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Sample records for alternative rna splicing

  1. Alternative RNA splicing and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sali; Cheng, Chonghui

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a fundamental mechanism by which a gene can give rise to multiple distinct mRNA transcripts, yielding protein isoforms with different, even opposing, functions. With the recognition that alternative splicing occurs in nearly all human genes, its relationship with cancer-associated pathways has emerged as a rapidly growing field. In this review, we summarize recent findings that have implicated the critical role of alternative splicing in cancer and discuss current understandings of the mechanisms underlying dysregulated alternative splicing in cancer cells. PMID:23765697

  2. Methods for Characterization of Alternative RNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Samuel E.; Cheng, Chonghui

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of alternative splicing to detect the abundance of differentially spliced isoforms of a gene in total RNA can be accomplished via RT-PCR using both quantitative real-time and semi-quantitative PCR methods. These methods require careful PCR primer design to ensure specific detection of particular splice isoforms. We also describe analysis of alternative splicing using a splicing “minigene” in mammalian cell tissue culture to facilitate investigation of the regulation of alternative splicing of a particular exon of interest. PMID:26721495

  3. Investigating alternative RNA splicing in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Mereau, Agnès; Hardy, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing, the process by which distinct mature mRNAs can be produced from a single primary transcript, is a key mechanism to increase the organism complexity. The generation of alternative splicing pattern is a means to expand the proteome diversity and also to control gene expression through the regulation of mRNA abundance. Alternative splicing is therefore particularly prevalent during development and accordingly numerous splicing events are regulated in a tissue or temporal manner. To study the roles of alternative splicing during developmental processes and decipher the molecular mechanisms that underlie temporal and spatial regulation, it is important to develop in vivo whole animal studies. In this chapter, we present the advantages of using the amphibian Xenopus as a fully in vivo model to study alternative splicing and we describe the experimental procedures that can be used with Xenopus laevis embryos and oocytes to define the cis-regulatory elements and identify the associated trans-acting factors. PMID:22956098

  4. Vitamin D and alternative splicing of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Chun, Rene F.; Lisse, Thomas S.; Garcia, Alejandro J.; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S.; Hewison, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The active form of vitamin D (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D) exerts its genomic effects via binding to a nuclear high-affinity vitamin D receptor (VDR). Recent deep sequencing analysis of VDR binding locations across the complete genome has significantly expanded our understanding of the actions of vitamin D and VDR on gene transcription. However, these studies have also promoted appreciation of the extra-transcriptional impact of vitamin D on gene expression. It is now clear that vitamin D interacts with the epigenome via effects on DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and microRNA generation to maintain normal biological functions. There is also increasing evidence that vitamin D can influence pre-mRNA constitutive splicing and alternative splicing, although the mechanism for this remains unclear. Pre-mRNA splicing has long been thought to be a post-transcription RNA processing event, but current data indicate that this occurs co-transcriptionally. Several steroid hormones have been recognized to coordinately control gene transcription and pre-mRNA splicing through the recruitment of nuclear receptor co-regulators that can both control gene transcription and splicing. The current review will discuss this concept with specific reference to vitamin D, and the potential role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNPC), a nuclear factor with an established function in RNA splicing. hnRNPC, has been shown to be involved in the VDR transcriptional complex as a vitamin D-response element-binding protein (VDRE-BP), and may act as a coupling factor linking VDR-directed gene transcription with RNA splicing. In this way hnRNPC may provide an additional mechanism for the fine-tuning of vitamin D-regulated target gene expression. PMID:25447737

  5. Identification of alternative splicing regulators by RNA interference in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung W.; Parisky, Katherine; Celotto, Alicia M.; Reenan, Robert A.; Graveley, Brenton R.

    2004-01-01

    Alternative splicing is thought to be regulated by nonspliceosomal RNA binding proteins that modulate the association of core components of the spliceosome with the pre-mRNA. Although the majority of metazoan genes encode pre-mRNAs that are alternatively spliced, remarkably few splicing regulators are currently known. Here, we used RNA interference to examine the role of >70% of the Drosophila RNA-binding proteins in regulating alternative splicing. We identified 47 proteins as splicing regulators, 26 of which have not previously been implicated in alternative splicing. Many of the regulators we identified are nonspliceosomal RNA-binding proteins. However, our screen unexpectedly revealed that altering the concentration of certain core components of the spliceosome specifically modulates alternative splicing. These results significantly expand the number of known splicing regulators and reveal an extraordinary richness in the mechanisms that regulate alternative splicing. PMID:15492211

  6. SplicingTypesAnno: annotating and quantifying alternative splicing events for RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyong; Zuo, Fenghua; Ru, Yuanbin; Guo, Jiqiang; Yan, Xiaoyan; Sablok, Gaurav

    2015-04-01

    Alternative splicing plays a key role in the regulation of the central dogma. Four major types of alternative splicing have been classified as intron retention, exon skipping, alternative 5 splice sites or alternative donor sites, and alternative 3 splice sites or alternative acceptor sites. A few algorithms have been developed to detect splice junctions from RNA-Seq reads. However, there are few tools targeting at the major alternative splicing types at the exon/intron level. This type of analysis may reveal subtle, yet important events of alternative splicing, and thus help gain deeper understanding of the mechanism of alternative splicing. This paper describes a user-friendly R package, extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. SplicingTypesAnno can: (1) provide annotation for major alternative splicing at exon/intron level. By comparing the annotation from GTF/GFF file, it identifies the novel alternative splicing sites; (2) offer a convenient two-level analysis: genome-scale annotation for users with high performance computing environment, and gene-scale annotation for users with personal computers; (3) generate a user-friendly web report and additional BED files for IGV visualization. SplicingTypesAnno is a user-friendly R package for extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types at exon/intron level for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. It is publically available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/splicingtypes/files/ or http://genome.sdau.edu.cn/research/software/SplicingTypesAnno.html. PMID:25720307

  7. Mechanisms and Regulation of Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing is a critical step in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, providing significant expansion of the functional proteome of eukaryotic organisms with limited gene numbers. Split eukaryotic genes contain intervening sequences or introns disrupting protein-coding exons, and intron removal occurs by repeated assembly of a large and highly dynamic ribonucleoprotein complex termed the spliceosome, which is composed of five small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles, U1, U2, U4/U6, and U5. Biochemical studies over the past 10 years have allowed the isolation as well as compositional, functional, and structural analysis of splicing complexes at distinct stages along the spliceosome cycle. The average human gene contains eight exons and seven introns, producing an average of three or more alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms. Recent high-throughput sequencing studies indicate that 100% of human genes produce at least two alternative mRNA isoforms. Mechanisms of alternative splicing include RNA–protein interactions of splicing factors with regulatory sites termed silencers or enhancers, RNA–RNA base-pairing interactions, or chromatin-based effects that can change or determine splicing patterns. Disease-causing mutations can often occur in splice sites near intron borders or in exonic or intronic RNA regulatory silencer or enhancer elements, as well as in genes that encode splicing factors. Together, these studies provide mechanistic insights into how spliceosome assembly, dynamics, and catalysis occur; how alternative splicing is regulated and evolves; and how splicing can be disrupted by cis- and trans-acting mutations leading to disease states. These findings make the spliceosome an attractive new target for small-molecule, antisense, and genome-editing therapeutic interventions. PMID:25784052

  8. Characterization of the Regulation of CD46 RNA Alternative Splicing.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sze Jing; Luo, Shufang; Ho, Jia Xin Jessie; Ly, Phuong Thao; Goh, Eling; Roca, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    Here we present a detailed analysis of the alternative splicing regulation of human CD46, which generates different isoforms with distinct functions. CD46 is a ubiquitous membrane protein that protects host cells from complement and plays other roles in immunity, autophagy, and cell adhesion. CD46 deficiency causes an autoimmune disorder, and this protein is also involved in pathogen infection and cancer. Before this study, the mechanisms of CD46 alternative splicing remained unexplored even though dysregulation of this process has been associated with autoimmune diseases. We proved that the 5' splice sites of CD46 cassette exons 7 and 8 encoding extracellular domains are defined by noncanonical mechanisms of base pairing to U1 small nuclear RNA. Next we characterized the regulation of CD46 cassette exon 13, whose inclusion or skipping generates different cytoplasmic tails with distinct functions. Using splicing minigenes, we identified multiple exonic and intronic splicing enhancers and silencers that regulate exon 13 inclusion via trans-acting splicing factors like PTBP1 and TIAL1. Interestingly, a common splicing activator such as SRSF1 appears to repress CD46 exon 13 inclusion. We also report that expression of CD46 mRNA isoforms is further regulated by non-sense-mediated mRNA decay and transcription speed. Finally, we successfully manipulated CD46 exon 13 inclusion using antisense oligonucleotides, opening up opportunities for functional studies of the isoforms as well as for therapeutics for autoimmune diseases. This study provides insight into CD46 alternative splicing regulation with implications for its function in the immune system and for genetic disease. PMID:27226545

  9. Alternative Splicing Signatures in RNA-seq Data: Percent Spliced in (PSI).

    PubMed

    Schafer, Sebastian; Miao, Kui; Benson, Craig C; Heinig, Matthias; Cook, Stuart A; Hubner, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of alternative exons are spliced out of messenger RNA to increase protein diversity. High-throughput sequencing of short cDNA fragments (RNA-seq) generates a genome-wide snapshot of these post-transcriptional processes. RNA-seq reads yield insights into the regulation of alternative splicing by revealing the usage of known or unknown splice sites as well as the expression level of exons. Constitutive exons are never covered by split alignments, whereas alternative exonic parts are located within highly expressed splicing junctions. The ratio between reads including or excluding exons, also known as percent spliced in index (PSI), indicates how efficiently sequences of interest are spliced into transcripts. This protocol describes a method to calculate the PSI without prior knowledge of splicing patterns. It provides a quantitative, global assessment of exon usage that can be integrated with other tools that identify differential isoform processing. Novel, complex splicing events along a genetic locus can be visualized in an exon-centric manner and compared across conditions. PMID:26439713

  10. Re-splicing of mature mRNA in cancer cells promotes activation of distant weak alternative splice sites

    PubMed Central

    Kameyama, Toshiki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Mayeda, Akila

    2012-01-01

    Transcripts of the human tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) are aberrantly spliced in many cancers. A major aberrant splicing event on the TSG101 pre-mRNA involves joining of distant alternative 5′ and 3′ splice sites within exon 2 and exon 9, respectively, resulting in the extensive elimination of the mRNA. The estimated strengths of the alternative splice sites are much lower than those of authentic splice sites. We observed that the equivalent aberrant mRNA could be generated from an intron-less TSG101 gene expressed ectopically in breast cancer cells. Remarkably, we identified a pathway-specific endogenous lariat RNA consisting solely of exonic sequences, predicted to be generated by a re-splicing between exon 2 and exon 9 on the spliced mRNA. Our results provide evidence for a two-step splicing pathway in which the initial constitutive splicing removes all 14 authentic splice sites, thereby bringing the weak alternative splice sites into close proximity. We also demonstrate that aberrant multiple-exon skipping of the fragile histidine triad (FHIT) pre-mRNA in cancer cells occurs via re-splicing of spliced FHIT mRNA. The re-splicing of mature mRNA can potentially generate mutation-independent diversity in cancer transcriptomes. Conversely, a mechanism may exist in normal cells to prevent potentially deleterious mRNA re-splicing events. PMID:22675076

  11. Alternative Splicing of TAF6: Downstream Transcriptome Impacts and Upstream RNA Splice Control Elements

    PubMed Central

    Kamtchueng, Catherine; Stébenne, Marie-Éve; Delannoy, Aurélie; Wilhelm, Emmanuelle; Léger, Hélène; Benecke, Arndt G.; Bell, Brendan

    2014-01-01

    The TAF6δ pathway of apoptosis can dictate life versus death decisions independently of the status of p53 tumor suppressor. TAF6δ is an inducible pro-apoptotic subunit of the general RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription factor TFIID. Alternative splice site choice of TAF6δ has been shown to be a pivotal event in triggering death via the TAF6δ pathway, yet nothing is currently known about the mechanisms that promote TAF6δ splicing. Furthermore the transcriptome impact of the gain of function of TAF6δ versus the loss of function of the major TAF6α splice form remains undefined. Here we employ comparative microarray analysis to show that TAF6δ drives a transcriptome profile distinct from that resulting from depletion of TAF6α. To define the cis-acting RNA elements responsible for TAF6δ alternative splicing we performed a mutational analysis of a TAF6 minigene system. The data point to several new RNA elements that can modulate TAF6δ and also reveal a role for RNA secondary structure in the selection of TAF6δ. PMID:25025302

  12. Alternative Splicing of Pre-mRNA in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Körner, Meike; Miller, Laurence J.

    2009-01-01

    Through alternative splicing, multiple different transcripts can be generated from a single gene. Alternative splicing represents an important molecular mechanism of gene regulation in physiological processes such as developmental programming as well as in disease. In cancer, splicing is significantly altered. Tumors express a different collection of alternative spliceoforms than normal tissues. Many tumor-associated splice variants arise from genes with an established role in carcinogenesis or tumor progression, and their functions can be oncogenic. This raises the possibility that products of alternative splicing play a pathogenic role in cancer. Moreover, cancer-associated spliceoforms represent potential diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets. G protein-coupled peptide hormone receptors provide a good illustration of alternative splicing in cancer. The wild-type forms of these receptors have long been known to be expressed in cancer and to modulate tumor cell functions. They are also recognized as attractive clinical targets. Recently, splice variants of these receptors have been increasingly identified in various types of cancer. In particular, alternative cholecystokinin type 2, secretin, and growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor spliceoforms are expressed in tumors. Peptide hormone receptor splice variants can fundamentally differ from their wild-type receptor counterparts in pharmacological and functional characteristics, in their distribution in normal and malignant tissues, and in their potential use for clinical applications. PMID:19574427

  13. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; et al

    2015-08-20

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected themore » splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. In conclusion, this large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs.« less

  14. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected the splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. This large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs. PMID:26294686

  15. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-08-20

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected the splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. In conclusion, this large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs.

  16. Integrative Analysis of Many RNA-Seq Datasets to Study Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyuan; Dai, Chao; Kang, Shuli; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is an important gene regulatory mechanism that dramatically increases the complexity of the proteome. However, how alternative splicing is regulated and how transcription and splicing are coordinated are still poorly understood, and functions of transcript isoforms have been studied only in a few limited cases. Nowadays, RNA-seq technology provides an exceptional opportunity to study alternative splicing on genome-wide scales and in an unbiased manner. With the rapid accumulation of data in public repositories, new challenges arise from the urgent need to effectively integrate many different RNA-seq datasets for study alterative splicing. This paper discusses a set of advanced computational methods that can integrate and analyze many RNA-seq datasets to systematically identify splicing modules, unravel the coupling of transcription and splicing, and predict the functions of splicing isoforms on a genome-wide scale. PMID:24583115

  17. Alternative splicing of SV40 early pre-mRNA in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    van Santen, V L; Spritz, R A

    1986-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) early pre-mRNA is spliced using either of two alternative 5' splice sites and a common 3' splice site to produce two mRNAs that encode the T and t antigens. We have studied alternative splicing of SV40 early pre-mRNA in vitro using a HeLa cell nuclear extract. Synthetic SV40 early transcripts are processed to T and t antigen mRNAs in vitro. As in SV40-infected cells in vivo, cleavage at the T antigen 5' splice site is more efficient than cleavage at the t antigen 5' splice site in vitro, although both of these 5' splice sites are utilized relatively inefficiently in vitro. The ratio of cleavage at the T and t antigen 5' splice sites is not changed significantly by a number of alterations in the conditions under which the in vitro splicing reactions are carried out. Images PMID:3027668

  18. Rbfox proteins regulate alternative mRNA splicing through evolutionarily conserved RNA bridges

    PubMed Central

    Lovci, Michael T; Ghanem, Dana; Marr, Henry; Arnold, Justin; Gee, Sherry; Parra, Marilyn; Liang, Tiffany Y; Stark, Thomas J; Gehman, Lauren T; Hoon, Shawn; Massirer, Katlin B; Pratt, Gabriel A; Black, Douglas L; Gray, Joe W; Conboy, John G; Yeo, Gene W

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) enables programmed diversity of gene expression across tissues and development. We show here that binding in distal intronic regions (>500 nucleotides (nt) from any exon) by Rbfox splicing factors important in development is extensive and is an active mode of splicing regulation. Similarly to exon-proximal sites, distal sites contain evolutionarily conserved GCATG sequences and are associated with AS activation and repression upon modulation of Rbfox abundance in human and mouse experimental systems. As a proof of principle, we validated the activity of two specific Rbfox enhancers in KIF21A and ENAH distal introns and showed that a conserved long-range RNA-RNA base-pairing interaction (an RNA bridge) is necessary for Rbfox-mediated exon inclusion in the ENAH gene. Thus we demonstrate a previously unknown RNA-mediated mechanism for AS control by distally bound RNA-binding proteins. PMID:24213538

  19. Rbfox proteins regulate alternative mRNA splicing through evolutionarily conserved RNA bridges.

    PubMed

    Lovci, Michael T; Ghanem, Dana; Marr, Henry; Arnold, Justin; Gee, Sherry; Parra, Marilyn; Liang, Tiffany Y; Stark, Thomas J; Gehman, Lauren T; Hoon, Shawn; Massirer, Katlin B; Pratt, Gabriel A; Black, Douglas L; Gray, Joe W; Conboy, John G; Yeo, Gene W

    2013-12-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) enables programmed diversity of gene expression across tissues and development. We show here that binding in distal intronic regions (>500 nucleotides (nt) from any exon) by Rbfox splicing factors important in development is extensive and is an active mode of splicing regulation. Similarly to exon-proximal sites, distal sites contain evolutionarily conserved GCATG sequences and are associated with AS activation and repression upon modulation of Rbfox abundance in human and mouse experimental systems. As a proof of principle, we validated the activity of two specific Rbfox enhancers in KIF21A and ENAH distal introns and showed that a conserved long-range RNA-RNA base-pairing interaction (an RNA bridge) is necessary for Rbfox-mediated exon inclusion in the ENAH gene. Thus we demonstrate a previously unknown RNA-mediated mechanism for AS control by distally bound RNA-binding proteins. PMID:24213538

  20. Context-dependent control of alternative splicing by RNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiang-Dong; Ares, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) bind to pre-mRNA to control alternative splicing, but it is not yet possible to read the ‘splicing code’ that dictates splicing regulation on the basis of genome sequence. Each alternative splicing event is controlled by multiple RBPs, the combined action of which creates a distribution of alternatively spliced products in a given cell type. As each cell type expresses a distinct array of RBPs, the interpretation of regulatory information on a given RNA target is exceedingly dependent on the cell type. RBPs also control each other’s functions at many levels, including by mutual modulation of their binding activities on specific regulatory RNA elements. In this Review, we describe some of the emerging rules that govern the highly context-dependent and combinatorial nature of alternative splicing regulation. PMID:25112293

  1. Spliceosomal DEAH-Box ATPases Remodel Pre-mRNA to Activate Alternative Splice Sites.

    PubMed

    Semlow, Daniel R; Blanco, Mario R; Walter, Nils G; Staley, Jonathan P

    2016-02-25

    During pre-mRNA splicing, a central step in the expression and regulation of eukaryotic genes, the spliceosome selects splice sites for intron excision and exon ligation. In doing so, the spliceosome must distinguish optimal from suboptimal splice sites. At the catalytic stage of splicing, suboptimal splice sites are repressed by the DEAH-box ATPases Prp16 and Prp22. Here, using budding yeast, we show that these ATPases function further by enabling the spliceosome to search for and utilize alternative branch sites and 3' splice sites. The ATPases facilitate this search by remodeling the splicing substrate to disengage candidate splice sites. Our data support a mechanism involving 3' to 5' translocation of the ATPases along substrate RNA and toward a candidate site, but, surprisingly, not across the site. Thus, our data implicate DEAH-box ATPases in acting at a distance by pulling substrate RNA from the catalytic core of the spliceosome. PMID:26919433

  2. Evolutionarily conserved autoregulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing by ribosomal protein L10a

    PubMed Central

    Takei, Satomi; Togo-Ohno, Marina; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kuroyanagi, Hidehito

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs can regulate expression of protein-coding genes by generating unproductive mRNAs rapidly degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Many of the genes directly regulated by alternative splicing coupled with NMD (AS-NMD) are related to RNA metabolism, but the repertoire of genes regulated by AS-NMD in vivo is to be determined. Here, we analyzed transcriptome data of wild-type and NMD-defective mutant strains of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans and demonstrate that eight of the 82 cytoplasmic ribosomal protein (rp) genes generate unproductively spliced mRNAs. Knockdown of any of the eight rp genes exerted a dynamic and compensatory effect on alternative splicing of its own transcript and inverse effects on that of the other rp genes. A large subunit protein L10a, termed RPL-1 in nematodes, directly and specifically binds to an evolutionarily conserved 39-nt stretch termed L10ARE between the two alternative 5′ splice sites in its own pre-mRNA to switch the splice site choice. Furthermore, L10ARE-mediated splicing autoregulation of the L10a-coding gene is conserved in vertebrates. These results indicate that L10a is an evolutionarily conserved splicing regulator and that homeostasis of a subset of the rp genes are regulated at the level of pre-mRNA splicing in vivo. PMID:26961311

  3. TCGASpliceSeq a compendium of alternative mRNA splicing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael; Wong, Wing Chung; Brown, Robert; Akbani, Rehan; Su, Xiaoping; Broom, Bradley; Melott, James; Weinstein, John

    2016-01-01

    TCGA's RNASeq data represent one of the largest collections of cancer transcriptomes ever assembled. RNASeq technology, combined with computational tools like our SpliceSeq package, provides a comprehensive, detailed view of alternative mRNA splicing. Aberrant splicing patterns in cancers have been implicated in such processes as carcinogenesis, de-differentiation and metastasis. TCGA SpliceSeq (http://bioinformatics.mdanderson.org/TCGASpliceSeq) is a web-based resource that provides a quick, user-friendly, highly visual interface for exploring the alternative splicing patterns of TCGA tumors. Percent Spliced In (PSI) values for splice events on samples from 33 different tumor types, including available adjacent normal samples, have been loaded into TCGA SpliceSeq. Investigators can interrogate genes of interest, search for the genes that show the strongest variation between or among selected tumor types, or explore splicing pattern changes between tumor and adjacent normal samples. The interface presents intuitive graphical representations of splicing patterns, read counts and various statistical summaries, including percent spliced in. Splicing data can also be downloaded for inclusion in integrative analyses. TCGA SpliceSeq is freely available for academic, government or commercial use. PMID:26602693

  4. Non-coding functions of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in development

    PubMed Central

    Mockenhaupt, Stefan; Makeyev, Eugene V.

    2015-01-01

    A majority of messenger RNA precursors (pre-mRNAs) in the higher eukaryotes undergo alternative splicing to generate more than one mature product. By targeting the open reading frame region this process increases diversity of protein isoforms beyond the nominal coding capacity of the genome. However, alternative splicing also frequently controls output levels and spatiotemporal features of cellular and organismal gene expression programs. Here we discuss how these non-coding functions of alternative splicing contribute to development through regulation of mRNA stability, translational efficiency and cellular localization. PMID:26493705

  5. A purine-rich intronic element enhances alternative splicing of thyroid hormone receptor mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, M L; Wilson, C M; Munroe, S H

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian thyroid hormone receptor gene c-erbAalpha gives rise to two mRNAs that code for distinct isoforms, TRalpha1 and TRalpha2, with antagonistic functions. Alternative processing of these mRNAs involves the mutually exclusive use of a TRalpha1-specific polyadenylation site or TRalpha2-specific 5' splice site. A previous investigation of TRalpha minigene expression defined a critical role for the TRalpha2 5' splice site in directing alternative processing. Mutational analysis reported here shows that purine residues within a highly conserved intronic element, SEa2, enhance splicing of TRalpha2 in vitro as well as in vivo. Although SEalpha2 is located within the intron of TRalpha2 mRNA, it activates splicing of a heterologous dsx pre-mRNA when located in the downstream exon. Competition with wild-type and mutant RNAs indicates that SEalpha2 functions by binding trans-acting factors in HeLa nuclear extract. Protein-RNA crosslinking identifies several proteins, including SF2/ASF and hnRNP H, that bind specifically to SEalpha2. SEalpha2 also includes an element resembling a 5' splice site consensus sequence that is critical for splicing enhancer activity. Mutations within this pseudo-5' splice site sequence have a dramatic effect on splicing and protein binding. Thus SEa2 and its associated factors are required for splicing of TRalpha2 pre-mRNA. PMID:11421362

  6. Regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing during erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hou, V C; Conboy, J G

    2001-03-01

    Although the mature enucleated erythrocyte is no longer active in nuclear processes such as pre-mRNA splicing, the function of many of its major structural proteins is dependent on alternative splicing choices made during the earlier stages of erythropoiesis. These splicing decisions fundamentally regulate many aspects of protein structure and function by governing the inclusion or exclusion of exons that encode protein interaction domains, regulatory signals, or translation initiation or termination sites. Alternative splicing events may be partially or entirely erythroid-specific, ie, distinct from the splicing patterns imposed on the same transcripts in nonerythroid cells. Moreover, differentiation stage-specific splicing "switches" may alter the structure and function of erythroid proteins in physiologically important ways as the cell is morphologically and functionally remodeled during normal differentiation. Derangements in the splicing of individual mutated pre-mRNAs can produce synthesis of truncated or unstable proteins that are responsible for numerous erythrocyte disorders. This review will summarize the salient features of regulated alternative splicing in general, review existing information concerning the widespread extent of alternative splicing among erythroid genes, and describe recent studies that are beginning to uncover the mechanisms that regulate an erythroid splicing switch in the protein 4.1R gene. PMID:11224680

  7. nagnag: Identification and quantification of NAGNAG alternative splicing using RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoyan; Sablok, Gaurav; Feng, Gang; Ma, Jiaxin; Zhao, Hongwei; Sun, Xiaoyong

    2015-07-01

    Regulation of proteome diversity by alternative splicing has been widely demonstrated in plants and animals. NAGNAG splicing, which was recently defined as a tissue specific event, results in the production of two distinct isoforms that are distinguished by three nucleotides (NAG) as a consequence of the intron proximal or distal to the splice site. Since the NAGNAG mechanism is not well characterized, tools for the identification and quantification of NAGNAG splicing events remain under-developed. Here we report nagnag, an R-based NAGNAG splicing detection tool, which accurately identifies and quantifies NAGNAG splicing events using RNA-Seq. Overall, nagnag produces user-friendly visualization reports and highlights differences between the DNA/RNA/protein across the identified isoforms of the reported gene. The package is available on https://sourceforge.net/projects/nagnag/files/; or http://genome.sdau.edu.cn/research/software/nagnag.html. PMID:26028313

  8. Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing in Neurons, Growing Up and Extending Its Reach

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Sika; Black, Douglas L.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing determines the protein output of most neuronally expressed genes. Many examples have been described of protein function being modulated by coding changes in different mRNA isoforms. Several recent studies demonstrate that through the coupling of splicing to other processes of mRNA metabolism alternative splicing can also act as an on/off switch for gene expression. Other regulated splicing events may determine how an mRNA is utilized in its later cytoplasmic life by changing its localization or translation. These studies make clear that the multiple steps of post-transcriptional gene regulation are strongly linked. Together these regulatory process play key roles in all aspects of the cell biology of neurons, from their initial differentiation, to their choice of connections, and finally to their function with mature circuits. PMID:23648015

  9. Spatio-temporal regulations and functions of neuronal alternative RNA splicing in developing and adult brains.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takatoshi; Hidaka, Chiharu; Iijima, Yoko

    2016-08-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a fundamental mechanism that generates molecular diversity from a single gene. In the central nervous system (CNS), key neural developmental steps are thought to be controlled by alternative splicing decisions, including the molecular diversity underlying synaptic wiring, plasticity, and remodeling. Significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms and functions of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in neurons through studies in invertebrate systems; however, recent studies have begun to uncover the potential role of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS. This article provides an overview of recent findings regarding the regulation and function of neuronal alternative splicing. In particular, we focus on the spatio-temporal regulation of neurexin, a synaptic adhesion molecule, by neuronal cell type-specific factors and neuronal activity, which are thought to be especially important for characterizing neural development and function within the mammalian CNS. Notably, there is increasing evidence that implicates the dysregulation of neuronal splicing events in several neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the detailed mechanisms of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS may provide plausible treatment strategies for these diseases. PMID:26853282

  10. Long Non-Coding RNA and Alternative Splicing Modulations in Parkinson's Leukocytes Identified by RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Soreq, Lilach; Guffanti, Alessandro; Salomonis, Nathan; Simchovitz, Alon; Israel, Zvi; Bergman, Hagai; Soreq, Hermona

    2014-01-01

    The continuously prolonged human lifespan is accompanied by increase in neurodegenerative diseases incidence, calling for the development of inexpensive blood-based diagnostics. Analyzing blood cell transcripts by RNA-Seq is a robust means to identify novel biomarkers that rapidly becomes a commonplace. However, there is lack of tools to discover novel exons, junctions and splicing events and to precisely and sensitively assess differential splicing through RNA-Seq data analysis and across RNA-Seq platforms. Here, we present a new and comprehensive computational workflow for whole-transcriptome RNA-Seq analysis, using an updated version of the software AltAnalyze, to identify both known and novel high-confidence alternative splicing events, and to integrate them with both protein-domains and microRNA binding annotations. We applied the novel workflow on RNA-Seq data from Parkinson's disease (PD) patients' leukocytes pre- and post- Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) treatment and compared to healthy controls. Disease-mediated changes included decreased usage of alternative promoters and N-termini, 5′-end variations and mutually-exclusive exons. The PD regulated FUS and HNRNP A/B included prion-like domains regulated regions. We also present here a workflow to identify and analyze long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) via RNA-Seq data. We identified reduced lncRNA expression and selective PD-induced changes in 13 of over 6,000 detected leukocyte lncRNAs, four of which were inversely altered post-DBS. These included the U1 spliceosomal lncRNA and RP11-462G22.1, each entailing sequence complementarity to numerous microRNAs. Analysis of RNA-Seq from PD and unaffected controls brains revealed over 7,000 brain-expressed lncRNAs, of which 3,495 were co-expressed in the leukocytes including U1, which showed both leukocyte and brain increases. Furthermore, qRT-PCR validations confirmed these co-increases in PD leukocytes and two brain regions, the amygdala and substantia

  11. Alternative pre-mRNA splicing switches modulate gene expression in late erythropoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Miki L.; Clark, Tyson A.; Gee, Sherry L.; Kang, Jeong-Ah; Schweitzer, Anthony C.; Wickrema, Amittha; Conboy, John G.

    2009-02-03

    Differentiating erythroid cells execute a unique gene expression program that insures synthesis of the appropriate proteome at each stage of maturation. Standard expression microarrays provide important insight into erythroid gene expression but cannot detect qualitative changes in transcript structure, mediated by RNA processing, that alter structure and function of encoded proteins. We analyzed stage-specific changes in the late erythroid transcriptome via use of high-resolution microarrays that detect altered expression of individual exons. Ten differentiation-associated changes in erythroblast splicing patterns were identified, including the previously known activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 splicing. Six new alternative splicing switches involving enhanced inclusion of internal cassette exons were discovered, as well as 3 changes in use of alternative first exons. All of these erythroid stage-specific splicing events represent activated inclusion of authentic annotated exons, suggesting they represent an active regulatory process rather than a general loss of splicing fidelity. The observation that 3 of the regulated transcripts encode RNA binding proteins (SNRP70, HNRPLL, MBNL2) may indicate significant changes in the RNA processing machinery of late erythroblasts. Together, these results support the existence of a regulated alternative pre-mRNA splicing program that is critical for late erythroid differentiation.

  12. Dynamic regulation of alternative splicing and chromatin structure in Drosophila gonads revealed by RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Qiang; Chepelev, Iouri; Wei, Gang; Tarayrah, Lama; Cui, Kairong; Zhao, Keji; Chen, Xin

    2010-01-01

    Both transcription and post-transcriptional processes, such as alternative splicing, play crucial roles in controlling developmental programs in metazoans. Recently emerged RNA-seq method has brought our understandings of eukaryotic transcriptomes to a new level, because it can resolve both gene expression level and alternative splicing events simultaneously. To gain a better understanding of cellular differentiation in gonads, we analyzed mRNA profiles from Drosophila testes and ovaries using RNA-seq. We identified a set of genes that have sex-specific isoforms in wild-type (wt) gonads, including several transcription factors. We found that differentiation of sperms from undifferentiated germ cells induced a dramatic down-regulation of RNA splicing factors. Our data confirmed that RNA splicing events are significantly more frequent in the undifferentiated-cell enriched bag of marbles (bam) mutant testis, but down-regulated upon differentiation in wt testis. Consistent with this, we showed that genes required for meiosis and terminal differentiation in wt testis were mainly regulated at the transcriptional level, but not by alternative splicing. Unexpectedly, we observed an increase in expression of all families of chromatin remodeling factors and histone modifying enzymes in the undifferentiated cell-enriched bam testis. More interestingly, chromatin regulators and histone modifying enzymes with opposite enzymatic activities are co-enriched in undifferentiated cells in testis, suggesting these cells may possess dynamic chromatin architecture. Finally, our data revealed many new features of the Drosophila gonadal transcriptomes, and will lead to a more comprehensive understanding of how differential gene expression and splicing regulate gametogenesis in Drosophila. Our data provided a foundation for the systematic study of gene expression and alternative splicing in many interesting areas of germ cell biology in Drosophila, such as the molecular basis for sexual

  13. Effects of airborne particulate matter on alternative pre-mRNA splicing in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Buggiano, Valeria; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Alló, Mariano; Lafaille, Celina; Redal, María Ana; Alghamdi, Mansour A.; Khoder, Mamdouh I.; Shamy, Magdy; Muñoz, Manuel J.; and others

    2015-07-15

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays key roles in determining tissue- and species-specific cell differentiation as well as in the onset of hereditary disease and cancer, being controlled by multiple post- and co-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. We report here that airborne particulate matter, resulting from industrial pollution, inhibits expression and specifically affects alternative splicing at the 5′ untranslated region of the mRNA encoding the bone morphogenetic protein BMP4 in human colon cells in culture. These effects are consistent with a previously reported role for BMP4 in preventing colon cancer development, suggesting that ingestion of particulate matter could contribute to the onset of colon cell proliferation. We also show that the underlying mechanism might involve changes in transcriptional elongation. This is the first study to demonstrate that particulate matter causes non-pleiotropic changes in alternative splicing. - Highlights: • Airborne particulate matter (PM10) affects alternative splicing in colon cells. • PM10 upregulates one of the two mRNA variants of the growth factor BMP-4. • This variant has a longer 5′ unstranslated region and introduces an upstream AUG. • By regulating BMP-4 mRNA splicing PM10 inhibits total expression of BMP-4 protein. • BMP-4 downregulation was previously reported to be associated to colon cancer.

  14. An alternatively spliced surfactant protein B mRNA in normal human lung: disease implication.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Z; Wang, G; Demello, D E; Floros, J

    1999-01-01

    We identified an alternatively-spliced surfactant protein B (SP-B) mRNA from normal human lung with a 12 nt deletion at the beginning of exon 8. This deletion causes a loss of four amino acids in the SP-B precursor protein. Sequence comparison of the 3' splice sites reveals only one difference in the frequency of U/C in the 11 predominantly-pyrimidine nucleotide tract, 73% for the normal and 45% for the alternatively-spliced SP-B mRNA (77-99% for the consensus sequence). Analysis of SP-B mRNA in lung indicates that the abundance of the alternatively-spliced form is very low and varies among individuals. Although the relative abundance of the deletion form of SP-B mRNA remains constant among normal lungs, it is found with relatively higher abundance in the lungs of some individuals with diseases such as congenital alveolar proteinosis, respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, alveolar capillary dysplasia and hypophosphatasia. This observation points to the possibility that the alternative splicing is a potential regulatory mechanism of SP-B and may play a role in the pathogenesis of disease under certain circumstances. PMID:10493923

  15. Cloning of Caenorhabditis U2AF65: an alternatively spliced RNA containing a novel exon.

    PubMed Central

    Zorio, D A; Lea, K; Blumenthal, T

    1997-01-01

    The U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) auxiliary factor, U2AF, is an essential splicing factor required for recognition of the polypyrimidine tract and subsequent U2 snRNP assembly at the branch point. Because Caenorhabditis elegans introns lack both polypyrimidine tract and branch point consensus sequences but have a very highly conserved UUUUCAG/R consensus at their 3' splice sites, we hypothesized that U2AF might serve to recognize this sequence and thus promote intron recognition in C. elegans. Here we report the cloning of the gene for the large subunit of U2AF, uaf-1. Three classes of cDNA were identified. In the most abundant class the open reading frame is similar to that for the U2AF65 from mammals and flies. The remaining two classes result from an alternative splicing event in which an exon containing an in-frame stop codon is inserted near the beginning of the second RNA recognition motif. However, this alternative mRNA is apparently not translated. Interestingly, the inserted exon contains 10 matches to the 3' splice site consensus. To determine whether this feature is conserved, we sequenced uaf-1 from the related nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae. It is composed of six exons, including an alternatively spliced third exon interrupting the gene at the same location as in C. elegans. uaf-1 is contained in an operon with the rab-18 gene in both species. Although the alternative exons from the two species are not highly conserved and would not encode related polypeptides, the C. briggsae alternative exon has 18 matches to the 3' splice site consensus. We hypothesize that the array of 3' splice site-like sequences in the pre-mRNA and alternatively spliced exon may have a regulatory role. The alternatively spliced RNA accumulates at high levels following starvation, suggesting that this RNA may represent an adaption for reducing U2AF65 levels when pre-mRNA levels are low. PMID:9001248

  16. Effects of airborne particulate matter on alternative pre-mRNA splicing in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Buggiano, Valeria; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Alló, Mariano; Lafaille, Celina; Redal, María Ana; Alghamdi, Mansour A; Khoder, Mamdouh I; Shamy, Magdy; Muñoz, Manuel J; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2015-07-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays key roles in determining tissue- and species-specific cell differentiation as well as in the onset of hereditary disease and cancer, being controlled by multiple post- and co-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. We report here that airborne particulate matter, resulting from industrial pollution, inhibits expression and specifically affects alternative splicing at the 5' untranslated region of the mRNA encoding the bone morphogenetic protein BMP4 in human colon cells in culture. These effects are consistent with a previously reported role for BMP4 in preventing colon cancer development, suggesting that ingestion of particulate matter could contribute to the onset of colon cell proliferation. We also show that the underlying mechanism might involve changes in transcriptional elongation. This is the first study to demonstrate that particulate matter causes non-pleiotropic changes in alternative splicing. PMID:25863591

  17. Global Profiling of the Cellular Alternative RNA Splicing Landscape during Virus-Host Interactions.

    PubMed

    Boudreault, Simon; Martenon-Brodeur, Camille; Caron, Marie; Garant, Jean-Michel; Tremblay, Marie-Pier; Armero, Victoria E S; Durand, Mathieu; Lapointe, Elvy; Thibault, Philippe; Tremblay-Létourneau, Maude; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Scott, Michelle S; Lemay, Guy; Bisaillon, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a central mechanism of genetic regulation which modifies the sequence of RNA transcripts in higher eukaryotes. AS has been shown to increase both the variability and diversity of the cellular proteome by changing the composition of resulting proteins through differential choice of exons to be included in mature mRNAs. In the present study, alterations to the global RNA splicing landscape of cellular genes upon viral infection were investigated using mammalian reovirus as a model. Our study provides the first comprehensive portrait of global changes in the RNA splicing signatures that occur in eukaryotic cells following infection with a human virus. We identify 240 modified alternative splicing events upon infection which belong to transcripts frequently involved in the regulation of gene expression and RNA metabolism. Using mass spectrometry, we also confirm modifications to transcript-specific peptides resulting from AS in virus-infected cells. These findings provide additional insights into the complexity of virus-host interactions as these splice variants expand proteome diversity and function during viral infection. PMID:27598998

  18. SplAdder: identification, quantification and testing of alternative splicing events from RNA-Seq data

    PubMed Central

    Kahles, André; Ong, Cheng Soon; Zhong, Yi; Rätsch, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Understanding the occurrence and regulation of alternative splicing (AS) is a key task towards explaining the regulatory processes that shape the complex transcriptomes of higher eukaryotes. With the advent of high-throughput sequencing of RNA (RNA-Seq), the diversity of AS transcripts could be measured at an unprecedented depth. Although the catalog of known AS events has grown ever since, novel transcripts are commonly observed when working with less well annotated organisms, in the context of disease, or within large populations. Whereas an identification of complete transcripts is technically challenging and computationally expensive, focusing on single splicing events as a proxy for transcriptome characteristics is fruitful and sufficient for a wide range of analyses. Results: We present SplAdder, an alternative splicing toolbox, that takes RNA-Seq alignments and an annotation file as input to (i) augment the annotation based on RNA-Seq evidence, (ii) identify alternative splicing events present in the augmented annotation graph, (iii) quantify and confirm these events based on the RNA-Seq data and (iv) test for significant quantitative differences between samples. Thereby, our main focus lies on performance, accuracy and usability. Availability: Source code and documentation are available for download at http://github.com/ratschlab/spladder. Example data, introductory information and a small tutorial are accessible via http://bioweb.me/spladder. Contacts: andre.kahles@ratschlab.org or gunnar.ratsch@ratschlab.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26873928

  19. Structural insights into RNA recognition by the alternative-splicing regulator muscleblind-like MBNL1

    SciTech Connect

    Teplova, Marianna; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2009-01-15

    Muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins, regulators of developmentally programmed alternative splicing, harbor tandem CCCH zinc-finger (ZnF) domains that target pre-mRNAs containing YGCU(U/G)Y sequence elements (where Y is a pyrimidine). In myotonic dystrophy, reduced levels of MBNL proteins lead to aberrant alternative splicing of a subset of pre-mRNAs. The crystal structure of MBNL1 ZnF3/4 bound to r(CGCUGU) establishes that both ZnF3 and ZnF4 target GC steps, with site-specific recognition mediated by a network of hydrogen bonds formed primarily with main chain groups of the protein. The relative alignment of ZnF3 and ZnF4 domains is dictated by the topology of the interdomain linker, with a resulting antiparallel orientation of bound GC elements, supportive of a chain-reversal loop trajectory for MBNL1-bound pre-mRNA targets. We anticipate that MBNL1-mediated targeting of looped RNA segments proximal to splice-site junctions could contribute to pre-mRNA alternative-splicing regulation.

  20. TCERG1 Regulates Alternative Splicing of the Bcl-x Gene by Modulating the Rate of RNA Polymerase II Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Marta; Cloutier, Alexandre; Sánchez-Hernández, Noemí; Michelle, Laetitia; Lemieux, Bruno; Blanchette, Marco; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Chabot, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Complex functional coupling exists between transcriptional elongation and pre-mRNA alternative splicing. Pausing sites and changes in the rate of transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) may therefore have fundamental impacts in the regulation of alternative splicing. Here, we show that the elongation and splicing-related factor TCERG1 regulates alternative splicing of the apoptosis gene Bcl-x in a promoter-dependent manner. TCERG1 promotes the splicing of the short isoform of Bcl-x (Bcl-xs) through the SB1 regulatory element located in the first half of exon 2. Consistent with these results, we show that TCERG1 associates with the Bcl-x pre-mRNA. A transcription profile analysis revealed that the RNA sequences required for the effect of TCERG1 on Bcl-x alternative splicing coincide with a putative polymerase pause site. Furthermore, TCERG1 modifies the impact of a slow polymerase on Bcl-x alternative splicing. In support of a role for an elongation mechanism in the transcriptional control of Bcl-x alternative splicing, we found that TCERG1 modifies the amount of pre-mRNAs generated at distal regions of the endogenous Bcl-x. Most importantly, TCERG1 affects the rate of RNAPII transcription of endogenous human Bcl-x. We propose that TCERG1 modulates the elongation rate of RNAPII to relieve pausing, thereby activating the proapoptotic Bcl-xS 5′ splice site. PMID:22158966

  1. Alternative splicing of the mRNA encoding the human cholesteryl ester transfer protein

    SciTech Connect

    Inazu, Akihiro; Quinet, E.M.; Suke Wang; Brown, M.L.; Stevenson, S.; Barr, M.L.; Moulin, P.; Tall, A.R. )

    1992-03-03

    The plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is known to facilitate the transfer of lipids between plasma lipoproteins. The human CETP gene is a complex locus encompassing 16 exons. The CETP mRNA is found in liver and small intestine as well as in a variety of peripheral tissues. While the CETP cDNA from human adipose tissue was being cloned, a variant CETP cDNA was discovered which excluded the complete sequence encoded by exon 9, but which was otherwise identical to the full-length CETP cDNA, suggesting modification of the CETP gene transcript by an alternative RNA splicing mechanism. RNase protection analysis of tissue RNA confirmed the presence of exon 9 deleted transcripts and showed that they represented a variable proportion of the total CETP mRNA in various human tissues including adipose tissue (25%), liver (33%), and spleen (46%). Transient expression of the exon 9 deleted cDNA in COS cells or stable expression in CHO cells showed that the protein encoded by the alternatively spliced transcript was inactive in neutral lipid transfer, smaller, and poorly secreted compared to the protein derived from the full-length cDNA. Endo H digestion suggested that the inactive, cell-associated protein was present within the endoplasmic reticulum. The experiments show that the expression of the human CETP gene is modified by alternative splicing of the ninth exon, in a tissue-specific fashion. The function of alternative splicing is unknown but could serve to produce a protein with a function other than plasma neutral lipid transfer, or as an on-off switch to regulate the local concentration of biologically active protein.

  2. Differential regulation of alternative 3{prime} splicing of {epsilon} messenger RNA variants

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Sanchez, D.; Zhang, K.; Saxon, A.

    1995-08-15

    Alternative 3{prime} splicing of the one active human {epsilon} heavy chain gene results in variants of {epsilon} mRNA encoding distinct IgE proteins. The same relative amounts of these {epsilon} mRNA variants were produced by non-atopic donor B cells when driven in a variety of T-dependent or T-independent systems. The most abundant variants were those for classic secreted {epsilon} and a novel secreted form (CH4-M2{double_prime}). In contrast, cells from subjects with high levels of serum IgE secondary to parasitic infection or atopy spontaneously produced higher relative levels of the CH4-M2{prime} {epsilon} mRNA variant, lower relative amounts of both the membrane and CH4-M2{double_prime} secreted variants, and very low levels of the CH4{prime}-CH5 variant. The existence of and corresponding changes in levels of the CH4-M2{prime}-enclosed secreted protein were demonstrated. IL-10 induced this same differential expression of {epsilon} splice variants in vitro when used to costimulate IL-4 plus CD40-driven B cells and could differentially enhance the production of CH4-M2{prime} protein by established IgE-secreting cell lines. Inhibition of IgE by cross-linking the low affinity IgE receptor (CD23) decreased the levels of {epsilon} mRNA and resulted in a distinct pattern of {epsilon} mRNA characterized by a dramatic decrease in CH4-M2{prime} splice variant. IL-6, IL-2, or IFN-{gamma} did not change the {epsilon} mRNA pattern. Overall, the absolute and relative amounts of the different {epsilon} mRNA splice variants produced appear to be controlled in a differentiation-related fashion.

  3. Regulation of alternative VEGF-A mRNA splicing is a therapeutic target for analgesia☆

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, R.P.; Beazley-Long, N.; Hua, J.; Kennedy, H.; Prager, J.; Bevan, H.; Qiu, Y.; Fernandes, E.S.; Gammons, M.V.; Ballmer-Hofer, K.; Gittenberger de Groot, A.C.; Churchill, A.J.; Harper, S.J.; Brain, S.D.; Bates, D.O.; Donaldson, L.F.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is best known as a key regulator of the formation of new blood vessels. Neutralization of VEGF-A with anti-VEGF therapy e.g. bevacizumab, can be painful, and this is hypothesized to result from a loss of VEGF-A-mediated neuroprotection. The multiple vegf-a gene products consist of two alternatively spliced families, typified by VEGF-A165a and VEGF-A165b (both contain 165 amino acids), both of which are neuroprotective. Under pathological conditions, such as in inflammation and cancer, the pro-angiogenic VEGF-A165a is upregulated and predominates over the VEGF-A165b isoform. We show here that in rats and mice VEGF-A165a and VEGF-A165b have opposing effects on pain, and that blocking the proximal splicing event – leading to the preferential expression of VEGF-A165b over VEGF165a – prevents pain in vivo. VEGF-A165a sensitizes peripheral nociceptive neurons through actions on VEGFR2 and a TRPV1-dependent mechanism, thus enhancing nociceptive signaling. VEGF-A165b blocks the effect of VEGF-A165a. After nerve injury, the endogenous balance of VEGF-A isoforms switches to greater expression of VEGF-Axxxa compared to VEGF-Axxxb, through an SRPK1-dependent pre-mRNA splicing mechanism. Pharmacological inhibition of SRPK1 after traumatic nerve injury selectively reduced VEGF-Axxxa expression and reversed associated neuropathic pain. Exogenous VEGF-A165b also ameliorated neuropathic pain. We conclude that the relative levels of alternatively spliced VEGF-A isoforms are critical for pain modulation under both normal conditions and in sensory neuropathy. Altering VEGF-Axxxa/VEGF-Axxxb balance by targeting alternative RNA splicing may be a new analgesic strategy. PMID:25151644

  4. Regulation of Fibronectin EDA Exon Alternative Splicing: Possible Role of RNA Secondary Structure for Enhancer Display

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Andrés F.; Caputi, Massimo; Pariyarath, Rajalakshmi; Pagani, Franco; Buratti, Emanuele; Baralle, Francisco E.

    1999-01-01

    The fibronectin primary transcript undergoes alternative splicing in three noncoordinated sites: the cassette-type EDA and EDB exons and the more complex IIICS region. We have shown previously that an 81-nucleotide region within the EDA exon is necessary for exon recognition and that this region contains at least two splicing-regulatory elements: a polypurinic enhancer (exonic splicing enhancer [ESE]) and a nearby silencer element (exonic splicing silencer [ESS]). Here, we have analyzed the function of both elements in different cell types. We have mapped the ESS to the nucleotide level, showing that a single base change is sufficient to abolish its function. Testing of the ESE and ESS elements in heterologous exons, individually or as part of the complete EDA regulatory region, showed that only the ESE element is active in different contexts. Functional studies coupled to secondary-structure enzymatic analysis of the EDA exon sequence variants suggest that the role of the ESS element may be exclusively to ensure the proper RNA conformation and raise the possibility that the display of the ESE element in a loop position may represent a significant feature of the exon splicing-regulatory region. PMID:10082532

  5. rMATS: robust and flexible detection of differential alternative splicing from replicate RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shihao; Park, Juw Won; Lu, Zhi-xiang; Lin, Lan; Henry, Michael D; Wu, Ying Nian; Zhou, Qing; Xing, Yi

    2014-12-23

    Ultra-deep RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) has become a powerful approach for genome-wide analysis of pre-mRNA alternative splicing. We previously developed multivariate analysis of transcript splicing (MATS), a statistical method for detecting differential alternative splicing between two RNA-Seq samples. Here we describe a new statistical model and computer program, replicate MATS (rMATS), designed for detection of differential alternative splicing from replicate RNA-Seq data. rMATS uses a hierarchical model to simultaneously account for sampling uncertainty in individual replicates and variability among replicates. In addition to the analysis of unpaired replicates, rMATS also includes a model specifically designed for paired replicates between sample groups. The hypothesis-testing framework of rMATS is flexible and can assess the statistical significance over any user-defined magnitude of splicing change. The performance of rMATS is evaluated by the analysis of simulated and real RNA-Seq data. rMATS outperformed two existing methods for replicate RNA-Seq data in all simulation settings, and RT-PCR yielded a high validation rate (94%) in an RNA-Seq dataset of prostate cancer cell lines. Our data also provide guiding principles for designing RNA-Seq studies of alternative splicing. We demonstrate that it is essential to incorporate biological replicates in the study design. Of note, pooling RNAs or merging RNA-Seq data from multiple replicates is not an effective approach to account for variability, and the result is particularly sensitive to outliers. The rMATS source code is freely available at rnaseq-mats.sourceforge.net/. As the popularity of RNA-Seq continues to grow, we expect rMATS will be useful for studies of alternative splicing in diverse RNA-Seq projects. PMID:25480548

  6. Systematically Differentiating Functions for Alternatively Spliced Isoforms through Integrating RNA-seq Data

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Rajasree; Wen, Yuchen; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Kretzler, Matthias; Guan, Yuanfang

    2013-01-01

    Integrating large-scale functional genomic data has significantly accelerated our understanding of gene functions. However, no algorithm has been developed to differentiate functions for isoforms of the same gene using high-throughput genomic data. This is because standard supervised learning requires ‘ground-truth’ functional annotations, which are lacking at the isoform level. To address this challenge, we developed a generic framework that interrogates public RNA-seq data at the transcript level to differentiate functions for alternatively spliced isoforms. For a specific function, our algorithm identifies the ‘responsible’ isoform(s) of a gene and generates classifying models at the isoform level instead of at the gene level. Through cross-validation, we demonstrated that our algorithm is effective in assigning functions to genes, especially the ones with multiple isoforms, and robust to gene expression levels and removal of homologous gene pairs. We identified genes in the mouse whose isoforms are predicted to have disparate functionalities and experimentally validated the ‘responsible’ isoforms using data from mammary tissue. With protein structure modeling and experimental evidence, we further validated the predicted isoform functional differences for the genes Cdkn2a and Anxa6. Our generic framework is the first to predict and differentiate functions for alternatively spliced isoforms, instead of genes, using genomic data. It is extendable to any base machine learner and other species with alternatively spliced isoforms, and shifts the current gene-centered function prediction to isoform-level predictions. PMID:24244129

  7. RNA-Seq analysis reveals new gene models and alternative splicing in the fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The genome of Fusarium graminearum has been sequenced and annotated previously, but correct gene annotation remains a challenge. In addition, posttranscriptional regulations, such as alternative splicing and RNA editing, are poorly understood in F. graminearum. Here we took advantage of RNA-Seq to improve gene annotations and to identify alternative splicing and RNA editing in F. graminearum. Results We identified and revised 655 incorrectly predicted gene models, including revisions of intron predictions, intron splice sites and prediction of novel introns. 231 genes were identified with two or more alternative splice variants, mostly due to intron retention. Interestingly, the expression ratios between different transcript isoforms appeared to be developmentally regulated. Surprisingly, no RNA editing was identified in F. graminearum. Moreover, 2459 novel transcriptionally active regions (nTARs) were identified and our analysis indicates that many of these could be missed genes. Finally, we identified the 5′ UTR and/or 3′ UTR sequences of 7666 genes. A number of representative novel gene models and alternatively spliced genes were validated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of the generated amplicons. Conclusions We have developed novel and efficient strategies to identify alternatively spliced genes and incorrect gene models based on RNA-Seq data. Our study identified hundreds of alternatively spliced genes in F. graminearum and for the first time indicated that alternative splicing is developmentally regulated in filamentous fungi. In addition, hundreds of incorrect predicted gene models were identified and revised and thousands of nTARs were discovered in our study, which will be helpful for the future genomic and transcriptomic studies in F. graminearum. PMID:23324402

  8. Alternative splicing creates two new architectures for human tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhiyi; Xu, Zhiwen; Liu, Xiaotian; Lo, Wing-Sze; Ye, Fei; Lau, Ching-Fun; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Jie J.; Nangle, Leslie A.; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Zhang, Mingjie; Schimmel, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Many human tRNA synthetases evolved alternative functions outside of protein synthesis. These functions are associated with over 200 splice variants (SVs), most of which are catalytic nulls that engender new biology. While known to regulate non-translational activities, little is known about structures resulting from natural internal ablations of any protein. Here, we report analysis of two closely related, internally deleted, SVs of homodimeric human tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS). In spite of both variants ablating a portion of the catalytic core and dimer-interface contacts of native TyrRS, each folded into a distinct stable structure. Biochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis showed that the internal deletion of TyrRSΔE2–4 SV gave an alternative, neomorphic dimer interface ‘orthogonal’ to that of native TyrRS. In contrast, the internal C-terminal splice site of TyrRSΔE2–3 prevented either dimerization interface from forming, and yielded a predominantly monomeric protein. Unlike ubiquitous TyrRS, the neomorphs showed clear tissue preferences, which were distinct from each other. The results demonstrate a sophisticated structural plasticity of a human tRNA synthetase for architectural reorganizations that are preferentially elicited in specific tissues. PMID:26773056

  9. Alternative splicing creates two new architectures for human tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhiyi; Xu, Zhiwen; Liu, Xiaotian; Lo, Wing-Sze; Ye, Fei; Lau, Ching-Fun; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Jie J; Nangle, Leslie A; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Zhang, Mingjie; Schimmel, Paul

    2016-02-18

    Many human tRNA synthetases evolved alternative functions outside of protein synthesis. These functions are associated with over 200 splice variants (SVs), most of which are catalytic nulls that engender new biology. While known to regulate non-translational activities, little is known about structures resulting from natural internal ablations of any protein. Here, we report analysis of two closely related, internally deleted, SVs of homodimeric human tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS). In spite of both variants ablating a portion of the catalytic core and dimer-interface contacts of native TyrRS, each folded into a distinct stable structure. Biochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis showed that the internal deletion of TyrRSΔE2-4 SV gave an alternative, neomorphic dimer interface 'orthogonal' to that of native TyrRS. In contrast, the internal C-terminal splice site of TyrRSΔE2-3 prevented either dimerization interface from forming, and yielded a predominantly monomeric protein. Unlike ubiquitous TyrRS, the neomorphs showed clear tissue preferences, which were distinct from each other. The results demonstrate a sophisticated structural plasticity of a human tRNA synthetase for architectural reorganizations that are preferentially elicited in specific tissues. PMID:26773056

  10. Structural Insights into RNA Recognition by the Alternate-Splicing Regulator CUG-Binding Protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    M Teplova; J Song; H Gaw; A Teplov; D Patel

    2011-12-31

    CUG-binding protein 1 (CUGBP1) regulates multiple aspects of nuclear and cytoplasmic mRNA processing, with implications for onset of myotonic dystrophy. CUGBP1 harbors three RRM domains and preferentially targets UGU-rich mRNA elements. We describe crystal structures of CUGBP1 RRM1 and tandem RRM1/2 domains bound to RNAs containing tandem UGU(U/G) elements. Both RRM1 in RRM1-RNA and RRM2 in RRM1/2-RNA complexes use similar principles to target UGU(U/G) elements, with recognition mediated by face-to-edge stacking and water-mediated hydrogen-bonding networks. The UG step adopts a left-handed Z-RNA conformation, with the syn guanine recognized through Hoogsteen edge-protein backbone hydrogen-bonding interactions. NMR studies on the RRM1/2-RNA complex establish that both RRM domains target tandem UGUU motifs in solution, whereas filter-binding assays identify a preference for recognition of GU over AU or GC steps. We discuss the implications of CUGBP1-mediated targeting and sequestration of UGU(U/G) elements on pre-mRNA alternative-splicing regulation, translational regulation, and mRNA decay.

