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Sample records for alternate storage facility

  1. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

    2009-04-29

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is

  2. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 6, Alternatives study

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for material and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This report is organized according to the sections and subsections outlined by Attachment 111-2 of DOE Document AL 4700.1, Project Management System. It is organized into seven parts. This document, Part VI - Alternatives Study, presents a study of the different storage/containment options considered for NMSF.

  3. Archive Storage Media Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranade, Sanjay

    1990-01-01

    Reviews requirements for a data archive system and describes storage media alternatives that are currently available. Topics discussed include data storage; data distribution; hierarchical storage architecture, including inline storage, online storage, nearline storage, and offline storage; magnetic disks; optical disks; conventional magnetic…

  4. Spent-fuel-storage alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

  5. MRS Action Plan Task B report: Analyses of alternative designs and operating approaches for a Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, W.D.; Jowdy, A.K.; Keehn, C.H.; Gale, R.M.; Smith, R.I.

    1988-12-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (NWPAA) instituted a number of changes in the DOE commercial nuclear waste management system. After passage of the Act, the DOE initiated a number of systems studies to reevaluate the role of Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) within the federal waste management system. This report summarizes the results of a study to determine the schedules and costs of developing those MRS facilities needed under a number of scenarios, with differing functions allocated to the MRS and/or different spent fuel acceptance schedules. Nine cases were defined for the system study, seven of which included an MRS Facility. The study cases or scenarios evaluated varied relative to the specific functions to be performed at the MRS. The scenarios ranged in magnitude from storage and shipment of bare, intact spent fuel to consolidating the spent fuel into repository emplacement containers prior to storage and shipment. Each scenario required specific modifications to be made to the design developed for the MRS proposal to Congress (the Conceptual Design Report). 41 figs., 326 tabs.

  6. Thermal energy storage test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ternes, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal behavior of prototype thermal energy storage units (TES) in both heating and cooling modes is determined. Improved and advanced storage systems are developed and performance standards are proposed. The design and construction of a thermal cycling facility for determining the thermal behavior of full scale TES units is described. The facility has the capability for testing with both liquid and air heat transport, at variable heat input/extraction rates, over a temperature range of 0 to 280 F.

  7. High-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy eenvironmental management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    Folga, S.M.; Conzelmann, G.; Gillette, J.L.; Kier, P.H.; Poch, L.A.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides data and information needed to support the risk and impact assessments of high-level waste (HLW) management alternatives in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Available data on the physical form, chemical and isotopic composition, storage locations, and other waste characteristics of interest are presented. High-level waste management follows six implementation phases: current storage, retrieval, pretreatment, treatment, interim canister storage, and geologic repository disposal; pretreatment, treatment, and repository disposal are outside the scope of the WM PEIS. Brief descriptions of current and planned HLW management facilities are provided, including information on the type of waste managed in the facility, costs, product form, resource requirements, emissions, and current and future status. Data sources and technical and regulatory assumptions are identified. The range of HLW management alternatives (including decentralized, regionalized, and centralized approaches) is described. The required waste management facilities include expanded interim storage facilities under the various alternatives. Resource requirements for construction (e.g., land and materials) and operation (e.g., energy and process chemicals), work force, costs, effluents, design capacities, and emissions are presented for each alternative.

  8. Hazardous waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect

    Lazaro, M.A.; Antonopoulos, A.A.; Esposito, M.P.; Policastro, A.J.

    1996-12-01

    This report focuses on the generation of hazardous waste (HW) and the treatment of HW being generated by routine US Department of Energy (DOE) facility operations. The wastes to be considered are managed by the DOE Waste Management (WM) Division (WM HW). The waste streams are to be sent to WM operations throughout the DOE complex under four management alternatives: No Action, Decentralization, Regionalized 1, and Regionalized 2. On-site and off-site capabilities for treatment are examined for each alternative. This report (1) summarizes the HW inventories and generated amounts resulting from WM activities, focusing on the largest DOE HW generators; (2) presents estimates of the annual amounts shipped off-site, as well as the amounts treated by various treatment technology groups; (3) describes the existing and planned treatment and storage capabilities of the largest HW-generating DOE installations, as well as the use of commercial treatment facilities by DOE sites; (4) presents applicable technologies (destruction of organics, deactivation/neutralization of waste, removal/recovery of organics, and aqueous liquid treatment); and (5) describes the four alternatives for consideration for future HW management, and for each alternative provides the HW loads and the approach used to estimate the source term for routine treatment operations. In addition, potential air emissions, liquid effluents, and solid residuals associated with each alternative are presented. This report is supplemented with an addendum that includes detailed information related to HW inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for the treatment alternatives. The addendum also presents source terms, emission rates, and throughput totals by alternative and treatment installation.

  9. 27 CFR 22.92 - Storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Storage facilities. 22.92 Section 22.92 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF TAX-FREE ALCOHOL Premises and Equipment § 22.92 Storage facilities. (a) Storerooms...

  10. Alternatives for Financing Higher Education Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Larry L.; Felix, Frank J.

    1980-01-01

    How state governments should finance public college and university facilities is discussed. A framework for analyzing the capital financing alternatives available to state governments is described. Several alternatives in Arizona--including state appropriations, leasing, and revenue bonding--are considered as an illustration. (Author/MLW)

  11. Calcined solids storage facility closure study

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C.

    1998-02-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a {open_quotes}Settlement Agreement{close_quotes} (or {open_quotes}Batt Agreement{close_quotes}) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed.

  12. Large capacity cryopropellant orbital storage facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    A comprehensive study was performed to develop the major features of a large capacity orbital propellant storage facility for the space-based cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle. Projected propellant usage and delivery schedules can be accommodated by two orbital tank sets of 100,000 lb storage capacity, with advanced missions expected to require increased capacity. Information is given on tank pressurization schemes, propellant transfer configurations, pump specifications, the refrigeration system, and flight tests.

  13. Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnema, Bruce Edward

    2001-09-01

    This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

  14. 30 CFR 56.4430 - Storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Storage facilities. 56.4430 Section 56.4430 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases...

  15. 27 CFR 22.92 - Storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF TAX-FREE ALCOHOL Premises and Equipment § 22.92... unauthorized access and will be equipped for locking. These storage facilities shall be of sufficient capacity to hold the maximum quantity of tax-free alcohol which will be on hand at one time. (b)...

  16. 27 CFR 22.92 - Storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF TAX-FREE ALCOHOL Premises and Equipment § 22.92... unauthorized access and will be equipped for locking. These storage facilities shall be of sufficient capacity to hold the maximum quantity of tax-free alcohol which will be on hand at one time. (b)...

  17. 30 CFR 56.4430 - Storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Storage facilities. 56.4430 Section 56.4430 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention...

  18. 30 CFR 56.4430 - Storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Storage facilities. 56.4430 Section 56.4430 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention...

  19. 30 CFR 56.4430 - Storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Storage facilities. 56.4430 Section 56.4430 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases...

  20. 27 CFR 20.165 - Storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Storage facilities. 20.165 Section 20.165 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Operations by Dealers...

  1. 27 CFR 20.165 - Storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Storage facilities. 20.165 Section 20.165 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Operations by Dealers and Users of Specially Denatured...

  2. Monitored retrievable storage facility site screening and evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1985-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 directs the Department of Energy to complete a detailed study of the need for and feasibility of, and to submit to the Congress a proposal for, the construction of one or more monitored retrievable storage facilities for high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.'' The Act directs that the proposal includes site specific designs. Further, the proposal is to include, for the first such facility, at least three alternative sites and at least five alternative combinations of such proposed site and facility designs...'' as well as a recommendation of the combination among the alternatives that the Secretary deems preferable.'' An MRS Site Screening Task Force has been formed to help identify and evaluated potential MRS facility sites within a preferred region and with the application of a siting process and criteria developed by the DOE. The activities of the task force presented in this report includes: site screening (Sections 3, 4, and 5), the MRS facilities which are to be sited are described; the criteria, process and outcome of the screening process is presented; and descriptions of the candidate MRS facility sites are given, and site evaluations (Sections 6 through 9) where the rational for the site evaluations are presented, along with each evaluation and findings of the Task Force.

  3. Automated Store Management For Drum Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, W.; Lang, R.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes advanced system technology developed for a new Drum Storage Facility to be operated by Taiwan Power Company (TPC). A logistics management concept is applied for the storage of solid rad-wastes in terms of automated handling, transportation and storing as well as in terms of data management. The individual equipments, such as automated Bridge Cranes, Automatic Guided Vehicles and auxiliary systems are introduced in this paper and the store management process is outlined. The authors report furthermore on challenges during the design and engineering phase and review the project implementation from the equipment supplier's end. (authors)

  4. Preconceptual design for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) transfer facility

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, W.D.; Jowdy, A.K. Co., Pasadena, CA ); Smith, R.I. )

    1990-09-01

    The contract between the DOE and the utilities specifies that the DOE will receive spent fuel from the nuclear utilities in 1998. This study investigates the feasibility of employing a simple Transfer Facility which can be constructed quickly, and operate while the full-scale MRS facilities are being constructed. The Transfer Facility is a hot cell designed only for the purpose of transferring spent fuel assemblies from the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) transport casks (shipped from the utility sites) into onsite concrete storage casks. No operational functions other than spent fuel assembly transfers and the associated cask handling, opening, and closing would be performed in this facility. Radioactive waste collected in the Transfer Facility during operations would be stored until the treatment facilities in the full-scale MRS facility became operational, approximately 2 years after the Transfer Facility started operation. An alternate wherein the Transfer Facility was the only waste handling building on the MRS site was also examined and evaluated. 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  5. 46 CFR 108.237 - Fuel storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel storage facilities. 108.237 Section 108.237... AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Helicopter Facilities § 108.237 Fuel storage facilities. (a) Helicopter fuel storage tanks must be installed as far as practicable from— (1) The landing area; and...

  6. 46 CFR 108.237 - Fuel storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fuel storage facilities. 108.237 Section 108.237... AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Helicopter Facilities § 108.237 Fuel storage facilities. (a) Helicopter fuel storage tanks must be installed as far as practicable from— (1) The landing area; and...

  7. 46 CFR 108.237 - Fuel storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fuel storage facilities. 108.237 Section 108.237... AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Helicopter Facilities § 108.237 Fuel storage facilities. (a) Helicopter fuel storage tanks must be installed as far as practicable from— (1) The landing area; and...

  8. Interim Storage of Plutonium in Existing Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Woodsmall, T.D.

    1999-05-10

    'In this era of nuclear weapons disarmament and nonproliferation treaties, among many problems being faced by the Department of Energy is the safe disposal of plutonium. There is a large stockpile of plutonium at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Center and it remains politically and environmentally strategic to relocate the inventory closer to a processing facility. Savannah River Site has been chosen as the final storage location, and the Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility (APSF) is currently under construction for this purpose. With the ability of APSF to receive Rocky Flats material an estimated ten years away, DOE has decided to use the existing reactor building in K-Area of SRS as temporary storage to accelerate the removal of plutonium from Rocky Flats. There are enormous cost savings to the government that serve as incentive to start this removal as soon as possible, and the KAMS project is scheduled to receive the first shipment of plutonium in January 2000. The reactor building in K-Area was chosen for its hardened structure and upgraded seismic qualification, both resulting from an effort to restart the reactor in 1991. The KAMS project has faced unique challenges from Authorization Basis and Safety Analysis perspectives. Although modifying a reactor building from a production facility to a storage shelter is not technically difficult, the nature of plutonium has caused design and safety analysis engineers to make certain that the design of systems, structures and components included will protect the public, SRS workers, and the environment. A basic overview of the KAMS project follows. Plutonium will be measured and loaded into DOT Type-B shipping packages at Rocky Flats. The packages are 35-gallon stainless steel drums with multiple internal containment boundaries. DOE transportation vehicles will be used to ship the drums to the KAMS facility at SRS. They will then be unloaded, stacked and stored in specific locations throughout the

  9. 26. AERIAL VIEW OF WASTE CALCINING FACILITY WITH SOLIDS STORAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. AERIAL VIEW OF WASTE CALCINING FACILITY WITH SOLIDS STORAGE FACILITY BEHIND. CAMERA FACING EAST. INEEL PHOTO NUMBER PHOTO 72-4571. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Monitored Retrievable Storage facility site screening and evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1985-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 directs the Department of Energy to complete a detailed study of the need for and feasibility of, and to submit to the Congress a proposal for, the construction of one or more monitored retrievable storage facilities for high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.'' The Act directs that the proposal includes site specific designs. Further, the proposal is to include, for the first such facility, at least three alternative sites and at least five alternative combinations of such proposed sites and facility designs {hor ellipsis}'' as well as a recommendation of the combination among the alternatives that the Secretary deems preferable.'' An MRS Site Screening Task Force has been formed to help identify and evaluate potential MRS facility sites within a preferred region and with the application of a siting process and criteria developed by the DOE. The activities of the Task Force presented in this report, all site evaluations (sections 13 through 16) where the rationale for the site evaluations are presented, along with each evaluation and findings of the Task Force. This is Volume 3 of a three volume document. References are also included in this volume.

  11. Monitored retrievable storage facility site screening and evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1985-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 directs the Department of Energy to complete a detailed study of the need for and feasibility of, and to submit to the Congress a proposal for, the construction of one or more monitored retrievable storage facilities for high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.'' The Act directs that the proposal includes site specific designs. Further, the proposal is to include, for the first such facility, at least three alternative sites and at least five alternative combinations of such proposed sites and facility designs{hor ellipsis}'' as well as a recommendation of the combination among the alternatives that the Secretary deems preferable.'' An MRS Site Screening Task Force has been formed to help identify and evaluate potential MRS facility sites within a preferred region and with the application of a siting process and criteria developed by the DOE. The activities of the Task Force presented in this report include: site evaluations (sections 10 through 12) where the rationale for the site evaluations are presented, along with each evaluation and findings of the Task Force. This in Volume 2 of a three volume document.

  12. Immobilized High Level Waste (HLW) Interim Storage Alternative Generation and analysis and Decision Report 2nd Generation Implementing Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    CALMUS, R.B.

    2000-09-14

    Two alternative approaches were previously identified to provide second-generation interim storage of Immobilized High-Level Waste (IHLW). One approach was retrofit modification of the Fuel and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) to accommodate IHLW. The results of the evaluation of the FMEF as the second-generation IHLW interim storage facility and subsequent decision process are provided in this document.

  13. 30 CFR 75.1600-3 - Communications facilities; refuge alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Communications facilities; refuge alternatives....1600-3 Communications facilities; refuge alternatives. (a) Refuge alternatives shall be provided with a... communication system, which can be used from inside the refuge alternative; and (2) An additional...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1600-3 - Communications facilities; refuge alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Communications facilities; refuge alternatives....1600-3 Communications facilities; refuge alternatives. (a) Refuge alternatives shall be provided with a... communication system, which can be used from inside the refuge alternative; and (2) An additional...

  15. FACILITY LAYOUT OF FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP603) SHOWING STORAGE BASINS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY LAYOUT OF FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP-603) SHOWING STORAGE BASINS, FUEL ELEMENT CUTTING FACILITY, AND DRY GRAPHITE STORAGE FACILITY. INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0603-00-030-056329. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. 30 CFR 57.6130 - Explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Explosive material storage facilities. 57.6130... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage-Surface Only § 57.6130 Explosive material storage facilities. (a) Detonators and explosives...

  17. 30 CFR 56.6130 - Explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Explosive material storage facilities. 56.6130... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage § 56.6130 Explosive material storage facilities. (a) Detonators and explosives shall be stored...

  18. 30 CFR 57.6130 - Explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Explosive material storage facilities. 57.6130... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage-Surface Only § 57.6130 Explosive material storage facilities. (a) Detonators and explosives...

  19. 30 CFR 57.6130 - Explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosive material storage facilities. 57.6130... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage-Surface Only § 57.6130 Explosive material storage facilities. (a) Detonators and explosives...

  20. 30 CFR 56.6130 - Explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosive material storage facilities. 56.6130... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage § 56.6130 Explosive material storage facilities. (a) Detonators and explosives shall be stored...

  1. 30 CFR 57.6130 - Explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Explosive material storage facilities. 57.6130... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage-Surface Only § 57.6130 Explosive material storage facilities. (a) Detonators and explosives...

  2. 30 CFR 56.6130 - Explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Explosive material storage facilities. 56.6130... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage § 56.6130 Explosive material storage facilities. (a) Detonators and explosives shall be stored...

  3. 30 CFR 56.6130 - Explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Explosive material storage facilities. 56.6130... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage § 56.6130 Explosive material storage facilities. (a) Detonators and explosives shall be stored...

  4. 30 CFR 57.6130 - Explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Explosive material storage facilities. 57.6130... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage-Surface Only § 57.6130 Explosive material storage facilities. (a) Detonators and explosives...

  5. 30 CFR 56.6130 - Explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Explosive material storage facilities. 56.6130... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage § 56.6130 Explosive material storage facilities. (a) Detonators and explosives shall be stored...

  6. 40 CFR 160.51 - Specimen and data storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Specimen and data storage facilities. 160.51 Section 160.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Facilities § 160.51 Specimen and data storage facilities....

  7. Structural Integrity Program for INTEC Calcined Solids Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Bryant

    2008-08-30

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual'. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities.

  8. 42 CFR 124.516 - Charitable facility compliance alternative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Charitable facility compliance alternative. 124.516... RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Reasonable Volume of Uncompensated Services to Persons Unable To Pay § 124.516 Charitable facility compliance alternative. (a) Effect...

  9. Heat Transfer Modeling of Dry Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    1999-01-13

    The present work was undertaken to provide heat transfer model that accurately predicts the thermal performance of dry spent nuclear fuel storage facilities. One of the storage configurations being considered for DOE Aluminum-clad Spent Nuclear Fuel (Al-SNF), such as the Material and Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel, is in a dry storage facility. To support design studies of storage options a computational and experimental program has been conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The main objective is to develop heat transfer models including natural convection effects internal to an interim dry storage canister and to geological codisposal Waste Package (WP). Calculated temperatures will be used to demonstrate engineering viability of a dry storage option in enclosed interim storage and geological repository WP and to assess the chemical and physical behaviors of the Al-SNF in the dry storage facilities. The current paper describes the modeling approaches and presents the computational results along with the experimental data.

  10. Transuranic waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, K.; Kotek, T.; Folga, S.; Koebnick, B.; Wang, Y.; Kaicher, C.

    1996-12-01

    Transuranic waste (TRUW) loads and potential contaminant releases at and en route to treatment, storage, and disposal sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex are important considerations in DOE`s Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Waste loads are determined in part by the level of treatment the waste has undergone and the complex-wide configuration of origination, treatment, storage, and disposal sites selected for TRUW management. Other elements that impact waste loads are treatment volumes, waste characteristics, and the unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. Treatment levels and site configurations have been combined into six TRUW management alternatives for study in the WM PEIS. This supplemental report to the WM PEIS gives the projected waste loads and contaminant release profiles for DOE treatment sites under each of the six TRUW management alternatives. It gives TRUW characteristics and inventories for current DOE generation and storage sites, describes the treatment technologies for three proposed levels of TRUW treatment, and presents the representative unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. The data presented are primary inputs to developing the costs, health risks, and socioeconomic and environmental impacts of treating, packaging, and shipping TRUW for disposal.

  11. TWRS HLW interim storage facility search and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Calmus, R.B., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-16

    The purpose of this study was to identify and provide an evaluation of interim storage facilities and potential facility locations for the vitrified high-level waste (HLW) from the Phase I demonstration plant and Phase II production plant. In addition, interim storage facilities for solidified separated radionuclides (Cesium and Technetium) generated during pretreatment of Phase I Low-Level Waste Vitrification Plant feed was evaluated.

  12. 42 CFR 124.516 - Charitable facility compliance alternative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Charitable facility compliance alternative. 124.516 Section 124.516 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH... Services to Persons Unable To Pay § 124.516 Charitable facility compliance alternative. (a) Effect...

  13. 42 CFR 124.516 - Charitable facility compliance alternative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Charitable facility compliance alternative. 124.516 Section 124.516 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH... Services to Persons Unable To Pay § 124.516 Charitable facility compliance alternative. (a) Effect...

  14. 42 CFR 124.516 - Charitable facility compliance alternative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Charitable facility compliance alternative. 124.516 Section 124.516 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH... Services to Persons Unable To Pay § 124.516 Charitable facility compliance alternative. (a) Effect...

  15. 42 CFR 124.516 - Charitable facility compliance alternative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Charitable facility compliance alternative. 124.516 Section 124.516 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH... Services to Persons Unable To Pay § 124.516 Charitable facility compliance alternative. (a) Effect...

  16. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, H L

    2007-09-07

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 612 (A612) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2006). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., drum crushing, size reduction, and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A612 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A612 fenceline is approximately 220 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A612 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage

  17. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, 616 Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility. Revision 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, R.C.

    1994-04-01

    This permit application for the 616 Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility consists for 15 chapters. Topics of discussion include the following: facility description and general provisions; waste characteristics; process information; personnel training; reporting and record keeping; and certification.

  18. Conceptual design report, Sodium Storage Facility, Fast Flux Test Facility, Project F-031

    SciTech Connect

    Shank, D.R.

    1995-02-14

    The Sodium Storage Facility Conceptual Design Report provides conceptual design for construction of a new facility for storage of the 260,000 gallons of sodium presently in the FFTF plant. The facility will accept the molten sodium transferred from the FFTF sodium systems, and store the sodium in a solid state under an inert cover gas until such time as a Sodium Reaction Facility is available for final disposal of the sodium.

  19. Structural Integrity Program for INTEC Calcined Solids Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, Jeffrey Whealdon; Nenni, Joseph A; Timothy S. Yoder

    2003-05-01

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual.” Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities.

  20. 40 CFR 141.714 - Requirements for uncovered finished water storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... water storage facilities. 141.714 Section 141.714 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced... water storage facilities. (a) Systems using uncovered finished water storage facilities must comply...

  1. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities May 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Laycak, D. T.

    2014-04-16

    This document contains the Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Building 693 (B693) Yard Area of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) at LLNL. The TSRs constitute requirements for safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analyses for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2011). The analysis presented therein concluded that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts of waste from other DOE facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities.

  2. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Laycak, D T

    2010-03-05

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2009). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting

  3. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Laycak, D T

    2008-06-16

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the 'Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities' (DSA) (LLNL 2008). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas

  4. Safety analysis report for the Waste Storage Facility. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bengston, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    This safety analysis report outlines the safety concerns associated with the Waste Storage Facility located in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The three main objectives of the report are: define and document a safety basis for the Waste Storage Facility activities; demonstrate how the activities will be carried out to adequately protect the workers, public, and environment; and provide a basis for review and acceptance of the identified risk that the managers, operators, and owners will assume.

  5. Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Laycak, D

    2008-06-16

    This documented safety analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements', and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

  6. Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities March 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Laycak, D T

    2010-03-05

    This Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements,' and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

  7. SOUTH ELEVATION OF IRRADIATED FUEL STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED IN FUEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH ELEVATION OF IRRADIATED FUEL STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED IN FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP-603). PHOTO TAKEN LOOKING NORTH. INL PHOTO NUMBER HD-54-15-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 8/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. NORTH ELEVATION OF IRRADIATED FUEL STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED IN FUEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH ELEVATION OF IRRADIATED FUEL STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED IN FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP-603). PHOTO TAKEN LOOKING SOUTH. INL PHOTO NUMBER HD-54-16-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 8/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. Staging and storage facility feasibility study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C.E.

    1995-02-01

    This study was performed to investigate the feasibility of adapting the design of the HWVP Canister Storage Building (CSB) to meet the needs of the WHC Spent Nuclear Fuel Project for Staging and Storage Facility (SSF), and to develop Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost and schedule estimates.

  10. 86. VIEW OF LIQUID NITROGEN STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    86. VIEW OF LIQUID NITROGEN STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST OF THE SLC-3W FUEL APRON. NOTE HEAT EXCHANGER IN BACKGROUND. CAMERA TOWER LOCATED DIRECTLY IN FRONT OF LIQUID NITROGEN STORAGE TANK. NITROGEN AND HELIUM GAS STORAGE TANKS AT SOUTH END OF FUEL APRON IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  11. 27 CFR 20.165 - Storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... equipped for locking to control access to the denatured spirits. An accurate means of measuring its... unattended. A storage cabinet or locker kept inside a room which is locked when unattended is considered...

  12. 27 CFR 20.165 - Storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... equipped for locking to control access to the denatured spirits. An accurate means of measuring its... unattended. A storage cabinet or locker kept inside a room which is locked when unattended is considered...

  13. 27 CFR 22.92 - Storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... control access to the spirits. All stationary storage tanks shall be equipped with an accurate means of... cabinet or locker kept inside a room which is locked when unattended is considered to be...

  14. Environmental assessment for the construction and operation of waste storage facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    1994-06-01

    DOE is proposing to construct and operate 3 waste storage facilities (one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for RCRA waste, one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for toxic waste (TSCA), and one 200,000 ft{sup 2} mixed (hazardous/radioactive) waste storage facility) at Paducah. This environmental assessment compares impacts of this proposed action with those of continuing present practices aof of using alternative locations. It is found that the construction, operation, and ultimate closure of the proposed waste storage facilities would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

  15. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Hazards Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    COVEY, L.I.

    2000-11-28

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) located on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for WESF. DOE Orders require an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification.

  16. Automation in a material processing/storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.; Gordon, J.

    1997-05-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently developing a new facility, the Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility (APSF), to process and store legacy materials from the United States nuclear stockpile. A variety of materials, with a variety of properties, packaging and handling/storage requirements, will be processed and stored at the facility. Since these materials are hazardous and radioactive, automation will be used to minimize worker exposure. Other benefits derived from automation of the facility include increased throughput capacity and enhanced security. The diversity of materials and packaging geometries to be handled poses challenges to the automation of facility processes. In addition, the nature of the materials to be processed underscores the need for safety, reliability and serviceability. The application of automation in this facility must, therefore, be accomplished in a rational and disciplined manner to satisfy the strict operational requirements of the facility. Among the functions to be automated are the transport of containers between process and storage areas via an Automatic Guided Vehicle (AGV), and various processes in the Shipping Package Unpackaging (SPU) area, the Accountability Measurements (AM) area, the Special Isotope Storage (SIS) vault and the Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) vault. Other areas of the facility are also being automated, but are outside the scope of this paper.

  17. 21 CFR 58.51 - Specimen and data storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Specimen and data storage facilities. 58.51 Section 58.51 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Facilities § 58.51 Specimen and...

  18. 40 CFR 792.51 - Specimen and data storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Specimen and data storage facilities. 792.51 Section 792.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Facilities § 792.51 Specimen and...

  19. 30 CFR 75.1600-3 - Communications facilities; refuge alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Communications facilities; refuge alternatives. 75.1600-3 Section 75.1600-3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Communications § 75.1600-3 Communications facilities;...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1600-3 - Communications facilities; refuge alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Communications facilities; refuge alternatives. 75.1600-3 Section 75.1600-3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Communications § 75.1600-3 Communications facilities;...

  1. Hanford Site existing irradiated fuel storage facilities description

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, W.L.

    1995-01-11

    This document describes facilities at the Hanford Site which are currently storing spent nuclear fuels. The descriptions provide a basis for the no-action alternatives of ongoing and planned National Environmental Protection Act reviews.

  2. STORAGE/SEDIMENTATION FACILITIES FOR CONTROL OF STORM AND COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW: DESIGN MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual describes applications of storage facilities in wet-weather flow management and presents step-by-step procedures for analysis and design of storage-treatment facilities. Retention, detention, and sedimentation storage information is classified and described. Internati...

  3. 303-K Storage Facility closure plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-15

    Recyclable scrap uranium with zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy, and zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gallon containers) in the 303-K Storage Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy and zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as mixed waste with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 303-K Storage Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040. This closure plan presents a description of the 303-K Storage Facility, the history of materials and waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 303-K Storage Facility. The 303-K Storage Facility is located within the 300-FF-3 (source) and 300-FF-5 (groundwater) operable units, as designated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992). Contamination in the operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5 is scheduled to be addressed through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 remedial action process. Therefore, all soil remedial action at the 304 Facility will be conducted as part of the CERCLA remedial action of operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5.

  4. Information related to low-level mixed waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, B.D.; Dolak, D.A.; Wang, Y.Y.; Meshkov, N.K.

    1996-12-01

    This report was prepared to support the analysis of risks and costs associated with the proposed treatment of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) under management of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The various waste management alternatives for treatment of LLMW have been defined in the DOE`s Office of Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. This technical memorandum estimates the waste material throughput expected at each proposed LLMW treatment facility and analyzes potential radiological and chemical releases at each DOE site resulting from treatment of these wastes. Models have been developed to generate site-dependent radiological profiles and waste-stream-dependent chemical profiles for these wastes. Current site-dependent inventories and estimates for future generation of LLMW have been obtained from DOE`s 1994 Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR-2). Using treatment procedures developed by the Mixed Waste Treatment Project, the MWIR-2 database was analyzed to provide waste throughput and emission estimates for each of the different waste types assessed in this report. Uncertainties in the estimates at each site are discussed for waste material throughputs and radiological and chemical releases.

  5. INEEL special case waste storage and disposal alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, L.A.; Bishop, C.W.; Bhatt, R.N.

    1997-07-01

    Special case waste is historically defined as radioactive waste that does not have a path forward or fit into current Department of Energy management plans for final treatment or disposal. The objectives of this report, relative to special case waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, are to (a) identify its current storage locations, conditions, and configuration; (b) review and verify the currently reported inventory; (c) segregate the inventory into manageable categories; (d) identify the portion that has a path forward or is managed under other major programs/projects; (e) identify options for reconfiguring and separating the disposable portions; (f) determine if the special case waste needs to be consolidated into a single storage location; and (g) identify a preferred facility for storage. This report also provides an inventory of stored sealed sources that are potentially greater than Class C or special case waste based on Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Site-Specific Waste Acceptance Criteria.

  6. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, PUREX storage tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, C. R.

    1997-09-08

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, `operating` treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the PUREX Storage Tunnels (this document, DOE/RL-90-24).

  7. Microbial Condition of Water Samples from Foreign Fuel Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, C.J.; Fliermans, C.B.; Santo Domingo, J.

    1997-10-30

    In order to assess the microbial condition of foreign nuclear fuel storage facilities, fourteen different water samples were received from facilities outside the United States that have sent spent nuclear fuel to SRS for wet storage. Each water sample was analyzed for microbial content and activity as determined by total bacteria, viable aerobic bacteria, viable anaerobic bacteria, viable sulfate- reducing bacteria, viable acid-producing bacteria and enzyme diversity. The results for each water sample were then compared to other foreign samples and to data from the receiving basin for off- site fuel (RBOF) at SRS.

  8. Fuel Storage Facility Final Safety Analysis Report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Linderoth, C.E.

    1984-03-01

    The Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) is an integral part of the Fast Flux Test Facility. Its purpose is to provide long-term storage (20-year design life) for spent fuel core elements used to provide the fast flux environment in FFTF, and for test fuel pins, components and subassemblies that have been irradiated in the fast flux environment. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and its supporting documentation provides a complete description and safety evaluation of the site, the plant design, operations, and potential accidents.

  9. Environmental Projects. Volume 9: Construction of hazardous materials storage facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Activities at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (GDSCC) are carried out in support of seven parabolic dish antennas. These activities may give rise to environmental hazards. This report is one in a series of reports describing environmental projects at GDSCC. The construction of two hazardous materials and wastes storage facilities and an acid-wash facility is described. An overview of the Goldstone complex is also presented along with a description of the environmental aspects of the GDSCC site.

  10. Lessons Learned from Radioactive Waste Storage and Disposal Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Esh, David W.; Bradford, Anna H.

    2008-01-15

    The safety of radioactive waste disposal facilities and the decommissioning of complex sites may be predicated on the performance of engineered and natural barriers. For assessing the safety of a waste disposal facility or a decommissioned site, a performance assessment or similar analysis is often completed. The analysis is typically based on a site conceptual model that is developed from site characterization information, observations, and, in many cases, expert judgment. Because waste disposal facilities are sited, constructed, monitored, and maintained, a fair amount of data has been generated at a variety of sites in a variety of natural systems. This paper provides select examples of lessons learned from the observations developed from the monitoring of various radioactive waste facilities (storage and disposal), and discusses the implications for modeling of future waste disposal facilities that are yet to be constructed or for the development of dose assessments for the release of decommissioning sites. Monitoring has been and continues to be performed at a variety of different facilities for the disposal of radioactive waste. These include facilities for the disposal of commercial low-level waste (LLW), reprocessing wastes, and uranium mill tailings. Many of the lessons learned and problems encountered provide a unique opportunity to improve future designs of waste disposal facilities, to improve dose modeling for decommissioning sites, and to be proactive in identifying future problems. Typically, an initial conceptual model was developed and the siting and design of the disposal facility was based on the conceptual model. After facility construction and operation, monitoring data was collected and evaluated. In many cases the monitoring data did not comport with the original site conceptual model, leading to additional investigation and changes to the site conceptual model and modifications to the design of the facility. The following cases are discussed

  11. Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

    1994-10-01

    This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

  12. 36 CFR 1234.10 - What are the facility requirements for all records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Administration, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001, phone number (301) 837-1867. (b) A facility with... 50 pounds per cubic foot supported by the shelf; (3) Compact mobile shelving systems (if used) must....), phone number (301) 837-1867). (j) The area occupied by the records storage facility must be...

  13. 36 CFR 1234.10 - What are the facility requirements for all records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Administration, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001, phone number (301) 837-1867. (b) A facility with... 50 pounds per cubic foot supported by the shelf; (3) Compact mobile shelving systems (if used) must....), phone number (301) 837-1867). (j) The area occupied by the records storage facility must be...

  14. Financing strategic healthcare facilities: the growing attraction of alternative capital.

    PubMed

    Zismer, Daniel K; Fox, James; Torgerson, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Community health system leaders often dismiss use of alternative capital to finance strategic facilities as being too expensive and less strategically useful, preferring to follow historical precedent and use tax-exempt bonding to finance such facilities. Proposed changes in accounting rules should cause third-party-financed facility lease arrangements to be treated similarly to tax-exempt debt financings with respect to the income statement and balance sheet, increasing their appeal to community health systems. An in-depth comparison of the total costs associated with each financing approach can help inform the choice of financing approaches by illuminating their respective advantages and disadvantages. PMID:23678696

  15. Treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives for the gunite and associated tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    DePew, R.E.; Rickett, K.; Redus, K.S.; DuMont, S.P.; Lewis, B.E.; DePaoli, S.M.; Van Hoesen, S.D. Jr.

    1996-05-01

    The gunite and associated tanks (GAAT) are inactive, liquid low-level waste tanks located in and around the North and South Tank Farms at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These underground tanks are the subject of an ongoing treatability study that will determine the best remediation alternatives for the tanks. As part of the treatability study, an assessment of viable treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) alternatives has been conducted. The report summarizes relevant waste characterization data and statistics obtained to date. The report describes screening and evaluation criteria for evaluating TSD options. Individual options that pass the screening criteria are described in some detail. Order-or-magnitude cost estimates are presented for each of the TSD system alternatives. All alternatives are compared to the baseline approach of pumping all of the GAAT sludge and supernate to the Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) facility for eventual TSD along with the existing MOST waste. Four TSD systems are identified as alternatives to the baseline approach. The baseline is the most expensive of the five identified alternatives. The least expensive alternative is in-situ grouting of all GAAT sludge followed by in-situ disposal. The other alternatives are: (1) ex-situ grouting with on-site storage and disposal at Nevada Test Site (NTS); (2) ex-situ grouting with on-site storage and disposal at NTS and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP); and (3) ex-situ vitrification with on-site storage and disposal at NTS and WIPP.

  16. Operations and Maintenance Concept Plan for the Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) Interim Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    JANIN, L.F.

    2000-08-30

    This O&M Concept looks at the future operations and maintenance of the IHLW/CSB interim storage facility. It defines the overall strategy, objectives, and functional requirements for the portion of the building to be utilized by Project W-464. The concept supports the tasks of safety basis planning, risk mitigation, alternative analysis, decision making, etc. and will be updated as required to support the evolving design.

  17. The GreenLab Research Facility: A Micro-Grid Integrating Production, Consumption and Storage of Clean Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell Bomani, Bilal Mark; Elbuluk, Malik; Fain, Henry; Kankam, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    There is a large gap between the production and demand for energy from alternative fuel and alternative renewable energy sources. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has initiated a laboratory-pilot study that concentrates on using biofuels as viable alternative fuel resources for the field of aviation, as well as, utilizing wind and solar technologies as alternative renewable energy resources, and in addition, the use of pumped water for storage of energy that can be retrieved through hydroelectric generation. This paper describes the GreenLab Research Facility and its power and energy sources with .recommendations for worldwide expansion and adoption of the concept of such a facility

  18. 30 CFR 57.4430 - Surface storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface storage facilities. 57.4430 Section 57.4430 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible...

  19. 30 CFR 57.4430 - Surface storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Surface storage facilities. 57.4430 Section 57.4430 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire...

  20. 30 CFR 57.4430 - Surface storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface storage facilities. 57.4430 Section 57.4430 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible...

  1. 30 CFR 57.4430 - Surface storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface storage facilities. 57.4430 Section 57.4430 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire...

  2. Transuranic storage and assay facility interim safety basis

    SciTech Connect

    Porten, D.R., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-12

    The Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF) Interim Safety Basis document provides the authorization basis for the interim operation and restriction on interim operations for the TRUSAF. The TRUSAF ISB demonstrates that the TRUSAF can be operated safely, protecting the workers, the public, and the environment. The previous safety analysis document TRUSAF Hazards Identification and Evaluation (WHC 1987) is superseded by this document.

  3. Gas detection for alternate-fuel vehicle facilities.

    PubMed

    Ferree, Steve

    2003-05-01

    Alternative fuel vehicles' safety is driven by local, state, and federal regulations in which fleet owners in key metropolitan [table: see text] areas convert much of their fleet to cleaner-burning fuels. Various alternative fuels are available to meet this requirement, each with its own advantages and requirements. This conversion to alternative fuels leads to special requirements for safety monitoring in the maintenance facilities and refueling stations. A comprehensive gas and flame monitoring system needs to meet the needs of both the user and the local fire marshal. PMID:12754860

  4. Physical characterization of radioactive sludges in selected Melton Valley and evaporator facility storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Ceo, R.N.; Sears, M.B.; Shor, J.T.

    1990-10-01

    Physical measurements were performed on typical radioactive sludge samples from selected Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) and evaporator facility storage tanks at ORNL. These measurements included viscosity, particle size, density, sedimentation rate, and solids content. The techniques developed during this project are simple and use inexpensive apparatus to assay the range of physical properties spanned by the sample set. The report provides data in support of the design of the proposed Waste Handling and Packaging Plant, and research and development activities in developing waste management alternatives. 5 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Management of a complex cavern storage facility for natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The Epe cavern storage facility operated by Ruhrgas AG has developed into one of the largest gas cavern storage facilities in the world. Currently, there are 32 caverns and 18 more are planned in the future. Working gas volume will increase from approximately 1.5 {times} 10{sup 9} to 2 {times} 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}. The stratified salt deposit containing the caverns has a surface area of approximately 7 km{sup 2} and is 250 m thick at the edge and 400 m thick in the center. Caverns are leached by a company that uses the recovered brine in the chlorine industry. Cavern dimensions are determined before leaching. The behavior of each cavern, as well as the thermodynamic properties of natural gas must be considered in cavern management. The full-length paper presents the components of a complex management system covering the design, construction, and operation of the Epe gas-storage caverns.

  6. Commercial experience with facility deactivation to safe storage

    SciTech Connect

    Sype, T.T.; Fischer, S.R.; Lee, J.H. Jr.; Sanchez, L.C.; Ottinger, C.A.; Pirtle, G.J.

    1995-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has shutdown many production reactors; the Department has begun a major effort to also shutdown a wide variety of other nuclear facilities. Because so many facilities are being closed, it is necessary to place many of them into a safe- storage status, i.e., deactivation, before conducting decommissioning- for perhaps as long as 20 years. The challenge is to achieve this safe-storage condition in a cost-effective manner while remaining in compliance with applicable regulations. The DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Transition and Management, commissioned a lessons-learned study of commercial experience with safe storage and decommissioning. Although the majority of the commercial experience has been with reactors, many of the lessons learned presented in this document can provide insight into transitioning challenges that Will be faced by the DOE weapons complex.

  7. 42 CFR 124.513 - Public facility compliance alternative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... as defined at 42 CFR 124.2(m). (2) It provides health services without charge or at a substantially...-public corporation as defined at 42 CFR 124.2(m), to cover operating deficits attributable to the... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Public facility compliance alternative....

