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Sample records for alters melatonin secretion

  1. Melatonin in Epilepsy: A New Mathematical Model of Diurnal Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Kijonka, Marek; Pęcka, Marcin; Sokół, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The main objective of the study was to create a mathematical model that describes the melatonin circadian secretion and, then the functionality of the model was tested by a comparison of the melatonin secretions in children with and without epilepsy. Material and Methods. The patients were divided into the epilepsy group (EG, n = 52) and the comparison group (CG, n = 30). The melatonin level was assessed by a radioimmunoassay method. The diurnal melatonin secretion was described using a nonlinear least squares method. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was chosen to estimate the dependence of the acquired data. The model reproduces blood concentration profiles and its parameters were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test and logistic regression. Results. The correlation analysis performed for the EG and CG groups showed moderate correlations between age and the melatonin secretion model parameters. Patients with epilepsy are characterized by an increased phase shift of melatonin release. PMID:27478439

  2. Central Interleukin-1β Suppresses the Nocturnal Secretion of Melatonin.

    PubMed

    Herman, A P; Bochenek, J; Król, K; Krawczyńska, A; Antushevich, H; Pawlina, B; Herman, A; Romanowicz, K; Tomaszewska-Zaremba, D

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, numerous processes occur in a rhythmic manner. The hormonal signal reliably reflecting the environmental light conditions is melatonin. Nocturnal melatonin secretion patterns could be disturbed in pathophysiological states, including inflammation, Alzheimer's disease, and depression. All of these states share common elements in their aetiology, including the overexpression of interleukin- (IL-) 1β in the central nervous system. Therefore, the present study was designed to determine the effect of the central injection of exogenous IL-1β on melatonin release and on the expression of the enzymes of the melatonin biosynthetic pathway in the pineal gland of ewe. It was found that intracerebroventricular injections of IL-1β (50 µg/animal) suppressed (P < 0.05) nocturnal melatonin secretion in sheep regardless of the photoperiod. This may have resulted from decreased (P < 0.05) synthesis of the melatonin intermediate serotonin, which may have resulted, at least partially, from a reduced expression of tryptophan hydroxylase. IL-1β also inhibited (P < 0.05) the expression of the melatonin rhythm enzyme arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase. However, the ability of IL-1β to affect the expression of these enzymes was dependent upon the photoperiod. Our study may shed new light on the role of central IL-1β in the aetiology of disruptions in melatonin secretion. PMID:27212805

  3. Central Interleukin-1β Suppresses the Nocturnal Secretion of Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Herman, A. P.; Bochenek, J.; Król, K.; Krawczyńska, A.; Antushevich, H.; Pawlina, B.; Herman, A.; Romanowicz, K.; Tomaszewska-Zaremba, D.

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, numerous processes occur in a rhythmic manner. The hormonal signal reliably reflecting the environmental light conditions is melatonin. Nocturnal melatonin secretion patterns could be disturbed in pathophysiological states, including inflammation, Alzheimer's disease, and depression. All of these states share common elements in their aetiology, including the overexpression of interleukin- (IL-) 1β in the central nervous system. Therefore, the present study was designed to determine the effect of the central injection of exogenous IL-1β on melatonin release and on the expression of the enzymes of the melatonin biosynthetic pathway in the pineal gland of ewe. It was found that intracerebroventricular injections of IL-1β (50 µg/animal) suppressed (P < 0.05) nocturnal melatonin secretion in sheep regardless of the photoperiod. This may have resulted from decreased (P < 0.05) synthesis of the melatonin intermediate serotonin, which may have resulted, at least partially, from a reduced expression of tryptophan hydroxylase. IL-1β also inhibited (P < 0.05) the expression of the melatonin rhythm enzyme arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase. However, the ability of IL-1β to affect the expression of these enzymes was dependent upon the photoperiod. Our study may shed new light on the role of central IL-1β in the aetiology of disruptions in melatonin secretion. PMID:27212805

  4. Acute allograft rejection and immunosuppression: influence on endogenous melatonin secretion.

    PubMed

    Cardell, Markus; Jung, Florian Johannes; Zhai, Wei; Hillinger, Sven; Welp, Andre; Manz, Bernhard; Weder, Walter; Korom, Stephan

    2008-04-01

    Melatonin displays a dose-dependent immunoregulatory effect in vitro and in vivo. Exogenous high-dose melatonin therapy exerted an immunosuppressive effect, abrogating acute rejection (AR), significantly prolonging transplant survival. Endogenous melatonin secretion, in response to heterotopic rat cardiac allograft transplantation (Tx), was investigated during the AR response and under standardized immunosuppressive maintenance therapy with cyclosporin A (CsA) and rapamycin (RPM). Recipients of syngeneic transplants, and recipients of allogeneic grafts, either untreated or receiving immunosuppressive therapy constituted the experimental groups. Endogenous circadian melatonin levels were measured at 07:00, 19:00, and 24:00 hr, using a novel radioimmunoassay (RIA) procedure, under standardized 12-hr-light/dark-conditions (light off: 19:00 hr; light on: 07:00 hr), before and after Tx. Neither the operative trauma, nor the challenge with a perfused allograft or the AR response influenced endogenous melatonin peak secretion. Immunosuppressive therapy with CsA led to a significant increase in peak secretion, measured for days 7 (212 +/- 40.7 pg/mL; P < 0.05), 14 (255 +/- 13.9 pg/mL; P < 0.001), and 21 (219 +/- 34 pg/mL; P < 0.01) after Tx, as compared with naïve animals (155 +/- 25.8 pg/mL). In contrast, treatment with RPM significantly decreased the melatonin peak post-Tx up to day 7 (87 +/- 25.2 pg/mL; P < 0.001), compared with naïve animals (155 +/- 25.8 pg/mL). These findings imply a robust nature of the endogenous circadian melatonin secretion kinetics, even against the background of profound allogeneic stimuli. Immunosuppressive maintenance therapy with CsA and RPM modulated early melatonin secretion, indicating a specific secondary action of these drugs. Further studies are necessary to disclose the long-term effect of immunosuppressive therapy on circadian melatonin secretion in transplant recipients. PMID:18339121

  5. Nocturnal melatonin secretion in multiple sclerosis patients with affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R; Awerbuch, G I

    1993-02-01

    The pineal gland has been implicated recently in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic demyelinating disease of CNS. Since nocturnal melatonin secretion is low in some groups of patients with mental depression, we predicted lower melatonin secretion in MS patients with history of affective illness compared to those without psychiatric disorders. To test this hypothesis, we studied single nocturnal plasma melatonin levels and the incidence of pineal calcification (PC) on CT scan in a cohort of 25 MS patients (4 men, 21 women; mean age = 39.4 years, SD = 9.3), 15 of whom had a history of coexisting psychiatric disorders with predominant affective symptomatology. Other factors that may be related to depression such as vitamin B12, folic acid, zinc, magnesium, and homocysteine, were also included in the analysis. Neither any of the metabolic factors surveyed nor the incidence of PC distinguished the psychiatric from the control group. However, the mean melatonin level in the psychiatric patients was significantly lower than in the control group. Since low melatonin secretion in patients with depression may be related to a phase-advance of the circadian oscillator regulating the offset of melatonin secretion, we propose that the depression of MS likewise may reflect the presence of dampened circadian oscillators. Furthermore, since exacerbation of motor symptoms in MS patients may be temporally related to worsening of depression, we propose that circadian phase lability may also underlie the relapsing-remitting course of the disease. Consequently, pharmacological agents such as lithium or bright light therapy, which have been shown to phase-delay circadian rhythms, might be effective in the treatment of affective symptoms in MS as well as preventing motor exacerbation and hastening a remission from an acute attack. PMID:8063528

  6. Dietary melatonin alters uterine artery hemodynamics in pregnant Holstein heifers.

    PubMed

    Brockus, K E; Hart, C G; Gilfeather, C L; Fleming, B O; Lemley, C O

    2016-04-01

    The objective was to examine uterine artery hemodynamics and maternal serum profiles in pregnant heifers supplemented with dietary melatonin (MEL) or no supplementation (CON). In addition, melatonin receptor-mediated responses in steroid metabolism were examined using a bovine endometrial epithelial culture system. Twenty singleton pregnant Holstein heifers were supplemented with 20 mg of melatonin (n = 10) or no melatonin supplementation (control; n = 10) from days 190 to 262 of gestation. Maternal measurements were recorded on days 180 (baseline), 210, 240, and 262 of gestation. Total uterine blood flow was increased by 25% in the MEL-treated heifers compared with the CON. Concentrations of progesterone were decreased in MEL vs CON heifers. Total serum antioxidant capacity was increased by 43% in MEL-treated heifers when compared with CON. Activity of cytochrome P450 1A, 2C, and superoxide dismutase was increased in bovine endometrial epithelial cells treated with melatonin, whereas the melatonin receptor antagonist, luzindole, negated the increase in cytochrome P450 2C activity. Moreover, estradiol or progesterone treatment altered bovine uterine melatonin receptor expression, which could potentiate the melatonin-mediated responses during late gestation. The observed increase in total uterine blood flow during melatonin supplementation could be related to its antioxidant properties. Compromised pregnancies are typically accompanied by increased oxidative stress; therefore, melatonin could serve as a therapeutic supplementation strategy. This could lead to further fetal programming implications in conjunction with offspring growth and development postnatally. PMID:26641925

  7. Individual Differences in the Amount and Timing of Salivary Melatonin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Helen J.; Fogg, Louis F.

    2008-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine individual differences in a large sample of complete melatonin profiles not suppressed by light and search for possible associations between the amount and timing of melatonin secretion and a multitude of lifestyle variables. The melatonin profiles were derived from saliva samples collected every 30 minutes in dim light from 85 healthy women and 85 healthy men aged 18–45 years. There was a large individual variability in the amount of melatonin secreted with peak values ranging from 2 to 84 pg/ml. The onset of melatonin secretion ranged from 18:13 to 00:26 hours. The use of hormonal birth control, reduced levels of employment, a smaller number of days on a fixed sleep schedule, increased day length and lower weight were associated with an increased amplitude of melatonin secretion. The use of hormonal birth control, contact lenses, a younger age, and lower ratings of mania and paranoia were associated with a longer duration of melatonin secretion. An earlier occurrence of the onset of melatonin secretion was associated with an earlier wake time, more morningness and the absence of a bed partner. Lifestyle and behavioral variables were only able to explain about 15% of the individual variability in the amount of melatonin secretion, which is likely because of a substantial genetic influence on the levels of melatonin secretion. PMID:18725972

  8. Melatonin modulates secretion of growth hormone and prolactin by trout pituitary glands and cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Falcón, J; Besseau, L; Fazzari, D; Attia, J; Gaildrat, P; Beauchaud, M; Boeuf, G

    2003-10-01

    In Teleost fish, development, growth, and reproduction are influenced by the daily and seasonal variations of photoperiod and temperature. Early in vivo studies indicated the pineal gland mediates the effects of these external factors, most probably through the rhythmic production of melatonin. The present investigation was aimed at determining whether melatonin acts directly on the pituitary to control GH and prolactin (PRL) secretion in rainbow trout. We show that 2-[125I]-iodomelatonin, a melatonin analog, binds selectively to membrane preparations and tissue sections from trout pituitaries. The affinity was within the range of that found for the binding to brain microsomal preparations, but the number of binding sites was 20-fold less than in the brain. In culture, melatonin inhibited pituitary cAMP accumulation induced by forskolin, the adenyl cyclase stimulator. Forskolin also induced an increase in GH release, which was reduced in the presence of picomolar concentrations of melatonin. At higher concentrations, the effects of melatonin became stimulatory. In the absence of forskolin, melatonin induced a dose-dependent increase in GH release, and a dose-dependent decrease in PRL release. Melatonin effects were abolished upon addition of luzindole, a melatonin antagonist. Our results provide the first evidence that melatonin modulates GH and PRL secretion in Teleost fish pituitary. Melatonin effects on GH have never been reported in any vertebrate before. The effects result from a direct action of melatonin on pituitary cells. The complexity of the observed responses suggests several types of melatonin receptors might be involved. PMID:12960030

  9. Melatonin secretion in Turner's syndrome: lack of effect of oestrogen administration.

    PubMed

    Schober, E; Waldhauser, F; Frisch, H; Schuster, E; Bieglmayer, C

    1989-10-01

    Melatonin secretion was investigated in 13 girls with Turner's syndrome before and after long-term oestrogen administration. Oestrogen treatment resulted in an increase in the serum levels of the hormone and a decrease in blood progesterone concentration. No change, however, was observed in the melatonin secretion pattern (in terms of peak values, time of peak level and total melatonin secretion) after oestrogen therapy. A distinct circadian rhythm in serum melatonin was evident in all subjects with peak occurring around 0200 h and concentration similar to those of normal subjects. PMID:2516784

  10. Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Pévet, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Melatonin (MEL) is a hormone synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland deep within the brain in response to photoperiodic cues relayed from the retina via an endogenous circadian oscillator within the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus. The circadian rhythm of melatonin production and release, characterized by nocturnal activity and daytime quiescence, is an important temporal signal to the body structures that can read it. Melatonin acts through high-affinity receptors located centrally and in numerous peripheral organs. Different receptor subtypes have been cloned and characterized: MT1 and MT2 (transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors), and MT3. However, their physiological role remains unelucidated, although livestock management applications already include the control of seasonal breeding and milk production. As for potential therapeutic applications, exogenous melatonin or a melatonin agonist and selective 5-hydroxytrypiamine receptor (5-HT2c) antagonist, eg, S 20098, can be used to manipulate circadian processes such as the sleep-vake cycle, which are frequently disrupted in many conditions, most notably seasonal affective disorder. PMID:22034091

  11. [Model of control of diurnal melatonin secretion by the solar radiation].

    PubMed

    Leonidov, A V

    2014-01-01

    The mathematical model of the control process of diurnal melatonin secretion under the influence of solar radiation on retina photoreceptors is proposed. Invariant relations for calculating melatonin secretion rate and its concentration in blood plasma are obtained. Spectral, time and energy characteristics of solar radiation synchronizing diurnal melatonin secretion and circadian rhythms in human are defined. A possibility of using the relations obtained is shown for arbitrary combination of calendar dates, local time of any time zone and geographical coordinates of a calculated point on earth surface. The adequacy of model is confirmed by coincidence of the calculation data with the results of independent experimental studies on diurnal secretion of melatonin and circadian rhythm in human. The model proposed can be used during investigation of diurnal secretion of melatonin and circadian rhythm in human. PMID:25707251

  12. Episodic secretion of melatonin in pre- and postpubertal girls and boys.

    PubMed

    Penny, R

    1985-04-01

    The concentration of melatonin was determined in serum samples obtained at 15-min intervals during a 4-h period from seven normal girls, 9.5-16.5 yr of age, and eight normal boys, 9.0-16.8 yr of age. All samples were obtained between 0800 and 1300 h. An episodic pattern of melatonin secretion was found in all subjects. There was no significant (P greater than 0.1) difference between girls and boys as to number of episodes [3.1 +/- 0.4 (+/- SD) vs. 3.4 +/- 0.5 per 4 h), absolute melatonin increase (49.0 +/- 6.7 vs. 50.4 +/- 4.1 pg/ml), or apparent melatonin half-life (20.3 +/- 0.8 vs. 20.8 +/- 1.0 min). The mean absolute increase during secretory episodes correlated (r = 0.843; P less than 0.005) with the mean melatonin concentration per 4 h, and a significant (P less than 0.05) inverse correlation (r = -0.508) was found between the mean percent increment of the melatonin secretory episode and the mean apparent melatonin half-life. A significant correlation between melatonin secretion and previously reported (22) episodic LH secretion was not found. In girls and boys, the mean melatonin concentration increased with advancing puberty. The increase in melatonin concentration was due to an increase in the amplitude of secretory episodes. These data are consistent with an influence of gonadal function on melatonin secretion. PMID:3972972

  13. Melatonin secretion is supersensitive to light in migraine.

    PubMed

    Claustrat, B; Brun, J; Chiquet, C; Chazot, G; Borson-Chazot, F

    2004-02-01

    The present study examined the sensitivity to light of melatonin (MLT) secretion in familial migraine during a headache-free interval. Twelve female patients and 12 healthy controls were included in the trial. All subjects were studied twice. In each session, light exposure (300 lx) or placebo was randomly administered for 30 min between 00.30 and 01.00 h. Blood was sampled hourly between 20.00 and 24.00 h, and 02.00 and 04.00 h and every 15 min between 00.30 and 01.30 h. Plasma MLT levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. MLT suppression was more marked in the migraine group than in the control group [difference of area under curve (DeltaAUC)=-53.8 +/- 16.2 vs. 18.5 +/- 12.7 pg/h/ml, P<0.005; maximum of MLT suppression (Delta)=-35.7 +/- 10.2 vs. - 6.7 +/- 5.8 pg/ml, P<0.05]. These findings show a clear hypersensitivity to light in young female migraineurs during the headache-free period. PMID:14728708

  14. Melatonin

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be used in these pills: natural and synthetic (manmade). Natural melatonin is made from the pineal ... a virus so it is not recommended. The synthetic form of melatonin does not carry this risk. ...

  15. Melatonin administration reverses the alteration of amyloid precursor protein-cleaving secretases expression in aged mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mukda, Sujira; Panmanee, Jiraporn; Boontem, Parichart; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2016-05-16

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptide is the pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Interestingly, Aβ is normally synthesized in the brain of healthy people; however, during advanced aging, the level of Aβ peptides increases. As a result, the aggregation of Aβ peptides leads to trafficking problems, synaptic loss, inflammation, and cell death. Melatonin, the hormone primarily synthesized and secreted from the pineal gland, is decreased with progressing age, particularly in Alzheimer's disease patients. The loss of melatonin levels and the abnormal accumulation of some proteins, such as Aβ peptides in the brains of AD patients are considered important factors in the initiation of the cognitive symptoms of dementia. A previous study in mice reported that increased brain melatonin levels remarkably diminished the potentially toxic Aβ peptide levels. The present study showed that aged mice significantly impaired spatial memory in the Morris Water Maze task. We also showed that α-, β-, and γ-secretases, which are type-I membrane protein proteases responsible for Aβ production, showed alterations in both mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus of aged mice. The long-term administration of melatonin, mice had shorter escape latencies and remained in the target quadrant longer compared to the aged group. Melatonin attenuated the reduction of α-secretase and inhibited the increase of β- and γ-secretases. Moreover, melatonin attenuated the upregulation of pNFkB and the reduction of sirtuin1 in the hippocampus of aged mice. These results suggested that melatonin protected against Aβ peptide production in aged mice. Hence, melatonin loss in aging could be recompensed through dietary supplementation as a beneficial therapeutic strategy for AD prevention and progression. PMID:27068758

  16. Modulation of Ca2+ oscillation and melatonin secretion by BKCa channel activity in rat pinealocytes.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Hiroya; Yamamura, Hisao; Muramatsu, Makoto; Hagihara, Yumiko; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2016-05-01

    The pineal glands regulate circadian rhythm through the synthesis and secretion of melatonin. The stimulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor due to parasympathetic nerve activity causes an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and eventually downregulates melatonin production. Our previous report shows that rat pinealocytes have spontaneous and nicotine-induced Ca(2+) oscillations that are evoked by membrane depolarization followed by Ca(2+) influx through voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs). These Ca(2+) oscillations are supposed to contribute to the inhibitory mechanism of melatonin secretion. Here we examined the involvement of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BKCa) channel conductance on the regulation of Ca(2+) oscillation and melatonin production in rat pinealocytes. Spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations were markedly enhanced by BKCa channel blockers (1 μM paxilline or 100 nM iberiotoxin). Nicotine (100 μM)-induced Ca(2+) oscillations were also augmented by paxilline. In contrast, spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations were abolished by BKCa channel opener [3 μM 12,14-dichlorodehydroabietic acid (diCl-DHAA)]. Under whole cell voltage-clamp configurations, depolarization-elicited outward currents were significantly activated by diCl-DHAA and blocked by paxilline. Expression analyses revealed that the α and β3 subunits of BKCa channel were highly expressed in rat pinealocytes. Importantly, the activity of BKCa channels modulated melatonin secretion from whole pineal gland of the rat. Taken together, BKCa channel activation attenuates these Ca(2+) oscillations due to depolarization-synchronized Ca(2+) influx through VDCCs and results in a recovery of reduced melatonin secretion during parasympathetic nerve activity. BKCa channels may play a physiological role for melatonin production via a negative-feedback mechanism. PMID:26791489

  17. Geomagnetic activity influences the melatonin secretion at latitude 70 degrees N.

    PubMed

    Weydahl, A; Sothern, R B; Cornélissen, G; Wetterberg, L

    2001-01-01

    Factors other than light may affect variations in melatonin, including disturbances in the geomagnetic field. Such a possibility was tested in Alta, Norway, located at latitude 70 degrees N, where the aurora borealis is a result of large changes in the horizontal component (H) of the geomagnetic field. Geomagnetic disturbances are felt more strongly closer to the pole than at lower latitudes. Also noteworthy in Alta is the fact that the sun does not rise above the horizon for several weeks during the winter. To examine whether changes in geomagnetic activity influence the secretion of melatonin, saliva was collected from 25 healthy subjects in Alta several times during the day-night and at different times of the year. Single cosinor analyses yielded individual estimates of.the circadian amplitude and MESOR of melatonin. A 3-hour mean value for the local geomagnetic activity index, K, was used for approximately the same 24-hour span. A circadian rhythm was found to characterize both melatonin and K, the peak in K (23:24) preceding that of melatonin (06:08). During the span of investigation, a circannual variation also characterized both variables. Correlation analyses suggest that changes in geomagnetic activity had to be of a certain magnitude to affect the circadian amplitude of melatonin. If large enough (> 80 nT/3 h), changes in geomagnetic activity also significantly decreased salivary melatonin concentration. PMID:11774869

  18. Effects of melatonin implants in pony mares. 1. Acute effects.

    PubMed

    Peltier, M R; Robinson, G; Sharp, D C

    1998-04-15

    The effects of melatonin implant treatment over a four week period on LH, estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) secretion during the breeding season were studied in ovary-intact and ovariectomized pony mares. Mares with melatonin implants had significantly higher daytime melatonin concentrations than mares with sharm implants (P = 0.0065). In ovariectomized mares, LH secretion did not differ between mares with melatonin and sham implants. In ovary-intact mares, melatonin implants altered the pattern of LH secretion (P = 0.0023) in such a way that an increase in LH secretion was observed during the periovulatory period. Estradiol and P4 secretion were unaffected by melatonin implants. These results suggest that constant administration of melatonin may enhance the secretion of LH during the periovulatory surge but does not adversely affect E2, P4 or basal LH secretion in mares during the breeding season. PMID:10732050

  19. The pattern of melatonin secretion is rhythmic in the domestic pig and responds rapidly to changes in daylength.

    PubMed

    Tast, A; Love, R J; Evans, G; Telsfer, S; Giles, R; Nicholls, P; Voultsios, A; Kennaway, D J

    2001-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the capability of pigs to respond to abrupt changes in lighting conditions by means of alterations in circadian melatonin profiles. Sixteen pre-pubertal crossbred male pigs weighing 40-45 kg were housed in individual pens in four temperature- and lighting-controlled climate rooms (four pigs per room). In two rooms there was a light-dark cycle of 16 L:8 D (Group A) and in two other rooms 8 L:16 D (Group B). Under both lighting regimens light intensity at pig eye-level was 220-240 lx during the light phase and less than 7 lx (red light) during the dark phase. The lighting regimens were changed after 2 wks to the opposite regimen and the change was repeated after a further 2 wks, so that animals ended up with the same light cycle with which they started. Blood was sampled at 2-hr intervals for 48 hr spanning each time of change in lighting. A further 24-hr sampling was performed at the end of the experiment (2 wks after the last change) in both groups and 1 wk after the change from short to long day lighting in Group A. On 83/86 occasions, pigs exhibited a clear circadian rhythm in plasma melatonin under both lighting regimens. Pigs responded immediately to the change from long to short day lighting by advancing melatonin secretion to the earlier lights-off time and some pigs were able to extend secretion to the delayed lights-on time. For short to long day changeover there was a small immediate response, with secretion pattern following the previously entrained endogenous rhythm to within 3 hr of the previous lights-on time. After 1 wk commencement of secretion was delayed by up to 2 hr, while after 2 wks some pigs were able to delay commencement of secretion until lights-off or to cease at lights-on. It is concluded that the domestic pig is able to commence adjustment to abrupt changes in photoperiod within a 1-wk acclimatization by altering circadian melatonin secretion. The present study suggests that it may be possible to

  20. Lower Melatonin Secretion in Older Females: Gender Differences Independent of Light Exposure Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Obayashi, Kenji; Saeki, Keigo; Tone, Nobuhiro; Iwamoto, Junko; Miyata, Kimie; Ikada, Yoshito; Kurumatani, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Background Melatonin is associated with a variety of diseases in advanced age, including insomnia, depression, and dementia, and its secretion is influenced by light exposure. Although studies in young and middle-aged subjects have shown that females tend to have higher melatonin levels than males, gender differences in melatonin levels among older people remain unclear. Methods To determine the gender differences in melatonin levels among older people in home settings, we conducted a cross-sectional study in 528 older people. We measured overnight urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin excretion (UME; an index of melatonin secretion), and ambulatory light intensity. Results The mean age of females was 1.8 years younger, and average intensity of daytime light exposure was half that in males (P < 0.01). In a univariate comparison, UME was significantly lower in females than in males (P < 0.01). A multivariate model using analysis of covariance showed that log-transformed UME remained significantly lower in females after adjustment for potential confounding factors, including age and daytime and nighttime light exposure profiles (males vs. females: 1.90 vs. 1.73 log µg; adjusted mean difference 0.17 log µg [95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02–0.32]; P = 0.02). This result indicates that older females have 18.4% (95% CI, 2.2–37.4%) lower UME than older males. Conclusions Older females have significantly lower UME than older males, an association which is independent of light exposure profiles in home settings. Our findings may be useful as basic data for further research to investigate gender differences in several diseases associated with melatonin in the elderly. PMID:25223887

  1. Enhanced nocturnal melatonin secretion in women with functional secondary amenorrhea: relationship to opioid system and endogenous estrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Okatani, Y; Sagara, Y

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of the opioid system and the estrogen environment in the nocturnal secretion of melatonin in women with secondary amenorrhea (SA). Nocturnal melatonin concentrations in patients with SA were significantly higher than in normal women (p < 0.01 vs. women with normal menstrual cycles). There were significant negative correlations between cumulative melatonin levels (between 8 p.m. and 8 a.m.) and serum estradiol-17 beta (r = -0.561, p < 0.01) and between peak serum melatonin values and serum estradiol-17 beta concentrations (r = -0.608, p < 0.01) in SA. Intravenous administration of a conjugated estrogen (Premarin 20 mg) significantly suppressed nocturnal melatonin secretion (p < 0.05), but a continuous intravenous infusion of naloxone (1.6 mg/h from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m.), an opiate antagonist, did not affect nocturnal melatonin secretion in SA. Our findings suggest that elevated nocturnal melatonin secretion may be related to low estrogen levels, but that it is not mediated by the opioid system. PMID:7782049

  2. Dietary melatonin alters uterine artery hemodynamics in pregnant holstein heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to examine uterine artery hemodynamics and maternal serum profiles in pregnant heifers supplemented with dietary melatonin (MEL) or no supplementation (CON). In addition, melatonin receptor–mediated responses in steroid metabolism were examined using a bovine endometrial epithelial...

  3. Circadian secretion of cortisol and melatonin in cluster headache during active cluster periods and remission.

    PubMed Central

    Waldenlind, E; Gustafsson, S A; Ekbom, K; Wetterberg, L

    1987-01-01

    The cyclic nature of cluster headache warranted a study of the 24-hour rhythms of serum cortisol and melatonin. They were both altered during cluster periods as compared with periods of remission and healthy controls. The 24-hour mean and maximal cortisol levels were higher and the timing of the cortisol minimum was delayed as compared to the same patients in remission. Although there was no relation between the cortisol and melatonin levels and headaches, the rise of cortisol following many attacks might in part represent an adaptive response to pain. The nocturnal melatonin maximum was lower during cluster periods than in remission. This finding, and the dysautonomic signs during attacks, may reflect a change of the vegetative tone in a hyposympathetic direction. Images PMID:3572435

  4. Evidence for a seasonal variation in the ability of exogenous melatonin to suppress prolactin secretion in the mare.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, B P; Davison, L A; McManus, C J

    2000-05-01

    In seasonally breeding species photoperiodic information is thought to be conveyed to the reproductive and prolactin axis via changes in circulating concentrations of melatonin. For some species, a constant melatonin stimulus is perceived as a short day, whereas in others no photoperiodic information is provided. In the mare, a preliminary study demonstrated that constant administration of melatonin did not modify prolactin secretion, suggesting that this treatment regimen failed to provide photoperiodic information. To further investigate this proposal and to investigate an alternative explanation, namely a seasonal variation in response to melatonin, 4 experiments were performed. In experiments 1-3, the effects of constant administration of melatonin on prolactin secretion were investigated. In each study the time of treatment initiation varied beginning before the summer solstice, (May 9; Exp. 1), at the autumnal equinox (Sept. 21; Exp. 2) or the winter solstice (Dec. 21; Exp. 3). In Experiment 4, melatonin was administered as a timed daily injection (5 PM) for 6 months, beginning at the summer solstice (June 21). Constantly elevated physiological concentrations of melatonin (expts. 1-3) and an extended nighttime elevation of melatonin (exp. 4) suppressed prolactin concentrations only during the spring and early summer months (April-August). At other times during the year prolactin concentrations were similar to untreated mares. In the presence of a continuous melatonin implant the circannual rhythm of prolactin secretion was not disturbed. The results suggest that the prolactin axis of the mare is sensitive to an inhibitory melatonin signal during a restricted period of time and that at other times is refractory to this signal. PMID:10869858

  5. Melatonin implants do not alter estrogen feedback or advance puberty in gilts.

    PubMed

    Kennaway, D J; Hughes, P E; van Wettere, W H E J

    2015-05-01

    Puberty in pigs is often delayed during late summer and autumn, with long daylength the most likely cause. We hypothesised (1) that gilts born around the shortest day would have a later release from the negative feedback actions of estradiol than gilts born around the spring equinox and (2) melatonin treatment would result in an earlier release from estradiol negative feedback and advance the onset of puberty in gilts born around the spring equinox. We first determined the optimal number of estradiol implants required to monitor the release from estradiol negative feedback in ovariectomised gilts. Secondly we determined whether melatonin implants altered negative feedback in 4 cohorts of ovariectomised gilts born between the winter solstice and spring equinox, and in the following year whether melatonin altered the time of the first ovulation in 5 cohorts of intact gilts born between the winter solstice and spring equinox. Plasma LH and FSH increased between 126 and 210d of age (P<0.001) in each cohort (season), but there was no effect of cohort, melatonin treatment or interactions (P>0.05). Age at first detection of elevated plasma progesterone in untreated, intact gilts decreased across the 4 cohorts (P<0.05). Melatonin treatment of intact gilts failed to advance the age of puberty irrespective of their season of birth (P>0.05). In conclusion, while we confirmed that estradiol sensitivity is decreased as gilts age, we failed to demonstrate any effects of season or melatonin on estradiol feedback or melatonin on puberty. PMID:25618532

  6. Melatonin controls experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by altering the T effector/regulatory balance.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Cruz-Chamorro, Ivan; López-González, Antonio; Utrilla, José C; Fernández-Santos, José M; Martínez-López, Alicia; Lardone, Patricia J; Guerrero, Juan M; Carrillo-Vico, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the experimental model for multiple sclerosis (MS), is triggered by myelin-specific Th1 and Th17 cells. The immunomodulatory activities of melatonin have been shown to be beneficial under several conditions in which the immune system is exacerbated. Here, we sought to elucidate the basis of the melatonin protective effect on EAE by characterizing the T effector/regulatory responses, particularly those of the memory cell subsets. Melatonin was tested for its effect on Th1, Th17 and T regulatory (Treg) cells in the lymph nodes and CNS of immunodominant peptide of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (pMOG)-immunized and EAE mice, respectively. The capacity of melatonin to ameliorate EAE as well as modifying both T cell response and effector/regulatory balance was surveyed. T cell memory subsets and CD44, a key activation marker involved in the EAE pathogenesis, were also examined. Melatonin protected from EAE by decreasing peripheral and central Th1/Th17 responses and enhancing both the Treg frequency and IL-10 synthesis in the CNS. Melatonin reduced the T effector memory population and its pro-inflammatory response and regulated CD44 expression, which was decreased in T effector cells and increased in Tregs. The alterations in the T cell subpopulations were associated with a reduced mononuclear infiltration (CD4 and CD11b cells) of the melatonin-treated mice CNS. For the first time, we report that melatonin protects against EAE by controlling peripheral and central T effector/regulatory responses, effects that might be partially mediated by CD44. This immunomodulatory effect on EAE suggests that melatonin may represent an effective treatment option for MS. PMID:26130320

  7. Sleep Deprivation Aggravates Median Nerve Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain and Enhances Microglial Activation by Suppressing Melatonin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Chiang, Rayleigh Ping-Ying; Chen, Chih-Li; Tsai, Yi-Ju

    2014-01-01

    deprivation aggravates median nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and enhances microglial activation by suppressing melatonin secretion. SLEEP 2014;37(9):1513-1523. PMID:25142572

  8. Interleukin-1β Modulates Melatonin Secretion in Ovine Pineal Gland: Ex Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Herman, A. P.; Bochenek, J.; Skipor, J.; Król, K.; Krawczyńska, A.; Antushevich, H.; Pawlina, B.; Marciniak, E.; Tomaszewska-Zaremba, D.

    2015-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the effect of proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin- (IL-) 1β, on melatonin release and expression enzymes essential for this hormone synthesis: arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase (HIOMT) in ovine pineal gland, taking into account the immune status of animals before sacrificing. Ewes were injected by lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 400 ng/kg) or saline, two hours after sunset during short day period (December). Animals were euthanized three hours after the injection. Next, the pineal glands were collected and divided into four explants. The explants were incubated with (1) medium 199 (control explants), (2) norepinephrine (NE; 10 µM), (3) IL-1β (75 pg/mL), or (4) NE + IL-1β. It was found that IL-1β abolished (P < 0.05) NE-induced increase in melatonin release. Treatment with IL-1β also reduced (P < 0.05) expression of AA-NAT enzyme compared to NE-treated explants. There was no effect of NE or IL-1β treatment on gene expression of HIOMT; however, the pineal fragments isolated from LPS-treated animals were characterized by elevated (P < 0.05) expression of HIOMT mRNA and protein compared to the explants from saline-treated ewes. Our study proves that IL-1β suppresses melatonin secretion and its action seems to be targeted on the reduction of pineal AA-NAT protein expression. PMID:26339621

  9. Melatonin inhibits insulin secretion in rat insulinoma β-cells (INS-1) heterologously expressing the human melatonin receptor isoform MT2.

    PubMed

    Mühlbauer, Eckhard; Albrecht, Elke; Hofmann, Kathleen; Bazwinsky-Wutschke, Ivonne; Peschke, Elmar

    2011-10-01

    Melatonin exerts some of its effects via G-protein-coupled membrane receptors. Two membrane receptor isoforms, MT1 and MT2, have been described. The MT1 receptor is known to inhibit second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling through receptor-coupling to inhibitory G-proteins (G(i) ). Much less is known about the MT2 receptor, but it has also been implicated in signaling via G(i) -proteins. In rat pancreatic β-cells, it has recently been reported that the MT2 receptor plays an inhibitory role in the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway. This study addresses the signaling features of the constitutively expressed human recombinant MT2 receptor (hMT2) and its impact on insulin secretion, using a rat insulinoma β-cell line (INS-1). On the basis of a specific radioimmunoassay, insulin secretion was found to be more strongly reduced in the clones expressing hMT2 than in INS-1 controls, when incubated with 1 or 100 nm melatonin. Similarly, cAMP and cGMP levels, measured by specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), were reduced to a greater extent in hMT2 clones after melatonin treatment. In hMT2-expressing cells, the inhibitory effect of melatonin on insulin secretion was blocked by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, demonstrating the coupling of the hMT2 to G(i) -proteins. These results indicate that functional hMT2 expression leads to the inhibition of cyclic nucleotide signaling and a reduction in insulin release. Because genetic variants of the hMT2 receptor are considered to be risk factors in the development of type 2 diabetes, our results are potentially significant in explaining and preventing the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:21585522

  10. Rapid shift in sleep time and acrophase of melatonin secretion in short shift work schedule.

    PubMed

    Quera-Salva, M A; Defrance, R; Claustrat, B; De Lattre, J; Guilleminault, C

    1996-09-01

    Tolerance to shift work and adaptability to shifting schedules is an issue of growing importance in industrialized society. We studied 40 registered nurses, 20 on fixed day-shifts and 20 on fixed night-shifts, to assess whether workers with rapidly shifting schedules were able to adapt their melatonin secretion and sleep-wake cycles. The day-shift worked 5 days with 2 days off and the night-shift worked 3 nights with 2 off. All night-shift personnel acknowledged shifting back to daytime schedules on their days off. Sleep-wake was determined by sleep logs and actigraphy. To measure 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels, urine was collected at 2-hour intervals on the last work day and on the last day off. Night-shift workers slept significantly more on days off. Napping on the job occurred in 9/20 night-shift workers (mean 114 minutes) between 3 and 6 a.m. The acrophase of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin in day-shift nurses occurred at similar times on workdays and off days. In night-shift nurses, the acrophase was about 7 a.m. on days off, but had a random distribution on workdays. Further analysis revealed two subgroups of night-shift nurses: six subjects (group A).demonstrated a rapid shift in melatonin secretion (acrophase at near 12 noon on work days and at near 7 a.m. on days off) while 14 nurses (group B) did not shift. Group A nurses slept more in the daytime on work days and their total sleep time was the same as day-shift nurses. Group A was slightly younger and was composed solely of women (there were nine women and five men in group B). Age may be a factor in the ability to adapt to rapidly shifting schedules. PMID:8899932

  11. Review of Disrupted Sleep Patterns in Smith-Magenis Syndrome and Normal Melatonin Secretion in a Patient with an Atypical Interstitial 17p11.2 Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau, Eilis A.; Johnson, Kyle P.; Jackman, Angela R.; Blancato, Jan; Huizing, Marjan; Bendavid, Claude; Jones, MaryPat; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C.; Lewy, Alfred J.; Smith, Ann C. M.; Magenis, R. Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and behavior problems, including abnormal sleep patterns. It is most commonly due to a 3.5 Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome 17 band p11.2. Secretion of melatonin, a hormone produced by the pineal gland, is the body’s signal for nighttime darkness. Published reports of 24-hour melatonin secretion patterns in two independent SMS cohorts (US & France) document an inverted endogenous melatonin pattern in virtually all cases (96%), suggesting that this finding is pathognomic for the syndrome. We report on a woman with SMS due to an atypical large proximal deletion (∼6Mb; cen<->TNFRSFproteinB) of chromosome band (17)(p11.1p11.2) who presents with typical sleep disturbances but a normal pattern of melatonin secretion. We further describe a melatonin light suppression test in this patient. This is the second reported patient with a normal endogenous melatonin rhythm in SMS associated with an atypical large deletion. These two patients are significant because they suggest that the sleep disturbances in SMS cannot be solely attributed to the abnormal diurnal melatonin secretion versus the normal nocturnal pattern. PMID:19530184

  12. In the Heat of the Night: Thermo-TRPV Channels in the Salmonid Pineal Photoreceptors and Modulation of Melatonin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Nisembaum, Laura Gabriela; Besseau, Laurence; Paulin, Charles-Hubert; Charpantier, Alice; Martin, Patrick; Magnanou, Elodie; Fuentès, Michael; Delgado, Maria-Jesus; Falcón, Jack

    2015-12-01

    Photoperiod plays an essential role in the synchronization of metabolism, physiology, and behavior to the cyclic variations of the environment. In vertebrates, information is relayed by the pineal cells and translated into the nocturnal production of melatonin. The duration of this signal corresponds to the duration of the night. In fish, the pinealocytes are true photoreceptors in which the amplitude of the nocturnal surge is modulated by temperature in a species-dependent manner. Thus, the daily and annual variations in the amplitude and duration of the nocturnal melatonin signal provide information on daily and calendar time. Both light and temperature act on the activity of the penultimate enzyme in the melatonin biosynthesis pathway, the arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (serotonin → N-acetylserotonin). Although the mechanisms of the light/dark regulation of melatonin secretion are quite well understood, those of temperature remain unelucidated. More generally, the mechanisms of thermoreception are unknown in ectotherms. Here we provide the first evidence that two thermotransient receptor potential (TRP) channels, TRPV1 and TRPV4, are expressed in the pineal photoreceptor cells of a teleost fish, in which they modulate melatonin secretion in vitro. The effects are temperature dependent, at least for TRPV1. Our data support the idea that the pineal of fish is involved in thermoregulation and that the pineal photoreceptors are also thermoreceptors. In other nervous and nonnervous tissues, TRPV1 and TRPV4 display a ubiquitous but quantitatively variable distribution. These results are a fundamental step in the elucidation of the mechanisms of temperature transduction in fish. PMID:26389691

  13. Effect of constant temperatures, darkness and light on the secretion of melatonin by pineal explants and retinas in the gecko Christinus marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Moyer, R W; Firth, B T; Kennaway, D J

    1995-03-27

    The effects of temperature and lighting conditions on the secretion of melatonin by the pineal organ of the nocturnal gecko Christinus marmoratus was studied using in vitro perifusion. In a 12L:12D lighting regime, a high-amplitude melatonin rhythm was detectable at a constant temperature of 20 and 30 degrees C but not at 10 or 37 degrees C. There were sustained high levels of melatonin in constant darkness and sustained low levels in constant light. No retinal melatonin was detected using static and perifusion culture techniques. These results show that the pineal organ of C. marmoratus maintains light sensitivity in vitro but does not contain an oscillator coupled to the melatonin synthetic pathway. PMID:7796151

  14. Seasonal Patterns of Melatonin, Cortisol, and Progesterone Secretion in Female Lambs Raised Beneath a 500-KV Transmission Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jack Monroe, Jr.

