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Sample records for alters keratinocytes expression

  1. Storage Temperature Alters the Expression of Differentiation-Related Genes in Cultured Oral Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Utheim, Tor Paaske; Islam, Rakibul; Fostad, Ida G.; Eidet, Jon R.; Sehic, Amer; Olstad, Ole K.; Dartt, Darlene A.; Messelt, Edward B.; Griffith, May; Pasovic, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Storage of cultured human oral keratinocytes (HOK) allows for transportation of cultured transplants to eye clinics worldwide. In a previous study, one-week storage of cultured HOK was found to be superior with regard to viability and morphology at 12°C compared to 4°C and 37°C. To understand more of how storage temperature affects cell phenotype, gene expression of HOK before and after storage at 4°C, 12°C, and 37°C was assessed. Materials and Methods Cultured HOK were stored in HEPES- and sodium bicarbonate-buffered Minimum Essential Medium at 4°C, 12°C, and 37°C for one week. Total RNA was isolated and the gene expression profile was determined using DNA microarrays and analyzed with Partek Genomics Suite software and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Differentially expressed genes (fold change > 1.5 and P < 0.05) were identified by one-way ANOVA. Key genes were validated using qPCR. Results Gene expression of cultures stored at 4°C and 12°C clustered close to the unstored control cultures. Cultures stored at 37°C displayed substantial change in gene expression compared to the other groups. In comparison with 12°C, 2,981 genes were differentially expressed at 37°C. In contrast, only 67 genes were differentially expressed between the unstored control and the cells stored at 12°C. The 12°C and 37°C culture groups differed most significantly with regard to the expression of differentiation markers. The Hedgehog signaling pathway was significantly downregulated at 37°C compared to 12°C. Conclusion HOK cultures stored at 37°C showed considerably larger changes in gene expression compared to unstored cells than cultured HOK stored at 4°C and 12°C. The changes observed at 37°C consisted of differentiation of the cells towards a squamous epithelium-specific phenotype. Storing cultured ocular surface transplants at 37°C is therefore not recommended. This is particularly interesting as 37°C is the standard incubation temperature used for cell

  2. Decorin gene expression and its regulation in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Velez-DelValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Castro-Munozledo, Federico; Kuri-Harcuch, Walid

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} We showed that cultured human diploid epidermal keratinocytes express and synthesize decorin. {yields} Decorin is found intracytoplasmic in suprabasal cells of cultures and in human epidermis. {yields} Decorin mRNA expression in cHEK is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. {yields} Decorin immunostaining of psoriatic lesions showed a lower intensity and altered intracytoplasmic arrangements. -- Abstract: In various cell types, including cancer cells, decorin is involved in regulation of cell attachment, migration and proliferation. In skin, decorin is seen in dermis, but not in keratinocytes. We show that decorin gene (DCN) is expressed in the cultured keratinocytes, and the protein is found in the cytoplasm of differentiating keratinocytes and in suprabasal layers of human epidermis. RT-PCR experiments showed that DCN expression is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. Our data suggest that decorin should play a significant role in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, cutaneous homeostasis and dermatological diseases.

  3. Disc large 1 expression is altered by human papillomavirus E6/E7 proteins in organotypic cultures of human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Valdano, M Bugnon; Cavatorta, A L; Morale, M G; Marziali, F; de Souza Lino, V; Steenbergen, R D M; Boccardo, E; Gardiol, D

    2016-02-01

    Loss of cell polarity is a fundamental process in cell transformation. Among polarity proteins, we focused on human disc large (DLG1), which is localized mainly at adherens junctions and contributes to the control of cell proliferation. We previously demonstrated that its expression is altered in HPV-associated cervical neoplastic lesions, but the mechanisms beyond this remain unknown. In this study, we analysed the contribution of HPV proteins to the changes in DLG1 expression in the squamous epithelium. We observed tissue and intracellular misdistribution of DLG1 when high-risk HPV-18 E7 or E6/E7 proteins were expressed in organotypic raft cultures. The viral oncoproteins induce the loss of DLG1 from the cell borders and an increase in the level of DLG1 protein, reflecting the pattern observed in cervical lesions. These findings were corroborated in cultures bearing the entire HPV-18 genome. Interestingly, changes in tissue distribution and abundance of DLG1 were also detected in organotypic cultures expressing the low-risk HPV-11 E7 or E6/E7 proteins, suggesting a conserved function among different HPV types. However, for low-risk HPVs, the subcellular localization of DLG1 at cell-to-cell contacts was predominantly maintained. This report offers new evidence, we believe, of the involvement of HPV proteins in DLG1 expression pattern and our data support previous observations regarding DLG1 expression in cervical lesions. PMID:26653181

  4. Evidence for Alteration of EZH2, BMI1, and KDM6A and Epigenetic Reprogramming in Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6/E7-Expressing Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Paula L.; McDade, Simon S.; McCloskey, Rachel; Dickson, Glenda J.; Arthur, Ken; McCance, Dennis J.; Patel, Daksha

    2011-01-01

    A number of epigenetic alterations occur in both the virus and host cellular genomes during human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated carcinogenesis, and investigations of such alterations, including changes in chromatin proteins and histone modifications, have the potential to lead to therapeutic epigenetic reversion. We report here that transformed HPV16 E6/E7-expressing primary human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) (E6/E7 cells) demonstrate increased expression of the PRC2 methyltransferase EZH2 at both the mRNA and protein levels but do not exhibit the expected increase in trimethylated H3K27 (H3K27me3) compared to normal keratinocytes. In contrast, these cells show a reduction in global H3K27me3 levels in vitro, as well as upregulation of the KDM6A demethylase. We further show for the first time that transformation with the HPV16 E6 and E7 oncogenes also results in an increase in phosphorylated EZH2 serine 21 (P-EZH2-Ser21), mediated by active Akt, and in a downregulation of the PRC1 protein BMI1 in these cells. High-grade squamous cervical intraepithelial lesions also showed a loss of H3K27me3 in the presence of increased expression of EZH2. Correlating with the loss of H3K27me3, E6/E7 cells exhibited derepression of specific EZH2-, KMD6A-, and BMI1-targeted HOX genes. These results suggest that the observed reduction in H3K27me3 may be due to a combination of reduced activities/levels of specific polycomb proteins and increases in demethylases. The dysregulation of multiple chromatin proteins resulting in the loss of global H3K27me3 and the transcriptional reprogramming in HPV16 E6/E7-infected cells could provide an epigenetic signature associated with risk and/or progression of HPV16-associated cancers, as well as the potential for epigenetic reversion in the future. PMID:21865393

  5. Capsule expression in Streptococcus mitis modulates interaction with oral keratinocytes and alters susceptibility to human antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Rukke, H V; Engen, S A; Schenck, K; Petersen, F C

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus mitis is a colonizer of the oral cavity and the nasopharynx, and is closely related to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Both species occur in encapsulated and unencapsulated forms, but in S. mitis the role of the capsule in host interactions is mostly unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine how capsule expression in S. mitis can modulate interactions with the host with relevance for colonization. The S. mitis type strain, as well as two mutants of the type strain, an isogenic capsule deletion mutant, and a capsule switch mutant expressing the serotype 4 capsule of S. pneumoniae TIGR4, were used. Wild-type and capsule deletion strains of S. pneumoniae TIGR4 were included for comparison. We found that capsule production in S. mitis reduced adhesion to oral and lung epithelial cells. Further, exposure of oral epithelial cells to encapsulated S. mitis resulted in higher interleukin-6 and CXCL-8 transcription levels relative to the unencapsulated mutant. Capsule expression in S. mitis increased the sensitivity to human neutrophil peptide 1-3 but reduced the sensitivity to human β-defensin-3 and cathelicidin. This was in contrast with S. pneumoniae in which capsule expression has been generally associated with increased sensitivity to human antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Collectively, these findings indicate that capsule expression in S. mitis is important in modulating interactions with epithelial cells, and is associated with increased or reduced susceptibility to AMPs depending on the nature of the AMP. PMID:26255868

  6. Human papillomavirus causes an angiogenic switch in keratinocytes which is sufficient to alter endothelial cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Li, F.; Mead, L.; White, H.; Walker, J.; Ingram, D.A.; Roman, A.

    2007-10-10

    One of the requirements for tumor growth is the ability to recruit a blood supply, a process known as angiogenesis. Angiogenesis begins early in the progression of cervical disease from mild to severe dysplasia and on to invasive cancer. We have previously reported that expression of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 (HPV16 E6E7) proteins in primary foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) decreases expression of two inhibitors and increases expression of two angiogenic inducers [Toussaint-Smith, E., Donner, D.B., Roman, A., 2004. Expression of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins in primary foreskin keratinocytes is sufficient to alter the expression of angiogenic factors. Oncogene 23, 2988-2995]. Here we report that HPV-induced early changes in the keratinocyte phenotype are sufficient to alter endothelial cell behavior both in vitro and in vivo. Conditioned media from HPV16 E6E7 expressing HFKs as well as from human cervical keratinocytes containing the intact HPV16 were able to stimulate proliferation and migration of human microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, introduction of the conditioned media into immunocompetent mice using a Matrigel plug model resulted in a clear angiogenic response. These novel data support the hypothesis that HPV proteins contribute not only to the uncontrolled keratinocyte growth seen following HPV infection but also to the angiogenic response needed for tumor formation.

  7. Cyclooxygenases in human and mouse skin and cultured human keratinocytes: association of COX-2 expression with human keratinocyte differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.; Rakhlin, N.; Habib, A.; Maclouf, J.; Goldyne, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    Epidermal expression of the two isoforms of the prostaglandin H-generating cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) was evaluated both by immunohistochemistry performed on human and mouse skin biopsy sections and by Western blotting of protein extracts from cultured human neonatal foreskin keratinocytes. In normal human skin, COX-1 immunostaining is observed throughout the epidermis whereas COX-2 immunostaining increases in the more differentiated, suprabasilar keratinocytes. Basal cell carcinomas express little if any COX-1 or COX-2 immunostaining whereas both isozymes are strongly expressed in squamous cell carcinomas deriving from a more differentiated layer of the epidermis. In human keratinocyte cultures, raising the extracellular calcium concentration, a recognized stimulus for keratinocyte differentiation, leads to an increased expression of both COX-2 protein and mRNA; expression of COX-1 protein, however, shows no significant alteration in response to calcium. Because of a recent report that failed to show COX-2 in normal mouse epidermis, we also looked for COX-1 and COX-2 immunostaining in sections of normal and acetone-treated mouse skin. In agreement with a previous report, some COX-1, but no COX-2, immunostaining is seen in normal murine epidermis. However, following acetone treatment, there is a marked increase in COX-1 expression as well as the appearance of significant COX-2 immunostaining in the basal layer. These data suggest that in human epidermis as well as in human keratinocyte cultures, the expression of COX-2 occurs as a part of normal keratinocyte differentiation whereas in murine epidermis, its constitutive expression is absent, but inducible as previously published.

  8. High-glucose environment increased thrombospondin-1 expression in keratinocytes via DNA hypomethylation.

    PubMed

    Lan, Cheng-Che E; Huang, Shu-Mei; Wu, Ching-Shuang; Wu, Chin-Han; Chen, Gwo-Shing

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes is an important health issue because of its increasing prevalence and association with impaired wound healing. Epidermal keratinocytes with overexpressed antiangiogenic molecule thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) have been shown to impair proper wound healing. This study examined the potential involvement of keratinocyte-derived TSP1 on diabetic wound healing. Cultured human keratinocytes and diabetic rat model were used to evaluate the effect of high-glucose environment on TSP1 expression in epidermal keratinocytes, and the molecular mechanisms involved in the process were also studied. We demonstrated that high-glucose environment increased TSP1 expression in keratinocytes. In addition, increased oxidative stress induced DNA hypomethylation at the TSP1 promoter region in keratinocytes exposed to high-glucose environment. Similar findings were found in our diabetic rat model. Early antioxidant administration normalized TSP1 expression and global DNA methylation status in diabetic rat skin and improved wound healing in vivo. Because oxidative stress contributed to TSP1 DNA hypomethylation, early recognition of diabetic condition and timely administration of antioxidant are logical approaches to reduce complications associated with diabetes as alterations in epigenome may not be reversible by controlling glucose levels during the later stages of disease course. PMID:26678678

  9. Nrf2 Activation Promotes Keratinocyte Survival during Early Skin Carcinogenesis via Metabolic Alterations.

    PubMed

    Rolfs, Frank; Huber, Marcel; Kuehne, Andreas; Kramer, Stefan; Haertel, Eric; Muzumdar, Sukalp; Wagner, Johanna; Tanner, Yasmine; Böhm, Friederike; Smola, Sigrun; Zamboni, Nicola; Levesque, Mitchell P; Dummer, Reinhard; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Hohl, Daniel; Werner, Sabine; Schäfer, Matthias

    2015-11-15

    Pharmacologic activation of the transcription factor NRF2 has been suggested to offer a strategy for cancer prevention. In this study, we present evidence from murine tumorigenesis experiments suggesting there may be limitations to this possibility, based on tumorigenic effects of Nrf2 in murine keratinocytes that have not been described previously. In this setting, Nrf2 expression conferred metabolic alterations in keratinocytes that were protumorigenic in nature, affecting enzymes involved in glutathione biosynthesis or in the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and other NADPH-producing enzymes. Under stress conditions, coordinate increases in NADPH, purine, and glutathione levels promoted the survival of keratinocytes harboring oncogenic mutations, thereby promoting tumor development. The protumorigenic activity of Nrf2 in keratinocytes was particularly significant in a mouse model of skin tumorigenesis that did not rely upon chemical carcinogenesis. In exploring the clinical relevance of our findings, we confirm that NRF2 and protumorigenic NRF2 target genes were activated in some actinic keratoses, the major precancerous lesion in human skin. Overall, our results reveal an unexpected tumor-promoting activity of activated NRF2 during early phases of skin tumorigenesis. PMID:26530903

  10. Hypotonic stress influence the membrane potential and alter the proliferation of keratinocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gönczi, Mónika; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Fülöp, László; Telek, Andrea; Szigeti, Gyula P; Magyar, János; Bíró, Tamás; Nánási, Péter P; Csernoch, László

    2007-04-01

    Keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation is strongly influenced by mechanical forces. We investigated the effect of osmotic changes in the development of HaCaT cells in culture using intracellular calcium measurements, electrophysiological recordings and molecular biology techniques. The application of hypotonic stress (174 mOsmol/l) caused a sustained hyperpolarization of HaCaT cells from a resting potential of -27 +/- 4 to -51 +/- 9 mV. This change was partially reversible. The surface membrane channels involved in the hyperpolarization were identified as chloride channels due to the lack of response in the absence of the anion. Cells responded with an elevation of intracellular calcium concentration to hypotonic stress, which critically depended on external calcium. The presence of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate in the culture medium for 12 h augmented the subsequent response to hypotonic stress. A sudden switch from iso- to hypotonic solution increased cell proliferation and suppressed the production of involucrin, filaggrin and transglutaminase, markers of keratinocyte differentiation. It is concluded that sudden mechanical forces increase the proliferation of keratinocytes through alterations in their membrane potential and intracellular calcium concentration. These changes together with additional modifications in channel expression and intracellular signalling mechanisms could underlie the increased proliferation of keratinocytes in hyperproliferative skin diseases. PMID:17359336

  11. Epidermal expression of the truncated prelamin A causing Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: effects on keratinocytes, hair and skin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexia; Panteleyev, Andrey A; Owens, David M; Djabali, Karima; Stewart, Colin L; Worman, Howard J

    2008-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by point mutation in LMNA encoding A-type nuclear lamins. The mutations in LMNA activate a cryptic splice donor site, resulting in expression of a truncated, prenylated prelamin A called progerin. Expression of progerin leads to alterations in nuclear morphology, which may underlie pathology in HGPS. We generated transgenic mice expressing progerin in epidermis under control of a keratin 14 promoter. The mice had severe abnormalities in morphology of skin keratinocyte nuclei, including nuclear envelope lobulation and decreased nuclear circularity not present in transgenic mice expressing wild-type human lamin A. Primary keratinocytes isolated from these mice had a higher frequency of nuclei with abnormal shape compared to those from transgenic mice expressing wild-type human lamin A. Treatment with a farnesyltransferase inhibitor significantly improved nuclear shape abnormalities and induced the formation of intranuclear foci in the primary keratinocytes expressing progerin. Similarly, spontaneous immortalization of progerin-expressing cultured keratinocytes selected for cells with normal nuclear morphology. Despite morphological alterations in keratinocyte nuclei, mice expressing progerin in epidermis had normal hair grown and wound healing. Hair and skin thickness were normal even after crossing to Lmna null mice to reduce or eliminate expression of normal A-type lamins. Although progerin induces significant alterations in keratinocyte nuclear morphology that are reversed by inhibition of farnesyltransferasae, epidermal expression does not lead to alopecia or other skin abnormalities typically seen in human subjects with HGPS. PMID:18442998

  12. Epidermal expression of the truncated prelamin A causing Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome: effects on keratinocytes, hair and skin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexia; Panteleyev, Andrey A.; Owens, David M.; Djabali, Karima; Stewart, Colin L.; Worman, Howard J.

    2008-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by point mutation in LMNA encoding A-type nuclear lamins. The mutations in LMNA activate a cryptic splice donor site, resulting in expression of a truncated, prenylated prelamin A called progerin. Expression of progerin leads to alterations in nuclear morphology, which may underlie pathology in HGPS. We generated transgenic mice expressing progerin in epidermis under control of a keratin 14 promoter. The mice had severe abnormalities in morphology of skin keratinocyte nuclei, including nuclear envelope lobulation and decreased nuclear circularity not present in transgenic mice expressing wild-type human lamin A. Primary keratinocytes isolated from these mice had a higher frequency of nuclei with abnormal shape compared to those from transgenic mice expressing wild-type human lamin A. Treatment with a farnesyltransferase inhibitor significantly improved nuclear shape abnormalities and induced the formation of intranuclear foci in the primary keratinocytes expressing progerin. Similarly, spontaneous immortalization of progerin-expressing cultured keratinocytes selected for cells with normal nuclear morphology. Despite morphological alterations in keratinocyte nuclei, mice expressing progerin in epidermis had normal hair grown and wound healing. Hair and skin thickness were normal even after crossing to Lmna null mice to reduce or eliminate expression of normal A-type lamins. Although progerin induces significant alterations in keratinocyte nuclear morphology that are reversed by inhibition of farnesyltransferasae, epidermal expression does not lead to alopecia or other skin abnormalities typically seen in human subjects with HGPS. PMID:18442998

  13. Expression and modulation of IL-1 alpha in murine keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ansel, J.C.; Luger, T.A.; Lowry, D.; Perry, P.; Roop, D.R.; Mountz, J.D.

    1988-04-01

    Murine and human keratinocytes produce an IL-1-like factor that appears to be similar if not identical to monocyte-derived IL-1. IL-1 may be an important mediator in cutaneous inflammatory responses, however, little is currently known concerning factors that may modulate IL-1 expression in keratinocytes. To address this issue we examined the effect of LPS, UV, and the cell differentiation state on murine keratinocyte IL-1 mRNA expression. Our results indicated that as with the murine P388D1 monocyte cell line, PAM 212 keratinocytes constitutively express abundant amounts of IL-1 alpha mRNA. On exposure to LPS (100 micrograms/ml) for 8 h there was more than 10 times the increase in PAM 212 IL-1 alpha mRNA which was accompanied by a sixfold increase in supernatant IL-1 activity. Similarly UV irradiation had a significant effect on keratinocyte IL-1 alpha expression. High dose UV (300 mJ/cm2) inhibited PAM 212 IL-1 alpha expression at 4, 8, 24, 48 h post-UV whereas a lower dose of UV (100 mJ/cm2) inhibited UV at 4 and 8 h post-UV, but induced IL-1 expression at 24 and 48 h post-UV. The expression of IL-1 alpha varied with the differentiation state of the keratinocytes. Freshly removed newborn murine keratinocytes were found to constitutively express IL-1 alpha mRNA. Keratinocytes grown in low (Ca2+) tissue culture media (0.05 mM) for 6 days, functionally and phenotypically become undifferentiated and express increased quantities of IL-1 alpha mRNA, whereas cells grown in high (Ca2+) media (1.2 mM) for 6 days become terminally differentiated and IL-1 expression ceased. Keratinocytes cultured for 3 days in low (Ca2+) conditions expressed an intermediate level of IL-1 alpha. In contrast, little or no IL-1 beta mRNA was detected in either the PAM 212 cells or newborn murine keratinocytes.

  14. Expression profiling of human epidermal keratinocyte response following 1-minute JP-8 exposure.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chi-Chung; Yang, Jen-Hung; Chen, San-Duo; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A; Li, Han-Ni; Chen, Jeremy J W

    2006-01-01

    The cDNA microarray analysis of 9600 expressed sequence tags was performed to examine the gene expression changes in human epidermal keratinocytes after 1-minute JP-8 exposure; 151 genes were identified as JP-8 responsive and classified into 8 clusters by self organization map. Genes involved in basal transcription and translations were up-regulated, whereas genes related to DNA repair, metabolism, and keratin were mostly down-regulated. Genes encoded for growth factors, apoptosis, signal transduction, and adhesion were also altered. These results indicated that human keratinocyte responds to a single dose of JP-8 insult and revealed several cellular processes previously not associated with jet fuel exposure. PMID:16835149

  15. Quantitative analysis of laminin 5 gene expression in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Nobuko; Amano, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Toshio

    2005-05-01

    To examine the expression of laminin 5 genes (LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2) encoding the three polypeptide chains alpha3, beta3, and gamma2, respectively, in human keratinocytes, we developed novel quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods utilizing Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase, specific primers, and fluorescein-labeled probes with the ABI PRISM 7700 sequence detector system. Gene expression levels of LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2 and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were quantitated reproducibly and sensitively in the range from 1 x 10(2) to 1 x 10(8) gene copies. Basal gene expression level of LAMB3 was about one-tenth of that of LAMA3 or LAMC2 in human keratinocytes, although there was no clear difference among immunoprecipitated protein levels of alpha3, beta3, and gamma2 synthesized in radio-labeled keratinocytes. Human serum augmented gene expressions of LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2 in human keratinocytes to almost the same extent, and this was associated with an increase of the laminin 5 protein content measured by a specific sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These results demonstrate that the absolute mRNA levels generated from the laminin 5 genes do not determine the translated protein levels of the laminin 5 chains in keratinocytes, and indicate that the expression of the laminin 5 genes may be controlled by common regulation mechanisms. PMID:15854126

  16. Ultraviolet radiation alters choline phospholipid metabolism in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    DeLeo, V.; Scheide, S.; Meshulam, J.; Hanson, D.; Cardullo, A.

    1988-10-01

    Ultraviolet radiation B (UVB-290-320 nm) induces inflammation and hyperproliferation in human epidermis. This response is associated with the recovery from irradiated skin of inflammatory mediators derived from membrane phospholipids. We have previously reported that UVB stimulates the production of such mediators by human keratinocytes (HK) in culture. In these studies we examined the effect of UVB on the metabolism of choline containing phospholipids in HK prelabeled with (/sup 3/H) choline. UVB (400-1600J/m2) stimulated a dose dependent release of (/sup 3/H) choline from HK within minutes of irradiation. Examination of media extracts by paper chromatography revealed that the released (/sup 3/H) choline was predominately in the form of glycerophosphorylcholine. Examination of label remaining in membranes of cells after irradiation by acid precipitation and HPLC revealed that the origin of the released (/sup 3/H) choline was the membrane phosphatidylcholine/lysophosphatidylcholine. These data support a concept of UVB stimulation of both a phospholipase A (1 or 2) and a lysophospholipase. These UVB induced alterations of HK membrane phospholipid metabolism likely have profound effects on UVB-induced inflammation and control of cell growth in human skin.

  17. Alteration in the arrangement of the keratin-type intermediate filaments during mitosis in cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Y; Inoue, S; Yoneda, K; Mori, S; Yaoita, H

    1985-09-01

    The behavior of the keratin-type intermediate filaments (KIFs) during mitosis was characterized in cultured human keratinocytes by immunofluorescence microscopy using polyclonal antibodies to keratin. The structural relationship of KIFs with microtubules (MTs) was also studied at the same time using a monoclonal antibody to alpha-tubulin. The KIFs and MTs showed similar but different cytoskeletal networks and underwent structural rearrangements independently during the cell cycle. KIFs in keratinocytes formed two different arrangements during meta- and anaphase: a global aggregation of filaments around the spindle and a fibrous array radiating from the central, global aggregation of filaments to the cell periphery where they were connected with those of the adjacent cells at desmosomal sites. These radiating fibrous portions of KIFs appeared to play a role in retaining the cell in its correct relationship to the surrounding cells during mitosis. This behavior of KIFs in normal keratinocytes was different from the KIF-alterations which had been previously described in SV40-transformed keratinocytes and other cells which expressed two different IFs (keratin and vimentin). PMID:2412816

  18. A Heat-Sensitive TRP Channel Expressed in Keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peier, Andrea M.; Reeve, Alison J.; Andersson, David A.; Moqrich, Aziz; Earley, Taryn J.; Hergarden, Anne C.; Story, Gina M.; Colley, Sian; Hogenesch, John B.; McIntyre, Peter; Bevan, Stuart; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2002-06-01

    Mechanical and thermal cues stimulate a specialized group of sensory neurons that terminate in the skin. Three members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of channels are expressed in subsets of these neurons and are activated at distinct physiological temperatures. Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of a novel thermosensitive TRP channel. TRPV3 has a unique threshold: It is activated at innocuous (warm) temperatures and shows an increased response at noxious temperatures. TRPV3 is specifically expressed in keratinocytes; hence, skin cells are capable of detecting heat via molecules similar to those in heat-sensing neurons.

  19. Epithelial expression of keratinocytes growth factor in oral precancer lesions

    PubMed Central

    Jimson, Sudha; Murali, S.; Zunt, Susan L.; Goldblatt, Lawrence I.; Srinivasan, Mythily

    2016-01-01

    Background: Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is a potent epithelial mitogen that acts by binding the KGF receptors (KGFRs) expressed on epithelial cells and regulates proliferation and differentiation. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of KGF in the epithelium in oral precancer. Materials and Methods: Archival tissues of oral submucous fibrosis (SMF) and leukoplakia were assessed for epithelial KGF expression by immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results: KGF was predominantly expressed in the basal and parabasal cells in the epithelium of SMF tissues. KGF transcript in the epithelial cells increased with increasing severity of epithelial dysplasia in oral leukoplakia. Conclusion: Although widely reported as a product secreted by the mesenchymal cells, our data suggest that the KGF is also expressed in oral epithelial cells much like the expression in ovarian epithelial cells. Based on the localization of KGF in cells at the epithelial mesenchymal junction and that of the reported presence of KGFR in oral keratinocytes, a potential mechanism involving paracrine and autocrine interactions of KGF and KGFR in early stages of oral precancer is postulated. PMID:27274338

  20. Ultraviolet B suppresses vitamin D receptor gene expression in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Courtois, S J; Segaert, S; Degreef, H; Bouillon, R; Garmyn, M

    1998-05-01

    Keratinocytes not only produce vitamin D3 in response to ultraviolet B light (UVB) and convert 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 to 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D) but also possess the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and respond to 1,25(OH)2D. We characterized the regulation of the expression of the VDR gene in primary human keratinocytes following UVB irradiation. We report a marked dose-dependent down-regulation of the VDR mRNA and protein within a few hours after irradiation. This occurs independently of de novo protein synthesis and is not due to a change in the half-life of the VDR mRNA. Interestingly, treatment of the cells with sodium salicylate, caffeic acid phenethyl ester and tosylphenylchloromethylketone inhibited this down-regulation. Our results strongly suggest the existence of a feedback mechanism in that UVB initiates vitamin D synthesis in keratinocytes and at the same time limits VDR abundance. They also provide a rational explanation for the reported lack of any additive effect between 1,25(OH)2D and UVB phototherapy in the treatment of psoriasis. PMID:9600069

  1. Differential effects of detergents on keratinocyte gene expression.

    PubMed

    van Ruissen, F; Le, M; Carroll, J M; van der Valk, P G; Schalkwijk, J

    1998-04-01

    We have studied the effect of various detergents on keratinocyte gene expression in vitro, using an anionic detergent (sodium dodecyl sulfate), a cationic detergent cetyltrimethylammoniumbromide (CTAB), and two nonionic detergents, Nonidet P-40 and Tween-20. We measured the effect of these detergents on direct cellular toxicity (lactate dehydrogenase release), on the expression of markers for normal differentiation (cytokeratin 1 and involucrin expression), and on disturbed keratinocyte differentiation (SKALP) by northern blot analysis. As reported in other studies, large differences were noted in direct cellular toxicity. In a culture model that mimics normal epidermal differentiation we found that low concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate could induce the expression of SKALP, a proteinase inhibitor that is not normally expressed in human epidermis but is found in hyperproliferative skin. Sodium dodecyl sulfate caused upregulation of involucrin and downregulation of cytokeratin 1 expression, which is associated with the hyperproliferative/inflammatory epidermal phenotype found in psoriasis, wound healing, and skin irritation. These changes were not induced after treatment of cultures with CTAB, Triton X-100, and Nonidet-P40. This effect appeared to be specific for the class of anionic detergents because sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate and sodium laurate also induced SKALP expression. These in vitro findings showed only a partial correlation with the potential of different detergents to induce clinical, biophysical, and cell biologic changes in vivo in human skin. Both sodium dodecyl sulfate and CTAB were found to cause induction and upregulation of SKALP and involucrin at low doses following a 24 h patch test, whereas high concentrations of Triton X-100 did not. Sodium dodecyl sulfate induced higher rates of transepidermal water loss, whereas CTAB treated skin showed more signs of cellular toxicity. We conclude that the action of anionic detergents on

  2. Interleukin 1 gene expression in cultured human keratinocytes is augmented by ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kupper, T.S.; Chua, A.O.; Flood, P.; McGuire, J.; Gubler, U.

    1987-08-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is a family of polypeptides initially found to be produced by activated monocytes and macrophages that mediate a wide variety of cellular responses to injury and infection. Epidermal epithelial cells (keratinocytes) produce ''epidermal cell-derived thymocyte activating factor'' or ETAF, which has been recently shown to be identical to IL-1. Human epidermis is normally exposed to significant amounts of solar ultraviolet radiation. Certain ultraviolet wavelengths (UVB, 290-320 nm) are thought to be responsible for most of the immediate and long-term pathological consequences of excessive exposure to sunlight. In this study, we asked whether exposure to UVB irradiation induced IL-1 gene expression in cultured human keratinocytes. Cultured human keratinocytes contain detectable amounts of IL-1 alpha and beta mRNA and protein in the absence of apparent stimulation; these levels could be significantly enhanced 6 h after exposure to 10 ng/ml of 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Exposure to UVB irradiation with an emission spectrum comparable to that of sunlight (as opposed to that of an unfiltered artificial UV light source) significantly increased the steady state levels IL-1 alpha and beta mRNA in identical populations of human keratinocytes. This was reflected in the production of increased IL-1 activity by these cultures in vitro. In the same cell population, exposures to UVB irradiation did not alter the level of actin mRNA; therefore, the effect of UV irradiation on IL-1 represents a specific enhancement of IL-1 gene expression. Local increases of IL-1 may mediate the inflammation and vasodilation characteristic of acute UVB-injured skin, and systemic release of this epidermal IL-1 may account for fever, leukocytosis, and the acute phase response seen after excessive sun exposure.

  3. Increased oxidative stress and antioxidant expression in mouse keratinocytes following exposure to paraquat

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Adrienne T.; Gray, Joshua P.; Shakarjian, Michael P.; Laskin, Debra L. Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2008-09-15

    Paraquat (1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium) is a widely used herbicide known to induce skin toxicity. This is thought to be due to oxidative stress resulting from the generation of cytotoxic reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) during paraquat redox cycling. The skin contains a diverse array of antioxidant enzymes which protect against oxidative stress including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), metallothionein-2 (MT-2), and glutathione-S-transferases (GST). In the present studies we compared paraquat redox cycling in primary cultures of undifferentiated and differentiated mouse keratinocytes and determined if this was associated with oxidative stress and altered expression of antioxidant enzymes. We found that paraquat readily undergoes redox cycling in both undifferentiated and differentiated keratinocytes, generating superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide as well as increased protein oxidation which was greater in differentiated cells. Paraquat treatment also resulted in increased expression of HO-1, Cu,Zn-SOD, catalase, GSTP1, GSTA3 and GSTA4. However, no major differences in expression of these enzymes were evident between undifferentiated and differentiated cells. In contrast, expression of GSTA1-2 was significantly greater in differentiated relative to undifferentiated cells after paraquat treatment. No changes in expression of MT-2, Mn-SOD, GPx-1, GSTM1 or the microsomal GST's mGST1, mGST2 and mGST3, were observed in response to paraquat. These data demonstrate that paraquat induces oxidative stress in keratinocytes leading to increased expression of antioxidant genes. These intracellular proteins may be important in protecting the skin from paraquat-mediated cytotoxicity.

  4. Effect of JP-8 jet fuel exposure on protein expression in human keratinocyte cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Witzmann, F A; Monteiro-Riviere, N A; Inman, A O; Kimpel, M A; Pedrick, N M; Ringham, H N; Riviere, J E

    2005-12-30

    Dermal exposure to jet fuel is a significant occupational hazard. Previous studies have investigated its absorption and disposition in skin, and the systemic biochemical and immunotoxicological sequelae to exposure. Despite studies of JP-8 jet fuel components in murine, porcine or human keratinocyte cell cultures, proteomic analysis of JP-8 exposure has not been investigated. This study was conducted to examine the effect of JP-8 administration on the human epidermal keratinocyte (HEK) proteome. Using a two-dimensional electrophoretic approach combined with mass spectrometric-based protein identification, we analyzed protein expression in HEK exposed to 0.1% JP-8 in culture medium for 24 h. JP-8 exposure resulted in significant expression differences (p<0.02) in 35 of the 929 proteins matched and analyzed. Approximately, a third of these alterations were increased in protein expression, two-thirds declined with JP-8 exposure. Peptide mass fingerprint identification of effected proteins revealed a variety of functional implications. In general, altered proteins involved endocytotic/exocytotic mechanisms and their cytoskeletal components, cell stress, and those involved in vesicular function. PMID:16019166

  5. Expression and modulation of nerve growth factor in murine keratinocytes (PAM 212)

    SciTech Connect

    Tron, V.A.; Coughlin, M.D.; Jang, D.E.; Stanisz, J.; Sauder, D.N. )

    1990-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a polypeptide that is required for normal development and maintenance of the sympathetic and sensory nervous systems. Skin has been shown to contain relatively high amounts of NGF, which is in keeping with the finding that the quantity of NGF in a tissue is proportional to the extent of sympathetic innervation of that organ. Since the keratinocyte, a major cellular constituent of the skin, is known to produce other growth factors and cytokines, our experiments were designed to determine whether keratinocytes are a source of NGF. Keratinocyte-conditioned media from the keratinocyte cell line PAM 212 contained NGF-like activity, approximately 2-3 ng/ml, as detected by the neurite outgrowth assay. Freshly isolated BALB/c keratinocytes contained approximately 0.1 ng/ml. Using a cDNA probe directed against NGF, we demonstrated the presence of a 1.3-kb NGF mRNA in both PAM 212 and BALB/c keratinocytes. Since ultraviolet radiation (UV) is a potentially important modulating factor for cytokines in skin, we examined the effect of UV on NGF mRNA expression. Although UV initially inhibited the expression of keratinocyte NGF mRNA (4 h), by 24 h an induction of NGF mRNA was seen. The NGF signal could also be induced by phorbol esters. Thus, keratinocytes synthesize and express NGF, and its expression is modulated by UVB and phorbol esters.

  6. Keratinocyte Expression of CGRPβ: Implications for Neuropathic and Inflammatory Pain Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Q; Barr, TP; Gee, LE; Vickers, JT; Wymer, JP; Borsani, E; Rodella, LF; Getsios, S; Burdo, TH; Eisenberg, E; Guha, U; Lavker, RM; Kessler, JA; Chittur, SV; Fiorino, DF; Rice, FL; Albrecht, PJ

    2011-01-01

    Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) is a vasodilatory peptide that has been detected at high levels in the skin, blood, and cerebral spinal fluid under a variety of inflammatory and chronic pain conditions, presumably derived from peptidergic C and Aδ innervation. Herein, CGRP immunolabeling (IL) was detected in epidermal keratinocytes at levels that were especially high and widespread in the skin of humans from locations afflicted with postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) and complex region pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS), of monkeys infected with simian immunodeficiency virus, and of rats subjected to L5/L6 spinal nerve ligation, sciatic nerve chronic constriction, and subcutaneous injection of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant. Increased CGRP-IL was also detected in epidermal keratinocytes of transgenic mice with keratin-14 promoter driven overexpression of noggin, an antagonist to BMP-4 signaling. Transcriptome microarray, qPCR, and Western blot analyses using laser captured mouse epidermis from transgenics, monolayer cultures of human and mouse keratinocytes, and multilayer human keratinocyte organotypic cultures, revealed that keratinocytes express predominantly the beta isoform of CGRP. Cutaneous peptidergic innervation has been shown to express predominantly the alpha isoform of CGRP. Keratinocytes also express the cognate CGRP receptor components, CRLR, RAMP1, and RCP, consistent with known observations that CGRP promotes several functional changes in keratinocytes, including proliferation and cytokine production. Our results indicate that keratinocyte derived CGRPβ may modulate epidermal homeostasis through autocrine/paracrine signaling and may contribute to chronic pain under pathological conditions. PMID:21641113

  7. Cell-matrix interactions modulate interstitial collagenase expression by human keratinocytes actively involved in wound healing.

    PubMed Central

    Saarialho-Kere, U K; Kovacs, S O; Pentland, A P; Olerud, J E; Welgus, H G; Parks, W C

    1993-01-01

    We reported that interstitial collagenase is produced by keratinocytes at the edge of ulcers in pyogenic granuloma, and in this report, we assessed if production of this metalloproteinase is a common feature of the epidermal response in a variety of wounds. In all samples of chronic ulcers, regardless of etiology, and in incision wounds, collagenase mRNA, localized by in situ hybridization, was prominently expressed by basal keratinocytes bordering the sites of active re-epithelialization indicating that collagenolytic activity is a characteristic response of the epidermis to wounding. No expression of mRNAs for 72- and 92-kD gelatinases or matrilysin was seen in keratinocytes, and no signal for any metalloproteinase was detected in normal epidermis. Immunostaining for type IV collagen showed that collagenase-positive keratinocytes were not in contact with an intact basement membrane and, unlike normal keratinocytes, expressed alpha 5 beta 1 receptors. These observations suggest that cell-matrix interactions influence collagenase expression by epidermal cells. Indeed, as determined by ELISA, primary cultures of human keratinocytes grown on basement membrane proteins (Matrigel; Collaborative Research Inc., Bedford, MA) did not express significant levels of collagenase, whereas cells grown on type I collagen produced markedly increased levels. These results suggest that migrating keratinocytes actively involved in re-epithelialization acquire a collagenolytic phenotype upon contact with the dermal matrix. Images PMID:8254040

  8. Modulation of keratinocyte expression of antioxidants by 4-hydroxynonenal, a lipid peroxidation end product

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ruijin; Heck, Diane E.; Mishin, Vladimir; Black, Adrienne T.; Shakarjian, Michael P.; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is a lipid peroxidation end product generated in response to oxidative stress in the skin. Keratinocytes contain an array of antioxidant enzymes which protect against oxidative stress. In these studies, we characterized 4-HNE-induced changes in antioxidant expression in mouse keratinocytes. Treatment of primary mouse keratinocytes and PAM 212 keratinocytes with 4-HNE increased mRNA expression for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), catalase, NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) A1-2, GSTA3 and GSTA4. In both cell types, HO-1 was the most sensitive, increasing 86-98 fold within 6 h. Further characterization of the effects of 4-HNE on HO-1 demonstrated concentration- and time-dependent increases in mRNA and protein expression which were maximum after 6 h with 30 μM. 4-HNE stimulated keratinocyte Erk1/2, JNK and p38 MAP kinases, as well as PI3 kinase. Inhibition of these enzymes suppressed 4-HNE-induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. 4-HNE also activated Nrf2 by inducing its translocation to the nucleus. 4-HNE was markedly less effective in inducing HO-1 mRNA and protein in keratinocytes from Nrf2−/− mice, when compared to wild type mice, indicating that Nrf2 also regulates 4-HNE-induced signaling. Western blot analysis of caveolar membrane fractions isolated by sucrose density centrifugation demonstrated that 4-HNE-induced HO-1 is localized in keratinocyte caveolae. Treatment of the cells with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which disrupts caveolar structure, suppressed 4-HNE-induced HO-1. These findings indicate that 4-HNE modulates expression of antioxidant enzymes in keratinocytes, and that this can occur by different mechanisms. Changes in expression of keratinocyte antioxidants may be important in protecting the skin from oxidative stress. PMID:24423726

  9. Association of Chromosomal Alterations with Arsenite-Induced Tumorigenicity of Human HaCaT Keratinocytes in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Chia-Wen; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Ho, I-Ching; Lee, Te-Chang

    2004-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a well-documented human carcinogen. Chronic low-dose exposure to inorganic arsenic is associated with an increased incidence of a variety of cancers, including skin, lung, bladder, and liver cancer. Because genetic alterations often occur during cancer development, the objective of this study was to explore what types of genetic alterations were induced by chronic exposure of human HaCaT cells to arsenic. After 20 passages in the presence of inorganic trivalent arsenite at concentrations of 0.5 or 1 μM, HaCaT cells had higher intracellular levels of glutathione, became more resistance to arsenite, and showed an increased frequency of micronuclei. Furthermore, the previously nontumorigenic HaCaT cells became tumorigenic, as shown by subcutaneous injection into Balb/c nude mice. Cell lines derived from the tumors formed by injection of arsenite-exposed HaCaT cells into nude mice expressed higher levels of keratin 6, a proliferation marker of keratinocytes, than did parental HaCaT cells, whereas the expression of keratins 5, 8, and 10 was significantly decreased. Comparative genomic hybridization demonstrated chromosomal alterations in the 11 cell lines derived from these tumors; all 11 showed significant loss of chromosome 9q, and seven showed significant gain of chromosome 4q. The present results show that long-term exposure to low doses of arsenite transformed nontumorigenic human keratinocytes to cells that were tumorigenic in nude mice and that chromosomal alterations were observed in all cell lines established from the tumors. PMID:15579417

  10. Expression of membrane glycoproteins in normal keratinocytes and squamous carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Rayter, Z. ); McIlhinney, R. ); Gusterson, B. )

    1989-08-01

    Con A acceptor glycoproteins were analyzed by 2D-PAGE and {sup 125}I-Con A overlay in three squamous carcinoma cell lines and compared with those in the simian virus (SV40)-transformed keratinocyte cell line SVK-14 and in normal keratinocytes. The majority of the glycoproteins identified by this technique were expressed at similar levels in all of the cells examined, independent of the culture conditions used. A cell surface glycoprotein gp34 was increased in the tumor cells compared with normal keratinocytes and expression varied with the culture density. Another glycoprotein, gp21, was found to be increased in expression in normal keratinocytes and stratified hyperconfluent cultures of squamous carcinoma cell lines. This paper describes the potential of this technique to identify membrane glycoproteins which may be expressed as a function of proliferation or differentiation.

  11. Dynamic and Physical Clustering of Gene Expression during Epidermal Barrier Formation in Differentiating Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Copley, Richard; Taylor, Martin S.; Hayden, Patrick J.; Stolper, Gina; Mott, Richard; Hein, Jotun; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Cookson, William O. C. M.

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian epidermis is a continually renewing structure that provides the interface between the organism and an innately hostile environment. The keratinocyte is its principal cell. Keratinocyte proteins form a physical epithelial barrier, protect against microbial damage, and prepare immune responses to danger. Epithelial immunity is disordered in many common diseases and disordered epithelial differentiation underlies many cancers. In order to identify the genes that mediate epithelial development we used a tissue model of the skin derived from primary human keratinocytes. We measured global gene expression in triplicate at five times over the ten days that the keratinocytes took to fully differentiate. We identified 1282 gene transcripts that significantly changed during differentiation (false discovery rate <0.01%). We robustly grouped these transcripts by K-means clustering into modules with distinct temporal expression patterns, shared regulatory motifs, and biological functions. We found a striking cluster of late expressed genes that form the structural and innate immune defences of the epithelial barrier. Gene Ontology analyses showed that undifferentiated keratinocytes were characterised by genes for motility and the adaptive immune response. We systematically identified calcium-binding genes, which may operate with the epidermal calcium gradient to control keratinocyte division during skin repair. The results provide multiple novel insights into keratinocyte biology, in particular providing a comprehensive list of known and previously unrecognised major components of the epidermal barrier. The findings provide a reference for subsequent understanding of how the barrier functions in health and disease. PMID:19888454

  12. Development of an inducible gene expression system for primary murine keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Priyadharsini

    2008-01-01

    Background The tetracycline (Tet) responsive system is a valuable tool that is routinely used in a wide variety of mammalian cells for regulatable expression of gene products. However, technical difficulties such as harsh selection conditions and extensive screening processes to identify suitably responsive clones limit the generation of stable cell lines. Hence, application of this system in mammalian cells with relatively slow growth rates and / or the capacity to undergo terminal differentiation such as primary mouse keratinocytes is particularly challenging. Objective To our knowledge, no Tet-responsive stable cell lines have been generated from mouse keratinocytes, presumably due to their sensitivity to selection conditions. Our goal was to utilize a modified and robust Tet-expression system to generate a stable primary mouse keratinocyte cell line. These cells could be then utilized for conditional expression of potentially toxic proteins in an inducible fashion. Methods We utilized a eukaryotic promoter instead of a viral promoter to express a modified reverse tetracycline transactivator in mouse keratinocytes and optimized the selection process for generating stable cell lines. Results Here, we report the generation of a stable mouse keratinocyte cell line for Tet-regulated gene expression with minimal leakiness and high degree of Tet responsivity. This mouse keratinocyte cell line was further engineered for generation of a double stable cell line, which expresses the transcription factor AP-2α in an inducible manner. Importantly, the selected cells retain their inherent keratinocyte morphology, respond to differentiation signals and exhibit a persistent and highly tunable Tet inducibility upon continuous culturing. Conclusion We have generated a tetracycline inducible gene expression model system in mouse epidermal keratinocytes. Such inducible cell lines will serve as valuable in vitro models for future gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies. PMID

  13. RNA-seq Analysis of Host and Viral Gene Expression Highlights Interaction between Varicella Zoster Virus and Keratinocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manuraj; Kanda, Ravinder K.; Yee, Michael B.; Kellam, Paul; Hollinshead, Michael; Kinchington, Paul R.; O'Toole, Edel A.; Breuer, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is the etiological agent of chickenpox and shingles, diseases characterized by epidermal skin blistering. Using a calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation model we investigated the interaction between epidermal differentiation and VZV infection. RNA-seq analysis showed that VZV infection has a profound effect on differentiating keratinocytes, altering the normal process of epidermal gene expression to generate a signature that resembles patterns of gene expression seen in both heritable and acquired skin-blistering disorders. Further investigation by real-time PCR, protein analysis and electron microscopy revealed that VZV specifically reduced expression of specific suprabasal cytokeratins and desmosomal proteins, leading to disruption of epidermal structure and function. These changes were accompanied by an upregulation of kallikreins and serine proteases. Taken together VZV infection promotes blistering and desquamation of the epidermis, both of which are necessary to the viral spread and pathogenesis. At the same time, analysis of the viral transcriptome provided evidence that VZV gene expression was significantly increased following calcium treatment of keratinocytes. Using reporter viruses and immunohistochemistry we confirmed that VZV gene and protein expression in skin is linked with cellular differentiation. These studies highlight the intimate host-pathogen interaction following VZV infection of skin and provide insight into the mechanisms by which VZV remodels the epidermal environment to promote its own replication and spread. PMID:24497829

  14. Inhibition of Inflammatory Gene Expression in Keratinocytes Using a Composition Containing Carnitine, Thioctic Acid and Saw Palmetto Extract

    PubMed Central

    Chittur, Sridar; Parr, Brian; Marcovici, Geno

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the hair follicle (HF) is considered a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Previously, we clinically tested liposterolic extract of Serenoa repens (LSESr) and its glycoside, β-sitosterol, in subjects with AGA and showed a highly positive response to treatment. In this study, we sought to determine whether blockade of inflammation using a composition containing LSESr as well as two anti-inflammatory agents (carnitine and thioctic acid) could alter the expression of molecular markers of inflammation in a well-established in vitro system. Using a well-validated assay representative of HF keratinocytes, specifically, stimulation of cultured human keratinocyte cells in vitro, we measured changes in gene expression of a spectrum of well-known inflammatory markers. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) provided an inflammatory stimulus. In particular, we found that the composition effectively suppressed LPS-activated gene expression of chemokines, including CCL17, CXCL6 and LTB(4) associated with pathways involved in inflammation and apoptosis. Our data support the hypothesis that the test compound exhibits anti-inflammatory characteristics in a well-established in vitro assay representing HF keratinocyte gene expression. These findings suggest that 5-alpha reductase inhibitors combined with blockade of inflammatory processes could represent a novel two-pronged approach in the treatment of AGA with improved efficacy over current modalities. PMID:19692448

  15. Modulation of keratinocyte expression of antioxidants by 4-hydroxynonenal, a lipid peroxidation end product

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ruijin; Heck, Diane E.; Mishin, Vladimir; Black, Adrienne T.; Shakarjian, Michael P.; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2014-03-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is a lipid peroxidation end product generated in response to oxidative stress in the skin. Keratinocytes contain an array of antioxidant enzymes which protect against oxidative stress. In these studies, we characterized 4-HNE-induced changes in antioxidant expression in mouse keratinocytes. Treatment of primary mouse keratinocytes and PAM 212 keratinocytes with 4-HNE increased mRNA expression for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), catalase, NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) A1-2, GSTA3 and GSTA4. In both cell types, HO-1 was the most sensitive, increasing 86–98 fold within 6 h. Further characterization of the effects of 4-HNE on HO-1 demonstrated concentration- and time-dependent increases in mRNA and protein expression which were maximum after 6 h with 30 μM. 4-HNE stimulated keratinocyte Erk1/2, JNK and p38 MAP kinases, as well as PI3 kinase. Inhibition of these enzymes suppressed 4-HNE-induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. 4-HNE also activated Nrf2 by inducing its translocation to the nucleus. 4-HNE was markedly less effective in inducing HO-1 mRNA and protein in keratinocytes from Nrf2 −/− mice, when compared to wild type mice, indicating that Nrf2 also regulates 4-HNE-induced signaling. Western blot analysis of caveolar membrane fractions isolated by sucrose density centrifugation demonstrated that 4-HNE-induced HO-1 is localized in keratinocyte caveolae. Treatment of the cells with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which disrupts caveolar structure, suppressed 4-HNE-induced HO-1. These findings indicate that 4-HNE modulates expression of antioxidant enzymes in keratinocytes, and that this can occur by different mechanisms. Changes in expression of keratinocyte antioxidants may be important in protecting the skin from oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Lipid peroxidation generates 4-hydroxynonenal, a reactive aldehyde. • 4-HNE induces antioxidant proteins in mouse keratinocytes. • Induction of

  16. H(+)/peptide transporter (PEPT2) is expressed in human epidermal keratinocytes and is involved in skin oligopeptide transport.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Michiko; Katayoshi, Takeshi; Kobayashi-Nakamura, Kumiko; Akagawa, Mitsugu; Tsuji-Naito, Kentaro

    2016-07-01

    Peptide transporter 2 (PEPT2) is a member of the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter family, which mediates the cellular uptake of oligopeptides and peptide-like drugs. Although PEPT2 is expressed in many tissues, its expression in epidermal keratinocytes remains unclear. We investigated PEPT2 expression profile and functional activity in keratinocytes. We confirmed PEPT2 mRNA expression in three keratinocyte lines (normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs), immortalized keratinocytes, and malignant keratinocytes) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. In contrast to PEPT1, PEPT2 expression in the three keratinocytes was similar or higher than that in HepG2 cells, used as PEPT2-positive cells. Immunolocalization analysis using human skin showed epidermal PEPT2 localization. We studied keratinocyte transport function by measuring the oligopeptide content using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Glycylsarcosine uptake in NHEKs was pH-dependent, suggesting that keratinocytes could absorb small peptides in the presence of an inward H(+) gradient. We also performed a skin-permeability test of several oligopeptides using skin substitute, suggesting that di- and tripeptides pass actively through the epidermis. In conclusion, PEPT2 is expressed in keratinocytes and involved in skin oligopeptide uptake. PMID:27216463

  17. Extracellular calcium regulates keratinocyte proliferation and HPV 16 E6 RNA expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Turunen, Aaro; Syrjänen, Stina

    2014-09-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are known to immortalize oral keratinocytes in vitro, but the underlying mechanisms causing the following resistance to differentiation remain unclear. We investigated the effect of extracellular calcium on the proliferation of HPV16-positive keratinocytes and on the mRNA expression of the viral E6-oncogene. HPV16-positive hypopharyngeal carcinoma cells (UD-SCC-2), spontaneously immortalized- (HMK) and HPV16 E6/E7-immortalized human gingival keratinocytes (IHGK) were grown for 3, 6 and 9 days in Keratinocyte Serum-free Medium with calcium concentrations ranging from 0 mM to 6 mM. Calcium concentrations up to 0.09 mM increased cellular proliferation, which decreased at higher concentrations. A shift of calcium concentration from 0 to 4 mM increased E6 expression in UD-SCC-2 cells 2.4-fold by day 9. Simultaneously, E2 expression increased. The most significant upregulation of E6 and E2 expressions was observed at day 9, grown in high-calcium media and the increase in E6 expression coincided with an increase in involucrin expression, likely indicating cell differentiation. Despite this, HPV-positive cells continued to proliferate even at high-calcium media in contrast to HPV-negative cells. Overexpression of E6 mRNA may be an important feature of HPV16-positive cells to resist the natural calcium gradient in differentiating keratinocytes allowing cell proliferation. PMID:25295350

  18. Distinct populations of basal keratinocytes express stromelysin-1 and stromelysin-2 in chronic wounds.

    PubMed Central

    Saarialho-Kere, U K; Pentland, A P; Birkedal-Hansen, H; Parks, W C; Welgus, H G

    1994-01-01

    Wound repair involves cell migration and tissue remodeling, and these ordered and regulated processes are facilitated by matrix-degrading proteases. We reported that interstitial collagenase is invariantly expressed by basal keratinocytes at the migrating front of healing epidermis (Saarialho-Kere, U. K., E. S. Chang, H. G. Welgus, and W. C. Parks, 1992. J. Clin. Invest. 90:1952-1957). Because of the limited substrate specificity of collagenase, principally for interstitial fibrillar collagens, other enzymes must also be produced in the wound environment to effectively restructure tissues with a complex matrix composition. Stromelysins-1 and -2 are closely related, yet distinct metalloproteinases, and both can degrade many noncollagenous connective tissue macromolecules. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we found that both stromelysins are produced by distinct populations of keratinocytes in a variety of chronic ulcers. Stromelysin-1 mRNA and protein were detected in basal keratinocytes adjacent to but distal from the wound edge in what probably represents the sites of proliferating epidermis. In contrast, stromelysin-2 mRNA was seen only in basal keratinocytes at the migrating front, in the same epidermal cell population that expresses collagenase. Stromelysin-1-producing keratinocytes resided on the basement membrane, whereas stromelysin-2-producing keratinocytes were in contact with the dermal matrix. Furthermore, stromelysin-1 expression was prominent in dermal fibroblasts, whereas no signal for stromelysin-2 was seen in any dermal cell. These findings demonstrate that stromelysins-1 and -2 are produced by different populations of basal keratinocytes in response to wounding and suggest that these two matrix metalloproteinases serve distinct roles in tissue repair. Images PMID:8040294

  19. IL-24 is Expressed During Wound Repair and Inhibits TGFα induced Migration and Proliferation of Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Poindexter, Nancy J.; Williams, Ryan R.; Powis, Garth; Jen, Emily; Caudle, Abigail S.; Chada, Sunil; Grimm, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-24 is the protein product of melanoma differentiation-associated gene 7 (MDA-7). Originally identified as a tumor suppressor molecule, MDA-7 was renamed IL-24 and classified as a cytokine because of its chromosomal location in the IL-10 locus, its mRNA expression in leukocytes, and its secretory sequence elements. We previously reported that IL-24 is expressed by cytokine-activated monocytes and T lymphocytes. Here, we show that IL-24 is expressed in keratinocytes during wound repair. Paraffin-embedded tissues prepared from human skin sampled at days 2, 6, and 10 after wounding were examined by immunohistochemistry for expression of IL-24. Protein expression was detected in the keratinocyte population with maximum expression at days 2 and 6; and no expression by day 10 (4 of 4 subjects). In vitro studies showed that cytokines involved in wound repair, most notably TGFα, TGFβ, IFNγ and IFNβ, upregulated IL-24 protein expression in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK). Examination of the function of IL-24 in both in vitro wound repair and migration assays demonstrated that IL-24 inhibits TGFα induced proliferation and migration of NHEKs. These data support the hypothesis that IL-24 functions during an inflammatory response in the skin by inhibiting the proliferation and migration of keratinocytes. PMID:20545760

  20. The expression of keratinocyte growth factor receptor (FGFR2-IIIb) correlates with the high proliferative rate of HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Nikoletta; Bata-Csörgo, Zsuzsanna; Kopasz, Norbert; Szeg, Csilla; Pivarcsi, Andor; Koreck, Andrea; Dobozy, Attila; Kemény, Lajos; Széll, Márta

    2006-08-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor receptor (KGFR = FGFR2-IIIb) is a tyrosine kinase receptor expressed by keratinocytes, which mediates the effects of fibroblast growth factors (FGF). There are contradictory data in the literature regarding the role of FGFR2-IIIb during the proliferation/differentiation programme of keratinocytes. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether overexpression of FGFR2-IIIb may have a role in the regulation of keratinocyte proliferation. We analysed the expression of FGFR2-IIIb in an in vitro HaCaT model system representing different stages of proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses demonstrated a correlation between FGFR2-IIIb mRNA and protein expression and the proportion of cells in S/G2/M phase in synchronized HaCaT keratinocytes and thus with proliferation activity (r = 0.96). After treatment with the antipsoriatic drug, dithranol, FGFR2-IIIb is downregulated dose dependently both at mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, when the rate of proliferation is decreased by the lack of cell attachment to the culturing surface, FGFR2-IIIb mRNA (P = 0.0315) and protein expressions were also reduced (P = 0.0242), while a differentiation marker, keratin 10, mRNA (P = 0.0003) and protein levels (P = 0.001) were increased (r = -0.92). Based on our results we conclude that FGFR2-IIIb expression in HaCaT keratinocytes corresponds with the proliferative activation of the cells and is not related to the differentiation programme. PMID:16842598

  1. Aberrantly Expressed Genes in HaCaT Keratinocytes Chronically Exposed to Arsenic Trioxide

    PubMed Central

    Udensi, Udensi K.; Cohly, Hari H.P.; Graham-Evans, Barbara E.; Ndebele, Kenneth; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Nanduri, Bindu; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Isokpehi, Raphael D.

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a known environmental toxicant and carcinogen of global public health concern. Arsenic is genotoxic and cytotoxic to human keratinocytes. However, the biological pathways perturbed in keratinocytes by low chronic dose inorganic arsenic are not completely understood. The objective of the investigation was to discover the mechanism of arsenic carcinogenicity in human epidermal keratinocytes. We hypothesize that a combined strategy of DNA microarray, qRT-PCR and gene function annotation will identify aberrantly expressed genes in HaCaT keratinocyte cell line after chronic treatment with arsenic trioxide. Microarray data analysis identified 14 up-regulated genes and 21 down-regulated genes in response to arsenic trioxide. The expression of 4 up-regulated genes and 1 down-regulated gene were confirmed by qRT-PCR. The up-regulated genes were AKR1C3 (Aldo-Keto Reductase family 1, member C3), IGFL1 (Insulin Growth Factor-Like family member 1), IL1R2 (Interleukin 1 Receptor, type 2), and TNFSF18 (Tumor Necrosis Factor [ligand] SuperFamily, member 18) and down-regulated gene was RGS2 (Regulator of G-protein Signaling 2). The observed over expression of TNFSF18 (167 fold) coupled with moderate expression of IGFL1 (3.1 fold), IL1R2 (5.9 fold) and AKR1C3 (9.2 fold) with a decreased RGS2 (2.0 fold) suggests that chronic arsenic exposure could produce sustained levels of TNF with modulation by an IL-1 analogue resulting in chronic immunologic insult. A concomitant decrease in growth inhibiting gene (RGS2) and increase in AKR1C3 may contribute to chronic inflammation leading to metaplasia, which may eventually lead to carcinogenicity in the skin keratinocytes. Also, increased expression of IGFL1 may trigger cancer development and progression in HaCaT keratinocytes. PMID:21461292

  2. Immortalization and altered differentiation of human keratinocytes in vitro by the E6 and E7 open reading frames of human papillomavirus type 18.

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, J B; Bedell, M A; McCance, D J; Laiminis, L A

    1990-01-01

    The E6-E7 region of human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 is selectively retained and expressed in cervical carcinoma cells. In cultured human keratinocytes, expression of the E6 and E7 open reading frames of human papillomavirus type 18, under the control of its homologous promoter, resulted in high-frequency immortalization. Furthermore, by using a system that allows for stratification of keratinocytes in vitro (raft system), we observed that the morphological differentiation of these E6-E7 immortalized cells was altered such that parabasal cells extended throughout most of the epithelium, with abnormal nuclei present in the upper regions. Examination of E6-E7-expressing cell lines in the raft system at a later passage revealed that complete loss of morphological differentiation had occurred. E7 alone was a much less effective immortalizing agent than E6 and E7 together and acted only minimally to alter morphological differentiation in vitro. No such activities were found for E6 alone. High-frequency transformation of human epithelial cells thus appears to require expression of both E6 and E7 gene products. Images PMID:2153221

  3. Tacrolimus does not alter the production of several cytokines and antimicrobial peptide in Malassezia furfur-infected-keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Balato, Anna; Paoletti, Iole; De Gregorio, Vincenza; Cantelli, Mariateresa; Ayala, Fabio; Donnarumma, Giovanna

    2014-03-01

    Topical immunosuppressant therapy is widely used in the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Besides its beneficial therapeutic effects, application of topical anti-inflammatory drugs may render the epidermis more vulnerable to invading pathogens by suppressing innate immune responses in keratinocytes (KCs). Cytokines, chemokines and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by epithelial cells enable them to participate in innate and acquired immune responses. The aim of the present work was to study the influence of tacrolimus (FK506) on KCs infected with Malassezia furfur (M. furfur), evaluating the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and IL-6, chemokine IL-8, anti-inflammatory cytokines transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) and IL-10 and AMP β-defensin-2. Human KCs were obtained from surgical specimens of normal adult skin. The expression of mRNAs in KCs: FK506-treated, FK506-treated and M. furfur-infected as well as only M. furfur-infected was quantified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Next, the production of the AMP β-defensin-2 and of the above-mentioned pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines was evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In this study, FK506 did not alter cytokine and AMP production by KCs; this led us to hypothesise that it may not enhance the risk of mycotic skin infections. PMID:24512536

  4. Keratinocyte Microvesicles Regulate the Expression of Multiple Genes in Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping; Bi, Jiarui; Owen, Gethin R; Chen, Weimin; Rokka, Anne; Koivisto, Leeni; Heino, Jyrki; Häkkinen, Lari; Larjava, Hannu

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular vesicles released from cells regulate many normal and pathological conditions. Little is known about the role of epidermal keratinocyte microvesicles (KC-MVs) in epithelial-stromal interaction that is essential for wound healing. We investigated, therefore, whether MV-like structures are present in human wounds and whether they affect wound healing-associated gene expression in dermal fibroblasts. In human wounds, MV-like vesicles were observed during active epithelial migration and early granulation tissue formation. When KC-MVs derived from keratinocyte-like cells (HaCaT) were added to fibroblast cultures, expression of 21 genes was significantly regulated (P<0.05) out of 80 genes investigated, including matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -3, interleukin-6 and -8, and genes associated with transforming growth factor-β signaling. Similar changes were observed at the protein level. MVs from normal epidermal keratinocytes showed similar response to HaCaT cells. KC-MVs activated ERK1/2, JNK, Smad, and p38 signaling pathways in fibroblasts with ERK1/2 signaling having the most prominent role in the MV-induced gene expression changes. KC-MVs stimulated fibroblast migration and induced fibroblast-mediated endothelial tube formation but did not affect collagen gel contraction by fibroblasts. The results demonstrate that keratinocyte microvesicles have a strong and a specific regulatory effect on fibroblasts that may modulate several aspects of wound healing. PMID:26288358

  5. Afadin requirement for cytokine expressions in keratinocytes during chemically induced inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Iwata, Takanori; Takai, Yoshimi; Birchmeier, Walter; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    Afadin is a filamentous actin-binding protein and a mediator of nectin signaling. Nectins are Ig-like cell adhesion molecules, and the nectin family is composed of four members, nectin-1 to nectin-4. Nectins show homophilic and heterophilic interactions with other nectins or proteins on adjacent cells. Nectin signaling induces formation of cell–cell junctions and is required for the development of epithelial tissues, including skin. This study investigated the role of afadin in epithelial tissue development and established epithelium-specific afadin-deficient (CKO) mice. Although showing no obvious abnormality in the skin development and homeostasis, the mice showed the reduced neutrophil infiltration into the epidermis during chemical-induced inflammation with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Immunohistochemical and quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that the expression levels of cytokines including Cxcl2, Il-1β and Tnf-α were reduced in CKO keratinocytes compared with control keratinocytes during TPA-induced inflammation. Primary-cultured skin keratinocytes from CKO mice also showed reduced expression of these cytokines and weak activation of Rap1 compared with those from control mice after the TPA treatment. These results suggested a remarkable function of afadin, which was able to enhance cytokine expression through Rap1 activation in keratinocytes during inflammation. PMID:25297509

  6. miR-24 and miR-205 expression is dependent on HPV onco-protein expression in keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, Declan J.; Patel, Daksha; McCance, Dennis J.

    2014-01-05

    A screen of microRNA (miRNA) expression following differentiation in human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) identified changes in several miRNAs, including miR-24 and miR-205. We investigated how expression of Human Papilloma Virus Type-16 (HPV16) onco-proteins E6 and E7 affected expression of miR-24 and miR-205 during proliferation and differentiation of HFKs. We show that the induction of both miR-24 and miR-205 observed during differentiation of HFKs is lost in HFKs expressing E6 and E7. We demonstrate that the effect on miR-205 is due to E7 activity, as miR-205 expression is dependent on pRb expression. Finally, we provide evidence that miR-24 effects in the cell may be due to targeting of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p27. In summary, these results indicate that expression of both miR-24 and miR-205 are impacted by E6 and/or E7 expression, which may be one mechanism by which HPV onco-proteins can disrupt the balance between proliferation and differentiation in keratinocytes. - Highlights: • miR-24 and miR-205 are induced during keratinocyte differentiation. • This induction is lost in keratinocytes expressing HPV onco-proteins E6 and E7. • miR-205 is dependent upon pRb expression. • miR-24 targets p27 in cycling keratinocytes.

  7. Markedly diminished epidermal keratinocyte expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in Sezary syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Nickoloff, B.J.; Griffiths, E.M.; Baadsgaard, O.; Voorhees, J.J.; Hanson, C.A.; Cooper, K.D. )

    1989-04-21

    In mucosis fungoides the malignant T cells express lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, which allows them to bind to epidermal keratinocytes expressing the gamma interferon-inducible intercellular adhesion molecule-1. In this report, a patient with leukemic-stage mucosis fungoides (Sezary syndrome) had widespread erythematous dermal infiltrates containing malignant T cells, but without any epidermotropism. The authors discovered that the T cells expressed normal amounts of functional lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, but the keratinocytes did not express significant levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, which was probably due to the inability of the malignant T cells to produce gamma interferon. These results support the concept that the inability of malignant T cells to enter the epidermis may contribute to emergence of more clinically aggressive T-cell clones that are no longer confined to the skin, but infiltrate the blood, lymph nodes, and viscera, as is seen in Sezary syndrome.

  8. Candidate EDA targets revealed by expression profiling of primary keratinocytes from Tabby mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Esibizione, Diana; Cui, Chang-Yi; Schlessinger, David

    2009-01-01

    EDA, the gene mutated in anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, encodes ectodysplasin, a TNF superfamily member that activates NF-kB mediated transcription. To identify EDA target genes, we have earlier used expression profiling to infer genes differentially expressed at various developmental time points in Tabby (Eda-deficient) compared to wild-type mouse skin. To increase the resolution to find genes whose expression may be restricted to epidermal cells, we have now extended studies to primary keratinocyte cultures established from E19 wild-type and Tabby skin. Using microarrays bearing 44,000 gene probes, we found 385 preliminary candidate genes whose expression was significantly affected by Eda loss. By comparing expression profiles to those from Eda-A1 transgenic skin, we restricted the list to 38 “candidate EDA targets”, 14 of which were already known to be expressed in hair follicles or epidermis. We confirmed expression changes for 3 selected genes, Tbx1, Bmp7, and Jag1, both in keratinocytes and in whole skin, by Q-PCR and Western blotting analyses. Thus, by the analysis of keratinocytes, novel candidate pathways downstream of EDA were detected. PMID:18848976

  9. Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells express keratinocyte lineage markers in a co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Irfan-Maqsood, M; Matin, M M; Heirani-Tabasi, A; Bahrami, M; Naderi-Meshkin, H; Mirahmadi, M; Hassanzadeh, H; Sanjar Moussavi, N; Raza-Shah, H; Raeesolmohaddeseen, M; Bidkhori, H; Bahrami, A R

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a complex type of biological event involving proliferation, differentiation, reprograming, trans/de-differentiation, recruitment, migration, and apoptosis of a number of cells (keratinocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, nerve cells and stem cells) to regenerate a multi-layered tissue that is damaged by either internal or external factors. The exact regeneration mechanism of damaged skin is still unknown but the epithelial and other kinds of stem cells located in skin play crucial roles in the healing process. In this work, a co-culture model composed of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells and keratinocytes was developed to understand the cellular differentiation behaviour in wound healing. Human mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from waste lipoaspirates. Keratinocytes were isolated from neonatal rats skin as well from human adult skin. Both types of cells were cultured and their culturing behaviour was observed microscopically under regular intervals of time. The identity of both cells was confirmed by flow cytometry and qRT-PCR. Cells were co-cultured under the proposed co-culturing model and the model was observed for 7, 14 and 21 days. The cellular behaviour was studied based on change in morphology, colonization, stratification, migration and expression of molecular markers. Expression of molecular markers was studied at transcriptional level and change in cellular morphology and migration capabilities was observed under the invert microscope regularly. Successfully isolated and characterized mesenchymal stem cells were found to express keratinocyte lineage markers i.e. K5, K10, K14, K18, K19 and Involucrin when co-cultured with keratinocytes after 14 and 21 days. Their expression was found to increase by increasing the time span of cell culturing. The keratinocyte colonies started to disappear after 10 days of culturing which might be due to stratification process initiated by possibly transdifferentiated stem cells. It can

  10. Copper-GHK increases integrin expression and p63 positivity by keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Youn-A; Choi, Hye-Ryung; Na, Jung-Im; Huh, Chang-Hun; Kim, Min-Ji; Youn, Sang-Woong; Kim, Kyu-Han; Park, Kyoung-Chan

    2009-04-01

    Glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysyl (GHK) possesses a high affinity for copper(II) ions, with which it spontaneously forms a complex (copper-GHK). It is well known that copper-GHK plays a physiological role in the process of wound healing and tissue repair by stimulating collagen synthesis in fibroblasts. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of copper-GHK on keratinocytes. Proliferative effects were analyzed and hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry were conducted to evaluate the effects of copper-GHK in skin equivalent (SE) models. In addition, western blotting was performed. In monolayer cultured keratinocytes, copper-GHK increased the proliferation of keratinocytes. When the SE models were evaluated, basal cells became cuboidal when copper-GHK was added. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that copper-GHK increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and p63 positivity. Furthermore, the expression of integrin alpha6 and beta1 increased in SE models, and these results were confirmed by Western blotting. The results of this study indicate that treatment with copper-GHK may increase the proliferative potential of basal keratinocytes by modulating the expression of integrins, p63 and PCNA. In addition, increased levels of p63, a putative stem cell marker of the skin, suggests that copper-GHK promotes the survival of basal stem cells in the skin. PMID:19319546

  11. Osmotic stress up-regulates aquaporin-3 gene expression in cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Y; Ota, Y; Hara, M; Inoue, S

    2001-12-01

    Of ten members of the aquaporin family (AQP), the mRNA expression and regulation of AQP1, AQP3, AQP4 and AQP9 in cultured human keratinocytes were examined by an RNase protection assay. AQP3 mRNA was expressed in growing and differentiating cells, while AQP9 mRNA was only detected in differentiating cells. The epidermis in skin-equivalent cultures expressed both AQP3 and AQP9 mRNA. However, neither AQP1 nor AQP4 mRNA was detectable in either monolayer or skin-equivalent cultures. Incubation of keratinocytes in sorbitol-added hypertonic medium increased AQP3 mRNA expression. This was confirmed using other solutes such as NaCl, mannitol, glucose and sucrose. The effect of sorbitol was reversible, dose-dependent and maximal at 24 h after addition. However, AQP1, AQP4 and AQP9 mRNA expression were unchanged under any of the hypertonic conditions examined. These findings indicated that osmotic stress up-regulates AQP3 gene expression in cultured keratinocytes. PMID:11750058

  12. Genome-wide p63-regulated gene expression in differentiating epidermal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oti, Martin; Kouwenhoven, Evelyn N.; Zhou, Huiqing

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 is a key regulator in epidermal keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. However, the role of p63 in gene regulation during these processes is not well understood. To investigate this, we recently generated genome-wide profiles of gene expression, p63 binding sites and active regulatory regions with the H3K27ac histone mark (Kouwenhoven et al., 2015). We showed that only a subset of p63 binding sites are active in keratinocytes, and that differentiation-associated gene expression dynamics correlate with the activity of p63 binding sites rather than with their occurrence per se. Here we describe in detail the generation and processing of the ChIP-seq and RNA-seq datasets used in this study. These data sets are deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) repository under the accession number GSE59827. PMID:26484246

  13. Expression profiling of human keratinocyte response to ultraviolet A: implications in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Ying; Huang, Jian-Li; Sik, Robert H; Liu, Jie; Waalkes, Michael P; Chignell, Colin F

    2004-02-01

    Ultraviolet A radiation from sunlight is a major human health concern, as it is not absorbed by the ozone layer and can deeply penetrate into the skin causing skin damage. To study the molecular mechanism involved in the ultraviolet A effect, human HaCaT keratinocytes were exposed to ultraviolet A at doses of 10 J per cm2 and 30 J per cm2. Ultraviolet A irradiation caused dose- and time-dependent apoptotic cell death, as evidenced by DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry, and the activation of caspase-3. To study the genes altered by ultraviolet A at an apoptosis-inducing dose (30 J per cm2), cells were harvested immediately after ultraviolet A treatment (0 h), and 6 h and 24 h after ultraviolet A exposure. Total RNA was extracted for microarray and real-time RT-PCR analysis, and cellular proteins were extracted for western blot analysis. Of the selected critical genes/proteins, the induction of c-Jun, c-myc, and p33ING1, and the repression of epidermal growth factor receptor, inhibitor of apoptosis protein, and survivin pathways, could be involved in ultraviolet-A-induced apoptosis. On the other hand, the late induction of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 was indicative of possible cell cycle recovery in surviving cells. Real-time RT-PCR analysis confirmed these results and a majority of the protein levels paralleled their corresponding RNA levels. In addition, ultraviolet A treatment altered the expression of genes involved in signal transduction, RNA processing, structural proteins, and metabolism in a time-dependent manner. This initial microarray analysis could advance our understanding of cellular responses to ultraviolet A exposure, and provide a platform from which to further study ultraviolet-A-induced apoptosis and carcinogenesis. PMID:15009741

  14. Interferon-Gamma Enhances TLR3 Expression and Anti-Viral Activity in Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kajita, Ai; Morizane, Shin; Takiguchi, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Takenobu; Yamada, Masao; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2015-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize specific microbial products in the innate immune response. TLR3, a double-stranded RNA sensor, is thought to have an important role in viral infections, but the regulation of TLR3 expression and its function in keratinocytes are not fully understood. Here we show the Th1 cytokine IFN-γ increased the TLR3 expression via STAT1 in cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs). Co-stimulation with IFN-γ and the TLR3 ligand poly (I:C) synergistically increased the expression of IFN-β, IL-6, IL-8, and human β-defensin-2 in NHEKs compared with poly (I:C) or IFN-γ alone. These synergistic inductions were significantly inhibited by an endosomal acidification inhibitor, chloroquine, and by TLR3 siRNA. Co-stimulation with IFN-γ and poly (I:C) also significantly enhanced the anti-viral activity against herpes simplex virus type-1 in NHEKs compared with poly (I:C) or IFN-γ alone. In addition to the in vitro findings, an immunohistochemical analysis revealed IFN-γ-positive cells surrounding herpetic vesicles. These findings indicate that IFN-γ might contribute to the innate immune response to cutaneous viral infections by enhancing TLR3 expression and function in keratinocytes. PMID:25822580

  15. Expression of paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2c (PITX2c) in epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Ge; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Choi, Tae-Young; Choi, Dae-Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Sin; Ou, Bai-sheng; Kim, Sooil; Lee, Young Ho; Yoon, Tae-Jin; Kim, Seong-Jin; Lee, Young; Seo, Young-Joon; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Kim, Chang Deok

    2010-11-15

    Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2) has been implicated as one of the genes responsible for Rieger syndrome. It has been also shown to play a central role during development. In this study, we investigated the functional role of PITX2 in keratinocyte differentiation. RT-PCR analysis showed that PITX2c isoform was predominantly expressed in a differentiation-dependent manner. Consistent with, immunohistochemical staining showed that PITX2 expression was increased in the upper layer of epidermis. When PITX2c was overexpressed in cultured keratinocytes by a recombinant adenovirus, the differentiation markers such as involucrin and loricrin were significantly increased at both mRNA and protein levels. In addition, PITX2c overexpression led to the decrease of cell growth, concomitantly with the upregulation of cell cycle-related genes p21. To investigate the effect of PITX2c in vivo, we microinjected PITX2c expression vector into zebrafish embryo. Interestingly, overexpression of PITX2c in zebrafish embryo led to the formation of horn-like structure and thickening of epidermis, together with the increase of keratin 8 (K8) expression. These results suggest that PITX2c has a role in proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes.