  8. 42 CFR 124.513 - Public facility compliance alternative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... as defined at 42 CFR 124.2(m). (2) It provides health services without charge or at a substantially...-public corporation as defined at 42 CFR 124.2(m), to cover operating deficits attributable to the... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Public facility compliance alternative....

  9. 42 CFR 124.513 - Public facility compliance alternative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... as defined at 42 CFR 124.2(m). (2) It provides health services without charge or at a substantially...-public corporation as defined at 42 CFR 124.2(m), to cover operating deficits attributable to the... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Public facility compliance alternative....

  10. 42 CFR 124.513 - Public facility compliance alternative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... as defined at 42 CFR 124.2(m). (2) It provides health services without charge or at a substantially...-public corporation as defined at 42 CFR 124.2(m), to cover operating deficits attributable to the... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public facility compliance alternative....

  11. Modular Energy Storage System for Alternative Energy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Janice; Ervin, Frank

    2012-05-15

    An electrical vehicle environment was established to promote research and technology development in the area of high power energy management. The project incorporates a topology that permits parallel development of an alternative energy delivery system and an energy storage system. The objective of the project is to develop technologies, specifically power electronics, energy storage electronics and controls that provide efficient and effective energy management between electrically powered devices in alternative energy vehicles plugin electric vehicles, hybrid vehicles, range extended vehicles, and hydrogen-based fuel cell vehicles. In order to meet the project objectives, the Vehicle Energy Management System (VEMS) was defined and subsystem requirements were obtained. Afterwards, power electronics, energy storage electronics and controls were designed. Finally, these subsystems were built, tested individually, and integrated into an electric vehicle system to evaluate and optimize the subsystems performance. Phase 1 of the program established the fundamental test bed to support development of an electrical environment ideal for fuel cell application and the mitigation of many shortcomings of current fuel cell technology. Phase 2, continued development from Phase 1, focusing on implementing subsystem requirements, design and construction of the energy management subsystem, and the integration of this subsystem into the surrogate electric vehicle. Phase 2 also required the development of an Alternative Energy System (AES) capable of emulating electrical characteristics of fuel cells, battery, gen set, etc. Under the scope of the project, a boost converter that couples the alternate energy delivery system to the energy storage system was developed, constructed and tested. Modeling tools were utilized during the design process to optimize both component and system design. This model driven design process enabled an iterative process to track and evaluate the impact

  12. Performance assessment of the proposed Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chockie, A.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Winter, C.

    1986-02-01

    Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) has completed a performance evaluation of the proposed monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. This study was undertaken as part of the Department of Energy MRS Program at PNL. The objective of the performance evaluation was to determine whether the conceptual MRS facility would be able to process spent fuel at the specified design rate of 3600 metric tons of uranium (MTU) per year. The performance of the proposed facility was assessed using the computer model COMPACT (Computer Optimization of Processing and Cask Transport) to simulate facility operations. The COMPACT model consisted of three application models each of which addressed a different aspect of the facility's operation: MRS/waste transportation interface; cask handling capability; and disassembly/consolidation (hot cell) operations. Our conclusions, based on the assessment of design criteria for the proposed facility, are as follows: Facilities and equipment throughout the facility have capability beyond the 3600 MTU/y design requirement. This added capability provides a reserve to compensate for unexpected perturbations in shipping or handling of the spent fuel. Calculations indicate that the facility's maximum maintainable processing capability is approximately 4800 MTU/y.

  13. ALTERNATE APPROACH TO HAZARD CATEGORIZATION FOR SALTSTONE FACILITY AT SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, B.

    2009-04-28

    The Saltstone Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS) was originally segmented into two segments: the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Based on the inventory of radionuclides available for release the SPF and SDF were categorized as Nonreactor Hazard Category (HC)-3. The hazard categorization recognized the SDF will contain contributions of radionuclides which would exceed the HC-2 Threshold Quantity (TQ) in the form of grout. However it was determined not to impact the facility hazard categorization based on the grout being in a solid, monolithic form which was not easily dispersible. But, the impact of a quantity of unset grout expected to be present at the vault following operation of the process was not addressed. A Potential Inadequacy in Safety Analysis (PISA) was later issued based on the hazard categorization determination for the facility not addressing unset grout. This initiated a re-evaluation of the accident scenarios within the hazards analysis. During this re-evaluation, the segmentation of the facility was challenged based on the potential interaction between facility segments; specifically, the leachate return line and the grout transfer line, which were considered separate segments, are located in close proximity at one point. such that for certain events (NPH as well as External Vehicle Impact) both could be damaged simultaneously and spill contents on the ground that could commingle. This would violate the guideline for segmentation. Therefore, the Hazard Categorization (HC) was reevaluated based on the facility being a single segment and including the additional unset grout as part of total inventory. This total inventory far exceeded the limit for HC-2 TQ and made the facility's initial categorization as HC-2. However, alternative analysis methodology based on credible release fractions allowed in DOE-STD-1027-92 (Ref.1) showed that the Saltstone facility could still be categorized as Hazard Category

  14. Low-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    Goyette, M.L.; Dolak, D.A.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides technical support information for use in analyzing environmental impacts associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management alternatives in the Waste-Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Waste loads treated and disposed of for each of the LLW alternatives considered in the DOE WM PEIS are presented. Waste loads are presented for DOE Waste Management (WM) wastes, which are generated from routine operations. Radioactivity concentrations and waste quantities for treatment and disposal under the different LLW alternatives are described for WM waste. 76 refs., 14 figs., 42 tabs.

  15. Mixed waste storage facility CDR review, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; Solid waste landfill CDR review, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    This report consists of two papers reviewing the waste storage facility and the landfill projects proposed for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant complex. The first paper is a review of DOE`s conceptual design report for a mixed waste storage facility. This evaluation is to review the necessity of constructing a separate mixed waste storage facility. The structure is to be capable of receiving, weighing, sampling and the interim storage of wastes for a five year period beginning in 1996. The estimated cost is assessed at approximately $18 million. The review is to help comprehend and decide whether a new storage building is a feasible approach to the PGDP mixed waste storage problem or should some alternate approach be considered. The second paper reviews DOE`s conceptual design report for a solid waste landfill. This solid waste landfill evaluation is to compare costs and the necessity to provide a new landfill that would meet State of Kentucky regulations. The assessment considered funding for a ten year storage facility, but includes a review of other facility needs such as a radiation detection building, compactor/baler machinery, material handling equipment, along with other personnel and equipment storage buildings at a cost of approximately $4.1 million. The review is to help discern whether a landfill only or the addition of compaction equipment is prudent.

  16. Minimum criticality dose evaluation for the Irradiated Fuel Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.S.

    1999-09-01

    The Irradiated Fuel Storage Facility (IFSF) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory within the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The mission of the facility is to provide safe dry storage for various types of irradiated fuels. Included are fuel elements such as irradiated ATR, EBR, MTR, Fort St. Vrain, TRIGA, and ROVER Parka fuels. Fuels requiring dry storage are received at the IFSF in fuel-shipping casks. At the facility receiving dock, the casks are removed from the transport vehicle, positioned in a cask transport car, and moved into the fuel-handling cave. Several functions are performed in the fuel-handling cave, including transferring fuel from shipping casks to storage canisters, preparing fuel elements for storage and processing. The minimum postulated criticality dose calculations were performed for the cask-receiving and fuel-handling areas to place criticality alarm system (CAS) detectors. The number of fissions for the minimum accident of concern is based on a dose of 20-rad air at 2 m in 1 min. The eigenvalue calculations were first performed to determine the size of the critical source. Then, two sets of fixed-source calculations were followed to calculate contributions from neutron and capture gamma rays and from prompt gamma rays. Two sets of MCNP calculations involved point and spherical critical sources. Validity of the Monte Carlo results was tested against ANISN deterministic calculations. The flux-to-dose conversion factors are based on ANSI/ANS-6.1.1-1977. All of the MCNP runs used continuous-energy ENDF/B-V cross sections. The BUGLE-80 cross-section library was used for the ANISN calculations.

  17. Prediction of the radiation situation during conditioned radioactive waste storage in hangar-type storage facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosnovskii, S. V.; Bulka, S. K.

    2014-02-01

    An original technology for the conditioning of solidified radioactive waste was developed by the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant (NPP) staff. The technology provides for waste placement inside NZK-150-1.5P containers with their further storage at light hangar-type storage facilities. A number of technical solutions were developed that allow for reducing the gamma-radiation dose rate from the package formed. A methodology for prediction of the radiation situation around hangars, depending on the radiation characteristics of irrecoverable shielding containers (ISCs) located in the peripheral row of a storage facility, was developed with the purpose of assuring safe storage. Based on empirical data, the field background gamma-radiation dose rate at an area as a function of the average dose rate at the hangar surface and the average dose rate close packages, placed in the peripheral row of the storage facility, was calculated. The application of the developed methodology made it possible to reduce by ten times the expenditures for the conditioning and holding of solidified radioactive waste (SRW) while unconditionally providing storage safety.

  18. Hydrogen Trailer Storage Facility (Building 878). Consequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Banda, Z.; Wood, C.L.

    1994-12-01

    The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This consequence analysis documents the impact that a hydrogen accident could have to employees, the general public, and nearby facilities. The computer model ARCHIE was utilized to determine discharge rates, toxic vapor dispersion analyses, flammable vapor cloud hazards, explosion hazards, and flame jets for the Hydrogen Trailer Storage Facility located at Building 878. To determine over pressurization effects, hand calculations derived from the Department of the Air Force Manual, ``Structures to Resist the Effects of Accidental Explosions,`` were utilized. The greatest distances at which a postulated facility event will produce the Lower Flammability and the Lower Detonation Levels are 1,721 feet and 882 feet, respectively. The greatest distance at which 10.0 psi overpressure (i.e., total building destruction) is reached is 153 feet.

  19. Greenfield Alternative Study LEU-Mo Fuel Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Washington Division of URS

    2008-07-01

    This report provides the initial “first look” of the design of the Greenfield Alternative of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC); a facility to be built at a Greenfield DOE National Laboratory site. The FFC is designed to fabricate LEU-Mo monolithic fuel for the 5 US High Performance Research Reactors (HPRRs). This report provides a pre-conceptual design of the site, facility, process and equipment systems of the FFC; along with a preliminary hazards evaluation, risk assessment as well as the ROM cost and schedule estimate.

  20. Radioactive Waste Storage Facility at the Armenian NPP - 12462

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoryan, G.; Amirjanyan, A.; Gondakyan, Y.; Stepanyan, A.

    2012-07-01

    We present a detailed contaminant transfer dynamics model for radionuclide in geosphere and biosphere medium. The model describes the transport of radionuclides using full equation for the processes of advection, diffusion, decay and sorption. The overall objective is to establish, from a post-closure radiological safety point of view, whether it is practical to convert an existing radioactive waste storage facility at Armenian NPP, to a waste disposal facility. The calculation includes: - Data sources for: the operational waste-source term; options for refurbishment and completion of the waste storage facility as a waste disposal facility; the site and its environs; - Development of an assessment context for the safety assessment, and identification of waste treatment options; - A description of the conceptual and mathematical models, and results calculated for the base case scenario relating to the release of contaminants via the groundwater pathway and also precipitation especially important for this site. The results of the calculations showed that the peak individual dose is < 7 E-8 Sv/y arising principally from I-129 after 700 years post closure. Other significant radionuclides, in terms of their contribution to the total dose are I-129, Tc-99 and in little C-14 (U- 234 and Po-210 are not relevant). The study does not explore all issues that might be expected to be presented in a safety case for a near surface disposal facility it mainly focuses on post- closure dose impacts. Most emphasis has been placed on the development of scenarios and conceptual models rather than the presentation and analyses of results and confidence building (only deterministic results are presented). The calculations suggest that, from a perspective the conversion of the waste-storage facility is feasible such that all the predicted doses are well below internationally recognized targets, as well as provisional Armenian regulatory objectives. This conclusion applies to the disposal

  1. Recommendations on the proposed Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    Following the Department of Energy's announcement in April 1985 that three Tennessee sites were to be considered for the Monitored Retrievable Storage facility, Governor Lamar Alexander initiated a review of the proposal to be coordinated by his Safe Growth Team. Roane County and the City of Oak Ridge, the local governments sharing jurisdiction over DOE's primary and secondary sites, were invited to participate in the state's review of the MRS proposal. Many issues related to the proposed MRS are being considered by the Governor's Safe Growth Team. The primary objective of the Clinch River MRS Task Force has been to determine whether the proposed Monitored Retrievable Storage facility should be accepted by the local governments, and if so, under what conditions. The Clinch River MRS Task Force is organized into an Executive Committee cochaired by the Roane County Executive and Mayor of Oak Ridge and three Study Groups focusing on environmental (including health and safety), socioeconomic, and transportation issues.

  2. 40 CFR 280.220 - Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or property on which an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system is located. 280.220 Section 280.220 Protection of Environment...

  3. Solid waste transuranic storage and assay facility indoor air sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Pingel, L.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-20

    The purpose of the study is to collect and analyze samples of the indoor air at the Transuranic Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF), Westinghouse Hanford. A modified US EPA TO-14 methodology, using gas chromatography/mass spectrography, may be used for the collection and analysis of the samples. The information obtained will be used to estimate the total release of volatile organic compounds from TRUSAF to determine the need for air emmission permits.

  4. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility interim operational safety requirements

    SciTech Connect

    COVEY, L.I.

    2000-11-28

    The Interim Operational Safety Requirements (IOSRs) for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management or administrative controls required to ensure safe operation during receipt and inspection of cesium and strontium capsules from private irradiators; decontamination of the capsules and equipment; surveillance of the stored capsules; and maintenance activities. Controls required for public safety, significant defense-in-depth, significant worker safety, and for maintaining radiological consequences below risk evaluation guidelines (EGs) are included.

  5. INEL storage facility for sealed sources from the commercial sector

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsford, C.O.; Satterthwaite, B.C.

    1994-08-01

    Commercially owned sealed radiation sources determine by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to be a public health or safety hazard are accepted by the US Department of Energy, under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as material for reuse of recycle. To implement this policy, the sealed sources must be stored until proper disposition is determined. This report documents the investigation and selection process undertaken to locate a suitable storage facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory.

  6. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, PUREX storage tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Price, S.M.

    1997-09-08

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, operating treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the PUREX Storage Tunnels (this document, DOE/RL-90-24). Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is contained in the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation, in relation to the Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents Section. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever appropriate, the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. Information provided in this PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation is current as of April 1997.

  7. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Interim Status Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    2000-12-01

    This document describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). WESF is located within the 225B Facility in the 200 East Area on the Hanford Facility. Although this document is prepared based on Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G requirements, closure of the storage unit will comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 regulations pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Action Plan (Ecology et al. 1996). Because the intention is to clean close WESF, postclosure activities are not applicable to this interim status closure plan. To clean close the storage unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left onsite at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or environmentally is impracticable, the interim status closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. WESF stores cesium and strontium encapsulated salts. The encapsulated salts are stored in the pool cells or process cells located within 225B Facility. The dangerous waste is contained within a double containment system to preclude spills to the environment. In the unlikely event that a waste spill does occur outside the capsules, operating methods and administrative controls require that waste spills be cleaned up promptly and completely, and a notation made in the operating record. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

  8. Evaluation of facility layout alternatives for a remanufacturing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, James S.; Lim, Huay-Huay

    2002-02-01

    Remanufacturing environments involve a higher degree of system complexity when compared to traditional manufacturing environments due to the variability associated with the routing, processing times and demand. Many of the consequences of this system complexity can be dealt with through operational-based approaches using specialized production planning and control techniques. However, it is also possible to improve overall system performance through the analysis of appropriate structural issues such as facility layout. This paper presents the results of a simulation-based analysis of four different layout alternatives: traditional job shop, cellular, fractal and holonic. An analysis of each layout alternative is conducted while varying product complexity, dispatching rules, number of workcenters, number of part types, shop load and demand variability with respect to flow time, WIP and machine utilization. The results of the analysis reveal under which conditions each layout alternative would be preferred to achieve the best overall system performance.

  9. The amino acid's backup bone - storage solutions for proteomics facilities.

    PubMed

    Meckel, Hagen; Stephan, Christian; Bunse, Christian; Krafzik, Michael; Reher, Christopher; Kohl, Michael; Meyer, Helmut Erich; Eisenacher, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics methods, especially high-throughput mass spectrometry analysis have been continually developed and improved over the years. The analysis of complex biological samples produces large volumes of raw data. Data storage and recovery management pose substantial challenges to biomedical or proteomic facilities regarding backup and archiving concepts as well as hardware requirements. In this article we describe differences between the terms backup and archive with regard to manual and automatic approaches. We also introduce different storage concepts and technologies from transportable media to professional solutions such as redundant array of independent disks (RAID) systems, network attached storages (NAS) and storage area network (SAN). Moreover, we present a software solution, which we developed for the purpose of long-term preservation of large mass spectrometry raw data files on an object storage device (OSD) archiving system. Finally, advantages, disadvantages, and experiences from routine operations of the presented concepts and technologies are evaluated and discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics in the Post-Identification Era. Guest Editors: Martin Eisenacher and Christian Stephan. PMID:23722089

  10. Alternatives generation and analysis report for immobilized low-level waste interim storage architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Burbank, D.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-01

    The Immobilized Low-Level Waste Interim Storage subproject will provide storage capacity for immobilized low-level waste product sold to the U.S. Department of Energy by the privatization contractor. This report describes alternative Immobilized Low-Level Waste storage system architectures, evaluation criteria, and evaluation results to support the Immobilized Low-Level Waste storage system architecture selection decision process.

  11. Preliminary safety evaluation (PSE) for Sodium Storage Facility at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, B.R.

    1994-09-30

    This evaluation was performed for the Sodium Storage Facility (SSF) which will be constructed at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) in the area adjacent to the South and West Dump Heat Exchanger (DHX) pits. The purpose of the facility is to allow unloading the sodium from the FFTF plant tanks and piping. The significant conclusion of this Preliminary Safety Evaluation (PSE) is that the only Safety Class 2 components are the four sodium storage tanks and their foundations. The building, because of its imminent risk to the tanks under an earthquake or high winds, will be Safety Class 3/2, which means the building has a Safety Class 3 function with the Safety Class 2 loads of seismic and wind factored into the design.

  12. Radon exposure at a radioactive waste storage facility.

    PubMed

    Manocchi, F H; Campos, M P; Dellamano, J C; Silva, G M

    2014-06-01

    The Waste Management Department of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) is responsible for the safety management of the waste generated at all internal research centers and that of other waste producers such as industry, medical facilities, and universities in Brazil. These waste materials, after treatment, are placed in an interim storage facility. Among them are (226)Ra needles used in radiotherapy, siliceous cake arising from conversion processes, and several other classes of waste from the nuclear fuel cycle, which contain Ra-226 producing (222)Rn gas daughter.In order to estimate the effective dose for workers due to radon inhalation, the radon concentration at the storage facility has been assessed within this study. Radon measurements have been carried out through the passive method with solid-state nuclear track detectors (CR-39) over a period of nine months, changing detectors every month in order to determine the long-term average levels of indoor radon concentrations. The radon concentration results, covering the period from June 2012 to March 2013, varied from 0.55 ± 0.05 to 5.19 ± 0.45 kBq m(-3). The effective dose due to (222)Rn inhalation was further assessed following ICRP Publication 65. PMID:24705248

  13. Alternative Cask Maintenance Facility concepts, an update and reassessment

    SciTech Connect

    Attaway, C.R.; Medley, L.B.; Williamson, A.; Pope, R.B.; Shappert, L.B.

    1992-02-01

    The results of three trade-off studies of alternative concepts for performing cask maintenance for Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System casks are presented. An earlier study resulted in a recommendation that a submerged pool concept for cask internal component removal be used in the design of a Cask Maintenance Facility. The first trade-off study resulted in confirming the previous recommendation that a submerged pool concept be used rather than an isolation cell; the basis for this continued recommendation is discussed. The second study provides an evaluation of the previously proposed facility for the capability of handling an increased quantity of OCRWM casks. This third study provides a preliminary concept for adding the capability to repaint the exterior cylindrical portions of casks.

  14. A New Storage Facility for Institutional Radioactive Wastes at IPEN.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Roberto; Dellamano, José Claudio; Potiens, Ademar José

    2015-08-01

    IPEN, the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute in Sao Paulo, Brazil, has been managing the radioactive wastes generated in its own activities of research and radioisotope production as well as those received from many radioisotope users in the country since its start up in 1958. Final disposal options are presently unavailable for the wastes that cannot be managed by release after decay. Treated and untreated wastes including disused sealed radioactive sources and solid and liquid wastes containing radionuclides of the uranium and thorium series or fission and activation products are among the categories that are under safe and secure storage. This paper discusses the aspects considered in the design and describes the startup of a new storage facility for these wastes. PMID:26102323

  15. Reorganizing Nigeria's Vaccine Supply Chain Reduces Need For Additional Storage Facilities, But More Storage Is Required.

    PubMed

    Shittu, Ekundayo; Harnly, Melissa; Whitaker, Shanta; Miller, Roger

    2016-02-01

    One of the major problems facing Nigeria's vaccine supply chain is the lack of adequate vaccine storage facilities. Despite the introduction of solar-powered refrigerators and the use of new tools to monitor supply levels, this problem persists. Using data on vaccine supply for 2011-14 from Nigeria's National Primary Health Care Development Agency, we created a simulation model to explore the effects of variance in supply and demand on storage capacity requirements. We focused on the segment of the supply chain that moves vaccines inside Nigeria. Our findings suggest that 55 percent more vaccine storage capacity is needed than is currently available. We found that reorganizing the supply chain as proposed by the National Primary Health Care Development Agency could reduce that need to 30 percent more storage. Storage requirements varied by region of the country and vaccine type. The Nigerian government may want to consider the differences in storage requirements by region and vaccine type in its proposed reorganization efforts. PMID:26858383

  16. Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling

    SciTech Connect

    Randy Bohachek; Charles Park; Bruce Wallace; Phil Winston; Steve Marschman

    2013-04-01

    This report evaluates existing capabilities at the INL to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for opening and handling full-sized dry storage casks. The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603, Irradiated Spent Fuel Storage Facility, provides the infrastructure to support handling and examining casks and their contents. Based on a reasonable set of assumptions, it is possible to receive, open, inspect, remove samples, close, and reseal large bolted-lid dry storage casks at the INL. The capability can also be used to open and inspect casks that were last examined at the TAN Hot Shop over ten years ago. The Castor V/21 and REA-2023 casks can provide additional confirmatory information regarding the extended performance of low-burnup (<45 GWD/MTU) used nuclear fuel. Once a dry storage cask is opened inside CPP-603, used fuel retrieved from the cask can be packaged in a shipping cask, and sent to a laboratory for testing. Testing at the INL’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) can occur starting with shipment of samples from CPP-603 over an on-site road, avoiding the need to use public highways. This reduces cost and reduces the risk to the public. The full suite of characterization methods needed to establish the condition of the fuel exists and MFC. Many other testing capabilities also exist at MFC, but when those capabilities are not adequate, samples can be prepared and shipped to other laboratories for testing. This report discusses how the casks would be handled, what work needs to be done to ready the facilities/capabilities, and what the work will cost.

  17. Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling

    SciTech Connect

    Bohachek, Randy; Wallace, Bruce; Winston, Phil; Marschman, Steve

    2013-04-30

    This report evaluates existing capabilities at the INL to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for opening and handling full-sized dry storage casks. The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603, Irradiated Spent Fuel Storage Facility, provides the infrastructure to support handling and examining casks and their contents. Based on a reasonable set of assumptions, it is possible to receive, open, inspect, remove samples, close, and reseal large bolted-lid dry storage casks at the INL. The capability can also be used to open and inspect casks that were last examined at the TAN Hot Shop over ten years ago. The Castor V/21 and REA-2023 casks can provide additional confirmatory information regarding the extended performance of low-burnup (<45 GWD/MTU) used nuclear fuel. Once a dry storage cask is opened inside CPP-603, used fuel retrieved from the cask can be packaged in a shipping cask, and sent to a laboratory for testing. Testing at the INL’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) can occur starting with shipment of samples from CPP-603 over an on-site road, avoiding the need to use public highways. This reduces cost and reduces the risk to the public. The full suite of characterization methods needed to establish the condition of the fuel exists and MFC. Many other testing capabilities also exist at MFC, but when those capabilities are not adequate, samples can be prepared and shipped to other laboratories for testing. This report discusses how the casks would be handled, what work needs to be done to ready the facilities/capabilities, and what the work will cost.

  18. Field Survey of Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome)

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas Miller, Terence Holland

    2008-10-31

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Health and Safety (DOE/HS-10), requested that National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management directorate (NSTec/EM) perform a field survey of the Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome), similar to past surveys conducted at their request. This field survey was conducted in conjunction with a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission on Runit Island in the Enewetak Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). The survey was strictly a visual survey, backed up by digital photos and a written description of the current condition.

  19. Integral Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    1985-09-01

    In April 1985, the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the Clinch River site as its preferred site for the construction and operation of the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility (USDOE, 1985). In support of the DOE MRS conceptual design activity, available data describing the site have been gathered and analyzed. A composite geotechnical description of the Clinch River site has been developed and is presented herein. This report presents Clinch River site description data in the following sections: general site description, surface hydrologic characteristics, groundwater characteristics, geologic characteristics, vibratory ground motion, surface faulting, stability of subsurface materials, slope stability, and references. 48 refs., 35 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Raccoon Mountain pumped-storage facility operational fish monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, J.P.; Pasch, R.W.; Smith, A.O.; Swor, C.T.; Tomljanovich, D.A.

    1983-09-01

    The impact of the Raccoon Mountain Pumped-Storage Facility operations on fisheries resources in the Nickajack Reservoir was investigated. Analyses of data collected from 1979 through 1981 on population status and distribution of adults, larvae and eggs are presented with comparisons of preoperational fisheries monitoring data collected by the TVA from 1977 through 1978. Although minor differences in composition of dominant species, and slight declines in standing stock of some species were noted, no major impacts were identified. Appendix B contains a short report entitled Nickajack Reservoir Ictiobine Study 1979 by Edwin Scott Jr. 7 references, 46 figures, 31 tables.

  1. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-01

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. The closure plan consists of a Part A Dangerous waste Permit Application and a RCRA Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Revision (Revision 1) submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan consists of 9 chapters and 5 appendices. The chapters cover: introduction; facility description; process information; waste characteristics; groundwater; closure strategy and performance standards; closure activities; postclosure; and references.

  2. Hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, J.K.; Calley, M.B.

    1994-04-01

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility (HWSF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. The area surrounding HWSF, the buildings and structures at HWSF, and the processes used at HWSF are described in this report. All nonradiological hazardous materials at the HWSF were identified (radiological hazardous materials are not stored at HWSF) and screened against threshold quantities according to DOE Order 5500.3A guidance. Two of the identified hazardous materials exceeded their specified threshold quantity. This report discusses the potential release scenarios and consequences associated with an accidental release for each of the two identified hazardous materials, lead and mercury. Emergency considerations, such as emergency planning zones, emergency classes, protective actions, and emergency action levels, are also discussed based on the analysis of potential consequences. Evaluation of the potential consequences indicated that the highest emergency class for operational emergencies at the HWSF would be a Site Area Emergency.

  3. Consolidated Storage Facilities: Camel's Nose or Shared Burden? - 13112

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, James M.

    2013-07-01

    The Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) made a strong argument why the reformulated nuclear waste program should make prompt efforts to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities (CSFs), and recommended the amendment of NWPA Section 145(b) 2 (linking 'monitored retrievable storage' to repository development) as an essential means to that end. However, other than recommending that the siting of CSFs should be 'consent-based' and that spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at stranded sites should be first-in-line for removal, the Commission made few recommendations regarding how CSF development should proceed. Working with three other key Senators, Jeff Bingaman attempted in the 112. Congress to craft legislation (S. 3469) to put the BRC recommendations into legislative language. The key reason why the Nuclear Waste Administration Act of 2012 did not proceed was the inability of the four senators to agree on whether and how to amend NWPA Section 145(b). A brief review of efforts to site consolidated storage since the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 suggests a strong and consistent motivation to shift the burden to someone (anyone) else. This paper argues that modification of NWPA Section 145(b) should be accompanied by guidelines for regional development and operation of CSFs. After review of the BRC recommendations regarding CSFs, and the 'camel's nose' prospects if implementation is not accompanied by further guidelines, the paper outlines a proposal for implementation of CSFs on a regional basis, including priorities for removal from reactor sites and subsequently from CSFs to repositories. Rather than allowing repository siting to be prejudiced by the location of a single remote CSF, the regional approach limits transport for off-site acceptance and storage, increases the efficiency of removal operations, provides a useful basis for compensation to states and communities that accept CSFs, and gives states with shared circumstances a shared stake in storage and

  4. 18 CFR 1304.405 - Fuel storage tanks and handling facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Fuel storage tanks and handling facilities. 1304.405 Section 1304.405 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY... ALTERATIONS Miscellaneous § 1304.405 Fuel storage tanks and handling facilities. Fuel storage tanks...

  5. 18 CFR 1304.405 - Fuel storage tanks and handling facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fuel storage tanks and handling facilities. 1304.405 Section 1304.405 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY... ALTERATIONS Miscellaneous § 1304.405 Fuel storage tanks and handling facilities. Fuel storage tanks...

  6. Simulation of mass storage systems operating in a large data processing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R.

    1972-01-01

    A mass storage simulation program was written to aid system designers in the design of a data processing facility. It acts as a tool for measuring the overall effect on the facility of on-line mass storage systems, and it provides the means of measuring and comparing the performance of competing mass storage systems. The performance of the simulation program is demonstrated.

  7. Recommendations on the proposed Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    Following the Department of Energy`s announcement in April 1985 that three Tennessee sites were to be considered for the Monitored Retrievable Storage facility, Governor Lamar Alexander initiated a review of the proposal to be coordinated by his Safe Growth Team. Roane County and the City of Oak Ridge, the local governments sharing jurisdiction over DOE`s primary and secondary sites, were invited to participate in the state`s review of the MRS proposal. Many issues related to the proposed MRS are being considered by the Governor`s Safe Growth Team. The primary objective of the Clinch River MRS Task Force has been to determine whether the proposed Monitored Retrievable Storage facility should be accepted by the local governments, and if so, under what conditions. The Clinch River MRS Task Force is organized into an Executive Committee cochaired by the Roane County Executive and Mayor of Oak Ridge and three Study Groups focusing on environmental (including health and safety), socioeconomic, and transportation issues.

  8. Conceptual Design of an Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, Stephen

    2006-10-24

    The Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility (AGSF) creates copious quantities of antiprotons, for bottling and transportation to remote cancer therapy centers. The first step in the generation and storage process is to accelerate an intense proton beam down the Main Linac for injection into the Main Ring, which is a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron that accelerates the protons to high energy. The beam is then extracted from the ring into a transfer line and into a Proton Target. Immediately downstream of the target is an Antiproton Collector that captures some of the antiprotons and focuses them into a beam that is transported sequentially into two antiproton rings. The Precooler ring rapidly manipulates antiproton bunches from short and broad (in momentum) to long and thin. It then performs some preliminary beam cooling, in the fraction of a second before the next proton bunch is extracted from the Main Ring. Pre-cooled antiprotons are passed on to the Accumulator ring before the next antiprotons arrive from the target. The Accumulator ring cools the antiprotons, compressing them into a dense state that is convenient for mass storage over many hours. Occasionally the Accumulator ring decelerates a large number of antiprotons, injecting them into a Deceleration Linac that passes them into a waiting Penning trap.

  9. 40 CFR 113.4 - Size classes and associated liability limits for fixed onshore oil storage facilities, 1,000...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... limits for fixed onshore oil storage facilities, 1,000 barrels or less capacity. 113.4 Section 113.4... SMALL ONSHORE STORAGE FACILITIES Oil Storage Facilities § 113.4 Size classes and associated liability limits for fixed onshore oil storage facilities, 1,000 barrels or less capacity. Unless the United...

  10. 40 CFR 113.4 - Size classes and associated liability limits for fixed onshore oil storage facilities, 1,000...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... limits for fixed onshore oil storage facilities, 1,000 barrels or less capacity. 113.4 Section 113.4... SMALL ONSHORE STORAGE FACILITIES Oil Storage Facilities § 113.4 Size classes and associated liability limits for fixed onshore oil storage facilities, 1,000 barrels or less capacity. Unless the United...

  11. 40 CFR 113.4 - Size classes and associated liability limits for fixed onshore oil storage facilities, 1,000...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... limits for fixed onshore oil storage facilities, 1,000 barrels or less capacity. 113.4 Section 113.4... SMALL ONSHORE STORAGE FACILITIES Oil Storage Facilities § 113.4 Size classes and associated liability limits for fixed onshore oil storage facilities, 1,000 barrels or less capacity. Unless the United...

  12. 40 CFR 113.4 - Size classes and associated liability limits for fixed onshore oil storage facilities, 1,000...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... limits for fixed onshore oil storage facilities, 1,000 barrels or less capacity. 113.4 Section 113.4... SMALL ONSHORE STORAGE FACILITIES Oil Storage Facilities § 113.4 Size classes and associated liability limits for fixed onshore oil storage facilities, 1,000 barrels or less capacity. Unless the United...

  13. 40 CFR 113.4 - Size classes and associated liability limits for fixed onshore oil storage facilities, 1,000...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... limits for fixed onshore oil storage facilities, 1,000 barrels or less capacity. 113.4 Section 113.4... SMALL ONSHORE STORAGE FACILITIES Oil Storage Facilities § 113.4 Size classes and associated liability limits for fixed onshore oil storage facilities, 1,000 barrels or less capacity. Unless the United...

  14. Site selection and assessment for a nuclear storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, D.A.; Zardecki, A.

    1996-09-01

    We investigate the structure and accuracy of the decision making process in finding an optimal location for stored nuclear materials for 25-50 years. Using a well-documented facility design, benefit hierarchy is set up for different sites to rank a given site for different options. Criteria involve safeguards standards, technical viability, environmental effects, economics, political impact, and public acceptance. Problem faced here is multi-criterion decision making. Two approaches are investigated: analytic hierarchy process (AHP) of Saaty, and fuzzy logic approach of Yager. Whereas AHP requires a pairwise comparison of criteria and pairwise comparison of alternatives, in Yager`s approach each alternative is considered independently, allowing one to extend the analysis without performing time-consuming computation.

  15. 30 CFR 57.4130 - Surface electric substations and liquid storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Surface electric substations and liquid storage... substations and liquid storage facilities. The requirements of this standard apply to surface areas only. (a... liquid storage tanks. (3) Any group of containers used for storage of more than 60 gallons of...

  16. 30 CFR 56.4130 - Electric substations and liquid storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric substations and liquid storage... and liquid storage facilities. (a) If a hazard to persons could be created, no combustible materials...) Unburied, flammable or combustible liquid storage tanks. (3) Any group of containers used for storage...

  17. 30 CFR 57.4130 - Surface electric substations and liquid storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface electric substations and liquid storage... substations and liquid storage facilities. The requirements of this standard apply to surface areas only. (a... liquid storage tanks. (3) Any group of containers used for storage of more than 60 gallons of...

  18. 30 CFR 56.4130 - Electric substations and liquid storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electric substations and liquid storage... and liquid storage facilities. (a) If a hazard to persons could be created, no combustible materials...) Unburied, flammable or combustible liquid storage tanks. (3) Any group of containers used for storage...

  19. 30 CFR 56.4130 - Electric substations and liquid storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electric substations and liquid storage... and liquid storage facilities. (a) If a hazard to persons could be created, no combustible materials...) Unburied, flammable or combustible liquid storage tanks. (3) Any group of containers used for storage...

  20. 30 CFR 57.4130 - Surface electric substations and liquid storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Surface electric substations and liquid storage... substations and liquid storage facilities. The requirements of this standard apply to surface areas only. (a... liquid storage tanks. (3) Any group of containers used for storage of more than 60 gallons of...

  1. 30 CFR 56.4130 - Electric substations and liquid storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electric substations and liquid storage... and liquid storage facilities. (a) If a hazard to persons could be created, no combustible materials...) Unburied, flammable or combustible liquid storage tanks. (3) Any group of containers used for storage...

  2. 30 CFR 57.4130 - Surface electric substations and liquid storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface electric substations and liquid storage... substations and liquid storage facilities. The requirements of this standard apply to surface areas only. (a... liquid storage tanks. (3) Any group of containers used for storage of more than 60 gallons of...

  3. 30 CFR 57.4130 - Surface electric substations and liquid storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface electric substations and liquid storage... substations and liquid storage facilities. The requirements of this standard apply to surface areas only. (a... liquid storage tanks. (3) Any group of containers used for storage of more than 60 gallons of...

  4. 30 CFR 56.4130 - Electric substations and liquid storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electric substations and liquid storage... and liquid storage facilities. (a) If a hazard to persons could be created, no combustible materials...) Unburied, flammable or combustible liquid storage tanks. (3) Any group of containers used for storage...

  5. Results of Safety Inspections of College Laboratory and Chemical Storage Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renfrew, Malcolm M., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Results of on-site inspections of 11 New York colleges, laboratories and storage facilities are summarized according to: (1) chemical storage and disposal; (2) safety equipment; (3) ventilation; (4) general housekeeping; and (5) safety education. (Author/SK)

  6. Chemisorption On Nanoparticles: An Alternative Mechanism For Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, A; Reboredo, F; Galli, G

    2004-04-09

    We present first principles, computational predictions of a porous, nano-structured semiconductor material that will reversibly store hydrogen for fuel cell applications. The material is competitive with current metal hydride storage materials, but contains only carbon and silicon, reducing both its cost and environmental impact. Additionally, unlike metal hydrides, the core skeleton structure of this material is unaltered when cycling from full hydrogen storage to full hydrogen depletion, removing engineering complications associated with expansion/contraction of the material.

  7. REVIEW OF FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) FUEL EXPERIMENTS FOR STORAGE IN INTERIM STORAGE CASKS (ISC)

    SciTech Connect

    CHASTAIN, S.A.

    2005-10-24

    Appendix H, Section H.3.3.10.11 of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), provides the limits to be observed for fueled components authorized for storage in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) spent fuel storage system. Currently, the authorization basis allows standard driver fuel assemblies (DFA), as described in the FSAR Chapter 17, Section 17.5.3.1, to be stored provided decay power per assembly is {le} 250 watts, post-irradiation time is four years minimum, average assembly burn-up is 150,000 MWD/MTHM maximum and the pre-irradiation enrichment is 29.3% maximum (per H.3.3.10.11). In addition, driver evaluation (DE), core characterizer assemblies (CCA), and run-to-cladding-breach (RTCB) assemblies are included based on their similarities to a standard DFA. Ident-69 pin containers with fuel pins from these DFAs can also be stored. Section H.3.3.10.11 states that fuel types outside the specification criteria above will be addressed on a case-by-case basis. There are many different types of fuel and blanket experiments that were irradiated in the FFTF which now require offload to the spent fuel storage system. Two reviews were completed for a portion of these special type fuel components to determine if placement into the Core Component Container (CCC)/Interim Storage Cask (ISC) would require any special considerations or changes to the authorization basis. Project mission priorities coupled with availability of resources and analysts prevented these evaluations from being completed as a single effort. Areas of review have included radiological accident release consequences, radiological shielding adequacy, criticality safety, thermal limits, confinement, and stress. The results of these reviews are available in WHC-SD-FF-RPT-005, Rev. 0 and 1, ''Review of FFTF Fuel Experiments for Storage at ISA'', (Reference I), which subsequently allowed a large portion of these components to be included in the authorization basis (Table H.3.3-21). The report also identified

  8. Groundwater Impact Assessment of Tailings Storage Facility, Western Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peksezer-Sayit, A.; Yazicigil, H.

    2015-12-01

    A tailings storage facility (TSF) is a fundamental part of the mining process and should be carefully designed and managed to prevent any adverse environmental effects. TSF is site-specific and its design criteria are determined by regulations. The new mine waste regulation for the deposition of hazardous waste in a tailings storage facility in Turkey enforces, from bottom to top, 0.5 m thick compacted clay layer with K less than or equal to 1X10-9 m/s , 2 mm thick HDPE geomembrane, and a protective natural material or geotextile. Although these criteria seem to be enough to prevent leakage from the base, in practice, manufacturing and application errors may cause leakage and subsequent contamination of groundwater. The purpose of this study is to assess potential impacts of leakage from the base of TSF on groundwater quality both in operational and post-closure period of a mine site in western Turkey. For this purpose, analytical and 2-D and 3-D numerical models are used together. The potential leakage rate of sulphate-bearing solution from the base of TSF is determined from analytical model. 2-D finite element models (SEEP/W and CTRAN/W) are used to simulate unsaturated flow conditions and advective-dispersive contaminant transport below the TSF under steady-state and transient conditions for the operating period. The long-term impacts of leakage from the base of TSF on groundwater resources are evaluated by 3-D numerical groundwater flow (MODFLOW) and contaminant transport models (MT3DMS). The model results suggest that sulphate-bearing solution leaking from the base of TSF can reach water table in about 290 years. Hence, during the operational period (i.e. 21 years), no interaction is expected between the solution and groundwater. Moreover, long-term simulation results show that about 500 years later, the sulphate concentration in groundwater will be below the maximum allowable limits (i.e. 250 mg/L).