  11. RNA polymerase III drives alternative splicing of the potassium channel–interacting protein contributing to brain complexity and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Massone, Sara; Vassallo, Irene; Castelnuovo, Manuele; Fiorino, Gloria; Gatta, Elena; Robello, Mauro; Borghi, Roberta; Tabaton, Massimo; Russo, Claudio; Dieci, Giorgio; Cancedda, Ranieri

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing generates protein isoforms that are conditionally or differentially expressed in specific tissues. The discovery of factors that control alternative splicing might clarify the molecular basis of biological and pathological processes. We found that IL1-α−dependent up-regulation of 38A, a small ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase III–transcribed RNA, drives the synthesis of an alternatively spliced form of the potassium channel–interacting protein (KCNIP4). The alternative KCNIP4 isoform cannot interact with the γ-secretase complex, resulting in modification of γ-secretase activity, amyloid precursor protein processing, and increased secretion of β-amyloid enriched in the more toxic Aβ x-42 species. Notably, synthesis of the variant KCNIP4 isoform is also detrimental to brain physiology, as it results in the concomitant blockade of the fast kinetics of potassium channels. This alternative splicing shift is observed at high frequency in tissue samples from Alzheimer’s disease patients, suggesting that RNA polymerase III cogenes may be upstream determinants of alternative splicing that significantly contribute to homeostasis and pathogenesis in the brain. PMID:21624954

  12. Alternative splicing of parathyroid hormone-related protein mRNA: expression and stability

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, R S; Luchin, A I; Richard, V; Brena, R M; Lima, D; Rosol, T J

    2011-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a multifunctional protein that is often dysregulated in cancer. The human PTHrP gene is alternatively spliced into three isoforms, each with a unique 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR), encoding 139, 173 and 141 amino acid proteins. The regulation of PTHrP mRNA isoform expression has not been completely elucidated, but it may be affected by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In this study, we examined differences in the PTHrP mRNA isoform expression in two squamous carcinoma cell lines (SCC2/88 and HARA), an immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT), and spontaneous human lung cancer with adjacent normal tissue. In addition, the effect of TGF-β1 on PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability was examined. Cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms occurred between the various cell lines, normal human lung, and immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). PTHrP isoform expression pattern was significantly altered between normal lung tissue and the adjacent lung cancer. In vitro studies revealed that TGF-β1 differentially altered the mRNA steady-state levels and mRNA stability of the PTHrP isoforms. Protein–RNA binding studies identified different proteins binding to the 3′-UTR of the PTHrP isoforms (139) and (141), which may be important in the differential mRNA stability and response to cytokines between the PTHrP isoforms. The data demonstrate that there is cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms, and disruption of the normal regulation during cancer progression may in part be associated with TGF-β1-induced changes in PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability. PMID:15291755

  13. Diverse alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing landscape of circular RNAs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ou; Dong, Rui; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jia-Lin; Luo, Zheng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Ling-Ling; Yang, Li

    2016-09-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) derived from back-spliced exons have been widely identified as being co-expressed with their linear counterparts. A single gene locus can produce multiple circRNAs through alternative back-splice site selection and/or alternative splice site selection; however, a detailed map of alternative back-splicing/splicing in circRNAs is lacking. Here, with the upgraded CIRCexplorer2 pipeline, we systematically annotated different types of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing events in circRNAs from various cell lines. Compared with their linear cognate RNAs, circRNAs exhibited distinct patterns of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing. Alternative back-splice site selection was correlated with the competition of putative RNA pairs across introns that bracket alternative back-splice sites. In addition, all four basic types of alternative splicing that have been identified in the (linear) mRNA process were found within circRNAs, and many exons were predominantly spliced in circRNAs. Unexpectedly, thousands of previously unannotated exons were detected in circRNAs from the examined cell lines. Although these novel exons had similar splice site strength, they were much less conserved than known exons in sequences. Finally, both alternative back-splicing and circRNA-predominant alternative splicing were highly diverse among the examined cell lines. All of the identified alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs are available in the CIRCpedia database (http://www.picb.ac.cn/rnomics/circpedia). Collectively, the annotation of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs provides a valuable resource for depicting the complexity of circRNA biogenesis and for studying the potential functions of circRNAs in different cells. PMID:27365365

  14. Transcriptomic Analysis of PNN- and ESRP1-Regulated Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing in Human Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Jeong-Hoon; Correia, Greg P.; Li, Jian-Liang; Lopez, Maria-Cecilia; Baker, Henry V.; Sugrue, Stephen P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We investigated the impact of PININ (PNN) and epithelial splicing regulatory protein 1 (ESRP1) on alternative pre-mRNA splicing in the corneal epithelial context. Methods. Isoform-specific RT-PCR assays were performed on wild-type and Pnn knockout mouse cornea. Protein interactions were examined by deconvolution microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation. For genome-wide alternative splicing study, immortalized human corneal epithelial cells (HCET) harboring doxycycline-inducible shRNA against PNN or ESRP1 were created. Total RNA was isolated from four biological replicates of control and knockdown HCET cells, and subjected to hGlue3_0 transcriptome array analysis. Results. Pnn depletion in developing mouse corneal epithelium led to disrupted alternative splicing of multiple ESRP-regulated epithelial-type exons. In HCET cells, ESRP1 and PNN displayed close localization in and around nuclear speckles, and their physical association in protein complexes was identified. Whole transcriptome array analysis on ESRP1 or PNN knockdown HCET cells revealed clear alterations in transcript profiles and splicing patterns of specific subsets of genes. Separate RT-PCR validation assays confirmed successfully specific changes in exon usage of several representative splice variants, including PAX6(5a), FOXJ3, ARHGEF11, and SLC37A2. Gene ontologic analyses on ESRP1- or PNN-regulated alternative exons suggested their roles in epithelial phenotypes, such as cell morphology and movement. Conclusions. Our data suggested that ESRP1 and PNN modulate alternative splicing of a specific subset of target genes, but not general splicing events, in HCET cells to maintain or enhance epithelial characteristics. PMID:23299472

  15. RNA-Seq of Arabidopsis Pollen Uncovers Novel Transcription and Alternative Splicing1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Loraine, Ann E.; McCormick, Sheila; Estrada, April; Patel, Ketan; Qin, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Pollen grains of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contain two haploid sperm cells enclosed in a haploid vegetative cell. Upon germination, the vegetative cell extrudes a pollen tube that carries the sperm to an ovule for fertilization. Knowing the identity, relative abundance, and splicing patterns of pollen transcripts will improve our understanding of pollen and allow investigation of tissue-specific splicing in plants. Most Arabidopsis pollen transcriptome studies have used the ATH1 microarray, which does not assay splice variants and lacks specific probe sets for many genes. To investigate the pollen transcriptome, we performed high-throughput sequencing (RNA-Seq) of Arabidopsis pollen and seedlings for comparison. Gene expression was more diverse in seedling, and genes involved in cell wall biogenesis were highly expressed in pollen. RNA-Seq detected at least 4,172 protein-coding genes expressed in pollen, including 289 assayed only by nonspecific probe sets. Additional exons and previously unannotated 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions for pollen-expressed genes were revealed. We detected regions in the genome not previously annotated as expressed; 14 were tested and 12 were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. Gapped read alignments revealed 1,908 high-confidence new splicing events supported by 10 or more spliced read alignments. Alternative splicing patterns in pollen and seedling were highly correlated. For most alternatively spliced genes, the ratio of variants in pollen and seedling was similar, except for some encoding proteins involved in RNA splicing. This study highlights the robustness of splicing patterns in plants and the importance of ongoing annotation and visualization of RNA-Seq data using interactive tools such as Integrated Genome Browser. PMID:23590974

  16. Detection of alternative splice and gene duplication by RNA sequencing in Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenji; Wang, Jing; You, Feng; Ma, Liman; Yang, Xiao; Gao, Jinning; He, Yan; Qi, Jie; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Xubo; Wu, Zhihao; Zhang, Quanqi

    2014-12-01

    Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) is one of the economic important fish in China. Sexual dimorphism, especially the different growth rates and body sizes between two sexes, makes this fish a good model to investigate mechanisms responsible for such dimorphism for both fundamental questions in evolution and applied topics in aquaculture. However, the lack of "omics" data has hindered the process. The recent advent of RNA-sequencing technology provides a robust tool to further study characteristics of genomes of nonmodel species. Here, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing for a double haploid Japanese flounder individual using Illumina sequencing. A single lane of paired-end sequencing produced more than 27 million reads. These reads were assembled into 107,318 nonredundant transcripts, half of which (51,563; 48.1%) were annotated by blastx to public protein database. A total of 1051 genes that had potential alternative splicings were detected by Chrysalis implemented in Trinity software. Four of 10 randomly picked genes were verified truly containing alternative splicing by cloning and Sanger sequencing. Notably, using a doubled haploid Japanese flounder individual allow us to analyze gene duplicates. In total, 3940 "single-nucleotide polymorphisms" were detected form 1859 genes, which may have happened gene duplicates. This study lays the foundation for structural and functional genomics studies in Japanese flounder. PMID:25512620

  17. Detection of Alternative Splice and Gene Duplication by RNA Sequencing in Japanese Flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenji; Wang, Jing; You, Feng; Ma, Liman; Yang, Xiao; Gao, Jinning; He, Yan; Qi, Jie; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Xubo; Wu, Zhihao; Zhang, Quanqi

    2014-01-01

    Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) is one of the economic important fish in China. Sexual dimorphism, especially the different growth rates and body sizes between two sexes, makes this fish a good model to investigate mechanisms responsible for such dimorphism for both fundamental questions in evolution and applied topics in aquaculture. However, the lack of “omics” data has hindered the process. The recent advent of RNA-sequencing technology provides a robust tool to further study characteristics of genomes of nonmodel species. Here, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing for a double haploid Japanese flounder individual using Illumina sequencing. A single lane of paired-end sequencing produced more than 27 million reads. These reads were assembled into 107,318 nonredundant transcripts, half of which (51,563; 48.1%) were annotated by blastx to public protein database. A total of 1051 genes that had potential alternative splicings were detected by Chrysalis implemented in Trinity software. Four of 10 randomly picked genes were verified truly containing alternative splicing by cloning and Sanger sequencing. Notably, using a doubled haploid Japanese flounder individual allow us to analyze gene duplicates. In total, 3940 “single-nucleotide polymorphisms” were detected form 1859 genes, which may have happened gene duplicates. This study lays the foundation for structural and functional genomics studies in Japanese flounder. PMID:25512620

  18. MYCN controls an alternative RNA splicing program in high-risk metastatic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shile; Wei, Jun S; Li, Samuel Q; Badgett, Tom C; Song, Young K; Agarwal, Saurabh; Coarfa, Cristian; Tolman, Catherine; Hurd, Laura; Liao, Hongling; He, Jianbin; Wen, Xinyu; Liu, Zhihui; Thiele, Carol J; Westermann, Frank; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Seeger, Robert C; Maris, John M; Guidry Auvil, Jamie M; Smith, Malcolm A; Kolaczyk, Eric D; Shohet, Jason; Khan, Javed

    2016-02-28

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the aggressive behavior of MYCN driven neuroblastoma (NBL) is under intense investigation; however, little is known about the impact of this family of transcription factors on the splicing program. Here we used high-throughput RNA sequencing to systematically study the expression of RNA isoforms in stage 4 MYCN-amplified NBL, an aggressive subtype of metastatic NBL. We show that MYCN-amplified NBL tumors display a distinct gene splicing pattern affecting multiple cancer hallmark functions. Six splicing factors displayed unique differential expression patterns in MYCN-amplified tumors and cell lines, and the binding motifs for some of these splicing factors are significantly enriched in differentially-spliced genes. Direct binding of MYCN to promoter regions of the splicing factors PTBP1 and HNRNPA1 detected by ChIP-seq demonstrates that MYCN controls the splicing pattern by direct regulation of the expression of these key splicing factors. Furthermore, high expression of PTBP1 and HNRNPA1 was significantly associated with poor overall survival of stage4 NBL patients (p ≤ 0.05). Knocking down PTBP1, HNRNPA1 and their downstream target PKM2, an isoform of pro-tumor-growth, result in repressed growth of NBL cells. Therefore, our study reveals a novel role of MYCN in controlling global splicing program through regulation of splicing factors in addition to its well-known role in the transcription program. These findings suggest a therapeutically potential to target the key splicing factors or gene isoforms in high-risk NBL with MYCN-amplification. PMID:26683771

  19. Tissue-specific alternative RNA splicing of rat vesicle-associated membrane protein-1 (VAMP-1).

    PubMed

    Mandic, R; Trimble, W S; Lowe, A W

    1997-10-15

    The vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) family is essential to vesicle-mediated protein transport. Three mammalian isoforms, VAMP-1, VAMP-2, and cellubrevin, play a role in protein transport to the plasma membrane. In this study, we describe a new rat VAMP-1 isoform produced by alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Only one VAMP-1 isoform dominates in each tissue. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence for the newly discovered isoform, VAMP-1b, reveals that its expression is determined by whether an intron is retained or removed. The predicted amino acid sequences for the VAMP-1 isoforms differ at the carboxy-terminal end of the protein. A similar process has been described for VAMPs in Drosophila melanogaster and suggests a conserved function for the carboxy-terminal domain that can be modulated. PMID:9358054

  20. Alternative Splicing in CKD.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Megan; Oltean, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) has emerged in the postgenomic era as one of the main drivers of proteome diversity, with ≥94% of multiexon genes alternatively spliced in humans. AS is therefore one of the main control mechanisms for cell phenotype, and is a process deregulated in disease. Numerous reports describe pathogenic mutations in splice factors, splice sites, or regulatory sequences. Additionally, compared with the physiologic state, disease often associates with an abnormal proportion of splice isoforms (or novel isoforms), without an apparent driver mutation. It is therefore essential to study how AS is regulated in physiology, how it contributes to pathogenesis, and whether we can manipulate faulty splicing for therapeutic advantage. Although the disease most commonly linked to deregulation of AS in several genes is cancer, many reports detail pathogenic splice variants in diseases ranging from neuromuscular disorders to diabetes or cardiomyopathies. A plethora of splice variants have been implicated in CKDs as well. In this review, we describe examples of these CKD-associated splice variants and ideas on how to manipulate them for therapeutic benefit. PMID:26763787

  1. Subcellular RNA profiling links splicing and nuclear DICER1 to alternative cleavage and polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Neve, Jonathan; Burger, Kaspar; Li, Wencheng; Hoque, Mainul; Patel, Radhika; Tian, Bin; Gullerova, Monika; Furger, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) plays a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression across eukaryotes. Although APA is extensively studied, its regulation within cellular compartments and its physiological impact remains largely enigmatic. Here, we used a rigorous subcellular fractionation approach to compare APA profiles of cytoplasmic and nuclear RNA fractions from human cell lines. This approach allowed us to extract APA isoforms that are subjected to differential regulation and provided us with a platform to interrogate the molecular regulatory pathways that shape APA profiles in different subcellular locations. Here, we show that APA isoforms with shorter 3′ UTRs tend to be overrepresented in the cytoplasm and appear to be cell-type–specific events. Nuclear retention of longer APA isoforms occurs and is partly a result of incomplete splicing contributing to the observed cytoplasmic bias of transcripts with shorter 3′ UTRs. We demonstrate that the endoribonuclease III, DICER1, contributes to the establishment of subcellular APA profiles not only by expected cytoplasmic miRNA-mediated destabilization of APA mRNA isoforms, but also by affecting polyadenylation site choice. PMID:26546131

  2. Subcellular RNA profiling links splicing and nuclear DICER1 to alternative cleavage and polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Neve, Jonathan; Burger, Kaspar; Li, Wencheng; Hoque, Mainul; Patel, Radhika; Tian, Bin; Gullerova, Monika; Furger, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) plays a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression across eukaryotes. Although APA is extensively studied, its regulation within cellular compartments and its physiological impact remains largely enigmatic. Here, we used a rigorous subcellular fractionation approach to compare APA profiles of cytoplasmic and nuclear RNA fractions from human cell lines. This approach allowed us to extract APA isoforms that are subjected to differential regulation and provided us with a platform to interrogate the molecular regulatory pathways that shape APA profiles in different subcellular locations. Here, we show that APA isoforms with shorter 3' UTRs tend to be overrepresented in the cytoplasm and appear to be cell-type-specific events. Nuclear retention of longer APA isoforms occurs and is partly a result of incomplete splicing contributing to the observed cytoplasmic bias of transcripts with shorter 3' UTRs. We demonstrate that the endoribonuclease III, DICER1, contributes to the establishment of subcellular APA profiles not only by expected cytoplasmic miRNA-mediated destabilization of APA mRNA isoforms, but also by affecting polyadenylation site choice. PMID:26546131

  3. MicroRNA-222 regulates muscle alternative splicing through Rbm24 during differentiation of skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cardinali, B; Cappella, M; Provenzano, C; Garcia-Manteiga, J M; Lazarevic, D; Cittaro, D; Martelli, F; Falcone, G

    2016-01-01

    A number of microRNAs have been shown to regulate skeletal muscle development and differentiation. MicroRNA-222 is downregulated during myogenic differentiation and its overexpression leads to alteration of muscle differentiation process and specialized structures. By using RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) pulldown followed by RNA sequencing, combined with in silico microRNA target prediction, we have identified two new targets of microRNA-222 involved in the regulation of myogenic differentiation, Ahnak and Rbm24. Specifically, the RNA-binding protein Rbm24 is a major regulator of muscle-specific alternative splicing and its downregulation by microRNA-222 results in defective exon inclusion impairing the production of muscle-specific isoforms of Coro6, Fxr1 and NACA transcripts. Reconstitution of normal levels of Rbm24 in cells overexpressing microRNA-222 rescues muscle-specific splicing. In conclusion, we have identified a new function of microRNA-222 leading to alteration of myogenic differentiation at the level of alternative splicing, and we provide evidence that this effect is mediated by Rbm24 protein. PMID:26844700

  4. MicroRNA-222 regulates muscle alternative splicing through Rbm24 during differentiation of skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Cardinali, B; Cappella, M; Provenzano, C; Garcia-Manteiga, J M; Lazarevic, D; Cittaro, D; Martelli, F; Falcone, G

    2016-01-01

    A number of microRNAs have been shown to regulate skeletal muscle development and differentiation. MicroRNA-222 is downregulated during myogenic differentiation and its overexpression leads to alteration of muscle differentiation process and specialized structures. By using RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) pulldown followed by RNA sequencing, combined with in silico microRNA target prediction, we have identified two new targets of microRNA-222 involved in the regulation of myogenic differentiation, Ahnak and Rbm24. Specifically, the RNA-binding protein Rbm24 is a major regulator of muscle-specific alternative splicing and its downregulation by microRNA-222 results in defective exon inclusion impairing the production of muscle-specific isoforms of Coro6, Fxr1 and NACA transcripts. Reconstitution of normal levels of Rbm24 in cells overexpressing microRNA-222 rescues muscle-specific splicing. In conclusion, we have identified a new function of microRNA-222 leading to alteration of myogenic differentiation at the level of alternative splicing, and we provide evidence that this effect is mediated by Rbm24 protein. PMID:26844700

  5. Identification of Alternative Splicing and Fusion Transcripts in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer by RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yoonki; Bang, Chi Young; Lee, Jae Cheol; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related death. Alterations in gene sequence, structure, and expression have an important role in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. Fusion genes and alternative splicing of cancer-related genes have the potential to be oncogenic. In the current study, we performed RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) to investigate potential fusion genes and alternative splicing in non-small cell lung cancer. Methods RNA was isolated from lung tissues obtained from 86 subjects with lung cancer. The RNA samples from lung cancer and normal tissues were processed with RNA-seq using the HiSeq 2000 system. Fusion genes were evaluated using Defuse and ChimeraScan. Candidate fusion transcripts were validated by Sanger sequencing. Alternative splicing was analyzed using multivariate analysis of transcript sequencing and validated using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. Results RNA-seq data identified oncogenic fusion genes EML4-ALK and SLC34A2-ROS1 in three of 86 normal-cancer paired samples. Nine distinct fusion transcripts were selected using DeFuse and ChimeraScan; of which, four fusion transcripts were validated by Sanger sequencing. In 33 squamous cell carcinoma, 29 tumor specific skipped exon events and six mutually exclusive exon events were identified. ITGB4 and PYCR1 were top genes that showed significant tumor specific splice variants. Conclusion In conclusion, RNA-seq data identified novel potential fusion transcripts and splice variants. Further evaluation of their functional significance in the pathogenesis of lung cancer is required. PMID:27066085

  6. Profiling alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms for prostate cancer classification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chaolin; Li, Hai-Ri; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Downs, Tracy; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Michael Q

    2006-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer illness and death among men in the United States and world wide. There is an urgent need to discover good biomarkers for early clinical diagnosis and treatment. Previously, we developed an exon-junction microarray-based assay and profiled 1532 mRNA splice isoforms from 364 potential prostate cancer related genes in 38 prostate tissues. Here, we investigate the advantage of using splice isoforms, which couple transcriptional and splicing regulation, for cancer classification. Results As many as 464 splice isoforms from more than 200 genes are differentially regulated in tumors at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.05. Remarkably, about 30% of genes have isoforms that are called significant but do not exhibit differential expression at the overall mRNA level. A support vector machine (SVM) classifier trained on 128 signature isoforms can correctly predict 92% of the cases, which outperforms the classifier using overall mRNA abundance by about 5%. It is also observed that the classification performance can be improved using multivariate variable selection methods, which take correlation among variables into account. Conclusion These results demonstrate that profiling of splice isoforms is able to provide unique and important information which cannot be detected by conventional microarrays. PMID:16608523

  7. RNA-Seq Uncovers SNPs and Alternative Splicing Events in Asian Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera).

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Xu, Liming; Liu, Yanling; Yang, Pingfang

    2015-01-01

    RNA-Seq is an efficient way to comprehensively identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and alternative splicing (AS) events from the expressed genes. In this study, we conducted transcriptome sequencing of four Asian lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) cultivars using Illumina HiSeq2000 platform to identify SNPs and AS events in lotus. A total of 505 million pair-end RNA-Seq reads were generated from four cultivars, of which 86% were mapped to the lotus reference genome. Using the four sets of data together, a total of 357,689 putative SNPs were identified with an average density of one SNP per 2.2 kb. These SNPs were located in 1,253 scaffolds and 15,016 expressed genes. A/G and C/T were the two major types of SNPs in the Asian lotus transcriptome. In parallel, a total of 177,540 AS events were detected in the four cultivars and were distributed in 64% of the expressed genes of lotus. The predominant type of AS events was alternative 5' first exon, which accounted for 41.2% of all the observed AS events, and exon skipping only accounted for 4.3% of all AS. Gene Ontology analysis was conducted to analyze the function of the genes containing SNPs and AS events. Validation of selected SNPs and AS events revealed that 74% of SNPs and 80% of AS events were reliable, which indicates that RNA-Seq is an efficient approach to uncover gene-associated SNPs and AS events. A large number of SNPs and AS events identified in our study will facilitate further genetic and functional genomics research in lotus. PMID:25928215

  8. Co-option of the piRNA pathway for germline-specific alternative splicing of C. elegans TOR.

    PubMed

    Barberán-Soler, Sergio; Fontrodona, Laura; Ribó, Anna; Lamm, Ayelet T; Iannone, Camilla; Cerón, Julián; Lehner, Ben; Valcárcel, Juan

    2014-09-25

    Many eukaryotic genes contain embedded antisense transcripts and repetitive sequences of unknown function. We report that male germline-specific expression of an antisense transcript contained in an intron of C. elegans Target of Rapamycin (TOR, let-363) is associated with (1) accumulation of endo-small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against an embedded Helitron transposon and (2) activation of an alternative 3' splice site of TOR. The germline-specific Argonaute proteins PRG-1 and CSR-1, which participate in self/nonself RNA recognition, antagonistically regulate the generation of these endo-siRNAs, TOR mRNA levels, and 3' splice-site selection. Supply of exogenous double-stranded RNA against the region of sense/antisense overlap reverses changes in TOR expression and splicing and suppresses the progressive multigenerational sterility phenotype of prg-1 mutants. We propose that recognition of a "nonself" intronic transposon by endo-siRNAs/the piRNA system provides physiological regulation of expression and alternative splicing of a host gene that, in turn, contributes to the maintenance of germline function across generations. PMID:25220461

  9. Identification of a chemical inhibitor for nuclear speckle formation: Implications for the function of nuclear speckles in regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Kurogi, Yutaro; Matsuo, Yota; Mihara, Yuki; Yagi, Hiroaki; Shigaki-Miyamoto, Kaya; Toyota, Syukichi; Azuma, Yuko; Igarashi, Masayuki; Tani, Tokio

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • We identified tubercidin as a compound inducing aberrant formation of the speckles. • Tubercidin causes delocalization of poly (A){sup +}RNAs from nuclear speckles. • Tubercidin induces dispersion of splicing factors from nuclear speckles. • Tubercidin affects alternative pre-mRNA splicing. • Nuclear speckles play a role in regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing. - Abstract: Nuclear speckles are subnuclear structures enriched with RNA processing factors and poly (A){sup +} RNAs comprising mRNAs and poly (A){sup +} non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Nuclear speckles are thought to be involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, such as pre-mRNA splicing. By screening 3585 culture extracts of actinomycetes with in situ hybridization using an oligo dT probe, we identified tubercidin, an analogue of adenosine, as an inhibitor of speckle formation, which induces the delocalization of poly (A){sup +} RNA and dispersion of splicing factor SRSF1/SF2 from nuclear speckles in HeLa cells. Treatment with tubercidin also decreased steady-state MALAT1 long ncRNA, thought to be involved in the retention of SRSF1/SF2 in nuclear speckles. In addition, we found that tubercidin treatment promoted exon skipping in the alternative splicing of Clk1 pre-mRNA. These results suggest that nuclear speckles play a role in modulating the concentration of splicing factors in the nucleoplasm to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing.

  10. Loss of Pnn expression attenuates expression levels of SR family splicing factors and modulates alternative pre-mRNA splicing in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu Yali; Ouyang Pin . E-mail: ouyang@mail.cgu.edu.tw

    2006-03-10

    SR and SR-related proteins have been implicated as trans-acting factors that play an important role in splice selection and are involved at specific stages of spliceosome formation. A well-established property of SR protein splicing factors is their ability to influence selection of alternative splice sites in a concentration-dependent manner. Identification of molecules that regulate SR family protein expression is therefore of vital importance in RNA biology. Here we report that depletion of Pnn expression, a SR-related protein with functions involved in pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA export, induces reduced expression of a subset of cellular proteins, especially that of SR family proteins, including SC35, SRm300, SRp55, and SRp40, but not that of other nuclear proteins, such as p53, Mdm2, and ki67. Knocking down Pnn expression was achieved in vitro by siRNA transfection. Expression levels of SR and SR-related proteins in Pnn-depleted cells as compared to those in control cells were evaluated by immunofluorescent staining and Western blot with specific antibodies. In addition, we also demonstrate that loss of Pnn expression could modulate splice site selection of model reporter gene in vivo. Our finding is significant in terms of regulation of SR protein cellular concentration because it reveals that Pnn may play a general role in the control of the cellular amount of family SR proteins through down-regulation of its own expression, thereby providing us with a better understanding of the cellular mechanism by which Pnn fulfills its biological function.

  11. Induced transcription and stability of CELF2 mRNA drives widespread alternative splicing during T-cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mallory, Michael J.; Allon, Samuel J.; Qiu, Jinsong; Gazzara, Matthew R.; Tapescu, Iulia; Martinez, Nicole M.; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Lynch, Kristen W.

    2015-01-01

    Studies in several cell types have highlighted dramatic and diverse changes in mRNA processing that occur upon cellular stimulation. However, the mechanisms and pathways that lead to regulated changes in mRNA processing remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that expression of the splicing factor CELF2 (CUGBP, Elav-like family member 2) is regulated in response to T-cell signaling through combined increases in transcription and mRNA stability. Transcriptional induction occurs within 6 h of stimulation and is dependent on activation of NF-κB. Subsequently, there is an increase in the stability of the CELF2 mRNA that correlates with a change in CELF2 3′UTR length and contributes to the total signal-induced enhancement of CELF2 expression. Importantly, we uncover dozens of splicing events in cultured T cells whose changes upon stimulation are dependent on CELF2 expression, and provide evidence that CELF2 controls a similar proportion of splicing events during human thymic T-cell development. Taken together, these findings expand the physiologic impact of CELF2 beyond that previously documented in developing neuronal and muscle cells to T-cell development and function, identify unappreciated instances of alternative splicing in the human thymus, and uncover novel mechanisms for CELF2 regulation that may broadly impact CELF2 expression across diverse cell types. PMID:25870297

  12. Novel RNA structural features of an alternatively splicing group II intron from Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Bonnie A; Zimmerly, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Group II introns are ribozymes in bacterial and organellar genomes that function as self-splicing introns and as retroelements. Previously, we reported that the group II intron C.te.I1 of Clostridium tetani alternatively splices in vivo to produce five distinct coding mRNAs. Accurate fusion of upstream and downstream reading frames requires a shifted 5' splice site located 8 nt upstream of the usual 5' GUGYG motif. This site is specified by the ribozyme through an altered intron/exon-binding site 1 (IBS1-EBS1) pairing. Here we use mutagenesis and self-splicing assays to investigate in more detail the significance of the structural features of the C.te.I1 ribozyme. The shifted 5' splice site is shown to be affected by structures in addition to IBS1-EBS1, and unlike other group II introns, C.te.I1 appears to require a spacer between IBS1 and the GUGYG motif. In addition, the mechanism of 3' exon recognition is modified from the ancestral IIB mechanism to a IIA-like mechanism that appears to be longer than the typical single base-pair interaction and may extend up to 4 bp. The novel ribozyme properties that have evolved for C.te.I1 illustrate the plasticity of group II introns in adapting new structural and catalytic properties that can be utilized to affect gene expression. PMID:24751650

  13. Novel RNA structural features of an alternatively splicing group II intron from Clostridium tetani

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Bonnie A.; Zimmerly, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Group II introns are ribozymes in bacterial and organellar genomes that function as self-splicing introns and as retroelements. Previously, we reported that the group II intron C.te.I1 of Clostridium tetani alternatively splices in vivo to produce five distinct coding mRNAs. Accurate fusion of upstream and downstream reading frames requires a shifted 5′ splice site located 8 nt upstream of the usual 5′ GUGYG motif. This site is specified by the ribozyme through an altered intron/exon-binding site 1 (IBS1–EBS1) pairing. Here we use mutagenesis and self-splicing assays to investigate in more detail the significance of the structural features of the C.te.I1 ribozyme. The shifted 5′ splice site is shown to be affected by structures in addition to IBS1–EBS1, and unlike other group II introns, C.te.I1 appears to require a spacer between IBS1 and the GUGYG motif. In addition, the mechanism of 3′ exon recognition is modified from the ancestral IIB mechanism to a IIA-like mechanism that appears to be longer than the typical single base-pair interaction and may extend up to 4 bp. The novel ribozyme properties that have evolved for C.te.I1 illustrate the plasticity of group II introns in adapting new structural and catalytic properties that can be utilized to affect gene expression. PMID:24751650

  14. RNA interference knockdown of DNA methyl-transferase 3 affects gene alternative splicing in the honey bee

    PubMed Central

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Li, Yang; Stroud, Hume; Feng, Suhua; Newman, Thomas C.; Kaneda, Megan; Hou, Kirk K.; Worley, Kim C.; Elsik, Christine G.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Ma, Jian; Robinson, Gene E.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of DNA methylation from fungi, plants, and animals indicate that gene body methylation is ancient and highly conserved in eukaryotic genomes, but its role has not been clearly defined. It has been postulated that regulation of alternative splicing of transcripts was an original function of DNA methylation, but a direct experimental test of the effect of methylation on alternative slicing at the whole genome level has never been performed. To do this, we developed a unique method to administer RNA interference (RNAi) in a high-throughput and noninvasive manner and then used it to knock down the expression of DNA methyl-transferase 3 (dnmt3), which is required for de novo DNA methylation. We chose the honey bee (Apis mellifera) for this test because it has recently emerged as an important model organism for studying the effects of DNA methylation on development and social behavior, and DNA methylation in honey bees is predominantly on gene bodies. Here we show that dnmt3 RNAi decreased global genomic methylation level as expected and in addition caused widespread and diverse changes in alternative splicing in fat tissue. Four different types of splicing events were affected by dnmt3 gene knockdown, and change in two types, exon skipping and intron retention, was directly related to decreased methylation. These results demonstrate that one function of gene body DNA methylation is to regulate alternative splicing. PMID:23852726

  15. Functional consequences of developmentally regulated alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Kalsotra, Auinash; Cooper, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide analyses of metazoan transcriptomes have revealed an unexpected level of mRNA diversity that is generated by alternative splicing. Recently, regulatory networks have been identified through which splicing promotes dynamic remodeling of the transcriptome to promote physiological changes, which involve robust and coordinated alternative splicing transitions. The regulation of splicing in yeast, worms, flies and vertebrates affects a variety of biological processes. The functional classes of genes that are regulated by alternative splicing include both those with widespread homeostatic activities and genes with cell-type-specific functions. Alternative splicing can drive determinative physiological change or can have a permissive role by providing mRNA variability that is utilized by other regulatory mechanisms. PMID:21921927

  16. Modeling Alternative Splicing Variants from RNA-Seq Data with Isoform Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Beretta, Stefano; Vedova, Gianluca Della; Pirola, Yuri; Rizzi, Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies need new methodologies for alternative splicing (AS) analysis. Current computational methods for AS analysis from NGS data are mainly based on aligning short reads against a reference genome, while methods that do not need a reference genome are mostly underdeveloped. In this context, the main developed tools for NGS data focus on de novo transcriptome assembly (Grabherr et al., 2011; Schulz et al., 2012). While these tools are extensively applied for biological investigations and often show intrinsic shortcomings from the obtained results, a theoretical investigation of the inherent computational limits of transcriptome analysis from NGS data, when a reference genome is unknown or highly unreliable, is still missing. On the other hand, we still lack methods for computing the gene structures due to AS events under the above assumptions—a problem that we start to tackle with this article. More precisely, based on the notion of isoform graph (Lacroix et al., 2008), we define a compact representation of gene structures—called splicing graph—and investigate the computational problem of building a splicing graph that is (i) compatible with NGS data and (ii) isomorphic to the isoform graph. We characterize when there is only one representative splicing graph compatible with input data, and we propose an efficient algorithmic approach to compute this graph. PMID:24200390

  17. Adaptive thermal control of stem gravitropism through alternative RNA splicing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jae Yong; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Chung-Mo

    2015-01-01

    Gravitropism is an important growth movement in response to gravity in virtually all higher plants: the roots showing positive gravitropism and the shoots showing negative gravitropism. The gravitropic orientation of plant organs is also influenced by environmental factors, such as light and temperature. It is known that a zinc finger (ZF)-containing transcription factor SHOOT GRAVITROPISM 5/INDETERMINATE DOMAIN 15 (SGR5/IDD15) mediates the early events of gravitropic responses occurring in inflorescence stems. We have recently found that SGR5 gene undergoes alternative splicing to produce 2 protein variants, the full-size SGR5α transcription factor and the truncated SGR5β form lacking functional ZF motifs. The SGR5β form inhibits SGR5α function possibly by forming nonfunctional heterodimers that are excluded from DNA binding. Notably, SGR5 alternative splicing is accelerated at high temperatures, resulting in a high-level accumulation of SGR5β proteins. Accordingly, transgenic plants overexpressing SGR5β exhibit a reduction in the negative gravitropism of inflorescence stems, as observed in the SGR5-defective mutant. It is proposed that the thermos-responsive alternative splicing of SGR5 gene provides an adaptation strategy by which plants protect the shoots from aerial heat frequently occurring in natural habitats. PMID:26452406

  18. Identification of a third region of cell-specific alternative splicing in human fibronectin mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, A.; Kornblihtt, A.R.

    1987-10-01

    The authors describe here a third region of variability in human fibronectin (FN) due to alternative RNA splicing. Two other positions of alternative splicing have been reported previously (ED and IIICS). The third region involves a 273-nucleotide exon encoding exactly one 91-amino acid repeat of type III homology, located between the DNA- and the cell-binding domains of FN, which is either included in or excluded from FN mRNA. The two mRNA variants arising by an exon-skipping mechanism are present in cells known to synthesize the cellular form of FN. However, liver cells, which are the source of plasma FN, produce only messengers without the extra type III sequence. Therefore, the region described here resembles, both structurally and functionally, the previously described ED (for extra domain) region, located toward the C terminus of the molecule between the cell- and heparin- (hep 2) binding domains. The authors conclude that both the extra type III repeat (names EDII) and ED represent sequences restricted to cellular FN. Combination of all the possible patterns of splicing in the three regions described to date may generate up to 20 distinct FN polypeptides from a single gene.

  19. The RNA-binding protein Arrest (Bruno) regulates alternative splicing to enable myofibril maturation in Drosophila flight muscle.

    PubMed

    Spletter, Maria L; Barz, Christiane; Yeroslaviz, Assa; Schönbauer, Cornelia; Ferreira, Irene R S; Sarov, Mihail; Gerlach, Daniel; Stark, Alexander; Habermann, Bianca H; Schnorrer, Frank

    2015-02-01

    In Drosophila, fibrillar flight muscles (IFMs) enable flight, while tubular muscles mediate other body movements. Here, we use RNA-sequencing and isoform-specific reporters to show that spalt major (salm) determines fibrillar muscle physiology by regulating transcription and alternative splicing of a large set of sarcomeric proteins. We identify the RNA-binding protein Arrest (Aret, Bruno) as downstream of salm. Aret shuttles between the cytoplasm and nuclei and is essential for myofibril maturation and sarcomere growth of IFMs. Molecularly, Aret regulates IFM-specific splicing of various salm-dependent sarcomeric targets, including Stretchin and wupA (TnI), and thus maintains muscle fiber integrity. As Aret and its sarcomeric targets are evolutionarily conserved, similar principles may regulate mammalian muscle morphogenesis. PMID:25532219

  20. The RNA-binding protein Arrest (Bruno) regulates alternative splicing to enable myofibril maturation in Drosophila flight muscle

    PubMed Central

    Spletter, Maria L; Barz, Christiane; Yeroslaviz, Assa; Schönbauer, Cornelia; Ferreira, Irene R S; Sarov, Mihail; Gerlach, Daniel; Stark, Alexander; Habermann, Bianca H; Schnorrer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila, fibrillar flight muscles (IFMs) enable flight, while tubular muscles mediate other body movements. Here, we use RNA-sequencing and isoform-specific reporters to show that spalt major (salm) determines fibrillar muscle physiology by regulating transcription and alternative splicing of a large set of sarcomeric proteins. We identify the RNA-binding protein Arrest (Aret, Bruno) as downstream of salm. Aret shuttles between the cytoplasm and nuclei and is essential for myofibril maturation and sarcomere growth of IFMs. Molecularly, Aret regulates IFM-specific splicing of various salm-dependent sarcomeric targets, including Stretchin and wupA (TnI), and thus maintains muscle fiber integrity. As Aret and its sarcomeric targets are evolutionarily conserved, similar principles may regulate mammalian muscle morphogenesis. PMID:25532219

  1. The mammalian homolog of suppressor-of-white-apricot regulates alternative mRNA splicing of CD45 exon 4 and fibronectin IIICS.

    PubMed

    Sarkissian, M; Winne, A; Lafyatis, R

    1996-12-01

    We have previously described human (HsSWAP) and mouse (MmSWAP) homologs to the Drosophila alternative splicing regulator suppressor-of-white-apricot (su(wa) or DmSWAP). DmSWAP was formally defined as an alternative splicing regulator by studies showing that it autoregulates splicing of its own pre-mRNA. We report here that mammalian SWAP regulates its own splicing, and also the splicing of fibronectin and CD45. Using an in vivo system of cell transfection, mammalian SWAP regulated 5' splice site selection in splicing of its own second intron. SWAP enhanced splicing to the distal 5' splice site, whereas the SR protein ASF/SF2 enhanced splicing to the proximal site. SWAP also regulated alternative splicing of the fibronectin IIICS region by promoting exclusion of the entire IIICS region. In contrast, ASF/SF2 stimulated inclusion of the entire IIICS region. Finally, SWAP regulated splicing of CD45 exon 4, promoting exclusion of this exon, an effect also seen with ASF/SF2. Experiments using SWAP deletion mutants showed that splicing regulation of the fibronectin IIICS region and CD45 exon 4 requires a region including a carboxyl-terminal arginine/serine (R/S)-rich motif. Since R/S motifs of various splicing proteins have been shown to interact with each other, these results suggest that the R/S motif in SWAP may regulate splicing, at least in part, through interactions with other R/S containing splicing factors. PMID:8940107

  2. The Choice of Alternative 5' Splice Sites in Influenza Virus M1 mRNA is Regulated by the Viral Polymerase Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Shin-Ru; Nemeroff, Martin E.; Krug, Robert M.

    1995-07-01

    The influenza virus M1 mRNA has two alternative 5' splice sites: a distal 5' splice site producing mRNA_3 that has the coding potential for 9 amino acids and a proximal 5' splice site producing M2 mRNA encoding the essential M2 ion-channel protein. Only mRNA_3 was made in uninfected cells transfected with DNA expressing M1 mRNA. Similarly, using nuclear extracts from uninfected cells, in vitro splicing of M1 mRNA yielded only mRNA_3. Only when the mRNA_3 5' splice site was inactivated by mutation was M2 mRNA made in uninfected cells and in uninfected cell extracts. In influenza virus-infected cells, M2 mRNA was made, but only after a delay, suggesting that newly synthesized viral gene product(s) were needed to activate the M2 5' splice site. We present strong evidence that these gene products are the complex of the three polymerase proteins, the same complex that functions in the transcription and replication of the viral genome. Gel shift experiments showed that the viral polymerase complex bound to the 5' end of the viral M1 mRNA in a sequence-specific and cap-dependent manner. During in vitro splicing catalyzed by uninfected cell extracts, the binding of the viral polymerase complex blocked the mRNA_3 5' splice site, resulting in the switch to the M2 mRNA 5' splice site and the production of M2 mRNA.

  3. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging. PMID:26529031

  4. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging. PMID:26529031

  5. The proto-oncogene PKCι regulates the alternative splicing of Bcl-x pre-mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Jacqueline C.; Vu, Ngoc; Shultz, Michael D.; Mba, Uzoma; Shapiro, Brian A.; Chalfant, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Two splice variants derived from the BCL-x gene via alternative 5′ splice site selection (5′SS) are pro-apoptotic Bcl-x(s) and anti-apoptotic Bcl-x(L). Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that apoptotic signaling pathways regulated the alternative 5′SS selection via protein phosphatase-1 and de novo ceramide. In this study, we examined the elusive pro-survival signaling pathways that regulate the 5′SS selection of Bcl-x pre-mRNA in cancer cells. Taking a broad-based approach by utilizing a number of small molecule inhibitors of various mitogenic/survival pathways, we found that only treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines with the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 (50 μM) or the pan-PKC inhibitor GÖ6983 (25 μM) decreased the Bcl-x(L)/Bcl-x(s) mRNA ratio. Pan-PKC inhibitors that did not target the atypical PKCs, PKCι and PKCζ, had no effect on the Bcl-x(L)/Bcl-x(s) mRNA ratio. Additional studies demonstrated that downregulation of the proto-oncogene, PKCι, in contrast to PKCζ, also resulted in a decrease in the Bcl-x(L)/Bcl-x(s) mRNA ratio. Furthermore, downregulation of PKCι correlated with a dramatic decrease in the expression of SAP155, an RNA trans-acting factor that regulates the 5′SS selection of Bcl-x pre-mRNA. Inhibition of the PI3K or atypical PKC pathway induced a dramatic loss of SAP155 complex formation at ceramide-responsive RNA cis-element 1. Lastly, forced expression of Bcl-x(L) “rescued” the loss of cell survival induced by PKCι siRNA. In summary, the PI3K/PKCι regulates the alternative splicing of Bcl-x pre-mRNA with implications in the cell survival of NSCLC cells. PMID:22522453

  6. RNA-seq analysis of impact of PNN on gene expression and alternative splicing in corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Debra; Newman, Jeremy R.B.; McIntyre, Lauren M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The specialized corneal epithelium requires differentiated properties, specific for its role at the anterior surface of the eye. Thus, tight maintenance of the differentiated qualities of the corneal epithelial is essential. Pinin (PNN) is an exon junction component (EJC) that has dramatic implications for corneal epithelial cell differentiation and may act as a stabilizer of the corneal epithelial cell phenotype. Our studies revealed that PNN is involved in transcriptional repression complexes and spliceosomal complexes, placing PNN at the fulcrum between chromatin and mRNA splicing. Transcriptome analysis of PNN-knockdown cells revealed clear and reproducible alterations in transcript profiles and splicing patterns of a subset of genes that would significantly impact the epithelial cell phenotype. We further investigated PNN’s role in the regulation of gene expression and alternative splicing (AS) in a corneal epithelial context. Methods Human corneal epithelial (HCET) cells that carry the doxycycline-inducible PNN-knockdown shRNA vector were used to perform RNA-seq to determine differential gene expression and differential AS events. Results Multiple genes and AS events were identified as differentially expressed between PNN-knockdown and control cells. Genes upregulated by PNN knockdown included a large proportion of genes that are associated with enhanced cell migration and ECM remodeling processes, such as MMPs, ADAMs, HAS2, LAMA3, CXCRs, and UNC5C. Genes downregulated in response to PNN depletion included IGFBP5, FGD3, FGFR2, PAX6, RARG, and SOX10. AS events in PNN-knockdown cells compared to control cells were also more likely to be detected, and upregulated. In particular, 60% of exon-skipping events, detected in only one condition, were detected in PNN-knockdown cells and of the shared exon-skipping events, 92% of those differentially expressed were more frequent in the PNN knockdown. Conclusions These data suggest that lowering of PNN levels in

  7. Coupling pre-mRNA splicing and 3' end formation to mRNA export: alternative ways to punch the nuclear export clock.

    PubMed

    Elbarbary, Reyad A; Maquat, Lynne E

    2016-03-01

    How does a mammalian cell determine when newly synthesized mRNAs are fully processed and appropriate for nuclear export? Müller-McNicoll and colleagues (pp. 553-566) expand on mechanisms known to be mediated by nuclear export factor 1 (NXF1) by describing SR proteins as NXF1 adaptors that flag alternatively spliced and polyadenylated mRNA isoforms as cargo ready for the cytoplasm. PMID:26944675

  8. Alternative mRNA Splicing from the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) Gene Generates Isoforms with Distinct Subcellular mRNA Localization Patterns in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Rune; Daugaard, Tina F.; Holm, Ida E.; Nielsen, Anders Lade

    2013-01-01

    The intermediate filament network of astrocytes includes Glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap) as a major component. Gfap mRNA is alternatively spliced resulting in generation of different protein isoforms where Gfapα is the most predominant isoform. The Gfapδ isoform is expressed in proliferating neurogenic astrocytes of the developing human brain and in the adult human and mouse brain. Here we provide a characterization of mouse Gfapδ mRNA and Gfapδ protein. RT-qPCR analysis showed that Gfapδ mRNA and Gfapα mRNA expression is coordinately increased in the post-natal period. Immunohistochemical staining of developing mouse brain samples showed that Gfapδ is expressed in the sub-ventricular zones in accordance with the described localization in the developing and adult human brain. Immunofluorescence analysis verified incorporation of Gfapδ into the Gfap intermediate filament network and overlap in Gfapδ and Gfapα subcellular localization. Subcellular mRNA localization studies identified different localization patterns of Gfapδ and Gfapα mRNA in mouse primary astrocytes. A larger fraction of Gfapα mRNA showed mRNA localization to astrocyte protrusions compared to Gfapδ mRNA. The differential mRNA localization patterns were dependent on the different 3′-exon sequences included in Gfapδ and Gfapα mRNA. The presented results show that alternative Gfap mRNA splicing results in isoform-specific mRNA localization patterns with resulting different local mRNA concentration ratios which have potential to participate in subcellular region-specific intermediate filament dynamics during brain development, maintenance and in disease. PMID:23991052

  9. Dual function of C/D box small nucleolar RNAs in rRNA modification and alternative pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Falaleeva, Marina; Pages, Amadis; Matuszek, Zaneta; Hidmi, Sana; Agranat-Tamir, Lily; Korotkov, Konstantin; Nevo, Yuval; Eyras, Eduardo; Sperling, Ruth; Stamm, Stefan

    2016-03-22

    C/D box small nucleolar RNAs (SNORDs) are small noncoding RNAs, and their best-understood function is to target the methyltransferase fibrillarin to rRNA (for example, SNORD27 performs 2'-O-methylation of A27 in 18S rRNA). Unexpectedly, we found a subset of SNORDs, including SNORD27, in soluble nuclear extract made under native conditions, where fibrillarin was not detected, indicating that a fraction of the SNORD27 RNA likely forms a protein complex different from canonical snoRNAs found in the insoluble nuclear fraction. As part of this previously unidentified complex,SNORD27 regulates the alternative splicing of the transcription factor E2F7p re-mRNA through direct RNA-RNA interaction without methylating the RNA, likely by competing with U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP). Furthermore, knockdown of SNORD27 activates previously "silent" exons in several other genes through base complementarity across the entire SNORD27 sequence, not just the antisense boxes. Thus, some SNORDs likely function in both rRNA and pre-mRNA processing, which increases the repertoire of splicing regulators and links both processes. PMID:26957605

  10. Prp40 pre-mRNA processing factor 40 homolog B (PRPF40B) associates with SF1 and U2AF65 and modulates alternative pre-mRNA splicing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Soraya; Montes, Marta; Hernández-Munain, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The first stable complex formed during the assembly of spliceosomes onto pre-mRNA substrates in mammals includes U1 snRNP, which recognizes the 5′ splice site, and the splicing factors SF1 and U2AF, which bind the branch point sequence, polypyrimidine tract, and 3′ splice site. The 5′ and 3′ splice site complexes are thought to be joined together by protein–protein interactions mediated by factors that ensure the fidelity of the initial splice site recognition. In this study, we identified and characterized PRPF40B, a putative mammalian ortholog of the U1 snRNP-associated yeast splicing factor Prp40. PRPF40B is highly enriched in speckles with a behavior similar to splicing factors. We demonstrated that PRPF40B interacts directly with SF1 and associates with U2AF65. Accordingly, PRPF40B colocalizes with these splicing factors in the cell nucleus. Splicing assays with reporter minigenes revealed that PRPF40B modulates alternative splice site selection. In the case of Fas regulation of alternative splicing, weak 5′ and 3′ splice sites and exonic sequences are required for PRPF40B function. Placing our data in a functional context, we also show that PRPF40B depletion increased Fas/CD95 receptor number and cell apoptosis, which suggests the ability of PRPF40B to alter the alternative splicing of key apoptotic genes to regulate cell survival. PMID:25605964

  11. Gene structure, chromosomal location, and basis for alternative mRNA splicing of the human VCAM1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Cybulsky, M.I.; Fries, J.W.U.; Williams, A.J.; Sultan, P.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.; Collins, T. ); Eddy, R.; Byers, M.; Shows, T. )

    1991-09-01

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) is a cell surface glycoprotein adhesive for certain blood leukocytes and tumor cells, which is expressed by activated endothelium in a variety of pathologic conditions including atherosclerosis. Genomic clones encoding the VCAM1 gene were isolated and the organization of the gene was determined. The gene, which is present in a single copy in the human genome, contains 9 exons spanning {approx}25 kilobases of DNA. Exons 2-8 contain C2 or H-type immunoglobulin domains. At least two different VCAM-1 precursors can be generated from the human gene as a result of alternative mRNA splicing events, which include or exclude exon 5. A consensus TATAA element is located upstream of the transcriptional start site. The VCAM1 promoter contains consensus binding sites for NF-{kappa}B, the GATA family of transcription factors, as well as an AP1 site. The VCAM1 gene was assigned to the 1p31-32 region of chromosome 1 based on the analysis of human-mouse hybrid cell lines and in situ hybridization. Structural analysis of the human VCAM1 gene provides the basis for alternative mRNA splicing and an initial approach to elucidating the regulation of VCAM-1 expression.

  12. Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA in cancer: focus on G protein-coupled peptide hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Körner, Meike; Miller, Laurence J

    2009-08-01

    Through alternative splicing, multiple different transcripts can be generated from a single gene. Alternative splicing represents an important molecular mechanism of gene regulation in physiological processes such as developmental programming as well as in disease. In cancer, splicing is significantly altered. Tumors express a different collection of alternative spliceoforms than normal tissues. Many tumor-associated splice variants arise from genes with an established role in carcinogenesis or tumor progression, and their functions can be oncogenic. This raises the possibility that products of alternative splicing play a pathogenic role in cancer. Moreover, cancer-associated spliceoforms represent potential diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets. G protein-coupled peptide hormone receptors provide a good illustration of alternative splicing in cancer. The wild-type forms of these receptors have long been known to be expressed in cancer and to modulate tumor cell functions. They are also recognized as attractive clinical targets. Recently, splice variants of these receptors have been increasingly identified in various types of cancer. In particular, alternative cholecystokinin type 2, secretin, and growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor spliceoforms are expressed in tumors. Peptide hormone receptor splice variants can fundamentally differ from their wild-type receptor counterparts in pharmacological and functional characteristics, in their distribution in normal and malignant tissues, and in their potential use for clinical applications. PMID:19574427

  13. MapSplice: Accurate mapping of RNA-seq reads for splice junction discovery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Singh, Darshan; Zeng, Zheng; Coleman, Stephen J.; Huang, Yan; Savich, Gleb L.; He, Xiaping; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Grimm, Sara A.; Perou, Charles M.; MacLeod, James N.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Prins, Jan F.; Liu, Jinze

    2010-01-01

    The accurate mapping of reads that span splice junctions is a critical component of all analytic techniques that work with RNA-seq data. We introduce a second generation splice detection algorithm, MapSplice, whose focus is high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of splices as well as CPU and memory efficiency. MapSplice can be applied to both short (<75 bp) and long reads (≥75 bp). MapSplice is not dependent on splice site features or intron length, consequently it can detect novel canonical as well as non-canonical splices. MapSplice leverages the quality and diversity of read alignments of a given splice to increase accuracy. We demonstrate that MapSplice achieves higher sensitivity and specificity than TopHat and SpliceMap on a set of simulated RNA-seq data. Experimental studies also support the accuracy of the algorithm. Splice junctions derived from eight breast cancer RNA-seq datasets recapitulated the extensiveness of alternative splicing on a global level as well as the differences between molecular subtypes of breast cancer. These combined results indicate that MapSplice is a highly accurate algorithm for the alignment of RNA-seq reads to splice junctions. Software download URL: http://www.netlab.uky.edu/p/bioinfo/MapSplice. PMID:20802226

  14. MapSplice: accurate mapping of RNA-seq reads for splice junction discovery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Singh, Darshan; Zeng, Zheng; Coleman, Stephen J; Huang, Yan; Savich, Gleb L; He, Xiaping; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Grimm, Sara A; Perou, Charles M; MacLeod, James N; Chiang, Derek Y; Prins, Jan F; Liu, Jinze

    2010-10-01

    The accurate mapping of reads that span splice junctions is a critical component of all analytic techniques that work with RNA-seq data. We introduce a second generation splice detection algorithm, MapSplice, whose focus is high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of splices as well as CPU and memory efficiency. MapSplice can be applied to both short (<75 bp) and long reads (≥ 75 bp). MapSplice is not dependent on splice site features or intron length, consequently it can detect novel canonical as well as non-canonical splices. MapSplice leverages the quality and diversity of read alignments of a given splice to increase accuracy. We demonstrate that MapSplice achieves higher sensitivity and specificity than TopHat and SpliceMap on a set of simulated RNA-seq data. Experimental studies also support the accuracy of the algorithm. Splice junctions derived from eight breast cancer RNA-seq datasets recapitulated the extensiveness of alternative splicing on a global level as well as the differences between molecular subtypes of breast cancer. These combined results indicate that MapSplice is a highly accurate algorithm for the alignment of RNA-seq reads to splice junctions. Software download URL: http://www.netlab.uky.edu/p/bioinfo/MapSplice. PMID:20802226

  15. Genome-wide identification and characterization of tissue-specific RNA editing events in D. melanogaster and their potential role in regulating alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Mazloomian, Alborz; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing is a widespread mechanism that plays a crucial role in diversifying gene products. Its abundance and importance in regulating cellular processes were revealed using new sequencing technologies. The majority of these editing events, however, cannot be associated with regulatory mechanisms. We use tissue-specific high-throughput libraries of D. melanogaster to study RNA editing. We introduce an analysis pipeline that utilises large input data and explicitly captures ADAR's requirement for double-stranded regions. It combines probabilistic and deterministic filters and can identify RNA editing events with a low estimated false positive rate. Analyzing ten different tissue types, we predict 2879 editing sites and provide their detailed characterization. Our analysis pipeline accurately distinguishes genuine editing sites from SNPs and sequencing and mapping artifacts. Our editing sites are 3 times more likely to occur in exons with multiple splicing acceptor/donor sites than in exons with unique splice sites (p-value < 2.10−15). Furthermore, we identify 244 edited regions where RNA editing and alternative splicing are likely to influence each other. For 96 out of these 244 regions, we find evolutionary evidence for conserved RNA secondary-structures near splice sites suggesting a potential regulatory mechanism where RNA editing may alter splicing patterns via changes in local RNA structure. PMID:26512413

  16. Alternative splicing and muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pistoni, Mariaelena; Ghigna, Claudia; Gabellini, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is a major contributor to proteomic diversity and to the control of gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells. For this reasons, alternative splicing is tightly regulated in different tissues and developmental stages and its disruption can lead to a wide range of human disorders. The aim of this review is to focus on the relevance of alternative splicing for muscle function and muscle disease. We begin by giving a brief overview of alternative splicing, muscle-specific gene expression and muscular dystrophy. Next, to illustrate these concepts we focus on two muscular dystrophy, myotonic muscular dystrophy and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, both associated to disruption of splicing regulation in muscle. PMID:20603608

  17. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P; Clark, John M; Reynolds, Stuart E; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Feil, Edward J; Urrutia, Araxi O

    2015-10-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation. PMID:26169943

  18. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M.; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P.; Clark, John M.; Reynolds, Stuart E.; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Feil, Edward J.; Urrutia, Araxi O.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation. PMID:26169943

  19. Effects of Age and Hindlimb Immobilization and Remobilization on Fast Troponin T Precursor mRNA Alternative Splicing in Rat Gastrocnemius Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Suhana; Schilder, Rudolf J.; Berg, Arthur S.; Kimball, Scot R.

    2016-01-01

    Fast skeletal muscle Troponin T (TNNT3) is an important component of the skeletal muscle contractile machinery. The pre-mRNA encoding TNNT3 is alternatively spliced and changes in the pattern of TNNT3 splice form expression are associated with alterations in thin filament calcium sensitivity and force production during muscle contraction, thereby regulating muscle function. Interestingly, during aging, muscle force/cross sectional area is reduced, suggesting that loss of mass does not completely account for the impaired muscle function that develops during the aging process. Therefore, in the present study, we tested the hypothesis that age- and changes in muscle loading are associated with alterations in TNNT3 alternative splicing in the rat gastrocnemius muscle. We found that the relative abundance of several TNNT3 splice forms varied significantly with age among 2, 9, and 18-month old rats, and the pattern correlated with changes in body weight rather than muscle mass. Hindlimb immobilization for 7 days resulted in dramatic alterations in splice form relative abundance such that the pattern was similar to that observed in lighter animals. Remobilization for 7 days restored the splicing pattern toward that observed in the non-immobilized limb, even though muscle mass had not yet begun to recover. In conclusion, the results suggest that TNNT3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing is rapidly (i.e. within days) modulated in response to changes in the load placed on the muscle. Moreover, the results show that restoration of TNNT3 alternative splicing to control patterns is initiated prior to an increase in muscle mass. PMID:26799695

  20. CELF RNA binding proteins promote axon regeneration in C. elegans and mammals through alternative splicing of Syntaxins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lizhen; Liu, Zhijie; Zhou, Bing; Wei, Chaoliang; Zhou, Yu; Rosenfeld, Michael G; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Chisholm, Andrew D; Jin, Yishi

    2016-01-01

    Axon injury triggers dramatic changes in gene expression. While transcriptional regulation of injury-induced gene expression is widely studied, less is known about the roles of RNA binding proteins (RBPs) in post-transcriptional regulation during axon regeneration. In C. elegans the CELF (CUGBP and Etr-3 Like Factor) family RBP UNC-75 is required for axon regeneration. Using crosslinking immunoprecipitation coupled with deep sequencing (CLIP-seq) we identify a set of genes involved in synaptic transmission as mRNA targets of UNC-75. In particular, we show that UNC-75 regulates alternative splicing of two mRNA isoforms of the SNARE Syntaxin/unc-64. In C. elegans mutants lacking unc-75 or its targets, regenerating axons form growth cones, yet are deficient in extension. Extending these findings to mammalian axon regeneration, we show that mouse Celf2 expression is upregulated after peripheral nerve injury and that Celf2 mutant mice are defective in axon regeneration. Further, mRNAs for several Syntaxins show CELF2 dependent regulation. Our data delineate a post-transcriptional regulatory pathway with a conserved role in regenerative axon extension. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16072.001 PMID:27253061

  1. RNA-Seq of Aradopsis pollen uncovers novel transcription and alternative splicing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pollen grains of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contain two haploid sperm cells enclosed in a haploid vegetative cell. Upon germination, the vegetative cell extrudes a pollen tube that carries the sperm to an ovule for fertilization. Knowing the identity, relative abundance, and splicing pattern...

  2. Differential Roles of Interleukin 15 mRNA Isoforms Generated by Alternative Splicing in Immune Responses in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Hitoshi; Yajima, Toshiki; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Tsunobuchi, Hironaka; Umemura, Masayuki; Itano, Keiko; Matsuguchi, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Misao; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Yoshikai, Yasunobu

    2000-01-01

    At least two types of interleukin (IL)-15 mRNA isoforms are generated by alternative splicing at the 5′ upstream of exon 5 in mice. To elucidate the potential roles of IL-15 isoforms in immune responses in vivo, we constructed two groups of transgenic mice using originally described IL-15 cDNA with a normal exon 5 (normal IL-15 transgenic [Tg] mice) and IL-15 cDNA with an alternative exon 5 (alternative IL-15 Tg mice) under the control of an MHC class I promoter. Normal IL-15 Tg mice constitutionally produced a significant level of IL-15 protein and had markedly increased numbers of memory type (CD44high Ly6C+) of CD8+ T cells in the LN. These mice showed resistance to Salmonella infection accompanied by the enhanced interferon (IFN)-γ production, but depletion of CD8+ T cells exaggerated the bacterial growth, suggesting that the IL-15–dependent CD8+ T cells with a memory phenotype may serve to protect against Salmonella infection in normal IL-15 Tg mice. On the other hand, a large amount of intracellular IL-15 protein was detected but hardly secreted extracellularly in alternative IL-15 Tg mice. Although most of the T cells developed normally in the alternative IL-15 Tg mice, they showed impaired IFN-γ production upon TCR engagement. The alternative IL-15 transgenic mice were susceptible to Salmonella accompanied by impaired production of endogenous IL-15 and IFN-γ. Thus, two groups of IL-15 Tg mice may provide information concerning the different roles of IL-15 isoforms in the immune system in vivo. PMID:10620614

  3. Translational control of germ cell-expressed mRNA imposed by alternative splicing: opioid peptide gene expression in rat testis.

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, J E; Collard, M W; Douglass, J O

    1989-01-01

    The three genes encoding the opioid peptide precursors (prodynorphin, proenkephalin, and proopiomelanocortin) are expressed in the rat testis. The sizes of the three opioid mRNAs in the testis differ from the sizes of the corresponding mRNAs in other rat tissues in which these genes are expressed. The smaller testicular proopiomelanocortin mRNA has previously been demonstrated to arise from alternative transcriptional initiation. In the present study, we found that the smaller testicular prodynorphin mRNA, expressed in Sertoli cells, results from alternative mRNA processing. Exon 2, which makes up 5' untranslated sequence, is removed from the mature transcript. Polysome analysis of brain and testis RNA indicates that the alteration of the prodynorphin leader sequence in the testis-specific transcript does not affect the efficiency of translation of this mRNA. The larger testicular proenkephalin transcript, expressed in developing germ cells, also results from alternative mRNA processing. Alternative acceptor site usage in the splicing of intron A results in a germ cell-specific proenkephalin transcript with a 491-nucleotide 5' untranslated leader sequence preceding the preproenkephalin-coding sequence. Polysome analysis indicates that this germ cell-specific proenkephalin mRNA is not efficiently translated. Mechanisms by which alternative mRNA splicing may serve to confer translational regulation upon the testicular proenkephalin transcript are discussed. Images PMID:2573832

  4. Gene and alternative splicing annotation with AIR

    PubMed Central

    Florea, Liliana; Di Francesco, Valentina; Miller, Jason; Turner, Russell; Yao, Alison; Harris, Michael; Walenz, Brian; Mobarry, Clark; Merkulov, Gennady V.; Charlab, Rosane; Dew, Ian; Deng, Zuoming; Istrail, Sorin; Li, Peter; Sutton, Granger

    2005-01-01

    Designing effective and accurate tools for identifying the functional and structural elements in a genome remains at the frontier of genome annotation owing to incompleteness and inaccuracy of the data, limitations in the computational models, and shifting paradigms in genomics, such as alternative splicing. We present a methodology for the automated annotation of genes and their alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts based on existing cDNA and protein sequence evidence from the same species or projected from a related species using syntenic mapping information. At the core of the method is the splice graph, a compact representation of a gene, its exons, introns, and alternatively spliced isoforms. The putative transcripts are enumerated from the graph and assigned confidence scores based on the strength of sequence evidence, and a subset of the high-scoring candidates are selected and promoted into the annotation. The method is highly selective, eliminating the unlikely candidates while retaining 98% of the high-quality mRNA evidence in well-formed transcripts, and produces annotation that is measurably more accurate than some evidence-based gene sets. The process is fast, accurate, and fully automated, and combines the traditionally distinct gene annotation and alternative splicing detection processes in a comprehensive and systematic way, thus considerably aiding in the ensuing manual curation efforts. PMID:15632090

  5. Regulation of Splicing Factors by Alternative Splicing and NMD Is Conserved between Kingdoms Yet Evolutionarily Flexible

    PubMed Central

    Lareau, Liana F.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraconserved elements, unusually long regions of perfect sequence identity, are found in genes encoding numerous RNA-binding proteins including arginine-serine rich (SR) splicing factors. Expression of these genes is regulated via alternative splicing of the ultraconserved regions to yield mRNAs that are degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), a process termed unproductive splicing (Lareau et al. 2007; Ni et al. 2007). As all human SR genes are affected by alternative splicing and NMD, one might expect this regulation to have originated in an early SR gene and persisted as duplications expanded the SR family. But in fact, unproductive splicing of most human SR genes arose independently (Lareau et al. 2007). This paradox led us to investigate the origin and proliferation of unproductive splicing in SR genes. We demonstrate that unproductive splicing of the splicing factor SRSF5 (SRp40) is conserved among all animals and even observed in fungi; this is a rare example of alternative splicing conserved between kingdoms, yet its effect is to trigger mRNA degradation. As the gene duplicated, the ancient unproductive splicing was lost in paralogs, and distinct unproductive splicing evolved rapidly and repeatedly to take its place. SR genes have consistently employed unproductive splicing, and while it is exceptionally conserved in some of these genes, turnover in specific events among paralogs shows flexible means to the same regulatory end. PMID:25576366

  6. Multiple cis elements regulate an alternative splicing event at 4.1R pre-mRNA during erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Deguillien, M; Huang, S C; Morinière, M; Dreumont, N; Benz, E J; Baklouti, F

    2001-12-15

    The inclusion of exon 16 in the mature protein 4.1R messenger RNA (mRNA) is a critical event in red blood cell membrane biogenesis. It occurs during late erythroid development and results in inclusion of the 10-kd domain needed for stabilization of the spectrin/actin lattice. In this study, an experimental model was established in murine erythroleukemia cells that reproduces the endogenous exon 16 splicing patterns from a transfected minigene. Exon 16 was excluded in predifferentiated and predominantly included after induction. This suggests that the minigene contained exon and abutting intronic sequences sufficient for splicing regulation. A systematic analysis of the cis-acting regulatory sequences that reside within the exon and flanking introns was performed. Results showed that (1) the upstream intron of 4.1R pre-mRNA is required for exon recognition and it displays 2 enhancer elements, a distal element acting in differentiating cells and a proximal constitutive enhancer that resides within the 25 nucleotides preceding the acceptor site; (2) the exon itself contains a strong constitutive splicing silencer; (3) the exon has a weak 5' splice site; and (4) the downstream intron contains at least 2 splicing enhancer elements acting in differentiating cells, a proximal element at the vicinity of the 5' splice site, and a distal element containing 3 copies of the UGCAUG motif. These results suggest that the interplay between negative and positive elements may determine the inclusion or exclusion of exon 16. The activation of the enhancer elements in late erythroid differentiation may play an important role in the retention of exon 16. PMID:11739190

  7. RNA Splicing: Regulation and Dysregulation in the Heart.

    PubMed

    van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M G; Pinto, Yigal M; Creemers, Esther E

    2016-02-01

    RNA splicing represents a post-transcriptional mechanism to generate multiple functional RNAs or proteins from a single transcript. The evolution of RNA splicing is a prime example of the Darwinian function follows form concept. A mutation that leads to a new mRNA (form) that encodes for a new functional protein (function) is likely to be retained, and this way, the genome has gradually evolved to encode for genes with multiple isoforms, thereby creating an enormously diverse transcriptome. Advances in technologies to characterize RNA populations have led to a better understanding of RNA processing in health and disease. In the heart, alternative splicing is increasingly being recognized as an important layer of post-transcriptional gene regulation. Moreover, the recent identification of several cardiac splice factors, such as RNA-binding motif protein 20 and SF3B1, not only provided important insight into the mechanisms underlying alternative splicing but also revealed how these splicing factors impact functional properties of the heart. Here, we review our current knowledge of alternative splicing in the heart, with a particular focus on the major and minor spliceosome, the factors controlling RNA splicing, and the role of alternative splicing in cardiac development and disease. PMID:26846640

  8. Alternative-splicing-mediated gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental process during gene expression and has been found to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. However, how AS impacts gene expression levels both quantitatively and qualitatively remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze two common models of gene expression, each incorporating a simple splice mechanism that a pre-mRNA is spliced into two mature mRNA isoforms in a probabilistic manner. In the constitutive expression case, we show that the steady-state molecular numbers of two mature mRNA isoforms follow mutually independent Poisson distributions. In the bursting expression case, we demonstrate that the tail decay of the steady-state distribution for both mature mRNA isoforms that in general are not mutually independent can be characterized by the product of mean burst size and splicing probability. In both cases, we find that AS can efficiently modulate both the variability (measured by variance) and the noise level of the total mature mRNA, and in particular, the latter is always lower than the noise level of the pre-mRNA, implying that AS always reduces the noise. These results altogether reveal that AS is a mechanism of efficiently controlling the gene expression noise.

  9. Biogenesis of sperm acrosome is regulated by pre-mRNA alternative splicing of Acrbp in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kanemori, Yoshinori; Koga, Yoshitaka; Sudo, Mai; Kang, Woojin; Kashiwabara, Shin-Ichi; Ikawa, Masahito; Hasuwa, Hidetoshi; Nagashima, Kiyoshi; Ishikawa, Yu; Ogonuki, Narumi; Ogura, Atsuo; Baba, Tadashi

    2016-06-28

    Proper biogenesis of a sperm-specific organelle, the acrosome, is essential for gamete interaction. An acrosomal matrix protein, ACRBP, is known as a proacrosin-binding protein. In mice, two forms of ACRBP, wild-type ACRBP-W and variant ACRBP-V5, are generated by pre-mRNA alternative splicing of Acrbp Here, we demonstrate the functional roles of these two ACRBP proteins. ACRBP-null male mice lacking both proteins showed a severely reduced fertility, because of malformation of the acrosome. Notably, ACRBP-null spermatids failed to form a large acrosomal granule, leading to the fragmented structure of the acrosome. The acrosome malformation was rescued by transgenic expression of ACRBP-V5 in ACRBP-null spermatids. Moreover, exogenously expressed ACRBP-W blocked autoactivation of proacrosin in the acrosome. Thus, ACRBP-V5 functions in the formation and configuration of the acrosomal granule during early spermiogenesis. The major function of ACRBP-W is to retain the inactive status of proacrosin in the acrosome until acrosomal exocytosis. PMID:27303034

  10. Variation in alternative splicing across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gene; Holste, Dirk; Kreiman, Gabriel; Burge, Christopher B

    2004-01-01

    Background Alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) is widely used by higher eukaryotes to generate different protein isoforms in specific cell or tissue types. To compare AS events across human tissues, we analyzed the splicing patterns of genomically aligned expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from libraries of cDNAs from different tissues. Results Controlling for differences in EST coverage among tissues, we found that the brain and testis had the highest levels of exon skipping. The most pronounced differences between tissues were seen for the frequencies of alternative 3' splice site and alternative 5' splice site usage, which were about 50 to 100% higher in the liver than in any other human tissue studied. Quantifying differences in splice junction usage, the brain, pancreas, liver and the peripheral nervous system had the most distinctive patterns of AS. Analysis of available microarray expression data showed that the liver had the most divergent pattern of expression of serine-arginine protein and heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein genes compared to the other human tissues studied, possibly contributing to the unusually high frequency of alternative splice site usage seen in liver. Sequence motifs enriched in alternative exons in genes expressed in the brain, testis and liver suggest specific splicing factors that may be important in AS regulation in these tissues. Conclusions This study distinguishes the human brain, testis and liver as having unusually high levels of AS, highlights differences in the types of AS occurring commonly in different tissues, and identifies candidate cis-regulatory elements and trans-acting factors likely to have important roles in tissue-specific AS in human cells. PMID:15461793

  11. Phylogenetic comparison of the pre-mRNA adenosine deaminase ADAR2 genes and transcripts: conservation and diversity in editing site sequence and alternative splicing patterns.

