Science.gov

Sample records for alternative gene programs

  1. A dynamic alternative splicing program regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry; Ghanem, Dana; An, Xiuli; Li, Jie; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative pre-messenger RNA splicing remodels the human transcriptome in a spatiotemporal manner during normal development and differentiation. Here we explored the landscape of transcript diversity in the erythroid lineage by RNA-seq analysis of five highly purified populations of morphologically distinct human erythroblasts, representing the last four cell divisions before enucleation. In this unique differentiation system, we found evidence of an extensive and dynamic alternative splicing program encompassing genes with many diverse functions. Alternative splicing was particularly enriched in genes controlling cell cycle, organelle organization, chromatin function and RNA processing. Many alternative exons exhibited differentiation-associated switches in splicing efficiency, mostly in late-stage polychromatophilic and orthochromatophilic erythroblasts, in concert with extensive cellular remodeling that precedes enucleation. A subset of alternative splicing switches introduces premature translation termination codons into selected transcripts in a differentiation stage-specific manner, supporting the hypothesis that alternative splicing-coupled nonsense-mediated decay contributes to regulation of erythroid-expressed genes as a novel part of the overall differentiation program. We conclude that a highly dynamic alternative splicing program in terminally differentiating erythroblasts plays a major role in regulating gene expression to ensure synthesis of appropriate proteome at each stage as the cells remodel in preparation for production of mature red cells. PMID:24442673

  2. A dynamic alternative splicing program regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry; Ghanem, Dana; An, Xiuli; Li, Jie; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G

    2014-04-01

    Alternative pre-messenger RNA splicing remodels the human transcriptome in a spatiotemporal manner during normal development and differentiation. Here we explored the landscape of transcript diversity in the erythroid lineage by RNA-seq analysis of five highly purified populations of morphologically distinct human erythroblasts, representing the last four cell divisions before enucleation. In this unique differentiation system, we found evidence of an extensive and dynamic alternative splicing program encompassing genes with many diverse functions. Alternative splicing was particularly enriched in genes controlling cell cycle, organelle organization, chromatin function and RNA processing. Many alternative exons exhibited differentiation-associated switches in splicing efficiency, mostly in late-stage polychromatophilic and orthochromatophilic erythroblasts, in concert with extensive cellular remodeling that precedes enucleation. A subset of alternative splicing switches introduces premature translation termination codons into selected transcripts in a differentiation stage-specific manner, supporting the hypothesis that alternative splicing-coupled nonsense-mediated decay contributes to regulation of erythroid-expressed genes as a novel part of the overall differentiation program. We conclude that a highly dynamic alternative splicing program in terminally differentiating erythroblasts plays a major role in regulating gene expression to ensure synthesis of appropriate proteome at each stage as the cells remodel in preparation for production of mature red cells. PMID:24442673

  3. Alternative Programming for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Thomas A.; Frey, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    The Council for Adult and Experiential Learning is currently cataloguing alternative programming features that are most effective with adult students in a best practices inventory organized around a framework of high-level descriptive principles of effectiveness. This chapter identifies a few interesting features from a quick survey of this…

  4. Integrating alternative splicing detection into gene prediction

    PubMed Central

    Foissac, Sylvain; Schiex, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing (AS) is now considered as a major actor in transcriptome/proteome diversity and it cannot be neglected in the annotation process of a new genome. Despite considerable progresses in term of accuracy in computational gene prediction, the ability to reliably predict AS variants when there is local experimental evidence of it remains an open challenge for gene finders. Results We have used a new integrative approach that allows to incorporate AS detection into ab initio gene prediction. This method relies on the analysis of genomically aligned transcript sequences (ESTs and/or cDNAs), and has been implemented in the dynamic programming algorithm of the graph-based gene finder EuGÈNE. Given a genomic sequence and a set of aligned transcripts, this new version identifies the set of transcripts carrying evidence of alternative splicing events, and provides, in addition to the classical optimal gene prediction, alternative optimal predictions (among those which are consistent with the AS events detected). This allows for multiple annotations of a single gene in a way such that each predicted variant is supported by a transcript evidence (but not necessarily with a full-length coverage). Conclusions This automatic combination of experimental data analysis and ab initio gene finding offers an ideal integration of alternatively spliced gene prediction inside a single annotation pipeline. PMID:15705189

  5. Alternative Work Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehn, Kerri L.

    2004-01-01

    Employers are feeling the strain of needing to offer alternative work arrangements to retain and recruit employees. Due to a change in demographics, dual-career couples and increased technology; people are demanding a transformation in the workplace environment. Two alternatives, which are being offered by employers, are flextime and…

  6. GATEWAYS: Degree program alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Strong, K.R.; Thayer, M.M.

    1991-11-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is using non-traditional solutions to assist employees in attaining degrees required for essential Laboratory operations. Varieties of distance learning technologies have been implemented to meet some degree needs. While distance learning is not always a perfect solution, it enables the Laboratory to provide education that would otherwise not be practical for full-time employees. The Laboratory has also formed partnerships with local colleges to design programs to fill particular needs. Meeting the challenge of providing cost-effective, viable degree programs in an isolated location requires both patience and innovation.

  7. The Arapahoe Detention Alternatives Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Champaign. Community Research Center.

    The efforts of the Colorado Division of Youth Services to develop a program that would reduce the inappropriate use of secure detention of juveniles by providing intake/screening units and various nonsecure alternative detention services are described. Program goals are discussed and criteria on which detention decisions were based for the…

  8. Evolution of alternative splicing after gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhixi; Wang, Jianmin; Yu, Jun; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Gu, Xun

    2006-02-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are two major sources of proteomic function diversity. Here, we study the evolutionary trend of alternative splicing after gene duplication by analyzing the alternative splicing differences between duplicate genes. We observed that duplicate genes have fewer alternative splice (AS) forms than single-copy genes, and that a negative correlation exists between the mean number of AS forms and the gene family size. Interestingly, we found that the loss of alternative splicing in duplicate genes may occur shortly after the gene duplication. These results support the subfunctionization model of alternative splicing in the early stage after gene duplication. Further analysis of the alternative splicing distribution in human duplicate pairs showed the asymmetric evolution of alternative splicing after gene duplications; i.e., the AS forms between duplicates may differ dramatically. We therefore conclude that alternative splicing and gene duplication may not evolve independently. In the early stage after gene duplication, young duplicates may take over a certain amount of protein function diversity that previously was carried out by the alternative splicing mechanism. In the late stage, the gain and loss of alternative splicing seem to be independent between duplicates. PMID:16365379

  9. Alternative Programs in Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditosto, Evelyn, Ed.; Huddle, Eugene, Ed.

    Practices and patterns in teacher education were explored at this meeting. Speeches are reprinted in this report on the following subjects: (1) the nature of educational alternatives; (2) the need for quality education for children of every race; (3) training programs designed for a varied group of professionals within a community of…

  10. Academic Programs in Alternative Education: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruzzi, Betsy Brown; Kraemer, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    This paper, second in a series of papers on alternative education, examines the academic programming in alternative education programs by reviewing the literature specifically focused on the academic programs in alternative education and summarizing a survey of fifteen alternative education programs. It suggests options for further research on…

  11. Alternative Programs for Disruptive Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, M. Angele, Ed.; And Others

    The book addresses issues in meeting the educational needs of disruptive students. In the introduction, R. Sarri examines the rise of alternative schools and discusses common elements in their design and operation. D. Sabatino follows with "Issues and Concerns: Problems with Alternative Schools," in which he examines the particular difficulties…

  12. ["Matreshka" Genes with Alternative Reading Frames].

    PubMed

    Sheshukova, E V; Shindyapina, A V; Komarova, T V; Dorokhov, Yu L

    2016-02-01

    Although a relatively small part of the human genome contains protein encoding genes, the latest data on the discovery of alternative open reading frames (ORFs) in conventional mRNAs has highlighted the expanded coding potential of these genes. Until recently, it was believed that each mRNA transcript encodes a single protein. Recent proteogenomics data indicate the existence of exceptions to this rule, which greatly changes the usual meaning of the term "gene". The topology of a gene with overlapping ORFs resembles a Russian "matreshka" toy. There are two levels of "matreshka" genetic systems. First, the chromosomal level, when the "nested" gene is located within introns and exons of the main chromosomal gene, both in the sense and antisense orientation relative to the external gene. The second level is a mature mRNA molecule containing overlapping ORFs or an ORF with an alternative-start codon. In this review we will focus on the properties of "matreshka" genes of the second type and methods for their detection and verification. Particular attention is paid to the biological properties of the polypeptides encoded by these genes. PMID:27215029

  13. Gene and alternative splicing annotation with AIR

    PubMed Central

    Florea, Liliana; Di Francesco, Valentina; Miller, Jason; Turner, Russell; Yao, Alison; Harris, Michael; Walenz, Brian; Mobarry, Clark; Merkulov, Gennady V.; Charlab, Rosane; Dew, Ian; Deng, Zuoming; Istrail, Sorin; Li, Peter; Sutton, Granger

    2005-01-01

    Designing effective and accurate tools for identifying the functional and structural elements in a genome remains at the frontier of genome annotation owing to incompleteness and inaccuracy of the data, limitations in the computational models, and shifting paradigms in genomics, such as alternative splicing. We present a methodology for the automated annotation of genes and their alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts based on existing cDNA and protein sequence evidence from the same species or projected from a related species using syntenic mapping information. At the core of the method is the splice graph, a compact representation of a gene, its exons, introns, and alternatively spliced isoforms. The putative transcripts are enumerated from the graph and assigned confidence scores based on the strength of sequence evidence, and a subset of the high-scoring candidates are selected and promoted into the annotation. The method is highly selective, eliminating the unlikely candidates while retaining 98% of the high-quality mRNA evidence in well-formed transcripts, and produces annotation that is measurably more accurate than some evidence-based gene sets. The process is fast, accurate, and fully automated, and combines the traditionally distinct gene annotation and alternative splicing detection processes in a comprehensive and systematic way, thus considerably aiding in the ensuing manual curation efforts. PMID:15632090

  14. Alternate nozzle ablative materials program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimmel, N. A.

    1984-01-01

    Four subscale solid rocket motor tests were conducted successfully to evaluate alternate nozzle liner, insulation, and exit cone structural overwrap components for possible application to the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) nozzle asasembly. The 10,000 lb propellant motor tests were simulated, as close as practical, the configuration and operational environment of the full scale SRM. Fifteen PAN based and three pitch based materials had no filler in the phenolic resin, four PAN based materials had carbon microballoons in the resin, and the rest of the materials had carbon powder in the resin. Three nozzle insulation materials were evaluated; an aluminum oxide silicon oxide ceramic fiber mat phenolic material with no resin filler and two E-glass fiber mat phenolic materials with no resin filler. It was concluded by MTI/WD (the fabricator and evaluator of the test nozzles) and NASA-MSFC that it was possible to design an alternate material full scale SRM nozzle assembly, which could provide an estimated 360 lb increased payload capability for Space Shuttle launches over that obtainable with the current qualified SRM design.

  15. Alternative Programs and Desegregation in Flint, Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kugler, Marianne Russell

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the results of the Flint, Michigan Board of Education's decision to include extensive development of alternative programs as part of the Quality Education/Desegregation Plan developed for the Flint schools. (Author/RK)

  16. Program for Alternative Careers in Education (PACE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flicker, Bernard

    The overall objective of the Program for Alternative Careers in Education (PACE) is to develop an alternative model of teacher preparation that prepares individuals to function as educators in the widest possible variety of educational institutions including public and private human service institutions, social welfare agencies, communication…

  17. Bridge Program: An Alternative Curricular Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    With the motivation for career advancement, many adult learners have chosen to return to graduate education or professional programs. The bridge program is one relatively new alternative curricular model available for adult learners who wish to build on their education within their chosen profession. Evidence on the effectiveness of such programs…

  18. Alternatives for Revitalizing Student Services Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deegan, William L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews alternatives for revitalizing the programs and management of community college student services. As program development models, considers Miami-Dade Community College's computer-based instructional management system; entrepreneurial fee-based services; and divestment of situational or special-interest services to student groups. In…

  19. Alternative promoters of gene MAGE4a

    SciTech Connect

    De Plaen, E.; Naerhuyzen, B.; De Smet, C.

    1997-03-01

    Gene MAGE-4 (HGMW-approved symbol MAGE4) is expressed in several types of tumors, but not in normal tissues, except testis and placenta. The 5{prime} end of this gene contains eight homologous exons spread over a 5.8-kb region. These exons are alternatively spliced to a unique second exon and a unique third exon, which encodes a protein of 317 amino acids. The analysis of transcripts found in testis, placenta, and a sarcoma cell line showed that each of the alternative first exons is used in at least one of these tissues. Various regions of the promoter of the fifth alternative exon (1.5) were cloned in a luciferase reporter plasmid, and the constructs were transfected in a sarcoma cell line that expresses MAGE-4. Two Ets motifs located between positions -70 and -29 relative to the transcription start site were found to drive 55% of the promoter activity. A region containing an Sp1 consensus binding site located upstream of the two Ets motifs was found to be responsible for 44% of the transcriptional activity. MAGE-4a promoters 1.4 and 1.6, which also contain the Sp1 and the two Ets binding motifs, supported a level of transcription comparable to that of promoter 1.5, whereas promoter 1.1, which contains only one Ets binding site, was sixfold less active. In line with observations made with gene MAGE-1 (HGMW-approved symbol MAGE1), we found that promoter 1.5 stimulated a high level of transcription in a melanoma cell line that does not express MAGE-4. This suggests that the tumor-specific expression of MAGE genes is not determined by the presence of specific transcription factors. 26 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. 76 FR 11310 - Alternatives Analysis Program Discretionary Funding Allocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... Federal Transit Administration Alternatives Analysis Program Discretionary Funding Allocations AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. ACTION: Alternatives Analysis Program Announcement of Project...) announces the selection of projects funded with unallocated Section 5339 Alternatives Analysis Program...

  1. Vials: Visualizing Alternative Splicing of Genes

    PubMed Central

    Strobelt, Hendrik; Alsallakh, Bilal; Botros, Joseph; Peterson, Brant; Borowsky, Mark; Pfister, Hanspeter; Lex, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a process by which the same DNA sequence is used to assemble different proteins, called protein isoforms. Alternative splicing works by selectively omitting some of the coding regions (exons) typically associated with a gene. Detection of alternative splicing is difficult and uses a combination of advanced data acquisition methods and statistical inference. Knowledge about the abundance of isoforms is important for understanding both normal processes and diseases and to eventually improve treatment through targeted therapies. The data, however, is complex and current visualizations for isoforms are neither perceptually efficient nor scalable. To remedy this, we developed Vials, a novel visual analysis tool that enables analysts to explore the various datasets that scientists use to make judgments about isoforms: the abundance of reads associated with the coding regions of the gene, evidence for junctions, i.e., edges connecting the coding regions, and predictions of isoform frequencies. Vials is scalable as it allows for the simultaneous analysis of many samples in multiple groups. Our tool thus enables experts to (a) identify patterns of isoform abundance in groups of samples and (b) evaluate the quality of the data. We demonstrate the value of our tool in case studies using publicly available datasets. PMID:26529712

  2. Alternative-splicing-mediated gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental process during gene expression and has been found to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. However, how AS impacts gene expression levels both quantitatively and qualitatively remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze two common models of gene expression, each incorporating a simple splice mechanism that a pre-mRNA is spliced into two mature mRNA isoforms in a probabilistic manner. In the constitutive expression case, we show that the steady-state molecular numbers of two mature mRNA isoforms follow mutually independent Poisson distributions. In the bursting expression case, we demonstrate that the tail decay of the steady-state distribution for both mature mRNA isoforms that in general are not mutually independent can be characterized by the product of mean burst size and splicing probability. In both cases, we find that AS can efficiently modulate both the variability (measured by variance) and the noise level of the total mature mRNA, and in particular, the latter is always lower than the noise level of the pre-mRNA, implying that AS always reduces the noise. These results altogether reveal that AS is a mechanism of efficiently controlling the gene expression noise.

  3. Alternative Training Using Selected Program Planning Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zappala, John

    1996-01-01

    Discusses a study to determine the extent that Michigan Adult Education Alternative Training (AEAT) providers used selected concepts of systematic planning in developing training programs. Finds that 55.6% of 65 responding AEAT planners utilized the concepts. Suggests that planners should also incorporate political and practical considerations.…

  4. School Counseling in Disciplinary Alternative Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Patrick R.; Lambie, Glenn W.

    2013-01-01

    Disciplinary alternative education programs (DAEP) service many students; however, limited literature is published for school counselors working in these schools. Therefore, this manuscript provides a conceptual foundation for counselors working with students attending DAEPs. Specifically, the manuscript (a) reviews the types of alternative…

  5. Indiana University Alternative School Teacher Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Univ., Bloomington. School of Education.

    As public school districts have begun to develop optional alternative schools, a common concern has been where to find trained teachers to staff the schools. For the past four years Indiana University has worked closely with several of these school districts in developing a field-based teacher education program to prepare new teachers for these…

  6. Dormancy programs as emerging antimetastasis therapeutic alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Maria Soledad

    2016-01-01

    We recently published that the retinoid-responsive gene NR2F1 (nuclear receptor subfamily 2, group F, member 1) mediates postsurgical dormancy of local residual tumor cells and disseminated tumor cells. Importantly, the combination of azacytidine with retinoids induces dormancy of malignant tumor cells by reinstating the NR2F1-regulated gene program. These findings open the door to the development of strategies that may stop minimal residual disease from becoming life-threatening metastases. PMID:27308542

  7. Alternative Learning Programs Evaluation: Part 3 Report. Case Studies of Alternative Schools and Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Caronly; Brewer, Delores; Bauman, Amy; Groves, Paula; Rayle, Joesph; Noblit, George

    In 1996, North Carolina began a 5-year evaluation of alternative learning programs (ALPs). This report contains in-depth case studies of four ALPs during the 1996-97 school year. The ALPs were selected to represent different types of programs in the state, and include one middle school, two high school, and one elementary school programs. The case…

  8. An alternative method on quadratic programming problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasril, Y.; Mohd, I. B.; Mustaffa, I.; Aminuddin, MMM.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we proposed an alternative approach to find the optimum solution of quadratic programming problems (QPP) in its original form without additional information such as slack variable, surplus variable or artificial variable as done in other favourite methods. This approached is based on the violated constraints by the unconstrained optimum. The optimal solution of QPP obtained by searching from initial point to another point alongside of feasible region.

  9. 45 CFR 400.69 - Alternative RCA programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alternative RCA programs. 400.69 Section 400.69... Assistance § 400.69 Alternative RCA programs. A State that determines that a public/private RCA program or a... choose instead to establish an alternative approach under the Wilson/Fish program, authorized by...

  10. 45 CFR 400.69 - Alternative RCA programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Alternative RCA programs. 400.69 Section 400.69... Assistance § 400.69 Alternative RCA programs. A State that determines that a public/private RCA program or a... choose instead to establish an alternative approach under the Wilson/Fish program, authorized by...

  11. 45 CFR 400.69 - Alternative RCA programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alternative RCA programs. 400.69 Section 400.69... Assistance § 400.69 Alternative RCA programs. A State that determines that a public/private RCA program or a... choose instead to establish an alternative approach under the Wilson/Fish program, authorized by...

  12. Association of American Railroads Alternative Fuels Program

    SciTech Connect

    Furber, C.P.

    1985-01-01

    Alternative fuels can be used in locomotive diesel engines as a means to reduce fuel costs or as fuel extenders when sufficient quantities of suitable lower cost fuels are not available. Broadened fuel purchasing guidelines, based on engine fuel tolerance limitation tests, offer a potential for reducing fuel costs. Fuels such as alcohols, certain vegetable oils, shale oils, and heavy oil blends can be used to extend fuel supplies. Fuel tolerance limitations of existing engines can be increased through modifications such as staged injection or the use of ceramic coatings. This paper describes the methods used by the Association of American Railroads Alternative Fuels Research Program to determine engine fuel tolerance limitations and extend engine fuel tolerance limits.

  13. 36 CFR 800.14 - Federal agency program alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... alternatives. 800.14 Section 800.14 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ADVISORY COUNCIL ON HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES Program Alternatives § 800.14 Federal agency program alternatives. (a) Alternate procedures. An agency official may develop procedures to implement section 106...

  14. 36 CFR 800.14 - Federal agency program alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... alternatives. 800.14 Section 800.14 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ADVISORY COUNCIL ON HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES Program Alternatives § 800.14 Federal agency program alternatives. (a) Alternate procedures. An agency official may develop procedures to implement section 106...

  15. 36 CFR 800.14 - Federal agency program alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... alternatives. 800.14 Section 800.14 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ADVISORY COUNCIL ON HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES Program Alternatives § 800.14 Federal agency program alternatives. (a) Alternate procedures. An agency official may develop procedures to implement section 106...

  16. 36 CFR 800.14 - Federal agency program alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... alternatives. 800.14 Section 800.14 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ADVISORY COUNCIL ON HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES Program Alternatives § 800.14 Federal agency program alternatives. (a) Alternate procedures. An agency official may develop procedures to implement section 106...

  17. 33 CFR 104.140 - Alternative Security Programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternative Security Programs... MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: VESSELS General § 104.140 Alternative Security Programs. A vessel owner or operator may use an Alternative Security Program as approved under § 101.120 of this...

  18. 33 CFR 105.140 - Alternative Security Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternative Security Program. 105... MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: FACILITIES General § 105.140 Alternative Security Program. (a) A facility owner or operator may use an Alternative Security Program approved under § 101.120 of...

  19. 33 CFR 104.140 - Alternative Security Programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternative Security Programs... MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: VESSELS General § 104.140 Alternative Security Programs. A vessel owner or operator may use an Alternative Security Program as approved under § 101.120 of this...

  20. 33 CFR 104.140 - Alternative Security Programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alternative Security Programs... MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: VESSELS General § 104.140 Alternative Security Programs. A vessel owner or operator may use an Alternative Security Program as approved under § 101.120 of this...

  1. 33 CFR 105.140 - Alternative Security Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alternative Security Program. 105... MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: FACILITIES General § 105.140 Alternative Security Program. (a) A facility owner or operator may use an Alternative Security Program approved under § 101.120 of...

  2. 33 CFR 106.135 - Alternative Security Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternative Security Program. 106... MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES General § 106.135 Alternative Security Program. An OCS facility owner or operator may use an Alternative Security Program approved...

  3. 33 CFR 105.140 - Alternative Security Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternative Security Program. 105... MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: FACILITIES General § 105.140 Alternative Security Program. (a) A facility owner or operator may use an Alternative Security Program approved under § 101.120 of...

  4. Alternative Education Guidelines, Model Middle School Alternative Education Program. Workshop II. Prevention Programs & Funding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of School Security Directors, Bellevue, WA.

    These workshop materials are the guidelines Broward County (Florida) has established to carry out the state legislative mandate authorizing school boards to establish educational alternative programs to meet the individual needs and interests of students who are disruptive, unsucessful, or disinterested in the normal school environment. Included…

  5. Alternative Gene Form Discovery and Candidate Gene Selection from Gene Indexing Projects

    PubMed Central

    Burke, John; Wang, Hui; Hide, Winston; Davison, Daniel B.

    1998-01-01

    Several efforts are under way to partition single-read expressed sequence tag (EST), as well as full-length transcript data, into large-scale gene indices, where transcripts are in common index classes if and only if they share a common progenitor gene. Accurate gene indexing facilitates gene expression studies, as well as inexpensive and early gene sequence discovery through assembly of ESTs that are derived from genes that have not been sequenced by classical methods. We extend, correct, and enhance the information obtained from index groups by splitting index classes into subclasses based on sequence dissimilarity (diversity). Two applications of this are highlighted in this report. First it is shown that our method can ameliorate the damage that artifacts, such as chimerism, inflict on index integrity. Additionally, we demonstrate how the organization imposed by an effective subpartition can greatly increase the sensitivity of gene expression studies by accounting for the existence and tissue- or pathology-specific regulation of novel gene isoforms and polymorphisms. We apply our subpartitioning treatment to the UniGene gene indexing project to measure a marked increase in information quality and abundance (in terms of assembly length and insertion/deletion error) after treatment and demonstrate cases where new levels of information concerning differential expression of alternate gene forms, such as regulated alternative splicing, are discovered. [Tables 2 and 3 can be viewed in their entirety as Online Supplements at http://www.genome.org.] PMID:9521931

  6. An Analysis of State Policies Connected with Alternative School Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielefeld, William C.; Stubblefield, Anna; Templeton, Zach

    2009-01-01

    Many school districts offer alternative education programs for their students who do not succeed in the regular classroom. At the high school level, many of these programs are separated from the regular schools. It seemed that many districts were establishing alternative education programs, but there were differences in the types of programs that…

  7. Current and Needed Research on Alternative Certification Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ham, Edward

    2010-01-01

    With alternative certification programs gaining popularity in teacher education, the need to evaluate these programs has become much more necessary. Without strict guidelines to classify alternative certification programs, it is difficult to make generalizations about these programs because of different requirements for completion and…

  8. Alternative Educational Programs for Gifted Students in Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Peggy A.

    1983-01-01

    Some alternatives available for meeting the needs of the mathematically gifted student at the secondary school level are examined. Along with curriculum modification are discussed such approaches as magnet programs, special schools, special classes, summer programs, and mentor programs. (MNS)

  9. Fourth annual report to Congress, Federal Alternative Motor Fuels Programs

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This annual report to Congress presents the current status of the alternative fuel vehicle programs being conducted across the country in accordance with the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988. These programs, which represent the most comprehensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative fuels, are beginning their fifth year. This report summarizes tests and results from the fourth year.

  10. Evaluating Organizational Training Programs: Alternatives and Criteria for Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marth, Joseph; And Others

    Managers and program sponsors are often unaware of possible alternatives to costly training evaluation procedures and do not have criteria for selecting alternatives. What is needed is an understanding of the various levels of evaluating training programs, feasible alternatives, and decision criteria for choosing the right system. It is proposed…

  11. The Role of Alternative Programming in College Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    College radio is quite often viewed as the true alternative to commercial radio. However, what is alternative radio and how does college radio factor into the ideal? To further understand this concept, this paper focuses on the role of alternative programming in college radio. Areas discussed include alternative radio as a non-mainstream form of…

  12. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transporation Program - State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets: Frequently Asked Questions

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-01

    Factsheet answering frequently asked questions about the U.S. Department of Energy's Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (the Program) that implements provisions of Titles III–V of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct). Answers to questions that are frequently asked about the Program by managers of state government and alternative fuel provider fleets are provided in the factsheet.

  13. 7 CFR 58.141 - Alternate quality control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate quality control program. 58.141 Section 58... Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Milk § 58.141 Alternate quality control program. When a plant has in operation an acceptable quality program, at the producer level, which is approved by...

  14. 45 CFR 400.69 - Alternative RCA programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alternative RCA programs. 400.69 Section 400.69 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT, ADMINISTRATION FOR... Assistance § 400.69 Alternative RCA programs. A State that determines that a public/private RCA program or...

  15. 6 CFR 27.235 - Alternative security program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternative security program. 27.235 Section 27.235 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Chemical Facility Security Program § 27.235 Alternative security program. (a)...

  16. 7 CFR 58.141 - Alternate quality control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate quality control program. 58.141 Section 58... Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Milk § 58.141 Alternate quality control program. When a plant has in operation an acceptable quality program, at the producer level, which is approved by...

  17. Cloning and expression of the potato alternative oxidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hiser, C.; McIntosh, L. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing )

    1990-05-01

    Mitochondria from 24-hour-aged potato slices possess an alternative path capacity and a 36kD protein not present in fresh potato mitochondria. This 36kD protein was identified by a monoclonal antibody against the Sauromatum guttatum alternative oxidase. These results suggest de novo synthesis of the 36kD protein during the aging process. To investigate this phenomenon, a clone containing a potato alternative oxidase gene was isolated from a cDNA library using the S. guttatum gene as a probe. This clone shows areas of high homology to the S. guttatum gene. Norther blots of RNA from fresh and 24-hour-aged potato slices are being probed with the potato gene to examine its expression in relation to the appearance of the 36kD protein.

  18. An Alternative Program for Pregnant Schoolgirls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Patricia W.

    The paper describes the Lafayette Parish Homebound Program (Louisiana) for students in grades K-12, with particular emphasis on the program's services for pregnant girls. Procedures for admitting students into the program, objectives for the pregnant girls (12-18 years old), and program components are considered. It is explained that the special…

  19. 33 CFR 101.125 - Approved Alternative Security Programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approved Alternative Security... SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: GENERAL General § 101.125 Approved Alternative Security Programs. The following have been approved, by the Commandant (CG-54), as Alternative Security...

  20. 24 CFR 7.5 - EEO Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Provisions § 7.5 EEO Alternative Dispute Resolution Program. In accordance with the Secretary's Policy Statement regarding Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) located on the Department's website and 29 CFR 1614... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false EEO Alternative Dispute...

  1. Alternative Schools and Programs: Five Descriptions. Technical Assistance Bulletin 37.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National School Resource Network, Washington, DC.

    During the past ten years, many school districts have established alternative schools or programs for students who are seriously disruptive and academically unsuccessful. This bulletin describes five different types of alternative programs that have been effective in dealing with disruptive youth. They include the Tri-C Community Centered…

  2. 78 FR 31535 - Assistive Technology Alternative Financing Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... On August 8, 2012, we published a notice in the Federal Register (77 FR 47375) inviting applications... Assistive Technology Alternative Financing Program AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative... Technology (AT) Alternative Financing Program (AFP) in fiscal year (FY) 2012 to make new grant awards in...

  3. Toward a New Era: Alternatives for Revitalizing Student Services Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deegan, William L.

    Alternatives for revitalizing the programs and management of student services in community colleges are reviewed in this paper. First, alternatives related to student services programs are considered, including: (1) the increased use of computer-assisted counseling to integrate student services more fully with mainstream academic activities; (2)…

  4. Choosing among Alternative Programs for Poor Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Janet M.

    1997-01-01

    Suggests four criteria (efficiency, return on investment, incentives, and equity) for evaluating and comparing public programs for poor children, and provides an overview of information available on eight large federal programs using these criteria. Positive effects of some programs are noted, and policy recommendations the evidence supports are…

  5. A serine–arginine-rich (SR) splicing factor modulates alternative splicing of over a thousand genes in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Lee M.; Goodman, Christopher D.; Hall, Nathan E.; van Dooren, Giel G.; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Ralph, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Single genes are often subject to alternative splicing, which generates alternative mature mRNAs. This phenomenon is widespread in animals, and observed in over 90% of human genes. Recent data suggest it may also be common in Apicomplexa. These parasites have small genomes, and economy of DNA is evolutionarily favoured in this phylum. We investigated the mechanism of alternative splicing in Toxoplasma gondii, and have identified and localized TgSR3, a homologue of ASF/SF2 (alternative-splicing factor/splicing factor 2, a serine-arginine–rich, or SR protein) to a subnuclear compartment. In addition, we conditionally overexpressed this protein, which was deleterious to growth. qRT-PCR was used to confirm perturbation of splicing in a known alternatively-spliced gene. We performed high-throughput RNA-seq to determine the extent of splicing modulated by this protein. Current RNA-seq algorithms are poorly suited to compact parasite genomes, and hence we complemented existing tools by writing a new program, GeneGuillotine, that addresses this deficiency by segregating overlapping reads into distinct genes. In order to identify the extent of alternative splicing, we released another program, JunctionJuror, that detects changes in intron junctions. Using this program, we identified about 2000 genes that were constitutively alternatively spliced in T. gondii. Overexpressing the splice regulator TgSR3 perturbed alternative splicing in over 1000 genes. PMID:25870410

  6. A serine-arginine-rich (SR) splicing factor modulates alternative splicing of over a thousand genes in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Lee M; Goodman, Christopher D; Hall, Nathan E; van Dooren, Giel G; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Ralph, Stuart A

    2015-05-19

    Single genes are often subject to alternative splicing, which generates alternative mature mRNAs. This phenomenon is widespread in animals, and observed in over 90% of human genes. Recent data suggest it may also be common in Apicomplexa. These parasites have small genomes, and economy of DNA is evolutionarily favoured in this phylum. We investigated the mechanism of alternative splicing in Toxoplasma gondii, and have identified and localized TgSR3, a homologue of ASF/SF2 (alternative-splicing factor/splicing factor 2, a serine-arginine-rich, or SR protein) to a subnuclear compartment. In addition, we conditionally overexpressed this protein, which was deleterious to growth. qRT-PCR was used to confirm perturbation of splicing in a known alternatively-spliced gene. We performed high-throughput RNA-seq to determine the extent of splicing modulated by this protein. Current RNA-seq algorithms are poorly suited to compact parasite genomes, and hence we complemented existing tools by writing a new program, GeneGuillotine, that addresses this deficiency by segregating overlapping reads into distinct genes. In order to identify the extent of alternative splicing, we released another program, JunctionJuror, that detects changes in intron junctions. Using this program, we identified about 2000 genes that were constitutively alternatively spliced in T. gondii. Overexpressing the splice regulator TgSR3 perturbed alternative splicing in over 1000 genes. PMID:25870410

  7. THE ALTERNATIVE COVERS ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (ACAP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alternative covers attempt to achieve equivalent performance to conventional impermeable covers through an action that has been described as 'sponge and pump'. In this type of cover system, the soil and plants absorb moisture from precipitation, store it in the plant and soil str...

  8. John Rennie High School Alternative Learning Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Donald R.

    The paper charts the development of a gifted program for secondary students in Pointe Claire, Quebec. The program featured an unstructured learning environment maximizing student choices, a resource teacher and facility, and learning experiences outside of school. Selection criteria are explained and a sample behavior rating scale is appended.…

  9. Alternative Strategies for Funding a General Dentistry Residency Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralewski, John E.; Wiggins, Carla

    1987-01-01

    Three alternative program funding approaches used in other professions are examined: (1) the reorientation of selected dental schools toward graduate education, (2) emphasizing and marketing the service aspects of the programs, and (3) developing education programs as in-house training for large organizations. (MSE)

  10. Parent Education: Key to Successful Alternative Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buroker, Charles D.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the relationship between parental involvement and alternative education programs and reports results of a highly successful parent education program (Active Parenting) in Lima, Ohio. This video-based discussion program evinced high participant satisfaction, specifically encouraged 15 positive parenting behaviors, and discouraged some…

  11. Spaces of Difference: The Contradictions of Alternative Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vadeboncoeur, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    Drawing upon the concept of "thirdspace" (Soja 1996), this article extends sociocultural theorizations of space in relation to alternative educational programs: programs designed to re-engage youth who have been pushed out of mainstream schools. Snapshots of educational programs, provided by ethnographic research gathered in the United States,…

  12. Alternative mathematical programming formulations for FSS synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilly, C. H.; Mount-Campbell, C. A.; Gonsalvez, D. J. A.; Levis, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of mathematical programming models and two solution strategies are suggested for the problem of allocating orbital positions to (synthesizing) satellites in the Fixed Satellite Service. Mixed integer programming and almost linear programming formulations are presented in detail for each of two objectives: (1) positioning satellites as closely as possible to specified desired locations, and (2) minimizing the total length of the geostationary arc allocated to the satellites whose positions are to be determined. Computational results for mixed integer and almost linear programming models, with the objective of positioning satellites as closely as possible to their desired locations, are reported for three six-administration test problems and a thirteen-administration test problem.

  13. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dlamini, Zodwa; Tshidino, Shonisani C.; Hull, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets. PMID:26580598

  14. Alternative splicing of inner-ear-expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfei; Liu, Yueyue; Nie, Hongyun; Ma, Xin; Xu, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    Alternative splicing plays a fundamental role in the development and physiological function of the inner ear. Inner-ear-specific gene splicing is necessary to establish the identity and maintain the function of the inner ear. For example, exon 68 of Cadherin 23 (Cdh23) gene is subject to inner-ear-specific alternative splicing, and as a result, Cdh23(+ 68) is only expressed in inner ear hair cells. Alternative splicing along the tonotopic axis of the cochlea contributes to frequency tuning, particularly in lower vertebrates, such as chickens and turtles. Differential splicing of Kcnma1, which encodes for the α subunit of the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (BK channel), has been suggested to affect the channel gating properties and is important for frequency tuning. Consequently, deficits in alternative splicing have been shown to cause hearing loss, as we can observe in Bronx Waltzer (bv) mice and Sfswap mutant mice. Despite the advances in this field, the regulation of alternative splicing in the inner ear remains elusive. Further investigation is also needed to clarify the mechanism of hearing loss caused by alternative splicing deficits. PMID:27376950

  15. Quality Alternative Certification Programs in Special Education Ensure High Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karge, Belinda D.; McCabe, Marjorie

    2014-01-01

    Market driven alternative routes to teaching have evolved into a quality program option and not just an answer to the teacher shortage. Alternative certification is a viable means of recruiting, training, and certifying those who have a bachelor's degree and a strong desire to enter the field of teaching. California has been a leader in the…

  16. 33 CFR 155.5061 - Alternative Training and Exercise Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... how the Alternative Training and Exercise Program addresses the requirements of 33 CFR 155.1055(b) through (f) and 33 CFR 155.1060; and (3) An explanation of how vessel owners or operators must implement... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternative Training and...

  17. Evaluating Alternative High Schools: Program Evaluation in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinds, Drew Samuel Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Alternative high schools serve some of the most vulnerable students and their programs present a significant challenge to evaluate. Determining the impact of an alternative high school that serves mostly at-risk students presented a significant research problem. Few studies exist that dig deeper into the characteristics and strategies of…

  18. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: Success Story (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    This success story highlights the EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program's series of workshops that bring fleets regulated under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) together with Clean Cities stakeholders and fuel providers to form and strengthen regional partnerships and initiate projects that will deploy more alternative fuel infrastructure.

  19. 24 CFR 7.26 - EEO Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false EEO Alternative Dispute Resolution...-Complaint Processing § 7.26 EEO Alternative Dispute Resolution Program. (a) The aggrieved person may elect... chosen, the EEO Counselor shall advise the aggrieved person that if the dispute is resolved during...

  20. 24 CFR 7.26 - EEO Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false EEO Alternative Dispute Resolution...-Complaint Processing § 7.26 EEO Alternative Dispute Resolution Program. (a) The aggrieved person may elect... chosen, the EEO Counselor shall advise the aggrieved person that if the dispute is resolved during...

  1. 76 FR 55136 - Implementation of the Alternative Dispute Resolution Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... COMMISSION Implementation of the Alternative Dispute Resolution Program AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Administrative Dispute Resolution Act (Act) which requires each Federal agency to, among other things; adopt a... 2011 or early November 2011 to solicit feedback from its stakeholders on its Alternative...

  2. Evaluation of the Union County Alternative to Suspension Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Joyce Ann

    2010-01-01

    The schools in Union County have undergone a tremendous amount of growth in the past decade. The growth in the county has led to an increase in discipline problems. In order to provide suspended students a second chance, Union County Public Schools implemented an alternative to suspension program, the Union County Alternative to Suspension Program…

  3. Another Alternative: A Ninety-Day Contractual Detoxification Treatment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Robert B.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In May, 1974, Fresno County's Narcotic Abuse Treatment Program began a twenty-one-day outpatient methadone detoxification treatment modality. The results of the evaluation suggested an alternative treatment modality. The purpose of this paper is to examine this alternative treatment modality, its characteristics, its therapeutic outcomes and the…

  4. Alternatives for Financing School Energy Savings Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esteves, Rich

    1983-01-01

    This report compares shared-savings programs with financing through the use of internal funds, loans, leases, and lease purchase plans for financing energy conservation in nonprofit buildings. The shared savings option was found to offer the greatest benefits to the customer. (MLF)

  5. Molecular trajectories leading to the alternative fates of duplicate genes.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Michael; Piontkivska, Helen; Tanaka, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    Gene duplication generates extra gene copies in which mutations can accumulate without risking the function of pre-existing genes. Such mutations modify duplicates and contribute to evolutionary novelties. However, the vast majority of duplicates appear to be short-lived and experience duplicate silencing within a few million years. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to these alternative fates. Here we delineate differing molecular trajectories of a relatively recent duplication event between humans and chimpanzees by investigating molecular properties of a single duplicate: DNA sequences, gene expression and promoter activities. The inverted duplication of the Glutathione S-transferase Theta 2 (GSTT2) gene had occurred at least 7 million years ago in the common ancestor of African great apes and is preserved in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), whereas a deletion polymorphism is prevalent in humans. The alternative fates are associated with expression divergence between these species, and reduced expression in humans is regulated by silencing mutations that have been propagated between duplicates by gene conversion. In contrast, selective constraint preserved duplicate divergence in chimpanzees. The difference in evolutionary processes left a unique DNA footprint in which dying duplicates are significantly more similar to each other (99.4%) than preserved ones. Such molecular trajectories could provide insights for the mechanisms underlying duplicate life and death in extant genomes. PMID:22720000

  6. Conservation of alternative polyadenylation patterns in mammalian genes

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Takeshi; Lopez, Fabrice; Ritchie, William; Benech, Philippe; Gautheret, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Background Alternative polyadenylation is a widespread mechanism contributing to transcript diversity in eukaryotes. Over half of mammalian genes are alternatively polyadenylated. Our understanding of poly(A) site evolution is limited by the lack of a reliable identification of conserved, equivalent poly(A) sites among species. We introduce here a working definition of conserved poly(A) sites as sites that are both (i) properly aligned in human and mouse orthologous 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) and (ii) supported by EST or cDNA data in both species. Results We identified about 4800 such conserved poly(A) sites covering one third of the orthologous gene set studied. Characteristics of conserved poly(A) sites such as processing efficiency and tissue-specificity were analyzed. Conserved sites show a higher processing efficiency but no difference in tissular distribution when compared to non-conserved sites. In general, alternative poly(A) sites are species-specific and involve minor, non-conserved sites that are unlikely to play essential roles. However, there are about 500 genes with conserved tandem poly(A) sites. A significant fraction of these conserved tandems display a conserved arrangement of major/minor sites in their 3' UTR, suggesting that these alternative 3' ends may be under selection. Conclusion This analysis allows us to identify potential functional alternative poly(A) sites and provides clues on the selective mechanisms at play in the appearance of multiple poly(A) sites and their maintenance in the 3' UTRs of genes. PMID:16872498

  7. Monitoring Alternative Splicing Changes in Arabidopsis Circadian Clock Genes.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Craig G; Fuller, John; Calixto, Cristiane P G; McNicol, Jim; Booth, Clare; Brown, John W S; Staiger, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional control makes an important contribution to circadian regulation of gene expression. In higher plants, alternative splicing is particularly prevalent upon abiotic and biotic stress and in the circadian system. Here we describe in detail a high-resolution reverse transcription-PCR based panel (HR RT-PCR) to monitor alternative splicing events. The use of the panel allows the quantification of changes in the proportion of splice isoforms between different samples, e.g., different time points, different tissues, genotypes, ecotypes, or treatments. PMID:26867620

  8. Fifth annual report to congress. Federal alternative motor fuels programs

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the status of the US Department of Energy`s alternative fuel vehicle demonstration and performance tracking programs being conducted in accordance with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. These programs comprise the most comprehensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative transportation fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The report summarizes tests and results from the fifth year. Electric vehicles are not included in these programs, and the annual report does not include information on them. Since the inception of the programs, great strides have been made in developing commercially viable alternative fuel vehicle technologies. However, as is the case in the commercialization of all new technologies, some performance problems have been experienced on vehicles involved in early demonstration efforts. Substantial improvements have been recorded in vehicle practicality, safety, and performance in real-world demonstrations. An aspect of particular interest is emissions output. Results from light duty alternative fuel vehicles have demonstrated superior inservice emissions performance. Heavy duty alternative fuel vehicles have demonstrated dramatic reductions in particulate emissions. However, emissions results from vehicles converted to run on alternative fuel have not been as promising. Although the technologies available today are commercially viable in some markets, further improvements in infrastructure and economics will result in greater market expansion. Information is included in this report on light and heavy duty vehicles, transit buses, vehicle conversions, safety, infrastructure support, vehicle availability, and information dissemination.

  9. Alternatives. Alternative Discipline and Suspension Program Handbook, Campbell County Junior High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell County School District 1, Gillette, WY.

    This booklet explains a program of discipline and suspension for students who come in conflict with school policy. The Alternative Discipline and Suspension Program (ADSP) operates in an environment of strict adherence to set rules where a student must earn advancement through and eventually out of ADSP back to regular classroom attendance. This…

  10. Hawaii alternative fuels utilization program. Phase 3, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, C.M.; Staackmann, M.