    There is ongoing controversy about the possibility of adverse biological effects from environmental exposures to electric and magnetic fields. These fields are produced by all electrical equipment and appliances including electrical transmission lines. The objective of this environmental science study was to investigate the possible effects of a high voltage transmission line on domestic sheep (Ovis aries L.), a species that can often be found near such lines. The study was primarily designed to determine whether a specific effect of electric and magnetic fields found in laboratory animals also occurs in livestock under natural environmental conditions. The effect is the ability of fields, at levels found in the environment, to significantly depress the normally high nocturnal concentrations of the pineal hormone-melatonin. Ten female Suffolk lambs were penned for 10 months directly beneath a 500-kV transmission line near Estacada, Oregon. Ten other lambs of the same type were penned in a control area away from the transmission line where electric and magnetic fields were at ambient levels. Serum melatonin was analyzed by radioimmunoassay (RIA) from 6618 blood samples collected at 0.5 to 3-hour intervals over eight 48-hour periods. Serum progesterone was analyzed by RIA from blood samples collected twice weekly. Serum cortisol was also assayed by RIA from the blood samples collected during the 48-hour samples. Results showed that lambs in both the control and line groups had the typical pattern of melatonin secretion consisting of low daytime and high nighttime serum concentrations. There were no statistically significant differences between groups in melatonin levels, or in the phase or duration of the nighttime melatonin elevation. Age at puberty and number of reproductive cycles also did not differ between groups. Serum cortisol showed a circadian rhythm with highest concentrations during the day. There were, however, no differences in cortisol concentrations

  15. A histological study of the effect of exogenous melatonin on gentamicin induced structural alterations of proximal tubules in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kapić, Dina; Mornjaković, Zakira; Ćosović, Esad; Šahinović, Maida

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to assess the reactive changes of rat proximal tubules caused by gentamicin and the effect of relatively low doses of melatonin. 48 adult male Wistar rats were distributed into six groups of equal size which all received one of the following daily intraperitoneal injections: vehicle (5% ethanol in Ringer solution) during 11 days (C); gentamicin (80 mg/kg) during 8 days (G), two groups which concomitantly received gentamicin (80 mg/kg) during 8 days and melatonin in two different test doses (5 or 20 mg/kg) during 11 days (GM1, GM2) and two groups treated only with melatonin in two different doses (5 or 20 mg/kg) during 11 days (M1, M2). Histological analysis included qualitative and semi-quantitative light microscopy analysis of proximal tubules. Exogenous melatonin had no significant effect on the microstructure, independently of dosis. The changes of proximal tubules microstructure induced by gentamicin were expressed in the form of granulovacuolar degeneration, necrosis and desquamation. The grade of proximal tubular changes was smaller in animals who besides gentamicin received melatonin. Melatonin has a dose dependent protective effect on the structural alterations of proximal tubules of the kidney induced by gentamicin. PMID:24579968

  16. Cortactin enhances exosome secretion without altering cargo.

    PubMed

    Gangoda, Lahiru; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2016-07-18

    The role of cortactin, a regulator of late endosomal trafficking, in the biogenesis and secretion of exosomes is poorly understood. In this issue, Sinha et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201601025) elucidate the role of cortactin as a positive regulator of late endosomal docking and exosome secretion. PMID:27432895

  17. Changes in melatonin secretion in tourists after rapid movement to another lighting zone without transition of time zone.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Joanna; Blazejczyk, Krzysztof; Morita, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Most of the research in the field of Chronobiology is focused on the problem of the circadian rhythms (CR) desynchronization. In travelers, it results mostly from the changes of surrounding: photoperiod, local climate conditions (radiation and thermal load) and behavior (e.g. type and place of tourism and activity level). Until now, it was not documented whether the changes in melatonin (MLT) secretion occur in effect of mid-distance transparallel travels (TpT), without complications arising due to time-zone transitions (e.g. jet-lag syndrome). To cope with this problem, a special field experiment was carried out. In the experiment, MLT characteristics were examined twice a year in real conditions through a group of young tourists (23-26 years old) at their place of habitual residence (Warsaw, Poland), and at their tourist destination (Tromso, Norway). Transition to circumpolar zone in summer has resulted in insignificant reduction in melatonin peak value (MPV) compared to preflight control (2 days before travel) and the melatonin peak time (MPT) was delayed. However, after traveling southward on the returning flight, MPV was lower compared to control and MPT was advanced. In winter, MPV was insignificantly higher in comparison to preflight control and MPT was almost unchanged. While changes in MPV do not depend on season, flight direction and day of stay after flight than MPT was differentiated seasonally and due to direction of flight. MPV and MPT were significantly modified by characteristics of individual light exposure during daytime and evening. The experiment showed also that in real conditions activity level is an important factor affected melatonin peak in tourists. In winter, greater daytime activity significantly influenced earlier MPT occurrence, both after northward and southward flights. PMID:26817496

  18. Beneficial effects of melatonin in a rat model of sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rudnitskaya, Ekaterina A; Maksimova, Kseniya Yi; Muraleva, Natalia A; Logvinov, Sergey V; Yanshole, Lyudmila V; Kolosova, Nataliya G; Stefanova, Natalia A

    2015-06-01

    Melatonin synthesis is disordered in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). To determine the role of melatonin in the pathogenesis of AD, suitable animal models are needed. The OXYS rats are an experimental model of accelerated senescence that has also been proposed as a spontaneous rat model of AD-like pathology. In the present study, we demonstrate that disturbances in melatonin secretion occur in OXYS rats at 4 months of age. These disturbances occur simultaneously with manifestation of behavioral abnormalities against the background of neurodegeneration and alterations in hormonal status but before the signs of amyloid-β accumulation. We examined whether oral administration of melatonin could normalize the melatonin secretion and have beneficial effects on OXYS rats before progression to AD-like pathology. The results showed that melatonin treatment restored melatonin secretion in the pineal gland of OXYS rats as well as the serum levels of growth hormone and IGF-1, the level of BDNF in the hippocampus and the healthy state of hippocampal neurons. Additionally, melatonin treatment of OXYS rats prevented an increase in anxiety and the decline of locomotor activity, of exploratory activity, and of reference memory. Thus, melatonin may be involved in AD progression, whereas oral administration of melatonin could be a prophylactic strategy to prevent or slow down the progression of some features of AD pathology. PMID:25515660

  19. Melatonin and 6-methoxy-2-benzoxazolinone (6-MBOA) alter the response of the male Syrian hamster to natural photoperiod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, M. K.; Little, J. C.; Powell, D. C.; Puig-Domingo, M.; Reiter, R. J.

    1988-06-01

    Adult male hamsters bearing either a blank beeswax, 6-methoxy-2-benzoxazolinone (6-MBOA), or melatonin pellet were exposed to 8 weeks (Oct. 6 Dec. 6) of natural autumn decreasing photoperiod (<11 h light) and temperature conditions (mean 10°C for last 4 weeks) or to a 14 h light/10 h dark (14L∶10D) photoperiod and controlled temperature (20°C). Melatonin but not 6-MBOA pellets partially prevented the combined effects of short photoperiod and cold temperatures on the testes and accessory organs. However, both 6-MBOA-and melatonin-treated hamsters maintained outdoors had significantly higher pituitary follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) values compared to their respective indoor-treated controls or to the animals kept outdoors and treated with a blank beeswax pellet. When one compares the various effects of 6-MBOA and melatonin (2 mg/month) on the reproductive system of the male hamster, 6-MBOA is not as effective as melatonin in altering reproductive responses to short photoperiod and cool temperatures at the dose administered.

  20. Melatonin Mediates Monochromatic Light-induced Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Secretion of Chick Liver: Involvement of Membrane Receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Suqi; Cao, Jing; Wang, Zixu; Dong, Yulan; Wang, Wenli; Chen, Yaoxing

    2016-07-01

    Monochromatic lights influenced the proliferation and differentiation of skeletal satellite cells in broilers by the enhancement of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) secretion. However, whether melatonin (MEL)-mediated monochromatic lights influenced the IGF-1 secretion remains unclear. Newly hatched broilers, including intact, sham operation and pinealectomy groups, were exposed to blue (BL), green (GL), red (RL) and white light (WL) from a light-emitting diode system for 14 days. The results showed that GL effectively promoted the secretion of MEL and IGF-1, the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and MEL receptor subtypes Mel1a, Mel1b and Mel1c in the liver compared to BL and RL in vivo. Moreover, those was a positive correlation between MEL and IGF-1 (r = 0.834). After pinealectomy, however, these parameters declined, and there were no differences between GL and other monochromatic light treatments. In vitro, exogenous MEL increased hepatocyte proliferation and IGF-1 secretion. Meanwhile, the MEL enhancements were suppressed by prazosin (selective Mel1c antagonist), followed by luzindole (nonselective Mel1a/Mel1b antagonist), but not suppressed by 4-phenyl-2-propionamideotetralin (selective Mel1b antagonist). These findings demonstrated that MEL mediated the monochromatic light-induced secretion of IGF-1 in chicks' livers by Mel1c and that Mel1a may be involved in this process. PMID:27128575

  1. Neuroendocrine aspects of primary endogenous depression. XV: Mathematical modeling of nocturnal melatonin secretion in major depressives and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Sekula, L K; Lucke, J F; Heist, E K; Czambel, R K; Rubin, R T

    1997-03-24

    We previously reported a trend toward a higher mean nocturnal serum melatonin (MEL) concentration, based on 30-min blood sampling over 24 h, in 23 female definite endogenous depressive compared to 23 matched normal female control subjects, and no significant difference in 15 male depressives compared to their controls (Rubin et al., 1992). In both groups of patients vs. their controls, there also were trends toward an earlier MEL rise time, by about 30 min, and a later MEL peak time, by about 90 min. Because the offset of MEL secretion was not estimated in that study, the total duration of MEL secretion could not be determined. To further delineate the nocturnal MEL secretion curve, we modeled the MEL data by a linear-Beta model, a four-parameter adaptation of the Beta function. One parameter accounted-for baseline (diurnal) MEL concentration, two accounted for the shapes of the ascending and descending phases of the nocturnal secretion curve, and the fourth accounted for the area under the curve. The model permitted estimation of the start, peak, and end times of nocturnal MEL secretion. There again was a trend toward a higher mean nocturnal MEL concentration in the female depressives compared to their matched controls. There were no significant patient-control differences in secretion onset or peak times in either the women or the men except for nocturnal MEL offset time: the female patients had a trend toward a later offset time, by about 40 min, than their controls; this difference was not present in the men. With women and men analyzed together, the difference in nocturnal MEL offset time between patients and controls just reached significance (P < 0.05). The linear-Beta model appears to satisfactorily fit the MEL data and provides estimators of the onset, peak, and offset times of the activation phase of MEL secretion. This model may be applicable to more severely skewed 24-h hormone secretion curves, such as ACTH and cortisol. PMID:9109182

  2. Decreased melatonin secretion is associated with increased intestinal permeability and marker of endotoxemia in alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Gorenz, Annika; Shaikh, Maliha; Desai, Vishal; Forsyth, Christopher; Fogg, Louis; Burgess, Helen J.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Chronic heavy alcohol use is known to cause gut leakiness and alcoholic liver disease (ALD), but only 30% of heavy drinkers develop increased intestinal permeability and ALD. The hypothesis of this study was that disruption of circadian rhythms is a potential risk factor in actively drinking alcoholics for gut leakiness and endotoxemia. We studied 20 subjects with alcohol use disorder (AD) and 17 healthy controls (HC, 6 day workers, 11 night workers). Subjects wore a wrist actiwatch for 7 days and underwent a 24-h dim light phase assessment and urine collection for intestinal permeability. The AD group had significantly less total sleep time and increased fragmentation of sleep (P < 0.05). AD also had significantly lower plasma melatonin levels compared with the HC [mean area under the curve (AUC) 322.78 ± 228.21 vs. 568.75 ± 304.26 pg/ml, P = 0.03]. In the AD group, AUC of melatonin was inversely correlated with small bowel and colonic intestinal permeability (lactulose-to-mannitol ratio, r = −0.39, P = 0.03; urinary sucralose, r = −0.47, P = 0.01). Cosinor analysis of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (marker of endotoxemia) and lipopolysaccharide every 4 h for 24 h in HC and AD subjects had a midline estimating statistic of rhythm of 5,026.15 ± 409.56 vs. 6,818.02 ± 628.78 ng/ml (P < 0.01) and 0.09 ± 0.03 vs. 0.15 ± 0.19 EU/ml (P < 0.05), respectively. We found plasma melatonin was significantly lower in the AD group, and lower melatonin levels correlated with increased intestinal permeability and a marker of endotoxemia. Our study suggests the suppression of melatonin in AD may promote gut leakiness and endotoxemia. PMID:25907689

  3. Decreased melatonin secretion is associated with increased intestinal permeability and marker of endotoxemia in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Garth R; Gorenz, Annika; Shaikh, Maliha; Desai, Vishal; Forsyth, Christopher; Fogg, Louis; Burgess, Helen J; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-06-15

    Chronic heavy alcohol use is known to cause gut leakiness and alcoholic liver disease (ALD), but only 30% of heavy drinkers develop increased intestinal permeability and ALD. The hypothesis of this study was that disruption of circadian rhythms is a potential risk factor in actively drinking alcoholics for gut leakiness and endotoxemia. We studied 20 subjects with alcohol use disorder (AD) and 17 healthy controls (HC, 6 day workers, 11 night workers). Subjects wore a wrist actiwatch for 7 days and underwent a 24-h dim light phase assessment and urine collection for intestinal permeability. The AD group had significantly less total sleep time and increased fragmentation of sleep (P < 0.05). AD also had significantly lower plasma melatonin levels compared with the HC [mean area under the curve (AUC) 322.78 ± 228.21 vs. 568.75 ± 304.26 pg/ml, P = 0.03]. In the AD group, AUC of melatonin was inversely correlated with small bowel and colonic intestinal permeability (lactulose-to-mannitol ratio, r = -0.39, P = 0.03; urinary sucralose, r = -0.47, P = 0.01). Cosinor analysis of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (marker of endotoxemia) and lipopolysaccharide every 4 h for 24 h in HC and AD subjects had a midline estimating statistic of rhythm of 5,026.15 ± 409.56 vs. 6,818.02 ± 628.78 ng/ml (P < 0.01) and 0.09 ± 0.03 vs. 0.15 ± 0.19 EU/ml (P < 0.05), respectively. We found plasma melatonin was significantly lower in the AD group, and lower melatonin levels correlated with increased intestinal permeability and a marker of endotoxemia. Our study suggests the suppression of melatonin in AD may promote gut leakiness and endotoxemia. PMID:25907689

  4. Melatonin alters the glycolytic profile of Sertoli cells: implications for male fertility.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Cátia S; Martins, Ana D; Rato, Luís; Silva, Branca M; Oliveira, Pedro F; Alves, Marco G

    2014-11-01

    Melatonin co-operates with insulin in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Within the testis, glucose metabolism in the somatic Sertoli cells (SCs) is pivotal for spermatogenesis. Since the effects of melatonin on male reproductive physiology remain largely unknown, we hypothesized that melatonin may affect spermatogenesis by modulating SC metabolism, interacting with insulin. To test our hypothesis, rat SCs were maintained in culture for 24 h in the presence of insulin, melatonin or both and metabolite production/consumption was determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR). Protein levels of glucose transporters (GLUT1 and GLUT3), phosphofructokinase 1, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and monocarboxylate transporter 4 were determined by western blot. LDH activity was also assessed. SCs treated with melatonin showed an increase in glucose consumption via modulation of GLUT1 levels, but decreased LDH protein expression and activity, which resulted in lower lactate production. Moreover, SCs exposed to melatonin produced and accumulated less acetate than insulin-exposed cells. The combined treatment (insulin plus melatonin) increased acetate production by SCs, but intracellular acetate content remained lower than in insulin exposed cells. Finally, the intracellular redox state, as reflected by intracellular lactate/alanine ratio, was maintained at control levels in SCs by melatonin exposure (i.e. melatonin, alone or with insulin, increased the lactate/alanine ratio versus cells treated with insulin). Furthermore, SCs exposed to insulin plus melatonin produced more lactate and maintained the protein levels of some glycolysis-related enzymes and transporters at control levels. These findings illustrate that melatonin regulates SCs metabolism, and thus may affect spermatogenesis. Since lactate produced by SCs provides nutritional support and has an anti-apoptotic effect in developing germ cells, melatonin supplementation may be an effective therapy for

  5. Light, melatonin and the sleep-wake cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, G M

    1994-01-01

    Blood levels of the pineal hormone melatonin are high at night and low during the day. Its secretion is regulated by a rhythm-generating system located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, which is in turn regulated by light. Melatonin is regulated not only by that circadian oscillator but acts as a darkness signal, providing feedback to the oscillator. Melatonin has both a soporific effect and an ability to entrain the sleep-wake rhythm. It also has a major role in regulating the body temperature rhythm. Melatonin rhythms are altered in a variety of circadian rhythm disorders. Melatonin treatment has been reported to be effective in treatment of disorders such as jet lag and delayed sleep phase syndrome. PMID:7803368

  6. Mutations alter secretion of fukutin-related protein.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pei J; Zillmer, Allen; Wu, XiaoHua; Lochmuller, Hanns; Vachris, Judy; Blake, Derek; Chan, Yiumo Michael; Lu, Qi L

    2010-02-01

    Mutations in the fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene cause limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I) as well as other severe muscle disorders, including Walker-Warburg syndrome, muscle-eye-brain disease, and congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C. The FKRP gene encodes a putative glycosyltransferase, but its precise localization and functions have yet to be determined. In the present study, we demonstrated that normal FKRP is secreted into culture medium and mutations alter the pattern of secretion in CHO cells. L276I mutation associated with mild disease phenotype was shown to reduce the level of secretion whereas P448L and C318Y mutations associated with severe disease phenotype almost abolished the secretion. However, a truncated FKRP mutant protein lacking the entire C-terminal 185 amino acids due to the E310X nonsense mutation was able to secrete as efficiently as the normal FKRP. The N-terminal signal peptide sequence is apparently cleaved from the secreted FKRP proteins. Alteration of the secretion pathway by different mutations and spontaneous read-through of nonsense mutation may contribute to wide variations in phenotypes associated with FKRP-related diseases. PMID:19900540

  7. Melatonin treatment during early life interacts with restraint to alter neuronal morphology and provoke depressive-like responses.

    PubMed

    Aubrecht, Taryn G; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-04-15

    Stressors during early life induce anxiety- and depressive-like responses in adult rodents. Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) exposed to short days post-weaning also increase adult anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. To test the hypothesis that melatonin and exposure to stressors early in life interact to alter adult affective responses, we administered melatonin either during the perinatal (gestational day 7 to postnatal day 14) or postnatal (day 15-56) periods and also exposed a subset of dams to restraint during gestation (1 h-2×/day for 4 days). During the final week of injections, depressive-like behaviors were assessed using the sucrose anhedonia and forced swim tests. Hamsters exposed to prenatal restraint and treated with melatonin only during the postnatal period increased depressive-like responses in the forced swim test relative to all other groups. Offspring from restrained dams increased the number of fecal boli produced during the forced swim test, an anxiety-like response. In the present study, prenatal restraint reduced CA1 dendritic branching overall and perinatal melatonin protected hamsters from this restraint-induced reduction. These results suggest that the photoperiodic conditions coincident with birth and early life stressors are important in the development of adult affective responses. PMID:24486255

  8. Melatonin treatment during early life interacts with restraint to alter neuronal morphology and provoke depressive-like responses

    PubMed Central

    Aubrecht, Taryn G.; Weil, Zachary M.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2014-01-01

    Stressors during early life induce anxiety- and depressive-like responses in adult rodents. Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) exposed to short days post-weaning also increase adult anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. To test the hypothesis that melatonin and exposure to stressors early in life interact to alter adult affective responses, we administered melatonin either during the perinatal (gestational day 7 to postnatal day 14) or postnatal (day 15–56) periods and also exposed a subset of dams to restraint during gestation (1 h–2×/day for 4 days). During the final week of injections, depressive-like behaviors were assessed using the sucrose anhedonia and forced swim tests. Hamsters exposed to prenatal restraint and treated with melatonin only during the postnatal period increased depressive-like responses in the forced swim test relative to all other groups. Offspring from restrained dams increased the number of fecal boli produced during the forced swim test, an anxiety-like response. In the present study, prenatal restraint reduced CA1 dendritic branching overall and perinatal melatonin protected hamsters from this restraint-induced reduction. These results suggest that the photoperiodic conditions coincident with birth and early life stressors are important in the development of adult affective responses. PMID:24486255

  9. Placental melatonin production and melatonin receptor expression are altered in preeclampsia: new insights into the role of this hormone in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lanoix, Dave; Guérin, Pascale; Vaillancourt, Cathy

    2012-11-01

    The melatonin system in preeclamptic pregnancies has been largely overlooked, especially in the placenta. We have previously documented melatonin production and expression of its receptors in normal human placentas. In addition, we and others have shown a beneficial role of melatonin in placental and fetal functions. In line with this, decreased maternal blood levels of melatonin are found in preeclamptic compared with normotensive pregnancies. However, melatonin production and expression of its receptors in preeclamptic compared with normotensive pregnancy placentas has never been examined. This study compares (i) melatonin-synthesizing enzyme expression and activity, (ii) melatonin and serotonin, melatonin's immediate precursor, levels and (iii) expression of MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors in placentas from preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies. Protein and mRNA expression of aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) and hydroxyindole O-methyltransferase (HIOMT), the melatonin-synthesizing enzymes, as well as MT1 and MT2 receptors were determined by RT-qPCR and Western blot, respectively. The activities of melatonin-synthesizing enzymes were assessed by radiometric assays while melatonin levels were determined by LC-MS/MS. There is a significant inhibition of AANAT, melatonin's rate-limiting enzyme, expression and activity in preeclamptic placentas, correlating with decreased melatonin levels. Likewise, MT1 and MT2 expression is significantly reduced in preeclamptic compared with normotensive pregnancy placentas. We propose that reduced maternal plasma melatonin levels may be an early diagnostic tool to identify pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia. This study indicates a clinical utility of melatonin as a potential treatment for preeclampsia in women where reduced maternal plasma levels have been identified. PMID:22686298

  10. Homeostatic versus circadian effects of melatonin on core body temperature in humans.

    PubMed

    Cagnacci, A; Kräuchi, K; Wirz-Justice, A; Volpe, A

    1997-12-01

    Evidence obtained in animals has suggested a link of the pineal gland and its hormone melatonin with the regulation of core body temperature (CBT). Depending on the species considered, melatonin intervenes in generating seasonal rhythms of daily torpor and hibernation, in heat stress tolerance, and in setting the CBT set point. In humans, the circadian rhythms of melatonin is strictly associated with that of CBT, the nocturnal decline of CBT being inversely related to the rise of melatonin. Whereas there is inconsistent evidence for the suggestion that the decline of CBT may prompt the release of melatonin, conversely, stringent data indicate that melatonin decreases CBT. Administration of melatonin during the day, when it is not normally secreted, decreases CBT by about 0.3 to 0.4 degree C, and suppression of melatonin at night enhances CBT by about the same magnitude. Accordingly, the nocturnal rise of melatonin contributes to the circadian amplitude of CBT. The mechanisms through which melatonin decreases CBT are unclear. It is known that melatonin enhances heat loss, but a reduction of heat production cannot be excluded. Besides actions on peripheral vessels aimed to favor heat loss, it is likely that the effect of melatonin to reduce CBT is exerted mainly in the hypothalamus, where thermoregulatory centers are located. Recent observations have shown that the acute thermoregulatory effects induced by melatonin and bright light are independent of their circadian phase-shifting effects. The effect of melatonin ultimately brings a saving of energy and is reduced in at least two physiological situations: aging and the luteal menstrual phase. In both conditions, melatonin does not exert its CBT-lowering effects. Whereas in older women this effect may represent an age-related alteration, in the luteal phase this modification may represent a mechanism of keeping CBT higher at night to promote a better embryo implantation and survival. PMID:9406024

  11. Melatonin in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Pévet, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Melatonin is a hormone synthesized and secreted during the night by the pineal gland. Its production is mainly driven by the Orcadian clock, which, in mammals, is situated in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. The melatonin production and release displays characteristic daily (nocturnal) and seasonal patterns (changes in duration proportional to the length of the night) of secretion. These rhythms in circulating melatonin are strong synchronizers for the expression of numerous physiological processes. In mammals, the role of melatonin in the control of seasonality is well documented, and the sites and mechanisms of action involved are beginning to be identified. The exact role of the hormone in the diurnal (Orcadian) timing system remains to be determined. However, exogenous melatonin has been shown to affect the circadian clock. The molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in this well-characterized “chronobiotic” effect have also begun to be characterized. The circadian clock itself appears to be an important site for the entrapment effect of melatonin and the presence of melatonin receptors appears to be a prerequisite. A better understanding of such “chronobiotic” effects of melatonin will allow clarification of the role of endogenous melatonin in circadian organization. PMID:22033558

  12. Continuous light after a long-day treatment is equivalent to melatonin implants to stimulate testosterone secretion in Alpine male goats.

    PubMed

    Delgadillo, J A; Vélez, L I; Flores, J A

    2016-04-01

    In rams, artificial long days followed by continuous light stimulate testosterone secretion during the non-breeding season. The objective of this study was to determine whether artificial long days followed by continuous light could stimulate testosterone secretion in Alpine bucks as well as in those exposed to long days followed by a melatonin treatment. All bucks were kept in shaded open pens. Control males were exposed to natural photoperiod conditions (n=5). Males of the two experimental groups were exposed to 2.5 months of long days from 1 December (n=5 each). On 16 February, one group of males was exposed to 24 h of light per day until 30 June; the other group was exposed to natural variations of photoperiod and received two s.c. melatonin implants. Testicular weight was determined every 2 weeks, and the plasma testosterone concentrations once a week. In the control and the two photoperiodic-treated groups, a treatment×time interaction was detected for testicular weight and plasma testosterone concentrations (P<0.001). In control bucks, testicular weight increased from January and peaked in June, whereas in both photoperiodic-treated groups, this variable increased from January, but peaked in April, when the values were higher than in controls (P<0.05). In the control group, plasma testosterone concentrations remained low from January to June, whereas in both photoperiodic-treated groups, this variable remained low from January to March; thereafter, these levels increased in both photoperiodic-treated groups, and were higher than controls in April and May (P<0.05). We conclude that continuous light after a long-day treatment stimulate testosterone secretion in Alpine male goats during the non-breeding season as well as the long days followed by a melatonin treatment. Therefore, continuous light could replace the implants of melatonin. PMID:26527165

  13. Alterations in nocturnal serum melatonin levels in humans with growth and aging.

    PubMed

    Waldhauser, F; Weiszenbacher, G; Tatzer, E; Gisinger, B; Waldhauser, M; Schemper, M; Frisch, H

    1988-03-01

    The available data on potential alterations in serum melatonin (MLT) levels during a human lifetime are fragmentary and inconsistent. We, therefore, measured day- and nighttime serum MLT concentrations in 367 subjects (210 males and 157 females), aged 3 days to 90 yr. Blood samples were collected between 0730 and 1000 h and between 2300 and 0100 h. Serum MLT levels were measured by RIA. The mean nighttime serum MLT concentration was low during the first 6 months of life, i.e. 27.3 +/- 5.4 (+/- SE) pg/mL (0.12 +/- 0.02 nmol/L). It then increased to a peak value at 1-3 yr of age [329.5 +/- 42.0 pg/mL; (1.43 +/- 0.18 nmol/L)], and it was considerably lower [62.5 +/- 9.0 pg/mL; (0.27 +/- 0.04 nmol/L)] in individuals aged 15-20 yr. During the following decades serum MLT declined moderately until old age (70-90 yr of age), i.e. 29.2 +/- 6.1 pg/mL (0.13 +/- 0.03 nmol/L). This biphasic MLT decline follows 2 exponential functions with different slopes (from age 1-20 yr: r = -0.56; P less than 0.001; y = 278.7 X e -0.09x; from age 20-90 yr: r = -0.44; P less than 0.001; y = 84.8 X e -0.017x). The decrease in nocturnal serum MLT in children and adolescents (1-20 yr) correlated with the increase in body weight (r = -0.54; P less than 0.001) and body surface area (r = -0.71; P less than 0.001). At a later age (20-90 yr) there was no correlation among these variables. Daytime serum MLT levels were low and no age-related alterations were found. This study revealed major age-related alterations in nocturnal serum MLT levels. The negative correlation between serum MLT and body weight in childhood and adolescence is evidence that expansion of body size is responsible for the huge MLT decrease during that period. The moderate decline at older ages must derive from other factors. PMID:3350912

  14. Melatonin in Chronic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Danilov, Andrei; Kurganova, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by epiphysis and extrapineal structures. It performs several functions including chronobiotic, antioxidant, oncostatic, immune modulating, normothermal, and anxiolytic functions. Melatonin affects the cardiovascular system and gastrointestinal tract, participates in reproduction and metabolism, and body mass regulation. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated melatonin efficacy in relation to pain syndromes. The present paper reviews the studies on melatonin use in fibromyalgia, headaches, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic back pain, and rheumatoid arthritis. The paper discusses the possible mechanisms of melatonin analgesic properties. On one hand, circadian rhythms normalization results in sleep improvement, which is inevitably disordered in chronic pain syndromes, and activation of melatonin adaptive capabilities. On the other hand, there is evidence of melatonin-independent analgesic effect involving melatonin receptors and several neurotransmitter systems. PMID:26984272

  15. Seasonal regulation of reproduction: altered role of melatonin under naturalistic conditions in hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Matthew P.; Turner, Kevin W.; Park, Jin Ho; Schoomer, Elanor E.; Zucker, Irving; Gorman, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    The seasonal reproductive cycle of photoperiodic rodents is conceptualized as a series of discrete melatonin-dependent neuroendocrine transitions. Least understood is the springtime restoration of responsiveness to winter-like melatonin signals (breaking of refractoriness) that enables animals to once again respond appropriately to winter photoperiods the following year. This has been posited to require many weeks of long days based on studies employing static photoperiods instead of the annual pattern of continually changing photoperiods under which these mechanisms evolved. Maintaining Siberian hamsters under simulated natural photoperiods, we demonstrate that winter refractoriness is broken within six weeks after the spring equinox. We then test whether a history of natural photoperiod exposure can eliminate the requirement for long-day melatonin signalling. Hamsters pinealectomized at the spring equinox and challenged 10 weeks later with winter melatonin infusions exhibited gonadal regression, indicating that refractoriness was broken. A photostimulatory effect on body weight is first observed in the last four weeks of winter. Thus, the seasonal transition to the summer photosensitive phenotype is triggered prior to the equinox without exposure to long days and is thereafter melatonin-independent. Distinctions between photoperiodic and circannual seasonal organization erode with the incorporation in the laboratory of ecologically relevant day length conditions. PMID:20444712

  16. Effect of variable temperatures, darkness and light on the secretion of melatonin by pineal explants in the gecko, Christinus marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Moyer, R W; Firth, B T; Kennaway, D J

    1997-02-01

    This study examined the combined effect of thermocycles with either variable or constant photic conditions on melatonin production by pineal organs in vitro in the gecko, Christinus marmoratus. A 30 degrees C:15 degrees C thermocycle elicited a rhythm of melatonin production under conditions of 12L:12D, constant light or constant darkness when the cryophase coincided with the dark phase of the photocycle or with the subjective night. A 6 h advance of the thermocycle with respect to the photocycle produced an advance in the onset and offset of melatonin production in subsequent nights. When the thermocycle was 180 degrees out of phase with the photoperiod, the rhythm of melatonin production was disrupted, suggesting a differential pattern of sensitivity to photothermal stimuli. It was concluded that both light and temperature are important modulators of pineal function although their combined effects on pineal melatonin production is complex and unclear. PMID:9045997

  17. Melatonin modulates M4-type ganglion-cell photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Pack, W; Hill, D D; Wong, K Y

    2015-09-10

    In the retina, melatonin is secreted at night by rod/cone photoreceptors and serves as a dark-adaptive signal. Melatonin receptors have been found in many retinal neurons including melanopsin-containing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), suggesting it could modulate the physiology of these inner retinal photoreceptors. Here, we investigated whether melatonin modulates the alpha-like M4-type ipRGCs, which are believed to mediate image-forming vision as well as non-image-forming photoresponses. Applying melatonin during daytime (when endogenous melatonin secretion is low) caused whole-cell-recorded M4 cells' rod/cone-driven depolarizing photoresponses to become broader and larger, whereas the associated elevation in spike rate was reduced. Melanopsin-based light responses were not affected significantly. Nighttime application of the melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole also altered M4 cells' rod/cone-driven light responses but in the opposite ways: the duration and amplitude of the graded depolarization were reduced, whereas the accompanying spiking increase was enhanced. These luzindole-induced changes confirmed that M4 cells are modulated by endogenous melatonin. Melatonin could induce the above effects by acting directly on M4 cells because immunohistochemistry detected MT1 receptors in these cells, although it could also act presynaptically. Interestingly, the daytime and nighttime recordings showed significant differences in resting membrane potential, spontaneous spike rate and rod/cone-driven light responses, suggesting that M4 cells are under circadian control. This is the first report of a circadian variation in ipRGCs' resting properties and synaptic input, and of melatoninergic modulation of ipRGCs. PMID:26141846

  18. Seasonal Patterns of Melatonin, Cortisol, and Progesterone Secretion in Female Lambs Raised Beneath a 500-kV Transmission Line.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jack M.

    1992-06-01

    Although several kinds of biological effects of electric and magnetic fields have been reported from laboratory studies, few have been independently replicated. When this study was being planned, the suppression of nighttime melatonin in rodents was thought to represent one of the strongest known effects of these fields. The effect had been replicated by a single laboratory for 60-Hz electric fields, and by multiple laboratories for d-c magnetic fields. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the effect of electric and magnetic fields on melatonin would also occur in sheep exposed to a high voltage transmission line. The specific hypothesis tested by this experiment was as follows: The electrical environment produced by a 60-Hz, 500-kV transmission line causes a depression in nocturnal melatonin in chronically exposed female lambs. This may mimic effects of pinealectomy or constant long-day photoperiods, thus delaying the onset of reproductive cycles. Results of the study do not provide evidence to support the hypothesis. Melatonin concentrations in the sheep exposed to the transmission line showed the normal pattern of low daytime and high nighttime serum levels. As compared to the control group, there were no statistically significant group differences in the mean amplitude, phase, or duration of the nighttime melatonin elevation.

  19. Evidence of melatonin secretion in cetaceans: plasma concentration and extrapineal HIOMT-like presence in the bottlenose dolphin Tursiops truncatus.

    PubMed

    Panin, Mattìa; Gabai, Gianfranco; Ballarin, Cristina; Peruffo, Antonella; Cozzi, Bruno

    2012-06-01

    The pineal gland is generally believed to be absent in cetaceans, although few and subsequently unconfirmed reports described the organ in some species. The recent description of a complete and photographed pineal body in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) prompted us to examine a series of 29 brains of the same species, but no gland was found. We then decided to investigate if the main product of the gland, melatonin, was nevertheless produced and present in the plasma of this species. We collected plasma and serum samples from a series of captive bottlenose dolphins for a period of 7 months spanning from winter to summer and we determined the indoleamine concentration by radio-immunoassay (RIA). The results demonstrated for the first time a quantitative assessment of melatonin production in the blood of a cetacean. Melatonin levels were comparable to those of terrestrial mammals (5.15-27.74 pg/ml daylight concentration), with indications of both seasonal and daily variation although the presence of a circadian rhythm remains uncertain. Immunohistochemical analyses using as a marker hydroxyindole-O-methyl-transferase (HIOMT, the key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the hormone), suggested extrapineal melatonin production by the retina, the Harderian gland and the gut. The enzyme was unequivocally localized in all the three tissues, and, specifically, ganglion cells in the retina showed a very strong HIOMT-immunoreactivity. Our results suggest that further research might reveal unexplored aspects of melatonin production in cetaceans and deserves special attention and further efforts. PMID:22554922

  20. Effects of melatonin implants in pony mares. 2. Long-term effects.

    PubMed

    Peltier, M R; Robinson, G; Sharp, D C

    1998-04-15

    The effects of melatonin implant treatment over a 4 wk period at the summer solstice on the transition into and out of the following anovulatory season were evaluated in ovary-intact and ovariectomized mares. Melatonin implants tended to delay the timing of the final ovulation of the breeding season (P = 0.0797) in the ovary-intact mares. Although the decline in LH secretion associated with the end of the breeding season was parallel between treatments and ovarian statuses, the rate of LH secretion, as expressed by its mathematical accumulation, was lower in ovariectomized, melatonin-treated mares than in ovariectomized, control mares suggesting that melatonin administration advanced the offset of the breeding season in ovariectomized mares (P = 0.0001). The first ovulation of the subsequent breeding season was significantly delayed in the melatonin-treated mares as compared with that of control mares (P = 0.0031). During reproductive recrudescence, the time of the onset of the increase in LH secretion was similar among all 4 groups but the patterns of LH secretion were different for each treatment and ovarian status combination (P = 0.0112). Mares with melatonin implants had a slower rate of increase in LH secretion than control mares (P = 0.0001), and ovariectomized mares had a faster rate of LH increase than intact mares (P = 0.0001). These results suggest that melatonin implants during the summer solstice can alter the annual reproductive rhythm in mares and support the concept that endocrine patterns of reproductive recrudescence are not entirely independent of the ovary. PMID:10732051

  1. Exogenous Melatonin Reproduces the Effects of Short Day Lengths on Hippocampal Function in Male White-Footed Mice, Peromyscus leucopus

    PubMed Central

    Walton, James C.; Chen, Zhixiong; Travers, Joseph B.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2013-01-01

    Photoperiodism is a biological phenomenon, common among organisms living outside of the tropics, by which environmental day length is used to ascertain time of year to engage in seasonally-appropriate adaptations. White-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) are small photoperiodic rodents which display a suite of adaptive winter responses to short day lengths mediated by the extended duration of nightly melatonin secretion. Exposure to short days alters hippocampal dendritic morphology, impairs spatial learning and memory, and impairs hippocampal long term potentiation (LTP). To determine the role of melatonin in these photoperiod-induced alterations of behavioral, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological processes in this species, we implanted male mice subcutaneously with melatonin or empty Silastic capsules and exposed them to long or short day lengths. After ten weeks, mice were assessed for hippocampal LTP, tested for spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze, and morphometric analysis of neurons in the hippocampus using Golgi staining. Extending the duration of melatonin exposure, by short day exposure or via melatonin implants, impaired both Schaffer collateral LTP in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and spatial learning and memory, and altered neuronal morphology in all hippocampal regions. The current results demonstrate that chronic melatonin implants reproduce the effects of short days on the hippocampus and implicate melatonin signaling as a critical factor in day-length induced changes in the structure and function of the hippocampus in a photoperiodic rodent. PMID:23806713

  2. Signal transduction and regulation of melatonin synthesis in bovine pinealocytes: impact of adrenergic, peptidergic and cholinergic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Schomerus, Christof; Laedtke, Elke; Olcese, James; Weller, Joan L; Klein, David C; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2002-09-01

    Limited studies of the regulation of pineal melatonin biosynthesis in ungulates indicate that it differs considerably from that in rodents. Here we have investigated several signal transduction cascades and their impact on melatonin synthesis in bovine pinealocytes. Norepinephrine increased the intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) via alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors. Activation of beta-adrenergic receptors enhanced cAMP accumulation and rapidly elevated arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) activity and melatonin secretion. The beta-adrenergically evoked increases in AANAT activity were potentiated by alpha(1)-adrenergic stimulation, but this was not seen with cAMP or melatonin production. PACAP treatment caused small increases in cAMP, AANAT activity and melatonin biosynthesis, apparently in a subpopulation of cells. VIP and glutamate did not influence any of these parameters. Activation of nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors increased [Ca2+]i, but did not alter cAMP levels, AANAT activity or melatonin production. Our study reveals that discrete differences in pineal signal transduction exist between the cow and rodent, and emphasizes the potential importance that the analysis of ungulate pinealocytes may play in understanding regulation of pineal melatonin biosynthesis in primates and man, whose melatonin-generating system appears to be more similar to that in ungulates than to that in rodents. PMID:12195298

  3. The Effects of Melatonin on Brain Arginine Vasotocin: Relationship with Sex and Seasonal Differences in Melatonin Receptor Type 1 in Green Treefrogs (Hyla cinerea).

    PubMed

    Howard, C M; Lutterschmidt, D I

    2015-08-01

    The neuroendocrine mechanisms by which animals synchronise their physiological state with environmental cues are vital to timing life-history events appropriately. One important endocrine transducer of environmental cues in vertebrates is the pineal hormone melatonin, the secretion of which is directly sensitive to photoperiod and temperature. Melatonin modulates arginine vasotocin (AVT)-immunoreactive (-IR) cell number in the brain of green treefrogs (Hyla cinerea) during the summer breeding season, and this modulation is sexually dimorphic. In the present study, we investigated whether the influence of melatonin on vasotocin varies seasonally. We show that treatment of nonreproductive male green treefrogs with melatonin-filled silastic implants for 4 weeks during the winter does not alter vasotocin-IR cell number in any brain region (i.e. nucleus accumbens, amygdala, preoptic area, suprachiasmatic nucleus or ventral hypothalamus). Taken together, these results suggest that the influence of melatonin on AVT is associated with sex and seasonal variation in melatonin receptor expression. We tested this hypothesis by using immunohistochemistry to characterise the distribution of melatonin receptor type 1 (MT1, also known as Mel1a) in the brain of reproductive and nonreproductive male and female frogs. We quantified MT1-IR cell number in regions known to contain AVT cell populations. Reproductive males had significantly more MT1-IR cells than nonreproductive males in all brain regions, including the combined nucleus accumbens, diagonal band of Broca and septum, striatum, amygdala, combined preoptic area and suprachiasmatic nucleus, as well as the ventral hypothalamus. In the accumbens region, where the effect of melatonin on AVT is known to be sexually dimorphic, males had significantly more MT1-IR cells than females during the summer breeding season. Based on these findings, we suggest that MT1 plays a role in mediating the interactions between melatonin and

  4. [Biological potentiality of melatonin].

