present study, valproic acid was administered to genetically altered mice lacking the Nrf2 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2) gene on postnatal day 14 (P14). Nrf2 is a transcription factor that induces genes that protect against oxidative stress. It was found that valproic acid-treated Nrf2 knockout mice were less active in open field activity chambers, less successful on the rotorod, and had deficits in learning and memory in the Morris water maze compared to the valproic acid-treated wild type mice. Given these results, it appears that Nrf2 knockout mice were more sensitive to the neural damage caused by valproic acid administered during early development. PMID:25454122

  11. Iron Inhibits Respiratory Burst of Peritoneal Phagocytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gotfryd, Kamil; Jurek, Aleksandra; Kubit, Piotr; Klein, Andrzej; Turyna, Bohdan

    2011-01-01

    Objective. This study examines the effects of iron ions Fe3+ on the respiratory burst of phagocytes isolated from peritoneal effluents of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients, as an in vitro model of iron overload in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Material and Methods. Respiratory burst of peritoneal phagocytes was measured by chemiluminescence method. Results. At the highest used concentration of iron ions Fe3+ (100 μM), free radicals production by peritoneal phagocytes was reduced by 90% compared to control. Conclusions. Iron overload may increase the risk of infectious complications in ESRD patients. PMID:22203913

  12. Do early-life events permanently alter behavioral and hormonal responses to stressors?

    PubMed

    Anisman, H; Zaharia, M D; Meaney, M J; Merali, Z

    1998-01-01

    Early-life stimulation (e.g., brief handling) attenuates the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stressors encountered in adulthood, particularly with respect to activation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity. In contrast, if neonates were subjected to a more severe stressor, such as protracted separation from the dam or exposure to an endotoxin, then the adult response to a stressor was exaggerated. These early-life experiences program HPA functioning, including negative feedback derived from stimulation of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptors, and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) coexpression in PVN neurons, to modify the response to subsequent stressor experiences. The persistent variations of HPA activity observed in handled/stimulated animals may stem from alterations in dam-pup interactions (e.g. increased arched-back feeding, licking, grooming). In addition genetic makeup is critical in determining stress reactivity. For instance, BALB/cByJ mice are more reactive to stressors than C57BL/6ByJ mice, exhibiting greater HPA hormonal alterations and behavioral disturbances. BALB/cByJ also fail to acquire a spatial learning response in a Morris water-maze paradigm, which has been shown to be correlated with hippocampal cell loss associated with aging. Early-life handling of BALB/cByJ mice prevented these performance deficits and attenuated the hypersecretion of ACTH and corticosterone elicited by stressors. The stressor reactivity may have been related to maternal and genetic factors. When BALB/cByJ mice were raised by a C57BL/6ByJ dam, the excessive stress-elicited HPA activity was reduced, as were the behavioral impairments. However, cross-fostering the more resilient C57BL/6ByJ mice to a BALB/cByJ dam failed to elicit the behavioral disturbances. It is suggested that genetic factors may influence dam-pup interactive styles and may thus proactively influence the response to subsequent stressors among

  13. Antidotal effects of buprenorphine on the behavioral alterations accompanying cocaine and combined cocaine-ethanol toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hayase, Tamaki; Yamamoto, Yoshiko; Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2002-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of buprenorphine (BUP), a mixed opioid agonist-antagonist, on the behaviors accompanying cocaine (COCA) and combined cocaine-ethanol (EtOH) toxicity in the surviving mice. Using the activity-counting instrument Supermex, the relationship between the toxic signs and the corresponding behavioral alterations could be assessed. In the COCA-only group, a prolonged increase in the activity counts was caused by a high dose of COCA (75 mg/kg ip). Furthermore, this COCA-induced hyperactivity included ataxic behaviors that were accompanied by visible toxic signs, which were not observed in the mice with no drug treatment. A depressive dose of EtOH (3 g/kg ip) did not significantly modify the mortality rate in the COCA-only group in spite of its anticonvulsant effects. However, the peak activity counts in the survivors were attenuated in the COCA-EtOH group as compared to the COCA-only group. BUP attenuated the mortality rate in both COCA and COCA-EtOH groups, even without any anticonvulsant effects, but the most effective dose differed between the COCA (BUP: 0.25 mg/kg ip) and COCA-EtOH (BUP: 0.5 mg/kg ip) groups. At these BUP doses, the prolonged suppression of the morbid hyperactivity in the COCA-BUP group and the restoration of normal behavior in the COCA-EtOH-BUP group both seemed to be correlated with a good prognosis in the survivors; there was an early recovery from an increased blood pressure (BP), increased heart rate (HR) and decreased respiratory rate (RR) in the COCA-BUP group, and an early recovery from a decreased BP, decreased HR and decreased RR in the COCA-EtOH-BUP group. PMID:11812504

  14. Early social isolation alters behavioral and physiological responses to an endotoxin challenge in piglets.

    PubMed

    Tuchscherer, Margret; Kanitz, Ellen; Puppe, Birger; Tuchscherer, Armin

    2006-12-01

    Psychosocial stress in the form of maternal deprivation and social isolation during early postnatal life induces persistent alterations in behavioral and physiological mechanisms of adaptation. One consequence may be an increased susceptibility to diseases in later life. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate in domestic piglets the effects of a repeated social isolation (2 h daily from day 3 to day 11 of age) on behavioral, endocrine and immune responses to an endotoxin challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 1 day or 45 days after the isolation period. Peripheral LPS administration caused serious sickness behavior (somnolence, shivering, vomiting) and provoked profound increases in circulating tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), ACTH and cortisol concentrations. The prior social isolation treatment enhanced signs of sickness and impaired suckling behavior. Early isolated piglets responded to LPS by an increase of shivering on day 12 and by increased vomiting on day 56 compared to controls. Further, there were considerable delays and reductions of time isolated piglets spent suckling on day 12. The repeated isolation stressor diminished TNF-alpha increases after LPS, whereas stress hormone levels were not significantly affected by isolation treatment. Finally, stronger relationships between signs of sickness and physiological measures were revealed in early isolated piglets. The duration of somnolence in isolated piglets was related to changes of cortisol and TNF-alpha concentrations, and the highest impact on duration of shivering was found for changes in cortisol and corticosteroid binding globulin levels. The present results suggest a sustained adaptive sensitization of coping with infection by social stress experience during early development in piglets. PMID:16899245

  15. Alteration by p11 of mGluR5 localization regulates depression-like behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ko-Woon; Westin, Linda; Kim, Jeongjin; Chang, Jerry C.; Oh, Yong-Seok; Amreen, Bushra; Gresack, Jodi; Flajolet, Marc; Kim, Daesoo; Aperia, Anita; Kim, Yong; Greengard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mood disorders and antidepressant therapy involve alterations of monoaminergic and glutamatergic transmission. The protein S100A10 (p11) was identified as a regulator of serotonin receptors, and has been implicated in the etiology of depression and in mediating the antidepressant actions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Here we report that p11 can also regulate depression-like behaviors via regulation of a glutamatergic receptor in mice. p11 directly binds to the cytoplasmic tail of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). p11 and mGluR5 mutually facilitate their accumulation at the plasma membranes, and p11 increases cell surface availability of the receptor. While p11 overexpression potentiates mGluR5 agonist-induced calcium responses, overexpression of mGluR5 mutant, which does not interact with p11, diminishes the calcium responses in cultured cells. Knockout of mGluR5 or p11 specifically in glutamatergic neurons in mice causes depression-like behaviors. Conversely, knockout of mGluR5 or p11 in GABAergic neurons causes antidepressant-like behaviors. Inhibition of mGluR5 with an antagonist, MPEP, induces antidepressant-like behaviors in a p11-dependent manner. Notably, the antidepressant-like action of MPEP is mediated by parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons, resulting in a decrease of inhibitory neuronal firing with a resultant increase of excitatory neuronal firing. These results identify a molecular and cellular basis by which mGluR5 antagonism achieves its antidepressant-like activity. PMID:26370144

  16. Structural Brain Alterations Associated with Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boucetta, Soufiane; Salimi, Ali; Dadar, Mahsa; Jones, Barbara E.; Collins, D. Louis; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh

    2016-01-01

    Characterized by dream-enactment motor manifestations arising from rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is frequently encountered in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Yet the specific neurostructural changes associated with RBD in PD patients remain to be revealed by neuroimaging. Here we identified such neurostructural alterations by comparing large samples of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in 69 PD patients with probable RBD, 240 patients without RBD and 138 healthy controls, using deformation-based morphometry (p < 0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons). All data were extracted from the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative. PD patients with probable RBD showed smaller volumes than patients without RBD and than healthy controls in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum, medullary reticular formation, hypothalamus, thalamus, putamen, amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex. These results demonstrate that RBD is associated with a prominent loss of volume in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum, where cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons are located and implicated in the promotion of REM sleep and muscle atonia. It is additionally associated with more widespread atrophy in other subcortical and cortical regions whose loss also likely contributes to the altered regulation of sleep-wake states and motor activity underlying RBD in PD patients. PMID:27245317

  17. Metabolic and feeding behavior alterations provoked by prenatal exposure to aspartame.

    PubMed

    von Poser Toigo, E; Huffell, A P; Mota, C S; Bertolini, D; Pettenuzzo, L F; Dalmaz, C

    2015-04-01

    The use of artificial sweeteners has increased together with the epidemic growth of obesity. In addition to their widespread use in sodas, artificial sweeteners are added to nearly 6000 other products sold in the US, including baby foods, frozen dinners and even yogurts. It has been suggested that the use of nonnutritive sweeteners can lead to body weight gain and an altered metabolic profile. However, very few studies have evaluated the effects of maternal consumption of artificial non-caloric sweeteners on body weight, feeding behavior or the metabolism of offspring in adult life. In this study, we found that animals exposed to aspartame during the prenatal period presented a higher consumption of sweet foods during adulthood and a greater susceptibility to alterations in metabolic parameters, such as increased glucose, LDL and triglycerides. These effects were observed in both males and females, although they were more pronounced in males. Despite the preliminary nature of this study, and the need for further confirmation of these effects, our data suggest that the consumption of sweeteners during gestation may have deleterious long-term effects and should be used with caution. PMID:25543075

  18. Clock genes and behavioral responses to light are altered in a mouse model of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Lahouaoui, Hasna; Coutanson, Christine; Cooper, Howard M; Bennis, Mohamed; Dkhissi-Benyahya, Ouria

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that melanopsin-expressing ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are altered in retinal pathologies. Using a streptozotocin-induced (STZ) model of diabetes, we investigated the impact of diabetic retinopathy on non-visual functions by analyzing ipRGCs morphology and light-induced c-Fos and Period 1-2 clock genes in the central clock (SCN). The ability of STZ-diabetic mice to entrain to light was challenged by exposure animals to 1) successive light/dark (LD) cycle of decreasing or increasing light intensities during the light phase and 2) 6-h advance of the LD cycle. Our results show that diabetes induces morphological changes of ipRGCs, including soma swelling and dendritic varicosities, with no reduction in their total number, associated with decreased c-Fos and clock genes induction by light in the SCN at 12 weeks post-onset of diabetes. In addition, STZ-diabetic mice exhibited a reduction of overall locomotor activity, a decrease of circadian sensitivity to light at low intensities, and a delay in the time to re-entrain after a phase advance of the LD cycle. These novel findings demonstrate that diabetes alters clock genes and behavioral responses of the circadian timing system to light and suggest that diabetic patients may show an increased propensity for circadian disturbances, in particular when they are exposed to chronobiological challenges. PMID:25006976

  19. Dido mutations trigger perinatal death and generate brain abnormalities and behavioral alterations in surviving adult mice.

    PubMed

    Villares, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, Julio; Fütterer, Agnes; Trachana, Varvara; Gutiérrez del Burgo, Fernando; Martínez-A, Carlos

    2015-04-14

    Nearly all vertebrate cells have a single cilium protruding from their surface. This threadlike organelle, once considered vestigial, is now seen as a pivotal element for detection of extracellular signals that trigger crucial morphogenetic pathways. We recently proposed a role for Dido3, the main product of the death inducer-obliterator (dido) gene, in histone deacetylase 6 delivery to the primary cilium [Sánchez de Diego A, et al. (2014) Nat Commun 5:3500]. Here we used mice that express truncated forms of Dido proteins to determine the link with cilium-associated disorders. We describe dido mutant mice with high incidence of perinatal lethality and distinct neurodevelopmental, morphogenetic, and metabolic alterations. The anatomical abnormalities were related to brain and orofacial development, consistent with the known roles of primary cilia in brain patterning, hydrocephalus incidence, and cleft palate. Mutant mice that reached adulthood showed reduced life expectancy, brain malformations including hippocampus hypoplasia and agenesis of corpus callosum, as well as neuromuscular and behavioral alterations. These mice can be considered a model for the study of ciliopathies and provide information for assessing diagnosis and therapy of genetic disorders linked to the deregulation of primary cilia. PMID:25825751

  20. The first mecp2-null zebrafish model shows altered motor behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Pietri, Thomas; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Guyon, Nicolas; Romano, Sebastián A.; Washbourne, Philip; Moens, Cecilia B.; de Polavieja, Gonzalo G.; Sumbre, Germán

    2013-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder and one of the most common causes of mental retardation in affected girls. Other symptoms include a rapid regression of motor and cognitive skills after an apparently early normal development. Sporadic mutations in the transcription factor MECP2 has been shown to be present in more than 90% of the patients and several models of MeCP2-deficient mice have been created to understand the role of this gene. These models have pointed toward alterations in the maintenance of the central nervous system rather than its development, in line with the late onset of the disease in humans. However, the exact functions of MeCP2 remain difficult to delineate and the animal models have yielded contradictory results. Here, we present the first mecp2-null allele mutation zebrafish model. Surprisingly and in contrast to MeCP2-null mouse models, mecp2-null zebrafish are viable and fertile. They present nonetheless clear behavioral alterations during their early development, including spontaneous and sensory-evoked motor anomalies, as well as defective thigmotaxis. PMID:23874272

  1. Dido mutations trigger perinatal death and generate brain abnormalities and behavioral alterations in surviving adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Villares, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, Julio; Fütterer, Agnes; Trachana, Varvara; Gutiérrez del Burgo, Fernando; Martínez-A, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all vertebrate cells have a single cilium protruding from their surface. This threadlike organelle, once considered vestigial, is now seen as a pivotal element for detection of extracellular signals that trigger crucial morphogenetic pathways. We recently proposed a role for Dido3, the main product of the death inducer-obliterator (dido) gene, in histone deacetylase 6 delivery to the primary cilium [Sánchez de Diego A, et al. (2014) Nat Commun 5:3500]. Here we used mice that express truncated forms of Dido proteins to determine the link with cilium-associated disorders. We describe dido mutant mice with high incidence of perinatal lethality and distinct neurodevelopmental, morphogenetic, and metabolic alterations. The anatomical abnormalities were related to brain and orofacial development, consistent with the known roles of primary cilia in brain patterning, hydrocephalus incidence, and cleft palate. Mutant mice that reached adulthood showed reduced life expectancy, brain malformations including hippocampus hypoplasia and agenesis of corpus callosum, as well as neuromuscular and behavioral alterations. These mice can be considered a model for the study of ciliopathies and provide information for assessing diagnosis and therapy of genetic disorders linked to the deregulation of primary cilia. PMID:25825751

  2. Human papillomavirus causes an angiogenic switch in keratinocytes which is sufficient to alter endothelial cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Li, F.; Mead, L.; White, H.; Walker, J.; Ingram, D.A.; Roman, A.

    2007-10-10

    One of the requirements for tumor growth is the ability to recruit a blood supply, a process known as angiogenesis. Angiogenesis begins early in the progression of cervical disease from mild to severe dysplasia and on to invasive cancer. We have previously reported that expression of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 (HPV16 E6E7) proteins in primary foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) decreases expression of two inhibitors and increases expression of two angiogenic inducers [Toussaint-Smith, E., Donner, D.B., Roman, A., 2004. Expression of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins in primary foreskin keratinocytes is sufficient to alter the expression of angiogenic factors. Oncogene 23, 2988-2995]. Here we report that HPV-induced early changes in the keratinocyte phenotype are sufficient to alter endothelial cell behavior both in vitro and in vivo. Conditioned media from HPV16 E6E7 expressing HFKs as well as from human cervical keratinocytes containing the intact HPV16 were able to stimulate proliferation and migration of human microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, introduction of the conditioned media into immunocompetent mice using a Matrigel plug model resulted in a clear angiogenic response. These novel data support the hypothesis that HPV proteins contribute not only to the uncontrolled keratinocyte growth seen following HPV infection but also to the angiogenic response needed for tumor formation.

  3. Structural Brain Alterations Associated with Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Boucetta, Soufiane; Salimi, Ali; Dadar, Mahsa; Jones, Barbara E; Collins, D Louis; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh

    2016-01-01

    Characterized by dream-enactment motor manifestations arising from rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is frequently encountered in Parkinson's disease (PD). Yet the specific neurostructural changes associated with RBD in PD patients remain to be revealed by neuroimaging. Here we identified such neurostructural alterations by comparing large samples of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in 69 PD patients with probable RBD, 240 patients without RBD and 138 healthy controls, using deformation-based morphometry (p < 0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons). All data were extracted from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative. PD patients with probable RBD showed smaller volumes than patients without RBD and than healthy controls in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum, medullary reticular formation, hypothalamus, thalamus, putamen, amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex. These results demonstrate that RBD is associated with a prominent loss of volume in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum, where cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons are located and implicated in the promotion of REM sleep and muscle atonia. It is additionally associated with more widespread atrophy in other subcortical and cortical regions whose loss also likely contributes to the altered regulation of sleep-wake states and motor activity underlying RBD in PD patients. PMID:27245317

  4. Persistent Behavioral Alterations in Rats Neonatally Exposed to Low Doses of the Organophosphate Pesticide, Parathion

    PubMed Central

    Timofeeva, Olga A.; Sanders, David; Seemann, Kristen; Yang, Liwei; Hermanson, Daniel; Regenbogen, Sam; Agoos, Samantha; Kallepalli, Anita; Rastogi, Anit; Braddy, David; Wells, Corinne; Perraut, Charles; Seidler, Frederic J.; Slotkin, Theodore A.; Levin, Edward D.

    2008-01-01

    Although developmental exposures of rats to low levels of the organophosphate pesticides (OPs), chlorpyrifos (CPF) or diazinon (DZN), both cause persistent neurobehavioral effects, there are important differences in their neurotoxicity. The current study extended investigation to parathion (PTN), an OP that has higher systemic toxicity than either CPF or DZN. We gave PTN on postnatal days (PND) 1–4 at doses spanning the threshold for systemic toxicity (0, 0.1 or 0.2 mg/kg/day, s.c.) and performed a battery of emotional and cognitive behavioral tests in adolescence through adulthood. The higher PTN dose increased time spent on the open arms and the number of center crossings in the plus maze, indicating greater risk-taking and overall activity. This group also showed a decrease in tactile startle response without altering prepulse inhibition, indicating a blunted acute sensorimotor reaction without alteration in sensorimotor plasticity. T-maze spontaneous alternation, novelty suppressed feeding, preference for sweetened chocolate milk, and locomotor activity were not significantly affected by neonatal PTN exposure. During radial arm maze acquisition, rats given the lower PTN dose committed fewer errors compared to controls and displayed lower sensitivity to the amnestic effects of the NMDA receptor blocker, dizocilpine. No PTN effects were observed with regard to the sensitivity to blockade of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors, or serotonin 5HT2 receptors. This study shows that neonatal PTN exposure evokes long-term changes in behavior, but the effects are less severe, and in some incidences opposite in nature, to those seen earlier for CPF or DZN, findings consistent with our neurochemical studies showing different patterns of effects and less neurotoxic damage with PTN. Our results reinforce the conclusion that low dose exposure to different OPs can have quite different neurotoxic effects, obviously unconnected to their shared property as

  5. Insulin-like Signaling Promotes Glial Phagocytic Clearance of Degenerating Axons through Regulation of Draper.

    PubMed

    Musashe, Derek T; Purice, Maria D; Speese, Sean D; Doherty, Johnna; Logan, Mary A

    2016-08-16

    Neuronal injury triggers robust responses from glial cells, including altered gene expression and enhanced phagocytic activity to ensure prompt removal of damaged neurons. The molecular underpinnings of glial responses to trauma remain unclear. Here, we find that the evolutionarily conserved insulin-like signaling (ILS) pathway promotes glial phagocytic clearance of degenerating axons in adult Drosophila. We find that the insulin-like receptor (InR) and downstream effector Akt1 are acutely activated in local ensheathing glia after axotomy and are required for proper clearance of axonal debris. InR/Akt1 activity, it is also essential for injury-induced activation of STAT92E and its transcriptional target draper, which encodes a conserved receptor essential for glial engulfment of degenerating axons. Increasing Draper levels in adult glia partially rescues delayed clearance of severed axons in glial InR-inhibited flies. We propose that ILS functions as a key post-injury communication relay to activate glial responses, including phagocytic activity. PMID:27498858

  6. Serotonin 2B receptor slows disease progression and prevents degeneration of spinal cord mononuclear phagocytes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    El Oussini, Hajer; Bayer, Hanna; Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Vercruysse, Pauline; Sinniger, Jérôme; Dirrig-Grosch, Sylvie; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Larmet, Yves; Müller, Kathrin; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Thal, Dietmar R; van Rheenen, Wouter; van Eijk, Kristel; Lawson, Roland; Monassier, Laurent; Maroteaux, Luc; Roumier, Anne; Wong, Philip C; van den Berg, Leonard H; Ludolph, Albert C; Veldink, Jan H; Witting, Anke; Dupuis, Luc

    2016-03-01

    Microglia are the resident mononuclear phagocytes of the central nervous system and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). During neurodegeneration, microglial activation is accompanied by infiltration of circulating monocytes, leading to production of multiple inflammatory mediators in the spinal cord. Degenerative alterations in mononuclear phagocytes are commonly observed during neurodegenerative diseases, yet little is known concerning the mechanisms leading to their degeneration, or the consequences on disease progression. Here we observed that the serotonin 2B receptor (5-HT2B), a serotonin receptor expressed in microglia, is upregulated in the spinal cord of three different transgenic mouse models of ALS. In mutant SOD1 mice, this upregulation was restricted to cells positive for CD11b, a marker of mononuclear phagocytes. Ablation of 5-HT2B receptor in transgenic ALS mice expressing mutant SOD1 resulted in increased degeneration of mononuclear phagocytes, as evidenced by fragmentation of Iba1-positive cellular processes. This was accompanied by decreased expression of key neuroinflammatory genes but also loss of expression of homeostatic microglial genes. Importantly, the dramatic effect of 5-HT2B receptor ablation on mononuclear phagocytes was associated with acceleration of disease progression. To determine the translational relevance of these results, we studied polymorphisms in the human HTR2B gene, which encodes the 5-HT2B receptor, in a large cohort of ALS patients. In this cohort, the C allele of SNP rs10199752 in HTR2B was associated with longer survival. Moreover, patients carrying one copy of the C allele of SNP rs10199752 showed increased 5-HT2B mRNA in spinal cord and displayed less pronounced degeneration of Iba1 positive cells than patients carrying two copies of the more common A allele. Thus, the 5-HT2B receptor limits degeneration of spinal cord mononuclear