    1996-08-01

    The Hawaii Alternative Fuels Utilization Program originated as a five-year grant awarded by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) to the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The overall program included research and demonstration efforts aimed at encouraging and sustaining the use of alternative (i.e., substitutes for gasoline and diesel) ground transportation fuels in Hawaii. Originally, research aimed at overcoming technical impediments to the widespread adoption of alternative fuels was an important facet of this program. Demonstration activities centered on the use of methanol-based fuels in alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). In the present phase, operations were expanded to include flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) which can operate on M85 or regular unleaded gasoline or any combination of these two fuels. Additional demonstration work was accomplished in attempting to involve other elements of Hawaii in the promotion and use of alcohol fuels for ground transportation in Hawaii.

  11. 24 CFR 7.26 - EEO Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false EEO Alternative Dispute Resolution Program. 7.26 Section 7.26 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race,...

  12. 45 CFR 400.69 - Alternative RCA programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Alternative RCA programs. 400.69 Section 400.69 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT, ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Refugee...

  13. An Evaluative Study of Texas Alternative Certification Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wale, William M.; Irons, E. Jane

    Results of an evaluative study of the Texas Alternative Certification Program (ACP), conducted by the Texas Educational Agency staff during the 1988-89 school year, are reported. The first ACP was implemented in a single urban school district during the 1985-86 school year. The program was designed, in part, to address the shortage of teachers. By…

  14. Selectable marker genes in transgenic plants: applications, alternatives and biosafety.

    PubMed

    Miki, Brian; McHugh, Sylvia

    2004-02-01

    used. Many of the genes have specific limitations or have not been sufficiently tested to merit their widespread use. For research, a variety of selection systems are essential as no single selectable marker gene was found to be sufficient for all circumstances. Although, no adverse biosafety effects have been reported for the marker genes that have been adopted for widespread use, biosafety concerns should help direct which markers will be chosen for future crop development. Common sense dictates that marker genes conferring resistance to significant therapeutic antibiotics should not be used. An area of research that is growing rapidly but is still in its infancy is the development of strategies for eliminating selectable marker genes to generate marker-free plants. Among the several technologies described, two have emerged with significant potential. The simplest is the co-transformation of genes of interest with selectable marker genes followed by the segregation of the separate genes through conventional genetics. The more complicated strategy is the use of site-specific recombinases, under the control of inducible promoters, to excise the marker genes and excision machinery from the transgenic plant after selection has been achieved. In this review each of the genes and processes will be examined to assess the alternatives that exist for producing transgenic plants. PMID:14736458

  15. Intrasplicing coordinates alternative first exons with alternative splicing in the protein 4.1R gene

    SciTech Connect

    Conboy, John G.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Tan, Jeff S.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2008-11-07

    In the protein 4.1R gene, alternative first exons splice differentially to alternative 3' splice sites far downstream in exon 2'/2 (E2'/2). We describe a novel intrasplicing mechanism by which exon 1A (E1A) splices exclusively to the distal E2'/2 acceptor via two nested splicing reactions regulated by novel properties of exon 1B (E1B). E1B behaves as an exon in the first step, using its consensus 5' donor to splice to the proximal E2'/2 acceptor. A long region of downstream intron is excised, juxtaposing E1B with E2'/2 to generate a new composite acceptor containing the E1B branchpoint/pyrimidine tract and E2 distal 3' AG-dinucleotide. Next, the upstream E1A splices over E1B to this distal acceptor, excising the remaining intron plus E1B and E2' to form mature E1A/E2 product. We mapped branch points for both intrasplicing reactions and demonstrated that mutation of the E1B 5' splice site or branchpoint abrogates intrasplicing. In the 4.1R gene, intrasplicing ultimately determines N-terminal protein structure and function. More generally, intrasplicing represents a new mechanism whereby alternative promoters can be coordinated with downstream alternative splicing.

  16. Program Health Indicators: An Alternative Approach to Program Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, John F.

    For the past 20 years, the University of Hawaii Community Colleges have had a formal process for the review of educational programs, requiring that each program undergo a systematic review at least once every 5 years. The result tended to be a lengthy document that chronicled the history of the previous 5 years and was far more descriptive than…

  17. Alternative Approaches in Gene Discovery and Characterization in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; De Jager, Phillip L; Yu, Lei; Bennett, David A

    2013-03-01

    Uncovering the genetic risk and protective factors for complex diseases is of fundamental importance for advancing therapeutic and biomarker discoveries. This endeavor is particularly challenging for neuropsychiatric diseases where diagnoses predominantly rely on the clinical presentation, which may be heterogeneous, possibly due to the heterogeneity of the underlying genetic susceptibility factors and environmental exposures. Although genome-wide association studies of various neuropsychiatric diseases have recently identified susceptibility loci, there likely remain additional genetic risk factors that underlie the liability to these conditions. Furthermore, identification and characterization of the causal risk variant(s) in each of these novel susceptibility loci constitute a formidable task, particularly in the absence of any prior knowledge about their function or mechanism of action. Biologically relevant, quantitative phenotypes, i.e., endophenotypes, provide a powerful alternative to the more traditional, binary disease phenotypes in the discovery and characterization of susceptibility genes for neuropsychiatric conditions. In this review, we focus on Alzheimer's disease (AD) as a model neuropsychiatric disease and provide a synopsis of the recent literature on the use of endophenotypes in AD genetics. We highlight gene expression, neuropathology and cognitive endophenotypes in AD, with examples demonstrating the utility of these alternative approaches in the discovery of novel susceptibility genes and pathways. In addition, we discuss how these avenues generate testable hypothesis about the pathophysiology of genetic factors that have far-reaching implications for therapies. PMID:23482655

  18. Alternative RNA Structure-Coupled Gene Regulations in Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Alternative RNA structures (ARSs), or alternative transcript isoforms, are critical for regulating cellular phenotypes in humans. In addition to generating functionally diverse protein isoforms from a single gene, ARS can alter the sequence contents of 5'/3' untranslated regions (UTRs) and intronic regions, thus also affecting the regulatory effects of these regions. ARS may introduce premature stop codon(s) into a transcript, and render the transcript susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay, which in turn can influence the overall gene expression level. Meanwhile, ARS can regulate the presence/absence of upstream open reading frames and microRNA targeting sites in 5'UTRs and 3'UTRs, respectively, thus affecting translational efficiencies and protein expression levels. Furthermore, since ARS may alter exon-intron structures, it can influence the biogenesis of intronic microRNAs and indirectly affect the expression of the target genes of these microRNAs. The connections between ARS and multiple regulatory mechanisms underline the importance of ARS in determining cell fate. Accumulating evidence indicates that ARS-coupled regulations play important roles in tumorigenesis. Here I will review our current knowledge in this field, and discuss potential future directions. PMID:25551597

  19. Alternative management and funding options for aeronautics programs, Task 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Research and technology will be at lower program levels with basic military research for aviation decreasing as fewer aircraft programs are initiated and the present new aircraft programs move into the prototype and production status. The key question is can industry take on the management and financing role and meet the criteria and characteristics considered essential for a viable research and technology program. The criteria for evaluating alternative approaches include an examination of the nature of the product to be provided, responsiveness to changing needs, efficiency in terms of costs, ability to provide leadership, and to provide impartial and independent evaluation of approaches, and to provide technological inputs for regulating functions.

  20. ModMAP (Modular Multiple Alternatives Program). Program Description 1973-1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgeport Univ., CT. Coll. of Education.

    The Modular Multiple Alternatives Program (ModMaP), being developed at the University of Bridgeport, is the first competency-based, individualized graduate program in teacher education in the state of Connecticut. The program focuses on elementary teacher training and includes both master's and six-year level options. The program provides the…

  1. Alternative Route Programs for Certification in Special Education: Program Infrastructure Instructional Delivery, and Participant Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Michael S.; Boyer, K. Lynn; Sindelar, Paul T.; Misra, Sunil K.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes special education alternative route (AR) teacher preparation programs. The authors developed a national database of programs and collected information on program sponsorship, length and intensity, features, and participant demographics. Most of the 235 programs in the database were in states that had significant shortages of…

  2. Educational Alternatives for Boating Safety Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sager, E.; And Others

    The Coast Guard, in efforts to improve the safety of recreational boating, undertook research to identify educational alternatives in boating safety programs. Background research was done to assess materials from areas of boating education and education in comparable recreational areas. Research was also conducted to review educational and mass…

  3. 33 CFR 106.135 - Alternative Security Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternative Security Program. 106.135 Section 106.135 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES General § 106.135...

  4. 33 CFR 106.135 - Alternative Security Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alternative Security Program. 106.135 Section 106.135 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES General § 106.135...

  5. 6 CFR 27.235 - Alternative security program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... facilities may submit an Alternate Security Program (ASP) pursuant to the requirements of this section. The... submit an ASP in lieu of a Security Vulnerability Assessment, Site Security Plan, or both. (2) Tier 1, Tier 2, or Tier 3 facilities may submit an ASP in lieu of a Site Security Plan. Tier 1, Tier 2,...

  6. 6 CFR 27.235 - Alternative security program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... facilities may submit an Alternate Security Program (ASP) pursuant to the requirements of this section. The... submit an ASP in lieu of a Security Vulnerability Assessment, Site Security Plan, or both. (2) Tier 1, Tier 2, or Tier 3 facilities may submit an ASP in lieu of a Site Security Plan. Tier 1, Tier 2,...

  7. 6 CFR 27.235 - Alternative security program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... facilities may submit an Alternate Security Program (ASP) pursuant to the requirements of this section. The... submit an ASP in lieu of a Security Vulnerability Assessment, Site Security Plan, or both. (2) Tier 1, Tier 2, or Tier 3 facilities may submit an ASP in lieu of a Site Security Plan. Tier 1, Tier 2,...

  8. 6 CFR 27.235 - Alternative security program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... facilities may submit an Alternate Security Program (ASP) pursuant to the requirements of this section. The... submit an ASP in lieu of a Security Vulnerability Assessment, Site Security Plan, or both. (2) Tier 1, Tier 2, or Tier 3 facilities may submit an ASP in lieu of a Site Security Plan. Tier 1, Tier 2,...

  9. Alternate Learning Center. Abstracts of Inservice Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island State Dept. of Education, Providence. Div. of Development and Operations.

    This booklet is a collection of abstracts describing the 18 programs offered at the Alternate Learning Center of the Rhode Island Teacher Center which has as its Primary function school based inservice training for local teachers and administrators. Each project is described in detail, including course goals, specific objectives, training…

  10. 33 CFR 106.135 - Alternative Security Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alternative Security Program. 106.135 Section 106.135 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES General § 106.135...

  11. The Evolution of Discipline: Alternative to Suspension Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streva, Michael A.

    Historically, the chosen method of discipline in United States schools has gone from corporal punishment to an emphasis on suspension. Recently, as principals have become less certain about the extent of their authority to suspend students, many inschool programs have been developed as alternatives to suspension. Among the advantages of such…

  12. Alternative Administrative Certification: Socializing Factors Influencing Program Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickmore, Dana L.; Bickmore, Steven T.; Raines, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    This study used an organizational socialization lens to examine factors influencing participants' decision to pursue the principalship and choice to engage in an alternate administration certification program. Through an analysis of participant focus groups and interviews, factors emerged from the codes that were compared with dimensions of…

  13. Evaluating the Prevention through Alternative Learning Styles Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Mary J.; Workman, Judson; Ford, Jo Ann; Moore, Dennis; Mayer, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on the evaluation of a two-year alcohol, tobacco and other drug (ATOD) intervention, the Prevention through Alternative Learning Styles ("PALS") program, targeting both teachers and middle-school students. Teachers are taught to recognize students' unique learning styles in the context of the ATOD curriculum and adapt the ATOD…

  14. Disciplinary Alternative Education Programs in Texas--A 2009 Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortez, Albert; Cortez, Josie Danini

    2009-01-01

    This report discusses the issues surrounding the disciplinary alternative education programs (DAEPs) in Texas, its updated findings, and the authors' recommendations on what the state should do to address DAEP problems. DAEPs were supposed to be for criminal offenses--drug-related activities, gun violations and assault--all violations that had…

  15. The Saturday Alternative: A Program for At-Risk Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooley, Van E.; Thompson, Jay C., Jr.

    The Saturday School Alternative for at-risk students provides educators with a realistic framework, time, and community resources to help resolve almost any student problem encountered. Based on effective schools research, the program is no panacea but a realistic attempt to modify student behavior by providing experiences that will build a…

  16. Another Alternative: A 90-Day Contractual Detoxification Treatment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Robert B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    In May 1974, Fresno County's Narcotic Abuse Treatment Program began a 21-day outpatient methadone detoxification treatment modality. The purpose of this paper is to examine this alternative treatment modality, its characteristics, its therapeutic outcomes and the rationale for its use. (Author)

  17. GAP: A computer program for gene assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Eisnstein, J.R.; Uberbacher, E.C.; Guan, X.; Mural, R.J.; Mann, R.C.

    1991-09-01

    A computer program, GAP (Gene Assembly Program), has been written to assemble and score hypothetical genes, given a DNA sequence containing the gene, and the outputs of several other programs which analyze the sequence. These programs include the codign-recognition and splice-junction-recognition modules developed in this laboratory. GAP is a prototype of a planned system in which it will be integrated with an expert system and rule base. Initial tests of GAP have been carried out with four sequences, the exons of which have been determined by biochemcial methods. The highest-scoring hypothetical genes for each of the four sequences had percent correct splice junctions ranging from 50 to 100% (average 81%) and percent correct bases ranging from 92 to 100% (average 96%). 9 refs., 1 tab.

  18. 78 FR 14843 - Temporary Scope Expansion of the Post-Investigation Alternative Dispute Resolution Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... COMMISSION Temporary Scope Expansion of the Post-Investigation Alternative Dispute Resolution Program AGENCY... Regulatory Commission (NRC) is expanding the scope of the post-investigation Alternative Dispute Resolution...-0115, ``Alternative Dispute Resolution Review Team (ART) Pilot Program Recommendations for...

  19. Considerations for the Placement of Youth with EBD in Alternative Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Trent; Bartuska, Jamie

    2010-01-01

    Alternative education programs (also called alternative schools) first appeared on the American landscape in the 1960s. Despite the proliferation of these programs, a generic description of what constitutes an alternative education program, historically, has been elusive. Most alternative education programs have the general criteria of serving…

  20. The human XPG gene: gene architecture, alternative splicing and single nucleotide polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Emmert, Steffen; Schneider, Thomas D.; Khan, Sikandar G.; Kraemer, Kenneth H.

    2001-01-01

    Defects in the XPG DNA repair endonuclease gene can result in the cancer-prone disorders xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or the XP–Cockayne syndrome complex. While the XPG cDNA sequence was known, determination of the genomic sequence was required to understand its different functions. In cells from normal donors, we found that the genomic sequence of the human XPG gene spans 30 kb, contains 15 exons that range from 61 to 1074 bp and 14 introns that range from 250 to 5763 bp. Analysis of the splice donor and acceptor sites using an information theory-based approach revealed three splice sites with low information content, which are components of the minor (U12) spliceosome. We identified six alternatively spliced XPG mRNA isoforms in cells from normal donors and from XPG patients: partial deletion of exon 8, partial retention of intron 8, two with alternative exons (in introns 1 and 6) and two that retained complete introns (introns 3 and 9). The amount of alternatively spliced XPG mRNA isoforms varied in different tissues. Most alternative splice donor and acceptor sites had a relatively high information content, but one has the U12 spliceosome sequence. A single nucleotide polymorphism has allele frequencies of 0.74 for 3507G and 0.26 for 3507C in 91 donors. The human XPG gene contains multiple splice sites with low information content in association with multiple alternatively spliced isoforms of XPG mRNA. PMID:11266544

  1. The Grimes Alternative School Program and Home Remedies Program. Interim Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jay R.

    This report describes and evaluates two programs which deal with chronic status offenders: the Grimes Alternative School Program, a delinquency prevention project which targets intermediate school (grades 4 and 5) students with chronic discipline and/or truant behaviors, and the Home Remedies Program, a short-term crisis intervention and…

  2. Alternative pre-mRNA splicing switches modulate gene expression in late erythropoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Miki L.; Clark, Tyson A.; Gee, Sherry L.; Kang, Jeong-Ah; Schweitzer, Anthony C.; Wickrema, Amittha; Conboy, John G.

    2009-02-03

    Differentiating erythroid cells execute a unique gene expression program that insures synthesis of the appropriate proteome at each stage of maturation. Standard expression microarrays provide important insight into erythroid gene expression but cannot detect qualitative changes in transcript structure, mediated by RNA processing, that alter structure and function of encoded proteins. We analyzed stage-specific changes in the late erythroid transcriptome via use of high-resolution microarrays that detect altered expression of individual exons. Ten differentiation-associated changes in erythroblast splicing patterns were identified, including the previously known activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 splicing. Six new alternative splicing switches involving enhanced inclusion of internal cassette exons were discovered, as well as 3 changes in use of alternative first exons. All of these erythroid stage-specific splicing events represent activated inclusion of authentic annotated exons, suggesting they represent an active regulatory process rather than a general loss of splicing fidelity. The observation that 3 of the regulated transcripts encode RNA binding proteins (SNRP70, HNRPLL, MBNL2) may indicate significant changes in the RNA processing machinery of late erythroblasts. Together, these results support the existence of a regulated alternative pre-mRNA splicing program that is critical for late erythroid differentiation.

  3. Radiopharmaceutical and Gene Therapy Program

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2006-02-09

    The objective of our research program was to determine whether novel receptors can be induced in solid cancers as a target for therapy with radiolabeled unmodified peptides that bind to the receptors. The hypothesis was that induction of a high number of receptors on the surface of these cancer cells would result in an increased uptake of the radiolabeled monomeric peptides as compared to published results with radiolabeled antibodies or peptides to naturally expressed antigens or receptors, and therefore a better therapeutic outcome. The following is a summary of published results.

  4. "Programmed packaging" for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, M; Sakurai, Y; Akita, H; Harashima, H

    2014-11-10

    We report on the development of a multifunctional envelope-type nano device (MEND) based on our packaging concept "Programmed packaging" to control not only intracellular trafficking but also the biodistribution of encapsulated compounds such as nucleic acids/proteins/peptides. Our strategy for achieving this is based on molecular mechanisms of cell biology such as endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, etc. In this review, we summarize the concept of programmed packaging and discuss some of our recent successful examples of using MENDs. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) was applied as a new methodology for identifying a new ligand toward cell or mitochondria. The delivery of siRNA to tumors and the tumor vasculature was achieved using pH sensitive lipid (YSK05), which was newly designed and optimized under in vivo conditions. The efficient delivery of pDNA to immune cells such as dendritic cells has also been developed using the KALA ligand, which can be a breakthrough technology for DNA vaccine. Finally, ss-cleavable and pH-activated lipid-like surfactant (ssPalm) which is a lipid like material with pH-activatable and SS-cleavable properties is also introduced as a proof of our concept. PMID:24780263

  5. Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

    2007-12-10

    EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

  6. ASPic-GeneID: A Lightweight Pipeline for Gene Prediction and Alternative Isoforms Detection

    PubMed Central

    Alioto, Tyler; Picardi, Ernesto; Guigó, Roderic

    2013-01-01

    New genomes are being sequenced at an increasingly rapid rate, far outpacing the rate at which manual gene annotation can be performed. Automated genome annotation is thus necessitated by this growth in genome projects; however, full-fledged annotation systems are usually home-grown and customized to a particular genome. There is thus a renewed need for accurate ab initio gene prediction methods. However, it is apparent that fully ab initio methods fall short of the required level of sensitivity and specificity for a quality annotation. Evidence in the form of expressed sequences gives the single biggest improvement in accuracy when used to inform gene predictions. Here, we present a lightweight pipeline for first-pass gene prediction on newly sequenced genomes. The two main components are ASPic, a program that derives highly accurate, albeit not necessarily complete, EST-based transcript annotations from EST alignments, and GeneID, a standard gene prediction program, which we have modified to take as evidence intron annotations. The introns output by ASPic CDS predictions is given to GeneID to constrain the exon-chaining process and produce predictions consistent with the underlying EST alignments. The pipeline was successfully tested on the entire C. elegans genome and the 44 ENCODE human pilot regions. PMID:24308000

  7. ASPic-GeneID: a lightweight pipeline for gene prediction and alternative isoforms detection.

    PubMed

    Alioto, Tyler; Picardi, Ernesto; Guigó, Roderic; Pesole, Graziano

    2013-01-01

    New genomes are being sequenced at an increasingly rapid rate, far outpacing the rate at which manual gene annotation can be performed. Automated genome annotation is thus necessitated by this growth in genome projects; however, full-fledged annotation systems are usually home-grown and customized to a particular genome. There is thus a renewed need for accurate ab initio gene prediction methods. However, it is apparent that fully ab initio methods fall short of the required level of sensitivity and specificity for a quality annotation. Evidence in the form of expressed sequences gives the single biggest improvement in accuracy when used to inform gene predictions. Here, we present a lightweight pipeline for first-pass gene prediction on newly sequenced genomes. The two main components are ASPic, a program that derives highly accurate, albeit not necessarily complete, EST-based transcript annotations from EST alignments, and GeneID, a standard gene prediction program, which we have modified to take as evidence intron annotations. The introns output by ASPic CDS predictions is given to GeneID to constrain the exon-chaining process and produce predictions consistent with the underlying EST alignments. The pipeline was successfully tested on the entire C. elegans genome and the 44 ENCODE human pilot regions. PMID:24308000

  8. Feelings of Preparedness among Alternatively Certified Teachers: What Is the Role of Program Features?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kee, Ayana N.

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, about one third of new teachers being hired are drawn from alternative certification programs. One way to address controversy about the differences among the training experiences of teachers in traditional certification programs, fast-track alternative programs, and residency alternative programs is to examine teacher reports…

  9. Discovering Successful Elements of Alternative Schools by Studying Student Perspectives in Two Alternative-to-Expulsion Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eschen, Eric Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study analyzed two alternative-to-expulsion programs for high school students. Both programs, the "Learning with Peers Program" and the "Individualized Online Program", offered students an opportunity to earn credits rather than be expelled, but their philosophies presented an educational dichotomy: Should…

  10. SSME engine system integration of the alternate turbopump program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, E. J.; Leahy, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the engine level integration of the alternate High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) on the performance of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is examined with reference to the results of the current engine system ground test data analysis. In particular, attention is given to the observed steady state and transient mainstage engine system effects with respect to various engine hardware combinations. It is concluded that none of the engine system concerns eliminate the turbomump from consideration as a permanent addition to the flight program pending certification.

  11. SSME engine system integration of the alternate turbopump program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, E. J.; Leahy, J. C.

    1993-06-01

    The effect of the engine level integration of the alternate High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) on the performance of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is examined with reference to the results of the current engine system ground test data analysis. In particular, attention is given to the observed steady state and transient mainstage engine system effects with respect to various engine hardware combinations. It is concluded that none of the engine system concerns eliminate the turbomump from consideration as a permanent addition to the flight program pending certification.

  12. The Evolutionary Fate of Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons after Gene Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Abascal, Federico; Tress, Michael L.; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are the two main processes responsible for expanding protein functional diversity. Although gene duplication can generate new genes and alternative splicing can introduce variation through alternative gene products, the interplay between the two processes is complex and poorly understood. Here, we have carried out a study of the evolution of alternatively spliced exons after gene duplication to better understand the interaction between the two processes. We created a manually curated set of 97 human genes with mutually exclusively spliced homologous exons and analyzed the evolution of these exons across five distantly related vertebrates (lamprey, spotted gar, zebrafish, fugu, and coelacanth). Most of these exons had an ancient origin (more than 400 Ma). We found examples supporting two extreme evolutionary models for the behaviour of homologous axons after gene duplication. We observed 11 events in which gene duplication was accompanied by splice isoform separation, that is, each paralog specifically conserved just one distinct ancestral homologous exon. At other extreme, we identified genes in which the homologous exons were always conserved within paralogs, suggesting that the alternative splicing event cannot easily be separated from the function in these genes. That many homologous exons fall in between these two extremes highlights the diversity of biological systems and suggests that the subtle balance between alternative splicing and gene duplication is adjusted to the specific cellular context of each gene. PMID:25931610

  13. The evolutionary fate of alternatively spliced homologous exons after gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Tress, Michael L; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-06-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are the two main processes responsible for expanding protein functional diversity. Although gene duplication can generate new genes and alternative splicing can introduce variation through alternative gene products, the interplay between the two processes is complex and poorly understood. Here, we have carried out a study of the evolution of alternatively spliced exons after gene duplication to better understand the interaction between the two processes. We created a manually curated set of 97 human genes with mutually exclusively spliced homologous exons and analyzed the evolution of these exons across five distantly related vertebrates (lamprey, spotted gar, zebrafish, fugu, and coelacanth). Most of these exons had an ancient origin (more than 400 Ma). We found examples supporting two extreme evolutionary models for the behaviour of homologous axons after gene duplication. We observed 11 events in which gene duplication was accompanied by splice isoform separation, that is, each paralog specifically conserved just one distinct ancestral homologous exon. At other extreme, we identified genes in which the homologous exons were always conserved within paralogs, suggesting that the alternative splicing event cannot easily be separated from the function in these genes. That many homologous exons fall in between these two extremes highlights the diversity of biological systems and suggests that the subtle balance between alternative splicing and gene duplication is adjusted to the specific cellular context of each gene. PMID:25931610

  14. 78 FR 22026 - Alternative Transportation in Parks and Public Lands Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... Federal Transit Administration Alternative Transportation in Parks and Public Lands Program AGENCY... of Federal land management agency transportation investments with public transportation systems that... in the document ``Alternative Transportation in Parks and Public Lands Program: Requirements...

  15. 77 FR 47375 - Applications for New Awards; Assistive Technology Alternative Financing Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... Applications for New Awards; Assistive Technology Alternative Financing Program AGENCY: Office of Special... Assistive Technology Alternative Financing Program Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards for Fiscal... have the private financial resources to purchase the assistive technology (AT) they need. In...

  16. ISO New England: Results of Ancillary Service Pilot Programs, Alternative Technology Regulation Pilot Program and Demand Response Reserves Pilot Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lowell, Jon; Yoshimura, Henry

    2011-10-26

    This PowerPoint presentation compares performance of pilot program assets and generation resources in alternative technology regulation and demand response reserves for flywheels and residential electric thermal storage.

  17. Innovation in two alternative elementary school programs: why it works.

    PubMed

    Dyson, B; O'Sullivan, M

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this paper was to describe and interpret the factors that supported and maintained curricular innovation at two alternative elementary schools. The two schools have Project Adventure as their curriculum focus and use the concepts of risk, challenge, trust, cooperation, and problem solving; briefing and debriefing; and personal goal-setting contracts as part of their schoolwide curriculum (Project Adventure, 1991). Data were collected through formal interviews with the physical education teachers, the principals, and four classroom teachers at each school. Nonparticipant observation, field notes, informal interviews, and document analysis were also conducted. Inductive analysis and constant comparison were used to analyze and organize the data throughout the research process. Five factors emerged that supported the implementation of this innovative physical education program: a shared vision, external support for the schools' programs, curricula integration, centrality of physical education, and shared decision making. Project Adventure at these schools provides an example of substantive curricular reform where physical education was a critical element in the school programs. PMID:9777661

  18. A dynamic intron retention program enriched in RNA processing genes regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry L.; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating erythroblasts execute a dynamic alternative splicing program shown here to include extensive and diverse intron retention (IR) events. Cluster analysis revealed hundreds of developmentally-dynamic introns that exhibit increased IR in mature erythroblasts, and are enriched in functions related to RNA processing such as SF3B1 spliceosomal factor. Distinct, developmentally-stable IR clusters are enriched in metal-ion binding functions and include mitoferrin genes SLC25A37 and SLC25A28 that are critical for iron homeostasis. Some IR transcripts are abundant, e.g. comprising ∼50% of highly-expressed SLC25A37 and SF3B1 transcripts in late erythroblasts, and thereby limiting functional mRNA levels. IR transcripts tested were predominantly nuclear-localized. Splice site strength correlated with IR among stable but not dynamic intron clusters, indicating distinct regulation of dynamically-increased IR in late erythroblasts. Retained introns were preferentially associated with alternative exons with premature termination codons (PTCs). High IR was observed in disease-causing genes including SF3B1 and the RNA binding protein FUS. Comparative studies demonstrated that the intron retention program in erythroblasts shares features with other tissues but ultimately is unique to erythropoiesis. We conclude that IR is a multi-dimensional set of processes that post-transcriptionally regulate diverse gene groups during normal erythropoiesis, misregulation of which could be responsible for human disease. PMID:26531823

  19. A dynamic intron retention program enriched in RNA processing genes regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry L.; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G.

    2015-11-03

    Differentiating erythroblasts execute a dynamic alternative splicing program shown here to include extensive and diverse intron retention (IR) events. Cluster analysis revealed hundreds of developmentallydynamic introns that exhibit increased IR in mature erythroblasts, and are enriched in functions related to RNA processing such as SF3B1 spliceosomal factor. Distinct, developmentally-stable IR clusters are enriched in metal-ion binding functions and include mitoferrin genes SLC25A37 and SLC25A28 that are critical for iron homeostasis. Some IR transcripts are abundant, e.g. comprising ~50% of highly-expressed SLC25A37 and SF3B1 transcripts in late erythroblasts, and thereby limiting functional mRNA levels. IR transcripts tested were predominantly nuclearlocalized. Splicemore » site strength correlated with IR among stable but not dynamic intron clusters, indicating distinct regulation of dynamically-increased IR in late erythroblasts. Retained introns were preferentially associated with alternative exons with premature termination codons (PTCs). High IR was observed in disease-causing genes including SF3B1 and the RNA binding protein FUS. Comparative studies demonstrated that the intron retention program in erythroblasts shares features with other tissues but ultimately is unique to erythropoiesis. Finally, we conclude that IR is a multi-dimensional set of processes that post-transcriptionally regulate diverse gene groups during normal erythropoiesis, misregulation of which could be responsible for human disease.« less

  20. A dynamic intron retention program enriched in RNA processing genes regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry L.; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G.

    2015-11-03

    Differentiating erythroblasts execute a dynamic alternative splicing program shown here to include extensive and diverse intron retention (IR) events. Cluster analysis revealed hundreds of developmentallydynamic introns that exhibit increased IR in mature erythroblasts, and are enriched in functions related to RNA processing such as SF3B1 spliceosomal factor. Distinct, developmentally-stable IR clusters are enriched in metal-ion binding functions and include mitoferrin genes SLC25A37 and SLC25A28 that are critical for iron homeostasis. Some IR transcripts are abundant, e.g. comprising ~50% of highly-expressed SLC25A37 and SF3B1 transcripts in late erythroblasts, and thereby limiting functional mRNA levels. IR transcripts tested were predominantly nuclearlocalized. Splice site strength correlated with IR among stable but not dynamic intron clusters, indicating distinct regulation of dynamically-increased IR in late erythroblasts. Retained introns were preferentially associated with alternative exons with premature termination codons (PTCs). High IR was observed in disease-causing genes including SF3B1 and the RNA binding protein FUS. Comparative studies demonstrated that the intron retention program in erythroblasts shares features with other tissues but ultimately is unique to erythropoiesis. Finally, we conclude that IR is a multi-dimensional set of processes that post-transcriptionally regulate diverse gene groups during normal erythropoiesis, misregulation of which could be responsible for human disease.

  1. A dynamic intron retention program enriched in RNA processing genes regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry L; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G

    2016-01-29

    Differentiating erythroblasts execute a dynamic alternative splicing program shown here to include extensive and diverse intron retention (IR) events. Cluster analysis revealed hundreds of developmentally-dynamic introns that exhibit increased IR in mature erythroblasts, and are enriched in functions related to RNA processing such as SF3B1 spliceosomal factor. Distinct, developmentally-stable IR clusters are enriched in metal-ion binding functions and include mitoferrin genes SLC25A37 and SLC25A28 that are critical for iron homeostasis. Some IR transcripts are abundant, e.g. comprising ∼50% of highly-expressed SLC25A37 and SF3B1 transcripts in late erythroblasts, and thereby limiting functional mRNA levels. IR transcripts tested were predominantly nuclear-localized. Splice site strength correlated with IR among stable but not dynamic intron clusters, indicating distinct regulation of dynamically-increased IR in late erythroblasts. Retained introns were preferentially associated with alternative exons with premature termination codons (PTCs). High IR was observed in disease-causing genes including SF3B1 and the RNA binding protein FUS. Comparative studies demonstrated that the intron retention program in erythroblasts shares features with other tissues but ultimately is unique to erythropoiesis. We conclude that IR is a multi-dimensional set of processes that post-transcriptionally regulate diverse gene groups during normal erythropoiesis, misregulation of which could be responsible for human disease. PMID:26531823

  2. An extensive program of periodic alternative splicing linked to cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Daniel; Tsai, Yi-Hsuan; Weatheritt, Robert; Wang, Yang; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Wang, Zefeng

    2016-01-01

    Progression through the mitotic cell cycle requires periodic regulation of gene function at the levels of transcription, translation, protein-protein interactions, post-translational modification and degradation. However, the role of alternative splicing (AS) in the temporal control of cell cycle is not well understood. By sequencing the human transcriptome through two continuous cell cycles, we identify ~1300 genes with cell cycle-dependent AS changes. These genes are significantly enriched in functions linked to cell cycle control, yet they do not significantly overlap genes subject to periodic changes in steady-state transcript levels. Many of the periodically spliced genes are controlled by the SR protein kinase CLK1, whose level undergoes cell cycle-dependent fluctuations via an auto-inhibitory circuit. Disruption of CLK1 causes pleiotropic cell cycle defects and loss of proliferation, whereas CLK1 over-expression is associated with various cancers. These results thus reveal a large program of CLK1-regulated periodic AS intimately associated with cell cycle control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10288.001 PMID:27015110

  3. 5 CFR 2425.8 - Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Collaboration and Alternative Dispute... AWARDS § 2425.8 Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program. The parties may request assistance from the Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program (CADR) to attempt to resolve...

  4. 5 CFR 2425.8 - Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Collaboration and Alternative Dispute... AWARDS § 2425.8 Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program. The parties may request assistance from the Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program (CADR) to attempt to resolve...

  5. 5 CFR 2425.8 - Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Collaboration and Alternative Dispute... AWARDS § 2425.8 Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program. The parties may request assistance from the Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program (CADR) to attempt to resolve...

  6. 5 CFR 2424.10 - Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Alternative Dispute Resolution; Requesting and Providing Allegations Concerning the Duty To Bargain § 2424.10 Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program. Where an exclusive representative and an agency are... and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program (CADR). Upon request, and as agreed upon by the...

  7. 5 CFR 2425.8 - Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AWARDS § 2425.8 Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program. The parties may request assistance from the Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program (CADR) to attempt to resolve the... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Collaboration and Alternative...

  8. 5 CFR 2424.10 - Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Alternative Dispute Resolution; Requesting and Providing Allegations Concerning the Duty To Bargain § 2424.10 Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program. Where an exclusive representative and an agency are... and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program (CADR). Upon request, and as agreed upon by the...

  9. Alternative Education Programs for At-Risk Youth: Issues, Best Practice, and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Tary; Sprague, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    This publication discusses definitions of alternative education, outlines common program features, and lists challenges to providing quality services. The paper focuses on alternatives for students who are at risk for school failure, dropout, or delinquency. Since few studies on the effectiveness of alternative programs have been conducted and…

  10. Reversion to an embryonic alternative splicing program enhances leukemia stem cell self-renewal.

    PubMed

    Holm, Frida; Hellqvist, Eva; Mason, Cayla N; Ali, Shawn A; Delos-Santos, Nathaniel; Barrett, Christian L; Chun, Hye-Jung; Minden, Mark D; Moore, Richard A; Marra, Marco A; Runza, Valeria; Frazer, Kelly A; Sadarangani, Anil; Jamieson, Catriona H M

    2015-12-15

    Formative research suggests that a human embryonic stem cell-specific alternative splicing gene regulatory network, which is repressed by Muscleblind-like (MBNL) RNA binding proteins, is involved in cell reprogramming. In this study, RNA sequencing, splice isoform-specific quantitative RT-PCR, lentiviral transduction, and in vivo humanized mouse model studies demonstrated that malignant reprogramming of progenitors into self-renewing blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells (BC LSCs) was partially driven by decreased MBNL3. Lentiviral knockdown of MBNL3 resulted in reversion to an embryonic alternative splice isoform program typified by overexpression of CD44 transcript variant 3, containing variant exons 8-10, and BC LSC proliferation. Although isoform-specific lentiviral CD44v3 overexpression enhanced chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitor replating capacity, lentiviral shRNA knockdown abrogated these effects. Combined treatment with a humanized pan-CD44 monoclonal antibody and a breakpoint cluster region - ABL proto-oncogene 1, nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (BCR-ABL1) antagonist inhibited LSC maintenance in a niche-dependent manner. In summary, MBNL3 down-regulation-related reversion to an embryonic alternative splicing program, typified by CD44v3 overexpression, represents a previously unidentified mechanism governing malignant progenitor reprogramming in malignant microenvironments and provides a pivotal opportunity for selective BC LSC detection and therapeutic elimination. PMID:26621726

  11. Alternatives Analysis for the Resumption of Transient Testing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Nelson

    2013-11-01

    An alternatives analysis was performed for resumption of transient testing. The analysis considered eleven alternatives – including both US international facilities. A screening process was used to identify two viable alternatives from the original eleven. In addition, the alternatives analysis includes a no action alternative as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The alternatives considered in this analysis included: 1. Restart the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) 2. Modify the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) which includes construction of a new hot cell and installation of a new hodoscope. 3. No Action

  12. 77 FR 31756 - Energy Conservation Program: Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods and Alternative Rating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-30

    ... Methods and Alternative Rating Methods: Public Meeting AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable... proposed modifications to the regulations authorizing the use of alternative methods of determining energy... alternative methods of determining energy efficiency or energy consumption of various consumer products...

  13. Alternative Splicing of an Insect Sodium Channel Gene Generates Pharmacologically Distinct Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jianguo; Liu, Zhiqi; Nomura, Yoshiko; Goldin, Alan L.; Dong, Ke

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a major mechanism by which potassium and calcium channels increase functional diversity in animals. Extensive alternative splicing of the para sodium channel gene and developmental regulation of alternative splicing have been reported in Drosophila species. Alternative splicing has also been observed for several mammalian voltage-gated sodium channel genes. However, the functional significance of alternative splicing of sodium channels has not been demonstrated. In this study, we identified three mutually exclusive alternative exons encoding part of segments 3 and 4 of domain III in the German cockroach sodium channel gene, paraCSMA. The splice site is conserved in the mouse, fish, and human Nav1.6 sodium channel genes, suggesting an ancient origin. One of the alternative exons possesses a stop codon, which would generate a truncated protein with only the first two domains. The splicing variant containing the stop codon is detected only in the PNS, whereas the other two full-size variants were detected in both the PNS and CNS. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, the two splicing variants produced robust sodium currents, but with different gating properties, whereas the splicing variant with the stop codon did not produce any detectable sodium current. Furthermore, these two functional splicing variants exhibited a striking difference in sensitivity to a pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin. Exon swapping partially reversed the channel sensitivity to deltamethrin. Our results therefore provide the first evidence that alternative splicing of a sodium channel gene produces pharmacologically distinct channels. PMID:12097481

  14. Alternate Assessment Manual for the Arizona Student Achievement Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Alternate Assessment Code of Ethics informs school personnel involved in alternate assessments of ethical, nondiscriminatory assessment practices and underscores the diligence necessary to provide accurate assessment data for instructional decision-making. The importance of commitment and adherence to the Alternate Assessment Code of Ethics by…

  15. 19 CFR 101.9 - Test programs or procedures; alternate requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Test programs or procedures; alternate... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.9 Test programs or procedures; alternate requirements. (a) General testing. For purposes of conducting a test program or procedure designed to...

  16. 19 CFR 101.9 - Test programs or procedures; alternate requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Test programs or procedures; alternate... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.9 Test programs or procedures; alternate requirements. (a) General testing. For purposes of conducting a test program or procedure designed to...

  17. 19 CFR 101.9 - Test programs or procedures; alternate requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Test programs or procedures; alternate... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.9 Test programs or procedures; alternate requirements. (a) General testing. For purposes of conducting a test program or procedure designed to...

  18. 19 CFR 101.9 - Test programs or procedures; alternate requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Test programs or procedures; alternate... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.9 Test programs or procedures; alternate requirements. (a) General testing. For purposes of conducting a test program or procedure designed to...

  19. 19 CFR 101.9 - Test programs or procedures; alternate requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Test programs or procedures; alternate... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.9 Test programs or procedures; alternate requirements. (a) General testing. For purposes of conducting a test program or procedure designed to...

  20. Perception of Preparedness of Novice Teachers from Alternative and Traditional Licensing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Tenielle; Lang, Nathan; Morin, Laura-Lee

    2013-01-01

    Alternative teacher licensing programs have become very popular; however, very little research has been conducted on the efficacy of the programs. Alternative licensing programs (ALPs) have evolved and multiplied rapidly over the last few decades. The Tennessee Independent Colleges and Universities Association (TICUA) is attempting to determine…

  1. Backgrounds, Teaching Responsibilities, and Motivations of Music Education Candidates Enrolled in Alternative Certification Music Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Daniel; McDowell, Carol

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factors associated with enrolling, continuing, and completing alternative certification programs in music education. Data were collected via surveys and semi-structured interviews of music teacher candidates from 43 program completers from seven alternative certification programs in three states. In…

  2. Computational Analysis of an Evolutionarily Conserved VertebrateMuscle Alternative Splicing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Debopriya; Clark, Tyson A.; Schweitzer, Anthony; Marr,Henry; Yamamoto, Miki L.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Arribere, Josh; Minovitsky,Simon; Dubchak, Inna; Blume, John E.; Conboy, John G.

    2006-06-15

    A novel exon microarray format that probes gene expression with single exon resolution was employed to elucidate critical features of a vertebrate muscle alternative splicing program. A dataset of 56 microarray-defined, muscle-enriched exons and their flanking introns were examined computationally in order to investigate coordination of the muscle splicing program. Candidate intron regulatory motifs were required to meet several stringent criteria: significant over-representation near muscle-enriched exons, correlation with muscle expression, and phylogenetic conservation among genomes of several vertebrate orders. Three classes of regulatory motifs were identified in the proximal downstream intron, within 200nt of the target exons: UGCAUG, a specific binding site for Fox-1 related splicing factors; ACUAAC, a novel branchpoint-like element; and UG-/UGC-rich elements characteristic of binding sites for CELF splicing factors. UGCAUG was remarkably enriched, being present in nearly one-half of all cases. These studies suggest that Fox and CELF splicing factors play a major role in enforcing the muscle-specific alternative splicing program, facilitating expression of a set of unique isoforms of cytoskeletal proteins that are critical to muscle cell differentiation. Supplementary materials: There are four supplementary tables and one supplementary figure. The tables provide additional detailed information concerning the muscle-enriched datasets, and about over-represented oligonucleotide sequences in the flanking introns. The supplementary figure shows RT-PCR data confirming the muscle-enriched expression of exons predicted from the microarray analysis.

  3. Structure of the human myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein gene and multiple alternative spliced isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Pham-Dinh, D.; Gaspera, D.B.; Dautigny, A.

    1995-09-20

    Myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a special component of the central nervous system localization on the outermost lamellae of mature myelin, is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. We report here the organization of the human MOG gene, which spans approximately 17 kb, and the characterization of six MOG mRNA splicing variants. The intron/exon structure of the human MOG gene confirmed the splicing pattern, supporting the hypothesis that mRNA isoforms could arise by alternative splicing of a single gene. In addition to the eight exons coding for the major MOG isoform, the human MOG gene also contains 3` region, a previously unknown alternatively spliced coding exon, VIA. Alternative utilization of two acceptor splicing sites for exon VIII could produce two different C-termini. The nucleotide sequences presented here may be a useful tool to study further possible involvement if the MOG gene in hereditary neurological disorders. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Alternative Transposition Generates New Chimeric Genes and Segmental Duplications at the Maize p1 Locus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dafang; Yu, Chuanhe; Zuo, Tao; Zhang, Jianbo; Weber, David F; Peterson, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The maize Ac/Ds transposon family was the first transposable element system identified and characterized by Barbara McClintock. Ac/Ds transposons belong to the hAT family of class II DNA transposons. We and others have shown that Ac/Ds elements can undergo a process of alternative transposition in which the Ac/Ds transposase acts on the termini of two separate, nearby transposons. Because these termini are present in different elements, alternative transposition can generate a variety of genome alterations such as inversions, duplications, deletions, and translocations. Moreover, Ac/Ds elements transpose preferentially into genic regions, suggesting that structural changes arising from alternative transposition may potentially generate chimeric genes at the rearrangement breakpoints. Here we identified and characterized 11 independent cases of gene fusion induced by Ac alternative transposition. In each case, a functional chimeric gene was created by fusion of two linked, paralogous genes; moreover, each event was associated with duplication of the ∼70-kb segment located between the two paralogs. An extant gene in the maize B73 genome that contains an internal duplication apparently generated by an alternative transposition event was also identified. Our study demonstrates that alternative transposition-induced duplications may be a source for spontaneous creation of diverse genome structures and novel genes in maize. PMID:26434719

  5. Alternatives for Young Americans: A Catalog of Drug Abuse Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applied Management Sciences, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    This reference book contains resumes of program descriptions geared toward youth and adults who need or want information on drug abuse prevention programs, locally or nationally. Several major entries include: (1) national program models; (2) evaluated alternative programs from all states; and (3) descriptions of prevention programs. All section…

  6. School District Program Cost Accounting: An Alternative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hentschke, Guilbert C.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the value for school districts of a program cost accounting system and examines different approaches to generating program cost data, with particular emphasis on the "cost allocation to program system" (CAPS) and the traditional "transaction-based system." (JG)

  7. Alternative filtration testing program: Pre-evaluation of test results

    SciTech Connect

    Georgeton, G.K.; Poirier, M.R.