  9. 30 CFR 56.6101 - Areas around explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Areas around explosive material storage... LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage § 56.6101 Areas around explosive material storage facilities. (a)...

  10. Engineering evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of Niagara Falls Storage Site, its residues and wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The final disposition scenarios selected by DOE for assessment in this document are consistent with those stated in the Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) (DOE, 1983d) and the modifications to the alternatives resulting from the public scoping process. The scenarios are: take no action beyond interim remedial measures other than maintenance and surveillance of the NFSS; retain and manage the NFSS as a long-term waste management facility for the wastes and residues on the site; decontaminate, certify, and release the NFSS for other use, with long-term management of the wastes and residues at other DOE sites; and partially decontaminate the NFSS by removal and transport off site of only the more radioactive residues, and upgrade containment of the remaining wastes and residues on site. The objective of this document is to present to DOE the conceptual engineering, occupational radiation exposure, construction schedule, maintenance and surveillance requirements, and cost information relevant to design and implementation of each of the four scenarios. The specific alternatives within each scenario used as the basis for discussion in this document were evaluated on the bases of engineering considerations, technical feasibility, and regulatory requirements. Selected alternatives determined to be acceptable for each of the four final disposition scenarios for the NFSS were approved by DOE to be assessed and costed in this document. These alternatives are also the subject of the EIS for the NFSS currently being prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 40 figures, 38 tables.

  11. Feasibility study: Assess the feasibility of siting a monitored retrievable storage facility. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.W.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of phase one of this study are: To understand the waste management system and a monitored retrievable storage facility; and to determine whether the applicant has real interest in pursuing the feasibility assessment process. Contents of this report are: Generating electric power; facts about exposure to radiation; handling storage, and transportation techniques; description of a proposed monitored retrievable storage facility; and benefits to be received by host jurisdiction.

  12. A comparison of alternative energy storage systems for automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The performance potentials of primary batteries, fuel cells, and flywheel-transmission systems in comparison with secondary batteries as alternates to conventional internal combustion engine automobile power systems are discussed. A number of areas of research that are recommended for attention as part of a well-rounded investigation of alternatives are outlined.

  13. Quantitative risk analysis of oil storage facilities in seismic areas.

    PubMed

    Fabbrocino, Giovanni; Iervolino, Iunio; Orlando, Francesca; Salzano, Ernesto

    2005-08-31

    Quantitative risk analysis (QRA) of industrial facilities has to take into account multiple hazards threatening critical equipment. Nevertheless, engineering procedures able to evaluate quantitatively the effect of seismic action are not well established. Indeed, relevant industrial accidents may be triggered by loss of containment following ground shaking or other relevant natural hazards, either directly or through cascade effects ('domino effects'). The issue of integrating structural seismic risk into quantitative probabilistic seismic risk analysis (QpsRA) is addressed in this paper by a representative study case regarding an oil storage plant with a number of atmospheric steel tanks containing flammable substances. Empirical seismic fragility curves and probit functions, properly defined both for building-like and non building-like industrial components, have been crossed with outcomes of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for a test site located in south Italy. Once the seismic failure probabilities have been quantified, consequence analysis has been performed for those events which may be triggered by the loss of containment following seismic action. Results are combined by means of a specific developed code in terms of local risk contour plots, i.e. the contour line for the probability of fatal injures at any point (x, y) in the analysed area. Finally, a comparison with QRA obtained by considering only process-related top events is reported for reference. PMID:15908107

  14. Immobilized high-level waste interim storage alternatives generation and analysis and decision report

    SciTech Connect

    CALMUS, R.B.

    1999-05-18

    This report presents a study of alternative system architectures to provide onsite interim storage for the immobilized high-level waste produced by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) privatization vendor. It examines the contract and program changes that have occurred and evaluates their impacts on the baseline immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) interim storage strategy. In addition, this report documents the recommended initial interim storage architecture and implementation path forward.

  15. Measurement of Atmospheric Sea Salt Concentration in the Dry Storage Facility of the Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Masumi Wataru; Hisashi Kato; Satoshi Kudo; Naoko Oshima; Koji Wada; Hirofumi Narutaki

    2006-07-01

    Spent nuclear fuel coming from a Japanese nuclear power plant is stored in the interim storage facility before reprocessing. There are two types of the storage methods which are wet and dry type. In Japan, it is anticipated that the dry storage facility will increase compared with the wet type facility. The dry interim storage facility using the metal cask has been operated in Japan. In another dry storage technology, there is a concrete overpack. Especially in USA, a lot of concrete overpacks are used for the dry interim storage. In Japan, for the concrete cask, the codes of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers and the governmental technical guidelines are prepared for the realization of the interim storage as well as the code for the metal cask. But the interim storage using the concrete overpack has not been in progress because the evaluation on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the canister is not sufficient. Japanese interim storage facilities would be constructed near the seashore. The metal casks and concrete overpacks are stored in the storage building in Japan. On the other hand, in USA they are stored outside. It is necessary to remove the decay heat of the spent nuclear fuel in the cask from the storage building. Generally, the heat is removed by natural cooling in the dry storage facility. Air including the sea salt particles goes into the dry storage facility. Concerning the concrete overpack, air goes into the cask body and cools the canister. Air goes along the canister surface and is in contact with the surface directly. In this case, the sea salt in the air attaches to the surface and then there is the concern about the occurrence of the SCC. For the concrete overpack, the canister including the spent fuel is sealed by the welding. The loss of sealability caused by the SCC has to be avoided. To evaluate the SCC for the canister, it is necessary to make clear the amount of the sea salt particles coming into the storage building and the

  16. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: UNH blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. Disposition is a process of use or disposal of material that results in the material being converted to a form that is substantially and inherently more proliferation-resistant than is the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. This report provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate blending option to produce oxide for disposal. This the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) alternative will have two missions (1) convert HEU materials into HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend the HEU uranyl nitrate with depleted and natural assay uranyl nitrate to produce an oxide that can be stored until an acceptable disposal approach is available. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  17. 42 CFR 124.517 - Unrestricted availability compliance alternative for Title VI-assisted facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for Title VI-assisted facilities. 124.517 Section 124.517 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... availability compliance alternative for Title VI-assisted facilities. (a) Effect of certification. The Secretary may certify a Title VI-assisted facility which meets the requirements of paragraph (b) of...

  18. 42 CFR 124.517 - Unrestricted availability compliance alternative for Title VI-assisted facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for Title VI-assisted facilities. 124.517 Section 124.517 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... availability compliance alternative for Title VI-assisted facilities. (a) Effect of certification. The Secretary may certify a Title VI-assisted facility which meets the requirements of paragraph (b) of...

  19. 42 CFR 124.517 - Unrestricted availability compliance alternative for Title VI-assisted facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for Title VI-assisted facilities. 124.517 Section 124.517 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... availability compliance alternative for Title VI-assisted facilities. (a) Effect of certification. The Secretary may certify a Title VI-assisted facility which meets the requirements of paragraph (b) of...

  20. 42 CFR 124.517 - Unrestricted availability compliance alternative for Title VI-assisted facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for Title VI-assisted facilities. 124.517 Section 124.517 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... availability compliance alternative for Title VI-assisted facilities. (a) Effect of certification. The Secretary may certify a Title VI-assisted facility which meets the requirements of paragraph (b) of...

  1. 42 CFR 124.517 - Unrestricted availability compliance alternative for Title VI-assisted facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for Title VI-assisted facilities. 124.517 Section 124.517 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... availability compliance alternative for Title VI-assisted facilities. (a) Effect of certification. The Secretary may certify a Title VI-assisted facility which meets the requirements of paragraph (b) of...

  2. Preliminary assessment of radiological doses in alternative waste management systems without an MRS facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, K.J.; Pelto, P.J.; Daling, P.M.; Lavender, J.C.; Fecht, B.A.

    1986-06-01

    This report presents generic analyses of radiological dose impacts of nine hypothetical changes in the operation of a waste management system without a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The waste management activities examined in this study include those for handling commercial spent fuel at nuclear power reactors and at the surface facilities of a deep geologic repository, and the transportation of spent fuel by rail and truck between the reactors and the repository. In the reference study system, the radiological doses to the public and to the occupational workers are low, about 170 person-rem/1000 metric ton of uranium (MTU) handled with 70% of the fuel transported by rail and 30% by truck. The radiological doses to the public are almost entirely from transportation, whereas the doses to the occupational workers are highest at the reactors and the repository. Operating alternatives examined included using larger transportation casks, marshaling rail cars into multicar dedicated trains, consolidating spent fuel at the reactors, and wet or dry transfer options of spent fuel from dry storage casks. The largest contribution to radiological doses per unit of spent fuel for both the public and occupational workers would result from use of truck transportation casks, which are smaller than rail casks. Thus, reducing the number of shipments by increasing cask sizes and capacities (which also would reduce the number of casks to be handled at the terminals) would reduce the radiological doses in all cases. Consolidating spent fuel at the reactors would reduce the radiological doses to the public but would increase the doses to the occupational workers at the reactors.

  3. 30 CFR 56.6131 - Location of explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... from powerlines so that the powerlines, if damaged, would not contact the magazines. (b) Operators should also be aware of regulations affecting storage facilities in 27 CFR part 55, in particular, 27...

  4. 30 CFR 56.6131 - Location of explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from powerlines so that the powerlines, if damaged, would not contact the magazines. (b) Operators should also be aware of regulations affecting storage facilities in 27 CFR part 55, in particular, 27...

  5. 30 CFR 56.6131 - Location of explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... from powerlines so that the powerlines, if damaged, would not contact the magazines. (b) Operators should also be aware of regulations affecting storage facilities in 27 CFR part 55, in particular, 27...

  6. 30 CFR 56.6131 - Location of explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... from powerlines so that the powerlines, if damaged, would not contact the magazines. (b) Operators should also be aware of regulations affecting storage facilities in 27 CFR part 55, in particular, 27...

  7. Design Verification Report Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA Fuel Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    CARRELL, R.D.

    2002-01-31

    This report outlines the methods, procedures, and outputs developed during the Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) Training, Research and Isotope Production, General Atomics (TRIGA) fuel storage system design and fabrication.

  8. 30 CFR 56.6101 - Areas around explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surrounding storage facilities for explosive material shall be clear of rubbish, brush, dry grass, and trees for 25 feet in all directions, except that live trees 10 feet or taller need not be removed. (b)...

  9. 30 CFR 56.6101 - Areas around explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... surrounding storage facilities for explosive material shall be clear of rubbish, brush, dry grass, and trees for 25 feet in all directions, except that live trees 10 feet or taller need not be removed. (b)...

  10. 40 CFR 141.714 - Requirements for uncovered finished water storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... water storage facilities. 141.714 Section 141.714 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for Cryptosporidium Treatment Technique Requirements § 141.714 Requirements for uncovered...

  11. 40 CFR 141.714 - Requirements for uncovered finished water storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... water storage facilities. 141.714 Section 141.714 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for Cryptosporidium Treatment Technique Requirements § 141.714 Requirements for uncovered...

  12. 36 CFR 1234.12 - What are the fire safety requirements that apply to records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true What are the fire safety requirements that apply to records storage facilities? 1234.12 Section 1234.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT FACILITY STANDARDS FOR RECORDS STORAGE FACILITIES Facility Standards...

  13. Regenerative Fuel Cell System As Alternative Energy Storage For Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, J.; Bockstahler, K.; Funke, H.; Jehle, W.; Markgraf, S.; Henn, N.; Schautz, M.

    2011-10-01

    Next generation telecommunication satellites will demand more power. Power levels of 20 to 30kW are foreseen for the next 10 years. Battery technology that can sustain 30kW for eclipse lengths of up to 72 minutes (equals amount of stored energy of 36kWh) will represent a major impact on the total mass of the satellite, even with Li-ion battery technologies, which are estimated to reach an energy density of 250Wh/kg (begin of life) on cell level i.e. 150Wh/kg on subsystem level in 10 years. For the high power level another technology is needed to reach the next goal of 300 - 350Wh/kg on subsystem level. One candidate is the Regenerative Fuel Cell (RFC) technology which proves to be superior to batteries with increasing power demand and increasing discharge time. Such an RFC system based on hydrogen and oxygen technology consists of storage for the reactants (H2, O2 and H2O), a fuel cell (FC) and an electrolyser (ELY). In charge mode, the electrolyser splits water in hydrogen and oxygen using electrical power from solar cells. The gases are stored in appropriate tanks. In discharge mode, during time intervals of power demand, O2 and H2 are converted in the fuel cell to generate electricity under formation of water as by-product. The water is stored in tanks and during charge mode rerouted to the electrolyser thus creating a closed-loop process. Today Astrium is developing an RFCS as energy storage and supply unit for some future ESA missions. A complete RFCS breadboard has been established and the operational behaviour of the system is being tested. First test results, dedicated experience gained from system testing and a comparison with the analytical prediction will be discussed and presented.

  14. Design report for the interim waste containment facility at the Niagara Falls Storage Site. [Surplus Facilities Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    Low-level radioactive residues from pitchblende processing and thorium- and radium-contaminated sand, soil, and building rubble are presently stored at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) in Lewiston, New York. These residues and wastes derive from past NFSS operations and from similar operations at other sites in the United States conducted during the 1940s by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and subsequently by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). The US Department of Energy (DOE), successor to MED/AEC, is conducting remedial action at the NFSS under two programs: on-site work under the Surplus Facilities Managemnt Program and off-site cleanup of vicinity properties under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. On-site remedial action consists of consolidating the residues and wastes within a designated waste containment area and constructing a waste containment facility to prevent contaminant migration. The service life of the system is 25 to 50 years. Near-term remedial action construction activities will not jeopardize or preclude implementation of any other remedial action alternative at a later date. Should DOE decide to extend the service life of the system, the waste containment area would be upgraded to provide a minimum service life of 200 years. This report describes the design for the containment system. Pertinent information on site geology and hydrology and on regional seismicity and meteorology is also provided. Engineering calculations and validated computer modeling studies based on site-specific and conservative parameters confirm the adequacy of the design for its intended purposes of waste containment and environmental protection.

  15. Fire protection considerations in the design of plutonium handling and storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    2000-08-01

    Unwanted fire in a facility that handles plutonium must be addressed early in the facility design. Such fires have the potential for transporting radioactive contamination throughout the building and widespread downwind dispersal. Features that mitigate such events can be severely challenged during the fire. High temperatures can cause storage containers to burst; a very efficient dispersal mechanism for radioactive contamination. The fire will also establish ventilation patterns that cause the migration of smoke and radioactive contamination throughout the facility. The smoke and soot generated by the fire will enter the exhaust system and travel to the filtration system where it will deposit on the filters. The quantity of smoke generated during a typical multi-room fire is expected to blind most High Efficiency Particulate Airfilter (HEPA) media. The blinding can have two possible outcomes. (1) The air movement though the facility is reduced, compromising the negative pressure containment and allowing contamination to leave the building though doors and other openings; or (2) the filters collapse allowing the contamination to bypass the filtration media and exit the building through the filter plenum. HEPA filter blinding during severe fires can be prevented or mitigated. Increasing the face surface area of HEPA filters will increase the smoke filtration capacity of the system, thus preventing blinding. As an alternative sandfilters can be provided to mitigate the effects of the HEPA filter bypass. Both concepts have distinct advantages. This paper will explore these two design concepts and two others; it will describe the design requirements necessary for each concept to prevent unacceptable contamination spread. The intent is to allow the filter media selection to be based on a comprehensive understanding of the four different design concepts.

  16. A free-piston Stirling engine/linear alternator controls and load interaction test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, Jeffrey S.; Kankam, M. David; Santiago, Walter; Madi, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    A test facility at LeRC was assembled for evaluating free-piston Stirling engine/linear alternator control options, and interaction with various electrical loads. This facility is based on a 'SPIKE' engine/alternator. The engine/alternator, a multi-purpose load system, a digital computer based load and facility control, and a data acquisition system with both steady-periodic and transient capability are described. Preliminary steady-periodic results are included for several operating modes of a digital AC parasitic load control. Preliminary results on the transient response to switching a resistive AC user load are discussed.

  17. A free-piston Stirling engine/linear alternator controls and load interaction test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, J.S.; Kankam, M.D.; Santiago, W.; Madi, F.J.

    1992-08-01

    A test facility at LeRC was assembled for evaluating free-piston Stirling engine/linear alternator control options, and interaction with various electrical loads. This facility is based on a 'SPIKE' engine/alternator. The engine/alternator, a multi-purpose load system, a digital computer based load and facility control, and a data acquisition system with both steady-periodic and transient capability are described. Preliminary steady-periodic results are included for several operating modes of a digital AC parasitic load control. Preliminary results on the transient response to switching a resistive AC user load are discussed.

  18. Environmental Assessment for the ammunition storage facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), a DOE national defense facility. The SRS maintains an armed and uniformed protective force that performs patrol, guard, and monitoring activities on site. A safe, secure storage facility is needed for the storage of weapons, small arms ammunition, and explosives that may be used in carrying out such activities. This Environmental Assessment assesses the potential environmental and related safety impacts of constructing a small storage facility to replace the existing facility being used to store these munitions. Constructing a new storage facility is necessary to enable SRS to meet DOE requirements and any other applicable standards including DOE Order-6430.1A, General Design Criteria; - 5632.7, Protective Forces; - DOE Manuals-DOE/TIC 11268, Manual for Prediction of Blast and Fragment Loading for Structures; - DOE/EV 06194-5, and Explosives Safety Manual. Additionally, this action is needed because the present facility, the Building 217-F vault, does not comply with the above criteria for storage of munitions and explosives, and has been cited with seven occupational safety violations by DOE safety engineers. The most serious noted violations are due to the existing lack of appropriate storage space: munitions stacked directly against masonry walls, weapons stored in the same magazine as the munitions, inoperable ventilation system, inadequate air circulation, and the existence of electrical fans and switchgear within the magazine.

  19. 18 CFR 1304.405 - Fuel storage tanks and handling facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fuel storage tanks and handling facilities. 1304.405 Section 1304.405 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY... flammable and combustible liquids storage tanks at marine service stations. (d) Fuel handling on...

  20. 18 CFR 1304.405 - Fuel storage tanks and handling facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fuel storage tanks and handling facilities. 1304.405 Section 1304.405 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY... flammable and combustible liquids storage tanks at marine service stations. (d) Fuel handling on...

  1. 30 CFR 57.4160 - Underground electric substations and liquid storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Underground electric substations and liquid... Underground electric substations and liquid storage facilities. The requirements of this standard apply to...) Electric substations. (2) Unburied, combustible liquid storage tanks. (3) Any group of containers used...

  2. 30 CFR 57.4160 - Underground electric substations and liquid storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Underground electric substations and liquid... Underground electric substations and liquid storage facilities. The requirements of this standard apply to...) Electric substations. (2) Unburied, combustible liquid storage tanks. (3) Any group of containers used...

  3. 30 CFR 57.4160 - Underground electric substations and liquid storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Underground electric substations and liquid... Underground electric substations and liquid storage facilities. The requirements of this standard apply to...) Electric substations. (2) Unburied, combustible liquid storage tanks. (3) Any group of containers used...

  4. 30 CFR 57.4160 - Underground electric substations and liquid storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Underground electric substations and liquid... Underground electric substations and liquid storage facilities. The requirements of this standard apply to...) Electric substations. (2) Unburied, combustible liquid storage tanks. (3) Any group of containers used...

  5. 30 CFR 57.4160 - Underground electric substations and liquid storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underground electric substations and liquid... Underground electric substations and liquid storage facilities. The requirements of this standard apply to...) Electric substations. (2) Unburied, combustible liquid storage tanks. (3) Any group of containers used...

  6. 18 CFR 157.213 - Underground storage field facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pressure, reservoir and buffer boundaries, and certificated capacity remain unchanged—and provided... pressure, reservoir and buffer boundaries, and certificated capacity remain unchanged—and provided... storage reservoir's total inventory, reservoir pressure, reservoir or buffer boundaries, or...

  7. 18 CFR 157.213 - Underground storage field facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pressure, reservoir and buffer boundaries, and certificated capacity remain unchanged—and provided... pressure, reservoir and buffer boundaries, and certificated capacity remain unchanged—and provided... storage reservoir's total inventory, reservoir pressure, reservoir or buffer boundaries, or...

  8. 18 CFR 157.213 - Underground storage field facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pressure, reservoir and buffer boundaries, and certificated capacity remain unchanged—and provided... pressure, reservoir and buffer boundaries, and certificated capacity remain unchanged—and provided... storage reservoir's total inventory, reservoir pressure, reservoir or buffer boundaries, or...

  9. 18 CFR 157.213 - Underground storage field facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... pressure, reservoir and buffer boundaries, and certificated capacity remain unchanged—and provided... pressure, reservoir and buffer boundaries, and certificated capacity remain unchanged—and provided... storage reservoir's total inventory, reservoir pressure, reservoir or buffer boundaries, or...

  10. 18 CFR 157.213 - Underground storage field facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pressure, reservoir and buffer boundaries, and certificated capacity remain unchanged—and provided... pressure, reservoir and buffer boundaries, and certificated capacity remain unchanged—and provided... storage reservoir's total inventory, reservoir pressure, reservoir or buffer boundaries, or...

  11. Design Alternatives for a Free Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, K; Bosch, R A; Eisert, D; Fisher, M V; Green, M A; Keil, R G; Kleman, K J; Kulpin, J G; Rogers, G C; Wehlitz, R; Chiang, T; Miller, T J; Lawler, J E; Yavuz, D; Legg, R A; York, R C

    2012-07-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison is continuing design efforts for a vacuum ultraviolet/X-ray Free Electron Laser facility. The design incorporates seeding the FEL to provide fully coherent photon output at energies up to {approx}1 keV. The focus of the present work is to minimize the cost of the facility while preserving its performance. To achieve this we are exploring variations in the electron beam driver for the FEL, in undulator design, and in the seeding mechanism. Design optimizations and trade-offs between the various technologies and how they affect the FEL scientific program will be presented.

  12. Final environmental assessment and Finding-of-No-Significant-Impact - drum storage facility for interim storage of materials generated by environmental restoration operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0995, for the construction and operation of a drum storage facility at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado. The proposal for construction of the facility was generated in response to current and anticipated future needs for interim storage of waste materials generated by environmental restoration operations. A public meeting was held on July 20, 1994, at which the scope and analyses of the EA were presented. The scope of the EA included evaluation of alternative methods of storage, including no action. A comment period from July 5, 1994 through August 4, 1994, was provided to the public and the State of Colorado to submit written comment on the EA. No written comments were received regarding this proposed action, therefore no comment response is included in the Final EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

  13. Understanding and Managing Aging of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Facility Components in Wet Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A. Burton

    2007-07-01

    Storage of nuclear fuel after it has been discharged from reactors has become the leading spent fuel management option. Many storage facilities are being required to operate longer than originally anticipated. Aging is a term that has emerged to focus attention on the consequences of extended operation on systems, structures, and components that comprise the storage facilities. The key to mitigation of age-related degradation in storage facilities is to implement effective strategies to understand and manage aging of the facility materials. A systematic approach to preclude serious effects of age-related degradation is addressed in this paper, directed principally to smaller facilities (test and research reactors). The first need is to assess the materials that comprise the facility and the environments that they are subject to. Access to historical data on facility design, fabrication, and operation can facilitate assessment of expected materials performance. Methods to assess the current condition of facility materials are summarized in the paper. Each facility needs an aging management plan to define the scope of the management program, involving identification of the materials that need specific actions to manage age-related degradation. For each material identified, one or more aging management programs are developed and become part of the plan Several national and international organizations have invested in development of comprehensive and systematic approaches to aging management. A method developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is recommended as a concise template to organize measures to effectively manage age-related degradation of storage facility materials, including the scope of inspection, surveillance, and maintenance that is needed to assure successful operation of the facility over its required life. Important to effective aging management is a staff that is alert for evidence of materials degradation and committed to carry out the aging

  14. Consequence analysis of a postulated NaOH release from the 2727-W sodium storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Himes, D.A.

    1996-09-27

    Toxicological and radiological consequences were calculated for a maximum sodium fire in the 2727-W Sodium Storage Facility. The sodium is solid and cannot leak out of the tanks. The maximum fire therefore corresponded to the maximum cross-sectional area of one tank. It was shown that release of the entire facility inventory of 22 Na is insufficient to produce an appreciable effect.

  15. EFFECTS OF MIXING AND AGING ON WATER QUALITY IN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM STORAGE FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aging of water in distribution system storage facilities can lead to deterioration of the water quality due to loss of disinfectant residual and bacterial regrowth. Facilities should be operated to insure that the age of the water is not excessive taking into account the quality...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1600-3 - Communications facilities; refuge alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 75.1600-3 Section 75.1600-3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Communications § 75... communication system, which can be used from inside the refuge alternative; and (2) An additional...

  17. Gas Test Loop Facilities Alternatives Assessment Report Rev 1

    SciTech Connect

    William J. Skerjanc; William F. Skerjanc

    2005-07-01

    An important task in the Gas Test Loop (GTL) conceptual design was to determine the best facility to serve as host for this apparatus, which will allow fast-flux neutron testing in an existing nuclear facility. A survey was undertaken of domestic and foreign nuclear reactors and accelerator facilities to arrive at that determination. Two major research reactors in the U.S. were considered in detail, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), each with sufficient power to attain the required neutron fluxes. HFIR routinely operates near its design power limit of 100 MW. ATR has traditionally operated at less than half its design power limit of 250 MW. Both of these reactors should be available for at least the next 30 years. The other major U.S. research reactor, the Missouri University Research Reactor, does not have sufficient power to reach the required neutron flux nor do the smaller research reactors. Of the foreign reactors investigated, BOR-60 is perhaps the most attractive. Monju and BN 600 are power reactors for their respective electrical grids. Although the Joyo reactor is vigorously campaigning for customers, local laws regarding transport of radioactive material mean it would be very difficult to retrieve test articles from either Japanese reactor for post irradiation examination. PHENIX is scheduled to close in 2008 and is fully booked until then. FBTR is limited to domestic (Indian) users only. Data quality is often suspect in Russia. The only accelerator seriously considered was the Fuel and Material Test Station (FMTS) currently proposed for operation at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron spectrum in FMTS is similar to that found in a fast reactor, but it has a pronounced high-energy tail that is atypical of fast fission reactor spectra. First irradiation in the FMTS is being contemplated for 2008. Detailed review of these facilities resulted in the recommendation that the ATR would be the best host for the GTL.

  18. Screening and identification of sites for a proposed Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1985-04-01

    The Director, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), Department of Energy (DOE), has identified the Clinch River Breeder Reactor site, the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Hartsville Nuclear Plant site as preferred and alternative sites, respectively, for development of site-specific designs as part of the proposal for construction of an integrated Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility. The proposal, developed pursuant to Section 141 (b) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, will be submitted to Congress in January 1986. The Director expects to propose to Congress that an MRS be constructed at the perferred site. His judgment could change based on information to be developed between now and January 1986. The decision to construct an MRS facility and final site selection are reserved by Congress for itself. The Director's judgment is based on the results of a rigorous site screening and evaluation process described in this report. The three sites were selected from among eleven sites evaluated in detail. The Clinch River Breeder Reactor site, owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority, was identified as the preferred site. It has several particularly desirable features including: (1) federal ownership and control by the Department of Energy; (2) particularly good transportation access (five miles to the nearest interstate highway and direct rail access); (3) site characteristics and current data base judged by the NRC in 1983 as sufficient for granting a limited work authorization for the now cancelled breeder reactor; and (4) a technical community in the vicinity of site which can provide experienced nuclear facility support functions. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Langley Storage facility which houses remains of Apollo 204 craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Apollo 204 command module is seen in storage at Langley Research Center in Virginia. The command module, damaged in the 1967 Apollo fire, its heat shield, booster protective cover and 81 cartons of related hardware and investigative data occupy 3,300 cubic feet of warehouse storage space. Astronauts Virgil I. Grissom, Roger B. Chaffee and Edward H. White II perished in the Apollo 204 spacecraft fire on Jan. 27, 1967 on Launch Complex 34 at Cape Canaveral. The hardware has been stored at Langley since 1967. PLEASE NOTE UPDATE: In early May of 1990, NASA announced plans to move the hardware and related data to permanent storage with the Challenger debris in an abandoned missile silo at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), Florida. However, at month's end, NASA announced it had decided to keep the capsule at Langley for an indefinite period of time.

  20. 42 CFR 124.514 - Compliance alternative for facilities with small annual obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compliance alternative for facilities with small annual obligations. 124.514 Section 124.514 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION...

  1. 42 CFR 124.514 - Compliance alternative for facilities with small annual obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compliance alternative for facilities with small annual obligations. 124.514 Section 124.514 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION...

  2. 42 CFR 124.514 - Compliance alternative for facilities with small annual obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compliance alternative for facilities with small annual obligations. 124.514 Section 124.514 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION...

  3. 42 CFR 124.514 - Compliance alternative for facilities with small annual obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compliance alternative for facilities with small annual obligations. 124.514 Section 124.514 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION...

  4. 75 FR 54025 - Vessel and Facility Response Plans for Oil: 2003 Removal Equipment Requirements and Alternative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... Facility Response Plans for Oil: 2003 Removal Equipment Requirements and Alternative Technology Revisions'' (74 FR 45004). This final rule amended its requirements for oil-spill removal equipment associated... facility with appropriate equipment and resources located in each zone of operation; specific lists...

  5. 40 CFR 63.121 - Storage vessel provisions-alternative means of emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Storage vessel provisions-alternative means of emission limitation. 63.121 Section 63.121 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National...

  6. 40 CFR 63.121 - Storage vessel provisions-alternative means of emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Storage vessel provisions-alternative means of emission limitation. 63.121 Section 63.121 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National...

  7. 40 CFR 63.121 - Storage vessel provisions-alternative means of emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Storage vessel provisions-alternative means of emission limitation. 63.121 Section 63.121 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National...

  8. 36 CFR 1234.30 - How does an agency request authority to establish or relocate records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authority to establish or relocate records storage facilities? 1234.30 Section 1234.30 Parks, Forests, and... RECORDS STORAGE FACILITIES Facility Approval and Inspection Requirements § 1234.30 How does an agency...” excludes NARA-owned and operated records centers. For purposes of this section and § 1234.34, the...

  9. Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) report, Pontiac Storage Facility, Pontiac, Michigan. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Young, B.; Carter, G.

    1994-04-01

    This report presents the results of the Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) investigation conducted by The Earth Technology Corporation (TETC) at Pontiac Storage Facility installation, a U.S. Government property selected for closure by the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Commission under Public Laws 100-526 and 101-510. The Pontiac Storage Facility is a 31-acre site located in Oakland County, Michigan, approximately 25 miles northwest of downtown Detroit. The installation`s primary mission is to provide storage for the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Command (TACOM); it is the site of administrative and record keeping departments, as well as the storage place of machinery used to produce military equipment and ordnance. Activities associated with the property that have environmental significance are degreasing and painting. TETC reviewed existing investigation documents; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, State, and county regulatory records; environmental data bases; and title documents pertaining to Pontiac Storage Facility during this investigation. In addition, TETC conducted interviews and visual inspections of Pontiac Storage Facility as well as visual inspections of and data base searches for the surrounding properties. pg12. JMD.

  10. Lessons learned from the Siting Process of an Interim Storage Facility in Spain - 12024

    SciTech Connect

    Lamolla, Meritxell Martell

    2012-07-01

    On 29 December 2009, the Spanish government launched a site selection process to host a centralised interim storage facility for spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. It was an unprecedented call for voluntarism among Spanish municipalities to site a controversial facility. Two nuclear municipalities, amongst a total of thirteen municipalities from five different regions, presented their candidatures to host the facility in their territories. For two years the government did not make a decision. Only in November 30, 2011, the new government elected on 20 November 2011 officially selected a non-nuclear municipality, Villar de Canas, for hosting this facility. This paper focuses on analysing the factors facilitating and hindering the siting of controversial facilities, in particular the interim storage facility in Spain. It demonstrates that involving all stakeholders in the decision-making process should not be underestimated. In the case of Spain, all regional governments where there were candidate municipalities willing to host the centralised interim storage facility, publicly opposed to the siting of the facility. (author)

  11. A review on nanowires as an alternative high density magnetic storage media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irshad, M. I.; Ahmad, F.; Mohamed, N. M.

    2012-09-01

    The thirst to design high density magnetic storage media with improved efficiency has always been one of the basic challenges in computer industry. In this paper, present challenges of magnetic storage media and different parameters that can affect the properties of magnetic nanowires have been investigated in detail. The magnetic nanowires are the promising candidate for the future high density magnetic storage media. So far the grain isolation is a problem while using thin film magnetic storage media. Further, during miniaturization, superparamagnetic limit is reached due to increasing thermal effects at this scale which makes the magnetic grains of magnetic nanowires susceptible to thermal fluctuations. To overcome this problem of superparamagnetism and grain isolation, nanowires with high coercivity, remanent magnetization and thermal stability are thought to be the alternatives. Alloy and multilayered magnetic nanowires prepared by some less expensive technique with suitable magnetic and thermal properties can serve to overcome this challenge.

  12. Modeling of information flows in natural gas storage facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbari, Leyla; Bahar, Arifah; Aziz, Zainal Abdul

    2013-09-01

    The paper considers the natural-gas storage valuation based on the information-based pricing framework of Brody-Hughston-Macrina (BHM). As opposed to many studies which the associated filtration is considered pre-specified, this work tries to construct the filtration in terms of the information provided to the market. The value of the storage is given by the sum of the discounted expectations of the cash flows under risk-neutral measure, conditional to the constructed filtration with the Brownian bridge noise term. In order to model the flow of information about the cash flows, we assume the existence of a fixed pricing kernel with liquid, homogenous and incomplete market without arbitrage.

  13. Groundwater Remediation and Alternate Energy at White Sands Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Holger

    2008-01-01

    White Sands Test Facility Core Capabilities: a) Remote Hazardous Testing of Reactive, Explosive, and Toxic Materials and Fluids; b) Hypergolic Fluids Materials and Systems Testing; c) Oxygen Materials and System Testing; d) Hypervelocity Impact Testing; e)Flight Hardware Processing; and e) Propulsion Testing. There is no impact to any drinking water well. Includes public wells and the NASA supply well. There is no public exposure. Groundwater is several hundred feet below ground. No air or surface water exposure. Plume is moving very slowly to the west. Plume Front Treatment system will stop this westward movement. NASA performs on-going monitoring. More than 200 wells and zones are routinely sampled. Approx. 850 samples are obtained monthly and analyzed for over 300 different hazardous chemicals.

  14. The INFN-CNAF Tier-1 GEMSS Mass Storage System and database facility activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Pier Paolo; Cavalli, Alessandro; Dell'Agnello, Luca; Favaro, Matteo; Gregori, Daniele; Prosperini, Andrea; Pezzi, Michele; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Zizzi, Giovanni; Vagnoni, Vincenzo

    2015-05-01

    The consolidation of Mass Storage services at the INFN-CNAF Tier1 Storage department that has occurred during the last 5 years, resulted in a reliable, high performance and moderately easy-to-manage facility that provides data access, archive, backup and database services to several different use cases. At present, the GEMSS Mass Storage System, developed and installed at CNAF and based upon an integration between the IBM GPFS parallel filesystem and the Tivoli Storage Manager (TSM) tape management software, is one of the largest hierarchical storage sites in Europe. It provides storage resources for about 12% of LHC data, as well as for data of other non-LHC experiments. Files are accessed using standard SRM Grid services provided by the Storage Resource Manager (StoRM), also developed at CNAF. Data access is also provided by XRootD and HTTP/WebDaV endpoints. Besides these services, an Oracle database facility is in production characterized by an effective level of parallelism, redundancy and availability. This facility is running databases for storing and accessing relational data objects and for providing database services to the currently active use cases. It takes advantage of several Oracle technologies, like Real Application Cluster (RAC), Automatic Storage Manager (ASM) and Enterprise Manager centralized management tools, together with other technologies for performance optimization, ease of management and downtime reduction. The aim of the present paper is to illustrate the state-of-the-art of the INFN-CNAF Tier1 Storage department infrastructures and software services, and to give a brief outlook to forthcoming projects. A description of the administrative, monitoring and problem-tracking tools that play a primary role in managing the whole storage framework is also given.

  15. Structural Integrity Program for the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.

    2003-05-22

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities.

  16. [Alternative treatment in psychiatric and psychotherapy facilities in Germany].

    PubMed

    Andritzky, W

    1996-01-01

    Questionnaires were sent to 545 clinics with at least partial psychotherapeutic or psychiatric activities to find out the spectrum of therapeutic techniques and methods used, as well as the spectrum of therapists' qualifications. From the 314 responding clinics, 127 different methods were named with an average of 4.0 each. The proportion of physicians and psychologists to patients becomes worse the bigger the clinics are: e.g., in the class of less than 50 beds, one psychologist cares for 7 patients; in the class 51-300 beds, the relation is one to 48. The six most frequently used methods are: music therapy (36.9%), imagery (25.2%), dance therapy (23.2%), autogenous training (22.6%), body therapies (21.7%), and psychodrama (18.2%). Apart from physicians and psychologists, 38 other professional groups were named. Comparing the answers concerning the methods with the performing professional group, an apparent trend towards a professional diversification was found, e.g. only 62% of music therapy is performed by music therapists, the rest by other professional groups. Finally, analysis of special remarks on the questionnaires resulted in four groups: discussions concerning the term alternative methods, recommendations to use unconventional methods after the clinical phase, conceptual changes of a clinic, and broader theoretical backgrounds integrating various methods, e.g. the psychoanalytic concept. PMID:8851128

  17. COMPLETION OF THE FIRST INTEGRATED SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL TRANSSHIPMENT/INTERIM STORAGE FACILITY IN NW RUSSIA

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.S.; Barnes, E.; Snipes, R.L.; Hoeibraaten, S.; Gran, H.C.; Foshaug, E.; Godunov, V.

    2003-02-27

    Northwest and Far East Russia contain large quantities of unsecured spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from decommissioned submarines that potentially threaten the fragile environments of the surrounding Arctic and North Pacific regions. The majority of the SNF from the Russian Navy, including that from decommissioned nuclear submarines, is currently stored in on-shore and floating storage facilities. Some of the SNF is damaged and stored in an unstable condition. Existing Russian transport infrastructure and reprocessing facilities cannot meet the requirements for moving and reprocessing this amount of fuel. Additional interim storage capacity is required. Most of the existing storage facilities being used in Northwest Russia do not meet health and safety, and physical security requirements. The United States and Norway are currently providing assistance to the Russian Federation (RF) in developing systems for managing these wastes. If these wastes are not properly managed, they could release significant concentrations of radioactivity to these sensitive environments and could become serious global environmental and physical security issues. There are currently three closely-linked trilateral cooperative projects: development of a prototype dual-purpose transport and storage cask for SNF, a cask transshipment interim storage facility, and a fuel drying and cask de-watering system. The prototype cask has been fabricated, successfully tested, and certified. Serial production is now underway in Russia. In addition, the U.S. and Russia are working together to improve the management strategy for nuclear submarine reactor compartments after SNF removal.

  18. Monitoring plan for routine organic air emissions at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Waste Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, K.J.; Jolley, J.G.

    1994-06-01

    This monitoring plan provides the information necessary to perform routine organic air emissions monitoring at the Waste Storage Facilities located at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The Waste Storage Facilities include both the Type I and II Waste Storage Modules. The plan implements a dual method approach where two dissimilar analytical methodologies, Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) and ancillary SUMMA{reg_sign} canister sampling, following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analytical method TO-14, will be used to provide qualitative and quantitative volatile organic concentration data. The Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy will provide in situ, real time monitoring of volatile organic compound concentrations in the ambient air of the Waste Storage Facilities. To supplement the OP-FTIR data, air samples will be collected using SUMMA{reg_sign}, passivated, stainless steel canisters, following the EPA Method TO-14. These samples will be analyzed for volatile organic compounds with gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry analysis. The sampling strategy, procedures, and schedules are included in this monitoring plan. The development of this monitoring plan is driven by regulatory compliance to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, State of Idaho Toxic Air Pollutant increments, Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The various state and federal regulations address the characterization of the volatile organic compounds and the resultant ambient air emissions that may originate from facilities involved in industrial production and/or waste management activities.