  16. Novel protein in human epidermal keratinocytes: regulation of expression during differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kartasova, T.; van Muijen, G.N.; van Pelt-Heerschap, H.; van de Putte, P.

    1988-05-01

    Recently, two groups of cDNA clones have been isolated from human epidermal keratinocytes; the clones correspond to genes whose expression is stimulated by exposure of the cells to UV light or treatment with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate. The proteins predicted by the nucleotide sequence of both groups of cDNAs are small (8 to 10 kilodaltons), are exceptionally rich in proline, glutamine, and cysteine, and contain repeating elements with a common sequence, PK PEPC. These proteins were designated sprI and sprII (small, proline rich). Here we describe the characterization of the sprIa protein, which is encoded by one of the group 1 cDNAs. The expression of this protein during keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and the distribution of the sprIa protein in some human tissues was studied by using a specific rabbit antiserum directed against a synthetic polypeptide corresponding to the 30 amino acids of the C-terminal region of the sprIa gene product. The results indicate that the expression of the sprIa protein is stimulated during keratinocyte differentiation both in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Increased hydrophobicity in Malassezia species correlates with increased proinflammatory cytokine expression in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Narifumi; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Takeoka, Shiori; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2012-11-01

    Malassezia cells stimulate cytokine production by keratinocytes, although this ability differs among Malassezia species for unknown reasons. The aim of this study was to clarify the factors determining the ability to induce cytokine production by human keratinocytes in response to Malassezia species. M. furfur NBRC 0656, M. sympodialis CBS 7222, M. dermatis JCM 11348, M. globosa CBS 7966, M. restricta CBS 7877, and three strains each of M. globosa, M. restricta, M. dermatis, M. sympodialis, and M. furfur maintained under various culture conditions were used. Normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) (1 × 10(5) cells) and the Malassezia species (1 × 10(6) cells) were co-cultured, and IL-1α, IL-6, and IL-8 mRNA levels were determined. Moreover, the hydrophobicity and β-1,3-glucan expression at the surface of Malassezia cells were analyzed. The ability of Malassezia cells to trigger the mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines in NHEKs differed with the species and conditions and was dependent upon the hydrophobicity of Malassezia cells not β-1,3-glucan expression. PMID:22548238

  18. Association of a genetic polymorphism (-44 C/G SNP) in the human DEFB1 gene with expression and inducibility of multiple β-defensins in gingival keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kalus, Andrea A; Fredericks, L Page; Hacker, Beth M; Dommisch, Henrik; Presland, Richard B; Kimball, Janet R; Dale, Beverly A

    2009-01-01

    Background Human β-defensins (hBDs) are antimicrobial peptides with a role in innate immune defense. Our laboratory previously showed that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 5' untranslated region of the hBD1 gene (DEFB1), denoted -44 (rs1800972), is correlated with protection from oral Candida. Because this SNP alters the putative mRNA structure, we hypothesized that it alters hBD1 expression. Methods Transfection of reporter constructs and evaluation of antimicrobial activity and mRNA expression levels in keratinocytes from multiple donors were used to evaluate the effect of this SNP on constitutive and induced levels of expression. Results Transfection of CAT reporter constructs containing the 5' untranslated region showed that the -44 G allele yielded a 2-fold increase in CAT protein compared to other common haplotypes suggesting a cis effect on transcription or translation. The constitutive hBD1 mRNA level in human oral keratinocytes was significantly greater in cells from donors with the -44 GG genotype compared to those with the common CC genotype. Surprisingly, the hBD3 mRNA level as well as antimicrobial activity of keratinocyte extracts also correlated with the -44 G allele. Induced levels of hBD1, hBD2, and hBD3 mRNA were evaluated in keratinocytes challenged with Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 ligands, interleukin-1β, TNFα, and interferon-γ (IFNγ). In contrast to constitutive expression levels, IFNγ-induced keratinocyte hBD1 and hBD3 mRNA expression was significantly greater in cells with the common CC genotype, but there was no clear correlation of genotype with hBD2 expression. Conclusion The DEFB1 -44 G allele is associated with an increase in overall constitutive antimicrobial activity and expression of hBD1 and hBD3 in a manner that is consistent with protection from candidiasis, while the more common C allele is associated with IFNγ inducibility of these β-defensins and is likely to be more protective in conditions that enhance IFN

  19. The cytotoxicity of mercury chloride to the keratinocytes is associated with metallothionein expression

    PubMed Central

    HWANG, TSANN-LONG; CHEN, HSIAO-YING; CHANGCHIEN, TZU-TSUNG; WANG, CHEE-CHAN; WU, CHI-MING

    2013-01-01

    There are trace amounts of heavy metals in cosmetics. Heavy metals such as mercury (Hg), which is added to skin-whitening cosmetics, may cause acute or chronic damage to human cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of mercury chloride (HgCl2) to human keratinocytes. The keratinocytes were treated with various concentrations of HgCl2 and the cell survival fractions were found to be 38.08, 17.59, 12.76, 3.29 and 0.77% when the cells were treated with 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1 and 1.5 μM of HgCl2, respectively. Moreover, we observed that the greatest damage was to the cell membrane. The metallothionein (MT) protein expression was also investigated. MT expression levels increased with increasing concentrations of HgCl2. The results indicated that MT protects the keratinocytes against HgCl2-induced toxicity. PMID:24648953

  20. Cataloging of the genes expressed in human keratinocytes: analysis of 607 randomly isolated cDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Konishi, K; Morishima, Y; Ueda, E; Kibe, Y; Nonomura, K; Yamanishi, K; Yasuno, H

    1994-07-29

    The partial nucleotide sequences of 607 cDNAs randomly isolated from a cDNA library of cultured human epidermal keratinocytes were determined by single pass sequencing. Homology search of the sequences to the non-redundant nucleotide databases revealed that 27% of the cDNAs matched registered human-or non-human genes encoding not only keratinocyte specific genes, but also a variety of functional proteins, the expression of which had not been identified in keratinocytes. Non-matching cDNAs covering 49% of the cDNAs were not homologous even to ESTs from other organs, suggesting that these cDNAs include novel genes expressed in the cells. The large scale sequencing of keratinocyte cDNAs provides a useful molecular source for research into biology and diseases of the skin. PMID:8048971

  1. XPC silencing in normal human keratinocytes triggers metabolic alterations that drive the formation of squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Kim, Arianna L.; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Ali, Nsrein; Daly, Meaghan; Mahfouf, Walid; Bellance, Nadège; Taïeb, Alain; de Verneuil, Hubert; Mazurier, Frédéric; Bickers, David R.

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage is a well-known initiator of tumorigenesis. Studies have shown that most cancer cells rely on aerobic glycolysis for their bioenergetics. We sought to identify a molecular link between genomic mutations and metabolic alterations in neoplastic transformation. We took advantage of the intrinsic genomic instability arising in xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC). The XPC protein plays a key role in recognizing DNA damage in nucleotide excision repair, and patients with XPC deficiency have increased incidence of skin cancer and other malignancies. In cultured human keratinocytes, we showed that lentivirus-mediated knockdown of XPC reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and increased glycolysis, recapitulating cancer cell metabolism. Accumulation of unrepaired DNA following XPC silencing increased DNA-dependent protein kinase activity, which subsequently activated AKT1 and NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX1), resulting in ROS production and accumulation of specific deletions in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) over time. Subcutaneous injection of XPC-deficient keratinocytes into immunodeficient mice led to squamous cell carcinoma formation, demonstrating the tumorigenic potential of transduced cells. Conversely, simultaneous knockdown of either NOX1 or AKT1 blocked the neoplastic transformation induced by XPC silencing. Our results demonstrate that genomic instability resulting from XPC silencing results in activation of AKT1 and subsequently NOX1 to induce ROS generation, mtDNA deletions, and neoplastic transformation in human keratinocytes. PMID:21123941

  2. Differential miRNA expression profiles in proliferating or differentiated keratinocytes in response to gamma irradiation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a group of short non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression, have recently emerged as potential modulators of cellular response to ionizing radiations both in vitro and in vivo in various cell types and tissues. However, in epidermal cells, the involvement of the miRNA machinery in the cellular response to ionizing radiations remains to be clarified. Indeed, understanding the mechanisms of cutaneous radiosensitivity is an important issue since skin is the most exposed organ to ionizing radiations and among the most sensitive. Results We settled up an expression study of miRNAs in primary human skin keratinocytes using a microfluidic system of qPCR assay, which permits to assess the expression of almost 700 annotated miRNAs. The keratinocytes were cultured to a proliferative or a differentiated state mimicking basal or suprabasal layers of human epidermis. These cells were irradiated at 10 mGy or 6 Gy and RNA was extracted 3 hours after irradiation. We found that proliferative cells irradiated at 6 Gy display a global fall of miRNA expression whereas differentiated cells exposed to the same dose display a global increase of miRNAs expression. We identified twenty miRNAs weakly but significantly modulated after 6 Gy irradiation, whereas only 2 miRNAs were modulated after low-dose irradiation in proliferating cells. To go further into the biological meaning of this miRNA response, we over-expressed some of the responding miRNA in proliferating cells: we observed a significant decrease of cell viability 72 hours after irradiation. Functional annotation of their predicted targets revealed that G-protein related pathways might be regulated by these responding miRNAs. Conclusions Our results reveal that human primary keratinocytes exposed to ionizing irradiation expressed a miRNA pattern strongly related to the differentiation status of irradiated cells. We also demonstrate that some miRNAs play a role in the radiation

  3. The flavonoid apigenin suppresses vitamin D receptor expression and vitamin D responsiveness in normal human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Segaert, S; Courtois, S; Garmyn, M; Degreef, H; Bouillon, R

    2000-02-01

    Apigenin, a flavonoid with chemopreventive properties, induces cellular growth arrest, with concomitant inhibition of intracellular signaling cascades and decreased proto-oncogene expression. We report that apigenin potently inhibited vitamin D receptor (VDR) mRNA and protein expression in human keratinocytes without changes in VDR mRNA half-life. Concurrently, downregulation of retinoid X receptor alpha, a dramatic loss of c-myc mRNA, and upregulation of p21(WAF1) took place. Furthermore, a nearly complete suppression of vitamin D responsiveness was observed as estimated by induction of 24-hydroxylase mRNA. The apigenin effect on VDR expression was shared by some other (quercetine and fisetine) but not all tested flavonoids. Interestingly, the apigenin-mediated VDR suppression was counteracted by the NFkappaB inhibitors sodium salicylate and caffeic acid phenethyl ester. The presented results propose suppression of nuclear receptor levels as a novel mechanism whereby flavonoids exert their pleiotropic effects. This study may also contribute to the understanding of the regulation of VDR expression in epidermal keratinocytes. PMID:10652242

  4. MALT1 Protease Activity Controls the Expression of Inflammatory Genes in Keratinocytes upon Zymosan Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Anja; Grondona, Paula; Maier, Tabea; Brändle, Marc; Schönfeld, Caroline; Jäger, Günter; Kosnopfel, Corinna; Eberle, Franziska C; Schittek, Birgit; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Yazdi, Amir S; Hailfinger, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    The protease activity of the paracaspase mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) plays an important role in antigen receptor-mediated lymphocyte activation by controlling the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB and is thus essential for the expression of inflammatory target genes. MALT1 is not only present in cells of the hematopoietic lineage, but is ubiquitously expressed. Here we report that stimulation with zymosan or Staphylococcus aureus induced MALT1 protease activity in human primary keratinocytes. Inhibition of the Src family of kinases or novel protein kinase C isoforms as well as silencing of CARMA2 or BCL10 interfered with activation of MALT1 protease. Silencing or inhibition of MALT1 protease strongly decreased the expression of important inflammatory genes such as TNFα, IL-17C, CXCL8 and HBD-2. MALT1-inhibited cells were unable to mount an antimicrobial response upon zymosan stimulation or phorbolester/ionomycin treatment, demonstrating a central role of MALT1 protease activity in keratinocyte immunity and suggesting MALT1 as a potential target in inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26767426

  5. XPC silencing in normal human keratinocytes triggers metabolic alterations through NOX-1 activation-mediated reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Ali, Nsrein; Benard, Giovanni; Tang, Xiuwei; Yang, Hee Seung; Jouary, Thomas; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Kim, Arianna L.; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cancer cells utilize complex mechanisms to remodel their bioenergetic properties. We exploited the intrinsic genomic stability of xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) to understand the interrelationships between genomic instability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and metabolic alterations during neoplastic transformation. We showed that knockdown of XPC (XPCKD) in normal human keratinocytes results in metabolism remodeling through NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX-1) activation, which in turn leads to increased ROS levels. While enforcing antioxidant defenses by overexpressing catalase, CuZnSOD, or MnSOD could not block the metabolism remodeling, impaired NOX-1 activation abrogates both alteration in ROS levels and modifications of energy metabolism. As NOX-1 activation is observed in human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), the blockade of NOX-1 could be a target for the prevention and the treatment of skin cancers. PMID:21167810

  6. Gene Expression Response of Trichophyton rubrum during Coculture on Keratinocytes Exposed to Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Komoto, Tatiana Takahasi; Bitencourt, Tamires Aparecida; Silva, Gabriel; Beleboni, Rene Oliveira; Marins, Mozart; Fachin, Ana Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Trichophyton rubrum is the most common causative agent of dermatomycoses worldwide, causing infection in the stratum corneum, nails, and hair. Despite the high prevalence of these infections, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in the fungal-host interaction, particularly during antifungal treatment. The aim of this work was to evaluate the gene expression of T. rubrum cocultured with keratinocytes and treated with the flavonoid trans-chalcone and the glycoalkaloid α-solanine. Both substances showed a marked antifungal activity against T. rubrum strain CBS (MIC = 1.15 and 17.8 µg/mL, resp.). Cytotoxicity assay against HaCaT cells produced IC50 values of 44.18 to trans-chalcone and 61.60 µM to α-solanine. The interaction of keratinocytes with T. rubrum conidia upregulated the expression of genes involved in the glyoxylate cycle, ergosterol synthesis, and genes encoding proteases but downregulated the ABC transporter TruMDR2 gene. However, both antifungals downregulated the ERG1 and ERG11, metalloprotease 4, serine proteinase, and TruMDR2 genes. Furthermore, the trans-chalcone downregulated the genes involved in the glyoxylate pathway, isocitrate lyase, and citrate synthase. Considering the urgent need for more efficient and safer antifungals, these results contribute to a better understanding of fungal-host interactions and to the discovery of new antifungal targets. PMID:26257814

  7. Ceramide stimulates ABCA12 expression via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {delta} in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan J; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Lu, Biao; Kim, Peggy; Mao, Cungui; Akiyama, Masashi; Elias, Peter M; Holleran, Walter M; Grunfeld, Carl; Feingold, Kenneth R

    2009-07-10

    ABCA12 (ATP binding cassette transporter, family 12) is a cellular membrane transporter that facilitates the delivery of glucosylceramides to epidermal lamellar bodies in keratinocytes, a process that is critical for permeability barrier formation. Following secretion of lamellar bodies into the stratum corneum, glucosylceramides are metabolized to ceramides, which comprise approximately 50% of the lipid in stratum corneum. Gene mutations of ABCA12 underlie harlequin ichthyosis, a devastating skin disorder characterized by abnormal lamellar bodies and a severe barrier abnormality. Recently we reported that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) and liver X receptor activators increase ABCA12 expression in human keratinocytes. Here we demonstrate that ceramide (C(2)-Cer and C(6)-Cer), but not C(8)-glucosylceramides, sphingosine, or ceramide 1-phosphate, increases ABCA12 mRNA expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Inhibitors of glucosylceramide synthase, sphingomyelin synthase, and ceramidase and small interfering RNA knockdown of human alkaline ceramidase, which all increase endogenous ceramide levels, also increased ABCA12 mRNA levels. Moreover, simultaneous treatment with C(6)-Cer and each of these same inhibitors additively increased ABCA12 expression, indicating that ceramide is an important inducer of ABCA12 expression and that the conversion of ceramide to other sphingolipids or metabolites is not required. Finally, both exogenous and endogenous ceramides preferentially stimulate PPARdelta expression (but not other PPARs or liver X receptors), whereas PPARdelta knockdown by siRNA transfection specifically diminished the ceramide-induced increase in ABCA12 mRNA levels, indicating that PPARdelta is a mediator of the ceramide effect. Together, these results show that ceramide, an important lipid component of epidermis, up-regulates ABCA12 expression via the PPARdelta-mediated signaling pathway, providing a substrate-driven, feed

  8. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces cholesterol synthesis by increasing HMG-CoA reductase mRNA expression in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Takumi; Muramatsu, Aimi; Shimura, Mari; Kobayashi-Hattori, Kazuo; Oishi, Yuichi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of TGF-β1 on cholesterol synthesis in human keratinocytes. TGF-β1 increased the level of cholesterol and the mRNA level of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in human keratinocytes. These results show that TGF-β1 induces cholesterol synthesis by increasing HMG-CoA reductase mRNA expression in human keratinocytes. PMID:26932266

  9. Dithranol downregulates expression of Id1 mRNA in human keratinocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ronpirin, C; Tencomnao, T

    2012-01-01

    The precise causes of psoriasis, a chronic skin disorder characterized by hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and incomplete keratinization, are unclear. It is known that expression of helix-loop-helix transcription factor Id1, which functions as an inhibitor of differentiation, is upregulated in psoriatic skin. We investigated the effect of the antipsoriatic drug dithranol on mRNA and protein expression levels of Id1 in the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line. Cultured HaCaT cells were treated with 0-0.5 μg/mL dithranol for 30 min. After 2 and 4 h, total cellular RNA and total proteins were isolated from HaCaT cells, and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to determine the mRNA and protein levels of Id1, respectively. Changes in normalized Id1 mRNA levels were observed only after 4 h of dithranol treatment. There was reduced expression of Id1 mRNA transcripts in the HaCaT cells treated with 0.1 μg/mL dithranol, but the reduction was not significant. The expression of Id1 mRNA was significantly downregulated (almost 50%) when 0.25 or 0.5 μg/mL dithranol was applied to the HaCaT cells. However, the normalized Id1 protein levels were not significantly affected. The molecular mechanisms underlying this finding should be investigated further to help determine the therapeutic action of this drug. PMID:23079823

  10. Glutathione peroxidase-1 inhibits UVA-induced AP-2{alpha} expression in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Lei; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Coleman, Mitchell C.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Wertz, Philip W.; Domann, Frederick E. . E-mail: frederick-domann@uiowa.edu

    2006-12-29

    In this study, we found a role for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in UVA-induced AP-2{alpha} expression in the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line. UVA irradiation not only increased AP-2{alpha}, but also caused accumulation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the cell culture media, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by itself could induce the expression of AP-2{alpha}. By catalyzing the removal of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} from cells through over-expression of GPx-1, induction of AP-2{alpha} expression by UVA was abolished. Induction of transcription factor AP-2{alpha} by UVA had been previously shown to be mediated through the second messenger ceramide. We found that not only UVA irradiation, but also H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by itself caused increases of ceramide in HaCaT cells, and C2-ceramide added to cells induced the AP-2{alpha} signaling pathway. Finally, forced expression of GPx-1 eliminated UVA-induced ceramide accumulation as well as AP-2{alpha} expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that GPx-1 inhibits UVA-induced AP-2{alpha} expression by suppressing the accumulation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  11. EFFECT OF ARSENICALS ON THE EXPRESSION OF CELL CYCLE PROTEINS AND EARLY SIGNALING EVENTS IN PRIMARY HUMAN KERATINOCYTES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effect of Arsenicals on the Expression of Cell Cycle Proteins and Early Signaling Events in Primary Human Keratinocytes.

    Mudipalli, A, Owen R. D. and R. J. Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, USEPA, RTP, NC 27711.

    Environmental exposure to arsenic is a m...

  12. Betel-derived alkaloid up-regulates keratinocyte alphavbeta6 integrin expression and promotes oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Moutasim, Karwan A; Jenei, Veronika; Sapienza, Karen; Marsh, Daniel; Weinreb, Paul H; Violette, Shelia M; Lewis, Mark P; Marshall, John F; Fortune, Farida; Tilakaratne, Waninayaka M; Hart, Ian R; Thomas, Gareth J

    2011-02-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a premalignant, fibrosing disorder of the mouth, pharynx, and oesophagus, with a malignant transformation rate of 7-13%. OSF is strongly associated with areca (betel) nut chewing and worldwide, over 5 million people are affected. As αvβ6 integrin is capable of promoting both tissue fibrosis and carcinoma invasion, we examined its expression in fibroepithelial hyperplasia and OSF. αvβ6 was markedly up-regulated in OSF, with high expression detected in 22 of 41 cases (p < 0.001). We investigated the functional role of αvβ6 using oral keratinocyte-derived cells genetically modified to express high αvβ6 (VB6), and also NTERT-immortalized oral keratinocytes, which express low αvβ6 (OKF6/TERT-1). VB6 cells showed significant αvβ6-dependent activation of TGF-β1, which induced transdifferentiation of oral fibroblasts into myofibroblasts and resulted in up-regulation of genes associated with tissue fibrosis. These experimental in vitro findings were confirmed using human clinical samples, where we showed that the stroma of OSF contained myofibroblasts and that TGF-β1-dependent Smad signalling was detectable both in keratinocytes and in myofibroblasts. We also found that arecoline, the major alkaloid of areca nuts, up-regulated keratinocyte αvβ6 expression. This was modulated through the M(4) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and was suppressed by the M(4) antagonist, tropicamide. Arecoline-dependent αvβ6 up-regulation promoted keratinocyte migration and induced invasion, raising the possibility that this mechanism may support malignant transformation. Over 80% of OSF-related oral cancers examined had moderate/high αvβ6 expression. These data suggest that the pathogenesis of OSF may be epithelial-driven and involve arecoline-dependent up-regulation of αvβ6 integrin. PMID:21171082

  13. Enhanced Expression of Keratinocyte Growth Factor and Its Receptor Correlates with Venous Invasion in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kazumitsu; Ishiwata, Toshiyuki; Uchida, Eiji; Nakazawa, Nando; Korc, Murray; Naito, Zenya; Tajiri, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) and KGF receptor (KGFR) have been implicated in cancer growth as well as tissue development and repair. In this study, we examined whether KGF and KGFR have a role in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). KGFR mRNA was expressed in eight pancreatic cancer cell lines, whereas the KGF mRNA was detected in seven of the cell lines and was absent in MIA PaCa-2 cells. KGFR and KGF immunoreactivity were localized in the cancer cells in 41.5 and 34.0% of patients, respectively. There was a significant correlation between KGFR or KGF immunoreactivity and venous invasion and a significant correlation between the presence of both markers and venous invasion, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A expression, and poor prognosis. Exogenous KGF increased VEGF-A expression and release in MIA PaCa-2 cells, and PANC-1 cells stably transfected to overexpress KGF-exhibited increased VEGF-A expression. Moreover, short hairpin-KGFR transfection in MIA PaCa-2 cells reduced the stimulatory effect of exogenous KGF on VEGF-A expression. Short hairpin-KGF transfection in KLM-1 cells reduced VEGF-A expression in the cells. KGFR and KGF may act to promote venous invasion and tumor angiogenesis in PDAC, raising the possibility that they may serve as novel therapeutic targets in anti-angiogenic strategies in PDAC. PMID:17525264

  14. Baicalein increases keratin 1 and 10 expression in HaCaT keratinocytes via TRPV4 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Feng; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Liu, Pei-Shan; Chen, Bo-Wei; Chueh, Sheau-Huei

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we characterized the effect of baicalein on the regulation of keratinocyte differentiation and proliferation, which are abnormal in atopic dermatitis or psoriasis. Treatment of HaCaT keratinocytes with 10 μm baicalein slightly inhibited cell growth, caused morphological differentiation and increased expression of keratins 1 and 10 (K1/K10) without affecting ROS generation, cytochrome c release or apoptosis. Baicalein treatment caused growth arrest in G0 /G1 phase and also induced Ca(2+) influx via TRPV4 receptor activation. Phosphorylation of ERK, Akt and p38 MAPK, but not JNK, was increased by baicalein, and inhibition of phosphorylation of ERK, but not that of Akt or p38 MAPK, blocked the baicalein-induced increase in K1/K10 expression, suggesting that ERK activation is involved in this increase. Removal of extracellular Ca(2+) or blockade of Ca(2+) influx by pharmacological inhibition or silencing of the TRPV4 receptor did not affect growth arrest, ROS generation or apoptosis, but inhibited baicalein-induced ERK phosphorylation and K1/K10 expression. Thus, baicalein treatment increases differentiation, and decreases proliferation, of keratinocytes. The mechanism of differentiation of keratinocytes is distinct from that of proliferation, the former being Ca(2+) dependent and the latter Ca(2+) independent. PMID:27060689

  15. NFX1-123 and Human Papillomavirus 16E6 Increase Notch Expression in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Vliet-Gregg, Portia A.; Hamilton, Jennifer R.

    2013-01-01

    The high-risk human papillomavirus (HR HPV) E6 oncoprotein binds host cell proteins to dysregulate multiple regulatory pathways, including apoptosis and senescence. HR HPV16 E6 (16E6) interacts with the cellular protein NFX1-123, and together they posttranscriptionally increase hTERT expression, the catalytic subunit of telomerase. NFX1-123 interacts with hTERT mRNA and stabilizes it, leading to greater telomerase activity and the avoidance of cellular senescence. Little is known regarding what other transcripts are dependent on or augmented by the association of NFX1-123 with 16E6. Microarray analysis revealed enhanced expression of Notch1 mRNA in 16E6-expressing keratinocytes when NFX1-123 was overexpressed. A moderate increase in Notch1 mRNA was seen with overexpression of NFX1-123 alone, but with 16E6 coexpression the increase in Notch1 was enhanced. The PAM2 motif and R3H protein domains in NFX1-123, which were important for increased hTERT expression, were also important in the augmentation of Notch1 expression by 16E6. These findings identify a second gene coregulated by 16E6 and NFX1-123 and the protein motifs in NFX1-123 that are important for this effect. PMID:24109236

  16. Keratinocyte Growth Factor Induces Gene Expression Signature Associated with Suppression of Malignant Phenotype of Cutaneous Squamous Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toriseva, Mervi; Ala-aho, Risto; Peltonen, Sirkku; Peltonen, Juha; Grénman, Reidar; Kähäri, Veli-Matti

    2012-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, fibroblast growth factor-7) is a fibroblast-derived mitogen, which stimulates proliferation of epithelial cells. The expression of KGF by dermal fibroblasts is induced following injury and it promotes wound repair. However, the role of KGF in cutaneous carcinogenesis and cancer progression is not known. We have examined the role of KGF in progression of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. The expression of KGF receptor (KGFR) mRNA was lower in cutaneous SCCs (n = 6) than in normal skin samples (n = 6). Expression of KGFR mRNA was detected in 6 out of 8 cutaneous SCC cell lines and the levels were downregulated by 24-h treatment with KGF. KGF did not stimulate SCC cell proliferation, but it reduced invasion of SCC cells through collagen. Gene expression profiling of three cutaneous SCC cell lines treated with KGF for 24 h revealed a specific gene expression signature characterized by upregulation of a set of genes specifically downregulated in SCC cells compared to normal epidermal keratinocytes, including genes with tumor suppressing properties (SPRY4, DUSP4, DUSP6, LRIG1, PHLDA1). KGF also induced downregulation of a set of genes specifically upregulated in SCC cells compared to normal keratinocytes, including genes associated with tumor progression (MMP13, MATN2, CXCL10, and IGFBP3). Downregulation of MMP-13 and KGFR expression in SCC cells and HaCaT cells was mediated via ERK1/2. Activation of ERK1/2 in HaCaT cells and tumorigenic Ha-ras-transformed HaCaT cells resulted in downregulation of MMP-13 and KGFR expression. These results provide evidence, that KGF does not promote progression of cutaneous SCC, but rather suppresses the malignant phenotype of cutaneous SCC cells by regulating the expression of several genes differentially expressed in SCC cells, as compared to normal keratinocytes. PMID:22427941

  17. Inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway reduces caspase-14 expression in impaired keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Ningning; Pang, Shuguang; Song, Haiyan; An, Liguo; Ma, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Several investigations have revealed that caspase-14 is responsible for the epidermal differentiation and cornification, as well as the regulation of moisturizing effect. However, the precise regulation mechanism is still not clear. This study was aimed to investigate the expression of caspase-14 in filaggrin-deficient normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) and to explore the possible mechanism that contributes to the regulation of caspase-14. Materials and Methods: The filaggrin-deficient NHEKs were induced by transfection with lentivirus (LV) vector encoding small hairpin RNAs (shRNA). The inhibitors SB203580, PD98059 and SP600125 were used for suppressing the expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), p44/42 MAPK and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK). The expression of filaggrin, p38 MAPK, p44/42 MAPK and SAPK/JNK, caspase-14, keratin1and keratin2 were detected by western blot. Results: In filaggrin-deficient NHEKs, the expression of p38, p44/42 MAPK and SAPK/JNK and caspase-14 were significantly decreased. The inhibition of p38 and SAPK/JNK reduced the expression of caspase-14, while the p44/42 MAPK showed no consistent effects. Moreover, the filaggrin knockdown decreased the expression of keratin2, but had no effects on the level of keratin1. Conclusion: The decreased expression of caspase-14 in filaggrin-deficient NHEKs may be induced by the inactivation of MAPK signaling pathway. These provide a novel perspective to understand the mechanism for the protective effects of filaggrin and caspase-14 on skin barrier function. PMID:27096061

  18. TSLP expression induced via Toll-like receptor pathways in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Takai, Toshiro; Chen, Xue; Xie, Yang; Vu, Anh Tuan; Le, Tuan Anh; Kinoshita, Hirokazu; Kawasaki, Junko; Kamijo, Seiji; Hara, Mutsuko; Ushio, Hiroko; Baba, Tadashi; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Ikeda, Shigaku; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko

    2014-01-01

    The skin epidermis and mucosal epithelia (airway, ocular tissues, gut, and so on) are located at the interface between the body and environment and have critical roles in the response to various stimuli. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), a cytokine expressed mainly by epidermal keratinocytes (KCs) and mucosal epithelial cells, is a critical factor linking the innate response at barrier surfaces to Th2-skewed acquired immune response. TSLP is highly expressed in skin lesions of atopic dermatitis patients. Here, we describe on Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated induction of TSLP expression in primary cultured human KCs, placing emphasis on experimental methods used in our studies. Double-stranded RNA (TLR3 ligand), flagellin (TLR5 ligand), and diacylated lipopeptide (TLR2-TLR6 ligand) stimulated human KCs to express TSLP and Staphylococcus aureus membranes did so via the TLR2-TLR6 pathway. Atopic cytokine milieu upregulated the TLR-mediated induction of TSLP. Culturing in the absence of glucocorticoid before stimulation enhanced the TSLP expression. Extracellular double-stranded RNA induced TSLP via endosomal acidification- and NF-κB-dependent pathway. Specific measurement of the long TSLP transcript, which contributes to the production of the TSLP protein, rather than total or the short transcript is useful for accurate detection of functional human TSLP gene expression. The results suggest that environment-, infection-, and/or self-derived TLR ligands contribute to the initiation and/or amplification of Th2-type skin inflammation including atopic dermatitis and atopic march through the induction of TSLP expression in KCs and include information helpful for understanding the role of the gene-environment interaction relevant in allergic diseases. PMID:24377934

  19. Tumor necrosis factor beta and ultraviolet radiation are potent regulators of human keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Krutmann, J.; Koeck, A.S.; Schauer, E.; Parlow, F.; Moeller, A.K.; Kapp, A.; Foerster, E.S.; Schoepf, E.L.; Luger, T.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) functions as a ligand of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), as well as a receptor for human picorna virus, and its regulation thus affects various immunologic and inflammatory reactions. The weak, constitutive ICAM-1 expression on human keratinocytes (KC) can be up-regulated by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). In order to further examine the regulation of KC ICAM-1 expression, normal human KC or epidermoid carcinoma cells (KB) were incubated with different cytokines and/or exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Subsequently, ICAM-1 expression was monitored cytofluorometrically using a monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Stimulation of cells with recombinant human (rh) interleukin (IL) 1 alpha, rhIL-4, rhIL-5, rhIL-6, rh granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), rh interferon alpha (rhIFN alpha), and rh transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) did not increase ICAM-1 surface expression. In contrast, rhTNF beta significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the combination of rhTNF beta with rhIFN gamma increased the percentage of ICAM-1-positive KC synergistically. This stimulatory effect of rhTNF beta was further confirmed by the demonstration that rhTNF beta was capable of markedly enhancing ICAM-1 mRNA expression in KC. Finally, exposure of KC in vitro to sublethal doses of UV radiation (0-100 J/m2) prior to cytokine (rhIFN tau, rhTNF alpha, rhTNF beta) stimulation inhibited ICAM-1 up-regulation in a dose-dependent fashion. These studies identify TNF beta and UV light as potent regulators of KC ICAM-1 expression, which may influence both attachment and detachment of leukocytes and possibly viruses to KC.

  20. Impact of blue LED irradiation on proliferation and gene expression of cultured human keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Anja; Sticht, Carsten; Dweep, Harsh; van Abeelen, Frank A.; Gretz, Norbert; Oversluizen, Gerrit

    2015-03-01

    Blue light is known for its anti-microbial, anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory effects. Furthermore, it is already used for the treatment of neonatal jaundice and acne. However, little is known about the exact mechanisms of action on gene expression level. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of blue LED irradiation on the proliferation and gene expression in immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT) in vitro. Furthermore its safety was assessed. XTT-tests revealed a decrease in cell proliferation in blue light irradiated cells depending on the duration of light irradiation. Moreover, gene expression analysis demonstrated deregulated genes already 3 hours after blue light irradiation. 24 hours after blue light irradiation the effects seemed to be even more pronounced. The oxidative stress response was significantly increased, pointing to increased ROS production due to blue light, as well as steroid hormone biosynthesis. Downregulated pathways or biological processes were connected to anti-inflammatory response. Interestingly, also the melanoma pathway contained significantly downregulated genes 24 hours after blue light irradiation, which stands in accordance to literature that blue light can also inhibit proliferation in cancer cells. First tests with melanoma cells revealed a decrease in cell proliferation after blue light irradiation. In conclusion, blue light irradiation might open avenues to new therapeutic regimens; at least blue light seems to have no effect that induces cancer growth or formation.

  1. Force generation and protease gene expression in organotypic co-cultures of fibroblasts and keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Wall, Ivan B; Bhadal, Navneet; Broad, Simon; Whawell, Simon A; Mudera, Vivek; Lewis, Mark P

    2009-12-01

    Fibroblast-epithelium interactions are crucial for successful tissue engineering of skin and oral mucosal equivalents. In this study, we assessed early force generation in organotypic fibroblast-epithelium co-cultures, using normal human keratinocytes (NHK) and HPV16-transformed (UP) cells. During the initial 2 h period, organotypic co-cultures containing both epithelial cell types produced significantly more force than fibroblasts alone (p < 0.05). After 2 h, the epithelial contribution became diminished and did not significantly contribute to intrinsic force generation by fibroblasts, and no differences were observed when using UP vs. NHK. We then measured protease gene expression at the end of the experimental period. Distinct differences were evident in protease expression both between NHK-human skin fibroblast (HSF) vs. UP-HSF co-cultures and compared to fibroblasts alone. We conclude that whilst the very early contractile response of fibroblasts is enhanced by the overlying epithelium, this becomes diminished as the fibroblast response becomes predominant and it does contribute to tissue remodelling via regulation of protease expression. PMID:19701934

  2. AGE-induced keratinocyte MMP-9 expression is linked to TET2-mediated CpG demethylation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinglu; Yang, Chuan; Wang, Chuan; Liu, Dan; Lao, Guojuan; Liang, Ying; Sun, Kan; Luo, Hengcong; Tan, Qin; Ren, Meng; Yan, Li

    2016-05-01

    Studies have documented that unusually high expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) suppresses wound healing during the late stages of diabetic foot ulcers. Recently, it has been reported that the presence of advanced glycation end products-bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) resulted in a higher expression of MMP-9 in skin primary keratinocytes. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the molecular machinery that is responsible for the inappropriately high AGE-BSA-induced expression of MMP-9. It has been demonstrated that site-specific DNA demethylation played an important role in MMP-9 expression in AGE-BSA-stimulated keratinocytes. Ten-eleven translocation-2 (TET2) was up-regulated, whereas the percentage of methylation in the MMP-9 promoter was reduced. Furthermore, TET2 directly bound to a fragment surrounding the transcriptional start site in the MMP-9 promoter region, contributing to the regulation of MMP-9 expression. In addition, evidence indicated that TET2 affected the migration and proliferation in vitro of cultured skin primary keratinocytes. These findings indicated that TET2 directly interacted with the promoter region of MMP-9 in diabetic tissues and may be a novel master regulator of wound healing. PMID:26913994

  3. Drug-induced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on lesional keratinocytes in fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed Central

    Teraki, Y.; Moriya, N.; Shiohara, T.

    1994-01-01

    The mechanism(s) and the factor(s) that contribute to preferential localization of fixed drug eruption (FDE) lesions to certain skin sites remain speculative. Previous studies suggested that populations of T cells residing in the lesional epidermis may be involved in selective destruction of the epidermis in FDE. In this study, to define the earliest cellular and molecular events with potential relevance to activation of the epidermal T cells, expression of adhesion molecules on keratinocytes (KC) and vascular endothelium was examined sequentially in the lesional skin of FDE patients after challenge with the causative drug. Rapid and intense intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression was induced on the vascular endothelium and KC as early as 1.5 hours after challenge, at which time E-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were not up-regulated. In vitro studies using skin organ culture showed that the lesional KC and endothelium responded more rapidly and intensely to express ICAM-1 to tumor necrosis factor-alpha or interferon-gamma compared with those in the nonlesional skin. Surprisingly, such selective induction of KC ICAM-1 restricted to the lesional skin was also observed after exposure to the causative drug alone in skin organ culture. Pretreatment of the lesional skin with anti-tumor necrosis factor completely abrogated in vitro induction of KC ICAM-1 expression by the drug. Drug-induced, TNF-alpha-dependent KC ICAM-1 expression in the lesional skin suggests that induction of ICAM-1 expression by the lesional KC after ingestion of the drug would probably provide a localized initiating stimulus for activation of the disease-associated epidermal T cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7915886

  4. Basal and stress-inducible expression of HSPA6 in human keratinocytes is regulated by negative and positive promoter regions.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Vincent P; Stamatis, Michael; Shmukler, Anastasia; Aneskievich, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes serve as the primary barrier between the body and environmental stressors. They are subjected to numerous stress events and are likely to respond with a repertoire of heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPA6 (HSP70B') is described in other cell types with characteristically low to undetectable basal expression, but is highly stress induced. Despite this response in other cells, little is known about its control in keratinocytes. We examined endogenous human keratinocyte HSPA6 expression and localized some responsible transcription factor sites in a cloned HSPA6 3 kb promoter. Using promoter 5' truncations and deletions, negative and positive regulatory regions were found throughout the 3 kb promoter. A region between -346 and -217 bp was found to be crucial to HSPA6 basal expression and stress inducibility. Site-specific mutations and DNA-binding studies show that a previously uncharacterized AP1 site contributes to the basal expression and maximal stress induction of HSPA6. Additionally, a new heat shock element (HSE) within this region was defined. While this element mediates increased transcriptional response in thermally stressed HaCaT keratinocytes, it preferentially binds a stress-inducible factor other than heat shock factor (HSF)1 or HSF2. Intriguingly, this newly characterized HSPA6 HSE competes HSF1 binding a consensus HSE and binds both HSF1 and HSF2 from other epithelial cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the HSPA6 promoter contains essential negative and positive promoter regions and newly identified transcription factor targets, which are key to the basal and stress-inducible expression of HSPA6. Furthermore, these results suggest that an HSF-like factor may preferentially bind this newly identified HSPA6 HSE in HaCaT cells. PMID:25073946

  5. Switch in Gap Junction Protein Expression is Associated with Selective Changes in Junctional Permeability During Keratinocyte Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissette, Janice L.; Kumar, Nalin M.; Gilula, Norton B.; Hall, James E.; Dotto, G. Paolo

    1994-07-01

    Gap junctional communication provides a mechanism for regulating multicellular activities by allowing the exchange of small diffusible molecules between neighboring cells. The diversity of gap junction proteins may exist to form channels that have different permeability properties. We report here that induction of terminal differentiation in mouse primary keratinocytes by calcium results in a specific switch in gap junction protein expression. Expression of α_1 (connexin 43) and β_2 (connexin 26) gap junction proteins is down-modulated, whereas that of β_3 (connexin 31) and β_4 (connexin 31.1) proteins is induced. Although both proliferating and differentiating keratinocytes are electrically coupled, there are significant changes in the permeability properties of the junctions to small molecules. In parallel with the changes in gap junction protein expression during differentiation, the intercellular transfer of the small dyes neurobiotin, carboxyfluorescein, and Lucifer yellow is significantly reduced, whereas that of small metabolites, such as nucleotides and amino acids, proceeds unimpeded. Thus, a switch in gap junction protein expression in differentiating keratinocytes is accompanied by selective changes in junctional permeability that may play an important role in the coordinate control of the differentiation process.

  6. The mitogenic effect of KGF and the expression of its cell surface receptor on cultured normal and malignant human oral keratinocytes and on contiguous fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Drugan, C S; Stone, A; Game, S M; Prime, S S

    1997-08-01

    This study examined the mitogenic response to keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) of normal and tumour-derived human oral keratinocytes in which the degree of cellular differentiation was known and in contiguous fibroblast cultures derived from the malignant epithelial cultures. Keratinocytes, but not fibroblasts, were stimulated by KGF, thereby demonstrating epithelial target cell specificity of the ligand. KGF-induced stimulation of the tumour-derived keratinocytes cultured in the absence of the 3T3 fibroblast support broadly correlated with the degree of cellular differentiation; well-differentiated keratinocytes were stimulated more by KGF than their less differentiated counterparts. Malignant oral keratinocytes expressed KGF cell surface receptors (KD 451-709 pM; receptors/cell 2306-13645), but KGF receptor mRNA did not correlate with either KGF-induced mitogenesis or the degree of epithelial cell differentiation. When the tumour-derived keratinocytes were cultured in the presence of 3T3 fibroblasts, the mitogenic response to KGF was comparable to normal epithelial cells. The results suggest that KGF-mediated growth stimulation may not be significant in providing a selective advantage for the growth of malignant keratinocytes. PMID:9250933

  7. TLR3 drives IRF6-dependent IL-23p19 expression and p19/EBI3 heterodimer formation in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramnath, Divya; Tunny, Kathryn; Hohenhaus, Daniel M; Pitts, Claire M; Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Hogarth, P Mark; Hamilton, John A; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Sturm, Richard A; Scholz, Glen M; Sweet, Matthew J

    2015-10-01

    Interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family members impart cell-type specificity to toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling, and we recently identified a role for IRF6 in TLR2 signalling in epithelial cells. TLR3 has a well-characterized role in wound healing in the skin, and here, we examined TLR3-dependent IRF6 functions in human keratinocytes. Primary keratinocytes responded robustly to the TLR3 agonist poly(IC) with upregulation of mRNAs for interferon-β (IFN-β), the interleukin-12 (IL-12) family member IL-23p19 and the chemokines IL-8 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5). Silencing of IRF6 expression enhanced poly(IC)-inducible IFN-β mRNA levels and inhibited poly(IC)-inducible IL-23p19 mRNA expression in primary keratinocytes. Consistent with these data, co-transfection of IRF6 increased poly(IC)-inducible IL-23p19 promoter activity, but inhibited poly(IC)-inducible IFN-β promoter activity in reporter assays. Surprisingly, poly(IC) did not regulate IL-12p40 expression in keratinocytes, suggesting that TLR3-inducible IL-23p19 may have an IL-23-independent function in these cells. The only other IL-12 family member that was strongly poly(IC) inducible was EBI3, which has not been shown to heterodimerize with IL-23p19. Both co-immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays revealed that IL-23p19 and EBI3 interact in cells. Co-expression of IL-23p19 and EBI3, as compared with IL-23p19 alone, resulted in increased levels of secreted IL-23p19, implying a functional role for this heterodimer. In summary, we report that IRF6 regulates a subset of TLR3 responses in human keratinocytes, including the production of a novel IL-12 family heterodimer (p19/EBI3). We propose that the TLR3-IRF6-p19/EBI3 axis may regulate keratinocyte and/or immune cell functions in the context of cell damage and wound healing in the skin. PMID:26303210

  8. Interleukin 6 is Expressed in High Levels in Psoriatic Skin and Stimulates Proliferation of Cultured Human Keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Rachel M.; Krueger, James; Yourish, Debra; Granelli-Piperno, Angela; Murphy, Daniel P.; May, Lester T.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Sehgal, Pravinkumar B.; Gottlieb, Alice B.

    1989-08-01

    Psoriasis is a common papulosquamous skin disease. The histopathology is characterized by epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation. Recent studies suggest that keratinocyte proliferation and inflammation in psoriasis are manifestations of the same underlying pathological process. Interleukin 6 (IL-6), a cytokine that is a major mediator of the host response to tissue injury and infection, is produced by both keratinocytes and leukocytes in culture. IL-6 expression was studied in psoriatic plaques by immunoperoxidase staining with two different polyclonal anti-recombinant IL-6 antisera and by in situ nucleic acid hybridization with IL-6 cRNA probes. Epidermal and dermal cells in active psoriatic plaques from 35 psoriasis patients stained heavily for IL-6 as compared with nonlesional skin and with plaques after treatment with antimetabolic and antiinflammatory agents. Absorption of the anti-recombinant IL-6 antisera with purified fibroblast-derived IL-6 or with recombinant IL-6, but not bovine serum albumin, removed the immunostaining. Increased levels of IL-6 were detected in the plasma of patients with active psoriasis (mean 3 ng/ml) by using two different bioassays. IL-6 production by proliferating keratinocytes was suggested by IL-6-specific immunostaining in cultured normal and psoriatic keratinocytes and by the detection of mRNA specific for IL-6 in psoriatic epidermis by in situ hybridization. IL-6 stimulated the proliferation of cultured, normal human keratinocytes as assessed by two different assays. Thus, IL-6 could directly contribute to the epidermal hyperplasia seen in psoriatic epithelium as well as affect the function of dermal inflammatory cells.

  9. LEKTI proteolytic processing in human primary keratinocytes, tissue distribution and defective expression in Netherton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bitoun, Emmanuelle; Micheloni, Alessia; Lamant, Laurence; Bonnart, Chrystelle; Tartaglia-Polcini, Alessandro; Cobbold, Christian; Al Saati, Talal; Mariotti, Feliciana; Mazereeuw-Hautier, Juliette; Boralevi, Franck; Hohl, Daniel; Harper, John; Bodemer, Christine; D'Alessio, Marina; Hovnanian, Alain

    2003-10-01

    SPINK5, encoding the putative multi-domain serine protease inhibitor LEKTI, was recently identified as the defective gene in the severe autosomal recessive ichthyosiform skin condition, Netherton syndrome (NS). Using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, we show that LEKTI is a marker of epithelial differentiation, strongly expressed in the granular and uppermost spinous layers of the epidermis, and in differentiated layers of stratified epithelia. LEKTI expression was also demonstrated in normal differentiated human primary keratinocytes (HK) through detection of a 145 kDa full-length protein and a shorter isoform of 125 kDa. Both proteins are N-glycosylated and rapidly processed in a post-endoplasmic reticulum compartment into at least three C-terminal fragments of 42, 65 and 68 kDa, also identified in conditioned media. Processing of the 145 and 125 kDa precursors was prevented in HK by treatment with a furin inhibitor. In addition, in vitro cleavage of the recombinant 145 kDa precursor by furin generated C-terminal fragments of 65 and 68 kDa, further supporting the involvement of furin in LEKTI processing. In contrast, LEKTI precursors and proteolytic fragments were not detected in differentiated HK from NS patients. Defective expression of LEKTI in skin sections was a constant feature in NS patients, whilst an extended reactivity pattern was observed in samples from other keratinizing disorders, demonstrating that loss of LEKTI expression in the epidermis is a diagnostic feature of NS. The identification of novel processed forms of LEKTI provides the basis for future functional and structural studies of fragments with physiological relevance. PMID:12915442

  10. Effects of ectopic expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase on immortalization of feather keratinocyte stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yulin; Yu, Minli; Wu, Fabai; Sun, Jianguo; Wood, Chris; Hattori, Masa-Aki; Wang, Jinfu; Xi, Yongmei

    2009-12-15

    Normal somatic cells possess a finite life span owing to replicative senescence. Telomerase functions as a potential regulator of senescence in various cells. Expression level of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is correlated with telomerase activity and cellular immortalization. In this study, we investigated the effects of ectopic expression of hTERT on proliferation potential of chicken feather keratinocyte stem cells (FKSCs). We established FKSCs transduced with hTERT catalytic subunit fused with EGFP marker gene (hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs). hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs had the great potential of proliferation in vitro and expressed kerainocyte stem cell markers integrin beta1 and CD49c. Keratin 15 and keratin 19, as native FKSCs, were also detected in hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs. By the analysis of fluorescent RT-PCR, western blotting and TRAP assay, hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs were positive for telomerase activity, in comparison with native FKSCs showing no telomerase activity. We demonstrated that ectopic expression of hTERT could result in immortalization of FKSCs. Tumorigenecity of hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs were examined by soft agar assay and transplantation into NOD-SCID mice. Results showed that hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs sustained the cellular characteristics of native FKSCs and had no transforming activity. In vivo differentiation multipotentials of hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs were confirmed by transplantation into developing chicken embryos and in situ hybridization analysis. These data provide a novel framework for understanding human telomerase activity in different species and suggest a new insight for manipulating hTERT for therapeutic purposes in treating tissue injury and aging. PMID:19551764

  11. Soybean extract showed modulation of retinoic acid-related gene expression of skin and photo-protective effects in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, N-H; Park, J-S; Kang, Y-G; Bae, J-H; Lee, H-K; Yeom, M-H; Cho, J-C; Na, Y J

    2013-04-01

    Soy extracts are well known as medicinal and nutritional ingredients, and exhibit benefits towards human skin including depigmenting or anti-ageing effects. Despite the wrinkle decreasing effects of retinoids on skin as an anti-ageing ingredient, retinoid application can causes photo-sensitive responses such as skin irritation. Thus, their daytime usage is not recommended. The aim of this study is the investigation into the activities of soybean extract as an anti-ageing ingredient and their comparison to retinoids in this respect. Soybean extract decreased the relative ratio of MMP-1/TIMP-1 mRNA to the same degree as retinoic acid in normal human fibroblasts. It also affected mRNA levels of HAS2 and CRABP2 in normal human keratinocytes. Furthermore, we investigated its effect on mRNA expression of histidase, an enzyme that converts histidine into urocanic acid, the main UV light absorption factor of the stratum corneum. Unlike the complete inhibition of histidase exhibited by the mRNA expression of retinoic acid, the effect of soybean extract on histidase gene expression was weaker in normal human keratinocytes. Also, soybean extract pretreatment inhibited UVB-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation dose-dependently in normal human keratinocytes. In this study, we found that soybean extract modulated retinoic acid-related genes and showed photo-protective effects. Our findings suggest that soybean extract could be an anti-ageing ingredient that can be safely used under the sunlight. PMID:23075113

  12. Effects of different terahertz frequencies on gene expression in human keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Cerna, Cesario Z.; Sloan, Mark A.; Elam, David P.; Ibey, Bennet L.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, a surge in the development of many terahertz (THz) sensing and imaging technologies occurred leading to increased use in military and civil operations. Therefore, understanding the biological effects associated with exposures to this radiation is becoming increasingly important. Previous studies have speculated that cells exposed to different frequencies of THz radiation may exhibit differential responses. However, empirical studies to confirm such differences have not been performed. The question of whether cells exposed to different THz frequencies exhibited specific biological responses remains unclear. In this study, we exposed human keratinocytes to a THz laser tuned to several different THz frequencies using our recently developed THz exposure system. This system consists of an optically pumped molecular gas THz laser source coupled to a modified cell culture incubator permitting THz radiation exposures under controlled standard tissue culture conditions. For all frequencies, we matched the THz exposure duration and irradiance. During THz exposure, we monitored the power as DC voltage-logged values (LabVIEW™ IV log). To determine the temperature changes by THz exposure, we collected temperature readings from the unexposed and THz-exposed cells using thermocouples. We assessed cellular viability after exposure using MTT colorimetric assays. We compared the changes in gene expression profiles using messenger RNA (mRNA) microarrays, and we identified the THz-induced signaling pathways for each frequency using bioinformatics. Our data provide valuable new insights that give a comparative picture of the genes and intracellular signaling pathways triggered in cells exposed to THz radiation at different frequencies.

  13. The widely expressed extracellular matrix protein SMOC-2 promotes keratinocyte attachment and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Silke; Paulsson, Mats; Hartmann, Ursula

    2008-08-01

    SMOC-2 is a recently discovered member of the BM-40/SPARC/osteonectin family of extracellular multidomain proteins of so far unknown function. While we have shown earlier that the homologous protein SMOC-1 is associated with basement membranes, in this study we demonstrate that, in the mouse, SMOC-2 could be detected in a large number of non-basement membrane localizations, often showing a diffuse tissue distribution. A more distinct expression pattern was seen in skin where SMOC-2 is mainly present in the basal layers of the epidermis. Functionally, recombinant SMOC-2 stimulated attachment of primary epidermal cells as well as several epidermal-derived cell lines but had no effect on the attachment of non-epidermal cells. Inhibition experiments using blocking antibodies against individual integrin subunits allowed the identification of {alpha}v{beta}6 and {alpha}v{beta}1 integrins as important cellular receptors for SMOC-2. Cell attachment as well as the formation of focal adhesions could be attributed to the extracellular calcium-binding domain. The calcium-binding domain also stimulated migration, but not proliferation of keratinocyte-like HaCaT cells. We conclude that SMOC-2, like other members of the BM40/SPARC family, acts as a regulator of cell-matrix interactions.

  14. Induction of IL-10 gene expression in human keratinocytes by UVB exposure in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Enk, C.D.; Blauvelt, A.; Katz, S.I.

    1995-05-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation has profound effects on the skin and systemic immune systems. Because many of the effects of UVB result in suppression of contact sensitivity responses and because IL-10 induces a Th2 rather than a Th1 response, we sought to determine whether UVB irradiation induces IL-10 transcription and subsequent protein secretion by human epidermal cells. Skin of nine volunteers was exposed to UVB or sham irradiation, and epidermal cell suspensions were prepared from suction blister roofs 24 h thereafter. mRNA was extracted using oligo dT-coated magnetic beads, and IL-10 cDNA was amplified with a sensitive RT-PCR technique. We found that IL-10 was constitutively expressed by epidermal cells in 5 of 9 volunteers and that IL-10 message was up-regulated by UVB exposure in all experiments. Since epidermis consists of a heterogeneous cell population with distinct cytokine profiles, we determined whether UVB caused enhanced IL-10 transcription and protein secretion in human keratinocyte cultures. In these experiments, IL-10 was constitutively expressed by keratinocytes and UVB up-regulated IL-10 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner 24 h after in vitro irradiation, coinciding with IL-10 protein secretion into the culture supernatants. Taken together, the findings indicate that UVB irradiation induces IL-10 in human keratinocytes and suggest that keratinocyte-derived IL-10 may be an important component of the immunosuppression that results from UVB irradiation. 55 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Loss of flotillin expression results in weakened desmosomal adhesion and Pemphigus vulgaris-like localisation of desmoglein-3 in human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Völlner, Frauke; Ali, Jawahir; Kurrle, Nina; Exner, Yvonne; Eming, Rüdiger; Hertl, Michael; Banning, Antje; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2016-01-01

    Desmosomes are adhesion plaques that mediate cell-cell adhesion in many tissues, including the epidermis, and generate mechanical resistance to tissues. The extracellular domains of desmosomal cadherin proteins, desmogleins and desmocollins, are required for the interaction with cadherins of the neighbouring cells, whereas their cytoplasmic tails associate with cytoplasmic proteins which mediate connection to intermediate filaments. Disruption of desmosomal adhesion by mutations, autoantibodies or bacterial toxins results in severe human disorders of e.g. the skin and the heart. Despite the vital role of desmosomes in various tissues, the details of their molecular assembly are not clear. We here show that the two members of the flotillin protein family directly interact with the cytoplasmic tails of desmogleins. Depletion of flotillins in human keratinocytes results in weakened desmosomal adhesion and reduced expression of desmoglein-3, most likely due to a reduction in the desmosomal pool due to increased turnover. In the absence of flotillins, desmoglein-3 shows an altered localisation pattern in the cell-cell junctions of keratinocytes, which is highly similar to the localisation observed upon treatment with pemphigus vulgaris autoantibodies. Thus, our data show that flotillins, which have previously been connected to the classical cadherins, are also of importance for the desmosomal cell adhesion. PMID:27346727

  16. Hypotonic stress induces E-cadherin expression in cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Loitsch, Stefan; Guschel, Maike; Müller, Jutta; Kaufmann, Roland; Bernd, August

    2005-01-01

    Human epidermis marks the interface between internal and external environments with the major task being to maintain body hydration. Alternating exposure of skin to a dry or humid environment is likely to cause changes in the epidermal water gradient resulting in osmotic alterations of epidermal keratinocytes. The present in vitro approach studied the effect of hypotonicity on cell-cell contact. It was demonstrated that hypotonic stress applied to human epithelial cells (HaCaT, A-431) induced upregulation of E-cadherin at both, the protein and mRNA level. 5'-deletional mutants of the E-cadherin promoter identified an element ranging from -53 to +31 that conveyed strong transactivation under hypotonic stress. In order to define relevant upstream regulators members of the MAP kinase family, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and protein kinase B/Akt (PKB/Akt) were investigated. Hypotonic conditions led to a fast activation of ERK1/2, SAPK/JNK, p38, EGFR and PKB/Akt with distinct activation patterns. Experiments using specific inhibitors showed that p38 contributes to the E-cadherin transactivation under hypotonic conditions. Further upstream, adhesion was found to be a prerequisite for E-cadherin transactivation in this model. In summary, the present study provides evidence that E-cadherin is an osmo-sensitive gene that responds to hypotonic stress. The function of this regulation may be found in morphological changes induced by cell swelling. It is likely that induction of E-cadherin contributes to the stabilization between adjacent cells in order to withstand the physical forces induced by hypotonicity. PMID:15620715

  17. Notch and TGF-β pathways cooperatively regulate receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase-κ (PTPRK) gene expression in human primary keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yiru; Xue, Siliang; Zhou, Jin; Voorhees, John J.; Fisher, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase-κ (PTPRK) specifically and directly dephosphorylates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), thereby limiting EGFR function in primary human keratinocytes. PTPRK expression is increased by the TGF-β/Smad3 pathway and cell–cell contact. Because the Notch receptor pathway is responsive to cell–cell contact and regulates keratinocyte growth and differentiation, we investigated the interplay between Notch and TGF-β pathways in regulation of PTPRK expression in human keratinocytes. Suppression of Notch signaling by γ-secretase inhibitors substantially reduced cell contact induction of PTPRK gene expression. In sparse keratinocyte cultures, addition of soluble Notch-activating ligand jagged one peptide (Jag1) induced PTPRK. Of interest, cell contact–induced expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β receptor inhibitor SB431542 inhibited contact-induced expression of PTPRK. Furthermore, inhibition of Notch signaling, via knockdown of Notch1 or by γ-secretase inhibitors, significantly reduced TGF-β–induced PTPRK gene expression, indicating that Notch and TGF-β pathways function together to regulate PTPRK. Of importance, the combination of Jag1 plus TGF-β results in greater PTPRK expression and lower EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation than either ligand alone. These data indicate that Notch and TGF-β act in concert to stimulate induction of PTPRK, which suppresses EGFR activation in human keratinocytes. PMID:25609089

  18. miR-125b inhibits keratinocyte proliferation and promotes keratinocyte apoptosis in oral lichen planus by targeting MMP-2 expression through PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Hong; Xiao, Yan; Wang, Luyao

    2016-05-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory mucosal disease that involves the degeneration of keratinocytes. However, the etiology and mechanisms of OLP pathogenesis have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we used keratinocytes HaCaT stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mimic a local OLP immune environment, and investigated the regulatory role of miR-125b in keratinocyte proliferation and apoptosis under OLP conditions. Immunohistochemical analysis and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assay showed that MMP-2 expression was up-regulated and miR-125b expression was down-regulated in both OLP mucosa tissues and LPS-incubated HaCaT cells. Western blot analysis indicated that miR-125b overexpression suppressed LPS-induced MMP-2 expression in HaCaT cells. Molecularly, our results confirmed that MMP-2 is a target gene of miR-125b in HaCaT cells. The effect of miR-125b on cell proliferation was revealed by CCK-8 assay, BrdU assay and cell cycle analysis, which illustrated that miR-125b overexpression impeded LPS-induced HaCaT cell proliferation. Flow cytometry analysis further demonstrated that miR-125b overexpression promoted HaCaT cell apoptosis. Moreover, these effects were involved in PI3K/Akt/mTOR activation, as miR-125b overexpression inhibited LPS-enhanced expression of p-Akt and p-mTOR proteins. Taken together, these data confirm that miR-125b might inhibit keratinocyte proliferation and promote keratinocyte apoptosis in OLP pathogenesis by targeting MMP-2 through PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. PMID:27133077

  19. Arsenic-exposed Keratinocytes Exhibit Differential microRNAs Expression Profile; Potential Implication of miR-21, miR-200a and miR-141 in Melanoma Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Horacio; Lema, Carolina; Kirken, Robert A.; Maldonado, Rosa A.; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Aguilera, Renato J.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term exposure to arsenic has been linked to cancer in different organs and tissues, including skin. Here, non-malignant human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were exposed to arsenic and its effects on microRNAs (miRNAs; miR) expression were analyzed via miRCURY LNA array analyses. A total of 30 miRNAs were found differentially expressed in arsenic-treated cells, as compared to untreated controls. Among the up-regulated miRNAs, miR-21, miR-200a and miR-141, are well known to be involved in carcinogenesis. Additional findings confirmed that those three miRNAs were indeed up-regulated in arsenic-stimulated keratinocytes as demonstrated by quantitative PCR assay. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis of both potential cancer-related pathways and targeted genes affected by miR-21, miR-200a and/or miR-141 was performed. Results revealed that miR-21, miR-200a and miR-141 are implicated in skin carcinogenesis related with melanoma development. Conclusively, our results indicate that arsenic-treated keratinocytes exhibited alteration in the miRNAs expression profile and that miR-21, miR-200a and miR-141 could be promising early biomarkers of the epithelial phenotype of cancer cells and they could be potential novel targets for melanoma therapeutic interventions. PMID:27054085

  20. Epilysin, a novel human matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-28) expressed in testis and keratinocytes and in response to injury.

    PubMed

    Lohi, J; Wilson, C L; Roby, J D; Parks, W C

    2001-03-30

    We have cloned a new human matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-28, epilysin) from human keratinocyte and testis cDNA libraries. Like most MMPs, epilysin contains a signal sequence, a prodomain with a PRCGVTD sequence, a zinc-binding catalytic domain with an HEIGHTLGLTH sequence, and a hemopexin-like domain. In addition, epilysin has a furin activation sequence (RRKKR) but has no transmembrane sequence. The exon-intron organization and splicing pattern of epilysin differ from that of other MMP genes. It has only 8 exons, and 5 exons are spliced at sites not used by other MMPs. Another novel feature of epilysin is that exon 4 is alternatively spliced to a transcript that does not encode the N-terminal half of the catalytic domain. Northern hybridization of tissue RNA indicated that epilysin is expressed at high levels in testis and at lower levels in lungs, heart, colon, intestine, and brain. RNase protection assay with various cell lines indicated that epilysin was selectively expressed in keratinocytes. Recombinant epilysin degraded casein in a zymography assay, and its proteolytic activity was inhibited by EDTA and by batimastat, a selective MMP inhibitor. Immunohistochemical staining showed expression of epilysin protein in the basal and suprabasal epidermis of intact skin. In injured skin, prominent staining for epilysin was seen in basal keratinocytes both at and some distance from the wound edge, a pattern that is quite distinct from that of other MMPs expressed during tissue repair. These findings suggest that this new MMP functions in several tissues both in tissue homeostasis and in repair. PMID:11121398

  1. TNF-α increases the expression and activity of vitamin D receptor in keratinocytes: role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ziv, Ester; Koren, Ruth; Zahalka, Muayad A.; Ravid, Amiram

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several inflammatory mediators increase calcitriol production by epidermal keratinocytes. In turn calcitriol attenuates the keratinocyte inflammatory response. Since the effect of the in-situ generated calcitriol depends also on the sensitivity to the hormone we studied the effect of inflammatory cytokines on the response of HaCaT human keratinocytes to calcitriol by examining the expression and transcriptional activity of VDR. Treatment with TNF, but not with IL-1β or interferon γ, increased VDR protein level, while decreasing the level of its heterodimerization partner RXRα. This was associated with increased VDR mRNA levels. c-Jun N-terminal kinase, but not P38 MAPK or NFκB, was found to participate in the upregulation of VDR by TNF. The functional significance of the modulation of VDR and RXRα levels by TNF is manifested by increased induction of VDR target gene CYP24A1 by calcitriol. Calcitriol, in turn, inhibited the enhanced expression of VDR by TNF. In conclusion, the inflammatory cytokine TNF increases the response of keratinocytes to calcitriol through upregulation of its receptor VDR, which in turn is subject to negative feedback by the hormone accelerating the return of the keratinocyte vitamin D system to its basal activity. We surmise that the increased generation and sensitivity to calcitriol in keratinocytes play a role in the resolution of epidermal inflammation. PMID:27195054

  2. TNF-α increases the expression and activity of vitamin D receptor in keratinocytes: role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Ester; Koren, Ruth; Zahalka, Muayad A; Ravid, Amiram

    2016-01-01

    Several inflammatory mediators increase calcitriol production by epidermal keratinocytes. In turn calcitriol attenuates the keratinocyte inflammatory response. Since the effect of the in-situ generated calcitriol depends also on the sensitivity to the hormone we studied the effect of inflammatory cytokines on the response of HaCaT human keratinocytes to calcitriol by examining the expression and transcriptional activity of VDR. Treatment with TNF, but not with IL-1β or interferon γ, increased VDR protein level, while decreasing the level of its heterodimerization partner RXRα. This was associated with increased VDR mRNA levels. c-Jun N-terminal kinase, but not P38 MAPK or NFκB, was found to participate in the upregulation of VDR by TNF. The functional significance of the modulation of VDR and RXRα levels by TNF is manifested by increased induction of VDR target gene CYP24A1 by calcitriol. Calcitriol, in turn, inhibited the enhanced expression of VDR by TNF. In conclusion, the inflammatory cytokine TNF increases the response of keratinocytes to calcitriol through upregulation of its receptor VDR, which in turn is subject to negative feedback by the hormone accelerating the return of the keratinocyte vitamin D system to its basal activity. We surmise that the increased generation and sensitivity to calcitriol in keratinocytes play a role in the resolution of epidermal inflammation. PMID:27195054

  3. RXRα ablation in epidermal keratinocytes enhances UV radiation induced DNA damage, apoptosis, and proliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhixing; Coleman, Daniel J.; Bajaj, Gaurav; Liang, Xiaobo; Ganguli-Indra, Gitali; Indra, Arup Kumar

    2011-01-01

    We show here that keratinocytic nuclear receptor Retinoid X Receptor α (RXRα) regulates mouse keratinocyte and melanocyte homeostasis following acute ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Keratinocytic RXRα has a protective role on UVR-induced keratinocyte and melanocyte proliferation/differentiation, oxidative stress mediated DNA damage and cellular apoptosis. We discovered that keratinocytic RXRα in a cell autonomous manner regulate mitogenic growth responses in skin epidermis via secretion of hbEGF, GMCSF, IL1-α and COX2, and activation of MAPK pathways. We identified altered expression of several keratinocyte-derived mitogenic paracrine growth factors such as ET-1, HGF, α–MSH, SCF and FGF2 in skin of mice lacking RXRα in epidermal keratinocytes (RXRαep−/− mice), which in a non-cell autonomous manner modulated melanocyte proliferation and activation after UVR. RXRαep−/− mouse represents a unique animal model where UVR induces melanocyte proliferation/activation in both epidermis and dermis. Considered together, our results suggest that RXR antagonists, together with inhibitors of cell proliferation can be effective to prevent solar UV radiation induced photo-carcinogenesis. PMID:20944655

  4. Fine-tuning of eTRPM8 expression and activity conditions keratinocyte fate.

    PubMed

    Bidaux, Gabriel; Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Gordienko, Dmitri

    2016-07-01

    Recently, we reported the cloning and characterization of short isoform of the icilin-activated cold receptor TRPM8 channel in keratinocytes, dubbed eTRPM8. We demonstrated that eTRPM8 via fine tuning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) - mitochondria Ca(2+) shuttling regulates mitochondrial ATP and superoxide (O2(•-)) production and, thereby, mediates control of epidermal homeostasis by mild cold. Here, we provide additional information explaining why eTRPM8 suppression and TRPM8 stimulation both inhibit keratinocyte growth. We also demonstrate that stimulation of eTRPM8 with icilin may give rise to sustained oscillatory responses. Furthermore, we show that ATP-induced cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) responses are attenuated by eTRPM8 suppression. This suggests positive interplay between eTRPM8 and purinergic signaling pathways, what may serve to facilitate the ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) shuttling. Finally, we demonstrate that cold (25°C) induces eTRPM8-dependent superoxide-mediated necrosis of keratinocytes. Altogether, these results are in line with our model of eTRPM8-mediated cold-dependent balance between keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. PMID:27014839

  5. A composite enhancer regulates p63 gene expression in epidermal morphogenesis and in keratinocyte differentiation by multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Antonini, Dario; Sirico, Anna; Aberdam, Edith; Ambrosio, Raffaele; Campanile, Carmen; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Altruda, Fiorella; Aberdam, Daniel; Brissette, Janice L.; Missero, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    p63 is a crucial regulator of epidermal development, but its transcriptional control has remained elusive. Here, we report the identification of a long-range enhancer (p63LRE) that is composed of two evolutionary conserved modules (C38 and C40), acting in concert to control tissue- and layer-specific expression of the p63 gene. Both modules are in an open and active chromatin state in human and mouse keratinocytes and in embryonic epidermis, and are strongly bound by p63. p63LRE activity is dependent on p63 expression in embryonic skin, and also in the commitment of human induced pluripotent stem cells toward an epithelial cell fate. A search for other transcription factors involved in p63LRE regulation revealed that the CAAT enhancer binding proteins Cebpa and Cebpb and the POU domain-containing protein Pou3f1 repress p63 expression during keratinocyte differentiation by binding the p63LRE enhancer. Collectively, our data indicate that p63LRE is composed of additive and partly redundant enhancer modules that act to direct robust p63 expression selectively in the basal layer of the epidermis. PMID:25567987

  6. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone enhances keratinocyte migration and induces Mmp13 gene expression in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Paes, Camila

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An evidence of the positive effect of AHL on epithelialization process is provided. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AHL enhances keratinocyte's ability to migrate in an in vitro scratch wound model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AHL induces the expression of Mmp13. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Topical application of AHL represents a possible strategy to treat chronic wounds. -- Abstract: Re-epithelialization is an essential step of wound healing involving three overlapping keratinocyte functions: migration, proliferation and differentiation. While quorum sensing (QS) is a cell density-dependent signaling system that enables bacteria to regulate the expression of certain genes, the QS molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone (AHL) exerts effects also on mammalian cells in a process called inter-kingdom signaling. Recent studies have shown that AHL improves epithelialization in in vivo wound healing models but detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms are needed. The present study focused on the AHL as a candidate reagent to improve wound healing through direct modulation of keratinocyte's activity in the re-epithelialization process. Results indicated that AHL enhances the keratinocyte's ability to migrate in an in vitro scratch wound healing model probably due to the high Mmp13 gene expression analysis after AHL treatment that was revealed by real-time RT-PCR. Inhibition of activator protein 1 (AP-1) signaling pathway completely prevented the migration of keratinocytes, and also resulted in a diminished Mmp13 gene expression, suggesting that AP-1 might be essential in the AHL-induced migration. Taken together, these results imply that AHL is a promising candidate molecule to improve re-epithelialization through the induction of migration of keratinocytes. Further investigation is needed to clarify the mechanism of action and molecular pathway of AHL on the keratinocyte migration process.