    1990-09-28

    Based on results of testing eight solids removal technologies and one pretreatment option, it is recommended that a centrifugal ultrafilter and polymeric ultrafilter undergo further testing as possible alternatives to the Norton Ceramic filters. Deep bed filtration should be considered as a third alternative, if a backwashable cartridge filter is shown to be inefficient in separate testing.

  8. Supports and Enhancements Designed for Alternative School Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menendez, Anthony L.

    2007-01-01

    In this informational survey, the author briefly explores the needs of professional staff and administrators who serve students in alternative educational settings and special education and provides a listing of helpful Internet resources. Initially, the author provides general information concerning the current state of alternative education…

  9. Gene, Stem Cell, and Alternative Therapies for SCA 1

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jacob L.; O'Connor, Deirdre M.; Donsante, Anthony; Boulis, Nicholas M.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 1 is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by neurodegeneration and motor dysfunction. In disease pathogenesis, polyglutamine expansion within Ataxin-1, a gene involved in transcriptional repression, causes protein nuclear inclusions to form. Most notably, neuronal dysfunction presents in Purkinje cells. However, the effect of mutant Ataxin-1 is not entirely understood. Two mouse models are employed to represent spinocerebellar ataxia 1, a B05 transgenic model that specifically expresses mutant Ataxin-1 in Purkinje cells, and a Sca1 154Q/2Q model that inserts the polyglutamine expansion into the mouse Ataxin-1 locus so that the mutant Ataxin-1 is expressed in all cells that express Ataxin-1. This review aims to summarize and evaluate the wide variety of therapies proposed for spinocerebellar ataxia 1, specifically gene and stem cell therapies. PMID:27570504

  10. Gene, Stem Cell, and Alternative Therapies for SCA 1.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jacob L; O'Connor, Deirdre M; Donsante, Anthony; Boulis, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 1 is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by neurodegeneration and motor dysfunction. In disease pathogenesis, polyglutamine expansion within Ataxin-1, a gene involved in transcriptional repression, causes protein nuclear inclusions to form. Most notably, neuronal dysfunction presents in Purkinje cells. However, the effect of mutant Ataxin-1 is not entirely understood. Two mouse models are employed to represent spinocerebellar ataxia 1, a B05 transgenic model that specifically expresses mutant Ataxin-1 in Purkinje cells, and a Sca1 154Q/2Q model that inserts the polyglutamine expansion into the mouse Ataxin-1 locus so that the mutant Ataxin-1 is expressed in all cells that express Ataxin-1. This review aims to summarize and evaluate the wide variety of therapies proposed for spinocerebellar ataxia 1, specifically gene and stem cell therapies. PMID:27570504

  11. An alternative pathway for gene regulation by Myc.

    PubMed Central

    Peukert, K; Staller, P; Schneider, A; Carmichael, G; Hänel, F; Eilers, M

    1997-01-01

    The c-Myc protein activates transcription as part of a heteromeric complex with Max. However, Myc-transformed cells are characterized by loss of expression of several genes, suggesting that Myc may also repress gene expression. Two-hybrid cloning identifies a novel POZ domain Zn finger protein (Miz-1; Myc-interacting Zn finger protein-1) that specifically interacts with Myc, but not with Max or USF. Miz-1 binds to start sites of the adenovirus major late and cyclin D1 promoters and activates transcription from both promoters. Miz-1 has a potent growth arrest function. Binding of Myc to Miz-1 requires the helix-loop-helix domain of Myc and a short amphipathic helix located in the carboxy-terminus of Miz-1. Expression of Myc inhibits transactivation, overcomes Miz-1-induced growth arrest and renders Miz-1 insoluble in vivo. These processes depend on Myc and Miz-1 association and on the integrity of the POZ domain of Miz-1, suggesting that Myc binding activates a latent inhibitory function of this domain. Fusion of a nuclear localization signal induces efficient nuclear transport of Miz-1 and impairs the ability of Myc to overcome transcriptional activation and growth arrest by Miz-1. Our data suggest a model for how gene repression by Myc may occur in vivo. PMID:9312026

  12. Alternative splicing of the FMR1 gene in human fetal brain neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Huang; Yan Shen; Xue-bin Qin; Guan-Yun Wu

    1996-08-09

    The alternative splicing expression of the FMR1 gene was reported in several human and mouse tissues. Five regions of FMR1 gene can be alternatively spliced, but the combination of them has not been investigated fully. We reported here the analysis of alternative splicing pattern of the FMR1 gene in cultured fetal human neurons, using a RT-PCR and cloning strategy. Eleven splicing types were cloned and different isoforms were not equally represented. The dominant isoform represents nearly 40%, and the other isoforms were relatively rare. One isoform has a different carboxyl-terminus. Most of the alternative spliced regions appear hydrophilic; thus, they may locate on the surface of the FMR1 protein. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Interweaving Teaching and Emotional Support for Novice Special Educators in Alternative Certification Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricci, Leila Ansari; Zetlin, Andrea G.

    2013-01-01

    As the shortage of special education teachers has led to increasing numbers of teacher candidates enrolled in alternative certification programs, there is a need to provide systematic mentoring and coaching. The relationship between support providers and novice teachers enrolled in an alternative certification program in a diverse, urban…

  14. Considerations for Coursework and Mentoring in an Alternative-Route-to- Licensure Program for STEM Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burbank, Mary D.; Shooter, Wynn; Groth, Cori A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate stakeholders' perspectives on coursework and the role of mentors within a unique teacher education program for prospective teachers of mathematics in an alternative-route-to-licensure program. The alternative route reflects a partnership between an institution of higher education, a state office…

  15. Bureaucratic Discretion and Alternative Teacher Certification: Understanding Program Variation in Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinen, Ethan B.; Scribner, Jay Paredes

    2007-01-01

    Alternative teacher certification literature has contributed significantly to our understanding of this approach to teacher preparation. However, this literature has more often than not treated alternative teacher certification programs (ATCPs) as a black box, thus ignoring program heterogeneity. The present study examines how and why five ATCPs…

  16. Evaluation of the Alternate Program at McBride School, 1971-72. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Katherine J.

    The alternate program at McBride School was an organizational and curricular modification that offered optional activities, community recreation, semestering of some subjects, and unstructured time. It involved four intermediate grade classes. Questionnaires were distributed to students who were enrolled in the alternate program and to their…

  17. 46 CFR 71.50-19 - The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program...) PASSENGER VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Drydocking § 71.50-19 The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE... apply to the AHE Program. You must submit an application at least 90 days before the requested...

  18. 46 CFR 176.630 - The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program... PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 176.630 The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application. If your vessel meets the...

  19. 46 CFR 71.50-19 - The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program...) PASSENGER VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Drydocking § 71.50-19 The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE... apply to the AHE Program. You must submit an application at least 90 days before the requested...

  20. 46 CFR 176.630 - The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program... PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 176.630 The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application. If your vessel meets the...

  1. 46 CFR 71.50-31 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Continued participation in the Alternative Hull... the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program. (a) To continue to participate in the AHE Program, vessel operators must conduct an annual hull condition assessment. At a minimum, vessel operators...

  2. 46 CFR 71.50-19 - The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program...) PASSENGER VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Drydocking § 71.50-19 The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE... apply to the AHE Program. You must submit an application at least 90 days before the requested...

  3. 46 CFR 71.50-19 - The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program...) PASSENGER VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Drydocking § 71.50-19 The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE... apply to the AHE Program. You must submit an application at least 90 days before the requested...

  4. 46 CFR 176.630 - The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program... PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 176.630 The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application. If your vessel meets the...

  5. 46 CFR 71.50-31 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Continued participation in the Alternative Hull... the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program. (a) To continue to participate in the AHE Program, vessel operators must conduct an annual hull condition assessment. At a minimum, vessel operators...

  6. 46 CFR 71.50-31 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Continued participation in the Alternative Hull... the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program. (a) To continue to participate in the AHE Program, vessel operators must conduct an annual hull condition assessment. At a minimum, vessel operators...

  7. 46 CFR 71.50-31 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Continued participation in the Alternative Hull... the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program. (a) To continue to participate in the AHE Program, vessel operators must conduct an annual hull condition assessment. At a minimum, vessel operators...

  8. Emotionally Disturbed Children: A Program of Alternatives to Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedford, Linda; Hybertson, Larry D.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the Treatment Alternatives Project (TAP) which provides caseworker aid and supportive services that allow problem children to undergo treatment while remaining in their own homes or foster homes. (SDH)

  9. Design and Implementation Considerations for Alternative Teacher Compensation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodsky, Andrew; DeCesare, Dale; Kramer-Wine, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, educators and policymakers have used a variety of approaches to designing and implementing teacher compensation programs. These approaches include federal incentive funds, state-level programs, and district initiatives. This article reviews 6 such programs in order to identify themes and draw conclusions relevant to…

  10. Alternative Summer Educational Programs for Urban Hearing-Impaired Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, Mark; Israelson, Jo

    The paper describes the summer programs offered by Kendall Demonstration Elementary School, a year-round day school for elementary level hearing impaired students in Washington, D.C. The programs are explained to be based on a three-point philosophy: (1) summer programs should be different from those of the rest of the year; (2) summer programs…

  11. Brayton heat exchanger unit development program (alternate design)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, J. D.; Gibson, J. C.; Graves, R. F.; Morse, C. J.; Richard, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    A Brayton Heat Exchanger Unit Alternate Design (BHXU-Alternate) consisting of a recuperator, a heat sink heat exchanger, and a gas ducting system, was designed and fabricated. The design was formulated to provide a high performance unit suitable for use in a long-life Brayton-cycle powerplant. Emphasis was on double containment against external leakage and leakage of the organic coolant into the gas stream. A parametric analysis and design study was performed to establish the optimum component configurations to achieve low weight and size and high reliability, while meeting the requirements of high effectiveness and low pressure drop. Layout studies and detailed mechanical and structural design were performed to obtain a flight-type packaging arrangement, including the close-coupled integration of the BHXU-Alternate with the Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU).

  12. 77 FR 32038 - Energy Conservation Program: Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods and Alternative Rating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ... the Federal Register on April 18, 2011. 76 FR 21673. The RFI requested suggestions, comments, and... ;dct=FR%252BPR%252BN%252BO%252BSR%252BPS;rpp=25;po=0;D=EER E-2011-BT-TP-0024. Table II.1--Stakeholders... Efficiency Determination Methods and Alternative Rating Methods AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency...

  13. Reconstruction and minimal gene requirements for the alternative iron-only nitrogenase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianguo; Xie, Xiaqing; Wang, Xia; Dixon, Ray; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2014-09-01

    All diazotrophic organisms sequenced to date encode a molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase, but some also have alternative nitrogenases that are dependent on either vanadium (VFe) or iron only (FeFe) for activity. In Azotobacter vinelandii, expression of the three different types of nitrogenase is regulated in response to metal availability. The majority of genes required for nitrogen fixation in this organism are encoded in the nitrogen fixation (nif) gene clusters, whereas genes specific for vanadium- or iron-dependent diazotophy are encoded by the vanadium nitrogen fixation (vnf) and alternative nitrogen fixation (anf) genes, respectively. Due to the complexities of metal-dependent regulation and gene redundancy in A. vinelandii, it has been difficult to determine the precise genetic requirements for alternative nitrogen fixation. In this study, we have used Escherichia coli as a chassis to build an artificial iron-only (Anf) nitrogenase system composed of defined anf and nif genes. Using this system, we demonstrate that the pathway for biosynthesis of the iron-only cofactor (FeFe-co) is likely to be simpler than the pathway for biosynthesis of the molybdenum-dependent cofactor (FeMo-co) equivalent. A number of genes considered to be essential for nitrogen fixation by FeFe nitrogenase, including nifM, vnfEN, and anfOR, are not required for the artificial Anf system in E. coli. This finding has enabled us to engineer a minimal FeFe nitrogenase system comprising the structural anfHDGK genes and the nifBUSV genes required for metallocluster biosynthesis, with nifF and nifJ providing electron transport to the alternative nitrogenase. This minimal Anf system has potential implications for engineering diazotrophy in eukaryotes, particularly in compartments (e.g., organelles) where molybdenum may be limiting. PMID:25139995

  14. Reconstruction and minimal gene requirements for the alternative iron-only nitrogenase in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianguo; Xie, Xiaqing; Wang, Xia; Dixon, Ray; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    All diazotrophic organisms sequenced to date encode a molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase, but some also have alternative nitrogenases that are dependent on either vanadium (VFe) or iron only (FeFe) for activity. In Azotobacter vinelandii, expression of the three different types of nitrogenase is regulated in response to metal availability. The majority of genes required for nitrogen fixation in this organism are encoded in the nitrogen fixation (nif) gene clusters, whereas genes specific for vanadium- or iron-dependent diazotophy are encoded by the vanadium nitrogen fixation (vnf) and alternative nitrogen fixation (anf) genes, respectively. Due to the complexities of metal-dependent regulation and gene redundancy in A. vinelandii, it has been difficult to determine the precise genetic requirements for alternative nitrogen fixation. In this study, we have used Escherichia coli as a chassis to build an artificial iron-only (Anf) nitrogenase system composed of defined anf and nif genes. Using this system, we demonstrate that the pathway for biosynthesis of the iron-only cofactor (FeFe-co) is likely to be simpler than the pathway for biosynthesis of the molybdenum-dependent cofactor (FeMo-co) equivalent. A number of genes considered to be essential for nitrogen fixation by FeFe nitrogenase, including nifM, vnfEN, and anfOR, are not required for the artificial Anf system in E. coli. This finding has enabled us to engineer a minimal FeFe nitrogenase system comprising the structural anfHDGK genes and the nifBUSV genes required for metallocluster biosynthesis, with nifF and nifJ providing electron transport to the alternative nitrogenase. This minimal Anf system has potential implications for engineering diazotrophy in eukaryotes, particularly in compartments (e.g., organelles) where molybdenum may be limiting. PMID:25139995

  15. ORNL Research Programs related to chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) alternatives. [Chlorofluorocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, P.D.

    1987-05-13

    Testimony covered: uses and control impacts; federal/Department of Energy role; and relevant DOE research and development (absorption cycle technology, advanced insulation, novel thermodynamic cycles, fluid substitutes and recovery technology, development of replacement chemicals, development of recycling and recovery practices, development of alternative technologies, and resource requirements and schedules for accomplishment). (PSB)

  16. The Twilight Academy: An Alternative Education Program that Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Angelo, Frank; Zemanick, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Today's adolescent learners are more diverse than ever in terms of their backgrounds, interests, learning styles, and motivations. Thus, school officials must address these differences by thinking outside of the box and creating alternative education settings that acknowledge the fact that not everyone can learn in the traditional classroom…

  17. 76 FR 77716 - Alternate Passenger Rail Service Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... and Development, FRA, 1200 New Jersey Ave. SE., Washington, DC 20590 (telephone: (202) 493-6109); or... proposed rulemaking (NPRM) published on September 7, 2011 (76 FR 55335), FRA proposed an alternate... 44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979. FRA has prepared and placed in the docket a regulatory...

  18. 24 CFR 7.5 - EEO Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Statement regarding Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) located on the Department's website and 29 CFR 1614... 29 CFR 1614.105(c). The aggrieved person's election to proceed through ADR instead of EEO counseling... terms, the aggrieved person or Complainant may exercise the right of appeal pursuant to 29 CFR...

  19. 24 CFR 7.5 - EEO Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Statement regarding Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) located on the Department's website and 29 CFR 1614... 29 CFR 1614.105(c). The aggrieved person's election to proceed through ADR instead of EEO counseling... terms, the aggrieved person or Complainant may exercise the right of appeal pursuant to 29 CFR...

  20. 24 CFR 7.5 - EEO Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Statement regarding Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) located on the Department's website and 29 CFR 1614... 29 CFR 1614.105(c). The aggrieved person's election to proceed through ADR instead of EEO counseling... terms, the aggrieved person or Complainant may exercise the right of appeal pursuant to 29 CFR...

  1. 24 CFR 7.5 - EEO Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Statement regarding Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) located on the Department's website and 29 CFR 1614... 29 CFR 1614.105(c). The aggrieved person's election to proceed through ADR instead of EEO counseling... terms, the aggrieved person or Complainant may exercise the right of appeal pursuant to 29 CFR...

  2. Survey and Analysis of Alternative Education Programs II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosley, Nathaniel S.; Hosley, Jessica; Thein, Myint

    2009-01-01

    This research is a follow up to a similar study published by the Center for Rural Pennsylvania in 2003 in which researchers examined alternative education policies and practices among Pennsylvania school districts. The current study extended the previous research to include information on the perceptions of administrators and teachers on the…

  3. An Alternative Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Replication Program Triggered by Host Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Alka; Lu, Michael; Lukac, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is linked to several neoplastic diseases: Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). KSHV replicates actively, via a controlled gene expression program, but can also remain latent. It had been thought that the transition from latent to lytic replication was controlled exclusively by the replication and transcription activator protein RTA (open reading frame 50 [ORF50] gene product). A dominant-negative (DN) ORF50 mutant, ORF50ΔSTAD, blocks gene expression and replication. We produced a PEL cell line derivative containing both latent KSHV genomes and an inducible ORF50ΔSTAD. We unexpectedly found that induction of apoptosis triggered high-level viral replication, even when DN ORF50ΔSTAD was present, suggesting that apoptosis triggers KSHV replication through a distinct RTA-independent pathway. We verified that apoptosis triggers KSHV replication independent of RTA using ORF50 small interfering RNA (siRNA) and also showed that caspase activity is required to trigger KSHV replication. We showed that when apoptosis triggers KSHV replication, the kinetics of late gene expression is accelerated by 12 to 24 h and that virus produced following apoptosis has reduced infectivity. KSHV therefore appears to replicate via two distinct pathways, a conventional pathway requiring RTA, with slower replication kinetics, producing virus with higher infectivity, and an alternative apoptosis-triggered pathway that does not require RTA, has faster replication kinetics, and produces virus with lower infectivity. The existence of a distinct apoptosis-triggered, accelerated replication pathway may have evolutionary advantages for the virus and clinical significance for the treatment of KSHV-associated neoplasms. It also provides further evidence that KSHV can sense and react to its environment. PMID:22345480

  4. An Alternative Feedback/Evaluation Model for Outdoor Wilderness Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, R.

    Project D.A.R.E. (Development through Adventure, Responsibility and Education), an adventure-based outdoor program, uses a feedback/evaluation model, combining a learning component with a two-part participant observational model. The first phase focuses on evaluation of the child and progress made while he is in the program (stages one to four);…

  5. Newcomer Programs: An Educational Alternative for Secondary Immigrant Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Deborah J.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the small but growing presence of newcomer programs being implemented in urban middle and high schools, providing the rationale for newcomer schools for recent, limited-English-speaking immigrants and summarizing data collected from a national study. Describes program designs in urban schools and their educational goals, instructional…

  6. Development and Delivery of an FCS Alternative Program for License

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Marsha L.

    2013-01-01

    When addressing the ongoing shortage of family and consumer sciences (FCS) teachers, it is important to accommodate those unable to follow a traditional college program. This article describes a program that is beneficial to practicing professionals; it utilizes technology to aid in effective communication and efficiency of content delivery.…

  7. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report; Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2013/FY 2014

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    Compliance rates for covered state government and alternative fuel provider fleets under the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (pursuant to the Energy Policy Act or EPAct) are reported for MY 2013/FY 2014 in this publication.

  8. Global genome splicing analysis reveals an increased number of alternatively spliced genes with aging.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Sofía A; Grochová, Diana; McKenna, Tomás; Borate, Bhavesh; Trivedi, Niraj S; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a key regulatory mechanism for the development of different tissues; however, not much is known about changes to alternative splicing during aging. Splicing events may become more frequent and widespread genome-wide as tissues age and the splicing machinery stringency decreases. Using skin, skeletal muscle, bone, thymus, and white adipose tissue from wild-type C57BL6/J male mice (4 and 18 months old), we examined the effect of age on splicing by AS analysis of the differential exon usage of the genome. The results identified a considerable number of AS genes in skeletal muscle, thymus, bone, and white adipose tissue between the different age groups (ranging from 27 to 246 AS genes corresponding to 0.3-3.2% of the total number of genes analyzed). For skin, skeletal muscle, and bone, we included a later age group (28 months old) that showed that the number of alternatively spliced genes increased with age in all three tissues (P < 0.01). Analysis of alternatively spliced genes across all tissues by gene ontology and pathway analysis identified 158 genes involved in RNA processing. Additional analysis of AS in a mouse model for the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome was performed. The results show that expression of the mutant protein, progerin, is associated with an impaired developmental splicing. As progerin accumulates, the number of genes with AS increases compared to in wild-type skin. Our results indicate the existence of a mechanism for increased AS during aging in several tissues, emphasizing that AS has a more important role in the aging process than previously known. PMID:26685868

  9. Digital-computer program for design analysis of salient, wound pole alternators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repas, D. S.

    1973-01-01

    A digital computer program for analyzing the electromagnetic design of salient, wound pole alternators is presented. The program, which is written in FORTRAN 4, calculates the open-circuit saturation curve, the field-current requirements at rated voltage for various loads and losses, efficiency, reactances, time constants, and weights. The methods used to calculate some of these items are presented or appropriate references are cited. Instructions for using the program and typical program input and output for an alternator design are given, and an alphabetical list of most FORTRAN symbols and the complete program listing with flow charts are included.

  10. FEMP (Federal Energy Management Program) presents alternative financing guidance memoranda

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    Utility financing of energy efficient measures becomes easier to accomplish with the two new alternative financing guidance memoranda, released April 17, 1998, that address the use of utility incentives for Federal facilities. The memoranda have been approved by the Alternative Financing Guidance Committee on the Interagency Energy Management Task Force. The memoranda include: (1) Policy Statement No. 001: Authority to Sole Source Utility Service Contracts as Referenced in Section 152 of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 1992; and (2) Policy Statement No. 002: Congressional Notification for Utility Projects Under the Authority of Section 152 of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 1992. The purpose for developing the financing memoranda was to address specific issues within current Federal procurement regulations that require clarification or guidance. This new guidance will allow for increased use of utility incentives as a means of financing energy efficient and life cycle cost-effective projects in Federal facilities.

  11. Gene structure, chromosomal location, and basis for alternative mRNA splicing of the human VCAM1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Cybulsky, M.I.; Fries, J.W.U.; Williams, A.J.; Sultan, P.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.; Collins, T. ); Eddy, R.; Byers, M.; Shows, T. )

    1991-09-01

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) is a cell surface glycoprotein adhesive for certain blood leukocytes and tumor cells, which is expressed by activated endothelium in a variety of pathologic conditions including atherosclerosis. Genomic clones encoding the VCAM1 gene were isolated and the organization of the gene was determined. The gene, which is present in a single copy in the human genome, contains 9 exons spanning {approx}25 kilobases of DNA. Exons 2-8 contain C2 or H-type immunoglobulin domains. At least two different VCAM-1 precursors can be generated from the human gene as a result of alternative mRNA splicing events, which include or exclude exon 5. A consensus TATAA element is located upstream of the transcriptional start site. The VCAM1 promoter contains consensus binding sites for NF-{kappa}B, the GATA family of transcription factors, as well as an AP1 site. The VCAM1 gene was assigned to the 1p31-32 region of chromosome 1 based on the analysis of human-mouse hybrid cell lines and in situ hybridization. Structural analysis of the human VCAM1 gene provides the basis for alternative mRNA splicing and an initial approach to elucidating the regulation of VCAM-1 expression.

  12. Analysis of genes encoding an alternative nitrogenase in the archaeon Methanosarcina barkeri 227.

    PubMed

    Chien, Y T; Auerbuch, V; Brabban, A D; Zinder, S H

    2000-06-01

    Methanosarcina barkeri 227 possesses two clusters of genes potentially encoding nitrogenases. We have previously demonstrated that one cluster, called nif2, is expressed under molybdenum (Mo)-sufficient conditions, and the deduced amino acid sequences for nitrogenase structural genes in that cluster most closely resemble those for the Mo nitrogenase of the gram-positive eubacterium Clostridium pasteurianum. The previously cloned nifH1 from M. barkeri shows phylogenetic relationships with genes encoding components of eubacterial Mo-independent eubacterial alternative nitrogenases and other methanogen nitrogenases. In this study, we cloned and sequenced nifD1 and part of nifK1 from M. barkeri 227. The deduced amino acid sequence encoded by nifD1 from M. barkeri showed great similarity with vnfD gene products from vanadium (V) nitrogenases, with an 80% identity at the amino acid level with the vnfD gene product from Anabaena variabilis. Moreover, there was a small open reading frame located between nifD1 and nifK1 with clear homology to vnfG, a hallmark of eubacterial alternative nitrogenases. Stimulation of diazotrophic growth of M. barkeri 227 by V in the absence of Mo was demonstrated. The unusual complement of nif genes in M. barkeri 227, with one cluster resembling that from a gram-positive eubacterium and the other resembling a eubacterial V nitrogenase gene cluster, suggests horizontal genetic transfer of those genes. PMID:10809706

  13. Global variability in gene expression and alternative splicing is modulated by mitochondrial content.

    PubMed

    Guantes, Raul; Rastrojo, Alberto; Neves, Ricardo; Lima, Ana; Aguado, Begoña; Iborra, Francisco J

    2015-05-01

    Noise in gene expression is a main determinant of phenotypic variability. Increasing experimental evidence suggests that genome-wide cellular constraints largely contribute to the heterogeneity observed in gene products. It is still unclear, however, which global factors affect gene expression noise and to what extent. Since eukaryotic gene expression is an energy demanding process, differences in the energy budget of each cell could determine gene expression differences. Here, we quantify the contribution of mitochondrial variability (a natural source of ATP variation) to global variability in gene expression. We find that changes in mitochondrial content can account for ∼50% of the variability observed in protein levels. This is the combined result of the effect of mitochondria dosage on transcription and translation apparatus content and activities. Moreover, we find that mitochondrial levels have a large impact on alternative splicing, thus modulating both the abundance and type of mRNAs. A simple mathematical model in which mitochondrial content simultaneously affects transcription rate and splicing site choice can explain the alternative splicing data. The results of this study show that mitochondrial content (and/or probably function) influences mRNA abundance, translation, and alternative splicing, which ultimately affects cellular phenotype. PMID:25800673

  14. Prevention-Related Research Targeting African American Alternative Education Program Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carswell, Steven B.; Hanlon, Thomas E.; Watts, Amy M.; O'Grady, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a program of research that examined the background, planning, implementation, and evaluation of an after-school preventive intervention program within an ongoing urban alternative education program targeting African American students referred to the school because of their problematic behavior in regular schools. The…

  15. AB 3059: A Report to the Governor on the Alternative Child Care Programs, 1976-80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailey, Jack

    This publication of the California Governor's Committee on Child Development Programs focuses on the Alternative Child Care Program in California (AB 3059). The report looks back over four years of the AB 3059, reviews the goals of that legislation, and measures the program's accomplishments against those goals. In early 1976, the Governor's…

  16. Behavioral Outcomes of an Alternative Program for Junior High School Students at Risk of Dropping Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Edward; And Others

    The study examines the relationship between success upon leaving an alternative school program and immediate measures of program effect. The strength of the relationship was used to determine the degree to which the program effected its long term goals of preparing students for future academic or vocational success. Student success was defined as…

  17. 76 FR 64124 - Implementation of the Alternative Dispute Resolution Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... INFORMATION: I. Background On September 6, 2011 (76 FR 55136), the NRC announced its intention to hold a... prolonged litigation and unnecessary expenses. The second sub-program (commonly referred to as...

  18. Alternate bearing design fabrication and test program, exhibit B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A 50 ft-lb-sec (FPS) reaction wheel was modified with an ironless armature brushless dc motor and a magnetic bearing suspension. The purpose was to demonstrate the performance of an alternate bearing concept, i.e., a magnetic bearing suspension, which could be used in Skylab type CMG's to meet the attitude control requirements of long term space stations. A magnetic suspension was built, installed and tested in the 50 FPS reaction wheel. A secondary effort included the build and test of a compatible reaction wheel motor. Performance characteristics of both are presented and discussed.

  19. High-fidelity promoter profiling reveals widespread alternative promoter usage and transposon-driven developmental gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Batut, Philippe; Dobin, Alexander; Plessy, Charles; Carninci, Piero; Gingeras, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Many eukaryotic genes possess multiple alternative promoters with distinct expression specificities. Therefore, comprehensively annotating promoters and deciphering their individual regulatory dynamics is critical for gene expression profiling applications and for our understanding of regulatory complexity. We introduce RAMPAGE, a novel promoter activity profiling approach that combines extremely specific 5′-complete cDNA sequencing with an integrated data analysis workflow, to address the limitations of current techniques. RAMPAGE features a streamlined protocol for fast and easy generation of highly multiplexed sequencing libraries, offers very high transcription start site specificity, generates accurate and reproducible promoter expression measurements, and yields extensive transcript connectivity information through paired-end cDNA sequencing. We used RAMPAGE in a genome-wide study of promoter activity throughout 36 stages of the life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster, and describe here a comprehensive data set that represents the first available developmental time-course of promoter usage. We found that >40% of developmentally expressed genes have at least two promoters and that alternative promoters generally implement distinct regulatory programs. Transposable elements, long proposed to play a central role in the evolution of their host genomes through their ability to regulate gene expression, contribute at least 1300 promoters shaping the developmental transcriptome of D. melanogaster. Hundreds of these promoters drive the expression of annotated genes, and transposons often impart their own expression specificity upon the genes they regulate. These observations provide support for the theory that transposons may drive regulatory innovation through the distribution of stereotyped cis-regulatory modules throughout their host genomes. PMID:22936248

  20. 77 FR 14587 - FY 2012 Discretionary Livability Funding Opportunity: Alternatives Analysis Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ... Federal Transit Administration FY 2012 Discretionary Livability Funding Opportunity: Alternatives Analysis Program AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of funding availability for FTA... by the Temporary Authorization. This notice solicits proposals to compete for FY 2012 funding...

  1. SELENIUM TREATMENT/REMOVAL ALTERNATIVES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT - MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM ACTIVITY III, PROJECT 20

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is the final report for EPA's Mine WAste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 20--Selenium Treatment/Removal Alternatives Demonstration project. Selenium contamination originates from many sources including mining operations, mineral processing, abandoned...

  2. 78 FR 45253 - National Toxicology Program Scientific Advisory Committee on Alternative Toxicological Methods...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Toxicology Program Scientific Advisory Committee... notice announces a meeting of the Scientific Advisory Committee on Alternative Toxicological Methods... and promotes the scientific validation and regulatory acceptance of toxicological and...

  3. Alternative Programs for At-Risk Students: Wolves in Sheep's Clothing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagor, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Provides a critique of alternative education and details the disadvantages of segregated schooling. Discusses the problems associated with labeling children as "problem students" and outlines ways in which equitable alternative programs can be devised. Gives a case study as an example. (RJM)

  4. 46 CFR 115.660 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Continued participation in the Alternative Hull... MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 115.660 Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program. (a) To continue to participate...

  5. 46 CFR 115.660 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Continued participation in the Alternative Hull... MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 115.660 Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program. (a) To continue to participate...

  6. 46 CFR 176.660 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Continued participation in the Alternative Hull... (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 176.660 Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program. (a)...

  7. 46 CFR 176.660 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Continued participation in the Alternative Hull... (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 176.660 Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program. (a)...

  8. 46 CFR 176.660 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Continued participation in the Alternative Hull... (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 176.660 Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program. (a)...

  9. 46 CFR 176.660 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Continued participation in the Alternative Hull... (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 176.660 Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program. (a)...

  10. 46 CFR 115.660 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Continued participation in the Alternative Hull... MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 115.660 Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program. (a) To continue to participate...

  11. 46 CFR 115.660 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Continued participation in the Alternative Hull... MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 115.660 Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program. (a) To continue to participate...

  12. 5 CFR 2424.10 - Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Collaboration and Alternative Dispute... Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program. Where an exclusive representative and an agency are unable to resolve disputes that arise under this part, they may request assistance from the...

  13. 5 CFR 2424.10 - Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Collaboration and Alternative Dispute... Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program. Where an exclusive representative and an agency are unable to resolve disputes that arise under this part, they may request assistance from the...

  14. 5 CFR 2424.10 - Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Collaboration and Alternative Dispute... Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program. Where an exclusive representative and an agency are unable to resolve disputes that arise under this part, they may request assistance from the...

  15. Alternate space shuttle concepts study: Design requirements and phased programs evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A study to determine program and technical alternatives to the design of the space shuttle orbiter is described. The alternatives include a phased approach, involving orbiter development and operation with an expendable booster for an interim period, as well as design variations to the basic vehicle. The space shuttle orbiter configurations and predicted performance parameters are presented.

  16. Inclusion of Alternative and Complementary Therapies in CACREP Training Programs: A Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumadue, Christine A.; Munk, Melanie; Wooten, H. Ray

    2005-01-01

    Given a heightened focus within the mental health profession on creative, complementary, and alternative practices, the authors surveyed CACREP programs with respect to their inclusion of such approaches in counselor training. For the purpose of this study, these approaches were designated as complementary and alternative methods (CAM) and defined…

  17. State Approved Alternative Certification: Are These Programs Changing the Face of Teacher Preparation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Terry; McNiece, Elaine

    The paper reviews a national survey of alternative teacher certification programs, comparing the data to: (1) Teacher Education Policy in the States: A 50-State Survey of Legislative and Administrative Actions (American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE), December 1990); and (2) Alternative Teacher Certification: A…

  18. Alternative Break Programs: From Isolated Enthusiasm to Best Practices--The Haiti Compact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piacitelli, Jill; Barwick, Molly; Doerr, Elizabeth; Porter, Melody; Sumka, Shoshanna

    2013-01-01

    Alternative break programs, which are short-term service-learning trips, immerse students in direct service and education, resulting in the creation of active citizens who think and act critically around the root causes of social issues. Over the last 20 years, domestic alternative breaks have effectively created strong community partnerships and…

  19. Experiments in Alternative Energy Program Design: Final Report, Volume One

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B. C.

    1989-04-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute issued a Notice of Program Interest (NOPI) which resulted in the selection of six projects. The balance of this report briefly describes each of the six projects in turn, and then evaluates the NOPI process, which was in itself an experiment.

  20. Modular Laboratory Courses: An Alternative to a Traditional Laboratory Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caprette, David R.; Armstrong, Sarah; Beason, K. Beth

    2005-01-01

    Our modular laboratory teaching program is characterized by two major features. First, each course is taught independently and not linked with a particular lecture course. Second, each course is designed to be completed within one-half semester or less. The modular organization has allowed incorporation of the latest technology, reduction of class…

  1. Clarendon Alternative School Japanese Bilingual Bicultural Program: Curriculum Sampler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Francisco Unified School District, CA.

    Sample lessons and instructional materials from a Japanese bilingual/bicultural elementary school program are presented. The lessons are designed to integrate Japanese language instruction with content instruction, using thematic units related to the core curriculum. The ten lessons are organized by target grade (K-5), and describe classroom…

  2. Pacific area wide program for methyl bromide alternatives – Ornamentals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the past 5 years the following field trials have been conducted as part of the Pacific Area-Wide program for cut flowers and ornamentals using various combinations of 1, 3-dichloropropene, chloropicrin, and metam: 1) Drip demonstration trial with field-grown calla lilies at Golden State Bulb ...

  3. Effects of hydrogen sulfide on alternative pathway respiration and induction of alternative oxidase gene expression in rice suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Man; Ma, Jun; Li, Hongyu; Jin, Han; Feng, Hanqing

    2010-01-01

    The toxic effects of H2S on plants are well documented. However, the molecular mechanisms reponsible for inhibition of plants by H2S are still not completely understood. We determined the effects of NaHS in the range of 0.5-10 mM on the growth of rice suspension culture cells, as well as on the expression of the alternative oxidase (AOX) gene. AOX is the terminal oxidase of the alternative pathway (AP) and exists in plant mitochondria. The results showed that H2S treatment enhanced the AP activity. During the process of H2S treatment for 4 h, the AP activity increased dramatically and achieved the peak value at a concentration of 2 mM NaHS. Then it declined at higher concentrations of NaHS (5-10 mM) and maintained a steady level. The AOX1 gene transcript level also showed a similar change as the AP activity. Interestingly, different NaHS concentrations seemed to have different effects on the expression of AOX1a, AOX1b, and AOX1c. The induction of AOX expression by low concentrations of NaHS was inferred through a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-independent pathway. At the same time, rice cells grown in culture were very sensitive to H2S, different H2S concentrations induced an increase in the cell viability. These results indicate that the H2S-induced AOX induction might play a role in inhibiting the ROS production and have an influence on cell viability. PMID:20737915

  4. Update from the NREL Alternative Fuel Transit Bus Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Norton, P.; Clark, N.

    1999-05-01

    The object of this project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is to provide a comprehensive comparison of heavy-duty urban transit buses operating on alternative fuels and diesel fuel. Final reports from this project were produced in 1996 from data collection and evaluation of 11 transit buses from eight transit sites. With the publication of these final reports, three issues were raised that needed further investigation: (1) the natural gas engines studied were older, open-loop control engines; (2) propane was not included in the original study; and (3) liquefied natural gas (LNG) was found to be in the early stages of deployment in transit applications. In response to these three issues, the project has continued by emissions testing newer natural gas engines and adding two new data collection sites to study the newer natural gas technology and specifically to measure new technology LNG buses.

  5. Multidimensional Programming Methods for Energy Facility Siting: Alternative Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, B. D.; Haynes, K. E.

    1982-01-01

    The use of multidimensional optimization methods in solving power plant siting problems, which are characterized by several conflicting, noncommensurable objectives is addressed. After a discussion of data requirements and exclusionary site screening methods for bounding the decision space, classes of multiobjective and goal programming models are discussed in the context of finite site selection. Advantages and limitations of these approaches are highlighted and the linkage of multidimensional methods with the subjective, behavioral components of the power plant siting process is emphasized.

  6. A Collaborative Alternative Path Program for Career-Changing Mathematics and Science Professionals: Context, Design, and Replication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selke, Mary J.; Fero, George J.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide insights useful to readers involved in or considering the design and delivery of alternative path programs by presenting (a) a chronology of the multiple definitions of alternative certification, (b) key components of quality alternative path programs, viewed through the example of a program for…

  7. Reference gene alternatives to Gapdh in rodent and human heart failure gene expression studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) is a highly sensitive method for mRNA quantification, but requires invariant expression of the chosen reference gene(s). In pathological myocardium, there is limited information on suitable reference genes other than the commonly used Gapdh mRNA and 18S ribosomal RNA. Our aim was to evaluate and identify suitable reference genes in human failing myocardium, in rat and mouse post-myocardial infarction (post-MI) heart failure and across developmental stages in fetal and neonatal rat myocardium. Results The abundance of Arbp, Rpl32, Rpl4, Tbp, Polr2a, Hprt1, Pgk1, Ppia and Gapdh mRNA and 18S ribosomal RNA in myocardial samples was quantified by RT-qPCR. The expression variability of these transcripts was evaluated by the geNorm and Normfinder algorithms and by a variance component analysis method. Biological variability was a greater contributor to sample variability than either repeated reverse transcription or PCR reactions. Conclusions The most stable reference genes were Rpl32, Gapdh and Polr2a in mouse post-infarction heart failure, Polr2a, Rpl32 and Tbp in rat post-infarction heart failure and Rpl32 and Pgk1 in human heart failure (ischemic disease and cardiomyopathy). The overall most stable reference genes across all three species was Rpl32 and Polr2a. In rat myocardium, all reference genes tested showed substantial variation with developmental stage, with Rpl4 as was most stable among the tested genes. PMID:20331858

  8. Computer programs for the characterization of protein coding genes.

    PubMed

    Pierno, G; Barni, N; Candurro, M; Cipollaro, M; Franzè, A; Juliano, L; Macchiato, M F; Mastrocinque, G; Moscatelli, C; Scarlato, V

    1984-01-11

    Computer programs, implemented on an Univac II00/80 computer system, for the identification and characterization of protein coding genes and for the analysis of nucleic acid sequences, are described. PMID:6546420

  9. Computer programs for the characterization of protein coding genes.

    PubMed Central

    Pierno, G; Barni, N; Candurro, M; Cipollaro, M; Franzè, A; Juliano, L; Macchiato, M F; Mastrocinque, G; Moscatelli, C; Scarlato, V

    1984-01-01

    Computer programs, implemented on an Univac II00/80 computer system, for the identification and characterization of protein coding genes and for the analysis of nucleic acid sequences, are described. PMID:6546420

  10. Quality Practices of Alternative Education Learning Environments as Represented in Virginia's Individual Student Alternative Education Plan (ISAEP) Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feltman, Doris R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze a prominent alternative education practice in the Commonwealth of Virginia through an analysis of the Virginia Department of Education's Individual Student Alternative Education Plan (ISAEP) program and the alternative education environment it provides. This was a descriptive study using…

  11. Stress-induced alternative gene splicing in mind-body medicine.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ernest Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    Recent research documents how psychosocial stress can alter the expression of the acetylcholinesterase gene to generate at least 3 alternative proteins that are implicated in a wide variety of normal mind-body functions, as well as pathologies. These range from early embryological development, plasticity of the brain in adulthood, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and stress-associated dysfunctions of the central nervous, endocrine, and immune systems, to age-related neuropathologies. Such stress-induced alternative gene splicing is proposed here as a major mind-body pathway of psychosocial genomics-the modulation of gene expression by creative psychological, social, and cultural processes. We explore the types of research that are now needed to investigate how stress-induced alternative splicing of the acetylcholinesterase gene may play a pivotal role in the deep psychobiology of psychotherapy, meditation, spiritual rituals, and the experiencing of positive humanistic values that have been associated with mind-body medicine, such as compassion, beneficence, serenity, forgiveness, and gratitude. PMID:15356952

  12. Alternative splicing of the tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) gene in human and mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Lin; Sterner, C.; Maheshwar, M.M.