  19. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan for the Y-12 9409-5 Tank Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This document presents information on the closure of the Y-12 9409-5 Tank Storage Facility. Topics discussed include: facility description; closure history; closure performance standard; partial closure; maximum waste inventory; closure activities; schedule; and postclosure care.

  20. Monitored retrievable storage submission to Congress: Volume 2, Environmental assessment for a monitored retrievable storage facility. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    1986-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) supports the DOE proposal to Congress to construct and operate a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) of spent fuel at a site on the Clinch River in the Roane County portion of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first part of this document is an assessment of the value of, need for, and feasibility of an MRS facility as an integral component of the waste management system. The second part is an assessment and comparison of the potential environmental impacts projected for each of six site-design combinations. The MRS facility would be centrally located with respect to existing reactors, and would receive and canister spent fuel in preparation for shipment to and disposal in a geologic repository. 207 refs., 57 figs., 132 tabs.

  1. Nuclear Storage Facility Inventory and Information Management using the GraFIC Software.

    SciTech Connect

    Hickerson, T.W.

    1999-05-04

    Oak Ridge has developed an intelligent facility and information management system to provide near real time, verifiable status of safeguarded materials in a nuclear storage facility. The Graphical Facility Information System (GraFIC{trademark}) is a versatile software package designed to operate in a distributed computing environment. GraFIC{trademark} is integrated with a suite of rugged, low-cost sensors that remotely monitor the physical and/or assigned attributes associated with stored nuclear materials and reports item and facility activity to an unlimited number of authorized clients. The software also contains facility management tools to assist with space planning, record management, item location, and a variety of other facilities needs.

  2. Consequence analysis of a postulated NaOH release from the 2727-W sodium storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Himes, D.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-02

    Toxicological and radiological consequences were calculated for a maximum sodium fire in the 2727-W Sodium Storage Facility. The sodium is solid and cannot leak out of the tanks. The maximum fire therefore corresponded to the maximum cross-sectional area of one tank. It was shown that release of the entire facility inventory of {sup 22}Na is insufficient to produce an appreciable effect.

  3. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP)

    SciTech Connect

    ROBINSON, P.A.

    2000-04-17

    This Quality Assurance Plan describes how the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) implements the quality assurance (QA) requirements of the Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) (HNF-Mp-599) for Project Hanford activities and products. This QAPP also describes the organizational structure necessary to successfully implement the program. The QAPP provides a road map of applicable Project Hanford Management System Procedures, and facility specific procedures, that may be utilized by WESF to implement the requirements of the QAPD.

  4. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Dangerous Waste Training Plan (DWTP)

    SciTech Connect

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    2000-03-29

    This Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) Dangerous Waste Training Plan (DWTP) applies to personnel who perform work at, or in support of WESF. The plan, along with the names of personnel, may be given to a regulatory agency inspector upon request. General workers, subcontractors, or visiting personnel who have not been trained in the management of dangerous wastes must be accompanied by an individual who meets the requirements of this training plan. Dangerous waste management includes handling, treatment, storage, and/or disposal of dangerous and/or mixed waste. Dangerous waste management units covered by this plan include: less-than-90-day accumulation area(s); pool cells 1-8 and 12 storage units; and process cells A-G storage units. This training plan describes general requirements, worker categories, and provides course descriptions for operation of the WESF permitted miscellaneous storage units and the Less-than-90-Day Accumulation Areas.

  5. Langley Storage facility which houses remains of Apollo 204 craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A warehouse holding Apollo 204 hardware and investigative data is seen at Langley Research Center in Virginia. The command module, damaged in the 1967 Apollo fire, its heat shield, booster protective cover and 81 cartons of data and other related materials occupy 3,300 cubic feet. Astronauts Virgil I. Grissom, Roger B. Chaffee and Edward H. White II perished in the Apollo 204 spacecraft fire on Jan. 27, 1967 on Launch Complex 34 at Cape Canaveral. The hardware has been stored at Langley since 1967. PLEASE NOTE UPDATE: In early May of 1990, NASA announced plans to move the hardware and related data to permanent storage with the Challenger debris in an abandoned missile silo at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), Florida. However, at month's end, NASA announced it had decided to keep the capsule at Langley for an indefinite period of time.

  6. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1992-11-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, as well as for activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. The 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility (3718-F Facility), located in the 300 Area, was used to store and treat alkali metal wastes. Therefore, it is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous wastes. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 (Ecology 1989) and 40 CFR 270.1. Closure also will satisfy the thermal treatment facility closure requirements of 40 CFR 265.381. This closure plan presents a description of the 3718-F Facility, the history of wastes managed, and the approach that will be followed to close the facility. Only hazardous constituents derived from 3718-F Facility operations will be addressed.

  7. 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE PERFORMANCE OF ALTERNATE MATERIALS FOR LONG-TERM STORAGE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, E.; Hoffman, E.; Daugherty, W.

    2010-02-24

    The Model 9975 shipping package specifies the materials of construction for its various components. With the loss of availability of material for two components (cane fiberboard overpack and Viton{reg_sign} GLT O-rings), alternate materials of construction were identified and approved for use for transport (softwood fiberboard and Viton{reg_sign} GLT-S O-rings). As these shipping packages are part of a long-term storage configuration at the Savannah River Site, additional testing is in progress to verify satisfactory long-term performance of the alternate materials under storage conditions. The test results to date can be compared to comparable results on the original materials of construction to draw preliminary conclusions on the performance of the replacement materials.

  8. Structural analyses of the storage container for heavy element facility, building-251

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, D S

    1999-01-01

    The Heavy Element Facility, Building 251, contains a series of underground storage vaults which are used for long term storage of nuclear materials. A storage rack with shelves is suspended from the top of each storage vault. The stainless steel containers enclosing the nuclear materials are stored on the shelves. A Hazard & Accident assessment analyzed the vulnerability of this storage system to assaults resulting from natural phenomena and accidents within the building. The assessment considered all racks and their containers to be stored underground and secured in their static, long-term configuration. Moving beyond the static, long-term hazard assessment, the structural analyses were performed to evaluate the storage container against a rare, short duration event. An accidental free drop of a container may occur in a combination of two events: a rare, short-duration earthquake concurrent with an operation of raising the storage rack to a maximum height that the crane is capable of. This hypothetical free drop may occur only to the container in the uppermost shelf of the storage rack. The analyses were the structural evaluation of the storage container to determine the material containment integrity of the storage container after the accident. The evaluation was performed simulating a free drop from the storage rack, with a maximum load in the container, striking/an unyielding surface in the worst orientation. The analyses revealed that, in the very unlikely event of a container drop, the integrity of the hermetic seal of the storage container could be compromised due to plastic deformation of the lid and mating flange. Simple engineering and administrative controls can prevent that from occurring.

  9. The 4843 Alkali Metal Storage Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The 4843 AMSF has been used primarily to provide a centralized building to receive and store dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste, including sodium and lithium, which has been generated at the Fast Flux Test Facility and at various other Hanford Site operations that used alkali metals. Most of the dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste received consists of retired equipment from liquid sodium processes. The unit continues to store material. In general, only solid alkali metal waste that is water reactive is stored at the 4843 AMSF. The 4843 AMSF will be closed in a manner consistent with Ecology guidelines and regulations (WAC 173-303-610). The general closure procedure is detailed as follows.

  10. Application of MCNP{trademark} to storage facility dose rate assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, W.T.; Roberts, R.R.; Estes, G.P.; Taylor, W.M.

    1996-12-31

    The MCNP code is widely used in the determination of neutral particle dose rate analyses. In this paper we examine the application of MCNP to several storage facilities containing special nuclear material, SNM, wherein the neutron dose rate is the primary quantity of interest. In particular, we describe the special geometry, modeling assumptions, and physics considerations encountered in each of three applications.

  11. 30 CFR 75.1903 - Underground diesel fuel storage facilities and areas; construction and safety precautions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Underground diesel fuel storage facilities and areas; construction and safety precautions. 75.1903 Section 75.1903 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment...

  12. 49 CFR 228.311 - Minimum space requirements, beds, storage, and sanitary facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... EMPLOYEES; RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING; SLEEPING QUARTERS Safety and Health Requirements for Camp Cars Provided by Railroads as Sleeping Quarters § 228.311 Minimum space requirements, beds, storage, and sanitary facilities. (a) Each camp car used for sleeping purposes must contain at least 80 square feet...

  13. 49 CFR 228.311 - Minimum space requirements, beds, storage, and sanitary facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... EMPLOYEES; RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING; SLEEPING QUARTERS Safety and Health Requirements for Camp Cars Provided by Railroads as Sleeping Quarters § 228.311 Minimum space requirements, beds, storage, and sanitary facilities. (a) Each camp car used for sleeping purposes must contain at least 80 square feet...

  14. 49 CFR 228.311 - Minimum space requirements, beds, storage, and sanitary facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... EMPLOYEES; RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING; SLEEPING QUARTERS Safety and Health Requirements for Camp Cars Provided by Railroads as Sleeping Quarters § 228.311 Minimum space requirements, beds, storage, and sanitary facilities. (a) Each camp car used for sleeping purposes must contain at least 80 square feet...

  15. 40 CFR 141.714 - Requirements for uncovered finished water storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requirements for uncovered finished water storage facilities. 141.714 Section 141.714 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for Cryptosporidium Treatment...

  16. 40 CFR 141.714 - Requirements for uncovered finished water storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requirements for uncovered finished water storage facilities. 141.714 Section 141.714 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for Cryptosporidium Treatment...

  17. 18 CFR 1304.405 - Fuel storage tanks and handling facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fuel storage tanks and handling facilities. 1304.405 Section 1304.405 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF STRUCTURES AND...

  18. Structural and seismic analyses of waste facility reinforced concrete storage vaults

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1995-07-01

    Facility 317 of Argonne National Laboratory consists of several reinforced concrete waste storage vaults designed and constructed in the late 1940`s through the early 1960`s. In this paper, structural analyses of these concrete vaults subjected to various natural hazards are described, emphasizing the northwest shallow vault. The natural phenomenon hazards considered include both earthquakes and tornados. Because these vaults are deeply embedded in the soil, the SASSI (System Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction) code was utilized for the seismic calculations. The ultimate strength method was used to analyze the reinforced concrete structures. In all studies, moment and shear strengths at critical locations of the storage vaults were evaluated. Results of the structural analyses show that almost all the waste storage vaults meet the code requirements according to ACI 349--85. These vaults also satisfy the performance goal such that confinement of hazardous materials is maintained and functioning of the facility is not interrupted.

  19. Development of a variable climate controlled portable storage facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmins, Mitchel; Yadav, Kamal; Iroanusi, Kennedy; Tickle, Andrew J.

    2012-10-01

    This paper focuses on the development of a portable variable climate controlled system that can be tailored to the requirements of the item to be stored by manipulating the temperature, humidity and light levels within the controlled area. This could be used to store anything from bio-chemical samples (to preserve them from field work) to cooled electronics (prior to deployment in a given situation) to foodstuffs (such as wine and other alcohols). In this situation however, to provide a relatively simplistic example, the environment will be used to store wine. The system is adaptive in that anything can be stored within it, assuming the storage parameters are known in order to correctly configure the environment. In this paper a microcontroller (PICF4520) is connected to a fridge with various sensors attached to monitor and manipulate the environment and adjust it accordingly. For the chosen item to be stored, a temperature of 13- 14oC is required, a high humidity level and a non-Ultraviolent (UV) light source. This work thus allows for a small handheld unit that could be used to control the climate within without the need for the traditional 12 - 16 foot size portable units traditionally used. The unit could be left in the field and run off a solar cell to assist in longer term studies. This paper presents how the microcontroller is connected to the fridge and its sensors, how it manipulates the environment and the process by which the temperature and other factors can be changed without having to edit and recompile the C code, this allows for a much more friendly device interface.

  20. Modification and expansion of X-7725A Waste Accountability Facility for storage of polychlorinated biphenyl wastes at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) must manage wastes containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in accordance with Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requirements and as prescribed in a Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) between DOE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). PCB-containing wastes are currently stored in the PORTS process buildings where they are generated. DOE proposes to modify and expand the Waste Accountability facility (X-7725A) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio, to provide a central storage location for these wastes. The proposed action is needed to eliminate the fire and safety hazards presented by the wastes. In this EA, DOE considers four alternatives: (1) no action, which requires storing wastes in limited storage areas in existing facilities; (2) modifying and expanding the X-7725A waste accountability facility; (3) constructing a new PCB waste storage building; and (4) shipping PCB wastes to the K-25 TSCA incinerator. If no action is taken, PCB-contaminated would continue to be stored in Bldgs X-326, X-330, and X-333. As TSCA cleanup activities continue, the quantity of stored waste would increase, which would subsequently cause congestion in the three process buildings and increase fire and safety hazards. The preferred alternative is to modify and expand Bldg. X-7725A to store wastes generated by TSCA compliance activities. Construction, which could begin as early as April 1996, would last approximately five to seven months, with a total peak work force of 70.

  1. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system.

  2. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 3, Supplemental information

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. It is organized into seven parts. Part I - Design Concept describes the selected solution. Part III - Supplemental Information contains calculations for the various disciplines as well as other supporting information and analyses.

  3. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 7, Estimate data

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This report is organized according to the sections and subsections outlined by Attachment III-2 of DOE Document AL 4700.1, Project Management System. It is organized into seven parts. This document, Part VII - Estimate Data, contains the project cost estimate information.

  4. 36 CFR 1232.12 - Under what conditions may Federal records be stored in records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... meets the provisions of 36 CFR part 1234. (b) Unscheduled records (1) Any storage facility that meets the provisions of 36 CFR part 1234. (2) Also requires prior notification to NARA (see § 1232.14(b... provisions of 36 CFR part 1234. (d) Vital records Storage facility must meet the provisions of 36 CFR...

  5. 36 CFR 1232.14 - What requirements must an agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... records to a records storage facility: (a) Ensure that the requirements of 36 CFR part 1234 are met... permanent retention, as those records typically require more stringent environmental controls (see 36 CFR... agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility? 1232.14 Section 1232.14...

  6. 36 CFR 1232.16 - What documentation must an agency create before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... National Archives of the United States in accordance with 36 CFR part 1235. ... agency create before it transfers records to a records storage facility? 1232.16 Section 1232.16 Parks... RECORDS TO RECORDS STORAGE FACILITIES § 1232.16 What documentation must an agency create before...

  7. 36 CFR 1232.16 - What documentation must an agency create before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... National Archives of the United States in accordance with 36 CFR part 1235. ... agency create before it transfers records to a records storage facility? 1232.16 Section 1232.16 Parks... RECORDS TO RECORDS STORAGE FACILITIES § 1232.16 What documentation must an agency create before...

  8. 36 CFR 1232.14 - What requirements must an agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... records to a records storage facility: (a) Ensure that the requirements of 36 CFR part 1234 are met... permanent retention, as those records typically require more stringent environmental controls (see 36 CFR... agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility? 1232.14 Section 1232.14...

  9. Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, W.W.

    1997-12-30

    This report outlines the design and Total Estimated Cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The grout vault facilities in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site were constructed in the 1980s to support Tank Waste disposal activities. The facilities were to serve project B-714 which was intended to store grouted low-activity waste. The existing 4 unused grout vaults, with modifications for remote handling capability, will provide sufficient capacity for approximately three years of immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) production from the Tank Waste Remediation System-Privatization Vendors (TWRS-PV). These retrofit modifications to the grout vaults will result in an ILAW interim storage facility (Project W465) that will comply with applicable DOE directives, and state and federal regulations.

  10. School Facility Logistics. A Study for Alberta Education Dealing with School Planning, Acquisition, and Funding Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Gordon and Co., Toronto (Ontario).

    Alternatives to current provincial policies and procedures relating to school construction and its funding are identified and examined. The report sets out findings and recommendations in four sections. In the first section, School Facility Planning, Policies, and Procedures, school building is proposed as an integral part of shared community…

  11. 78 FR 13695 - Information Collection: Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ...To comply with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) is notifying the public that we have submitted an information collection request (ICR) to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. This ICR concerns the paperwork requirements in the regulations under ``Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on......

  12. Materials and degradation modes in an alternative LLW (low-level waste) disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cowgill, M.G.; MacKenzie, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The materials used in the construction of alternative low-level waste disposal facilities will be subject to interaction with both the internal and the external environments associated with the facilities and unless precautions are taken, may degrade, leading to structural failure. This paper reviews the characteristics of both environments with respect to three alternative disposal concepts, then assesses how reaction with them might affect the properties of the materials, which include concrete, steel-reinforced concrete, structural steel, and various protective coatings and membranes. It identifies and evaluates the probability of reactions occurring which might lead to degradation of the materials and so compromise the structure. The probability of failure (interpreted relative to the ability of the structure to restrict ingress and egress of water) is assessed for each material and precautionary measures, intended to maximize the durability of the facility, are reviewed. 19 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. CENTRAL STORAGE FACILITY PROJECT IN COLOMBIA TO PROVIDE THE SAFE STORAGE AND PROTECTION OF HIGH-ACTIVITY RADIOACTIVE SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Raymond; Wright, Kyle A.; McCaw, Erica E.; Vallejo, Jorge

    2009-10-07

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) reduces and protects vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. Internationally, over 40 countries are cooperating with GTRI to enhance the security of these materials. The GTRI program has worked successfully with foreign countries to remove and protect nuclear and radioactive materials, including orphaned and disused high-activity sources. GTRI began cooperation with the Republic of Colombia in April 2004. This cooperation has been a resounding success by securing forty high-risk sites, consolidating disused/orphan sources at an interim secure national storage facility, and developing a comprehensive approach to security, training, and sustainability. In 2005 the Colombian Ministry of Mines and Energy requested the Department of Energy’s support in the construction of a new Central Storage Facility (CSF). In December 2005, the Ministry selected to construct this facility at the Institute of Geology and Mining (Ingeominas) site in Bogota. This site already served as Colombia’s national repository, where disused sources were housed in various buildings around the complex. The CSF project was placed under contract in May 2006, but environmental issues and public protests, which led to a class action lawsuit against the Colombian Government, forced the Ministry to quickly suspend activities, thereby placing the project in jeopardy. Despite these challenges, however, the Ministry of Mines and Energy worked closely with public and environmental authorities to resolve these issues, and continued to be a strong advocate of the GTRI program. In June 2008, the Ministry of Mines and Energy was granted the construction and environmental licenses. As a result, construction immediately resumed and the CSF was completed by December 2008. A commissioning ceremony was held for the new facility in January 2009, which was attended by representatives from the Department of Energy, U.S. Embassy

  14. 36 CFR 1234.10 - What are the facility requirements for all records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facility must ensure that the roof membrane does not permit water to penetrate the roof. NARA strongly... the exception of fire protection sprinkler piping and storm water roof drainage piping) must not be... prevent water leaks and the piping assembly is inspected for potential leaks regularly. If drainage...

  15. 36 CFR 1234.10 - What are the facility requirements for all records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... facility must ensure that the roof membrane does not permit water to penetrate the roof. NARA strongly... the exception of fire protection sprinkler piping and storm water roof drainage piping) must not be... prevent water leaks and the piping assembly is inspected for potential leaks regularly. If drainage...

  16. 36 CFR 1234.10 - What are the facility requirements for all records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... facility must ensure that the roof membrane does not permit water to penetrate the roof. NARA strongly... the exception of fire protection sprinkler piping and storm water roof drainage piping) must not be... prevent water leaks and the piping assembly is inspected for potential leaks regularly. If drainage...

  17. Handling of multiassembly sealed baskets between reactor storage and a remote handling facility: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, J.V.; Kessler, J.H.; McSherry, A.J.

    1989-06-01

    The storage of multiple fuel assemblies in sealed (welded) dry storage baskets is gaining increasing use to augment at-reactor fuel storage capacity. Since this increasing use will place a significant number of such baskets on reactor sites, some initial downstream planning for their future handling scenarios for retrieving multi-assembly sealed baskets (MSBs) from onsite storage and transferring and shipping the fuel (and/or the baskets) to a federally operated remote handling facility (RHF). Numerous options or at-reactor and away-from-reactor handling were investigated. Materials handling flowsheets were developed along with conceptual designs for the equipment and tools required to handle and open the MSBs. The handling options were evaluated and compared to a reference case, fuel handling sequence (i.e., fuel assemblies are taken from the fuel pool, shipped to a receiving and handling facility and placed into interim storage). The main parameters analyzed are throughout, radiation dose burden and cost. In addition to evaluating the handling of MSBs, this work also evaluated handling consolidated fuel canisters (CFCs). In summary, the handling of MSBs and CFCs in the store, ship and bury fuel cycle was found to be feasible and, under some conditions, to offer significant benefits in terms of throughput, cost and safety. 14 refs., 20 figs., 24 tabs.

  18. Criticality safety evaluation report for spent nuclear fuelprocessing and storage facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Schwinkendorf, K.N., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-24

    This criticality evaluation is for Spent N Reactor fuel unloaded from the existing canisters in both KE and KW Basins, and loaded into multiple canister overpack (MCO) containers with specially- built baskets containing either 54 Mark IV or 48 Mark IA fuel assemblies. The criticality evaluations include loading baskets into the MCO/Cask, operations at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF), and storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Many conservatisms have been built into this analysis, the primary one being the selection of the k{sub eff} @ 0.95 criticality safety limit.

  19. Waste and Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) Essential and Support Drawing List

    SciTech Connect

    SHANNON, W.R.

    1999-08-31

    The drawings identified in this document will comprise the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility essential and support drawing list. This list will replace drawings identified as the ''WESF Essential and support drawing list''. Additionally, this document will follow the applicable requirements of HNF-PRO-242 ''Engineering Drawing Requirements'' and FSP-WESF-001, Section EN-1 ''Documenting Engineering Changes''. An essential drawing is defined as an engineering drawing identified by the facility staff as necessary to directly support the safe operation or maintenance of the facility. A support drawing is defined as a drawing identified by the facility staff that further describes the design details of structures, systems, or components shown on essential drawings or is frequently used by the support staff.

  20. Evaluation of alternatives to fungicide to control postharvest gray mold alone or with ozone storage in grapes, 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gray mold, caused by B. cinerea, causes severe losses since it spreads easily among berries during cold storage. Currently, it is controlled by fumigation with SO2 or SO2 emitting sheets within boxes. Alternative methods, such as storage in ozone atmospheres, are needed because SO2 is banned in orga...

  1. High Purity Germanium Gamma-PHA Assay of Uranium Storage Pigs for 321-M Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.A.

    2001-09-18

    The Analytical Development Section of SRTC was requested by the Facilities Disposition Division (FDD) to determine the holdup of enriched uranium in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. The 321-M facility was used to fabricate enriched uranium fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the production reactors. The facility also includes the 324-M storage building and the passageway connecting it to 321-M. The results of the holdup assays are essential for determining compliance with the Solid Waste's Waste Acceptance Criteria, Material Control and Accountability, and to meet criticality safety controls. This report describes and documents the use of a portable HPGe detector and EG and G Dart system that contains a high voltage power supply, signal processing electronics, a personal computer with Gamma-Vision software, and space to store and manipulate multiple 4096-channel g-ray spectra to assay for 235U content in 268 uranium shipping and storage pigs. This report includes a description of three efficiency calibration configurations and also the results of the assay. A description of the quality control checks is included as well.

  2. Alternative energy facility siting policies for urban coastal areas: executive summary of findings and policy recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Morell, D; Singer, G

    1980-11-01

    An analysis was made of siting issues in the coastal zone, one of the nation's most critical natural resource areas and one which is often the target for energy development proposals. The analysis addressed the changing perceptions of citizens toward energy development in the coastal zone, emphasizing urban communities where access to the waterfront and revitalization of waterfront property are of interest to the citizen. The findings of this analysis are based on an examination of energy development along New Jersey's urban waterfront and along the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast, and on redevelopment efforts in Seattle, San Francisco, Boston, and elsewhere. The case studies demonstrate the significance of local attitudes and regional cooperation in the siting process. In highly urbanized areas, air quality has become a predominant concern among citizen groups and an influential factor in development of alternative energy facility siting strategies, such as consideration of inland siting connected by pipeline to a smaller coastal facility. The study addresses the economic impact of the permitting process on the desirability of energy facility investments, and the possible effects of the location selected for the facility on the permitting process and investment economics. The economic analysis demonstrates the importance of viewing energy facility investments in a broad perspective that includes the positive or negative impacts of various alternative siting patterns on the permitting process. Conclusions drawn from the studies regarding Federal, state, local, and corporate politics; regulatory, permitting, licensing, environmental assessment, and site selection are summarized. (MCW)

  3. Treatability studies of alternative wastewaters for Metal Finishing Effluent Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wittry, D.M.; Martin, H.L.

    1994-06-01

    The 300-M Area Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility (LETF) of the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an end-of-pipe industrial wastewater treatment facility that uses precipitation and filtration, which is the EPA Best Available Technology economically achievable for a Metal Finishing and Aluminum Form Industries. Upon the completion of stored waste treatment, the LETF will be shut down, because production of nuclear materials for reactors stopped at the end of the Cold War. The economic use of the LETF for the treatment of alternative wastewater streams is being evaluated through laboratory bench-scale treatability studies.

  4. Low emittance lattice for the storage ring of the Turkish Light Source Facility TURKAY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nergiz, Z.; Aksoy, A.

    2015-06-01

    The TAC (Turkish Accelerator Center) project aims to build an accelerator center in Turkey. The first stage of the project is to construct an Infra-Red Free Electron Laser (IR-FEL) facility. The second stage is to build a synchrotron radiation facility named TURKAY, which is a third generation synchrotron radiation light source that aims to achieve a high brilliance photon beam from a low emittance electron beam at 3 GeV. The electron beam parameters are highly dependent on the magnetic lattice of the storage ring. In this paper a low emittance storage ring for TURKAY is proposed and the beam dynamic properties of the magnetic lattice are investigated. Supported by Turkish Republic Ministry of Development (DPT2006K120470)

  5. Waste encapsulation storage facility (WESF) standards/requirements identification document (S/RIDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Maddox, B.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-29

    This Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) sets forth the Environmental Safety and Health (ES{ampersand}H) standards/requirements for the Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF). This S/RID is applicable to the appropriate life cycle phases of design, construction, operation, and preparation for decommissioning. These standards/requirements are adequate to ensure the protection of the health and safety of workers, the public, and the environment.

  6. European concepts for shared storage and disposal facilities for radioactive wastes?

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoef, Ewoud; Codee, Hans; Stefula, Vladan; McCombie, Charles

    2007-07-01

    Geological disposal is an essential component of the long-term management of spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Implementation of a suitable deep repository may, however, be difficult or impossible in some (especially small) countries because of challenging geological conditions or restricted siting options, or because of the high costs involved. For these countries, shared regional or international storage and disposal facilities are a necessity. The European Parliament and the EC have both expressed support for concepts that could lead to regional shared facilities being implemented in the EU. The EC, therefore, funded two projects that form the first two steps of a staged process towards the implementation of shared regional or international storage and disposal facilities. In the period 2003 to 2005, the EC funded SAPIERR I, a project devoted to pilot studies on the feasibility of shared regional storage facilities and geological repositories, for use by European countries. The studies showed that shared regional repositories are feasible, but also that, if they are to be implemented, even some decades ahead, efforts must already be increased now. The first step would be to establish a structured framework for the work on regional repositories. This is the goal of SAPIERR II (2006-2008): to develop possible practical implementation strategies and organisational structures. These will enable a formalised, structured European Development Organisation (EDO) to be established in 2008 or afterwards for working on shared EU radioactive waste storage and disposal activities. The EDO can work in parallel with national waste programmes. Participating EU Member States will be able to use the structures developed as, when and if needed for the furtherance of their individual national policies. (authors)

  7. Characterization and reclamation assessment for the central shops diesel storage facility at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Hazen, T.C.; Bledsoe, H.W.

    1994-12-31

    The contamination of subsurface terrestrial environments by organic contaminants is a global phenomenon. The remediation of such environments requires innovative assessment techniques and strategies for successful cleanups. Using innovative approaches, the central Shops Diesel Storage Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was characterized to determine the extent of subsurface diesel fuel contamination. Effective bioremediation techniques for cleaning up of the contaminant plume were established.

  8. NEUTRINO FACTORY BASED ON MUON-STORAGE-RINGS TO MUON COLLIDERS: PHYSICS AND FACILITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2001-06-18

    Intense muon sources for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams ({nu} factory) represents very interesting possibilities. If successful, such efforts would significantly advance the state of muon technology and provides intermediate steps in technologies required for a future high energy muon collider complex. High intensity muon: production, capture, cooling, acceleration and multi-turn muon storage rings are some of the key technology issues that needs more studies and developments, and will briefly be discussed here. A muon collider requires basically the same number of muons as for the muon storage ring neutrino factory, but would require more cooling, and simultaneous capture of both {+-} {mu}. We present some physics possibilities, muon storage ring based neutrino facility concept, site specific examples including collaboration feasibility studies, and upgrades to a full collider.

  9. Evaluation of Dynamic Behavior of Pile Foundations for Interim Storage Facilities Through Geotechnical Centrifuge Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Shizuo Tsurumaki; Hiroyuki Watanabe; Akira Tateishi; Kenichi Horikoshi; Shunichi Suzuki

    2002-07-01

    In Japan, there is a possibility that interim storage facilities for recycled nuclear fuel resources may be constructed on quaternary layers, rather than on hard rock. In such a case, the storage facilities need to be supported by pile foundations or spread foundations to meet the required safety level. The authors have conducted a series of experimental studies on the dynamic behavior of storage facilities supported by pile foundations. A centrifuge modeling technique was used to satisfy the required similitude between the reduced size model and the prototype. The centrifuge allows a high confining stress level equivalent to prototype deep soils to be generated (which is considered necessary for examining complex pile-soil interactions) as the soil strength and the deformation are highly dependent on the confining stress. The soil conditions were set at as experimental variables, and the results are compared. Since 2000, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has been conducting these research tests under the auspices on the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan. (authors)

  10. Fire hazards analysis for W-413, West Area Tank Farm Storage and Staging Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Huckfeldt, R.A.; Lott, D.T.

    1994-12-14

    In accordance with DOE Order 5480.7A, a Fire Hazards Analysis must be performed for all new facilities. The purpose of the analysis is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the fire protection objectives of the Order are met. The Order acknowledges a graded approach commensurate with the hazards involved. Tank Farms Operations must sore/stage material and equipment such as pipes, fittings, conduit, instrumentation and others related items until work packages are ready to work. Consumable materials, such as nut, bolts and welding rod, are also requires to be stored for routine and emergency work. Connex boxes and open storage is currently used for much of the storage because of the limited space at and 272WA. Safety issues based on poor housekeeping and material deteriorating due to weather damage has resulted from this inadequate storage space. It has been determined that a storage building in close proximity to the Tank Farm work force would be cost effective. This facility is classified as a safety class 4 building.

  11. Waste management facility accident analysis (WASTE ACC) system: software for analysis of waste management alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Kohout, E.F.; Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the Waste Management Facility Accident Analysis (WASTE{underscore}ACC) software, which was developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to support the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Waste Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). WASTE{underscore}ACC is a decision support and database system that is compatible with Microsoft{reg_sign} Windows{trademark}. It assesses potential atmospheric releases from accidents at waste management facilities. The software provides the user with an easy-to-use tool to determine the risk-dominant accident sequences for the many possible combinations of process technologies, waste and facility types, and alternative cases described in the WM PEIS. In addition, its structure will allow additional alternative cases and assumptions to be tested as part of the future DOE programmatic decision-making process. The WASTE{underscore}ACC system demonstrates one approach to performing a generic, systemwide evaluation of accident risks at waste management facilities. The advantages of WASTE{underscore}ACC are threefold. First, the software gets waste volume and radiological profile data that were used to perform other WM PEIS-related analyses directly from the WASTE{underscore}MGMT system. Second, the system allows for a consistent analysis across all sites and waste streams, which enables decision makers to understand more fully the trade-offs among various policy options and scenarios. Third, the system is easy to operate; even complex scenario runs are completed within minutes.

  12. Progress of the commissioning of the DELTA storage ring FEL facility

    SciTech Connect

    Noelle, D.; Geisler, A.; Ridder, M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper will present the status of the ongoing commissioning of the DELTA storage-ring FEL facility. The commissioning of the LINAC started in autumn `94. The operation of the booster started in spring `95, the first stored beam was achieved end of march `95. During the summer of `95 the commissioning of the main storage ring will be started. Simultaneously, the first FEL FELICTA I was built. All FEL hardware is in house, the undulator is already mounted in the storage-ring. Thus first operation of the undulator with electron beam, will take place immediately after the first stored beam in DELTA. Therefore, first spontanous photons are to be expected in late summer `95. As soon as DELTA provides stable and rather reliable operation the experiments on FELICITA I will start. 16 mA total average current in DELTA at 500 MeV should be sufficient to reach the laser threshold in the FEL mode of FELICITA I. Operating the device as an optical klystron should result in lasing at substantial less currents.

  13. A feasibility study for the storage of plutonium pits in non-partitioned warehouse facilities

    SciTech Connect

    James, D.; Parameswaran, S.; Nagendran, S.

    1999-02-01

    It is projected that up to 20,000 plutonium pits will be stored at Pantex for up to 50 years. The proposed storage system has to meet longevity, safety and cost requirements. Thermal, mechanical, chemical, nuclear criticality and safety performance characteristics of any proposed plutonium container design need to be formally analyzed. Plutonium generates thermal energy as it decays. The generated thermal energy may cause excessive rise of temperature. For safety and other considerations, it is important that the plutonium temperature remains relatively constant and no hot spots develop. Plutonium containers should not be disassembled for routine monitoring and there are various reasons for the need to monitor the plutonium non-obtrusively. Therefore, accurate predictions of the temperature distribution within the storage container based upon external monitoring within the storage facility needs to be developed. A heat transfer analysis of the storage container is required. The heat transfer analysis, however, requires the knowledge of the temperature and velocity of the air circulating around the containers in order to determine the heat transferred to the air from the containers by convection. Therefore, a complete flow field analysis is required prior to performing the conduction analysis of each pit. The objective of this research is, therefore, to develop and validate a numerical model to predict the temperature distribution within the plutonium storage container as a function of the ambient air temperature within the warehouse.

  14. Risk assessment of CST-7 proposed waste treatment and storage facilities Volume I: Limited-scope probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of proposed CST-7 waste treatment & storage facilities. Volume II: Preliminary hazards analysis of proposed CST-7 waste storage & treatment facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Sasser, K.

    1994-06-01

    In FY 1993, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Group [CST-7 (formerly EM-7)] requested the Probabilistic Risk and Hazards Analysis Group [TSA-11 (formerly N-6)] to conduct a study of the hazards associated with several CST-7 facilities. Among these facilities are the Hazardous Waste Treatment Facility (HWTF), the HWTF Drum Storage Building (DSB), and the Mixed Waste Receiving and Storage Facility (MWRSF), which are proposed for construction beginning in 1996. These facilities are needed to upgrade the Laboratory`s storage capability for hazardous and mixed wastes and to provide treatment capabilities for wastes in cases where offsite treatment is not available or desirable. These facilities will assist Los Alamos in complying with federal and state requlations.

  15. Dose reduction through automation of nuclear weapons dismantlement and storage procedures at the Department of Energy`s Pantex Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.A.; Poston, J.W.

    1996-06-01

    With the end of the Cold War and the subsequent break up of the Soviet Union, the number of weapons in the nuclear stockpile now greatly exceeds any foreseeable future need. To compensate for this excess an estimated 20,000 nuclear warheads have been earmarked for dismantlement and storage at the Department of Energy`s Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. It is anticipated that the majority of these warheads will arrive at the Pantex facility by the year 2000. At that time, it is estimated that current dismantlement and inventory procedures will not be adequate to control worker radiation exposure within administrative and federal dose limits. To control these exposures alternate approaches to dismantlement and inventory must be developed. One attractive approach is to automate as many activities as possible, thus reducing worker exposure. To facilitate automation of dismantlement and storage procedures, current procedures were investigated in terms of collective dose to workers, time to completion, ease of completion, and cost of automation for each task. A cost-benefit comparison was then performed in order to determine which procedures would be most cost-effective to automate.

  16. Sampling and analysis of radioactive liquid wastes and sludges in the Melton Valley and evaporator facility storage tanks at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, M.B.; Botts, J.L.; Ceo, R.N.; Ferrada, J.J.; Griest, W.H.; Keller, J.M.; Schenley, R.L.

    1990-09-01

    The sampling and analysis of the radioactive liquid wastes and sludges in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs), as well as two of the evaporator service facility storage tanks at ORNL, are described. Aqueous samples of the supernatant liquid and composite samples of the sludges were analyzed for major constituents, radionuclides, total organic carbon, and metals listed as hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Liquid samples from five tanks and sludge samples from three tanks were analyzed for organic compounds on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Target Compound List. Estimates were made of the inventory of liquid and sludge phases in the tanks. Descriptions of the sampling and analytical activities and tabulations of the results are included. The report provides data in support of the design of the proposed Waste Handling and Packaging Plant, the Liquid Low-Level Waste Solidification Project, and research and development activities (R D) activities in developing waste management alternatives. 7 refs., 8 figs., 16 tabs.

  17. Material handling for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Material Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pittman, P.; Roybal, J.; Durrer, R.; Gordon, D.

    1999-04-01

    This paper will present the design and application of material handling and automation systems currently being developed for the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Nuclear Material Storage Facility (NMSF) renovation project. The NMSF is a long-term storage facility for nuclear material in various forms. The material is stored within tubes in a rack called a basket. The material handling equipment range from simple lift assist devices to more sophisticated fully automated robots, and are split into three basic systems: a Vault Automation System, an NDA automation System, and a Drum handling System. The Vault Automation system provides a mechanism to handle a basket of material cans and to load/unload storage tubes within the material vault. In addition, another robot is provided to load/unload material cans within the baskets. The NDA Automation System provides a mechanism to move material within the small canister NDA laboratory and to load/unload the NDA instruments. The Drum Handling System consists of a series of off the shelf components used to assist in lifting heavy objects such as pallets of material or drums and barrels.

  18. Mobile Pit verification system design based on passive special nuclear material verification in weapons storage facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J. N.; Chin, M. R.; Sjoden, G. E.

    2013-07-01

    A mobile 'drive by' passive radiation detection system to be applied in special nuclear materials (SNM) storage facilities for validation and compliance purposes has been designed through the use of computational modeling and new radiation detection methods. This project was the result of work over a 1 year period to create optimal design specifications to include creation of 3D models using both Monte Carlo and deterministic codes to characterize the gamma and neutron leakage out each surface of SNM-bearing canisters. Results were compared and agreement was demonstrated between both models. Container leakages were then used to determine the expected reaction rates using transport theory in the detectors when placed at varying distances from the can. A 'typical' background signature was incorporated to determine the minimum signatures versus the probability of detection to evaluate moving source protocols with collimation. This established the criteria for verification of source presence and time gating at a given vehicle speed. New methods for the passive detection of SNM were employed and shown to give reliable identification of age and material for highly enriched uranium (HEU) and weapons grade plutonium (WGPu). The finalized 'Mobile Pit Verification System' (MPVS) design demonstrated that a 'drive-by' detection system, collimated and operating at nominally 2 mph, is capable of rapidly verifying each and every weapon pit stored in regularly spaced, shelved storage containers, using completely passive gamma and neutron signatures for HEU and WGPu. This system is ready for real evaluation to demonstrate passive total material accountability in storage facilities. (authors)

  19. Feasibility study for Zaporozhye Nuclear Power Plant spent fuel dry storage facility in Ukraine. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This document reports the results of a Feasibility Study sponsored by a TDA grant to Zaporozhye Nuclear Power Plant (ZNPP) in Ukraine to study the construction of storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel. It provides pertinent information to U.S. companies interested in marketing spent fuel storage technology and related business to countries of the former Soviet Union or Eastern Europe.

  20. CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, R.D.

    1995-10-01

    The CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) has been constructed to describe the activities required for the relocation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the CPP-603 facility. These activities are the only Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) actions identified in the Implementation Plan developed to meet the requirements of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 to the Secretary of Energy regarding an improved schedule for remediation in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Complex. As described in the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan, issued February 28, 1995, an INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan is currently under development to direct the placement of SNF currently in existing INEL facilities into interim storage, and to address the coordination of intrasite SNF movements with new receipts and intersite transfers that were identified in the DOE SNF Programmatic and INEL Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Record, of Decision. This SISMP will be a subset of the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and the activities described are being coordinated with other INEL SNF management activities. The CPP-603 relocation activities have been assigned a high priority so that established milestones will be meet, but there will be some cases where other activities will take precedence in utilization of available resources. The Draft INEL Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), INEL-94/0279, Draft Rev. 2, dated March 10, 1995, is being superseded by the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and this CPP-603 specific SISMP.