  7. Cellular immune responses and phagocytic activity of fishes exposed to pollution of volcano mud.

    PubMed

    Risjani, Yenny; Yunianta; Couteau, Jerome; Minier, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Since May 29, 2006, a mud volcano in the Brantas Delta of the Sidoarjo district has emitted mud that has inundated nearby villages. Pollution in this area has been implicated in detrimental effects on fish health. In fishes, leukocyte and phagocytic cells play a vital role in body defenses. We report for the first time the effect of "LUSI" volcano mud on the immune systems of fish in the Brantas Delta. The aim of this study was to find biomarkers to allow the evaluation of the effects of volcanic mud and anthropogenic pollution on fish health in the Brantas Delta. The study took places at the Brantas Delta, which was polluted by volcano mud, and at reference sites in Karangkates and Pasuruan. Leukocyte numbers were determined using a Neubauer hemocytometer and a light microscope. Differential leukocyte counts were determined using blood smears stained with May Grunwald-Giemsa, providing neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte counts. Macrophages were taken from fish kidney, and their phagocytic activity was measured. In vitro analyses revealed that leukocyte and differential leukocyte counts (DLC) were higher in Channa striata and Chanos chanos caught from the polluted area. Macrophage numbers were higher in Oreochromis mossambicus than in the other species, indicating that this species is more sensitive to pollution. In areas close to volcanic mud eruption, all specimens had lower phagocytic activity. Our results show that immune cells were changed and phagocytic activity was reduced in the polluted area indicating cytotoxicity and alteration of the innate immune system in fishes exposed to LUSI volcano mud and anthropogenic pollution. PMID:24631200

  8. Altered functional connectivity in lesional peduncular hallucinosis with REM sleep behavior disorder.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Maiya R; Tie, Yanmei; Gabrieli, John D E; McGinnis, Scott M; Golby, Alexandra J; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Brainstem lesions causing peduncular hallucinosis (PH) produce vivid visual hallucinations occasionally accompanied by sleep disorders. Overlapping brainstem regions modulate visual pathways and REM sleep functions via gating of thalamocortical networks. A 66-year-old man with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation developed abrupt-onset complex visual hallucinations with preserved insight and violent dream enactment behavior. Brain MRI showed restricted diffusion in the left rostrodorsal pons suggestive of an acute ischemic stroke. REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) was diagnosed on polysomnography. We investigated the integrity of ponto-geniculate-occipital circuits with seed-based resting-state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) in this patient compared to 46 controls. Rs-fcMRI revealed significantly reduced functional connectivity between the lesion and lateral geniculate nuclei (LGN), and between LGN and visual association cortex compared to controls. Conversely, functional connectivity between brainstem and visual association cortex, and between visual association cortex and prefrontal cortex (PFC) was significantly increased in the patient. Focal damage to the rostrodorsal pons is sufficient to cause RBD and PH in humans, suggesting an overlapping mechanism in both syndromes. This lesion produced a pattern of altered functional connectivity consistent with disrupted visual cortex connectivity via de-afferentation of thalamocortical pathways. PMID:26656284

  9. Adolescent binge ethanol treatment alters adult brain regional volumes, cortical extracellular matrix protein and behavioral flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Leon Garland; Liu, Wen; Oguz, Ipek; Styner, Martin; Crews, Fulton T.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents binge drink more than any other age group, increasing risk of disrupting the development of the frontal cortex. We hypothesized that adolescent binge drinking would lead to persistent alterations in adulthood. In this study, we modeled adolescent weekend underage binge-drinking, using adolescent mice (post-natal days [P] 28–37). The adolescent intermittent binge ethanol (AIE) treatment includes 6 binge intragastric doses of ethanol in an intermittent pattern across adolescence. Assessments were conducted in adulthood following extended abstinence to determine if there were persistent changes in adults. Reversal learning, open field and other behavioral assessments as well as brain structure using magnetic imaging and immunohistochemistry were determined. We found AIE did not impact adult Barnes Maze learning. However, AIE did cause reversal learning deficits in adults. AIE also caused structural changes in the adult brain. AIE was associated with adulthood volume enlargements in specific brain regions without changes in total brain volume. Enlarged regions included the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, 4%), cerebellum (4.5%), thalamus (2%), internal capsule (10%) and genu of the corpus callosum (7%). The enlarged OFC volume in adults after AIE is consistent with previous imaging studies in human adolescents. AIE treatment was associated with significant increases in the expression of several extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the adult OFC including WFA (55%), Brevican (32%), Neurocan (105%), Tenacin-C (25%), and HABP (5%). These findings are consistent with AIE causing persistent changes in brain structure that could contribute to a lack of behavioral flexibility. PMID:24275185

  10. Transient alterations in neuronal and behavioral activity following bensultap and fipronil treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Szegedi, Viktor; Bárdos, György; Détári, László; Tóth, Attila; Banczerowski-Pelyhe, Ilona; Világi, Ildikó

    2005-10-15

    In the present multilevel study, neuromodulatory effect of two insecticides, bensultap and fipronil were investigated in rats. Although the new generation of insecticides shows greater affinity to invertebrate as compared to mammalian receptors, toxic effect of these compounds in vertebrates cannot be excluded. The aim of the study was to follow the course of neuronal changes in rats for 1 week after a high-dose insecticide exposure. Alterations in synaptic excitability, in sleep-wake pattern and in behavior were analyzed using conventional in vitro brain slice method, long-lasting EEG recordings, and open-field tests. The two chemicals examined in this study induced only weak and transient effects. Bensultap, acting on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, caused a transient decrease in neuronal excitability. Sleep and behavioral changes demonstrated a similar time course. Fipronil, on the other hand, increased excitability and its effect lasted slightly longer. All effects were greatest on the first day following 'poisoning', and measured variables usually returned to normal within a week. These results suggest that the studied compounds do have some effects on the mammalian nervous system, but this effect is usually mild and temporary. PMID:16009481

  11. Dynamical and phase behavior of a phospholipid membrane altered by an antimicrobial peptide at low concentration

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mamontov, Eugene; Tyagi, M.; Qian, Shuo; Rai, Durgesh K.; Urban, Volker S.; Sharma, V. K.

    2016-05-27

    Here we discuss that the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is traditionally attributed to the formation of pores in the lipid cell membranes of pathogens, which requires a substantial peptide to lipid ratio. However, using incoherent neutron scattering, we show that even at a concentration too low for pore formation, an archetypal antimicrobial peptide, melittin, disrupts the regular phase behavior of the microscopic dynamics in a phospholipid membrane, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). At the same time, another antimicrobial peptide, alamethicin, does not exert a similar effect on the DMPC microscopic dynamics. The melittin-altered lateral motion of DMPC at physiological temperature nomore » longer resembles the fluid-phase behavior characteristic of functional membranes of the living cells. The disruptive effect demonstrated by melittin even at low concentrations reveals a new mechanism of antimicrobial action relevant in more realistic scenarios, when peptide concentration is not as high as would be required for pore formation, which may facilitate treatment with antimicrobial peptides.« less

  12. Can a tablet device alter undergraduate science students' study behavior and use of technology?

    PubMed

    Morris, Neil P; Ramsay, Luke; Chauhan, Vikesh

    2012-06-01

    This article reports findings from a study investigating undergraduate biological sciences students' use of technology and computer devices for learning and the effect of providing students with a tablet device. A controlled study was conducted to collect quantitative and qualitative data on the impact of a tablet device on students' use of devices and technology for learning. Overall, we found that students made extensive use of the tablet device for learning, using it in preference to laptop computers to retrieve information, record lectures, and access learning resources. In line with other studies, we found that undergraduate students only use familiar Web 2.0 technologies and that the tablet device did not alter this behavior for the majority of tools. We conclude that undergraduate science students can make extensive use of a tablet device to enhance their learning opportunities without institutions changing their teaching methods or computer systems, but that institutional intervention may be needed to drive changes in student behavior toward the use of novel Web 2.0 technologies. PMID:22665424

  13. 3. Impact of altered gravity on CNS development and behavior in male and female rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Nguon, K.; Ladd, B.; Sulkowski, V. A.; Sulkowski, Z. L.; Baxter, M. G.

    The present study examined the effect of altered gravity on CNS development. Specifically, we compared neurodevelopment, behavior, cerebellar structure and protein expression in rat neonates exposed perinatally to hypergravity. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 1.5G-1.75G hypergravity on a 24-ft centrifuge starting on gestational day (G) 10, through giving birth on G22/G23, and nursing their offspring through postnatal day (P) 21. Cerebellar mass on P6 was decreased in 1.75G-exposed male pups by 27.5 percent; in 1.75G-exposed female pups it was decreased by 22.5 percent. The observed cerebellar changes were associated with alterations in neurodevelopment and motor behavior. Exposure to hypergravity impaired performance on the following neurocognitive tests: (1) righting time on P3 was more than doubled in 1.75G-exposed rats and the effect appeared more pronounced in female pups, (2) startle response on P10 was delayed in both male and female HG pups; HG pups were one-fifth as likely to respond to a clapping noise as SC pups, and (3) performance on a rotorod on P21 was decreased in HG pups; the duration of the stay on rotorod recorded for HG pups of both sexes was one tenth of the SC pups. Furthermore, Western blot analysis of selected cerebellar proteins suggested gender-specific changes in glial and neuronal proteins. On P6, GFAP expression was decreased by 59.2 percent in HG males, while no significant decrease was observed in female cerebella. Synaptophysin expression was decreased in HG male neonates by 29.9 percent and in HG female neonates by 20.7 percent as compared to its expression in SC cerebella. The results of this experiment suggest that perinatal exposure to hypergravity affects cerebellar development and behavior differently in male and female neonates. If one accepts that hypergravity is a good paradigm to study the effect of microgravity on the CNS, and since males and females were shown to respond differently to hypergravity, it can be

  14. Environmental prenatal stress eliminates brain and maternal behavioral sex differences and alters hormone levels in female rats.

    PubMed

    Del Cerro, M C R; Ortega, E; Gómez, F; Segovia, S; Pérez-Laso, C

    2015-07-01

    Environmental prenatal stress (EPS) has effects on fetuses that are long-lasting, altering their hormone levels, brain morphology and behavior when they reach maturity. In previous research, we demonstrated that EPS affects the expression of induced maternal behavior (MB), the neuroendocrine system, and morphology of the sexually dimorphic accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) involved in reproductive behavior patterns. The bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT) is another vomeronasal (VN) structure that plays an inhibitory role in rats in the expression of induced maternal behavior in female and male virgins. In the present study, we have ascertained whether the behavioral, neuroendocrine, and neuromorphological alterations of the AOB found after EPS also appear in the BAOT. After applying EPS to pregnant rats during the late gestational period, in their female offspring at maturity we tested induced maternal behavior, BAOT morphology and plasma levels of testosterone (T), estradiol (E2), progesterone (P), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone (Cpd B). EPS: a) affected the induction of MB, showed a male-like pattern of care for pups, b) elevated plasma levels of Cpd B and reduced E2 in comparison with the controls, and c) significantly increased the number of BAOT neurons compared to the control females and comparable to the control male group. These findings provide further evidence that stress applied to pregnant rats produces long-lasting behavioral, endocrine and neuroanatomical alterations in the female offspring that are evident when they become mature. PMID:26163152

  15. Phagocytic activity of neuronal progenitors regulates adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenjie; Elliott, Michael R; Chen, Yubo; Walsh, James T; Klibanov, Alexander L; Ravichandran, Kodi S; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    Whereas thousands of new neurons are generated daily during adult life, only a fraction of them survive and become part of neural circuits; the rest die, and their corpses are presumably cleared by resident phagocytes. How the dying neurons are removed and how such clearance influences neurogenesis are not well understood. Here, we identify an unexpected phagocytic role for the doublecortin (DCX)-positive neuronal progenitor cells during adult neurogenesis. Our in vivo and ex vivo studies demonstrate that DCX(+) cells comprise a significant phagocytic population within the neurogenic zones. Intracellular engulfment protein ELMO1, which promotes Rac activation downstream of phagocytic receptors, was required for phagocytosis by DCX(+) cells. Disruption of engulfment in vivo genetically (in Elmo1-null mice) or pharmacologically (in wild-type mice) led to reduced uptake by DCX(+) cells, accumulation of apoptotic nuclei in the neurogenic niches and impaired neurogenesis. Collectively, these findings indicate a paradigm wherein DCX(+) neuronal precursors also serve as phagocytes, and that their phagocytic activity critically contributes to neurogenesis in the adult brain. PMID:21804544

  16. Diet, age, and prior injury status differentially alter behavioral outcomes following concussion in rats.

    PubMed

    Mychasiuk, Richelle; Hehar, Harleen; van Waes, Linda; Esser, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion affects a large portion of the population and although many of these individuals recover completely, a small subset of people experience lingering symptomology and poor outcomes. Little is known about the factors that affect individual susceptibility or resilience to poor outcomes after mTBI and there are currently no biomarkers to delineate mTBI diagnosis or prognosis. Based upon the growing literature associated with caloric intake and altered neurological aging and the ambiguous link between repetitive mTBI and progressive neurodegeneration, the current study was designed to examine the effect of a high fat diet (HFD), developmental age, and repetitive mTBI on behavioral outcomes following a mTBI. In addition, telomere length was examined before and after experimental mTBI. Sprague Dawley rats were maintained on a HFD or standard rat chow throughout life (including the prenatal period) and then experienced an mTBI/concussion at P30, P30 and P60, or only at P60. Behavioral outcomes were examined using a test battery that was administered between P61-P80 and included; beam-walking, open field, elevated plus maze, novel context mismatch, Morris water task, and forced swim task. Animals with a P30 mTBI often demonstrated lingering symptomology that was still present during testing at P80. Injuries at P30 and P60 rarely produced cumulative effects, and in some tests (i.e., beam walking), the first injury may have protected the brain from the second injury. Exposure to the high fat diet exacerbated many of the behavioral deficits associated with concussion. Finally, telomere length was shortened following mTBI and was influenced by the animal's dietary intake. Diet, age at the time of injury, and the number of prior concussion incidents differentially contribute to behavioral deficits and may help explain individual variations in susceptibility and resilience to poor outcomes following an mTBI. PMID:25270295

  17. Behavior of nuclear waste elements during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite in an active geothermal system: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Sturchio, N.C.; Seitz, M.G.

    1984-12-31

    The behavior of a group of nuclear waste elements (U, Th, Sr, Zr, Sb, Cs, Ba, and Sm) during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite is investigated through detailed geochemical analyses of whole rocks, glass and mineral separates, and thermal waters. Significant mobility of U, Sr, Sb, Cs, and Ba is found, and the role of sorption processes in their observed behavior is identified. Th, Zr, and Sm are relatively immobile, except on a microscopic scale. 9 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Short and long term neuro-behavioral alterations in type 1 diabetes mellitus pediatric population

    PubMed Central

    Litmanovitch, Edna; Geva, Ronny; Rachmiel, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions affecting individuals under the age of 18 years, with increasing incidence worldwide, especially among very young age groups, younger than 5. There is still no cure for the disease, and therapeutic goals and guidelines are a challenge. Currently, despite T1DM intensive management and technological interventions in therapy, the majority of pediatric patients do not achieve glycemic control goals. This leads to a potential prognosis of long term diabetic complications, nephrological, cardiac, ophthalmological and neurological. Unfortunately, the neurological manifestations, including neurocognitive and behavioral complications, may present soon after disease onset, during childhood and adolescence. These manifestations may be prominent, but at times subtle, thus they are often not reported by patients or physicians as related to the diabetes. Furthermore, the metabolic mechanism for such manifestations has been inconsistent and difficult to interpret in practical clinical care, as reported in several reviews on the topic of brain and T1DM. However, new technological methods for brain assessment, as well as the introduction of continuous glucose monitoring, provide new insights and information regarding brain related manifestations and glycemic variability and control parameters, which may impact the clinical care of children and youth with T1DM. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the most recently reported behavioral, cognitive domains, sleep related, electrophysiological, and structural alterations in children and adolescences from a novel point of view. The review focuses on reported impairments based on duration of T1DM, its timeline, and modifiable disease related risk parameters. These findings are not without controversy, and limitations of data are presented in addition to recommendations for future research direction. PMID:25789107

  19. Common behaviors alterations after extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field exposure in rat animal model.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad; Sahraei, Hedayat; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Najafi Abedi, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Naturally, the presence of electromagnetic waves in our living environment affects all components of organisms, particularly humans and animals, as the large part of their body consists of water. In the present study, we tried to investigate the relation between exposure to the extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) and common behaviors such as body weight, food and water intake, anorexia (poor appetite), plasma glucose concentration, movement, rearing and sniffing in rats. For this purpose, rats were exposed to 40  Hz ELF-EMF once a day for 21 days, then at days 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 after exposure, any changes in the above-mentioned items were assessed in the exposed rats and compared to the non-exposed group as control. Body weight of irradiated rats significantly increased only a week after exposure and decreased after that. No significant change was observed in food and water intake of irradiated rats compared to the control, and the anorexia parameter in the group exposed to ELF-EMF was significantly decreased at one and two weeks after irradiation. A week after exposure, the level of glucose was significantly increased but at other days these changes were not significant. Movements, rearing and sniffing of rats at day 1 after exposure were significantly decreased and other days these changes did not follow any particular pattern. However, the result of this study demonstrated that exposure to ELF-EMF can alter the normal condition of animals and may represent a harmful impact on behavior. PMID:26182237

  20. An Scn1a epilepsy mutation in Scn8a alters seizure susceptibility and behavior.

    PubMed

    Makinson, Christopher D; Dutt, Karoni; Lin, Frank; Papale, Ligia A; Shankar, Anupama; Barela, Arthur J; Liu, Robert; Goldin, Alan L; Escayg, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the role of SCN8A in epilepsy and behavior is critical in light of recently identified human SCN8A epilepsy mutations. We have previously demonstrated that Scn8a(med) and Scn8a(med-jo) mice carrying mutations in the Scn8a gene display increased resistance to flurothyl and kainic acid-induced seizures; however, they also exhibit spontaneous absence seizures. To further investigate the relationship between altered SCN8A function and epilepsy, we introduced the SCN1A-R1648H mutation, identified in a family with generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), into the corresponding position (R1627H) of the mouse Scn8a gene. Heterozygous R1627H mice exhibited increased resistance to some forms of pharmacologically and electrically induced seizures and the mutant Scn8a allele ameliorated the phenotype of Scn1a-R1648H mutants. Hippocampal slices from heterozygous R1627H mice displayed decreased bursting behavior compared to wild-type littermates. Paradoxically, at the homozygous level, R1627H mice did not display increased seizure resistance and were susceptible to audiogenic seizures. We furthermore observed increased hippocampal pyramidal cell excitability in heterozygous and homozygous Scn8a-R1627H mutants, and decreased interneuron excitability in heterozygous Scn8a-R1627H mutants. These results expand the phenotypes associated with disruption of the Scn8a gene and demonstrate that an Scn8a mutation can both confer seizure protection and increase seizure susceptibility. PMID:26410685

  1. The Relationship between Instructor Misbehaviors and Student Antisocial Behavioral Alteration Techniques: The Roles of Instructor Attractiveness, Humor, and Relational Closeness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claus, Christopher J.; Booth-Butterfield, Melanie; Chory, Rebecca M.

    2012-01-01

    Using rhetorical/relational goal theory as a guiding frame, we examined relationships between instructor misbehaviors (i.e., indolence, incompetence, and offensiveness) and the likelihood of students communicating antisocial behavioral alteration techniques (BATs). More specifically, the study focused on whether students' perceptions of instructor…

  2. Alteration of cingulate long-term plasticity and behavioral sensitization to inflammation by environmental enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Shum, Fanny W.F.; Wu, Long-Jun; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Toyoda, Hiroki; Xu, Hui; Ren, Ming; Pinaud, Raphael; Ko, Shanelle W.; Lee, Yong-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Zhuo, Min

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to an enriched environment (EE) has been shown to induce cortical plasticity. Considerable amount of research is focused on the effects of EE in the hippocampus; however, effects of EE on other brain regions and the mechanisms involved are not well known. To investigate this, we induced cortical plasticity by placing mice in an EE for one month and measured the effects of EE in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Here, we show that EE enhanced the expression of the plasticity gene, egr-1, in the ACC of EE animals accompanied by enhanced cingulate long-term potentiation (LTP) and decreased cingulate long-term depression (LTD). The increased NMDA receptor NR2B/NR2A subunits current ratio is associated with the plasticity seen in the ACC while total protein levels remain unchanged. Furthermore, behavioral experiments show that these mice exposed to EE demonstrate enhanced responses to acute and long-term inflammation. Our findings suggest that exposure to EE alters physiological properties within the ACC which results in enhanced responses to inflammation. PMID:17522019

  3. Arsenic moiety in gallium arsenide is responsible for neuronal apoptosis and behavioral alterations in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Flora, Swaran J.S. Bhatt, Kapil; Mehta, Ashish

    2009-10-15

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), an intermetallic semiconductor finds widespread applications in high frequency microwave and millimeter wave, and ultra fast supercomputers. Extensive use of GaAs has led to increased exposure to humans working in semiconductor industry. GaAs has the ability to dissociate into its constitutive moieties at physiological pH and might be responsible for the oxidative stress. The present study was aimed at evaluating, the principle moiety (Ga or As) in GaAs to cause neurological dysfunction based on its ability to cause apoptosis, in vivo and in vitro and if this neuronal dysfunction translated to neurobehavioral changes in chronically exposed rats. Result indicated that arsenic moiety in GaAs was mainly responsible for causing oxidative stress via increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) generation, both in vitro and in vivo. Increased ROS further caused apoptosis via mitochondrial driven pathway. Effects of oxidative stress were also confirmed based on alterations in antioxidant enzymes, GPx, GST and SOD in rat brain. We noted that ROS induced oxidative stress caused changes in the brain neurotransmitter levels, Acetylcholinesterase and nitric oxide synthase, leading to loss of memory and learning in rats. The study demonstrates for the first time that the slow release of arsenic moiety from GaAs is mainly responsible for oxidative stress induced apoptosis in neuronal cells causing behavioral changes.