    1995-06-10

    The recently isolated gene for tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) encodes a 5.5.kb transcript that is widely expressed. The TSC2 gene product, named tuberin, is a 1784-amino-acid protein that shows a small stretch of homology to the GTPase activating protein rap1GAP. We have detected a novel variant of the TSC2 mRNA lacking 129 nucleotides, predicting an in-frame deletion of 43 amino acids spanning codons 946-988 of tuberin. This 129-bp deletion precisely corresponds to exon 25 of the TSC2 gene suggesting that alternative splicing leads to production of two forms of transcripts designated isoforms 1 and 2. Further molecular analysis revealed a third isoform exhibiting a deletion of 44 amino acids spanning codons 946-989 of tuberin. Amino acid 989 is a Ser residue encoded by the first codon of exon 26. The two isoforms also exist in newborn and adult mouse tissues, reinforcing the potential functional importance of these alternatively spliced products. These alternative isoforms should have implications for efforts aimed at identifying mutations in TSC patients. The distinct polypeptides encoded by the TSC2 gene may have different targets as well as functions involved in the regulation of cell growth. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Unraveling the evolution and regulation of the alternative oxidase gene family in plants.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xiao-jun; Lv, Xin; Lin, Hong-hui

    2015-11-01

    Alternative oxidase (AOX) is a diiron carboxylate protein present in all plants examined to date that couples the oxidation of ubiquinol with the reduction of oxygen to water. The predominant structure of AOX genes is four exons interrupted by three introns. In this study, by analyzing the genomic sequences of genes from different plant species, we deduced that intron/exon loss/gain and deletion of fragments are the major mechanisms responsible for the generation and evolution of AOX paralogous genes. Integrating gene duplication and structural information with expression profiles for various AOXs revealed that tandem duplication/block duplication contributed greatly to the generation and maintenance of the AOX gene family. Notably, the expression profiles based on public microarray database showed highly diverse expression patterns among AOX members in different developmental stages and tissues and that both orthologous and paralogous genes did not have the same expression profiles due to their divergence in regulatory regions. Comparative analysis of genes in six plant species under various perturbations indicated a large number of protein kinases, transcription factors and antioxidant enzymes are co-expressed with AOX. Of these, four sets of transcription factors--WRKY, NAC, bZIP and MYB--are likely involved in the regulating the differential responses of AOX1 genes to specific stresses. Furthermore, divergence of AOX1 and AOX2 subfamilies in regulation might be the main reason for their differential stress responses. PMID:26438244

  14. A subgroup of MYB transcription factor genes undergoes highly conserved alternative splicing in Arabidopsis and rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jigang; Li, Xiaojuan; Guo, Lei; Lu, Feng; Feng, Xiaojie; He, Kun; Wei, Liping; Chen, Zhangliang; Qu, Li-Jia; Gu, Hongya

    2006-01-01

    MYB transcription factor genes play important roles in many developmental processes and in various defence responses of plants. Two Arabidopsis R2R3-type MYB genes, AtMYB59 and AtMYB48, were found to undergo similar alternative splicing. Both genes have four distinctively spliced transcripts that encode either MYB-related proteins or R2R3-MYB proteins. An extensive BLAST search of the GenBank database resulted in finding and cloning two rice homologues, both of which were also found to share a similar alternative splicing pattern. In a semi-quantitative study, the expression of one splice variant of AtMYB59 was found to be differentially regulated in treatments with different phytohormones and stresses. GFP fusion protein analysis revealed that both of the two predicted nuclear localization signals (NLSs) in the R3 domain are required for localizing to the nucleus. Promoter-GUS analysis in transgenic plants showed that 5'-UTR is sufficient for the translation initiation of type 3 transcripts (encoding R2R3-MYB proteins), but not for type 2 transcripts (encoding MYB-related proteins). Moreover, a new type of non-canonical intron, with the same nucleotide repeats at the 5' and 3' splice sites, was identified. Thirty-eight Arabidopsis and rice genes were found to have this type of non-canonical intron, most of which undergo alternative splicing. These data suggest that this subgroup of transcription factor genes may be involved in multiple biological processes and may be transcriptionally regulated by alternative splicing. PMID:16531467

  15. Daemen Alternative Energy/Geothermal Technologies Demonstration Program Erie County

    SciTech Connect

    Beiswanger, Jr, Robert C

    2010-05-20

    The purpose of the Daemen Alternative Energy/Geothermal Technologies Demonstration Project is to demonstrate the use of geothermal technology as model for energy and environmental efficiency in heating and cooling older, highly inefficient buildings. The former Marian Library building at Daemen College is a 19,000 square foot building located in the center of campus. Through this project, the building was equipped with geothermal technology and results were disseminated. Gold LEED certification for the building was awarded. 1) How the research adds to the understanding of the area investigated. This project is primarily a demonstration project. Information about the installation is available to other companies, organizations, and higher education institutions that may be interested in using geothermal energy for heating and cooling older buildings. 2) The technical effectiveness and economic feasibility of the methods or techniques investigated or demonstrated. According to the modeling and estimates through Stantec, the energy-efficiency cost savings is estimated at 20%, or $24,000 per year. Over 20 years this represents $480,000 in unrestricted revenue available for College operations. See attached technical assistance report. 3) How the project is otherwise of benefit to the public. The Daemen College Geothermal Technologies Ground Source Heat Pumps project sets a standard for retrofitting older, highly inefficient, energy wasting and environmentally irresponsible buildings quite typical of many of the buildings on the campuses of regional colleges and universities. As a model, the project serves as an energy-efficient system with significant environmental advantages. Information about the energy-efficiency measures is available to other colleges and universities, organizations and companies, students, and other interested parties. The installation and renovation provided employment for 120 individuals during the award period. Through the new Center, Daemen will

  16. How Induction Programs Affect the Decision of Alternate Route Urban Teachers to Remain Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoCascio, Steven J.; Smeaton, Patricia S.; Waters, Faith H.

    2016-01-01

    This mixed-methods study analyzes the induction programs for alternate route beginning teachers in low socioeconomic, urban schools. The researcher surveyed 53 teachers at the end of their first year and conducted six in-depth follow-up interviews. The study found that half the teachers did not receive an induction program congruent with state…

  17. 7 CFR 58.149 - Alternate quality control programs for dairy products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate quality control programs for dairy products... FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection... for dairy products. (a) When a plant has in operation an acceptable quality control program which...

  18. 7 CFR 58.149 - Alternate quality control programs for dairy products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate quality control programs for dairy products... FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection... for dairy products. (a) When a plant has in operation an acceptable quality control program which...

  19. 7 CFR 58.149 - Alternate quality control programs for dairy products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate quality control programs for dairy products... FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection... for dairy products. (a) When a plant has in operation an acceptable quality control program which...

  20. 7 CFR 58.149 - Alternate quality control programs for dairy products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate quality control programs for dairy products... FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection... for dairy products. (a) When a plant has in operation an acceptable quality control program which...

  1. 7 CFR 58.149 - Alternate quality control programs for dairy products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate quality control programs for dairy products... FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection... for dairy products. (a) When a plant has in operation an acceptable quality control program which...

  2. Discipline or Prejudice? Overrepresentation of Minority Students in Disciplinary Alternative Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tajalli, Hassan; Garba, Houmma A.

    2014-01-01

    The study seeks to determine the underlying factors contributing to the overrepresentation of minorities in school disciplinary programs. Data from 207 Disciplinary Alternative Education Programs (DAEPs) in Texas are analyzed. The data represent more than 62% of the student population of Texas school districts. Results support the hypothesis that…

  3. An Analysis on the Experience of Mentoring Support in a College Alternative Teacher Certification Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgore, Debra V.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to explore how college alternative teacher certification (ATC) participants experience mentoring support. The goal was to obtain a rich and deep understanding of the nature of the mentoring experience in a college ATC program through the perspectives of mentees and their mentors. The ATC program was the…

  4. A Comparison of the Alternative and Traditional Licensure Programs at Metropolitan State College of Denver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyman, Ernest L.

    This study evaluated Metropolitan State College of Denver's Teacher-in-Residence (TiR) alternative licensure program. To participate, teacher candidates must possess a baccalaureate degree, have a teaching contract in a participating local school district, enroll in the TiR program, and pass a state content test. This study examined what Metro…

  5. A Comparison of Technology Experiences Included in Alternative and Traditional Teacher Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strycker, Jesse D.

    2011-01-01

    Though an educational technology experience is required as part of a traditional teacher education program student's educational preparation, research has been limited into the experiences had by alternative teacher education program students. Similarly, little research has been done comparing technology experiences between both types of teacher…

  6. Yoga for Stress Management Program as a Complementary Alternative Counseling Resource in a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Colleen K.

    2006-01-01

    A Yoga for Stress Management Program (YSMP) that served as a complementary alternative therapy resource was successfully implemented at a midsize, predominantly undergraduate university. It was offered in addition to traditional treatments for student mental health. Counselors, Residence Life staff, and faculty found that the program was useful…

  7. 75 FR 25913 - Alternative Transportation in Parks and Public Lands Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ...The U.S. Department of Transportation's (DOT) Federal Transit Administration (FTA) announces the selection of projects funded with Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 appropriations for the Paul S. Sarbanes Transit in Parks program (formally the Alternative Transportation in Parks and Public Lands (ATPPL)) program, authorized by Section 3021 of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation......

  8. Do Alternative Teacher Education Programs Manage to Attract Different Candidates and Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donitsa-Schmidt, Smadar; Weinberger, Yehudith

    2014-01-01

    During 2009, three alternative teacher retraining programs in English as a Foreign Language, mathematics and biology were launched for the first time in one of Israel's largest teacher education colleges. The programs, which offered varied economic incentives to participants, were initiated by the state owing to shortages of teachers in these…

  9. "Special Delivery": Case Studies in Alternative Teacher Licensure Programs for Students of Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasslen, Robin; Green, Les

    St. Cloud State University's Teacher of Color project provides alternate licensure for degreed individuals needing only to complete their teacher education core and subject area coursework. It offers minority students on- and off-campus programs, financial support, flexible hours, and a compressed program. Researchers examined participating…

  10. Providing Access for Adults to Alternative College Programs. Alliance Manual No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Ronald H., Ed.

    The issue of providing access to alternative college programs for adult students through evaluation of institutional accessibility and development of appropriate responses is addressed in six articles. Barriers that adults experience in the admissions process and in completing college programs are identified by Thomas Taafee and Thomas M. Rocco in…

  11. Alternatives in Scheduling Patterns: Practitioner Implementation of Minicourse Programs in Selected Midwestern High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Patricia; Guenther, John

    The purposes of the document are to report on the status of social studies minicourse programs in selected midwestern high schools and to provide information to schools regarding obstacles to minicourses as alternatives to traditional programs. A 1976-77 survey of 265 midwestern high schools determined that only 60 (23%) of the schools offered…

  12. Examining Our Career Switching Teachers' First Year of Teaching: Implications for Alternative Teacher Education Program Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Dawn Renee; Samaras, Anastasia P.

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the impact of an alternative teacher preparation program development from the "inside out" or through the voices of second career teachers, known as "Career Switchers," at a mid-size state university. The major objective of this study was to probe into their perceptions to inform program development with reporting framed in…

  13. Comparative Evaluation of AB 3059 Alternative Child Care Programs. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Donna D.; And Others

    Findings from the evaluation of the AB 3059 alternative child care programs are presented in this report. (AB 3059 child care programs were mandated by the California legislature in 1976 with the goals of assessing features that might reduce child care costs, ensuring maximum parental choice among facilities, addressing unmet child care needs…

  14. HIP--An Alternative Program for the Preparation of Elementary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Coll. of Education.

    The University of Missouri College of Education and the Columbia Public Schools implemented an alternative program for the preparation of elementary teachers. The program, Humanizing, Individualizing and Personalizing Education (HIP), is offered over a three-year period, and correlates a field experience with university classroom activities. Each…

  15. Transitioning from School to Work: Programming for an Alternative School for At-Risk Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lister, Robert

    The Portsmouth (New Hampshire) Alternative Secondary School (PASS) has been developed for at-risk students who need a self-contained educational program with a community educational approach. This model program is based on the need for students to experience individual growth and success in the areas of academics, therapeutics, behavior…

  16. Does Teaching Experience Matter? Examining Biology Teachers' Prior Knowledge for Teaching in an Alternative Certification Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrichsen, Patricia J.; Abell, Sandra K.; Pareja, Enrique M.; Brown, Patrick L.; Lankford, Deanna M.; Volkmann, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Alternative certification programs (ACPs) have been proposed as a viable way to address teacher shortages, yet we know little about how teacher knowledge develops within such programs. The purpose of this study was to investigate prior knowledge for teaching among students entering an ACP, comparing individuals with teaching experience to those…

  17. Towards a Lakatosian Analysis of the Piagetian and Alternative Conceptions Research Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, John K.; Swift, David J.

    1985-01-01

    Lakatos's methodology of scientific research programs is summarized and discussed for Piagetian schools and alternative conceptions movement. Commonalities/differences between these two rival programs are presented along with fundamental assumptions, auxiliary hypotheses, and research policy. Suggests that research findings should not be merely…

  18. Mentor & Intern Teacher Boundary Practices: Integrating Theory and Practice in Effective Alternative Certification Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, R Page, II.

    2011-01-01

    Alternative certification programs for primary and secondary school teachers face a difficult challenge: they must develop highly qualified and high quality teachers while adapting to the unique on-the-job training needs of their participants. Research literature indicates that many programs suffer from a lack of cohesion between coursework and…

  19. An Alternative School Teacher Education Program. Teacher Education Forum; Volume 3, Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Robert D.

    The Alternative School Teacher Education Program, cooperatively developed by participating public schools and Indiana University, is a field-based masters degree program designed for completion in one calendar year. Students spend two summers on campus pursuing graduate course work. During the academic year between these summers, students earn…

  20. The Planning Unit Concept: An Alternative Approach to Program-Budgeting in Public Service Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Edmond; And Others

    The Planning Unit is a concept employed in resource requirements forecasting for the public service agencies, as an alternative to the conventional hierarchical program-structure used in PPB systems. The planning unit concept allows analysts to generate cost analyses by several simultaneous program-structures, not all of which need be in a…

  1. State-Wide Collaborative Partnerships for Alternative Certification the Kansas Transition to Teaching Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Jeri A.; Hayes, Judith L.; Mercer, Debbie; Neuenswander, Bill; Drake, Sheila

    2006-01-01

    Alternative certification programs continue to increase as school districts, institutions of higher education, and commercial companies share common educational expectations. In Kansas, a state-wide collaborative of eleven partner institutions, governed by an advisory board, designed a conceptual framework, a standards-based program, curriculum,…

  2. Program Evaluation of Alternative Schools in North Carolina: A Companion Dissertation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Michael O.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the evaluation was to evaluate two alternative programs in a North Carolina (NC) and South Carolina (SC) public school district to determine if they are effective in delivering constructive interventions that modify student behavior once students have left the programs and have returned to their regular learning environments. This…

  3. Misregulation of Gene Expression and Sterility in Interspecies Hybrids: Causal Links and Alternative Hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Civetta, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the origin of species is of interest to biologist in general and evolutionary biologist in particular. Hybrid male sterility (HMS) has been a focus in studies of speciation because sterility imposes a barrier to free gene flow between organisms, thus effectively isolating them as distinct species. In this review, I focus on the role of differential gene expression in HMS and speciation. Microarray and qPCR assays have established associations between misregulation of gene expression and sterility in hybrids between closely related species. These studies originally proposed disrupted expression of spermatogenesis genes as a causative of sterility. Alternatively, rapid genetic divergence of regulatory elements, particularly as they relate to the male sex (fast-male evolution), can drive the misregulation of sperm developmental genes in the absence of sterility. The use of fertile hybrids (both backcross and F1 progeny) as controls has lent support to this alternative explanation. Differences in gene expression between fertile and sterile hybrids can also be influenced by a pattern of faster evolution of the sex chromosome (fast-X evolution) than autosomes. In particular, it would be desirable to establish whether known X-chromosome sterility factors can act as trans-regulatory drivers of genome-wide patterns of misregulation. Genome-wide expression studies coupled with assays of proxies of sterility in F1 and BC progeny have identified candidate HMS genes but functional assays, and a better phenotypic characterization of sterility phenotypes, are needed to rigorously test how these genes might contribute to HMS. PMID:27025762

  4. Human Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Genes: Alternatively-Spliced Transcriptional Variants and Their Suggested Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Black, William J.; Stagos, Dimitrios; Marchitti, Satori A.; Nebert, Daniel W.; Tipton, Keith F.; Bairoch, Amos; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The human aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily consists of 19 genes encoding enzymes critical for NAD(P)+-dependent oxidation of endogenous and exogenous aldehydes, including drugs and environmental toxicants. Mutations in ALDH genes are the molecular basis of several disease states (e.g. Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, pyridoxine-dependent seizures, and type II hyperprolinemia) and may contribute to the etiology of complex diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. The aim of this nomenclature update was to identify splice transcriptional variants principally for the human ALDH genes. METHODS Data-mining methods were used to retrieve all human ALDH sequences. Alternatively-spliced transcriptional variants were determined based upon: a) criteria for sequence integrity and genomic alignment; b) evidence of multiple independent cDNA sequences corresponding to a variant sequence; and c) if available, empirical evidence of variants from the literature. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Alternatively-spliced transcriptional variants and their encoded proteins exist for most of the human ALDH genes; however, their function and significance remain to be established. When compared with the human genome, rat and mouse include an additional gene, Aldh1a7, in the ALDH1A subfamily. In order to avoid confusion when identifying splice variants in various genomes, nomenclature guidelines for the naming of such alternative transcriptional variants and proteins are recommended herein. In addition, a web database (www.aldh.org) has been developed to provide up-to-date information and nomenclature guidelines for the ALDH superfamily. PMID:19823103

  5. Ubiquitously expressed genes participate in cell-specific functions via alternative promoter usage.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guihai; Tong, Man; Xia, Baolong; Luo, Guan-Zheng; Wang, Meng; Xie, Dongfang; Wan, Haifeng; Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Xiu-Jie

    2016-09-01

    How do different cell types acquire their specific identities and functions is a fundamental question of biology. Previously significant efforts have been devoted to search for cell-type-specifically expressed genes, especially transcription factors, yet how do ubiquitously expressed genes participate in the formation or maintenance of cell-type-specific features remains largely unknown. Here, we have identified 110 mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) specifically expressed transcripts with cell-stage-specific alternative transcription start sites (SATS isoforms) from 104 ubiquitously expressed genes, majority of which have active epigenetic modification- or stem cell-related functions. These SATS isoforms are specifically expressed in mESCs, and tend to be transcriptionally regulated by key pluripotency factors through direct promoter binding. Knocking down the SATS isoforms of Nmnat2 or Usp7 leads to differentiation-related phenotype in mESCs. These results demonstrate that cell-type-specific transcription factors are capable to produce cell-type-specific transcripts with alternative transcription start sites from ubiquitously expressed genes, which confer ubiquitously expressed genes novel functions involved in the establishment or maintenance of cell-type-specific features. PMID:27466324

  6. Subfunctionalization of duplicate mitf genes associated with differential degeneration of alternative exons in fish.

    PubMed Central

    Altschmied, Joachim; Delfgaauw, Jacqueline; Wilde, Brigitta; Duschl, Jutta; Bouneau, Laurence; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Schartl, Manfred

    2002-01-01

    The microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) exists in at least four isoforms. These are generated in higher vertebrates using alternative 5' exons and promoters from a single gene. Two separate genes (mitf-m and mitf-b), however, are present in different teleost fish species including the poeciliid Xiphophorus, the pufferfishes Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis, and the zebrafish Danio rerio. Fish proteins MITF-m and MITF-b correspond at both the structural and the expression levels to one particular bird/mammalian MITF isoform. In the teleost lineage subfunctionalization of mitf genes after duplication at least 100 million years ago is associated with the degeneration of alternative exons and, probably, regulatory elements and promoters. For example, a remnant of the first exon specific for MITF-m is detected within the pufferfish gene encoding MITF-b. Retracing the evolutionary history of mitf genes in vertebrates uncovered the differential recruitment of new introns specific for either the teleost or the bird/mammalian lineage. PMID:12019239

  7. Divergent functions through alternative splicing: the Drosophila CRMP gene in pyrimidine metabolism, brain, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Morris, Deanna H; Dubnau, Josh; Park, Jae H; Rawls, John M

    2012-08-01

    DHP and CRMP proteins comprise a family of structurally similar proteins that perform divergent functions, DHP in pyrimidine catabolism in most organisms and CRMP in neuronal dynamics in animals. In vertebrates, one DHP and five CRMP proteins are products of six genes; however, Drosophila melanogaster has a single CRMP gene that encodes one DHP and one CRMP protein through tissue-specific, alternative splicing of a pair of paralogous exons. The proteins derived from the fly gene are identical over 90% of their lengths, suggesting that unique, novel functions of these proteins derive from the segment corresponding to the paralogous exons. Functional homologies of the Drosophila and mammalian CRMP proteins are revealed by several types of evidence. Loss-of-function CRMP mutation modifies both Ras and Rac misexpression phenotypes during fly eye development in a manner that is consistent with the roles of CRMP in Ras and Rac signaling pathways in mammalian neurons. In both mice and flies, CRMP mutation impairs learning and memory. CRMP mutant flies are defective in circadian activity rhythm. Thus, DHP and CRMP proteins are derived by different processes in flies (tissue-specific, alternative splicing of paralogous exons of a single gene) and vertebrates (tissue-specific expression of different genes), indicating that diverse genetic mechanisms have mediated the evolution of this protein family in animals. PMID:22649077

  8. Detection of alternative splice and gene duplication by RNA sequencing in Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenji; Wang, Jing; You, Feng; Ma, Liman; Yang, Xiao; Gao, Jinning; He, Yan; Qi, Jie; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Xubo; Wu, Zhihao; Zhang, Quanqi

    2014-12-01

    Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) is one of the economic important fish in China. Sexual dimorphism, especially the different growth rates and body sizes between two sexes, makes this fish a good model to investigate mechanisms responsible for such dimorphism for both fundamental questions in evolution and applied topics in aquaculture. However, the lack of "omics" data has hindered the process. The recent advent of RNA-sequencing technology provides a robust tool to further study characteristics of genomes of nonmodel species. Here, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing for a double haploid Japanese flounder individual using Illumina sequencing. A single lane of paired-end sequencing produced more than 27 million reads. These reads were assembled into 107,318 nonredundant transcripts, half of which (51,563; 48.1%) were annotated by blastx to public protein database. A total of 1051 genes that had potential alternative splicings were detected by Chrysalis implemented in Trinity software. Four of 10 randomly picked genes were verified truly containing alternative splicing by cloning and Sanger sequencing. Notably, using a doubled haploid Japanese flounder individual allow us to analyze gene duplicates. In total, 3940 "single-nucleotide polymorphisms" were detected form 1859 genes, which may have happened gene duplicates. This study lays the foundation for structural and functional genomics studies in Japanese flounder. PMID:25512620

  9. Detection of Alternative Splice and Gene Duplication by RNA Sequencing in Japanese Flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenji; Wang, Jing; You, Feng; Ma, Liman; Yang, Xiao; Gao, Jinning; He, Yan; Qi, Jie; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Xubo; Wu, Zhihao; Zhang, Quanqi

    2014-01-01

    Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) is one of the economic important fish in China. Sexual dimorphism, especially the different growth rates and body sizes between two sexes, makes this fish a good model to investigate mechanisms responsible for such dimorphism for both fundamental questions in evolution and applied topics in aquaculture. However, the lack of “omics” data has hindered the process. The recent advent of RNA-sequencing technology provides a robust tool to further study characteristics of genomes of nonmodel species. Here, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing for a double haploid Japanese flounder individual using Illumina sequencing. A single lane of paired-end sequencing produced more than 27 million reads. These reads were assembled into 107,318 nonredundant transcripts, half of which (51,563; 48.1%) were annotated by blastx to public protein database. A total of 1051 genes that had potential alternative splicings were detected by Chrysalis implemented in Trinity software. Four of 10 randomly picked genes were verified truly containing alternative splicing by cloning and Sanger sequencing. Notably, using a doubled haploid Japanese flounder individual allow us to analyze gene duplicates. In total, 3940 “single-nucleotide polymorphisms” were detected form 1859 genes, which may have happened gene duplicates. This study lays the foundation for structural and functional genomics studies in Japanese flounder. PMID:25512620

  10. Evaluation of five ab initio gene prediction programs for the discovery of maize genes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong; Guo, Ling; Fu, Yan; Borsuk, Lisa A; Wen, Tsui-Jung; Skibbe, David S; Cui, Xiangqin; Scheffler, Brian E; Cao, Jun; Emrich, Scott J; Ashlock, Daniel A; Schnable, Patrick S

    2005-02-01

    Five ab initio programs (FGENESH, GeneMark.hmm, GENSCAN, GlimmerR and Grail) were evaluated for their accuracy in predicting maize genes. Two of these programs, GeneMark.hmm and GENSCAN had been trained for maize; FGENESH had been trained for monocots (including maize), and the others had been trained for rice or Arabidopsis. Initial evaluations were conducted using eight maize genes (gl8a, pdc2, pdc3, rf2c, rf2d, rf2e1, rth1, and rth3) of which the sequences were not released to the public prior to conducting this evaluation. The significant advantage of this data set for this evaluation is that these genes could not have been included in the training sets of the prediction programs. FGENESH yielded the most accurate and GeneMark.hmm the second most accurate predictions. The five programs were used in conjunction with RT-PCR to identify and establish the structures of two new genes in the a1-sh2 interval of the maize genome. FGENESH, GeneMark.hmm and GENSCAN were tested on a larger data set consisting of maize assembled genomic islands (MAGIs) that had been aligned to ESTs. FGENESH, GeneMark.hmm and GENSCAN correctly predicted gene models in 773, 625, and 371 MAGIs, respectively, out of the 1353 MAGIs that comprise data set 2. PMID:15830133

  11. Programmed cell death and the gene behind spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, A

    1995-01-01

    A gene involved in the development of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has been found on human chromosome 5 after a 4-year search. Named the neuronal apoptosis inhibitor protein (NAIP) gene, it is believed to inhibit the normal process of apoptosis--the disintegration of single cells that results from programmed cell death--in motor neurons. The researchers who found the NAIP gene also discovered that healthy people carry one complete copy of the gene along with many other partial copies. Many children with SMA have the partial copies but not the complete gene. This discovery facilitates the accurate genetic diagnosis of SMA. But gene therapy for SMA will not be possible until researchers find a suitable vector to stably introduce activated and intact copies of the gene into the motor neurons of children with SMA in time to stop motor neuron loss. Images p1460-a PMID:7585374

  12. Alternative promoters are used for genes within maize chloroplast polycistronic transcription units.

    PubMed

    Haley, J; Bogorad, L

    1990-04-01

    Many chloroplast genes are co-transcribed in polycistronic transcription units that give rise to numerous overlapping RNAs, but the significance of this pattern of transcript accumulation is not understood. An analysis of the transcripts of the adjacent and divergent maize psbE-psbF-psbL-ORF40 and ORF31-petE-ORF42 gene clusters indicates that transcription initiation at alternative promoters contributes to the generation of overlapping RNAs for both clusters. Furthermore, developmentally varying transcript ratios for the ORF31-petE-ORF42 gene cluster are determined at least in part by selective promoter usage. During light-induced plastid maturation, increased levels of primarily monocistronic petE transcripts accumulate from a promoter upstream of the internal petE gene. Dark-predominant and non-light-responsive bi- and tricistronic transcripts result from transcription initiation upstream of ORF31, the proximal gene of the cluster. In addition to the transcriptional overlap within gene clusters, divergent transcription units for the two gene clusters overlap and reciprocal antisense RNAs accumulate. The organization of the transcription units in this region raises the possibility of promoter interdependence or other functional interaction between transcription units. PMID:2152119

  13. Complex Alternative Splicing of the Smarca2 Gene Suggests the Importance of Smarca2-B Variants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Sun, Yuan; Ma, Ling; Wang, Chenguang; Wu, Jian-min; Bi, Anding; Liao, D. Joshua

    2011-01-01

    BRM is an ATPase component of the SWI/SNF complex that regulates chromatin remodeling and cell proliferation and is considered a tumor suppressor. In this study we characterized transcripts from the Smarca2 gene that encodes the BRM protein. We found that the human Smarca2 gene (hSmarca2), like its mouse counterpart (mSmarca2), also initiated a short transcript from intron 27 of the long transcript. We name the long and short transcripts as Smarca2-a and Smarca2-b, respectively. Like its human counterpart, mSmarca2-a also underwent alternative splicing at the 54-bp exon 29. The hSmarca2-b had two alternative initiation sites and underwent alternative splicing at three different 3' sites of exon 1 and at exons 2, 3 and/or 5. We identified nine hSmarca2-b mRNA variants that might produce five different proteins. mSmarca2-b also underwent alternative splicing at exon 3 and/or exon 5, besides alternatively retaining part of intron 1 in exon 1. Smarca2-b was expressed more abundantly than Smarca2-a in many cell lines and was more sensitive to serum starvation. Moreover, cyclin D1 also regulated the expression of both Smarca2-a and Smarca2-b in a complex manner. These data suggest that the functions of the Smarca2 gene may be very complex, not just simply inhibiting cell proliferation, and in certain situations may be elicited mainly by expressing the much less known Smarca2-b, not the better studied Smarca2-a and its products BRM proteins. PMID:21811517

  14. Milk fat globule is an alternative to mammary epithelial cells for gene expression analysis in buffalo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiuming; Wu, Yanjun; Zhang, Mingyuan; Xu, Wenwen; Guo, Xiaoping; Yan, Xueyu; Deng, Haiying; Jiang, Qinyang; Yang, Xiurong; Lan, Ganqiu; Guo, Yafen; Qin, Guangsheng; Jiang, Hesheng

    2016-05-01

    Owing to the difficulty in obtaining mammary gland tissue from lactating animals, it is difficult to test the expression levels of genes in mammary gland. The aim of the current study was to identify if milk fat globule (MFG) in buffalo milk was an alternative to mammary gland (MG) and milk somatic cell (MSC) for gene expression analysis. Six buffalos in late lactation were selected to collect MFG and MSC, and then MG was obtained by surgery. MFG was stained with acridine orange to successfully visualise RNA and several cytoplasmic crescents in MFG. The total RNA in MFG was successfully isolated and the integrity was assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis. We analysed the cellular components in MFG, MG and MSC through testing the expression of cell-specific genes by qRT-PCR. The results showed that adipocyte-specific gene (AdipoQ) and leucocyte-specific genes (CD43, CSF1 and IL1α) in MFG were not detected, whereas epithelial cell marker genes (Keratin 8 and Keratin 18) in MFG were higher than in MSC and lower than in MG, fibroblast marker gene (vimentin) in MFG was significantly lower than in MG and MSC, milk protein genes (LALBA, BLG and CSN2) and milk fat synthesis-related genes (ACC, BTN1A1, FABP3 and FAS) in MFG were higher than in MG and MSC. In conclusion, the total RNA in MFG mainly derives from mammary epithelial cells and can be used to study the functional gene expression of mammary epithelial cells. PMID:27032540

  15. Mammalian Glutaminase Gls2 Gene Encodes Two Functional Alternative Transcripts by a Surrogate Promoter Usage Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Sandoval, José A.; Manzanares, Elisa; Lobo, Carolina; Segura, J. A.; Alonso, Francisco J.; Matés, José M.; Márquez, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Background Glutaminase is expressed in most mammalian tissues and cancer cells, but the regulation of its expression is poorly understood. An essential step to accomplish this goal is the characterization of its species- and cell-specific isoenzyme pattern of expression. Our aim was to identify and characterize transcript variants of the mammalian glutaminase Gls2 gene. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate for the first time simultaneous expression of two transcript variants from the Gls2 gene in human, rat and mouse. A combination of RT-PCR, primer-extension analysis, bioinformatics, real-time PCR, in vitro transcription and translation and immunoblot analysis was applied to investigate GLS2 transcripts in mammalian tissues. Short (LGA) and long (GAB) transcript forms were isolated in brain and liver tissue of human, rat and mouse. The short LGA transcript arises by a combination of two mechanisms of transcriptional modulation: alternative transcription initiation and alternative promoter. The LGA variant contains both the transcription start site (TSS) and the alternative promoter in the first intron of the Gls2 gene. The full human LGA transcript has two in-frame ATGs in the first exon, which are missing in orthologous rat and mouse transcripts. In vitro transcription and translation of human LGA yielded two polypeptides of the predicted size, but only the canonical full-length protein displayed catalytic activity. Relative abundance of GAB and LGA transcripts showed marked variations depending on species and tissues analyzed. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report demonstrating expression of alternative transcripts of the mammalian Gls2 gene. Transcriptional mechanisms giving rise to GLS2 variants and isolation of novel GLS2 transcripts in human, rat and mouse are presented. Results were also confirmed at the protein level, where catalytic activity was demonstrated for the human LGA protein. Relative abundance of GAB and LGA transcripts was

  16. Alternative processing of scrambled genes generates protein diversity in the ciliate Chilodonella uncinata.

    PubMed

    Katz, Laura A; Kovner, Alexandra M

    2010-09-15

    In ciliates, chromosomal rearrangements occur during the development of the somatic macronuclear genome from the germline micronuclear genome. These rearrangements are extensive in three ciliate classes-Armophorea, Spirotrichea, and Phyllopharyngea-generating a macronucleus with up to 20,000,000 gene-sized chromosomes. Earlier, we have shown that these three classes also share elevated rates of protein evolution relative to other ciliates. To assess the evolution of germline-limited sequences in the class Phyllopharyngea, we used a combination of traditional and walking PCR to analyze micronuclear copies of multiple genes from two lines of the morphospecies Chilodonella uncinata for which we had previously characterized macronuclear sequences. Analyses of the resulting data yield three main results: (1) conserved macronuclear (somatic) regions are found within rapidly evolving micronuclear (germline) regions; (2) gene scrambling exists within this ciliate lineage; and (3) alternative processing of micronuclear regions yields diverse macronuclear beta-tubulin paralogs. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate gene scrambling outside the nonsister class Spirotrichea, and to show that alternative processing of scrambled genes generates diversity in gene families. Intriguingly, the Spirotrichea and Phyllopharyngea are also united in having transient "giant" polytene chromosomes, gene-sized somatic chromosomes, and elevated rates of protein evolution. We hypothesize that this suite of characters enables these ciliates to enjoy the benefits of asexuality while still maintaining the ability to go through sexual cycles. The data presented here add to the growing evidence of the dynamic nature of eukaryotic genomes within diverse lineages across the tree of life. PMID:20700892

  17. A cell-based in vitro alternative to identify skin sensitizers by gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hooyberghs, Jef Schoeters, Elke; Lambrechts, Nathalie; Nelissen, Inge; Witters, Hilda; Schoeters, Greet; Heuvel, Rosette van den

    2008-08-15

    The ethical and economic burden associated with animal testing for assessment of skin sensitization has triggered intensive research effort towards development and validation of alternative methods. In addition, new legislation on the registration and use of cosmetics and chemicals promote the use of suitable alternatives for hazard assessment. Our previous studies demonstrated that human CD34{sup +} progenitor-derived dendritic cells from cord blood express specific gene profiles upon exposure to low molecular weight sensitizing chemicals. This paper presents a classification model based on this cell type which is successful in discriminating sensitizing chemicals from non-sensitizing chemicals based on transcriptome analysis of 13 genes. Expression profiles of a set of 10 sensitizers and 11 non-sensitizers were analyzed by RT-PCR using 9 different exposure conditions and a total of 73 donor samples. Based on these data a predictive dichotomous classifier for skin sensitizers has been constructed, which is referred to as . In a first step the dimensionality of the input data was reduced by selectively rejecting a number of exposure conditions and genes. Next, the generalization of a linear classifier was evaluated by a cross-validation which resulted in a prediction performance with a concordance of 89%, a specificity of 97% and a sensitivity of 82%. These results show that the present model may be a useful human in vitro alternative for further use in a test strategy towards the reduction of animal use for skin sensitization.

  18. Perspectives on best practices for gene therapy programs.

    PubMed

    Cheever, Thomas R; Berkley, Dale; Braun, Serge; Brown, Robert H; Byrne, Barry J; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Cwik, Valerie; Duan, Dongsheng; Federoff, Howard J; High, Katherine A; Kaspar, Brian K; Klinger, Katherine W; Larkindale, Jane; Lincecum, John; Mavilio, Fulvio; McDonald, Cheryl L; McLaughlin, James; Weiss McLeod, Bonnie; Mendell, Jerry R; Nuckolls, Glen; Stedman, Hansell H; Tagle, Danilo A; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Wang, Hao; Wernett, Pamela J; Wilson, James M; Porter, John D; Gubitz, Amelie K

    2015-03-01

    With recent successes in gene therapy trials for hemophilia and retinal diseases, the promise and prospects for gene therapy are once again garnering significant attention. To build on this momentum, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Muscular Dystrophy Association jointly hosted a workshop in April 2014 on "Best Practices for Gene Therapy Programs," with a focus on neuromuscular disorders. Workshop participants included researchers from academia and industry as well as representatives from the regulatory, legal, and patient advocacy sectors to cover the gamut from preclinical optimization to intellectual property concerns and regulatory approval. The workshop focused on three key issues in the field: (1) establishing adequate scientific premise for clinical trials in gene therapy, (2) addressing regulatory process issues, and (3) intellectual property and commercialization issues as they relate to gene therapy. The outcomes from the discussions at this workshop are intended to provide guidance for researchers and funders in the gene therapy field. PMID:25654329

  19. RNA-Seq analysis reveals new gene models and alternative splicing in the fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The genome of Fusarium graminearum has been sequenced and annotated previously, but correct gene annotation remains a challenge. In addition, posttranscriptional regulations, such as alternative splicing and RNA editing, are poorly understood in F. graminearum. Here we took advantage of RNA-Seq to improve gene annotations and to identify alternative splicing and RNA editing in F. graminearum. Results We identified and revised 655 incorrectly predicted gene models, including revisions of intron predictions, intron splice sites and prediction of novel introns. 231 genes were identified with two or more alternative splice variants, mostly due to intron retention. Interestingly, the expression ratios between different transcript isoforms appeared to be developmentally regulated. Surprisingly, no RNA editing was identified in F. graminearum. Moreover, 2459 novel transcriptionally active regions (nTARs) were identified and our analysis indicates that many of these could be missed genes. Finally, we identified the 5′ UTR and/or 3′ UTR sequences of 7666 genes. A number of representative novel gene models and alternatively spliced genes were validated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of the generated amplicons. Conclusions We have developed novel and efficient strategies to identify alternatively spliced genes and incorrect gene models based on RNA-Seq data. Our study identified hundreds of alternatively spliced genes in F. graminearum and for the first time indicated that alternative splicing is developmentally regulated in filamentous fungi. In addition, hundreds of incorrect predicted gene models were identified and revised and thousands of nTARs were discovered in our study, which will be helpful for the future genomic and transcriptomic studies in F. graminearum. PMID:23324402

  20. Alternatively expressed genes identified in the CD4+ T cells of allograft rejection mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Chao; Song, Jing; Liang, Ting; Jin, Weirong; Kim, Yeong C; Wang, San Ming; Hou, Guihua

    2011-01-01

    Allograft rejection is a leading cause for the failure of allotransplantation. CD4(+) T cells play critical roles in this process. The identification of genes that alternatively expressed in CD4(+) T cells during allograft rejection will provide critical information for studying the mechanism of allograft rejection, finding specific gene markers for monitoring, predicting allograft rejection, and opening new ways to regulate and prevent allograft rejection. Here, we established allograft and isograft transplantation models by adoptively transferring wild-type BALB/c mouse CD4(+) T cells into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with a C57BL/6 or BALB/c mouse skin graft. Using the whole transcriptome sequencing-based serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) technology, we identified 97 increasingly and 88 decreasingly expressed genes that may play important roles in allograft rejection and tolerance. Functional classification of these genes shows that apoptosis, transcription regulation, cell growth and maintenance, and signal transduction are among the frequently changed functional groups. This study provides a genome-wide view for the candidate genes of CD4(+) T cells related to allotransplantation, and this report is a good resource for further microarray studies and for identifying the specific markers that are associated with clinical organ transplantations. PMID:21294963

  1. Alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay modulate expression of important regulatory genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kalyna, Maria; Simpson, Craig G.; Syed, Naeem H.; Lewandowska, Dominika; Marquez, Yamile; Kusenda, Branislav; Marshall, Jacqueline; Fuller, John; Cardle, Linda; McNicol, Jim; Dinh, Huy Q.; Barta, Andrea; Brown, John W. S.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) coupled to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a post-transcriptional mechanism for regulating gene expression. We have used a high-resolution AS RT–PCR panel to identify endogenous AS isoforms which increase in abundance when NMD is impaired in the Arabidopsis NMD factor mutants, upf1-5 and upf3-1. Of 270 AS genes (950 transcripts) on the panel, 102 transcripts from 97 genes (32%) were identified as NMD targets. Extrapolating from these data around 13% of intron-containing genes in the Arabidopsis genome are potentially regulated by AS/NMD. This cohort of naturally occurring NMD-sensitive AS transcripts also allowed the analysis of the signals for NMD in plants. We show the importance of AS in introns in 5′ or 3′UTRs in modulating NMD-sensitivity of mRNA transcripts. In particular, we identified upstream open reading frames overlapping the main start codon as a new trigger for NMD in plants and determined that NMD is induced if 3′-UTRs were >350 nt. Unexpectedly, although many intron retention transcripts possess NMD features, they are not sensitive to NMD. Finally, we have shown that AS/NMD regulates the abundance of transcripts of many genes important for plant development and adaptation including transcription factors, RNA processing factors and stress response genes. PMID:22127866

  2. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program. Final report, volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFVs) in typical applications in New York State. This report, Volume 2, includes 13 appendices to Volume 1 that expand upon issues raised therein. Volume 1 provides: (1) Information about the purpose and scope of the AFV-FDP; (2) A summary of AFV-FDP findings organized on the basis of vehicle type and fuel type; (3) A short review of the status of AFV technology development, including examples of companies in the State that are active in developing AFVs and AFV components; and (4) A brief overview of the status of AFV deployment in the State. Volume 3 provides expanded reporting of AFV-FDP technical details, including the complete texts of the brochure Garage Guidelines for Alternative Fuels and the technical report Fleet Experience Survey Report, plus an extensive glossary of AFV terminology. The appendices cover a wide range of issues including: emissions regulations in New York State; production and health effects of ozone; vehicle emissions and control systems; emissions from heavy-duty engines; reformulated gasoline; greenhouse gases; production and characteristics of alternative fuels; the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the Clean Fuel Fleet Program; garage design guidelines for alternative fuels; surveys of fleet managers using alternative fuels; taxes on conventional and alternative fuels; and zero-emission vehicle technology.

  3. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos.

    PubMed

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R; Peters, Antoine H F M; Gurdon, John B; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  4. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos

    PubMed Central

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E.; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M.; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R.; Peters, Antoine H.F.M.; Gurdon, John B.; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  5. A Preventive Intervention Program for Urban African American Youth Attending an Alternative Education Program: Background, Implementation, and Feasibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carswell, Steven B.; Hanlon, Thomas E.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Watts, Amy M.; Pothong, Pattarapan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents background, implementation, and feasibility findings associated with planning and conducting an after-school intervention program in an alternative education setting designed to prevent the initiation and escalation of violence and substance abuse among urban African American youth at high risk for life-long problem behaviors.…

  6. Alternative-fueled truck demonstration natural gas program: Caterpillar G3406LE development and demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    In 1990, the California Energy Commission, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and the Southern California Gas Company joined together to sponsor the development and demonstration of compressed natural gas engines for Class 8 heavy-duty line-haul trucking applications. This program became part of an overall Alternative-Fueled Truck Demonstration Program, with the goal of advancing the technological development of alternative-fueled engines. The demonstration showed natural gas to be a technically viable fuel for Class 8 truck engines.

  7. Review of alternative services and approaches for the Energy-Related Inventions Program

    SciTech Connect

    Soderstrom, E.J.; Rorke, M.L.; Livesay, H.; Myers, S.

    1984-12-01

    This report integrates and synthesizes the information collected as part of the ongoing program evaluation and policy assessment of the Energy-Related Inventions Program. The results are summarized and recommendations on program objectives, target audience, operations, services, and evaluation are given. Included in the program evaluation is examination of alternative approaches for providing similar services to inventors in foreign countries and by other parts of the US government and of relevant resources such as financial investments, invention licensing arrangements, and new product development assistance. While the

  8. Functions, structure, and read-through alternative splicing of feline APOBEC3 genes

    PubMed Central

    Münk, Carsten; Beck, Thomas; Zielonka, Jörg; Hotz-Wagenblatt, Agnes; Chareza, Sarah; Battenberg, Marion; Thielebein, Jens; Cichutek, Klaus; Bravo, Ignacio G; O'Brien, Stephen J; Lochelt, Martin; Yuhki, Naoya

    2008-01-01

    Background Over the past years a variety of host restriction genes have been identified in human and mammals that modulate retrovirus infectivity, replication, assembly, and/or cross-species transmission. Among these host-encoded restriction factors, the APOBEC3 (A3; apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing catalytic polypeptide 3) proteins are potent inhibitors of retroviruses and retrotransposons. While primates encode seven of these genes (A3A to A3H), rodents carry only a single A3 gene. Results Here we identified and characterized several A3 genes in the genome of domestic cat (Felis catus) by analyzing the genomic A3 locus. The cat genome presents one A3H gene and three very similar A3C genes (a-c), probably generated after two consecutive gene duplications. In addition to these four one-domain A3 proteins, a fifth A3, designated A3CH, is expressed by read-through alternative splicing. Specific feline A3 proteins selectively inactivated only defined genera of feline retroviruses: Bet-deficient feline foamy virus was mainly inactivated by feA3Ca, feA3Cb, and feA3Cc, while feA3H and feA3CH were only weakly active. The infectivity of Vif-deficient feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus was reduced only by feA3H and feA3CH, but not by any of the feA3Cs. Within Felidae, A3C sequences show significant adaptive selection, but unexpectedly, the A3H sequences present more sites that are under purifying selection. Conclusion Our data support a complex evolutionary history of expansion, divergence, selection and individual extinction of antiviral A3 genes that parallels the early evolution of Placentalia, becoming more intricate in taxa in which the arms race between host and retroviruses is harsher. PMID:18315870

  9. Data collection plan for Phase 2 Alternative Fuels Bus Data Collection Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Krenelka, T

    1993-07-01

    This document constitutes the plan for collecting and reporting data associated with a special set of transit bus demonstrations to be conducted under the Urban Bus Program of the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) of 1988. This program, called the Phase 2 Bus Data Collection Program, serves as an adjunct to the Phase I Bus Data Collection Program, collecting detailed data on just a few buses to augment and enhance the Phase 1 data in fulfilling the urban bus requirements of AMFA. Demonstrations will be conducted at a few transit system locations throughout the US and will use alternative fuels and associated technologies to reduce undesirable transit bus exhaust emissions. Several organizations will be involved in the data collection; NREL will manage the program, analyze and store vehicle data, and make these data available through the Alternative Fuels Data Center. This information will enable transit agencies, equipment manufacturers, fuel suppliers, and government policy makers to make informed decisions about buying and using alternative fuels.