    PubMed

    Muñoz Barragán, Luciano

    2002-01-01

    The pineal gland is an epithalamic structure whose mission is to integrate incoming environmental information with other types of information deriving from the inner milieu itself of the organism, releasing melatonin, a substance able to elicit responses in the central nervous and endocrine systems. Secreted rhythmically during the scotophase, melatonin is involved in reproductive mechanisms, in cyclically developing nosological. Processes, and in the genesis or maintenance of cerebral biorhythms. Owing to its ability to uptake free radicals produced by cell metabolism, it is a potent antioxidant agent that is able to delay cellular ageing and inhibit cellular proliferation in both experimental and spontaneous tumours. PMID:12812036

  5. Time course of saliva and serum melatonin levels after ingestion of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, S; Tsuchiya, S; Tsutsumi, Y; Kotorii, T; Uchimura, N; Sakamoto, T; Yamada, S

    1998-04-01

    Salival and serum melatonin levels after melatonin ingestion were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Ingestion of 3 mg melatonin caused a marked increase in serum melatonin (3561+/-1201 pg/mL) within 20 min, followed by a gradual decrease, but the level still remained higher than the basal level at 240 min after the ingestion. The saliva melatonin 60 min after the ingestion showed the highest level (1177+/-403 pg/mL) which was one-third of the plasma level. The saliva melatonin level was highly correlated with the serum level throughout the experimental period (r=0.82, P=0.0001). These data indicate that the measurement of saliva melatonin level may be a suitable indicator for the melatonin secretion into general circulation. PMID:9628188

  6. Melatonin as a proconvulsive hormone in humans.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R; Tsagas, N; Anninos, P A

    1992-03-01

    The pineal gland and melatonin exert a major influence in the control of brain electrical activity and have been shown to be involved in seizure and sleep mechanisms. Since pinealectomy has been reported to result in seizures in experimental animals, it is assumed that melatonin has anticonvulsant properties. Indeed, limited studies in humans with temporal lobe epilepsy indicate that melatonin attenuates seizure activity. In the present communication we present evidence, based on magnetoencephalographic (MEG) brain measurements, that melatonin may exert proconvulsive activity in humans as well. The proconvulsive properties of melatonin may explain several phenomena associated with epilepsy such as the increased occurrence of seizures at night when melatonin plasma levels are 5 to 8-fold higher than during the day and the observed exacerbation of seizures premenstrually and during pregnancy as well as the attenuation of seizures in the menopause. Furthermore, our findings suggest that anticonvulsants which decrease melatonin secretion, such as the benzodiazepines, may exert their antiepileptic activity by attenuating nocturnal melatonin secretion. Finally, we propose that patients with nocturnal epilepsy or those experiencing exacerbation of seizures premenstrually may benefit from the administration of agents which block the secretion or action of melatonin. PMID:1342024

  7. Melatonin and Melatonin Agonists as Adjunctive Treatments in Bipolar Disorders.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Pierre Alexis; Etain, Bruno; Franchi, Jean-Arthur Micoulaud; Bellivier, Frank; Ritter, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorders (BD) present with abnormalities of circadian rhythmicity and sleep homeostasis, even during phases of remission. These abnormalities are linked to the underlying neurobiology of genetic susceptibility to BD. Melatonin is a pineal gland secreted neurohormone that induces circadian-related and sleep-related responses. Exogenous melatonin has demonstrated efficacy in treating primary insomnia, delayed sleep phase disorder, improving sleep parameters and overall sleep quality, and some psychiatric disorders like autistic spectrum disorders. In order to evaluate the efficacy of melatonin among patients with BD, this comprehensive review emphasizes the abnormal melatonin function in BD, the rationale of melatonin action in BD, the available data about the exogenous administration of melatonin, and melatonin agonists (ramelteon and tasimelteon), and recommendations of use in patients with BD. There is a scientific rationale to propose melatonin-agonists as an adjunctive treatment of mood stabilizers in treating sleep disorders in BD and thus to possibly prevent relapses when administered during remission phases. We emphasized the need to treat insomnia, sleep delayed latencies and sleep abnormalities in BD that are prodromal markers of an emerging mood episode and possible targets to prevent future relapses. An additional interesting adjunctive therapeutic effect might be on preventing metabolic syndrome, particularly in patients treated with antipsychotics. Finally, melatonin is well tolerated and has little dependence potential in contrast to most available sleep medications. Further studies are expected to be able to produce stronger evidence-based therapeutic guidelines to confirm and delineate the routine use of melatonin-agonists in the treatment of BD. PMID:26088111

  8. The role of melatonin in diabetes: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shweta; Singh, Hemant; Ahmad, Nabeel; Mishra, Priyanka; Tiwari, Archana

    2015-10-01

    Melatonin referred as the hormone of darkness is mainly secreted by pineal gland, its levels being elevated during night and low during the day. The effects of melatonin on insulin secretion are mediated through the melatonin receptors (MT1 and MT2). It decreases insulin secretion by inhibiting cAMP and cGMP pathways but activates the phospholipaseC/IP3 pathway, which mobilizes Ca2+from organelles and, consequently increases insulin secretion. Both in vivo and in vitro, insulin secretion by the pancreatic islets in a circadian manner, is due to the melatonin action on the melatonin receptors inducing a phase shift in the cells. Melatonin may be involved in the genesis of diabetes as a reduction in melatonin levels and a functional interrelationship between melatonin and insulin was observed in diabetic patients. Evidences from experimental studies proved that melatonin induces production of insulin growth factor and promotes insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation. The disturbance of internal circadian system induces glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, which could be restored by melatonin supplementation. Therefore, the presence of melatonin receptors on human pancreatic islets may have an impact on pharmacotherapy of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26331226

  9. Alterations in mitochondrial respiratory functions, redox metabolism and apoptosis by oxidant 4-hydroxynonenal and antioxidants curcumin and melatonin in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, Haider John, Annie; Brown, Eric M.; Benedict, Sheela; Kambal, Amr

    2008-01-15

    Cellular oxidative stress and alterations in redox metabolisms have been implicated in the etiology and pathology of many diseases including cancer. Antioxidant treatments have been proven beneficial in controlling these diseases. We have recently shown that 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a by-product of lipid peroxidation, induces oxidative stress in PC12 cells by compromising the mitochondrial redox metabolism. In this study, we have further investigated the deleterious effects of 4-HNE on mitochondrial respiratory functions and apoptosis using the same cell line. In addition, we have also compared the effects of two antioxidants, curcumin and melatonin, used as chemopreventive agents, on mitochondrial redox metabolism and respiratory functions in these cells. 4-HNE treatment has been shown to cause a reduction in glutathione (GSH) pool, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), protein carbonylation and apoptosis. A marked inhibition in the activities of the mitochondrial respiratory enzymes, cytochrome c oxidase and aconitase was observed after 4-HNE treatment. Increased nuclear translocation of NF-kB/p65 protein was also observed after 4-HNE treatment. Curcumin and melatonin treatments, on the other hand, maintained the mitochondrial redox and respiratory functions without a marked effect on ROS production and cell viability. These results suggest that 4-HNE-induced cytotoxicity may be associated, at least in part, with the altered mitochondrial redox and respiratory functions. The alterations in mitochondrial energy metabolism and redox functions may therefore be critical in determining the difference between cell death and survival.

  10. Melatonin, endocrine pancreas and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Peschke, Elmar

    2008-01-01

    Melatonin influences insulin secretion both in vivo and in vitro. (i) The effects are MT(1)-and MT(2)-receptor-mediated. (ii) They are specific, high-affinity, pertussis-toxin-sensitive, G(i)-protein-coupled, leading to inhibition of the cAMP-pathway and decrease of insulin release. [Correction added after online publication 4 December 2007: in the preceding sentence, 'increase of insulin release' was changed to 'decrease of insulin release'.] Furthermore, melatonin inhibits the cGMP-pathway, possibly mediated by MT(2) receptors. In this way, melatonin likely inhibits insulin release. A third system, the IP(3)-pathway, is mediated by G(q)-proteins, phospholipase C and IP(3), which mobilize Ca(2+) from intracellular stores, with a resultant increase in insulin. (iii) Insulin secretion in vivo, as well as from isolated islets, exhibits a circadian rhythm. This rhythm, which is apparently generated within the islets, is influenced by melatonin, which induces a phase shift in insulin secretion. (iv) Observation of the circadian expression of clock genes in the pancreas could possibly be an indication of the generation of circadian rhythms in the pancreatic islets themselves. (v) Melatonin influences diabetes and associated metabolic disturbances. The diabetogens, alloxan and streptozotocin, lead to selective destruction of beta-cells through their accumulation in these cells, where they induce the generation of ROS. Beta-cells are very susceptible to oxidative stress because they possess only low-antioxidative capacity. Results suggest that melatonin in pharmacological doses provides protection against ROS. (vi) Finally, melatonin levels in plasma, as well as the arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) activity, are lower in diabetic than in nondiabetic rats and humans. In contrast, in the pineal gland, the AANAT mRNA is increased and the insulin receptor mRNA is decreased, which indicates a close interrelationship between insulin and melatonin. PMID:18078445

  11. Overtrained horses alter their resting pulsatile growth hormone secretion

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf-Roelfsema, E.; Veldhuis, P. P.; Keizer, H. A.; van Ginneken, M. M. E.; van Dam, K. G.; Johnson, M. L.; Barneveld, A.; Menheere, P. P. C. A.; van Breda, E.; Wijnberg, I. D.; van der Kolk, J. H.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of intensified and reduced training on nocturnal growth hormone (GH) secretion and elimination dynamics was studied in young (1.5 yr) Standardbred geldings to detect potential markers indicative for early overtraining. Ten horses trained on a treadmill for 32 wk in age-, breed-, and gender-matched fixed pairs. Training was divided into four phases (4, 18, 6, and 4 wk, respectively): 1) habituation to high-speed treadmill trotting, 2) normal training, in which speed and duration of training sessions were gradually increased, 3) in this phase, the horses were divided into 2 groups: control (C) and intensified trained (IT) group. In IT, training intensity, duration, and frequency were further increased, whereas in control these remained unaltered, and 4) reduced training (RT). At the end of phases 2, 3, and 4, blood was sampled overnight every 5 min for 8 h for assessment of GH secretory dynamics using pulse detection, deconvolution analysis, and approximate entropy (ApEn). Intensified training induced overtraining (performance decreased by 19% compared with C), which was associated with an increase in concentration peaks number (3.6 vs. 2.0, respectively), a smaller peak secretion pattern with a prolonged half-life (15.2 vs. 7.3 min, respectively), and an increased ApEn (0.89 vs. 0.49, respectively). RT did not lead to full recovery for the overtrained horses. The increased irregularity of nocturnal GH pulsatility pattern is indicative of a loss of coordinated control of GH regulation. Longer phases of somatostatin withdrawal are hypothesized to be the underlying mechanism for the observed changes in GH pulsatility pattern. PMID:19494168

  12. Constant light induces alterations in melatonin levels, food intake, feed efficiency, visceral adiposity, and circadian rhythms in rats.

    PubMed

    Wideman, Cyrilla H; Murphy, Helen M

    2009-10-01

    Melatonin levels, metabolic parameters, circadian rhythm activity patterns, and behavior were observed in rats subjected to a 12-h/12-h light/dark cycle (LD) compared to animals exposed to continuous dark (DD) or continuous light (LL). LD and DD animals were similar in melatonin levels, food intake, relative food intake, feed efficiency, water intake, circadian activity levels, and behavior. LL animals had lower melatonin levels in the subjective dark compared to LD and DD animals. Food intake, relative food intake, and water intake values were lower and feed efficiency was more positive in LL animals compared to LD and DD animals. In addition, LL animals exhibited greater visceral adiposity than the other two groups. The circadian rhythmicity of activity became free-running in LL animals and there was a decrease in overall activity. Notable behavioral changes in LL animals were an increase in irritability and excitability. Results indicate that a decrease in melatonin levels and concomitant changes in metabolism, circadian rhythms, and behavior are consequences of exposure to constant light. PMID:19761654

  13. Pharmacokinetics of melatonin in human sexual maturation.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, A; Ritschel, W A

    1996-05-01

    To determine whether melatonin pharmacokinetics change during puberty, we infused melatonin iv in 9 prepubertal, 8 pubertal, and 16 adult subjects and measured melatonin in serum and saliva, and 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate in urine. A pilot study of 3 adult males showed dose linearity, absence of saturation kinetics, and unaltered metabolism and urinary excretion for doses of 0.1, 0.5, and 5.0 micrograms/kg. All other subjects received 0.5 microgram/kg melatonin. The results of pharmacokinetic parameters calculated from serum melatonin showed no significant gender differences in adults. However, developmental differences were significant between prepubertal children and adults for terminal elimination rate constant (1.08 +/- 0.25 vs. 0.89 +/- 0.11 h-1), elimination half-life (0.67 +/- 0.12 vs. 0.79 +/- 0.10 h), and area under the concentration-time curve (250.9 +/- 91.8 vs. 376.9 +/- 154.3 (pg/mL).h, respectively). At all time points melatonin levels were higher in serum than in saliva, and the ratio between serum and salivary melatonin varied up to 55-fold within and between individuals. Results based on salivary melatonin showed significant differences between prepubertal children and adults for the terminal elimination rate constant (1.90 +/- 0.95 vs. 1.06 +/- 0.28 h-1). The described group differences in pharmacokinetic parameters suggest that prepubertal children metabolize melatonin faster than adults. The inconsistent ratio between serum and salivary melatonin calls for caution in the use of salivary melatonin for pharmacokinetic studies or to infer pineal function. The present findings, suggestive of faster melatonin metabolism in prepubertal children, combined with the known decline of serum melatonin with age and higher excretion rate of the metabolite in prepubertal children lead us to conclude that the prepubertal pineal gland has a higher melatonin secretion rate than the adult gland. PMID:8626852

  14. Altered Myokine Secretion Is an Intrinsic Property of Skeletal Muscle in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ciaraldi, Theodore P.; Ryan, Alexander J.; Mudaliar, Sunder R.; Henry, Robert R.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle secretes factors, termed myokines. We employed differentiated human skeletal muscle cells (hSMC) cultured from Type 2 diabetic (T2D) and non-diabetic (ND) subjects to investigate the impact of T2D on myokine secretion. Following 24 hours of culture concentrations of selected myokines were determined to range over 4 orders of magnitude. T2D hSMC released increased amounts of IL6, IL8, IL15, TNFa, Growth Related Oncogene (GRO)a, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, and follistatin compared to ND myotubes. T2D and ND hSMC secreted similar levels of IL1ß and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Treatment with the inflammatory agents lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or palmitate augmented the secretion of many myokines including: GROa, IL6, IL8, IL15, and TNFa, but did not consistently alter the protein content and/or phosphorylation of IkBa, p44/42 MAPK, p38 MAPK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and NF-kB, nor lead to consistent changes in basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake or free fatty acid oxidation. Conversely, treatment with pioglitazone or oleate resulted in modest reductions in the secretion of several myokines. Our results demonstrate that altered secretion of a number of myokines is an intrinsic property of skeletal muscle in T2D, suggesting a putative role of myokines in the response of skeletal muscle to T2D. PMID:27453994

  15. Melatonin treatment in the prevention of postoperative delirium in cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Artemiou, Panagiotis; Bilecova-Rabajdova, Miroslava; Sabol, Frantisek; Torok, Pavol; Kolarcik, Peter; Kolesar, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Post-cardiac surgery delirium is a severe complication. The circadian rhythm of melatonin secretion has been shown to be altered postoperatively. Aim of the study It was hypothesized that restoring normal sleeping patterns with a substance that is capable of resynchronizing circadian rhythm such as exogenous administration of melatonin may possibly reduce the incidence of postoperative delirium. Material and methods This paper represents a prospective clinical observational study. Two consecutive groups of 250 consecutive patients took part in the study. Group A was the control group and group B was the melatonin group. In group B, the patients received prophylactic melatonin treatment. The main objectives were to observe the incidence of delirium, to identify any predictors of delirium, and to compare the two groups based on the delirium incidence. Results The incidence of delirium was 8.4% in the melatonin group vs. 20.8% in the control group (p = 0.001). Predictors of delirium in the melatonin group were age (p = 0.001) and higher EuroSCORE II value (p = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, age and EuroSCORE II value (p = 0.014) were predictors of postoperative delirium. Comparing the groups, the main predictors of delirium were age (p = 0.001), EuroSCORE II value (p = 0.001), cardio-pulmonary bypass (CPB) time (p = 0.001), aortic cross-clamping (ACC) time (p = 0.008), sufentanil dose (p = 0.001) and mechanical ventilation (p = 0.033). Conclusions Administration of melatonin significantly decreases the incidence of postoperative delirium after cardiac surgery. Prophylactic treatment with melatonin should be considered in every patient scheduled for cardiac surgery. PMID:26336494

  16. [The influence of melatonin on human reproduction].

    PubMed

    Boczek-Leszczyk, Emilia; Juszczak, Marlena

    2007-08-01

    This paper reviews the possible participation of melatonin in the process of human reproduction. The results of several studies have shown the clear correlation between melatonin and gonadotropins and/or sexual steroids, which suggest that melatonin may be involved in the sexual maturation, ovulation or menopause. Decreased secretion of melatonin which coexists with increased fertility in the summer is specific for women living on the north hemisphere. Moreover, abnormal levels of melatonin in the blood are associated with several disorders of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonads axis activity, i.e., precocious or delayed pubertas, hypogonadotrophic or hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism or amenorrhoea. Melatonin binding sites have been demonstrated in the central nervous system (mainly in the pars dystalis of the pituitary and hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus) as well as in the reproductive organs, e.g., human granulosa cells, prostate and spermatozoa. Melatonin can, therefore, influence the gonadal function indirectly--via its effect on gonadotropin-releasing hormone and/or gonadotropins secretion. It may also act directly; several data show that melatonin can be synthesized in gonads. PMID:18044344

  17. Long noncoding RNA H19 mediates melatonin inhibition of premature senescence of c-kit(+) cardiac progenitor cells by promoting miR-675.

    PubMed

    Cai, Benzhi; Ma, Wenya; Bi, Chongwei; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Lai; Han, Zhenbo; Huang, Qi; Ding, Fengzhi; Li, Yuan; Yan, Gege; Pan, Zhenwei; Yang, Baofeng; Lu, Yanjie

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin, a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, possesses multiple biological activities such as antitumor, antioxidant, and anti-ischemia. C-kit(+) cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) have emerged as a promising tool for the treatment of heart diseases. However, the senescence of CPCs due to pathological stimuli leads to the decline of CPCs' functions and regenerative potential. This study was conducted to demonstrate whether melatonin antagonizes the senescence of CPCs in response to oxidative stress. Here, we found that the melatonin treatment markedly inhibited the senescent characteristics of CPCs after exposed to sublethal concentration of H2 O2 , including the increase in senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal)-positive CPCs, senescence-associated heterochromatin loci (SAHF), secretory IL-6 level, and the upregulation of p53 and p21 proteins. Senescence-associated proliferation reduction was also attenuated by melatonin in CPCs. Luzindole, the melatonin membrane receptor blocker, may block the melatonin-mediated suppression of premature senescence in CPCs. Interestingly, we found that long noncoding RNA H19 and its derived miR-675 were downregulated by H2 O2 in CPCs, but melatonin treatment could counter this alteration. Furthermore, knockdown of H19 or miR-675 blocked antisenescence actions of melatonin on H2 O2 -treated CPCs. It was further verified that H19-derived miR-675 targeted at the 3'UTR of USP10, which resulted in the downregulation of p53 and p21 proteins. In summary, melatonin antagonized premature senescence of CPCs via H19/miR-675/USP10 pathway, which provides new insights into pharmacological actions and potential applications of melatonin on the senescence of CPCs. PMID:27062045

  18. A Review of Melatonin, Its Receptors and Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Emet, Mucahit; Ozcan, Halil; Ozel, Lutfu; Yayla, Muhammed; Halici, Zekai; Hacimuftuoglu, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    After a Turkish scientist took Nobel Prize due to his contributions to understand clock genes, melatonin, closely related to these genes, may begin to shine. Melatonin, a hormone secreted from the pineal gland at night, plays roles in regulating sleep-wake cycle, pubertal development and seasonal adaptation. Melatonin has antinociceptive, antidepressant, anxiolytic, antineophobic, locomotor activity-regulating, neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory, pain-modulating, blood pressure-reducing, retinal, vascular, anti-tumor and antioxidant effects. It is related with memory, ovarian physiology, and osteoblast differentiation. Pathologies associated with an increase or decrease in melatonin levels are summarized in the review. Melatonin affects by four mechanisms: 1) Binding to melatonin receptors in plasma membrane, 2) Binding to intracellular proteins such as calmoduline, 3) Binding to Orphan nuclear receptors, and 4) Antioxidant effect. Receptors associated with melatonin are as follows: 1) Melatonin receptor type 1a: MT1 (on cell membrane), 2) Melatonin receptor type 1b: MT2 (on cell membrane), 3) Melatonin receptor type 1c (found in fish, amphibians and birds), 4) Quinone reductase 2 enzyme (MT3 receptor, a detoxification enzyme), 5) RZR/RORα: Retinoid-related Orphan nuclear hormone receptor (with this receptor, melatonin binds to the transcription factors in nucleus), and 6) GPR50: X-linked Melatonin-related Orphan receptor (it is effective in binding of melatonin to MT1). Melatonin agonists such as ramelteon, agomelatine, circadin, TIK-301 and tasimelteon are introduced and side effects will be discussed. In conclusion, melatonin and related drugs is a new and promising era for medicine. Melatonin receptors and melatonin drugs will take attention with greater interest day by day in the future. PMID:27551178

  19. A Review of Melatonin, Its Receptors and Drugs.

    PubMed

    Emet, Mucahit; Ozcan, Halil; Ozel, Lutfu; Yayla, Muhammed; Halici, Zekai; Hacimuftuoglu, Ahmet

    2016-06-01

    After a Turkish scientist took Nobel Prize due to his contributions to understand clock genes, melatonin, closely related to these genes, may begin to shine. Melatonin, a hormone secreted from the pineal gland at night, plays roles in regulating sleep-wake cycle, pubertal development and seasonal adaptation. Melatonin has antinociceptive, antidepressant, anxiolytic, antineophobic, locomotor activity-regulating, neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory, pain-modulating, blood pressure-reducing, retinal, vascular, anti-tumor and antioxidant effects. It is related with memory, ovarian physiology, and osteoblast differentiation. Pathologies associated with an increase or decrease in melatonin levels are summarized in the review. Melatonin affects by four mechanisms: 1) Binding to melatonin receptors in plasma membrane, 2) Binding to intracellular proteins such as calmoduline, 3) Binding to Orphan nuclear receptors, and 4) Antioxidant effect. Receptors associated with melatonin are as follows: 1) Melatonin receptor type 1a: MT1 (on cell membrane), 2) Melatonin receptor type 1b: MT2 (on cell membrane), 3) Melatonin receptor type 1c (found in fish, amphibians and birds), 4) Quinone reductase 2 enzyme (MT3 receptor, a detoxification enzyme), 5) RZR/RORα: Retinoid-related Orphan nuclear hormone receptor (with this receptor, melatonin binds to the transcription factors in nucleus), and 6) GPR50: X-linked Melatonin-related Orphan receptor (it is effective in binding of melatonin to MT1). Melatonin agonists such as ramelteon, agomelatine, circadin, TIK-301 and tasimelteon are introduced and side effects will be discussed. In conclusion, melatonin and related drugs is a new and promising era for medicine. Melatonin receptors and melatonin drugs will take attention with greater interest day by day in the future. PMID:27551178

  20. Genetic Deletion of MT1 Melatonin Receptors Alters Spontaneous Behavioral Rhythms in Male and Female C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Adamah-Biassi, E.B.; Hudson, R.L.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    Behaviors vary over the 24 hr. light/dark cycle and these temporal patterns reflect in part modulation by circadian neural circuits and hormones, such as melatonin. The goal of this study was to investigate if MT1 melatonin receptors are involved in behavioral regulation by comparing male and female C57 wild type (WT) mice with C57 mice that had a genetic deletion of the MT1 receptor (MT1KO). A comprehensive array of fifteen distinct spontaneous behaviors was recorded continuously in the homecage over multiple days using the HomeCageScan system. Behaviors assessed were activity-like (i.e. come down, hang, jump, walk), exploration-like (i.e. dig, groom, rear up, sniff, stretch), resting-like (i.e. awake, remain low, rest, twitch) and ingestion-like (i.e. drink, eat). Phenotypic array and temporal distribution analysis revealed distinct behavioral rhythms that differed between WT and MT1KO mice. The rhythms were consistent from day to day in males and varied with the estrous cycle in females. We also studied the role of MT1 receptors on depressive and anxiety-like behaviors. Genetic deletion of MT1 receptors increased immobility time in the forced swim test and decreased the number of marbles buried in the marble burying test in both male and female C57 mice. We conclude that MT1 melatonin receptors are involved in neural pathways modulating diurnal rhythms of spontaneous behavior in the homecage as well as pathways regulating depressive and anxiolytic-like behaviors. PMID:25200199

  1. Genetic deletion of MT1 melatonin receptors alters spontaneous behavioral rhythms in male and female C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Adamah-Biassi, E B; Hudson, R L; Dubocovich, M L

    2014-09-01

    Behaviors vary over the 24h light/dark cycle and these temporal patterns reflect in part modulation by circadian neural circuits and hormones, such as melatonin. The goal of this study was to investigate the involvement of MT1 melatonin receptors in behavioral regulation by comparing male and female C57 wild type (WT) mice with C57 mice with genetic deletion of the MT1 receptor (MT1KO). A comprehensive array of fifteen distinct spontaneous behaviors was recorded continuously in the homecage over multiple days using the HomeCageScan system. Behaviors assessed were activity-like (i.e. come down, hang, jump, walk), exploration-like (i.e. dig, groom, rear up, sniff, stretch), resting-like (i.e. awake, remain low, rest, twitch) and ingestion-like (i.e. drink, eat). Phenotypic array and temporal distribution analysis revealed distinct behavioral rhythms that differed between WT and MT1KO mice. The rhythms were consistent from day to day in males and varied with the estrous cycle in females. We also studied the role of MT1 receptors on depressive and anxiety-like behaviors. Genetic deletion of MT1 receptors increased immobility time in the forced swim test and decreased the number of marbles buried in the marble burying test in both male and female C57 mice. We conclude that MT1 melatonin receptors are involved in neural pathways modulating diurnal rhythms of spontaneous behavior in the homecage as well as pathways regulating depressive and anxiolytic-like behaviors. PMID:25200199

  2. Decreased melatonin levels and increased levels of advanced oxidation protein products in the seminal plasma are related to male infertility.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Ewa Maria; Piwowar, Agnieszka; Zeman, Michal; Stebelová, Katarína; Thalhammer, Theresia

    2016-03-01

    Melatonin, an indolamine secreted by the pineal gland, is known as a powerful free-radical scavenger and wide-spectrum antioxidant. Therefore, the aim of this study was to correlate markers of oxidative protein damage (advanced oxidation protein products, AOPPs) and the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) with melatonin levels in the seminal plasma of men with azoospermia (n=37), theratozoospermia (n=29) and fertile controls (normozoospermia, n=37). Melatonin concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The levels of AOPP as well as TAC efficiency (determined by the ferric reducing antioxidant power, FRAP) were estimated by spectrophotometric methods. The concentration of melatonin and AOPP significantly differed in azoospermic (P<0.0001) and theratozoospermic (P<0.0001) patients versus fertile men, and correlated negatively (r=-0.33, P=0.0016). The TAC levels were significantly higher in azoospermia than in theratozoospermia (P=0.0022) and the control group (P=0.00016). In azoospermia, the AOPP concentration was also significantly higher than that observed in theratozoospermia (P=0.00029). Decreased levels of melatonin together with elevated AOPP altered the oxidative-antioxidative balance in the ejaculate, thereby reducing fertility. Therefore, melatonin and AOPP levels may serve as additional diagnostic markers of semen quality and male reproductive potential. PMID:25218686

  3. Therapeutic potential of melatonin in oral medicine and periodontology.

    PubMed

    Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxy tryptamine) is a substance secreted by multiple organs in vertebrates. In addition to playing a part in the circadian cycle of the body, melatonin is known to have antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antioncotic effects on human tissues. Oral cavity is affected by a number of conditions such as periodontitis, mucositis, cancers, and cytotoxicity from various drugs or biomaterials. Research has suggested that melatonin is effective in treating the aforementioned pathologies. Furthermore, melatonin has been observed to enhance osseointegration and bone regeneration. The aim of this review is to critically analyze and summarize the research focusing on the potential of melatonin in the field of oral medicine. Topical administration of melatonin has a positive effect on periodontal health and osseointegration. Furthermore, melatonin is particularly effective in improving the periodontal parameters of diabetic patients with periodontitis. Melatonin exerts a regenerative effect on periodontal bone and may be incorporated into of periodontal scaffolds. The cytotoxic effect of various drugs and dental materials may be countered by the antioxidant properties of melatonin. Topical administration of melatonin promotes the healing of tooth extraction sockets and may also impede the progression of oral cancer. Although, there are a number of current and potential applications of melatonin, further long term clinical and animal studies are needed to assess its efficacy. Moreover, the role of melatonin supplements in the management of periodontitis should also be assessed. PMID:27523451

  4. Tributyltin alters secretion of interleukin 1 beta from human immune cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Shyretha; Whalen, Margaret

    2015-08-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) has been used as a biocide in industrial applications such as wood preservation, antifouling paint and antifungal agents. Owing to its many uses, it contaminates the environment and has been found in human blood samples. Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that promotes cell growth, tissue repair and immune response regulation. Produced predominately by both monocytes and macrophages, IL-1β appears to increase the invasiveness of certain tumors. This study shows that TBT modifies the secretion of IL-1β from increasingly reconstituted preparations of human immune cells. IL-1β secretion was examined after 24-, 48-h or 6-day exposures to TBT in highly enriched human natural killer (NK) cells, monocyte-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MD-PBMCs), PBMCs, granulocytes and a preparation combining both PBMCs and granulocytes (PBMCs+granulocytes). TBT altered IL-1β secretion from all of the cell preparations. The 200 nM concentration of TBT normally blocked the secretion of IL-1β, whereas lower concentrations (usually 5-50 nM) elevated secretion of IL-1β. Examination of the signaling pathway(s) responsible for the elevated secretion of IL-1β was carried out in MD-PBMCs. Pathways examined were IL-1β processing (Caspase-1), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB). Results indicated that MAPK pathways (p44/42 and p38) appear to be the targets of TBT that lead to increased IL-1β secretion from immune cells. These results from human immune cells show IL-1β dysregulation by TBT is occurring ex vivo. Thus, the potential for in vivo effects on pro-inflammatory cytokine levels may possibly be a consequence of TBT exposures. PMID:25382723

  5. Do plasma melatonin concentrations decline with age?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitzer, J. M.; Daniels, J. E.; Duffy, J. F.; Klerman, E. B.; Shanahan, T. L.; Dijk, D. J.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Numerous reports that secretion of the putative sleep-promoting hormone melatonin declines with age have led to suggestions that melatonin replacement therapy be used to treat sleep problems in older patients. We sought to reassess whether the endogenous circadian rhythm of plasma melatonin concentration changes with age in healthy drug-free adults. METHODS: We analyzed the amplitude of plasma melatonin profiles during a constant routine in 34 healthy drug-free older subjects (20 women and 14 men, aged 65 to 81 years) and compared them with 98 healthy drug-free young men (aged 18 to 30 years). RESULTS: We could detect no significant difference between a healthy and drug-free group of older men and women as compared to one of young men in the endogenous circadian amplitude of the plasma melatonin rhythm, as described by mean 24-hour average melatonin concentration (70 pmol/liter vs 73 pmol/liter, P = 0.97), or the duration (9.3 hours vs 9.1 hours, P = 0.43), mean (162 pmol/liter vs 161 pmol/liter, P = 0.63), or integrated area (85,800 pmol x min/liter vs 86,700 pmol x min/liter, P = 0.66) of the nocturnal peak of plasma melatonin. CONCLUSION: These results do not support the hypothesis that reduction of plasma melatonin concentration is a general characteristic of healthy aging. Should melatonin replacement therapy or melatonin supplementation prove to be clinically useful, we recommend that an assessment of endogenous melatonin be carried out before such treatment is used in older patients.

  6. Melatonin and Pancreatic Islets: Interrelationships between Melatonin, Insulin and Glucagon

    PubMed Central

    Peschke, Elmar; Bähr, Ina; Mühlbauer, Eckhard

    2013-01-01

    The pineal hormone melatonin exerts its influence in the periphery through activation of two specific trans-membrane receptors: MT1 and MT2. Both isoforms are expressed in the islet of Langerhans and are involved in the modulation of insulin secretion from β-cells and in glucagon secretion from α-cells. De-synchrony of receptor signaling may lead to the development of type 2 diabetes. This notion has recently been supported by genome-wide association studies identifying particularly the MT2 as a risk factor for this rapidly spreading metabolic disturbance. Since melatonin is secreted in a clearly diurnal fashion, it is safe to assume that it also has a diurnal impact on the blood-glucose-regulating function of the islet. This factor has hitherto been underestimated; the disruption of diurnal signaling within the islet may be one of the most important mechanisms leading to metabolic disturbances. The study of melatonin–insulin interactions in diabetic rat models has revealed an inverse relationship: an increase in melatonin levels leads to a down-regulation of insulin secretion and vice versa. Elucidation of the possible inverse interrelationship in man may open new avenues in the therapy of diabetes. PMID:23535335

  7. Ethanol Alters Production and Secretion of Estrogen-Regulated Growth Factors That Control Prolactin-Secreting Tumors in the Pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Dipak K.; Boyadjieva, Nadka I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic administration of ethanol increases plasma prolactin levels and enhances estradiol’s mitogenic action on the lactotropes of the pituitary gland. The present study was conducted to determine whether ethanol’s lactotropic cell-proliferating action, like estradiol’s, is associated with alteration in the production of 3 peptides that regulate cell growth: transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), TGF-β3 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Methods Using ovariectomized Fischer-344 female rats, we determined ethanol’s and estradiol’s actions on lactotropic cell proliferation and growth-regulatory peptide production and release in the pituitary gland during tumorigenesis. Results Ethanol increased basal and estradiol-enhanced mitosis of lactotropes in the pituitary glands of ovariectomized rats. The level of growth-inhibitory TGF-β1 was reduced in the pituitary following ethanol and/or estradiol treatment for 2 and 4 weeks. In contrast, ethanol and estradiol alone as well as together increased levels of growth-stimulatory TGF-β3 and bFGF in the pituitary at 2 and 4 weeks. In primary cultures of pituitary cells, both ethanol and estradiol reduced TGF-β1 release and increased TGF-β3 and bFGF release at 24 hours. Ethanol’s effect on growth factor levels in the pituitary or growth factor release from the pituitary cells was less than that of estradiol. When ethanol and estradiol were applied together, their individual effects on these growth factors were amplified. Conclusions These results confirm estradiol’s modulation of pituitary growth factor production and release, and provide evidence that ethanol, like estradiol, alters the production and secretion of growth-regulatory peptides controlling lactotropic cell proliferation. PMID:18034699

  8. Decidual-secreted factors alter invasive trophoblast membrane and secreted proteins implying a role for decidual cell regulation of placentation.

    PubMed

    Menkhorst, Ellen Melaleuca; Lane, Natalie; Winship, Amy Louise; Li, Priscilla; Yap, Joanne; Meehan, Katie; Rainczuk, Adam; Stephens, Andrew; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2012-01-01

    Inadequate or inappropriate implantation and placentation during the establishment of human pregnancy is thought to lead to first trimester miscarriage, placental insufficiency and other obstetric complications. To create the placental blood supply, specialized cells, the 'extravillous trophoblast' (EVT) invade through the differentiated uterine endometrium (the decidua) to engraft and remodel uterine spiral arteries. We hypothesized that decidual factors would regulate EVT function by altering the production of EVT membrane and secreted factors. We used a proteomics approach to identify EVT membrane and secreted proteins regulated by decidual cell factors. Human endometrial stromal cells were decidualized in vitro by treatment with estradiol (10(-8) M), medroxyprogesterone acetate (10(-7) M) and cAMP (0.5 mM) for 14 days. Conditioned media (CM) was collected on day 2 (non-decidualized CM) and 14 (decidualized CM) of treatment. Isolated primary EVT cultured on Matrigel™ were treated with media control, non-decidualized or decidualized CM for 16 h. EVT CM was fractionated for proteins <30 kDa using size-exclusion affinity nanoparticles (SEAN) before trypsin digestion and HPLC-MS/MS. 43 proteins produced by EVT were identified; 14 not previously known to be expressed in the placenta and 12 which had previously been associated with diseases of pregnancy including preeclampsia. Profilin 1, lysosome associated membrane glycoprotein 1 (LAMP1), dipeptidyl peptidase 1 (DPP1/cathepsin C) and annexin A2 expression by interstitial EVT in vivo was validated by immunhistochemistry. Decidual CM regulation in vitro was validated by western blotting: decidualized CM upregulated profilin 1 in EVT CM and non-decidualized CM upregulated annexin A2 in EVT CM and pro-DPP1 in EVT cell lysate. Here, non-decidualized factors induced protease expression by EVT suggesting that non-decidualized factors may induce a pro-inflammatory cascade. Preeclampsia is a pro-inflammatory condition

  9. Decidual-Secreted Factors Alter Invasive Trophoblast Membrane and Secreted Proteins Implying a Role for Decidual Cell Regulation of Placentation

    PubMed Central

    Menkhorst, Ellen Melaleuca; Lane, Natalie; Winship, Amy Louise; Li, Priscilla; Yap, Joanne; Meehan, Katie; Rainczuk, Adam; Stephens, Andrew; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2012-01-01

    Inadequate or inappropriate implantation and placentation during the establishment of human pregnancy is thought to lead to first trimester miscarriage, placental insufficiency and other obstetric complications. To create the placental blood supply, specialized cells, the ‘extravillous trophoblast’ (EVT) invade through the differentiated uterine endometrium (the decidua) to engraft and remodel uterine spiral arteries. We hypothesized that decidual factors would regulate EVT function by altering the production of EVT membrane and secreted factors. We used a proteomics approach to identify EVT membrane and secreted proteins regulated by decidual cell factors. Human endometrial stromal cells were decidualized in vitro by treatment with estradiol (10−8 M), medroxyprogesterone acetate (10−7 M) and cAMP (0.5 mM) for 14 days. Conditioned media (CM) was collected on day 2 (non-decidualized CM) and 14 (decidualized CM) of treatment. Isolated primary EVT cultured on Matrigel™ were treated with media control, non-decidualized or decidualized CM for 16 h. EVT CM was fractionated for proteins <30 kDa using size-exclusion affinity nanoparticles (SEAN) before trypsin digestion and HPLC-MS/MS. 43 proteins produced by EVT were identified; 14 not previously known to be expressed in the placenta and 12 which had previously been associated with diseases of pregnancy including preeclampsia. Profilin 1, lysosome associated membrane glycoprotein 1 (LAMP1), dipeptidyl peptidase 1 (DPP1/cathepsin C) and annexin A2 expression by interstitial EVT in vivo was validated by immunhistochemistry. Decidual CM regulation in vitro was validated by western blotting: decidualized CM upregulated profilin 1 in EVT CM and non-decidualized CM upregulated annexin A2 in EVT CM and pro-DPP1 in EVT cell lysate. Here, non-decidualized factors induced protease expression by EVT suggesting that non-decidualized factors may induce a pro-inflammatory cascade. Preeclampsia is a pro-inflammatory condition

  10. Pancreatic and biliary secretion are both altered in cystic fibrosis pigs

    PubMed Central

    Giriyappa, Radhamma; Meyerholz, David K.; Griffin, Michelle; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Abu-El-Haija, Marwa; Stoltz, David A.; Ludwig, Paula; Pezzulo, Alejandro; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Taft, Peter; Welsh, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The pancreas, liver, and gallbladder are commonly involved in cystic fibrosis (CF), and acidic, dehydrated, and protein-rich secretions are characteristic findings. Pancreatic function studies in humans have been done by sampling the jejunal fluid. However, it has been difficult to separately study the function of pancreatic and biliary systems in humans with CF, because jejunal fluid contains a mixture of bile and pancreatic fluids. In contrast, pancreatic and biliary ducts open separately into the porcine intestine; therefore, biliary and pancreatic fluid can be individually analyzed in CF pigs. We studied newborn wild-type (WT) and CF pigs and found that CFTR was localized to the pancreatic ducts. We collected bile and pancreatic fluid and analyzed pancreatic enzymes with activity assays and immunoblot. Pancreatic enzyme expression was significantly decreased in CF compared with WT pigs. The volume and pH of pancreatic fluid were significantly lower and protein concentration was >5-fold higher in CF pigs. Secretin stimulation increased pancreatic fluid volume and pH in WT, but not CF, pigs. Baseline bile volume did not differ between WT and CF pigs, but volume did not increase in response to secretin in CF pigs. Bile pH was lower and protein concentration was twofold higher in CF pigs. These results indicate that pancreatic and biliary secretions are altered in CF pigs. Abnormal pancreatic and biliary secretion in CF may have important implications in disease pathogenesis. PMID:22936270

  11. Pancreatic and biliary secretion are both altered in cystic fibrosis pigs.

    PubMed

    Uc, Aliye; Giriyappa, Radhamma; Meyerholz, David K; Griffin, Michelle; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Abu-El-Haija, Marwa; Stoltz, David A; Ludwig, Paula; Pezzulo, Alejandro; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Taft, Peter; Welsh, Michael J

    2012-10-15

    The pancreas, liver, and gallbladder are commonly involved in cystic fibrosis (CF), and acidic, dehydrated, and protein-rich secretions are characteristic findings. Pancreatic function studies in humans have been done by sampling the jejunal fluid. However, it has been difficult to separately study the function of pancreatic and biliary systems in humans with CF, because jejunal fluid contains a mixture of bile and pancreatic fluids. In contrast, pancreatic and biliary ducts open separately into the porcine intestine; therefore, biliary and pancreatic fluid can be individually analyzed in CF pigs. We studied newborn wild-type (WT) and CF pigs and found that CFTR was localized to the pancreatic ducts. We collected bile and pancreatic fluid and analyzed pancreatic enzymes with activity assays and immunoblot. Pancreatic enzyme expression was significantly decreased in CF compared with WT pigs. The volume and pH of pancreatic fluid were significantly lower and protein concentration was >5-fold higher in CF pigs. Secretin stimulation increased pancreatic fluid volume and pH in WT, but not CF, pigs. Baseline bile volume did not differ between WT and CF pigs, but volume did not increase in response to secretin in CF pigs. Bile pH was lower and protein concentration was twofold higher in CF pigs. These results indicate that pancreatic and biliary secretions are altered in CF pigs. Abnormal pancreatic and biliary secretion in CF may have important implications in disease pathogenesis. PMID:22936270

  12. Hexabromocyclododecane and tetrabromobisphenol A alter secretion of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) from human immune cells.

    PubMed

    Almughamsi, Haifa; Whalen, Margaret M

    2016-07-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) are brominated flame-retardant compounds used in a variety of applications including insulation, upholstery, and epoxy resin circuit boards. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is an inflammatory cytokine produced by activated T and NK cells that regulates immune responsiveness. HBCD and TBBPA are found in human blood, and previous studies have shown that they alter the ability of human natural killer (NK) lymphocytes to destroy tumor cells. This study examines whether HBCD and TBBPA affect the secretion of IFN-γ from increasingly complex preparations of human immune cells-purified NK cells, monocyte-depleted (MD) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and PBMCs. Both HBCD and TBBPA were tested at concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 5 µM. HBCD generally caused increases in IFN-γ secretion after 24-h, 48-h, and 6-day exposures in each of the different cell preparations. The specific concentration of HBCD that caused increases as well as the magnitude of the increase varied from donor to donor. In contrast, TBBPA tended to decrease secretion of IFN-γ from NK cells, MD-PBMCs, and PBMCs. Thus, exposure to these compounds may potentially disrupt the immune regulation mediated by IFN-γ. Signaling pathways that have the capacity to regulate IFN-γ production (nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), p44/42, p38, JNK) were examined for their role in the HBCD-induced increases in IFN-γ. Results showed that the p44/42 (ERK1/2) MAPK pathway appears to be important in HBCD-induced increases in IFN-γ secretion from human immune cells. PMID:26302867

  13. Rotating wall vessel exposure alters protein secretion and global gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, Helena; O'Neill, Alex J.; Blake, Katy L.; Walther, Meik; Long, Paul F.; Hinds, Jason; Taylor, Peter W.

    2012-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is routinely recovered from air and surface samples taken aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and poses a health threat to crew. As bacteria respond to the low shear forces engendered by continuous rotation conditions in a Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) and the reduced gravitational field of near-Earth flight by altering gene expression, we examined the effect of low-shear RWV growth on protein secretion and gene expression by three S. aureus isolates. When cultured under 1 g, the total amount of protein secreted by these strains varied up to fourfold; under continuous rotation conditions, protein secretion by all three strains was significantly reduced. Concentrations of individual proteins were differentially reduced and no evidence was found for increased lysis. These data suggest that growth under continuous rotation conditions reduces synthesis or secretion of proteins. A limited number of changes in gene expression under continuous rotation conditions were noted: in all isolates vraX, a gene encoding a polypeptide associated with cell wall stress, was down-regulated. A vraX deletion mutant of S. aureus SH1000 was constructed: no differences were found between SH1000 and ΔvraX with respect to colony phenotype, viability, protein export, antibiotic susceptibility, vancomycin kill kinetics, susceptibility to cold or heat and gene modulation. An ab initio protein-ligand docking simulation suggests a major binding site for β-lactam drugs such as imipenem. If such changes to the bacterial phenotype occur during spaceflight, they will compromise the capacity of staphylococci to cause systemic infection and to circumvent antibacterial chemotherapy.