  7. Aquaporin 5 increases keratinocyte-derived chemokine expression and NF-κB activity through ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yuima; Hisatsune, Akinori; Katsuki, Hiroshi; Horie, Ichiro; Isohama, Yoichiro

    2014-06-13

    Aquaporin-5 (AQP5) is a water-selective channel protein that is expressed in submucosal glands and alveolar epithelial cells in the lungs. Recent studies have revealed that AQPs regulate not only water metabolism, but also some cellular functions such as cell growth and migration. Here, we report the role of AQP5 in inflammatory responses. In MLE-12 cells, knockdown of AQP5 using siRNA (10-50 nM) attenuated TNF-α-induced expression of keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) mRNA and protein. Conversely, in NIH-3T3 cells, overexpression of AQP5 increased KC expression, NF-κB activation, and ERK phosphorylation. The AQP5-induced increase of KC expression was diminished by treatment with ERK inhibitors. Taken together, we propose a new function of AQP5 as an inflammatory signal potentiator, which may be mediated by increased activation of ERK and NF-κB. PMID:24747567

  8. Hydrolyzed Methylhesperidin Induces Antioxidant Enzyme Expression via the Nrf2-ARE Pathway in Normal Human Epidermal Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kuwano, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Manabu; Kagawa, Daiji; Murase, Takatoshi

    2015-09-16

    Methylhesperidin (MHES) is a mixture of methylated derivatives of the citrus flavonoid hesperidin and is used as a food or pharmaceutical additive. Dietary MHES could be hydrolyzed by gut microflora to give aglycons. Therefore, we prepared hydrolyzed methylhesperidin (h-MHES) and assessed its pharmacological activity in human epidermal keratinocytes. h-MHES promoted nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation and the expression of cytoprotective genes (e.g., heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC)). h-MHES also increased intracellular glutathione levels and reduced UVB-induced reactive oxygen species. Moreover, h-MHES increased phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and a p38 MAPK inhibitor significantly attenuated h-MHES-induced HO-1 and GCLC expression. Furthermore, when we purified the components of h-MHES, we identified two methoxy-chalcones as novel Nrf2 activators. Our study demonstrates that h-MHES can induce cytoprotective gene expression and reduce oxidative stress via the Nrf2-ARE pathway in keratinocytes, suggesting that MHES may contribute to the suppression of UVB-induced skin damage in vivo. PMID:26313892

  9. Photoprotective effect of arctiin against ultraviolet B-induced damage in HaCaT keratinocytes is mediated by microRNA expression changes.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hwa Jun; Lee, Ghang Tai; Lee, Kwang Sik; Lee, Kun Kook; Hong, Jin Tae; Lee, Na Kyeong; Kim, Soo-Yeon; Lee, Bo Mi; An, In-Sook; Hahn, Hyung Jin; Ahn, Kyu Joong; Lee, Su-Jae; An, Sungkwan; Bae, Seunghee

    2014-09-01

    Human keratinocytes are located in the outermost skin layer and thus particularly vulnerable to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation exposure. Previous studies have focused on the cellular and molecular perspectives of UVB-induced keratinocyte damage. In the present study, it was demonstrated that pretreatment with the phytochemical arctiin, one of the lignin compounds, protects human HaCaT keratinocytes from UVB-mediated damage. Biochemical assays revealed that UVB-induced cytotoxicity and cell death were significantly reduced in arctiin-pretreated HaCaT cells. In addition, arctiin promoted the wound healing and DNA repair properties of keratinocytes. The photoprotective effects of arctiin were associated with changes in the expression levels of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) in HaCaT cells. A bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that the miRNAs were functionally involved in cancer, cell cycle, and Wnt and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. In the present study, the results from the cellular and molecular assays demonstrated a novel role for arctiin in UVB protection in keratinocytes, which is mediated by miRNA responses and the suppression of UVB-induced cell death. Furthermore, arctiin is implicated as a potential chemopreventive agent through UVB protection of keratinocytes. PMID:24926940

  10. Exogenous stimulation with Eclipta alba promotes hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation and downregulates TGF-β1 expression in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Begum, Shahnaz; Lee, Mi Ra; Gu, Li Juan; Hossain, Jamil; Sung, Chang Keun

    2015-02-01

    Eclipta alba (L.) Hassk (E. alba) is a traditionally acclaimed medicinal herb used for the promotion of hair growth. However, to the best of our knowledge, no report has been issued to date on its effects on genetically distorted hair follicles (HFs). In this study, we aimed to identify an agent (stimuli) that may be beneficial for the restoration of human hair loss and which may be used as an alternative to synthetic drugs. We investigated the effects of petroleum ether extract (PEE) and different solvent fractions of E. alba on HFs of nude mice. Treatment was performed by topical application on the backs of nude mice and the changes in hair growth patterns were evaluated. Histological analysis was carried out to evaluate the HF morphology and the structural differences. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining was performed to visualize follicular keratinocyte proliferation. The histological assessments revealed that the PEE-treated skin specimens exhibited prominent follicular hypertrophy. Subsequently, IHC staining revealed a significant increase (p<0.001) in the number of follicular keratinocytes in basal epidermal and matrix cells. Our results also demonstrated that PEE significantly (p<0.001) reduced the levels of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) expression during early anagen and anagen-catagen transition. Our results suggest that PEE of E. alba acts as an important exogenous mediator that stimulates follicular keratinocyte proliferation and delays terminal differentiation by downregulating TGF-β1 expression. Thus, this study highlights the potential use of PEE of E. alba in the treatment of certain types of alopecia. PMID:25484129

  11. T Helper 1 and T Helper 2 Cytokines Differentially Modulate Expression of Filaggrin and its Processing Proteases in Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Di, Zheng-Hong; Ma, Lei; Qi, Rui-Qun; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Huo, Wei; Zhang, Li; Lyu, Ya-Ni; Hong, Yu-Xiao; Chen, Hong-Duo; Gao, Xing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by defective skin barrier and imbalance in T helper 1/T helper 2 (Th1/Th2) cytokine expression. Filaggrin (FLG) is the key protein to maintaining skin barrier function. Recent studies indicated that Th1/Th2 cytokines influence FLG expression in keratinocytes. However, the role of Th1/Th2 cytokines on FLG processing is not substantially documented. Our aim was to investigate the impact of Th1/Th2 cytokines on FLG processing. Methods: HaCaT cells and normal human keratinocytes were cultured in low and high calcium media and stimulated by either interleukin (IL)-4, 13 or interferon-γ (IFN-γ). FLG, its major processing proteases and key protease inhibitor lymphoepithelial Kazal-type-related inhibitor (LEKTI) were measured by both real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Their expression was also evaluated in acute and chronic AD lesions by immunohistochemistry. Results: IL-4/13 significantly reduced, while IFN-γ significantly up-regulated FLG expression. IL-4/13 significantly increased, whereas IFN-γ significantly decreased the expression of kallikreins 5 and 7, matriptase and channel-activating serine protease 1. On the contrary, IL-4/13 significantly decreased, while IFN-γ increased the expression of LEKTI and caspase-14. Similar trends were observed in AD lesions. Conclusions: Our results suggested that Th1/Th2 cytokines differentially regulated the expression of major FLG processing enzymes. The imbalance between Th1 and Th2 polarized immune response seems to extend to FLG homeostasis, through the network of FLG processing enzymes. PMID:26831231

  12. Methylosome Protein 50 and PKCδ/p38δ Protein Signaling Control Keratinocyte Proliferation via Opposing Effects on p21Cip1 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Saha, Kamalika; Eckert, Richard L

    2015-05-22

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is a key epigenetic regulator that symmetrically dimethylates arginine residues on histones H3 and H4 to silence gene expression. PRMT5 is frequently observed in a complex with the cofactor methylosome protein 50 (MEP50), which is required for PRMT5 activity. PKCδ/p38δ signaling, a key controller of keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation, increases p21(Cip1) expression to suppress keratinocyte proliferation. We now show that MEP50 enhances keratinocyte proliferation and survival via mechanisms that include silencing of p21(Cip1) expression. This is associated with enhanced PRMT5-MEP50 interaction at the p21(Cip1) promoter and enhanced arginine dimethylation of the promoter-associated histones H3 and H4. It is also associated with a MEP50-dependent reduction in the level of p53, a key controller of p21(Cip1) gene expression. We confirm an important biological role for MEP50 and PRMT5 in regulating keratinocyte proliferation using a stratified epidermal equivalent model that mimics in vivo epidermal keratinocyte differentiation. In this model, PRMT5 or MEP50 knockdown results in reduced keratinocyte proliferation. We further show that PKCδ/p38δ signaling suppresses MEP50 expression, leading to reduced H3/H4 arginine dimethylation at the p21(Cip1) promoter, and that this is associated with enhanced p21(Cip1) expression and reduced cell proliferation. These findings describe an opposing action between PKCδ/p38δ MAPK signaling and PRMT5/MEP50 epigenetic silencing mechanisms in regulating cell proliferation. PMID:25851901

  13. "HepG2/erythroid/brain" type glucose transporter (GLUT1) is highly expressed in human epidermis: keratinocyte differentiation affects GLUT1 levels in reconstituted epidermis.

    PubMed

    Gherzi, R; Melioli, G; de Luca, M; D'Agostino, A; Distefano, G; Guastella, M; D'Anna, F; Franzi, A T; Cancedda, R

    1992-03-01

    In mature animals, the "HepG2/erythroid/brain" glucose transporter isoform (GLUT1) appears to be expressed at the highest levels at blood tissue barriers; however, these levels may still be lower than the levels of expression seen in fetal tissues. Also, glucose transporters might serve as water channels. Therefore, we decided to investigate GLUT1 expression in human epidermis, a very active tissue, in terms of metabolism, even if not directly vascularized. We found GLUT1 transcripts in human skin and demonstrated, by immunohistochemistry, that GLUT1 protein is highly expressed in the basal layer and, to a lower extent, in the immediately suprabasal layer of the epidermis. This distribution pattern suggested that GLUT1 expression is affected by keratinocyte differentiation. To investigate this possibility, we used human epidermis reconstituted in culture. Our culture system allows the reconstruction of a stratified squamous epithelium which has been successfully grafted onto patients presenting large skin defects. Human keratinocytes have been cultured under conditions which allow a modulation of cellular differentiation and stratification. We observed that (i) GLUT1 expression is 4-6-fold higher in "stem-like" basal cells than in large, differentiated keratinocytes; (ii) culture conditions causing cell differentiation reduce GLUT1 expression, while conditions which minimize either differentiation or stratification of keratinocytes enhance GLUT1 expression. Finally, we found that IGF-1 and insulin, probably acting through the IGF-1 receptor, increase GLUT1 expression and stimulate glucose transport activity in epidermis reconstituted in culture. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that GLUT1 is highly expressed in the basal layers of human epidermis and that its expression is modulated by keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:1537878

  14. Beta Adrenergic Receptors in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sivamani, Raja K.; Lam, Susanne T.; Isseroff, R. Rivkah

    2007-01-01

    Synopsis Beta2 adrenergic receptors were identified in keratinocytes more than 30 years ago, but their function in the epidermis continues to be elucidated. Abnormalities in their expression, signaling pathway, or in the generation of endogenous catecholamine agonists by keratinocytes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cutaneous diseases such as atopic dermatitis, vitiligo and psoriasis. New studies also indicate that the beta2AR also modulates keratinocyte migration, and thus can function to regulate wound re-epithelialization. This review focuses on the function of these receptors in keratinocytes and their contribution to cutaneous physiology and disease. PMID:17903623

  15. Proliferative Defects in Dyskeratosis Congenita Skin Keratinocytes are Corrected by Expression of the Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, TERT, or by Activation of Endogenous Telomerase through Expression of Papillomavirus E6/E7 or the Telomerase RNA Component, TERC

    PubMed Central

    Gourronc, Francoise A.; Robertson, Mckaylee M.; Herrig, Annie K.; Lansdorp, Peter M.; Goldman, Frederick D.; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.

    2010-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is characterized by the triad of reticulate skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy, and leukoplakia. Epidermal atrophy, hair growth defects, bone marrow failure, and increased risk of cancer are also common in DC patients. DC is caused by mutations in genes encoding for telomerase complex factors. Although there is an association of epidermal abnormalities with DC, epidermal cells from DC donors have not been previously characterized. We have isolated skin keratinocytes from affected members of a family with an autosomal dominant form of DC that is due to a mutation in the RNA component of telomerase, TERC. Here we demonstrate that, similar to DC fibroblasts from these donors, DC keratinocytes have short telomeres and a short lifespan. DC keratinocytes also exhibited impaired colony forming efficiency and migration capacity. Exogenous expression of the reverse transcriptase component of telomerase, TERT, activated telomerase levels to half that of TERT expressing normal cells and maintained telomeres at a short length with concomitant extension of lifespan. Unlike fibroblasts, transduction of human papillomavirus type 16 E6/E7 genes into DC keratinocytes activated telomerase to half that of E6/E7 expressing normal cells, and robust proliferation was observed. While expression of TERC has no measurable effect on telomerase in fibroblasts, expression of TERC in keratinocytes upregulated telomerase activity and, rarely, allowed rescue of proliferative defects. Our results point to important differences between DC fibroblasts and keratinocytes and show, for the first time, that expression of TERC can increase the lifespan of primary human epithelial cells. PMID:19558498

  16. Mechanical stretch inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced keratinocyte-derived chemokine and tissue factor expression while increasing procoagulant activity in murine lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sebag, Sara C; Bastarache, Julie A; Ware, Lorraine B

    2013-03-15

    Previous studies have shown that the innate immune stimulant LPS augments mechanical ventilation-induced pulmonary coagulation and inflammation. Whether these effects are mediated by alveolar epithelial cells is unclear. The alveolar epithelium is a key regulator of the innate immune reaction to pathogens and can modulate both intra-alveolar inflammation and coagulation through up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and tissue factor (TF), the principal initiator of the extrinsic coagulation pathway. We hypothesized that cyclic mechanical stretch (MS) potentiates LPS-mediated alveolar epithelial cell (MLE-12) expression of the chemokine keratinocyte-derived cytokine (KC) and TF. Contrary to our hypothesis, MS significantly decreased LPS-induced KC and TF mRNA and protein expression. Investigation into potential mechanisms showed that stretch significantly reduced LPS-induced surface expression of TLR4 that was not a result of increased degradation. Decreased cell surface TLR4 expression was concomitant with reduced LPS-mediated NF-κB activation. Immunofluorescence staining showed that cyclic MS markedly altered LPS-induced organization of actin filaments. In contrast to expression, MS significantly increased LPS-induced cell surface TF activity independent of calcium signaling. These findings suggest that cyclic MS of lung epithelial cells down-regulates LPS-mediated inflammatory and procoagulant expression by modulating actin organization and reducing cell surface TLR4 expression and signaling. However, because LPS-induced surface TF activity was enhanced by stretch, these data demonstrate differential pathways regulating TF expression and activity. Ultimately, loss of LPS responsiveness in the epithelium induced by MS could result in increased susceptibility of the lung to bacterial infections in the setting of mechanical ventilation. PMID:23362270

  17. Mechanical Stretch Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-induced Keratinocyte-derived Chemokine and Tissue Factor Expression While Increasing Procoagulant Activity in Murine Lung Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Sebag, Sara C.; Bastarache, Julie A.; Ware, Lorraine B.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the innate immune stimulant LPS augments mechanical ventilation-induced pulmonary coagulation and inflammation. Whether these effects are mediated by alveolar epithelial cells is unclear. The alveolar epithelium is a key regulator of the innate immune reaction to pathogens and can modulate both intra-alveolar inflammation and coagulation through up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and tissue factor (TF), the principal initiator of the extrinsic coagulation pathway. We hypothesized that cyclic mechanical stretch (MS) potentiates LPS-mediated alveolar epithelial cell (MLE-12) expression of the chemokine keratinocyte-derived cytokine (KC) and TF. Contrary to our hypothesis, MS significantly decreased LPS-induced KC and TF mRNA and protein expression. Investigation into potential mechanisms showed that stretch significantly reduced LPS-induced surface expression of TLR4 that was not a result of increased degradation. Decreased cell surface TLR4 expression was concomitant with reduced LPS-mediated NF-κB activation. Immunofluorescence staining showed that cyclic MS markedly altered LPS-induced organization of actin filaments. In contrast to expression, MS significantly increased LPS-induced cell surface TF activity independent of calcium signaling. These findings suggest that cyclic MS of lung epithelial cells down-regulates LPS-mediated inflammatory and procoagulant expression by modulating actin organization and reducing cell surface TLR4 expression and signaling. However, because LPS-induced surface TF activity was enhanced by stretch, these data demonstrate differential pathways regulating TF expression and activity. Ultimately, loss of LPS responsiveness in the epithelium induced by MS could result in increased susceptibility of the lung to bacterial infections in the setting of mechanical ventilation. PMID:23362270

  18. The Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine IL-22 Up-Regulates Keratin 17 Expression in Keratinocytes via STAT3 and ERK1/2

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaowei; Jin, Liang; Feng, Zhenzhen; Hu, Lei; Wu, Yan; Wang, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate the regulation of K17 expression by the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-22 in keratinocytes and its important role in our previously hypothesized “K17/T cell/cytokine autoimmune loop” in psoriasis. Materials and Methods K17 expression was examined in the IL-22-treated keratinocytes by real-time quantitative PCR, ELISA, Western blot and Immunofluorescence. In addition, the signaling pathways involved in K17 regulation were investigated with related inhibitors and siRNAs. In addition, K17 expression was examined in the epidermis of IL-22-injected mouse skin. Results IL-22-induced K17 expression was confirmed in keratinocytes and the epidermis of IL-22-injected mouse skin at both mRNA and protein levels, which is an important complement to the autoimmune loop. We further investigated the regulatory mechanisms and found that both STAT3 and ERK1/2 were involved in the up-regulation of K17 expression induced by IL-22. Conclusion IL-22 up-regulates K17 expression in keratinocytes in a dose-dependent manner through STAT3- and ERK1/2-dependent mechanisms. These findings indicated that IL-22 was also involved in the K17/T cell/cytokine autoimmune loop and may play an important role in the progression of psoriasis. PMID:22808266

  19. Novel Staphylococcus aureus Secreted Protein Alters Keratinocyte Proliferation and Elicits a Proinflammatory Response In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Merriman, Joseph A; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Diekema, Daniel J; Leung, Donald Y M; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2015-08-11

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of surgical site infections that results in increased hospital stays due to the development of chronic wounds. Little is known about factors involved in S. aureus' ability to prevent wounds from healing. We discovered a novel secreted protein produced by a surgical site isolate of S. aureus that prevents keratinocyte proliferation. The protein has a molecular weight of 15.7 kDa and an isoelectric point of 8.9. The cloned and purified protein has cytotoxic and proinflammatory properties, as shown in vitro and in vivo. Potent biological effects on keratinocytes and rabbit skin suggest that this protein may play an important role in preventing re-epithelialization. Its lack of homology to known exotoxins suggests that this protein is novel, and this observation is likely to open a new field of research in S. aureus exotoxins. Due to its cytotoxic activities, we call this new protein ε-cytotoxin. PMID:26177220

  20. Microgravity alters the expression of salivary proteins.

    PubMed

    Mednieks, Maija; Khatri, Aditi; Rubenstein, Renee; Burleson, Joseph A; Hand, Arthur R

    2014-06-01

    Spaceflight provides a unique opportunity to study how physiologic responses are influenced by the external environment. Microgravity has been shown to alter the function of a number of tissues and organ systems. Very little, however, is known about how microgravity affects the oral cavity. The rodent model is useful for study in that their salivary gland morphology and physiology is similar to that of humans. Useful also is the fact that saliva, a product of the salivary glands with a major role in maintaining oral health, can be easily collected in humans whereas the glands can be studied in experimental animals. Our working hypothesis is that expression of secretory proteins in saliva will respond to microgravity and will be indicative of the nature of physiologic reactions to travel in space. This study was designed to determine which components of the salivary proteome are altered in mice flown on the US space shuttle missions and to determine if a subset with predictive value can be identified using microscopy and biochemistry methods. The results showed that the expression of secretory proteins associated with beta-adrenergic hormone regulated responses and mediated via the cyclic AMP pathway was significantly altered, whereas that of a number of unrelated proteins was not. The findings are potentially applicable to designing a biochemical test system whereby specific salivary proteins can be biomarkers for stress associated with travel in space and eventually for monitoring responses to conditions on earth. PMID:24984624

  1. Ginsenosides Rb₁ and Rd regulate proliferation of mature keratinocytes through induction of p63 expression in hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Li, Jing-Jie; Gu, Li-Juan; Zhang, Dong-Liang; Wang, Yun-Bo; Sung, Chang-Keun

    2013-07-01

    Ginsenosides Rb₁ and Rd are the two main types of ginsenosides in Panax ginseng and have been used as an additive to against alopecia. However, the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. To determine how ginsenosides prevent hair loss, we topically applied protopanaxadiol-type ginsenosides Rb₁ and Rd over the shaved skin of B57CL/6 mice, and monitored and assessed them for 35 days. We then investigated the effects of ginsenosides on cell genesis in different phases of adult hair follicles (HFs), using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine as a marker for dividing cells. Moreover, p63, a specific marker and a major regulator of keratinocyte progenitor cells of the multi-layered epithelia, was detected in epidermis. Results indicated that treatment with ginsenosides Rb₁ and Rd increased cell proliferation in both anagen and telogen of HFs. However, it had no significant effect on the survival of cells in the bulge and upper follicle region. Investigation of p63 demonstrated that up-regulation of p63 expression in the matrix and outer root sheath might be one of the mechanisms by which ginsenosides Rb₁ and Rd promote cell proliferation in HFs. Our study reveals a novel mechanism by which ginsenoside promotes hair growth through p63 induction in follicular keratinocytes and indicates that ginsenosides Rb₁ and Rd might be developed as a therapeutic agent for the prevention of hair loss. PMID:23007914

  2. Post-Aire Maturation of Thymic Medullary Epithelial Cells Involves Selective Expression of Keratinocyte-Specific Autoantigens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoping; Laan, Martti; Bichele, Rudolf; Kisand, Kai; Scott, Hamish S.; Peterson, Pärt

    2012-01-01

    The autoimmune regulator (Aire)-directed ectopic expression of tissue-specific antigens (TSAs) by mature medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) has been viewed as an essential mechanism in the induction of central tolerance. Recent data suggest that the survival of mTECs extends beyond the Aire+ cell population to form the post-Aire mTEC population and Hassall’s corpuscles (HCs). The nature and function of these post-Aire epithelial cells and structures, however, have remained unidentified. In this study, we characterized in detail the end-stage development of mTECs and HCs in both Aire-sufficient and Aire-deficient mice. In addition, using a transgenic mouse model in which the LacZ reporter gene is under the control of the endogenous Aire promoter, we purified and analyzed the post-Aire mTECs to characterize their function. We showed that the end-stage maturation of mTECs closely resembles that of keratinocytes and that the lack of Aire results in a marked block of mTEC differentiation, which is partially overcome by ligands for RANK and CD40. We also provide evidence that, during mTEC development, Aire is expressed only once and during a limited 1–2 day period. The following loss of Aire expression is accompanied by a quick downregulation of MHC class II and CD80, and of most of the Aire-dependent and Aire-independent TSAs, with the exception of keratinocyte-specific genes. In the final stage of maturation, the mTECs lose their nuclei to become HCs and specifically express desmogleins (DGs) 1 and 3, which, via cross-presentation by APCs, may contribute to tolerance against these pemphigus vulgaris-related TSAs. PMID:22448160

  3. Methylation-specific digital karyotyping of HPV16E6E7-expressing human keratinocytes identifies novel methylation events in cervical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Steenbergen, Renske D M; Ongenaert, Maté; Snellenberg, Suzanne; Trooskens, Geert; van der Meide, Wendy F; Pandey, Deeksha; Bloushtain-Qimron, Noga; Polyak, Kornelia; Meijer, Chris J L M; Snijders, Peter J F; Van Criekinge, Wim

    2013-09-01

    Transformation of epithelial cells by high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) types can lead to anogenital carcinomas, particularly cervical cancer, and oropharyngeal cancers. This process is associated with DNA methylation alterations, often affecting tumour suppressor gene expression. This study aimed to comprehensively unravel genome-wide DNA methylation events linked to a transforming hrHPV-infection, which is driven by deregulated expression of the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 in dividing cells. Primary human keratinocytes transduced with HPV16E6E7 and their untransduced counterparts were subjected to methylation-specific digital karyotyping (MSDK) to screen for genome-wide DNA-methylation changes at different stages of HPV-induced transformation. Integration of the obtained methylation profiles with genome-wide gene expression patterns of cervical carcinomas identified 34 genes with increased methylation in HPV-transformed cells and reduced expression in cervical carcinomas. For 12 genes (CLIC3, CREB3L1, FAM19A4, LFNG, LHX1, MRC2, NKX2-8, NPTX-1, PHACTR3, PRDM14, SOST and TNFSF13) specific methylation in HPV-containing cell lines was confirmed by semi-quantitative methylation-specific PCR. Subsequent analysis of FAM19A4, LHX1, NKX2-8, NPTX-1, PHACTR3 and PRDM14 in cervical tissue specimens showed increasing methylation levels for all genes with disease progression. All six genes were frequently methylated in cervical carcinomas, with highest frequencies (up to 100%) seen for FAM19A4, PHACTR3 and PRDM14. Analysis of hrHPV-positive cervical scrapes revealed significantly increased methylation levels of the latter three genes in women with high-grade cervical disease compared to controls. In conclusion, MSDK analysis of HPV16-transduced keratinocytes at different stages of HPV-induced transformation resulted in the identification of novel DNA methylation events, involving FAM19A4, LHX1, NKX2-8, PHACTR3 and PRDM14 genes in cervical carcinogenesis. These genes may

  4. Altered CD45 expression and disease.

    PubMed

    Tchilian, Elma Z; Beverley, Peter C L

    2006-03-01

    CD45, the leucocyte common antigen, is a haemopoietic cell-specific tyrosine phosphatase. Many isoforms are generated by alternative splicing, but their function remains obscure. The extracellular domain of CD45 is highly polymorphic in all vertebrates. Importantly, human polymorphic variants that alter CD45 isoform expression are associated with autoimmune and infectious diseases, establishing CD45 as an important immunomodulator with a significant influence on disease burden. Here, we discuss the new opportunities provided by the human variants for investigating and understanding how CD45 regulates antigen receptor signalling, cytokine responses and apoptosis. PMID:16423560

  5. Elevated expression and release of tissue-type, but not urokinase-type, plasminogen activator after binding of autoantibodies to bullous pemphigoid antigen 180 in cultured human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    SCHMIDT, E; WEHR, B; TABENGWA, E M; REIMER, S; BRÖCKER, E-B; ZILLIKENS, D

    2004-01-01

    In bullous pemphigoid (BP), the binding of BP180-specific antibodies to their hemidesmosomal target antigen is not sufficient for blister formation, but must be accompanied by the release of proteases. Using plasminogen activator (PA) knock-out mice, the PA system has previously been shown to be a prerequisite for blister formation in experimental murine BP. Here, we found elevated levels of plasmin and tPA, but not of uPA, in blister fluid from BP patients (n = 7) compared to blisters from patients with toxic epidermal necrolysis (n = 4) and suction blisters in healthy controls (n = 7). Subsequently, we addressed the question whether keratinocytes release PA in response to the binding of anti-BP180 antibodies. Treatment of cultured normal human keratinocytes with BP IgG, but not with control IgG, led to both increased protein and mRNA levels of tPA, but not of uPA, as determined by ELISA and RT-PCR, respectively. The specificity of this finding was confirmed using BP180-deficient keratinocytes from a patient with generalized atrophic benign epidermolysis bullosa, where no tPA release was observed after stimulation with BP IgG. Our results show the elevated expression and release of tPA from normal human keratinocytes upon stimulation with antibodies to human BP180. Keratinocytes, by secreting tPA, may thus play an active role in blister formation of BP. PMID:15008985

  6. Protein 4.1R regulates cell adhesion, spreading, migration and motility of mouse keratinocytes by modulating surface expression of β1 integrin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lixiang; Hughes, Richard A.; Baines, Anthony J.; Conboy, John; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2011-01-01

    Protein 4.1R is a membrane-cytoskeleton adaptor protein that has diverse roles in controlling the cell surface expression and/or function of transmembrane proteins, and in organizing F-actin. 4.1R is expressed in keratinocytes, but its role in these cells has not been explored. Here, we have investigated the role of 4.1R in skin using 4.1R−/− mice. Cell adhesion, spreading, migration and motility were significantly impaired in 4.1R−/− keratinocytes, and 4.1R−/− mice exhibited defective epidermal wound healing. Cultured 4.1R−/− keratinocytes on fibronectin failed to form actin stress fibres and focal adhesions. Furthermore, in the absence of 4.1R, the surface expression, and consequently the activity of β1 integrin were reduced. These data enabled the identification of a functional role for protein 4.1R in keratinocytes by modulating the surface expression of β1 integrin, possibly through a direct association between 4.1R and β1 integrin. PMID:21693581

  7. Protein 4.1R regulates cell adhesion, spreading, migration and motility of mouse keratinocytes by modulating surface expression of beta1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lixiang; Hughes, Richard A; Baines, Anthony J; Conboy, John; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2011-07-15

    Protein 4.1R is a membrane-cytoskeleton adaptor protein that has diverse roles in controlling the cell surface expression and/or function of transmembrane proteins, and in organizing F-actin. 4.1R is expressed in keratinocytes, but its role in these cells has not been explored. Here, we have investigated the role of 4.1R in skin using 4.1R(-/-) mice. Cell adhesion, spreading, migration and motility were significantly impaired in 4.1R(-/-) keratinocytes, and 4.1R(-/-) mice exhibited defective epidermal wound healing. Cultured 4.1R(-/-) keratinocytes on fibronectin failed to form actin stress fibres and focal adhesions. Furthermore, in the absence of 4.1R, the surface expression, and consequently the activity of β1 integrin were reduced. These data enabled the identification of a functional role for protein 4.1R in keratinocytes by modulating the surface expression of β1 integrin, possibly through a direct association between 4.1R and β1 integrin. PMID:21693581

  8. Endothelin-1 is a transcriptional target of p53 in epidermal keratinocytes and regulates UV induced melanocyte homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Hyter, Stephen; Coleman, Daniel J.; Ganguli-Indra, Gitali; Merrill, Gary F.; Ma, Steven; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Indra, Arup K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Keratinocytes contribute to melanocyte activity by influencing their microenvironment, in part, through secretion of paracrine factors. Here we discovered that p53 directly regulates Edn1 expression in epidermal keratinocytes and controls UV-induced melanocyte homeostasis. Selective ablation of EDN1 in murine epidermis (EDN1ep−/−) does not alter melanocyte homeostasis in newborn skin but decreases dermal melanocytes in adult skin. Results showed that keratinocytic EDN1 in a non-cell autonomous manner controls melanocyte proliferation, migration, DNA damage and apoptosis after UVB irradiation. Expression of other keratinocyte derived paracrine factors did not compensate for the loss of EDN1. Topical treatment with EDN1 receptor (EDNRB) antagonist BQ788 abrogated UV induced melanocyte activation and recapitulated the phenotype seen in EDN1ep−/− mice. Altogether, present studies establish an essential role of EDN1 in epidermal keratinocytes to mediate UV induced melanocyte homeostasis in vivo. PMID:23279852

  9. Changes in localization of human discs large (hDlg) during keratinocyte differentiation is associated with expression of alternatively spliced hDlg variants

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S. . E-mail: s.roberts@bham.ac.uk; Calautti, E.; Vanderweil, S.; Nguyen, H.O.; Foley, A.; Baden, H.P.; Viel, A.

    2007-07-15

    Alternative spliced variants of the human discs large (hDlg) tumour suppressor are characterized by combinations of insertions. Here, using insertions I2- and I3-specific antibodies, we show that I2 and I3 variants have distinct distributions in epidermal and cervical epithelia. In skin and cervix, I3 variants are found in the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic localization of I3 variants decreases as cervical keratinocytes differentiate, concomitant with relocalization to the cell periphery. I2 variants are found at the cell periphery of differentiated epidermal and cervical keratinocytes. Nuclear localization of I2 variants was evident in both tissues, with concentration of nuclear I2 variants in basal and parabasal cervical keratinocytes. A prominent nuclear localization of hDlg in cells of hyperproliferative layers of psoriatic lesions, but not in mature differentiated keratinocytes, together with I2 redistribution in differentiating keratinocytes, suggests that nuclear hDlg functions may be pertinent to growth of undifferentiated cells. Supporting our findings in squamous tissues, a decrease of nuclear hDlg and an increase of membrane-bound and cytoplasmic hDlg upon calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation were not concomitant processes. Furthermore, we confirm that the exit of I2 variants from the nucleus is linked to stimulation of epithelial differentiation. The dynamic redistribution of hDlg also correlated with a marked increase in the expression of I3 variants while the level of I2 variants showed only a moderate decrease. Because changes in the intracellular distribution of hDlg splice variants, and in their expression levels, correlate with changes in differentiation state we hypothesize that the different hDlg isoforms play distinct roles at various stages of epithelial differentiation.

  10. Shadows Alter Facial Expressions of Noh Masks

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Nobuyuki; Miyata, Hiromitsu; Nishimura, Ritsuko; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Background A Noh mask, worn by expert actors during performance on the Japanese traditional Noh drama, conveys various emotional expressions despite its fixed physical properties. How does the mask change its expressions? Shadows change subtly during the actual Noh drama, which plays a key role in creating elusive artistic enchantment. We here describe evidence from two experiments regarding how attached shadows of the Noh masks influence the observers’ recognition of the emotional expressions. Methodology/Principal Findings In Experiment 1, neutral-faced Noh masks having the attached shadows of the happy/sad masks were recognized as bearing happy/sad expressions, respectively. This was true for all four types of masks each of which represented a character differing in sex and age, even though the original characteristics of the masks also greatly influenced the evaluation of emotions. Experiment 2 further revealed that frontal Noh mask images having shadows of upward/downward tilted masks were evaluated as sad/happy, respectively. This was consistent with outcomes from preceding studies using actually tilted Noh mask images. Conclusions/Significance Results from the two experiments concur that purely manipulating attached shadows of the different types of Noh masks significantly alters the emotion recognition. These findings go in line with the mysterious facial expressions observed in Western paintings, such as the elusive qualities of Mona Lisa’s smile. They also agree with the aesthetic principle of Japanese traditional art “yugen (profound grace and subtlety)”, which highly appreciates subtle emotional expressions in the darkness. PMID:23940748

  11. Tungsten carbide cobalt nanoparticles exert hypoxia-like effects on the gene expression level in human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Tungsten carbide (WC) and tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) nanoparticles are of occupational health relevance because of the increasing usage in hard metal industries. Earlier studies showed an enhanced toxic potential for WC-Co compared to WC or cobalt ions alone. Therefore, we investigated the impact of these particles, compared to cobalt ions applied as CoCl2, on the global gene expression level in human keratinocytes (HaCaT) in vitro. Results WC nanoparticles exerted very little effects on the transcriptomic level after 3 hours and 3 days of exposure. In contrast, WC-Co nanoparticles caused significant transcriptional changes that were similar to those provoked by CoCl2. However, CoCl2 exerted even more pronounced changes in the transcription patterns. Gene set enrichment analyses revealed that the differentially expressed genes were related to hypoxia response, carbohydrate metabolism, endocrine pathways, and targets of several transcription factors. The role of the transcription factor HIF1 (hypoxia inducible factor 1) is particularly highlighted and aspects of downstream events as well as the role of other transcription factors related to cobalt toxicity are considered. Conclusions This study provides extensive data useful for the understanding of nanoparticle and cobalt toxicity. It shows that WC nanoparticles caused low transcriptional responses while WC-Co nanoparticles are able to exert responses similar to that of free cobalt ions, particularly the induction of hypoxia-like effects via interactions with HIF1α in human keratinocytes. However, the enhanced toxicity of WC-Co particles compared to CoCl2 could not be explained by differences in gene transcription. PMID:20105288

  12. Infection of Keratinocytes with Trichophytum rubrum Induces Epidermal Growth Factor-Dependent RNase 7 and Human Beta-Defensin-3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Franziska; Schröder, Lena; Brasch, Jochen; Harder, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Human keratinocytes are able to express various antimicrobial peptides (AMP) to protect the skin from exaggerated microbial colonization and infection. Recently, in vitro growth-inhibiting activity of the skin-derived AMP psoriasin, RNase 7 and human beta-defensin (hBD)-2 against dermatophytes such as Trichophyton (T.) rubrum have been reported. To evaluate whether keratinocytes are able to respond to T. rubrum infection by an induced expression of AMP we exposed primary keratinocytes to living conidia of T. rubrum. This led to conidia germination and mycelial growth which was paralleled by a strong gene induction of the skin-derived AMP RNase 7 and hBD-3. Gene expression of the AMP psoriasin (S100A7) and hBD-2 were only slightly induced. The T. rubrum-mediated RNase 7 gene induction was accompanied by increased secretion of RNase 7. Parallel treatment of the keratinocytes with T. rubrum and the cytokine combination IL-17A/IFN-γ resulted in synergistic induction of RNase 7 and hBD-3 expression. Since patients receiving therapy by inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) more often suffer from dermatophytoses we investigated whether EGFR may be involved in the T. rubrum-mediated RNase 7 and hBD-3 induction. Primary keratinocytes incubated with an EGFR blocking antibody as well as with the EGFR antagonist AG1478 showed a significantly diminished RNase 7 and hBD-3 induction upon exposure of the keratinocytes to T. rubrum indicating that EGFR is involved in the T. rubrum-mediated induction of RNase 7 and hBD-3. The growth of T. rubrum in vitro was inhibited by hBD-3 in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that hBD-3 may contribute to cutaneous innate defense against T. rubrum. Taken together our data indicate that keratinocytes are able to initiate a fast defense response towards T. rubrum by the increased expression of AMP active against T. rubrum. A dysregulation of AMP may contribute to chronic and recurring dermatophytoses. PMID:24747887

  13. Alterated integrin expression in lichen planopilaris

    PubMed Central

    d'Ovidio, Roberto; Sgarra, Concetta; Conserva, Anna; Angelotti, Umberto Filippo; Erriquez, Roberta; Foti, Caterina

    2007-01-01

    Background Lichen planopilaris (LPP) is an inflammatory disease characterized by a lymphomononuclear infiltrate surrounding the isthmus and infundibulum of the hair follicle of the scalp, that evolves into atrophic/scarring alopecia. In the active phase of the disease hairs are easily plucked with anagen-like hair-roots. In this study we focused on the expression of integrins and basement membrane components of the hair follicle in active LPP lesions. Methods Scalp biopsies were taken in 10 patients with LPP and in 5 normal controls. Using monoclonal antibodies against α3β1 and α6β4 integrins we showed the expression of these integrins and of the basement membrane components of the hair follicle in active LPP lesions and in healthy scalp skin. Results In the LPP involved areas, α3β1 was distributed in a pericellular pattern, the α6 subunit was present with a basolateral distribution while the β4 subunit showed discontinuous expression at the basal pole and occasionally, basolateral staining of the hair follicle. Conclusion: An altered distribution of the integrins in active LPP lesions can explain the phenomenon of easy pulling-out of the hair with a "gelatinous" root-sheath. PMID:17288588

  14. Keratin-6 driven ODC expression to hair follicle keratinocytes enhances stemness and tumorigenesis by negatively regulating Notch

    SciTech Connect

    Arumugam, Aadithya; Weng, Zhiping; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Afaq, Farrukh; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad

    2014-08-29

    Highlights: • Targeting ODC to hair follicle augments skin carcinogenesis and invasive SCCs. • Hair follicle ODC expands stem cell compartment carrying CD34{sup +}/K15{sup +}/p63{sup +} keratinocytes. • Negatively regulated Notch1 is associated with expansion of stem cell compartment. - Abstract: Over-expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is known to be involved in the epidermal carcinogenesis. However, the mechanism by which it enhances skin carcinogenesis remains undefined. Recently, role of stem cells localized in various epidermal compartments has been shown in the pathogenesis of skin cancer. To direct ODC expression in distinct epidermal compartments, we have developed keratin 6 (K6)-ODC/SKH-1 and keratin 14 (K14)-ODC/SKH-1 mice and employed them to investigate the role of ODC directed to these epidermal compartments on UVB-induced carcinogenesis. K6-driven ODC over-expression directed to outer root sheath (ORS) of hair follicle was more effective in augmenting tumorigenesis as compared to mice where K14-driven ODC expression was directed to inter-follicular epidermal keratinocytes. Chronically UVB-irradiated K6-ODC/SKH-1 developed 15 ± 2.5 tumors/mouse whereas K14-ODC/SKH-1 developed only 6.8 ± 1.5 tumors/mouse. K6-ODC/SKH-1 showed augmented UVB-induced proliferation and much higher pro-inflammatory responses than K14-ODC/SKH-1 mice. Tumors induced in K6-ODC/SKH-1 were rapidly growing, invasive and ulcerative squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) showing decreased expression of epidermal polarity marker E-cadherin and enhanced mesenchymal marker, fibronectin. Interestingly, the number of CD34/CK15/p63 positive stem-like cells was significantly higher in chronically UVB-irradiated K6-ODC/SKH-1 as compared to K14-ODC/SKH-1 mice. Reduced Notch1 expression was correlated with the expansion of stem cell compartment in these animals. However, other signaling pathways such as DNA damage response or mTOR signaling pathways were not significantly different in

  15. A comprehensive analysis of microRNA expression during human keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Janosch; Rütze, Martin; Walz, Nicole; Gallinat, Stefan; Wenck, Horst; Deppert, Wolfgang; Grundhoff, Adam; Knott, Anja

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report a comprehensive investigation of changes in microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles on human keratinocyte (HK) differentiation in vitro and in vivo. We have monitored expression patterns of 377 miRNAs during calcium-induced differentiation of primary HKs, and have compared these patterns with miRNA expression profiles of epidermal stem cells, transient amplifying cells, and terminally differentiated HKs from human skin. Apart from the previously described miR-203, we found an additional nine miRNAs (miR-23b, miR-95, miR-210, miR-224, miR-26a, miR-200a, miR-27b, miR-328, and miR-376a) that are associated with HK differentiation in vitro and in vivo. In situ hybridization experiments confirmed miR-23b as a marker of HK differentiation in vivo. Additionally, gene ontology analysis and functional validation of predicted miRNA targets using 3'-untranslated region-luciferase assays suggest that multiple miRNAs that are upregulated on HK differentiation cooperate to regulate gene expression during skin development. Our results thus provide the basis for further analysis of miRNA functions during epidermal differentiation. PMID:20827281

  16. Sphingomyelinase D from Loxosceles laeta Venom Induces the Expression of MMP7 in Human Keratinocytes: Contribution to Dermonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Mara A; Okamoto, Cinthya K; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M; van den Berg, Carmen W; Tambourgi, Denise V

    2016-01-01

    Envenomation by Loxosceles spider is characterized by the development of dermonecrosis. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that increased expression/secretion of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, induced by Loxosceles intermedia venom Class 2 SMases D (the main toxin in the spider venom), contribute to the development of cutaneous loxoscelism. In the present study we show that the more potent venom containing the Class 1 SMase D from Loxosceles laeta, in addition to increasing the expression/secretion of MMP2 and MMP9, also stimulates the expression of MMP7 (Matrilysin-1), which was associated with keratinocyte cell death. Tetracycline, a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, prevented cell death and reduced MMPs expression. Considering that L. laeta venom is more potent at inducing dermonecrosis than L. intermedia venom, our results suggest that MMP7 may play an important role in the severity of dermonecrosis induced by L. laeta spider venom SMase D. In addition, the inhibition of MMPs by e.g. tetracyclines may be considered for the treatment of the cutaneous loxoscelism. PMID:27078876

  17. Sphingomyelinase D from Loxosceles laeta Venom Induces the Expression of MMP7 in Human Keratinocytes: Contribution to Dermonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Mara A.; Okamoto, Cinthya K.; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M.; van den Berg, Carmen W.; Tambourgi, Denise V.

    2016-01-01

    Envenomation by Loxosceles spider is characterized by the development of dermonecrosis. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that increased expression/secretion of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, induced by Loxosceles intermedia venom Class 2 SMases D (the main toxin in the spider venom), contribute to the development of cutaneous loxoscelism. In the present study we show that the more potent venom containing the Class 1 SMase D from Loxosceles laeta, in addition to increasing the expression/secretion of MMP2 and MMP9, also stimulates the expression of MMP7 (Matrilysin-1), which was associated with keratinocyte cell death. Tetracycline, a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, prevented cell death and reduced MMPs expression. Considering that L. laeta venom is more potent at inducing dermonecrosis than L. intermedia venom, our results suggest that MMP7 may play an important role in the severity of dermonecrosis induced by L. laeta spider venom SMase D. In addition, the inhibition of MMPs by e.g. tetracyclines may be considered for the treatment of the cutaneous loxoscelism. PMID:27078876

  18. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in human keratinocytes, HaCaT cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyeon Ho; Lee, Youngae; Eun, Hee Chul Chung, Jin Ho

    2008-04-04

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is an omega-3 ({omega}-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), which has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. Some reports have demonstrated that EPA inhibits NF-{kappa}B activation induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in various cells. However, its detailed mode of action is unclear. In this report, we investigated whether EPA inhibits the expression of TNF-{alpha}-induced matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-9 in human immortalized keratinocytes (HaCaT). TNF-{alpha} induced MMP-9 expression by NF-{kappa}B-dependent pathway. Pretreatment of EPA inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression and p65 phosphorylation. However, EPA could not affect I{kappa}B-{alpha} phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of p65, and DNA binding activity of NF-{kappa}B. EPA inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced p65 phosphorylation through p38 and Akt inhibition and this inhibition was IKK{alpha}-dependent event. Taken together, we demonstrate that EPA inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression through inhibition of p38 and Akt activation.

  19. Subcellular localisation of BAG-1 and its regulation of vitamin D receptor-mediated transactivation and involucrin expression in oral keratinocytes: Implications for oral carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, San San; Crabb, Simon J.; Janghra, Nari; Carlberg, Carsten; Williams, Ann C.; Cutress, Ramsey I.; Packham, Graham; Hague, Angela

    2007-09-10

    In oral cancers, cytoplasmic BAG-1 overexpression is a marker of poor prognosis. BAG-1 regulates cellular growth, differentiation and survival through interactions with diverse proteins, including the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a key regulator of keratinocyte growth and differentiation. BAG-1 is expressed ubiquitously in human cells as three major isoforms of 50 kDa (BAG-1L), 46 kDa (BAG-1M) and 36 kDa (BAG-1S) from a single mRNA. In oral keratinocytes BAG-1L, but not BAG-1M and BAG-1S, enhanced VDR transactivation in response to 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3.} BAG-1L was nucleoplasmic and nucleolar, whereas BAG-1S and BAG-1M were cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic in localisation. Having identified the nucleolar localisation sequence in BAG-1L, we showed that mutation of this sequence did not prevent BAG-1L from potentiating VDR activity. BAG-1L also potentiated transactivation of known vitamin-D-responsive gene promoters, osteocalcin and 24-hydroxylase, and enhanced VDR-dependent transcription and protein expression of the keratinocyte differentiation marker, involucrin. These results demonstrate endogenous gene regulation by BAG-1L by potentiating nuclear hormone receptor function and suggest a role for BAG-1L in 24-hydroxylase regulation of vitamin D metabolism and the cellular response of oral keratinocytes to 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}. By contrast to the cytoplasmic BAG-1 isoforms, BAG-1L may act to suppress tumorigenesis.

  20. IL-2, IL-5, TNF-α and IFN-γ mRNA expression in epidermal keratinocytes of systemic lupus erythematosus skin lesions

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, José Ronaldo M; Fuzii, Hellen T; Kayser, Cristiane; Alberto, Fernando L; Soares, Fernando A; Sato, Emília I; Andrade, Luís Eduardo C

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze cytokine gene expression in keratinocytes from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). INTRODUCTION: Keratinocytes represent 95% of epidermal cells and can secrete several cytokines. METHODS: Keratinocytes were obtained by laser microdissection from 21 patients with SLE (10 discoid and 11 acute lesions) at involved and uninvolved sites. All patients were receiving a low/moderate prednisone dose and 18 were receiving chloroquine diphosphate. IL-2, IL-5, TNF-α and IFN-γ gene expression was evaluated by real-time PCR and expressed as the ratio (R) to a pool of skin samples from 12 healthy volunteers. RESULTS: Heterogeneity in cytokine gene expression was found among patients with SLE. Eighteen of 38 valid SLE samples (47%) presented overexpression (R>1) of at least one cytokine. Lesional skin samples tended to show higher cytokine expression than samples from uninvolved skin (p = 0.06). IL-5 and IFN-γ were the most commonly overexpressed cytokines. Samples with cytokine overexpression corresponded to more extensive and severe lesions. Prednisone dose did not differ between samples without cytokine overexpression (15.71±3.45 mg/day) and those with overexpressed cytokines (12.68±5.41 mg/day) (p = 0.216). Samples from all patients not receiving diphosphate chloroquine had at least one overexpressed cytokine. CONCLUSIONS: The heterogeneous keratinocyte cytokine gene expression reflects the complex immunological and inflammatory background in SLE. Patients with severe/extensive skin lesions showed a higher frequency of cytokine gene overexpression. Increased IFN-γ and IL-5 expression suggests that Th1 and Th2 cells are involved in SLE skin inflammation. The possibility that prednisone and antimalarial drugs may have contributed to low cytokine gene expression in some samples cannot be ruled out. PMID:21437440

  1. Mustard vesicants alter expression of the endocannabinoid system in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Wohlman, Irene M; Composto, Gabriella M; Heck, Diane E; Heindel, Ned D; Lacey, C Jeffrey; Guillon, Christophe D; Casillas, Robert P; Croutch, Claire R; Gerecke, Donald R; Laskin, Debra L; Joseph, Laurie B; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2016-07-15

    Vesicants including sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM) are bifunctional alkylating agents that cause skin inflammation, edema and blistering. This is associated with alterations in keratinocyte growth and differentiation. Endogenous cannabinoids, including N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide, AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), are important in regulating inflammation, keratinocyte proliferation and wound healing. Their activity is mediated by binding to cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2), as well as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). Levels of endocannabinoids are regulated by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). We found that CB1, CB2, PPARα and FAAH were all constitutively expressed in mouse epidermis and dermal appendages. Topical administration of NM or SM, at concentrations that induce tissue injury, resulted in upregulation of FAAH, CB1, CB2 and PPARα, a response that persisted throughout the wound healing process. Inhibitors of FAAH including a novel class of vanillyl alcohol carbamates were found to be highly effective in suppressing vesicant-induced inflammation in mouse skin. Taken together, these data indicate that the endocannabinoid system is important in regulating skin homeostasis and that inhibitors of FAAH may be useful as medical countermeasures against vesicants. PMID:27125198

  2. Modulation of keratin 1, 10 and involucrin expression as part of the complex response of the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT to ultraviolet radiation

    PubMed Central

    Moravcová, Martina; Libra, Antonín; Dvořáková, Jana; Víšková, Alena; Muthný, Tomáš; Velebný, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Skin exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light evokes a complex stress response in keratinocytes. Keratin filament organization provides structural stability and mechanical integrity of keratinocytes. Involucrin is a transglutaminase substrate protein contributing to the formation of insoluble cornified envelopes. However, a more complex role for keratins and involucrin has been proposed, including the regulation of cell stress response. The aim was to evaluate modulations of keratin 1, 10 and involucrin expression in HaCaT in the light of the complex response of these cells to UV-B radiation, including effects on c-Jun and matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) gene expression and production of interleukin (IL) 6 and 8. A UV-B (300±5 nm) dose of 10 mJ/cm2 was selected since this dose resulted in a partial decrease in cell viability in contrast to higher UV-B doses, which induced complete cell death 48 h after treatment. The UV-B radiation induced significant expression of keratin 1 and 10 and decreased expression of involucrin. This was accompanied by increased expression of c-Jun and MMP-1 and IL-6 and IL-8 production. The data suggest that the expression of keratin 1, 10 and involucrin is modulated in HaCaT keratinocytes as a part of the complex stress response to UV radiation. PMID:24678259

  3. Augmentation of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor expression by ultraviolet irradiation is mediated by interleukin 1 in Pam 212 keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, S.; Abrams, J.S.; Pearce, M.K.; Sauder, D.N. )

    1991-07-01

    Keratinocytes are a potent source of a variety of cytokines including granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). In this study, we have shown that ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation augments GM-CSF mRNA expression by murine keratinocytes. This is reflected in the increased production of GM-CSF protein by these cells. In the same cell population, exposure to UVB irradiation increases interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) mRNA and IL-1 protein as detected by bioactivity. This increase in IL-1 alpha precedes the increase of GM-CSF mRNA. Addition of recombinant IL-1 alpha to the medium increases GM-CSF mRNA expression. Anti-IL-1 alpha antibodies can completely inhibit UV-augmented GM-CSF mRNA expression. These results demonstrate that UVB irradiation-induced augmentation of GM-CSF is mediated by UV-induced IL-1 alpha.

  4. Role of MAP kinases in regulating expression of antioxidants and inflammatory mediators in mouse keratinocytes following exposure to the half mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Adrienne T.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Casillas, Robert P.; Heck, Diane E.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-06-15

    Dermal exposure to sulfur mustard causes inflammation and tissue injury. This is associated with changes in expression of antioxidants and eicosanoids which contribute to oxidative stress and toxicity. In the present studies we analyzed mechanisms regulating expression of these mediators using an in vitro skin construct model in which mouse keratinocytes were grown at an air-liquid interface and exposed directly to 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a model sulfur mustard vesicant. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) was found to cause marked increases in keratinocyte protein carbonyls, a marker of oxidative stress. This was correlated with increases in expression of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, thioredoxin reductase and the glutathione S-transferases, GSTA1-2, GSTP1 and mGST2. CEES also upregulated several enzymes important in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-2 (mPGES-2), prostaglandin D synthase (PGDS), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), leukotriene A{sub 4} (LTA{sub 4}) hydrolase and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) synthase. CEES readily activated keratinocyte JNK and p38 MAP kinases, signaling pathways which are known to regulate expression of antioxidants, as well as prostaglandin and leukotriene synthases. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase suppressed CEES-induced expression of GSTA1-2, COX-2, mPGES-2, PGDS, 5-LOX, LTA{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase, while JNK inhibition blocked PGDS and GSTP1. These data indicate that CEES modulates expression of antioxidants and enzymes producing inflammatory mediators by distinct mechanisms. Increases in antioxidants may be an adaptive process to limit tissue damage. Inhibiting the capacity of keratinocytes to generate eicosanoids may be important in limiting inflammation and protecting the skin from vesicant-induced oxidative stress and injury.

  5. Keratin gene expression profiles after digit amputation in C57BL/6 vs. regenerative MRL mice imply an early regenerative keratinocyte activated-like state

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chia-Ho; Leferovich, John; Zhang, Xiang-Ming; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Gourevitch, Dmitri; Hatcher, Cathy J.; Basson, Craig T.; Heber-Katz, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Mouse strains C57BL/6 (B6) and MRL were studied by whole mouse genome chip microarray analyses of RNA isolated from amputation sites at different times pre- and postamputation at the midsecond phalange of the middle digit. Many keratin genes were highly differentially expressed. All keratin genes were placed into three temporal response classes determined by injury/preinjury ratios. One class, containing only Krt6 and Krt16, were uniquely expressed relative to the other two classes and exhibited different temporal responses in MRL vs. B6. Immunohistochemical staining for Krt6 and Krt16 in tissue sections, including normal digit, flank skin, and small intestine, and from normal and injured ear pinna tissue exhibited staining differences in B6 (low) and MRL (high) that were consistent with the microarray results. Krt10 staining showed no injury-induced differences, consistent with microarray expression. We analyzed Krt6 and Krt16 gene association networks and observed in uninjured tissue several genes with higher expression levels in MRL, but not B6, that were associated with the keratinocyte activated state: Krt6, Krt16, S100a8, S100a9, and Il1b; these data suggest that keratinocytes in the MRL strain, but not in B6, are in an activated state prior to wounding. These expression levels decreased in MRL at all times postwounding but rose in the B6, peaking at day 3. Other keratins significantly expressed in the normal basal keratinocyte state showed no significant strain differences. These data suggest that normal MRL skin is in a keratinocyte activated state, which may provide it with superior responses to wounding. PMID:23512742

  6. Effects of the differentiated keratinocyte phenotype on expression levels of CYP1-4 family genes in human skin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Du Liping; Neis, Mark M.; Ladd, Patricia A.; Yost, Garold S.; Keeney, Diane S. . E-mail: diane.keeney@vanderbilt.edu

    2006-06-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids produced by mouse CYP2B19 have been implicated in mechanisms regulating epidermal cornification (Ladd, P.A., Du, L., Capdevila, J.H., Mernaugh, R., Keeney, D.S., 2003. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids activate transglutaminases in situ and induce cornification of epidermal keratinocytes. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 35184-35192). In this study, we aimed to identify CYPs that are up-regulated during keratinocyte differentiation and potentially responsible for epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation in human skin. The cellular differentiation state of human epidermal cell cultures was manipulated to resemble the basal, spinous, and granular cell phenotypes in vivo. Changes in CYP mRNA levels were measured as a function of differentiation state for a panel of 15 CYPs that included known and putative arachidonate monooxygenases. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that all of the CYPs were expressed in differentiating epidermal cell cultures and in human epidermis, with the exception of CYP2B6, which was poorly expressed in vitro. Six CYPs were strongly up-regulated at Day 6 and Day 8 of in vitro differentiation (CYP4B1, 2W1, 2C18, 3A4, 2C19, 2C9); the increase in mRNA levels ranged from 27- to 356-fold. Only CYP2U1 mRNA levels decreased (6-fold change) during cellular differentiation. Six CYPs showed little variation (<2-fold change) in mRNA levels during in vitro differentiation (CYP2S1, 2J2, 1B1, 1A1, 2E1, 2D6). No single CYP was identifiable as being a functional counterpart to CYP2B19 in mouse skin since none qualified as being mainly responsible for epidermal epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation. Rather, the data suggest that epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in human skin are formed by several CYPs expressed in different cell layers of the epidermis. This would predict that CYP-derived eicosanoids have different functions in different epidermal cell layers.

  7. Dysregulated ΔNp63α Inhibits Expression of Ink4a/arf, Blocks Senescence, and Promotes Malignant Conversion of Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Linan; Ponnamperuma, Roshini M.; Jay, Steven; Ricci, M. Stacey; Weinberg, Wendy C.

    2011-01-01

    p63 is critical for squamous epithelial development, and elevated levels of the ΔNp63α isoform are seen in squamous cell cancers of various organ sites. However, significant controversy exists regarding the role of p63 isoforms as oncoproteins or tumor suppressors. Here, lentiviruses were developed to drive long-term overexpression of ΔNp63α in primary keratinocytes. Elevated levels of ΔNp63α in vitro promote long-term survival and block both replicative and oncogene-induced senescence in primary keratinocytes, as evidenced by the expression of SA-β-gal and the presence of nuclear foci of heterochromatin protein 1γ. The contribution of ΔNp63α to cancer development was assessed using an in vivo grafting model of experimental skin tumorigenesis that allows distinction between benign and malignant tumors. Grafted lenti-ΔNp63α keratinocytes do not form tumors, whereas lenti-GFP/v-rasHa keratinocytes develop well-differentiated papillomas. Lenti-ΔNp63α/v-rasHa keratinocytes form undifferentiated carcinomas. The average volume of lenti-ΔNp63α/v-rasHa tumors was significantly higher than those in the lenti-GFP/v-rasHa group, consistent with increased BrdU incorporation detected by immunohistochemistry. The block in oncogene-induced senescence corresponds to sustained levels of E2F1 and phosphorylated AKT, and is associated with loss of induction of p16ink4a/p19arf. The relevance of p16ink4a/p19arf loss was demonstrated in grafting studies of p19arf-null keratinocytes, which develop malignant carcinomas in the presence of v-rasHa similar to those arising in wildtype keratinocytes that express lenti-ΔNp63α and v-rasHa. Our findings establish that ΔNp63α has oncogenic activity and its overexpression in human squamous cell carcinomas contributes to the malignant phenotype, and implicate its ability to regulate p16ink4a/p19arf in the process. PMID:21789189

  8. Mutation-dependent effects on mRNA and protein expressions in cultured keratinocytes of Hailey-Hailey disease.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Mitsuhiro; Hamada, Takahiro; Numata, Sanae; Teye, Kwesi; Okazawa, Hiromi; Imafuku, Shinichi; Ohata, Chika; Furumura, Minao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD) is a dominantly inherited skin disease caused by mutations in ATP2C1 gene, which encodes secretory pathway Ca(2+) /Mn(2+) -ATPase protein 1. The precise mechanism remains unclear. In this study, to understand molecular basis of HHD, we examined expression of mRNA and protein in cultured keratinocytes derived from three HHD patients with different mutations. We showed that reduced expression of mRNA and protein in patient with p.Gln504X, but not in patients with p.Pro307His and c.1308+1G>A. RT-PCR analysis for patient with c.1308+1G>A revealed in-frame exon skipping. Reduction of mRNA and protein in p.Gln504X was considered to be caused by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. p.Pro307His located adjacent to Ca(2+) -binding residue may induced conformational change, which leads to defective Ca(2+) transport. In-frame shorter transcript caused by c.1308+1G>A may have slightly reduced activity, which accounted for mild phenotype of the patient. These results clarified the pathogenic effects of different causative mutations in development of skin lesions. PMID:24698124

  9. Up-regulation of keratin 17 expression in human HaCaT keratinocytes by interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Bonnekoh, B; Huerkamp, C; Wevers, A; Geisel, J; Sebök, B; Bange, F C; Greenhalgh, D A; Böttger, E C; Krieg, T; Mahrle, G

    1995-01-01

    The immortalized human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT was used to assess the effect of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) on expression of keratin K17. Both IFN-gamma and K17 have been implicated in the pathophysiology of psoriasis. Western and quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses demonstrated increasing induction of K17 protein by 48 h exposure to IFN-gamma at concentrations of 10, 50, and 250 U/ml. At 50 U/ml IFN-gamma, immunohistochemical analysis revealed numerous K17-positive foci, whereas in situ hybridization demonstrated K17 message in the majority of cells. In addition, at low (5 U/ml) concentrations of IFN-gamma, cell proliferation and protein synthesis decreased, as determined by 3H-thymidine labeling and 14C-amino acid uptake. These data suggest that aberrant K17 expression observed in psoriatic lesions may be a consequence of IFN-gamma overexpression, and that the HaCaT cell line may be a useful in vitro model system to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. PMID:7528246

  10. The Retinoid-Related Orphan Receptor RORα Promotes Keratinocyte Differentiation via FOXN1

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jun; Brooks, Yang; Lefort, Karine; Getsios, Spiro; Dotto, G. Paolo

    2013-01-01

    RORα is a retinoid-related orphan nuclear receptor that regulates inflammation, lipid metabolism, and cellular differentiation of several non-epithelial tissues. In spite of its high expression in skin epithelium, its functions in this tissue remain unclear. Using gain- and loss-of-function approaches to alter RORα gene expression in human keratinocytes (HKCs), we have found that this transcription factor functions as a regulator of epidermal differentiation. Among the 4 RORα isoforms, RORα4 is prominently expressed by keratinocytes in a manner that increases with differentiation. In contrast, RORα levels are significantly lower in skin squamous cell carcinoma tumors (SCCs) and cell lines. Increasing the levels of RORα4 in HKCs enhanced the expression of structural proteins associated with early and late differentiation, as well as genes involved in lipid barrier formation. Gene silencing of RORα impaired the ability of keratinocytes to differentiate in an in vivo epidermal cyst model. The pro-differentiation function of RORα is mediated at least in part by FOXN1, a well-known pro-differentiation transcription factor that we establish as a novel direct target of RORα in keratinocytes. Our results point to RORα as a novel node in the keratinocyte differentiation network and further suggest that the identification of RORα ligands may prove useful for treating skin disorders that are associated with abnormal keratinocyte differentiation, including cancer. PMID:23922987

  11. The organic osmolyte betaine induces keratin 2 expression in rat epidermal keratinocytes - A genome-wide study in UVB irradiated organotypic 3D cultures.

    PubMed

    Rauhala, Leena; Hämäläinen, Lasse; Dunlop, Thomas W; Pehkonen, Petri; Bart, Geneviève; Kokkonen, Maarit; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-12-25

    The moisturizing and potentially protective properties of the organic osmolyte betaine (trimethylglycine) have made it an attractive component for skin care products. Its wide use despite the lack of comprehensive studies addressing its specific effects in skin led us to characterize the molecular targets of betaine in keratinocytes and to explore, whether it modifies the effects of acute UVB exposure. Genome-wide expression analysis was performed on organotypic cultures of rat epidermal keratinocytes, treated either with betaine (10mM), UVB (30 mJ/cm(2)) or their combination. Results were verified with qRT-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Additionally, cell proliferation and differentiation were analyzed. Among the 89 genes influenced by betaine, the differentiation marker keratin 2 showed the highest upregulation, which was also confirmed at protein level. Expression of Egr1, a transcription factor, and Purkinje cell protein 4, a regulator of Ca(2+)/calmodulin metabolism, also increased, while downregulated genes included several ion-channel components, such as Fxyd2. Bioinformatics analyses suggest that genes modulated by betaine are involved in DNA replication, might counteract UV-induced processes, and include many targets of transcription factors associated with cell proliferation and differentiation. Our results indicate that betaine controls unique gene expression pathways in keratinocytes, including some involved in differentiation. PMID:26391144

  12. Mouse keratinocytes express c98, a novel gene homologous to bcl-2, that is stimulated by insulin-like growth factor 1 and prevents dexamethasone-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Su, Hung-Yi; Cheng, Winston T K; Chen, Shih-Chu; Lin, Chen-Tse; Lien, Yi-Yang; Liu, Hung-Jen; Gilmour, R Stewart

    2004-01-20

    Many studies have been undertaken to investigate the mechanisms of skin differentiation. In particular, growth factors and hormones are believed to play important roles in skin proliferation, differentiation and survival. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) has been identified as a survival factor in many tissues including the skin, but the molecular mechanism of IGF-1 in epidermal differentiation is not completely understood. Neonatal mouse skin is useful for studying changes in gene expression, as the mitotic activity of skin cells changes shortly after birth. Using RNA differential display (DD), a 357-nt message that is specifically expressed in the epidermal keratinocytes of IGF-1-injected newborn mice but not in controls, has been identified. Confirmation of expression of this gene by ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) showed that its mRNA expression in the epidermal keratinocytes is induced by IGF-1. Using RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of 5' cDNA ends (RLM-5'-RACE), we have successfully isolated a 3473-bp full-length gene, c98, that has 97% sequence homology to a bcl-2-like gene, bcl-w. The latter has been identified as a proto-oncogene in several murine myeloid cell lines. Amino acid sequence analysis of the c98 showed that it has 97% sequence identity to the bcl-w protein and possesses bcl-2 homology domains (BH) 1, 2 and 3. Immunoblotting data revealed similar increases of c98 protein expression to its mRNA expression in the keratinocytes of IGF-1-injected animals. Weak expression of other bcl-2 family member proteins, bax, bcl-2 and bcl-xL, were also found in the immunoblots. Additionally, IGF-1 was found to be able to protect epidermal keratinocytes from dexamethasone (DEX)-induced apoptosis, based on the findings that after the cells were treated with DEX, DNA laddering was present in the control mice but not in those injected with IGF-1. Further, using a photometric enzyme-linked immunoassay to quantitate keratinocyte death, we found that

  13. Expression profiles of cortisol-inactivating enzyme, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2, in human epidermal tumors and its role in keratinocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Terao, Mika; Itoi, Saori; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2013-02-01

    The enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) catalyzes the interconversion between hormonally active cortisol and inactive cortisone within cells. There are two isozymes: 11β-HSD1 activates cortisol from cortisone and 11β-HSD2 inactivates cortisol to cortisone. 11β-HSD1 was recently discovered in skin, and we subsequently found that the enzyme negatively regulates keratinocyte proliferation. We verified 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 expression in benign and malignant skin tumors and investigated the role of 11β-HSD in skin tumor pathogenesis. Randomly selected formalin-fixed sections of skin lesions of seborrheic keratosis (SK), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) were stained with 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 antibodies, and 11β-HSD expression was also evaluated in murine epidermis in which hyperproliferation was induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13 acetate (TPA). We observed that 11β-HSD1 expression was decreased in all SK, SCC, and BCC lesions compared with unaffected skin. Conversely, 11β-HSD2 expression was increased in SK and BCC but not in SCC. Overexpression of 11β-HSD2 in keratinocytes increased cell proliferation. In the murine model, 11β-HSD1 expression was decreased in TPA-treated hyperproliferative skin. Our findings suggest that 11β-HSD1 expression is decreased in keratinocyte proliferative conditions, and 11β-HSD2 expression is increased in basal cell proliferating conditions, such as BCC and SK. Assessing 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 expression could be a useful tool for diagnosing and characterizing skin tumors. PMID:23362866

  14. Fir honeydew honey flavonoids inhibit TNF-α-induced MMP-9 expression in human keratinocytes: a new action of honey in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Majtan, Juraj; Bohova, Jana; Garcia-Villalba, Rocio; Tomas-Barberan, Francisco A; Madakova, Zuzana; Majtan, Tomas; Majtan, Viktor; Klaudiny, Jaroslav

    2013-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) appears to be a major protease responsible for the degradation of matrix and growth-promoting agents in chronic wounds. Honey has been successfully used for treating non-healing wounds associated with infections. However, the mechanisms of its action at the cellular level have remained poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of fir honeydew honey on TNF-α-induced MMP-9 expression and secretion from human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and to identify the honey component(s) responsible for a discovered effect. A C18 solid-phase column was used for preparation of honey aqueous extract (HAE). Expression and production of MMP-9 by HaCaT cells were determined by reverse transcription-PCR, gelatine zymography and Western blot analysis using a polyclonal antibody against MMP-9. We found that HAE inhibited TNF-α-induced production of MMP-9 in keratinocytes in a dose-dependent manner at both the mRNA and protein levels. Apigenin and kaempferol, identified flavonoids in HAE, markedly inhibited MMP-9 production from HaCaT and epidermal keratinocytes. Taken together, fir honeydew honey, which contains certain flavonoids, prevents TNF-α-induced proteolytic activity in cutaneous inflammation. Thus, our findings provide clear evidence that honey may serve as a natural treatment for dermatological problems associated with a persistent inflammation. PMID:23812412

  15. TCDD induces dermal accumulation of keratinocyte-derived matrix metalloproteinase-10 in an organotypic model of human skin

    SciTech Connect

    De Abrew, K. Nadira; Thomas-Virnig, Christina L.; Rasmussen, Cathy A.; Bolterstein, Elyse A.; Schlosser, Sandy J.; Allen-Hoffmann, B. Lynn

    2014-05-01

    The epidermis of skin is the first line of defense against the environment. A three dimensional model of human skin was used to investigate tissue-specific phenotypes induced by the environmental contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Continuous treatment of organotypic cultures of human keratinocytes with TCDD resulted in intracellular spaces between keratinocytes of the basal and immediately suprabasal layers as well as thinning of the basement membrane, in addition to the previously reported hyperkeratinization. These tissue remodeling events were preceded temporally by changes in expression of the extracellular matrix degrading enzyme, matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10). In organotypic cultures MMP-10 mRNA and protein were highly induced following TCDD treatment. Q-PCR and immunoblot results from TCDD-treated monolayer cultures, as well as indirect immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis of TCDD-treated organotypic cultures, showed that MMP-10 was specifically contributed by the epidermal keratinocytes but not the dermal fibroblasts. Keratinocyte-derived MMP-10 protein accumulated over time in the dermal compartment of organotypic cultures. TCDD-induced epidermal phenotypes in organotypic cultures were attenuated by the keratinocyte-specific expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, a known inhibitor of MMP-10. These studies suggest that MMP-10 and possibly other MMP-10-activated MMPs are responsible for the phenotypes exhibited in the basement membrane, the basal keratinocyte layer, and the cornified layer of TCDD-treated organotypic cultures. Our studies reveal a novel mechanism by which the epithelial–stromal microenvironment is altered in a tissue-specific manner thereby inducing structural and functional pathology in the interfollicular epidermis of human skin. - Highlights: • TCDD causes hyperkeratosis and basement membrane changes in a model of human skin. • TCDD induces MMP-10 expression in organotypic cultures

  16. Increased mRNA expression of manganese superoxide dismutase in psoriasis skin lesions and in cultured human keratinocytes exposed to IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Löntz, W; Sirsjö, A; Liu, W; Lindberg, M; Rollman, O; Törmä, H

    1995-02-01

    Because reactive oxygen species have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various hyperproliferative and inflammatory diseases, the mRNA expression of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase was studied in psoriatic skin tissue. By using reverse transcription-PCR we found similar expression of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) in the involved vs. uninvolved psoriatic skin. In contrast, the level of the manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) mRNA message was consistently higher in lesional psoriatic skin as compared to adjacent uninvolved skin and healthy control skin. Parallel investigation of those cytokines that are thought to be direct or indirect inducers of the MnSOD activity revealed an increased mRNA expression of IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and GM-CSF in lesional psoriatic skin. To study if these cytokines exert a direct effect on dismutase expression in epidermal cells, human keratinocytes in culture were challenged with IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and GM-CSF. It was found that IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha, but not GM-CSF, induced the mRNA expression of MnSOD, and an additive effect was demonstrated for the two former cytokines. Further, the expression of both CuZnSOD and MnSOD transcripts was similar in cultured keratinocytes maintained at low differentiation (low Ca2+ medium) and cells forced to terminal differentiation (by high Ca2+ medium). Our results indicate that the abnormal expression of MnSOD mRNA in lesional psoriatic skin is not directly linked to the pathologic state of keratinocyte differentiation in the skin. It seems more likely that the cutaneous overexpression of MnSOD in psoriatic epidermis represents a protective cellular response evoked by cytokines released from inflammatory cells invading the diseased skin. PMID:7744320

  17. Vitamin D signaling regulates oral keratinocyte proliferation in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, FENG-NING F.; VALIYAPARAMBIL, JAYASANKER; WOODS, MICHAEL C.; TRAN, HUY; PANT, RIMA; ADAMS, JOHN S.; MALLYA, SANJAY M.