    PubMed

    Slavov, D; Gardiner, K

    2002-10-16

    Adenosine deaminase that acts on RNA -2 (ADAR2) is a member of a family of vertebrate genes that encode adenosine (A)-to-inosine (I) RNA deaminases, enzymes that deaminate specific A residues in specific pre-mRNAs to produce I. Known substrates of ADAR2 include sites within the coding regions of pre-mRNAs of the ionotropic glutamate receptors, GluR2-6, and the serotonin receptor, 5HT2C. Mammalian ADAR2 expression is itself regulated by A-to-I editing and by several alternative splicing events. Because the biological consequences of ADAR2 function are significant, we have undertaken a phylogenetic comparison of these features. Here we report a comparison of cDNA sequences, genomic organization, editing site sequences and patterns of alternative splicing of ADAR2 genes from human, mouse, chicken, pufferfish and zebrafish. Coding sequences and intron/exon organization are highly conserved. All ADAR2 genes show evidence of transcript editing with required sequences and predicted secondary structures very highly conserved. Patterns and levels of editing and alternative splicing vary among organisms, and include novel N-terminal exons and splicing events. PMID:12459255

  12. Cauliflower mosaic virus Transcriptome Reveals a Complex Alternative Splicing Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Bouton, Clément; Geldreich, Angèle; Ramel, Laëtitia; Ryabova, Lyubov A.; Dimitrova, Maria; Keller, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The plant pararetrovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) uses alternative splic-ing to generate several isoforms from its polycistronic pregenomic 35S RNA. This pro-cess has been shown to be essential for infectivity. Previous works have identified four splice donor sites and a single splice acceptor site in the 35S RNA 5’ region and sug-gested that the main role of CaMV splicing is to downregulate expression of open read-ing frames (ORFs) I and II. In this study, we show that alternative splicing is a conserved process among CaMV isolates. In Cabb B-JI and Cabb-S isolates, splicing frequently leads to different fusion between ORFs, particularly between ORF I and II. The corresponding P1P2 fusion proteins expressed in E. coli interact with viral proteins P2 and P3 in vitro. However, they are detected neither during infection nor upon transient expression in planta, which suggests rapid degradation after synthesis and no important biological role in the CaMV infectious cycle. To gain a better understanding of the functional relevance of 35S RNA alternative splicing in CaMV infectivity, we inactivated the previously described splice sites. All the splicing mutants were as pathogenic as the corresponding wild-type isolate. Through RT-PCR-based analysis we demonstrate that CaMV 35S RNA exhibits a complex splicing pattern, as we identify new splice donor and acceptor sites whose selection leads to more than thirteen 35S RNA isoforms in infected turnip plants. Inactivating splice donor or acceptor sites is not lethal for the virus, since disrupted sites are systematically rescued by the activation of cryptic and/or seldom used splice sites. Taken together, our data depict a conserved, complex and flexible process, involving multiple sites, that ensures splicing of 35S RNA. PMID:26162084

  13. Alternatively Spliced Androgen Receptor Variants

    PubMed Central

    Dehm, Scott M.; Tindall, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing is an important mechanism for increasing functional diversity from a limited set of genes. De-regulation of this process is common in diverse pathologic conditions. The androgen receptor (AR) is a steroid receptor transcription factor with functions critical for normal male development as well as the growth and survival of normal and cancerous prostate tissue. Studies of AR function in androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer (PCa) have demonstrated loss-of-function AR alterations in AIS, and gain-of-function AR alterations in PCa. Over the past two decades, AR gene alterations have been identified in various individuals with AIS, which disrupt normal AR splicing patterns and yield dysfunctional AR protein variants. More recently, altered AR splicing patterns have been identified as a mechanism of PCa progression and resistance to androgen-depletion therapy. Several studies have described the synthesis of alternatively spliced transcripts encoding truncated AR isoforms that lack the ligand-binding domain, which is the ultimate target of androgen depletion. Many of these truncated AR isoforms function as constitutively active, ligand-independent transcription factors that can support androgen-independent expression of AR target genes, as well as the androgen-independent growth of PCa cells. In this review, we will summarize the various alternatively spliced AR variants that have been discovered, with a focus on their role and origin in the pathologic conditions of AIS and PCa. PMID:21778211

  14. Impacts of Alternative Splicing Events on the Differentiation of Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jung-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing was found to be a common phenomenon after the advent of whole transcriptome analyses or next generation sequencing. Over 90% of human genes were demonstrated to undergo at least one alternative splicing event. Alternative splicing is an effective mechanism to spatiotemporally expand protein diversity, which influences the cell fate and tissue development. The first focus of this review is to highlight recent studies, which demonstrated effects of alternative splicing on the differentiation of adipocytes. Moreover, use of evolving high-throughput approaches, such as transcriptome analyses (RNA sequencing), to profile adipogenic transcriptomes, is also addressed. PMID:26389882

  15. Tau exon 10 alternative splicing and tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2008-01-01

    Abnormalities of microtubule-associated protein tau play a central role in neurofibrillary degeneration in several neurodegenerative disorders that collectively called tauopathies. Six isoforms of tau are expressed in adult human brain, which result from alternative splicing of pre-mRNA generated from a single tau gene. Alternative splicing of tau exon 10 results in tau isoforms containing either three or four microtubule-binding repeats (3R-tau and 4R-tau, respectively). Approximately equal levels of 3R-tau and 4R-tau are expressed in normal adult human brain, but the 3R-tau/4R-tau ratio is altered in the brains in several tauopathies. Discovery of silence mutations and intronic mutations of tau gene in some individuals with frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), which only disrupt tau exon 10 splicing but do not alter tau's primary sequence, demonstrates that dysregulation of tau exon 10 alternative splicing and consequently of 3R-tau/4R-tau balance is sufficient to cause neurodegeneration and dementia. Here, we review the gene structure, transcripts and protein isoforms of tau, followed by the regulation of exon 10 splicing that determines the expression of 3R-tau or 4R-tau. Finally, dysregulation of exon 10 splicing of tau in several tauopathies is discussed. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which tau exon 10 splicing is regulated and how it is disrupted in tauopathies will provide new insight into the mechanisms of these tauopathies and help identify new therapeutic targets to treat these disorders. PMID:18616804

  16. Alternatively spliced exons encode the tissue-specific 5{prime} termini of leukocyte pp52 and stromal cell S37 mRNA isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.A.; May, W.; Denny, C.T.

    1996-03-05

    The pp52 gene encodes an intracellular, F-actin-binding phosphoprotein (also designated LSP1 and WP34) postulated to function in cytoskeleton dynamics and cell motility. We previously reported that different mRNA isoforms are expressed from this gene in cells of the leukocyte lineage versus mesodermally derived cells. These tissue-specific mRNA isoforms are identical except for 5{prime}-untranslated regions and sequences coding for unique N-termini of 23 and 21 amino acids, respectively. As this is a single-copy gene, we predicted that these tissue-specific mRNA isoforms would be generated by alternative RNA splicing. We report that the unique 5{prime} sequences in these mRNA isoforms are encoded in two separate exons containing ATG initiation codes. These features confirm that the pp52 and S37 mRNA isoforms are generated by alternative RNA splicing and establish that they are independently translated. Other results presented here indicate that the differential expression of these exons in leukocytes versus mesodermally derived cells is regulated at the level of transcription by tissue-specific promoters. 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Splicing factor SRSF1 negatively regulates alternative splicing of MDM2 under damage

    PubMed Central

    Comiskey, Daniel F.; Jacob, Aishwarya G.; Singh, Ravi K.; Tapia-Santos, Aixa S.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic stress induces alternative splicing of the oncogene MDM2 generating MDM2-ALT1, an isoform attributed with tumorigenic properties. However, the mechanisms underlying this event remain unclear. Here we explore MDM2 splicing regulation by utilizing a novel minigene that mimics endogenous MDM2 splicing in response to UV and cisplatinum-induced DNA damage. We report that exon 11 is necessary and sufficient for the damage-specific alternative splicing of the MDM2 minigene and that the splicing factor SRSF1 binds exon 11 at evolutionarily conserved sites. Interestingly, mutations disrupting this interaction proved sufficient to abolish the stress-induced alternative splicing of the MDM2 minigene. Furthermore, SRSF1 overexpression promoted exclusion of exon 11, while its siRNA-mediated knockdown prevented the stress-induced alternative splicing of endogenous MDM2. Additionally, we observed elevated SRSF1 levels under stress and in tumors correlating with the expression of MDM2-ALT1. Notably, we demonstrate that MDM2-ALT1 splicing can be blocked by targeting SRSF1 sites on exon 11 using antisense oligonucleotides. These results present conclusive evidence supporting a negative role for SRSF1 in MDM2 alternative splicing. Importantly, we define for the first time, a clear-cut mechanism for the regulation of damage-induced MDM2 splicing and present potential strategies for manipulating MDM2 expression via splicing modulation. PMID:25845590

  18. Prevention of 5-hydroxytryptamine2C receptor RNA editing and alternate splicing in C57BL/6 mice activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and alters mood

    PubMed Central

    Bombail, Vincent; Qing, Wei; Chapman, Karen E; Holmes, Megan C

    2014-01-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine2C (5-HT)2C receptor is widely implicated in the aetiology of affective and eating disorders as well as regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis. Signalling through this receptor is regulated by A-to-I RNA editing, affecting three amino acids in the protein sequence, with unedited transcripts encoding a receptor (INI) that, in vitro, is hyperactive compared with edited isoforms. Targeted alteration (knock-in) of the Htr2c gene to generate ‘INI’ mice with no alternate splicing, solely expressing the full-length unedited isoform, did not produce an overt metabolic phenotype or altered anxiety behaviour, but did display reduced depressive-like and fear-associated behaviours. INI mice exhibited a hyperactive hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, with increased nadir plasma corticosterone and corticotrophin-releasing hormone expression in the hypothalamus but responded normally to chronic stress and showed normal circadian activity and activity in a novel environment. The circadian patterns of 5-HT2C receptor mRNA and mbii52, a snoRNA known to regulate RNA editing and RNA splicing of 5-HT2C receptor pre-mRNA, were altered in INI mice compared with wild-type control mice. Moreover, levels of 5-HT1A receptor mRNA were increased in the hippocampus of INI mice. These gene expression changes may underpin the neuroendocrine and behavioural changes observed in INI mice. However, the phenotype of INI mice was not consistent with a globally hyperactive INI receptor encoded by the unedited transcript in the absence of alternate splicing. Hence, the in vivo outcome of RNA editing may be neuronal cell type specific. PMID:25257581

  19. Organization of the human protein 4.1 genomic locus: New insights into the tissue-specific alternative splicing of the pre-mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Baklouti, F. ||; Huang, Shu-Ching; Benz, E.J. Jr. |

    1997-02-01

    Protein 4.1 is a globular 80-kDa component of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton that enhances spectrin-actin interaction via its internal 10-kDa domain. Previous studies have shown that protein 4.1 mRNA is expressed as multiple alternatively spliced isoforms, resulting from the inclusion or exclusion of small cassette sequences called motifs. By tissue screening for protein 4.1 isoforms, we have observed new features of an already complex pattern of alternative splicing within the spectrin/actin binding domain. In particular, we found a new 51-nt exon that is present almost exclusively in muscle tissue. In addition, we have isolated multiple genomic clones spanning over 200 kb, containing the entire erythroid and nonerythroid coding sequence of the human locus. The exon/intron structure has now been characterized; with the exception of a 17-nt motif, all of the alternatively spliced motifs correspond to individual exons. The 3{prime}-untranslated region (UTR) has also been completely sequenced using various PCR and genomic-sequencing methods. The 3{prime} UTR, over 3 kb, accounts for one-half of the mature mRNA. 83 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  20. COMMUNICATION: Alternative splicing and genomic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Kevin

    2004-06-01

    Alternative splicing allows an organism to make different proteins in different cells at different times, all from the same gene. In a cell that uses alternative splicing, the total length of all the exons is much shorter than in a cell that encodes the same set of proteins without alternative splicing. This economical use of exons makes genes more stable during reproduction and development because a genome with a shorter exon length is more resistant to harmful mutations. Genomic stability may be the reason why higher vertebrates splice alternatively. For a broad class of alternatively spliced genes, a formula is given for the increase in their stability.

  1. Nanoplasmonic probes of RNA folding and assembly during pre-mRNA splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Anh H.; Lee, Jong Uk; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-02-01

    RNA splicing plays important roles in transcriptome and proteome diversity. Herein, we describe the use of a nanoplasmonic system that unveils RNA folding and assembly during pre-mRNA splicing wherein the quantification of mRNA splice variants is not taken into account. With a couple of SERS-probes and plasmonic probes binding at the boundary sites of exon-2/intron-2 and intron-2/exon-3 of the pre-mature RNA of the β-globin gene, the splicing process brings the probes into the plasmonic bands. For plasmonic probes, a plasmon shift increase of ~29 nm, corresponding to intron removal and exon-2 and exon-3 connection to form the mRNA molecule, is measured by plasmonic coupling. The increased scattering intensity and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) fingerprinting reveal the clear dynamics of pre-mRNA splicing. Moreover, a time-resolved experiment of individual RNA molecules exhibited a successful splicing and an inhibited splicing event by 33 μM biflavonoid isoginkgetin, a general inhibitor of RNA splicing. The results suggest that the RNA splicing is successfully monitored with the nanoplasmonic system. Thus, this platform can be useful for studying RNA nanotechnology, biomolecular folding, alternative splicing, and maturation of microRNA.

  2. AB171. RNA alternative splicing modulator can effectively increase lymphoblast enzyme activity in patients with cardiac fabry disease caused by IVS4+919G >A mutation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yung-Hsiu; Li, Cheng-Fang; Huang, Chun-Kai; Lin, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Ting-Rong; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background In Taiwan, DNA-based newborn screening showed a surprisingly high incidence (1/875 in males and 1/399 in females) of a cardiac fabry mutation (IVS4 + 919G >A). The common cardiac variant fabry mutation, IVS4+919G >A, affects the splicing of GLA RNA by introducing a 57-nucleotide insertion between exons 4 and 5 that contains a stop codon and leads to a truncated protein and inactive enzyme. And this mutation affected males have up to 10% residual enzyme activity and present clinically with late-onset hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Due to the high cost of enzyme replacement therapy and the large number of patients with this mutation, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Several low-molecular-mass compounds, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors or kinase/phosphatase inhibitors, have been identified as modulators of alternative splicing. It may offer a potential alternative to enzyme replacement therapy. We expect to find out a more economic and effective drug by the detailed study of the mechanism of the small molecule modulators on the IVS4+919G >A mutation for the greater benefits of patients with this mutation. Methods In this study, we used to generate Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblast cell lines and incubated with different concentrations of three HDIs (sodium butyrate, valproic acid, and trichostatin A) and Amiloride hydrochloride (Amiloride HCl). To identify the respond of these compound, we were monitored the relative amounts of normal and aberrant splice forms by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, the relative amounts of the normal and truncated α-Gal A protein products were analyzed by Western blotting and enzyme activities. Results Western blotting revealed those females heterozygous for the IVS4+919G >A mutation had approximately 50% of the normal level of α-Gal A protein, whereas hemizygous males had approximately 10% of the normal level. The three HDIs were all found to rescue the aberrant RNA

  3. IRAS: High-Throughput Identification of Novel Alternative Splicing Regulators.

    PubMed

    Zheng, S

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a fundamental regulatory process of gene expression. Defects in alternative splicing can lead to various diseases, and modification of disease-causing splicing events presents great therapeutic promise. Splicing outcome is commonly affected by extracellular stimuli and signaling cascades that converge on RNA-binding splicing regulators. These trans-acting factors recognize cis-elements in pre-mRNA transcripts to affect spliceosome assembly and splice site choices. Identification of these splicing regulators and/or upstream modulators has been difficult and traditionally done by piecemeal. High-throughput screening strategies to find multiple regulators of exon splicing have great potential to accelerate the discovery process, but typically confront low sensitivity and low specificity of screening assays. Here we describe a unique screening strategy, IRAS (identifying regulators of alternative splicing), using a pair of dual-output minigene reporters to allow for sensitive detection of exon splicing changes. Each dual-output reporter produces green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) fluorescent signals to assay the two spliced isoforms exclusively. The two complementary minigene reporters alter GFP/RFP output ratios in the opposite direction in response to splicing change. Applying IRAS in cell-based high-throughput screens allows sensitive and specific identification of splicing regulators and modulators for any alternative exons of interest. In comparison to previous high-throughput screening methods, IRAS substantially enhances the specificity of the screening assay. This strategy significantly eliminates false positives without sacrificing sensitive identification of true regulators of splicing. PMID:27241759

  4. Evolution of alternative splicing after gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhixi; Wang, Jianmin; Yu, Jun; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Gu, Xun

    2006-02-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are two major sources of proteomic function diversity. Here, we study the evolutionary trend of alternative splicing after gene duplication by analyzing the alternative splicing differences between duplicate genes. We observed that duplicate genes have fewer alternative splice (AS) forms than single-copy genes, and that a negative correlation exists between the mean number of AS forms and the gene family size. Interestingly, we found that the loss of alternative splicing in duplicate genes may occur shortly after the gene duplication. These results support the subfunctionization model of alternative splicing in the early stage after gene duplication. Further analysis of the alternative splicing distribution in human duplicate pairs showed the asymmetric evolution of alternative splicing after gene duplications; i.e., the AS forms between duplicates may differ dramatically. We therefore conclude that alternative splicing and gene duplication may not evolve independently. In the early stage after gene duplication, young duplicates may take over a certain amount of protein function diversity that previously was carried out by the alternative splicing mechanism. In the late stage, the gain and loss of alternative splicing seem to be independent between duplicates. PMID:16365379

  5. SRSF2 Is Essential for Hematopoiesis, and Its Myelodysplastic Syndrome-Related Mutations Dysregulate Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Komeno, Yukiko; Huang, Yi-Jou; Qiu, Jinsong; Lin, Leo; Xu, YiJun; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Liang; Monterroza, Dora D.; Li, Hairi; DeKelver, Russell C.; Yan, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of neoplasms characterized by ineffective myeloid hematopoiesis and various risks for leukemia. SRSF2, a member of the serine/arginine-rich (SR) family of splicing factors, is one of the mutation targets associated with poor survival in patients suffering from myelodysplastic syndromes. Here we report the biological function of SRSF2 in hematopoiesis by using conditional knockout mouse models. Ablation of SRSF2 in the hematopoietic lineage caused embryonic lethality, and Srsf2-deficient fetal liver cells showed significantly enhanced apoptosis and decreased levels of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Induced ablation of SRSF2 in adult Mx1-Cre Srsf2flox/flox mice upon poly(I):poly(C) injection demonstrated a significant decrease in lineage− Sca+ c-Kit+ cells in bone marrow. To reveal the functional impact of myelodysplastic syndromes-associated mutations in SRSF2, we analyzed splicing responses on the MSD-L cell line and found that the missense mutation of proline 95 to histidine (P95H) and a P95-to-R102 in-frame 8-amino-acid deletion caused significant changes in alternative splicing. The affected genes were enriched in cancer development and apoptosis. These findings suggest that intact SRSF2 is essential for the functional integrity of the hematopoietic system and that its mutations likely contribute to development of myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:26124281

  6. Augmented DNA-binding activity of p53 protein encoded by a carboxyl-terminal alternatively spliced mRNA is blocked by p53 protein encoded by the regularly spliced form.

    PubMed Central

    Wolkowicz, R; Peled, A; Elkind, N B; Rotter, V

    1995-01-01

    DNA-binding activity of the wild-type p53 is central to its function in vivo. However, recombinant or in vitro translated wild-type p53 proteins, unless modified, are poor DNA binders. The fact that the in vitro produced protein gains DNA-binding activity upon modification at the C terminus raises the possibility that similar mechanisms may exist in the cell. Data presented here show that a C-terminal alternatively spliced wild-type p53 (ASp53) mRNA expressed by bacteria or transcribed in vitro codes for a p53 protein that efficiently binds DNA. Our results support the conclusion that the augmented DNA binding activity of an ASp53 protein is probably due to attenuation of the negative effect residing at the C terminus of the wild-type p53 protein encoded by the regularly spliced mRNA (RSp53) rather than acquisition of additional functionality by the alternatively spliced C' terminus. In addition, we found that ASp53 forms a complex with the non-DNA-binding RSp53, which in turn blocks the DNA-binding activity of ASp53. Interaction between these two wild-type p53 proteins may underline a mechanism that controls the activity of the wild-type p53 protein in the cell. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7624329

  7. Pre-mRNA Splicing in Plants: In Vivo Functions of RNA-Binding Proteins Implicated in the Splicing Process

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Katja; Koester, Tino; Staiger, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Alternative pre-messenger RNA splicing in higher plants emerges as an important layer of regulation upon exposure to exogenous and endogenous cues. Accordingly, mutants defective in RNA-binding proteins predicted to function in the splicing process show severe phenotypic alterations. Among those are developmental defects, impaired responses to pathogen threat or abiotic stress factors, and misregulation of the circadian timing system. A suite of splicing factors has been identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we summarize recent insights on how defects in these splicing factors impair plant performance. PMID:26213982

  8. Regulation of mRNA Abundance by Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein-Controlled Alternate 5′ Splice Site Choice

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Fursham M.; Makeyev, Eugene V.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) provides a potent mechanism for increasing protein diversity and modulating gene expression levels. How alternate splice sites are selected by the splicing machinery and how AS is integrated into gene regulation networks remain important questions of eukaryotic biology. Here we report that polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (Ptbp1/PTB/hnRNP-I) controls alternate 5′ and 3′ splice site (5′ss and 3′ss) usage in a large set of mammalian transcripts. A top scoring event identified by our analysis was the choice between competing upstream and downstream 5′ss (u5′ss and d5′ss) in the exon 18 of the Hps1 gene. Hps1 is essential for proper biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles and loss of its function leads to a disease called type 1 Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS). We show that Ptbp1 promotes preferential utilization of the u5′ss giving rise to stable mRNAs encoding a full-length Hps1 protein, whereas bias towards d5′ss triggered by Ptbp1 down-regulation generates transcripts susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). We further demonstrate that Ptbp1 binds to pyrimidine-rich sequences between the u5′ss and d5′ss and activates the former site rather than repressing the latter. Consistent with this mechanism, u5′ss is intrinsically weaker than d5′ss, with a similar tendency observed for other genes with Ptbp1-induced u5′ss bias. Interestingly, the brain-enriched Ptbp1 paralog Ptbp2/nPTB/brPTB stimulated the u5′ss utilization but with a considerably lower efficiency than Ptbp1. This may account for the tight correlation between Hps1 with Ptbp1 expression levels observed across mammalian tissues. More generally, these data expand our understanding of AS regulation and uncover a post-transcriptional strategy ensuring co-expression of a subordinate gene with its master regulator through an AS-NMD tracking mechanism. PMID:25375251

  9. The human U1-70K snRNP protein: cDNA cloning, chromosomal localization, expression, alternative splicing and RNA-binding.

    PubMed Central

    Spritz, R A; Strunk, K; Surowy, C S; Hoch, S O; Barton, D E; Francke, U

    1987-01-01

    We have isolated and sequenced cDNA clones encoding the human U1-70K snRNP protein, and have mapped this locus (U1AP1) to human chromosome 19. The gene produces two size classes of RNA, a major 1.7-kb RNA and a minor 3.9-kb RNA. The 1.7-kb species appears to be the functional mRNA; the role of the 3.9-kb RNA, which extends further in the 5' direction, is unclear. The actual size of the hU1-70K protein is probably 52 kd, rather than 70 kd. The protein contains three regions similar to known nucleic acid-binding proteins, and it binds RNA in an in vitro assay. Comparison of the cDNA sequences indicates that there are multiple subclasses of mRNA that arise by alternative pre-mRNA splicing of at least four alternative exon segments. This suggests that multiple forms of the hU1-70K protein may exist, possibly with different functions in vivo. Images PMID:2447561

  10. Designing oligo libraries taking alternative splicing into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoshan, Avi; Grebinskiy, Vladimir; Magen, Avner; Scolnicov, Ariel; Fink, Eyal; Lehavi, David; Wasserman, Alon

    2001-06-01

    We have designed sequences for DNA microarrays and oligo libraries, taking alternative splicing into account. Alternative splicing is a common phenomenon, occurring in more than 25% of the human genes. In many cases, different splice variants have different functions, are expressed in different tissues or may indicate different stages of disease. When designing sequences for DNA microarrays or oligo libraries, it is very important to take into account the sequence information of all the mRNA transcripts. Therefore, when a gene has more than one transcript (as a result of alternative splicing, alternative promoter sites or alternative poly-adenylation sites), it is very important to take all of them into account in the design. We have used the LEADS transcriptome prediction system to cluster and assemble the human sequences in GenBank and design optimal oligonucleotides for all the human genes with a known mRNA sequence based on the LEADS predictions.

  11. Molecular Characterization, mRNA Expression and Alternative Splicing of Ryanodine Receptor Gene in the Brown Citrus Aphid, Toxoptera citricida (Kirkaldy)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke-Yi; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Yuan, Guo-Rui; Shang, Feng; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) play a critical role in regulating the release of intracellular calcium, which enables them to be effectively targeted by the two novel classes of insecticides, phthalic acid diamides and anthranilic diamides. However, less information is available about this target site in insects, although the sequence and structure information of target molecules are essential for designing new control agents of high selectivity and efficiency, as well as low non-target toxicity. Here, we provided sufficient information about the coding sequence and molecular structures of RyR in T. citricida (TciRyR), an economically important pest. The full-length TciRyR cDNA was characterized with an open reading frame of 15,306 nucleotides, encoding 5101 amino acid residues. TciRyR was predicted to embrace all the hallmarks of ryanodine receptor, typically as the conserved C-terminal domain with consensus calcium-biding EF-hands (calcium-binding motif) and six transmembrane domains, as well as a large N-terminal domain. qPCR analysis revealed that the highest mRNA expression levels of TciRyR were observed in the adults, especially in the heads. Alternative splicing in TciRyR was evidenced by an alternatively spliced exon, resulting from intron retention, which was different from the case of RyR in Myzus persicae characterized with no alternative splicing events. Diagnostic PCR analysis indicated that the splicing of this exon was not only regulated in a body-specific manner but also in a stage-dependent manner. Taken together, these results provide useful information for new insecticide design and further insights into the molecular basis of insecticide action. PMID:26154764

  12. Molecular Characterization, mRNA Expression and Alternative Splicing of Ryanodine Receptor Gene in the Brown Citrus Aphid, Toxoptera citricida (Kirkaldy).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Yi; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Yuan, Guo-Rui; Shang, Feng; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) play a critical role in regulating the release of intracellular calcium, which enables them to be effectively targeted by the two novel classes of insecticides, phthalic acid diamides and anthranilic diamides. However, less information is available about this target site in insects, although the sequence and structure information of target molecules are essential for designing new control agents of high selectivity and efficiency, as well as low non-target toxicity. Here, we provided sufficient information about the coding sequence and molecular structures of RyR in T. citricida (TciRyR), an economically important pest. The full-length TciRyR cDNA was characterized with an open reading frame of 15,306 nucleotides, encoding 5101 amino acid residues. TciRyR was predicted to embrace all the hallmarks of ryanodine receptor, typically as the conserved C-terminal domain with consensus calcium-biding EF-hands (calcium-binding motif) and six transmembrane domains, as well as a large N-terminal domain. qPCR analysis revealed that the highest mRNA expression levels of TciRyR were observed in the adults, especially in the heads. Alternative splicing in TciRyR was evidenced by an alternatively spliced exon, resulting from intron retention, which was different from the case of RyR in Myzus persicae characterized with no alternative splicing events. Diagnostic PCR analysis indicated that the splicing of this exon was not only regulated in a body-specific manner but also in a stage-dependent manner. Taken together, these results provide useful information for new insecticide design and further insights into the molecular basis of insecticide action. PMID:26154764

  13. Connecting the dots: chromatin and alternative splicing in EMT

    PubMed Central

    Warns, Jessica A.; Davie, James R.; Dhasarathy, Archana

    2015-01-01

    Nature has devised sophisticated cellular machinery to process mRNA transcripts produced by RNA Polymerase II, removing intronic regions and connecting exons together, to produce mature RNAs. This process, known as splicing, is very closely linked to transcription. Alternative splicing, or the ability to produce different combinations of exons that are spliced together from the same genomic template, is a fundamental means of regulating protein complexity. Similar to transcription, both constitutive and alternative splicing can be regulated by chromatin and its associated factors in response to various signal transduction pathways activated by external stimuli. This regulation can vary between different cell types, and interference with these pathways can lead to changes in splicing, often resulting in aberrant cellular states and disease. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which leads to cancer metastasis, is influenced by alternative splicing events of chromatin remodelers and epigenetic factors such as DNA methylation and non-coding RNAs. In this review, we will discuss the role of epigenetic factors including chromatin, chromatin remodelers, DNA methyltransferases and microRNAs in the context of alternative splicing, and discuss their potential involvement in alternative splicing during the EMT process. PMID:26291837

  14. Pinin interacts with C-terminal binding proteins for RNA alternative splicing and epithelial cell identity of human ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanli; Kwok, Jamie Sui-Lam; Choi, Pui-Wah; Liu, Minghua; Yang, Junzheng; Singh, Margit; Ng, Shu-Kay; Welch, William R.; Muto, Michael G.; Tsui, Stephen KW; Sugrue, Stephen P.; Berkowitz, Ross S.; Ng, Shu-Wing

    2016-01-01

    Unlike many other human solid tumors, ovarian tumors express many epithelial markers at a high level for cell growth and local invasion. The phosphoprotein Pinin plays a key role in epithelial cell identity. We showed that clinical ovarian tumors and ovarian cancer cell lines express a high level of Pinin when compared with normal ovarian tissues and immortalized normal ovarian surface epithelial cell lines. Pinin co-localized and physically interacted with transcriptional corepressor C-terminal binding proteins, CtBP1 and CtBP2, in the nuclei of cancer cells. Knockdown of Pinin in ovarian cancer cells resulted in specific reduction of CtBP1 protein expression, cell adhesion, anchorage-independent growth, and increased drug sensitivity. Whole transcriptomic comparison of next-generation RNA sequencing data between control ovarian cancer cell lines and cancer cell lines with respective knockdown of Pinin, CtBP1, and CtBP2 expression also showed reduced expression of CtBP1 mRNA in the Pinin knockdown cell lines. The Pinin knockdown cell lines shared significant overlap of differentially expressed genes and RNA splicing aberrations with CtBP1 knockdown and in a lesser degree with CtBP2 knockdown cancer cells. Hence, Pinin and CtBP are oncotargets that closely interact with each other to regulate transcription and pre-mRNA alternative splicing and promote cell adhesion and other epithelial characteristics of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:26871283

  15. Pinin interacts with C-terminal binding proteins for RNA alternative splicing and epithelial cell identity of human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanli; Kwok, Jamie Sui-Lam; Choi, Pui-Wah; Liu, Minghua; Yang, Junzheng; Singh, Margit; Ng, Shu-Kay; Welch, William R; Muto, Michael G; Tsui, Stephen Kw; Sugrue, Stephen P; Berkowitz, Ross S; Ng, Shu-Wing

    2016-03-01

    Unlike many other human solid tumors, ovarian tumors express many epithelial markers at a high level for cell growth and local invasion. The phosphoprotein Pinin plays a key role in epithelial cell identity. We showed that clinical ovarian tumors and ovarian cancer cell lines express a high level of Pinin when compared with normal ovarian tissues and immortalized normal ovarian surface epithelial cell lines. Pinin co-localized and physically interacted with transcriptional corepressor C-terminal binding proteins, CtBP1 and CtBP2, in the nuclei of cancer cells. Knockdown of Pinin in ovarian cancer cells resulted in specific reduction of CtBP1 protein expression, cell adhesion, anchorage-independent growth, and increased drug sensitivity. Whole transcriptomic comparison of next-generation RNA sequencing data between control ovarian cancer cell lines and cancer cell lines with respective knockdown of Pinin, CtBP1, and CtBP2 expression also showed reduced expression of CtBP1 mRNA in the Pinin knockdown cell lines. The Pinin knockdown cell lines shared significant overlap of differentially expressed genes and RNA splicing aberrations with CtBP1 knockdown and in a lesser degree with CtBP2 knockdown cancer cells. Hence, Pinin and CtBP are oncotargets that closely interact with each other to regulate transcription and pre-mRNA alternative splicing and promote cell adhesion and other epithelial characteristics of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:26871283

  16. Defective control of pre–messenger RNA splicing in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Shkreta, Lulzim

    2016-01-01

    Examples of associations between human disease and defects in pre–messenger RNA splicing/alternative splicing are accumulating. Although many alterations are caused by mutations in splicing signals or regulatory sequence elements, recent studies have noted the disruptive impact of mutated generic spliceosome components and splicing regulatory proteins. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of how the altered splicing function of RNA-binding proteins contributes to myelodysplastic syndromes, cancer, and neuropathologies. PMID:26728853

  17. Aberrant RNA splicing in cancer; expression changes and driver mutations of splicing factor genes.

    PubMed

    Sveen, A; Kilpinen, S; Ruusulehto, A; Lothe, R A; Skotheim, R I

    2016-05-12

    Alternative splicing is a widespread process contributing to structural transcript variation and proteome diversity. In cancer, the splicing process is commonly disrupted, resulting in both functional and non-functional end-products. Cancer-specific splicing events are known to contribute to disease progression; however, the dysregulated splicing patterns found on a genome-wide scale have until recently been less well-studied. In this review, we provide an overview of aberrant RNA splicing and its regulation in cancer. We then focus on the executors of the splicing process. Based on a comprehensive catalog of splicing factor encoding genes and analyses of available gene expression and somatic mutation data, we identify cancer-associated patterns of dysregulation. Splicing factor genes are shown to be significantly differentially expressed between cancer and corresponding normal samples, and to have reduced inter-individual expression variation in cancer. Furthermore, we identify enrichment of predicted cancer-critical genes among the splicing factors. In addition to previously described oncogenic splicing factor genes, we propose 24 novel cancer-critical splicing factors predicted from somatic mutations. PMID:26300000

  18. Splicing: is there an alternative contribution to Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    La Cognata, Valentina; D'Agata, Velia; Cavalcanti, Francesca; Cavallaro, Sebastiano

    2015-10-01

    Alternative splicing is a crucial mechanism of gene expression regulation that enormously increases the coding potential of our genome and represents an intermediate step between messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription and protein posttranslational modifications. Alternative splicing occupies a central position in the development and functions of the nervous system. Therefore, its deregulation frequently leads to several neurological human disorders. In the present review, we provide an updated overview on the impact of alternative splicing in Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder worldwide. We will describe the alternative splicing of major PD-linked genes by collecting the current evidences about this intricate and not carefully explored aspect. Assessing the role of this mechanism on PD pathobiology may represent a central step toward an improved understanding of this complex disease. PMID:25980689

  19. A serine–arginine-rich (SR) splicing factor modulates alternative splicing of over a thousand genes in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Lee M.; Goodman, Christopher D.; Hall, Nathan E.; van Dooren, Giel G.; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Ralph, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Single genes are often subject to alternative splicing, which generates alternative mature mRNAs. This phenomenon is widespread in animals, and observed in over 90% of human genes. Recent data suggest it may also be common in Apicomplexa. These parasites have small genomes, and economy of DNA is evolutionarily favoured in this phylum. We investigated the mechanism of alternative splicing in Toxoplasma gondii, and have identified and localized TgSR3, a homologue of ASF/SF2 (alternative-splicing factor/splicing factor 2, a serine-arginine–rich, or SR protein) to a subnuclear compartment. In addition, we conditionally overexpressed this protein, which was deleterious to growth. qRT-PCR was used to confirm perturbation of splicing in a known alternatively-spliced gene. We performed high-throughput RNA-seq to determine the extent of splicing modulated by this protein. Current RNA-seq algorithms are poorly suited to compact parasite genomes, and hence we complemented existing tools by writing a new program, GeneGuillotine, that addresses this deficiency by segregating overlapping reads into distinct genes. In order to identify the extent of alternative splicing, we released another program, JunctionJuror, that detects changes in intron junctions. Using this program, we identified about 2000 genes that were constitutively alternatively spliced in T. gondii. Overexpressing the splice regulator TgSR3 perturbed alternative splicing in over 1000 genes. PMID:25870410

  20. A serine-arginine-rich (SR) splicing factor modulates alternative splicing of over a thousand genes in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Lee M; Goodman, Christopher D; Hall, Nathan E; van Dooren, Giel G; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Ralph, Stuart A

    2015-05-19

    Single genes are often subject to alternative splicing, which generates alternative mature mRNAs. This phenomenon is widespread in animals, and observed in over 90% of human genes. Recent data suggest it may also be common in Apicomplexa. These parasites have small genomes, and economy of DNA is evolutionarily favoured in this phylum. We investigated the mechanism of alternative splicing in Toxoplasma gondii, and have identified and localized TgSR3, a homologue of ASF/SF2 (alternative-splicing factor/splicing factor 2, a serine-arginine-rich, or SR protein) to a subnuclear compartment. In addition, we conditionally overexpressed this protein, which was deleterious to growth. qRT-PCR was used to confirm perturbation of splicing in a known alternatively-spliced gene. We performed high-throughput RNA-seq to determine the extent of splicing modulated by this protein. Current RNA-seq algorithms are poorly suited to compact parasite genomes, and hence we complemented existing tools by writing a new program, GeneGuillotine, that addresses this deficiency by segregating overlapping reads into distinct genes. In order to identify the extent of alternative splicing, we released another program, JunctionJuror, that detects changes in intron junctions. Using this program, we identified about 2000 genes that were constitutively alternatively spliced in T. gondii. Overexpressing the splice regulator TgSR3 perturbed alternative splicing in over 1000 genes. PMID:25870410

  1. P68 RNA Helicase (DDX5) Alters Activity of Cis- and Trans-Acting Factors of the Alternative Splicing of H-Ras

    PubMed Central

    Kokolo, Mariette; Bach-Elias, Montse

    2008-01-01

    Background H-Ras pre-mRNA undergoes an alternative splicing process to render two proteins, namely p21 H-Ras and p19 H-Ras, due to either the exclusion or inclusion of the alternative intron D exon (IDX), respectively. p68 RNA helicase (p68) is known to reduce IDX inclusion. Principal Findings Here we show that p68 unwinds the stem-loop IDX-rasISS1 structure and prevents binding of hnRNP H to IDX-rasISS1. We also found that p68 alters the dynamic localization of SC35, a splicing factor that promotes IDX inclusion. The knockdown of hnRNP A1, FUS/TLS and hnRNP H resulted in upregulation of the expression of the gene encoding the SC35-binding protein, SFRS2IP. Finally, FUS/TLS was observed to upregulate p19 expression and to stimulate IDX inclusion, and in vivo RNAi-mediated depletion of hnRNP H decreased p19 H-Ras abundance. Significance Taken together, p68 is shown to be an essential player in the regulation of H-Ras expression as well as in a vital transduction signal pathway tied to cell proliferation and many cancer processes. PMID:18698352

  2. A liver X receptor (LXR)-{beta} alternative splicing variant (LXRBSV) acts as an RNA co-activator of LXR-{beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Koshi; Ishida, Emi; Matsumoto, Shunichi; Shibusawa, Nobuyuki; Okada, Shuichi; Monden, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Tetsurou; Yamada, Masanobu; Mori, Masatomo

    2009-12-25

    We report the isolation and functional characterization of a novel transcriptional co-activator, termed LXRBSV. LXRBSV is an alternative splicing variant of liver X receptor (LXR)-{beta} LXRBSV has an intronic sequence between exons 2 and 3 in the mouse LXR-{beta} gene. The LXRBSV gene is expressed in various tissues including the liver and brain. We sub-cloned LXRBSV into pSG5, a mammalian expression vector, and LXRBSV in pSG5 augmented human Sterol Response Element Binding Protein (SREBP)-1c promoter activity in HepG2 cells in a ligand (TO901317) dependent manner. The transactivation mediated by LXRBSV is selective for LXR-{beta}. The LXRBSV protein was deduced to be 64 amino acids in length; however, a GAL4-LXRBSV fusion protein was not able to induce transactivation. Serial deletion constructs of LXRBSV demonstrated that the intronic sequence inserted in LXRBSV is required for its transactivation activity. An ATG mutant of LXRBSV was able to induce transactivation as wild type. Furthermore, LXRBSV functions in the presence of cycloheximide. Taken together, we have concluded that LXRBSV acts as an RNA transcript not as a protein. In the current study, we have demonstrated for the first time that an alternative splicing variant of a nuclear receptor acts as an RNA co-activator.

  3. Age-Dependent Decrease and Alternative Splicing of Methionine Synthase mRNA in Human Cerebral Cortex and an Accelerated Decrease in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Christina R.; Hodgson, Nathaniel W.; Trivedi, Malav S.; Abdolmaleky, Hamid M.; Persico, Antonio M.; Lintas, Carla; De La Monte, Suzanne; Deth, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    The folate and vitamin B12-dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS) is highly sensitive to cellular oxidative status, and lower MS activity increases production of the antioxidant glutathione, while simultaneously decreasing more than 200 methylation reactions, broadly affecting metabolic activity. MS mRNA levels in postmortem human cortex from subjects across the lifespan were measured and a dramatic progressive biphasic decrease of more than 400-fold from 28 weeks of gestation to 84 years was observed. Further analysis revealed alternative splicing of MS mRNA, including deletion of folate-binding domain exons and age-dependent deletion of exons from the cap domain, which protects vitamin B12 (cobalamin) from oxidation. Although three species of MS were evident at the protein level, corresponding to full-length and alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts, decreasing mRNA levels across the lifespan were not associated with significant changes in MS protein or methionine levels. MS mRNA levels were significantly lower in autistic subjects, especially at younger ages, and this decrease was replicated in cultured human neuronal cells by treatment with TNF-α, whose CSF levels are elevated in autism. These novel findings suggest that rather than serving as a housekeeping enzyme, MS has a broad and dynamic role in coordinating metabolism in the brain during development and aging. Factors adversely affecting MS activity, such as oxidative stress, can be a source of risk for neurological disorders across the lifespan via their impact on methylation reactions, including epigenetic regulation of gene expression. PMID:23437274

  4. Influence of Intron Length on Alternative Splicing of CD44

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Martyn V.; Cowper, Alison E.; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Bell, John I.; Screaton, Gavin R.

    1998-01-01

    Although the splicing of transcripts from most eukaryotic genes occurs in a constitutive fashion, some genes can undergo a process of alternative splicing. This is a genetically economical process which allows a single gene to give rise to several protein isoforms by the inclusion or exclusion of sequences into or from the mature mRNA. CD44 provides a unique example; more than 1,000 possible isoforms can be produced by the inclusion or exclusion of a central tandem array of 10 alternatively spliced exons. Certain alternatively spliced exons have been ascribed specific functions; however, independent regulation of the inclusion or skipping of each of these exons would clearly demand an extremely complex regulatory network. Such a network would involve the interaction of many exon-specific trans-acting factors with the pre-mRNA. Therefore, to assess whether the exons are indeed independently regulated, we have examined the alternative exon content of a large number of individual CD44 cDNA isoforms. This analysis shows that the downstream alternatively spliced exons are favored over those lying upstream and that alternative exons are often included in blocks rather than singly. Using a novel in vivo alternative splicing assay, we show that intron length has a major influence upon the alternative splicing of CD44. We propose a kinetic model in which short introns may overcome the poor recognition of alternatively spliced exons. These observations suggest that for CD44, intron length has been exploited in the evolution of the genomic structure to enable tissue-specific patterns of splicing to be maintained. PMID:9742110

  5. Modulation of RNA splicing as a potential treatment for cancer.

    PubMed

    Bauman, John A; Kole, Ryszard

    2011-01-01

    Close to 90% of human genes are transcribed into pre-mRNA that undergoes alternative splicing, producing multiple mRNAs and proteins from single genes. This process is largely responsible for human proteome diversity, and about half of genetic disease-causing mutations affect splicing. Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) comprise an emerging class of antisense therapeutics that modify gene expression by directing pre-mRNA splice site usage. Bauman et al. investigated an SSO that up-regulated the expression of an anti-cancer splice variant while simultaneously eliminating an over-expressed cancer-causing splice variant.  This was accomplished by targeting pre-mRNA of the apoptotic regulator Bcl-x, which is alternatively spliced to express anti- and pro-apoptotic splice variants Bcl-xL and Bcl-xS, respectively. High expression of Bcl-xL is a hallmark of many cancers and is considered a general mechanism used by cancer cells to evade apoptosis. Redirection of Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing from Bcl-xL to -xS by SSO induced apoptotic and chemosensitizing effects in various cancer cell lines. Importantly, the paper shows that delivery of Bcl-x SSO using a lipid nanoparticle redirected Bcl-x splicing and reduced tumor burden in melanoma lung metastases. This was the first demonstration of SSO efficacy in tumors in vivo. SSOs are not limited to be solely potential anti-cancer drugs. SSOs were first applied to repair aberrant splicing in thalassemia, a genetic disease, they have been used to create novel proteins (e.g., ∆7TNFR1), and they have recently progressed to clinical trials for patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.  PMID:21637003

  6. Involvement of PARP1 in the regulation of alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Matveeva, Elena; Maiorano, John; Zhang, Qingyang; Eteleeb, Abdallah M; Convertini, Paolo; Chen, Jing; Infantino, Vittoria; Stamm, Stefan; Wang, Jiping; Rouchka, Eric C; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne N

    2016-01-01

    Specialized chromatin structures such as nucleosomes with specific histone modifications decorate exons in eukaryotic genomes, suggesting a functional connection between chromatin organization and the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing. Through profiling the functional location of Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase, we observed that it is associated with the nucleosomes at exon/intron boundaries of specific genes, suggestive of a role for this enzyme in alternative splicing. Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase has previously been implicated in the PARylation of splicing factors as well as regulation of the histone modification H3K4me3, a mark critical for co-transcriptional splicing. In light of these studies, we hypothesized that interaction of the chromatin-modifying factor, Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase with nucleosomal structures at exon–intron boundaries, might regulate pre-mRNA splicing. Using genome-wide approaches validated by gene-specific assays, we show that depletion of PARP1 or inhibition of its PARylation activity results in changes in alternative splicing of a specific subset of genes. Furthermore, we observed that PARP1 bound to RNA, splicing factors and chromatin, suggesting that Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase serves as a gene regulatory hub to facilitate co-transcriptional splicing. These studies add another function to the multi-functional protein, Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase, and provide a platform for further investigation of this protein’s function in organizing chromatin during gene regulatory processes. PMID:27462443

  7. Coupling of RNA Polymerase II Transcription Elongation with Pre-mRNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Saldi, Tassa; Cortazar, Michael A; Sheridan, Ryan M; Bentley, David L

    2016-06-19

    Pre-mRNA maturation frequently occurs at the same time and place as transcription by RNA polymerase II. The co-transcriptionality of mRNA processing has permitted the evolution of mechanisms that functionally couple transcription elongation with diverse events that occur on the nascent RNA. This review summarizes the current understanding of the relationship between transcriptional elongation through a chromatin template and co-transcriptional splicing including alternative splicing decisions that affect the expression of most human genes. PMID:27107644

  8. Tropomyosin exons as models for alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Clare; Smith, Christopher W J

    2008-01-01

    Three of the four mammalian tropomyosin (Tm) genes are alternatively spliced, most commonly by mutually exclusive selection from pairs of internal or 3' end exons. Alternative splicing events in the TPM1, 2 and 3 genes have been analysed experimentally in various levels ofdetail. In particular, mutually exclusive exon pairs in the betaTm (TPM2) and alphaTm (TPM1) genes are among the most intensively studied models for striated and smooth muscle specific alternative splicing, respectively. Analysis of these model systems has provided important insights into general mechanisms and strategies of splicing regulation. PMID:19209811

  9. Involvement of the nuclear cap-binding protein complex in alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Raczynska, Katarzyna Dorota; Simpson, Craig G.; Ciesiolka, Adam; Szewc, Lukasz; Lewandowska, Dominika; McNicol, Jim; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia; Brown, John W. S.; Jarmolowski, Artur

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear cap-binding protein complex (CBC) participates in 5′ splice site selection of introns that are proximal to the mRNA cap. However, it is not known whether CBC has a role in alternative splicing. Using an RT–PCR alternative splicing panel, we analysed 435 alternative splicing events in Arabidopsis thaliana genes, encoding mainly transcription factors, splicing factors and stress-related proteins. Splicing profiles were determined in wild type plants, the cbp20 and cbp80(abh1) single mutants and the cbp20/80 double mutant. The alternative splicing events included alternative 5′ and 3′ splice site selection, exon skipping and intron retention. Significant changes in the ratios of alternative splicing isoforms were found in 101 genes. Of these, 41% were common to all three CBC mutants and 15% were observed only in the double mutant. The cbp80(abh1) and cbp20/80 mutants had many more changes in alternative splicing in common than did cbp20 and cbp20/80 suggesting that CBP80 plays a more significant role in alternative splicing than CBP20, probably being a platform for interactions with other splicing factors. Cap-binding proteins and the CBC are therefore directly involved in alternative splicing of some Arabidopsis genes and in most cases influenced alternative splicing of the first intron, particularly at the 5′ splice site. PMID:19864257

  10. Co-transcriptional commitment to alternative splice site selection.

    PubMed

    Roberts, G C; Gooding, C; Mak, H Y; Proudfoot, N J; Smith, C W

    1998-12-15

    Production of mRNA in eukaryotic cells involves not only transcription but also various processing reactions such as splicing. Recent experiments have indicated that there are direct physical connections between components of the transcription and processing machinery, supporting previous suggestions that pre-mRNA splicing occurs co-transcriptionally. Here we have used a novel functional approach to demonstrate co-transcriptional regulation of alternative splicing. Exon 3 of the alpha-tropomyosin gene is specifically repressed in smooth muscle cells. By delaying synthesis of an essential downstream inhibitory element, we show that the decision to splice or repress exon 3 occurs during a limited window of opportunity following transcription, indicating that splice site selection proceeds rapidly after transcription. PMID:9837984

  11. MicroRNA (miRNA)-mediated Interaction between Leukemia/Lymphoma-related Factor (LRF) and Alternative Splicing Factor/Splicing Factor 2 (ASF/SF2) Affects Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast Senescence and Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Verduci, Lorena; Simili, Marcella; Rizzo, Milena; Mercatanti, Alberto; Evangelista, Monica; Mariani, Laura; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Pitto, Letizia

    2010-01-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma-related factor (LRF) is a transcriptional repressor, which by recruiting histone deacetylases specifically represses p19/ARF expression, thus behaving as an oncogene. Conversely, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF), LRF inhibition causes aberrant p19ARF up-regulation resulting in proliferative defects and premature senescence. We have recently shown that LRF is controlled by microRNAs. Here we show that LRF acts on MEF proliferation and senescence/apoptosis by repressing miR-28 and miR-505, revealing a regulatory circuit where microRNAs (miRNAs) work both upstream and downstream of LRF. By analyzing miRNA expression profiles of MEF transfected with LRF-specific short interfering RNAs, we found that miR-28 and miR-505 are modulated by LRF. Both miRNAs are predicted to target alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2 (ASF/SF2), a serine/arginine protein essential for cell viability. In vertebrates, loss or inactivation of ASF/SF2 may result in genomic instability and induce G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We showed that miR-28 and miR-505 modulate ASF/SF2 by directly binding ASF/SF2 3′-UTR. Decrease in LRF causes a decrease in ASF/SF2, which depends on up-regulation of miR-28 and miR-505. Alteration of each of the members of the LRF/miR-28/miR-505/ASF/SF2 axis affects MEF proliferation and the number of senescent and apoptotic cells. Consistently, the axis is coordinately modulated as cell senescence increases with passages in MEF culture. In conclusion, we show that LRF-dependent miRNAs miR-28 and miR-505 control MEF proliferation and survival by targeting ASF/SF2 and suggest a central role of LRF-related miRNAs, in addition to the role of LRF-dependent p53 control, in cellular homeostasis. PMID:20923760

  12. Nonmuscle and muscle tropomyosin isoforms are expressed from a single gene by alternative RNA splicing and polyadenylation.

    PubMed Central

    Helfman, D M; Cheley, S; Kuismanen, E; Finn, L A; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y

    1986-01-01

    The molecular basis for the expression of rat embryonic fibroblast tropomyosin 1 and skeletal muscle beta-tropomyosin was determined. cDNA clones encoding these tropomyosin isoforms exhibit complete identity except for two carboxy-proximal regions (amino acids 189 to 213 and 258 to 284) and different 3'-untranslated sequences. The isoform-specific regions delineate the troponin T-binding domains of skeletal muscle tropomyosin. Analysis of genomic clones indicates that there are two separate loci in the rat genome that contain sequences complementary to these mRNAs. One locus is a pseudogene. The other locus contains a single gene made up of 11 exons and spans approximately 10 kilobases. Sequences common to all mRNAs were found in exons 1 through 5 (amino acids 1 to 188) and exons 8 and 9 (amino acids 214 to 257). Exons 6 and 11 are specific for fibroblast mRNA (amino acids 189 to 213 and 258 to 284, respectively), while exons 7 and 10 are specific for skeletal muscle mRNA (amino acids 189 to 213 and 258 to 284, respectively). In addition, exons 10 and 11 each contain the entire 3'-untranslated sequences of the respective mRNAs including the polyadenylation site. Although the gene is also expressed in smooth muscle (stomach, uterus, and vas deferens), only the fibroblast-type splice products can be detected in these tissues. S1 and primer extension analyses indicate that all mRNAs expressed from this gene are transcribed from a single promoter. The promoter was found to contain G-C-rich sequences, a TATA-like sequence TTTTA, no identifiable CCAAT box, and two putative Sp1-binding sites. Images PMID:2432392

  13. Alternative mRNA splicing of SMRT creates functional diversity by generating corepressor isoforms with different affinities for different nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Michael L; Jonas, Brian A; Privalsky, Martin L

    2005-03-01

    Many eukaryotic transcription factors are bimodal in their regulatory properties and can both repress and activate expression of their target genes. These divergent transcriptional properties are conferred through recruitment of auxiliary proteins, denoted coactivators and corepressors. Repression plays a particularly critical role in the functions of the nuclear receptors, a large family of ligand-regulated transcription factors involved in metazoan development, differentiation, reproduction, and homeostasis. The SMRT corepressor interacts directly with nuclear receptors and serves, in turn, as a platform for the assembly of a larger corepressor complex. We report here that SMRT is expressed in cells by alternative mRNA splicing to yield two distinct variants or isoforms. We designate these isoforms SMRTalpha and SMRTtau and demonstrate that these isoforms have significantly different affinities for different nuclear receptors. These isoforms are evolutionarily conserved and are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Our results suggest that differential mRNA splicing serves to customize corepressor function in different cells, allowing the transcriptional properties of nuclear receptors to be adapted to different contexts. PMID:15632172

  14. Hallmarks of alternative splicing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Oltean, S; Bates, D O

    2014-11-13

    The immense majority of genes are alternatively spliced and there are many isoforms specifically associated with cancer progression and metastasis. The splicing pattern of specific isoforms of numerous genes is altered as cells move through the oncogenic process of gaining proliferative capacity, acquiring angiogenic, invasive, antiapoptotic and survival properties, becoming free from growth factor dependence and growth suppression, altering their metabolism to cope with hypoxia, enabling them to acquire mechanisms of immune escape, and as they move through the epithelial-mesenchymal and mesenchymal-epithelial transitions and metastasis. Each of the 'hallmarks of cancer' is associated with a switch in splicing, towards a more aggressive invasive cancer phenotype. The choice of isoforms is regulated by several factors (signaling molecules, kinases, splicing factors) currently being identified systematically by a number of high-throughput, independent and unbiased methodologies. Splicing factors are de-regulated in cancer, and in some cases are themselves oncogenes or pseudo-oncogenes and can contribute to positive feedback loops driving cancer progression. Tumour progression may therefore be associated with a coordinated splicing control, meaning that there is the potential for a relatively small number of splice factors or their regulators to drive multiple oncogenic processes. The understanding of how splicing contributes to the various phenotypic traits acquired by tumours as they progress and metastasise, and in particular how alternative splicing is coordinated, can and is leading to the development of a new class of anticancer therapeutics-the alternative-splicing inhibitors. PMID:24336324

  15. Subgroup Specific Alternative Splicing in Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kloosterhof, Nanne K; Northcott, Paul A; Yu, Emily PY; Shih, David; Peacock, John; Grajkowska, Wieslawa; van Meter, Timothy; Eberhart, Charles G; Pfister, Stefan; Marra, Marco A; Weiss, William A; Scherer, Stephen W; Rutka, James T; French, Pim J; Taylor, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is comprised of four distinct molecular variants: WNT, SHH, Group 3, and Group 4. We analyzed alternative splicing usage in 14 normal cerebellar samples and 103 medulloblastomas of known subgroup. Medulloblastoma samples have a statistically significant increase in alternative splicing as compared to normal fetal cerebella (2.3-times; P<6.47E-8). Splicing patterns are distinct and specific between molecular subgroups. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of alternative splicing events accurately assigns medulloblastomas to their correct subgroup. Subgroup-specific splicing and alternative promoter usage was most prevalent in Group 3 (19.4%) and SHH (16.2%) medulloblastomas, while observed less frequently in WNT (3.2%), and Group 4 (9.3%) tumors. Functional annotation of alternatively spliced genes reveals over-representation of genes important for neuronal development. Alternative splicing events in medulloblastoma may be regulated in part by the correlative expression of antisense transcripts, suggesting a possible mechanism affecting subgroup specific alternative splicing. Our results identify additional candidate markers for medulloblastoma subgroup affiliation, further support the existence of distinct subgroups of the disease, and demonstrate an additional level of transcriptional heterogeneity between medulloblastoma subgroups. PMID:22358458

  16. Regulation of Telomerase Alternative Splicing: A New Target for Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Mandy S.; Chen, Ling; Foster, Christopher; Kainthla, Radhika; Shay, Jerry W.; Wright, Woodring E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Telomerase is present in human cancer cells but absent in most somatic tissues. The mRNA of human telomerase (hTERT) is alternatively spliced into mostly non-functional products. We sought to understand splicing so we could decrease functional splice isoforms to reduce telomerase activity to complement direct enzyme inhibition. Unexpectedly, minigenes containing hTERT exons 5–10 flanked by 150–300bp intronic sequences did not produce alternative splicing. A 1.1kb region of 38bp repeats ~2kb from the exon 6/intron junction restored exclusion of exons 7/8. An element within intron 8, also >1kb from intron/exon junctions, modulated this effect. Transducing an oligonucleotide complementary to this second element increased non-functional hTERT mRNA from endogenous telomerase. These results demonstrate the potential of manipulating hTERT splicing for both chemotherapy and regenerative medicine, and provide the first specific sequences deep within introns that regulate alternative splicing in mammalian cells by mechanisms other than introducing cryptic splice sites. PMID:23562158

  17. EASI--enrichment of alternatively spliced isoforms.

    PubMed

    Venables, Julian P; Burn, John

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing produces more than one protein from the majority of genes and the rarer forms can have dominant functions. Instability of alternative transcripts can also hinder the study of regulation of gene expression by alternative splicing. To investigate the true extent of alternative splicing we have developed a simple method of enriching alternatively spliced isoforms (EASI) from PCRs using beads charged with Thermus aquaticus single-stranded DNA-binding protein (T.Aq ssb). This directly purifies the single-stranded regions of heteroduplexes between alternative splices formed in the PCR, enabling direct sequencing of all the rare alternative splice forms of any gene. As a proof of principle the alternative transcripts of three tumour suppressor genes, TP53, MLH1 and MSH2, were isolated from testis cDNA. These contain missing exons, cryptic splice sites or include completely novel exons. EASI beads are stable for months in the fridge and can be easily combined with standard protocols to speed the cloning of novel transcripts. PMID:16951290

  18. Regulation of alternative splicing through coupling with transcription and chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Naftelberg, Shiran; Schor, Ignacio E; Ast, Gil; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2015-01-01

    Alternative precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing plays a pivotal role in the flow of genetic information from DNA to proteins by expanding the coding capacity of genomes. Regulation of alternative splicing is as important as regulation of transcription to determine cell- and tissue-specific features, normal cell functioning, and responses of eukaryotic cells to external cues. Its importance is confirmed by the evolutionary conservation and diversification of alternative splicing and the fact that its deregulation causes hereditary disease and cancer. This review discusses the multiple layers of cotranscriptional regulation of alternative splicing in which chromatin structure, DNA methylation, histone marks, and nucleosome positioning play a fundamental role in providing a dynamic scaffold for interactions between the splicing and transcription machineries. We focus on evidence for how the kinetics of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) elongation and the recruitment of splicing factors and adaptor proteins to chromatin components act in coordination to regulate alternative splicing. PMID:26034889

  19. The landscape of alternative splicing in cervical squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Peng; Wang, Dan; Wu, Jun; Yang, Junjun; Ren, Tong; Zhu, Baoli; Xiang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing (AS) is a key regulatory mechanism in protein synthesis and proteome diversity. In this study, we identified alternative splicing events in four pairs of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) and adjacent nontumor tissues using RNA sequencing. Methods The transcripts of the four paired samples were thoroughly analyzed by RNA sequencing. SpliceMap software was used to detect the splicing junctions. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis was conducted to detect the alternative spliced genes-related signal pathways. The alternative spliced genes were validated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results There were 35 common alternative spliced genes in the four CSCC samples; they were novel and CSCC specific. Sixteen pathways were significantly enriched (P<0.05). One novel 5′AS site in the KLHDC7B gene, encoding kelch domain-containing 7B, and an exon-skipping site in the SYCP2 gene, encoding synaptonemal complex 2, were validated by RT-PCR. The KLHDC7B gene with 5′AS was found in 67.5% (27/40) of CSCC samples and was significantly related with cellular differentiation and tumor size. The exon-skipping site of the SYCP2 gene was found in 35.0% (14/40) of CSCC samples and was significantly related with depth of cervical invasion. Conclusion The KLHDC7B and the SYCP2 genes with alternative spliced events might be involved in the development and progression of CSCC and could be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis of CSCC. PMID:25565867

  20. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  1. Multiple mRNA isoforms of the transcription activator protein CREB: generation by alternative splicing and specific expression in primary spermatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ruppert, S; Cole, T J; Boshart, M; Schmid, E; Schütz, G

    1992-01-01

    We have characterized cDNA clones representing mouse CREB (cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein) mRNA isoforms. These include CREB delta and CREB alpha, of which the rat and human homologues have been previously identified. Both encode proteins with CRE-binding activity and identical transactivation potential. The additional CREB mRNA isoforms potentially encode CREB related proteins. From the structural organization of the mouse CREB gene we conclude that the multiple transcripts are generated by alternative splicing. Furthermore we show that specific CREB mRNA isoforms are expressed at a high level in the adult testis. Expression of these isoforms is induced after commencement of spermatogenesis. In situ hybridization suggests that this expression occurs predominantly in the primary spermatocytes. Comparison of the CREB gene with the recently isolated CREM (cAMP responsive element modulator) cDNAs illustrates that the two genes have arisen by gene duplication and have diverged to encode transcriptional activators and repressors of the cAMP signal transduction pathway. Images PMID:1532935

  2. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A.; Sturm, Nancy R.; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3′-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods. PMID:26621068

  3. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A.; Sturm, Nancy R.; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-12-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3‧-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods.

  4. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A; Sturm, Nancy R; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3'-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods. PMID:26621068

  5. Splicing variants of ADAR2 and ADAR2-mediated RNA editing in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yao; Zhao, Xingli; Li, Zhaohui; Wei, Jun; Tian, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The roles of alternative splicing and RNA editing in gene regulation and transcriptome diversity are well documented. Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) are responsible for adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing and exemplify the complex association between RNA editing and alternative splicing. The self-editing activity of ADAR2, which acts on its own pre-mRNA, leads to its alternative splicing. Alternative splicing occurs independently at nine splicing sites on ADAR2 pre-mRNA, generating numerous alternative splicing variants with various catalytic activities. A-to-I RNA editing is important in a range of physiological processes in humans and is associated with several diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, mood disorders, epilepsy and glioma. Reduced editing at the glutamine/arginine site of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 in glioma, without any alteration in ADAR2 expression, is a notable phenomenon. Several studies have tried to explain this alteration in the catalytic activity of ADAR2; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The present review summarizes the relevant literature and shares experimental results concerning ADAR2 alternative splicing. In particular, the present review demonstrates that shifts in the relative abundance of the active and inactive splicing variants of ADAR2 may reduce the ADAR2 editing activity in glioma. Dominant expression of ADAR2 splicing variant with low enzyme activity causes reduced RNA editing of GluA2 subunit at the glutamine/arginine site in glioma. PMID:27446352

  6. Regulation of alternative splicing of tau exon 10.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei; Liu, Fei

    2014-04-01

    The neuronal microtubule-associated protein tau is abnormally hyperphosphorylated and aggregated into neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative disorders. The adult human brain expresses six isoforms of tau generated by alternative splicing of exons 2, 3, and 10 of its pre-mRNA. Exon 10 encodes the second microtubule-binding repeat of tau. Its alternative splicing produces tau isoforms with either three or four microtubule-binding repeats, termed 3R-tau and 4Rtau. In the normal adult human brain, the level of 3R-tau is approximately equal to that of 4R-tau. Several silent and intronic mutations of the tau gene associated with FTDP-17T (frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 and specifically characterized by tau pathology) only disrupt exon 10 splicing, but do not influence the primary sequence of the tau protein. Thus, abnormal exon 10 splicing is sufficient to cause neurodegeneration and dementia. Here, we review the regulation of tau exon 10 splicing by cis-elements and trans-factors and summarize all the mutations associated with FTDP-17T and related tauopathies. The findings suggest that correction of exon 10 splicing may be a potential target for tau exon 10 splicing-related tauopathies. PMID:24627328

  7. Reprogramming the Dynamin 2 mRNA by Spliceosome-mediated RNA Trans-splicing.

    PubMed

    Trochet, Delphine; Prudhon, Bernard; Jollet, Arnaud; Lorain, Stéphanie; Bitoun, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Dynamin 2 (DNM2) is a large GTPase, ubiquitously expressed, involved in membrane trafficking and regulation of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. DNM2 mutations cause autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy which is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by skeletal muscle weakness and histopathological features including nuclear centralization in absence of regeneration. No curative treatment is currently available for the DNM2-related autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy. In order to develop therapeutic strategy, we evaluated here the potential of Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-splicing technology to reprogram the Dnm2-mRNA in vitro and in vivo in mice. We show that classical 3'-trans-splicing strategy cannot be considered as accurate therapeutic strategy regarding toxicity of the pre-trans-splicing molecules leading to low rate of trans-splicing in vivo. Thus, we tested alternative strategies devoted to prevent this toxicity and enhance frequency of trans-splicing events. We succeeded to overcome the toxicity through a 5'-trans-splicing strategy which also allows detection of trans-splicing events at mRNA and protein levels in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that the Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-splicing strategy may be used to reprogram mutated Dnm2-mRNA but highlight the potential toxicity linked to the molecular tools which have to be carefully investigated during preclinical development. PMID:27623444

  8. Global genome splicing analysis reveals an increased number of alternatively spliced genes with aging.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Sofía A; Grochová, Diana; McKenna, Tomás; Borate, Bhavesh; Trivedi, Niraj S; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a key regulatory mechanism for the development of different tissues; however, not much is known about changes to alternative splicing during aging. Splicing events may become more frequent and widespread genome-wide as tissues age and the splicing machinery stringency decreases. Using skin, skeletal muscle, bone, thymus, and white adipose tissue from wild-type C57BL6/J male mice (4 and 18 months old), we examined the effect of age on splicing by AS analysis of the differential exon usage of the genome. The results identified a considerable number of AS genes in skeletal muscle, thymus, bone, and white adipose tissue between the different age groups (ranging from 27 to 246 AS genes corresponding to 0.3-3.2% of the total number of genes analyzed). For skin, skeletal muscle, and bone, we included a later age group (28 months old) that showed that the number of alternatively spliced genes increased with age in all three tissues (P < 0.01). Analysis of alternatively spliced genes across all tissues by gene ontology and pathway analysis identified 158 genes involved in RNA processing. Additional analysis of AS in a mouse model for the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome was performed. The results show that expression of the mutant protein, progerin, is associated with an impaired developmental splicing. As progerin accumulates, the number of genes with AS increases compared to in wild-type skin. Our results indicate the existence of a mechanism for increased AS during aging in several tissues, emphasizing that AS has a more important role in the aging process than previously known. PMID:26685868

  9. Molecular cloning of the. alpha. -subunit of human prolyl 4-hydroxylase: The complete cDNA-derived amino acid sequence and evidence for alternative splicing of RNA transcripts

    SciTech Connect

    Helaakoski, T.; Vuori, K.; Myllylae, R.; Kivirikko, K.I.; Pihlajaniemi, T. )

    1989-06-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} tetramer, catalyzes the formation of 4-hydroxyproline in collagens by the hydroxylation of proline residues in peptide linkages. The authors report here on the isolation of cDNA clones encoding the {alpha}-subunit of the enzyme from human tumor HT-1080, placenta, and fibroblast cDNA libraries. Eight overlapping clones covering almost all of the corresponding 3,000-nucleotide mRNA, including all the coding sequences, were characterized. These clones encode a polypeptide of 517 amino acid residues and a signal peptide of 17 amino acids. Previous characterization of cDNA clones for the {beta}-subunit of prolyl 4-hydroxylase has indicated that its C terminus has the amino acid sequence Lys-Asp-Gly-Leu, which, it has been suggested, is necessary for the retention of a polypeptide within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. The {alpha}-subunit does not have this C-terminal sequence, and thus one function of the {beta}-subunit in the prolyl 4-hydroxylase tetramer appears to be to retain the enzyme within this cell organelle. Southern blot analyses of human genomic DNA with a cDNA probe for the {alpha}-subunit suggested the presence of only one gene encoding the two types of mRNA, which appear to result from mutually exclusive alternative splicing of primary transcripts of one gene.

  10. A chloroplast retrograde signal regulates nuclear alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Ezequiel; Herz, Micaela A. Godoy; Fuchs, Armin; Reifer, Dominik; Fuller, John; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.; Simpson, Craig; Brown, John W. S.; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.