  4. Developmental Exposure to Aroclor 1254 Alters Migratory Behavior in Juvenile European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Flahr, Leanne M; Michel, Nicole L; Zahara, Alexander R D; Jones, Paul D; Morrissey, Christy A

    2015-05-19

    Birds exposed to endocrine disrupting chemicals during development could be susceptible to neurological and other physiological changes affecting migratory behaviors. We investigated the effects of ecologically relevant levels of Aroclor 1254, a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture, on moult, fattening, migratory activity, and orientation in juvenile European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). Birds were orally administered 0 (control), 0.35 (low), 0.70 (intermediate), or 1.05 (high) μg Aroclor 1254/g-body weight by gavage from 1 through 18 days posthatch and later exposed in captivity to a photoperiod shift simulating an autumn migration. Migratory activity and orientation were examined using Emlen funnel trials. Across treatments, we found significant increases in mass, fat, and moulting and decreasing plasma thyroid hormones over time. We observed a significant increase in activity as photoperiod was shifted from 13L:11D (light:dark) to 12L:12D, demonstrating that migratory condition was induced in captivity. At 12L:12D, control birds oriented to 155.95° (South-Southeast), while high-dosed birds did not. High-dosed birds showed a delayed orientation to 197.48° (South-Southwest) under 10L:14D, concomitant with apparent delays in moult. These findings demonstrate how subtle contaminant-induced alterations during development could lead to longer-scale effects, including changes in migratory activity and orientation, which could potentially result in deleterious effects on fitness and survival. PMID:25893686

  5. Mutations in the circadian gene period alter behavioral and biochemical responses to ethanol in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jennifer; Seggio, Joseph A; Ahmad, S Tariq

    2016-04-01

    Clock genes, such as period, which maintain an organism's circadian rhythm, can have profound effects on metabolic activity, including ethanol metabolism. In turn, ethanol exposure has been shown in Drosophila and mammals to cause disruptions of the circadian rhythm. Previous studies from our labs have shown that larval ethanol exposure disrupted the free-running period and period expression of Drosophila. In addition, a recent study has shown that arrhythmic flies show no tolerance to ethanol exposure. As such, Drosophila period mutants, which have either a shorter than wild-type free-running period (perS) or a longer one (perL), may also exhibit altered responses to ethanol due to their intrinsic circadian differences. In this study, we tested the initial sensitivity and tolerance of ethanol exposure on Canton-S, perS, and perL, and then measured their Alcohol Dehydrogenase (ADH) and body ethanol levels. We showed that perL flies had slower sedation rate, longer recovery from ethanol sedation, and generated higher tolerance for sedation upon repeated ethanol exposure compared to Canton-S wild-type flies. Furthermore, perL flies had lower ADH activity and had a slower ethanol clearance compared to wild-type flies. The findings of this study suggest that period mutations influence ethanol induced behavior and ethanol metabolism in Drosophila and that flies with longer circadian periods are more sensitive to ethanol exposure. PMID:26802726

  6. Low dose effects of a Withania somnifera extract on altered marble burying behavior in stressed mice

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Amitabha; Chatterjee, Shyam Sunder; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Withania somnifera root (WSR) extracts are often used in traditionally known Indian systems of medicine for prevention and cure of psychosomatic disorders. The reported experiment was designed to test whether low daily oral doses of such extracts are also effective in suppressing marble burying behavior in stressed mice or not. Materials and Methods: Groups of mice treated with 10, 20, or 40 mg/kg daily oral doses of WSR were subjected to a foot shock stress-induced hyperthermia test on the 1st, 5th, 7th, and 10th day of the experiment. On the 11th and 12th treatment days, they were subjected to marble burying tests. Stress response suppressing effects of low dose WSR were estimated by its effects on body weight and basal core temperature of animals during the course of the experiment. Results: Alterations in bodyweight and basal core temperature triggered by repeated exposures to foot shock stress were absent even in the 10 mg/kg/day WSR treated group, whereas the effectiveness of the extract in foot shock stress-induced hyperthermia and marble burying tests increased with its increasing daily dose. Conclusion: Marble burying test in stressed mice is well suited for identifying bioactive constituents of W. somnifera like medicinal plants with adaptogenic, anxiolytic and antidepressant activities, or for quantifying pharmacological interactions between them. PMID:27366354

  7. Pain-related behaviors and neurochemical alterations in mice expressing sickle hemoglobin: modulation by cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Divyanshoo R.; Li, Yunfang; Khasabov, Sergey G.; Gupta, Pankaj; Kehl, Lois J.; Ericson, Marna E.; Nguyen, Julia; Gupta, Vinita; Hebbel, Robert P.; Simone, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    Sickle cell disease causes severe pain. We examined pain-related behaviors, correlative neurochemical changes, and analgesic effects of morphine and cannabinoids in transgenic mice expressing human sickle hemoglobin (HbS). Paw withdrawal threshold and withdrawal latency (to mechanical and thermal stimuli, respectively) and grip force were lower in homozygous and hemizygous Berkley mice (BERK and hBERK1, respectively) compared with control mice expressing human hemoglobin A (HbA-BERK), indicating deep/musculoskeletal and cutaneous hyperalgesia. Peripheral nerves and blood vessels were structurally altered in BERK and hBERK1 skin, with decreased expression of μ opioid receptor and increased calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P immunoreactivity. Activators of neuropathic and inflammatory pain (p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, STAT3, and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase) showed increased phosphorylation, with accompanying increase in COX-2, interleukin-6, and Toll-like receptor 4 in the spinal cord of hBERK1 compared with HbA-BERK. These neurochemical changes in the periphery and spinal cord may contribute to hyperalgesia in mice expressing HbS. In BERK and hBERK1, hyperalgesia was markedly attenuated by morphine and cannabinoid receptor agonist CP 55940. We show that mice expressing HbS exhibit characteristics of pain observed in sickle cell disease patients, and neurochemical changes suggestive of nociceptor and glial activation. Importantly, cannabinoids attenuate pain in mice expressing HbS. PMID:20304807

  8. Effect of wettability alteration on long-term behavior of fluids in subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandara, Uditha C.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-04-01

    Wettability is an important factor affecting fluid behavior in the subsurface, including oil, gas, and supercritical hbox {CO}_2 in deep geological reservoirs. For example, hbox {CO}_2 is generally assumed to behave as a non-wetting fluid, which favors safe storage. However, because of chemical heterogeneity of the reservoirs, mixed wettability conditions can exist. Furthermore, recent experiments suggest that with time, the wettability of super-critical hbox {CO}_2 may change from non-wetting to partially wetting due to changes in electrostatic interactions. These changes are caused by chemical reactions between dissolved hbox {CO}_2 and its environment. To date, the effect of wettability alteration and mixed wettability on the long-term fate of injected hbox {CO}_2 has not well been studied. Here, we use the multiphase pairwise force smoothed particle hydrodynamics model to study complex pore-scale processes involved in geological hbox {CO}_2 sequestration, including the effect of spatial and temporal wettability variations on long-term distribution of hbox {CO}_2 in porous media. Results reveal that in the absence of dissolution of supercritical hbox {CO}_2 and precipitation of carbonate minerals (mineral trapping), the amount of trapped supercritical hbox {CO}_2 significantly decreases as the wettability of the porous media changes from brine-wet to partial-wet or hbox {CO}_2-wet.

  9. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Chronic Mild Stress Differentially Alter Depressive- and Anxiety-Like Behaviors in Male and Female Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Hellemans, Kim G. C.; Verma, Pamela; Yoon, Esther; Yu, Wayne K.; Young, Allan H.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is associated with numerous neuro behavioral alterations, as well as disabilities in a number of domains, including a high incidence of depression and anxiety disorders. Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) also alters hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) function, resulting in increased responsiveness to stressors and HPA dysregulation in adulthood. Interestingly, data suggest that pre-existing HPA abnormalities may be a major contributory factor to some forms of depression, particularly when an individual is exposed to stressors later in life. We tested the hypothesis that exposure to stressors in adulthood may unmask an increased vulnerability to depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors in PAE animals. Methods Male and female offspring from prenatal alcohol (PAE), pair-fed (PF), and ad libitumfed control (C) treatment groups were tested in adulthood. Animals were exposed to 10 consecutive days of chronic mild stress (CMS), and assessed in a battery of well-validated tasks sensitive to differences in depressive- and / or anxiety-like behaviors. Results We report here that the combination of PAE and CMS in adulthood increases depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors in a sexually dimorphic manner. PAE males showed impaired hedonic responsivity (sucrose contrast test), locomotor hyperactivity (open field), and alterations in affiliative and nonaffiliative social behaviors (social interaction test) compared to control males. By contrast, PAE and, to a lesser extent, PF, females showed greater levels of “behavioral despair” in the forced swim test, and PAE females showed altered behavior in the final 5 minutes of the social interaction test compared to control females. Conclusions These data support the possibility that stress may be a mediating or contributing factor in the psychopathologies reported in FASD populations. PMID:20102562

  10. Manipulation of Autophagy in Phagocytes Facilitates Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, Kate M.; Wilk, Mieszko M.; Leech, John M.; Murphy, Alison G.; Laabei, Maisem; Monk, Ian R.; Massey, Ruth C.; Lindsay, Jodi A.; Foster, Timothy J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.

    2015-01-01

    The capacity for intracellular survival within phagocytes is likely a critical factor facilitating the dissemination of Staphylococcus aureus in the host. To date, the majority of work on S. aureus-phagocyte interactions has focused on neutrophils and, to a lesser extent, macrophages, yet we understand little about the role played by dendritic cells (DCs) in the direct killing of this bacterium. Using bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs), we demonstrate for the first time that DCs can effectively kill S. aureus but that certain strains of S. aureus have the capacity to evade DC (and macrophage) killing by manipulation of autophagic pathways. Strains with high levels of Agr activity were capable of causing autophagosome accumulation, were not killed by BMDCs, and subsequently escaped from the phagocyte, exerting significant cytotoxic effects. Conversely, strains that exhibited low levels of Agr activity failed to accumulate autophagosomes and were killed by BMDCs. Inhibition of the autophagic pathway by treatment with 3-methyladenine restored the bactericidal effects of BMDCs. Using an in vivo model of systemic infection, we demonstrated that the ability of S. aureus strains to evade phagocytic cell killing and to survive temporarily within phagocytes correlated with persistence in the periphery and that this effect is critically Agr dependent. Taken together, our data suggest that strains of S. aureus exhibiting high levels of Agr activity are capable of blocking autophagic flux, leading to the accumulation of autophagosomes. Within these autophagosomes, the bacteria are protected from phagocytic killing, thus providing an intracellular survival niche within professional phagocytes, which ultimately facilitates dissemination. PMID:26099586

  11. Increasing Maternal or Post-Weaning Folic Acid Alters Gene Expression and Moderately Changes Behavior in the Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Kuizon, Salomon; Buenaventura, Diego; Stapley, Nathan W.; Ruocco, Felicia; Begum, Umme; Guariglia, Sara R.; Brown, W. Ted; Junaid, Mohammed A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies have indicated that altered maternal micronutrients and vitamins influence the development of newborns and altered nutrient exposure throughout the lifetime may have potential health effects and increased susceptibility to chronic diseases. In recent years, folic acid (FA) exposure has significantly increased as a result of mandatory FA fortification and supplementation during pregnancy. Since FA modulates DNA methylation and affects gene expression, we investigated whether the amount of FA ingested during gestation alters gene expression in the newborn cerebral hemisphere, and if the increased exposure to FA during gestation and throughout the lifetime alters behavior in C57BL/6J mice. Methods Dams were fed FA either at 0.4 mg or 4 mg/kg diet throughout the pregnancy and the resulting pups were maintained on the diet throughout experimentation. Newborn pups brain cerebral hemispheres were used for microarray analysis. To confirm alteration of several genes, quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analyses were performed. In addition, various behavior assessments were conducted on neonatal and adult offspring. Results Results from microarray analysis suggest that the higher dose of FA supplementation during gestation alters the expression of a number of genes in the newborns’ cerebral hemispheres, including many involved in development. QRT-PCR confirmed alterations of nine genes including down-regulation of Cpn2, Htr4, Zfp353, Vgll2 and up-regulation of Xist, Nkx6-3, Leprel1, Nfix, Slc17a7. The alterations in the expression of Slc17a7 and Vgll2 were confirmed at the protein level. Pups exposed to the higher dose of FA exhibited increased ultrasonic vocalizations, greater anxiety-like behavior and hyperactivity. These findings suggest that although FA plays a significant role in mammalian cellular machinery, there may be a loss of benefit from higher amounts of FA. Unregulated high FA supplementation during pregnancy and throughout the

  12. Environmental enrichment reverses behavioral alterations in rats prenatally exposed to valproic acid: issues for a therapeutic approach in autism.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Tomasz; Turczak, Joanna; Przewłocki, Ryszard

    2006-01-01

    Environmental enrichment has been repeatedly shown to affect multiple aspects of brain function, and is known to improve cognitive, behavioral, and histopathological outcome after brain injuries. The purpose of the present experiments was to determine the effect of an enriched environment on behavioral aberrations observed in male rats exposed to valproic acid on day 12.5 of gestation (VPA rats), and proposed on the basis of etiological, anatomical, and behavioral data as an animal model of autism. Environmental enrichment reversed almost all behavioral alterations observed in the model. VPA rats after environmental enrichment (VPA-E) compared to VPA rats reared in standard conditions have higher sensitivity to pain and lower sensitivity to nonpainful stimuli; stronger acoustic prepulse inhibition; lower locomotor, repetitive/stereotypic-like activity, and enhanced exploratory activity; decreased anxiety; increased number of social behaviors; and shorter latency to social explorations. In comparison with control animals (Con), VPA-E rats exhibited increased number of pinnings in adolescence and social explorations in adulthood, and were less anxious in the elevated plus maze. Similar differences in social behavior and anxiety were observed between control rats exposed to environmental enrichment (Con-E) and control group reared in standard conditions. These results suggest that postnatal environmental manipulations can counteract the behavioral alterations in VPA rats. We propose environmental enrichment as an important tool for the treatment of autism spectrum disorders. PMID:15920505

  13. Dopamine D2 receptor overexpression alters behavior and physiology in Drd2-EGFP mice.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Paul F; Christensen, Christine H; Hazelwood, Lisa A; Dobi, Alice; Bock, Roland; Sibley, David R; Mateo, Yolanda; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mice expressing the reporter protein enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the D1 and D2 dopamine receptor promoters (Drd1-EGFP and Drd2-EGFP) have been widely used to study striatal function and have contributed to our understanding of the physiological and pathological functions of the basal ganglia. These tools were produced and promptly made available to address questions in a cell-specific manner that has transformed the way we frame hypotheses in neuroscience. However, these mice have not been fully characterized until now. We found that Drd2-EGFP mice display an ∼40% increase in membrane expression of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) and a twofold increase in D2R mRNA levels in the striatum when compared with wild-type and Drd1-EGFP mice. D2R overexpression was accompanied by behavioral hypersensitivity to D2R-like agonists, as well as enhanced electrophysiological responses to D2R activation in midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Dopamine (DA) transients evoked by stimulation in the nucleus accumbens showed slower clearance in Drd2-EGFP mice, and cocaine actions on DA clearance were impaired in these mice. Thus, it was not surprising to find that Drd2-EGFP mice were hyperactive when exposed to a novel environment and locomotion was suppressed by acute cocaine administration. All together, this study demonstrates that Drd2-EGFP mice overexpress D2R and have altered dopaminergic signaling that fundamentally differentiates them from wild-type and Drd1-EGFP mice. PMID:21209197

  14. Molt-breeding overlap alters molt dynamics and behavior in zebra finches, Taeniopygia guttata castanotis.

    PubMed

    Echeverry-Galvis, Maria A; Hau, Michaela

    2012-06-01

    Costly events in the life history cycle of organisms such as reproduction, migration and pelage/plumage replacement are typically separated in time to maximize their outcome. Such temporal separation is thought to be necessitated by energetical trade-offs, and mediated through physiological processes. However, certain species, such as tropical birds, are able to overlap two costly life history stages: reproduction and feather replacement. It has remained unclear how both events progress when they co-occur over extended periods of time. Here we determined the consequences and potential costs of such overlap by comparing molt and behavioral patterns in both sexes of captive zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata castanotis) that were solely molting or were overlapping breeding and molt. Individuals overlapping the early stages of breeding with molt showed a roughly 40% decrease in the growth rate of individual feathers compared with birds that were molting but not breeding. Further, individuals that overlapped breeding and molt tended to molt fewer feathers simultaneously and exhibited longer intervals between shedding consecutive feathers on the tail or the same wing as well as delays in shedding corresponding flight feathers on opposite sides. Overlapping individuals also altered their time budgets: they devoted more than twice the time to feeding while halving the time spent for feather care in comparison to molt-only individuals. These data provide experimental support for the previously untested hypothesis that when molt and reproduction overlap in time, feather replacement will occur at a slower and less intense rate. There were no sex differences in any of the variables assessed, except for a tendency in females to decline body condition more strongly over time during the overlap than males. Our data indicate the existence of major consequences of overlapping breeding and molt, manifested in changes in both molt dynamics and time budgets of both sexes. It is

  15. Nanoparticles of barium induce apoptosis in human phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mores, Luana; França, Eduardo Luzia; Silva, Núbia Andrade; Suchara, Eliane Aparecida; Honorio-França, Adenilda Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nutrients and immunological factors of breast milk are essential for newborn growth and the development of their immune system, but this secretion can contain organic and inorganic toxins such as barium. Colostrum contamination with barium is an important issue to investigate because this naturally occurring element is also associated with human activity and industrial pollution. The study evaluated the administration of barium nanoparticles to colostrum, assessing the viability and functional activity of colostral mononuclear phagocytes. Methods Colostrum was collected from 24 clinically healthy women (aged 18–35 years). Cell viability, superoxide release, intracellular Ca2+ release, and phagocyte apoptosis were analyzed in the samples. Results Treatment with barium lowered mononuclear phagocyte viability, increased superoxide release, and reduced intracellular calcium release. In addition, barium increased cell death by apoptosis. Conclusion These data suggest that nanoparticles of barium in colostrum are toxic to cells, showing the importance of avoiding exposure to this element. PMID:26451108

  16. Experimental investigation of fatigue behavior of spur gear in altered tooth-sum gearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachidananda, H. K.; Gonsalvis, Joseph; Prakash, H. R.

    2012-09-01

    This paper deals with the contact stress, power loss, and pitting of spur gear tooth in altered tooth-sum gearing for a tooth-sum of 100 teeth when altered by ±4% tooth-sum. Analytical and experimental methods were performed to investigate and compare the altered tooth-sum gearing against the standard tooth-sum gearing. The experiments were performed using a power recirculating type test rig. The tooth loads for the experimental investigations were determined considering the surface durability of gears. A clear picture of the surface damage was obtained using a scanning electron microphotograph. The negative alteration in the tooth-sum performed better than the positive alteration in a tooth-sum operating between specified center distances.

  17. Bacopa monniera (L.) Wettst ameliorates behavioral alterations and oxidative markers in sodium valproate induced autism in rats.

    PubMed

    Sandhya, T; Sowjanya, J; Veeresh, B

    2012-05-01

    Early prenatal or post natal exposure to environmental insults such as valproic acid (VPA), thalidomide and ethanol could induce behavioral alterations similar to autistic symptoms. Bacopa monniera, a renowned plant in ayurvedic medicine is useful in several neurological disorders. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of B. monniera on VPA induced autism. On 12.5 day of gestation the female pregnant rats were divided into control and VPA treated groups. They were administered saline/VPA (600 mg/kg, i.p.) respectively and allowed to raise their own litters. Group I-male pups of saline treated mothers. On postnatal day (PND) 21 VPA induced autistic male pups were divided into two groups (n = 6); Group II-received saline and Group III-received B. monniera (300 mg/kg/p.o.) from PND 21-35. Behavioral tests (nociception, locomotor activity, exploratory activity, anxiety and social behavior) were performed in both adolescence (PND 30-40) and adulthood (PND 90-110) period. At the end of behavioral testing animals were sacrificed, brain was isolated for biochemical estimations (serotonin, glutathione, catalase and nitric oxide) and histopathological examination. Induction of autism significantly affected normal behavior, increased oxidative stress and serotonin level, altered histoarchitecture of cerebellum (decreased number of purkinje cells, neuronal degeneration and chromatolysis) when compared with normal control group. Treatment with B. monniera significantly (p < 0.05) improved behavioral alterations, decreased oxidative stress markers and restored histoarchitecture of cerebellum. In conclusion, the present study suggests that B. monniera ameliorates the autistic symptoms possibly due to its anti-anxiety, antioxidant and neuro-protective activity. PMID:22322665

  18. Metabolic changes and DNA hypomethylation in cerebellum are associated with behavioral alterations in mice exposed to trichloroethylene postnatally

    SciTech Connect

    Blossom, Sarah J.; Cooney, Craig A.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Rau, Jenny L.; Swearingen, Christopher J.; Wessinger, William D.