    2014-01-01

    The secosteroidal hormone 1,25-dihyroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D3] and its receptor, the vitamin D receptor (VDR), are crucial regulators of epidermal proliferation and differentiation. However, the effects of 1,25(OH)2D3-directed signaling on oral keratinocyte pathophysiology have not been well studied. We examined the role of 1,25(OH)2D3 in regulating proliferation and differentiation in cultured oral keratinocytes and on the oral epithelium in vivo. Using lentiviral-mediated shRNA to silence VDR, we generated an oral keratinocyte cell line with stable knockdown of VDR expression. VDR knockdown significantly enhanced proliferation and disrupted calcium- and 1,25(OH)2D3-induced oral keratinocyte differentiation, emphasizing the anti-proliferative and pro-differentiation effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 in oral keratinocytes. Using vitamin D3-deficient diets, we induced chronic vitamin D deficiency in mice as evidenced by decreased serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentrations. The vitamin D-deficient mice manifested increased proliferation of the tongue epithelium, but did not develop any morphological or histological abnormalities in the oral epithelium, suggesting that vitamin D deficiency alone is insufficient to alter oral epithelial homeostasis and provoke carcinogenesis. Immunohistochemical analyses of human and murine oral squamous cell carcinomas showed increased VDR expression. Overall, our results provide strong support for a crucial role for vitamin D signaling in oral keratinocyte pathophysiology. PMID:24626468

  18. Human Keratinocytes Are Vanilloid Resistant

    PubMed Central

    Pecze, László; Szabó, Kornélia; Széll, Márta; Jósvay, Katalin; Kaszás, Krisztián; Kúsz, Erzsébet; Letoha, Tamás; Prorok, János; Koncz, István; Tóth, András; Kemény, Lajos; Vizler, Csaba; Oláh, Zoltán

    2008-01-01

    Background Use of capsaicin or resiniferatoxin (RTX) as analgesics is an attractive therapeutic option. RTX opens the cation channel inflammatory pain/vanilloid receptor type 1 (TRPV1) permanently and selectively removes nociceptive neurons by Ca2+-cytotoxicity. Paradoxically, not only nociceptors, but non-neuronal cells, including keratinocytes express full length TRPV1 mRNA, while patient dogs and experimental animals that underwent topical treatment or anatomically targeted molecular surgery have shown neither obvious behavioral, nor pathological side effects. Methods To address this paradox, we assessed the vanilloid sensitivity of the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line and primary keratinocytes from skin biopsies. Results Although both cell types express TRPV1 mRNA, neither responded to vanilloids with Ca2+-cytotoxicity. Only ectopic overproduction of TRPV1 rendered HaCaT cells sensitive to low doses (1–50 nM) of vanilloids. The TRPV1-mediated and non-receptor specific Ca2+-cytotoxity ([RTX]>15 µM) could clearly be distinguished, thus keratinocytes were indeed resistant to vanilloid-induced, TRPV1-mediated Ca2+-entry. Having a wider therapeutic window than capsaicin, RTX was effective in subnanomolar range, but even micromolar concentrations could not kill human keratinocytes. Keratinocytes showed orders of magnitudes lower TRPV1 mRNA level than sensory ganglions, the bona fide therapeutic targets in human pain management. In addition to TRPV1, TRPV1b, a dominant negative splice variant was also noted in keratinocytes. Conclusion TRPV1B expression, together with low TRPV1 expression, may explain the vanilloid paradox: even genuinely TRPV1 mRNA positive cells can be spared with therapeutic (up to micromolar) doses of RTX. This additional safety information might be useful for planning future human clinical trials. PMID:18852901

  19. Adult human keratinocyte cultures express 40, 52, 58 and 67 KD keratins

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, R.S.; Chandrakasan, G.; Hussain, M.Z.; Enriquez, B.; Ryder, M.I.

    1986-03-01

    Keratins are complex fibrous proteins characteristic of epithelial cells. Although several different classes of keratins are known to occur in the epidermis, the expression of all keratins has not been observed in vitro. The authors have developed a procedure that allows us to culture and passage up to ten times, adult human kerationcytes, in the absence of mesenchymal substrates. EM examination of stratifying cultures showed the presence of numerous tonofilaments, desmosomes and keratohyaline granules. The expression of different classes of keratins was examined by immunofluorescence, radiolabeling, SDS-PAGE and Western blot, using mouse monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of water-insoluble proteins showed the presence of keratins of M.W. 40 kd, 50-52 kd, 56-57 kd and 65-67 kd. The expression of 40kd keratin is known to be associated with basal cells. In their culture system basal cells secrete a well-defined basement membrane on which they rest. These cells may be responsible for the 40kd keratin. The expression of 65-67kd keratins has not previously been observed in vitro. These keratins are considered to be markers for terminal differentiation of epidermal cells. These proteins are presumed to be synthesized in their cultures by sloughing layers of rough, granular cells.

  20. Gardenia jasminoides Extract Attenuates the UVB-Induced Expressions of Cytokines in Keratinocytes and Indirectly Inhibits Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Jin Kyung; Suh, Hwa-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UV) is a major cause of photoaging, which also involves inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). The present study was undertaken to examine the UVB-protecting effects of yellow-colored plant extracts in cell-based assays. HaCaT keratinocytes were exposed to UVB in the absence or presence of plant extracts, and resulting changes in cell viability and inflammatory cytokine expression were measured. Of the plant extracts tested, Gardenia jasminoides extract showed the lowest cytotoxicity and dose-dependently enhanced the viabilities of UVB-exposed cells. Gardenia jasminoides extract also attenuated the mRNA expressions of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in HaCaT cells stimulated by UVB. Conditioned medium from UVB-exposed HaCaT cells was observed to stimulate MMP-1 protein expression in human dermal fibroblasts, and this effect was much smaller for the conditioned medium of HaCaT cells exposed to UVB in the presence of Gardenia jasminoides extract. Gardenia jasminoides extract also exhibited antioxidative and antiapoptotic effects in HaCaT cells exposed to UVB. These results indicated that UVB-induced injury and inflammatory responses of skin cells can be attenuated by yellow-colored plant extracts, such as Gardenia jasminoides extract. PMID:24711853

  1. Highly efficient expression of functional recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor 1 and its protective effects on hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ping; Zhu, Xiaojing; Shi, Junqing; Fu, Hongqi; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Min; Jiang, Chao; Li, Xiaokun

    2014-05-01

    Three forms of recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor 1 (rhKGF1) with or without the native signal peptide or a 23-amino acid truncation were expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda 9 (Sf9) cells by designing with insect codon usage. Immunoblotting demonstrated that these rhKGF1 proteins were recognized by a human anti-KGF1 antibody. The multiplicity of infection and timing of harvest had a significant effect on protein yield, protein quality, and cytotoxicity. Our results indicated that the native signal peptide directed KGF1 secretion from insect cells, reaching a maximum at 60 h postinfection. Although secretion of rhKGF1194 was less efficient than that of rhKGF1163 and rhKGF1140, protein secretion is an attractive pathway for simple purification of biologically active rhKGF1 at a high yield. Moreover, the sizes of rhKGF1194 and rhKGF1163 were similar (20 kDa), suggesting that the signal peptide may be recognized and removed in Sf9 cells. A 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay was used to analyze the biological function of rhKGF1, indicating that the three forms of rhKGF1 had a similar mitogenic function in BaF3 cells. Furthermore, to elucidate the effect of rhKGF1 on cytoprotection of liver cells, we used KGF1 pretreatment of an acute liver injury model. The results indicated that rhKGF1 prevented necrosis and apoptosis of CCl4-treated HL7702 cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that KGF1 may be a candidate therapeutic drug for acute liver injury. PMID:24463717

  2. Interleukin-4 Downregulation of Involucrin Expression in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes Involves Stat6 Sequestration of the Coactivator CREB-Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Alexander, Jaime B; Zhang, Huayi; Shen, Kui; Chan, Lawrence S

    2016-06-01

    Skin barrier defects play an important role in atopic dermatitis (AD). Involucrin, an important barrier protein suppressed in human AD, is downregulated by interleukin-4 (IL-4). However, the molecular mechanism for IL-4 downregulation of involucrin has not been delineated, and especially how Stat6, a transcriptional activator, represses involucrin expression is unknown. Since Stats usually recruit p300/CBP in the general transcription machinery of their target genes and involucrin expression also involves p300/CBP, we hypothesize that Stat6 activated by IL-4 may sequestrate p300/CBP from the involucrin transcription complex, thus suppressing involucrin expression in keratinocytes. Using IL-4 transgenic mice, an AD mouse model, we find that involucrin expression is similarly downregulated as in human AD. In HaCat cells, the Jak inhibitor and dominant negative studies indicate that the Jaks-Stat6 pathway is involved in IL-4 downregulation of involucrin. Next, we transfected HaCat cells with an involucrin promoter-luciferase construct and then treated them with IL-4. IL-4 greatly suppresses the promoter activity, which is totally abolished by cotransfecting the CREB-binding protein (CBP) expression vector, indicating that IL-4 cannot downregulate involucrin in the presence of excess CBP. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrates that IL-4 decreases CBP binding to the involucrin transcription complex. For the first time, we defined a molecular mechanism for IL-4 downregulation of involucrin in keratinocytes, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:26918372

  3. Isolation and Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting of Mouse Keratinocytes Expressing β-Galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Maria; Toftgård, Rune; Jaks, Viljar

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, the rapid development of new transgenic and knock-in mouse models has propelled epidermal stem-cell research into "fast-forward mode". It has become possible to identify and visualize defined cell populations during normal tissue maintenance, and to follow their progeny during the processes of homeostasis, wound repair, and tumorigenesis. Moreover, these cells can be isolated using specific labels, and characterized in detail using an array of molecular and cell biology approaches. The bacterial enzyme, β-galactosidase (β-gal), the product of the LacZ gene, is one of the most commonly used in vivo cell labels in genetically-engineered mice. The protocol described in this chapter provides a guideline for the isolation of viable murine epidermal cells expressing β-gal, which can then be subjected to further characterization in vivo or in vitro. PMID:27431252

  4. Chromium III histidinate exposure modulates antioxidant gene expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the toxicity of hexavalent chromium is well established, trivalent Cr (Cr(III)) is an essential nutrient involved in insulin and glucose homeostasis. Recently, antioxidant effects of chromium (III) histidinate (Cr(III)His) were reported in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress...

  5. RNA-binding protein CELF1 promotes tumor growth and alters gene expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    House, Reniqua P; Talwar, Sudha; Hazard, E Starr; Hill, Elizabeth G; Palanisamy, Viswanathan

    2015-12-22

    The RNA binding protein CELF1 (also known as CUGBP1) is emerging as a critical regulator of cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, to provide a global prospective of CELF1 regulation of oral squamous cell carcinoma, we performed RNA-sequencing in oral cancer cells and CELF1 overexpression analysis in non-malignant human oral keratinocytes. Our approaches identified 1283 mRNAs differentially regulated as a function of CELF1 expression and more importantly CELF1 promoted alternative splicing of several target pre-mRNAs, which are known to be involved in various cancer biological processes. Overexpression of CELF1 in non-malignant human oral keratinocytes protected cells against oxidative damage and altered gene expression patterns. Finally, we provide evidence that reduction of CELF1 protein using a xenograft tumorigenesis mouse model decreased tumor growth. Altogether, these data provided a comprehensive view of the CELF1 mRNA regulatory network in oral cancer and suggests that CELF1 and/or its target mRNAs are viable candidates for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26498364

  6. Carbon Nanomaterials Alter Global Gene Expression Profiles.

    PubMed

    Woodman, Sara; Short, John C W; McDermott, Hyoeun; Linan, Alexander; Bartlett, Katelyn; Gadila, Shiva Kumar Goud; Schmelzle, Katie; Wanekaya, Adam; Kim, Kyoungtae

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), which include carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their derivatives, have diverse technological and biomedical applications. The potential toxicity of CNMs to cells and tissues has become an important emerging question in nanotechnology. To assess the toxicity of CNTs and fullerenol C60(OH)24, we in the present work used the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the simplest eukaryotic organisms that share fundamental aspects of eukaryotic cell biology. We found that treatment with CNMs, regardless of their physical shape, negatively affected the growth rates, end-point cell densities and doubling times of CNM-exposed yeast cells when compared to unexposed cells. To investigate potential mechanisms behind the CNMs-induced growth defects, we performed RNA-Seq dependent transcriptional analysis and constructed global gene expression profiles of fullerenol C60(OH)24- and CNT-treated cells. When compared to non-treated control cells, CNM-treated cells displayed differential expression of genes whose functions are implicated in membrane transporters and stress response, although differentially expressed genes were not consistent between CNT- and fullerenol C60(OH)24-treated groups, leading to our conclusion that CNMs could serve as environmental toxic factors to eukaryotic cells. PMID:27483901

  7. KGF alters gene expression in human airway epithelia: potential regulation of the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Prince, L S; Karp, P H; Moninger, T O; Welsh, M J

    2001-07-17

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) regulates several functions in adult and developing lung epithelia; it causes proliferation, stimulates secretion of fluid and electrolytes, enhances repair, and may minimize injury. To gain insight into the molecular processes influenced by KGF, we applied KGF to primary cultures of well-differentiated human airway epithelia and used microarray hybridization to assess the abundance of gene transcripts. Of 7,069 genes tested, KGF changed expression levels of 910. Earlier studies showed that KGF causes epithelial proliferation, and as expected, treatment altered expression of numerous genes involved in cell proliferation. We found that KGF stimulated transepithelial Cl(-) transport, but the number of cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) transcripts fell. Although transcripts for ClC-1 and ClC-7 Cl(-) channels increased, KGF failed to augment transepithelial Cl(-) transport in CF epithelia, suggesting that KGF-stimulated Cl(-) transport in differentiated airway epithelia depends on the CFTR Cl(-) channel. Interestingly, KGF decreased transcripts for many interferon (IFN)-induced genes. IFN causes trafficking of Stat dimers to the nucleus, where they activate transcription of IFN-induced genes. We found that KGF prevented the IFN-stimulated trafficking of Stat1 from the cytosol to the nucleus, suggesting a molecular mechanism for KGF-mediated suppression of the IFN-signaling pathway. These results suggest that in addition to stimulating proliferation and repair of damaged airway epithelia, KGF stimulates Cl(-) transport and may dampen the response of epithelial cells to inflammatory mediators. PMID:11459923

  8. Baicalein Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 by Regulating the ERK/JNK/AP-1 Pathway in Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Cheon; Kang, Sam Sik; Lee, Jongsung; Park, Deokhoon; Hyun, Jin Won

    2012-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family is involved in the breakdown of the extracellular matrix during normal physiological processes such as embryonic development, reproduction, and tissue remodeling, as well as in disease processes such as pathological aging, arthritis, and metastasis. Oxidative conditions generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) (e.g., hydrogen peroxide [H2O2]) in cells, which subsequently induce the synthesis of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1). MMP-1, an interstitial collagenase, in turn stimulates an aging phenomenon. In this study, baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone) was investigated for its in vitro activity against H2O2-induced damage using a human skin keratinocyte model. Baicalein pretreatment significantly inhibited H2O2-induced up-regulation of MMP-1 mRNA, MMP-1 protein expression and MMP-1 activity in cultured HaCaT keratinocytes. In addition, baicalein decreased the transcriptional activity of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and the expression of c-Fos and c-Jun, both components of the heterodimeric AP-1 transcription factor. Furthermore, baicalein reduced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), which are upstream of the AP-1 transcription factor. The results of this study suggest that baicalein is involved in the inhibition of oxidative stress-induced expression of MMP-1 via inactivation of the ERK/JNK/AP-1 signaling pathway. PMID:24116275

  9. Adenophora remotiflora protects human skin keratinocytes against UVB-induced photo-damage by regulating antioxidative activity and MMP-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Chronic ultraviolet (UV) exposure-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) are commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage by activating the metalloproteinases (MMP) that break down type I collagen. Adenophora remotiflora (AR) is a perennial wild plant that inhabits Korea, China, and Japan. The present study investigated the protective effects of AR against UVB-induced photo-damage in keratinocytes. MATERIALS/METHODS An in vitro cell-free system was used to examine the scavenging activity of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical and nitric oxide (NO). The effect of AR on ROS formation, antioxidant enzymes, elastase, MMP-1 level, and mRNA expression of MMP-1 were determined in UVB-irradiated human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. RESULTS AR demonstrated strong DPPH free radical and NO scavenging activity in a cell-free system exhibiting IC50 values of 1.88 mg/mL and 6.77 mg/mL, respectively. AR pretreatment dose-dependently attenuated the production of UVB-induced intracellular ROS, and antioxidant enzymes (catalase and superoxide dismutase) were enhanced in HaCaT cells. Furthermore, pretreatment of AR prevented UVB-induced elastase and collagen degradation by inhibiting the MMP-1 protein level and mRNA expression. Accordingly, AR treatment elevated collagen content in UVB-irradiated HaCaT cells. CONCLUSION The present study provides the first evidence of AR inhibiting UVB-induced ROS production and induction of MMP-1 as a result of augmentation of antioxidative activity in HaCaT human keratinocytes. These results suggest that AR might act as an effective inhibitor of UVB-modulated signaling pathways and might serve as a photo-protective agent. PMID:27478542

  10. Cyclic stretch induces upregulation of endothelin-1 with keratinocytes in vitro: Possible role in mechanical stress-induced hyperpigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, Masakazu; Okazaki, Mutsumi; Fujino, Takashi; Takushima, Akihiko; Harii, Kiyonori

    2011-05-27

    Highlights: {yields} Influence of cyclic stretch on melanogenetic paracrine cytokines was investigated. {yields} Keratinocyte-derived endothelin-1 was upregulated with cyclic stretch. {yields} Degree of upregulation increases dose-dependently. {yields} This upregulation possibly plays a role in the pathogenesis of pigmented disorders. -- Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the possible pathological relation between mechanical stress and hyperpigmentation. We did this by investigating the influence of cyclic stretch on the expression of keratinocyte- and fibroblast-derived melanogenetic paracrine cytokines in vitro. Using primary human keratinocytes and fibroblasts, alterations of mRNA expression of melanogenetic paracrine cytokines due to cyclic stretch were investigated using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The cytokines included basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-1{alpha}, and endothelin-1 (ET-1) for keratinocytes and bFGF, SCF, and hepatocyte growth factor for fibroblasts. The dose dependence of keratinocyte-derived ET-1 upregulation was further investigated using real-time PCR and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We also investigated the effects of cyclic stretch on the proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. Among the melanogenetic paracrine cytokines investigated, keratinocyte-derived ET-1 was consistently upregulated in all four cell lines. The degree of upregulation increased with the degree of the length and frequency of the stretch; in contrast, cell number and differentiation markers showed no obvious alterations with cyclic stretch. Keratinocyte-derived ET-1 upregulation possibly plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of pigmented disorders, such as friction melanosis, caused by mechanical stress.

  11. Alterations in cathepsin L expression in lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Okudela, Koji; Mitsui, Hideaki; Woo, Tetsukan; Arai, Hiromasa; Suzuki, Takehisa; Matsumura, Mai; Kojima, Yoko; Umeda, Shigeaki; Tateishi, Yoko; Masuda, Munetaka; Ohashi, Kenichi

    2016-07-01

    We herein investigated the potential role of cathepsin L in lung carcinogenesis. Lung cancer cell lines and surgically resected tumors were examined for the expression of the cathepsin L protein and copy number alterations in its gene locus. Cathepsin L was stably expressed in bronchiolar epithelial cells. Neoplastic cells expressed cathepsin L at various levels, whereas its expression was completely lost in most of the lung cancer cell lines (63.6%, 7/11) examined. Furthermore, expression levels were lower in a large fraction of lung tumors (69.5%, 139/200) than in bronchiolar epithelia. The expression of cathepsin L was lost in some tumors (16.0%, 32/200). In adenocarcinomas, expression levels were significantly lower in high-grade tumors than in low-grade tumors (one-way ANOVA, P < 0.0500). Copy number alterations were found in 18.0% (36 [32 gain + 4 loss] /200) of lung tumors. No relationship existed between cathepsin L protein expression levels and the copy number of its gene locus (Spearman's rank-order correlation, P = 0.3096). Collectively, these results suggest that the down-regulated expression of cathepsin L, which is caused by an undefined mechanism other than copy number alterations, is involved in the progression of lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:27327955

  12. Ultraviolet radiation can either suppress or induce expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) on the surface of cultured human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, D.A.; Lyons, M.B.; Middleton, M.H.; Yohn, J.J.; Kashihara-Sawami, M. )

    1990-08-01

    Interactions of the ligand/receptor pair LFA-1(CD11a/CD18) and ICAM-1(CD54) initiate and control the cell-cell interactions of leukocytes and interactions of leukocytes with parenchymal cells in all phases of the immune response. Induction of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) on the surface of epidermal keratinocytes has been proposed as an important regulator of contact-dependent aspects of cutaneous inflammation. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) also modifies cutaneous inflammation, producing both up- and down-regulation of contact hypersensitivity. We have found that UVR has a biphasic effect on the induction of keratinocyte CD54. Using immunofluorescence and FACS techniques to quantitate cell-surface CD54 staining, we have shown that UVR significantly (p less than 0.01) inhibits keratinocyte CD54 induction by gamma interferon 24 h after irradiation. However, at 48, 72, and 96 h after UVR, CD54 expression is significantly induced to levels even greater than are induced by gamma interferon (20 U/ml). In addition, at 48, 72, or 96 h following UVR (30-100 mJ/cm2), the gamma-interferon-induced CD54 expression on human keratinocytes is also strongly (p less than 0.05 to p less than 0.001) enhanced. In this cell-culture system, gamma interferon and TNF-alpha are both strong CD54 inducers and are synergistic, but GM-CSF, TFG-beta, and IL-1 have no direct CD54-inducing effects. Thus the effects of UVR on CD54 induction are biphasic, producing inhibition at 24 h and induction at 48, 72, and 96 h. This effect on CD54 may contribute to the biphasic effects of UVR on delayed hypersensitivity in vivo. The early inhibition of ICAM-1 by UVR may also contribute to the therapeutic effects of UVR. We also speculate that the late induction of ICAM-1 by UVR might be an important step in the induction of photosensitive diseases such as lupus erythematosus.

  13. Phlorizin, an Active Ingredient of Eleutherococcus senticosus, Increases Proliferative Potential of Keratinocytes with Inhibition of MiR135b and Increased Expression of Type IV Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hye-Ryung; Nam, Kyung-Mi; Lee, Hyun-Sun; Yang, Seung-Hye; Kim, Young-Soo; Lee, Jongsung; Date, Akira; Toyama, Kazumi; Park, Kyoung-Chan

    2016-01-01

    E. senticosus extract (ESE), known as antioxidant, has diverse pharmacologic effects. It is also used as an antiaging agent for the skin and phlorizin (PZ) is identified as a main ingredient. In this study, the effects of PZ on epidermal stem cells were investigated. Cultured normal human keratinocytes and skin equivalents are used to test whether PZ affects proliferative potential of keratinocytes and how it regulates these effects. Skin equivalents (SEs) were treated with ESE and the results showed that the epidermis became slightly thickened on addition of 0.002% ESE. The staining intensity of p63 as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is increased, and integrin α6 was upregulated. Analysis of ESE confirmed that PZ is the main ingredient. When SEs were treated with PZ, similar findings were observed. In particular, the expression of integrin α6, integrin β1, and type IV collagen was increased. Levels of mRNA for type IV collagen were increased and levels of miR135b were downregulated. All these findings suggested that PZ can affect the proliferative potential of epidermal cells in part by microenvironment changes via miR135b downregulation and following increased expression of type IV collagen. PMID:27042261

  14. Phlorizin, an Active Ingredient of Eleutherococcus senticosus, Increases Proliferative Potential of Keratinocytes with Inhibition of MiR135b and Increased Expression of Type IV Collagen.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye-Ryung; Nam, Kyung-Mi; Lee, Hyun-Sun; Yang, Seung-Hye; Kim, Young-Soo; Lee, Jongsung; Date, Akira; Toyama, Kazumi; Park, Kyoung-Chan

    2016-01-01

    E. senticosus extract (ESE), known as antioxidant, has diverse pharmacologic effects. It is also used as an antiaging agent for the skin and phlorizin (PZ) is identified as a main ingredient. In this study, the effects of PZ on epidermal stem cells were investigated. Cultured normal human keratinocytes and skin equivalents are used to test whether PZ affects proliferative potential of keratinocytes and how it regulates these effects. Skin equivalents (SEs) were treated with ESE and the results showed that the epidermis became slightly thickened on addition of 0.002% ESE. The staining intensity of p63 as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is increased, and integrin α6 was upregulated. Analysis of ESE confirmed that PZ is the main ingredient. When SEs were treated with PZ, similar findings were observed. In particular, the expression of integrin α6, integrin β1, and type IV collagen was increased. Levels of mRNA for type IV collagen were increased and levels of miR135b were downregulated. All these findings suggested that PZ can affect the proliferative potential of epidermal cells in part by microenvironment changes via miR135b downregulation and following increased expression of type IV collagen. PMID:27042261

  15. Non-coding Double-stranded RNA and Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 Induce Growth Factor Expression from Keratinocytes and Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Adase, Christopher A; Borkowski, Andrew W; Zhang, Ling-Juan; Williams, Michael R; Sato, Emi; Sanford, James A; Gallo, Richard L

    2016-05-27

    A critical function for skin is that when damaged it must simultaneously identify the nature of the injury, repair barrier function, and limit the intrusion of pathogenic organisms. These needs are carried out through the detection of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and a response that includes secretion of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In this study, we analyzed how non-coding double-stranded RNA (dsRNAs) act as a DAMP in the skin and how the human cathelicidin AMP LL-37 might influence growth factor production in response to this DAMP. dsRNA alone significantly increased the expression of multiple growth factors in keratinocytes, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. Furthermore, RNA sequencing transcriptome analysis found that multiple growth factors increase when cells are exposed to both LL-37 and dsRNA, a condition that mimics normal wounding. Quantitative PCR and/or ELISA validated that growth factors expressed by keratinocytes in these conditions included, but were not limited to, basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGFC), betacellulin (BTC), EGF, epiregulin (EREG), and other members of the transforming growth factor β superfamily. These results identify a novel role for DAMPs and AMPs in the stimulation of repair and highlight the complex interactions involved in the wound environment. PMID:27048655

  16. Substrate Stiffness Affects Human Keratinocyte Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zarkoob, Hoda; Bodduluri, Sandeep; Ponnaluri, Sailahari V.; Selby, John C.; Sander, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of epidermal organization and function in response to a variety of pathophysiological insults is critically dependent on coordinated keratinocyte migration, proliferation, and stratification during the process of wound healing. These processes are mediated by the reconfiguration of both cell-cell (desmosomes, adherens junctions) and cell-matrix (focal adhesions, hemidesmosomes) junctions and the cytoskeletal filament networks that they serve to interconnect. In this study, we investigated the role of substrate elasticity (stiffness) on keratinocyte colony formation in vitro during the process of nascent epithelial sheet formation as triggered by the calcium switch model of keratinocyte culture. Keratinocytes cultured on pepsin digested type I collagen coated soft (nominal E = 1.2 kPa) polyacrylamide gels embedded with fluorescent microspheres exhibited (i) smaller spread contact areas, (ii) increased migration velocities, and (iii) increased rates of colony formation with more cells per colony than did keratinocytes cultured on stiff (nominal E = 24 kPa) polyacrylamide gels. As assessed by tracking of embedded microsphere displacements, keratinocytes cultured on soft substrates generated large local substrate deformations that appeared to recruit adjacent keratinocytes into joining an evolving colony. Together with the observed differences in keratinocyte kinematics and substrate deformations, we developed two ad hoc analyses, termed distance rank (DR) and radius of cooperativity (RC), that help to objectively ascribe what we perceive as increasingly cooperative behavior of keratinocytes cultured on soft versus stiff gels during the process of colony formation. We hypothesize that the differences in keratinocyte colony formation observed in our experiments could be due to cell-cell mechanical signaling generated via local substrate deformations that appear to be correlated with the increased expression of β4 integrin within keratinocytes positioned

  17. Altered expression of natively glycosylated dystroglycan in pediatric solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Laura T.; Glass, Matthew; Dosunmu, Eniolami; Martin, Paul T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Altered glycosylation and/or expression of dystroglycan have been reported in forms of congenital muscular dystrophy as well as in cancers of the breast, colon, and oral epithelium. To date, however, there has been no study of the expression of dystroglycan in pediatric solid tumors. Using a combination of immunostaining on tissue microarrays and immunoblotting of snap-frozen unfixed tissues, we demonstrate a significant reduction in native α dystroglycan expression in pediatric alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), embryonal RMS, neuroblastoma (NBL), and medulloblastoma, whereas expression of β dystroglycan, which is cotranslated with α dystroglycan, is largely unchanged. Loss of native α dystroglycan expression was significantly more pronounced in stage 4 NBL than in pooled samples of stage 1 and stage 2 NBL, suggesting that loss of native α dystroglycan expression increases with advancing tumor stage. Neuroblastoma and RMS samples with reduced expression of native α dystroglycan also showed reduced laminin binding in laminin overlay experiments. Expression of natively glycosylated α dystroglycan was not altered in several other pediatric tumor types when compared with appropriate normal tissue controls. These data provide the first evidence that α dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding to α dystroglycan are altered in certain pediatric solid tumors and suggest that aberrant dystroglycan glycosylation may contribute to tumor cell biology in patients with RMS, medulloblastoma, and NBL. PMID:17640712

  18. Assessment of Anti-TNF-α Activities in Keratinocytes Expressing Inducible TNF- α: A Novel Tool for Anti-TNF-α Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    Udommethaporn, Sutthirat; Tencomnao, Tewin; McGowan, Eileen M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine important in normal and pathological biological processes. Newly synthesized pro-TNF-α is expressed on the plasma membrane and cleaved to release soluble TNF-α protein: both are biologically active. Secreted TNF-α signals through TNF receptors and the membrane-bound TNF-α acts by cell contact-dependent signaling. Anti-TNF-α antibodies have been used effectively for treatment of chronic inflammation, however with adverse side effects. Thus, there is a need for new anti-TNF-α small molecule compounds. Anti-TNF-α activity assays involve treatment of keratinocytes with exogenous TNF-α before or after anti-TNF-α incubation. However, this model fails to address the dual signaling of TNF-α. Here we describe a Doxycycline (Dox)-inducible TNF-α (HaCaT-TNF-α) expression system in keratinocytes. Using this in-vitro model, we show cell inhibition and induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and markers, including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, NF-κB1, and KRT-16, similar to cells treated with exogenous TNF-α. Sufficient secreted TNF-α produced also activated IL-1β and IL-8 expression in wt HaCaT cells. Importantly, stimulated expression of IL-1β and IL-8 in HaCaT-TNF-α were blocked by Quercetin, a flavanol shown to possess anti-TNF-α activities. This novel in vitro cell model provides an efficient tool to investigate the dual signaling of TNF-α. Importantly, this model provides an effective, fast, and simple screening for compounds with anti-TNF-α activities for chronic inflammatory disease therapies. PMID:27415000

  19. Role of taurine accumulation in keratinocyte hydration.

    PubMed

    Janeke, Guido; Siefken, Wilfried; Carstensen, Stefanie; Springmann, Gunja; Bleck, Oliver; Steinhart, Hans; Höger, Peter; Wittern, Klaus-Peter; Wenck, Horst; Stäb, Franz; Sauermann, Gerhard; Schreiner, Volker; Doering, Thomas

    2003-08-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes are exposed to a low water concentration at the stratum corneum-stratum granulosum interface. When epithelial tissues are osmotically perturbed, cellular protection and cell volume regulation is mediated by accumulation of organic osmolytes such as taurine. Previous studies reported the presence of taurine in the epidermis of several animal species. Therefore, we analyzed human skin for the presence of the taurine transporter (TAUT) and studied the accumulation of taurine as one potential mechanism protecting epidermal keratinocytes from dehydration. According to our results, TAUT is expressed as a 69 kDa protein in human epidermis but not in the dermis. For the epidermis a gradient was evident with maximal levels of TAUT in the outermost granular keratinocyte layer and lower levels in the stratum spinosum. No TAUT was found in the basal layer or in the stratum corneum. Keratinocyte accumulation of taurine was induced by experimental induction of skin dryness via application of silica gel to human skin. Cultured human keratinocytes accumulated taurine in a concentration- and osmolarity-dependent manner. TAUT mRNA levels were increased after exposure of human keratinocytes to hyperosmotic culture medium, indicating osmosensitive TAUT mRNA expression as part of the adaptation of keratinocytes to hyperosmotic stress. Keratinocyte uptake of taurine was inhibited by beta-alanine but not by other osmolytes such as betaine, inositol, or sorbitol. Accumulation of taurine protected cultured human keratinocytes from both osmotically induced and ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. Our data indicate that taurine is an important epidermal osmolyte required to maintain keratinocyte hydration in a dry environment. PMID:12880428

  20. Effect of Gloriosa superba and Catharanthus roseus Extracts on IFN-γ-Induced Keratin 17 Expression in HaCaT Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Pattarachotanant, Nattaporn; Rakkhitawatthana, Varaporn; Tencomnao, Tewin

    2014-01-01

    Gloriosa superba and Catharanthus roseus are useful in traditional medicine for treatment of various skin diseases and cancer. However, their molecular effect on psoriasis has not been investigated. In this study, the effect of ethanol extracts derived from G. superba leaves and C. roseus stems on the expression of psoriatic marker, keratin 17 (K17), was investigated in human keratinocytes using biochemical and molecular experimental approaches. Both extracts could reduce the expression of K17 in a dose-dependent manner through JAK/STAT pathway as demonstrated by an observation of reduced phosphorylation of STAT3 (p-STAT3). The inhibitory activity of G. superba extract was more potent than that of C. roseus. The Pearson's correlation between K17 and cell viability was shown positive. Taken together, the extracts of G. superba and C. roseus may be developed as alternative therapies for psoriasis. PMID:25435888

  1. Effect of Gloriosa superba and Catharanthus roseus Extracts on IFN-γ-Induced Keratin 17 Expression in HaCaT Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pattarachotanant, Nattaporn; Rakkhitawatthana, Varaporn

    2014-01-01

    Gloriosa superba and Catharanthus roseus are useful in traditional medicine for treatment of various skin diseases and cancer. However, their molecular effect on psoriasis has not been investigated. In this study, the effect of ethanol extracts derived from G. superba leaves and C. roseus stems on the expression of psoriatic marker, keratin 17 (K17), was investigated in human keratinocytes using biochemical and molecular experimental approaches. Both extracts could reduce the expression of K17 in a dose-dependent manner through JAK/STAT pathway as demonstrated by an observation of reduced phosphorylation of STAT3 (p-STAT3). The inhibitory activity of G. superba extract was more potent than that of C. roseus. The Pearson's correlation between K17 and cell viability was shown positive. Taken together, the extracts of G. superba and C. roseus may be developed as alternative therapies for psoriasis. PMID:25435888

  2. Caffeine exposure alters cardiac gene expression in embryonic cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiefan; Mei, Wenbin; Barbazuk, William B.; Rivkees, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that in utero caffeine treatment at embryonic day (E) 8.5 alters DNA methylation patterns, gene expression, and cardiac function in adult mice. To provide insight into the mechanisms, we examined cardiac gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in cardiomyocytes shortly after exposure to physiologically relevant doses of caffeine. In HL-1 and primary embryonic cardiomyocytes, caffeine treatment for 48 h significantly altered the expression of cardiac structural genes (Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b, Tnni3), hormonal genes (Anp and BnP), cardiac transcription factors (Gata4, Mef2c, Mef2d, Nfatc1), and microRNAs (miRNAs; miR208a, miR208b, miR499). In addition, expressions of these genes were significantly altered in embryonic hearts exposed to in utero caffeine. For in utero experiments, pregnant CD-1 dams were treated with 20–60 mg/kg of caffeine, which resulted in maternal circulation levels of 37.3–65.3 μM 2 h after treatment. RNA sequencing was performed on embryonic ventricles treated with vehicle or 20 mg/kg of caffeine daily from E6.5-9.5. Differential expression (DE) analysis revealed that 124 genes and 849 transcripts were significantly altered, and differential exon usage (DEU) analysis identified 597 exons that were changed in response to prenatal caffeine exposure. Among the DE genes identified by RNA sequencing were several cardiac structural genes and genes that control DNA methylation and histone modification. Pathway analysis revealed that pathways related to cardiovascular development and diseases were significantly affected by caffeine. In addition, global cardiac DNA methylation was reduced in caffeine-treated cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that caffeine exposure alters gene expression and DNA methylation in embryonic cardiomyocytes. PMID:25354728

  3. Expression of a dominant negative mutant of epidermal growth factor receptor in the epidermis of transgenic mice elicits striking alterations in hair follicle development and skin structure.

    PubMed Central

    Murillas, R; Larcher, F; Conti, C J; Santos, M; Ullrich, A; Jorcano, J L

    1995-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a key regulator of keratinocyte biology. However, the physiological role of EGFR in vivo has not been well established. To analyze the role of EGFR in skin, we have generated transgenic mice expressing an EGFR dominant negative mutant in the basal layer of epidermis and outer root sheath of hair follicles. Mice expressing the mutant receptor display short and waved pelage hair and curly whiskers during the first weeks of age, but subsequently pelage and vibrissa hairs become progressively sparser and atrophic. Eventually, most mice present severe alopecia. Histological examination of the skin of transgenic mice shows striking alterations in the development of hair follicles, which fail to enter into catagen stage. These alterations eventually lead to necrosis and disappearance of the follicles, accompanied by strong infiltration of the skin with inflammatory elements. The interfollicular epidermis of these mice shows marked hyperplasia, expression of hyperproliferation-associated keratin K6 and increased 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation. EGFR function was inhibited in transgenic skin keratinocytes, since in vivo and in vitro autophosphorylation of EGFR was almost completely abolished on EGF stimulation. These results implicate EGFR in the control of hair cycle progression, and provide new information about its role in epidermal growth and differentiation. Images PMID:7489711

  4. Alteration of CD1 expression in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bine, S; Haziot, A; Malikova, I; Pelletier, J; Charron, D; Boucraut, J; Mooney, N; Gelin, C

    2012-01-01

    Studies of multiple sclerosis (MS) have concentrated mainly on antigen presentation of peptides derived from the myelin sheath, while the implication of lipid antigen has been less explored in this pathology. As the extracellular environment regulates expression of the lipid antigen-presenting molecule CD1, we have examined whether sera from patients alters CD1 surface expression in monocyte-derived dendritic cells. We have shown that: (i) CD1 group 1 proteins were highly expressed in the presence of MS sera; (ii) sera from MS patients differentially regulated CD1 group 1 versus CD1 group 2 molecular expression; and (iii) CD1 was expressed strongly in monocytes from MS patients under immunosuppressive treatment. Overall, these results reveal that CD1 expression is modified in MS and provide novel information on the regulation of lipid antigen presentation in myeloid cells. PMID:22670773

  5. Altering sensorimotor feedback disrupts visual discrimination of facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Wood, Adrienne; Lupyan, Gary; Sherrin, Steven; Niedenthal, Paula

    2016-08-01

    Looking at another person's facial expression of emotion can trigger the same neural processes involved in producing the expression, and such responses play a functional role in emotion recognition. Disrupting individuals' facial action, for example, interferes with verbal emotion recognition tasks. We tested the hypothesis that facial responses also play a functional role in the perceptual processing of emotional expressions. We altered the facial action of participants with a gel facemask while they performed a task that involved distinguishing target expressions from highly similar distractors. Relative to control participants, participants in the facemask condition demonstrated inferior perceptual discrimination of facial expressions, but not of nonface stimuli. The findings suggest that somatosensory/motor processes involving the face contribute to the visual perceptual-and not just conceptual-processing of facial expressions. More broadly, our study contributes to growing evidence for the fundamentally interactive nature of the perceptual inputs from different sensory modalities. PMID:26542827

  6. Increased expression of the histamine H4 receptor following differentiation and mediation of the H4 receptor on interleukin-8 mRNA expression in HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Eriko; Yamaura, Katsunori; Sato, Shiori; Ueno, Koichi

    2014-02-01

    Recent in vivo studies have demonstrated involvement of the histamine H4 receptor in pruritus and skin inflammation. We previously reported that an H4 receptor antagonist attenuated scratching behaviour and improved skin lesions in an experimental model of atopic dermatitis. We also reported the expression of the H4 receptor in human epidermal tissues. In this study, we investigated the expression of H4 receptor mRNA and the function of the receptor in a culture system that mimics in vivo inflammation on the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line. Increased expression of the H4 receptor was observed in HaCaT cells following differentiation. Treatment of HaCaT cells with histamine and TNFα enhanced the mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-8. These increases in expression were significantly inhibited by the H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120. Our results indicate that IL-8 mRNA expression might be enhanced by histamine and TNFα via H4 receptor stimulation in keratinocytes. PMID:24372819

  7. Exosomes released by keratinocytes modulate melanocyte pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Cicero, Alessandra Lo; Delevoye, Cédric; Gilles-Marsens, Floriane; Loew, Damarys; Dingli, Florent; Guéré, Christelle; André, Nathalie; Vié, Katell; van Niel, Guillaume; Raposo, Graça

    2015-01-01

    Cells secrete extracellular vesicles (EVs), exosomes and microvesicles, which transfer proteins, lipids and RNAs to regulate recipient cell functions. Skin pigmentation relies on a tight dialogue between keratinocytes and melanocytes in the epidermis. Here we report that exosomes secreted by keratinocytes enhance melanin synthesis by increasing both the expression and activity of melanosomal proteins. Furthermore, we show that the function of keratinocyte-derived exosomes is phototype-dependent and is modulated by ultraviolet B. In sum, this study uncovers an important physiological function for exosomes in human pigmentation and opens new avenues in our understanding of how pigmentation is regulated by intercellular communication in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:26103923

  8. Exosomes released by keratinocytes modulate melanocyte pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Lo Cicero, Alessandra; Delevoye, Cédric; Gilles-Marsens, Floriane; Loew, Damarys; Dingli, Florent; Guéré, Christelle; André, Nathalie; Vié, Katell; van Niel, Guillaume; Raposo, Graça

    2015-01-01

    Cells secrete extracellular vesicles (EVs), exosomes and microvesicles, which transfer proteins, lipids and RNAs to regulate recipient cell functions. Skin pigmentation relies on a tight dialogue between keratinocytes and melanocytes in the epidermis. Here we report that exosomes secreted by keratinocytes enhance melanin synthesis by increasing both the expression and activity of melanosomal proteins. Furthermore, we show that the function of keratinocyte-derived exosomes is phototype-dependent and is modulated by ultraviolet B. In sum, this study uncovers an important physiological function for exosomes in human pigmentation and opens new avenues in our understanding of how pigmentation is regulated by intercellular communication in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:26103923

  9. Altered expression of Ano1 variants in human diabetic gastroparesis.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Strege, Peter R; Beyder, Arthur; Galietta, Luis J V; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Rae, James L; Parkman, Henry P; Linden, David R; Szurszewski, Joseph H; Ördög, Tamas; Gibbons, Simon J; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2011-04-15

    Diabetes affects many organs including the stomach. Altered number and function of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), the gastrointestinal pacemaker cells, underlie a number of gastrointestinal motility disorders, including diabetic gastroparesis. In the muscle layers, ICC selectively express Ano1, thought to underlie classical Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents. Mice homozygous for Ano1 knock-out exhibit abnormal ICC function and motility. Several transcripts for Ano1 are generated by alternative splicing of four exons. Here, we report expression levels of transcripts encoded by alternative splicing of Ano1 gene in gastric muscles of patients with diabetic gastroparesis and nondiabetic control tissues. Expression of mRNA from two alternatively transcribed exons are significantly different between patients and controls. Furthermore, patients with diabetic gastroparesis express mRNA for a previously unknown variant of Ano1. The 5' end of this novel variant lacks exons 1 and 2 and part of exon 3. Expression of this variant in HEK cells produces a decreased density of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents that exhibit slower kinetics compared with the full-length Ano1. These results identify important changes in expression and splicing of Ano1 in patients with diabetic gastroparesis that alter the electrophysiological properties of the channel. Changes in Ano1 expression in ICC may directly contribute to diabetic gastroparesis. PMID:21349842

  10. Microarray expression profiling identifies genes with altered expression in HDL-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Callow, Matthew J.; Dudoit, Sandrine; Gong, Elaine L.; Speed, Terence P.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-05-05

    Based on the assumption that severe alterations in the expression of genes known to be involved in HDL metabolism may affect the expression of other genes we screened an array of over 5000 mouse expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for altered gene expression in the livers of two lines of mice with dramatic decreases in HDL plasma concentrations. Labeled cDNA from livers of apolipoprotein AI (apo AI) knockout mice, Scavenger Receptor BI (SR-BI) transgenic mice and control mice were co-hybridized to microarrays. Two-sample t-statistics were used to identify genes with altered expression levels in the knockout or transgenic mice compared with the control mice. In the SR-BI group we found 9 array elements representing at least 5 genes to be significantly altered on the basis of an adjusted p value of less than 0.05. In the apo AI knockout group 8 array elements representing 4 genes were altered compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Several of the genes identified in the SR-BI transgenic suggest altered sterol metabolism and oxidative processes. These studies illustrate the use of multiple-testing methods for the identification of genes with altered expression in replicated microarray experiments of apo AI knockout and SR-BI transgenic mice.

  11. Regulation of migratory activity of human keratinocytes by topography of multiscale collagen-containing nanofibrous matrices.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoling; Xu, Meng; Liu, Jie; Qi, Yanmei; Li, Shaohua; Wang, Hongjun

    2014-02-01

    Nanofibrous matrices hold great promise in skin wound repair partially due to their capability of recapturing the essential attributes of native extracellular matrix (ECM). With regard to limited studies on the effect of nanofibrous matrices on keratinocytes, the present study was aimed to understand how the topographical feature of nanofibrous matrices regulates keratinocyte motility by culturing keratinocytes on polycaprolactone (PCL)/collagen nanofibrous matrices (rough surface with fiber diameters of 331 ± 112 nm) or the matrices coated with a thin layer of collagen gel to form a secondary ultrafine fibrous network (smooth surface with ultrafine fiber diameters of 55 ± 26 nm). It was found that the PCL/collagen nanofibrous matrices alone did not stimulate cell migration, while collagen gel coating could significantly increase cell motility. Further studies demonstrated that the ultrafine fibrous network of collagen gel coating significantly activated integrin β1, Rac1 and Cdc42, facilitated the deposition of laminin-332 (formerly called laminin-5), and promoted the expression of active matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) (i.e., MMP-2 and 9). Neutralization of integrin β1 activity abrogated the gel coating-induced keratinocyte migration. These findings provide important evidence on the role of topographical features of nanofibrous matrices in regulating the phenotypic alteration of keratinocytes and suggest the possible utility of collagen-containing nanofibrous matrices for skin regeneration especially in re-epithelialization. PMID:24268197

  12. Induction of proteins and mRNAs after uv irradiation of human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kartasova, T.; Ponec, M.; van de Putte, P.

    1988-02-01

    uv sensitivity of cultured human epidermal keratinocytes was analyzed at different growth conditions and compared with the sensitivity of dermal fibroblasts derived from the same skin specimen. No significant differences in survival curves were found between these two cell types, although keratinocytes grown under standard conditions were slightly more resistant to uv irradiation than fibroblasts. The extracellular concentration of calcium appeared to be critical not only in the regulation of keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation, but also in the uv sensitivity of these cells: keratinocytes grown under conditions which favor cell proliferation (low calcium concentration) are more resistant to uv irradiation than those grown under conditions favoring differentiation (high calcium concentration). Two-dimensional protein gel electrophoresis was used to detect a possible effect of uv irradiation on the accumulation of specific mRNAs in the cytoplasm and/or on the synthesis of specific proteins. Proteins were pulse labeled in vivo with (/sup 35/S)methionine or synthesized in vitro in rabbit reticulocyte lysates on mRNA isolated from keratinocytes that were irradiated with different uv doses at different periods of time prior to isolation. Alterations in expression were demonstrated for several proteins in both in vivo and in vitro experiments.

  13. Gq protein mediates UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression by stimulating HB-EGF secretion from HaCaT human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, MiRan; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2010-03-05

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression to produce cellular responses including aging and carcinogenesis in skin. We hypothesised that heterotrimeric G proteins mediate UV-induced COX-2 expression by stimulating secretion of soluble HB-EGF (sHB-EGF). In this study, we aimed to elucidate the role and underlying mechanism of the {alpha} subunit of Gq protein (G{alpha}q) in UVB-induced HB-EGF secretion and COX-2 induction. We found that expression of constitutively active G{alpha}q (G{alpha}qQL) augmented UVB-induced HB-EGF secretion, which was abolished by knockdown of G{alpha}q with shRNA in HaCaT human keratinocytes. G{alpha}q was found to mediate the UVB-induced HB-EGF secretion by sequential activation of phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C{delta} (PKC{delta}), and matrix metaloprotease-2 (MMP-2). Moreover, G{alpha}qQL mediated UVB-induced COX-2 expression in an HB-EGF-, EGFR-, and p38-dependent manner. From these results, we concluded that G{alpha}q mediates UV-induced COX-2 expression through activation of EGFR by HB-EGF, of which ectodomain shedding was stimulated through sequential activation of PLC, PKC{delta} and MMP-2 in HaCaT cells.

  14. Gastrointestinal Hyperplasia with Altered Expression of DNA Polymerase β

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Jelezcova, Elena; Brown, Ashley R.; Foley, Julie F.; Nyska, Abraham; Cui, Xiangli; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Maronpot, Robert M.; Wilson, Samuel H.; Sepulveda, Antonia R.; Sobol, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Altered expression of DNA polymerase β (Pol β) has been documented in a large percentage of human tumors. However, tumor prevalence or predisposition resulting from Pol β over-expression has not yet been evaluated in a mouse model. Methodology/Principal Findings We have recently developed a novel transgenic mouse model that over-expresses Pol β. These mice present with an elevated incidence of spontaneous histologic lesions, including cataracts, hyperplasia of Brunner's gland and mucosal hyperplasia in the duodenum. In addition, osteogenic tumors in mice tails, such as osteoma and osteosarcoma were detected. This is the first report of elevated tumor incidence in a mouse model of Pol β over-expression. These findings prompted an evaluation of human gastrointestinal tumors with regard to Pol β expression. We observed elevated expression of Pol β in stomach adenomas and thyroid follicular carcinomas, but reduced Pol β expression in esophageal adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas. Conclusions/Significance These data support the hypothesis that balanced and proficient base excision repair protein expression and base excision repair capacity is required for genome stability and protection from hyperplasia and tumor formation. PMID:19654874

  15. Single cell mechanics of keratinocyte cells.

    PubMed

    Lulevich, Valentin; Yang, Hsin-ya; Isseroff, R Rivkah; Liu, Gang-yu

    2010-11-01

    Keratinocytes represent the major cell type of the uppermost layer of human skin, the epidermis. Using AFM-based single cell compression, the ability of individual keratinocytes to resist external pressure and global rupturing forces is investigated and compared with various cell types. Keratinocytes are found to be 6-70 times stiffer than other cell types, such as white blood, breast epithelial, fibroblast, or neuronal cells, and in contrast to other cell types they retain high mechanic strength even after the cell's death. The absence of membrane rupturing peaks in the force-deformation profiles of keratinocytes and their high stiffness during a second load cycle suggests that their unique mechanical resistance is dictated by the cytoskeleton. A simple analytical model enables the quantification of Young's modulus of keratinocyte cytoskeleton, as high as 120-340 Pa. Selective disruption of the two major cytoskeletal networks, actin filaments and microtubules, does not significantly affect keratinocyte mechanics. F-actin is found to impact cell deformation under pressure. During keratinocyte compression, the plasma membrane stretches to form peripheral blebs. Instead of blebbing, cells with depolymerized F-actin respond to pressure by detaching the plasma membrane from the cytoskeleton underneath. On the other hand, the compression force of keratinocytes expressing a mutated keratin (cell line, KEB-7) is 1.6-2.2 times less than that for the control cell line that has normal keratin networks. Therefore, we infer that the keratin intermediate filament network is responsible for the extremely high keratinocyte stiffness and resilience. This could manifest into the rugged protective nature of the human epidermis. PMID:20728993

  16. Airway Epithelial miRNA Expression Is Altered in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Owen D.; Ostrin, Edwin J.; Love, Michael I.; Peng, Jeffrey C.; Bhakta, Nirav R.; Nguyen, Christine; Solon, Margaret; Nguyen, Cindy; Barczak, Andrea J.; Zlock, Lorna T.; Blagev, Denitza P.; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Ansel, K. Mark; Arron, Joseph R.; Erle, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Changes in airway epithelial cell differentiation, driven in part by IL-13, are important in asthma. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation in many systems and could contribute to epithelial abnormalities in asthma. Objectives: To determine whether airway epithelial miRNA expression is altered in asthma and identify IL-13–regulated miRNAs. Methods: We used miRNA microarrays to analyze bronchial epithelial brushings from 16 steroid-naive subjects with asthma before and after inhaled corticosteroids, 19 steroid-using subjects with asthma, and 12 healthy control subjects, and the effects of IL-13 and corticosteroids on cultured bronchial epithelial cells. We used quantitative polymerase chain reaction to confirm selected microarray results. Measurements and Main Results: Most (12 of 16) steroid-naive subjects with asthma had a markedly abnormal pattern of bronchial epithelial miRNA expression by microarray analysis. Compared with control subjects, 217 miRNAs were differentially expressed in steroid-naive subjects with asthma and 200 in steroid-using subjects with asthma (false discovery rate < 0.05). Treatment with inhaled corticosteroids had modest effects on miRNA expression in steroid-naive asthma, inducing a statistically significant (false discovery rate < 0.05) change for only nine miRNAs. qPCR analysis confirmed differential expression of 22 miRNAs that were highly differentially expressed by microarrays. IL-13 stimulation recapitulated changes in many differentially expressed miRNAs, including four members of the miR-34/449 family, and these changes in miR-34/449 family members were resistant to corticosteroids. Conclusions: Dramatic alterations of airway epithelial cell miRNA levels are a common feature of asthma. These alterations are only modestly corrected by inhaled corticosteroids. IL-13 effects may account for some of these alterations, including repression of miR-34/449 family members that have established roles in airway

  17. The antipsoriatic dimethyl-fumarate suppresses interferon-gamma -induced ICAM-1 and HLA-DR expression on hyperproliferative keratinocytes. Quantification by a culture plate-directed APAAP-ELISA technique.

    PubMed

    Sebok, B; Bonnekoh, B; Vetter, R; Schneider, I; Gollnick, H; Mahrle, G

    1998-01-01

    The derivatives of fumaric acid show antipsoriatic effects but details of the mechanism of action are largely unknown. The study focused on the effect of fumaric acid, dimethyl-fumarate, Zn-, Ca- and Mg-monoethyl-fumarate on the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-induced expression of ICAM-1 and HLA-DR molecules on keratinocytes. Human hyperproliferative keratinocytes of the HaCaT cell line were exposed to IFN-gamma (10 U/ml) alone or in combination with fumaric acid and its derivatives for 48 hrs. The effect of fumarates was investigated semiquantitatively using the alkaline phosphatase-anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) method. Subsequently, the effect of dimethyl-fumarate, the main component of "fumaric acid therapy", was evaluated quantitatively by means of an APAAP-ELISA technique. The semiquantitative evaluation revealed that in the micromolar dose range investigated only dimethyl-fumarate demonstrated substantial growth inhibition and down-regulation of the cell surface markers. In the quantitative evaluation, dimethyl-fumarate significantly (pexpression of ICAM-1 (84%) and HLA-DR (67%) on HaCaT keratinocytes at a subtoxic concentration of 4.0 microM as compared to untreated controls (100%). In contrast, concentrations of 4.0, 12 and 35 microM dimethyl-fumarate had no influence on the ICAM-1 and HLA-DR expression on IFN-gamma-exposed normal human epidermal keratinocytes in primary cultures. Thus, there is experimental evidence that dimethyl-fumarate may exert its antipsoriatic effect not only as an antiproliferative agent but also by down-regulation of ICAM-1 and HLA-DR molecules on hyperproliferative keratinocytes. PMID:9649687

  18. Expression of the human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein induces an autophagy-related process and sensitizes normal human keratinocytes to cell death in response to growth factor deprivation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiaobo; Muenger, Karl

    2009-03-01

    Expression of oncogenes, such as the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E7 oncoprotein, promotes aberrant cell proliferation. In the absence of concurrent mitogenic stimuli, this triggers a cell-intrinsic defense mechanism, the 'trophic sentinel response', which eliminates such aberrant cells. The molecular pathways that elicit this response, however, remain obscure. We set up an experimental system to investigate the trophic sentinel pathway triggered by HPV16 E7 expression in normal human keratinocytes, the natural host cells of HPVs. Keratinocytes expressing HPV16 E7 cultured in E-medium undergo cell death and show increased sub-G1 DNA content when grown to confluence or under conditions of serum deprivation. Moreover, HPV16 E7 expressing human keratinocytes express higher levels of the autophagy marker, LC3-II, which can be abrogated by 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor. These findings indicate that even under normal culture conditions, HPV16 E7 expression triggers metabolic stress that may result in autophagy, a pathway implicated in carcinogenesis.

  19. Inflammatory bowel disease alters intestinal bile acid transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Jahnel, Jörg; Fickert, Peter; Hauer, Almuthe C; Högenauer, Christoph; Avian, Alexander; Trauner, Michael

    2014-09-01

    The enterohepatic circulation of bile acids (BAs) critically depends on absorption of BA in the terminal ileum and colon, which can be affected by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Diarrhea in IBD is believed to result in part from BA malabsorption (BAM). We explored whether IBD alters mRNA expression of key intestinal BA transporters, BA detoxifying systems, and nuclear receptors that regulate BA transport and detoxification. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction, mucosal biopsy specimens from the terminal ileum in Crohn's disease (CD) patients and from the descending colon in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients were assessed for mRNA expression. Levels were compared with healthy controls. The main ileal BA uptake transporter, the apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter, was downregulated in active CD and UC and in CD in remission. Other significant changes such as repression of breast cancer-related protein and sulphotransferase 2A1 were seen only during active disease. In UC, pancolitis (but not exclusively left-sided colitis) was associated with altered expression of major BA transporters [multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (MRP3), MRP4, multidrug resistance gene 1, organic solute transporter α/β] and nuclear receptors (pregnane X receptor, vitamin D receptor) in the descending colon. UC pancolitis leads to broad changes and CD ileitis to selective changes in intestinal BA transporter expression. Early medical manipulation of intestinal BA transporters may help prevent BAM. PMID:24965812

  20. Abnormalities in the basement membrane structure promote basal keratinocytes in the epidermis of hypertrophic scars to adopt a proliferative phenotype

    PubMed Central

    YANG, SHAOWEI; SUN, YEXIAO; GENG, ZHIJUN; MA, KUI; SUN, XIAOYAN; FU, XIAOBING

    2016-01-01

    The majority of studies on scar formation have mainly focused on the dermis and little is known of the involvement of the epidermis. Previous research has demonstrated that the scar tissue-derived keratinocytes are different from normal cells at both the genetic and cell biological levels; however, the mechanisms responsible for the fundamental abnormalities in keratinocytes during scar development remain elusive. For this purpose, in this study, we used normal, wound edge and hypertrophic scar tissue to examine the morphological changes which occur during epidermal regeneration as part of the wound healing process and found that the histological structure of hypertrophic scar tissues differed from that of normal skin, with a significant increase in epidermal thickness. Notably, staining of the basement membrane (BM) appeared to be absent in the scar tissues. Moreover, immunofluorescence staining for cytokeratin (CK)10, CK14, CK5, CK19 and integrin-β1 indicated the differential expression of cell markers in the epidermal keratinocytes among the normal, wound edge and hypertrophic scar tissues, which corresponded with the altered BM structures. By using a panel of proteins associated with BM components, we validated our hypothesis that the BM plays a significant role in regulating the cell fate decision of epidermal keratinocytes during skin wound healing. Alterations in the structure of the BM promote basal keratinocytes to adopt a proliferative phenotype both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26986690

  1. Carnosic acid, a phenolic diterpene from rosemary, prevents UV-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinases in human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Miyoung; Han, Jiwon; Lee, Chang Seok; Soo, Baek Heung; Lim, Kyung-Min; Ha, Hunjoo

    2013-05-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induces photoageing through the up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and subsequent breakdown of extracellular matrices. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation play central roles in UV-induced MMP expression through initiating extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated AP-1 signalling. We aimed to explore the effects of carnosic acid (CA), a phenolic diterpene from rosemary, on UV-induced MMP expression in human skin cells. Molecular mechanism underlying the effects of CA was also examined in the aspect of MMP expression, ERK/AP-1 pathway, ROS generation and EGFR activation. Human dermal fibroblast cell line (Hs68), primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and normal human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKs) were employed, and antiphotoageing effects of CA were assessed by Western blotting, quantitative real-time PCR and enzyme assays. CA significantly inhibited UVA- and UVB-induced expression of MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-9 in a concentration-dependent manner in Hs68 cells. UVB-induced ERK activation and the formation of transcription factor, AP-1, were significantly suppressed by CA. Among the upstream events of MMP expression, UVB-induced ROS generation was attenuated by CA, while EGFR activation was not affected. Confirming the antiphotoageing effects of CA through the suppression of UV-induced ROS generation, UVB-enhanced GADD45 expression, a marker for oxidative DNA damages was significantly reduced by CA. Inhibitory effects of CA on UVB-induced MMP expression could be also seen in HDFs and HEKs. Collectively, our study demonstrates that CA inhibits the UV-enhanced MMPs in human skin cells through the inhibition of ROS and the suppression of ERK/AP-1 activation. PMID:23614740

  2. Blocking protein farnesylation improves nuclear shape abnormalities in keratinocytes of mice expressing the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexia; Ostlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J

    2010-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA leading to expression of a truncated prelamin A variant termed progerin. Whereas a farnesylated polypeptide is normally removed from the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A during endoproteolytic processing to lamin A, progerin lacks the cleavage site and remains farnesylated. Cultured cells from human subjects with HGPS and genetically modified mice expressing progerin have nuclear morphological abnormalities, which are reversed by inhibitors of protein farnesylation. In addition, treatment with protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors improves whole animal phenotypes in mouse models of HGPS. However, improvement in nuclear morphology in tissues after treatment of animals has not been demonstrated. We therefore treated transgenic mice that express progerin in epidermis with the protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor FTI-276 or a combination of pravastatin and zoledronate to determine if they reversed nuclear morphological abnormalities in tissue. Immunofluorescence microscopy and "blinded" electron microscopic analysis demonstrated that systemic administration of FTI-276 or pravastatin plus zoledronate significantly improved nuclear morphological abnormalities in keratinocytes of transgenic mice. These results show that pharmacological blockade of protein prenylation reverses nuclear morphological abnormalities that occur in HGPS in vivo. They further suggest that skin biopsy may be useful to determine if protein farnesylation inhibitors are exerting effects in subjects with HGPS in clinical trials. PMID:21326826

  3. Histamine induces proliferation in keratinocytes from atopic dermatitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Glatzer, Franziska; Gschwandtner, Maria; Ehling, Sarah; Rossbach, Kristine; Janik, Katrin; Klos, Andreas; Bäumer, Wolfgang; Kietzmann, Manfred; Werfel, Thomas; Gutzmer, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidermal hyperproliferation resulting in acanthosis is an important clinical observation in atopic dermatitis and its underlying mechanisms are not completely understood by now. Objective Since elevated levels of histamine are present in lesional skin, we investigated the effect of histamine, especially with regard to H4R activation, on the proliferation of human and murine keratinocytes. Methods The expression of H4R on human and murine keratinocytes was detected by real-time PCR. Keratinocyte proliferation was evaluated by different in vitro cell proliferation assays, scratch assays and measurement of epidermal thickness of murine skin. Results We detected H4R mRNA on foreskin keratinocytes and on outer root sheath keratinocytes; H4R mRNA was more abundant in keratinocytes from patients with atopic dermatitis as compared to non-atopic donors. Stimulation of foreskin keratinocytes, atopic dermatitis outer root sheath keratinocytes and H4R transfected HaCaT cells with histamine and H4R agonist resulted in an increase of proliferation, which was blocked with the H4R-specific antagonist JNJ7777120. Abdominal epidermis of H4R-deficient mice was significantly thinner and the in vitro proliferation of keratinocytes derived from H4R-deficient mice was lower compared to control mice. Interestingly, we only detected H4R expression on murine keratinocytes after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycane. Conclusion The H4R is highly expressed on keratinocytes from atopic dermatitis patients and its stimulation induces keratinocyte proliferation. This might represent a mechanism that contributes to the epidermal hyperplasia observed in atopic dermatitis. PMID:23932072

  4. Gene Expression Profiling of Biological Pathway Alterations by Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuei-Fang; Weng, Julia Tzu-Ya; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Chi, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Ching-Kai; Liu, Ingrid Y.; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Though damage caused by radiation has been the focus of rigorous research, the mechanisms through which radiation exerts harmful effects on cells are complex and not well-understood. In particular, the influence of low dose radiation exposure on the regulation of genes and pathways remains unclear. In an attempt to investigate the molecular alterations induced by varying doses of radiation, a genome-wide expression analysis was conducted. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from five participants and each sample was subjected to 0.5 Gy, 1 Gy, 2.5 Gy, and 5 Gy of cobalt 60 radiation, followed by array-based expression profiling. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated that the immune system and cancer development pathways appeared to be the major affected targets by radiation exposure. Therefore, 1 Gy radioactive exposure seemed to be a critical threshold dosage. In fact, after 1 Gy radiation exposure, expression levels of several genes including FADD, TNFRSF10B, TNFRSF8, TNFRSF10A, TNFSF10, TNFSF8, CASP1, and CASP4 that are associated with carcinogenesis and metabolic disorders showed significant alterations. Our results suggest that exposure to low-dose radiation may elicit changes in metabolic and immune pathways, potentially increasing the risk of immune dysfunctions and metabolic disorders. PMID:25276823

  5. The role of the skin barrier in modulating the effects of common skin microbial species on the inflammation, differentiation and proliferation status of epidermal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Skin resident microbial species are often thought of either as pathogenic or commensal. However, little is known about the role of the skin barrier in modulating their potential for causing disease. To investigate this question we measured the effects of three microbial species commonly found on the skin (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Propionibacterium acnes) on a reconstructed human epidermal model by either applying the bacteria on the model surface (intact barrier) or adding them to the culture medium (simulating barrier breach). Results When added to the medium, all of the tested species induced inflammatory responses and keratinocyte cell death with species-specific potency. P. acnes and S. epidermidis induced specific alterations in the expression of keratinocyte differentiation and proliferation markers, suggesting a barrier reparation response. S. aureus induced complete keratinocyte cell death. On the contrary, topically applied S. epidermidis and P. acnes caused no inflammatory response even when tested at high concentrations, while topical S. aureus induced a weak reaction. None of the tested species were able to alter the expression of keratinocyte differentiation or expression markers, when applied topically. Conclusions We show that the skin barrier prevents the effects of common skin bacteria on epidermal keratinocyte inflammation, differentiation and proliferation and highlight the importance of skin barrier in defending against the pathogenic effects of common skin bacteria. PMID:24245826

  6. Expression alterations define unique molecular characteristics of spinal ependymomas

    PubMed Central

    Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Rahman, Ruman; Grundy, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Ependymomas are glial tumors that originate in either intracranial or spinal regions. Although tumors from different regions are histologically similar, they are biologically distinct. We therefore sought to identify molecular characteristics of spinal ependymomas (SEPN) in order to better understand the disease biology of these tumors. Using gene expression profiles of 256 tumor samples, we identified increased expression of 1,866 genes in SEPN when compared to intracranial ependymomas. These genes are mainly related to anterior/posterior pattern specification, response to oxidative stress, glial cell differentiation, DNA repair, and PPAR signalling, and also significantly enriched with cellular senescence genes (P = 5.5 × 10−03). In addition, a high number of significantly down-regulated genes in SEPN are localized to chromosome 22 (81 genes from chr22: 43,325,255 – 135,720,974; FDR = 1.77 × 10−23 and 22 genes from chr22: 324,739 – 32,822,302; FDR = 2.07 × 10−09) including BRD1, EP300, HDAC10, HIRA, HIC2, MKL1, and NF2. Evaluation of NF2 co-expressed genes further confirms the enrichment of chromosome 22 regions. Finally, systematic integration of chromosome 22 genes with interactome and NF2 co-expression data identifies key candidate genes. Our results reveal unique molecular characteristics of SEPN such as altered expression of cellular senescence and chromosome 22 genes. PMID:25909290

  7. Baicalin Downregulates Porphyromonas gingivalis Lipopolysaccharide-Upregulated IL-6 and IL-8 Expression in Human Oral Keratinocytes by Negative Regulation of TLR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Wang, Cun-Yu; Jin, Lijian

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal (gum) disease is one of the main global oral health burdens and severe periodontal disease (periodontitis) is a leading cause of tooth loss in adults globally. It also increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a key virulent attribute that significantly contributes to periodontal pathogenesis. Baicalin is a flavonoid from Scutellaria radix, an herb commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating inflammatory diseases. The present study examined the modulatory effect of baicalin on P. gingivalis LPS-induced expression of IL-6 and IL-8 in human oral keratinocytes (HOKs). Cells were pre-treated with baicalin (0–80 µM) for 24 h, and subsequently treated with P. gingivalis LPS at 10 µg/ml with or without baicalin for 3 h. IL-6 and IL-8 transcripts and proteins were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) proteins was analyzed by western blot. A panel of genes related to toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling was examined by PCR array. We found that baicalin significantly downregulated P. gingivalis LPS-stimulated expression of IL-6 and IL-8, and inhibited P. gingivalis LPS-activated NF-κB, p38 MAPK and JNK. Furthermore, baicalin markedly downregulated P. gingivalis LPS-induced expression of genes associated with TLR signaling. In conclusion, the present study shows that baicalin may significantly downregulate P. gingivalis LPS-upregulated expression of IL-6 and IL-8 in HOKs via negative regulation of TLR signaling. PMID:23239998

  8. Analysis of epithelial–mesenchymal transition markers in psoriatic epidermal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Man, Xiao-Yong; Chen, Xi-Bei; Li, Wei; Landeck, Lilla; Dou, Ting-Ting; Chen, Jia-qi; Zhou, Jiong; Cai, Sui-Qing; Zheng, Min

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is similar to endpoints of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process of epithelial cells transformed into fibroblast-like cells. The molecular epithelial and mesenchymal markers were analysed in psoriatic keratinocytes. No obvious alteration of epithelial markers E-cadherin (E-cad), keratin 10 (K10), K14 and K16 was detected in psoriatic keratinocytes. However, significantly increased expression of Vim, FN, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) and Slug was seen. IL-17A and IL-13 at 50 ng ml−1 strongly decreased expression of K10, Vim and FN. TGF-β1 at 50 ng ml−1 promoted the production of N-cad, Vim, FN and PAI-1. Slug was decreased by dexamethasone (Dex), but E-cad was upregulated by Dex. Silencing of ERK partially increased E-cad and K16, but remarkably inhibited K14, FN, Vim, β-catenin, Slug and α5 integrin. Moreover, inhibition of Rho and GSK3 by their inhibitors Y27632 and SB216763, respectively, strongly raised E-cad, β-catenin and Slug. Dex decreased Y27632-mediated increase of β-catenin. Dex at 2.0 µM inhibited SB216763-regulated E-cad, β-catenin and slug. In conclusion, EMT in psoriatic keratinocytes may be defined as an intermediate phenotype of type 2 EMT. ERK, Rho and GSK3 play active roles in the process of EMT in psoriatic keratinocytes. PMID:26269426

  9. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes In Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism it is important to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. This study is an effort to examine the effects of adaptive mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses. Using procedures approved by the JSC Animal Care & Use Committee, C57 male mice were exposed to Cs-137 in groups: controls, low dose (50 mGy), high dose (6Gy) and a fourth group that received both radiation doses separated by 24 hours. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed 4 hours after their last radiation exposure. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted and purified (Absolutely RNA, Agilent). Quality of RNA samples was evaluated (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100). Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used to run RT-qPCR screening arrays for DNA Repair and Drug Metabolism (SuperArray, SABiosciences/Qiagen; BioRad Cfx96 qPCR System). Of 91 drug metabolism genes examined, expression of 7 was altered by at least one treatment condition. Genes that had elevated expression include those that metabolize promethazine and steroids (4-8-fold), many that reduce oxidation products, and one that reduces heavy metal exposure (greater than 200-fold). Of the 91 DNA repair and general metabolism genes examined, expression of 14 was altered by at least one treatment condition. These gene expression changes are likely homeostatic and could lead to development of new radioprotective countermeasures.

  10. Altered neurofilament expression does not contribute to Lewy body formation.

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, C.; Petrunka, C.; Weyer, L.; Pollanen, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    Lewy bodies (LBs) are cytoskeletal alterations found in several neurodegenerative disorders. Although neurofilaments are the main constituent of the LB, the precise mechanisms that underlie their formation remain speculative. To examine the pathogenesis of this inclusion, we measured the mRNA level of the low molecular weight neurofilament subunit in the nigral dopaminergic neurons of patients with LB disorders and neurologically normal controls. We found a small but significant decrease in the mean mRNA values in the LB group as compared with controls. However, a comparison of LB-bearing and non-LB-bearing neurons on the same section showed no significant difference between these two neuronal populations. We conclude that altered neurofilament expression is not a major contributory event in the pathogenesis of the LB. The decrease in neurofilament mRNA expression observed in the overall nigral dopaminergic neuronal population of LB disorders probably represents a nonspecific response to neuronal injury independent of LB formation. Images Figure 1 PMID:8546215

  11. In vitro maturation alters gene expression in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Adona, Paulo R; Leal, Cláudia L V; Biase, Fernando H; De Bem, Tiago H; Mesquita, Lígia G; Meirelles, Flávio V; Ferraz, André L; Furlan, Luiz R; Monzani, Paulo S; Guemra, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    Gene expression profiling of in vivo- and in vitro-matured bovine oocytes can identify transcripts related to the developmental potential of oocytes. Nonetheless, the effects of in vitro culturing oocytes are yet to be fully understood. We tested the effects of in vitro maturation on the transcript profile of oocytes collected from Bos taurus indicus cows. We quantified the expression of 1488 genes in in vivo- and in vitro-matured oocytes. Of these, 51 genes were up-regulated, whereas 56 were down-regulated (≥2-fold) in in vivo-matured oocytes in comparison with in vitro-matured oocytes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of nine genes confirmed the microarray results of differential expression between in vivo- and in vitro-matured oocytes (EZR, EPN1, PSEN2, FST, IGFBP3, RBBP4, STAT3, FDPS and IRS1). We interrogated the results for enrichment of Gene Ontology categories and overlap with protein-protein interactions. The results revealed that the genes altered by in vitro maturation are mostly related to the regulation of oocyte metabolism. Additionally, analysis of protein-protein interactions uncovered two regulatory networks affected by the in vitro culture system. We propose that the differentially expressed genes are candidates for biomarkers of oocyte competence. In vitro oocyte maturation can affect the abundance of specific transcripts and are likely to deplete the developmental competence. PMID:26885679

  12. Selective loss of PMA-stimulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase 1 in HaCaT keratinocytes is correlated with the inability to induce mitogen-activated protein family kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Sudbeck, B D; Baumann, P; Ryan, G J; Breitkopf, K; Nischt, R; Krieg, T; Mauch, C

    1999-01-01

    Many cell types, including fibroblasts and primary keratinocytes, increase matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) production in response to agonists such as growth factors and phorbol esters. However, the spontaneously transformed human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT, although it increases MMP-1 production in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF), does not respond similarly to stimulation with PMA. This phenomenon occurs even though HaCaT cells remain proliferatively responsive to both agonists, suggesting a HaCaT-specific defect in a PMA-mediated signal transduction pathway. Using an inside-out approach to elucidate the source of this defect, we found that EGF, but not PMA, stimulated MMP-1 promoter activity in transiently transfected HaCaT keratinocytes. In addition, an assessment of fibroblast and HaCaT c-fos and c-jun gene expression after exposure to EGF and PMA showed that although both agonists increased the expression of c-fos and c-jun mRNA in fibroblasts, only EGF did so in HaCaT keratinocytes. Finally, we looked at the activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) family kinases after stimulation with EGF or PMA and found that both agonists increased the phosphorylation and activation of fibroblast extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, but only EGF activated the same kinase activities in HaCaT cells. Further, the EGF-mediated increase in MMP-1 gene expression was inhibited by the MAP kinase/ERK kinase (MEK)-specific inhibitor PD98059 and the p38 kinase-specific inhibitor SB203580. Our evidence indicates that although HaCaT MAP kinases are functional, they are not properly regulated in response to the activation of protein kinase C, and that the defect that bars HaCaT MMP-1 expression in response to stimulation with PMA lies before MAP kinase activation. PMID:10085241

  13. Vibrational force alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Vincent, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3E1) cells were subjected to a vibrational force modeled by NASA to simulate a space shuttle launch (7.83 G rms). The mRNA levels for eight genes were investigated to determine the effect of vibrational force on mRNA expression. The mRNA levels of two growth-related protooncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, were up-regulated significantly within 30 min after vibration, whereas those of osteocalcin as well as transforming growth factor-beta1 were decreased significantly within 3 h after vibration. No changes were detected in the levels of beta-actin, histone H4, or cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 after vibration. No basal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 expression were detected. In addition, the extracellular concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent autocrine/paracrine growth factor in bone, were not significantly altered after vibration most likely due to the serum deprivation state of the osteoblasts. In comparison with the gravitational launch profile, vibrational-induced changes in gene expression were greater both in magnitude and number of genes activated. Taken together, these data suggest that the changes in mRNA expression are due to a direct mechanical effect of the vibrational force on the osteoblast cells and not to changes in the local PGE2 concentrations. The finding that launch forces induce gene expression is of utmost importance since many of the biological experiments do not dampen vibrational loads on experimental samples. This lack of dampening of vibrational forces may partially explain why 1-G onboard controls sometimes do not reflect 1-G ground controls. These data may also suggest that scientists use extra ground controls that are exposed to launch forces, have these forces dampened on launched samples, or use facilities such as Biorack that provide an onboard 1-G centrufuge in order to control for space shuttle launch forces.