  14. Potency of Melatonin in Living Beings

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Donchan

    2013-01-01

    Living beings are surrounded by various changes exhibiting periodical rhythms in environment. The environmental changes are imprinted in organisms in various pattern. The phenomena are believed to match the external signal with organisms in order to increase their survival rate. The signals are categorized into circadian, seasonal, and annual cycles. Among the cycles, the circadian rhythm is regarded as the most important factor because its periodicity is in harmony with the levels of melatonin secreted from pineal gland. Melatonin is produced by the absence of light and its presence displays darkness. Melatonin plays various roles in creatures. Therefore, this review is to introduce the diverse potential ability of melatonin in manifold aspects in living organism. PMID:25949131

  15. Melatonin Attenuates Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wongprayoon, Pawaris; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), an illegal psycho-stimulant, is widely known as a recreational drug. In addition to its addictive effect, METH induces neurotoxicity via multiple mechanisms. The major contributors to METH-induced neurotoxicity are reactive oxygen species, which lead to cell death through apoptotic pathway and disturbances in mitochondria, the generation of neuroinflammation, and autophagy. Melatonin, a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland, is a potent antioxidant compound that plays a beneficial role by protecting against the oxidative stress caused by METH. Melatonin also plays a role in maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis. Nanomolar concentrations of melatonin have been shown to protect against the inflammation caused by METH and to prevent the decrease in neurogenesis caused by METH in progenitor cells obtained from adult rat hippocampal tissue. The intent of this review is to describe the underlying mechanisms involving melatonin that protect against the neurodegeneration caused by METH. PMID:25248807

  16. Effects of Alterations of Plasma Free Fatty Acid Levels on Pancreatic Glucagon Secretion in Man

    PubMed Central

    Gerich, John E.; Langlois, Maurice; Schneider, Victor; Karam, John H.; Noacco, Claudio

    1974-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to ascertain whether alterations in plasma free fatty acids (FFA) affect pancreatic glucagon secretion in man since FFA have been reported to influence pancreatic alpha cell function in other species. Elevation of plasma FFA from a mean (±SE) basal level of 0.478±0.036 mM to 0.712±0.055 mM after heparin administration caused plasma glucagon levels to fall approximately 50%, from a basal value of 122±15 pg/ml to 59±14 pg/ml (P < 0.001). Lowering of plasma FFA from a basal level of 0.520±0.046 mM to 0.252±0.041 mM after nicotinic acid administration raised plasma glucagon from a basal level of 113±18 pg/ml to 168±12 pg/ml (P < 0.005). Infusion of glucose elevated plasma glucose levels to the same degree that heparin raised plasma FFA levels. This resulted in suppression of plasma glucagon despite the fact that plasma FFA levels also were suppressed. Glucagon responses to arginine were diminished after elevation of plasma FFA (P < 0.01) and during infusion of glucose (P < 0.01). Diminution of plasma FFA by nicotinic acid did not augment glucagon responses to arginine. These results thus demonstrate that rather small alterations in plasma FFA within the physiologic range have a significant effect on glucagon secretion in man. Although the effects of glucose appear to predominate over those of FFA, alterations in plasma FFA may nevertheless exert an important physiologic influence over human pancreatic alpha cell function, especially in the postabsorptive state. PMID:4825225

  17. Neurobiology, Pathophysiology, and Treatment of Melatonin Deficiency and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2012-01-01

    Melatonin is a highly pleiotropic signaling molecule, which is released as a hormone of the pineal gland predominantly during night. Melatonin secretion decreases during aging. Reduced melatonin levels are also observed in various diseases, such as types of dementia, some mood disorders, severe pain, cancer, and diabetes type 2. Melatonin dysfunction is frequently related to deviations in amplitudes, phasing, and coupling of circadian rhythms. Gene polymorphisms of melatonin receptors and circadian oscillator proteins bear risks for several of the diseases mentioned. A common symptom of insufficient melatonin signaling is sleep disturbances. It is necessary to distinguish between symptoms that are curable by short melatonergic actions and others that require extended actions during night. Melatonin immediate release is already effective, at moderate doses, for reducing difficulties of falling asleep or improving symptoms associated with poorly coupled circadian rhythms, including seasonal affective and bipolar disorders. For purposes of a replacement therapy based on longer-lasting melatonergic actions, melatonin prolonged release and synthetic agonists have been developed. Therapies with melatonin or synthetic melatonergic drugs have to consider that these agents do not only act on the SCN, but also on numerous organs and cells in which melatonin receptors are also expressed. PMID:22629173

  18. The effect of age and pre-light melatonin concentration on the melatonin sensitivity to dim light.

    PubMed

    Nathan, P J; Burrows, G D; Norman, T R

    1999-05-01

    The hormone melatonin is secreted at night from the pineal gland, with light being a potent inhibitor of its secretion. Age related decreases in plasma melatonin concentrations have indicated that this may be related to pineal calcification with aging. Recently, it was shown that the melatonin sensitivity to light may be a biological marker of bipolar disorder. However, on average, patients were older than the control group in most studies, and it is not known if age has an effect on the melatonin suppression by light. To test this hypothesis, the present study investigated the effect of age on the melatonin sensitivity to dim light (200 lux). Participants were grouped into three age groups. On the testing night, they were placed in a dark room from 21.00 h to 02.30 h. Light exposure was for an hour from midnight to 01.00 h. Blood samples were collected at regular intervals for measurement of plasma melatonin. No significant differences were found in the percentage suppression of melatonin within the age groups defined in the present study (P > 0.5). No correlation was also found between age and percentage suppression of melatonin (r2 = 0.007; P > 0.1). Our results suggest that the melatonin suppression by light (200 lux) is not affected by age. PMID:10435774

  19. High membrane permeability for melatonin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haijie; Dickson, Eamonn J; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Koh, Duk-Su; Hille, Bertil

    2016-01-01

    The pineal gland, an endocrine organ in the brain, synthesizes and secretes the circulating night hormone melatonin throughout the night. The literature states that this hormone is secreted by simple diffusion across the pinealocyte plasma membrane, but a direct quantitative measurement of membrane permeability has not been made. Experiments were designed to compare the cell membrane permeability to three indoleamines: melatonin and its precursors N-acetylserotonin (NAS) and serotonin (5-HT). The three experimental approaches were (1) to measure the concentration of effluxing indoleamines amperometrically in the bath while cells were being dialyzed internally by a patch pipette, (2) to measure the rise of intracellular indoleamine fluorescence as the compound was perfused in the bath, and (3) to measure the rate of quenching of intracellular fura-2 dye fluorescence as indoleamines were perfused in the bath. These measures showed that permeabilities of melatonin and NAS are high (both are uncharged molecules), whereas that for 5-HT (mostly charged) is much lower. Comparisons were made with predictions of solubility-diffusion theory and compounds of known permeability, and a diffusion model was made to simulate all of the measurements. In short, extracellular melatonin equilibrates with the cytoplasm in 3.5 s, has a membrane permeability of ∼1.7 µm/s, and could not be retained in secretory vesicles. Thus, it and NAS will be "secreted" from pineal cells by membrane diffusion. Circumstances are suggested when 5-HT and possibly catecholamines may also appear in the extracellular space passively by membrane diffusion. PMID:26712850

  20. Short-term sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure alters time-dependent glucagon-like peptide-1 and insulin secretion in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gil-Lozano, Manuel; Hunter, Paola M; Behan, Lucy-Ann; Gladanac, Bojana; Casper, Robert F; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal L cell is the principal source of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a major determinant of insulin release. Because GLP-1 secretion is regulated in a circadian manner in rodents, we investigated whether the activity of the human L cell is also time sensitive. Rhythmic fluctuations in the mRNA levels of canonical clock genes were found in the human NCI-H716 L cell model, which also showed a time-dependent pattern in their response to well-established secretagogues. A diurnal variation in GLP-1 responses to identical meals (850 kcal), served 12 h apart in the normal dark (2300) and light (1100) periods, was also observed in male volunteers maintained under standard sleep and light conditions. These findings suggest the existence of a daily pattern of activity in the human L cell. Moreover, we separately tested the short-term effects of sleep deprivation and nocturnal light exposure on basal and postprandial GLP-1, insulin, and glucose levels in the same volunteers. Sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure disrupted the melatonin and cortisol profiles and increased insulin resistance. Moreover, it also induced profound derangements in GLP-1 and insulin responses such that postprandial GLP-1 and insulin levels were markedly elevated and the normal variation in GLP-1 responses was abrogated. These alterations were not observed in sleep-deprived participants maintained under dark conditions, indicating a direct effect of light on the mechanisms that regulate glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, the metabolic abnormalities known to occur in shift workers may be related to the effects of irregular light-dark cycles on these glucoregulatory pathways. PMID:26530153

  1. Reduced secretion and altered proteolytic processing caused by missense mutations in progranulin.

    PubMed

    Kleinberger, Gernot; Capell, Anja; Brouwers, Nathalie; Fellerer, Katrin; Sleegers, Kristel; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Haass, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Progranulin (GRN) is a secreted growth factor involved in various cellular functions, and loss-of-function mutations are a major cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with TDP-43 positive pathology. Most FTLD-related GRN mutations are nonsense mutations resulting in reduced GRN expression. Nonsynonymous GRN missense mutations have been described as risk factor for neurodegenerative brain diseases, but their pathogenic nature remains largely elusive. We identified a double missense mutation in GRN leading to amino acid changes p.D33E and p.G35R in an FTLD patient from Turkish origin. Biochemical and cell biological analysis of the double-mutation together with 2 so-far uncharacterized GRN missense mutations (p.C105R and p.V514M) revealed a reduced secretion efficiency of the GRN p.D33E/p.G35R and p.C105R proteins. Furthermore, loss of the conserved cysteine residue affects protein folding and altered proteolytic processing by neutrophil elastase and proteinase 3. Our data indicate that the described variants may cause a loss-of-function, albeit to a lesser extent than GRN null mutations, and hence could be considered as low-penetrant risk factors for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26811050

  2. Altered insulin and glucagon secretion in treated genetic hyperlipemia: a mechanism of theraphy?

    PubMed

    Eaton, R P; Oase, R; Schade, D S

    1976-03-01

    The influence of Halofenate therapy on insulin and glucagon secretion was examined in the Zucker rat with genetic endogenous hyperlipemia. Coincident with the lipid lowering effects of Halofenate, the net change in the basal bihormonal axis favored glucagon, with the I/G molar ratio (Insulin/Glucagon) decreasing from 2.72 +/- 0.53 to 0.96 +/- 0.20 during treatment with this drug. Following arginine stimulation the I/G ratio remained reduced at 0.87 +/- 0.13 in Halofenate treated animals, contrasting with the statistically greater ratio of 2.5 +/- 0.55 in control animals. The Halofenate induced state of reduced insulin:glucagon was associated with hypolipemia, postarginine hyperglycemia, and hyperketonemia,-three metabolic parameters characteristic of glucagon excess relative to insulin. It is suggested that the lipid-lowering action of Halofenate in genetic hyperlipemia may reflect the altered bihormonal axis induced by the drug. PMID:1250161

  3. Human longevity is characterised by high thyroid stimulating hormone secretion without altered energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, S. W.; Akintola, A. A.; Roelfsema, F.; van der Spoel, E.; Cobbaert, C. M.; Ballieux, B. E.; Egri, P.; Kvarta-Papp, Z.; Gereben, B.; Fekete, C.; Slagboom, P. E.; van der Grond, J.; Demeneix, B. A.; Pijl, H.; Westendorp, R. G. J.; van Heemst, D.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have included subjects with the propensity to reach old age in good health, with the aim to disentangle mechanisms contributing to staying healthier for longer. The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis maintains circulating levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid hormone (TH) in an inverse relationship. Greater longevity has been associated with higher TSH and lower TH levels, but mechanisms underlying TSH/TH differences and longevity remain unknown. The HPT axis plays a pivotal role in growth, development and energy metabolism. We report that offspring of nonagenarians with at least one nonagenarian sibling have increased TSH secretion but similar bioactivity of TSH and similar TH levels compared to controls. Healthy offspring and spousal controls had similar resting metabolic rate and core body temperature. We propose that pleiotropic effects of the HPT axis may favour longevity without altering energy metabolism. PMID:26089239

  4. Melatonin and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Wetterberg, L

    1999-01-01

    A review of the different publications dealing with melatonin in humans shows that this field has been very active in the last few years. Normative melatonin values have been defined. Various relationships between melatonin and other traits have been studied, such as sleep, circadian rhythm, surgical stress and anaesthesia. Age-related melatonin studies and melatonin during depression and other psychiatric disorders have been reviewed. Finally, some studies have been performed to use melatonin as a medication for sleep disturbance in depression, for jet-lag and as a skin protector for ultraviolet light. PMID:10420439

  5. High membrane permeability for melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haijie; Dickson, Eamonn J.; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Koh, Duk-Su

    2016-01-01

    The pineal gland, an endocrine organ in the brain, synthesizes and secretes the circulating night hormone melatonin throughout the night. The literature states that this hormone is secreted by simple diffusion across the pinealocyte plasma membrane, but a direct quantitative measurement of membrane permeability has not been made. Experiments were designed to compare the cell membrane permeability to three indoleamines: melatonin and its precursors N-acetylserotonin (NAS) and serotonin (5-HT). The three experimental approaches were (1) to measure the concentration of effluxing indoleamines amperometrically in the bath while cells were being dialyzed internally by a patch pipette, (2) to measure the rise of intracellular indoleamine fluorescence as the compound was perfused in the bath, and (3) to measure the rate of quenching of intracellular fura-2 dye fluorescence as indoleamines were perfused in the bath. These measures showed that permeabilities of melatonin and NAS are high (both are uncharged molecules), whereas that for 5-HT (mostly charged) is much lower. Comparisons were made with predictions of solubility-diffusion theory and compounds of known permeability, and a diffusion model was made to simulate all of the measurements. In short, extracellular melatonin equilibrates with the cytoplasm in 3.5 s, has a membrane permeability of ∼1.7 µm/s, and could not be retained in secretory vesicles. Thus, it and NAS will be “secreted” from pineal cells by membrane diffusion. Circumstances are suggested when 5-HT and possibly catecholamines may also appear in the extracellular space passively by membrane diffusion. PMID:26712850

  6. Absence of an increase in the duration of the circadian melatonin secretory episode in totally blind human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Zeitzer, J. M.; Duffy, J. F.; Khalsa, S. B.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    The daily rhythm of melatonin influences multiple physiological measures, including sleep tendency, circadian rhythms, and reproductive function in seasonally breeding mammals. The biological signal for photoperiodic changes in seasonally breeding mammals is a change in the duration of melatonin secretion, which in a natural environment reflects the different durations of daylight across the year, with longer nights leading to a longer duration of melatonin secretion. These seasonal changes in the duration of melatonin secretion do not simply reflect the known acute suppression of melatonin secretion by ocular light exposure, but also represent long-term changes in the endogenous nocturnal melatonin episode that persist in constant conditions. As the eyes of totally blind individuals do not transmit ocular light information, we hypothesized that the duration of the melatonin secretory episode in blind subjects would be longer than those in sighted individuals, who are exposed to light for all their waking hours in an urban environment. We assessed the melatonin secretory profile during constant posture, dim light conditions in 17 blind and 157 sighted adults, all of whom were healthy and using no prescription or nonprescription medications. The duration of melatonin secretion was not significantly different between blind and sighted individuals. Healthy blind individuals after years without ocular light exposure do not have a longer duration of melatonin secretion than healthy sighted individuals.

  7. Melatonin attenuates methamphetamine-induced inhibition of neurogenesis in the adult mouse hippocampus: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Singhakumar, Rachen; Boontem, Parichart; Ekthuwapranee, Kasima; Sotthibundhu, Areechun; Mukda, Sujira; Chetsawang, Banthit; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2015-10-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), a highly addictive psychostimulant drug, is known to exert neurotoxic effects to the dopaminergic neural system. Long-term METH administration impairs brain functions such as cognition, learning and memory. Newly born neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus play an important role in spatial learning and memory. Previous in vitro studies have shown that METH inhibits cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. On the other hand, melatonin, a major indole secreted by the pineal gland, enhances neurogenesis in both the subventricular zone and dentate gyrus. In this study, adult C57BL/6 mice were used to study the beneficial effects of melatonin on METH-induced alterations in neurogenesis and post-synaptic proteins related to learning and memory functions in the hippocampus. The results showed that METH caused a decrease in neuronal phenotypes as determined by the expressions of nestin, doublecortin (DCX) and beta-III tubulin while causing an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. Moreover, METH inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling activity and altered expression of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B as well as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). These effects could be attenuated by melatonin pretreatment. In conclusion, melatonin prevented the METH-induced reduction in neurogenesis, increase in astrogliogenesis and alteration of NMDA receptor subunit expression. These findings may indicate the beneficial effects of melatonin on the impairment of learning and memory caused by METH. PMID:26366944

  8. Melatonin in plants.

    PubMed

    Reiter, R J; Tan, D X; Burkhardt, S; Manchester, L C

    2001-09-01

    Once thought to be exclusively a molecule of the animal kingdom, melatonin has now been found to exist in plants as well. Among a number of actions, melatonin is a direct free radical scavenger and an indirect antioxidant. Melatonin directly detoxifies the hydroxyl radical (OH), hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide, peroxynitrite anion, peroxynitrous acid, and hypochlorous acid. The products from each of these reactions have been identified in pure chemical systems and in at least one case in vivo; the interaction product of melatonin with the OH, ie., cyclic 3-hydroxymelatonin, is found in the urine of humans and rats. Some of the products that are produced when melatonin detoxifies reactive species are also highly efficient scavengers. As a result, a cascade of scavenging reactions may enhance the antioxidant capacity of melatonin. Additionally, melatonin increases the activity of several antioxidative enzymes, thereby improving its ability to protect macromolecules from oxidative stress. Melatonin is endogenously produced and is also consumed in edible plants. In animal experiments, feeding melatonin-containing foods raised blood levels of the indole. Because physiologic concentrations of melatonin in the blood are known to correlate with the total antioxidant capacity of the serum, consuming food-stuffs containing melatonin may be helpful in lowering oxidative stress. PMID:11570431

  9. A melatonin-independent seasonal timer induces neuroendocrine refractoriness to short day lengths.

    PubMed

    Butler, Matthew P; Turner, Kevin W; Zucker, Irving

    2008-06-01

    The duration of nocturnal pineal melatonin secretion transduces effects of day length (DL) on the neuroendocrine axis of photoperiodic rodents. Long DLs support reproduction, and short DLs induce testicular regression, followed several months later by spontaneous recrudescence; gonadal regrowth is thought to reflect development of tissue refractoriness to melatonin. In most photoperiodic species, pinealectomy does not diminish reproductive competence in long DLs. Turkish hamsters (Mesocricetus brandti) deviate from this norm: elimination of melatonin secretion in long-day males by pinealectomy or constant light treatment induces testicular regression and subsequently recrudescence; the time course of these gonadal transitions is similar to that observed in males transferred from long to short DLs. In the present study, long-day Turkish hamsters that underwent testicular regression and recrudescence in constant light subsequently were completely unresponsive to the antigonadal effects of short DLs. Other hamsters that manifested testicular regression and recrudescence in short DLs were unresponsive to the antigonadal effects of pinealectomy or constant light. Long-term suppression of melatonin secretion induces a physiological state in Turkish hamsters similar or identical to the neuroendocrine refractoriness produced by short-day melatonin signals (i.e., neural refractoriness to melatonin develops in the absence of circulating melatonin secretion). A melatonin-independent interval timer, which would remain operative in the absence of melatonin during hibernation, may determine the onset of testicular recrudescence in the spring. In this respect, Turkish hamsters differ from most other photoperiodic rodents. PMID:18487416

  10. Alterations in Hepatic Metabolism in fld Mice Reveal a Role for Lipin 1 in Regulating VLDL-Triacylglyceride Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhouji; Gropler, Matthew C.; Norris, Jin; Lawrence, John C.; Harris, Thurl E.; Finck, Brian N.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Lipin 1 controls fatty acid metabolism in the nucleus as a transcriptional regulator and in the cytosol as an enzyme catalyzing the penultimate step in phosphoglycerol triacylglyceride (TAG) synthesis. We sought to evaluate the effects of lipin 1 on hepatic TAG synthesis and secretion by gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches. Methods and Results Rates of TAG synthesis were not impaired in hepatocytes isolated from adult lipin 1—deficient (fld) mice and were actually increased in 14-day-old fld mice. Additionally, compared to littermate controls, VLDL-TAG secretion rates were markedly increased in fld mice of both ages. Lipin 1 overexpression did not alter TAG synthesis rates but significantly suppressed VLDL-TAG secretion. The lipin 1-mediated suppression of VLDL-TAG secretion was linked to the peptide motif mediating its transcriptional-regulatory effects. However, the expression of candidate genes required for VLDL assembly and secretion was unaltered by lipin 1 activation or deficiency. Finally, the hepatic expression of lipin 1 was diminished in obese insulin-resistant mice, whereas adenoviral-mediated overexpression of lipin 1 in liver of these mice inhibits VLDL-TAG secretion and improves hepatic insulin signaling. Conclusions Collectively, these studies reveal new and unexpected effects of lipin 1 on hepatic TAG metabolism and obesity-related hepatic insulin resistance. PMID:18669885

  11. Lysosomal secretion of Flightless I upon injury has the potential to alter inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cowin, Allison J.; Lei, Nazi; Franken, Linda; Ruzehaji, Nadira; Offenhäuser, Carolin; Kopecki, Zlatko; Murray, Rachael Z.

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular Flightless I (Flii), a gelsolin family member, has been found to have roles modulating actin regulation, transcriptional regulation and inflammation. In vivo Flii can regulate wound healing responses. We have recently shown that a pool of Flii is secreted by fibroblasts and macrophages, cells typically found in wounds, and its secretion can be upregulated upon wounding. We show that secreted Flii can bind to the bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide and has the potential to regulate inflammation. We now show that secreted Flii is present in both acute and chronic wound fluid. PMID:23336022

  12. Nocturnal plasma melatonin and alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone levels during exacerbation of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R; Awerbuch, G I

    1992-01-01

    The pineal gland has been implicated recently in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). To investigate this hypothesis further, we studied nocturnal plasma melatonin levels and the presence or absence of pineal calcification (PC) on CT scan in a cohort of 25 patients (5 men, 20 women; mean age: 41.1 years; SD = 11.1; range: 27-72) who were admitted to a hospital Neurology service for exacerbation of symptoms. Plasma alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) estimations were included in the study since there is evidence for a feedback inhibition between alpha-MSH and melatonin secretion. Abnormal melatonin levels were found in 13 patients (52.0%), 11 of whom had nocturnal levels which were below the daytime values (i.e., < 25 pg/ml). Although melatonin levels were unrelated to the patient's age and sex, there was a positive correlation with age of onset of symptoms (p < .0001) and an inverse correlation with the duration of illness (p < .05). PC was noted in 24 of 25 patients (96%) underscoring the pathogenetic relationship between MS and the pineal gland. Alpha-MSH levels were undetectable in 15 patients (60.0%), low in two patients (8.0%), normal in seven patients (28.0%), and elevated in one patient (4.0%). Collectively, abnormal alpha-MSH levels were found in over 70% of patients. These findings support the hypothesis that MS may be associated with pineal failure and suggest, furthermore, that alterations in the secretion of alpha-MSH also occur during exacerbation of symptoms. The relevance of these findings to the pathogenesis of MS are discussed. PMID:1305632

  13. [Alteration of thyroid hormone secretion after long-term exposure to low doses of endocrine disruptor DDT].

    PubMed

    Iaglova, N V; Iaglov, V V

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are exogenous substances that exhibit hormone-like action and consequently disrupt homeostatic action of endogenous hormones. DDT is the most common disruptor. The objective was to evaluate changes in thyroid hormone secretion after long-term exposure to low doses of DDT. The experiment was performed on male Wistar rats. The rats were given DDT at doses of 1.89±0.86 мg/kg/day and 7.77±0.17 мg/kg/day for 6 and 10 weeks. Dose dependent increase of serum total thyroxine, total triiodthyronine, and thyroid peroxidase was revealed after 6 weeks exposure. After 10 weeks free thyroxine secretion was reduced. Such alterations of the thyroid status are typical for iodine deficient goiter. The data obtained indicate that the main mechanism of DDT action includes disruption of thyroxine secretion by thyrocytes, but not inhibition of deiodinase activity and decrease of blood thyroid binding proteins. PMID:25552505

  14. Melatonin for sleep problems in children with neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    Children with neurodevelopmental disorders are at risk of sleep problems, typically difficulty getting to sleep, sleep/wake rhythm disturbances and reduced duration of sleep (insomnia). This may be associated with abnormally timed or inadequate secretion of melatonin, a naturally-occurring hormone involved in coordinating the body's sleep-wake cycle. Previously, we reviewed the use of a melatonin product licensed for primary insomnia in adults aged over 55 years. Here we review off-label and unlicensed use of melatonin in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder or related neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:26471270

  15. Melatonin inhibits cholangiocyte hyperplasia in cholestatic rats by interaction with MT1 but not MT2 melatonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Renzi, Anastasia; Glaser, Shannon; Demorrow, Sharon; Mancinelli, Romina; Meng, Fanyin; Franchitto, Antonio; Venter, Julie; White, Mellanie; Francis, Heather; Han, Yuyan; Alvaro, Domenico; Gaudio, Eugenio; Carpino, Guido; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Onori, Paolo; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2011-10-01

    In bile duct-ligated (BDL) rats, large cholangiocytes proliferate by activation of cAMP-dependent signaling. Melatonin, which is secreted from pineal gland as well as extrapineal tissues, regulates cell mitosis by interacting with melatonin receptors (MT1 and MT2) modulating cAMP and clock genes. In the liver, melatonin suppresses oxidative damage and ameliorates fibrosis. No information exists regarding the role of melatonin in the regulation of biliary hyperplasia. We evaluated the mechanisms of action by which melatonin regulates the growth of cholangiocytes. In normal and BDL rats, we determined the hepatic distribution of MT1, MT2, and the clock genes, CLOCK, BMAL1, CRY1, and PER1. Normal and BDL (immediately after BDL) rats were treated in vivo with melatonin before evaluating 1) serum levels of melatonin, bilirubin, and transaminases; 2) intrahepatic bile duct mass (IBDM) in liver sections; and 3) the expression of MT1 and MT2, clock genes, and PKA phosphorylation. In vitro, large cholangiocytes were stimulated with melatonin in the absence/presence of luzindole (MT1/MT2 antagonist) and 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetralin (MT2 antagonist) before evaluating cell proliferation, cAMP levels, and PKA phosphorylation. Cholangiocytes express MT1 and MT2, CLOCK, BMAL1, CRY1, and PER1 that were all upregulated following BDL. Administration of melatonin to BDL rats decreased IBDM, serum bilirubin and transaminases levels, the expression of all clock genes, cAMP levels, and PKA phosphorylation in cholangiocytes. In vitro, melatonin decreased the proliferation, cAMP levels, and PKA phosphorylation, decreases that were blocked by luzindole. Melatonin may be important in the management of biliary hyperplasia in human cholangiopathies. PMID:21757639

  16. Apolipoprotein B100 secretion by cultured ARPE-19 cells is modulated by alteration of cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tinghuai; Fujihara, Masashi; Tian, Jane; Jovanovic, Miroslava; Grayson, Celene; Cano, Marisol; Gehlbach, Peter; Margaron, Philippe; Handa, James T

    2010-09-01

    Cholesteryl ester rich apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) lipoproteins accumulate in Bruch's membrane before the development of age-related macular degeneration. It is not known if these lipoproteins come from the circulation or local ocular tissue. Emerging, but incomplete evidence suggests that the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) can secrete lipoproteins. The purpose of this investigation was to determine (i) whether human RPE cells synthesize and secrete apoB100, and (ii) whether this secretion is driven by cellular cholesterol, and if so, (iii) whether statins inhibit this response. The established, human derived ARPE-19 cells challenged with 0-0.8 mM oleic acid accumulated cellular cholesterol, but not triglycerides. Oleic acid increased the amount of apoB100 protein recovered from the medium by both western blot analysis and (35) S-radiolabeled immunoprecipitation while negative stain electron microscopy showed lipoprotein-like particles. Of nine statins evaluated, lipophilic statins induced HMG-CoA reductase mRNA expression the most. The lipophilic Cerivastatin (5 μM) reduced cellular cholesterol by 39% and abrogated apoB100 secretion by 3-fold. In contrast, the hydrophilic statin Pravastatin had minimal effect on apoB100 secretion. These data suggest that ARPE-19 cells synthesize and secrete apoB100 lipoproteins, that this secretion is driven by cellular cholesterol, and that statins can inhibit apoB100 secretion by reducing cellular cholesterol. PMID:20598021

  17. Melatonin exerts by an autocrine loop antiproliferative effects in cholangiocarcinoma; its synthesis is reduced favoring cholangiocarcinoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yuyan; DeMorrow, Sharon; Invernizzi, Pietro; Jing, Qing; Glaser, Shannon; Renzi, Anastasia; Meng, Fanyin; Venter, Julie; Bernuzzi, Francesca; White, Mellanie; Francis, Heather; Lleo, Ana; Marzioni, Marco; Onori, Paolo; Alvaro, Domenico; Torzilli, Guido; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a devastating biliary cancer. Melatonin is synthesized in the pineal gland and peripheral organs from serotonin by two enzymes, serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) and acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT). Cholangiocytes secrete neuroendocrine factors, including serotonin-regulating CCA growth by autocrine mechanisms. Melatonin exerts its effects by interaction with melatonin receptor type 1A/1B (MT1/MT2) receptors. We propose that 1) in CCA, there is decreased expression of AANAT and ASMT and secretion of melatonin, changes that stimulate CCA growth; and 2) in vitro overexpression of AANAT decreases CCA growth. We evaluated the 1) expression of AANAT, ASMT, melatonin, and MT1/MT2 in human nonmalignant and CCA lines and control and CCA biopsy samples; 2) melatonin levels in nonmalignant and CCA lines, and bile and serum from controls and patients with intrahepatic CCA; 3) effect of melatonin on the growth and expression of AANAT/ASMT and MT1/MT2 in CCA lines implanted into nude mice; and 4) effect of AANAT overexpression on the proliferation, apoptosis, and expression of MT1/MT2 in Mz-ChA-1 cells. The expression of AANAT, ASMT, and melatonin decreased, whereas MT1/MT2 expression increased in CCA lines and biopsy samples. Melatonin secretion decreased in the supernatant of CCA lines and bile of CCA patients. Melatonin decreased xenograft CCA tumor growth in nude mice by increased AANAT/ASMT and melatonin, along with reduced MT1/MT2 expression. Overexpression of AANAT in Mz-ChA-1 cells inhibited proliferation and MT1/MT2 expression and increased apoptosis. There is dysregulation of the AANAT/ASMT/melatoninmelatonin receptor axis in CCA, which inhibited melatonin secretion and subsequently enhanced CCA growth. PMID:21778461

  18. Melatonin acts at the suprachiasmatic nucleus to attenuate behavioral symptoms of infection.

    PubMed

    Freeman, David A; Kampf-Lassin, August; Galang, Jerome; Wen, Jarvi C; Prendergast, Brian J

    2007-08-01

    In common with reproduction, immune function exhibits strong seasonal patterns, which are driven by annual changes in day length (photoperiod) and melatonin secretion. Whereas changes in melatonin communicate seasonal time into the reproductive axis via subcortical receptors, the relevant melatonin targets for communicating seasonal time into the immune system remain unspecified. The authors report that melatonin implants targeting the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) induced a winter phenotype in the immune system. SCN melatonin implants attenuated infection-induced anorexia and cachexia, indicating that the SCN mediate the effects of melatonin on these behavioral and metabolic symptoms of infection. However, SCN melatonin implants failed to induce winter-like peripheral leukocyte concentrations or behavioral thermoregulatory responses to infection. In contrast, subcutaneous melatonin implants induced winter-like changes in all behavioral and immunological parameters. Melatonin acts directly at the SCN to induce seasonal changes in neural-immune systems that regulate behavior. The data identify anatomical overlap between neural substrates mediating the effects of melatonin on the reproductive and immune systems but also suggest that the SCN are not the sole mediator of photoperiodic effects of melatonin on immunity. PMID:17663594

  19. Jet lag: therapeutic use of melatonin and possible application of melatonin analogs.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Venkataramanujan; Spence, D Warren; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Trakht, Ilya; Cardinali, Daniel P

    2008-01-01

    Each year millions of travelers undertake long distance flights over one or more continents. These multiple time zone flights produce a constellation of symptoms known as jet lag. Familiar to almost every intercontinental traveler is the experience of fatigue upon arrival in a new time zone, but almost as problematic are a number of other jet lag symptoms. These include reduced alertness, nighttime insomnia, loss of appetite, depressed mood, poor psychomotor coordination and reduced cognitive skills, all symptoms which are closely affected by both the length and direction of travel. The most important jet lag symptoms are due to disruptions to the body's sleep/wake cycle. Clinical and pathophysiological studies also indicate that jet lag can exacerbate existing affective disorders. It has been suggested that dysregulation of melatonin secretion and occurrence of circadian rhythm disturbances may be the common links which underlie jet lag and affective disorders. Largely because of its regulatory effects on the circadian system, melatonin has proven to be highly effective for treating the range of symptoms that accompany transmeridian air travel. Additionally, it has been found to be of value in treating mood disorders like seasonal affective disorder. Melatonin acts on MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptors located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei, the site of the body's master circadian clock. Melatonin resets disturbed circadian rhythms and promotes sleep in jet lag and other circadian rhythm sleep disorders, including delayed sleep phase syndrome and shift-work disorder. Although post-flight melatonin administration works efficiently in transmeridian flights across less than 7-8 times zones, in the case longer distances, melatonin should be given by 2-3 days in advance to the flight. To deal with the unwanted side effects which usually accompany this pre-departure treatment (acute soporific and sedative effects in times that may not be wanted), the

  20. Evidence of melatonin synthesis in the ram reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Arto, M; Hamilton, T R Dos S; Gallego, M; Gaspar-Torrubia, E; Aguilar, D; Serrano-Blesa, E; Abecia, J A; Pérez-Pé, R; Muiño-Blanco, T; Cebrián-Pérez, J A; Casao, A

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin is a ubiquitous molecule found in a wide range of fluids, one of them being ram seminal plasma, in which it can reach higher concentrations than those found in blood, suggesting an extrapineal secretion by the reproductive tract. In order to identify the source of the melatonin found in ram seminal plasma, we first tried to determine whether the melatonin levels were maintained during the day. For this purpose, melatonin concentrations were measured in seminal plasma obtained from first ejaculates of six rams at 6:00 a.m. in total darkness, at 10:00 a.m. and at 14:00 p.m. The melatonin concentration was higher (p < 0.05) in ejaculates collected at 6:00 a.m. than at 10:00 and 14:00. There was no statistical difference between the latter. To further corroborate an extrapineal secretion of melatonin, the presence of the two key enzymes involved in melatonin synthesis, arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) and N-acetylserotonin-O-methyltransferase (ASMT) was analyzed by RT-PCR, q-PCR and Western-blot in ram testes, epididymis, and accessory glands. The RT-PCR showed the presence of the m-RNA codifying both AANAT and ASTM in all the tissues under study, but the q-PCR and Western-blot revealed that gene expression of these enzymes was significantly higher in the testis (p < 0.05). Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of AANAT and ASMT in the testis and revealed that they were found in the Leydig cells, spermatocytes, and spermatids. Also, measurable levels of melatonin were found in testicular tissue and the tail of the epididymis. In conclusion, our study indicates that the testes are one of the likely sources of the high levels of melatonin found in ram seminal plasma, at least during the day. PMID:26742835

  1. Altered regulation of luteinizing hormone secretion in 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-treated male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bookstaff, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) severely decreases plasma androgen concentrations, yet plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations remain unchanged. The mechanism by which TCDD prevents the expected compensatory increase in plasma LH was investigated. No effect on the plasma disappearance rate of LH or on pituitary capacity to synthesize or secrete LH was detected. Rather, TCDD altered the regulation of LH secretion by substantially increasing the potency of both androgens and estrogens as feedback inhibitors of LH secretion. The mechanism by which TCDD alters androgen-regulated LH secretion was further investigated. Seven days after dosing, TCDD decreased plasma testosterone concentrations but prevented the expected compensatory increases in pituitary gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor number, pituitary responsiveness to GnRH, and plasma LH concentrations as seen in similarly hypoandrogenic vehicle dosed rats. Furthermore, the TCDD dose-response relationships for preventing the compensatory increases in pituitary GnRH receptor number and plasma LH concentration were similar. However, in the absence of gonadal steroids (7 days after castration) TCDD did not affect the compensatory increases in pituitary GnRH receptor number, pituitary responsiveness to GnRH, or plasma LH concentration. All of these parameters increased substantially relative to intact TCDD treated rats, and to levels virtually identical to those seen in castrated control rats. Treatment of castrated rats with testosterone restored the ability of TCDD to prevent these compensatory increases. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the presence of androgens is required for TCDD to alter the regulation of pituitary GnRH receptors.

  2. Astrocyte-Secreted Factors Selectively Alter Neural Stem and Progenitor Cell Proliferation in the Fragile X Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sourial, Mary; Doering, Laurie C.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that astrocytes contribute to the governance and fine tuning of stem and progenitor cell production during brain development. The effect of astrocyte function in cell production in neurodevelopmental disorders is unknown. We used the Neural Colony Forming Cell assay to determine the effect of astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) on the generation of neurospheres originating from either progenitor cells or functional stem cells in the knock out (KO) Fragile X mouse model. ACM from both normal and Fmr1-KO mice generated higher percentages of smaller neurospheres indicative of restricted proliferation of the progenitor cell population in Fmr1-KO brains. Wild type (WT) neurospheres, but not KO neurospheres, showed enhanced responses to ACM from the Fmr1-KO mice. In particular, Fmr1-KO ACM increased the percentage of large neurospheres generated, representative of spheres produced from neural stem cells. We also used 2D DIGE to initiate identification of the astrocyte-secreted proteins with differential expression between Fmr1-KO and WT cortices and hippocampi. The results further support the critical role of astrocytes in governing neural cell production in brain development and point to significant alterations in neural cell proliferation due to astrocyte secreted factors from the Fragile X brain. Highlights: • We studied the proliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells in Fragile X. • We examined the role of astrocyte-secreted factors in neural precursor cell biology. • Astrocyte-secreted factors with differential expression in Fragile X identified. PMID:27242437

  3. Melatonin modulates the fetal cardiovascular defense response to acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Botting, Kimberley J; Serón-Ferré, Maria; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-08-01

    Experimental studies in animal models supporting protective effects on the fetus of melatonin in adverse pregnancy have prompted clinical trials in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. However, the effects of melatonin on the fetal defense to acute hypoxia, such as that which may occur during labor, remain unknown. This translational study tested the hypothesis, in vivo, that melatonin modulates the fetal cardiometabolic defense responses to acute hypoxia in chronically instrumented late gestation fetal sheep via alterations in fetal nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Under anesthesia, 6 fetal sheep at 0.85 gestation were instrumented with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Five days later, fetuses were exposed to acute hypoxia with or without melatonin treatment. Fetal blood was taken to determine blood gas and metabolic status and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Hypoxia during melatonin treatment was repeated during in vivo NO blockade with the NO clamp. This technique permits blockade of de novo synthesis of NO while compensating for the tonic production of the gas, thereby maintaining basal cardiovascular function. Melatonin suppressed the redistribution of blood flow away from peripheral circulations and the glycemic and plasma catecholamine responses to acute hypoxia. These are important components of the fetal brain sparing response to acute hypoxia. The effects of melatonin involved NO-dependent mechanisms as the responses were reverted by fetal treatment with the NO clamp. Melatonin modulates the in vivo fetal cardiometabolic responses to acute hypoxia by increasing NO bioavailability. PMID:25908097

  4. Melatonin modulates the fetal cardiovascular defense response to acute hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Botting, Kimberley J; Serón-Ferré, Maria; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies in animal models supporting protective effects on the fetus of melatonin in adverse pregnancy have prompted clinical trials in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. However, the effects of melatonin on the fetal defense to acute hypoxia, such as that which may occur during labor, remain unknown. This translational study tested the hypothesis, in vivo, that melatonin modulates the fetal cardiometabolic defense responses to acute hypoxia in chronically instrumented late gestation fetal sheep via alterations in fetal nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Under anesthesia, 6 fetal sheep at 0.85 gestation were instrumented with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Five days later, fetuses were exposed to acute hypoxia with or without melatonin treatment. Fetal blood was taken to determine blood gas and metabolic status and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Hypoxia during melatonin treatment was repeated during in vivo NO blockade with the NO clamp. This technique permits blockade of de novo synthesis of NO while compensating for the tonic production of the gas, thereby maintaining basal cardiovascular function. Melatonin suppressed the redistribution of blood flow away from peripheral circulations and the glycemic and plasma catecholamine responses to acute hypoxia. These are important components of the fetal brain sparing response to acute hypoxia. The effects of melatonin involved NO-dependent mechanisms as the responses were reverted by fetal treatment with the NO clamp. Melatonin modulates the in vivo fetal cardiometabolic responses to acute hypoxia by increasing NO bioavailability. PMID:25908097

  5. Effects of short-term feed deprivation and melatonin implants on circadian patterns of leptin in the horse.

    PubMed

    Buff, P R; Morrison, C D; Ganjam, V K; Keisler, D H

    2005-05-01

    Leptin is a protein hormone produced by adipose tissue that influences hypothalamic mechanisms regulating appetite and energy balance. In species tested thus far, including horses, concentrations of leptin increase as animal fat mass increases. The variables and mechanisms that influence the secretion of leptin are not well known, nor is it known in equine species how the secretion of leptin is influenced by acute alterations in energy balance, circadian patterns, and/or reproductive competence. Our objectives were to determine in horses: 1) whether plasma concentrations of leptin are secreted in a circadian and/or a pulsatile pattern; 2) whether a 48-h period of feed restriction would alter plasma concentrations of leptin, growth hormone, or insulin; and 3) whether ovariectomy and/or a melatonin implant would affect leptin. In Exp. 1, mares exposed to ambient photoperiod of visible light (11 h, 33 min to 11 h, 38 min), received treatments consisting of a 48-h feed restriction (RES) or 48 h of alfalfa hay fed ad libitum (FED). Mares were maintained in a dry lot before sampling and were tethered to a rail during sampling. Analyses revealed that leptin was not secreted in a pulsatile manner, and that mean leptin concentrations were greater (P < 0.001) in FED vs. RES mares (17.20 +/- 0.41 vs. 7.29 +/- 0.41 ng/mL). Plasma growth hormone was pulsatile, and mean concentrations were greater in RES than FED mares (2.15 +/- 0.31 vs. 1.08 +/- 0.31 ng/mL; P = 0.05). Circadian patterns of leptin secretion were observed, but only in FED mares (15.39 +/- 0.58 ng/mL for morning vs. 19.00 +/- 0.58 ng/mL for evening; P < 0.001). In Exp. 2, mares that were ovariectomized or intact received either a s.c. melatonin implant or a sham implant. Thereafter, blood was sampled at weekly intervals at 1000 and 1700. Concentrations of leptin in samples collected at 1700 were greater (P < 0.001) than in those collected at 1000 (28.24 +/- 1.7 vs. 22.07 +/- 1.7 ng/mL). Neither ovariectomy nor

  6. Melatonin modulates the functions of porcine granulosa cells via its membrane receptor MT2 in vitro.

    PubMed

    He, Ya-Mei; Deng, Hong-Hui; Shi, Mei-Hong; Bodinga, Bello Musa; Chen, Hua-Li; Han, Zeng-Sheng; Jiang, Zhong-Liang; Li, Qing-Wang

    2016-09-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is documented as a hormone involved in the circadian regulation of physiological and neuroendocrine function in mammals. Herein, the effects of melatonin on the functions of porcine granulosa cells in vitro were investigated. Porcine granulosa cells were cultivated with variable concentrations of melatonin (0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, and 10ng/mL) for 48h. Melatonin receptor agonist (IIK7) and antagonist (Luzindole, 4P-PDOT) were used to further examine the action of melatonin. The results showed optimum cell viability and colony-forming efficiency of porcine granulosa cells at 0.01ng/mL melatonin for 48-h incubation period. The percentage of apoptotic granulosa cells was significantly reduced by 0.01 and 0.1ng/mL melatonin within the 48-h incubation period as compared with the rest of the treatments. Estradiol biosynthesis was significantly stimulated by melatonin supplementation and suppressed for the progesterone secretion; the minimum ratio of progesterone to estradiol was 1.82 in 0.01ng/mL melatonin treatment after 48h of cultivation. Moreover, the expression of BCL-2, CYP17A1, CYP19A1, SOD1, and GPX4 were up-regulated by 0.01ng/mL melatonin or combined with IIK7, but decreased for the mRNA levels of BAX, P53, and CASPASE-3, as compared with control or groups treated with Luzindole or 4P-PDOT in the presence of melatonin. In conclusion, the study demonstrated that melatonin mediated proliferation, apoptosis, and steroidogenesis in porcine granulosa cells predominantly through the activation of melatonin receptor MT2 in vitro, which provided evidence of the beneficial role of melatonin as well as its functional mechanism in porcine granulosa cells in vitro. PMID:27477115

  7. Use of anesthesia dramatically alters the oral glucose tolerance and insulin secretion in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Windeløv, Johanne A; Pedersen, Jens; Holst, Jens J

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of the impact of anesthesia on oral glucose tolerance in mice. Anesthesia is often used when performing OGTT in mice to avoid the stress of gavage and blood sampling, although anesthesia may influence gastrointestinal motility, blood glucose, and plasma insulin dynamics. C57Bl/6 mice were anesthetized using the following commonly used regimens: (1) hypnorm/midazolam repetitive or single injection; (2) ketamine/xylazine; (3) isoflurane; (4) pentobarbital; and (5) A saline injected, nonanesthetized group. Oral glucose was administered at time 0 min and blood glucose measured in the time frame -15 to +150 min. Plasma insulin concentration was measured at time 0 and 20 min. All four anesthetic regimens resulted in impaired glucose tolerance compared to saline/no anesthesia. (1) hypnorm/midazolam increased insulin concentrations and caused an altered glucose tolerance; (2) ketamine/xylazine lowered insulin responses and resulted in severe hyperglycemia throughout the experiment; (3) isoflurane did not only alter the insulin secretion but also resulted in severe hyperglycemia; (4) pentobarbital resulted in both increased insulin secretion and impaired glucose tolerance. All four anesthetic regimens altered the oral glucose tolerance, and we conclude that anesthesia should not be used when performing metabolic studies in mice. PMID:27255361

  8. Melatonin and Ischemic Stroke: Mechanistic Roles and Action

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Syed Suhail; Parvez, Suhel; Tabassum, Heena

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most devastating neurological disabilities and brain's vulnerability towards it proves to be fatal and socio-economic loss of millions of people worldwide. Ischemic stroke remains at the center stage of it, because of its prevalence amongst the several other types attacking the brain. The various cascades of events that have been associated with stroke involve oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, upregulation of Ca2+ level, and so forth. Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by pineal and extra pineal tissues responsible for various physiological processes like sleep and mood behaviour. Melatonin has been implicated in various neurological diseases because of its antioxidative, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory properties. We have previously reviewed the neuroprotective effect of melatonin in various models of brain injury like traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. In this review, we have put together the various causes and consequence of stroke and protective role of melatonin in ischemic stroke. PMID:26435711

  9. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers. PMID:22792106

  10. Effect of L-NAME-induced hypertension on melatonin receptors and melatonin levels in the pineal gland and the peripheral organs of rats.