    2013-06-15

    Previous studies demonstrated that low-level postnatal and early life exposure to the environmental contaminant, trichloroethylene (TCE), in the drinking water of MRL +/+ mice altered glutathione redox homeostasis and increased biomarkers of oxidative stress indicating a more oxidized state. Plasma metabolites along the interrelated transmethylation pathway were also altered indicating impaired methylation capacity. Here we extend these findings to further characterize the impact of TCE exposure in mice exposed to water only or two doses of TCE in the drinking water (0, 2, and 28 mg/kg/day) postnatally from birth until 6 weeks of age on redox homeostasis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in the cerebellum. In addition, pathway intermediates involved in methyl metabolism and global DNA methylation patterns were examined in cerebellar tissue. Because the cerebellum is functionally important for coordinating motor activity, including exploratory and social approach behaviors, these parameters were evaluated in the present study. Mice exposed to 28 mg/kg/day TCE exhibited increased locomotor activity over time as compared with control mice. In the novel object exploration test, these mice were more likely to enter the zone with the novel object as compared to control mice. Similar results were obtained in a second test when an unfamiliar mouse was introduced into the testing arena. The results show for the first time that postnatal exposure to TCE causes key metabolic changes in the cerebellum that may contribute to global DNA methylation deficits and behavioral alterations in TCE-exposed mice. - Highlights: • We exposed male mice to low-level trichloroethylene from postnatal days 1 through 42. • This exposure altered redox potential and increased oxidative stress in cerebellum. • This exposure altered metabolites important in cellular methylation in cerebellum. • This exposure promoted DNA hypomethylation in cerebellum. • This exposure enhanced locomotor

  19. Maternal Inflammation Contributes to Brain Overgrowth and Autism-Associated Behaviors through Altered Redox Signaling in Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Le Belle, Janel E.; Sperry, Jantzen; Ngo, Amy; Ghochani, Yasmin; Laks, Dan R.; López-Aranda, Manuel; Silva, Alcino J.; Kornblum, Harley I.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A period of mild brain overgrowth with an unknown etiology has been identified as one of the most common phenotypes in autism. Here, we test the hypothesis that maternal inflammation during critical periods of embryonic development can cause brain overgrowth and autism-associated behaviors as a result of altered neural stem cell function. Pregnant mice treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide at embryonic day 9 had offspring with brain overgrowth, with a more pronounced effect in PTEN heterozygotes. Exposure to maternal inflammation also enhanced NADPH oxidase (NOX)-PI3K pathway signaling, stimulated the hyperproliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells, increased forebrain microglia, and produced abnormal autism-associated behaviors in affected pups. Our evidence supports the idea that a prenatal neuroinflammatory dysregulation in neural stem cell redox signaling can act in concert with underlying genetic susceptibilities to affect cellular responses to environmentally altered cellular levels of reactive oxygen species. PMID:25418720

  20. Translational Rodent Paradigms to Investigate Neuromechanisms Underlying Behaviors Relevant to Amotivation and Altered Reward Processing in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jared W.; Markou, Athina

    2015-01-01

    Amotivation and reward-processing deficits have long been described in patients with schizophrenia and considered large contributors to patients’ inability to integrate well in society. No effective treatments exist for these symptoms, partly because the neuromechanisms mediating such symptoms are poorly understood. Here, we propose a translational neuroscientific approach that can be used to assess reward/motivational deficits related to the negative symptoms of schizophrenia using behavioral paradigms that can also be conducted in experimental animals. By designing and using objective laboratory behavioral tools that are parallel in their parameters in rodents and humans, the neuromechanisms underlying behaviors with relevance to these symptoms of schizophrenia can be investigated. We describe tasks that measure the motivation of rodents to expend physical and cognitive effort to gain rewards, as well as probabilistic learning tasks that assess both reward learning and feedback-based decision making. The latter tasks are relevant because of demonstrated links of performance deficits correlating with negative symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. These tasks utilize operant techniques in order to investigate neural circuits targeting a specific domain across species. These tasks therefore enable the development of insights into altered mechanisms leading to negative symptom-relevant behaviors in patients with schizophrenia. Such findings will then enable the development of targeted treatments for these altered neuromechanisms and behaviors seen in schizophrenia. PMID:26194891

  1. Mosquito Protein Kinase G Phosphorylates Flavivirus NS5 and Alters Flight Behavior in Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Julie A.; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Rund, Samuel S.C.; Hoover, Spencer; Dasgupta, Ranjit; Lee, Samuel J.; Duffield, Giles E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Many arboviral proteins are phosphorylated in infected mammalian cells, but it is unknown if the same phosphorylation events occur when insects are similarly infected. One of the mammalian kinases responsible for phosphorylation, protein kinase G (PKG), has been implicated in the behavior of multiple nonvector insects, but is unstudied in mosquitoes. PKG from Aedes aegypti was cloned, and phosphorylation of specific viral sites was monitored by mass spectrometry from biochemical and cell culture experiments. PKG from Aedes mosquitoes is able to phosphorylate dengue nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) at specific sites in cell culture and cell-free systems and autophosphorylates its own regulatory domain in a cell-free system. Injecting Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes with a pharmacological PKG activator resulted in increased Aedes wing activity during periods of their natural diurnal/crepuscular activity and increased Anopheles nocturnal locomotor/flight activity. Thus, perturbation of the PKG signaling pathway in mosquitoes alters flight behavior. The demonstrated effect of PKG alterations is consistent with a viral PKG substrate triggering increased PKG activity. This increased PKG activity could be the mechanism by which dengue virus increases flight behavior and possibly facilitates transmission. Whether or not PKG is part of the mechanism by which dengue increases flight behavior, this report is the first to show PKG can modulate behavior in hematophagous disease vectors. PMID:23930976

  2. TRIADIMEFON, A TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDE, INDUCES STEREOTYPED BEHAVIOR AND ALTERS MONOAMINE METABOLISM IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, a triazole fungicide, has been observed to increase locomotion and induce stereotyped behavior in rodents. he present experiments characterized the stereotyped behavior induced by triadimefon using a computer-supported observational method, and tested the hypothesis ...

  3. Self-organizing actin waves as planar phagocytic cup structures

    PubMed Central

    Ecke, Mary; Schroth-Diez, Britta; Gerwig, Silke; Engel, Ulrike; Maddera, Lucinda; Clarke, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Actin waves that travel on the planar membrane of a substrate-attached cell underscore the capability of the actin system to assemble into dynamic structures by the recruitment of proteins from the cytoplasm. The waves have no fixed shape, can reverse their direction of propagation and can fuse or divide. Actin waves separate two phases of the plasma membrane that are distinguished by their lipid composition. The area circumscribed by a wave resembles in its phosphoinositide content the interior of a phagocytic cup, leading us to explore the possibility that actin waves are in-plane phagocytic structures generated without the localized stimulus of an attached particle. Consistent with this view, wave-forming cells were found to exhibit a high propensity for taking up particles. Cells fed rod-shaped particles produced elongated phagocytic cups that displayed a zonal pattern that reflected in detail the actin and lipid pattern of free-running actin waves. Neutrophils and macrophages are known to spread on surfaces decorated with immune complexes, a process that has been interpreted as “frustrated” phagocytosis. We suggest that actin waves enable a phagocyte to scan a surface for particles that might be engulfed. PMID:19855162

  4. Adenylate Cyclase Toxin promotes bacterial internalisation into non phagocytic cells

    PubMed Central

    Martín, César; Etxaniz, Asier; Uribe, Kepa B.; Etxebarria, Aitor; González-Bullón, David; Arlucea, Jon; Goñi, Félix M.; Aréchaga, Juan; Ostolaza, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis causes whooping cough, a respiratory infectious disease that is the fifth largest cause of vaccine-preventable death in infants. Though historically considered an extracellular pathogen, this bacterium has been detected both in vitro and in vivo inside phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. However the precise mechanism used by B. pertussis for cell entry, or the putative bacterial factors involved, are not fully elucidated. Here we find that adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT), one of the important toxins of B. pertussis, is sufficient to promote bacterial internalisation into non-phagocytic cells. After characterization of the entry route we show that uptake of “toxin-coated bacteria” proceeds via a clathrin-independent, caveolae-dependent entry pathway, allowing the internalised bacteria to survive within the cells. Intracellular bacteria were found inside non-acidic endosomes with high sphingomyelin and cholesterol content, or “free” in the cytosol of the invaded cells, suggesting that the ACT-induced bacterial uptake may not proceed through formation of late endolysosomes. Activation of Tyr kinases and toxin-induced Ca2+-influx are essential for the entry process. We hypothesize that B. pertussis might use ACT to activate the endocytic machinery of non-phagocytic cells and gain entry into these cells, in this way evading the host immune system. PMID:26346097

  5. Acute prenatal exposure to a moderate dose of valproic acid increases social behavior and alters gene expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ori S; Varlinskaya, Elena I; Wilson, Carey A; Glatt, Stephen J; Mooney, Sandra M

    2013-12-01

    Prenatal exposure to moderate doses of valproic acid (VPA) produces brainstem abnormalities, while higher doses of this teratogen elicit social deficits in the rat. In this pilot study, we examined effects of prenatal exposure to a moderate dose of VPA on behavior and on transcriptomic expression in three brain regions that mediate social behavior. Pregnant Long Evans rats were injected with 350 mg/kg VPA or saline on gestational day 13. A modified social interaction test was used to assess social behavior and social preference/avoidance during early and late adolescence and in adulthood. VPA-exposed animals demonstrated more social investigation and play fighting than control animals. Social investigation, play fighting, and contact behavior also differed as a function of age; the frequency of these behaviors increased in late adolescence. Social preference and locomotor activity under social circumstances were unaffected by treatment or age. Thus, a moderate prenatal dose of VPA produces behavioral alterations that are substantially different from the outcomes that occur following exposure to a higher dose. At adulthood, VPA-exposed subjects exhibited transcriptomic abnormalities in three brain regions: anterior amygdala, cerebellar vermis, and orbitofrontal cortex. A common feature among the proteins encoded by the dysregulated genes was their ability to be modulated by acetylation. Analysis of the expression of individual exons also revealed that genes involved in post-translational modification and epigenetic regulation had particular isoforms that were ubiquitously dysregulated across brain regions. The vulnerability of these genes to the epigenetic effects of VPA may highlight potential mechanisms by which prenatal VPA exposure alters the development of social behavior. PMID:24055786

  6. Inhibition of Phagocytic Killing of Escherichia coli in Drosophila Hemocytes by RNA Chaperone Hfq.

    PubMed

    Shiratsuchi, Akiko; Nitta, Mao; Kuroda, Ayumi; Komiyama, Chiharu; Gawasawa, Mitsuko; Shimamoto, Naoto; Tuan, Tran Quoc; Morita, Teppei; Aiba, Hiroji; Nakanishi, Yoshinobu

    2016-08-15

    An RNA chaperone of Escherichia coli, called host factor required for phage Qβ RNA replication (Hfq), forms a complex with small noncoding RNAs to facilitate their binding to target mRNA for the alteration of translation efficiency and stability. Although the role of Hfq in the virulence and drug resistance of bacteria has been suggested, how this RNA chaperone controls the infectious state remains unknown. In the present study, we addressed this issue using Drosophila melanogaster as a host for bacterial infection. In an assay for abdominal infection using adult flies, an E. coli strain with mutation in hfq was eliminated earlier, whereas flies survived longer compared with infection with a parental strain. The same was true with flies deficient in humoral responses, but the mutant phenotypes were not observed when a fly line with impaired hemocyte phagocytosis was infected. The results from an assay for phagocytosis in vitro revealed that Hfq inhibits the killing of E. coli by Drosophila phagocytes after engulfment. Furthermore, Hfq seemed to exert this action partly through enhancing the expression of σ(38), a stress-responsive σ factor that was previously shown to be involved in the inhibition of phagocytic killing of E. coli, by a posttranscriptional mechanism. Our study indicates that the RNA chaperone Hfq contributes to the persistent infection of E. coli by maintaining the expression of bacterial genes, including one coding for σ(38), that help bacteria evade host immunity. PMID:27357148

  7. Onset of apoprotein E secretion during differentiation of mouse bone marrow-derived mononuclear phagocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Werb, Z.; Chin, J.R.

    1983-10-01

    A number of macrophage functions were sequentially expressed when the bone marrow precursors of mononuclear phagocytes differentiated in culture in the presence of a specific growth factor, colony-stimulating factor-1. The authors defined the expression of apoprotein E (ApoE), a major secreted protein of resident peritoneal macrophages, during maturation of adherent bone marrow-derived mononuclear phagocytes into macrophages. By 5 d the bone marrow macrophages were active secretory cells, but few cells contained intracellular immunoreactive ApoE, and little, if any, ApoE was secreted. ApoE secretion was initiated at 9 d, and this correlated with an increase in the percentage of macrophages containing intracellular ApoE. The onset of ApoE secretion was selective, and little change occurred in the other major secreted proteins detected by (/sup 35/S)methionine incorporation. In parallel, the high rate of plasminogen activator secretion, which peaked at 7 d, decreased markedly. ApoE secretion was not associated with altered expression of the macrophage surface antigen, la, or with secretion of fibronectin. Virtually all cells in independent colonies of bone marrow-derived macrophages eventually expressed ApoE. The proliferating monocyte/macrophage-like cell lines P388D1, J774.2, WHEI-3, RAW 264.1, and MGI.D/sup +/ secreted little or no ApoE. These data establish that ApoE secretion is developmentally regulated.

  8. Relationship among Short and Long Term of Hypoinsulinemia-Hyperglycemia, Dermatophytosis, and Immunobiology of Mononuclear Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fraga-Silva, Thais F. C.; Marchetti, Camila M.; Mimura, Luiza A. N.; Locachevic, Gisele A.; Golim, Márjorie A.; Venturini, James; Arruda, Maria S. P.

    2015-01-01

    Dermatophytes are fungi responsible for causing superficial infections. In patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), dermatophytosis is usually more severe and recurrent. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the influence of short and long term hypoinsulinemia-hyperglycemia (HH) during experimental infection by Trichophyton mentagrophytes as well as alterations in the mononuclear phagocytes. Our results showed two distinct profiles of fungal outcome and immune response. Short term HH induced a discrete impaired proinflammatory response by peritoneal adherent cells (PAC) and a delayed fungal clearance. Moreover, long term HH mice showed low and persistent fungal load and a marked reduction in the production of TNF-α by PAC. Furthermore, while the inoculation of TM in non-HH mice triggered high influx of Gr1+ monocytes into the peripheral blood, long term HH mice showed low percentage of these cells. Thus, our results demonstrate that the time of exposure of HH interferes with the TM infection outcome as well as the immunobiology of mononuclear phagocytes, including fresh monocyte recruitment from bone marrow and PAC activity. PMID:26538824

  9. Calbindin Knockout Alters Sex-Specific Regulation of Behavior and Gene Expression in Amygdala and Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Harris, Erin P; Abel, Jean M; Tejada, Lucia D; Rissman, Emilie F

    2016-05-01

    Calbindin-D(28K) (Calb1), a high-affinity calcium buffer/sensor, shows abundant expression in neurons and has been associated with a number of neurobehavioral diseases, many of which are sexually dimorphic in incidence. Behavioral and physiological end points are affected by experimental manipulations of calbindin levels, including disruption of spatial learning, hippocampal long-term potentiation, and circadian rhythms. In this study, we investigated novel aspects of calbindin function on social behavior, anxiety-like behavior, and fear conditioning in adult mice of both sexes by comparing wild-type to littermate Calb1 KO mice. Because Calb1 mRNA and protein are sexually dimorphic in some areas of the brain, we hypothesized that sex differences in behavioral responses of these behaviors would be eliminated or revealed in Calb1 KO mice. We also examined gene expression in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, two areas of the brain intimately connected with limbic system control of the behaviors tested, in response to sex and genotype. Our results demonstrate that fear memory and social behavior are altered in male knockout mice, and Calb1 KO mice of both sexes show less anxiety. Moreover, gene expression studies of the amygdala and prefrontal cortex revealed several significant genotype and sex effects in genes related to brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling, hormone receptors, histone deacetylases, and γ-aminobutyric acid signaling. Our findings are the first to directly link calbindin with affective and social behaviors in rodents; moreover, the results suggest that sex differences in calbindin protein influence behavior. PMID:27010449

  10. Altered diurnal pattern of steroid hormones in relation to various behaviors, external factors and pathologies: A review.

    PubMed

    Collomp, K; Baillot, A; Forget, H; Coquerel, A; Rieth, N; Vibarel-Rebot, N

    2016-10-01

    The adrenal and gonadal stress steroids [i.e., cortisol, testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)] have gathered considerable attention in the last few decades due to their very broad physiological and psychological actions. Their diurnal patterns have become a particular focus following new data implicating altered diurnal hormone patterns in various endocrine, behavioral and cardiovascular risk profiles. In this review of the current literature, we present a brief overview of the altered diurnal patterns of these hormones that may occur in relation to chronic stress, nutritional behaviors, physical exercise, drugs and sleep deprivation/shift. We also present data on the altered diurnal hormone patterns implicated in cardiometabolic and psychiatric/neurologic diseases, cancer and other complex pathologies. We consider the occasionally discrepant results of the studies, and summarize the current knowledge in this new field of interest, underlining the potential effects on both biological and psychological functioning, and assess the implications of these effects. Last, we conclude with some practical considerations and perspectives. PMID:27235338

  11. Group size alters postures, and maintenance, oral, locomotor and social behaviors of veal calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of group size on behavior of veal calves. Holstein-Friesian bull calves (n = 168; 44 ± 3 d of age), were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments of group housing with 2, 4, or 8 calves per pen (1.82 m2 per calf for all groups). Behavior was obser...

  12. Chronic fluoxetine treatment induces anxiolytic responses and altered social behaviors in medaka, Oryzias latipes.

    PubMed

    Ansai, Satoshi; Hosokawa, Hiroshi; Maegawa, Shingo; Kinoshita, Masato

    2016-04-15

    Medaka (Oryzias latipes) is a small freshwater teleost that is an emerging model system for neurobehavioral research and toxicological testing. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants such as fluoxetine is one of the widely prescribed drugs, but little is known about the effects of these drugs on medaka behaviors. To assess the behavioral effects of fluoxetine, we chronically administrated fluoxetine to medaka adult fish and analyzed the anxiety-related and social behaviors using five behavioral paradigms (diving, open-field, light-dark transition, mirror-biting, and social interaction) with an automated behavioral testing system. Fish chronically treated with fluoxetine exhibited anxiolytic responses such as an overall increased time spent in the top area in the diving test and an increased time spent in center area in the open-field test. Analysis of socially evoked behavior showed that chronic fluoxetine administration decreased the number of mirror biting times in the mirror-biting test and increased latency to first contact in the social interaction test. Additionally, chronic fluoxetine administration reduced the horizontal locomotor activity in the open-field test but not the vertical activity in the diving test. These investigations are mostly consistent with previous reports in the other teleost species and rodent models. These results indicate that behavioral assessment in medaka adult fish will become useful for screening of effects of pharmaceutical and toxicological compounds in animal behaviors. PMID:26821288

  13. Protein and Carbohydrate Interactions Alter Ruminal Fermentation, Digesta Characteristics, and Behavior in Lactating Dairy Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of altering dietary nonfiber carbohydrate complement and ruminally degradable protein was evaluated in an incomplete partially balanced Latin square design with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments (trt) and two 21-d periods. Eight ruminally cannulated Holstein dairy cows were rand...

  14. Genetic variations alter production and behavioral responses following heat stress in two strains of laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress is a problem for both egg production and hen well-being. Given a stressor, genetic differences alter the type and degree of hens’ responses and their adaptation. This study examined heat stress responses of two strains of White Leghorns: Dekalb XL (DXL), a commercial strain individually ...

  15. Immunoenhancing effect of trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid on the phagocytic capacity and oxidative burst activity of canine peripheral blood phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min-Haeng; Kang, Ji-Houn; Yang, Mhan-Pyo

    2008-10-01

    The effect of trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (t10c12-CLA) on the phagocytic capacity and oxidative burst activity (OBA) of canine peripheral blood phagocytes was examined. t10c12-CLA did not directly affect the phagocytic capacity and OBA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes or polymorphonuclear cells (PMN). However, the phagocytic capacity of PMN and monocytes was enhanced by the culture supernatant from t10c12-CLA-treated PBMC. This supernatant enhanced the latex bead-induced OBA of PMN and monocytes. t10c12-CLA also increased TNF-alpha production by PBMC. Recombinant canine (rc) TNF-alpha also increased the phagocytic capacity and OBA of PMN and monocytes. The ability of the culture supernatant from t10c12-CLA-treated PBMC to stimulate the phagocytic capacity and OBA of phagocytes was inhibited by anti-rcTNF-alpha pAb. These results suggest that t10c12-CLA has an immunoenhancing effect on the phagocytic capacity and OBA of phagocytes, and this effect may be mediated by TNF-alpha released from t10c12-CLA-treated PBMC. PMID:18234254

  16. [Alteration of Social Behaviors in Male Mice of CBA/Lac Strain under Agonistic Interactions].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, I L; Kudryavtseva, N N

    2015-01-01

    Ability of people to communicate with each other is a necessary component of social behavior and normal development of individuals living in community. A pronounced impairment in communication may be the result of autism which is characterized by impaired socialization, low communication and restricted and/or repetitive behaviors. It is hypothesized that genes or rare mutations play a key role in the development of autism. However a multifold increase of the cases with autistic spectrum symptoms over the last years cannot be attributed exclusively to genetic mutations or heredity. Environmental contribution to the development of autistic symptoms has to be considered. The paper aimed to analyze the social behaviors of CBA/Lac mice with repeated experience of aggression or social defeats in daily agonistic interactions with accent on searches of associations with autistic symptoms in comparison with previously studied C57BL/6J animals. It has been shown that male mice of both strains with alternative social behaviors demonstrated the changes in social behaviors; however the expression of some form of behaviors was different. The data obtained to assert that long-term hostile social environment lead to development of disturbances in social behaviors, accompanying by autistic-like symptoms. PMID:26601507

  17. Early Life Manipulations of the Nonapeptide System Alter Pair Maintenance Behaviors and Neural Activity in Adult Male Zebra Finches

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Nicole M.; Tomaszycki, Michelle L.; Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Adult zebra finches (T. guttata) form socially monogamous pair bonds characterized by proximity, vocal communication, and contact behaviors. In this experiment, we tested whether manipulations of the nonapeptide hormone arginine vasotocin (AVT, avian homolog of vasopressin) and the V1a receptor (V1aR) early in life altered species-typical pairing behavior in adult zebra finches of both sexes. Although there was no effect of treatment on the tendency to pair in either sex, males in different treatments exhibited profoundly different profiles of pair maintenance behavior. Following a brief separation, AVT-treated males were highly affiliative with their female partner but sang very little compared to Controls. In contrast, males treated with a V1aR antagonist sang significantly less than Controls, but did not differ in affiliation. These effects on behavior in males were also reflected in changes in the expression of V1aR and immediate early gene activity in three brain regions known to be involved in pairing behavior in birds: the medial amygdala, medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and the lateral septum. AVT males had higher V1aR expression in the medial amygdala than both Control and antagonist-treated males and immediate early gene activity of V1aR neurons in the medial amygdala was positively correlated with affiliation. Antagonist treated males showed decreased activity in the medial amygdala. In addition, there was a negative correlation between the activity of V1aR cells in the medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and singing. Treatment also affected the expression of V1aR and activity in the lateral septum, but this was not correlated with any behaviors measured. These results provide evidence that AVT and V1aR play developmental roles in specific pair maintenance behaviors and the neural substrate underlying these behaviors in a bird. PMID:27065824

  18. Early Life Manipulations of the Nonapeptide System Alter Pair Maintenance Behaviors and Neural Activity in Adult Male Zebra Finches.

