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Sample records for aluminium potroom asthma

  1. Increased nitric oxide in exhaled air: an early marker of asthma in non-smoking aluminium potroom workers?

    PubMed Central

    Lund, M; Oksne, P; Hamre, R; Kongerud, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To study exhaled nitric oxide (NO) as a marker of airway inflammation caused by potroom exposure, hypothesising that (a) workers exposed to potroom pollutants would have higher concentrations of NO in expired air than control subjects employed at the same plant but working outside of the potroom atmosphere, and (b) that concentrations of exhaled NO in potroom employees might be positively associated with concentrations of fluoride and exposure to dust.
METHODS—A study group comprising 186 male subjects (aged 24-63 years), employed in the potrooms of one Norwegian aluminium smelter, and 40 comparable control subjects (aged 25-60 years) recruited from the same plant, were examined by measurements of exhaled and nasal concentrations of NO, spirometry, and a questionnaire on respiratory symptoms as a part of an annual health surveillance programme. Estimates of exposure to fluorides and dust for selected job categories were obtained by means of personal samplers carried by the workers.
RESULTS—In the non-smokers, the concentrations of exhaled NO were higher in the potroom workers than in the controls (median (interquartile range) 9.3 (6.2-15.6) v 5.7 (4.6-8.3) ppb, p=0.001). The two groups did not differ in spirometry and asthma-like symptoms. Non-smoking potroom workers with asthma-like symptoms had higher concentrations of exhaled NO than those with no symptoms (median (interquartile range) 21.0 (19.3-41.4) v 8.5 (5.9-12.8) ppb, p=0.001), but had comparable spirometric values. In subjects who smoked, the concentrations of exhaled NO did not differ significantly between potroom workers and controls (median (interquartile range) 4.6 (3.3-8.0) v 4.0 (3.4-5.1) ppb. Exhaled NO was not significantly associated with either duration of employment or routine measurements of dust and fluorides.
CONCLUSIONS—Exposure to potroom pollutants is associated with increased concentrations of exhaled NO in non-smoking subjects. Nitric oxide in exhaled

  2. Prevalence of respiratory symptoms and spirometric values in aluminium potroom workers.

    PubMed

    Kezunović, Ljiljana Cvejanov

    2008-06-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms in potroom workers and to compare these results with changes in spirometric parameters. A modified questionnaire on respiratory symptoms from the British Medical Research Council was used to take the medical history data about respiratory symptoms. Spirometric parameters were determined on the same day (as a part of regular checkups) using the Jaeger spirometer. The study included 215 potroom workers from the aluminium factory in Podgorica, Montenegro. All subjects were men, but they differed in age and duration of work. The group used for comparison consisted of 81 unemployed male applicants for jobs in the factory who had never been exposed to this kind of air pollution before. Potroom workers mostly complained of breathlessness associated with the workplace (56.7 %) or weather changes (rain, cold wind, and humidity) (41.9%) and of dyspnoea when climbing stairs (51.2 %), but only 22.3 % reported using medication to treat these episodes. Most workers reported to have been smoking at the time of the study (62.4 %). Spirometric data showed only insignificant variations compared to the expected values (CECA standards). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterised by FEV1/VC % <88 % was found in only 17 (7.9 %) potroom workers, while asthma was identified in 9 (4.2 %). Although the prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms reported by the examined potroom workers was quite high at the group level, they were not associated with ventilatory impairments. PMID:18573745

  3. Peak exposures in aluminium potrooms: instrument development and field calibration.

    PubMed

    Carter, Stephanie R; Seixas, Noah S; Thompson, Mary Lou; Yost, Michael G

    2004-11-01

    Aluminium smelter potrooms are unique in that workplace exposures to hydrogen fluoride (HF), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and particulate matter occur simultaneously for some tasks. The peak exposures to these contaminants are of increasing interest in discovering the etiology of respiratory health effects. While a variety of direct-reading instruments are available for sulfur dioxide and particulate matter, only a few exist for hydrogen fluoride. The sensors in these HF instruments have a cross-sensitivity to sulfur dioxide making it difficult to monitor HF in an environment that also contains SO2. To overcome this problem, we assessed the simultaneous use of two electrochemical instruments: one with a SO2 sensor that does not respond to HF and the second with a hydrogen fluoride sensor that responds to both HF and SO2 in a 1 : 1 ratio, termed 'total acid gas'. The difference in the response between the two instruments should indicate the HF concentration: [HF + SO2] minus SO2 equals HF. The performance characteristics of this sampling train were evaluated in the laboratory through the generation of both HF and SO2 with permeation tubes. The response and recovery times for the SO2 only instrument were acceptable (6 and 15 s, respectively), but the "total acid gas" instrument exhibited both slow response and slow recovery approaching three and six min. The association between the traditional integrated filter sampling method and the direct-reading instrument for SO2 is 0.80 (Spearman's rho). The use of the digital filter strengthens the association between the HF direct-reading instrument and the integrated samples from 0.41 to 0.68. PMID:15536509

  4. Prevalence of respiratory disorders among aluminium potroom workers in relation to exposure to fluoride.

    PubMed Central

    Søyseth, V; Kongerud, J

    1992-01-01

    In a survey of 370 aluminium potroom workers in western Norway, bronchial responsiveness, lung function, and respiratory symptoms were studied in relation to occupational exposure to air contaminants in the potroom. Increased prevalences of respiratory symptoms, work related asthmatic symptoms, and abnormal lung function were found in subjects exposed to total fluorides above 0.5 mg/m3 when compared with workers exposed to total fluorides at concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/m3. No significant association between bronchial responsiveness and exposure to fluoride was found and the prevalence of respiratory symptoms was independent of the degree of dust exposure. These findings indicate that work related asthmatic symptoms in potroom workers may be related to exposure to fluorides. PMID:1536819

  5. Characterization of individual aerosol particles in workroom air of aluminium smelter potrooms.

    PubMed

    Hoflich, Burkard L W; Weinbruch, Stephan; Theissmann, Ralf; Gorzawski, Hauke; Ebert, Martin; Ortner, Hugo M; Skogstad, Asbjorn; Ellingsen, Dag G; Drablos, Per A; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2005-05-01

    Aerosol particles with aerodynamic diameters between 0.18 and 10 microm were collected in the workroom air of two aluminium smelter potrooms with different production processes (Soderberg and Prebake processes). Size, morphology and chemical composition of more than 2000 individual particles were determined by high resolution scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Based on chemical composition and morphology, particles were classified into different groups. Particle groups with a relative abundance above 1%(by number) include aluminium oxides, cryolite, aluminium oxides-cryolite mixtures, soot, silicates and sea salt. In both production halls, mixtures of aluminium oxides and cryolite are the dominant particle group. Many particles have fluoride-containing surface coatings or show agglomerations of nanometer-sized fluoride-containing particles on their surface. The phase composition of approximately 100 particles was studied by transmission electron microscopy. According to selected area electron diffraction, sodium beta-alumina (NaAl(11)O(17)) is the dominant aluminium oxide and cryolite (Na(3)AlF(6)) the only sodium aluminium fluoride present. Implications of our findings for assessment of adverse health effects are discussed. PMID:15877161

  6. Potroom asthma: New Zealand experience and follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, T.V.; Welford, B.; Coleman, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    Occupational asthma related to work in potlines in an aluminum smelter has been diagnosed on clinical criteria in 57 workers. About half were regular tobacco smokers but atopy was uncommon. There was a wide range in the time for which each had been employed prior to development of symptoms, but the average was about 20 months. Thirty-four showed nonspecific bronchial hyperreactivity to methacholine. At annual reviews over a period of 5 years following transfer to other work at the smelter, the majority improved in symptoms in 1-2 years and bronchial hyperreactivity returned to normal. However, over the subsequent 3 years, deterioration, not limited to tobacco smokers or atopic subjects, has occurred in some subjects.

  7. Theoretical aspects of fluoride air contaminant formation in aluminium smelter potrooms.

    PubMed

    L'vov, Boris V; Polzik, Leonid K; Weinbruch, Stephan; Ellingsen, Dag G; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2005-05-01

    The amount of particulate fluorides evolved from aluminium electrolysis cells is not entirely accounted for by the fluorides entrained in the anode gas. The largest additional source of particulate fluoride formation is by direct evaporation of fluorides into the anode gas stream and subsequent condensation on the drops of electrolyte generated in the process of bubble burst. A theoretical model was used for the calculation of the main physical parameters responsible for the formation of particle nuclei when the hot anode-gas is mixed with ambient air. The results of these calculations are in agreement with experimental observations reported in the literature. In particular, the size distribution, composition and morphology of the nano-particles support the theory of a vapour condensation mechanism under conditions of extreme supersaturation, but further studies are necessary. PMID:15877162

  8. Intelligent Potroom Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Jan Berkow; Larry Banta

    2003-07-29

    The Intelligent Potroom Operation project focuses on maximizing the performance of an aluminum smelter by innovating components for an intelligent manufacturing system. The Intelligent Potroom Advisor (IPA) monitors process data to identify reduction cells exhibiting behaviors that require immediate attention. It then advises operational personnel on those heuristic-based actions to bring the cell back to an optimal operating state in order to reduce the duration and frequency of substandard reduction cell performance referred to as ''Off-Peak Modes'' (OPMs). Techniques developed to identify cells exhibiting OPMs include the use of a finite element model-based cell state estimator for defining the cell's current operating state via advanced cell noise analyses. In addition, rule induction was also employed to identify statistically significant complex behaviors that occur prior to OPMs. The intelligent manufacturing system design, concepts and formalisms developed in this project w ere used as a basis for an intelligent manufacturing system design. Future research will incorporate an adaptive component to automate continuous process improvement, a technology platform with the potential to improve process performance in many of the other Industries of the Future applications as well.

  9. Asthma caused by potassium aluminium tetrafluoride: a case series.

    PubMed

    Laštovková, Andrea; Klusáčková, Pavlina; Fenclová, Zdenka; Bonneterre, Vincent; Pelclová, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe a case-series of potassium aluminium tetrafluoride (KAlF(4))-induced occupational asthma (OA) and/or occupational rhinitis (OR). The study involves five patients from a heat-exchanger production line who were examined (including specific inhalation challenge tests) for suspected OA and/or OR caused by a flux containing almost 100% KAlF(4) - with fluorides' workplace air concentrations ranging between 1.7 and 2.8 mg/m(3). No subject had a previous history of asthma. All five patients had a positive specific challenge test (three patients were diagnosed with OA alone, one with OR and one with both OR and OA). At the follow-up visit, after three years on average, all patients needed permanent corticosteroid therapy (four topical, one oral). After elimination from the exposure, only one of the observed subjects gave an indication of an improvement, two subjects stabilized and two worsened. Our case series focuses on the correlation between patients' exposure to fluorides in air-conditioner production and the subsequent occurrence of OR/OA. Currently, it is uncertain whether these OR/OA were caused by hypersensitivity or irritation. PMID:26212411

  10. A longitudinal study of respiratory symptoms in aluminum potroom workers

    SciTech Connect

    Kongerud, J.; Samuelsen, S.O. )

    1991-07-01

    The influence of occupational work exposure and host factors on the incidence of dyspnea and wheezing as reported in questionnaires was examined in 1,301 new employees in aluminum electrolytic potrooms. The incidence appeared to decrease after 2 yr of exposure, and the estimated probability of development of symptoms was nearly 20% after 4 yr. A total of 105 subjects developed dyspnea and wheezing. Of 78 symptomatic subjects who were interviewed, 76% experienced improvement or absence of symptoms when off work. In 523 subjects who were assigned to specific levels of exposure at the end of follow-up, a dose-response gradient was found between the development of symptoms and fluoride exposure. Increased risk with increasing amounts of tobacco was also observed, but childhood allergy and a family history of asthma were not significantly related to the outcome variable. The authors conclude that both total fluoride exposure and smoking are related to asthmatic symptoms in potroom workers, and the suggestion of a dose-response gradient was found for both variables. However, a causal relationship between fluorides and symptoms should be investigated further by specific bronchial provocation testing and by research for specific antibodies and other immunologic markers.

  11. 40 CFR 63.845 - Incorporation of new source performance standards for potroom groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... by the regulatory authority; and that the potroom group and associated air pollution control... any Soderberg, CWPB2, and CWPB3 potline that adds a new potroom group to an existing potline or that is associated with a potroom group that meets the definition of “modified potroom group”...

  12. Exposures in the alumina and primary aluminium industry: an historical review.

    PubMed

    Benke, G; Abramson, M; Sim, M

    1998-04-01

    We reviewed specific chemical exposures and exposure assessment methods relating to published and unpublished epidemiological studies in the alumina and primary aluminium industry. Our focus was to review limitations in the current literature and make recommendations for future research. Although some of the exposures in the smelting of aluminium have been well characterised, particularly in potrooms, little has been published regarding the exposures in bauxite mining and alumina refining. Past epidemiological studies in the industry have concentrated on the smelting of aluminium, with many limitations in the methodology used in their exposure assessment. We found that in aluminium smelting, exposures to fluorides, coal tar pitch volatiles (CTPV) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) have tended to decrease in recent years, but insufficient information exists for the other known exposures. Although excess cancers have been found among workers in the smelting of aluminium, the exposure assessment methods in future studies need to be improved to better characterise possible causative agents. The small number of cohort studies has been a factor in the failure to identify clear exposure-response relationships for respiratory diseases. A dose-response relationship has been recently described for fluoride exposure and bronchial hyper-responsiveness, but whether fluorides are the causative agent, co-agent or simply markers for the causative agent(s) for potroom asthma, remains to be determined. Published epidemiological studies and quantitative exposure data for bauxite mining and alumina refining are virtually non-existent. Determination of possible exposure-response relationships for this part of the industry through improved exposure assessment methods should be the focus of future studies. PMID:9684558

  13. Annual decline in forced expiratory volume is steeper in aluminum potroom workers than in workers without exposure to potroom fumes

    PubMed Central

    Henneberger, Paul K.; Einvik, Gunnar; Virji, Mohammed Abbas; Bakke, Berit; Kongerud, Johny

    2016-01-01

    Background Aluminum potroom exposure is associated with increased mortality of COPD but the association between potroom exposure and annual decline in lung function is unknown. We have measured lung volumes annually using spirometry from 1986 to 1996. The objective was to compare annual decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (dFEV1) and forced vital capacity (dFVC). Methods The number of aluminum potroom workers was 4,546 (81% males) and the number of workers in the reference group was 651 (76% males). The number of spirometries in the index group and the references were 24,060 and 2,243, respectively. Results After adjustment for confounders, the difference in dFEV1 and dFVC between the index and reference groups were 13.5 (P < 0.001) and −8.0 (P = 0.060) ml/year. Conclusion Aluminum potroom operators have increased annual decline in FEV1 relative to a comparable group with non‐exposure to potroom fumes and gases. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:322–329, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Industrial Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26853811

  14. Potroom palsy? Neurologic disorder in three aluminum smelter workers.

    PubMed

    Longstreth, W T; Rosenstock, L; Heyer, N J

    1985-11-01

    We studied three patients with a progressive neurologic disorder, all of whom had worked for over 12 years in the same potroom of an aluminum smelting plant. All had incoordination and an intention tremor. Two of the three patients had cognitive deficits, and the most severely affected patient also had spastic paraparesis. None had involvement of the peripheral nervous system. Despite extensive evaluations, the cause of these patients' problems remains obscure. It is tempting to implicate one of the numerous substances to which the patients were exposed in the potroom, but none is known to cause the neurologic problems seen in these patients. Neurotoxic effects of aluminum in animals are directed at the central nervous system, and theoretically long-term low-level exposure to aluminum in the potroom could explain the findings in our patients. PMID:4062445

  15. Potroom palsy. Neurologic disorder in three aluminum smelter workers

    SciTech Connect

    Longstreth, W.T. Jr.; Rosenstock, L.; Heyer, N.J.

    1985-11-01

    The authors studied three patients with a progressive neurologic disorder, all of whom had worked for over 12 years in the same potroom of an aluminum smelting plant. All had incoordination and an intention tremor. Two of the three patients had cognitive deficits, and the most severely affected patient also had spastic paraparesis. None had involvement of the peripheral nervous system. Despite extensive evaluations, the cause of these patients problems remains obscure. It is tempting to implicate one of the numerous substances to which the patients were exposed in the potroom, but none is known to cause the neurologic problems seen in these patients. Neurotoxic effects of aluminum in animals are directed at the central nervous system, and theoretically long-term low-level exposure to aluminum in the potroom could explain the findings in our patients.

  16. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > Asthma Print A A A ... it can take several days. continue Who Gets Asthma? No one really knows why one person's airways ...

  17. Biological indicators of exposure to total and respirable aluminium dust fractions in a primary aluminium smelter.

    PubMed Central

    Röllin, H B; Theodorou, P; Cantrell, A C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The study attempts to define biological indicators of aluminium uptake and excretion in workers exposed to airborne aluminium compounds in a primary aluminium smelter. Also, this study defines the total and respirable aluminium dust fractions in two different potrooms, and correlates their concentrations with biological indicators in this group of workers. METHODS: Air was sampled at defined work sites. Non-destructive and conventional techniques were used to find total and respirable aluminium content of the dust. Blood and urine was collected from 84 volunteers employed at various work stations throughout the smelter and from two different cohorts of controls matched for sex, age, and socioeconomic status. Aluminium in serum samples and urine specimens was measured by flameless atomic absorption with a PE 4100 ZL spectrometer. RESULTS: The correlation of aluminium concentrations in serum and urine samples with the degree of exposure was assessed for three arbitrary exposure categories; low (0.036 mg Al/m3), medium (0.35 mg Al/m3) and high (1.47 mg Al/m3) as found in different areas of the smelter. At medium and high exposure, the ratio of respirable to total aluminium in the dust samples varied significantly. At high exposure, serum aluminium, although significantly raised, was still within the normal range of an unexposed population. The workers with low exposure excreted aluminium in urine at levels significantly higher than the controls, but still within the normal range of the population. However, potroom workers with medium and high exposure had significantly higher urinary aluminium than the normal range. CONCLUSIONS: It is concluded that only urinary aluminium constitutes a practical index of occupational exposure at or above 0.35 mg Al/m3, and that the respirable fraction of the dust may play a major role in the biological response to exposure to aluminium in a smelter environment. PMID:8758038

  18. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma is a chronic disease that affects your airways. Your airways are tubes that carry air in and out ... you have asthma, the inside walls of your airways become sore and swollen. That makes them very ...

  19. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Month with a Google+ Hangout on Air for parents and caregivers to learn how to help control a child's asthma so that they can breathe ... parents build up their asthma team. Jose, his parents, a doctor and a nurse, ... forces to help Jose control his asthma. The video is recorded in Spanish ...

  20. Asthma.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Karl-Christian

    2014-01-01

    'Asthma' is derived from the Greek root ασθμαινω, meaning 'gasp for breath'. The term originally did not define a disease, but was employed to describe respiratory symptoms of a variety of pulmonary conditions. Over the centuries, several models have been proposed to understand the pathophysiologic abnormalities of asthma. By the beginning of the 20th century, asthma was seen to be a unique illness characterized by 'spasmodic afflictions of the bronchial tubes'. Consistent with the nature of asthma as a complex disease, the models for asthma pathogenesis have become increasingly complex. Research has moved from antiquated ideas to a descriptive functional approach to one that relies on pathophysiology in cellular and molecular biology, immunology, microbiology and genetics/genomics. As more advanced technologies for measuring lung function were developed, the features of asthma were steadily unraveled and its pathophysiology clarified. Asthma was shown to be associated with transient increases in airway resistance, reductions in forced expiratory volumes and flows, hyperinflation of the lungs and increased work of breathing, as well as abnormalities in the distribution of ventilation, perfusion and arterial blood gases. Today, asthma is seen as a chronic inflammatory disease which is not yet fully understood in its pathophysiology; therefore, therapy is still on the path to becoming optimal. PMID:24925386

  1. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... exercise. It's a great way to keep the body and mind healthy, so if you get exercise-induced asthma ...

  2. Asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Calverley, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is now recognised to be a major cause of morbidity and even mortality in people of all ages. Two important ideas have changed our approach to asthma management. The first is understanding that asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder which needs regular treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs such as inhaled corticosteroids to prevent further attacks. The second development is the availability of prescribable peak flow meters, which allows both confident diagnosis and early prediction of relapse. Asthma management guidelines provide a logical treatment framework for most patients, but a few difficult cases still consume large amounts of medical time. The commonest problem is one of compliance with treatment which may respond to patient education, although this is not universally so. Other problems include misdiagnosis, acid reflux and, rarely, true corticosteroid-resistant asthma. Several potentially important new treatments have been developed. These include longer acting anticholinergic drugs, drugs with bronchodilator and some anti-inflammatory properties which antagonise or inhibit the production of leukotrienes, sub-types of phosphodiesterase inhibitor with anti-inflammatory properties and immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclosporin. Ultimately these new treatments must be rigorously tested and integrated into a care plan that remains centred on patient education. PMID:8746278

  3. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Burks AW, et al, eds. In: Middleton's Allergy Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2014:chap 55. Lugogo N, Que LG, Gilstrap DL, Kraft M. Asthma: clinical diagnosis and management. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  4. Bladder cancer in the aluminium industry.

    PubMed

    Thériault, G; Tremblay, C; Cordier, S; Gingras, S

    1984-04-28

    The incidence of bladder cancer is unusually high in aluminium smelter workers. An epidemiological study showed that workers in Soderberg potrooms are at highest risk for bladder cancer, the adjusted overall relative risk being 2.39 (1.34-4.28). Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, of which benz(a)pyrene (BaP) served as an indicator, seems to be the causative factor. The relative risk was evaluated at 12.38 for workers with 20 or more equivalent years of BaP exposure. Cigarette smoking contributed significantly to the appearance of bladder cancer in the population studied. There is a synergistic effect when cigarette smoking and BaP exposure are combined; the numbers in our population are too small to determine whether this interaction effect is multiplicative or additive. It is concluded that bladder cancer is associated with aluminium smelting (primarily with the Soderberg process). PMID:6143877

  5. Aluminium plasmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Gerard, Davy; Gray, Stephen K.

    2014-12-15

    In this study, we present an overview of 'aluminium plasmonics', i.e. the study of both fundamental and practical aspects of surface plasmon excitations in aluminium structures, in particular thin films and metal nanoparticles. After a brief introduction noting both some recent and historical contributions to aluminium plasmonics, we discuss the optical properties of aluminium and aluminium nanostructures and highlight a few selected studies in a host of areas ranging from fluorescence to data storage.

  6. Industrial hygiene survey in an aluminium reduction plant in India.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Ashit K; Ravichandran, Beerappa; Bhattacharya, Sanat K; Roy, Sanjit K; Ahmed, Sabir; Thakur, Sridhar; Saiyed, Habibullah N

    2008-09-01

    This study reports a work-environmental assessment and workers' exposure in a major prebake type aluminium smelter in India. Levels of known health hazards in and near the main smelting operations viz., the Potroom, the Carbon area, the Butt section, the Rodding shop, the Bath preparing area and the Casthouse were measured. Dustiness in general was high to excessively high. Mean levels of respirable dust (PM10) in air in the three dustiest areas were 24.07 mg/m3 in the Carbon areas, 27.57 mg/m3 in the Bath preparing and 4.44 mg/m3 in the Rodding shop. 40- 60% of the particles were less than 5 microm in size. 0.5- 2.82% particulate fluoride was obtained in the size fraction 0.4- 4.7 microm of the Potroom air. Naturally, exposures to total dusts were very high in these processes. The background levels of NOx and SO2 and fluorides (gaseous and particulate) were found to be within the prescribed Indian Standards. Higher exposures to gaseous and particulate fluoride, 3.85 and 6.53 mg/m3 respectively, were observed among the Rodding shop workers. The levels ofpolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were deemed to be excessive in the Carbon area. Measurements of heat stress were made in winter and were found to be lower than the prescribed limit. PMID:18783008

  7. Occupational asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - occupational exposure; Irritant-induced reactive airways disease ... the workplace can trigger asthma symptoms, leading to occupational asthma. The most common triggers are wood dust, grain ...

  8. Susceptibility factors and DNA adducts in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of aluminium smelter workers exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Rainer; Baranczewski, Pawel; Warholm, Margareta; Hagmar, Lars; Möller, Lennart; Rannug, Agneta

    2002-04-01

    Formation of DNA adducts as a result of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was studied in 98 potroom workers from an aluminium smelting plant and in 55 blue-collar workers without occupational PAH exposure. DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was used for quantitation of individual PAH-DNA adducts by 32P-postlabelling/high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Four individual DNA adducts (denoted A, B, C and D) were quantified in 141 of a total of 153 subjects. Genetic polymorphisms for cytochrome P-4501A1 ( CYP1A1), microsomal epoxide hydrolase, N-acetyltransferase 2, glutathione transferases M1, P1 and T1 ( GSTM1, GSTP1 and GSTT1, respectively) and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) were analysed. For 52 subjects, analysis of mRNA inducibility of CYP1A1 was performed. No statistically significant differences in the levels of total or individual DNA adducts A, C and D were found between potroom workers and control subjects. All potroom workers and the subgroup of potroom workers who reported to never/sometimes use personal respiratory protection ( n=72) were found to have a significantly higher likelihood of having high levels of adduct B than control subjects [odds ratio (OR) =3.4 with 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.3-9.2, and OR=4.2 with 95% CI 1.6-11.5, respectively]. In the subgroup, levels of adducts A and B were found to be significantly higher among workers with employment time of less than 6 months ( n=5). Also, the levels of the individual DNA adducts were to some extent modified by genetic polymorphisms in CYP1A1, GSTM1, GSTP1 and NQO1 and by CYP1A1 inducibility. In conclusion, levels of adduct B, identified by 32P-postlabelling/HPLC methodology as an indicator of PAH exposure in aluminium production, were modified by the use of respiratory protection, length of employment and genetic polymorphisms. PMID:11967624

  9. Asthma Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asthma is a chronic disease that requires ongoing management. Personalized plans for treatment may include medications, an asthma action plan, and environmental control measures to avoid your child's asthma triggers. ...

  10. Asthma - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - inhaled corticosteroids; Asthma - long-acting beta-agonists; Asthma - leukotriene modifiers; Asthma - cromolyn; Bronchial asthma-control drugs; Wheezing - control drugs; Reactive airway disease - control drugs

  11. Evidence of aluminium accumulation in aluminium welders.

    PubMed Central

    Elinder, C G; Ahrengart, L; Lidums, V; Pettersson, E; Sjögren, B

    1991-01-01

    Using atomic absorption spectrometry the aluminium concentrations in blood and urine and in two iliac bone biopsies obtained from welders with long term exposure to fumes containing aluminium were measured. The urinary excretion of two workers who had welded for 20 and 21 years varied between 107 and 351 micrograms Al/l, more than 10 times the concentration found in persons without occupational exposure. Urinary aluminium excretion remained high many years after stopping exposure. Blood and bone aluminium concentrations (4-53 micrograms Al/l and 18-29 micrograms Al/g respectively) were also raised but not to the same extent as urine excretion. It is concluded that long term exposure to aluminium by inhalation gives rise to accumulation of aluminium in the body and skeleton of health persons, and that the elimination of retained aluminium is very slow, in the order of several years. PMID:1954151

  12. Exposure and inhalation risk assessment in an aluminium cast-house.

    PubMed

    Godderis, L; Vanderheyden, W; Van Geel, J; Moens, G; Masschelein, R; Veulemans, H

    2005-12-01

    To date the exposure, absorption and respiratory health effects of cast-house workers have not been described since most studies performed in the aluminium industry are focused on exposure and health effects of potroom personnel. In the present study, we assessed the external exposure and the absorbed dose of metals in personnel from the aluminium cast house. This was combined with an evaluation of respiratory complaints and the lung function of the personnel. 30 workers from an aluminium casting plant participated and 17 individuals of the packaging and distribution departments were selected as controls. The exposure was assessed by the quantification of total inhalable fume with metal fraction and by the determination of urinary aluminium, chromium, beryllium, manganese and lead concentration. Carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), aldehydes and polyaromatic hydrocarbons and man-made mineral fibres concentration were assessed as well. In order to evaluate their respiratory status each participant filled out a questionnaire and their lung function was tested by forced spirometry. Total inhalable fume exposure was maximum 4.37 mg m(-3). Exposure to the combustion gases, man-made mineral fibres and metal fume was well below the exposure limits. Beryllium could not be detected in the urine. The values of aluminium, manganese and lead in the urine were all under the respective reference value. One individual had a urinary chromium excretion above the ACGIH defined biological exposure index (BEI) of 30 microg g(-1) creatinine. There was no significant difference in any of the categories of the respiratory questionnaire and in the results of the spirometry between cast house personnel and referents (Chi-square, all p > 0.05). Exposure in cast houses seem to be acceptable under these conditions. However, peak exposure to fumes cannot be excluded and the potential risk of chromium and beryllium exposure due to the recycling of aluminium requires further attention

  13. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Nicholas J; Morrissey, Brian M; Schivo, Michael; Albertson, Timothy E

    2012-08-01

    Occupational asthma is the most common occupational lung disease. Work-aggravated asthma and occupational asthma are two forms of asthma causally related to the workplace, while reactive airways dysfunction syndrome is a separate entity and a subtype of occupational asthma. The diagnosis of occupational asthma is most often made on clinical grounds. The gold standard test, specific inhalation challenge, is rarely used. Low molecular weight isocyanates are the most common compounds that cause occupational asthma. Workers with occupational asthma secondary to low molecular weight agents may not have elevated specific IgE levels. The mechanisms of occupational asthma associated with these compounds are partially described. Not all patients with occupational asthma will improve after removal from the workplace. PMID:21573916

  14. Childhood Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share your child's asthma management plan with the school nurse and any coaches who oversee your child. With the approval of physicians and parents, school-age children with asthma should be allowed to ...

  15. An immunologic and genetic study of asthma in workers in an aluminum smelter

    SciTech Connect

    Mackay, I.R.; Oliphant, R.C.; Laby, B.; Smith, M.M.; Fisher, J.N.; Mitchell, R.J.; Propert, D.N.; Tait, B.D. )

    1990-10-01

    The cause or causes of asthma among employees in aluminum smelters is unknown. We attempted to ascertain whether such workers who developed asthma differed in respect to indices of immunological function and certain genetic markers. Data were collected from 33 asthmatic and 127 nonasthmatic potroom workers. Asthmatic workers had significantly lower mean serum levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)M; however, mean levels of IgG and IgA, median levels of IgE, the capacity for recall of delayed type hypersensitivity, levels of immune complexes, and frequency of antinuclear or other autoantibodies did not differ from values for nonasthmatic workers. Asthma was found to develop on a background of atopy in 21 workers (64%), whereas there were no features of atopy in 12 workers (36%). Cigarette smoking had independent effects on immunological function. In respect to genetic markers, there was a higher frequency among asthmatic workers of the alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency phenotype MS, but the frequency of blood groups, Gm allotypes, or human leucocyte antigen types was similar. The study established that the profile of immune function, or genetic markers tested, did not differ essentially for workers in an aluminum smelter who did or did not develop asthma; however, there was an indication of heterogeneity in causation, as judged by atopy-related and non-atopy-related groups in the asthma population.

  16. Asthma Outcomes: Asthma Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Jerry A.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Canino, Glorisa J.; Elward, Kurtis S.; Kattan, Meyer; Matsui, Elizabeth C.; Mitchell, Herman; Sutherland, E. Rand; Minnicozzi, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Respiratory symptoms are commonly used to assess the impact of patient-centered interventions. Objective At the request of National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies, an expert group was convened to propose which measurements of asthma symptoms should be used as a standardized measure in future clinical research studies. Methods Asthma symptom instruments were classified as daily diaries (prospectively recording symptoms between research visits) or retrospective questionnaires (completed at research visits). We conducted a systematic search in PubMed and a search for articles that cited key studies describing development of instruments. We classified outcome instruments as either core (required in future studies), supplemental (used according to study aims and standardized), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results Four instruments (3 daily diaries, 1 for adults and 2 for children; and 1 retrospective questionnaire for adults) were identified. Minimal clinically important differences have not been established for these instruments, and validation studies were only conducted in a limited number of patient populations. Validity of existing instruments may not be generalizable across racial-ethnic or other subgroups. Conclusions An evaluation of symptoms should be a core asthma outcome measure in clinical research. However, available instruments have limitations that preclude selection of a core instrument. The working group participants propose validation studies in diverse populations, comparisons of diaries versus retrospective questionnaires, and evaluations of symptom assessment alone versus composite scores of asthma control. PMID:22386505

  17. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asthma: Associated Conditions Asthma and Pregnancy Asthma Medications Asthma Medications Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... make sure you are using it correctly. Other Asthma Related Medication Treatment Annual influenza vaccine (flu shot) ...

  18. Joining of aluminium structures with aluminium foams

    SciTech Connect

    Burzer, J.; Bernard, T.; Bergmann, H.W.

    1998-12-31

    The aim of this work is the evaluation of new construction elements for applications in transportation industry which are based on new designs incorporating commonly applied aluminium structures and aluminium foams. The work includes the characterization of the joining process, the joining mechanism and the mechanical properties of the joining zone. A testing method for the joints is developed which is based on a common tensile test in order to evaluate the influence of the main laser welding parameters on the toughness of the joints and to afford a comparison between laser beam welding and gluing process. The analysis of the joining mechanism is investigated with the help of metallographic studies. In addition, the energy absorption properties of aluminium hollows filled and joined with foam structures are characterized.

  19. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M

    1995-01-01

    Many toxic compounds found in air emissions may induce bronchoconstriction. In the workplace, workers are exposed to these compounds, often in much higher concentrations. Some of these compounds act as sensitizers. Of these, some compounds induce asthma by producing specific IgE antibodies to the compound or its protein conjugate, while others induce asthma through yet unidentified immunologic mechanisms. Some compounds, when inhaled in high concentrations, act as irritants and produce bronchoconstriction probably by inducing acute airway inflammation. The latter condition is called Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome (RADS) or irritant-induced asthma. Occupational asthma is an excellent model to study the pathogenesis and the natural history of adult onset asthma because the responsible agent can be identified, complete avoidance is possible, and exposure can be measured or estimated. PMID:8549481

  20. What Is Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section What Is Asthma? Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... major trigger for asthma. Photo: iStock Who Gets Asthma? People get asthma because of an interaction between ...

  1. Exercise and Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Exercise and Asthma Page Content Article Body Almost every ... children more likely to develop asthma. How does exercise cause asthma symptoms? The symptoms of asthma are ...

  2. Asthma and allergy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - asthma and allergy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on asthma and allergies : Allergy and Asthma Network Mothers of Asthmatics -- www.aanma.org American Academy of Allergy, Asthma ...

  3. Asthma and Hispanic Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Asthma Asthma and Hispanic Americans In 2014, 2.1 million Hispanics reported that they currently have asthma. Puerto Rican Americans have almost twice the asthma ...

  4. Diagnosing Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & ...

  5. Asthma Inhalers

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduce the release of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) into the atmosphere when taking certain asthma medications. Until recently, most ... hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) inhalers, that do not rob the atmosphere of ozone. “The FDA [Food and Drug Administration] ...

  6. Asthma Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... of asthma. The doctor may take a spirometer reading, give the child an inhaled medication that opens ...

  7. Childhood asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, N M; Brown, R W; Parker, E; Robins, T G; Remick, D G; Philbert, M A; Keeler, G J; Israel, B A

    1999-01-01

    Asthma prevalence in children has increased 58% since 1980. Mortality has increased by 78%. The burden of the disease is most acute in urban areas and racial/ethnic minority populations. Hospitalization and morbidity rates for nonwhites are more than twice those for whites. Asthma is characterized by recurrent wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing. Research in the past decade has revealed the importance of inflammation of the airways in asthma and clinical treatment to reduce chronic inflammation. Asthma is associated with production of IgE to common environmental allergens including house dust mite, animal dander, cockroach, fungal spores, and pollens. Some interventions to reduce symptoms through control of dust mite and animal dander have had positive results. Control of symptoms through interventions to reduce exposures to cockroach antigen has not been reported. Studies illustrating causal effects between outdoor air pollution and asthma prevalence are scant. Increases in asthma prevalence have occurred at the same time as general improvements in air quality. However, air quality appears to exacerbate symptoms in the child who already has the disease. Decreased pulmonary function has been associated with exposure to particulates and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to smoke, SO(2) and NO(2). Symptoms have been correlated with increased levels of respirable particulates, ozone, and SO(2). Interventions that reduce the negative outcomes in asthma associated with outdoor environmental factors have not been reported. Control of asthma in children will entail the collaborative efforts of patients, family, clinical professionals, and school personnel, as well as community-wide environmental control measures and conducive national and local policies based on sound research. Images Figure 1 PMID:10423388

  8. [Occupational asthma].

    PubMed

    Pauli, G; Bessot, J C; Gourdon, C

    1992-12-01

    The diagnosis of occupational asthma requires the integration of a multiplicity of data; the history, cutaneous skin tests, biological tests, respiratory function tests and non-specific tests of bronchial hyperreactivity and specific bronchial provocation test. The history search for the presence of an atopic state, the occurrence of similar disorders in members of the same firm and also the timing of symptoms in relation to the occupational activities. Cutaneous tests are particularly helpful in IgE-mediated asthma in relation to the inhalation of animal or vegetable materials of glycoprotein origin. For haptens, the need for their prior coupling to a protein carrier causes problems which have not been entirely resolved. Laboratory tests run into the same snags. Respiratory function and non-specific bronchial provocation tests, confirm the diagnosis of asthma and enable the medium and long term prognostic to be assessed. Specific bronchial provocation tests are the most appropriate tests to establish an aetiological diagnosis in occupational asthma. Different technical methods are possible: quantitative administration of allergen aerosols, realistic tests, and tests using exposure chambers to achieve true test doses. The products responsible for occupational asthma are multiple. The different substances are characterised in a simplified manner: first animal matter (mammalian and arthropod allergens), secondly substances of vegetable origin (roots, leaves, flowers, grain and flour, wood and its derivates) and finally chemical products. The chemical products are primarily from the pharmaceutical and metal industries and above all from the plastics industry. PMID:1296320

  9. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M.; Grzybowski, S.

    1976-01-01

    Occupational asthma is probably much more common than is generally realized. Though many causes have been described, undoubtedly many more are yet to be recognized. One of the diagnostic difficulties lies in the fact that in most forms of this disease a late asthmatic reaction occurs in the evening rather than at work. The pathogenetic mechanisms differ in various forms of occupational asthma. In some, an immunologic mechanism is likely; in others, a "pharmacologic" action of the offending agent is implicated. Asthma due to inhalation of dusts of western red cedar, isocyanates, detergent enzymes and textiles is considered in detail. Periodic examination of workers at risk is of value for early diagnosis and prevention of irrversible airway obstruction. PMID:766943

  10. Fatal aluminium phosphide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Sachin; Rani, Yashoda

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium phosphide (AlP) is a cheap solid fumigant and a highly toxic pesticide which is commonly used for grain preservation. AlP has currently aroused interest with a rising number of cases in the past four decades due to increased use for agricultural and non-agricultural purposes. Its easy availability in the markets has increased also its misuse for committing suicide. Phosphine inhibits cellular oxygen utilization and can induce lipid peroxidation. Poisoning with AlP has often occurred in attempts to commit suicide, and that more often in adults than in teenagers. This is a case of suicidal consumption of aluminium phosphide by a 32-year-old young medical anesthetist. Toxicological analyses detected aluminium phosphide. We believe that free access of celphos tablets in grain markets should be prohibited by law. PMID:27486362

  11. Bronchial asthma and COPD due to irritants in the workplace - an evidence-based approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Respiratory irritants represent a major cause of occupational obstructive airway diseases. We provide an overview of the evidence related to irritative agents causing occupational asthma or occupational COPD. Methods We searched MEDLINE via PubMed. Reference lists of relevant reviews were also screened. The SIGN grading system was used to rate the quality of each study. The modified RCGP three-star system was used to grade the body of evidence for each irritant agent regarding its causative role in either occupational asthma or occupational COPD. Results A total of 474 relevant papers were identified, covering 188 individual agents, professions or work-sites. The focus of most of the studies and the predominant diagnosis was occupational asthma, whereas occupational COPD arose only incidentally. The highest level assigned using the SIGN grading was 2+ (well-conducted systematic review, cohort or case–control study with a low risk of confounding or bias). According to the modified RCGP three-star grading, the strongest evidence of association with an individual agent, profession or work-site (“**”) was found for 17 agents or work-sites, including benzene-1,2,4-tricarboxylicacid-1,2-anhydride, chlorine, platinum salt, isocyanates, cement dust, grain dust, animal farming, environmental tobacco smoke, welding fumes or construction work. Phthalic anhydride, glutaraldehyde, sulphur dioxide, cotton dust, cleaning agents, potrooms, farming (various), foundries were found to be moderately associated with occupational asthma or occupational COPD (“*[+]”). Conclusion This study let us assume that irritant-induced occupational asthma and especially occupational COPD are considerably underreported. Defining the evidence of the many additional occupational irritants for causing airway disorders will be the subject of continued studies with implications for diagnostics and preventive measures. PMID:23013890

  12. Asthma - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2014:chap 53. Lugogo N, Que LG, Gilstrap DL, Kraft M. Asthma: clinical diagnosis and management. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  13. Thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    AN ASSOCIATION between asthma and thunderstorms based on retrospective data has been noted in several papers. This study, however, draws on almost-real-time, anonymised attendance data from 35 emergency departments (EDs) in the UK, and lightning-strike plots from the Met Office. PMID:25270814

  14. Asthma and school

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma action plan - school; Wheezing - school; Reactive airway disease - school; Bronchial asthma - school ... Your child's school asthma action plan should include: Phone ... nurse, parents, and guardians A brief history of your child's ...

  15. Sleep in asthma.

    PubMed

    Khan, Wajahat H; Mohsenin, Vahid; D'Ambrosio, Carolyn M

    2014-09-01

    Many patients with asthma experience worsening of symptoms at night. Understanding the mechanism of nocturnal asthma and the factors that exacerbate asthma during sleep would lead to better management of the condition. PMID:25156764

  16. Asthma: Basic Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Learn How to Control Asthma Language: ... common triggers are tobacco smoke, dust mites, outdoor air pollution, cockroach allergen, pets, mold, and smoke from burning ...

  17. Asthma - child - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000001.htm Asthma - child - discharge To use the sharing features on ... for your child. Take charge of your child's asthma at home Make sure you know the asthma ...

  18. Asthma in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... have asthma. Nearly 9 million of them are children. Children have smaller airways than adults, which makes asthma especially serious for them. Children with asthma may experience wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, ...

  19. [Severe asthma].

    PubMed

    González, Claudio D

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to investigate the frequency of severe asthma (SA) according to WHO definition and to compare SA patients' characteristics with those of non-severe asthma (NSA); secondly, to investigate the level of control reached throughout a period of regular treatment. Between 1-1-2005 and 12-31-2014, 471 medical records from patients with bronchial asthma assisted in Buenos Aires City were analyzed. SA frequency was 40.1% (189/471), being significantly higher among patients from the public health system (47.7%, 108/226 vs. 33%, 81/245, p = 0.001). SA patients were older than NSA ones (51.3 ± 17.4 vs. 42.6 ± 17.1 years, p = 0.000), presented longer time since onset of the disease (median 30 vs. 20 years, p = 0.000), lower educational levels (secondary level or higher 41.7% vs. 58.1%, p = 0.000), lower frequency of rhinitis (47% vs. 60.6%, p = 0.004), more severe levels of airway obstruction (FEV% 50.2 ± 13.7 vs. 77.7 ± 12.4, p = 0.000), more frequent antecedents of Near Fatal Asthma (11.1% vs. 2.8%, p = 0.000), higher levels of serum IgE (median of 410 vs. 279 UI/l, p = 0.01) and higher demand of systemic steroids requirements and hospitalizations (68.7% vs. 50.7%, p = 0.000 and 37.5% vs. 15.9%, p = 0.000, respectively). A 30.6% of SA patients (58/189) reached a follow-up period of 12 months, 13 (22.5%) of whom reached the controlled asthma level. The frequency of SA found seems to be considerable. Multicenter studies to investigate the levels of control reached by SA patients with access to proper treatment are recommended. PMID:26826988

  20. Aluminium and human breast diseases.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D; Pugazhendhi, D; Mannello, F

    2011-11-01

    The human breast is exposed to aluminium from many sources including diet and personal care products, but dermal application of aluminium-based antiperspirant salts provides a local long-term source of exposure. Recent measurements have shown that aluminium is present in both tissue and fat of the human breast but at levels which vary both between breasts and between tissue samples from the same breast. We have recently found increased levels of aluminium in noninvasively collected nipple aspirate fluids taken from breast cancer patients (mean 268 ± 28 μg/l) compared with control healthy subjects (mean 131 ± 10 μg/l) providing evidence of raised aluminium levels in the breast microenvironment when cancer is present. The measurement of higher levels of aluminium in type I human breast cyst fluids (median 150 μg/l) compared with human serum (median 6 μg/l) or human milk (median 25 μg/l) warrants further investigation into any possible role of aluminium in development of this benign breast disease. Emerging evidence for aluminium in several breast structures now requires biomarkers of aluminium action in order to ascertain whether the presence of aluminium has any biological impact. To this end, we report raised levels of proteins that modulate iron homeostasis (ferritin, transferrin) in parallel with raised aluminium in nipple aspirate fluids in vivo, and we report overexpression of mRNA for several S100 calcium binding proteins following long-term exposure of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro to aluminium chlorhydrate. PMID:22099158

  1. Occupational lung fibrosis in an aluminium polisher.

    PubMed

    De Vuyst, P; Dumortier, P; Rickaert, F; Van de Weyer, R; Lenclud, C; Yernault, J C

    1986-02-01

    An aluminium polisher developed severe lung fibrosis complicated by bronchial carcinoma. Although he was not submitted to the exposure risks usually described in aluminium lung (bauxite smelting, use of aluminium powders, aluminium welding), he worked in a high concentration of aluminium dust. This was demonstrated by mineralogical analyses which revealed large amounts of small metallic aluminium particles (0.5 micron - 5 micron) in bronchoalveolar lavage, lung tissue and lymph nodes 5 years after the end of exposure. Aluminium polishing seems to be a potential cause of aluminium lung. PMID:3699115

  2. Imaging of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Richards, John Caleb; Lynch, David; Koelsch, Tilman; Dyer, Debra

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is one of the most common diseases of the lung. Asthma manifests with common, although often subjective and nonspecific, imaging features at radiography and high-resolution computed tomography. The primary role of imaging is not to make a diagnosis of asthma but to identify complications, such as allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, or mimics of asthma, such as hypersensitivity pneumonitis. This article reviews the imaging features of asthma as well as common complications and mimics. PMID:27401624

  3. Stay away from asthma triggers

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma triggers - stay away from; Asthma triggers - avoiding; Reactive airway disease - triggers; Bronchial asthma - triggers ... to them. Have someone who does not have asthma cut the grass, or wear a facemask if ...

  4. Wheezing and Asthma in Infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Wheezing and Asthma in Infants KidsHealth > For Parents > Wheezing and Asthma ... of asthma.) My Baby Is Wheezing. Is It Asthma? If your baby has a cold and is ...

  5. Psychological Factors in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Asthma has long been considered a condition in which psychological factors have a role. As in many illnesses, psychological variables may affect outcome in asthma via their effects on treatment adherence and symptom reporting. Emerging evidence suggests that the relation between asthma and psychological factors may be more complex than that, however. Central cognitive processes may influence not only the interpretation of asthma symptoms but also the manifestation of measurable changes in immune and physiologic markers of asthma. Furthermore, asthma and major depressive disorder share several risk factors and have similar patterns of dysregulation in key biologic systems, including the neuroendocrine stress response, cytokines, and neuropeptides. Despite the evidence that depression is common in people with asthma and exerts a negative impact on outcome, few treatment studies have examined whether improving symptoms of depression do, in fact, result in better control of asthma symptoms or improved quality of life in patients with asthma. PMID:20525122

  6. Thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Philip E; Jonsson, Haflidi

    2004-09-01

    Thunderstorms have often been linked to epidemics of asthma, especially during the grass flowering season; however, the precise mechanisms explaining this phenomenon are unknown. Evidence of high respirable allergen loadings in the air associated with specific meteorologic events combined with an analysis of pollen physiology suggests that rupture of airborne pollen can occur. Strong downdrafts and dry, cold outflows distinguish thunderstorm rain from frontal rain. The weather system of a mature thunderstorm likely entrains grass pollen into the cloud base, where pollen rupture would be enhanced, then transports the respirable-sized fragments of pollen debris to ground level where outflows distribute them ahead of the rain. The conditions occurring at the onset of a thunderstorm might expose susceptible people to a rapid increase in concentrations of pollen allergens in the air that can readily deposit in the lower airways and initiate asthmatic reactions. PMID:15283882

  7. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer. PMID:16045991

  8. Asthma triggers (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes. ... asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes.

  9. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic rhinitis - dust ... make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are said to have a dust allergy. ...

  10. Test Your Asthma Knowledge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Test Your Asthma Knowledge Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents ... page please turn Javascript on. True or False? Asthma is caused by an inflammation of the inner ...

  11. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size en español ¿Causan asma las alergias? My daughter has asthma and I'm worried that her ... a person who already has asthma, like your daughter, can have symptoms worsen if she's exposed to ...

  12. ASTHMA RESEARCH STRATEGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In individuals susceptible to asthma, common aeroallergens can cause airway inflammation marked by episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, mucus secretion, chest tightness, and cough. While there is a definite genetic component to asthma, triggers include house dust mites, animal ...

  13. Managing Allergies, Asthma 101

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158635.html Managing Allergies, Asthma 101 Doctor offers advice to students who will ... 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Teens with allergies or asthma who are heading for college later this year ...

  14. Asthma triggers (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes. ... common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes.

  15. Allergies, asthma, and molds

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic rhinitis - mold ... make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Mold is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to mold, you are said to have a mold allergy. ...

  16. Paediatric asthma and obesity.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Sean R; Platts-Mills, Thomas A E

    2006-12-01

    None of the explanations proposed for the increase in paediatric asthma have been adequate. It is becoming apparent that the cause of the increase in asthma must be multi-factorial. Increasing attention has been focused on the role of lifestyle in the development of asthma. Lifestyle changes that have occurred in children are those in diet and decreased physical activity, with obesity being the product of these changes. The increase in asthma, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle have occurred together. However, a temporal relationship between asthma, obesity and decreased physical activity has not been determined in the paediatric literature. Limited data suggest that decreased physical activity could be playing a role in the aetiology of asthma independent of obesity. Furthermore, there has been substantial research on the benefits of exercise programmes for paediatric patients with asthma. Longitudinal trials monitoring physical activity, obesity and the development of asthma are needed. PMID:17098637

  17. Smoking and asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000504.htm Smoking and asthma To use the sharing features on this page, ... enable JavaScript. Things that make your allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Smoking is a trigger ...