  10. Structure of the human laminin {gamma}2 chain gene (LAMC2): Alternative splicing with different tissue distribution of two transcripts

    SciTech Connect

    Airenne, T.; Haakana, H.; Kallunki, T.

    1996-02-15

    This article discusses the exon-intron structure and tissue distribution of the laminin {gamma}2 chain (LAMC2) gene, which is mutated in some cases of junctional epidermolysis bullosa. The article also discusses the transcription and splicing of this gene, which result in alternative uses of the last two exons of the gene. The different tissue distributions of the transcripts indicate different functions for the gene in vivo. 36 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Identification and characterization of yak (Bos grunniens) b-Boule gene and its alternative splice variants.

    PubMed

    Li, Bojiang; Ngo, Sherry; Wu, Wangjun; Xu, Hongtao; Xie, Zhuang; Li, Qifa; Pan, Zengxiang

    2014-10-25

    Boule is responsible for meiotic arrest of sperms and male sterility during mammalian spermatogenesis. In the present study, we first identified yak b-Boule gene and its two alternative splice variants. The full length coding region of yak b-Boule is 888bp and encodes a 295-amino acid protein with a typical RNA-recognition motif (RRM) and a Deleted in Azoospermia (DAZ) repetitive sequence motif. Two alternative splice variants of yak b-Boule were generated following the consensus "GT-AG" rule and named b-Boule1 (36bp deletion in exon 3) and b-Boule2 (deletion of integral exon 7), respectively. In male yak, b-Boule, b-Boule1 and b-Boule2 were found to be exclusively expressed in the testes at a ratio of 81:0.1:1. Intriguingly, the mRNA expression levels of b-Boule and b-Boule1 in yak testis were significantly higher than those in cattle-yak, although no significant difference was observed for b-Boule2 expression between the yak and cattle-yak. These results suggest that b-Boule gene, which is partially regulated by alternative splicing, may be involved in the process of yak spermatogenesis. PMID:25149018

  12. Alternative life histories shape brain gene expression profiles in males of the same population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aubin-Horth, N.; Landry, C.R.; Letcher, B.H.; Hofmann, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) undergo spectacular marine migrations before homing to spawn in natal rivers. However, males that grow fastest early in life can adopt an alternative 'sneaker' tactic by maturing earlier at greatly reduced size without leaving freshwater. While the ultimate evolutionary causes have been well studied, virtually nothing is known about the molecular bases of this developmental plasticity. We investigate the nature and extent of coordinated molecular changes that accompany such a fundamental transformation by comparing the brain transcription profiles of wild mature sneaker males to age-matched immature males (future large anadromous males) and immature females. Of the ca. 3000 genes surveyed, 15% are differentially expressed in the brains of the two male types. These genes are involved in a wide range of processes, including growth, reproduction and neural plasticity. Interestingly, despite the potential for wide variation in gene expression profiles among individuals sampled in nature, consistent patterns of gene expression were found for individuals of the same reproductive tactic. Notably, gene expression patterns in immature males were different both from immature females and sneakers, indicating that delayed maturation and sea migration by immature males, the 'default' life cycle, may actually result from an active inhibition of development into a sneaker. ?? 2005 The Royal Society.

  13. Benchmarking of gene prediction programs for metagenomic data.

    PubMed

    Yok, Non; Rosen, Gail

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript presents the most rigorous benchmarking of gene annotation algorithms for metagenomic datasets to date. We compare three different programs: GeneMark, MetaGeneAnnotator (MGA) and Orphelia. The comparisons are based on their performances over simulated fragments from one hundred species of diverse lineages. We defined four different types of fragments; two types come from the inter- and intra-coding regions and the other types are from the gene edges. Hoff et al. used only 12 species in their comparison; therefore, their sample is too small to represent an environmental sample. Also, no predecessors has separately examined fragments that contain gene edges as opposed to intra-coding regions. General observations in our results are that performances of all these programs improve as we increase the length of the fragment. On the other hand, intra-coding fragments of our data show low annotation error in all of the programs if compared to the gene edge fragments. Overall, we found an upper-bound performance by combining all the methods. PMID:21097156

  14. Gene identification programs in bread wheat: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Jaber; Naghavi, Mohammadreza; Rad, Sara Naseri; Yolmeh, Tahereh; Shirazi, Milaveh; Naderi, Ramin; Nasiri, Mojtaba; Ahmadi, Sayvan

    2013-01-01

    Seven ab initio web-based gene prediction programs (i.e., AUGUSTUS, BGF, Fgenesh, Fgenesh+, GeneID, Genemark.hmm, and HMMgene) were assessed to compare their prediction accuracy using protein-coding sequences of bread wheat. At both nucleotide and exon levels, Fgenesh+ was deduced as the superior program and BGF followed by Fgenesh were resided in the next positions, respectively. Conversely, at gene level, Fgenesh with the value of predicting more than 75% of all the genes precisely, concluded as the best ones. It was also found out that programs such as Fgenesh+, BGF, and Fgenesh, because of harboring the highest percentage of correct predictive exons appear to be much more applicable in achieving more trustworthy results, while using both GeneID and HMMgene the percentage of false negatives would be expected to enhance. Regarding initial exon, overall, the frequency of accurate recognition of 3' boundary was significantly higher than that of 5' and the reverse was true if terminal exon is taken into account. Lastly, HMMgene and Genemark.hmm, overall, presented independent tendency against GC content, while the others appear to be slightly more sensitive if GC-poor sequences are employed. Our results, overall, exhibited that to make adequate opportunity in acquiring remarkable results, gene finders still need additional improvements. PMID:24124688

  15. Low-Rank Regularization for Learning Gene Expression Programs

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Guibo; Tang, Mengfan; Cai, Jian-Feng; Nie, Qing; Xie, Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    Learning gene expression programs directly from a set of observations is challenging due to the complexity of gene regulation, high noise of experimental measurements, and insufficient number of experimental measurements. Imposing additional constraints with strong and biologically motivated regularizations is critical in developing reliable and effective algorithms for inferring gene expression programs. Here we propose a new form of regulation that constrains the number of independent connectivity patterns between regulators and targets, motivated by the modular design of gene regulatory programs and the belief that the total number of independent regulatory modules should be small. We formulate a multi-target linear regression framework to incorporate this type of regulation, in which the number of independent connectivity patterns is expressed as the rank of the connectivity matrix between regulators and targets. We then generalize the linear framework to nonlinear cases, and prove that the generalized low-rank regularization model is still convex. Efficient algorithms are derived to solve both the linear and nonlinear low-rank regularized problems. Finally, we test the algorithms on three gene expression datasets, and show that the low-rank regularization improves the accuracy of gene expression prediction in these three datasets. PMID:24358148

  16. Alternative haplotypes of antigen processing genes in zebrafish diverged early in vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Sean C; Hernandez, Kyle M; Wcisel, Dustin J; Kettleborough, Ross N; Stemple, Derek L; Yoder, Jeffrey A; Andrade, Jorge; de Jong, Jill L O

    2016-08-23

    Antigen processing and presentation genes found within the MHC are among the most highly polymorphic genes of vertebrate genomes, providing populations with diverse immune responses to a wide array of pathogens. Here, we describe transcriptome, exome, and whole-genome sequencing of clonal zebrafish, uncovering the most extensive diversity within the antigen processing and presentation genes of any species yet examined. Our CG2 clonal zebrafish assembly provides genomic context within a remarkably divergent haplotype of the core MHC region on chromosome 19 for six expressed genes not found in the zebrafish reference genome: mhc1uga, proteasome-β 9b (psmb9b), psmb8f, and previously unknown genes psmb13b, tap2d, and tap2e We identify ancient lineages for Psmb13 within a proteasome branch previously thought to be monomorphic and provide evidence of substantial lineage diversity within each of three major trifurcations of catalytic-type proteasome subunits in vertebrates: Psmb5/Psmb8/Psmb11, Psmb6/Psmb9/Psmb12, and Psmb7/Psmb10/Psmb13. Strikingly, nearby tap2 and MHC class I genes also retain ancient sequence lineages, indicating that alternative lineages may have been preserved throughout the entire MHC pathway since early diversification of the adaptive immune system ∼500 Mya. Furthermore, polymorphisms within the three MHC pathway steps (antigen cleavage, transport, and presentation) are each predicted to alter peptide specificity. Lastly, comparative analysis shows that antigen processing gene diversity is far more extensive than previously realized (with ancient coelacanth psmb8 lineages, shark psmb13, and tap2t and psmb10 outside the teleost MHC), implying distinct immune functions and conserved roles in shaping MHC pathway evolution throughout vertebrates. PMID:27493218

  17. An EMT–Driven Alternative Splicing Program Occurs in Human Breast Cancer and Modulates Cellular Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Flytzanis, Nicholas C.; Balsamo, Michele; Condeelis, John S.; Oktay, Maja H.; Burge, Christopher B.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a mechanism important for embryonic development, plays a critical role during malignant transformation. While much is known about transcriptional regulation of EMT, alternative splicing of several genes has also been correlated with EMT progression, but the extent of splicing changes and their contributions to the morphological conversion accompanying EMT have not been investigated comprehensively. Using an established cell culture model and RNA–Seq analyses, we determined an alternative splicing signature for EMT. Genes encoding key drivers of EMT–dependent changes in cell phenotype, such as actin cytoskeleton remodeling, regulation of cell–cell junction formation, and regulation of cell migration, were enriched among EMT–associated alternatively splicing events. Our analysis suggested that most EMT–associated alternative splicing events are regulated by one or more members of the RBFOX, MBNL, CELF, hnRNP, or ESRP classes of splicing factors. The EMT alternative splicing signature was confirmed in human breast cancer cell lines, which could be classified into basal and luminal subtypes based exclusively on their EMT–associated splicing pattern. Expression of EMT–associated alternative mRNA transcripts was also observed in primary breast cancer samples, indicating that EMT–dependent splicing changes occur commonly in human tumors. The functional significance of EMT–associated alternative splicing was tested by expression of the epithelial-specific splicing factor ESRP1 or by depletion of RBFOX2 in mesenchymal cells, both of which elicited significant changes in cell morphology and motility towards an epithelial phenotype, suggesting that splicing regulation alone can drive critical aspects of EMT–associated phenotypic changes. The molecular description obtained here may aid in the development of new diagnostic and prognostic markers for analysis of breast cancer progression. PMID:21876675

  18. Alternative splicing of a group II intron in a surface layer protein gene in Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Bonnie A; Simon, Dawn M; Zimmerly, Steven

    2014-02-01

    Group II introns are ribozymes and retroelements found in bacteria, and are thought to have been the ancestors of nuclear pre-mRNA introns. Whereas nuclear introns undergo prolific alternative splicing in some species, group II introns are not known to carry out equivalent reactions. Here we report a group II intron in the human pathogen Clostridium tetani, which undergoes four alternative splicing reactions in vivo. Together with unspliced transcript, five mRNAs are produced, each encoding a distinct surface layer protein isoform. Correct fusion of exon reading frames requires a shifted 5' splice site located 8 nt upstream of the canonical boundary motif. The shifted junction is accomplished by an altered IBS1-EBS1 pairing between the intron and 5' exon. Growth of C. tetani under a variety of conditions did not result in large changes in alternative splicing levels, raising the possibility that alternative splicing is constitutive. This work demonstrates a novel type of gene organization and regulation in bacteria, and provides an additional parallel between group II and nuclear pre-mRNA introns. PMID:24214997

  19. Gene regulatory networks and developmental plasticity in the early sea urchin embryo: alternative deployment of the skeletogenic gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Ettensohn, Charles A; Kitazawa, Chisato; Cheers, Melani S; Leonard, Jennifer D; Sharma, Tara

    2007-09-01

    Cell fates in the sea urchin embryo are remarkably labile, despite the fact that maternal polarity and zygotic programs of differential gene expression pattern the embryo from the earliest stages. Recent work has focused on transcriptional gene regulatory networks (GRNs) deployed in specific embryonic territories during early development. The micromere-primary mesenchyme cell (PMC) GRN drives the development of the embryonic skeleton. Although normally deployed only by presumptive PMCs, every lineage of the early embryo has the potential to activate this pathway. Here, we focus on one striking example of regulative activation of the skeletogenic GRN; the transfating of non-skeletogenic mesoderm (NSM) cells to a PMC fate during gastrulation. We show that transfating is accompanied by the de novo expression of terminal, biomineralization-related genes in the PMC GRN, as well as genes encoding two upstream transcription factors, Lvalx1 and Lvtbr. We report that Lvalx1, a key component of the skeletogenic GRN in the PMC lineage, plays an essential role in the regulative pathway both in NSM cells and in animal blastomeres. MAPK signaling is required for the expression of Lvalx1 and downstream skeletogenic genes in NSM cells, mirroring its role in the PMC lineage. We also demonstrate that Lvalx1 regulates the signal from PMCs that normally suppresses NSM transfating. Significantly, misexpression of Lvalx1 in macromeres (the progenitors of NSM cells) is sufficient to activate the skeletogenic GRN. We suggest that NSM cells normally deploy a basal mesodermal pathway and require only an Lvalx1-mediated sub-program to express a PMC fate. Finally, we provide evidence that, in contrast to the normal pathway, activation of the skeletogenic GRN in NSM cells is independent of Lvpmar1. Our studies reveal that, although most features of the micromere-PMC GRN are recapitulated in transfating NSM cells, different inputs activate this GRN during normal and regulative development. PMID

  20. A development program: an alternative way of funding capital and program expenditures.

    PubMed

    Batchelder, C D

    1985-01-01

    As medical groups look for new ways to acquire dollars to fund purchases of supplies, services, and capital equipment, the idea of a development program to raise funds from the private sector may become appealing. A development program can provide a mechanism for acquiring additional funds without charging patients more for medical services. The prerequisites of a successful program are: a group's commitment to the effort, establishment of proper tax-exempt status, and availability of competent legal counsel and a qualified person to lead the program. Also discussed here are the essential considerations of implementation approaches, the case statement, standard components of a program, and donor relations. PMID:10270051

  1. Control of neuronal synapse specification by a highly dedicated alternative splicing program.

    PubMed

    Traunmüller, Lisa; Gomez, Andrea M; Nguyen, Thi-Minh; Scheiffele, Peter

    2016-05-20

    Alternative RNA splicing represents a central mechanism for expanding the coding power of genomes. Individual RNA-binding proteins can control alternative splicing choices in hundreds of RNA transcripts, thereby tuning amounts and functions of large numbers of cellular proteins. We found that the RNA-binding protein SLM2 is essential for functional specification of glutamatergic synapses in the mouse hippocampus. Genome-wide mapping revealed a markedly selective SLM2-dependent splicing program primarily consisting of only a few target messenger RNAs that encode synaptic proteins. Genetic correction of a single SLM2-dependent target exon in the synaptic recognition molecule neurexin-1 was sufficient to rescue synaptic plasticity and behavioral defects in Slm2 knockout mice. These findings uncover a highly selective alternative splicing program that specifies synaptic properties in the central nervous system. PMID:27174676

  2. An Evaluative Assessment of Two CrossRoads Alternative Schools Program Sites in Georgia (Case Study).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlin, Shary L.; Harnish, Dorothy

    This report describes an exploratory evaluative assessment of the first year of 2 alternative public schools for 117 chronically disruptive, committed, and/or non-attending students (grades 6-12) in Georgia. The CrossRoads program is intended to provide students with the social services, individualized instruction, and/or transitions to other…

  3. A Synergistic Model for a Juvenile Court Administered Alternative Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbst, Dominic P.; Sontheimer, Henry G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Alternative Education program coordinated by a juvenile probation department providing tutorial instruction by university students to secondary school students who have been referred through the juvenile court for minor delinquency and/or truancy. Discusses benefits which include providing an option for school districts for chronic…

  4. Implementation of a Program to Reduce Stress in Middle School Alternative Education Students. Practicum Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nenortas, Gint

    Students who are involved in middle school alternative education programs are often labeled as severely disruptive. They have a history of physical violence, abusive language, truancy, and sometimes police arrests and juvenile detention records. These students need to learn how to deal with stress-producing events in a more socially acceptable…

  5. 78 FR 52116 - Request for Public Comment on a Review Level Alternative Dispute Resolution Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION 29 CFR Part 2200 Request for Public Comment on a Review Level Alternative Dispute Resolution Program AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. ACTION: Request for comment. SUMMARY: The Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission invites the public to comment...

  6. 46 CFR 8.420 - Classification society authorization to participate in the Alternate Compliance Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... recognition to the Commandant in writing in accordance with 46 CFR 1.03-15(h)(4). (e) The Coast Guard will... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Classification society authorization to participate in... § 8.420 Classification society authorization to participate in the Alternate Compliance Program....

  7. Supporting First Year Alternatively Certified Urban and Rural Intern Teachers through a Multicomponent Distance Induction Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresko, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    The pathway for entering the K-12 classroom as a teacher varies compared to what was once the traditional model of teacher preparation. In this mixed-methods action research study, I explore supporting first year alternatively certified urban and rural intern teachers through a multicomponent distance induction program. The induction model in this…

  8. Responding to Special Education Teacher Shortages in Diverse Urban Settings: An Accelerated Alternative Credential Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposito, Mary C.; Lal, Shirley

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to better serve the school districts within its service area and the unique credential candidate population, California State University Dominguez Hills (CSUDH) implemented an accelerated alternative certification program based upon the Professional Development School (PDS) model hereinafter referred to as SPED PDS. During the…

  9. Examining Incoming Identities in an Alternative Certification Program in Mathematics and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrichsen, Patricia; Lannin, John; Abell, Sandra; Arbaugh, Fran; Volkmann, Mark

    2008-01-01

    In response to the shortage of qualified secondary mathematics and science teachers in the United States, alternative certification programs (ACPs) are proliferating. This study used identity as a theoretical lens to examine the incoming identities of 19 participants with post-baccalaureate degrees who entered an ACP. Within this cohort, the…

  10. Accelerating the commercialization on new technologies. [free market operation of federal alternate energy sources programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehn, T. J.; Nawrocki, P. M.

    1978-01-01

    It is suggested that federal programs for hastening the adoption of alternative energy sources must operate within the free market structure. Five phases of the free market commercialization process are described. Federal role possibilities include information dissemination and funding to stimulate private sector activities within these five phases, and federally sponsored procedures for accelerating commercialization of solar thermal small power systems are considered.

  11. Correlates of Risky Sexual Activity for Urban African American Youth in an Alternative Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carswell, Steven B.; Hanlon, Thomas E.; Watts, Amy M.; O'Grady, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the link between developmental risk and protective factors and risky sexual activity among 222 urban African American youth attending an alternative education program (AEP) because of problematic behavior. Self-report information provided by these AEP participants revealed that, for the risk and protective factors examined, the…

  12. Clarendon Alternative School. Japanese Bilingual Bicultural Program. Curriculum Sampler II: Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choy, V. Kanani, Ed.; And Others

    A sampler of thematic science lessons from the Japanese bilingual/bicultural education program of the Clarendon Alternative School, a California elementary school, is presented. The lessons are designed to integrate Japanese instruction with the core science curriculum. Each lesson contains this information: the grade level, teacher(s), and…

  13. Piloting a Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) Infused Skills Group in a Disciplinary Alternative Education Program (DAEP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricard, Richard J.; Lerma, Eunice; Heard, Courtney C. C.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the impact of a 4-week skills group intervention based on the principles of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) with a sample of adolescents attending a Disciplinary Alternative Education Program. This article provides a session-by-session overview of activities adapted from DBT-specified training modules of mindfulness,…

  14. Outcomes from a School-Based Nutrition Education Program Alternating Special Resource Teachers and Classroom Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auld, Garry W.; Romaniello, Cathy; Heimendinger, Jerianne; Hambridge, Carolyn; Hambridge, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Tested the efficacy of a modified nutrition education program for elementary students. Sixteen nutrition lessons were taught alternately by special resource teachers (SRTs) and classroom teachers (as opposed to 24 lessons taught by SRTs). Surveys, observations, interviews, and plate waste data indicated that treatment students had greater…

  15. Alternative Break Programs and the Factors that Contribute to Changes in Students' Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niehaus, Elizabeth Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to and ways in which student participants in Alternative Break (AB) programs report that their AB experience influenced their intentions or plans to volunteer, engage in advocacy, or study or travel abroad, or their major or career plans. Additional analysis explored the specific program…

  16. The Effects of a Violence Prevention Program on Alternative High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triplett, Carla A.

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the effectiveness of a violence prevention program in an inner-city alternative school setting. The researcher, an administrator at the school, used a prepackaged curriculum targeting lessons on violence in an eight-week study with the entire school population. Students met bi-weekly with a team of two teachers to review and…

  17. Alternatives to Social Promotion Program at Grades 7 & 8. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wircenski, Jerry L.; Sarkees, Michelle D.

    This final report and curriculum guide are products of a project conducted to improve existing at-risk programs through cooperation between vocational and academic personnel by coordinating lesson plans. The following project activities are described: (1) a literature review on the diverse needs of at-risk students enrolled in an alternative to…

  18. Perceptions of Educators Regarding the Effectiveness of Alternative Programs in a Southern State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    At-risk students are engaged in dangerous behaviors that lead them to become involved in the juvenile justice system and cause the feeling of low self-worth. This eventually causes at-risk youths to drop out of school and engage in detrimental behaviors that meddle in their academic success. The alternative education program provides these at-risk…

  19. The One-Year Residency Program: An Alternative Path to the Master's Degree in Social Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Robert; Walker, Joel

    1981-01-01

    At Hunter College an alternative master's program for social workers who cannot give up employment for full-time study replaces the traditional scheduling with three flexible time periods: pre-fieldwork and post-fieldwork, part-time coursework, and one-year, four-day-a-week fieldwork experience in the place of employment. (MSE)

  20. Alternative Education for Disruptive Youth: Recommended Parameters and Best Practices for Effective Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This document was prepared to serve as an aid in the planning, design, implementation, and ongoing evaluation of Alternative Education for Disruptive Youth Programs in Pennsylvania. School Codes and Public Laws are cited for guidance on mandatory issues. The suggestions and implementation strategies provided in this document are not requirements…

  1. Secondary Mathematics Teacher Differences: Teacher Quality and Preparation in a New York City Alternative Certification Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    Providing students in urban settings with quality teachers is important for student achievement. This study examined the differences in content knowledge, attitudes toward mathematics, and teacher efficacy among several different types of alternatively certified teachers in a sample from the New York City Teaching Fellows program in order to…

  2. Evaluation of 2+2 Alternative Teacher Performance Appraisal Program in Shanxi, People's Republic of China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Weiping

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the impact of the 2+2 Alternative Teacher Performance Appraisal System that has been implemented in Shanxi province in China. A mixed research design was used to evaluate the program. Six high schools and a total of 78 teachers (13 teachers in each school) in Shanxi province were selected. Three of the schools participated in…

  3. 46 CFR 176.650 - Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... underwater ROV. 176.650 Section 176.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Examinations § 176.650 Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete the underwater survey portion of the AHE, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV)....

  4. 46 CFR 115.650 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater ROV. 115.650 Section 115.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete your underwater survey, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). (a) If you use divers...

  5. 46 CFR 176.650 - Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... underwater ROV. 176.650 Section 176.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Examinations § 176.650 Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete the underwater survey portion of the AHE, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV)....

  6. 46 CFR 115.650 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater ROV. 115.650 Section 115.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete your underwater survey, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). (a) If you use divers...

  7. 46 CFR 176.650 - Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... underwater ROV. 176.650 Section 176.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Examinations § 176.650 Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete the underwater survey portion of the AHE, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV)....

  8. 46 CFR 115.650 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater ROV. 115.650 Section 115.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete your underwater survey, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). (a) If you use divers...

  9. 46 CFR 115.650 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater ROV. 115.650 Section 115.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete your underwater survey, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). (a) If you use divers...

  10. 46 CFR 176.650 - Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... underwater ROV. 176.650 Section 176.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Examinations § 176.650 Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete the underwater survey portion of the AHE, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV)....

  11. 46 CFR 115.650 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater ROV. 115.650 Section 115.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete your underwater survey, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). (a) If you use divers...

  12. 46 CFR 176.650 - Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... underwater ROV. 176.650 Section 176.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Examinations § 176.650 Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete the underwater survey portion of the AHE, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV)....

  13. Total Program Efficacy: A Comparison of Traditionally and Alternatively Certified Agriculture Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Dennis W.; Ricketts, John C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine agriculture teachers' perceived levels of efficacy as they relate to managing the total program of agricultural education, both for traditionally and alternatively certified teachers. The constructs used in this study were technical content, FFA/leadership development/SAE, teaching and learning, and…

  14. Aerosol delivery of programmed cell death protein 4 using polysorbitol-based gene delivery system for lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Kyoung; Xing, Lei; Chen, Bao-An; Xu, Fengguo; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Zhang, Can

    2014-11-01

    The development of a safe and effective gene delivery system is the most challenging obstacle to the broad application of gene therapy in the clinic. In this study, we report the development of a polysorbitol-based gene delivery system as an alternative gene carrier for lung cancer therapy. The copolymer was prepared by a Michael addition reaction between sorbitol diacrylate (SD) and spermine (SPE); the SD-SPE copolymer effectively condenses with DNA on the nanoscale and protects it from nucleases. SD-SPE/DNA complexes showed excellent transfection with low toxicity both in vitro and in vivo, and aerosol delivery of SD-SPE complexes with programmed cell death protein 4 DNA significantly suppressed lung tumorigenesis in K-ras(LA1) lung cancer model mice. These results demonstrate that SD-SPE has great potential as a gene delivery system based on its excellent biocompatibility and high gene delivery efficiency for lung cancer gene therapy. PMID:24983766

  15. Evaluation of gene-finding programs on mammalian sequences.

    PubMed

    Rogic, S; Mackworth, A K; Ouellette, F B

    2001-05-01

    We present an independent comparative analysis of seven recently developed gene-finding programs: FGENES, GeneMark.hmm, Genie, Genescan, HMMgene, Morgan, and MZEF. For evaluation purposes we developed a new, thoroughly filtered, and biologically validated dataset of mammalian genomic sequences that does not overlap with the training sets of the programs analyzed. Our analysis shows that the new generation of programs has substantially better results than the programs analyzed in previous studies. The accuracy of the programs was also examined as a function of various sequence and prediction features, such as G + C content of the sequence, length and type of exons, signal type, and score of the exon prediction. This approach pinpoints the strengths and weaknesses of each individual program as well as those of computational gene-finding in general. The dataset used in this analysis (HMR195) as well as the tables with the complete results are available at http://www.cs.ubc.ca/~rogic/evaluation/. PMID:11337477

  16. Identification of new alternative splice events in the TCIRG1 gene in different human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnova, Anna S.; Morgun, Andrey . E-mail: anemorgun@hotmail.com; Shulzhenko, Natalia; Silva, Ismael D.C.G.; Gerbase-DeLima, Maria

    2005-05-13

    Two transcript variants (TV) of the T cell immune regulator gene 1 (TCIRG1) have already been characterized. TV1 encodes a subunit of the osteoclast vacuolar proton pump and TV2 encodes a T cell inhibitory receptor. Based on the search in dbEST, we validated by RT-PCR six new alternative splice events in TCIRG1 in most of the 28 human tissues studied. In addition, we observed that transcripts using the TV1 transcription start site and two splice forms previously described in a patient with infantile malignant osteopetrosis are also expressed in various tissues of healthy individuals. Studies of these nine splice forms in cytoplasmic RNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed that at least six of them could be efficiently exported from the nucleus. Since various products with nearly ubiquitous tissue distribution are generated from TCIRG1, this gene may be involved in other processes besides immune response and bone resorption.

  17. Radiolabeled semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay for the analysis of alternative splicing of interleukin genes.

    PubMed

    Shakola, Felitsiya; Byrne, Stephen; Javed, Kainaat; Ruggiu, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing evolved as a very efficient way to generate proteome diversity from a limited number of genes, while at the same time modulating posttranscriptional events of gene expression-such as stability, turnover, subcellular localization, binding properties, and general activity of both mRNAs and proteins. Since the vast majority of human genes undergo alternative splicing, it comes to no surprise that interleukin genes also show extensive alternative splicing. In fact, there is a growing body of evidence indicating that alternative splicing plays a central role in modulating the pleiotropic functions of cytokines, and aberrant expression of alternatively spliced interleukin mRNAs has been linked to disease. However, while several interleukin splice variants have been described, their function is still poorly understood. This is particularly relevant, since alternatively spliced cytokine isoforms can act both as disease biomarkers and as candidate entry points for therapeutic intervention. In this chapter we describe a protocol that uses radiolabeled semi-quantitative RT-PCR to efficiently detect, analyze, and quantify alternative splicing patterns of cytokine genes. PMID:24908320

  18. Translational research in cancer complementary and alternative medicine: the National Cancer Institute's Best Case Series Program.

    PubMed

    Lee, Colleen O

    2004-04-01

    Public interest in CAM for cancer care likely will influence the need for continued scientific evaluation. The NCI BCS program evaluates case studies involving novel alternative therapies for cancer treatment. Through the NCI BCS program, meaningful data are generated that may lead to NCI-supported research projects, including prospective studies, clinical trials, and advances in scientific knowledge. Individuals interested in obtaining a submission packet for the NCI BCS program may access the official OCCAM Web site at http://www3.cancer.gov/occam/ or call 301-435-7980. PMID:15108425

  19. Alternative promoter usage and differential expression of multiple transcripts of mouse Prkar1a gene.

    PubMed

    Banday, Abdul Rouf; Azim, Shafquat; Tabish, Mohammad

    2011-11-01

    Prkar1a gene encodes regulatory type 1 alpha subunit (RIα) of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in mouse. The role of this gene has been implicated in Carney complex and many cancer types that suggest its involvement in physiological processes like cell cycle regulation, growth and/or proliferation. We have identified and sequenced partial cDNA clones encoding four alternatively spliced transcripts of mouse Prkar1a gene. These transcripts have alternate 5' UTR structure which results from splicing of three exons (designated as E1a, E1b, and E1c) to canonical exon 2. The designated transcripts T1, T2, T3, and T4 contain 5' UTR exons as E1c, E1a + E1b, E1a, and E1b, respectively. The transcript T1 corresponded to earlier reported transcript in GenBank. In silico study of genomic DNA sequence revealed three distinct promoter regions namely, P1, P2, and P3 upstream of the exons E1a, E1b, and E1c, respectively. P1 is non-CpG-related promoter but P2 and P3 are CpG-related promoters; however, all three are TATA less. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated the expression of all four transcripts in late postnatal stages; however, these were differentially regulated in early postnatal stages of 0.5 day, 3 day, and 15 day mice in different tissue types. Variations in expression of Prkar1a gene transcripts suggest their regulation from multiple promoters that respond to a variety of signals arising in or out of the cell in tissue and developmental stage-specific manner. PMID:21638026

  20. The Gene Expression Program for the Formation of Wing Cuticle in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sobala, Lukasz F; Adler, Paul N

    2016-05-01

    The cuticular exoskeleton of insects and other arthropods is a remarkably versatile material with a complex multilayer structure. We made use of the ability to isolate cuticle synthesizing cells in relatively pure form by dissecting pupal wings and we used RNAseq to identify genes expressed during the formation of the adult wing cuticle. We observed dramatic changes in gene expression during cuticle deposition, and combined with transmission electron microscopy, we were able to identify candidate genes for the deposition of the different cuticular layers. Among genes of interest that dramatically change their expression during the cuticle deposition program are ones that encode cuticle proteins, ZP domain proteins, cuticle modifying proteins and transcription factors, as well as genes of unknown function. A striking finding is that mutations in a number of genes that are expressed almost exclusively during the deposition of the envelope (the thin outermost layer that is deposited first) result in gross defects in the procuticle (the thick chitinous layer that is deposited last). An attractive hypothesis to explain this is that the deposition of the different cuticle layers is not independent with the envelope instructing the formation of later layers. Alternatively, some of the genes expressed during the deposition of the envelope could form a platform that is essential for the deposition of all cuticle layers. PMID:27232182

  1. The Gene Expression Program for the Formation of Wing Cuticle in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Paul N.

    2016-01-01

    The cuticular exoskeleton of insects and other arthropods is a remarkably versatile material with a complex multilayer structure. We made use of the ability to isolate cuticle synthesizing cells in relatively pure form by dissecting pupal wings and we used RNAseq to identify genes expressed during the formation of the adult wing cuticle. We observed dramatic changes in gene expression during cuticle deposition, and combined with transmission electron microscopy, we were able to identify candidate genes for the deposition of the different cuticular layers. Among genes of interest that dramatically change their expression during the cuticle deposition program are ones that encode cuticle proteins, ZP domain proteins, cuticle modifying proteins and transcription factors, as well as genes of unknown function. A striking finding is that mutations in a number of genes that are expressed almost exclusively during the deposition of the envelope (the thin outermost layer that is deposited first) result in gross defects in the procuticle (the thick chitinous layer that is deposited last). An attractive hypothesis to explain this is that the deposition of the different cuticle layers is not independent with the envelope instructing the formation of later layers. Alternatively, some of the genes expressed during the deposition of the envelope could form a platform that is essential for the deposition of all cuticle layers. PMID:27232182

  2. Innovative Program Targets Five Common Pain Syndromes With Non-opioid Alternatives.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    To combat the prescription opioid problem, St. Joseph's Healthcare System in Paterson, NJ, has developed a new program that gives providers options they can use to effectively alleviate pain without resorting to highly addictive medication. Launched in January 2016 in the ED at St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center (SJRMC), the Alternatives to Opioids (ALTO) program utilizes protocols that primarily target five common conditions: renal colic, sciatica, headaches, musculoskeletal pain, and extremity fractures. Administrators say they have successfully treated more than 300 patients under the new program, and they see ALTO as a model other hospitals can duplicate. Among the alternative therapies called for in the ALTO program are trigger point injections, nitrous oxide, and ultrasound-guided nerve blocks. ALTO medications are specifically chosen because of how they affect the pain receptor sites for each different pain syndrome. While the primary goal of the program is to use alternatives to opioids when-ever possible, another important underlying goal is to stop acute pain from becoming chronic. While ALTO therapies typically take a bit longer to deliver than prescribing opioids, administrators note that this has not adversely affected patient flow in the ED. PMID:27295817

  3. The exosome controls alternative splicing by mediating the gene expression and assembly of the spliceosome complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Wan, Yufeng; Huang, Guobin; Wang, Dongni; Yu, Xinyang; Huang, Guocun; Guo, Jinhu

    2015-01-01

    The exosome is a complex with exoribonuclease activity that regulates RNA surveillance and turnover. The exosome also plays a role in regulating the degradation of precursor mRNAs to maintain the expression of splicing variants. In Neurospora, the silencing of rrp44, which encodes the catalytic subunit of the exosome, changed the expression of a set of spliceosomal snRNA, snRNP genes and SR protein related genes. The knockdown of rrp44 also affected the assembly of the spliceosome. RNA-seq analysis revealed a global change in bulk splicing events. Exosome-mediated splicing may regulate alternative splicing of NCU05290, NCU07421 and the circadian clock gene frequency (frq). The knockdown of rrp44 led to an increased ratio of splicing variants without intron 6 (I-6) and shorter protein isoform small FRQ (s-FRQ) as a consequence. These findings suggest that the exosome controls splicing events by regulating the degradation of precursor mRNAs and the gene expression, assembly and function of the spliceosome. PMID:26306464

  4. Multiple Effects of Mutation on Expression of Alternative Cell Surface Protein Genes in Tetrahymena Thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D. L.; Doerder, F. P.

    1992-01-01

    Genes at the SerH locus of the ciliated protist Tetrahymena thermophila specify the major (H) surface protein on cells grown at 20-36°. Alternative proteins L, T, S and I are expressed under different conditions of temperature and culture media. Mutants unable to express SerH genes were examined for expression of these proteins, also called immobilization or i-antigens, at both H and non-H conditions. In all instances, one or more i-antigens were expressed in the absence of H, and, in most instances, expression of i-antigens under non-H conditions was also affected. Examples of the latter include both the continued expression of H-replacement antigens and the inability to express certain other i-antigens. Such multiple effects were observed in mutants with trans-acting (rseA, rseB, rseC, RseD) and cis-acting (H1-1 and H1-2) mutations, but not in mutants in which SerH is affected developmentally (B2092, B2101, B2103, B2107). These interactions suggest that the wild-type genes identified by mutation exert both positive and negative effects in the regulation of i-antigen gene expression. PMID:1732170

  5. Role of Energy Metabolism in the Brown Fat Gene Program

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Minwoo; Cooper, Marcus P.

    2015-01-01

    In murine and human brown adipose tissue (BAT), mitochondria are powerful generators of heat that safely metabolize fat, a feature that has great promise in the fight against obesity and diabetes. Recent studies suggest that the actions of mitochondria extend beyond their conventional role as generators of heat. There is mounting evidence that impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity is accompanied by attenuated expression of Ucp1 and other BAT-selective genes, implying that mitochondria exert transcriptional control over the brown fat gene program. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of brown fat mitochondria, their potential role in transcriptional control of the brown fat gene program, and potential strategies to treat obesity in humans by leveraging thermogenesis in brown adipocytes. PMID:26175716

  6. Alternative splicing, a new target to block cellular gene expression by poliovirus 2A protease

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Enrique; Castello, Alfredo; Carrasco, Luis; Izquierdo, Jose M.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Novel role for poliovirus 2A protease as splicing modulator. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease inhibits the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease blocks the second catalytic step of splicing. -- Abstract: Viruses have developed multiple strategies to interfere with the gene expression of host cells at different stages to ensure their own survival. Here we report a new role for poliovirus 2A{sup pro} modulating the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Expression of 2A{sup pro} potently inhibits splicing of reporter genes in HeLa cells. Low amounts of 2A{sup pro} abrogate Fas exon 6 skipping, whereas higher levels of protease fully abolish Fas and FGFR2 splicing. In vitro splicing of MINX mRNA using nuclear extracts is also strongly inhibited by 2A{sup pro}, leading to accumulation of the first exon and the lariat product containing the unspliced second exon. These findings reveal that the mechanism of action of 2A{sup pro} on splicing is to selectively block the second catalytic step.

  7. A Preventive Intervention Program for Urban African American Youth Attending an Alternative Education Program: Background, Implementation, and Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Carswell, Steven B.; Hanlon, Thomas E.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Watts, Amy M.; Pothong, Pattarapan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents background, implementation, and feasibility findings associated with planning and conducting an after-school intervention program in an alternative education setting designed to prevent the initiation and escalation of violence and substance abuse among urban African American youth at high risk for life-long problem behaviors. Evolving from earlier preventive interventions implemented in clinic and school settings, the program, entitled The Village Model of Care, consisted of structured group mentoring, parental support, and community outreach services administered to alternative education students and their primary caregiver(s) during the school year. Over a two-year intake period, 109 youth participated in the present process evaluation study. Findings from the study not only provided relevant demographic information on the characteristics of youth likely to be included in such programs but also indicated the importance of including the family in the rehabilitation effort and the need for school administrative system support for the underlying alternative education approach. The information presented in this report has a direct bearing on the planning of future prevention efforts conducted in similar settings that are aimed at reducing problem behaviors and promoting positive lifestyles among high-risk youth. PMID:20054423

  8. Alternative Splicing in Adhesion- and Motility-Related Genes in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aversa, Rosanna; Sorrentino, Anna; Esposito, Roberta; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Amato, Angela; Zambelli, Alberto; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; D’Apice, Luciana; Costa, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common tumor and the second leading cause of cancer death among woman, mainly caused by the metastatic spread. Tumor invasiveness is due to an altered expression of adhesion molecules. Among them, semaphorins are of peculiar interest. Cancer cells can manipulate alternative splicing patterns to modulate the expression of adhesion- and motility-related molecules, also at the isoform level. In this study, combining RNA-Sequencing on MCF-7 to targeted experimental validations—in human breast cell lines and breast tumor biopsies—we identified 12 new alternative splicing transcripts in genes encoding adhesion- and motility-related molecules, including semaphorins, their receptors and co-receptors. Among them, a new SEMA3F transcript is expressed in all breast cell lines and breast cancer biopsies, and is translated into a new semaphorin 3F isoform. In silico analysis predicted that most of the new putative proteins lack functional domains, potentially missing some functions and acquiring new ones. Our findings better describe the extent of alternative splicing in breast cancer and highlight the need to further investigate adhesion- and motility-related molecules to gain insights into breast cancer progression. PMID:26784191

  9. Alternative Splicing of Rice WRKY62 and WRKY76 Transcription Factor Genes in Pathogen Defense.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiqin; Chen, Xujun; Liang, Xiaoxing; Zhou, Xiangui; Yang, Fang; Liu, Jia; He, Sheng Yang; Guo, Zejian

    2016-06-01

    The WRKY family of transcription factors (TFs) functions as transcriptional activators or repressors in various signaling pathways. In this study, we discovered that OsWRKY62 and OsWRKY76, two genes of the WRKY IIa subfamily, undergo constitutive and inducible alternative splicing. The full-length OsWRKY62.1 and OsWRKY76.1 proteins formed homocomplexes and heterocomplexes, and the heterocomplex dominates in the nuclei when analyzed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Transgenic overexpression of OsWRKY62.1 and OsWRKY76.1 in rice (Oryza sativa) enhanced plant susceptibility to the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae and the leaf blight bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae, whereas RNA interference and loss-of-function knockout plants exhibited elevated resistance. The dsOW62/76 and knockout lines of OsWRKY62 and OsWRKY76 also showed greatly increased expression of defense-related genes and the accumulation of phytoalexins. The ratio of full-length versus truncated transcripts changed in dsOW62/76 plants as well as in response to pathogen infection. The short alternative OsWRKY62.2 and OsWRKY76.2 isoforms could interact with each other and with full-length proteins. OsWRKY62.2 showed a reduced repressor activity in planta, and two sequence determinants required for the repressor activity were identified in the amino terminus of OsWRKY62.1. The amino termini of OsWRKY62 and OsWRKY76 splice variants also showed reduced binding to the canonical W box motif. These results not only enhance our understanding of the DNA-binding property, the repressor sequence motifs, and the negative feedback regulation of the IIa subfamily of WRKYs but also provide evidence for alternative splicing of WRKY TFs during the plant defense response. PMID:27208272

  10. Development Of Educational Programs In Renewable And Alternative Energy Processing: The Case Of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirina, Anna; Shindor, Olga; Tatmyshevsky, Konstantin

    2014-12-01

    The paper deals with the main problems of Russian energy system development that proves necessary to provide educational programs in the field of renewable and alternative energy. In the paper the process of curricula development and defining teaching techniques on the basis of expert opinion evaluation is defined, and the competence model for renewable and alternative energy processing master students is suggested. On the basis of a distributed questionnaire and in-depth interviews, the data for statistical analysis was obtained. On the basis of this data, an optimization of curricula structure was performed, and three models of a structure for optimizing teaching techniques were developed. The suggested educational program structure which was adopted by employers is presented in the paper. The findings include quantitatively estimated importance of systemic thinking and professional skills and knowledge as basic competences of a masters' program graduate; statistically estimated necessity of practice-based learning approach; and optimization models for structuring curricula in renewable and alternative energy processing. These findings allow the establishment of a platform for the development of educational programs.