  1. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Basis for Interim Operation (BIO)

    SciTech Connect

    COVEY, L.I.

    2000-11-28

    The Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) is located in the 200 East Area adjacent to B Plant on the Hanford Site north of Richland, Washington. The current WESF mission is to receive and store the cesium and strontium capsules that were manufactured at WESF in a safe manner and in compliance with all applicable rules and regulations. The scope of WESF operations is currently limited to receipt, inspection, decontamination, storage, and surveillance of capsules in addition to facility maintenance activities. The capsules are expected to be stored at WESF until the year 2017, at which time they will have been transferred for ultimate disposition. The WESF facility was designed and constructed to process, encapsulate, and store the extracted long-lived radionuclides, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs, from wastes generated during the chemical processing of defense fuel on the Hanford Site thus ensuring isolation of hazardous radioisotopes from the environment. The construction of WESF started in 1971 and was completed in 1973. Some of the {sup 137}Cs capsules were leased by private irradiators or transferred to other programs. All leased capsules have been returned to WESF. Capsules transferred to other programs will not be returned except for the seven powder and pellet Type W overpacks already stored at WESF.

  2. Social assessment of siting a low-level radioactive waste storage facility in Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffle, R.W.; Traugott, M.J.; Stone, J.V.; McIntyre, P.D.; Davidson, C.C.; Jensen, F.V.; Coover, G.E. )

    1990-01-01

    This report presents findings from a social assessment of siting a low-level radioactive waste storage facility in Michigan. Social assessments derive from direct interaction between researchers and study participants. The report is organized into five chapters. Chapter One, Summary of Findings, focuses on key findings from the statewide telephone surveys and the in-depth ethnographic study conducted by the SNR/ISR study team. These and additional findings are discussed in greater detail in the three subsequent chapters. Chapter Two, Statewide Telephone Survey Findings, presents the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs statewide residents have regarding the LLRW project. Chapter Three, Statewide Demographic Findings, presents a detailed examination of differences among various demographic groups and includes regional analysis. Chapter Four, Hillsdale-area Ethnographic Study Findings, discusses perceived impacts of the proposed LLRW storage facility on local residents who mistakenly came to believe that their area had been specially selected as the location for the facility. Specifically, the chapter presents the development, spread, shape and persistence of what is termed a risk perception shadow in the greater Hillsdale area. Possible causes of the shadow also are discussed, and comparisons are made between statewide and Hillsdale-area survey populations. Chapter Five, Research Methods, presents a discussion of the social assessment research methods used to derive these findings.

  3. Hazard Evaluation for Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Sludge at the Solid Waste Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect

    SCHULTZ, M.V.

    2000-08-22

    As part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) storage basin clean-up project, sludge that has accumulated in the K Basins due to corrosion of damaged irradiated N Reactor will be loaded into containers and placed in interim storage. The Hanford Site Treatment Complex (T Plant) has been identified as the location where the sludge will be stored until final disposition of the material occurs. Long term storage of sludge from the K Basin fuel storage facilities requires identification and analysis of potential accidents involving sludge storage in T Plant. This report is prepared as the initial step in the safety assurance process described in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports and HNF-PRO-704, Hazards and Accident Analysis Process. This report documents the evaluation of potential hazards and off-normal events associated with sludge storage activities. This information will be used in subsequent safety analyses, design, and operations procedure development to ensure safe storage. The hazards evaluation for the storage of SNF sludge in T-Plant used the Hazards and Operability Analysis (HazOp) method. The hazard evaluation identified 42 potential hazardous conditions. No hazardous conditions involving hazardous/toxic chemical concerns were identified. Of the 42 items identified in the HazOp study, eight were determined to have potential for onsite worker consequences. No items with potential offsite consequences were identified in the HazOp study. Hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker or offsite consequences are candidates for quantitative consequence analysis. The hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker consequences were grouped into two event categories, Container failure due to overpressure - internal to T Plant, and Spill of multiple containers. The two event categories will be developed into accident scenarios that will be quantitatively analyzed to determine release consequences. A third category, Container failure due to

  4. Alternative poultry litter storage for improved transportation and use as a soil amendment.

    PubMed

    Penn, Chad J; Vitale, Jeffery; Fine, Scott; Payne, Joshua; Warren, Jason G; Zhang, Hailin; Eastman, Margaret; Herron, Sheri L

    2011-01-01

    Transportation of poultry litter out of nutrient limited watersheds such as the Illinois River basin (eastern Oklahoma) is a logical solution for minimizing phosphorus (P) losses from soils to surface waters. Transportation costs are basedon mass of load and distance transported. This study investigated an alternative litter storage technique designed to promote carbon (C) degradation, thereby concentrating nutrients for the purpose of decreasing transportation costs through decreased mass. Poultry litter was stored in 0.90-Mg conical piles under semipermeable tarps and adjusted to 40% moisture content, tested with and without addition of alum (aluminum sulfate). additional study was conducted using 3.6-Mg piles under the same conditions, except tested with and without use of aeration pipes. Samples were analyzed before and after (8 wk) storage. Litter mass degradation (i.e., loss in mass due to organic matter decomposition) was estimated on the basis of changes in litter total P contents. Additional characterization included pH, total nutrients, moisture content, total C, and degree of humification. Litter storage significantly decreased litter mass (16 to 27%), concentrated nutrients such as P and potassium (K) and increased proportion of fulvic and humic acids. The addition of aeration pipes increased mass degradationrelative to piles without aeration pipes. Nitrogen volatilization losses were minimized with alum additions. Increases in P and K concentrations resulted in greater monetary value per unit mass compared with fresh litter. Such increases translate to increased litter shipping distance and cost savings of $17.2 million over 25 yr for litter movement out of eastern Oklahoma. PMID:21488512

  5. Assessment of Performance for Alternative Cover Systems on a Waste Rock Storage Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argunhan, C.; Yazicigil, H.

    2015-12-01

    A cover is usually applied to the top of the mining wastes to prevent exposure of sulphide minerals in the waste to water and oxygen ingress in order to mitigate the unwanted consequences such as acid rock drainage. Hence, the selection and design of the appropriate cover system by considering the climatic conditions, local unsaturated and saturated properties and the availability of the cover materials become an important issue. This study aims to investigate the performance of various cover systems and designs for the North Waste Rock Storage Area in Kışladağ Gold Mine located in Uşak in Western Turkey. SEEP/W and VADOSE/W softwares are used to model the flow in unsaturated and saturated zones and to assess the performance of various cover systems. The soil water characteristics and parameters used in the model for saturated and unsaturated conditions were taken from field tests and literature. Accuracy of input data is checked during calibration for steady state conditions with SEEP/W. Then, bedrock, waste rock and cover alternatives are modeled under transient conditions for 20 years using daily climatic data. The effectiveness of the various cover systems for minimizing the ingress of water and air that cause acid rock drainage is evaluated and recommendations are made so that the impacts to groundwater from the waste rock storage areas during closure period are minimized.

  6. Facile synthesis of graphene oxide-modified lithium hydroxide for low-temperature chemical heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xixian; Huang, Hongyu; Wang, Zhihui; Kubota, Mitsuhiro; He, Zhaohong; Kobayashi, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    LiOH·H2O nanoparticles supported on graphene oxide (GO) were facilely synthesized by a hydrothermal process. The mean diameter of nanoparticles on the integrated graphene sheet was about 5-10 nm showed by SEM and TEM results. XRD results suggested that the nanoparticles are in good agreement with the data of LiOH·H2O. The as-prepared sample showed a greatly enhanced thermal energy storage density and exhibit higher rate of heat release than pure lithium hydroxide, and thermal conductivity of composites increased due to the introduction of nano carbon. LiOH·H2O/GO nanocomposites are novel chemical heat storage materials for potential highly efficient energy system.

  7. Holographic data storage crystals for the LDEF. [long duration exposure facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callen, W. Russell; Gaylord, Thomas K.

    1992-01-01

    Lithium niobate is a significant electro-optic material, with potential applications in ultra high capacity storage and processing systems. Lithium niobate is the material of choice for many integrated optical devices and holographic mass memory systems. For crystals of lithium niobate were passively exposed to the space environment of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Three of these crystals contained volume holograms. Although the crystals suffered the surface damage characteristics of most of the other optical components on the Georgia Tech tray, the crystals were recovered intact. The holograms were severely degraded because of the lengthy exposure, but the bulk properties are being investigated to determine the spaceworthiness for space data storage and retrieval systems.

  8. 7 CFR 301.89-16 - Compensation for grain storage facilities, flour millers, National Survey participants, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... incurred because of the Karnal bunt regulations and emergency actions, as follows: (a) Decontamination of... inspector ordering decontamination of the facilities, are eligible to be compensated, on a one time only... decontamination. However, compensation will not exceed $20,000 per grain storage facility (as defined in §...

  9. 7 CFR 301.89-16 - Compensation for grain storage facilities, flour millers, National Survey participants, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... incurred because of the Karnal bunt regulations and emergency actions, as follows: (a) Decontamination of... inspector ordering decontamination of the facilities, are eligible to be compensated, on a one time only... decontamination. However, compensation will not exceed $20,000 per grain storage facility (as defined in §...

  10. 7 CFR 301.89-16 - Compensation for grain storage facilities, flour millers, National Survey participants, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... incurred because of the Karnal bunt regulations and emergency actions, as follows: (a) Decontamination of... inspector ordering decontamination of the facilities, are eligible to be compensated, on a one time only... decontamination. However, compensation will not exceed $20,000 per grain storage facility (as defined in §...

  11. Long-term storage facility for reactor compartments in Sayda Bay - German support for utilization of nuclear submarines in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, Dietmar; Voelzke, Holger; Weber, Wolfgang; Noack, Volker; Baeuerle, Guenther

    2007-07-01

    The German-Russian project that is part of the G8 initiative on Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction focuses on the speedy construction of a land-based interim storage facility for nuclear submarine reactor compartments at Sayda Bay near Murmansk. This project includes the required infrastructure facilities for long-term storage of about 150 reactor compartments for a period of about 70 years. The interim storage facility is a precondition for effective activities of decommissioning and dismantlement of almost all nuclear-powered submarines of the Russian Northern Fleet. The project also includes the establishment of a computer-assisted waste monitoring system. In addition, the project involves clearing Sayda Bay of other shipwrecks of the Russian navy. On the German side the project is carried out by the Energiewerke Nord GmbH (EWN) on behalf of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Labour (BMWi). On the Russian side the Kurchatov Institute holds the project management of the long-term interim storage facility in Sayda Bay, whilst the Nerpa Shipyard, which is about 25 km away from the storage facility, is dismantling the submarines and preparing the reactor compartments for long-term interim storage. The technical monitoring of the German part of this project, being implemented by BMWi, is the responsibility of the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM). This paper gives an overview of the German-Russian project and a brief description of solutions for nuclear submarine disposal in other countries. At Nerpa shipyard, being refurbished with logistic and technical support from Germany, the reactor compartments are sealed by welding, provided with biological shielding, subjected to surface treatment and conservation measures. Using floating docks, a tugboat tows the reactor compartments from Nerpa shipyard to the interim storage facility at Sayda Bay where they will be left on the on-shore concrete

  12. Power Hardware-in-the-Loop (PHIL) Testing Facility for Distributed Energy Storage (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer.J.; Lundstrom, B.; Simpson, M.; Pratt, A.

    2014-06-01

    The growing deployment of distributed, variable generation and evolving end-user load profiles presents a unique set of challenges to grid operators responsible for providing reliable and high quality electrical service. Mass deployment of distributed energy storage systems (DESS) has the potential to solve many of the associated integration issues while offering reliability and energy security benefits other solutions cannot. However, tools to develop, optimize, and validate DESS control strategies and hardware are in short supply. To fill this gap, NREL has constructed a power hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) test facility that connects DESS, grid simulator, and load bank hardware to a distribution feeder simulation.

  13. An information management system for a spent nuclear fuel interim storage facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, Robert J.; Chiu, Hsien-Lang; Giles, Todd; Horak, Karl Emanuel; Jow, Hong-Nian

    2010-12-01

    We describe an integrated information management system for an independent spent fuel dry-storage installation (ISFSI) that can provide for (1) secure and authenticated data collection, (2) data analysis, (3) dissemination of information to appropriate stakeholders via a secure network, and (4) increased public confidence and support of the facility licensing and operation through increased transparency. This information management system is part of a collaborative project between Sandia National Laboratories, Taiwan Power Co., and the Fuel Cycle Materials Administration of Taiwan's Atomic Energy Council, which is investigating how to implement this concept.

  14. NPH Risk Assessment and Mitigation of a SRS Facility for the Safe Storage of Tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, J.R.; Griffin, M.J.; Bjorkman, G.S.

    1995-10-18

    Because of the reduction in the nation`s stockpile of weapon systems a large amount of tritium is being returned to the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC. Due to the increased quantity of tritium returning to SRS, the SRS Tritium Facility was tasked to determine the most cost effective means to safely store the tritium gas in a short period of time. This paper presents results of the risk assessment developed to evaluate the safe storage of tritium at SRS, and highlights the structural design of the HIVES used as the cost-effective short term NPH mitigation solution.

  15. Transformative research issues and opportunities in alternative energy generation and storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Rockett, A.; Chung, Y. W.; Blaschek, H.; Butterfield, S.; Chance, R. R.; Ferekides, C.; Robinson, M.; Snyder, S. W; Thackeray, M.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a summary of research issues and opportunities in alternative energy source research identified by panels of experts assembled by the Engineering Directorate of the US National Science Foundation. The objective was to identify transformative research issues and opportunities to make alternative energy sources viable. The article presents motivations for energy research, grand challenges, and specific challenges in the research areas covered. The grand challenges identified for the United States include supplying 30% of US electricity from photovoltaics by 2030, supplying 25% of US electricity from wind by 2025, displacing 30% of US hydrocarbon use by 2030 with bio-based products, and providing a practical 250-300 W h/kg energy storage system by 2025. Similar challenges could be outlined along the same lines for the remainder of the world. Examples of specific areas of research focus identified as promising include high performance p-type transparent conductors, multijunction thin-film photovoltaic devices, defects in chalcogenide semiconductors, experimental study and numerical modeling of the fluid mechanics of airflow as applied to wind turbines, improved materials for wind turbines, methods for creating high energy density transportable biological feedstocks, biorefinery processes yielding infrastructure-compatible biofuels and biochemicals directly, and improved electrodes and electrolytes for Li ion batteries. Arguments for each of these as research priorities are given.

  16. Radiological considerations regarding an alternate method for the placement of intermediate impact absorbers at the Canister Storage Building (CSB)

    SciTech Connect

    ELDER, R.E.

    2003-04-01

    This report documents radiological considerations arising from the proposed implementation of an alternate method for intermediate impact absorber placement at the Canister Storage Building (CSB). These considerations include revising the dose rate estimate, at deck level over an open storage tube and outlining the administrative controls necessary for this implementation. Currently, the MCO Handling Machine (MHM) is used to install the intermediate impact absorbers. The proposed alternative would utilize a mobile crane, thus freeing up the MHM to handle the movement of MCOs within the CSB.

  17. Evaluation of closure alternatives for the Building 3001 Storage Canal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The Bldg. 3001 Storage Canal at ORNL is leaking approximately 400 gal of water per day. This report presents the Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) Team's evaluation of plans and presents recommendations for interim closure alternatives to stop the release of radionuclides and potential release of heavy metals into the environment. This is a conceptual evaluation and does not include detailed engineering of physical mitigation methods. The alternatives address only interim closure measures and not final decommissioning of the canal.

  18. Assessment of Energy Storage Alternatives in the Puget Sound Energy System Volume 2: Energy Storage Evaluation Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Di; Jin, Chunlian; Balducci, Patrick J.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2013-12-01

    This volume presents the battery storage evaluation tool developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), which is used to evaluate benefits of battery storage for multiple grid applications, including energy arbitrage, balancing service, capacity value, distribution system equipment deferral, and outage mitigation. This tool is based on the optimal control strategies to capture multiple services from a single energy storage device. In this control strategy, at each hour, a look-ahead optimization is first formulated and solved to determine battery base operating point. The minute by minute simulation is then performed to simulate the actual battery operation. This volume provide background and manual for this evaluation tool.

  19. Thermal analysis of the drywell for the Nuclear Material Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Steinke, R.G.

    1997-02-01

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility Renovation Project has a conceptual design for the facility to store nuclear materials in containers inside drywells with passive cooling for long-term storage. The CFX thermal-hydraulic computer program was used to analyze internal heat-transfer processes by conduction, convection, and radiation with natural circulation of air by hydraulic buoyancy with turbulence and thermal stratification (TS) evaluated. A vertical drywell was modeled with 14 containers on support plates at 12-in. intervals. The TS of bay air outside the drywell increased the container maximum temperature by 0.728 F for each 1.0 F of bay-air TS from the bottom to the top of the drywell. The drywell outer-surface peak heat flux was shifted downward because of the effect of bay-air TS. An equivalent model was evaluated by the nodal-network conduction, convection, and radiation heat-transfer computer program (Thermal System Analysis Program) TSAP. The TSAP results are in good agreement with the CFX-model results, with the difference in results understood based on the approximations of each model.

  20. Stress evaluation of the primary tank of a double-shell underground storage tank facility

    SciTech Connect

    Atalay, M.B.; Stine, M.D.; Farnworth, S.K.

    1994-12-01

    A facility called the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) is being designed at the Department of Energy`s Hanford site. The MWTF is expected to be completed in 1998 and will consist of six underground double-shell waste storage tanks and associated systems. These tanks will provide safe and environmentally acceptable storage capacity to handle waste generated during single-shell and double-shell tank safety mitigation and remediation activities. This paper summarizes the analysis and qualification of the primary tank structure of the MWTF, as performed by ICF Kaiser Hanford during the latter phase of Title 1 (Preliminary) design. Both computer finite element analysis (FEA) and hand calculations methods based on the so-called Tank Seismic Experts Panel (TSEP) Guidelines were used to perform the analysis and evaluation. Based on the evaluations summarized in this paper, it is concluded that the primary tank structure of the MWTF satisfies the project design requirements. In addition, the hand calculations performed using the methodologies provided in the TSEP Guidelines demonstrate that, except for slosh height, the capacities exceed the demand. The design accounts for the adverse effect of the excessive slosh height demand, i.e., inadequate freeboard, by increasing the hydrodynamic wall and roof pressures appropriately, and designing the tank for such increased pressures.

  1. 40 CFR 63.1037 - Alternative means of emission limitation: Enclosed-vented process units or affected facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternative means of emission limitation: Enclosed-vented process units or affected facilities. 63.1037 Section 63.1037 Protection of... Equipment Leaks-Control Level 2 Standards § 63.1037 Alternative means of emission limitation:...

  2. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: Metal blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. The nuclear material is converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Blending HEU (highly enriched uranium) with less-enriched uranium to form LEU has been proposed as a disposition option. Five technologies are being assessed for blending HEU. This document provides data to be used in environmental impact analysis for the HEU-LEU disposition option that uses metal blending with an oxide waste product. It is divided into: mission and assumptions, conversion and blending facility descriptions, process descriptions and requirements, resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards discussion, and intersite transportation.

  3. TEMPERATURE PREDICTION IN 3013 CONTAINERS IN K AREA MATERIAL STORAGE (KAMS) FACILITY USING REGRESSION METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N

    2008-04-22

    3013 containers are designed in accordance with the DOE-STD-3013-2004. These containers are qualified to store plutonium (Pu) bearing materials such as PuO2 for 50 years. DOT shipping packages such as the 9975 are used to store the 3013 containers in the K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) facility at Savannah River Site (SRS). DOE-STD-3013-2004 requires that a comprehensive surveillance program be set up to ensure that the 3013 container design parameters are not violated during the long term storage. To ensure structural integrity of the 3013 containers, thermal analyses using finite element models were performed to predict the contents and component temperatures for different but well defined parameters such as storage ambient temperature, PuO{sub 2} density, fill heights, weights, and thermal loading. Interpolation is normally used to calculate temperatures if the actual parameter values are different from the analyzed values. A statistical analysis technique using regression methods is proposed to develop simple polynomial relations to predict temperatures for the actual parameter values found in the containers. The analysis shows that regression analysis is a powerful tool to develop simple relations to assess component temperatures.

  4. Asphyxiation Incidents by Hydrogen Sulfide at Manure Storage Facilities of Swine Livestock Farms in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihoon; Kang, Taesun; Jin, Suhyun; Heo, Yong; Kim, Kyungran; Lee, Kyungsuk; Tsai, Perngjy; Yoon, Chungsik

    2016-01-01

    Livestock workers are involved in a variety of tasks, such as caring for animals, maintaining the breeding facilities, cleaning, and manure handling, and are exposed to health and safety risks. Hydrogen sulfide is considered the most toxic by-product of the manure handling process at livestock facilities. Except for several reports in developed countries, the statistics and cause of asphyxiation incidents in farms have not been collected and reported systematically, although the number of these incidents is expected to increase in developing and underdeveloped countries. In this study, the authors compiled the cases of work-related asphyxiation incidents at livestock manure storage facilities and analyzed the main causes. In this survey, a total of 17 incidents were identified through newspapers or online searches and public reports. Thirty workers died and eight were injured due to work-related tasks and rescue attempts from 1998 to 2013 in Korea. Of the 30 fatalities, 18 occurred during manure handling/maintenance tasks and 12 during rescue attempts. All incidents except for one case occurred during the warm season from the late spring (April) to early autumn (September) when manure is likely to decompose rapidly. It is important to train employees involved in the operation of the facilities (i.e., owners, managers, employees) regarding the appropriate prevention strategies for confined space management, such as hazard identification before entry, periodical facility inspection, restriction of unnecessary access, proper ventilation, and health and safety. Sharing information or case reports on previous incidents could also help prevent similar cases from occurring and reduce the number of fatalities and injuries. PMID:26765950

  5. Leak-Path Factor Analysis for the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, C.; Leonard, M.

    1999-06-13

    Leak-path factors (LPFs) were calculated for the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) located in the Plutonium Facility, Building 41 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 55. In the unlikely event of an accidental fire powerful enough to fail a container holding actinides, the subsequent release of oxides, modeled as PuO{sub 2} aerosols, from the facility and into the surrounding environment was predicted. A 1-h nondestructive assay (NDA) laboratory fire accident was simulated with the MELCOR severe accident analysis code. Fire-driven air movement along with wind-driven air infiltration transported a portion of these actinides from the building. This fraction is referred to as the leak-path factor. The potential effect of smoke aerosol on the transport of the actinides was investigated to verify the validity of neglecting the smoke as conservative. The input model for the NMSF consisted of a system of control volumes, flow pathways, and surfaces sufficient to model the thermal-hydraulic conditions within the facility and the aerosol transport data necessary to simulate the transport of PuO{sub 2} particles. The thermal-hydraulic, heat-transfer, and aerosol-transport models are solved simultaneously with data being exchanged between models. A MELCOR input model was designed such that it would reproduce the salient features of the fire per the corresponding CFAST calculation. Air infiltration into and out of the facility would be affected strongly by wind-driven differential pressures across the building. Therefore, differential pressures were applied to each side of the building according to guidance found in the ASHRAE handbook using a standard-velocity head equation with a leading multiplier to account for the orientation of the wind with the building. The model for the transport of aerosols considered all applicable transport processes, but the deposition within the building clearly was dominated by gravitational settling.

  6. A new method of geobiological sample storage by snap freezing under alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morono, Y.; Terada, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Hirose, T.; Xiao, N.; Sugeno, M.; Ohwada, N.; Inagaki, F.

    2012-12-01

    Scientific ocean drilling provides unprecedented opportunities to study the deep subseafloor biosphere. Especially, subseafloor living life and its genomes are significant components, since the activity may play some roles in global biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, metals, and other elements over geologic times. Given the significance of deep biological components as well as the potential application of future analytical technologies to the core, the material (or portions thereof) should be preserved in the best appropriate manner for long-term storage. Here we report a novel technology to freeze the cored sample with the least damage on scientifically important multiple characteristics including microbial cells. In the conventional freezer, expanding volume of pore space by the formation of ice crystals may change the (micro-) structure in the core sample (e.g., cell, micro-fossils). The cell alive system (CAS) is the new super-quick freezing system that applies alternating magnetic field for vibrating water molecules in the samples: i.e., the vibration leads to the stable super-cooled condition of the liquid-phase water at around -7 to -10 degree-C, keeping the liquid at the low temperature uniformly. Following further decrease of temperature enables the snap and hence uniform freezing of the samples with minimal size of the ice crystal formation, resulting in the minimum damage on structurally fragile components such as microbial cells and its DNA. We tested the CAS freezing technique for sediment core samples obtained by the Chikyu training cruise 905 and others. The core samples from various depths were sub-sampled, and immediately frozen in the CAS system along with the standard freezing method under the temperature of -20, -80, and -196 (liquid nitrogen) degree-C. Microbial cell abundance showed that the normal freezing decreased the number of microbial cells, whereas the CAS freezing resulted in almost no loss of the cells. We also tested

  7. Pilot scale facility to determine gaseous emissions from livestock slurry during storage.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Søren O; Skov, Morten; Drøscher, Per; Adamsen, Anders P S

    2009-01-01

    Livestock production is a growing source of air pollution, locally and to the wider environment. Improved livestock manure management has the potential to reduce environmental impacts, but there is a need for methodologies to precisely quantify emissions. This paper describes and evaluates a novel storage facility for livestock slurry consisting of eight 6.5-m(3) cylindrical units. The stores may be equipped with airtight covers and ventilated during storage or during measurement only. Each store has eight air inlets (160 mm diameter) and a single outlet in the cover connected to a main ventilation duct. The stores can also be used as static enclosures. Ventilation can be regulated within the range of 50 to 250 m(3) h(-1). A gas sampling line enables sampling of odorants using automatic thermal desorption tubes, ammonia using acid traps, and greenhouse gases using gas sampling bags (pooled samples) or a syringe (time point samples). Complete recovery of CH(4) independent of ventilation rate was demonstrated. Vertical profiles of CO(2) and CH(4) above the slurry surface with and without ventilation and mixing of the headspace indicated methane oxidation activity in the surface crust. p-Cresol and 4-ethyl phenol emission from pig slurry was identified by GC-MS analysis of odor collected on adsorption tubes. Ammonia emissions between 0 and 166 mg N m(-2) h(-1) were observed during storage of pig slurry with and without surface crust and cover. A comparison of pooled and averaged time point measurements of CO(2), CH(4), and N(2)O indicated that pooled samples account for the diurnal variations under realistic storage conditions. PMID:19549932

  8. A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrell, Dennis L.

    1993-01-01

    A shielded storage rack has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which processes and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGs. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

  9. A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrell, D.L.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

  10. A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrell, D.L.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE`s Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford`s MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford`s calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

  11. The Earthscope USArray Array Network Facility (ANF): Evolution of Data Acquisition, Processing, and Storage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, G. A.; Battistuz, B.; Foley, S.; Vernon, F. L.; Eakins, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Since April 2004 the Earthscope USArray Transportable Array (TA) network has grown to over 400 broadband seismic stations that stream multi-channel data in near real-time to the Array Network Facility in San Diego. In total, over 1.7 terabytes per year of 24-bit, 40 samples-per-second seismic and state of health data is recorded from the stations. The ANF provides analysts access to real-time and archived data, as well as state-of-health data, metadata, and interactive tools for station engineers and the public via a website. Additional processing and recovery of missing data from on-site recorders (balers) at the stations is performed before the final data is transmitted to the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC). Assembly of the final data set requires additional storage and processing capabilities to combine the real-time data with baler data. The infrastructure supporting these diverse computational and storage needs currently consists of twelve virtualized Sun Solaris Zones executing on nine physical server systems. The servers are protected against failure by redundant power, storage, and networking connections. Storage needs are provided by a hybrid iSCSI and Fiber Channel Storage Area Network (SAN) with access to over 40 terabytes of RAID 5 and 6 storage. Processing tasks are assigned to systems based on parallelization and floating-point calculation needs. On-site buffering at the data-loggers provide protection in case of short-term network or hardware problems, while backup acquisition systems at the San Diego Supercomputer Center and the DMC protect against catastrophic failure of the primary site. Configuration management and monitoring of these systems is accomplished with open-source (Cfengine, Nagios, Solaris Community Software) and commercial tools (Intermapper). In the evolution from a single server to multiple virtualized server instances, Sun Cluster software was evaluated and found to be unstable in our environment. Shared filesystem

  12. Partial Closure Report for the Area 514 Treatment and Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Abri, M

    2005-05-02

    The purpose of this partial closure report is to inform the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) of the status of final closure of the Area 514 Treatment and Storage Facility (Area 514) and fulfill the DTSC requirements to proceed with the implementation of the interim action. Area 514 is located at the Livermore main site of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). LLNL is owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and operated jointly by DOE and the University of California. LLNL received its permit to operate hazardous waste facilities from DTSC in 1997. The hazardous waste treatment and storage operations of Area 514 were transferred to a newly constructed complex, the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF), in 2003. Once the DWTF was operational, the final closure of Area 514 began in accordance with the DTSC-approved closure plan in June 2004. Abri Environmental Engineering, Inc., was retained by LLNL to observe the A514 closure process and prepare this partial closure report and certification. Prior to closure, the configuration of the Area 514 Treatment and Storage Facility consisted of Building 514, the Area 514-1 Container Storage and Treatment unit, the Area 514-2 Container Storage Unit (CSU), the Area 514-3 CSU, Building 513, the Wastewater Treatment Tank Farm unit, and the associated Area 514 yard area. The fenced area of Area 514 included approximately 27,350 ft2 on the LLNL Livermore site. To date, except for the 514-3 CSU, all of the other Area 514 structures have been demolished; and sampling and analysis have taken place. The non-hazardous wastes have been disposed of. At the time of writing this report, the hazardous, mixed, and low-level radioactive wastes are in the process of profiling for final disposition. Once the disposition of all wastes has been finalized, the implementation of the approved closure plan will be completed. As a part of the closure process, LLNL is required to submit a closure report and a

  13. Studies of cryogenic propellant storage and handling for the lunar landing and launch facility (complex 39L)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsley, Jerald N.

    1988-01-01

    A brief description of Complex 39L as it is currently conceived is presented. A brief discussion of lunar thermal history is then presented. From this follows a discussion of the current lunar thermal environment which will impact the design of cryogenic storage and handling facilities on the moon. Some previous studies are discussed. A conceptual design of liquid oxygen and hydrogen storage facilities is presented. The essential feature of this facility is that cryogens are to be stored in a number of small tanks which can serve as lander propellant tanks rather than as one large storage vessel. These tanks will be placed under a Fuel Inventory Tent (FIT) for shadow shielding. Methods of dealing with propellant boil-off are discussed. A base case cascade refrigeration system for requirements are such that it seems very feasible to construct a prototype boil-off recovery system in a laboratory environment.

  14. Integrated monitoring and reviewing systems for the Rokkasho Spent Fuel Receipt and Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Yasuhiro; Ishikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Yuji

    1998-12-31

    The Rokkasho Spent Fuel Receipt and Storage (RSFS) Facility at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) in Japan is expected to begin operations in 1998. Effective safeguarding by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Japan Atomic Energy Bureau (JAEB) inspectors requires monitoring the time of transfer, direction of movement, and number of spent fuel assemblies transferred. At peak throughput, up to 1,000 spent fuel assemblies will be accepted by the facility in a 90-day period. In order for the safeguards inspector to efficiently review the resulting large amounts of inspection information, an unattended monitoring system was developed that integrates containment and surveillance (C/S) video with radiation monitors. This allows for an integrated review of the facility`s radiation data, C/S video, and operator declaration data. This paper presents an outline of the integrated unattended monitoring hardware and associated data reviewing software. The hardware consists of a multicamera optical surveillance (MOS) system radiation monitoring gamma-ray and neutron detector (GRAND) electronics, and an intelligent local operating network (ILON). The ILON was used for time synchronization and MOS video triggers. The new software consists of a suite of tools, each one specific to a single data type: radiation data, surveillance video, and operator declarations. Each tool can be used in a stand-alone mode as a separate ion application or configured to communicate and match time-synchronized data with any of the other tools. A data summary and comparison application (Integrated Review System [IRS]) coordinates the use of all of the data-specific review tools under a single-user interface. It therefore automates and simplifies the importation of data and the data-specific analyses.

  15. Verification of maximum impact force for interim storage cask for the Fast Flux Testing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.W.; Chang, S.J.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform an impact analysis of the Interim Storage Cask (ISC) of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) for a 4-ft end drop. The ISC is a concrete cask used to store spent nuclear fuels. The analysis is to justify the impact force calculated by General Atomics (General Atomics, 1994) using the ILMOD computer code. ILMOD determines the maximum force developed by the concrete crushing which occurs when the drop energy has been absorbed. The maximum force, multiplied by the dynamic load factor (DLF), was used to determine the maximum g-level on the cask during a 4-ft end drop accident onto the heavily reinforced FFTF Reactor Service Building`s concrete surface. For the analysis, this surface was assumed to be unyielding and the cask absorbed all the drop energy. This conservative assumption simplified the modeling used to qualify the cask`s structural integrity for this accident condition.

  16. Letter technical plan for the hydrazine blending and storage facility groundwater investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-13

    This draft final letter technical plan presents the proposed scope of work for the hydrazine blending and storage facility ground water investigation. The purposes of the investigation are to assess the nature and extent of hydrazine fuel compounds (hydrazine, UDMH, MMH, NDMA) in ground water at or near the HBSF and evaluate the potential for migration of the fuel compounds. The scope of work proposed includes: collecting ground water samples from 12 wells near the HBSF; collecting 1 effluent sample at the basin a neck treatment system; collecting 1 influent sample at both the north and northwest boundary systems. This plan describes the following: field program - sampling locations and procedures, decontamination; analytical program - parameters, certified reporting limits; QA/QC control.

  17. Development of a methodology to accelerate a spontaneous grass colonization in a tailings storage facility under semiarid mediterranean climate type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginocchio, Rosanna; Arellano, Eduardo; Morales-Ladron de Guevara, Arturo

    2016-04-01

    Phytostabilization of massive mine tailings (>400 he) under semiarid environments is challenging, particularly when no organic amendments are locally available and no irrigation is possible. Increasing tendency for reprocessing old tailings to recover valued metals further pioneer the need for simple but effective plant covers. The choice of plant species and form of management are thus very important. CODELCO-Chile chose the Cauquenes post-operational tailings storage facility (TFS; 700 ha), that will be reprocessed for copper and other elements in the near future, to evaluate efficacy of the phytostabilization technology under semiarid conditions in central Chile. Surface application of a polymer (Soiltac TM) has been used for wind control of tailings but phytostabilization is considered as a best cost-effective alternative. A field study was performed to define a management program to improve the establishment and cover of an annual native grass (Vulpia myuros var. megalura), a spontaneous colonizer of the TSF. Considered management factors were control of macro herbivores (with and without fence), macronutrient improvement (with and without application of N-rich foliar fertilizer), and improvement of seed retention in the substrate (with and without small-scale rugosity; with and without lived wind-breakers; with and without mechanical wind-breakers). Each treatment was replicated three times and established in 2 m x 2 m quadrats. Plant response variables were monitored after 1 and 2 grass growing seasons. Application of N-rich foliar fertilizer and any wind control mechanism for seed retention in the substrate were effective for significantly improving both grass cover and biomass production in time, irrespective of macro-herbivore control. Seed production was significantly improved when macro herbivores were excluded and was positively and significantly correlated to vegetative biomass production. When applying this management program for tailings

  18. Analysis of long-term impacts of TRU waste remaining at generator/storage sites for No Action Alternative 2

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, J.W.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Bergeron, M.P.; Streile, G.P.

    1997-09-01

    This report is a supplement to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal-Phase Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II). Described herein are the underlying information, data, and assumptions used to estimate the long-term human-health impacts from exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in transuranic (TRU) waste remaining at major generator/storage sites after loss of institutional control under No Action Alternative 2. Under No Action Alternative 2, TRU wastes would not be emplaced at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) but would remain at generator/storage sites in surface or near-surface storage. Waste generated at smaller sites would be consolidated at the major generator/storage sites. Current TRU waste management practices would continue, but newly generated waste would be treated to meet the WIPP waste acceptance criteria. For this alternative, institutional control was assumed to be lost 100 years after the end of the waste generation period, with exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in the TRU waste possible from direct intrusion and release to the surrounding environment. The potential human-health impacts from exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in TRU waste were analyzed for two different types of scenarios. Both analyses estimated site-specific, human-health impacts at seven major generator/storage sites: the Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The analysis focused on these seven sites because 99 % of the estimated TRU waste volume and inventory would remain there under the assumptions of No Action Alternative 2.

  19. F/H Effluent Treatment Facility filtration upgrade alternative evaluations overview

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, W.C. Jr.; Poirier, M.R.; Brown, D.F.

    1992-01-01

    The F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was designed to treat process wastewater from the 200-F/H Production Facilities (routine wastewater) as well as intermittent flows from the F/H Retention Basins and F/H Cooling Water Basins (nonroutine wastewater). Since start-up of the ETF at SRS in 1988, the treatment process has experienced difficulties processing routine and nonroutine wastewater. Studies have identified high bacteria and bacterial decomposition products in the wastewater as the cause for excessive fouling of the filtration system. In order to meet Waste Management requirements for the treatment of processed wastewater, an upgrade of the ETF filtration system is being developed. This upgrade must be able to process the nonroutine wastewater at design capacity. As a result, a study of alternative filter technologies was conducted utilizing simulated wastewater. The simulated wastewater tests have been completed. Three filter technologies, centrifugal polymeric ultrafilters, tubular polymeric ultrafilters, and backwashable cartridge filters have been selected for further evaluation utilizing actual ETF wastewater.

  20. F/H Effluent Treatment Facility filtration upgrade alternative evaluations overview

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, W.C. Jr.; Poirier, M.R.; Brown, D.F.

    1992-07-01

    The F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was designed to treat process wastewater from the 200-F/H Production Facilities (routine wastewater) as well as intermittent flows from the F/H Retention Basins and F/H Cooling Water Basins (nonroutine wastewater). Since start-up of the ETF at SRS in 1988, the treatment process has experienced difficulties processing routine and nonroutine wastewater. Studies have identified high bacteria and bacterial decomposition products in the wastewater as the cause for excessive fouling of the filtration system. In order to meet Waste Management requirements for the treatment of processed wastewater, an upgrade of the ETF filtration system is being developed. This upgrade must be able to process the nonroutine wastewater at design capacity. As a result, a study of alternative filter technologies was conducted utilizing simulated wastewater. The simulated wastewater tests have been completed. Three filter technologies, centrifugal polymeric ultrafilters, tubular polymeric ultrafilters, and backwashable cartridge filters have been selected for further evaluation utilizing actual ETF wastewater.

  1. A Facile Route to Metal Oxides/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Macrofilm Nanocomposites for Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zeyuan; Wei, Bingqing

    2015-05-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of transition-metal oxides and carbon nanomaterials with a desired size and structure are highly demanded for high performance energy storage devices. Here, a facile two-step and cost-efficient approach relying on directly thermal treatment of chemical-vapor-deposition products is developed as a general synthetic method to prepare a family of metal oxides (MxOy (M=Fe, Co, Ni))/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) macrofilm nanocomposites. The MxOy nanoparticles obtained are of 3-17 nm in diameter and homogeneously anchor on the free-standing SWNT macrofilms. NiO/SWNT also exhibits a high specific capacitance of 400 F g-1 and fast charge-transfer Faradaic redox reactions to achieve asymmetric supercapacitors with a high power and energy density. All MxOy/SWNT nanocomposites could deliver a high capacity beyond 1000 mAh g-1 and show excellent cycling stability for lithium-ion batteries. The impressive results demonstrate the promise for energy storage devices and the general approach may pave the way to synthesize other functional nanocomposites.

  2. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county`s future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

  3. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county's future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

  4. PU/SS EUTECTIC ASSESSMENT IN 9975 PACKAGINGS IN A STORAGE FACILITY DURING EXTENDED FIRE

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.

    2012-03-26

    In a radioactive material (RAM) packaging, the formation of eutectic at the Pu/SS (plutonium/stainless steel) interface is a serious concern and must be avoided to prevent of leakage of fissile material to the environment. The eutectic temperature for the Pu/SS is rather low (410 C) and could seriously impact the structural integrity of the containment vessel under accident conditions involving fire. The 9975 packaging is used for long term storage of Pu bearing materials in the DOE complex where the Pu comes in contact with the stainless steel containment vessel. Due to the serious consequences of the containment breach at the eutectic site, the Pu/SS interface temperature is kept well below the eutectic formation temperature of 410 C. This paper discusses the thermal models and the results for the extended fire conditions (1500 F for 86 minutes) that exist in a long term storage facility and concludes that the 9975 packaging Pu/SS interface temperature is well below the eutectic temperature.