    2015-01-01

    Light is a source of energy and also a regulator of plant physiological adaptations. We show here that light/dark conditions affect alternative splicing of a subset of Arabidopsis genes preferentially encoding proteins involved in RNA processing. The effect requires functional chloroplasts and is also observed in roots when the communication with the photosynthetic tissues is not interrupted, suggesting that a signaling molecule travels through the plant. Using photosynthetic electron transfer inhibitors with different mechanisms of action we deduce that the reduced pool of plastoquinones initiates a chloroplast retrograde signaling that regulates nuclear alternative splicing and is necessary for proper plant responses to varying light conditions. PMID:24763593

  11. Towards understanding pre-mRNA splicing mechanisms and the role of SR proteins.

    PubMed

    Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M; van Wijnen, Andre J; Azizi, Parisa; Abiri, Rambod; Ashkani, Sadegh; Taheri, Sima

    2016-08-10

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing provides a source of vast protein diversity by removing non-coding sequences (introns) and accurately linking different exonic regions in the correct reading frame. The regulation of alternative splicing is essential for various cellular functions in both pathological and physiological conditions. In eukaryotic cells, this process is commonly used to increase proteomic diversity and to control gene expression either co- or post-transcriptionally. Alternative splicing occurs within a megadalton-sized, multi-component machine consisting of RNA and proteins; during the splicing process, this complex undergoes dynamic changes via RNA-RNA, protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions. Co-transcriptional splicing functionally integrates the transcriptional machinery, thereby enabling the two processes to influence one another, whereas post-transcriptional splicing facilitates the coupling of RNA splicing with post-splicing events. This review addresses the structural aspects of spliceosomes and the mechanistic implications of their stepwise assembly on the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing. Moreover, the role of phosphorylation-based, signal-induced changes in the regulation of the splicing process is demonstrated. PMID:27154819

  12. UnSplicer: mapping spliced RNA-Seq reads in compact genomes and filtering noisy splicing.

    PubMed

    Burns, Paul D; Li, Yang; Ma, Jian; Borodovsky, Mark

    2014-02-01

    Accurate mapping of spliced RNA-Seq reads to genomic DNA has been known as a challenging problem. Despite significant efforts invested in developing efficient algorithms, with the human genome as a primary focus, the best solution is still not known. A recently introduced tool, TrueSight, has demonstrated better performance compared with earlier developed algorithms such as TopHat and MapSplice. To improve detection of splice junctions, TrueSight uses information on statistical patterns of nucleotide ordering in intronic and exonic DNA. This line of research led to yet another new algorithm, UnSplicer, designed for eukaryotic species with compact genomes where functional alternative splicing is likely to be dominated by splicing noise. Genome-specific parameters of the new algorithm are generated by GeneMark-ES, an ab initio gene prediction algorithm based on unsupervised training. UnSplicer shares several components with TrueSight; the difference lies in the training strategy and the classification algorithm. We tested UnSplicer on RNA-Seq data sets of Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Cryptococcus neoformans and Drosophila melanogaster. We have shown that splice junctions inferred by UnSplicer are in better agreement with knowledge accumulated on these well-studied genomes than predictions made by earlier developed tools. PMID:24259430

  13. The Interplay of Temperature and Genotype on Patterns of Alternative Splicing in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jakšić, Ana Marija; Schlötterer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is the highly regulated process of variation in the removal of introns from premessenger-RNA transcripts. The consequences of alternative splicing on the phenotype are well documented, but the impact of the environment on alternative splicing is not yet clear. We studied variation in alternative splicing among four different temperatures, 13, 18, 23, and 29°, in two Drosophila melanogaster genotypes. We show plasticity of alternative splicing with up to 10% of the expressed genes being differentially spliced between the most extreme temperatures for a given genotype. Comparing the two genotypes at different temperatures, we found <1% of the genes being differentially spliced at 18°. At extreme temperatures, however, we detected substantial differences in alternative splicing—with almost 10% of the genes having differential splicing between the genotypes: a magnitude similar to between species differences. Genes with differential alternative splicing between genotypes frequently exhibit dominant inheritance. Remarkably, the pattern of surplus of differences in alternative splicing at extreme temperatures resembled the pattern seen for gene expression intensity. Since different sets of genes were involved for the two phenotypes, we propose that purifying selection results in the reduction of differences at benign temperatures. Relaxed purifying selection at temperature extremes, on the other hand, may cause the divergence in gene expression and alternative splicing between the two strains in rarely encountered environments. PMID:27440867

  14. Tissue-specific alternative splicing of TCF7L2.

    PubMed

    Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Welch, Cullan; Hansson, Ola; Adhikari, Neeta; Scott, Laura J; Usher, Nicolle; Tong, Maurine; Sprau, Andrew; Swift, Amy; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Erdos, Michael R; He, Zhi; Saxena, Richa; Harmon, Brennan; Kotova, Olga; Hoffman, Eric P; Altshuler, David; Groop, Leif; Boehnke, Michael; Collins, Francis S; Hall, Jennifer L

    2009-10-15

    Common variants in the transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene have been identified as the strongest genetic risk factors for type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the mechanisms by which these non-coding variants increase risk for T2D are not well-established. We used 13 expression assays to survey mRNA expression of multiple TCF7L2 splicing forms in up to 380 samples from eight types of human tissue (pancreas, pancreatic islets, colon, liver, monocytes, skeletal muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue and lymphoblastoid cell lines) and observed a tissue-specific pattern of alternative splicing. We tested whether the expression of TCF7L2 splicing forms was associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs7903146 and rs12255372, located within introns 3 and 4 of the gene and most strongly associated with T2D. Expression of two splicing forms was lower in pancreatic islets with increasing counts of T2D-associated alleles of the SNPs: a ubiquitous splicing form (P = 0.018 for rs7903146 and P = 0.020 for rs12255372) and a splicing form found in pancreatic islets, pancreas and colon but not in other tissues tested here (P = 0.009 for rs12255372 and P = 0.053 for rs7903146). Expression of this form in glucose-stimulated pancreatic islets correlated with expression of proinsulin (r(2) = 0.84-0.90, P < 0.00063). In summary, we identified a tissue-specific pattern of alternative splicing of TCF7L2. After adjustment for multiple tests, no association between expression of TCF7L2 in eight types of human tissue samples and T2D-associated genetic variants remained significant. Alternative splicing of TCF7L2 in pancreatic islets warrants future studies. GenBank Accession Numbers: FJ010164-FJ010174. PMID:19602480

  15. Comprehensive Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Long Noncoding RNA Expression and Alternative Splicing Regulation during Fruit Development and Ripening in Kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis).

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Zheng, Yi; Dong, Jing; Yu, Jia; Yue, Junyang; Liu, Fangfang; Guo, Xiuhong; Huang, Shengxiong; Wisniewski, Michael; Sun, Jiaqi; Niu, Xiangli; Ding, Jian; Liu, Jia; Fei, Zhangjun; Liu, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Genomic and transcriptomic data on kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) in public databases are very limited despite its nutritional and economic value. Previously, we have constructed and sequenced nine fruit RNA-Seq libraries of A. chinensis "Hongyang" at immature, mature, and postharvest ripening stages of fruit development, and generated over 66.2 million paired-end and 24.4 million single-end reads. From this dataset, here we have identified 7051 long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), 29,327 alternative splicing (AS) events and 2980 novel protein-coding genes that were not annotated in the draft genome of "Hongyang." AS events were demonstrated in genes involved in the synthesis of nutritional metabolites in fruit, such as ascorbic acids, carotenoids, anthocyanins, and chlorophylls, and also in genes in the ethylene signaling pathway, which plays an indispensable role in fruit ripening. Additionally, transcriptome profiles and the contents of sugars, organic and main amino acids were compared between immature, mature, and postharvest ripening stages in kiwifruits. A total of 5931 differentially expressed genes were identified, including those associated with the metabolism of sugar, organic acid, and main amino acids. The data generated in this study provide a foundation for further studies of fruit development and ripening in kiwifruit, and identify candidate genes and regulatory elements that could serve as targets for improving important agronomic traits through marker assisted breeding and biotechnology. PMID:27594858

  16. Comprehensive Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Long Noncoding RNA Expression and Alternative Splicing Regulation during Fruit Development and Ripening in Kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wei; Zheng, Yi; Dong, Jing; Yu, Jia; Yue, Junyang; Liu, Fangfang; Guo, Xiuhong; Huang, Shengxiong; Wisniewski, Michael; Sun, Jiaqi; Niu, Xiangli; Ding, Jian; Liu, Jia; Fei, Zhangjun; Liu, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Genomic and transcriptomic data on kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) in public databases are very limited despite its nutritional and economic value. Previously, we have constructed and sequenced nine fruit RNA-Seq libraries of A. chinensis “Hongyang” at immature, mature, and postharvest ripening stages of fruit development, and generated over 66.2 million paired-end and 24.4 million single-end reads. From this dataset, here we have identified 7051 long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), 29,327 alternative splicing (AS) events and 2980 novel protein-coding genes that were not annotated in the draft genome of “Hongyang.” AS events were demonstrated in genes involved in the synthesis of nutritional metabolites in fruit, such as ascorbic acids, carotenoids, anthocyanins, and chlorophylls, and also in genes in the ethylene signaling pathway, which plays an indispensable role in fruit ripening. Additionally, transcriptome profiles and the contents of sugars, organic and main amino acids were compared between immature, mature, and postharvest ripening stages in kiwifruits. A total of 5931 differentially expressed genes were identified, including those associated with the metabolism of sugar, organic acid, and main amino acids. The data generated in this study provide a foundation for further studies of fruit development and ripening in kiwifruit, and identify candidate genes and regulatory elements that could serve as targets for improving important agronomic traits through marker assisted breeding and biotechnology.

  17. An intronic (A/U)GGG repeat enhances the splicing of an alternative intron of the chicken beta-tropomyosin pre-mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Sirand-Pugnet, P; Durosay, P; Brody, E; Marie, J

    1995-01-01

    Computer analysis of human intron sequences have revealed a 50 nucleotide (nt) GC-rich region downstream of the 5' splice site; the trinucleotide GGG occurs almost four times as frequently as it would in a random sequence. The 5' part of a beta-tropomyosin intron exhibits six repetitions of the motif (A/U)GGG. In order to test whether these motifs play a role in the splicing process we have mutated some or all of them. Mutated RNAs show a lower in vitro splicing efficiency when compared with the wild-type, especially when all six motifs are mutated (> 70% inhibition). Assembly of the spliceosome complex B and, to a lesser extent, of the pre-spliceosome complex A also appears to be strongly affected by this mutation. A 55 kDa protein within HeLa cell nuclear extract is efficiently cross-linked to the G-rich region. This protein is present in the splicing complexes and its cross-linking to the pre-mRNA requires the presence of one or several snRNP. Altogether our results suggest that the G-rich sequences present in the 5' part of introns may act as an enhancer of the splicing reaction at the level of spliceosome assembly. Images PMID:7567462

  18. Identification, mRNA expression, and functional analysis of chitin synthase 1 gene and its two alternative splicing variants in oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Jia; Xu, Kang-Kang; Cong, Lin; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Two alternative splicing variants of chitin synthase 1 gene (BdCHS1) were cloned and characterized from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). The cDNA of both variants (BdCHS1a and BdCHS1b) consisted of 5,552 nucleotides (nt), with an open reading frame (ORF) of 4,776 nt, encoding a protein of 1,592 amino acid residues, plus 685- and 88-nt of 5'- and 3'-noncoding regions, respectively. The alternative splicing site was located between positions 3,784-3,960 and formed a pair of mutually exclusive exons (a/b) that were same in size (177 nt), but showed only 65% identity at the nucleotide level. During B. dorsalis growth and development, BdCHS1 and BdCHS1a were both mainly expressed during the larval-pupal and pupal-adult transitions, while BdCHS1b was mainly expressed during pupal-adult metamorphosis and in the middle of the pupal stage. BdCHS1a was predominately expressed in the integument whereas BdCHS1b was mainly expressed in the trachea. The 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) induced the expression of BdCHS1 and its variants. Injection of dsRNA of BdCHS1, BdCHS1a, and BdCHS1b into third-instar larvae significantly reduced the expression levels of the corresponding variants, generated phenotypic defects, and killed most of the treated larvae. Furthermore, silencing of BdCHS1 and BdCHS1a had a similar result in that the larva was trapped in old cuticle and died without tanning completely, while silencing of BdCHS1b has no effect on insect morphology. These results demonstrated that BdCHS1 plays an important role in the larval-pupal transition and the expression of BdCHS1 in B. dorsalis is regulated by 20E. PMID:23569438

  19. Identification, mRNA Expression, and Functional Analysis of Chitin Synthase 1 Gene and Its Two Alternative Splicing Variants in Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Jia; Xu, Kang-Kang; Cong, Lin; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Two alternative splicing variants of chitin synthase 1 gene (BdCHS1) were cloned and characterized from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). The cDNA of both variants (BdCHS1a and BdCHS1b) consisted of 5,552 nucleotides (nt), with an open reading frame (ORF) of 4,776 nt, encoding a protein of 1,592 amino acid residues, plus 685- and 88-nt of 5′- and 3′-noncoding regions, respectively. The alternative splicing site was located between positions 3,784-3,960 and formed a pair of mutually exclusive exons (a/b) that were same in size (177 nt), but showed only 65% identity at the nucleotide level. During B. dorsalis growth and development, BdCHS1 and BdCHS1a were both mainly expressed during the larval-pupal and pupal-adult transitions, while BdCHS1b was mainly expressed during pupal-adult metamorphosis and in the middle of the pupal stage. BdCHS1a was predominately expressed in the integument whereas BdCHS1b was mainly expressed in the trachea. The 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) induced the expression of BdCHS1 and its variants. Injection of dsRNA of BdCHS1, BdCHS1a, and BdCHS1b into third-instar larvae significantly reduced the expression levels of the corresponding variants, generated phenotypic defects, and killed most of the treated larvae. Furthermore, silencing of BdCHS1 and BdCHS1a had a similar result in that the larva was trapped in old cuticle and died without tanning completely, while silencing of BdCHS1b has no effect on insect morphology. These results demonstrated that BdCHS1 plays an important role in the larval-pupal transition and the expression of BdCHS1 in B. dorsalis is regulated by 20E. PMID:23569438

  20. Quantitative Imaging of Single mRNA Splice Variants in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyuwan; Cui, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing is a fundamental process of gene regulation via the precise control of the post-transcriptional step that occurs before mRNA translation. Errors in RNA splicing have been known to correlate with different diseases; however, a key limitation is the lack of technologies for live cell monitoring and quantification to understand the process of alternative splicing. Here, we report a spectroscopic strategy for quantitative imaging of mRNA splice variants in living cells, using nanoplasmonic dimer antennas. The spatial and temporal distribution of three selected splice variants of the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1 were monitored at single copy resolution by measuring the hybridization dynamics of nanoplasmonic antennas targeting complementary mRNA sequences in live cells. Our study provides valuable insights on RNA and its transport in living cells, which has the potential to enhance our understanding of cellular protein complex, pharmacogenomics, genetic diagnosis, and gene therapies. PMID:24747838

  1. Coordinated tissue-specific regulation of adjacent alternative 3′ splice sites in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ragle, James Matthew; Katzman, Sol; Akers, Taylor F.; Barberan-Soler, Sergio; Zahler, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Adjacent alternative 3′ splice sites, those separated by ≤18 nucleotides, provide a unique problem in the study of alternative splicing regulation; there is overlap of the cis-elements that define the adjacent sites. Identification of the intron's 3′ end depends upon sequence elements that define the branchpoint, polypyrimidine tract, and terminal AG dinucleotide. Starting with RNA-seq data from germline-enriched and somatic cell-enriched Caenorhabditis elegans samples, we identify hundreds of introns with adjacent alternative 3′ splice sites. We identify 203 events that undergo tissue-specific alternative splicing. For these, the regulation is monodirectional, with somatic cells preferring to splice at the distal 3′ splice site (furthest from the 5′ end of the intron) and germline cells showing a distinct shift toward usage of the adjacent proximal 3′ splice site (closer to the 5′ end of the intron). Splicing patterns in somatic cells follow C. elegans consensus rules of 3′ splice site definition; a short stretch of pyrimidines preceding an AG dinucleotide. Splicing in germline cells occurs at proximal 3′ splice sites that lack a preceding polypyrimidine tract, and in three instances the germline-specific site lacks the AG dinucleotide. We provide evidence that use of germline-specific proximal 3′ splice sites is conserved across Caenorhabditis species. We propose that there are differences between germline and somatic cells in the way that the basal splicing machinery functions to determine the intron terminus. PMID:25922281

  2. A Model System for Activation-Induced Alternative Splicing of CD45 Pre-mRNA in T Cells Implicates Protein Kinase C and Ras

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Kristen W.; Weiss, Arthur

    2000-01-01

    Multiple isoforms of the protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45 are expressed on the surface of human T cells. Interestingly, the expression of these isoforms has been shown to vary significantly upon T-cell activation. In this report, we describe a novel cell line-based model system in which we can mimic the activation-induced alternative splicing of CD45 observed in primary T cells. Of the many proximal signaling events induced by T-cell stimulation, we show that activation of protein kinase C and activation of Ras are important for the switch toward the exclusion of CD45 variable exons, whereas events related to Ca2+ flux are not. In addition, the ability of cycloheximide to block the activation-induced alternative splicing of CD45 suggests a requirement for de novo protein synthesis. We further demonstrate that sequences which have previously been implicated in the tissue-specific regulation of CD45 variable exons are likewise necessary and sufficient for activation-induced splicing. These results provide an initial understanding of the requirements for CD45 alternative splicing upon T-cell activation, and they confirm the importance of this novel cell line in facilitating a more detailed analysis of the activation-induced regulation of CD45 than has been previously possible. PMID:10594010

  3. Spliced synthetic genes as internal controls in RNA sequencing experiments.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Simon A; Chen, Wendy Y; Wong, Ted; Deveson, Ira W; Blackburn, James; Andersen, Stacey B; Nielsen, Lars K; Mattick, John S; Mercer, Tim R

    2016-09-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) can be used to assemble spliced isoforms, quantify expressed genes and provide a global profile of the transcriptome. However, the size and diversity of the transcriptome, the wide dynamic range in gene expression and inherent technical biases confound RNA-seq analysis. We have developed a set of spike-in RNA standards, termed 'sequins' (sequencing spike-ins), that represent full-length spliced mRNA isoforms. Sequins have an entirely artificial sequence with no homology to natural reference genomes, but they align to gene loci encoded on an artificial in silico chromosome. The combination of multiple sequins across a range of concentrations emulates alternative splicing and differential gene expression, and it provides scaling factors for normalization between samples. We demonstrate the use of sequins in RNA-seq experiments to measure sample-specific biases and determine the limits of reliable transcript assembly and quantification in accompanying human RNA samples. In addition, we have designed a complementary set of sequins that represent fusion genes arising from rearrangements of the in silico chromosome to aid in cancer diagnosis. RNA sequins provide a qualitative and quantitative reference with which to navigate the complexity of the human transcriptome. PMID:27502218

  4. Cancer-associated SF3B1 mutations affect alternative splicing by promoting alternative branchpoint usage

    PubMed Central

    Alsafadi, Samar; Houy, Alexandre; Battistella, Aude; Popova, Tatiana; Wassef, Michel; Henry, Emilie; Tirode, Franck; Constantinou, Angelos; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Dutertre, Martin; Stern, Marc-Henri

    2016-01-01

    Hotspot mutations in the spliceosome gene SF3B1 are reported in ∼20% of uveal melanomas. SF3B1 is involved in 3′-splice site (3′ss) recognition during RNA splicing; however, the molecular mechanisms of its mutation have remained unclear. Here we show, using RNA-Seq analyses of uveal melanoma, that the SF3B1R625/K666 mutation results in deregulated splicing at a subset of junctions, mostly by the use of alternative 3′ss. Modelling the differential junctions in SF3B1WT and SF3B1R625/K666 cell lines demonstrates that the deregulated splice pattern strictly depends on SF3B1 status and on the 3'ss-sequence context. SF3B1WT knockdown or overexpression do not reproduce the SF3B1R625/K666 splice pattern, qualifying SF3B1R625/K666 as change-of-function mutants. Mutagenesis of predicted branchpoints reveals that the SF3B1R625/K666-promoted splice pattern is a direct result of alternative branchpoint usage. Altogether, this study provides a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying splicing alterations induced by mutant SF3B1 in cancer, and reveals a role for alternative branchpoints in disease. PMID:26842708

  5. Oncogenic fusion protein EWS-FLI1 is a network hub that regulates alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Selvanathan, Saravana P; Graham, Garrett T; Erkizan, Hayriye V; Dirksen, Uta; Natarajan, Thanemozhi G; Dakic, Aleksandra; Yu, Songtao; Liu, Xuefeng; Paulsen, Michelle T; Ljungman, Mats E; Wu, Cathy H; Lawlor, Elizabeth R; Üren, Aykut; Toretsky, Jeffrey A

    2015-03-17

    The synthesis and processing of mRNA, from transcription to translation initiation, often requires splicing of intragenic material. The final mRNA composition varies based on proteins that modulate splice site selection. EWS-FLI1 is an Ewing sarcoma (ES) oncoprotein with an interactome that we demonstrate to have multiple partners in spliceosomal complexes. We evaluate the effect of EWS-FLI1 on posttranscriptional gene regulation using both exon array and RNA-seq. Genes that potentially regulate oncogenesis, including CLK1, CASP3, PPFIBP1, and TERT, validate as alternatively spliced by EWS-FLI1. In a CLIP-seq experiment, we find that EWS-FLI1 RNA-binding motifs most frequently occur adjacent to intron-exon boundaries. EWS-FLI1 also alters splicing by directly binding to known splicing factors including DDX5, hnRNP K, and PRPF6. Reduction of EWS-FLI1 produces an isoform of γ-TERT that has increased telomerase activity compared with wild-type (WT) TERT. The small molecule YK-4-279 is an inhibitor of EWS-FLI1 oncogenic function that disrupts specific protein interactions, including helicases DDX5 and RNA helicase A (RHA) that alters RNA-splicing ratios. As such, YK-4-279 validates the splicing mechanism of EWS-FLI1, showing alternatively spliced gene patterns that significantly overlap with EWS-FLI1 reduction and WT human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Exon array analysis of 75 ES patient samples shows similar isoform expression patterns to cell line models expressing EWS-FLI1, supporting the clinical relevance of our findings. These experiments establish systemic alternative splicing as an oncogenic process modulated by EWS-FLI1. EWS-FLI1 modulation of mRNA splicing may provide insight into the contribution of splicing toward oncogenesis, and, reciprocally, EWS-FLI1 interactions with splicing proteins may inform the splicing code. PMID:25737553

  6. Oncogenic fusion protein EWS-FLI1 is a network hub that regulates alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Selvanathan, Saravana P.; Erkizan, Hayriye V.; Dirksen, Uta; Natarajan, Thanemozhi G.; Dakic, Aleksandra; Yu, Songtao; Liu, Xuefeng; Paulsen, Michelle T.; Ljungman, Mats E.; Wu, Cathy H.; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.; Üren, Aykut; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis and processing of mRNA, from transcription to translation initiation, often requires splicing of intragenic material. The final mRNA composition varies based on proteins that modulate splice site selection. EWS-FLI1 is an Ewing sarcoma (ES) oncoprotein with an interactome that we demonstrate to have multiple partners in spliceosomal complexes. We evaluate the effect of EWS-FLI1 on posttranscriptional gene regulation using both exon array and RNA-seq. Genes that potentially regulate oncogenesis, including CLK1, CASP3, PPFIBP1, and TERT, validate as alternatively spliced by EWS-FLI1. In a CLIP-seq experiment, we find that EWS-FLI1 RNA-binding motifs most frequently occur adjacent to intron–exon boundaries. EWS-FLI1 also alters splicing by directly binding to known splicing factors including DDX5, hnRNP K, and PRPF6. Reduction of EWS-FLI1 produces an isoform of γ-TERT that has increased telomerase activity compared with wild-type (WT) TERT. The small molecule YK-4–279 is an inhibitor of EWS-FLI1 oncogenic function that disrupts specific protein interactions, including helicases DDX5 and RNA helicase A (RHA) that alters RNA-splicing ratios. As such, YK-4–279 validates the splicing mechanism of EWS-FLI1, showing alternatively spliced gene patterns that significantly overlap with EWS-FLI1 reduction and WT human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Exon array analysis of 75 ES patient samples shows similar isoform expression patterns to cell line models expressing EWS-FLI1, supporting the clinical relevance of our findings. These experiments establish systemic alternative splicing as an oncogenic process modulated by EWS-FLI1. EWS-FLI1 modulation of mRNA splicing may provide insight into the contribution of splicing toward oncogenesis, and, reciprocally, EWS-FLI1 interactions with splicing proteins may inform the splicing code. PMID:25737553

  7. Origin of Spliceosomal Introns and Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Manuel; Roy, Scott William

    2014-01-01

    In this work we review the current knowledge on the prehistory, origins, and evolution of spliceosomal introns. First, we briefly outline the major features of the different types of introns, with particular emphasis on the nonspliceosomal self-splicing group II introns, which are widely thought to be the ancestors of spliceosomal introns. Next, we discuss the main scenarios proposed for the origin and proliferation of spliceosomal introns, an event intimately linked to eukaryogenesis. We then summarize the evidence that suggests that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) had remarkably high intron densities and many associated characteristics resembling modern intron-rich genomes. From this intron-rich LECA, the different eukaryotic lineages have taken very distinct evolutionary paths leading to profoundly diverged modern genome structures. Finally, we discuss the origins of alternative splicing and the qualitative differences in alternative splicing forms and functions across lineages. PMID:24890509

  8. Regulation of alternative splicing of liver scavenger receptor class B gene by estrogen and the involved regulatory splicing factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Moor, Andrea N; Merkler, Kathleen A; Liu, Qiyuan; McLean, Mark P

    2007-11-01

    The scavenger receptor class B isoforms (SR-B) type I and type II mediate the selective uptake of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and promote reverse cholesterol transport, an important atherosclerosis protection mechanism, in the liver. Previously it was shown that the hepatic expression of SR-BI and SR-BII is regulated by estrogen. In the present study, we demonstrate that estrogen differentially regulates expression of the glycosylated and nonglycosylated forms of SR-BI and SR-BII in rat liver and hepatic cells. We report that estrogen mainly induces the down-regulation of glycosylated SR-BI and the up-regulation of nonglycosylated SR-BII. To study how estrogen regulates expression of the SR-B isoforms, we constructed a SR-B minigene containing minimal genomic sequences and were able to demonstrate that estrogen directly regulates the pre-mRNA alternative splicing of the exogenously expressed SR-B minigene in hepatic cells. Furthermore, we showed that the overexpression of splicing factors alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2, Transformer (Tra)-2alpha, and Tra2beta changes the splicing pattern of SR-B dramatically, whereas other splicing factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein-G, SC-35, and arginine/serine-rich p40, had no effect. We also demonstrate that estrogen regulates Tra2beta expression levels in liver cells. These studies suggest that estrogen may regulate SR-B isoform expression at both the RNA splicing and posttranslational modification levels and that, for alternative splicing regulation, estrogen may function by regulating the expression of the splicing factors alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2, Tra2alpha, and especially Tra2beta. PMID:17673517

  9. Arabidopsis PTB1 and PTB2 proteins negatively regulate splicing of a mini-exon splicing reporter and affect alternative splicing of endogenous genes differentially.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Craig G; Lewandowska, Dominika; Liney, Michele; Davidson, Diane; Chapman, Sean; Fuller, John; McNicol, Jim; Shaw, Paul; Brown, John W S

    2014-07-01

    This paper examines the function of Arabidopsis thaliana AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 as plant splicing factors. The effect on splicing of overexpression of AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 was analysed in an in vivo protoplast transient expression system with a novel mini-exon splicing reporter. A range of mutations in pyrimidine-rich sequences were compared with and without AtPTB and NpU2AF65 overexpression. Splicing analyses of constructs in protoplasts and RNA from overexpression lines used high-resolution reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 reduced inclusion/splicing of the potato invertase mini-exon splicing reporter, indicating that these proteins can repress plant intron splicing. Mutation of the polypyrimidine tract and closely associated Cytosine and Uracil-rich (CU-rich) sequences, upstream of the mini-exon, altered repression by AtPTB1 and AtPTB2. Coexpression of a plant orthologue of U2AF65 alleviated the splicing repression of AtPTB1. Mutation of a second CU-rich upstream of the mini-exon 3' splice site led to a decline in mini-exon splicing, indicating the presence of a splicing enhancer sequence. Finally, RT-PCR of AtPTB overexpression lines with c. 90 known alternative splicing (AS) events showed that AtPTBs significantly altered AS of over half the events. AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 are splicing factors that influence alternative splicing. This occurs in the potato invertase mini-exon via the polypyrimidine tract and associated pyrimidine-rich sequence. PMID:24749484

  10. RNA-Binding Proteins: Splicing Factors and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, Alger M.; Cygan, Kamil J.; Brown, Brian A.; Fairbrother, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is mediated by interactions of the Core Spliceosome and an array of accessory RNA binding proteins with cis-sequence elements. Splicing is a major regulatory component in higher eukaryotes. Disruptions in splicing are a major contributor to human disease. One in three hereditary disease alleles are believed to cause aberrant splicing. Hereditary disease alleles can alter splicing by disrupting a splicing element, creating a toxic RNA, or affecting splicing factors. One of the challenges of medical genetics is identifying causal variants from the thousands of possibilities discovered in a clinical sequencing experiment. Here we review the basic biochemistry of splicing, the mechanisms of splicing mutations, the methods for identifying splicing mutants, and the potential of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25985083

  11. RNA structure in splicing: An evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Ling; Taggart, Allison J; Fairbrother, William G

    2016-09-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is a key post-transcriptional regulation process in which introns are excised and exons are ligated together. A novel class of structured intron was recently discovered in fish. Simple expansions of complementary AC and GT dimers at opposite boundaries of an intron were found to form a bridging structure, thereby enforcing correct splice site pairing across the intron. In some fish introns, the RNA structures are strong enough to bypass the need of regulatory protein factors for splicing. Here, we discuss the prevalence and potential functions of highly structured introns. In humans, structured introns usually arise through the co-occurrence of C and G-rich repeats at intron boundaries. We explore the potentially instructive example of the HLA receptor genes. In HLA pre-mRNA, structured introns flank the exons that encode the highly polymorphic β sheet cleft, making the processing of the transcript robust to variants that disrupt splicing factor binding. While selective forces that have shaped HLA receptor are fairly atypical, numerous other highly polymorphic genes that encode receptors contain structured introns. Finally, we discuss how the elevated mutation rate associated with the simple repeats that often compose structured intron can make structured introns themselves rapidly evolving elements. PMID:27454491

  12. RNA-binding protein RBM20 represses splicing to orchestrate cardiac pre-mRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Maatz, Henrike; Jens, Marvin; Liss, Martin; Schafer, Sebastian; Heinig, Matthias; Kirchner, Marieluise; Adami, Eleonora; Rintisch, Carola; Dauksaite, Vita; Radke, Michael H.; Selbach, Matthias; Barton, Paul J.R.; Cook, Stuart A.; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Gotthardt, Michael; Landthaler, Markus; Hubner, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the RNA-binding protein RBM20 have been implicated in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a major cause of chronic heart failure, presumably through altering cardiac RNA splicing. Here, we combined transcriptome-wide crosslinking immunoprecipitation (CLIP-seq), RNA-seq, and quantitative proteomics in cell culture and rat and human hearts to examine how RBM20 regulates alternative splicing in the heart. Our analyses revealed the presence of a distinct RBM20 RNA-recognition element that is predominantly found within intronic binding sites and linked to repression of exon splicing with RBM20 binding near 3′ and 5′ splice sites. Proteomic analysis determined that RBM20 interacts with both U1 and U2 small nuclear ribonucleic particles (snRNPs) and suggested that RBM20-dependent splicing repression occurs through spliceosome stalling at complex A. Direct RBM20 targets included several genes previously shown to be involved in DCM as well as genes not typically associated with this disease. In failing human hearts, reduced expression of RBM20 affected alternative splicing of several direct targets, indicating that differences in RBM20 expression may affect cardiac function. Together, these findings identify RBM20-regulated targets and provide insight into the pathogenesis of human heart failure. PMID:24960161

  13. RNA-binding protein RBM20 represses splicing to orchestrate cardiac pre-mRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Maatz, Henrike; Jens, Marvin; Liss, Martin; Schafer, Sebastian; Heinig, Matthias; Kirchner, Marieluise; Adami, Eleonora; Rintisch, Carola; Dauksaite, Vita; Radke, Michael H; Selbach, Matthias; Barton, Paul J R; Cook, Stuart A; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Gotthardt, Michael; Landthaler, Markus; Hubner, Norbert

    2014-08-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the RNA-binding protein RBM20 have been implicated in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a major cause of chronic heart failure, presumably through altering cardiac RNA splicing. Here, we combined transcriptome-wide crosslinking immunoprecipitation (CLIP-seq), RNA-seq, and quantitative proteomics in cell culture and rat and human hearts to examine how RBM20 regulates alternative splicing in the heart. Our analyses revealed the presence of a distinct RBM20 RNA-recognition element that is predominantly found within intronic binding sites and linked to repression of exon splicing with RBM20 binding near 3' and 5' splice sites. Proteomic analysis determined that RBM20 interacts with both U1 and U2 small nuclear ribonucleic particles (snRNPs) and suggested that RBM20-dependent splicing repression occurs through spliceosome stalling at complex A. Direct RBM20 targets included several genes previously shown to be involved in DCM as well as genes not typically associated with this disease. In failing human hearts, reduced expression of RBM20 affected alternative splicing of several direct targets, indicating that differences in RBM20 expression may affect cardiac function. Together, these findings identify RBM20-regulated targets and provide insight into the pathogenesis of human heart failure. PMID:24960161

  14. Histone methylation, alternative splicing and neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fiszbein, Ana; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing, as well as chromatin structure, greatly contributes to specific transcriptional programs that promote neuronal differentiation. The activity of G9a, the enzyme responsible for mono- and di-methylation of lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9me1 and H3K9me2) in mammalian euchromatin, has been widely implicated in the differentiation of a variety of cell types and tissues. In a recent work from our group (Fiszbein et al., 2016) we have shown that alternative splicing of G9a regulates its nuclear localization and, therefore, the efficiency of H3K9 methylation, which promotes neuronal differentiation. We discuss here our results in the light of a report from other group (Laurent et al. 2015) demonstrating a key role for the alternative splicing of the histone demethylase LSD1 in controlling specific gene expression in neurons. All together, these results illustrate the importance of alternative splicing in the generation of a proper equilibrium between methylation and demethylation of histones for the regulation of neuron-specific transcriptional programs. PMID:27606339

  15. Evolutionary Character of Alternative Splicing in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengjun; Yang, Hong; Yang, Huizhao

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is one of the most important ways to enhance the functional diversity of genes. Huge amounts of data have been produced by microarray, expressed sequence tag, and RNA-seq, and plenty of methods have been developed specifically for this task. The most frequently asked questions in previous research were as follows. What is the content rate of AS genes among the whole gene set? How many AS types are presented in the genome, and which type is dominant? How about the conservation ability of AS among different species? Which kinds of isoforms from some genes have the environmental response to help individual adaptation? Based on this background, we collected analysis results from 17 species to try to map out the landscape of AS studies in plants. We have noted the shortages of previous results, and we appeal to all scientists working in the AS field to make a standard protocol so that analyses between different projects are comparable. PMID:26819552

  16. The Role of Canonical and Noncanonical Pre-mRNA Splicing in Plant Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovina, A. S.; Kiselev, K. V.; Zhuravlev, Yu. N.

    2013-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms capable of adapting to various environmental constraints, such as high or low temperatures, drought, soil salinity, or pathogen attack. To survive the unfavorable conditions, plants actively employ pre-mRNA splicing as a mechanism to regulate expression of stress-responsive genes and reprogram intracellular regulatory networks. There is a growing evidence that various stresses strongly affect the frequency and diversity of alternative splicing events in the stress-responsive genes and lead to an increased accumulation of mRNAs containing premature stop codons, which in turn have an impact on plant stress response. A number of studies revealed that some mRNAs involved in plant stress response are spliced counter to the traditional conception of alternative splicing. Such noncanonical mRNA splicing events include trans-splicing, intraexonic deletions, or variations affecting multiple exons and often require short direct repeats to occur. The noncanonical alternative splicing, along with common splicing events, targets the spliced transcripts to degradation through nonsense-mediated mRNA decay or leads to translation of truncated proteins. Investigation of the diversity, biological consequences, and mechanisms of the canonical and noncanonical alternative splicing events will help one to identify those transcripts which are promising for using in genetic engineering and selection of stress-tolerant plants. PMID:23509698

  17. Does distance matter? Variations in alternative 3' splicing regulation.

    PubMed

    Akerman, Martin; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing constitutes a major mechanism creating protein diversity in humans. This diversity can result from the alternative skipping of entire exons or by alternative selection of the 5' or 3' splice sites that define the exon boundaries. In this study, we analyze the sequence and evolutionary characteristics of alternative 3' splice sites conserved between human and mouse genomes for distances ranging from 3 to 100 nucleotides. We show that alternative splicing events can be distinguished from constitutive splicing by a combination of properties which vary depending on the distance between the splice sites. Among the unique features of alternative 3' splice sites, we observed an unexpectedly high occurrence of events in which a polypyrimidine tract was found to overlap the upstream splice site. By applying a machine-learning approach, we show that we can successfully discriminate true alternative 3' splice sites from constitutive 3' splice sites. Finally, we propose that the unique features of the intron flanking alternative splice sites are indicative of a regulatory mechanism that is involved in splice site selection. We postulate that the process of splice site selection is influenced by the distance between the competitive splice sites. PMID:17704130

  18. WT1 interacts with the splicing protein RBM4 and regulates its ability to modulate alternative splicing in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Markus, M. Andrea; Heinrich, Bettina; Raitskin, Oleg; Adams, David J.; Mangs, Helena; Goy, Christine; Ladomery, Michael; Sperling, Ruth; Stamm, Stefan; Morris, Brian J. . E-mail: brianm@medsci.usyd.edu.au

    2006-10-15

    Wilm's tumor protein 1 (WT1), a protein implicated in various cancers and developmental disorders, consists of two major isoforms: WT1(-KTS), a transcription factor, and WT1(+KTS), a post-transcriptional regulator that binds to RNA and can interact with splicing components. Here we show that WT1 interacts with the novel splicing regulator RBM4. Each protein was found to colocalize in nuclear speckles and to cosediment with supraspliceosomes in glycerol gradients. RBM4 conferred dose-dependent and cell-specific regulation of alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs transcribed from several reporter genes. We found that overexpressed WT1(+KTS) abrogated this effect of RBM4 on splice-site selection, whereas WT1(-KTS) did not. We conclude that the (+KTS) form of WT1 is able to inhibit the effect of RBM4 on alternative splicing.

  19. Leveraging transcript quantification for fast computation of alternative splicing profiles.

    PubMed

    Alamancos, Gael P; Pagès, Amadís; Trincado, Juan L; Bellora, Nicolás; Eyras, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    Alternative splicing plays an essential role in many cellular processes and bears major relevance in the understanding of multiple diseases, including cancer. High-throughput RNA sequencing allows genome-wide analyses of splicing across multiple conditions. However, the increasing number of available data sets represents a major challenge in terms of computation time and storage requirements. We describe SUPPA, a computational tool to calculate relative inclusion values of alternative splicing events, exploiting fast transcript quantification. SUPPA accuracy is comparable and sometimes superior to standard methods using simulated as well as real RNA-sequencing data compared with experimentally validated events. We assess the variability in terms of the choice of annotation and provide evidence that using complete transcripts rather than more transcripts per gene provides better estimates. Moreover, SUPPA coupled with de novo transcript reconstruction methods does not achieve accuracies as high as using quantification of known transcripts, but remains comparable to existing methods. Finally, we show that SUPPA is more than 1000 times faster than standard methods. Coupled with fast transcript quantification, SUPPA provides inclusion values at a much higher speed than existing methods without compromising accuracy, thereby facilitating the systematic splicing analysis of large data sets with limited computational resources. The software is implemented in Python 2.7 and is available under the MIT license at https://bitbucket.org/regulatorygenomicsupf/suppa. PMID:26179515

  20. Involvement of Alternative Splicing in Barley Seed Germination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qisen; Zhang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Songbo; Tan, Cong; Zhou, Gaofeng; Li, Chengdao

    2016-01-01

    Seed germination activates many new biological processes including DNA, membrane and mitochondrial repairs and requires active protein synthesis and sufficient energy supply. Alternative splicing (AS) regulates many cellular processes including cell differentiation and environmental adaptations. However, limited information is available on the regulation of seed germination at post-transcriptional levels. We have conducted RNA-sequencing experiments to dissect AS events in barley seed germination. We identified between 552 and 669 common AS transcripts in germinating barley embryos from four barley varieties (Hordeum vulgare L. Bass, Baudin, Harrington and Stirling). Alternative 3' splicing (34%-45%), intron retention (32%-34%) and alternative 5' splicing (16%-21%) were three major AS events in germinating embryos. The AS transcripts were predominantly mapped onto ribosome, RNA transport machineries, spliceosome, plant hormone signal transduction, glycolysis, sugar and carbon metabolism pathways. Transcripts of these genes were also very abundant in the early stage of seed germination. Correlation analysis of gene expression showed that AS hormone responsive transcripts could also be co-expressed with genes responsible for protein biosynthesis and sugar metabolisms. Our RNA-sequencing data revealed that AS could play important roles in barley seed germination. PMID:27031341

  1. Involvement of Alternative Splicing in Barley Seed Germination

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qisen; Zhang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Songbo; Tan, Cong; Zhou, Gaofeng; Li, Chengdao

    2016-01-01

    Seed germination activates many new biological processes including DNA, membrane and mitochondrial repairs and requires active protein synthesis and sufficient energy supply. Alternative splicing (AS) regulates many cellular processes including cell differentiation and environmental adaptations. However, limited information is available on the regulation of seed germination at post-transcriptional levels. We have conducted RNA-sequencing experiments to dissect AS events in barley seed germination. We identified between 552 and 669 common AS transcripts in germinating barley embryos from four barley varieties (Hordeum vulgare L. Bass, Baudin, Harrington and Stirling). Alternative 3’ splicing (34%-45%), intron retention (32%-34%) and alternative 5’ splicing (16%-21%) were three major AS events in germinating embryos. The AS transcripts were predominantly mapped onto ribosome, RNA transport machineries, spliceosome, plant hormone signal transduction, glycolysis, sugar and carbon metabolism pathways. Transcripts of these genes were also very abundant in the early stage of seed germination. Correlation analysis of gene expression showed that AS hormone responsive transcripts could also be co-expressed with genes responsible for protein biosynthesis and sugar metabolisms. Our RNA-sequencing data revealed that AS could play important roles in barley seed germination. PMID:27031341

  2. Estimation of the minimum mRNA splicing error rate in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Skandalis, A

    2016-01-01

    The majority of protein coding genes in vertebrates contain several introns that are removed by the mRNA splicing machinery. Errors during splicing can generate aberrant transcripts and degrade the transmission of genetic information thus contributing to genomic instability and disease. However, estimating the error rate of constitutive splicing is complicated by the process of alternative splicing which can generate multiple alternative transcripts per locus and is particularly active in humans. In order to estimate the error frequency of constitutive mRNA splicing and avoid bias by alternative splicing we have characterized the frequency of splice variants at three loci, HPRT, POLB, and TRPV1 in multiple tissues of six vertebrate species. Our analysis revealed that the frequency of splice variants varied widely among loci, tissues, and species. However, the lowest observed frequency is quite constant among loci and approximately 0.1% aberrant transcripts per intron. Arguably this reflects the "irreducible" error rate of splicing, which consists primarily of the combination of replication errors by RNA polymerase II in splice consensus sequences and spliceosome errors in correctly pairing exons. PMID:26811995

  3. The role of splicing factors in deregulation of alternative splicing during oncogenesis and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Shilo, Asaf; Siegfried, Zahava; Karni, Rotem

    2015-01-01

    In past decades, cancer research has focused on genetic alterations that are detected in malignant tissues and contribute to the initiation and progression of cancer. These changes include mutations, copy number variations, and translocations. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that epigenetic changes, including alternative splicing, play a major role in cancer development and progression. There are relatively few studies on the contribution of alternative splicing and the splicing factors that regulate this process to cancer development and progression. Recently, multiple studies have revealed altered splicing patterns in cancers and several splicing factors were found to contribute to tumor development. Studies using high-throughput genomic analysis have identified mutations in components of the core splicing machinery and in splicing factors in several cancers. In this review, we will highlight new findings on the role of alternative splicing and its regulators in cancer initiation and progression, in addition to novel approaches to correct oncogenic splicing. PMID:27308389

  4. Transcriptome Bioinformatical Analysis of Vertebrate Stages of Schistosoma japonicum Reveals Alternative Splicing Events

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinye; Xu, Xindong; Lu, Xingyu; Zhang, Yuanbin; Pan, Weiqing

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a molecular process that contributes greatly to the diversification of proteome and to gene functions. Understanding the mechanisms of stage-specific alternative splicing can provide a better understanding of the development of eukaryotes and the functions of different genes. Schistosoma japonicum is an infectious blood-dwelling trematode with a complex lifecycle that causes the tropical disease schistosomiasis. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptome of Schistosoma japonicum to discover alternative splicing events in this parasite, by applying RNA-seq to cDNA library of adults and schistosomula. Results were validated by RT-PCR and sequencing. We found 11,623 alternative splicing events among 7,099 protein encoding genes and average proportion of alternative splicing events per gene was 42.14%. We showed that exon skip is the most common type of alternative splicing events as found in high eukaryotes, whereas intron retention is the least common alternative splicing type. According to intron boundary analysis, the parasite possesses same intron boundaries as other organisms, namely the classic “GT-AG” rule. And in alternative spliced introns or exons, this rule is less strict. And we have attempted to detect alternative splicing events in genes encoding proteins with signal peptides and transmembrane helices, suggesting that alternative splicing could change subcellular locations of specific gene products. Our results indicate that alternative splicing is prevalent in this parasitic worm, and that the worm is close to its hosts. The revealed secretome involved in alternative splicing implies new perspective into understanding interaction between the parasite and its host. PMID:26407301

  5. Transcriptome Bioinformatical Analysis of Vertebrate Stages of Schistosoma japonicum Reveals Alternative Splicing Events.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinye; Xu, Xindong; Lu, Xingyu; Zhang, Yuanbin; Pan, Weiqing

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a molecular process that contributes greatly to the diversification of proteome and to gene functions. Understanding the mechanisms of stage-specific alternative splicing can provide a better understanding of the development of eukaryotes and the functions of different genes. Schistosoma japonicum is an infectious blood-dwelling trematode with a complex lifecycle that causes the tropical disease schistosomiasis. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptome of Schistosoma japonicum to discover alternative splicing events in this parasite, by applying RNA-seq to cDNA library of adults and schistosomula. Results were validated by RT-PCR and sequencing. We found 11,623 alternative splicing events among 7,099 protein encoding genes and average proportion of alternative splicing events per gene was 42.14%. We showed that exon skip is the most common type of alternative splicing events as found in high eukaryotes, whereas intron retention is the least common alternative splicing type. According to intron boundary analysis, the parasite possesses same intron boundaries as other organisms, namely the classic "GT-AG" rule. And in alternative spliced introns or exons, this rule is less strict. And we have attempted to detect alternative splicing events in genes encoding proteins with signal peptides and transmembrane helices, suggesting that alternative splicing could change subcellular locations of specific gene products. Our results indicate that alternative splicing is prevalent in this parasitic worm, and that the worm is close to its hosts. The revealed secretome involved in alternative splicing implies new perspective into understanding interaction between the parasite and its host. PMID:26407301

  6. The splice is right: Guarantors of fidelity in pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Two recent papers, one from the Staley laboratory (Koodathingal and colleagues) and the other from the Cheng laboratory (Tseng and colleagues), show that the RNA-dependent ATPase Prp16, which is required for the second step of splicing, acts to reject slowly splicing pre-mRNAs immediately before the first catalytic reaction in pre-mRNA splicing. The results answer long-investigated questions about the actions of Prp16 and provide a wealth of molecular details on the proofreading process in pre-mRNA splicing. The discussion here reviews and integrates the results of the two papers and describes the implications for proofreading in splicing. PMID:21357751

  7. Integrating alternative splicing detection into gene prediction

    PubMed Central

    Foissac, Sylvain; Schiex, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing (AS) is now considered as a major actor in transcriptome/proteome diversity and it cannot be neglected in the annotation process of a new genome. Despite considerable progresses in term of accuracy in computational gene prediction, the ability to reliably predict AS variants when there is local experimental evidence of it remains an open challenge for gene finders. Results We have used a new integrative approach that allows to incorporate AS detection into ab initio gene prediction. This method relies on the analysis of genomically aligned transcript sequences (ESTs and/or cDNAs), and has been implemented in the dynamic programming algorithm of the graph-based gene finder EuGÈNE. Given a genomic sequence and a set of aligned transcripts, this new version identifies the set of transcripts carrying evidence of alternative splicing events, and provides, in addition to the classical optimal gene prediction, alternative optimal predictions (among those which are consistent with the AS events detected). This allows for multiple annotations of a single gene in a way such that each predicted variant is supported by a transcript evidence (but not necessarily with a full-length coverage). Conclusions This automatic combination of experimental data analysis and ab initio gene finding offers an ideal integration of alternatively spliced gene prediction inside a single annotation pipeline. PMID:15705189

  8. RNA catalyzes nuclear pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Fica, Sebastian M.; Tuttle, Nicole; Novak, Thaddeus; Li, Nan-Sheng; Lu, Jun; Koodathingal, Prakash; Dai, Qing; Staley, Jonathan P.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In nuclear pre-messenger RNA splicing, introns are excised by the spliceosome, a multi-megadalton machine composed of both proteins and small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). Over thirty years ago, following the discovery of self-splicing group II intron RNAs, the snRNAs were hypothesized to catalyze splicing. However, no definitive evidence for a role of either RNA or protein in catalysis by the spliceosome has been reported to date. By using metal rescue strategies, here we show that the U6 snRNA catalyzes both splicing reactions by positioning divalent metals that stabilize the leaving groups during each reaction. Strikingly, all of the U6 catalytic metal ligands we identified correspond to the ligands observed to position catalytic, divalent metals in crystal structures of a group II intron RNA. These findings indicate that group II introns and the spliceosome share common catalytic mechanisms, and likely common evolutionary origins. Our results demonstrate that RNA mediates catalysis within the spliceosome. PMID:24196718

  9. Plant pre-tRNA splicing enzymes are targeted to multiple cellular compartments.

    PubMed

    Englert, Markus; Latz, Andreas; Becker, Dirk; Gimple, Olaf; Beier, Hildburg; Akama, Kazuhito

    2007-11-01

    Splicing of precursor tRNAs in plants requires the concerted action of three enzymes: an endonuclease to cleave the intron at the two splice sites, an RNA ligase for joining the resulting tRNA halves and a 2'-phosphotransferase to remove the 2'-phosphate from the splice junction. Pre-tRNA splicing has been demonstrated to occur exclusively in the nucleus of vertebrates and in the cytoplasm of budding yeast cells, respectively. We have investigated the subcellular localization of plant splicing enzymes fused to GFP by their transient expression in Allium epidermal and Vicia guard cells. Our results show that all three classes of splicing enzymes derived from Arabidopsis and Oryza are localized in the nucleus, suggesting that plant pre-tRNA splicing takes place preferentially in the nucleus. Moreover, two of the splicing enzymes, i.e., tRNA ligase and 2'-phosphotransferase, contain chloroplast transit signals at their N-termini and are predominantly targeted to chloroplasts and proplastids, respectively. The putative transit sequences are effective also in the heterologous context fused directly to GFP. Chloroplast genomes do not encode intron-containing tRNA genes of the nuclear type and consequently tRNA ligase and 2'-phosphotransferase are not required for classical pre-tRNA splicing in these organelles but they may play a role in tRNA repair and/or splicing of atypical group II introns. Additionally, 2'-phosphotransferase-GFP fusion protein has been found to be associated with mitochondria, as confirmed by colocalization studies with MitoTracker Red. In vivo analyses with mutated constructs suggest that alternative initiation of translation is one way utilized by tRNA splicing enzymes for differential targeting. PMID:17698277

  10. Vials: Visualizing Alternative Splicing of Genes

    PubMed Central

    Strobelt, Hendrik; Alsallakh, Bilal; Botros, Joseph; Peterson, Brant; Borowsky, Mark; Pfister, Hanspeter; Lex, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a process by which the same DNA sequence is used to assemble different proteins, called protein isoforms. Alternative splicing works by selectively omitting some of the coding regions (exons) typically associated with a gene. Detection of alternative splicing is difficult and uses a combination of advanced data acquisition methods and statistical inference. Knowledge about the abundance of isoforms is important for understanding both normal processes and diseases and to eventually improve treatment through targeted therapies. The data, however, is complex and current visualizations for isoforms are neither perceptually efficient nor scalable. To remedy this, we developed Vials, a novel visual analysis tool that enables analysts to explore the various datasets that scientists use to make judgments about isoforms: the abundance of reads associated with the coding regions of the gene, evidence for junctions, i.e., edges connecting the coding regions, and predictions of isoform frequencies. Vials is scalable as it allows for the simultaneous analysis of many samples in multiple groups. Our tool thus enables experts to (a) identify patterns of isoform abundance in groups of samples and (b) evaluate the quality of the data. We demonstrate the value of our tool in case studies using publicly available datasets. PMID:26529712

  11. Control of neuronal synapse specification by a highly dedicated alternative splicing program.

    PubMed

    Traunmüller, Lisa; Gomez, Andrea M; Nguyen, Thi-Minh; Scheiffele, Peter

    2016-05-20

    Alternative RNA splicing represents a central mechanism for expanding the coding power of genomes. Individual RNA-binding proteins can control alternative splicing choices in hundreds of RNA transcripts, thereby tuning amounts and functions of large numbers of cellular proteins. We found that the RNA-binding protein SLM2 is essential for functional specification of glutamatergic synapses in the mouse hippocampus. Genome-wide mapping revealed a markedly selective SLM2-dependent splicing program primarily consisting of only a few target messenger RNAs that encode synaptic proteins. Genetic correction of a single SLM2-dependent target exon in the synaptic recognition molecule neurexin-1 was sufficient to rescue synaptic plasticity and behavioral defects in Slm2 knockout mice. These findings uncover a highly selective alternative splicing program that specifies synaptic properties in the central nervous system. PMID:27174676

  12. A heroin addiction severity-associated intronic single nucleotide polymorphism modulates alternative pre-mRNA splicing of the μ opioid receptor gene OPRM1 via hnRNPH interactions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Lu, Zhigang; Xu, Mingming; Pan, Ling; Deng, Yi; Xie, Xiaohu; Liu, Huifen; Ding, Shixiong; Hurd, Yasmin L; Pasternak, Gavril W; Klein, Robert J; Cartegni, Luca; Zhou, Wenhua; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2014-08-13

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the OPRM1 gene have been associated with vulnerability to opioid dependence. The current study identifies an association of an intronic SNP (rs9479757) with the severity of heroin addiction among Han-Chinese male heroin addicts. Individual SNP analysis and haplotype-based analysis with additional SNPs in the OPRM1 locus showed that mild heroin addiction was associated with the AG genotype, whereas severe heroin addiction was associated with the GG genotype. In vitro studies such as electrophoretic mobility shift assay, minigene, siRNA, and antisense morpholino oligonucleotide studies have identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H (hnRNPH) as the major binding partner for the G-containing SNP site. The G-to-A transition weakens hnRNPH binding and facilitates exon 2 skipping, leading to altered expressions of OPRM1 splice-variant mRNAs and hMOR-1 proteins. Similar changes in splicing and hMOR-1 proteins were observed in human postmortem prefrontal cortex with the AG genotype of this SNP when compared with the GG genotype. Interestingly, the altered splicing led to an increase in hMOR-1 protein levels despite decreased hMOR-1 mRNA levels, which is likely contributed by a concurrent increase in single transmembrane domain variants that have a chaperone-like function on MOR-1 protein stability. Our studies delineate the role of this SNP as a modifier of OPRM1 alternative splicing via hnRNPH interactions, and suggest a functional link between an SNP-containing splicing modifier and the severity of heroin addiction. PMID:25122903

  13. A Heroin Addiction Severity-Associated Intronic Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Modulates Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing of the μ Opioid Receptor Gene OPRM1 via hnRNPH Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin; Lu, Zhigang; Xu, Mingming; Pan, Ling; Deng, Yi; Xie, Xiaohu; Liu, Huifen; Ding, Shixiong; Hurd, Yasmin L.; Pasternak, Gavril W.; Klein, Robert J.; Cartegni, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the OPRM1 gene have been associated with vulnerability to opioid dependence. The current study identifies an association of an intronic SNP (rs9479757) with the severity of heroin addiction among Han-Chinese male heroin addicts. Individual SNP analysis and haplotype-based analysis with additional SNPs in the OPRM1 locus showed that mild heroin addiction was associated with the AG genotype, whereas severe heroin addiction was associated with the GG genotype. In vitro studies such as electrophoretic mobility shift assay, minigene, siRNA, and antisense morpholino oligonucleotide studies have identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H (hnRNPH) as the major binding partner for the G-containing SNP site. The G-to-A transition weakens hnRNPH binding and facilitates exon 2 skipping, leading to altered expressions of OPRM1 splice-variant mRNAs and hMOR-1 proteins. Similar changes in splicing and hMOR-1 proteins were observed in human postmortem prefrontal cortex with the AG genotype of this SNP when compared with the GG genotype. Interestingly, the altered splicing led to an increase in hMOR-1 protein levels despite decreased hMOR-1 mRNA levels, which is likely contributed by a concurrent increase in single transmembrane domain variants that have a chaperone-like function on MOR-1 protein stability. Our studies delineate the role of this SNP as a modifier of OPRM1 alternative splicing via hnRNPH interactions, and suggest a functional link between an SNP-containing splicing modifier and the severity of heroin addiction. PMID:25122903

  14. A dynamic alternative splicing program regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry; Ghanem, Dana; An, Xiuli; Li, Jie; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative pre-messenger RNA splicing remodels the human transcriptome in a spatiotemporal manner during normal development and differentiation. Here we explored the landscape of transcript diversity in the erythroid lineage by RNA-seq analysis of five highly purified populations of morphologically distinct human erythroblasts, representing the last four cell divisions before enucleation. In this unique differentiation system, we found evidence of an extensive and dynamic alternative splicing program encompassing genes with many diverse functions. Alternative splicing was particularly enriched in genes controlling cell cycle, organelle organization, chromatin function and RNA processing. Many alternative exons exhibited differentiation-associated switches in splicing efficiency, mostly in late-stage polychromatophilic and orthochromatophilic erythroblasts, in concert with extensive cellular remodeling that precedes enucleation. A subset of alternative splicing switches introduces premature translation termination codons into selected transcripts in a differentiation stage-specific manner, supporting the hypothesis that alternative splicing-coupled nonsense-mediated decay contributes to regulation of erythroid-expressed genes as a novel part of the overall differentiation program. We conclude that a highly dynamic alternative splicing program in terminally differentiating erythroblasts plays a major role in regulating gene expression to ensure synthesis of appropriate proteome at each stage as the cells remodel in preparation for production of mature red cells. PMID:24442673

  15. A dynamic alternative splicing program regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry; Ghanem, Dana; An, Xiuli; Li, Jie; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G

    2014-04-01

    Alternative pre-messenger RNA splicing remodels the human transcriptome in a spatiotemporal manner during normal development and differentiation. Here we explored the landscape of transcript diversity in the erythroid lineage by RNA-seq analysis of five highly purified populations of morphologically distinct human erythroblasts, representing the last four cell divisions before enucleation. In this unique differentiation system, we found evidence of an extensive and dynamic alternative splicing program encompassing genes with many diverse functions. Alternative splicing was particularly enriched in genes controlling cell cycle, organelle organization, chromatin function and RNA processing. Many alternative exons exhibited differentiation-associated switches in splicing efficiency, mostly in late-stage polychromatophilic and orthochromatophilic erythroblasts, in concert with extensive cellular remodeling that precedes enucleation. A subset of alternative splicing switches introduces premature translation termination codons into selected transcripts in a differentiation stage-specific manner, supporting the hypothesis that alternative splicing-coupled nonsense-mediated decay contributes to regulation of erythroid-expressed genes as a novel part of the overall differentiation program. We conclude that a highly dynamic alternative splicing program in terminally differentiating erythroblasts plays a major role in regulating gene expression to ensure synthesis of appropriate proteome at each stage as the cells remodel in preparation for production of mature red cells. PMID:24442673

  16. Splicing Express: a software suite for alternative splicing analysis using next-generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Jose E.; Kim, Jihoon; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2015-01-01

    Motivation. Alternative splicing events (ASEs) are prevalent in the transcriptome of eukaryotic species and are known to influence many biological phenomena. The identification and quantification of these events are crucial for a better understanding of biological processes. Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies have allowed deep characterization of transcriptomes and made it possible to address these issues. ASEs analysis, however, represents a challenging task especially when many different samples need to be compared. Some popular tools for the analysis of ASEs are known to report thousands of events without annotations and/or graphical representations. A new tool for the identification and visualization of ASEs is here described, which can be used by biologists without a solid bioinformatics background. Results. A software suite named Splicing Express was created to perform ASEs analysis from transcriptome sequencing data derived from next-generation DNA sequencing platforms. Its major goal is to serve the needs of biomedical researchers who do not have bioinformatics skills. Splicing Express performs automatic annotation of transcriptome data (GTF files) using gene coordinates available from the UCSC genome browser and allows the analysis of data from all available species. The identification of ASEs is done by a known algorithm previously implemented in another tool named Splooce. As a final result, Splicing Express creates a set of HTML files composed of graphics and tables designed to describe the expression profile of ASEs among all analyzed samples. By using RNA-Seq data from the Illumina Human Body Map and the Rat Body Map, we show that Splicing Express is able to perform all tasks in a straightforward way, identifying well-known specific events. Availability and Implementation.Splicing Express is written in Perl and is suitable to run only in UNIX-like systems. More details can be found at: http

  17. Structure of the human myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein gene and multiple alternative spliced isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Pham-Dinh, D.; Gaspera, D.B.; Dautigny, A.

    1995-09-20

    Myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a special component of the central nervous system localization on the outermost lamellae of mature myelin, is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. We report here the organization of the human MOG gene, which spans approximately 17 kb, and the characterization of six MOG mRNA splicing variants. The intron/exon structure of the human MOG gene confirmed the splicing pattern, supporting the hypothesis that mRNA isoforms could arise by alternative splicing of a single gene. In addition to the eight exons coding for the major MOG isoform, the human MOG gene also contains 3` region, a previously unknown alternatively spliced coding exon, VIA. Alternative utilization of two acceptor splicing sites for exon VIII could produce two different C-termini. The nucleotide sequences presented here may be a useful tool to study further possible involvement if the MOG gene in hereditary neurological disorders. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved--all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago--and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles. PMID:26061177

  19. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level

    PubMed Central

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved—all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago—and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles. PMID:26061177

  20. Widespread alternative and aberrant splicing revealed by lariat sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Stepankiw, Nicholas; Raghavan, Madhura; Fogarty, Elizabeth A.; Grimson, Andrew; Pleiss, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing is an important and ancient feature of eukaryotic gene structure, the existence of which has likely facilitated eukaryotic proteome expansions. Here, we have used intron lariat sequencing to generate a comprehensive profile of splicing events in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, amongst the simplest organisms that possess mammalian-like splice site degeneracy. We reveal an unprecedented level of alternative splicing, including alternative splice site selection for over half of all annotated introns, hundreds of novel exon-skipping events, and thousands of novel introns. Moreover, the frequency of these events is far higher than previous estimates, with alternative splice sites on average activated at ∼3% the rate of canonical sites. Although a subset of alternative sites are conserved in related species, implying functional potential, the majority are not detectably conserved. Interestingly, the rate of aberrant splicing is inversely related to expression level, with lowly expressed genes more prone to erroneous splicing. Although we validate many events with RNAseq, the proportion of alternative splicing discovered with lariat sequencing is far greater, a difference we attribute to preferential decay of aberrantly spliced transcripts. Together, these data suggest the spliceosome possesses far lower fidelity than previously appreciated, highlighting the potential contributions of alternative splicing in generating novel gene structures. PMID:26261211

  1. An EMT–Driven Alternative Splicing Program Occurs in Human Breast Cancer and Modulates Cellular Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Flytzanis, Nicholas C.; Balsamo, Michele; Condeelis, John S.; Oktay, Maja H.; Burge, Christopher B.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a mechanism important for embryonic development, plays a critical role during malignant transformation. While much is known about transcriptional regulation of EMT, alternative splicing of several genes has also been correlated with EMT progression, but the extent of splicing changes and their contributions to the morphological conversion accompanying EMT have not been investigated comprehensively. Using an established cell culture model and RNA–Seq analyses, we determined an alternative splicing signature for EMT. Genes encoding key drivers of EMT–dependent changes in cell phenotype, such as actin cytoskeleton remodeling, regulation of cell–cell junction formation, and regulation of cell migration, were enriched among EMT–associated alternatively splicing events. Our analysis suggested that most EMT–associated alternative splicing events are regulated by one or more members of the RBFOX, MBNL, CELF, hnRNP, or ESRP classes of splicing factors. The EMT alternative splicing signature was confirmed in human breast cancer cell lines, which could be classified into basal and luminal subtypes based exclusively on their EMT–associated splicing pattern. Expression of EMT–associated alternative mRNA transcripts was also observed in primary breast cancer samples, indicating that EMT–dependent splicing changes occur commonly in human tumors. The functional significance of EMT–associated alternative splicing was tested by expression of the epithelial-specific splicing factor ESRP1 or by depletion of RBFOX2 in mesenchymal cells, both of which elicited significant changes in cell morphology and motility towards an epithelial phenotype, suggesting that splicing regulation alone can drive critical aspects of EMT–associated phenotypic changes. The molecular description obtained here may aid in the development of new diagnostic and prognostic markers for analysis of breast cancer progression. PMID:21876675

  2. The RNA binding protein RBM38 (RNPC1) regulates splicing during late erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Heinicke, Laurie A; Nabet, Behnam; Shen, Shihao; Jiang, Peng; van Zalen, Sebastiaan; Cieply, Benjamin; Russell, J Eric; Xing, Yi; Carstens, Russ P

    2013-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a prevalent mechanism in mammals that promotes proteomic diversity, including expression of cell-type specific protein isoforms. We characterized a role for RBM38 (RNPC1) in regulation of alternative splicing during late erythroid differentiation. We used an Affymetrix human exon junction (HJAY) splicing microarray to identify a panel of RBM38-regulated alternatively spliced transcripts. Using microarray databases, we noted high RBM38 expression levels in CD71(+) erythroid cells and thus chose to examine RBM38 expression during erythroid differentiation of human hematopoietic stem cells, detecting enhanced RBM38 expression during late erythroid differentiation. In differentiated erythroid cells, we validated a subset of RBM38-regulated splicing events and determined that RBM38 regulates activation of Protein 4.1R (EPB41) exon 16 during late erythroid differentiation. Using Epb41 minigenes, Rbm38 was found to be a robust activator of exon 16 splicing. To further address the mechanism of RBM38-regulated alternative splicing, a novel mammalian protein expression system, followed by SELEX-Seq, was used to identify a GU-rich RBM38 binding motif. Lastly, using a tethering assay, we determined that RBM38 can directly activate splicing when recruited to a downstream intron. Together, our data support the role of RBM38 in regulating alternative splicing during erythroid differentiation. PMID:24250749

  3. The RNA Binding Protein RBM38 (RNPC1) Regulates Splicing during Late Erythroid Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Heinicke, Laurie A.; Nabet, Behnam; Shen, Shihao; Jiang, Peng; van Zalen, Sebastiaan; Cieply, Benjamin; Russell, J. Eric; Xing, Yi; Carstens, Russ P.