    PubMed

    Baran, Nicole M; Tomaszycki, Michelle L; Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Adult zebra finches (T. guttata) form socially monogamous pair bonds characterized by proximity, vocal communication, and contact behaviors. In this experiment, we tested whether manipulations of the nonapeptide hormone arginine vasotocin (AVT, avian homolog of vasopressin) and the V1a receptor (V1aR) early in life altered species-typical pairing behavior in adult zebra finches of both sexes. Although there was no effect of treatment on the tendency to pair in either sex, males in different treatments exhibited profoundly different profiles of pair maintenance behavior. Following a brief separation, AVT-treated males were highly affiliative with their female partner but sang very little compared to Controls. In contrast, males treated with a V1aR antagonist sang significantly less than Controls, but did not differ in affiliation. These effects on behavior in males were also reflected in changes in the expression of V1aR and immediate early gene activity in three brain regions known to be involved in pairing behavior in birds: the medial amygdala, medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and the lateral septum. AVT males had higher V1aR expression in the medial amygdala than both Control and antagonist-treated males and immediate early gene activity of V1aR neurons in the medial amygdala was positively correlated with affiliation. Antagonist treated males showed decreased activity in the medial amygdala. In addition, there was a negative correlation between the activity of V1aR cells in the medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and singing. Treatment also affected the expression of V1aR and activity in the lateral septum, but this was not correlated with any behaviors measured. These results provide evidence that AVT and V1aR play developmental roles in specific pair maintenance behaviors and the neural substrate underlying these behaviors in a bird. PMID:27065824

  19. Absence of BRINP1 in mice causes increase of hippocampal neurogenesis and behavioral alterations relevant to human psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously identified BRINP (BMP/RA-inducible neural-specific protein-1, 2, 3) family genes that possess the ability to suppress cell cycle progression in neural stem cells. Of the three family members, BRINP1 is the most highly expressed in various brain regions, including the hippocampus, in adult mice and its expression in dentate gyrus (DG) is markedly induced by neural activity. In the present study, we generated BRINP1-deficient (KO) mice to clarify the physiological functions of BRINP1 in the nervous system. Results Neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of dentate gyrus was increased in BRINP1-KO mice creating a more immature neuronal population in granule cell layer. The number of parvalbumin expressing interneuron in hippocampal CA1 subregion was also increased in BRINP1-KO mice. Furthermore, BRINP1-KO mice showed abnormal behaviors with increase in locomotor activity, reduced anxiety-like behavior, poor social interaction, and slight impairment of working memory, all of which resemble symptoms of human psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and attention–deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Conclusions Absence of BRINP1 causes deregulation of neurogenesis and impairments of neuronal differentiation in adult hippocampal circuitry. Abnormal behaviors comparable to those of human psychiatric disorders such as hyperactivity and poor social behavior were observed in BRINP1-KO mice. These abnormal behaviors could be caused by alteration of hippocampal circuitry as a consequence of the lack of BRINP1. PMID:24528488

  20. Metarhizium anisopliae infection alters feeding and trophallactic behavior in the ant Solenopsis invicta.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hua-Long; Lu, Li-Hua; Zalucki, M P; He, Yu-Rong

    2016-07-01

    In social insects, social behavior may be changed in a way that preventing the spread of pathogens. We infected workers of the ant Solenopsis invicta with an entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae and then videotaped and/or measured worker feeding and trophallactic behavior. Results showed that fungal infected S. invicta enhanced their preference for bitter alkaloid chemical quinine on 3days after inoculation, which might be self-medication of S. invicta by ingesting more alkaloid substances in response to pathogenic infection. Furthermore, infected ants devoted more time to trophallactic behavior with their nestmates on 3days post inoculation, in return receiving more food. Increased interactions between exposed ants and their naive nestmates suggest the existence of social immunity in S. invicta. Overall, our study indicates that S. invicta may use behavioral defenses such as self-medication and social immunity in response to a M. anisopliae infection. PMID:27234423

  1. Differential Rearing Alters Forced Swim Test Behavior, Fluoxetine Efficacy, and Post-Test Weight Gain in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Arndt, David L; Peterson, Christy J; Cain, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors play a key role in the etiology of depression. The rodent forced swim test (FST) is commonly used as a preclinical model of depression, with increases in escape-directed behavior reflecting antidepressant effects, and increases in immobility reflecting behavioral despair. Environmental enrichment leads to serotonergic alterations in rats, but it is unknown whether these alterations may influence the efficacy of common antidepressants. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were reared in enriched (EC), standard (SC), or isolated (IC) conditions. Following the rearing period, fluoxetine (10 or 20 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 23.5 hrs, 5 hrs, and 1 hr before locomotor and FST measures. Following locomotor testing and FST exposure, rats were weighed to assess fluoxetine-, FST-, and environmental condition-induced moderations in weight gain. Results revealed an antidepressant effect of environmental enrichment and a depressant effect of isolation. Regardless of significant fluoxetine effects on locomotor activity, fluoxetine generally decreased swimming and increased immobility in all three environmental conditions, with IC-fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) rats and EC-fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) rats swimming less than vehicle counterparts. Subchronic 20 mg/kg fluoxetine also induced significant weight loss, and differential rearing appeared to moderate weight gain following FST stress. These results suggest that differential rearing has the ability to alter FST behaviors, fluoxetine efficacy, and post-stressor well-being. Moreover, 20 mg/kg fluoxetine, administered subchronically, may lead to atypical effects of those commonly observed in the FST, highlighting the importance and impact of both environmental condition and dosing regimen in common animal models of depression. PMID:26154768

  2. Benefits of agomelatine in behavioral, neurochemical and blood brain barrier alterations in prenatal valproic acid induced autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, B M; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2015-12-01

    Valproic acid administration during gestational period causes behavior and biochemical deficits similar to those observed in humans with autism spectrum disorder. Although worldwide prevalence of autism spectrum disorder has been increased continuously, therapeutic agents to ameliorate the social impairment are very limited. The present study has been structured to investigate the therapeutic potential of melatonin receptor agonist, agomelatine in prenatal valproic acid (Pre-VPA) induced autism spectrum disorder in animals. Pre-VPA has produced reduction in social interaction (three chamber social behavior apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complex I, II, IV). Furthermore, Pre-VPA has increased locomotor activity (actophotometer), anxiety, brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, and catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium levels and blood brain barrier leakage in animals. Treatment with agomelatine has significantly attenuated Pre-VPA induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, agomelatine also attenuated Pre-VPA induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative stress, nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium levels and blood brain barrier leakage. It is concluded that, Pre-VPA has induced autism spectrum disorder, which was attenuated by agomelatine. Agomelatine has shown ameliorative effect on behavioral, neurochemical and blood brain barrier alteration in Pre-VPA exposed animals. Thus melatonin receptor agonists may provide beneficial therapeutic strategy for managing autism spectrum disorder. PMID:26498253

  3. Postpartum Behavioral Profiles in Wistar Rats Following Maternal Separation – Altered Exploration and Risk-Assessment Behavior in MS15 Dams

    PubMed Central

    Daoura, Loudin; Hjalmarsson, My; Oreland, Sadia; Nylander, Ingrid; Roman, Erika

    2010-01-01

    The rodent maternal separation (MS) model is frequently used to investigate the impact of early environmental factors on adult neurobiology and behavior. The majority of MS studies assess effects in the offspring and few address the consequences of repeated pup removal in the dam. Such studies are of interest since alterations detected in offspring subjected to MS may, at least in part, be mediated by variations in maternal behavior and the amount of maternal care provided by the dam. The aim of this study was to investigate how daily short (15 min; MS15) and prolonged (360 min; MS360) periods of MS affects the dam by examining postpartum behavioral profiles using the multivariate concentric square field™ (MCSF) test. The dams were tested on postpartum days 24–25, i.e., just after the end of the separation period and weaning. The results reveal a lower exploratory drive and lower risk-assessment behavior in MS15 dams relative to MS360 or animal facility reared dams. The present results contrast some of the previously reported findings and provide new information about early post-weaning behavioral characteristics in a multivariate setting. Plausible explanations for the results are provided including a discussion how the present results fit into the maternal mediation hypothesis. PMID:20617189

  4. Microscopical studies on the hemocytes of bivalves and their phagocytic interaction with selected bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrick, G. E.; Ulrich, S. A.

    1984-03-01

    Hemocytes represent one of the most important defense mechanisms against foreign material in Mollusca. The morphology, hematological parameters and behaviour of hemolymph cells were studied in the southern quahog Mercenaria campechiensis, the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, and the blood ark Anadara ovalis challenged with the bacteria Vibrio vulnificus and V. anguillarum. Two general classes of hemocytes (granular and agranular) exist in C. virginica and M. campechiensis. In contrast, A. ovalis possesses 3 general classes (granular, agranular and erythrocytes). Three types of granules were identified by light microscopy. When hemolymph cells were studied by transmission electron microscopy, the cytoplasm of hemolymph cells was noted to contain many organelles, including electron dense granules. Both agranular and granular hemolymph cells were capable of colchicine-sensitive pseudopodial movement and spreading. The results indicate that marine bivalves possess hemolymph blood cells which may play a role in the internal defense paralleling mammalian phagocytes. The morphology of these cells, as determined by light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, showed some similarity to mammalian-mononuclear phagocytes. The sub-cellular events of molluscan hemocyte phagocytosis of V. vulnificus and V. anguillarum were studied by both scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The role of these cells and the factors which govern their behavior are of economic and public health importance.

  5. Sphingolipids as Regulators of the Phagocytic Response to Fungal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Arielle M.; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Luberto, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections pose a significant risk for the increasing population of individuals who are immunocompromised. Phagocytes play an important role in immune defense against fungal pathogens, but the interactions between host and fungi are still not well understood. Sphingolipids have been shown to play an important role in many cell functions, including the function of phagocytes. In this review, we discuss major findings that relate to the importance of sphingolipids in macrophage and neutrophil function and the role of macrophages and neutrophils in the most common types of fungal infections, as well as studies that have linked these three concepts to show the importance of sphingolipid signaling in immune response to fungal infections. PMID:26688618

  6. Phagocytic function in cyclists: correlation with catecholamines and cortisol.

    PubMed

    Ortega Rincón, E; Marchena, J M; García, J J; Schmidt, A; Schulz, T; Malpica, I; Rodríguez, A B; Barriga, C; Michna, H; Lötzerich, H

    2001-09-01

    Flow cytometer measurements were made of the basal variations in peripheral blood functional monocytes and granulocytes over the course of a training season (January to November) of a cycling team. Parallel determinations were made of plasma concentration of catecholamines (chromatography) and cortisol (RIA) in a search for neuroendocrine markers. The results showed the greatest phagocytic capacity to occur in the central months (March, May, and July), coinciding with the greatest number and highest level of competitive events with good correlation with a peak in epinephrine during these months (r(2) = 0.998 for monocytes and r(2) = 0.674 for granulocytes). No good correlations were found between phagocytosis and norepinephrine or cortisol. The highest values for phagocytosis and epinephrine concentration were found in May. These results suggest that blood epinephrine concentration could be a good neuroendocrine marker of sportspeople's phagocytic response. PMID:11509500

  7. The cytochemical and ultrastructural characteristics of phagocytes in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuai; Jia, Zhihao; Xin, Lusheng; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Ran; Wang, Weilin; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-08-01

    Phagocytes have been proved to play vital roles in the innate immune response. However, the cellular characteristics of phagocytes in invertebrates, especially in molluscs, remain largely unknown. In the present study, fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) was employed to sort the phagocytes from the non-phagocytic haemocytes of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The cytochemical staining analysis revealed that phagocytes were positive staining for α-naphthyl acetate esterase and myeloperoxidase, while negative staining for toluidine blue and periodic acid-Schiff. The non-phagocytic haemocytes exhibited positive staining for periodic acid-Schiff, weak positive staining for toluidine blue, but negative staining for α-naphthyl acetate esterase and myeloperoxidase. In addition, phagocytes exhibited ultrastructural cellular features similar to those of macrophages, with large cell diameter, rough cell membrane and extended pseudopodia revealed by the scanning electron microscopy, while the non-phagocytic haemocytes exhibited small cell diameter, smooth cell surface and round spherical shape. Transmission electron microscopy further demonstrated that phagocytes were abundant of cytoplasmic bodies and mitochondria, while non-phagocytic haemocytes were characterized as the comparatively large cell nucleus with contorted and condensed heterochromatin adherent to the nuclear envelope. Moreover, compared with non-phagocytic haemocytes, phagocytes exhibited significantly higher levels of intracellular cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor, interferon-like protein and interleukin-17, and significantly higher abundance of lysosome and reactive oxygen species, which were of great importance to the activation of immune response and pathogen clearance. Taken together, these findings revealed the different cytochemical and ultrastructural features between phagocytes and non-phagocytic haemocytes in C. gigas, which would provide an important clue to investigate the

  8. Impaired phagocyte responses to lipopolysaccharide in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.

    PubMed Central

    Duchow, J; Marchant, A; Crusiaux, A; Husson, C; Alonso-Vega, C; De Groote, D; Neve, P; Goldman, M

    1993-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells from patients suffering from paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) show a defect in the expression of phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins, including the CD14 molecule. Blocking experiments with anti-CD14 monoclonal antibodies have shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha production by monocytes depends on the interaction between CD14 and a complex formed by LPS and LPS-binding protein. We used a whole-blood model to examine the LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 in PNH patients and healthy volunteers. At low endotoxin concentrations (1 ng/ml), PNH patients displayed a marked defect in the production of both cytokines, whereas at high LPS concentrations (100 ng/ml), cytokine production was similar to that in healthy volunteers. Using flow cytometry, we also studied the expression of the adhesion molecules Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) and ICAM-1 (CD54) by monocytes and granulocytes after LPS stimulation. Compared with phagocytes from healthy volunteers, CD14-deficient cells showed poor Mac-1 and ICAM-1 upregulation when whole blood was stimulated with LPS (1 ng/ml), whereas their response to higher LPS doses (100 and 1,000 ng/ml) was essentially normal. The importance of the CD14 molecule in the activation of phagocytes by low LPS concentrations was confirmed by the inhibitory effect of an anti-CD14 antibody both in healthy volunteers and in PNH patients. Since these patients produce the soluble form of the CD14 molecule, these data suggest that soluble CD14 could play a role in phagocyte responses to LPS. We conclude that, in whole blood, phagocytes from PNH patients show impaired responsiveness to LPS and this phenomenon is most probably related to their defect in expression of membrane CD14. PMID:7691746

  9. Geochemical behavior of rare earth elements of the hydrothermal alterations within the Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au deposits at Balikesir, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doner, Zeynep; Abdelnasser, Amr; Kiran Yildirim, Demet; Kumral, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    This work reports the geochemical characteristics and behavior of the rare earth elements (REE) of the hydrothermal alteration of the Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au deposit located in the Anatolian tectonic belt at Biga peninsula (Locally Balikesir province), NW Turkey. The Cu-Mo-Au mineralization at this deposit hosted in the hornfels rocks and related to the silicic to intermediate intrusion of Eybek pluton. It locally formed with brecciated zones and quartz vein stockworks, as well as the brittle fracture zones associated with intense hydrothermal alteration. Three main alteration zones with gradual boundaries formed in the mine area in the hornfels rock that represents the host rock, along that contact the Eybek pluton; potassic, propylitic and phyllic alteration zones. The potassic alteration zone that formed at the center having high amount of Cu-sulfide minerals contains biotite, muscovite, and sericite with less amount of K-feldspar and associated with tourmalinization alteration. The propylitic alteration surrounds the potassic alteration having high amount of Mo and Au and contains chlorite, albite, epidote, calcite and pyrite. The phyllic alteration zone also surrounds the potassic alteration containing quartz, sericite and pyrite minerals. Based on the REE characteristics and content and when we correlate the Alteration index (AI) with the light REEs and heavy REEs of each alteration zone, it concluded that the light REEs decrease and heavy REEs increase during the alteration processes. The relationships between K2O index with Eu/Eu* and Sr/Sr* reveals a positive correlation in the potassic and phyllic alteration zones and a negative correlation in the propylitic alteration zone. This refers to the hydrothermal solution which is responsible for the studied porphyry deposits and associated potassic and phyllic alterations has a positive Eu and Sr anomaly as well as these elements were added to the altered rock from the hydrothermal solution. Keywords: Rare

  10. The use of messages in altering risky gambling behavior in experienced gamblers.

    PubMed

    Jardin, Bianca F; Wulfert, Edelgard

    2012-03-01

    The present study was an experimental analogue that examined the relationship between gambling-related irrational beliefs and risky gambling behavior. Eighty high-frequency gamblers were randomly assigned to four conditions and played a chance-based computer game in a laboratory setting. Depending on the condition, during the game a pop-up screen repeatedly displayed either accurate or inaccurate messages concerning the game, neutral messages, or no messages. Consistent with a cognitive-behavioral model of gambling, accurate messages that correctly described the random contingencies governing the game decreased risky gambling behavior. Contrary to predictions, inaccurate messages designed to mimic gamblers' irrational beliefs about their abilities to influence chance events did not lead to more risky gambling behavior than exposure to neutral or no messages. Participants in the latter three conditions did not differ significantly from one another and all showed riskier gambling behavior than participants in the accurate message condition. The results suggest that harm minimization strategies that help individuals maintain a rational perspective while gambling may protect them from unreasonable risk-taking. PMID:22181580

  11. Maternal and developmental immune challenges alter behavior and learning ability of offspring

    PubMed Central

    Grindstaff, Jennifer L.; Hunsaker, Veronica R.; Cox, Shelby N.

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of the offspring immune response during development is known to influence growth and behavioral phenotype. However, the potential for maternal antibodies to block the behavioral effects of immune activation during the neonatal period has not been assessed. We challenged female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) prior to egg laying and then challenged offspring during the nestling and juvenile periods with one of two antigens (keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)). We then tested the effects of maternal and neonatal immune challenges on offspring growth rates and neophobia and learning ability of offspring during adulthood. Neonatal immune challenge depressed growth rates. Neophobia of adult offspring was influenced by a combination of maternal treatment, offspring treatment, and offspring sex. Males challenged with LPS during the nestling and juvenile periods had reduced learning performance in a novel foraging task; however, female learning was not impacted. Offspring challenged with the same antigen as mothers exhibited similar growth suppression and behavioral changes as offspring challenged with a novel antigen. Thus, developmental immune challenges have long-term effects on the growth and behavioral phenotype of offspring. We found limited evidence that matching of maternal and offspring challenges reduces the effects of immune challenge in the altricial zebra finch. This may be a result of rapid catabolism of maternal antibodies in altricial birds. Our results emphasize the need to address sex differences in the long-term effects of developmental immune challenge and suggest neonatal immune activation may be one proximate mechanism underlying differences in adult behavior. PMID:22522078

  12. Nonprofessional Phagocytic Cell Receptors Involved in Staphylococcus aureus Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Alva-Murillo, Nayeli; López-Meza, Joel Edmundo

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a successful human and animal pathogen. The majority of infections caused by this pathogen are life threatening, primarily because S. aureus has developed multiple evasion strategies, possesses intracellular persistence for long periods, and targets the skin and soft tissues. Therefore, it is very important to understand the mechanisms employed by S. aureus to colonize and proliferate in these cells. The aim of this review is to describe the recent discoveries concerning the host receptors of nonprofessional phagocytes involved in S. aureus internalization. Most of the knowledge related to the interaction of S. aureus with its host cells has been described in professional phagocytic cells such as macrophages. Here, we showed that in nonprofessional phagocytes the α5β1 integrin host receptor, chaperons, and the scavenger receptor CD36 are the main receptors employed during S. aureus internalization. The characterization and identification of new bacterial effectors and the host cell receptors involved will undoubtedly lead to new discoveries with beneficial purposes. PMID:24826382

  13. Degradation of biomaterials by phagocyte-derived oxidants.

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, K; Mahoney, J R; Coury, A J; Eaton, J W

    1993-01-01

    Polymers used in implantable devices, although relatively unreactive, may degrade in vivo through unknown mechanisms. For example, polyetherurethane elastomers used as cardiac pacemaker lead insulation have developed surface defects after implantation. This phenomenon, termed "environmental stress cracking," requires intimate contact between polymer and host phagocytic cells, suggesting that phagocyte-generated oxidants might be involved. Indeed, brief exposure of polyetherurethane to activated human neutrophils, hypochlorous acid, or peroxynitrite produces modifications of the polymer similar to those found in vivo. Damage to the polymer appears to arise predominantly from oxidation of the urethane-aliphatic ester and aliphatic ether groups. There are substantial increases in the solid phase surface oxygen content of samples treated with hypochlorous acid, peroxynitrite or activated human neutrophils, resembling those observed in explanted polyetherurethane. Furthermore, both explanted and hypochlorous acid-treated polyetherurethane show marked reductions in polymer molecular weight. Interestingly, hypochlorous acid and peroxynitrite appear to attack polyetherurethane at different sites. Hypochlorous acid or activated neutrophils cause decreases in the urethane-aliphatic ester stretch peak relative to the aliphatic ether stretch peak (as determined by infrared spectroscopy) whereas peroxynitrite causes selective loss of the aliphatic ether. In vivo degradation may involve both hypohalous and nitric oxide-based oxidants because, after long-term implantation, both stretch peaks are diminished. These results suggest that in vivo destruction of implanted polyetherurethane involves attack by phagocyte-derived oxidants. Images PMID:8227352

  14. Juvenile exposure to a high fat diet promotes behavioral and limbic alterations in the absence of obesity.

    PubMed

    Vinuesa, Angeles; Pomilio, Carlos; Menafra, Martin; Bonaventura, Maria Marta; Garay, Laura; Mercogliano, María Florencia; Schillaci, Roxana; Lux Lantos, Victoria; Brites, Fernando; Beauquis, Juan; Saravia, Flavia

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of metabolic disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome have seriously increased in the last decades. These diseases - with growing impact in modern societies - constitute major risk factors for neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), sharing insulin resistance, inflammation and associated cognitive impairment. However, cerebral cellular and molecular pathways involved are not yet clearly understood. Thus, our aim was to study the impact of a non-severe high fat diet (HFD) that resembles western-like alimentary habits, particularly involving juvenile stages where the brain physiology and connectivity are in plain maturation. To this end, one-month-old C57BL/6J male mice were given either a control diet or HFD during 4 months. Exposure to HFD produced metabolic alterations along with changes in behavioral and central parameters, in the absence of obesity. Two-month-old HFD mice showed increased glycemia and plasmatic IL1β but these values normalized at the end of the HFD protocol at 5 months of age, probably representing an acute response that is compensated at later stages. After four months of HFD exposure, mice presented dyslipidemia, increased Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity, hepatic insulin resistance and inflammation. Alterations in the behavioral profile of the HFD group were shown by the impediment in nest building behavior, deficiencies in short and mid-term spatial memories, anxious and depressive- like behavior. Regarding the latter disruptions in emotional processing, we found an increased neural activity in the amygdala, shown by a greater number of c-Fos+ nuclei. We found that hippocampal adult neurogenesis was decreased in HFD mice, showing diminished cell proliferation measured as Ki67+ cells and neuronal differentiation in SGZ by doublecortin labeling. These phenomena were accompanied by a neuroinflammatory and insulin-resistant state in the hippocampus

  15. Preschool-Aged Children with Iron Deficiency Anemia Show Altered Affect and Behavior1,2

    PubMed Central

    Lozoff, Betsy; Corapci, Feyza; Burden, Matthew J.; Kaciroti, Niko; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa; Sazawal, Sunil; Black, Maureen

    2012-01-01

    This study compared social looking and response to novelty in preschool-aged children (47–68 mo) with or without iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Iron status of the participants from a low-income community in New Delhi, India, was based on venous hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, and red cell distribution width. Children’s social looking toward adults, affect, and wary or hesitant behavior in response to novelty were assessed in a semistructured paradigm during an in-home play observation. Affect and behavior were compared as a function of iron status: IDA (n = 74) vs. nonanemic (n = 164). Compared with nonanemic preschoolers, preschoolers with IDA displayed less social looking toward their mothers, moved close to their mothers more quickly, and were slower to display positive affect and touch novel toys for the first time. These results indicate that IDA in the preschool period has affective and behavioral effects similar to those reported for IDA in infancy. PMID:17311960