  18. Asthma and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... best live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Asthma and Pregnancy Saturday, 01 August 2015 In every ... her background risk. This sheet talks about whether asthma may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  19. Managing Allergies, Asthma 101

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Public Relations Committee. "In addition to moving to ... in the journal Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology . The first step, he said, is to meet ...

  20. Asthma - child - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... asthma symptoms worse. Know which triggers make your child's asthma worse and what to do when this happens. Common triggers include: Pets Smells from chemicals and cleaners Grass and weeds Smoke Dust Cockroaches Rooms that are moldy or damp Know ...

  1. The toxicity of aluminium in humans.

    PubMed

    Exley, C

    2016-06-01

    We are living in the 'aluminium age'. Human exposure to aluminium is inevitable and, perhaps, inestimable. Aluminium's free metal cation, Alaq(3+), is highly biologically reactive and biologically available aluminium is non-essential and essentially toxic. Biologically reactive aluminium is present throughout the human body and while, rarely, it can be acutely toxic, much less is understood about chronic aluminium intoxication. Herein the question is asked as to how to diagnose aluminium toxicity in an individual. While there are as yet, no unequivocal answers to this problem, there are procedures to follow to ascertain the nature of human exposure to aluminium. It is also important to recognise critical factors in exposure regimes and specifically that not all forms of aluminium are toxicologically equivalent and not all routes of exposure are equivalent in their delivery of aluminium to target sites. To ascertain if Alzheimer's disease is a symptom of chronic aluminium intoxication over decades or breast cancer is aggravated by the topical application of an aluminium salt or if autism could result from an immune cascade initiated by an aluminium adjuvant requires that each of these is considered independently and in the light of the most up to date scientific evidence. The aluminium age has taught us that there are no inevitabilities where chronic aluminium toxicity is concerned though there are clear possibilities and these require proving or discounting but not simply ignored. PMID:26922890

  2. Primary prevention of asthma.

    PubMed

    Becker, Allan B; Chan-Yeung, Moira

    2002-01-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the prevalence of asthma over the last quarter century, particularly in the industrialized world. Although our understanding of asthma continues to improve, there is no cure for the disease. Primary prevention of asthma is the focus of this review. Asthma is a disease with multiple gene-environment interactions. Candidate genes for asthma are considered, and potential interaction between one of those genes, CD14, and an environmental factor, endotoxin, is reviewed as it relates to the hygiene hypothesis. Environmental risk factors for asthma including allergens, pollutants, infectious factors, and dietary modifications are considered, particularly their potential for primary prevention of asthma. Ongoing cohort studies including the Canadian Allergy and Asthma Prevention Study, the Manchester Allergy and Asthma Study, the Children's Asthma Prevention Study from Australia, and the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy Study from the Netherlands are briefly reviewed. A more definitive understanding of genetic background and environmental triggers and their interactions is required before any specific approach to the primary prevention of asthma can be championed aggressively. PMID:11753119

  3. How Is Asthma Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Month with a Google+ Hangout on Air for parents and caregivers to learn how to help control a child's asthma so that they can breathe ... parents build up their asthma team. Jose, his parents, a doctor and a nurse, ... forces to help Jose control his asthma. The video is recorded in Spanish ...

  4. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Teens > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Print A A A Text Size en español ¿Las alergias provocan asma? Do allergies cause asthma? The answer to that question is: yes and ...

  5. [Obesity and asthma].

    PubMed

    Vázquez García, Juan Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Obesity and asthma are two disorders of high and increasing worldwide prevalence. A consistent association between obesity and asthma has been recently found in case-control, cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. This association is more consistent in women after the puberty. Moreover, an improvement in the severity of asthma has been described after weight reduction in obese patients. A causal association between asthma and obesity may represent an additional respiratory work that could increase the morbidity and medical expenditures. The most striking studies which demonstrate association between obesity and asthma and the possible causal mechanisms are reviewed. PMID:12587420

  6. Asthma: beyond corticosteroid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Marandi, Yasser; Farahi, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in the world, affecting over 300 million people. It is an inflammatory disorder characterized by bronchoconstriction and airway hyperresponsiveness, followed by inflammatory manifestations in the respiratory system. The prevalence of asthma is rising and there is a clinical need to develop more effective treatments. While corticosteroids (glucocorticosteroids) remain the mainstay of asthma therapy, they have limitations because of their potentially severe side-effects and the presence of corticosteroid resistance in some patients. This review discusses current strategies in the treatment of asthma and considers new therapeutic regimens of asthma in the drug development pipeline. PMID:23847676

  7. Obesity and asthma.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Peter G

    2013-12-01

    There is a global epidemic of asthma and obesity that is concentrated in Westernized and developed countries. A causal association in some people with asthma is suggested by observations that obesity precedes the onset of asthma and that bariatric surgery for morbid obesity can resolve asthma. The obese asthma phenotype features poor asthma control, limited response to corticosteroids, and an exaggeration of the physiological effects of obesity on lung function, which includes a reduction in expiratory reserve volume and airway closure occurring during tidal breathing. Obesity has important implications for asthma treatment. Increasing corticosteroid doses based on poor asthma control, as currently recommended in guidelines, may lead to overtreatment with corticosteroids in obese asthma. Enhanced bronchodilation, particularly of the small airways, may reduce the component of airway closure due to increased bronchomotor tone and suggests that greater emphasis should be placed on long-acting bronchodilators in obese asthma. The societal implications of this are important: with increasing obesity there will be increasing asthma from obesity, and the need to identify successful individual and societal weight-control strategies becomes a key goal. PMID:24313764

  8. Asthma and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vatti, Rani Reddy; Teuber, Suzanne S

    2012-08-01

    Asthma is probably the most common serious medical disorder that may complicate pregnancy. A third of pregnant women with asthma will experience worsening of their symptoms, a third will see improvement of their symptoms and a third will see no change. The primary goal is to maintain optimal control of asthma for maternal health and well-being as well as fetal maturation. Vital patient education should cover the use of controller medication, avoidance of asthma triggers and early treatment of asthma exacerbations. Proper asthma management should ideally be started in the preconception period. Since smoking is probably the most modifiable risk factor of asthma, pregnant woman should avoid active and passive smoking. Acute asthma exacerbation during the first trimester is associated with an increased risk of congenital malformations. Poorly controlled asthma is associated with low birth weight, preeclampsia, and preterm birth. Medications used for asthma control in the non-pregnant population are generally the same in pregnancy with a few exceptions. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are the preferred controller therapy. Budesonide is the preferred ICS. Long-acting B-agonists (LABA) are the preferred add-on therapy to medium to high dose ICS. Major triggers for asthma exacerbations during pregnancy are viral infections and ICS nonadherence. PMID:21858482

  9. Mechanisms of occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Maestrelli, Piero; Boschetto, Piera; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Mapp, Cristina E

    2009-03-01

    Inhalation of agents in the workplace can induce asthma in a relatively small proportion of exposed workers. Like nonoccupational asthma, occupational asthma is probably the result of multiple genetic, environmental, and behavioral influences. It is important that occupational asthma be recognized clinically because it has serious medical and socioeconomic consequences. Environmental factors that can affect the initiation of occupational asthma include the intrinsic characteristics of causative agents as well as the influence of the level and route of exposure at the workplace. The identification of host factors, polymorphisms, and candidate genes associated with occupational asthma may improve our understanding of mechanisms involved in asthma. High-molecular-weight compounds from biological sources and low-molecular-weight chemicals cause occupational asthma after a latent period of exposure. Although the clinical, functional, and pathologic features of occupational asthma caused by low-molecular-weight agents resemble those of allergic asthma, the failure to detect specific IgE antibodies against most low-molecular-weight agents has resulted in a search for alternative or complementary physiopathologic mechanisms leading to airway sensitization. Recent advances have been made in the characterization of the immune response to low-molecular-weight agents. In contrast, the mechanism of the type of occupational asthma that occurs without latency after high-level exposure to irritants remains undetermined. PMID:19281901

  10. Monitoring asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Pijnenburg, Mariëlle W; Baraldi, Eugenio; Brand, Paul L P; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Eber, Ernst; Frischer, Thomas; Hedlin, Gunilla; Kulkarni, Neeta; Lex, Christiane; Mäkelä, Mika J; Mantzouranis, Eva; Moeller, Alexander; Pavord, Ian; Piacentini, Giorgio; Price, David; Rottier, Bart L; Saglani, Sejal; Sly, Peter D; Szefler, Stanley J; Tonia, Thomy; Turner, Steve; Wooler, Edwina; Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C

    2015-04-01

    The goal of asthma treatment is to obtain clinical control and reduce future risks to the patient. To reach this goal in children with asthma, ongoing monitoring is essential. While all components of asthma, such as symptoms, lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and inflammation, may exist in various combinations in different individuals, to date there is limited evidence on how to integrate these for optimal monitoring of children with asthma. The aims of this ERS Task Force were to describe the current practise and give an overview of the best available evidence on how to monitor children with asthma. 22 clinical and research experts reviewed the literature. A modified Delphi method and four Task Force meetings were used to reach a consensus. This statement summarises the literature on monitoring children with asthma. Available tools for monitoring children with asthma, such as clinical tools, lung function, bronchial responsiveness and inflammatory markers, are described as are the ways in which they may be used in children with asthma. Management-related issues, comorbidities and environmental factors are summarised. Despite considerable interest in monitoring asthma in children, for many aspects of monitoring asthma in children there is a substantial lack of evidence. PMID:25745042

  11. Asthma Research: The NIH–NJRC Connection

    MedlinePlus

    ... could help physicians decide definitively whether to prescribe antibiotics for asthma patients. ( See accompanying story. ) In pediatric asthma, doctors are studying and treating the progression of asthma, infant wheezing that leads to asthma, and severe asthma. ...

  12. Predicting Asthma in Preschool Children with Asthma-Like Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: allergic asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions allergic asthma allergic asthma Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Asthma is a breathing disorder characterized by inflammation of ...

  14. Monitoring asthma in childhood.

    PubMed

    Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C; Pijnenburg, Mariëlle W

    2015-06-01

    The goal of asthma treatment is to obtain clinical control and reduce future risks to the patient. However, to date there is limited evidence on how to monitor patients with asthma. Childhood asthma introduces specific challenges in terms of deciding what, when, how often, by whom and in whom different assessments of asthma should be performed. The age of the child, the fluctuating course of asthma severity, variability in clinical presentation, exacerbations, comorbidities, socioeconomic and psychosocial factors, and environmental exposures may all influence disease activity and, hence, monitoring strategies. These factors will be addressed in herein. We identified large knowledge gaps in the effects of different monitoring strategies in children with asthma. Studies into monitoring strategies are urgently needed, preferably in collaborative paediatric studies across countries and healthcare systems. PMID:26028630

  15. Asthma in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Forno, Erick; Gogna, Mudita; Cepeda, Alfonso; Yañez, Anahi; Solé, Dirceu; Cooper, Philip; Avila, Lydiana; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A; Celedón, Juan C

    2015-09-01

    Consistent with the diversity of Latin America, there is profound variability in asthma burden among and within countries in this region. Regional variation in asthma prevalence is likely multifactorial and due to genetics, perinatal exposures, diet, obesity, tobacco use, indoor and outdoor pollutants, psychosocial stress and microbial or parasitic infections. Similarly, non-uniform progress in asthma management leads to regional variability in disease morbidity. Future studies of distinct asthma phenotypes should follow-up well-characterised Latin American subgroups and examine risk factors that are unique or common in Latin America (eg, stress and violence, parasitic infections and use of biomass fuels for cooking). Because most Latin American countries share the same barriers to asthma management, concerted and multifaceted public health and research efforts are needed, including approaches to curtail tobacco use, campaigns to improve asthma treatment, broadening access to care and clinical trials of non-pharmacological interventions (eg, replacing biomass fuels with gas or electric stoves). PMID:26103996

  16. Asthma in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Forno, Erick; Gogna, Mudita; Cepeda, Alfonso; Yañez, Anahi; Solé, Dirceu; Cooper, Philip; Avila, Lydiana; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A.; Celedón, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Consistent with the diversity of Latin America, there is profound variability in asthma burden among and within countries in this region. Regional variation in asthma prevalence is likely multifactorial and due to genetics, perinatal exposures, diet, obesity, tobacco use, indoor and outdoor pollutants, psychosocial stress, and microbial or parasitic infections. Similarly, nonuniform progress in asthma management leads to regional variability in disease morbidity. Future studies of distinct asthma phenotypes should follow up well-characterized Latin American subgroups and examine risk factors that are unique or common in Latin America (e.g. stress and violence, parasitic infections and use of biomass fuels for cooking). Because most Latin American countries share the same barriers to asthma management, concerted and multifaceted public health and research efforts are needed, including approaches to curtail tobacco use, campaigns to improve asthma treatment, broadening access to care and clinical trials of non-pharmacologic interventions (e.g. replacing biomass fuels with gas or electric stoves). PMID:26103996

  17. Occupational asthma in Japan.

    PubMed

    Dobashi, Kunio

    2012-07-01

    Research into occupational asthma (OA) in Japan has been led by the Japanese Society of Occupational and Environmental Allergy. The first report about allergic OA identified konjac asthma. After that, many kinds of OA have been reported. Cases of some types of OA, such as konjac asthma and sea squirt asthma, have been dramatically reduced by the efforts of medical personnel. Recently, with the development of new technologies, chemical antigen-induced asthma has increased in Japan. Due to advances in anti-asthma medication, control by medical treatment tends to be emphasized and the search for causative antigens seems to be neglected. Furthermore, we do not have a Japanese guideline for diagnosis and management of OA. This article discusses the current state of OA in Japan. PMID:22872819

  18. Psychological aspects of asthma.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, Paul; Feldman, Jonathan; Giardino, Nicholas; Song, Hye-Sue; Schmaling, Karen

    2002-06-01

    Asthma can be affected by stress, anxiety, sadness, and suggestion, as well as by environmental irritants or allergens, exercise, and infection. It also is associated with an elevated prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders. Asthma and these psychological states and traits may mutually potentiate each other through direct psychophysiological mediation, nonadherence to medical regimen, exposure to asthma triggers, and inaccuracy of asthma symptom perception. Defensiveness is associated with inaccurate perception of airway resistance and stress-related bronchoconstriction. Asthma education programs that teach about the nature of the disease, medications, and trigger avoidance tend to reduce asthma morbidity. Other promising psychological interventions as adjuncts to medical treatment include training in symptom perception, stress management, hypnosis, yoga, and several biofeedback procedures. PMID:12090377

  19. Endobronchial Tuberculosis Mimicking Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Argun Baris, Serap; Onyilmaz, Tuğba; Basyigit, Ilknur; Boyaci, Hasim

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial tuberculosis (EBTB) is defined as tuberculosis infection of the tracheobronchial tree with microbial and histopathological evidence. The clinical symptoms of the diseases are nonspecific. Chronic cough is the major symptom of the disease. The diagnosis is often delayed due to its nonspecific presentation and misdiagnosed as bronchial asthma. This case is presented to recall the notion that the endobronchial tuberculosis can mimic asthma and the importance of bronchoscopic evaluation in a patient with chronic cough and treatment resistant asthma. PMID:26798513

  20. Aluminium phosphide-induced leukopenia.

    PubMed

    Ntelios, Dimitrios; Mandros, Charalampos; Potolidis, Evangelos; Fanourgiakis, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Acute intoxication from the pesticide aluminium phosphide is a relatively rare, life-threatening condition in which cardiovascular decompensation is the most feared problem. We report the case of a patient exposed to aluminium phosphide-liberated phosphine gas. It resulted in the development of a gastroenteritis-like syndrome accompanied by severe reduction in white blood cell numbers as an early and prominent manifestation. By affecting important physiological processes such as mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species homeostasis, phosphine could cause severe toxicity. After presenting the characteristics of certain leucocyte subpopulations we provide the current molecular understanding of the observed leukopenia which in part seems paradoxical. PMID:24172776

  1. Aluminium phosphide-induced leukopenia

    PubMed Central

    Ntelios, Dimitrios; Mandros, Charalampos; Potolidis, Evangelos; Fanourgiakis, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Acute intoxication from the pesticide aluminium phosphide is a relatively rare, life-threatening condition in which cardiovascular decompensation is the most feared problem. We report the case of a patient exposed to aluminium phosphide-liberated phosphine gas. It resulted in the development of a gastroenteritis-like syndrome accompanied by severe reduction in white blood cell numbers as an early and prominent manifestation. By affecting important physiological processes such as mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species homeostasis, phosphine could cause severe toxicity. After presenting the characteristics of certain leucocyte subpopulations we provide the current molecular understanding of the observed leukopenia which in part seems paradoxical. PMID:24172776

  2. Teaching Your Child about Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  3. Asthma in Olympians.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Kai-Håkon

    2016-01-01

    High prevalence of asthma has been reported repeatedly among elite athletes, especially among endurance athletes. So many athletes used asthma drugs that the objective demonstration of bronchial hyperresponsiveness was required to obtain approval for their use in international sports until 2012 when the most used inhaled asthma drugs was allowed for free use, but with a maximum dose for inhaled β2-agonists. Several factors contribute to the development of asthma among the Olympians causing airways inflammation and bronchial hyper-responsiveness. PMID:26631837

  4. Asthma and the diver.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J; Fisher, Laura H; Chegini, Soheil; Craig, Timothy J

    2005-10-01

    Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) diving has grown in popularity, with nearly 9 million sport divers in the United States alone. Approximately 7% of the population has been diagnosed with asthma, which is similar to the percentage of divers admitting they have asthma. Numerous concerns exist regarding subjects with asthma who choose to participate in recreational diving. Among these concerns are pulmonary barotrauma, pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, arterial gas embolism, ear barotrauma, sinus barotrauma, and dental barotrauma. Despite these concerns, a paucity of information exists linking asthma to increased risk of diving complications. However, it has long been the norm to discourage individuals with asthma from participating in recreational scuba diving. This article examines the currently available literature to allow for a more informed decision regarding the possible risks associated with diving and asthma. It examines the underlying physiological principles associated with diving, including Henry's law and Boyle's law, to provide a more intimate understanding on physiological changes occurring in the respiratory system under compressive stress. Finally, this article offers a framework for guiding the patient with asthma who is interested in scuba diving. Under the right circumstances, the patient with asthma can safely participate in recreational diving without apparent increased risk of an asthma-related event. PMID:16251767

  5. Folate and asthma.

    PubMed

    Blatter, Joshua; Han, Yueh-Ying; Forno, Erick; Brehm, John; Bodnar, Lisa; Celedón, Juan C

    2013-07-01

    Findings from experimental studies and animal models led to the hypothesis that folic acid supplementation during pregnancy confers an increased risk of asthma. This review provides a critical examination of current experimental and epidemiologic evidence of a causal association between folate status and asthma. In industrialized nations, the prevalence of asthma was rising before widespread fortification of foodstuffs with folic acid or folate supplementation before or during pregnancy, thus suggesting that changes in folate status are an unlikely explanation for "the asthma epidemic." Consistent with this ecologic observation, evidence from human studies does not support moderate or strong effects of folate status on asthma. Given known protective effects against neural tube and cardiac defects, there is no reason to alter current recommendations for folic acid supplementation during conception or pregnancy based on findings for folate and asthma. Although we believe that there are inadequate data to exclude a weak effect of maternal folate status on asthma or asthma symptoms, such effects could be examined within the context of very large (and ongoing) birth cohort studies. At this time, there is no justification for funding new studies of folate and asthma. PMID:23650899

  6. Biomarkers in Severe Asthma.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiao Chloe; Woodruff, Prescott G

    2016-08-01

    Biomarkers have been critical for studies of disease pathogenesis and the development of new therapies in severe asthma. In particular, biomarkers of type 2 inflammation have proven valuable for endotyping and targeting new biological agents. Because of these successes in understanding and marking type 2 inflammation, lack of knowledge regarding non-type 2 inflammatory mechanisms in asthma will soon be the major obstacle to the development of new treatments and management strategies in severe asthma. Biomarkers can play a role in these investigations as well by providing insight into the underlying biology in human studies of patients with severe asthma. PMID:27401625

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea and asthma*

    PubMed Central

    Salles, Cristina; Terse-Ramos, Regina; Souza-Machado, Adelmir; Cruz, Álvaro A

    2013-01-01

    Symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing, especially obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), are common in asthma patients and have been associated with asthma severity. It is known that asthma symptoms tend to be more severe at night and that asthma-related deaths are most likely to occur during the night or early morning. Nocturnal symptoms occur in 60-74% of asthma patients and are markers of inadequate control of the disease. Various pathophysiological mechanisms are related to the worsening of asthma symptoms, OSAS being one of the most important factors. In patients with asthma, OSAS should be investigated whenever there is inadequate control of symptoms of nocturnal asthma despite the treatment recommended by guidelines having been administered. There is evidence in the literature that the use of continuous positive airway pressure contributes to asthma control in asthma patients with obstructive sleep apnea and uncontrolled asthma. PMID:24310634

  8. The prophylactic reduction of aluminium intake.

    PubMed

    Lione, A

    1983-02-01

    The use of modern analytical methods has demonstrated that aluminium salts can be absorbed from the gut and concentrated in various human tissues, including bone, the parathyroids and brain. The neurotoxicity of aluminium has been extensively characterized in rabbits and cats, and high concentrations of aluminium have been detected in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Various reports have suggested that high aluminium intakes may be harmful to some patients with bone disease or renal impairment. Fatal aluminium-induced neuropathies have been reported in patients on renal dialysis. Since there are no demonstrable consequences of aluminium deprivation, the prophylactic reduction of aluminium intake by many patients would appear prudent. In this report, the major sources of aluminium in foods and non-prescription drugs are summarized and alternative products are described. The most common foods that contain substantial amounts of aluminium-containing additives include some processed cheeses, baking powders, cake mixes, frozen doughs, pancake mixes, self-raising flours and pickled vegetables. The aluminium-containing non-prescription drugs include some antacids, buffered aspirins, antidiarrhoeal products, douches and haemorrhoidal medications. The advisability of recommending a low aluminium diet for geriatric patients is discussed in detail. PMID:6337934

  9. Aluminium toxicity in chronic renal insufficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Savory, J.; Bertholf, R.L.; Wills, M.R.

    1985-08-01

    Aluminium is a ubiquitous element in the environment and has been demonstrated to be toxic, especially in individuals with impaired renal function. Not much is known about the biochemistry of aluminium and the mechanisms of its toxic effects. Most of the interest in aluminium has been in the clinical setting of the hemodialysis unit. Here aluminium toxicity occurs due to contamination of dialysis solutions, and treatment of the patients with aluminium-containing phosphate binding gels. Aluminium has been shown to be the major contributor to the dialysis encephalopathy syndrome and an osteomalacic component of dialysis osteodystrophy. Other clinical disturbances associated with aluminium toxicity are a microcytic anemia and metastatic extraskeletal calcification. Aluminium overload can be treated effectively by chelation therapy with desferrioxamine and hemodialysis. Aluminium is readily transferred from the dialysate to the patient's -bloodstream during hemodialysis. Once transferred, the aluminium is tightly bound to non-dialysable plasma constituents. Very low concentrations of dialysate aluminium in the range of 10-15 micrograms/l are recommended to guard against toxic effects. Very few studies have been directed towards the separation of the various plasma species which bind eluminium. Gel filtration chromatography has been used to identify five major fractions, one of which is of low molecular weight and the others appear to be protein-aluminium complexes. Recommendations on aluminium monitoring have been published and provide safe and toxic concentrations. Also, the frequency of monitoring has been addressed. Major problems exist with the analytical methods for measuring aluminium which result from inaccurate techniques and contamination difficulties. 136 references.

  10. Occupational asthma: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, L J; Balmes, J R

    2000-01-01

    Occupational asthma is the most common form of occupational lung disease in the developed world at the present time. In this review, the epidemiology, pathogenesis/mechanisms, clinical presentations, management, and prevention of occupational asthma are discussed. The population attributable risk of asthma due to occupational exposures is considerable. Current understanding of the mechanisms by which many agents cause occupational asthma is limited, especially for low-molecular-weight sensitizers and irritants. The diagnosis of occupational asthma is generally established on the basis of a suggestive history of a temporal association between exposure and the onset of symptoms and objective evidence that these symptoms are related to airflow limitation. Early diagnosis, elimination of exposure to the responsible agent, and early use of inhaled steroids may play important roles in the prevention of long-term persistence of asthma. Persistent occupational asthma is often associated with substantial disability and consequent impacts on income and quality of life. Prevention of new cases is the best approach to reducing the burden of asthma attributable to occupational exposures. Future research needs are identified. PMID:10931788

  11. Kerosene-induced asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez de la Vega, A.; Casaco, A.; Garcia, M.; Noa, M.; Carvajal, D.; Arruzazabala, L.; Gonzalez, R. )

    1990-04-01

    Clinical evaluation of 286 asthmatic women showed 15.5% of those who improved clinically had contact with kerosene, while 43.9% of those who failed to improve used kerosene as fuel for cooking. In 16 women the onset of asthma occurred soon after they began to use kerosene. Kerosene can cause and aggravate asthma.

  12. Managing asthma in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a common comorbidity during pregnancy and its prevalence is increasing in the community. Exacerbations are a major clinical problem during pregnancy with up to 45% of women needing to seek medical help, resulting in poor outcomes for mothers and their babies, including low birth weight and preterm delivery. The goals of effective asthma management in pregnancy are to maintain the best possible asthma control and prevent exacerbations. This is achieved by aiming to prevent day- and night-time symptoms, and maintain lung function and normal activity. In addition, maintaining fetal oxygenation is an important consideration in pregnancy. Guidelines recommend providing asthma advice and review prior to conception, and managing asthma actively during pregnancy, with regular 4-weekly review, provision of a written action plan, use of preventer medications as indicated for other adults with asthma, and management of comorbid conditions such as rhinitis. Improvements have been made in recent years in emergency department management of asthma in pregnancy, and multidisciplinary approaches are being proposed to optimise both asthma outcomes and perinatal outcomes. One strategy that has demonstrated success in reducing exacerbations in pregnancy is treatment adjustment using a marker of eosinophilic lung inflammation, the exhaled nitric oxide fraction (FeNO). The use of an algorithm that adjusted inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) according to FeNO and added long-acting β-agonists when symptoms remained uncontrolled resulted in fewer exacerbations, more women on ICS but at lower mean doses, and improved infant respiratory health at 12 months of age. Further evidence is needed to determine whether this strategy can also improve perinatal outcomes and be successfully translated into clinical practice. Key points Asthma is the most common chronic disease to affect pregnant women. Exacerbations occur in up to 45% of pregnant women with asthma. Asthma should be managed

  13. [Occupational asthma in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Endre, László

    2015-05-10

    Occupational asthma belongs to communicable diseases, which should be reported in Hungary. During a 24-year period between January 1990 and December 2013, 180 occupational asthma cases were reported in Hungary (52 cases between 1990 and 1995, 83 cases between 1996 and 2000, 40 cases between 2001 and 2006, and 5 cases between 2007 and 2013). These data are unusual, because according to the official report of the National Korányi Pulmonology Institute in Budapest, at least 14,000 new adult asthma cases were reported in every year between 2000 and 2012 in Hungary. Also, international data indicate that at least 2% of adult patients with asthma have occupational asthma and at least 50 out of 1 million employees develop occupational asthma in each year. In 2003, 631 new occupational asthma patients were reported in the United Kingdom, but only 7 cases in Hungary. Because it is unlikely that the occupational environment in Hungary is much better than anywhere else in the world, it seems that not all new occupational asthma cases are reported in Hungary. Of the 180 reported cases in Hungary, 55 were bakers or other workers in flour mills. There were 11 metal-workers, 10 health care assistants, 9 workers dealing with textiles (tailors, dressmakers, workers in textile industry) and 9 employees worked upon leather and animal fur. According to international data, the most unsafe profession is the animal keeper in scientific laboratories, but only 4 of them were reported as having occupational asthma during the studied 24 years in Hungary. Interestingly, 3 museologists with newly-diagnosed occupational asthma were reported in 2003, but not such cases occurred before or after that year. In this paper the Hungarian literature of occupational asthma is summarized, followed by a review on the classification, pathomechanism, clinical presentation, predisposing factors, diagnostics and therapeutic aspects of the disease. Epidemiological data of adult asthma in Hungary and data from

  14. Pneumothorax and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Porpodis, Konstantinos; Spyratos, Dionysios; Domvri, Kalliopi; Kioumis, Ioannis; Angelis, Nikolaos; Konoglou, Maria; Kolettas, Alexandros; Kessisis, Georgios; Beleveslis, Thomas; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Tsiouda, Theodora; Argyriou, Michael; Kotsakou, Maria; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    This review is focused on the relationship between asthma, pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum while presenting a number of case reports that include these conditions. The association between pneumothorax and asthma is not widely known. While asthma includes a common disorder and is prevalent worldwide, its morbidity and mortality is high when is associated with pneumothorax. Furthermore, the delayed diagnosis of pneumothorax while focusing on asthma includes the higher risk of coincidental pneumothorax in asthmatic patients. In addition, pneumomediastinum is considered benign and self-limiting condition that responds to conservative therapy. Although it is rare, the concurrence of pneumomediastinum with pneumothorax may prove fatal during a serious asthma attack. In conclusion, the symptoms of chest pain, dyspnea or focal chest findings when presented in asthmatic patients, must always create suspicion of pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum to the physician. PMID:24672689

  15. Cough and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Akio

    2011-01-01

    Cough is the most common complaint for which patients seek medical attention. Cough variant asthma (CVA) is a form of asthma, which presents solely with cough. CVA is one of the most common causes of chronic cough. More importantly, 30 to 40% of adult patients with CVA, unless adequately treated, may progress to classic asthma. CVA shares a number of pathophysiological features with classic asthma such as atopy, airway hyper-responsiveness, eosinophilic airway inflammation and various features of airway remodeling. Inhaled corticosteroids remain the most important form of treatment of CVA as they improve cough and reduce the risk of progression to classic asthma most likely through their prevention of airway remodeling and chronic airflow obstruction. PMID:22081767

  16. The costs of asthma.

    PubMed

    Barnes, P J; Jonsson, B; Klim, J B

    1996-04-01

    At present, asthma represents a substantial burden on health care resources in all countries so far studied. The costs of asthma are largely due to uncontrolled disease, and are likely to rise as its prevalence and severity increase. Costs could be significantly reduced if disease control is improved. A large proportion of the total cost of illness is derived from treating the consequences of poor asthma control-direct costs, such as emergency room use and hospitalizations. Indirect costs, which include time off work or school and early retirement, are incurred when the disease is not fully controlled and becomes severe enough to have an effect on daily life. In addition, quality of life assessments show that asthma has a significant socioeconomic impact, not only on the patients themselves, but on the whole family. Underuse of prescribed therapy, which includes poor compliance, significantly contributes towards the poor control of asthma. The consequences of poor compliance in asthma include increased morbidity and sometimes mortality, and increased health care expenditure. To improve asthma management, international guidelines have been introduced which recommend an increase in the use of prophylactic therapy. The resulting improvements in the control of asthma will reduce the number of hospitalizations associated with asthma, and may ultimately produce a shift within direct costs, with subsequent reductions in indirect costs. In addition, costs may be reduced by improving therapeutic interventions and through effective patient education programmes. This paper reviews current literature on the costs of asthma to assess how effectively money is spent and, by estimating the proportion of the cost attributable to uncontrolled disease, will identify where financial savings might be made. PMID:8726924

  17. Advances in Pediatric Asthma in 2013: Coordinating Asthma Care

    PubMed Central

    Szefler, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Last year’s Advances in Pediatric Asthma: Moving Toward Asthma Prevention concluded that: “We are well on our way to creating a pathway around wellness in asthma care and also to utilize new tools to predict the risk for asthma and take steps to not only prevent asthma exacerbations but also to prevent the early manifestations of the disease and thus prevent its evolution to severe asthma.” This year’s summary will focus on recent advances in pediatric asthma on pre- and postnatal factors altering the natural history of asthma, assessment of asthma control, and new insights regarding potential therapeutic targets for altering the course of asthma in children as indicated in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology publications in 2013 and early 2014. Recent reports continue to shed light on methods to understand factors that influence the course of asthma, methods to assess and communicate levels of control, and new targets for intervention as well as new immunomodulators. It will now be important to carefully assess risk factors for the development of asthma as well as the risk for asthma exacerbations and to improve the way we communicate this information in the health care system. This will allow parents, primary care physicians, specialists and provider systems to more effectively intervene in altering the course of asthma and to further reduce asthma morbidity and mortality. PMID:24581430

  18. Bumblebee Pupae Contain High Levels of Aluminium

    PubMed Central

    Exley, Christopher; Rotheray, Ellen; Goulson, David

    2015-01-01

    The causes of declines in bees and other pollinators remains an on-going debate. While recent attention has focussed upon pesticides, other environmental pollutants have largely been ignored. Aluminium is the most significant environmental contaminant of recent times and we speculated that it could be a factor in pollinator decline. Herein we have measured the content of aluminium in bumblebee pupae taken from naturally foraging colonies in the UK. Individual pupae were acid-digested in a microwave oven and their aluminium content determined using transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Pupae were heavily contaminated with aluminium giving values between 13.4 and 193.4 μg/g dry wt. and a mean (SD) value of 51.0 (33.0) μg/g dry wt. for the 72 pupae tested. Mean aluminium content was shown to be a significant negative predictor of average pupal weight in colonies. While no other statistically significant relationships were found relating aluminium to bee or colony health, the actual content of aluminium in pupae are extremely high and demonstrate significant exposure to aluminium. Bees rely heavily on cognitive function and aluminium is a known neurotoxin with links, for example, to Alzheimer’s disease in humans. The significant contamination of bumblebee pupae by aluminium raises the intriguing spectre of cognitive dysfunction playing a role in their population decline. PMID:26042788

  19. Cleaning agents and asthma.

    PubMed

    Quirce, S; Barranco, P

    2010-01-01

    Although cleaners represent a significant part of the working population worldwide, they remain a relatively understudied occupational group. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between cleaning work and asthma, but the risk factors are uncertain. Cleaning workers are exposed to a large variety of cleaning products containing both irritants and sensitizers, as well as to common indoor allergens and pollutants. Thus, the onset or aggravation of asthma in this group could be related to an irritant-induced mechanism or to specific sensitization. The main sensitizers contained in cleaning products are disinfectants, quaternary ammonium compounds (such as benzalkonium chloride), amine compounds, and fragrances.The strongest airway irritants in cleaning products are bleach (sodium hypochlorite), hydrochloric acid, and alkaline agents (ammonia and sodium hydroxide), which are commonly mixed together. Exposure to the ingredients of cleaning products may give rise to both new-onset asthma, with or without a latency period, and work-exacerbated asthma. High-level exposure to irritants may induce reactive airways dysfunction syndrome. Cleaning workers may also have a greater relative risk of developing asthma due to prolonged low-to-moderate exposure to respiratory irritants. In addition, asthma-like symptoms without confirmed asthma are also common after exposure to cleaning agents. In many cleaners, airway symptoms induced by chemicals and odors cannot be explained by allergic or asthmatic reactions. These patients may have increased sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin, which is known to reflect sensory reactivity, and this condition is termed airway sensory hyperreactivity. PMID:21313993

  20. Pharmacotherapy of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The pharmacotherapy of asthma is a complex and evolving topic. A detailed understanding of the pathophysiologic processes involved in the asthmatic response forms the basis for understanding the actions of drugs used to treat this condition. Likewise, a solid comprehension of the medicinal chemistry and pharmacologic properties of the numerous agents involved in the treatment of asthma is critical for rationalizing drug choices and understanding potential side effects. Asthma is addressed at several points in the PharmD curriculum at South University including in the Pathophysiology (quarter 2), Integrated Sequence III (quarter 6), and Critical Care (quarter 9) courses. Various teaching strategies are employed throughout, along with weekly case-based recitations. The content presented here includes a synopsis of the pathophysiology and pharmacology from our Integrated Sequence III block on inflammatory diseases and asthma. A short review of pertinent pathophysiology is followed by a detailed presentation on the various classes of asthma drugs which includes their chemistry, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and interactions. This presentation is designed to prepare students for asthma therapeutics, which follows next in the schedule. The complexities of asthma pharmacotherapy are stressed along with current controversies and future drug development. PMID:17998995

  1. The future of asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, I. P.

    1997-01-01

    Reports in the media describing the discovery of "the asthma gene" or "a new vaccine for asthma" may be inaccurate and often raise patients' hopes unjustifiably. This article is a personal view of key areas in current asthma research, and it examines how they may impinge on the care of asthmatic patients in the next decade. I have tried to explain the thinking behind some of the approaches under study. I discuss the potential contributions of genetic studies, immunological approaches, and new therapeutic approaches. PMID:9001482

  2. Eosinophilic Endotype of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Fernando; Lim, Hui Fang; Nair, Parameswaran

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease that can be classified into different clinical endotypes, depending on the type of airway inflammation, clinical severity, and response to treatment. This article focuses on the eosinophilic endotype of asthma, which is defined by the central role that eosinophils play in the pathophysiology of the condition. It is characterized by elevated sputum and/or blood eosinophils on at least 2 occasions and by a significant response to treatments that suppress eosinophilia. Histopathologic demonstration of eosinophils in the airways provides the most direct diagnosis of eosinophilic asthma; but it is invasive, thus, impractical in clinical practice. PMID:27401626

  3. Asthma outcome measures.

    PubMed

    Watkins, K D

    1999-08-01

    Annually, asthma accounts for 10.4 million physician visits, 468,000 hospitalizations, 1.8 million emergency room visits, and 10 million missed school days. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of asthma deaths has increased progressively since 1978 form 1,800 to 5,400 per year. It is an expensive disease, accounting for about 1% of all health expenditure in the United States in 1990. Asthma has a significant impact on the patient and the community at large and the assessment of the clinical, physiologic, humanistic and economic outcomes will be measured. PMID:10563275

  4. Aluminium in foodstuffs and diets in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Jorhem, L; Haegglund, G

    1992-01-01

    The levels of aluminium have been determined in a number of individual foodstuffs on the Swedish market and in 24 h duplicate diets collected by women living in the Stockholm area. The results show that the levels in most foods are very low and that the level in vegetables can vary by a factor 10. Beverages from aluminium cans were found to have aluminium levels not markedly different from those in glass bottles. Based on the results of the analysis of individual foods, the average Swedish daily diet was calculated to contain about 0.6 mg aluminium, whereas the mean content of the collected duplicate diets was 13 mg. A cake made from a mix containing aluminium phosphate in the baking soda was identified as the most important contributor of aluminium to the duplicate diets. Tea and aluminium utensils were estimated to increase the aluminium content of the diets by approximately 4 and 2 mg/day, respectively. The results also indicate that a considerable amount of aluminium must be introduced from other sources. PMID:1542992

  5. National Asthma Control Program State Profiles

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health State Data Profiles (2011) Recommend on ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I ...

  6. What's an Asthma Flare-Up?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy What's an Asthma Flare-Up? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's an Asthma ... of a straw that's being pinched. Causes of Asthma Flare-Ups People with asthma have airways that ...

  7. Asthma - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Burks AW, et al., eds. In: Middleton's Allergy Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2013:chap 55. Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma . Rockville, MD. National Heart, Lung, and ...

  8. Vitamin D and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sheena D.; Calvert, H. Hardie; Fitzpatrick, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    Asthma, one of the most prevalent diseases affecting people worldwide, is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by heightened airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness and airflow obstruction in response to specific triggers. While the specific mechanisms responsible for asthma are not well understood, changing environmental factors associated with urban lifestyles may underlie the increased prevalence of the disorder. Vitamin D is of particular interest in asthma since vitamin D concentrations decrease with increased time spent indoors, decreased exposure to sunlight, less exercise, obesity, and inadequate calcium intake. Additionally, a growing body of literature suggests that there is a relationship between vitamin D status and respiratory symptoms, presumably through immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D. This review discusses vitamin D as it relates to asthma across the age spectrum, with a focus on human studies. PMID:22928069

  9. Asthma, Allergies and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just for Kids Library School Tools Videos Virtual Allergist Education & Training Careers in A/I Continuing Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation ...

  10. Skin Exposure and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Redlich, Carrie A.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous occupational and environmental exposures that increase asthma risk have been identified. Research and prevention have focused primarily on the respiratory tract. However, recent studies suggest that the skin may also be an important route of exposure and site of sensitization that contributes to asthma development. Factors that impair skin barrier function, such as filaggrin gene mutations or skin trauma, may facilitate allergen entry and promote Th2-like sensitization and subsequent asthma. Animal studies demonstrate that skin exposure to chemical and protein allergens is highly effective at inducing sensitization, with subsequent inhalation challenge eliciting asthmatic responses. A similar role for human skin exposure to certain sensitizing agents, such as isocyanates, is likely. Skin exposure methodologies are being developed to incorporate skin exposure assessment into epidemiology studies investigating asthma risk factors. PMID:20427586

  11. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Wheezing - exercise-induced; Reactive airway disease - exercise ... Having asthma symptoms when you exercise does not mean you cannot or should not exercise. But be aware of your EIA triggers. Cold or dry air may ...

  12. Common Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... your bedding on the hottest water setting. Outdoor Air Pollution Outdoor air pollution can trigger an asthma attack. This pollution can ... your newspaper to plan your activities for when air pollution levels will be low. Cockroach Allergen Cockroaches and ...

  13. Asthma Medicines: Quick Relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advisory Board Sponsors Sponsorship Opporunities Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Asthma Medicines: Quick Relief Page Content Article Body Short-Acting ...

  14. Asthma and Food Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  15. Asthma Action Plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cold or warm water used with detergent and bleach can also be effective. • Wash the sheets and ... hot water or cooler water with detergent and bleach. Ë Cockroaches Many people with asthma are allergic ...

  16. What Is Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... common materials like house dust mites, cockroaches, and pollens—may cause the inflammation that leads to asthma ... dander from furred or feathered animals, fungi, and pollens are common allergens. Other Irritants : Tobacco smoke, industrial ...

  17. Allergies, asthma, and pollen

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... them is your first step toward feeling better. Pollen is a trigger for many people who have allergies and asthma. The types of pollens that are triggers vary from person to person ...

  18. Smoking and asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... your allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Smoking is a trigger for many people who have ... do not have to be a smoker for smoking to cause harm. Exposure to someone else's smoking ( ...

  19. Asthma and school

    MedlinePlus

    ... Include a list of triggers that make your child's asthma worse, such as: Smells from chemicals and cleaning products Grass and weeds Smoke Dust Cockroaches Rooms that are moldy or damp Provide ...

  20. Asthma in primary care.

    PubMed

    Usta, J; Mroueh, S

    2001-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease that cannot be cured but can be effectively controlled. Control is achieved through education of the patient, monitoring of symptoms and pulmonary functions, environmental modification and pharmacologic therapy. The latter should aim at providing control with the least amount of medications. Any form of asthma more severe than mild intermittent requires the use of long term anti-inflammatory medications. PMID:12243423

  1. Asthma Outcomes: Exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Fuhlbrigge, Anne; Peden, David; Apter, Andrea J.; Boushey, Homer A.; Camargo, Carlos; Gern, James; Heymann, Peter W.; Martinez, Fernando D.; Mauger, David; Teague, William G.; Blaisdell, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Background The goals of asthma treatment include preventing recurrent exacerbations. Yet there is no consensus about the terminology for describing or defining “exacerbation,” or about how to characterize an episode’s severity. Objective National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies convened an expert group to propose how asthma exacerbation should be assessed as a standardized asthma outcome in future asthma clinical research studies. Methods We utilized comprehensive literature reviews and expert opinion to compile a list of asthma exacerbation outcomes, and classified them as either core (required in future studies), supplemental (used according to study aims and standardized), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results No dominant definition of “exacerbation” was found. The most widely used definitions included 3 components, all related to treatment, rather than symptoms: (1) systemic use of corticosteroids, (2) asthma-specific emergency department visits or hospitalization, and (3) use of short-acting β-agonists (SABAs) as quick-relief (sometimes referred to as “rescue” or “reliever”) medications. Conclusions The working group participants propose that the definition of “asthma exacerbation” be “a worsening of asthma requiring the use of systemic corticosteroids to prevent a serious outcome.” As core outcomes, they propose inclusion and separate reporting of several essential variables of an exacerbation. Further, they propose the development of a standardized, component-based definition of “exacerbation” with clear thresholds of severity for each component. PMID:22386508

  2. Neural mechanisms in asthma.

    PubMed

    Joos, G F; Germonpré, P R; Pauwels, R A

    2000-06-01

    Advances in the understanding of neural mechanisms in asthma may provide novel therapeutic approaches in the treatment of asthma. Excessive activity of cholinergic nerves may be important in asthma. Dysfunction of M2 muscarinic receptors in asthma may lead to excessive bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion and can be induced in animal models by a range of stimuli including allergen, viral infection, ozone, eosinophil products and cytokines. Cholinergic mechanisms may be especially important in certain types of patients and anticholinergic agents provide protection against bronchospasm due to psychogenic factors or beta2-blockers. Non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) mechanisms, both inhibitory (i-NANC) and excitatory (e-NANC), may play a significant role in the pathophysiology of asthma. The putative neurotransmitters, vasoactive interstinal polypeptide (VIP) and nitric oxide (NO), mediate neural bronchodilation in human airways. There does not appear to be a defect in the i-NANC system in moderate or severe asthma. e-NANC is mediated by the sensory neuropeptides substance P (SP) and the more potent bronchoconstrictor neurokinin A (NKA). Various studies suggest that the SP content of human airways is increased in asthma. Tachykinins are not only present in sensory nerves, but also are produced by inflammatory cells such as alveolar macrophages, dendritic cells, eosinophils, lymphocytes and neutrophils. They can be released into the airways by stimuli such as allergen and ozone. Evidence suggests that in addition to smooth muscle contraction, which is mediated mainly by NK2 receptors, tachykinins also cause mucus secretion, plasma extravasation and stimulate inflammatory and immune cells. These effects are mediated by NK1 receptors. Recent studies have shown that NK2 receptor antagonists such as saredutant partially inhibit NKA-induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatics. Thus, tachykinin receptor antagonists have potential as therapies for asthma. PMID:10849478

  3. Arginine metabolism in asthma.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jeremy A; Grasemann, Hartmut

    2014-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is important in the regulation of airway tone and airway responsiveness. Alterations in the L-arginine metabolism resulting in reduced availability of the substrate L-arginine for NO synthases, as well as the presence of NO synthase inhibitors such as asymmetric dimethylarginine, contribute to the reduced NO formation and airway dysfunction in asthma. Therapeutic interventions aiming to modulate the impaired L-arginine metabolism may help correct the enhanced airway tone and responsiveness in asthma. PMID:25282289

  4. Asthma Therapies Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Lemanske, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogenous disorder related to numerous biologic, immunologic, and physiologic components that generate multiple clinical phenotypes. Further, genetic and environmental factors interact in ways that produce variability in both disease onset and severity and differential expression based on both the age and sex of the patient. Thus, the natural history of asthma is complex in terms of disease expression, remission, relapse, and progression. As such, therapy for asthma is complicated and has been approached from the standpoints of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention. Presently, asthma cannot be cured but can be controlled in most patients, an indication that most of the success clinical research strategies have realized has been in the area of tertiary prevention. Since for many adult patients with asthma their disease had its roots in early life, much recent research has focused on events during early childhood that can be linked to subsequent asthma development with the hopes of creating appropriate interventions to alter its natural history of expression. These research approaches can be categorized into three questions. Who is the right patient to treat? When is the right time to begin treatment? And finally, what is the appropriate treatment to prescribe? PMID:19387036

  5. [Asthma, obesity and diet].