    2013-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a prevalent mechanism in mammals that promotes proteomic diversity, including expression of cell-type specific protein isoforms. We characterized a role for RBM38 (RNPC1) in regulation of alternative splicing during late erythroid differentiation. We used an Affymetrix human exon junction (HJAY) splicing microarray to identify a panel of RBM38-regulated alternatively spliced transcripts. Using microarray databases, we noted high RBM38 expression levels in CD71+ erythroid cells and thus chose to examine RBM38 expression during erythroid differentiation of human hematopoietic stem cells, detecting enhanced RBM38 expression during late erythroid differentiation. In differentiated erythroid cells, we validated a subset of RBM38-regulated splicing events and determined that RBM38 regulates activation of Protein 4.1R (EPB41) exon 16 during late erythroid differentiation. Using Epb41 minigenes, Rbm38 was found to be a robust activator of exon 16 splicing. To further address the mechanism of RBM38-regulated alternative splicing, a novel mammalian protein expression system, followed by SELEX-Seq, was used to identify a GU-rich RBM38 binding motif. Lastly, using a tethering assay, we determined that RBM38 can directly activate splicing when recruited to a downstream intron. Together, our data support the role of RBM38 in regulating alternative splicing during erythroid differentiation. PMID:24250749

  4. Alternative Splicing of G9a Regulates Neuronal Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fiszbein, Ana; Giono, Luciana E; Quaglino, Ana; Berardino, Bruno G; Sigaut, Lorena; von Bilderling, Catalina; Schor, Ignacio E; Steinberg, Juliana H Enriqué; Rossi, Mario; Pietrasanta, Lía I; Caramelo, Julio J; Srebrow, Anabella; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-03-29

    Chromatin modifications are critical for the establishment and maintenance of differentiation programs. G9a, the enzyme responsible for histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation in mammalian euchromatin, exists as two isoforms with differential inclusion of exon 10 (E10) through alternative splicing. We find that the G9a methyltransferase is required for differentiation of the mouse neuronal cell line N2a and that E10 inclusion increases during neuronal differentiation of cultured cells, as well as in the developing mouse brain. Although E10 inclusion greatly stimulates overall H3K9me2 levels, it does not affect G9a catalytic activity. Instead, E10 increases G9a nuclear localization. We show that the G9a E10(+) isoform is necessary for neuron differentiation and regulates the alternative splicing pattern of its own pre-mRNA, enhancing E10 inclusion. Overall, our findings indicate that by regulating its own alternative splicing, G9a promotes neuron differentiation and creates a positive feedback loop that reinforces cellular commitment to differentiation. PMID:26997278

  5. The human XPG gene: gene architecture, alternative splicing and single nucleotide polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Emmert, Steffen; Schneider, Thomas D.; Khan, Sikandar G.; Kraemer, Kenneth H.

    2001-01-01

    Defects in the XPG DNA repair endonuclease gene can result in the cancer-prone disorders xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or the XP–Cockayne syndrome complex. While the XPG cDNA sequence was known, determination of the genomic sequence was required to understand its different functions. In cells from normal donors, we found that the genomic sequence of the human XPG gene spans 30 kb, contains 15 exons that range from 61 to 1074 bp and 14 introns that range from 250 to 5763 bp. Analysis of the splice donor and acceptor sites using an information theory-based approach revealed three splice sites with low information content, which are components of the minor (U12) spliceosome. We identified six alternatively spliced XPG mRNA isoforms in cells from normal donors and from XPG patients: partial deletion of exon 8, partial retention of intron 8, two with alternative exons (in introns 1 and 6) and two that retained complete introns (introns 3 and 9). The amount of alternatively spliced XPG mRNA isoforms varied in different tissues. Most alternative splice donor and acceptor sites had a relatively high information content, but one has the U12 spliceosome sequence. A single nucleotide polymorphism has allele frequencies of 0.74 for 3507G and 0.26 for 3507C in 91 donors. The human XPG gene contains multiple splice sites with low information content in association with multiple alternatively spliced isoforms of XPG mRNA. PMID:11266544

  6. Decreased stability and translation of T cell receptor zeta mRNA with an alternatively spliced 3'-untranslated region contribute to zeta chain down-regulation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Bhabadeb; Tsokos, Christos G; Krishnan, Sandeep; Robertson, James; Fisher, Carolyn U; Warke, Rahul G; Warke, Vishal G; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Tsokos, George C

    2005-05-13

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the aberrant expression of T cell receptor (TCR) zeta chain of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus are not known. Previously we demonstrated that although normal T cells express high levels of TCR zeta mRNA with wild-type (WT) 3' untranslated region (3' UTR), systemic lupus erythematosus T cells display significantly high levels of TCR zeta mRNA with the alternatively spliced (AS) 3' UTR form, which is derived by splice deletion of nucleotides 672-1233 of the TCR zeta transcript. Here we report that the stability of TCR zeta mRNA with an AS 3' UTR is low compared with TCR zeta mRNA with WT 3' UTR. AS 3' UTR, but not WT 3' UTR, conferred similar instability to the luciferase gene. Immunoblotting of cell lysates derived from transfected COS-7 cells demonstrated that TCR zeta with AS 3' UTR produced low amounts of 16-kDa protein. In vitro transcription and translation also produced low amounts of protein from TCR zeta with AS 3' UTR. Taken together our findings suggest that nucleotides 672-1233 bp of TCR zeta 3' UTR play a critical role in its stability and also have elements required for the translational regulation of TCR zeta chain expression in human T cells. PMID:15743765

  7. Evolutionary Insights into RNA trans-Splicing in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Quan; Li, Cong; Zuo, Zhixiang; Huang, Chunhua; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2016-01-01

    Pre-RNA splicing is an essential step in generating mature mRNA. RNA trans-splicing combines two separate pre-mRNA molecules to form a chimeric non-co-linear RNA, which may exert a function distinct from its original molecules. Trans-spliced RNAs may encode novel proteins or serve as noncoding or regulatory RNAs. These novel RNAs not only increase the complexity of the proteome but also provide new regulatory mechanisms for gene expression. An increasing amount of evidence indicates that trans-splicing occurs frequently in both physiological and pathological processes. In addition, mRNA reprogramming based on trans-splicing has been successfully applied in RNA-based therapies for human genetic diseases. Nevertheless, clarifying the extent and evolution of trans-splicing in vertebrates and developing detection methods for trans-splicing remain challenging. In this review, we summarize previous research, highlight recent advances in trans-splicing, and discuss possible splicing mechanisms and functions from an evolutionary viewpoint. PMID:26966239

  8. An artificial riboswitch for controlling pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Suk; Gusti, Veronica; Pillai, Sailesh G; Gaur, Rajesh K

    2005-11-01

    Riboswitches, as previously reported, are natural RNA aptamers that regulate the expression of numerous bacterial metabolic genes in response to small molecule ligands. It has recently been shown that these RNA genetic elements are also present near the splice site junctions of plant and fungal introns, thus raising the possibility of their involvement in regulating mRNA splicing. Here it is shown for the first time that a riboswitch can be engineered to regulate pre-mRNA splicing in vitro. We show that insertion of a high-affinity theophylline binding aptamer into the 3' splice site (3' ss) region of a model pre-mRNA (AdML-Theo29AG) enables its splicing to be repressed by the addition theophylline. Our results indicate that the location of 3' ss AG within the aptamer plays a crucial role in conferring theophylline-dependent control of pre-mRNA splicing. We also show that theophylline-mediated control of pre-mRNA splicing is highly specific by first demonstrating that a small molecule ligand similar in shape and size to theophylline had no effect on the splicing of AdML-Theo29AG pre-mRNA. Second, theophylline failed to exert any influence on the splicing of a pre-mRNA that does not contain its binding site. Third, theophylline specifically blocks the step II of the splicing reaction. Finally, we provide evidence that theophylline-dependent control of pre-mRNA splicing is functionally relevant. PMID:16244133

  9. A pair of RNA binding proteins controls networks of splicing events contributing to specialization of neural cell types

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Adam D.; Gao, Shangbang; Norris, Megan L.; Ray, Debashish; Ramani, Arun K.; Fraser, Andrew G.; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy R.; Zhen, Mei; Calarco, John A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Alternative splicing is important for the development and function of the nervous system, but little is known about the differences in alternative splicing between distinct types of neurons. Furthermore, the factors that control cell-type-specific splicing and the physiological roles of these alternative isoforms are unclear. By monitoring alternative splicing at single cell resolution in Caenorhabditis elegans, we demonstrate that splicing patterns in different neurons are often distinct and highly regulated. We identify two conserved RNA binding proteins, UNC-75/CELF and EXC-7/Hu/ELAV, which regulate overlapping networks of splicing events in GABAergic and cholinergic neurons. We use the UNC-75 exon network to discover regulators of synaptic transmission and to identify unique roles for isoforms of UNC-64/Syntaxin, a protein required for synaptic vesicle fusion. Our results indicate that combinatorial regulation of alternative splicing in distinct neurons provides a mechanism to specialize metazoan nervous systems. PMID:24910101

  10. Alternative mRNA splice variants of the rat ClC-2 chloride channel gene are expressed in lung: genomic sequence and organization of ClC-2.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, S; Zeitlin, P L

    1997-01-01

    The ClC-2 epithelial cell chloride channel is a voltage-, tonicity- and pH-regulated member of the ClC super family. We have previously shown that rat lung ClC-2 (rClC-2) is down-regulated at birth, and molecular diversity is generated by alternative splicing [Murray et al. (1995) Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 12, 597-604; Murray et al. (1996) Am. J. Physiol. 271, L829-L837; Chu et al . (1996) Nucleic Acids Res. 24, 3453-3457]. To investigate other possible mRNA splice variations, we sequenced the entire rClC-2 gene and found that ClC-2Sa (formerly ClC-2S) results from the deletion of exon 20. The preceding intron 19 has an unusually high CT content and a rare AAG acceptor site. Because both features were also found in intron 13, we next tested the hypothesis that intron 13 would be involved in alternative splicing. As predicted, a second splice product, ClC-2Sb, was found by RT-PCR, but only in lung. When we compared the genomic maps of rClC-2 and human ClC-1 (hClC-1), striking similarities were found in each exon except for rClC-2 exon 20, which is absent in hClC-1. These observations suggest that ClC-1 and ClC-2 may have evolved by gene duplication, mutation and DNA rearrangement. PMID:9321672

  11. Role of Acinus in Regulating Retinoic Acid-Responsive Gene Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Soprano, Kenneth J.; Soprano, Dianne Robert

    2014-01-01

    Acinus-S’ is a co-repressor for retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-dependent gene transcription and has been suggested to be involved in RNA processing. In this study the role of Acinus isoforms in regulating pre-mRNA splicing was explored using in vivo splicing assays. Both Acinus-L and Acinus-S’, with the activity of Acinus-L higher than that of Acinus-S’, increase the splicing of a retinoic acid (RA)-responsive minigene containing a weak 5′ splice site but not a RA-responsive minigene containing a strong 5′ splice site. RA treatment further enhances the splicing of the weak 5′ splice site by Acinus in a dose- and time-dependent manner, suggesting a RA-dependent activity in addition to a RA-independent activity of Acinus. The RA-independent effect of Acinus occurs to varying degrees using minigene constructs containing several different promoters while the RA-dependent splicing activity of Acinus is specific for transcripts derived from the minigene driven by a RA response element (RARE)-containing promoter. This suggests that the ligand-dependent splicing activity of Acinus is related to the RA-activated RAR bound to the RARE. The RRM domain is necessary for the RA-dependent splicing activity of Acinus and the RA-independent splicing activity of Acinus is repressed by RNPS1. Importantly, measurement of the splicing of endogenous human RARβ and Bcl-x in vivo demonstrates that Acinus stimulates the use of the weaker alternative 5′ splice site of these two genes in a RA-dependent manner for RARβ and a RA-independent manner for Bcl-x. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that Acinus functions in both RAR-dependent splicing and RAR-dependent transcription. PMID:25205379

  12. Tissue-specific alternative splicing of Tak1 is conserved in deuterostomes.

    PubMed

    Venables, Julian P; Vignal, Emmanuel; Baghdiguian, Stephen; Fort, Philippe; Tazi, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing allows organisms to rapidly modulate protein functions to physiological changes and therefore represents a highly versatile adaptive process. We investigated the conservation of the evolutionary history of the "Fox" family of RNA-binding splicing factors (RBFOX) as well as the conservation of regulated alternative splicing of the genes they control. We found that the RBFOX proteins are conserved in all metazoans examined. In humans, Fox proteins control muscle-specific alternative splicing of many genes but despite the conservation of splicing factors, conservation of regulation of alternative splicing has never been demonstrated between man and nonvertebrate species. Therefore, we studied 40 known Fox-regulated human exons and found that 22 had a tissue-specific splicing pattern in muscle and heart. Of these, 11 were spliced in the same tissue-specific manner in mouse tissues and 4 were tissue-specifically spliced in muscle and heart of the frog Xenopus laevis. The inclusion of two of these alternative exons was also downregulated during tadpole development. Of the 40 in the starting set, the most conserved alternative splicing event was in the transforming growth factor (TGF) beta-activated kinase Tak1 (MAP3K7) as this was also muscle specific in urochordates and in Ambulacraria, the most ancient deuterostome clade. We found exclusion of the muscle-specific exon of Tak1 was itself under control of TGF beta in cell culture and consistently that TGF beta caused an upregulation of Fox2 (RBFOX2) expression. The alternative exon, which codes for an in-frame 27 amino acids between the kinase and known regulatory domain of TAK1, contains conserved features in all organisms including potential phosphorylation sites and likely has an important conserved function in TGF beta signaling and development. This study establishes that deuterostomes share a remarkable conserved physiological process that involves a splicing factor and expression of tissue

  13. The transcription factor c-Myb affects pre-mRNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Orvain, Christophe; Matre, Vilborg; Gabrielsen, Odd S.

    2008-07-25

    c-Myb is a transcription factor which plays a key role in haematopoietic proliferation and lineage commitment. We raised the question of whether c-Myb may have abilities beyond the extensively studied transcriptional activation function. In this report we show that c-Myb influences alternative pre-mRNA splicing. This was seen by its marked effect on the 5'-splice site selection during E1A alternative splicing, while no effect of c-Myb was observed when reporters for the 3'-splice site selection or for the constitutive splicing process were tested. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation experiments provided evidence for interactions between c-Myb and distinct components of the splicing apparatus, such as the general splicing factor U2AF{sup 65} and hnRNPA1 involved in the 5'-splice site selection. The effect on 5'-splice site selection was abolished in the oncogenic variant v-Myb. Altogether, these data provide evidence that c-Myb may serve a previously unappreciated role in the coupling between transcription and splicing.

  14. RNA splicing factors as oncoproteins and tumour suppressors.

    PubMed

    Dvinge, Heidi; Kim, Eunhee; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Bradley, Robert K

    2016-07-01

    The recent genomic characterization of cancers has revealed recurrent somatic point mutations and copy number changes affecting genes encoding RNA splicing factors. Initial studies of these 'spliceosomal mutations' suggest that the proteins bearing these mutations exhibit altered splice site and/or exon recognition preferences relative to their wild-type counterparts, resulting in cancer-specific mis-splicing. Such changes in the splicing machinery may create novel vulnerabilities in cancer cells that can be therapeutically exploited using compounds that can influence the splicing process. Further studies to dissect the biochemical, genomic and biological effects of spliceosomal mutations are crucial for the development of cancer therapies targeted at these mutations. PMID:27282250

  15. A general definition and nomenclature for alternative splicing events.

    PubMed

    Sammeth, Michael; Foissac, Sylvain; Guigó, Roderic

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of the transcriptome present in eukaryotic cells is one of the most challenging tasks in the postgenomic era. In this regard, alternative splicing (AS) is a key phenomenon contributing to the production of different mature transcripts from the same primary RNA sequence. As a plethora of different transcript forms is available in databases, a first step to uncover the biology that drives AS is to identify the different types of reflected splicing variation. In this work, we present a general definition of the AS event along with a notation system that involves the relative positions of the splice sites. This nomenclature univocally and dynamically assigns a specific "AS code" to every possible pattern of splicing variation. On the basis of this definition and the corresponding codes, we have developed a computational tool (AStalavista) that automatically characterizes the complete landscape of AS events in a given transcript annotation of a genome, thus providing a platform to investigate the transcriptome diversity across genes, chromosomes, and species. Our analysis reveals that a substantial part--in human more than a quarter-of the observed splicing variations are ignored in common classification pipelines. We have used AStalavista to investigate and to compare the AS landscape of different reference annotation sets in human and in other metazoan species and found that proportions of AS events change substantially depending on the annotation protocol, species-specific attributes, and coding constraints acting on the transcripts. The AStalavista system therefore provides a general framework to conduct specific studies investigating the occurrence, impact, and regulation of AS. PMID:18688268

  16. Genome-Wide Analysis of Alternative Splicing during Development and Drought Stress in Maize1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Shawn R.; Meng, Xin; Beatty, Mary; Zastrow-Hayes, Gina; Harris, Charlotte; Habben, Jeffrey; Li, Bailin

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a crucial role in plant development as well as stress responses. Although alternative splicing has been studied during development and in response to stress, the interplay between these two factors remains an open question. To assess the effects of drought stress on developmentally regulated splicing in maize (Zea mays), 94 RNA-seq libraries from ear, tassel, and leaf of the B73 public inbred line were constructed at four developmental stages under both well-watered and drought conditions. This analysis was supplemented with a publicly available series of 53 libraries from developing seed, embryo, and endosperm. More than 48,000 novel isoforms, often with stage- or condition-specific expression, were uncovered, suggesting that developmentally regulated alternative splicing occurs in thousands of genes. Drought induced large developmental splicing changes in leaf and ear but relatively few in tassel. Most developmental stage-specific splicing changes affected by drought were tissue dependent, whereas stage-independent changes frequently overlapped between leaf and ear. A linear relationship was found between gene expression changes in splicing factors and alternative spicing of other genes during development. Collectively, these results demonstrate that alternative splicing is strongly associated with tissue type, developmental stage, and stress condition. PMID:26582726

  17. Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Vivo by Overexpression of Antagonistic Splicing Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres, Javier F.; Stamm, Stefan; Helfman, David M.; Krainer, Adrian R.

    1994-09-01

    The opposing effects of SF2/ASF and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 influence alternative splicing in vitro. SF2/ASF or hnRNP A1 complementary DNAs were transiently overexpressed in HeLa cells, and the effect on alternative splicing of several cotransfected reporter genes was measured. Increased expression of SF2/ASF activated proximal 5' splice sites, promoted inclusion of a neuron-specific exon, and prevented abnormal exon skipping. Increased expression of hnRNP A1 activated distal 5' splice sites. Therefore, variations in the intracellular levels of antagonistic splicing factors influence different modes of alternative splicing in vivo and may be a natural mechanism for tissue-specific or developmental regulation of gene expression.

  18. m(6)A: Signaling for mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Samir; Xiao, Wen; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Yang, Yun-Gui

    2016-09-01

    Among myriads of distinct chemical modifications in RNAs, dynamic N6-methyladenosine (m(6)A) is one of the most prevalent modifications in eukaryotic mRNAs and non-coding RNAs. Similar to the critical role of chemical modifications in regulation of DNA and protein activities, RNA m(6)A modification is also observed to be involved in the regulation of diverse functions of RNAs including meiosis, fertility, development, cell reprogramming and circadian period. The RNA m(6)A modification is recognized by YTH domain containing family proteins comprising of YTHDC1-2 and YTHDF1-3. Here we focus on the nuclear m(6)A reader YTHDC1 and its regulatory role in alternative splicing and other RNA metabolic processes. PMID:27351695

  19. Splicing of goose parvovirus pre-mRNA influences cytoplasmic translation of the processed mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Long; Pintel, David J.

    2012-04-25

    Translation of goose parvovirus (GPV) 72 kDa Rep 1 is initiated from unspliced P9-generated mRNAs in ORF1 from the first in-frame AUG (537 AUG); however, this AUG is bypassed in spliced P9-generated RNA: translation of the 52 kDa Rep 2 protein from spliced RNA is initiated in ORF2 at the next AUG downstream (650 AUG). Usage of the 537 AUG was restored in spliced RNA when the GPV intron was replaced with a chimeric SV40 intron, or following specific mutations of the GPV intron which did not appear in the final spliced mRNA. Additionally, 650 AUG usage was gained in unspliced RNA when the GPV intron splice sites were debilitated. Splicing-dependent regulation of translation initiation was mediated in cis by GPV RNA surrounding the target AUGs. Thus, nuclear RNA processing of GPV P9-generated pre-mRNAs has a complex, but significant, effect on alternative translation initiation of the GPV Rep proteins.

  20. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system. PMID:26703587

  1. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system. PMID:26703587

  2. RBFox1-mediated RNA splicing regulates cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chen; Ren, Shuxun; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Qiu, Jinsong; Chapski, Douglas J; Rau, Christoph D; Zhou, Yu; Abdellatif, Maha; Nakano, Astushi; Vondriska, Thomas M; Xiao, Xinshu; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Chen, Jau-Nian; Wang, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    RNA splicing is a major contributor to total transcriptome complexity; however, the functional role and regulation of splicing in heart failure remain poorly understood. Here, we used a total transcriptome profiling and bioinformatic analysis approach and identified a muscle-specific isoform of an RNA splicing regulator, RBFox1 (also known as A2BP1), as a prominent regulator of alternative RNA splicing during heart failure. Evaluation of developing murine and zebrafish hearts revealed that RBFox1 is induced during postnatal cardiac maturation. However, we found that RBFox1 is markedly diminished in failing human and mouse hearts. In a mouse model, RBFox1 deficiency in the heart promoted pressure overload-induced heart failure. We determined that RBFox1 is a potent regulator of RNA splicing and is required for a conserved splicing process of transcription factor MEF2 family members that yields different MEF2 isoforms with differential effects on cardiac hypertrophic gene expression. Finally, induction of RBFox1 expression in murine pressure overload models substantially attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and pathological manifestations. Together, this study identifies regulation of RNA splicing by RBFox1 as an important player in transcriptome reprogramming during heart failure that influence pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:26619120

  3. Molecular Characteristics, mRNA Expression, and Alternative Splicing of a Ryanodine Receptor Gene in the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guo-Rui; Shi, Wen-Zhi; Yang, Wen-Jia; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a distinct class of ligand-gated channels controlling the release of calcium from intracellular stores. The emergence of diamide insecticides, which selectively target insect RyRs, has promoted the study of insect RyRs. In the present study, the full-length RyR cDNA (BdRyR) was cloned and characterized from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), a serious pest of fruits and vegetables throughout East Asia and the Pacific Rim. The cDNA of BdRyR contains a 15,420-bp open reading frame encoding 5,140 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 582.4 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.38. BdRyR shows a high level of amino acid sequence identity (78 to 97%) to other insect RyR isoforms. All common structural features of the RyRs are present in the BdRyR, including a well-conserved C-terminal domain containing consensus calcium-binding EF-hands and six transmembrane domains, and a large N-terminal domain. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that BdRyR was expressed at the lowest and highest levels in egg and adult, respectively, and that the BdRyR expression levels in the third instar larva, pupa and adult were 166.99-, 157.56- and 808.56-fold higher, respectively, than that in the egg. Among different adult body parts, the highest expression level was observed in the thorax compared with the head and abdomen. In addition, four alternative splice sites were identified in the BdRyR gene, with the first, ASI, being located in the central part of the predicted second spore lysis A/RyR domain. Diagnostic PCR analyses revealed that alternative splice variants were generated not only in a tissue-specific manner but also in a developmentally regulated manner. These results lay the foundation for further understanding the structural and functional properties of BdRyR, and the molecular mechanisms for target site resistance in B. dorsalis. PMID:24740254

  4. Two novel exonic point mutations in HEXA identified in a juvenile Tay-Sachs patient: role of alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Levit, A; Nutman, D; Osher, E; Kamhi, E; Navon, R

    2010-06-01

    We have identified three mutations in the beta-hexoseaminidase A (HEXA) gene in a juvenile Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) patient, which exhibited a reduced level of HEXA mRNA. Two mutations are novel, c.814G>A (p.Gly272Arg) and c.1305C>T (p.=), located in exon 8 and in exon 11, respectively. The third mutation, c.1195A>G (p.Asn399Asp) in exon 11, has been previously characterized as a common polymorphism in African-Americans. Hex A activity measured in TSD Glial cells, transfected with HEXA cDNA constructs bearing these mutations, was unaltered from the activity level measured in normal HEXA cDNA. Analysis of RT-PCR products revealed three aberrant transcripts in the patient, one where exon 8 was absent, one where exon 11 was absent and a third lacking both exons 10 and 11. All three novel transcripts contain frameshifts resulting in premature termination codons (PTCs). Transfection of mini-gene constructs carrying the c.814G>A and c.1305C>T mutations proved that the two mutations result in exon skipping. mRNAs that harbor a PTC are detected and degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway to prevent synthesis of abnormal proteins. However, although NMD is functional in the patient's fibroblasts, aberrant transcripts are still present. We suggest that the level of correctly spliced transcripts as well as the efficiency in which NMD degrade the PTC-containing transcripts, apparently plays an important role in the phenotype severity of the unique patient and thus should be considered as a potential target for drug therapy. PMID:20363167

  5. Alternative splicing affects the subcellular localization of Drosha

    PubMed Central

    Link, Steffen; Grund, Stefanie E.; Diederichs, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The RNase III enzyme Drosha is a key factor in microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and as such indispensable for cellular homeostasis and developmental processes. Together with its co-factor DGCR8, it converts the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) into the precursor hairpin (pre-miRNA) in the nucleus. While the middle and the C-terminal domain are crucial for pri-miRNA processing and DGCR8 binding, the function of the N-terminus remains cryptic. Different studies have linked this region to the subcellular localization of Drosha, stabilization and response to stress. In this study, we identify alternatively spliced Drosha transcripts that are devoid of a part of the arginine/serine-rich (RS-rich) domain and expressed in a large set of human cells. In contrast to their expected habitation, we find two isoforms also present in the cytoplasm, while the other two isoforms reside exclusively in the nucleus. Their processing activity for pri-miRNAs and the binding to co-factors remains unaltered. In multiple cell lines, the endogenous mRNA expression of the Drosha isoforms correlates with the localization of endogenous Drosha proteins. The pri-miRNA processing efficiency is not significantly different between groups of cells with or without cytoplasmic Drosha expression. In summary, we discovered novel isoforms of Drosha with differential subcellular localization pointing toward additional layers of complexity in the regulation of its activity. PMID:27185895

  6. Alternative splicing affects the subcellular localization of Drosha.

    PubMed

    Link, Steffen; Grund, Stefanie E; Diederichs, Sven

    2016-06-20

    The RNase III enzyme Drosha is a key factor in microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and as such indispensable for cellular homeostasis and developmental processes. Together with its co-factor DGCR8, it converts the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) into the precursor hairpin (pre-miRNA) in the nucleus. While the middle and the C-terminal domain are crucial for pri-miRNA processing and DGCR8 binding, the function of the N-terminus remains cryptic. Different studies have linked this region to the subcellular localization of Drosha, stabilization and response to stress. In this study, we identify alternatively spliced Drosha transcripts that are devoid of a part of the arginine/serine-rich (RS-rich) domain and expressed in a large set of human cells. In contrast to their expected habitation, we find two isoforms also present in the cytoplasm, while the other two isoforms reside exclusively in the nucleus. Their processing activity for pri-miRNAs and the binding to co-factors remains unaltered. In multiple cell lines, the endogenous mRNA expression of the Drosha isoforms correlates with the localization of endogenous Drosha proteins. The pri-miRNA processing efficiency is not significantly different between groups of cells with or without cytoplasmic Drosha expression. In summary, we discovered novel isoforms of Drosha with differential subcellular localization pointing toward additional layers of complexity in the regulation of its activity. PMID:27185895

  7. Alternative Splicing in the Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells into Cardiac Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Salomonis, Nathan; Nelson, Brandon; Vranizan, Karen; Pico, Alexander R.; Hanspers, Kristina; Kuchinsky, Allan; Ta, Linda; Mercola, Mark; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2009-01-01

    The role of alternative splicing in self-renewal, pluripotency and tissue lineage specification of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is largely unknown. To better define these regulatory cues, we modified the H9 hESC line to allow selection of pluripotent hESCs by neomycin resistance and cardiac progenitors by puromycin resistance. Exon-level microarray expression data from undifferentiated hESCs and cardiac and neural precursors were used to identify splice isoforms with cardiac-restricted or common cardiac/neural differentiation expression patterns. Splice events for these groups corresponded to the pathways of cytoskeletal remodeling, RNA splicing, muscle specification, and cell cycle checkpoint control as well as genes with serine/threonine kinase and helicase activity. Using a new program named AltAnalyze (http://www.AltAnalyze.org), we identified novel changes in protein domain and microRNA binding site architecture that were predicted to affect protein function and expression. These included an enrichment of splice isoforms that oppose cell-cycle arrest in hESCs and that promote calcium signaling and cardiac development in cardiac precursors. By combining genome-wide predictions of alternative splicing with new functional annotations, our data suggest potential mechanisms that may influence lineage commitment and hESC maintenance at the level of specific splice isoforms and microRNA regulation. PMID:19893621

  8. The RNA-Binding Protein QKI Suppresses Cancer-Associated Aberrant Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Feng-Yang; Fu, Xing; Wei, Wen-Juan; Luo, Ya-Ge; Heiner, Monika; Cao, Li-Juan; Fang, Zhaoyuan; Fang, Rong; Lu, Daru; Ji, Hongbin; Hui, Jingyi

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Aberrant splicing has been implicated in lung tumorigenesis. However, the functional links between splicing regulation and lung cancer are not well understood. Here we identify the RNA-binding protein QKI as a key regulator of alternative splicing in lung cancer. We show that QKI is frequently down-regulated in lung cancer, and its down-regulation is significantly associated with a poorer prognosis. QKI-5 inhibits the proliferation and transformation of lung cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrate that QKI-5 regulates the alternative splicing of NUMB via binding to two RNA elements in its pre-mRNA, which in turn suppresses cell proliferation and prevents the activation of the Notch signaling pathway. We further show that QKI-5 inhibits splicing by selectively competing with a core splicing factor SF1 for binding to the branchpoint sequence. Taken together, our data reveal QKI as a critical regulator of splicing in lung cancer and suggest a novel tumor suppression mechanism involving QKI-mediated regulation of the Notch signaling pathway. PMID:24722255

  9. Defective histone supply causes changes in RNA polymerase II elongation rate and cotranscriptional pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Jimeno-González, Silvia; Payán-Bravo, Laura; Muñoz-Cabello, Ana M.; Guijo, Macarena; Gutierrez, Gabriel; Prado, Félix; Reyes, José C.

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription elongation is a highly regulated process that greatly influences mRNA levels as well as pre-mRNA splicing. Despite many studies in vitro, how chromatin modulates RNAPII elongation in vivo is still unclear. Here, we show that a decrease in the level of available canonical histones leads to more accessible chromatin with decreased levels of canonical histones and variants H2A.X and H2A.Z and increased levels of H3.3. With this altered chromatin structure, the RNAPII elongation rate increases, and the kinetics of pre-mRNA splicing is delayed with respect to RNAPII elongation. Consistent with the kinetic model of cotranscriptional splicing, the rapid RNAPII elongation induced by histone depletion promotes the skipping of variable exons in the CD44 gene. Indeed, a slowly elongating mutant of RNAPII was able to rescue this defect, indicating that the defective splicing induced by histone depletion is a direct consequence of the increased elongation rate. In addition, genome-wide analysis evidenced that histone reduction promotes widespread alterations in pre-mRNA processing, including intron retention and changes in alternative splicing. Our data demonstrate that pre-mRNA splicing may be regulated by chromatin structure through the modulation of the RNAPII elongation rate. PMID:26578803

  10. Alternative splicing of inner-ear-expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfei; Liu, Yueyue; Nie, Hongyun; Ma, Xin; Xu, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    Alternative splicing plays a fundamental role in the development and physiological function of the inner ear. Inner-ear-specific gene splicing is necessary to establish the identity and maintain the function of the inner ear. For example, exon 68 of Cadherin 23 (Cdh23) gene is subject to inner-ear-specific alternative splicing, and as a result, Cdh23(+ 68) is only expressed in inner ear hair cells. Alternative splicing along the tonotopic axis of the cochlea contributes to frequency tuning, particularly in lower vertebrates, such as chickens and turtles. Differential splicing of Kcnma1, which encodes for the α subunit of the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (BK channel), has been suggested to affect the channel gating properties and is important for frequency tuning. Consequently, deficits in alternative splicing have been shown to cause hearing loss, as we can observe in Bronx Waltzer (bv) mice and Sfswap mutant mice. Despite the advances in this field, the regulation of alternative splicing in the inner ear remains elusive. Further investigation is also needed to clarify the mechanism of hearing loss caused by alternative splicing deficits. PMID:27376950

  11. Global analysis of alternative splicing differences between humans and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Calarco, John A; Xing, Yi; Cáceres, Mario; Calarco, Joseph P; Xiao, Xinshu; Pan, Qun; Lee, Christopher; Preuss, Todd M; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2007-11-15

    Alternative splicing is a powerful mechanism affording extensive proteomic and regulatory diversity from a limited repertoire of genes. However, the extent to which alternative splicing has contributed to the evolution of primate species-specific characteristics has not been assessed previously. Using comparative genomics and quantitative microarray profiling, we performed the first global analysis of alternative splicing differences between humans and chimpanzees. Surprisingly, 6%-8% of profiled orthologous exons display pronounced splicing level differences in the corresponding tissues from the two species. Little overlap is observed between the genes associated with alternative splicing differences and the genes that display steady-state transcript level differences, indicating that these layers of regulation have evolved rapidly to affect distinct subsets of genes in humans and chimpanzees. The alternative splicing differences we detected are predicted to affect diverse functions including gene expression, signal transduction, cell death, immune defense, and susceptibility to diseases. Differences in expression at the protein level of the major splice variant of Glutathione S-transferase omega-2 (GSTO2), which functions in the protection against oxidative stress and is associated with human aging-related diseases, suggests that this enzyme is less active in human cells compared with chimpanzee cells. The results of this study thus support an important role for alternative splicing in establishing differences between humans and chimpanzees. PMID:17978102

  12. Meayamycin Inhibits pre-mRNA Splicing and Exhibits Picomolar Activity Against Multidrug Resistant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Brian J.; McPherson, Peter A.; O'Brien, Kristine; Czaicki, Nancy L.; DeStefino, Vincent; Osman, Sami; Li, Miaosheng; Day, Billy W.; Grabowski, Paula J.; Moore, Melissa J.; Vogt, Andreas; Koide, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    FR901464 is a potent antitumor natural product that binds to the SF3b complex and inhibits pre-mRNA splicing. Its analogue, meayamycin, is two orders of magnitude more potent as an antiproliferative agent against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Here, we report the picomolar antiproliferative activity of meayamycin against various cancer cell lines and multidrug resistant cells. Time-dependence studies implied that meayamycin may form a covalent bond with its target protein(s). Meayamycin inhibited pre-mRNA splicing in HEK-293 cells but not alternative splicing in a neuronal system. Meayamycin exhibited specificity toward human lung cancer cells compared to non-tumorigenic human lung fibroblasts and retained picomolar growth inhibitory activity against multi-drug resistant cells. These data suggest that meayamycin is a useful chemical probe to study pre-mRNA splicing in live cells and is a promising lead as an anticancer agent. PMID:19671752

  13. Selection and Characterization of Pre-mRNA Splicing Enhancers: Identification of Novel SR Protein-Specific Enhancer Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schaal, Thomas D.; Maniatis, Tom

    1999-01-01

    Splicing enhancers are RNA sequences required for accurate splice site recognition and the control of alternative splicing. In this study, we used an in vitro selection procedure to identify and characterize novel RNA sequences capable of functioning as pre-mRNA splicing enhancers. Randomized 18-nucleotide RNA sequences were inserted downstream from a Drosophila doublesex pre-mRNA enhancer-dependent splicing substrate. Functional splicing enhancers were then selected by multiple rounds of in vitro splicing in nuclear extracts, reverse transcription, and selective PCR amplification of the spliced products. Characterization of the selected splicing enhancers revealed a highly heterogeneous population of sequences, but we identified six classes of recurring degenerate sequence motifs five to seven nucleotides in length including novel splicing enhancer sequence motifs. Analysis of selected splicing enhancer elements and other enhancers in S100 complementation assays led to the identification of individual enhancers capable of being activated by specific serine/arginine (SR)-rich splicing factors (SC35, 9G8, and SF2/ASF). In addition, a potent splicing enhancer sequence isolated in the selection specifically binds a 20-kDa SR protein. This enhancer sequence has a high level of sequence homology with a recently identified RNA-protein adduct that can be immunoprecipitated with an SRp20-specific antibody. We conclude that distinct classes of selected enhancers are activated by specific SR proteins, but there is considerable sequence degeneracy within each class. The results presented here, in conjunction with previous studies, reveal a remarkably broad spectrum of RNA sequences capable of binding specific SR proteins and/or functioning as SR-specific splicing enhancers. PMID:10022858

  14. A survey of splice variants of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase and DNA polymerase beta genes: products of alternative or aberrant splicing?

    PubMed Central

    Skandalis, Adonis; Uribe, Elke

    2004-01-01

    Errors during the pre-mRNA splicing of metazoan genes can degrade the transmission of genetic information, and have been associated with a variety of human diseases. In order to characterize the mutagenic and pathogenic potential of mis-splicing, we have surveyed and quantified the aberrant splice variants in the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) and DNA polymerase β (POLB) in the presence and the absence of the Nonsense Mediated Decay (NMD) pathway, which removes transcripts with premature termination codons. POLB exhibits a high frequency of splice variants (40–60%), whereas the frequency of HPRT splice variants is considerably lower (∼1%). Treatment of cells with emetine to inactivate NMD alters both the spectrum and frequency of splice variants of POLB and HPRT. It is not certain at this point, whether POLB and HPRT splice variants are the result of regulated alternative splicing processes or the result of aberrant splicing, but it appears likely that at least some of the variants are the result of splicing errors. Several mechanisms that may contribute to aberrant splicing are discussed. PMID:15601998

  15. Alternative splicing of human T-cell-specific MAL mRNA and its correlation with the exon/intron organization of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Rancano, C.; Rubio, T.; Alonso, M.A. )

    1994-05-15

    Sequence analysis of the T-cell-specific MAL gene revealed four exons, each encoding a hydrophobic, presumably membrane-associated, segment and its adjacent hydrophilic sequence. Amplification by the polymerase chain reaction of cDNA from different T-cell samples indicated the existence of four different forms of MAL mRNA, termed MAL-a, -b, -c, and -d, that arise from differential usage of exons II and/or III. As the three introns were located between complete codons, the reading frame was maintained in all the transcripts. A model resembling the structures postulated for different proteolipid proteins is proposed for the protein encoded by each alternative mRNA species. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  16. SPACE: an algorithm to predict and quantify alternatively spliced isoforms using microarrays.

    PubMed

    Anton, Miguel A; Gorostiaga, Dorleta; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Segura, Victor; Carmona-Saez, Pedro; Pascual-Montano, Alberto; Pio, Ruben; Montuenga, Luis M; Rubio, Angel

    2008-01-01

    Exon and exon+junction microarrays are promising tools for studying alternative splicing. Current analytical tools applied to these arrays lack two relevant features: the ability to predict unknown spliced forms and the ability to quantify the concentration of known and unknown isoforms. SPACE is an algorithm that has been developed to (1) estimate the number of different transcripts expressed under several conditions, (2) predict the precursor mRNA splicing structure and (3) quantify the transcript concentrations including unknown forms. The results presented here show its robustness and accuracy for real and simulated data. PMID:18312629

  17. Alternative Splicing of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor IgIII Loops in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Holzmann, Klaus; Grunt, Thomas; Heinzle, Christine; Sampl, Sandra; Steinhoff, Heinrich; Reichmann, Nicole; Kleiter, Miriam; Hauck, Marlene; Marian, Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing of the IgIII loop of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) 1–3 produces b- and c-variants of the receptors with distinctly different biological impact based on their distinct ligand-binding spectrum. Tissue-specific expression of these splice variants regulates interactions in embryonic development, tissue maintenance and repair, and cancer. Alterations in FGFR2 splicing are involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition that produces invasive, metastatic features during tumor progression. Recent research has elucidated regulatory factors that determine the splice choice both on the level of exogenous signaling events and on the RNA-protein interaction level. Moreover, methodology has been developed that will enable the in depth analysis of splicing events during tumorigenesis and provide further insight on the role of FGFR 1–3 IIIb and IIIc in the pathophysiology of various malignancies. This paper aims to summarize expression patterns in various tumor types and outlines possibilities for further analysis and application. PMID:22203889

  18. Different forms of Go alpha mRNA arise by alternative splicing of transcripts from a single gene on human chromosome 16.

    PubMed Central

    Murtagh, J J; Eddy, R; Shows, T B; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1991-01-01

    Go alpha, (gene symbol GNA01), a member of the signal-transducing guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein family, has been implicated in ion channel regulation. Some tissues contain multiple Go alpha mRNAs of different sizes that differ in the 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). Using sequence-specific 48-base oligonucleotides, two complementary to the different 3' UTRs and one complementary to the coding region, we investigated the origin of the multiple Go alpha transcripts, the organization of the Go alpha gene, the interspecies conservation of 3' UTRs, and the chromosomal localization of Go alpha. Oligonucleotides labeled to high specific activity by using terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase each hybridized with a single band of restriction enzyme-digested mouse and human DNAs. In three of four digests of human DNA, the two probes specific for the different 3' UTRs hybridized with the same restriction fragment. Thus, these nucleotide sequences are in close proximity in the human genome. The order of the UTRs in the bovine, human, and mouse genomes was confirmed directly by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing. Hybridization of bovine oligonucleotide sequence with mouse and human genomic DNA indicated a high degree of interspecies sequence conservation: conservation was confirmed by PCR amplification and sequencing. Bands detected by both UTR probes, as well as the predominant bands detected by a bovine Go alpha cDNA, segregated with human chromosome 16 on Southern blot analysis of human-mouse somatic cell hybrids. We conclude that Go alpha mRNAs with different 3' UTRs arise by alternative splicing of transcripts from a single gene. The UTRs, which exhibit a high degree of interspecies conservation, may play a role in regulation of Go alpha expression during differentiation or in specific tissues. The use of oligonucleotide probes of the type described here represents a new strategy, potentially widely applicable for mapping and elucidating

  19. In Vitro and In Vivo Modulation of Alternative Splicing by the Biguanide Metformin

    PubMed Central

    Laustriat, Delphine; Gide, Jacqueline; Barrault, Laetitia; Chautard, Emilie; Benoit, Clara; Auboeuf, Didier; Boland, Anne; Battail, Christophe; Artiguenave, François; Deleuze, Jean-François; Bénit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre; Franc, Sylvia; Charpentier, Guillaume; Furling, Denis; Bassez, Guillaume; Nissan, Xavier; Martinat, Cécile; Peschanski, Marc; Baghdoyan, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    Major physiological changes are governed by alternative splicing of RNA, and its misregulation may lead to specific diseases. With the use of a genome-wide approach, we show here that this splicing step can be modified by medication and demonstrate the effects of the biguanide metformin, on alternative splicing. The mechanism of action involves AMPK activation and downregulation of the RBM3 RNA-binding protein. The effects of metformin treatment were tested on myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1), a multisystemic disease considered to be a spliceopathy. We show that this drug promotes a corrective effect on several splicing defects associated with DM1 in derivatives of human embryonic stem cells carrying the causal mutation of DM1 as well as in primary myoblasts derived from patients. The biological effects of metformin were shown to be compatible with typical therapeutic dosages in a clinical investigation involving diabetic patients. The drug appears to act as a modifier of alternative splicing of a subset of genes and may therefore have novel therapeutic potential for many more diseases besides those directly linked to defective alternative splicing. PMID:26528939

  20. Alternative splicing: functional diversity among voltage-gated calcium channels and behavioral consequences.

    PubMed

    Lipscombe, Diane; Andrade, Arturo; Allen, Summer E

    2013-07-01

    Neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels generate rapid, transient intracellular calcium signals in response to membrane depolarization. Neuronal Ca(V) channels regulate a range of cellular functions and are implicated in a variety of neurological and psychiatric diseases including epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, chronic pain, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Each mammalian Cacna1 gene has the potential to generate tens to thousands of Ca(V) channels by alternative pre-mRNA splicing, a process that adds fine granulation to the pool of Ca(V) channel structures and functions. The precise composition of Ca(V) channel splice isoform mRNAs expressed in each cell are controlled by cell-specific splicing factors. The activity of splicing factors are in turn regulated by molecules that encode various cellular features, including cell-type, activity, metabolic states, developmental state, and other factors. The cellular and behavioral consequences of individual sites of Ca(V) splice isoforms are being elucidated, as are the cell-specific splicing factors that control splice isoform selection. Altered patterns of alternative splicing of Ca(V) pre-mRNAs can alter behavior in subtle but measurable ways, with the potential to influence drug efficacy and disease severity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels. PMID:23022282

  1. Alternative splicing: Functional diversity among voltage-gated calcium channels and behavioral consequences☆

    PubMed Central

    Lipscombe, Diane; Andrade, Arturo; Allen, Summer E.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels generate rapid, transient intracellular calcium signals in response to membrane depolarization. Neuronal CaV channels regulate a range of cellular functions and are implicated in a variety of neurological and psychiatric diseases including epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, chronic pain, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Each mammalian Cacna1 gene has the potential to generate tens to thousands of CaV channels by alternative pre-mRNA splicing, a process that adds fine granulation to the pool of CaV channel structures and functions. The precise composition of CaV channel splice isoform mRNAs expressed in each cell are controlled by cell-specific splicing factors. The activity of splicing factors are in turn regulated by molecules that encode various cellular features, including cell-type, activity, metabolic states, developmental state, and other factors. The cellular and behavioral consequences of individual sites of CaV splice isoforms are being elucidated, as are the cell-specific splicing factors that control splice isoform selection. Altered patterns of alternative splicing of CaV pre-mRNAs can alter behavior in subtle but measurable ways, with the potential to influence drug efficacy and disease severity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels. PMID:23022282

  2. Alternative splicing, a new target to block cellular gene expression by poliovirus 2A protease

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Enrique; Castello, Alfredo; Carrasco, Luis; Izquierdo, Jose M.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Novel role for poliovirus 2A protease as splicing modulator. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease inhibits the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease blocks the second catalytic step of splicing. -- Abstract: Viruses have developed multiple strategies to interfere with the gene expression of host cells at different stages to ensure their own survival. Here we report a new role for poliovirus 2A{sup pro} modulating the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Expression of 2A{sup pro} potently inhibits splicing of reporter genes in HeLa cells. Low amounts of 2A{sup pro} abrogate Fas exon 6 skipping, whereas higher levels of protease fully abolish Fas and FGFR2 splicing. In vitro splicing of MINX mRNA using nuclear extracts is also strongly inhibited by 2A{sup pro}, leading to accumulation of the first exon and the lariat product containing the unspliced second exon. These findings reveal that the mechanism of action of 2A{sup pro} on splicing is to selectively block the second catalytic step.

  3. Genome-wide profiling of alternative splicing in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Mitchell K.P.; Esiri, Margaret M.; Tan, Michelle G.K.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a highly regulated process which generates transcriptome and proteome diversity through the skipping or inclusion of exons within gene loci. Identification of aberrant alternative splicing associated with human diseases has become feasible with the development of new genomic technologies and powerful bioinformatics. We have previously reported genome-wide gene alterations in the neocortex of a well-characterized cohort of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and matched elderly controls using a commercial exon microarray platform [1]. Here, we provide detailed description of analyses aimed at identifying differential alternative splicing events associated with AD. PMID:26484111

  4. Genome-wide survey of Alternative Splicing in Sorghum Bicolor.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Bahman; Abbaszadeh, Bahram; Taghizadeghan, Mehdi; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2014-07-01

    Sorghum bicolor is a member of grass family which is an attractive model plant for genome study due to interesting genome features like low genome size. In this research, we performed comprehensive investigation of Alternative Splicing and ontology aspects of genes those have undergone these events in sorghum bicolor. We used homology based alignments between gene rich transcripts, represented by tentative consensus (TC) transcript sequences, and genomic scaffolds to deduce the structure of genes and identify alternatively spliced transcripts in sorghum. Using homology mapping of assembled expressed sequence tags with genomics data, we identified 2,137 Alternative Splicing events in S. bicolor. Our study showed that complex events and intron retention are the main types of Alternative Splicing events in S. bicolor and highlights the prevalence of splicing site recognition for definition of introns in this plant. Annotations of the alternatively spliced genes revealed that they represent diverse biological process and molecular functions, suggesting a fundamental role for Alternative Splicing in affecting the development and physiology of S. bicolor. PMID:25049459

  5. Genome-Wide Survey of Cold Stress Regulated Alternative Splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana with Tiling Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Leviatan, Noam; Alkan, Noam; Leshkowitz, Dena; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in expanding the potential informational content of eukaryotic genomes. It is an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism that can increase protein diversity and affect mRNA stability. Alternative splicing is often regulated in a tissue-specific and stress-responsive manner. Cold stress, which adversely affects plant growth and development, regulates the transcription and splicing of plant splicing factors. This can affect the pre-mRNA processing of many genes. To identify cold regulated alternative splicing we applied Affymetrix Arabidopsis tiling arrays to survey the transcriptome under cold treatment conditions. A novel algorithm was used for detection of statistically relevant changes in intron expression within a transcript between control and cold growth conditions. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of a number of randomly selected genes confirmed the changes in splicing patterns under cold stress predicted by tiling array. Our analysis revealed new types of cold responsive genes. While their expression level remains relatively unchanged under cold stress their splicing pattern shows detectable changes in the relative abundance of isoforms. The majority of cold regulated alternative splicing introduced a premature termination codon (PTC) into the transcripts creating potential targets for degradation by the nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) process. A number of these genes were analyzed in NMD-defective mutants by RT-PCR and shown to evade NMD. This may result in new and truncated proteins with altered functions or dominant negative effects. The results indicate that cold affects both quantitative and qualitative aspects of gene expression. PMID:23776682

  6. Alternative splicing of RNAs transcribed from the human c- myb gene

    SciTech Connect

    Shen-Ong, G.L.C.; Skurla, R.M. Jr.; Owens, J.D.; Mushinski, J.F. )

    1990-06-01

    An alternative splicing event in which a portion of the intron bounded by the vE6 and vE7 exons with v-{ital myb} homology is included as an additional 363-nucleotide coding exon (termed E6A or coding exon 9A) has been described for normal and tumor murine cells that express {ital myb}. The authors show that this alternative splicing event is conserved in human c-{ital myb} transcripts. In addition, another novel exon (termed E7A or coding exon 10A) is identified in human c-{ital myb} mRNAs expressed in normal and tumor cells. Although the {ital myb} protein isoform encoded by murine E6A-containing mRNA is larger than the major c-{ital myb} protein, the predicted products of both forms of human alternatively spliced {ital myb} transcripts are 3{prime}-truncated {ital myb} proteins that terminate in the alternative exons. These proteins are predicted to lack the same carboxy-terminal domains as the viral {ital myb} proteins encoded by avian myeloblastosis virus and E26 virus. The junction sequences that flank these exons closely resemble the consensus splice donor and splice acceptor sequences, yet the alternative transcripts are less abundant than is the major form of c-{ital myb} transcripts. The contribution that alternative splicing events in c-{ital myb} expression may make on c-{ital myb} function remains to be elucidated.

  7. Quantitative imaging of single mRNA splice variants in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyuwan; Cui, Yi; Lee, Luke P.; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Alternative messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing is a fundamental process of gene regulation, and errors in RNA splicing are known to be associated with a variety of different diseases. However, there is currently a lack of quantitative technologies for monitoring mRNA splice variants in cells. Here, we show that a combination of plasmonic dimer probes and hyperspectral imaging can be used to detect and quantify mRNA splice variants in living cells. The probes are made from gold nanoparticles functionalized with oligonucleotides and can hybridize to specific mRNA sequences, forming nanoparticle dimers that exhibit distinct spectral shifts due to plasmonic coupling. With this approach, we show that the spatial and temporal distribution of three selected splice variants of the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1, can be monitored at single-copy resolution by measuring the hybridization dynamics of the nanoplasmonic dimers. Our study provides insights into RNA and its transport in living cells, which could improve our understanding of cellular protein complexes, pharmacogenomics, genetic diagnosis and gene therapies.

  8. RNA splicing. The human splicing code reveals new insights into the genetic determinants of disease.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hui Y; Alipanahi, Babak; Lee, Leo J; Bretschneider, Hannes; Merico, Daniele; Yuen, Ryan K C; Hua, Yimin; Gueroussov, Serge; Najafabadi, Hamed S; Hughes, Timothy R; Morris, Quaid; Barash, Yoseph; Krainer, Adrian R; Jojic, Nebojsa; Scherer, Stephen W; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Frey, Brendan J

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate precision medicine and whole-genome annotation, we developed a machine-learning technique that scores how strongly genetic variants affect RNA splicing, whose alteration contributes to many diseases. Analysis of more than 650,000 intronic and exonic variants revealed widespread patterns of mutation-driven aberrant splicing. Intronic disease mutations that are more than 30 nucleotides from any splice site alter splicing nine times as often as common variants, and missense exonic disease mutations that have the least impact on protein function are five times as likely as others to alter splicing. We detected tens of thousands of disease-causing mutations, including those involved in cancers and spinal muscular atrophy. Examination of intronic and exonic variants found using whole-genome sequencing of individuals with autism revealed misspliced genes with neurodevelopmental phenotypes. Our approach provides evidence for causal variants and should enable new discoveries in precision medicine. PMID:25525159

  9. Nuclear matrix protein Matrin3 regulates alternative splicing and forms overlapping regulatory networks with PTB

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Miguel B; Attig, Jan; Bellora, Nicolás; König, Julian; Hallegger, Martina; Kayikci, Melis; Eyras, Eduardo; Ule, Jernej; Smith, Christopher WJ

    2015-01-01

    Matrin3 is an RNA- and DNA-binding nuclear matrix protein found to be associated with neural and muscular degenerative diseases. A number of possible functions of Matrin3 have been suggested, but no widespread role in RNA metabolism has yet been clearly demonstrated. We identified Matrin3 by its interaction with the second RRM domain of the splicing regulator PTB. Using a combination of RNAi knockdown, transcriptome profiling and iCLIP, we find that Matrin3 is a regulator of hundreds of alternative splicing events, principally acting as a splicing repressor with only a small proportion of targeted events being co-regulated by PTB. In contrast to other splicing regulators, Matrin3 binds to an extended region within repressed exons and flanking introns with no sharply defined peaks. The identification of this clear molecular function of Matrin3 should help to clarify the molecular pathology of ALS and other diseases caused by mutations of Matrin3. PMID:25599992

  10. Identification of important long non-coding RNAs and highly recurrent aberrant alternative splicing events in hepatocellular carcinoma through integrative analysis of multiple RNA-Seq datasets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Liu, Xiaoqiao; Zhang, Xuegong; Chen, Ronghua

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive and deadly cancer. The molecular pathogenesis of the disease remains poorly understood. To better understand HCC biology and explore potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets, we investigated the whole transcriptome of HCC. Considering the genetic heterogeneity of HCC, four datasets from four studies consisting of 15 pairs of HCC and adjacent normal samples were analyzed. We observed that the number of lncRNAs expressed in each HCC sample was consistently greater than the adjacent normal sample. Moreover, 15 lncRNAs were identified expressed in five to seven HCC tissues but were not detected in any adjacent normal tissue. Differential expression analysis detected 35 up- and 80 down-regulated lncRNAs in HCC samples compared with adjacent normal samples. In addition, five differentially expressed lncRNAs were predicted to play a role in oxidation and reduction process. With regard to splicing alterations, we identified nine highly recurrent differential splicing events belonging to eight genes USO1, RPS24, CCDC50, THNSL2, NUMB, FN1 (two events), SLC39A14 and NR1I3. Of them, splicing alterations of SLC39A14 and NR1I3 were reported for the association with HCC for the first time. The splicing dysregulation in HCC may be influenced by three splicing factors ESRP2, CELF2 and SRSF5 which were significantly down-regulated in HCC samples. This study revealed uncharacterized aspects of HCC transcriptome and identified important lncRNAs and splicing isoforms with the potential to serve as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for the disease. PMID:26711644

  11. Validation of alternative transcript splicing in chicken lines that differ in genetic resistance to Marek’s disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Utilizing RNA-seq data, 1,574 candidate genes with alternative splicing were previously identified between two chicken lines that differ in Marek’s disease (MD) genetic resistance under control and Marek’s disease virus infection conditions. After filtering out 1,530 genes with splice variants in th...

  12. Should pharmacologists care about alternative splicing? IUPHAR Review 4

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, T I

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of mRNAs occurs in the majority of human genes, and most differential splicing results in different protein isoforms with possibly different functional properties. However, there are many reported splicing variations that may be quite rare, and not all combinatorially possible variants of a given gene are expressed at significant levels. Genes of interest to pharmacologists are frequently expressed at such low levels that they are not adequately represented in genome-wide studies of transcription. In single-gene studies, data are commonly available on the relative abundance and functional significance of individual alternatively spliced exons, but there are rarely data that quantitate the relative abundance of full-length transcripts and define which combinations of exons are significant. A number of criteria for judging the significance of splice variants and suggestions for their nomenclature are discussed. PMID:24670145

  13. Transfer RNA splicing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: defining the substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, R C; Lee, M C; Knapp, G

    1984-01-01

    The primary sequences of all the tRNA precursors which contain intervening sequences and which accumulate in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae rnal mutant are presented. A combination of DNA and RNA sequence analysis has led to elucidation of the primary sequence of four hitherto uncharacterized precursors. The location of the intervening sequence has in all cases been unambiguously determined by analysis of the intermediates in the splicing reaction. Secondary structures based upon the tRNA cloverleaf are shown for all the tRNA precursors and discussed with respect to common recognition by the yeast splicing endonuclease. Images PMID:6096826

  14. Lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched alternative exon promotes glioblastoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Ferrarese, Roberto; Harsh, Griffith R.; Yadav, Ajay K.; Bug, Eva; Maticzka, Daniel; Reichardt, Wilfried; Dombrowski, Stephen M.; Miller, Tyler E.; Masilamani, Anie P.; Dai, Fangping; Kim, Hyunsoo; Hadler, Michael; Scholtens, Denise M.; Yu, Irene L.Y.; Beck, Jürgen; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Costa, Fabrizio; Baxan, Nicoleta; Pfeifer, Dietmar; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Backofen, Rolf; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Duarte, Christine W.; He, Xiaolin; Prinz, Marco; Chandler, James P.; Vogel, Hannes; Chakravarti, Arnab; Rich, Jeremy N.; Carro, Maria S.; Bredel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing is critical for the emergence of tissue identity during development, yet the role of this process in malignant transformation is undefined. Tissue-specific splicing involves evolutionarily conserved, alternative exons that represent only a minority of the total alternative exons identified. Many of these conserved exons have functional features that influence signaling pathways to profound biological effect. Here, we determined that lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched cassette exon in the membrane-binding tumor suppressor annexin A7 (ANXA7) diminishes endosomal targeting of the EGFR oncoprotein, consequently enhancing EGFR signaling during brain tumor progression. ANXA7 exon splicing was mediated by the ribonucleoprotein PTBP1, which is normally repressed during neuronal development. PTBP1 was highly expressed in glioblastomas due to loss of a brain-enriched microRNA (miR-124) and to PTBP1 amplification. The alternative ANXA7 splicing trait was present in precursor cells, suggesting that glioblastoma cells inherit the trait from a potential tumor-initiating ancestor and that these cells exploit this trait through accumulation of mutations that enhance EGFR signaling. Our data illustrate that lineage-specific splicing of a tissue-regulated alternative exon in a constituent of an oncogenic pathway eliminates tumor suppressor functions and promotes glioblastoma progression. This paradigm may offer a general model as to how tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms can reprogram normal developmental processes into oncogenic ones. PMID:24865424

  15. Lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched alternative exon promotes glioblastoma progression.

    PubMed

    Ferrarese, Roberto; Harsh, Griffith R; Yadav, Ajay K; Bug, Eva; Maticzka, Daniel; Reichardt, Wilfried; Dombrowski, Stephen M; Miller, Tyler E; Masilamani, Anie P; Dai, Fangping; Kim, Hyunsoo; Hadler, Michael; Scholtens, Denise M; Yu, Irene L Y; Beck, Jürgen; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Costa, Fabrizio; Baxan, Nicoleta; Pfeifer, Dietmar; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Backofen, Rolf; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Duarte, Christine W; He, Xiaolin; Prinz, Marco; Chandler, James P; Vogel, Hannes; Chakravarti, Arnab; Rich, Jeremy N; Carro, Maria S; Bredel, Markus

    2014-07-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing is critical for the emergence of tissue identity during development, yet the role of this process in malignant transformation is undefined. Tissue-specific splicing involves evolutionarily conserved, alternative exons that represent only a minority of the total alternative exons identified. Many of these conserved exons have functional features that influence signaling pathways to profound biological effect. Here, we determined that lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched cassette exon in the membrane-binding tumor suppressor annexin A7 (ANXA7) diminishes endosomal targeting of the EGFR oncoprotein, consequently enhancing EGFR signaling during brain tumor progression. ANXA7 exon splicing was mediated by the ribonucleoprotein PTBP1, which is normally repressed during neuronal development. PTBP1 was highly expressed in glioblastomas due to loss of a brain-enriched microRNA (miR-124) and to PTBP1 amplification. The alternative ANXA7 splicing trait was present in precursor cells, suggesting that glioblastoma cells inherit the trait from a potential tumor-initiating ancestor and that these cells exploit this trait through accumulation of mutations that enhance EGFR signaling. Our data illustrate that lineage-specific splicing of a tissue-regulated alternative exon in a constituent of an oncogenic pathway eliminates tumor suppressor functions and promotes glioblastoma progression. This paradigm may offer a general model as to how tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms can reprogram normal developmental processes into oncogenic ones. PMID:24865424

  16. Comprehensive exon array data processing method for quantitative analysis of alternative spliced variants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ping; Lepikhova, Tatiana; Hu, Yizhou; Monni, Outi; Hautaniemi, Sampsa

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA generates protein diversity. Dysfunction of splicing machinery and expression of specific transcripts has been linked to cancer progression and drug response. Exon microarray technology enables genome-wide quantification of expression levels of the majority of exons and facilitates the discovery of alternative splicing events. Analysis of exon array data is more challenging than the analysis of gene expression data and there is a need for reliable quantification of exons and alternatively spliced variants. We introduce a novel, computationally efficient methodology, Multiple Exon Array Preprocessing (MEAP), for exon array data pre-processing, analysis and visualization. We compared MEAP with existing pre-processing methods, and validation of six exons and two alternatively spliced variants with qPCR corroborated MEAP expression estimates. Analysis of exon array data from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines revealed several transcripts associated with 11q13 amplification, which is related with decreased survival and metastasis in HNSCC patients. Our results demonstrate that MEAP produces reliable expression values at exon, alternatively spliced variant and gene levels, which allows generating novel experimentally testable predictions. PMID:21745820

  17. Expression proteomics of UPF1 knockdown in HeLa cells reveals autoregulation of hnRNP A2/B1 mediated by alternative splicing resulting in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In addition to acting as an RNA quality control pathway, nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) plays roles in regulating normal gene expression. In particular, the extent to which alternative splicing is coupled to NMD and the roles of NMD in regulating uORF containing transcripts have been a matter of debate. Results In order to achieve a greater understanding of NMD regulated gene expression we used 2D-DiGE proteomics technology to examine the changes in protein expression induced in HeLa cells by UPF1 knockdown. QPCR based validation of the corresponding mRNAs, in response to both UPF1 knockdown and cycloheximide treatment, identified 17 bona fide NMD targets. Most of these were associated with bioinformatically predicted NMD activating features, predominantly upstream open reading frames (uORFs). Strikingly, however, the majority of transcripts up-regulated by UPF1 knockdown were either insensitive to, or even down-regulated by, cycloheximide treatment. Furthermore, the mRNA abundance of several down-regulated proteins failed to change upon UPF1 knockdown, indicating that UPF1's role in regulating mRNA and protein abundance is more complex than previously appreciated. Among the bona fide NMD targets, we identified a highly conserved AS-NMD event within the 3' UTR of the HNRNPA2B1 gene. Overexpression of GFP tagged hnRNP A2 resulted in a decrease in endogenous hnRNP A2 and B1 mRNA with a concurrent increase in the NMD sensitive isoforms. Conclusions Despite the large number of changes in protein expression upon UPF1 knockdown, a relatively small fraction of them can be directly attributed to the action of NMD on the corresponding mRNA. From amongst these we have identified a conserved AS-NMD event within HNRNPA2B1 that appears to mediate autoregulation of HNRNPA2B1 expression levels. PMID:20946641

  18. Identification of alternatively spliced mRNAs encoding potential new regulatory proteins in cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersen, S; Carpenter, S; Christensen, J; Storgaard, T; Viuff, B; Wannemuehler, Y; Belousov, J; Roth, J A

    1993-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction was used to detect and characterize low-abundance bovine leukemia virus (BLV) mRNAs. In infected cattle we could detect spliced mRNA with a splice pattern consistent with a Tax/Rex mRNA, as well as at least four alternatively spliced RNAs. Two of the alternatively spliced mRNAs encoded hitherto unrecognized BLV proteins, designated RIII and GIV. The Tax/Rex and alternatively spliced mRNAs could be detected at their highest levels in BLV-infected cell cultures; the next highest levels were found in samples from calves experimentally infected at 6 weeks postinoculation. Alternatively spliced mRNAs were also expressed, albeit at lower levels, in naturally infected animals; they were detected by a nested polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, the GIV mRNA was specifically detected in naturally infected cows with persistent lymphocytosis and in two of five calves at 6 months after experimental infection with BLV. Furthermore, the calf with the strongest signal for GIV had the highest lymphocyte counts. These data may suggest a correlation between expression of the GIV product and development of persistent lymphocytosis. Some of the donor and acceptor sites in the alternatively spliced mRNAs were highly unusual. The biological mechanisms and significance of such a choice of unexpected splice sites are currently unknown. Images PMID:8380084

  19. U2AF1 Mutations Alter Sequence Specificity of pre-mRNA Binding and Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Okeyo-Owuor, Theresa; White, Brian S.; Chatrikhi, Rakesh; Mohan, Dipika R.; Kim, Sanghyun; Griffith, Malachi; Ding, Li; Ketkar-Kulkarni, Shamika; Hundal, Jasreet; Laird, Kholiswa M.; Kielkopf, Clara L.; Ley, Timothy J.; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified missense mutations in the U2AF1 splicing factor affecting codons S34 (S34F and S34Y) or Q157 (Q157R and Q157P) in 11% of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Although the role of U2AF1 as an accessory factor in the U2 snRNP is well established, it is not yet clear how mutations affect splicing or contribute to MDS pathophysiology. We analyzed splice junctions in RNA-seq data generated from transfected CD34+ hematopoietic cells and found significant differences in the abundance of known and novel junctions in samples expressing mutant U2AF1 (S34F). For selected transcripts, splicing alterations detected by RNA-seq were confirmed by analysis of primary de novo MDS patient samples. These effects were not due to impaired U2AF1 (S34F) localization as it co-localized normally with U2AF2 within nuclear speckles. We further found evidence in the RNA-seq data for decreased affinity of U2AF1 (S34F) for uridine (relative to cytidine) at the e-3 position immediately upstream of the splice acceptor site and corroborated this finding using affinity binding assays. These data suggest that the S34F mutation alters U2AF1 function in the context of specific RNA sequences, leading to aberrant alternative splicing of target genes, some of which may be relevant for MDS pathogenesis. PMID:25311244

  20. Monitoring Alternative Splicing Changes in Arabidopsis Circadian Clock Genes.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Craig G; Fuller, John; Calixto, Cristiane P G; McNicol, Jim; Booth, Clare; Brown, John W S; Staiger, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional control makes an important contribution to circadian regulation of gene expression. In higher plants, alternative splicing is particularly prevalent upon abiotic and biotic stress and in the circadian system. Here we describe in detail a high-resolution reverse transcription-PCR based panel (HR RT-PCR) to monitor alternative splicing events. The use of the panel allows the quantification of changes in the proportion of splice isoforms between different samples, e.g., different time points, different tissues, genotypes, ecotypes, or treatments. PMID:26867620

  1. In vitro Splicing of Influenza Viral NS1 mRNA and NS1-β -globin Chimeras: Possible Mechanisms for the Control of Viral mRNA Splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotch, Stephen J.; Krug, Robert M.