    PubMed

    Benova, Miroslava; Herichova, Iveta; Stebelova, Katarina; Paulis, Ludovit; Krajcirovicova, Kristina; Simko, Fedor; Zeman, Michal

    2009-04-01

    Melatonin plays a role in blood pressure (BP) control. The aim of this study was to determine whether melatonin concentrations and melatonin receptor levels are altered in L-NAME-treated, NO-deficient hypertensive rats. Two groups of male adult Wistar rats were investigated: rats (n=36) treated with NO-synthase inhibitor L-NAME (40 mg kg(-1)) and age-matched controls (n=36). BP was measured weekly by tail-cuff plethysmography. After 4 weeks, L-NAME administration increased BP (178+/-1 vs. control 118+/-1 mm Hg). At the end of treatment, rats were killed in regular 4 h intervals over a 24-h period. Melatonin concentrations in the plasma, pineal gland, heart and kidney and melatonin receptor (MT(1)) density in the aorta were determined. A significant daily rhythm of melatonin concentrations was found in the blood, pineal gland, kidney and heart of both control and hypertensive rats. Peak nighttime pineal melatonin concentrations were higher in L-NAME-treated rats than in controls (3.38+/-0.48 vs. 1.75+/-0.33 ng per pineal gland). No differences between both groups were found in melatonin concentrations in blood, kidney and heart or in the MT(1) receptor density in the aorta. Our results suggest that L-NAME treatment enhances melatonin production in the pineal gland, potentially by decreasing an inhibitory effect of NO on melatonin production in the pineal gland. However, the enhanced pineal melatonin formation was insufficient to increase melatonin concentrations in circulation, heart and kidney of L-NAME-treated rats, indicating an increased use of melatonin in hypertensive animals. PMID:19262491

  11. TNF-α alters the inflammatory secretion profile of human first trimester placenta.

    PubMed

    Siwetz, Monika; Blaschitz, Astrid; El-Heliebi, Amin; Hiden, Ursula; Desoye, Gernot; Huppertz, Berthold; Gauster, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Implantation and subsequent placental development depend on a well-orchestrated interaction between fetal and maternal tissues, involving a fine balanced synergistic cross-talk of inflammatory and immune-modulating factors. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α has been increasingly recognized as pivotal factor for successful pregnancy, although high maternal TNF-α levels are associated with a number of adverse pregnancy conditions including gestational hypertension and gestational diabetes mellitus. This study describes effects of exogenously applied TNF-α, mimicking increased maternal TNF-α levels, on the secretion profile of inflammation associated factors in human first trimester villous placenta. Conditioned culture media from first trimester villous placental explants were analyzed by inflammation antibody arrays and ELISA after 48 h culture in the presence or absence of TNF-α. Inflammation antibody arrays identified interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), CCL4, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as the most abundantly secreted inflammation-associated factors under basal culture conditions. In the presence of TNF-α, secretion of GM-CSF, CCL5, and IL-10 increased, whereas IL-4 and macrophage CSF levels decreased compared with controls. ELISA analysis verified antibody arrays by showing significantly increased synthesis and release of GM-CSF and CCL5 by placental explants in response to TNF-α. Immunohistochemistry localized GM-CSF in the villous trophoblast compartment, whereas CCL5 was detected in maternal platelets adhering to perivillous fibrin deposits on the villous surface. mRNA-based in situ padlock probe approach localized GM-CSF and CCL5 transcripts in the villous trophoblast layer and the villous stroma. Results from this study suggest that the inflammatory secretion profile of human first trimester placenta shifts towards increased levels of GM-CSF, CCL5, and IL10 in response to elevated maternal

  12. Effect of melatonin or maternal nutrient restriction on vascularity and cell proliferation in the ovine placenta.

    PubMed

    Eifert, Adam W; Wilson, Matthew E; Vonnahme, Kimberly A; Camacho, Leticia E; Borowicz, Pawel P; Redmer, Dale A; Romero, Sinibaldo; Dorsam, Sheri; Haring, Jodie; Lemley, Caleb O

    2015-02-01

    Previously we reported increased umbilical artery blood flow in ewes supplemented with melatonin from mid- to late-pregnancy, while maternal nutrient restriction decreased uterine artery blood flow. To further unravel these responses, this study was designed to assess placental cell proliferation and vascularity following supplementation with melatonin or maternal nutrient restriction. For the first experiment, 31 primiparous ewes were supplemented with 5mg of melatonin per day (MEL) or no melatonin (CON) and allocated to receive 100% (adequate fed; ADQ) or 60% (restricted; RES) of their nutrient requirements from day 50 to 130 of gestation. To examine melatonin receptor dependent effects, a second experiment was designed utilizing 14 primiparous ewes infused with vehicle, melatonin, or luzindole (melatonin receptor 1 and 2 antagonist) from day 62 to 90 of gestation. For experiment 1, caruncle concentrations of RNA were increased in MEL-RES compared to CON-RES. Caruncle capillary area density and average capillary cross-sectional area were decreased in MEL-RES compared to CON-RES. Cotyledon vascularity was not different across dietary treatments. For experiment 2, placental cellular proliferation and vascularity were not affected by infusion treatment. In summary, melatonin interacted with nutrient restriction to alter caruncle vascularity and RNA concentrations during late pregnancy. Although melatonin receptor antagonism alters feto-placental blood flow, these receptor dependent responses were not observed in placental vascularity. Moreover, placental vascularity measures do not fully explain the alterations in uteroplacental blood flow. PMID:25578503

  13. Melatonin Alleviates Liver Apoptosis in Bile Duct Ligation Young Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Hsu, Mei-Hsin; Tain, You-Lin; Huang, Ying-Hsien; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Li, Shih-Wen; Huang, Li-Tung

    2016-01-01

    Bile duct ligation (BDL)-treated rats display cholestasis and liver damages. The potential protective activity of melatonin in young BDL rats in terms of apoptosis, mitochondrial function, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis has not yet been evaluated. Three groups of young male Sprague-Dawley rats were used: one group received laparotomy (Sham), a second group received BDL for two weeks (BDL), and a third group received BDL and intraperitoneal melatonin (100 mg/day) for two weeks (BDL + M). BDL group rats showed liver apoptosis, increased pro-inflamamtory mediators, caspases alterations, anti-apoptotic factors changes, and dysfunction of ER homeostasis. Melatonin effectively reversed apoptosis, mainly through intrinsic pathway and reversed ER stress. In addition, in vitro study showed melatonin exerted its effect mainly through the melatonin 2 receptor (MT2) in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, BDL in young rats caused liver apoptosis. Melatonin rescued the apoptotic changes via the intrinsic pathway, and possibly through the MT2 receptor. Melatonin also reversed ER stress induced by BDL. PMID:27556445

  14. Arabidopsis Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Key Roles of Melatonin in Plant Defense Systems

    PubMed Central

    Weeda, Sarah; Zhang, Na; Zhao, Xiaolei; Ndip, Grace; Guo, Yangdong; Buck, Gregory A.; Fu, Conggui; Ren, Shuxin

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is a ubiquitous molecule and exists across kingdoms including plant species. Studies on melatonin in plants have mainly focused on its physiological influence on growth and development, and on its biosynthesis. Much less attention has been drawn to its affect on genome-wide gene expression. To comprehensively investigate the role(s) of melatonin at the genomics level, we utilized mRNA-seq technology to analyze Arabidopsis plants subjected to a 16-hour 100 pM (low) and 1 mM (high) melatonin treatment. The expression profiles were analyzed to identify differentially expressed genes. 100 pM melatonin treatment significantly affected the expression of only 81 genes with 51 down-regulated and 30 up-regulated. However, 1 mM melatonin significantly altered 1308 genes with 566 up-regulated and 742 down-regulated. Not all genes altered by low melatonin were affected by high melatonin, indicating different roles of melatonin in regulation of plant growth and development under low and high concentrations. Furthermore, a large number of genes altered by melatonin were involved in plant stress defense. Transcript levels for many stress receptors, kinases, and stress-associated calcium signals were up-regulated. The majority of transcription factors identified were also involved in plant stress defense. Additionally, most identified genes in ABA, ET, SA and JA pathways were up-regulated, while genes pertaining to auxin responses and signaling, peroxidases, and those associated with cell wall synthesis and modifications were mostly down-regulated. Our results indicate critical roles of melatonin in plant defense against various environmental stresses, and provide a framework for functional analysis of genes in melatonin-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:24682084

  15. Effect of melatonin on kidney cold ischemic preservation injury

    PubMed Central

    Aslaner, Arif; Gunal, Omer; Turgut, Hamdi Taner; Celik, Erdal; Yildirim, Umran; Demirci, Rojbin Karakoyun; Gunduz, Umut Riza; Calis, Hasan; Dogan, Sami

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin is a potent free radical scavenger of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor and a well-known antioxidant secreted from pineal gland. This hormone has been reported to protect tissue from oxidative damage. In this study, we aim to investigate the effect of melatonin on kidney cold ischemia time when added to preservation solution. Thirty male Wistar albino rats were divided equally into three groups; Ringer Lactate (RL) solution, University of Wisconsin (UW) solution with and without melatonin. The serum Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) activities of the preservation solutions at 2nd, 24th, 36th, and 48th hours were determined. Tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were also measured and a histological examination was performed at 48th hour. Melatonin that added to preservation solution prevented enzyme elevation and decreased lipid peroxidation in preservation solution when compared to the control group (p<0.05). The histological examination revealed that UW solution containing melatonin significantly prevented the kidney from pathological injury (p<0.05). Melatonin added to preservation solutions such as UW solution seemed to protect the tissue preserved effectively from cold ischemic injury for up to 48 hour. PMID:24179573

  16. Advances in the Research of Melatonin in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Literature Review and New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tordjman, Sylvie; Najjar, Imen; Bellissant, Eric; Anderson, George M.; Barburoth, Marianne; Cohen, David; Jaafari, Nemat; Schischmanoff, Olivier; Fagard, Rémi; Lagdas, Enas; Kermarrec, Solenn; Ribardiere, Sophie; Botbol, Michel; Fougerou, Claire; Bronsard, Guillaume; Vernay-Leconte, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Abnormalities in melatonin physiology may be involved or closely linked to the pathophysiology and behavioral expression of autistic disorder, given its role in neurodevelopment and reports of sleep-wake rhythm disturbances, decreased nocturnal melatonin production, and beneficial therapeutic effects of melatonin in individuals with autism. In addition, melatonin, as a pineal gland hormone produced from serotonin, is of special interest in autistic disorder given reported alterations in central and peripheral serotonin neurobiology. More specifically, the role of melatonin in the ontogenetic establishment of circadian rhythms and the synchronization of peripheral oscillators opens interesting perspectives to ascertain better the mechanisms underlying the significant relationship found between lower nocturnal melatonin excretion and increased severity of autistic social communication impairments, especially for verbal communication and social imitative play. In this article, first we review the studies on melatonin levels and the treatment studies of melatonin in autistic disorder. Then, we discuss the relationships between melatonin and autistic behavioral impairments with regard to social communication (verbal and non-verbal communication, social interaction), and repetitive behaviors or interests with difficulties adapting to change. In conclusion, we emphasize that randomized clinical trials in autism spectrum disorders are warranted to establish potential therapeutic efficacy of melatonin for social communication impairments and stereotyped behaviors or interests. PMID:24129182

  17. Human colon epithelial cells productively infected with human immunodeficiency virus show impaired differentiation and altered secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Fantini, J; Yahi, N; Baghdiguian, S; Chermann, J C

    1992-01-01

    Selected strains of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) types 1 and 2 are able to infect human colon epithelial cells in vitro, suggesting a mechanism for the anal route of HIV transmission. In some cases, HIV is not produced by infected colon cells but can be rescued after coculture with T-lymphoid cells. One of the HIV strains (HIV1-NDK) replicated well in colonic cells. A transmission electron microscope study demonstrated two major structural perturbations in producer colon cells: an unusual number of secretion bodies and the appearance of intracellular lumina with disorganized microvilli, indicating a defect in brush border assembly and differentiation. Either abnormality could account for HIV-induced enteropathy consisting of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption in the absence of enteric pathogens. Moreover, HT29 cells infected with HIV provide a unique model for selection of enterotropic HIV strains. Images PMID:1727501

  18. Melatonin protects skin keratinocyte from hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell death via the SIRT1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Nazim, Uddin Md; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-03-15

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), which is primarily synthesized in and secreted from the pineal gland, plays a pivotal role in cell proliferation as well as in the regulation of cell metastasis and cell survival in a diverse range of cells. The aim of this study is to investigate protection effect of melatonin on H2O2-induced cell damage and the mechanisms of melatonin in human keratinocytes. Hydrogen peroxide dose-dependently induced cell damages in human keratinocytes and co-treatment of melatonin protected the keratinocytes against H2O2-induced cell damage. Melatonin treatment activated the autophagy flux signals, which were identified by the decreased levels of p62 protein. Inhibition of autophagy flux via an autophagy inhibitor and ATG5 siRNA technique blocked the protective effects of melatonin against H2O2-induced cell death in human keratinocytes. And we found the inhibition of sirt1 using sirtinol and sirt1 siRNA reversed the protective effects of melatonin and induces the autophagy process in H2O2-treated cells. This is the first report demonstrating that autophagy flux activated by melatonin protects human keratinocytes through sirt1 pathway against hydrogen peroxide-induced damages. And this study also suggest that melatonin could potentially be utilized as a therapeutic agent in skin disease. PMID:26918354

  19. Melatonin protects skin keratinocyte from hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell death via the SIRT1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Nazim, Uddin MD.; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), which is primarily synthesized in and secreted from the pineal gland, plays a pivotal role in cell proliferation as well as in the regulation of cell metastasis and cell survival in a diverse range of cells. The aim of this study is to investigate protection effect of melatonin on H2O2-induced cell damage and the mechanisms of melatonin in human keratinocytes. Hydrogen peroxide dose-dependently induced cell damages in human keratinocytes and co-treatment of melatonin protected the keratinocytes against H2O2-induced cell damage. Melatonin treatment activated the autophagy flux signals, which were identified by the decreased levels of p62 protein. Inhibition of autophagy flux via an autophagy inhibitor and ATG5 siRNA technique blocked the protective effects of melatonin against H2O2-induced cell death in human keratinocytes. And we found the inhibition of sirt1 using sirtinol and sirt1 siRNA reversed the protective effects of melatonin and induces the autophagy process in H2O2-treated cells. This is the first report demonstrating that autophagy flux activated by melatonin protects human keratinocytes through sirt1 pathway against hydrogen peroxide-induced damages. And this study also suggest that melatonin could potentially be utilized as a therapeutic agent in skin disease. PMID:26918354

  20. Nocturnal Melatonin Profiles in Patients with Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder and Control Sleepers.

    PubMed

    Micic, Gorica; Lovato, Nicole; Gradisar, Michael; Burgess, Helen J; Ferguson, Sally A; Kennaway, David J; Lack, Leon

    2015-10-01

    A significant delay in the timing of endogenous circadian rhythms has been associated with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). More recently, other mechanisms have also been proposed to account for this disorder. To further explore the etiology of DSPD, the present study compared nocturnal melatonin profiles of 26 DSPD patients (18 males, 8 females; age, 21.73 ± 4.98 years) and 17 normally timed good sleepers (10 males, 7 females; age, 23.82 ± 5.23 years) in a time-free, dim-light (<10 lux) laboratory environment. A 30-h modified constant routine with alternating 20-min sleep opportunities and 40 min of enforced wakefulness was used to measure the endogenous melatonin circadian rhythm. Salivary melatonin was sampled half-hourly from 1820 h to 0020 h and then hourly from 0120 h to 1620 h. DSPD patients had significantly later timed melatonin profiles that were delayed by approximately 3 h compared to normal sleepers, and there were no notable differences in the relative duration of secretion between groups. However, melatonin secretion between dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) and acrophase was less prominent in DSPD patients compared to good sleepers, who showed a more acute initial surge of melatonin following the DLMO. Although the regulatory role of melatonin is unknown, abnormal melatonin profiles have been linked to psychiatric and neurological disorders (e.g., major depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, Parkinson disease). These results therefore suggest that in addition to a delayed endogenous circadian rhythm, a diminished initial surge of melatonin secretion following DLMO may contribute to the etiology of DSPD. PMID:26149168

  1. Maternal melatonin treatment influences rates of neonatal development of meadow vole pups.

    PubMed

    Lee, T M; Spears, N; Tuthill, C R; Zucker, I

    1989-03-01

    Meadow vole dams, housed in a 14L:10D photoperiod were injected daily 3 h before onset of darkness with 10 micrograms melatonin. Treatment during gestation or lactation produced offspring that exhibited altered somatic, testicular, and pelage growth. Gestational melatonin treatment decreased preweaning weight gain, delayed testicular development, and increased pelage growth in offspring, whereas melatonin treatment during lactation increased pelage depth at weaning and increased post-weaning somatic growth. These results suggest that pre- and postnatal maternal melatonin secretory patterns influence postnatal development of photosensitive traits in offspring. PMID:2667649

  2. Inflammation conditions mature dendritic cells to retain the capacity to present new antigens but with altered cytokine secretion function.

    PubMed

    Vega-Ramos, Javier; Roquilly, Antoine; Zhan, Yifan; Young, Louise J; Mintern, Justine D; Villadangos, Jose A

    2014-10-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are directly activated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and undergo maturation. Mature DCs express high levels of MHC class II molecules ("signal 1"), upregulate T cell costimulatory receptors ("signal 2"), and secrete "signal 3" cytokines (e.g., IL-12). Mature DCs efficiently present Ags linked to the activating PAMP and prime naive T cells. However, mature DCs downregulate MHC II synthesis, which prevents them from presenting newly encountered Ags. DCs can also be indirectly activated by inflammatory mediators released during infection (e.g., IFN). Indirectly activated DCs mature but do not present pathogen Ags (as they have not encountered the pathogen) and do not provide signal 3. Therefore, although they are probably generated in large numbers upon infection or vaccination, indirectly activated DCs are considered to play little or no role in T cell immunity. In this article, we show that indirectly activated DCs retain their capacity to present Ags encountered after maturation in vivo. They can also respond to PAMPs, but the previous encounter of inflammatory signals alters their cytokine (signal 3) secretion pattern. This implies that the immune response elicited by a PAMP is more complex than predicted by the examination of the immunogenic features of directly activated DCs, and that underlying inflammatory processes can skew the immune response against pathogens. Our observations have important implications for the design of vaccines and for the understanding of the interactions between simultaneous infections, or of infection in the context of ongoing sterile inflammation. PMID:25200952

  3. The Type III Secretion System and Cytotoxic Enterotoxin Alter the Virulence of Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Jian; Pillai, Lakshmi; Fadl, Amin A.; Galindo, Cristi L.; Erova, Tatiana E.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2005-01-01

    Many gram-negative bacteria use a type III secretion system (TTSS) to deliver effector proteins into host cells. Here we report the characterization of a TTSS chromosomal operon from the diarrheal isolate SSU of Aeromonas hydrophila. We deleted the gene encoding Aeromonas outer membrane protein B (AopB), which is predicted to be involved in the formation of the TTSS translocon, from wild-type (WT) A. hydrophila as well as from a previously characterized cytotoxic enterotoxin gene (act)-minus strain of A. hydrophila, thus generating aopB and act/aopB isogenic mutants. The act gene encodes a type II-secreted cytotoxic enterotoxin (Act) that has hemolytic, cytotoxic, and enterotoxic activities and induces lethality in a mouse model. These isogenic mutants (aopB, act, and act/aopB) were highly attenuated in their ability to induce cytotoxicity in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages and HT-29 human colonic epithelial cells. The act/aopB mutant demonstrated the greatest reduction in cytotoxicity to cultured cells after 4 h of infection, as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme, and was avirulent in mice, with a 90% survival rate compared to that of animals infected with Act and AopB mutants, which caused 50 to 60% of the animals to die at a dose of three 50% lethal doses. In contrast, WT A. hydrophila killed 100% of the mice within 48 h. The effects of these mutations on cytotoxicity could be complemented with the native genes. Our studies further revealed that the production of lactones, which are involved in quorum sensing (QS), was decreased in the act (32%) and aopB (64%) mutants and was minimal (only 8%) in the act/aopB mutant, compared to that of WT A. hydrophila SSU. The effects of act and aopB gene deletions on lactone production could also be complemented with the native genes, indicating specific effects of Act and the TTSS on lactone production. Although recent studies with other bacteria have indicated TTSS regulation by QS, this is the first

  4. Differential Reovirus-Specific and Herpesvirus-Specific Activator Protein 1 Activation of Secretogranin II Leads to Altered Virus Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Berard, Alicia R.; Severini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    families interact with the host. Here we show that secretogranin II (SCG2), a protein not previously studied in the context of virus infections, alters virus output in a virus-specific manner and that the quantity of SCG2 is inversely related to amounts of infectious-virus secretion. Herpesviruses may target this protein to facilitate enhanced virus release from the host. PMID:26378181

  5. Twice Daily Melatonin Peaks in Siberian but not Syrian Hamsters under 24 h Light:Dark:Light:Dark Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Raiewski, Evan E.; Elliott, Jeffrey A.; Evans, Jennifer A.; Glickman, Gena L.; Gorman, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The daily pattern of blood borne melatonin varies seasonally under the control of a multi-oscillator circadian pacemaker. Here we examine patterns of melatonin secretion and locomotor activity in Siberian and Syrian hamsters entrained to bimodal LDLD8:4:8:4 and LD20:4 lighting schedules that facilitate novel temporal arrangements of component circadian oscillators. Under LDLD, both species robustly bifurcated wheel-running activity in distinct day scotophase (DS) and night scotophase (NS) bouts. Siberian hamsters displayed significant melatonin increases during each scotophase in LDLD, and in the single daily scotophase of LD20:4. The bimodal melatonin secretion pattern persisted in acutely extended 16 h scotophases. Syrian hamsters, in contrast, showed no significant increases in plasma melatonin during either scotophase of LDLD8:4:8:4 or in LD20:4. In this species, detectable levels were observed only when the day scotophase of LDLD was acutely extended to yield 16 h of darkness. Established species differences in the phase lag of nocturnal melatonin secretion relative to activity onset may underlie the above contrast: In non-bifurcated entrainment to 24 h LD cycles, Siberian hamsters show increased melatonin secretion within ~ 2 h after activity onset, whereas in Syrian hamsters, detectable melatonin secretion phase lags activity onset and the L/D transition by at least 4 h. The present results provide new evidence indicating multi-oscillator regulation of the waveform of melatonin secretion, specifically, the circadian control of the onset, offset, and duration of nocturnal secretion. PMID:23003567

  6. Hypernatremia-induced vasopressin secretion is not altered in TRPV1-/- rats.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Andrew Blake; Stocker, Sean D

    2016-09-01

    Changes in osmolality or extracellular NaCl concentrations are detected by specialized neurons in the hypothalamus to increase vasopressin (VP) and stimulate thirst. Recent in vitro evidence suggests this process is mediated by an NH2-terminal variant of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel expressed by osmosensitive neurons of the lamina terminalis and vasopressinergic neurons of the supraoptic nucleus. The present study tested this hypothesis in vivo by analysis of plasma VP levels during acute hypernatremia in awake control and TRPV1(-/-) rats. TRPV1(-/-) rats were produced by a Zinc-finger-nuclease 2-bp deletion in exon 13. Intravenous injection of the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin produced hypotension and bradycardia in control rats, but this response was absent in TRPV1(-/-) rats. Infusion of 2 M NaCl (1 ml/h iv) increased plasma osmolality, electrolytes, and VP levels in both control and TRPV1(-/-) rats. However, plasma VP levels did not differ between strains at any time. Furthermore, a linear regression between plasma VP versus osmolality revealed a significant correlation in both control and TRPV1(-/-) rats, but the slope of the regression lines was not attenuated in TRPV1(-/-) versus control rats. Hypotension produced by intravenous injection of minoxidil decreased blood pressure and increased plasma VP levels similarly in both groups. Finally, both treatments stimulated thirst; however, cumulative water intakes in response to hypernatremia or hypotension were not different between control and TRPV1(-/-) rats. These findings suggest that TRPV1 channels are not necessary for VP secretion and thirst stimulated by hypernatremia. PMID:27335281

  7. Oral contraceptives alter circadian rhythm parameters of cortisol, melatonin, blood pressure, heart rate, skin blood flow, transepidermal water loss, and skin amino acids of healthy young women.

    PubMed

    Reinberg, A E; Touitou, Y; Soudant, E; Bernard, D; Bazin, R; Mechkouri, M

    1996-08-01

    Sixteen healthy women users and nonusers of oral contraceptives (OC) volunteered to document a set of circadian rhythms. Nine were taking OC providing ethynyl estradiol (0.03-0.05 mg/24h, 21 days/month) combined with DL- or L-norgestrel or norethisterone. There was no group difference (p > 0.05) in median age (22 years), weight (57 kg), and height (162) cm). Data were obtained at fixed hours, 5 times/24h, during a 48-h span, in November. (Day activity from approximately 08:00 to approximately 23:00 h and night rest). Environmental conditions were controlled, using air-conditioned rooms of constant temperature (26 degrees +/- 0.5) and relative humidity 45% +/- 1. Both cosinor and ANOVA were used for statistical analyses. All circadian rhythms were validated with one exception: that of salivary melatonin was not detected in OC users. The 24h mean (M) exhibited group differences for certain variables: M was greater in OC than non-OC users for systolic blood pressure (p < 0.0001), heart rate (p < 0.01), skin blood flow (p < 0.04), and transepidermal water loss (p < 0.02). M was lower in OC than non-OC users in salivary cortisol (p < 0.04) and skin amino acids (p < 0.003). No group difference was detected in any other documented rhythms: diastolic blood pressure, grip strength of both hands, oral temperature, self-rated fatigue, and the skin variables of urea, lactate, triglycerides, and acid phosphatase activity. PMID:8874983

  8. Melatonin attenuates traumatic brain injury-induced inflammation: a possible role for mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao; Chao, Honglu; Li, Zheng; Xu, Xiupeng; Liu, Yinlong; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Ning; Ji, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Melatonin functions as a crucial mediator of sterile neuroinflammation; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Dysfunctional mitochondria, a main source of reactive oxygen species, are impacted in inflammation activation. This study aimed to examine the effect of melatonin on inflammation via elimination of damaged mitochondria after controlled cortical impact, an in vivo model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here, we demonstrated that inhibition of mitophagy, the selective degradation of damaged mitochondria by autophagy, markedly enhanced inflammation induced by TBI. Melatonin treatment activated mitophagy through the mTOR pathway, then to attenuate TBI-induced inflammation. Furthermore, treatment with melatonin significantly ameliorated neuronal death and behavioral deficits after TBI, while 3-methyladenine reversed this effect by inhibiting mitophagy. Taken together, these results highlight a role for melatonin in protecting against TBI-triggered immunopathology, which is accomplished by negatively regulating inflammation activation and IL-1β secretion via the autophagy of damaged mitochondria. PMID:27117839

  9. Increased Melatonin Signaling Is a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Nagorny, Cecilia L F; Singh, Pratibha; Bennet, Hedvig; Yu, Qian; Alenkvist, Ida; Isomaa, Bo; Östman, Bjarne; Söderström, Johan; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Martikainen, Silja; Räikkönen, Katri; Forsén, Tom; Hakaste, Liisa; Almgren, Peter; Storm, Petter; Asplund, Olof; Shcherbina, Liliya; Fex, Malin; Fadista, João; Tengholm, Anders; Wierup, Nils; Groop, Leif; Mulder, Hindrik

    2016-06-14

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a global pandemic. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified >100 genetic variants associated with the disease, including a common variant in the melatonin receptor 1 b gene (MTNR1B). Here, we demonstrate increased MTNR1B expression in human islets from risk G-allele carriers, which likely leads to a reduction in insulin release, increasing T2D risk. Accordingly, in insulin-secreting cells, melatonin reduced cAMP levels, and MTNR1B overexpression exaggerated the inhibition of insulin release exerted by melatonin. Conversely, mice with a disruption of the receptor secreted more insulin. Melatonin treatment in a human recall-by-genotype study reduced insulin secretion and raised glucose levels more extensively in risk G-allele carriers. Thus, our data support a model where enhanced melatonin signaling in islets reduces insulin secretion, leading to hyperglycemia and greater future risk of T2D. The findings also imply that melatonin physiologically serves to inhibit nocturnal insulin release. PMID:27185156

  10. Pineal and circulating melatonin rhythms in the box turtle, Terrapene carolina triunguis: effect of photoperiod, light pulse, and environmental temperature.

    PubMed

    Vivien-Roels, B; Pévet, P; Claustrat, B

    1988-02-01

    Pineal and circulating melatonin concentrations have been measured throughout the 24-hr cycle in the box turtle, Terrapene carolina triunguis, under different conditions of photoperiod and temperature. An obvious effect of photoperiod on the duration of the night rise of pineal and circulating melatonin is observed; the period of elevated melatonin is 4.30 hr in long photoperiod (18L:6D) and 11.00 hr in short photoperiod (8L:16D). A single pulse of 1 hr illumination beginning 1.30 hr after the onset of darkness, in a 16L:8D cycle, has no effect on pineal or circulating melatonin levels. A clear effect of environmental temperature on the amplitude of the day-night rhythm of melatonin production is observed. A possible role of the pineal of poikilotherms in the transduction of several environmental factors, via the daily pattern of melatonin secretion, is hypothesized. PMID:3366352

  11. Human Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Promoter Variant Alters Transcription in Chromaffin Cells, Enzyme Secretion, and Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuqing; Zhang, Kuixing; Wen, Gen; Rao, Fangwen; Sanchez, Amber P.; Wang, Lei; Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L.; Mahata, Manjula; Mahata, Sushil K.; Waalen, Jill; Ziegler, Michael G.; Hamilton, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) plays an indispensable role in catecholamine synthesis by converting dopamine into norepinephrine. Here, we characterized a DBH promoter polymorphism (C-2073T; rs1989787; minor allele frequency ∼16%) that influences not only gene transcription but also enzyme secretion and blood pressure (BP) in vivo. Methods Plasma DBH activity was measured spectrophotometrically. DBH genetic effects on BP were tested in subjects with the most extreme BP values in a large primary care population. Functional effects of promoter variants were studied by site-directed mutagenesis in DBH promoter haplotype/luciferase reporter plasmids transfected into chromaffin cells. Sequence motifs were predicted from position weight matrices, and endogenous transcription factor binding was probed by Chromatin ImmunoPrecipitation (ChIP). Results The T-allele of common promoter variant C-2073T was contained in a promoter haplotype that associated with plasma DBH activity, a trait also predicted by that variant itself. Promoter haplotypes including C-2073T predicted BP in the population, and the effect was also referable to C-2073T itself. Computationally, C-2073 disrupted a predicted match for transcription factor c-FOS. Site-directed mutagenesis at C-2073T altered not only basal promoter activity, but also transactivation by c-FOS, as well as the chromaffin cell secretory stimuli nicotine or pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP). Endogenous c-FOS bound to the motif in chromatin. Conclusion These results suggest that DBH promoter variant C-2073T is functional in vivo: this promoter variant seems to initiate a cascade of transcriptional and biochemical changes including augmented DBH secretion, eventuating in elevation of basal BP, and hence cardiovascular risk. The observations suggest new strategies for probing the pathophysiology, risk, and treatment of hypertension. American Journal of Hypertension, advance online publication 2

  12. THE ESTROGENIC AND ANTIANDROGENIC PESTICIDE METHOXYCHLOR ALTERS THE REPRODUCTIVE TRACT AND BEHAVIOR WITHOUT AFFECTING PITUITARY SIZE OR LH AND PROLACTIN SECRETION IN MALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The estrogenic and antiandrogenic pesticide methoxychlor alters the reproductive tract and behavior without affecting pituitary size or LH and prolactin secretion in male rats.

    Gray LE Jr, Ostby J, Cooper RL, Kelce WR.

    Endocrinology Branch, United States Environment...

  13. Melatonin inhibits tumorigenicity of glioblastoma stem-like cells via the AKT-EZH2-STAT3 signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueran; Hao, Aijun; Li, Xian; Du, Zhaoxia; Li, Hao; Wang, Hongzhi; Yang, Haoran; Fang, Zhiyou

    2016-09-01

    Glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) displaying self-renewing and tumor-propagating capacity play a particularly important role in maintaining tumor growth, therapeutic resistance, and tumor recurrence. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies focusing on impairing GSC maintenance are urgently needed. Here, we used GSCs isolated from surgical specimens from patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) to study the roles and underlying mechanisms associated with melatonin in GSC biology. The results showed that melatonin directly targeted glioma tumor cells by altering GSC biology and inhibiting GSC proliferation. Additionally, melatonin altered profile of transcription factors to inhibit tumor initiation and propagation. Furthermore, EZH2 S21 phosphorylation and EZH2-STAT3 interaction in GSCs were impaired following melatonin treatment. These results suggested that melatonin attenuated multiple key signals involved in GSC self-renewal and survival, and further supported melatonin as a promising GBM therapeutic. PMID:27121240

  14. Comparative photosynthetic and metabolic analyses reveal mechanism of improved cold stress tolerance in bermudagrass by exogenous melatonin.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhengrong; Fan, Jibiao; Xie, Yan; Amombo, Erick; Liu, Ao; Gitau, Margaret Mukami; Khaldun, A B M; Chen, Liang; Fu, Jinmin

    2016-03-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) has been reported to participate in plant development and abiotic stress responses. The main objective of this study was to investigate the role of melatonin in the cold-sensitive (S) and the cold-tolerant (T) bermudagrass genotypes' response to cold stress. The genotypes were treated with 100 μM melatonin and exposed to 4 °C temperature for 3 days. In both genotypes, cold stress increased the endogenous melatonin levels, and more prominently in T than S. Physiological responses indicated that exogenous melatonin triggered antioxidant activities in both genotypes, while it alleviated cell damage in the T genotype response to cold stress. Melatonin treatment under cold stress increased fluorescence curve levels for both genotypes, and higher in T than S genotypes. In both genotypes, the alterations in photosynthetic fluorescence parameters after melatonin treatment highlighted the participation of melatonin in improving photosystem response to cold stress, particularly for the cold-tolerant genotype. The metabolic analyses revealed the alterations of 44 cold-responsive metabolites in the two genotypes, mainly including carbohydrates, organic acids and amino acids. After exogenous melatonin treatment under cold condition, there was high accumulation of metabolites in the cold-tolerant regimes than their cold-sensitive counterparts. Collectively, the present study revealed differential modulations of melatonin between the cold-sensitive and the cold-tolerant genotypes in response to cold stress. This was mainly by impacting antioxidant system, photosystem II, as well as metabolic homeostasis. PMID:26807934

  15. Chronic melatonin administration mitigates behavioral dysfunction induced by γ-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Haridas, Seenu; Kumar, Mayank; Manda, Kailash

    2012-11-01

    Melatonin, a 'hormone of darkness,' has been reported to play a role in a wide variety of physiological responses including reproduction, circadian homeostasis, sleep, retinal neuromodulation, and vasomotor responses. Our recent studies reported a prophylactic effect of exogenous melatonin against radiation-induced neurocognitive changes. However, there is no reported evidence for a mitigating effect of chronic melatonin administration against radiation-induced behavioral alterations. In the present study, C57BL/6 mice were given either whole day chronic melatonin administration (CMA) or chronic night-time melatonin administration (CNMA) by a low dose of melatonin in drinking water for a period of 2 weeks and 1 month following exposure to 6 Gy of γ-radiation. Various behavioral endpoints, such as locomotor activities, gross behavioral traits, basal anxiety level, and depressive tendencies were scored at different time points. Radiation exposure significantly impaired gross behavioral traits as observed in the open field exploratory paradigms and forced swim test. Both the CMA and CNMA significantly ameliorated the radiation-induced changes in exploratory tendencies, risk-taking behavior and gross behavior traits, such as rearing and grooming. Melatonin administration afforded anxiolytic function against radiation in terms of center exploration tendencies. The radiation-induced augmentation of immobility time in the forced swim test, indices of depression-like behavior was also inhibited by chronic melatonin administration. The results demonstrated the mitigating effect of chronic melatonin administration on radiation-induced affective disorders in mice. PMID:23026539

  16. Subsensitive melatonin suppression by dim white light: possible biological marker of panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Pradeep J.; Burrows, Graham D.; Norman, Trevor R.

    1998-12-01

    Light is involved in providing entrainment of circadian rhythms and the suppression of the pineal hormone melatonin. In patients with affective disorders, there have been indications of circadian as well as seasonal variation in illness, which may be reflected in melatonin production. Varying sensitivity to light has been noted within healthy individuals as well as in some patients with affective disorders. Recent evidence suggests that patients with panic disorder may have an altered and phase-delayed melatonin rhythm. The present study examined the nocturnal plasma melatonin rhythm in patients with panic disorder, and also examined their melatonin sensitivity to dim light. The melatonin rhythm was examined in 6 patients with panic disorder and 8 controls. The melatonin sensitivity to dim white light (200 lx) was examined in 8 patients with panic disorder and 63 controls and was compared to that of a group of 7 patients with other anxiety disorders. Patients with panic disorder demonstrated a trend towards higher and delayed peak melatonin levels compared to controls. Patients with panic disorder also had a subsensitive melatonin suppression by dim white light, compared to controls and patients with other anxiety disorders (p<0.005). The phase-delayed circadian rhythm observed in patients with panic disorder may be secondary to the subsensitivity of the melatonin response to light. It is hypothesized that the subsensitivity may be due to abnormal neurotransmitter/receptor systems involved in regulation of melatonin suppression and circadian rhythmicity, and may lead to phase- delayed circadian rhythms. The melatonin subsensitivity to light may be used as a biological marker of panic disorder. PMID:11281954

  17. Alterations in expression of endometrial genes coding for proteins secreted into the uterine lumen during conceptus elongation in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that genes that are up-regulated in the uterine endometrium at the initiation of conceptus elongation in cattle, and that encode for secreted proteins, contribute to the composition of the uterine luminal fluid (ULF) and ultimately, drive conceptus elongation. The aims of this study were to: 1) screen endometrial transcriptomic data for genes that encode secreted proteins on Day 13; 2) determine temporal changes in the expression of these genes during the estrous cycle/early pregnancy; 3) determine if expression of these genes is affected by altered concentrations of progesterone (P4) in vivo and 4) determine if the protein products of these genes are detectable in ULF. Results Of the fourteen candidate genes examined, quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed the expression of APOA1, ARSA, DCN, LCAT, MUC13, NCDN, NMN, NPNT, NXPH3, PENK, PLIN2 and TINAGL1 was modulated in the endometrium (P<0.05) as the estrous cycle/early pregnancy progressed. APOA1, DCN and NPNT expression was higher in cyclic compared to pregnant heifers, and pregnancy increased (P<0.05) the expression of LCAT, NCDN, NMN, PLIN2 and TINAGL1. The magnitude of the increase in expression of APOA1, PENK and TINAGL1 on Day 13 was reduced (P<0.05) in heifers with low P4. Furthermore, low P4 decreased (P<0.05) the expression of LCAT and NPNT on Day 7, while an early increase (P<0.05) in the expression of NXPH3 and PLIN2 was observed in heifers with high P4. The protein products of 5 of the candidate genes (APOA1, ARSA, LCAT, NCDN and PLIN) were detected in the ULF on either Days 13, 16 or 19 of pregnancy. Conclusion Using a candidate gene approach, we determined that both P4 concentration and the presence of the conceptus alter endometrial expression of PLIN2, TINAGL1, NPNT, LCAT, NMN and APOA1. Comparison of the expression profiles of these genes to proteins detected in ULF during conceptus elongation (i.e., Days 13 through 19) revealed the presence of APOA1, ARSA, LCAT

  18. Continuous Melatonin Attenuates the Regressing Activities of Short Photoperiod in Male Golden Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Donchan

    2013-01-01

    Golden hamsters reproduce in a limited time of a year. Their sexual activities are active in summer but inactive in winter during which day length does not exceed night time and environmental conditions are severe to them. The reproductive activities are determined by the length of light in a day (photoperiod). Melatonin is synthesized and secreted only at night time from the pineal gland. Duration of elevated melatonin is longer in winter than summer, resulting in gonadal regression. The present study aimed at the influences of continuous melatonin treatments impinging on the gonadal function in male golden hamsters. Animals received empty or melatonin-filled capsules for 10 weeks. They were divided into long photoperiod (LP) and short photoperiod (SP). All the animals maintained in LP (either empty or melatonin-filled capsules) showed large testes, implying that melatonin had no effects on testicular functions. Animals housed in SP displayed completely regressed testes. But animals kept in SP and implanted with melatonin capsules exhibited blockage of full regression by SP. These results suggest that constant release of melatonin prohibits the regressing influence of SP. PMID:25949127

  19. Effect of mobile usage on serum melatonin levels among medical students.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Abha; Saxena, Yogesh

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic radiations from mobile phones may affect the circadian rhythm of melatonin in mobile users. The study was designed with objective to evaluate the influence of mobile phone on circadian rhythm of melatonin and to find the association if any between the hours of mobile usage with serum melatonin levels. All the volunteers medical students using mobiles for > 2 hrs/day were included in high users group and volunteers who used mobile for ≤ 2 hrs where included in low users group. Both high and low users volunteers were sampled three times in the same day (Morning-3-4 am, Noon 1-2 pm, Evening-5-6 pm) for estimation of serum melatonin levels: Comparsion of sernum melatonin levels in high users and low users were done by Mann Whitney "U" Test. Reduced morning melatonin levels (3-4 am) was observed in high users (> 2 hrs/day) i.e high users had a disturbed melatonin circadian rhythm.There was a negative correlation between melatonin secretion and hours of mobile usages. PMID:26215007

  20. Melatonin improves spermatogonial stem cells transplantation efficiency in azoospermic mice

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Mohammadreza; Saki, Ghasem; Hemadi, Masoud; Khodadadi, Ali; Mohammadi-asl, Javad

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Transplantation quality improvement and reduction of cellular damage are important goals that are now considered by researchers. Melatonin is secreted from the pineal gland and some organs such as testes. According to beneficial effects of melatonin (such as its antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties), researchers have proposed that the use of melatonin may improve transplantation quality. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on the spermatogonial stem cells transplantation in the azoospermic mice. Materials and Methods: The testes of the BALB/c mice pups (6-day-old) after vitrified-thawed, were digested with enzymes (collagenase, DNaseΙ, trypsin-EDTA) to disperse the cells. The SSCs, type A, were isolated from the rest of testicular cells by MACS. Spermatogonial stem cells were labeled with PKH26 fluorescent kit. Labeled spermatogonial stem cells were transplanted into the testes of infertile mice (busulfan 40 mg/kg). The mice died two months after transplantation and the efficiency of spermatogenesis was investigated. TNP2 and hematoxyline-eosin staining were used to detect the efficiency of cell transplantation. Results: TNP2 were detected in the samples that received melatonin and spermatogonial stem cells transplantation, simultaneously. TNP2 was not detectable in the transplant recipient mice that received placebo for 10 weeks (control group). According to hematoxyline-eosin staining, melatonin improved structure of testes. Conclusion: Administration of melatonin (20 mg/kg) simultaneously with transplantation of spermatogonial stem cells in azoospermia mouse testis increases the efficiency of transplantation and improves structural properties of the testes tissue. PMID:24711891

  1. Alleviation of cold damage to photosystem II and metabolisms by melatonin in Bermudagrass

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jibiao; Hu, Zhengrong; Xie, Yan; Chan, Zhulong; Chen, Ke; Amombo, Erick; Chen, Liang; Fu, Jinmin

    2015-01-01

    As a typical warm-season grass, Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L).Pers.] is widely applied in turf systems and animal husbandry. However, cold temperature is a key factor limiting resource utilization for Bermudagrass. Therefore, it is relevant to study the mechanisms by which Burmudagrass responds to cold. Melatonin is a crucial animal and plant hormone that is responsible for plant abiotic stress responses. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of melatonin in cold stress response of Bermudagrass. Wild Bermudagrass pre-treated with 100 μM melatonin was subjected to different cold stress treatments (−5°C for 8 h with or without cold acclimation). The results showed lower malondialdehyde (MDA) and electrolyte leakage (EL) values, higher levels of chlorophyll, and greater superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities after melatonin treatment than those in non-melatonin treatment under cold stress. Analysis of chlorophyll a revealed that the chlorophyll fluorescence transient (OJIP) curves were higher after treatment with melatonin than that of non-melatonin treated plants under cold stress. The values of photosynthetic fluorescence parameters increased after treatment with melatonin under cold stress. The analysis of metabolism showed alterations in 46 metabolites in cold-stressed plants after melatonin treatment. Among the measured metabolites, five sugars (arabinose, mannose, glucopyranose, maltose, and turanose) and one organic acid (propanoic acid) were significantly increased. However, valine and threonic acid contents were reduced in melatonin-treated plants. In summary, melatonin maintained cell membrane stability, increased antioxidant enzymes activities, improved the process of photosystem II, and induced alterations in Bermudagrass metabolism under cold stress. PMID:26579171

  2. Anorexigenic effects of miglitol in concert with the alterations of gut hormone secretion and gastric emptying in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kaku, H; Tajiri, Y; Yamada, K

    2012-04-01

    Although the α-glucosidase inhibitor miglitol (MG) has been reported to have anorexigenic effects, the mechanism remains to be elucidated. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of MG on appetite in relation to concomitant changes in postprandial gut hormone levels. This randomized open-label crossover study included 20 healthy volunteers. The effects of 50 mg MG on glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY), and ghrelin levels were assessed in conjunction with a simultaneous determination of appetite scores using visual analogue scales (VAS) over 3 h after the ingestion of a 592 kcal test cookie. Additionally, the gastric emptying rate (GER) was measured using breath ¹³CO₂ appearance in 10 subjects. 12 subjects were administered 50 mg MG thrice a day for 1 week, and alterations of the gut hormone levels and the VAS scores for appetite were evaluated. MG pre-administration resulted in a significant enhancement of GLP-1 and PYY responses induced by the cookie ingestion. Following MG administration, ghrelin level declined at 1 h, with a persistent suppression during the postprandial phase in contrast to the restoration to the basal level without MG. Furthermore, MG pre-administration suppressed appetite and maintained satiety evaluated using a VAS rating with concomitant inhibition of GER after cookie ingestion. One-week administration of MG did not influence either gut hormone levels before a meal or VAS rating during a whole day. These observations suggest that MG exerts an anorexigenic effects with concomitant alterations of gut hormone secretions and gastric emptying after meal ingestion. PMID:22351480

  3. Melatonin increases following convulsive seizures may be related to its anticonvulsant properties at physiological concentrations.