  16. GluN1 hypomorph mice exhibit wide-ranging behavioral alterations

    PubMed Central

    Barkus, C; Dawson, L A; Sharp, T; Bannerman, D M

    2012-01-01

    The psychotomimetic effects of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA) antagonists such as ketamine and phencyclidine suggest a role for reduced NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission in schizophrenia. GluN1 ‘hypomorph’ (GluN1hypo) mice exhibit reduced NMDA receptor expression and have been suggested as a mouse model of schizophrenia. However, NMDA receptors are ubiquitous and are implicated in many physiological and pathological processes. The GluN1hypo mice have a global reduction of NMDA receptors and the consequences of such a global manipulation are likely to be wide-ranging. We therefore assessed GluN1hypo mice on a battery of behavioral tests, including tests of naturalistic behaviors, anxiety and cognition. GluN1hypo mice exhibited impairments on all tests of cognition that we employed, as well as reduced engagement in naturalistic behaviors, including nesting and burrowing. Behavioral deficits were present in both spatial and non-spatial domains, and included deficits on both short- and long-term memory tasks. Results from anxiety tests did not give a clear overall picture. This may be the result of confounds such as the profound hyperactivity seen in GluN1hypo mice, although hyperactivity cannot account for all of the results obtained. When viewed against this background of far-reaching behavioral abnormalities, the specificity of any one behavioral deficit is inevitably called into question. Indeed, the present data from GluN1hypo mice are indicative of a global impairment rather than any specific disease. The deficits seen go beyond what one would expect from a mouse model of schizophrenia, thus questioning their utility as a selective model of this disease. PMID:22300668

  17. Conessine, an H3 receptor antagonist, alters behavioral and neurochemical effects of ethanol in mice.

    PubMed

    Morais-Silva, Gessynger; Ferreira-Santos, Mariane; Marin, Marcelo T

    2016-05-15

    Ethanol abuse potential is mainly due to its reinforcing properties, crucial in the transition from the recreational to pathological use. These properties are mediated by mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways and neuroadaptations in these pathways seem to be responsible for addiction. Both pathways are modulated by other neurotransmitters systems, including neuronal histaminergic system. Among the histamine receptors, H3 receptor stands out due to its role in modulation of histamine and other neurotransmitters release. Thus, histaminergic system, through H3 receptors, may have an important role in ethanol addiction development. Aiming to understand these interactions, conessine, an H3 receptor antagonist, was given to mice subjected to the evaluation of ethanol-induced psychostimulation, ethanol CPP and quantification of norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites in mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal pathways following acute ethanol treatment. Systemic conessine administration exacerbated ethanol effects on locomotor activity. Despite of conessine reinforcing effect on CPP, this drug did not alter acquisition of ethanol CPP. Ethanol treatment affects the serotoninergic neurotransmission in the ventral tegmental area, the dopaminergic neurotransmission in the pre-frontal cortex (PFC) and caudate-putamen nucleus (CPu) and the noradrenergic neurotransmission in the CPu. In the PFC, conessine blocked ethanol effects on dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission. The blockade of H3 receptors and ethanol seem to interact in the modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission of nigrostriatal pathway, decreasing dopamine metabolites in substantia nigra. In conclusion, conessine was able to change psychostimulant effect of ethanol, without altering its reinforcing properties. This exacerbation of ethanol-induced psychostimulation would be related to alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nigrostriatal pathway. PMID

  18. Traumatic brain injury in young rats leads to progressive behavioral deficits coincident with altered tissue properties in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Ajao, David O; Pop, Viorela; Kamper, Joel E; Adami, Arash; Rudobeck, Emil; Huang, Lei; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Hartman, Richard E; Ashwal, Stephen; Obenaus, André; Badaut, Jérôme

    2012-07-20

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects many infants and children, and results in enduring motor and cognitive impairments with accompanying changes in white matter tracts, yet few experimental studies in rodent juvenile models of TBI (jTBI) have examined the timeline and nature of these deficits, histologically and functionally. We used a single controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury to the parietal cortex of rats at post-natal day (P) 17 to evaluate behavioral alterations, injury volume, and morphological and molecular changes in gray and white matter, with accompanying measures of electrophysiological function. At 60 days post-injury (dpi), we found that jTBI animals displayed behavioral deficits in foot-fault and rotarod tests, along with a left turn bias throughout their early developmental stages and into adulthood. In addition, anxiety-like behaviors on the zero maze emerged in jTBI animals at 60 dpi. The final lesion constituted only ∼3% of brain volume, and morphological tissue changes were evaluated using MRI, as well as immunohistochemistry for neuronal nuclei (NeuN), myelin basic protein (MBP), neurofilament-200 (NF200), and oligodendrocytes (CNPase). White matter morphological changes were associated with a global increase in MBP immunostaining and reduced compound action potential amplitudes at 60 dpi. These results suggest that brain injury early in life can induce long-term white matter dysfunction, occurring in parallel with the delayed development and persistence of behavioral deficits, thus modeling clinical and longitudinal TBI observations. PMID:22697253

  19. Reduced Anxiety-Like Behavior and Altered Hippocampal Morphology in Female p75NTRexon IV−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Puschban, Zoe; Sah, Anupam; Grutsch, Isabella; Singewald, Nicolas; Dechant, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The presence of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in adult basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, precursor cells in the subventricular cell layer and the subgranular cell layer of the hippocampus has been linked to alterations in learning as well as anxiety- and depression- related behaviors. In contrast to previous studies performed in a p75NTRexon III−/− model still expressing the short isoform of the p75NTR, we focused on locomotor and anxiety–associated behavior in p75NTRexon IV−/− mice lacking both p75NTR isoforms. Comparing p75NTRexon IV−/− and wildtype mice for both male and female animals showed an anxiolytic-like behavior as evidenced by increased central activities in the open field paradigm and flex field activity system as well as higher numbers of open arm entries in the elevated plus maze test in female p75NTR knockout mice. Morphometrical analyses of dorsal and ventral hippocampus revealed a reduction of width of the dentate gyrus and the granular cell layer in the dorsal but not ventral hippocampus in male and female p75NTRexon IV−/− mice. We conclude that germ-line deletion of p75NTR seems to differentially affect morphometry of dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus and that p75NTR may play a role in anxiety-like behavior, specifically in female mice. PMID:27313517

  20. Social Isolation Stress Induces Anxious-Depressive-Like Behavior and Alterations of Neuroplasticity-Related Genes in Adult Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ieraci, Alessandro; Mallei, Alessandra; Popoli, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Stress is a major risk factor in the onset of several neuropsychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression. Although several studies have shown that social isolation stress during postweaning period induces behavioral and brain molecular changes, the effects of social isolation on behavior during adulthood have been less characterized. Aim of this work was to investigate the relationship between the behavioral alterations and brain molecular changes induced by chronic social isolation stress in adult male mice. Plasma corticosterone levels and adrenal glands weight were also analyzed. Socially isolated (SI) mice showed higher locomotor activity, spent less time in the open field center, and displayed higher immobility time in the tail suspension test compared to group-housed (GH) mice. SI mice exhibited reduced plasma corticosterone levels and reduced difference between right and left adrenal glands. SI showed lower mRNA levels of the BDNF-7 splice variant, c-Fos, Arc, and Egr-1 in both hippocampus and prefrontal cortex compared to GH mice. Finally, SI mice exhibited selectively reduced mGluR1 and mGluR2 levels in the prefrontal cortex. Altogether, these results suggest that anxious- and depressive-like behavior induced by social isolation stress correlates with reduction of several neuroplasticity-related genes in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of adult male mice. PMID:26881124

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury in Young Rats Leads to Progressive Behavioral Deficits Coincident with Altered Tissue Properties in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Ajao, David O.; Pop, Viorela; Kamper, Joel E.; Adami, Arash; Rudobeck, Emil; Huang, Lei; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Hartman, Richard E.; Ashwal, Stephen; Obenaus, André

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects many infants and children, and results in enduring motor and cognitive impairments with accompanying changes in white matter tracts, yet few experimental studies in rodent juvenile models of TBI (jTBI) have examined the timeline and nature of these deficits, histologically and functionally. We used a single controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury to the parietal cortex of rats at post-natal day (P) 17 to evaluate behavioral alterations, injury volume, and morphological and molecular changes in gray and white matter, with accompanying measures of electrophysiological function. At 60 days post-injury (dpi), we found that jTBI animals displayed behavioral deficits in foot-fault and rotarod tests, along with a left turn bias throughout their early developmental stages and into adulthood. In addition, anxiety-like behaviors on the zero maze emerged in jTBI animals at 60 dpi. The final lesion constituted only ∼3% of brain volume, and morphological tissue changes were evaluated using MRI, as well as immunohistochemistry for neuronal nuclei (NeuN), myelin basic protein (MBP), neurofilament-200 (NF200), and oligodendrocytes (CNPase). White matter morphological changes were associated with a global increase in MBP immunostaining and reduced compound action potential amplitudes at 60 dpi. These results suggest that brain injury early in life can induce long-term white matter dysfunction, occurring in parallel with the delayed development and persistence of behavioral deficits, thus modeling clinical and longitudinal TBI observations. PMID:22697253

  2. Behavioral Phenotype of Fmr1 Knock-Out Mice during Active Phase in an Altered Light/Dark Cycle123

    PubMed Central

    Saré, R. Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most commonly inherited form of intellectual disability and is a disorder that is also highly associated with autism. FXS occurs as a result of an expanded CGG repeat sequence leading to transcriptional silencing. In an animal model of FXS in which Fmr1 is knocked out (Fmr1 KO), many physical, physiological, and behavioral characteristics of the human disease are recapitulated. Prior characterization of the mouse model was conducted during the day, the inactive phase of the circadian cycle. Circadian rhythms are an important contributor to behavior and may play a role in the study of disease phenotype. Moreover, changes in the parameters of circadian rhythm are known to occur in FXS animal models. We conducted an investigation of key behavioral phenotypes in Fmr1 KO mice during their active phase. We report that phase did not alter the Fmr1 KO phenotype in open field activity, anxiety, and learning and memory. There was a slight effect of phase on social behavior as measured by time in chamber, but not by time spent sniffing. Our data strengthen the existing data characterizing the phenotype of Fmr1 KO mice, indicating that it is independent of circadian phase. PMID:27294193

  3. Repeated exposure of adult rats to transient oxidative stress induces various long-lasting alterations in cognitive and behavioral functions.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Yoshio; Kosugi, Sakurako; Nishikawa, Hiromi; Lin, Ziqiao; Minabe, Yoshio; Toda, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of neonates to oxidative stress may increase the risk of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia in adulthood. However, the effects of moderate oxidative stress on the adult brain are not completely understood. To address this issue, we systemically administrated 2-cyclohexen-1-one (CHX) to adult rats to transiently reduce glutathione levels. Repeated administration of CHX did not affect the acquisition or motivation of an appetitive instrumental behavior (lever pressing) rewarded by a food outcome under a progressive ratio schedule. In addition, response discrimination and reversal learning were not affected. However, acute CHX administration blunted the sensitivity of the instrumental performance to outcome devaluation, and this effect was prolonged in rats with a history of repeated CHX exposure, representing pro-depression-like phenotypes. On the other hand, repeated CHX administration reduced immobility in forced swimming tests and blunted acute cocaine-induced behaviors, implicating antidepressant-like effects. Multivariate analyses segregated a characteristic group of behavioral variables influenced by repeated CHX administration. Taken together, these findings suggest that repeated administration of CHX to adult rats did not cause a specific mental disorder, but it induced long-term alterations in behavioral and cognitive functions, possibly related to specific neural correlates. PMID:25489939

  4. Repeated Exposure of Adult Rats to Transient Oxidative Stress Induces Various Long-Lasting Alterations in Cognitive and Behavioral Functions

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi, Yoshio; Kosugi, Sakurako; Nishikawa, Hiromi; Lin, Ziqiao; Minabe, Yoshio; Toda, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of neonates to oxidative stress may increase the risk of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia in adulthood. However, the effects of moderate oxidative stress on the adult brain are not completely understood. To address this issue, we systemically administrated 2-cyclohexen-1-one (CHX) to adult rats to transiently reduce glutathione levels. Repeated administration of CHX did not affect the acquisition or motivation of an appetitive instrumental behavior (lever pressing) rewarded by a food outcome under a progressive ratio schedule. In addition, response discrimination and reversal learning were not affected. However, acute CHX administration blunted the sensitivity of the instrumental performance to outcome devaluation, and this effect was prolonged in rats with a history of repeated CHX exposure, representing pro-depression-like phenotypes. On the other hand, repeated CHX administration reduced immobility in forced swimming tests and blunted acute cocaine-induced behaviors, implicating antidepressant-like effects. Multivariate analyses segregated a characteristic group of behavioral variables influenced by repeated CHX administration. Taken together, these findings suggest that repeated administration of CHX to adult rats did not cause a specific mental disorder, but it induced long-term alterations in behavioral and cognitive functions, possibly related to specific neural correlates. PMID:25489939

  5. Targeting the-Dopaminergic Nervous System: Altering Behavior in Larval Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zebrafish (Dania rerio) are becoming an important model system in studying the effects of environmental chemicals on behavior. In order to develop a rapid in vivo screen to prioritize toxic chemicals, we have begun assessing the acute locomotor effects of drugs that act on the do...

  6. Deletion of vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) in mice alters behavioral effects of ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Blednov, Y.A.; Harris, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 is activated by ethanol and this may be important for some of the central and peripheral actions of ethanol. To determine if this receptor has a role in ethanol-mediated behaviors, we studied null mutant mice in which the Trpv1 gene was deleted. Mice lacking this gene showed significantly higher preference for ethanol and consumed more ethanol in a two-bottle choice test as compared with wild type littermates. Null mutant mice showed shorter duration of loss of righting reflex induced by low doses of ethanol (3.2 and 3.4 g/kg) and faster recovery from motor incoordination induced by ethanol (2 g/kg). However, there were no differences between null mutant and wild type mice in severity of ethanol-induced acute withdrawal (4 g/kg) or conditioned taste aversion to ethanol (2.5 g/kg). Two behavioral phenotypes (decreased sensitivity to ethanol-induced sedation and faster recovery from ethanol-induced motor incoordination) seen in null mutant mice were reproduced in wild type mice by injection of a TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine (10 mg/kg). These two ethanol behaviors were changed in the opposite direction after injection of capsaicin, a selective TRPV1 agonist, in wild type mice. The studies provide the first evidence that TRPV1 is important for specific behavioral actions of ethanol. PMID:19705551

  7. Heat Stress Alters Ruminal Fermentation and Digesta Characteristics, and Behavior in Lactating Dairy Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a study designed to assess the impact and interaction of nonfiber carbohydrates (NFC) and ruminally degradable protein (RDP) on ruminal characteristics and animal behavior, animals experienced heat stress in the first period (HS), and no/greatly reduced heat stress (NHS) in the second period, all...

  8. Host behavior alters spiny lobster-viral disease dynamics: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Thomas W; Butler, Mark J; Shields, Jeffrey D

    2014-08-01

    Social behavior confers numerous benefits to animals but also risks, among them an increase in the spread of pathogenic diseases. We examined the trade-off between risk of predation and disease transmission under different scenarios of host spatial structure and disease avoidance behavior using a spatially explicit, individual-based model of the host pathogen interaction between juvenile Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) and Panulirus argus Virus 1 (PaV1). Spiny lobsters are normally social but modify their behavior to avoid diseased conspecifics, a potentially effective means of reducing transmission but one rarely observed in the wild. We found that without lobster avoidance of diseased conspecifics, viral outbreaks grew in intensity and duration in simulations until the virus was maintained continuously at unrealistically high levels. However, when we invoked disease avoidance at empirically observed levels, the intensity and duration of outbreaks was reduced and the disease extirpated within five years. Increased lobster (host) spatial aggregation mimicking that which occurs when sponge shelters for lobsters are diminished by harmful algal blooms, did not significantly increase PaV1 transmission or persistence in lobster populations. On the contrary, behavioral aversion of diseased conspecifics effectively reduced viral prevalence, even when shelters were limited, which reduced shelter availability for all lobsters but increased predation, especially of infected lobsters. Therefore, avoidance of diseased conspecifics selects against transmission by contact, promotes alternative modes of transmission, and results in a more resilient host-pathogen system. PMID:25230484

  9. Alterations in Error-Related Brain Activity and Post-Error Behavior over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Themanson, Jason R.; Rosen, Peter J.; Pontifex, Matthew B.; Hillman, Charles H.; McAuley, Edward

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the relation between the error-related negativity (ERN) and post-error behavior over time in healthy young adults (N = 61). Event-related brain potentials were collected during two sessions of an identical flanker task. Results indicated changes in ERN and post-error accuracy were related across task sessions, with more…

  10. The Use of Simultaneous Feedback to Alter Teaching Behaviors of University Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyquist, Jody L.; Wulff, Donald H.

    1982-01-01

    Researchers used simultaneous feedback, a means of modifying behavior through verbal cues transmitted via a transistorized ear plug, to improve the teaching skills of university faculty engaged in the act of teaching. Faculty identified areas they wished to improve after viewing videotapes of their teaching. (Authors/PP)

  11. Altering Misperception of Sleep in Insomnia: Behavioral Experiment Versus Verbal Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Nicole K. Y.; Harvey, Allison G.

    2006-01-01

    Forty-eight individuals with insomnia were asked to wear an actigraph and keep a sleep diary for 2 nights. On the following day, half were shown the discrepancy between the data recorded on the actigraph and their sleep diary via a behavioral experiment, whereas the other half were told of the discrepancy verbally. Participants were then asked to…

  12. Modulation of circadian glucocorticoid oscillation through adrenal opioid-CXCR7 signaling alters emotional behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Yuichi; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Skach, Amber; Sato, Makito; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Circulating glucocorticoid levels oscillate with a robust circadian rhythm, yet physiological relevance of this rhythmicity remains unclear. Here we show that modulation of circadian glucocorticoid oscillation by enhancing its amplitude leads to anxiolytic-like behavior. We observed that mice with adrenal subcapsular cell hyperplasia (SCH), a common histological change in the adrenals, are less anxious than mice without SCH. This behavioral change was found to be dependent on the higher amplitude of glucocorticoid oscillation, although the total glucocorticoid secretion is not increased in these mice. Genetic and pharmacologic experiments demonstrated that intermediate opioid peptides secreted from SCH activate CXCR7, a β-arrestin-biased G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), to augment circadian oscillation of glucocorticoid levels in a paracrine manner. Furthermore, recapitulating this paracrine axis by subcutaneous administration of a synthetic CXCR7 ligand is sufficient to induce anxiolytic-like behavior. Adrenocortical β-arrestin-biased GPCR signaling is a potential target for modulating circadian glucocorticoid oscillation and emotional behavior. PMID:24315101

  13. Diet induced alterations in gastrointestinal bacterial populations affect memory and learning behavior in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of dietary manipulation to influence learning and behavior is well recognized. While the mechanism of action is almost exclusively interpreted as direct effects of dietary constituents on neural functioning within the central nervous system (CNS), the role of dietary modification on bact...

  14. Brief Report: Altered Social Behavior in Isolation-Reared "Fmr1" Knockout Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzer, Andrew M.; Roth, Alexandra K.; Nawrocki, Lauren; Wrenn, Craige C.; Valdovinos, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    Social behavior abnormalities in Fragile X syndrome (FXS) are characterized by social withdrawal, anxiety, and deficits in social cognition. To assess these deficits, a model of FXS, the "Fmr1" knockout mouse ("Fmr1" KO), has been utilized. This mouse model has a null mutation in the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene ("Fmr1") and displays…

  15. The effect of dietary alterations during rearing on growth, productivity, and behavior in broiler breeder females.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, K L H; Widowski, T; Leeson, S; Sandilands, V; Arnone, A; Torrey, S

    2014-02-01

    Parent stocks of meat birds are severely feed restricted to avoid obesity-related health and fertility problems. This restriction often leads to chronic hunger, accompanied by stereotypic behavior. Research based in the United Kingdom has shown that using diets containing fiber and appetite suppressants may relieve some of the symptoms of hunger. However, few data are available regarding North American-sourced ingredients or nondaily feeding regimens. This study investigated the effects of 2 alternative diets, in combination with 2 feeding frequencies on growth, productivity, and behavior in broiler breeders. Six dietary treatments were tested, each with 5 replicate pens of 12 or 13 birds. Control diets consisted of a commercial crumble, fed on a daily or skip-a-day (SAD) basis. Alternative diets included soybean hulls as a fiber source, and calcium propionate as an appetite suppressant of either a feed-grade or purified quality, fed on either a daily or SAD basis. Birds were weighed weekly and egg production was recorded daily. Video cameras were used to record behavior during and following the morning feeding bout every 2 wk from 11 to 28 wk. Data were analyzed with a mixed model ANOVA, with repeated measures. Diet, feeding frequency, time, or an interaction of the 3 had significant effects on all observed behavior during rearing. These differences appeared to diminish during lay, with most stereotypic behavior no longer present. Very little object pecking and aggression was observed during and immediately following feeding bouts; however, daily-fed control birds still displayed this behavior more often, especially during rearing (P = 0.015). During feeding bouts, SAD birds feather pecked (P = 0.003) and rested more (P = 0.0002) than daily-fed birds. Control birds feather pecked most often (P = 0.033) after feeding bouts. Overall, the feed-grade diet appeared most effective at reducing hunger-related behavior, and the control diet appeared the least effective

  16. High aggression in rats is associated with elevated stress, anxiety-like behavior, and altered catecholamine content in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Patki, Gaurav; Atrooz, Fatin; Alkadhi, Isam; Solanki, Naimesh; Salim, Samina

    2015-01-01

    The social defeat paradigm involves aggressive encounters between Long-Evans (LE) (resident) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) (intruder) rats. Successful application of chronic social defeat stress in SD rats is dependent upon selection of highly aggressive LE rats. Half of the LE rats screened for aggression did not meet the criterion for aggression (LE rats performing a defeat, characterized by the intruder surrendering or acquiring a supine position for at least 3 sec). The observation of the differences in the level of aggression between age and weight matched LE rats was quite compelling which led us to the present study. Herein, we measured behavioral differences between aggressor and non-aggressor LE rats. We analyzed their anxiety-like behavior using open-field and elevated plus maze tests. We also measured aggression/violence-like behavior using two tests. In one, time taken to defeat the intruder SD rat was recorded. In the second test, time taken to attack a novel object was compared between the two groups. We observed a significant increase in anxiety-like behavior in aggressor rats when compared to the non-aggressive group. Furthermore, time taken to defeat the intruder rat and to attack a novel object was significantly lower in aggressive LE rats. Biochemical data suggests that heightened anxiety-like behavior and aggression is associated with increased plasma levels of corticosterones and elevated oxidative stress. Significant alterations in dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI) were observed within the hippocampus, amygdala and the prefrontal cortex, suggesting potential involvement of dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems in regulation of aggressive behaviors. PMID:25450144

  17. Manipulation of the oxytocin system alters social behavior and attraction in pair-bonding primates, Callithrix penicillata