    PubMed

    Barranco, P; Delgado, J; Gallego, L T; Bobolea, I; Pedrosa, Ma; García de Lorenzo, A; Quirce, S

    2012-01-01

    Asthma and obesity have a considerable impact on public health and their prevalence has increased in recent years. Numerous studies have linked both disorders. Most prospective studies show that obesity is a risk factor for asthma and have found a positive correlation between baseline body mass index (BMI) and the subsequent development of asthma, although these results are not conclusive when studying the association between airway hyperresponsiveness with BMI. Furthermore, several studies suggest that whereas weight gain increases the risk of asthma, weight loss improves the course of the illness. Different factors could explain this association. Obesity is capable of reducing pulmonary compliance, lung volumes and the diameter of peripheral respiratory airways as well as affecting the volume of blood in the lungs and the ventilation-perfusion relationship. Furthermore, the increase in the normal functioning of adipose tissue in obese subjects leads to a systemic proinflammatory state, which produces a rise in the serum concentrations of several cytokines, the soluble fractions of their receptors and chemokines. Many of these mediators are synthesized and secreted by cells from adipose tissue and receive the generic name of adipokines, including IL-6, IL-10, eotaxin, TNF-α, TGF- 1, PCR, leptin y adiponectin. Finally, specific regions of the human genome which are related to both asthma and obesity have been identified. Most studies point out that obesity is capable of increasing the prevalence and incidence of asthma, although this effect appears to be modest. The treatment of obese asthmatics must include a weight control program. PMID:22566313

  6. Prognosis of occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Paggiaro, P L; Vagaggini, B; Bacci, E; Bancalari, L; Carrara, M; Di Franco, A; Giannini, D; Dente, F L; Giuntini, C

    1994-04-01

    Several studies on the prognosis of occupational asthma have shown that a significant proportion of patients continue to experience asthmatic symptoms and nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness after cessation of work. The determinants of this unfavourable prognosis of asthma are: long duration of exposure before the onset of asthma; long duration of symptoms before diagnosis; baseline airway obstruction; dual response after specific challenge test; and the persistence of markers of airway inflammation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and bronchial biopsy. The relevance of immunological markers in the outcome of occupational asthma has not yet been assessed. Further occupational exposure in sensitized subjects leads to persistence and sometimes to progressive deterioration of asthma, irrespective of the reduction of exposure to the specific sensitizer, and only the use of particular protective devices effectively prevents the progression of the disease. A long-term follow-up study of toluene diisocyanate (TDI)-induced asthma showed that the improvement in bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine occurred in a small percentage of subjects and only a long time after work cessation. Bronchial sensitivity to TDI may disappear, but non-specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness often persists unchanged, suggesting a permanent deregulation of airway tone. Steroid treatment significantly reduces nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness only when started immediately after diagnosis. PMID:8005260

  7. Asthma is Different in Women

    PubMed Central

    Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2015-01-01

    Gender differences in asthma incidence, prevalence and severity have been reported worldwide. After puberty, asthma becomes more prevalent and severe in women, and is highest in women with early menarche or with multiple gestations, suggesting a role for sex hormones in asthma genesis. However, the impact of sex hormones on the pathophysiology of asthma is confounded by and difficult to differentiate from age, obesity, atopy, and other gender associated environmental exposures. There are also gender discrepancies in the perception of asthma symptoms. Understanding gender differences in asthma is important to provide effective education and personalized management plans for asthmatics across the lifecourse. PMID:26141573

  8. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 alleviates aluminium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Leilei; Zhai, Qixiao; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Zhao, Jianxin; Narbad, Arjan; Zhang, Hao; Tian, Fengwei; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Aluminium (Al) is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. Al exposure can cause a variety of adverse physiological effects in humans and animals. Our aim was to demonstrate that specific probiotic bacteria can play a special physiologically functional role in protection against Al toxicity in mice. Thirty strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were tested for their aluminium-binding ability, aluminium tolerance, their antioxidative capacity, and their ability to survive the exposure to artificial gastrointestinal (GI) juices. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 was selected for animal experiments because of its excellent performance in vitro. Forty mice were divided into four groups: control, Al only, Al plus CCFM639, and Al plus deferiprone (DFP). CCFM639 was administered at 10(9) CFU once daily for 10 days, followed by a single oral dose of aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 5.14 mg aluminium (LD50) for each mouse. The results showed that CCFM639 treatment led to a significant reduction in the mortality rates with corresponding decrease in intestinal aluminium absorption and in accumulation of aluminium in the tissues and amelioration of hepatic histopathological damage. This probiotic treatment also resulted in alleviation of hepatic, renal, and cerebral oxidative stress. The treatment of L. plantarum CCFM639 has potential as a therapeutic dietary strategy against acute aluminium toxicity. PMID:26610803

  9. Drugs for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Peter J

    2006-01-01

    Current drug therapy for asthma is highly effective and has evolved from naturally occurring substances through logical pharmaceutical developments. Pharmacology has played a critical role in asthma drug development and several key experimental observations have been published in this journal. Understanding the pharmacology of effective drug therapies has also taught us much about the underlying mechanisms of asthma. β2-Adrenoceptor agonists are the most effective bronchodilators and evolved from catecholamines from the adrenal medulla, whereas corticosteroids, from the adrenal cortex, are by far the most effective controllers of the underlying inflammatory process in the airways. The current ‘gold standard' of asthma therapy is a combination inhaler containing a long-acting β2-agonist with a corticosteroid – an improved form of adrenal gland extract. Cromoglycate, derived from a plant product and theophylline, a dietary methyl xanthine, have also been extensively used in the therapy of asthma, but we still do not understand their molecular mechanisms. Pharmacology has played an important role in improving natural products to make effective long lasting and safe asthma therapies, but has so far been challenged to produce new classes of antiasthma therapy. The only novel class of antiasthma therapy introduced in the last 30 years are leukotriene antagonists, which are less effective than existing treatments. New, more specific, therapies targeted at specific cytokines are less effective than corticosteroids, whereas more effective therapies carry a risk of side effects that may not be acceptable. It seems likely that pharmacology, rather than molecular genetics, will remain the main approach to the further improvement of treatment for asthma. PMID:16402117

  10. Aluminium Diphosphamethanides: Hidden Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

    PubMed

    Styra, Steffen; Radius, Michael; Moos, Eric; Bihlmeier, Angela; Breher, Frank

    2016-07-01

    The synthesis and characterisation of two aluminium diphosphamethanide complexes, [Al(tBu)2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (3) and [Al(C6 F5 )2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (4), and the silylated analogue, Mes*PCHP(SiMe3 )Mes* (5), are reported. The aluminium complexes feature four-membered PCPAl core structures consisting of diphosphaallyl ligands. The silylated phosphine 5 was found to be a valuable precursor for the synthesis of 4 as it cleanly reacts with the diaryl aluminium chloride [(C6 F5 )2 AlCl]2 . The aluminium complex 3 reacts with molecular dihydrogen at room temperature under formation of the acyclic σ(2) λ(3) ,σ(3) λ(3) -diphosphine Mes*PCHP(H)Mes* and the corresponding dialkyl aluminium hydride [tBu2 AlH]3 . Thus, 3 belongs to the family of so-called hidden frustrated Lewis pairs. PMID:27271936

  11. Allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    It was only in the late 19th century that specific allergens, pollen, animal antigens and, later, house dust mite, were identified to cause upper and lower airway disease. Early allergen challenge studies, crudely monitored before measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s became widespread in the 1950s, focused on the immediate effects but noted in passing prolonged and/or recurrent asthma symptoms. The late asthmatic response, recurrent bronchoconstriction after spontaneous resolution of the early responses occurring 3 h to 8 h or more postchallenge, has been identified and well characterized over the past 50 years. The associated allergen-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (1977) and allergen-induced airway inflammation (1985) indicate that these late sequelae are important in the mechanism of allergen-induced asthma. Allergens are now recognized to be the most important cause of asthma. A standardized allergen inhalation challenge model has been developed and is proving to be a valuable research tool in the investigation of asthma pathophysiology and of potential new pharmacological agents for the treatment of asthma. PMID:24791256

  12. [Immunological therapy in asthma].

    PubMed

    Matta Campos, Juan José

    2009-01-01

    The goals of pharmacological treatment of asthma is to achieve clinical control and prevent exacerbations with the minimal adverse effects. Pharmacologic therapies are categorized in two general classes: long-term and quick-relief medications. Local or systemic corticosteroids blockade the late phase reaction of the immunological inflammatory response and reduce airway hyperresponsiveness. This reaction can also be diminished by allergen specific immunotherapy, this treatment also create immunological tolerance for the allergen and prevents new sensitizations. Immunosuppressants and immunomodulators such as methotrexate can be used as part of therapy in patients who does not respond to the recommended treatment, these medications should be used only selected patients under the supervision of an asthma specialist, as their potential beneficial effect may not outweigh the risk of serious side effects. Biomolecular therapy medications, such as etarnecept, are not recommended, more studies are required. The anti-IgE monoclonal antibody, omalizumab, is recommended in adults and children over 12, who have allergy as an important cause of their asthma. In reference to childhood immunizations, there is no evidence of influence on the incidence of asthma, possible beneficial effect on asthma exacerbations with anti-influenzae vaccine. Finally we'll see some interesting points about pharmacogenetics. PMID:20873057

  13. Asthma in elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-06-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athletes have been shown to have a different distribution of airway inflammation and unequal response to bronchial provocative test. Elite athletes display signs of exercise-induced symptoms, for example, nonasthmatic inspiratory wheeze, vocal cord dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmias, which could limit their physical capacity. Elite athletes should undergo comprehensive assessment to confirm an asthma diagnosis and determine its degree of severity. Treatment should be as for any other asthmatic individual, including the use of β2-agonist, inhaled steroid as well as leukotriene-antagonist. It should, however, be noted that daily use of β-agonists could expose elite athletes to the risk of developing tolerance towards these drugs. Use of β2-agonist should be replaced with daily inhaled corticosteroid treatment, the most important treatment of exercise-induced asthma. All physicians treating asthma should be aware of the doping aspects. Systemic β2-agonist intake is strictly prohibited, whereas inhaled treatment is allowed in therapeutic doses when asthma is documented and dispensation has been granted when needed. PMID:21702657

  14. The Microbiome in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yvonne J.; Boushey, Homer A.

    2014-01-01

    The application of recently developed sensitive, specific, culture-independent tools for identification of microbes is transforming concepts of microbial ecology, including concepts of the relationships between the vast, complex populations of microbes associated with ourselves and with states of health and disease. While most work initially focused on the community of microbes (microbiome) in the gastrointestinal tract and its relationships to gastrointestinal disease, interest has expanded to include study of the relationships of the microbiome of the airways to asthma and its phenotypes, and to the relationships between the gastrointestinal microbiome, development of immune function, and predisposition to development of allergic sensitization and asthma. We here provide our perspective on the findings of studies of differences in the airway microbiome in patients with asthma vs. healthy subjects, and of studies of relationships between environmental microbiota, gut microbiota, immune function, and the development of asthma, and additionally provide our perspective on how these findings suggest in broad outline a rationale for approaches involving directed manipulation of the gut and airway microbiome for treatment and prevention of allergic asthma. PMID:25567040

  15. Swimming pool-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Beretta, S; Vivaldo, T; Morelli, M; Carlucci, P; Zuccotti, G V

    2011-01-01

    A 13-year-old elite swimmer presented with wheezing after indoor swimming training. On the basis of her clinical history and the tests performed, exercise-induced asthma and mold-induced asthma were ruled out and a diagnosis of chlorine-induced asthma was made. PMID:21548454

  16. Managing Asthma in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Ellen M.

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting nearly 5 million children under the age of 18. Children with asthma account for 3 million hospital visits and 200,000 hospitalizations yearly. This adds up to an estimated $2 billion annually in health care costs (American Academy of Pediatrics, 1999). A child with asthma has three…

  17. Smoking and Asthma (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Smoking and Asthma KidsHealth > For Teens > Smoking and Asthma Print A A A Text Size What's in ... the health problems it causes. If you have asthma, smoking is especially risky because of the damage ...

  18. Smoking and Asthma (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Smoking and Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Smoking and Asthma Print A A A Text Size What's in ... unhealthy for everyone, but especially for someone with asthma. The lungs of a smoker, with or without ...

  19. [Inhaled therapy in asthma].

    PubMed

    Plaza Moral, Vicente; Giner Donaire, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Because of its advantages, inhaled administration of aerosolized drugs is the administration route of choice for the treatment of asthma and COPD. Numerous technological advances in the devices used in inhaled therapy in recent decades have boosted the appearance of multiple inhalers and aerosolized drugs. However, this variety also requires that the prescribing physician is aware of their characteristics. The main objective of the present review is to summarize the current state of knowledge on inhalers and inhaled drugs commonly used in the treatment of asthma. The review ranges from theoretical aspects (fundamentals and available devices and drugs) to practical and relevant aspects for asthma care in the clinical setting (therapeutic strategies, education, and adherence to inhalers). PMID:26683076

  20. Asthma and athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Fitch, K D; Godfrey, S

    1976-07-12

    Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is a manifestation of bronchial hyper-reactivity that poses a special problem for the asthmatic engaging in competitive and recreational sports. Recent Olympic successes by swimmers with asthma are not surprising in view of the lessened asthmogenicity of swimming. Neither the cause of EIA nor the reason why some forms of exercise have a greater propensity to provoke EIA is known. Preexercise prophylactic medication with selective beta 2-sympathomimetic agents or cromolyn sodium will reduce or abolish EIA in the majority of asthmatics if administered just before the event. Other agents are less effective or as yet not fully evaluated. With suitable control of exercise-induced asthma, asthmatics should not be unnecessarily restricted, and competitive sports or physical recreation can then occupy an identical role in their lives as it does for their non-asthmatic contemporaries. PMID:819668

  1. Asthma Outcomes: Pulmonary Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Robert S.; Wise, Robert S.; Covar, Ronina; Irvin, Charles G.; Kercsmar, Carolyn M.; Kraft, Monica; Liu, Mark C.; O’Connor, George T.; Peters, Stephen P.; Sorkness, Ronald; Togias, Alkis

    2014-01-01

    Background Outcomes of pulmonary physiology have a central place in asthma clinical research. Objective At the request of National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies, an expert group was convened to provide recommendations on the use of pulmonary function measures as asthma outcomes that should be assessed in a standardized fashion in future asthma clinical trials and studies to allow for cross-study comparisons. Methods Our subcommittee conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed to identify studies that focused on the validation of various airway response tests used in asthma clinical research. The subcommittee classified the instruments as core (to be required in future studies), supplemental (to be used according to study aims and in a standardized fashion), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results A list of pulmonary physiology outcomes that applies to both adults and children older than 6 years was created. These outcomes were then categorized into core, supplemental, and emerging. Spirometric outcomes (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], and FEV1/FVC) are proposed as core outcomes for study population characterization, for observational studies, and for prospective clinical trials. Bronchodilator reversibility and pre- and post-bronchodilator FEV1 also are core outcomes for study population characterization and observational studies. Conclusions The subcommittee considers pulmonary physiology outcomes of central importance in asthma and proposes spirometric outcomes as core outcomes for all future NIH-initiated asthma clinical research. PMID:22386510

  2. Asthma in Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Hunninghake, Gary M.; Weiss, Scott T.; Celedón, Juan C.

    2006-01-01

    Hispanic individuals trace their ancestry to countries that were previously under Spanish rule, including Mexico, large parts of Central and South America, and some Caribbean islands. Most—but not all—Hispanics have variable proportions of European, Amerindian, and African ancestry. Hispanics are diverse with regard to many factors, including racial ancestry, country of origin, area of residence, socioeconomic status, education, and access to health care. Recent findings suggest that there is marked variation in the prevalence, morbidity, and mortality of asthma in Hispanics in the United States and in Hispanic America. The reasons for differences in asthma and asthma morbidity among and within Hispanic subgroups are poorly understood but are likely due to the interaction between yet-unidentified genetic variants and other factors, including environmental tobacco smoke exposure, obesity, allergen exposure, and availability of health care. Barriers to optimal management of asthma in Hispanics in the United States and in Hispanic America include inadequate access to health care, suboptimal use of antiinflammatory medications, and lack of reference values for spirometric measures of lung function in many subgroups (e.g., Puerto Ricans). Future studies of asthma in Hispanics should include large samples of subgroups that are well characterized with regard to self-reported ethnicity, country of origin, place of birth, area of residence, and indicators of socioeconomic status. Because Hispanics are disproportionately represented among the poor in the United States, implementation of adequate access to health care and social reforms (e.g., improving housing conditions) would likely have a major impact on reducing asthma morbidity in this population. PMID:16210666

  3. Alveolar proteinosis associated with aluminium dust inhalation.

    PubMed

    Chew, R; Nigam, S; Sivakumaran, P

    2016-08-01

    Secondary alveolar proteinosis is a rare lung disease which may be triggered by a variety of inhaled particles. The diagnosis is made by detection of anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which appears milky white and contains lamellar bodies. Aluminium has been suggested as a possible cause, but there is little evidence in the literature to support this assertion. We report the case of a 46-year-old former boilermaker and boat builder who developed secondary alveolar proteinosis following sustained heavy aluminium exposure. The presence of aluminium was confirmed both by histological examination and metallurgical analysis of a mediastinal lymph node. Despite cessation of exposure to aluminium and treatment with whole-lung lavage which normally results in improvements in both symptoms and lung function, the outcome was poor and novel therapies are now being used for this patient. It may be that the natural history in aluminium-related alveolar proteinosis is different, with the metal playing a mediating role in the disease process. Our case further supports the link between aluminium and secondary alveolar proteinosis and highlights the need for measures to prevent excessive aluminium inhalation in relevant industries. PMID:27099254

  4. Asthma in childhood.

    PubMed

    Ellis, E F

    1983-11-01

    Asthma is defined as an obstructive disease of the pulmonary airways resulting from spasm of airway muscle, increased mucus secretion, and inflammation. The airways of asthmatic individuals are hyperresponsive to a variety of stimuli including cold air, atmospheric irritants, pharmacologically active chemicals, various drugs, and hyperventilation. The fundamental abnormality underlying the hyperresponsiveness appears to be genetically determined; two theories explaining the abnormality have received the most attention. One theory suggests that asthma is due to abnormal beta-adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase function with decreased adrenergic responsiveness. An alternate theory proposes that increased cholinergic activity in the airway is the fundamental defect in the disease. The true prevalence of asthma has been difficult to determine owing to uncertainties regarding the definition of the disease. Prevalence in various populations of children ranged from 1.37% to 11.4% or higher. Most studies report a preponderance of asthma in boys over girls, with ratios varying from 1.3:1 to 3.3:1. Risk factors for the disease include a history of atopy, acute lower respiratory tract disease, parental cigarette smoking, and bronchiolitis or croup. The spectrum of asthma is that of an illness beginning early in life and persisting, in some cases, through adulthood. Signs of the disease may be apparent in the first 2 yr of life and are often associated with viral respiratory infections. Disproportionate narrowing of peripheral airways and decreased static elastic recoil properties of the lung predispose infants and young children to asthma. During midchildhood there is a tendency toward improvement, with continued improvement during adolescence. The goal of management of the child with asthma is to reduce symptoms sufficiently so that the child can regularly attend school, engage in play activities, and sleep through the night uninterrupted, while avoiding unacceptable

  5. Inner City Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Togias, Alkis

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The inner city has long been recognized as an area of high asthma morbidity and mortality. A wide range of factors interact to create this environment. These factors include well-recognized asthma risk factors that are not specific to the inner city, the structure and delivery of health care, the location and function of the urban environment, and social inequities. This article will review these facets and discuss successful and unsuccessful interventions in order to understand what is needed to solve this problem. PMID:25459579

  6. Inhalation treatment for asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, J; Warner, J O

    1986-01-01

    Inhaled medication has revolutionised the lives of many children with asthma. Despite this we see many children for whom appropriate inhaled medication has been prescribed but whose symptoms continue to be poorly controlled. In our experience this is often due to poor technique or inappropriately prescribed devices and an inadequate understanding of when and how to use the treatment. The prescribing physician must have a clear idea of the optimal inhalation technique. We have reviewed the standard devices available and our use of them in the treatment of childhood asthma. PMID:3082295

  7. Traditional Therapies for Severe Asthma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Eileen; Hoyte, Flavia C L

    2016-08-01

    Severe asthma is a complex and heterogeneous disease. The European Respiratory Society and American Thoracic Society guidelines define severe asthma for patients 6 years or older as "asthma which requires treatment with high-dose inhaled corticosteroids…plus a second controller or systemic corticosteroids to prevent it from becoming 'uncontrolled' or which remains 'uncontrolled' despite this therapy." This article reviews available traditional therapies, data behind their uses in severe asthma, and varying recommendations. As various asthma endotypes and phenotypes are better understood and characterized, targeted therapies should help improve disease outcomes, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness. PMID:27401628

  8. Pharmacogenetics of asthma in children

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Eiko; Nishimura, Akane; Kaneko, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as bronchial asthma and atopic dermatitis develop by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Several candidate causative genes of asthma and atopy have been reported as the genetic factors. The clinical features of patients and causes of diseases vary. Therefore, personalized medicine (tailor-made medicine) is necessary for the improvement of quality of life (QOL) and for asthma cure. Pharmacogenetics is very important for personalized medicine. Here, we present the genetics and pharmacogenetics of asthma in children. Finally, we show the guideline for personalized medicine for asthma, particularly in childhood, including the pharmacogenetics of anti-asthmatic drugs, preliminarily produced by the authors. PMID:20224673

  9. Aluminium in Biological Environments: A Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mujika, Jon I; Rezabal, Elixabete; Mercero, Jose M; Ruipérez, Fernando; Costa, Dominique; Ugalde, Jesus M; Lopez, Xabier

    2014-01-01

    The increased availability of aluminium in biological environments, due to human intervention in the last century, raises concerns on the effects that this so far “excluded from biology” metal might have on living organisms. Consequently, the bioinorganic chemistry of aluminium has emerged as a very active field of research. This review will focus on our contributions to this field, based on computational studies that can yield an understanding of the aluminum biochemistry at a molecular level. Aluminium can interact and be stabilized in biological environments by complexing with both low molecular mass chelants and high molecular mass peptides. The speciation of the metal is, nonetheless, dictated by the hydrolytic species dominant in each case and which vary according to the pH condition of the medium. In blood, citrate and serum transferrin are identified as the main low molecular mass and high molecular mass molecules interacting with aluminium. The complexation of aluminium to citrate and the subsequent changes exerted on the deprotonation pathways of its tritable groups will be discussed along with the mechanisms for the intake and release of aluminium in serum transferrin at two pH conditions, physiological neutral and endosomatic acidic. Aluminium can substitute other metals, in particular magnesium, in protein buried sites and trigger conformational disorder and alteration of the protonation states of the protein's sidechains. A detailed account of the interaction of aluminium with proteic sidechains will be given. Finally, it will be described how alumnium can exert oxidative stress by stabilizing superoxide radicals either as mononuclear aluminium or clustered in boehmite. The possibility of promotion of Fenton reaction, and production of hydroxyl radicals will also be discussed. PMID:24757505

  10. Investigation of the aluminium-aluminium oxide reversible transformation as observed by hot stage electron microscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, C. A.; Judd, G.; Ansell, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Thin foils of high purity aluminium and an Al-Al2O3 SAP type of alloy were oxidised in a specially designed hot stage specimen chamber in an electron microscope. Below 450 C, amorphous aluminium oxide formed on the foil surface and was first detectable at foil edges, holes, and pits. Islands of aluminium then nucleated in this amorphous oxide. The aluminium islands displayed either a lateral growth with eventual coalescence with other islands, or a reoxidation process which caused the islands to disappear. The aluminium island formation was determined to be related to the presence of the electron beam. A mechanism based upon electron charging due to the electron beam was proposed to explain the nucleation, growth, coalescence, disappearance, and geometry of the aluminium islands.

  11. Structural study of VO {sub x} doped aluminium fluoride and aluminium oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Scheurell, Kerstin; Scholz, Gudrun; Kemnitz, Erhard

    2007-02-15

    The structural properties of vanadium doped aluminium oxyfluorides and aluminium oxides, prepared by a modified sol-gel synthesis route, were thoroughly investigated. The influence of the preparation technique and the calcination temperature on the coordination of vanadium, aluminium and fluorine was analysed by different spectroscopic methods such as Raman, MAS NMR and ESR spectroscopy. In all samples calcined at low temperatures (350 deg. C), vanadium coexists in two oxidation states V{sup IV} and V{sup V}, with V{sup IV} as dominating species in the vanadium doped aluminium oxyfluorides. In the fluoride containing solids aluminium as well as vanadium are coordinated by fluorine and oxygen. Thermal annealing of 800 deg. C leads to an extensive reorganisation of the original matrices and to the oxidation of V{sup IV} to V{sup V} in both systems. - Graphical abstract: Structure model for VO {sub x} doped aluminium oxide.

  12. Workplace respiratory irritants and asthma.

    PubMed

    Tarlo, S M

    2000-01-01

    Workplace respiratory irritants can have a variety of effects in relation to asthma. Very high exposures can cause new-onset asthma (reactive airways dysfunction syndrome or irritant-induced asthma) with or without concurrent sensitization, e.g., to diisocyanate. Aggravation of underlying asthma can result from moderate exposures. Adjuvant or other effects enhancing the risk of sensitization to high molecular weight allergens have occurred with chronic low-moderate exposures. Enhancement of airway responsiveness on a short-term basis can be produced by ozone and biological irritants such as endotoxin and beta 1-3 glucans. Production of nonasthmatic responses such as hyperventilation and vocal cord dysfunction can mimic asthma symptoms. Controversy exists as to whether moderate irritant exposures can cause asthma or long-term worsening of underlying asthma. PMID:10769351

  13. Respiratory Conditions Update: Asthma.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Timothy A

    2016-09-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by chronic airway inflammation and variable expiratory airflow limitation. Related clinical features include wheezing, dyspnea, chest tightness, and cough that worsens at night or in the early morning, and that varies over time and in intensity. A finding of variable expiratory airflow limitation on spirometry confirms the diagnosis. A forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity ratio less than the level predicted for the patient's age is suggestive of airflow limitation. Variability also must be confirmed. Updated guidelines recommend control-based management administered in a stepwise manner, with goals of achieving symptom control and minimizing the risks of exacerbations, future fixed airway limitation, and adverse effects of therapy. There is good evidence for the effectiveness of asthma education and self-management plans. Short-acting bronchodilators should be used as needed for symptom relief, with the addition of an inhaled corticosteroid early as maintenance therapy if symptoms are not well controlled. If asthma remains uncontrolled despite therapy, patients should be referred for more specialized treatment. Biomarkers, biologic drugs, and endoscopic treatments are being studied in the management of severe asthma, and ongoing research may determine which patients might benefit most from these emerging therapies. PMID:27576231

  14. Allergies, asthma, and pollen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some trees Some grasses Weeds Ragweed Watch the weather and the season The amount of pollen in the air can affect whether you or your child has hay fever and asthma symptoms. On hot, dry, windy days, more pollen is in the air. ...

  15. Managing Asthma at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Julie A.

    2000-01-01

    School personnel must know which students have asthma, typical warning signs, and appropriate actions in an emergency. Administering appropriate medication and reducing environmental triggers are not enough. Policymaking in schools and workplaces and legislation to increase health care access and eliminate substandard housing and air pollution are…

  16. MONTEFIORE - ASTHMA INTERVENTION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Montefiore Medical Center is conducting an asthma intervention study using, in part, their Lead Safe House on the Montefiore campus, a low-allergen controlled setting. There are three groups of participants, all severe asthmatics. The first group is being moved temporarily into...

  17. [Asthma and aspirin].

    PubMed

    Schiappoli, Michele; Gani, Federica; Frati, Francesco; Marcucci, Francesco; Senna, Gianenrico

    2003-02-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is an important cause of asthma so that ASA induced asthma (AIA) is considered a disease. Its prevalence is of 0.3-0.6 in the general population but it raises to 21% in the asthmatic one. Middle aged female are the most affected. AIA generally begins with a non allergic rhinitis, complicated sometimes with polyps, that evolves secondarily in asthma. The disease is often so severe to need oral corticosteroids to be controlled. It persists independently to the intake of ASA. From a pathogenetic point of view the interaction of ASA with the arachidonic acid metabolism seems to be important. The inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) induces an activation of lypo-oxygenase with an increased synthesis of leukotrienes. In ASA intolerant patients there is also an activation of LTC4 synthetase, enzyme responsible for the synthesis of leukotrienes. Clinical history is very important to diagnose the disease but to confirm the diagnosis sometimes the provocation test is mandatory. Oral and bronchial challenges can be dangerous, while nasal challenge is safer even if must be better standardized. Patients must not use antiinflammatory drugs with the same mechanism of action of ASA; COX-2 inhibitors are generally well tolerated. Antileukotrienes are useful to treat asthma, in association with steroids. Desensitization can be used in very selected patients. PMID:12908375

  18. Occupational allergies and asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Tarlo, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review aspects of occupational allergies and asthma for primary care physicians recognizing, diagnosing, and managing patients with these conditions. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Studies in the medical literature mainly provide level 2 evidence, that is, from at least one well-designed clinical trial without randomization, from cohort or case-control analytical studies, from multiple time series, or from dramatic results in uncontrolled experiments. MAIN MESSAGE: Occupational allergies and asthma have the best prognosis with an early, accurate diagnosis and subsequent avoidance of exposure to the relevant sensitizer. These diagnoses can normally be suspected from the clinical history. Primary care physicians can also initiate investigations to make an objective diagnosis, can assess workplace exposure agents from the history, and can review appropriate data sheets on material safety. Specialist evaluation is likely to be needed for skin tests, however, and for other specialized tests (such as pulmonary function assessments at work and off work or specific challenges with the suspected workplace agent). Patients with a confirmed diagnosis need appropriate medical management of their allergic manifestations or asthma, but also often require psychosocial support during the period of investigation and management, especially in relation to required changes in their work and to compensation or insurance claims. CONCLUSIONS: Consider workplace exposure as a source of patients' allergies or asthma and aim to make an early, accurate diagnosis. PMID:10386216

  19. Exercise training in asthma.

    PubMed

    Satta, A

    2000-12-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease that is often limiting the exercise capacity. Rehabilitation programs are recommended and widely applied in asthmatic patients, and exercise prescription is a keystone of these programs. The impairment of exercise performance in asthmatics, the role of exercise training in such patients, the mechanisms of its beneficial effects and the suggested programs are discussed in a review, accordingly to the current evidence and available data in scientific literature. Exercise performance is impaired in most asthmatics. There is no conclusive evidence that asthma may involve a ventilatory limitation to exercise. The lesser fitness in asthmatics seems mainly due to inactivity and sedentary lifestyle. Exercise induced asthma (EIA) is a significant problem, and the best approach to minimise its effects on exercise capacity is prevention. Exercise training has been proved to have health-related benefits and to improve the quality of life. There is substantial evidence that exercise training increases exercise performance and fitness in asthmatics. It is still unclear whether physical training improves pulmonary function and bronchial responsiveness. Since asthma ranges widely, exercise prescription varies for each patient. The proper selection of the patients and the choice of exercise programs are the steps required. Accordingly with the severity of the disease, exercise strategies may range from sports activities to, when the disease is severe, inpatient hospital programs that overlap with COPD rehabilitation. Further research to clarify some aspects (effects on pulmonary function and EIA, outcomes, cost-benefit relationship) is necessary. PMID:11296996

  20. The removal of iron from molten aluminium

    SciTech Connect

    Donk, H.M. van der; Nijhof, G.H.; Castelijns, C.A.M.

    1995-12-31

    In this work an overview is given about the techniques available for the removal of metallic impurities from molten aluminium. The overview is focused on the removal of iron. Also, some experimental results are given about the creation of iron-rich intermetallic compounds in an aluminium system, which are subsequently removed by gravity segregation and filtration techniques. This work is part of an ongoing research project of three major European aluminium companies who are co-operating on the subject of recycling of aluminium packaging materials recovered from household waste by means of Eddy-Current techniques. Using this technique the pick-up of some contaminating metals, particularly iron, is almost unavoidable.

  1. Asthma outcomes: Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Szefler, Stanley J.; Wenzel, Sally; Brown, Robert; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Fahy, John V.; Hamilton, Robert G.; Hunt, John F.; Kita, Hirohito; Liu, Andrew H.; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Minnicozzi, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Measurement of biomarkers has been incorporated within clinical research studies of asthma to characterize the population and associate the disease with environmental and therapeutic effects. Objective National Institutes of Health institutes and federal agencies convened an expert group to propose which biomarkers should be assessed as standardized asthma outcomes in future clinical research studies. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search of the literature to identify studies that developed and/or tested asthma biomarkers. We identified biomarkers relevant to the underlying disease process progression and response to treatment. We classified the biomarkers as either core (required in future studies), supplemental (used according to study aims and standardized), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an National Institutes of Health–organized workshop convened in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results Ten measures were identified; only 1, multiallergen screening to define atopy, is recommended as a core asthma outcome. Complete blood counts to measure total eosinophils, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (Feno), sputum eosinophils, urinary leukotrienes, and total and allergen-specific IgE are recommended as supplemental measures. Measurement of sputum polymorphonuclear leukocytes and other analytes, cortisol measures, airway imaging, breath markers, and system-wide studies (eg, genomics, proteomics) are considered as emerging outcome measures. Conclusion The working group participants propose the use of multiallergen screening in all asthma clinical trials to characterize study populations with respect to atopic status. Blood, sputum, and urine specimens should be stored in biobanks, and standard procedures should be developed to harmonize sample collection for clinical trial biorepositories. PMID:22386512

  2. 4 Tips: Asthma and Complementary Health Practices

    MedlinePlus

    ... U V W X Y Z 4 Tips: Asthma and Complementary Health Practices Share: Asthma is a chronic lung disease that affects people ... cure, most people are able to control their asthma with conventional therapies and by avoiding the substances ...

  3. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Asthma who Smoke Insurance coverage and barriers to care for people with asthma Tables and Graphs Asthma ... Home Pregnant Women - Medical clinics/physicians' office Health care providers - Medical clinics/physicians' office Health care providers - ...

  4. Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native > Asthma Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives In 2014, 218, ... Native American adults reported that they currently have asthma. American Indian/Alaska Native children are 30% more ...

  5. Aluminium in the blood and urine of industrially exposed workers.

    PubMed Central

    Sjögren, B; Lundberg, I; Lidums, V

    1983-01-01

    Blood and urine aluminium concentrations were studied in industrially exposed workers using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Welders and workers making aluminium powder and aluminium sulphate had higher concentrations in blood and urine than non-exposed referents. Workers in the electrolytic production of aluminium had higher urine but not blood concentrations than the referents. Thus aluminium was found to be absorbed by all industrially exposed workers. Blood concentrations were lower than those presumably associated with aluminium induced encephalopathy in patients receiving dialysis. PMID:6871119

  6. Mitral Stenosis Presenting as Asthma.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenjing; Jbeli, Aiham; Stys, Maria; Stys, Adam

    2016-02-01

    Although wheezing is one of the most common symptoms and physical findings in asthma, other causes of wheezing should be kept in mind: vocal cord dysfunction, postnasal drip syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis, and non-pulmonary diseases, like heart failure and pulmonary edema. Here, we present a case of severe mitral stenosis with pulmonary edema treated for resistant asthma. If asthma is difficult to control, other etiologies of wheezing, including cardiac disease, should be taken into consideration during diagnosis. PMID:26999914

  7. Prevention of asthma.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, H S; Frick, O L

    1981-11-01

    Infants born of allergic mothers but normal fathers, who had eczema and who were fed cows' milk, had a significantly greater incidence of asthma (P less than 0.001) than infants with a similar history but who were breast-fed. An analysis of all breast-fed infants in the study showed that they were less likely to develop asthma than those who were bottle-fed (P less than 0.06). There was a lower incidence of allergy in infants born of families with allergic mothers and normal fathers, than in families in which both parents were allergic (P less than 0.02). In skin tests of both breast or bottle-fed babies, the two most common allergens eliciting reactions were egg and cat dander. PMID:7333001

  8. Asthma induced by enkephalin.

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, R D; Bellamy, D; Pyke, D A

    1980-01-01

    A total of 291 diabetics were studied to see whether an asthmatic reaction was associated with facial flushing induced by chlorpropamide and alcohol. Of these patients, 191 reported facial flushing, of whom 12 reported breathlessness as well. Of these 12, five also described wheezing, and respiratory function tests showed them to have asthma. Three of these five patients underwent further tests, which showed that the asthmatic reaction could be prevented by giving disodium cromoglycate and the specific opiate antagonist naloxone. One patient developed wheezing when given an enkephalin analogue with opiate-like activity. Asthma induced by chlorpropamide and alcohol was concluded to be mediated by endogenous peptides with opiate-like activity such as enkephalin. PMID:7357255

  9. Allergens and thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Shuaib M; Pulimood, Thomas B

    2009-09-01

    Thunderstorm-related asthma is increasingly recognized in many parts of the world. This review focuses on important advances in the understanding of the mechanism of the role of allergens, in particular fungal spores such as Alternaria, in asthma epidemics associated with thunderstorms. From our observations, we have proposed that the prerequisites for this phenomenon are as follows: 1) a sensitized, atopic, asthmatic individual; 2) prior airway hyperresponsiveness before a sudden, large allergen exposure; 3) a large-scale thunderstorm with cold outflow occurring at a time and location during an allergen season in which large numbers of asthmatics are outdoors; and 4) sudden release of large amounts of respirable allergenic fragments, particularly fungal spores such as Alternaria. PMID:19671382

  10. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) (and Asthma)

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  11. Personalizing the Approach to Childhood Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  12. Prevalence of asthma in Portugal - The Portuguese National Asthma Survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Asthma is a frequent chronic respiratory disease in both children and adults. However, few data on asthma prevalence are available in Portugal. The Portuguese National Asthma Survey is the first nationwide study that uses standardized methods. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of current asthma in the Portuguese population and to assess the association between ‘Current asthma’ and comorbidities such as upper airways disease. Methods A cross-sectional, population-based, telephone interview survey including all municipalities of Portugal was undertaken. Participants were randomly selected to answer a questionnaire based on the Portuguese version of the GA2LEN survey. ‘Current asthma’ was defined as self-reported lifetime asthma and at least one of 3 symptoms in the last 12 months: wheezing, waking with breathlessness or having an asthma attack. Results Data were obtained for 6 003 respondents, with mean age of 38.9 (95%CI 38.2-39.6) years and 57.3% females. In the Portuguese population, the prevalence of ‘Current asthma’ was 6.8% (95%CI 6.0-7.7) and of ‘Lifetime asthma’ was 10.5% (95%CI 9.5-11.6) Using GA2LEN definition for asthma, our prevalence estimate was 7.8% (95%CI 7.0-8.8). Rhinitis had a strong association with asthma (Adjusted OR 3.87, 95%CI 2.90-5.18) and the association between upper airway diseases and asthma was stronger in patients with both rhinitis and sinusitis (Adjusted OR 13.93, 95%CI 6.60-29.44). Conclusions Current asthma affects 695 000 Portuguese, with a prevalence of 6.8%. People who reported both rhinitis and sinusitis had the highest risk of having asthma. PMID:22931550

  13. Asthma in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 10% of adults have suffered an attack of asthma, and up to 5% of these have severe disease that responds poorly to treatment. Patients with severe disease have an increased risk of death, but patients with mild to moderate disease are also at risk of exacerbations. Most guidelines about the management of asthma follow stepwise protocols. This review does not endorse or follow any particular protocol, but presents the evidence about specific interventions. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for acute asthma? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 100 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: beta2 agonists (plus ipratropium bromide, pressured metered-dose inhalers, short-acting continuous nebulised, short-acting intermittent nebulised, short-acting iv, and inhaled formoterol); corticosteroids (inhaled); corticosteroids (single oral, combined inhaled, and short courses); education about acute asthma; generalist care; helium–oxygen mixture (heliox); magnesium sulphate (iv and adding isotonic nebulised magnesium to inhaled beta2 agonists); mechanical ventilation; oxygen supplementation (controlled 28% oxygen and controlled 100% oxygen); and specialist care. PMID:21463536

  14. Surface modification for aluminium pigment inhibition.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Philip; Palmqvist, Anders E C; Holmberg, Krister

    2006-12-21

    This review concerns surface treatment of aluminium pigments for use in water borne coatings. Aluminium pigments are commonly used in coatings to give a silvery and shiny lustre to the substrate. Such paints and inks have traditionally been solvent borne, since aluminium pigment particles react with water. For environmental and health reasons solvent borne coatings are being replaced by water borne and the aluminium pigments then need to be surface modified in order to stand exposure to water. This process is called inhibition and both organic and inorganic substances are used as inhibiting agents. The organic inhibiting agents range from low molecular weight substances, such as phenols and aromatic acids, via surfactants, in particular alkyl phosphates and other anionic amphiphiles, to high molecular weight compounds, such as polyelectrolytes. A common denominator for them all is that they contain a functional group that interacts specifically with aluminium at the surface. A particularly strong interaction is obtained if the inhibiting agent contains functional groups that form chelating complex with surface Al(III). Encapsulation of the pigment can be made by in situ polymerization at the surface of the pigment and a recent approach is to have the polymerization occur within a double layer of adsorbed surfactant. The inorganic route is dominated by coating with silica, and recent progress has been made using an alkoxide, such as tetraethoxysilane as silica precursor. Such silica coated aluminium pigments are comparable in performance to chromate inhibited pigments and thus offer a possible heavy metal-free alternative. There are obvious connections between surface modifications made to prevent the pigment to react with water and inhibition of corrosion of macroscopic aluminium surfaces. PMID:17239333

  15. Aluminium and the human breast.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2016-06-01

    The human population is exposed to aluminium (Al) from diet, antacids and vaccine adjuvants, but frequent application of Al-based salts to the underarm as antiperspirant adds a high additional exposure directly to the local area of the human breast. Coincidentally the upper outer quadrant of the breast is where there is also a disproportionately high incidence of breast cysts and breast cancer. Al has been measured in human breast tissues/fluids at higher levels than in blood, and experimental evidence suggests that at physiologically relevant concentrations, Al can adversely impact on human breast epithelial cell biology. Gross cystic breast disease is the most common benign disorder of the breast and evidence is presented that Al may be a causative factor in formation of breast cysts. Evidence is also reviewed that Al can enable the development of multiple hallmarks associated with cancer in breast cells, in particular that it can cause genomic instability and inappropriate proliferation in human breast epithelial cells, and can increase migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. In addition, Al is a metalloestrogen and oestrogen is a risk factor for breast cancer known to influence multiple hallmarks. The microenvironment is established as another determinant of breast cancer development and Al has been shown to cause adverse alterations to the breast microenvironment. If current usage patterns of Al-based antiperspirant salts contribute to causation of breast cysts and breast cancer, then reduction in exposure would offer a strategy for prevention, and regulatory review is now justified. PMID:26997127

  16. Acute bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sudhanshu; Jindal, Atul; Bansal, Arun; Singhi, Sunit C

    2011-11-01

    Acute asthma is the third commonest cause of pediatric emergency visits at PGIMER. Typically, it presents with acute onset respiratory distress and wheeze in a patient with past or family history of similar episodes. The severity of the acute episode of asthma is judged clinically and categorized as mild, moderate and severe. The initial therapy consists of oxygen, inhaled beta-2 agonists (salbutamol or terbutaline), inhaled budesonide (three doses over 1 h, at 20 min interval) in all and ipratropium bromide and systemic steroids (hydrocortisone or methylprednisolone) in acute severe asthma. Other causes of acute onset wheeze and breathing difficulty such as pneumonia, foreign body, cardiac failure etc. should be ruled out with help of chest radiography and appropriate laboratory investigations in first time wheezers and those not responding to 1 h of inhaled therapy. In case of inadequate response or worsening, intravenous infusion of magnesium sulphate, terbutaline or aminophylline may be used. Magnesium sulphate is the safest and most effective alternative among these. Severe cases may need ICU care and rarely, ventilatory support. PMID:21769523

  17. The Microbiome and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yvonne J.

    2014-01-01

    That the subglottic airways are not sterile, as was once believed, but are populated by a distinct “bronchial microbiome,” is now accepted. Also accepted is the concept that asthma is associated with differences in the composition of this microbiome. What is not clear is whether the differences in microbial community composition themselves mediate pathologic changes in the airways or whether they reflect differences in systemic immune function driven by differences in the development of the gastrointestinal microbiome in early life, when the immune system is most malleable. Recognition of the probable existence of a “common mucosal immune system” allowed synthesis of these apparently opposing ideas into a single conceptual model. Gastrointestinal microbiome–driven differences in systemic immune function predispose to sensitization to allergens deposited on mucosal surfaces, whereas possibly similar, but not identical, differences in immune function predispose to less effective responses to microbial infection of the airways, resulting in persistence of the inflammation underlying the structural and functional abnormalities of asthma. In this model, allergic sensitization and asthma are thus seen as commonly overlapping but not necessarily coincident consequences of abnormalities in microbial colonization, development of immune function, and encounter with agents infecting the respiratory tract. PMID:24437406

  18. The healthy worker effect in asthma: work may cause asthma, but asthma may also influence work

    PubMed Central

    Le Moual, Nicole; Kauffmann, Francine; Eisen, Ellen; Kennedy, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Despite the increasing attention to the relationship between asthma and work exposures, occupational asthma remains under-recognized and its population burden underestimated. This may be due, in part, to the fact that traditional approaches to studying asthma in populations cannot adequately take into account the Healthy Worker Effect (HWE). The HWE is the potential bias caused by the phenomenon that sicker individuals may choose work environments in which exposures are low; may be excluded from being hired; or once hired, may seek transfer to less exposed jobs or leave work. This article demonstrates that population and workplace based asthma studies are particularly subject to HWE bias, which leads to underestimates of relative risks. Our objective is to describe the HWE as it relates to asthma research, and to discuss the significance of taking HWE bias into account in designing and interpreting asthma studies. We also discuss the importance of understanding HWE bias for public health practitioners and for clinicians. Finally, we emphasize the timeliness of this review in light of the many longitudinal ‘child to young adult’ asthma cohort studies currently underway. These prospective studies will soon provide an ideal opportunity to examine the impact of early workplace environments on asthma in young adults. We urge occupational and childhood asthma epidemiologists collaborate to ensure that this opportunity is not lost. PMID:17872490

  19. Emerging therapeutic options for asthma.

    PubMed

    Colice, Gene L

    2011-04-01

    Asthma is characterized by eosinophilic airway inflammation and elevated serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels. Due to these pathologic features, the foundation of asthma treatment has historically been anti-inflammatory therapy with inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs). Numerous factors in addition to IgE and eosinophils, however, likely play important roles in mediating the airway inflammatory response characteristic of asthma. ICSs are effective therapy for some patients with persistent asthma, but clinical trials have shown that even increasing doses of ICSs under carefully controlled situations does not always result in acceptable asthma control. Consequently, other classes of medications, in addition to ICSs, are recommended in those patients with more severe asthma. The class of medication most commonly used in more severe asthma, along with ICSs, is long-acting inhaled beta2-agonists, but leukotriene modifying agents and anti-IgE monoclonal antibodies may also be used. Agents such as tiotropium, a long-acting inhaled anti-muscarinic agent, and those aimed at inhibiting cytokines, such as mepoluzimab, daclizumab, and etanercept, hold promise in the treatment of asthma. Other agents under investigation include phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitors and oligonucleotides. Bronchial thermoplasty, a nonpharmacologic option, may also be beneficial in patients with poorly controlled asthma. As our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of asthma increases, it will enable the development of novel therapeutic approaches for patients who are not responding well to traditional treatments. Although more studies are necessary to ensure the efficacy and safety of both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches, there is future promise for therapeutic advances in severe, persistent asthma. PMID:21761958

  20. Investigation of detonation initiation in aluminium suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veyssiere, B.; Khasainov, B. A.; Briand, A.

    2008-09-01

    Detonation initiation is investigated in aluminium/oxygen and aluminium/air mixtures. Critical conditions for initiation of spherical detonations are examined in analogy with the criteria defined for gaseous mixtures, which correlate critical parameters of detonation initiation to the characteristic size of the cellular structure. However, experimental data on the detonation cell size in these two-phase mixtures are very scarce, on account of the difficulty to perform large-scale experiments. Therefore, 2D numerical simulations of the detonation cellular structure have been undertaken, with the same combustion model for Al/air and Al/O2 mixtures. The cell size is found to be λ = 37.5 cm for a rich ( r = 1.61) aluminium-air mixture, and λ = 7.5 cm for a stoichiometric aluminium-oxygen mixture, which is in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. Calculations performed in large-scale configurations (up to 25 m in length and 1.5 m in lateral direction) suggest that the critical initiation energy and predetonation radius for direct initiation of the unconfined detonation in the aluminium-air mixture are, respectively, 10 kg of TNT and 8 m. Moreover, numerical simulations reveal that the structure of the detonation wave behind the leading front is even more complicated than in pure gaseous mixtures, due to two-phase flow effects.

  1. Uncontrolled asthma and recurring pulmonary opacities: just asthma?

    PubMed Central

    Davidsen, Jesper Rømhild; Madsen, Poul Henning; Laursen, Christian B

    2014-01-01

    In asthma, when comorbidities and common causes of poor control have been considered and treated, the clinician may speculate, ‘Is it all asthma?’. In patients with uncontrolled atopic asthma with recurring episodes of symptoms mimicking pneumonia, the suspicion of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) should remain high. ABPA is caused by a complex immunological hypersensitivity reaction to colonisation with Aspergillus fumigatus in the bronchial tree, and is characterised by the presence of atopic asthma, blood eosinophilia, migrating pulmonary opacities and potential bronchiectasis. This case report describes a delay in diagnosing ABPA which was imitating pneumonia. The clinician should pay increased attention to ABPA and test for this in patients with uncontrolled asthma with an ongoing requirement for oral corticosteroids and/or antibiotics and with pulmonary opacities on chest imaging. PMID:24862414

  2. Understanding Asthma in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohay, Heather; Holzheimer, Leisa

    1997-01-01

    Asthma is an incurable respiratory disease characterized by increased responsiveness of the tracheobronchial tree to a variety of stimuli. Associated symptoms include shortness of breath, chest tightness, and a cough or wheeze. This resource booklet for child caregivers presents comprehensive information on the nature of asthma and caring for a…

  3. Prenatal Stress, Prematurity, and Asthma.

    PubMed

    Medsker, Brock; Forno, Erick; Simhan, Hyagriv; Celedón, Juan C

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting millions of children in the United States and worldwide. Prematurity is a risk factor for asthma, and certain ethnic or racial minorities such as Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic blacks are disproportionately affected by both prematurity and asthma. In this review, we examine current evidence to support maternal psychosocial stress as a putative link between prematurity and asthma, while also focusing on disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and immune responses as potential underlying mechanisms for stress-induced "premature asthma." Prenatal stress may cause not only abnormalities in the HPA axis but also epigenetic changes in the fetal glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1), leading to impaired glucocorticoid metabolism. Moreover, maternal stress can alter fetal cytokine balance, favoring TH2 (allergic) immune responses characteristic of atopic asthma: interleukin 6 (IL-6), which has been associated with premature labor, can promote TH2 responses by stimulating production of IL-4 and IL-13. Given a link among stress, prematurity, and asthma, future research should include birth cohorts aimed at confirming and better characterizing "premature asthma." If confirmed, clinical trials of prenatal maternal stress reduction would be warranted to reduce the burden of these common comorbidities. While awaiting the results of such studies, sound policies to prevent domestic and community violence (eg, from firearms) are justified, not only by public safety but also by growing evidence of detrimental effects of violence-induced stress on psychiatric and somatic health. PMID:26676148

  4. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  5. CHILDHOOD ASTHMA PROJECT, TOPPENISH, WA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Poorly controlled childhood asthma can be a life-threatening situation, particularly for young children whose small airways cannot handle large amounts of environmental triggers or allergens. The Toppenish Childhood Asthma Project is unique as it involves a culturally diverse, i...

  6. Comorbidity of Asthma with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Riise, Trond; Eagan, Tomas Mikal; Lund, Anders; Dilsaver, Steven C.; Hundal, Oivind; Oedegaard, Ketil J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess how frequently drugs used to treat asthma and ADHD are prescribed to the same patients. Method: The authors used data from the Norwegian Prescription Database for 2006, including the total Norwegian population (n = 4,640,219). Results: Anti-asthma drugs were prescribed to 350,894 persons (7.56 % of the population), anti-ADHD…

  7. The Saudi Initiative for Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moamary, Mohamed S.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.; Idrees, Majdy M.; Zeitouni, Mohamed O.; Alanezi, Mohammed O.; Al-Jahdal, Hamdan H.; Al Dabbagh, Maha

    2009-01-01

    The Saudi Initiative for Asthma (SINA) provides up-to-date guidelines for healthcare workers managing patients with asthma. SINA was developed by a panel of Saudi experts with respectable academic backgrounds and long-standing experience in the field. SINA is founded on the latest available evidence, local literature, and knowledge of the current setting in Saudi Arabia. Emphasis is placed on understanding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, medications, and clinical presentation. SINA elaborates on the development of patient-doctor partnership, self-management, and control of precipitating factors. Approaches to asthma treatment in SINA are based on disease control by the utilization of Asthma Control Test for the initiation and adjustment of asthma treatment. This guideline is established for the treatment of asthma in both children and adults, with special attention to children 5 years and younger. It is expected that the implementation of these guidelines for treating asthma will lead to better asthma control and decrease patient utilization of the health care system. PMID:19881170

  8. Managing asthma in Black children.

    PubMed

    Rance, Karen; Oʼlaughlen, Mary; Platts-Mills, Thomas

    2012-06-10

    Black children bear a disproportionate burden of asthma when compared to other segments of the population. This study assessed the role of symptom scores, spirometry testing, and serum-specific immunoglobulin E in the primary care management of asthma in Black children. PMID:22635264

  9. Hot tearing evaluation for aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brůna, Marek

    2016-06-01

    Hot tearing during solidification of aluminium alloys castings can be a serious problem. This phenomenon is well known but still insufficiently investigated. Hot tearing occurs in form of irregular cracks in metal castings that develop during solidification and cooling. The cause of hot tearing is generally attributed to the development of thermally induced tensile stresses and strains in a casting as the molten metal contracts during solidification and solid state shrinkage. Submited paper consists of two parts. The first part introduces the reader to the phenomenon of hot tearing. The second part describes newly developed method for assessing hot tearing susceptibility of aluminium alloys, and also gives the results on hot tearing for various aluminium alloys.