  5. Alternative ways to resolve contract disputes: implications for pharmacists, facilities, and patients.

    PubMed

    Fink, Joseph L

    2009-12-01

    Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) has been developed as an alternative to going to court to resolve disputes. Arbitration and mediation are the two most common forms, with arbitration involving a neutral third party who decides the controversy, the award being either binding or nonbinding on the parties base d on prior agreement. Mediation also involves a neutral third party, but the decision comes from the parties themselves reaching an agreement, with the mediator focused more on the process of securing a meeting of the minds. With the growing prevalence of ADR, pharmacists may encounter provisions in contracts-in either professional or personal life-so it is important that they understand the implications of such provisos. Pharmacists who serve patients in long-term care facilities also should be aware of the increasing use of provisions in patients' contracts with the institution and know how courts view those agreements. ADR is being encountered with increasing frequency, and by being familiar with the two most common approaches, pharmacists can keep abreast of developments and work to avoid pitfalls while adopting these approaches to resolve disputes in appropriate circumstances. PMID:20156004

  6. Environmental assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill facility storage of commercial crude oil project, Jefferson County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    The Big Hill SPR facility located in Jefferson County, Texas has been a permitted operating crude oil storage site since 1986 with benign environmental impacts. However, Congress has not authorized crude oil purchases for the SPR since 1990, and six storage caverns at Big Hill are underutilized with 70 million barrels of available storage capacity. On February 17, 1999, the Secretary of Energy offered the 70 million barrels of available storage at Big Hill for commercial use. Interested commercial users would enter into storage contracts with DOE, and DOE would receive crude oil in lieu of dollars as rental fees. The site could potentially began to receive commercial oil in May 1999. This Environmental Assessment identified environmental changes that potentially would affect water usage, power usage, and air emissions. However, as the assessment indicates, changes would not occur to a major degree affecting the environment and no long-term short-term, cumulative or irreversible impacts have been identified.

  7. Impact of Nitrification on the Formation of N-Nitrosamines and Halogenated Disinfection Byproducts within Distribution System Storage Facilities.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Teng; Mitch, William A

    2016-03-15

    Distribution system storage facilities are a critical, yet often overlooked, component of the urban water infrastructure. This study showed elevated concentrations of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), total N-nitrosamines (TONO), regulated trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), 1,1-dichloropropanone (1,1-DCP), trichloroacetaldehyde (TCAL), haloacetonitriles (HANs), and haloacetamides (HAMs) in waters with ongoing nitrification as compared to non-nitrifying waters in storage facilities within five different chloraminated drinking water distribution systems. The concentrations of NDMA, TONO, HANs, and HAMs in the nitrifying waters further increased upon application of simulated distribution system chloramination. The addition of a nitrifying biofilm sample collected from a nitrifying facility to its non-nitrifying influent water led to increases in N-nitrosamine and halogenated DBP formation, suggesting the release of precursors from nitrifying biofilms. Periodic treatment of two nitrifying facilities with breakpoint chlorination (BPC) temporarily suppressed nitrification and reduced precursor levels for N-nitrosamines, HANs, and HAMs, as reflected by lower concentrations of these DBPs measured after re-establishment of a chloramine residual within the facilities than prior to the BPC treatment. However, BPC promoted the formation of halogenated DBPs while a free chlorine residual was maintained. Strategies that minimize application of free chlorine while preventing nitrification are needed to control DBP precursor release in storage facilities. PMID:26859842

  8. Thermal and flow analyses of the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility Renovation Title I 60% design

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, T.D.; Steinke, R.G.; Mueller, C.

    1998-08-01

    The authors are continuing to use the computational fluid dynamics code CFX-4.2 to evaluate the steady-state thermal-hydraulic conditions in the Nuclear Material Storage Facility Renovation Title 1 60% Design. The analyses build on those performed for the 30% design. They have run an additional 9 cases to investigate both the performance of the passive vault and of an individual drywell. These cases investigated the effect of wind on the inlet tower, the importance of resolving boundary layers in the analyses, and modifications to the porous-medium approach used in the earlier analyses to represent better the temperature fields resulting from the detailed modeling of the boundary layers. The difference between maximum temperatures of the bulk air inside the vault for the two approaches is small. They continued the analyses of the wind effects around the inflector fixture, a canopy and cruciform device, on the inlet tower by running a case with the wind blowing diagonally across the inflector. The earlier analyses had investigated a wind that was blowing parallel to one set of vanes on the inflector. Several subcases for these analyses investigated coupling the analysis to the facility analysis and design changes for the inflector.

  9. Siting new or expanded treatment, storage, or disposal facilities: the pigs in the parlors of the 1980s

    SciTech Connect

    Tarlock, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    There are no signs that the controversy over siting new treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities for hazardous wastes or expanding existing facilities is abating. Few communities want a TSD facility because of safety concerns. Public fear has moved the siting issue from a technical problem into the institutional bog of risk-benefit analysis. A review of the legal issues, including that of state control and federal preemption, concludes that states face difficult choices in designing statutes because of conflict between technical and political problems. The most positive aspects of siting statutes is the back door they open to the basic problem of waste-stream reduction. 138 references.

  10. Drafting Recommendations for a Shared Statewide High-Density Storage Facility: Experiences with the State University Libraries of Florida Proposal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Ben

    2008-01-01

    In August 2007, an $11.2 million proposal for a shared statewide high-density storage facility was submitted to the Board of Governors, the governing body of the State University System in Florida. The project was subsequently approved at a slightly lower level and funding was delayed until 2010/2011. The experiences of coordinating data…

  11. 36 CFR 1234.12 - What are the fire safety requirements that apply to records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... records storage facilities? (a) The fire detection and protection systems must be designed or reviewed by... engineer that describes the design intent of the fire detection and suppression system, detailing the... are provided in the areas to be protected with these large drop sprinkler heads. (l) Open flame...

  12. 36 CFR 1234.12 - What are the fire safety requirements that apply to records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... records storage facilities? (a) The fire detection and protection systems must be designed or reviewed by... engineer that describes the design intent of the fire detection and suppression system, detailing the... are provided in the areas to be protected with these large drop sprinkler heads. (l) Open flame...

  13. 36 CFR 1234.12 - What are the fire safety requirements that apply to records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... records storage facilities? (a) The fire detection and protection systems must be designed or reviewed by... engineer that describes the design intent of the fire detection and suppression system, detailing the... are provided in the areas to be protected with these large drop sprinkler heads. (l) Open flame...

  14. 36 CFR 1234.12 - What are the fire safety requirements that apply to records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... records storage facilities? (a) The fire detection and protection systems must be designed or reviewed by... engineer that describes the design intent of the fire detection and suppression system, detailing the... are provided in the areas to be protected with these large drop sprinkler heads. (l) Open flame...

  15. 36 CFR 1232.14 - What requirements must an agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Administration, Modern Records Programs (NWM), 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001, phone number (301... records to a records storage facility: (a) Ensure that the requirements of 36 CFR part 1234 are met... permanent retention, as those records typically require more stringent environmental controls (see 36...

  16. 36 CFR 1232.14 - What requirements must an agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Administration, Modern Records Programs (NWM), 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001, phone number (301... records to a records storage facility: (a) Ensure that the requirements of 36 CFR part 1234 are met... permanent retention, as those records typically require more stringent environmental controls (see 36...

  17. 36 CFR 1232.14 - What requirements must an agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Administration, Modern Records Programs (NWM), 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001, phone number (301... records to a records storage facility: (a) Ensure that the requirements of 36 CFR part 1234 are met... permanent retention, as those records typically require more stringent environmental controls (see 36...

  18. Investigation of using a Porous Media Approximation for Flow and Heat Transfer through the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility Drywell Array

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardin, J.D.; Gregory, W.S.; Owen, A.C.

    1999-04-21

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) is being renovated to provide a safe and secure long-term facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory to store nuclear materials. The concept for storage uses vertical tubes that are called drywells that have nuclear bearing canisters inside the tubes. The NMSF facility may use up to 370 of these tubes containing up to 10 canisters producing 15 W each. Analysts at the Laboratory wish to use CFD computer codes to predict the flow and thermal effects of air flow through the facility and the tube array. However, the complexity and large number of storage tubes precludes modeling the facility in enough detail to resolve the boundary layers around each and every tube. Therefore, certain approximations have to be made. A major approximation that has been used in this modeling effort has been to simulate the array of tubes as a porous media, The assumption-in the use of porous media is that the resistance of the drywells can be accounted for in a general way. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the suitability of the porous media approximation for modeling the tube array in the NMSF. In this study we will compare porous media models results with results from models that resolve the boundary layer around tubes. Finally, we offer a compromise modeling approach to address with this problem.

  19. Model description of storage and infiltration functions of infiltration facilities for urban runoff analysis by a distributed model.

    PubMed

    Furumai, H; Jinadasa, H K P K; Murakami, M; Nakajima, F; Aryal, R K

    2005-01-01

    Although there have been simulation researches focusing on reduction of stormwater peak flow by introduced infiltration facilities, model simulation of dynamic runoff behavior is still limited for frequently occurring rainfall events with weak intensity. Therefore, dynamic simulation was carried out in two urban drainages with infiltration facilities incorporated with a distributed model using two methods for describing functions of infiltration facilities. A method adjusting effective rainfall model gave poor simulation of runoff behavior in light rainfalls. Another method considering dynamic change of storage capacity as well as infiltration rate gave satisfactory estimation of the runoff in both drainages. In addition, assumption of facility clogging improved the agreement between measured and simulated hydrographs in small and medium-sized rainfall. Therefore, the proposed method might be useful for quantifying the secondary effects of the infiltration facilities on groundwater recharge and urban non-point pollutant trapping as well as runoff reduction. PMID:16248180

  20. Cation exchange in a glacial till drumlin at a road salt storage facility.

    PubMed

    Ostendorf, David W; Xing, Baoshan; Kallergis, Niki

    2009-05-12

    We use laboratory and field data to calibrate existing geochemical and transport models of cation exchange induced by contamination of an unconfined aquifer at a road salt storage facility built upon a glacial till drumlin in eastern Massachusetts. A Gaines and Thomas selectivity coefficient K models the equilibrium sodium and divalent cation distribution in the groundwater and solid matrix, while an existing method of characteristics model describes the advective transport of total dissolved cations and sorbed sodium. Laboratory isotherms of split spoon soil samples from the drumlin calibrate K with an average value of 0.0048 (L/g)(1/2) for a measured cation exchange capacity of 0.057 meq/g dry soil. Ten years of monitoring well data document groundwater flow and the advection of conservative chloride due to outdoor storage and handling of road salt at the site. The monitoring well cation data and retarded transport model offer an independent K calibration of 0.0040 to 0.0047 (L/g)(1/2): the consistency of the field and laboratory selectivity coefficient calibrations endorse this application of the Gaines and Thomas and method of characteristics models. The advancing deicing agent plume releases divalent cations from the till into the groundwater, so that monitoring well samples do not reflect the chemical composition of the road salt. In this regard, dissolved divalent cation milliequivalent concentrations are as high as 80% of the total dissolved cationic concentrations in the salt contaminated monitoring well samples, far greater than their 2.5% level in the road salt stored at the site. Cation exchange can thus obscure attempts to hindcast stored road salt sodium water table concentration from monitoring well sample stoichiometry, or to predict sodium impacts on groundwater or receiving stream quality downgradient of the well. PMID:19272668

  1. Cation exchange in a glacial till drumlin at a road salt storage facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostendorf, David W.; Xing, Baoshan; Kallergis, Niki

    2009-05-01

    We use laboratory and field data to calibrate existing geochemical and transport models of cation exchange induced by contamination of an unconfined aquifer at a road salt storage facility built upon a glacial till drumlin in eastern Massachusetts. A Gaines and Thomas selectivity coefficient K models the equilibrium sodium and divalent cation distribution in the groundwater and solid matrix, while an existing method of characteristics model describes the advective transport of total dissolved cations and sorbed sodium. Laboratory isotherms of split spoon soil samples from the drumlin calibrate K with an average value of 0.0048 (L/g) 1/2 for a measured cation exchange capacity of 0.057 meq/g dry soil. Ten years of monitoring well data document groundwater flow and the advection of conservative chloride due to outdoor storage and handling of road salt at the site. The monitoring well cation data and retarded transport model offer an independent K calibration of 0.0040 to 0.0047 (L/g) 1/2: the consistency of the field and laboratory selectivity coefficient calibrations endorse this application of the Gaines and Thomas and method of characteristics models. The advancing deicing agent plume releases divalent cations from the till into the groundwater, so that monitoring well samples do not reflect the chemical composition of the road salt. In this regard, dissolved divalent cation milliequivalent concentrations are as high as 80% of the total dissolved cationic concentrations in the salt contaminated monitoring well samples, far greater than their 2.5% level in the road salt stored at the site. Cation exchange can thus obscure attempts to hindcast stored road salt sodium water table concentration from monitoring well sample stoichiometry, or to predict sodium impacts on groundwater or receiving stream quality downgradient of the well.

  2. Nanotubes within transition metal silicate hollow spheres: Facile preparation and superior lithium storage performances

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; An, Yongling; Zhai, Wei; Gao, Xueping; Feng, Jinkui; Ci, Lijie; Xiong, Shenglin

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The hollow Co{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, MnSiO{sub 3} and CuSiO{sub 3} were successfully prepared by a facile hydrothermal method using SiO{sub 2} nanosphere. • The hollow Co{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, MnSiO{sub 3} and CuSiO{sub 3} were tested as anode materials for lithium batteries. • The hollow Co{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, MnSiO{sub 3} and CuSiO{sub 3} delivered superior electrochemical performance. • The lithium storage mechanism is probe via cyclic voltammetry and XPS. - Abstract: A series of transition metal silicate hollow spheres, including cobalt silicate (Co{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}), manganese silicate (MnSiO{sub 3}) and copper silicate (CuSiO{sub 3}.2H{sub 2}O, CuSiO{sub 3} as abbreviation in the text) were prepared via a simple and economic hydrothermal method by using silica spheres as chemical template. Time-dependent experiments confirmed that the resultants formed a novel type of hierarchical structure, hollow spheres assembled by numerous one-dimensional (1D) nanotubes building blocks. For the first time, the transition metal silicate hollow spheres were characterized as novel anode materials of Li-ion battery, which presented superior lithium storage capacities, cycle performance and rate performance. The 1D nanotubes assembly and hollow interior endow this kind of material facilitate fast lithium ion and electron transport and accommodate the big volume change during the conversion reactions. Our study shows that low-cost transition metal silicate with rationally designed nanostructures can be promising anode materials for high capacity lithium-ion battery.

  3. Study of nonneutral plasma storage in a magnetic trap with a rotating electric field at the lepta facility

    SciTech Connect

    Eseev, M. K.; Kobets, A. G.; Meshkov, I. N.; Rudakov, A. Yu.; Yakovenko, S. L.

    2013-10-15

    Results from experimental studies of plasma storage in a Penning-Malmberg trap at the LEPTA facility are presented. The number of stored particles is found to increase substantially when using the so-called “rotating wall” method, in which a transverse rotating electric field generated by a cylindrical segmented electrode cut into four pairs is applied to the plasma storage region. The conditions of transverse compression of the plasma bunch under the action of the rotating field and buffer gas are studied. The optimal storage parameters are determined for these experimental conditions. Mechanisms of the action of the rotating field and buffer gas on the process of plasma storage are discussed.

  4. 75 FR 72679 - Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf-Acquire a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... Federal Register on July 9, 2008 (73 FR 39376). The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS... Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf--Acquire a Lease... an Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) renewable energy lease. We are taking this action because...

  5. 76 FR 8962 - Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf-Acquire a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... published in the Federal Register on July 9, 2008 (73 FR 39376). The North American Industry Classification... Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf--Acquire a Lease... acquisition of an Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) renewable energy lease. We are taking this action because...

  6. 76 FR 28178 - Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf-Acquire a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... 9, 2008 (73 FR 39376). The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code for the... on February 16, 2011 (76 FR 8962), and received a total of 76 comments. The Offshore Wind Development... Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf--Acquire a...

  7. Aquifer thermal energy storage at Mid-Island postal facility: Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Marseille, T.J.; Armstrong, P.R.; Brown, D.R.; Vail, L.W.; Kannberg, L.D.

    1993-05-01

    The successful widespread commercialization of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in the United States will depend on how experiences gained from early full-scale projects are used as guides in the design, installation, and operation of future projects. One early system, built in the mid-1980s, is the US Postal Service (USPS) Mid-Island Mail Processing Facility (MPF), in Melville, New York. The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) of the MPF`s workroom is provided by an ATES system, which is operated year-round to provide a source for both heating and cooling, in combination with a triethylene glycol (TEG) liquid-desiccant system for humidity control. Because the facility affords a unique opportunity to study this innovative system, the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) entered into agreements with the USPS, the US Geological Survey (USGS), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (the Energy Authority) to assess the operation and performance of the system. Two essentially independent questions were to be addressed by the project. The first question was: ``How does the MPF ATES/TEG technology compare to conventional technologies?`` The second was: ``What can be done to make operation of the USPS MPF more economical?`` Modelling of the MPF ATES/TEG HVAC system and its loads helped to address both of these questions by showing how much energy is used by the different system components. This report is divided into six sections. Section 1 is an introduction. Section 2 provides system background. Section 3 describes PNL`s technical performance assessment of the system. Section 4 discusses the life-cycle cost assessment. An operational assessment of the liquid-desiccant system is discussed in Section 5. Section 6 contains conclusions of this study.

  8. Aquifer thermal energy storage at Mid-Island postal facility: Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Marseille, T.J.; Armstrong, P.R.; Brown, D.R.; Vail, L.W.; Kannberg, L.D.

    1993-05-01

    The successful widespread commercialization of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in the United States will depend on how experiences gained from early full-scale projects are used as guides in the design, installation, and operation of future projects. One early system, built in the mid-1980s, is the US Postal Service (USPS) Mid-Island Mail Processing Facility (MPF), in Melville, New York. The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) of the MPF's workroom is provided by an ATES system, which is operated year-round to provide a source for both heating and cooling, in combination with a triethylene glycol (TEG) liquid-desiccant system for humidity control. Because the facility affords a unique opportunity to study this innovative system, the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) entered into agreements with the USPS, the US Geological Survey (USGS), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (the Energy Authority) to assess the operation and performance of the system. Two essentially independent questions were to be addressed by the project. The first question was: How does the MPF ATES/TEG technology compare to conventional technologies '' The second was: What can be done to make operation of the USPS MPF more economical '' Modelling of the MPF ATES/TEG HVAC system and its loads helped to address both of these questions by showing how much energy is used by the different system components. This report is divided into six sections. Section 1 is an introduction. Section 2 provides system background. Section 3 describes PNL's technical performance assessment of the system. Section 4 discusses the life-cycle cost assessment. An operational assessment of the liquid-desiccant system is discussed in Section 5. Section 6 contains conclusions of this study.

  9. ANION ANALYSES BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY FOR THE ALTERNATE REDUCTANT DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Best, D.

    2010-08-04

    The Process Science Analytical Laboratory (PSAL) at the Savannah River National Laboratory was requested by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to develop and demonstrate an Ion Chromatography (IC) method for the analysis of glycolate, in addition to eight other anions (fluoride, formate, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate and phosphate) in Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples. The method will be used to analyze anions for samples generated from the Alternate Reductant Demonstrations to be performed for the DWPF at the Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL). The method is specific to the characterization of anions in the simulant flowsheet work. Additional work will be needed for the analyses of anions in radiological samples by Analytical Development (AD) and DWPF. The documentation of the development and demonstration of the method fulfills the third requirement in the TTQAP, SRNL-RP-2010-00105, 'Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for Glycolic-Formic Acid Flowsheet Development, Definition and Demonstrations Tasks 1-3'.

  10. Referenced-site environmental document for a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility: backup waste management option for handling 1800 MTU per year

    SciTech Connect

    Silviera, D.J.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cushing, C.E.; Marshall, A.; Scott, M.J.; Sewart, G.H.; Strenge, D.L.

    1985-06-01

    This environmental document includes a discussion of the purpose of a monitored retrievable storage facility, a description of two facility design concepts (sealed storage cask and field drywell), a description of three reference sites (arid, warm-wet, and cold-wet), and a discussion and comparison of the impacts associated with each of the six site/concept combinations. This analysis is based on a 15,000-MTU storage capacity and a throughput rate of up to 1800 MTU per year.

  11. CHARACTERIZING DOE HANFORD SITE WASTE ENCAPSULATION STORAGE FACILITY CELLS USING RADBALL

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.; Coleman, R.

    2011-03-31

    RadBall{trademark} is a novel technology that can locate and quantify unknown radioactive hazards within contaminated areas, hot cells, and gloveboxes. The device consists of a colander-like outer tungsten collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer semi-sphere. The collimator has a number of small holes with tungsten inserts; as a result, specific areas of the polymer are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer semi-sphere is imaged in an optical computed tomography scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. A subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data using a reverse ray tracing or backprojection technique provides information on the spatial distribution of gamma-ray sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. RadBall{trademark} was originally designed for dry deployments and several tests, completed at Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, substantiate its modeled capabilities. This study involves the investigation of the RadBall{trademark} technology during four submerged deployments in two water filled cells at the DOE Hanford Site's Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility.

  12. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume III: Engineering design files

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The following information was calculated to support cost estimates and radiation exposure calculations for closure activities at the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). Within the estimate, volumes were calculated to determine the required amount of grout to be used during closure activities. The remaining calcine on the bin walls, supports, piping, and floor was also calculated to approximate the remaining residual calcine volumes at different stages of the removal process. The estimates for remaining calcine and vault void volume are higher than what would actually be experienced in the field, but are necessary for bounding purposes. The residual calcine in the bins may be higher than was is experienced in the field as it was assumed that the entire bin volume is full of calcine before removal activities commence. The vault void volumes are higher as the vault roof beam volumes were neglected. The estimations that follow should be considered rough order of magnitude, due to the time constraints as dictated by the project`s scope of work. Should more accurate numbers be required, a new analysis would be necessary.

  13. Methane Emissions from Leak and Loss Audits of Natural Gas Compressor Stations and Storage Facilities.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Derek R; Covington, April N; Clark, Nigel N

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Environmental Defense Fund's Barnett Coordinated Campaign, researchers completed leak and loss audits for methane emissions at three natural gas compressor stations and two natural gas storage facilities. Researchers employed microdilution high-volume sampling systems in conjunction with in situ methane analyzers, bag samples, and Fourier transform infrared analyzers for emissions rate quantification. All sites had a combined total methane emissions rate of 94.2 kg/h, yet only 12% of the emissions total resulted from leaks. Methane slip from exhausts represented 44% of the total emissions. Remaining methane emissions were attributed to losses from pneumatic actuators and controls, engine crankcases, compressor packing vents, wet seal vents, and slop tanks. Measured values were compared with those reported in literature. Exhaust methane emissions were lower than emissions factor estimates for engine exhausts, but when combined with crankcase emissions, measured values were 11.4% lower than predicted by AP-42 as applicable to emissions factors for four-stroke, lean-burn engines. Average measured wet seal emissions were 3.5 times higher than GRI values but 14 times lower than those reported by Allen et al. Reciprocating compressor packing vent emissions were 39 times higher than values reported by GRI, but about half of values reported by Allen et al. Though the data set was small, researchers have suggested a method to estimate site-wide emissions factors for those powered by four-stroke, lean-burn engines based on fuel consumption and site throughput. PMID:26148551

  14. Facile Synthesis of Nitrogen-Containing Mesoporous Carbon for High-Performance Energy Storage Applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunling; Wang, Jie; Chang, Zhi; Ding, Bing; Wang, Ya; Shen, Laifa; Mi, Changhuan; Dou, Hui; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2016-03-14

    Porous carbon with high specific surface area (SSA), a reasonable pore size distribution, and modified surface chemistry is highly desirable for application in energy storage devices. Herein, we report the synthesis of nitrogen-containing mesoporous carbon with high SSA (1390 m(2)  g(-1) ), a suitable pore size distribution (1.5-8.1 nm), and a nitrogen content of 4.7 wt % through a facile one-step self-assembly process. Owing to its unique physical characteristics and nitrogen doping, this material demonstrates great promise for application in both supercapacitors and encapsulating sulfur as a superior cathode material for lithium-sulfur batteries. When deployed as a supercapacitor electrode, it exhibited a high specific capacitance of 238.4 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) and an excellent rate capability (180 F g(-1) , 10 A g(-1) ). Furthermore, when an NMC/S electrode was evaluated as the cathode material for lithium-sulfur batteries, it showed a high initial discharge capacity of 1143.6 mA h g(-1) at 837.5 mA g(-1) and an extraordinary cycling stability with 70.3 % capacity retention after 100 cycles. PMID:26849174

  15. Decommissioning and Dismantling of Liquid Waste Storage and Liquid Waste Treatment Facility from Paldiski Nuclear Site, Estonia

    SciTech Connect

    Varvas, M.; Putnik, H.; Johnsson, B.

    2006-07-01

    The Paldiski Nuclear Facility in Estonia, with two nuclear reactors was owned by the Soviet Navy and was used for training the navy personnel to operate submarine nuclear reactors. After collapse of Soviet Union the Facility was shut down and handed over to the Estonian government in 1995. In co-operation with the Paldiski International Expert Reference Group (PIERG) decommission strategy was worked out and started to implement. Conditioning of solid and liquid operational waste and dismantling of contaminated installations and buildings were among the key issues of the Strategy. Most of the liquid waste volume, remained at the Facility, was processed in the frames of an Estonian-Finnish co-operation project using a mobile wastewater purification unit NURES (IVO International OY) and water was discharged prior to the site take-over. In 1999-2002 ca 120 m{sup 3} of semi-liquid tank sediments (a mixture of ion exchange resins, sand filters, evaporator and flocculation slurry), remained after treatment of liquid waste were solidified in steel containers and stored into interim storage. The project was carried out under the Swedish - Estonian co-operation program on radiation protection and nuclear safety. Contaminated installations in buildings, used for treatment and storage of liquid waste (Liquid Waste Treatment Facility and Liquid Waste Storage) were then dismantled and the buildings demolished in 2001-2004. (authors)

  16. Implementing storage rings free electron lasers for users on synchrotron radiation facilities: from Super-ACO to SOLEIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Nutarelli, D.; Billardon, M.

    1998-09-01

    Storage Ring Free Electron Laser (SRFEL) sources can be implemented on synchrotron radiation facilities. Although in the beginning an additional experiment on the accelerator requires specific operating conditions as on Super-ACO at Orsay (France), they can now be conceived as an integral part of the project, providing coherent picosecond tunable light in the UV-VUV range, synchronized with synchrotron radiation for the scientific community, as on the SOLEIL project. Third generation storage ring beam characteristics are discussed in terms of synchrotron radiation and FEL optimization. FEL performances are presented, showing the improvement between the Super-ACO and the SOLEIL cases, including stability issues.

  17. Performance Evaluation of Lower-Energy Energy Storage Alternatives for Full-Hybrid Vehicles; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonder, J.; Cosgrove, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-02-11

    Automakers have been mass producing hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) for well over a decade, and the technology has proven to be very effective at reducing per-vehicle fuel use. However, the incremental cost of HEVs such as the Toyota Prius or Ford Fusion Hybrid remains several thousand dollars higher than the cost of comparable conventional vehicles, which has limited HEV market penetration. The b b b b battery energy storage device is typically the component with the greatest contribution toward this cost increment, so significant cost reductions/performance improvements to the energy storage system (ESS) can correspondingly improve the vehicle-level cost/benefit relationship. Such an improvement would in turn lead to larger HEV market penetration and greater aggregate fuel savings. The United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Program managers asked the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collaborate with a USABC Workgroup and analyze the trade-offs between vehicle fuel economy and reducing the decade-old minimum energy requirement for power-assist HEVs. NREL’s analysis showed that significant fuel savings could still be delivered from an ESS with much lower energy storage than the previous targets, which prompted USABC to issue a new set of lower-energy ESS (LEESS) targets that could be satisfied by a variety of technologies. With support from DOE, NREL has developed an HEV test platform for in-vehicle performance and fuel economy validation testing of the hybrid system using such LEESS devices. This presentation describes development of the vehicle test platform, and laboratory as well as in-vehicle evaluation results with alternate energy storage configurations as compared to the production battery system. The alternate energy storage technologies considered include lithium-ion capacitors -- i.e., asymmetric electrochemical energy storage devices possessing one electrode with battery

  18. Final work plan : investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Hanover, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-19

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the northeastern edge of the city of Hanover, Kansas, from 1950 until the early 1970s. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In February 1998, trace to low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contaminant level [MCL] of 5.0 {micro}g/L) were detected in two private wells near the former grain storage facility at Hanover, as part of a statewide USDA private well sampling program that was implemented by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) near former CCC/USDA facilities. In April 2007, the CCC/USDA collected near-surface soil samples at 1.8-2 ft BGL (below ground level) at 61 locations across the former CCC/USDA facility. All soil samples were analyzed by the rigorous gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer analytical method (purge-and-trap method). No contamination was found in soil samples above the reporting limit of 10 {micro}g/kg. In July 2007, the CCC/USDA sampled indoor air at nine residences on or adjacent to its former facility to address the residents concerns regarding vapor intrusion. Low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected at four of the nine homes. Because carbon tetrachloride found in private wells and indoor air at the site might be linked to historical use of fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA is proposing to conduct an investigation to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination associated with the former facility. This investigation will be conducted in accordance with the intergovernmental agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the USDA. The investigation at Hanover will be performed, on behalf of the CCC/USDA, by the Environmental Science

  19. Economic and Environmental Evaluation of Flexible Integrated Gasification Polygeneration Facilities Equipped with Carbon Capture and Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, M.; Yelverton, W. H.; Dodder, R. S.; Loughlin, D. H.

    2014-12-01

    Among the diverse menu of technologies for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, one option involves pairing carbon capture and storage (CCS) with the generation of synthetic fuels and electricity from co-processed coal and biomass. In this scheme, the feedstocks are first converted to syngas, from which a Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process reactor and combined cycle turbine produce liquid fuels and electricity, respectively. With low concentrations of sulfur and other contaminants, the synthetic fuels are expected to be cleaner than conventional crude oil products. And with CO2 as an inherent byproduct of the FT process, most of the GHG emissions can be eliminated by simply compressing the CO2 output stream for pipeline transport. In fact, the incorporation of CCS at such facilities can result in very low—or perhaps even negative—net GHG emissions, depending on the fraction of biomass as input and its CO2 signature. To examine the potential market penetration and environmental impact of coal and biomass to liquids and electricity (CBtLE), which encompasses various possible combinations of input and output parameters within the overall energy landscape, a system-wide analysis is performed using the MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) model. With resource supplies, energy conversion technologies, end-use demands, costs, and pollutant emissions as user-defined inputs, MARKAL calculates—using linear programming techniques—the least-cost set of technologies that satisfy the specified demands subject to environmental and policy constraints. In this framework, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed both national and regional databases to characterize assorted technologies in the industrial, commercial, residential, transportation, and generation sectors of the U.S. energy system. Here, the EPA MARKAL database is updated to include the costs and emission characteristics of CBtLE using figures from the literature. Nested sensitivity analysis is then

  20. Assessment of plutonium storage safety issues at Department of Energy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) mission for utilization and storage of nuclear materials has recently changed as a result of the end of the ``Cold War`` era. Past and current plutonium storage practices largely reflect a temporary, in-process, or in-use storage condition which must now be changed to accommodate longer-term storage. This report summarizes information concerning current plutonium metal and oxide storage practices which was presented at the Office of Defense programs (DP) workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico on May 26-27, 1993 and contained in responses to questions by DP-62 from the field organizations.

  1. Characterization and reclamation assessment for the Central Shops Diesel Storage Facility, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Hazen, T.C.; Bledsoe, H.

    1993-10-01

    The contamination of subsurface terrestrial environments by organic contaminants is a global phenomenon. The remediation of such environments requires innovative assessment techniques and strategies for successful clean-ups. Central Shops Diesel Storage Facility at Savannah River Site was characterized to determine the extent of subsurface diesel fuel contamination using innovative approaches and effective bioremediation techniques for clean-up of the contaminant plume have been established.

  2. DNA as a phosphate storage polymer and the alternative advantages of polyploidy for growth or survival.

    PubMed

    Zerulla, Karolin; Chimileski, Scott; Näther, Daniela; Gophna, Uri; Papke, R Thane; Soppa, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Haloferax volcanii uses extracellular DNA as a source for carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous. However, it can also grow to a limited extend in the absence of added phosphorous, indicating that it contains an intracellular phosphate storage molecule. As Hfx. volcanii is polyploid, it was investigated whether DNA might be used as storage polymer, in addition to its role as genetic material. It could be verified that during phosphate starvation cells multiply by distributing as well as by degrading their chromosomes. In contrast, the number of ribosomes stayed constant, revealing that ribosomes are distributed to descendant cells, but not degraded. These results suggest that the phosphate of phosphate-containing biomolecules (other than DNA and RNA) originates from that stored in DNA, not in rRNA. Adding phosphate to chromosome depleted cells rapidly restores polyploidy. Quantification of desiccation survival of cells with different ploidy levels showed that under phosphate starvation Hfx. volcanii diminishes genetic advantages of polyploidy in favor of cell multiplication. The consequences of the usage of genomic DNA as phosphate storage polymer are discussed as well as the hypothesis that DNA might have initially evolved in evolution as a storage polymer, and the various genetic benefits evolved later. PMID:24733558

  3. DNA as a Phosphate Storage Polymer and the Alternative Advantages of Polyploidy for Growth or Survival

    PubMed Central

    Zerulla, Karolin; Chimileski, Scott; Näther, Daniela; Gophna, Uri; Papke, R. Thane; Soppa, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Haloferax volcanii uses extracellular DNA as a source for carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous. However, it can also grow to a limited extend in the absence of added phosphorous, indicating that it contains an intracellular phosphate storage molecule. As Hfx. volcanii is polyploid, it was investigated whether DNA might be used as storage polymer, in addition to its role as genetic material. It could be verified that during phosphate starvation cells multiply by distributing as well as by degrading their chromosomes. In contrast, the number of ribosomes stayed constant, revealing that ribosomes are distributed to descendant cells, but not degraded. These results suggest that the phosphate of phosphate-containing biomolecules (other than DNA and RNA) originates from that stored in DNA, not in rRNA. Adding phosphate to chromosome depleted cells rapidly restores polyploidy. Quantification of desiccation survival of cells with different ploidy levels showed that under phosphate starvation Hfx. volcanii diminishes genetic advantages of polyploidy in favor of cell multiplication. The consequences of the usage of genomic DNA as phosphate storage polymer are discussed as well as the hypothesis that DNA might have initially evolved in evolution as a storage polymer, and the various genetic benefits evolved later. PMID:24733558

  4. Evaluation of alternative phase change materials for energy storage in solar dynamic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, R. A.; Dustin, M. O.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of fluoride salt and metallic thermal energy storage materials are compared in terms of basic performance as applied to solar dynamic power generation. Specific performance considerations include uniformity of cycle inlet temperature, peak cavity temperature, TES utilization, and system weights. Also investigated were means of enhancing the thermal conductivity of the salts and its effect on the system performance.

  5. Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration.

  6. Design, construction and management of tailings storage facilities for surface disposal in China: case studies of failures.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zuoan; Yin, Guangzhi; Wang, J G; Wan, Ling; Li, Guangzhi

    2013-01-01

    Rapid development of China's economy demands for more mineral resources. At the same time, a vast quantity of mine tailings, as the waste byproduct of mining and mineral processing, is being produced in huge proportions. Tailings impoundments play an important role in the practical surface disposal of these large quantities of mining waste. Historically, tailings were relatively small in quantity and had no commercial value, thus little attention was paid to their disposal. The tailings were preferably discharged near the mines and few tailings storage facilities were constructed in mainland China. This situation has significantly changed since 2000, because the Chinese economy is growing rapidly and Chinese regulations and legislation require that tailings disposal systems must be ready before the mining operation begins. Consequently, data up to 2008 shows that more than 12 000 tailings storage facilities have been built in China. This paper reviews the history of tailings disposal in China, discusses three cases of tailings dam failures and explores failure mechanisms, and the procedures commonly used in China for planning, design, construction and management of tailings impoundments. This paper also discusses the current situation, shortcomings and key weaknesses, as well as future development trends for tailings storage facilities in China. PMID:23064963

  7. 42 CFR 124.514 - Compliance alternative for facilities with small annual obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...” must provide for financial and other objective eligibility criteria and procedures, including notice... HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION...

  8. Assessment of Energy Storage Alternatives in the Puget Sound Energy System

    SciTech Connect

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Jin, Chunlian; Wu, Di; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Leslie, Patrick; Daitch, Charles

    2013-12-12

    As part of an ongoing study co-funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, under its Technology Innovation Grant Program, and the U.S. Department of Energy, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed an approach and modeling tool for assessing the net benefits of using energy storage located close to the customer in the distribution grid to manage demand. PNNL in collaboration with PSE and Primus Power has evaluated the net benefits of placing a zinc bromide battery system at two locations in the PSE system (Baker River / Rockport and Bainbridge Island). Energy storage can provide a number of benefits to the utility through the increased flexibility it provides to the grid system. Applications evaluated in the assessment include capacity value, balancing services, arbitrage, distribution deferral and outage mitigation. This report outlines the methodology developed for this study and Phase I results.

  9. The planning, construction, and operation of a radioactive waste storage facility for an Australian state radiation regulatory authority

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, J.D.; Kleinschmidt, R.; Veevers, P.

    1995-12-31

    Radiation regulatory authorities have a responsibility for the management of radioactive waste. This, more often than not, includes the collection and safe storage of radioactive sources in disused radiation devices and devices seized by the regulatory authority following an accident, abandonment or unauthorised use. The public aversion to all things radioactive, regardless of the safety controls, together with the Not In My Back Yard (NIMBY) syndrome combine to make the establishment of a radioactive materials store a near impossible task, despite the fact that such a facility is a fundamental tool for regulatory authorities to provide for the radiation safety of the public. In Queensland the successful completion and operational use of such a storage facility has taken a total of 8 years of concerted effort by the staff of the regulatory authority, the expenditure of over $2 million (AUS) not including regulatory staff costs and the cost of construction of an earlier separate facility. This paper is a summary of the major developments in the planning, construction and eventual operation of the facility including technical and administrative details, together with the lessons learned from the perspective of the overall project.

  10. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Dangerous Waste Training Plan (DWTP)

    SciTech Connect

    LEBARON, G.J.

    1999-12-03

    This training plan describes general requirements, worker categories, and provides course descriptions for operation of the WESF permitted miscellaneous storage units, and the < 90 day accumulation areas.

  11. Cleaning residual NaK in the fast flux test facility fuel storage cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, T.M.; Church, W.R.; Hodgson, K.M.

    2008-01-15

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, is a liquid metal-cooled test reactor. The FFTF was constructed to support the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. The bulk of the alkali metal (sodium and NaK) has been drained and will be stored onsite prior to final disposition. Residual NaK needed to be removed from the pipes, pumps, heat exchangers, tanks, and vessels in the Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) cooling system. The cooling system was drained in 2004 leaving residual NaK in the pipes and equipment. The estimated residual NaK volume was 76 liters in the storage tank, 1.9 liters in the expansion tank, and 19-39 liters in the heat transfer loop. The residual NaK volume in the remainder of the system was expected to be very small, consisting of films, droplets, and very small pools. The NaK in the FSF Cooling System was not radiologically contaminated. The portions of the cooling system to be cleaned were divided into four groups: 1. The storage tank, filter, pump, and associated piping; 2. The heat exchanger, expansion tank, and associated piping; 3. Argon supply piping; 4. In-vessel heat transfer loop. The cleaning was contracted to Creative Engineers, Inc. (CEI) and they used their superheated steam process to clean the cooling system. It has been concluded that during the modification activities (prior to CEI coming onsite) to prepare the NaK Cooling System for cleaning, tank T-914 was pressurized relative to the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and NaK was pushed from the tank back into the Cooler and that on November 6, 2005, when the gas purge through the In-Vessel NaK Cooler was increased from 141.6 slm to 283.2 slm, NaK was forced from the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and it contacted water in the vent line and/or scrubber. The gases from the reaction then traveled back through the vent line coating the internal surface of the vent line with NaK and NaK reaction products. The hot gases also exited the

  12. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-06-02

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  13. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-04-09

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  14. 40 CFR 279.45 - Used oil storage at transfer facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... all applicable Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures (40 CFR part 112) in addition to the requirements of this subpart. Used oil transporters are also subject to the Underground Storage Tank (40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Used oil storage at...

  15. 40 CFR 279.45 - Used oil storage at transfer facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... all applicable Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures (40 CFR part 112) in addition to the requirements of this subpart. Used oil transporters are also subject to the Underground Storage Tank (40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Used oil storage at...