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Adam S.; Ågmo, Anders; Birnie, Andrew K.; French, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of stable, long-term male-female relationships, or pair bonds, are marked by high levels of mutual attraction, selective preference for the partner, and high rates of sociosexual behavior. Central oxytocin (OT) affects social preference and partner-directed social behavior in rodents, but the role of this neuropeptide has yet to be studied in heterosexual primate relationships. The present study evaluated whether the OT system plays a role in the dynamics of social behavior and partner preference during the first three weeks of cohabitation in male and female marmosets, Callithrix penicillata. OT activity was stimulated by intranasal administration of OT, and inhibited by oral administration of a non-peptide OT-receptor antagonist (L-368,899; Merck). Social behavior throughout the pairing varied as a function of OT treatment. Compared to controls, marmosets initiated huddling with their social partner more often after OT treatments but reduced proximity and huddling after OT antagonist treatments. OT antagonist treatment also eliminated food sharing between partners. During the 24-h preference test, all marmosets interacted more with an opposite-sex stranger than with the partner. By the third-week preference test, marmosets interacted with the partner and stranger equally with the exception that intranasal-OT treatments facilitated initial partner-seeking behavior over initial contact with the stranger. Our findings demonstrate that pharmacological manipulations of OT activity alter partner-directed social behavior during pair interactions, suggesting that central OT may facilitate the process of pair-bond formation and social relationships in marmoset monkeys. PMID:20025881

  18. Alterations in affective behavior during the time course of alcohol hangover.

    PubMed

    Karadayian, Analía G; Busso, María J; Feleder, Carlos; Cutrera, Rodolfo A

    2013-09-15

    Alcohol hangover is a temporary state described as the unpleasant next-day effects after binge-like drinking. Hangover begins when ethanol is absent in plasma and is characterized by physical and psychological symptoms. Affective behavior is impaired during the acute phase of alcohol intoxication; however, no reports indicate if similar effects are observed during withdrawal. The aim of this work was to study the time-extension and possible fluctuations in affective behavior during a hangover episode. Male Swiss mice were injected i.p. either with saline (control group) or with ethanol (3.8g/kg BW) (hangover group). Anxiety, fear-related behavior and despair phenotype were evaluated at a basal point (ZT0) and every 2h up to 20h after blood alcohol levels were close to zero (hangover onset). Also, anhedonia signs and pain perception disabilities were studied. Mice exhibited an increase in anxiety-like behavior during 4h and 14h after hangover onset when evaluated by the elevated-plus maze and open field test respectively (p<0.05). Fear-related behavior was detected in hangover animals by the increase of freezing and decrease of line crossings and rearing frequency during 16h after hangover onset (p<0.001). Depression signs were found in hangover mice during 14h (p<0.05). Hangover mice showed a significant decrease in pain perception when tested by tail immersion test at the beginning of hangover (p<0.05). Our findings demonstrate a time-extension between 14 and 16h for hangover affective impairments. This study shows the long lasting effects of hangover over the phase of ethanol intoxication. PMID:23850352

  19. Chronic cocaine or ethanol exposure during adolescence alters novelty-related behaviors in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Kirstie H; Kirstein, Cheryl L

    2007-04-01

    Adolescence is a time of high-risk behavior and increased exploration. This developmental period is marked by a greater probability to initiate drug use and is associated with an increased risk to develop addiction and adulthood dependency and drug use at this time is associated with an increased risk. Human adolescents are predisposed toward an increased likelihood of risk-taking behaviors [Zuckerman M. Sensation seeking and the endogenous deficit theory of drug abuse. NIDA Res Monogr 1986;74:59-70.], including drug use or initiation. In the present study, adolescent animals were exposed to twenty days of either saline (0.9% sodium chloride), cocaine (20 mg/kg) or ethanol (1 g/kg) i.p. followed by a fifteen-day washout period. All animals were tested as adults on several behavioral measures including locomotor activity induced by a novel environment, time spent in the center of an open field, novelty preference and novel object exploration. Animals exposed to cocaine during adolescence and tested as adults exhibited a greater locomotor response in a novel environment, spent less time in the center of the novel open field and spent less time with a novel object, results that are indicative of a stress or anxiogenic response to novelty or a novel situation. Adolescent animals chronically administered ethanol and tested as adults, unlike cocaine-exposed were not different from controls in a novel environment, indicated by locomotor activity or time spent with a novel object. However, ethanol-exposed animals approached the novel object more, suggesting that exposure to ethanol during development may result in less-inhibited behaviors during adulthood. The differences in adult behavioral responses after drug exposure during adolescence are likely due to differences in the mechanisms of action of the drugs and subsequent reward and/or stress responsivity. Future studies are needed to determine the neural substrates of these long lasting drug-induced changes. PMID

  20. A literature review of surface alteration layer effects on waste glass behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    When in contact with an aqueous solution, nuclear waste glass is subject to a chemical attack that results in progressive alteration. During tills alteration, constituent elements of the glass pass into the solution; elements initially in solution diffuse into, or are adsorbed onto, the solid; and new phases appear. This results in the formation of surface layers on the reacted glass. The glass corrosion and radionuclide release can be better understood by investigating these surface layer effects. In the past decade, there have been numerous studies regarding the effects of surface layers on glass reactions. This paper presents a systematic analysis and summary of the past knowledge regarding the effects of surface layers on glass-water interaction. This paper describes the major formation mechanisms of surface layers; reviews the role of surface layers in controlling mass transport and glass reaction affinity (through crystalline phases, an amorphous silica, a gel layer, or all the components in the glass); and discusses how the surface layers contribute to the retention of radionuclides during glass dissolution.

  1. A literature review of surface alteration layer effects on waste glass behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.

    1993-05-01

    When in contact with an aqueous solution, nuclear waste glass is subject to a chemical attack that results in progressive alteration. During tills alteration, constituent elements of the glass pass into the solution; elements initially in solution diffuse into, or are adsorbed onto, the solid; and new phases appear. This results in the formation of surface layers on the reacted glass. The glass corrosion and radionuclide release can be better understood by investigating these surface layer effects. In the past decade, there have been numerous studies regarding the effects of surface layers on glass reactions. This paper presents a systematic analysis and summary of the past knowledge regarding the effects of surface layers on glass-water interaction. This paper describes the major formation mechanisms of surface layers; reviews the role of surface layers in controlling mass transport and glass reaction affinity (through crystalline phases, an amorphous silica, a gel layer, or all the components in the glass); and discusses how the surface layers contribute to the retention of radionuclides during glass dissolution.

  2. Electrothermal shrinkage reduces laxity but alters creep behavior in a lapine ligament model.

    PubMed

    Wallace, A L; Hollinshead, R M; Frank, C B

    2001-01-01

    Thermal denaturation of collagen in ligament tissue has the potential to enhance arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. Previous studies have shown that laser energy produces significant capsular shortening without alteration of viscoelastic properties, but little information is available on the effects of radio frequency electrothermal energy. We assessed the acute effects of radio frequency shrinkage with use of the lapine medial collateral ligament model, in which the tibial insertion was shifted proximally to produce abnormal laxity. Thermal treatment resulted in restoration of laxity from 3.33 +/- 0.25 mm to 0.66 +/- 0.31 mm, which was not significantly different from medial collateral ligaments replaced anatomically (0.50 +/- 0.34 mm). When tested at 4.1 megapascals, cyclic and static creep strains were increased twofold to threefold in thermally-treated ligaments (P <.01), and partial failure occurred in 2 of 8 cases. We conclude that radio frequency electrothermal shrinkage is effective at reducing laxity but significantly alters viscoelastic properties, posing a risk of recurrent stretching-out at "physiological" loads. PMID:11182728

  3. Altered behavioral and neural responsiveness to counterfactual gains in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Tobia, Michael J; Guo, Rong; Gläscher, Jan; Schwarze, Ulrike; Brassen, Stefanie; Büchel, Christian; Obermayer, Klaus; Sommer, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    Counterfactual information processing refers to the consideration of events that did not occur in comparison to those actually experienced, in order to determine optimal actions, and can be formulated as computational learning signals, referred to as fictive prediction errors. Decision making and the neural circuitry for counterfactual processing are altered in healthy elderly adults. This experiment investigated age differences in neural systems for decision making with knowledge of counterfactual outcomes. Two groups of healthy adult participants, young (N = 30; ages 19-30 years) and elderly (N = 19; ages 65-80 years), were scanned with fMRI during 240 trials of a strategic sequential investment task in which a particular strategy of differentially weighting counterfactual gains and losses during valuation is associated with more optimal performance. Elderly participants earned significantly less than young adults, differently weighted counterfactual consequences and exploited task knowledge, and exhibited altered activity in a fronto-striatal circuit while making choices, compared to young adults. The degree to which task knowledge was exploited was positively correlated with modulation of neural activity by expected value in the vmPFC for young adults, but not in the elderly. These findings demonstrate that elderly participants' poor task performance may be related to different counterfactual processing. PMID:26864879

  4. Effects of lithium on oxidative stress and behavioral alterations induced by lisdexamfetamine dimesylate: relevance as an animal model of mania.

    PubMed

    Macêdo, Danielle S; de Lucena, David F; Queiroz, Ana Isabelle G; Cordeiro, Rafaela C; Araújo, Maíra M; Sousa, Francisca Cléa; Vasconcelos, Silvânia M; Hyphantis, Thomas N; Quevedo, João; McIntyre, Roger S; Carvalho, André F

    2013-06-01

    Lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) is a prodrug that requires conversion to d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) for bioactivity. Treatment with d-AMPH induces hyperlocomotion and is regarded as a putative animal model of bipolar mania. Therefore, we sought to determine the behavioral and oxidative stress alterations induced by sub-chronic LDX administration as well as their reversal and prevention by lithium in rats. A significant increment in locomotor behavior was induced by LDX (10 and 30 mg/kg). To determine Li effects against LDX-induced alterations, in the reversal protocol rats received LDX (10 or 30 mg/kg) or saline for 14 days. Between days 8 and 14 animals received Li (47.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline. In the prevention paradigm, rats were pretreated with Li or saline prior to LDX administration. Glutathione (GSH) levels and lipid peroxidation was determined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HC) and striatum (ST) of rats. Lithium prevented LDX-induced hyperlocomotion at the doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg, but only reversed LDX-induced hyperlocomotion at dose of 10mg/kg. In addition, both doses of LDX decreased GSH content (in ST and PFC), while Li was able to reverse and prevent these alterations mainly in the PFC. LDX (10 and 30 mg/kg) increased lipid peroxidation which was reversed and prevented by Li. In conclusion, LDX-induced hyperlocomotion along with associated increments in oxidative stress show promise as an alternative animal model of mania. PMID:23333378

  5. Chronic anabolic androgenic steroid exposure alters corticotropin releasing factor expression and anxiety-like behaviors in the female mouse.

    PubMed

    Costine, Beth A; Oberlander, Joseph G; Davis, Matthew C; Penatti, Carlos A A; Porter, Donna M; Leaton, Robert N; Henderson, Leslie P

    2010-11-01

    In the past several decades, the therapeutic use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has been overshadowed by illicit use of these drugs by elite athletes and a growing number of adolescents to enhance performance and body image. As with adults, AAS use by adolescents is associated with a range of behavioral effects, including increased anxiety and altered responses to stress. It has been suggested that adolescents, especially adolescent females, may be particularly susceptible to the effects of these steroids, but few experiments in animal models have been performed to test this assertion. Here we show that chronic exposure of adolescent female mice to a mixture of three commonly abused AAS (testosterone cypionate, nandrolone decanoate and methandrostenolone; 7.5 mg/kg/day for 5 days) significantly enhanced anxiety-like behavior as assessed by the acoustic startle response (ASR), but did not augment the fear-potentiated startle response (FPS) or alter sensorimotor gating as assessed by prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (PPI). AAS treatment also significantly increased the levels of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) mRNA and somal-associated CRF immunoreactivity in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), as well as neuropil-associated immunoreactivity in the dorsal aspect of the anterolateral division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBnST). AAS treatment did not alter CRF receptor 1 or 2 mRNA in either the CeA or the dBnST; CRF immunoreactivity in the ventral BnST, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) or the median eminence (ME); or peripheral levels of corticosterone. These results suggest that chronic AAS treatment of adolescent female mice may enhance generalized anxiety, but not sensorimotor gating or learned fear, via a mechanism that involves increased CRF-mediated signaling from CeA neurons projecting to the dBnST. PMID:20537804

  6. Chronic Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Exposure Alters Corticotropin Releasing Factor Expression and Anxiety-Like Behaviors in the Female Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Costine, Beth A; Oberlander, Joseph G; Davis, Matthew C; Penatti, Carlos A A; Porter, Donna M; Leaton, Robert N; Henderson, Leslie P

    2010-01-01

    Summary In the past several decades, the therapeutic use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has been overshadowed by illicit use of these drugs by elite athletes and a growing number of adolescents to enhance performance and body image. As with adults, AAS use by adolescents is associated with a range of behavioral effects, including increased anxiety and altered responses to stress. It has been suggested that adolescents, especially adolescent females, may be particularly susceptible to the effects of these steroids, but few experiments in animal models have been performed to test this assertion. Here we show that chronic exposure of adolescent female mice to a mixture of three commonly abused AAS (testosterone cypionate, nandrolone decanoate and methandrostenolone; 7.5 mg/kg/day for 5 days) significantly enhanced anxiety-like behavior as assessed by the acoustic startle response (ASR), but did not augment the fear-potentiated startle response (FPS) or alter sensorimotor gating as assessed by prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (PPI). AAS treatment also significantly increased the levels of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) mRNA and somal-associated CRF immunoreactivity in the central amygdala (CeA), as well as neuropil-associated immunoreactivity in the dorsal aspect of the anterolateral division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBnST). AAS treatment did not alter CRF receptor 1 or 2 mRNA in either the CeA or the dBnST; CRF immunoreactivity in the ventral BNST, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) or the median eminence (ME); or peripheral levels of corticosterone. These results suggest that chronic AAS treatment of adolescent female mice may enhance generalized anxiety, but not sensorimotor gating or learned fear, via a mechanism that involves increased CRF-mediated signaling from CeA neurons projecting to the dBnST. PMID:20537804

  7. Macrophage reprogramming: influence of latex beads with various functional groups on macrophage phenotype and phagocytic uptake in vitro.

    PubMed

    Akilbekova, Dana; Philiph, Rachel; Graham, Austin; Bratlie, Kaitlin M

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in initiating immune responses with various functions ranging from wound healing to antimicrobial actions. The type of biomaterial is suggested to influence macrophage phenotype. Here, we show that exposing M1- and M2-activated macrophages to polystyrene latex beads bearing different functional groups can alter secretion profiles, providing a possible method for altering the course of the host response. Macrophages were stimulated with either lipopolysaccharide or interleukin (IL) 4 and cultured for 24 h with 10 different latex beads. Proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, monocyte chemotactic protein 1) and nitrite served as markers for the M1 phenotype and proangiogenic cytokine (IL-10) and arginase activity for M2 cells. The ability of the macrophages to phagocytize Escherichia coli particles and water contact angles of the polymers were also assessed. Different patterns of cytokine expression and phagocytosis activity were induced by the various particles. Particles did not polarize the cells toward one specific phenotype versus another, but rather induced changes in both pro- and anti-inflammatory markers. Our results suggest a dependence of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and phagocytic activities on material type and cytokine stimuli. These data also illustrate how biomaterials can be exploited to alter host responses for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. PMID:24639060

  8. Relationship between dopamine deficit and the expression of depressive behavior resulted from alteration of serotonin system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minkyung; Ryu, Young Hoon; Cho, Won Gil; Kang, Yeo Wool; Lee, Soo Jin; Jeon, Tae Joo; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung; Kim, Chul Hoon; Kim, Dong Goo; Lee, Kyochul; Choi, Tae Hyun; Choi, Jae Yong

    2015-09-01

    Depression frequently accompanies in Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous research suggested that dopamine (DA) and serotonin systems are closely linked with depression in PD. However, comprehensive studies about the relationship between these two neurotransmitter systems are limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of dopaminergic destruction on the serotonin system. The interconnection between motor and depression was also examined. Two PET scans were performed in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned and sham operated rats: [(18) F]FP-CIT for DA transporters and [(18) F]Mefway for serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptors. Here, 6-OHDA is a neurotoxin for dopaminergic neurons. Behavioral tests were used to evaluate the severity of symptoms: rotational number for motor impairment and immobility time, acquired from the forced swim test for depression. Region-of-interests were drawn in the striatum and cerebellum for the DA system and hippocampus and cerebellum for the 5-HT system. The cerebellum was chosen as a reference region. Nondisplaceable binding potential in the striatum and hippocampus were compared between 6-OHDA and sham groups. As a result, the degree of DA depletion was negatively correlated with rotational behavior (R(2)  = 0.79, P = 0.003). In 6-OHDA lesioned rats, binding values for 5-HT(1A) receptors was 22% lower than the sham operated group. This decrement of 5-HT(1A) receptor binding was also correlated with the severity of depression (R(2)  = 0.81, P = 0.006). Taken together, this research demonstrated that the destruction of dopaminergic system causes the reduction of the serotonergic system resulting in the expression of depressive behavior. The degree of dopaminergic dysfunction was positively correlated with the impairment of the serotonin system. Severity of motor symptoms was also closely related to depressive behavior. PMID:26089169

  9. Gestational Exposure to Low Dose Bisphenol A Alters Social Behavior in Juvenile Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wolstenholme, Jennifer T.; Taylor, Julia A.; Shetty, Savera R. J.; Edwards, Michelle; Connelly, Jessica J.; Rissman, Emilie F.

    2011-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a man-made compound used to make polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins; public health concerns have been fueled by findings that BPA exposure can reduce sex differences in brain and some behaviors. We asked if a low BPA dose, within the range measured in humans, ingested during pregnancy, would affect social behaviors in prepubertal mice. We noted sex differences in social interactions whereby females spent more time sitting side-by-side, while males engaged in more exploring and sitting alone. In addition BPA increased display of nose-to-nose contacts, play solicitations and approaches in both sexes. Interactions between sex and diet were found for self grooming, social interactions while sitting side-by-side and following the other mouse. In all these cases interactions were produced by differences between control and BPA females. We examined brains from embryos during late gestation to determine if gene expression differences might be correlated with some of the sexually dimorphic or BPA affected behaviors we observed. Because BPA treatments ended at birth we took the brains during embryogenesis to increase the probability of discovering BPA mediated effects. We also selected this embryonic age (E18.5) because it coincides with the onset of sexual differentiation of the brain. Interestingly, mRNA for the glutamate transporter, Slc1a1, was enhanced by exposure to BPA in female brains. Also we noted that BPA changed the expression of two of the three DNA methyltransferase genes, Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a. We propose that BPA affects DNA methylation of Sc1a1 during neural development. Sex differences in juvenile social interactions are affected by BPA and in particular this compound modifies behavior in females. PMID:21980460

  10. Daily episodes of confusion · altered behavior · chronic sleep deprivation · Dx?

    PubMed

    Motamedi, Gholam K; Wheeler, Margot G

    2015-02-01

    His neurologic exam was normal. Family history was positive for a cousin with narcolepsy but negative for seizures and obstructive sleep apnea. Polysomnography revealed moderate OSA with minimal oxygen desaturation. Inpatient video EEG monitoring captured several of the events that the patient and his wife had described; the patient seemed "uninhibited" in his behavior. His EEG, cardiac telemetry, oxygen saturation, blood pressure, and serum glucose level remained normal. PMID:25671536

  11. Subchronic and mild social defeat stress alter mouse nest building behavior.

    PubMed

    Otabi, Hikari; Goto, Tatsuhiko; Okayama, Tsuyoshi; Kohari, Daisuke; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral and physiological evaluations of animal models of depression are essential to thoroughly understand the mechanisms of depression in humans. Various models have been developed and characterized, and the socially defeated mouse has been widely used for studying depression. Here, we developed and characterized a mouse model of social aversion using a subchronic and mild social defeat stress (sCSDS) paradigm. Compared to control mice, sCSDS mice showed significantly increased body weight gain, water intake, and social aversion to dominant mice on the social interaction test. We observed nest building behavior in sCSDS mice using the pressed cotton as a nest material. Although sCSDS mice eventually successfully built nests, the onset of nest building was severely delayed compared to control mice. The underlying mechanism of this significant delay in nest building by sCSDS mice is unclear. However, our results demonstrate that nest building evaluation is a simple and useful assay for understanding behavior in socially defeated mice and screening drugs such as antidepressants. PMID:26524409

  12. Male-like behavioral patterns and physiological alterations induced by androgenic gland implantation in female crayfish.