  10. "Kickin' Asthma": School-Based Asthma Education in an Urban Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Patel, Bina; Davis, Adam; Edelstein, Joan; Tager, Ira B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In urban communities with high prevalence of childhood asthma, school-based educational programs may be the most appropriate approach to deliver interventions to improve asthma morbidity and asthma-related outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the implementation of "Kickin' Asthma", a school-based asthma curriculum…

  11. Pilot Testing "Okay with Asthma"[TM]: An Online Asthma Intervention for School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Tami H.; Hauenstein, Emily J.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is the leading cause of missed school days despite advancements in asthma treatment. This may be, in part, due to a lack of understanding about asthma. "Okay With Asthma"[TM], an online story with psychosocial management strategies for school-age children, was pilot tested to measure its effect on asthma knowledge and attitude. The online…

  12. Is asthma prevalence still increasing?

    PubMed

    Lundbäck, Bo; Backman, Helena; Lötvall, Jan; Rönmark, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Increased awareness of asthma in society and altered diagnostic practices makes evaluation of data on prevalence change difficult. In most parts of the world the asthma prevalence seems to still be increasing. The increase is associated with urbanization and has been documented particularly among children and teenagers in urban areas of middle- and low-level income countries. Use of validated questionnaires has enabled comparisons of studies. Among adults there are few studies based on representative samples of the general population which allow evaluation of time trends of prevalence. This review focuses mainly on studies of asthma prevalence and symptoms among adults. Parallel with increased urbanization, we can assume that the increase in asthma prevalence in most areas of the world will continue. However, in Australia and North-West Europe studies performed, particularly among children and adolescents, indicate that the increase in asthma prevalence may now be leveling off. PMID:26610152

  13. [Clinical aspects of occupational asthma].

    PubMed

    Bessot, J C; Pauli, G; Lenz, D; Roegel, E

    1984-01-01

    Although on the increase overall, the actual prevalence of occupational asthma is difficult to assess because of variations seen according to periods, countries, jobs, and the agents responsible. In the authors' experience, this prevalence is slightly less than 10%. Three principal mechanisms, sometimes present together, not always elucidated: immunological, reflex and irritative, are responsible for such asthma. Whilst a positive diagnosis raises few problems, the aetiological diagnosis is difficult and involves two stages: recognition of the occupational characteristic of the asthma and attribution of this asthma to an allergen or substance in the occupational environment. Skin tests and in vitro tests, but above all exposure tests, make an important diagnostic contribution. Personal examples are used to illustrate the principal aetiological factors in occupational asthma of animal, vegetable or chemical origin. PMID:6729340

  14. Current concepts of severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Ray, Anuradha; Raundhal, Mahesh; Oriss, Timothy B; Ray, Prabir; Wenzel, Sally E

    2016-07-01

    The term asthma encompasses a disease spectrum with mild to very severe disease phenotypes whose traditional common characteristic is reversible airflow limitation. Unlike milder disease, severe asthma is poorly controlled by the current standard of care. Ongoing studies using advanced molecular and immunological tools along with improved clinical classification show that severe asthma does not identify a specific patient phenotype, but rather includes patients with constant medical needs, whose pathobiologic and clinical characteristics vary widely. Accordingly, in recent clinical trials, therapies guided by specific patient characteristics have had better outcomes than previous therapies directed to any subject with a diagnosis of severe asthma. However, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of the full scope of this disease that hinder the development of effective treatments for all severe asthmatics. In this Review, we discuss our current state of knowledge regarding severe asthma, highlighting different molecular and immunological pathways that can be targeted for future therapeutic development. PMID:27367183

  15. Diamond grooving of rapidly solidified optical aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-El-Hossein, Khaled; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Ghobashy, Sameh; Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Mkoko, Zwelinzima

    2015-10-01

    Traditional optical aluminium grades such as Al 6061 are intensively used for making optical components for applications ranging from mould insert fabrication to laser machine making. However, because of their irregular microstructure and relative inhomogeneity of material properties at micro scale, traditional optical aluminium may exhibit some difficulties when ultra-high precision diamond turned. Inhomogeneity and micro-variation in the material properties combined with uneven and coarse microstructure may cause unacceptable surface finish and accelerated tool wear, especially in grooving operation when the diamond tool edge is fully immersed in the material surface. Recently, new grades of optical aluminium that are featured by their ultra-fine microstructure and improved material properties have been developed to overcome the problem of high tool wear rates. The new aluminium grades have been developed using rapid solidification process which results in extremely small grain sizes combined with improved mechanical properties. The current study is concerned with investigating the performance of single-point diamond turning when grooving two grades of rapidly solidified aluminium (RSA) grades: RSA905 which is a high-alloyed aluminium grade and RSA443 which has a high silicon content. In this study, two series of experiments employed to create radial microgrooves on the two RSA grades. The surface roughness obtained on the groove surface is measured when different combinations of cutting parameters are used. Cutting speed is varied while feed rate and depth of cut were kept constant. The results show that groove surface roughness produced on RSA443 is higher than that obtained on RSA905. Also, the paper reports on the effect of cutting speed on surface roughness for each RSA grade.

  16. Hazardous air pollutants and asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Leikauf, George D

    2002-01-01

    Asthma has a high prevalence in the United States, and persons with asthma may be at added risk from the adverse effects of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). Complex mixtures (fine particulate matter and tobacco smoke) have been associated with respiratory symptoms and hospital admissions for asthma. The toxic ingredients of these mixtures are HAPs, but whether ambient HAP exposures can induce asthma remains unclear. Certain HAPs are occupational asthmagens, whereas others may act as adjuncts during sensitization. HAPs may exacerbate asthma because, once sensitized, individuals can respond to remarkably low concentrations, and irritants lower the bronchoconstrictive threshold to respiratory antigens. Adverse responses after ambient exposures to complex mixtures often occur at concentrations below those producing effects in controlled human exposures to a single compound. In addition, certain HAPs that have been associated with asthma in occupational settings may interact with criteria pollutants in ambient air to exacerbate asthma. Based on these observations and past experience with 188 HAPs, a list of 19 compounds that could have the highest impact on the induction or exacerbation of asthma was developed. Nine additional compounds were identified that might exacerbate asthma based on their irritancy, respirability, or ability to react with biological macromolecules. Although the ambient levels of these 28 compounds are largely unknown, estimated exposures from emissions inventories and limited air monitoring suggest that aldehydes (especially acrolein and formaldehyde) and metals (especially nickel and chromium compounds) may have possible health risk indices sufficient for additional attention. Recommendations for research are presented regarding exposure monitoring and evaluation of biologic mechanisms controlling how these substances induce and exacerbate asthma. PMID:12194881

  17. Managing Asthma: A Guide for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This guide was developed to provide school personnel with practical ways to help students with asthma participate fully in all school activities. It begins by noting the prevalence of asthma and stating that asthma is a leading cause of absenteeism among students. This is followed by a brief description of asthma as a chronic lung disease…

  18. Asthma and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Oseid, S

    1982-01-01

    Physical activity regularly leads to a decline in lung function in children and adolescents with asthma. This decline is a consequence of what is known as exercise-induced asthma (EIA), and can be determined and graded with the help of lung function tests before and after submaximal workloads on the ergometer cycle or the treadmill. Typical EIA appears in asthmatic individuals with entirely normal lung function before the effort, but EIA may also become clinically manifest with exercise in patients who have a subclinical degree of obstruction. The grade of EIA is essentially dependent on the duration and intensity of effort but also on the type of exercise. For example, free running causes much greater bronchoconstriction than swimming. The temperature and humidity of the inspired air may partially explain this difference. At the Voksentoppen Allergy Institute we find that about 85% of children develop a fall in lung function of 15% or more after a six minute ergometer cycle test. With typical EIA the fall may be totally or partially abolished by prophylactic medication 10 minutes before the start of the test. Disodium cromoglycate (Intal) and/or beta-adrenergic drugs are regularly used before all physical activity. Training programmes must be based on the interval principle. Swimming, ball games, relay races and dancing are examples of useful activities in the training and rehabilitation of children and adolescents with asthma. Through prophylactic medication and physical training, the aerobic work capacity, muscle strength and lung function in asthmatic children is improved. Training also leads to a significant mobilisation of mental resources and an increase in social integration. PMID:6958045

  19. Bronchoprovocation testing in asthma.

    PubMed

    Katial, Rohit K; Covar, Ronina A

    2012-08-01

    This article covers the relationships between BHR and airway inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that various commonly used bronchoprovocation challenges (BPCs) differ in their potential to serve as inflammatory biomarkers. The response to direct stimuli depends on the smooth muscle's response to the chemical, whereas in indirect challenges, the reaction is caused by the smooth muscle's responsiveness to the mediators induced by the stimuli. The information obtained from studies with BPC has provided insights into the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of asthma, and the relationships between airway inflammation and bronchial hyper-responsiveness. PMID:22877619

  20. [Persulfate asthma in hairdressers].

    PubMed

    Pankow, W; Hein, H; Bittner, K; Wichert, P

    1989-03-01

    At the a two-year apprenticeship, a young female hairdresser developed rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma, induced by a hair bleach containing the substance persulphate. On each occasion, her symptoms occurred in the form of an immediate reaction. The causative role of the bleach was demonstrated with the aid of an inhalation challenge test. In addition, the prick test produced a positive reaction vis-a-vis persulphate. The long latency period and the positive prick test might militate in favour of an allergic pathomechanism. PMID:2710769

  1. Asthma across the ages: knowledge gaps in childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Szefler, Stanley J; Chmiel, James F; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Giacoia, George; Green, Thomas P; Jackson, Daniel J; Nielsen, Heber C; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Raissy, Hengameh H

    2014-01-01

    The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development convened an Asthma Group in response to the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act. The overall goal of the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act Program is to improve pediatric therapeutics through preclinical and clinical drug trials that lead to drug-labeling changes. Although significant advances have been made in the understanding and management of asthma in adults with appropriately labeled medications, less information is available on the management of asthma in children. Indeed, many medications are inadequately labeled for use in children. In general, the younger the child, the less information there is available to guide clinicians. Because asthma often begins in early childhood, it is incumbent on us to continue to address the primary questions raised in this review and carefully evaluate the medications used to manage asthma in children. Meanwhile, continued efforts should be made in defining effective strategies that reduce the risk of exacerbations. If the areas of defined need are addressed in the coming years, namely prevention of exacerbations and progression of disease, as well as primary intervention, we will see continuing reduction in asthma mortality and morbidity along with improved quality of life for children with asthma. PMID:24290281

  2. Holy Saturday asthma.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Terence M; Cusack, Ruth; Landers, Sarah; Bredin, Charles Patrick

    2014-01-01

    A 61-year-old man complained of cough and dyspnoea after exposure to colophony-containing solder fumes at work. A histamine challenge test confirmed airway hyper-responsiveness, and colophony-challenge demonstrated a 16.7% drop in peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), supporting a diagnosis of colophony-induced occupational asthma. At review, the patient presented with cough, dyspnoea and wheeze that occurred acutely when exposed to the fumes from burning incense during Easter Saturday services, necessitating his departure from the church. Inhalation challenge tests using two blends of incense used at his church (Greek and Vatican) led to identical symptoms and a significant reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 s 15 min after exposure and PEFRs up to 48 h after exposure, indicating an early and late phase asthmatic reaction. This is the first report of coexistent colophony and incense-induced asthma. The similarities in chemical structures between abietic acid in colophony and boswellic acid in incense suggest a common mechanism. PMID:24626388

  3. Holy Saturday asthma

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Terence M; Cusack, Ruth; Landers, Sarah; Bredin, Charles Patrick

    2014-01-01

    A 61-year-old man complained of cough and dyspnoea after exposure to colophony-containing solder fumes at work. A histamine challenge test confirmed airway hyper-responsiveness, and colophony-challenge demonstrated a 16.7% drop in peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), supporting a diagnosis of colophony-induced occupational asthma. At review, the patient presented with cough, dyspnoea and wheeze that occurred acutely when exposed to the fumes from burning incense during Easter Saturday services, necessitating his departure from the church. Inhalation challenge tests using two blends of incense used at his church (Greek and Vatican) led to identical symptoms and a significant reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 s 15 min after exposure and PEFRs up to 48 h after exposure, indicating an early and late phase asthmatic reaction. This is the first report of coexistent colophony and incense-induced asthma. The similarities in chemical structures between abietic acid in colophony and boswellic acid in incense suggest a common mechanism. PMID:24626388

  4. Diet and asthma: an update

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yueh-Ying; Forno, Erick; Holguin, Fernando; Celedón, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Our objective is to provide an overview and discussion of recent experimental studies, epidemiologic studies, and clinical trials of diet and asthma. We focus on dietary sources and vitamins with antioxidant properties (vitamins (A, C, and E), folate, and omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 and n-6 PUFAs). Recent findings Current evidence does not support the use of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E or PUFAs for the prevention or treatment of asthma or allergies. Current guidelines for prenatal use of folate to prevent neural tube defects should be followed, as there is no evidence of major effects of this practice on asthma or allergies. Consumption of a balanced diet that is rich in sources of antioxidants (e.g. fruits and vegetables) may be beneficial in the primary prevention of asthma. Summary None of the vitamins or nutrients examined is consistently associated with asthma or allergies. In some cases, further studies of the effects of a vitamin or nutrient on specific asthma phenotypes (e.g. vitamin C to prevent viral-induced exacerbations) are warranted. Clinical trials of “whole diet” interventions to prevent asthma are advisable on the basis of existing evidence. PMID:26110689

  5. Guidelines for severe uncontrolled asthma.

    PubMed

    Cisneros Serrano, Carolina; Melero Moreno, Carlos; Almonacid Sánchez, Carlos; Perpiñá Tordera, Miguel; Picado Valles, César; Martínez Moragón, Eva; Pérez de Llano, Luis; Soto Campos, José Gregorio; Urrutia Landa, Isabel; García Hernández, Gloria

    2015-05-01

    Since the publication, 9 years ago, of the latest SEPAR (Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery) Guidelines on Difficult-to-Control Asthma (DCA), much progress has been made in the understanding of asthmatic disease. These new data need to be reviewed, analyzed and incorporated into the guidelines according to their level of evidence and recommendation. Recently, consensus documents and clinical practice guidelines (CPG) addressing this issue have been published. In these guidelines, specific mention will be made of what the previous DCA guidelines defined as "true difficult-to-control asthma". This is asthma that remains uncontrolled after diagnosis and a systematic evaluation to rule out factors unrelated to the disease itself that lead to poor control ("false difficult-to-control asthma"), and despite an appropriate treatment strategy (Spanish Guidelines for the Management of Asthma [GEMA] steps 5 and 6): severe uncontrolled asthma. In this respect, the guidelines propose a revised definition, an attempt to classify the various manifestations of this type of asthma, a proposal for a stepwise diagnostic procedure, and phenotype-targeted treatment. A specific section has also been included on DCA in childhood, aimed at assisting healthcare professionals to improve the care of these patients. PMID:25677358

  6. Effect of aluminium chloride on human spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, S.

    1988-03-01

    Aluminium (Al), which is the most prevalent metal in the earth's crust, has been implicated as an etiological factor in a variety of clinical disorders. Only recently Al has been discussed in the pathogenesis of the parenteral nutrition - associated liver disease. Included in this report are the preliminary findings on its effects on the reproductive functions of human beings.

  7. Molecular breeding of cereals for aluminium resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminium (Al3+) toxicity is the primary factor limiting crop production on acidic soils worldwide. In addition to an application of lime for soil amelioration, Al3+ resistant plant varieties have been deployed to raise productivity on such hostile soils. This has been possible due to the exploita...

  8. An ultrafast rechargeable aluminium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meng-Chang; Gong, Ming; Lu, Bingan; Wu, Yingpeng; Wang, Di-Yan; Guan, Mingyun; Angell, Michael; Chen, Changxin; Yang, Jiang; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Dai, Hongjie

    2015-04-01

    The development of new rechargeable battery systems could fuel various energy applications, from personal electronics to grid storage. Rechargeable aluminium-based batteries offer the possibilities of low cost and low flammability, together with three-electron-redox properties leading to high capacity. However, research efforts over the past 30 years have encountered numerous problems, such as cathode material disintegration, low cell discharge voltage (about 0.55 volts ref. 5), capacitive behaviour without discharge voltage plateaus (1.1-0.2 volts or 1.8-0.8 volts) and insufficient cycle life (less than 100 cycles) with rapid capacity decay (by 26-85 per cent over 100 cycles). Here we present a rechargeable aluminium battery with high-rate capability that uses an aluminium metal anode and a three-dimensional graphitic-foam cathode. The battery operates through the electrochemical deposition and dissolution of aluminium at the anode, and intercalation/de-intercalation of chloroaluminate anions in the graphite, using a non-flammable ionic liquid electrolyte. The cell exhibits well-defined discharge voltage plateaus near 2 volts, a specific capacity of about 70 mA h g-1 and a Coulombic efficiency of approximately 98 per cent. The cathode was found to enable fast anion diffusion and intercalation, affording charging times of around one minute with a current density of ~4,000 mA g-1 (equivalent to ~3,000 W kg-1), and to withstand more than 7,500 cycles without capacity decay.

  9. Environmental factors associated with asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Bailus; Stokes, Lynette D.; Warren, Rueben

    2003-01-01

    Asthma, a disease of attacks and remission, continues to account for substantial morbidity and direct economic costs. Numerous studies--epidemiologic, toxicologic and clinical--present evidence for a broad spectrum of environmental risk factors associated with asthma. This review summarizes current thinking on a subset of these factors. Knowledge of potential environmental determinants of asthma is important to both the patient and healthcare professional in the application of multiple modalities of medical and environmental intervention for management of the development, and exacerbation of this chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways. PMID:12760611

  10. [Asthma and cost of illness].

    PubMed

    Beyhun, N Ercüment; Cilingiroğlu, Nesrin

    2004-01-01

    The basic aim of the activities concerning health is to implement the initiatives for people to attain the best health status and sustain it. That's why these initiatives have to be chosen from the ones that consume minimum resource and affect life quality and duration in most beneficial way. Asthma is one of the most prevalent chronic disorders. Asthma brings significant direct and indirect costs to societies. To decrease the burden of asthma, it is necessary to emphasize its effects related to morbidity, mortality and material losses. Therefore, countries should give priority to cost of illness studies. PMID:15558364

  11. Investigation and treatment of asthma.

    PubMed

    Chantaphakul, Hiroshi

    2005-09-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic respiratory diseases presenting with a variety of symptoms from cough, chest tightness, wheeze, difficulty breathing and in many cases persistent dyspnea. The individual has been effected usually spends a significant amount of time and financial resources in order to control the symptoms. Even though asthma has been known for more than several decades, the medications for the condition are relatively limited. This article has reviewed currently available guidelines, classifications, investigations for the diagnosis and treatment recommendations of asthma for both the general practitioners and the specialists who mainly taking care of patients with this chronic airway condition. PMID:16623056

  12. Toxicity of dissolved and precipitated aluminium to marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Gillmore, Megan L; Golding, Lisa A; Angel, Brad M; Adams, Merrin S; Jolley, Dianne F

    2016-05-01

    Localised aluminium contamination can lead to high concentrations in coastal waters, which have the potential for adverse effects on aquatic organisms. This research investigated the toxicity of 72-h exposures of aluminium to three marine diatoms (Ceratoneis closterium (formerly Nitzschia closterium), Minutocellus polymorphus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) by measuring population growth rate inhibition and cell membrane damage (SYTOX Green) as endpoints. Toxicity was correlated to the time-averaged concentrations of different aluminium size-fractions, operationally defined as <0.025μm filtered, <0.45μm filtered (dissolved) and unfiltered (total) present in solution over the 72-h bioassay. The chronic population growth rate inhibition after aluminium exposure varied between diatom species. C. closterium was the most sensitive species (10% inhibition of growth rate (72-h IC10) of 80 (55-100)μg Al/L (95% confidence limits)) while M. polymorphus (540 (460-600)μg Al/L) and P. tricornutum (2100 (2000-2200)μg Al/L) were less sensitive (based on measured total aluminium). Dissolved aluminium was the primary contributor to toxicity in C. closterium, while a combination of dissolved and precipitated aluminium forms contributed to toxicity in M. polymorphus. In contrast, aluminium toxicity to the most tolerant diatom P. tricornutum was due predominantly to precipitated aluminium. Preliminary investigations revealed the sensitivity of C. closterium and M. polymorphus to aluminium was influenced by initial cell density with aluminium toxicity significantly (p<0.05) increasing with initial cell density from 10(3) to 10(5)cells/mL. No effects on plasma membrane permeability were observed for any of the three diatoms suggesting that mechanisms of aluminium toxicity to diatoms do not involve compromising the plasma membrane. These results indicate that marine diatoms have a broad range in sensitivity to aluminium with toxic mechanisms related to both dissolved and precipitated

  13. Spirometry for Asthma - When You Need It and Why

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Patient Resources Spirometry for Asthma Spirometry for Asthma When you need the test—and why DOWNLOAD ... ADVICE FROM CONSUMER REPORTS How should you manage asthma? The following steps can help to control asthma: ...

  14. Asthma - quick-relief drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Burks AW, et al., eds. In: Middleton's Allergy Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2013:chap 55. Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma . Rockville, MD. National Heart, Lung, and ...

  15. Exercising and asthma at school

    MedlinePlus

    ... asthma attack, modify PE activities. For example, a running program might be set up this way: Walk ... whole distance Run part of the distance Alternate running and walking Some exercises may be less likely ...

  16. Signs of an asthma attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education and Prevention Program Expert Panel Report 3: Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma. Rockville, MD. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, US Dept of Health and Human Services; 2007. NIH publications 08-4051.

  17. Lung Macrophage Diversity and Asthma.

    PubMed

    Lumeng, Carey N

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages (MPs) are one of the most prominent leukocyte populations in the lung and, in many ways, a forgotten player in asthma pathogenesis. Diverse functions in asthma initiation and maintenance in chronic disease have been demonstrated, which has led to confusion as to if pulmonary MPs are agents of good or evil in asthma. Much of this is due to the wide diversity of MP populations in the lung, many of which are inaccessible experimentally in most clinical studies. This review frames lung MP biology in the context of location, phenotype, function, and response phase in asthma pathogenesis. It also assesses new findings regarding MP diversity that have challenged old dogmas and generates new ways to understand how MPs function. PMID:27027949

  18. Exercising and asthma at school

    MedlinePlus

    ... fields or lawns. A student with asthma should warm up before exercising and cool down afterward. ... For example, a running program might be set up this way: Walk the ... The warm, moist air may keep symptoms away. Football, baseball, ...

  19. Allergy and Asthma Health Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    Contact Us Home > Healthy Living Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition Exercise Coming Of Age Older Adults Allergy and Asthma Health Magazine Women Infant, Children and Teenagers Living ...

  20. Emerging molecular phenotypes of asthma.

    PubMed

    Ray, Anuradha; Oriss, Timothy B; Wenzel, Sally E

    2015-01-15

    Although asthma has long been considered a heterogeneous disease, attempts to define subgroups of asthma have been limited. In recent years, both clinical and statistical approaches have been utilized to better merge clinical characteristics, biology, and genetics. These combined characteristics have been used to define phenotypes of asthma, the observable characteristics of a patient determined by the interaction of genes and environment. Identification of consistent clinical phenotypes has now been reported across studies. Now the addition of various 'omics and identification of specific molecular pathways have moved the concept of clinical phenotypes toward the concept of molecular phenotypes. The importance of these molecular phenotypes is being confirmed through the integration of molecularly targeted biological therapies. Thus the global term asthma is poised to become obsolete, being replaced by terms that more specifically identify the pathology associated with the disease. PMID:25326577

  1. Outdoor air pollution and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, Michael; Balmes, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Traffic and power generation are the main sources of urban air pollution. The idea that outdoor air pollution can cause exacerbations of pre-existing asthma is supported by an evidence base that has been accumulating for several decades, with several studies suggesting a contribution to new-onset asthma as well. In this Series paper, we discuss the effects of particulate matter (PM), gaseous pollutants (ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and sulphur dioxide), and mixed traffic-related air pollution. We focus on clinical studies, both epidemiological and experimental, published in the previous 5 years. From a mechanistic perspective, air pollutants probably cause oxidative injury to the airways, leading to inflammation, remodelling, and increased risk of sensitisation. Although several pollutants have been linked to new-onset asthma, the strength of the evidence is variable. We also discuss clinical implications, policy issues, and research gaps relevant to air pollution and asthma. PMID:24792855

  2. Mediastinal fibrosis presenting as asthma.

    PubMed

    Chantaphakul, H; Rock, M J; Steiner, D S; Gern, J E

    1998-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic medical conditions affecting children. The usual presenting symptoms of asthma include wheezing, shortness of breath, and dyspnea on exertion. Occasionally, children who present with one of these respiratory complaints have a less common disorder. Mediastinal fibrosis is a rare and incurable condition in which an excessive fibrotic reaction in the mediastinum causes progressive cardiopulmonary compromise. The presentation is variable: many patients present with respiratory symptoms such as cough, wheezing, dyspnea, and/or hemoptysis, while others are asymptomatic and present with a mediastinal mass discovered incidentally on a radiograph. With such a broad array of presenting complaints, and a clinical course characterized by slow progression of symptoms, the early stages of mediastinal fibrosis can mimic other diseases such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, or the superior vena cava syndrome. In this report we describe two patients with mediastinal fibrosis who were initially thought to have asthma. PMID:9642434

  3. Analgesics, allergy and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Szczeklik, Andrew

    1980-01-01

    1 Recent studies of idiosyncratic reactions to analgesics have revealed several clinical patterns with a different pathogenesis. 2 In the pathogenesis of a common type of asthma precipitated by aspirin, inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase leading to disturbances in metabolism of arachidonic acid is of fundamental importance. 3 In some patients with urticaria/angioedema, symptoms are due to inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase by analgesics; in others the cause might be impurities in commercial preparations of aspirin; and in others the mechanisms are still unknown. 4 There is a distinct group of patients who develop anaphylactic shock or urticaria following administration of pyrazolone drugs, but who tolerate aspirin and other cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors. This type of hypersensitivity seems to have an immunological background. PMID:7002192

  4. Dendritic cells in asthma.

    PubMed

    van Helden, Mary J; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2013-12-01

    The lungs are constantly exposed to antigens, most of which are non-pathogenic and do not require the induction of an immune response. Dendritic cells (DCs) are situated at the basolateral site of the lungs and continuously scan the environment to detect the presence of pathogens and subsequently initiate an immune response. They are a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells that exert specific functions. Compelling evidence is now provided that DCs are both sufficient and necessary to induce allergic responses against several inhaled harmless allergens. How various DC subsets exactly contribute to the induction of allergic asthma is currently a subject of intense investigation. We here review the current progress in this field. PMID:24455765

  5. Clinical asthma phenotyping: A trial for bridging gaps in asthma management.

    PubMed

    Zedan, Magdy Mohamed; Laimon, Wafaa Nabil; Osman, Amal Mohamed; Zedan, Mohamed Magdy

    2015-05-01

    Asthma is a common disease affecting millions of people worldwide and exerting an enormous strain on health resources in many countries. Evidence is increasing that asthma is unlikely to be a single disease but rather a series of complex, overlapping individual diseases or phenotypes, each defined by its unique interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Asthma phenotypes were initially focused on combinations of clinical characteristics, but they are now evolving to link pathophysiological mechanism to subtypes of asthma. Better characterization of those phenotypes is expected to be most useful for allocating asthma therapies. This article reviews different published researches in terms of unbiased approaches to phenotype asthma and emphasizes how the phenotyping exercise is an important step towards proper asthma treatment. It is structured into three sections; the heterogeneity of asthma, the impact of asthma heterogeneity on asthma management and different trials for phenotyping asthma. PMID:26015875

  6. Identification of asthma clusters in two independent Korean adult asthma cohorts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Bum; Jang, An-Soo; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Park, Jong-Sook; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Cho, Sang-Heon; Choi, Byoung Whui; Park, Jung-Won; Nam, Dong-Ho; Yoon, Ho-Joo; Cho, Young-Joo; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook; Park, Choon-Sik

    2013-06-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous airway disease with various clinical phenotypes. It is crucial to clearly identify clinical phenotypes to achieve better asthma management. We used cluster analysis to classify the clinical groups of 724 asthmatic patients from the Cohort for Reality and Evolution of Adult Asthma in Korea (COREA), and in 1843 subjects from another independent Korean asthma cohort of Soonchunhyang University Asthma Genome Research Centre (SCH) (Bucheon, Republic of Korea). Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed by Ward's method, followed by κ-means cluster analysis. Cluster analysis of the COREA cohort indicated four asthma subtypes: 1) smoking asthma; 2) severe obstructive asthma; 3) early-onset atopic asthma; and 4) late-onset mild asthma. An independent cluster analysis of the SCH cohort also indicated four clusters that were similar to the COREA clusters. Our results indicate that adult Korean asthma patients can be classified into four distinct clusters. PMID:23060627

  7. Moses Maimonides' treatise on asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, F

    1981-01-01

    This paper contains an analysis and appreciation of one of Moses Maimonides' authentic medical works, his Treatise on Asthma. After a brief biographical section, passages from the work are cited and analysed to illustrate the approach of this medieval physician who organised the knowledge of Greeks and others who preceded him. Maimonides presents a logical and systematic approach to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, an approach which is clearly evident in his Treatise on Asthma. PMID:7025335

  8. Chronic Infection and Severe Asthma.

    PubMed

    Carr, Tara F; Kraft, Monica

    2016-08-01

    Chronic bacterial infection is implicated in both the development and severity of asthma. The atypical bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae have been identified in the airways of asthmatics and correlated with clinical features such as adult onset, exacerbation risks, steroid sensitivity, and symptom control. Asthmatic patients with evidence of bacterial infection may benefit from antibiotic treatment directed towards these atypical organisms. Examination of the airway microbiome may identify microbial communities that confer risk for or protection from severe asthma. PMID:27401621

  9. Update on asthma and cleaners

    PubMed Central

    Zock, Jan-Paul; Vizcaya, David; Le Moual, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review This paper summarises the recent literature on the relation between cleaning exposures and respiratory health, in particular asthma, including reviews, epidemiological surveys, surveillance programmes and exposure studies. The authors also aimed to identify gaps in the current knowledge and to recommend future research on the topic. Recent findings A large international general population study showed an increased risk of new-onset asthma associated with cleaning work, with professional use of cleaning products, and with domestic use of cleaning sprays. Three surveillance studies confirm the recognition of occupational asthma cases among cleaners and among others who use cleaning products at work. Six workforce-based studies show that respiratory symptoms are partly work-related, and are associated with certain specific exposures including sprays, chlorine bleach and other disinfectants. Summary Recent studies have strengthened the evidence of asthma and other adverse respiratory effects in cleaning workers. Similar effects were seen in other settings where cleaning products are used such as healthcare professionals and homemakers. Both new-onset asthma and work-exacerbated asthma due to cleaning exposures may play a role. Exposure to cleaning sprays, chlorine bleach and other disinfectants may be particularly relevant. The predominant effect mechanisms remain largely unclear and may include both specific sensitisation and irritant-related features. PMID:20093933

  10. Emerging therapies for severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Many patients with asthma have poorly controlled symptoms, and particularly for those with severe disease, there is a clear need for improved treatments. Two recent therapies licensed for use in asthma are omalizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds circulating IgE antibody, and bronchial thermoplasty, which involves the delivery of radio frequency energy to the airways to reduce airway smooth muscle mass. In addition, there are new therapies under development for asthma that have good potential to reach the clinic in the next five years. These include biological agents targeting pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-5 and interleukin-13, inhaled ultra long-acting β2-agonists and once daily inhaled corticosteroids. In addition, drugs that block components of the arachidonic acid pathway that targets neutrophilic asthma and CRTH2 receptor antagonists that inhibit the proinflammatory actions of prostaglandin D2 may become available. We review the recent progress made in developing viable therapies for severe asthma and briefly discuss the idea that development of novel therapies for asthma is likely to increasingly involve the assessment of genotypic and/or phenotypic factors. PMID:21896202

  11. Lifestyle changes and childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Neil; Douwes, Jeroen

    2013-03-01

    In recent decades there have been marked increases in asthma prevalence in Western countries. More recently, asthma prevalence has peaked, or even begun to decline, in Western countries, but many low and middle income countries are now beginning to experience increases in prevalence (although there is no evidence of increases in prevalence in India to date). "Established" risk factors for asthma cannot account for the global prevalence increases, or the international patterns that have been observed, or the recent declines in prevalence in some Western countries. It seems that as a result of the "package" of changes in the intrauterine and infant environment that are occurring with "Westernization", we are seeing an increased susceptibility to the development of asthma and/or allergy. There are a number of elements of this "package" including changes in maternal diet, increased fetal growth, smaller family size, reduced infant infections and increased use of antibiotics and paracetamol, and immunization, all of which have been (inconsistently) associated with an increased risk of childhood asthma, but none of which can alone explain the increases in prevalence. It is likely that the "package" is more than the sum of its parts, and that these social and environmental changes are all pushing the infants' immune systems towards an increased risk of asthma. PMID:22555908

  12. Awareness regarding childhood asthma in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Harbi, Saleh; Al-Harbi, Adel S.; Al-Khorayyef, Abdullah; Al-Qwaiee, Mansour; Al-Shamarani, Abdullah; Al-Aslani, Wafa; Kamfar, Hayat; Felemban, Osama; Barzanji, Mohammed; Al-Harbi, Naser; Dhabab, Ruqaia; Al-Omari, Mohammed Ahmed; Yousef, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Assessing the knowledge and awareness of the Saudi society about bronchial asthma in children. METHODS: Structured questionnaires were randomly distributed to 1039 Saudi Arabians in May 2014 at Jeddah, Riyadh, and Dammam. RESULTS: The awareness of bronchial asthma questions showed that 67% of total sample thought that it could be a fatal disease, and only 13.2% thought that there is a difference between bronchial asthma and chest allergies in children. 86.1% thought that the symptoms of bronchial asthma include dyspnea and nocturnal cough, and 45.7% thought that fever, a runny nose and throat inflammation are not symptoms. 60.2% thought that infectious respiratory diseases may increase bronchial asthma progression. In addition, 40% thought that the use of antibiotics doesn’t help in diminishing bronchial asthma complications, and some thought that the patient can stop medication after an acute asthma attack. 34.1% thought that inhaled medication for asthma doesn’t cause addiction. Very highly significant results are shown between bronchial asthma knowledge and age, the level of education, marital status, and if the individual knows a person who suffers from bronchial asthma (P < 0.001). There are positive correlations between bronchial asthma knowledge and age, marital status, and level of education (r = 0.152, 0.150, 0.197), respectively. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrated that bronchial asthma knowledge in the Saudi Arabian population is insufficient, and efforts should be carried out to spread bronchial asthma management. PMID:26933459

  13. Korean Asthma Guideline 2014: Summary of Major Updates to the Korean Asthma Guideline 2014.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deog Kyeom; Park, Yong Bum; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Jung, Ki-Suck; Yoo, Ji Hong; Yoo, Kwang-Ha; Kim, Kwan Hyung

    2016-07-01

    Asthma is a prevalent and serious health problem in Korea. Recently, the Korean Asthma Guideline has been updated by The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases (KATRD) in an effort to improve the clinical management of asthma. This guideline focuses on adult patients with asthma and aims to deliver up to date scientific evidence and recommendations to general physicians for the management of asthma. For this purpose, this guideline was updated following systematic review and meta-analysis of recent studies and adapting some points of international guidelines (Global Initiative for Asthma [GINA] report 2014, National Asthma Education and Prevention Program [NAEPP] 2007, British Thoracic Society [BTS/SIGN] asthma guideline 2012, and Canadian asthma guideline 2012). Updated issues include recommendations derived using the population, intervention, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) model, which produced 20 clinical questions on the management of asthma. It also covers a new definition of asthma, the importance of confirming various airflow limitations with spirometry, the epidemiology and the diagnostic flow of asthma in Korea, the importance and evidence for inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and ICS/formoterol as a single maintenance and acute therapy in the stepwise management of asthma, assessment of severity of asthma and management of exacerbation, and an action plan to cope with exacerbation. This guideline includes clinical assessments, and treatment of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome, management of asthma in specific conditions including severe asthma, elderly asthma, cough variant asthma, exercise-induced bronchial contraction, etc. The revised Korean Asthma Guideline is expected to be a useful resource in the management of asthma. PMID:27433170

  14. An ultrafast rechargeable aluminium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Chang; Gong, Ming; Lu, Bingan; Wu, Yingpeng; Wang, Di-Yan; Guan, Mingyun; Angell, Michael; Chen, Changxin; Yang, Jiang; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Dai, Hongjie

    2015-04-16

    The development of new rechargeable battery systems could fuel various energy applications, from personal electronics to grid storage. Rechargeable aluminium-based batteries offer the possibilities of low cost and low flammability, together with three-electron-redox properties leading to high capacity. However, research efforts over the past 30 years have encountered numerous problems, such as cathode material disintegration, low cell discharge voltage (about 0.55 volts; ref. 5), capacitive behaviour without discharge voltage plateaus (1.1-0.2 volts or 1.8-0.8 volts) and insufficient cycle life (less than 100 cycles) with rapid capacity decay (by 26-85 per cent over 100 cycles). Here we present a rechargeable aluminium battery with high-rate capability that uses an aluminium metal anode and a three-dimensional graphitic-foam cathode. The battery operates through the electrochemical deposition and dissolution of aluminium at the anode, and intercalation/de-intercalation of chloroaluminate anions in the graphite, using a non-flammable ionic liquid electrolyte. The cell exhibits well-defined discharge voltage plateaus near 2 volts, a specific capacity of about 70 mA h g(-1) and a Coulombic efficiency of approximately 98 per cent. The cathode was found to enable fast anion diffusion and intercalation, affording charging times of around one minute with a current density of ~4,000 mA g(-1) (equivalent to ~3,000 W kg(-1)), and to withstand more than 7,500 cycles without capacity decay. PMID:25849777

  15. Addressing the Childhood Asthma Crisis in Harlem: The Harlem Children’s Zone Asthma Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Stephen W.; Jean-Louis, Betina; Ortiz, Benjamin; Northridge, Mary; Shoemaker, Katherine; Vaughan, Roger; Rome, Michaela; Canada, Geoffrey; Hutchinson, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. We determined the prevalence of asthma and estimated baseline asthma symptoms and asthma management strategies among children aged 0–12 years in Central Harlem. Methods. The Harlem Children’s Zone Asthma Initiative is a longitudinal, community-based intervention designed for poor children with asthma. Children aged 0–12 years who live or go to school in the Harlem Children’s Zone Project or who participate in any Harlem Children’s Zone, Inc, program were screened for asthma. Children with asthma or asthma-like symptoms were invited to participate in an intensive intervention. Results. Of the 1982 children currently screened, 28.5% have been told by a doctor or nurse that they have asthma, and 30.3% have asthma or asthma-like symptoms. To date, 229 children are enrolled in the Harlem Children’s Zone Asthma Initiative; at baseline, 24.0% had missed school in the last 14 days because of asthma. Conclusion. The high prevalence of asthma among children in the Harlem Children’s Zone Project is consistent with reports from other poor urban communities. Intensive efforts are under way to reduce children’s asthma symptoms and improve their asthma management strategies. PMID:15671459

  16. Feet sunk in molten aluminium: The burn and its prevention.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Peña, David; Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Valero-Gasalla, Javier Luis; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Campillo-Campaña, Ramón; Alonso-Peña, Javier; González-Santos, Jose María; Fernández-Díaz, Alaska Leonor; Arnáiz, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, despite improvements in safety rules and inspections in the metal industry, foundry workers are not free from burn accidents. Injuries caused by molten metals include burns secondary to molten iron, aluminium, zinc, copper, brass, bronze, manganese, lead and steel. Molten aluminium is one of the most common causative agents of burns (60%); however, only a few publications exist concerning injuries from molten aluminium. The main mechanisms of lesion from molten aluminium include direct contact of the molten metal with the skin or through safety apparel, or when the metal splash burns through the pants and rolls downward along the leg. Herein, we report three cases of deep dermal burns after 'soaking' the foot in liquid aluminium and its evolutive features. This paper aims to show our experience in the management of burns due to molten aluminium. We describe the current management principles and the key features of injury prevention. PMID:25687835

  17. Inhalation exposure in secondary aluminium smelting.

    PubMed

    Healy, J; Bradley, S D; Northage, C; Scobbie, E

    2001-04-01

    Inhalation exposure at seven UK secondary aluminium smelters was investigated to quantify the main exposures and identify their sources. The substances monitored were gases (carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulphide and nitrogen dioxide), total inhalable dust, metals, ammonia, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), particulate fluoride salts and acids. The results showed that people were exposed to a range of workplace air pollutants. Personal exposure results for total inhalable dust were between 700 and 5600 microg x m(-3) and the maximum personal exposure result for particulate fluoride salts was 690 microg x m(-3) (as F). The maximum aluminium, total PAH and lead personal exposure results were 900, 19 and 18 microg x m(-3) respectively. The average proportion of aluminium in total inhalable dust samples was 13% and rotary furnace processes generated the most dust. Particulate fluoride salt exposure was more widespread than hydrofluoric acid exposure. The source of the salt exposure was fluoride containing fluxes. The lead exposure source was lead solder contamination in the furnace charge. PMID:11295145

  18. Plasmonic enhancement of photoluminescence from aluminium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Chris; Stewart, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Aluminium nitride (AlN) films were grown on c-plane sapphire wafers by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) under aluminium-rich conditions. The excess aluminium (Al) accumulated on the surface of the films as micro-scale droplets 1-10 μm in size, and as Al nanoparticles with diameters in the range 10-110 nm. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements were performed on the AlN samples using a 193 nm Excimer laser as the excitation source. Prior to PL measurements the wafers were cleaved in half. One half of each wafer was submitted to a 10 min treatment in H3PO4 heated to 70 °C to remove the excess Al from the film surface. The remaining half was left in the as-deposited condition. The mean intensities of the near-band-edge PL peaks of the as-deposited samples were 2.0-3.4 times higher compared to the samples subjected to the H3PO4 Al-removal treatment. This observation motivated calculations to determine the optimal Al surface nanosphere size for plasmonic enhancement of PL from AlN. The PL enhancement was found to peak for an Al nanosphere radius of 15 nm, which is within the range of the experimentally-observed Al nanoparticle sizes.

  19. Improving the Crashworthiness of Aluminium Rail Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangani, Donato; Robinson, Mark; Kotsikos, George

    An experimental and modelling programme of work have been undertaken to predict the performance of aluminium welds in rail vehicles under highly dynamic loading conditions and provide design guidelines to reduce the likelihood of the occurrence of weld unzipping. Modelling of weld unzipping in large rail structures is a challenging task since it requires to deal with material instability, to take into account the uncertainties in material parameters and to address the problem of mesh resolution which together pose severe challenges to computability. The proposed methodology to the prediction of weld failure is based on the validation of the numerical models through correlation with laboratory scale tearing tests. The tearing tests were conducted on samples taken from real rail extrusions with the purpose of obtaining the failure parameters under dynamic loading and understanding the effect of weld material composition on joint behaviour. The validated material models were used to construct a FEA simulation of the collision of an aluminium rail car and investigate the effect of both joint geometry and welding techniques on the failure mechanism. Comparisons of the model with the failures observed in an aluminium rail vehicle that was involved in a high speed collision, have shown that it is possible to model the phenomenon of weld unzipping with good accuracy. The numerical models have also been used as a tool for the optimisation of joint design to improve crashworthiness.

  20. Thermodynamic properties of uranium in gallium-aluminium based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovich, V. A.; Maltsev, D. S.; Yamshchikov, L. F.; Chukin, A. V.; Smolenski, V. V.; Novoselova, A. V.; Osipenko, A. G.

    2015-10-01

    Activity, activity coefficients and solubility of uranium was determined in gallium-aluminium alloys containing 1.6 (eutectic), 5 and 20 wt.% aluminium. Additionally, activity of uranium was determined in aluminium and Ga-Al alloys containing 0.014-20 wt.% Al. Experiments were performed up to 1073 K. Intermetallic compounds formed in the alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Partial and excess thermodynamic functions of U in the studied alloys were calculated.

  1. The aluminium content of infant formulas remains too high

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent research published in this journal highlighted the issue of the high content of aluminium in infant formulas. The expectation was that the findings would serve as a catalyst for manufacturers to address a significant problem of these, often necessary, components of infant nutrition. It is critically important that parents and other users have confidence in the safety of infant formulas and that they have reliable information to use in choosing a product with a lower content of aluminium. Herein, we have significantly extended the scope of the previous research and the aluminium content of 30 of the most widely available and often used infant formulas has been measured. Methods Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were subjected to microwave digestion in the presence of 15.8 M HNO3 and 30% w/v H2O2 and the aluminium content of the digests was measured by TH GFAAS. Results Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were contaminated with aluminium. The concentration of aluminium across all milk products ranged from ca 100 to 430 μg/L. The concentration of aluminium in two soya-based milk products was 656 and 756 μg/L. The intake of aluminium from non-soya-based infant formulas varied from ca 100 to 300 μg per day. For soya-based milks it could be as high as 700 μg per day. Conclusions All 30 infant formulas were contaminated with aluminium. There was no clear evidence that subsequent to the problem of aluminium being highlighted in a previous publication in this journal that contamination had been addressed and reduced. It is the opinion of the authors that regulatory and other non-voluntary methods are now required to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas and thereby protect infants from chronic exposure to dietary aluminium. PMID:24103160

  2. Thermodynamic properties of uranium in gallium-aluminium based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovich, V. A.; Maltsev, D. S.; Yamshchikov, L. F.; Chukin, A. V.; Smolenski, V. V.; Novoselova, A. V.; Osipenko, A. G.

    2015-10-01

    Activity, activity coefficients and solubility of uranium was determined in gallium-aluminium alloys containing 1.6 (eutectic), 5 and 20 wt.% aluminium. Additionally, activity of uranium was determined in aluminium and Ga-Al alloys containing 0.014-20 wt.% Al. Experiments were performed up to 1073 K. Intermetallic compounds formed in the alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Partial and excess thermodynamic functions of U in the studied alloys were calculated.

  3. Amish Lifestyle Brings Unexpected Benefit: Less Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160228.html Amish Lifestyle Brings Unexpected Benefit: Less Asthma Finding suggests exposing kids to lots of allergens, ... rest of the population -- much lower rates of asthma. "We found Amish children had extremely low levels ...

  4. New Asthma Guidelines What You Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section New Asthma Guidelines: What You Should Know Past Issues / Fall ... on. If you or a relative suffers from asthma, it is important to know that quality care ...

  5. Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL Past Issues / Fall 2007 ... a peak flow meter. Photo courtesy of MCAN Asthma, a reality of daily life for more than ...

  6. Kids with Mild Asthma Can Take Acetaminophen

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160475.html Kids With Mild Asthma Can Take Acetaminophen: Study Finding counters past research ... 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Acetaminophen does not worsen asthma symptoms in young children, a new study finds. ...

  7. Asthma Research: The NIH–NJRC Connection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Asthma Research: The NIH–NJRC Connection Past Issues / Fall ... the many ways that NIH supports and promotes asthma research is through its strong relationship with National ...

  8. Recent advances in understanding and managing asthma.

    PubMed

    Loo, Su-Ling; Wark, Peter A B

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the important articles published in the area of asthma research from January 2015 to July 2016. In basic science, significant advances have been made in understanding the link between the innate immune response and type II acquired immune responses in asthma and the role of the airway epithelium. Novel information continues to emerge with regard to the pathogenesis and heterogeneity of severe asthma. There have been important translational clinical trials in the areas of childhood asthma, treatment of allergy to improve asthma outcomes, and improving drug delivery to optimize the management of asthma. In addition, there are increasing data concerning the application of biological agents to the management of severe asthma. This body of work discusses the most notable advances in the understanding and management of asthma. PMID:27610226

  9. Asthma and COPD: Differences and Similarities

    MedlinePlus

    ... and COPD: differences and similarities Share | Asthma and COPD: Differences and Similarities This article has been reviewed ... you could have asthma, or you could have Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) , such as emphysema or chronic bronchitis. Because ...

  10. MECHANISTIC INDICATORS OF CHILDHOOD ASTHMA (MICA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is interested in the interplay of environmental and genetic factors on the development and exacerbation of asthma. The Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) study will use exposure measurements and markers of environmental ...

  11. Managing Asthma: Learning to Breathe Easier

    MedlinePlus

    ... even narrower. Common asthma triggers include cigarette smoke, air pollution, mold, house dust mites, and furry animal dander. ... your asthma worse—such as dust mites, mold, air pollution, or secondhand tobacco smoke—and try to avoid ...

  12. Obesity-related asthma in adults.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Nikunj A; Lazarus, Angeline

    2016-08-01

    Obesity as a risk factor for asthma has been identified in previous studies. Additionally, a disproportionate number of patients with severe or difficult-to-control asthma are obese. Patients with obesity-related asthma tend to have worse asthma control and quality of life disproportionate to their pulmonary function tests, are less responsive to corticosteroid therapy, and are more likely to have obesity-related comorbidities such as obstructive sleep apnea and gastroesophageal disease that complicate asthma treatment. With the increasing prevalence of obesity, the prevalence of asthma is anticipated to grow proportionally. Addressing weight loss and encouraging activity is essential in the management of obesity-related asthma. This article briefly overviews the epidemiology, unique distinguishing features, potential mechanisms, and approach to management of patients with obesity-related asthma in adults. PMID:27336439

  13. Asthma Symptoms Can Bloom in Springtime

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159082.html Asthma Symptoms Can Bloom in Springtime Follow your care ... 27, 2016 FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Asthma symptoms increase in spring, making it especially important ...