  11. Neural Progenitors Adopt Specific Identities by Directly Repressing All Alternative Progenitor Transcriptional Programs

    PubMed Central

    Kutejova, Eva; Sasai, Noriaki; Shah, Ankita; Gouti, Mina; Briscoe, James

    2016-01-01

    Summary In the vertebrate neural tube, a morphogen-induced transcriptional network produces multiple molecularly distinct progenitor domains, each generating different neuronal subtypes. Using an in vitro differentiation system, we defined gene expression signatures of distinct progenitor populations and identified direct gene-regulatory inputs corresponding to locations of specific transcription factor binding. Combined with targeted perturbations of the network, this revealed a mechanism in which a progenitor identity is installed by active repression of the entire transcriptional programs of other neural progenitor fates. In the ventral neural tube, sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, together with broadly expressed transcriptional activators, concurrently activates the gene expression programs of several domains. The specific outcome is selected by repressive input provided by Shh-induced transcription factors that act as the key nodes in the network, enabling progenitors to adopt a single definitive identity from several initially permitted options. Together, the data suggest design principles relevant to many developing tissues. PMID:26972603

  12. Neural Progenitors Adopt Specific Identities by Directly Repressing All Alternative Progenitor Transcriptional Programs.

    PubMed

    Kutejova, Eva; Sasai, Noriaki; Shah, Ankita; Gouti, Mina; Briscoe, James

    2016-03-21

    In the vertebrate neural tube, a morphogen-induced transcriptional network produces multiple molecularly distinct progenitor domains, each generating different neuronal subtypes. Using an in vitro differentiation system, we defined gene expression signatures of distinct progenitor populations and identified direct gene-regulatory inputs corresponding to locations of specific transcription factor binding. Combined with targeted perturbations of the network, this revealed a mechanism in which a progenitor identity is installed by active repression of the entire transcriptional programs of other neural progenitor fates. In the ventral neural tube, sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, together with broadly expressed transcriptional activators, concurrently activates the gene expression programs of several domains. The specific outcome is selected by repressive input provided by Shh-induced transcription factors that act as the key nodes in the network, enabling progenitors to adopt a single definitive identity from several initially permitted options. Together, the data suggest design principles relevant to many developing tissues. PMID:26972603

  13. Dysregulation of Autoantigen Genes in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis Involves Alternative Transcripts and New Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    McInnis, Elizabeth A.; Badhwar, Anshul K.; Muthigi, Akhil; Lardinois, Olivier M.; Allred, S. Colby; Yang, Jiajin; Free, Meghan E.; Jennette, J. Charles; Preston, Gloria A.; Falk, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) are two major autoantigens in patients with vasculitis with ANCA. The genes encoding these autoantigens are abnormally expressed in peripheral granulocytes of patients with active ANCA-associated vasculitis. This study provides evidence that this transcriptional dysregulation results in a variety of mRNA processing events from the PRTN3 gene locus. In addition to elevated levels of PR3 message, leukocyte RNA from patients contained PR3 transcripts with an alternative 3′ untranslated region. Furthermore, we detected usage of an alternative transcription start site within intron 1 of the PRTN3 gene locus that coincided with active disease (odds ratio, 3.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 8.4; P=0.01). This promoter may be developmentally regulated, because it was active in normal human bone marrow, multiple leukemia cell lines, MCF-7 cells, and subjects after GM-CSF treatment but not subjects with a neutrophil left shift. This transcript, which lacks exon 1 of PRTN3, encodes a 24-kD protein (p24PR3/MBN) with a sequence similar to that previously described for myeloblastin. Notably, PR3, p24PR3/MBN, and MPO were synthesized in cultured neutrophils from patients with active ANCA-associated vasculitis, indicating that increased transcription results in newly synthesized autoantigens in peripheral neutrophils of patients. The synthesis of p24PR3/MBN seems to expand the autoantigen repertoire, because immunoblots showed that sera from patients recognized p24PR3/MBN. These findings emphasize the importance of transcriptional dysregulation of the autoantigen in autoimmune disease. PMID:25060059

  14. Using gene expression programming to infer gene regulatory networks from time-series data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongqing; Pu, Yifei; Zhang, Haisen; Su, Yabo; Zhang, Lifang; Zhou, Jiliu

    2013-12-01

    Gene regulatory networks inference is currently a topic under heavy research in the systems biology field. In this paper, gene regulatory networks are inferred via evolutionary model based on time-series microarray data. A non-linear differential equation model is adopted. Gene expression programming (GEP) is applied to identify the structure of the model and least mean square (LMS) is used to optimize the parameters in ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The proposed work has been first verified by synthetic data with noise-free and noisy time-series data, respectively, and then its effectiveness is confirmed by three real time-series expression datasets. Finally, a gene regulatory network was constructed with 12 Yeast genes. Experimental results demonstrate that our model can improve the prediction accuracy of microarray time-series data effectively. PMID:24140883

  15. Description of the Prometheus Program Alternator/Thruster Integration Laboratory (ATIL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baez, Anastacio N.; Birchenough, Arthur G.; Lebron-Velilla, Ramon C.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.

    2005-01-01

    The Project Prometheus Alternator Electric Thruster Integration Laboratory's (ATIL) primary two objectives are to obtain test data to influence the power conversion and electric propulsion systems design, and to assist in developing the primary power quality specifications prior to system Preliminary Design Review (PDR). ATIL is being developed in stages or configurations of increasing fidelity and complexity in order to support the various phases of the Prometheus program. ATIL provides a timely insight of the electrical interactions between a representative Permanent Magnet Generator, its associated control schemes, realistic electric system loads, and an operating electric propulsion thruster. The ATIL main elements are an electrically driven 100 kWe Alternator Test Unit (ATU), an alternator controller using parasitic loads, and a thruster Power Processing Unit (PPU) breadboard. This paper describes the ATIL components, its development approach, preliminary integration test results, and current status.

  16. Differential gene expression and alternative splicing between diploid and tetraploid watermelon.

    PubMed

    Saminathan, Thangasamy; Nimmakayala, Padma; Manohar, Sumanth; Malkaram, Sridhar; Almeida, Aldo; Cantrell, Robert; Tomason, Yan; Abburi, Lavanya; Rahman, Mohammad A; Vajja, Venkata G; Khachane, Amit; Kumar, Brajendra; Rajasimha, Harsha K; Levi, Amnon; Wehner, Todd; Reddy, Umesh K

    2015-03-01

    The exploitation of synthetic polyploids for producing seedless fruits is well known in watermelon. Tetraploid progenitors of triploid watermelon plants, compared with their diploid counterparts, exhibit wide phenotypic differences. Although many factors modulate alternative splicing (AS) in plants, the effects of autopolyploidization on AS are still unknown. In this study, we used tissues of leaf, stem, and fruit of diploid and tetraploid sweet watermelon to understand changes in gene expression and the occurrence of AS. RNA-sequencing analysis was performed along with reverse transcription quantitative PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR to demonstrate changes in expression and splicing. All vegetative tissues except fruit showed an increased level of AS in the tetraploid watermelon throughout the growth period. The ploidy levels of diploids and the tetraploid were confirmed using a ploidy analyser. We identified 5362 and 1288 genes that were up- and downregulated, respectively, in tetraploid as compared with diploid plants. We further confirmed that 22 genes underwent AS events across tissues, indicating possibilities of generating different protein isoforms with altered functions of important transcription factors and transporters. Arginine biosynthesis, chlorophyllide synthesis, GDP mannose biosynthesis, trehalose biosynthesis, and starch and sucrose degradation pathways were upregulated in autotetraploids. Phloem protein 2, chloroplastic PGR5-like protein, zinc-finger protein, fructokinase-like 2, MYB transcription factor, and nodulin MtN21 showed AS in fruit tissues. These results should help in developing high-quality seedless watermelon and provide additional transcriptomic information related to other cucurbits. PMID:25520388

  17. Cold-induced RNA-binding proteins regulate circadian gene expression by controlling alternative polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuting; Hu, Wenchao; Murakawa, Yasuhiro; Yin, Jingwen; Wang, Gang; Landthaler, Markus; Yan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The body temperature is considered a universal cue by which the master clock synchronizes the peripheral clocks in mammals, but the mechanism is not fully understood. Here we identified two cold-induced RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), Cirbp and Rbm3, as important regulators for the temperature entrained circadian gene expression. The depletion of Cirbp or Rbm3 significantly reduced the amplitudes of core circadian genes. PAR-CLIP analyses showed that the 3′UTR binding sites of Cirbp and Rbm3 were significantly enriched near the polyadenylation sites (PASs). Furthermore, the depletion of Cirbp or Rbm3 shortened 3′UTR, whereas low temperature (upregulating Cirbp and Rbm3) lengthened 3′UTR. Remarkably, we found that they repressed the usage of proximal PASs by binding to the common 3′UTR, and many cases of proximal/distal PAS selection regulated by them showed strong circadian oscillations. Our results suggested that Cirbp and Rbm3 regulated the circadian gene expression by controlling alternative polyadenylation (APA). PMID:23792593

  18. Differential gene expression and alternative splicing between diploid and tetraploid watermelon

    PubMed Central

    Saminathan, Thangasamy; Nimmakayala, Padma; Manohar, Sumanth; Malkaram, Sridhar; Almeida, Aldo; Cantrell, Robert; Tomason, Yan; Abburi, Lavanya; Rahman, Mohammad A.; Vajja, Venkata G.; Khachane, Amit; Kumar, Brajendra; Rajasimha, Harsha K.; Levi, Amnon; Wehner, Todd; Reddy, Umesh K.

    2015-01-01

    The exploitation of synthetic polyploids for producing seedless fruits is well known in watermelon. Tetraploid progenitors of triploid watermelon plants, compared with their diploid counterparts, exhibit wide phenotypic differences. Although many factors modulate alternative splicing (AS) in plants, the effects of autopolyploidization on AS are still unknown. In this study, we used tissues of leaf, stem, and fruit of diploid and tetraploid sweet watermelon to understand changes in gene expression and the occurrence of AS. RNA-sequencing analysis was performed along with reverse transcription quantitative PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR to demonstrate changes in expression and splicing. All vegetative tissues except fruit showed an increased level of AS in the tetraploid watermelon throughout the growth period. The ploidy levels of diploids and the tetraploid were confirmed using a ploidy analyser. We identified 5362 and 1288 genes that were up- and downregulated, respectively, in tetraploid as compared with diploid plants. We further confirmed that 22 genes underwent AS events across tissues, indicating possibilities of generating different protein isoforms with altered functions of important transcription factors and transporters. Arginine biosynthesis, chlorophyllide synthesis, GDP mannose biosynthesis, trehalose biosynthesis, and starch and sucrose degradation pathways were upregulated in autotetraploids. Phloem protein 2, chloroplastic PGR5-like protein, zinc-finger protein, fructokinase-like 2, MYB transcription factor, and nodulin MtN21 showed AS in fruit tissues. These results should help in developing high-quality seedless watermelon and provide additional transcriptomic information related to other cucurbits. PMID:25520388

  19. Life in the Fast Track: How States Seek to Balance Incentives and Quality in Alternative Teacher Certification Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Susan Moore; Birkeland, Sarah E.; Peske, Heather G.

    2005-01-01

    The prospect of overseeing the rapid preparation of many participants in fast-track alternative certification programs presents several challenges for state education officials who seek to maintain, or even enhance, the quality of the state's teaching force. This study examined a range of fast-track alternative teacher certification programs in 11…

  20. Conceptions of Science Teacher Mentoring and Mentoring Practice in an Alternative Certification Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koballa, Thomas R.; Upson Bradbury, Leslie; Glynn, Shawn M.; Deaton, Cynthia Minchew

    2008-08-01

    Conceptions of mentoring held by six mentors and six beginning science teachers in an alternative certification program were explored qualitatively by means of case studies and phenomenography. Interviews with the six mentors and six beginning teachers produced 379 statements that were grouped into six conceptual categories. The categories of apprenticeship, personal support, and colearning revealed the variation in how mentors and beginning teachers conceptualized school-based mentoring. The conceptions functioned as referents for their mentoring practice. Mentoring as apprenticeship was the dominant conception among both the beginning teachers and mentors. The findings of this study imply that conceptions of mentoring held by mentors and beginning science teachers should be considered when organizing the school-based component of alternative certification programs.

  1. Perspectives on Best Practices for Gene Therapy Programs

    PubMed Central

    Cheever, Thomas R.; Berkley, Dale; Braun, Serge; Brown, Robert H.; Byrne, Barry J.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.; Cwik, Valerie; Duan, Dongsheng; Federoff, Howard J.; High, Katherine A.; Kaspar, Brian K.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Larkindale, Jane; Lincecum, John; Mavilio, Fulvio; McDonald, Cheryl L.; McLaughlin, James; Weiss McLeod, Bonnie; Mendell, Jerry R.; Nuckolls, Glen; Stedman, Hansell H.; Tagle, Danilo A.; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Wang, Hao; Wernett, Pamela J.; Wilson, James M.; Porter, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract With recent successes in gene therapy trials for hemophilia and retinal diseases, the promise and prospects for gene therapy are once again garnering significant attention. To build on this momentum, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Muscular Dystrophy Association jointly hosted a workshop in April 2014 on “Best Practices for Gene Therapy Programs,” with a focus on neuromuscular disorders. Workshop participants included researchers from academia and industry as well as representatives from the regulatory, legal, and patient advocacy sectors to cover the gamut from preclinical optimization to intellectual property concerns and regulatory approval. The workshop focused on three key issues in the field: (1) establishing adequate scientific premise for clinical trials in gene therapy, (2) addressing regulatory process issues, and (3) intellectual property and commercialization issues as they relate to gene therapy. The outcomes from the discussions at this workshop are intended to provide guidance for researchers and funders in the gene therapy field. PMID:25654329

  2. Signals Regulating the Expression of the Nuclear Gene Encoding Alternative Oxidase of Plant Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Vanlerberghe, G. C.; McLntosh, L.

    1996-06-01

    Suspension cells of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow) were used to investigate signals regulating the expression of the nuclear gene Aox1 encoding the mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) protein responsible for cyanide-resistant respiration in plants. We found that an increase in the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate citrate (either after its exogenous supply to cells or after inhibition of aconitase by monofluoroacetate) caused a rapid and dramatic increase in the steady-state level of Aox1 mRNA and AOX protein. This led to a large increase in the capacity for AOX respiration, defined as the amount of salicylhydroxamic acid-sensitive O2 uptake by cells in the presence of potassium cyanide. The results indicate that citrate may be an important signal metabolite regulating Aox1 gene expression. A number of other treatments were also identified that rapidly induced the level of Aox1 mRNA and AOX capacity. These included short-term incubation of cells with 10 mM acetate, 2 [mu]M antimycin A, 5 mM H2O2, or 1 mM cysteine. For some of these treatments, induction of AOX occurred without an increase in cellular citrate level, indicating that other signals (possibly related to oxidative stress conditions) are also important in regulating Aox1 gene expression. The signals influencing Aox1 gene expression are discussed with regard to the potential function(s) of AOX to modulate tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism and/or to prevent the generation of active oxygen species by the mitochondrial electron transport chain. PMID:12226312

  3. Global Gene Expression Profiling and Alternative Splicing Events during the Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Cartilage Endplate-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jin; Fan, Xin; Shangguan, Lei; Liu, Huan; Zhou, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a very prevalent disease and degenerative disc diseases (DDDs) usually account for the LBP. However, the pathogenesis of DDDs is complicated and difficult to elucidate. Alternative splicing is a sophisticated regulatory process which greatly increases cellular complexity and phenotypic diversity of eukaryotic organisms. In addition, the cartilage endplate-derived stem cells have been discovered and identified by our research group. In this paper, we continue to investigate gene expression profiling and alternative splicing events during chondrogenic differentiation of cartilage endplate-derived stem cells. We adopted Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 (HTA 2.0) to compare the transcriptional and splicing changes between the control and differentiated samples. RT-PCR and quantitative PCR are used to validate the microarray results. The GO and KEGG pathway analysis was also performed. After bioinformatics analysis of the data, we detected 1953 differentially expressed genes. In terms of alternative splicing, the Splicing Index algorithm was used to select alternatively spliced genes. We detected 4411 alternatively spliced genes. GO and KEGG pathway analysis also revealed several functionally involved biological processes and signaling pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the alternative splicing mechanisms in chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells on a genome-wide scale. PMID:26649308

  4. Survey of Programs Used to Detect Alternative Splicing Isoforms from Deep Sequencing Data In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Min, Feng; Wang, Sumei; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing techniques have been rapidly emerging. However, the massive sequencing reads hide a great deal of unknown important information. Advances have enabled researchers to discover alternative splicing (AS) sites and isoforms using computational approaches instead of molecular experiments. Given the importance of AS for gene expression and protein diversity in eukaryotes, detecting alternative splicing and isoforms represents a hot topic in systems biology and epigenetics research. The computational methods applied to AS prediction have improved since the emergence of next-generation sequencing. In this study, we introduce state-of-the-art research on AS and then compare the research methods and software tools available for AS based on next-generation sequencing reads. Finally, we discuss the prospects of computational methods related to AS. PMID:26421304

  5. 'Living stones' reveal alternative petal identity programs within the core eudicots.

    PubMed

    Brockington, Samuel F; Rudall, Paula J; Frohlich, Michael W; Oppenheimer, David G; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E

    2012-01-01

    Petals, defined as the showy laminar floral organs in the second floral whorl, have been shown to be under similar genetic control in distantly related core eudicot model organisms. On the basis of these findings, it is commonly assumed that the petal identity program regulated by B-class MADS-box gene homologs is invariant across the core eudicot clade. However, the core eudicots, which comprise >70% of angiosperm species, exhibit numerous instances of petal and sepal loss, transference of petal function between floral whorls, and recurrent petal evolution. In the face of these complex patterns of perianth evolution, the concept of a core eudicot petal identity program has not been tested. We therefore examined the petal identity program in the Caryophyllales, a core eudicot clade in which perianth differentiation into sepals and petals has evolved multiple times. Specifically, we analyzed the expression patterns of B- and C-class MADS-box homologs for evidence of a conserved petal identity program between sepal-derived and stamen-derived petaloid organs in the 'living stone' family Aizoaceae. We found that neither sepal-derived nor stamen-derived petaloid organs exhibit gene expression patterns consistent with the core eudicot petal identity program. B-class gene homologs are not expressed during the development of sepal-derived petals and are not implicated in petal identity in stamen-derived petals, as their transient expression coincides with early expression of the C-class homolog. We therefore provide evidence for petal development that is independent of B-class genes and suggest that different genetic control of petal identity has evolved within this lineage of core eudicots. These findings call for a more comprehensive understanding of perianth variation and its genetic causes within the core eudicots--an endeavor that will have broader implications for the interpretation of perianth evolution across angiosperms. PMID:21951031

  6. Characterization of the interferon genes in homozygous rainbow trout reveals two novel genes, alternate splicing and differential regulation of duplicated genes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, M.K.; Laing, K.J.; Woodson, J.C.; Thorgaard, G.H.; Hansen, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    The genes encoding the type I and type II interferons (IFNs) have previously been identified in rainbow trout and their proteins partially characterized. These previous studies reported a single type II IFN (rtIFN-??) and three rainbow trout type I IFN genes that are classified into either group I (rtIFN1, rtIFN2) or group II (rtIFN3). In this present study, we report the identification of a novel IFN-?? gene (rtIFN-??2) and a novel type I group II IFN (rtIFN4) in homozygous rainbow trout and predict that additional IFN genes or pseudogenes exist in the rainbow trout genome. Additionally, we provide evidence that short and long forms of rtIFN1 are actively and differentially transcribed in homozygous trout, and likely arose due to alternate splicing of the first exon. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) assays were developed to systematically profile all of the rainbow trout IFN transcripts, with high specificity at an individual gene level, in na??ve fish and after stimulation with virus or viral-related molecules. Cloned PCR products were used to ensure the specificity of the qRT-PCR assays and as absolute standards to assess transcript abundance of each gene. All IFN genes were modulated in response to Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a DNA vaccine based on the IHNV glycoprotein, and poly I:C. The most inducible of the type I IFN genes, by all stimuli tested, were rtIFN3 and the short transcript form of rtIFN1. Gene expression of rtIFN-??1 and rtIFN-??2 was highly up-regulated by IHNV infection and DNA vaccination but rtIFN-??2 was induced to a greater magnitude. The specificity of the qRT-PCR assays reported here will be useful for future studies aimed at identifying which cells produce IFNs at early time points after infection. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. High gene flow between alternative morphs and the evolutionary persistence of facultative paedomorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Oromi, Neus; Michaux, Johan; Denoël, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Paedomorphosis and metamorphosis are two major developmental processes that characterize the evolution of complex life cycles in many lineages. Whereas these processes were fixed in some taxa, they remained facultative in others, with alternative phenotypes expressed in the same populations. From a genetic perspective, it is still unknown whether such phenotypes form a single population or whether they show some patterns of isolation in syntopy. This has deep implications for understanding the evolution of the phenotypes, i.e. towards their persistence or their fixation and speciation. Newts and salamanders are excellent models to test this hypothesis because they exhibit both developmental processes in their populations: the aquatic paedomorphs retain gills, whereas the metamorphs are able to colonize land. Using microsatellite data of coexisting paedomorphic and metamorphic palmate newts (Lissotriton helveticus), we found that they formed a panmictic population, which evidences sexual compatibility between the two phenotypes. The high gene flow could be understood as an adaptation to unstable habitats in which phenotypic plasticity is favored over the fixation of developmental alternatives. This makes then possible the persistence of a polyphenism: only metamorphosis could be maintained in case of occasional drying whereas paedomorphosis could offer specific advantages in organisms remaining in water. PMID:27534370

  8. High gene flow between alternative morphs and the evolutionary persistence of facultative paedomorphosis.

    PubMed

    Oromi, Neus; Michaux, Johan; Denoël, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Paedomorphosis and metamorphosis are two major developmental processes that characterize the evolution of complex life cycles in many lineages. Whereas these processes were fixed in some taxa, they remained facultative in others, with alternative phenotypes expressed in the same populations. From a genetic perspective, it is still unknown whether such phenotypes form a single population or whether they show some patterns of isolation in syntopy. This has deep implications for understanding the evolution of the phenotypes, i.e. towards their persistence or their fixation and speciation. Newts and salamanders are excellent models to test this hypothesis because they exhibit both developmental processes in their populations: the aquatic paedomorphs retain gills, whereas the metamorphs are able to colonize land. Using microsatellite data of coexisting paedomorphic and metamorphic palmate newts (Lissotriton helveticus), we found that they formed a panmictic population, which evidences sexual compatibility between the two phenotypes. The high gene flow could be understood as an adaptation to unstable habitats in which phenotypic plasticity is favored over the fixation of developmental alternatives. This makes then possible the persistence of a polyphenism: only metamorphosis could be maintained in case of occasional drying whereas paedomorphosis could offer specific advantages in organisms remaining in water. PMID:27534370

  9. Implementation of alternative bio-based fuels in aviation: The Clean Airports Program

    SciTech Connect

    Shauck, M.E.; Zanin, M.G.

    1997-12-31

    The Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, was designated, in March 1996, by the US Department of Energy (US DOE) as the national coordinator of the Clean Airports Program. This program, a spin-off of the Clean Cities Program, was initiated to increase the use of alternative fuels in aviation. There are two major fuels used in aviation today, the current piston engine aviation gasoline, and the current turbine engine fuel. The environmental impact of each of these fuels is significant. Aviation Gasoline (100LL), currently used in the General Aviation piston engine fleet, contributes 100% of the emissions containing lead in the USA today. In the case of the turbine engine fuel (Jet fuel), there are two major environmental impacts to be considered: the local, in the vicinity of the airports, and the global impact on climate change. The Clean Airports Program was established to promote the use of clean burning fuels in order to achieve and maintain clean air at and in the vicinities of airports through the use of alternative fuel-powered air and ground transportation vehicles.

  10. Determination of ligand-binding specificity by alternative splicing: Two distinct growth factor receptors encoded by a single gene

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, T.; Bottaro, D.P.; Fleming, T.P.; Smith, C.L.; Chan, A.M.L.; Aaronson, S.A. ); Burgess, W.H. )

    1992-01-01

    Expression cDNA cloning and structural analysis of the human keratinocyte growth factor receptor (KGFR) revealed identity with one of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors encoded by the bek gene (FGFR-2), except for a divergent stretch of 49 amino acids in their extracellular domains. Binding assays demonstrated that the KGFR was a high-affinity receptor for both KGF and acidic FGF, while FGFR-2 showed high affinity for basic and acidic FGF but no detectable binding by KGF. Genomic analysis of the bek gene revealed two alternative exons responsible for the region of divergence between the two receptors. The KGFR transcript was specific to epithelial cells, and it appeared to be differentially regulated with respect to the alternative FGFR-2 transcript. Thus, two growth factor receptors with different ligand-binding specificities and expression patterns are encoded by alternative transcripts of the same gene.

  11. Structure and expression of the human L-myc gene reveal a complex pattern of alternative mRNA processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, F.; Battey, J.; Nau, M.; Brooks, B.; Seifter, E.; De Greve, J.; Birrer, M.; Sausville, E.; Minna, J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors' analyzed in detail the structure of the L-myc gene isolated from human placental DNA and characterized its expression in several small-cell lung cancer cell lines. The gene is composed of three exons and two introns spanning 6.6 kilobases in human DNA. Several distinct mRNA species are produced in all small-cell lung cancer cell lines that express L-myc. These transcripts are generated from a single gene by alternative splicing of introns 1 and 2 and by use of alternative polyadenylation signals. In some mRNAs that is a long open reading frame with a predicted translated protein of 364 residues. Amino acid sequence comparison with c-myc and N-myc demonstrated multiple discrete regions with extensive homology. In contrast, other mRNA transcripts, generated by alternative processing, could encode a truncated protein with a novel carboxy-terminal end.

  12. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a mouse gene upregulated by lipopolysaccharide treatment reveals alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Kejun; Chen, Yaoming; Dai, Zongming; Bi, Yuan; Cai, Tongjian; Hou, Lichao; Chai, Yubo; Song, Qinghe; Chen, Sumin; Luo, Wenjing; Chen, Jingyuan

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of mouse cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) potently initiates an inflammatory response, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We therefore sought to characterize cDNA sequences of a new mouse LPS-responsive gene, and to evaluate the effects of MLrg. Full-length cDNAs were obtained from LPS-treated NIH3T3 cells. We report that the MLrg gene produces two alternative splice products (GenBank Accession Nos. (DQ316984) and (DQ320011)), respectively, encoding MLrgW and MLrgS polypeptides. Both proteins contain zinc finger and leucine zipper domains and are thus potential regulators of transcription. Expression of MLrgW and MLrgS were robustly upregulated following LPS treatment, and the proteins were localized predominantly in the nuclear membrane and cytoplasm. In stable transfectants over-expressing MLrgW the proportion of cells in G1 phase was significantly reduced, while in cells over-expressing MLrgS the proportion of cells in G2 was significantly increased; both proteins are thus potential regulators of cell cycle progression. Upregulation of MLrgW and MLrgS may be an important component of the LPS inflammatory pathway and of the host response to infection with GNB.

  13. Outcomes from a school-based nutrition education program alternating special resource teachers and classroom teachers.

    PubMed

    Auld, G W; Romaniello, C; Heimendinger, J; Hambidge, C; Hambidge, M

    1999-12-01

    This study modified a successful nutrition program to improve its transferability and potential for institutionalization. Specific aims were to determine: 1) if 16 nutrition lessons taught alternately by special resource teachers (SRT) and classroom teachers, could produce outcomes equivalent to 24 SRT lessons; and 2) teachers' reactions to the program. The quasi-experimental design used classrooms (19 treatment and 19 comparison) in matched schools. Surveys and plate waste measured children's outcomes, and classroom teachers were observed and interviewed. Treatment students showed greater knowledge and self-efficacy scores and consumed 0.36 more servings of fruits and vegetables at lunch. Behavioral differences between groups were greater when SRTs provided all instruction. Teachers supported the program and anticipated teaching more nutrition on their own, but noted serious structural barriers. Findings support the need for long-term contact to induce behavior change and the advantage of using teachers specifically trained in nutrition and experiential education. PMID:10685377

  14. Functional Cross-Talking between Differentially Expressed and Alternatively Spliced Genes in Human Liver Cancer Cells Treated with Berberine

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zhen; Sun, Yi; Zhu, Ruixin; Jiao, Na; Tang, Kailin; Cao, Zhiwei; Ma, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Berberine has been identified with anti-proliferative effects on various cancer cells. Many researchers have been trying to elucidate the anti-cancer mechanisms of berberine based on differentially expressed genes. However, differentially alternative splicing genes induced by berberine might also contribute to its pharmacological actions and have not been reported yet. Moreover, the potential functional cross-talking between the two sets of genes deserves further exploration. In this study, RNA-seq technology was used to detect the differentially expressed genes and differentially alternative spliced genes in BEL-7402 cancer cells induced by berberine. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly enriched in the p53 and cell cycle signalling pathway. In addition, it was statistically proven that the two sets of genes were locally co-enriched along chromosomes, closely connected to each other based on protein-protein interaction and functionally similar on Gene Ontology tree. These results suggested that the two sets of genes regulated by berberine might be functionally cross-talked and jointly contribute to its cell cycle arresting effect. It has provided new clues for further researches on the pharmacological mechanisms of berberine as well as the other botanical drugs. PMID:26606055

  15. Alternative splicing of the AGAMOUS orthologous gene in double flower of Magnolia stellata (Magnoliaceae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Zhi-Xiong; Ma, Jiang; Song, Yi; Chen, Fa-Ju

    2015-12-01

    Magnolia stellata is a woody ornamental shrub with more petaloid tepals than related plants from family Magnoliaceae. Recent studies revealed that expression changes in an AGAMOUS (AG) orthologous gene could resulted in double flowers with increased numbers of petals. We isolated three transcripts encoding different isoforms of a single AG orthologous gene, MastAG, mastag_2 and mastag_3, from M. stellata. Sequence alignments and Southern blot analyses suggested that MastAG was a single-copy gene in M. stellata genomes, and that mastag_2 and mastag_3 were abnormally spliced isoforms of MastAG. An 144bp exon skipping in MastAG results in the truncated mastag_2 protein lacking the completely I domain and 18 aa of the K1 subdomain, whereas an 165bp exon skipping of MastAG produces a truncated mastag_3 protein lacking 6 aa of the K3 subdomain and the completely C terminal region. Expression analyses showed that three alternative splicing (AS) isoforms expressed only in developing stamens and carpels. Functional analyses revealed that MastAG could mimic the endogenous AG to specify carpel identity, but failed to regulate stamen development in an Arabidopsis ag-1 mutant. Moreover, the key domain or subdomain deletions represented by mastag_2 and mastag_3 resulted in loss of C-function. However, ectopic expression of mastag_2 in Arabidopsis produced flowers with sepals converted into carpeloid organs, but without petals and stamens, whereas ectopic expression of mastag_3 in Arabidopsis could mimic the flower phenotype of the ag mutant and produced double flowers with homeotic transformation of stamens into petals and carpels into another ag flower. Our results also suggest that mastag_3 holds some potential for biotechnical engineering to create multi-petal phenotypes in commercial ornamental cultivars. PMID:26706078

  16. Fruit regulates seasonal expression of flowering genes in alternate-bearing ‘Moncada’ mandarin

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Fambuena, Natalia; Mesejo, Carlos; Carmen González-Mas, M.; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Agustí, Manuel; Iglesias, Domingo J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The presence of fruit has been widely reported to act as an inhibitor of flowering in fruit trees. This study is an investigation into the effect of fruit load on flowering of ‘Moncada’ mandarin and on the expression of putative orthologues of genes involved in flowering pathways to provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying alternate bearing in citrus. Methods The relationship between fruit load and flowering intensity was examined first. Defruiting experiments were further conducted to demonstrate the causal effect of fruit removal upon flowering. Finally, the activity of flowering-related genes was investigated to determine the extent to which their seasonal expression is affected by fruit yield. Key Results First observations and defruiting experiments indicated a significant inverse relationship between preceding fruit load and flowering intensity. Moreover, data indicated that when fruit remained on the tree from November onwards, a dramatic inhibition of flowering occurred the following spring. The study of the expression pattern of flowering-genes of on (fully loaded) and off (without fruits) trees revealed that homologues of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), SUPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1), APETALA1 (AP1) and LEAFY (LFY) were negatively affected by fruit load. Thus, CiFT expression showed a progressive increase in leaves from off trees through the study period, the highest differences found from December onwards (10-fold). Whereas differences in the relative expression of SOC1 only reached significance from September to mid-December, CsAP1 expression was constantly higher in those trees through the whole study period. Significant variations in CsLFY expression only were found in late February (close to 20 %). On the other hand, the expression of the homologues of TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1) and FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) did not appear to be related to fruit load. Conclusions These results suggest for the first time

  17. Alternatives for management of wastes generated by the formerly utilized sites remedial action program and supplement

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, T.L.; Peterson, J.M.; Vocke, R.W.; Alexander, J.K.

    1983-03-01

    Alternatives for disposal or stabilization of the wastes generated by the US Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) are identified and compared, with emphasis on the long-term aspects. These wastes consist of soil material and rubble containing trace amounts of radionuclides. A detailed pathway analysis for the dose to the maximally exposed individual is carried out using an adaptation of the natural analogue method. Comparisons of the different alternatives, based on the results of the pathway analysis and qualitative cost considerations, indicate that, if the hazard is such that the wastes must be removed and disposed of rather than stabilized in place, disposal by immediate dispersal is preferable to containment, and containment followed by slow planned dispersal is preferable to containment without dispersal. The Supplement presents refinements of work that was reported at the 1982 International Decommissioning Symposium. The new material consists of revisions of the estimates of the predicted potential dose to the maximally exposed individual and a more detailed comparative assessment of the radiological impacts of alternatives for management of wastes generated by the US Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP).

  18. Functional analysis of alternative transcripts of the soybean Rj2 gene that restricts nodulation with specific rhizobial strains.

    PubMed

    Tang, F; Yang, S; Zhu, H

    2016-05-01

    The Rj2 gene is a TIR-NBS-LRR-type resistance gene in soybean (Glycine max) that restricts root nodule symbiosis with a group of Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains including USDA122. Rj2 generates two distinct transcript variants in its expression profile through alternative splicing. Alternative splicing of Rj2 is caused by the retention of the 86-bp intron 4. Inclusion of intron 4 in mature mRNA introduces an in-frame stop codon; as such, the alternative transcript is predicted to encode a truncated protein consisting of the entire portion of the TIR, NBS and LRR domains but missing the C-terminal domain of the full-length Rj2 protein encoded by the regular transcript. Since alternative splicing has been shown to be essential for full activity of several plant R genes, we attempted to test whether the alternative splicing is required for Rj2-mediated nodulation restriction. Here we demonstrated that the Rj2-mediated nodulation restriction does not require the combined presence of the regular and alternative transcripts, and the expression of the regular transcript alone is sufficient to confer nodulation restriction. PMID:26848549

  19. Alternative State Funding Allocation Methods for Local School District Programs To Serve "At-Risk" Students: "Project FAIR."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, K. Forbis; And Others

    Project "FAIR" identified and evaluated alternative funding mechanisms for allocating state resources to support programs and services for at-risk youth. Information was gathered through the following activities: (1) two national surveys; (2) the development of a classification system for programs and the identification of prototype programs; (3)…

  20. HuR Regulates Alternative Splicing of the TRA2β Gene in Human Colon Cancer Cells under Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Akaike, Yoko; Kuwano, Yuki; Nishida, Kensei; Kajita, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Ken; Satake, Yuzuru; Shoda, Katsutoshi; Imoto, Issei; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2014-01-01

    Hu antigen R (HuR) regulates stress responses through stabilizing and/or facilitating the translation of target mRNAs. The human TRA2β gene encodes splicing factor transformer 2β (Tra2β) and generates 5 mRNA isoforms (TRA2β1 to -5) through alternative splicing. Exposure of HCT116 colon cancer cells to sodium arsenite stimulated checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2)- and mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 (p38MAPK)-mediated phosphorylation of HuR at positions S88 and T118. This induced an association between HuR and the 39-nucleotide (nt) proximal region of TRA2β exon 2, generating a TRA2β4 mRNA that includes exon 2, which has multiple premature stop codons. HuR knockdown or Chk2/p38MAPK double knockdown inhibited the arsenite-stimulated production of TRA2β4 and increased Tra2β protein, facilitating Tra2β-dependent inclusion of exons in target pre-mRNAs. The effects of HuR knockdown or Chk2/p38MAPK double knockdown were also confirmed using a TRA2β minigene spanning exons 1 to 4, and the effects disappeared when the 39-nt region was deleted from the minigene. In endogenous HuR knockdown cells, the overexpression of a HuR mutant that could not be phosphorylated (with changes of serine to alanine at position 88 [S88A], S100A, and T118A) blocked the associated TRA2β4 interaction and TRA2β4 generation, while the overexpression of a phosphomimetic HuR (with mutations S88D, S100D, and T118D) restored the TRA2β4-related activities. Our findings revealed the potential role of nuclear HuR in the regulation of alternative splicing programs under oxidative stress. PMID:24865968

  1. Characteristic features of the nucleotide sequences of yeast mitochondrial ribosomal protein genes as analyzed by computer program GeneMark.

    PubMed

    Isono, K; McIninch, J D; Borodovsky, M

    1994-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence data for yeast mitochondrial ribosomal protein (MRP) genes were analyzed by the computer program GeneMark which predicts the presence of likely genes in sequence data by calculating statistical biases in the appearance of consecutive nucleotides. The program uses a set of standard sequence data for this calculation. We used this program for the analysis of yeast nucleotide sequence data containing MRP genes, hoping to obtain information as to whether they share features in common that are different from other yeast genes. Sequence data sets for ordinary yeast genes and for 27 known MRP genes were used. The MRP genes were nicely predicted as likely genes regardless of the data sets used, whereas other yeast genes were predicted to be likely genes only when the data set for ordinary yeast genes was used. The assembled sequence data for chromosomes II, III, VIII and XI as well as the segmented data for chromosome V were analyzed in a similar manner. In addition to the known MRP genes, eleven ORF's were predicted to be likely MRP genes. Thus, the method seems very powerful in analyzing genes of heterologous origins. PMID:7719921

  2. Alternative Education: A Comparative Case Study of the Behavior Modification Programs of Two Upstate South Carolina Alternative Schools for Youth Who Exhibit Behavior That Is Disruptive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scipio, Timothy Lamont

    2013-01-01

    This study examined behavior modification programs in schools designed to focus on discipline and that aim to reform disruptive behavior in students, usually over a limited period of time. This was a comparative case study of two type II alternative schools in the Upstate of South Carolina. The findings contributed to the research base regarding…

  3. Cold-dependent alternative splicing of a Jumonji C domain-containing gene MtJMJC5 in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yingfang; Wu, Xiaopei; Liu, Demei; Song, Shengjing; Liu, Dengcai; Wang, Haiqing

    2016-05-27

    Histone methylation is an epigenetic modification mechanism that regulates gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Jumonji C domain-containing demethylases are involved in removal of methyl groups at lysine or arginine residues. The JmjC domain-only member, JMJ30/JMJD5 of Arabidopsis, is a component of the plant circadian clock. Although some plant circadian clock genes undergo alternative splicing in response to external cues, there is no evidence that JMJ30/JMJD5 is regulated by alternative splicing. In this study, the expression of an Arabidopsis JMJ30/JMJD5 ortholog in Medicago truncatula, MtJMJC5, in response to circadian clock and abiotic stresses were characterized. The results showed that MtJMJC5 oscillates with a circadian rhythm, and undergoes cold specifically induced alternative splicing. The cold-induced alternative splicing could be reversed after ambient temperature returning to the normal. Sequencing results revealed four alternative splicing RNA isoforms including a full-length authentic protein encoding variant, and three premature termination condon-containing variants due to alternative 3' splice sites at the first and second intron. Under cold treatment, the variants that share a common 3' alternative splicing site at the second intron were intensively up-regulated while the authentic protein encoding variant and the premature termination condon-containing variant only undergoing a 3' alternative splicing at the first intron were down regulated. Although all the premature termination condon-harboring alternative splicing variants were sensitive to nonsense-mediated decay, the premature termination codon-harboring alternative splicing variants sharing the 3' alternative splicing site at the second intron showed less sensitivity than the one only containing the 3' alternative slicing site at the first intron under cold treatment. These results suggest that the cold-dependent alternative splicing of MtJMJC5 is likely a species or genus

  4. Genes Encoding Cher-TPR Fusion Proteins Are Predominantly Found in Gene Clusters Encoding Chemosensory Pathways with Alternative Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Alfonso, Carlos; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemosensory pathways correspond to major signal transduction mechanisms and can be classified into the functional families flagellum-mediated taxis, type four pili-mediated taxis or pathways with alternative cellular functions (ACF). CheR methyltransferases are core enzymes in all of these families. CheR proteins fused to tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains have been reported and we present an analysis of this uncharacterized family. We show that CheR-TPRs are widely distributed in GRAM-negative but almost absent from GRAM-positive bacteria. Most strains contain a single CheR-TPR and its abundance does not correlate with the number of chemoreceptors. The TPR domain fused to CheR is comparatively short and frequently composed of 2 repeats. The majority of CheR-TPR genes were found in gene clusters that harbor multidomain response regulators in which the REC domain is fused to different output domains like HK, GGDEF, EAL, HPT, AAA, PAS, GAF, additional REC, HTH, phosphatase or combinations thereof. The response regulator architectures coincide with those reported for the ACF family of pathways. Since the presence of multidomain response regulators is a distinctive feature of this pathway family, we conclude that CheR-TPR proteins form part of ACF type pathways. The diversity of response regulator output domains suggests that the ACF pathways form a superfamily which regroups many different regulatory mechanisms, in which all CheR-TPR proteins appear to participate. In the second part we characterize WspC of Pseudomonas putida, a representative example of CheR-TPR. The affinities of WspC-Pp for S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine were comparable to those of prototypal CheR, indicating that WspC-Pp activity is in analogy to prototypal CheRs controlled by product feed-back inhibition. The removal of the TPR domain did not impact significantly on the binding constants and consequently not on the product feed-back inhibition. WspC-Pp was found to be

  5. Computer-based construction of gene models using the GRAIL Gene Assembly Program

    SciTech Connect

    Einstein, J.R.; Mural, R.J.; Guan, X.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1992-09-01

    The Gene Assembly Program (GAP), a module of GRAIL, assembles and scores gene models, given a DNA sequence and the outputs of other GRAIL modules for the sequence. The latter modules determine the positions of coding regions, the positions and scores of possible splice junctions, the positions of possible translation-initiation sites, the coding strand for the gene, and the probable-translation-frame function over the sequence. GAP tests combinations of those splice junctions which are within acceptable distances from the initial estimated edges of the coding regions. Every complete gene model, comprising translation-initiation site, splice junctions and stop codon, which agrees with GAP`s set of rules is scored, and the ten highest-scoring models are saved. Each gene-model score depends on the input scores of splice junctions used in the model, their positions relative to the initial estimated edges of the included coding regions, and the degree of agreement of the entire model with the probable-translation-frame function. If error conditions are detected, the present version of GAP attempts to correct them by the insertion and/or deletion of one or more coding regions. These insertions and deletions have resulted in a net improvement of gene models, and a particularly large improvement in the recognition and characterization of very short coding regions. The results of GRAIL including the GAP module for 26 sequences from GenBank, each with a biochemically characterized single gene, are quite promising and demonstrate the feasibility of constructing largely accurate gene models strictly on the basis of sequence data.

  6. Computer-based construction of gene models using the GRAIL Gene Assembly Program

    SciTech Connect

    Einstein, J.R.; Mural, R.J.; Guan, X.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1992-09-01

    The Gene Assembly Program (GAP), a module of GRAIL, assembles and scores gene models, given a DNA sequence and the outputs of other GRAIL modules for the sequence. The latter modules determine the positions of coding regions, the positions and scores of possible splice junctions, the positions of possible translation-initiation sites, the coding strand for the gene, and the probable-translation-frame function over the sequence. GAP tests combinations of those splice junctions which are within acceptable distances from the initial estimated edges of the coding regions. Every complete gene model, comprising translation-initiation site, splice junctions and stop codon, which agrees with GAP's set of rules is scored, and the ten highest-scoring models are saved. Each gene-model score depends on the input scores of splice junctions used in the model, their positions relative to the initial estimated edges of the included coding regions, and the degree of agreement of the entire model with the probable-translation-frame function. If error conditions are detected, the present version of GAP attempts to correct them by the insertion and/or deletion of one or more coding regions. These insertions and deletions have resulted in a net improvement of gene models, and a particularly large improvement in the recognition and characterization of very short coding regions. The results of GRAIL including the GAP module for 26 sequences from GenBank, each with a biochemically characterized single gene, are quite promising and demonstrate the feasibility of constructing largely accurate gene models strictly on the basis of sequence data.