    1986-08-01

    In influenza virus-infected cells, the splicing of the viral NS1 mRNA catalyzed by host nuclear enzymes is controlled so that the steady-state amount of the spliced NS2 mRNA is only 5-10% of that of the unspliced NS1 mRNA. Here we examine the splicing of NS1 mRNA in vitro, using nuclear extracts from HeLa cells. We show that in addition to its consensus 5' and 3' splice sites, NS1 mRNA has an intron branch-point adenosine residue that was functional in lariat formation. Nonetheless, this RNA was not detectably spliced in vitro under conditions in which a human β -globin precursor was efficiently spliced. Using chimeric RNA precursors containing both NS1 and β -globin sequences, we show that the NS1 5' splice site was effectively utilized by the β -globin branch-point sequence and 3' splice site to form a spliced RNA, whereas the NS1 3' splice site did not function in detectable splicing in vitro, even in the presence of the β -globin branch-point sequence or in the presence of both the branch-point sequence and 5' exon and splice site from β -globin With the chimeric precursors that were not detectably spliced, as with NS1 mRNA itself, a low level of a lariat structure containing only intron and not 3' exon sequences was formed. The inability of the consensus 3' splice site of NS1 mRNA to function effectively in in vitro splicing suggests that this site is structurally inaccessible to components of the splicing machinery. Based on these results, we propose two mechanisms whereby NS1 mRNA splicing in infected cells is controlled via the accessibility of its 3' splice site.

  2. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dlamini, Zodwa; Tshidino, Shonisani C.; Hull, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets. PMID:26580598

  3. Modulation of alternative splicing with chemical compounds in new therapeutics for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Ohe, Kenji; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2015-04-17

    Alternative splicing is a critical step where a limited number of human genes generate a complex and diverse proteome. Various diseases, including inherited diseases with abnormalities in the "genome code," have been found to result in an aberrant mis-spliced "transcript code" with correlation to the resulting phenotype. Chemical compound-based and nucleic acid-based strategies are trying to target this mis-spliced "transcript code". We will briefly mention about how to obtain splicing-modifying-compounds by high-throughput screening and overview of what is known about compounds that modify splicing pathways. The main focus will be on RNA-binding protein kinase inhibitors. In the main text, we will refer to diseases where splicing-modifying-compounds have been intensively investigated, with comparison to nucleic acid-based strategies. The information on their involvement in mis-splicing as well as nonsplicing events will be helpful in finding better compounds with less off-target effects for future implications in mis-splicing therapy. PMID:25560473

  4. Multiple interdependent sequence elements control splicing of a fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 alternative exon.

    PubMed Central

    Del Gatto, F; Plet, A; Gesnel, M C; Fort, C; Breathnach, R

    1997-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene contains a pair of mutually exclusive alternative exons, one of which (K-SAM) is spliced specifically in epithelial cells. We have described previously (F. Del Gatto and R. Breathnach, Mol. Cell. Biol. 15:4825-4834, 1995) some elements controlling K-SAM exon splicing, namely weak exon splice sites, an exon-repressing sequence, and an intron-activating sequence. We identify here two additional sequences in the intron downstream from the K-SAM exon which activate splicing of the exon. The first sequence (intron-activating sequence 2 [IAS2]) lies 168 to 186 nucleotides downstream from the exon's 5' splice site. The second sequence (intron-activating sequence 3 [IAS3]) lies 933 to 1,052 nucleotides downstream from the exon's 5' splice site. IAS3 is a complex region composed of several parts, one of which (nucleotides 963 to 983) can potentially form an RNA secondary structure with IAS2. This structure is composed of two stems separated by an asymmetric bulge. Mutations which disrupt either stem decrease activation, while compensatory mutations which reestablish the stem restore activation, either completely or partially, depending on the mutation. We present a model for K-SAM exon splicing involving the intervention of multiple, interdependent pre-mRNA sequence elements. PMID:9271388

  5. Depolarization and CaM kinase IV modulate NMDA receptor splicing through two essential RNA elements.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Ann; Xing, Yi; Nguyen, David; Xie, Jiuyong; Lee, Christopher J; Black, Douglas L

    2007-02-01

    Alternative splicing controls the activity of many proteins important for neuronal excitation, but the signal-transduction pathways that affect spliced isoform expression are not well understood. One particularly interesting system of alternative splicing is exon 21 (E21) of the NMDA receptor 1 (NMDAR1 E21), which controls the trafficking of NMDA receptors to the plasma membrane and is repressed by Ca(++)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) IV signaling. Here, we characterize the splicing of NMDAR1 E21. We find that E21 splicing is reversibly repressed by neuronal depolarization, and we identify two RNA elements within the exon that function together to mediate the inducible repression. One of these exonic elements is similar to an intronic CaMK IV-responsive RNA element (CaRRE) originally identified in the 3' splice site of the BK channel STREX exon, but not previously observed within an exon. The other element is a new RNA motif. Introduction of either of these two motifs, called CaRRE type 1 and CaRRE type 2, into a heterologous constitutive exon can confer CaMK IV-dependent repression on the new exon. Thus, either exonic CaRRE can be sufficient for CaMK IV-induced repression. Single nucleotide scanning mutagenesis defined consensus sequences for these two CaRRE motifs. A genome-wide motif search and subsequent RT-PCR validation identified a group of depolarization-regulated alternative exons carrying CaRRE consensus sequences. Many of these exons are likely to alter neuronal function. Thus, these two RNA elements define a group of co-regulated splicing events that respond to a common stimulus in neurons to alter their activity. PMID:17298178

  6. CLASS2: accurate and efficient splice variant annotation from RNA-seq reads.

    PubMed

    Song, Li; Sabunciyan, Sarven; Florea, Liliana

    2016-06-01

    Next generation sequencing of cellular RNA is making it possible to characterize genes and alternative splicing in unprecedented detail. However, designing bioinformatics tools to accurately capture splicing variation has proven difficult. Current programs can find major isoforms of a gene but miss lower abundance variants, or are sensitive but imprecise. CLASS2 is a novel open source tool for accurate genome-guided transcriptome assembly from RNA-seq reads based on the model of splice graph. An extension of our program CLASS, CLASS2 jointly optimizes read patterns and the number of supporting reads to score and prioritize transcripts, implemented in a novel, scalable and efficient dynamic programming algorithm. When compared against reference programs, CLASS2 had the best overall accuracy and could detect up to twice as many splicing events with precision similar to the best reference program. Notably, it was the only tool to produce consistently reliable transcript models for a wide range of applications and sequencing strategies, including ribosomal RNA-depleted samples. Lightweight and multi-threaded, CLASS2 requires <3GB RAM and can analyze a 350 million read set within hours, and can be widely applied to transcriptomics studies ranging from clinical RNA sequencing, to alternative splicing analyses, and to the annotation of new genomes. PMID:26975657

  7. CLASS2: accurate and efficient splice variant annotation from RNA-seq reads

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li; Sabunciyan, Sarven; Florea, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing of cellular RNA is making it possible to characterize genes and alternative splicing in unprecedented detail. However, designing bioinformatics tools to accurately capture splicing variation has proven difficult. Current programs can find major isoforms of a gene but miss lower abundance variants, or are sensitive but imprecise. CLASS2 is a novel open source tool for accurate genome-guided transcriptome assembly from RNA-seq reads based on the model of splice graph. An extension of our program CLASS, CLASS2 jointly optimizes read patterns and the number of supporting reads to score and prioritize transcripts, implemented in a novel, scalable and efficient dynamic programming algorithm. When compared against reference programs, CLASS2 had the best overall accuracy and could detect up to twice as many splicing events with precision similar to the best reference program. Notably, it was the only tool to produce consistently reliable transcript models for a wide range of applications and sequencing strategies, including ribosomal RNA-depleted samples. Lightweight and multi-threaded, CLASS2 requires <3GB RAM and can analyze a 350 million read set within hours, and can be widely applied to transcriptomics studies ranging from clinical RNA sequencing, to alternative splicing analyses, and to the annotation of new genomes. PMID:26975657

  8. Widespread Expansion of Protein Interaction Capabilities by Alternative Splicing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinping; Coulombe-Huntington, Jasmin; Kang, Shuli; Sheynkman, Gloria M; Hao, Tong; Richardson, Aaron; Sun, Song; Yang, Fan; Shen, Yun A; Murray, Ryan R; Spirohn, Kerstin; Begg, Bridget E; Duran-Frigola, Miquel; MacWilliams, Andrew; Pevzner, Samuel J; Zhong, Quan; Trigg, Shelly A; Tam, Stanley; Ghamsari, Lila; Sahni, Nidhi; Yi, Song; Rodriguez, Maria D; Balcha, Dawit; Tan, Guihong; Costanzo, Michael; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles; Zhou, Xianghong J; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Charloteaux, Benoit; Chen, Alyce A; Calderwood, Michael A; Aloy, Patrick; Roth, Frederick P; Hill, David E; Iakoucheva, Lilia M; Xia, Yu; Vidal, Marc

    2016-02-11

    While alternative splicing is known to diversify the functional characteristics of some genes, the extent to which protein isoforms globally contribute to functional complexity on a proteomic scale remains unknown. To address this systematically, we cloned full-length open reading frames of alternatively spliced transcripts for a large number of human genes and used protein-protein interaction profiling to functionally compare hundreds of protein isoform pairs. The majority of isoform pairs share less than 50% of their interactions. In the global context of interactome network maps, alternative isoforms tend to behave like distinct proteins rather than minor variants of each other. Interaction partners specific to alternative isoforms tend to be expressed in a highly tissue-specific manner and belong to distinct functional modules. Our strategy, applicable to other functional characteristics, reveals a widespread expansion of protein interaction capabilities through alternative splicing and suggests that many alternative "isoforms" are functionally divergent (i.e., "functional alloforms"). PMID:26871637

  9. A Subtle Alternative Splicing Event Gives Rise to a Widely Expressed Human RNase k Isoform

    PubMed Central

    Karousis, Evangelos D.; Sideris, Diamantis C.

    2014-01-01

    Subtle alternative splicing leads to the formation of RNA variants lacking or including a small number of nucleotides. To date, the impact of subtle alternative splicing phenomena on protein biosynthesis has been studied in frame-preserving incidents. On the contrary, mRNA isoforms derived from frame-shifting events were poorly studied and generally characterized as non-coding. This work provides evidence for a frame-shifting subtle alternative splicing event which results in the production of a novel protein isoform. We applied a combined molecular approach for the cloning and expression analysis of a human RNase κ transcript (RNase κ-02) which lacks four consecutive bases compared to the previously isolated RNase κ isoform. RNase κ-02 mRNA is expressed in all human cell lines tested end encodes the synthesis of a 134-amino-acid protein by utilizing an alternative initiation codon. The expression of RNase κ-02 in the cytoplasm of human cells was verified by Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis using a specific polyclonal antibody developed on the basis of the amino-acid sequence difference between the two protein isoforms. The results presented here show that subtle changes during mRNA splicing can lead to the expression of significantly altered protein isoforms. PMID:24797913

  10. Long noncoding RNA Saf and splicing factor 45 increase soluble Fas and resistance to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Riberdy, Janice M.; Persons, Derek A.; Wilber, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, cell growth and differentiation is controlled in part by programmed cell death or apoptosis. One major apoptotic pathway is triggered by Fas receptor (Fas)-Fas ligand (FasL) interaction. Neoplastic cells are frequently resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis, evade Fas signals through down regulation of Fas and produce soluble Fas proteins that bind FasL thereby blocking apoptosis. Soluble Fas (sFas) is an alternative splice product of Fas pre-mRNA, commonly created by exclusion of transmembrane spanning sequences encoded within exon 6 (FasΔEx6). Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) interact with other RNAs, DNA, and proteins to regulate gene expression. One lncRNA, Fas-antisense or Saf, was shown to participate in alternative splicing of Fas pre-mRNA through unknown mechanisms. We show that Saf is localized in the nucleus where it interacts with Fas receptor pre-mRNA and human splicing factor 45 (SPF45) to facilitate alternative splicing and exclusion of exon 6. The product is a soluble Fas protein that protects cells against FasL-induced apoptosis. Collectively, these studies reveal a novel mechanism to modulate this critical cell death program by an lncRNA and its protein partner. PMID:26885613

  11. Long noncoding RNA Saf and splicing factor 45 increase soluble Fas and resistance to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Olga; Chambers, Christopher B; Riberdy, Janice M; Persons, Derek A; Wilber, Andrew

    2016-03-22

    In multicellular organisms, cell growth and differentiation is controlled in part by programmed cell death or apoptosis. One major apoptotic pathway is triggered by Fas receptor (Fas)-Fas ligand (FasL) interaction. Neoplastic cells are frequently resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis, evade Fas signals through down regulation of Fas and produce soluble Fas proteins that bind FasL thereby blocking apoptosis. Soluble Fas (sFas) is an alternative splice product of Fas pre-mRNA, commonly created by exclusion of transmembrane spanning sequences encoded within exon 6 (FasΔEx6). Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) interact with other RNAs, DNA, and proteins to regulate gene expression. One lncRNA, Fas-antisense or Saf, was shown to participate in alternative splicing of Fas pre-mRNA through unknown mechanisms. We show that Saf is localized in the nucleus where it interacts with Fas receptor pre-mRNA and human splicing factor 45 (SPF45) to facilitate alternative splicing and exclusion of exon 6. The product is a soluble Fas protein that protects cells against FasL-induced apoptosis. Collectively, these studies reveal a novel mechanism to modulate this critical cell death program by an lncRNA and its protein partner. PMID:26885613

  12. The evolutionary landscape of alternative splicing in vertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Morais, Nuno L; Irimia, Manuel; Pan, Qun; Xiong, Hui Y; Gueroussov, Serge; Lee, Leo J; Slobodeniuc, Valentina; Kutter, Claudia; Watt, Stephen; Colak, Recep; Kim, TaeHyung; Misquitta-Ali, Christine M; Wilson, Michael D; Kim, Philip M; Odom, Duncan T; Frey, Brendan J; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2012-12-21

    How species with similar repertoires of protein-coding genes differ so markedly at the phenotypic level is poorly understood. By comparing organ transcriptomes from vertebrate species spanning ~350 million years of evolution, we observed significant differences in alternative splicing complexity between vertebrate lineages, with the highest complexity in primates. Within 6 million years, the splicing profiles of physiologically equivalent organs diverged such that they are more strongly related to the identity of a species than they are to organ type. Most vertebrate species-specific splicing patterns are cis-directed. However, a subset of pronounced splicing changes are predicted to remodel protein interactions involving trans-acting regulators. These events likely further contributed to the diversification of splicing and other transcriptomic changes that underlie phenotypic differences among vertebrate species. PMID:23258890

  13. Alternative splicing of a group II intron in a surface layer protein gene in Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Bonnie A; Simon, Dawn M; Zimmerly, Steven

    2014-02-01

    Group II introns are ribozymes and retroelements found in bacteria, and are thought to have been the ancestors of nuclear pre-mRNA introns. Whereas nuclear introns undergo prolific alternative splicing in some species, group II introns are not known to carry out equivalent reactions. Here we report a group II intron in the human pathogen Clostridium tetani, which undergoes four alternative splicing reactions in vivo. Together with unspliced transcript, five mRNAs are produced, each encoding a distinct surface layer protein isoform. Correct fusion of exon reading frames requires a shifted 5' splice site located 8 nt upstream of the canonical boundary motif. The shifted junction is accomplished by an altered IBS1-EBS1 pairing between the intron and 5' exon. Growth of C. tetani under a variety of conditions did not result in large changes in alternative splicing levels, raising the possibility that alternative splicing is constitutive. This work demonstrates a novel type of gene organization and regulation in bacteria, and provides an additional parallel between group II and nuclear pre-mRNA introns. PMID:24214997

  14. Sam68 Regulates S6K1 Alternative Splicing during Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jingwen

    2015-01-01

    The requirement for alternative splicing during adipogenesis is poorly understood. The Sam68 RNA binding protein is a known regulator of alternative splicing, and mice deficient for Sam68 exhibit adipogenesis defects due to defective mTOR signaling. Sam68 null preadipocytes were monitored for alternative splicing imbalances in components of the mTOR signaling pathway. Herein, we report that Sam68 regulates isoform expression of the ribosomal S6 kinase gene (Rps6kb1). Sam68-deficient adipocytes express Rps6kb1-002 and its encoded p31S6K1 protein, in contrast to wild-type adipocytes that do not express this isoform. Sam68 binds an RNA sequence encoded by Rps6kb1 intron 6 and prevents serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1)-mediated alternative splicing of Rps6kb1-002, as assessed by cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) and minigene assays. Depletion of p31S6K1 with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) partially restored adipogenesis of Sam68-deficient preadipocytes. The ectopic expression of p31S6K1 in wild-type 3T3-L1 cells resulted in adipogenesis differentiation defects, showing that p31S6K1 is an inhibitor of adipogenesis. Our findings indicate that Sam68 is required to prevent the expression of p31S6K1 in adipocytes for adipogenesis to occur. PMID:25776557

  15. The exosome controls alternative splicing by mediating the gene expression and assembly of the spliceosome complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Wan, Yufeng; Huang, Guobin; Wang, Dongni; Yu, Xinyang; Huang, Guocun; Guo, Jinhu

    2015-01-01

    The exosome is a complex with exoribonuclease activity that regulates RNA surveillance and turnover. The exosome also plays a role in regulating the degradation of precursor mRNAs to maintain the expression of splicing variants. In Neurospora, the silencing of rrp44, which encodes the catalytic subunit of the exosome, changed the expression of a set of spliceosomal snRNA, snRNP genes and SR protein related genes. The knockdown of rrp44 also affected the assembly of the spliceosome. RNA-seq analysis revealed a global change in bulk splicing events. Exosome-mediated splicing may regulate alternative splicing of NCU05290, NCU07421 and the circadian clock gene frequency (frq). The knockdown of rrp44 led to an increased ratio of splicing variants without intron 6 (I-6) and shorter protein isoform small FRQ (s-FRQ) as a consequence. These findings suggest that the exosome controls splicing events by regulating the degradation of precursor mRNAs and the gene expression, assembly and function of the spliceosome. PMID:26306464

  16. Evolution of alternative splicing regulation: changes in predicted exonic splicing regulators are not associated with changes in alternative splicing levels in primates.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Roy, Scott William

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing is tightly regulated in a spatio-temporal and quantitative manner. This regulation is achieved by a complex interplay between spliceosomal (trans) factors that bind to different sequence (cis) elements. cis-elements reside in both introns and exons and may either enhance or silence splicing. Differential combinations of cis-elements allows for a huge diversity of overall splicing signals, together comprising a complex 'splicing code'. Many cis-elements have been identified, and their effects on exon inclusion levels demonstrated in reporter systems. However, the impact of interspecific differences in these elements on the evolution of alternative splicing levels has not yet been investigated at genomic level. Here we study the effect of interspecific differences in predicted exonic splicing regulators (ESRs) on exon inclusion levels in human and chimpanzee. For this purpose, we compiled and studied comprehensive datasets of predicted ESRs, identified by several computational and experimental approaches, as well as microarray data for changes in alternative splicing levels between human and chimpanzee. Surprisingly, we found no association between changes in predicted ESRs and changes in alternative splicing levels. This observation holds across different ESR exon positions, exon lengths, and 5' splice site strengths. We suggest that this lack of association is mainly due to the great importance of context for ESR functionality: many ESR-like motifs in primates may have little or no effect on splicing, and thus interspecific changes at short-time scales may primarily occur in these effectively neutral ESRs. These results underscore the difficulties of using current computational ESR prediction algorithms to identify truly functionally important motifs, and provide a cautionary tale for studies of the effect of SNPs on splicing in human disease. PMID:19495418

  17. Neuronal regulation of pre-mRNA splicing by polypyrimidine tract binding proteins, PTBP1 and PTBP2

    PubMed Central

    Keppetipola, Niroshika; Sharma, Shalini; Li, Qin; Black, Douglas L.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing patterns are regulated by RNA binding proteins that assemble onto each pre-mRNA to form a complex RNP structure. The polypyrimidine tract binding protein, PTB, has served as an informative model for understanding how RNA binding proteins affect spliceosome assembly and how changes in the expression of these proteins can control complex programs of splicing in tissues. In this review, we describe the mechanisms of splicing regulation by PTB and its function, along with its paralog PTBP2, in neuronal development. PMID:22655688

  18. The ASRG database: identification and survey of Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing-Bing; Brendel, Volker

    2004-01-01

    A total of 74 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) genes and 395 genes encoding splicing-related proteins were identified in the Arabidopsis genome by sequence comparison and motif searches, including the previously elusive U4atac snRNA gene. Most of the genes have not been studied experimentally. Classification of these genes and detailed information on gene structure, alternative splicing, gene duplications and phylogenetic relationships are made accessible as a comprehensive database of Arabidopsis Splicing Related Genes (ASRG) on our website. PMID:15575968

  19. DARPP-32 binds to tra2-beta1 and influences alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Benderska, Natalya; Becker, Kristina; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Becker, Cord-Michael; Andreadis, Athena; Stamm, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The majority of human genes undergo alternative splicing, which is frequently altered in response to physiological stimuli. DARPP-32 (Dopamine and cAMP regulated phosphoprotein, 32 kD) is a component of PKA-dependent signaling pathways. Here we show that DARPP-32 binds directly to the splicing factor tra2-beta1 (transformer 2). DARPP-32 changes the usage of tra2-beta1 dependent alternative exons in a concentration dependent manner, suggesting that the DARPP-32:tra2-beta1 interaction is a molecular link between signaling pathways and pre-mRNA processing. PMID:20074680

  20. Rbm24 Regulates Alternative Splicing Switch in Embryonic Stem Cell Cardiac Lineage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Lin, Yu; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Zi Guan; Fu, Wei; Guo, Li Yan; Pan, Lei; Kong, Xu; Zhang, Meng Kai; Lu, Ying Hua; Huang, Zheng Rong; Xie, Qiang; Li, Wei Hua; Xu, Xiu Qin

    2016-07-01

    The transition of embryonic stem cell (ESC) pluripotency to differentiation is accompanied by an expansion of mRNA and proteomic diversity. Post-transcriptional regulation of ESCs is critically governed by cell type-specific splicing. However, little is known about the splicing factors and the molecular mechanisms directing ESC early lineage differentiation. Our study identifies RNA binding motif protein 24 (Rbm24) as a key splicing regulator that plays an essential role in controlling post-transcriptional networks during ESC transition into cardiac differentiation. Using an inducible mouse ESC line in which gene expression could be temporally regulated, we demonstrated that forced expression of Rbm24 in ESCs dramatically induced a switch to cardiac specification. Genome-wide RNA sequencing analysis identified more than 200 Rbm24-regulated alternative splicing events (AS) which occurred in genes essential for the ESC pluripotency or differentiation. Remarkably, AS genes regulated by Rbm24 composed of transcriptional factors, cytoskeleton proteins, and ATPase gene family members which are critical components required for cardiac development and functionality. Furthermore, we show that Rbm24 regulates ESC differentiation by promoting alternative splicing of pluripotency genes. Among the Rbm24-regulated events, Tpm1, an actin filament family gene, was identified to possess ESC/tissue specific isoforms. We demonstrated that these isoforms were functionally distinct and that their exon AS switch was essential for ESC differentiation. Our results suggest that ESC's switching into the differentiation state can be initiated by a tissue-specific splicing regulator, Rbm24. This finding offers a global view on how an RNA binding protein influences ESC lineage differentiation by a splicing-mediated regulatory mechanism. Stem Cells 2016;34:1776-1789. PMID:26990106

  1. A secreted form of the human lymphocyte cell surface molecule CD8 arises from alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Giblin, P.; Kavathas, P. ); Ledbetter, J.A. )

    1989-02-01

    The human lymphocyte differentiation antigen CD8 is encoded by a single gene that gives rise to a 33- to 34-kDa glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface as a dimer and in higher molecular mass forms. The authors demonstrate that the mRNA is alternatively spliced so that an exon encoding a transmembrane domain is deleted. This gives rise to a 30-kDa molecule that is secreted and exists primarily as a monomer. mRNA corresponding to both forms is present in peripheral blood lymphocytes, Con A-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes, and three CD8{sup +} T-cell lines, with the membrane form being the major species. However, differences in the ratio of mRNA for membrane CD8 and secreted CD8 exist. In addition, the splicing pattern observed differs from the pattern found for the mouse CD8 gene. This mRNA is also alternatively spliced, but an exon encoding a cytoplasmic region is deleted, giving rise to a cell surface molecule that differs in its cytoplasmic tail from the protein encoded by the longer mRNA. Neither protein is secreted. This is one of the first examples of a different splicing pattern between two homologous mouse and human genes giving rise to very different proteins. This represents one mechanism of generating diversity during speciation.

  2. Spinal morphine but not ziconotide or gabapentin analgesia is affected by alternative splicing of voltage-gated calcium channel CaV2.2 pre-mRNA.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu-Qiu; Andrade, Arturo; Lipscombe, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Presynaptic voltage-gated calcium Ca(V)2.2 channels play a privileged role in spinal level sensitization following peripheral nerve injury. Direct and indirect inhibitors of Ca(V)2.2 channel activity in spinal dorsal horn are analgesic in chronic pain states. Ca(V)2.2 channels represent a family of splice isoforms that are expressed in different combinations according to cell-type. A pair of mutually exclusive exons in the Ca(V)2.2 encoding Cacna1b gene, e37a and e37b, differentially influence morphine analgesia. In mice that lack exon e37a, which is enriched in nociceptors, the analgesic efficacy of intrathecal morphine against noxious thermal stimuli is reduced. Here we ask if sequences unique to e37a influence: the development of abnormal thermal and mechanical sensitivity associated with peripheral nerve injury; and the actions of two other classes of analgesics that owe part or all of their efficacy to Ca(V)2.2 channel inhibition. We find that: i) the analgesic efficacy of morphine, but not ziconotide or gabapentin, is reduced in mice lacking e37a, ii) the induction and maintenance of behaviors associated with sensitization that accompany peripheral nerve injury, do not require e37a-specific sequence, iii) intrathecal morphine, but not ziconotide or gabapentin analgesia to thermal stimuli is significantly lower in wild-type mice after peripheral nerve injury, iv) the analgesic efficacy of ziconotide and gabapentin to mechanical stimuli is reduced following nerve injury, and iv) intrathecal morphine analgesia to thermal stimuli in mice lacking e37a is not further reduced by peripheral nerve injury. Our findings show that the analgesic action of morphine, but not ziconotide or gabapentin, to thermal stimuli is linked to which Cacna1b exon, e37a or e37b, is selected during alternative pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:24369063

  3. Regulation of alternative splicing of CD45 by antagonistic effects of SR protein splicing factors.

    PubMed

    ten Dam, G B; Zilch, C F; Wallace, D; Wieringa, B; Beverley, P C; Poels, L G; Screaton, G R

    2000-05-15

    CD45 is a transmembrane glycoprotein possessing tyrosine phosphatase activity, which is involved in cell signaling. CD45 is expressed on the surface of most leukocytes and can be alternatively spliced by the inclusion or skipping of three variable exons (4, 5, and 6 or A, B, and C) to produce up to eight isoforms. In T cells, the splicing pattern of CD45 isoforms changes after activation; naive cells express high m.w. isoforms of CD45 which predominantly express exon A (CD45RA), whereas activated cells lose expression of exon A to form low m.w. isoforms of CD45 including CD45RO. Little is known about the specific factors controlling the switch in CD45 splicing which occurs on activation. In this study, we examined the influence of the SR family of splicing factors, which, like CD45, are expressed in tissue-specific patterns and have been shown to modulate the alternative splicing of a variety of transcripts. We show that specific SR proteins have antagonistic effects on CD45 splicing, leading either to exon inclusion or skipping. Furthermore, we were able to demonstrate specific changes in the SR protein expression pattern during T cell activation. PMID:10799890

  4. Convergence of Acquired Mutations and Alternative Splicing of CD19 Enables Resistance to CART-19 Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sotillo, Elena; Barrett, David M.; Black, Kathryn L; Bagashev, Asen; Oldridge, Derek; Wu, Glendon; Sussman, Robyn; Lanauze, Claudia; Ruella, Marco; Gazzara, Matthew R.; Martinez, Nicole M.; Harrington, Colleen T.; Chung, Elaine Y.; Perazzelli, Jessica; Hofmann, Ted J.; Maude, Shannon L.; Raman, Pichai; Barrera, Alejandro; Gill, Saar; Lacey, Simon F.; Melenhorst, Jan J.; Allman, David; Jacoby, Elad; Fry, Terry; Mackall, Crystal; Barash, Yoseph; Lynch, Kristen W.; Maris, John M.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Thomas-Tikhonenko, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    The CD19 antigen, expressed on most B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALL), can be targeted with chimeric antigen receptor–armed T cells (CART-19), but relapses with epitope loss occur in 10% to 20% of pediatric responders. We detected hemizygous deletions spanning the CD19 locus and de novo frameshift and missense mutations in exon 2 of CD19 in some relapse samples. However, we also discovered alternatively spliced CD19 mRNA species, including one lacking exon 2. Pull-down/siRNA experiments identified SRSF3 as a splicing factor involved in exon 2 retention, and its levels were lower in relapsed B-ALL. Using genome editing, we demonstrated that exon 2 skipping bypasses exon 2 mutations in B-ALL cells and allows expression of the N-terminally truncated CD19 variant, which fails to trigger killing by CART-19 but partly rescues defects associated with CD19 loss. Thus, this mechanism of resistance is based on a combination of deleterious mutations and ensuing selection for alternatively spliced RNA isoforms. Significance CART-19 yield 70% response rates in patients with B-ALL, but also produce escape variants. We discovered that the underlying mechanism is the selection for preexisting alternatively spliced CD19 isoforms with the compromised CART-19 epitope. This mechanism suggests a possibility of targeting alternative CD19 ectodomains, which could improve survival of patients with B-cell neoplasms. PMID:26516065

  5. FineSplice, enhanced splice junction detection and quantification: a novel pipeline based on the assessment of diverse RNA-Seq alignment solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, Alberto; Torroja-Fungairiño, Carlos; Mazzarotto, Francesco; Cook, Stuart A.; Barton, Paul J. R.; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is the main mechanism governing protein diversity. The recent developments in RNA-Seq technology have enabled the study of the global impact and regulation of this biological process. However, the lack of standardized protocols constitutes a major bottleneck in the analysis of alternative splicing. This is particularly important for the identification of exon–exon junctions, which is a critical step in any analysis workflow. Here we performed a systematic benchmarking of alignment tools to dissect the impact of design and method on the mapping, detection and quantification of splice junctions from multi-exon reads. Accordingly, we devised a novel pipeline based on TopHat2 combined with a splice junction detection algorithm, which we have named FineSplice. FineSplice allows effective elimination of spurious junction hits arising from artefactual alignments, achieving up to 99% precision in both real and simulated data sets and yielding superior F1 scores under most tested conditions. The proposed strategy conjugates an efficient mapping solution with a semi-supervised anomaly detection scheme to filter out false positives and allows reliable estimation of expressed junctions from the alignment output. Ultimately this provides more accurate information to identify meaningful splicing patterns. FineSplice is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/p/finesplice/. PMID:24574529

  6. FineSplice, enhanced splice junction detection and quantification: a novel pipeline based on the assessment of diverse RNA-Seq alignment solutions.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Alberto; Torroja-Fungairiño, Carlos; Mazzarotto, Francesco; Cook, Stuart A; Barton, Paul J R; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique

    2014-04-01

    Alternative splicing is the main mechanism governing protein diversity. The recent developments in RNA-Seq technology have enabled the study of the global impact and regulation of this biological process. However, the lack of standardized protocols constitutes a major bottleneck in the analysis of alternative splicing. This is particularly important for the identification of exon-exon junctions, which is a critical step in any analysis workflow. Here we performed a systematic benchmarking of alignment tools to dissect the impact of design and method on the mapping, detection and quantification of splice junctions from multi-exon reads. Accordingly, we devised a novel pipeline based on TopHat2 combined with a splice junction detection algorithm, which we have named FineSplice. FineSplice allows effective elimination of spurious junction hits arising from artefactual alignments, achieving up to 99% precision in both real and simulated data sets and yielding superior F1 scores under most tested conditions. The proposed strategy conjugates an efficient mapping solution with a semi-supervised anomaly detection scheme to filter out false positives and allows reliable estimation of expressed junctions from the alignment output. Ultimately this provides more accurate information to identify meaningful splicing patterns. FineSplice is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/p/finesplice/. PMID:24574529

  7. Activation of muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase and binding to dystroglycan are regulated by alternative mRNA splicing of agrin.

    PubMed

    Scotton, Patrick; Bleckmann, Dorothee; Stebler, Michael; Sciandra, Francesca; Brancaccio, Andrea; Meier, Thomas; Stetefeld, Jörg; Ruegg, Markus A

    2006-12-01

    Agrin induces the aggregation of postsynaptic proteins at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). This activity requires the receptor-tyrosine kinase MuSK. Agrin isoforms differ in short amino acid stretches at two sites, called A and B, that are localized in the two most C-terminal laminin G (LG) domains. Importantly, agrin isoforms greatly differ in their activities of inducing MuSK phosphorylation and of binding to alpha-dystroglycan. By using site-directed mutagenesis, we characterized the amino acids important for these activities of agrin. We find that the conserved tripeptide asparagineglutamate-isoleucine in the eight-amino acid long insert at the B-site is necessary and sufficient for full MuSK phosphorylation activity. However, even if all eight amino acids were replaced by alanines, this agrin mutant still has significantly higher MuSK phosphorylation activity than the splice version lacking any insert. We also show that binding to alpha-dystroglycan requires at least two LG domains and that amino acid inserts at the A and the B splice sites negatively affect binding. PMID:17012237

  8. Conserved mechanism of tRNA splicing in eukaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Zillmann, M; Gorovsky, M A; Phizicky, E M

    1991-01-01

    The ligation steps of tRNA splicing in yeast and vertebrate cells have been thought to proceed by fundamentally different mechanisms. Ligation in yeast cells occurs by incorporation of an exogenous phosphate from ATP into the splice junction, with concomitant formation of a 2' phosphate at the 5' junction nucleotide. This phosphate is removed in a subsequent step which, in vitro, is catalyzed by an NAD-dependent dephosphorylating activity. In contrast, tRNA ligation in vertebrates has been reported to occur without incorporation of exogenous phosphate or formation of a 2' phosphate. We demonstrate in this study the existence of a yeast tRNA ligase-like activity in HeLa cells. Furthermore, in extracts from these cells, the entire yeastlike tRNA splicing machinery is intact, including that for cleavage, ligation, and removal of the 2' phosphate in an NAD-dependent fashion to give mature tRNA. These results argue that the mechanism of tRNA splicing is conserved among eukaryotes. Images PMID:1922054

  9. Alternative Splicing of Neuronal Differentiation Factor TRF2 Regulated by HNRNPH1/H2.

    PubMed

    Grammatikakis, Ioannis; Zhang, Peisu; Panda, Amaresh C; Kim, Jiyoung; Maudsley, Stuart; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Yang, Xiaoling; Martindale, Jennifer L; Motiño, Omar; Hutchison, Emmette R; Mattson, Mark P; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-05-01

    During neuronal differentiation, use of an alternative splice site on the rat telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) mRNA generates a short TRF2 protein isoform (TRF2-S) capable of derepressing neuronal genes. However, the RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) controlling this splicing event are unknown. Here, using affinity pull-down analysis, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins H1 and H2(HNRNPH) as RBPs specifically capable of interacting with the spliced RNA segment (exon 7) of Trf2 pre-mRNA. HNRNPH proteins prevent the production of the short isoform of Trf2 mRNA, as HNRNPH silencing selectively elevates TRF2-S levels. Accordingly, HNRNPH levels decline while TRF2-S levels increase during neuronal differentiation. In addition, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of hnRNPH2 selectively accelerates the NGF-triggered differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma cells into neurons. In sum, HNRNPH is a splicing regulator of Trf2 pre-mRNA that prevents the expression of TRF2-S, a factor implicated in neuronal differentiation. PMID:27117401

  10. From single-cell to cell-pool transcriptomes: stochasticity in gene expression and RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; McCue, Ken; Schroth, Gary P; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M; Wold, Barbara J

    2014-03-01

    Single-cell RNA-seq mammalian transcriptome studies are at an early stage in uncovering cell-to-cell variation in gene expression, transcript processing and editing, and regulatory module activity. Despite great progress recently, substantial challenges remain, including discriminating biological variation from technical noise. Here we apply the SMART-seq single-cell RNA-seq protocol to study the reference lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. By using spike-in quantification standards, we estimate the absolute number of RNA molecules per cell for each gene and find significant variation in total mRNA content: between 50,000 and 300,000 transcripts per cell. We directly measure technical stochasticity by a pool/split design and find that there are significant differences in expression between individual cells, over and above technical variation. Specific gene coexpression modules were preferentially expressed in subsets of individual cells, including one enriched for mRNA processing and splicing factors. We assess cell-to-cell variation in alternative splicing and allelic bias and report evidence of significant differences in splice site usage that exceed splice variation in the pool/split comparison. Finally, we show that transcriptomes from small pools of 30-100 cells approach the information content and reproducibility of contemporary RNA-seq from large amounts of input material. Together, our results define an experimental and computational path forward for analyzing gene expression in rare cell types and cell states. PMID:24299736

  11. Coordinated Dynamics of RNA Splicing Speckles in the Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Kota, Krishna P; Alam, Samer G; Nickerson, Jeffrey A; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2016-06-01

    Despite being densely packed with chromatin, nuclear bodies and a nucleoskeletal network, the nucleus is a remarkably dynamic organelle. Chromatin loops form and relax, RNA transcripts and transcription factors move diffusively, and nuclear bodies move. We show here that RNA splicing speckled domains (splicing speckles) fluctuate in constrained nuclear volumes and remodel their shapes. Small speckles move in a directed way toward larger speckles with which they fuse. This directed movement is reduced upon decreasing cellular ATP levels or inhibiting RNA polymerase II activity. The random movement of speckles is reduced upon decreasing cellular ATP levels, moderately reduced after inhibition of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling and modestly increased upon inhibiting RNA polymerase II activity. To define the paths through which speckles can translocate in the nucleus, we generated a pressure gradient to create flows in the nucleus. In response to the pressure gradient, speckles moved along curvilinear paths in the nucleus. Collectively, our results demonstrate a new type of ATP-dependent motion in the nucleus. We present a model where recycling splicing factors return as part of small sub-speckles from distal sites of RNA processing to larger splicing speckles by a directed ATP-driven mechanism through interchromatin spaces. PMID:26496460

  12. Conserved alternative splicing and expression patterns of arthropod N-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shu-Ning; Yonekura, Shinichi; Ting, Chun-Yuan; Robertson, Hugh M; Iwai, Youichi; Uemura, Tadashi; Lee, Chi-Hon; Chiba, Akira

    2009-04-01

    Metazoan development requires complex mechanisms to generate cells with diverse function. Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA not only expands proteomic diversity but also provides a means to regulate tissue-specific molecular expression. The N-Cadherin gene in Drosophila contains three pairs of mutually-exclusive alternatively-spliced exons (MEs). However, no significant differences among the resulting protein isoforms have been successfully demonstrated in vivo. Furthermore, while the N-Cadherin gene products exhibit a complex spatiotemporal expression pattern within embryos, its underlying mechanisms and significance remain unknown. Here, we present results that suggest a critical role for alternative splicing in producing a crucial and reproducible complexity in the expression pattern of arthropod N-Cadherin. We demonstrate that the arthropod N-Cadherin gene has maintained the three sets of MEs for over 400 million years using in silico and in vivo approaches. Expression of isoforms derived from these MEs receives precise spatiotemporal control critical during development. Both Drosophila and Tribolium use ME-13a and ME-13b in "neural" and "mesodermal" splice variants, respectively. As proteins, either ME-13a- or ME-13b-containing isoform can cell-autonomously rescue the embryonic lethality caused by genetic loss of N-Cadherin. Ectopic muscle expression of either isoform beyond the time it normally ceases leads to paralysis and lethality. Together, our results offer an example of well-conserved alternative splicing increasing cellular diversity in metazoans. PMID:19343204

  13. Species-specific alternative splicing generates a catalytically inactive form of human hormone-sensitive lipase.

    PubMed

    Laurell, H; Grober, J; Vindis, C; Lacombe, T; Dauzats, M; Holm, C; Langin, D

    1997-11-15

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyses the rate-limiting step of adipose tissue lipolysis. The enzyme is also expressed in steroidogenic tissues, mammary gland, muscle tissues and macrophages. A novel HSL mRNA termed hHSL-S, 228 bp shorter than the full-length HSL mRNA, was detected in human adipocytes. hHSL-S mRNA results from the in-frame skipping of exon 6, which encodes the serine residue of the catalytic triad. The corresponding 80 kDa protein was identified in human adipocytes after immunoprecipitation. The truncated protein expressed in COS cells showed neither lipase nor esterase activity but was phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. hHSL-S mRNA was found in all human tissues expressing HSL, except brown adipose tissue from newborns. It represented approx. 20% of total HSL transcripts in human subcutaneous adipocytes. No alternative splicing was detected in other mammals. Human and mouse three-exon HSL minigenes transfected into primate and rodent cell lines reproduced the splicing pattern of the endogenous HSL genes. Analysis of hybrid human/mouse minigenes transfected into human cell lines showed that cis-acting elements responsible for the skipping of human exon 6 were restricted to a 247 bp region including exon 6 and the first 19 nt of intron 6. Moreover, divergence in exonic splicing elements between mouse and human was shown to be critical for the species-specific alternative splicing. PMID:9359844

  14. Alternative splicing of the androgen receptor in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangfang; Pan, Jiexue; Liu, Ye; Meng, Qing; Lv, Pingping; Qu, Fan; Ding, Guo-Lian; Klausen, Christian; Leung, Peter C K; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Yao, Weimiao; Zhou, Cai-Yun; Shi, Biwei; Zhang, Junyu; Sheng, Jianzhong; Huang, Hefeng

    2015-04-14

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common female endocrine disorders and a leading cause of female subfertility. The mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of PCOS remains to be illustrated. Here, we identify two alternative splice variants (ASVs) of the androgen receptor (AR), insertion and deletion isoforms, in granulosa cells (GCs) in ∼62% of patients with PCOS. AR ASVs are strongly associated with remarkable hyperandrogenism and abnormalities in folliculogenesis, and are absent from all control subjects without PCOS. Alternative splicing dramatically alters genome-wide AR recruitment and androgen-induced expression of genes related to androgen metabolism and folliculogenesis in human GCs. These findings establish alternative splicing of AR in GCs as the major pathogenic mechanism for hyperandrogenism and abnormal folliculogenesis in PCOS. PMID:25825716

  15. Reversion to an embryonic alternative splicing program enhances leukemia stem cell self-renewal.

    PubMed

    Holm, Frida; Hellqvist, Eva; Mason, Cayla N; Ali, Shawn A; Delos-Santos, Nathaniel; Barrett, Christian L; Chun, Hye-Jung; Minden, Mark D; Moore, Richard A; Marra, Marco A; Runza, Valeria; Frazer, Kelly A; Sadarangani, Anil; Jamieson, Catriona H M

    2015-12-15

    Formative research suggests that a human embryonic stem cell-specific alternative splicing gene regulatory network, which is repressed by Muscleblind-like (MBNL) RNA binding proteins, is involved in cell reprogramming. In this study, RNA sequencing, splice isoform-specific quantitative RT-PCR, lentiviral transduction, and in vivo humanized mouse model studies demonstrated that malignant reprogramming of progenitors into self-renewing blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells (BC LSCs) was partially driven by decreased MBNL3. Lentiviral knockdown of MBNL3 resulted in reversion to an embryonic alternative splice isoform program typified by overexpression of CD44 transcript variant 3, containing variant exons 8-10, and BC LSC proliferation. Although isoform-specific lentiviral CD44v3 overexpression enhanced chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitor replating capacity, lentiviral shRNA knockdown abrogated these effects. Combined treatment with a humanized pan-CD44 monoclonal antibody and a breakpoint cluster region - ABL proto-oncogene 1, nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (BCR-ABL1) antagonist inhibited LSC maintenance in a niche-dependent manner. In summary, MBNL3 down-regulation-related reversion to an embryonic alternative splicing program, typified by CD44v3 overexpression, represents a previously unidentified mechanism governing malignant progenitor reprogramming in malignant microenvironments and provides a pivotal opportunity for selective BC LSC detection and therapeutic elimination. PMID:26621726

  16. Staying on Message: Ensuring Fidelity in Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Semlow, Daniel R.; Jonathan P. Staley

    2012-01-01

    The faithful expression of genes requires that cellular machinery select substrates with high specificity at each step in gene expression. High specificity is particularly important at the stage of nuclear pre-mRNA splicing, during which the spliceosome selects splice sites and excises intervening introns. With low specificity, the usage of alternative sites would yield insertions, deletions and frame shifts in messenger RNA. Recently, biochemical, genetic and genome-wide approaches have significantly advanced our understanding of splicing fidelity. In particular, we have learned that DExD/H-box ATPases play a general role in rejecting and discarding suboptimal substrates and that these factors serve as a paradigm for proofreading NTPases in other systems. Recent advances have also defined fundamental questions for future investigations. PMID:22564363

  17. Staying on message: ensuring fidelity in pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Semlow, Daniel R; Staley, Jonathan P

    2012-07-01

    The faithful expression of genes requires that cellular machinery select substrates with high specificity at each step in gene expression. High specificity is particularly important at the stage of nuclear pre-mRNA splicing, during which the spliceosome selects splice sites and excises intervening introns. With low specificity, the usage of alternative sites would yield insertions, deletions and frame shifts in mRNA. Recently, biochemical, genetic and genome-wide approaches have significantly advanced our understanding of splicing fidelity. In particular, we have learned that DExD/H-box ATPases play a general role in rejecting and discarding suboptimal substrates and that these factors serve as a paradigm for proofreading NTPases in other systems. Recent advances have also defined fundamental questions for future investigations. PMID:22564363

  18. Meta-Analysis of Multiple Sclerosis Microarray Data Reveals Dysregulation in RNA Splicing Regulatory Genes.

    PubMed

    Paraboschi, Elvezia Maria; Cardamone, Giulia; Rimoldi, Valeria; Gemmati, Donato; Spreafico, Marta; Duga, Stefano; Soldà, Giulia; Asselta, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in RNA metabolism and alternative splicing (AS) are emerging as important players in complex disease phenotypes. In particular, accumulating evidence suggests the existence of pathogenic links between multiple sclerosis (MS) and altered AS, including functional studies showing that an imbalance in alternatively-spliced isoforms may contribute to disease etiology. Here, we tested whether the altered expression of AS-related genes represents a MS-specific signature. A comprehensive comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of publicly-available microarray datasets (190 MS cases, 182 controls), followed by gene-ontology enrichment analysis, highlighted a significant enrichment for differentially-expressed genes involved in RNA metabolism/AS. In detail, a total of 17 genes were found to be differentially expressed in MS in multiple datasets, with CELF1 being dysregulated in five out of seven studies. We confirmed CELF1 downregulation in MS (p=0.0015) by real-time RT-PCRs on RNA extracted from blood cells of 30 cases and 30 controls. As a proof of concept, we experimentally verified the unbalance in alternatively-spliced isoforms in MS of the NFAT5 gene, a putative CELF1 target. In conclusion, for the first time we provide evidence of a consistent dysregulation of splicing-related genes in MS and we discuss its possible implications in modulating specific AS events in MS susceptibility genes. PMID:26437396

  19. Robust detection of alternative splicing in a population of single cells.

    PubMed

    Welch, Joshua D; Hu, Yin; Prins, Jan F

    2016-05-01

    Single cell RNA-seq experiments provide valuable insight into cellular heterogeneity but suffer from low coverage, 3' bias and technical noise. These unique properties of single cell RNA-seq data make study of alternative splicing difficult, and thus most single cell studies have restricted analysis of transcriptome variation to the gene level. To address these limitations, we developed SingleSplice, which uses a statistical model to detect genes whose isoform usage shows biological variation significantly exceeding technical noise in a population of single cells. Importantly, SingleSplice is tailored to the unique demands of single cell analysis, detecting isoform usage differences without attempting to infer expression levels for full-length transcripts. Using data from spike-in transcripts, we found that our approach detects variation in isoform usage among single cells with high sensitivity and specificity. We also applied SingleSplice to data from mouse embryonic stem cells and discovered a set of genes that show significant biological variation in isoform usage across the set of cells. A subset of these isoform differences are linked to cell cycle stage, suggesting a novel connection between alternative splicing and the cell cycle. PMID:26740580

  20. Eukaryotic TPP riboswitch regulation of alternative splicing involving long-distance base pairing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sanshu; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2013-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitches are found in organisms from all three domains of life. Examples in bacteria commonly repress gene expression by terminating transcription or by blocking ribosome binding, whereas most eukaryotic TPP riboswitches are predicted to regulate gene expression by modulating RNA splicing. Given the widespread distribution of eukaryotic TPP riboswitches and the diversity of their locations in precursor messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs), we sought to examine the mechanism of alternative splicing regulation by a fungal TPP riboswitch from Neurospora crassa, which is mostly located in a large intron separating protein-coding exons. Our data reveal that this riboswitch uses a long-distance (∼530-nt separation) base-pairing interaction to regulate alternative splicing. Specifically, a portion of the TPP-binding aptamer can form a base-paired structure with a conserved sequence element (α) located near a 5′ splice site, which greatly increases use of this 5′ splice site and promotes gene expression. Comparative sequence analyses indicate that many fungal species carry a TPP riboswitch with similar intron architecture, and therefore the homologous genes in these fungi are likely to use the same mechanism. Our findings expand the scope of genetic control mechanisms relying on long-range RNA interactions to include riboswitches. PMID:23376932

  1. Simultaneous quantification of alternatively spliced transcripts in a single droplet digital PCR reaction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing; Tao, Lian; Zheng, Yun-Ling

    2014-06-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is an essential component required for telomerase activity and telomere maintenance. Several alternatively spliced forms of hTERT mRNA have been reported in human primary and tumor cells. Currently, however, there is no sensitive and accurate method for the simultaneous quantification of multiple alternatively spliced RNA transcripts, such as in the case of hTERT. Here we show droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) provides sensitive, simultaneous digital quantification in a single reaction of two alternatively spliced single deletion hTERT transcripts (α-/β+ and α+/β-) as well as the opportunity to manually quantify non-deletion (α+/β+) and double deletion (α-/β-) transcripts. Our ddPCR method enables direct comparison among four alternatively spliced mRNAs without the need for internal standards or multiple primer pairs specific for each variant as real-time PCR (qPCR) requires, thus eliminating potential variation due to differences in PCR amplification efficiency. PMID:24924392

  2. Sec16 alternative splicing dynamically controls COPII transport efficiency.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmi, Ilka; Kanski, Regina; Neumann, Alexander; Herdt, Olga; Hoff, Florian; Jacob, Ralf; Preußner, Marco; Heyd, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The transport of secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi depends on COPII-coated vesicles. While the basic principles of the COPII machinery have been identified, it remains largely unknown how COPII transport is regulated to accommodate tissue- or activation-specific differences in cargo load and identity. Here we show that activation-induced alternative splicing of Sec16 controls adaptation of COPII transport to increased secretory cargo upon T-cell activation. Using splice-site blocking morpholinos and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering, we show that the number of ER exit sites, COPII dynamics and transport efficiency depend on Sec16 alternative splicing. As the mechanistic basis, we suggest the C-terminal Sec16 domain to be a splicing-controlled protein interaction platform, with individual isoforms showing differential abilities to recruit COPII components. Our work connects the COPII pathway with alternative splicing, adding a new regulatory layer to protein secretion and its adaptation to changing cellular environments. PMID:27492621

  3. Sec16 alternative splicing dynamically controls COPII transport efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmi, Ilka; Kanski, Regina; Neumann, Alexander; Herdt, Olga; Hoff, Florian; Jacob, Ralf; Preußner, Marco; Heyd, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The transport of secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi depends on COPII-coated vesicles. While the basic principles of the COPII machinery have been identified, it remains largely unknown how COPII transport is regulated to accommodate tissue- or activation-specific differences in cargo load and identity. Here we show that activation-induced alternative splicing of Sec16 controls adaptation of COPII transport to increased secretory cargo upon T-cell activation. Using splice-site blocking morpholinos and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering, we show that the number of ER exit sites, COPII dynamics and transport efficiency depend on Sec16 alternative splicing. As the mechanistic basis, we suggest the C-terminal Sec16 domain to be a splicing-controlled protein interaction platform, with individual isoforms showing differential abilities to recruit COPII components. Our work connects the COPII pathway with alternative splicing, adding a new regulatory layer to protein secretion and its adaptation to changing cellular environments. PMID:27492621

  4. Cold-dependent alternative splicing of a Jumonji C domain-containing gene MtJMJC5 in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yingfang; Wu, Xiaopei; Liu, Demei; Song, Shengjing; Liu, Dengcai; Wang, Haiqing

    2016-05-27

    Histone methylation is an epigenetic modification mechanism that regulates gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Jumonji C domain-containing demethylases are involved in removal of methyl groups at lysine or arginine residues. The JmjC domain-only member, JMJ30/JMJD5 of Arabidopsis, is a component of the plant circadian clock. Although some plant circadian clock genes undergo alternative splicing in response to external cues, there is no evidence that JMJ30/JMJD5 is regulated by alternative splicing. In this study, the expression of an Arabidopsis JMJ30/JMJD5 ortholog in Medicago truncatula, MtJMJC5, in response to circadian clock and abiotic stresses were characterized. The results showed that MtJMJC5 oscillates with a circadian rhythm, and undergoes cold specifically induced alternative splicing. The cold-induced alternative splicing could be reversed after ambient temperature returning to the normal. Sequencing results revealed four alternative splicing RNA isoforms including a full-length authentic protein encoding variant, and three premature termination condon-containing variants due to alternative 3' splice sites at the first and second intron. Under cold treatment, the variants that share a common 3' alternative splicing site at the second intron were intensively up-regulated while the authentic protein encoding variant and the premature termination condon-containing variant only undergoing a 3' alternative splicing at the first intron were down regulated. Although all the premature termination condon-harboring alternative splicing variants were sensitive to nonsense-mediated decay, the premature termination codon-harboring alternative splicing variants sharing the 3' alternative splicing site at the second intron showed less sensitivity than the one only containing the 3' alternative slicing site at the first intron under cold treatment. These results suggest that the cold-dependent alternative splicing of MtJMJC5 is likely a species or genus

  5. The Ski2-family helicase Obelus regulates Crumbs alternative splicing and cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Vichas, Athea; Laurie, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing can have profound consequences for protein activity, but the functions of most alternative splicing regulators are not known. We show that Obelus, a conserved Ski2-family helicase, is required for cell polarity and adherens junction organization in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo. In obelus mutants, epithelial cells display an expanded apical domain, aggregation of adherens junctions at the cell membrane, and microtubule-dependent defects in centrosome positioning. Through whole-genome transcriptome analysis, we found that Obelus is required for the alternative splicing of a small number of transcripts in the early embryo, including the pre-mRNA that encodes the apical polarity protein Crumbs. In obelus mutants, inclusion of an alternative exon results in increased expression of a Crumbs isoform that contains an additional epidermal growth factor–like repeat in the extracellular domain. Overexpression of this alternative Crumbs isoform recapitulates the junctional aggregation and centrosome positioning defects of obelus mutants. These results indicate that regulation of Crumbs alternative splicing by the Obelus helicase modulates epithelial polarity during development. PMID:26644515

  6. The Ski2-family helicase Obelus regulates Crumbs alternative splicing and cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Vichas, Athea; Laurie, Matthew T; Zallen, Jennifer A

    2015-12-01

    Alternative splicing can have profound consequences for protein activity, but the functions of most alternative splicing regulators are not known. We show that Obelus, a conserved Ski2-family helicase, is required for cell polarity and adherens junction organization in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo. In obelus mutants, epithelial cells display an expanded apical domain, aggregation of adherens junctions at the cell membrane, and microtubule-dependent defects in centrosome positioning. Through whole-genome transcriptome analysis, we found that Obelus is required for the alternative splicing of a small number of transcripts in the early embryo, including the pre-mRNA that encodes the apical polarity protein Crumbs. In obelus mutants, inclusion of an alternative exon results in increased expression of a Crumbs isoform that contains an additional epidermal growth factor-like repeat in the extracellular domain. Overexpression of this alternative Crumbs isoform recapitulates the junctional aggregation and centrosome positioning defects of obelus mutants. These results indicate that regulation of Crumbs alternative splicing by the Obelus helicase modulates epithelial polarity during development. PMID:26644515

  7. Deep intron elements mediate nested splicing events at consecutive AG dinucleotides to regulate alternative 3' splice site choice in vertebrate 4.1 genes.

    PubMed

    Parra, Marilyn K; Gallagher, Thomas L; Amacher, Sharon L; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G

    2012-06-01

    Distal intraexon (iE) regulatory elements in 4.1R pre-mRNA govern 3' splice site choice at exon 2 (E2) via nested splicing events, ultimately modulating expression of N-terminal isoforms of cytoskeletal 4.1R protein. Here we explored intrasplicing in other normal and disease gene contexts and found conservation of intrasplicing through vertebrate evolution. In the paralogous 4.1B gene, we identified ∼120 kb upstream of E2 an ultradistal intraexon, iE(B), that mediates intrasplicing by promoting two intricately coupled splicing events that ensure selection of a weak distal acceptor at E2 (E2dis) by prior excision of the competing proximal acceptor (E2prox). Mutating iE(B) in minigene splicing reporters abrogated intrasplicing, as did blocking endogenous iE(B) function with antisense morpholinos in live mouse and zebrafish animal models. In a human elliptocytosis patient with a mutant 4.1R gene lacking E2 through E4, we showed that aberrant splicing is consistent with iE(R)-mediated intrasplicing at the first available exons downstream of iE(R), namely, alternative E5 and constitutive E6. Finally, analysis of heterologous acceptor contexts revealed a strong preference for nested 3' splice events at consecutive pairs of AG dinucleotides. Distal regulatory elements may control intrasplicing at a subset of alternative 3' splice sites in vertebrate pre-mRNAs to generate proteins with functional diversity. PMID:22473990

  8. Comprehensive transcriptome profiling reveals long noncoding RNA expression and alternative splicing regulation during fruit development and ripening in kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic and transcriptomic data on kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) in public databases are very limited despite its nutritional and economic value. Previously, we have constructed and sequenced nine fruit RNA-Seq libraries of A. chinensis cv. 'Hongyang' at immature, mature, and postharvest ripening...

  9. Structure, dynamics and RNA binding of the multi-domain splicing factor TIA-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Iren; Hennig, Janosch; Jagtap, Pravin Kumar Ankush; Sonntag, Miriam; Valcárcel, Juan; Sattler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Alternative pre-messenger ribonucleic acid (pre-mRNA) splicing is an essential process in eukaryotic gene regulation. The T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is an apoptosis-promoting factor that modulates alternative splicing of transcripts, including the pre-mRNA encoding the membrane receptor Fas. TIA-1 is a multi-domain ribonucleic acid (RNA) binding protein that recognizes poly-uridine tract RNA sequences to facilitate 5′ splice site recognition by the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP). Here, we characterize the RNA interaction and conformational dynamics of TIA-1 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our NMR-derived solution structure of TIA-1 RRM2–RRM3 (RRM2,3) reveals that RRM2 adopts a canonical RNA recognition motif (RRM) fold, while RRM3 is preceded by an non-canonical helix α0. NMR and SAXS data show that all three RRMs are largely independent structural modules in the absence of RNA, while RNA binding induces a compact arrangement. RRM2,3 binds to pyrimidine-rich FAS pre-mRNA or poly-uridine (U9) RNA with nanomolar affinities. RRM1 has little intrinsic RNA binding affinity and does not strongly contribute to RNA binding in the context of RRM1,2,3. Our data unravel the role of binding avidity and the contributions of the TIA-1 RRMs for recognition of pyrimidine-rich RNAs. PMID:24682828

  10. Hypoxia-Induced Alternative Splicing in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weigand, Julia E.; Boeckel, Jes-Niels; Gellert, Pascal; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    Background Adaptation to low oxygen by changing gene expression is vitally important for cell survival and tissue development. The sprouting of new blood vessels, initiated from endothelial cells, restores the oxygen supply of ischemic tissues. In contrast to the transcriptional response induced by hypoxia, which is mainly mediated by members of the HIF family, there are only few studies investigating alternative splicing events. Therefore, we performed an exon array for the genome-wide analysis of hypoxia-related changes of alternative splicing in endothelial cells. Methodology/Principal findings Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated under hypoxic conditions (1% O2) for 48 h. Genome-wide transcript and exon expression levels were assessed using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array. We found altered expression of 294 genes after hypoxia treatment. Upregulated genes are highly enriched in glucose metabolism and angiogenesis related processes, whereas downregulated genes are mainly connected to cell cycle and DNA repair. Thus, gene expression patterns recapitulate known adaptations to low oxygen supply. Alternative splicing events, until now not related to hypoxia, are shown for nine genes: six which are implicated in angiogenesis-mediated cytoskeleton remodeling (cask, itsn1, larp6, sptan1, tpm1 and robo1); one, which is involved in the synthesis of membrane-anchors (pign) and two universal regulators of gene expression (cugbp1 and max). Conclusions/Significance For the first time, this study investigates changes in splicing in the physiological response to hypoxia on a genome-wide scale. Nine alternative splicing events, until now not related to hypoxia, are reported, considerably expanding the information on splicing changes due to low oxygen supply. Therefore, this study provides further knowledge on hypoxia induced gene expression changes and presents new starting points to study the hypoxia adaptation of endothelial cells

  11. The neuronal splicing factor Nova controls alternative splicing in N-type and P-type CaV2 calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Allen, Summer E; Darnell, Robert B; Lipscombe, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Many cellular processes are involved in optimizing protein function for specific neuronal tasks; here we focus on alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Alternative pre-mRNA splicing gives cells the capacity to modify and selectively re-balance their existing pool of transcripts in a coordinated way across multiple mRNAs, thereby effecting relatively rapid and relatively stable changes in protein activity. Here we report on and discuss the coordinated regulation of two sites of alternative splicing, e24a and e31a, in P-type CaV2.1 and N-type CaV2.2 channels. These two exons encode 4 and 2 amino acids, respectively, in the extracellular linker regions between transmembrane spanning segments S3 and S4 in domains III and IV of each CaV2 subunit. Recent genome-wide screens of splicing factor-RNA binding events by Darnell and colleagues show that Nova-2 promotes inclusion of e24a in CaV2.2 mRNAs in brain. We review these studies and show that a homologous e24a is present in theCaV2 .1 gene, Cacna1a, and that it is expressed in different regions of the nervous system. Nova-2 enhances inclusion of e24a but represses e31a inclusion in CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 mRNAs in brain. It is likely that coordinated alternative pre-mRNA splicing across related CaV2 genes by common splicing factors, allows neurons to orchestrate changes in synaptic protein function while maintaining a balanced and functioning system. PMID:21150296

  12. The transcription factor FBI-1 inhibits SAM68-mediated BCL-X alternative splicing and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Pamela; Busà, Roberta; Di Stasi, Savino M; Munoz, Manuel J; Botti, Flavia; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Sette, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is tightly coupled to transcription for the majority of human genes. However, how these two processes are linked is not well understood. Here, we unveil a direct role for the transcription factor FBI-1 in the regulation of AS. FBI-1 interacts with the splicing factor SAM68 and reduces its binding to BCL-X mRNA. This, in turn, results in the selection of the proximal 5' splice site in BCL-X exon 2, thereby favoring the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant and counteracting SAM68-mediated apoptosis. Conversely, depletion of FBI-1, or expression of a SAM68 mutant lacking the FBI-1 binding region, restores the ability of SAM68 to induce BCL-XS splicing and apoptosis. FBI-1's role in splicing requires the activity of histone deacetylases, whose pharmacological inhibition recapitulates the effects of FBI-1 knockdown. Our study reveals an unexpected function for FBI-1 in splicing modulation with a direct impact on cell survival. PMID:24514149

  13. The transcription factor FBI-1 inhibits SAM68-mediated BCL-X alternative splicing and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bielli, Pamela; Busà, Roberta; Di Stasi, Savino M; Munoz, Manuel J; Botti, Flavia; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Sette, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is tightly coupled to transcription for the majority of human genes. However, how these two processes are linked is not well understood. Here, we unveil a direct role for the transcription factor FBI-1 in the regulation of AS. FBI-1 interacts with the splicing factor SAM68 and reduces its binding to BCL-X mRNA. This, in turn, results in the selection of the proximal 5′ splice site in BCL-X exon 2, thereby favoring the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant and counteracting SAM68-mediated apoptosis. Conversely, depletion of FBI-1, or expression of a SAM68 mutant lacking the FBI-1 binding region, restores the ability of SAM68 to induce BCL-XS splicing and apoptosis. FBI-1's role in splicing requires the activity of histone deacetylases, whose pharmacological inhibition recapitulates the effects of FBI-1 knockdown. Our study reveals an unexpected function for FBI-1 in splicing modulation with a direct impact on cell survival. PMID:24514149

  14. Rbfox-regulated alternative splicing is critical for zebrafish cardiac and skeletal muscle function

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Thomas L.; Arribere, Joshua A.; Geurts, Paul A.; Exner, Cameron R. T.; McDonald, Kent L.; Dill, Kariena K.; Marr, Henry L.; Adkar, Shaunak S.; Garnett, Aaron T.; Amacher, Sharon L.; Conboy, John G.