    PubMed

    Barki, Assaf; Karplus, Ilan; Khalaila, Isam; Manor, Rivka; Sagi, Amir

    2003-06-01

    The androgenic gland (AG) has been shown to regulate male sexual differentiation and secondary male characteristics in Crustacea. This study presents for the first time in crustaceans evidence for masculinization effects of the AG on reproductive behavior, in addition to morpho-anatomical and physiological effects. AG implantation into immature female red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus inhibited secondary vitellogenesis and development of the ovaries, as well as morphological traits that facilitate maternal egg brooding; it also caused the appearance of secondary male characteristics. However, primary male characteristics and a masculine reproductive system were not developed. In pair encounters, aggression was substantially lower in interactions between AG-implanted and intact females than in interactions within AG-implanted or intact pairs. Moreover, elements of mating behavior, i.e. male courtship displays and false copulations, were exhibited by AG-implanted females in several encounters with intact females. In addition to known morpho-anatomical and physiological effects of the AG in crustaceans, the present study suggests that the AG has novel effects on the neural network that generates social behavior. PMID:12728000

  13. Hesr1 knockout mice exhibit behavioral alterations through the dopaminergic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fuke, Satoshi; Minami, Natsumi; Kokubo, Hiroki; Yoshikawa, Ayumu; Yasumatsu, Hiroshi; Sasagawa, Noboru; Saga, Yumiko; Tsukahara, Toshifumi; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2006-11-15

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional factor Hesr1 gene (hairy and enhancer of split-related 1, also called Hey1/HRT1/CHF2/HERP2) has been identified and characterized as a member of the subfamily of hairy/Enhancer of split, and shown to be involved in cardiovascular and neural development. We report that HESR1 binds directly to a part of the 3' non-coding region of the human dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene and represses the endogenous DAT1 gene in HEK293 cells. To investigate functions of the HESR1 gene in the dopaminergic nervous system in vivo, we analyzed the expressions of dopamine-related genes in the postnatal day 0 whole brains of Hesr1 knockout mice by real-time RT-PCR analysis. Several dopamine-related genes, such as DAT, dopamine receptors D1, D2, D4, and D5, were significantly upregulated. Moreover, young adults of Hesr1 knockout mice showed a decrease in spontaneous locomotor activity and a reduction in exploratory behavior or behavioral responses to novelty in the open-field, and elevated plus-maze tests. These results indicate that the HESR1 gene is related to neuropsychiatric disorders and behavioral traits through the dopaminergic nervous system. PMID:16998899

  14. Behavioral sensitization and long-term neurochemical alterations associated with the fungicide triadimefon.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Ruth; Thiruchelvam, Mona; Richfield, Eric K; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A

    2003-09-01

    Triadimefon (TDF), a widely used triazole fungicide, blocks reuptake of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA), similarly to cocaine. Preliminary studies show that intermittent intraperitoneal injections of TDF increase ambulatory and vertical activity across repeated injections [Neurotoxicology (in press)] leading to the hypothesis tested here, that exposure to TDF may influence the development and expression of behavioral sensitization, a model of psychostimulant-induced psychosis. Exposure of adult male C57BL/6 mice to 75 mg/kg i.p. TDF (TDF75) twice a week for 7 weeks increased vertical activity at each injection. Following a 2-week withdrawal period, a TDF challenge to test for expression of behavioral sensitization revealed further increases in vertical activity levels relative to all other conditions. TDF induction/expression of behavioral sensitization was associated with long-term, perhaps permanent modulation of dopaminergic function that included increases in striatal dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and DA turnover, increases in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) dopamine transporter (DAT) binding, as well as decreases in DA D1 and increases in DA D2 and DAT receptor binding that appeared to target the nucleus accumbens shell (NAs) subregion. Thus, TDF exposure may serve as an environmental risk factor for DA system dysfunctions. PMID:14592684

  15. Altered behavior, physiology, and metabolism in fish exposed to polystyrene nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Karin; Ekvall, Mikael T; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Linse, Sara; Malmendal, Anders; Cedervall, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles in consumer products, for example, cosmetics, sunscreens, and electrical devices, has increased tremendously over the past decade despite insufficient knowledge about their effects on human health and ecosystem function. Moreover, the amount of plastic waste products that enter natural ecosystems, such as oceans and lakes, is increasing, and degradation of the disposed plastics produces smaller particles toward the nano scale. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to gain knowledge about how plastic nanoparticles enter and affect living organisms. Here we have administered 24 and 27 nm polystyrene nanoparticles to fish through an aquatic food chain, from algae through Daphnia, and studied the effects on behavior and metabolism. We found severe effects on feeding and shoaling behavior as well as metabolism of the fish; hence, we conclude that polystyrene nanoparticles have severe effects on both behavior and metabolism in fish and that commonly used nanosized particles may have considerable effects on natural systems and ecosystem services derived from them. PMID:25380515

  16. Broken or maladaptive? Altered trajectories in neuroinflammation and behavior after early life adversity.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Prabarna; Brenhouse, Heather C

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to adversity and stress early in development yields vulnerability to mental illnesses throughout the lifespan. Growing evidence suggests that this vulnerability has mechanistic origins involving aberrant development of both neurocircuitry and neuro-immune activity. Here we review the current understanding of when and how stress exposure initiates neuroinflammatory events that interact with brain development. We first review how early life adversity has been associated with various psychopathologies, and how neuroinflammation plays a role in these pathologies. We then summarize data and resultant hypotheses describing how early life adversity may particularly alter neuro-immune development with psychiatric consequences. Finally, we review how sex differences contribute to individualistic vulnerabilities across the lifespan. We submit the importance of understanding how stress during early development might cause outright neural or glial damage, as well as experience-dependent plasticity that may insufficiently prepare an individual for sex-specific or life-stage specific challenges. PMID:25081071

  17. Broken or maladaptive? Altered trajectories in neuroinflammation and behavior after early life adversity

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Prabarna; Brenhouse, Heather C.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to adversity and stress early in development yields vulnerability to mental illnesses throughout the lifespan. Growing evidence suggests that this vulnerability has mechanistic origins involving aberrant development of both neurocircuitry and neuro-immune activity. Here we review the current understanding of when and how stress exposure initiates neuroinflammatory events that interact with brain development. We first review how early life adversity has been associated with various psychopathologies, and how neuroinflammation plays a role in these pathologies. We then summarize data and resultant hypotheses describing how early life adversity may particularly alter neuro-immune development with psychiatric consequences. Finally, we review how sex differences contribute to individualistic vulnerabilities across the lifespan. We submit the importance of understanding how stress during early development might cause outright neural or glial damage, as well as experience-dependent plasticity that may insufficiently prepare an individual for sex-specific or life-stage specific challenges. PMID:25081071

  18. Developmental neurotoxicity of organophosphorous pesticides: fetal and neonatal exposure to chlorpyrifos alters sex-specific behaviors at adulthood in mice.

    PubMed

    Ricceri, Laura; Venerosi, Aldina; Capone, Francesca; Cometa, Maria Francesca; Lorenzini, Paola; Fortuna, Stefano; Calamandrei, Gemma

    2006-09-01

    Developmental exposure to the organophosphorous insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) induces long-term effects on brain and behavior in laboratory rodents. We evaluated in adult mice the behavioral effects of either fetal and/or neonatal CPF exposure at doses not inhibiting fetal and neonatal brain cholinesterase. CPF (3 or 6 mg/kg) was given by oral treatment to pregnant females on gestational days 15-18 and offspring were treated sc (1 or 3 mg/kg) on postnatal days (PNDs) 11-14. Serum and brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was evaluated at birth and 24 h from termination of postnatal treatments. On PND 70, male mice were assessed for spontaneous motor activity in an open-field test and in a socioagonistic encounter with an unfamiliar conspecific. Virgin females underwent a maternal induction test following presentation of foster pups. Both sexes were subjected to a plus-maze test to evaluate exploration and anxiety levels. Gestational and postnatal CPF exposure (higher doses) affected motor activity in the open field and enhanced synergically agonistic behavior. Postnatal CPF exposure increased maternal responsiveness toward pups in females. Mice of both sexes exposed to postnatal CPF showed reduced anxiety response in the plus-maze, an effect greater in females. Altogether, developmental exposure to CPF at doses that do not cause brain AChE inhibition induces long-term alterations in sex-specific behavior patterns of the mouse species. Late neonatal exposure on PNDs 11-14 was the most effective in causing behavioral changes. These findings support the hypothesis that developmental CPF may represent a risk factor for increased vulnerability to neurodevelopmental disorders in humans. PMID:16760416

  19. Developmental fluoxetine exposure increases behavioral despair and alters epigenetic regulation of the hippocampal BDNF gene in adult female offspring.

    PubMed

    Boulle, Fabien; Pawluski, Jodi L; Homberg, Judith R; Machiels, Barbie; Kroeze, Yvet; Kumar, Neha; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Kenis, Gunter; van den Hove, Daniel L A

    2016-04-01

    A growing number of infants are exposed to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications during the perinatal period. Perinatal exposure to SSRI medications alter neuroplasticity and increase depressive- and anxiety-related behaviors, particularly in male offspring as little work has been done in female offspring to date. The long-term effects of SSRI on development can also differ with previous exposure to prenatal stress, a model of maternal depression. Because of the limited work done on the role of developmental SSRI exposure on neurobehavioral outcomes in female offspring, the aim of the present study was to investigate how developmental fluoxetine exposure affects anxiety and depression-like behavior, as well as the regulation of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling in the hippocampus of adult female offspring. To do this female Sprague-Dawley rat offspring were exposed to prenatal stress and fluoxetine via the dam, for a total of four groups of female offspring: 1) No Stress+Vehicle, 2) No Stress+Fluoxetine, 3) Prenatal Stress+Vehicle, and 4) Prenatal Stress+Fluoxetine. Primary results show that, in adult female offspring, developmental SSRI exposure significantly increases behavioral despair measures on the forced swim test, decreases hippocampal BDNF exon IV mRNA levels, and increases levels of the repressive histone 3 lysine 27 tri-methylated mark at the corresponding promoter. There was also a significant negative correlation between hippocampal BDNF exon IV mRNA levels and immobility in the forced swim test. No effects of prenatal stress or developmental fluoxetine exposure were seen on tests of anxiety-like behavior. This research provides important evidence for the long-term programming effects of early-life exposure to SSRIs on female offspring, particularily with regard to affect-related behaviors and their underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:26844865

  20. Time Course of Behavioral Alteration and mRNA Levels of Neurotrophic Factor Following Stress Exposure in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa, Naoya; Ogawa, Takumi; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Ogawa, Mami; Matsuo, Yumi; Zamami, Yoshito; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi

    2015-08-01

    Stress is known to affect neurotrophic factor expression, which induces depression-like behavior. However, whether there are time-dependent changes in neurotrophic factor mRNA expression following stress remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether chronic stress exposure induces long-term changes in depression-related behavior, serum corticosterone, and hippocampal proliferation as well as neurotrophic factor family mRNA levels, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), in the mouse hippocampus. The mRNA level of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, NGF, NT-3, and CNTF) was measured using the real-time PCR. The serum corticosterone level was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and, for each subject, the hippocampal proliferation was examined by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine immunostaining. Mice exhibited depression-like behavior in the forced-swim test (FST) and decreased BDNF mRNA and hippocampal proliferation in the middle of the stress exposure. After 15 days of stress exposure, we observed increased immobility in the FST, serum corticosterone levels, and BDNF mRNA levels and degenerated hippocampal proliferation, maintained for at least 2 weeks. Anhedonia-like behavior in the sucrose preference test and NGF mRNA levels were decreased following 15 days of stress. NGF mRNA levels were significantly higher 1 week after stress exposure. The current data demonstrate that chronic stress exposure induces prolonged BDNF and NGF mRNA changes and increases corticosterone levels and depression-like behavior in the FST, but does not alter other neurotrophic factors or performance in the sucrose preference test. PMID:25820756

  1. Prenatal SSRI alters the hormonal and behavioral responses to stress in female mice: Possible role for glucocorticoid resistance.

    PubMed

    Avitsur, Ronit; Grinshpahet, Rachel; Goren, Naama; Weinstein, Ido; Kirshenboim, Or; Chlebowski, Noa

    2016-08-01

    Life time prevalence of major depression disorder (MDD) is higher in women compared to men especially during the period surrounding childbirth. Women suffering from MDD during pregnancy use antidepressant medications, particularly Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI). These drugs readily cross the placental barrier and impact the developing fetal brain. The present study assessed the effects of prenatal exposure to fluoxetine (FLX), an SSRI antidepressant drug, on corticosterone and behavioral responses to stress in female mice. In young females, prenatal FLX significantly elevated corticosterone response to continuous stress. In adults, prenatal FLX augmented corticosterone response to acute stress and suppressed the response to continuous stress. Additionally, prenatal FLX significantly augmented stress-induced increase in locomotion and reduced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in adult, but not young mice. The dexamethasone suppression test revealed that prenatal FLX induced a state of glucocorticoid resistance in adult females, indicating that the negative feedback control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to stress was disrupted. These findings provide the first indication of altered hormonal and behavioral responses to continuous stress and suggest a role for the development of glucocorticoid resistance in these effects. According to these findings, prenatal environment may have implications for stress sensitivity and responsiveness to life challenges. Furthermore, this study may assist in understanding the limitations and precautions that should be taken in the use of SSRIs during pregnancy. PMID:27283378

  2. Structural alterations in the rat brain and behavioral impairment after status epilepticus: An MRI study.

    PubMed

    Suleymanova, E M; Gulyaev, M V; Abbasova, K R

    2016-02-19

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is one of the most common neurologic disorders often associated with behavioral impairments and cognitive deficit. Lithium-pilocarpine model of seizures in rodents reproduces many features of human convulsive status epilepticus (SE) and subsequent TLE. In this study, we have investigated changes in the rat brain after lithium-pilocarpine SE using a high-field MRI system for small animals in early and chronic periods after SE. We have studied the relationship between T2 relaxation time measured in these periods and the development of behavioral exploratory response to novelty and habituation in the open field test. A significant increase in T2 in the hippocampus and associated structures was found 2 days after SE and practically resolved by day seven, while an increase in T2 in the parietal and prefrontal cortex appeared 30 days after SE. High T2 values in the parietal cortex and thalamus on day two after SE were associated with an increased mortality risk. A substantial variability in T2 relaxation time was observed in the hippocampus and amygdala 30 days after SE. Rats survived after SE showed locomotor hyperactivity and disruption of long-term habituation in the open field test carried out 5 weeks after the seizures. Interestingly, T2 in the amygdala 30 days after SE had a strong correlation with hyperactivity in the novel open field. Therefore, the amygdala damage may be an important factor in the development of hyperactivity in the chronic period after SE. PMID:26674057

  3. Orbitofrontal Dopamine Depletion Upregulates Caudate Dopamine and Alters Behavior via Changes in Reinforcement Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cardinal, R. N.; Rygula, R.; Hong, Y. T.; Fryer, T. D.; Sawiak, S. J.; Ferrari, V.; Cockcroft, G.; Aigbirhio, F. I.; Robbins, T. W.; Roberts, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with upregulation of dopamine (DA) release in the caudate nucleus. The caudate has dense connections with the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) via the frontostriatal loops, and both areas exhibit pathophysiological change in schizophrenia. Despite evidence that abnormalities in dopaminergic neurotransmission and prefrontal cortex function co-occur in schizophrenia, the influence of OFC DA on caudate DA and reinforcement processing is poorly understood. To test the hypothesis that OFC dopaminergic dysfunction disrupts caudate dopamine function, we selectively depleted dopamine from the OFC of marmoset monkeys and measured striatal extracellular dopamine levels (using microdialysis) and dopamine D2/D3 receptor binding (using positron emission tomography), while modeling reinforcement-related behavior in a discrimination learning paradigm. OFC dopamine depletion caused an increase in tonic dopamine levels in the caudate nucleus and a corresponding reduction in D2/D3 receptor binding. Computational modeling of behavior showed that the lesion increased response exploration, reducing the tendency to persist with a recently chosen response side. This effect is akin to increased response switching previously seen in schizophrenia and was correlated with striatal but not OFC D2/D3 receptor binding. These results demonstrate that OFC dopamine depletion is sufficient to induce striatal hyperdopaminergia and changes in reinforcement learning relevant to schizophrenia. PMID:24872570

  4. Time course study of microglial and behavioral alterations induced by 6-hydroxydopamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thiago Pereira da; Poli, Anicleto; Hara, Daniela Balz; Takahashi, Reinaldo Naoto

    2016-05-27

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for nonmotor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) is crucial in the search for new therapeutic approaches. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the time course of behavioral, neurochemical, and microglial responses after a retrograde partial lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway induced by bilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The results showed that 6-OHDA was able to produce both anhedonic and anxiety behaviors; however, an increase of microglial density in some brain areas (substantia nigra, hippocampus and striatum) and deficits in locomotor activity was observed only one week after the lesion. Striatal levels of dopamine (DA) and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were reduced by approximately 60% at all times tested. Conversely, increased levels of serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite were also noted in the striatum only at the first week. These data extend our previous findings and suggest that the retrograde and partial damage of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra can induce effects resembling premotor symptoms of PD, two and three weeks after injury. PMID:27113204

  5. Self-affirmation alters the brain’s response to health messages and subsequent behavior change

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Emily B.; O’Donnell, Matthew Brook; Cascio, Christopher N.; Tinney, Francis; Kang, Yoona; Lieberman, Matthew D.; Taylor, Shelley E.; An, Lawrence; Resnicow, Kenneth; Strecher, Victor J.

    2015-01-01

    Health communications can be an effective way to increase positive health behaviors and decrease negative health behaviors; however, those at highest risk are often most defensive and least open to such messages. For example, increasing physical activity among sedentary individuals affects a wide range of important mental and physical health outcomes, but has proven a challenging task. Affirming core values (i.e., self-affirmation) before message exposure is a psychological technique that can increase the effectiveness of a wide range of interventions in health and other domains; however, the neural mechanisms of affirmation’s effects have not been studied. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine neural processes associated with affirmation effects during exposure to potentially threatening health messages. We focused on an a priori defined region of interest (ROI) in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC), a brain region selected for its association with self-related processing and positive valuation. Consistent with our hypotheses, those in the self-affirmation condition produced more activity in VMPFC during exposure to health messages and went on to increase their objectively measured activity levels more. These findings suggest that affirmation of core values may exert its effects by allowing at-risk individuals to see the self-relevance and value in otherwise-threatening messages. PMID:25646442

  6. Tickling during adolescence alters fear-related and cognitive behaviors in rats after prolonged isolation.

    PubMed

    Hori, Miyo; Yamada, Kazuo; Ohnishi, Junji; Sakamoto, Shigeko; Furuie, Hiroki; Murakami, Kazuo; Ichitani, Yukio

    2014-05-28

    Social interactions during adolescence are important especially for neuronal development and behavior. We recently showed that positive emotions induced by repeated tickling could modulate fear-related behaviors and sympatho-adrenal stress responses. In the present study, we examined whether tickling during early to late adolescence stage could reverse stress vulnerability induced by socially isolated rearing. Ninety-five male Fischer rats were reared under different conditions from postnatal day (PND) 21 to 53: group-housed (three rats/cage), isolated-nontickled (one rat/cage) and isolated-tickled (received tickling stimulation for 5min a day). Auditory fear conditioning was then performed on the rats at PND 54. Isolated-tickled rats exhibited significantly lower freezing compared with group-housed rats in the first retention test performed 48h after conditioning and compared with isolated-nontickled rats in the second retention test performed 96h after conditioning. Moreover, group-housed and isolated-tickled rats tended to show a significant decrease in freezing responses in the second retention test; however, isolated-nontickled rats did not. In the Morris water maze task that was trained in adulthood (PND 88), but not in adolescence (PND 56), isolated-nontickled rats showed slower decrease of escape latency compared to group-housed rats; however, tickling treatment significantly improved this deficit. These results suggest that tickling stimulation can alleviate the detrimental effects of isolated rearing during adolescence on fear responses and spatial learning. PMID:24727339

  7. Behavioral alterations in mice lacking the gene for tenascin-x.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kohei; Matsumoto, Ken-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Tenascin-X (TNX) is the largest member in the tenascin family of large oligomeric glycoproteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM). TNX is expressed in the leptomeningeal trabecula and connective tissue of choroid plexus in the brain as well as in muscular tissues. Interestingly, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis in human showed that TNX is significantly associated with schizophrenia. Previously we generated TNX-deficient (TNX-/-) mice by homologous recombination using embryonic stem (ES) cells. In the present study, we analyzed behaviors relevant to affect, learning and memory, and motor control in TNX-/- mice. TNX-/- mice showed increased anxiety in light-dark and open-field tests and superior memory retention in a passive avoidance test. Also, TNX-/- mice displayed higher sensorimotor coordination than did wild-type mice in a rotorod test. However, TNX-/- mice did not differ from wild-type mice in locomotor activity in a home-cage activity test using telemetric monitoring. These findings suggest that TNX has diverse roles including roles in behavioral functions such as anxiety, emotional learning and memory, and sensorimotor ability. PMID:21467652

  8. Protective effect of Labisia pumila on stress-induced behavioral, biochemical, and immunological alterations.

    PubMed

    Kour, Kiranjeet; Sharma, Neelam; Chandan, Bal Krishan; Koul, Surrinder; Sangwan, Payare Lal; Bani, Sarang

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the antistress potential of LABISIA PUMILA aqueous extract (LPPM/A003) using a battery of tests widely employed in different stressful situations. Pretreatment of experimental animals with LPPM/A003 caused an increase in the swimming endurance and hypoxia time and also showed the recovery of physical stress-induced depletion of neuromuscular coordination and scopolamine induced memory deficit. LPPM/A003 at graded doses reversed the chronic restraint stress (RST), induced depletion of CD4 (+) and CD8 (+) T lymphocytes, NK cell population, and corresponding cytokines expression besides downregulating the stress-induced increase in plasma corticosterone, a major stress hormone. In addition, LPPM/A003 reversed the chronic stress-induced increase in adrenal gland weight, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and hepatic lipid peroxidation (LP) levels and augmented the RST induced decrease in hepatic glutathione (GSH), thymus and spleen weight. Thus, we conclude that LPPM/A003 has the ability to reverse the alterations produced by various stressful stimuli and therefore restores homeostasis. PMID:20217640

  9. Tau pathology induces loss of GABAergic interneurons leading to altered synaptic plasticity and behavioral impairments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tau is a microtubule stabilizing protein and is mainly expressed in neurons. Tau aggregation into oligomers and tangles is considered an important pathological event in tauopathies, such as frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Tauopathies are also associated with deficits in synaptic plasticity such as long-term potentiation (LTP), but the specific role of tau in the manifestation of these deficiencies is not well-understood. We examined long lasting forms of synaptic plasticity in JNPL3 (BL6) mice expressing mutant tau that is identified in some inherited FTDs. Results We found that aged (>12 months) JNPL3 (BL6) mice exhibit enhanced hippocampal late-phase (L-LTP), while young JNPL3 (BL6) mice (age 6 months) displayed normal L-LTP. This enhanced L-LTP in aged JNPL3 (BL6) mice was rescued with the GABAAR agonist, zolpidem, suggesting a loss of GABAergic function. Indeed, we found that mutant mice displayed a reduction in hippocampal GABAergic interneurons. Finally, we also found that expression of mutant tau led to severe sensorimotor-gating and hippocampus-dependent memory deficits in the aged JNPL3 (BL6) mice. Conclusions We show for the first time that hippocampal GABAergic function is impaired by pathological tau protein, leading to altered synaptic plasticity and severe memory deficits. Increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the synaptic failure in AD and FTD is critical to identifying targets for therapies to restore cognitive deficiencies associated with tauopathies. PMID:24252661

  10. Central Thalamic Deep-Brain Stimulation Alters Striatal-Thalamic Connectivity in Cognitive Neural Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ching; Pan, Han-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Huang; Lo, Yu-Chun; Shen, Elise Ting-Hsin; Liao, Lun-De; Liao, Pei-Han; Chien, Yi-Wei; Liao, Kuei-Da; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chu, Kai-Wen; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Central thalamic deep brain stimulation (CT-DBS) has been proposed as an experimental therapeutic approach to produce consistent sustained regulation of forebrain arousal for several neurological diseases. We investigated local field potentials (LFPs) induced by CT-DBS from the thalamic central lateral nuclei (CL) and the striatum as potential biomarkers for the enhancement of lever-pressing skill learning. LFPs were simultaneously recorded from multiple sites in the CL, ventral striatum (Vstr), and dorsal striatum (Dstr). LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed and compared between the CT-DBS and sham control groups. The theta and alpha LFP oscillations were significantly increased in the CL and striatum in the CT-DBS group. Furthermore, interhemispheric coherences between bilateral CL and striatum were increased in the theta band. Additionally, enhancement of c-Fos activity, dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2), and α4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4-nAChR) occurred after CT-DBS treatment in the striatum and hippocampus. CT-DBS strengthened thalamic-striatal functional connectivity, which demonstrates that the inter-regional connectivity enhancement might contribute to synaptic plasticity in the striatum. Altered dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors resulted in modulation of striatal synaptic plasticity's ability to regulate downstream signaling cascades for higher brain functions of lever-pressing skill learning. PMID:26793069