    PubMed

    Molina-Carballo, A; Muñoz-Hoyos, A; Sánchez-Forte, M; Uberos-Fernández, J; Moreno-Madrid, F; Acuña-Castroviejo, D

    2007-06-01

    Melatonin ( N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, aMT) is an indoleamine produced by several organs and tissues including the pineal gland. Melatonin (aMT) modulates the activity of the brain, mainly acting on both GABA and glutamate receptors. Previous studies have shown the participation of melatonin in the control of convulsive crises, suggesting that aMT concentration increases during seizures, and that patients with seizures of diverse origins show an alteration of the aMT rhythm. However, what is not known is the duration of the aMT response to seizures, and whether aMT changes during seizures could be a marker of the disease. For this reason, the serum levels of aMT in 54 children with a convulsive crisis, febrile and epileptic, were analyzed during the crisis, as well as at 1 h and 24 hours after the seizure. The results show that aMT significantly increases during the seizure (Day group, 75.64+/-45.91 and Night group, 90.69+/-51.85 pg/mL), with normal values being recovered 1 h later (Day group, 26.33+/-10.15 and Night group, 27.78+/-7.82 pg/mL) and maintained for up to 24 hours, when the circadian variation of aMT returns to the normal acrophase. Due to the interindividual variation of aMT levels among healthy people, a single determination of the indoleamine concentration is not a suitable marker of the existence of a convulsive crisis unless the circadian profile of aMT secretion in the patient is known. The results obtained also support the view that the stimulation of aMT production by the convulsive crisis may participate in the response of the organism against the seizures. PMID:17985260

  4. Secreted herpes simplex virus-2 glycoprotein G alters thermal pain sensitivity by modifying NGF effects on TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Jorge Rubén; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel; Alcamí, Antonio; Wandosell, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Genital herpes is a painful disease frequently caused by the neurotropic pathogen herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). We have recently shown that HSV-2-secreted glycoprotein G (SgG2) interacts with and modulates the activity of the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF). This interaction modifies the response of the NGF receptor TrkA, increasing NGF-dependent axonal growth. NGF is not only an axonal growth modulator but also an important mediator of pain and inflammation regulating the amount, localization, and activation of the thermal pain receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). In this work, we addressed whether SgG2 could contribute to HSV-2-induced pain. Injection of SgG2 in the mouse hindpaw produced a rapid and transient increase in thermal pain sensitivity. At the molecular level, this acute increase in thermal pain induced by SgG2 injection was dependent on differential NGF-induced phosphorylation and in changes in the amount of TrkA and TRPV1 in the dermis. These results suggest that SgG2 alters thermal pain sensitivity by modulating TRPV1 receptor. PMID:27576911

  5. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Vico, Antonio; Lardone, Patricia J.; Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Ana; Guerrero, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed. PMID:23609496

  6. Plasma melatonin in the horse: measurements in natural photoperiod and in acutely extended darkness throughout the year.

    PubMed

    Guerin, M V; Deed, J R; Kennaway, D J; Matthews, C D

    1995-08-01

    Plasma melatonin was measured at the winter and summer solstices and the autumn and spring equinoxes in four mares held under natural conditions at 35 degrees S. At all seasons the onset of the nightly elevated melatonin was coincident with or after the time of sunset and the melatonin offset after the time of sunrise. The duration of elevated melatonin was not different from the duration of natural scotophase for each season, with the duration of elevated melatonin longer in winter than the other seasons. Immediately following each 24 hr sampling two mares were resampled in acutely extended darkness to determine the melatonin profile of the endogenous rhythm of the circadian pacemaker, originating from the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). At each season melatonin secretion commenced earlier and decreased later than that measured under the natural photoperiodic condition, suggesting that the expression of the melatonin rhythm is normally gated by natural environmental light both at dusk and dawn. The interval from the onset of melatonin measured under acutely extended darkness to the time of sunset was greater in the spring/summer than the autumn/winter suggesting a possible alternating signal throughout the year. Thus the mare appears to exhibit a similar interaction between endogenous circadian rhythmic activity and the natural photoperiod as the ewe which may underlie the mechanism for timing reproductive activity through the year. PMID:8609596

  7. Altered secretion of selected arachidonic acid metabolites during subclinical endometritis relative to estrous cycle stage and grade of fibrosis in mares.

    PubMed

    Gajos, Katarzyna; Kozdrowski, Roland; Nowak, Marcin; Siemieniuch, Marta J

    2015-08-01

    Mares that fail to become pregnant after repeated breeding, without showing typical signs of clinical endometritis, should be suspected of subclinical endometritis (SE). Contact with infectious agents results in altered synthesis and secretion of inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and arachidonic acid metabolites, and disturbs endometrial functional balance. To address the hypothesis that SE affects the immune endocrine status of the equine endometrium, spontaneous secretion of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), prostaglandin F(2α) (PGF(2α)), 6-keto-PGF(1α )(a metabolite of prostacyclin I(2)), leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)), and leukotriene C(4) (LTC(4)) was examined. In addition, secretion of these factors was examined relative to the grade of inflammation, fibrosis, and estrous cycle stage. Eighty-two warmblood mares, of known breeding history, were enrolled in this study. On the basis of histopathologic assessment, mares were classified as suffering from first-grade SE, second-grade SE, or being healthy. The grade of fibrosis and the infiltration of endometrial tissue with polymorphonuclear leukocytes were examined by routine hematoxylin-eosin staining. In mares suffering from SE, the secretion profiles of PGE(2), 6-keto-PGF(1α), LTB(4), and LTC(4) were changed compared to mares that did not suffer from endometritis. The secretion of PGE(2) and 6-keto-PGF1α was increased, whereas that of LTB(4) and LTC(4) was decreased. Secretion of 6-keto-PGF(1α) was increased in first- and second-grade SE (P < 0.01). The concentration of PGI(2) metabolite was increased only in inflamed endometrium, independently of the inflammation grade, but was not affected by fibrosis. Prostaglandin E(2) secretion was increased in second-grade SE (P < 0.05). The secretion of LTB(4) decreased in both first- and second-grade SE (P < 0.05), whereas secretion of LTC(4) was decreased only in second-grade SE (P < 0.05). Fibrosis did not change the secretion profile of PGE(2), PGF(2α), and 6

  8. Seasonal serum concentrations of melatonin in cycling and noncycling mares.

    PubMed

    Diekman, M A; Braun, W; Peter, D; Cook, D

    2002-11-01

    To determine whether secretory patterns of melatonin change throughout the seasons in mares, blood samples were drawn byvenipuncture from nine mares at noon and midnight for five successive days at monthly intervals from August through July at the University of Missouri in Columbia, MO. In addition, during September, December, March, and June, blood samples were drawn from indwelling catheters at 2-h intervals for 48 or 72 h. Mares were predominantly Quarter Horses weighing approximately 450 kg and ranged from 3 to 12 yr of age. Mares were housed in outdoor paddocks with three-sided run-in sheds for shelter. During the noon and midnight bleeding period, mares were placed in a larger open-sided barn with outside runs. Mares remained outdoors with the barn being used as a shelter in the event of inclement weather. All lights in the shed were converted to red light. Often, moonlight provided enough illumination to collect blood samples. Mares were returned to their normal paddock after each sampling period. For analysis of data, a mare was considered to be cycling if serum concentrations of progesterone were greater than 1 ng/ mL. For a mare to be classified as exhibiting a nocturnal rise of melatonin, serum concentrations of melatonin had to be at least two times greater at midnight than at noon. By month, a relationship did not exist (chi2; P > 0.05) among mares that were exhibiting estrous cycles and exhibiting nocturnal rises of melatonin. Likewise, examination of serum profiles of melatonin taken at 2-h intervals for 48 h revealed considerable variation among mares throughout the seasons. A nocturnal rise in serum melatonin was observed only in June (P < 0.02). In March and December, serum melatonin was greater in cycling mares than noncycling mares, but the elevation was not associated with light-dark periods (P < 0.01). Two of the mares exhibited estrous cycles throughout the seasons but melatonin secretion in these two mares were similar to that observed in

  9. Neurotoxins: Free Radical Mechanisms and Melatonin Protection

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Russel J.; Manchester, Lucien C.; Tan, Dun-Xian

    2010-01-01

    Toxins that pass through the blood-brain barrier put neurons and glia in peril. The damage inflicted is usually a consequence of the ability of these toxic agents to induce free radical generation within cells but especially at the level of the mitochondria. The elevated production of oxygen and nitrogen-based radicals and related non-radical products leads to the oxidation of essential macromolecules including lipids, proteins and DNA. The resultant damage is referred to as oxidative and nitrosative stress and, when the molecular destruction is sufficiently severe, it causes apoptosis or necrosis of neurons and glia. Loss of brain cells compromises the functions of the central nervous system expressed as motor, sensory and cognitive deficits and psychological alterations. In this survey we summarize the publications related to the following neurotoxins and the protective actions of melatonin: aminolevulinic acid, cyanide, domoic acid, kainic acid, metals, methamphetamine, polychlorinated biphenyls, rotenone, toluene and 6-hydroxydopamine. Given the potent direct free radical scavenging activities of melatonin and its metabolites, their ability to indirectly stimulate antioxidative enzymes and their efficacy in reducing electron leakage from mitochondria, it would be expected that these molecules would protect the brain from oxidative and nitrosative molecular mutilation. The studies summarized in this review indicate that this is indeed the case, an action that is obviously assisted by the fact that melatonin readily crosses the blood brain barrier. PMID:21358970

  10. Complete absence of evening melatonin increase in tetraplegics.

    PubMed

    Verheggen, Rebecca J H M; Jones, Helen; Nyakayiru, Jean; Thompson, Andrew; Groothuis, Jan T; Atkinson, Greg; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2012-07-01

    Individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI), especially with tetraplegia, experience poor sleep quality, and this may be related to impaired control of circadian rhythmicity. Here, we examined the evening onset of melatonin secretion, an important hormone for the initiation of sleep, in people with a complete cervical (tetraplegia) and thoracic (paraplegia) SCI, and age- and sex-matched able-bodied control participants. Multiple samples of salivary melatonin were obtained during the evening hours and analyzed by ELISA methods in 10 control partcipants, 9 individuals with paraplegia, and 6 individuals with tetraplegia. Sleep quality was assessed using questionnaires. Interactive effects of group and time were found for melatonin levels (P=0.022). In the control and paraplegia groups, the mean melatonin level increased significantly from 2.59 ± 1.04 and 4.28 ± 3.28 pg/ml at 7 PM to 10.62 ± 4.59 and 13.10 ± 7.39 pg/ml at 11 PM, respectively (P<0.001). In the tetraplegia group, melatonin level was 5.25 ± 3.72 at 7 PM but only 2.41 ± 1.25 pg/ml at 11 PM (P>0.05). Decreased sleep quality was more prevalent in individuals with tetraplegia (83%) and paraplegia (75%) compared with controls (20%; P=0.02). Unlike in the control and paraplegia groups, the evening increase in melatonin concentration was completely absent in the tetraplegia group. This provides biological insight into sleep regulation in humans and provides better understanding of the poor sleep quality in people with tetraplegia. PMID:22474242

  11. Melatonin, light and chronobiological disorders.

    PubMed

    Lewy, A J; Sack, R L; Singer, C M

    1985-01-01

    Human plasma melatonin concentrations can be measured accurately and sensitively by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry. With this assay, we have shown that: in rats and in humans, plasma melatonin is exclusively derived from the pineal gland; propranolol and clonidine reduce melatonin levels in human; some blind people appear to have free-running melatonin secretory circadian rhythms; bright light can acutely suppress human melatonin production according to a linear fluence-response relationship; manic-depressive patients appear to be supersensitive to light, even when they are well; melatonin levels are greater in manic patients than in depressed patients; in experiments to test the clock-gate model and the hypothesized phase-response curve, two different effects of light appear to present in humans: an acute suppressant effect (mainly in the evening during long photoperiods) and an entrainment effect (particularly during the morning but also in the evening). When blood is sampled for measuring melatonin levels as a marker for circadian phase position, bright light should be avoided after 5 p.m. (the dim light melatonin onset). Bright-light exposure in the morning appears to advance circadian rhythms, whereas bright-light exposure in the evening appears to delay them. Once a patient has been 'phase typed' (phase-advanced vs. phase-delayed), predictions can be made about whether morning or evening light would be more effective in treating the sleep or mood disorder. PMID:3836816

  12. Potential drug interactions with melatonin.

    PubMed

    Papagiannidou, Eleni; Skene, Debra J; Ioannides, Costas

    2014-05-28

    Possible interactions of melatonin with concurrently administered drugs were investigated in in vitro studies utilising human hepatic post-mitochondrial preparations; similar studies were conducted with rat preparations to ascertain whether rat is a suitable surrogate for human. Drugs were selected based not only on the knowledge that the 6-hydroxylation of exogenous melatonin, its principal pathway of metabolism, is mainly mediated by hepatic CYP1A2, but also on the likelihood of the drug being concurrently administered with melatonin. Hepatic preparations were incubated with either melatonin or 6-hydroxymelatonin in the presence and absence of a range of concentrations of interacting drug, and the production of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin monitored using a radioimmunoassay procedure. Of the drugs screened, only the potent CYP1A2 inhibitor 5-methoxypsoralen impaired the 6-melatonin hydroxylation at pharmacologically relevant concentrations, and is likely to lead to clinical interactions; diazepam, tamoxifen and acetaminophen (paracetamol) did not impair the metabolic conversion of melatonin to 6-sulphatoxymelatonin at concentrations attained following therapeutic administration. 17-Ethinhyloestradiol appeared not to suppress the 6-hydroxylation of melatonin but inhibited the sulphation of 6-hydroxymelatonin, but this is unlikely to result in an interaction following therapeutic intake of the steroid. Species differences in the inhibition of melatonin metabolism in human and rat hepatic post-mitochondrial preparations were evident implying that the rat may not be an appropriate surrogate of human in such studies. PMID:24732412

  13. Melatonin prevents neural tube defects in the offspring of diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shangming; Guo, Yuji; Yuan, Qiuhuan; Pan, Yan; Wang, Liyan; Liu, Qian; Wang, Fuwu; Wang, Jingjing; Hao, Aijun

    2015-11-01

    Melatonin, an endogenous neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland, has a variety of physiological functions and neuroprotective effects. However, its protective role on the neural tube defects (NTDs) was not very clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on the incidence of NTDs (including anencephaly, encephalocele, and spina bifida) of offspring from diabetic pregnant mice as well as its underlying mechanisms. Pregnant mice were given 10 mg/kg melatonin by daily i.p. injection from embryonic day (E) 0.5 until being killed on E11.5. Here, we showed that melatonin decreased the NTDs (especially exencephaly) rate of embryos exposed to maternal diabetes. Melatonin stimulated proliferation of neural stem cells (NSCs) under hyperglycemic condition through the extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK) pathway. Furthermore, as a direct free radical scavenger, melatonin decreased apoptosis of NSCs exposed to hyperglycemia. In the light of these findings, it suggests that melatonin supplementation may play an important role in the prevention of neural malformations in diabetic pregnancy. PMID:26475080

  14. Persistent diel melatonin rhythmicity during the Arctic summer in free-living willow warblers.

    PubMed

    Silverin, Bengt; Gwinner, Eberhard; Van't Hof, Thomas J; Schwabl, Ingrid; Fusani, Leonida; Hau, Michaela; Helm, Barbara

    2009-06-01

    Arctic environments are challenging for circadian systems. Around the solstices, the most important zeitgeber, the change between night and day, is reduced to minor fluctuations in light intensities. However, many species including songbirds nonetheless show clear diel activity patterns. Here we examine the possible physiological basis underlying diel rhythmicity under continuous Arctic summer light. Rhythmic secretion of the hormone melatonin constitutes an important part of the songbird circadian system and its experimental suppression, e.g., by constant light, usually leads to behavioral arrhythmia. We therefore studied melatonin patterns in a free-living migratory songbird, the willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus), that maintains diel activity during the Arctic summer. We compared melatonin profiles during late spring and summer solstice in two Swedish populations from the south (58 degrees N) and near the Arctic circle (66 degrees N). We found the northern Swedish population maintained clear diel changes in melatonin secretion during the summer solstice, although peak concentrations were lower than in southern Sweden. Melatonin levels were highest before midnight and in good accordance with periods of reduced activity. The maintenance of diel melatonin rhythmicity under conditions of continuous light may be one of the physiological mechanisms that enables continued functioning of the circadian system. PMID:19374903

  15. Genetic, temporal and developmental differences between melatonin rhythm generating systems in the teleost fish pineal organ and retina.

    PubMed

    Falcón, J; Gothilf, Y; Coon, S L; Boeuf, G; Klein, D C

    2003-04-01

    Complete melatonin rhythm generating systems, including photodetector, circadian clock and melatonin synthesis machinery, are located within individual photoreceptor cells in two sites in Teleost fish: the pineal organ and retina. In both, light regulates daily variations in melatonin secretion by controlling the activity of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT). However, in each species examined to date, marked differences exist between the two organs which may involve the genes encoding the photopigments, genes encoding AANAT, the times of day at which AANAT activity and melatonin production peak and the developmental schedule. We review the fish pineal and retinal melatonin rhythm generating systems and consider the evolutional pressures and other factors which led to these differences. PMID:12622837

  16. Sexually Dimorphic Effects of Melatonin on Brain Arginine Vasotocin Immunoreactivity in Green Treefrogs (Hyla cinerea)

    PubMed Central

    Lutterschmidt, Deborah I.; Wilczynski, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Arginine vasotocin (AVT) and its mammalian homologue, arginine vasopressin (AVP), regulate a variety of social and reproductive behaviors, often with complex species-, sex-, and context-dependent effects. Despite extensive evidence documenting seasonal variation in brain AVT/AVP, relatively few studies have investigated the environmental and/or hormonal factors mediating these seasonal changes. In the present study, we investigated whether the pineal hormone melatonin alters brain AVT immunoreactivity in green treefrogs (Hyla cinerea). Reproductively active male and female frogs were collected during the summer breeding season and a melatonin-filled or blank silastic capsule was surgically implanted subcutaneously. The duration of hormone treatment was 4 weeks, at which time frogs were euthanized and the brains and blood collected and processed for AVT immunohistochemistry and steroid hormone assay. We quantified AVT-immunoreactive (AVT-ir) cell bodies in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), caudal striatum and amygdala (AMG), anterior preoptic area (POA), suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and infundibular region of the ventral hypothalamus (VH). Sex differences in AVT-ir cell number were observed in all brain regions except the anterior POA and VH, with males having more AVT-ir cells than females in the NAcc, AMG, and SCN. Brain AVT was sensitive to melatonin signaling during the breeding season, and the effects of melatonin varied significantly with both region and sex. Treatment with melatonin decreased AVT immunoreactivity in both the NAcc and SCN in male H. cinerea. In contrast, brain AVT was relatively insensitive to melatonin signaling in females, indicating that the regulation of the AVT/AVP neuropeptide system by melatonin may be sexually dimorphic. Finally, melatonin did not significantly influence testosterone or estradiol concentrations of male or female frogs, respectively, suggesting that the effects of melatonin on AVT immunoreactivity are independent of

  17. Seasonal variations in the nycthemeral rhythm of plasma melatonin in the camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    El Allali, K; Achaaban, M R; Vivien-Roels, B; Bothorel, B; Tligui, N S; Pévet, P

    2005-09-01

    Seasonal changes in the pattern of plasma melatonin were investigated in two groups of camels (Camelus dromedarius): 11 adult and six young camels. Animals were subjected to the outdoor conditions of a desert environment. Blood samples were taken at regular intervals of about 3 hr (added to particular samples at 1 hr before then 30 min and 1 hr after sunset, and 1 hr before and 1 hr after sunrise) for 24 hr at both solstices and equinoxes of the year. The plasma melatonin levels steeply increased soon after sunset and remained elevated throughout all the night. Then, melatonin concentrations progressively declined shortly before sunrise and returned to daytime basal levels 1 hr later. There was no seasonal variation in the amplitude or in the offset of the melatonin peak or in the daytime basal levels. The onset of the nocturnal peak was delayed by 2 hr in June at the summer solstice (P < 0.05), which can be related to the changes in night length between the two solstices. A significant effect of age was observed in all seasons. Melatonin levels were higher in the young camel group (fall equinox: P < 0.001; spring equinox: P < 0.01; winter solstice: P < 0.01; summer solstice: P < 0.05). The pattern of melatonin secretion in the camel showed a significant seasonal variation parallel to the photoperiodic changes of the year. The observed decline of melatonin levels during an extra-light pulse in the middle of the night indicates the light control of melatonin synthesis. It is not yet known if, in this low latitude desert region, the seasonal breeding period of the camel is cued by the photoperiod. The data obtained, however, clearly demonstrate that the camel has the capacity to follow and to integrate photoperiodic changes through melatonin changes. PMID:16098088

  18. Prospective Study on Salivary Evening Melatonin and Sleep before and after Pinealectomy in Humans.

    PubMed

    Slawik, Helen; Stoffel, Michael; Riedl, Lina; Veselý, Zdenko; Behr, Michael; Lehmberg, Jens; Pohl, Corina; Meyer, Bernhard; Wiegand, Michael; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-02-01

    Melatonin is secreted systemically from the pineal gland maximally at night but is also produced locally in many tissues. Its chronobiological function is mainly exerted by pineal melatonin. It is a feedback regulator of the main circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei and of many peripheral oscillators. Although exogenous melatonin is approved for circadian rhythm sleep disorders and old-age insomnia, research on endogenous melatonin in humans is hindered by the great interindividual variability of its amount and circadian rhythm. Single case studies on pinealectomized patients report on disrupted but also hypersomnic sleep. This is the first systematic prospective report on sleep with respect to pinealectomy due to pinealocytoma World Health Organization grade I without chemo- or radiotherapy. Before and after pinealectomy, 8 patients completed questionnaires on sleep quality and circadian rhythm (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire), 2 nights of polysomnography, salivary evening melatonin profiles, and qualitative assessment of 2 weeks of actigraphy and sleep logs. Six patients were assessed retrospectively up to 4 years after pinealectomy. Before pinealectomy, all but 1 patient showed an evening melatonin rise typical for indifferent chronotypes. After pinealectomy, evening saliva melatonin was markedly diminished, mostly below the detection limit of the assay (0.09 pg/mL). No systematic change in subjective sleep quality or standard measures of polysomnography was found. Mean pre- and postoperative sleep efficiency was 94% and 95%, and mean sleep-onset latency was 21 and 17 min, respectively. Sleep-wake rhythm during normal daily life did not change. Retrospective patients had a reduced sleep efficiency (90%) and more stage changes, although this was not significantly different from prospective patients. In conclusion, melatonin does seem to have a modulatory, not a

  19. Pineal melatonin acts as a circadian zeitgeber and growth factor in chick astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Paulose, Jiffin K.; Peters, Jennifer L.; Karaganis, Stephen P.; Cassone, Vincent M.

    2009-01-01

    Melatonin is rhythmically synthesized and released by the avian pineal gland and retina during the night, targeting an array of tissues and affecting a variety of physiological and behavioral processes. Among these targets, astrocytes express two melatonin receptor subtypes in vitro, the Mel1A and Mel1C receptors, which play a role in regulating metabolic activity and calcium homeostasis in these cells. Molecular characterization of chick astrocytes has revealed the expression of orthologs of the mammalian clock genes including clock, cry1, cry2, per2, and per3. To test the hypothesis that pineal melatonin entrains molecular clockworks in downstream cells, we asked whether coculturing astrocytes with pinealocytes or administration of exogenous melatonin cycles would entrain metabolic rhythms of 2-deoxy [14C]-glucose (2DG] uptake and/or clock gene expression in cultured astrocytes. Rhythmic secretion of melatonin from light-entrained pinealocytes in coculture as well as cyclic administration of exogenous melatonin entrained rhythms of 2DG uptake and expression of Gallus per2 (gper2) and/or gper3, but not of gcry1 mRNA. Surprisingly, melatonin also caused a dose-dependent increase in mitotic activity of astrocytes, both in coculture and when administered exogenously. The observation that melatonin stimulates mitotic activity in diencephalic astrocytes suggests a trophic role of the hormone in brain development. The data suggest a dual role for melatonin in avian astrocytes: synchronization of rhythmic processes in these cells and regulation of growth and differentiation. These two processes may or may not be mutually exclusive. PMID:19196435

  20. Pineal melatonin acts as a circadian zeitgeber and growth factor in chick astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Paulose, Jiffin K; Peters, Jennifer L; Karaganis, Stephen P; Cassone, Vincent M

    2009-04-01

    Melatonin is rhythmically synthesized and released by the avian pineal gland and retina during the night, targeting an array of tissues and affecting a variety of physiological and behavioral processes. Among these targets, astrocytes express two melatonin receptor subtypes in vitro, the Mel(1A) and Mel(1C) receptors, which play a role in regulating metabolic activity and calcium homeostasis in these cells. Molecular characterization of chick astrocytes has revealed the expression of orthologs of the mammalian clock genes including clock, cry1, cry2, per2, and per3. To test the hypothesis that pineal melatonin entrains molecular clockworks in downstream cells, we asked whether coculturing astrocytes with pinealocytes or administration of exogenous melatonin cycles would entrain metabolic rhythms of 2-deoxy [14C]-glucose (2DG] uptake and/or clock gene expression in cultured astrocytes. Rhythmic secretion of melatonin from light-entrained pinealocytes in coculture as well as cyclic administration of exogenous melatonin entrained rhythms of 2DG uptake and expression of Gallus per2 (gper2) and/or gper3, but not of gcry1 mRNA. Surprisingly, melatonin also caused a dose-dependent increase in mitotic activity of astrocytes, both in coculture and when administered exogenously. The observation that melatonin stimulates mitotic activity in diencephalic astrocytes suggests a trophic role of the hormone in brain development. The data suggest a dual role for melatonin in avian astrocytes: synchronization of rhythmic processes in these cells and regulation of growth and differentiation. These two processes may or may not be mutually exclusive. PMID:19196435

  1. Effects of melatonin and its analogues on neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jiaqi; Tu, Yalin; Chen, Jingkao; Tan, Dunxian; Liu, Xingguo; Pi, Rongbiao

    2016-01-15

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent cells which are capable of self-replication and differentiation into neurons, astrocytes or oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). NSCs are found in two main regions in the adult brain: the subgranular zone (SGZ) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone (SVZ). The recent discovery of NSCs in the adult mammalian brain has fostered a plethora of translational and preclinical studies to investigate novel approaches for the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Melatonin is the major secretory product synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland and shows both a wide distribution within phylogenetically distant organisms from bacteria to humans and a great functional versatility. Recently, accumulated experimental evidence showed that melatonin plays an important role in NSCs, including its proliferation, differentiation and survival, which are modulated by many factors including MAPK/ERK signaling pathway, histone acetylation, neurotrophic factors, transcription factors, and apoptotic genes. The purpose of this review is to summarize the beneficial effects of melatonin on NSCs and further to discuss the potential usage of melatonin and its derivatives or analogues in the treatment of CNS neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26499395

  2. Maternal Melatonin Therapy Rescues Prenatal Dexamethasone and Postnatal High-Fat Diet Induced Programmed Hypertension in Male Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Tain, You-Lin; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Yu, Hong-Ren; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Lin, Yu-Ju; Kuo, Kuang-Che; Huang, Li-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal dexamethasone (DEX) exposure and high-fat (HF) intake are linked to hypertension. We examined whether maternal melatonin therapy prevents programmed hypertension synergistically induced by prenatal DEX plus postnatal HF in adult offspring. We also examined whether DEX and melatonin causes renal programming using next-generation RNA sequencing (NGS) technology. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received intraperitoneal dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg) or vehicle from gestational day 16 to 22. In the melatonin-treatment groups (M), rats received 0.01% melatonin in drinking water during their entire pregnancy and lactation. Male offspring were assigned to five groups: control, DEX, HF, DEX+HF, and DEX+HF+M. Male offspring in the HF group were fed a HF diet from weaning to 4 months of age. Prenatal DEX and postnatal HF diet synergistically induced programmed hypertension in adult offspring, which melatonin prevented. Maternal melatonin treatment modified over 3000 renal transcripts in the developing offspring kidney. Our NGS data indicate that PPAR signaling and fatty acid metabolism are two significantly regulated pathways. In addition, maternal melatonin therapy elicits longstanding alterations on renal programming, including regulation of the melatonin signaling pathway and upregulation of Agtr1b and Mas1 expression in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), to protect male offspring against programmed hypertension. Postnatal HF aggravates prenatal DEX induced programmed hypertension in adult offspring, which melatonin prevented. The protective effects of melatonin on programmed hypertension is associated with regulation of the RAS and melatonin receptors. The long-term effects of maternal melatonin therapy on renal transcriptome require further clarification. PMID:26696906

  3. Seasonal and daily variations in plasma melatonin in the high-arctic Svalbard ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus hyperboreus).

    PubMed

    Reierth, E; Van't Hof, T J; Stokkan, K A

    1999-08-01

    This study presents the daily rhythm of melatonin secretion throughout one year in a bird from the northern hemisphere, the Svalbard ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus hyperboreus), which lives naturally at 76-80 degrees N. Eight Svalbard ptarmigan were caged outdoors at 70 degrees N and blood sampled throughout one day each month for 13 months. At this latitude, daylight is continuous between May and August, but there is a short period of civil twilight around noon from late November to mid January. There was no daily rhythm in plasma melatonin in May-July. Plasma melatonin levels varied significantly throughout the day in all other months of the year, with the nighttime increase reflecting the duration of darkness. The highest mean plasma concentration occurred at midnight in March (110.1 +/- 16.5 pg/ml) and represented the annual peak in estimated daily production. Around the winter solstice, melatonin levels were significantly reduced at noon and elevated during the nearly 18 h of consecutive darkness, and the estimated mean daily production of melatonin was significantly reduced. Thus, at the times of the year characterized by light-dark cycles, melatonin may convey information concerning the length of the day and, therefore, progression of season. The nearly undetectable low melatonin secretion in summer and the reduced amplitude and production in midwinter indicate a flexible circadian system that may reflect an important adaptation to life in the Arctic. PMID:10447312

  4. Melatonin Inhibits CXCL10 and MMP-1 Production in IL-1β-Stimulated Human Periodontal Ligament Cells.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Ikuko; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka; Shindo, Satoru; Ozaki, Kazumi; Matsuo, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin is a hormone that is mainly secreted by the pineal gland and exhibits a wide spectrum of activities, including antioxidant functions. Melatonin has been detected in gingival crevicular fluid. However, the role of melatonin in periodontal tissue is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of melatonin on inflammatory mediator expression in human periodontal ligament cells (HPDLC). Interleukin (IL)-1β induced CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL)10, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 production in HPDLC. Melatonin decreased CXCL10 and MMP-1 production and increased TIMP-1 production in IL-1β-stimulated HPDLC. Western blot analysis showed that melatonin inhibited p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation, and IkB-α degradation and phosphorylation in IL-1β-stimulated HPDLC. These results suggest that melatonin might inhibit Th1 cell migration by reducing CXCL10 production. Moreover, melatonin might inhibit soft tissue destruction by decreasing MMP-1 production in periodontal lesions. PMID:27271323

  5. Melatonin involvement in oxidative processes.

    PubMed

    Ianăş, O; Olinescu, R; Bădescu, I

    1991-01-01

    The fact that the pineal gland, by its melatonin (MT) production, responds to environmental light variations (the day-night cycle), being also a modulator of the body adaptation to these conditions, may lead to the assumption of its involvement in the body oxidative processes. The redox capacity of melatonin was followed-up in vitro by the chemiluminescence phenomenon. The system generating chemiluminescence as well as free radicals was made up of luminol and H2O2. Incubation of melatonin in doses of 0.08-0.5 microM/ml with the generating system showed that in doses under 0.25 microM/ml melatonin has a pro-oxidative effect while in doses above this value it has an antioxidative effect. The diagram of the results shows the answer specific to a modulator. The study of the correlation between the dose of melatonin with highest pro-oxidative properties and the various peroxide concentrations in the generating system showed that melatonin gets antioxidative properties with the increase in peroxide concentrations (less than 8 mM/ml). In the presence of a hypothalamic homogenate, which is a stimulant of the chemiluminescence-generating system (PXI = 16), melatonin has a dose-dependent antioxidative effect. Similar results were also obtained by adding tryptophan--a free radicals acceptor (PXI = 0.1) and the substrate in melatonin synthesis to the reaction medium. Melatonin in low concentrations (greater than 0.1 microM/ml) has an antioxidative effect while in higher doses it has a dose-dependent pro-oxidative effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1821072

  6. Long-term melatonin treatment reduces ovarian mass and enhances tissue antioxidant defenses during ovulation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Chuffa, L G A; Amorim, J P A; Teixeira, G R; Mendes, L O; Fioruci, B A; Pinheiro, P F F; Seiva, F R F; Novelli, E L B; Mello Júnior, W; Martinez, M; Martinez, F E

    2011-03-01

    Melatonin regulates the reproductive cycle, energy metabolism and may also act as a potential antioxidant indoleamine. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether long-term melatonin treatment can induce reproductive alterations and if it can protect ovarian tissue against lipid peroxidation during ovulation. Twenty-four adult female Wistar rats, 60 days old (± 250-260 g), were randomly divided into two equal groups. The control group received 0.3 mL 0.9% NaCl + 0.04 mL 95% ethanol as vehicle, and the melatonin-treated group received vehicle + melatonin (100 µg·100 g body weight(-1)·day(-1)) both intraperitoneally daily for 60 days. All animals were killed by decapitation during the morning estrus at 4:00 am. Body weight gain and body mass index were reduced by melatonin after 10 days of treatment (P < 0.05). Also, a marked loss of appetite was observed with a fall in food intake, energy intake (melatonin 51.41 ± 1.28 vs control 57.35 ± 1.34 kcal/day) and glucose levels (melatonin 80.3 ± 4.49 vs control 103.5 ± 5.47 mg/dL) towards the end of treatment. Melatonin itself and changes in energy balance promoted reductions in ovarian mass (20.2%) and estrous cycle remained extensive (26.7%), arresting at diestrus. Regarding the oxidative profile, lipid hydroperoxide levels decreased after melatonin treatment (6.9%) and total antioxidant substances were enhanced within the ovaries (23.9%). Additionally, melatonin increased superoxide dismutase (21.3%), catalase (23.6%) and glutathione-reductase (14.8%) activities and the reducing power (10.2% GSH/GSSG ratio). We suggest that melatonin alters ovarian mass and estrous cyclicity and protects the ovaries by increasing superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione-reductase activities. PMID:21344135

  7. On the Thermus thermophilus HB8 potential pathogenicity triggered from rhamnolipids secretion: morphological alterations and cytotoxicity induced on fibroblastic cell line.

    PubMed

    Pantazaki, A A; Choli-Papadopoulou, T

    2012-05-01

    A limited number of bacterial strains usually grown under nutrient limitation secrete rhamnolipids (RLs), which are recorded as virulence factors that are implicated in the pathogenicity of a microorganism. The non-pathogenic T. thermophilus HB8 produces extracellular rhamnolipids (TthRLs) under defined cultivation conditions using sunflower seed oil and sodium gluconate as carbon sources. In particular, the secreted TthRLs have been isolated, purified and identified with ATR-FTIR. Their effects on the cells' viability were examined when they were supplemented in a culture of human skin fibroblasts. Purified TthRLs triggered a sequence of rapid and pronounced morphological alterations characterized by transformation of fibroblast shape from polygonal to fusiform; retraction with cytoplasm condensation, rounding up, distortion of nuclei and loss of lamellar processes, and finally disruption of membrane. The addition of TthRLs in the cultured fibroblasts caused cytotoxicity, in contrast to that of rhamnose that stimulated viability, as it was assessed by MTT test. These results revealed that among the constituents of RLs that are implicated in the cytotoxicity, it has to be attributed to the lipidic chain variation and not to the carbohydrate part. TthRLs cytotoxicity on fibroblasts is comparable, and provoked similar effects, to that caused by saponin white, a known surfactant. TthRLs secretion might be a crucial point for the transformation of a non-pathogenic bacterium to a pathogenic one under certain environmental conditions favoring their secretion. RLs secretion in the microorganism's world might be a general route for the passage in the pathogenicity to ensure their survival under nutrient limitation conditions. PMID:21611776

  8. Hepatoprotective actions of melatonin: Possible mediation by melatonin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mathes, Alexander M

    2010-01-01

    Melatonin, the hormone of darkness and messenger of the photoperiod, is also well known to exhibit strong direct and indirect antioxidant properties. Melatonin has previously been demonstrated to be a powerful organ protective substance in numerous models of injury; these beneficial effects have been attributed to the hormone’s intense radical scavenging capacity. The present report reviews the hepatoprotective potential of the pineal hormone in various models of oxidative stress in vivo, and summarizes the extensive literature showing that melatonin may be a suitable experimental substance to reduce liver damage after sepsis, hemorrhagic shock, ischemia/reperfusion, and in numerous models of toxic liver injury. Melatonin’s influence on hepatic antioxidant enzymes and other potentially relevant pathways, such as nitric oxide signaling, hepatic cytokine and heat shock protein expression, are evaluated. Based on recent literature demonstrating the functional relevance of melatonin receptor activation for hepatic organ protection, this article finally suggests that melatonin receptors could mediate the hepatoprotective actions of melatonin therapy. PMID:21182223

  9. Nocturnal headache associated with melatonin deficiency due to a pineal gland cyst.

    PubMed

    Karadaş, Omer; Ipekdal, Ilker H; Ulaş, Umit H; Odabaşi, Zeki

    2012-02-01

    The cyclic nature of some of headache disorders is closely related to melatonin, which is secreted by the pineal gland. We report a 29-year-old male patient with a 2.5-year history of headaches that woke him in the middle of the night. These headaches were pulsatile and continued until sunrise. During these attacks he also suffered from allodynia over the scalp, bilateral conjunctival hyperemia, and nervousness. His brain MRI showed a 5mm by 4mm neuroepithelial cyst in the pineal gland. The peak plasma melatonin level that was measured at 2 am was 28 pg/mL. The patient underwent oral melatonin treatment (6 mg/day). After 1 month he experienced a 70% reduction in his symptoms. When the melatonin dosage was increased to 10mg/day he became headache-free, and 5 months after the treatment began, had no complaints. His 5-month follow-up plasma melatonin level at 2 am was 61 pg/mL. To our knowledge this is the first report of a patient with nocturnal headache associated with a low level of melatonin due to a neuroepithelial cyst in the pineal gland. PMID:22136735

  10. Sex differential nectar secretion in protandrous Alstroemeria aurea (Alstroemeriaceae): is production altered by pollen removal and receipt?