  14. Behavioral Contributions to Rehabilitation and Childhood Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creer, Thomas L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Described is the 12- to 18-month residential treatment program at the Children's Asthma Research Institute and Hospital, a behaviorally oriented rehabilitation program for children who suffer from chronic bronchial asthma. (IM)

  15. Asthma Symptoms Can Bloom in Springtime

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159082.html Asthma Symptoms Can Bloom in Springtime Follow your care ... 27, 2016 FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Asthma symptoms increase in spring, making it especially important ...

  16. Poverty Linked to Asthma, Allergy Treatment Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_157642.html Poverty Linked to Asthma, Allergy Treatment Failure Patients from low-income households more ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with asthma or food allergies who are poor have worse treatment outcomes, two ...

  17. Near-fatal asthma in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Arjona, Nydia

    2015-01-01

    Asthma affects the elderly as often as other age groups; however, it more often becomes fatal in the elderly. Unfortunately, asthma is often unmanaged or underdiagnosed in the older population. It is important for health care providers to recognize risk factors in the elderly and properly treat them before asthma becomes fatal. This article describes near-fatal asthma and identifies risk factors specifically for the elderly. Symptoms of asthma are reviewed as well as assessments and diagnostic tests to identify asthma severity and complications. Proper management needs to be urgently initiated to prevent worsening respiratory distress; this includes fast-acting drug treatments appropriate for elderly patients. Decompensated acute respiratory failure, secondary to severe asthma, requires the skills of an experienced anesthesiologist because these patients may rapidly deteriorate during induction and intubation. Ventilator management must include strategies to prevent worsening hyperinflation of the lungs. Elderly asthma patients have a higher mortality risk related to ventilator complications and other comorbidities. PMID:25470264

  18. Asthma: New Information for the Early Interventionist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simeonsson, Nancy; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This article highlights key portions of the National Institutes of Health's National Asthma Education Program. Guidelines for understanding asthma triggers and medications are provided, and approaches to controlling environmental factors are suggested. (Author/PB)

  19. Asthma - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000209.htm Asthma - what to ask your doctor - child To use ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asthma is a problem with the airways that bring ...

  20. Diagnosing Asthma in Very Young Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Diagnosing Asthma in Babies & Toddlers Page Content Article Body One ... family with recurrent bronchitis or sinus problems. When Asthma is Not the Cause Your pediatrician will listen ...

  1. American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

    MedlinePlus

    ... an Allergist American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Seeking Relief? Find an Allergist ACAAI Members Members ... Find an Allergist American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology © 2014 Contact US

  2. Asthma - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Asthma URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/asthma.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  3. Recent advances in understanding and managing asthma

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Su-Ling; Wark, Peter A.B.

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the important articles published in the area of asthma research from January 2015 to July 2016. In basic science, significant advances have been made in understanding the link between the innate immune response and type II acquired immune responses in asthma and the role of the airway epithelium. Novel information continues to emerge with regard to the pathogenesis and heterogeneity of severe asthma. There have been important translational clinical trials in the areas of childhood asthma, treatment of allergy to improve asthma outcomes, and improving drug delivery to optimize the management of asthma. In addition, there are increasing data concerning the application of biological agents to the management of severe asthma. This body of work discusses the most notable advances in the understanding and management of asthma. PMID:27610226

  4. Cold-impregnated aluminium. A new source of nickel exposure.

    PubMed

    Lidén, C

    1994-07-01

    A new technique for finishing anodized aluminium was introduced during the 1980s--cold impregnation with nickel. Nickel is available on the surface of cold-impregnated aluminium, as shown by the dimethylglyoxime test. Chemical analysis with EDXA showed that nickel was in the form of NiSO4. A case of work-related allergic contact dermatitis in an engraver with nickel allergy is reported. It transpired that the patient was exposed to nickel in connection with aluminium. It is concluded that cold-impregnated aluminium is a new source of nickel exposure, probably previously unknown to dermatologists. PMID:7924288

  5. Effects of aluminium surface morphology and chemical modification on wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, M.; Fojan, P.; Gurevich, L.; Afshari, A.

    2014-03-01

    Aluminium alloys are some of the predominant metals in industrial applications such as production of heat exchangers, heat pumps. They have high heat conductivity coupled with a low specific weight. In cold working conditions, there is a risk of frost formation on the surface of aluminium in the presence of water vapour, which can lead to the deterioration of equipment performance. This work addresses the methods of surface modification of aluminium and their effect of the underlying surface morphology and wettability, which are the important parameters for frost formation. Three groups of real-life aluminium surfaces of different morphology: unpolished aluminium, polished aluminium, and aluminium foil, were subjected to surface modification procedures which involved the formation of a layer of hydrophilic hyperbranched polyethyleneglycol via in situ polymerization, molecular vapour deposition of a monolayer of fluorinated silane, and a combination of those. The effect of these surface modification techniques on roughness and wettability of the aluminium surfaces was elucidated by ellipsometry, contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy. We demonstrated that by employing different types of surface modifications the contact angle of water droplets on aluminium samples can be varied from 12° to more than 120°. A crossover from Cassie-Baxter to Wenzel regime upon changing the surface roughness was also observed.

  6. Production of aluminium metal matrix composites by liquid processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Kumar, R.; Tharmaraj, R.; Velu, P. Shenbaga

    2016-05-01

    Owing to high strength to low weight ratio, Aluminium matrix composites are widely used in diverse applications of many industries. This lucrative property is achieved by reinforcing the brittle ceramic particles in the aluminium matrix. Aluminium matrix composites are produced by liquid processing methods and solid processing methods. Nevertheless, liquidprocessing techniques stand out because of its simplicity and its suitability for mass production. In this review article, the production of aluminium matrix composites by different liquid processing technique is discussed and a comparative study is carried out.

  7. Current and emerging treatments for severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Al Efraij, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma, which is poorly controlled despite the elimination of modifiable factors and the correct use of standard therapy, accounts only for 5% of people with asthma but it contributes to approximately 50% of the economic costs of asthma. Because of this unmet need, novel therapies have been developed for optimal treatment of these patients. The use of tiotropium, omalizumab, mepolizumab and thermoplasty in well-selected patients provides better control and most importantly a reduction in asthma exacerbations. PMID:26716048

  8. Korean Asthma Guideline 2014: Summary of Major Updates to the Korean Asthma Guideline 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog Kyeom; Park, Yong Bum; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Jung, Ki-Suck; Yoo, Ji Hong

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a prevalent and serious health problem in Korea. Recently, the Korean Asthma Guideline has been updated by The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases (KATRD) in an effort to improve the clinical management of asthma. This guideline focuses on adult patients with asthma and aims to deliver up to date scientific evidence and recommendations to general physicians for the management of asthma. For this purpose, this guideline was updated following systematic review and meta-analysis of recent studies and adapting some points of international guidelines (Global Initiative for Asthma [GINA] report 2014, National Asthma Education and Prevention Program [NAEPP] 2007, British Thoracic Society [BTS/SIGN] asthma guideline 2012, and Canadian asthma guideline 2012). Updated issues include recommendations derived using the population, intervention, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) model, which produced 20 clinical questions on the management of asthma. It also covers a new definition of asthma, the importance of confirming various airflow limitations with spirometry, the epidemiology and the diagnostic flow of asthma in Korea, the importance and evidence for inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and ICS/formoterol as a single maintenance and acute therapy in the stepwise management of asthma, assessment of severity of asthma and management of exacerbation, and an action plan to cope with exacerbation. This guideline includes clinical assessments, and treatment of asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome, management of asthma in specific conditions including severe asthma, elderly asthma, cough variant asthma, exercise-induced bronchial contraction, etc. The revised Korean Asthma Guideline is expected to be a useful resource in the management of asthma. PMID:27433170

  9. Electrodeposition of aluminium, aluminium/magnesium alloys, and magnesium from organometallic electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, A.

    1988-01-01

    The electrodeposition of aluminum, magnesium, and the combination of these metals from nonaqueous media is discussed. Plating baths for depositing Al/Mg alloys or for plating essentially pure Mg were developed. These solutions contain alkali meal fluoride or quaternary ammonium halide/aluminium alkyl complexes and dialkyl magnesium dissolved in aromatic hydrocarbons. Alloy deposits over the whole composition range can be plated from these solutions by varying the relative quantities of the aluminium and magnesium alkyls and by changing the bath-operating parameters. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  10. 10. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Bardana, Emil J

    2008-02-01

    A diversity of airborne dusts, gases, fumes, and vapors can induce dose-related respiratory symptoms in individuals exposed in the workplace. These agents can cause annoyance reactions, irritational effects, sensitization, or the induction of corrosive changes in the respiratory tract, depending on their composition, concentration, and duration of exposure. The prevalence of occupational asthma (OA) ranges from 9% to 15% of the asthmatic population. Factors that might influence the development of OA include the work environment, climatic conditions, genetic proclivities, tobacco and recreational drug use, respiratory infection, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, and endotoxin exposure. Pathogenetically, new-onset OA can be allergic or nonallergic in origin. The allergic variants are usually caused by high-molecular-weight allergens, such as grain dust and animal or fish protein. Selected low-molecular-weight agents are also capable of inducing allergic OA. Symptoms ensue after a latent period of months to years. Nonallergic OA can be precipitated by a brief high-level exposure to a potent irritant. Symptoms occur immediately or within a few hours of the exposure. Once the diagnosis of allergic OA is established, the worker should be removed from further exposure in the workplace. In nonallergic OA the worker can return to work if the exposure was clearly a nonrecurring event. If the diagnosis is made in a timely fashion, most workers experience improvement. Prevention is the best therapeutic intervention. PMID:18241692

  11. [The therapy of bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Fabbri, L M; Papi, A; Corbetta, L; Ciaccia, A

    1999-05-01

    Asthma (Greek word that means "breathlessness" or "open-mouth breath") is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, with extensive infiltration of the airway lumen and wall with eosinophils, mast cells, activated T-lymphocytes. Airway inflammation is associated with airway hyperresponsiveness, recurrent episodes of reversible airflow limitation and respiratory symptoms such as wheezing, chest tightness, breathlessness and cough with mucus production. Curiously, asthma worsens particularly at night and in the early hours of the morning. The current consensus on asthma therapy suggests that pharmacological control of asthma can be achieved with antiinflammatory "controller" medications such as inhaled glucocorticoids and cromones. Short-acting bronchodilators act as "reliever" medications and rapidly reverse acute manifestations of asthma. Asthmatic exacerbations require the repetitive administration of inhaled short-acting beta-2-agonist and the early introduction of oral glucocorticoids. Rarely the severity of exacerbation requires the administration of oxygen (that, if available, is not contraindicated), intravenous bronchodilators, glucocorticoids and epinephryne and mechanical ventilation. PMID:10380556

  12. Piperazine-induced occupational asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmar, L.; Bellander, T.; Bergoeoe, B.; Simonsson, B.G.

    1982-03-01

    Asthmatic reactions were studied among some 130 factory workers who handled amines and other chemicals. Among present employees, we found 15 cases of asthma associated with occupational exposure to chemicals; among former employees there were at least 18. The inducing agent was judged to be piperazine in 29 persons and ethylenediamine (EDA) in three. The asthma was of the late or dual type; immediate reactions alone were to seen. No one had attacks of asthma before employment, and atopic subjects were not preferentially affected. Routine spirometry revealed airway obstruction in fewer than half of the recent cases. Tests of nonspecific bronchial reactivity with methacholine in six subjects with recent asthma showed hyperactivity in five, while tow subjects with earlier asthma did not have hyperactivity. Bronchial provocation tests with piperazine in one subject were positive both in the factory and in the laboratory. The level of piperazine was 1.2 mg/m3 time-weighted average (TWA) in a work place associated with induction of the asthmatic state, and 0.3 mg/m3 in a place connected with attacks in ''sensitized'' subjects.

  13. Nerve growth factor and asthma.

    PubMed

    Bonini, S; Lambiase, A; Lapucci, G; Properzi, F; Bresciani, M; Bracci Laudiero, M L; Mancini, M J; Procoli, A; Micera, A; Sacerdoti, G; Bonini, S; Levi-Schaffer, F; Rasi, G; Aloe, L

    2002-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence shows that nerve growth factor (NGF) exerts biological activity not only on the central and peripheral nervous system, but also on the immune system thereby influencing allergic diseases and asthma. (1) NGF circulating levels are increased in patients with allergic diseases and asthma, and are related to the severity of the inflammatory process and disease. In vernal keratoconjunctivitis, NGF plasma levels correlate with the number of mast cells infiltrating the conjunctiva, and NGF mRNA is increased in nasal mucosal scrapings of patients with allergic rhinitis who have high levels of NGF in serum and nasal fluids; NGF is further increased in nasal fluids after specific allergen challenge. (2) NGF is produced and released by several modulatory and effector cells of allergic inflammation and asthma, for example T-helper 2 lymphocytes, mast cells and eosinophils. (3) NGF receptors are expressed on the conjunctival epithelium of patients with allergic conjunctivitis and the number of NGF-receptor positive cells is increased in the conjunctiva of these patients. Indeed, local administration of NGF induces fibroblast activation and healing processes of human corneal ulcers, which suggests that NGF plays a role in tissue remodelling processes occurring in asthma. (4) NGF increases airway hyperreactivity to histamine in an animal model of asthma, while anti-NGF treatment reduces airway hyperreactivity induced by ovalbumin topical challenge in the sensitized mouse. PMID:12144547

  14. Conundrum in an asthma exacerbation.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Barney Thomas Jesudason; McLellan, Thomas; Samuel, Johnson; Yung, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old man, an asthmatic, presented with symptoms suggestive of an acute exacerbation of asthma. His arterial blood gas revealed type 1 respiratory failure (PaO2 <8 kPa or 60 mm Hg with normal or low PaCO2) with a compensated lactic acidosis. He was treated for an asthma exacerbation and sepsis. Despite treatment, his respiratory rate remained elevated although his hypoxaemia improved. There was progressive worsening of the lactic acidosis. Treatment for sepsis was augmented. Peak flow measurements were not used to assess the severity of his exacerbation nor his response to treatment. An alternate diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome with acute pulmonary oedema was made and his asthma treatment was stopped. This coincided with a decline in his serum lactate. A diagnosis of salbutamol-induced lactic acidosis (SILA) was made. SILA is a relatively common complication of salbutamol therapy in moderate/severe asthma exacerbations. It is caused by a mechanism different from the lactataemia that is associated with septic shock and life-threatening asthma. PMID:27166007

  15. Mechanical ventilation for severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Leatherman, James

    2015-06-01

    Acute exacerbations of asthma can lead to respiratory failure requiring ventilatory assistance. Noninvasive ventilation may prevent the need for endotracheal intubation in selected patients. For patients who are intubated and undergo mechanical ventilation, a strategy that prioritizes avoidance of ventilator-related complications over correction of hypercapnia was first proposed 30 years ago and has become the preferred approach. Excessive pulmonary hyperinflation is a major cause of hypotension and barotrauma. An appreciation of the key determinants of hyperinflation is essential to rational ventilator management. Standard therapy for patients with asthma undergoing mechanical ventilation consists of inhaled bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and drugs used to facilitate controlled hypoventilation. Nonconventional interventions such as heliox, general anesthesia, bronchoscopy, and extracorporeal life support have also been advocated for patients with fulminant asthma but are rarely necessary. Immediate mortality for patients who are mechanically ventilated for acute severe asthma is very low and is often associated with out-of-hospital cardiorespiratory arrest before intubation. However, patients who have been intubated for severe asthma are at increased risk for death from subsequent exacerbations and must be managed accordingly in the outpatient setting. PMID:26033128

  16. Childhood Asthma and Environmental Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Felicia; Takaro, Tim K.

    2007-01-01

    Background Contaminants encountered in many households, such as environmental tobacco smoke, house dust mite, cockroach, cat and dog dander, and mold, are risk factors in asthma. Young children are a particularly vulnerable subpopulation for environmentally mediated asthma, and the economic burden associated with this disease is substantial. Certain mechanical interventions are effective both in reducing allergen loads in the home and in improving asthmatic children’s respiratory health. Results Combinations of interventions including the use of dust mite-impermeable bedding covers, improved cleaning practices, high-efficiency particulate air vacuum cleaners, mechanical ventilation, and parental education are associated with both asthma trigger reduction and improved health outcomes for asthmatic children. Compared with valuated health benefits, these combinations of interventions have proven cost effective in studies that have employed them. Education alone has not proven effective in changing parental behaviors such as smoking in the home. Conclusions Future research should focus on improving the effectiveness of education on home asthma triggers, and understanding long-term children’s health effects of the interventions that have proven effective in reducing asthma triggers. PMID:17589609

  17. International Differences in Asthma Guidelines for Children

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Shannon F.; Ungar, Wendy J.; Glazier, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Over the last decade, a number of clinical practice guidelines that include guidance for the management of pediatric asthma have been introduced. The consistency across pediatric asthma guidelines is unknown and the emphasis on establishing asthma control may vary. The objective of this paper was to depict the evolution of guidelines for pediatric asthma and to compare current international guidelines in terms of their organization, presentation of evidence and consideration of children, with special emphasis on definitions of asthma control and severity. Methods A systematic search to identify asthma guidelines was conducted, and guidelines were searched for pediatric terms. The approaches used by guidelines to define assessments of asthma severity and control were compared between the United States, the Global Initiative for Asthma, Canada, the United Kingdom and Australia. Results Pediatric considerations in the management of asthma have been integrated into the various guidelines to different degrees and through varied strategies. There were differences in the conceptual and operational approach used to assess asthma which emphasized either asthma severity or control. Conclusions It will be important for future guidelines to clearly define whether the primary assessment parameter is asthma severity or control. Delineating the guideline development process and supporting evidence may improve transparency, consistency and guideline adherence. PMID:19001786

  18. Understanding Children with Asthma: Trouble and Triggers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, JungHa; Wood, Beatrice L.; Cheah, PoAnn

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common illnesses of childhood; in the United States, nearly 9% of children have the condition (Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, 2006). Among children with chronic illnesses, asthma is the most common cause for school absence and hospitalization (Akinbami, 2006). Asthma is a chronic disorder of the…

  19. Consequences of Asthma in Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales-Macias, Laura Denise

    2009-01-01

    Much of the literature on asthma is based on non-school data collected primarily in clinics. As asthma is given greater national attention, it is crucial to examine the educational consequences of the disease in the context of school where children spend much of their days. This study examines the educational impact of asthma on elementary and…

  20. Managing Asthma in the Early Childhood Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graville, Iris

    2011-01-01

    Asthma, one of the most common chronic disorders in childhood, affects more than seven million children in the United States, and is the third leading cause of hospitalization for children. Statistics like these make planning and preparing for asthma in the early childhood setting a high priority. With the high rates of asthma in the U.S. today,…

  1. Asthma Education Programme in Russia: Educating Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslennikova, G. Ya.; Morosova, M. E.; Salman, N. V.; Kulikov, S. M.; Oganov, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    U.S. recommendations for asthma management were adapted for use in educating Moscow families with children with asthma (N=252). Use of anti-inflammatory drugs, doctor visits, peak flow rates, and daily peak flow were also measured. One-year follow up showed significant improvement in asthma self-management skills among the education group.…

  2. An Online Simulation in Pediatric Asthma Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Keith B.

    2004-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that nearly 20 million Americans suffer from asthma, 6.3 million of which are children (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2004). It is not merely an annoyance disease, as is commonly believed. Asthma kills. It takes more than 5,000 American lives each year (Asthma Statistics in America,…

  3. Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Pacific Islander > Asthma Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders are 70 percent more likely to have ... being told they had asthma, 2014 Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Non-Hispanic White Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander/ ...

  4. How Is Asthma Treated and Controlled?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Month with a Google+ Hangout on Air for parents and caregivers to learn how to help control a child's asthma so that they can breathe ... parents build up their asthma team. Jose, his parents, a doctor and a nurse, ... forces to help Jose control his asthma. The video is recorded in Spanish ...

  5. The school environment and asthma in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Hauptman, Marissa; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the relationship between environmental exposures within the school environment and pediatric asthma morbidity. This article will conclude by reviewing novel school based asthma education and therapeutic programs and environmental interventions designed to help mitigate pediatric asthma morbidity. PMID:26523228

  6. How Can I Deal with My Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Who Cuts? How Can I Deal With My Asthma? KidsHealth > For Teens > How Can I Deal With My Asthma? Print A A A Text Size What's in ... Tips en español ¿Cómo puedo afrontar mi asma? Asthma is more common these days than it used ...

  7. Epidemiology and Pulmonary Physiology of Severe Asthma.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Jacqueline; Mikulic, Lucas; Kaminsky, David A

    2016-08-01

    The epidemiology and physiology of severe asthma are inherently linked because of varying phenotypes and expressions of asthma throughout the population. To understand how to better treat severe asthma, we must use both population data and physiologic principles to individualize therapies among groups with similar expressions of this disease. PMID:27401616

  8. Eosinophilic bioactivities in severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Carr, Tara F; Berdnikovs, Sergejs; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Bochner, Bruce S; Rosenwasser, Lanny J

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is clearly related to airway or blood eosinophilia, and asthmatics with significant eosinophilia are at higher risk for more severe disease. Eosinophils actively contribute to innate and adaptive immune responses and inflammatory cascades through the production and release of diverse chemokines, cytokines, lipid mediators and other growth factors. Eosinophils may persist in the blood and airways despite guidelines-based treatment. This review details eosinophil effector mechanisms, surface markers, and clinical outcomes associated with eosinophilia and asthma severity. There is interest in the potential of eosinophils or their products to predict treatment response with biotherapeutics and their usefulness as biomarkers. This is important as monoclonal antibodies are targeting cytokines and eosinophils in different lung environments for treating severe asthma. Identifying disease state-specific eosinophil biomarkers would help to refine these strategies and choose likely responders to biotherapeutics. PMID:27386041

  9. Eosinophilic Inflammation in Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Possa, Samantha S.; Leick, Edna A.; Prado, Carla M.; Martins, Mílton A.; Tibério, Iolanda F. L. C.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils are circulating granulocytes involved in pathogenesis of asthma. A cascade of processes directed by Th2 cytokine producing T-cells influence the recruitment of eosinophils into the lungs. Furthermore, multiple elements including interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, chemoattractants such as eotaxin, Clara cells, and CC chemokine receptor (CCR)3 are already directly involved in recruiting eosinophils to the lung during allergic inflammation. Once recruited, eosinophils participate in the modulation of immune response, induction of airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling, characteristic features of asthma. Various types of promising treatments for reducing asthmatic response are related to reduction in eosinophil counts both in human and experimental models of pulmonary allergic inflammation, showing that the recruitment of these cells really plays an important role in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases such asthma. PMID:23616768

  10. Prevalence of beryllium sensitization among aluminium smelter workers

    PubMed Central

    Slade, M. D.; Cantley, L. F.; Kirsche, S. R.; Wesdock, J. C.; Cullen, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Beryllium exposure occurs in aluminium smelters from natural contamination of bauxite, the principal source of aluminium. Aims To characterize beryllium exposure in aluminium smelters and determine the prevalence rate of beryllium sensitization (BeS) among aluminium smelter workers. Methods A population of 3185 workers from nine aluminium smelters owned by four different aluminium-producing companies were determined to have significant beryllium exposure. Of these, 1932 workers participated in medical surveillance programmes that included the serum beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT), confirmation of sensitization by at least two abnormal BeLPT test results and further evaluation for chronic beryllium disease in workers with BeS. Results Personal beryllium samples obtained from the nine aluminium smelters showed a range of <0.01–13.00 μg/m3 time-weighted average with an arithmetic mean of 0.25 μg/m3 and geometric mean of 0.06 μg/m3. Nine workers were diagnosed with BeS (prevalence rate of 0.47%, 95% confidence interval = 0.21–0.88%). Conclusions BeS can occur in aluminium smelter workers through natural beryllium contamination of the bauxite and further concentration during the refining and smelting processes. Exposure levels to beryllium observed in aluminium smelters are similar to those seen in other industries that utilize beryllium. However, compared with beryllium-exposed workers in other industries, the rate of BeS among aluminium smelter workers appears lower. This lower observed rate may be related to a more soluble form of beryllium found in the aluminium smelting work environment as well as the consistent use of respiratory protection. PMID:20610489

  11. Evaluation of quality of life according to asthma control and asthma severity in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Natasha Yumi; Ribeiro, Maria Angela Gonçalves de Oliveira; Saad, Ivete Alonso Bredda; Morcillo, André Moreno; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Toro, Adyléia Aparecida Dalbo Contrera

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate quality of life according to the level of asthma control and degree of asthma severity in children and adolescents. METHODS: We selected children and adolescents with asthma (7-17 years of age) from the Pediatric Pulmonology Outpatient Clinic of the State University of Campinas Hospital de Clínicas, located in the city of Campinas, Brazil. Asthma control and asthma severity were assessed by the Asthma Control Test and by the questionnaire based on the Global Initiative for Asthma, respectively. The patients also completed the Paediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ), validated for use in Brazil, in order to evaluate their quality of life. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 11.22 ± 2.91 years, with a median of 11.20 (7.00-17.60) years. We selected 100 patients, of whom 27, 33, and 40 were classified as having controlled asthma (CA), partially controlled asthma (PCA), and uncontrolled asthma (UA), respectively. As for asthma severity, 34, 19, and 47 were classified as having mild asthma (MiA), moderate asthma (MoA), and severe asthma (SA), respectively. The CA and the PCA groups, when compared with the NCA group, showed higher values for the overall PAQLQ score and all PAQLQ domains (activity limitation, symptoms, and emotional function; p < 0.001 for all). The MiA group showed higher scores for all of the PAQLQ components than did the MoA and SA groups. CONCLUSIONS: Quality of life appears to be directly related to asthma control and asthma severity in children and adolescents, being better when asthma is well controlled and asthma severity is lower. PMID:26785958

  12. Exercise and asthma: an overview.

    PubMed

    Del Giacco, Stefano R; Firinu, Davide; Bjermer, Leif; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon

    2015-01-01

    The terms 'exercise-induced asthma' (EIA) and 'exercise-induced bronchoconstriction' (EIB) are often used interchangeably to describe symptoms of asthma such as cough, wheeze, or dyspnoea provoked by vigorous physical activity. In this review, we refer to EIB as the bronchoconstrictive response and to EIA when bronchoconstriction is associated with asthma symptoms. EIB is a common occurrence for most of the asthmatic patients, but it also affects more than 10% of otherwise healthy individuals as shown by epidemiological studies. EIA and EIB have a high prevalence also in elite athletes, especially within endurance type of sports, and an athlete's asthma phenotype has been described. However, the occurrence in elite athletes shows that EIA/EIB, if correctly managed, may not impair physical activity and top sports performance. The pathogenic mechanisms of EIA/EIB classically involve both osmolar and vascular changes in the airways in addition to cooling of the airways with parasympathetic stimulation. Airways inflammation plays a fundamental role in EIA/EIB. Diagnosis and pharmacological management must be carefully performed, with particular consideration of current anti-doping regulations, when caring for athletes. Based on the demonstration that the inhaled asthma drugs do not improve performance in healthy athletes, the doping regulations are presently much less strict than previously. Some sports are at a higher asthma risk than others, probably due to a high environmental exposure while performing the sport, with swimming and chlorine exposure during swimming as one example. It is considered very important for the asthmatic child and adolescent to master EIA/EIB to be able to participate in physical activity on an equal level with their peers, and a precise early diagnosis with optimal treatment follow-up is vital in this aspect. In addition, surprising recent preliminary evidences offer new perspectives for moderate exercise as a potential therapeutic tool for

  13. Asthma Outcomes: Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sandra R.; Rand, Cynthia S.; Cabana, Michael D.; Foggs, Michael B.; Halterman, Jill S.; Olson, Lynn; Vollmer, William M.; Wright, Rosalind J.; Taggart, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Background “Asthma-related quality of life” refers to the perceived impact that asthma has on the patient’s quality of life. Objective National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies convened an expert group to recommend standardized measures of the impact of asthma on quality of life for use in future asthma clinical research. Methods We reviewed published documentation regarding the development and psychometric evaluation; clinical research use since 2000; and extent to which the content of each existing quality of life instrument provides a unique, reliable, and valid assessment of the intended construct. We classified instruments as core (required in future studies), supplemental (used according to the study’s aims and standardized), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop convened in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results Eleven instruments for adults and 6 for children were identified for review. None qualified as core instruments because they predominantly measured indicators of asthma control (symptoms and/or functional status); failed to provide a distinct, reliable score measuring all key dimensions of the intended construct; and/or lacked adequate psychometric data. Conclusions In the absence of existing instruments that meet the stated criteria, currently available instruments are classified as either supplemental or emerging. Research is strongly recommended to develop and evaluate instruments that provide a distinct, reliable measure of the patient’s perception of the impact of asthma on all of the key dimensions of quality of life, an important outcome that is not captured in other outcome measures. PMID:22386511

  14. Asthma as an axon reflex.

    PubMed

    Barnes, P J

    1986-02-01

    In asthma, damage to airway epithelium, possibly caused by eosinophil products, exposes C-fibre afferent nerve endings. Stimulation of these endings by inflammatory mediators such as bradykinin may result in an axon (local) reflex with antidromic conduction down afferent nerve collaterals and release of sensory neuropeptides such as substance P, neurokinin A, and calcitonin gene-related peptide. These peptides are potent inducers of airway smooth muscle contraction, bronchial oedema, extravasation of plasma, mucus hypersecretion, and possibly inflammatory cell infiltration and secretion. Thus, axon reflexes could account for at least some of the pathophysiology of asthma and this concept might lead to new strategies for treatment. PMID:2418322

  15. Emerging Biologics in Severe Asthma.

    PubMed

    Pavord, Ian D; Hilvering, Bart; Shrimanker, Rahul

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease that can be classified into different clinical endotypes, depending on the type of airway inflammation, clinical severity, and response to treatment. This article focuses on the eosinophilic endotype of asthma, which is defined by the central role that eosinophils play in the pathophysiology of the condition. It is characterized by persistently elevated sputum and/or blood eosinophils and by a significant response to treatments that suppress eosinophilia. Eosinophil activity in the airway may be more important than their numbers and this needs to be investigated. Transcriplomic or Metabolomic signatures may also be useful to identify this endotype. PMID:27401629

  16. Canadian asthma consensus report, 1999

    PubMed Central

    Boulet, L P; Becker, A; Bérubé, D; Beveridge, R; Ernst, P

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To provide physicians with current guidelines for the diagnosis and optimal management of asthma in children and adults, including pregnant women and the elderly, in office, emergency department, hospital and clinic settings. OPTIONS: The consensus group considered the roles of education, avoidance of provocative environmental and other factors, diverse pharmacotherapies, delivery devices and emergency and in-hospital management of asthma. OUTCOMES: Provision of the best control of asthma by confirmation of the diagnosis using objective measures, rapid achievement and maintenance of control and regular follow-up. EVIDENCE: The key diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations are based on the 1995 Canadian guidelines and a critical review of the literature by small groups before a full meeting of the consensus group. Recommendations are graded according to 5 levels of evidence. Differences of opinion were resolved by consensus following discussion. VALUES: Respirologists, immunoallergists, pediatricians and emergency and family physicians gave prime consideration to the achievement and maintenance of optimal control of asthma through avoidance of environmental inciters, education of patients and the lowest effective regime of pharmacotherapy to reduce morbidity and mortality. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Adherence to the guidelines should be accompanied by significant reduction in patients' symptoms, reduced morbidity and mortality, fewer emergency and hospital admissions, fewer adverse side-effects from medications, better quality of life for patients and reduced costs. RECOMMENDATIONS: Recommendations are included in each section of the report. In summary, after a diagnosis of asthma is made based on clinical evaluation, including demonstration of variable airflow obstruction, and contributing factors are identified, a treatment plan is established to obtain and maintain optimal asthma control. The main components of treatment are patient education

  17. Epidemiology of asthma in the United States.

    PubMed

    Follenweider, Linda M; Lambertino, Anissa

    2013-03-01

    Incidence and prevalence rates of asthma can vary greatly according to population and location. The National Heart and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health defines asthma as a common chronic disorder of the airways that involves a complex interaction of airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, and an underlying inflammation. This article uses the most common definitions and diagnostic methods for asthma. In 2009 there were 2.1 million asthma-related emergency department (ED) visits. ED visits lend an opportunity for providers to identify and intervene in the care of patients whose asthma is poorly controlled. PMID:23465442

  18. Defining and managing risk in asthma.

    PubMed

    Blakey, J D; Zaidi, S; Shaw, D E

    2014-08-01

    Asthma attacks are a major global source of morbidity and cost. The incidence and impact of asthma attacks have not improved despite widespread adoption of effective universal treatment guidelines. Consequently, there is increasing interest in managing asthma based on specific assessments of both current symptoms and future risk. In this review, we consider 'risk' in asthma, and how it might be assessed from the patient's history and objective measurements. We also discuss the potential for encouraging shared decision-making and improving medical consensus through explicit communication of risk and highlight the potential opportunities and challenges in risk assessment to improve asthma management through individualised treatment strategies. PMID:24773229

  19. Primary Care of the Patient with Asthma.

    PubMed

    Lenaeus, Michael J; Hirschmann, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Obstructive lung disease includes asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because a previous issue of Medical Clinics of North America (2012;96[4]) was devoted to COPD, this article focuses on asthma in adults, and addresses some topics about COPD not addressed previously. Asthma is a heterogeneous disease marked by variable airflow obstruction and bronchial hyperreactivity. Onset is most common in early childhood, although many people develop asthma later in life. Adult-onset asthma presents a particular challenge in the primary care clinic because of incomplete understanding of the disorder, underreporting of symptoms, underdiagnosis, inadequate treatment, and high rate of comorbidity. PMID:26320041

  20. Linkage and Genetic Association in Severe Asthma.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bridgette L; Rosenwasser, Lanny J

    2016-08-01

    A significant body of work in the genetics of asthma currently exists. However, current knowledge has not been clarifying in understanding the pathophysiology of asthma and therapeutic treatment of the disease. Severe asthma in adults and children is a significant burden in relation to disproportionate disease morbidity, mortality, and health utilization. This disease phenotype is not well understood; current effective treatment regimens are limited. Genetic studies may lead to improved understanding of the pathophysiology of severe asthma and identification of relevant subsets, which allow more targeted and effective therapies and the realization of Precision Medicine in asthma. PMID:27401617

  1. Role of Obesity in Asthma Control, the Obesity-Asthma Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Novosad, Shannon; Khan, Supriya; Wolfe, Bruce; Khan, Akram

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a disease with distinct phenotypes that have implications for both prognosis and therapy. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated an association between asthma and obesity. Further studies have shown that obese asthmatics have poor asthma control and more severe asthma. This obese-asthma group may represent a unique phenotype. The mechanisms behind poor asthma control in obese subjects remain unclear, but recent research has focused on adipokines and their effects on the airways as well as the role of oxidative stress. Both surgical and nonsurgical weight loss therapy have shown promising results with improvements in asthma control and decreased asthma severity. Comorbid conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease and obstructive sleep apnea may also have a role in poor asthma control in obese asthmatics. Further research is needed to define the mechanisms behind this phenotype which will guide the development of targeted therapies. PMID:23710195

  2. Advances in asthma 2015: Across the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Andrew H; Anderson, William C; Dutmer, Cullen M; Searing, Daniel A; Szefler, Stanley J

    2016-08-01

    In 2015, progress in understanding asthma ranged from insights to asthma inception, exacerbations, and severity to advancements that will improve disease management throughout the lifespan. 2015's insights to asthma inception included how the intestinal microbiome affects asthma expression with the identification of specific gastrointestinal bacterial taxa in early infancy associated with less asthma risk, possibly by promoting regulatory immune development at a critical early age. The relevance of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating asthma-related gene expression was strengthened. Predicting and preventing exacerbations throughout life might help to reduce progressive lung function decrease and disease severity in adulthood. Although allergy has long been linked to asthma exacerbations, a mechanism through which IgE impairs rhinovirus immunity and underlies asthma exacerbations was demonstrated and improved by anti-IgE therapy (omalizumab). Other key molecular pathways underlying asthma exacerbations, such as cadherin-related family member 3 (CDHR3) and orosomucoid like 3 (ORMDL3), were elucidated. New anti-IL-5 therapeutics, mepolizumab and reslizumab, were US Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of patients with severe eosinophilic asthma. In a clinical trial the novel therapeutic inhaled GATA3 mRNA-specific DNAzyme attenuated early- and late-phase allergic responses to inhaled allergen. These current findings are significant steps toward addressing unmet needs in asthma prevention, severity modification, disparities, and lifespan outcomes. PMID:27497278

  3. Aluminium salt slag characterization and utilization--a review.

    PubMed

    Tsakiridis, P E

    2012-05-30

    Aluminium salt slag (also known as aluminium salt cake), which is produced by the secondary aluminium industry, is formed during aluminium scrap/dross melting and contains 15-30% aluminium oxide, 30-55% sodium chloride, 15-30% potassium chloride, 5-7% metallic aluminium and impurities (carbides, nitrides, sulphides and phosphides). Depending on the raw mix the amount of salt slag produced per tonne of secondary aluminium ranges from 200 to 500 kg. As salt slag has been classified as toxic and hazardous waste, it should be managed in compliance with the current legislation. Its landfill disposal is forbidden in most of the European countries and it should be recycled and processed in a proper way by taking the environmental impact into consideration. This paper presents a review of the aluminium salt slag chemical and mineralogical characteristics, as well as various processes for metal recovery, recycling of sodium and potassium chlorides content back to the smelting process and preparation of value added products from the final non metallic residue. PMID:22480708

  4. Occupational asthma due to oil mists.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, A S; Weir, D C; Burge, P S

    1988-01-01

    Twenty five patients who were exposed to oil mists at their place of work were investigated for possible work related asthma. Serial peak expiratory flow recordings showed 13 to have definite work related asthma, seven equivocal work related asthma, and three asthma unrelated to work; two had normal recordings. Subjects with work related asthma often produced different patterns of peak flow response during the working week; patterns also varied between patients. Six of these patients had bronchial tests with oil from their place of work. Three had asthma induced by exposure to unused (clean) soluble oil and one reacted to used but not to clean oil. The challenge tests in the remaining two gave inconclusive results. It is concluded that occupational asthma due to oil mists is common, the peak flow response is heterogeneous, and the provoking agent within the oil may vary from worker to worker. PMID:3406905

  5. Gene–Environment Interactions in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Fernando D.

    2007-01-01

    Many environmental factors and a large number of genetic polymorphisms have been reported to be associated with asthma risk in different locales and at different ages. It seems that what we call asthma is a heterogeneous set of conditions for which the only common feature is recurrent airway obstruction that is at least partially responsive to usual asthma therapy. Recent studies in which environmental factors and genetic variants were studied concomitantly have suggested a potential unifying concept for the disease. It seems that asthma is a genetically mediated development dysregulation of diverse immune and airway responses to a variety of specific and nonspecific exposures. It thus seems improbable that most genetic variants associated with asthma influence the disease regardless of which environmental factors trigger it and at which lifetime phase they are present. More likely, the most important gene variants for asthma are polymorphisms that exert their influence on the network system controlling biological responses to asthma-related exposures. PMID:17202288

  6. Progress in the management of childhood asthma

    PubMed Central

    Pensrichon, Rattana; Kurasirikul, Suruthai

    2012-01-01

    Asthma has become the most common chronic disease in childhood. Significant advances in epidemiological research as well as in therapy of pediatric asthma have been made over the past 2 decades. In this review, we look at certain aspects therapy of childhood asthma, both in the past and present. Literature review on allergen avoidance (including mites, cockroach and cat), intensive therapy with β2-agonists in acute asthma (administering via continuous nebulization and intravenous routes), a revisit of theophylline use and its action, the use of inhaled corticosteroids in various phases of childhood asthma and sublingual immunotherapy in asthma are examined. Recent facts and dilemmas of these treatments are identified along with expression of our opinions, particularly on points of childhood asthma in the Asia-Pacific, are made in this review. PMID:22348203

  7. Deviatoric response of the aluminium alloy, 5083

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Hazell, Paul; Millett, Jeremy; Bourne, Neil

    2009-06-01

    Aluminium alloys such as 5083 are established light weight armour materials. As such, the shock response of these materials is of great importance. The shear strength of a material under shock loading provides an insight into its ballistic performance. In this investigation embedded manganin stress gauges have been employed to measure both the longitudinal and lateral components of stress during plate impact experiments over a range of impact stresses. In turn, these results were used to determine the shear strength and to investigate the time dependence of lateral stress behind the shock front to give an indication of material response.

  8. Managed care opportunities for improving asthma care.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jonathan D

    2011-04-01

    Uncontrolled asthma is an enormous burden in terms of the propensity to reach asthma control in the future, direct and indirect costs, and health-related quality of life. The complex pathophysiology, treatment, and triggers of asthma warrant a unified, yet targeted, approach to care. No single factor is fully responsible for poor control. Complicating the problem of asthma control is adherence to long-term controller medications. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) established several key points for asthma control, and developed classifications for asthma control and recommended actions for treatment. All parties involved in the management of asthma, including physicians, pharmacists, nurses, patients, family members, and insurance companies, need to be aware of the NAEPP guidelines. To determine if the goals of asthma therapy are being met, assessment of asthma outcomes is necessary. Unfortunately, some measures may get overlooked, and patient-reported outcomes (as assessed by the validated control instruments) are not often collected during routine examinations. The Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set measure for asthma may be used to quantify asthma care, but there is evidence that it does not fully capture the goals of asthma management. Most well-designed, education-based interventions are considered good value for money, but it can be difficult to put into practice such policy interventions. An optimal managed care plan will adhere to known evidence-based guidelines, can measure outcomes, is targeted to the patient's risk and impairment, and can adapt to changes in our understanding of asthma and its treatment. PMID:21761959

  9. Aluminium Electroplating on Steel from a Fused Bromide Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhat Tripathy; Laura Wurth; Eric Dufek; Toni Y. Gutknecht; Natalie Gese; Paula Hahn; Steven Frank; Guy Fredrickson; J Stephen Herring

    2014-08-01

    A quaternary bromide bath (LiBr-KBr-CsBr-AlBr3) was used to electro-coat aluminium on steel substrates. The electrolyte was prepared by the addition of AlBr3 into the eutectic LiBr-KBr-CsBr melt. A smooth, thick, adherent and shiny aluminium coating could be obtained with 80 wt.% AlBr3 in the ternary melt. The SEM photographs of the coated surfaces suggest the formation of thick and dense coatings with good aluminium coverage. Both salt immersion and open circuit potential measurement suggest that the coatings did display good corrosion-resistance behavior. Annealing of the coated surfaces, prior to corrosion tests, suggested the robustness of the metallic aluminium coating in preventing the corrosion of the steel surfaces. Studies also indicated that the quaternary bromide plating bath can potentially provide a better aluminium coating on both ferrous and non-ferrous metals, including complex surfaces/geometries.

  10. Galvanised steel to aluminium joining by laser and GTAW processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sierra, G.; Peyre, P.; Deschaux Beaume, F. Stuart, D.; Fras, G.

    2008-12-15

    A new means of assembling galvanised steel to aluminium involving a reaction between solid steel and liquid aluminium was developed, using laser and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) processes. A direct aluminium melting strategy was investigated with the laser process, whereas an aluminium-induced melting by steel heating and heat conduction through the steel was carried out with the GTAW process. The interfaces generated during the interaction were mainly composed of a 2-40 {mu}m thick intermetallic reaction layers. The linear strength of the assemblies can be as high as 250 N/mm and 190 N/mm for the assemblies produced respectively by laser and GTAW processes. The corresponding failures were located in the fusion zone of aluminium (laser assemblies), or in the reaction layer (GTAW assemblies)

  11. Multilayer roll bonded aluminium foil: processing, microstructure and flow stress

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, C.Y.; Nielsen, P.; Hansen, N

    2004-08-02

    Bulk aluminium has been produced by warm-rolling followed by cold-rolling of commercial purity (99% purity) aluminium foil. The bonding appeared perfect from observation with the naked eye, light and transmission electron microscopy. By comparison with bulk aluminium of similar purity (AA1200) rolled to a similar strain (90%RA), the roll-bonded metal showed a much higher density of high-angle grain boundaries, similar strength and improved thermal stability. This study has implications for a number of applications in relation to the processing of aluminium. Roll bonding is of interest as a method for grain size refinement; oxide-containing materials have increased strength, enhanced work-hardening behaviour, and exhibit alterations in recrystallisation behaviour. The behaviour of the hard oxide film is of interest in aluminium processing, and has been investigated by characterising the size and distribution of oxide particles in the roll-bonded samples.

  12. Usage of Neural Network to Predict Aluminium Oxide Layer Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Michal, Peter; Vagaská, Alena; Gombár, Miroslav; Kmec, Ján; Spišák, Emil; Kučerka, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows an influence of chemical composition of used electrolyte, such as amount of sulphuric acid in electrolyte, amount of aluminium cations in electrolyte and amount of oxalic acid in electrolyte, and operating parameters of process of anodic oxidation of aluminium such as the temperature of electrolyte, anodizing time, and voltage applied during anodizing process. The paper shows the influence of those parameters on the resulting thickness of aluminium oxide layer. The impact of these variables is shown by using central composite design of experiment for six factors (amount of sulphuric acid, amount of oxalic acid, amount of aluminium cations, electrolyte temperature, anodizing time, and applied voltage) and by usage of the cubic neural unit with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm during the results evaluation. The paper also deals with current densities of 1 A·dm−2 and 3 A·dm−2 for creating aluminium oxide layer. PMID:25922850

  13. Usage of neural network to predict aluminium oxide layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Michal, Peter; Vagaská, Alena; Gombár, Miroslav; Kmec, Ján; Spišák, Emil; Kučerka, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows an influence of chemical composition of used electrolyte, such as amount of sulphuric acid in electrolyte, amount of aluminium cations in electrolyte and amount of oxalic acid in electrolyte, and operating parameters of process of anodic oxidation of aluminium such as the temperature of electrolyte, anodizing time, and voltage applied during anodizing process. The paper shows the influence of those parameters on the resulting thickness of aluminium oxide layer. The impact of these variables is shown by using central composite design of experiment for six factors (amount of sulphuric acid, amount of oxalic acid, amount of aluminium cations, electrolyte temperature, anodizing time, and applied voltage) and by usage of the cubic neural unit with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm during the results evaluation. The paper also deals with current densities of 1 A · dm(-2) and 3 A · dm(-2) for creating aluminium oxide layer. PMID:25922850

  14. Albumin adsorption on to aluminium oxide and polyurethane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sharma, C P; Sunny, M C

    1990-05-01

    The changes in protein adsorption onto aluminium surfaces coated with different thicknesses of oxide layers were examined. The oxide layers on aluminium substrates were derived by the anodizing technique. Protein adsorption studies were conducted using 125I-labelled albumin and the amount of albumin adsorbed was estimated with the help of a gamma counter. An increase in albumin adsorption was observed on oxide layer coated aluminium surfaces. The effect of anti-Hageman factor on albumin and fibrinogen adsorption on to bare aluminium, oxide layer coated aluminium and bare polyether urethane urea surfaces was also investigated. It was observed that the presence of anti-Hageman factor increased the adsorption of albumin and fibrinogen on to all these substrates. PMID:2383620

  15. Barriers to Asthma Management as Identified by School Nurses.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Judith E; Spencer, Gale A

    2016-10-01

    Asthma rates are increasing in children. School nurses have opportunities to care for children with asthma but need to overcome barriers impacting their ability to manage asthma in the school setting. This study (a) assessed barriers present in the school setting, (b) determined the impact of barriers on performance of asthma management behaviors, and (c) determined the impact of barriers on importance ratings of asthma management behaviors, asthma self-efficacy, and asthma attitudes (N = 537). Results revealed 72% of the nurses reported at least one barrier. As numbers of barriers increased, performance of asthma management behaviors decreased. Significant relationships were found between specific asthma management behaviors and specific barriers. No significant relationships were found between barriers and asthma self-efficacy, asthma attitude, or importance ratings of asthma management behaviors. Removing barriers may allow the nurse to perform at greatest effectiveness, enhancing the positive outcomes that result from appropriate asthma management. PMID:27044669

  16. An Economic Evaluation of Asthma Action Plans for Children with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Polisena, Julie; Tam, Susanna; Lodha, Abhay; Laporte, Audrey; Coyte, Peter C.; Ungar, Wendy J.

    2016-01-01

    The costs and effectiveness of asthma action plans for children were evaluated in a cross-sectional economic analysis. Direct health care and indirect costs, nights with symptoms, and asthma attacks were measured in 879 Ontario children with asthma. From a societal perspective, the total annual costs of the asthma action plan and the control groups were CDN$6, 948 and CDN$6, 140 per patient, respectively. Health outcomes were similar. The difference in cost was attributable to greater medication and health services use in the intervention group. Prospective randomized trials are necessary to measure potential improvements in control of asthma using asthma action plans. PMID:17885851

  17. Carboxyhemoglobin and Methemoglobin in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Naples, Robert; Laskowski, Dan; McCarthy, Kevin; Mattox, Emmea; Comhair, Suzy A. A.; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) are synthesized at high levels in asthmatic airways. NO can oxidize hemoglobin (Hb) to methemoglobin (MetHb). CO binds to heme to produce carboxyhemoglobin (COHb). We hypothesized that MetHb and COHb may be increased in asthma. COHb, MetHb, and Hb were measured in venous blood of healthy controls (n=32) and asthmatics (n=31). Arterial COHb and oxyhemoglobin were measured by pulse CO-oximeter. Hb, oxyhemoglobin, and deoxyhemoglobin were similar among groups, but arterial COHb was higher in asthmatics than controls (p=0.04). Venous COHb was similar among groups, and thus arteriovenous COHb (a-v COHb) concentration difference was greater in asthma compared with controls. Venous MetHb was lower in asthma compared to controls (p=0.01) and correlated to venous NO (p=0.009). The greater a-v COHb in asthma suggests CO offloading to tissues, but lower than normal MetHb suggests countermeasures to avoid adverse effects of high NO on gas transfer. PMID:25680415

  18. Asthma and Respiratory Allergic Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases such as allergy is complex and poorly understood. The causes of chronic allergic diseases including asthma involve to a large extent, immunomodulation of the adaptive and particularly the innate immune systems and are markedly influen...

  19. ST. REGIS MOHAWKS - ASTHMA INTERVENTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This grant is to both support the St. Regis Mohawk's budding indoor air quality program and to provide resources for the Mohawks to work collaboratively with SUNY School of Public Health (see "Allergen Levels in Homes of Native Americans" above). In the study of asthma prevalenc...