    2012-01-01

    Rbfox RNA binding proteins are implicated as regulators of phylogenetically-conserved alternative splicing events important for muscle function. To investigate the function of rbfox genes, we used morpholino-mediated knockdown of muscle-expressed rbfox1l and rbfox2 in zebrafish embryos. Single and double morphant embryos exhibited changes in splicing of overlapping sets of bioinformatically-predicted rbfox target exons, many of which exhibit a muscle-enriched splicing pattern that is conserved in vertebrates. Thus, conservation of intronic Rbfox binding motifs is a good predictor of Rbfox-regulated alternative splicing. Morphology and development of single morphant embryos was strikingly normal; however, muscle development in double morphants was severely disrupted. Defects in cardiac muscle were marked by reduced heart rate and in skeletal muscle by complete paralysis. The predominance of wavy myofibers and abnormal thick and thin filaments in skeletal muscle revealed that myofibril assembly is defective and disorganized in double morphants. Ultra-structural analysis revealed that although sarcomeres with electron dense M- and Z-bands are present in muscle fibers of rbfox1l/rbox2 morphants, they are substantially reduced in number and alignment. Importantly, splicing changes and morphological defects were rescued by expression of morpholino-resistant rbfox cDNA. Additionally, a target-blocking MO complementary to a single UGCAUG motif adjacent to an rbfox target exon of fxr1 inhibited inclusion in a similar manner to rbfox knockdown, providing evidence that Rbfox regulates the splicing of target exons via direct binding to intronic regulatory motifs. We conclude that Rbfox proteins regulate an alternative splicing program essential for vertebrate heart and skeletal muscle function. PMID:21925157

  15. Rbfox-regulated alternative splicing is critical for zebrafish cardiac and skeletal muscle functions.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Thomas L; Arribere, Joshua A; Geurts, Paul A; Exner, Cameron R T; McDonald, Kent L; Dill, Kariena K; Marr, Henry L; Adkar, Shaunak S; Garnett, Aaron T; Amacher, Sharon L; Conboy, John G

    2011-11-15

    Rbfox RNA binding proteins are implicated as regulators of phylogenetically-conserved alternative splicing events important for muscle function. To investigate the function of rbfox genes, we used morpholino-mediated knockdown of muscle-expressed rbfox1l and rbfox2 in zebrafish embryos. Single and double morphant embryos exhibited changes in splicing of overlapping sets of bioinformatically-predicted rbfox target exons, many of which exhibit a muscle-enriched splicing pattern that is conserved in vertebrates. Thus, conservation of intronic Rbfox binding motifs is a good predictor of Rbfox-regulated alternative splicing. Morphology and development of single morphant embryos were strikingly normal; however, muscle development in double morphants was severely disrupted. Defects in cardiac muscle were marked by reduced heart rate and in skeletal muscle by complete paralysis. The predominance of wavy myofibers and abnormal thick and thin filaments in skeletal muscle revealed that myofibril assembly is defective and disorganized in double morphants. Ultra-structural analysis revealed that although sarcomeres with electron dense M- and Z-bands are present in muscle fibers of rbfox1l/rbox2 morphants, they are substantially reduced in number and alignment. Importantly, splicing changes and morphological defects were rescued by expression of morpholino-resistant rbfox cDNA. Additionally, a target-blocking MO complementary to a single UGCAUG motif adjacent to an rbfox target exon of fxr1 inhibited inclusion in a similar manner to rbfox knockdown, providing evidence that Rbfox regulates the splicing of target exons via direct binding to intronic regulatory motifs. We conclude that Rbfox proteins regulate an alternative splicing program essential for vertebrate heart and skeletal muscle functions. PMID:21925157

  16. Opioid inhibition of N-type Ca2+ channels and spinal analgesia couple to alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Arturo; Denome, Sylvia; Jiang, Yu-Qiu; Marangoudakis, Spiro; Lipscombe, Diane

    2010-10-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing occurs extensively in the nervous systems of complex organisms, including humans, considerably expanding the potential size of the proteome. Cell-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing is thought to optimize protein function for specialized cellular tasks, but direct evidence for this is limited. Transmission of noxious thermal stimuli relies on the activity of N-type Ca(V)2.2 calcium channels in nociceptors. Using an exon-replacement strategy in mice, we show that mutually exclusive splicing patterns in the Ca(V)2.2 gene modulate N-type channel function in nociceptors, leading to a change in morphine analgesia. Exon 37a (e37a) enhances μ-opioid receptor-mediated inhibition of N-type calcium channels by promoting activity-independent inhibition. In the absence of e37a, spinal morphine analgesia is weakened in vivo but the basal response to noxious thermal stimuli is not altered. Our data suggest that highly specialized, discrete cellular responsiveness in vivo can be attributed to alternative splicing events regulated at the level of individual neurons. PMID:20852623

  17. Diagnosis of trypanosomatid infections: targeting the spliced leader RNA.

    PubMed

    González-Andrade, Pablo; Camara, Mamady; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Bucheton, Bruno; Jamonneau, Vincent; Deborggraeve, Stijn

    2014-07-01

    Trypanosomatids transcribe their genes in large polycistronic clusters that are further processed into mature mRNA molecules by trans-splicing. During this maturation process, a conserved spliced leader RNA (SL-RNA) sequence of 39 bp is physically linked to the 5' end of the pre-mRNA molecules. Trypanosomatid infections cause a series of devastating diseases in man (sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis, Chagas disease) and animals (nagana, surra, dourine). Here, we investigated the SL-RNA molecule for its diagnostic potential using reverse transcription followed by real-time PCR. As a model, we used Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, which causes sleeping sickness in west and central Africa. We showed that the copy number of the SL-RNA molecule in one single parasitic cell is at least 8600. We observed a lower detection limit of the SL-RNA assay in spiked blood samples of 100 trypanosomes per milliliter of blood. We also proved that we can detect the trypanosome's SL-RNA in the blood of sleeping sickness patients with a sensitivity of 92% (95% CI, 78%-97%) and a specificity of 96% (95% CI, 86%-99%). The SL-RNA is thus an attractive new molecular target for next-generation diagnostics in diseases caused by trypanosomatids. PMID:24814957

  18. SKIP Is a Component of the Spliceosome Linking Alternative Splicing and the Circadian Clock in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Fangming; Xie, Qiguang; Wang, Huamei; Wang, Ying; Yue, Yanling; Gahura, Ondrej; Ma, Shuangshuang; Liu, Lei; Cao, Ying; Jiao, Yuling; Puta, Frantisek; McClung, C. Robertson; Xu, Xiaodong; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    Circadian clocks generate endogenous rhythms in most organisms from cyanobacteria to humans and facilitate entrainment to environmental diurnal cycles, thus conferring a fitness advantage. Both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms are prominent in the basic network architecture of circadian systems. Posttranscriptional regulation, including mRNA processing, is emerging as a critical step for clock function. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms linking RNA metabolism to the circadian clock network. Here, we report that a conserved SNW/Ski-interacting protein (SKIP) domain protein, SKIP, a splicing factor and component of the spliceosome, is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of circadian clock genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutation in SKIP lengthens the circadian period in a temperature-sensitive manner and affects light input and the sensitivity of the clock to light resetting. SKIP physically interacts with the spliceosomal splicing factor Ser/Arg-rich protein45 and associates with the pre-mRNA of clock genes, such as PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR7 (PRR7) and PRR9, and is necessary for the regulation of their alternative splicing and mRNA maturation. Genome-wide investigations reveal that SKIP functions in regulating alternative splicing of many genes, presumably through modulating recognition or cleavage of 5′ and 3′ splice donor and acceptor sites. Our study addresses a fundamental question on how the mRNA splicing machinery contributes to circadian clock function at a posttranscriptional level. PMID:22942380

  19. Ancient nature of alternative splicing and functions of introns

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Kemin; Salamov, Asaf; Kuo, Alan; Aerts, Andrea; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-21

    Using four genomes: Chamydomonas reinhardtii, Agaricus bisporus, Aspergillus carbonarius, and Sporotricum thermophile with EST coverage of 2.9x, 8.9x, 29.5x, and 46.3x respectively, we identified 11 alternative splicing (AS) types that were dominated by intron retention (RI; biased toward short introns) and found 15, 35, 52, and 63percent AS of multiexon genes respectively. Genes with AS were more ancient, and number of AS correlated with number of exons, expression level, and maximum intron length of the gene. Introns with tendency to be retained had either stop codons or length of 3n+1 or 3n+2 presumably triggering nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), but introns retained in major isoforms (0.2-6percent of all introns) were biased toward 3n length and stop codon free. Stopless introns were biased toward phase 0, but 3n introns favored phase 1 that introduced more flexible and hydrophilic amino acids on both ends of introns which would be less disruptive to protein structure. We proposed a model in which minor RI intron could evolve into major RI that could facilitate intron loss through exonization.

  20. Functional Implications of RNA Splicing for Human Long Intergenic Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng-Chi; Pan, Chia-Lin; Lin, Hsuan-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) have been suggested as playing important roles in human gene regulation. The majority of annotated human lincRNAs include multiple exons and are alternatively spliced. However, the connections between alternative RNA splicing (AS) and the functions/regulations of lincRNAs have remained elusive. In this study, we compared the sequence evolution and biological features between single-exonic lincRNAs and multi-exonic lincRNAs (SELs and MELs, respectively) that were present only in the hominoids (hominoid-specific) or conserved in primates (primate-conserved). The MEL exons were further classified into alternatively spliced exons (ASEs) and constitutively spliced exons (CSEs) for evolutionary analyses. Our results indicate that SELs and MELs differed significantly from each other. Firstly, in hominoid-specific lincRNAs, MELs (both CSEs and ASEs) evolved slightly more rapidly than SELs, which evolved approximately at the neutral rate. In primate-conserved lincRNAs, SELs and ASEs evolved slightly more slowly than CSEs and neutral sequences. The evolutionary path of hominid-specific lincRNAs thus seemed to have diverged from that of their more ancestral counterparts. Secondly, both of the exons and transcripts of SELs were significantly longer than those of MELs, and this was probably because SEL transcripts were more resistant to RNA splicing than MELs. Thirdly, SELs were physically closer to coding genes than MELs. Fourthly, SELs were more widely expressed in human tissues than MELs. These results suggested that SELs and MELs represented two biologically distinct groups of genes. In addition, the SEL–MEL and ASE–CSE differences implied that splicing might be important for the functionality or regulations of lincRNAs in primates. PMID:25574121

  1. Intrasplicing coordinates alternative first exons with alternative splicing in the protein 4.1R gene

    SciTech Connect

    Conboy, John G.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Tan, Jeff S.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2008-11-07

    In the protein 4.1R gene, alternative first exons splice differentially to alternative 3' splice sites far downstream in exon 2'/2 (E2'/2). We describe a novel intrasplicing mechanism by which exon 1A (E1A) splices exclusively to the distal E2'/2 acceptor via two nested splicing reactions regulated by novel properties of exon 1B (E1B). E1B behaves as an exon in the first step, using its consensus 5' donor to splice to the proximal E2'/2 acceptor. A long region of downstream intron is excised, juxtaposing E1B with E2'/2 to generate a new composite acceptor containing the E1B branchpoint/pyrimidine tract and E2 distal 3' AG-dinucleotide. Next, the upstream E1A splices over E1B to this distal acceptor, excising the remaining intron plus E1B and E2' to form mature E1A/E2 product. We mapped branch points for both intrasplicing reactions and demonstrated that mutation of the E1B 5' splice site or branchpoint abrogates intrasplicing. In the 4.1R gene, intrasplicing ultimately determines N-terminal protein structure and function. More generally, intrasplicing represents a new mechanism whereby alternative promoters can be coordinated with downstream alternative splicing.

  2. Inhibition of Splicing but not Cleavage at the 5' Splice Site by Truncating Human β -globin Pre-mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furdon, Paul J.; Kole, Ryszard

    1986-02-01

    Human β -globin mRNAs truncated in the second exon or in the first intron have been processed in vitro in a HeLa cell nuclear extract. Transcripts containing a fragment of the second exon as short as 53 nucleotides are efficiently spliced, whereas transcripts truncated 24 or 14 nucleotides downstream from the 3' splice site are spliced inefficiently, if at all. All of these transcripts, however, are efficiently and accurately cleaved at the 5' splice site. In contrast, RNA truncated in the first intron, 54 nucleotides upstream from the 3' splice site, is not processed at all. These findings suggest that cleavage at the 5' splice site and subsequent splicing steps--i.e., cleavage at the 3' splice site and exon ligation--need not be coupled. Anti-Sm serum inhibits the complete splicing reaction and cleavage at the 5' splice site, suggesting involvement of certain ribonucleoprotein particles in the cleavage reaction. ATP and Mg2+ are required for cleavage at the 5' splice site at concentrations similar to those for the complete splicing reaction.

  3. [Alternative Splicing Detection as a Biomarker for Cancer Diagnosis: A Novel Progressive Mechanism of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with Alternative Splicing as a Biomarker Candidate].

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Kouichi; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Kobayashi, Souhei; Ishige, Takayuki; Semba, Toshihisa; Kimura, Asako; Kazami, Takahiro; Ohyama, Masayuki; Itoga, Sakae; Beppu, Minako; Nishimura, Motoi; Satoh, Mamoru; Nomura, Fumio

    2015-09-01

    Alternative splicing is an important mechanism that links to transcription and contributes to protein diversity. Disturbed alternative splicing is frequently observed in cancers, but its precise mechanism remains largely unknown. FUSE-binding protein (FBP) -interacting repressor (FIR) is a transcriptional repressor of the c-myc gene. Previous studies indicated that a splice variant of FIR, FIRΔexon2, that lacks exon2 in the transcriptional repressor domain, was increased in colorectal cancers, hepatocellular carcinomas, and leukemia cells. Furthermore, FIRΔexon2 activated c-myc transcription by disabling wild-type FIR as a dominant-negative form of FIR. Recently, somatic mutations of the SF3B1 (SAP155) gene, a subunit of the SF3B spliceosome complex, were found in myelodysplastic leukemia. In this study, FIR heterozygous knockout (FIR(+/-)) was established as a dominant-negative model of FIR in the C57BL/6 mouse. FIR(+/-) mice showed an increased c-myc mRNA expression level, particularly in peripheral blood, although FIR(+/-) mice had no apparent pathogenic phenotype. Therefore, an increased c-myc mRNA expression level alone is not enough for leukemogenesis. Nevertheless, FIR(+/-)TP53(-/-) mice generated acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) with increased organ and/or bone marrow invasion. In conclusion, alternative splicing of FIR, generating FIRΔexon2, contributes to not only colorectal carcinogenesis but also leukemogenesis independent of the c-Myc activation pathway. Finally, we will discuss our hypothesis that FIRΔexon2 interferes with FBW7, that FIRΔexon2 inhibits PP1 in the EGFR pathway, and that FIR haploinsufficiency is potentially associated with protein expression through transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. PMID:26731899

  4. Mutations in RRM4 uncouple the splicing repression and RNA-binding activities of polypyrimidine tract binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiying; Zhang, Wenqing; Reed, Robyn B; Liu, Weiqun; Grabowski, Paula J

    2002-01-01

    The polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB, or hnRNP I) contains four RNA-binding domains of the ribonucleoprotein fold type (RRMs 1, 2, 3, and 4), and mediates the negative regulation of alternative splicing through sequence-specific binding to intronic splicing repressor elements. To assess the roles of individual RRM domains in splicing repression, a neural-specific splicing extract was used to screen for loss-of-function mutations that fail to switch splicing from the neural to nonneural pathway. These results show that three RRMs are sufficient for wild-type RNA binding and splicing repression activity, provided that RRM4 is intact. Surprisingly, the deletion of RRM4, or as few as 12 RRM4 residues, effectively uncouples these functions. Such an uncoupling phenotype is unique to RRM4, and suggests a possible regulatory role for this domain either in mediating specific RNA contacts, and/or contacts with putative splicing corepressors. Evidence of a role for RRM4 in anchoring PTB binding adjacent to the branch site is shown by mobility shift and RNA footprinting assays. PMID:11911361

  5. NOVA regulates Dcc alternative splicing during neuronal migration and axon guidance in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Leggere, Janelle C; Saito, Yuhki; Darnell, Robert B; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Junge, Harald J; Chen, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) control multiple aspects of post-transcriptional gene regulation and function during various biological processes in the nervous system. To further reveal the functional significance of RBPs during neural development, we carried out an in vivo RNAi screen in the dorsal spinal cord interneurons, including the commissural neurons. We found that the NOVA family of RBPs play a key role in neuronal migration, axon outgrowth, and axon guidance. Interestingly, Nova mutants display similar defects as the knockout of the Dcc transmembrane receptor. We show here that Nova deficiency disrupts the alternative splicing of Dcc, and that restoring Dcc splicing in Nova knockouts is able to rescue the defects. Together, our results demonstrate that the production of DCC splice variants controlled by NOVA has a crucial function during many stages of commissural neuron development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14264.001 PMID:27223328

  6. Identification of new alternative splice events in the TCIRG1 gene in different human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnova, Anna S.; Morgun, Andrey . E-mail: anemorgun@hotmail.com; Shulzhenko, Natalia; Silva, Ismael D.C.G.; Gerbase-DeLima, Maria

    2005-05-13

    Two transcript variants (TV) of the T cell immune regulator gene 1 (TCIRG1) have already been characterized. TV1 encodes a subunit of the osteoclast vacuolar proton pump and TV2 encodes a T cell inhibitory receptor. Based on the search in dbEST, we validated by RT-PCR six new alternative splice events in TCIRG1 in most of the 28 human tissues studied. In addition, we observed that transcripts using the TV1 transcription start site and two splice forms previously described in a patient with infantile malignant osteopetrosis are also expressed in various tissues of healthy individuals. Studies of these nine splice forms in cytoplasmic RNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed that at least six of them could be efficiently exported from the nucleus. Since various products with nearly ubiquitous tissue distribution are generated from TCIRG1, this gene may be involved in other processes besides immune response and bone resorption.

  7. Increased dosage of Dyrk1A alters alternative splicing factor (ASF)-regulated alternative splicing of tau in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianhua; Zhang, Tianyi; Zhou, Chunlei; Chohan, Muhammad Omar; Gu, Xiaosong; Wegiel, Jerzy; Zhou, Jianhua; Hwang, Yu-Wen; Iqbal, Khalid; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2008-10-17

    Two groups of tau, 3R- and 4R-tau, are generated by alternative splicing of tau exon 10. Normal adult human brain expresses equal levels of them. Disruption of the physiological balance is a common feature of several tauopathies. Very early in their life, individuals with Down syndrome (DS) develop Alzheimer-type tau pathology, the molecular basis for which is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Dyrk1A, a kinase encoded by a gene in the DS critical region, phosphorylates alternative splicing factor (ASF) at Ser-227, Ser-234, and Ser-238, driving it into nuclear speckles and preventing it from facilitating tau exon 10 inclusion. The increased dosage of Dyrk1A in DS brain due to trisomy of chromosome 21 correlates to an increase in 3R-tau level, which on abnormal hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau results in neurofibrillary degeneration. Imbalance of 3R- and 4R-tau in DS brain by Dyrk1A-induced dysregulation of alternative splicing factor-mediated alternative splicing of tau exon 10 represents a novel mechanism of neurofibrillary degeneration and may help explain early onset tauopathy in individuals with DS. PMID:18658135

  8. Global variability in gene expression and alternative splicing is modulated by mitochondrial content.

    PubMed

    Guantes, Raul; Rastrojo, Alberto; Neves, Ricardo; Lima, Ana; Aguado, Begoña; Iborra, Francisco J

    2015-05-01

    Noise in gene expression is a main determinant of phenotypic variability. Increasing experimental evidence suggests that genome-wide cellular constraints largely contribute to the heterogeneity observed in gene products. It is still unclear, however, which global factors affect gene expression noise and to what extent. Since eukaryotic gene expression is an energy demanding process, differences in the energy budget of each cell could determine gene expression differences. Here, we quantify the contribution of mitochondrial variability (a natural source of ATP variation) to global variability in gene expression. We find that changes in mitochondrial content can account for ∼50% of the variability observed in protein levels. This is the combined result of the effect of mitochondria dosage on transcription and translation apparatus content and activities. Moreover, we find that mitochondrial levels have a large impact on alternative splicing, thus modulating both the abundance and type of mRNAs. A simple mathematical model in which mitochondrial content simultaneously affects transcription rate and splicing site choice can explain the alternative splicing data. The results of this study show that mitochondrial content (and/or probably function) influences mRNA abundance, translation, and alternative splicing, which ultimately affects cellular phenotype. PMID:25800673

  9. Involvement of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and of HA95 in pre-mRNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Kvissel, Anne-Katrine . E-mail: a.k.kvissel@basalmed.uio.no; Orstavik, Sigurd; Eikvar, Sissel; Brede, Gaute; Jahnsen, Tore; Collas, Philippe; Akusjaervi, Goeran; Skalhegg, Bjorn Steen

    2007-08-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a holoenzyme consisting of two catalytic (C) subunits bound to a regulatory (R) subunit dimer. Stimulation by cAMP dissociates the holoenzyme and causes translocation to the nucleus of a fraction of the C subunit. Apart from transcription regulation, little is known about the function of the C subunit in the nucleus. In the present report, we show that both C{alpha} and C{beta} are localized to spots in the mammalian nucleus. Double immunofluorescence analysis of splicing factor SC35 with the C subunit indicated that these spots are splicing factor compartments (SFCs). Using the E1A in vivo splicing assay, we found that catalytically active C subunits regulate alternative splicing and phosphorylate several members of the SR-protein family of splicing factors in vitro. Furthermore, nuclear C subunits co-localize with the C subunit-binding protein homologous to AKAP95, HA95. HA95 also regulates E1A alternative splicing in vivo, apparently through its N-terminal domain. Localization of the C subunit to SFCs and the E1A splicing pattern were unaffected by cAMP stimulation. Our findings demonstrate that the nuclear PKA C subunit co-locates with HA95 in SFCs and regulates pre-mRNA splicing, possibly through a cAMP-independent mechanism.

  10. Identification of a Male-Specific RNA Binding Protein That Regulates Sex-Specific Splicing of Bmdsx by Increasing RNA Binding Activity of BmPSI▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka G.; Imanishi, Shigeo; Dohmae, Naoshi; Asanuma, Miwako; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2010-01-01

    Bmdsx is a sex-determining gene in the silkworm and is alternatively spliced in males and females. CE1 is a splicing silencer element responsible for the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx. To identify sex-specific factors implicated in the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx, we performed RNA affinity chromatography using CE1 RNA as a ligand. We have identified BmIMP, a Bombyx homolog of IGF-II mRNA binding protein (IMP), as a male-specific factor that specifically binds to CE1. The gene encoding BmIMP is localized on the Z chromosome and is male-specifically expressed in various tissues. Antisense inhibition of BmIMP expression increased female-specific splicing of Bmdsx pre-mRNA. Coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown analyses demonstrated that BmIMP physically interacts with BmPSI, which has been identified as a factor implicated in the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx, through the KH domains of BmIMP. The functional consequence of this interaction was examined using RNA mobility shift analysis. BmIMP increased BmPSI-CE1 RNA binding activity by decreasing the rate of BmPSI dissociation from CE1 RNA. Truncation analysis of BmIMP suggested that the KH domains are responsible for enhancing BmPSI-CE1 RNA binding activity. These results suggest that BmIMP may enhance the male-specific splicing of Bmdsx pre-mRNA by increasing RNA binding activity of BmPSI. PMID:20956562

  11. Decrease in hnRNP A/B expression during erythropoiesis mediates a pre-mRNA splicing switch.

    PubMed

    Hou, Victor C; Lersch, Robert; Gee, Sherry L; Ponthier, Julie L; Lo, Annie J; Wu, Michael; Turck, Chris W; Koury, Mark; Krainer, Adrian R; Mayeda, Akila; Conboy, John G

    2002-11-15

    A physiologically important alternative pre-mRNA splicing switch, involving activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 (E16) splicing, is required for the establishment of proper mechanical integrity of the erythrocyte membrane during erythropoiesis. Here we identify a conserved exonic splicing silencer element (CE(16)) in E16 that interacts with hnRNP A/B proteins and plays a role in repression of E16 splicing during early erythropoiesis. Experiments with model pre-mRNAs showed that CE(16) can repress splicing of upstream introns, and that mutagenesis or replacement of CE(16) can relieve this inhibition. An affinity selection assay with biotinylated CE(16) RNA demonstrated specific binding of hnRNP A/B proteins. Depletion of hnRNP A/B proteins from nuclear extract significantly increased E16 inclusion, while repletion with recombinant hnRNP A/B restored E16 silencing. Most importantly, differentiating mouse erythroblasts exhibited a stage-specific activation of the E16 splicing switch in concert with a dramatic and specific down-regulation of hnRNP A/B protein expression. These findings demonstrate that natural developmental changes in hnRNP A/B proteins can effect physiologically important switches in pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:12426391

  12. Decrease in hnRNP A/B expression during erythropoiesis mediates a pre-mRNA splicing switch

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Victor C.; Lersch, Robert; Gee, Sherry L.; Ponthier, Julie L.; Lo, Annie J.; Wu, Michael; Turck, Chris W.; Koury, Mark; Krainer, Adrian R.; Mayeda, Akila; Conboy, John G.

    2002-01-01

    A physiologically important alternative pre-mRNA splicing switch, involving activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 (E16) splicing, is required for the establishment of proper mechanical integrity of the erythrocyte membrane during erythropoiesis. Here we identify a conserved exonic splicing silencer element (CE16) in E16 that interacts with hnRNP A/B proteins and plays a role in repression of E16 splicing during early erythropoiesis. Experiments with model pre-mRNAs showed that CE16 can repress splicing of upstream introns, and that mutagenesis or replacement of CE16 can relieve this inhibition. An affinity selection assay with biotinylated CE16 RNA demonstrated specific binding of hnRNP A/B proteins. Depletion of hnRNP A/B proteins from nuclear extract significantly increased E16 inclusion, while repletion with recombinant hnRNP A/B restored E16 silencing. Most importantly, differentiating mouse erythroblasts exhibited a stage-specific activation of the E16 splicing switch in concert with a dramatic and specific down-regulation of hnRNP A/B protein expression. These findings demonstrate that natural developmental changes in hnRNP A/B proteins can effect physiologically important switches in pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:12426391

  13. Decrease in hnRNP A/B expression during erythropoiesis mediates a pre-mRNA splicing switch

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Victor C.; Lersch, Robert; Gee, Sherry L.; Ponthier, Julie L.; Lo, Annie J.; Wu, Michael; Turck, Chris W.; Koury, Mark; Krainer, Adrian R.; Mayeda, Akila; Conboy, John G.

    2002-10-17

    A physiologically important alternative pre-mRNA splicing switch, involving activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 (E16) splicing, is required for establishing proper mechanical integrity of the erythrocyte membrane during erythropoiesis. Here we identify a conserved exonic splicing silencer element (CE16) in E16 that interacts with hnRNP A/B proteins and plays a role in repression of E16 splicing during early erythropoiesis. Experiments with model pre-mRNAs showed that CE16 can repress splicing of upstream introns, and that mutagenesis or replacement of CE16 can relieve this inhibition. An affinity selection assay with biotinylated CE16 RNA demonstrated specific binding of hnRNP A/B proteins. Depletion of hnRNP A/B proteins from nuclear extract significantly increased E16 inclusion, while repletion with recombinant hnRNP A/B restored E16 silencing. Most importantly, differentiating mouse erythroblasts exhibited a stage-specific activation of the E16 splicing switch in concert with a drama tic and specific down-regulation of hnRNP A/B protein expression. These findings demonstrate that natural developmental changes in hnRNP A/B proteins can effect physiologically important switches in pre-mRNA splicing.

  14. Modulation of PKM alternative splicing by PTBP1 promotes gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Calabretta, Sara; Bielli, Pamela; Passacantilli, Ilaria; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Fendrich, Volker; Capurso, Gabriele; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Sette, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive and incurable disease. Poor prognosis is due to multiple reasons, including acquisition of resistance to gemcitabine, the first line chemotherapeutic approach. Thus, there is a strong need for novel therapies, targeting more directly the molecular aberrations of this disease. We found that chronic exposure of PDAC cells to gemcitabine selected a subpopulation of cells that are drug-resistant (DR-PDAC cells). Importantly, alternative splicing of the pyruvate kinase gene (PKM) was differentially modulated in DR-PDAC cells, resulting in promotion of the cancer-related PKM2 isoform, whose high expression also correlated with shorter recurrence free survival in PDAC patients. Switching PKM splicing by antisense oligonucleotides to favour the alternative PKM1 variant rescued sensitivity of DR-PDAC cells to gemcitabine and cisplatin, suggesting that PKM2 expression is required to withstand drug-induced genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, up-regulation of the polypyrimidine-tract binding protein (PTBP1), a key modulator of PKM splicing, correlated with PKM2 expression in DR-PDAC cell lines. PTBP1 was recruited more efficiently to PKM pre-mRNA in DR- than in parental PDAC cells. Accordingly, knockdown of PTBP1 in DR-PDAC cells reduced its recruitment to the PKM pre-mRNA, promoted splicing of the PKM1 variant and abolished drug resistance. Thus, chronic exposure to gemcitabine leads to up-regulation of PTBP1 and modulation of PKM alternative splicing in PDAC cells, conferring resistance to the drug. These findings point to PKM2 and PTBP1 as new potential therapeutic targets to improve response of PDAC to chemotherapy. PMID:26234680

  15. Alternative splicing for the alpha1 subunit of soluble guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, D; Taylor, J F; Hoffmann, J W; Carnaghi, L; Giddings, S J; Zakeri, H; Kwok, P Y

    2000-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), the receptor for nitric oxide, is a heterodimer consisting of alpha and beta subunits. We investigated the mRNA species for the alpha(1) subunit in human brain, heart, artery and immortalized B-lymphocytes. Three mRNA species were identified in these tissues. The major mRNA species contained the full expression sequence of the alpha(1) subunit. Two other types of mRNA were detected in which 5' sequences were deleted by splicing (506-590 and 412-590). Each of these deletions included the predicted translation start site, indicating that translation of these two alternatively spliced RNA species does not result in the production of full-length alpha(1) subunits. The relative amounts of the two mRNA species with deletions of the translation start site differed significantly between cell lines of immortalized B-lymphocytes from different individuals. sGC enzymic activity was significantly decreased in cellular extracts from cell lines with high proportions of mRNA species containing the deletion 506-590 when compared with extracts from cell lines that contained mostly mRNA without this deletion. PMID:10698711

  16. Introns, alternative splicing, spliced leader trans-splicing and differential expression of pcna and cyclin in Perkinsus marinus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Dungan, Christopher F; Lin, Senjie

    2011-01-01

    To gain understanding on the structure and regulation of growth-related genes of the parasitic alveolatePerkinsus marinus, we analyzed genes encoding proliferating cell nuclear antigen (pcna) and cyclins (cyclin). Comparison of the full-length cDNAs with the corresponding genomic sequences revealedtrans-splicing of the mRNAs of these genes with a conserved 21-22 nt spliced leader. Over 10 copies ofpcnawere detected, with identical gene structures and similar nucleotide (nt) sequences (88-99%), encoding largely identical amino acid sequences (aa). Two distinct types ofcyclin(Pmacyclin1 andPmacyclin2) were identified, with 66-69% nt and 81-85% aa similarities.Pmacyclin2 was organized in tandem repeats, and was alternatively spliced, giving rise to five subtypes of transcripts. For bothpcnaandcyclingenes, 6-10 introns were found. Quantitative RT-PCR assays showed thatpcnaandPmacyclin2 expression levels were low with small variations during a 28-h time course, whereasPmacyclin1 transcript abundance was 10-100 times higher, and increased markedly during active cell division, suggesting that it is a mitoticcyclinand can be a useful growth marker for this species. The gene structure and expression features along with phylogenetic results position this organism between dinoflagellates and apicomplexans, but its definitive affiliation among alveolates requires further studies. PMID:20650682

  17. The organization of RNA contacts by PTB for regulation of FAS splicing

    PubMed Central

    Mickleburgh, Ian; Kafasla, Panagiota; Cherny, Dmitry; Llorian, Miriam; Curry, Stephen; Jackson, Richard J.; Smith, Christopher W.J.

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional steps of gene expression are regulated by RNA binding proteins. Major progress has been made in characterizing RNA-protein interactions, from high resolution structures to transcriptome-wide profiling. Due to the inherent technical challenges, less attention has been paid to the way in which proteins with multiple RNA binding domains engage with target RNAs. We have investigated how the four RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of Polypyrimidine tract binding (PTB) protein, a major splicing regulator, interact with FAS pre-mRNA under conditions in which PTB represses FAS exon 6 splicing. A combination of tethered hydroxyl radical probing, targeted inactivation of individual RRMs and single molecule analyses revealed an unequal division of labour between the four RRMs of PTB. RNA binding by RRM4 is the most important for function despite the low intrinsic binding specificity and the complete lack of effect of disrupting individual RRM4 contact points on the RNA. The ordered RRM3-4 di-domain packing provides an extended binding surface for RNA interacting at RRM4, via basic residues in the preceding linker. Our results illustrate how multiple alternative low-specificity binding configurations of RRM4 are consistent with repressor function as long as the overall ribonucleoprotein architecture provided by appropriate di-domain packing is maintained. PMID:24957602

  18. G to A substitution in 5{prime} donor splice site of introns 18 and 48 of COL1A1 gene of type I collagen results in different splicing alternatives in osteogenesis imperfecta type I cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Willing, M.; Deschenes, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a G to A substitution in the 5{prime} donor splice site of intron 18 of one COL1A1 allele in two unrelated families with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. A third OI type I family has a G to A substitution at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele. Both mutations abolish normal splicing and lead to reduced steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant COL1A1 allele. The intron 18 mutation leads to both exon 18 skipping in the mRNA and to utilization of a single alternative splice site near the 3{prime} end of exon 18. The latter results in deletion of the last 8 nucleotides of exon 18 from the mRNA, a shift in the translational reading-frame, and the creation of a premature termination codon in exon 19. Of the potential alternative 5{prime} splice sites in exon 18 and intron 18, the one utilized has a surrounding nucleotide sequence which most closely resembles that of the natural splice site. Although a G to A mutation was detected at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele in another OI type I family, nine complex alternative splicing patterns were identified by sequence analysis of cDNA clones derived from fibroblast mRNA from this cell strain. All result in partial or complete skipping of exon 48, with in-frame deletions of portions of exons 47 and/or 49. The different patterns of RNA splicing were not explained by their sequence homology with naturally occuring 5{prime} splice sites, but rather by recombination between highly homologous exon sequences, suggesting that we may not have identified the major splicing alternative(s) in this cell strain. Both G to A mutations result in decreased production of type I collagen, the common biochemical correlate of OI type I.

  19. Cross-talk between PRMT1-mediated methylation and ubiquitylation on RBM15 controls RNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Tran, Ngoc-Tung; Su, Hairui; Wang, Rui; Lu, Yuheng; Tang, Haiping; Aoyagi, Sayura; Guo, Ailan; Khodadadi-Jamayran, Alireza; Zhou, Dewang; Qian, Kun; Hricik, Todd; Côté, Jocelyn; Han, Xiaosi; Zhou, Wenping; Laha, Suparna; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Levine, Ross L; Raffel, Glen; Liu, Yanyan; Chen, Dongquan; Li, Haitao; Townes, Tim; Wang, Hengbin; Deng, Haiteng; Zheng, Y George; Leslie, Christina; Luo, Minkui; Zhao, Xinyang

    2015-01-01

    RBM15, an RNA binding protein, determines cell-fate specification of many tissues including blood. We demonstrate that RBM15 is methylated by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) at residue R578, leading to its degradation via ubiquitylation by an E3 ligase (CNOT4). Overexpression of PRMT1 in acute megakaryocytic leukemia cell lines blocks megakaryocyte terminal differentiation by downregulation of RBM15 protein level. Restoring RBM15 protein level rescues megakaryocyte terminal differentiation blocked by PRMT1 overexpression. At the molecular level, RBM15 binds to pre-messenger RNA intronic regions of genes important for megakaryopoiesis such as GATA1, RUNX1, TAL1 and c-MPL. Furthermore, preferential binding of RBM15 to specific intronic regions recruits the splicing factor SF3B1 to the same sites for alternative splicing. Therefore, PRMT1 regulates alternative RNA splicing via reducing RBM15 protein concentration. Targeting PRMT1 may be a curative therapy to restore megakaryocyte differentiation for acute megakaryocytic leukemia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07938.001 PMID:26575292

  20. Cross-talk between PRMT1-mediated methylation and ubiquitylation on RBM15 controls RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Tran, Ngoc-Tung; Su, Hairui; Wang, Rui; Lu, Yuheng; Tang, Haiping; Aoyagi, Sayura; Guo, Ailan; Khodadadi-Jamayran, Alireza; Zhou, Dewang; Qian, Kun; Hricik, Todd; Côté, Jocelyn; Han, Xiaosi; Zhou, Wenping; Laha, Suparna; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Levine, Ross L; Raffel, Glen; Liu, Yanyan; Chen, Dongquan; Li, Haitao; Townes, Tim; Wang, Hengbin; Deng, Haiteng; Zheng, Y George; Leslie, Christina; Luo, Minkui; Zhao, Xinyang

    2015-01-01

    RBM15, an RNA binding protein, determines cell-fate specification of many tissues including blood. We demonstrate that RBM15 is methylated by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) at residue R578, leading to its degradation via ubiquitylation by an E3 ligase (CNOT4). Overexpression of PRMT1 in acute megakaryocytic leukemia cell lines blocks megakaryocyte terminal differentiation by downregulation of RBM15 protein level. Restoring RBM15 protein level rescues megakaryocyte terminal differentiation blocked by PRMT1 overexpression. At the molecular level, RBM15 binds to pre-messenger RNA intronic regions of genes important for megakaryopoiesis such as GATA1, RUNX1, TAL1 and c-MPL. Furthermore, preferential binding of RBM15 to specific intronic regions recruits the splicing factor SF3B1 to the same sites for alternative splicing. Therefore, PRMT1 regulates alternative RNA splicing via reducing RBM15 protein concentration. Targeting PRMT1 may be a curative therapy to restore megakaryocyte differentiation for acute megakaryocytic leukemia. PMID:26575292

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis of Alternative Splicing in Zea mays: Landscape and Genetic Regulation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Shawn R.; Zhou, Wengang; Leonard, April; Wang, Bing-Bing; Beatty, Mary; Zastrow-Hayes, Gina; Zhao, Xiangyu; Baumgarten, Andy; Li, Bailin

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing enhances transcriptome diversity in all eukaryotes and plays a role in plant tissue identity and stress adaptation. To catalog new maize (Zea mays) transcripts and identify genomic loci that regulate alternative splicing, we analyzed over 90 RNA-seq libraries from maize inbred lines B73 and Mo17, as well as Syn10 doubled haploid lines (progenies from B73 × Mo17). Transcript discovery was augmented with publicly available data from 14 maize tissues, expanding the maize transcriptome by more than 30,000 and increasing the percentage of intron-containing genes that undergo alternative splicing to 40%. These newly identified transcripts greatly increase the diversity of the maize proteome, sometimes coding for entirely different proteins compared with their most similar annotated isoform. In addition to increasing proteome diversity, many genes encoding novel transcripts gained an additional layer of regulation by microRNAs, often in a tissue-specific manner. We also demonstrate that the majority of genotype-specific alternative splicing can be genetically mapped, with cis-acting quantitative trait loci (QTLs) predominating. A large number of trans-acting QTLs were also apparent, with nearly half located in regions not shown to contain genes associated with splicing. Taken together, these results highlight the currently underappreciated role that alternative splicing plays in tissue identity and genotypic variation in maize. PMID:25248552

  2. Identification and characterization of yak (Bos grunniens) b-Boule gene and its alternative splice variants.

    PubMed

    Li, Bojiang; Ngo, Sherry; Wu, Wangjun; Xu, Hongtao; Xie, Zhuang; Li, Qifa; Pan, Zengxiang

    2014-10-25

    Boule is responsible for meiotic arrest of sperms and male sterility during mammalian spermatogenesis. In the present study, we first identified yak b-Boule gene and its two alternative splice variants. The full length coding region of yak b-Boule is 888bp and encodes a 295-amino acid protein with a typical RNA-recognition motif (RRM) and a Deleted in Azoospermia (DAZ) repetitive sequence motif. Two alternative splice variants of yak b-Boule were generated following the consensus "GT-AG" rule and named b-Boule1 (36bp deletion in exon 3) and b-Boule2 (deletion of integral exon 7), respectively. In male yak, b-Boule, b-Boule1 and b-Boule2 were found to be exclusively expressed in the testes at a ratio of 81:0.1:1. Intriguingly, the mRNA expression levels of b-Boule and b-Boule1 in yak testis were significantly higher than those in cattle-yak, although no significant difference was observed for b-Boule2 expression between the yak and cattle-yak. These results suggest that b-Boule gene, which is partially regulated by alternative splicing, may be involved in the process of yak spermatogenesis. PMID:25149018

  3. Oligonucleotide-induced alternative splicing of serotonin 2C receptor reduces food intake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaiyi; Shen, Manli; Gresch, Paul J; Ghamari-Langroudi, Masoud; Rabchevsky, Alexander G; Emeson, Ronald B; Stamm, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The serotonin 2C receptor regulates food uptake, and its activity is regulated by alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Alternative exon skipping is predicted to generate a truncated receptor protein isoform, whose existence was confirmed with a new antiserum. The truncated receptor sequesters the full-length receptor in intracellular membranes. We developed an oligonucleotide that promotes exon inclusion, which increases the ratio of the full-length to truncated receptor protein. Decreasing the amount of truncated receptor results in the accumulation of full-length, constitutively active receptor at the cell surface. After injection into the third ventricle of mice, the oligonucleotide accumulates in the arcuate nucleus, where it changes alternative splicing of the serotonin 2C receptor and increases pro-opiomelanocortin expression. Oligonucleotide injection reduced food intake in both wild-type and ob/ob mice. Unexpectedly, the oligonucleotide crossed the blood-brain barrier and its systemic delivery reduced food intake in wild-type mice. The physiological effect of the oligonucleotide suggests that a truncated splice variant regulates the activity of the serotonin 2C receptor, indicating that therapies aimed to change pre-mRNA processing could be useful to treat hyperphagia, characteristic for disorders like Prader-Willi syndrome. PMID:27406820

  4. Activity-dependent mRNA splicing controls ER export and synaptic delivery of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yuanyue; Otsuka, Takeshi; Horton, April C; Scott, Derek B; Ehlers, Michael D

    2003-10-30

    Activity-dependent targeting of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) is a key feature of synapse formation and plasticity. Although mechanisms for rapid trafficking of glutamate receptors have been identified, the molecular events underlying chronic accumulation or loss of synaptic NMDARs have remained unclear. Here we demonstrate that activity controls NMDAR synaptic accumulation by regulating forward trafficking at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER export is accelerated by the alternatively spliced C2' domain of the NR1 subunit and slowed by the C2 splice cassette. This mRNA splicing event at the C2/C2' site is activity dependent, with C2' variants predominating upon activity blockade and C2 variants abundant with increased activity. The switch to C2' accelerates NMDAR forward trafficking by enhancing recruitment of nascent NMDARs to ER exit sites via binding of a divaline motif within C2' to COPII coats. These results define a novel pathway underlying activity-dependent targeting of glutamate receptors, providing an unexpected mechanistic link between activity, mRNA splicing, and membrane trafficking during excitatory synapse modification. PMID:14642281

  5. Validation of Alternative Transcript Splicing in Chicken Lines that Differ in Genetic Resistance to Marek's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Muhammet; Preeyanon, Likit; Dodgson, Jerry B; Cheng, Hans H

    2016-10-01

    Utilizing RNA-seq data, 1,574 candidate genes with alternative splicing were previously identified between two chicken lines that differ in Marek's disease (MD) genetic resistance under control and Marek's disease virus infection conditions. After filtering out 1,530 genes with splice variants in the first or last exon, 44 genes were screened for possible exon loss or gain using PCR and gel electrophoresis. Consequently, 7 genes exhibited visually detectable differential expression of splice variants between lines 6 (MD resistant) and 7 (MD susceptible), and the resultant PCR products verified by DNA sequencing. Birds from inbred line 6 have transcripts that preferentially retain an exon compared to line 7 chickens for ITGB2, SGPL1, and COMMD5. Birds from inbred line 7 have alleles that preferentially retain an exon compared to line 6 for MOCS2. CCBL2 exon 1a is absent and ATAD1 exon 2 is truncated by 87 nucleotides in transcripts expressed by line 7 compared to those from line 6. For CHTF18, line 6 transcripts have an indel mutation with 7 additional nucleotides in exon 21 compared to line 7. The current study validates 7 genes with alternatively spliced isomers between the two chicken lines, which helps provide potential underlying mechanisms for the phenotypic differences. PMID:27565867

  6. Alternative Splicing and Transcriptome Profiling of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Using Genome-Wide Exon Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Gillett, Alan; Maratou, Klio; Fewings, Chris; Harris, Robert A.; Jagodic, Maja; Aitman, Tim; Olsson, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease causing demyelination and nerve loss in the central nervous system. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of MS that is widely used to investigate complex pathogenic mechanisms. Transcriptional control through isoform selection and mRNA levels determines pathway activation and ultimately susceptibility to disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We have studied the role of alternative splicing and differential expression in lymph node cells from EAE-susceptible Dark Agouti (DA) and EAE-resistant Piebald Virol Glaxo.AV1 (PVG) inbred rat strains using Affymetrix Gene Chip Rat Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Comparing the two strains, we identified 11 differentially spliced and 206 differentially expressed genes at day 7 post-immunization, as well as 9 differentially spliced and 144 differentially expressed genes upon autoantigen re-stimulation. Functional clustering and pathway analysis implicate genes for glycosylation, lymphocyte activation, potassium channel activity and cellular differentiation in EAE susceptibility. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that alternative splicing occurs during complex disease and may govern EAE susceptibility. Additionally, transcriptome analysis not only identified previously defined EAE pathways regulating the immune system, but also novel mechanisms. Furthermore, several identified genes overlap known quantitative trait loci, providing novel causative candidate targets governing EAE. PMID:19915720

  7. Alternative splicing of Drosophila Nmnat functions as a switch to enhance neuroprotection under stress

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Kai; Zhu, Yi; Li, Chong; Brazill, Jennifer M.; Zhai, R. Grace

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT) is a conserved enzyme in the NAD synthetic pathway. It has also been identified as an effective and versatile neuroprotective factor. However, it remains unclear how healthy neurons regulate the dual functions of NMNAT and achieve self-protection under stress. Here we show that Drosophila Nmnat (DmNmnat) is alternatively spliced into two mRNA variants, RA and RB, which translate to protein isoforms with divergent neuroprotective capacities against spinocerebellar ataxia 1-induced neurodegeneration. Isoform PA/PC translated from RA is nuclear-localized with minimal neuroprotective ability, and isoform PB/PD translated from RB is cytoplasmic and has robust neuroprotective capacity. Under stress, RB is preferably spliced in neurons to produce the neuroprotective PB/PD isoforms. Our results indicate that alternative splicing functions as a switch that regulates the expression of functionally distinct DmNmnat variants. Neurons respond to stress by driving the splicing switch to produce the neuroprotective variant and therefore achieve self-protection. PMID:26616331

  8. Alternative splicing contributes to K+ channel diversity in the mammalian central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Luneau, C J; Williams, J B; Marshall, J; Levitan, E S; Oliva, C; Smith, J S; Antanavage, J; Folander, K; Stein, R B; Swanson, R

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to define the molecular basis of the functional diversity of K+ channels, we have isolated overlapping rat brain cDNAs that encoded a neuronal delayed rectifier K+ channel, K,4, that is structurally related to the Drosophila Shaw protein. Unlike previously characterized mammalian K+ channel genes, which each contain a single protein-coding exon, K,4 arises from alternative exon usage at a locus that also encodes another mammalian Shaw homolog, NGK2. Thus, the enormous diversity of K+ channels in mammals can be generated not just through gene duplication and divergence but also through alternative splicing of RNA. Images PMID:2023941

  9. Aging and Loss of Circulating 17β-Estradiol Alters the Alternative Splicing of ERβ in the Female Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Shults, Cody L; Pinceti, Elena; Rao, Yathindar S; Pak, Toni R

    2015-11-01

    Loss of circulating 17β-estradiol (E2) that occurs during menopause can have detrimental effects on cognitive function. The efficacy of hormone replacement therapy declines as women become farther removed from the menopausal transition, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying this age-related switch in E2 efficacy are unknown. We hypothesized that aging and varying lengths of E2 deprivation alters the ratio of alternatively spliced estrogen receptor (ER)β isoforms in the brain of female rats. Further, we tested whether changes in global transcriptional activity and splicing kinetics regulate the alternative splicing of ERβ. Our results revealed brain region-specific changes in ERβ alternative splicing in both aging and E2-deprivation paradigms and showed that ERβ could mediate E2-induced alternative splicing. Global transcriptional activity, as measured by phosphorylated RNA polymerase II, was also regulated by age and E2 in specific brain regions. Finally, we show that inhibition of topoisomerase I resulted in increased ERβ2 splice variant expression. PMID:26295370

  10. Alternative Splicing of an Insect Sodium Channel Gene Generates Pharmacologically Distinct Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jianguo; Liu, Zhiqi; Nomura, Yoshiko; Goldin, Alan L.; Dong, Ke

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a major mechanism by which potassium and calcium channels increase functional diversity in animals. Extensive alternative splicing of the para sodium channel gene and developmental regulation of alternative splicing have been reported in Drosophila species. Alternative splicing has also been observed for several mammalian voltage-gated sodium channel genes. However, the functional significance of alternative splicing of sodium channels has not been demonstrated. In this study, we identified three mutually exclusive alternative exons encoding part of segments 3 and 4 of domain III in the German cockroach sodium channel gene, paraCSMA. The splice site is conserved in the mouse, fish, and human Nav1.6 sodium channel genes, suggesting an ancient origin. One of the alternative exons possesses a stop codon, which would generate a truncated protein with only the first two domains. The splicing variant containing the stop codon is detected only in the PNS, whereas the other two full-size variants were detected in both the PNS and CNS. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, the two splicing variants produced robust sodium currents, but with different gating properties, whereas the splicing variant with the stop codon did not produce any detectable sodium current. Furthermore, these two functional splicing variants exhibited a striking difference in sensitivity to a pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin. Exon swapping partially reversed the channel sensitivity to deltamethrin. Our results therefore provide the first evidence that alternative splicing of a sodium channel gene produces pharmacologically distinct channels. PMID:12097481

  11. Trans-splicing and RNA editing of LSU rRNA in Diplonema mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Valach, Matus; Moreira, Sandrine; Kiethega, Georgette N.; Burger, Gertraud

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) often display reduced size and deviant secondary structure, and sometimes are fragmented, as are their corresponding genes. Here we report a mitochondrial large subunit rRNA (mt-LSU rRNA) with unprecedented features. In the protist Diplonema, the rnl gene is split into two pieces (modules 1 and 2, 534- and 352-nt long) that are encoded by distinct mitochondrial chromosomes, yet the rRNA is continuous. To reconstruct the post-transcriptional maturation pathway of this rRNA, we have catalogued transcript intermediates by deep RNA sequencing and RT-PCR. Gene modules are transcribed separately. Subsequently, transcripts are end-processed, the module-1 transcript is polyuridylated and the module-2 transcript is polyadenylated. The two modules are joined via trans-splicing that retains at the junction ∼26 uridines, resulting in an extent of insertion RNA editing not observed before in any system. The A-tail of trans-spliced molecules is shorter than that of mono-module 2, and completely absent from mitoribosome-associated mt-LSU rRNA. We also characterize putative antisense transcripts. Antisense-mono-modules corroborate bi-directional transcription of chromosomes. Antisense-mt-LSU rRNA, if functional, has the potential of guiding concomitantly trans-splicing and editing of this rRNA. Together, these findings open a window on the investigation of complex regulatory networks that orchestrate multiple and biochemically diverse post-transcriptional events. PMID:24259427

  12. Analysis of cellulose synthase genes from domesticated apple identifies collinear genes WDR53 and CesA8A: partial co-expression, bicistronic mRNA, and alternative splicing of CESA8A

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Gea; Spadiut, Oliver; Kerschbamer, Christine; Giorno, Filomena; Baric, Sanja; Ezcurra, Inés

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose synthase (CesA) genes constitute a complex multigene family with six major phylogenetic clades in angiosperms. The recently sequenced genome of domestic apple, Malus×domestica, was mined for CesA genes, by blasting full-length cellulose synthase protein (CESA) sequences annotated in the apple genome against protein databases from the plant models Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa. Thirteen genes belonging to the six angiosperm CesA clades and coding for proteins with conserved residues typical of processive glycosyltransferases from family 2 were detected. Based on their phylogenetic relationship to Arabidopsis CESAs, as well as expression patterns, a nomenclature is proposed to facilitate further studies. Examination of their genomic organization revealed that MdCesA8-A is closely linked and co-oriented with WDR53, a gene coding for a WD40 repeat protein. The WDR53 and CesA8 genes display conserved collinearity in dicots and are partially co-expressed in the apple xylem. Interestingly, the presence of a bicistronic WDR53–CesA8A transcript was detected in phytoplasma-infected phloem tissues of apple. The bicistronic transcript contains a spliced intergenic sequence that is predicted to fold into hairpin structures typical of internal ribosome entry sites, suggesting its potential cap-independent translation. Surprisingly, the CesA8A cistron is alternatively spliced and lacks the zinc-binding domain. The possible roles of WDR53 and the alternatively spliced CESA8 variant during cellulose biosynthesis in M.×domestica are discussed. PMID:23048131

  13. The impact of RNA binding motif protein 4-regulated splicing cascade on the progression and metabolism of colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Ju; Lin, Jung-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated splicing of pre-messenger (m)RNA is considered a molecular occasion of carcinogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism is complex and remains to be investigated. Herein, we report that the upregulated miR-92a reduced the RNA-binding motif 4 (RBM4) protein expression, leading to the imbalanced expression of the neuronal polypyrimidine tract-binding (nPTB) protein through alternative splicing-coupled nonsense mediated decay (NMD) mechanism. Increase in nPTB protein enhances the relative level of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 IIIc (FGFR2) and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) transcripts which contribute to the progression and metabolic signature of CRC cells. Expression profiles of RBM4 and downstream alternative splicing events are consistently observed in cancerous tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues. These results constitute a mechanistic understanding of RBM4 on repressing the carcinogenesis of colorectal cells. PMID:26506517

  14. Intronic motif pairs cooperate across exons to promote pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A very early step in splice site recognition is exon definition, a process that is as yet poorly understood. Communication between the two ends of an exon is thought to be required for this step. We report genome-wide evidence for exons being defined through the combinatorial activity of motifs located in flanking intronic regions. Results Strongly co-occurring motifs were found to specifically reside in four intronic regions surrounding a large number of human exons. These paired motifs occur around constitutive and alternative exons but not pseudo exons. Most co-occurring motifs are limited to intronic regions within 100 nucleotides of the exon. They are preferentially associated with weaker exons. Their pairing is conserved in evolution and they exhibit a lower frequency of single nucleotide polymorphism when paired. Paired motifs display specificity with respect to distance from the exon borders and in constitutive versus alternative splicing. Many resemble binding sites for heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins. Specific pairs are associated with tissue-specific genes, the higher expression of which coincides with that of the pertinent RNA binding proteins. Tested pairs acted synergistically to enhance exon inclusion, and this enhancement was found to be exon-specific. Conclusions The exon-flanking sequence pairs identified here by genomic analysis promote exon inclusion and may play a role in the exon definition step in pre-mRNA splicing. We propose a model in which multiple concerted interactions are required between exonic sequences and flanking intronic sequences to effect exon definition. PMID:20704715

  15. The pathogenicity of splicing defects: mechanistic insights into pre-mRNA processing inform novel therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Daguenet, Elisabeth; Dujardin, Gwendal; Valcárcel, Juan

    2015-12-01

    Removal of introns from pre-mRNA precursors (pre-mRNA splicing) is a necessary step for the expression of most genes in multicellular organisms, and alternative patterns of intron removal diversify and regulate the output of genomic information. Mutation or natural variation in pre-mRNA sequences, as well as in spliceosomal components and regulatory factors, has been implicated in the etiology and progression of numerous pathologies. These range from monogenic to multifactorial genetic diseases, including metabolic syndromes, muscular dystrophies, neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Understanding the molecular mechanisms associated with splicing-related pathologies can provide key insights into the normal function and physiological context of the complex splicing machinery and establish sound basis for novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26566663

  16. RNA splicing in regulation of Nitric Oxide receptor Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Sharina, Iraida G.; Cote, Gilbert J.; Martin, Emil; Doursout, Marie-Francoise; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a key protein in the nitric oxide (NO)/-cGMP signaling pathway. sGC activity is involved in a number of important physiological processes including smooth muscle relaxation, neurotransmission and platelet aggregation and adhesion. Regulation of sGC expression and activity emerges as a crucial factor in control of sGC function in normal and pathological conditions. Recently accumulated evidence strongly indicates that the regulation of sGC expression is a complex process modulated on several levels including transcription, post-transcriptional regulation, translation and protein stability. Presently our understanding of mechanisms governing regulation of sGC expression remains very limited and awaits systematic investigation. Among other ways, the expression of sGC subunits is modulated at the levels of mRNA abundance and transcript diversity. In this review we summarize available information on different mechanisms (including transcriptional activation, mRNA stability and alternative splicing) involved in the modulation of mRNA levels of sGC subunits in response to various environmental clues. We also summarize and cross-reference the information on human sGC splice forms available in the literature and in genomic databases. This review highlights the fact that the study of the biological role and regulation of sGC splicing will bring new insights to our understanding of NO/cGMP biology. PMID:21867767

  17. Species-specific alternative splicing leads to unique expression of sno-lncRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intron-derived long noncoding RNAs with snoRNA ends (sno-lncRNAs) are highly expressed from the imprinted Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) region on human chromosome 15. However, sno-lncRNAs from other regions of the human genome or from other genomes have not yet been documented. Results By exploring non-polyadenylated transcriptomes from human, rhesus and mouse, we have systematically annotated sno-lncRNAs expressed in all three species. In total, using available data from a limited set of cell lines, 19 sno-lncRNAs have been identified with tissue- and species-specific expression patterns. Although primary sequence analysis revealed that snoRNAs themselves are conserved from human to mouse, sno-lncRNAs are not. PWS region sno-lncRNAs are highly expressed in human and rhesus monkey, but are undetectable in mouse. Importantly, the absence of PWS region sno-lncRNAs in mouse suggested a possible reason why current mouse models fail to fully recapitulate pathological features of human PWS. In addition, a RPL13A region sno-lncRNA was specifically revealed in mouse embryonic stem cells, and its snoRNA ends were reported to influence lipid metabolism. Interestingly, the RPL13A region sno-lncRNA is barely detectable in human. We further demonstrated that the formation of sno-lncRNAs is often associated with alternative splicing of exons within their parent genes, and species-specific alternative splicing leads to unique expression pattern of sno-lncRNAs in different animals. Conclusions Comparative transcriptomes of non-polyadenylated RNAs among human, rhesus and mouse revealed that the expression of sno-lncRNAs is species-specific and that their processing is closely linked to alternative splicing of their parent genes. This study thus further demonstrates a complex regulatory network of coding and noncoding parts of the mammalian genome. PMID:24734784

  18. Prognostic value of a newly identified MALAT1 alternatively spliced transcript in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meseure, Didier; Vacher, Sophie; Lallemand, François; Alsibai, Kinan Drak; Hatem, Rana; Chemlali, Walid; Nicolas, Andre; De Koning, Leanne; Pasmant, Eric; Callens, Celine; Lidereau, Rosette; Morillon, Antonin; Bieche, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epigenetic deregulation is considered as a new hallmark of cancer. The long non-coding RNA MALAT1 has been implicated in several cancers; however, its role in breast cancer is still little known. Methods: We used RT–PCR, in situ hybridisation, and RPPA methods to quantify (i) the full-length (FL) and an alternatively spliced variant (Δsv) of MALAT1, and (ii) a panel of transcripts and proteins involved in MALAT1 pathways, in a large series of breast tumours from patients with known clinical/pathological status and long-term outcome. Results: MALAT1 was overexpressed in 14% (63/446) of the breast tumours. MALAT1-overexpressed tumour epithelial cells showed marked diffuse nuclear signals and numerous huge nuclear speckles. Screening of the dbEST database led to the identification of Δsv-MALAT1, a major alternatively spliced MALAT1 transcript, with a very different expression pattern compared with FL-MALAT1. This alternative Δsv-MALAT1 transcript was mainly underexpressed (18.8%) in our breast tumour series. Multivariate analysis showed that alternative Δsv-MALAT1 transcript is an independent prognostic factor. Δsv-MALAT1 expression was associated with alterations of the pre-mRNAs alternative splicing machinery, and of the Drosha-DGCR8 complex required for non-coding RNA biogenesis. Alternative Δsv-MALAT1 transcript expression was associated to YAP protein status and with an activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway. Conclusions: Our results reveal a complex expression pattern of various MALAT1 transcript variants in breast tumours, and suggest that this pattern of expressions should be taken into account to evaluate MALAT1 as predictive biomarker and therapeutic target. PMID:27172249

  19. Alternative splicing: An important mechanism in stem cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kenian; Dai, Xiaojing; Wu, Jiaqian

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an essential mechanism in post-transcriptional regulation and leads to protein diversity. It has been shown that AS is prevalent in metazoan genomes, and the splicing pattern is dynamically regulated in different tissues and cell types, including embryonic stem cells. These observations suggest that AS may play critical roles in stem cell biology. Since embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to give rise to all types of cells and tissues, they hold the promise of future cell-based therapy. Many efforts have been devoted to understanding the mechanisms underlying stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. However, most of the studies focused on the expression of a core set of transcription factors and regulatory RNAs. The role of AS in stem cell differentiation was not clear. Recent advances in high-throughput technologies have allowed the profiling of dynamic splicing patterns and cis-motifs that are responsible for AS at a genome-wide scale, and provided novel insights in a number of studies. In this review, we discuss some recent findings involving AS and stem cells. An emerging picture from these findings is that AS is integrated in the transcriptional and post-transcriptional networks and together they control pluripotency maintenance and differentiation of stem cells. PMID:25621101

  20. APPRIS: annotation of principal and alternative splice isoforms.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Maietta, Paolo; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Pietrelli, Alessandro; Wesselink, Jan-Jaap; Lopez, Gonzalo; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present APPRIS (http://appris.bioinfo.cnio.es), a database that houses annotations of human splice isoforms. APPRIS has been designed to provide value to manual annotations of the human genome by adding reliable protein structural and functional data and information from cross-species conservation. The visual representation of the annotations provided by APPRIS for each gene allows annotators and researchers alike to easily identify functional changes brought about by splicing events. In addition to collecting, integrating and analyzing reliable predictions of the effect of splicing events, APPRIS also selects a single reference sequence for each gene, here termed the principal isoform, based on the annotations of structure, function and conservation for each transcript. APPRIS identifies a principal isoform for 85% of the protein-coding genes in the GENCODE 7 release for ENSEMBL. Analysis of the APPRIS data shows that at least 70% of the alternative (non-principal) variants would lose important functional or structural information relative to the principal isoform. PMID:23161672

  1. Convergent evolution of alternative splices at domain boundaries of the BK channel.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Anthony A; Aldrich, Richard W

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a widespread mechanism for generating transcript diversity in higher eukaryotic genomes. The alternative splices of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channel have been the subject of a good deal of experimental functional characterization in the Arthropoda, Chordata, and Nematoda phyla. In this review, we examine a list of splices of the BK channel by manual curation of Unigene clusters mapped to mouse, human, chicken, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans genomes. We find that BK alternative splices do not appear to be conserved across phyla. Despite this lack of conservation, splices occur in both vertebrates and invertebrates at identical regions of the channel at experimentally established domain boundaries. The fact that, across phyla, unique splices occur at experimentally established domain boundaries suggests a prominent role for the convergent evolution of alternative splices that produce functional changes via changes in interdomain communication. PMID:18694345

  2. Argonaute-1 binds transcriptional enhancers and controls constitutive and alternative splicing in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Alló, Mariano; Agirre, Eneritz; Bessonov, Sergey; Bertucci, Paola; Gómez Acuña, Luciana; Buggiano, Valeria; Bellora, Nicolás; Singh, Babita; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Blaustein, Matías; Miñana, Belén; Dujardin, Gwendal; Pozzi, Berta; Pelisch, Federico; Bechara, Elías; Agafonov, Dmitry E.; Srebrow, Anabella; Lührmann, Reinhard; Valcárcel, Juan; Eyras, Eduardo; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.

    2014-01-01

    The roles of Argonaute proteins in cytoplasmic microRNA and RNAi pathways are well established. However, their implication in small RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing in the mammalian cell nucleus is less understood. We have recently shown that intronic siRNAs cause chromatin modifications that inhibit RNA polymerase II elongation and modulate alternative splicing in an Argonaute-1 (AGO1)-dependent manner. Here we used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) to investigate the genome-wide distribution of AGO1 nuclear targets. Unexpectedly, we found that about 80% of AGO1 clusters are associated with cell-type-specific transcriptional enhancers, most of them (73%) overlapping active enhancers. This association seems to be mediated by long, rather than short, enhancer RNAs and to be more prominent in intragenic, rather than intergenic, enhancers. Paradoxically, crossing ChIP-seq with RNA-seq data upon AGO1 depletion revealed that enhancer-bound AGO1 is not linked to the global regulation of gene transcription but to the control of constitutive and alternative splicing, which was confirmed by an individual gene analysis explaining how AGO1 controls inclusion levels of the cassette exon 107 in the SYNE2 gene. PMID:25313066

  3. Alternative 5' exons and differential splicing regulate expression of protein 4.1R isoforms with distinct N-termini.

    PubMed

    Parra, Marilyn K; Gee, Sherry L; Koury, Mark J; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G

    2003-05-15

    Among the alternative pre-mRNA splicing events that characterize protein 4.1R gene expression, one involving exon 2' plays a critical role in regulating translation initiation and N-terminal protein structure. Exon 2' encompasses translation initiation site AUG1 and is located between alternative splice acceptor sites at the 5' end of exon 2; its inclusion or exclusion from mature 4.1R mRNA regulates expression of longer or shorter isoforms of 4.1R protein, respectively. The current study reports unexpected complexity in the 5' region of the 4.1R gene that directly affects alternative splicing of exon 2'. Identified far upstream of exon 2 in both mouse and human genomes were 3 mutually exclusive alternative 5' exons, designated 1A, 1B, and 1C; all 3 are associated with strong transcriptional promoters in the flanking genomic sequence. Importantly, exons 1A and 1B splice differentially with respect to exon 2', generating transcripts with different 5' ends and distinct N-terminal protein coding capacity. Exon 1A-type transcripts splice so as to exclude exon 2' and therefore utilize the downstream AUG2 for translation of 80-kDa 4.1R protein, whereas exon 1B transcripts include exon 2' and initiate at AUG1 to synthesize 135-kDa isoforms. RNA blot analyses revealed that 1A transcripts increase in abundance in late erythroblasts, consistent with the previously demonstrated up-regulation of 80-kDa 4.1R during terminal erythroid differentiation. Together, these results suggest that synthesis of structurally distinct 4.1R protein isoforms in various cell types is regulated by a novel mechanism requiring coordination between upstream transcription initiation events and downstream alternative splicing events. PMID:12522012

  4. Alternative 5' exons and differential splicing regulate expression of protein 4.1R isoforms with distinct n-termini

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Marilyn K.; Gee, Sherry L.; Koury, Mark J.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2003-03-25

    Among the alternative pre-mRNA splicing events that characterize protein 4.1R gene expression, one involving exon 2' plays a critical role in regulating translation initiation and N-terminal protein structure. Exon 2' encompasses translation initiation site AUG1 and is located between alternative splice acceptor sites at the 5' end of exon 2; its inclusion or exclusion from mature 4.1R mRNA regulates expression of longer or shorter isoforms of 4.1R protein, respectively. The current study reports unexpected complexity in the 5' region of the 4.1R gene that directly affects alternative splicing of exon 2'. Three mutually exclusive alternative 5' exons, designated 1A, 1B, and 1C, were identified far upstream of exon 2 in both mouse and human genomes; all three are associated with strong transcriptional promoters in the flanking genomic sequence. Importantly, exons 1A and 1B splice differentially with respect to exon 2', generating transcripts with different 5' ends and distinct N-terminal protein coding capacity. Exon 1A-type transcripts splice so as to exclude exon 2' and therefore utilize the downstream AUG2 for translation of 80kD 4.1R protein, whereas exon 1B transcripts include exon 2' and initiate at AUG1 to synthesize 135kD isoforms. RNA blot analyses revealed that 1A transcripts increase in abundance in late erythroblasts, consistent with the previously demonstrated upregulation of 80kD 4.1R during terminal erythroid differentiation. Together these results suggest that synthesis of structurally distinct 4.1R protein isoforms in various cell types is regulated by a novel mechanism requiring coordination between upstream transcription initiation events and downstream alternative splicing events.