  7. Evolution of the CNS myelin gene regulatory program.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiliang; Richardson, William D

    2016-06-15

    Myelin is a specialized subcellular structure that evolved uniquely in vertebrates. A myelinated axon conducts action potentials many times faster than an unmyelinated axon of the same diameter; for the same conduction speed, the unmyelinated axon would need a much larger diameter and volume than its myelinated counterpart. Hence myelin speeds information transfer and saves space, allowing the evolution of a powerful yet portable brain. Myelination in the central nervous system (CNS) is controlled by a gene regulatory program that features a number of master transcriptional regulators including Olig1, Olig2 and Myrf. Olig family genes evolved from a single ancestral gene in non-chordates. Olig2, which executes multiple functions with regard to oligodendrocyte identity and development in vertebrates, might have evolved functional versatility through post-translational modification, especially phosphorylation, as illustrated by its evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine phospho-acceptor sites and its accumulation of serine residues during more recent stages of vertebrate evolution. Olig1, derived from a duplicated copy of Olig2 in early bony fish, is involved in oligodendrocyte development and is critical to remyelination in bony vertebrates, but is lost in birds. The origin of Myrf orthologs might be the result of DNA integration between an invading phage or bacterium and an early protist, producing a fusion protein capable of self-cleavage and DNA binding. Myrf seems to have adopted new functions in early vertebrates - initiation of the CNS myelination program as well as the maintenance of mature oligodendrocyte identity and myelin structure - by developing new ways to interact with DNA motifs specific to myelin genes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution. PMID:26474911

  8. Comparative analysis of alternative splicing, alternative polyadenylation and the expression of the two KIN genes from cytoplasmic male sterility cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.).

    PubMed

    Tao, Peng; Huang, Xiaoyun; Li, Biyuan; Wang, Wuhong; Yue, Zhichen; Lei, Juanli; Zhong, Xinmin

    2014-06-01

    The KIN genes are crucial members of the cold-regulated gene family. They play exclusive roles during the developmental processes of many organs and respond to various abiotic stresses in plants. However, little is known about the regulation of KIN gene expression in cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) cabbages (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.). We carried out a genome-wide analysis to identify the KIN genes in the CMS cabbage. Two non-redundant KIN genes, named BoKIN1 (Bol021262) and BoKIN2 (Bol030498), were identified. Reverse transcriptase PCR detected alternative splicing (AS) products of BoKIN1 (four AS products) and BoKIN2 (three AS products). In addition, alternative polyadenylation (APA) was observed for BoKIN1 and BoKIN2 in the CMS cabbage, resulting in variable 3'UTRs in their transcripts. Furthermore, the transcription levels of BoKIN1-0 and BoKIN2-0, the introns of which were spliced completely, were analyzed in various organs and young leaves treated by abiotic stresses. Our data indicated that BoKIN1-0 is highly expressed in various organs, whereas BoKIN2-0 is expressed exclusively in the stamen. Our study also suggested that BoKIN1-0 was upregulated significantly in young leaves of plants exposed to abscisic acid treatment, and cold and heat stress. BoKIN1 and BoKIN2 had differential AS and APA patterns in pre-mRNA processing, and showed differences in their expression patterns and transcript levels. BoKIN1 participates widely in organ development and responds to diverse abiotic stresses, whereas BoKIN2 plays a main role in stamen development in the CMS cabbage. PMID:24488150

  9. Advanced Transportation System Studies. Technical Area 3: Alternate Propulsion Subsystems Concepts. Volume 3; Program Cost Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levack, Daniel J. H.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this contract was to provide definition of alternate propulsion systems for both earth-to-orbit (ETO) and in-space vehicles (upper stages and space transfer vehicles). For such propulsion systems, technical data to describe performance, weight, dimensions, etc. was provided along with programmatic information such as cost, schedule, needed facilities, etc. Advanced technology and advanced development needs were determined and provided. This volume separately presents the various program cost estimates that were generated under three tasks: the F- IA Restart Task, the J-2S Restart Task, and the SSME Upper Stage Use Task. The conclusions, technical results , and the program cost estimates are described in more detail in Volume I - Executive Summary and in individual Final Task Reports.

  10. Co-existence of classical and alternative activation programs in macrophages responding to Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Veerupaxagouda; Zhao, Yanlin; Shah, Suhagi; Fox, Barbara A.; Rommereim, Leah M.; Bzik, David J.; Yap, George S.

    2013-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages are critical for defense against intracellular pathogens while alternatively-activated M2 macrophages mediate tissue homeostasis and repair. Whether these distinct activation programs are mutually exclusive or can co-exist within the same cell is unclear. Here, we report the co-existence of these programs in Toxoplasma gondii-elicited inflammatory macrophages. This is independent of parasite expression of the virulence factor ROP16 and host cell expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6). Furthermore, this observation was recapitulated by IFN-γ and IL-4 treated bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. These results highlight the multi-functionality of macrophages as they respond to diverse microbial and endogenous stimuli. PMID:24083945

  11. Co-existence of classical and alternative activation programs in macrophages responding to Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Patil, Veerupaxagouda; Zhao, Yanlin; Shah, Suhagi; Fox, Barbara A; Rommereim, Leah M; Bzik, David J; Yap, George S

    2014-02-01

    Pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages are critical for defense against intracellular pathogens while alternatively-activated M2 macrophages mediate tissue homeostasis and repair. Whether these distinct activation programs are mutually exclusive or can co-exist within the same cell is unclear. Here, we report the co-existence of these programs in Toxoplasma gondii-elicited inflammatory macrophages. This is independent of parasite expression of the virulence factor ROP16 and host cell expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6). Furthermore, this observation was recapitulated by IFN-γ and IL-4 treated bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. These results highlight the multi-functionality of macrophages as they respond to diverse microbial and endogenous stimuli. PMID:24083945

  12. 46 CFR 176.625 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger vessels. 176.625 Section 176.625 Shipping COAST GUARD... CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 176.625 Eligibility requirements for the Alternative...

  13. 46 CFR 115.625 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull... OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 115.625 Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for...

  14. 46 CFR 115.625 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull... OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 115.625 Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for...

  15. 46 CFR 115.625 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull... OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 115.625 Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for...

  16. 46 CFR 71.50-17 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull...-17 Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger... aluminum; (2) It has an effective hull protection system; (3) It has operated exclusively in fresh...

  17. 46 CFR 115.625 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull... OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 115.625 Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for...

  18. 46 CFR 71.50-17 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull...-17 Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger... aluminum; (2) It has an effective hull protection system; (3) It has operated exclusively in fresh...

  19. 46 CFR 71.50-17 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull...-17 Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger... aluminum; (2) It has an effective hull protection system; (3) It has operated exclusively in fresh...

  20. 46 CFR 71.50-17 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull...-17 Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger... aluminum; (2) It has an effective hull protection system; (3) It has operated exclusively in fresh...

  1. 46 CFR 71.50-17 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull...-17 Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger... aluminum; (2) It has an effective hull protection system; (3) It has operated exclusively in fresh...

  2. 46 CFR 115.625 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull... OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 115.625 Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for...

  3. THE GRK4 SUBFAMILY OF G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR KINASES: ALTERNATIVE SPLICING, GENE ORGANIZATION, AND SEQUENCE CONSERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The GRK4 subfamily of G protein-coupled receptor kinases. Alternative splicing, gene organization, and sequence conservation.

    Premont RT, Macrae AD, Aparicio SA, Kendall HE, Welch JE, Lefkowitz RJ.

    Department of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke Univer...

  4. RNA interference knockdown of DNA methyl-transferase 3 affects gene alternative splicing in the honey bee

    PubMed Central

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Li, Yang; Stroud, Hume; Feng, Suhua; Newman, Thomas C.; Kaneda, Megan; Hou, Kirk K.; Worley, Kim C.; Elsik, Christine G.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Ma, Jian; Robinson, Gene E.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of DNA methylation from fungi, plants, and animals indicate that gene body methylation is ancient and highly conserved in eukaryotic genomes, but its role has not been clearly defined. It has been postulated that regulation of alternative splicing of transcripts was an original function of DNA methylation, but a direct experimental test of the effect of methylation on alternative slicing at the whole genome level has never been performed. To do this, we developed a unique method to administer RNA interference (RNAi) in a high-throughput and noninvasive manner and then used it to knock down the expression of DNA methyl-transferase 3 (dnmt3), which is required for de novo DNA methylation. We chose the honey bee (Apis mellifera) for this test because it has recently emerged as an important model organism for studying the effects of DNA methylation on development and social behavior, and DNA methylation in honey bees is predominantly on gene bodies. Here we show that dnmt3 RNAi decreased global genomic methylation level as expected and in addition caused widespread and diverse changes in alternative splicing in fat tissue. Four different types of splicing events were affected by dnmt3 gene knockdown, and change in two types, exon skipping and intron retention, was directly related to decreased methylation. These results demonstrate that one function of gene body DNA methylation is to regulate alternative splicing. PMID:23852726

  5. Transcriptome analyses and differential gene expression in a non-model fish species with alternative mating tactics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Social dominance is important for the reproductive success of males in many species. In the black-faced blenny (Tripterygion delaisi) during the reproductive season, some males change color and invest in nest making and defending a territory, whereas others do not change color and ‘sneak’ reproductions when females lay their eggs. Using RNAseq, we profiled differential gene expression between the brains of territorial males, sneaker males, and females to study the molecular signatures of male dimorphism. Results We found that more genes were differentially expressed between the two male phenotypes than between males and females, suggesting that during the reproductive period phenotypic plasticity is a more important factor in differential gene expression than sexual dimorphism. The territorial male overexpresses genes related to synaptic plasticity and the sneaker male overexpresses genes involved in differentiation and development. Conclusions Previously suggested candidate genes for social dominance in the context of alternative mating strategies seem to be predominantly species-specific. We present a list of novel genes which are differentially expressed in Tripterygion delaisi. This is the first genome-wide study for a molecular non-model species in the context of alternative mating strategies and provides essential information for further studies investigating the molecular basis of social dominance. PMID:24581002

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of Izumo1 gene from sheep and cashmere goat reveal alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Xing, Wan-Jin; Han, Bao-Da; Wu, Qi; Zhao, Li; Bao, Xiao-Hong; Bou, Shorgan

    2011-03-01

    We cloned the cDNA and genomic DNA encoding for Izumo1 of cashmere goat (Capra hircus) and sheep (Ovis aries). Analysis of 4.6 kb Izumo1 genomic sequences in sheep and goat revealed a canonical open reading frame (ORF) of 963 bp spliced by eight exons. Sheep and goat Izumo1 genes share >99% identity at both DNA and protein levels and are also highly homologous to the orthologues in cattle, mouse, rat and human. Extensive cloning and analysis of Izumo1 cDNA revealed three (del 69, del 182 and del 217) and two (del 69 and ins 30) alternative splicing isoforms in goat and sheep, respectively. All of the isoforms are derived from splicing at typical GT-AG sites leading to partial or complete truncation of the immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain. Bioinformatics analysis showed that caprine and ovine Izumo1 proteins share similar structure with their murine orthologue. There are a signal peptide at the N-terminus (1-22 aa), a transmembrane domain at the C-terminus (302-319 aa), and an extracellular Ig-like region in the middle (161-252 aa) with a putative N-linked glycosylation site (N(205)-N-S). Alignment of Izumo1 protein sequences among 15 mammalian species displayed several highly conserved regions, including LDC and YRC motifs with cysteine residues for potential disulfide bridge formation, CPNKCG motif upstream of the Ig-like domain, GLTDYSFYRVW motif upstream of the putative N-linked glycosylation site, and a number of scattered cysteine residues. These distinctive features are very informative to pinpoint the important gene motifs and functions. The C-terminal regions, however, are more variable across species. Izumo1 cDNA sequences of goat, sheep, and cow were found to be largely homologous, and the molecular phylogenetic analysis is consistent with their morphological taxonomy. This implies the Izumo1 gene evolves from the same ancestor, and the mechanism of sperm-egg fusion in mammals may be under the same principle in which Izumo1 plays an important role. PMID

  7. XRCC1 suppresses somatic hypermutation and promotes alternative nonhomologous end joining in Igh genes

    PubMed Central

    Saribasak, Huseyin; Maul, Robert W.; Cao, Zheng; McClure, Rhonda L.; Yang, William; McNeill, Daniel R.; Wilson, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) deaminates cytosine to uracil in immunoglobulin genes. Uracils in DNA can be recognized by uracil DNA glycosylase and abasic endonuclease to produce single-strand breaks. The breaks are repaired either faithfully by DNA base excision repair (BER) or mutagenically to produce somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR). To unravel the interplay between repair and mutagenesis, we decreased the level of x-ray cross-complementing 1 (XRCC1), a scaffold protein involved in BER. Mice heterozygous for XRCC1 showed a significant increase in the frequencies of SHM in Igh variable regions in Peyer’s patch cells, and of double-strand breaks in the switch regions during CSR. Although the frequency of CSR was normal in Xrcc1+/− splenic B cells, the length of microhomology at the switch junctions decreased, suggesting that XRCC1 also participates in alternative nonhomologous end joining. Furthermore, Xrcc1+/− B cells had reduced Igh/c-myc translocations during CSR, supporting a role for XRCC1 in microhomology-mediated joining. Our results imply that AID-induced single-strand breaks in Igh variable and switch regions become substrates simultaneously for BER and mutagenesis pathways. PMID:21967769

  8. The dynamics of the alternatively spliced NOL7 gene products and role in nucleolar architecture

    PubMed Central

    Kinor, Noa

    2011-01-01

    Three alternatively spliced forms of the human NOL7 gene coding for relatively small proteins were identified. The two shorter forms were generated by intron retention events, and each isoform was differently localized within the cell. The NOL7-SP1 long form (29 kD) localized to the nucleolus, SP2 was nucleoplasmic, while SP3 was distributed throughout the whole cell. NOL7-SP1 was confined to the nucleolar granular component, and during cell division disassociated from the nucleolus. Knockdown of NOL7-SP1 levels abrogated nucleolar architecture, in particular the internal regions, and reduced cell proliferation. Analysis of the nucleolar dynamics of the SP1 protein during interphase showed nucleolar high binding affinity. Dissection of protein domains showed that nucleolar targeting was mediated by a unique C-terminal nucleolar localization sequence (NoLS). However, this sequence was not sufficient for conferring high binding affinity, which required additional regions of the protein. Our analysis shows that NOL7 is important for maintaining internal nucleolar structure and cell growth rates, and that while specific protein localization can be obtained by specific short localization motifs, nucleolar residency through binding must be mediated by a synergistic combination of protein modules. PMID:21818416

  9. Biodiesel Drives Florida Power & Light's EPAct Alternative Compliance Strategy; EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: Success Story (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-05-01

    This success story highlights how Florida Power & Light Company has successfully complied with the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) through Alternative Compliance using biodiesel technologies and how it has become a biofuel leader, reducing petroleum use and pollutant emissions throughout Florida.

  10. MYCN controls an alternative RNA splicing program in high-risk metastatic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shile; Wei, Jun S; Li, Samuel Q; Badgett, Tom C; Song, Young K; Agarwal, Saurabh; Coarfa, Cristian; Tolman, Catherine; Hurd, Laura; Liao, Hongling; He, Jianbin; Wen, Xinyu; Liu, Zhihui; Thiele, Carol J; Westermann, Frank; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Seeger, Robert C; Maris, John M; Guidry Auvil, Jamie M; Smith, Malcolm A; Kolaczyk, Eric D; Shohet, Jason; Khan, Javed

    2016-02-28

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the aggressive behavior of MYCN driven neuroblastoma (NBL) is under intense investigation; however, little is known about the impact of this family of transcription factors on the splicing program. Here we used high-throughput RNA sequencing to systematically study the expression of RNA isoforms in stage 4 MYCN-amplified NBL, an aggressive subtype of metastatic NBL. We show that MYCN-amplified NBL tumors display a distinct gene splicing pattern affecting multiple cancer hallmark functions. Six splicing factors displayed unique differential expression patterns in MYCN-amplified tumors and cell lines, and the binding motifs for some of these splicing factors are significantly enriched in differentially-spliced genes. Direct binding of MYCN to promoter regions of the splicing factors PTBP1 and HNRNPA1 detected by ChIP-seq demonstrates that MYCN controls the splicing pattern by direct regulation of the expression of these key splicing factors. Furthermore, high expression of PTBP1 and HNRNPA1 was significantly associated with poor overall survival of stage4 NBL patients (p ≤ 0.05). Knocking down PTBP1, HNRNPA1 and their downstream target PKM2, an isoform of pro-tumor-growth, result in repressed growth of NBL cells. Therefore, our study reveals a novel role of MYCN in controlling global splicing program through regulation of splicing factors in addition to its well-known role in the transcription program. These findings suggest a therapeutically potential to target the key splicing factors or gene isoforms in high-risk NBL with MYCN-amplification. PMID:26683771

  11. Update on a Pharmacokinetic-Centric Alternative Tier II Program for MMT-Part I: Program Implementation and Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Dorman, David C; Andersen, Melvin E; Roper, Jerry M; Taylor, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding environmental manganese exposure since high exposures have been associated with neurological disorders. The USA Environmental Protection Agency most recent human health risk assessment of inhaled manganese conducted in 1993 identified specific areas of uncertainty regarding manganese pharmacokinetics. This led to the development of a test rule under the USA Clean Air Act that required the generation of pharmacokinetic information on the inorganic manganese combustion products of the organometallic fuel additive methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT). The Alternative Tier 2 testing program for MMT, described in this paper, has yielded substantial pharmacokinetic data and has enabled the generation of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for manganese. These models are capable of predicting tissue manganese concentrations across a variety of dose routes, levels, and durations while accounting for factors such as age, gender, and reproductive status, enabling the consideration of tissue dosimetry in future risk assessments. PMID:22545047

  12. Update on a Pharmacokinetic-Centric Alternative Tier II Program for MMT—Part I: Program Implementation and Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Dorman, David C.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Roper, Jerry M.; Taylor, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding environmental manganese exposure since high exposures have been associated with neurological disorders. The USA Environmental Protection Agency most recent human health risk assessment of inhaled manganese conducted in 1993 identified specific areas of uncertainty regarding manganese pharmacokinetics. This led to the development of a test rule under the USA Clean Air Act that required the generation of pharmacokinetic information on the inorganic manganese combustion products of the organometallic fuel additive methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT). The Alternative Tier 2 testing program for MMT, described in this paper, has yielded substantial pharmacokinetic data and has enabled the generation of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for manganese. These models are capable of predicting tissue manganese concentrations across a variety of dose routes, levels, and durations while accounting for factors such as age, gender, and reproductive status, enabling the consideration of tissue dosimetry in future risk assessments. PMID:22545047

  13. Integration of Metabolic Modeling with Gene Co-expression Reveals Transcriptionally Programmed Reactions Explaining Robustness in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Kulshreshtha, Deepika; Mittal, Inna; Mobeen, Ahmed; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Robustness of metabolic networks is accomplished by gene regulation, modularity, re-routing of metabolites and plasticity. Here, we probed robustness against perturbations of biochemical reactions of M. tuberculosis in the form of predicting compensatory trends. In order to investigate the transcriptional programming of genes associated with correlated fluxes, we integrated with gene co-expression network. Knock down of the reactions NADH2r and ATPS responsible for producing the hub metabolites, and Central carbon metabolism had the highest proportion of their associated genes under transcriptional co-expression with genes of their flux correlated reactions. Reciprocal gene expression correlations were observed among compensatory routes, fresh activation of alternative routes and in the multi-copy genes of Cysteine synthase and of Phosphate transporter. Knock down of 46 reactions caused the activation of Isocitrate lyase or Malate synthase or both reactions, which are central to the persistent state of M. tuberculosis. A total of 30 new freshly activated routes including Cytochrome c oxidase, Lactate dehydrogenase, and Glycine cleavage system were predicted, which could be responsible for switching into dormant or persistent state. Thus, our integrated approach of exploring transcriptional programming of flux correlated reactions has the potential to unravel features of system architecture conferring robustness. PMID:27000948

  14. Integration of Metabolic Modeling with Gene Co-expression Reveals Transcriptionally Programmed Reactions Explaining Robustness in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Kulshreshtha, Deepika; Mittal, Inna; Mobeen, Ahmed; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Robustness of metabolic networks is accomplished by gene regulation, modularity, re-routing of metabolites and plasticity. Here, we probed robustness against perturbations of biochemical reactions of M. tuberculosis in the form of predicting compensatory trends. In order to investigate the transcriptional programming of genes associated with correlated fluxes, we integrated with gene co-expression network. Knock down of the reactions NADH2r and ATPS responsible for producing the hub metabolites, and Central carbon metabolism had the highest proportion of their associated genes under transcriptional co-expression with genes of their flux correlated reactions. Reciprocal gene expression correlations were observed among compensatory routes, fresh activation of alternative routes and in the multi-copy genes of Cysteine synthase and of Phosphate transporter. Knock down of 46 reactions caused the activation of Isocitrate lyase or Malate synthase or both reactions, which are central to the persistent state of M. tuberculosis. A total of 30 new freshly activated routes including Cytochrome c oxidase, Lactate dehydrogenase, and Glycine cleavage system were predicted, which could be responsible for switching into dormant or persistent state. Thus, our integrated approach of exploring transcriptional programming of flux correlated reactions has the potential to unravel features of system architecture conferring robustness. PMID:27000948

  15. Alternatively spliced transcripts of Pi-ta blast resistance gene in Oryza sativa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pi-ta gene in rice (Oryza sativa L.) confers resistance to races of Magnaporthe oryzae containing its cognate avirulence gene AVR-Pita. Pi-ta is a single-copy gene belonging to the nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) class of plant resistance (R) genes. In the present study, w...

  16. Identification of candidate genes for congenital splay leg in piglets by alternative analysis of DNA microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Maak, Steffen; Boettcher, Diana; Tetens, Jens; Wensch-Dorendorf, Monika; Nürnberg, Gerd; Wimmers, Klaus; Swalve, Hermann H.; Thaller, Georg

    2009-01-01

    The congenital splay leg syndrome in piglets is characterized by a temporarily impaired functionality of the hind leg muscles immediately after birth. Etiology and pathogenetic mechanisms for the disease are still not well understood. We compared genome wide gene expression of three hind leg muscles (M. adductores, M. gracilis and M. sartorius) between affected piglets and their healthy littermates with the GeneChip® Porcine Genome Array (Affymetrix) in order to identify candidate genes for the disease. Data analysis with standard algorithms revealed no significant differences between both groups. By application of an alternative approach, we identified 63 transcripts with differences in two muscles and 5 genes differing between the groups in three muscles. The expression of six selected genes (SQSTM1, SSRP1, DDIT4, ENAH, MAF, and PDK4) was investigated with SYBRGreen RT - Real time PCR. The differences obtained with the microarray analysis could be confirmed and demonstrate the validity of the alternative approach to microarray data analysis. Four genes with different expression levels in at least two muscles (SQSTM1, SSRP1, DDIT4, and MAF) are assigned to transcriptional cascades related to cell death and may thus indicate pathways for further investigations on congenital splay leg in piglets. PMID:19421343

  17. Comparison of Alternative and Traditional Teacher Preparation Programs for First Year Special Education Teachers in Northwest Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhamisi, Judy Carol

    2011-01-01

    This study compares knowledge as measured by grade point averages and Praxis II scores between first-year special education teachers who completed one university's alternative teacher preparation program (ATTP) and those who completed the university's traditional teacher preparation program (TTPP). A total of 33 teachers, 15 from the ATTP and 18…

  18. A "Normalized" Educational Alternative for High-Risk Youth: Description and Rationale of the Boys Town Urban Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilg, James E.; Greenspan, Stephen

    This paper describes an alternative approach to educating high risk youth, developed in Omaha, Nebraska, and known as the Boys Town Urban (BTU) Program. The BTU Program includes four components: (1) a normalized school setting; (2) a concretized credit system; (3) a focused discipline policy; and (4) a responsive services approach. A rationale for…

  19. Narrative Non-Fiction Stories of the School-to-Prison Pipeline: Are Discipline Alternative Educational Programs the Pump Station?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Ronny D.

    2013-01-01

    This research project used the Narrative Non-fiction method to examine the school-to-prison pipeline phenomenon through the experiences of four previously incarcerated adult males who had been placed in Discipline Alternative Educational Programs (DAEPs) during their public school education. In 1981, DAEPs were instituted as a pilot program to…

  20. Investigating the Effectiveness of a Reading Recovery Program for At-Risk Students in an Alternative School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderman, Clyde E.

    2008-01-01

    This applied dissertation was designed to evaluate a Reading Recovery program at an alternative school in Florida. The Reading Recovery program was used as an intervention for improving students' reading skills and performances on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) that is given each year to students in Grades 7 and 8. The…

  1. Three novel brain tropomyosin isoforms are expressed from the rat alpha-tropomyosin gene through the use of alternative promoters and alternative RNA processing.

    PubMed Central

    Lees-Miller, J P; Goodwin, L O; Helfman, D M

    1990-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding three novel tropomyosins, termed TMBr-1, TMBr-2, and TMBr-3, were isolated and characterized from a rat brain cDNA library. All are derived from a single gene, which was previously found to express striated muscle alpha-tropomyosin and a number of other tropomyosin isoforms via an alternative splicing mechanism (N. Ruiz-Opazo and B. Nadal-Ginard, J. Biol. Chem. 262:4755-4765, 1987; D. F. Wieczorek, C. W. J. Smith, and B. Nadal-Ginard, Mol. Cell. Biol. 8:679-694, 1988). The derived amino acid sequences revealed that TMBr-1 contains 281 amino acids, TMBr-2 contains 251 amino acids, and TMBr-3 contains 245 amino acids. All three proteins contain a region that is identical to amino acids 81 through 258 of skeletal muscle alpha-tropomyosin. TMBr-1 is identical to striated muscle alpha-tropomyosin from amino acids 1 through 258 but contains a novel COOH-terminal region from amino acids 259 through 281. TMBr-2 and TMBr-3 both contain identical NH2-terminal sequences from amino acids 1 through 44 which were found to be expressed from a novel promoter. TMBr-3 contains the same COOH-terminal region as TMBr-1, whereas TMBr-2 contains a second novel COOH-terminal region. The genomic organization of the exons encoding TMBr-1, TMBr-2, and TMBr-3 were determined. These studies revealed a previously uncharacterized promoter located in the internal region of the alpha-TM gene as well as two novel COOH-terminal coding exons. The alpha-TM gene is a complex transcription unit containing 15 exons including two alternative promoters, two internal mutually exclusive exon cassettes, and four alternatively spliced 3' exons that encode four different COOH-terminal coding regions. A total of nine distinct mRNAs are known to be expressed from the alpha-TM gene in a cell type-specific manner in tissues such as striated muscle, smooth muscle, kidney, liver, brain, and fibroblasts. The mRNAs encoding TMBr-1, TMBr-2, and TMBr-3 were found to be expressed only in brain tissue

  2. MAp19, the alternative splice product of the MASP2 gene.

    PubMed

    Degn, Søren E; Thiel, Steffen; Nielsen, Ole; Hansen, Annette G; Steffensen, Rudi; Jensenius, Jens C

    2011-10-28

    The lectin pathway of complement is a central part of innate immunity, but as a powerful inducer of inflammation it needs to be tightly controlled. The MASP2 gene encodes two proteins, MASP-2 and MAp19. MASP-2 is the serine protease responsible for lectin pathway activation. The smaller alternative splice product, MAp19, lacks a catalytic domain but retains two of three domains involved in association with the pattern-recognition molecules (PRMs): mannan-binding lectin (MBL), H-ficolin, L-ficolin and M-ficolin. MAp19 reportedly acts as a competitive inhibitor of MASP-2-mediated complement activation. In light of a ten times lower affinity of MAp19, versus MASP-2, for association with the PRMs, much higher serum concentrations of MAp19 than MASP-2 would be required for MAp19 to exert such an inhibitory activity. Just four amino acid residues distinguish MAp19 from MASP-2, and these are conserved between man, mouse and rat. Nonetheless we generated monoclonal rat anti-MAp19 antibodies and established a quantitative assay. We found the concentration of MAp19 in serum to be 217 ng/ml, i.e., 11nM, comparable to the 7 nM of MASP-2. In serum all MASP-2, but only a minor fraction of MAp19, was associated with PRMs. In contrast to previous reports we found that MAp19 could not compete with MASP-2 for binding to MBL, nor could it inhibit MASP-2-mediated complement activation. Immunohistochemical analyses combined with qRT-PCR revealed that both MAp19 and MASP-2 were mainly expressed in hepatocytes. High levels of MAp19 were found in urine, where MASP-2 was absent. PMID:21871896

  3. Population Genetics of Duplicated Alternatively Spliced Exons of the Dscam Gene in Daphnia and Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Brites, Daniela; Encinas-Viso, Francisco; Ebert, Dieter; Du Pasquier, Louis; Haag, Christoph R.

    2011-01-01

    In insects and crustaceans, the Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) occurs in many different isoforms. These are produced by mutually exclusive alternative splicing of dozens of tandem duplicated exons coding for parts or whole immunoglobulin (Ig) domains of the Dscam protein. This diversity plays a role in the development of the nervous system and also in the immune system. Structural analysis of the protein suggested candidate epitopes where binding to pathogens could occur. These epitopes are coded by regions of the duplicated exons and are therefore diverse within individuals. Here we apply molecular population genetics and molecular evolution analyses using Daphnia magna and several Drosophila species to investigate the potential role of natural selection in the divergence between orthologs of these duplicated exons among species, as well as between paralogous exons within species. We found no evidence for a role of positive selection in the divergence of these paralogous exons. However, the power of this test was low, and the fact that no signs of gene conversion between paralogous exons were found suggests that paralog diversity may nonetheless be maintained by selection. The analysis of orthologous exons in Drosophila and in Daphnia revealed an excess of non-synonymous polymorphisms in the epitopes putatively involved in pathogen binding. This may be a sign of balancing selection. Indeed, in Dr. melanogaster the same derived non-synonymous alleles segregate in several populations around the world. Yet other hallmarks of balancing selection were not found. Hence, we cannot rule out that the excess of non-synonymous polymorphisms is caused by segregating slightly deleterious alleles, thus potentially indicating reduced selective constraints in the putative pathogen binding epitopes of Dscam. PMID:22174757

  4. Program Evaluation: A Study to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Academic and Behavioral Interventions in an Alternative to out of School Suspension Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizzi, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide insight regarding the impact that the alternative to suspension program Achievement Character Excellence (ACE) has on the students who are placed there. The study utilized four achievement indicators to track the level of improvement of students after they were placed in the ACE program and after they were…

  5. Structure and expression of the nuclear gene coding for the chloroplast ribosomal protein L21: developmental regulation of a housekeeping gene by alternative promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Lagrange, T; Franzetti, B; Axelos, M; Mache, R; Lerbs-Mache, S

    1993-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the nuclear gene of the chloroplast ribosomal protein L21 (rpl21) of Spinacia oleracea. The gene consists of five exons and four introns. All introns are located in the sequence which corresponds to the Escherichia coli-like central core of the protein. L21 mRNA is present in photosynthetic (leaves) and nonphotosynthetic (roots and seeds) plant organs, although large quantitative differences exist. Primer extension and S1 nuclease mapping experiments revealed the existence of two types of transcripts in leaves. The two corresponding start sites were defined as P1 and P2. In roots and seeds, we found only the shorter of the two transcripts (initiated at P2). The nucleotide sequence surrounding P2 resembles promoters for housekeeping and vertebrate r-protein genes. Analysis of several promoter constructions by transient expression confirmed that both transcripts originate from transcription initiation. Results are interpreted to mean that the expression of the rpl21 gene is regulated by alternative promoters. One of the promoters (P2) is constitutive, and the other one (P1) is specifically induced in leaves, i.e., its activation should be related to the transformation of amyloplasts or proplastids to chloroplasts. The gene thus represents the first example of a housekeeping gene which is regulated by the organ-specific usage of alternative promoters. Primer extension analysis and S1 nuclease mapping of another nucleus-encoded chloroplast ribosomal protein gene (rps1) give evidence that the same type of regulation by two-promoter usage might be a more general phenomenon of plant chloroplast-related ribosomal protein genes. Preliminary results indicate that presence of conserved sequences within the rpl21 and rps1 promoter regions which compete for the same DNA binding activities. Images PMID:8455634

  6. Conceptions of Teaching Science Held by Novice Teachers in an Alternative Certification Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koballa, Thomas R.; Glynn, Shawn M.; Upson, Leslie

    2005-12-01

    Case studies to investigate the conceptions of teaching science held by three novice teachers participating in an alternative secondary science teacher certification program were conducted, along with the relationships between their conceptions of science teaching and their science teaching practice. Data used to build the cases included the participants' responses to two surveys and transcripts of audiotaped interviews with the participants and their university supervisors who observed them teach. Findings revealed that novice teachers hold ideal and working conceptions of teaching science, the novices' conceptions can serve as referents for their classroom practice, and the conceptions of teaching science held by the novice teachers were resistant to change, even in the face of well-intentioned instruction.

  7. Alternative dispute resolution programs in health care: a study of organizational utilization.

    PubMed

    Rotarius, T M; Liberman, A; Osterman, K C; Putnam, P

    1999-03-01

    The hyperturbulence in today's health care environment acts as a primer that escalates the frequency and severity of business conflicts. Several alternative dispute resolution (ADR) programs are described, with ADR suggested as a viable approach in assisting organizations in resolving conflicts. The data indicate that all of the health care organizations surveyed utilize some form of ADR to resolve conflict. The most common conflict resolution objective found is win/win, and respondents felt that ADR effectively met intended objectives. While the data gathered for this study are from a limited geographic region in Central Florida, the results can likely be generalized to many socially and ethnically diverse regions of the country. PMID:10351047

  8. MSWT-01, an alternative in combining Production Based Education (PBE) and student CSR program in Polman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananto, Gamawan; Setiawan, Albertus B.; Z, Darman M.

    2014-06-01

    MSWT-01, Mobile Surface Water Treatment, producing 1m3 per hour, is an alternative for providing clean water in flood disaster areas, and was developed at Bandung State Polytechnic for Manufacturing (Polman) as a part of institution research project. The combination of cartridge or membrane technology such as carbon block, MF, UF and filtration media is used for this machine, instead of coagulation-flocculation with chemical addition, due to emergency purposes related with its treatment processing time. The idea is that MSWT could be combined with Production Based Education (PBE) concept in Polman as a vocational education institution and students 'CSR', students social activities. With the number of implementation trials in real flood area condition, MSWT will be developed further based on the technical output result. The manufacturing process for improving or adding necessary features could be implemented as a student's project in PBE system. This might be an ideal combination alternative for such vocational institution that students get the product media for their PBE program and implement their work as a defined social activity. They will learn and experience related technical matters and more social interactions with the people and other disaster stakeholder as well.

  9. StrateGene: object-oriented programming in molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Carhart, R E; Cash, H D; Moore, J F

    1988-03-01

    This paper describes some of the ways that object-oriented programming methodologies have been used to represent and manipulate biological information in a working application. When running on a Xerox 1100 series computer, StrateGene functions as a genetic engineering workstation for the management of information about cloning experiments. It represents biological molecules, enzymes, fragments, and methods as classes, subclasses, and members in a hierarchy of objects. These objects may have various attributes, which themselves can be defined and classified. The attributes and their values can be passed from the classes of objects down to the subclasses and members. The user can modify the objects and their attributes while using them. New knowledge and changes to the system can be incorporated relatively easily. The operations on the biological objects are associated with the objects themselves. This makes it easier to invoke them correctly and allows generic operations to be customized for the particular object. PMID:3164229

  10. Pyramiding, alternating or mixing: comparative performances of deployment strategies of nematode resistance genes to promote plant resistance efficiency and durability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistant cultivars are key elements for pathogen control and pesticide reduction, but their repeated use may lead to the emergence of virulent pathogen populations, able to overcome the resistance. Increased research efforts, mainly based on theoretical studies, explore spatio-temporal deployment strategies of resistance genes in order to maximize their durability. We evaluated experimentally three of these strategies to control root-knot nematodes: cultivar mixtures, alternating and pyramiding resistance genes, under controlled and field conditions over a 3-years period, assessing the efficiency and the durability of resistance in a protected crop rotation system with pepper as summer crop and lettuce as winter crop. Results The choice of the resistance gene and the genetic background in which it is introgressed, affected the frequency of resistance breakdown. The pyramiding of two different resistance genes in one genotype suppressed the emergence of virulent isolates. Alternating different resistance genes in rotation was also efficient to decrease virulent populations in fields due to the specificity of the virulence and the trapping effect of resistant plants. Mixing resistant cultivars together appeared as a less efficient strategy to control nematodes. Conclusions This work provides experimental evidence that, in a cropping system with seasonal sequences of vegetable species, pyramiding or alternating resistance genes benefit yields in the long-term by increasing the durability of resistant cultivars and improving the long-term control of a soil-borne pest. To our knowledge, this result is the first one obtained for a plant-nematode interaction, which helps demonstrate the general applicability of such strategies for breeding and sustainable management of resistant cultivars against pathogens. PMID:24559060

  11. TCERG1 Regulates Alternative Splicing of the Bcl-x Gene by Modulating the Rate of RNA Polymerase II Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Marta; Cloutier, Alexandre; Sánchez-Hernández, Noemí; Michelle, Laetitia; Lemieux, Bruno; Blanchette, Marco; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Chabot, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Complex functional coupling exists between transcriptional elongation and pre-mRNA alternative splicing. Pausing sites and changes in the rate of transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) may therefore have fundamental impacts in the regulation of alternative splicing. Here, we show that the elongation and splicing-related factor TCERG1 regulates alternative splicing of the apoptosis gene Bcl-x in a promoter-dependent manner. TCERG1 promotes the splicing of the short isoform of Bcl-x (Bcl-xs) through the SB1 regulatory element located in the first half of exon 2. Consistent with these results, we show that TCERG1 associates with the Bcl-x pre-mRNA. A transcription profile analysis revealed that the RNA sequences required for the effect of TCERG1 on Bcl-x alternative splicing coincide with a putative polymerase pause site. Furthermore, TCERG1 modifies the impact of a slow polymerase on Bcl-x alternative splicing. In support of a role for an elongation mechanism in the transcriptional control of Bcl-x alternative splicing, we found that TCERG1 modifies the amount of pre-mRNAs generated at distal regions of the endogenous Bcl-x. Most importantly, TCERG1 affects the rate of RNAPII transcription of endogenous human Bcl-x. We propose that TCERG1 modulates the elongation rate of RNAPII to relieve pausing, thereby activating the proapoptotic Bcl-xS 5′ splice site. PMID:22158966

  12. Gene regulation, alternative splicing, and posttranslational modification of troponin subunits in cardiac development and adaptation: a focused review

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Juan-Juan; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Troponin plays a central role in regulating the contraction and relaxation of vertebrate striated muscles. This review focuses on the isoform gene regulation, alternative RNA splicing, and posttranslational modifications of troponin subunits in cardiac development and adaptation. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations such as phosphorylation and proteolysis modifications, and structure-function relationships of troponin subunit proteins are summarized. The physiological and pathophysiological significances are discussed for impacts on cardiac muscle contractility, heart function, and adaptations in health and diseases. PMID:24817852

  13. The Anne Frank Haven: A case of an alternative educational program in an integrative Kibbutz setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Peretz, Miriam; Giladi, Moshe; Dror, Yuval

    1992-01-01

    The essential features of the programme of the Anne Frank Haven are the complete integration of children from low SES and different cultural backgrounds with Kibbutz children; a holistic approach to education; and the involvement of the whole community in an "open" residential school. After 33 years, it is argued that the experiment has proved successful in absorbing city-born youth in the Kibbutz, enabling at-risk populations to reach significant academic achievements, and ensuring their continued participation in the dominant culture. The basic integration model consists of "layers" of concentric circles, in dynamic interaction. The innermost circle is the class, the learning community. The Kibbutz community and the foster parents form a supportive, enveloping circle, which enables students to become part of the outer community and to intervene in it. A kind of meta-environment, the inter-Kibbutz partnership and the Israeli educational system, influence the program through decision making and guidance. Some of the principles of the Haven — integration, community involvement, a year's induction for all new students, and open residential settings — could be useful for cultures and societies outside the Kibbutz. The real "secret" of success of an alternative educational program is the dedicated, motivated and highly trained staff.