  14. Fluconazole alters CYP26 gene expression in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Tiboni, Gian Mario; Marotta, Francesca; Carletti, Erminia

    2009-04-01

    Disruption of embryonal retinoic acid homeostasis has been postulated to represent an etiological factor involved in the onset of fluconazole-induced teratogenesis. In the present study the impact of a teratogenic pulse of fluconazole on the gene expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 26 isoforms, which plays a central role in maintaining proper retinoic acid levels by mediating its degradation, was investigated. ICR pregnant mice were orally administered with 0 (vehicle) or 700mg/kg of fluconazole on gestation day 8. Embryos were collected 12, 24 and 48h after treatment. Quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (quantitative real-time RT-PCR) assay was used to quantify the mRNA expression of CYP26a1, CYP26b1 and CYP26c1 in embryos. As result, fluconazole exposure was associated to an up-regulation of CYP26a1, CYP26b1, whereas no significant change was identified for the CYP26c1 isoform. This study demonstrates the capacity of fluconazole to alter CYP26 gene expression in mouse embryos. PMID:19429397

  15. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Adaptation to Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Grace; Paulino, Franklin; Wachtel, Sarah; Parker, Dane; Wickersham, Matthew; Zhang, Dongni; Brown, Armand; Lauren, Christine; Dowd, Margaret; West, Emily; Horst, Basil; Planet, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Skin is the most common site of Staphylococcus aureus infection. While most of these infections are self-limited, recurrent infections are common. Keratinocytes and recruited immune cells participate in skin defense against infection. We postulated that S. aureus is able to adapt to the milieu within human keratinocytes to avoid keratinocyte-mediated clearance. From a collection of S. aureus isolated from chronically infected patients with atopic dermatitis, we noted 22% had an agr mutant-like phenotype. Using several models of human skin infection, we demonstrate that toxin-deficient, agr mutants of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) USA300 are able to persist within keratinocytes by stimulating autophagy and evading caspase-1 and inflammasome activation. MRSA infection induced keratinocyte autophagy, as evidenced by galectin-8 and LC3 accumulation. Autophagy promoted the degradation of inflammasome components and facilitated staphylococcal survival. The recovery of more than 58% agr or RNAIII mutants (P < 0.0001) of an inoculum of wild-type (WT) MRSA from within wortmannin-treated keratinocytes compared to control keratinocytes reflected the survival advantage for mutants no longer expressing agr-dependent toxins. Our results illustrate the dynamic interplay between S. aureus and keratinocytes that can result in the selection of mutants that have adapted specifically to evade keratinocyte-mediated clearance mechanisms. PMID:25900653

  16. Dynamic Expression of Novel MiRNA Candidates and MiRNA-34 Family Members in Early- to Mid-Gestational Fetal Keratinocytes Contributes to Scarless Wound Healing by Targeting the TGF-β Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Feng; Wang, Zhe; Lang, Hongxin; Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Dianbao; Wang, Xiliang; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Rui; Shi, Ping; Pang, Xining

    2015-01-01

    Background Early- to mid-gestational fetal mammalian skin wounds heal rapidly and without scarring. Keratinocytes (KCs) have been found to exert important effects on the regulation of fibroblasts. There may be significant differences of gestational fetal KCs at different ages. The advantages in early- to mid-gestational fetal KCs could lead to fetal scarless wound healing. Methods KCs from six human fetal skin samples were divided into two groups: a mid-gestation group (less than 28 weeks of gestational age) and a late-gestation group (more than 28 weeks of gestational age). RNA extracted from KCs was used to prepare a library of small RNAs for next-generation sequencing (NGS). To uncover potential novel microRNA (miRNAs), the mirTools 2.0 web server was used to identify candidate novel human miRNAs from the NGS data. Other bioinformatical analyses were used to further validate the novel miRNAs. The expression levels of the miRNAs were further confirmed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Results A total of 61.59 million reads were mapped to 1,170 known human miRNAs in miRBase. Among a total of 202 potential novel miRNAs uncovered, 106 candidates have a higher probability of being novel human miRNAs. A total of 110 miRNAs, including 22 novel miRNA candidates, were significantly differently expressed between mid- and late-gestational fetal KCs. Thirty-three differentially expressed miRNAs and miR-34 family members are correlated with the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathway. Conclusions Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence supporting the existence of 106 novel miRNAs and the dynamic expression of miRNAs that extensively targets the TGF-β pathway at different gestational ages in fetal KCs. MiRNAs showing altered expression at different gestational ages in fetal KCs may contribute to scarless wound healing in early- to mid-gestational fetal KCs, and thus may be new targets for potential scar prevention and reduction therapies. PMID:25978377

  17. Chitin Modulates Innate Immune Responses of Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Koller, Barbara; Müller-Wiefel, Alisa Sophie; Rupec, Rudolph; Korting, Hans Christian; Ruzicka, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background Chitin, after cellulose the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature, is an essential component of exoskeletons of crabs, shrimps and insects and protects these organisms from harsh conditions in their environment. Unexpectedly, chitin has been found to activate innate immune cells and to elicit murine airway inflammation. The skin represents the outer barrier of the human host defense and is in frequent contact with chitin-bearing organisms, such as house-dust mites or flies. The effects of chitin on keratinocytes, however, are poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We hypothesized that chitin stimulates keratinocytes and thereby modulates the innate immune response of the skin. Here we show that chitin is bioactive on primary and immortalized keratinocytes by triggering production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Chitin stimulation further induced the expression of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) TLR4 on keratinocytes at mRNA and protein level. Chitin-induced effects were mainly abrogated when TLR2 was blocked, suggesting that TLR2 senses chitin on keratinocytes. Conclusions/Significance We speculate that chitin-bearing organisms modulate the innate immune response towards pathogens by upregulating secretion of cytokines and chemokines and expression of MyD88-associated TLRs, two major components of innate immunity. The clinical relevance of this mechanism remains to be defined. PMID:21383982

  18. Knockdown of filaggrin in a three-dimensional reconstructed human epidermis impairs keratinocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pendaries, Valérie; Malaisse, Jeremy; Pellerin, Laurence; Le Lamer, Marina; Nachat, Rachida; Kezic, Sanja; Schmitt, Anne-Marie; Paul, Carle; Poumay, Yves; Serre, Guy; Simon, Michel

    2014-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder characterized by defects in the epidermal barrier and keratinocyte differentiation. The expression of filaggrin, a protein thought to have a major role in the function of the epidermis, is downregulated. However, the impact of this deficiency on keratinocytes is not really known. This was investigated using lentivirus-mediated small-hairpin RNA interference in a three-dimensional reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) model, in the absence of other cell types than keratinocytes. Similar to what is known for atopic skin, the experimental filaggrin downregulation resulted in hypogranulosis, a disturbed corneocyte intracellular matrix, reduced amounts of natural moisturizing factor components, increased permeability and UV-B sensitivity of the RHE, and impaired keratinocyte differentiation at the messenger RNA and protein levels. In particular, the amounts of two filaggrin-related proteins and one protease involved in the degradation of filaggrin, bleomycin hydrolase, were lower. In addition, caspase-14 activation was reduced. These results demonstrate the importance of filaggrin for the stratum corneum properties/functions. They indicate that filaggrin downregulation in the epidermis of atopic patients, either acquired or innate, may be directly responsible for some of the disease-related alterations in the epidermal differentiation program and epidermal barrier function. PMID:24940654

  19. Analysis of the response of human keratinocytes to Malassezia globosa and restricta strains.

    PubMed

    Donnarumma, Giovanna; Perfetto, Brunella; Paoletti, Iole; Oliviero, Giovanni; Clavaud, Cécile; Del Bufalo, Aurelia; Guéniche, Audrey; Jourdain, Roland; Tufano, Maria Antonietta; Breton, Lionel

    2014-10-01

    Malassezia spp. are saprophyte yeasts involved in skin diseases with different degrees of severity. The aim of our study was to analyze the response of human epidermal keratinocytes to Malassezia globosa and restricta strains evaluating the host defence mechanisms induced by Malassezia spp. colonization. Our results showed a different modulation of the inflammatory and immunomodulatory cytokine pathways obtained with the different strains of Malassezia tested. In addition, this expression is altered by blocking the TLR2 receptor. In comparison with M. furfur, M. globosa and restricta displayed an unexpected and striking cytotoxicity on keratinocytes. The differences observed could be related to the different modalities of interaction between keratinocytes and Malassezia strains, but also to their growth condition. Taken together, these results indicate that M. globosa or M. restricta colonization exert a different control on the cytokine inflammatory response activated in the human keratinocyte in which TLR2 might be involved. M. globosa and M. restricta may play a synergistic role in the exacerbation of skin diseases in which both are found. PMID:25038621

  20. Characterization of TNF-α- and IL-17A-Mediated Synergistic Induction of DEFB4 Gene Expression in Human Keratinocytes through IκBζ.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Claus; Bertelsen, Trine; Ljungberg, Christine; Mose, Maike; Iversen, Lars

    2016-08-01

    Human β-defensin 2 (hBD2), encoded by the DEFB4 gene, is an antimicrobial peptide playing an essential role in inflammatory processes in the skin. hBD2 expression is regulated synergistically by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-17A; however, the underlying regulatory mechanisms are unknown. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular mechanism by which TNF-α and IL-17A synergistically induce hBD2 expression. In cultured human keratinocytes we show that a constitutive noninducible binding of the transcription factor organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1) to the DEFB4 promoter is crucial for IL-17A/TNF-α-mediated synergistic induction of hBD2 but not the synergistic induction of CCL20, IL8, IL17C and LCN2. Interestingly, stimulation with IL-17A results in a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent accumulation of inhibitor of nuclear factor κB ζ (IκBζ), which is a necessity for synergistic induction of hBD2. Finally, co-stimulation with TNF-α induces DNA binding of NF-κB and activator protein 1 (AP-1) to two specific sites in the DEFB4 promoter region. Hence, our study shows how two inflammatory stimuli are integrated by three different signaling pathways into the regulation of one specific target gene involving the three specific transcription factors OCT1, NF-κB, and AP-1 as well as the transcriptional cofactor IκBζ. These findings may be important in psoriasis, where TNF-α and IL-17A have been identified as key pathogenic cytokines. PMID:27117051

  1. Surfactant metabolism and anti-oxidative capacity in hyperoxic neonatal rat lungs: effects of keratinocyte growth factor on gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Koslowski, Roland; Kasper, Michael; Schaal, Katharina; Knels, Lilla; Lange, Marco; Bernhard, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    Development of preterm infant lungs is frequently impaired resulting in bronchopulmoary dysplasia (BPD). BPD results from interruption of physiologic anabolic intrauterine conditions, the inflammatory basis and therapeutic consequences of premature delivery, including increased oxygen supply for air breathing. The latter requires surfactant, produced by alveolar type II (AT II) cells to lower surface tension at the pulmonary air:liquid interface. Its main components are specific phosphatidylcholine (PC) species including dipalmitoyl-PC, anionic phospholipids and surfactant proteins. Local antioxidative enzymes are essential to cope with the pro-inflammatory side effects of normal alveolar oxygen pressures. However, respiratory insufficiency frequently requires increased oxygen supply. To cope with the injurious effects of hyperoxia to epithelia, recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (rhKGF) was proposed as a surfactant stimulating, non-catabolic and epithelial-protective therapeutic. The aim of the present study was to examine the qualification of rhKGF to improve expression parameters of lung maturity in newborn rats under hyperoxic conditions (85% O(2) for 7 days). In response to rhKGF proliferating cell nuclear antigen mRNA, as a feature of stimulated proliferation, was elevated. Similarly, the expressions of ATP-binding cassette protein A3 gene, a differentiation marker of AT II cells and of peroxiredoxin 6, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase, three genes involved in oxygen radical protection were increased. Furthermore, mRNA levels of acyl-coA:lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1, catalyzing dipalmitoyl-PC synthesis by acyl remodeling, and adipose triglyceride lipase, considered as responsible for fatty acid supply for surfactant PC synthesis, were elevated. These results, together with a considerable body of other confirmative evidence, suggest that rhKGF should be developed into a therapeutic option to treat preterm infants at risk for

  2. Growth-regulated synthesis and secretion of biologically active nerve growth factor by human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, E; Marchisio, P C; Bondanza, S; Franzi, A T; Cancedda, R; De Luca, M

    1991-11-15

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) transcripts were identified in normal human keratinocytes in primary and secondary culture. The expression of the NGF mRNA was strongly down-regulated by corticosteroids and was maximal when keratinocytes were in the exponential phase of growth. Immunofluorescence studies on growing keratinocytes colonies and on elutriated keratinocytes obtained from growing colonies and mature stratified epithelium showed specific staining of the Golgi apparatus only in basal keratinocytes in the exponential phase of growth. The keratinocyte-derived NGF was secreted in a biologically active form as assessed by neurite induction in sensory neurons obtained from chick embryo dorsal root ganglia. Based on these data we suggest that the basal keratinocyte is the cell synthesizing and secreting NGF in the human adult epidermis. The paracrine secretion of NGF by keratinocytes might have a major role in regulating innervation, lymphocyte function, and melanocyte growth and differentiation in epidermal morphogenesis as well as during wound healing. PMID:1718982

  3. Altered representation of facial expressions after early visual deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaoqing; Maurer, Daphne; Nishimura, Mayu

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of early visual deprivation on the underlying representation of the six basic emotions. Using multi-dimensional scaling (MDS), we compared the similarity judgments of adults who had missed early visual input because of bilateral congenital cataracts to control adults with normal vision. Participants made similarity judgments of the six basic emotional expressions, plus neutral, at three different intensities. Consistent with previous studies, the similarity judgments of typical adults could be modeled with four underlying dimensions, which can be interpreted as representing pleasure, arousal, potency and intensity of expressions. As a group, cataract-reversal patients showed a systematic structure with dimensions representing pleasure, potency, and intensity. However, an arousal dimension was not obvious in the patient group's judgments. Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed a pattern in patients seen in typical 7-year-olds but not typical 14-year-olds or adults. There was also more variability among the patients than among the controls, as evidenced by higher stress values for the MDS fit to the patients' data and more dispersed weightings on the four dimensions. The findings suggest an important role for early visual experience in shaping the later development of the representations of emotions. Since the normal underlying structure for emotion emerges postnatally and continues to be refined until late childhood, the altered representation of emotion in adult patients suggests a sleeper effect. PMID:24312071

  4. TOLL-LIKE RECEPTORS (TLR) 2 AND 4 EXPRESSION OF KERATINOCYTES FROM PATIENTS WITH LOCALIZED AND DISSEMINATED DERMATOPHYTOSIS

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Cristiane Beatriz; Vasconcellos, Cídia; Sakai-Valente, Neusa Y.; Sotto, Mirian Nacagami; Luiz, Fernanda Guedes; Belda, Walter; de Sousa, Maria da Gloria Teixeira; Benard, Gil; Criado, Paulo Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    There are few studies on the role of innate immune response in dermatophytosis. An investigation was conducted to define the involvement of Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4 in localized (LD) and disseminated (DD) dermatophytosis due to T. rubrum. Fifteen newly diagnosed patients, eight patients with LD and seven with DD, defined by involvement of at least three body segments were used in this study. Controls comprised twenty skin samples from healthy individuals undergoing plastic surgery. TLR2 and TLR4 were quantified in skin lesions by immunohistochemistry. A reduced expression of TLR4 in the lower and upper epidermis of both LD and DD patients was found compared to controls; TLR2 expression was preserved in the upper and lower epidermis of all three groups. As TLR4 signaling induces the production of inflammatory cytokines and neutrophils recruitment, its reduced expression likely contributed to the lack of resolution of the infection and the consequent chronic nature of the dermatophytosis. As TLR2 expression acts to limit the inflammatory process and preserves the epidermal structure, its preserved expression may also contribute to the persistent infection and limited inflammation that are characteristic of dermatophytic infections. PMID:25651327

  5. TCDD INDUCES DERMAL ACCUMULATION OF KERATINOCYTE-DERIVED MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE-10 IN AN ORGANOTYPIC MODEL OF HUMAN SKIN

    PubMed Central

    De Abrew, K. Nadira; Thomas-Virnig, Christina L.; Rasmussen, Cathy A.; Bolterstein, Elyse A.; Schlosser, Sandy J.; Allen-Hoffmann, B. Lynn

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis of skin is the first line of defense against the environment. A three dimensional model of human skin was used to investigate tissue-specific phenotypes induced by the environmental contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Continuous treatment of organotypic cultures of human keratinocytes with TCDD resulted in intracellular spaces between keratinocytes of the basal and immediately suprabasal layers as well as thinning of the basement membrane, in addition to the previously reported hyperkeratinization. These tissue remodeling events were preceded temporally by changes in expression of the extracellular matrix degrading enzyme, matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10). In organotypic cultures MMP-10 mRNA and protein were highly induced following TCDD treatment. Q-PCR and immunoblot results from TCDD-treated monolayer cultures, as well as indirect immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis of TCDD-treated organotypic cultures, showed MMP-10 was specifically contributed by the epidermal keratinocytes but not the dermal fibroblasts. Keratinocyte-derived MMP-10 protein accumulated over time in the dermal compartment of organotypic cultures. TCDD-induced epidermal phenotypes in organotypic cultures were attenuated by the keratinocyte-specific expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, a known inhibitor of MMP-10. These studies suggest that MMP-10 and possibly other MMP-10-activated MMPs are responsible for the phenotypes exhibited in the basement membrane, the basal keratinocyte layer, and the cornified layer of TCDD-treated organotypic cultures. Our studies reveal a novel mechanism by which the epithelial-stromal microenvironment is altered in a tissue-specific manner thereby inducing structural and functional pathology in the interfollicular epidermis of human skin. PMID:24576722

  6. TCDD induces dermal accumulation of keratinocyte-derived matrix metalloproteinase-10 in an organotypic model of human skin.

    PubMed

    De Abrew, K Nadira; Thomas-Virnig, Christina L; Rasmussen, Cathy A; Bolterstein, Elyse A; Schlosser, Sandy J; Allen-Hoffmann, B Lynn

    2014-05-01

    The epidermis of skin is the first line of defense against the environment. A three dimensional model of human skin was used to investigate tissue-specific phenotypes induced by the environmental contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Continuous treatment of organotypic cultures of human keratinocytes with TCDD resulted in intracellular spaces between keratinocytes of the basal and immediately suprabasal layers as well as thinning of the basement membrane, in addition to the previously reported hyperkeratinization. These tissue remodeling events were preceded temporally by changes in expression of the extracellular matrix degrading enzyme, matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10). In organotypic cultures MMP-10 mRNA and protein were highly induced following TCDD treatment. Q-PCR and immunoblot results from TCDD-treated monolayer cultures, as well as indirect immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis of TCDD-treated organotypic cultures, showed that MMP-10 was specifically contributed by the epidermal keratinocytes but not the dermal fibroblasts. Keratinocyte-derived MMP-10 protein accumulated over time in the dermal compartment of organotypic cultures. TCDD-induced epidermal phenotypes in organotypic cultures were attenuated by the keratinocyte-specific expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, a known inhibitor of MMP-10. These studies suggest that MMP-10 and possibly other MMP-10-activated MMPs are responsible for the phenotypes exhibited in the basement membrane, the basal keratinocyte layer, and the cornified layer of TCDD-treated organotypic cultures. Our studies reveal a novel mechanism by which the epithelial-stromal microenvironment is altered in a tissue-specific manner thereby inducing structural and functional pathology in the interfollicular epidermis of human skin. PMID:24576722

  7. Peroxisome proliferators alter the expression of estrogen-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Corton, J C; Bocos, C; Moreno, E S; Merritt, A; Cattley, R C; Gustafsson, J A

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to some peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) leads to toxic effects on sex organ function possibly by alterations of steroid hormone metabolism. A systematic search for genes whose mRNA levels are modulated by the PPC WY-14643 (WY) was carried out in rat liver, a site of steroid hormone metabolism. The sequence of one up-regulated cDNA (2480 bp) was predicted to encode a protein of 735 amino acids with 82% identity to the porcine 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type IV (HSD IV) originally isolated as a 17 beta-estradiol dehydrogenase. The rat HSD IV was localized to peroxisomes and was regulated by diverse PPC by two distinct mechanisms. Induction of HSD IV and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) proteins in rat liver at different treatment times and concentrations of gemfibrozil (GEM) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) were almost identical, suggesting that HSD IV mRNA induction involves the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, a regulator of ACO. In contrast, HSD IV protein levels were only weakly induced by WY, a strong inducer of ACO protein, even though the levels of both HSD IV and ACO mRNA were strongly stimulated by WY. Thus HSD IV protein levels were uniquely regulated pretranslationally by WY. In addition to HSD IV we also identified the male-specific alpha 2u-globulin as a PPC down-regulated gene. This prompted us to examine the expression of another male-specific gene, CYP2C11, that catalyzes the hydroxylations of estradiol at the 2 and 16 alpha positions. Cyp2C11 protein expression in rat liver was either decreased or completely abolished after a 3-week treatment by GEM or WY, respectively. Decreased expression of enzymes which inactivate estradiol including Cyp2C11, and the reported increased expression of aromatase may explain why male rats exposed to diverse PPC have higher serum estradiol levels. These higher estradiol levels in male rats have been thought to be mechanistically linked to Leydig cell hyperplasia and adenomas. Increased

  8. Trangenic misexpression of the differentiation-specific desmocollin isoform 1 in basal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Henkler, F; Strom, M; Mathers, K; Cordingley, H; Sullivan, K; King, I

    2001-01-01

    Keratinocytes undergoing terminal differentiation are characterized by well-defined changes in protein expression, which contribute towards the transformation of cytoarchitecture and epithelial morphology. Characteristic patterns of desmosomal cadherins are tightly regulated and distinct isoforms are expressed during development and differentiation of epithelial tissues. Desmocollin-1 is strictly confined to suprabasal layers of epidermis, but it is absent in mitotically active, basal keratinocytes. This raises the question of whether basal desmocollin-1 could alter desmosomal functions and compromise keratinocyte proliferation, stratification, or early differentiation in skin. In this study, we misexpressed human desmocollin-1 in mouse epidermis, under control of the keratin-14 promoter. Transgenic animals were generated, which showed a specific expression of transgenic human desmocollin-1 in epidermal basal cells. High level transgenic expression, which was equal to or greater than endogenous protein levels, was observed in mice with multiple copy integration of the transgene. A punctate distribution of desmocollin-1 was demonstrated at the cell membrane by indirect immunofluorescence. Transgenic human desmocollin-1 colocalized with endogenous desmosomal marker proteins, indicating efficient incorporation into desmosomes. Transgenic mice did not display any obvious abnormalities, either in the histology of skin and hair follicles, or in the ultrastructure of desmosomes. These observations suggest that desmocollin-1 can function as a desmosomal cadherin both in basal and suprabasal cells. We propose that the differentiation-specific desmocollin isoforms desmocollin-1 and desmocollin-3 are functionally equivalent in basal epidermal cells and suggest that their changing expression patterns are markers, but not regulators, of the initial steps in keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:11168810

  9. Activation of the Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase in Keratinocytes Exposed to Hyperosmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cavalheiro, Renan P.; Machado, Daisy; Cruz, Bread L. G.; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J.; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria C. C.; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Vasques, Luciana; Nader, Helena B.; Souza, Ana Carolina S.; Justo, Giselle Z.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we provide new contribution to the mechanisms involved in keratinocytes response to hyperosmotic shock showing, for the first time, the participation of Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (LMWPTP) activity in this event. We reported that sorbitol-induced osmotic stress mediates alterations in the phosphorylation of pivotal cytoskeletal proteins, particularly Src and cofilin. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of the phosphorylated form of LMWPTP, which was followed by an augment in its catalytic activity, was observed. Of particular importance, these responses occurred in an intracellular milieu characterized by elevated levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and increased expression of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. Altogether, our results suggest that hyperosmostic stress provides a favorable cellular environment to the activation of LMWPTP, which is associated with increased expression of antioxidant enzymes, high levels of GSH and inhibition of Src kinase. Finally, the real contribution of LMWPTP in the hyperosmotic stress response of keratinocytes was demonstrated through analysis of the effects of ACP1 gene knockdown in stressed and non-stressed cells. LMWPTP knockdown attenuates the effects of sorbitol induced-stress in HaCaT cells, mainly in the status of Src kinase, Rac and STAT5 phosphorylation and activity. These results describe for the first time the participation of LMWPTP in the dynamics of cytoskeleton rearrangement during exposure of human keratinocytes to hyperosmotic shock, which may contribute to cell death. PMID:25781955

  10. Stathmin Regulates Keratinocyte Proliferation and Migration during Cutaneous Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Sabrina; Safferling, Kai; Westphal, Kathi; Hrabowski, Manuel; Müller, Ute; Angel, Peter; Wiechert, Lars; Ehemann, Volker; Müller, Benedikt; Holland-Cunz, Stefan; Stichel, Damian; Harder, Nathalie; Rohr, Karl; Germann, Günter; Matthäus, Franziska; Schirmacher, Peter; Grabe, Niels; Breuhahn, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous regeneration utilizes paracrine feedback mechanisms to fine-tune the regulation of epidermal keratinocyte proliferation and migration. However, it is unknown how fibroblast-derived hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) affects these mutually exclusive processes in distinct cell populations. We here show that HGF stimulates the expression and phosphorylation of the microtubule-destabilizing factor stathmin in primary human keratinocytes. Quantitative single cell- and cell population-based analyses revealed that basal stathmin levels are important for the migratory ability of keratinocytes in vitro; however, its expression is moderately induced in the migration tongue of mouse skin or organotypic multi-layered keratinocyte 3D cultures after full-thickness wounding. In contrast, clearly elevated stathmin expression is detectable in hyperproliferative epidermal areas. In vitro, stathmin silencing significantly reduced keratinocyte proliferation. Automated quantitative and time-resolved analyses in organotypic cocultures demonstrated a high correlation between Stathmin/phospho-Stathmin and Ki67 positivity in epidermal regions with proliferative activity. Thus, activation of stathmin may stimulate keratinocyte proliferation, while basal stathmin levels are sufficient for keratinocyte migration during cutaneous regeneration. PMID:24066165

  11. Keratinocyte expression of inflammatory mediators plays a crucial role in substance P-induced acute and chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tibia fracture in rats followed by cast immobilization leads to nociceptive, trophic, vascular and bone-related changes similar to those seen in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). Substance P (SP) mediated neurogenic inflammation may be responsible for some of the signs of CRPS in humans. We therefore hypothesized that SP acting through the SP receptor (NK1) leads to the CRPS-like changes found in the rat model. In the present study, we intradermally injected rats with SP and monitored hindpaw mechanical allodynia, temperature, and thickness as well as tissue levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and nerve growth factor-β (NGF) for 72 h. Anti-NGF antibody was utilized to block the effects of SP-induced NGF up-regulation. Fracture rats treated with the selective NK1 receptor antagonist LY303870 prior to cast removal were assessed for BrdU, a DNA synthesis marker, incorporation in skin cells to examine cellular proliferation. Bone microarchitecture was measured using micro computed tomography (μCT). We observed that: (1) SP intraplantar injection induced mechanical allodynia, warmth and edema as well as the expression of nociceptive mediators in the hindpaw skin of normal rats, (2) LY303870 administered intraperitoneally after fracture attenuated allodynia, hindpaw unweighting, warmth, and edema, as well as cytokine and NGF expression, (3) LY303870 blocked fracture-induced epidermal thickening and BrdU incorporation after fracture, (4) anti-NGF antibody blocked SP-induced allodynia but not warmth or edema, and (5) LY303870 had no effect on bone microarchitecture. Collectively our data indicate that SP acting through NK1 receptors supports the nociceptive and vascular components of CRPS, but not the bone-related changes. PMID:22824437

  12. Ultraviolet radiation induction of ornithine decarboxylase in rat keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, C.F.; Gajic, D.; Drucker, D.J. )

    1990-05-01

    UV radiation plays an important role in the induction of cutaneous malignancy, including basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanoma. In addition to its effects on DNA damage and repair mechanisms, UV radiation has been shown to modulate the expression of specific genes, altering the levels of their mRNAs and the synthesis of their corresponding proteins. In order to gain further information about the molecular effects of UV radiation, we have studied the regulation of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene expression in response to UVB radiation. ODC is the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, is involved in growth and differentiation, and has been implicated in carcinogenesis. Keratinocytes grown in culture were either sham-irradiated or exposed to increasing doses of UVB (1-5 mJ/cm2). Northern blot analysis of keratinocyte RNA under basal conditions demonstrated the presence of two ODC mRNA transcripts. Increasing exposure to UVB resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the levels of both ODC mRNA transcripts. The induction of ODC gene expression following UVB was noted 2 h after UVB exposure, and ODC mRNA levels continued to increase up to 24 h after UVB exposure. The UVB-induced increase in ODC gene expression was not serum dependent, despite the ability of serum alone to induce ODC gene expression. The mRNA transcripts for actin and hexosaminidase A were not induced after UVB exposure. These studies show that the UVB-induced increase in ODC activity is due, at least in part, to an increase in ODC gene expression and they provide a useful model for the analysis of the molecular effects of UVB radiation.

  13. Serum-free primary human fibroblast and keratinocyte coculture.

    PubMed

    Mujaj, Sally; Manton, Kerry; Upton, Zee; Richards, Sean

    2010-04-01

    Research has shown that the inclusion of a fibroblast cell support layer is required for the isolation and expansion of primary keratinocytes. Recent advances have provided keratinocyte culture with fibroblast-free alternatives. However, these technologies are often undefined and rely on the incorporation of purified proteins/components. To address this problem we developed a medium that used recombinant proteins to support the serum-free isolation and expansion of human dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes. The human dermal fibroblasts were able to be isolated serum free by adding recombinant human albumin to a collagenase solution. These fibroblasts were then expanded using a serum-free medium containing recombinant proteins: epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, chimeric vitronectin:insulin-like growth factor-I protein, and recombinant human albumin. These fibroblasts maintained a typical morphology and expressed fibroblast markers during their serum-free isolation, expansion, and freezing. Moreover, these fibroblasts were able to support the serum-free isolation and expansion of primary keratinocytes using these recombinant proteins. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that there were no differences in expression levels of p63 or keratins 1, 6, and 10 when keratinocytes were grown in either serum-supplemented or serum-free medium. Using a three-dimensional human skin equivalent model we demonstrated that these keratinocytes also maintained their ability to reform an epidermal layer. In summary, the techniques described provide a valuable alternative for culturing fibroblasts and keratinocytes using recombinant proteins. PMID:19929322

  14. Acute and chronic wound fluids influence keratinocyte function differently.

    PubMed

    Thamm, Oliver C; Koenen, Paola; Bader, Nicola; Schneider, Alina; Wutzler, Sebastian; Neugebauer, Edmund A M; Spanholtz, Timo A

    2015-04-01

    Wound healing requires a proper functioning of keratinocytes that migrate, proliferate and lead to a competent wound closure. Impaired wound healing might be due to a disturbed keratinocyte function caused by the wound environment. Basically, chronic wound fluid (CWF) differs from acute wound fluid (AWF). The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of AWF and CWF on keratinocyte function. We therefore investigated keratinocyte migration and proliferation under the influence of AWF and CWF using MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] test and scratch assay. We further measured the gene expression by qRT-PCR regarding growth factors and matrixmetalloproteinases (MMPs) involved in regeneration processes. AWF had a positive impact on keratinocyte proliferation over time, whereas CWF had an anti-proliferative effect. Keratinocyte migration was significantly impaired by CWF in contrast to an undisturbed wound closure under the influence of AWF. MMP-9 expression was strongly upregulated by CWF compared with AWF. Keratinocyte function was significantly impaired by CWF. An excessive induction of MMP-9 by CWF might lead to a permanent degradation of extracellular matrix and thereby prevent wounds from healing. PMID:23517467

  15. Sulfation of estradiol in human epidermal keratinocyte.

    PubMed

    Kushida, Akira; Hattori, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Nozomi; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Date, Akira; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2011-01-01

    Epidermis is one of the well-known estrogen target tissues. Information regarding estrogen metabolism in epidermis is still very limited compared to that of estrogen action. In the breast cancer tissue, 17β-estradiol (E(2)) is inactivated by sulfation and the expression level of estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1) is inversely correlated with its malignancy. However, there is little datum about inactivation of estradiol in skin. In order to detect and measure E(2) and its metabolites simultaneously, we established an assay method with radio HPLC. A majority of [(3)H] labeled E(2) was converted to E(2) sulfate in normal human epidermal keratinocyte (NHEK) cells. The estimated activity of sulfotransferase toward E(2) at 20 nM was 0.11±0.01 (pmol/min/mg protein). Significant induction of estrogen sulfotransferase activity was observed in calcium-differentiated NHEK cells (0.58±0.07 (pmol/min/mg protein)). The gene expression of SULT1E1 was fifteen-fold higher in differentiated keratinocyte than in proliferating keratinocyte, whereas that of steroid sulfatase was reduced. These results suggest that E(2) inactivation is primarily mediated by SULT1E1 in keratinocyte and E(2) action is likely suppressed in epidermal differentiation. PMID:21720030

  16. Increased keratinocyte proliferation initiated through downregulation of desmoplakin by RNA interference

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Hong . E-mail: hong.wan@cancer.org.uk; South, Andrew P.; Hart, Ian R.

    2007-07-01

    The intercellular adhesive junction desmosomes are essential for the maintenance of tissue structure and integrity in skin. Desmoplakin (Dp) is a major obligate plaque protein which plays a fundamental role in anchoring intermediate filaments to desmosomal cadherins. Evidence from hereditary human disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding Dp, e.g. Dp haploinsufficiency, suggests that alterations in Dp expression result not only in the disruption of tissue structure and integrity but also could evoke changes in keratinocyte proliferation. We have used transient RNA interference (RNAi) to downregulate Dp specifically in HaCaT keratinocytes. We showed that this Dp downregulation also caused reduced expression of several other desmosomal proteins. Increased cell proliferation and enhanced G{sub 1}-to-S-phase entry in the cell cycle, as monitored by colonial cellular density and BrdU incorporation, were seen in Dp RNAi-treated cells. These proliferative changes were associated with elevated phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-Akt levels. Furthermore, this increase in phospho-ERK/1/2 and phospho-Akt levels was sustained in Dp RNAi-treated cells at confluence whereas in control cells there was a significant reduction in phosphorylation of ERK1/2. This study indicates that Dp may participate in the regulation of keratinocyte cell proliferation by, in part at least, regulating cell cycle progression.

  17. Functional analysis of ZFP36 proteins in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Prenzler, Frauke; Fragasso, Annunziata; Schmitt, Angelika; Munz, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    The ZFP36 family of zinc finger proteins, including ZFP36, ZFP36L1, and ZFP36L2, regulates the production of growth factors and cytokines via destabilization of the respective mRNAs. We could recently demonstrate that in cultured keratinocytes, expression of the ZFP36, ZFP36L1, and ZFP36L2 genes is induced by growth factors and cytokines and that ZFP36L1 is a potent regulator of keratinocyte VEGF production. We now further analyzed the localization and function of ZFP36 proteins in the skin, specifically in epidermal keratinocytes. We found that in human epidermis, the ZFP36 protein could be detected in basal and suprabasal keratinocytes, whereas ZFP36L1 and ZFP36L2 were expressed mainly in the basal layer, indicating different and non-redundant functions of the three proteins in the epidermis. Consistently, upon inhibition of ZFP36 or ZFP36L1 expression using specific siRNAs, there was no major effect on expression of the respective other gene. In addition, we demonstrate that both ZFP36 and ZFP36L1 influence keratinocyte cell cycle, differentiation, and apoptosis in a distinct manner. Finally, we show that similarly as ZFP36L1, ZFP36 is a potent regulator of keratinocyte VEGF production. Thus, it is likely that both proteins regulate angiogenesis via paracrine mechanisms. Taken together, our results suggest that ZFP36 proteins might control reepithelialization and angiogenesis in the skin in a multimodal manner. PMID:27182009

  18. Novel sphingolipid derivatives promote keratinocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Paragh, György; Schling, Petra; Ugocsai, Peter; Kel, Alexander E; Liebisch, Gerhard; Heimerl, Susanne; Moehle, Christoph; Schiemann, Yvonne; Wegmann, Michael; Farwick, Mike; Wikonkál, Norbert M; Mandl, József; Langmann, Thomas; Schmitz, Gerd

    2008-12-01

    Sphingolipids are important components of the water permeability barrier of the skin. Moreover, ceramides were also shown to influence keratinocyte differentiation and regulate cellular signalling. A confluence-induced differentiation model of normal human keratinocytes was established to allow evaluation of pro- and anti-differentiation effects of exogenous compounds. The effects of phytosphingosine (PS), sphingosine (SO), sphinganine (SA) and their hexanoyl (-C6), stearoyl (-C18) and salicyl (-SLC) derivatives, C12-alkylamine-salicylate (C12-SLC), salicylate (SLC) along with vitamin D3 (VD3) and retinol as control substances were tested in this system. Cytotoxicity assays were carried out to optimize the incubation conditions of compounds and whole genome expression changes were monitored by DNA-microarray on days 0, 1 and 4. Geometric means of gene expression levels of a subset of known keratinocyte differentiation-related genes were calculated from the microarray data to compare effects of the sphingolipid derivatives. Compound treatment-induced transcriptional changes were analysed by the ExPlain software (BIOBASE GmbH). Five of the assayed substances (SA, SO-C6, PS-C6, SO-SLC, PS-SLC) were found to be potent promoters of keratinocyte differentiation compared with VD3, and C12-SLC revealed potential anti-differentiation properties. ExPlain analysis found a different regulatory profile in the computed transcriptional networks of the sphingoid bases versus their -C6 and especially -SLC derivatives suggesting that the change in their keratinocyte differentiation modifying potential is due to a unique effect of the covalent attachment of the salicylic acid. Taken together, these results demonstrate the gene regulatory potential of sphingolipid species that could be valuable for dermatological or cosmetic applications. PMID:18631249

  19. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation as an Epigenetic Consequence of Epstein-Barr Virus Infection of Immortalized Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Birdwell, Christine E.; Queen, Krista J.; Kilgore, Phillip C. S. R.; Rollyson, Phoebe; Trutschl, Marjan; Cvek, Urska

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The oral cavity is a persistent reservoir for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with lifelong infection of resident epithelial and B cells. Infection of these cell types results in distinct EBV gene expression patterns regulated by epigenetic modifications involving DNA methylation and chromatin structure. Regulation of EBV gene expression relies on viral manipulation of the host epigenetic machinery that may result in long-lasting host epigenetic reprogramming. To identify epigenetic events following EBV infection, a transient infection model was established to map epigenetic changes in telomerase-immortalized oral keratinocytes. EBV-infected oral keratinocytes exhibited a predominantly latent viral gene expression program with some lytic or abortive replication. Calcium and methylcellulose-induced differentiation was delayed in EBV-positive clones and in clones that lost EBV compared to uninfected controls, indicating a functional consequence of EBV epigenetic modifications. Analysis of global cellular DNA methylation identified over 13,000 differentially methylated CpG residues in cells exposed to EBV compared to uninfected controls, with CpG island hypermethylation observed at several cellular genes. Although the vast majority of the DNA methylation changes were silent, 65 cellular genes that acquired CpG methylation showed altered transcript levels. Genes with increased transcript levels frequently acquired DNA methylation within the gene body while those with decreased transcript levels acquired DNA methylation near the transcription start site. Treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, decitabine, restored expression of some hypermethylated genes in EBV-infected and EBV-negative transiently infected clones. Overall, these observations suggested that EBV infection of keratinocytes leaves a lasting epigenetic imprint that can enhance the tumorigenic phenotype of infected cells. IMPORTANCE Here, we show that EBV infection of oral keratinocytes led to

  20. Distinctive molecular responses to ultraviolet radiation between keratinocytes and melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyun; Kim, Arianna; Nakatani, Masashi; Shen, Yao; Liu, Liang

    2016-09-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the major risk factor for skin carcinogenesis. To gain new insights into the molecular pathways mediating UVR effects in the skin, we performed comprehensive transcriptomic analyses to identify shared and distinctive molecular responses to UVR between human keratinocytes and melanocytes. Keratinocytes and melanocytes were irradiated with varying doses of UVB (10, 20 and 30 mJ/cm(2) ) then analysed by RNA-Seq at different time points post-UVB radiation (4, 24 and 72 h). Under basal conditions, keratinocytes and melanocytes expressed similar number of genes, although they each expressed a distinctive subset of genes pertaining to their specific cellular identity. Upon UVB radiation, keratinocytes displayed a clear pattern of time- and dose-dependent changes in gene expression that was different from melanocytes. The early UVB-responsive gene set (4 h post-UVR) differed significantly from delayed UVB-responsive gene sets (24 and 72 h). We also identified multiple novel UVB signature genes including PRSS23, SERPINH1, LCE3D and CNFN, which were conserved between melanocyte and keratinocyte lines from different individuals. Taken together, our findings elucidated both common and distinctive molecular features between melanocytes and keratinocytes and uncovered novel UVB signature genes that might be utilized to predict UVB photobiological effects on the skin. PMID:27119462

  1. Inhibition of Inflammatory and Proliferative Responses of Human Keratinocytes Exposed to the Sesquiterpene Lactones Dehydrocostuslactone and Costunolide

    PubMed Central

    Scarponi, Claudia; Butturini, Elena; Sestito, Rosanna; Madonna, Stefania; Cavani, Andrea; Mariotto, Sofia; Albanesi, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The imbalance of the intracellular redox state and, in particular, of the glutathione (GSH)/GSH disulfide couple homeostasis, is involved in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. In many skin diseases, including psoriasis, oxidative stress plays an important role, as demonstrated by the observation that treatments leading to increase of the local levels of oxidant species ameliorate the disease. Recently, dehydrocostuslactone (DCE) and costunolide (CS), two terpenes naturally occurring in many plants, have been found to exert various anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic effects on different human cell types. These compounds decrease the level of the intracellular GSH by direct interaction with it, and, therefore, can alter cellular redox state. DCE and CS can trigger S-glutathionylation of various substrates, including the transcription factor STAT3 and JAK1/2 proteins. In the present study, we investigated on the potential role of DCE and CS in regulating inflammatory and proliferative responses of human keratinocytes to cytokines. We demonstrated that DCE and CS decreased intracellular GSH levels in human keratinocytes, as well as inhibited STAT3 and STAT1 phosphorylation and activation triggered by IL-22 or IFN-γ, respectively. Consequently, DCE and CS decreased the IL-22- and IFN-γ-induced expression of inflammatory and regulatory genes in keratinocytes, including CCL2, CXCL10, ICAM-1 and SOCS3. DCE and CS also inhibited proliferation and cell-cycle progression-related gene expression, as well as they promoted cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In parallel, DCE and CS activated the anti-inflammatory EGFR and ERK1/2 molecules in keratinocytes, and, thus, wound healing in an in vitro injury model. In light of our findings, we can hypothesize that the employment of DCE and CS in psoriasis could efficiently counteract the pro-inflammatory effects of IFN-γ and IL-22 on keratinocytes, revert the apoptosis-resistant phenotype, as well as inhibit hyperproliferation

  2. Altered expression of KLC3 may affect semen parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kargar- Dastjerdy, Pegah; Tavalaee, Marziyeh; Salehi, Mansoor; Falahati, Mojtaba; Izadi, Tayebeh; Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: KLC3 protein as a member of the kinesin light-chain protein family plays an important role in spermatogenesis, during formation of mitochondrial sheath in the mid piece of the sperm tail. Objective: This study for the first time aims to compare the expression of the KLC3 gene between fertile and infertile individuals. Materials and Methods: Semen samples were collected from 19 fertile individuals who were selected from embryo-donor volunteers and 57 infertile individuals who had abnormal sperm parameters according to world health organization criteria. Sperm parameters using computer assisted sperm analysis and the quantitative KLC3-gene expression using the real-time PCR method were measured. Results: Our results revealed a significant correlations between sperm concentration with relative expression of KLC3 only in infertile groups (r=0.45, p=0.00). A significant correlation was not found between KLC3 expression and sperm motility; however, the relative expression of KLC3 was significantly higher in asthenozoospermic compared to non-asthenozoospermic individuals. Conclusion: Low expression of KLC3 may result in improper function of midpiece, which has important function in sperm motility. The results of this study show that aberrant expression of KLC3 might be associated with phenomena like oligozoospermia and asthenozoospermia. This article is extracted from student’s thesis. PMID:27141544

  3. Transcription Factor CTIP2 Maintains Hair Follicle Stem Cell Pool and Contributes to Altered Expression of LHX2 and NFATC1.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Shreya; Wheeler, Heather; Leid, Mark; Ganguli-Indra, Gitali; Indra, Arup K

    2015-11-01

    Transcription factor CTIP2 (chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor-interacting protein 2), also known as BCL11B, is expressed in hair follicles (HFs) of embryonic and adult skin. Ctip2-null mice exhibit reduced HF density during embryonic development. In contrast, conditional inactivation of Ctip2 in the epidermis (Ctip2(ep-/-) mice) leads to a shorter telogen and a premature entry into anagen during the second phase of hair cycling without a detectable change in the number of HFs. Keratinocytes of the bulge stem cells (SCs) niche of Ctip2(ep-/-) mice proliferate more and undergo reduced apoptosis compared with the corresponding cells of wild-type mice. However, premature activation of follicular SCs in mice lacking CTIP2 leads to the exhaustion of this SC compartment in comparison with Ctip2(L2/L2) mice, which retained quiescent follicle SCs. CTIP2 modulates expression of genes encoding EGFR and NOTCH1 during formation of HFs and those encoding nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic calcineurin-dependent 1 and LIM homeobox 2 during normal hair cycling in adult skin. The expression of most of these genes is disrupted in mice lacking CTIP2, and these alterations may underlie the phenotype of Ctip2-null and Ctip2(ep-/-) mice. CTIP2 appears to serve as a transcriptional organizer that integrates input from multiple signaling cues during HF morphogenesis and hair cycling. PMID:26176759

  4. Transcription Factor CTIP2 maintains hair follicle stem cell pool and contributes to altered expression of LHX2 and NFATC1

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Shreya; Wheeler, Heather; Leid, Mark; Ganguli-Indra, Gitali; Indra, Arup K.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor CTIP2 (COUP-TF-interacting protein 2), also known as BCL11B, is expressed in hair follicles of embryonic and adult skin. Ctip2-null mice exhibit reduced hair follicle density during embryonic development. In contrast, conditional inactivation of Ctip2 in epidermis (Ctip2ep−/− mice) leads to a shorter telogen and premature entry into anagen during the second phase of hair cycling without a detectable change in the number of hair follicles. Keratinocytes of the bulge stem cells niche of Ctip2ep−/− mice proliferate more and undergo reduced apoptosis than the corresponding cells of wild-type mice. However, premature activation of follicular stem cells in mice lacking CTIP2 leads to the exhaustion of this stem cell compartment in comparison to Ctip2L2/L2 mice, which retained quiescent follicle stem cells. CTIP2 modulates expression of genes encoding EGFR and NOTCH1 during formation of hair follicles, and those encoding NFATC1 and LHX2 during normal hair cycling in adult skin. The expression of most of these genes is disrupted in mice lacking CTIP2 and these alterations may underlie the phenotype of Ctip2-null and Ctip2ep−/− mice. CTIP2 appears to serve as a transcriptional organizer that integrates input from multiple signaling cues during hair follicle morphogenesis and hair cycling. PMID:26176759

  5. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns are altered during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Popp, Michael P.; Gurley, William B.; Guy, Charles; Norwood, Kelly L.; Ferl, Robert J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments results in differential gene expression. A 5-day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β-Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on gene expression patterns initially by using the Adh/GUS transgene to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response (Paul, A.L., Daugherty, C.J., Bihn, E.A., Chapman, D.K., Norwood, K.L., Ferl, R.J., 2001. Transgene expression patterns indicate that spaceflight affects stress signal perception and transduction in arabidopsis, Plant Physiol. 126, 613-621). As a follow-on to the reporter gene analysis, we report here the evaluation of genome-wide patterns of native gene expression within Arabidopsis shoots utilizing the Agilent DNA array of 21,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - Taqman®). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays probed with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to RNA isolated from ground control plants revealed 182 genes that were differentially expressed in response to the spaceflight mission by more than 4-fold, and of those only 50 genes were expressed at levels chosen to support a conservative change call. None of the genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were induced to this level. However, genes related to heat shock were dramatically induced - but in a pattern and under growth conditions that are not easily explained by elevated temperatures. These gene expression data are discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment and with regard to potential future spaceflight experiment

  6. Altered Expression of Oxidative Metabolism Related Genes in Cholangiocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Boonmars, Thidarut; Juasook, Amornrat; Sriraj, Pranee; Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Wu, Zhiliang; Laummuanwai, Porntip; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Khuntikeo, Narong; Rattanasuwan, Panaratana

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a rare but highly fatal cancer for which the molecular mechanisms and diagnostic markers are obscure. We therefore investigated the kinetic expression of isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1), isocitrate dehydrogenase-2 (IDH2) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD) during the tumorigenesis of O. viverrini infection-associated CCA in an animal model, and confirmed down-regulation of expression in human cases of opisthorchiasis-associated CCA through real time PCR. Kinetic expression of HGD, IDH1 and IDH2 in the animal model of O. viverrini infection-induced CCA was correlated with human CCA cases. In the animal model, expression of HGD was decreased at all time points (p<0.01) and expression of both IDH1 and IDH2 was decreased in the CCA group. In human cases, expression of HGD, IDH1 and IDH2 was decreased more than 2 fold in 55 cases (70.5%), 25 cases (32.1%) and 24 cases (30.8%) respectively. The present study suggests that reduction of HGD, IDH1 and IDH2 may be involve in cholangiocarcinoma genesis and may be useful for molecular diagnosis. PMID:26320466

  7. Microenvironment-induced myofibroblast-like conversion of engrafted keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, MeiRong; Ti, DongDong; Han, WeiDong; Fu, XiaoBing

    2014-02-01

    Myofibroblasts, recognized classically by α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, play a key role in the wound-healing process, promoting wound closure and matrix deposition. Although a body of evidence shows that keratinocytes explanted onto a wound bed promote closure of a skin injury, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. The basal layer of epidermis is rich in undifferentiated keratinocytes (UKs). We showed that UKs injected into granulation tissue could switch into α-SMA positive cells, and accelerate the rate of skin wound healing. In addition, when the epidermis sheets isolated from foreskin cover up the wound bed or are induced in vitro, keratinocytes located at the basal layers or adjacent sites were observed to convert into myofibroblast-like cells. Thus, UKs have a potential for myofibroblastic transition, which provides a novel mechanism by which keratinocyte explants accelerate skin wound healing. PMID:24443179

  8. Activation of the human keratinocyte B1 bradykinin receptor induces expression and secretion of metalloproteases 2 and 9 by transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Matus, Carola E; Ehrenfeld, Pamela; Pavicic, Francisca; González, Carlos B; Concha, Miguel; Bhoola, Kanti D; Burgos, Rafael A; Figueroa, Carlos D

    2016-09-01

    The B1 bradykinin receptor (BDKRB1) is a component of the kinin cascade localized in the human skin. Some of the effects produced by stimulation of BDKRB1 depend on transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), but the mechanisms involved in this process have not been clarified yet. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a BDKRB1 agonist on wound healing in a mouse model and the migration and secretion of metalloproteases 2 and 9 from human HaCaT keratinocytes and delineate the signalling pathways that triggered their secretion. Although stimulation of BDKRB1 induces weak chemotactic migration of keratinocytes and wound closure in an in vitro scratch-wound assay, the BDKRB1 agonist improved wound closure in a mouse model. BDKRB1 stimulation triggers synthesis and secretion of both metalloproteases, effects that depend on the activity of EGFR and subsequent phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and PI3K/Akt. In the mouse model, immunoreactivity for both gelatinases was concentrated around wound borders. EGFR transactivation by BDKRB1 agonist involves Src kinases family and ADAM17. In addition to extracellular matrix degradation, metalloproteases 2 and 9 regulate cell migration and differentiation, cell functions that are associated with the role of BDKRB1 in keratinocyte differentiation. Considering that BDKRB1 is up-regulated by inflammation and/or by cytokines that are abundant in the inflammatory milieu, more stable BDKRB1 agonists may be of therapeutic value to modulate wound healing. PMID:27093919

  9. Reorganization of the interchromosomal network during keratinocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Nitasha; Seifert, Brandon; Ding, Hu; Chen, Zihe; Stojkovic, Branislav; Bhattacharya, Sambit; Xu, Jinhui; Berezney, Ronald

    2016-06-01

    The well-established human epidermal keratinocyte (HEK) differentiation model was investigated to determine possible alterations in chromosome territory (CT) association during differentiation. The seven human chromosomes (1, 4, 11, 12, 16, 17, and 18) selected for this analysis are representative of the chromosome size and gene density range of the overall human genome as well as including a majority of genes involved in epidermal development and differentiation (CT1, 12, and 17). Induction with calcium chloride (Ca(2+)) resulted in morphological changes characteristic of keratinocyte differentiation. Combined multi-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and computational image analysis on the undifferentiated (0 h) and differentiated (24 h after Ca(2+) treatment) HEK revealed that (a) increases in CT volumes correspond to overall nuclear volume increases, (b) radial positioning is gene density-dependent at 0 h but neither gene density- nor size-dependent at 24 h, (c) the average number of interchromosomal associations for each CT is gene density-dependent and similar at both time points, and (d) there are striking differences in the single and multiple pairwise interchromosomal association profiles. Probabilistic network models of the overall interchromosomal associations demonstrate major reorganization of the network during differentiation. Only ~40 % of the CT pairwise connections in the networks are common to both 0 and 24 h HEK. We propose that there is a probabilistic chromosome positional code which can be significantly altered during cell differentiation in coordination with reprogramming of gene expression. PMID:26490167

  10. Transcription Factor MafB Coordinates Epidermal Keratinocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Miyai, Masashi; Hamada, Michito; Moriguchi, Takashi; Hiruma, Junichiro; Kamitani-Kawamoto, Akiyo; Watanabe, Hajime; Hara-Chikuma, Mariko; Takahashi, Kenzo; Takahashi, Satoru; Kataoka, Kohsuke

    2016-09-01

    Mammalian epidermis is a stratified epithelium composed of distinct layers of keratinocytes. The outermost cornified layer is a primary barrier that consists of a cornified envelope, an insoluble structure assembled by cross-linked scaffold proteins, and a surrounding mixture of lipids. Skin keratinocytes undergo a multistep differentiation process, but the mechanism underlying this process is not fully understood. We demonstrate that the transcription factor MafB is expressed in differentiating keratinocytes in mice and is transcriptionally upregulated upon human keratinocyte differentiation in vitro. In MafB-deficient mice, epidermal differentiation was partially impaired and the cornified layer was thinner than in wild-type mice. On the basis of transcriptional profiling, we detected reduced expression levels of a subset of cornified envelope genes, for example, filaggrin and repetin, in the MafB(-/-) epidermis. By contrast, the expression levels of lipid metabolism-related genes, such as Alox12e and Smpd3, increased. The upregulated genes in the MafB(-/-) epidermis were enriched for putative target genes of the transcription factors Gata3, Grhl3, and Klf4. Immunohistochemical analysis of skin biopsy samples revealed that the expression levels of filaggrin and MafB were significantly reduced in patients with human atopic dermatitis and psoriasis vulgaris. Our results indicate that MafB is a component of the gene expression program that regulates epidermal keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:27208706

  11. Altered Expression of Polycomb Group Genes in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Warden, Charles; Zou, Zhaoxia; Neman, Josh; Krueger, Joseph S.; Jain, Alisha; Jandial, Rahul; Chen, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins play a critical role in histone mediated epigenetics which has been implicated in the malignant evolution of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). By systematically interrogating The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we discovered widespread aberrant expression of the PcG members in GBM samples compared to normal brain. The most striking differences were upregulation of EZH2, PHF19, CBX8 and PHC2 and downregulation of CBX7, CBX6, EZH1 and RYBP. Interestingly, changes in EZH2, PHF19, CBX7, CBX6 and EZH1 occurred progressively as astrocytoma grade increased. We validated the aberrant expression of CBX6, CBX7, CBX8 and EZH2 in GBM cell lines by Western blotting and qRT-PCR, and further the aberrant expression of CBX6 in GBM tissue samples by immunohistochemical staining. To determine if there was functional significance to the diminished CBX6 levels in GBM, CBX6 was overexpressed in GBM cells resulting in decreased proliferative capacity. In conclusion, aberrant expression of PcG proteins in GBMs may play a role in the development or maintenance of the malignancy. PMID:24260522

  12. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  13. Locomotion in Lymphocytes is Altered by Differential PKC Isoform Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    1999-01-01

    Lymphocyte locomotion is critical for proper elicitation of the immune response. Locomotion of immune cells via the interstitium is essential for optimal immune function during wound healing, inflammation and infection. There are conditions which alter lymphocyte locomotion and one of them is spaceflight. Lymphocyte locomotion is severely inhibited in true spaceflight (true microgravity) and in rotating wall vessel culture (modeled microgravity). When lymphocytes are activated prior to culture in modeled microgravity, locomotion is not inhibited and the levels are comparable to those of static cultured lymphocytes. When a phorbol ester (PMA) is used in modeled microgravity, lymphocyte locomotion is restored by 87%. This occurs regardless if PMA is added after culture in the rotating wall vessel or during culture. Inhibition of DNA synthesis also does not alter restoration of lymphocyte locomotion by PMA. PMA is a direct activator of (protein kinase C) PKC . When a calcium ionophore, ionomycin is used it does not possess any restorative properties towards locomotion either alone or collectively with PMA. Since PMA brings about restoration without help from calcium ionophores (ionomycin), it is infer-red that calcium independent PKC isoforms are involved. Changes were perceived in the protein levels of PKC 6 where levels of the protein were downregulated at 24,72 and 96 hours in untreated rotated cultures (modeled microgravity) compared to untreated static (1g) cultures. At 48 hours there is an increase in the levels of PKC & in the same experimental set up. Studies on transcriptional and translational patterns of calcium independent isoforms of PKC such as 8 and E are presented in this study.

  14. Regulated Expression of a Calmodulin Isoform Alters Growth and Development in Potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Takezawa, D.; An, G.; Han, T.-J.

    1996-01-01

    A transgene approach was taken to study the consequences of altered expression of a calmodutin iso-form on plant growth and development. Eight genomic clones of potato calmodulin (PCM 1 to 8) have been isolated and characterized. Among the potato calmodulin isoforms studied, PCM 1 differs from the other isoforms because of its unique amino acid substitutions. Transgenic potato plants were produced carrying sense construct of PCM 1 fused to the CAMV 35S promoter. Transgenic plants showing a moderate increase in PCM 1 MRNA exhibited strong apical dominance, produced elongated tubers, and were taller than the controls. Interestingly, the plants expressing the highest level of PCM 1 MRNA did not form underground tubers. Instead, these transgenic plants produced aerial tubers when allowed to grow for longer periods. The expression of different calmodulin isoforms (PCM 1, 5, 6, and 8) was studied in transgenic plants. Among the four potato calmodulin isoforms, only the expression of PCM 1 MRNA was altered in transgenic plants, while the expression of other isoforms was not significantly altered. Western analysis revealed increased PCM 1 protein in transgenic plants, indicating that the expression of both MRNA and protein are altered in transgenic plants. These results suggest that increasing the expression of PCM 1 alters growth and development in potato plants.

  15. Alteration of gene expression in rat colon mucosa after exercise.

    PubMed

    Buehlmeyer, K; Doering, F; Daniel, H; Kindermann, B; Schulz, T; Michna, H

    2008-01-01

    The development of colon cancer is highly influenced by lifestyle factors such as nutrition and physical inactivity. Detailed biological mechanisms are thus far unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of regular treadmill exercise on gene expression in rat colon mucosa. For this purpose, 6-week-old male Wistar rats completed a stress-free voluntary treadmill exercise period of 12 weeks. Sedentary rats served as a control group. In the colon mucosa, steady-state mRNA expression levels of approximately 10,000 genes were compared between both groups by micro-array analysis (MWG rat 10K array). A total of 8846 mRNAs were detected above background level. Regular exercise led to a decreased expression of 47 genes at a threshold-factor of 2.0. Three genes were found to be up-regulated in the exercise group. The identified genes encode proteins involved in signal transduction (n=11), transport (n=8), immune system (n=7), cytoskeleton (n=6), protein targeting (n=6), metabolism (n=5), transcription (n=3) and vascularization (n=2). Among the genes regulated by regular exercise, the betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase 2 (BHMT2) seems to be of particular interest. Physical activity may protect against aberrant methylation by repressing the BHMT2 gene and thus contribute to a decreased risk of developing colon cancer. We have also identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin-2 (ANG-2) and calcium-independent phospholipase a2 (iPL-A2), all of them with markedly reduced transcript levels in the mucosa of active rats. In summary, our experiment presents the first gene expression pattern in rat colon mucosa following regular treadmill activity and represents an important step in understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the preventive effect of physical activity on the development of colon cancer. PMID:18342145

  16. Altered circadian clock gene expression in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anne-Sofie; Owe-Larsson, Björn; Hetta, Jerker; Lundkvist, Gabriella B

    2016-07-01

    Impaired circadian rhythmicity has been reported in several psychiatric disorders. Schizophrenia is commonly associated with aberrant sleep-wake cycles and insomnia. It is not known if schizophrenia is associated with disturbances in molecular rhythmicity. We cultured fibroblasts from skin samples obtained from patients with chronic schizophrenia and from healthy controls, respectively, and analyzed the circadian expression during 48h of the clock genes CLOCK, BMAL1, PER1, PER2, CRY1, CRY2, REV-ERBα and DBP. In fibroblasts obtained from patients with chronic schizophrenia, we found a loss of rhythmic expression of CRY1 and PER2 compared to cells from healthy controls. We also estimated the sleep quality in these patients and found that most of them suffered from poor sleep in comparison with the healthy controls. In another patient sample, we analyzed mononuclear blood cells from patients with schizophrenia experiencing their first episode of psychosis, and found decreased expression of CLOCK, PER2 and CRY1 compared to blood cells from healthy controls. These novel findings show disturbances in the molecular clock in schizophrenia and have important implications in our understanding of the aberrant rhythms reported in this disease. PMID:27132483

  17. Impaired keratinocyte function on matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) damaged collagen

    PubMed Central

    Perone, Patricia; Deming, Monica O’Brien; Warner, Roscoe L.; Aslam, Muhammad N.; Bhagavathula, Narasimharao; Dame, Michael K.; Voorhees, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Healing of superficial skin wounds depends on the proliferation and migration of keratinocytes at the wound margin. When human epidermal keratinocytes were incubated on polymerized type I collagen, they rapidly attached and spread. The cells underwent a proliferative response and, over the subsequent 6-day period, covered the collagen surface with a monolayer of cells. When keratinocytes were plated on collagen that had been fragmented by exposure to matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1, collagenase-1), the cells attached as readily as to intact collagen but spread more slowly and less completely. Growth was reduced by approximately 50%. Instead of covering the collagen surface, the keratinocytes remained localized to the site of attachment. Keratinocytes on fragmented collagen expressed a more differentiated phenotype as indicated by a higher level of surface E-cadherin. Based on these findings, we suggest that damage to the underlying collagenous matrix may impede efficient keratinocyte function and retard wound closure. PMID:19352688

  18. Human keratinocyte culture from the peritonsillar mucosa.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, P; Bonnekoh, B; Wevers, A; Michel, O; Mahrle, G; Krieg, T; Stennert, E

    1996-01-01

    Tonsillectomy tissue can be used as a routine source for cultures of oropharyngeal keratinocytes. In so doing, a peritonsillar strip of unaltered mucosa was dissected in the upper submucosa. Subsequent trypsinization yielded 7.0 +/- 3.4 x 10(6) keratinocytes per bilateral tonsillectomy. Keratinocyte attachment and growth in primary culture were promoted by sublethally irradiated 3T3 murine fibroblasts. Three subcultures could be performed without a feeder layer and were characterized by a population doubling time of 4.5 days during log growth phase. Electrophoretic and immunoblot analysis of the third subculture revealed a strong expression of keratin pairs 5/14 and 6/16 as well as keratins 7 and 19, whereas keratins 8/18 were expressed less intensely. The lowest intensity, was found for keratin 13, which is known to be indicative of the differentiated mucosa. The culture technique thus provides an easily available in vitro model for morphological and functional studies on the epithelial compartment of human oropharyngeal mucosa. PMID:8737778

  19. γδ T-cell-deficient mice show alterations in mucin expression, glycosylation, and goblet cells but maintain an intact mucus layer.

    PubMed

    Kober, Olivia I; Ahl, David; Pin, Carmen; Holm, Lena; Carding, Simon R; Juge, Nathalie

    2014-04-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is maintained by a hierarchy of immune defenses acting in concert to minimize contact between luminal microorganisms and the intestinal epithelial cell surface. The intestinal mucus layer, covering the gastrointestinal tract epithelial cells, contributes to mucosal homeostasis by limiting bacterial invasion. In this study, we used γδ T-cell-deficient (TCRδ(-/-)) mice to examine whether and how γδ T-cells modulate the properties of the intestinal mucus layer. Increased susceptibility of TCRδ(-/-) mice to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis is associated with a reduced number of goblet cells. Alterations in the number of goblet cells and crypt lengths were observed in the small intestine and colon of TCRδ(-/-) mice compared with C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice. Addition of keratinocyte growth factor to small intestinal organoid cultures from TCRδ(-/-) mice showed a marked increase in crypt growth and in both goblet cell number and redistribution along the crypts. There was no apparent difference in the thickness or organization of the mucus layer between TCRδ(-/-) and WT mice, as measured in vivo. However, γδ T-cell deficiency led to reduced sialylated mucins in association with increased gene expression of gel-secreting Muc2 and membrane-bound mucins, including Muc13 and Muc17. Collectively, these data provide evidence that γδ T cells play an important role in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis by regulating mucin expression and promoting goblet cell function in the small intestine. PMID:24503767

  20. Arsenic exposure disrupts epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, Katharine J.; Holloway, Adele; Cook, Anthony L.; Chin, Suyin P.; Snow, Elizabeth T.

    2014-11-15

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin which increases skin cancer risk for exposed populations worldwide; however the underlying biomolecular mechanism for arsenic-induced carcinogenesis is complex and poorly defined. Recent investigations show that histone deacetylase and DNA methyltransferase activity is impaired, and epigenetic patterns of gene regulation are consistently altered in cancers associated with arsenic exposure. Expression of the histone deacetylase SIRT1 is altered in solid tumours and haematological malignancies; however its role in arsenic-induced pathology is unknown. In this study we investigated the effect of arsenic on epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 and its targeting microRNA, miR-34a in primary human keratinocytes. Acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16) increased in keratinocytes exposed to 0.5 μM arsenite [As(III)]; and this was associated with chromatin remodelling at the miR-34a promoter. Moreover, although SIRT1 protein initially increased in these As(III)-exposed cells, after 24 days expression was not significantly different from untreated controls. Extended exposure to low-dose As(III) (0.5 μM; > 5 weeks) compromised the pattern of CpG methylation at SIRT1 and miR-34a gene promoters, and this was associated with altered expression for both genes. We have found that arsenic alters epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 expression via structural reorganisation of chromatin at the miR-34a gene promoter in the initial 24 h of exposure; and over time, through shifts in miR-34a and SIRT1 gene methylation. Taken together, this investigation demonstrates that arsenic produces cumulative disruptions to epigenetic regulation of miR-34a expression, and this is associated with impaired coordination of SIRT1 functional activity. - Highlights: • Submicromolar arsenic concentrations disrupt SIRT1 activity and expression in human keratinocytes. • Arsenic-induced chromatin remodelling at the miR-34a gene promoter is associated with hyperacetylation

  1. Ski protein levels increase during in vitro progression of HPV16-immortalized human keratinocytes and in cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi; Pirisi, Lucia; Creek, Kim E.

    2013-09-15

    We compared the levels of the Ski oncoprotein, an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling, in normal human keratinocytes (HKc), HPV16 immortalized HKc (HKc/HPV16), and differentiation resistant HKc/HPV16 (HKc/DR) in the absence and presence of TGF-β. Steady-state Ski protein levels increased in HKc/HPV16 and even further in HKc/DR, compared to HKc. TGF-β treatment of HKc, HKc/HPV16, and HKc/DR dramatically decreased Ski. TGF-β-induced Ski degradation was delayed in HKc/DR. Ski and phospho-Ski protein levels are cell cycle dependent with maximal Ski expression and localization to centrosomes and mitotic spindles during G2/M. ShRNA knock down of Ski in HKc/DR inhibited cell proliferation. More intense nuclear and cytoplasmic Ski staining and altered Ski localization were found in cervical cancer samples compared to adjacent normal tissue in a cervical cancer tissue array. Overall, these studies demonstrate altered Ski protein levels, degradation and localization in HPV16-transformed human keratinocytes and in cervical cancer. - Highlights: • Ski oncoprotein levels increase during progression of HPV16-transformed cells. • Ski and phospho-Ski protein levels are cell cycle dependent. • Ski knock-down in HPV16-transformed keratinocytes inhibited cell proliferation. • Cervical cancer samples overexpress Ski.

  2. Polarized Integrin Mediates Human Keratinocyte Adhesion to Basal Lamina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Luca, Michele; Tamura, Richard N.; Kajiji, Shama; Bondanza, Sergio; Rossino, Paola; Cancedda, Ranieri; Carlo Marchisio, Pier; Quaranta, Vito

    1990-09-01

    Epithelial cell interactions with matrices are critical to tissue organization. Indirect immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitations of cell lysates prepared from stratified cultures of human epidermal cells showed that the major integrins expressed by keratinocytes are α_Eβ_4 (also called α_6β_4) and α_2β_1/α_3β_1. The α_Eβ_4 integrin is localized at the surface of basal cells in contact with the basement membrane, whereas α_2β_1/ α_3β_1 integrins are absent from the basal surface and are localized only on the lateral surface of basal and spinous keratinocytes. Anti-β_4 antibodies potently inhibited keratinocyte adhesion to matrigel or purified laminin, whereas anti-β_1 antibodies were ineffective. Only anti-β_4 antibodies were able to detach established keratinocyte colonies. These data suggest that α_Eβ_4 mediates keratinocyte adhesion to basal lamina, whereas the β_1 subfamily is involved in cell-cell adhesion of keratinocytes.

  3. Micronucleus formation in human keratinocytes is dependent on radiation quality and tissue architecture.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Antoine M; Mannion, Brandon J; Leung, Stanley G; Moon, Sol C; Kronenberg, Amy; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (MN) assay was used to assess the genotoxicity of low doses of different types of space radiation. Normal human primary keratinocytes and immortalized keratinocytes grown in 2D monolayers each were exposed to graded doses of 0.3 or 1.0 GeV/n silicon ions or similar energies of iron ions. The frequencies of induced MN were determined and compared to γ-ray data. RBE(max) values ranged from 1.6 to 3.9 for primary keratinocytes and from 2.4 to 6.3 for immortalized keratinocytes. At low radiation doses ≤ 0.4 Gy, 0.3 GeV/n iron ions were the most effective at inducing MN in normal keratinocytes. An "over-kill effect" was observed for 0.3 GeV/n iron ions at higher doses, wherein 1.0 GeV/n iron ions were most efficient in inducing MN. In immortalized keratinocytes, 0.3 GeV/n iron ions produced MN with greater frequency than 1.0 GeV/n iron ions, except at the highest dose tested. MN formation was higher in immortalized keratinocytes than in normal keratinocytes for all doses and radiation qualities investigated. MN induction was also assessed in human keratinocytes cultured in 3D to simulate the complex architecture of human skin. RBE values for MN formation in 3D were reduced for normal keratinocytes exposed to iron ions, but were elevated for immortalized keratinocytes. Overall, MN induction was significantly lower in keratinocytes cultured in 3D than in 2D. Together, the results suggest that tissue architecture and immortalization status modulate the genotoxic response to space radiation, perhaps via alterations in DNA repair fidelity. PMID:25041929

  4. Identification of Reference Genes in Human Myelomonocytic Cells for Gene Expression Studies in Altered Gravity

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Cora S.; Hauschild, Swantje; Tauber, Svantje; Paulsen, Katrin; Raig, Christiane; Raem, Arnold; Biskup, Josefine; Gutewort, Annett; Hürlimann, Eva; Philpot, Claudia; Lier, Hartwin; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression studies are indispensable for investigation and elucidation of molecular mechanisms. For the process of normalization, reference genes (“housekeeping genes”) are essential to verify gene expression analysis. Thus, it is assumed that these reference genes demonstrate similar expression levels over all experimental conditions. However, common recommendations about reference genes were established during 1 g conditions and therefore their applicability in studies with altered gravity has not been demonstrated yet. The microarray technology is frequently used to generate expression profiles under defined conditions and to determine the relative difference in expression levels between two or more different states. In our study, we searched for potential reference genes with stable expression during different gravitational conditions (microgravity, normogravity, and hypergravity) which are additionally not altered in different hardware systems. We were able to identify eight genes (ALB, B4GALT6, GAPDH, HMBS, YWHAZ, ABCA5, ABCA9, and ABCC1) which demonstrated no altered gene expression levels in all tested conditions and therefore represent good candidates for the standardization of gene expression studies in altered gravity. PMID:25654098

  5. Nursing frequency alters circadian patterns of mammary gene expression in lactating mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Milking frequency impacts lactation in dairy cattle and in rodent models of lactation. The role of circadian gene expression in this process is unknown. The hypothesis tested was that changing nursing frequency alters the circadian patterns of mammary gene expression. Mid-lactation CD1 mice were stu...