  16. 40 CFR 279.45 - Used oil storage at transfer facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... all applicable Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures (40 CFR part 112) in addition to the requirements of this subpart. Used oil transporters are also subject to the Underground Storage Tank (40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Used oil storage at...

  17. 40 CFR 279.45 - Used oil storage at transfer facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... all applicable Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures (40 CFR part 112) in addition to the requirements of this subpart. Used oil transporters are also subject to the Underground Storage Tank (40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Used oil storage at...

  18. 40 CFR 279.45 - Used oil storage at transfer facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... all applicable Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures (40 CFR part 112) in addition to the requirements of this subpart. Used oil transporters are also subject to the Underground Storage Tank (40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Used oil storage at...

  19. 40 CFR 63.11087 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) If your gasoline storage tank is subject to, and complies with, the control requirements of 40 CFR... Distribution Bulk Terminals, Bulk Plants, and Pipeline Facilities Emission Limitations and Management...

  20. Hazardous waste storage facility accident scenarios for the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect

    Policastro, A.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Marmer, D.; Lazaro, M.; Mueller, C.; Freeman, W.

    1994-03-01

    This paper presents the methods for developing accident categories and accident frequencies for internally initiated accidents at hazardous waste storage facilities (HWSFs) at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. This categorization is a necessary first step in evaluating the risk of accidents to workers and the general population at each of the sites. This risk evaluation is part of the process of comparing alternative management strategies in DOE`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Such strategies involve regionalization, decentralization, and centralization of waste treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Potential accidents at the HWSFs at the DOE sites are divided into categories of spill alone, spill plus fire, and other event combinations including spill plus fire plus explosion, fire only, spill and explosion, and fire and explosion. One or more accidents are chosen to represent the types of accidents for FY 1992 for 12 DOE sites were studied to determine the most representative set of possible accidents at all DOE sites. Each accident scenario is given a probability of occurrence that is adjusted, depending on the throughput and waste composition that passes through the HWSF at the particular site. The justification for the probabilities chosen is presented.

  1. Strontium and cesium radionuclide leak detection alternatives in a capsule storage pool

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.E.; Crawford, T.W.; Joyce, S.M.

    1981-08-01

    A study was performed to assess radionuclide leak-detection systems for use in locating a capsule leaking strontium-90 or cesium-137 into a water-filled pool. Each storage pool contains about 35,000 L of water and up to 715 capsules, each of which contains up to 150 kCi strontium-90 or 80 kCi cesium-137. Potential systems assessed included instrumental chemical analyses, radionuclide detection, visual examination, and other nondestructive nuclear-fuel examination techniques. Factors considered in the assessment include: cost, simplicity of maintenance and operation, technology availability, reliability, remote operation, sensitivity, and ability to locate an individual leaking capsule in its storage location. The study concluded that an adaption of the spent nuclear-fuel examination technique of wet sipping be considered for adaption. In the suggested approoch, samples would be taken continuously from pool water adjacent to the capsule(s) being examined for remote radiation detection. In-place capsule isolation and subsequent water sampling would confirm that a capsule was leaking radionuclides. Additional studies are needed before implementing this option. Two other techniques that show promise are ultrasonic testing and eddy-current testing.

  2. Intended long term performances of cementitious engineered barriers for future storage and disposal facilities for radioactive wastes in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fako, R.; Barariu, Gh.; Toma, R.; Georgescu, R.; Sociu, F.

    2013-07-01

    Considering the EU statements, Romania is engaged to endorse in the near future the IAEA relevant publications on geological repository (CNCANa), to update the Medium and Long Term National Strategy for Safe Management of Radioactive Waste and to approve the Road Map for Geological Repository Development. Currently, for example, spent fuel is wet stored for 6 years and after this period it is transported to dry storage in MACSTOR-200 (a concrete monolithic module) where it is intended to remain at least 50 years. The present situation for radioactive waste management in Romania is reviewed in the present paper. Focus will be done on existent disposal facilities but, also, on future facilities planned for storage / disposal of radioactive wastes. Considering specific data for Romanian radioactive waste inventory, authors are reviewing the advance in the radioactive waste management in Romania considering its particularities. The team tries to highlight the expected limitations and unknown data related with cementitious engineered barriers that has to be faced in the near future incase of interim storage or for the upcoming long periods of disposal.

  3. An assessment of alternatives and technologies for replacing ozone- depleting substances at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, C.W.; Miller, K.B.; Friedman, J.R.; Rapoport, R.D.; Conover, D.R.; Hendrickson, P.L. ); Koss, T.C. . Office of Environmental Guidance)

    1992-10-01

    Title VI of the Clean Air Act, as amended, mandates a production phase-out for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). These requirements will have a significant impact on US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Currently, DOE uses ODSs in three major activities: fire suppression (halon), refrigeration and cooling (chlorofluorocarbons [CFCs]), and cleaning that requires solvents (CFCs, methyl chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride). This report provides basic information on methods and strategies to phase out use of ODSs at DOE facilities.

  4. 40 CFR 63.11087 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) If your gasoline storage tank is subject to, and complies with, the control requirements of 40 CFR... gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category:...

  5. 40 CFR 63.11087 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) If your gasoline storage tank is subject to, and complies with, the control requirements of 40 CFR... gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category:...

  6. 40 CFR 63.11087 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) If your gasoline storage tank is subject to, and complies with, the control requirements of 40 CFR... gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category:...

  7. 40 CFR 63.11087 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) If your gasoline storage tank is subject to, and complies with, the control requirements of 40 CFR... gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category:...

  8. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  9. Applicability of thermal-storage systems to air force facilities. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, D.B.

    1990-09-01

    Thermal storage is a technology that shifts the electrical demand for air conditioning from on-peak to off-peak periods. This is accomplished by chilling a storage medium during off-peak periods, storing this medium in an insulated container, and using it during on-peak periods to provide cooling. The result of this action is a lowered electric bill. This study approaches this issue from both a qualitative and a quantitive stand point. The qualitative portion addresses the general validity and effectiveness of thermal storage. The quantitative portion determines the specific market potential of packaged ice thermal storage systems for the 51 CONUS bases studied based on three initial cost scenarios.

  10. Alternatives for improved safety in storage and handling of LOX and LIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmauch, G. E.; Peters, G. A.

    The industrial gas industry has experienced favourable safety performance in the storage and handling of cryogenic liquids. In recent years, however, there have been increasing challenges to further reduce the risk to employees, customers and the public from inadvertent spills and releases of LOX and LIN. With large flat-bottom storage tanks, serious spills or releases can result from external liquid piping damage or valve failure, tank overpressurization to the point of failure and overfill beyond the maximum safe liquid levels. This paper demonstrates by fault tree analysis the benefits of internal shut-off valves for spill prevention. It describes the risk reduction obtained by multiple pressure relief devices for prevention of overpressure failure of the tank. Overfill hazards are also described and quantified. With over-the-road LOX and LIN tanker loading, serious spills and releases can result from tanker pull-away during loading and from tanker overfill. Pull-away prevention/protection systems are discussed. A precision loading system to regulate the maximum load in tankers at or slightly below the road weight limit is described and its benefits as a hazardous overfill and spill protection system are quantified. Malfunction of cryogenic liquid vaporizer systems can lead to effluent temperatures that challenge the low temperature integrity of non-cryogenic downstream piping. The benefits of redundant low temperature monitors and flow shut-off systems as protection against piping failure and uncontrolled releases are demonstrated by fault tree analysis. While these systems focus on spill and release prevention or frequency reduction, the use of liquid retention systems such as curbs, gutters, sumps and dikes are briefly discussed, along with vapour barriers for vapour retention, as techniques for consequence reduction.

  11. The Pain in Storage: Work Safety in a High-Density Shelving Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Stephanie A.

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of academic and research libraries have built high-density shelving facilities to address overcrowding conditions in their regular stacks. However, the work performed in these facilities is physically strenuous and highly repetitive in nature and may require the use of potentially dangerous equipment. This article will examine…

  12. Dismantlement and removal of Old Hydrofracture Facility bulk storage bins and water tank, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF), located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was constructed in 1963 to allow experimentation and operations with an integrated solid storage, mixing, and grout injection facility. During its operation, OHF blended liquid low-level waste with grout and used a hydrofracture process to pump the waste into a deep low-permeable shale formation. Since the OHF Facility was taken out of service in 1980, the four bulk storage bins located adjacent to Building 7852 had deteriorated to the point that they were a serious safety hazard. The ORNL Surveillance and Maintenance Program requested and received permission from the US Department of Energy to dismantle the bins as a maintenance action and send the free-released metal to an approved scrap metal vendor. A 25,000-gal stainless steel water tank located at the OHF site was included in the scope. A fixed-price subcontract was signed with Allied Technology Group, Inc., to remove the four bulk storage bins and water tank to a staging area where certified Health Physics personnel could survey, segregate, package, and send the radiologically clean scrap metal to an approved scrap metal vendor. All radiologically contaminated metal and metal that could not be surveyed was packaged and staged for later disposal. Permissible personnel exposure limits were not exceeded, no injuries were incurred, and no health and safety violations occurred throughout the duration of the project. Upon completion of the dismantlement, the project had generated 53,660 lb of clean scrap metal (see Appendix D). This resulted in $3,410 of revenue generated and a cost avoidance of an estimated $100,000 in waste disposal fees.

  13. Final work plan : supplemental upward vapor intrusion investigation at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Hanover, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-12-15

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the northeastern edge of the city of Hanover, Kansas, from 1950 until the early 1970s. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In February 1998, trace to low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contaminant level [MCL] of 5.0 {micro}g/L) were detected in two private wells near the former grain storage facility at Hanover, as part of a statewide USDA private well sampling program that was implemented by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) near former CCC/USDA facilities. In 2007, the CCC/USDA conducted near-surface soil sampling at 61 locations and also sampled indoor air at nine residences on or adjacent to its former Hanover facility to address the residents concerns regarding vapor intrusion. Low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected at four of the nine homes. The results were submitted to the KDHE in October 2007 (Argonne 2007). On the basis of the results, the KDHE requested sub-slab sampling and/or indoor air sampling (KDHE 2007). This Work Plan describes, in detail, the proposed additional scope of work requested by the KDHE and has been developed as a supplement to the comprehensive site investigation work plan that is pending (Argonne 2008). Indoor air samples collected previously from four homes at Hanover were shown to contain the carbon tetrachloride at low concentrations (Table 2.1). It cannot be concluded from these previous data that the source of the detected carbon tetrachloride is vapor intrusion attributable to former grain storage operations of the CCC/USDA at Hanover. The technical objective of the vapor intrusion investigation described here is to assess the risk to human health due to the potential for upward migration of carbon tetrachloride and

  14. Coal gasification systems engineering and analysis. Appendix C: Alternate product facility designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The study of the production of methane, methanol, gasoline, and hydrogen by an add-on facility to a Koppers-Totzek based MBG plant is presented. Applications to a Texaco facility are inferred by evaluation of delta effects from the K-T cases. The production of methane from an add-on facility to a Lurgi based MBG plant and the co-production of methane and methanol from a Lurgi based system is studied. Studies are included of the production of methane from up to 50 percent of the MBG produced in an integrated K-T based plant and the production of methane from up to 50 percent of the MBG produced from an integrated plant in which module 1 is based on K-T technology and modules 2, 3, and 4 are based on Texaco technology.

  15. Environmental Data Store (EDS): A multi-node Data Storage Facility for diverse sets of Geoscience Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, M.; Ji, P.

    2014-12-01

    Geoscience data comes in many flavors that are determined by type of data such as continous on a grid or mesh or discrete colelcted at point either as one time samples or a stream of data coming of sensors, but coudl also encompass digital files of any time type such text files, WORD or EXCEL documents, or audio and video files. We present a storage facility that is comprsed of 6 nodes each of speciaized to host a certain data type: grid based data (netCDF on a THREDDS server), GIS data (shapefiles using GeoServer), point time series data (CUAHSI ODM), sample data (EDBS), and any digital data (RAMADAA) plus a server fro Remote sensing data and its products. While there is overlap in data type storage capabilities (rasters can go into several of these nodes) we prefer to use dedicated storage facilities that are a) freeware, and b) have a good degree of maturity, and c) have shown their utility for stroing a cetain type. In addition it allows to place these commonly used software stacks and storage solutiosn side-by-side to develop interoprability strategies. We have used a DRUPAL based system to handle user regoistration and authentication, and also use the system for data submission and data search. In support for tis system we developed an extensive controlled vocabulary system that is an amalgamation of various CVs used in the geosciecne community in order to achieve as high a degree of recognition, such the CF conventions, CUAHSI Cvs, , NASA (GCMD), EPA and USGS taxonomies, GEMET, in addition to ontological representations such as SWEET.

  16. Mobilization plan for the Y-12 9409-5 tank storage facility RCRA closure plan. Final report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-01

    This mobilization plan identifies the activities and equipment necessary to begin the field sampling for the Oak Ridge Y-12 9409-5 Diked Tank Storage Facility (DTSF) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure. Elements of the plan outline the necessary components of each mobilization task and identify whether SAIC or the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Y-12 Environmental Restoration Division will be responsible for task coordination. Field work will be conducted in two phases: mobilization phase and soil sampling phase. Training and medical monitoring, access, permits and passes, decontamination/staging area, equipment, and management are covered in this document.

  17. Alternatives to relational databases in precision medicine: Comparison of NoSQL approaches for big data storage using supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, Enrique Israel

    Improvements in medical and genomic technologies have dramatically increased the production of electronic data over the last decade. As a result, data management is rapidly becoming a major determinant, and urgent challenge, for the development of Precision Medicine. Although successful data management is achievable using Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS), exponential data growth is a significant contributor to failure scenarios. Growing amounts of data can also be observed in other sectors, such as economics and business, which, together with the previous facts, suggests that alternate database approaches (NoSQL) may soon be required for efficient storage and management of big databases. However, this hypothesis has been difficult to test in the Precision Medicine field since alternate database architectures are complex to assess and means to integrate heterogeneous electronic health records (EHR) with dynamic genomic data are not easily available. In this dissertation, we present a novel set of experiments for identifying NoSQL database approaches that enable effective data storage and management in Precision Medicine using patients' clinical and genomic information from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). The first experiment draws on performance and scalability from biologically meaningful queries with differing complexity and database sizes. The second experiment measures performance and scalability in database updates without schema changes. The third experiment assesses performance and scalability in database updates with schema modifications due dynamic data. We have identified two NoSQL approach, based on Cassandra and Redis, which seems to be the ideal database management systems for our precision medicine queries in terms of performance and scalability. We present NoSQL approaches and show how they can be used to manage clinical and genomic big data. Our research is relevant to the public health since we are focusing on one of the main

  18. The MRS (Monitored Retrievable Storage) task force: Economic and non-economic incentives for local public acceptance of a proposed nuclear waste packaging and storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Peelle, E.

    1987-03-01

    A joint Oak Ridge - Roane County citizen task force (TF) evaluated the Department of Energy's (DOE) proposal to site a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility in Tennessee in terms of environmental, transportation, and socioeconomic impacts. The case study examines how the TF used mitigation, compensation and incentives (economic and non-economic) to address the problem of distrust of DOE and to change the net local impact balance from negative to positive. Intensive group interaction during their investigations and development of trust within the TF led to consensus decisions on safety and conditional acceptance. DOE accepted most of the TF conditions after informal negotiations. The siting process was stopped by extensive state-wide opposition resulting in legal challenge by the state and vetoes by the governor and state legislature.

  19. Technical Competencies for the Safe Interim Storage and Management of 233U at U.S. Department of Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D.O.; Krichinsky, A.M.; Laughlin, S.S.; Van Essen, D.C.; Yong, L.K.

    1999-02-17

    Uranium-233 (with concomitant {sup 232}U) is a man-made fissile isotope of uranium with unique nuclear characteristics which require high-integrity alpha containment biological shielding, and remote handling. The special handling considerations and the fact that much of the {sup 233}U processing and large-scale handling was performed over a decade ago underscore the importance of identifying the people within the DOE complex who are currently working with or have worked with {sup 233}U. The availability of these key personnel is important in ensuring safe interim storage, management and ultimate disposition of {sup 233}U at DOE facilities. Significant programs are ongoing at several DOE sites with actinides. The properties of these actinide materials require many of the same types of facilities and handling expertise as does {sup 233}U.

  20. An assessment of alternative diesel fuels: microbiological contamination and corrosion under storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason S; Ray, Richard I; Little, Brenda J

    2010-08-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate the nature and extent of microbial contamination and the potential for microbiologically influenced corrosion of alloys exposed in a conventional high sulfur diesel (L100) and alternative fuels, including 100% biodiesel (B100), ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and blends of ULSD and B100 (B5 and B20). In experiments with additions of distilled water, all fuels supported biofilm formation. Changes in the water pH did not correlate with observations related to corrosion. In all exposures, aluminum 5052 was susceptible to pitting while stainless steel 304L exhibited passive behavior. Carbon steel exhibited uniform corrosion in ULSD and L100, and passive behavior in B5, B20, and B100. PMID:20628927

  1. ALTERNATE VOC CONTROL TECHNIQUE OPTIONS FOR SMALL ROTOGRAVURE AND FLEXOGRAPHY FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report identifies Available Control Techniques (ACTs) for states to use as a referenec when implementing Reasonable Available Control Technilogy (RACT) for graphic arts facilities that are covered by the Control Technologies Guidelines (CTGs), but emit less than 91 tonnes of ...

  2. Inspection of alleged design and construction deficiencies in the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-16

    On June 8, 1994, the Office of Inspections, Office of Inspector General (OIG), Department of Energy (DOE), received a letter dated May 31, 1994, from a complainant concerning the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The complainant alleged that the NMSF, completed in 1987, was so poorly designed and constructed that it was never usable and that DOE proposed to gut the entire facility and sandblast the walls. According to the complainant, ``these errors are so gross as to constitute professional malpractice in a commercial design setting.`` The complainant further stated that ``DOE proposes to renovate this facility to store large amounts of plutonium (as much as 30 metric tons, by some accounts), and it is imperative that the public receive some assurance that this waste will not recur and that the facility will be made safe.`` The purpose of our inspection was to determine if the allegations regarding the design and construction of the NMSF were accurate, and if so, to determine if the Government could recover damages from the Architect/Engineer and/or the construction contractor. We also reviewed the Department`s proposed actions to renovate the NMSF.

  3. Evaluation of surface storage facilities for explosives, blasting agents and other explosive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, J.

    1983-06-01

    The histories of recent and past magazine explosions were reviewed; present explosive storage conditions and practices were observed; and existing Federal regulations on explosive storage were examined. A recent increase in magazine explosion frequency must be attributed to a large increase in deliberate explosions; fires of various origins account for the remaining explosions of the past decade. During 1884-1926 several lightning generated explosions occurred in nonmetal magazines. It appears that the contents of a well constructed metal magazine are immune to direct lightning strikes, regardless of whether the magazine is grounded or not. Grounding a metal magazine cannot be harmful, but it maywell be superfluous. Mine Safety and Health Administration and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms standards on explosive storage appear to cover safety aspects adequately. Certain revisions are recommended to clarify some of the standards and to reduce inconsistencies in their enforcement.

  4. Design of System Architecture and Thermal Management Components for an Underwater Energy Storage Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Brian C.

    The electricity industry is currently experiencing a significant paradigm shift in managing electrical resources. With the onset of aging infrastructure and growing power demands, and the influx of intermittent renewable energy generation, grid system operators are looking towards energy storage as a solution for mitigating industry challenges. An emerging storage solution is underwater compressed air energy storage (UWCAES), where air compressors and turbo-expanders are used to convert electricity to and from compressed air stored in submerged accumulators. This work presents three papers that collectively focus on the design and optimization of an UWCAES system. In the first paper, the field performance of a distensible air accumulator is studied for application in UWCAES systems. It is followed by a paper that analyzed the energetic and exergetic performance of a theoretical UWCAES system. The final paper presents a multi-objective UWCAES optimization model utilizing a genetic algorithm to determine optimum system configurations.

  5. 77 FR 61633 - Information Collection: Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ...To comply with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) is inviting comments on a collection of information that we will submit to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. The information collection request (ICR) concerns the paperwork requirements in the regulations under ``Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing......

  6. Hydrogen and Storage Initiatives at the NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maes, Miguel; Woods, Stephen S.

    2006-01-01

    NASA WSTF Hydrogen Activities: a) Aerospace Test; b) System Certification & Verification; c) Component, System, & Facility Hazard Assessment; d) Safety Training Technical Transfer: a) Development of Voluntary Consensus Standards and Practices; b) Support of National Hydrogen Infrastructure Development.

  7. 36 CFR 1234.34 - When may NARA conduct an inspection of a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... testing exercise Required. Assign & train OEP officials (assignment based on largest tenant in facility... Required. Establish standardized unarmed guard qualifications/training requirements Required. Establish standardized armed guard qualifications/training requirements Required. Tenant Assignment: Co-locate...

  8. Targeted Health Assessment for Wastes Contained at the Niagara Falls Storage Site to Guide Planning for Remedial Action Alternatives - 13428

    SciTech Connect

    Busse, John; Keil, Karen; Staten, Jane; Miller, Neil; Barker, Michelle; MacDonell, Margaret; Peterson, John; Chang, Young-Soo; Durham, Lisa

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is evaluating potential remedial alternatives at the 191-acre Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) in Lewiston, New York, under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) brought radioactive wastes to the site during the 1940's and 1950's, and the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) consolidated these wastes into a 10-acre interim waste containment structure (IWCS) in the southwest portion of the site during the 1980's. The USACE is evaluating remedial alternatives for radioactive waste contained within the IWCS at the NFSS under the Feasibility Study phase of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. A preliminary evaluation of the IWCS has been conducted to assess potential airborne releases associated with uncovered wastes, particularly during waste excavation, as well as direct exposures to uncovered wastes. Key technical issues for this assessment include: (1) limitations in waste characterization data; (2) representative receptors and exposure routes; (3) estimates of contaminant emissions at an early stage of the evaluation process; (4) consideration of candidate meteorological data and air dispersion modeling approaches; and (5) estimates of health effects from potential exposures to both radionuclides and chemicals that account for recent updates of exposure and toxicity factors. Results of this preliminary health risk assessment indicate if the wastes were uncovered and someone stayed at the IWCS for a number of days to weeks, substantial doses and serious health effects could be incurred. Current controls prevent such exposures, and the controls that would be applied to protect onsite workers during remedial action at the IWCS would also effectively protect the public nearby. This evaluation provides framing context for the upcoming development and detailed evaluation of

  9. Evaluating the heat pump alternative for heating enclosed wastewater treatment facilities in cold regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, C. J.; Phetteplace, G. E.

    1982-05-01

    This report presents a five-step procedure for evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of using heat pumps to recover heat from treatment plant effluent. The procedure is meant to be used at the facility planning level by engineers who are unfamiliar with this technology. An example of the use of the procedure and general design information are provided. Also, the report reviews the operational experience with heat pumps at wastewater plants located in Fairbanks, Alaska, Madison, Wisconsin, and Wilton, Maine.

  10. Computer simulation of an alternate-energy-based, high-density brooding facility

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    A computer model was developed to simulate a poultry brooding facility characterized by high-density cage or floor brooding, environmental housing, ventilation heat recovery, solar energy collection, and biogas generation. Repeated simulations revealed the following: (1) Solar collection and ventilation heat recovery could reduce fossil fuel use by 12 and 91%, respectively. Combining solar collection and heat recovery may reduce fossil fuel use by only an additional 1.5%. (2) Methane generation can provide more energy on a yearly basis than is required for supplemental heat for brooding. Seasonal energy demands do not match supplies from methane generation and shortages may occur in winter as well as excesses in summer. A digester operated in the thermophilic temperature range produces more net energy than one operated in the mesophilic range. (3) Operating expenses for the simulated cage facility exceeded conventional brooding. (4) Relative humidity patterns of certain areas create the need for complex controls to properly maintain the internal environment. (5) Feed and fuel account for nearly 100% of the operating expenses of brooding. Controlling heat and ventilation with a microprocessor may be the only way to optimize the environment of a broiler brooding facility.

  11. "Not in (or under) my backyard": Geographic proximity and public acceptance of carbon capture and storage facilities.

    PubMed

    Krause, Rachel M; Carley, Sanya R; Warren, David C; Rupp, John A; Graham, John D

    2014-03-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is an innovative technical approach to mitigate the problem of climate change by capturing carbon dioxide emissions and injecting them underground for permanent geological storage. CCS has been perceived both positively, as an innovative approach to facilitate a more environmentally benign use of fossil fuels while also generating local economic benefits, and negatively, as a technology that prolongs the use of carbon-intensive energy sources and burdens local communities with prohibitive costs and ecological and human health risks. This article extends existing research on the "not in my backyard" (NIMBY) phenomenon in a direction that explores the public acceptance of CCS. We utilize survey data collected from 1,001 residents of the coal-intensive U.S. state of Indiana. Over 80% of respondents express support for the general use of CCS technology. However, 20% of these initial supporters exhibit a NIMBY-like reaction and switch to opposition as a CCS facility is proposed close to their communities. Respondents' worldviews, their beliefs about the local economic benefits that CCS will generate, and their concerns about its safety have the greatest impact on increasing or decreasing the acceptance of nearby facilities. These results lend valuable insights into the perceived risks associated with CCS technology and the possibilities for its public acceptance at both a national and local scale. They may be extended further to provide initial insights into likely public reactions to other technologies that share a similar underground dimension, such as hydraulic fracturing. PMID:24117789

  12. PLOT PLAN OF FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP603) SHOWING STORAGE BASINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PLOT PLAN OF FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP-603) SHOWING STORAGE BASINS AND PROPOSED LOCATION OF FUEL ELEMENT CUTTING FACILITY. INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0603-00-706-051287. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER CPP-C-1287. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Economic and environmental evaluation of flexible integrated gasification polygeneration facilities with carbon capture and storage

    EPA Science Inventory

    One innovative option for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions involves pairing carbon capture and storage (CCS) with the production of synthetic fuels and electricity from co-processed coal and biomass. In this scheme, the feedstocks are first converted to syngas, from which ...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1903 - Underground diesel fuel storage facilities and areas; construction and safety precautions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... percent of the maximum capacity of the fuel storage system; and (7) Provided with a competent concrete...) When it is necessary to weld, cut, or solder pipelines, tanks, or other containers that may have..., tanks, or containers that have been welded, soldered, brazed, or cut until the metal has cooled...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1903 - Underground diesel fuel storage facilities and areas; construction and safety precautions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... percent of the maximum capacity of the fuel storage system; and (7) Provided with a competent concrete...) When it is necessary to weld, cut, or solder pipelines, tanks, or other containers that may have..., tanks, or containers that have been welded, soldered, brazed, or cut until the metal has cooled...

  16. Distribution, abundance, and seasonal patterns of stored product beetles in a commercial food storage facility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-year monitoring study was performed using pitfall traps baited with pheromone lures and food oil to assess seasonal prevalence of stored product beetles inside a large community food storage warehouse located in the Midwestern US. The four primary species captured were Tribolium castaneum (H...

  17. Foam testing of an alternative antifoam agent for the processing of radioactive sludge in the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.C.

    2000-01-26

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site is responsible for immobilizing high level radioactive waste (HLW) as glass-filled steel canisters for permanent storage. In the DWPF facility, the HLW sludge undergoes chemical treatment to prepare it for vitrification in a melter. The generation of stable foams is possible during treatment. The current DWPF antifoam is ineffective in preventing and minimizing the formation of foam. The adverse consequences of excess foam can be severe enough to cause foam to exit the evaporator and collect in the condensate. A foamover will contaminate the relatively clean condensate with HLW solids. It can also potentially lead to the production of an unsuitable melter feed that would not make quality glass. Both of these consequences are costly and time consuming to correct. A new antifoam agent was developed by the Illinois Institute of Technology, IIT, for DWPF in an attempt to minimize or eliminate the frequency of these foamovers. This antifoam agent was demonstrated to be superior to the existing DWPF antifoam agent in laboratory scale experiments. However, the DWPF evaporation heat flux was not achievable in the laboratory scale equipment. A 1/240th-scale pilot facility was built to achieve this heat flux and determine whether the existing or new antifoam agent was superior. The pilot facility was built out of glass to allow observation of the foam formation during processing. The experiments used a non-radioactive simulant slurry similar to HLW. The IIT antifoam agent was found to be much more effective than the DWPF antifoam at the current conditions of maximum foam formation. The IIT antifoam agent was comparable or superior to the present DWPF antifoam under all conditions tested. This report summarizes the results of the antifoam agent comparison testing.

  18. Evaluation of closure alternatives for the Building 3001 Storage Canal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The Bldg. 3001 Storage Canal at ORNL is leaking approximately 400 gal of water per day. This report presents the Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) Team`s evaluation of plans and presents recommendations for interim closure alternatives to stop the release of radionuclides and potential release of heavy metals into the environment. This is a conceptual evaluation and does not include detailed engineering of physical mitigation methods. The alternatives address only interim closure measures and not final decommissioning of the canal.

  19. Alternative-fuel production facility for City of Huntsville, Alabama. Volume I. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    The feasibility of a Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)-to-energy project in the Huntsville area was invetigated and found to be an environmentally attractive and cost effective method of MSW disposal. Of nine likely alternatives, that were developed for detailed evaluation and analysis. Alternative 1M surfaced as best for the City. It is described as follows: a MSW-To-Energy Plant, consisting of two 300 TPD Mass Burning Waterwall Furnace/Boiler Systems at Lowe Industrial Park to provide low pressure steam to industries in the park. A MSW Transfer Station at the existing landfill and MSW as well as residue transport rolling stock equipment is included to facilitate movement of the waste materials between the two locations that are some twelve miles apart.

  20. Evaluating the effects of the number of caverns on the performance of underground oil storage facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1992-01-01

    Three dimensional finite element calculations were performed to investigate the effect field size, in terms of the number of caverns, on the performance of SPR oil storage caverns leached in domal salt (interms of surface subsidence, storage losses, and cavern integrity). The calculations were performed for cavern fields containing 1, 7, 19, and an infinite number of caverns. The magnitude and volume of subsidence was significantly affected by increasing the number of caverns (nearly an order of magnitude increase was predicted for each increase in field size), while the extent of subsidence (approximately 2000 m fromthe center of the field) and storage loss were not. Furthermore, the percentage of storage loss volume manifested as surface subsidence increased as the cavern field was enlarged. This was attributed to elasticvolumetric dilatation of overlying strata. The multiple cavern calculations demonstrate that storage losses are greater for caverns farther from the center of the caverns field. Based on an accumulated strain stability criteria, the larger cavern fields are predicted to have a shorter life. This criteria also indicates that caverns on the periphery of a field may show signs of instability before the inner caverns. The West Hackberry site (containing 22 caverns) subsidence data closely agrees with the 19 cavern model subsidence predictions, providing confidence in the calculations. Even a 19 cavern field, substantially large by SPR standards, does not approach the behavior predicted by infinite cavern models (which are frequently used because they are economical). This demonstrates that 3D modeling is required to accurately investigate the performance of a multi-cavern array. Although based on a typical SPR cavern design, the results of this study describe mechanics common to all multi-cavern fields and should, in general, be useful tocavern engineers and architects.

  1. Using Geographic Information Systems to Determine Site Suitability for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Storage Facility.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Charles A; Matthews, Kennith; Pulsipher, Allan; Wang, Wei-Hsung

    2016-02-01

    ) sites. Cells above 90%, 95%, and 99% suitability include respectively 404, 88, and 4 cells suitable for further analysis. With these areas identified, the next step in siting a LLW storage facility would be on-site analysis using additional requirements as specified by relevant regulatory guidelines. The GIS based method provides an easy, economic, efficient and effective means in evaluating potential sites for LLW storage facilities where sufficient GIS data exist. PMID:26710161

  2. 3D Seismic Characterization of the Research Facility for Geological Storage of CO2: Hontomín (Burgos, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalde, J.; Martí, D.; Calahorrano, A.; Marzan, I.; Ayarza, P.; Carbonell, R.; Perez-Estaun, A.

    2011-12-01

    A technological research facility dedicated to the underground geological storage of CO2 is currently being developed by the Spanish research program on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in Hontomin (Burgos, North of the Iberian Peninsula) This research program is being developed by the CIUDEN Foundation. CIUDEN is an initiative of 3 Spanish state departments (Science & Innovation, Environment and Industry). An extensive multidisciplinary site characterization phase has been carried out, including a multi-seismic data acquisition experiment. Within this effort a 36 km2 academic-oriented 3D seismic reflection survey was acquired in summer 2010. The aim of data acquisition effort are to provide high resolution images of the subsurface of the storage complex, constrain a baseline model for all the disciplines involved in the project. The main acquisition characteristics of this survey included: a mixed source (Vibroseis & explosive , 74% and 26% of the source points, respectively); 5000 shot points, distributed along 22 source lines (separated 250 m), 22 lines of receivers (separated 275 m); shot and receiver spacing along the source and receiver lines was of 25 m; this resulted in a nominal CDP-fold of 36 traces, with 13 m2 bins. This 3D-data was fully processed until migration. The main features within the processing sequence include static correction calculation, frequency filtering, trace amplitude equalization, rms velocity modeling, FK-domain filtering, 3D deconvolution, dip move-out corrections, residual static calculation and pre and post stack migration. The final high-resolution 3D-volume allowed to characterize the main tectonic structure of the dome complex, the fault system of the area and the feasibility of the reservoir for the storage. The target reservoir is a saline aquifer placed at 1400, approximately, within Lower Jurassic carbonates (Lias); the main seal is formed by inter-layered marls and marly limestones from Early to Middle Jurassic (Dogger

  3. Prestressed concrete barge with liquefaction plant and storage facility for l. n. g

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    A prestressed concrete barge installed with a combination of liquefaction plant and storage tank has been developed which will operate in order to economically gather the natural gas available of small-scale offshore gas wells in the world. A full design of a prototype has been completed through systematic works, namely, structural analysis, stability analysis, experiments of materials and structural members. The engineering data developed here will also be applicable to a larger scale barge.

  4. Design and operation of an inert gas facility for thermoelectric generator storage

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    While the flight hardware is protected by design from the harsh environments of space, its in-air storage often requires special protection from contaminants such as dust, moisture and other gases. One of these components, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) which powers the missions, was deemed particularly vulnerable to pre-launch aging because the generators remain operational at core temperatures in excess of 1000 degrees centigrade throughout the storage period. Any oxygen permitted to enter the devices will react with thermally hot components, preferentially with molybdenum in the insulating foils, and with graphites to form CO/CO{sub 2} gases which are corrosive to the thermopile. It was important therefore to minimize the amount of oxygen which could enter, by either limiting the effective in-leakage areas on the generators themselves, or by reducing the relative amount of oxygen within the environment around the generators, or both. With the generators already assembled and procedures in place to assure minimal in-leakage in handling, the approach of choice was to provide a storage environment which contains significantly less oxygen than normal air. 2 refs.

  5. 30 CFR 75.1912 - Fire suppression systems for permanent underground diesel fuel storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... susceptible to alteration or recorded electronically in a secured computer system that is not susceptible to... facilities. (a) The fire suppression system required by § 75.1903 shall be an automatic multipurpose dry chemical type (ABC) fire suppression system listed or approved as an engineered dry chemical...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1912 - Fire suppression systems for permanent underground diesel fuel storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... susceptible to alteration or recorded electronically in a secured computer system that is not susceptible to... facilities. (a) The fire suppression system required by § 75.1903 shall be an automatic multipurpose dry chemical type (ABC) fire suppression system listed or approved as an engineered dry chemical...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1912 - Fire suppression systems for permanent underground diesel fuel storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... susceptible to alteration or recorded electronically in a secured computer system that is not susceptible to... facilities. (a) The fire suppression system required by § 75.1903 shall be an automatic multipurpose dry chemical type (ABC) fire suppression system listed or approved as an engineered dry chemical...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1912 - Fire suppression systems for permanent underground diesel fuel storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... susceptible to alteration or recorded electronically in a secured computer system that is not susceptible to... facilities. (a) The fire suppression system required by § 75.1903 shall be an automatic multipurpose dry chemical type (ABC) fire suppression system listed or approved as an engineered dry chemical...

  9. 40 CFR 761.213 - Use of manifest-Commercial storage and disposal facility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION IN COMMERCE, AND USE PROHIBITIONS PCB Waste Disposal Records and Reports § 761.213... or disposal facility receives PCB waste accompanied by a manifest, the owner, operator or his/her... the PCB waste covered by the manifest was received, that the PCB waste was received except as noted...

  10. 40 CFR 761.213 - Use of manifest-Commercial storage and disposal facility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION IN COMMERCE, AND USE PROHIBITIONS PCB Waste Disposal Records and Reports § 761.213... or disposal facility receives PCB waste accompanied by a manifest, the owner, operator or his/her... the PCB waste covered by the manifest was received, that the PCB waste was received except as noted...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1903 - Underground diesel fuel storage facilities and areas; construction and safety precautions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with at least 240 pounds of rock dust and provided with two portable multipurpose dry chemical type... laboratory and have a 10A:60B:C or higher rating. Both fire extinguishers must be easily accessible to... of the facility, in intake air; or (2) Provided with three portable multipurpose dry chemical...

  12. 30 CFR 75.1903 - Underground diesel fuel storage facilities and areas; construction and safety precautions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with at least 240 pounds of rock dust and provided with two portable multipurpose dry chemical type... laboratory and have a 10A:60B:C or higher rating. Both fire extinguishers must be easily accessible to... of the facility, in intake air; or (2) Provided with three portable multipurpose dry chemical...

  13. UPDATE/ADDITIONS TO CURRENT OUST PUBLICATION: "HOW TO EVALUATE ALTERNATIVE CLEANUP TECHNOLOGIES FOR UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK SITES: A GUIDE FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN REVIEWERS"

    EPA Science Inventory

    This guidance manual is comprised of several chapters, each of which describes in detail alternative cleanup technologies for underground storage tank sites. Each chapter provides diagrams and tables to aide in determining whether a particular technology may be applicable for cl...

  14. Mine-induced sinkholes over the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Storage Facility at Weeks Island, Louisiana: geological mitigation and environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.

    1997-03-01

    A sinkhole formed over the former salt mine used for crude oil storage by the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve at Weeks Island, Louisiana. This created a dilemma because in-mine grouting was not possible, and external grouting, although possible, was impractical. However, environmental protection during oil withdrawal and facility decommissioning was considered critical and alternative solutions were essential. Mitigation of, the sinkhole growth over the salt mine was accomplished by injecting saturated brine directly into the sinkhole throat, and by constructing a cylindrical freeze curtain around and into the dissolution orifice at the top of the salt dome. These measures vastly reduced the threat of major surface collapse around the sinkhole during oil transfer and subsequent brine backfill. The greater bulk of the crude oil was removed from the mine during 1995-6. Final skimming operations will remove residual oil trapped in low spots, concurrent with initiating backfill of the mine with saturated brine. Environmental monitoring during 1995-9 will assure that environmental surety is achieved.

  15. PEGASYS: A proposed internal target-spectrometer facility for the PEP storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Van Bibber, K.

    1988-09-01

    A proposal for an internal gas-jet target and forward spectrometer for the PEP storage ring is described. The beam structure, allowable luminosity (L=10/sup 33/ cm/sup /minus/2/s/sup /minus/1/ for H/sub 2/, D/sub 2/ decreasing as Z/sup /minus/1.75/ for nuclear targets) and energy (E/sub e/less than or equal to 15 GeV) make the ring ideal for multiparticle coincidence studies in the scaling regime, and where perturbative QCD may be an apt description of some exclusive and semi-inclusive reactions. 17 refs., 5 figs.

  16. PEGASYS---A proposed internal target facility for the PEP storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Van Biber, K.