    PubMed

    Aizen, M; Basilio, A

    1998-02-01

    We examined diurnal and nocturnal nectar secretion across sexual stages in protandrous Alstroemeria aurea, a bumble bee-pollinated herb with long-lived flowers native to the southern Andes. We found the following patterns: (1) most nectar was produced diurnally and (2) three times more sugar was secreted during the male than female phase, not only because the male phase lasted longer but also because the rate of nectar production was higher. This 3:1 ratio in nectar production matched the ratio of the minimum number of bumble bee visits required on average to saturate male (pollen removal) vs. female (seed set) functions. Standing crop of nectar, on the other hand, did not differ greatly between male- and female- stage flowers left open to visitors, because the high-production male-phase flowers were visited more frequently than female- phase flowers. In an experiment concurrent with the repeated nectar sampling of individual flowers over their life-span, we removed pollen from anthers or deposited pollen on stigmas by hand. Neither treatment, designed to mimic effects of visits by Alstroemeria's native bumble bee pollinator, affected nectar production. The absence of plasticity in nectar secretion in relation to pollination events may reflect a low cost of nectar production, or may result from developmental constraints related to the evolution of the synchronous protandry that characterizes A. aurea. PMID:21684907

  11. Calcium, calcification, and melatonin biosynthesis in the human pineal gland: a postmortem study into age-related factors.

    PubMed

    Schmid, H A; Requintina, P J; Oxenkrug, G F; Sturner, W

    1994-05-01

    It is believed that pineal calcification may be age-associated and that the well-demonstrated age-related decline in melatonin biosynthesis may be an expression of an alteration in calcium homeostasis in the pinealocyte. Prior correlations of melatonin to calcium deposition and age were made on the basis of radiological or semiquantitative analysis. In this postmortem study of 33 subjects (age range 3 months to 65 years) calcium deposits measured by atomic absorption spectrometry correlated positively with age in day and night samples (day: r = 0.56, P < 0.05; night: r = 0.818, P < 0.001). Nighttime (2200 h to 0800 h) pineal melatonin content (HPLC fluorometry) was higher than daytime melatonin levels (nighttime 3.80 +/- 0.3 vs. daytime 0.85 +/- 0.4 ng/mg protein). Nighttime calcium levels in the supernatant correlated negatively with melatonin content (r = -0.59, P < 0.05). PMID:7807371

  12. [Circadian blood serotonin and melatonin level in anorexia nervosa patients in comparison with normally menstruating women].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, G; Pollow, K; Nowara, D; Pollow, B; Schaffrath, M

    1996-09-01

    Day and night rhythms of melatonin and serotonin were measured in four female anorexia nervosa patients and for comparison in a control group with normal 28-day menstrual cycle. In the anorexia nervosa group the levels of gonadotropins and sexual steroids were distinctly lowered. In the LHRH test the hormonal profile showed pubertal to prepubertal patterns of secretion with an only moderate increase of LH and distinct shifting of the LH/FSH ratio in direction of FSH. For both groups the 24-hour profiles of melatonin and serotonin showed a normal cycle, i.e. melatonin had its maximum by night, whereas serotonin in contrast displayed its highest values by day. However, in the group of patients with anorexia nervosa the maximum of melatonin was on the average 2.1 fold higher than that found in the control group, whereas that of serotonin was 1.4 fold higher. A close functional coherence between the neurotransmitters melatonin and serotonin and the hypothalamic secretion of LHRH is being discussed. PMID:8991847

  13. The hockey-stick method to estimate evening dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) in humans.

    PubMed

    Danilenko, Konstantin V; Verevkin, Evgeniy G; Antyufeev, Viktor S; Wirz-Justice, Anna; Cajochen, Christian

    2014-04-01

    The onset of melatonin secretion in the evening is the most reliable and most widely used index of circadian timing in humans. Saliva (or plasma) is usually sampled every 0.5-1 hours under dim-light conditions in the evening 5-6 hours before usual bedtime to assess the dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO). For many years, attempts have been made to find a reliable objective determination of melatonin onset time either by fixed or dynamic threshold approaches. The here-developed hockey-stick algorithm, used as an interactive computer-based approach, fits the evening melatonin profile by a piecewise linear-parabolic function represented as a straight line switching to the branch of a parabola. The switch point is considered to reliably estimate melatonin rise time. We applied the hockey-stick method to 109 half-hourly melatonin profiles to assess the DLMOs and compared these estimates to visual ratings from three experts in the field. The DLMOs of 103 profiles were considered to be clearly quantifiable. The hockey-stick DLMO estimates were on average 4 minutes earlier than the experts' estimates, with a range of -27 to +13 minutes; in 47% of the cases the difference fell within ±5 minutes, in 98% within -20 to +13 minutes. The raters' and hockey-stick estimates showed poor accordance with DLMOs defined by threshold methods. Thus, the hockey-stick algorithm is a reliable objective method to estimate melatonin rise time, which does not depend on a threshold value and is free from errors arising from differences in subjective circadian phase estimates. The method is available as a computerized program that can be easily used in research settings and clinical practice either for salivary or plasma melatonin values. PMID:24224578

  14. Melatonin Cytotoxicity Is Associated to Warburg Effect Inhibition in Ewing Sarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Sanchez, Ana M.; Antolin, Isaac; Puente-Moncada, Noelia; Suarez, Santos; Gomez-Lobo, Marina; Rodriguez, Carmen; Martin, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin kills or inhibits the proliferation of different cancer cell types, and this is associated with an increase or a decrease in reactive oxygen species, respectively. Intracellular oxidants originate mainly from oxidative metabolism, and cancer cells frequently show alterations in this metabolic pathway, such as the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis). Thus, we hypothesized that melatonin could also regulate differentially oxidative metabolism in cells where it is cytotoxic (Ewing sarcoma cells) and in cells where it inhibits proliferation (chondrosarcoma cells). Ewing sarcoma cells but not chondrosarcoma cells showed a metabolic profile consistent with aerobic glycolysis, i.e. increased glucose uptake, LDH activity, lactate production and HIF-1α activation. Melatonin reversed Ewing sarcoma metabolic profile and this effect was associated with its cytotoxicity. The differential regulation of metabolism by melatonin could explain why the hormone is harmless for a wide spectrum of normal and only a few tumoral cells, while it kills specific tumor cell types. PMID:26252771

  15. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Dysfunction in Renal Convoluted Tubules of Obese Mice: Protective Role of Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Giugno, Lorena; Lavazza, Antonio; Reiter, Russel J.; Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio; Rezzani, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a common and complex health problem, which impacts crucial organs; it is also considered an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease. Few studies have analyzed the consequence of obesity in the renal proximal convoluted tubules, which are the major tubules involved in reabsorptive processes. For optimal performance of the kidney, energy is primarily provided by mitochondria. Melatonin, an indoleamine and antioxidant, has been identified in mitochondria, and there is considerable evidence regarding its essential role in the prevention of oxidative mitochondrial damage. In this study we evaluated the mechanism(s) of mitochondrial alterations in an animal model of obesity (ob/ob mice) and describe the beneficial effects of melatonin treatment on mitochondrial morphology and dynamics as influenced by mitofusin-2 and the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. Melatonin dissolved in 1% ethanol was added to the drinking water from postnatal week 5–13; the calculated dose of melatonin intake was 100 mg/kg body weight/day. Compared to control mice, obesity-related morphological alterations were apparent in the proximal tubules which contained round mitochondria with irregular, short cristae and cells with elevated apoptotic index. Melatonin supplementation in obese mice changed mitochondria shape and cristae organization of proximal tubules, enhanced mitofusin-2 expression, which in turn modulated the progression of the mitochondria-driven intrinsic apoptotic pathway. These changes possibly aid in reducing renal failure. The melatonin-mediated changes indicate its potential protective use against renal morphological damage and dysfunction associated with obesity and metabolic disease. PMID:25347680

  16. Electric power, melatonin, and breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.G.

    1987-08-01

    In this paper, the epidemiology of breast cancer will be discussed, followed by a brief description of the effect of electric fields on melatonin and the relation of melatonin to mammary cancer in rats. Finally, there will be a consideration of factors such as alcohol that affect melatonin and their relation to breast cancer risk. 55 refs.

  17. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7 milligrams of melatonin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053923 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of...

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in toll-like receptor 6 are associated with altered lipopeptide- and mycobacteria-induced IL-6 secretion

    PubMed Central

    Shehu Shey, Muki; Randhawa, April Kaur; Bowmaker, Mark; Smith, Elizabeth; Jens Scriba, Thomas; de Kock, Marwou; Mahomed, Hassan; Hussey, Gregory; Richard Hawn, Thomas; Albert Hanekom, Willem

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are critical mediators of the immune response to pathogens. The influence of human TLR6 polymorphisms on susceptibility to infection is only partially understood. Most microbes contain lipopeptides recognized by TLR2/1 or TLR2/6 heterodimers. Our aim was to determine whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR6 are associated with altered immune responses to lipopeptides and whole mycobacteria. We sequenced the TLR6 coding region in 100 healthy South African adults to assess genetic variation and determined associations between polymorphisms and lipopeptide- and mycobacteria-induced IL-6 production in whole blood. We found 2 polymorphisms, C745T and G1083C that were associated with altered IL-6 secretion. G1083C was associated with altered IL-6 levels in response to lipopeptides, Mycobacterium tuberculosis lysate (Mtb, P = 0.018) and BCG (P = 0.039). The 745T allele was also associated with lower NF-κB signaling in response to di-acylated lipopeptide, PAM2 (P = 0.019) or Mtb (P = 0.026) in a HEK293 cell line reconstitution assay, compared with the 745C allele. We conclude that TLR6 polymorphisms may be associated with altered lipopeptide-induced cytokine responses and recognition of Mtb. These studies provide new insight into the role of TLR6 variation and the innate immune response to human infection. PMID:20445564

  19. Variability of plasma melatonin level in pony mares (Equus caballus), comparison with the hybrid: mules and with jennies (Equus asinus).

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Daniel; Zarazaga, Luiz A; Malpaux, Benoît; Chemineau, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    In long-day breeders like horses, the length of nocturnal melatonin secretion is the main messenger of photoperiod. Previous studies have shown that the nocturnal jugular melatonin concentration is lower in horses, than in mules but is unknown in donkeys. The aim of this study was to estimate the inter-animal variability of plasma melatonin concentration in domestic mares and to compare this concentration with those observed in domestic jennies and in their hybrid mules. In the autumn, blood samples were collected at 22 h, 23 h, 0 h and 1 h during 2 nights at 3 weeks intervals, in 110 pony mares, 10 jennies and 6 mules maintained under natural photoperiod. Melatonin was assayed by a validated RIA method. The statistical analysis of the measures was done with a specific unbalanced analysis of variance model. The effect of species and individuals (nested under species) was highly significant. The mean melatonin concentration was 24 pg.mL(-1) in mares and was significantly lower than in jennies and in mules which were 90 pg.mL(-1) and 169 pg.mL(-1) respectively. The melatonin plasma concentration was higher in jennies than in mares. These results suggest that the melatonin concentration is genetically determined. PMID:17169310

  20. Melatonin lowers edema after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Chen, Xiao; Qiao, Suchi; Liu, Xinwei; Liu, Chang; Zhu, Degang; Su, Jiacan; Wang, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin has been shown to diminish edema in rats. Melatonin can be used to treat spinal cord injury. This study presumed that melatonin could relieve spinal cord edema and examined how it might act. Our experiments found that melatonin (100 mg/kg, i.p.) could reduce the water content of the spinal cord, and suppress the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein after spinal cord injury. This suggests that the mechanism by which melatonin alleviates the damage to the spinal cord by edema might be related to the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein. PMID:25657743

  1. Update on melatonin receptors: IUPHAR Review 20.

    PubMed

    Jockers, Ralf; Delagrange, Philippe; Dubocovich, Margarita L; Markus, Regina P; Renault, Nicolas; Tosini, Gianluca; Cecon, Erika; Zlotos, Darius P

    2016-09-01

    Melatonin receptors are seven transmembrane-spanning proteins belonging to the GPCR superfamily. In mammals, two melatonin receptor subtypes exist - MT1 and MT2 - encoded by the MTNR1A and MTNR1B genes respectively. The current review provides an update on melatonin receptors by the corresponding subcommittee of the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. We will highlight recent developments of melatonin receptor ligands, including radioligands, and give an update on the latest phenotyping results of melatonin receptor knockout mice. The current status and perspectives of the structure of melatonin receptor will be summarized. The physiological importance of melatonin receptor dimers and biologically important and type 2 diabetes-associated genetic variants of melatonin receptors will be discussed. The role of melatonin receptors in physiology and disease will be further exemplified by their functions in the immune system and the CNS. Finally, antioxidant and free radical scavenger properties of melatonin and its relation to melatonin receptors will be critically addressed. PMID:27314810

  2. Novel Staphylococcus aureus Secreted Protein Alters Keratinocyte Proliferation and Elicits a Proinflammatory Response In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Merriman, Joseph A; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Diekema, Daniel J; Leung, Donald Y M; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2015-08-11

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of surgical site infections that results in increased hospital stays due to the development of chronic wounds. Little is known about factors involved in S. aureus' ability to prevent wounds from healing. We discovered a novel secreted protein produced by a surgical site isolate of S. aureus that prevents keratinocyte proliferation. The protein has a molecular weight of 15.7 kDa and an isoelectric point of 8.9. The cloned and purified protein has cytotoxic and proinflammatory properties, as shown in vitro and in vivo. Potent biological effects on keratinocytes and rabbit skin suggest that this protein may play an important role in preventing re-epithelialization. Its lack of homology to known exotoxins suggests that this protein is novel, and this observation is likely to open a new field of research in S. aureus exotoxins. Due to its cytotoxic activities, we call this new protein ε-cytotoxin. PMID:26177220

  3. Morphine or capsaicin administration alters the secretion of beta-endorphin into the hypophysial portal vasculature of the rat.

    PubMed

    Koenig, J I; Meltzer, H Y; Gudelsky, G A

    1986-01-01

    Immunoreactive beta-endorphin (ir-beta-END) concentrations were measured in the hypophysial portal plasma of the male rat under urethane anesthesia. On the basis of immunochemical studies and gel filtration chromatography it appears that ir-beta-END in rat hypophysial portal plasma is primarily beta-endorphin (beta-END) and not beta-lipotropin (beta-LPH). In addition, much of the ir-beta-END in portal plasma may be of pituitary origin since acute hypophysectomy resulted in approximately an 80% decrease in the portal plasma concentration of ir-beta-END. Nevertheless, in anesthetized animals that had been hypophysectomized acutely, portal plasma concentrations of ir-beta-END were still 5 times those in systemic plasma, indicative of hypothalamic secretion of the peptide. The administration of morphine sulfate (3 mg/kg, i.v.) resulted in a decrease of ir-beta-END concentrations from 3,157 +/- 547 pg/ml to 1,044 +/- 250 pg/ml. This effect was blocked by naltrexone (1 mg/kg, s.c.) pretreatment. Capsaicin (10 micrograms), which, when infused into the lateral cerebral ventricle of the rat, has been shown to decrease the amount of beta-END in the hypothalamus, but not elsewhere in the central nervous system, selectively decreased the concentration of ir-beta-END in portal plasma without changing systemic ir-beta-END concentrations. These studies indicate that ir-beta-END in portal plasma is probably beta-END which is derived from neurons in the hypothalamus. Moreover, it is concluded that the regulation of the release of ir-beta-END from these neurons involves opiate receptor mechanisms. The inhibitory influence of opiates on ir-beta-END secretion may be indicative of a classical feedback regulation of ir-beta-END-containing neurons. PMID:2944026

  4. GnRH Episodic Secretion Is Altered by Pharmacological Blockade of Gap Junctions: Possible Involvement of Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pinet-Charvet, Caroline; Geller, Sarah; Desroziers, Elodie; Ottogalli, Monique; Lomet, Didier; Georgelin, Christine; Tillet, Yves; Franceschini, Isabelle; Vaudin, Pascal; Duittoz, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Episodic release of GnRH is essential for reproductive function. In vitro studies have established that this episodic release is an endogenous property of GnRH neurons and that GnRH secretory pulses are associated with synchronization of GnRH neuron activity. The cellular mechanisms by which GnRH neurons synchronize remain largely unknown. There is no clear evidence of physical coupling of GnRH neurons through gap junctions to explain episodic synchronization. However, coupling of glial cells through gap junctions has been shown to regulate neuron activity in their microenvironment. The present study investigated whether glial cell communication through gap junctions plays a role in GnRH neuron activity and secretion in the mouse. Our findings show that Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein-expressing glial cells located in the median eminence in close vicinity to GnRH fibers expressed Gja1 encoding connexin-43. To study the impact of glial-gap junction coupling on GnRH neuron activity, an in vitro model of primary cultures from mouse embryo nasal placodes was used. In this model, GnRH neurons possess a glial microenvironment and were able to release GnRH in an episodic manner. Our findings show that in vitro glial cells forming the microenvironment of GnRH neurons expressed connexin-43 and displayed functional gap junctions. Pharmacological blockade of the gap junctions with 50 μM 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid decreased GnRH secretion by reducing pulse frequency and amplitude, suppressed neuronal synchronization and drastically reduced spontaneous electrical activity, all these effects were reversed upon 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid washout. PMID:26562259

  5. AngiomiR-126 expression and secretion from circulating CD34(+) and CD14(+) PBMCs: role for proangiogenic effects and alterations in type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Mocharla, Pavani; Briand, Sylvie; Giannotti, Giovanna; Dörries, Carola; Jakob, Philipp; Paneni, Francesco; Lüscher, Thomas; Landmesser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Several peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived cell populations can promote angiogenesis, and differences in CD34(+) or CD14(+) surface expression have been used to separate PBMC subpopulations in this respect. AngiomiRs, microRNAs regulating angiogenesis, are key regulators of angiogenic processes. The present study examines differential angiomiR expression/secretion from CD34(+)/CD14(+), CD34(+)/CD14(-), CD34(-)/CD14(+), and CD34(-)/CD14(-) PBMC subsets and their relevance for different proangiogenic properties. Notably, both circulating human CD34(+)/14(+) and CD34(+)/14(-) PBMC subsets and their supernatants exerted more potent proangiogenic effects compared with CD34(-) PBMC subsets. MiR-126 was identified as most differentially expressed angiomiR in CD34(+) compared with CD34(-) PBMC subsets, determined by miR-array and RT-PCR validation. Modulation of miR-126 by anti-miR-126 or miR-mimic-126 treatment resulted in significant loss or increase of proangiogenic effects of CD34(+) PBMCs. MiR-126 levels in supernatants of CD34(+) PBMC subsets were substantially higher compared with CD34(-) PBMC subsets. MiR-126 was secreted in microvesicles/exosomes, and inhibition of their release impaired CD34(+) PBMCs proangiogenic effects. Notably, high-glucose treatment or diabetes reduced miR-126 levels of CD34(+) PBMCs, associated with impaired proangiogenic properties that could be rescued by miR-mimic-126 treatment. The present findings provide a novel molecular mechanism underlying increased proangiogenic effects of CD34(+) PBMCs, that is, angiomiR-126 expression/secretion. Moreover, an alteration of angiomiR-126 expression in CD34(+) PBMCs in diabetes provides a novel pathway causing impaired proangiogenic effects. PMID:23144172

  6. Seasonal variations of melatonin in ram seminal plasma are correlated to those of testosterone and antioxidant enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Some breeds of sheep are highly seasonal in terms of reproductive capability, and these changes are regulated by photoperiod and melatonin secretion. These changes affect the reproductive performance of rams, impairing semen quality and modifying hormonal profiles. Also, the antioxidant defence systems seem to be modulated by melatonin secretion, and shows seasonal variations. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of melatonin and testosterone in ram seminal plasma and their variations between the breeding and non-breeding seasons. In addition, we analyzed the possible correlations between these hormones and the antioxidant enzyme defence system activity. Methods Seminal plasma from nine Rasa Aragonesa rams were collected for one year, and their levels of melatonin, testosterone, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GRD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT) were measured. Results All samples presented measurable quantities of hormones and antioxidant enzymes. Both hormones showed monthly variations, with a decrease after the winter solstice and a rise after the summer solstice that reached the maximum levels in October-November, and a marked seasonal variation (P < 0.01) with higher levels in the breeding season. The yearly pattern of GRD and catalase was close to that of melatonin, and GRD showed a significant seasonal variation (P < 0.01) with a higher activity during the breeding season. Linear regression analysis between the studied hormones and antioxidant enzymes showed a significant correlation between melatonin and testosterone, GRD, SOD and catalase. Conclusions These results show the presence of melatonin and testosterone in ram seminal plasma, and that both hormones have seasonal variations, and support the idea that seasonal variations of fertility in the ram involve interplay between melatonin and the antioxidant defence system. PMID:20540737

  7. Postentry Processing of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Type 1 and Transduction of the Ferret Lung Are Altered by a Factor in Airway Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ziying; Sun, Xingshen; Evans, Idil A.; Tyler, Scott R.; Song, Yi; Liu, Xiaoming; Sui, Hongshu

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We recently created a cystic fibrosis ferret model that acquires neonatal lung infection. To develop lung gene therapies for this model, we evaluated recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene transfer to the neonatal ferret lung. Unlike in vitro ferret airway epithelial (FAE) cells, in vivo infection of the ferret lung with rAAV1 required proteasome inhibitors to achieve efficient airway transduction. We hypothesized that differences in transduction between these two systems were because of an in vivo secreted factor that alter the transduction biology of rAAV1. Indeed, treatment of rAAV1 with ferret airway secretory fluid (ASF) strongly inhibited rAAV1, but not rAAV2, transduction of primary FAE and HeLa cells. Properties of the ASF inhibitory factor included a strong affinity for the AAV1 capsid, heat-stability, negative charge, and sensitivity to endoproteinase Glu-C. ASF-treated rAAV1 dramatically inhibited apical transduction of FAE ALI cultures (512-fold), while only reducing viral entry by 55-fold, suggesting that postentry processing of virus was influenced by the inhibitor factor. Proteasome inhibitors rescued transduction in the presence of ASF (∼1600-fold) without effecting virus internalization, while proteasome inhibitors only enhanced transduction 45-fold in the absence of ASF. These findings demonstrate that a factor in lung secretions can influence intracellular processing of rAAV1 in a proteasome-dependent fashion. PMID:23948055

  8. Melatonin Anticancer Effects: Review

    PubMed Central

    Di Bella, Giuseppe; Mascia, Fabrizio; Gualano, Luciano; Di Bella, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, MLT), the main hormone produced by the pineal gland, not only regulates circadian rhythm, but also has antioxidant, anti-ageing and immunomodulatory properties. MLT plays an important role in blood composition, medullary dynamics, platelet genesis, vessel endothelia, and in platelet aggregation, leukocyte formula regulation and hemoglobin synthesis. Its significant atoxic, apoptotic, oncostatic, angiogenetic, differentiating and antiproliferative properties against all solid and liquid tumors have also been documented. Thanks, in fact, to its considerable functional versatility, MLT can exert both direct and indirect anticancer effects in factorial synergy with other differentiating, antiproliferative, immunomodulating and trophic molecules that form part of the anticancer treatment formulated by Luigi Di Bella (Di Bella Method, DBM: somatostatin, retinoids, ascorbic acid, vitamin D3, prolactin inhibitors, chondroitin-sulfate). The interaction between MLT and the DBM molecules counters the multiple processes that characterize the neoplastic phenotype (induction, promotion, progression and/or dissemination, tumoral mutation). All these particular characteristics suggest the use of MLT in oncological diseases. PMID:23348932

  9. Melatonin: the watchdog of villous trophoblast homeostasis against hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lanoix, Dave; Lacasse, Andrée-Anne; Reiter, Russel J; Vaillancourt, Cathy

    2013-12-01

    Human placenta produces melatonin and expresses its receptors. We propose that melatonin, an antioxidant, protects the human placenta against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)-induced damage. Primary term villous cytotrophoblasts were cultured under normoxia (8% O2) with or without 1mM melatonin for 72h to induce differentiation into the syncytiotrophoblast. The cells were then cultured for an additional 22h under normoxia or subjected to hypoxia (0.5% O2) for 4h followed by 18h reoxygenation (8% O2) with or without melatonin. H/R induced oxidative stress, which activated the Bax/Bcl-2 mitochondrial apoptosis pathway and the downstream fragmentation of DNA. Villous trophoblast treatment with melatonin reversed all the negative effects induced by H/R to normoxic levels. This study shows that melatonin protects the villous trophoblast against H/R-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis and suggests a potential preventive and therapeutic use of this indolamine in pregnancy complications characterized by syncytiotrophoblast survival alteration. PMID:23886990

  10. Triiodothyronine and melatonin influence antioxidant defense mechanism in a teleost Anabas testudineus (Bloch): in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, P; Beyo, R S; Divya, L; Vijayasree, A S; Manju, M; Oommen, O V

    2007-06-01

    The effect of the hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and melatonin on antioxidant defense system was studied in 6-propyl thiouracil (6-PTU)-treated or photoperiod-exposed teleost Anabas testudineus. 6-PTU (2 microg/g) treatment or photoperiod exposure (24 h) increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated dienes (CD) concentrations, indicating increased lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the experimental conditions. T3 or melatonin (10(-6) M) treatment for 15 min in vitro in PTU-treated fish reversed the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione content. T3-treated group showed no change in glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, whereas melatonin treatment decreased its activity. T3 inhibited glutathione reductase (GR) activity. Photoperiod exposure (physiological pinealotomy) induced a stressful situation in this teleost, as evidenced by LPO products and antioxidant enzyme activities. Melatonin and T3 treatment for 15 min in vitro also reversed the effect of photoperiod on peroxidation products and the SOD and catalase activities. GR activity decreased in photoperiod-exposed group and melatonin and T3 treatment reversed the activities. The antioxidant enzymes responded to the stress situation after 6-PTU treatment and photoperiod exposure by altering their activities. The study suggested an independent effect of T3 and melatonin on antioxidant defence mechanism in different physiological situations in fish. PMID:17650585

  11. Glucose-based microbial production of the hormone melatonin in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Germann, Susanne M; Baallal Jacobsen, Simo A; Schneider, Konstantin; Harrison, Scott J; Jensen, Niels B; Chen, Xiao; Stahlhut, Steen G; Borodina, Irina; Luo, Hao; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Maury, Jérôme; Forster, Jochen

    2016-05-01

    Melatonin is a natural mammalian hormone that plays an important role in regulating the circadian cycle in humans. It is a clinically effective drug exhibiting positive effects as a sleep aid and a powerful antioxidant used as a dietary supplement. Commercial melatonin production is predominantly performed by complex chemical synthesis. In this study, we demonstrate microbial production of melatonin and related compounds, such as serotonin and N-acetylserotonin. We generated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that comprise heterologous genes encoding one or more variants of an L-tryptophan hydroxylase, a 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan decarboxylase, a serotonin acetyltransferase, an acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase, and means for providing the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin via heterologous biosynthesis and recycling pathways. We thereby achieved de novo melatonin biosynthesis from glucose. We furthermore accomplished increased product titers by altering expression levels of selected pathway enzymes and boosting co-factor supply. The final yeast strain produced melatonin at a titer of 14.50 ± 0.57 mg L(-1) in a 76h fermentation using simulated fed-batch medium with glucose as sole carbon source. Our study lays the basis for further developing a yeast cell factory for biological production of melatonin. PMID:26710256

  12. Melatonin-induced changes in kiss/gnrh gene expression patterns in the brain of male sea bass during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, María Victoria; Carrillo, Manuel; Felip, Alicia

    2015-07-01

    Evidence exists that melatonin may drive the seasonal changes in kisspeptin-expressing cells and GnRH/gonadotropin secretion in mammals, thus modulating their reproductive activity. This study established the influence of long-term melatonin administration (as an implant) on growth performance and reproduction of adult male sea bass. Melatonin reduced the fish weight and condition factor, thus affecting the performance of fish. Melatonin also affected gonadogenesis, as shown by a decrease in the gonadosomatic index after 150 days of treatment and the lower percentage of running males during the spermatogenesis and full spermiation stages of this species. Exogenous melatonin also resulted in lower plasma androgen levels during the reproductive period, and showed a significant decrease in serum Lh and Fsh concentration after 30 and 60 days of treatment, respectively. Thus, melatonin elicited seasonal changes in key reproductive hormones that affected testicular maturity. The hypothalamic expression of kiss1 was significantly higher in melatonin-treated fish than in controls after 30 days of treatment, while a significant increase in kiss2 expression was detected on day 90 of treatment. By contrast, melatonin showed a significant decrease in kisspeptin expression in the dorsal brain on day 150 of treatment and also affected the expression of gnrh-1 and gnrh-3 and gnrhr-II-1a and 2b and the fshβ gene in the pituitary. These results suggest that in this species, melatonin evokes changes in the mRNA levels of kisspeptin and gnrh system genes that appear to mirror disturbances in spermatogenesis. PMID:25810361

  13. Augmented expression and secretion of adipose-derived pigment epithelium-derived factor does not alter local angiogenesis or contribute to the development of systemic metabolic derangements.

    PubMed

    Lakeland, Thomas V; Borg, Melissa L; Matzaris, Maria; Abdelkader, Amany; Evans, Roger G; Watt, Matthew J

    2014-06-15

    Impaired coupling of adipose tissue expansion and vascularization is proposed to lead to adipocyte hypoxia and inflammation, which in turn contributes to systemic metabolic derangements. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a powerful antiangiogenic factor that is secreted by adipocytes, elevated in obesity, and implicated in the development of insulin resistance. We explored the angiogenic and metabolic role of adipose-derived PEDF through in vivo studies of mice with overexpression of PEDF in adipocytes (PEDF-aP2). PEDF expression in white adipocytes and PEDF secretion from adipose tissue was increased in transgenic mice, but circulating levels of PEDF were not increased. Overexpression of PEDF did not alter vascularization, the partial pressure of O2, cellular hypoxia, or gene expression of inflammatory markers in adipose tissue. Energy expenditure and metabolic substrate utilization, body mass, and adiposity were not altered in PEDF-aP2 mice. Whole body glycemic control was normal as assessed by glucose and insulin tolerance tests, and adipocyte-specific glucose uptake was unaffected by PEDF overexpression. Adipocyte lipolysis was increased in PEDF-aP2 mice and associated with increased adipose triglyceride lipase and decreased perilipin 1 expression. Experiments conducted in mice rendered obese by high-fat feeding showed no differences between PEDF-aP2 and wild-type mice for body mass, adiposity, whole body energy expenditure, glucose tolerance, or adipose tissue oxygenation. Together, these data indicate that adipocyte-generated PEDF enhances lipolysis but question the role of PEDF as a major antiangiogenic or proinflammatory mediator in adipose tissue in vivo. PMID:24760990

  14. 'Melatonin isomer' in wine is not an isomer of the melatonin but tryptophan-ethylester.

    PubMed

    Gardana, Claudio; Iriti, Marcello; Stuknytė, Milda; De Noni, Ivano; Simonetti, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone, chronobiotic, and antioxidant compound found in wine and deriving directly from grapes and/or synthesized by yeast during alcoholic fermentation. In addition, a melatonin isomer has been detected in different foods, wine among them. The special interest for melatonin isomer related to the fact that it was found in greater quantities than melatonin and probably shares some of its biological properties. Despite this, its chemical structure has not yet been defined; although some researchers hypothesize, it could be melatonin with the ethylacetamide group shifted into position N1. Thus, the aim of our study was to identify the structures of the melatonin isomer. For this purpose, melatonin and melatonin isomer in Syrah wine were separated chromatographically by a sub-2 μm particle column and detected by tandem mass spectrometry. The sample was then purified and concentrated by solid-phase extraction, hydrolyzed with alkali or esterase, and substrates and products quantified by UPLC-MS/MS. Moreover, melatonin, melatonin isomer, and their product ions were evaluated by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The amount of melatonin isomer and melatonin in the wine was 84 ± 4 and 3 ± 0 ng/mL, respectively. In the solutions, containing diluted alkali or esterase, melatonin isomer was hydrolyzed in about 8 min. Correspondingly, tryptophan was detected, and its amount increased and reached the maximum concentration in about 8 min. Melatonin concentration was not affected by diluted alkali or esterase. The fragmentation pattern of melatonin isomer was different from that of melatonin but comparable to that of tryptophan-ethylester. Finally, the so-called melatonin isomer identity was verified by cochromatography with authentic standard of tryptophan-ethylester. PMID:25251161

  15. Melatonin uptake through glucose transporters: a new target for melatonin inhibition of cancer.

    PubMed

    Hevia, David; González-Menéndez, Pedro; Quiros-González, Isabel; Miar, Ana; Rodríguez-García, Aida; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J; Mayo, Juan C; Sainz, Rosa M

    2015-03-01

    Melatonin is present in a multitude of taxa and it has a broad range of biological functions, from synchronizing circadian rhythms to detoxifying free radicals. Some functions of melatonin are mediated by its membrane receptors but others are receptor-independent. For the latter, melatonin must enter into the cell. Melatonin is a derivative of the amino acid tryptophan and reportedly easily crosses biological membranes due to its amphipathic nature. However, the mechanism by which melatonin enters into cells remains unknown. Changes in redox state, endocytosis pathways, multidrug resistance, glycoproteins or a variety of strategies have no effect on melatonin uptake. Herein, it is demonstrated that members of the SLC2/GLUT family glucose transporters have a central role in melatonin uptake. When studied by docking simulation, it is found that melatonin interacts at the same location in GLUT1 where glucose does. Furthermore, glucose concentration and the presence of competitive ligands of GLUT1 affect the concentration of melatonin into cells. As a regulatory mechanism, melatonin reduces the uptake of glucose and modifies the expression of GLUT1 transporter in prostate cancer cells. More importantly, glucose supplementation promotes prostate cancer progression in TRAMP mice, while melatonin attenuated glucose-induced tumor progression and prolonged the lifespan of tumor-bearing mice. This is the first time that a facilitated transport of melatonin is suggested. In fact, the important role of glucose transporters and glucose metabolism in cell fate might explain some of the diverse functions described for melatonin. PMID:25612238

  16. Protective effect of melatonin against zonisamide-induced reproductive disorders in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Abdu, Faiza

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Zonisamide (ZNS) is a modern antiepileptic drug (AED) that is distinguished from other AEDs by its unique structure and broad mechanistic profile. The pineal hormone melatonin is involved in the regulation of reproductive function, including the timing of the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. The aim of the present work was to study the protective effect of melatonin against the potential suppression impact of ZNS on reproductive activity. Material and methods Ninety adult albino male rats were allocated to several groups treated with melatonin (10 mg/kg BW), ZNS (10, 20 and 50 mg/kg BW) and 10 mg/kg of melatonin plus ZNS (10, 20 or 50 mg/kg BW, respectively). Reproductive hormones (testosterone, LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)) levels were measured in animal serum. Sperm abnormalities and DNA fragmentation in testis tissues as well as expression alteration of several reproductive-related genes were analyzed. Results The results revealed that ZNS decreased the levels of serum free testosterone, LH, and FSH and expression of their encoding genes in male rats. In addition, ZNS treatment increased the sperm abnormalities and DNA fragmentation and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in testis tissues as well as GABA level in liver tissues. However, melatonin supplementation inhibited the negative symptoms of ZNS in which it increased the levels of reproductive hormones and expression of their encoding genes in the ZNS-treated rats. Moreover, melatonin decreased the sperm abnormalities, DNA fragmentation, iNOS activity and GABA level in ZNS-treated rats. Conclusions The data obtained in this study suggest that melatonin administration confers protection against toxicity inflicted by ZNS, and support the contention that melatonin protection is achieved by its ability as a scavenger for free radicals generated by ZNS. PMID:26170862

  17. Genome-wide association of polycystic ovary syndrome implicates alterations in gonadotropin secretion in European ancestry populations.

    PubMed

    Hayes, M Geoffrey; Urbanek, Margrit; Ehrmann, David A; Armstrong, Loren L; Lee, Ji Young; Sisk, Ryan; Karaderi, Tugce; Barber, Thomas M; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Stephen; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Welt, Corrine K; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Panidis, Dimitrios; Goodarzi, Mark O; Azziz, Ricardo; Zhang, Yi; James, Roland G; Olivier, Michael; Kissebah, Ahmed H; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Legro, Richard S; Dunaif, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common, highly heritable complex disorder of unknown aetiology characterized by hyperandrogenism, chronic anovulation and defects in glucose homeostasis. Increased luteinizing hormone relative to follicle-stimulating hormone secretion, insulin resistance and developmental exposure to androgens are hypothesized to play a causal role in PCOS. Here we map common genetic susceptibility loci in European ancestry women for the National Institutes of Health PCOS phenotype, which confers the highest risk for metabolic morbidities, as well as reproductive hormone levels. Three loci reach genome-wide significance in the case-control meta-analysis, two novel loci mapping to chr 8p23.1 [Corrected] and chr 11p14.1, and a chr 9q22.32 locus previously found in Chinese PCOS. The same chr 11p14.1 SNP, rs11031006, in the region of the follicle-stimulating hormone B polypeptide (FSHB) gene strongly associates with PCOS diagnosis and luteinizing hormone levels. These findings implicate neuroendocrine changes in disease pathogenesis. PMID:26284813

  18. Genome-wide association of polycystic ovary syndrome implicates alterations in gonadotropin secretion in European ancestry populations

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Urbanek, Margrit; Ehrmann, David A.; Armstrong, Loren L.; Lee, Ji Young; Sisk, Ryan; Karaderi, Tugce; Barber, Thomas M.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Franks, Stephen; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Welt, Corrine K.; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Panidis, Dimitrios; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Azziz, Ricardo; Zhang, Yi; James, Roland G.; Olivier, Michael; Kissebah, Ahmed H.; Alvero, Ruben; Barnhart, Huiman X.; Baker, Valerie; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Bates, G. Wright; Brzyski, Robert G.; Carr, Bruce R.; Carson, Sandra A.; Casson, Peter; Cataldo, Nicholas A.; Christman, Gregory; Coutifaris, Christos; Diamond, Michael P.; Eisenberg, Esther; Gosman, Gabriella G.; Giudice, Linda C.; Haisenleder, Daniel J.; Huang, Hao; Krawetz, Stephen A.; Lucidi, Scott; McGovern, Peter G.; Myers, Evan R.; Nestler, John E.; Ohl, Dana; Santoro, Nanette; Schlaff, William D.; Snyder, Peter; Steinkampf, Michael P.; Trussell, J. C.; Usadi, Rebecca; Yan, Qingshang; Zhang, Heping; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Legro, Richard S.; Dunaif, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common, highly heritable complex disorder of unknown aetiology characterized by hyperandrogenism, chronic anovulation and defects in glucose homeostasis. Increased luteinizing hormone relative to follicle-stimulating hormone secretion, insulin resistance and developmental exposure to androgens are hypothesized to play a causal role in PCOS. Here we map common genetic susceptibility loci in European ancestry women for the National Institutes of Health PCOS phenotype, which confers the highest risk for metabolic morbidities, as well as reproductive hormone levels. Three loci reach genome-wide significance in the case–control meta-analysis, two novel loci mapping to chr 8p32.1 and chr 11p14.1, and a chr 9q22.32 locus previously found in Chinese PCOS. The same chr 11p14.1 SNP, rs11031006, in the region of the follicle-stimulating hormone B polypeptide (FSHB) gene strongly associates with PCOS diagnosis and luteinizing hormone levels. These findings implicate neuroendocrine changes in disease pathogenesis. PMID:26284813

  19. Absence of a serum melatonin rhythm under acutely extended darkness in the horse

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In contrast to studies showing gradual adaptation of melatonin (MT) rhythms to an advanced photoperiod in humans and rodents, we previously demonstrated that equine MT rhythms complete a 6-h light/dark (LD) phase advance on the first post-shift day. This suggested the possibility that melatonin secretion in the horse may be more strongly light-driven as opposed to endogenously rhythmic and light entrained. The present study investigates whether equine melatonin is endogenously rhythmic in extended darkness (DD). Methods Six healthy, young mares were maintained in a lightproof barn under an LD cycle that mimicked the ambient natural photoperiod outside. Blood samples were collected at 2-h intervals for 48 consecutive h: 24-h in LD, followed by 24-h in extended dark (DD). Serum was harvested and stored at -20°C until melatonin and cortisol were measured by commercial RIA kits. Results Two-way repeated measures ANOVA (n = 6/time point) revealed a significant circadian time (CT) x lighting condition interaction (p < .0001) for melatonin with levels non-rhythmic and consistently high during DD (CT 0-24). In contrast, cortisol displayed significant clock-time variation throughout LD and DD (p = .0009) with no CT x light treatment interaction (p = .4018). Cosinor analysis confirmed a significant 24-h temporal variation for melatonin in LD (p = .0002) that was absent in DD (p = .51), while there was an apparent circadian component in cortisol, which approached significance in LD (p = .076), and was highly significant in DD (p = .0059). Conclusions The present finding of no 24 h oscillation in melatonin in DD is the first evidence indicating that melatonin is not gated by a self-sustained circadian process in the horse. Melatonin is therefore not a suitable marker of circadian phase in this species. In conjunction with recent similar findings in reindeer, it appears that biosynthesis of melatonin in the pineal glands of some ungulates is strongly driven by the

  20. Impact of Common Diabetes Risk Variant in MTNR1B on Sleep, Circadian, and Melatonin Physiology.

    PubMed

    Lane, Jacqueline M; Chang, Anne-Marie; Bjonnes, Andrew C; Aeschbach, Daniel; Anderson, Clare; Cade, Brian E; Cain, Sean W; Czeisler, Charles A; Gharib, Sina A; Gooley, Joshua J; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Grant, Struan F A; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Lauderdale, Diane S; Lockley, Steven W; Munch, Miriam; Patel, Sanjay; Punjabi, Naresh M; Rajaratnam, Shanthakumar M W; Rueger, Melanie; St Hilaire, Melissa A; Santhi, Nayantara; Scheuermaier, Karin; Van Reen, Eliza; Zee, Phyllis C; Shea, Steven A; Duffy, Jeanne F; Buxton, Orfeu M; Redline, Susan; Scheer, Frank A J L; Saxena, Richa

    2016-06-01

    The risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increased by abnormalities in sleep quantity and quality, circadian alignment, and melatonin regulation. A common genetic variant in a receptor for the circadian-regulated hormone melatonin (MTNR1B) is associated with increased fasting blood glucose and risk of T2D, but whether sleep or circadian disruption mediates this risk is unknown. We aimed to test if MTNR1B diabetes risk variant rs10830963 associates with measures of sleep or circadian physiology in intensive in-laboratory protocols (n = 58-96) or cross-sectional studies with sleep quantity and quality and timing measures from self-report (n = 4,307-10,332), actigraphy (n = 1,513), or polysomnography (n = 3,021). In the in-laboratory studies, we found a significant association with a substantially longer duration of elevated melatonin levels (41 min) and delayed circadian phase of dim-light melatonin offset (1.37 h), partially mediated through delayed offset of melatonin synthesis. Furthermore, increased T2D risk in MTNR1B risk allele carriers was more pronounced in early risers versus late risers as determined by 7 days of actigraphy. Our results provide the surprising insight that the MTNR1B risk allele influences dynamics of melatonin secretion, generating a novel hypothesis that the MTNR1B risk allele may extend the duration of endogenous melatonin production later into the morning and that early waking may magnify the diabetes risk conferred by the risk allele. PMID:26868293

  1. Evaluating the Potential Effect of Melatonin on the post-Cardiac Surgery Sleep Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dianatkhah, Mehrnoush; Ghaeli, Padideh; Hajhossein Talasaz, Azita; Karimi, Abbasali; Salehiomran, Abbas; Bina, Peyvand; Jalali, Arash; Ghaffary, Saba; Shahmansouri, Nazila; Vejdani, Shaghayegh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative neurological injuries, including cognitive dysfunction, sleep disorder, delirium, and anxiety, are the important consequences of coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). Evidence has shown that postoperative sleep disturbance is partly due to disturbed melatonin secretion in the perioperative period. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of melatonin on postoperative sleep disorder in patients undergoing CABG. Method: One hundred forty-five elective CABG patients participated in a randomized double-blind study during the preoperative period. The patients were randomized to receive either 3 mg of melatonin or 10 mg of Oxazepam one hour before sleep time. Each group received the medication from 3 days before surgery until the time of discharge. Sleep quality was evaluated using the Groningen Sleep Quality Score (GSQS), and the incidence of delirium was evaluated by nursing records. Sleep quality and anxiety scores were compared before and after surgery through the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and independent t-test were used to compare the sleep and anxiety scores between the groups. P values ≤ 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Totally, 137 patients at a mean age of 60 years completed the study (76% male). The analysis of the data showed that sleep was significantly disturbed after surgery in both groups. The patients in the Oxazepam group demonstrated significantly higher disturbance in their mean postoperative GSQS score than did their counterparts in the melatonin group (p value < 0.001). A smaller proportion of the participants experienced delirium in the melatonin group (0.06%) than in the Oxazepam group (0.12%); however, this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The result of the present study revealed that melatonin improved sleep in post-cardiac surgery patients more than what was observed with Oxazepam. Therefore, melatonin may be