  6. Identification of reference genes in human myelomonocytic cells for gene expression studies in altered gravity.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Cora S; Hauschild, Swantje; Tauber, Svantje; Paulsen, Katrin; Raig, Christiane; Raem, Arnold; Biskup, Josefine; Gutewort, Annett; Hürlimann, Eva; Unverdorben, Felix; Buttron, Isabell; Lauber, Beatrice; Philpot, Claudia; Lier, Hartwin; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E; Ullrich, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression studies are indispensable for investigation and elucidation of molecular mechanisms. For the process of normalization, reference genes ("housekeeping genes") are essential to verify gene expression analysis. Thus, it is assumed that these reference genes demonstrate similar expression levels over all experimental conditions. However, common recommendations about reference genes were established during 1 g conditions and therefore their applicability in studies with altered gravity has not been demonstrated yet. The microarray technology is frequently used to generate expression profiles under defined conditions and to determine the relative difference in expression levels between two or more different states. In our study, we searched for potential reference genes with stable expression during different gravitational conditions (microgravity, normogravity, and hypergravity) which are additionally not altered in different hardware systems. We were able to identify eight genes (ALB, B4GALT6, GAPDH, HMBS, YWHAZ, ABCA5, ABCA9, and ABCC1) which demonstrated no altered gene expression levels in all tested conditions and therefore represent good candidates for the standardization of gene expression studies in altered gravity. PMID:25654098

  7. Alteration of Caenorhabditis elegans gene expression by targeted transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Broverman, S; MacMorris, M; Blumenthal, T

    1993-01-01

    We have produced strains carrying a synthetic fusion of parts of two vitellogenin genes, vit-2 and vit-6, integrated into the Caenorhabditis elegans genome. In most of the 63 transformant strains, the plasmid sequences are integrated at random locations in the genome. However, in two strains the transgene integrated by homologous recombination into the endogenous vit-2 gene. In both cases the reciprocal exchange between the chromosome and the injected circular plasmid containing a promoter deletion led to switching of the plasmid-borne promoter and the endogenous promoter, with a reduction in vit-2 expression. Thus in nematodes, transforming DNA can integrate by homologous recombination to result in partial inactivation of the chromosomal locus. The simplicity of the event and its reasonably high frequency suggest that gene targeting by homologous recombination should be considered as a method for directed inactivation of C. elegans genes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8506273

  8. Alteration of Caenorhabditis elegans gene expression by targeted transformation.

    PubMed

    Broverman, S; MacMorris, M; Blumenthal, T

    1993-05-15

    We have produced strains carrying a synthetic fusion of parts of two vitellogenin genes, vit-2 and vit-6, integrated into the Caenorhabditis elegans genome. In most of the 63 transformant strains, the plasmid sequences are integrated at random locations in the genome. However, in two strains the transgene integrated by homologous recombination into the endogenous vit-2 gene. In both cases the reciprocal exchange between the chromosome and the injected circular plasmid containing a promoter deletion led to switching of the plasmid-borne promoter and the endogenous promoter, with a reduction in vit-2 expression. Thus in nematodes, transforming DNA can integrate by homologous recombination to result in partial inactivation of the chromosomal locus. The simplicity of the event and its reasonably high frequency suggest that gene targeting by homologous recombination should be considered as a method for directed inactivation of C. elegans genes. PMID:8506273

  9. Neurotoxocarosis alters myelin protein gene transcription and expression.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Lea; Beyerbach, Martin; Lühder, Fred; Beineke, Andreas; Strube, Christina

    2015-06-01

    Neurotoxocarosis is an infection of the central nervous system caused by migrating larvae of the common dog and cat roundworms (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), which are zoonotic agents. As these parasites are prevalent worldwide and neuropathological and molecular investigations on neurotoxocarosis are scare, this study aims to characterise nerve fibre demyelination associated with neurotoxocarosis on a molecular level. Transcription of eight myelin-associated genes (Cnp, Mag, Mbp, Mog, Mrf-1, Nogo-A, Plp1, Olig2) was determined in the mouse model during six time points of the chronic phase of infection using qRT-PCR. Expression of selected proteins was analysed by Western blotting or immunohistochemistry. Additionally, demyelination and neuronal damage were investigated histologically. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between transcription rates of T. canis-infected and uninfected control mice were detected for all analysed genes while T. cati affected five of eight investigated genes. Interestingly, 2', 3 ´-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (Cnp) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog) were upregulated in both T. canis- and T. cati-infected mice preceding demyelination. Later, CNPase expression was additionally enhanced. As expected, myelin basic protein (Mbp) was downregulated in cerebra and cerebella of T. canis-infected mice when severe demyelination was present 120 days post infectionem (dpi). The transcriptional pattern observed in the present study appears to reflect direct traumatic and hypoxic effects of larval migration as well as secondary processes including host immune reactions, demyelination and attempts to remyelinate damaged areas. PMID:25773181

  10. Galectin-7 regulates keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation through JNK-miR-203-p63 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hung-Lin; Chiang, Po-Cheng; Lo, Chia-Hui; Lo, Yuan-Hsin; Hsu, Daniel K.; Chen, Huan-Yuan; Liu, Fu-Tong

    2015-01-01

    Galectin-7, a member of the β-galactoside-binding protein family, is primarily expressed in stratified epithelial cells, including keratinocytes. There is information in the literature suggesting a role for this protein in regulation of keratinocyte survival and growth, but the underlying mechanism remains relatively unknown. Moreover, its expression pattern in the epidermis suggests that it is also involved in the regulation of keratinocyte differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that galectin-7 knockdown results in reduced differentiation and increased proliferation of keratinocytes. Using microarray and deep-sequencing analyses, we found that galectin-7 positively and negatively regulates microRNA (miR)-203 and miR-146a expression, respectively. We show that galectin-7 regulates keratinocyte differentiation and proliferation through miR-203 but not miR-146a. A knockdown of either galectin-7 or miR-203 in keratinocytes increases expression of p63, an essential transcription factor involved in skin development. Rescue of miR-203 expression in a galectin-7 knockdown model reduces p63 expression to baseline. Increased galectin-7 expression up-regulates c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) protein levels, which is required for miR-203 expression. Finally, we establish that galectin-7 can be associated with JNK1 and protect it from ubiquitination and degradation. Thus, our data suggest an intracellular function of galectin-7: regulation of keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation through the JNK1-miR-203-p63 pathway. PMID:26763438

  11. Integrated Genomic and Transcriptional Profiling Identifies Chromosomal Loci with Altered Gene Expression in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilting, Saskia M.; de Wilde, Jillian; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Berkhof, Johannes; Yi, Yajun; van Wieringen, Wessel N.; Braakhuis, Boudewijn J. M.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Ylstra, Bauke; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Steenbergen, Renske D. M.

    2009-01-01

    For a better understanding of the consequences of recurrent chromosomal alterations in cervical carcinomas, we integrated genome-wide chromosomal and transcriptional profiles of 10 squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), 5 adenocarcinomas (AdCAs) and 6 normal controls. Previous genomic profiling showed that gains at chromosome arms 1q, 3q, and 20q as well as losses at 8q, 10q, 11q, and 13q were common in cervical carcinomas. Altered regions spanned multiple megabases, and the extent to which expression of genes located there is affected remains unclear. Expression analysis of these previously chromosomally profiled carcinomas yielded 83 genes with significantly differential expression between carcinomas and normal epithelium. Application of differential gene locus mapping (DIGMAP) analysis and the array CGH expression integration tool (ACE-it) identified hotspots within large chromosomal alterations in which gene expression was altered as well. Chromosomal gains of the long arms of chromosome 1, 3, and 20 resulted in increased expression of genes located at 1q32.1-32.2, 3q13.32-23, 3q26.32-27.3, and 20q11.21-13.33, whereas a chromosomal loss of 11q22.3-25 was related to decreased expression of genes located in this region. Overexpression of DTX3L, PIK3R4, ATP2C1, and SLC25A36, all located at 3q21.1-23 and identified by DIGMAP, ACE-it or both, was confirmed in an independent validation sample set consisting of 12 SCCs and 13 normal ectocervical samples. In conclusion, integrated chromosomal and transcriptional profiling identified chromosomal hotspots at 1q, 3q, 11q, and 20q with altered gene expression within large commonly altered chromosomal regions in cervical cancer. PMID:18618715

  12. Amarogentin Displays Immunomodulatory Effects in Human Mast Cells and Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wölfle, Ute; Haarhaus, Birgit; Schempp, Christoph M.

    2015-01-01

    Keratinocytes express the bitter taste receptors TAS2R1 and TAS2R38. Amarogentin as an agonist for TAS2R1 and other TAS2Rs promotes keratinocyte differentiation. Similarly, mast cells are known to express bitter taste receptors. The aim of this study was to assess whether bitter compounds display immunomodulatory effects on these immunocompetent cells in the skin, so that they might be a target in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Here, we investigated the impact of amarogentin on substance P-induced release of histamine and TNF-α from the human mast cell line LAD-2. Furthermore, the effect of amarogentin on HaCaT keratinocytes costimulated with TNF-α and histamine was investigated. Amarogentin inhibited in LAD-2 cells substance P-induced production of newly synthesized TNF-α, but the degranulation and release of stored histamine were not affected. In HaCaT keratinocytes histamine and TNF-α induced IL-8 and MMP-1 expression was reduced by amarogentin to a similar extent as with azelastine. In conclusion amarogentin displays immunomodulatory effects in the skin by interacting with mast cells and keratinocytes. PMID:26600671

  13. AMPK regulation of the growth of cultured human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Asish K. . E-mail: aksaha@bu.edu; Persons, Kelly; Safer, Joshua D.; Luo Zhijun; Holick, Michael F.; Ruderman, Neil B.

    2006-10-20

    AMP kinase (AMPK) is a fuel sensing enzyme that responds to cellular energy depletion by increasing processes that generate ATP and inhibiting others that require ATP but are not acutely necessary for survival. In the present study, we examined the relationship between AMPK activation and the growth (proliferation) of cultured human keratinocytes and assessed whether the inhibition of keratinocyte growth by vitamin D involves AMPK activation. In addition, we explored whether the inhibition of keratinocyte proliferation as they approach confluence could be AMPK-related. Keratinocytes were incubated for 12 h with the AMPK activator, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-{beta}-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR). At concentrations of 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -3} M, AICAR inhibited keratinocyte growth by 50% and 95%, respectively, based on measurements of thymidine incorporation into DNA. It also increased AMPK and acetyl CoA carboxylase phosphorylation (P-AMPK and P-ACC) and decreased the concentration of malonyl CoA confirming that AMPK activation had occurred. Incubation with the thiazolidinedione, troglitazone (10{sup -6} M) caused similar alterations in P-AMPK, P-ACC, and cell growth. In contrast, the well known inhibition of keratinocyte growth by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (10{sup -7} and 10{sup -6} M) was not associated with changes in P-AMPK or P-ACC. Like most cells, the growth of keratinocytes diminished as they approached confluence. Thus, it was of note that we found a progressive increase in P-AMPK (1.5- to 2-fold, p < 0.05) as keratinocytes grown in control medium went from 25% to 100% confluence. In conclusion, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of AMPK acts as a signal to diminish the proliferation of cultured keratinocytes as they approach confluence. They also suggest that AMPK activators, such as AICAR and troglitazone, inhibit keratinocyte growth and that the inhibition of cell growth by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} is AMPK-independent.

  14. Shared gene expression alterations in prostate cancer and histologically benign prostate from patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kosari, Farhad; Cheville, John C; Ida, Cristiane M; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Leontovich, Alexey A; Sebo, Thomas J; Erdogan, Sibel; Rodriguez, Erika; Murphy, Stephen J; Vasmatzis, George

    2012-07-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) field effect alterations provide important clues regarding the initiation of these tumors and suggest targets for prevention or biomarkers for early detection. However, biomarkers of PCa field effects that have passed independent validation are lacking, largely because these alterations are subtle and difficult to distinguish from unrelated small changes in gene expression. We hypothesized that shared expression alterations in PCa and benign prostates containing PCa (BPCs) would have a higher potential for independent validation than alterations identified in BPCs alone. Expression analyses were performed on 37 PCas and 36 unmatched BPCs and were contrasted with 28 benign prostates (BPs) from patients free of PCa. Most of the protein-coding genes and nonexonic RNAs selected according to the hypothesis were validated by quantitative RT-PCR in an independent set of 51 BPCs and BPs. A statistical model based on two markers distinguished BPCs from BPs in the RT-PCR set and in an external microarray (area under the curve = 0.84 and 0.90, respectively). In addition, genes with predominant expression in stroma were identified by expression profiling of pure stroma and epithelial cells. Pathway analysis identified dysregulated platelet-derived growth factor receptor signaling in BPC stroma. These results validate our approach for finding PCa field effect alterations and demonstrate a PCa transcriptome fingerprint in nonneoplastic cells in prostates containing cancer. PMID:22640805

  15. POF1B localizes to desmosomes and regulates cell adhesion in human intestinal and keratinocyte cell lines.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Arianna; Bertoni, Alessandra; Ferrari, Ilaria; Padovano, Valeria; Della Mina, Pamela; Berti, Emilio; Villa, Antonello; Pietrini, Grazia

    2015-01-01

    By means of morphological and biochemical criteria, we here provide evidence for the localization and function of premature ovarian failure, 1B (POF1B) in desmosomes. In monolayers of Caco-2 intestinal cells and in stratified HaCaT keratinocytes, endogenous POF1B colocalized with desmoplakin at desmosome plaques and in cytoplasmic particles aligned along intermediate filaments (IFs). POF1B predominantly co-fractionated with desmosomes and IF components and exhibited properties characteristic of desmosomes (i.e., detergent insolubility and calcium independence). The role of NH2 and COOH domains in the association of POF1B with desmosomes and IFs was revealed by transient expression of the truncated protein in Caco-2 cells and in cells lacking desmosomes. The function of POF1B in desmosomes was investigated in HaCaT keratinocytes stably downregulated for POF1B expression. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed a decrease in desmosome number and size, and desmosomes of the downregulated keratinocytes displayed weak electron-dense plaques. Desmosome alterations were associated with defects in cell adhesion, as revealed by the reduced resistance to mechanical stress in the dispase fragmentation assay. Moreover, desmosome localization of POF1B was restricted to granular layers in human healthy epidermis, whereas it largely increased in hyperproliferative human skin diseases, thus demonstrating the localization of POF1B also in desmosomes of multistratified epithelia. PMID:25084053

  16. Novel in vivo targets of ΔNp63 in keratinocytes identified by a modified chromatin immunoprecipitation approach

    PubMed Central

    Birkaya, Barbara; Ortt, Kori; Sinha, Satrajit

    2007-01-01

    Background p63 is a transcription factor that plays an important role in skin epidermal development and differentiation. The p63 gene encodes for two major protein isoforms, those containing an amino-terminal trans-activation domain (TAp63) and those lacking this domain (ΔNp63). Both the TA and ΔN transcripts are also alternatively spliced at the 3' end producing proteins with unique C-termini that are designated as α, β and γ isoforms. Recent research has suggested that ΔNp63 is the predominant isoform expressed and active in keratinocytes. Results To better elucidate the biological role of p63 in regulating gene expression in keratinocytes we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments with ΔNp63-specific antibodies. We included an additional step in the ChIP procedure to enrich for ΔNp63 targets by screening the library of immunoprecipitated DNA for its ability to bind recombinant GST-ΔNp63. Cloning of ΔNp63-ChIP-derived DNA fragments identified more than 60 potential ΔNp63 target loci that were located close to or embedded within known or predicted genes. Identity of these target genes suggests that they may participate in a myriad of cellular processes including transcriptional regulation, signaling and metabolism. Here we confirm the binding of ΔNp63 to several of these genomic loci both by EMSA and replicate ChIP assays. Finally we show that the expression of many of these target genes is altered when ΔNp63 levels in keratinocytes are reduced by siRNA, further confirming that these are bona fide targets. Conclusion This unbiased genomic approach has allowed us to uncover functional targets of ΔNp63 and serves as the initial step in further analysis of the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that are governed by p63 in keratinocytes. PMID:17521434

  17. Regulation of p53 during senescence in normal human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Reuben H; Kang, Mo K; Kim, Terresa; Yang, Paul; Bae, Susan; Williams, Drake W; Phung, Samantha; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Hong, Christine; Park, No-Hee

    2015-01-01

    p53, the guardian of the genome, is a tumor suppressor protein and critical for the genomic integrity of the cells. Many studies have shown that intracellular level of p53 is enhanced during replicative senescence in normal fibroblasts, and the enhanced level of p53 is viewed as the cause of senescence. Here, we report that, unlike in normal fibroblasts, the level of intracellular p53 reduces during replicative senescence and oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs). We found that the intracellular p53 level was also decreased in age-dependent manner in normal human epithelial tissues. Senescent NHKs exhibited an enhanced level of p16INK4A, induced G2 cell cycle arrest, and lowered the p53 expression and transactivation activity. We found that low level of p53 in senescent NHKs was due to reduced transcription of p53. The methylation status at the p53 promoter was not altered during senescence, but senescent NHKs exhibited notably lower level of acetylated histone 3 (H3) at the p53 promoter in comparison with rapidly proliferating cells. Moreover, p53 knockdown in rapidly proliferating NHKs resulted in the disruption of fidelity in repaired DNA. Taken together, our study demonstrates that p53 level is diminished during replicative senescence and OIS and that such diminution is associated with H3 deacetylation at the p53 promoter. The reduced intracellular p53 level in keratinocytes of the elderly could be a contributing factor for more frequent development of epithelial cancer in the elderly because of the loss of genomic integrity of cells. PMID:26138448

  18. Altered Expression of Diabetes-Related Genes in Alzheimer's Disease Brains: The Hisayama Study

    PubMed Central

    Hokama, Masaaki; Oka, Sugako; Leon, Julio; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Honda, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Kensuke; Iwaki, Toru; Ohara, Tomoyuki; Sasaki, Tomio; LaFerla, Frank M.; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is considered to be a risk factor for dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanism underlying this risk is not well understood. We examined gene expression profiles in postmortem human brains donated for the Hisayama study. Three-way analysis of variance of microarray data from frontal cortex, temporal cortex, and hippocampus was performed with the presence/absence of AD and vascular dementia, and sex, as factors. Comparative analyses of expression changes in the brains of AD patients and a mouse model of AD were also performed. Relevant changes in gene expression identified by microarray analysis were validated by quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The hippocampi of AD brains showed the most significant alteration in gene expression profile. Genes involved in noninsulin-dependent DM and obesity were significantly altered in both AD brains and the AD mouse model, as were genes related to psychiatric disorders and AD. The alterations in the expression profiles of DM-related genes in AD brains were independent of peripheral DM-related abnormalities. These results indicate that altered expression of genes related to DM in AD brains is a result of AD pathology, which may thereby be exacerbated by peripheral insulin resistance or DM. PMID:23595620

  19. Effects of non-toxic zinc exposure on human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Emri, Eszter; Miko, Edit; Bai, Péter; Boros, Gábor; Nagy, Georgina; Rózsa, Dávid; Juhász, Tamás; Hegedűs, Csaba; Horkay, Irén; Remenyik, Éva; Emri, Gabriella

    2015-03-01

    Zinc is an essential microelement; its importance to the skin is highlighted by the severe skin symptoms in hereditary or acquired zinc deficiency, by the improvement of several skin conditions using systemic or topical zinc preparations and by the induced intracellular zinc release upon UVB exposure, which is the main harmful environmental factor to the skin. Understanding the molecular background of the role of zinc in skin may help gain insight into the pathology of skin disorders and provide evidence for the therapeutic usefulness of zinc supplementation. Herein, we studied the effects of zinc chloride (ZnCl2) exposure on the function of HaCaT keratinocytes, and the results showed that a non-toxic elevation in the concentration of extracellular zinc (100 μM) facilitated cell proliferation and induced significant alterations in the mRNA expression of NOTCH1, IL8, and cyclooxygenase-2. In addition, increased heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) expression and non-toxic generation of superoxide were detected in the first 4 h. Regarding the effects on the UVB-induced toxicity, although the level of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the keratinocytes pre-treated with zinc for 24 h was reduced 3 h after UVB irradiation, significantly enhanced superoxide generation was observed 10 h after UVB exposure in the zinc pre-exposed cells. The overall survival was unaffected; however, there was a decrease in the percentage of early apoptotic cells and an increase in the percentage of late apoptotic plus necrotic cells. These results suggest that the exposure of human keratinocytes to non-toxic concentrations of ZnCl2 impacts gene expression, cell proliferation and the responses to environmental stress in the skin. It would be important to further examine the role of zinc in skin and further clarify whether this issue can affect our thinking regarding the pathogenesis of skin diseases. PMID:25659595

  20. Epiprofin orchestrates epidermal keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takashi; Yoshitomi, Yasuo; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Patel, Vyomesh; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The basal layer of the epidermis contains stem cells and transit amplifying cells that rapidly proliferate and differentiate further into the upper layers of the epidermis. A number of molecules have been identified as regulators of this process, including p63 (also known as tumor protein 63) and Notch1. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate the transitions from stem cell to proliferating or differentiating transit amplifying cell. Here, we demonstrate that epiprofin (Epfn, also known as Sp6) plays crucial distinct roles in these transition stages as a cell cycle regulator and a transcription factor. Epfn knockout mice have a thickened epidermis, in which p63-expressing basal cells form multiple layers owing to the accumulation of premature transit amplifying cells with reduced proliferation and a reduction in the number of differentiating keratinocytes expressing Notch1. We found that low levels of Epfn expression increased the proliferation of human immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells by increasing EGF responsiveness and superphosphorylation of Rb. By contrast, high levels of Epfn expression promoted cell cycle exit and differentiation, by reducing E2F transactivation and inducing Notch1 expression. Our findings identify multiple novel functions of Epfn in epidermal development. PMID:25344255

  1. Epiprofin orchestrates epidermal keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Yoshitomi, Yasuo; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Patel, Vyomesh; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    2014-12-15

    The basal layer of the epidermis contains stem cells and transit amplifying cells that rapidly proliferate and differentiate further into the upper layers of the epidermis. A number of molecules have been identified as regulators of this process, including p63 (also known as tumor protein 63) and Notch1. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate the transitions from stem cell to proliferating or differentiating transit amplifying cell. Here, we demonstrate that epiprofin (Epfn, also known as Sp6) plays crucial distinct roles in these transition stages as a cell cycle regulator and a transcription factor. Epfn knockout mice have a thickened epidermis, in which p63-expressing basal cells form multiple layers owing to the accumulation of premature transit amplifying cells with reduced proliferation and a reduction in the number of differentiating keratinocytes expressing Notch1. We found that low levels of Epfn expression increased the proliferation of human immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells by increasing EGF responsiveness and superphosphorylation of Rb. By contrast, high levels of Epfn expression promoted cell cycle exit and differentiation, by reducing E2F transactivation and inducing Notch1 expression. Our findings identify multiple novel functions of Epfn in epidermal development. PMID:25344255

  2. Characterisation of human fibroblasts as keratinocyte feeder layer using p63 isoforms status.

    PubMed

    Auxenfans, Céline; Thépot, Amélie; Justin, Virginie; Hautefeuille, Agnès; Shahabeddin, Lili; Damour, Odile; Hainaut, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Large-scale culture of primary keratinocytes allows the production of large epidermal sheet surfaces for the treatment of extensive skin burns. This method is dependent upon the capacity to establish cultures of proliferating keratinocytes in conditions compatible with their clonal expansion while maintaining their capacity to differentiate into the typical squamous pattern of human epidermis. Feeder layers are critical in this process because the fibroblasts that compose this layer serve as a source of adhesion, growth and differentiation factors. In this report, we have characterise the expression patterns of p63 isoforms in primary keratinocytes cultured on two different feeder layer systems, murine 3T3 and human fibroblasts. We show that with the latter, keratinocytes express a higher ratio of Delta N to TAp63 isoform, in relation with higher clonogenic potential. These results indicate that human fibroblasts represent an adequate feeder layer system to support the culture of primary human keratinocytes. PMID:20042803

  3. Keratinocyte-derived Laminin-332 Protein Promotes Melanin Synthesis via Regulation of Tyrosine Uptake*

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Heesung; Jung, Hyejung; Lee, Jung-hyun; Oh, Hye Yun; Kim, Ok Bin; Han, Inn-Oc; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Melanocytes, which produce the pigment melanin, are known to be closely regulated by neighboring keratinocytes. However, how keratinocytes regulate melanin production is unclear. Here we report that melanin production in melanoma cells (B16F10 and MNT-1) was increased markedly on a keratinocyte-derived extracellular matrix compared with a melanoma cell-derived extracellular matrix. siRNA-mediated reduction of keratinocyte-derived laminin-332 expression decreased melanin synthesis in melanoma cells, and laminin-332, but not fibronectin, enhanced melanin content and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-regulated melanin production in melanoma cells. Similar effects were observed in human melanocytes. Interestingly, however, laminin-332 did not affect the expression or activity of tyrosinase. Instead, laminin-332 promoted the uptake of extracellular tyrosine and, subsequently, increased intracellular levels of tyrosine in both melanocytes and melanoma cells. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that keratinocyte-derived laminin-332 contributes to melanin production by regulating tyrosine uptake. PMID:24951591

  4. Additive Effects of Millimeter Waves and 2-Deoxyglucose Co-Exposure on the Human Keratinocyte Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Soubere Mahamoud, Yonis; Aite, Meziane; Martin, Catherine; Zhadobov, Maxim; Sauleau, Ronan; Le Dréan, Yves; Habauzit, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Millimeter Waves (MMW) will be used in the next-generation of high-speed wireless technologies, especially in future Ultra-Broadband small cells in 5G cellular networks. Therefore, their biocompatibilities must be evaluated prior to their massive deployment. Using a microarray-based approach, we analyzed modifications to the whole genome of a human keratinocyte model that was exposed at 60.4 GHz-MMW at an incident power density (IPD) of 20 mW/cm2 for 3 hours in athermic conditions. No keratinocyte transcriptome modifications were observed. We tested the effects of MMWs on cell metabolism by co-treating MMW-exposed cells with a glycolysis inhibitor, 2-deoxyglucose (2dG, 20 mM for 3 hours), and whole genome expression was evaluated along with the ATP content. We found that the 2dG treatment decreased the cellular ATP content and induced a high modification in the transcriptome (632 coding genes). The affected genes were associated with transcriptional repression, cellular communication and endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. The MMW/2dG co-treatment did not alter the keratinocyte ATP content, but it did slightly alter the transcriptome, which reflected the capacity of MMW to interfere with the bioenergetic stress response. The RT-PCR-based validation confirmed 6 MMW-sensitive genes (SOCS3, SPRY2, TRIB1, FAM46A, CSRNP1 and PPP1R15A) during the 2dG treatment. These 6 genes encoded transcription factors or inhibitors of cytokine pathways, which raised questions regarding the potential impact of long-term or chronic MMW exposure on metabolically stressed cells. PMID:27529420

  5. Additive Effects of Millimeter Waves and 2-Deoxyglucose Co-Exposure on the Human Keratinocyte Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Soubere Mahamoud, Yonis; Aite, Meziane; Martin, Catherine; Zhadobov, Maxim; Sauleau, Ronan; Le Dréan, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Millimeter Waves (MMW) will be used in the next-generation of high-speed wireless technologies, especially in future Ultra-Broadband small cells in 5G cellular networks. Therefore, their biocompatibilities must be evaluated prior to their massive deployment. Using a microarray-based approach, we analyzed modifications to the whole genome of a human keratinocyte model that was exposed at 60.4 GHz-MMW at an incident power density (IPD) of 20 mW/cm2 for 3 hours in athermic conditions. No keratinocyte transcriptome modifications were observed. We tested the effects of MMWs on cell metabolism by co-treating MMW-exposed cells with a glycolysis inhibitor, 2-deoxyglucose (2dG, 20 mM for 3 hours), and whole genome expression was evaluated along with the ATP content. We found that the 2dG treatment decreased the cellular ATP content and induced a high modification in the transcriptome (632 coding genes). The affected genes were associated with transcriptional repression, cellular communication and endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. The MMW/2dG co-treatment did not alter the keratinocyte ATP content, but it did slightly alter the transcriptome, which reflected the capacity of MMW to interfere with the bioenergetic stress response. The RT-PCR-based validation confirmed 6 MMW-sensitive genes (SOCS3, SPRY2, TRIB1, FAM46A, CSRNP1 and PPP1R15A) during the 2dG treatment. These 6 genes encoded transcription factors or inhibitors of cytokine pathways, which raised questions regarding the potential impact of long-term or chronic MMW exposure on metabolically stressed cells. PMID:27529420

  6. Lamina-specific alterations in cortical GABA(A) receptor subunit expression in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Beneyto, Monica; Abbott, Andrew; Hashimoto, Takanori; Lewis, David A

    2011-05-01

    Dysfunction of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in schizophrenia is associated with lamina-specific alterations in particular subpopulations of interneurons. In pyramidal cells, postsynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A)) receptors containing different α subunits are inserted preferentially in distinct subcellular locations targeted by inputs from specific interneuron subpopulations. We used in situ hybridization to quantify the laminar expression of α1, α2, α3, and α5 subunit, and of β1-3 subunit, mRNAs in the DLFPC of schizophrenia, and matched normal comparison subjects. In subjects with schizophrenia, mean GABA(A) α1 mRNA expression was 17% lower in layers 3 and 4, α2 expression was 14% higher in layer 2, α5 expression was 15% lower in layer 4, and α3 expression did not differ relative to comparison subjects. The mRNA expression of β2, which preferentially assembles with α1 subunits, was also 20% lower in layers 3 and 4, whereas β1 and β3 mRNA levels were not altered in schizophrenia. These expression differences were not attributable to medication effects or other potential confounds. These findings suggest that GABA neurotransmission in the DLPFC is altered at the postsynaptic level in a receptor subunit- and layer-specific manner in subjects with schizophrenia and support the hypothesis that GABA neurotransmission in this illness is predominantly impaired in certain cortical microcircuits. PMID:20843900

  7. Primary structure of keratinocyte transglutaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.A.; Stewart, B.E.; Qin, Q.; Rice, R.H. ); Chakravarty, R. ); Floyd, E.E.; Jetten, A.M. )

    1990-12-01

    The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the coding regions of human and rat keratinocyte transglutaminases (protein-glutamine: amine {gamma}-glutamyltransferase; EC 2.3.2.13) have been determined. These yield proteins of {approximately}90 kDa that are 92% identical, indicative of the conservation of important structural features. Alignments of amino acid sequences show substantial similarity among the keratinocyte transglutaminase, human clotting factor XIII catalytic subunit, guinea pig liver tissue transglutaminase, and the human erythrocyte band-4.2 protein. The keratinocyte enzyme is most similar to factor XIII, whereas the band-4.2 protein is most similar to the tissue transglutaminase. A salient feature of the keratinocyte transglutaminase is its 105-residue extension beyond the N terminus of the tissue transglutaminase. This extension and the unreltaed activation peptide of factor XIII (a 37-residue extension) appear to be added for specialized functions after divergence of the tissue transglutaminase from their common lineage.

  8. Pregnancy Complicated by Obesity Induces Global Transcript Expression Alterations in Visceral and Subcutaneous Fat

    PubMed Central

    Bashiri, Asher; Heo, Hye J.; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Mazor, Moshe; Budagov, Temuri; Einstein, Francine H.; Atzmon, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Maternal obesity is a significant risk factor for development of both maternal and fetal metabolic complications. Increase in visceral fat and insulin resistance is a metabolic hallmark of pregnancy, yet little is known how obesity alters adipose cellular function and how this may contribute to pregnancy morbidities. We sought to identify alterations in genome-wide transcription expression in both visceral (omental) and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits in pregnancy complicated by obesity. Visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits were collected from normal weight and obese pregnant women (n=4/group) at time of scheduled uncomplicated cesarean section. A genome-wide expression array (Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 st platform), validated by quantitative real-time PCR, was utilized to establish the gene transcript expression profile in both visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat in normal weight and obese pregnant women. Global alteration in gene expression was identified in pregnancy complicated by obesity. These regions of variations lead to identification of indolethylamine N-methyltransferase (INMT), tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2), and ephrin type-B receptor 6 (EPHB6), not previously associated with fat metabolism during pregnancy. In addition, subcutaneous fat of obese pregnant women demonstrated increased coding protein transcripts associated with apoptosis compared to lean counterparts. Global alteration of gene expression in adipose tissue may contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with obesity. PMID:24696292

  9. Characterization of primary human keratinocytes transformed by human papillomavirus type 18

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, P.; McDougall, J.K. )

    1988-06-01

    Primary human epithelial cells were cotransfected with pHPV-18 and pSV2neo, and cell strains were generated by selecting in G418. Southern blot analysis revealed the presence of at least one intact, integrated viral genome in these cells. FE-A cells showed altered growth properties, characterized by a change in morphology, and clonal density. Differentiation markers analyzed by Western blotting (immunoblotting), such as cytokeratins and involucrin, indicated that the cells resembled a partially differentiated epithelial population. Increased expression of the 40-kilodalton cytokeratin was observed in FE-A cells, similar to that observed in simian virus 40-immortalized human keratinocytes. Calcium and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate treatment induced normal epithelial cells to differentiate, whereas the human papillomavirus 18 (HPV-18)-containing keratinocytes were resistant to these signals, indicating their partially transformed nature. These cells were not able to induce tumors in nude mice over a period of up to 8 months. A second cell strain, FE-H18L, also generated by transfecting HPV-18, also exhibited an extended life span and similar alterations in morphology. Viral RNA transcribed from the early region of HPV-18 was detected in both cell strains by Northern (RNA) blot analysis. These cell strains should provide a useful model for determining the role of HPV in carcinogenesis.

  10. Altered expression of AT-rich interactive domain 1A in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Akimasa; Kunita, Akiko; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Shibahara, Junji; Kokudo, Norihiro; Fukayama, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    AT-rich interactive domain 1A (ARID1A) is a subunit of the Switch/Sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complex. Recently, genome-wide whole exome sequencing revealed frequent mutations of ARID1A in hepatocellular carcinoma, but clinicopathological significance of ARID1A alteration has not been clarified yet. In this study, expression of ARID1A was investigated immunohistochemically in 290 cases of hepatocellular carcinomas. In the evaluation of tissue microarrays, cases of ARID1A alteration (63 total cases, 21.7%) consisted of 11 (3.8%) cases showing loss of expression and 52 (17.9%) with weak expression. Alteration of ARID1A was correlated with larger tumor size (P=0.034) and well or moderate differentiation of tumor histology (P=0.035). There was no significant correlation with age, sex, cirrhosis, TNM stage, tumor size, number of tumors, vascular invasion, patient survival, HBV infection, HCV infection, heavy use of alcohol, nor diabetes mellitus. EBER in situ hybridization was negative in all 11 cases with loss of ARID1A. Altered expression of ARID1A was inversely correlated with nuclear expression of p53 (P=0.018) or beta-catenin (P=0.025). There was some heterogeneity of ARID1A alteration within each case, and immunohistochemistry of the whole sections demonstrated that four of 11 cases with loss of ARID1A in TMA analysis showed localized positive area within the tumor. Alteration of ARID1A may accelerate tumor growth in a subset of hepatocellular carcinoma, and this pathway may be distinct from p53 and beta-catenin pathways. PMID:26045782

  11. Single Low-Dose Radiation Induced Regulation of Keratinocyte Differentiation in Calcium-Induced HaCaT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Youn, Hae Jeong; Cha, Hwa Jun; Kim, Karam; An, Sungkwan

    2016-01-01

    Background We are continually exposed to low-dose radiation (LDR) in the range 0.1 Gy from natural sources, medical devices, nuclear energy plants, and other industrial sources of ionizing radiation. There are three models for the biological mechanism of LDR: the linear no-threshold model, the hormetic model, and the threshold model. Objective We used keratinocytes as a model system to investigate the molecular genetic effects of LDR on epidermal cell differentiation. Methods To identify keratinocyte differentiation, we performed western blots using a specific antibody for involucrin, which is a precursor protein of the keratinocyte cornified envelope and a marker for keratinocyte terminal differentiation. We also performed quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We examined whether LDR induces changes in involucrin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. Results Exposure of HaCaT cells to LDR (0.1 Gy) induced p21 expression. p21 is a key regulator that induces growth arrest and represses stemness, which accelerates keratinocyte differentiation. We correlated involucrin expression with keratinocyte differentiation, and examined the effects of LDR on involucrin levels and keratinocyte development. LDR significantly increased involucrin mRNA and protein levels during calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. Conclusion These studies provide new evidence for the biological role of LDR, and identify the potential to utilize LDR to regulate or induce keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:27489424

  12. Microemboli alter the acute stress response and cause prolonged expression of MCP-1 in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Christina L; Neigh, Gretchen N

    2015-04-01

    Microvascular ischemia is linked to cardiovascular disease pathology, as well as alterations in mood and cognition. Ischemia activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and through chronic activation, alters HPA axis function. Dysregulation of the HPA axis can lead to the chronic release of glucocorticoids, a hyper-inflammatory cerebral response, cell damage, and changes in behavior. Although the interactions between injury and HPA axis activity have been established in global ischemia, HPA-related repercussions of diffuse ischemic damage and subsequent inflammation have not been assessed. The current study used a rat model of microsphere embolism (ME) ischemia to test the hypothesis that microvascular ischemia would lead to long term alterations in HPA axis function and inflammatory activity. Furthermore, given the pro-inflammatory nature of chronic stress, we assessed the implications of chronic stress for gene expression of inflammatory factors and key components of the glucocorticoid receptor response, following microvascular ischemia. Results indicated that ME altered the response to an acute stress fourteen days following ME injury and increased hippocampal expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (Mcp-1) as long as 4 weeks following ME injury, without concomitant effects on gene expression of the glucocorticoid receptor or its co-chaperones. Furthermore, no exacerbative effects of chronic stress exposure were observed following ME injury beyond the effects of ME injury alone. Together, these results indicate that ME injury is sufficient to alter both HPA axis activity and cerebral inflammation for a prolonged period of time following injury. PMID:25697594

  13. Altered expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition proteins in extraprostatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Verrill, Clare; Cerundolo, Lucia; Mckee, Chad; White, Michael; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Fryer, Eve; Morris, Emma; Brewster, Simon; Ratnayaka, Indrika; Marsden, Luke; Lilja, Hans; Muschel, Ruth; Lu, Xin; Hamdy, Freddie; Bryant, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of cancer cells involves loss of epithelial polarity and adhesiveness, and gain of invasive and migratory mesenchymal behaviours. EMT occurs in prostate cancer (PCa) but it is unknown whether this is in specific areas of primary tumours. We examined whether any of eleven EMT-related proteins have altered expression or subcellular localisation within the extraprostatic extension component of locally advanced PCa compared with other localisations, and whether similar changes may occur in in vitro organotypic PCa cell cultures and in vivo PCa models. Expression profiles of three proteins (E-cadherin, Snail, and α-smooth muscle actin) were significantly different in extraprostatic extension PCa compared with intra-prostatic tumour, and 18/27 cases had an expression change of at least one of these three proteins. Of the three significantly altered EMT proteins in pT3 samples, one showed similar significantly altered expression patterns in in vitro organotypic culture models, and two in in vivo Pten−/− model samples. These results suggest that changes in EMT protein expression can be observed in the extraprostatic extension component of locally invasive PCa. The biology of some of these changes in protein expression may be studied in certain in vitro and in vivo PCa models. PMID:26701730

  14. A decisive function of transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling in tissue morphogenesis and differentiation of human HaCaT keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Buschke, Susanne; Stark, Hans-Jürgen; Cerezo, Ana; Prätzel-Wunder, Silke; Boehnke, Karsten; Kollar, Jasmin; Langbein, Lutz; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Boukamp, Petra

    2011-01-01

     The mechanism by which transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) regulates differentiation in human epidermal keratinocytes is still poorly understood. To assess the role of Smad signaling, we engineered human HaCaT keratinocytes either expressing small interfering RNA against Smads2, 3, and 4 or overexpressing Smad7 and verified impaired Smad signaling as decreased Smad phosphorylation, aberrant nuclear translocation, and altered target gene expression. Besides abrogation of TGFβ-dependent growth inhibition in conventional cultures, epidermal morphogenesis and differentiation in organotypic cultures were disturbed, resulting in altered tissue homeostasis with suprabasal proliferation and hyperplasia upon TGFβ treatment. Neutralizing antibodies against TGFβ, similar to blocking the actions of EGF-receptor or keratinocyte growth factor, caused significant growth reduction of Smad7-overexpressing cells, thereby demonstrating that epithelial hyperplasia was attributed to TGFβ-induced “dermis”-derived growth promoting factors. Furthermore impaired Smad signaling not only blocked the epidermal differentiation process or caused epidermal-to-mesenchymal transition but induced a switch to a complex alternative differentiation program, best characterized as mucous/intestinal-type epithelial differentiation. As the same alternative phenotype evolved from both modes of Smad-pathway interference, and reduction of Smad7-overexpression caused reversion to epidermal differentiation, our data suggest that functional TGFβ/Smad signaling, besides regulating epidermal tissue homeostasis, is not only essential for terminal epidermal differentiation but crucial in programming different epithelial differentiation routes. PMID:21289094

  15. Loss of nuclear receptor RXRα in epidermal keratinocytes promotes the formation of Cdk4-activated invasive melanomas.

    PubMed

    Hyter, Stephen; Bajaj, Gaurav; Liang, Xiaobo; Barbacid, Mariano; Ganguli-Indra, Gitali; Indra, Arup Kumar

    2010-10-01

    Keratinocytes contribute to melanocyte transformation by affecting their microenvironment, in part through the secretion of paracrine factors. Here we report a loss of expression of nuclear receptor RXRα in epidermal keratinocytes during human melanoma progression. In the absence of keratinocytic RXRα, in combination with mutant Cdk4, cutaneous melanoma was generated that metastasized to lymph nodes in a bigenic mouse model. Expression of several keratinocyte-derived mitogenic growth factors (Et-1, Hgf, Scf, α-MSH and Fgf 2 ) was elevated in skin of bigenic mice, whereas Fas, E-cadherin and Pten, implicated in apoptosis, cellular invasion and melanomagenesis, respectively, were downregulated within the microdissected melanocytic tumors. We demonstrated that RXRα is recruited on the proximal promoter of both Et-1 and Hgf, possibly directly regulating their transcription in keratinocytes. These studies demonstrate the contribution of keratinocytic paracrine signaling during the cellular transformation and malignant conversion of melanocytes. PMID:20629968

  16. Altered PKR Signalling and C / EBPβ Expression is Associated with HLA-B27 Expression in Monocytic Cells.

    PubMed

    Sahlberg, A S; Ruuska, M; Colbert, R A; Granfors, K; Penttinen, M A

    2012-02-01

    Infection caused by certain gram-negative bacteria, e.g. Salmonella, can trigger inflammatory joint disease reactive arthritis (ReA). It is suggested that the disease-triggering bacteria or bacterial components persist in patients for an abnormally long time. Development of ReA is strongly associated with tissue antigen HLA-B27. Previously, we reported an enhanced replication of Salmonella enteritidis and altered p38 MAP kinase signalling in HLA-B27-expressing monocytic cells. Here we aimed to investigate the role of HLA-B27 in regulation of double-stranded RNA-activated kinase (PKR)-related signalling in Salmonella-infected or Salmonella lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human U937 monocytic cells, as PKR has been reported to modify p38 signalling in Salmonella-infected cells. In cells expressing HLA-B27, PKR is overexpressed and hypophosphorylated, and the expression of transcription factor CCAAT enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPβ) is increased upon Salmonella infection and LPS stimulation. The expression of C/EBPβ is PKR-dependent in LPS-stimulated mock cells, whereas in LPS-stimulated B27 cells the majority of C/EBPβ is expressed in a PKR-independent manner. Our results show that the expression of HLA-B27 disturbs the PKR-mediated signalling pathway. Moreover, altered signalling is related to misfolding-linked Glu45 in the B pocket of the HLA-B27 heavy chain. We suggest that the expression of HLA-B27 HCs modulates the intracellular environment of monocyte/macrophages and the mechanisms that are important in eliminating intracellular S. enteritidis by altering the intracellular signalling. This phenomenon is at least partly dependent on the misfolding feature of the B27 molecule. These observations offer a novel mechanism by which HLA-B27 may modulate inflammatory response induced by ReA-triggering bacteria. PMID:21988375

  17. Mutant U2AF1 Expression Alters Hematopoiesis and Pre-mRNA Splicing In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Cara Lunn; Ley, James N.; White, Brian S.; Kim, Sanghyun; Tibbitts, Justin; Shao, Jin; Ndonwi, Matthew; Wadugu, Brian; Duncavage, Eric J.; Okeyo-Owuor, Theresa; Liu, Tuoen; Griffith, Malachi; McGrath, Sean; Magrini, Vincent; Fulton, Robert S.; Fronick, Catrina; O’Laughlin, Michelle; Graubert, Timothy A.; Walter, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Heterozygous somatic mutations in the spliceosome gene U2AF1 occur in ~11% of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), the most common adult myeloid malignancy. It is unclear how these mutations contribute to disease. We examined in vivo hematopoietic consequences of the most common U2AF1 mutation using a doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse model. Mice expressing mutant U2AF1(S34F) display altered hematopoiesis and changes in pre-mRNA splicing in hematopoietic progenitor cells by whole transcriptome analysis (RNA-seq). Integration with human RNA-seq datasets determined that common mutant U2AF1-induced splicing alterations are enriched in RNA processing genes, ribosomal genes, and recurrently-mutated MDS and acute myeloid leukemia-associated genes. These findings support the hypothesis that mutant U2AF1 alters downstream gene isoform expression, thereby contributing to abnormal hematopoiesis in MDS patients. PMID:25965570

  18. Methyl-ß-cyclodextrin alters adipokine gene expression and glucose metabolism in swine adipose tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if metabolic stress as induced by methyl-ß-cyclodextrin (MCD) can alter cytokine expression in neonatal swine adipose tissue explants. Subcutaneous adipose tissue explants (100 ± 10 mg) were prepared from 21 day old pigs. Explants were incubated in medium 199 s...

  19. POTENTIAL ALTERATIONS IN GENE EXPRESSION ASSOCIATED WITH CARCINOGEN EXPOSURE IN MYA ARENARIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gonadal cancers in soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) have been found at high prevalences (20-40%) in populations in eastern Maine. The aetiology of these tumours is unknown. We hypothesized that gene expression would be altered in gonadal tumours and that examination of gene expres...

  20. Role of HuR and p38MAPK in ultraviolet B-induced post-transcriptional regulation of COX-2 expression in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT.

    PubMed

    Fernau, Niklas S; Fugmann, Dominik; Leyendecker, Martin; Reimann, Kerstin; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Galban, Stefanie; Ale-Agha, Niloofar; Krutmann, Jean; Klotz, Lars-Oliver

    2010-02-01

    COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) is a pivotal player in inflammatory processes, and ultraviolet radiation is a known stimulus for COX-2 expression in skin cells. Here, an induction of COX-2 expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes was observed only upon exposure of cells to UVB (280-320 nm) but not to UVA radiation (320-400 nm), as demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting. Prostaglandin E(2) levels were elevated in cell culture supernatants of HaCaT cells exposed to UVB. COX-2 mRNA stability was dramatically increased by UVB irradiation. Both the stabilization of COX-2 mRNA and the enhancement of COX-2 steady-state mRNA and protein levels caused by UVB were prevented both by inhibition and small interfering RNA-induced depletion of p38(MAPK), a kinase strongly activated upon exposure to UVB, suggesting p38(MAPK)-dependent mRNA stabilization as a mechanism of UVB-induced COX-2 expression. A dramatic decrease in COX-2 expression induced by UVB was elicited by small interfering RNA-based depletion of a stress-responsive mRNA stabilizing protein regulated by p38(MAPK), i.e. HuR; UVB-induced elevation of COX-2 mRNA and protein levels coincided with an accumulation of HuR in the cytoplasm and was attenuated in cells depleted of HuR. Moreover, UVB-induced generation of prostaglandin E(2) by HaCaT cells was blunted by HuR depletion, suggesting that stress kinases (such as p38(MAPK)) as well as HuR are excellent targets for approaches aiming at interfering with induction of COX-2 expression by UVB. PMID:19917608

  1. Role of HuR and p38MAPK in Ultraviolet B-induced Post-transcriptional Regulation of COX-2 Expression in the Human Keratinocyte Cell Line HaCaT*

    PubMed Central

    Fernau, Niklas S.; Fugmann, Dominik; Leyendecker, Martin; Reimann, Kerstin; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Galban, Stefanie; Ale-Agha, Niloofar; Krutmann, Jean; Klotz, Lars-Oliver

    2010-01-01

    COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) is a pivotal player in inflammatory processes, and ultraviolet radiation is a known stimulus for COX-2 expression in skin cells. Here, an induction of COX-2 expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes was observed only upon exposure of cells to UVB (280–320 nm) but not to UVA radiation (320–400 nm), as demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting. Prostaglandin E2 levels were elevated in cell culture supernatants of HaCaT cells exposed to UVB. COX-2 mRNA stability was dramatically increased by UVB irradiation. Both the stabilization of COX-2 mRNA and the enhancement of COX-2 steady-state mRNA and protein levels caused by UVB were prevented both by inhibition and small interfering RNA-induced depletion of p38MAPK, a kinase strongly activated upon exposure to UVB, suggesting p38MAPK-dependent mRNA stabilization as a mechanism of UVB-induced COX-2 expression. A dramatic decrease in COX-2 expression induced by UVB was elicited by small interfering RNA-based depletion of a stress-responsive mRNA stabilizing protein regulated by p38MAPK, i.e. HuR; UVB-induced elevation of COX-2 mRNA and protein levels coincided with an accumulation of HuR in the cytoplasm and was attenuated in cells depleted of HuR. Moreover, UVB-induced generation of prostaglandin E2 by HaCaT cells was blunted by HuR depletion, suggesting that stress kinases (such as p38MAPK) as well as HuR are excellent targets for approaches aiming at interfering with induction of COX-2 expression by UVB. PMID:19917608

  2. Induction of differentiation in psoriatic keratinocytes by propylthiouracil and fructose.

    PubMed

    Arul, Santhosh; Dayalan, Haripriya; Jegadeesan, Muhilan; Damodharan, Prabhavathy

    2016-12-01

    Psoriasis is characterized by uncontrolled proliferation and poor differentiation. Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) a class III deacetylase, crucial for differentiation in normal keratinocytes, is reduced in psoriasis. Down regulated SIRT1 levels may contribute to poor differentiation in psoriasis. In addition, the levels of early differentiation factors Keratin1 (K1) and Keratin10 (K10) are depleted in psoriasis. We attempted to study a possible effect of fructose, a SIRT1 upregulator and Propylthiouracil (PTU) to augment differentiation in psoriatic keratinocytes. Keratinocytes were cultured from lesional biopsies obtained from psoriatic patients and control cells were obtained from patients undergoing abdominoplasty. Cells were treated with fructose and PTU individually. K1 and K10 transcript levels were measured to evaluate early differentiation; SIRT1 protein expression was also studied to decipher its role in the mechanism of differentiation. The K1, K10 transcript levels, SIRT1 protein and transcript levels in fructose treated psoriatic keratinocytes were improved. This suggests keratinocyte differentiation was induced by fructose through SIRT1 upregulation. Whereas PTU induced differentiation, as confirmed by improved K1, K10 transcript levels followed a non-SIRT1 mechanism. We conclude that the use of fructose and PTU may be an adjunct to the existing therapies for psoriasis. PMID:27453822

  3. Chemosensory Information Processing between Keratinocytes and Trigeminal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sondersorg, Anna Christina; Busse, Daniela; Kyereme, Jessica; Rothermel, Markus; Neufang, Gitta; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns; Conrad, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Trigeminal fibers terminate within the facial mucosa and skin and transmit tactile, proprioceptive, chemical, and nociceptive sensations. Trigeminal sensations can arise from the direct stimulation of intraepithelial free nerve endings or indirectly through information transmission from adjacent cells at the peripheral innervation area. For mechanical and thermal cues, communication processes between skin cells and somatosensory neurons have already been suggested. High concentrations of most odors typically provoke trigeminal sensations in vivo but surprisingly fail to activate trigeminal neuron monocultures. This fact favors the hypothesis that epithelial cells may participate in chemodetection and subsequently transmit signals to neighboring trigeminal fibers. Keratinocytes, the major cell type of the epidermis, express various receptors that enable reactions to multiple environmental stimuli. Here, using a co-culture approach, we show for the first time that exposure to the odorant chemicals induces a chemical communication between human HaCaT keratinocytes and mouse trigeminal neurons. Moreover, a supernatant analysis of stimulated keratinocytes and subsequent blocking experiments with pyrodoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonate revealed that ATP serves as the mediating transmitter molecule released from skin cells after odor stimulation. We show that the ATP release resulting from Javanol® stimulation of keratinocytes was mediated by pannexins. Consequently, keratinocytes act as chemosensors linking the environment and the trigeminal system via ATP signaling. PMID:24790106

  4. Increased Skin Tumor Incidence and Keratinocyte Hyper-Proliferation in a Mouse Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Annan; Currier, Duane; Poitras, Jennifer L.; Reeves, Roger H.

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic disorder caused by the presence of an extra copy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21). People with DS display multiple clinical traits as a result of the dosage imbalance of several hundred genes. While many outcomes of trisomy are deleterious, epidemiological studies have shown a significant risk reduction for most solid tumors in DS. Reduced tumor incidence has also been demonstrated in functional studies using trisomic DS mouse models. Therefore, it was interesting to find that Ts1Rhr trisomic mice developed more papillomas than did their euploid littermates in a DMBA-TPA chemical carcinogenesis paradigm. Papillomas in Ts1Rhr mice also proliferated faster. The increased proliferation was likely caused by a stronger response of trisomy to TPA induction. Treatment with TPA caused hyperkeratosis to a greater degree in Ts1Rhr mice than in euploid, reminiscent of hyperkeratosis seen in people with DS. Cultured trisomic keratinocytes also showed increased TPA-induced proliferation compared to euploid controls. These outcomes suggest that altered gene expression in trisomy could elevate a proliferation signalling pathway. Gene expression analysis of cultured keratinocytes revealed upregulation of several trisomic and disomic genes may contribute to this hyperproliferation. The contributions of these genes to hyper-proliferation were further validated in a siRNA knockdown experiment. The unexpected findings reported here add a new aspect to our understanding of tumorigenesis with clinical implications for DS and demonstrates the complexity of the tumor repression phenotype in this frequent condition. PMID:26752700

  5. Increased Skin Tumor Incidence and Keratinocyte Hyper-Proliferation in a Mouse Model of Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Annan; Currier, Duane; Poitras, Jennifer L; Reeves, Roger H

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic disorder caused by the presence of an extra copy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21). People with DS display multiple clinical traits as a result of the dosage imbalance of several hundred genes. While many outcomes of trisomy are deleterious, epidemiological studies have shown a significant risk reduction for most solid tumors in DS. Reduced tumor incidence has also been demonstrated in functional studies using trisomic DS mouse models. Therefore, it was interesting to find that Ts1Rhr trisomic mice developed more papillomas than did their euploid littermates in a DMBA-TPA chemical carcinogenesis paradigm. Papillomas in Ts1Rhr mice also proliferated faster. The increased proliferation was likely caused by a stronger response of trisomy to TPA induction. Treatment with TPA caused hyperkeratosis to a greater degree in Ts1Rhr mice than in euploid, reminiscent of hyperkeratosis seen in people with DS. Cultured trisomic keratinocytes also showed increased TPA-induced proliferation compared to euploid controls. These outcomes suggest that altered gene expression in trisomy could elevate a proliferation signalling pathway. Gene expression analysis of cultured keratinocytes revealed upregulation of several trisomic and disomic genes may contribute to this hyperproliferation. The contributions of these genes to hyper-proliferation were further validated in a siRNA knockdown experiment. The unexpected findings reported here add a new aspect to our understanding of tumorigenesis with clinical implications for DS and demonstrates the complexity of the tumor repression phenotype in this frequent condition. PMID:26752700

  6. HPV-18 confers resistance to TNF-{alpha} in organotypic cultures of human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Boccardo, Enrique . E-mail: eboccardo@ludwig.org.br; Noya, Francisco; Broker, Thomas R.; Chow, Louise T.; Villa, Luisa L.

    2004-10-25

    The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) inhibits normal keratinocytes proliferation. However, many human papillomavirus (HPV)-immortalized or transformed cell lines are resistant to TNF-{alpha} antiproliferative effect. The present study analyzes the effects of TNF-{alpha} on organotypic cultures of primary human keratinocytes (PHKs) that express HPV-18 oncogenes. Raft cultures prepared with PHKs acutely transfected with HPV-18 whole genome or infected with recombinant retroviruses containing only E6/E7 or E7 were treated with 2 nM TNF-{alpha}. While BrdU incorporation into basal/parabasal cells of normal PHKs cultures was markedly inhibited by TNF-{alpha} cultures transfected with HPV-18 whole genome showed proliferation in all cell strata. Furthermore, BrdU incorporation into cultures expressing E6/E7 or E7 was not significantly reduced, indicating that E7 alone confers partial resistance to TNF-{alpha}. Besides, TNF-{alpha} treatment did not alter p16{sup ink4a}, p21{sup cip1}, p27{sup kip1}, or cyclin E levels, but did reduce cyclin A and PCNA levels in sensitive cells.

  7. Nitric Oxide Donors Suppress Chemokine Production by Keratinocytes in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Giustizieri, Maria Laura; Albanesi, Cristina; Scarponi, Claudia; De Pità, Ornella; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the modulation of inflammatory responses. In psoriatic skin, NO is highly produced by epidermal keratinocytes in response to interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. In this study, we investigated whether the NO donors, S-nitrosoglutathione (GS-NO) and NOR-1, could regulate chemokine production by human keratinocytes activated with interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. In addition, we studied the effects of the topical application of a GS-NO ointment on chemokine expression in lesional psoriatic skin. NO donors diminished in a dose-dependent manner and at both mRNA and protein levels the IP-10, RANTES, and MCP-1 expression in keratinocytes cultured from healthy patients and psoriatic patients. In contrast, constitutive and induced interleukin-8 production was unchanged. GS-NO-treated psoriatic skin showed reduction of IP-10, RANTES, and MCP-1, but not interleukin-8 expression by keratinocytes. Moreover, the number of CD14+ and CD3+ cells infiltrating the epidermis and papillary dermis diminished significantly. NO donors also down-regulated ICAM-1 protein expression without affecting mRNA accumulation in vitro, and suppressed keratinocyte ICAM-1 in vivo. Finally, NO donors inhibited nuclear factor-κB and STAT-1, but not AP-1 activities in transiently transfected keratinocytes. These results define NO donors as negative regulators of chemokine production by keratinocytes. PMID:12368213

  8. Maturation of human gingival keratinocytes cultured with fibroblasts from keratinizing and non-keratinizing epithelia.

    PubMed

    Taichman, L; Sciubba, J; Cho, M I

    1982-01-01

    When keratinocytes from epidermis, gingiva and buccal mucosa are cultured in vitro they form a stratified squamous epithelium that lacks evidence of orthokeratinization or parakeratinization. We attempted to induce orthokeratinization or parakeratinization in cultured gingival keratinocytes by co-cultivation with fibroblasts from human skin, gingiva and buccal mucosa. Keratinization was defined by the morphological appearance of the cultured cells and by the presence of large molecular weight keratin proteins (63,000 and 67,000 mol. wt). Using these criteria, the chosen fibroblasts failed to induce any alteration in the pattern of keratinization. We conclude that under our present culture conditions, fibroblasts alone cannot induce keratinization in cultured keratinocytes. PMID:6180716

  9. Reconstruction of Rabbit Urethral Epithelium with Skin Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rogovaya, O. S.; Fayzulin, A. K.; Vasiliev, A. V.; Kononov, A. V.; Terskikh, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the living skin equivalent (LSE) as an alternative source of plastic material for closing full-thickness epithelial-stromal urethral injuries. The possibility of transdifferentiation of epidermal keratinocytes, a component of 3D tissue constructs, was investigated in vivo in a model of the recovery of urethral injuries in laboratory rabbits. Autologous grafting of LSE in de-epithelialized urethra showed that skin keratinocytes placed in a specific in vivo microenvironment can be incorporated into the damaged area and function as urothelium. The use of EGFP transfected keratinocytes allowed us to identify transplanted cells. The reconstructed urethral tubes did not develop strictures or fistulas at the site of the grafted LSE. Immunohistochemical studies of neo-urothelium revealed EGFP-positive cells expressing the urothelial markers K7 and UP3. PMID:25927003

  10. Reconstruction of rabbit urethral epithelium with skin keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Rogovaya, O S; Fayzulin, A K; Vasiliev, A V; Kononov, A V; Terskikh, V V

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the living skin equivalent (LSE) as an alternative source of plastic material for closing full-thickness epithelial-stromal urethral injuries. The possibility of transdifferentiation of epidermal keratinocytes, a component of 3D tissue constructs, was investigated in vivo in a model of the recovery of urethral injuries in laboratory rabbits. Autologous grafting of LSE in de-epithelialized urethra showed that skin keratinocytes placed in a specific in vivo microenvironment can be incorporated into the damaged area and function as urothelium. The use of EGFP transfected keratinocytes allowed us to identify transplanted cells. The reconstructed urethral tubes did not develop strictures or fistulas at the site of the grafted LSE. Immunohistochemical studies of neo-urothelium revealed EGFP-positive cells expressing the urothelial markers K7 and UP3. PMID:25927003

  11. Alcohol Consumption Modulates Host Defense in Rhesus Macaques by Altering Gene Expression in Circulating Leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Barr, Tasha; Girke, Thomas; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Nguyen, Christina; Grant, Kathleen; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that chronic alcohol use disorder leads to increased susceptibility to several viral and bacterial infections, whereas moderate alcohol consumption decreases the incidence of colds and improves immune responses to some pathogens. In line with these observations, we recently showed that heavy ethanol intake (average blood ethanol concentrations > 80 mg/dl) suppressed, whereas moderate alcohol consumption (blood ethanol concentrations < 50 mg/dl) enhanced, T and B cell responses to modified vaccinia Ankara vaccination in a nonhuman primate model of voluntary ethanol consumption. To uncover the molecular basis for impaired immunity with heavy alcohol consumption and enhanced immune response with moderate alcohol consumption, we performed a transcriptome analysis using PBMCs isolated on day 7 post-modified vaccinia Ankara vaccination, the earliest time point at which we detected differences in T cell and Ab responses. Overall, chronic heavy alcohol consumption reduced the expression of immune genes involved in response to infection and wound healing and increased the expression of genes associated with the development of lung inflammatory disease and cancer. In contrast, chronic moderate alcohol consumption upregulated the expression of genes involved in immune response and reduced the expression of genes involved in cancer. To uncover mechanisms underlying the alterations in PBMC transcriptomes, we profiled the expression of microRNAs within the same samples. Chronic heavy ethanol consumption altered the levels of several microRNAs involved in cancer and immunity and known to regulate the expression of mRNAs differentially expressed in our data set. PMID:26621857

  12. Influenza matrix protein 2 alters CFTR expression and function through its ion channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Londino, James D.; Lazrak, Ahmed; Jurkuvenaite, Asta; Collawn, James F.; Noah, James W.

    2013-01-01

    The human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cyclic AMP-activated chloride (Cl−) channel in the lung epithelium that helps regulate the thickness and composition of the lung epithelial lining fluid. We investigated whether influenza M2 protein, a pH-activated proton (H+) channel that traffics to the plasma membrane of infected cells, altered CFTR expression and function. M2 decreased CFTR activity in 1) Xenopus oocytes injected with human CFTR, 2) epithelial cells (HEK-293) stably transfected with CFTR, and 3) human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o−) expressing native CFTR. This inhibition was partially reversed by an inhibitor of the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1. Next we investigated whether the M2 inhibition of CFTR activity was due to an increase of secretory organelle pH by M2. Incubation of Xenopus oocytes expressing CFTR with ammonium chloride or concanamycin A, two agents that alkalinize the secretory pathway, inhibited CFTR activity in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of M2- and CFTR-expressing oocytes with the M2 ion channel inhibitor amantadine prevented the loss in CFTR expression and activity; in addition, M2 mutants, lacking the ability to transport H+, did not alter CFTR activity in Xenopus oocytes and HEK cells. Expression of an M2 mutant retained in the endoplasmic reticulum also failed to alter CFTR activity. In summary, our data show that M2 decreases CFTR activity by increasing secretory organelle pH, which targets CFTR for destruction by the ubiquitin system. Alteration of CFTR activity has important consequences for fluid regulation and may potentially modify the immune response to viral infection. PMID:23457187

  13. Immunosenescence is associated with altered gene expression and epigenetic regulation in primary and secondary immune organs

    PubMed Central

    Sidler, Corinne; Wóycicki, Rafał; Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Metz, Gerlinde; Kovalchuk, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Deterioration of the immune system (immunosenescence) with age is associated with an increased susceptibility to infection, autoimmune disease and cancer, and reduced responsiveness to vaccination. Immunosenescence entails a reduced supply of naïve T cells from the thymus and increased specialization of peripheral T cell clones. Both thymic involution and peripheral T cell homeostasis are thought to involve cellular senescence. In order to analyze this at the molecular level, we studied gene expression profiles, epigenetic status, and genome stability in the thymus and spleen of 1-, 4-, and 18-month-old Long Evans rats. In the thymus, altered gene expression, DNA and histone H3K9 hypomethylation, increased genome instability, and apoptosis were observed in 18-month-old animals compared to 1- and 4-month-old animals. In the spleen, alterations in gene expression and epigenetic regulation occurred already by the age of 4 months compared to 1 month and persisted in 18-month-old compared to 1-month-old rats. In both organs, these changes were accompanied by the altered composition of resident T cell populations. Our study suggests that both senescence and apoptosis may be involved in altered organ function. PMID:24151501

  14. Restricted maternal nutrition alters myogenic regulatory factor expression in satellite cells of ovine offspring.

    PubMed

    Raja, J S; Hoffman, M L; Govoni, K E; Zinn, S A; Reed, S A

    2016-07-01

    Poor maternal nutrition inhibits muscle development and postnatal muscle growth. Satellite cells are myogenic precursor cells that contribute to postnatal muscle growth, and their activity can be evaluated by the expression of several transcription factors. Paired-box (Pax)7 is expressed in quiescent and active satellite cells. MyoD is expressed in activated and proliferating satellite cells and myogenin is expressed in terminally differentiating cells. Disruption in the expression pattern or timing of expression of myogenic regulatory factors negatively affects muscle development and growth. We hypothesized that poor maternal nutrition during gestation would alter the in vitro temporal expression of MyoD and myogenin in satellite cells from offspring at birth and 3 months of age. Ewes were fed 100% or 60% of NRC requirements from day 31±1.3 of gestation. Lambs from control-fed (CON) or restricted-fed (RES) ewes were euthanized within 24 h of birth (birth; n=5) or were fed a control diet until 3 months of age (n=5). Satellite cells isolated from the semitendinosus muscle were used for gene expression analysis or cultured for 24, 48 or 72 h and immunostained for Pax7, MyoD or myogenin. Fusion index was calculated from a subset of cells allowed to differentiate. Compared with CON, temporal expression of MyoD and myogenin was altered in cultured satellite cells isolated from RES lambs at birth. The percent of cells expressing MyoD was greater in RES than CON (P=0.03) after 24 h in culture. After 48 h of culture, there was a greater percent of cells expressing myogenin in RES compared with CON (P0.05). In satellite cells from RES lambs at 3 months of age, the percent of cells expressing MyoD and myogenin were greater than CON after 72 h in culture (P<0.05). Fusion index was reduced in RES lambs at 3 months of age compared with CON (P<0.001). Restricted nutrition during gestation alters the temporal expression of myogenic regulatory factors in satellite cells of the

  15. Altered Stra13 and Dec2 circadian gene expression in hypoxic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guillaumond, Fabienne; Lacoche, Samuel; Dulong, Sandrine; Grechez-Cassiau, Aline; Filipski, Elisabeth; Li, Xiao-Mei; Levi, Francis; Berra, Edurne; Delaunay, Franck; Teboul, Michele

    2008-05-16

    The circadian system regulates rhythmically most of the mammalian physiology in synchrony with the environmental light/dark cycle. Alteration of circadian clock gene expression has been associated with tumour progression but the molecular links between the two mechanisms remain poorly defined. Here we show that Stra13 and Dec2, two circadian transcriptional regulators which play a crucial role in cell proliferation and apoptosis are overexpressed and no longer rhythmic in serum shocked fibroblasts treated with CoCl{sub 2,} a substitute of hypoxia. This effect is associated with a loss of circadian expression of the clock genes Rev-erb{alpha} and Bmal1, and the clock-controlled gene Dbp. Consistently, cotransfection assays demonstrate that STRA13 and DEC2 both antagonize CLOCK:BMAL1 dependent transactivation of the Rev-erb{alpha} and Dbp promoters. Using a transplantable osteosarcoma tumour model, we show that hypoxia is associated with altered circadian expression of Stra13, Dec2, Rev-erb{alpha}, Bmal1 and Dbp in vivo. These observations collectively support the notion that overexpression of Stra13 and Dec2 links hypoxia signalling to altered circadian clock gene expression.

  16. Mitral valve prolapse is associated with altered extracellular matrix gene expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Greenhouse, David G; Murphy, Alison; Mignatti, Paolo; Zavadil, Jiri; Galloway, Aubrey C; Balsam, Leora B

    2016-07-15

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is the leading indication for isolated mitral valve surgery in the United States. Disorganization of collagens and glycosaminoglycans in the valvular extracellular matrix (ECM) are histological hallmarks of MVP. We performed a transcriptome analysis to study the alterations in ECM-related gene expression in humans with sporadic MVP. Mitral valve specimens were obtained from individuals undergoing valve repair for MVP (n=7 patients) and from non-beating heart-tissue donors (n=3 controls). Purified RNA was subjected to whole-transcriptome microarray analysis. Microarray results were validated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Gene ontology enrichment analysis was performed. 2046 unique genes showed significant differential expression (false discovery rate <0.5%). After demonstrating appropriate sample clustering, microarray results were globally validated using a subset of 22 differentially expressed genes by RT-qPCR (Pearson's correlation r=0.65, p=0.001). Gene ontology enrichment analyses performed with ErmineJ and DAVID Bioinformatics Database demonstrated overrepresentation of ECM components (p<0.05). Functional annotation clustering calculated enrichment of ECM-related ontology groups (enrichment score=4.1). ECM-related gene expression is significantly altered in MVP. Our study is consistent with the histologically observed alterations in collagen and mucopolysaccharide profiles of myxomatous mitral valves. Furthermore, whole-transcriptome analyses suggest dysregulation of multiple pathways, including TGF-beta signaling. PMID:27063507

  17. Chronic alcohol exposure alters gene expression in HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Pochareddy, Sirisha; Edenberg, Howard J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Liver is the primary site of alcohol metabolism and is highly vulnerable to injuries due to chronic alcohol abuse. Several molecular mechanisms, including oxidative stress and altered cellular metabolism, have been implicated in the development and progression of alcoholic liver disease. We sought to gain further insight into the molecular pathogenesis by studying the effects of ethanol exposure on global gene expression in HepG2 cells. Methods HepG2 cells were cultured in the presence or absence of 75 mM ethanol for nine days, with fresh media daily. Global gene expression changes were studied using Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Gene expression differences were validated for thirteen genes by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. To identify biological pathways affected by ethanol treatment, differentially expressed genes were analyzed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. Results Long term ethanol exposure altered the expression of 1093 genes (FDR ≤ 3%); many of these changes were modest. Long term ethanol exposure affected several pathways, including acute phase response, amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and lipid metabolism. Conclusions Global measurements of gene expression show that a large number of genes are affected by chronic ethanol, although most show modest effect. These data provide insight into the molecular pathology resulting from extended alcohol exposure. PMID:22150570

  18. Altered expression of transforming growth factor-beta isoforms in bovine cystic ovarian disease.

    PubMed

    Matiller, V; Stangaferro, M L; Díaz, P U; Ortega, H H; Rey, F; Huber, E; Salvetti, N R

    2014-10-01

    Cystic ovarian disease (COD) is one of the main causes of infertility in dairy cattle. It has been shown that intra-ovarian factors may contribute to follicular persistence. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFB) isoforms are important paracrine and autocrine signalling molecules that regulate ovarian follicle growth and physiology. Considering the importance of these factors in the ovarian physiology, in this study, we examined the expression of TGFB isoforms (TGFB1, TGFB2 and TGFB3) in the ovary of healthy cows and animals with spontaneous and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-induced COD. In the oestrous-synchronized control group, the expression of TGFB1 in granulosa and theca cells was higher in spontaneous cysts than in atretic or tertiary follicles. When we compared TGFB2 expression in granulosa cells from atretic or tertiary follicles from the oestrous-synchronized control group with that in ACTH-induced or spontaneous follicular cysts, we found a higher expression in the latter. The expression of the TGFB isoforms studied was also altered during folliculogenesis in both the spontaneous and ACTH-induced COD groups. As it has been previously shown that TGFB influences steroidogenesis, ovarian follicular proliferation and apoptosis, an alteration in its expression may contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:25112788

  19. Maternal tobacco use modestly alters correlated epigenome-wide placental DNA methylation and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Melissa; Ma, Jun; Harris, Alan; Patterson, Lauren; Brown, Kathleen A; Shope, Cynthia; Showalter, Lori; Abramovici, Adi

    2011-01-01

    Several studies linking alterations in differential placental methylation with pregnancy disorders have implicated (de) regulation of the placental epigenome with fetal programming and later-in-life disease. We have previously demonstrated that maternal tobacco use is associated with alterations in promoter methylation of placental CYP1A1 and that these changes are correlated with CYP1A1 gene expression and fetal growth restriction. In this study we sought to expand our analysis of promoter methylation by correlating it to gene expression on a genome-wide scale. Employing side-by-side IlluminaHG-12 gene transcription with Infinium27K methylation arrays, we interrogated correlative changes in placental gene expression and DNA methylation associated with maternal tobacco smoke exposure at an epigenome-wide level and in consideration of signature gene pathways. We observed that the expression of 623 genes and the methylation of 1,024 CpG dinucleotides are significantly altered among smokers, with only 38 CpGs showing significant differential methylation (differing by a methylation level of ≥10%). We identified a significant Pearson correlation (≥0.7 or ≤-0.7) between placental transcriptional regulation and differential CpG methylation in only 25 genes among non-smokers but in 438 genes among smokers (18-fold increase, p < 0.0001), with a dominant effect among oxidative stress pathways. Differential methylation at as few as 6 sites was attributed to maternal smoking-mediated birth weight reduction in linear regression models with Bonferroni correction (p < 1.8 × 10−6). These studies suggest that a common perinatal exposure (such as maternal smoking) deregulates placental methylation in a CpG site-specific manner that correlates with meaningful alterations in gene expression along signature pathways. PMID:21937876

  20. Pioglitazone administration alters ovarian gene expression in aging obese lethal yellow mice

    PubMed Central

    Brannian, John D; Eyster, Kathleen M; Weber, Mitch; Diggins, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    Background Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are often treated with insulin-sensitizing agents, e.g. thiazolidinediones (TZD), which have been shown to reduce androgen levels and improved ovulatory function. Acting via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma, TZD alter the expression of a large variety of genes. Lethal yellow (LY; C57BL/6J Ay/a) mice, possessing a mutation (Ay) in the agouti gene locus, exhibit progressive obesity, reproductive dysfunction, and altered metabolic regulation similar to women with PCOS. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that prolonged treatment of aging LY mice with the TZD, pioglitazone, alters the ovarian expression of genes that may impact reproduction. Methods Female LY mice received daily oral doses of either 0.01 mg pioglitazone (n = 4) or an equal volume of vehicle (DMSO; n = 4) for 8 weeks. At the end of treatment, ovaries were removed and DNA microarrays were used to analyze differential gene expression. Results Twenty-seven genes showed at least a two-fold difference in ovarian expression with pioglitazone treatment. These included leptin, angiopoietin, angiopoietin-like 4, Foxa3, PGE1 receptor, resistin-like molecule-alpha (RELM), and actin-related protein 6 homolog (ARP6). For most altered genes, pioglitazone changed levels of expression to those seen in untreated C57BL/6J(a/a) non-mutant lean mice. Conclusion TZD administration may influence ovarian function via numerous diverse mechanisms that may or may not be directly related to insulin/IGF signaling. PMID:18348723

  1. UVB-induced Senescence in Human Keratinocytes Requires a Functional Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 Receptor and p53

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Davina A.; Yi, Qiaofang; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    To cope with the frequent exposure to carcinogenic UV B (UVB) wavelengths found in sunlight, keratinocytes have acquired extensive protective measures to handle UVB-induced DNA damage. Recent in vitro and epidemiological data suggest one these protective mechanisms is dependent on the functional status of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling network in keratinocytes. During the normal UVB response, ligand-activated IGF-1Rs protect keratinocytes from UVB-induced apoptosis; however, as a consequence, these keratinocytes fail to proliferate. This adaptive response of keratinocytes to UVB exposure maintains the protective barrier function of the epidermis while ensuring that UVB-damaged keratinocytes do not replicate DNA mutations. In contrast, when keratinocytes are exposed to UVB in the absence of IGF-1R activation, the keratinocytes are more sensitive to UVB-induced apoptosis, but the surviving keratinocytes retain the capacity to proliferate. This aberrant UVB response represents flawed protection from UVB damage potentially resulting in the malignant transformation of keratinocytes. Using normal human keratinocytes grown in vitro, we have demonstrated that activation of the IGF-1R promotes the premature senescence of UVB-irradiated keratinocytes through increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by maintaining the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21CDKN1A. Furthermore, IGF-1R–dependent UVB-induced premature senescence required the phosphorylation of p53 serine 46. These data suggest one mechanism of keratinocyte resistance to UVB-induced carcinogenesis involves the induction of IGF-1R–dependent premature senescence. PMID:18216278

  2. Ectopic ERK Expression Induces Phenotypic Conversion of C10 Cells and Alters DNA Methyltransferase Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2012-05-04

    In some model systems constitutive extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) activation is sufficient to promote an oncogenic phenotype. Here we investigate whether constitutive ERK expression influences phenotypic conversion in murine C10 type II alveolar epithelial cells. C10 cells were stably transduced with an ERK1-green fluorescent protein (ERK1-GFP) chimera or empty vector and ectopic ERK expression was associated with the acquisition of soft agar focus-forming potential in late passage, but not early passage cells. Late passage ERK1-GFP cells exhibited a significant increase in the expression of DNA methyl transferases (DNMT1 and 3b) and a marked increase in sensitivity to 5-azacytidine (5-azaC)-mediated toxicity, relative to early passage ERK1-GFP cells and vector controls. The expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) were significantly increased in late passage cells, suggesting enhanced DNA damage recognition and repair activity which we interpret as a reflection of genomic instability. Phospho-ERK levels were dramatically decreased in late passage ERK1-GFP cells, relative to early passage and vector controls, and phospho-ERK levels were restored by treatment with sodium orthovanadate, indicating a role for phosphatase activity in this response. Collectively these observations suggest that ectopic ERK expression promotes phenotypic conversion of C10 cells that is associated with latent effects on epigenetic programming and phosphatase activities.