    1988-07-01

    A proposal for an integral gas-jet target and forward spectrometer for the PEP storage ring is described. The beam structure, allowable, luminosity (L = 10/sup 33/ cm/sup /minus/2/s/sup /minus/1/ for H/sub 2/, D/sub 2/) and energy (E/sub e/ less than or equal to 15 GeV) make the ring ideal for multiparticle coincidence studies in the scaling regime, and where perturbative QCD may be an apt description of some exclusive and semi-inclusive reactions. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Modular Design of Processing and Storage Facilities for Small Volumes of Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste including Disused Sealed Sources - 12372

    SciTech Connect

    Keene, David R.; Kumar Samanta, Susanta; Drace, Zoran

    2012-07-01

    There are a number of IAEA Member States generating relatively small quantities of radioactive waste and/or disused sealed sources in application of nuclear techniques in medicine, industry and research and in nuclear research centres having small research reactors. At present many of these Member States do not have facilities for processing and storing their radioactive wastes; notably in those countries with small quantities of generated radioactive wastes. In other Member States the existing waste processing and storage facilities (WPSF) are in need of varying degrees of upgrading in order to address new waste streams, incorporate new waste processing technologies, or expand interim storage capacities. The IAEA has developed a modular design approach for a WPSF that is based on a variety of modules for different waste stream treatment and conditioning processes. The modular WPSF design is elaborated in a substantial Design Engineering Package that will be published by IAEA as a technical report. The Design Engineering Package enables users to select the optimum waste processing and storage modules to meet their needs, and to specify the requirements for procurement of individual modules and their integration into a waste processing and storage facility. The Design Engineering Package is planned for publication by the IAEA in 2012 and is presented as: - A Design Engineering Package Summary document. - A supporting CD that contains: - Process module general specifications. - Process module interface specifications. - Design Engineering Package for process modules. - Sample technical specifications for design and construction of modular processing facility. - Design Engineering Package for storage modules. (authors)

  18. Final report : phase I investigation at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-05

    From approximately 1949 until 1970, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility on federally owned property approximately 0.25 mi northwest of Savannah, Missouri (Figure 1.1). During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In November 1998, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a private well (Morgan) roughly 50 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of state-wide screening of private wells near former CCC/USDA facilities, conducted in Missouri by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1999). The 1998 and subsequent investigations by the EPA and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride in the Morgan well, as well as in a second well (on property currently owned and occupied by the Missouri Department of Transportation [MoDOT]), described as being approximately 400 ft east of the former CCC/USDA facility. The identified concentrations in these two wells were above the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) and the default target level (DTL) values of 5.0 {micro}g/L for carbon tetrachloride in water used for domestic purposes (EPA 1999; MoDNR 2000a,b, 2006). (The DTL is defined in Section 4.) Because the observed contamination in the Morgan and MoDOT wells might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an investigation to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at Savannah and (2) evaluate the potential risks to human health, public welfare, and the environment posed by the contamination. This work is being performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service

  19. Summary of treatment, storage, and disposal facility usage data collected from U.S. Department of Energy sites

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, A.; Oswald, K.; Trump, C.

    1995-04-01

    This report presents an analysis for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to determine the level and extent of treatment, storage, and disposal facility (TSDF) assessment duplication. Commercial TSDFs are used as an integral part of the hazardous waste management process for those DOE sites that generate hazardous waste. Data regarding the DOE sites` usage have been extracted from three sets of data and analyzed in this report. The data are presented both qualitatively and quantitatively, as appropriate. This information provides the basis for further analysis of assessment duplication to be documented in issue papers as appropriate. Once the issues have been identified and adequately defined, corrective measures will be proposed and subsequently implemented.

  20. Facile preparation of hierarchically porous carbons from metal-organic gels and their application in energy storage

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wei; Qiu, Bin; Xia, Dingguo; Zou, Ruqiang

    2013-01-01

    Porous carbon materials have numerous applications due to their thermal and chemical stability, high surface area and low densities. However, conventional preparing porous carbon through zeolite or silica templates casting has been criticized by the costly and/or toxic procedure. Creating three-dimensional (3D) carbon products is another challenge. Here, we report a facile way to prepare porous carbons from metal-organic gel (MOG) template, an extended metal-organic framework (MOF) structure. We surprisingly found that the carbon products inherit the highly porous nature of MOF and combine with gel's integrated character, which results in hierarchical porous architectures with ultrahigh surface areas and quite large pore volumes. They exhibit considerable hydrogen uptake and excellent electrochemical performance as cathode material for lithium-sulfur battery. This work provides a general method to fast and clean synthesis of porous carbon materials and opens new avenues for the application of metal-organic gel in energy storage. PMID:23728472

  1. Ageing management program for the Spanish low and intermediate level waste disposal and spent fuel and high-level waste centralised storage facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuloaga, P.; Ordoñez, M.; Andrade, C.; Castellote, M.

    2011-04-01

    The generic design of the centralised spent fuel storage facility was approved by the Spanish Safety Authority in 2006. The planned operational life is 60 years, while the design service life is 100 years. Durability studies and surveillance of the behaviour have been considered from the initial design steps, taking into account the accessibility limitations and temperatures involved. The paper presents an overview of the ageing management program set in support of the Performance Assessment and Safety Review of El Cabril low and intermediate level waste (LILW) disposal facility. Based on the experience gained for LILW, ENRESA has developed a preliminary definition of the Ageing Management Plan for the Centralised Interim Storage Facility of spent Fuel and High Level Waste (HLW), which addresses the behaviour of spent fuel, its retrievability, the confinement system and the reinforced concrete structure. It includes tests plans and surveillance design considerations, based on the El Cabril LILW disposal facility.

  2. Niagara Falls Storage Site, Annual site environmental report, Lewiston, New York, Calendar year 1986: Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    During 1986, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York, presently used for the interim storage of radioactive residues and contaminated soils and rubble. The monitoring program is being conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. The monitoring program at the NFSS measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in the report, this individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 6% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. By comparison, the incremental dose received from living in a brick house versus a wooden house is 10 mrem/yr above background. The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the NFSS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose that the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1986 monitoring show that the NFSS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 14 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.

  3. PEGASUS, a European research project on the effects of gas in underground storage facilities for radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Haijtink, B.; McMenamin, T.

    1993-12-31

    Whereas the subject of gas generation and possible gas release from radioactive waste repositories has gained in interest on the international scene, the Commission of the European Communities has increased its research efforts on this issue. In particular in the 4th five year R and D program on Management and Storage of Radioactive Waste (1990--1994), a framework has been set up in which research efforts on the subject of gas generation and migration, supported by the CEC, are brought together and coordinated. In this project, called PEGASUS, Project on the Effects of GAS in Underground Storage facilities for radioactive waste, about 20 organizations and research institutes from 7 European countries are involved. The project covers both experimental and theoretical studies of the processes of gas formation and possible gas release from the different waste types, LLW, ILW and HLW, under typical repository conditions in suitable geological formations as clay, salt and granite. In this paper an overview is given of the various studies undertaken in the project as well as some first results presented.

  4. The cryogenic on-orbit liquid analytical tool (COOLANT) - A computer program for evaluating the thermodynamic performance of orbital cryogen storage facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W. J.; Honkonen, S. C.; Williams, G. E.; Liggett, M. W.; Tucker, S. P.

    1991-01-01

    The United States plans to establish a permanent manned presence at the Space Station Freedom in low earth orbit (LEO) and then carry out exploration of the solar system from this base. These plans may require orbital cryogenic propellant storage depots. The COOLANT program has been developed to analyze the thermodynamic performance of these depots to support design tradeoff studies. It was developed as part of the Long Term Cryogenic Storage Facility Systems Study for NASA/MSFC. This paper discusses the program structure and capabilities of the COOLANT program. In addition, the results of an analysis of a 200,000 lbm hydrogen/oxygen storage depot tankset using COOLANT are presented.

  5. Soil sampling and analysis plan for the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility closure activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnichsen, J.C.

    1997-05-01

    Amendment V.13.B.b to the approved closure plan (DOE-RL 1995a) requires that a soil sampling and analysis plan be prepared and submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) for review and approval. Amendment V.13.B.c requires that a diagram of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility unit (the treatment, storage, and disposal [TSD] unit) boundary that is to be closed, including the maximum extent of operation, be prepared and submitted as part is of the soil sampling and analysis plan. This document describes the sampling and analysis that is to be performed in response to these requirements and amends the closure plan. Specifically, this document supersedes Section 6.2, lines 43--46, and Section 7.3.6 of the closure plan. Results from the analysis will be compared to cleanup levels identified in the closure plan. These cleanup levels will be established using residential exposure assumptions in accordance with the Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) Cleanup Regulation (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-340) as required in Amendment V.13.B.I. Results of all sampling, including the raw analytical data, a summary of analytical results, a data validation package, and a narrative summary with conclusions will be provided to Ecology as specified in Amendment V.13.B.e. The results and process used to collect and analyze the soil samples will be certified by a licensed professional engineer. These results and a certificate of closure for the balance of the TSD unit, as outlined in Chapter 7.0 of the approved closure plan (storage shed, concrete pad, burn building, scrubber, and reaction tanks), will provide the basis for a closure determination.

  6. Advanced Motor Control Test Facility for NASA GRC Flywheel Energy Storage System Technology Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Kascak, Peter E.; Hofmann, Heath; Mackin, Michael; Santiago, Walter; Jansen, Ralph

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the flywheel test facility developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center with particular emphasis on the motor drive components and control. A four-pole permanent magnet synchronous machine, suspended on magnetic bearings, is controlled with a field orientation algorithm. A discussion of the estimation of the rotor position and speed from a "once around signal" is given. The elimination of small dc currents by using a concurrent stationary frame current regulator is discussed and demonstrated. Initial experimental results are presented showing the successful operation and control of the unit at speeds up to 20,000 rpm.

  7. Facile Synthesis of Chevrel Phase Nanocubes and their Applications for Multivalent Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yingwen; Parent, Lucas R.; Shao, Yuyan; Wang, Chong M.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun

    2014-08-14

    The Chevrel phases (CPs, MxMo6T8, M=metal, T=S or Se) are capable of rapid and reversible intercalation of multivalent ions and are the most practical cathode materials for rechargeable magnesium batteries. For the first time, we report a facile method for synthesizing Mo6S8 nanoparticles and demonstrate that these nanoparticles have significantly better Mg2+ intercalation kinetics compared with microparticles. The results described in this work could inspire the synthesis of nanoscale CPs, which could substantially impact their application.

  8. Facile Green Synthesis of BCN Nanosheets as High-Performance Electrode Material for Electrochemical Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Karbhal, Indrapal; Devarapalli, Rami Reddy; Debgupta, Joyashish; Pillai, Vijayamohanan K; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Shelke, Manjusha V

    2016-05-17

    Two-dimensional hexagonal boron carbon nitride (BCN) nanosheets (NSs) were synthesized by new approach in which a mixture of glucose and an adduct of boric acid (H3 BO3 ) and urea (NH2 CONH2 ) is heated at 900 °C. The method is green, scalable and gives a high yield of BCN NSs with average size of about 1 μm and thickness of about 13 nm. Structural characterization of the as-synthesized material was carried out by several techniques, and its energy-storage properties were evaluated electrochemically. The material showed excellent capacitive behaviour with a specific capacitance as high as 244 F g(-1) at a current density of 1 A g(-1) . The material retains up to 96 % of its initial capacity after 3000 cycles at a current density of 5 A g(-1) . PMID:27072914

  9. Methodology for assessing alternative water-acquisition-and-use strategies for energy facilities in the American West

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J.J.; Adams, E.E.; Harleman, D.R.F.; Marks, D.H.

    1981-12-01

    A method for assessing alternative strategies for acquiring and using water at western energy plants was developed. The method was tested in a case study of cooling-water use for a hypothetical steam-electric power plant on the Crazy Woman Creek, an unregulated stream in Wyoming. The results from the case study suggest a careful analysis of reservoir design and water-right purchase strategies can reduce the cost of acquiring and using water at an energy facility. The method uses simulation models to assess the capital and operating costs and expected monthly water-consumption rates for different cooling-system designs. The method also uses reservoir operating algorithms to select, for a fixed cooling-system design, the optimal tradeoff between building a make-up water reservoir and purchasing water rights. These tradeoffs can be used to derive the firm's true demand curve for different sources of water. The analysis also reveals the implicit cost of selecting strategies that minimize conflicts with other water users. Results indicate that: (1) cooling ponds are as good as or preferred to wet towers because their costs already include provisions for storing water for use during the normally dry summer months and during occasional drought years; (2) the energy firm's demand for overall water consumption in the cooling system was found to be inversely proportional to both the cost of installing make-up water reservoirs, and the size of the energy facility; and (3) the firm's willingness to pay for existing rights is proportional to both the cost of installing reservoirs, and the size of the energy facility.

  10. Site selection study for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico as an alternative site for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.; Wheeler, T.; McClellan, Y.

    1996-03-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and operate the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in support of the Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SSM) Programmatic Environmental impact Statement (PEIS). The National Environmental Policy Act requires the DOE to look at alternative sites for the NIF. The SSM PEIS will evaluate four alternative locations for the NIF. This study documents the process and results of a site selection study for a preferred site for the NIF at SNL/NM. The NIF research objectives are to provide the world`s most powerful laser systems to be used in ignition of fusion fuel and energy gain to perform high energy density and radiation effects experiments in support of the DOE`s national security, energy, and basic science research mission. The most immediate application of the NIF will be to provide nuclear-weapon-related physics data, since many phenomena occurring on the laboratory scale are similar to those that occur in weapons. The NIF may also provide an important capability for weapons effects simulation. The NIF is designed to achieve propagating fusion bum and modest energy gain for development as a source of civilian energy.

  11. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Exploratory Shaft Facility fluids and materials evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    West, K.A.

    1988-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if any fluids or materials used in the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) of Yucca Mountain will make the mountain unsuitable for future construction of a nuclear waste repository. Yucca Mountain, an area on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada, USA, is a candidate site for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste from commercial nuclear power and defense nuclear activities. To properly characterize Yucca Mountain, it will be necessary to construct an underground test facility, in which in situ site characterization tests can be conducted. The candidate repository horizon at Yucca Mountain, however, could potentially be compromised by fluids and materials used in the site characterization tests. To minimize this possibility, Los Alamos National Laboratory was directed to evaluate the kinds of fluids and materials that will be used and their potential impacts on the site. A secondary objective was to identify fluids and materials, if any, that should be prohibited from, or controlled in, the underground. 56 refs., 19 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Hazard categorization for 300 area N reactor fuel fabrication and storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, J.R., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-12

    A final hazard categorization has been prepared for the 300 Area Fuel Supply Shutdown (FSS) facility in accordance with DOE-STD-1027-92, ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'' (DOE 1992). Prior to using the hazard category methodology, hazard classifications were prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) controlled manual, WHC-CM-4-46, ''Safety Analysis Manual'', Chapter 4.0, ''Hazard Classification.'' A hazard classification (Huang 1995) was previously prepared for the FSS in accordance with WHC-CM-4-46. The analysis lead to the conclusion that the FSS should be declared a Nuclear facility with a Moderate Hazard Class rating. The analysis and results contained in the hazard classification can be used to provide additional information to support other safety analysis documentation. Also, the hazard classification provides analyses of the toxicological hazards inherent with the FSS inventory: whereas, a hazard categorization prepared in accordance with DOE-STD-1027-92, considers only the radiological component of the inventory.

  13. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 5, Structural/seismic investigation. Section A report, existing conditions calculations/supporting information

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. Based upon US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations (DOE/Al) Office and LANL projections, storage space limitations/restrictions will begin to affect LANL`s ability to meet its missions between 1998 and 2002.

  14. Facile synthesis of ultrahigh-surface-area hollow carbon nanospheres for enhanced adsorption and energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fei; Tang, Zhiwei; Huang, Siqi; Chen, Luyi; Liang, Yeru; Mai, Weicong; Zhong, Hui; Fu, Ruowen; Wu, Dingcai

    2015-06-01

    Exceptionally large surface area and well-defined nanostructure are both critical in the field of nanoporous carbons for challenging energy and environmental issues. The pursuit of ultrahigh surface area while maintaining definite nanostructure remains a formidable challenge because extensive creation of pores will undoubtedly give rise to the damage of nanostructures, especially below 100 nm. Here we report that high surface area of up to 3,022 m2 g-1 can be achieved for hollow carbon nanospheres with an outer diameter of 69 nm by a simple carbonization procedure with carefully selected carbon precursors and carbonization conditions. The tailor-made pore structure of hollow carbon nanospheres enables target-oriented applications, as exemplified by their enhanced adsorption capability towards organic vapours, and electrochemical performances as electrodes for supercapacitors and sulphur host materials for lithium-sulphur batteries. The facile approach may open the doors for preparation of highly porous carbons with desired nanostructure for numerous applications.

  15. Facile Solvothermal Synthesis of Flowerlike SnS2 Nanosheets for Enhanced Lithium Ion Storage Property.

    PubMed

    Li, Keyu; Yan, Shancheng; Zhou, Liyan; Yang, Meng; Shi, Yi; Wang, Yuqiao; Xie, Jingcao

    2016-06-01

    Flowerlike SnS2 nanosheets are synthesized by a fast, low-energy, and facile hydrothermal route. Synthetic conditions, such as the sulfur source, reaction temperature, molar ratio of Sn/S in the source material, and reaction time, that vitally affect the morphologies of the final products are investigated. BET measurements show that the flowerlike SnS2 nanostructure has high surface area (71.84 m2g(-1)). Furthermore, the treated flowerlike SnS2 architecture as anode material of lithium ion batteries has a relatively large initial reversible capacity of 1470.1 mAhg(-1) and retains a reversible capacity of 604.5 mAhg(-1) after 30 cycles, with enhanced cycling performances at a current density of 200 mAg(-1). PMID:27427628

  16. Benzotriazole Enrichment in Snowmelt Discharge Emanating from Engineered Snow Storage Facilities.

    PubMed

    Alvey, Josh K; Hagedorn, Birgit; Dotson, Aaron

    2016-06-01

    Snowpacks in urban environments can retain a high load of anthropogenic contaminants that, upon melting, can deliver concentrated contaminant pulses into the aquatic environment. In climates with an extended period of snowfall accumulation, such as in Anchorage, Alaska, contaminant amplification within meltwater may affect aquatic ecosystem health. A spatiotemporal study of benzotriazoles on snow, meltwater and soils was performed in association with three urban snow disposal facilities. Benzotriazole elution from engineered snow disposal sites behaved similarly to inorganic salt and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) during the initial melt period, with maximum concentrations between 2.23-7.39 μg/L; similar enrichment was observed in creeks. Assays of disposal site soils revealed the presence of tolytriazole. Furthermore, using fluorescence spectroscopy and PARAFAC analysis, a modeled component representative of benzotriazoles was identified, a possible indicator of anthropogenic input rather than a unique indicator for benzotriazole compounds. PMID:27225781

  17. Beam dynamics in an ultra-low energy storage rings (review of existing facilities and feasibility studies for future experiments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papash, A. I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Welsch, C. P.

    2014-03-01

    Storage rings operating at ultra-low energies and in particular electrostatic storage rings have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Due to the mass independence of the electrostatic rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged bio-molecules. However, earlier measurements showed strong limitations on beam intensity, fast decay of ion current, reduced life time etc. The nature of these effects was not fully understood. Also a large variety of experiments in future generation ultra-low energy storage and decelerator facilities including in-ring collision studies with a reaction microscope require a comprehensive investigation of the physical processes involved into the operation of such rings. In this paper, we present review of non-linear and long term beam dynamics studies on example of the ELISA, AD Recycler, TSR and USR rings using the computer codes BETACOOL, OPERA-3D and MAD-X. The results from simulations were benchmarked against experimental data of beam losses in the ELISA storage ring. We showed that decay of beam intensity in ultra-low energy rings is mainly caused by ion losses on ring aperture due to multiple scattering on residual gas. Beam is lost on ring aperture due to small ring acceptance. Rate of beam losses increases at high intensities because of the intra-beam scattering effect adds to vacuum losses. Detailed investigations into the ion kinetics under consideration of the effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target have been carried out as well. The life time, equilibrium momentum spread and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with this internal gas jet target were estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the TSR ring, where low intensity beam of CF+ ions at 93 keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions have been reproduced. Based on these simulations

  18. Characterization of the Hontomín Research Facility for Geological Storage of CO2: 3D Seismic Imaging Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalde, J.; Martí, D.; Juhlin, C.; Malehmir, A.; Calahorrano, A.; Ayarza, P.; Pérez-Estaún, A.; Carbonell, R.

    2012-04-01

    A technological research facility dedicated to the underground geological storage of CO2 is currently being developed by the Spanish research program on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in Hontomin (Burgos). This research program is being developed by the CIUDEN Foundation, an initiative launched by 3 Spanish state departments (Science & Innovation, Environment and Industry). An extensive multidisciplinary site characterization phase has been carried out, including a multiseismic data acquisition experiment. Within this effort, a 36 km2 3D seismic reflection survey was acquired in the summer of 2010. Its aim was to provide high resolution images of the subsurface of the storage complex, as well as to provide a baseline model for all the disciplines involved in the project. The target reservoir is a saline aquifer located at 1400 m, approximately, within Lower Jurassic carbonates (Lias). The main seal is formed by inter-layered marls and marly limestones of Early to Middle Jurassic age (Dogger and Lias). The main acquisition characteristics of the survey included (1) a mixed source of vibroseis and explosives with 74% and 26% of each used, respectively, (2) 5000 source points distributed along 22 source lines (separated 250 m) and (3) 22 lines of receivers (separated 275 m). Shot and receiver spacing along the source and receiver lines was 25 m, resulting in a nominal CDP-fold of 36 for 13 m2 bins. The 3D-data have been fully processed to post stack migration. The most critical processing steps included static correction calculations, time variant frequency filtering, rms velocity analysis, F-XY deconvolution, dip move-out correction, residual statics calculations and post stack migration. The final high-resolution 3D-volume shows the shape and depth of the primary reservoir-seal system, the main faults of the area and the secondary reservoir-seal sequence. It allows us to characterize the main tectonic structure of the dome complex, the fault system of the area and

  19. Optimization of CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers Using Water-Alternating Gas (WAG) Scheme - Case Study for Utsira Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, R. K.; Zhang, Z.; Zhu, C.

    2013-12-01

    For optimization of CO2 storage and reduced CO2 plume migration in saline aquifers, a genetic algorithm (GA) based optimizer has been developed which is combined with the DOE multi-phase flow and heat transfer numerical simulation code TOUGH2. Designated as GA-TOUGH2, this combined solver/optimizer has been verified by performing optimization studies on a number of model problems and comparing the results with brute-force optimization which requires a large number of simulations. Using GA-TOUGH2, an innovative reservoir engineering technique known as water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection has been investigated to determine the optimal WAG operation for enhanced CO2 storage capacity. The topmost layer (layer # 9) of Utsira formation at Sleipner Project, Norway is considered as a case study. A cylindrical domain, which possesses identical characteristics of the detailed 3D Utsira Layer #9 model except for the absence of 3D topography, was used. Topographical details are known to be important in determining the CO2 migration at Sleipner, and are considered in our companion model for history match of the CO2 plume migration at Sleipner. However, simplification on topography here, without compromising accuracy, is necessary to analyze the effectiveness of WAG operation on CO2 migration without incurring excessive computational cost. Selected WAG operation then can be simulated with full topography details later. We consider a cylindrical domain with thickness of 35 m with horizontal flat caprock. All hydrogeological properties are retained from the detailed 3D Utsira Layer #9 model, the most important being the horizontal-to-vertical permeability ratio of 10. Constant Gas Injection (CGI) operation with nine-year average CO2 injection rate of 2.7 kg/s is considered as the baseline case for comparison. The 30-day, 15-day, and 5-day WAG cycle durations are considered for the WAG optimization design. Our computations show that for the simplified Utsira Layer #9 model, the

  20. REVIEW OF ALTERNATIVES FOR EVALUATION OF SEWER FLUSHING DORCHESTER AREA--BOSTON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alternatives employing sewer flushing were developed for the Dorchester area of Boston and their cost effectiveness compared with the decentralized combined sewer overflow (CSO) storage/treatment and disinfection facilities proposed as Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan Area (EMM...

  1. Facile Generation and Storage of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Ions in Astrophysical Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    In situ ultraviolet-visible absorption and emission studies of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiated water-rich, cosmic ice analogs containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are described. W V irradiation of 12 K water ices containing the PAHs naphthalene (H2O/C10H8 = 200) and 4-methylpyrene (H2O/C17H12 > 500) readily converts the PAHs into their cation form (PAH(+)). Under these conditions, PAH photoionization is the predominant reaction. These ions are trapped and stored in the ices at temperatures between 10 and 50 K, a temperature domain common to ices throughout interstellar clouds and the solar system. Unlike the approx.15% ionization typical after W V irradiation of PAHs isolated in rare-gas matrices, in water ice, PAH photoionization and storage proceed efficiently and almost quantitatively with a greater than 70% ionization yield. As the temperature is increased from 50 to 150 K, the PAH ion bands slowly diminish as the PAH ions ultimately react to form more complex organic species involving the water host. The chemical, spectroscopic, and physical properties of these ion-rich ices can be important in icy objects such as molecular clouds, comets, and planets. Several astrophysical applications are presented.

  2. Proceedings of a workshop on uses of depleted uranium in storage, transportation and repository facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    A workshop on the potential uses of depleted uranium (DU) in the repository was organized to coordinate the planning of future activities. The attendees, the original workshop objective and the agenda are provided in Appendices A, B and C. After some opening remarks and discussions, the objectives of the workshop were revised to: (1) exchange information and views on the status of the Department of Energy (DOE) activities related to repository design and planning; (2) exchange information on DU management and planning; (3) identify potential uses of DU in the storage, transportation, and disposal of high-level waste and spent fuel; and (4) define the future activities that would be needed if potential uses were to be further evaluated and developed. This summary of the workshop is intended to be an integrated resource for planning of any future work related to DU use in the repository. The synopsis of the first day`s presentations is provided in Appendix D. Copies of slides from each presenter are presented in Appendix E.

  3. Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and maintain additional storage capacity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW). New capacity would be provided by a facility partitioned into six individual tank vaults containing one 100,000 gallon LLLW storage tank each. The storage tanks would be located within the existing Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) facility. This action would require the extension of a potable water line approximately one mile from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) area to the proposed site to provide the necessary potable water for the facility including fire protection. Alternatives considered include no-action, cease generation, storage at other ORR storage facilities, source treatment, pretreatment, and storage at other DOE facilities.

  4. Preliminary studies of tunnel interface response modeling using test data from underground storage facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Bartel, Lewis Clark

    2010-11-01

    In attempting to detect and map out underground facilities, whether they be large-scale hardened deeply-buried targets (HDBT's) or small-scale tunnels for clandestine border or perimeter crossing, seismic imaging using reflections from the tunnel interface has been seen as one of the better ways to both detect and delineate tunnels from the surface. The large seismic impedance contrast at the tunnel/rock boundary should provide a strong, distinguishable seismic response, but in practice, such strong indicators are often lacking. One explanation for the lack of a good seismic reflection at such a strong contrast boundary is that the damage caused by the tunneling itself creates a zone of altered seismic properties that significantly changes the nature of this boundary. This report examines existing geomechanical data that define the extent of an excavation damage zone around underground tunnels, and the potential impact on rock properties such as P-wave and S-wave velocities. The data presented from this report are associated with sites used for the development of underground repositories for the disposal of radioactive waste; these sites have been excavated in volcanic tuff (Yucca Mountain) and granite (HRL in Sweden, URL in Canada). Using the data from Yucca Mountain, a numerical simulation effort was undertaken to evaluate the effects of the damage zone on seismic responses. Calculations were performed using the parallelized version of the time-domain finitedifference seismic wave propagation code developed in the Geophysics Department at Sandia National Laboratories. From these numerical simulations, the damage zone does not have a significant effect upon the tunnel response, either for a purely elastic case or an anelastic case. However, what was discovered is that the largest responses are not true reflections, but rather reradiated Stoneley waves generated as the air/earth interface of the tunnel. Because of this, data processed in the usual way may not

  5. Facile synthesis of ultrahigh-surface-area hollow carbon nanospheres for enhanced adsorption and energy storage

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Tang, Zhiwei; Huang, Siqi; Chen, Luyi; Liang, Yeru; Mai, Weicong; Zhong, Hui; Fu, Ruowen; Wu, Dingcai

    2015-01-01

    Exceptionally large surface area and well-defined nanostructure are both critical in the field of nanoporous carbons for challenging energy and environmental issues. The pursuit of ultrahigh surface area while maintaining definite nanostructure remains a formidable challenge because extensive creation of pores will undoubtedly give rise to the damage of nanostructures, especially below 100 nm. Here we report that high surface area of up to 3,022 m2 g−1 can be achieved for hollow carbon nanospheres with an outer diameter of 69 nm by a simple carbonization procedure with carefully selected carbon precursors and carbonization conditions. The tailor-made pore structure of hollow carbon nanospheres enables target-oriented applications, as exemplified by their enhanced adsorption capability towards organic vapours, and electrochemical performances as electrodes for supercapacitors and sulphur host materials for lithium–sulphur batteries. The facile approach may open the doors for preparation of highly porous carbons with desired nanostructure for numerous applications. PMID:26072734

  6. 2727-S Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility clean closure evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, S.N.

    1994-07-14

    This report presents the analytical results of 2727-S NRDWS facility closure verification soil sampling and compares these results to clean closure criteria. The results of this comparison will determine if clean closure of the unit is regulatorily achievable. This report also serves to notify regulators that concentrations of some analytes at the site exceed sitewide background threshold levels (DOE-RL 1993b) and/or the limits of quantitation (LOQ). This report also presents a Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup (MTCA) (WAC 173-340) regulation health-based closure standard under which the unit can clean close in lieu of closure to background levels or LOQ in accordance with WAC 173-303-610. The health-based clean closure standard will be closure to MTCA Method B residential cleanup levels. This report reconciles all analyte concentrations reported above background or LOQ to this health-based cleanup standard. Regulator acceptance of the findings presented in this report will qualify the TSD unit for clean closure in accordance with WAC 173-303-610 without further TSD unit soil sampling, or soil removal and/or decontamination. Nondetected analytes require no further evaluation.

  7. Alternative public-policy incentives and the development of ethanol-production facilities in New York state. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The federal and state incentives available to investors are outlined and the impact of selected incentives on ethanol plant feasibility in New York state is assessed. Two ethanol plants are selected as representative facilities against which the various incentive programs can be evaluated. One plant has the annual capacity to produce 1.675 million gallons from deproteinized cheese whey. The second plant has an annual capacity of 25 million gallons from corn grain. These two plants represent significantly different options to potential plant developers. The cheese whey-based plant is a relatively low-volume facility, but utilizes a low-cost waste product of the dairy sector. The corn-based plant is a high-volume enterprise, but utilizes corn, which has many alternative uses to ethanol production and is thus a potentially expensive feedstock. Neither plant necessarily represents an optimal scale of conversion for its respective feedstock. However, each plant is well suited for demonstrating the impacts of incentive programs. Of the various incentives tested, the federal fuel excise tax exemption appears to be the most important, followed by the Federal Energy Investment Tax Credit, state industrial revenue bond financing, and the Accelerated Capital Recovery System provisions of the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981. The incentives studied are successful in reducing, to various degrees, the uncertainty surrounding investments in ethanol fuels. However, it would appear that the incentives cannot compensate for a lack of basic economic strength. The whey-to-ethanol plant is relatively risk-free under a wide range of assumptions even when no incentives are utilized.

  8. Fate and persistence of glutaraldehyde and retention lagoon diversity of life at a natural gas storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Derr, R.M.; Morris, E.A. III; Pope, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    In view of increasingly stringent environmental regulations concerning Produced water disposal, the natural gas industry needs to approximate the maximum amount of biocide which can be applied downhole and not adversely impact the local biology in retention lagoons receiving produced waters. Biocide treatment data from a microbially sour aquifer-storage natural gas facility, archived by the operations personnel, were incorporated into a study sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), Chicago, Illinois along with additional data from focused field sampling. The sandy assessed the persistence and fate of glutaraldehyde and its possible effects on diversity of life in the produced water system and outfall areas which receive the lagoon discharge under a National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. In this study, a mathematical model was constructed that incorporated experimentally-determined glutaraldehyde persistence, wellhead Outaraldehyde residuals, rates of water production, and lagoon specifications. The model was used to calculate the levels of glutaraldehyde in the lagoons as a function of time, based on the amount of glutaraldehyde applied downhole. The modeled results were used to assess the potential impacts of various levels of downhole treatment using glutaraldehyde and confirmed that the current treatment regime provided little potential for adverse environmental effects in the retention lagoons or the lagoon outfall areas. Chemical and biological sampling and diversity of life analyses were performed in the retention lagoon system and outfall areas to further test for environmental impacts relating to biocide use; no evidence of adverse effects was found.

  9. Vegetation and soil water interactions on a tailings sand storage facility in the athabasca oil sands region of Alberta Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeth, M. A.; Chanasyk, D. S.; Burgers, T. D.

    The relationship between vegetation and soil water was studied on the Syncrude South West Sand Storage facility in the Athabasca Oil Sands region of Alberta, Canada. Soil water and relevant soil chemical and physical properties were measured at the soil surface, as well as above and below the reclamation soil and tailings sand interface, in areas of low and high vegetation cover. The interface between the reclamation soil and the tailings sand acted as a capillary barrier. Water content was highest under low vegetation cover but soil water conditions above field capacity were rare and unlikely to have impacted vegetation. Periods of water stress occurred, where volumetric water content was below wilting point; these periods were of short duration and generally typical of ecosystems in the study area. Differences in surface soil water between the two vegetation covers were attributed to evapotranspiration and/or canopy interception. Differences above and below the interface were attributed to variation in canopy cover at the surface and resulting quantities of water available for percolation through the soil profiles. At the interface of the reclamation soil and tailings sand, water movement was restricted. High and low canopy covers responded differently to precipitation events; low vegetation cover areas had greater fluctuations in volumetric water content at all depths. The occurrence of a capillary barrier effect will need to be accounted for in developing reclamation soil profiles.

  10. Facile synthesis of fine Zn2SnO4 nanoparticles/graphene composites with superior lithium storage performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bang-Yong; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Ma, Yin-Long; Zhao, Xiao-Hui; Qi, Wen; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2015-05-01

    Fine Zn2SnO4 nanoparticles are synthesized via a facile hydrothermal route using potassium sodium tartrate as a structure-directing agent for the first time. The average size of the as-prepared nanoparticles is about 8-10 nm. More significantly, based on the effect of the reaction time and the amounts of tartrate on the morphology evolution of the precursors, a crystal growth mechanism is proposed involving in-situ dissolution-recrystallization accompanied by morphology and phase change. The Zn2SnO4/graphene (Zn2SnO4/G) nanocomposites are further obtained through the incorporation of graphene sheets under another hydrothermal condition. When evaluated as anode for lithium ion batteries, Zn2SnO4/G nanocomposites deliver a high specific capacity of 745 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles at 200 mA g-1 and improved cyclic stability with a capacity of 492 mAh g-1 after 500 cycles at 500 mA g-1. The outstanding electrochemical performance is mainly ascribed to the synergetic effect of fine Zn2SnO4 nanoparticles and graphene nanosheets. Furthermore, our work provides a simple and low-cost synthetic strategy for the controllable fabrication of various structural materials for energy storage.

  11. Assessment of environmental risk for red mud storage facility in China: a case study in Shandong Province.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhi-Chao; Ma, Shu-Hua; Zheng, Shi-Li; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Red mud storage facility (RM-SF) pollution remains a serious problem in China mainly due to the RM's huge quantity, little recyclability, and high alkalinity. And, there is also a risk of dam failure because almost all RM-SFs are processed by damming. In order to address this challenge and improve the level of risk management, it is necessary to evaluate the environmental risk of RM-SFs systematically. So, this paper firstly designs a comprehensive evaluation index system with a three-level evaluation index in the terms of RM characteristics, RM-SF characteristics, ambient environment of RM-SF, the management of RM-SF, and the application aspect of RM by the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) method. Then, a case of RM-SF from a typical alumina production enterprise is studied according to this system, as is assisted by several experts from different fields when determining the weights of all indicators. The results show that the risk of selected RM-SF primarily depends on the former factors, that is, RM and RM-SF characteristics, while the contributions of the other factors are quite smaller. PMID:26920533

  12. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 1: Sections 1-9

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. The methodology is in compliance with the most recent guidance from DOE. It considers the spectrum of accident sequences that could occur in activities covered by the WM PEIS and uses a graded approach emphasizing the risk-dominant scenarios to facilitate discrimination among the various WM PEIS alternatives. Although it allows reasonable estimates of the risk impacts associated with each alternative, the main goal of the accident analysis methodology is to allow reliable estimates of the relative risks among the alternatives. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  13. SCFA lead lab technical assistance at Oak Ridge Y-12 nationalsecurity complex: Evaluation of treatment and characterizationalternatives of mixed waste soil and debris at disposal area remedialaction DARA solids storage facility (SSF)

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry

    2002-08-26

    On July 17-18, 2002, a technical assistance team from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) met with the Bechtel Jacobs Company Disposal Area Remedial Action (DARA) environmental project leader to review treatment and characterization options for the baseline for the DARA Solids Storage Facility (SSF). The technical assistance request sought suggestions from SCFA's team of technical experts with experience and expertise in soil treatment and characterization to identify and evaluate (1) alternative treatment technologies for DARA soils and debris, and (2) options for analysis of organic constituents in soil with matrix interference. Based on the recommendations, the site may also require assistance in identifying and evaluating appropriate commercial vendors.

  14. Supplemental analysis of accident sequences and source terms for waste treatment and storage operations and related facilities for the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Kohout, E.; Mishima, J.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents supplemental information for the document Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities for Waste Generated by US Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. Additional technical support information is supplied concerning treatment of transuranic waste by incineration and considering the Alternative Organic Treatment option for low-level mixed waste. The latest respirable airborne release fraction values published by the US Department of Energy for use in accident analysis have been used and are included as Appendix D, where respirable airborne release fraction is defined as the fraction of material exposed to accident stresses that could become airborne as a result of the accident. A set of dominant waste treatment processes and accident scenarios was selected for a screening-process analysis. A subset of results (release source terms) from this analysis is presented.

  15. Thermal and flow analysis of the Fluor Daniel, Inc., Nuclear Material Storage Facility renovation design (initial 30% effort of Title 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Steinke, R.G.; Mueller, C.; Knight, T.D.

    1998-03-01

    The computational fluid dynamics code CFX4.2 was used to evaluate steady-state thermal-hydraulic conditions in the Fluor Daniel, Inc., Nuclear Material Storage Facility renovation design (initial 30% of Title 1). Thirteen facility cases were evaluated with varying temperature dependence, drywell-array heat-source magnitude and distribution, location of the inlet tower, and no-flow curtains in the drywell-array vault. Four cases of a detailed model of the inlet-tower top fixture were evaluated to show the effect of the canopy-cruciform fixture design on the air pressure and flow distributions.

  16. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 3: Appendixes C-H

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

    1995-04-01

    This report contains the Appendices for the Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment and Storage Facilities for Waste Generated by the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. The main report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  17. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  18. Facile synthesis of a mesoporous Co3O4 network for Li-storage via thermal decomposition of an amorphous metal complex.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wei; Wu, Jin-Ming; Cao, Min-Hua

    2014-11-01

    A facile strategy is developed for mass fabrication of porous Co3O4 networks via the thermal decomposition of an amorphous cobalt-based complex. At a low mass loading, the achieved porous Co3O4 network exhibits excellent performance for lithium storage, which has a high capacity of 587 mA h g(-1) after 500 cycles at a current density of 1000 mA g(-1). PMID:25252110

  19. Criticality Safety Evaluation Report CSER-96-019 for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Processing and Storage Facilities Multi Canister Overpack (MCO)

    SciTech Connect

    KESSLER, S.F.

    1999-10-20

    This criticality evaluation is for Spent N Reactor fuel unloaded from the existing canisters in both KE and KW Basins, and loaded into multiple canister overpack (MCO) containers with specially built baskets containing a maximum of either 54 Mark IV or 48 Mark IA fuel assemblies. The criticality evaluations include loading baskets into the cask-MCO, operation at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility,a nd storage in the Canister Storage Building. Many conservatisms have been built into this analysis, the primary one being the selection of the K{sub eff} = 0.95 criticality safety limit. This revision incorporates the analyses for the sampling/weld station in the Canister Storage Building and additional analysis of the MCO during the draining at CVDF. Additional discussion of the scrap basket model was added to show why the addition of copper divider plates was not included in the models.

  20. Environmental assessment: Solid waste retrieval complex, enhanced radioactive and mixed waste storage facility, infrastructure upgrades, and central waste support complex, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to take action to: retrieve transuranic (TRU) waste because interim storage waste containers have exceeded their 20-year design life and could fail causing a radioactive release to the environment provide storage capacity for retrieved and newly generated TRU, Greater-than-Category 3 (GTC3), and mixed waste before treatment and/or shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP); and upgrade the infrastructure network in the 200 West Area to enhance operational efficiencies and reduce the cost of operating the Solid Waste Operations Complex. This proposed action would initiate the retrieval activities (Retrieval) from Trench 4C-T04 in the 200 West Area including the construction of support facilities necessary to carry out the retrieval operations. In addition, the proposed action includes the construction and operation of a facility (Enhanced Radioactive Mixed Waste Storage Facility) in the 200 West Area to store newly generated and the retrieved waste while it awaits shipment to a final disposal site. Also, Infrastructure Upgrades and a Central Waste Support Complex are necessary to support the Hanford Site`s centralized waste management area in the 200 West Area. The proposed action also includes mitigation for the loss of priority shrub-steppe habitat resulting from construction. The estimated total cost of the proposed action is $66 million.