  20. Obesity and Asthma: Physiological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Brashier, Bill; Salvi, Sundeep

    2013-01-01

    Obesity induces some pertinent physiological changes which are conducive to either development of asthma or cause of poorly controlled asthma state. Obesity related mechanical stress forces induced by abdominal and thoracic fat generate stiffening of the lungs and diaphragmatic movements to result in reduction of resting lung volumes such as functional residual capacity (FRC). Reduced FRC is primarily an outcome of decreased expiratory reserve volume, which pushes the tidal breathing more towards smaller high resistance airways, and consequentially results in expiratory flow limitation during normal breathing in obesity. Reduced FRC also induces plastic alteration in the small collapsible airways, which may generate smooth muscle contraction resulting in increased small airway resistance, which, however, is not picked up by spirometric lung volumes. There is also a possibility that chronically reduced FRC may generate permanent adaptation in the very small airways; therefore, the airway calibres may not change despite weight reduction. Obesity may also induce bronchodilator reversibility and diurnal lung functional variability. Obesity is also associated with airway hyperresponsiveness; however, the mechanism of this is not clear. Thus, obesity has effects on lung function that can generate respiratory distress similar to asthma and may also exaggerate the effects of preexisting asthma. PMID:23970905

  1. Leukotriene activity modulation in asthma.

    PubMed

    Spector, S L

    1997-09-01

    Leukotrienes constitute a class of inflammatory mediators synthesised from arachidonic acid, a product of cell membrane metabolism. Synthesis occurs in the 5-lipoxygenase enzyme pathway, which produces several species of leukotrienes, each with characteristic biological activities. With regard to asthma, the leukotrienes are particularly important because of their ability to directly and potently mediate bronchoconstriction; in addition, they specifically stimulate the secretion of mucus into the airways and the extravasation of fluids and proteins into the airway tissues, both of which contribute to airway obstruction. A number of antileukotriene agents have been developed with the goal of modulating the inflammatory process in various disease states. These agents fall into 2 general classes: leukotriene receptor antagonists and leukotriene synthesis inhibitors. Results of antileukotriene agents in preclinical and clinical trials indicate that antileukotriene agents attenuate the response to challenges with inhaled leukotrienes, cold air, exercise, aspirin and allergen; in addition, they have shown efficacy in clinical asthma and have not been associated with serious adverse effects. Although results to date indicate that these medications are well tolerated and effective in the treatment of asthma, the recent approval by the FDA of 2 antileukotriene agents will give physicians further insight into how patients with asthma respond to them. PMID:9279501

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL RISK FACTORS FOR ASTHMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The incidence of asthma has doubled in the last 20 years with the largest increase among children below the age of 15 years (CDC, 1998). This increase cannot be explained by changes in diagnostic categorization or by alterations in the gene pool, and suggests a strong associatio...

  3. A patient's view of asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, J M

    1995-01-01

    A medical consultation is seen as a meeting between cultures which have developed from different standpoints. These cultures are described, as are the ways in which they may contribute to, or impede a full understanding between the doctor and the patient with asthma, or concerned parent. PMID:8537950

  4. Volatilisation and oxidation of aluminium scraps fed into incineration furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Biganzoli, Laura; Gorla, Leopoldo; Nessi, Simone; Grosso, Mario

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminium packaging partitioning in MSW incineration residues is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amount of aluminium packaging recoverable from the bottom ashes is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminium packaging oxidation rate in the residues of MSW incineration is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 80% of aluminium cans, 51% of trays and 27% of foils can be recovered from bottom ashes. - Abstract: Ferrous and non-ferrous metal scraps are increasingly recovered from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash and used in the production of secondary steel and aluminium. However, during the incineration process, metal scraps contained in the waste undergo volatilisation and oxidation processes, which determine a loss of their recoverable mass. The present paper evaluates the behaviour of different types of aluminium packaging materials in a full-scale waste to energy plant during standard operation. Their partitioning and oxidation level in the residues of the incineration process are evaluated, together with the amount of potentially recoverable aluminium. About 80% of post-consumer cans, 51% of trays and 27% of foils can be recovered through an advanced treatment of bottom ash combined with a melting process in the saline furnace for the production of secondary aluminium. The residual amount of aluminium concentrates in the fly ash or in the fine fraction of the bottom ash and its recovery is virtually impossible using the current eddy current separation technology. The average oxidation levels of the aluminium in the residues of the incineration process is equal to 9.2% for cans, 17.4% for trays and 58.8% for foils. The differences between the tested packaging materials are related to their thickness, mechanical strength and to the alloy.

  5. Asthma and Adolescents: Review of Strategies to Improve Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy-Harstad, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    One of every 10 adolescents in the United States has asthma. Adolescents who lack asthma control are at increased risk for severe asthma episodes and death. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 2007 asthma guidelines and research studies indicated that school nurses are instrumental in assisting adolescents to monitor their asthma, learn…

  6. Evaluation of an Educational Program for Adolescents with Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Jill; Tichacek, Mary J.; Theodorakis, Renee

    2004-01-01

    In addition to challenges of adolescence itself, teens with asthma face demands of asthma management and risks of asthma sequelae, including fatalities. Few asthma educational programs specifically address their needs. In response to school nurse concern, this pilot study evaluated an adolescent asthma education program, the "Power Breathing[TM]…

  7. Exercise and asthma: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Giacco, Stefano R. Del; Firinu, Davide; Bjermer, Leif; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon

    2015-01-01

    The terms ‘exercise-induced asthma’ (EIA) and ‘exercise-induced bronchoconstriction’ (EIB) are often used interchangeably to describe symptoms of asthma such as cough, wheeze, or dyspnoea provoked by vigorous physical activity. In this review, we refer to EIB as the bronchoconstrictive response and to EIA when bronchoconstriction is associated with asthma symptoms. EIB is a common occurrence for most of the asthmatic patients, but it also affects more than 10% of otherwise healthy individuals as shown by epidemiological studies. EIA and EIB have a high prevalence also in elite athletes, especially within endurance type of sports, and an athlete's asthma phenotype has been described. However, the occurrence in elite athletes shows that EIA/EIB, if correctly managed, may not impair physical activity and top sports performance. The pathogenic mechanisms of EIA/EIB classically involve both osmolar and vascular changes in the airways in addition to cooling of the airways with parasympathetic stimulation. Airways inflammation plays a fundamental role in EIA/EIB. Diagnosis and pharmacological management must be carefully performed, with particular consideration of current anti-doping regulations, when caring for athletes. Based on the demonstration that the inhaled asthma drugs do not improve performance in healthy athletes, the doping regulations are presently much less strict than previously. Some sports are at a higher asthma risk than others, probably due to a high environmental exposure while performing the sport, with swimming and chlorine exposure during swimming as one example. It is considered very important for the asthmatic child and adolescent to master EIA/EIB to be able to participate in physical activity on an equal level with their peers, and a precise early diagnosis with optimal treatment follow-up is vital in this aspect. In addition, surprising recent preliminary evidences offer new perspectives for moderate exercise as a potential therapeutic

  8. Epidemiology of asthma in India.

    PubMed

    Paramesh, H

    2002-04-01

    Allergic respiratory disorders, in particular asthma are increasing in prevalence, which is a global phenomenon. Even though genetic predisposition is one of the factors in children for the increased prevalence - urbanisation, air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke contribute more significantly. Our hospital based study on 20,000 children under the age of 18 years from 1979,1984,1989,1994 and 1999 in the city of Bangalore showed a prevalence of 9%,10.5%,18.5%, 24.5% and 29.5% respectively. The increased prevalence correlated well with demographic changes of the city. Further to the hospital study, a school survey in 12 schools on 6550 children in the age group of 6 to 15 years was undertaken for prevalence of asthma and children were categorized into three groups depending upon the geographical situation of the school in relation to vehicular traffic and the socioeconomic group of children. Group I-Children from schools of heavy traffic area showed prevalence of 19.34%, Group II-Children from heavy traffic region and low socioeconomic population had 31.14% and Group III-Children from low traffic area school had 11.15% respectively. (P: I & II; II & III <0.001). A continuation of study in rural areas showed 5.7% in children of 6-15 years. The persistent asthma also showed an increase from 20% to 27.5% and persistent severe asthma 4% to 6.5% between 1994-99. Various epidemiological spectra of asthma in children are discussed here. PMID:12019551

  9. Hearing conservation in the primary aluminium industry

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, N.; Dixon-Ernst, C.; Chesson, B. J.; Cullen, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Noise-induced hearing loss has been an intractable problem for heavy industry. Aims To report our experience in reducing the incidence of age-corrected confirmed 10 dB hearing shifts (averaged over 2, 3 and 4kHz) in employees in the primary aluminium industry in Australia over the period 2006–13. Methods We analysed annual audiometric data to determine the number of permanent hearing shifts that occurred in employees in two bauxite mines, three alumina refineries and two aluminium smelters. Annual hearing shift rates were calculated based on the number of employees tested per year. Hearing conservation initiatives undertaken during the study period are described. An assessment of similar exposure group noise exposures was also undertaken to determine the magnitude of noise exposure reduction during the study period. Results Across all operations, hearing shift rates declined from 5.5% per year in 2006 to 1.3% per year in 2013 (P < 0.001). The decline in shift rates was greater in mines and refineries, where baseline shift rates were higher, than in smelter workers. Modest reductions in noise exposure occurred during the study period. Conclusions We observed a substantial decline in hearing shift rates during the study period. We describe the hearing conservation initiatives that were collectively associated with this decline. We suspect these initiatives could be deployed relatively easily and at modest cost in other industries with noise-exposed employees. PMID:26470945

  10. Accidents in the aluminium smelting industry.

    PubMed

    Das, B C; Chaudhury, S

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of the accident records of an aluminium smelting industry, covering about 2,100 employees, over a period of three years, showed a total of 465 accidents of male employees. Out of these, 5 were fatal, 40.86% were from contacts with extreme temperatures, causing burn injury to 42.58%. Hot materials were the agents causing 44.52% of the burn injuries. Molten aluminium constituted 43.96% amongst hot materials. Injury to lower limbs constituted 38.71% and that to upper limbs 36.99%. The accidents occurring to the employees, in the age group of 26-33 years, amounted to 61.72% of the total accidents. The average number of man-days lost per year was 11,153. Average frequency rate of accidents was 30.75 accidents per million man-hours worked. Severity rate of accidents was 2.196 per million man-hours worked. Incident rate per thousand employees was 73.81. Average number of days lost per accidents was 71.95 days and average duration of man-hours between accidents was 32,516. Mean age of the employees, who met with the accidents were 29.53 years. Share of accidents in the second half of each shift was always more than that in the first half, and this average was 66.66%. PMID:8557540

  11. Precipitate strengthening of nanostructured aluminium alloy.

    PubMed

    Wawer, Kinga; Lewandowska, Malgorzata; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof J

    2012-11-01

    Grain boundaries and precipitates are the major microstructural features influencing the mechanical properties of metals and alloys. Refinement of the grain size to the nanometre scale brings about a significant increase in the mechanical strength of the materials because of the increased number of grain boundaries which act as obstacles to sliding dislocations. A similar effect is obtained if nanoscale precipitates are uniformly distributed in coarse grained matrix. The development of nanograin sized alloys raises the important question of whether or not these two mechanisms are "additive" and precipitate strengthening is effective in nanostructured materials. In the reported work, hydrostatic extrusion (HE) was used to obtain nanostructured 7475 aluminium alloy. Nanosized precipitates were obtained by post-HE annealing. It was found that such annealing at the low temperatures (100 degrees C) results in a significant increase in the microhardness (HV0.2) and strength of the nanostructured 7475 aluminium alloy. These results are discussed in terms of the interplay between the precipitation and deformation of nanocrystalline metals. PMID:23421286

  12. Study on aluminium-based single films.

    PubMed

    Vinod Kumar, G S; García-Moreno, F; Babcsán, N; Brothers, A H; Murty, B S; Banhart, J

    2007-12-28

    In the present paper the authors studied isolated metallic films made from the same material used for making metallic foams, and then characterised their properties. Metal films were made from a liquid aluminium alloy reinforced with ceramic particles of known concentration. Melts without such particles were also investigated. It is shown that stable films could not be made from Al-Si alloy having no particles, and just extremely thin and fragile films could be made from commercially-pure Al. In contrast, aluminium alloys containing particles such as SiC and TiB(2) allowed pulling thin, stable films, which did not rupture. Significant thinning of films was observed when the particle concentration in the melt decreased. By in situ X-ray monitoring of liquid films during pulling, film thickness and drainage effects within the liquid film could be studied. The morphology and microstructure of films was characterised after solidification. Our work shows that the question of how foams are stabilised can be studied using a simplified system such as a film, instead of having to deal with the multitude of different structural elements present in a foam. PMID:18060172

  13. Inhalation of honey reduces airway inflammation and histopathological changes in a rabbit model of ovalbumin-induced chronic asthma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Honey is widely used in folk medicine to treat cough, fever, and inflammation. In this study, the effect of aerosolised honey on airway tissues in a rabbit model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma was investigated. The ability of honey to act either as a rescuing agent in alleviating asthma-related symptoms or as a preventive agent to preclude the occurrence of asthma was also assessed. Methods Forty New Zealand white rabbits were sensitized twice with mixture of OVA and aluminium hydroxide on days 1 and 14. Honey treatments were given from day 23 to day 25 at two different doses (25% (v/v) and 50% (v/v) of honey diluted in sterile phosphate buffer saline. In the aerosolised honey as a rescue agent group, animals were euthanized on day 28; for the preventive group, animals were further exposed to aerosolised OVA for 3 days starting from day 28 and euthanized on day 31. The effects of honey on inflammatory cell response, airway inflammation, and goblet cell hyperplasia were assessed for each animal. Results Histopathological analyses revealed that aerosolised honey resulted in structural changes of the epithelium, mucosa, and submucosal regions of the airway that caused by the induction with OVA. Treatment with aerosolised honey has reduced the number of airway inflammatory cells present in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and inhibited the goblet cell hyperplasia. Conclusion In this study, aerosolised honey was used to effectively treat and manage asthma in rabbits, and it could prove to be a promising treatment for asthma in humans. Future studies with a larger sample size and studies at the gene expression level are needed to better understand the mechanisms by which aerosolised honey reduces asthma symptoms. PMID:24886260

  14. Racial Differences in Biologic Predictors of Severe Asthma: Data from the Severe Asthma Research Program

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Christy; Talbott, Evelyn; Youk, Ada; Holguin, Fernando; Pitt, Bruce; Silveira, Lori; Bleecker, Eugene; Busse, William; Calhoun, William; Castro, Mario; Chung, Kian Fan; Erzurum, Serpil; Israel, Elliot; Wenzel, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Background Biologic factors are known to contribute to asthma severity. It is unknown whether these factors differentially contribute to asthma severity in Blacks compared to Whites. Objective We sought to assess the extent to which racial disparities in severe asthma between Blacks and Whites are attributable to physiologic, immunoinflammatory, and sociodemographic variables. Methods Black and White asthmatic adults enrolled in a cross-sectional study focused on severe asthma were evaluated. Severe asthma was identified using the American Thoracic Society definition. Following initial univariable analyses, unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the probability of having severe asthma for Blacks and Whites. Results Differences in severe asthma in Blacks compared to Whites were observed. In univariable analysis, IgE was not associated with severe asthma in Blacks or Whites, while in multivariable analysis IgE was significantly associated with severe asthma for Blacks (p=0.014) but not in Whites. The odds of having severe asthma more than doubled for Blacks with 2 or more family members with asthma (p=0.026), while the odds of severe asthma for White participants with a strong family history of asthma decreased by almost half (p=0.05). Atopy was negatively associated with severe asthma in both races in univariable analysis, but remained significant only in Blacks, while co-morbidities were associated with severe asthma in Whites. Conclusion Biologic factors were distinctly associated with severe asthma only in Blacks. Studies which incorporate comprehensive evaluation of biologic factors associated with asthma may lead to the development of therapies which target biologic abnormalities in Blacks. PMID:21051082

  15. Urinary Bromotyrosine Measures Asthma Control and Predicts Asthma Exacerbations in Children

    PubMed Central

    Wedes, Samuel H.; Wu, Weijia; Comhair, Suzy A. A.; McDowell, Karen M.; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the usefulness of urinary bromotyrosine, a noninvasive marker of eosinophil-catalyzed protein oxidation, in tracking with indexes of asthma control and in predicting future asthma exacerbations in children. Study design Children with asthma were recruited consecutively at the time of clinic visit. Urine was obtained, along with spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide, and Asthma Control Questionnaire data. Follow-up phone calls were made 6 weeks after enrollment. Results Fifty-seven participants were enrolled. Urinary bromotyrosine levels tracked significantly with indexes of asthma control as assessed by Asthma Control Questionnaire scores at baseline (R = 0.38, P = .004) and follow-up (R = 0.39, P = .008). Participants with high baseline levels of bromotyrosine were 18.1-fold (95% CI 2.1–153.1, P = .0004) more likely to have inadequately controlled asthma and 4.0-fold more likely (95% CI 1.1–14.7, P = .03) to have an asthma exacerbation (unexpected emergency department visit; doctor’s appointment or phone call; oral or parenteral corticosteroid burst; acute asthma-related respiratory symptoms) over the ensuing 6 weeks. Exhaled nitric oxide levels did not track with Asthma Control Questionnaire data; and immunoglobulin E, eosinophil count, spirometry, and exhaled nitric oxide levels failed to predict asthma exacerbations. Conclusions Urinary bromotyrosine tracks with asthma control and predicts the risk of future asthma exacerbations in children. PMID:21392781

  16. Establishing school-centered asthma programs.

    PubMed

    Cicutto, Lisa; Gleason, Melanie; Szefler, Stanley J

    2014-12-01

    Asthma is a common chronic childhood disease associated with significant morbidity and high rates of school absenteeism, along with excessive costs for the patient and society. Asthma is a leading cause of school absenteeism, but this absenteeism is not equally distributed among those with asthma. Second to their home, school-aged children spend the largest portion of their wakeful hours at school. Opportunities exist to partner with schools to reach most children with asthma and those at the highest risk for asthma burden and in need of assistance. Asthma management at schools is important for pediatric pulmonologists and allergists, primary care providers, and the whole interdisciplinary team working alongside them to provide quality asthma care. The variability of asthma care services and programs provided in schools should prompt clinicians to understand their own school system and to advocate for appropriate services. Models of asthma care that place schools at the center or core of the model and coordinate evidence-based asthma care are applicable nationwide and might serve as a model for managing other chronic illnesses. PMID:25482867

  17. Recent developments regarding periostin in bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Izuhara, Kenji; Matsumoto, Hisako; Ohta, Shoichiro; Ono, Junya; Arima, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    Although it is currently recognized that bronchial asthma is not a single disease but a syndrome, we have not yet made use of our new understanding of this heterogeneity as we treat asthma patients. To increase the efficacy of anti-asthma drugs and to decrease costs, it is important to stratify asthma patients into subgroups and to develop therapeutic strategies for each subgroup. Periostin has recently emerged as a biomarker for bronchial asthma, unique in that it is useful not in diagnosis but in categorizing asthma patients. We first found that periostin is a novel component of subepithelial fibrosis in bronchial asthma downstream of IL-13 signals. Thereafter, it was shown that periostin can be a surrogate biomarker of type 2 immune responses, the basis of the notion that a detection system of serum periostin is potentially a companion diagnostic for type 2 antagonists. Furthermore, we have recently shown that serum periostin can predict resistance or hyporesponsiveness to inhaled corticosteroids, based on its contribution to tissue remodeling or fibrosis in bronchial asthma. Thus, serum periostin has two characteristics as a biomarker for bronchial asthma: it is both a surrogate biomarker of type 2 immune responses and a biomarker reflecting tissue remodeling or fibrosis. We can take advantage of these characteristics to develop stratified medicine in bronchial asthma. PMID:26344077

  18. Asthma in Hispanics. An 8-year update.

    PubMed

    Rosser, Franziska J; Forno, Erick; Cooper, Philip J; Celedón, Juan C

    2014-06-01

    This review provides an update on asthma in Hispanics, a diverse group tracing their ancestry to countries previously under Spanish rule. A marked variability in the prevalence and morbidity from asthma remains among Hispanic subgroups in the United States and Hispanic America. In the United States, Puerto Ricans and Mexican Americans have high and low burdens of asthma, respectively (the "Hispanic Paradox"). This wide divergence in asthma morbidity among Hispanic subgroups is multifactorial, likely reflecting the effects of known (secondhand tobacco smoke, air pollution, psychosocial stress, obesity, inadequate treatment) and potential (genetic variants, urbanization, vitamin D insufficiency, and eradication of parasitic infections) risk factors. Barriers to adequate asthma management in Hispanics include economic and educational disadvantages, lack of health insurance, and no access to or poor adherence with controller medications such as inhaled corticosteroids. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of asthma in Hispanic subgroups, many questions remain. Studies of asthma in Hispanic America should focus on environmental or lifestyle factors that are more relevant to asthma in this region (e.g., urbanization, air pollution, parasitism, and stress). In the United States, research studies should focus on risk factors that are known to or may diverge among Hispanic subgroups, including but not limited to epigenetic variation, prematurity, vitamin D level, diet, and stress. Clinical trials of culturally appropriate interventions that address multiple aspects of asthma management in Hispanic subgroups should be prioritized for funding. Ensuring high-quality healthcare for all remains a pillar of eliminating asthma disparities. PMID:24881937

  19. Asthma in Hispanics. An 8-Year Update

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, Franziska J.; Forno, Erick; Cooper, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    This review provides an update on asthma in Hispanics, a diverse group tracing their ancestry to countries previously under Spanish rule. A marked variability in the prevalence and morbidity from asthma remains among Hispanic subgroups in the United States and Hispanic America. In the United States, Puerto Ricans and Mexican Americans have high and low burdens of asthma, respectively (the “Hispanic Paradox”). This wide divergence in asthma morbidity among Hispanic subgroups is multifactorial, likely reflecting the effects of known (secondhand tobacco smoke, air pollution, psychosocial stress, obesity, inadequate treatment) and potential (genetic variants, urbanization, vitamin D insufficiency, and eradication of parasitic infections) risk factors. Barriers to adequate asthma management in Hispanics include economic and educational disadvantages, lack of health insurance, and no access to or poor adherence with controller medications such as inhaled corticosteroids. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of asthma in Hispanic subgroups, many questions remain. Studies of asthma in Hispanic America should focus on environmental or lifestyle factors that are more relevant to asthma in this region (e.g., urbanization, air pollution, parasitism, and stress). In the United States, research studies should focus on risk factors that are known to or may diverge among Hispanic subgroups, including but not limited to epigenetic variation, prematurity, vitamin D level, diet, and stress. Clinical trials of culturally appropriate interventions that address multiple aspects of asthma management in Hispanic subgroups should be prioritized for funding. Ensuring high-quality healthcare for all remains a pillar of eliminating asthma disparities. PMID:24881937

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction in metabolic syndrome and asthma.

    PubMed

    Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ghosh, Balaram

    2013-01-01

    Though severe or refractory asthma merely affects less than 10% of asthma population, it consumes significant health resources and contributes significant morbidity and mortality. Severe asthma does not fell in the routine definition of asthma and requires alternative treatment strategies. It has been observed that asthma severity increases with higher body mass index. The obese-asthmatics, in general, have the features of metabolic syndrome and are progressively causing a significant burden for both developed and developing countries thanks to the westernization of the world. As most of the features of metabolic syndrome seem to be originated from central obesity, the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome could help us to understand the pathobiology of obese-asthma condition. While mitochondrial dysfunction is the common factor for most of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, the involvement of mitochondria in obese-asthma pathogenesis seems to be important as mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been shown to be involved in airway epithelial injury and asthma pathogenesis. This review discusses current understanding of the overlapping features between metabolic syndrome and asthma in relation to mitochondrial structural and functional alterations with an aim to uncover mechanisms for obese-asthma. PMID:23840225

  1. Puerto Rican families' experiences of asthma and use of the emergency department for asthma care.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Jean; Cloutier, Michelle; Meadows-Oliver, Mikki; Terrazos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Puerto Ricans have been found to have higher asthma prevalence rates than non-Hispanic whites, blacks, and all other Hispanic subgroups. They also have the highest rates of emergency department (ED) use for the management of their asthma. Using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach, the aim of this study was to describe the lived experience of Puerto Rican families caring for their child's asthma and using the ED for asthma care. Six themes were generated from in-depth interviews with 10 Puerto-Rican caregivers: (1) The Folklore of Asthma, (2) Culture and the Medicine Woman, (3) In Awe of Asthma, (4) Praying to God, (5) The Decision-Time to Go, and (6) The ED Environment. The findings emphasize the necessity of establishing and maintaining a therapeutic partnership between primary care providers and families of children with asthma. The results may be used as a foundation for understanding motivations for seeking asthma care in the ED. PMID:22920777

  2. Asthma and Schools | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breathing Easier Asthma and Schools Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of ... of America 800–727–8462 www.aafa.org Asthma and Physical Activity Exercise-induced asthma is triggered ...

  3. Many Parents Ill-Informed about Kids' Asthma Meds

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159117.html Many Parents Ill-Informed About Kids' Asthma Meds Only half surveyed knew what drugs were ... News) -- Only half of parents of children with asthma fully understand the use of their youngsters' asthma ...

  4. The varied functions of aluminium-activated malate transporters-much more than aluminium resistance.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Antony J; Baker, Alison; Muench, Stephen P

    2016-06-15

    The ALMT (aluminium-activated malate transporter) family comprises a functionally diverse but structurally similar group of ion channels. They are found ubiquitously in plant species, expressed throughout different tissues, and located in either the plasma membrane or tonoplast. The first family member identified was TaALMT1, discovered in wheat root tips, which was found to be involved in aluminium resistance by means of malate exudation into the soil. However, since this discovery other family members have been shown to have many other functions such as roles in stomatal opening, general anionic homoeostasis, and in economically valuable traits such as fruit flavour. Recent evidence has also shown that ALMT proteins can act as key molecular actors in GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) signalling, the first evidence that GABA can act as a signal transducer in plants. PMID:27284052

  5. Indicators of asthma control among students in a rural, school-based asthma management program

    PubMed Central

    Rasberry, Catherine N.; Cheung, Karen; Buckley, Rebekah; Dunville, Richard; Daniels, Brandy; Cook, Deborah; Robin, Leah; Dean, Blair

    2015-01-01

    Objective The evaluation sought to determine if a comprehensive, school-based asthma management program in a small, rural school district helped students improve asthma control. Methods To determine if students in the asthma program demonstrated better asthma control than students in a comparison school district, the evaluation team used a quasi-experimental, cross-sectional design and administered questionnaires assessing asthma control (which included FEV1 measurement) to 456 students with asthma in the intervention and comparison districts. Data were analyzed for differences in asthma control between students in the two districts. To determine if students in the intervention experienced increased asthma control between baseline and follow-up, the evaluation team used a one-group retrospective design. Program records for 323 students were analyzed for differences in percent of predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) between baseline and follow-up. Results Students with asthma in the intervention district exhibited significantly better asthma control than students with asthma in the comparison district. Percent of predicted FEV1 did not change significantly between baseline and follow-up for the intervention participants; however, post hoc analyses revealed students with poorly-controlled asthma at baseline had significantly higher FEV1 scores at follow-up, and students with well-controlled asthma at baseline had significantly lower FEV1 scores at follow-up. Conclusions Findings suggest the comprehensive school-based program led to improvements in asthma control for students with poorly controlled asthma at baseline, and school-based programs need mechanisms for tracking students with initially well-controlled asthma in order to ensure they maintain control. PMID:24730771

  6. Occupational asthma in a national disability survey

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, P.

    1987-10-01

    The contribution of workplace exposures to the prevalence of asthma in adults has been minimized in the epidemiology of this illness. Analysis of the 1978 Social Security Disability Survey provides a population-based assessment as a novel approach utilizing self-attributed, occupationally related asthma as a measure of disease. Of 6063 respondents, 468 (7.7 percent) identified asthma as a personal medical condition; 72 (1.2 percent (15.4 percent of all those with asthma)) attributed it to workplace exposures. These subjects were older and included more men and cigarette smokers than groups of both asthmatic and nonasthmatic subjects. The relative risk for occupationally attributed asthma was elevated among industrial and agricultural workers as compared with white collar and service occupations. Analysis of disability benefit status did not indicate that this introduced major reporting bias in this survey. This study suggests that occupational factors may have a greater role in adult asthma than previously thought.

  7. Asthma symptoms do not predict spirometry

    PubMed Central

    Cowie, Robert L; Underwood, Margot F; Field, Stephen K

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Asthma is a disease characterized by variable airflow obstruction, but the measurement of airflow is often omitted in the process of diagnosis and management of the disease. OBJECTIVES: Features of asthma severity and control were examined to determine the extent to which objective measurements, including forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity, correlated with other manifestations of the disease. METHODS: Subjects were a consecutive sample of patients with asthma attending a university-based asthma clinic. All subjects underwent routine assessment using a standard questionnaire and spirometry. RESULTS: A total of 500 subjects were included in the present study, and their assessment showed that neither symptoms nor history could predict or be predicted by their measurements of lung function. CONCLUSION: Routine measurement of lung function should be performed on subjects with asthma if normal or near-normal lung function is a desired component of asthma control. PMID:17885693

  8. Psychological considerations of the child with asthma.

    PubMed

    Peters, Todd E; Fritz, Gregory K

    2010-04-01

    Asthma, the most common chronic disease in children and adolescents in industrialized countries, is typified by airway inflammation and obstruction leading to wheezing, dyspnea, and cough. However, the effect of asthma does not end with pulmonary changes. Research has shown a direct link between asthma and stress and psychiatric illness, which if untreated results in heightened morbidity and effects on society. The link between asthma and psychiatric illness, however, is often underappreciated by many pediatric and child mental health professionals. This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of asthma as well as the correlation between asthma and psychiatric illness in children in an effort to improve management and treatment strategies for this prevalent disease. PMID:20478502

  9. Outpatient Management of Asthma in Children

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, André; Martin, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    The principal aims of asthma management in childhood are to obtain symptom control that allows individuals to engage in unrestricted physical activities and to normalize lung function. These aims should be achieved using the fewest possible medications. Ensuring a correct diagnosis is the first priority. The mainstay of asthma management remains pharmacotherapy. Various treatment options are discussed. Asthma monitoring includes the regular assessment of asthma severity and asthma control, which then informs decisions regarding the stepping up or stepping down of therapy. Delivery systems and devices for inhaled therapy are discussed, as are the factors influencing adherence to prescribed treatment. The role of the pediatric health care provider is to establish a functional partnership with the child and their family in order to minimize the impact of asthma symptoms and exacerbations during childhood. PMID:23641174

  10. Sleep Disorders in Patients with Bronchial Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna; Lovre, Vladimir; Dragisic, Dejan

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory disturbances during sleep are recognized as extremely common disorders with important clinical consequences. Breathing disorders during sleep can result in broad range of clinical manifestations, the most prevalent of which are unrefreshing sleep, daytime sleepiness and fatigue, and cognitive impairmant. There is also evidence that respiratory-related sleep disturbances can contribute to several common cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, including systemic hypertension, cardiac dysfunction, and insulin-resistance. Correlations are found between asthma-related symptoms and sleep disturbances. Difficulties inducing sleep, sleep fragmentation on polysomnography, early morning awakenings and daytime sleepiness are more common in asthmatics compared with subjects without asthma. The “morning deep” in asthma is relevant for the characterization of asthma severity, and impact drugs’ choices. Sleep and night control of asthma could be relevant to evaluate disease’s control. Appropriate asthma control recovering is guarantor for better sleep quality in these patients and less clinical consequences of respiratory disturbances during sleep. PMID:23678304

  11. A quest for super dense aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiquet, G.; Narayana, C.; Bellin, C.; Shukla, A.; Esteve, I.; Mezouar, N.

    2013-12-01

    The extreme pressure phase diagram of materials is important not only for understanding the interiors of planets or stars, but also for the fundamental understanding of the relation between crystal structure and electronic structure. Structural transitions induced by extreme pressure are governed by the deformation of valence electron charge density which bears the brunt of increasing compression while the relative volume occupied by the nearly incompressible ionic core electrons increases. At extreme pressures common materials are expected to transform into new dense phases with extremely compact atomic arrangements that may also have unusual physical properties. In this report, we present new experiments carried out on aluminium. A simple system like Al is not only important as a benchmark for theory, but can also be used as a standard for pressures in the TPa range and beyond which are targeted at new dynamic compression facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the US or Laser Mégajoule (LMJ) in Bordeaux in France. For aluminium, first principle calculations have consistently predicted a phase transition sequence from fcc to hcp and hcp to bcc in a pressure range below 0.5 TPa [Tambe et al., Phys. Rev. B 77, 172102, 2008]. The hcp phase was identified at 217 GPa in a recent experiment [Akahama et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 45505, 2006] but the detection of the predicted bcc phase has been hampered by the difficulty of routine static high pressure experiments beyond 350 GPa. Here, we report on the overcoming of this obstacle and the detection of all the structural phase transitions predicted in Al by achieving a pressure in excess of 500 GPa in the static regime in a diamond-anvil cell. In particular, using X-ray diffraction at the high-pressure beamline ID27 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), we find a bcc super-dense phase of aluminium at a pressure of 380 GPa. In this report

  12. Aluminium and iron air pollution near an iron casting and aluminium foundry in Turin district (Italy).

    PubMed

    Polizzi, Salvatore; Ferrara, Mauro; Bugiani, Massimiliano; Barbero, Domenico; Baccolo, Tiziana

    2007-09-01

    This work reports the results of an environmental survey carried out in an industrial area in the Province of Turin: its main aim is to assess the levels of iron and aluminium in the outside air during the period from July to September to assess the influence of industrial activity (a cast-iron and aluminium foundry) which is interrupted during the month of August, on the level of metals present in the air. Conducting the analysis during this period of time made it possible to avoid the confounding effect of pollution due to domestic central heating. The measurements were taken from nine areas at different distances from the foundry in the area and according to the direction of the prevailing winds, as deduced from the historical data. The results of this survey show a statistically significant difference in iron and aluminium levels in the outside air in the geographic areas between the two main periods examined: during August (no foundry activity) v/s July-September (foundry activity). The values recorded are: Aluminium 0.4+/-0.45 microg/m(3) v/s 1.12+/-1.29 microg/m(3) (p<0.0001); Iron 0.95+/-0.56 microg/m(3) v/s 1.6+/-1.0 microg/m(3) (p<0.0001). There were no statistically significant differences between the nine sampling points from the point of view of the sampling sites, climate conditions and wind directions. We found no correlation with car traffic, in terms of the number of vehicles, and metals. The values of iron tended to be higher in the areas farther away from the foundry site in the areas located along the path of the prevailing winds. PMID:17637476

  13. Living with Asthma: Part 2, Manual for Teaching Children the Self-Management of Asthma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Lung Diseases.

    The Living with Asthma Program is designed to teach asthma self-management skills to children (ages 8-12) with asthma and to give their parents the knowledge and behavior modification skills to help their children take over responsibility for managing the condition. Both groups receive training in problem solving and in ways to improve family…

  14. Living with Asthma: Part I, Manual for Teaching Parents the Self-Management of Childhood Asthma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Lung Diseases.

    The Living with Asthma Program is designed to teach asthma self-management skills to children (ages 8-12) with asthma and to give their parents the knowledge and behavior modification skills to help their children take over responsibility for managing the condition. Both groups receive training in problem solving and in ways to improve family…

  15. Challenges of Asthma Management for School Nurses in Districts with High Asthma Hospitalization Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberatos, Penny; Leone, Jennifer; Craig, Ann Marie; Frei, Elizabeth Mary; Fuentes, Natalie; Harris, India Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background: School nurses play a central role in assisting elementary school children in managing their asthma, especially those in higher-risk school districts that are at increased risk of uncontrolled asthma. Study purposes are to (1) identify barriers to asthma management by school nurses in higher-risk school districts; and (2) assess the…

  16. Roles of the State Asthma Program in Implementing Multicomponent, School-Based Asthma Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, Laura L.; Wilce, Maureen A.; Gill, Sarah A.; Disler, Sheri L.; Collins, Pamela; Crawford, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Background: Asthma is a leading chronic childhood disease in the United States and a major contributor to school absenteeism. Evidence suggests that multicomponent, school-based asthma interventions are a strategic way to address asthma among school-aged children. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourages the 36 health…

  17. Asthma Risk Profiles of Children Participating in an Asthma Education and Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Candice; Rapp, Kristi Isaac; Jack, Leonard, Jr.; Hayes, Sandra; Post, Robert; Malveaux, Floyd

    2015-01-01

    Background: Focused risk assessment is essential in the effective management of asthma. Purpose: This study identified and examined correlations among areas of pediatric asthma risk and determined associations between these risks and demographic characteristics. Methods: This exploratory study identified risk factors that affect asthma management…

  18. My Child Is Diagnosed with Asthma, Now What?: Motivating Parents to Help Their Children Control Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepney, Cesalie; Kane, Katelyn; Bruzzese, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric asthma is often undiagnosed, and therefore untreated. It negatively impacts children's functioning, including school attendance and performance, as well as quality of life. Schoolwide screening for asthma is becoming increasingly common, making identification of possible asthma particularly relevant for school nurses. Nurses may need to…

  19. Is ventilation heterogeneity related to asthma control?

    PubMed

    Svenningsen, Sarah; Nair, Parameswaran; Guo, Fumin; McCormack, David G; Parraga, Grace

    2016-08-01

    In asthma patients, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the lung clearance index (LCI) have revealed persistent ventilation heterogeneity, although its relationship to asthma control is not well understood. Therefore, our goal was to explore the relationship of MRI ventilation defects and the LCI with asthma control and quality of life in patients with severe, poorly controlled asthma.18 patients with severe, poorly controlled asthma (mean±sd 46±12 years, six males/12 females) provided written informed consent to an ethics board approved protocol, and underwent spirometry, LCI and (3)He MRI during a single 2-h visit. Asthma control and quality of life were evaluated using the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) and Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ). Ventilation heterogeneity was quantified using the LCI and (3)He MRI ventilation defect percent (VDP).All participants reported poorly controlled disease (mean±sd ACQ score=2.3±0.9) and highly heterogeneous ventilation (mean±sd VDP=12±11% and LCI=10.5±3.0). While VDP and LCI were strongly correlated (r=0.86, p<0.0001), in a multivariate model that included forced expiratory volume in 1 s, VDP and LCI, VDP was the only independent predictor of asthma control (R(2)=0.38, p=0.01). There was also a significantly worse VDP, but not LCI in asthma patients with an ACQ score >2 (p=0.04) and AQLQ score <5 (p=0.04), and a trend towards worse VDP (p=0.053), but not LCI in asthma patients reporting ≥1 exacerbation in the past 6 months.In patients with poorly controlled, severe asthma MRI ventilation, but not LCI was significantly worse in those with worse ACQ and AQLQ. PMID:27174885

  20. Neutrophils in asthma--a review.

    PubMed

    Ciepiela, Olga; Ostafin, Magdalena; Demkow, Urszula

    2015-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease, with an array of cells involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. The role of neutrophils in the development of bronchial asthma is found to be complex, as they may trigger activation of immunocompetent cells and are a potent source of free oxygen radicals and enzymes participating in airway remodeling. The review highlights the role of neutrophils in bronchial asthma. PMID:25511380

  1. [Epigenetics in allergic diseases and asthma].

    PubMed

    Castro-Rodríguez, José A; Krause, Bernardo J; Uauy, Ricardo; Casanello, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases and asthma are the result of complex interactions between genetic predisposition and environmental factors. Asthma is one of the most prevalent chronic disease among children. In this article we review some environmental factors like: allergen exposition, tobacco, bacteria, microbial components, diet, obesity and stress, which influences during intrauterine and infancy life in the epigenetic regulation of asthma and allergic diseases. The review has been done in three models: in-vitro, animal and human. PMID:27055949

  2. The public health implications of asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Jean; Bousquet, Philippe J.; Godard, Philippe; Daures, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Asthma is a very common chronic disease that occurs in all age groups and is the focus of various clinical and public health interventions. Both morbidity and mortality from asthma are significant. The number of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost due to asthma worldwide is similar to that for diabetes, liver cirrhosis and schizophrenia. Asthma management plans have, however, reduced mortality and severity in countries where they have been applied. Several barriers reduce the availability, affordability, dissemination and efficacy of optimal asthma management plans in both developed and developing countries. The workplace environment contributes significantly to the general burden of asthma. Patients with occupational asthma have higher rates of hospitalization and mortality than healthy workers. The surveillance of asthma as part of a global WHO programme is essential. The economic cost of asthma is considerable both in terms of direct medical costs (such as hospital admissions and the cost of pharmaceuticals) and indirect medical costs (such as time lost from work and premature death). Direct costs are significant in most countries. In order to reduce costs and improve quality of care, employers and health plans are exploring more precisely targeted ways of controlling rapidly rising health costs. Poor control of asthma symptoms is a major issue that can result in adverse clinical and economic outcomes. A model of asthma costs is needed to aid attempts to reduce them while permitting optimal management of the disease. This paper presents a discussion of the burden of asthma and its socioeconomic implications and proposes a model to predict the costs incurred by the disease. PMID:16175830

  3. New combination therapies for asthma.

    PubMed

    Donohue, J F; Ohar, J A

    2001-03-01

    Combination products often have useful clinical benefits in asthma. The scientific rationale for combination therapy includes the fact that different agents have complimentary modes of action. Long-acting beta(2)-agonists have effects on airway smooth muscle, and inhaled corticosteroids have potent topical antiinflammatory effect. This combination has been shown to effectively reduce exacerbations and improve symptoms. Substantial clinical trial data provide a rationale for dual-control therapy supported by basic scientific data. Another combined therapy is inhaled steroids plus leukotriene-receptor antagonists, which provides the patient with two effective therapies. Leukotriene-receptor antagonist can also be combined with antihistamines for improved asthma control. Older therapies including theophylline and controlled release albuterol have been effectively added to inhaled corticosteroids, enabling a reduction in the dose of the inhaled steroids. Many other combination therapies are presently being tested. PMID:11224725

  4. [Physiopathology of aspirin intolerant asthma].

    PubMed

    Carsin, A; Bienvenu, J; Pacheco, Y; Devouassoux, G

    2012-02-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) refers to the development of bronchoconstriction in individuals with asthma following the ingestion of aspirin. AERD affects up to 20 % of adults with asthma. At present, no reliable in vitro test is available to confirm the diagnosis. The confirmation of the diagnosis of AERD therefore depends on the response to challenge testing with aspirin. The pathogenesis of AERD is linked to abnormalities in arachidonic acid metabolism. Prior to exposure to aspirin, respiratory mucosal inflammation is the result of a cell infiltration, an overproduction of leukotrienes, prostaglandins D2, 5-oxo-eicosatetraenoic acid and an underproduction of lipoxins. After aspirin ingestion, patients with AERD synthesize excessive amounts of cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin metabolites involved in bronchoconstriction. New hypotheses concerning AERD pathogenesis have been added to the initial cyclooxygenase theory. These propose that AERD may be linked to the complement system, adenosine metabolism or angiotensin converting enzyme gene and IgE receptor gene polymorphisms. PMID:22405107

  5. [Anesthetic management in bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Kozian, Alf; Schilling, Thomas; Hachenberg, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    In daily practice, acute and chronic pulmonary diseases are common issues presenting to the anesthetist. Respiratory physiology in general is affected by both general and regional anesthesia, which results in an increased number of perioperative complications in pulmonary risk patients. Therefore, anesthetic management of patients with bronchial asthma needs to address different clinical topics: the physical appearance of pulmonary disease, type and extent of surgical intervention as well as effects of therapeutic drugs, anesthetics and mechanical ventilation on respiratory function. The present work describes important precautions in preoperative scheduling of the asthmatic patient. In the operative course, airway manipulation and a number of anesthetics are able to trigger intraoperative bronchial spasm with possibly fatal outcome. It is essential to avoid these substances to prevent asthma attack. If asthmatic status occurs, appropriate procedures according to therapeutic standards have to be applied to the patient. Postoperatively, sufficient pain therapy avoids pulmonary complications and improves outcome. PMID:27359239

  6. Do Newborns Have More Complications When Mom Has Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  7. Inhaler Reminders Significantly Improve Asthma Patients' Use of Controller Medications

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  8. Impact of Food Allergy on Asthma in Children

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  9. Genetics of asthma: a molecular biologist perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amrendra; Ghosh, Balaram

    2009-01-01

    Asthma belongs to the category of classical allergic diseases which generally arise due to IgE mediated hypersensitivity to environmental triggers. Since its prevalence is very high in developed or urbanized societies it is also referred to as "disease of civilizations". Due to its increased prevalence among related individuals, it was understood quite long back that it is a genetic disorder. Well designed epidemiological studies reinforced these views. The advent of modern biological technology saw further refinements in our understanding of genetics of asthma and led to the realization that asthma is not a disorder with simple Mendelian mode of inheritance but a multifactorial disorder of the airways brought about by complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Current asthma research has witnessed evidences that are compelling researchers to redefine asthma altogether. Although no consensus exists among workers regarding its definition, it seems obvious that several pathologies, all affecting the airways, have been clubbed into one common category called asthma. Needless to say, genetic studies have led from the front in bringing about these transformations. Genomics, molecular biology, immunology and other interrelated disciplines have unearthed data that has changed the way we think about asthma now. In this review, we center our discussions on genetic basis of asthma; the molecular mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis. Taking cue from the existing data we would briefly ponder over the future directions that should improve our understanding of asthma pathogenesis. PMID:19419542

  10. Genetics of asthma: a molecular biologist perspective.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amrendra; Ghosh, Balaram

    2009-01-01

    Asthma belongs to the category of classical allergic diseases which generally arise due to IgE mediated hypersensitivity to environmental triggers. Since its prevalence is very high in developed or urbanized societies it is also referred to as "disease of civilizations". Due to its increased prevalence among related individuals, it was understood quite long back that it is a genetic disorder. Well designed epidemiological studies reinforced these views. The advent of modern biological technology saw further refinements in our understanding of genetics of asthma and led to the realization that asthma is not a disorder with simple Mendelian mode of inheritance but a multifactorial disorder of the airways brought about by complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Current asthma research has witnessed evidences that are compelling researchers to redefine asthma altogether. Although no consensus exists among workers regarding its definition, it seems obvious that several pathologies, all affecting the airways, have been clubbed into one common category called asthma. Needless to say, genetic studies have led from the front in bringing about these transformations. Genomics, molecular biology, immunology and other interrelated disciplines have unearthed data that has changed the way we think about asthma now. In this review, we center our discussions on genetic basis of asthma; the molecular mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis. Taking cue from the existing data we would briefly ponder over the future directions that should improve our understanding of asthma pathogenesis. PMID:19419542

  11. Asthma Care in Resource-Poor Settings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Asthma prevalence in low-to middle-income countries is at least the same or higher than in rich countries, but with increased severity. Lack of control in these settings is due to various factors such as low accessibility to effective medications, multiple and uncoordinated weak infrastructures of medical services for the management of chronic diseases such as asthma, poor compliance with prescribed therapy, lack of asthma education, and social and cultural factors. There is an urgent requirement for the implementation of better ways to treat asthma in underserved populations, enhancing the access to preventive medications and educational approaches with modern technological methods. PMID:23282401

  12. Perimenstrual asthma: from pathophysiology to treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Graziottin, Alessandra; Serafini, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma is about 9,7 % in women and 5,5 % in men. Asthma can deteriorate during the perimenstrual period, a phenomenon known as perimenstrual asthma (PMA), which represents a unique, highly symptomatic asthma phenotype. It is distinguished from traditional allergic asthma by aspirin sensitivity, less atopy, and lower lung capacity. PMA incidence is reported to vary between 19 and 40 % of asthmatic women. The presence of PMA has been related to increases in asthma-related emergency department visits, hospitalizations and emergency treatment including intubations. It is hypothesized that hormonal status may influence asthma in women, focusing on the role of sex hormones, and specifically on the impact of estrogens' fluctuations at ovulation and before periods. This paper will focus on the pathophysiology of hormone triggered cycle related inflammatory/allergic events and their relation with asthma. We reviewed the scientific literature on Pubmed database for studies on PMA. Key word were PMA, mastcells, estrogens, inflammation, oral contraception, hormonal replacement therapy (HRT), and hormone free interval (HFI). Special attention will be devoted to the possibility of reducing the perimenstrual worsening of asthma and associated symptoms by reducing estrogens fluctuations, with appropriate hormonal contraception and reduced HFI. This novel therapeutical approach will be finally discussed. PMID:27482380

  13. Is Asthma Related to Choroidal Neovascularization?

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jing; Gong, Peihua; Zheng, Yi; Zhao, Mingwei; Zhou, Peng; Li, Xiaoxin

    2012-01-01

    Background Age-related degeneration(AMD) and asthma are both diseases that are related to the activation of the complement system. The association between AMD and asthma has been debated in previous studies. The authors investigated the relationship between AMD and asthma systemically. Principal Findings The epidemiological study showed that asthma was related to choroidal neovascularization(CNV) subtype(OR = 1.721, P = 0.023). However, the meta-analysis showed there was no association between AMD and asthma. In an animal model, we found more fluoresce in leakage of CNV lesions by FA analysis and more angiogenesis by histological analysis in rats with asthma. Western blot demonstrated an elevated level of C3α-chain, C3α’-chain and VEGF. After compstatin was intravitreally injected, CNV leakage decreased according to FA analysis, with the level of C3 and VEGF protein decreasing at the same time. Significance This study first investigated the relationship between AMD and asthma systematically, and it was found that asthma could be a risk factor for the development of AMD. The study may provide a better understanding of the disease, which may advance the potential for screening asthma patients in clinical practice. PMID:22567103

  14. Dietary Factors and the Development of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Litonjua, Augusto A.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Asthma and allergies continue to be major public health problems in affluent westernized countries. One feature of a westernized lifestyle that may have a role in the development of asthma and allergies is the changes in dietary habits that predated the increase in asthma prevalence. Many studies have investigated the role of specific nutrients in asthma and allergies, and intervention studies with supplementation of particular nutrients have been conducted, but results have been mixed. It is likely that nutrients may exert their strongest effect early in life, when both the immune system and the lungs are not yet fully developed. PMID:18572110

  15. Wilderness and adventure travel with underlying asthma.

    PubMed

    Doan, Daniel; Luks, Andrew M

    2014-06-01

    Given the high prevalence of asthma, it is likely that providers working in a pretravel setting will be asked to provide guidance for asthma patients about how to manage their disease before and during wilderness or adventure travel, while providers working in the field setting may need to address asthma-related issues that arise during such excursions. This review aims to provide information to assist providers facing these issues. Relevant literature was identified through the MEDLINE database using a key word search of the English-language literature from 1980 to 2013 using the term "asthma" cross-referenced with "adventure travel," "trekking," "exercise," "exercise-induced bronchoconstriction," "high-altitude," "scuba," and "diving." We review data on the frequency of worsening asthma control during wilderness or adventure travel and discuss the unique aspects of wilderness travel that may affect asthma patients in the field. We then provide a general approach to evaluation and management of asthma before and during a planned sojourn and address 2 particular situations, activities at high altitude and scuba diving, which pose unique risks to asthma patients and warrant additional attention. Although wilderness and adventure travel should be avoided in individuals with poorly controlled disease or worsening control at the time of a planned trip, individuals with well-controlled asthma who undergo appropriate pretravel assessment and planning can safely engage in a wide range of wilderness and adventure-related activities. PMID:24393703

  16. Corticosteroids in the treatment of acute asthma

    PubMed Central

    Alangari, Abdullah A.