  3. EGFR-mediated Akt and MAPKs signal pathways play a crucial role in patulin-induced cell proliferation in primary murine keratinocytes via modulation of Cyclin D1 and COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Alam, Shamshad; Pal, Anu; Kumar, Rahul; Dwivedi, Premendra D; Das, Mukul; Ansari, Kausar M

    2014-12-01

    Patulin (PAT), a present day major contaminant of commercial apple and apple products is reported to be carcinogenic, embryotoxic, and immunotoxic. While oral and inhalation are considered to be the most prevalent routes of exposure to this toxin, exposure through skin is now being extensively investigated. Our previous study showed that short-term dermal exposure to PAT resulted in toxicological injury to the skin, while long-term exposure induced skin tumorigenesis. In this study, we explore the mechanism involve in proliferation of mouse keratinocytes by PAT. Our study revealed that PAT rapidly induces phosphorylation of EGFR, activation of the Ras/MAPKs, and Akt pathways. This in-turn leads to the activation of NF-κB/AP-1 transcription factors which then binds to the promoter region of the cell growth regulatory genes Cyclin D1 and COX-2 inducing their expression leading ultimately to PMKs proliferation. Inhibition of EGFR or the Ras/MAPKs, PI3/Akt pathways with different pharmacological inhibitors or knockdown of NF-κB, c-jun, c-fos, Cyclin D1, and COX-2 with siRNA inhibited PAT-induced PMKs proliferation. PMID:23813870

  4. HIV-1 Alters Intestinal Expression of Drug Transporters and Metabolic Enzymes: Implications for Antiretroviral Drug Disposition.

    PubMed

    Kis, Olena; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Hoque, M Tozammel; Walmsley, Sharon L; Dandekar, Satya; Bendayan, Reina

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of HIV-1 infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the expression of intestinal drug efflux transporters, i.e., P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and metabolic enzymes, such as cytochrome P450s (CYPs), in the human upper intestinal tract. Intestinal biopsy specimens were obtained from HIV-negative healthy volunteers, ART-naive HIV-positive (HIV(+)) subjects, and HIV(+) subjects receiving ART (10 in each group). Intestinal tissue expression of drug transporters and metabolic enzymes was examined by microarray, real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qPCR), and immunohistochemistry analyses. Microarray analysis demonstrated significantly lower expression of CYP3A4 and ABCC2/MRP2 in the HIV(+) ART-naive group than in uninfected subjects. qPCR analysis confirmed significantly lower expression of ABCC2/MRP2 in ART-naive subjects than in the control group, while CYP3A4 and ABCG2/BCRP showed a trend toward decreased expression. Protein expression of MRP2 and BCRP was also significantly lower in the HIV(+) naive group than in the control group and was partially restored to baseline levels in HIV(+) subjects receiving ART. In contrast, gene and protein expression of ABCB1/Pgp was significantly increased in HIV(+) subjects on ART relative to HIV(+) ART-naive subjects. These data demonstrate that the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters is significantly altered in therapy-naive HIV(+) subjects and in those receiving ART. Since CYP3A4, Pgp, MRPs, and BCRP metabolize or transport many antiretroviral drugs, their altered expression with HIV infection may negatively impact drug pharmacokinetics in HIV(+) subjects. This has clinical implications when using data from healthy volunteers to guide ART. PMID:26902756

  5. Functional profiling and gene expression analysis of chromosomal copy number alterations

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Lucía; Montaner, David; Burguet-Castell, Jordi; Tárraga, Joaquín; Al-Shahrour, Fátima; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2007-01-01

    Contrarily to the traditional view in which only one or a few key genes were supposed to be the causative factors of diseases, we discuss the importance of considering groups of functionally related genes in the study of pathologies characterised by chromosomal copy number alterations. Recent observations have reported the existence of regions in higher eukaryotic chromosomes (including humans) containing genes of related function that show a high degree of coregulation. Copy number alterations will consequently affect to clusters of functionally related genes, which will be the final causative agents of the diseased phenotype, in many cases. Therefore, we propose that the functional profiling of the regions affected by copy number alterations must be an important aspect to take into account in the understanding of this type of pathologies. To illustrate this, we present an integrated study of DNA copy number variations, gene expression along with the functional profiling of chromosomal regions in a case of multiple myeloma. PMID:17597935

  6. ZIP2 Protein, a Zinc Transporter, Is Associated with Keratinocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yu; Hasegawa, Seiji; Ban, Sadanori; Yamada, Takaaki; Date, Yasushi; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru; Tanaka, Masahiko; Hirashima, Naohide

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is essential for the proper functioning of various enzymes and transcription factors, and its homeostasis is rigorously controlled by zinc transporters (SLC39/ZIP, importers; SLC30/ZnT, exporters). Skin disease is commonly caused by a zinc deficiency. Dietary and inherited zinc deficiencies are known to cause alopecia and the development of vesicular or pustular dermatitis. A previous study demonstrated that zinc played crucial roles in the survival of keratinocytes and their unique functions. High levels of zinc have been detected in the epidermis. Epidermal layers are considered to use a mechanism that preferentially takes in zinc, which is involved with the unique functions of keratinocytes. However, few studies have investigated the ZIP (Zrt- and Irt-like protein) proteins specifically expressed in keratinocytes and their functions. We explored the ZIP proteins specifically expressed in the epidermis and analyzed their functions. Gene expression analysis showed that the expression of ZIP2 was consistently higher in the epidermis than in the dermis. Immunohistochemistry analysis confirmed the expression of ZIP2 in differentiating keratinocytes. The expression of ZIP2 was found to be up-regulated by the differentiation induction of cultured keratinocytes. Intracellular zinc levels were decreased in keratinocytes when ZIP2 was knocked down by siRNA, and this subsequently inhibited the differentiation of keratinocytes. Moreover, we demonstrated that ZIP2 knockdown inhibited the normal formation of a three-dimensional cultured epidermis. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that ZIP2, a zinc transporter expressed specifically in the epidermis, and zinc taken up by ZIP2 are necessary for the differentiation of keratinocytes. PMID:24936057

  7. Alteration of human hepatic drug transporter activity and expression by cigarette smoke condensate.

    PubMed

    Sayyed, Katia; Vee, Marc Le; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Jouan, Elodie; Stieger, Bruno; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Fardel, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Smoking is well-known to impair pharmacokinetics, through inducing expression of drug metabolizing enzymes. In the present study, we demonstrated that cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) also alters activity and expression of hepatic drug transporters, which are now recognized as major actors of hepatobiliary elimination of drugs. CSC thus directly inhibited activities of sinusoidal transporters such as OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OCT1 and NTCP as well as those of canalicular transporters like P-glycoprotein, MRP2, BCRP and MATE1, in hepatic transporters-overexpressing cells. CSC similarly counteracted constitutive OATP, NTCP and OCT1 activities in human highly-differentiated hepatic HepaRG cells. In parallel, CSC induced expression of BCRP at both mRNA and protein level in HepaRG cells, whereas it concomitantly repressed mRNA expression of various transporters, including OATP1B1, OATP2B1, OAT2, NTCP, OCT1 and BSEP, and enhanced that of MRP4. Such changes in transporter gene expression were found to be highly correlated to those caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, a reference activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway, and were counteracted, for some of them, by siRNA-mediated AhR silencing. This suggests that CSC alters hepatic drug transporter levels via activation of the AhR cascade. Importantly, drug transporter expression regulations as well as some transporter activity inhibitions occurred for a range of CSC concentrations similar to those required for inducing drug metabolizing enzymes and may therefore be hypothesized to be relevant for smokers. Taken together, these data established human hepatic transporters as targets of cigarette smoke, which could contribute to known alteration of pharmacokinetics and some liver adverse effects caused by smoking. PMID:27450509

  8. Renal cell carcinoma alters endothelial receptor expression responsible for leukocyte adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Juengel, Eva; Krueger, Geraldine; Rutz, Jochen; Nelson, Karen; Werner, Isabella; Relja, Borna; Seliger, Barbara; Fisslthaler, Beate; Fleming, Ingrid; Tsaur, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) escapes immune recognition. To elaborate the escape strategy the influence of RCC cells on endothelial receptor expression and endothelial leukocyte adhesion was evaluated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were co-cultured with the RCC cell line, Caki-1, with and without tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. Intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), endothelial (E)-selectin, standard and variants (V) of CD44 were then analysed in HUVEC, using flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. To determine which components are responsible for HUVEC-Caki-1 interaction causing receptor alteration, Caki-1 membrane fragments versus cell culture supernatant were applied to HUVECS. Adhesion of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to endothelium was evaluated by co-culture adhesion assays. Relevance of endothelial receptor expression for adhesion to endothelium was determined by receptor blockage. Co-culture of RCC and HUVECs resulted in a significant increase in endothelial ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, CD44 V3 and V7 expression. Previous stimulation of HUVECs with TNF-alpha and co-cultivation with Caki-1 resulted in further elevation of endothelial CD44 V3 and V7 expression, whereas ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression were significantly diminished. Since Caki-1 membrane fragments also caused these alterations, but cell culture supernatant did not, cell-cell contact may be responsible for this process. Blocking ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin or CD44 with respective antibodies led to a significant decrease in PBL and PMN adhesion to endothelium. Thus, exposing HUVEC to Caki-1 results in significant alteration of endothelial receptor expression and subsequent endothelial attachment of PBL and PMN. PMID:26943029

  9. Calcium homeostasis is altered in skeletal muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats: cytofluorimetric and gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Liantonio, Antonella; Camerino, Giulia M; Scaramuzzi, Antonia; Cannone, Maria; Pierno, Sabata; De Bellis, Michela; Conte, Elena; Fraysse, Bodvael; Tricarico, Domenico; Conte Camerino, Diana

    2014-10-01

    Hypertension is often associated with skeletal muscle pathological conditions related to function and metabolism. The mechanisms underlying the development of these pathological conditions remain undefined. Because calcium homeostasis is a biomarker of muscle function, we assessed whether it is altered in hypertensive muscles. We measured resting intracellular calcium and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers from normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) by cytofluorimetric technique and determined the expression of SOCE gene machinery by real-time PCR. Hypertension caused a phenotype-dependent dysregulation of calcium homeostasis; the resting intracellular calcium of extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles of SHRs were differently altered with respect to the related muscle of normotensive animals. In addition, soleus muscles of SHR showed reduced activity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and decreased sarcolemmal calcium permeability at rest and after SOCE activation. Accordingly, we found an alteration of the expression levels of some SOCE components, such as stromal interaction molecule 1, calcium release-activated calcium modulator 1, and transient receptor potential canonical 1. The hypertension-induced alterations of calcium homeostasis in the soleus muscle of SHRs occurred with changes of some functional outcomes as excitability and resting chloride conductance. We provide suitable targets for therapeutic interventions aimed at counterbalancing muscle performance decline in hypertension, and propose the reported calcium-dependent parameters as indexes to predict how the antihypertensive drugs could influence muscle function. PMID:25084345

  10. Transgenic tobacco expressing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin exhibits enhanced growth and altered metabolite production.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, N; Lilius, G; Bailey, J E; Bülow, L

    1997-03-01

    The gene for Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) has been introduced and expressed in Nicotiana tabaccum (tobacco). Transgenic tobacco plants expressing VHb exhibited enhanced growth, on average 80-100% more dry weight after 35 days of growth compared to wild-type controls. Furthermore, germination time is reduced from 6-8 days for wild-type tobacco to 3-4 days and the growth phase from germination to flowering was 3-5 days shorter for the VHb-expressing transgenes. Transgenic plants contained, on average, 30-40% more chlorophyll and 34% more nicotine than controls. VHb expression also resulted in an altered distribution of secondary metabolites: In the trangenic tobacco plants anabasine content was decreased 80% relative to control plants. PMID:9062923

  11. Epstein-Barr virus growth/latency III program alters cellular microRNA expression

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Jennifer E. Fewell, Claire Yin, Qinyan McBride, Jane Wang Xia Lin Zhen

    2008-12-20

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with lymphoid and epithelial cancers. Initial EBV infection alters lymphocyte gene expression, inducing cellular proliferation and differentiation as the virus transitions through consecutive latency transcription programs. Cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of signaling pathways and are implicated in carcinogenesis. The extent to which EBV exploits cellular miRNAs is unknown. Using micro-array analysis and quantitative PCR, we demonstrate differential expression of cellular miRNAs in type III versus type I EBV latency including elevated expression of miR-21, miR-23a, miR-24, miR-27a, miR-34a, miR-146a and b, and miR-155. In contrast, miR-28 expression was found to be lower in type III latency. The EBV-mediated regulation of cellular miRNAs may contribute to EBV signaling and associated cancers.

  12. Formaldehyde exposure alters miRNA expression profiles in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Li, Guifa; Yang, Jing; Ling, Shucai

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that inhaling formaldehyde (FA) causes damage to the central nervous system. However, it is unclear whether FA can disturb the function of the olfactory bulb. Using a microarray, we found that FA inhalation altered the miRNA expression profile. Functional enrichment analysis of the predicted targets of the changed miRNA showed that the enrichment canonical pathways and networks associated with cancer and transcriptional regulation. FA exposure disrupts miRNA expression profiles within the olfactory bulb. PMID:26161908

  13. Gene expression patterns underlying parasite-induced alterations in host behaviour and life history.

    PubMed

    Feldmeyer, Barbara; Mazur, Johanna; Beros, Sara; Lerp, Hannes; Binder, Harald; Foitzik, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Many parasites manipulate their hosts' phenotype. In particular, parasites with complex life cycles take control of their intermediate hosts' behaviour and life history to increase transmission to their definitive host. The proximate mechanisms underlying these parasite-induced alterations are poorly understood. The cestode Anomotaenia brevis affects the behaviour, life history and morphology of parasitized Temnothorax nylanderi ants and indirectly of their unparasitized nestmates. To gain insights on how parasites alter host phenotypes, we contrast brain gene expression patterns of T. nylanderi workers parasitized with the cestode, their unparasitized nestmates and unparasitized workers from unparasitized colonies. Over 400 differentially expressed genes between the three groups were identified, with most uniquely expressed genes detected in parasitized workers. Among these are genes that can be linked to the increased lifespan of parasitized workers. Furthermore, many muscle (functionality) genes are downregulated in these workers, potentially causing the observed muscular deformations and their inactive behaviour. Alterations in lifespan and activity could be adaptive for the parasite by increasing the likelihood that infected workers residing in acorns are eaten by their definitive host, a woodpecker. Our transcriptome analysis reveals numerous gene expression changes in parasitized workers and their uninfected nestmates and indicates possible routes of parasite manipulation. Although causality still needs to be established, parasite-induced alterations in lifespan and host behaviour appear to be partly explained by morphological muscle atrophy instead of central nervous system interference, which is often the core of behavioural regulation. Results of this study will shed light upon the molecular basis of antagonistic species interactions. PMID:26615010

  14. Oxidative Stress Alters miRNA and Gene Expression Profiles in Villous First Trimester Trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Courtney E.; Tolba, Mai F.; Rondelli, Catherine M.; Xu, Meixiang; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between oxidative stress and miRNA changes in placenta as a potential mechanism involved in preeclampsia (PE) is not fully elucidated. We investigated the impact of oxidative stress on miRNAs and mRNA expression profiles of genes associated with PE in villous 3A first trimester trophoblast cells exposed to H2O2 at 12 different concentrations (0-1 mM) for 0.5, 4, 24, and 48 h. Cytotoxicity, determined using the SRB assay, was used to calculate the IC50 of H2O2. RNA was extracted after 4 h exposure to H2O2 for miRNA and gene expression profiling. H2O2 exerted a concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity on 3A trophoblast cells. Short-term exposure of 3A cells to low concentration of H2O2 (5% of IC50) significantly altered miRNA profile as evidenced by significant changes in 195 out of 595 evaluable miRNAs. Tool for annotations of microRNAs (TAM) analysis indicated that these altered miRNAs fall into 43 clusters and 34 families, with 41 functions identified. Exposure to H2O2 altered mRNA expression of 22 out of 84 key genes involved in dysregulation of placental development. In conclusion, short-term exposure of villous first trimester trophoblasts to low concentrations of H2O2 significantly alters miRNA profile and expression of genes implicated in placental development. PMID:26339600

  15. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Ion Channel Functions as a Pruriceptor in Epidermal Keratinocytes to Evoke Histaminergic Itch.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Fang, Quan; Wang, Zilong; Zhang, Jennifer Y; MacLeod, Amanda S; Hall, Russell P; Liedtke, Wolfgang B

    2016-05-01

    TRPV4 ion channels function in epidermal keratinocytes and in innervating sensory neurons; however, the contribution of the channel in either cell to neurosensory function remains to be elucidated. We recently reported TRPV4 as a critical component of the keratinocyte machinery that responds to ultraviolet B (UVB) and functions critically to convert the keratinocyte into a pain-generator cell after excess UVB exposure. One key mechanism in keratinocytes was increased expression and secretion of endothelin-1, which is also a known pruritogen. Here we address the question of whether TRPV4 in skin keratinocytes functions in itch, as a particular form of "forefront" signaling in non-neural cells. Our results support this novel concept based on attenuated scratching behavior in response to histaminergic (histamine, compound 48/80, endothelin-1), not non-histaminergic (chloroquine) pruritogens in Trpv4 keratinocyte-specific and inducible knock-out mice. We demonstrate that keratinocytes rely on TRPV4 for calcium influx in response to histaminergic pruritogens. TRPV4 activation in keratinocytes evokes phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase, ERK, for histaminergic pruritogens. This finding is relevant because we observed robust anti-pruritic effects with topical applications of selective inhibitors for TRPV4 and also for MEK, the kinase upstream of ERK, suggesting that calcium influx via TRPV4 in keratinocytes leads to ERK-phosphorylation, which in turn rapidly converts the keratinocyte into an organismal itch-generator cell. In support of this concept we found that scratching behavior, evoked by direct intradermal activation of TRPV4, was critically dependent on TRPV4 expression in keratinocytes. Thus, TRPV4 functions as a pruriceptor-TRP in skin keratinocytes in histaminergic itch, a novel basic concept with translational-medical relevance. PMID:26961876

  16. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Ion Channel Functions as a Pruriceptor in Epidermal Keratinocytes to Evoke Histaminergic Itch*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Fang, Quan; Wang, Zilong; Zhang, Jennifer Y.; MacLeod, Amanda S.; Hall, Russell P.; Liedtke, Wolfgang B.

    2016-01-01

    TRPV4 ion channels function in epidermal keratinocytes and in innervating sensory neurons; however, the contribution of the channel in either cell to neurosensory function remains to be elucidated. We recently reported TRPV4 as a critical component of the keratinocyte machinery that responds to ultraviolet B (UVB) and functions critically to convert the keratinocyte into a pain-generator cell after excess UVB exposure. One key mechanism in keratinocytes was increased expression and secretion of endothelin-1, which is also a known pruritogen. Here we address the question of whether TRPV4 in skin keratinocytes functions in itch, as a particular form of “forefront” signaling in non-neural cells. Our results support this novel concept based on attenuated scratching behavior in response to histaminergic (histamine, compound 48/80, endothelin-1), not non-histaminergic (chloroquine) pruritogens in Trpv4 keratinocyte-specific and inducible knock-out mice. We demonstrate that keratinocytes rely on TRPV4 for calcium influx in response to histaminergic pruritogens. TRPV4 activation in keratinocytes evokes phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase, ERK, for histaminergic pruritogens. This finding is relevant because we observed robust anti-pruritic effects with topical applications of selective inhibitors for TRPV4 and also for MEK, the kinase upstream of ERK, suggesting that calcium influx via TRPV4 in keratinocytes leads to ERK-phosphorylation, which in turn rapidly converts the keratinocyte into an organismal itch-generator cell. In support of this concept we found that scratching behavior, evoked by direct intradermal activation of TRPV4, was critically dependent on TRPV4 expression in keratinocytes. Thus, TRPV4 functions as a pruriceptor-TRP in skin keratinocytes in histaminergic itch, a novel basic concept with translational-medical relevance. PMID:26961876

  17. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A; Woodman, Scott E; Kwong, Lawrence N

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy. PMID:26787600

  18. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A.; Woodman, Scott E.; Kwong, Lawrence N.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy.

  19. Prickle1 stunts limb growth through alteration of cell polarity and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tian; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Background Wnt/PCP signaling plays a critical role in multiple developmental processes, including limb development. Wnt5a, a ligand of the PCP pathway, signals through the Ror2/Vangl2 or the Vangl2/Ryk complex to regulate limb development along the proximal-distal axis in mice. Based on the interaction between Van Gogh and Prickle in Drosophila, we hypothesized the vertebrate Prickle1 have similar function as Vangl2 in limb development. Results We show Prickle1 is expressed in the skeletal condensates that will differentiate into chondrocytes and later form bones. Disrupted Prickle1 function in Prickle1C251X/C251X mouse mutants alters expression of genes such as Bmp4, Fgf8, Vangl2 and Wnt5a. These expression changes correlate with shorter and wider bones in the limbs and loss of one phalangeal segment in digits 2-5 of Prickle1C251X mutants. These growth defects along the proximal-distal axis are also associated with increased cell death in the growing digit tip, reduced cell death in the interdigital membrane and disrupted chondrocyte polarity. Conclusions We suggest Prickle1 is part of the Wnt5a/PCP signaling, regulating cell polarity and affecting expression of multiple factors to stunt limb growth through altered patterns of gene expression, including the PCP genes Wnt5a and Vangl2. PMID:23913870

  20. Altered Expression of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Accessory Proteins in Murine and Human Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Noelle; Gaynor, Katherine U; Rowan, Simon C; Walsh, Sinead M; Fabre, Aurelie; Boylan, John; Keane, Michael P; McLoughlin, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic, progressive fibrotic disease with a poor prognosis. The balance between transforming growth factor β1 and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling plays an important role in tissue homeostasis, and alterations can result in pulmonary fibrosis. We hypothesized that multiple BMP accessory proteins may be responsible for maintaining this balance in the lung. Using the bleomycin mouse model for fibrosis, we examined an array of BMP accessory proteins for changes in mRNA expression. We report significant increases in mRNA expression of gremlin 1, noggin, follistatin, and follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1), and significant decreases in mRNA expression of chordin, kielin/chordin-like protein, nephroblastoma overexpressed gene, and BMP and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI). Protein expression studies demonstrated increased levels of noggin, BAMBI, and FSTL1 in the lungs of bleomycin-treated mice and in the lungs of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that transforming growth factor β stimulation resulted in increased expression of noggin, BAMBI, and FSTL1 in human small airway epithelial cells. These results provide the first evidence that multiple BMP accessory proteins are altered in fibrosis and may play a role in promoting fibrotic injury. PMID:26765958

  1. Optimal Differentiation of In Vitro Keratinocytes Requires Multifactorial External Control

    PubMed Central

    Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Delcourt, Philippe; Dewailly, Etienne; Bidaux, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    For almost 30 years, keratinocyte differentiation has been studied in numerous cell models including keratinocyte primary culture with various supplemented culture media. In this respect, it has become quite difficult to draw comparisons between studies using such a variety of culture conditions. Serum-free condition with low calcium has been used to culture basal proliferating cells, though differentiation is induced by various procedures. These latter include the addition of calcium at mM concentration and a concomitant addition of serum and calcium. Lowering the incubation temperature of cells has also been reported to induce a premature differentiation of keratinocytes in organotypic skin culture. This effect of temperature on keratinocyte differentiation has been poorly depicted, although average human skin temperature has been shown to be about 32°C. However, studying differentiation and quantifying shifts in the differentiation rate of a cell population implies to precisely know i) the proportion of differentiated cells in the whole population, and ii) to which extent and to which level of expression, the induction of a gene or a protein might be considered as a marker of differentiation. This lack has rarely been taken into consideration and has surely led to over-interpretations of single protein induction and to consequent extrapolations to real differentiation processes. By means of paralleled analyses with immunocytofluorescence, flow cytometry, and with multiple differentiation markers quantify by qPCR and western-blot, we studied the paradoxical connection between calcium, serum, multilayer culture and incubation temperature on the differentiation of in vitro keratinocytes. Conversely to previous reports, we have shown that calcium switch is indeed a potent model for inducing calcium-dependent genes, but is not an efficient procedure when one wishes to assess the keratinocyte differentiation rate. Moreover, we have demonstrated that a synergic

  2. Altered tryptophan hydroxylase 2 expression in enteric serotonergic nerves in Hirschsprung’s-associated enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, David; Murphy, Justin M; Doyle, Brian; O’Donnell, Anne Marie; Gillick, John; Puri, Prem

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine if expression of colonic tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2), a surrogate marker of neuronal 5-hydroxytryptamine, is altered in Hirschsprung’s-associated enterocolitis. METHODS: Entire resected colonic specimens were collected at the time of pull-through operation in children with Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR, n = 12). Five of these patients had a history of pre-operative Hirschsprung’s-associated enterocolitis (HAEC). Controls were collected at colostomy closure in children with anorectal malformation (n = 10). The distribution of expression of TPH2 was evaluated using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Protein expression of TPH2 was quantified using western blot analysis in the deep smooth muscle layers. RESULTS: TPH2 was co-expressed in nitrergic and cholinergic ganglia in the myenteric and submucosal plexuses in ganglionic colon in HSCR and healthy controls. Co-expression was also seen in submucosal interstitial cells of Cajal and PDGFRα+ cells. The density of TPH2 immuno-positive fibers decreased incrementally from ganglionic bowel to transition zone bowel to aganglionic bowel in the myenteric plexus. Expression of TPH2 was reduced in ganglionic bowel in those affected by pre-operative HAEC compared to those without HAEC and healthy controls. However, expression of TPH2 was similar or high compared to controls in the colons of children who had undergone diverting colostomy for medically refractory HAEC. CONCLUSION: Altered TPH2 expression in colonic serotonergic nerves of patients with HSCR complicated by HAEC may contribute to intestinal secretory and motor disturbances, including recurrent HAEC. PMID:27217698

  3. Warming Alters Expressions of Microbial Functional Genes Important to Ecosystem Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Kai; Xie, Jianping; Zhou, Aifen; Liu, Feifei; Li, Dejun; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Luo, Yiqi; Zhou, Jizhong

    2016-01-01

    Soil microbial communities play critical roles in ecosystem functioning and are likely altered by climate warming. However, so far, little is known about effects of warming on microbial functional gene expressions. Here, we applied functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0) to analyze cDNA reversely transcribed from total RNA to assess expressed functional genes in active soil microbial communities after nine years of experimental warming in a tallgrass prairie. Our results showed that warming significantly altered the community wide gene expressions. Specifically, expressed genes for degrading more recalcitrant carbon were stimulated by warming, likely linked to the plant community shift toward more C4 species under warming and to decrease the long-term soil carbon stability. In addition, warming changed expressed genes in labile C degradation and N cycling in different directions (increase and decrease), possibly reflecting the dynamics of labile C and available N pools during sampling. However, the average abundances of expressed genes in phosphorus and sulfur cycling were all increased by warming, implying a stable trend of accelerated P and S processes which might be a mechanism to sustain higher plant growth. Furthermore, the expressed gene composition was closely related to both dynamic (e.g., soil moisture) and stable environmental attributes (e.g., C4 leaf C or N content), indicating that RNA analyses could also capture certain stable trends in the long-term treatment. Overall, this study revealed the importance of elucidating functional gene expressions of soil microbial community in enhancing our understanding of ecosystem responses to warming. PMID:27199978

  4. Effects of epidermal growth factor and keratinocyte growth factor on the growth of oropharyngeal keratinocytes in coculture with autologous fibroblasts in a three-dimensional matrix.

    PubMed

    Blaimauer, Karin; Watzinger, Elisabeth; Erovic, Boban M; Martinek, Helga; Jagersberger, Tamara; Thurnher, Dietmar

    2006-01-01

    Tissue engineering of oropharyngeal mucosa is rendered complex by the fact that oropharyngeal keratinocytes are difficult to culture in the long term and do not grow well after several subcultivations. Three populations of oropharyngeal keratinocytes were isolated by a method based on different levels of beta(1)-integrin expression. In particular, keratinocytes were isolated between cell fractions that adhere rapidly on collagen-IV-coated culture dishes (RAC-IV) and populations that are less adherent (RAC-IV-D). The total fraction of both subpopulations served as a control (RAC-IV-T). The epidermal growth factor (EGF) and the keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) were examined with regard to their effects on the growth of the three populations. Growth curves of all three cell fractions grown with or without EGF were generated, and different concentrations of EGF and KGF were tested. EGF did not change any growth characteristics of the cells, with the exception of the speed of growth. Best growth was achieved with a physiologic EGF concentration of 0.15-1.5 ng/ml and a KGF concentration of 15 ng/ml. Finally, we cocultured oropharyngeal keratinocytes and their autologous fibroblasts in a three-dimensional matrix using Matrigeltrade mark. Oropharyngeal keratinocytes grown in coculture formed larger colonies than keratinocytes grown without fibroblasts. In conclusion, we were able to optimize the supplement of EGF and KGF in standard medium for the long-term culture of primary oropharyngeal keratinocytes. The use of Matrigel as a scaffold for three-dimensional cocultures of oropharyngeal keratinocytes and fibroblasts might signify a step forward in the development of a transplantable mucosa construct. PMID:16804300

  5. Differential cytokine modulation of the genes LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2, encoding the constitutive polypeptides, alpha 3, beta 3, and gamma 2, of human laminin 5 in epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Korang, K; Christiano, A M; Uitto, J; Mauviel, A

    1995-07-24

    Laminin 5, an anchoring filament protein previously known as nicein/kalinin/epiligrin, consists of three polypeptide chains, alpha 3, beta 3, and gamma 2, encoded by the genes LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2, respectively. The expression of laminin 5 was detected by Northern hybridization with specific cDNA probes in various epidermal keratinocyte cultures, whereas no expression of any of the three genes could be detected in foreskin fibroblast cultures. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) enhanced LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2 gene expression in human epidermal keratinocytes, as well as in HaCaT and Balb/K cells in culture, although the extent of enhancement was greater for LAMA3 and LAMC2 genes than for LAMB3. Interestingly, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, (TNF-alpha) alone did not alter the expression of LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes in human epidermal keratinocytes, whereas it inhibited the expression of LAMA3. These results suggest that the expression of the three genes encoding the laminin 5 subunits is not coordinately regulated by the cytokines tested. PMID:7635220

  6. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Lysate Increases Re-Epithelialization of Keratinocyte Scratch Assays by Promoting Migration

    PubMed Central

    Mohammedsaeed, Walaa; Cruickshank, Sheena; McBain, Andrew J.; O’Neill, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    A limited number of studies have investigated the potential of probiotics to promote wound healing in the digestive tract. The aim of the current investigation was to determine whether probiotic bacteria or their extracts could be beneficial in cutaneous wound healing. A keratinocyte monolayer scratch assay was used to assess re-epithelialization; which comprises keratinocyte proliferation and migration. Primary human keratinocyte monolayers were scratched then exposed to lysates of Lactobacillus (L) rhamnosus GG, L. reuteri, L. plantarum or L. fermentum. Re-epithelialization of treated monolayers was compared to that of untreated controls. Lysates of L. rhamnosus GG and L. reuteri significantly increased the rate of re-epithelialization, with L. rhamnosus GG being the most efficacious. L. reuteri increased keratinocyte proliferation while L. rhamnosus GG lysate significantly increased proliferation and migration. Microarray analysis of L. rhamnosus GG treated scratches showed increased expression of multiple genes including the chemokine CXCL2 and its receptor CXCR2. These are involved in normal wound healing where they stimulate keratinocyte proliferation and/or migration. Increased protein expression of both CXCL2 and CXCR2 were confirmed by ELISA and immunoblotting. These data demonstrate that L. rhamnosus GG lysate accelerates re-epithelialization of keratinocyte scratch assays, potentially via chemokine receptor pairs that induce keratinocyte migration. PMID:26537246

  7. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Lysate Increases Re-Epithelialization of Keratinocyte Scratch Assays by Promoting Migration.

    PubMed

    Mohammedsaeed, Walaa; Cruickshank, Sheena; McBain, Andrew J; O'Neill, Catherine A

    2015-01-01

    A limited number of studies have investigated the potential of probiotics to promote wound healing in the digestive tract. The aim of the current investigation was to determine whether probiotic bacteria or their extracts could be beneficial in cutaneous wound healing. A keratinocyte monolayer scratch assay was used to assess re-epithelialization; which comprises keratinocyte proliferation and migration. Primary human keratinocyte monolayers were scratched then exposed to lysates of Lactobacillus (L) rhamnosus GG, L. reuteri, L. plantarum or L. fermentum. Re-epithelialization of treated monolayers was compared to that of untreated controls. Lysates of L. rhamnosus GG and L. reuteri significantly increased the rate of re-epithelialization, with L. rhamnosus GG being the most efficacious. L. reuteri increased keratinocyte proliferation while L. rhamnosus GG lysate significantly increased proliferation and migration. Microarray analysis of L. rhamnosus GG treated scratches showed increased expression of multiple genes including the chemokine CXCL2 and its receptor CXCR2. These are involved in normal wound healing where they stimulate keratinocyte proliferation and/or migration. Increased protein expression of both CXCL2 and CXCR2 were confirmed by ELISA and immunoblotting. These data demonstrate that L. rhamnosus GG lysate accelerates re-epithelialization of keratinocyte scratch assays, potentially via chemokine receptor pairs that induce keratinocyte migration. PMID:26537246

  8. Keratinocytes can modulate and directly initiate nociceptive responses

    PubMed Central

    Baumbauer, Kyle M; DeBerry, Jennifer J; Adelman, Peter C; Miller, Richard H; Hachisuka, Junichi; Lee, Kuan Hsien; Ross, Sarah E; Koerber, H Richard; Davis, Brian M; Albers, Kathryn M

    2015-01-01

    How thermal, mechanical and chemical stimuli applied to the skin are transduced into signals transmitted by peripheral neurons to the CNS is an area of intense study. Several studies indicate that transduction mechanisms are intrinsic to cutaneous neurons and that epidermal keratinocytes only modulate this transduction. Using mice expressing channelrhodopsin (ChR2) in keratinocytes we show that blue light activation of the epidermis alone can produce action potentials (APs) in multiple types of cutaneous sensory neurons including SA1, A-HTMR, CM, CH, CMC, CMH and CMHC fiber types. In loss of function studies, yellow light stimulation of keratinocytes that express halorhodopsin reduced AP generation in response to naturalistic stimuli. These findings support the idea that intrinsic sensory transduction mechanisms in epidermal keratinocytes can directly elicit AP firing in nociceptive as well as tactile sensory afferents and suggest a significantly expanded role for the epidermis in sensory processing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09674.001 PMID:26329459

  9. Activation of Nrf2 in keratinocytes causes chloracne (MADISH)-like skin disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Matthias; Willrodt, Ann-Helen; Kurinna, Svitlana; Link, Andrea S; Farwanah, Hany; Geusau, Alexandra; Gruber, Florian; Sorg, Olivier; Huebner, Aaron J; Roop, Dennis R; Sandhoff, Konrad; Saurat, Jean-Hilaire; Tschachler, Erwin; Schneider, Marlon R; Langbein, Lutz; Bloch, Wilhelm; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Werner, Sabine

    2014-04-01

    The transcription factor Nrf2 is a key regulator of the cellular stress response, and pharmacological Nrf2 activation is a promising strategy for skin protection and cancer prevention. We show here that prolonged Nrf2 activation in keratinocytes causes sebaceous gland enlargement and seborrhea in mice due to upregulation of the growth factor epigen, which we identified as a novel Nrf2 target. This was accompanied by thickening and hyperkeratosis of hair follicle infundibula. These abnormalities caused dilatation of infundibula, hair loss, and cyst development upon aging. Upregulation of epigen, secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor (Slpi), and small proline-rich protein 2d (Sprr2d) in hair follicles was identified as the likely cause of infundibular acanthosis, hyperkeratosis, and cyst formation. These alterations were highly reminiscent to the phenotype of chloracne/"metabolizing acquired dioxin-induced skin hamartomas" (MADISH) patients. Indeed, SLPI, SPRR2, and epigen were strongly expressed in cysts of MADISH patients and upregulated by dioxin in human keratinocytes in an NRF2-dependent manner. These results identify novel Nrf2 activities in the pilosebaceous unit and point to a role of NRF2 in MADISH pathogenesis. PMID:24503019

  10. Weight Gain Alters Adiponectin Receptor 1 Expression on Adipose Tissue-Resident Helios+ Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Ramírez, P; Malmhäll, C; Johansson, K; Lötvall, J; Bossios, A

    2016-04-01

    Adipose tissue produces multiple mediators that modulate the immune response. Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived cytokine that exhibits metabolic and anti-inflammatory effects. Adiponectin acts through binding to adiponectin receptor 1 and 2 (AdipoR1/AdipoR2). AdipoR1 is ubiquitously expressed, whereas AdipoR2 is restricted to skeletal muscle and liver. AdipoR1 expression has been reported on a small percentage of T cells; nevertheless, it is still unknown whether Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) express AdipoR1. Recently, it has been shown that Tregs accumulate in adipose tissue and that they play a potential role in modulating adipose tissue inflammation. Our aim was to evaluate AdipoR1 expression in adipose tissue-resident Tregs and to evaluate the effect of weight gain on this expression. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with a high-fat diet for 14 weeks (to develop overweight) or 21 weeks (to develop obesity). Mice on a standard diet were used as age-matched controls. Helios expression was evaluated as a marker to discriminate thymic-derived from peripherally induced Tregs. The majority of Tregs in both adipose tissue and the spleen expressed Helios. Adipose tissue Tregs expressed higher levels of AdipoR1 than Tregs in the spleen. AdipoR1 expression on adipose tissue Helios(+) Tregs was negatively correlated with epididymal fat. Overall, we show that AdipoR1 is expressed on adipose tissue-resident Tregs, mainly Helios(+) Tregs, and that this expression is dependent on weight and fat accumulation. Because both adiponectin and Tregs play roles in anti-inflammatory mechanisms, our data propose a new mechanism through which weight gain might alter immunoregulation. PMID:26900653

  11. PRENATAL ALCOHOL EXPOSURE ALTERS STEADY-STATE AND ACTIVATED GENE EXPRESSION IN THE ADULT RAT BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Stepien, Katarzyna A.; Lussier, Alexandre A.; Neumann, Sarah M.; Pavlidis, Paul; Kobor, Michael S.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) is associated with alterations in numerous physiological systems, including the stress and immune systems . We have previously shown that PAE increases the course and severity of arthritis in an adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) model. While the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully known, changes in neural gene expression are emerging as important factors in the etiology of PAE effects. As the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HPC) play key roles in neuroimmune function, PAE-induced alterations to their transcriptome may underlie abnormal steady-state functions and responses to immune challenge. The current study examined brains from adult PAE and control females from our recent AA study to determine whether PAE causes long-term alterations in gene expression and whether these mediate the altered severity and course of arthritis in PAE females Methods Adult females from PAE, pair-fed [PF], and ad libitum-fed control [C]) groups were injected with either saline or complete Freund’s adjuvant. Animals were terminated at the peak of inflammation or during resolution (days 16 and 39 post-injection, respectively); cohorts of saline-injected PAE, PF and C females were terminated in parallel. Gene expression was analyzed in the PFC and HPC using whole genome mRNA expression microarrays. Results Significant changes in gene expression in both the PFC and HPC were found in PAE compared to controls in response to ethanol exposure alone (saline-injected females), including genes involved in neurodevelopment, apoptosis, and energy metabolism. Moreover, in response to inflammation (adjuvant-injected females), PAE animals showed unique expression patterns, while failing to exhibit the activation of genes and regulators involved in the immune response observed in control and pair-fed animals. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that PAE affects neuroimmune function at the level of gene expression

  12. Somatic alteration and depleted nuclear expression of BAP1 in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Takahiro; Sumii, Makiko; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Ueno, Kazuko; Emi, Mitsuru; Nagasaki, Masao; Ishioka, Chikashi; Chiba, Natsuko

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme that is involved in the regulation of cell growth. Recently, many somatic and germline mutations of BAP1 have been reported in a broad spectrum of tumors. In this study, we identified a novel somatic non-synonymous BAP1 mutation, a phenylalanine-to-isoleucine substitution at codon 170 (F170I), in 1 of 49 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) of BAP1 gene in this ESCC tumor disclosed monoallelic deletion (LOH), suggesting BAP1 alterations on both alleles in this tumor. The deubiquitinase activity and the auto-deubiquitinase activity of F170I-mutant BAP1 were markedly suppressed compared with wild-type BAP1. In addition, wild-type BAP1 mostly localizes to the nucleus, whereas the F170I mutant preferentially localized in the cytoplasm. Microarray analysis revealed that expression of the F170I mutant drastically altered gene expression profiles compared with expressed wild-type BAP1. Gene-ontology analyses indicated that the F170I mutation altered the expression of genes involved in oncogenic pathways. We found that one candidate, TCEAL7, previously reported as a putative tumor suppressor gene, was significantly induced by wild-type BAP1 as compared to F170I mutant BAP1. Furthermore, we found that the level of BAP1 expression in the nucleus was reduced in 44% of ESCC examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Because the nuclear localization of BAP1 is important for its tumor suppressor function, BAP1 may be functionally inactivated in a substantial portion of ESCC. Taken together, BAP1 is likely to function as a tumor suppressor in at least a part of ESCC. PMID:26081045

  13. Comparison of gene expression profiles altered by comfrey and riddelliine in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan; Dial, Stacey; Fuscoe, James; Chen, Tao

    2007-01-01

    Background Comfrey (Symphytum officinale) is a perennial plant and has been consumed by humans as a vegetable, a tea and an herbal medicine for more than 2000 years. It, however, is hepatotoxic and carcinogenic in experimental animals and hepatotoxic in humans. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) exist in many plants and many of them cause liver toxicity and/or cancer in humans and experimental animals. In our previous study, we found that the mutagenicity of comfrey was associated with the PAs contained in the plant. Therefore, we suggest that carcinogenicity of comfrey result from those PAs. To confirm our hypothesis, we compared the expression of genes and processes of biological functions that were altered by comfrey (mixture of the plant with PAs) and riddelliine (a prototype of carcinogenic PA) in rat liver for carcinogenesis in this study. Results Groups of 6 Big Blue Fisher 344 rats were treated with riddelliine at 1 mg/kg body weight by gavage five times a week for 12 weeks or fed a diet containing 8% comfrey root for 12 weeks. Animals were sacrificed one day after the last treatment and the livers were isolated for gene expression analysis. The gene expressions were investigated using Applied Biosystems Rat Whole Genome Survey Microarrays and the biological functions were analyzed with Ingenuity Analysis Pathway software. Although there were large differences between the significant genes and between the biological processes that were altered by comfrey and riddelliine, there were a number of common genes and function processes that were related to carcinogenesis. There was a strong correlation between the two treatments for fold-change alterations in expression of drug metabolizing and cancer-related genes. Conclusion Our results suggest that the carcinogenesis-related gene expression patterns resulting from the treatments of comfrey and riddelliine are very similar, and PAs contained in comfrey are the main active components responsible for carcinogenicity of

  14. Transcriptional regulation of genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation by human papillomavirus 16 oncoproteins.

    PubMed

    Gyöngyösi, Eszter; Szalmás, Anita; Ferenczi, Annamária; Póliska, Szilárd; Kónya, József; Veress, György

    2015-02-01

    The life cycle of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is strictly linked to the differentiation of their natural host cells. The HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins can delay the normal differentiation program of keratinocytes; however, the exact mechanisms responsible for this have not yet been identified. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of HPV16 oncoproteins on the expression of genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation. Primary human keratinocytes transduced by LXSN (control) retroviruses or virus vectors expressing HPV16 E6, E7 or E6/E7 genes were subjected to gene expression profiling. The results of microarray analysis showed that HPV 16 E6 and E7 have the capacity to downregulate the expression of several genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays were performed to confirm the microarray data. To investigate the effects of the HPV oncoproteins on the promoters of selected keratinocyte differentiation genes, luciferase reporter assays were performed. Our results suggest that the HPV 16 E6 and/or E7 oncogenes are able to downregulate the expression of several genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation (such as desmocollin 1, keratin 4, S100 calcium-binding protein A8 and small proline-rich protein 1A), at least partially by downregulating their promoter activity. This activity of the HPV oncoproteins may have a role in the productive virus life cycle, and also in virus-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:25488293

  15. Fisetin inhibits TNF-α-induced inflammatory action and hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in human keratinocyte HaCaT cells through PI3K/AKT/Nrf-2-mediated heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seung-Hee; Jeong, Gil-Saeng

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative skin damage and skin inflammation play key roles in the pathogenesis of skin-related diseases. Fisetin is a naturally occurring flavonoid abundantly found in several vegetables and fruits. Fisetin has been shown to exert various positive biological effects, such as anti-cancer, anti-proliferative, neuroprotective and anti-oxidative effects. In this study, we investigate the skin protective effects and anti-inflammatory properties of fisetin in hydrogen peroxide- and TNF-α-challenged human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. When HaCaT cells were treated with non-cytotoxic concentrations of fisetin (1-20μM), heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA and protein expression increased in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, fisetin dose-dependently increased cell viability and reduced ROS production in hydrogen peroxide-treated HaCaT cells. Fisetin also inhibited the production of NO, PGE2 IL-1β, IL-6, expression of iNOS and COX-2, and activation of NF-κB in HaCaT cells treated with TNF-α. Fisetin induced Nrf2 translocation to the nuclei. HO-1 siRNA transient transfection reversed the effects of fisetin on cytoprotection, ROS reduction, NO, PGE2, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α production, and NF-κB DNA-binding activity. Moreover, fisetin increased Akt phosphorylation and a PI3K pathway inhibitor (LY294002) abolished fisetin-induced cytoprotection and NO inhibition. Taken together, these results provide evidence for a beneficial role of fisetin in skin therapy. PMID:26590114

  16. The modulatory effect of ellagic acid and rosmarinic acid on ultraviolet-B-induced cytokine/chemokine gene expression in skin keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells.

    PubMed

    Lembo, Serena; Balato, Anna; Di Caprio, Roberta; Cirillo, Teresa; Giannini, Valentina; Gasparri, Franco; Monfrecola, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UV) induces an increase in multiple cutaneous inflammatory mediators. Ellagic acid (EA) and rosmarinic acid (RA) are natural anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory compounds found in many plants, fruits, and nuts. We assessed the ability of EA and RA to modulate IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, MCP-1, and TNF-α gene expression in HaCaT cells after UVB irradiation. Cells were treated with UVB (100 mJ/cm(2)) and simultaneously with EA (5 μM in 0.1% DMSO) or RA (2.7 μM in 0.5% DMSO). Moreover, these substances were added to the UVB-irradiated cells 1 h or 6 h before harvesting, depending on the established UVB-induced cytokine expression peak. Cytokine gene expression was examined using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. RA produced a significant reduction in UVB-induced expression of IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, and TNF-α when applied at the same time as irradiation. EA showed milder effects compared with RA, except for TNF-α. Both substances decreased IL-6 expression, also when applied 5 h after irradiation, and always produced a significant increase in UVB-induced IL-10 expression. Our findings suggest that EA and RA are able to prevent and/or limit the UVB-induced inflammatory cascade, through a reduction in proinflammatory mediators and the enhancement of IL-10, with its protective function. PMID:25162011

  17. Alteration of select gene expression patterns in individuals infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Erik; Wang, Chia-Hao; Frederick, Toinette; Lee, Chi-Lin; Anthony, Patricia; Arribas-Layton, David; Baker, Kerry; Millstein, Joshua; Kovacs, Andrea; Neamati, Nouri

    2014-04-01

    Multiple human proteins have been shown to both support and restrict viral replication, and confirmation of virus-associated changes in the expression of these genes is relevant for future therapeutic efforts. In this study a well-characterized panel of 49 individuals either infected with HIV-1 or uninfected was compiled and analyzed for the effect of HIV infection status, viral load, and antiretroviral treatment on specific gene expression. mRNA was extracted and reverse transcribed from purified CD4+ cells, and quantitative real-time PCR was utilized to scrutinize differences in the expression of four host genes that have been demonstrated to either stimulate (HSP90 and LEDGF/p75) or restrict (p21/WAF1 and APOBEC3G) proviral integration. HIV infection status was associated with slight to moderate alterations in the expression of all four genes. After adjusting for age, mRNA expression levels of HSP90, LEDGF/p75 and APOBEC3G were found to all be decreased in infected patients compared to healthy controls by 1.43-, 1.26-, and 4.71-fold, respectively, while p21/WAF1 expression was increased 2.35-fold. Furthermore, individuals receiving raltegravir exhibited a 1.28-fold reduction in LEDGF/p75 compared to those on non-raltegravir antiretroviral treatment. Identification of these and similar HIV-induced changes in gene expression may be valuable for delineating the extent of host cell molecular mechanisms stimulating viral replication. PMID:24482297

  18. Altered expression of progesterone receptor isoforms A and B in human eutopic endometrium in endometriosis patients.

    PubMed

    Wölfler, Monika Martina; Küppers, Mareike; Rath, Werner; Buck, Volker Uwe; Meinhold-Heerlein, Ivo; Classen-Linke, Irmgard

    2016-07-01

    Recent data implicate an altered expression of progesterone receptor isoform A (PR-A) and B (PR-B) in the endometrium of endometriosis patients. This prospective exploratory study aimed to precisely determine the PR-A and PR-B expression using immunohistochemical techniques in eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis compared with disease-free women throughout the menstrual cycle. All symptomatic patients underwent laparoscopy for the diagnosis of endometriosis and histological confirmation of the disease (EO) whereas controls were proven disease-free (CO). In CO samples (n=10) an increased expression of PR-A and PR-B during the proliferative to early secretory phase and a decreased expression of both receptor isoforms during the mid to late secretory phase was ascertained in accordance with previous studies. In patients with endometriosis (n=16) no cycle dependent pattern of PR-A and PR-B expression was identified in contrast to patients without endometriosis. Moreover, in EO samples a huge variety of inter- and intra-individual differences in PR-A and PR-B expression were detected. These data provide further evidence that dysregulation of the PR-A and PR-B expression might contribute to the pathophysiology of endometriosis. PMID:27050108

  19. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense–antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis. PMID:23650872

  20. DNA repair in cultured keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.C.; Parsons, S.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1983-07-01

    Most of our understanding of DNA repair mechanisms in human cells has come from the study of these processes in cultured fibroblasts. The unique properties of keratinocytes and their pattern of terminal differentiation led us to a comparative examination of their DNA repair properties. The relative repair capabilities of the basal cells and the differentiated epidermal keratinocytes as well as possible correlations of DNA repair capacity with respect to age of the donor have been examined. In addition, since portions of human skin are chronically exposed to sunlight, the repair response to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (254 nm) when the cells are conditioned by chronic low-level UV irradiation has been assessed. The comparative studies of DNA repair in keratinocytes from infant and aged donors have revealed no significant age-related differences for repair of UV-induced damage to DNA. Sublethal UV conditioning of cells from infant skin had no appreciable effect on either the repair or normal replication response to higher, challenge doses of UVL. However, such conditioning resulted in attenuated repair in keratinocytes from adult skin after UV doses above 25 J/m2. In addition, a surprising enhancement in replication was seen in conditioned cells from adult following challenge UV doses.

  1. TELOMERE AND TELOMERASE MODULATION BY BERGAMOT POLYPHENOLIC FRACTION IN EXPERIMENTAL PHOTOAGEING IN HUMAN KERATINOCYTES.

    PubMed

    Nisticò, S; Ehrlich, J; Gliozzi, M; Maiuolo, J; Del Duca, E; Muscoli, C; Mollace, V

    2015-01-01

    Photoageing represents the addition of extrinsic chronic ultraviolet radiation-induced damage on intrinsic ageing and accounts for most age-associated changes in skin appearance. In this study, we evaluated the effect of 38% BPF, a highly concentrated extract of the bergamot fruit (Citrus bergamia) on UVB-induced photoageing by examining inflammatory cytokine expression, telomere length/telomerase alterations and cellular viability in human immortalized HaCaT keratinocytes. Our results suggest that 38% BPF protects HaCaT cells against UVB-induced oxidative stress and markers of photoageing in a dose-dependent manner and could be a useful supplement in skin care products. Together with antioxidant properties, BPF, a highly concentrated extract of the bergamot fruit, appears to modulate basic cellular signal transduction pathways leading to anti-proliferative, anti-aging and immune modulating responses. PMID:26403416

  2. Areca Nut Components Affect COX-2, Cyclin B1/cdc25C and Keratin Expression, PGE2 Production in Keratinocyte Is Related to Reactive Oxygen Species, CYP1A1, Src, EGFR and Ras Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsiao-Hua; Chan, Chiu-Po; Yeh, Chien-Yang; Wang, Yin-Lin; Cheng, Ru-Hsiu; Hahn, Liang-Jiunn; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2014-01-01

    Aims Chewing of betel quid (BQ) increases the risk of oral cancer and oral submucous fibrosis (OSF), possibly by BQ-induced toxicity and induction of inflammatory response in oral mucosa. Methods Primary gingival keratinocytes (GK cells) were exposed to areca nut (AN) components with/without inhibitors. Cytotoxicity was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethyl- thiazol- 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. mRNA and protein expression was evaluated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting. PGE2/PGF2α production was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results Areca nut extract (ANE) stimulated PGE2/PGF2α production, and upregulated the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1), but inhibited expression of keratin 5/14, cyclinB1 and cdc25C in GK cells. ANE also activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), Src and Ras signaling pathways. ANE-induced COX-2, keratin 5, keratin 14 and cdc25C expression as well as PGE2 production were differentially regulated by α–naphthoflavone (a CYP 1A1/1A2 inhibitor), PD153035 (EGFR inhibitor), pp2 (Src inhibitor), and manumycin A (a Ras inhibitor). ANE-induced PGE2 production was suppressed by piper betle leaf (PBL) extract and hydroxychavicol (two major BQ components), dicoumarol (a NAD(P)H:Quinone Oxidoreductase - NQO1 inhibitor) and curcumin. ANE-induced cytotoxicity was inhibited by catalase and enhanced by dicoumarol, suggesting that AN components may contribute to the pathogenesis of OSF and oral cancer via induction of aberrant differentiation, cytotoxicity, COX-2 expression, and PGE2/PGF2αproduction. Conclusions CYP4501A1, reactive oxygen species (ROS), EGFR, Src and Ras signaling pathways could all play a role in ANE-induced pathogenesis of oral cancer. Addition of PBL into BQ and curcumin consumption could inhibit the ANE-induced inflammatory response. PMID:25051199

  3. Altered gene expression profiles in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of type 2 diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been an increasing body of epidemiologic and biochemical evidence implying the role of cerebral insulin resistance in Alzheimer-type dementia. For a better understanding of the insulin effect on the central nervous system, we performed microarray-based global gene expression profiling in the hippocampus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of streptozotocin-induced and spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats as model animals for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Results Following pathway analysis and validation of gene lists by real-time polymerase chain reaction, 30 genes from the hippocampus, such as the inhibitory neuropeptide galanin, synuclein gamma and uncoupling protein 2, and 22 genes from the prefrontal cortex, e.g. galanin receptor 2, protein kinase C gamma and epsilon, ABCA1 (ATP-Binding Cassette A1), CD47 (Cluster of Differentiation 47) and the RET (Rearranged During Transfection) protooncogene, were found to exhibit altered expression levels in type 2 diabetic model animals in comparison to non-diabetic control animals. These gene lists proved to be partly overlapping and encompassed genes related to neurotransmission, lipid metabolism, neuronal development, insulin secretion, oxidative damage and DNA repair. On the other hand, no significant alterations were found in the transcriptomes of the corpus striatum in the same animals. Changes in the cerebral gene expression profiles seemed to be specific for the type 2 diabetic model, as no such alterations were found in streptozotocin-treated animals. Conclusions According to our knowledge this is the first characterization of the whole-genome expression changes of specific brain regions in a diabetic model. Our findings shed light on the complex role of insulin signaling in fine-tuning brain functions, and provide further experimental evidence in support of the recently elaborated theory of type 3 diabetes. PMID:22369239

  4. Alteration of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) Expression in Orbital Fibroblasts from Patients with Graves’ Ophthalmopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pei-Chen; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Graves’ ophthalmopathy (GO) is a disfiguring and sometimes blinding disease, which is characterized by inflammation and swelling of orbital tissues, with fibrosis and adipogenesis being predominant features. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the expression levels of fibrosis-related genes, especially that of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), are altered in orbital fibroblasts of patients with GO. The role of oxidative stress in the regulation of CTGF expression in GO orbital fibroblasts is also examined. By a SYBR Green-based real time quantitative PCR (RT-QPCR), we demonstrated that the mRNA expression levels of fibronectin, apolipoprotein J, and CTGF in cultured orbital fibroblasts from patients with GO were significantly higher than those of age-matched normal controls (p = 0.007, 0.037, and 0.002, respectively). In addition, the protein expression levels of fibronectin, apolipoprotein J, and CTGF analyzed by Western blot were also significantly higher in GO orbital fibroblasts (p = 0.046, 0.032, and 0.008, respectively) as compared with the control. Furthermore, after treatment of orbital fibroblasts with a sub-lethal dose of hydrogen peroxide (200 μM H2O2), we found that the H2O2-induced increase of CTGF expression was more pronounced in the GO orbital fibroblasts as compared with those in normal controls (20% vs. 7%, p = 0.007). Importantly, pre-incubation with antioxidants including N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin C, respectively, resulted in significant attenuation of the induction of CTGF in GO orbital fibroblasts in response to H2O2 (p = 0.004 and 0.015, respectively). Taken together, we suggest that oxidative stress plays a role in the alteration of the expression of CTGF in GO orbital fibroblasts that may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of GO. Antioxidants may be used in combination with the therapeutic agents for effective treatment of GO. PMID:26599235

  5. Altered Gene Expression Pattern in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kiliszek, Marek; Burzynska, Beata; Michalak, Marcin; Gora, Monika; Winkler, Aleksandra; Maciejak, Agata; Leszczynska, Agata; Gajda, Ewa; Kochanowski, Janusz; Opolski, Grzegorz

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite a substantial progress in diagnosis and therapy, acute myocardial infarction (MI) is a major cause of mortality in the general population. A novel insight into the pathophysiology of myocardial infarction obtained by studying gene expression should help to discover novel biomarkers of MI and to suggest novel strategies of therapy. The aim of our study was to establish gene expression patterns in leukocytes from acute myocardial infarction patients. Methods and Results Twenty-eight patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) were included. The blood was collected on the 1st day of myocardial infarction, after 4–6 days, and after 6 months. Control group comprised 14 patients with stable coronary artery disease, without history of myocardial infarction. Gene expression analysis was performed with Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST microarrays and GCS3000 TG system. Lists of genes showing altered expression levels (fold change >1.5, p<0.05) were submitted to Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Gene lists from each group were examined for canonical pathways and molecular and cellular functions. Comparing acute phase of MI with the same patients after 6 months (stable phase) and with control group we found 24 genes with changed expression. In canonical analysis three pathways were highlighted: signaling of PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor), IL-10 and IL-6 (interleukin 10 and 6). Conclusions In the acute phase of STEMI, dozens of genes from several pathways linked with lipid/glucose metabolism, platelet function and atherosclerotic plaque stability show altered expression. Up-regulation of SOCS3 and FAM20 genes in the first days of myocardial infarction is observed in the vast majority of patients. PMID:23185530

  6. Altered expression of miRNAs in a dihydrotestosterone-induced rat PCOS model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex and heterogeneous endocrine condition characterized by hyperandrogenism, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and chronic anovulation. Regulation and interaction of a multitude of genes required for follicular development are found to be altered in PCOS. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) mediate posttranscriptional gene regulation by binding to the 3´ untranslated region of mRNAs to either inhibit or enhance translation. However, the extent and regulation of miRNA expression in PCOS is poorly understood and the current study is the first to describe altered expression of miRNAs in PCOS. Methods A chronically androgenized [5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated] rat model which recapitulates many of the phenotypes of human PCOS, and miRNA PCR array was used to investigate the expression of 349 miRNAs in DHT treated rat ovaries. The ovarian expression of several selected miRNAs was also analyzed by in situ localization experiment. Results DHT-treated rats exhibit increased body weight, disrupted estrus cyclicity, decreased insulin sensitivity and decreased ovarian weight, with the latter phenomenon readily rescued by gonadotropin treatment in vivo. In general, 24% of the 349 miRNAs investigated were found to be differentially expressed between DHT-treated and control rats. Most of the differentially expressed miRNAs were found to be predominantly localized in the theca cells of the follicles. In silico analysis of the potential target genes of dysregulated miRNAs revealed their possible involvement in various pathways in the regulation of ovarian function. Conclusion Our current findings suggest that miRNAs are differentially regulated in hyperandrogenism, a condition possibly involved in the dysregulation of steroid hormone receptors and intra-ovarian factors, and that miRNAs may be involved in the etiology of PCOS. PMID:23675970

  7. Sulfite exposure-induced hepatocyte death is not associated with alterations in p53 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jianying; Lei, Peiyu; Zhang, Jidong; Zhao, Chunyan; Liang, Ruifeng

    2013-10-01

    Although sulfite (SO3(2-)) is commonly used as an antimicrobial agent and preservative in foods, medicines and wine, it has also been listed as an important risk factor for the initiation and progression of liver diseases due to oxidative damage. In general, apoptosis that is induced by oxidative stress is triggered by increases in p53 and alterations in Mdm2 and Bcl-2. However, the level of involvement of the p53 signaling pathway, which has been shown to be upregulated in some animal studies, in hepatocyte death remains unclear. To examine the response of the p53 signaling pathway to stimulation with different concentrations of sulfite, a time course study of p53, Mdm2, and Bcl-2 expression was conducted in an immortalized hepatic cell line, HL-7702. When the HL-7702 cells were cultured in the presence of Na2SO3, the cell viability was significantly decreased after 24h compared to that of the control group (0mmol/L) (p<0.05). Meanwhile, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels in the supernatants of HL-7702 cells were significantly increased following Na2SO3 administration. Interestingly, the expression of p53 and p-p53 (Ser15) remained unchanged. In addition, no obvious alterations in Mdm2 and Bcl-2 expression were observed in HL-7702 cells that had been stimulated with various concentrations of sulfite. To further investigate the detailed mechanism underlying sulfite toxicity, caspase-3, PCNA and RIP1 expression in HL-7702 cells was studied. The expression levels of caspase-3 and PCNA were unchanged, but RIP1 expression was increased significantly after 24h of exposure. In light of this evidence, we propose that sulfite is cytotoxic to hepatocytes, but this cytotoxicity is not achieved by direct interruption of the p53 signaling pathway. In addition, we propose that an alternative necrotic process underlies hepatocellular death following sulfite exposure. PMID:23973939

  8. Ethanol-related alterations in gene expression patterns in the developing murine hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Chanchal; Park, Kyoung Sun; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that consuming alcohol prior to and during pregnancy can cause harm to the developing fetus. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a term commonly used to describe a range of disabilities that may arise from prenatal alcohol exposure such as fetal alcohol syndrome, partial fetal alcohol syndrome, alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorders, and alcohol-related birth defects. Here, we report that maternal binge alcohol consumption alters several important genes that are involved in nervous system development in the mouse hippocampus at embryonic day 18. Microarray analysis revealed that Nova1, Ntng1, Gal, Neurog2, Neurod2, and Fezf2 gene expressions are altered in the fetal hippocampus. Pathway analysis also revealed the association of the calcium signaling pathway in addition to other pathways with the differentially expressed genes during early brain development. Alteration of such important genes and dynamics of the signaling pathways may cause neurodevelopmental disorders. Our findings offer insight into the molecular mechanism involved in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with alcohol-related defects. PMID:26063602

  9. High glucose inhibits ClC-2 chloride channels and attenuates cell migration of rat keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fuqiang; Guo, Rui; Cheng, Wenguang; Chai, Linlin; Wang, Wenping; Cao, Chuan; Li, Shirong

    2015-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that migration of keratinocytes is critical to wound epithelialization, and defects of this function result in chronic delayed-healing wounds in diabetes mellitus patients, and the migration has been proved to be associated with volume-activated chloride channels. The aim of the study is to investigate the effects of high glucose (HG, 25 mM) on ClC-2 chloride channels and cell migration of keratinocytes. Methods Newborn Sprague Dawley rats were used to isolate and culture the keratinocyte in this study. Immunofluorescence assay, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot assay were used to examine the expression of ClC-2 protein or mRNA. Scratch wound assay was used to measure the migratory ability of keratinocytes. Transwell cell migration assay was used to measure the invasion and migration of keratinocytes. Recombinant lentivirus vectors were established and transducted to keratinocytes. Whole-cell patch clamp was used to perform the electrophysiological studies. Results We found that the expression of ClC-2 was significantly inhibited when keratinocytes were exposed to a HG (25 mM) medium, accompanied by the decline of volume-activated Cl− current (ICl,vol), migration potential, and phosphorylated PI3K as compared to control group. When knockdown of ClC-2 by RNAi or pretreatment with wortmannin, similar results were observed, including ICl,vol and migration keratinocytes were inhibited. Conclusion Our study proved that HG inhibited ClC-2 chloride channels and attenuated cell migration of rat keratinocytes via inhibiting PI3K signaling. PMID:26355894

  10. Notch Cooperates with Survivin to Maintain Stemness and to Stimulate Proliferation in Human Keratinocytes during Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Palazzo, Elisabetta; Morandi, Paolo; Lotti, Roberta; Saltari, Annalisa; Truzzi, Francesca; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Dumas, Marc; Marconi, Alessandra; Pincelli, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway orchestrates cell fate by either inducing cell differentiation or maintaining cells in an undifferentiated state. This study aims to evaluate Notch expression and function in normal human keratinocytes. Notch1 is expressed in all epidermal layers, though to a different degree of intensity, with a dramatic decrease during ageing. Notch1 intracellular domain (N1ICD) levels are decreased during transit from keratinocyte stem cells (KSC) to transit amplifying (TA) cells, mimicking survivin expression in samples from donors of all ages. Calcium markedly reduces N1ICD levels in keratinocytes. N1ICD overexpression induces the up-regulation of survivin and the down-regulation of keratin 10 and involucrin, while increasing the S phase of the cell cycle. On the other hand, Notch1 inhibition (DAPT) dose-dependently decreases survivin, stimulates differentiation, and reduces keratinocyte proliferation in samples from donors of all ages. Silencing Notch downgrades survivin and increases keratin 10. In addition, Notch1 inhibition decreases survivin levels and proliferation both in KSC and TA cells. Finally, while survivin overexpression decreases keratinocyte differentiation and increases N1ICD expression both in KSC and TA cells, silencing survivin results in N1ICD down-regulation and an increase in differentiation markers. These results suggest that the Notch1/survivin crosstalk contributes to the maintenance of stemness in human keratinocytes. PMID:26540052

  11. Simulated microgravity alters the expression of key genes involved in fracture healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, N. Patrick; Androjna, Caroline; Hill, Esther; Globus, Ruth K.; Midura, Ronald J.

    2013-11-01

    Fracture healing in animal models has been shown to be altered in both ground based analogs of spaceflight and in those exposed to actual spaceflight. The molecular mechanisms behind altered fracture healing as a result of chronic exposure to microgravity remain to be elucidated. This study investigates temporal gene expression of multiple factors involved in secondary fracture healing, specifically those integral to the development of a soft tissue callus and the transition to that of hard tissue. Skeletally mature female rats were subjected to a 4 week period of simulated microgravity and then underwent a closed femoral fracture procedure. Thereafter, they were reintroduced to the microgravity and allowed to heal for a 1 or 2 week period. A synchronous group of weight bearing rats was used as a normal fracture healing control. Utilizing Real-Time quantitative PCR on mRNA from fracture callus tissue, we found significant reductions in the levels of transcripts associated with angiogenesis, chondrogenesis, and osteogenesis. These data suggest an altered fracture healing process in a simulated microgravity environment, and these alterations begin early in the healing process. These findings may provide mechanistic insight towards developing countermeasure protocols to mitigate these adaptations.

  12. Altered Expression of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines in Ovarian Follicles of Cows with Cystic Ovarian Disease.