  5. 20-hydroxyecdysone mediates non-canonical regulation of mosquito vitellogenins through alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Provost-Javier, K N; Rasgon, J L

    2014-08-01

    Vitellogenesis is one of the most well-studied physiological processes in mosquitoes. Expression of mosquito vitellogenin genes is classically described as being restricted to female adult reproduction. We report premature vitellogenin transcript expression in three vector mosquitoes: Culex tarsalis, Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae. Vitellogenins expressed during non-reproductive stages are alternatively spliced to retain their first intron and encode premature termination codons. We show that intron retention results in transcript degradation by translation-dependent nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. This is probably an example of regulated unproductive splicing and translation (RUST), a mechanism known to regulate gene expression in numerous organisms but which has never been described in mosquitoes. We demonstrate that the hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) is responsible for regulating post-transcriptional splicing of vitellogenin. After exposure of previtellogenic fat bodies to 20E, vitellogenin expression switches from a non-productive intron-retaining transcript to a spliced protein-coding transcript. This effect is independent of factors classically known to influence transcription, such as juvenile hormone-mediated competence and amino acid signalling through the target of rapamycin pathway. Non-canonical regulation of vitellogenesis through RUST is a novel role for the multifunctional hormone 20E, and may have important implications for general patterns of gene regulation in mosquitoes. PMID:24720618

  6. 20-hydroxyecdysone mediates non-canonical regulation of mosquito vitellogenins through alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Provost-Javier, K. N.; Rasgon, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Vitellogenesis is one of the most well-studied physiological processes in mosquitoes. Expression of mosquito vitellogenin genes is classically described as being restricted to female adult reproduction. We report premature vitellogenin transcript expression in three vector mosquitoes: Culex tarsalis, Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae. Vitellogenins expressed during non-reproductive stages are alternatively spliced to retain their first intron and encode premature termination codons. We show that intron retention results in transcript degradation by translation-dependent nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. This is probably an example of regulated unproductive splicing and translation (RUST), a mechanism known to regulate gene expression in numerous organisms but which has never been described in mosquitoes. We demonstrate that the hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) is responsible for regulating post-transcriptional splicing of vitellogenin. After exposure of previtellogenic fat bodies to 20E, vitellogenin expression switches from a non-productive intron-retaining transcript to a spliced protein-coding transcript. This effect is independent of factors classically known to influence transcription, such as juvenile hormone-mediated competence and amino acid signalling through the target of rapamycin pathway. Non-canonical regulation of vitellogenesis through RUST is a novel role for the multifunctional hormone 20E, and may have important implications for general patterns of gene regulation in mosquitoes. PMID:24720618

  7. Alternative Splicing in Adhesion- and Motility-Related Genes in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aversa, Rosanna; Sorrentino, Anna; Esposito, Roberta; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Amato, Angela; Zambelli, Alberto; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; D’Apice, Luciana; Costa, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common tumor and the second leading cause of cancer death among woman, mainly caused by the metastatic spread. Tumor invasiveness is due to an altered expression of adhesion molecules. Among them, semaphorins are of peculiar interest. Cancer cells can manipulate alternative splicing patterns to modulate the expression of adhesion- and motility-related molecules, also at the isoform level. In this study, combining RNA-Sequencing on MCF-7 to targeted experimental validations—in human breast cell lines and breast tumor biopsies—we identified 12 new alternative splicing transcripts in genes encoding adhesion- and motility-related molecules, including semaphorins, their receptors and co-receptors. Among them, a new SEMA3F transcript is expressed in all breast cell lines and breast cancer biopsies, and is translated into a new semaphorin 3F isoform. In silico analysis predicted that most of the new putative proteins lack functional domains, potentially missing some functions and acquiring new ones. Our findings better describe the extent of alternative splicing in breast cancer and highlight the need to further investigate adhesion- and motility-related molecules to gain insights into breast cancer progression. PMID:26784191

  8. Alternatively spliced variants of the cell adhesion molecule CD44 and tumour progression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gotley, D. C.; Fawcett, J.; Walsh, M. D.; Reeder, J. A.; Simmons, D. L.; Antalis, T. M.

    1996-01-01

    Increased expression of alternatively spliced variants of the CD44 family of cell adhesion molecules has been associated with tumour metastasis. In the present study, expression of alternatively spliced variants of CD44 and their cellular distribution have been investigated in human colonic tumours and in the corresponding normal mucosa, in addition to benign adenomatous polyps. The expression of CD44 alternatively spliced variants has been correlated with tumour progression according to Dukes' histological stage. CD44 variant expression was determined by immunohistochemisty using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific CD44 variant domains together with RT-PCR analysis of CD44 variant mRNA expression in the same tissue specimens. We demonstrate that as well as being expressed in colonic tumour cells, the full range of CD44 variants, CD44v2-v10, are widely expressed in normal colonic crypt epithelium, predominantly in the crypt base. CD44v6, the epitope which is most commonly associated with tumour progression and metastasis, was not only expressed by many benign colonic tumours, but was expressed as frequently in normal basal crypt epithelium as in malignant colonic tumour cells, and surprisingly, was even absent from some metastatic colorectal tumours. Expression of none of the CD44 variant epitopes was found to be positively correlated with tumour progression or with colorectal tumour metastasis to the liver, results which are inconsistent with a role for CD44 variants as indicators of colonic cancer progression. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8695347

  9. Transcriptional properties and splicing of the flamenco piRNA cluster.

    PubMed

    Goriaux, Coline; Desset, Sophie; Renaud, Yoan; Vaury, Chantal; Brasset, Emilie

    2014-04-01

    In Drosophila, the piRNA cluster, flamenco, produces most of the piRNAs (PIWI-interacting RNAs) that silence transposable elements in the somatic follicle cells during oogenesis. These piRNAs are thought to be processed from a long single-stranded precursor transcript. Here, we demonstrate that flamenco transcription is initiated from an RNA polymerase II promoter containing an initiator motif (Inr) and downstream promoter element (DPE) and requires the transcription factor, Cubitus interruptus. We show that the flamenco precursor transcript undergoes differential alternative splicing to generate diverse RNA precursors that are processed to piRNAs. Our data reveal dynamic processing steps giving rise to piRNA cluster precursors. PMID:24562610

  10. Exon Organization and Novel Alternative Splicing of Ank3 in Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Yamankurt, Gokay; Wu, Henry C.; McCarthy, Michael; Cunha, Shane R.

    2015-01-01

    Ankyrin-G is an adaptor protein that links membrane proteins to the underlying cytoskeletal network. Alternative splicing of the Ank3 gene gives rise to multiple ankyrin-G isoforms in numerous tissues. To date, only one ankyrin-G isoform has been characterized in heart and transcriptional regulation of the Ank3 gene is completely unknown. In this study, we describe the first comprehensive analysis of Ank3 expression in heart. Using a PCR-based screen of cardiac mRNA transcripts, we identify two new exons and 28 alternative splice variants of the Ank3 gene. We measure the relative expression of each splice variant using quantitative real-time PCR and exon-exon boundary spanning primers that specifically amplify individual Ank3 variants. Six variants are rarely expressed (<1%), while the remaining variants display similar expression patterns in three hearts. Of the five first exons in the Ank3 gene, exon 1d is only expressed in heart and skeletal muscle as it was not detected in brain, kidney, cerebellum, and lung. Immunoblot analysis reveals multiple ankyrin-G isoforms in heart, and two ankyrin-G subpopulations are detected in adult cardiomyocytes by immunofluorescence. One population co-localizes with the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5 at the intercalated disc, while the other population expresses at the Z-line. Two of the rare splice variants excise a portion of the ZU5 motif, which encodes the minimal spectrin-binding domain, and these variants lack β-spectrin binding. Together, these data demonstrate that Ank3 is subject to complex splicing regulation resulting in a diverse population of ankyrin-G isoforms in heart. PMID:26024478

  11. Detection and visualization of differential splicing in RNA-Seq data with JunctionSeq

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Stephen W.; Mullikin, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Although RNA-Seq data provide unprecedented isoform-level expression information, detection of alternative isoform regulation (AIR) remains difficult, particularly when working with an incomplete transcript annotation. We introduce JunctionSeq, a new method that builds on the statistical techniques used by the well-established DEXSeq package to detect differential usage of both exonic regions and splice junctions. In particular, JunctionSeq is capable of detecting differential usage of novel splice junctions without the need for an additional isoform assembly step, greatly improving performance when the available transcript annotation is flawed or incomplete. JunctionSeq also provides a powerful and streamlined visualization toolset that allows bioinformaticians to quickly and intuitively interpret their results. We tested our method on publicly available data from several experiments performed on the rat pineal gland and Toxoplasma gondii, successfully detecting known and previously validated AIR genes in 19 out of 19 gene-level hypothesis tests. Due to its ability to query novel splice sites, JunctionSeq is still able to detect these differences even when all alternative isoforms for these genes were not included in the transcript annotation. JunctionSeq thus provides a powerful method for detecting alternative isoform regulation even with low-quality annotations. An implementation of JunctionSeq is available as an R/Bioconductor package. PMID:27257077

  12. A mutation in the Srrm4 gene causes alternative splicing defects and deafness in the Bronx waltzer mouse.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yoko; Jahan, Israt; Bonde, Gregory; Sun, Xingshen; Hildebrand, Michael S; Engelhardt, John F; Smith, Richard J H; Cornell, Robert A; Fritzsch, Bernd; Bánfi, Botond

    2012-01-01

    Sensory hair cells are essential for hearing and balance. Their development from epithelial precursors has been extensively characterized with respect to transcriptional regulation, but not in terms of posttranscriptional influences. Here we report on the identification and functional characterization of an alternative-splicing regulator whose inactivation is responsible for defective hair-cell development, deafness, and impaired balance in the spontaneous mutant Bronx waltzer (bv) mouse. We used positional cloning and transgenic rescue to locate the bv mutation to the splicing factor-encoding gene Ser/Arg repetitive matrix 4 (Srrm4). Transcriptome-wide analysis of pre-mRNA splicing in the sensory patches of embryonic inner ears revealed that specific alternative exons were skipped at abnormally high rates in the bv mice. Minigene experiments in a heterologous expression system confirmed that these skipped exons require Srrm4 for inclusion into the mature mRNA. Sequence analysis and mutagenesis experiments showed that the affected transcripts share a novel motif that is necessary for the Srrm4-dependent alternative splicing. Functional annotations and protein-protein interaction data indicated that the encoded proteins cluster in the secretion and neurotransmission pathways. In addition, the splicing of a few transcriptional regulators was found to be Srrm4 dependent, and several of the genes known to be targeted by these regulators were expressed at reduced levels in the bv mice. Although Srrm4 expression was detected in neural tissues as well as hair cells, analyses of the bv mouse cerebellum and neocortex failed to detect splicing defects. Our data suggest that Srrm4 function is critical in the hearing and balance organs, but not in all neural tissues. Srrm4 is the first alternative-splicing regulator to be associated with hearing, and the analysis of bv mice provides exon-level insights into hair-cell development. PMID:23055939

  13. Quantification of pre-mRNA escape rate and synergy in splicing

    PubMed Central

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Voegeli, Sylvia; Baudrimont, Antoine; Séraphin, Bertrand; Becskei, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Splicing reactions generally combine high speed with accuracy. However, some of the pre-mRNAs escape the nucleus with a retained intron. Intron retention can control gene expression and increase proteome diversity. We calculated the escape rate for the yeast PTC7 intron and pre-mRNA. This prediction was facilitated by the observation that splicing is a linear process and by deriving simple algebraic expressions from a model of co- and post-transcriptional splicing and RNA surveillance that determines the rate of the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) of the pre-mRNAs with the retained intron. The escape rate was consistent with the observed threshold of splicing rate below which the mature mRNA level declined. When an mRNA contains multiple introns, the outcome of splicing becomes more difficult to predict since not only the escape rate of the pre-mRNA has to be considered, but also the possibility that the splicing of each intron is influenced by the others. We showed that the two adjacent introns in the SUS1 mRNA are spliced cooperatively, but this does not counteract the escape of the partially spliced mRNA. These findings will help to infer promoter activity and to predict the behavior of and to control splicing regulatory networks. PMID:25352554

  14. Quantification of pre-mRNA escape rate and synergy in splicing.

    PubMed

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Voegeli, Sylvia; Baudrimont, Antoine; Séraphin, Bertrand; Becskei, Attila

    2014-11-10

    Splicing reactions generally combine high speed with accuracy. However, some of the pre-mRNAs escape the nucleus with a retained intron. Intron retention can control gene expression and increase proteome diversity. We calculated the escape rate for the yeast PTC7 intron and pre-mRNA. This prediction was facilitated by the observation that splicing is a linear process and by deriving simple algebraic expressions from a model of co- and post-transcriptional splicing and RNA surveillance that determines the rate of the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) of the pre-mRNAs with the retained intron. The escape rate was consistent with the observed threshold of splicing rate below which the mature mRNA level declined. When an mRNA contains multiple introns, the outcome of splicing becomes more difficult to predict since not only the escape rate of the pre-mRNA has to be considered, but also the possibility that the splicing of each intron is influenced by the others. We showed that the two adjacent introns in the SUS1 mRNA are spliced cooperatively, but this does not counteract the escape of the partially spliced mRNA. These findings will help to infer promoter activity and to predict the behavior of and to control splicing regulatory networks. PMID:25352554

  15. Two alternatively spliced isoforms of the Arabidopsis SR45 protein have distinct roles during normal plant development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ning; Mount, Stephen M

    2009-07-01

    The serine-arginine-rich (SR) proteins constitute a conserved family of pre-mRNA splicing factors. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), they are encoded by 19 genes, most of which are themselves alternatively spliced. In the case of SR45, the use of alternative 3' splice sites 21 nucleotides apart generates two alternatively spliced isoforms. Isoform 1 (SR45.1) has an insertion relative to isoform 2 (SR45.2) that replaces a single arginine with eight amino acids (TSPQRKTG). The biological implications of SR45 alternative splicing have been unclear. A previously described loss-of-function mutant affecting both isoforms, sr45-1, shows several developmental defects, including defects in petal development and root growth. We found that the SR45 promoter is highly active in regions with actively growing and dividing cells. We also tested the ability of each SR45 isoform to complement the sr45-1 mutant by overexpression of isoform-specific green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins. As expected, transgenic plants overexpressing either isoform displayed both nuclear speckles and GFP fluorescence throughout the nucleoplasm. We found that SR45.1-GFP complements the flower petal phenotype, but not the root growth phenotype. Conversely, SR45.2-GFP complements root growth but not floral morphology. Mutation of a predicted phosphorylation site within the alternatively spliced segment, SR45.1-S219A-GFP, does not affect complementation. However, a double mutation affecting both serine-219 and the adjacent threonine-218 (SR45.1-T218A + S219A-GFP) behaves like isoform 2, complementing the root but not the floral phenotype. In conclusion, our study provides evidence that the two alternatively spliced isoforms of SR45 have distinct biological functions. PMID:19403727

  16. Chemical Modifications Mark Alternatively Spliced and Uncapped Messenger RNAs in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Vandivier, Lee E.; Silverman, Ian M.; Wang, Li-San

    2015-01-01

    Posttranscriptional chemical modification of RNA bases is a widespread and physiologically relevant regulator of RNA maturation, stability, and function. While modifications are best characterized in short, noncoding RNAs such as tRNAs, growing evidence indicates that mRNAs and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are likewise modified. Here, we apply our high-throughput annotation of modified ribonucleotides (HAMR) pipeline to identify and classify modifications that affect Watson-Crick base pairing at three different levels of the Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptome (polyadenylated, small, and degrading RNAs). We find this type of modifications primarily within uncapped, degrading mRNAs and lncRNAs, suggesting they are the cause or consequence of RNA turnover. Additionally, modifications within stable mRNAs tend to occur in alternatively spliced introns, suggesting they regulate splicing. Furthermore, these modifications target mRNAs with coherent functions, including stress responses. Thus, our comprehensive analysis across multiple RNA classes yields insights into the functions of covalent RNA modifications in plant transcriptomes. PMID:26561561

  17. Modulation of PKM alternative splicing by PTBP1 promotes gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Calabretta, S; Bielli, P; Passacantilli, I; Pilozzi, E; Fendrich, V; Capurso, G; Fave, G Delle; Sette, C

    2016-04-21

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive and incurable disease. Poor prognosis is due to multiple reasons, including acquisition of resistance to gemcitabine, the first-line chemotherapeutic approach. Thus, there is a strong need for novel therapies, targeting more directly the molecular aberrations of this disease. We found that chronic exposure of PDAC cells to gemcitabine selected a subpopulation of cells that are drug-resistant (DR-PDAC cells). Importantly, alternative splicing (AS) of the pyruvate kinase gene (PKM) was differentially modulated in DR-PDAC cells, resulting in promotion of the cancer-related PKM2 isoform, whose high expression also correlated with shorter recurrence-free survival in PDAC patients. Switching PKM splicing by antisense oligonucleotides to favor the alternative PKM1 variant rescued sensitivity of DR-PDAC cells to gemcitabine and cisplatin, suggesting that PKM2 expression is required to withstand drug-induced genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, upregulation of the polypyrimidine-tract binding protein (PTBP1), a key modulator of PKM splicing, correlated with PKM2 expression in DR-PDAC cell lines. PTBP1 was recruited more efficiently to PKM pre-mRNA in DR- than in parental PDAC cells. Accordingly, knockdown of PTBP1 in DR-PDAC cells reduced its recruitment to the PKM pre-mRNA, promoted splicing of the PKM1 variant and abolished drug resistance. Thus, chronic exposure to gemcitabine leads to upregulation of PTBP1 and modulation of PKM AS in PDAC cells, conferring resistance to the drug. These findings point to PKM2 and PTBP1 as new potential therapeutic targets to improve response of PDAC to chemotherapy. PMID:26234680

  18. Skipping of exons by premature termination of transcription and alternative splicing within intron-5 of the sheep SCF gene: a novel splice variant.

    PubMed

    Saravanaperumal, Siva Arumugam; Pediconi, Dario; Renieri, Carlo; La Terza, Antonietta

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) is a growth factor, essential for haemopoiesis, mast cell development and melanogenesis. In the hematopoietic microenvironment (HM), SCF is produced either as a membrane-bound (-) or soluble (+) forms. Skin expression of SCF stimulates melanocyte migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. We report for the first time, a novel mRNA splice variant of SCF from the skin of white merino sheep via cloning and sequencing. Reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR and molecular prediction revealed two different cDNA products of SCF. Full-length cDNA libraries were enriched by the method of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE-PCR). Nucleotide sequencing and molecular prediction revealed that the primary 1519 base pair (bp) cDNA encodes a precursor protein of 274 amino acids (aa), commonly known as 'soluble' isoform. In contrast, the shorter (835 and/or 725 bp) cDNA was found to be a 'novel' mRNA splice variant. It contains an open reading frame (ORF) corresponding to a truncated protein of 181 aa (vs 245 aa) with an unique C-terminus lacking the primary proteolytic segment (28 aa) right after the D(175)G site which is necessary to produce 'soluble' form of SCF. This alternative splice (AS) variant was explained by the complete nucleotide sequencing of splice junction covering exon 5-intron (5)-exon 6 (948 bp) with a premature termination codon (PTC) whereby exons 6 to 9/10 are skipped (Cassette Exon, CE 6-9/10). We also demonstrated that the Northern blot analysis at transcript level is mediated via an intron-5 splicing event. Our data refine the structure of SCF gene; clarify the presence (+) and/or absence (-) of primary proteolytic-cleavage site specific SCF splice variants. This work provides a basis for understanding the functional role and regulation of SCF in hair follicle melanogenesis in sheep beyond what was known in mice, humans and other mammals. PMID:22719917

  19. Splice site consensus sequences are preferentially accessible to nucleases in isolated adenovirus RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, S H; Duthie, R S

    1986-01-01

    The conformation of RNA sequences spanning five 3' splice sites and two 5' splice sites in adenovirus mRNA was probed by partial digestion with single-strand specific nucleases. Although cleavage of nucleotides near both 3' and 5' splice sites was observed, most striking was the preferential digestion of sequences near the 3' splice site. At each 3' splice site a region of very strong cleavage is observed at low concentrations of enzyme near the splice site consensus sequence or the upstream branch point consensus sequence. Additional sites of moderately strong cutting near the branch point consensus sequence were observed in those sequences where the splice site was the preferred target. Since recognition of the 3' splice site and branch site appear to be early events in mRNA splicing these observations may indicate that the local conformation of the splice site sequences may play a direct or indirect role in enhancing the accessibility of sequences important for splicing. Images PMID:3024107

  20. Female-specific insect lethality engineered using alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guoliang; Condon, Kirsty C; Epton, Matthew J; Gong, Peng; Jin, Li; Condon, George C; Morrison, Neil I; Dafa'alla, Tarig H; Alphey, Luke

    2007-03-01

    The Sterile Insect Technique is a species-specific and environmentally friendly method of pest control involving mass release of sterilized insects that reduce the wild population through infertile matings. Insects carrying a female-specific autocidal genetic system offer an attractive alternative to conventional sterilization methods while also eliminating females from the release population. We exploited sex-specific alternative splicing in insects to engineer female-specific autocidal genetic systems in the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata. These rely on the insertion of cassette exons from the C. capitata transformer gene into a heterologous tetracycline-repressible transactivator such that the transactivator transcript is disrupted in male splice variants but not in the female-specific one. As the key components of these systems function across a broad phylogenetic range, this strategy addresses the paucity of sex-specific expression systems (e.g., early-acting, female-specific promoters) in insects other than Drosophila melanogaster. The approach may have wide applicability for regulating gene expression in other organisms, particularly for combinatorial control with appropriate promoters. PMID:17322873

  1. Sip1, a novel RS domain-containing protein essential for pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W J; Wu, J Y

    1998-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that protein-protein interactions among splicing factors may play an important role in pre-mRNA splicing. We report here identification and functional characterization of a new splicing factor, Sip1 (SC35-interacting protein 1). Sip1 was initially identified by virtue of its interaction with SC35, a splicing factor of the SR family. Sip1 interacts with not only several SR proteins but also with U1-70K and U2AF65, proteins associated with 5' and 3' splice sites, respectively. The predicted Sip1 sequence contains an arginine-serine-rich (RS) domain but does not have any known RNA-binding motifs, indicating that it is not a member of the SR family. Sip1 also contains a region with weak sequence similarity to the Drosophila splicing regulator suppressor of white apricot (SWAP). An essential role for Sip1 in pre-mRNA splicing was suggested by the observation that anti-Sip1 antibodies depleted splicing activity from HeLa nuclear extract. Purified recombinant Sip1 protein, but not other RS domain-containing proteins such as SC35, ASF/SF2, and U2AF65, restored the splicing activity of the Sip1-immunodepleted extract. Addition of U2AF65 protein further enhanced the splicing reconstitution by the Sip1 protein. Deficiency in the formation of both A and B splicing complexes in the Sip1-depleted nuclear extract indicates an important role of Sip1 in spliceosome assembly. Together, these results demonstrate that Sip1 is a novel RS domain-containing protein required for pre-mRNA splicing and that the functional role of Sip1 in splicing is distinct from those of known RS domain-containing splicing factors. PMID:9447963

  2. Accurate Splicing of HDAC6 Pre-mRNA Requires SON

    PubMed Central

    Battini, Vishnu Priya; Bubulya, Athanasios; Bubulya, Paula A.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing requires proper splice site selection mediated by many factors including snRNPs and serine-arginine rich (SR) splicing factors. Our lab previously reported that the SR-like protein SON maintains organization of pre-mRNA splicing factors in nuclear speckles as well as splicing of many human transcripts including mRNAs coding for the chromatin-modifying enzymes HDAC6, ADA and SETD8. However, the mechanism by which SON maintains accurate splicing is unknown. To build tools for understanding SON-dependent pre-mRNA splicing, we constructed a minigene reporter plasmid driving expression of the genomic sequence spanning exons 26 through 29 of HDAC6. Following SON depletion, we observed altered splicing of HDAC6 reporter transcripts that showed exclusion of exons 27 and 28, reflecting the splicing patterns of endogenous HDAC6 mRNA. Importantly, loss of HDAC6 biological function was also observed, as indicated by truncated HDAC6 protein and corresponding absence of aggresome assembly activities of HDAC6 binding-of-ubiquitin zinc finger (BUZ) domain. We therefore propose that SON-mediated splicing regulation of HDAC6 is essential for supporting protein degradation pathways that prevent human disease. PMID:25782155

  3. GTP cyclohydrolase I mRNA: novel splice variants in the slime mould Physarum polycephalum and in human monocytes (THP-1) indicate conservation of mRNA processing.

    PubMed Central

    Golderer, G; Werner, E R; Heufler, C; Strohmaier, W; Gröbner, P; Werner-Felmayer, G

    2001-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (EC 3.5.4.16) is the first enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin [(6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin, H(4)-biopterin] in mammals and of folic acid in bacteria. Here we have characterized the GTP cyclohydrolase I gene structure and two mRNA species from Physarum polycephalum, an acellular slime mould that synthesizes H(4)-biopterin and metabolites of the folic acid biosynthetic pathway. Its GTP cyclohydrolase I gene consists of seven exons, and the two GTP cyclohydrolase I cDNA species isolated from Physarum encode for proteins with 228 (25.7 kDa) and 195 (22.1 kDa) amino acids. Furthermore, we identified two previously undescribed mRNA species in interferon-gamma-treated human myelomonocytoma cells (THP-1) in addition to the cDNA coding for the fully functional 250-residue (27.9 kDa) protein, which is identical with that in human phaeochromocytoma cells. One of the new splice variants codes for a 233-residue (25.7 kDa) protein, whereas the other codes for the full-length protein but is alternatively spliced within the 3'-untranslated region. In heterologous expression, the shorter proteins of Physarum as well as of THP-1 cells identified here are degraded by proteolysis. Accordingly, only the 27.9 kDa protein was detectable in Western blots from THP-1 cell extracts. Quantification of GTP cyclohydrolase I mRNA species in different human cell types with and without cytokine treatment showed that in addition to the correct mRNA the two splice variants isolated here, as well as the two splice variants known from human liver, are strongly induced by cytokines in cell types with inducible GTP cyclohydrolase I (THP-1, dermal fibroblasts), but not in cell types with constitutive GTP cyclohydrolase I expression (SK-N-SH, Hep-G2). As in human liver, splicing of the new mRNA variant found in THP-1 cells occurs at the boundary of exons 5 and 6. Strikingly, the 195-residue protein from Physarum is alternatively spliced at a homologous position

  4. Induction and reversal of myotonic dystrophy type 1 pre-mRNA splicing defects by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa; Tran, Tuan; Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, HaJeung; Chen, Catherine Z; Hoskins, Jason; Southall, Noel; Marugan, Juan J; Patnaik, Samarjit; Zheng, Wei; Austin, Chris P; Schatz, George C; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Thornton, Charles A; Disney, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    The ability to control pre-mRNA splicing with small molecules could facilitate the development of therapeutics or cell-based circuits that control gene function. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 is caused by the dysregulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing due to sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1) by expanded, non-coding r(CUG) repeats (r(CUG)(exp)). Here we report two small molecules that induce or ameliorate alternative splicing dysregulation. A thiophene-containing small molecule (1) inhibits the interaction of MBNL1 with its natural pre-mRNA substrates. Compound (2), a substituted naphthyridine, binds r(CUG)(exp) and displaces MBNL1. Structural models show that 1 binds MBNL1 in the Zn-finger domain and that 2 interacts with UU loops in r(CUG)(exp). This study provides a structural framework for small molecules that target MBNL1 by mimicking r(CUG)(exp) and shows that targeting MBNL1 causes dysregulation of alternative splicing, suggesting that MBNL1 is thus not a suitable therapeutic target for the treatment of myotonic dystrophy type 1. PMID:23806903

  5. Induction and Reversal of Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Pre-mRNA Splicing Defects by Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L.; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa; Tran, Tuan; Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, HaJeung; Chen, Catherine Z.; Hoskins, Jason; Southall, Noel; Marugan, Juan J.; Patnaik, Samarjit; Zheng, Wei; Austin, Chris P.; Schatz, George C.; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Thornton, Charles A.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to control pre-mRNA splicing with small molecules could facilitate the development of therapeutics or cell-based circuits that control gene function. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by the dysregulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing due to sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1) by expanded, non-coding r(CUG) repeats (r(CUG)exp). Here we report two small molecules that induce or ameliorate alternative splicing dysregulation. The thiophene-containing small molecule (1) inhibits the interaction of MBNL1 with its natural pre-mRNA substrates. Compound (2), a substituted naphthyridine, binds r(CUG)exp and displaces MBNL1. Structural models show that 1 binds MBNL1 in the Zn-finger domain and that 2 interacts with UU loops in r(CUG)exp. This study provides a structural framework for small molecules that target MBNL1 by mimicking r(CUG)exp and shows that targeting MBNL1 causes dysregulation of alternative splicing, suggesting that MBNL1 is thus not a suitable therapeutic target for the treatment of DM1. PMID:23806903

  6. The alternative splicing regulator Tra2b is required for somitogenesis and regulates splicing of an inhibitory Wnt11b isoform

    PubMed Central

    Dichmann, Darwin S; Walentek, Peter; Harland, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Alternative splicing is pervasive in vertebrates, yet little is known about most isoforms or their regulation. transformer-2b (tra2b) encodes a splicing regulator whose endogenous function is poorly understood. Tra2b knockdown in Xenopus results in embryos with multiple defects, including defective somitogenesis. Using RNA-seq, we identify 142 splice changes, mostly intron retention and exon skipping, of which 89% are not in current annotations. A previously not described isoform of wnt11b retains the last intron, resulting in a truncated ligand (Wnt11b-short). We show that this isoform acts as a dominant-negative in cardiac gene induction and pronephric tubule formation. To determine the contribution of Wnt11b-short to the tra2b phenotype, we induce retention of intron4 in wnt11b, which recapitulates the failure to form somites but not other tra2b morphant defects. This alternative splicing of a Wnt ligand adds intricacy to a complex signaling pathway and highlights intron retention as a regulatory mechanism. PMID:25620705

  7. Comprehensive identification of internal structure and alternative splicing events in circular RNAs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Wang, Jinfeng; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Jinyang; Chen, Shuai; Zhao, Fangqing

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies demonstrated circular RNAs (circRNAs) does not exclusively comprise mRNA exons, no study has extensively explored their internal structure. By combining an algorithm with long-read sequencing data and experimental validation, we, for the first time, comprehensively investigate internal components of circRNAs in 10 human cell lines and 62 fruit fly samples, and reveal the prevalence of alternative splicing (AS) events within circRNAs. Significantly, a large proportion of circRNA AS exons can hardly be detected in mRNAs and are enriched with binding sites of distinct splicing factors from those enriched in mRNA exons. We find that AS events in circRNAs have a preference towards nucleus localization and exhibit tissue- and developmental stage-specific expression patterns. This study suggests an independent regulation on the biogenesis or decay of AS events in circRNAs and the identified circular AS isoforms provide targets for future studies on circRNA formation and function. PMID:27350239

  8. Comprehensive identification of internal structure and alternative splicing events in circular RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuan; Wang, Jinfeng; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Jinyang; Chen, Shuai; Zhao, Fangqing

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies demonstrated circular RNAs (circRNAs) does not exclusively comprise mRNA exons, no study has extensively explored their internal structure. By combining an algorithm with long-read sequencing data and experimental validation, we, for the first time, comprehensively investigate internal components of circRNAs in 10 human cell lines and 62 fruit fly samples, and reveal the prevalence of alternative splicing (AS) events within circRNAs. Significantly, a large proportion of circRNA AS exons can hardly be detected in mRNAs and are enriched with binding sites of distinct splicing factors from those enriched in mRNA exons. We find that AS events in circRNAs have a preference towards nucleus localization and exhibit tissue- and developmental stage-specific expression patterns. This study suggests an independent regulation on the biogenesis or decay of AS events in circRNAs and the identified circular AS isoforms provide targets for future studies on circRNA formation and function. PMID:27350239

  9. Splicing of Friend Murine Leukemia Virus env-mRNA Enhances Its Ability to Form Polysomes.

    PubMed

    Machinaga, Akihito; Ishihara, Syuhei; Shirai, Akiko; Takase-Yoden, Sayaka

    2016-01-01

    Friend murine leukemia virus (MLV) belongs to the gamma retroviruses of the Retroviridae family. The positive-sense RNA of its genome contains a 5' long terminal repeat (LTR), 5' leader sequence, gag, pol, env, and 3' LTR. Transcription from proviral DNA begins from the R region of the 5' LTR and ends at the polyadenylation signal located at the R region of the other end of the 3' LTR. There is a 5' splice site in the 5' leader sequence and a 3' splice site at the 3' end of the pol region. Both full-length unspliced mRNAs and a singly spliced mRNA (env-mRNA) are produced in MLV-infected cells. The MLV Env protein plays important roles both in viral adsorption to host cells and in neuropathogenic disease in MLV-infected mice and rats. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms controlling Env expression is important for determining the functions of the Env protein. We have previously shown that splicing increases env-mRNA stability and translation efficiency. Generally, mRNA polysome formation correlates with translation efficiency. Therefore, here we investigated the effects of env-mRNA splicing on polysome formation to identify mechanisms for Env up-regulation due to splicing. We performed polysome profile analyses using Env-expression plasmids producing spliced or unspliced env-mRNA and showed that the former formed polysomes more efficiently than the latter. Thus, splicing of env-mRNA facilitated polysome formation, suggesting that this contributes to up-regulation of Env expression. We replaced the env region of the expression plasmids with a luciferase (luc) gene, and found that in this case both unspliced and spliced luc-mRNA formed polysomes to a similar extent. Thus, we conclude that whether mRNA polysome formation is affected by splicing depends on the structure of gene in question. PMID:26909075

  10. Splicing of Friend Murine Leukemia Virus env-mRNA Enhances Its Ability to Form Polysomes

    PubMed Central

    Machinaga, Akihito; Ishihara, Syuhei; Shirai, Akiko; Takase-Yoden, Sayaka

    2016-01-01

    Friend murine leukemia virus (MLV) belongs to the gamma retroviruses of the Retroviridae family. The positive-sense RNA of its genome contains a 5′ long terminal repeat (LTR), 5′ leader sequence, gag, pol, env, and 3′ LTR. Transcription from proviral DNA begins from the R region of the 5′ LTR and ends at the polyadenylation signal located at the R region of the other end of the 3′ LTR. There is a 5′ splice site in the 5′ leader sequence and a 3′ splice site at the 3′ end of the pol region. Both full-length unspliced mRNAs and a singly spliced mRNA (env-mRNA) are produced in MLV-infected cells. The MLV Env protein plays important roles both in viral adsorption to host cells and in neuropathogenic disease in MLV-infected mice and rats. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms controlling Env expression is important for determining the functions of the Env protein. We have previously shown that splicing increases env-mRNA stability and translation efficiency. Generally, mRNA polysome formation correlates with translation efficiency. Therefore, here we investigated the effects of env-mRNA splicing on polysome formation to identify mechanisms for Env up-regulation due to splicing. We performed polysome profile analyses using Env-expression plasmids producing spliced or unspliced env-mRNA and showed that the former formed polysomes more efficiently than the latter. Thus, splicing of env-mRNA facilitated polysome formation, suggesting that this contributes to up-regulation of Env expression. We replaced the env region of the expression plasmids with a luciferase (luc) gene, and found that in this case both unspliced and spliced luc-mRNA formed polysomes to a similar extent. Thus, we conclude that whether mRNA polysome formation is affected by splicing depends on the structure of gene in question. PMID:26909075

  11. RNA splicing regulated by RBFOX1 is essential for cardiac function in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Frese, Karen S; Meder, Benjamin; Keller, Andreas; Just, Steffen; Haas, Jan; Vogel, Britta; Fischer, Simon; Backes, Christina; Matzas, Mark; Köhler, Doreen; Benes, Vladimir; Katus, Hugo A; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2015-08-15

    Alternative splicing is one of the major mechanisms through which the proteomic and functional diversity of eukaryotes is achieved. However, the complex nature of the splicing machinery, its associated splicing regulators and the functional implications of alternatively spliced transcripts are only poorly understood. Here, we investigated the functional role of the splicing regulator rbfox1 in vivo using the zebrafish as a model system. We found that loss of rbfox1 led to progressive cardiac contractile dysfunction and heart failure. By using deep-transcriptome sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR, we show that depletion of rbfox1 in zebrafish results in an altered isoform expression of several crucial target genes, such as actn3a and hug. This study underlines that tightly regulated splicing is necessary for unconstrained cardiac function and renders the splicing regulator rbfox1 an interesting target for investigation in human heart failure and cardiomyopathy. PMID:26116573

  12. RNA splicing regulated by RBFOX1 is essential for cardiac function in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Frese, Karen S.; Meder, Benjamin; Keller, Andreas; Just, Steffen; Haas, Jan; Vogel, Britta; Fischer, Simon; Backes, Christina; Matzas, Mark; Köhler, Doreen; Benes, Vladimir; Katus, Hugo A.; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Alternative splicing is one of the major mechanisms through which the proteomic and functional diversity of eukaryotes is achieved. However, the complex nature of the splicing machinery, its associated splicing regulators and the functional implications of alternatively spliced transcripts are only poorly understood. Here, we investigated the functional role of the splicing regulator rbfox1 in vivo using the zebrafish as a model system. We found that loss of rbfox1 led to progressive cardiac contractile dysfunction and heart failure. By using deep-transcriptome sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR, we show that depletion of rbfox1 in zebrafish results in an altered isoform expression of several crucial target genes, such as actn3a and hug. This study underlines that tightly regulated splicing is necessary for unconstrained cardiac function and renders the splicing regulator rbfox1 an interesting target for investigation in human heart failure and cardiomyopathy. PMID:26116573

  13. Antagonistic regulation of mRNA expression and splicing by CELF and MBNL proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eric T.; Ward, Amanda J.; Cherone, Jennifer M.; Giudice, Jimena; Wang, Thomas T.; Treacy, Daniel J.; Lambert, Nicole J.; Freese, Peter; Saxena, Tanvi; Cooper, Thomas A.; Burge, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    RNA binding proteins of the conserved CUGBP1, Elav-like factor (CELF) family contribute to heart and skeletal muscle development and are implicated in myotonic dystrophy (DM). To understand their genome-wide functions, we analyzed the transcriptome dynamics following induction of CELF1 or CELF2 in adult mouse heart and of CELF1 in muscle by RNA-seq, complemented by crosslinking/immunoprecipitation-sequencing (CLIP-seq) analysis of mouse cells and tissues to distinguish direct from indirect regulatory targets. We identified hundreds of mRNAs bound in their 3′ UTRs by both CELF1 and the developmentally induced MBNL1 protein, a threefold greater overlap in target messages than expected, including messages involved in development and cell differentiation. The extent of 3′ UTR binding by CELF1 and MBNL1 predicted the degree of mRNA repression or stabilization, respectively, following CELF1 induction. However, CELF1's RNA binding specificity in vitro was not detectably altered by coincubation with recombinant MBNL1. These findings support a model in which CELF and MBNL proteins bind independently to mRNAs but functionally compete to specify down-regulation or localization/stabilization, respectively, of hundreds of mRNA targets. Expression of many alternative 3′ UTR isoforms was altered following CELF1 induction, with 3′ UTR binding associated with down-regulation of isoforms and genes. The splicing of hundreds of alternative exons was oppositely regulated by these proteins, confirming an additional layer of regulatory antagonism previously observed in a handful of cases. The regulatory relationships between CELFs and MBNLs in control of both mRNA abundance and splicing appear to have evolved to enhance developmental transitions in major classes of heart and muscle genes. PMID:25883322

  14. Identification of two spliced leader RNA transcripts from Perkinsus marinus.

    PubMed

    Hearne, Jennifer L; Pitula, Joseph S

    2011-01-01

    Spliced leader (SL) variants are present in a number of mRNAs from Perkinsus marinus. Three different SLs of 22 nucleotides (nt) in length were previously reported, with a consensus sequence of (DCCGUAGCCAUYUUGGCUCAAG). A truncated 21 nt SL, with an (A) at nt-1 and a (U) deletion at nt-13, has also been reported. Here, we report an additional 21 nt SL variant with (G) at nt-1. Using cDNA analysis, a full-length SL RNA transcript was identified for both 21 nt SLs (SL2[A] and SL2[G]). This transcript is 81 nt in length and contains a conserved transcription termination sequence present in closely related dinoflagellates. PMID:21435079

  15. Splicing of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA is essential for viral infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss-László, Z; Blanc, S; Hohn, T

    1995-01-01

    A splicing event essential for the infectivity of a plant pararetrovirus has been characterized. Transient expression experiments using reporter constructs revealed a splice donor site in the leader sequence of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S RNA and three additional splice donor sites within open reading frame (ORF) I. All four donors use the same splice acceptor within ORF II. Splicing between the leader and ORF II produces an mRNA from which ORF III and, in the presence of the CaMV translational transactivator, ORF IV can be translated efficiently. The other three splicing events produce RNAs encoding ORF I-II in-frame fusions. All four spliced CaMV RNAs were detected in CaMV-infected plants. Virus mutants in which the splice acceptor site in ORF II is inactivated are not infectious, indicating that splicing plays an essential role in the CaMV life cycle. The results presented here suggest a model for viral gene expression in which RNA splicing is required to provide appropriate substrate mRNAs for the specialized translation mechanisms of CaMV. Images PMID:7628455

  16. Complex Alternative Splicing of the Smarca2 Gene Suggests the Importance of Smarca2-B Variants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Sun, Yuan; Ma, Ling; Wang, Chenguang; Wu, Jian-min; Bi, Anding; Liao, D. Joshua

    2011-01-01

    BRM is an ATPase component of the SWI/SNF complex that regulates chromatin remodeling and cell proliferation and is considered a tumor suppressor. In this study we characterized transcripts from the Smarca2 gene that encodes the BRM protein. We found that the human Smarca2 gene (hSmarca2), like its mouse counterpart (mSmarca2), also initiated a short transcript from intron 27 of the long transcript. We name the long and short transcripts as Smarca2-a and Smarca2-b, respectively. Like its human counterpart, mSmarca2-a also underwent alternative splicing at the 54-bp exon 29. The hSmarca2-b had two alternative initiation sites and underwent alternative splicing at three different 3' sites of exon 1 and at exons 2, 3 and/or 5. We identified nine hSmarca2-b mRNA variants that might produce five different proteins. mSmarca2-b also underwent alternative splicing at exon 3 and/or exon 5, besides alternatively retaining part of intron 1 in exon 1. Smarca2-b was expressed more abundantly than Smarca2-a in many cell lines and was more sensitive to serum starvation. Moreover, cyclin D1 also regulated the expression of both Smarca2-a and Smarca2-b in a complex manner. These data suggest that the functions of the Smarca2 gene may be very complex, not just simply inhibiting cell proliferation, and in certain situations may be elicited mainly by expressing the much less known Smarca2-b, not the better studied Smarca2-a and its products BRM proteins. PMID:21811517

  17. AVISPA: a web tool for the prediction and analysis of alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Barash, Yoseph; Vaquero-Garcia, Jorge; González-Vallinas, Juan; Xiong, Hui Yuan; Gao, Weijun; Lee, Leo J; Frey, Brendan J

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptome complexity and its relation to numerous diseases underpins the need to predict in silico splice variants and the regulatory elements that affect them. Building upon our recently described splicing code, we developed AVISPA, a Galaxy-based web tool for splicing prediction and analysis. Given an exon and its proximal sequence, the tool predicts whether the exon is alternatively spliced, displays tissue-dependent splicing patterns, and whether it has associated regulatory elements. We assess AVISPA's accuracy on an independent dataset of tissue-dependent exons, and illustrate how the tool can be applied to analyze a gene of interest. AVISPA is available at http://avispa.biociphers.org. PMID:24156756

  18. Staufen1 Regulates Multiple Alternative Splicing Events either Positively or Negatively in DM1 Indicating Its Role as a Disease Modifier

    PubMed Central

    Bondy-Chorney, Emma; Crawford Parks, Tara E.; Ravel-Chapuis, Aymeric; Klinck, Roscoe; Rocheleau, Lynda; Pelchat, Martin; Chabot, Benoit; Jasmin, Bernard J.; Côté, Jocelyn

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a neuromuscular disorder caused by an expansion of CUG repeats in the 3' UTR of the DMPK gene. The CUG repeats form aggregates of mutant mRNA, which cause misregulation and/or sequestration of RNA-binding proteins, causing aberrant alternative splicing in cells. Previously, we showed that the multi-functional RNA-binding protein Staufen1 (Stau1) was increased in skeletal muscle of DM1 mouse models and patients. We also showed that Stau1 rescues the alternative splicing profile of pre-mRNAs, e.g. the INSR and CLC1, known to be aberrantly spliced in DM1. In order to explore further the potential of Stau1 as a therapeutic target for DM1, we first investigated the mechanism by which Stau1 regulates pre-mRNA alternative splicing. We report here that Stau1 regulates the alternative splicing of exon 11 of the human INSR via binding to Alu elements located in intron 10. Additionally, using a high-throughput RT-PCR screen, we have identified numerous Stau1-regulated alternative splicing events in both WT and DM1 myoblasts. A number of these aberrant ASEs in DM1, including INSR exon 11, are rescued by overexpression of Stau1. However, we find other ASEs in DM1 cells, where overexpression of Stau1 shifts the splicing patterns away from WT conditions. Moreover, we uncovered that Stau1-regulated ASEs harbour Alu elements in intronic regions flanking the alternative exon more than non-Stau1 targets. Taken together, these data highlight the broad impact of Stau1 as a splicing regulator and suggest that Stau1 may act as a disease modifier in DM1. PMID:26824521

  19. Staufen1 Regulates Multiple Alternative Splicing Events either Positively or Negatively in DM1 Indicating Its Role as a Disease Modifier.

    PubMed

    Bondy-Chorney, Emma; Crawford Parks, Tara E; Ravel-Chapuis, Aymeric; Klinck, Roscoe; Rocheleau, Lynda; Pelchat, Martin; Chabot, Benoit; Jasmin, Bernard J; Côté, Jocelyn

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a neuromuscular disorder caused by an expansion of CUG repeats in the 3' UTR of the DMPK gene. The CUG repeats form aggregates of mutant mRNA, which cause misregulation and/or sequestration of RNA-binding proteins, causing aberrant alternative splicing in cells. Previously, we showed that the multi-functional RNA-binding protein Staufen1 (Stau1) was increased in skeletal muscle of DM1 mouse models and patients. We also showed that Stau1 rescues the alternative splicing profile of pre-mRNAs, e.g. the INSR and CLC1, known to be aberrantly spliced in DM1. In order to explore further the potential of Stau1 as a therapeutic target for DM1, we first investigated the mechanism by which Stau1 regulates pre-mRNA alternative splicing. We report here that Stau1 regulates the alternative splicing of exon 11 of the human INSR via binding to Alu elements located in intron 10. Additionally, using a high-throughput RT-PCR screen, we have identified numerous Stau1-regulated alternative splicing events in both WT and DM1 myoblasts. A number of these aberrant ASEs in DM1, including INSR exon 11, are rescued by overexpression of Stau1. However, we find other ASEs in DM1 cells, where overexpression of Stau1 shifts the splicing patterns away from WT conditions. Moreover, we uncovered that Stau1-regulated ASEs harbour Alu elements in intronic regions flanking the alternative exon more than non-Stau1 targets. Taken together, these data highlight the broad impact of Stau1 as a splicing regulator and suggest that Stau1 may act as a disease modifier in DM1. PMID:26824521

  20. rMAPS: RNA map analysis and plotting server for alternative exon regulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Juw Won; Jung, Sungbo; Rouchka, Eric C.; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a critical role in the regulation of alternative splicing (AS), a prevalent mechanism for generating transcriptomic and proteomic diversity in eukaryotic cells. Studies have shown that AS can be regulated by RBPs in a binding-site-position dependent manner. Depending on where RBPs bind, splicing of an alternative exon can be enhanced or suppressed. Therefore, spatial analyses of RBP motifs and binding sites around alternative exons will help elucidate splicing regulation by RBPs. The development of high-throughput sequencing technologies has allowed transcriptome-wide analyses of AS and RBP–RNA interactions. Given a set of differentially regulated alternative exons obtained from RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) experiments, the rMAPS web server (http://rmaps.cecsresearch.org) performs motif analyses of RBPs in the vicinity of alternatively spliced exons and creates RNA maps that depict the spatial patterns of RBP motifs. Similarly, rMAPS can also perform spatial analyses of RBP–RNA binding sites identified by cross-linking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq) experiments. We anticipate rMAPS will be a useful tool for elucidating RBP regulation of alternative exon splicing using high-throughput sequencing data. PMID:27174931

  1. rMAPS: RNA map analysis and plotting server for alternative exon regulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Juw Won; Jung, Sungbo; Rouchka, Eric C; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Xing, Yi

    2016-07-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a critical role in the regulation of alternative splicing (AS), a prevalent mechanism for generating transcriptomic and proteomic diversity in eukaryotic cells. Studies have shown that AS can be regulated by RBPs in a binding-site-position dependent manner. Depending on where RBPs bind, splicing of an alternative exon can be enhanced or suppressed. Therefore, spatial analyses of RBP motifs and binding sites around alternative exons will help elucidate splicing regulation by RBPs. The development of high-throughput sequencing technologies has allowed transcriptome-wide analyses of AS and RBP-RNA interactions. Given a set of differentially regulated alternative exons obtained from RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) experiments, the rMAPS web server (http://rmaps.cecsresearch.org) performs motif analyses of RBPs in the vicinity of alternatively spliced exons and creates RNA maps that depict the spatial patterns of RBP motifs. Similarly, rMAPS can also perform spatial analyses of RBP-RNA binding sites identified by cross-linking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq) experiments. We anticipate rMAPS will be a useful tool for elucidating RBP regulation of alternative exon splicing using high-throughput sequencing data. PMID:27174931

  2. Qualitative research of alternatively splice variants of fibronectin in different development stage of mice heart

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Feng; Ma, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ying; Wei, Fei-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background Fibronectin (FN) plays vital roles in cell adhesion, differentiation, proliferation and migration. It is involved in the process of embryonic development and is highly conserved during evolution. The EIIIA and EIIIB of FN show a very high degree of homology among vertebrates. Embryos deleting both EIIIA and EIIIB displayed multiple embryonic cardiovascular defects, implying their crucial role during embryogenesis. The correlation of spliced EIIIB, EIIIA, and IIICS of FN to heart development was studied by observing their chronological expression in mice heart. Methods C57 mice embryos at E11.5, E12.5, E13.5, E14.5, E15.5, E16.5, E17.5, E18.5, E19.5 days, postnatal day 1 (P1d), and adult male mice (3 months) were used. For each alternatively spliced FN1 domain (EIIIB, EIIIA and IIICS), primer pairs were designed for specific amplification. Total RNA was extracted from the heart tissue, reverse transcripted to cDNA, followed by RT-PCR with specific primers. The PCR amplification was verified by agarose gel electrophoresis, showing specific fragments of the expected sizes. Results In adult mice heart, only alternatively splice variants of EIIIA-, EIIIB-, IIICS+ were expressed. While in embryonic mice, spliced variant of EIIIA+/-, EIIIB+/-, IIICS+ were observed. The expression of EIIIA and EIIIB changed during heart development. Conclusions FN is crucial for the normal development of the embryonic heart by modulating cardiac neural crest (CNC) proliferation and survival, and maintenance of CNC cells. FN1 gene seems to play a significant role by expression of highly conserved EIIIA and EIIIB in embryonic heart development. PMID:26793352

  3. FULL-GENOME ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVE SPLICING IN MOUSE LIVER AFTER HEPATOTOXICANT EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alternative splicing plays a role in determining gene function and protein diversity. We have employed whole genome exon profiling using Affymetrix Mouse Exon 1.0 ST arrays to understand the significance of alternative splicing on a genome-wide scale in response to multiple toxic...

  4. RTCB-1 mediates neuroprotection via XBP-1 mRNA splicing in the unfolded protein response pathway.

    PubMed

    Ray, Arpita; Zhang, Siyuan; Rentas, Courtney; Caldwell, Kim A; Caldwell, Guy A

    2014-11-26

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons and age-dependent formation of protein inclusions that contain the α-synuclein (α-syn) protein. RNA interference (RNAi) screening using Caenorhabditis elegans identified RTCB-1, an uncharacterized gene product, as one of several significant modifiers of α-syn protein misfolding. RTCB-1 is the worm ortholog of the human HSPC117 protein, a component of RNA trafficking granules in mammalian neurons. Here we show that RTCB-1 protects C. elegans DA neurons from age-dependent degeneration induced by human α-syn. Moreover, neuronal-specific RNAi depletion of rtcb-1 enhanced α-syn-induced degeneration. Similar results were obtained when worms were exposed to the DA neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine. HSPC117 has been characterized recently as an essential subunit of the human tRNA splicing ligase complex. tRNA ligases have alternative functions in RNA repair and nonconventional mRNA splicing events. For example, in yeast, unconventional splicing of HAC1, a transcription factor that controls the unfolded protein response (UPR), is mediated by a tRNA ligase. In C. elegans, we demonstrate that RTCB-1 is necessary for xbp-1 (worm homolog of HAC1) mRNA splicing. Moreover, using a RNA ligase-dead mutant, we determine that the ligase activity of worm RTCB-1 is required for its neuroprotective role, which, in turn, is mediated through XBP-1 in the UPR pathway. Collectively, these studies highlight the mechanistic intersection of RNA processing and proteostasis in mediating neuroprotection. PMID:25429148

  5. Control of adenovirus E1B mRNA synthesis by a shift in the activities of RNA splice sites.

    PubMed Central

    Montell, C; Fisher, E F; Caruthers, M H; Berk, A J

    1984-01-01

    The primary transcript from adenovirus 2 early region 1B (E1B) is processed by differential RNA splicing into two overlapping mRNAs, 13S and 22S. The 22S mRNA is the major E1B mRNA during the early phase of infection, whereas the 13S mRNA predominates during the late phase. In previous work, it has been shown that this shift in proportions of the E1B mRNAs is influenced by increased cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA at late times in infection. Two observations presented here demonstrate that the increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA at late times is also regulated by a change in the specificity of RNA splicing. First, the relative concentrations of the 13S to 22S nuclear RNAs were not constant throughout infection but increased at late times. Secondly, studies with the mutant, adenovirus 2 pm2250 , provided evidence that there was an increased propensity to utilize a 5' splice in the region of the 13S 5' splice site at late times in infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 has a G----C transversion in the first base of E1B 13S mRNA intron preventing splicing of the 13S mRNA but not of the 22S mRNA. During the early phase of a pm2250 infection, the E1B primary transcripts were processed into the 22S mRNA only. However, during the late phase, when the 13S mRNA normally predominates, E1B primary transcripts were also processed by RNA splicing at two formerly unused or cryptic 5' splice sites. Both cryptic splice sites were located much closer to the disrupted 13S 5' splice site than to the 22S 5' splice site. Thus, the temporal increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA to the 22S mRNA is regulated by two processes, an increase in cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA and an increased propensity to utilize the 13S 5' splice site during the late phase of infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 was not defective for productive infection of HeLa cells or for transformation of rat cells. Images PMID:6727875

  6. A new γ-interferon-inducible promoter and splice variants of an anti-angiogenic human tRNA synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianming; Shue, Eveline; Ewalt, Karla L.; Schimmel, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Two forms of human tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) are produced in vivo through alternative mRNA splicing. The two forms, full-length TrpRS and mini TrpRS, are catalytically active, but are distinguished by the striking anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic activity specific to mini TrpRS. Here we describe two new splice variants of human TrpRS mRNA. Their production was strongly regulated by γ-interferon (IFN-γ), an anti-proliferative cytokine known to stimulate the expression of other anti-angiogenic factors. A new IFN-γ-sensitive promoter was demonstrated to drive production of these splice variants. In human endothelial cells, both the newly discovered and a previously reported promoter were shown to respond specifically to IFN-γ and not to other cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, transforming growth factor-β, interleukin-4 or erythropoietin. In addition, both promoters were stimulated by the ‘downstream’ interferon regulatory factor 1 that, in turn, is known to be regulated by the ‘upstream’ signal transducer and activator of transcription 1α subunit. Thus, the tandem promoters provide a dual system to regulate expression and alternative splicing of human TrpRS in vivo. PMID:14757836

  7. A novel alternative splicing isoform of NF2 identified in human Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fang; Zhou, Zhengguang; Su, Wen; Wang, Zishu; Wu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular schwannoma (VS) is a benign, slow-growing cranial tumor that originates from the hypertrophy of Schwann cells. The majority of sporadic VS are unilateral, and the mechanisms underlying VS tumorigenesis are not fully understood. The human neurofibromin 2 (NF2) gene encodes the tumor suppressor protein merlin and the NF2 transcript can be alternatively spliced to form numerous isoforms. The present study investigated human Schwann cells (HSCs) at the mRNA and protein level to understand the function of the alternative splicing (AS) isoform of NF2. The total RNA of HSCs was isolated and the full-length coding sequence of NF2 was amplified. The amplified products were excised from agarose gels, purified and sequenced. NF2 at a protein level was assayed by immunoprecipitation and western blot analysis. The full-length and spliced NF2 forms were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from the HSC complementary DNA and ligated into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(+). The plasmids were transfected into the HSC HEI-193 cell line and cell proliferation assays were performed using Cell Counting Kit-8. PCR analysis using HSC total RNA as a template revealed the presence of a shortened NF2 transcript, which was due to splicing at the 3′-end of the NF2 mRNA. Sequence analysis confirmed that this AS isoform omitted exons 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16. Immunoprecipitation and western blot analysis demonstrated that the AS isoform was highly expressed in the HSCs at 38 kDa, while the wild-type (WT) isoform, which was expected at 66 kDa, was undetectable. Transfection and cell proliferation assays revealed that the WT isoform exhibited significant growth inhibition, while the AS isoform did not suppress cell growth. In conclusion, the present study detected AS NF2 isoforms in HSC for the first time, and investigated the function of the principle AS isoform. The present study suggests that although HSCs have an undetectable level of WT isoform of the NF2 protein

  8. Nuclear mutations that block group II RNA splicing in maize chloroplasts reveal several intron classes with distinct requirements for splicing factors.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, B D; Kulhanek, D J; Barkan, A

    1997-01-01

    To elucidate mechanisms that regulate chloroplast RNA splicing in multicellular plants, we sought nuclear mutations in maize that result in chloroplast splicing defects. Evidence is presented for two nuclear genes whose function is required for the splicing of group II introns in maize chloroplasts. A mutation in the crs1 (for chloroplast RNA splicing 1) gene blocks the splicing of only the atpF intron, whereas a mutation in the crs2 gene blocks the splicing of many chloroplast introns. In addition, a correlation was observed between the absence of plastid ribosomes and the failure to splice several chloroplast introns. Our results suggest that a chloroplast-encoded factor and a nuclear-encoded factor whose activity requires crs2 function facilitate the splicing of distinct sets of group II introns. These two genetically defined intron sets also differ with regard to intron structure: one set consists of only subgroup IIA introns and the other of only subgroup IIB introns. Therefore, it is likely that distinct splicing factors recognize subgroup-specific features of intron structure or facilitate subgroup-specific aspects of the splicing reaction. Of the 12 pre-mRNA introns in the maize chloroplast genome, only one is normally spliced in both crs2 mutants and in mutants lacking plastid ribosomes, indicating that few, if any, of the group II introns in the chloroplast genome undergo autocatalytic splicing in vivo. PMID:9090875

  9. Synthetic oligonucleotides recruit ILF2/3 to RNA transcripts to modulate splicing.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Frank; Hua, Yimin; Chun, Seung J; Prakash, Thazha P; Krainer, Adrian R; Bennett, C Frank

    2012-06-01

    We describe a new technology for recruiting specific proteins to RNA through selective recognition of heteroduplexes formed with chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). Typically, ASOs function by hybridizing to their RNA targets and blocking the binding of single-stranded RNA-binding proteins. Unexpectedly, we found that ASOs with 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro (2'-F) nucleotides, but not with other 2' chemical modifications, have an additional property: they form heteroduplexes with RNA that are specifically recognized by the interleukin enhancer-binding factor 2 and 3 complex (ILF2/3). 2'-F ASO-directed recruitment of ILF2/3 to RNA can be harnessed to control gene expression by modulating alternative splicing of target transcripts. ILF2/3 recruitment to precursor mRNA near an exon results in omission of the exon from the mature mRNA, both in cell culture and in mice. We discuss the possibility of using chemically engineered ASOs that recruit specific proteins to modulate gene expression for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22504300

  10. A human RNA helicase-like protein, HRH1, facilitates nuclear export of spliced mRNA by releasing the RNA from the spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Ohno, M; Shimura, Y

    1996-04-15

    Because the nuclear export of mRNA occurs only after the splicing reaction is completed, intron-containing pre-mRNA does not normally appear in the cytoplasm. As a mechanism to secure this, intron-containing RNA is retained in the nucleus via formation of the spliceosome. Therefore, the process of releasing spliced mRNA from the spliceosome after completion of splicing is an essential step for triggering the nuclear export of the spliced mRNA. In budding yeast, RNA helicase-like protein Prp22 is implicated in this process. Here we demonstrate the function of HRH1, a human protein homologous to Prp22, in mammalian cells using dominant-negative HRH1++ mutants (dn-HRH1). dn-HRH1 protein stalls on the spliceosome and prevents release of the spliced RNA from the spliceosome in vitro. Expression of dn-HRH1 in mammalian cells leads to inhibition of splicing and to extensive nuclear export of unspliced pre-mRNA, probably because of the incapability of recycling spliceosome components that normally retain the pre-mRNA in the nucleus. The arginine/serine-rich domain (RS domain) of HRH1, which is missing in Prp22, confers a nuclear localization signal, and appears to facilitate the interaction of HRH1 with the spliceosome. This is the first report on a bona fide mammalian homolog of yeast Prp splicing factor, and also on a mammalian RNA helicase-like splicing factor. PMID:8608946

  11. Achieving targeted and quantifiable alteration of mRNA splicing with Morpholino oligos

    SciTech Connect

    Morcos, Paul A. . E-mail: pmorcos@gene-tools.com

    2007-06-29

    This work represents the first guide for using steric-block antisense oligos as tools for effective and targeted modification of RNA splicing. Comparison of several steric-block oligo types shows the properties of Morpholinos provide significant advantages over other potential splice-blocking oligos. The procedures and complications of designing effective splice-blocking Morpholino oligos are described. The design process requires complete pre-mRNA sequence for defining suitable targets, which usually generate specific predictable messengers. To validate the targeting procedure, the level and nature of transcript alteration is characterized by RT-PCR analysis of splice modification in a {beta}-globin splice model system. An oligo-walking study reveals that while U1 and U2 small nuclear RiboNucleoProtein (snRNP) binding sites are the most effective targets for blocking splicing, inclusion of these sites is not required to achieve effective splice modifications. The most effective targeting strategy employs simultaneously blocking snRNP binding sites and splice-junctions. The work presented here continues to be the basis for most of the successful Morpholino oligos designed for the worldwide research community to block RNA splicing.

  12. Identification of novel splicing variants from RON proto-oncogene pre-mRNA.

    PubMed

    Moon, Heegyum; Cho, Sunghee; Yang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Jianhua; Loh, Tiing Jen; Zheng, Xuexiu; Shen, Haihong

    2012-12-01

    RON is a proto-oncogene that induces cell dissociation, migration and matrix invasion. RON∆160, a splicing variant of RON, is a natural splicing product in colon cancers that is produced through skipping of exons 5 and 6 in alternative splicing process. RON∆160 promotes cellular transformation in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. We present, here, two novel splicing variants of RON in the partial splicing events that involve exons 5 and 6. The common facts of these two novel splicing variants are that exons 4-7 are included. In addition, intron 4 is spliced whereas intron 5 is included in both variants. The difference of these two isoforms is the inclusion or skipping of intron 6. In one variant intron 6 is included, but intron 6 is skipped in another variant. These two variants should be truncated but these proteins have not yet been detected. PMID:22993024

  13. Alternative splicing of the tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) gene in human and mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Lin; Sterner, C.; Maheshwar, M.M.

    1995-06-10

    The recently isolated gene for tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) encodes a 5.5.kb transcript that is widely expressed. The TSC2 gene product, named tuberin, is a 1784-amino-acid protein that shows a small stretch of homology to the GTPase activating protein rap1GAP. We have detected a novel variant of the TSC2 mRNA lacking 129 nucleotides, predicting an in-frame deletion of 43 amino acids spanning codons 946-988 of tuberin. This 129-bp deletion precisely corresponds to exon 25 of the TSC2 gene suggesting that alternative splicing leads to production of two forms of transcripts designated isoforms 1 and 2. Further molecular analysis revealed a third isoform exhibiting a deletion of 44 amino acids spanning codons 946-989 of tuberin. Amino acid 989 is a Ser residue encoded by the first codon of exon 26. The two isoforms also exist in newborn and adult mouse tissues, reinforcing the potential functional importance of these alternatively spliced products. These alternative isoforms should have implications for efforts aimed at identifying mutations in TSC patients. The distinct polypeptides encoded by the TSC2 gene may have different targets as well as functions involved in the regulation of cell growth. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Alternative splicing and expression profile analysis of expressed sequence tags in domestic pig.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Tao, Lin; Ye, Lin; He, Ling; Zhu, Yuan-Zhong; Zhu, Yue-Dong; Zhou, Yan

    2007-02-01

    Domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica) is one of the most important mammals to humans. Alternative splicing is a cellular mechanism in eukaryotes that greatly increases the diversity of gene products. Expression sequence tags (ESTs) have been widely used for gene discovery, expression profile analysis, and alternative splicing detection. In this study, a total of 712,905 ESTs extracted from 101 different non-normalized EST libraries of the domestic pig were analyzed. These EST libraries cover the nervous system, digestive system, immune system, and meat production related tissues from embryo, newborn, and adult pigs, making contributions to the analysis of alternative splicing variants as well as expression profiles in various stages of tissues. A modified approach was designed to cluster and assemble large EST datasets, aiming to detect alternative splicing together with EST abundance of each splicing variant. Much efforts were made to classify alternative splicing into different types and apply different filters to each type to get more reliable results. Finally, a total of 1,223 genes with average 2.8 splicing variants were detected among 16,540 unique genes. The overview of expression profiles would change when we take alternative splicing into account. PMID:17572361

  15. Identification and comparative analysis of novel alternatively spliced transcripts of RhoGEF domain encoding gene in C. elegans and C. briggsae

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Luv; Tabish, Mohammad; Ganesh, Subramaniam; Dubey, Deepti

    2007-01-01

    Y95B8A.12 gene of C. elegans encodes RhoGEF domain, which is a novel module in the Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Alternative splicing increases transcriptome and proteome diversification. Y95B8A.12 gene has two reported alternatively spliced transcripts by the C. elegans genome sequencing consortium. In the work presented here, we report the presence of four new spliced transcripts of Y95B8A.12 arising as a result of alternative splicing in the pre-mRNA encoded by Y95B8A.12 gene. Our methodology involved the use of various gene or exon finding programmes and several other bioinformatics tools followed by experimental validation. We have also studied alternative splicing pattern in RhoGEF domain encoding orthologues gene from C. briggsae and have obtained very similar results. These new unreported spliced transcripts, which were not detected through conventional approaches, not only point towards the extent of alternative splicing in C. elegans genes but also emphasize towards the need of analyzing genome data using a combinations of bioinformatics tools to delineate all possible gene products. PMID:18188419

  16. Prediction and Quantification of Splice Events from RNA-Seq Data

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Leonard D.; Cao, Yi; Pau, Gregoire; Lawrence, Michael; Wu, Thomas D.; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Gentleman, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of splice variants from short read RNA-seq data remains a challenging problem. Here we present a novel method for the genome-guided prediction and quantification of splice events from RNA-seq data, which enables the analysis of unannotated and complex splice events. Splice junctions and exons are predicted from reads mapped to a reference genome and are assembled into a genome-wide splice graph. Splice events are identified recursively from the graph and are quantified locally based on reads extending across the start or end of each splice variant. We assess prediction accuracy based on simulated and real RNA-seq data, and illustrate how different read aligners (GSNAP, HISAT2, STAR, TopHat2) affect prediction results. We validate our approach for quantification based on simulated data, and compare local estimates of relative splice variant usage with those from other methods (MISO, Cufflinks) based on simulated and real RNA-seq data. In a proof-of-concept study of splice variants in 16 normal human tissues (Illumina Body Map 2.0) we identify 249 internal exons that belong to known genes but are not related to annotated exons. Using i