  14. Severe hypoxia exerts parallel and cell-specific regulation of gene expression and alternative splicing in human mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The endosteum of the bone marrow provides a specialized hypoxic niche that may serve to preserve the integrity, pluripotency, longevity and stemness of resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). To explore the molecular genetic consequences of such a niche we subjected human (h) MSCs to a pO2 of 4 mmHg and analyzed global gene expression and alternative splicing (AS) by genome-exon microarray and RT-qPCR, and phenotype by western blot and immunostaining. Results Out of 446 genes differentially regulated by >2.5-fold, down-regulated genes outnumbered up-regulated genes by 243:203. Exon analyses revealed 60 hypoxia-regulated AS events with splice indices (SI) >1.0 from 53 genes and a correlation between high SI and degree of transcript regulation. Parallel analyses of a publicly available AS study on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) showed that there was a strong cell-specific component with only 11 genes commonly regulated in hMSCs and HUVECs and 17 common differentially spliced genes. Only 3 genes were differentially responsive to hypoxia at the gene (>2.0) and AS levels in both cell types. Functional assignments revealed unique profiles of gene expression with complex regulation of differentiation, extracellular matrix, intermediate filament and metabolic marker genes. Antioxidant genes, striated muscle genes and insulin/IGF-1 signaling intermediates were down-regulated. There was a coordinate induction of 9 out of 12 acidic keratins that along with other epithelial and cell adhesion markers implies a partial mesenchymal to epithelial transition. Conclusions We conclude that severe hypoxia confers a quiescent phenotype in hMSCs that is reflected by both the transcriptome profile and gene-specific changes of splicosome actions. The results reveal that severe hypoxia imposes markedly different patterns of gene regulation of MSCs compared with more moderate hypoxia. This is the first study to report hypoxia-regulation of AS in stem

  15. Alternatively Spliced Genes as Biomarkers for Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder and Psychosis: A Blood-Based Spliceome-Profiling Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Glatt, S.J.; Chandler, S.D.; Bousman, C.A.; Chana, G.; Lucero, G.R.; Tatro, E.; May, T.; Lohr, J.B.; Kremen, W.S.; Everall, I.P.; Tsuang, M.T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Transcriptomic biomarkers of psychiatric diseases obtained from a query of peripheral tissues that are clinically accessible (e.g., blood cells instead of post-mortem brain tissue) have substantial practical appeal to discern the molecular subtypes of common complex diseases such as major psychosis. To this end, spliceome-profiling is a new methodological approach that has considerable conceptual relevance for discovery and clinical translation of novel biomarkers for psychiatric illnesses. Advances in microarray technology now allow for improved sensitivity in measuring the transcriptome while simultaneously querying the “exome” (all exons) and “spliceome” (all alternatively spliced variants). The present study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of spliceome-profiling to discern transcriptomic biomarkers of psychosis. Methods We measured exome and spliceome expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 13 schizophrenia patients, nine bipolar disorder patients, and eight healthy control subjects. Each diagnostic group was compared to each other, and the combined group of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia patients was also compared to the control group. Furthermore, we compared subjects with a history of psychosis to subjects without such history. Results After applying Bonferroni corrections for the 21,866 full-length gene transcripts analyzed, we found significant interactions between diagnostic group and exon identity, consistent with group differences in rates or types of alternative splicing. Relative to the control group, 18 genes in the bipolar disorder group, eight genes in the schizophrenia group, and 15 genes in the combined bipolar disorder and schizophrenia group appeared differentially spliced. Importantly, thirty-three genes showed differential splicing patterns between the bipolar disorder and schizophrenia groups. More frequent exon inclusion and/or over-expression was observed in psychosis. Finally, these observations are

  16. Using Basic Science to Develop an Innovative Program in Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Amri, Hakima; Haramati, Aviad

    2010-01-01

    The growing interest in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) and the increasing incorporation of its modalities in the United States' healthcare system have exposed a number of problems in the field. These include a shortage of qualified CAM providers, scarcity of evidence-based research, lack of trained scientists in the field, and the ubiquitous marketing of frequently uncontrolled CAM products. Thus, the development of a comprehensive and scientifically sound educational infrastructure has become a crucial initial step in redirecting these adverse trends.With support from the NIH-sponsored curricular CAM initiative, faculty from the department of physiology and biophysics at Georgetown University developed a M.S. program in CAM in 2003. This unique, first of its kind, science-based graduate program offers a master's degree (MS) in physiology with an emphasis on CAM. The CAM-MS degree in physiology is designed to enable students to critically assess various CAM modalities, apply scientific rigor, and carry out evidence-based CAM research. The curriculum includes core science courses and CAM-related classes. Additionally, in order to emphasize the application of academic knowledge and further strengthen problem-solving skills, the students complete an eight-week summer practicum in a professional CAM-related environment.Here, we report on our innovative and interdisciplinary CAM graduate program where creative teaching is implemented by basic scientists and enhanced by the application of their disciplines in tandem with the clinical expertise of CAM practitioners in the community. Thus, the faculty in the Department of Physiology & Biophysics is developing emerging cross disciplinary areas of study and interest in order to prepare new generations of future physicians, health professionals, educators, and researchers capable of objectively assessing the safety and efficacy of various CAM modalities, and introducing scientific rigor to much needed research

  17. Using Basic Science to Develop an Innovative Program in Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Amri, Hakima; Haramati, Aviad

    2010-01-01

    The growing interest in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) and the increasing incorporation of its modalities in the United States' healthcare system have exposed a number of problems in the field. These include a shortage of qualified CAM providers, scarcity of evidence-based research, lack of trained scientists in the field, and the ubiquitous marketing of frequently uncontrolled CAM products. Thus, the development of a comprehensive and scientifically sound educational infrastructure has become a crucial initial step in redirecting these adverse trends. With support from the NIH-sponsored curricular CAM initiative, faculty from the department of physiology and biophysics at Georgetown University developed a M.S. program in CAM in 2003. This unique, first of its kind, science-based graduate program offers a master's degree (MS) in physiology with an emphasis on CAM. The CAM-MS degree in physiology is designed to enable students to critically assess various CAM modalities, apply scientific rigor, and carry out evidence-based CAM research. The curriculum includes core science courses and CAM-related classes. Additionally, in order to emphasize the application of academic knowledge and further strengthen problem-solving skills, the students complete an eight-week summer practicum in a professional CAM-related environment. Here, we report on our innovative and interdisciplinary CAM graduate program where creative teaching is implemented by basic scientists and enhanced by the application of their disciplines in tandem with the clinical expertise of CAM practitioners in the community. Thus, the faculty in the Department of Physiology & Biophysics is developing emerging cross disciplinary areas of study and interest in order to prepare new generations of future physicians, health professionals, educators, and researchers capable of objectively assessing the safety and efficacy of various CAM modalities, and introducing scientific rigor to much needed research

  18. Gene gun bombardment with DNA-coated gold particles is a potential alternative to hydrodynamics-based transfection for delivering genes into superficial hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Ling; Chen, Jeng-Chang; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Chang, Ming-Yu; Liang, Chun-Kai; Chiu, Cheng-Tang; Lin, Deng-Yn; Liaw, Yun-Fan

    2008-04-01

    Although in vivo nonviral gene delivery to the liver is critical for hepatic gene therapy, there are a number of technical obstacles. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-encoding DNA was coated onto gold particles (gold-DNA), dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline (pure DNA), and prepared as a polymer adjuvant (jetPEI)-galactosidase solution (polymer-DNA). Murine liver transfection was attempted by nonviral approaches, which included hydrodynamics-based transfection (HBT) of pure DNA, transport and transhepatic injection of polymer-DNA, and gene gun bombardment with pure DNA, gold-DNA, and polymer-DNA. Only HBT and gene gun bombardment yielded significant numbers of EGFP(+) hepatocytes. With the exception of the edge of the liver, HBT had a whole-liver transfection rate of 20% under optimized conditions. HBT resulted in marked hepatic infarctions, most prominently at the edge of the liver. For gene gun bombardment, the transfection rate was pressure dependent and limited to 15% for gold-DNA. Triple or quadruple bombardment at 30 psi resulted in a transfection rate comparable to that of a single bombardment at higher pressure, but was associated with minimal scattered hepatic necrosis. The EGFP(+) hepatocytes were located mainly in the superficial layers. We conclude that both HBT and gene gun bombardment yielded efficient murine hepatocyte transfection in vivo. Severe hepatic infarction impedes foreign gene expression in the superficial hepatocytes after HBT. Repeated bombardment with gold-DNA, using an accelerated particle gene gun at 30 psi, is a potential alternative to HBT for delivering genes to superficial hepatocytes in vivo, although gold-related hepatic necrosis is a persistent problem. PMID:18366343

  19. Ligand-Bound GeneSwitch Causes Developmental Aberrations in Drosophila that Are Alleviated by the Alternative Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Andjelković, Ana; Kemppainen, Kia K.; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2016-01-01

    Culture of Drosophila expressing the steroid-dependent GeneSwitch transcriptional activator under the control of the ubiquitous α-tubulin promoter was found to produce extensive pupal lethality, as well as a range of dysmorphic adult phenotypes, in the presence of high concentrations of the inducing drug RU486. Prominent among these was cleft thorax, seen previously in flies bearing mutant alleles of the nuclear receptor Ultraspiracle and many other mutants, as well as notched wings, leg malformations, and bristle abnormalities. Neither the α-tubulin-GeneSwitch driver nor the inducing drug on their own produced any of these effects. A second GeneSwitch driver, under the control of the daughterless promoter, which gave much lower and more tissue-restricted transgene expression, exhibited only mild bristle abnormalities in the presence of high levels of RU486. Coexpression of the alternative oxidase (AOX) from Ciona intestinalis produced a substantial shift in the developmental outcome toward a wild-type phenotype, which was dependent on the AOX expression level. Neither an enzymatically inactivated variant of AOX, nor GFP, or the alternative NADH dehydrogenase Ndi1 from yeast gave any such rescue. Users of the GeneSwitch system should be aware of the potential confounding effects of its application in developmental studies. PMID:27412986

  20. Population genomics of resource exploitation: insights from gene expression profiles of two Daphnia ecotypes fed alternate resources.

    PubMed

    Dudycha, Jeffry L; Brandon, Christopher S; Deitz, Kevin C

    2012-02-01

    Consumer-resource interactions are a central issue in evolutionary and community ecology because they play important roles in selection and population regulation. Most consumers encounter resource variation at multiple scales, and respond through phenotypic plasticity in the short term or evolutionary divergence in the long term. The key traits for these responses may influence resource acquisition, assimilation, and/or allocation. To identify relevant candidate genes, we experimentally assayed genome-wide gene expression in pond and lake Daphnia ecotypes exposed to alternate resource environments. One was a simple, high-quality laboratory diet, Ankistrodesmus falcatus. The other was the complex natural seston from a large lake. In temporary ponds, Daphnia generally experience high-quality, abundant resources, whereas lakes provide low-quality, seasonally shifting resources that are chronically limiting. For both ecotypes, we used replicate clones drawn from a number of separate populations. Fourteen genes were differentially regulated with respect to resources, including genes involved in gut processes, resource allocation, and activities with no obvious connection to resource exploitation. Three genes were differentially regulated in both ecotypes; the others may play a role in ecological divergence. Genes clearly linked to gut processes include two peritrophic matrix proteins, a Niemann-Pick type C2 gene, and a chymotrypsin. A pancreatic lipase, an epoxide hydrolase, a neuroparsin, and an UDP-dependent glucuronyltransferase are potentially involved in resource allocation through effects on energy processing and storage or hormone pathways. We performed quantitative rt-PCR for eight genes in independent samples of three clones of each of the two ecotypes. Though these largely confirmed observed differential regulation, some genes' expression was highly variable among clones. Our results demonstrate the value of matching the level of biological replication in

  1. Subnuclear partitioning of rRNA genes between the nucleolus and nucleoplasm reflects alternative epiallelic states

    PubMed Central

    Pontvianne, Frederic; Blevins, Todd; Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; Mozgová, Iva; Hassel, Christiane; Pontes, Olga M.F.; Tucker, Sarah; Mokroš, Petr; Muchová, Veronika; Fajkus, Jiří; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotes can have thousands of 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, many of which are silenced during development. Using fluorescence-activated sorting techniques, we show that active rRNA genes in Arabidopsis thaliana are present within sorted nucleoli, whereas silenced rRNA genes are excluded. DNA methyltransferase (met1), histone deacetylase (hda6), or chromatin assembly (caf1) mutants that disrupt silencing abrogate this nucleoplasmic–nucleolar partitioning. Bisulfite sequencing data indicate that active nucleolar rRNA genes are nearly completely demethylated at promoter CGs, whereas silenced genes are nearly fully methylated. Collectively, the data reveal that rRNA genes occupy distinct but changeable nuclear territories according to their epigenetic state. PMID:23873938

  2. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program final report. Volume 1: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles in typical applications in New York State. During 3 years of collecting data, 7.3 million miles of driving were accumulated, 1,003 chassis-dynamometer emissions tests were performed, 862,000 gallons of conventional fuel were saved, and unique information was developed about garage safety recommendations, vehicle performance, and other topics. Findings are organized by vehicle and fuel type. For light-duty compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, technology has evolved rapidly and closed-loop, electronically-controlled fuel systems provide performance and emissions advantages over open-loop, mechanical systems. The best CNG technology produces consistently low tailpipe emissions versus gasoline, and can eliminate evaporative emissions. Reduced driving range remains the largest physical drawback. Fuel cost is low ($/Btu) but capital costs are high, indicating that economics are best with vehicles that are used intensively. Propane produces impacts similar to CNG and is less expensive to implement, but fuel cost is higher than gasoline and safety codes limit use in urban areas. Light-duty methanol/ethanol vehicles provide performance and emissions benefits over gasoline with little impact on capital costs, but fuel costs are high. Heavy-duty CNG engines are evolving rapidly and provide large reductions in emissions versus diesel. Capital costs are high for CNG buses and fuel efficiency is reduced, but the fuel is less expensive and overall operating costs are about equal to those of diesel buses. Methanol buses provide performance and emissions benefits versus diesel, but fuel costs are high. Other emerging technologies were also evaluated, including electric vehicles, hybrid-electric vehicles, and fuel cells.

  3. Characterization of the Amicetin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster from Streptomyces vinaceusdrappus NRRL 2363 Implicates Two Alternative Strategies for Amide Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaiyun; Zhang, Haibo; Li, Sumei; Xiao, Ji; Zhang, Guangtao; Zhu, Yiguang; Niu, Siwen; Ju, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Amicetin, an antibacterial and antiviral agent, belongs to a group of disaccharide nucleoside antibiotics featuring an α-(1→4)-glycoside bond in the disaccharide moiety. In this study, the amicetin biosynthesis gene cluster was cloned from Streptomyces vinaceusdrappus NRRL 2363 and localized on a 37-kb contiguous DNA region. Heterologous expression of the amicetin biosynthesis gene cluster in Streptomyces lividans TK64 resulted in the production of amicetin and its analogues, thereby confirming the identity of the ami gene cluster. In silico sequence analysis revealed that 21 genes were putatively involved in amicetin biosynthesis, including 3 for regulation and transportation, 10 for disaccharide biosynthesis, and 8 for the formation of the amicetin skeleton by the linkage of cytosine, p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), and the terminal (+)-α-methylserine moieties. The inactivation of the benzoate coenzyme A (benzoate-CoA) ligase gene amiL and the N-acetyltransferase gene amiF led to two mutants that accumulated the same two compounds, cytosamine and 4-acetamido-3-hydroxybenzoic acid. These data indicated that AmiF functioned as an amide synthethase to link cytosine and PABA. The inactivation of amiR, encoding an acyl-CoA-acyl carrier protein transacylase, resulted in the production of plicacetin and norplicacetin, indicating AmiR to be responsible for attachment of the terminal methylserine moiety to form another amide bond. These findings implicated two alternative strategies for amide bond formation in amicetin biosynthesis. PMID:22267658

  4. Characterization of two chitin synthase genes of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and alternate exon usage in one of the genes during development.

    PubMed

    Arakane, Yasuyuki; Hogenkamp, David G; Zhu, Yu Cheng; Kramer, Karl J; Specht, Charles A; Beeman, Richard W; Kanost, Michael R; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam

    2004-03-01

    Two chitin synthase (CHS) genes of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, were sequenced and their transcription patterns during development examined. By screening a BAC library of genomic DNA from T. castaneum (Tc) with a DNA probe encoding the catalytic domain of a putative Tribolium CHS, several clones that contained CHS genes were identified. Two distinct PCR products were amplified from these BAC clones and confirmed to be highly similar to CHS genes from other insects, nematodes and fungi. The DNA sequences of these genes, TcCHS1 and TcCHS2, were determined by amplification of overlapping PCR fragments from two of the BAC DNAs and mapped to different linkage groups. Each ORF was identified and full-length cDNAs were also amplified, cloned and sequenced. TcCHS1 and TcCHS2 encode transmembrane proteins of 1558 and 1464 amino acids, respectively. The TcCHS1 gene was found to use alternate exons, each encoding 59 amino acids, a feature not found in the TcCHS2 gene. During development, Tribolium expressed TcCHS1 predominantly in the embryonic and pupal stages, whereas TcCHS2 was prevalent in the late larval and adult stages. The alternate exon 8a of TcCHS1 was utilized over a much broader range of development than exon 8b. We propose that the two isoforms of the TcCHS1 enzyme are used predominantly for the formation of chitin in embryonic and pupal cuticles, whereas TcCHS2 is utilized primarily for the synthesis of peritrophic membrane-associated chitin in the midgut. PMID:14871625

  5. LIN28A Modulates Splicing and Gene Expression Programs in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Bennett, Brian D; Luo, Shujun; Inoue, Kaoru; Grimm, Sara A; Schroth, Gary P; Bushel, Pierre R; Kinyamu, H Karimi; Archer, Trevor K

    2015-09-01

    LIN28 is an evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding protein with critical functions in developmental timing and cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying LIN28's oncogenic properties are yet to be described. RNA-protein immunoprecipitation coupled with genome-wide sequencing (RIP-Seq) analysis revealed significant LIN28 binding within 843 mRNAs in breast cancer cells. Many of the LIN28-bound mRNAs are implicated in the regulation of RNA and cell metabolism. We identify heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1), a protein with multiple roles in mRNA metabolism, as a LIN28-interacting partner. Subsequently, we used a custom computational method to identify differentially spliced gene isoforms in LIN28 and hnRNP A1 small interfering RNA (siRNA)-treated cells. The results reveal that these proteins regulate alternative splicing and steady-state mRNA expression of genes implicated in aspects of breast cancer biology. Notably, cells lacking LIN28 undergo significant isoform switching of the ENAH gene, resulting in a decrease in the expression of the ENAH exon 11a isoform. The expression of ENAH isoform 11a has been shown to be elevated in breast cancers that express HER2. Intriguingly, analysis of publicly available array data from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) reveals that LIN28 expression in the HER2 subtype is significantly different from that in other breast cancer subtypes. Collectively, our data suggest that LIN28 may regulate splicing and gene expression programs that drive breast cancer subtype phenotypes. PMID:26149387

  6. LIN28A Modulates Splicing and Gene Expression Programs in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Bennett, Brian D.; Luo, Shujun; Inoue, Kaoru; Grimm, Sara A.; Schroth, Gary P.; Bushel, Pierre R.

    2015-01-01

    LIN28 is an evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding protein with critical functions in developmental timing and cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying LIN28's oncogenic properties are yet to be described. RNA-protein immunoprecipitation coupled with genome-wide sequencing (RIP-Seq) analysis revealed significant LIN28 binding within 843 mRNAs in breast cancer cells. Many of the LIN28-bound mRNAs are implicated in the regulation of RNA and cell metabolism. We identify heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1), a protein with multiple roles in mRNA metabolism, as a LIN28-interacting partner. Subsequently, we used a custom computational method to identify differentially spliced gene isoforms in LIN28 and hnRNP A1 small interfering RNA (siRNA)-treated cells. The results reveal that these proteins regulate alternative splicing and steady-state mRNA expression of genes implicated in aspects of breast cancer biology. Notably, cells lacking LIN28 undergo significant isoform switching of the ENAH gene, resulting in a decrease in the expression of the ENAH exon 11a isoform. The expression of ENAH isoform 11a has been shown to be elevated in breast cancers that express HER2. Intriguingly, analysis of publicly available array data from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) reveals that LIN28 expression in the HER2 subtype is significantly different from that in other breast cancer subtypes. Collectively, our data suggest that LIN28 may regulate splicing and gene expression programs that drive breast cancer subtype phenotypes. PMID:26149387

  7. 75 FR 32942 - National Toxicology Program (NTP); NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM) AGENCY: National Institute of...-2009: Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods. In accordance with... validation and regulatory acceptance of toxicological test methods that more accurately assess the safety...

  8. Characterization of genes for an alternative nitrogenase in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, T

    1993-01-01

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is a heterotrophic, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium that has been reported to fix nitrogen and reduce acetylene to ethane in the absence of molybdenum. DNA from this strain hybridized well at low stringency to the nitrogenase 2 (vnfDGK) genes of Azotobacter vinelandii. The hybridizing region was cloned from a lambda EMBL3 genomic library of A. variabilis, mapped, and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequences of the vnfD and vnfK genes of A. variabilis showed only about 56% similarity to the nifDK genes of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 but were 76 to 86% similar to the anfDK or vnfDK genes of A. vinelandii. The organization of the vnf gene cluster in A. variabilis was similar to that of A. vinelandii. However, in A. variabilis, the vnfG gene was fused to vnfD; hence, this gene is designated vnfDG. A vnfH gene was not contiguous with the vnfDG gene and has not yet been identified. A mutant strain, in which a neomycin resistance cassette was inserted into the vnf cluster, grew well in a medium lacking a source of fixed nitrogen in the presence of molybdenum but grew poorly when vanadium replaced molybdenum. In contrast, the parent strain grew equally well in media containing either molybdenum or vanadium. The vnf genes were transcribed in the absence of molybdenum, with or without vanadium. The vnf gene cluster did not hybridize to chromosomal DNA from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 or from the heterotrophic strains, Nostoc sp. strain Mac and Nostoc sp. strain ATCC 29150. A hybridizing ClaI fragment very similar in size to the A. variabilis ClaI fragment was present in DNA isolated from several independent, cultured isolates of Anabaena sp. from the Azolla symbiosis. Images PMID:8407800

  9. Differential gene expression and alternative splicing between diploid and tetraploid watermelon lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synthetic tetraploid plants have been used for production of seedless triploid watermelon lines being pollinated with diploid plants. When compared to their diploid or triploid counterparts, the tetraploid exhibit wide phenotypic differences. Though many factors, including alternative splicing (AS),...

  10. Alternative splicing of RNAs transcribed from the human c- myb gene

    SciTech Connect

    Shen-Ong, G.L.C.; Skurla, R.M. Jr.; Owens, J.D.; Mushinski, J.F. )

    1990-06-01

    An alternative splicing event in which a portion of the intron bounded by the vE6 and vE7 exons with v-{ital myb} homology is included as an additional 363-nucleotide coding exon (termed E6A or coding exon 9A) has been described for normal and tumor murine cells that express {ital myb}. The authors show that this alternative splicing event is conserved in human c-{ital myb} transcripts. In addition, another novel exon (termed E7A or coding exon 10A) is identified in human c-{ital myb} mRNAs expressed in normal and tumor cells. Although the {ital myb} protein isoform encoded by murine E6A-containing mRNA is larger than the major c-{ital myb} protein, the predicted products of both forms of human alternatively spliced {ital myb} transcripts are 3{prime}-truncated {ital myb} proteins that terminate in the alternative exons. These proteins are predicted to lack the same carboxy-terminal domains as the viral {ital myb} proteins encoded by avian myeloblastosis virus and E26 virus. The junction sequences that flank these exons closely resemble the consensus splice donor and splice acceptor sequences, yet the alternative transcripts are less abundant than is the major form of c-{ital myb} transcripts. The contribution that alternative splicing events in c-{ital myb} expression may make on c-{ital myb} function remains to be elucidated.

  11. 75 FR 25867 - National Toxicology Program (NTP) Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ... workshop. SUMMARY: The Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM... validation activities needed to further advance the use of alternative methods for vaccine post-licensing... development and validation of alternative methods that can reduce, refine, and replace the use of animals...

  12. Commute alternatives educational outreach. Transportation demand management resource program for the transportation professional. Report for July 1993-December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, P.L.; Rudge, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    This project is designed to aid in the planning, implementation, evaluation, and improvements of a (TDM) agency of program. Through the use of examples, the TDM professional can review innovative programs and initiatives throughout the United States, and model activities after these exhibits. The equations and benchmarks cited by this publication are other effective tools which offer insights into the relative success of TDM plan components in various environments. This report also introduces many of the traditional and innovative commute alternatives and discusses the benefits, obstacles, and goals of these initiatives. Strategies including carpooling, vanpooling, telecommuting, tax incentives, guaranteed ride home programs, bicycle and pedestrian facilities, transit, telecommuting, alternative work hour programs, and intermodalism are discussed and evaluated in real-world scenarios.

  13. Population genomics of resource exploitation: insights from gene expression profiles of two Daphnia ecotypes fed alternate resources

    PubMed Central

    Dudycha, Jeffry L; Brandon, Christopher S; Deitz, Kevin C

    2012-01-01

    Consumer–resource interactions are a central issue in evolutionary and community ecology because they play important roles in selection and population regulation. Most consumers encounter resource variation at multiple scales, and respond through phenotypic plasticity in the short term or evolutionary divergence in the long term. The key traits for these responses may influence resource acquisition, assimilation, and/or allocation. To identify relevant candidate genes, we experimentally assayed genome-wide gene expression in pond and lake Daphnia ecotypes exposed to alternate resource environments. One was a simple, high-quality laboratory diet, Ankistrodesmus falcatus. The other was the complex natural seston from a large lake. In temporary ponds, Daphnia generally experience high-quality, abundant resources, whereas lakes provide low-quality, seasonally shifting resources that are chronically limiting. For both ecotypes, we used replicate clones drawn from a number of separate populations. Fourteen genes were differentially regulated with respect to resources, including genes involved in gut processes, resource allocation, and activities with no obvious connection to resource exploitation. Three genes were differentially regulated in both ecotypes; the others may play a role in ecological divergence. Genes clearly linked to gut processes include two peritrophic matrix proteins, a Niemann–Pick type C2 gene, and a chymotrypsin. A pancreatic lipase, an epoxide hydrolase, a neuroparsin, and an UDP-dependent glucuronyltransferase are potentially involved in resource allocation through effects on energy processing and storage or hormone pathways. We performed quantitative rt-PCR for eight genes in independent samples of three clones of each of the two ecotypes. Though these largely confirmed observed differential regulation, some genes’ expression was highly variable among clones. Our results demonstrate the value of matching the level of biological replication

  14. Expression and alternative splicing of classical and nonclassical MHCI genes in the hippocampus and neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Tetruashvily, Mazell M; Melson, John W; Park, Joseph J; Peng, Xiaoyu; Boulanger, Lisa M

    2016-04-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) is a large gene family, with over 20 members in mouse. Some MHCIs are well-known for their critical roles in the immune response. Studies in mice which lack stable cell-surface expression of many MHCI proteins suggest that one or more MHCIs also play unexpected, essential roles in the establishment, function, and modification of neuronal synapses. However, there is little information about which genes mediate MHCI's effects in neurons. In this study, RT-PCR was used to simultaneously assess transcription of many MHCI genes in regions of the central and peripheral nervous system where MHCI has a known or suspected role. In the hippocampus, a part of the CNS where MHCI regulates synapse density, synaptic transmission, and plasticity, we found that more than a dozen MHCI genes are transcribed. Single-cell RT-PCR revealed that individual hippocampal neurons can express more than one MHCI gene, and that the MHCI gene expression profile of CA1 pyramidal neurons differs significantly from that of CA3 pyramidal neurons or granule cells of the dentate gyrus. MHCI gene expression was also assessed at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), a part of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) where MHCI plays a role in developmental synapse elimination, aging-related synapse loss, and neuronal regeneration. Four MHCI genes are expressed at the NMJ at an age when synapse elimination is occurring in three different muscles. Several MHCI mRNA splice variants were detected in hippocampus, but not at the NMJ. Together, these results establish the first profile of MHCI gene expression at the developing NMJ, and demonstrate that MHCI gene expression is under tight spatial and temporal regulation in the nervous system. They also identify more than a dozen MHCIs that could play important roles in regulating synaptic transmission and plasticity in the central and peripheral nervous systems. PMID:26802536

  15. EM-21 ALTERNATIVE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROGRAM FOR SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M; King, W; Martino, C

    2009-12-18

    Preliminary studies in the EM-21 Alternative Chemical Cleaning Program have focused on understanding the dissolution of Hematite (a primary sludge heel phase) in oxalic acid, with a focus on minimizing oxalic acid usage. Literature reviews, thermodynamic modeling, and experimental results have all confirmed that pH control, preferably using a supplemental proton source, is critical to oxalate minimization. With pH control, iron concentrations as high as 0.103 M have been obtained in 0.11 M oxalic acid. This is consistent with the formation of a 1:1 (iron:oxalate) complex. The solubility of Hematite in oxalic acid has been confirmed to increase by a factor of 3 when the final solution pH decreases from 5 to below 1. This is consistent with literature predictions of a shift in speciation from a 1:3 to 1:1 as the pH is lowered. Above a solution pH of 6, little Hematite dissolves. These results emphasize the importance of pH control in optimizing Hematite dissolution in oxalic acid.

  16. Assessment of Alternative Student Aid Delivery Systems: Preliminary Specification of the Current System with Program Antecedents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advanced Technology, Inc., Reston, VA.

    Specifications of the current delivery systems of the Pell Grant program, the Guaranteed Student Loan (GSL) program, and campus-based aid programs are provided. The relationship between features of the programs and delivery systems is also examined. The campus-based programs include the Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) Program,…

  17. Comprehensive gene expression analysis of rice aleurone cells: probing the existence of an alternative gibberellin receptor.

    PubMed

    Yano, Kenji; Aya, Koichiro; Hirano, Ko; Ordonio, Reynante Lacsamana; Ueguchi-Tanaka, Miyako; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2015-02-01

    Current gibberellin (GA) research indicates that GA must be perceived in plant nuclei by its cognate receptor, GIBBERELLIN INSENSITIVE DWARF1 (GID1). Recognition of GA by GID1 relieves the repression mediated by the DELLA protein, a model known as the GID1-DELLA GA perception system. There have been reports of potential GA-binding proteins in the plasma membrane that perceive GA and induce α-amylase expression in cereal aleurone cells, which is mechanistically different from the GID1-DELLA system. Therefore, we examined the expression of the rice (Oryza sativa) α-amylase genes in rice mutants impaired in the GA receptor (gid1) and the DELLA repressor (slender rice1; slr1) and confirmed their lack of response to GA in gid1 mutants and constitutive expression in slr1 mutants. We also examined the expression of GA-regulated genes by genome-wide microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses and confirmed that all GA-regulated genes are modulated by the GID1-DELLA system. Furthermore, we studied the regulatory network involved in GA signaling by using a set of mutants defective in genes involved in GA perception and gene expression, namely gid1, slr1, gid2 (a GA-related F-box protein mutant), and gamyb (a GA-related trans-acting factor mutant). Almost all GA up-regulated genes were regulated by the four named GA-signaling components. On the other hand, GA down-regulated genes showed different expression patterns with respect to GID2 and GAMYB (e.g. a considerable number of genes are not controlled by GAMYB or GID2 and GAMYB). Based on these observations, we present a comprehensive discussion of the intricate network of GA-regulated genes in rice aleurone cells. PMID:25511432

  18. Calcitonin/calcitonin gene-related peptide transcription unit: tissue-specific expression involves selective use of alternative polyadenylation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Amara, S G; Evans, R M; Rosenfeld, M G

    1984-01-01

    Different 3' coding exons in the rat calcitonin gene are used to generate distinct mRNAs encoding either the hormone calcitonin in thyroidal C-cells or a new neuropeptide referred to as calcitonin gene-related peptide in neuronal tissue, indicating the RNA processing regulation is one strategy used in tissue-specific regulation of gene expression in the brain. Although the two mRNAs use the same transcriptional initiation site and have identical 5' terminal sequences, their 3' termini are distinct. The polyadenylation sites for calcitonin and calcitonin gene-related peptide mRNAs are located at the end of the exons 4 and 6, respectively. Termination of transcription after the calcitonin exon does not dictate the production of calcitonin mRNA, because transcription proceeds through both calcitonin and calcitonin gene-related peptide exons irrespective of which mRNA is ultimately produced. In isolated nuclei, both polyadenylation sites appear to be utilized; however, the proximal (calcitonin) site is preferentially used in nuclei from tissues producing calcitonin mRNA. These data suggest that the mechanism dictating production of each mRNA involves the selective use of alternative polyadenylation sites. Images PMID:6334229

  19. Polymorphism, recombination and alternative unscrambling in the DNA polymerase alpha gene of the ciliate Stylonychia lemnae (Alveolata; class Spirotrichea).

    PubMed Central

    Ardell, David H; Lozupone, Catherine A; Landweber, Laura F

    2003-01-01

    DNA polymerase alpha is the most highly scrambled gene known in stichotrichous ciliates. In its hereditary micronuclear form, it is broken into >40 pieces on two loci at least 3 kb apart. Scrambled genes must be reassembled through developmental DNA rearrangements to yield functioning macronuclear genes, but the mechanism and accuracy of this process are unknown. We describe the first analysis of DNA polymorphism in the macronuclear version of any scrambled gene. Six functional haplotypes obtained from five Eurasian strains of Stylonychia lemnae were highly polymorphic compared to Drosophila genes. Another incompletely unscrambled haplotype was interrupted by frameshift and nonsense mutations but contained more silent mutations than expected by allelic inactivation. In our sample, nucleotide diversity and recombination signals were unexpectedly high within a region encompassing the boundary of the two micronuclear loci. From this and other evidence we infer that both members of a long repeat at the ends of the loci provide alternative substrates for unscrambling in this region. Incongruent genealogies and recombination patterns were also consistent with separation of the two loci by a large genetic distance. Our results suggest that ciliate developmental DNA rearrangements may be more probabilistic and error prone than previously appreciated and constitute a potential source of macronuclear variation. From this perspective we introduce the nonsense-suppression hypothesis for the evolution of ciliate altered genetic codes. We also introduce methods and software to calculate the likelihood of hemizygosity in ciliate haplotype samples and to correct for multiple comparisons in sliding-window analyses of Tajima's D. PMID:14704164

  20. Alternative migratory locust phenotypes are associated with differences in the expression of genes encoding the methylation machinery.

    PubMed

    Robinson, K L; Tohidi-Esfahani, D; Ponton, F; Simpson, S J; Sword, G A; Lo, N

    2016-04-01

    Despite the importance of locust density-dependent polyphenism as a model system for understanding phenotypic plasticity, there is still much to be learnt about its underlying molecular control. Here we describe the first investigation into the expression of genes encoding the DNA methylation machinery in the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria). We show that the alternative solitarious and gregarious phenotypic states induced by different locust rearing densities are associated with significant differences in the expression of the target genes DNA methyltransferase 1, DNA methyltransferase 2 and methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2/3. This variation was most pronounced in the embryos of solitarious vs. gregarious mothers. We mapped the embryonic methylation profiles of several intragenic regions and a Long Interspersed Nuclear Element (LINE), each of which is known to be differentially expressed between alternative locust phenotypes or has been directly implicated in phase change. LmI and three genes, adenyl cyclase-associated binding protein 2, choline kinase alpha-like and henna, were methylated. Our results set the stage for future studies investigating the specific role of DNA methylation in the maternal transfer of migratory locust phase polyphenism. PMID:26612460

  1. Teacher and Parent Perceptions of Classroom Experiences of African American Male Students in a High School Alternative Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kimberly C.

    2013-01-01

    A major concern in the public schools is the low academic achievement of African American males. This mixed methods study examined the classroom experiences of African American male students in an alternative program. The dual purpose was to investigate the teachers' perceptions and their ability to provide best learning environments for…

  2. Commission Recommendations Concerning Alternate Delivery Options for the State's Cal Grant Program. Commission Report 03-04

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2003

    2003-01-01

    In September 2002, the California Legislature adopted Supplemental Report Language (SRL) directing the California Postsecondary Education Commission (CPEC) to convene a task force to examine alternative delivery systems for the State's Cal Grant program. This report responds to that legislative request. The recommendations contained in this report…

  3. UNESCO Science Programs: Impacts of U.S. Withdrawal and Suggestions for Alternative Interim Arrangements. A Preliminary Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Office of International Affairs.

    This study was conducted to provide the U.S. Department of State with an assessment of the potential impacts on science of a United States withdrawal from UNESCO and to suggest possible alternative arrangements to maintain essential U.S. scientific contacts with UNESCO-sponsored programs in case the United States were no longer a member of UNESCO…

  4. The Impact of Traditional and Alternative University Teacher Preparation Program Options on Secondary Teacher Candidates' Knowledge, Skills, Dispositions, and Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnabel, Rebecca B.

    2009-01-01

    The preparation of secondary teacher candidates through traditional (n = 13) or alternative (n = 15) options did not statistically significantly impact knowledge, skills or dispositions. Results for content knowledge, as measured at entrance to the program based on the Pre-Professional Skills Test, indicate that candidates who entered the…

  5. Lower East Side Prep: An Alternative to the Conventional High School Program. First Year of Operation, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wohl, Seth F.

    This evaluation report of one alternative high school in New York City analyzes the academic achievement, attendance, testing, academic credit, English language proficiency, and attitudes of the sixty minority students who attended this urban prep school in Chinatown. Three fifths of the students in the program were recent Chinese immigrants. The…

  6. When There Is No Blueprint: The Provision of Mental Health Services in Alternative School Programs for Suspended and Expelled Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenson, Julie

    2011-01-01

    A variety of alternative programs are being implemented in Canada and the United States for students who have exhibited conduct problems and who are suspended or expelled from their schools. Given the complexity of issues that these students frequently face, treatment must be multifaceted, wrap-around, delivered by trained professionals and be…

  7. An Analysis of the Efficacy Beliefs of Special Education Teachers Completing the Alternative versus the Traditional Certification Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Thomas Hunter

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy beliefs of two groups of special education teachers who had completed certification requirements in mild/moderate disabilities. The first group included 26 special education teachers who had completed an alternative certification program at a midsize public university in Louisiana between 2003 and 2008. The…

  8. An Interactive Microcomputer Program for Teaching the Impacts of Alternative Policy Sets in the Market for a Single Commodity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Elton; Stoecker, Arthur

    1995-01-01

    Describes a computer software program where students define alternative policy sets and compare their effects on the welfare of consumers, producers, and the public sector. Policy sets may be a single tax or quota or a mix of taxes, subsidies, and/or price supports implemented in the marketing chain. (MJP)

  9. South Carolina's Program of Alternative Certification for Educators (PACE): Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Post-Employment Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkett, Christopher; Gimbert, Belinda G.

    2009-01-01

    This research evaluated South Carolina's Program of Alternative Certification for Educators (PACE). Specifically, the study analyzed this nontraditional teacher preparation pathway's outcomes: to recruit, train, and retain effective beginning teachers who fill the growing teacher vacancies in rural South Carolina. From an in-depth review of the…

  10. Beginning Mathematics Teachers from Alternative Certification Programs: Their Success in the Classroom and How They Achieved It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ham, Edward

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on beginning mathematics teachers from alternative certification programs and their perceptions of what is required to be successful. A mixed-methods research study was completed with several goals in mind: (1) identifying how beginning mathematics teachers define success in the classroom during their earliest years, (2)…

  11. An Alternative Approach to the Organization of the Office of Education Programs. Bureau of Indian Affairs, December 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, James E.

    Presenting a Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Office of Education organizational alternative based upon the findings of the Task Force on the Functions and Organization of the BIA Education Programs (Executive Summary is appended) and the concept of American Indian self-determination, this document deals with: the experience of Indian control of…

  12. Capacity Building Special Alternatives Program Community School District 3. Final Evaluation Report, 1993-94. OER Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duque, Diana L.

    The Capacity Building Special Alternatives Program, an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its second year of operation, functioned at seven schools in a community school district of Manhattan (New York). The project served 195 students of limited English proficiency (LEP) whose native languages were Albanian,…

  13. Leadership Preparation Program's Effects on Principals' Preparedness: Traditional University-Based vs. Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagliardi, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    In this mixed-method causal comparative and interview-based study, I developed an understanding of the way in which school principals perceived their level of preparedness. The effectiveness of two types of leadership preparation programs, traditional-university based and alternative, were considered on principal preparedness. One hundred and…

  14. Gene organization and alternative splicing of human prohormone convertase PC8.

    PubMed Central

    Goodge, K A; Thomas, R J; Martin, T J; Gillespie, M T

    1998-01-01

    The mammalian Ca2+-dependent serine protease prohormone convertase PC8 is expressed ubiquitously, being transcribed as 3.5, 4.3 and 6.0 kb mRNA isoforms in various tissues. To determine the origin of these various mRNA isoforms we report the characterization of the human PC8 gene, which has been previously localized to chromosome 11q23-24. Consisting of 16 exons, the human PC8 gene spans approx. 27 kb. A comparison of the position of intron-exon junctions of the human PC8 gene with the gene structures of previously reported prohormone convertase genes demonstrated a divergence of the human PC8 from the highly conserved nature of the gene organization of this enzyme family. The nucleotide sequence of the 5'-flanking region of the human PC8 is reported and possesses putative promoter elements characteristic of a GC-rich promoter. Further supporting the potential role of a GC-rich promoter element, multiple transcriptional initiation sites within a 200 bp region were demonstrated. We propose that the various mRNA isoforms of PC8 result from the inclusion of intronic sequences within transcripts. PMID:9820811

  15. The Program of Gene Transcription for a Single Differentiating Cell Type during Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Asymmetric division during sporulation by Bacillus subtilis generates a mother cell that undergoes a 5-h program of differentiation. The program is governed by a hierarchical cascade consisting of the transcription factors: σE, σK, GerE, GerR, and SpoIIID. The program consists of the activation and repression of 383 genes. The σE factor turns on 262 genes, including those for GerR and SpoIIID. These DNA-binding proteins downregulate almost half of the genes in the σE regulon. In addition, SpoIIID turns on ten genes, including genes involved in the appearance of σK. Next, σK activates 75 additional genes, including that for GerE. This DNA-binding protein, in turn, represses half of the genes that had been activated by σK while switching on a final set of 36 genes. Evidence is presented that repression and activation contribute to proper morphogenesis. The program of gene expression is driven forward by its hierarchical organization and by the repressive effects of the DNA-binding proteins. The logic of the program is that of a linked series of feed-forward loops, which generate successive pulses of gene transcription. Similar regulatory circuits could be a common feature of other systems of cellular differentiation. PMID:15383836

  16. Program for Alternative Careers in Education (P.A.C.E.). A Nontraditional Program Combining Teacher and Human Service Career Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flicker, Bernard

    The Program for Alternative Careers in Education of Lehman College (New York) is described. Since its beginning in February 1973, it has functioned to prepare undergraduate college juniors and seniors for careers as educators in the widest possible variety of educational institutions, including public and private human service institutions, social…

  17. A mutation in the Srrm4 gene causes alternative splicing defects and deafness in the Bronx waltzer mouse.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yoko; Jahan, Israt; Bonde, Gregory; Sun, Xingshen; Hildebrand, Michael S; Engelhardt, John F; Smith, Richard J H; Cornell, Robert A; Fritzsch, Bernd; Bánfi, Botond

    2012-01-01

    Sensory hair cells are essential for hearing and balance. Their development from epithelial precursors has been extensively characterized with respect to transcriptional regulation, but not in terms of posttranscriptional influences. Here we report on the identification and functional characterization of an alternative-splicing regulator whose inactivation is responsible for defective hair-cell development, deafness, and impaired balance in the spontaneous mutant Bronx waltzer (bv) mouse. We used positional cloning and transgenic rescue to locate the bv mutation to the splicing factor-encoding gene Ser/Arg repetitive matrix 4 (Srrm4). Transcriptome-wide analysis of pre-mRNA splicing in the sensory patches of embryonic inner ears revealed that specific alternative exons were skipped at abnormally high rates in the bv mice. Minigene experiments in a heterologous expression system confirmed that these skipped exons require Srrm4 for inclusion into the mature mRNA. Sequence analysis and mutagenesis experiments showed that the affected transcripts share a novel motif that is necessary for the Srrm4-dependent alternative splicing. Functional annotations and protein-protein interaction data indicated that the encoded proteins cluster in the secretion and neurotransmission pathways. In addition, the splicing of a few transcriptional regulators was found to be Srrm4 dependent, and several of the genes known to be targeted by these regulators were expressed at reduced levels in the bv mice. Although Srrm4 expression was detected in neural tissues as well as hair cells, analyses of the bv mouse cerebellum and neocortex failed to detect splicing defects. Our data suggest that Srrm4 function is critical in the hearing and balance organs, but not in all neural tissues. Srrm4 is the first alternative-splicing regulator to be associated with hearing, and the analysis of bv mice provides exon-level insights into hair-cell development. PMID:23055939

  18. NPY family genes respond negatively to alternative feedstuffs in channel catfish diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Of considerable importance in fish nutrition is the development of aquafeeds using alternative dietary ingredients which will allow aquaculture to grow globally, without putting excessive pressure on natural fisheries or adding considerable cost to production, while also addressing and maintaining t...

  19. A Gene Regulatory Program for Meiotic Prophase in the Fetal Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Mark E.; Mueller, Jacob L.; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Page, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomal program of meiotic prophase, comprising events such as laying down of meiotic cohesins, synapsis between homologs, and homologous recombination, must be preceded and enabled by the regulated induction of meiotic prophase genes. This gene regulatory program is poorly understood, particularly in organisms with a segregated germline. We characterized the gene regulatory program of meiotic prophase as it occurs in the mouse fetal ovary. By profiling gene expression in the mouse fetal ovary in mutants with whole tissue and single-cell techniques, we identified 104 genes expressed specifically in pre-meiotic to pachytene germ cells. We characterized the regulation of these genes by 1) retinoic acid (RA), which induces meiosis, 2) Dazl, which is required for germ cell competence to respond to RA, and 3) Stra8, a downstream target of RA required for the chromosomal program of meiotic prophase. Initial induction of practically all identified meiotic prophase genes requires Dazl. In the presence of Dazl, RA induces at least two pathways: one Stra8-independent, and one Stra8-dependent. Genes vary in their induction by Stra8, spanning fully Stra8-independent, partially Stra8-independent, and fully Stra8-dependent. Thus, Stra8 regulates the entirety of the chromosomal program but plays a more nuanced role in governing the gene expression program. We propose that Stra8-independent gene expression enables the stockpiling of selected meiotic structural proteins prior to the commencement of the chromosomal program. Unexpectedly, we discovered that Stra8 is required for prompt down-regulation of itself and Rec8. Germ cells that have expressed and down-regulated Stra8 are refractory to further Stra8 expression. Negative feedback of Stra8, and subsequent resistance to further Stra8 expression, may ensure a single, restricted pulse of Stra8 expression. Collectively, our findings reveal a gene regulatory logic by which germ cells prepare for the chromosomal program of

  20. Large introns in relation to alternative splicing and gene evolution: a case study of Drosophila bruno-3

    PubMed Central

    Kandul, Nikolai P; Noor, Mohamed AF

    2009-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing (AS) of maturing mRNA can generate structurally and functionally distinct transcripts from the same gene. Recent bioinformatic analyses of available genome databases inferred a positive correlation between intron length and AS. To study the interplay between intron length and AS empirically and in more detail, we analyzed the diversity of alternatively spliced transcripts (ASTs) in the Drosophila RNA-binding Bruno-3 (Bru-3) gene. This gene was known to encode thirteen exons separated by introns of diverse sizes, ranging from 71 to 41,973 nucleotides in D. melanogaster. Although Bru-3's structure is expected to be conducive to AS, only two ASTs of this gene were previously described. Results Cloning of RT-PCR products of the entire ORF from four species representing three diverged Drosophila lineages provided an evolutionary perspective, high sensitivity, and long-range contiguity of splice choices currently unattainable by high-throughput methods. Consequently, we identified three new exons, a new exon fragment and thirty-three previously unknown ASTs of Bru-3. All exon-skipping events in the gene were mapped to the exons surrounded by introns of at least 800 nucleotides, whereas exons split by introns of less than 250 nucleotides were always spliced contiguously in mRNA. Cases of exon loss and creation during Bru-3 evolution in Drosophila were also localized within large introns. Notably, we identified a true de novo exon gain: exon 8 was created along the lineage of the obscura group from intronic sequence between cryptic splice sites conserved among all Drosophila species surveyed. Exon 8 was included in mature mRNA by the species representing all the major branches of the obscura group. To our knowledge, the origin of exon 8 is the first documented case of exonization of intronic sequence outside vertebrates. Conclusion We found that large introns can promote AS via exon-skipping and exon turnover during evolution likely due to