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a prevalent chronic disease of the respiratory system and acute asthma exacerbations are among the most common causes of presentation to the emergency department (ED) and admission to hospital particularly in children. Bronchial airways inflammation is the most prominent pathological feature of asthma. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), through their anti-inflammatory effects have been the mainstay of treatment of asthma for many years. Systemic and ICS are also used in the treatment of acute asthma exacerbations. Several international asthma management guidelines recommend the use of systemic corticosteroids in the management of moderate to severe acute asthma early upon presentation to the ED. On the other hand, ICS use in the management acute asthma has been studied in different contexts with encouraging results in some and negative in others. This review sheds some light on the role of systemic and ICS in the management of acute asthma and discusses the current evidence behind their different ways of application particularly in relation to new developments in the field. PMID:25276236

  17. Melt spun aluminium alloys for moulding optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubbels, G.; Tegelaers, L.; Senden, R.

    2013-09-01

    Melt spinning is a rapid quenching process that makes it possible to create materials with a very fine microstructure. Due to this very fine microstructure the melt spinning process is an enabler for diamond turning optics and moulds without the need of post-polishing. Using diamond turning of melt spun aluminium one can achieve <=2 nm Rq surface roughness. Application areas are imaging and projection optics, mirrors, moulds for contact lenses and spectacles. One of the alloys that RSP produces is RSA-905. This alloy has a solid track record as a better and cheaper concept in the application of moulds for optical components such as contact lenses. The RSA-905 is a dispersion hardened amorphous-like alloy that keeps its properties when exposed to elevated temperatures (up to 380°C). This gives the material unique features for optics moulding applications. RSA-905 moulds are cheaper and better than traditional mould concepts such as copper or brass with or without NiP plating. In addition logistics can be simplified significantly: from typical weeks-months into days-week. Lifetime is typically in the range of 100.000 - 200.000 shots. For high volume production typically ranging from several 100.000 - several 1.000.000 shots, NiP plated steel moulds are typically used. By using an appropriate optical coating concept RSA-905 can be upgraded to a competitive alternative to steel in terms of price, performance and logistics. This paper presents some recent developments for improved mould performance of such concept. Hardness, wear resistance and adhesion are topics of interest and they can be applied by special coatings such as diamond-like carbon (DLC) and chromium nitride (CrN). These coatings make the aluminium alloy suitable for moulding mass production of small as well as larger optics, such as spectacle lenses.

  18. Measurement of asthma control according to global initiative for asthma guidelines: a comparison with the asthma control questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) is a validated tool to measure asthma control. Cut-off points that best discriminate “well-controlled” or “not well-controlled” asthma have been suggested from the analysis of a large randomized clinical trial but they may not be adequate for daily clinical practice. Aims To establish cut-off points of the ACQ that best discriminate the level of control according to Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) 2006 guidelines in patients with asthma managed at Allergology and Pulmonology Departments as well as Primary Care Centers in Spain. Patients and methods An epidemiological descriptive study, with prospective data collection. Asthma control following GINA-2006 classification and 7-item ACQ was assessed. The study population was split in two parts: 2/3 for finding the cut-off points (development population) and 1/3 for validating the results (validation population). Results A total of 1,363 stable asthmatic patients were included (mean age 38 ± 14 years, 60.3% women; 69.1% non-smokers). Patient classification according to GINA-defined asthma control was: controlled 13.6%, partially controlled 34.2%, and uncontrolled 52.3%. The ACQ cut-off points that better agreed with GINA-defined asthma control categories were calculated using receiver operating curves (ROC). The analysis showed that ACQ < 0.5 was the optimal cut-off point for “controlled asthma” (sensitivity 74.1%, specificity 77.5%) and 1.00 for “uncontrolled asthma” (sensitivity 73%, specificity 88.2%). Kappa index between GINA categories and ACQ was 0.62 (p < 0.001). Conclusion The ACQ cut-off points associated with GINA-defined asthma control in a real-life setting were <0.5 for controlled asthma and ≥1 for uncontrolled asthma. PMID:22726416

  19. [Eosinophilic oesophagitis in bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Mikhaleva, L M; Barkhina, T G; Golovanova, V E; Shchegoleva, N N; Gracheva, N A

    2012-01-01

    Combination of bronchial asthma and gastrointestinal pathology is frequently encountered in clinical practice. Clinical symptoms of this condition are highly diversified and gastrointestinal diseases play an important role in exacerbation of bronchial asthma. The prevalence of allergic diseases has recently become rampant. Eosinophilic oesophagitis is worth of special attention because its histological criteria, unlike clinical ones, are well defined. They include chronic immune antigen-mediated inflammatory oesophageal disease with pronounced intraepithelial eosinophilic infiltration and clinical symptoms resulting from oesophageal dysfunction that resemble manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease but fail to respond to antireflux and antacid therapy. Many specific and practical aspects of the problem remain to be elucidated. The poor awareness of clinicians of this disease hampers its adequate diagnostics and treatment. In order to revise and optimize the former diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm., an interdisciplinary expert group was set up in 2010 constituted by specialists of the American College of Gastroenterology, American Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology, and Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition. Results of the work of this group together with the literature data on eosinophilic esopahgitis are discussed in the present review. PMID:23516863

  20. [Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome].

    PubMed

    Odler, Balázs; Müller, Veronika

    2016-08-01

    Obstructive lung diseases represent a major health problem worldwide due to their high prevalence associated with elevated socioeconomic costs. Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are chronic obstructive ventilatory disorders with airway inflammation, however they are separate nosological entities based on thedifferent development, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and prognostic features. However, these diseases may coexist and can be defined as the coexistence of increased variability of airflow in a patient with incompletely reversible airway obstruction. This phenotype is called asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. The syndrome is a clinical and scientific challenge as the majority of these patients have been excluded from the clinical and pharmacological trials, thus well-defined clinical characteristics and therapeutic approaches are lacking. The aim of this review is to summarize the currently available literature focusing on pathophysiological and clinical features, and discuss possible therapeutic approaches of patients with asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(33), 1304-1313. PMID:27523313

  1. Aluminium alloys in municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanjun; Rem, Peter

    2009-05-01

    With the increasing growth of incineration of household waste, more and more aluminium is retained in municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash. Therefore recycling of aluminium from bottom ash becomes increasingly important. Previous research suggests that aluminium from different sources is found in different size fractions resulting in different recycling rates. The purpose of this study was to develop analytical and sampling techniques to measure the particle size distribution of individual alloys in bottom ash. In particular, cast aluminium alloys were investigated. Based on the particle size distribution it was computed how well these alloys were recovered in a typical state-of-the-art treatment plant. Assessment of the cast alloy distribution was carried out by wet physical separation processes, as well as chemical methods, X-ray fluorescence analysis and electron microprobe analysis. The results from laboratory analyses showed that cast alloys tend to concentrate in the coarser fractions and therefore are better recovered in bottom ash treatment plants. PMID:19423581

  2. Aluminium leaching from red mud by filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Urík, Martin; Bujdoš, Marek; Milová-Žiaková, Barbora; Mikušová, Petra; Slovák, Marek; Matúš, Peter

    2015-11-01

    This contribution investigates the efficient and environmentally friendly aluminium leaching from red mud (bauxite residue) by 17 species of filamentous fungi. Bioleaching experiments were examined in batch cultures with the red mud in static, 7-day cultivation. The most efficient fungal strains in aluminium bioleaching were Penicillium crustosum G-140 and Aspergillus niger G-10. The A. niger G-10 strain was capable to extract up to approximately 141 mg·L(-1) of aluminium from 0.2 g dry weight red mud. Chemical leaching with organic acids mixture, prepared according to A. niger G-10 strain's respective fungal excretion during cultivation, proved that organic acids significantly contribute to aluminium solubilization from red mud. PMID:26365318

  3. Level of asthma control and its relationship with medication use in asthma patients in Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Marchioro, Josiane; Gazzotti, Mariana Rodrigues; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Montealegre, Federico; Fish, James; Jardim, José Roberto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess asthma patients in Brazil in terms of the level of asthma control, compliance with maintenance treatment, and the use of rescue medication. METHODS: We used data from a Latin American survey of a total of 400 asthma patients in four Brazilian state capitals, all of whom completed a questionnaire regarding asthma control and treatment. RESULTS: In that sample, the prevalence of asthma was 8.8%. Among the 400 patients studied, asthma was classified, in accordance with the Global Initiative for Asthma criteria, as controlled, partially controlled, and uncontrolled in 37 (9.3%), 226 (56.5%), and 137 (34.3%), respectively. In those three groups, the proportion of patients on maintenance therapy in the past four weeks was 5.4%, 19.9%, and 41.6%, respectively. The use of rescue medication was significantly more common in the uncontrolled asthma group (86.9%; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that, in accordance with the established international criteria, asthma is uncontrolled in the vast majority of asthma patients in Brazil. Maintenance medications are still underutilized in Brazil, and patients with partially controlled or uncontrolled asthma are more likely to use rescue medications and oral corticosteroids. PMID:25410836

  4. Utility of Asthma Control Questionnaire 7 in the assessment of asthma control*

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Mariana Nadal; Chong, Herberto José; Rabelo, Lêda Maria; Riedi, Carlos Antônio; Rosário, Nelson Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the reproducibility of Asthma Control Questionnaire 7 (ACQ-7) in asthma patients, comparing our results against those obtained with the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) criteria. We evaluated 52 patients. Patients completed the ACQ-7, underwent spirometry, and were clinically assessed to determine the level of asthma control according to the GINA criteria, in two visits, 15 days apart. The ACQ-7 cutoff for uncontrolled asthma was a score of 1.5. The ACQ-7 showed good reproducibility, with a correlation coefficient of 0.73. The ACQ-7 identified a greater number of patients with uncontrolled asthma than did the GINA criteria; according to the GINA criteria, 47 patients (90.4%) presented with partially controlled asthma. PMID:24831402

  5. A+ Asthma Rural Partnership coloring for health: an innovative rural asthma teaching strategy.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Phyllis Luers; Huss, Karen; Calabrese, Barbara; Smith, Teresa; Quartey, Ruth; Van de Castle, Barbara; Lewis, Cassia; Hill, Kimberly; Walker, Jennifer; Winkelstein, Marilyn

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is the leading chronic illness in children, affecting about 4.8 million children in the United States. Recent reports indicate a lack of asthma educational resources for rural school health nurses to use in their practice. This article describes the development of the My Asthma Coloring Book educational tool for children and their families living in rural communities. My Asthma Coloring Book was developed to provide asthma information in a short-story format for children with asthma. The coloring book content is described, including its utilization as part of the A+ Asthma Rural Partnership research project funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research (R01NR05062-01). PMID:15704600

  6. Surface roughness when diamond turning RSA 905 optical aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otieno, T.; Abou-El-Hossein, K.; Hsu, W. Y.; Cheng, Y. C.; Mkoko, Z.

    2015-08-01

    Ultra-high precision machining is used intensively in the photonics industry for the production of various optical components. Aluminium alloys have proven to be advantageous and are most commonly used over other materials to make various optical components. Recently, the increasing demand from optical systems for optical aluminium with consistent material properties has led to the development of newly modified grades of aluminium alloys produced by rapid solidification in the foundry process. These new aluminium grades are characterised by their finer microstructures and refined mechanical and physical properties. However the machining database of these new optical aluminium grades is limited and more research is still required to investigate their machinability performance when they are diamond turned in ultrahigh precision manufacturing environment. This work investigates the machinability of rapidly solidified aluminium RSA 905 by varying a number of diamond-turning cutting parameters and measuring the surface roughness over a cutting distance of 4 km. The machining parameters varied in this study were the cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut. The results showed a common trend of decrease in surface roughness with increasing cutting distance. The lowest surface roughness Ra result obtained after 4 km in this study was 3.2 nm. This roughness values was achieved using a cutting speed of 1750 rpm, feed rate of 5 mm/min and depth of cut equal to 25 μm.

  7. Volatilisation and oxidation of aluminium scraps fed into incineration furnaces.

    PubMed

    Biganzoli, Laura; Gorla, Leopoldo; Nessi, Simone; Grosso, Mario

    2012-12-01

    Ferrous and non-ferrous metal scraps are increasingly recovered from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash and used in the production of secondary steel and aluminium. However, during the incineration process, metal scraps contained in the waste undergo volatilisation and oxidation processes, which determine a loss of their recoverable mass. The present paper evaluates the behaviour of different types of aluminium packaging materials in a full-scale waste to energy plant during standard operation. Their partitioning and oxidation level in the residues of the incineration process are evaluated, together with the amount of potentially recoverable aluminium. About 80% of post-consumer cans, 51% of trays and 27% of foils can be recovered through an advanced treatment of bottom ash combined with a melting process in the saline furnace for the production of secondary aluminium. The residual amount of aluminium concentrates in the fly ash or in the fine fraction of the bottom ash and its recovery is virtually impossible using the current eddy current separation technology. The average oxidation levels of the aluminium in the residues of the incineration process is equal to 9.2% for cans, 17.4% for trays and 58.8% for foils. The differences between the tested packaging materials are related to their thickness, mechanical strength and to the alloy. PMID:22749723

  8. Risk of Migraine in Patients With Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yi-Hao; Chen, Kuan-Fei; Kao, Chia-Hung; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Hsia, Te-Chun; Chen, Chia-Hung; Liao, Wei-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Asthma has been described as an “acephalic migraine” and “pulmonary migraine.” However, no study has investigated the temporal frequency of migraine development in patients with asthma, and the results of previous studies may be difficult to generalize. We investigated the effect of asthma on the subsequent development of migraine by using a population-based data set in Taiwan. We retrieved our study sample from the National Health Insurance Research Database. Specifically, 25,560 patients aged 12 years and older with newly diagnosed asthma were identified as the asthma group, and 102,238 sex and age-matched patients without asthma were identified as the nonasthma group. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were employed to measure the risk of migraine for the asthmatic group compared with that for the nonasthmatic group. The risk of migraine in the asthmatic group was 1.45-fold higher (95% confidence interval 1.33–1.59) than that in the nonasthmatic group after adjustment for sex, age, the Charlson comorbidity index, common medications prescribed for patients with asthma, and annual outpatient department visits. An additional stratified analysis revealed that the risk of migraine remained significantly higher in both sexes and all age groups older than 20 years. Asthma could be an independent predisposing risk factor for migraine development in adults. PMID:26945388

  9. Occupational asthma: natural history, evaluation and management

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, S.; Chan-Yeung, M.

    1987-04-01

    A variety of occupational circumstances are capable of inducing asthma by specific exposure to airborne dusts, gases, vapors and fumes. The authors review the clinical history of the disease, including detection of exposures and diagnostic tests. The natural history of occupational asthma, its management and finally its prevention are then discussed.

  10. Occupational asthma due to alkyl cyanoacrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazawa, T. )

    1990-08-01

    A case of bronchial asthma induced by occupational exposure to alkyl cyanoacrylate, an adhesive, occurred in an assembly operation. Provocative exposure testing induced immediate and delayed asthmatic responses. Alkyl cyanoacrylate seemed to act as an allergen or as an irritant, resulting in the development of asthma.

  11. Deciphering Asthma Biomarkers with Protein Profiling Technology

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Zhizhou; Wilson, Jarad J.; Luo, Shuhong; Zhu, Si-Wei; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, resulting in bronchial hyperresponsiveness with every allergen exposure. It is now clear that asthma is not a single disease, but rather a multifaceted syndrome that results from a variety of biologic mechanisms. Asthma is further problematic given that the disease consists of many variants, each with its own etiologic and pathophysiologic factors, including different cellular responses and inflammatory phenotypes. These facets make the rapid and accurate diagnosis (not to mention treatments) of asthma extremely difficult. Protein biomarkers can serve as powerful detection tools in both clinical and basic research applications. Recent endeavors from biomedical researchers have developed technical platforms, such as cytokine antibody arrays, that have been employed and used to further the global analysis of asthma biomarker studies. In this review, we discuss potential asthma biomarkers involved in the pathophysiologic process and eventual pathogenesis of asthma, how these biomarkers are being utilized, and how further testing methods might help improve the diagnosis and treatment strain that current asthma patients suffer. PMID:26346739

  12. A review of asthma and scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, Kay; Muth, Claus M; Waldhauser, Lisa K

    2002-10-01

    An increasing number of asthmatics participate in recreational scuba diving. This activity presents unique physical and physiological challenges to the respiratory system. This review addresses the susceptibility of divers with asthma to diving accidents, acute asthmatic attacks, and long-term exacerbation of their disease. Recommendations on fitness to dive with asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness are provided. PMID:12442945

  13. Sleep Problems in Asthma and COPD

    MedlinePlus

    ... important for everyone. People with asthma and/or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) may have sleep issues that can lead ... http: / / www. sleepfoundation. org/ article/ sleep- related- problems/ chronic- obstructive- pulmonary- disease- and- sleep Action Steps If you have asthma ...

  14. Vascular Biomarkers in Asthma and COPD.

    PubMed

    Bakakos, Petros; Patentalakis, George; Papi, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remain a global health problem with significant morbidity and mortality. The changes in bronchial microvasculature that occurin asthma and COPD contribute to airway wall remodeling. Angiogenesis seems to be more prevalent in asthma and vasodilatation seemsmore relevant in COPD while vascular leak is present in both diseases. Recently, there has been increased interest in the vascular component of airway remodeling in chronic bronchial inflammation of asthma and COPD although its role in the progression of the diseases has not been fully elucidated. Various cells andmediators are involved in the vascular remodeling in asthma and COPD while proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors exert angiogenic and antiangiogenic effects. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of blood vessel growth mainly in asthma but also in COPD. In asthmatic airways VEGF promotes proliferation and differentiation of endothelial cells and induces vascular leakage and permeability. It has also been involved in enhanced allergic sensitization, upregulated subsequent T-helper-2 type inflammatory responses, chemotaxis for monocytes and eosinophils, and airway oedema. Impaired VEGF signaling has been associated with emphysema in animal models. Studies on lung biopsies have shown a decreasing effect of anti-asthma drugs to the vascular component of airway remodeling. There is less available evidence on the effect of the currently used drugs on airway microvascular network in COPD. This review article explores the current knowledge regarding vascular biomarkers in asthma and COPD as well as the therapeutic implications of these mediators. PMID:26420364

  15. Adenosine receptors and asthma in humans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C N

    2008-10-01

    According to an executive summary of the GINA dissemination committee report, it is now estimated that approximately 300 million people (5% of the global population or 1 in 20 persons) have asthma. Despite the scientific progress made over the past several decades toward improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma, there is still a great need for improved therapies, particularly oral therapies that enhance patient compliance and that target new mechanisms of action. Adenosine is an important signalling molecule in human asthma. By acting on extracellular G-protein-coupled ARs on a number of different cell types important in the pathophysiology of human asthma, adenosine affects bronchial reactivity, inflammation and airway remodelling. Four AR subtypes (A(1), A(2a), A(2b) and A(3)) have been cloned in humans, are expressed in the lung, and are all targets for drug development for human asthma. This review summarizes what is known about these AR subtypes and their function in human asthma as well as the pros and cons of therapeutic approaches to these AR targets. A number of molecules with high affinity and high selectivity for the human AR subtypes have entered clinical trials or are poised to enter clinical trials as anti-asthma treatments. With the availability of these molecules for testing in humans, the function of ARs in human asthma, as well as the safety and efficacy of approaches to the different AR targets, can now be determined. PMID:18852693

  16. The Effects of Asthma on School Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara; Lowenthal, Mark

    1995-01-01

    Factors which may affect school performance in children with asthma, including absenteeism, learning disabilities, psychological functioning, and medications, are reviewed. Recommendations are made to assist teachers in creating a classroom environment which promotes optimal academic and social development of students with asthma. (Author/DB)

  17. Thunderstorm-asthma and pollen allergy.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G; Liccardi, G; Frenguelli, G

    2007-01-01

    Thunderstorms have been linked to asthma epidemics, especially during the pollen seasons, and there are descriptions of asthma outbreaks associated with thunderstorms, which occurred in several cities, prevalently in Europe (Birmingham and London in the UK and Napoli in Italy) and Australia (Melbourne and Wagga Wagga). Pollen grains can be carried by thunderstorm at ground level, where pollen rupture would be increased with release of allergenic biological aerosols of paucimicronic size, derived from the cytoplasm and which can penetrate deep into lower airways. In other words, there is evidence that under wet conditions or during thunderstorms, pollen grains may, after rupture by osmotic shock, release into the atmosphere part of their content, including respirable, allergen-carrying cytoplasmic starch granules (0.5-2.5 microm) or other paucimicronic components that can reach lower airways inducing asthma reactions in pollinosis patients. The thunderstorm-asthma outbreaks are characterized, at the beginning of thunderstorms by a rapid increase of visits for asthma in general practitioner or hospital emergency departments. Subjects without asthma symptoms, but affected by seasonal rhinitis can experience an asthma attack. No unusual levels of air pollution were noted at the time of the epidemics, but there was a strong association with high atmospheric concentrations of pollen grains such as grasses or other allergenic plant species. However, subjects affected by pollen allergy should be informed about a possible risk of asthma attack at the beginning of a thunderstorm during pollen season. PMID:17156336

  18. The Misunderstood Asthma of Theodore Roosevelt.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Carlos A; Roosevelt, Tweed

    2015-01-01

    In this special article, we examine the asthma of President Theodore "TR" Roosevelt (1858-1919). Through a comprehensive review of thousands of source documents, and a modern understanding of asthma, we examine several misunderstandings, including the longstanding assertion that TR's illness was "psychosomatic." TR's respiratory problems began in early childhood, and the historical record provides strong evidence for poorly controlled, persistent asthma. Like many patients, his asthma entered a relatively quiescent stage during adolescence, coincident with initiation of a vigorous exercise program when TR was 12 years old. Nevertheless, TR continued to suffer serious asthma exacerbations, both in adolescence and adulthood. Although psychosocial issues affect most chronic diseases, there is little (if any) support for assertions that TR's asthma was psychosomatic. We believe that TR's childhood struggles with asthma, and the misconception that he vanquished his illness through exercise, were experiences that profoundly affected his worldview. TR is known for his appreciation of life's struggles and for a bedrock belief that people can create major change with sufficient motivation and hard work. In different ways, misunderstandings about asthma contributed to the early development of these personal characteristics. Together with later experiences, they contributed to a lifetime of action that changed modern history. PMID:26271837

  19. The link between chronic rhinosinusitis and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chien-Chia; Wang, Chun-Hua; Fu, Chia-Hsiang; Huang, Chi-Che; Chang, Po-Hung; Chen, I-Wei; Lee, Ta-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Treatments for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and asthma can affect both conditions, based on the united airway concept. This study aimed to evaluate the link between CRS and asthma, based on disease-specific quality of life measures. We performed a prospective cohort study to investigate the correlations between results from CRS- and asthma-specific questionnaires. Thirty-two patients with asthma and CRS were evaluated before and after undergoing nasal surgery at a tertiary medical center. There were significant correlations between the results from the Asthma Control Test (ACT) and the Sino-Nasal Outcome Test-22, as well as between the results of the ACT and Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire, at both the preoperative and 3-month postoperative evaluations (P < 0.01). Moreover, nasal surgery improved the sinonasal symptoms, asthma control, and pulmonary function (P < 0.01). Increasingly severe sinonasal symptoms of CRS were associated with poor asthma control. Therefore, CRS and asthma should be considered and treated as common airway diseases. PMID:27495032

  20. The relationships between asthma control, daytime sleepiness, and quality of life among children with asthma: a path analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Huang, I-Chan; Thompson, Lindsay; Tuli, Sanjeev; Huang, Shih-Wen; DeWalt, Darren; Revicki, Dennis; Shenkman, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to examine the relationships between asthma control, daytime sleepiness, and asthma-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among children with asthma. Path analyses were conducted to test if daytime sleepiness can mediate the effect of asthma control status on asthma-specific HRQOL. Methods 160 dyads of asthmatic children and their parents were collected for analyses. The Asthma Control and Communication Instrument (ACCI) was used to categorize adequate and poor asthma control status. The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire (CASQ) was used to measure children’s daytime sleepiness, including sleep in school, awake in school, sleep in evening, and sleep during transport. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Asthma Impact Scale was used to measure asthma-specific HRQOL. Results Poorly controlled asthma was associated with daytime sleepiness and impaired asthma-specific HRQOL. Asthma control status was directly associated with asthma-specific HRQOL (P<.05), whereas sleep in school and sleep in evening domains of daytime sleepiness significantly mediated the relationship between poor asthma control and impaired HRQOL (P<.01). Conclusions Asthma control status was associated with pediatric asthma-specific HRQOL, and the association was significantly mediated by daytime sleepiness. Healthcare providers need to address pediatric sleep needs related to poor asthma control to reduce the impact on HRQOL. PMID:23684939

  1. Association of Rhinovirus Infections with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gern, James E.; Busse, William W.

    1999-01-01

    Rhinoviruses are the most common cause of the common cold, but they can cause more severe illnesses in people with underlying lung disorders such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or cystic fibrosis. Epidemiologic studies with sensitive detection methods such as PCR have identified rhinovirus infection as a major source of asthma exacerbations in both children and adults, especially during the spring and fall. Since rhinoviruses cause little tissue destruction, it is presumed that the immune response to the infection may play an important role in the pathogenesis of rhinovirus-induced exacerbations of asthma. This review examines the epidemiologic association between rhinovirus infections and exacerbations of asthma and outlines current information on immune responses to rhinovirus infection and potential connections between antiviral responses and preexisting allergic inflammation. Finally, current and future strategies for treating rhinovirus infections and virus-induced exacerbations of asthma are discussed. PMID:9880472

  2. Irritant-induced asthma in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Tarlo, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Irritant-induced asthma in the workplace has been the focus of several articles in the past few years, and reviewed here. A clinical case definition is most readily associated with a single acute/accidental exposure to a presumed high concentration of an agent or agents expected to be irritant to the airways, as was initially reported with the subgroup Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome (RADS). When most but not all criteria for RADS are met, then a diagnosis of irritant-induced asthma may also be considered to be "more probable than not". However, in addition, there is evolving understanding from epidemiological studies that chronic exposures may be associated with an increased risk of developing asthma. Despite this recognition, the mechanisms and clinical case definitions of work-related asthma that might be caused by chronic exposures to irritants (vs. new-onset asthma that begins coincidentally to work exposures), remain unclear at present. PMID:24343122

  3. Failure in Asthma Control: Reasons and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Clinical research showed that asthma control is an achievable target. However, real-life observations suggest that a significant proportion of patients suffer from symptoms and report lifestyle limitations with a considerable burden on patient's quality of life. The achievement of asthma control is the result of the interaction among different variables concerning the disease pattern and patients' and physicians' knowledge and behaviour. The failure in asthma control can be considered as the result of the complex interaction among different variables, such as the role of guidelines diffusion and implementation, some disease-related factors (i.e., the presence of common comorbidities in asthma such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), sleep disturbances and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and rhinitis) or patient-related factors (i.e., adherence to treatment, alexithymia, and coping strategies). Asthma control may be reached through a tailored treatment plan taking into account the complexity of factors that contribute to achieve and maintain this objective. PMID:24455432

  4. [CYTYOGENETIC MARKERS OF BRONCHIAL ASTHMA IN CHILDREN].

    PubMed

    Lytvynets', L Ia

    2014-01-01

    The learning of cytyogenetic special of cariotip in children with the bronchial asthma maked by course of the investigation of prometahyases chromosomes of limphocytes of the periferic bloods. The quantity of association of acrocentric chromosome was analised. The 82 children in age 6-18 years old with the bronchial asthma and with the different control were learned by results of asthma--test control. In children with the noncontrol bronchial asthma the big frequency of of association of acrocentric chromosome 13-15 (D-D), 21-22 (G-G) n 13-15--21-22 (D-G) were received. In patients with the bronchial asthma the lover mitotic activity by healthy were marked (P(N) < 0.05). With the degree of activity it was decreased. PMID:26118082

  5. Gastroesophageal reflux: a potential asthma trigger.

    PubMed

    Harding, Susan M

    2005-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a potential trigger of asthma. Approximately 77% of asthmatics report heartburn. GER is a risk factor for asthma-related hospitalization and oral steroid burst use. Asthmatics may be predisposed to GER development because of a high prevalence of hiatal hernia and autonomic dysregulation and an increased pressure gradient between the abdominal cavity and the thorax, over-riding the lower esophageal sphincter pressure barrier. Asthma medications may potentiate GER. Potential mechanisms of esophageal acid-induced bronchoconstriction include a vagally mediated reflex, local axonal reflexes, heightened bronchial reactivity, and microaspiration, all resulting in neurogenic inflammation. Anti-reflux therapy improves asthma symptoms in approximately 70% of asthmatics with GER. A 3-month empiric trial of twice-daily proton pump inhibitor given 30 to 60 minutes before breakfast and dinner can identify asthmatics who have GER as a trigger of their asthma. PMID:15579368

  6. Distinguishing Asthma Phenotypes Using Machine Learning Approaches.

    PubMed

    Howard, Rebecca; Rattray, Magnus; Prosperi, Mattia; Custovic, Adnan

    2015-07-01

    Asthma is not a single disease, but an umbrella term for a number of distinct diseases, each of which are caused by a distinct underlying pathophysiological mechanism. These discrete disease entities are often labelled as 'asthma endotypes'. The discovery of different asthma subtypes has moved from subjective approaches in which putative phenotypes are assigned by experts to data-driven ones which incorporate machine learning. This review focuses on the methodological developments of one such machine learning technique-latent class analysis-and how it has contributed to distinguishing asthma and wheezing subtypes in childhood. It also gives a clinical perspective, presenting the findings of studies from the past 5 years that used this approach. The identification of true asthma endotypes may be a crucial step towards understanding their distinct pathophysiological mechanisms, which could ultimately lead to more precise prevention strategies, identification of novel therapeutic targets and the development of effective personalized therapies. PMID:26143394

  7. Breathing exercises for adults with asthma.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is a common long-term condition that remains poorly controlled in many people despite the availability of pharmacological interventions, evidence-based treatment guidelines and care pathways.(1) There is considerable public interest in the use of non-pharmacological approaches for the treatment of asthma.(2) A survey of people with asthma reported that many have used complementary and alternative medicine, often without the knowledge of their clinical team.(3) Such interventions include breathing techniques, herbal products, homeopathy and acupuncture. The role of breathing exercises within the management of asthma has been controversial, partly because early claims of effectiveness were exaggerated.(4) UK national guidance and international guidelines on the management of asthma have included the option of breathing exercise programmes as an adjuvant to pharmacological treatment.(5,6) Here we discuss the types of breathing exercises used and review the evidence for their effectiveness. PMID:26563876

  8. Aluminium content of some foods and food products in the USA, with aluminium food additives.

    PubMed

    Saiyed, Salim M; Yokel, Robert A

    2005-03-01

    The primary objective was to determine the aluminium (Al) content of selected foods and food products in the USA which contain Al as an approved food additive. Intake of Al from the labeled serving size of each food product was calculated. The samples were acid or base digested and analysed for Al using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Quality control (QC) samples, with matrices matching the samples, were generated and used to verify the Al determinations. Food product Al content ranged from <1-27,000 mg kg(-1). Cheese in a serving of frozen pizzas had up to 14 mg of Al, from basic sodium aluminium phosphate; whereas the same amount of cheese in a ready-to-eat restaurant pizza provided 0.03-0.09 mg. Many single serving packets of non-dairy creamer had approximately 50-600 mg Al kg(-1) as sodium aluminosilicate, providing up to 1.5 mg Al per serving. Many single serving packets of salt also had sodium aluminosilicate as an additive, but the Al content was less than in single-serving non-dairy creamer packets. Acidic sodium aluminium phosphate was present in many food products, pancakes and waffles. Baking powder, some pancake/waffle mixes and frozen products, and ready-to-eat pancakes provided the most Al of the foods tested; up to 180 mg/serving. Many products provide a significant amount of Al compared to the typical intake of 3-12 mg/day reported from dietary Al studies conducted in many countries. PMID:16019791

  9. Health Planning that Magnifies the Community's Voice: Allies against Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfoss, Frances D.; Kelly, Cynthia; Taylor-Fishwick, Jude

    2005-01-01

    Allies Against Asthma, a working group of the Consortium for Infant and Child Health (CINCH), conducted a comprehensive asthma needs assessment in Hampton Roads, Virginia, in 2001. Results from extant data and parent surveys indicated that asthma prevalence was high (15% to 18%), 45% to 50% of children received primary care for asthma in the…

  10. Posttraumatic Stress in Adolescents with Asthma and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kean, Emily Millikan; Kelsay, Kimberly; Wamboldt, Frederick; Wamboldt, Marianne Z.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms in adolescents with and without asthma and their parents and the relationship between PTS symptoms and asthma morbidity. Method: Three groups of adolescents (12-18 years) participated: adolescents who had experienced a life-threatening asthma episode (n = 49), asthma controls (n = 71), and…

  11. Asthma and Environment Fact Sheet for Parents and Schools. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2012

    2012-01-01

    Important facts about asthma and the environment include: (1) Asthma has reached epidemic proportions in the United States, affecting about 25 million people of all ages and races, including about 7 million children; (2) Nearly one in 10 school-aged children has asthma, and the percentage of children with asthma is rising more rapidly in…

  12. Barriers to Asthma Management for School Nurses: An Integrative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanley Nadeau, Ellen; Toronto, Coleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Childhood asthma is a growing health concern. Asthma is the most common chronic illness of childhood and a leading cause of emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and school absenteeism. School nurses play a valuable role in asthma management. The purpose of this integrative review is to examine barriers to asthma management for school nurses in…

  13. A Preliminary Investigation of Asthma Mortality in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greiling, Andrea K.; Boss, Leslie P.; Wheeler, Lani S.

    2005-01-01

    Although asthma deaths in children are rare, most asthma deaths should be preventable. No information has been identified in the professional literature addressing the occurrence of asthma deaths in schools. This investigation identified asthma deaths that occurred in US schools between 1990 and 2003 and the circumstances surrounding those deaths.…

  14. Impact of School Nurse Case Management on Students with Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taras, Howard; Wright, Sandra; Brennan, Jesse; Campana, Jack; Lofgren, RoseMarie

    2004-01-01

    This project determined asthma prevalence in a large school district, absentee rates, and potential effects of school nurse case management for student asthma over three years. Data were derived from an asthma tracking tool used by nurses in one school district for every student reported as having asthma by their parent. School nurses began…

  15. Childhood asthma: breakthroughs and challenges.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Henry

    2006-01-01

    As we move forward, our goal is to control and eliminate asthma and other allergic disorders. This may come through broadly applied manipulation of environmental, dietary, and infectious risk factors, possibly during the perinatal period. Or we may learn to identify genetically susceptible children and to intervene with individualized genotype-specific treatment before the onset of disease. Maybe we'll learn how to block the mechanisms that give rise to chronic inflammation, or how to subdue Th2 activation. However, as the Swedish proverb says--Don't throw away the old bucket until you know whether the new one holds water. To continue using the old bucket, we have to fix the leaks. One approach to reducing asthma disparities is through traditional disease prevention stages. Primary prevention targets asthma incidence; secondary prevention mitigates established disease and involves disease detection, management, and control; and tertiary prevention is the reduction of complications caused by severe disease. Once causative factors at each level of disease prevention are understood, this knowledge can be translated into clinical practice and public health policy. We need reliable diagnostic criteria to provide correct treatment for infants and toddlers. This will require longitudinal cohort studies supported by assessment of pulmonary function and inflammatory markers. We must find ways to convince more physicians to embrace controller therapy for more severe disease, and to identify the patients with less severe disease who also require ongoing controller therapy. We need to close the gap between what we know and what we do in practice. We need to link basic research to healthcare delivery, and to gain acceptance and support from the intended recipients of new interventions. We need better strategies for improving adherence. We need accountability, foresight, and imagination. PMID:17089863

  16. Occupational asthma caused by ethanolamines.

    PubMed

    Savonius, B; Keskinen, H; Tuppurainen, M; Kanerva, L

    1994-12-01

    Amino alcohols are used in various industries, often as minor constituents of compounds to modify the properties of the compound. Generally, they are considered to be safe, but they have been known to cause local skin irritation at higher concentrations in solutions. We report on three cases of occupational asthma caused by ethanolamines: two metal workers exposed to a cutting fluid containing triethanolamine, and one cleaner exposed to a detergent containing monoethanolamine. The diagnosis was based on work-related symptoms and on a chamber challenge with the suspected agent. Persistence of the symptoms after exposure ended was a common feature of the three cases. PMID:7709998

  17. Clinical Significance of Asthma Clusters by Longitudinal Analysis in Korean Asthma Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sujeong; Yoon, Sun-young; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Cho, You Sook; Jang, An-Soo; Park, Jung Won; Nahm, Dong-Ho; Yoon, Ho-Joo; Cho, Sang-Heon; Cho, Young-Joo; Choi, ByoungWhui; Moon, Hee-Bom; Kim, Tae-Bum

    2013-01-01

    Background We have previously identified four distinct groups of asthma patients in Korean cohorts using cluster analysis: (A) smoking asthma, (B) severe obstructive asthma, (C) early-onset atopic asthma, and (D) late-onset mild asthma. Methods and Results A longitudinal analysis of each cluster in a Korean adult asthma cohort was performed to investigate the clinical significance of asthma clusters over 12 months. Cluster A showed relatively high asthma control test (ACT) scores but relatively low FEV1 scores, despite a high percentage of systemic corticosteroid use. Cluster B had the lowest mean FEV1, ACT, and the quality of life questionnaire for adult Korean asthmatics (QLQAKA) scores throughout the year, even though the percentage of systemic corticosteroid use was the highest among the four clusters. Cluster C was ranked second in terms of FEV1, with the second lowest percentage of systemic corticosteroid use, and showed a marked improvement in subjective symptoms over time. Cluster D consistently showed the highest FEV1, the lowest systemic corticosteroid use, and had high ACT and QLQAKA scores. Conclusion Our asthma clusters had clinical significance with consistency among clusters over 12 months. These distinctive phenotypes may be useful in classifying asthma in real practice. PMID:24391784

  18. Elevated urinary excretion of aluminium and iron in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher; Mamutse, Godwin; Korchazhkina, Olga; Pye, Eleanor; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Polwart, Anthony; Hawkins, Clive

    2006-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, immune-mediated, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system of as yet unknown aetiology. A consensus of opinion has suggested that the disorder is the result of an interplay between environmental factors and susceptibility genes. We have used a battery of analytical techniques to determine if the urinary excretion of i) markers of oxidative damage; ii) iron and iii) the environmental toxin aluminium and its antagonist, silicon, are altered in relapsing-remitting (RRMS) and secondary progressive MS (SPMS). Urinary concentrations of oxidative biomarkers, MDA and TBARS, were not found to be useful indicators of inflammatory disease in MS. However, urinary concentrations of another potential marker for inflammation and oxidative stress, iron, were significantly increased in SPMS (P<0.01) and insignificantly increased in RRMS (P>0.05). Urinary concentrations of aluminium were also significantly increased in RRMS (P<0.001) and SPMS (P <0.05) such that the levels of aluminium excretion in the former were similar to those observed in individuals undergoing metal chelation therapy. The excretion of silicon was lower in MS and significantly so in SPMS (P<0.05). Increased excretion of iron in urine supported a role for iron dysmetabolism in MS. Levels of urinary aluminium excretion similar to those seen in aluminium intoxication suggested that aluminium may be a hitherto unrecognized environmental factor associated with the aetiology of MS. If aluminium is involved in MS then an increased dietary intake of its natural antagonist, silicon, might be a therapeutic option. PMID:17086897

  19. Orthorhombic aluminium oxyfluoride, AlOF.

    PubMed

    Vasiliev, Alexander D; Melnikova, Svetlana V; Isaenko, Lyudmila I

    2009-04-01

    Crystals of the title compound were extracted from the bulk of grown SrAlF(5) crystals as unexpected inclusions that were identified as the long sought after aluminium oxyfluoride. The structure of AlOF is built up from tetrahedral and octahedral polyhedra. Each tetrahedron is bisected by a mirror plane, with the Al atom and two vertex anions in the plane. All tetrahedral vertices are positions of competing oxide and fluoride ions and are shared with octahedra. These shared vertices belong to two octahedral edges which join the octahedra to form infinite zigzag chains. The chains are strung along twofold screw axes that run parallel to the unit-cell b axis. The remaining two octahedral vertices are occupied only by fluoride ions. A small deficiency in the occupation of the octahedral Al position was suggested by the refinement. However, the stoichiometry of the compound is AlOF within experimental uncertainty. The Al-F(O) distances are separated into three groups with average values of 1.652 (3) (tetrahedra), 1.800 (2) (octahedra) and 1.894 (2) A (octahedra). This structure differs widely from the reported tetragonal phase Al(1-x)O(1-3x)F(1+3x) (x = 0.0886) [Kutoglu (1992). Z. Kristallogr. 199, 197-201], which consists solely of octahedral structural units. PMID:19346595

  20. Adsorption of aluminium by stream particulates.

    PubMed

    Tipping, E; Ohnstad, M; Woof, C

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study was made of the adsorption of aluminium by fine particulates from Whitray Beck, a hill stream in NW England. Adsorption increased with Al(3) activity, pH and concentration of particles, and could be quantitatively described by the empirical equation: [Formula: see text] [particles] where square brackets indicate concentrations, curly brackets, activities, and alpha, beta and gamma are constants with values of 5.14x10(-10) (mol litre(-1))(2.015) (g particles litre(-1))(-1), 0.457, and 1.472, respectively. For the experimental data, the equation gave a correlation ratio of 0.99. The equation accounts reasonably well for the adsorption of Al by particulates from seven other streams. In applying the equation, it must be borne in mind that the desorption kinetics of Al depend on pH, and rapid reversibility (<15min) can only be assumed for pHor=10%) of total monomeric Al. PMID:15092454

  1. A systematic review of aluminium phosphide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Mehrpour, Omid; Jafarzadeh, Mostafa; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2012-03-01

    Every year, about 300,000 people die because of pesticide poisoning worldwide. The most common pesticide agents are organophosphates and phosphides, aluminium phosphide (AlP) in particular. AlP is known as a suicide poison that can easily be bought and has no effective antidote. Its toxicity results from the release of phosphine gas as the tablet gets into contact with moisture. Phosphine gas primarily affects the heart, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and kidneys. Poisoning signs and symptoms include nausea, vomiting, restlessness, abdominal pain, palpitation, refractory shock, cardiac arrhythmias, pulmonary oedema, dyspnoea, cyanosis, and sensory alterations. Diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion, positive silver nitrate paper test to phosphine, and gastric aspirate and viscera biochemistry. Treatment includes early gastric lavage with potassium permanganate or a combination with coconut oil and sodium bicarbonate, administration of charcoal, and palliative care. Specific therapy includes intravenous magnesium sulphate and oral coconut oil. Moreover, acidosis can be treated with early intravenous administration of sodium bicarbonate, cardiogenic shock with fluid, vasopresor, and refractory cardiogenic shock with intra-aortic baloon pump or digoxin. Trimetazidine may also have a useful role in the treatment, because it can stop ventricular ectopic beats and bigeminy and preserve oxidative metabolism. This article reviews the epidemiological, toxicological, and clinical/pathological aspects of AlP poisoning and its management. PMID:22450207

  2. Fuzzy Multicriteria Ranking of Aluminium Coating Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzias, A. F.

    2007-12-01

    This work deals with multicriteria ranking of aluminium coating methods. The alternatives used are: sulfuric acid anodization, A1; oxalic acid anodization, A2; chromic acid anodization, A3; phosphoric acid anodization, A4; integral color anodizing, A5; chemical conversion coating, A6; electrostatic powder deposition, A7. The criteria used are: cost of production, f1; environmental friendliness of production process, f2; appearance (texture), f3; reflectivity, f4; response to coloring, f5; corrosion resistance, f6; abrasion resistance, f7; fatigue resistance, f8. Five experts coming from relevant industrial units set grades to the criteria vector and the preference matrix according to a properly modified Delphi method. Sensitivity analysis of the ranked first alternative A1 against the `second best', which was A3 at low and A7 at high resolution levels proved that the solution is robust. The dependence of anodized products quality on upstream processes is presented and the impact of energy price increase on industrial cost is discussed.

  3. New approaches to managing asthma: a US perspective

    PubMed Central

    Berger, William E

    2008-01-01

    Despite remarkable advances in diagnosis and long-term management, asthma remains a serious public health concern. Newly updated expert guidelines emphasize the intra- and inter-individual variability of asthma and highlight the importance of periodic assessment of asthma control. These guidelines update recommendations for step-wise asthma treatment, address the burgeoning field of asthma diagnostics, and stress the importance of a patient and health care professional partnership, including written action plans and self monitoring. The field of asthma therapeutics is expanding rapidly, with promising new treatment options available or in development that may address some of the existing barriers to successful asthma management. These approaches simplify treatment, use combinations of agents in one delivery device that have complementary actions, or target specific pathways involved in asthma patho-physiology. Considerable activity is taking place in asthma pharmacogenetics. This review provides an overview of these new approaches to managing asthma, including their present status and future potential. PMID:18728834

  4. Respiratory Disorders in Aluminum Smelter Workers

    PubMed Central

    Søyseth, Vidar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Summarizing the knowledge status, including the morphology, possible etiological factors, and clinical expression of aluminum potroom asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease related to aluminum potroom exposure. Methods: A review of the literature from the last two decades as it appears in PubMed. Results: There is substantial evidence for the existence of potroom asthma, although the incidence seems to decline over the last 10 years. Increased mortality from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and longitudinal decline in forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration has been shown in aluminum potroom workers. Morphological manifestations in bronchial biopsies and the inflammatory markers NO and eosinophils in airway tissue and blood are consistent with asthma in general. The causative agent(s) is (are) not known. Conclusions: Reduction of exposure and cessation of smoking seem to be the major preventive measures to avoid respiratory disorders in the aluminum industry. PMID:24806727

  5. Supported self-management for asthma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Key points Self-management education in asthma is not an optional extra. Healthcare professionals have a responsibility to ensure that everyone with asthma has personalised advice to enable them to optimise how they self-manage their condition. Overviews of the extensive evidence-base conclude that asthma self-management supported by regular professional review, improves asthma control, reduces exacerbations and admissions, and improves quality of life. Self-management education should be reinforced by a written personalised asthma action plan which provides a summary of the regular management strategy, how to recognise deterioration and the action to take. Successful implementation combines education for patients, skills training for professionals in the context of an organisation committed to both the concept and the practice of supported self-management. Educational aims To summarise the evidence base underpinning supported self-management for asthma To provide clinicians with a practical approach to providing supported self-management for asthma To suggest an appropriate strategy for implementing supported self-management Summary The evidence in favour of supported self-management for asthma is overwhelming. Self-management including provision of a written asthma action plan and supported by regular medical review, almost halves the risk of hospitalisation, significantly reduces emergency department attendances and unscheduled consultations, and improves markers of asthma control and quality of life. Demographic and cultural tailoring enables effective programmes to be implemented in deprived and/or ethnic communities or within schools. A crucial component of effective asthma self-management interventions is the provision of an agreed, written personalised action plan which advises on using regular medication, recognising deterioration and appropriate action to take. Monitoring can be based on symptoms or on peak flows and should specify thresholds for action

  6. Vitamin E and D regulation of allergic asthma immunopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cook-Mills, Joan M.; Avila, Pedro C.