    PubMed

    Baravalle, M E; Stassi, A F; Velázquez, M M L; Belotti, E M; Rodríguez, F M; Ortega, H H; Salvetti, N R

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that ovulation shares many of the features of an inflammatory reaction and that cytokines play many diverse and important roles in reproductive biology. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α in ovarian cells from cows with cystic ovarian disease (COD) as compared with that in ovarian structures from regularly cycling cows. Expression of genes encoding IL-1α, IL-6 and TNF-α was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction in follicular cells from ovaries from healthy cows and cows with COD with no significant differences. However, immunohistochemistry showed increased expression of IL-1α, IL-6 and TNF-α in cystic follicles, suggesting that this expression may be related to the persistence of follicular cysts. The effect of COD was evident for IL-1α and TNF-α, and a follicular structure-disease interaction was observed in the expression of all the cytokines evaluated. Thus, altered expression of these proinflammatory cytokines may be related to ovulation failure and development of follicular cysts. PMID:26065705

  13. Pain-related behaviors and neurochemical alterations in mice expressing sickle hemoglobin: modulation by cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Divyanshoo R.; Li, Yunfang; Khasabov, Sergey G.; Gupta, Pankaj; Kehl, Lois J.; Ericson, Marna E.; Nguyen, Julia; Gupta, Vinita; Hebbel, Robert P.; Simone, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    Sickle cell disease causes severe pain. We examined pain-related behaviors, correlative neurochemical changes, and analgesic effects of morphine and cannabinoids in transgenic mice expressing human sickle hemoglobin (HbS). Paw withdrawal threshold and withdrawal latency (to mechanical and thermal stimuli, respectively) and grip force were lower in homozygous and hemizygous Berkley mice (BERK and hBERK1, respectively) compared with control mice expressing human hemoglobin A (HbA-BERK), indicating deep/musculoskeletal and cutaneous hyperalgesia. Peripheral nerves and blood vessels were structurally altered in BERK and hBERK1 skin, with decreased expression of μ opioid receptor and increased calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P immunoreactivity. Activators of neuropathic and inflammatory pain (p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, STAT3, and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase) showed increased phosphorylation, with accompanying increase in COX-2, interleukin-6, and Toll-like receptor 4 in the spinal cord of hBERK1 compared with HbA-BERK. These neurochemical changes in the periphery and spinal cord may contribute to hyperalgesia in mice expressing HbS. In BERK and hBERK1, hyperalgesia was markedly attenuated by morphine and cannabinoid receptor agonist CP 55940. We show that mice expressing HbS exhibit characteristics of pain observed in sickle cell disease patients, and neurochemical changes suggestive of nociceptor and glial activation. Importantly, cannabinoids attenuate pain in mice expressing HbS. PMID:20304807

  14. Impact of altered actin gene expression on vinculin, talin, cell spreading, and motility.

    PubMed

    Schevzov, G; Lloyd, C; Gunning, P

    1995-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a strong correlation between the expression of vinculin and the shape and motility of a cell (Rodriguez Fernandez et al., 1992a, b, 1993). This hypothesis was tested by comparing the expression of vinculin and talin with the motility of morphologically altered myoblasts. These mouse C2 myoblasts were previously generated by directly perturbing the cell cytoskeleton via the stable transfection of a mutant-form of the beta-actin gene (beta sm) and three different forms of the gamma-actin gene; gamma, gamma minus 3'UTR (gamma delta'UTR), and gamma minus intron III (gamma delta IVSIII) (Schevzov et al., 1992; Lloyd and Gunning, 1993). In the case of the beta sm and gamma-actin transfectants, a two-fold decrease in the cell surface area was coupled, as predicted, with a decrease in vinculin and talin expression. In contrast, the gamma delta IVSIII transfectants with a seven-fold decrease in the cell surface area showed an unpredicted slight increase in vinculin and talin expression and the gamma delta 3'-UTR transfectants with a slight increase in the cell surface area showed no changes in talin expression and a decrease in vinculin expression. We conclude that changes in actin gene expression alone can impact on the expression of vinculin and talin. Furthermore, we observed that these actin transfectants failed to show a consistent relationship between cell shape, motility, and the expression of vinculin. However, a relationship between talin and cell motility was found to exist, suggesting a role for talin in the establishment of focal contacts necessary for motility. PMID:7646816

  15. Sequential Infection with Common Pathogens Promotes Human-like Immune Gene Expression and Altered Vaccine Response.

    PubMed

    Reese, Tiffany A; Bi, Kevin; Kambal, Amal; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Beura, Lalit K; Bürger, Matheus C; Pulendran, Bali; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Jameson, Stephen C; Masopust, David; Haining, W Nicholas; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-05-11

    Immune responses differ between laboratory mice and humans. Chronic infection with viruses and parasites are common in humans, but are absent in laboratory mice, and thus represent potential contributors to inter-species differences in immunity. To test this, we sequentially infected laboratory mice with herpesviruses, influenza, and an intestinal helminth and compared their blood immune signatures to mock-infected mice before and after vaccination against yellow fever virus (YFV-17D). Sequential infection altered pre- and post-vaccination gene expression, cytokines, and antibodies in blood. Sequential pathogen exposure induced gene signatures that recapitulated those seen in blood from pet store-raised versus laboratory mice, and adult versus cord blood in humans. Therefore, basal and vaccine-induced murine immune responses are altered by infection with agents common outside of barrier facilities. This raises the possibility that we can improve mouse models of vaccination and immunity by selective microbial exposure of laboratory animals to mimic that of humans. PMID:27107939

  16. Adrenergic stimulation alters the expression of inflammasome components and interleukins in primary human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    HORSTMANN, JOHANN-PHILIPP; MARZI, INGO; RELJA, BORNA

    2016-01-01

    Prior to their release, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 are cleaved to their bioactive forms by a multiprotein complex known as an inflammasome, which is comprised of a number of elements that are subject to nuclear factor-κB-dependent transcription. Catecholamines have been indicated to exert an enhancing effect on the IL-1β release. The aim of the present study was to determine whether alterations in inflammasome gene expression may be responsible for the modified IL-1β and IL-18 secretion following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and catecholamine co-stimulation. Monocytes were isolated from the peripheral blood of 21 healthy volunteers using CD14+ microbeads. Following stimulation with LPS (2 µg/ml) and/or phenylephrine (PE; 10 µM) for 24 h, the supernatants were subjected to ELISA to evaluate the ex vivo protein expression levels of IL-1β and IL-18. In addition, the gene expression levels of inflammasome components associated with the cleavage of IL-1β and IL-18, including NLRP1, NLRP3, caspase-1 and PYCARD were determined using polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that LPS significantly increased IL-1β expression compared with the unstimulated control samples. Co-stimulation with LPS + PE significantly enhanced IL-1β expression compared with LPS alone. Furthermore, IL-18 expression was significantly reduced by LPS and LPS + PE co-stimulation. The gene expression levels of IL-18, NLRP1, caspase-1 and PYCARD were comparable in the LPS- and LPS + PE-stimulated cells. LPS significantly induced the expression levels of IL-1β and NLRP3, and to a lesser degree, the expression of NLRP1, compared with the control. By contrast, PE markedly induced the expression levels of IL-18 and NLRP1, while LPS reduced the gene expression of IL-18. In conclusion, adrenergic stimulation suppressed NLRP3 expression and enhanced NLRP1 expression, indicating that NLRP3 may regulate IL-1β secretion and NLRP1 may regulate the release of IL-18. PMID:26889257

  17. The Altered Renal and Hepatic Expression of Solute Carrier Transporters (SLCs) in Type 1 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chenghao; Zhu, Ling; Chan, Ting; Lu, Xiaoxi; Shen, Weiyong; Gillies, Mark C.; Zhou, Fanfan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder that significantly affects human health and well-being. The Solute carrier transporters (SLCs), particularly the Organic anion/cation transporters (Oats/Octs/Octns), Organic anion transporting polypeptides (Oatps) and Oligopeptide transporters (Pepts) are essential membrane proteins responsible for cellular uptake of many endogenous and exogenous substances such as clinically important drugs. They are widely expressed in mammalian key organs especially the kidney and liver, in which they facilitate the influx of various drug molecules, thereby determining their distribution and elimination in body. The altered expression of SLCs in diabetes mellitus could have a profound and clinically significant influence on drug therapies. In this study, we extensively investigated the renal and hepatic expression of twenty essential SLCs in the type 1 diabetic Ins2Akita murine model that develops both hyperglycemia and diabetes-related complications using real-time PCR and immunoblotting analysis. We found that the renal expression of mOatp1a1, mOatp1a6, mOat1, mOat3, mOat5, mOct2 and mPept2 was decreased; while that of mPept1 was increased at the mRNA level in the diabetic mice compared with non-diabetic controls. We found up-regulated mRNA expression of mOatp1a4, mOatp1c1, mOctn2, mOct3 and mPept1 as well as down-regulation of mOatp1a1 in the livers of diabetic mice. We confirmed the altered protein expression of several SLCs in diabetic mice, especially the decreased renal and hepatic expression of mOatp1a1. We also found down-regulated protein expression of mOat3 and mOctn1 in the kidneys as well as increased protein expression of mOatp1a4 and mOct3 in the livers of diabetic mice. Our findings contribute to better understanding the modulation of SLC transporters in type 1 diabetes mellitus, which is likely to affect the pharmacokinetic performance of drugs that are transported by these transporters and therefore, forms the

  18. Altered expression of PGK1 in a family with phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Svaasand, Eva K; Aasly, Jan; Landsem, Veslemøy Malm; Klungland, Helge

    2007-11-01

    The X-linked recessive disease phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) deficiency is caused by altered expression of the PGK1 enzyme, which causes muscle stiffness, hemolytic anemia, and mental retardation. In this study we characterized the PGK1 gene in a family of two brothers, two sisters, and their parents. A single mutation in exon 6, which was associated with the pattern of inheritance of PGK1 deficiency, was observed. This silent G213G; c.639C>T mutation was localized to the conserved exon-intron boundary. We have developed a method for quantification of PGK1 mRNA and demonstrated a marked reduction in PGK1 mRNA in both brothers with the disease. A smaller decrease in PGK1 expression was observed in one sister with symptoms of PGK deficiency and in her mother. Only the normal PGK1 allele was expressed in the two heterozygous women. Whereas most known PGK1 mutations cause amino acid alterations, our study indicates that inhibition of the transcription mechanism is the cause of PGK deficiency. PMID:17661373

  19. Rat embryo fibroblast cells expressing human papillomavirus 1a genes exhibit altered growth properties and tumorigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Green, M; Brackmann, K H; Loewenstein, P M

    1986-01-01

    Human papillomavirus 1a (HPV1a) induces benign tumors (papillomas or warts) in humans under natural conditions of infection but has not been found to replicate significantly in cell culture or in experimental animals. To establish model systems to study the oncogenic properties and expression of HPV genes, we established cell lines by cotransfecting the 3Y1 rat fibroblast cell line with HPV1a DNA constructs containing an intact early gene region and the Tn5 neomycin resistance gene. Most cell lines selected for expression of the neomycin resistance gene by treatment with the antibiotic G-418 contained viral DNA in a high-molecular-weight form. The growth characteristics of several cell lines containing high copy numbers of HPV1a DNA were studied further. They were shown to differ from the parental cell line and from G-418-resistant cell lines that did not incorporate viral DNA in the following properties: morphological alteration, increased cell density at confluence, growth in 0.5% serum, efficient anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, and rapid formation of tumors in nude mice. Those cell lines that possessed altered growth properties and tumorigenicity were found to express abundant quantities of polyadenylated virus-specific RNA species in the cytoplasm. Images PMID:3023676

  20. MicroRNA-Offset RNA Alters Gene Expression and Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jin; Schnitzler, Gavin R.; Iyer, Lakshmanan K.; Aronovitz, Mark J.; Baur, Wendy E.; Karas, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-offset RNAs (moRs) were first identified in simple chordates and subsequently in mouse and human cells by deep sequencing of short RNAs. MoRs are derived from sequences located immediately adjacent to microRNAs (miRs) in the primary miR (pri-miR). Currently moRs are considered to be simply a by-product of miR biosynthesis that lack biological activity. Here we show for the first time that a moR is biologically active. We demonstrate that endogenous or over-expressed moR-21 significantly alters gene expression and inhibits the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In addition, we find that miR-21 and moR-21 may regulate different genes in a given pathway and can oppose each other in regulating certain genes. We report that there is a “seed region” of moR-21 as well as a “seed match region” in the target gene 3’UTR that are indispensable for moR-21-mediated gene down-regulation. We further demonstrate that moR-21-mediated gene repression is Argonaute 2 (Ago2) dependent. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence that microRNA offset RNA alters gene expression and is biologically active. PMID:27276022

  1. Dendritic remodeling of hippocampal neurons is associated with altered NMDA receptor expression in alcohol dependent rats

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Miranda C.; Kim, Airee; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged alcohol exposure has been previously shown to impair the structure and function of the hippocampus, although the underlying structural and biochemical alterations contributing to these deleterious effects are unclear. Also unclear is whether these changes persist into prolonged periods of abstinence. Previous work from our lab utilizing a clinically relevant rodent model of alcohol consumption demonstrated that alcohol dependence (induced by chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure or CIE) decreases proliferation and survival of neural stem cells in the hippocampal subgranular zone and hippocampal neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, implicating this region of the cortex as particularly sensitive to the toxic effects of prolonged ethanol exposure. For this study, we investigated seven weeks of CIE-induced morphological changes (dendritic complexity and dendritic spine density) of dentate gyrus (DG) granule cell neurons, CA3, and CA1 pyramidal neurons and the associated alterations in biochemical markers of synaptic plasticity and toxicity (NMDA receptors and PSD-95) in the hippocampus in ethanol-experienced Wistar rats 3h (CIE) and 21 days (protracted abstinence) after the last ethanol vapor exposure. CIE reduced dendritic arborization of DG neurons and this effect persisted into protracted abstinence. CIE enhanced dendritic arborization of pyramidal neurons and this effect did not persist into protracted abstinence. The architectural changes in dendrites did not correlate with alterations in dendritic spine density, however, they were associated with increases in the expression of pNR2B, total NR2B, and total NR2A immediately following CIE with expression levels returning to control levels in prolonged abstinence. Overall, these data provide the evidence that CIE produces profound changes in hippocampal structural plasticity and in molecular tools that maintain hippocampal structural plasticity, and these alterations may underlie cognitive dysfunction

  2. Absence of premature senescence in Werner's syndrome keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Badr; Sheerin, Angela N; Jennert-Burston, Katrin; Bird, Joe L E; Massala, M V; Illsley, Matthew; James, S Elizabeth; Faragher, Richard G A

    2016-10-01

    Werner's syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by loss of function mutation in wrn and is a useful model of premature in vivo ageing. Cellular senescence is a plausible causal mechanism of mammalian ageing and, at the cellular level, WS fibroblasts show premature senescence resulting from a combination of telomeric attrition and replication fork stalling. Over 90% of WS fibroblast cultures achieve <20 population doublings (PD) in vitro compared to wild type human fibroblast cultures. It has been proposed that some cell types, capable of proliferation, will fail to show a premature senescence phenotype in response to wrn mutations. To test this hypothesis, human dermal keratinocytes (derived from both WS and wild type patients) were cultured long term. WS Keratinocytes showed a replicative lifespan in excess of 100 population doublings but maintained functional growth arrest mechanisms based on p16 and p53. The karyotype of the cells was superficially normal and the cultures retained markers characteristic of keratinocyte holoclones (stem cells) including p63 expression and telomerase activity. Accordingly we conclude that, in contrast to WS fibroblasts, WS keratinocytes do not demonstrate slow growth rates or features of premature senescence. These findings suggest that the epidermis is among the tissue types that do not display symptoms of premature ageing caused by loss of function of wrn. This is in support that Werner's syndrome is a segmental progeroid syndrome. PMID:27492502

  3. Cyclic Equibiaxial Tensile Strain Alters Gene Expression of Chondrocytes via Histone Deacetylase 4 Shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chongwei; Wei, Xiaochun; Lv, Zhi; Sun, Xiaojuan; Wang, Shaowei; Zhang, Yang; Jiao, Qiang; Wang, Xiaohu; Li, Yongping; Wei, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This paper aims to investigate whether equibiaxial tensile strain alters chondrocyte gene expression via controlling subcellular localization of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4). Materials and Methods Murine chondrocytes transfected with GFP-HDAC4 were subjected to 3 h cyclic equibiaxial tensile strain (CTS, 6% strain at 0.25 Hz) by a Flexcell® FX-5000™ Tension System. Fluorescence microscope and western blot were used to observe subcellular location of HDAC4. The gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. The concentration of Glycosaminoglycans in culture medium was quantified by bimethylmethylene blue dye; Collagen II protein was evaluated by western blot. Cells phenotype was identified by immunohistochemistry. Cell viability was evaluated by live-dead cell detect kit. Okadaic acid, an inhibitor of HDAC4 nuclear relocation, was used to further validate whether HDAC4 nuclear relocation plays a role in gene expression in response to tension stimulation. Results 87.5% of HDAC4 was located in the cytoplasm in chondrocytes under no loading condition, but it was relocated to the nucleus after CTS. RT-PCR analysis showed that levels of mRNA for aggrecan, collagen II, LK1 and SOX9 were all increased in chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to no loading control chondrocytes; in contrast, the levels of type X collagen, MMP-13, IHH and Runx2 gene expression were decreased in the chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to control chondrocytes. Meanwhile, CTS contributed to elevation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen II protein, but did not change collagen I production. When Okadaic acid blocked HDAC4 relocation from the cytoplasm to nucleus, the changes of the chondrocytes induced by CTS were abrogated. There was no chondrocyte dead detected in this study in response to CTS. Conclusions CTS is able to induce HDAC4 relocation from cytoplasm to nucleus. Thus, CTS alters chondrocytes gene expression in association with the relocation of HDAC4 induced

  4. Transgenic poplar expressing the pine GS1a show alterations in nitrogen homeostasis during drought.

    PubMed

    Molina-Rueda, Juan Jesús; Kirby, Edward G

    2015-09-01

    Transgenic hybrid poplars engineered to express ectopically the heterologous pine cytosolic GS1a display a number of significant pleiotropic phenotypes including enhanced growth, enhanced nitrogen use efficiency, and resistance to drought stress. The present study was undertaken in order to assess mechanisms whereby ectopic expression of pine GS1a in transgenic poplars results in enhanced agronomic phenotypes. Microarray analysis using the Agilent Populus whole genome array has allowed identification of genes differentially expressed between wild type (WT) and GS transgenics in four tissues (sink leaves, source leaves, stems, and roots) under three growth conditions (well-watered, drought, and recovery). Analysis revealed that differentially expressed genes in functional categories related to nitrogen metabolism show a trend of significant down-regulation in GS poplars compared to the WT, including genes encoding nitrate and nitrite reductases. The down-regulation of these genes was verified using qPCR, and downstream effects were further tested using NR activity assays. Results suggest that higher glutamine levels in GS transgenics regulate nitrate uptake and reduction. Transcript levels of nitrogen-related genes in leaves, including GS/GOGAT cycle enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase, GABA shunt enzymes, photorespiration enzymes, asparagine synthetase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and PII, were also assessed using qPCR revealing significant differences between GS poplars and the WT. Moreover, metabolites related to these differentially expressed genes showed alterations in levels, including higher levels of GABA, hydroxyproline, and putrescine in the GS transgenic. These alterations in nitrogen homeostasis offer insights into mechanisms accounting for drought tolerance observed in GS poplars. PMID:26113157

  5. Inferring causal genomic alterations in breast cancer using gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One of the primary objectives in cancer research is to identify causal genomic alterations, such as somatic copy number variation (CNV) and somatic mutations, during tumor development. Many valuable studies lack genomic data to detect CNV; therefore, methods that are able to infer CNVs from gene expression data would help maximize the value of these studies. Results We developed a framework for identifying recurrent regions of CNV and distinguishing the cancer driver genes from the passenger genes in the regions. By inferring CNV regions across many datasets we were able to identify 109 recurrent amplified/deleted CNV regions. Many of these regions are enriched for genes involved in many important processes associated with tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Genes in these recurrent CNV regions were then examined in the context of gene regulatory networks to prioritize putative cancer driver genes. The cancer driver genes uncovered by the framework include not only well-known oncogenes but also a number of novel cancer susceptibility genes validated via siRNA experiments. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first effort to systematically identify and validate drivers for expression based CNV regions in breast cancer. The framework where the wavelet analysis of copy number alteration based on expression coupled with the gene regulatory network analysis, provides a blueprint for leveraging genomic data to identify key regulatory components and gene targets. This integrative approach can be applied to many other large-scale gene expression studies and other novel types of cancer data such as next-generation sequencing based expression (RNA-Seq) as well as CNV data. PMID:21806811

  6. Systemic Sclerosis Patients Present Alterations in the Expression of Molecules Involved in B-Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Lilian; Ferrier, Ashley; Aravena, Octavio; Fonseca, Elianet; Berendsen, Jorge; Biere, Andrea; Bueno, Daniel; Ramos, Verónica; Aguillón, Juan Carlos; Catalán, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The activation threshold of B cells is tightly regulated by an array of inhibitory and activator receptors in such a way that disturbances in their expression can lead to the appearance of autoimmunity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of activating and inhibitory molecules involved in the modulation of B cell functions in transitional, naive, and memory B-cell subpopulations from systemic sclerosis patients. To achieve this, blood samples were drawn from 31 systemic sclerosis patients and 53 healthy individuals. Surface expression of CD86, MHC II, CD19, CD21, CD40, CD22, Siglec 10, CD35, and FcγRIIB was determined by flow cytometry. IL-10 production was evaluated by intracellular flow cytometry from isolated B cells. Soluble IL-6 and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA from supernatants of stimulated B cells. Systemic sclerosis patients exhibit an increased frequency of transitional and naive B cells related to memory B cells compared with healthy controls. Transitional and naive B cells from patients express higher levels of CD86 and FcγRIIB than healthy donors. Also, B cells from patients show high expression of CD19 and CD40, whereas memory cells from systemic sclerosis patients show reduced expression of CD35. CD19 and CD35 expression levels associate with different autoantibody profiles. IL-10+ B cells and secreted levels of IL-10 were markedly reduced in patients. In conclusion, systemic sclerosis patients show alterations in the expression of molecules involved in B-cell regulation. These abnormalities may be determinant in the B-cell hyperactivation observed in systemic sclerosis. PMID:26483788

  7. ALTERED EXPRESSION OF NEUROPLASTICITY-RELATED GENES IN THE BRAIN OF DEPRESSED SUICIDES

    PubMed Central

    FUCHSOVA, B.; ALVAREZ JULIÁ, A.; RIZAVI, H. S.; FRASCH, A. C.; PANDEY, G. N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Expression of the neuronal membrane glycoprotein M6a (GPM6A), the proteolipid protein (PLP/DM20) family member, is downregulated in the hippocampus of chronically stressed animals. Its neuroplastic function involves a role in neurite formation, filopodium outgrowth and synaptogenesis through an unknown mechanism. Disruptions in neuroplasticity mechanisms have been shown to play a significant part in the etiology of depression. Thus, the current investigation examined whether GPM6A expression is also altered in human depressed brain. Methods Expression levels and coexpression patterns of GPM6A, GPM6B, and PLP1 (two other members of PLP/DM20 family) as well as of the neuroplasticity-related genes identified to associate with GPM6A were determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in postmortem samples from the hippocampus (n =18) and the prefrontal cortex (PFC) (n= 25) of depressed suicide victims and compared with control subjects (hippocampus n= 18; PFC n =25). Neuroplasticity-related proteins that form complexes with GPM6A were identified by coimmunoprecipitation technique followed by mass spectrometry. Results Results indicated transcriptional downregulation of GPM6A and GPM6B in the hippocampus of depressed suicides. The expression level of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha (CAMK2A) and coronin1A (CORO1A) was also significantly decreased. Subsequent analysis of coexpression patterns demonstrated coordinated gene expression in the hippocampus and in the PFC indicating that the function of these genes might be coregulated in the human brain. However, in the brain of depressed suicides this coordinated response was disrupted. Conclusions Disruption of coordinated gene expression as well as abnormalities in GPM6A and GPM6B expression and expression of the components of GPM6A complexes were detected in the brain of depressed suicides. PMID:25934039

  8. Chronic maternal morphine alters calbindin D-28k expression pattern in postnatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Mithbaokar, Pratibha; Fiorito, Filomena; Della Morte, Rossella; Maharajan, Veeramani; Costagliola, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The distribution pattern of calbindin (CB)-D28k-expressing neurons results to be altered in several brain regions of chronic morphine exposed adult mice. In this study, the influence of chronic maternal exposure to morphine on the distribution pattern of CB-D28k-expressing neurons in the brain of mouse offspring was investigated. Females of CD-1 mice were daily administered with saline or morphine for 7 days before mating, during the whole gestation period, and until 21 day post-partum. Their offspring were sacrificed on postnatal day 18, and the brains were examined by histology using cresyl violet and by immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal anti-CB-D28k antibody. Histology revealed no significant differences in the distribution pattern and the number of neurons between the offspring forebrain of the control group of mice and the two groups of mice treated with different doses of morphine. However, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the number of CB-D28k-immunoreactive neurons remarkably decreased in the cingulate cortex, in the layers II-IV of the parietal cortex and in all regions of the hippocampus, while it increased in the layers V-VI of the parietal cortex and in the subicular region of the offspring brain of morphine treated mice. Overall, our findings demonstrate that maternal exposure to morphine alters the pattern of CB-D28k-expressing neuron pattern in specific regions of murine developing brain, in a layer- and dose-dependent way, thus suggesting that these alterations might represent a mechanism by which morphine modifies the functional aspects of developing brain. PMID:26418221

  9. Altered Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha expression levels correlate with coronary vessel anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Wikenheiser, Jamie; Wolfram, Julie A.; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Yang, Ke; Karunamuni, Ganga; Wilson, David L.; Semenza, Gregg L.; Agani, Faton; Fisher, Steven A.; Ward, Nicole; Watanabe, Michiko

    2009-01-01

    The outflow tract myocardium and other regions corresponding to the location of the major coronary vessels of the developing chicken heart, display a high level of hypoxia as assessed by the hypoxia indicator EF5. The EF5 positive tissues were also specifically positive for nuclear-localized hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), the oxygen-sensitive component of the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) heterodimer. This led to our hypothesis that there is a “template” of hypoxic tissue that determines the stereotyped pattern of the major coronary vessels. In this study we disturbed this template by altering ambient oxygen levels (hypoxia 15%; hyperoxia 75-40%) during the early phases of avian coronary vessel development, in order to alter tissue hypoxia, HIF-1α protein expression and its downstream target genes without high mortality. We also altered HIF-1α gene expression in the embryonic outflow tract cardiomyocytes by injecting an adenovirus containing a constitutively active form of HIF-1α (AdCA5). We assayed for coronary anomalies using anti-alpha-smooth muscle actin immunohistology. When incubated under abnormal oxygen levels or injected with a low titer of the AdCA5, coronary arteries displayed deviations from their normal proximal connections to the aorta. These deviations were similar to known clinical anomalies of coronary arteries. These findings indicated that developing coronary vessels may be subject to a level of regulation that is dependent on differential oxygen levels within cardiac tissues and subsequent HIF-1 regulation of gene expression. PMID:19777592

  10. Altered expression of glycosaminoglycans in metastatic 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steck, P.A.; Cheong, P.H.; Nakajima, M.; Yung, W.K.A.; Moser, R.P.; Nicolson, G.L.

    1987-02-24

    A difference in the expression and metabolism of (/sup 35/S)sulfated glycosaminoglycans between rat mammary tumor cells derived from a primary tumor and those from its metastatic lesions has been observed. Cells from the primary tumor possessed about equal quantities of chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate on their cell surfaces but released fourfold more chondroitin sulfate than heparan sulfate into their medium. In contrast, cells from distal metastatic lesions expressed approximately 5 times more heparan sulfate than chondroitin sulfate in both medium and cell surface fractions. This was observed to be the result of differential synthesis of the glycosaminoglycans and not of major structural alterations of the individual glycosaminoglycans. The degree of sulfation and size of heparan sulfate were similar for all cells examined. However, chondroitin sulfate, observed to be only chondroitin 4-sulfate, from the metastases-derived cells had a smaller average molecular weight on gel filtration chromatography and showed a decreased quantity of sulfated disaccharides upon degradation with chondroitin ABC lyase compared to the primary tumor derived cells. Major qualitative or quantitative alterations were not observed for hyaluronic acid among the various 13762NF cells. The metabolism of newly synthesized sulfated glycosaminoglycans was also different between cells from primary tumor and metastases. A pulse-chase kinetics study demonstrated that both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate were degraded by the metastases-derived cells, whereas the primary tumor derived cells degraded only heparan sulfate and degraded it at a slower rate. These results suggested that altered glycosaminoglycan expression and metabolism may be associated with the metastatic process in 13762NF rat mammary tumor cells.

  11. Altered Th17 Cytokine Expression in Helicobacter pylori Patients with TLR4 (D299G) Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Nader; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Kheiri, Soleyman; Gholipour, Abolfazl; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2016-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is associated with gastric ulcer and gastric adenocarcinoma. Polymorphisms in the host genes coding for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) may influence the innate and adaptive immune response to the infection, affecting the susceptibility to H. pylori or the disease outcomes. However, the details and association with different polymorphism and clinical expression of infection remain unclear. A case-control study consisting of 58 patients with H. pylori infection and 44 H. pylori uninfection was conducted. Genomic DNA was extracted and genotypes of TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphism were assessed through polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Mucosal cytokines expression in H. pylori-infected and uninfected gastric biopsies was determined by real-time PCR. The expression of IL-6, IL-17, IL-21, IL-23 and TGF-β1 was significantly higher in patients with D299G polymorphism in TLR4. But the expression of IL-18 between patients with single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR4 and patients with the wild-type allele was not significant. In H. pylori-infected patients with gastritis, SNPs in TLR4 may alter cytokine expression toward Th17 immune response in the gastric mucosa and may have increased risk for the development of peptic ulcer. PMID:26853914

  12. A Complex Interaction Between Reduced Reelin Expression and Prenatal Organophosphate Exposure Alters Neuronal Cell Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Brian R.; Ross, Brennan; Chou, Joan Wang; Khankan, Rana; Khialeeva, Elvira; Bui, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors are both likely to contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders including schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders, and major depressive disorders. Prior studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that the combinatorial effect of two factors—reduced expression of reelin protein and prenatal exposure to the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos oxon—gives rise to acute biochemical effects and to morphological and behavioral phenotypes in adolescent and young adult mice. In the current study, we examine the consequences of these factors on reelin protein expression and neuronal cell morphology in adult mice. While the cell populations that express reelin in the adult brain appear unchanged in location and distribution, the levels of full length and cleaved reelin protein show persistent reductions following prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon. Cell positioning and organization in the hippocampus and cerebellum are largely normal in animals with either reduced reelin expression or prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon, but cellular complexity and dendritic spine organization is altered, with a skewed distribution of immature dendritic spines in adult animals. Paradoxically, combinatorial exposure to both factors appears to generate a rescue of the dendritic spine phenotypes, similar to the mitigation of behavioral and morphological changes observed in our prior study. Together, our observations support an interaction between reelin expression and chlorpyrifos oxon exposure that is not simply additive, suggesting a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors in regulating brain morphology. PMID:27364165

  13. Verticillium dahliae alters Pseudomonas spp. populations and HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere of strawberry.

    PubMed

    DeCoste, Nadine J; Gadkar, Vijay J; Filion, Martin

    2010-11-01

    The production of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) by beneficial root-associated bacteria is an important mechanism for the biological control of plant pathogens. However, little is known about the biotic factors affecting HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere of plants. In this study, real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) assays were developed to investigate the effect of the plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae on hcnC (encoding for HCN biosynthesis) gene expression in Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. Strawberry plants were inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300 and (or) V. dahliae and grown in pots filled with nonsterilized field soil. RNA was extracted from rhizosphere soil sampled at 0, 15, 30, and 45 days following inoculation with V. dahliae and used for qRT-PCR analyses. Populations of V. dahliae and Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300 were also monitored using a culture-independent qPCR approach. hcnC expression was detected at all sampling dates. The presence of V. dahliae had a significant stimulation effect on hcnC gene expression and also increased the population of Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. However, the V. dahliae population was not altered by the presence of Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. To our knowledge, this study is the first to evaluate the effect of a plant pathogen on HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere soil. PMID:21076481

  14. Altered enteroendocrine cell expression in T cell receptor alpha chain knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Rubin, D C; Zhang, H; Qian, P; Lorenz, R G; Hutton, K; Peters, M G

    2000-10-15

    Mice lacking T cell receptor alpha chain (TCRalpha(-/-)) develop inflammation of the colon. We have examined the effect of this inflammation on the colonic epithelium by studying markers of epithelial cuff, enteroendocrine, and immune cell differentiation. Using immunohistochemical techniques, colons were compared in normal C57/BL6 and murine TCR alpha(-/-) mice aged 2 and 3 weeks and 3-11 months. TCR alpha(-/-) mice aged 3-11 months had histologic evidence of inflammation with increased expression of CD45, CD4+, CD8+, and B220+ cells and a decrease in expression of IgA+ cells. There was a decrease in the number of cholecystokinin, serotonin, and neurotensin enteroendocrine expressing cells in the colon of TCR alpha(-/-) mice. These changes were not present in 2-3-week-old suckling/weaning mice. In contrast, peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY), glucagon-like peptide-1, and gastrin expression did not change and small intestinal enteroendocrine cells remained unaltered. The change in colonic enteroendocrine cell expression appears to be a specific response, since only a subset of these cells was altered, and the epithelium was intact by histologic analysis. The absence of functional T cells in TCR alpha(-/-) colon has a marked effect on differentiation of a specific subpopulation of enteroendocrine cells, prior to loss of integrity of the epithelium. PMID:11054861

  15. Localisation of Neuregulin 1-{beta}3 to different sub-nuclear structures alters gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ming; Trim, Carol M.; Gullick, William J.

    2011-02-15

    Neuregulins are growth factors that signal via the ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors. Here we show using immunohistochemistry that they are often expressed in the nucleus of a range of tumour types including soft tissue and breast. The Neuregulin 1 type I-{beta}3 (NRG1-{beta}3) isoform localises to two sub-nuclear compartments in animal cells, nucleoli and spliceosomes. We used NRG1-{beta}3 tagged with photoactivatable GFP and demonstrated that this re-localised from nucleoli to spliceosomes over 90 min. Tyrosine kinase activity was not required for retaining the NRG1-{beta}3 within the nucleus. Mutation of the lysines 14 and 16 or 15 and 16 together prevented nucleolar uptake while four positively charged residues were identified which were required for spliceosome uptake. Molecular modelling suggests that three of these may form a binding site. We showed using a kinome array that NRG1-{beta}3 and a mutant exclusively localising to spliceosomes increased phosphorylation and/or expression of the HER4 and HER2 receptors. Using a transcriptomic analysis the same two constructs induced expression of several messenger RNAs and we confirmed the increased expression at the protein level of the most highly induced, Heat Shock Protein 70B'. These results suggest that Neuregulin activates receptor signalling in spliceosomes leading to altered gene expression.

  16. Rosiglitazone Promotes PPARγ-Dependent and -Independent Alterations in Gene Expression in Mouse Islets

    PubMed Central

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Kawamori, Dan; Meyer, John; Hu, Jiang; Smith, David M.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2012-01-01

    The glitazone class of insulin-sensitizing agents act, in part, by the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in adipocytes. However, it is unclear whether the expression of PPARγ in the islets is essential for their potential β-cell-sparing properties. To investigate the in vivo effects of rosiglitazone on β-cell biology, we used an inducible, pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 enhancer element-driven, Cre recombinase to knockout PPARγ expression specifically in adult β-cells (PPARgKO). Subjecting the PPARgKO mice to a chow diet led to virtually undetectable changes in glucose or insulin sensitivity, which was paralleled by minimal changes in islet gene expression. Similarly, challenging the mutant mice with a high-fat diet and treatment with rosiglitazone did not alter insulin sensitivity, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, islet size, or proliferation in the knockout mice despite PPARγ-dependent and -independent changes in islet gene expression. These data suggest that PPARγ expression in the β-cells is unlikely to be directly essential for normal β-cell function or the insulin-sensitizing actions of rosiglitazone. PMID:22807489

  17. Altered expression of neuropeptide Y receptors caused by focal cortical dysplasia in human intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hanjiang; Guan, Yuguang; Zhou, Jian; Qi, Xueling; Li, Tianfu; Xu, Zhiqing David; Luan, Guo-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is a common cause of pharmacologically-intractable epilepsy, however, the precise mechanisms underlying the epileptogenicity of FCD remains to be determined. Neuropeptide Y (NPY), an endogenous anticonvulsant in the central nervous system, plays an important role in the regulation of neuronal excitability. Increased expression of NPY and its receptors has been identified in the hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, presumed to act as an endogenous anticonvulsant mechanism. Therefore, we investigated whether expression changes in NPY receptors occurs in patients with FCD. We specifically investigated the expression of seizure-related NPY receptor subtypes Y1, Y2, and Y5 in patients with FCD versus autopsy controls. We found that Y1R and Y2R were up-regulated at the mRNA and protein levels in the temporal and frontal lobes in FCD lesions. By contrast, there was no significant change in either receptor detected in parietal lesions. Notably, overexpression of Y5R was consistently observed in all FCD lesions. Our results demonstrate the altered expression of Y1R, Y2R and Y5R occurs in FCD lesions within the temporal, frontal and parietal lobe. Abnormal NPY receptor subtype expression may be associated with the onset and progression of epileptic activity and may act as a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of refractory epilepsy caused by FCD. PMID:26943580

  18. A Complex Interaction Between Reduced Reelin Expression and Prenatal Organophosphate Exposure Alters Neuronal Cell Morphology.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Brian R; Ross, Brennan; Chou, Joan Wang; Khankan, Rana; Khialeeva, Elvira; Bui, Kimberly; Carpenter, Ellen M

    2016-06-01

    Genetic and environmental factors are both likely to contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders including schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders, and major depressive disorders. Prior studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that the combinatorial effect of two factors-reduced expression of reelin protein and prenatal exposure to the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos oxon-gives rise to acute biochemical effects and to morphological and behavioral phenotypes in adolescent and young adult mice. In the current study, we examine the consequences of these factors on reelin protein expression and neuronal cell morphology in adult mice. While the cell populations that express reelin in the adult brain appear unchanged in location and distribution, the levels of full length and cleaved reelin protein show persistent reductions following prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon. Cell positioning and organization in the hippocampus and cerebellum are largely normal in animals with either reduced reelin expression or prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon, but cellular complexity and dendritic spine organization is altered, with a skewed distribution of immature dendritic spines in adult animals. Paradoxically, combinatorial exposure to both factors appears to generate a rescue of the dendritic spine phenotypes, similar to the mitigation of behavioral and morphological changes observed in our prior study. Together, our observations support an interaction between reelin expression and chlorpyrifos oxon exposure that is not simply additive, suggesting a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors in regulating brain morphology. PMID:27364165

  19. Expression of Arabidopsis CAX1 in tobacco: altered calcium homeostasis and increased stress sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Hirschi, K D

    1999-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2)+) efflux from the cytosol modulates Ca(2+) concentrations in the cytosol, loads Ca(2+) into intracellular compartments, and supplies Ca(2+) to organelles to support biochemical functions. The Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporter CAX1 (for CALCIUM EXCHANGER 1) of Arabidopsis is thought to be a key mediator of these processes. To clarify the regulation of CAX1, we examined CAX1 RNA expression in response to various stimuli. CAX1 was highly expressed in response to exogenous Ca(2+). Transgenic tobacco plants expressing CAX1 displayed symptoms of Ca(2+) deficiencies, including hypersensitivity to ion imbalances, such as increased magnesium and potassium concentrations, and to cold shock, but increasing the Ca(2+) in the media abrogated these sensitivities. Tobacco plants expressing CAX1 also demonstrated increased Ca(2+) accumulation and altered activity of the tonoplast-enriched Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporter. These results emphasize that regulated expression of Ca(2+)/H(+) antiport activity is critical for normal growth and adaptation to certain stresses. PMID:10559438

  20. Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Infection of Sensory Neurons Alters Neuronal Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Martha F.; Cook, W. James; Roth, Frederick P.; Zhu, Jia; Holman, Holly; Knipe, David M.; Coen, Donald M.

    2003-01-01

    The persistence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and the diseases that it causes in the human population can be attributed to the maintenance of a latent infection within neurons in sensory ganglia. Little is known about the effects of latent infection on the host neuron. We have addressed the question of whether latent HSV infection affects neuronal gene expression by using microarray transcript profiling of host gene expression in ganglia from latently infected versus mock-infected mouse trigeminal ganglia. 33P-labeled cDNA probes from pooled ganglia harvested at 30 days postinfection or post-mock infection were hybridized to nylon arrays printed with 2,556 mouse genes. Signal intensities were acquired by phosphorimager. Mean intensities (n = 4 replicates in each of three independent experiments) of signals from mock-infected versus latently infected ganglia were compared by using a variant of Student's t test. We identified significant changes in the expression of mouse neuronal genes, including several with roles in gene expression, such as the Clk2 gene, and neurotransmission, such as genes encoding potassium voltage-gated channels and a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. We confirmed the neuronal localization of some of these transcripts by using in situ hybridization. To validate the microarray results, we performed real-time reverse transcriptase PCR analyses for a selection of the genes. These studies demonstrate that latent HSV infection can alter neuronal gene expression and might provide a new mechanism for how persistent viral infection can cause chronic disease. PMID:12915567

  1. FOXM1 regulates proliferation, senescence and oxidative stress in keratinocytes and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, Artem; Panatta, Emanuele; Lena, AnnaMaria; Castiglia, Daniele; Di Daniele, Nicola; Melino, Gerry; Candi, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    Several transcription factors, including the master regulator of the epidermis, p63, are involved in controlling human keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. Here, we report that in normal keratinocytes, the expression of FOXM1, a member of the Forkhead superfamily of transcription factors, is controlled by p63. We observe that, together with p63, FOXM1 strongly contributes to the maintenance of high proliferative potential in keratinocytes, whereas its expression decreases during differentiation, as well as during replicative-induced senescence. Depletion of FOXM1 is sufficient to induce keratinocyte senescence, paralleled by an increased ROS production and an inhibition of ROS-scavenger genes (SOD2, CAT, GPX2, PRDX). Interestingly, FOXM1 expression is strongly reduced in keratinocytes isolated from old human subjects compared with young subjects. FOXM1 depletion sensitizes both normal keratinocytes and squamous carcinoma cells to apoptosis and ROS-induced apoptosis. Together, these data identify FOXM1 as a key regulator of ROS in normal dividing epithelial cells and suggest that squamous carcinoma cells may also use FOXM1 to control oxidative stress to escape premature senescence and apoptosis. PMID:27385468

  2. RIPK4 activates an IRF6-mediated proinflammatory cytokine response in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kwa, Mei Qi; Scholz, Glen M; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-07-01

    Keratinocytes of the oral mucosa and epidermis play key roles in host defense. In addition to functioning as a physical barrier, they also produce cytokines to elicit inflammation in response to infection or injury. We recently established that receptor-interacting protein kinase 4 (RIPK4) and interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) function as a cell-intrinsic signaling axis to regulate keratinocyte differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated a functional relationship between RIPK4 and IRF6 in the control of proinflammatory cytokine expression in keratinocytes. The overexpression of RIPK4 by oral keratinocytes induced the strong expression of CCL5 and CXCL11. In contrast, the expression of other cytokines (e.g. IL8 and TNF) was largely unaffected, thus demonstrating specificity in the induction of proinflammatory cytokine expression by RIPK4. CCL5 and CXCL11 expression were also induced in response to the activation of the PKC pathway, and gene silencing experiments indicated that their inducible expression was dependent on RIPK4 and IRF6. Moreover, gene reporter assays suggested that RIPK4 induces CCL5 and CXCL11 expression by stimulating the transactivation of their promoters by IRF6. Accordingly, our findings suggest that the RIPK4-IRF6 signaling axis plays a multifaceted role in barrier epithelial homeostasis through its regulation of both keratinocyte inflammation and differentiation. PMID:27014863

  3. Altered Gene Expressions and Cytogenetic Repair Efficiency in Cells with Suppressed Expression of XPA after Proton Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Gridley, Daila S.; Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Cellular responses to damages from ionizing radiation (IR) exposure are influenced not only by the genes involved in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, but also by non- DSB repair genes. We demonstrated previously that suppressed expression of several non-DSB repair genes, such as XPA, elevated IR-induced cytogenetic damages. In the present study, we exposed human fibroblasts that were treated with control or XPA targeting siRNA to 250 MeV protons (0 to 4 Gy), and analyzed chromosome aberrations and expressions of genes involved in DNA repair. As expected, after proton irradiation, cells with suppressed expression of XPA showed a significantly elevated frequency of chromosome aberrations compared with control siRNA treated (CS) cells. Protons caused more severe DNA damages in XPA knock-down cells, as 36% cells contained multiple aberrations compared to 25% in CS cells after 4Gy proton irradiation. Comparison of gene expressions using the real-time PCR array technique revealed that expressions of p53 and its regulated genes in irradiated XPA suppressed cells were altered similarly as in CS cells, suggesting that the impairment of IR induced DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells is p53-independent. Except for XPA, which was more than 2 fold down regulated in XPA suppressed cells, several other DNA damage sensing and repair genes (GTSE1, RBBP8, RAD51, UNG and XRCC2) were shown a more than 1.5 fold difference between XPA knock-down cells and CS cells after proton exposure. The possible involvement of these genes in the impairment of DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells will be further investigated.

  4. Human Cytomegalovirus Modulates Expression of Noncanonical Wnt Receptor ROR2 To Alter Trophoblast Migration

    PubMed Central

    van Zuylen, Wendy J.; Ford, Caroline E.; Wong, Diana D. Y.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Maternal primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, reactivation, or reinfection with a different viral strain may cause fetal injury and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Increasing evidence indicates that fetal injury results not only from direct viral cytopathic damage to the CMV-infected fetus but also from indirect effects through placental infection and dysfunction. CMV alters Wingless (Wnt) signaling, an essential cellular pathway involved in placentation, as evidenced by reduced transcription of canonical Wnt target genes and decreased Wnt3a-induced trophoblast migration. Whether CMV affects the noncanonical Wnt signaling pathway has been unclear. This study demonstrates for the first time that CMV infection inhibits Wnt5a-stimulated migration of human SGHPL-4 trophoblasts and that inhibition of the pathway restores normal migration of CMV-infected cells. Western blot and real-time PCR analyses show increased expression of noncanonical Wnt receptor ROR2 in CMV-infected trophoblasts. Mimicking the CMV-induced ROR2 protein expression via ectopic expression inhibited Wnt5a-induced trophoblast migration and reduced T cell-specific factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor (LEF)-mediated transcription as measured using luciferase reporter assays. Gene silencing using small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes decreased ROR2 transcript and protein levels. In contrast, proliferation of SGHPL-4 trophoblasts, measured by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was not affected. The siRNA-mediated downregulation of ROR2 in trophoblasts rescued CMV-induced reduction in trophoblast migration. These data suggest a mechanism where CMV alters the expression of the Wnt receptor ROR2 to alter Wnt5a-mediated signaling and inhibit trophoblast motility. Inhibition of this mechanism may be a target for therapeutic intervention for CMV-induced placental damage and consequent fetal damage in congenital CMV infections. IMPORTANCE Maternal

  5. Genes and small RNA transcripts exhibit dosage-dependent expression pattern in maize copy-number alterations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copy-number alterations are widespread in animal and plant genomes, but their immediate impact on gene expression is still unclear. In animals, copy-number alterations usually exhibit dosage effects, except for sex chromosomes that tend to be dosage compensated. In plants, genes within small duplica...

  6. Overexpression of CRABPI in suprabasal keratinocytes enhances the proliferation of epidermal basal keratinocytes in mouse skin topically treated with all-trans retinoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X.-H.; Vivero, Marina; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether ectopic expression of CRABPI, a cellular retinoic acid binding protein, influenced the actions of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in transgenic (TG) mice. We targeted CRABPI to the basal vs. suprabasal layers of mouse epidermis by using the keratin 14 (K14) and keratin 10 (K10) promoters, respectively. Greater CRABPI protein levels were detected in the epidermis of adult transgenic(+) mice than in transgenic(-) mice for both transgenes. In adult mouse skin CRABPI overexpression in the basal or suprabasal keratinocytes did not cause morphological abnormalities, but did result in decreased CRABPII mRNA levels. Ectopically overexpressed CRABPI in suprabasal keratinocytes, but not in basal keratinocytes, enhanced the thickening of the epidermis induced by topical ATRA treatments (10 {mu}M, 400 {mu}l for 4 days) by 1.59 {+-} 0.2-fold (p < 0.05). ATRA treatment (10 {mu}M) resulted in a 59.9 {+-} 9.8% increase (p < 0.05) in the BrdU labeling index in K10/FLAG-CRABPI TG(+) mice vs. TG(-) mice. Retinoid topical treatments reduced p27 and CYP26A1 mRNA levels in TG(+) and TG(-) mouse skin in K14 and K10/FLAG-CRABPI transgenic mice. As epidermal basal keratinocyte proliferation is stimulated by paracrine growth factors secreted by ATRA activated suprabasal keratinocytes, our results indicate that CRABPI overexpression in suprabasal keratinocytes enhances the physiological functions of ATRA.

  7. Neoplastic transformation of immortalized human epidermal keratinocytes by ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thraves, P.; Salehi, Z.; Dritschilo, A.; Rhim, J.S. )

    1990-02-01

    Efforts to investigate the progression of events that cause human cells to become neoplastic in response to ionizing radiation have been aided by the development of tissue culture systems of epithelial cells. In the present study, nontumorigenic human epidermal keratinocytes immortalized by adenovirus type 12 and simian virus 40 have been transformed by exposure to x-ray irradiation. Such transformants showed morphological alterations, formed colonies in soft agar, and induced carcinomas when transplanted into nude mice, whereas primary human epidermal keratinocytes exposed to radiation in this manner failed to show any evidence of transformation. These findings demonstrate the malignant transformation of human primary epithelial cells in culture by the combined action of a DNA tumor virus and radiation, indicating a multistep process for radiation-induced neoplastic conversion. This in vitro system may be useful as a tool for dissecting the process of radiation-induced neoplastic transformation of human epithelial cells and for detecting previously unreported human oncogenes.

  8. Altered surfactant protein A gene expression and protein metabolism associated with repeat exposure to inhaled endotoxin.

    PubMed

    George, Caroline L S; White, Misty L; O'Neill, Marsha E; Thorne, Peter S; Schwartz, David A; Snyder, Jeanne M

    2003-12-01

    Chronically inhaled endotoxin, which is ubiquitous in many occupational and domestic environments, can adversely affect the respiratory system resulting in an inflammatory response and decreased lung function. Surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) is part of the lung innate immune system and may attenuate the inflammatory response in various types of lung injury. Using a murine model to mimic occupational exposures to endotoxin, we hypothesized that SP-A gene expression and protein would be elevated in response to repeat exposure to inhaled grain dust and to purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our results demonstrate that repeat exposure to inhaled endotoxin, either in the form of grain dust or purified LPS, results in increased whole lung SP-A gene expression and type II alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia, whereas SP-A protein levels in lung lavage fluid are decreased. Furthermore, these alterations in SP-A gene activity and protein metabolism are dependent on an intact endotoxin signaling system. PMID:12922979

  9. Neutral buoyancy and sleep-deprived serum factors alter expression of cytokines regulating osteogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorczynski, Reginald M.; Gorczynski, Christopher P.; Gorczynski, Laura Y.; Hu, Jiang; Lu, Jin; Manuel, Justin; Lee, Lydia

    2005-05-01

    We examined expression of genes associated with cytokine production, and genes implicated in regulating bone metabolism, in bone stromal and osteoblast cells incubated under standard ground conditions and under conditions of neutral buoyancy, and in the presence/absence of serum from normal or sleep-deprived mice. We observed a clear interaction between these two conditions (exposure to neutral buoyancy and serum stimulation) in promoting enhanced osteoclastogenesis. Both conditions independently altered expression of a number of cytokines implicated in the regulation of bone metabolism. However, using stromal cells from IL-1 and TNF α cytokine r KO mice, we concluded that the increased bone loss under microgravity conditions was not primarily cytokine mediated.

  10. Transgenic plants that express the phytoplasma effector SAP11 show altered phosphate starvation and defense responses.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yen-Ting; Li, Meng-Ying; Cheng, Kai-Tan; Tan, Choon Meng; Su, Li-Wen; Lin, Wei-Yi; Shih, Hsien-Tzung; Chiou, Tzyy-Jen; Yang, Jun-Yi

    2014-03-01

    Phytoplasmas have the smallest genome among bacteria and lack many essential genes required for biosynthetic and metabolic functions, making them unculturable, phloem-limited plant pathogens. In this study, we observed that transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing the secreted Aster Yellows phytoplasma strain Witches' Broom protein11 shows an altered root architecture, similarly to the disease symptoms of phytoplasma-infected plants, by forming hairy roots. This morphological change is paralleled by an accumulation of cellular phosphate (Pi) and an increase in the expression levels of Pi starvation-induced genes and microRNAs. In addition to the Pi starvation responses, we found that secreted Aster Yellows phytoplasma strain Witches' Broom protein11 suppresses salicylic acid-mediated defense responses and enhances the growth of a bacterial pathogen. These results contribute to an improved understanding of the role of phytoplasma effector SAP11 and provide new insights for understanding the molecular basis of plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:24464367

  11. Altered expression of adhesion molecules on peripheral blood leukocytes in feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Olyslaegers, Dominique A J; Dedeurwaerder, Annelike; Desmarets, Lowiese M B; Vermeulen, Ben L; Dewerchin, Hannah L; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2013-10-25

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal, coronavirus-induced systemic disease in domestic and wild felids. The pathology associated with FIP (multifocal granulomatous vasculitis) is considered to be elicited by exaggerated activation and subsequent extravasation of leukocytes. As changes in the expression of adhesion molecules on circulating leukocytes precede their margination and emigration, we reasoned that the expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules may be altered in FIP. In present study, the expression of principal adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte transmigration (CD15s, CD11a, CD11b, CD18, CD49d, and CD54) on peripheral blood leukocytes from cats with naturally occurring FIP (n=15) and controls (n=12) was quantified by flow cytometry using a formaldehyde-based rapid leukocyte preparation technique. T- and B-lymphocytes from FIP patients exhibit higher expression of both subunits (CD11a and CD18) composing the β2 integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1. In addition, the expression of the α4 subunit (CD49d) of the β1 integrin very late antigen (VLA)-4 was elevated on B-lymphocytes from FIP patients. The expression of CD11b and CD18, that combine to form the β2 integrin macrophage-1 antigen (Mac-1), was elevated on monocytes, whereas the density of CD49d was reduced on this population in FIP. Granulocytes of FIP cats displayed an increased expression of the α chain of Mac-1 (CD11b). These observations suggest that leukocytes from FIP patients show signs of systemic activation causing them to extravasate into surrounding tissues and ultimately contribute to pyogranuloma formation seen in FIP. PMID:23910523

  12. Altered T-UCRs expression profile in the spinal cord of mice with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    He, Li-Na; Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord plays an important role in the transmission and modulation of nociceptive information. Global changes in gene expression in the spinal cord contribute to the induction and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Transcribed Ultraconserved Regions (T-UCRs), a novel class of long noncoding RNAs, can regulate gene expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels and are related to many human diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, and heart diseases. In this study, we screened abnormal T-UCRs expression in the spinal cord under spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic pain condition. Microarray data showed the alternation of T-UCRs at the transcriptional level in the spinal cord 10 days after SNL. Among 78 altered T-UCRs, 23 T-UCRs were upregulated by more than 1.5-fold and 55 ones downregulated by less than 0.5-fold after SNL. Hierarchical cluster analysis of T-UCRs expression profiles showed the opposite expression pattern between SNL and sham-operated mice. The quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis further confirmed the expression patterns of uc.305, uc.189, uc.46, and uc.217 after SNL. The gene ontology annotation and signaling pathway analysis for the T-UCRs host genes indicated that differentially expressed T-UCRs were involved in several intracellular activities and signaling pathways, including Ephrin receptor activity, soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) interactions in vesicular transport pathway, and WNT signaling pathway. Collectively, the current data suggest the possible role of T-UCR in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. T-UCRs may serve as a new kind of target for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:27500182

  13. Alterations in gene expression and DNA methylation during murine and human lung alveolar septation.

    PubMed

    Cuna, Alain; Halloran, Brian; Faye-Petersen, Ona; Kelly, David; Crossman, David K; Cui, Xiangqin; Pandit, Kusum; Kaminski, Naftali; Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Ahmad, Ausaf; Mariani, Thomas J; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2015-07-01

    DNA methylation, a major epigenetic mechanism, may regulate coordinated expression of multiple genes at specific time points during alveolar septation in lung development. The objective of this study was to identify genes regulated by methylation during normal septation in mice and during disordered septation in bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In mice, newborn lungs (preseptation) and adult lungs (postseptation) were evaluated by microarray analysis of gene expression and immunoprecipitation of methylated DNA followed by sequencing (MeDIP-Seq). In humans, microarray gene expression data were integrated with genome-wide DNA methylation data from bronchopulmonary dysplasia versus preterm and term lung. Genes with reciprocal changes in expression and methylation, suggesting regulation by DNA methylation, were identified. In mice, 95 genes with inverse correlation between expression and methylation during normal septation were identified. In addition to genes known to be important in lung development (Wnt signaling, Angpt2, Sox9, etc.) and its extracellular matrix (Tnc, Eln, etc.), genes involved with immune and antioxidant defense (Stat4, Sod3, Prdx6, etc.) were also observed. In humans, 23 genes were differentially methylated with reciprocal changes in expression in bronchopulmonary dysplasia compared with preterm or term lung. Genes of interest included those involved with detoxifying enzymes (Gstm3) and transforming growth factor-β signaling (bone morphogenetic protein 7 [Bmp7]). In terms of overlap, 20 genes and three pathways methylated during mouse lung development also demonstrated changes in methylation between preterm and term human lung. Changes in methylation correspond to altered expression of a number of genes associated with lung development, suggesting that DNA methylation of these genes may regulate normal and abnormal alveolar septation. PMID:25387348

  14. Alterations in Gene Expression and DNA Methylation during Murine and Human Lung Alveolar Septation

    PubMed Central

    Cuna, Alain; Halloran, Brian; Faye-Petersen, Ona; Kelly, David; Crossman, David K.; Cui, Xiangqin; Pandit, Kusum; Kaminski, Naftali; Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Ahmad, Ausaf; Mariani, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation, a major epigenetic mechanism, may regulate coordinated expression of multiple genes at specific time points during alveolar septation in lung development. The objective of this study was to identify genes regulated by methylation during normal septation in mice and during disordered septation in bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In mice, newborn lungs (preseptation) and adult lungs (postseptation) were evaluated by microarray analysis of gene expression and immunoprecipitation of methylated DNA followed by sequencing (MeDIP-Seq). In humans, microarray gene expression data were integrated with genome-wide DNA methylation data from bronchopulmonary dysplasia versus preterm and term lung. Genes with reciprocal changes in expression and methylation, suggesting regulation by DNA methylation, were identified. In mice, 95 genes with inverse correlation between expression and methylation during normal septation were identified. In addition to genes known to be important in lung development (Wnt signaling, Angpt2, Sox9, etc.) and its extracellular matrix (Tnc, Eln, etc.), genes involved with immune and antioxidant defense (Stat4, Sod3, Prdx6, etc.) were also observed. In humans, 23 genes were differentially methylated with reciprocal changes in expression in bronchopulmonary dysplasia compared with preterm or term lung. Genes of interest included those involved with detoxifying enzymes (Gstm3) and transforming growth factor-β signaling (bone morphogenetic protein 7 [Bmp7]). In terms of overlap, 20 genes and three pathways methylated during mouse lung development also demonstrated changes in methylation between preterm and term human lung. Changes in methylation correspond to altered expression of a number of genes associated with lung development, suggesting that DNA methylation of these genes may regulate normal and abnormal alveolar septation. PMID:25387348

  15. p16/CDKN2 alterations and pRb expression in oesophageal squamous carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Busatto, G; Shiao, Y H; Parenti, A R; Baffa, R; Ruol, A; Plebani, M; Rugge, M

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Upregulation of the cell cycle associated genes, p16/CDKN2 and the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene (Rb), is commonly seen during the proliferation of normal cells. An inverse relation between the expression of p16/CDKN2 and Rb has been noted in many tumours, but has not yet been determined in oesophageal squamous carcinoma. AIMS: To investigate p16/CDKN2 genetic alterations and both the p16/CDKN2 and the Rb protein (pRb) immunophenotypes in oesophageal squamous carcinoma. METHODS: Twenty primary oesophageal squamous carcinomas were examined for mutations in p16/CDKN2 by the polymerase chain reaction, single stranded conformational polymorphism, and DNA sequencing. Synthesis of p16/CDKN2 and pRb proteins was determined by immunohistochemistry in 19 specimens of formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissues. RESULTS: Mutations of p16/CDKN2 were not detected in exons 1 and 2. In only one case, G to C and C to T base changes were detected in a non-coding region of exon 3. Expression of p16/CDKN2 and Rb was observed in both normal and neoplastic areas of tissue sections, indicating neither consistent homozygous deletion nor consistent hypermethylation of the genes in tumours. Fourteen tumours showed an inverse expression of p16/CDKN2 and Rb. An increased percentage of cells that immunostained positively for p16/CDKN2 but not for pRb was observed in eight tumours, five of which had no detectable pRb, suggesting defective Rb expression in these oesophageal squamous carcinomas. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that p16/CDKN2 mutations occur infrequently in oesophageal squamous carcinoma. The alteration of the Rb gene is suggested as an important step in the development of these tumours. PMID:9713590

  16. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-κB activation, Bay11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-κB in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. PMID:22705584

  17. An Atlas of Altered Expression of Deubiquitinating Enzymes in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luise, Chiara; Capra, Maria; Donzelli, Maddalena; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Jodice, Maria Giovanna; Nuciforo, Paolo; Viale, Giuseppe; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Confalonieri, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Background Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are proteases that process ubiquitin (Ub) or ubiquitin-like gene products, remodel polyubiquitin(-like) chains on target proteins, and counteract protein ubiquitination exerted by E3 ubiquitin-ligases. A wealth of studies has established the relevance of DUBs to the control of physiological processes whose subversion is known to cause cellular transformation, including cell cycle progression, DNA repair, endocytosis and signal transduction. Altered expression of DUBs might, therefore, subvert both the proteolytic and signaling functions of the Ub system. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we report the first comprehensive screening of DUB dysregulation in human cancers by in situ hybridization on tissue microarrays (ISH-TMA). ISH-TMA has proven to be a reliable methodology to conduct this kind of study, particularly because it allows the precise identification of the cellular origin of the signals. Thus, signals associated with the tumor component can be distinguished from those associated with the tumor microenvironment. Specimens derived from various normal and malignant tumor tissues were analyzed, and the “normal” samples were derived, whenever possible, from the same patients from whom tumors were obtained. Of the ∼90 DUBs encoded by the human genome, 33 were found to be expressed in at least one of the analyzed tissues, of which 22 were altered in cancers. Selected DUBs were subjected to further validation, by analyzing their expression in large cohorts of tumor samples. This analysis unveiled significant correlations between DUB expression and relevant clinical and pathological parameters, which were in some cases indicative of aggressive disease. Conclusions/Significance The results presented here demonstrate that DUB dysregulation is a frequent event in cancer, and have implications for therapeutic approaches based on DUB inhibition. PMID:21283576

  18. Ozone Exposure Alters Serotonin and Serotonin Receptor Expression in the Developing Lung

    PubMed Central

    Van Winkle, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    Ozone, a pervasive environmental pollutant, adversely affects functional lung growth in children. Animal studies demonstrate that altered lung development is associated with modified signaling within the airway epithelial mesenchymal trophic unit, including mediators that can change nerve growth. We hypothesized that ozone exposure alters the normal pattern of serotonin, its transporter (5-HTT), and two key receptors (5-HT2A and 5-HT4), a pathway involved in postnatal airway neural, epithelial, and immune processes. We exposed monkeys to acute or episodic ozone during the first 2 or 6 months of life. There were three exposure groups/age: (1) filtered air, (2) acute ozone challenge, and (3) episodic ozone + acute ozone challenge. Lungs were prepared for compartment-specific qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and stereology. Airway epithelial serotonin immunopositive staining increased in all exposure groups with the most prominent in 2-month midlevel and 6-month distal airways. Gene expression of 5-HTT, 5-HT2AR, and 5-HT4R increased in an age-dependent manner. Overall expression was greater in distal compared with midlevel airways. Ozone exposure disrupted both 5-HT2AR and 5-HT4R protein expression in airways and enhanced immunopositive staining for 5-HT2AR (2 months) and 5-HT4R (6 months) on smooth muscle. Ozone exposure increases serotonin in airway epithelium regardless of airway level, age, and exposure history and changes the spatial pattern of serotonin receptor protein (5-HT2A and 5-HT4) and 5-HTT gene expression depending on compartment, age, and exposure history. Understanding how serotonin modulates components of reversible airway obstruction exacerbated by ozone exposure sets the foundation for developing clinically relevant therapies for airway disease. PMID:23570994

  19. Altered expression of CmNRRa changes flowering time of Chrysanthemum morifolium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuman; Lian, Lijuan; Liu, Qing; Xiao, Na; Fang, Rongxiang; Liu, Qinglin; Chen, Xiaoying

    2013-04-01

    Flowering time is an important ornamental trait for chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium, Dendranthema x grandiflorum) floricultural production. In this study, CmNRRa, an orthologous gene of OsNRRa that regulates root growth in response to nutrient stress in rice, was identified from Chrysanthemum and its role in flowering time was studied. The entire CmNRRa cDNA sequence was determined using a combinatorial PCR approach along with 5' and 3' RACE methods. CmNRRa expression levels in various tissues were monitored by real-time RT-PCR. CmNRRa was strongly expressed in flower buds and peduncles, suggesting that CmNRRa plays a regulatory role in floral development. To investigate the biological function of CmNRRa in chrysanthemums, overexpression and knockdown of CmNRRa were carried out using transgenic Chrysanthemum plants generated through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. CmNRRa expression levels in the transgenic plants were assayed by real-time RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis. The transgenic plants showed altered flowering times compared with nontransgenic plants. CmNRRa-RNAi transgenic plants flowered 40-64 days earlier, while CmNRRa-overexpressing plants exhibited a delayed flowering phenotype. These results revealed a negative effect of CmNRRa on flowering time modulation. Alteration of CmNRRa expression levels might be an effective means of controlling flowering time in Chrysanthemum. These results possess potential application in molecular breeding of chrysanthemums that production year-round, and may improve commercial chrysanthemum production in the flower industry. PMID:23190188

  20. Neonatal Colon Insult Alters Growth Factor Expression and TRPA1 Responses in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, Julie A.; Bielefeldt, Klaus; Malin, Sacha A.; Davis, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation or pain during neonatal development can result in long-term structural and functional alterations of nociceptive pathways, ultimately altering pain perception in adulthood. We have developed a mouse model of neonatal colon irritation (NCI) to investigate the plasticity of pain processing within the viscerosensory system. Mouse pups received an intracolonic administration of 2% mustard oil (MO) on postnatal days 8 and 10. Distal colons were processed at subsequent timepoints for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and growth factor expression. Adult mice were assessed for visceral hypersensitivity by measuring the visceromotor response during colorectal distension. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from adult mice were retrogradely labeled from the distal colon and calcium imaging was used to measure transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) responses to acute application of capsaicin and MO, respectively. Despite the absence of inflammation (as indicated by MPO activity), neonatal exposure to intracolonic MO transiently maintained a higher expression level of growth factor messenger RNA (mRNA). Adult NCI mice displayed significant visceral hypersensitivity, as well as increased sensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the hindpaw, compared to control mice. The percentage of TRPA1-expressing colon afferents was significantly increased in NCI mice, however they displayed no increase in the percentage of TRPV1-immunopositive or capsaicin-sensitive colon DRG neurons. These results suggest that early neonatal colon injury results in a long-lasting visceral hypersensitivity, possibly driven by an early increase in growth factor expression and maintained by permanent changes in TRPA1 function. PMID:20850221

  1. Na+/H+ exchanger 1 deficiency alters gene expression in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Xue, Jin; Gavrialov, Orit; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2004-08-11

    Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1) is well known to function as a major regulator of intracellular pH (pH(i)). It is activated by low pH(i) and exchanges extracellular Na(+) for intracellular H(+) to maintain cellular homeostasis. Despite the fact that we now have evidence suggesting other roles for NHE1, there has been no comprehensive study investigating its role as a signaling molecule. Toward this aim, we used in this study NHE1 null mutant mice and cDNA microarrays to investigate the effects of NHE1 on global gene expression in various regions of the brain, e.g., cortex, hippocampus, brain stem-diencephalon, and cerebellum. We found that a total of 35 to 79 genes were up- or downregulated in each brain region, with the majority being downregulated. The effect of NHE1 null mutation on gene expression is region specific, and only 11 genes were changed in all brain regions studied. Further analysis of the cis-regulatory regions of downregulated genes revealed that transcription suppressors, BCL6 and E4BP4, were probable candidates that mediated the inhibitory effect of NHE1 null mutation. One of the genes, MCT-13, was not only downregulated in the NHE1 null mutant brain but also in tissue cultures treated with an NHE1 inhibitor. We conclude that 1) a relatively small number of genes were altered in the NHE1 null mouse brain; 2) the effects of NHE1 null mutation on gene expression are region specific; and 3) several genes implicated in neurodegeneration have altered expression, potentially offering a molecular explanation for the phenotype of the NHE1 null mouse. PMID:15306696

  2. Neonatal colon insult alters growth factor expression and TRPA1 responses in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Julie A; Bielefeldt, Klaus; Malin, Sacha A; Davis, Brian M

    2010-11-01

    Inflammation or pain during neonatal development can result in long-term structural and functional alterations of nociceptive pathways, ultimately altering pain perception in adulthood. We have developed a mouse model of neonatal colon irritation (NCI) to investigate the plasticity of pain processing within the viscerosensory system. Mouse pups received an intracolonic administration of 2% mustard oil (MO) on postnatal days 8 and 10. Distal colons were processed at subsequent timepoints for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and growth factor expression. Adult mice were assessed for visceral hypersensitivity by measuring the visceromotor response during colorectal distension. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from adult mice were retrogradely labeled from the distal colon and calcium imaging was used to measure transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) responses to acute application of capsaicin and MO, respectively. Despite the absence of inflammation (as indicated by MPO activity), neonatal exposure to intracolonic MO transiently maintained a higher expression level of growth factor messenger RNA (mRNA). Adult NCI mice displayed significant visceral hypersensitivity, as well as increased sensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the hindpaw, compared to control mice. The percentage of TRPA1-expressing colon afferents was significantly increased in NCI mice, however they displayed no increase in the percentage of TRPV1-immunopositive or capsaicin-sensitive colon DRG neurons. These results suggest that early neonatal colon injury results in a long-lasting visceral hypersensitivity, possibly driven by an early increase in growth factor expression and maintained by permanent changes in TRPA1 function. PMID:20850221

  3. Altered Skeletal Muscle Lipase Expression and Activity Contribute to Insulin Resistance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Badin, Pierre-Marie; Louche, Katie; Mairal, Aline; Liebisch, Gerhard; Schmitz, Gerd; Rustan, Arild C.; Smith, Steven R.; Langin, Dominique; Moro, Cedric

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin resistance is associated with elevated content of skeletal muscle lipids, including triacylglycerols (TAGs) and diacylglycerols (DAGs). DAGs are by-products of lipolysis consecutive to TAG hydrolysis by adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and are subsequently hydrolyzed by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). We hypothesized that an imbalance of ATGL relative to HSL (expression or activity) may contribute to DAG accumulation and insulin resistance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We first measured lipase expression in vastus lateralis biopsies of young lean (n = 9), young obese (n = 9), and obese-matched type 2 diabetic (n = 8) subjects. We next investigated in vitro in human primary myotubes the impact of altered lipase expression/activity on lipid content and insulin signaling. RESULTS Muscle ATGL protein was negatively associated with whole-body insulin sensitivity in our population (r = −0.55, P = 0.005), whereas muscle HSL protein was reduced in obese subjects. We next showed that adenovirus-mediated ATGL overexpression in human primary myotubes induced DAG and ceramide accumulation. ATGL overexpression reduced insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis (−30%, P < 0.05) and disrupted insulin signaling at Ser1101 of the insulin receptor substrate-1 and downstream Akt activation at Ser473. These defects were fully rescued by nonselective protein kinase C inhibition or concomitant HSL overexpression to restore a proper lipolytic balance. We show that selective HSL inhibition induces DAG accumulation and insulin resistance. CONCLUSIONS Altogether, the data indicate that altered ATGL and HSL expression in skeletal muscle could promote DAG accumulation and disrupt insulin signaling and action. Targeting skeletal muscle lipases may constitute an interesting strategy to improve insulin sensitivity in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:21498783

  4. Systemic suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity by supernatants from UV-irradiated keratinocytes. An essential role for keratinocyte-derived IL-10.

    PubMed

    Rivas, J M; Ullrich, S E

    1992-12-15

    Exposing murine keratinocyte cultures to UV radiation causes the release of a suppressive cytokine that mimics the immunosuppressive effects of total-body UV exposure. Injecting supernatants from UV-irradiated keratinocyte cultures into mice inhibits their ability to generate a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction against allogeneic histocompatibility Ag, and spleen cells from mice injected with supernatant do not respond to alloantigen in the in vitro MLR. A unique feature of the immunosuppression induced by either total-body UV-exposure or injecting the suppressive cytokine from UV-irradiated keratinocytes is the selectivity of suppression. Although cellular immune reactions such as delayed-type hypersensitivity are suppressed antibody production is unaffected. Because the selective nature to the UV-induced immunosuppression is similar to the biologic activity of IL-10, we examined the hypothesis that UV exposure of keratinocytes causes the release of IL-10. Keratinocyte monolayers were exposed to UV radiation and at specific times after exposure mRNA was isolated or the culture supernatant from the cells was collected. IL-10 mRNA expression was enhanced in UV-irradiated keratinocytes. The secretion of IL-10 by the irradiated keratinocytes was determined by Western blot analysis. A band reactive with anti-IL-10 mAb was found in supernatants from the UV-irradiated but not the mock-irradiated cells. IL-10 biologic activity was determined by the ability of the supernatants from the UV-irradiated keratinocytes to suppress IFN-gamma production by Ag-activated Th 1 cell clones. Anti-IL-10 mAb neutralized the ability of supernatants from UV-irradiated keratinocytes to suppress the induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity in vivo. Furthermore, injecting UV-irradiated mice with antibodies against IL-10 partially inhibited in vivo immunosuppression. These data indicate that activated keratinocytes are capable of secreting IL-10 and suggest that the release of IL-10 by

  5. Niacin in Pharmacological Doses Alters MicroRNA Expression in Skeletal Muscle of Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Most, Erika; Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Administration of pharmacological niacin doses was recently reported to have pronounced effects on skeletal muscle gene expression and phenotype in obese Zucker rats, with the molecular mechanisms underlying the alteration of gene expression being completely unknown. Since miRNAs have been shown to play a critical role for gene expression through inducing miRNA-mRNA interactions which results in the degradation of specific mRNAs or the repression of protein translation, we herein aimed to investigate the influence of niacin at pharmacological doses on the miRNA expression profile in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats fed either a control diet with 30 mg supplemented niacin/kg diet or a high-niacin diet with 780 mg supplemented niacin/kg diet for 4 wk. miRNA microarray analysis revealed that 42 out of a total of 259 miRNAs were differentially expressed (adjusted P-value <0.05), 20 being down-regulated and 22 being up-regulated, between the niacin group and the control group. Using a biostatistics approach, we could demonstrate that the most strongly up-regulated (log2 ratio ≥0.5) and down-regulated (log2 ratio ≤−0.5) miRNAs target approximately 1,800 mRNAs. Gene-term enrichment analysis showed that many of the predicted target mRNAs from the most strongly regulated miRNAs were involved in molecular processes dealing with gene transcription such as DNA binding, transcription regulator activity, transcription factor binding and in important regulatory pathways such as Wnt signaling and MAPK signaling. In conclusion, the present study shows for the first time that pharmacological niacin doses alter the expression of miRNAs in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats and that the niacin-regulated miRNAs target a large set of genes and pathways which are involved in gene regulatory activity indicating that at least some of the recently reported effects of niacin on skeletal muscle gene expression and phenotype in obese Zucker rats are mediated through mi

  6. Microvascular endothelial cells from preeclamptic women exhibit altered expression of angiogenic and vasopressor factors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dennis K; Nevo, Ori

    2016-06-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a severe complication of pregnancy associated with maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The underlying pathophysiology involves maternal systemic vascular and endothelial dysfunction associated with circulating antiangiogenic factors, although the specific etiology of the disease remains elusive. Our aim was to investigate the maternal endothelium in PE by exploring the expression of genes involved with endothelial function in a novel platform of maternal primary endothelial cells. Adipose tissue was sampled at the time of caesarean section from both normal and preeclamptic patients. Maternal microvascular endothelial cells were isolated by tissue digestion and CD31 magnetic Dynabeads. Cell purity was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Western analyses revealed VEGF activation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and ERK in primary cells. Quantitative PCR analyses revealed significantly altered mRNA levels of various genes involved with angiogenesis and blood pressure control in preeclamptic cells, including soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1, endoglin, VEGFR2, angiotensin receptor 1, and endothelin compared with cells isolated from normal pregnancies. Overall, maternal endothelial cells from preeclamptic patients exhibit extensive alteration of expression of factors associated with antiangiogenic and vasoconstrictive phenotypes, shedding light on the underlying mechanisms associated with the vascular dysfunction characteristic of PE. PMID:27199113

  7. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in combination with expression of MIG6 alters gefitinib sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, metastasis, and invasion in various tumors. Earlier studies showed that the EGFR is frequently overexpressed in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and EGFR mutations at specific amino acid residues in the kinase domain induce altered responsiveness to gefitinib, a small molecule EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor. However, the mechanism underlying the drug response modulated by EGFR mutation is still largely unknown. To elucidate drug response in EGFR signal transduction pathway in which complex dynamics of multiple molecules involved, a systematic approach is necessary. In this paper, we performed experimental and computational analyses to clarify the underlying mechanism of EGFR signaling and cell-specific gefitinib responsiveness in three H1299-derived NSCLC cell lines; H1299 wild type (H1299WT), H1299 with an overexpressed wild type EGFR (H1299EGFR-WT), and H1299 with an overexpressed mutant EGFR L858R (H1299L858R; gefitinib sensitive mutant). Results We predicted and experimentally verified that Mig6, which is a known negative regulator of EGFR and specifically expressed in H1299L858R cells, synergized with gefitinib to suppress cellular growth. Computational analyses indicated that this inhibitory effect is amplified at the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation steps of MEK and ERK. Conclusions Thus, we showed that L858R receptor mutation in combination with expression of its negative regulator, Mig6, alters signaling outcomes and results in variable drug sensitivity. PMID:21333004

  8. Over-Expressing Mitofusin-2 in Healthy Mature Mammalian Skeletal Muscle Does Not Alter Mitochondrial Bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Lally, James S. V.; Herbst, Eric A. F.; Matravadia, Sarthak; Maher, Amy C.; Perry, Christopher G. R.; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Holloway, Graham P.

    2013-01-01

    The role of mitofusin-2 (MFN-2) in regulating mitochondrial dynamics has been well-characterized in lower order eukaryotic cell lines through the complete ablation of MFN-2 protein. However, to support the contractile function of mature skeletal muscle, the subcellular architecture and constituent proteins of this tissue differ substantially from simpler cellular organisms. Such differences may also impact the role of MFN-2 in mature mammalian muscle, and it is unclear if minor fluctuations in MFN-2, as observed in response to physiological perturbations, has a functional consequence. Therefore, we have transiently transfected MFN-2 cDNA into rat tibialis ant