  2. Clinical uses of melatonin in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Barceló, Emilio J; Mediavilla, Maria D; Reiter, Russel J

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the results of clinical trials of treatments with melatonin conducted in children, mostly focused on sleep disorders of different origin. Melatonin is beneficial not only in the treatment of dyssomnias, especially delayed sleep phase syndrome, but also on sleep disorders present in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity, autism spectrum disorders, and, in general, in all sleep disturbances associated with mental, neurologic, or other medical disorders. Sedative properties of melatonin have been used in diagnostic situations requiring sedation or as a premedicant in children undergoing anesthetic procedures. Epilepsy and febrile seizures are also susceptible to treatment with melatonin, alone or associated with conventional antiepileptic drugs. Melatonin has been also used to prevent the progression in some cases of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. In newborns, and particularly those delivered preterm, melatonin has been used to reduce oxidative stress associated with sepsis, asphyxia, respiratory distress, or surgical stress. Finally, the administration of melatonin, melatonin analogues, or melatonin precursors to the infants through the breast-feeding, or by milk formula adapted for day and night, improves their nocturnal sleep. Side effects of melatonin treatments in children have not been reported. Although the above-described results are promising, specific studies to resolve the problem of dosage, formulations, and length of treatment are necessary. PMID:21760817

  3. Melatonin promotes ripening and improves quality of tomato fruit during postharvest life

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qianqian; Zhang, Na; Wang, Jinfang; Zhang, Haijun; Li, Dianbo; Shi, Jin; Li, Ren; Weeda, Sarah; Zhao, Bing; Ren, Shuxin; Guo, Yang-Dong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of melatonin on the postharvest ripening and quality improvement of tomato fruit was carried out. The tomatoes were immersed in exogenous melatonin for 2h, and then the related physiological indicators and the expression of genes during post-harvest life were evaluated. Compared with control check (CK), the 50 µM melatonin treatment significantly increased lycopene levels by 5.8-fold. Meanwhile, the key genes involved in fruit colour development, including phytoene synthase1 (PSY1) and carotenoid isomerase (CRTISO), showed a 2-fold increase in expression levels. The rate of water loss from tomato fruit also increased 8.3%, and the expression of aquaporin genes, such as SlPIP12Q, SlPIPQ, SlPIP21Q, and SlPIP22, was up-regulated 2- to 3-fold under 50 µM melatonin treatment. In addition, 50 µM melatonin treatment enhanced fruit softening, increased water-soluble pectin by 22.5%, and decreased protopectin by 19.5%. The expression of the cell wall modifying proteins polygalacturonase (PG), pectin esterase1 (PE1), β-galactosidase (TBG4), and expansin1 (Exp1) was up-regulated under 50 µM melatonin treatment. Melatonin increased ethylene production by 27.1%, accelerated the climacteric phase, and influenced the ethylene signalling pathway. Alteration of ethylene production correlated with altered 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase (ACS4) expression. The expression of ethylene signal transduction-related genes such as NR, SlETR4, SlEIL1, SlEIL3, and SlERF2, was enhanced by 50 µM melatonin. The effect of melatonin on ethylene biosynthesis, ethylene perception, and ethylene signalling may contribute to fruit ripening and quality improvement in tomato. This research may promote the application of melatonin on postharvest ripening and quality improvement of tomato fruit as well as other horticultural productions in the future. PMID:25147270

  4. Effect of immunization against melatonin on seasonal fleece growth in feral goats.

    PubMed

    Foldes, A; Hoskinson, R M; Baker, P; McDonald, B J; Maxwell, C A; Restall, B J

    1992-09-01

    Four vaccination protocols were utilized to investigate the effects of immunoneutralizing circulating melatonin on the annual cashmere growth cycle and cashmere production in Australian feral goats. A fluctuating anti-melatonin antibody response, achieved by repeated booster vaccinations, resulted in an acceleration of the growth cycle in goats which exhibited a significant immune response, compared to sham-immunized controls. Responding goats showed two cycles of cashmere length growth in the first 16 months and increased annual cashmere production in the first year. However, in the second year, these effects were no longer apparent, suggesting either some form of desensitization to melatonin, or a diminished response due to declining antibody titre. The effects of immunization were observed in both sexes; the effect on cashmere length was greater in wethers than in does. Cashmere fibre growth in response to a continuously declining plane of specific antibody showed increased cycle frequency, albeit with a decreased amplitude; guard hair growth cycles were affected to a much lesser extent. Small transient peaks of specific immunity at the summer or winter solstice were without significant effect on cashmere growth. Immunization to provoke a persistent anti-melatonin antibody response at the winter solstice resulted in significantly increased greasy fleece weight, % cashmere yield, and mass of cashmere produced, but no change in fibre diameter in both sexes. Thus the timing of cashmere growth cycles in goats may be, at least transiently, altered by appropriately timed immunization against melatonin. The mechanism of pineal-mediated regulation of cashmere growth cycles may involve (i) entrainment of an endogenous rhythm by melatonin, or (ii) seasonal alteration of cashmere follicle sensitivity to the effect of melatonin. PMID:1453313

  5. Lead (Pb) alters the norepinephrine-induced secretion of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone from the median eminence of adult male rats in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bratton, G.R.; Hiney, J.K.; Dees, W.L. )

    1994-01-01

    In the present study, the authors evaluated the in vitro effects of lead (Pb) on basal and stimulated luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) and Prostaglandin E[sub 2] (PGE[sub 2]) secretion. Median eminences (ME) were removed from brains of adult male rats and preincubated for 15 minutes in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate glucose buffer in an atmosphere of 95% O[sub 2]-5% CO[sub 2]. These media were discarded and all MEs were subjected to one of the following experiments. In Experiment 1, all MEs were incubated for 30 minutes in medium only. These media were collected and replaced with medium only (controls) or with medium containing Pb doses ranging from 5 to 20 [mu]M. After this 60-minute incubation, media were collected, then replaced with new medium containing 60 [mu]M norepinephrine (NE), or NE plus each dose of Pb, then incubated for a final 30-minute period. Experiment 2 was conducted as above, except PGE[sub 2] (2.8 [mu]M) replaced the NE. In both experiments, the amounts of LHRH released was measured by RIA. In experiment 3, NE was again used for the challenge; however, this time, the amount of PGE[sub 2] released was measured by RIA. Results indicate that Pb did not alter basal LHRH release, but compared with controls, significantly blocked NE-induced LHRH release in a dose-related manner. Conversely, Pb had no effect on the PGE[sub 2]-induced release of LHRH. Additionally, Pb did not alter basal PGE[sub 2] release; however, it significantly blocked the NE-induced release of PGE[sub 2]. Since NE-induced LHRH release is mediated by PGE[sub 2], these results support the hypothesis that Pb is capable of altering the hypothalamus and suggest that this effect is due, at least in part, to the diminished PGE[sub 2] synthesis/release within the ME, resulting in diminished LHRH secretion.

  6. Microarray analysis of genes differentially expressed in melatonin-rich transgenic rice expressing a sheep serotonin N-acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Park, Sangkyu; Kim, Young Soon; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2013-11-01

    Transgenic rice plants overexpressing a sheep serotonin N-acetyltransferase led to an enhanced production of melatonin with various physiological effects, including seminal root elongation and resistance against cold and oxidative stress, which raises the possibility that melatonin may alter gene expression profiles in the transgenic rice. Therefore, we performed a microarray analysis to investigate the regulatory role of melatonin using the melatonin-rich transgenic rice. We identified 260 and 204 genes that were up- or downregulated in the melatonin-rich transgenic rice when compared with the wild type. Of these, 20 upregulated genes were identified in the seedlings of melatonin-rich rice at more than twice the levels in the wild type (P < 0.05), while 23 downregulated genes were also detected. The representative upregulated genes included caleosin, a Ca(2+) -binding oil-body surface protein involved in the degradation of lipids stored in oil bodies and various signaling proteins such as a cyclin F-box protein and leucine-rich repeat protein. In contrast, jasmonate-induced protein, senescence-associated protein, and polygalacturonase were included in the downregulated gene group. These results suggest that melatonin has an important role in modulating a wide range of gene expression, reflecting its pleiotropic physiological roles in plant growth and development. PMID:23889160

  7. Melatonin in human preovulatory follicular fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brzezinski, Amnon; Seibel, Machelle M.; Lynch, Harry J.; Deng, Mei-Hua; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    Melatonin, the major hormone of the pineal gland, has antigonadotrophic activity in many mammals and may also be involved in human reproduction. Melatonin suppresses steroidogenesis by ovarian granulosa and luteal cells in vitro. To determine if melatonin is present in the human ovary, preovulatory follicular fluids (n = 32) from 15 women were assayed for melatonin by RIA after solvent extraction. The fluids were obtained by laparoscopy or sonographically controlled follicular puncture from infertile women undergoing in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer. All patients had received clomiphene citrate, human menopausal gonadotropin, and hCG to stimulate follicle formation. Blood samples were obtained by venipuncture 30 rain or less after follicular aspiration. All of the follicular fluids contained melatonim, in concentrations substantially higher than those in the corresponding serum. A positive correlation was found between follicular fluid and serum melatonin levels in each woman; these observations indicate that preovulatory follicles contain substantial amounts of melatonin that may affect ovarian steroidogenesis.

  8. Rapid, concurrent alterations in pre- and postsynaptic structure induced by naturally-secreted amyloid-beta protein.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Barbara; Shaked, Gideon M; Tabarean, Iustin V; Braga, Julia; Koo, Edward H; Halpain, Shelley

    2007-06-01

    In Alzheimer's disease increasing evidence attributes synaptic and cognitive deficits to soluble oligomers of amyloid beta protein (Abeta), even prior to the accumulation of amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuronal cell death. Here we show that within 1-2 h picomolar concentrations of cell-derived, soluble Abeta induce specific alterations in pre- and postsynaptic morphology and connectivity in cultured hippocampal neurons. Clusters of presynaptic vesicle markers decreased in size and number at glutamatergic but not GABAergic terminals. Dendritic spines also decreased in number and became dysmorphic, as spine heads collapsed and/or extended long protrusions. Simultaneous time-lapse imaging of axon-dendrite pairs revealed that shrinking spines sometimes became disconnected from their presynaptic varicosity. Concomitantly, miniature synaptic potentials decreased in amplitude and frequency. Spine changes were prevented by blockers of nAChRs and NMDARs. Washout of Abeta within the first day reversed these spine changes. Further, spine changes reversed spontaneously by 2 days, because neurons acutely developed resistance to continuous Abeta exposure. Thus, rapid Abeta-induced synapse destabilization may underlie transient behavioral impairments in animal models, and early cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's patients. PMID:17368908

  9. Abnormality of circadian rhythm of serum melatonin and other biochemical parameters in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Fatima, Ghizal; Das, Siddhartha Kumar; Verma, Nar Singh

    2011-04-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a complex chronic condition causing widespread pain and variety of other symptoms. It produces pain in the soft tissues located around joints throughout the body. FMS has unknown etiology and its pathophysiology is not fully understood. However, abnormality in circadian rhythm of hormonal profiles and cytokines has been observed in this disorder. Moreover, there are reports of deficiency of serotonin, melatonin, cortisol and cytokines in FMS patients, which are fully regulated by circadian rhythm. Melatonin, the primary hormone of the pineal gland regulates the body's circadian rhythm and normally its levels begin to rise in the mid-to-late evening, remain high for most of the night, and then decrease in the early morning. FMS patients have lower melatonin secretion during the hours of darkness than the healthy subjects. This may contribute to impaired sleep at night, fatigue during the day and changed pain perception. Studies have shown blunting of normal diurnal cortisol rhythm, with elevated evening serum cortisol level in patients with FMS. Thus, due to perturbed level of cortisol secretion several symptoms of FMS may occur. Moreover, disturbed cytokine levels have also been reported in FMS patients. Therefore, circadian rhythm can be an important factor in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of FMS. This article explores the circadian pattern of abnormalities in FMS patients, as this may help in better understanding the role of variation in symptoms of FMS and its possible relationship with circadian variations of melatonin, cortisol, cytokines and serotonin levels. PMID:21682138

  10. Nonpineal melatonin in the alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Roth, J J; Gern, W A; Roth, E C; Ralph, C L; Jacobson, E

    1980-10-31

    All living and most fossil representatives of the reptilian subclass Archosauria lack pineal bodies. Arrhythmic, low-level, nonpineal melatonin is present, however, in the blood of Alligator mississippiensis. Although pineal bodies have been implicated in circadian phenomena, these results suggest that arrhytmic melatonin in alligators may not be involved incircadian events and indicate that the pineal is not the only source of the hormone melatonin. The evolutionary loss of the pineal in Archosauria occurred during the Mesozoic, and era noted for its seasonal stability. Arrhythmic melatonin titers inalligators and pineal loss in alligators and other archosaurs may be related to Mesozoic seasonal stability. PMID:7423204

  11. Ultradian oscillation in expression of four melatonin receptor subtype genes in the pineal gland of the grass puffer, a semilunar-synchronized spawner, under constant darkness

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Taro; Maruyama, Yusuke; Doi, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Atsuhiko; Ando, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin receptor gene expression as well as melatonin synthesis and secretion activities were examined in the pineal gland of the grass puffer, which exhibits unique lunar/tidal cycle-synchronized mass spawing: spawning occurs before high tide on the day of spring tide during spawing season. Melatonin synthesizing activity was assessed by the abundance of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (AANAT2) mRNA. The amount of aanat2 mRNA was low during light phase and initiated to increase after the light was turned off. The secretion of melatonin from primary pineal organ culture was stimulated after the light was turned off and ceased immediately after the light was turned on. The expression levels of four melatonin receptor subtype genes (mel1a1.4, mel1a1.7, mel1b, and mel1c) showed synchronous variations, and the levels tended to be high during the dark phase under light/dark conditions. These results suggest that the action of melatonin on the pineal gland is highly dependent on light and photoperiod, possibly with stronger action during night time. Under constant darkness, the expression of four melatonin receptor subtype genes showed unique ultradian oscillations with the period of 14.0–15.4 h, suggesting the presence of a circatidal oscillator in the pineal gland. The present results indicate that melatonin may serve local chronobiological functions in the pineal gland. These cyclic expressions of melatonin receptor genes in the pineal gland may be important in the control of the lunar/tidal cycle-synchronized mass spawning in the grass puffer. PMID:25688184

  12. Therapeutic potential of melatonin and its analogs in Parkinson’s disease: focus on sleep and neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Venkatramanujam; Cardinali, Daniel P.; Srinivasan, Uddanapalli S.; Kaur, Charanjit; Brown, Gregory M.; Spence, D. Warren; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disorders constitute major nonmotor features of Parkinson’s disease (PD) that have a substantial effect on patients’ quality of life and can be related to the progression of the neurodegenerative disease. They can also serve as preclinical markers for PD, as it is the case for rapid eye movement (REM)-associated sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Although the etiology of sleep disorders in PD remains undefined, the assessment of the components of the circadian system, including melatonin secretion, could give therapeutically valuable insight on their pathophysiopathology. Melatonin is a regulator of the sleep/wake cycle and also acts as an effective antioxidant and mitochondrial function protector. A reduction in the expression of melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors has been documented in the substantia nigra of PD patients. The efficacy of melatonin for preventing neuronal cell death and for ameliorating PD symptoms has been demonstrated in animal models of PD employing neurotoxins. A small number of controlled trials indicate that melatonin is useful in treating disturbed sleep in PD, in particular RBD. Whether melatonin and the recently developed melatonergic agents (ramelteon, tasimelteon, agomelatine) have therapeutic potential in PD is also discussed. PMID:22010042

  13. Melatonin-Mediated Intracellular Insulin during 2-Deoxy-d-glucose Treatment Is Reduced through Autophagy and EDC3 Protein in Insulinoma INS-1E Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han Sung; Han, Tae-Young

    2016-01-01

    2-DG triggers glucose deprivation without altering other nutrients or metabolic pathways and then activates autophagy via activation of AMPK and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We investigated whether 2-DG reduced intracellular insulin increased by melatonin via autophagy/EDC3 in insulinoma INS-1E cells. p-AMPK and GRP78/BiP level were significantly increased by 2-DG in the presence/absence of melatonin, but IRE1α level was reduced in 2-DG treatment. Levels of p85α, p110, p-Akt (Ser473, Thr308), and p-mTOR (Ser2481) were also significantly reduced by 2-DG in the presence/absence of melatonin. Mn-SOD increased with 2-DG plus melatonin compared to groups treated with/without melatonin alone. Bcl-2 was decreased and Bax increased with 2-DG plus melatonin. LC3II level increased with 2-DG treatment in the presence/absence of melatonin. Intracellular insulin production increased in melatonin plus 2-DG but reduced in treatment with 2-DG with/without melatonin. EDC3 was increased by 2-DG in the presence/absence of melatonin. Rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, increased GRP78/BiP and EDC3 levels in a dose-dependent manner and subsequently resulted in a decrease in intracellular production of insulin. These results suggest that melatonin-mediated insulin synthesis during 2-DG treatment involves autophagy and EDC3 protein in rat insulinoma INS-1E cells and subsequently results in a decrease in intracellular production of insulin. PMID:27493704

  14. Effects of damage to the suprachiasmatic area of the anterior hypothalamus on the daily melatonin and cortisol rhythms in the rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Reppert, S.M.; Perlow, M.J.; Ungerleider, L.G.; Mishkin, M.; Tamarkin, L.; Orloff, D.G.; Hoffman, H.J.; Klein, D.C.

    1981-12-01

    The effects of lesions of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) on the circadian rhythms in melatonin and cortisol were examined in the rhesus monkey. The concentrations of the two hormones were monitored in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) withdrawn from two sham-operated animals, two animals with complete bilateral SCN lesions, and two animals with partial SCN damage at 4 and 8 months after surgery. In the sham-operated animals, as in the intact animal, the daily melatonin rhythm was entrained to the daily light-dark cycle, was suppressed in constant light, and persisted in constant darkness. In contrast, neither animal with complete SCN ablation exhibited a daily pattern of CSF melatonin in diurnal lighting at 4 months after surgery nor were their melatonin levels at constant low values. Furthermore, CSF melatonin concentrations were not suppressed in either animal by constant light. Surprisingly, at 8 months after surgery, spectral analysis revealed a 24-hr component to the melatonin patterns for each animal with complete SCN ablation in both diurnal lighting and constant darkness. The two animals with partial SCN damage exhibited a daily melatonin rhythm in diurnal lighting, but constant light did not suppress CSF melatonin concentrations consistently. Daily rhythms persisted in both for a 6 1/2-d period of study in constant darkness. In contrast to the alterations in the melatonin rhythm after SCN damage, there was no apparent effect of either partial or complete SCN ablation on the daily CSF cortisol rhythm. These data indicate that, in the rhesus monkey, the SCN is important for the generation, photic entrainment, and photic suppression of the melatonin rhythm. However, circadian oscillators located outside of the SCN region may control the normal daily cortisol rhythm and perhaps the melatonin rhythm in the absence of the SCN.

  15. The effects of extremely low-frequency magnetic fields on melatonin and cortisol, two marker rhythms of the circadian system

    PubMed Central

    Touitou, Yvan; Selmaoui, Brahim

    2012-01-01

    In the past 30 years the concern that daily exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-EMF) (1 to 300 Hz) might be harmful to human health (cancer, neurobehavioral disturbances, etc) has been the object of debate, and has become a public health concern. This has resulted in the classification of ELF-EMF into category 2B, ie, agents that are “possibly carcinogenic to humans” by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Since melatonin, a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland, has been shown to possess oncostatic properties, a “melatonin hypothesis” has been raised, stating that exposure to EMF might decrease melatonin production and therefore might promote the development of breast cancer in humans. Data from the literature reviewed here are contradictory. In addition, we have demonstrated a lack of effect of ELF-EMF on melatonin secretion in humans exposed to EMF (up to 20 years' exposure) which rebuts the melatonin hypothesis. Currently, the debate concerns the effects of ELF-EMF on the risk of childhood leukemia in children chronically exposed to more than 0.4 μT. Further research is thus needed to obtain more definite answers regarding the potential deleterious effects of ELF-EMF. PMID:23393415

  16. Melatonin treatment during the incubation of sensitization attenuates methamphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization and MeCP2 expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jintao; Zhu, Dexiao; Zhang, Jing; Li, Guibao; Liu, Zengxun; Sun, Jinhao

    2016-02-01

    Behavior sensitization is a long-lasting enhancement of locomotor activity after exposure to psychostimulants. Incubation of sensitization is a phenomenon of remarkable augmentation of locomotor response after withdrawal and reflects certain aspects of compulsive drug craving. However, the mechanisms underlying these phenomena remain elusive. Here we pay special attention to the incubation of sensitization and suppose that the intervention of this procedure will finally decrease the expression of sensitization. Melatonin is an endogenous hormone secreted mainly by the pineal gland. It is effective in treating sleep disorder, which turns out to be one of the major withdrawal symptoms of methamphetamine (MA) addiction. Furthermore, melatonin can also protect neuronal cells against MA-induced neurotoxicity. In the present experiment, we treated mice with low dose (10mg/kg) of melatonin for 14 consecutive days during the incubation of sensitization. We found that melatonin significantly attenuated the expression of sensitization. In contrast, the vehicle treated mice showed prominent enhancement of locomotor activity after incubation. MeCP2 expression was also elevated in the vehicle treated mice and melatonin attenuated its expression. Surprisingly, correlation analysis suggested significant correlation between MeCP2 expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and locomotion in both saline control and vehicle treated mice, but not in melatonin treated ones. MA also induced MeCP2 over-expression in PC12 cells. However, melatonin failed to reduce MeCP2 expression in vitro. Our results suggest that melatonin treatment during the incubation of sensitization attenuates MA-induced expression of sensitization and decreases MeCP2 expression in vivo. PMID:26416230

  17. Circadian melatonin rhythm and excessive daytime sleepiness in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Videnovic, Aleksandar; Noble, Charleston; Reid, Kathryn J.; Peng, Jie; Turek, Fred W.; Marconi, Angelica; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Simuni, Tanya; Zadikoff, Cindy; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Diurnal fluctuations of motor and non-motor symptoms and high prevalence of sleep/wake disturbances in Parkinson’s disease (PD) suggest a role of the circadian system in the modulation of these symptoms. Yet, surprisingly little is known regarding circadian function in PD, and whether circadian dysfunction is involved in the development of sleep/wake disturbances in PD. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the timing and amplitude of the 24-hour melatonin rhythm, a marker of endogenous circadian rhythmicity, with self-reported sleep quality, the severity of daytime sleepiness and disease metrics. Design A cross-sectional study, (2009–2012). Setting PD and Movement Disorders Center, Northwestern University, Chicago. Participants Twenty PD patients on stable dopaminergic therapy and 15 age-matched controls underwent blood sampling for the measurement of serum melatonin levels at 30-minute intervals for 24 hours under modified constant routine conditions. Main Outcome Measure(s) Clinical and demographic data, self-reported measures of sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI)) and daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS)), circadian markers of the melatonin rhythm, including the amplitude, area-under-the-curve (AUC), and phase of the 24-hour rhythm. Results Participants with PD had a blunted circadian rhythms of melatonin secretion compared to controls; both the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm and the 24-hour AUC for circulating melatonin levels were significantly lower in PD participants compared with controls (p<0.001). Markers of circadian phase were not significantly different between the two groups. Among PD participants, those with excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS score ≥10) had a significantly lower amplitude of the melatonin rhythm and the 24-hour melatonin AUC compared with PD participants without excessive sleepiness (p=0.001). Disease duration, UPDRS scores, levodopa

  18. [MELATONIN CONCENTRATION IN THE BLOOD OF VITILIGO PATIENTS WITH STRESS IN ANAMNESIS].

    PubMed

    Tsiskarishvili, N I; Katsitadze, A; Tsiskarishvili, N V; Tsiskarishvil, Ts; Chitanava, L

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, despite some progress in the study of vitiligo many aspects of pathogenesis and treatment of this dermatosis remain unsolved or are highly controversial. It is believed that progression of disease is associated with a genetic predisposition, autoimmune processes and oxidative stress, but the concrete role of stress on the processes having place in the organism of vitiligo patients so far is not investigated. As we know, epiphysis is the main regulator of adaptation of the individual to the environment. An important product of secretion of the pineal gland is the hormone melatonin - a universal regulator of vital functions and biorhythms of the body. Psychoses, neuroses, depression, immunopathology are aspects of disturbances in circadian, seasonal and annual rhythms of the synthesis of this hormone. Clinical and experimental studies indicate that the hormone melatonin, which is one of the links in a stress defense mechanism of the body, has antioxidant and immunomodulatory properties. The purpose of this study was to determine plasma level of melatonin in the blood of vitiligo patients (with stress in anamnesis), depending on the clinical form and duration of the disease. 41 patients with vitiligo (16 with segmental and 25 with non-segmental form) with stress in anamnesis and duration of disease from several months to 20 years were under observation. The level of melatonin in the blood plasma was determined by ELISA (IBL - international - reagent), the results were expressed in units of pg/ml. According to the results of our study, 8 patients with segmental vitiligo had the normal level of plasma melatonin concentration (in the range of 20.2-31.1 pg/ml), in 2 cases - the level was near the norm (19.2 pg/ml). In the group of patients with non-segmental vitiligo, the level of melatonin was below the norm (12.5 pg/ml) and in 2 cases, the content of melatonin was very low - 4.05 pg / ml. Correlation analysis of melatonin levels with duration of disease

  19. An increase in melatonin in transgenic rice causes pleiotropic phenotypes, including enhanced seedling growth, delayed flowering, and low grain yield.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2014-05-01

    No previous reports have described the effects of an increase in endogenous melatonin levels on plant yield and reproduction. Here, the phenotypes of melatonin-rich transgenic rice plants overexpressing sheep serotonin N-acetyltransferase were investigated under field conditions. Early seedling growth of melatonin-rich transgenic rice was greatly accelerated, with enhanced biomass relative to the wild type (WT). However, flowering was delayed by 1 wk in the transgenic lines compared with the WT. Grain yields of the melatonin-rich transgenic lines were reduced by 33% on average. Other phenotypes also varied among the transgenic lines. For example, the transgenic line S1 exhibited greater height and biomass than the WT, while the S10 transgenic line showed diminished height and an increase in panicle numbers per plant. The expression levels of Oryza sativa homeobox1 (OSH1) and TEOSINTE BRANCHED1 (TB1) genes, two key regulators of meristem initiation and maintenance, were not altered in the transgenic lines. These data demonstrate that an alteration of endogenous melatonin levels leads to pleiotropic effects such as height, biomass, panicle number, flowering time, and grain yield, indicating that melatonin behaves as a signaling molecule in plant growth and reproduction. PMID:24571270

  20. Melatonin improves experimental colitis with sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    PARK, YOUNG-SOOK; CHUNG, SOOK-HEE; LEE, SEONG-KYU; KIM, JA-HYUN; KIM, JUN-BONG; KIM, TAE-KYUN; KIM, DONG-SHIN; BAIK, HAING-WOON

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) is an epidemic phenomenon in modern countries, and its harmful effects are well known. SD acts as an aggravating factor in inflammatory bowel disease. Melatonin is a sleep-related neurohormone, also known to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in the gastrointestinal tract; however, the effects of melatonin on colitis have been poorly characterized. Thus, in this study, we assessed the measurable effects of SD on experimental colitis and the protective effects of melatonin. For this purpose, male imprinting control region (ICR) mice (n=24) were used; the mice were divided into 4 experimental groups as follows: the control, colitis, colitis with SD and colitis with SD and melatonin groups. Colitis was induced by the administration of 5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in the drinking water for 6 days. The mice were sleep-deprived for 3 days. Changes in body weight, histological analyses of colon tissues and the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and genes were evaluated. SD aggravated inflammation and these effects were reversed by melatonin in the mice with colitis. In addition, weight loss in the mice with colitis with SD was significantly reduced by the injection of melatonin. Treatment with melatonin led to high survival rates in the mice, in spite of colitis with SD. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the serum of mice were significantly increased by SD and reduced by melatonin treatment. The melatonin-treated group showed a histological improvement of inflammation. Upon gene analysis, the expression of the inflammatory genes, protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ) and calmodulin 3 (CALM3), was increased by SD, and the levels decreased following treatment with melatonin. The expression levels of the apoptosis-related inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 5A (Wnt5a) genes was

  1. Melatonin Metabolism in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2010-01-01

    The metabolism of melatonin in the central nervous system is of interest for several reasons. Melatonin enters the brain either via the pineal recess or by uptake from the blood. It has been assumed to be also formed in some brain areas. Neuroprotection by melatonin has been demonstrated in numerous model systems, and various attempts have been undertaken to counteract neurodegeneration by melatonin treatment. Several concurrent pathways lead to different products. Cytochrome P450 subforms have been demonstrated in the brain. They either demethylate melatonin to N-acetylserotonin, or produce 6-hydroxymelatonin, which is mostly sulfated already in the CNS. Melatonin is deacetylated, at least in pineal gland and retina, to 5-methoxytryptamine. N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine is formed by pyrrole-ring cleavage, by myeloperoxidase, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and various non-enzymatic oxidants. Its product, N1-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine, is of interest as a scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, mitochondrial modulator, downregulator of cyclooxygenase-2, inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, neuronal and inducible NO synthases. Contrary to other nitrosated aromates, the nitrosated kynuramine metabolite, 3-acetamidomethyl-6-methoxycinnolinone, does not re-donate NO. Various other products are formed from melatonin and its metabolites by interaction with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. The relative contribution of the various pathways to melatonin catabolism seems to be influenced by microglia activation, oxidative stress and brain levels of melatonin, which may be strongly changed in experiments on neuroprotection. Many of the melatonin metabolites, which may appear in elevated concentrations after melatonin administration, possess biological or pharmacological properties, including N-acetylserotonin, 5-methoxytryptamine and some of its derivatives, and especially the 5-methoxylated kynuramines. PMID:21358968

  2. Melatonin inhibits paraquat-induced cell death in bovine preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yun-Wei; Sun, Ye-Qing; Sun, Wei-Jun; Du, Wei-Hua; Hao, Hai-Sheng; Zhao, Shan-Jiang; Zhu, Hua-Bin

    2016-03-01

    Preimplantation embryos are sensitive to oxidative stress-induced damage that can be caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) originating from normal embryonic metabolism and/or the external surroundings. Paraquat (PQ), a commonly used pesticide and potent ROS generator, can induce embryotoxicity. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of melatonin on PQ-induced damage during embryonic development in bovine preimplantation embryos. PQ treatment significantly reduced the ability of bovine embryos to develop to the blastocyst stage, and the addition of melatonin markedly reversed the developmental failure caused by PQ (20.9% versus 14.3%). Apoptotic assay showed that melatonin pretreatment did not change the total cell number in blastocysts, but the incidence of apoptotic nuclei and the release of cytochrome c were significantly decreased. Using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis, we found that melatonin pre-incubation significantly altered the expression levels of genes associated with redox signaling, particularly by attenuating the transcript level of Txnip and reinforcing the expression of Trx. Furthermore, melatonin pretreatment significantly reduced the expression of the pro-apoptotic caspase-3 and Bax, while the expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and XIAP was unaffected. Western blot analysis showed that melatonin protected bovine embryos from PQ-induced damage in a p38-dependent manner, but extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK) did not appear to be involved. Together, these results identify an underlying mechanism by which melatonin enhances the developmental potential of bovine preimplantation embryos under oxidative stress conditions. PMID:26607207

  3. Modulation of plasma melatonin concentrations by changes in posture.

    PubMed

    Nathan, P J; Jeyaseelan, A S; Burrows, G D; Norman, T R

    1998-05-01

    Posture change from a lying position to a standing position results in a decrease in plasma volume, which leads to an increase in plasma constituents, especially that of proteins and blood constituents bound to them. The aim of the present study was to investigate the physiological effects of postural changes on plasma nocturnal melatonin concentrations in healthy human volunteers. The study was divided into four stages. During stage one, subjects were seated from 21.00 hr to 01.00 hr. In stage two, subjects were lying at ground level from 21.00 hr to 01.00 hr. In stage three, subjects were is a sitting position from 2100 hr to 2300 hr and then in a standing position from 23.00 hr to 24.00 hr, and back to the sitting position from 24.00 hr to 01.00 hr. In the final stage, subjects were in a lying position from 21.00 hr to 23.00 hr and then in a standing position from 23.00 hr to 24.00 hr and back to the lying position from 24.00 hr to 01.00 hr. AUC analysis showed significant differences between sitting and lying positions (t=2.84; P<0.05; df=5), with higher melatonin levels associated with the sitting position (mean difference in peak concentration of 17.1 pg/ml). Furthermore a change in posture from the lying to the standing position produced a statistically significant increase in melatonin concentrations (final stage) (t=-3.37; P<0.05; df=5) (mean difference in peak concentration of 28.5 pg/ml). No differences were found with a change in posture from a sitting to a standing position. The hemoconcentration and hemodilution associated with posture changes may play a role in altering plasma protein bound hormones such as melatonin. PMID:9572531

  4. Identification of Pathway-Biased and Deleterious Melatonin Receptor Mutants in Autism Spectrum Disorders and in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Mercati, Oriane; Guillaume, Jean-Luc; Delorme, Richard; Botros, Hany Goubran; Pagan, Cécile; Périvier, Samuel; Scheid, Isabelle; Nygren, Gudrun; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Rastam, Maria; Ståhlberg, Ola; Gillberg, Carina; Serrano, Emilie; Lemière, Nathalie; Launay, Jean Marie; Mouren-Simeoni, Marie Christine; Leboyer, Marion; Gillberg, Christopher; Jockers, Ralf; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Melatonin is a powerful antioxidant and a synchronizer of many physiological processes. Alteration of the melatonin pathway has been reported in circadian disorders, diabetes and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, very little is known about the genetic variability of melatonin receptors in humans. Here, we sequenced the melatonin receptor MTNR1A and MTNR1B, genes coding for MT1 and MT2 receptors, respectively, in a large panel of 941 individuals including 295 patients with ASD, 362 controls and 284 individuals from different ethnic backgrounds. We also sequenced GPR50, coding for the orphan melatonin-related receptor GPR50 in patients and controls. We identified six non-synonymous mutations for MTNR1A and ten for MTNR1B. The majority of these variations altered receptor function. Particularly interesting mutants are MT1-I49N, which is devoid of any melatonin binding and cell surface expression, and MT1-G166E and MT1-I212T, which showed severely impaired cell surface expression. Of note, several mutants possessed pathway-selective signaling properties, some preferentially inhibiting the adenylyl cyclase pathway, others preferentially activating the MAPK pathway. The prevalence of these deleterious mutations in cases and controls indicates that they do not represent major risk factor for ASD (MTNR1A case 3.6% vs controls 4.4%; MTNR1B case 4.7% vs 3% controls). Concerning GPR50, we detected a significant association between ASD and two variations, Δ502–505 and T532A, in affected males, but it did not hold up after Bonferonni correction for multiple testing. Our results represent the first functional ascertainment of melatonin receptors in humans and constitute a basis for future structure-function studies and for interpreting genetic data on the melatonin pathway in patients. PMID:20657642

  5. Melatonin as a Signaling Molecule for Metabolism Regulation in Response to Hypoxia in the Crab Neohelice granulata

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Fábio Everton; Geihs, Márcio Alberto; Cruz, Bruno Pinto; Vargas, Marcelo Alves; Allodi, Silvana; Marins, Luis Fernando; Nery, Luiz Eduardo Maia

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin has been identified in a variety of crustacean species, but its function is not as well understood as in vertebrates. The present study investigates whether melatonin has an effect on crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) gene expression, oxygen consumption (VO2) and circulating glucose and lactate levels, in response to different dissolved-oxygen concentrations, in the crab Neohelice granulata, as well as whether these possible effects are eyestalk- or receptor-dependent. Melatonin decreased CHH expression in crabs exposed for 45 min to 6 (2, 200 or 20,000 pmol·crab−1) or 2 mgO2·L−1 (200 pmol·crab−1). Since luzindole (200 nmol·crab−1) did not significantly (p > 0.05) alter the melatonin effect, its action does not seem to be mediated by vertebrate-typical MT1 and MT2 receptors. Melatonin (200 pmol·crab−1) increased the levels of glucose and lactate in crabs exposed to 6 mgO2·L−1, and luzindole (200 nmol·crab−1) decreased this effect, indicating that melatonin receptors are involved in hyperglycemia and lactemia. Melatonin showed no effect on VO2. Interestingly, in vitro incubation of eyestalk ganglia for 45 min at 0.7 mgO2·L−1 significantly (p < 0.05) increased melatonin production in this organ. In addition, injections of melatonin significantly increased the levels of circulating melatonin in crabs exposed for 45 min to 6 (200 or 20,000 pmol·crab−1), 2 (200 and 20,000 pmol·crab−1) and 0.7 (200 or 20,000 pmol·crab−1) mgO2·L−1. Therefore, melatonin seems to have an effect on the metabolism of N. granulata. This molecule inhibited the gene expression of CHH and caused an eyestalk- and receptor-dependent hyperglycemia, which suggests that melatonin may have a signaling role in metabolic regulation in this crab. PMID:25486055

  6. Genetic deletion of MT₁/MT₂ melatonin receptors enhances murine cognitive and motor performance.

    PubMed

    O'Neal-Moffitt, G; Pilli, J; Kumar, S S; Olcese, J

    2014-09-26

    Melatonin, an indoleamine hormone secreted into circulation at night primarily by the brain's pineal gland, has been shown to have a wide variety of actions on the development and physiology of neurons in the CNS. Acting via two G-protein-coupled membrane receptors (MT1 and MT2), melatonin modulates neurogenesis, synaptic functions, neuronal cytoskeleton and gene expression. In the present studies, we sought to characterize the behavior and neuronal biology of transgenic mice lacking both of these melatonin receptors as a way to understand the hormone's receptor versus non-receptor-mediated actions in CNS-dependent activities, such as learning and memory, anxiety, general motor performance and circadian rhythmicity. Assessment of these behaviors was complemented by molecular analyses of gene expression in the brain. Our results demonstrate mild behavioral hyperactivity and a lengthened circadian period of free-running motor activity in melatonin receptor-deficient mice as compared to receptor-intact control mice beginning at an early age. Significant improvement in cognitive performance was found using the Barnes Maze and the Y-Maze. No behavioral changes in anxiety levels were found. Electrophysiological measures in hippocampal slices revealed a clear enhancement of long-term potentiation in mice lacking melatonin receptors with no significant differences in paired-pulse facilitation. Quantitative analysis of brain protein expression levels of phosphoCREB and phosphoERK1/2 and key markers of synaptic activity (synapsin, glutamate receptor 1, spinophilin, and glutamic acid decarboxylase 1) revealed significant differences between the double-knockout and wild-type animals, consistent with the behavioral findings. Thus, genetic deletion of melatonin receptors produces mice with enhanced cognitive and motor performance, supporting the view that these receptors play an important role in neurobehavioral development. PMID:25046530

  7. The influence of season, photoperiod, and pineal melatonin on immune function.

    PubMed

    Nelson, R J; Demas, G E; Klein, S L; Kriegsfeld, L J

    1995-11-01

    In addition to the well-documented seasonal cycles of mating and birth, there are also significant seasonal cycles of illness and death among many animal populations. Challenging winter conditions (i.e., low ambient temperature and decreased food availability) can directly induce death via hypothermia, starvation, or shock. Coping with these challenges can also indirectly increase morbidity and mortality by increasing glucocorticoid secretion, which can compromise immune function. Many environmental challenges are recurrent and thus predictable; animals could enhance survival, and presumably increase fitness, if they could anticipate immunologically challenging conditions in order to cope with these seasonal threats to health. The annual cycle of changing photoperiod provides an accurate indicator of time of year and thus allows immunological adjustments prior to the deterioration of conditions. Pineal melatonin codes day length information. Short day lengths enhance several aspects of immune function in laboratory studies, and melatonin appears to mediate many of the enhanced immunological effects of photoperiod. Generally, field studies report compromised immune function during the short days of autumn and winter. The conflict between laboratory and field data is addressed with a multifactor approach. The evidence for seasonal fluctuations in lymphatic tissue size and structure, as well as immune function and disease processes, is reviewed. The role of pineal melatonin and the hormones regulated by melatonin is discussed from an evolutionary and adaptive functional perspective. Finally, the clinically significance of seasonal fluctuations in immune function is presented. Taken together, it appears that seasonal fluctuations in immune parameters, mediated by melatonin, could have profound effects on the etiology and progression of diseases in humans and nonhuman animals. An adaptive functional perspective is critical to gain insights into the interaction among

  8. Pharmacokinetics of melatonin in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nazakat M; Azzopardi, Denis V; Hawwa, Ahmed F; McElnay, James C; Middleton, Benita; Arendt, J; Arichi, Tomoki; Gressens, Pierre; Edwards, A David

    2013-01-01

    Aims Preterm infants are deprived of the normal intra-uterine exposure to maternal melatonin and may benefit from replacement therapy. We conducted a pharmacokinetic study to guide potential therapeutic trials. Methods Melatonin was administered to 18 preterm infants in doses ranging from 0.04–0.6 μg kg−1 over 0.5–6 h. Pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed individually and by population methods. Results Baseline melatonin was largely undetectable. Infants receiving melatonin at 0.1 μg kg−1 h−1 for 2 h showed a median half-life of 15.82 h and median maximum plasma concentration of 203.3 pg ml−1. On population pharmacokinetics, clearance was 0.045 l h−1, volume of distribution 1.098 l and elimination half-life 16.91 h with gender (P = 0.047) and race (P < 0.0001) as significant covariates. Conclusions A 2 h infusion of 0.1 μg kg−1 h−1 increased blood melatonin from undetectable to approximately peak adult concentrations. Slow clearance makes replacement of a typical maternal circadian rhythm problematic. The pharmacokinetic profile of melatonin in preterm infants differs from that of adults so dosage of melatonin for preterm infants cannot be extrapolated from adult studies. Data from this study can be used to guide therapeutic clinical trials of melatonin in preterm infants. PMID:23432339

  9. Melatonin as an Antioxidant for Stroke Neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Watson, Nate; Diamandis, Theo; Gonzales-Portillo, Chiara; Reyes, Stephanny; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is a hormone derived from the pineal gland that has a wide range of clinical applications. While melatonin was originally assessed as a hormone specializing in regulation of the normal circadian rhythm in mammals, it now has been shown to be an effective free radical scavenger and antioxidant. Current research has focused on central nervous system (CNS) disorders, stroke in particular, for potential melatonin-based therapeutics. As of now, the realm of potential therapy regimens is focused on three main treatments: exogenously delivered melatonin, pineal gland grafting, and melatonin-mediated stem cell therapy. All therapies contain both costs and benefits, and current research is still focused on finding the best treatment plan. While comprehensive research has been conducted, more research regarding the safety of such therapies is needed in order to transition into the clinical level of testing. Antioxidants such as traditional Chinese medicine, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), and lavender oil, which have been used for thousands of years as treatment, are now gaining recognition as effective melatonin treatment alternatives. This review will further discuss relevant studies assessing melatonin-based therapeutics and provide evidence of other natural melatonin treatment alternatives for the treatment of stroke. PMID:26497887

  10. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7...—(1) Amount. One implant per mink. (2) Indications for use. For use in healthy male and female kit...