    2014-01-01

    Asthma occurs as complex interactions of the environmental and genetics. Clinical studies and animal models of asthma indicate dietary factors such as vitamin E and vitamin D as protective for asthma risk. In this review, we discuss opposing regulatory functions of tocopherol isoforms of vitamin E and regulatory functions of vitamin D in asthma and how the variation in global prevalence of asthma may be explained, at least in part, by these dietary components. PMID:25175918

  7. PSYCHOLOGICAL MANAGEMENT OF CHILDHOOD ASTHMA

    PubMed Central

    Selesnick, Sheldon T.; Friedman, David Belais; Augenbraun, Bernice

    1964-01-01

    Over-emphasis on physical factors in asthma probably has come about because psychological factors have seemed elusive, difficult to define and often misleading. Several concepts of classic causes of emotional disturbances that abet asthmatic attacks in children may be helpful in management of the patient and his environs. The first concept has to do with feelings of inadequacy in the mother which lead her to place the burden of decision-making upon the child. She is thus able to give the child very little support and communicates to him her anxiety. Often encouragement to the mother, through the physician's pointing out her very real capacities and achievements can be helpful to the child. The second concept has to do with the asthmatic child's character structure and his assumption of a pseudo-mature position. Among the things the physician can do is to advise the parents as to what is age-appropriate behavior for the child and instruct them in ways to make the child recognize his position of dependence. The third concept concerns threat of separation as a precipitant to the asthma attack. To deal with such a situation the physician may make a number of recommendations of methods for alleviating such a threat. In some families, the degree of disturbance is so great that the parents cannot respond to the physician's advice and may need psychiatric referral. Clues for recognizing such a situation are given along with recommendations on how to make a successful referral. PMID:14154286

  8. Asthma in Rhinosinusitis: A Survey from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshaee, Mehdi; Majidi, Mohamad-Reza; Gharavi, Vahideh; Alavizadeh, Fatemeh-Sadat; Movahed, Rahman; Asnaashari, Parasto; Asnaashari, Amir-Mohammad-Hashem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The coexistence of asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is more common than expected given their individual prevalence in the general population and may affect patient’s quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of asthma in chronic rhinosinusitis in Mashhad, Northeast Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was performed in two university hospital from November 2012 for 12 months. In total, 153 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis were enrolled and referred to a particular pulmonologist for asthma evaluation. Results: The mean age of participants was 40.54±13.11 years, and 41.8% were male. In total, 63.4% of patients had the polypoid form of CRS. The proportion of patients in this study with asthma was 41.8%, compared with a general asthma prevalence in this region of 13.5%. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of asthma among patients with CRS, but it often remains undiagnosed. Asthma in CRS patients should be diagnosed and treated in order to improve patient’s quality of life. We recommend an evaluation of the lower airways in all of these patients as well as further studies in this field. PMID:27602339

  9. National and regional asthma programmes in Europe.

    PubMed

    Selroos, Olof; Kupczyk, Maciej; Kuna, Piotr; Łacwik, Piotr; Bousquet, Jean; Brennan, David; Palkonen, Susanna; Contreras, Javier; FitzGerald, Mark; Hedlin, Gunilla; Johnston, Sebastian L; Louis, Renaud; Metcalf, Leanne; Walker, Samantha; Moreno-Galdó, Antonio; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Rosado-Pinto, José; Powell, Pippa; Haahtela, Tari

    2015-09-01

    This review presents seven national asthma programmes to support the European Asthma Research and Innovation Partnership in developing strategies to reduce asthma mortality and morbidity across Europe. From published data it appears that in order to influence asthma care, national/regional asthma programmes are more effective than conventional treatment guidelines. An asthma programme should start with the universal commitments of stakeholders at all levels and the programme has to be endorsed by political and governmental bodies. When the national problems have been identified, the goals of the programme have to be clearly defined with measures to evaluate progress. An action plan has to be developed, including defined re-allocation of patients and existing resources, if necessary, between primary care and specialised healthcare units or hospital centres. Patients should be involved in guided self-management education and structured follow-up in relation to disease severity. The three evaluated programmes show that, thanks to rigorous efforts, it is possible to improve patients' quality of life and reduce hospitalisation, asthma mortality, sick leave and disability pensions. The direct and indirect costs, both for the individual patient and for society, can be significantly reduced. The results can form the basis for development of further programme activities in Europe. PMID:26324809

  10. Management of critical asthma syndrome during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Andrew L; Juarez, Maya M; Gidwani, Nisha; Albertson, Timothy E

    2015-02-01

    One-third of pregnant asthmatics experience a worsening of their asthma that may progress to a critical asthma syndrome (CAS) that includes status asthmaticus (SA) and near-fatal asthma (NFA). Patients with severe asthma before pregnancy may experience more exacerbations, especially during late pregnancy. Prevention of the CAS includes excellent asthma control involving targeted early and regular medical care of the pregnant asthmatic, together with medication compliance. Spontaneous abortion risk is higher in pregnant women with uncontrolled asthma than in non-asthmatics. Should CAS occur during pregnancy, aggressive bronchodilator therapy, montelukast, and systemic corticosteroids can be used in the context of respiratory monitoring, preferably in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Systemic epinephrine should be avoided due to potential teratogenic side-effects and placental/uterine vasoconstriction. Non-invasive ventilation has been used in some cases. Intratracheal intubation can be hazardous and rapid-sequence intubation by an experienced physician is recommended. Mechanical ventilation parameters are adjusted based on changes to respiratory mechanics in the pregnant patient. An inhaled helium-oxygen gas admixture may promote laminar airflow and improve gas exchange. Permissive hypercapnea is controversial, but may be unavoidable. Sedation with propofol which itself has bronchodilating properties is preferred to benzodiazepines. Case reports delineating good outcomes for both mother and fetus despite intubation for SA suggest that multidisciplinary ICU care of the pregnant asthmatic with critical asthma are feasible especially if hypoxemia is avoided. PMID:24258096

  11. Socioeconomic Factors and Asthma Control in Children

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Shannon F.; Ungar, Wendy J.; Glazier, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between socioeconomic factors and asthma control in children, as defined by the Canadian Pediatric Asthma Consensus Guidelines. Patients and Methods Cross-sectional data from a completed study of 879 asthmatic children between the ages of 1 and 18 residing in the Greater Toronto Area were used. The database included data on demographics, health status, asthma control, and health-related quality of life. Stepwise forward modeling multiple regression was used to investigate the impact of socioeconomic status on asthma control, based on six control parameters from the 2003 Canadian Pediatric Asthma Consensus Guidelines. Results Only 11% of patients met the requirements for acceptable control, while 20% had intermediate control, and 69% had unacceptable asthma control. Children from families in lower income adequacy levels had poorer control. Conclusions Disparities in asthma control between children from families of different socio-economic strata persist, even with adjustment for utilization of primary care services and use of controller medications. PMID:18615669

  12. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Parisa; Peters, Kamau O; Bidad, Katayoon; Strickland, Paul T

    2015-02-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic illness in children living in developed countries and the leading cause of childhood hospitalization and school absenteeism. Prevalence rates of asthma are increasing and show disparities across gender, geographic regions, and ethnic/racial groups. Common risk factors for developing childhood asthma include exposure to tobacco smoke, previous allergic reactions, a family history of asthma, allergic rhinitis or eczema, living in an urban environment, obesity and lack of physical exercise, severe lower respiratory tract infections, and male gender. Asthma exacerbation in children can be triggered by a variety of factors, including allergens (e.g., pollen, dust mites, and animal dander), viral and bacterial infections, exercise, and exposure to airway irritants. Recent studies have shown that exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a major component of fine particulate matter from combustion sources, is also associated with onset of asthma, and increasing asthmatic symptoms. In this paper, we review sources of childhood PAH exposure and the association between airborne PAH exposure and childhood asthma prevalence and exacerbation. PMID:25600297

  13. Monosodium L-glutamate-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Allen, D H; Delohery, J; Baker, G

    1987-10-01

    Ingested chemicals, including aspirin and sulfites, are becoming increasingly recognized as provokers of acute severe asthma. In order to investigate the asthma-provoking potential of the widely used flavor enhancer, monosodium L-glutamate (MSG), we challenged 32 subjects with asthma, a number of whom gave histories of severe asthma after Chinese restaurant meals or similarly spiced meals. The subjects received an additive-free diet for 5 days before challenge and were challenged in hospital, after an overnight fast, with 500 mg capsules of MSG. They were challenged in a single-blind, placebo-controlled fashion with increasing doses of MSG from 0.5 gm to 5.0 gm. Thirteen subjects reacted. Seven subjects (group 1) developed asthma and symptoms of the Chinese restaurant syndrome 1 to 2 hours after ingestion of MSG. Six subjects (group 2) did not develop symptoms of Chinese restaurant syndrome, and their asthma developed 6 to 12 hours after ingestion of MSG. These challenge studies confirm that MSG can provoke asthma. The reaction to MSG is dose dependent and may be delayed up to 12 hours, making recognition difficult for both patient and physician. PMID:3312372

  14. Improving Asthma during Pregnancy with Dietary Antioxidants: The Current Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Grieger, Jessica A.; Wood, Lisa G.; Clifton, Vicki L.

    2013-01-01

    The complication of asthma during pregnancy is associated with a number of poor outcomes for the mother and fetus. This may be partially driven by increased oxidative stress induced by the combination of asthma and pregnancy. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways associated with systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, which contributes to worsening asthma symptoms. Pregnancy alone also intensifies oxidative stress through the systemic generation of excess reactive oxidative species (ROS). Antioxidants combat the damaging effects of ROS; yet antioxidant defenses are reduced in asthma. Diet and nutrition have been postulated as potential factors to combat the damaging effects of asthma. In particular, dietary antioxidants may play a role in alleviating the heightened oxidative stress in asthma. Although there are some observational and interventional studies that have shown protective effects of antioxidants in asthma, assessment of antioxidants in pregnancy are limited and there are no antioxidant intervention studies in asthmatic pregnancies on asthma outcomes. The aims of this paper are to (i) review the relationships between oxidative stress and dietary antioxidants in adults with asthma and asthma during pregnancy, and (ii) provide the rationale for which dietary management strategies, specifically increased dietary antioxidants, might positively impact maternal asthma outcomes. Improving asthma control through a holistic antioxidant dietary approach might be valuable in reducing asthma exacerbations and improving asthma management during pregnancy, subsequently impacting perinatal health. PMID:23948757

  15. Improving Efficiency of Aluminium Sacrificial Anode Using Cold Work Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmara, Y. P.; Siregar, J. P.; Tezara, C.; Ann, Chang Tai

    2016-02-01

    Aluminium is one of the preferred materials to be used as sacrificial anode for carbon steel protection. The efficiency of these can be low due to the formation of oxide layer which passivate the anodes. Currently, to improve its efficiency, there are efforts using a new technique called surface modifications. The objective of this research is to study corrosion mechanism of aluminium sacrificial anode which has been processed by cold work. The cold works are applied by reducing the thickness of aluminium sacrificial anodes at 20% and 40% of thickness reduction. The cathodic protection experiments were performed by immersion of aluminium connected to carbon steel cylinder in 3% NaCl solutions. Visual inspections using SEM had been conducted during the experiments and corrosion rate data were taken in every week for 8 weeks of immersion time. Corrosion rate data were measured using weight loss and linear polarization technique (LPR). From the results, it is observed that cold worked aluminium sacrificial anode have a better corrosion performance. It shows higher corrosion rate and lower corrosion potential. The anodes also provided a long functional for sacrificial anode before it stop working. From SEM investigation, it is shown that cold works have changed the microstructure of anodes which is suspected in increasing corrosion rate and cause de-passivate of the surface anodes.

  16. Risk factors for asthma: is prevention possible?

    PubMed

    Beasley, Richard; Semprini, Alex; Mitchell, Edwin A

    2015-09-12

    Asthma is one of the most common diseases in the world, resulting in a substantial burden of disease. Although rates of deaths due to asthma worldwide have reduced greatly over the past 25 years, no available therapeutic regimens can cure asthma, and the burden of asthma will continue to be driven by increasing prevalence. The reasons for the increase in asthma prevalence have not been defined, which limits the opportunities to develop targeted primary prevention measures. Although associations are reported between a wide range of risk factors and childhood asthma, substantiation of causality is inherently difficult from observational studies, and few risk factors have been assessed in primary prevention studies. Furthermore, none of the primary prevention intervention strategies that have undergone scrutiny in randomised controlled trials has provided sufficient evidence to lead to widespread implementation in clinical practice. A better understanding of the factors that cause asthma is urgently needed, and this knowledge could be used to develop public health and pharmacological primary prevention measures that are effective in reducing the prevalence of asthma worldwide. To achieve this it will be necessary to think outside the box, not only in terms of risk factors for the causation of asthma, but also the types of novel primary prevention strategies that are developed, and the research methods used to provide the evidence base for their implementation. In the interim, public health efforts should remain focused on measures with the potential to improve lung and general health, such as: reducing tobacco smoking and environmental tobacco smoke exposure; reducing indoor and outdoor air pollution and occupational exposures; reducing childhood obesity and encouraging a diet high in vegetables and fruit; improving feto-maternal health; encouraging breastfeeding; promoting childhood vaccinations; and reducing social inequalities. PMID:26382999

  17. Corrosion of aluminium metal in OPC- and CAC-based cement matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Hajime; Swift, Paul; Utton, Claire; Carro-Mateo, Beatriz; Collier, Nick; Milestone, Neil

    2013-08-15

    Corrosion of aluminium metal in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based pastes produces hydrogen gas and expansive reaction products causing problems for the encapsulation of aluminium containing nuclear wastes. Although corrosion of aluminium in cements has been long known, the extent of aluminium corrosion in the cement matrices and effects of such reaction on the cement phases are not well established. The present study investigates the corrosion reaction of aluminium in OPC, OPC-blast furnace slag (BFS) and calcium aluminate cement (CAC) based systems. The total amount of aluminium able to corrode in an OPC and 4:1 BFS:OPC system was determined, and the correlation between the amount of calcium hydroxide in the system and the reaction of aluminium obtained. It was also shown that a CAC-based system could offer a potential matrix to incorporate aluminium metal with a further reduction of pH by introduction of phosphate, producing a calcium phosphate cement.

  18. Neighborhood Poverty, Urban Residence, Race/ethnicity and Asthma: Rethinking the Inner-city Asthma Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Keet, Corinne A.; McCormack, Meredith C.; Pollack, Craig E.; Peng, Roger D.; McGowan, Emily; Matsui, Elizabeth C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although it is thought that inner-city areas have a high burden of asthma, the prevalence of asthma in inner-cities across the U.S. is not known. Objective To estimate the prevalence of current asthma in U.S. children living in inner-city and non-inner city areas, and to examine whether urban residence, poverty or race/ethnicity are the main drivers of asthma disparities. Methods The National Health Interview Survey 2009–2011 was linked by census tract to data from the U.S. Census and the National Center for Health Statistics. Multivariate logistic regression models adjusted for sex, age, race/ethnicity, residence in an urban, suburban, medium metro or small metro/rural area, poverty, and birth outside the U.S. with current asthma and asthma morbidity as outcome variables. Inner-city areas were defined as urban areas with ≥20% of households below the poverty line. Results 23,065 children living in 5,853 census tracts were included. The prevalence of current asthma was 12.9% in inner-city and 10.6% in non-inner-city areas, but this difference was not significant after adjusting for race/ethnicity, region, age and sex. In fully adjusted models, Black race, Puerto Rican ethnicity and lower household income, but not residence in poor or urban areas, were independent risk factors for current asthma. Household poverty increased the risk of asthma among non-Hispanics and Puerto Ricans but not among other Hispanics. Associations with asthma morbidity were very similar to prevalent asthma. Conclusions Although the prevalence of asthma is high in some inner-city areas, this is largely explained by demographic factors and not by living in an urban neighborhood. PMID:25617226

  19. Complementary and alternative asthma treatments and their association with asthma control: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenjia; FitzGerald, J Mark; Rousseau, Roxanne; Lynd, Larry D; Tan, Wan C; Sadatsafavi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Many patients with asthma spend time and resources consuming complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs). This study explores whether CAM utilisation is associated with asthma control and the intake of asthma controller medications. Design Population-based, prospective cross-sectional study. Setting General population residing in two census areas in the province of British Columbia, Canada. Recruitment was based on random-digit dialling of both landlines and cell phones. Participants 486 patients with self-reported physician diagnosis of asthma (mean age 52 years; 67.3% woman). Primary and secondary outcome measures We assessed CAM use over the previous 12 months, level of asthma control as defined by the Global Initiative for Asthma and the self-reported intake of controller medications. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to study the relationship between any usage of CAMs (outcome), asthma control and controller medication usage, adjusted for potential confounders. Results A total of 179 (36.8%) of the sample reported CAM usage in the past 12 months. Breathing exercises (17.7%), herbal medicines (10.1%) and vitamins (9.7%) were the most popular CAMs reported. After adjustment, female sex (OR 1.66; 95% CI 1.09 to 2.52) and uncontrolled asthma (vs controlled asthma, OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.30 to 3.89) were associated with a higher likelihood of using any CAMs in the past 12 months. Controller medication use was not associated with CAM usage in general and in the subgroups defined by asthma control. Conclusions Clinicians and policy makers need to be aware of the high prevalence of CAM use in patients with asthma and its association with lack of asthma control. PMID:24005131

  20. Identification of Asthma Phenotypes Using Cluster Analysis in the Severe Asthma Research Program

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Wendy C.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Wenzel, Sally E.; Teague, W. Gerald; Li, Huashi; Li, Xingnan; D'Agostino, Ralph; Castro, Mario; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Gaston, Benjamin; Jarjour, Nizar N.; Sorkness, Ronald; Calhoun, William J.; Chung, Kian Fan; Comhair, Suzy A. A.; Dweik, Raed A.; Israel, Elliot; Peters, Stephen P.; Busse, William W.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Bleecker, Eugene R.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: The Severe Asthma Research Program cohort includes subjects with persistent asthma who have undergone detailed phenotypic characterization. Previous univariate methods compared features of mild, moderate, and severe asthma. Objectives: To identify novel asthma phenotypes using an unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis. Methods: Reduction of the initial 628 variables to 34 core variables was achieved by elimination of redundant data and transformation of categorical variables into ranked ordinal composite variables. Cluster analysis was performed on 726 subjects. Measurements and Main Results: Five groups were identified. Subjects in Cluster 1 (n = 110) have early onset atopic asthma with normal lung function treated with two or fewer controller medications (82%) and minimal health care utilization. Cluster 2 (n = 321) consists of subjects with early-onset atopic asthma and preserved lung function but increased medication requirements (29% on three or more medications) and health care utilization. Cluster 3 (n = 59) is a unique group of mostly older obese women with late-onset nonatopic asthma, moderate reductions in FEV1, and frequent oral corticosteroid use to manage exacerbations. Subjects in Clusters 4 (n = 120) and 5 (n = 116) have severe airflow obstruction with bronchodilator responsiveness but differ in to their ability to attain normal lung function, age of asthma onset, atopic status, and use of oral corticosteroids. Conclusions: Five distinct clinical phenotypes of asthma have been identified using unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis. All clusters contain subjects who meet the American Thoracic Society definition of severe asthma, which supports clinical heterogeneity in asthma and the need for new approaches for the classification of disease severity in asthma. PMID:19892860

  1. Psychosocial Factors in Severe Pediatric Asthma.

    PubMed

    Booster, Genery D; Oland, Alyssa A; Bender, Bruce G

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic illness among children in the United States and can impact nearly all aspects of functioning. Most research suggests that children with severe asthma display more emotional and behavioral problems than their healthy peers. These psychological difficulties are associated with increased risk for functional impairments and problematic disease course. Multidisciplinary teams that assess and treat these psychosocial factors using psychoeducational and behavioral interventions are important for children whose asthma is poorly controlled. Future research should examine the ways in which stress, emotions, and immune functions interact, so as to develop more preventative interventions. PMID:27401618

  2. Ground zero: not asthma at all.

    PubMed

    de Benedictis, Fernando Maria; de Benedictis, Diletta; Mirabile, Lorenzo; Pozzi, Marco; Guerrieri, Arcangela; Di Pillo, Sabrina

    2015-09-01

    Upper airway obstruction is commonly misdiagnosed as asthma. We report on four children with recurrent respiratory symptoms who had been erroneously diagnosed as having asthma and who received anti-asthma medication for several years. The evaluation of spirometry tracing was neglected in all cases. Subglottic stenosis, tracheomalacia secondary to tracheo-esophageal fistula, double aortic arch, and vocal cord dysfunction were suspected by direct inspection of the flow-volume curves and eventually diagnosed. The value of clinical history and careful evaluation of spirometry tracing in children with persistent respiratory symptoms is critically discussed. PMID:26059018

  3. Does bronchial hyperresponsiveness in asthma matter?

    PubMed

    Currie, Graeme P; Jackson, Catherine M; Lipworth, Brian J

    2004-01-01

    Bronchial hyperresponsiveness is a fundamental component of the asthmatic inflammatory process causing airway narrowing on exposure to a bronchoconstrictor stimulus. This in turn causes patients to experience symptoms of breathlessness, chest tightness, cough and wheeze. Bronchial challenge tests can be performed in the laboratory to establish the degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness to both direct and indirect stimuli. The extent to which asthma pharmacotherapy attenuates bronchial hyperresponsiveness is therefore an important measure of efficacy. This review article discusses the effects of inhaled and oral asthma treatment upon bronchial hyperresponsiveness and highlights how, in conjunction with conventional measures of asthma control, it can be used as an aid to optimally manage patients. PMID:15260457

  4. Enterovirus 68 Infection-Association with Asthma.

    PubMed

    Moss, Ronald B

    2016-01-01

    A previously sporadic virus called enterovirus 68 (EV-D68) appears to have been associated with asthma-like illness with a predisposition for asthmatics after an outbreak that occurred in North America in 2014. Clinicians should be aware of the clinical associations with EV-D68 particularly its predilection with pre-existing asthma or asthma-like illness as well as the potential association with acute flaccid myelitis. Further elucidation and development of diagnostic and treatments modalities are warranted to better understand and limit the potential public health impact of future outbreaks of EV-D68 infection. PMID:26843407

  5. Early origins of asthma (and allergy).

    PubMed

    Kabesch, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease starting in childhood and persisting into adulthood in many cases. During childhood, different forms of asthma and wheezing disorders exist that can be discriminated by the mechanisms they are caused by. Specific genetic constellations and exposure against environmental factors during early childhood and in utero play a decisive role in the early development of the disease. Epigenetic mechanisms which are master regulators of gene transcription and thus govern the accessibility and use of genome information, have recently been identified as a "third power" determining many features in the early development of asthma and allergy. PMID:27510897

  6. Occupational asthma and related respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Bardana, E J

    1995-03-01

    Occupational rhinitis is a common but generally underreported entity. Although it may occur alone, it is frequently associated with occupational asthma. Occupational asthma may have one of several presentations that are difficult to distinguish from non-work conditions. The respiratory tract acts as the final common pathway for all inhaled environmental pollutants, whether encountered in the home or at work. More than 200 chemicals have been incriminated as a cause of work-related asthma. It is said that about 2% of the 10 million Americans who have asthma acquired it as a result of some chemical irritant or immunogen in their work environment. A number of predisposing factors facilitate the development of work-related asthma. These include industrial conditions, climatic factors, atopic predisposition, smoking, recreational drug use, viral infection, nonspecific bronchial hyperreactivity, and a variety of miscellaneous factors. Pathogenetically, occupational asthma may be immunologic or nonimmunologic in nature. The immunologic variants involve sensitization to a variety of large-molecular-weight constituents. The major nonimmune variant is referred to as inflammatory bronchoconstriction or reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). There are well-defined criteria for the diagnosis of immunologic and nonimmunologic asthma. The several clinical variations of occupational asthma can be difficult to distinguish from nonindustrial disorders. The most common presentation in practice involves the worker with preexistent asthma who has been adversely affected by work exposures. Occasionally these industrial exposures precipitate permanent impairment. It is clear, however, that occupational asthma is not a single, simple, or homogeneous entity, even when a single specific causal factor can be identified in the workplace. Therefore the physician must be aware of the patient's entire medical history and the precise occupational exposures and must have convincing

  7. T regulatory cells in childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Deborah H; Holt, Patrick G

    2011-09-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease of the airways, most commonly driven by immuno-inflammatory responses to ubiquitous airborne antigens. Epidemiological studies have shown that disease is initiated early in life when the immune and respiratory systems are functionally immature and less able to maintain homeostasis in the face of continuous antigen challenge. Here, we examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie initial aeroallergen sensitization and the ensuing regulation of secondary responses to inhaled allergens in the airway mucosa. In particular, we focus on how T-regulatory (Treg) cells influence early asthma initiation and the potential of Treg cells as therapeutic targets for drug development in asthma. PMID:21798806

  8. Role of Small Airways in Asthma.

    PubMed

    Finkas, Lindsay K; Martin, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory condition of both the small and large airways. Recently the small airways have gained attention as studies have shown significant inflammation in the small airways in all severities of asthma. This inflammation has correlated with peripheral airway resistance and as a result, noninvasive methods to reliably measure small airways have been pursued. In addition, recent changes in asthma inhalers have led to alterations in drug formulations and the development of extrafine particle inhalers that improve delivery to the distal airways. PMID:27401620

  9. Stimulation of eryptosis by aluminium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Niemoeller, Olivier M.; Kiedaisch, Valentin; Dreischer, Peter; Wieder, Thomas; Lang, Florian . E-mail: florian.lang@uni-tuebingen.de

    2006-12-01

    Aluminium salts are utilized to impede intestinal phosphate absorption in chronic renal failure. Toxic side effects include anemia, which could result from impaired formation or accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes. Erythrocytes may be cleared secondary to suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage and exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) at the erythrocyte surface. As macrophages are equipped with PS receptors, they bind, engulf and degrade PS-exposing cells. The present experiments have been performed to explore whether Al{sup 3+} ions trigger eryptosis. The PS exposure was estimated from annexin binding and cell volume from forward scatter in FACS analysis. Exposure to Al{sup 3+} ions ({>=} 10 {mu}M Al{sup 3+} for 24 h) indeed significantly increased annexin binding, an effect paralleled by decrease of forward scatter at higher concentrations ({>=} 30 {mu}M Al{sup 3+}). According to Fluo3 fluorescence Al{sup 3+} ions ({>=} 30 {mu}M for 3 h) increased cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} activity. Al{sup 3+} ions ({>=} 10 {mu}M for 24 h) further decreased cytosolic ATP concentrations. Energy depletion by removal of glucose similarly triggered annexin binding, an effect not further enhanced by Al{sup 3+} ions. The eryptosis was paralleled by release of hemoglobin, pointing to loss of cell membrane integrity. In conclusion, Al{sup 3+} ions decrease cytosolic ATP leading to activation of Ca{sup 2+}-permeable cation channels, Ca{sup 2+} entry, stimulation of cell membrane scrambling and cell shrinkage. Moreover, Al{sup 3+} ions lead to loss of cellular hemoglobin, a feature of hemolysis. Both effects are expected to decrease the life span of circulating erythrocytes and presumably contribute to the development of anemia during Al{sup 3+} intoxication.

  10. Pathophysiology of asthma: lessons from genetic research with particular focus on severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Melén, E; Pershagen, G

    2012-08-01

    There is good evidence that both inherited and environmental factors influence the risk of developing asthma. Only recently, large well-designed studies have been undertaken with the power to identify the genetic causes for asthma, and methods developed in parallel with the Human Genome Project, such as gene expression and epigenetic studies, have made large-scale analyses of functional genetics possible. In this review, we discuss the recent findings from genetic and genomic research studies of asthma, particularly severe asthma, and highlight specific genes for which there are multiple lines of evidence for involvement in asthma pathogenesis. Bio-ontologic enrichment analyses of the most recently identified asthma-related genes point to attributes such as 'molecular and signal transducer activity' and 'immune system processes', which indicates the importance of immunoregulation and inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of asthma. Finally, we discuss how genetic and environmental factors jointly influence asthma susceptibility and summarize how the results may increase understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma-related diseases. PMID:22632610

  11. IEC 61267: Feasibility of type 1100 aluminium and a copper/aluminium combination for RQA beam qualities.

    PubMed

    Leong, David L; Rainford, Louise; Zhao, Wei; Brennan, Patrick C

    2016-01-01

    In the course of performance acceptance testing, benchmarking or quality control of X-ray imaging systems, it is sometimes necessary to harden the X-ray beam spectrum. IEC 61267 specifies materials and methods to accomplish beam hardening and, unfortunately, requires the use of 99.9% pure aluminium (Alloy 1190) for the RQA beam quality, which is expensive and difficult to obtain. Less expensive and more readily available filters, such as Alloy 1100 (99.0% pure) aluminium and copper/aluminium combinations, have been used clinically to produce RQA series without rigorous scientific investigation to support their use. In this paper, simulation and experimental methods are developed to determine the differences in beam quality using Alloy 1190 and Alloy 1100. Additional simulation investigated copper/aluminium combinations to produce RQA5 and outputs from this simulation are verified with laboratory tests using different filter samples. The results of the study demonstrate that although Alloy 1100 produces a harder beam spectrum compared to Alloy 1190, it is a reasonable substitute. A combination filter of 0.5 mm copper and 2 mm aluminium produced a spectrum closer to that of Alloy 1190 than Alloy 1100 with the added benefits of lower exposures and lower batch variability. PMID:26776501

  12. Different Approach to the Aluminium Oxide Topography Characterisation

    SciTech Connect

    Poljacek, Sanja Mahovic; Gojo, Miroslav; Raos, Pero; Stoic, Antun

    2007-04-07

    Different surface topographic techniques are being widely used for quantitative measurements of typical industrial aluminium oxide surfaces. In this research, specific surface of aluminium oxide layer on the offset printing plate has been investigated by using measuring methods which have previously not been used for characterisation of such surfaces. By using two contact instruments and non-contact laser profilometer (LPM) 2D and 3D roughness parameters have been defined. SEM micrographs of the samples were made. Results have shown that aluminium oxide surfaces with the same average roughness value (Ra) and mean roughness depth (Rz) typically used in the printing plate surface characterisation, have dramatically different surface topographies. According to the type of instrument specific roughness parameters should be used for defining the printing plate surfaces. New surface roughness parameters were defined in order to insure detailed characterisation of the printing plates in graphic reproduction process.

  13. Time-resolved aluminium laser-induced plasma temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, D. M.; Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    We seek to characterize the temperature decay of laser-induced plasma near the surface of an aluminium target from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of aluminium alloy sample. Laser-induced plasma are initiated by tightly focussing 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation. Temperatures are inferred from aluminium monoxide spectra viewed at systematically varied time delays by comparing experimental spectra to theoretical calculations with a Nelder Mead algorithm. The temperatures are found to decay from 5173 ± 270 to 3862 ± 46 Kelvin from 10 to 100 μs time delays following optical breakdown. The temperature profile along the plasma height is also inferred from spatially resolved spectral measurements and the electron number density is inferred from Stark broadened Hβ spectra.

  14. Modelling of micro- and macrosegregation for industrial multicomponent aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingsen, K.; Mortensen, D.; M'Hamdi, M.

    2015-06-01

    Realistic predictions of macrosegregation formation during casting of aluminium alloys requires an accurate modeling of solute microsegregation accounting for multicomponent phase diagrams and secondary phase formation. In the present work, the stand alone Alstruc model, a microsegregation model for industrial multicomponent aluminium alloys, is coupled with the continuum model ALSIM which calculates the macroscopic transport of mass, enthalpy, momentum, and solutes as well as stresses and deformation during solidification of aluminium. Alstruc deals with multicomponent alloys accounting for temperature dependent partition coefficients, liquidus slopes and the precipitation of secondary phases. The challenge associated with computation of microsegregation for multicomponent alloys is solved in Alstruc by approximating the phase diagram data by simple, analytical expressions which allows for a CPU-time efficient coupling with the macroscopic transport model. In the present work, the coupled model has been applied in a study of macrosegregation including thermal and solutal convection, solidification shrinkage and surface exudation on an industrial DC-cast billet.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of a new aluminium-based compound.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Cosp, José; Artiaga, Ramón; Corpas-Iglesias, Francisco; Benítez-Guerrero, Mónica

    2009-08-28

    A new aluminium polynuclear crystalline species, Al(13)(OH)(30)(H(2)O)(15)Cl(9) has been synthesized and characterized. It is a particular case of the Al(13)(OH)(30-y)(H(2)O)(18-x)Cl(9) x zH(2)O family. It has been obtained from aluminium waste cans treated with HCl solution in strong acid media, followed by an ageing period. The crystalline structure of the complex was determined by XRD spectroscopy. Twelve reflections were found and indexed with the DICVOL04 software. Morphologically, a flattened preferred orientation was observed by SEM and FESEM. The chemical structure was studied by several absorption spectroscopy techniques: FTIR, ATR-FTIR and Raman dispersion spectroscopy. The coordination of the aluminium nuclei was determined by Al-MAS-NMR. Only octahedral sites were observed. Thermal characterization of the compound was performed by evolved gas analysis (EGA) coupled to simultaneous TGA-DSC. PMID:19655063

  16. Aluminium toxicity in the rat liver and brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, S.; Ohashi, H.; Nagai, H.; Kakimi, S.; Ishikawa, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Ogawa, Y.; Ishii, K.

    1993-04-01

    To investigate the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, we examined the brain and liver tissue uptake of aluminium 5-75 days after aluminium injection into healthy rats. Ten days after the last injection, Al was detected in the brain and the brain cell nuclei by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Al was also demonstrated in the liver and the liver cell nuclei by PIXE analysis and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS). The morphological changes of the rat brain examined 75 days after the injection were similar to those which have been reportedly observed in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. These results support the theory that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminium in the brain, as well as in the nuclei of brain cells.

  17. Laser micro welding of copper and aluminium using filler materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, Gerd; Mys, Ihor; Schmidt, Michael H.

    2004-10-01

    The most evident trend in electronics production is towards miniaturization. Regarding the materials involved, another trend can be observed: intelligent combinations of different materials. One example is the combination of copper and aluminium. Copper is the material of choice for electronic packaging applications due to its superior electrical and thermal conductivity. On the other hand, aluminium offers technical and economical advantages with respect to cost and component weight -- still providing thermal and electrical properties acceptable for numerous applications. Especially for high volume products, the best solution often seems to be a combination of both materials. This fact raises the question of joining copper and aluminium. With respect to miniaturization laser micro welding is a very promising joining technique. Unfortunately, the metallurgical incompatibility of copper and aluminium easily results in the formation of brittle intermetallic phases and segregations during laser welding, thus generating an unacceptable quality of the joints. This paper presents investigations on enhancing the quality during laser micro welding of copper and aluminium for applications in electronics production. In order to eliminate the formation of brittle intermetallic phases, the addition of a filter material in form of a foil has been investigated. It can be shown that the addition of pure metals such as nickel and especially silver significantly reduces the occurrence of brittle phases in the joining area and therefore leads to an increase in welding quality. The proper control of the volume fractions of copper, aluminium and filler material in the melting zone helps to avoid materials segregation and reduces residual stress, consequently leading to a reduction of crack affinity and a stabilization of the mechanical and electrical properties.

  18. Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Asthma Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents NIH-Sponsored Research Asthma in the Inner City: Recognizing that asthma severity ...

  19. Assessment of asthma control using asthma control test in chest clinics in Cameroon: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Hugo, Mbatchou Ngahane Bertrand; Walter, Pefura-Yone Eric; Maïmouna, Mama; Malea, Nganda Motto; Ubald, Olinga; Adeline, Wandji; Bruno, Tengang; Emmanuel, Nyankiyé; Emmanuel, Afane Ze; Christopher, Kuaban

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The goal of asthma treatment is to obtain and maintain a good control of symptoms. Investigating factors associated with inadequately control asthma could help in strategies to improve asthma control. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and factors associated with inadequately controlled asthma in asthma patients under chest specialist care. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 2012 to May 2013. Physician-diagnosed asthma patients aged 12 years and above were included. A questionnaire was used to collect demographic data, comorbidities, and medical history of asthma. Asthma control was assessed using the Asthma Control Test (ACT), with a score less than 20 for inadequately controlled asthma and a score greater or equal to 20 for controlled asthma. A multivariate analysis was used to identify factors associated with inadequately controlled asthma. Results Overall, 243 patients were included in this study. Asthma was controlled in 141 patients (58%) and inadequately controlled in 102 (42%). The mean duration of asthma was 8 years with an interquartile range of 4 and 18 years. Forty-three participants (17.7%) were not under any controller medication while the mean ACT score was 19.3 ± 4.6. Independent associations were found between inadequately controlled asthma and female gender (OR 1.91; 95% CI 1.06-3.47) and obesity (OR 1.81; 1.01-3.27). Conclusion Asthma remains poorly controlled in a large proportion of asthma patients under specialist care in Cameroon. Educational programs for asthma patients targeting women and based on weight loss for obese patients may help in improving the control of asthma. PMID:27217894

  20. Asthma Medicines: Long-Term Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Asthma Medicines: Long-term Control Page Content Article Body Corticosteroids Synthetic ... and sprinkle forms are available for young children. Long-Acting Beta2-Agonists Medications in the beta 2 - ...

  1. Asthma - what to ask the doctor - adult

    MedlinePlus

    ... I have a fire in my fireplace or wood-burning stove? What sort of changes do I ... 38. National Asthma Education and Prevention Program Expert Panel Report 3: Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management ...

  2. Prevention of Allergies and Asthma in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just for Kids Library School Tools Videos Virtual Allergist Education & Training Careers in A/I Continuing Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation ...

  3. New Asthma Guidelines What You Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section New Asthma Guidelines: What You Should Know Past Issues / ... and chairs the Expert Panel that established the new guidelines. The report gives health care professionals new ...

  4. [Assessment and management of acute severe asthma].

    PubMed

    Kabe, J; Kudo, K

    1992-09-01

    In the management of acute severe asthma it is very important to start the treatment as soon as possible, by appropriate evaluation of the physical status and signs of airflow obstruction. We propose a guideline to be used by patients with asthma, emergency car crews, physicians and nurses to evaluate the severity and to choose the appropriate management of acute asthma, including intubation and mechanical ventilation, by the assessment of clinical features, as well as blood gas analysis and pulmonary function test. Several researchers have demonstrated that the additional administration of aminophylline to inhaled or subcutaneous beta 2-agonist bronchodilator during the first 4 hours of an attack provides no additional benefit compared to the administration of beta 2-agonist alone. In our retrospective study of 68 episodes of acute severe asthma in the last 5 years at our institute, however, the additional administration of aminophylline with beta 2-agonists was clearly shown to be effective with infrequent minor side effects. PMID:1360031

  5. Asthma & Physical Activity in the School

    MedlinePlus

    ... asthma is worsened by pollen, cold air, or air pollution. Check the air quality index and consider moving an outdoor activity indoors when the air pollution or pollen levels are high or when the ...

  6. MedlinePlus: Asthma in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... including Allergens - mold, pollen, animals Irritants - cigarette smoke, air pollution Weather - cold air, changes in weather Exercise Infections - ... Wheezing Show More Show Less Related Health Topics Air Pollution Allergy Asthma Breathing Problems Indoor Air Pollution National ...

  7. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthcare Professionals Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  8. [Asthma in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Bautista Bautista, Edgar Gildardo

    2009-01-01

    All asthma patients are at risk of suffering an asthma attack in the course of their life, which can eventually be fatal. Hospitalizations and attention at critical care services are a fundamental aspect of patient care in asthma, which invests a significant percentage of economic contributions to society as a whole does, therefore it is particularly important establish plans for prevention, treatment education and rationalization in the primary care level to stabilize the disease and reduce exacerbations. The severity of exacerbations can range from mild to crisis fatal or potentially fatal asthma; there is a fundamental link between mortality and inadequate assessment of the severity of the patient, which results in inadequate treatment for their condition. PMID:20873061

  9. Buteyko technique use to control asthma symptoms.

    PubMed

    Austin, Gillian

    The Buteyko breathing technique is recommended in national guidance for control of asthma symptoms. This article explores the evidence base for the technique, outlines its main principles and includes two cases studies. PMID:23697004

  10. Asthma in the elderly: a different disease?

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Salvatore; Benfante, Alida; Spatafora, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Key points Asthma in the elderly can be difficult to identify due to modifications of its clinical features and functional characteristics. Several comorbidities are associated with asthma in the elderly, and this association differs from that observed in younger patients. In clinical practice, physicians should treat comorbidities that are correlated with asthma (i.e. rhinitis or gastro-oesophageal reflux), assess comorbidities that may influence asthma outcomes (i.e. depression or cognitive impairment) and try to prevent comorbidities related to ­‘drug-associated side-effects (i.e. cataracts, arrhythmias or osteoporosis). “Geriatric asthma” should be the preferred term because it implies the comprehensive and multidimensional approach to the disease in the older populations, whereas “asthma in the elderly” is only descriptive of the occurrence of the disease in this age range. Educational aims To present critical issues in performing differential diagnosis of asthma in the elderly. To offer the instrument to implement the management of asthma in the most advanced ages. Asthma is a chronic airway disease that affects all ages, but does this definition also include the elderly? Traditionally, asthma has been considered a disease of younger age, but epidemiological studies and clinical experience support the concept that asthma is as prevalent in older age as it is in the young. With the ever-increasing elderly population worldwide, the detection and proper management of the disease in old age may have a great impact from the public health perspective. Whether asthma in the elderly maintains the same characteristics as in young populations is an interesting matter. The diagnostic process in older individuals with suspected asthma follows the same steps, namely a detailed history supported by clinical examination and laboratory investigations; however, it should be recognised that elderly patients may partially lose reversibility of airway obstruction

  11. Gene by environment interaction in asthma.

    PubMed

    London, Stephanie J; Romieu, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    Marked international differences in rates of asthma and allergies and the importance of family history highlight the primacy of interactions between genetic variation and the environment in asthma etiology. Environmental tobacco smoke (or secondhand smoke), ambient air pollutants, and endotoxin and/or other pathogen-associated molecular patterns are the ambient exposures studied most frequently for interactions with genetic polymorphisms in asthma. To date, results from the literature remain inconclusive. Most published studies are underpowered to study interactions between genetic polymorphisms and ambient exposures, each with weak effects. Strategies to increase power include cooperation across studies to increase sample sizes and improve measures of both exposure and asthma phenotypes. Genome-wide association studies hold promise for identifying unexpected gene environment interactions, but given the statistical power issues, candidate gene association studies will remain important. New tools are enabling the study of epigenetic mechanisms for environmental interactions. PMID:18980546

  12. Exercise-induced asthma: an overview.

    PubMed

    Cummiskey, J

    2001-10-01

    Asthmatic attack in exercise-induced asthma is brought about by hyperventilation (not necessarily to exercise), cold air, and low humidity of the air breathed. The effects are an increase in airway resistance, damage to bronchial mucosa, and an increase in bronchovascular permeability. The mechanism of these changes is the release of mediators such as histamine, leukotrienes, nitric oxide, sensory neuropeptides, the inhibition of neuronal activity, and bronchovascular permeability. The cause of asthma and exercise-induced asthma is unknown. It is probably an abnormality of vascular control in the peribronchium and/or an alteration in local adrenergic function. The importance of exercise-induced asthma definition and the use of stimulants in sport and antidoping in sport are discussed. PMID:11678516

  13. Carbon treated commercial aluminium alloys as anodes for aluminium-air batteries in sodium chloride electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, M.; Herranz, D.; Chacón, J.; Fatás, E.; Ocón, P.

    2016-09-01

    An easy treatment based in carbon layer deposition into aluminium alloys is presented to enhance the performance of Al-air primary batteries with neutral pH electrolyte. The jellification of aluminate in the anode surface is described and avoided by the carbon covering. Treated commercial Al alloys namely Al1085 and Al7475 are tested as anodes achieving specific capacities above 1.2 Ah g-1vs 0.5 Ah g-1 without carbon covering. The influence of the binder proportion in the treatment as well as different carbonaceous materials, Carbon Black, Graphene and Pyrolytic Graphite are evaluated as candidates for the covering. Current densities of 1-10 mA cm-2 are measured and the influence of the alloy explored. A final battery design of 4 cells in series is presented for discharges with a voltage plateau of 2 V and 1 Wh g-1 energy density.

  14. Bilateral internal laryngoceles mimicking asthma.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Elif A; Elsürer, Cağdaş; Serin, Gediz M; Unal, O Faruk

    2013-05-01

    Laryngocele is an air-filled, abnormal dilation of the laryngeal saccule that extends upward within the false vocal fold, in communication with the laryngeal lumen. A case of 43-year-old male with bilateral internal laryngoceles, who has been treated as asthma for 4 years, is presented. The patient had dyspnea, cough, and excessive phlegm for a month and a late onset stridor. Flexible nasopharyngolaryngoscopy showed bilateral cystic enlargements of the false vocal folds and true vocal folds could not be visualized. Laryngeal CT without contrast enhancement showed bilateral internal laryngoceles. Submucosal total excision of bilateral cystic masses including parts of false vocal folds was performed. The symptoms resolved immediately after surgery. Although the incidence of internal laryngocele is rare, it should be remembered in the differential diagnosis of upper airway problems and diagnostic flexible nasopharnygolaryngoscopy is routinely indicated for airway evaluation in at-risk patients. PMID:24174956

  15. Increased Asthma Risk and Asthma-Related Health Care Complications Associated With Childhood Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Black, Mary Helen; Zhou, Hui; Takayanagi, Miwa; Jacobsen, Steven J.; Koebnick, Corinna

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic condition of childhood, yet the relationship between obesity and asthma risk and the impact of obesity on clinical asthma outcomes are not well understood. For this population-based, longitudinal study, demographic and clinical data were extracted from administrative and electronic health records of 623,358 patients aged 6–19 years who were enrolled in the Kaiser Permanente Southern California health plan in 2007–2011. Crude asthma incidence ranged from 16.9 per 1,000 person-years among normal-weight youth to 22.3 per 1,000 person-years among extremely obese youth. The adjusted risks of asthma for overweight, moderately obese, and extremely obese youth relative to those of normal weight youth were 1.16 (95% confidence interval: 1.13, 1.20), 1.23 (95% confidence interval: 1.19, 1.28), and 1.37 (95% confidence interval: 1.32, 1.42), respectively (Ptrend < 0.0001). The relationship between obesity and asthma risk was strongest in Asian/Pacific Islanders and in the youngest girls (aged 6–10 years), compared with other groups. Among youth who developed asthma, those who were moderately or extremely obese had more frequent asthma exacerbations requiring emergency department services and/or treatment with oral corticosteroids. In conclusion, obese youth are not only more likely to develop asthma, but they may be more likely to have severe asthma, resulting in a greater need for health care utilization and aggressive asthma treatment. PMID:23924576

  16. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Respiratory infections, such as the common cold Strong emotions (stress) Tobacco smoke Substances in some workplaces can ... symptoms that need prompt medical help include: Bluish color to the lips and face Decreased level of ...

  17. Mechanisms of hyperinflation in asthma.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Y; Lecours, R; Legris, C

    1990-06-01

    We studied 11 mild asthmatics to verify whether the mechanisms of hyperinflation in asthma could be inhibited or overcome by passively changing lung volumes. On day 1, we induced a fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of 30-60% by methacholine inhalation and measured the resulting increase in FRC (delta FRC). The delta FRC was 729 +/- 378 ml (mean +/- SD). On day 2, with the subject supine in an iron lung, we measured oesophageal (Poes), gastric (Pgas) and transdiaphragmatic (Pdi) pressures, and changes in functional residual capacity (FRC) (delta V) induced by extrathoracic pressures from -20 to +20 cmH2O before and after bronchoprovocation. With positive pressures, the FRC decreased and reached a plateau at 10 cmH2O pressure or higher. This plateau was at a mean FRC of 839 ml higher after the bronchoprovocation than before. Pdi at FRC varied in the same direction as the extrathoracic pressure and was not modified by the bronchospasm. Peak inspiratory Pdi, without pressure applied in the iron lung, increased from 13.6 +/- 5.4 to 28.1 +/- 13.5 cmH2O after methacholine; extrathoracic pressure of -20 cmH2O decreased this latter value to 15.4 +/- 7.3 cmH2O (p less than 0.01). The increased lung volume and the displaced chest wall recoil curve after provocation were not inhibited by positive or negative extrathoracic pressures. Our data show that the mechanisms of hyperinflation are not eliminated or overcome by passively changing lung volumes and support the hypothesis that persisting activity of inspiratory muscles other than the diaphragm during expiration and perhaps a prolonged expiratory time constant are responsible for hyperinflation in asthma. PMID:2199206

  18. [Physical activity and bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Endre, László

    2016-06-26

    An article was published in the Lancet in 1935 about the therapy of asthmatic patients, using a special breathing exercise (the authors used a control group, too). Swimming, as a complementary therapy for asthmatic children, was first recommended in 1968, by authors from the United States. In Hungary, regular swimming training for asthmatic children is in use since August, 1981. As the result of this exercise, the physical fitness of asthmatic children (using this method regularly for years) increased dramatically, and it is much better compared to that found in the non asthmatic, non swimming children of the same age group. Their asthma medication requirement decreased, and the severity of their disease moderated considerably. On the other hand, asthma is not a rarity even among elite athletes. It is most frequent in the endurance sports (for example in Northern Europe among cross-country skiers its prevalence is between 14-54%, among long distance runners 15-24%, and among swimmers 13-44%). The possible reason is related to the fact that elite athletes inspirate 200 liter air per minutum (mostly through their mouth). The air pollution and the allergens can penetrate in their lower respiratory tract. The air causes cooling and drying of the mucosa of their airways and, as a consequence, mediators liberate which produce oedema of the mucosa, and bronchoconstriction. Beta-2-receptor agonists inhalation can prevent (or decrease significantly) this phenomenon. These agents are used regularly by elite athletes, too. The non-medical possibilities for prevention include wearing a special mask, frequent ventilation of the swimming pool's air, consumption of omega-3-fatty acid, and inhalation of dry salt (very small, and very clear sodiumchloride particles). PMID:27319382

  19. Cleaning products and work-related asthma.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, Kenneth D; Reilly, Mary Jo; Schill, Donald P; Valiante, David; Flattery, Jennifer; Harrison, Robert; Reinisch, Florence; Pechter, Elise; Davis, Letitia; Tumpowsky, Catharine M; Filios, Margaret

    2003-05-01

    To describe the characteristics of individuals with work-related asthma associated with exposure to cleaning products, data from the California-, Massachusetts-, Michigan-, and New Jersey state-based surveillance systems of work-related asthma were used to identify cases of asthma associated with exposure to cleaning products at work. From 1993 to 1997, 236 (12%) of the 1915 confirmed cases of work-related asthma identified by the four states were associated with exposure to cleaning products. Eighty percent of the reports were of new-onset asthma and 20% were work-aggravated asthma. Among the new-onset cases, 22% were consistent with reactive airways dysfunction syndrome. Individuals identified were generally women (75%), white non-Hispanic (68%), and 45 years or older (64%). Their most likely exposure had been in medical settings (39%), schools (13%), or hotels (6%), and they were most likely to work as janitor/cleaners (22%), nurse/nurses' aides (20%), or clerical staff (13%). However, cases were reported with exposure to cleaning products across a wide range of job titles. Cleaning products contain a diverse group of chemicals that are used in a wide range of industries and occupations as well as in the home. Their potential to cause or aggravate asthma has recently been recognized. Further work to characterize the specific agents and the circumstances of their use associated with asthma is needed. Additional research to investigate the frequency of adverse respiratory effects among regular users, such as housekeeping staff, is also needed. In the interim, we recommend attention to adequate ventilation, improved warning labels and Material Safety Data Sheets, and workplace training and education. PMID:12762081

  20. Occupational Asthma in a Cable Manufacturing Company

    PubMed Central

    Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Dehghan, Faezeh; Yazdanparast, Taraneh; Mohammadi, Saber; Golchin, Mahdie; Sadeghi, Zargham; Moafi, Masoud; Seyed Mehdi, Seyed Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: During the past decade, incidence of asthma has increased, which might have been due to environmental exposures. Objectives: Considering the expansion of cable manufacturing industry in Iran, the present study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of occupational asthma in a cable manufacturing company in Iran as well as its related factors. Patients and Methods: This study was conducted on employees of a cable manufacturing company in Yazd, Iran, in 2012. The workers were divided into two groups of exposure (to toluene diisocyanate, polyvinyl chloride, polyethylene or polypropylene) and without exposure. Diagnosis of occupational asthma was made based on the subjects’ medical history, spirometry and peak flowmetry, and its frequency was compared between the two groups. Results: The overall prevalence of occupational asthma was 9.7%. This rate was 13.8% in the exposed group. Logistic regression analysis showed that even after adjustment for confounding factors, a significant correlation existed between the frequency of occupational asthma and exposure to the produced dust particles (P < 0.05). In addition, age, work experience, body mass index, cigarette smoking and shift work had significant correlations with the prevalence of occupational asthma (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Considering the high prevalence of occupational asthma among cable manufacturing company workers in Iran, this issue needs to be addressed immediately in addition to reduction of exposure among subjects. Reduction in work shift duration, implementation of tobacco control and cessation programs for the personnel, and performing spirometry tests and respiratory examinations in shorter periods may be among effective measures for reducing the incidence of occupational asthma in this industry. PMID:25558389